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Sample records for multidrug resistance-linked abcg2

  1. The naphthoquinones, vitamin K3 and its structural analog plumbagin, are substrates of the multidrug resistance-linked ABC drug transporter ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Suneet; Wu, Chung-Pu; Nandigama, Krishnamachary; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin K3 (Menadione; 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) is a structural precursor of vitamins K1 and K2 which are essential for blood clotting. The naturally occurring structural analog of this vitamin, plumbagin (5-hydroxy-menadione), is known to modulate cellular proliferation, apoptosis, carcinogenesis, and radioresistance. We, here, report that both vitamin K3 and plumbagin are substrates of the multidrug resistance-linked ATP binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter, ABCG2. Vitamin K3 and plumbagin specifically inhibited the ABCG2-mediated efflux of mitoxantrone, but did not have any effect on the ABCB1-mediated efflux of rhodamine 123. This inhibition of ABCG2 function was due to their interaction at the substrate-binding site(s). They inhibited the binding of [125I]-Iodoarylazidoprazosin (IAAP), a substrate of ABCG2, to this transporter in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of 7.3 and 22.6 μM, respectively, but had no effect on the binding of this photoaffinity analog to ABCB1. Both compounds stimulated ABCG2-mediated ATP hydrolysis and also inhibited the mitoxantrone-stimulated ATPase activity of this transporter, but did not have any significant effect on the ATPase activity of ABCB1. In a cytotoxicity assay, ABCG2-expressing HEK cells were 2.8- and 2.3-fold resistant to plumbagin and vitamin K3, respectively, compared to the control cells, suggesting that they are substrates of this transporter. Collectively, these data demonstrate for the first time that vitamin K3 is a substrate of the ABCG2 transporter. Thus, ABCG2 may have a role in the regulation of vitamin K3 levels in the body. In addition, vitamin K3 and its structural derivative, plumbagin, could potentially be used to modulate ABCG2 function. PMID:18065489

  2. Evidence for dual mode of action of a thiosemicarbazone, NSC73306: A potent substrate of the multidrug resistance-linked ABCG2 transporter

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chung-Pu; Shukla, Suneet; Calcagno, Anna Maria; Hall, Matthew D.; Gottesman, Michael M.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2008-01-01

    Multidrug resistance due to reduced drug accumulation is a phenomenon predominantly caused by the overexpression of members of the ATP-binding cassette transporters, including ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein), ABCG2 and several ABCC family members (MRPs). We previously reported that a thiosemicarbazone derivative, NSC73306, is cytotoxic to carcinoma cells that overexpress functional P-glycoprotein and it re-sensitizes these cells to chemotherapeutics. In this study, we investigated the effect of NSC73306 on cells overexpressing other ABC drug transporters, including ABCG2, MRP1, MRP4 and MRP5. Our findings demonstrated that NSC73306 is not more toxic to cells that overexpress these transporters compared to their respective parental cells, and these transporters do not confer resistance to NSC73306 either. In spite of this, we observed that NSC73306 is a transport substrate for ABCG2 that can effectively inhibit ABCG2-mediated drug transport and reverse resistance to both mitoxantrone and topotecan in ABCG2-expressing cells. Interactions between NSC73306 and the ABCG2 drug-binding site(s) were confirmed by its stimulatory effect on ATPase activity (140–150 nM concentration required for 50% stimulation) and by inhibition of [125I]-Iodoarylazidoprazosin photolabeling (50% inhibition at 250–400 nM) of the substrate-binding site(s). Overall, NSC73306 appears to be a potent modulator of ABCG2 that does not interact with MRP1, MRP4 or MRP5. Collectively, these data suggest that NSC73306 can potentially be used, due to its dual mode of action, as an effective agent to overcome drug resistance by eliminating P-glycoprotein-overexpressing cells, and by acting as a potent modulator that re-sensitizes ABCG2-expressing cancer cells to chemotherapeutics. PMID:18089722

  3. The calcium channel blockers, 1,4-dihydropyridines, are substrates of the multidrug resistance-linked ABC drug transporter, ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Suneet; Robey, Robert W; Bates, Susan E; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2006-07-25

    The human ATP-binding cassette transporter, ABCG2, confers resistance to multiple chemotherapeutic agents and also affects the bioavailability of different drugs. [(125)I]Iodoarylazidoprazosin (IAAP) and [(3)H]azidopine were used for photoaffinity labeling of ABCG2 in this study. We show here for the first time that both of these photoaffinity analogues are transport substrates for ABCG2 and that [(3)H]azidopine can also be used to photolabel both wild-type R482-ABCG2 and mutant T482-ABCG2. We further used these assays to screen for potential substrates or modulators of ABCG2 and observed that 1,4-dihydropyridines such as nicardipine and nifedipine, which are clinically used as antihypertensive agents, inhibited the photolabeling of ABCG2 with [(125)I]IAAP and [(3)H]azidopine as well as the transport of these photoaffinity analogues by ABCG2. Furthermore, [(3)H]nitrendipine and bodipy-Fl-dihydropyridine accumulation assays showed that these compounds are transported by ABCG2. These dihydropyridines also inhibited the efflux of the known ABCG2 substrates, mitoxantrone and pheophorbide-a, from ABCG2-overexpressing cells, and nicardipine was more potent in inhibiting this transport. Both nicardipine and nifedipine stimulated the ATPase activity of ABCG2, and the nifedipine-stimulated activity was inhibited by fumitremorgin C, suggesting that these agents might interact at the same site on the transporter. In addition, nontoxic concentrations of dihydropyridines increased the sensitivity of ABCG2-expressing cells to mitoxantrone by 3-5-fold. In aggregate, results from the photoaffinity labeling and efflux assays using [(125)I]IAAP and [(3)H]azidopine demonstrate that 1,4-dihydropyridines are substrates of ABCG2 and that these photolabels can be used to screen new substrates and/or inhibitors of this transporter.

  4. Human ABCG2: structure, function, and its role in multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Wei; Zhang, Jian-Ting

    2012-01-01

    Human ABCG2 is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily and is known to contribute to multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer chemotherapy. Among ABC transporters that are known to cause MDR, ABCG2 is particularly interesting for its potential role in protecting cancer stem cells and its complex oligomeric structure. Recent studies have also revealed that the biogenesis of ABCG2 could be modulated by small molecule compounds. These modulators, upon binding to ABCG2, accelerate the endocytosis and trafficking to lysosome for degradation and effectively reduce the half-life of ABCG2. Hence, targeting ABCG2 stability could be a new venue for therapeutic discovery to sensitize drug resistant human cancers. In this report, we review recent progress on understanding the structure, function, biogenesis, as well as physiological and pathophysiological functions of ABCG2. PMID:22509477

  5. OSI-930 analogues as novel reversal agents for ABCG2-mediated multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ye-Hong; Patel, Jay P; Sodani, Kamlesh; Wu, Chung-Pu; Liao, Li-Qiu; Patel, Atish; Tiwari, Amit K; Dai, Chun-Ling; Chen, Xiang; Fu, Li-Wu; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Korlipara, Vijaya L; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-09-15

    OSI-930, a dual c-Kit and KDR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is reported to have undergone a Phase I dose escalation study in patients with advanced solid tumors. A series of fifteen pyridyl and phenyl analogues of OSI-930 were designed and synthesized. Extensive screening of these compounds led to the discovery that nitropyridyl and ortho-nitrophenyl analogues, VKJP1 and VKJP3, were effective in reversing ABC subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) transporter-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR). VKJP1 and VKJP3 significantly sensitized ABCG2-expressing cells to established substrates of ABCG2 including mitoxantrone, SN-38, and doxorubicin in a concentration-dependent manner, but not to the non-ABCG2 substrate cisplatin. However, they were unable to reverse ABCB1- or ABCC1-mediated MDR indicating their selectivity for ABCG2. Western blotting analysis was performed to evaluate ABCG2 expression and it was found that neither VKJP1 nor VKJP3 significantly altered ABCG2 protein expression for up to 72 h. [(3)H]-mitoxantrone accumulation study demonstrated that VKJP1 and VKJP3 increased the intracellular accumulation of [(3)H]-mitoxantrone, a substrate of ABCG2. VKJP1 and VKJP3 also remarkably inhibited the transport of [(3)H]-methotrexate by ABCG2 membrane vesicles. Importantly, both VKJP1 and VKJP3 were efficacious in stimulating the activity of ATPase of ABCG2 and inhibited the photoaffinity labeling of this transporter by its substrate [(125)I]-iodoarylazidoprazosin. The results suggested that VKJP1 and VKJP3, specifically inhibit the function of ABCG2 through direct interaction with its substrate binding site(s). Thus VKJP1 and VKJP3 represent a new class of drugs for reducing MDR in ABCG2 over-expressing tumors.

  6. Multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy and xenobiotic protection mediated by the half ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Han, B; Zhang, J-T

    2004-01-01

    ABCG2, also termed BCRP/MXR/ABCP, is a half ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expressed on plasma membranes. ABCG2 was independently cloned from placenta as well as cell lines selected for resistance to mitoxantrone or anthracyclines. ABCG2 consists of a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) at the amino terminus and a transmembrane domain (TMD) at the carboxyl terminus and it is postulated to form a homodimer to perform its biological functions. Over-expression of ABCG2 in cell lines confers resistance on a wide variety of anticancer drugs including mitoxantrone, daunorubicin, doxorubicin, topotecan and epirubicin. The expression of ABCG2 has been implicated in multidrug resistance (MDR) of acute myeloid leukemia and some solid tumors. In addition, ABCG2 can transport several fluorescent dyes or toxins. ABCG2 is found to be expressed in epithelial cells of intestine and colon, liver canaliculi, and renal tubules, where it serves to eliminate the plasma level of orally administered anticancer drugs as well as ingested toxins. ABCG2 is found to be highly expressed in placenta and the luminal surface of microvessel endothelium blood-brain barrier where it may play a role in limiting the penetration of drugs, such as topotecan from the maternal plasma into the fetus and from blood to brain. A variety of inhibitors for ABCG2 including GF120918 may prove useful for sensitizing cancer cells to chemotherapy or altering the distribution of orally administered drug substrates of ABCG2. Interestingly, ABCG2 is also expressed highly in hematopoietic stem cells. However, the function of ABCG2 in stem cells is currently unknown, although it may provide protection to stem cells from a variety of xenobiotics.

  7. Constitutive AhR activation leads to concomitant ABCG2-mediated multidrug resistance in cisplatin-resistant esophageal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    To, Kenneth K W; Yu, Le; Liu, Shuwen; Fu, Jianhua; Cho, Chi Hin

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a highly malignant disease that is generally not responding to chemotherapy. It is particularly predominant in China. Although ESCC is significantly associated with cigarette smoking, the relationship between its molecular pathogenesis and responsiveness to chemotherapy and cigarette smoke remains elusive. This study reported the constitutive activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), leading to ABCG2 upregulation and the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype, in ESCC cell lines with acquired cisplatin resistance. Reporter gene assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis and specific gene knockdown confirmed that the enhanced AhR binding to a xenobiotic response element (XRE) within the ABCG2 promoter is responsible for ABCG2 overexpression. A HSP90 inhibitor (17-AAG) and two AhR antagonists (kaempferol and salicylamide) were shown to inhibit ABCG2 upregulation, thereby reversing the ABCG2-mediated MDR. Our data therefore advocate the use of these inhibitors as novel chemosensitizers for the treatment of esophageal cancer.

  8. Flavonoids from Eight Tropical Plant Species That Inhibit the Multidrug Resistance Transporter ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Versiani, Muhammad Ali; Diyabalanage, Thushara; Ratnayake, Ranjala; Henrich, Curtis J.; Bates, Susan E.; McMahon, James B.; Gustafson, Kirk R.

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of ABCG2, a membrane-bound multidrug transporter, can make tumor cells resistant to treatment with conventional chemotherapeutic agents. A high-throughput screening effort with the NCI repository of natural product extracts revealed that eight tropical plant extracts significantly inhibited the function of ABCG2. This activity was tracked throughout the extract fractionation process to a series of ABCG2 inhibitory flavonoids (1–13). Their structures were identified by a combination of NMR, mass spectrometry, and circular dichroism studies, and this resulted in the elucidation of (2S)-5,7,3′-trihydroxy-4′-methoxy-8-(3″-methylbut-2″-enyl)-flavonone (1), (2S)-5,7,3′,5′-tetrahydroxy-8-[3″,8″ -dimethylocta-2″(E),7″-dienyl]flavonone (3), and 5,7,3′-trihydroxy-3,5′-dimethoxy-2′-(3′-methylbut-2-enyl)flavone (12) as new compounds. PMID:21275386

  9. Alectinib (CH5424802) antagonizes ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated multidrug resistance in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ke; Chen, Yifan; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Wang, Fang; Li, Delan; Chen, Likun; Fu, Liwu

    2017-01-01

    Alectinib, an inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here we investigated the reversal effect of alectinib on multidrug resistance (MDR) induced by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which is the primary cause of chemotherapy failure. We provide the first evidence that alectinib increases the sensitivity of ABCB1- and ABCG2-overexpressing cells to chemotherapeutic agents in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, alectinib increased the intracellular accumulation of ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates such as doxorubicin (DOX) and Rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) by inhibiting the efflux function of the transporters in ABCB1- or ABCG2-overexpressing cells but not in their parental sensitive cells. Furthermore, alectinib stimulated ATPase activity and competed with substrates of ABCB1 or ABCG2 and competed with [125I] iodoarylazidoprazosin (IAAP) photolabeling bound to ABCB1 or ABCG2 but neither altered the expression and localization of ABCB1 or ABCG2 nor the phosphorylation levels of AKT and ERK. Alectinib also enhanced the cytotoxicity of DOX and the intracellular accumulation of Rho 123 in ABCB1-overexpressing primary leukemia cells. These findings suggest that alectinib combined with traditional chemotherapy may be beneficial to patients with ABCB1- or ABCG2-mediated MDR. PMID:28303028

  10. Vandetanib (Zactima, ZD6474) Antagonizes ABCC1- and ABCG2-Mediated Multidrug Resistance by Inhibition of Their Transport Function

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Li-sheng; Wang, Fang; Li, Yu-hong; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Li-ming; Liang, Yong-ju; Dai, Chun-ling; Yan, Yan-yan; Tao, Li-yang; Mi, Yan-jun; Yang, An-kui; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Fu, Li-wu

    2009-01-01

    Background ABCC1 and ABCG2 are ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette transmembrane proteins that play an important role in multidrug resistance (MDR). In this study, we evaluated the possible interaction of vandetanib, an orally administered drug inhibiting multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, with ABCC1 and ABCG2 in vitro. Methodology and Principal Findings MDR cancer cells overexpressing ABCC1 or ABCG2 and their sensitive parental cell lines were used. MTT assay showed that vandetanib had moderate and almost equal-potent anti-proliferative activity in both sensitive parental and MDR cancer cells. Concomitant treatment of MDR cells with vandetanib and specific inhibitors of ABCC1 or ABCG2 did not alter their sensitivity to the former drug. On the other hand, clinically attainable but non-toxic doses of vandetanib were found to significantly enhance the sensitivity of MDR cancer cells to ABCC1 or ABCG2 substrate antitumor drugs. Flow cytometric analysis showed that vandetanib treatment significantly increase the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and rhodamine 123, substrates of ABCC1 and ABCG2 respectively, in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). However, no significant effect was shown in sensitive parental cell lines. Reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that vandetanib did not change the expression of ABCC1 and ABCG2 at both mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, total and phosphorylated forms of AKT and ERK1/2 remained unchanged after vandetanib treatment in both sensitive and MDR cancer cells. Conclusions Vandetanib is unlikely to be a substrate of ABCC1 or ABCG2. It overcomes ABCC1- and ABCG2-mediated drug resistance by inhibiting the transporter activity, independent of the blockade of AKT and ERK1/2 signal transduction pathways. PMID:19390592

  11. Bafetinib (INNO-406) reverses multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux function of ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Zhang, Guan-Nan; Wang, Yi-Jun; Patel, Bhargav A.; Talele, Tanaji T.; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette transporters are involved in the efflux of xenobiotic compounds and are responsible for decreasing drug accumulation in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. Discovered by structure-based virtual screening algorithms, bafetinib, a Bcr-Abl/Lyn tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was found to have inhibitory effects on both ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR in this in-vitro investigation. Bafetinib significantly sensitized ABCB1 and ABCG2 overexpressing MDR cells to their anticancer substrates and increased the intracellular accumulation of anticancer drugs, particularly doxorubicin and [3H]-paclitaxel in ABCB1 overexpressing cells; mitoxantrone and [3H]-mitoxantrone in ABCG2 overexpressing cells, respectively. Bafetinib stimulated ABCB1 ATPase activities while inhibited ABCG2 ATPase activities. There were no significant changes in the expression level or the subcellular distribution of ABCB1 and ABCG2 in the cells exposed to 3 μM of bafetinib. Overall, our study indicated that bafetinib reversed ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR by blocking the drug efflux function of these transporters. These findings might be useful in developing combination therapy for MDR cancer treatment.

  12. The role of the human ABCG2 multidrug transporter and its variants in cancer therapy and toxicology.

    PubMed

    Cervenak, Judit; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Ozvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Tordai, Attila; Német, Katalin; Váradi, András; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2006-03-08

    The human multidrug resistance ABC transporters provide a protective function in our body against a large number of toxic compounds. These proteins, residing in the plasma membrane, perform an active, ATP-dependent extrusion of such xenobiotics. However, the same proteins are also used by the tumor cells to fight various anticancer agents. ABCG2 is an important member of the multidrug resistance proteins, an 'ABC half transporter', which functions as a homodimer in the cell membrane. In this review, we provide a basic overview of ABCG2 function in physiology and drug metabolism, but concentrate on the discussion of mutations and polymorphisms discovered in this protein. Interestingly, a single nucleotide mutation, changing amino acid 482 from arginine to threonine or glycine in ABCG2, results in a major increase in the catalytic activity and a wider drug recognition by this protein. Still, this mutation proved to be an in vitro artifact, produced only in heavily drug-selected cell lines. In contrast, at least two, but possibly more polymorphic variants of ABCG2 were found to be present in large human populations with different ethnic background. However, currently available experimental data regarding the cellular expression, localization and function of these ABCG2 variants are strongly contradictory. Since, the proteins produced by these variant alleles may differently modulate cancer treatment, general drug absorption and toxicity, may represent risk factors in fetal toxicity, or alter the differentiation of stem cells, their exact characterization is a major challenge in this field.

  13. Jump into a New Fold—A Homology Based Model for the ABCG2/BCRP Multidrug Transporter

    PubMed Central

    László, Laura; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2016-01-01

    ABCG2/BCRP is a membrane protein, involved in xenobiotic and endobiotic transport in key pharmacological barriers and drug metabolizing organs, in the protection of stem cells, and in multidrug resistance of cancer. Pharmacogenetic studies implicated the role of ABCG2 in response to widely used medicines and anticancer agents, as well as in gout. Its Q141K variant exhibits decreased functional expression thus increased drug accumulation and decreased urate secretion. Still, there has been no reliable molecular model available for this protein, as the published structures of other ABC transporters could not be properly fitted to the ABCG2 topology and experimental data. The recently published high resolution structure of a close homologue, the ABCG5-ABCG8 heterodimer, revealed a new ABC transporter fold, unique for ABCG proteins. Here we present a structural model of the ABCG2 homodimer based on this fold and detail the experimental results supporting this model. In order to describe the effect of mutations on structure and dynamics, and characterize substrate recognition and cholesterol regulation we performed molecular dynamics simulations using full length ABCG2 protein embedded in a membrane bilayer and in silico docking simulations. Our results show that in the Q141K variant the introduced positive charge diminishes the interaction between the nucleotide binding and transmembrane domains and the R482G variation alters the orientation of transmembrane helices. Moreover, the R482 position, which plays a role the substrate specificity of the transporter, is located in one of the substrate binding pockets identified by the in silico docking calculations. In summary, the ABCG2 model and in silico simulations presented here may have significant impact on understanding drug distribution and toxicity, as well as drug development against cancer chemotherapy resistance or gout. PMID:27741279

  14. Multidrug transporter ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein secretes riboflavin (vitamin B2) into milk.

    PubMed

    van Herwaarden, Antonius E; Wagenaar, Els; Merino, Gracia; Jonker, Johan W; Rosing, Hilde; Beijnen, Jos H; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2007-02-01

    The multidrug transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is strongly induced in the mammary gland during pregnancy and lactation. We here demonstrate that BCRP is responsible for pumping riboflavin (vitamin B(2)) into milk, thus supplying the young with this important nutrient. In Bcrp1(-/-) mice, milk secretion of riboflavin was reduced >60-fold compared to that in wild-type mice. Yet, under laboratory conditions, Bcrp1(-/-) pups showed no riboflavin deficiency due to concomitant milk secretion of its cofactor flavin adenine dinucleotide, which was not affected. Thus, two independent secretion mechanisms supply vitamin B(2) equivalents to milk. BCRP is the first active riboflavin efflux transporter identified in mammals and the first transporter shown to concentrate a vitamin into milk. BCRP activity elsewhere in the body protects against xenotoxins by reducing their absorption and mediating their excretion. Indeed, Bcrp1 activity increased excretion of riboflavin into the intestine and decreased its systemic availability in adult mice. Surprisingly, the paradoxical dual utilization of BCRP as a xenotoxin and a riboflavin pump is evolutionarily conserved among mammals as diverse as mice and humans. This study establishes the principle that an ABC transporter can transport a vitamin into milk and raises the possibility that other vitamins and nutrients are likewise secreted into milk by ABC transporters.

  15. Enhanced therapeutic effect of Adriamycin on multidrug resistant breast cancer by the ABCG2-siRNA loaded polymeric nanoparticles assisted with ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yanwei; Sun, Ying; Li, Fan; Zhang, Xiangyu; Xu, Yuanyuan; Duan, Yourong; Du, Lianfang

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression of the breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) confers resistance to Adriamycin (ADR) in breast cancer. The silencing of ABCG2 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) could be a promising approach to overcome multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. To deliver ABCG2-siRNA effectively into breast cancer cells, we used mPEG-PLGA-PLL (PEAL) nanoparticles (NPs) with ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD). PEAL NPs were prepared with an emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The NPs size was about 131.5 ± 6.5 nm. The siRNA stability in serum was enhanced. The intracellular ADR concentration increased after the introduction of siRNA-loaded NPs. After intravenous injection of PEAL NPs in tumor-bearing mice, the ABCG2-siRNA-loaded NPs with UTMD efficiently silenced the ABCG2 gene and enhanced the ADR susceptibility of MCF-7/ADR (ADR resistant human breast cancer cells). The siRNA-loaded NPs with UTMD + ADR showed better tumor inhibition effect and good safety in vivo. These results indicate that ADR-chemotherapy in combination with ABCG2-siRNA is an attractive strategy to treat breast cancer. PMID:26575421

  16. Multidrug resistance proteins: role of P-glycoprotein, MRP1, MRP2, and BCRP (ABCG2) in tissue defense

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, Elaine M.; Deeley, Roger G.; Cole, Susan P.C. . E-mail: coles@post.queensu.ca

    2005-05-01

    In tumor cell lines, multidrug resistance is often associated with an ATP-dependent decrease in cellular drug accumulation which is attributed to the overexpression of certain ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins. ABC proteins that confer drug resistance include (but are not limited to) P-glycoprotein (gene symbol ABCB1), the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1, gene symbol ABCC1), MRP2 (gene symbol ABCC2), and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, gene symbol ABCG2). In addition to their role in drug resistance, there is substantial evidence that these efflux pumps have overlapping functions in tissue defense. Collectively, these proteins are capable of transporting a vast and chemically diverse array of toxicants including bulky lipophilic cationic, anionic, and neutrally charged drugs and toxins as well as conjugated organic anions that encompass dietary and environmental carcinogens, pesticides, metals, metalloids, and lipid peroxidation products. P-glycoprotein, MRP1, MRP2, and BCRP/ABCG2 are expressed in tissues important for absorption (e.g., lung and gut) and metabolism and elimination (liver and kidney). In addition, these transporters have an important role in maintaining the barrier function of sanctuary site tissues (e.g., blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebral spinal fluid barrier, blood-testis barrier and the maternal-fetal barrier or placenta). Thus, these ABC transporters are increasingly recognized for their ability to modulate the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity of xenobiotics. In this review, the role of these four ABC transporter proteins in protecting tissues from a variety of toxicants is discussed. Species variations in substrate specificity and tissue distribution of these transporters are also addressed since these properties have implications for in vivo models of toxicity used for drug discovery and development.

  17. Estrogen Enhances the Expression of the Multidrug Transporter Gene ABCG2—Increasing Drug Resistance of Breast Cancer Cells through Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Fung-Wei; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Liu, Jui-Ming; Fan, Tai-Ping; Jing, Jin; Yang, Chia-Ling; Hsu, Ren-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Multidrug resistance is a major obstacle in the successful therapy of breast cancer. Studies have proved that this kind of drug resistance happens in both human cancers and cultured cancer cell lines. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance is important for the reasonable design and use of new treatment strategies to effectively confront cancers. Results: In our study, ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase and cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc (COX6C) were over-expressed more in the MCF-7/MX cell line than in the normal MCF7 cell line. Therefore, we believe that these three genes increase the tolerance of MCF7 to mitoxantrone (MX). The data showed that the high expression of COX6C made MCF-7/MX have more stable on mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) expression than normal MCF7 cells under hypoxic conditions. The accumulation of MX was greater in the ATP-depleted treatment MCF7/MX cells than in normal MCF7/MX cells. Furthermore, E2 increased the tolerance of MCF7 cells to MX through inducing the expression of ABCG2. However, E2 could not increase the expression of ABCG2 after the inhibition of estrogen receptor α (ERα) in MCF7 cells. According to the above data, under the E2 treatment, MDA-MB231, which lacks ER, had a higher sensitivity to MX than MCF7 cells. Conclusions: E2 induced the expression of ABCG2 through ERα and the over-expressed ABCG2 made MCF7 more tolerant to MX. Moreover, the over-expressed ATP synthase and COX6c affected mitochondrial genes and function causing the over-expressed ABCG2 cells pumped out MX in a concentration gradient from the cell matrix. Finally lead to chemoresistance. PMID:28098816

  18. Multidrug transporter ABCG2 prevents tumor cell death induced by the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor Iressa (ZD1839, Gefitinib).

    PubMed

    Elkind, N Barry; Szentpétery, Zsófia; Apáti, Agota; Ozvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Várady, György; Ujhelly, Olga; Szabó, Katalin; Homolya, László; Váradi, András; Buday, László; Kéri, György; Német, Katalin; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2005-03-01

    Iressa (ZD1839, Gefitinib), used in clinics to treat non-small cell lung cancer patients, is a tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor that leads to specific decoupling of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Recent data indicate that Iressa is especially effective in tumors with certain EGFR mutations; however, a subset of these tumors does not respond to Iressa. In addition, certain populations have an elevated risk of side effects during Iressa treatment. The human ABCG2 (BCRP/MXR/ABCP) transporter causes cancer drug resistance by actively extruding a variety of cytotoxic drugs, and it functions physiologically to protect our tissues from xenobiotics. Importantly, ABCG2 modifies absorption, distribution, and toxicity of several pharmacologic agents. Previously, we showed that ABCG2 displays a high-affinity interaction with several tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitors, including Iressa. Here, we show that the expression of ABCG2, but not its nonfunctional mutant, protects the EGFR signaling-dependent A431 tumor cells from death on exposure to Iressa. This protection is reversed by the ABCG2-specific inhibitor, Ko143. These data, reinforced with cell biology and biochemical experiments, strongly suggest that ABCG2 can actively pump Iressa. Therefore, variable expression and polymorphisms of ABCG2 may significantly modify the antitumor effect as well as the absorption and tissue distribution of Iressa.

  19. Development of sulfasalazine resistance in human T cells induces expression of the multidrug resistance transporter ABCG2 (BCRP) and augmented production of TNFα

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, J; de Jong, M C; Dijkmans, B; Lems, W; Oerlemans, R; Kathmann, I; Schalkwijk, C; Scheffer, G; Scheper, R; Jansen, G

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether overexpression of cell membrane associated drug efflux pumps belonging to the family of ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins contributes to a diminished efficacy of sulfasalazine (SSZ) after prolonged cellular exposure to this disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD). Methods: A model system of human T cells (CEM) was used to expose cells in vitro to increasing concentrations of SSZ for a period of six months. Cells were then characterised for the expression of drug efflux pumps: P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1), multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2). Results: Prolonged exposure of CEM cells to SSZ provoked resistance to SSZ as manifested by a 6.4-fold diminished antiproliferative effect of SSZ compared with parental CEM cells. CEM cells resistant to SSZ (CEM/SSZ) showed a marked induction of ABCG2/BCRP, Pgp expression was not detectable, while MRP1 expression was even down regulated. A functional role of ABCG2 in SSZ resistance was demonstrated by 60% reversal of SSZ resistance by the ABCG2 blocker Ko143. Release of the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) was threefold higher in CEM/SSZ cells than in CEM cells. Moreover, twofold higher concentrations of SSZ were required to inhibit TNFα release from CEM/SSZ cells compared with CEM cells. Conclusion: Collectively, ABCG2 induction, augmented TNFα release, and less efficient inhibition of TNFα production by SSZ may contribute to diminished efficacy after prolonged exposure to SSZ. These results warrant further clinical studies to verify whether drug efflux pumps, originally identified for their roles in cytostatic drug resistance, can also be induced by SSZ or other DMARDs. PMID:14722201

  20. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2): its role in multidrug resistance and regulation of its gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Takeo; Ross, Douglas D.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)/ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter identified as a molecular cause of multidrug resistance (MDR) in diverse cancer cells. BCRP physiologically functions as a part of a self-defense mechanism for the organism; it enhances elimination of toxic xenobiotic substances and harmful agents in the gut and biliary tract, as well as through the blood-brain, placental, and possibly blood-testis barriers. BCRP recognizes and transports numerous anticancer drugs including conventional chemotherapeutic and targeted small therapeutic molecules relatively new in clinical use. Thus, BCRP expression in cancer cells directly causes MDR by active efflux of anticancer drugs. Because BCRP is also known to be a stem cell marker, its expression in cancer cells could be a manifestation of metabolic and signaling pathways that confer multiple mechanisms of drug resistance, self-renewal (sternness), and invasiveness (aggressiveness), and thereby impart a poor prognosis. Therefore, blocking BCRP-mediated active efflux may provide a therapeutic benefit for cancers. Delineating the precise molecular mechanisms for BCRP gene expression may lead to identification of a novel molecular target to modulate BCRP-mediated MDR. Current evidence suggests that BCRP gene transcription is regulated by a number of trans-acting elements including hypoxia inducible factor 1α, estrogen receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor. Furthermore, alternative promoter usage, demethylation of the BCRP promoter, and histone modification are likely associated with drug-induced BCRP overexpression in cancer cells. Finally, PI3K/AKT signaling may play a critical role in modulating BCRP function under a variety of conditions. These biological events seem involved in a complicated manner. Untangling the events would be an essential first step to developing a method to modulate BCRP function to aid patients with

  1. Role of Abcg2 During Mouse Embroyonic Stem Cell Diffferentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Role of Abcg2 During Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation. Abcg2 is a multidrug resistance ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter whose activity may be considered a hallmark of stem cell plasticity. The role of Abcg2 during early embryogenesis, however, is unclear. Studies...

  2. ABCG2 -- a transporter for all seasons.

    PubMed

    Sarkadi, Balázs; Ozvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Német, Katalin; Váradi, András

    2004-06-01

    The human ABCG2 (ABCP/MXR/BCRP) protein is a recently recognized ABC half-transporter, which forms homodimers in the plasma membrane and actively extrudes a wide variety of chemically unrelated compounds from the cells. This protein protects our cells and tissues against various xenobiotics, with a crucial role in the intestine, liver, placenta, and the blood-brain barrier. Moreover, ABCG2 seems to have a key function in stem cell protection/regulation, and also in hypoxic defense mechanisms. Widely occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms in ABCG2 may affect absorption and distribution, altering the effectiveness and toxicity of drugs in large populations. At the clinics, overexpression of ABCG2 in tumor cells confers cancer multidrug resistance to a variety of newly developed anticancer agents. On the other hand, specific substrate mutants of ABCG2 are advocated for use as selectable markers in stem-cell based gene therapy.

  3. Promoter methylation patterns of ABCB1, ABCC1 and ABCG2 in human cancer cell lines, multidrug-resistant cell models and tumor, tumor-adjacent and tumor-distant tissues from breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Spitzwieser, Melanie; Pirker, Christine; Koblmüller, Bettina; Pfeiler, Georg; Hacker, Stefan; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra; Cichna-Markl, Margit

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of ABCB1, ABCC1 and ABCG2 in tumor tissues is considered a major cause of limited efficacy of anticancer drugs. Gene expression of ABC transporters is regulated by multiple mechanisms, including changes in the DNA methylation status. Most of the studies published so far only report promoter methylation levels for either ABCB1 or ABCG2, and data on the methylation status for ABCC1 are scarce. Thus, we determined the promoter methylation patterns of ABCB1, ABCC1 and ABCG2 in 19 human cancer cell lines. In order to contribute to the elucidation of the role of DNA methylation changes in acquisition of a multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotype, we also analyzed the promoter methylation patterns in drug-resistant sublines of the cancer cell lines GLC-4, SW1573, KB-3-1 and HL-60. In addition, we investigated if aberrant promoter methylation levels of ABCB1, ABCC1 and ABCG2 occur in tumor and tumor-surrounding tissues from breast cancer patients. Our data indicates that hypomethylation of the ABCC1 promoter is not cancer type-specific but occurs in cancer cell lines of different origins. Promoter methylation was found to be an important mechanism in gene regulation of ABCB1 in parental cancer cell lines and their drug-resistant sublines. Overexpression of ABCC1 in MDR cell models turned out to be mediated by gene amplification, not by changes in the promoter methylation status of ABCC1. In contrast to the promoters of ABCC1 and ABCG2, the promoter of ABCB1 was significantly higher methylated in tumor tissues than in tumor-adjacent and tumor-distant tissues from breast cancer patients. PMID:27689338

  4. Placental passage of olomoucine II, but not purvalanol A, is affected by p-glycoprotein (ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (ABCCs).

    PubMed

    Hofman, Jakub; Kučera, Radim; Neumanova, Zuzana; Klimes, Jiri; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    1. Purine cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors have recently been recognised as promising candidates for the treatment of various cancers. While pharmacodynamic properties of these compounds are relatively well understood, their pharmacokinetics including possible interactions with placental transport systems have not been characterised to date. 2. In this study, we investigated transplacental passage of olomoucine II and purvalanol A in rat focusing on possible role of p-glycoprotein (ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) and/or multidrug resistance-associated proteins (ABCCs). Employing the in situ method of dually perfused rat term placenta, we demonstrate transplacental passage of both olomoucine II and purvalanol A against the concentration gradient in foetus-to-mother direction. Using several ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter inhibitors, we confirm the participation of ABCB1, ABCG2 and ABCCs transporters in the placental passage of olomoucine II, but not purvalanol A. 3. Transplacental passage of olomoucine II and purvalanol A from mother to foetus is significantly reduced by active transporters, restricting thereby foetal exposure and providing protection against harmful effects of these xenobiotics. Importantly, we demonstrate that in spite of their considerable structural similarity, the two molecules utilise distinct placental transport systems. These facts should be kept in mind when introducing these prospective anticancer candidates and/or their analogues into the clinical area.

  5. Modulating the function of ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) with inhibitor cabozantinib.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guan-Nan; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Barbuti, Anna Maria; Zhu, Xi-Jun; Yu, Xin-Yue; Wen, Ai-Wen; Wurpel, John N D; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2017-01-25

    Cabozantinib (XL184) is a small molecule tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor, which targets c-Met and VEGFR2. Cabozantinib has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat advanced medullary thyroid cancer and renal cell carcinoma. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of cabozantinib to modulate the function of the ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) by sensitizing cells that are resistant to ABCG2 substrate antineoplastic drugs. We used a drug-selected resistant cell line H460/MX20 and three ABCG2 stable transfected cell lines ABCG2-482-R2, ABCG2-482-G2, and ABCG2-482-T7, which overexpress ABCG2. Cabozantinib, at non-toxic concentrations (3 or 5μM), sensitized the ABCG2-overexpressing cells to mitoxantrone, SN-38, and topotecan. Our results indicate that cabozantinib reverses ABCG2-mediated multidrug resistance by antagonizing the drug efflux function of the ABCG2 transporter instead of downregulating its expression. The molecular docking analysis indicates that cabozantinib binds to the drug-binding site of the ABCG2 transporter. Overall, our findings demonstrate that cabozantinib inhibits the ABCG2 transporter function and consequently enhances the effect of the antineoplastic agents that are substrates of ABCG2. Cabozantinib may be a useful agent in anticancer treatment regimens for patients who are resistant to ABCG2 substrate drugs.

  6. ABCG2 is not able to catalyze glutathione efflux and does not contribute to GSH-dependent collateral sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Charlotte; Ozvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Szakacs, Gergely; Sarkadi, Balazs; Di Pietro, Attilio

    2013-01-01

    ABCG2 is a key human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediating cancer cell chemoresistance. In the case of ABCC1, another multidrug transporter, earlier findings documented that certain modulators greatly increase ABCC1-mediated glutathione (GSH) efflux and, upon depletion of intracellular GSH, induce “collateral sensitivity” leading to the apoptosis of multidrug resistant cells. Recently, it has been suggested that ABCG2 may mediate an active GSH transport. In order to explore if ABCG2-overexpressing cells may be similarly targeted, we first looked for the effects of ABCG2 expression on cellular GSH levels, and for an ABCG2-dependent GSH transport in HEK293 and MCF7 cells. We found that, while ABCG2 overexpression altered intracellular GSH levels in these transfected or drug-selected cells, ABCG2 inhibitors or transport modulators did not influence GSH efflux. We then performed direct measurements of drug-stimulated ATPase activity and 3H-GSH transport in inside-out membrane vesicles of human ABC transporter-overexpressing Sf9 insect cells. Our results indicate that ABCG2-ATPase is not modulated by GSH and, in contrast to ABCC1, ABCG2 does not catalyze any significant GSH transport. Our data suggest no direct interaction between the ABCG2 transporter and GSH, although a long-term modulation of cellular GSH by ABCG2 cannot be excluded. PMID:24312054

  7. Dietary polyacetylenes of the falcarinol type are inhibitors of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Tan, Kee W; Killeen, Daniel P; Li, Yan; Paxton, James W; Birch, Nigel P; Scheepens, Arjan

    2014-01-15

    Polyacetylenes of the falcarinol type are present in vegetables such as carrots and parsley. They display interesting bioactivities and hold potential as health-promoting and therapeutic agents. In this study, falcarinol, falcarindiol, falcarindiol 3-acetate and falcarindiol 3,8-diacetate were examined for their modulation on breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), an efflux transporter important for xenobiotic absorption and disposition, and multidrug resistance in cancer. Falcarinol, falcarindiol, and falcarindiol 3-acetate were extracted from carrots and falcarindiol 3,8-diacetate prepared from falcarindiol. Their modulatory effects on ABCG2 were studied using three methods-mitoxantrone accumulation, vesicular transport, and ATPase assay. The polyacetylenes inhibited mitoxantrone (an ABCG2 substrate) efflux in ABCG2-overexpressing HEK293 cells. The inhibitory effect was confirmed in the vesicular transport assay, in which concentration-dependent inhibition of methotrexate (an ABCG2 substrate) uptake into ABCG2-overexpressing Sf9 membrane vesicles was observed (IC50=19.7-41.7µM). The polyacetylenes also inhibited baseline and sulfasalazine-stimulated vanadate-sensitive ATPase activities in ABCG2-overexpressing Sf9 membrane vesicles (IC50=19.3-79.3µM). This is the first report of an inhibitory effect of polyacetylenes on ABCG2. These results indicate a prospective use of polyacetylenes as multidrug resistance reversal agents, a possible role of ABCG2 in the absorption and disposition of polyacetylenes, and potential food-drug interactions between polyacetylene-rich foods and ABCG2 substrate drugs.

  8. A-803467, a tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel blocker, modulates ABCG2-mediated MDR in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Atish; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Shukla, Suneet; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Kumar, Priyank; Gupta, Pranav; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Wurpel, John N. D.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily proteins, which has been implicated in the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer, apart from its physiological role to remove toxic substances out of the cells. The diverse range of substrates of ABCG2 includes many antineoplastic agents such as topotecan, doxorubicin and mitoxantrone. ABCG2 expression has been reported to be significantly increased in some solid tumors and hematologic malignancies, correlated to poor clinical outcomes. In addition, ABCG2 expression is a distinguishing feature of cancer stem cells, whereby this membrane transporter facilitates resistance to the chemotherapeutic drugs. To enhance the chemosensitivity of cancer cells, attention has been focused on MDR modulators. In this study, we investigated the effect of a tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel blocker, A-803467 on ABCG2-overexpressing drug selected and transfected cell lines. We found that at non-toxic concentrations, A-803467 could significantly increase the cellular sensitivity to ABCG2 substrates in drug-resistant cells overexpressing either wild-type or mutant ABCG2. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that A-803467 (7.5 μM) significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-mitoxantrone by inhibiting the transport activity of ABCG2, without altering its expression levels. In addition, A-803467 stimulated the ATPase activity in membranes overexpressed with ABCG2. In a murine model system, combination treatment of A-803467 (35 mg/kg) and topotecan (3 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the tumor growth in mice xenografted with ABCG2-overexpressing cancer cells. Our findings indicate that a combination of A-803467 and ABCG2 substrates may potentially be a novel therapeutic treatment in ABCG2-positive drug resistant cancers. PMID:26515463

  9. Specific inhibition of the ABCG2 transporter could improve the efficacy of photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Bebes, Attila; Nagy, Tünde; Bata-Csörgo, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Lajos; Dobozy, Attila; Széll, Márta

    2011-11-03

    Photodynamic therapy is based on the selective accumulation of a photosensitizer in tumors, followed by destruction of the target tissue by a light source. Protoporphyrin IX, a well-known photosensitizer, was recently reported as an endogenous substrate for the multidrug transporter ABCG2. We investigated the role of ABCG2 protein in the porphyrin extrusion ability of keratinocytes, with regard to the impact of the specific inhibition of ABCG2 by a non-toxic fumitremorgin C analog, Ko-134, on photodynamic therapy efficacy. We studied the level of porphyrin accumulation in response to delta-aminolevulinic acid pretreatment in proliferating and highly differentiated HaCaT keratinocytes. An in vitro model of photodynamic therapy on HaCaT cells was established with a therapeutically approved narrow-bandwidth red-light source. The porphyrin extrusion ability of HaCaT cells proved to correlate with their ABCG2 expression which was higher in proliferating cells than in differentiated cells. Moreover, the specific inhibition of ABCG2 by Ko-134 enhanced the sensitivity of keratinocytes to photodynamic therapy in vitro. These results suggest that ABCG2 may serve as a target molecule via which to improve the photodynamic therapy of skin lesions: its inhibition by the non-toxic Ko-134 is a promising therapeutic modality.

  10. Regulation and expression of the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Raji; Chen, Kevin G; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Handley, Misty; Mallon, Barbara S; Hamilton, Rebecca S; Park, Kyeyoon; Varma, Sudhir; Mehaffey, Michele G; Robey, Pamela G; McKay, Ronald D G; Gottesman, Michael M

    2012-10-01

    The expression and function of several multidrug transporters (including ABCB1 and ABCG2) have been studied in human cancer cells and in mouse and human adult stem cells. However, the expression of ABCG2 in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) remains unclear. Limited and contradictory results in the literature from two research groups have raised questions regarding its expression and function. In this study, we used quantitative real-time PCR, Northern blots, whole genome RNA sequencing, Western blots, and immunofluorescence microscopy to study ABCG2 expression in hESCs. We found that full-length ABCG2 mRNA transcripts are expressed in undifferentiated hESC lines. However, ABCG2 protein was undetectable even under embryoid body differentiation or cytotoxic drug induction. Moreover, surface ABCG2 protein was coexpressed with the differentiation marker stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 of hESCs, following constant BMP-4 signaling at days 4 and 6. This expression was tightly correlated with the downregulation of two microRNAs (miRNAs) (i.e., hsa-miR-519c and hsa-miR-520h). Transfection of miRNA mimics and inhibitors of these two miRNAs confirmed their direct involvement in the regulation ABCG2 translation. Our findings clarify the controversy regarding the expression of the ABCG2 gene and also provide new insights into translational control of the expression of membrane transporter mRNAs by miRNAs in hESCs.

  11. Effect of ABCG2/BCRP Expression on Efflux and Uptake of Gefitinib in NSCLC Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Galetti, Maricla; Petronini, Pier Giorgio; Fumarola, Claudia; Cretella, Daniele; La Monica, Silvia; Bonelli, Mara; Cavazzoni, Andrea; Saccani, Francesca; Caffarra, Cristina; Andreoli, Roberta; Mutti, Antonio; Tiseo, Marcello; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Alfieri, Roberta R.

    2015-01-01

    Background BCRP/ABCG2 emerged as an important multidrug resistance protein, because it confers resistance to several classes of cancer chemotherapeutic agents and to a number of novel molecularly-targeted therapeutics such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Gefitinib is an orally active, selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor used in the treatment of patients with advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) carrying activating EGFR mutations. Membrane transporters may affect the distribution and accumulation of gefitinib in tumour cells; in particular a reduced intracellular level of the drug may result from poor uptake, enhanced efflux or increased metabolism. Aim The present study, performed in a panel of NSCLC cell lines expressing different ABCG2 plasma membrane levels, was designed to investigate the effect of the efflux transporter ABCG2 on intracellular gefitinib accumulation, by dissecting the contribution of uptake and efflux processes. Methods and Results Our findings indicate that gefitinib, in lung cancer cells, inhibits ABCG2 activity, as previously reported. In addition, we suggest that ABCG2 silencing or overexpression affects intracellular gefitinib content by modulating the uptake rather than the efflux. Similarly, overexpression of ABCG2 affected the expression of a number of drug transporters, altering the functional activities of nutrient and drug transport systems, in particular inhibiting MPP, glucose and glutamine uptake. Conclusions Therefore, we conclude that gefitinib is an inhibitor but not a substrate for ABCG2 and that ABCG2 overexpression may modulate the expression and activity of other transporters involved in the uptake of different substrates into the cells. PMID:26536031

  12. Single-step doxorubicin-selected cancer cells overexpress the ABCG2 drug transporter through epigenetic changes

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, A M; Fostel, J M; To, K K W; Salcido, C D; Martin, S E; Chewning, K J; Wu, C-P; Varticovski, L; Bates, S E; Caplen, N J; Ambudkar, S V

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of multidrug resistance (MDR) could improve clinical drug efficacy. Multidrug resistance is associated with ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, but the factors that regulate their expression at clinically relevant drug concentrations are poorly understood. We report that a single-step selection with low doses of anti-cancer agents, similar to concentrations reported in vivo, induces MDR that is mediated exclusively by ABCG2. We selected breast, ovarian and colon cancer cells (MCF-7, IGROV-1 and S-1) after exposure to 14 or 21 nM doxorubicin for only 10 days. We found that these cells overexpress ABCG2 at the mRNA and protein levels. RNA interference analysis confirmed that ABCG2 confers drug resistance. Furthermore, ABCG2 upregulation was facilitated by histone hyperacetylation due to weaker histone deacetylase 1-promoter association, indicating that these epigenetic changes elicit changes in ABCG2 gene expression. These studies indicate that the MDR phenotype arises following low-dose, single-step exposure to doxorubicin, and further suggest that ABCG2 may mediate early stages of MDR development. This is the first report to our knowledge of single-step, low-dose selection leading to overexpression of ABCG2 by epigenetic changes in multiple cancer cell lines. PMID:18382425

  13. Inhibition of breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) in human myeloid dendritic cells induces potent tolerogenic functions during LPS stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jun-O; Zhang, Wei; Wong, Ka-Wing; Kwak, Minseok; van Driel, Ian R; Yu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2), a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporters has been identified as a major determinant of multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells, but ABC transporter inhibition has limited therapeutic value in vivo. In this research, we demonstrated that inhibition of efflux transporters ABCG2 induced the generation of tolerogenic DCs from human peripheral blood myeloid DCs (mDCs). ABCG2 expression was present in mDCs and was further increased by LPS stimulation. Treatment of CD1c+ mDCs with an ABCG2 inhibitor, Ko143, during LPS stimulation caused increased production of IL-10 and decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreased expression of CD83 and CD86. Moreover, inhibition of ABCG2 in monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) abrogated the up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells in response to LPS. Furthermore, CD1c+ mDCs stimulated with LPS plus Ko143 inhibited the proliferation of allogeneic and superantigen-specific syngenic CD4+ T cells and promoted expansion of CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells in an IL-10-dependent fashion. These tolerogenic effects of ABCG2 inhibition could be abolished by ERK inhibition. Thus, we demonstrated that inhibition of ABCG2 in LPS-stimulated mDCs can potently induce tolerogenic potentials in these cells, providing crucial new information that could lead to development of better strategies to combat MDR cancer.

  14. CD147 mediates chemoresistance in breast cancer via ABCG2 by affecting its cellular localization and dimerization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuangyuan; Liao, Liqiu; Chen, Chen; Zeng, Weiqi; Liu, Shuang; Su, Juan; Zhao, Shuang; Chen, Mingliang; Kuang, Yehong; Chen, Xiang; Li, Jie

    2013-09-01

    CD147 and ABCG2 both have been reported to mediate Multidrug resistance (MDR) in breast cancer. Recent study demonstrates that CD147 could form a complex with ABCG2 on the cell membrane in primary effusion lymphoma. However, whether these two molecules regulate each other in breast cancer and result in MDR is not clear. We established four MCF-7 cell lines transfected with CD147 and/or ABCG2 and found that CD147 could increase the expression and dimerization of ABCG2, affect its cellular localization and regulate its drug transporter function. The findings derived from cells were confirmed subsequently in clinic samples of chemotherapy-sensitive/resistant breast cancer.

  15. Osimertinib (AZD9291) Attenuates the Function of Multidrug Resistance-Linked ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter ABCB1 in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Sung-Han; Lu, Yu-Jen; Li, Yan-Qing; Huang, Yang-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Wu, Chung-Pu

    2016-06-06

    The effectiveness of cancer chemotherapy is often circumvented by multidrug resistance (MDR) caused by the overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter ABCB1 (MDR1, P-glycoprotein). Several epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been shown previously capable of modulating the function of ABCB1 and reversing ABCB1-mediated MDR in human cancer cells. Furthermore, some TKIs are transported by ABCB1, which results in low oral bioavailability, reduced distribution, and the development of acquired resistance to these TKIs. In this study, we investigated the interaction between ABCB1 and osimertinib, a novel selective, irreversible third-generation EGFR TKI that has recently been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. We also evaluated the potential impact of ABCB1 on the efficacy of osimertinib in cancer cells, which can present a therapeutic challenge to clinicians in the future. We revealed that although osimertinib stimulates the ATPase activity of ABCB1, overexpression of ABCB1 does not confer resistance to osimertinib. Our results suggest that it is unlikely that the overexpression of ABCB1 can be a major contributor to the development of osimertinib resistance in cancer patients. More significantly, we revealed an additional action of osimertinib that directly inhibits the function of ABCB1 without affecting the expression level of ABCB1, enhances drug-induced apoptosis, and reverses the MDR phenotype in ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells. Considering that osimertinib is a clinically approved third-generation EGFR TKI, our findings suggest that a combination therapy with osimertinib and conventional anticancer drugs may be beneficial to patients with MDR tumors.

  16. The breast cancer resistance protein BCRP (ABCG2) concentrates drugs and carcinogenic xenotoxins into milk.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Johan W; Merino, Gracia; Musters, Sandra; van Herwaarden, Antonius E; Bolscher, Ellen; Wagenaar, Els; Mesman, Elly; Dale, Trevor C; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2005-02-01

    Contamination of milk with drugs, pesticides and other xenotoxins can pose a major health risk to breast-fed infants and dairy consumers. Here we show that the multidrug transporter BCRP (encoded by ABCG2) is strongly induced in the mammary gland of mice, cows and humans during lactation and that it is responsible for the active secretion of clinically and toxicologically important substrates such as the dietary carcinogen PhIP, the anticancer drug topotecan and the antiulcerative cimetidine into mouse milk.

  17. Generation of an ABCG2{sup GFPn-puro} transgenic line - A tool to study ABCG2 expression in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Orford, Michael; Mean, Richard; Lapathitis, George; Genethliou, Nicholas; Panayiotou, Elena; Panayi, Helen; Malas, Stavros

    2009-06-26

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter 2 (ABCG2) is expressed by stem cells in many organs and in stem cells of solid tumors. These cells are isolated based on the side population (SP) phenotype, a Hoechst 3342 dye efflux property believed to be conferred by ABCG2. Because of the limitations of this approach we generated transgenic mice that express Nuclear GFP (GFPn) coupled to the Puromycin-resistance gene, under the control of ABCG2 promoter/enhancer sequences. We show that ABCG2 is expressed in neural progenitors of the developing forebrain and spinal cord and in embryonic and adult endothelial cells of the brain. Using the neurosphere assay, we isolated tripotent ABCG2-expressing neural stem cells from embryonic mouse brain. This transgenic line is a powerful tool for studying the expression of ABCG2 in many tissues and for performing functional studies in different experimental settings.

  18. MBL-II-141, a chromone derivative, enhances irinotecan (CPT-11) anticancer efficiency in ABCG2-positive xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Honorat, Mylène; Guitton, Jérôme; Gauthier, Charlotte; Bouard, Charlotte; Lecerf-Schmidt, Florine; Peres, Basile; Terreux, Raphaël; Gervot, Héloïse; Rioufol, Catherine; Boumendjel, Ahcène; Puisieux, Alain; Di Pietro, Attilio; Payen, Léa

    2014-01-01

    ABCG2 is responsible for the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype, and strongly modulates cancer outcomes. Its high expression at a number of physiological barriers, including blood-brain and intestinal barriers, impacts on drug pharmacokinetics parameters. We characterized MBL-II-141, a specific and potent ABCG2 inhibitor. Combination of 10 mg/kg MBL-II-141 with the anticancer agent CPT-11 completely blocked the growth of 90% freshly implanted ABCG2-positive tumors. Moreover, the same combination slowed the growth of already established tumors. As required for preclinical development, we defined the main pharmacokinetics parameters of MBL-II-141 and its influence on the kinetics of CPT-11 and its active metabolite SN-38 in mice. MBL-II-141 distribution into the brain occurred at a low, but detectable, level. Interestingly, preliminary data suggested that MBL-II-141 is well tolerated (at 50 mg/kg) and absorbed upon force-feeding. MBL-II-141 induced a potent sensitization of ABCG2-positive xenografts to CPT-11 through in vivo ABCG2 inhibition. MBL-II-141 strongly increased CPT-11 levels in the brain, and therefore would be a valuable agent to improve drug distribution into the brain to efficiently treat aggressive gliomas. Safety and other pharmacological data strongly support the reglementary preclinical development of MBL-II-141. PMID:25474134

  19. Hedgehog pathway inhibitor HhAntag691 is a potent inhibitor of ABCG2/BCRP and ABCB1/Pgp.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yimao; Laterra, John; Pomper, Martin G

    2009-01-01

    HhAntag691 (GDC-0449), a low-molecular weight inhibitor of the tumor-promoting hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway, has been used to treat medulloblastoma in animal models and has recently entered clinical trials for a variety of solid tumors. Here, we show that HhAntag691 inhibits multiple ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. ATP-binding cassette transporters are within a family of membrane proteins, the overexpression of which is associated with multidrug resistance, a major impediment to successful cancer treatment. HhAntag691 is a potent inhibitor of two ABC transporters, ABCG2/BCRP and ABCB1/Pgp, and is a mild inhibitor of ABCC1/MRP1. In ABCG2-overexpressing HEK293 cells, HhAntag691 increased retention of the fluorescent ABCG2 substrate BODIPY-prazosin and resensitized these cells to mitoxantrone, an antineoplastic ABCG2 substrate. In Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells engineered to overexpress Pgp or MRP1, HhAntag691 increased the retention of calcein-AM and resensitized them to colchicine. HhAntag691 also resensitized human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells NCI-H460/par and NCI-H460/MX20, which overexpress ABCG2 in response to mitoxantrone, to mitoxantrone, and to topotecan or SN-38. The IC(50) values of HhAntag691 for inhibition of ABCG2 and Pgp were approximately 1.4 and approximately 3.0 microM, respectively. Because ABC transporters are highly expressed at the blood-brain barrier and on many tumor cells, they contribute significantly to treatment failure of many types of cancer, particularly of those within the neuraxis. In addition to its effect on Hh signaling, the ability of HhAntag691 and related compounds to inhibit two key ABC transporters could contribute to their effectiveness in treating malignancies.

  20. Phenolic indeno[1,2-b]indoles as ABCG2-selective potent and non-toxic inhibitors stimulating basal ATPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Gozzi, Gustavo Jabor; Bouaziz, Zouhair; Winter, Evelyn; Daflon-Yunes, Nathalia; Honorat, Mylène; Guragossian, Nathalie; Marminon, Christelle; Valdameri, Glaucio; Bollacke, Andre; Guillon, Jean; Pinaud, Noël; Marchivie, Mathieu; Cadena, Silvia M; Jose, Joachim; Le Borgne, Marc; Di Pietro, Attilio

    2015-01-01

    Ketonic indeno[1,2-b]indole-9,10-dione derivatives, initially designed as human casein kinase II (CK2) inhibitors, were recently shown to be converted into efficient inhibitors of drug efflux by the breast cancer resistance protein ABCG2 upon suited substitutions including a N5-phenethyl on C-ring and hydrophobic groups on D-ring. A series of ten phenolic and seven p-quinonic derivatives were synthesized and screened for inhibition of both CK2 and ABCG2 activities. The best phenolic inhibitors were about threefold more potent against ABCG2 than the corresponding ketonic derivatives, and showed low cytotoxicity. They were selective for ABCG2 over both P-glycoprotein and MRP1 (multidrug resistance protein 1), whereas the ketonic derivatives also interacted with MRP1, and they additionally displayed a lower interaction with CK2. Quite interestingly, they strongly stimulated ABCG2 ATPase activity, in contrast to ketonic derivatives, suggesting distinct binding sites. In contrast, the p-quinonic indenoindoles were cytotoxic and poor ABCG2 inhibitors, whereas a partial inhibition recovery could be reached upon hydrophobic substitutions on D-ring, similarly to the ketonic derivatives. PMID:26170632

  1. Osimertinib (AZD9291) Enhanced the Efficacy of Chemotherapeutic Agents in ABCB1- and ABCG2-Overexpressing Cells In Vitro, In Vivo, and Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Chen, Yifan; Xu, Meng; Chen, Likun; Zhang, Xu; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Zhao, Hongyun; Wang, Fang; Xia, Zhongjun; Chen, Xiaoqin; Fu, Liwu

    2016-08-01

    The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters has been proved to be a major trigger for multidrug resistance (MDR) in certain types of cancer. In our study, we investigated whether osimertinib (AZD9291), a third-generation irreversible tyrosine kinase inhibitor of both activating EGFR mutations and resistance-associated T790M point mutation, could reverse MDR induced by ABCB1 and ABCG2 in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo Our results showed that osimertinib significantly increased the sensitivity of ABCB1- and ABCG2-overexpressing cells to their substrate chemotherapeutic agents in vitro and in the model of ABCB1-overexpressing KBv200 cell xenograft in nude mice. Mechanistically, osimertinib increased the intracellular accumulations of doxorubicin (DOX) and Rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) by inhibiting the efflux function of the transporters in ABCB1- or ABCG2-overexpressing cells but not in their parental sensitive cells. Furthermore, osimertinib stimulated the ATPase activity of both ABCB1 and ABCG2 and competed with the [(125)I] iodoarylazidoprazosin photolabeling bound to ABCB1 or ABCG2, but did not alter the localization and expression of ABCB1 or ABCG2 in mRNA and protein levels nor the phosphorylations of EGFR, AKT, and ERK. Importantly, osimertinib also enhanced the cytotoxicity of DOX and intracellular accumulation of Rho 123 in ABCB1-overexpressing primary leukemia cells. Overall, these findings suggest osimertinib reverses ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR via inhibiting ABCB1 and ABCG2 from pumping out chemotherapeutic agents and provide possibility for cancer combinational therapy with osimertinib in the clinic. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1845-58. ©2016 AACR.

  2. The ABCG2 efflux transporter from rabbit placenta: Cloning and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Halwachs, Sandra; Kneuer, Carsten; Gohlsch, Katrin; Müller, Marian; Ritz, Vera; Honscha, Walther

    2016-02-01

    In human placenta, the ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter ABCG2 is highly expressed in syncytiotrophoblast cells and mediates cellular excretion of various drugs and toxins. Hence, physiological ABCG2 activity substantially contributes to the fetoprotective placenta barrier function during gestation. Developmental toxicity studies are often performed in rabbit. However, despite its toxicological relevance, there is no data so far on functional ABCG2 expression in this species. Therefore, we cloned ABCG2 from placenta tissues of chinchilla rabbit. Sequencing showed 84-86% amino acid sequence identity to the orthologues from man, rat and mouse. We transduced the rabbit ABCG2 clone (rbABCG2) in MDCKII cells and stable rbABCG2 gene and protein expression was shown by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The rbABCG2 efflux activity was demonstrated with the Hoechst H33342 assay using the specific ABCG2 inhibitor Ko143. We further tested the effect of established human ABCG2 (hABCG2) drug substrates including the antibiotic danofloxacin or the histamine H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine on H33342 accumulation in MDCKII-rbABCG2 or -hABCG2 cells. Human therapeutic plasma concentrations of all tested drugs caused a comparable competitive inhibition of H33342 excretion in both ABCG2 clones. Altogether, we first showed functional expression of the ABCG2 efflux transporter in rabbit placenta. Moreover, our data suggest a similar drug substrate spectrum of the rabbit and the human ABCG2 efflux transporter.

  3. ABCG2-overexpressing H460/MX20 cell xenografts in athymic nude mice maintained original biochemical and cytological characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Zhen; Chen, Likun; Wang, Fang; Li, Furong; Wang, Xiaokun; Fu, Liwu

    2017-01-01

    H460/MX20 are derived from large cell lung cancer H460 cell line and then transformed into ABCG2-overexpressing cells by mitoxantrone’s induction, which are widely used in study of multidrug resistance (MDR) in vitro. To establish and spread the model of H460/MX20 cell xenografts, we investigated whether cell biological characteristics and the MDR phenotype were maintained in vivo model. Our results demonstrated that the cell proliferation, cell cycle, and ABCG2 expression level in xH460/MX20 cells isolated from H460/MX20 cell xenografts were similar to H460/MX20 cells in vitro. Importantly, xH460/MX20 cells exhibited high levels of resistance to ABCG2 substrates such as mitoxantrone and topotecan as H460/MX20 cells did. Furthermore, lapatinib, the inhibitor of ABCG2, potently reversed mitoxantrone- and topotecan-resistance of xH460/MX20 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that H460/MX20 cell xenografts in athymic nude mice still retain their original cytological characteristics and MDR phenotype. Thus, the H460/MX20 cell xenografts model could serve as a sound model in vivo for study on reversal MDR. PMID:28059154

  4. ABCG2-overexpressing H460/MX20 cell xenografts in athymic nude mice maintained original biochemical and cytological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Zhen; Chen, Likun; Wang, Fang; Li, Furong; Wang, Xiaokun; Fu, Liwu

    2017-01-06

    H460/MX20 are derived from large cell lung cancer H460 cell line and then transformed into ABCG2-overexpressing cells by mitoxantrone's induction, which are widely used in study of multidrug resistance (MDR) in vitro. To establish and spread the model of H460/MX20 cell xenografts, we investigated whether cell biological characteristics and the MDR phenotype were maintained in vivo model. Our results demonstrated that the cell proliferation, cell cycle, and ABCG2 expression level in xH460/MX20 cells isolated from H460/MX20 cell xenografts were similar to H460/MX20 cells in vitro. Importantly, xH460/MX20 cells exhibited high levels of resistance to ABCG2 substrates such as mitoxantrone and topotecan as H460/MX20 cells did. Furthermore, lapatinib, the inhibitor of ABCG2, potently reversed mitoxantrone- and topotecan-resistance of xH460/MX20 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that H460/MX20 cell xenografts in athymic nude mice still retain their original cytological characteristics and MDR phenotype. Thus, the H460/MX20 cell xenografts model could serve as a sound model in vivo for study on reversal MDR.

  5. ABCG2 in peptic ulcer: gene expression and mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Salagacka-Kubiak, Aleksandra; Żebrowska, Marta; Wosiak, Agnieszka; Balcerczak, Mariusz; Mirowski, Marek; Balcerczak, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the participation of polymorphism at position C421A and mRNA expression of the ABCG2 gene in the development of peptic ulcers, which is a very common and severe disease. ABCG2, encoded by the ABCG2 gene, has been found inter alia in the gastrointestinal tract, where it plays a protective role eliminating xenobiotics from cells into the extracellular environment. The materials for the study were biopsies of gastric mucosa taken during a routine endoscopy. For genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) at position C421A, DNA was isolated from 201 samples, while for the mRNA expression level by real-time PCR, RNA was isolated from 60 patients. The control group of healthy individuals consisted of 97 blood donors. The dominant genotype in the group of peptic ulcer patients and healthy individuals was homozygous CC. No statistically significant differences between healthy individuals and the whole group of peptic ulcer patients and, likewise, between the subgroups of peptic ulcer patients (infected and uninfected with Helicobacter pylori) were found. ABCG2 expression relative to GAPDH expression was found in 38 of the 60 gastric mucosa samples. The expression level of the gene varies greatly among cases. The statistically significant differences between the intensity (p = 0.0375) of H. pylori infection and ABCG2 gene expression have been shown. It was observed that the more intense the infection, the higher the level of ABCG2 expression.

  6. Crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment of a monoclonal antibody specific for the multidrug-resistance-linked ABC transporter human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Esser, Lothar; Shukla, Suneet; Zhou, Fei; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Xia, Di

    2016-08-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a polyspecific ATP-dependent transporter linked to multidrug resistance in cancers that plays important roles in the pharmacokinetics of a large number of drugs. The drug-resistance phenotype of P-gp can be modulated by the monoclonal antibody UIC2, which specifically recognizes human P-gp in a conformation-dependent manner. Here, the purification, sequence determination and high-resolution structure of the Fab fragment of UIC2 (UIC2/Fab) are reported. Purified UIC2/Fab binds human P-gp with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Crystals of UIC2/Fab are triclinic (space group P1), with unit-cell parameters a = 40.67, b = 44.91, c = 58.09 Å, α = 97.62, β = 99.10, γ = 94.09°, and diffracted X-rays to 1.6 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement and refined to 1.65 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of UIC2/Fab, which exhibits a positively charged antigen-binding surface, suggesting that it might recognize an oppositely charged extracellular epitope of P-gp.

  7. Crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment of a monoclonal antibody specific for the multidrug-resistance-linked ABC transporter human P-glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, Lothar; Shukla, Suneet; Zhou, Fei; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Xia, Di

    2016-07-27

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a polyspecific ATP-dependent transporter linked to multidrug resistance in cancers that plays important roles in the pharmacokinetics of a large number of drugs. The drug-resistance phenotype of P-gp can be modulated by the monoclonal antibody UIC2, which specifically recognizes human P-gp in a conformation-dependent manner. Here, the purification, sequence determination and high-resolution structure of the Fab fragment of UIC2 (UIC2/Fab) are reported. Purified UIC2/Fab binds human P-gp with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Crystals of UIC2/Fab are triclinic (space groupP1), with unit-cell parametersa= 40.67,b= 44.91,c= 58.09 Å, α = 97.62, β = 99.10, γ = 94.09°, and diffracted X-rays to 1.6 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement and refined to 1.65 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of UIC2/Fab, which exhibits a positively charged antigen-binding surface, suggesting that it might recognize an oppositely charged extracellular epitope of P-gp.

  8. Hedgehog signaling regulates drug sensitivity by targeting ABC transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Bieber, Marcia M; Teng, Nelson N H

    2014-08-01

    A major challenge of successful chemotherapy in ovarian cancer is overcoming intrinsic or acquired multi-drug resistance caused by active drug efflux mediated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Regulation of these transporters in ovarian cancer is poorly understood. We have found that abnormal expression of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway transcription factor Gli1 is involved in the regulation of ABC transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 in ovarian cancer. Hh is a known regulator of cancer cell proliferation and differentiation in several other types of invasive and metastatic malignancies. Our work has demonstrated that Gli1 is abnormally activated in a portion of ovarian cancers. Inhibition of Gli1 expression decreases ABCB1 and ABCG2 gene expression levels and enhances the response of ovarian cancer cells to certain chemotherapeutic drugs. The underlying mechanism is a direct association of Gli1 with a specific consensus sequence located in the promoter region of ABCB1 and ABCG2 genes. This study provides new understanding of ABC gene regulation by Hh signaling pathway, which may lead to the identification of new markers to detect and to anticipate ovarian cancer chemotherapy drug sensitivity.

  9. ABCG2 expression, function, and promoter methylation in human multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Joel G.; Gump, Jana L.; Zhang, Chunchun; Cook, James M.; Marchion, Douglas; Hazlehurst, Lori; Munster, Pamela; Schell, Michael J.; Dalton, William S.; Sullivan, Daniel M.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the role of the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in drug resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). Human MM cell lines, and MM patient plasma cells isolated from bone marrow, were evaluated for ABCG2 mRNA expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and ABCG2 protein, by Western blot analysis, immunofluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. ABCG2 function was determined by measuring topotecan and doxorubicin efflux using flow cytometry, in the presence and absence of the specific ABCG2 inhibitor, tryprostatin A. The methylation of the ABCG2 promoter was determined using bisulfite sequencing. We found that ABCG2 expression in myeloma cell lines increased after exposure to topotecan and doxorubicin, and was greater in logphase cells when compared with quiescent cells. Myeloma patients treated with topotecan had an increase in ABCG2 mRNA and protein expression after treatment with topotecan, and at relapse. Expression of ABCG2 is regulated, at least in part, by promoter methylation both in cell lines and in patient plasma cells. Demethylation of the promoter increased ABCG2 mRNA and protein expression. These findings suggest that ABCG2 is expressed and functional in human myeloma cells, regulated by promoter methylation, affected by cell density, up-regulated in response to chemotherapy, and may contribute to intrinsic drug resistance. PMID:16917002

  10. Functional characterization of the ABCG2 5' non-coding exon variants: Stem cell specificity, translation efficiency and the influence of drug selection.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Sára; Jordanidisz, Theodora; Schamberger, Anita; Várady, György; Erdei, Zsuzsa; Apáti, Ágota; Sarkadi, Balázs; Orbán, Tamás I

    2016-07-01

    ABCG2 is a multidrug transporter with wide substrate specificity, and is believed to protect several cell types from various xenobiotics and endobiotics. This "guardian" function is important in numerous cell types and tissue barriers but becomes disadvantageous by being responsible for the multidrug resistance phenotype in certain tumor cells. ABCG2 regulation at the protein level has already been extensively studied, however, regulation at the mRNA level, especially the functional role of the various 5' untranslated exon variants (5' UTRs) has been elusive. In the present work, we describe a comprehensive characterization of four ABCG2 mRNA variants with different exon 1 sequences, investigate drug inducibility, stem cell specificity, mRNA stability, and translation efficiency. Although certain variants (E1B and E1C) are considered as "constitutive" mRNA isoforms, we show that chemotoxic drugs significantly alter the expression pattern of distinct ABCG2 mRNA isoforms. When examining human embryonic stem cell lines, we provide evidence that variant E1A has an expression pattern coupled to undifferentiated stem cell stage, as its transcript level is regulated parallel to mRNAs of Oct4 and Nanog pluripotency marker genes. When characterizing the four exon 1 variants we found no significant differences in terms of mRNA stabilities and half-lives of the isoforms. In contrast, variant E1U showed markedly lower translation efficiency both at the total protein level or regarding the functional presence in the plasma membrane. Taken together, these results indicate that the different 5' UTR variants play an important role in cell type specific regulation and fine tuning of ABCG2 expression.

  11. ABCG2 deficiency in skin impairs re-epithelialization in cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiao-Min; Huang, Wen-Yen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Huang, Wei-Chao; Shen, Chia-Rui; Mao, Wan-Yu; Shen, Chia-Ning

    2016-05-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 is expressed in the interfollicular epidermis and mediates the side-population phenotype in skin cells. However, the role of ABCG2 in skin is unclear. Increased expression levels of ABCG2 were found at the basal layer of transitional epidermis adjacent to cutaneous wounds in human patients, indicating that ABCG2 may be involved in regulating the wound healing process. To investigate the role of ABCG2 in cutaneous wound healing, full-thickness skin wounds were created in ABCG2 knockout (ABCG2-KO) and wild-type mice. The healing process was analysed and revealed that ABCG2 deficiency in skin results in delays in wound closure and impairments in re-epithelialization, as evidenced by reductions in both suprabasal differentiation and in p63-expressing keratinocytes migrating from transitional epidermis to epithelial tongues. The reduction in p63-expressing cells may be due to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species in ABCG2-KO epidermis, which can cause DNA damage and lead to proliferation arrest. To determine whether ABCG2 deficiency affects the potency of epidermal stem/progenitor cells (EPCs), transplantation studies were carried out, which demonstrated that ABCG2-KO EPCs display higher levels of γH2AX and lose the capacity to differentiate into suprabasal keratinocytes. A competitive repopulation assay confirmed that ABCG2 expression is critical for the proper expansion and differentiation of EPCs in cutaneous wounds. As EPCs are known to contribute to the healing of larger wounds, the current findings imply a functional role for ABCG2 in the expansion and differentiation of p63-expressing EPCs. Thus, ABCG2 deficiency in skin impairs re-epithelialization in cutaneous wound healing.

  12. Downregulation of mdr1 and abcg2 genes is a mechanism of inhibition of efflux pumps mediated by polymeric amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, María L; Castillo, Amalia I; Sosnik, Alejandro; Mathet, Verónica L

    2012-11-01

    The ability of cells to acquire resistance to multiple pharmaceuticals, namely multidrug resistance (MDR), is often mediated by the over-expression of efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily; for example P-glycoprotein (P-gp or MDR1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP or ABCG2), and multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP1. ABCs pump drug molecules out of cells against a concentration gradient, reducing their intracellular concentration. The ability of polymeric amphiphiles to inhibit ABCs as well as the cellular pathways involved in the inhibition has been extensively investigated. This work investigated for the first time the effect of branched poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) block copolymers (poloxamines) on the levels of mRNA encoding for MDR1, BCRP and MRP1, in a human hepatoma cell line (Huh7). Copolymers with a broad range of molecular weights and hydrophilic-lipophilic balances were assayed. Results confirmed the down-regulation of mdr1 and abcg2 genes. Conversely, the mrp1 gene was not affected. These findings further support the versatility of these temperature- and pH-responsive copolymers to overcome drug resistance in cancer and infectious diseases.

  13. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors enhance ciprofloxacin-induced phototoxicity by inhibiting ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Katrina L; Dassanayake, Sandamali; Burke, Neal S

    2014-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) class of anticancer agents inhibits ABCG2-mediated drug efflux. ABCG2 is an important component of the blood-retinal barrier, where it limits retinal exposure to phototoxic compounds such as fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Patients treated with TKIs would be expected to be at greater risk for retinal phototoxicity. Using an in vitro system, our results indicate that the TKIs gefitinib and imatinib abrogate the ability of ABCG2 to protect cells against ciprofloxacin-induced phototoxicity. We conclude that the concurrent administration of ABCG2 inhibitors with photoreactive fluoroquinolone antibiotics may result in retinal damage.

  14. Abcg2-Labeled Cells Contribute to Different Cell Populations in the Embryonic and Adult Heart.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Michelle J; Maher, Travis J; Li, Qinglu; Garry, Mary G; Sorrentino, Brian P; Martin, Cindy M

    2016-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily G member 2 (Abcg2)-expressing cardiac-side population cells have been identified in the developing and adult heart, although the role they play in mammalian heart growth and regeneration remains unclear. In this study, we use genetic lineage tracing to follow the cell fate of Abcg2-expressing cells in the embryonic and adult heart. During cardiac embryogenesis, the Abcg2 lineage gives rise to multiple cardiovascular cell types, including cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells. This capacity for Abcg2-expressing cells to contribute to cardiomyocytes decreases rapidly during the postnatal period. We further tested the role of the Abcg2 lineage following myocardial injury. One month following ischemia reperfusion injury, Abcg2-expressing cells contributed significantly to the endothelial cell lineage, however, there was no contribution to regenerated cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, consistent with previous results showing that Abcg2 plays an important cytoprotective role during oxidative stress, we show an increase in Abcg2 labeling of the vasculature, a decrease in the scar area, and a moderate improvement in cardiac function following myocardial injury. We have uncovered a difference in the capacity of Abcg2-expressing cells to generate the cardiovascular lineages during embryogenesis, postnatal growth, and cardiac regeneration.

  15. Gene and functional up-regulation of the BCRP/ABCG2 transporter in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is one member of ABC transporters proteins super family responsible of drug resistance. Since data on ABCG2 expression in liver malignances are scanty, here we report the expression of ABCG2 in adult human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in both in vivo and in vitro models with different degree of malignancy. Methods In cell lines derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma, ABCG2 gene expression was assessed by reverse transcription quantitative real time PCR and function by Hoechst 33342 efflux assay; protein content was assessed by SDS-PAGE Western blot. Results ABCG2 expression was found to be highest in the most undifferentiated cell lines, and this was related with a higher functional activity. ABCG2 expression was sensitive to antineoplastic drugs since exposure to 5 μM doxorubicin for 24 hours resulted in significant up-regulations of ABCG2 in all cell lines, particularly in those lines with low basal ABCG2 expression (p<0.01). The gene expression was also investigated in 51 adult liver tissues with HCC and related cirrhosis; normal liver tissue was used as control. ABCG2 gene expression was higher in HCC than both cirrhotic paired tissue and normal tissue. This up-regulation was greater (p<0.05) in pathological poorly differentiated grade G3/G4 than in well-differentiated G1/G2 HCC. Conclusions Our results suggest a correlation of ABCG2 gene expression and differentiation stage both in human and HCC derived cell lines. The rapid up-regulation of ABCG2 to exposure to doxorubicin emphasizes the importance of this transporter in accounting for drug resistance in liver tumors. PMID:23153066

  16. Hyperuricemia in acute gastroenteritis is caused by decreased urate excretion via ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Hirotaka; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Ooyama, Keiko; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Tappei; Nakashima, Akio; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Higashino, Toshihide; Wakai, Kenji; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Hokari, Ryota; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Inui, Ayano; Fujimori, Shin; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the physiological and pathophysiological roles of intestinal urate excretion via ABCG2 in humans, we genotyped ABCG2 dysfunctional common variants, Q126X (rs72552713) and Q141K (rs2231142), in end-stage renal disease (hemodialysis) and acute gastroenteritis patients, respectively. ABCG2 dysfunction markedly increased serum uric acid (SUA) levels in 106 hemodialysis patients (P = 1.1 × 10−4), which demonstrated the physiological role of ABCG2 for intestinal urate excretion because their urate excretion almost depends on intestinal excretion via ABCG2. Also, ABCG2 dysfunction significantly elevated SUA in 67 acute gastroenteritis patients (P = 6.3 × 10−3) regardless of the degree of dehydration, which demonstrated the pathophysiological role of ABCG2 in acute gastroenteritis. These findings for the first time show ABCG2-mediated intestinal urate excretion in humans, and indicates the physiological and pathophysiological importance of intestinal epithelium as an excretion pathway besides an absorption pathway. Furthermore, increased SUA could be a useful marker not only for dehydration but also epithelial impairment of intestine. PMID:27571712

  17. Abcg2 labels multiple cell types in skeletal muscle and participates in muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Michelle J.; Zhou, Sheng; Tanaka, Kathleen Kelly; Pisconti, Addolorata; Farina, Nicholas H.; Sorrentino, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contains progenitor cells (satellite cells) that maintain and repair muscle. It also contains muscle side population (SP) cells, which express Abcg2 and may participate in muscle regeneration or may represent a source of satellite cell replenishment. In Abcg2-null mice, the SP fraction is lost in skeletal muscle, although the significance of this loss was previously unknown. We show that cells expressing Abcg2 increased upon injury and that muscle regeneration was impaired in Abcg2-null mice, resulting in fewer centrally nucleated myofibers, reduced myofiber size, and fewer satellite cells. Additionally, using genetic lineage tracing, we demonstrate that the progeny of Abcg2-expressing cells contributed to multiple cell types within the muscle interstitium, primarily endothelial cells. After injury, Abcg2 progeny made a minor contribution to regenerated myofibers. Furthermore, Abcg2-labeled cells increased significantly upon injury and appeared to traffic to muscle from peripheral blood. Together, these data suggest an important role for Abcg2 in positively regulating skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:21949413

  18. Role of ABCB1, ABCG2, ABCC2 and ABCC5 transporters in placental passage of zidovudine.

    PubMed

    Neumanova, Zuzana; Cerveny, Lukas; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Zidovudine (AZT) is one of the most frequently used antiretroviral drugs in prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV. However, safety concerns on AZT use in pregnancy still persist as severe side effects are associated with AZT exposure in children. In our study we aimed to contribute to current knowledge on AZT transplacental transport and to evaluate potential involvement of the main human drug efflux ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, p-glycoprotein (ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins 2 and 5 (ABCC2 and ABCC5) in the disposition of AZT between mother and fetus. In order to elucidate this issue we investigated the effect of selected ABC transporters on AZT transepithelial transport across MDCKII cell monolayers. In addition we used the in situ method of dually perfused rat term placenta to further study the role of ABC transporters in AZT transplacental transport. In vitro studies revealed significant effect of ABCB1 and ABCG2 on AZT transport which was subsequently confirmed also on organ level. Lamivudine, an antiretroviral agent commonly co-administered with AZT, did not affect ABC transporter-mediated AZT transfer.

  19. Pharmacogenomics of the human ABC transporter ABCG2: from functional evaluation to drug molecular design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Tamura, Ai; Saito, Hikaru; Wakabayashi, Kanako; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2005-10-01

    In the post-genome-sequencing era, emerging genomic technologies are shifting the paradigm for drug discovery and development. Nevertheless, drug discovery and development still remain high-risk and high-stakes ventures with long and costly timelines. Indeed, the attrition of drug candidates in preclinical and development stages is a major problem in drug design. For at least 30% of the candidates, this attrition is due to poor pharmacokinetics and toxicity. Thus, pharmaceutical companies have begun to seriously re-evaluate their current strategies of drug discovery and development. In that light, we propose that a transport mechanism-based design might help to create new, pharmacokinetically advantageous drugs, and as such should be considered an important component of drug design strategy. Performing enzyme- and/or cell-based drug transporter, interaction tests may greatly facilitate drug development and allow the prediction of drug-drug interactions. We recently developed methods for high-speed functional screening and quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis to study the substrate specificity of ABC transporters and to evaluate the effect of genetic polymorphisms on their function. These methods would provide a practical tool to screen synthetic and natural compounds, and these data can be applied to the molecular design of new drugs. In this review article, we present an overview on the genetic polymorphisms of human ABC transporter ABCG2 and new camptothecin analogues that can circumvent AGCG2-associated multidrug resistance of cancer.

  20. Role of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in Cancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Karthika; Xie, Yi; Baer, Maria R.; Ross, Douglas D.

    2012-01-01

    Since cloning of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family member breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) and its characterization as a multidrug resistance efflux transporter in 1998, BCRP has been the subject of more than two thousand scholarly articles. In normal tissues, BCRP functions as a defense mechanism against toxins and xenobiotics, with expression in the gut, bile canaliculi, placenta, blood-testis and blood-brain barriers facilitating excretion and limiting absorption of potentially toxic substrate molecules, including many cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. BCRP also plays a key role in heme and folate homeostasis, which may help normal cells survive under conditions of hypoxia. BCRP expression appears to be a characteristic of certain normal tissue stem cells termed “side population cells,” which are identified on flow cytometric analysis by their ability to exclude Hoechst 33342, a BCRP substrate fluorescent dye. Hence, BCRP expression may contribute to the natural resistance and longevity of these normal stem cells. Malignant tissues can exploit the properties of BCRP to survive hypoxia and to evade exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs. Evidence is mounting that many cancers display subpopulations of stem cells that are responsible for tumor self-renewal. Such stem cells frequently manifest the “side population” phenotype characterized by expression of BCRP and other ABC transporters. Along with other factors, these transporters may contribute to the inherent resistance of these neoplasms and their failure to be cured. PMID:22248732

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of flavones and benzoflavones as inhibitors of BCRP/ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Juvale, Kapil; Stefan, Katja; Wiese, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) often leads to a failure of cancer chemotherapy. Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2), a member of the superfamily of ATP binding cassette proteins has been found to confer MDR in cancer cells by transporting molecules with amphiphilic character out of the cells using energy from ATP hydrolysis. Inhibiting BCRP can be a solution to overcome MDR. We synthesized a series of flavones, 7,8-benzoflavones and 5,6-benzoflavones with varying substituents at positions 3, 3' and 4' of the (benzo)flavone structure. All synthesized compounds were tested for BCRP inhibition in Hoechst 33342 and pheophorbide A accumulation assays using MDCK cells expressing BCRP. All the compounds were further screened for their P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) inhibitory activity by calcein AM accumulation assay to check the selectivity towards BCRP. In addition most active compounds were investigated for their cytotoxicity. It was observed that in most cases 7,8-benzoflavones are more potent in comparison to the 5,6-benzoflavones. In general it was found that presence of a 3-OCH3 substituent leads to increase in activity in comparison to presence of OH or no substitution at position 3. Also, it was found that presence of 3',4'-OCH3 on phenyl ring lead to increase in activity as compared to other substituents. Compound 24, a 7,8-benzoflavone derivative was found to be most potent being 50 times selective for BCRP and showing very low cytotoxicity at higher concentrations.

  2. Expression of Potential Cancer Stem Cell Marker ABCG2 is Associated with Malignant Behaviors of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Weihuan; Jiao, Hongbo; Jiang, Chunping

    2013-01-01

    Background. Despite improvement in treatment, the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains disastrous. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) may be responsible for cancer malignant behaviors. ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G, member 2 (ABCG2) is widely expressed in both normal and cancer stem cells and may play an important role in cancer malignant behaviors. Methods. The expression of ABCG2 in HCC tissues and SMMC-7721 cells was examined, and the relevance of ABCG2 expression with clinical characteristics was analyzed. ABCG2+ and ABCG2− cells were sorted, and the potential of tumorigenicity was determined. Expression level of ABCG2 was manipulated by RNA interference and overexpression. Malignant behaviors including proliferation, drug resistance, migration, and invasion were studied in vitro. Results. Expression of ABCG2 was found in a minor group of cells in HCC tissues and cell lines. ABCG2 expression showed tendencies of association with unfavorable prognosis factors. ABCG2 positive cells showed a superior tumorigenicity. Upregulation of ABCG2 enhanced the capacity of proliferation, doxorubicin resistance, migration, and invasion potential, while downregulation of ABCG2 significantly decreased these malignant behaviors. Conclusion. Our results indicate that ABCG2 is a potential CSC marker for HCC. Its expression level has a close relationship with tumorigenicity, proliferation, drug resistance, and metastasis ability. PMID:24194752

  3. Association of the ABCG2 C421A polymorphism with prostate cancer risk and survival

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Erin R.; Ahlers, Christoph M.; Shukla, Suneet; Sissung, Tristan M.; Ockers, Sandra B.; Price, Douglas K.; Hamada, Akinobu; Robey, Robert W.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Dahut, William L.; Figg, William D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine if the C421A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 increases prostate cancer risk or affects survival. Patients, subjects and methods Numerous studies have suggested that dietary, hormonal and environmental factors all play a role in the initiation in prostate cancer; among these, the carcinogenic heterocyclic amine 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), a known substrate of the ABCG2. A SNP of ABCG2, C421A, resulting in a glutamine to lysine change at amino acid 141, has been shown to result in decreased function of the protein. Due to the expression of ABCG2 in the prostate, together with the purported role of dietary carcinogens and steroids in the development and progression of prostate cancer, 311 individuals were genotyped for the ABCG2 C421A SNP, 170 patients with androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC) and 141 ‘healthy’ controls. We also evaluated the effect of this SNP on the intracellular accumulation of PhIP and testosterone in vitro. Results There were no significant differences in the prevalence of prostate cancer based on ABCG2 genetic variation in this population. However, survival was significantly longer for individuals with wild-type ABCG2, as compared with those hetero- or homozygous for the C421A SNP (7.4 years vs 5.3 years, P = 0.044). Conclusion Intracellular accumulation of PhIP was 80% higher in HEK293 cells transfected with Q141K ABCG2 than in wild-type cells, confirming that this SNP decreases transport of PhIP. In contrast, testosterone was not transported by either wild-type or variant transfected cells, nor did it act as in inhibitor of ABCG2 in subsequent transport assays. PMID:18710444

  4. ABCG2/BCRP gene expression is related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition inducer genes in a papillary thyroid carcinoma cell line (TPC-1).

    PubMed

    Mato, E; González, C; Moral, A; Pérez, J I; Bell, O; Lerma, E; de Leiva, A

    2014-06-01

    Tumor malignancy is associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process and resistance to chemotherapy. However, little is known about the relationship between the EMT and the multidrug-resistance gene in thyroid tumor progression. We investigated whether the expression of the ABCG2/BCRP gene is associated with ZEB1 and other EMT inducer genes involved in tumor dedifferentiation. We established a subpopulation of cells that express the ABCG2/BCRP gene derived from the thyroid papillary carcinoma cell line (TPC-1), the so-called TPC-1 MITO-resistant subline. The most relevant findings in these TPC-1 selected cells were a statistically significant upregulation of ZEB1 and TWIST1 (35- and 15-fold change respectively), no changes in the relative expression of vimentin and SNAIL1, and no expression of E-cadherin. The TPC-1 MITO-resistant subline displayed a faster migration and greater invasive ability than parental cells in correlation with a significant upregulation of the survivin (BIRC5) gene (twofold change, P<0.05). The knockdown of ZEB1 promoted nuclear re-expression of E-cadherin, reduced expression of vimentin, N-cadherin, and BIRC5 genes, and reduced cell migration (P<0.05). Analysis of human thyroid carcinoma showed a slight overexpression of the ABCG2/BCRP at stages I and II (P<0.01), and a higher overexpression at stages III and IV (P<0.01). SNAIL1, TWIST1, and ZEB1 genes showed higher expression at stages III and IV than at stages I and II. E- and N-cadherin genes were upregulated at stages I and II of the disease (ninefold and tenfold change, respectively, P<0.01) but downregulated at stages III and IV (fourfold lower, P<0.01). These results could be a promising starting point for further study of the role of the ABCG2/BCRP gene in the progression of thyroid tumor.

  5. Fetoprotective activity of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2): expression and function throughout pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hahnova-Cygalova, Lenka; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek

    2011-02-01

    The medical treatment of pregnant women, as well as their fetuses, has become a common clinical practice in developed countries. Therefore, detailed knowledge of maternofetal pharmacokinetics, including the role of drug-efflux transporters in the fetoplacental unit, is crucial to optimize drug choice and dosage schemes and to avoid or exploit possible drug-drug interactions on placental transporters in order to assure appropriate drug levels in the mother and/or fetus. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) is the most recent member of ATP-binding cassette drug-efflux transporters that has been associated with resistance in cancer chemotherapy. Importantly, ABCG2 has also been localized in various normal tissues, affecting the pharmacokinetics of several xenobiotics as well as a number of physiological substances. Extensive expression of ABCG2 in tissue barriers, such as the blood-brain barrier, intestine, testis, or placenta, suggests that ABCG2 plays an important role in the protection of sensitive tissues against toxins. In the placenta, ABCG2 has been experimentally evidenced to actively pump its substrates in the fetal-to-maternal direction and to play an important role in transplacental pharmacokinetics, fetal protection, and detoxication. Further, ABCG2 expression in embryonic and fetal membranes over the course of pregnancy helps ensure proper function of the fetoplacental unit. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding expression and function of ABCG2 in the fetoplacental unit during the development of the fetus and overview the aspects of transplacental pharmacokinetics, ABCG2 regulation, and clinical significance of the transporter for pharmacotherapy in pregnancy.

  6. Epigenetic modulation of the drug resistance genes MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance of the highly aggressive glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) to drug therapy is a major clinical problem resulting in a poor patient’s prognosis. Beside promoter methylation of the O 6 -methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) gene the efflux transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 have been suggested as pivotal factors contributing to drug resistance, but the methylation of ABCB1 and ABCG2 has not been assessed before in GBM. Methods Therefore, we evaluated the proportion and prognostic significance of promoter methylation of MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 in 64 GBM patient samples using pyrosequencing technology. Further, the single nucleotide polymorphisms MGMT C-56 T (rs16906252), ABCB1 C3435T (rs1045642) and ABCG2 C421A (rs2231142) were determined using the restriction fragment length polymorphism method (RFLP). To study a correlation between promoter methylation and gene expression, we analyzed MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 expression in 20 glioblastoma and 7 non-neoplastic brain samples. Results Despite a significantly increased MGMT and ABCB1 promoter methylation in GBM tissue, multivariate regression analysis revealed no significant association between overall survival of glioblastoma patients and MGMT or ABCB1 promoter methylation. However, a significant negative correlation between promoter methylation and expression could be identified for MGMT but not for ABCB1 and ABCG2. Furthermore, MGMT promoter methylation was significantly associated with the genotypes of the MGMT C-56 T polymorphism showing a higher methylation level in the T allele bearing GBM. Conclusions In summary, the data of this study confirm the previous published relation of MGMT promoter methylation and gene expression, but argue for no pivotal role of MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 promoter methylation in GBM patients’ survival. PMID:24380367

  7. Identification of Febuxostat as a New Strong ABCG2 Inhibitor: Potential Applications and Risks in Clinical Situations

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Hiroshi; Takada, Tappei; Toyoda, Yu; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2) is a plasma membrane protein that regulates the pharmacokinetics of a variety of drugs and serum uric acid (SUA) levels in humans. Despite the pharmacological and physiological importance of this transporter, there is no clinically available drug that modulates ABCG2 function. Therefore, to identify such drugs, we investigated the effect of drugs that affect SUA levels on ABCG2 function. This strategy was based on the hypothesis that the changes of SUA levels might caused by interaction with ABCG2 since it is a physiologically important urate transporter. The results of the in vitro screening showed that 10 of 25 drugs investigated strongly inhibited the urate transport activity of ABCG2. Moreover, febuxostat was revealed to be the most promising candidate of all the potential ABCG2 inhibitors based on its potent inhibition at clinical concentrations; the half-maximal inhibitory concentration of febuxostat was lower than its maximum plasma unbound concentrations reported. Indeed, our in vivo study demonstrated that orally administered febuxostat inhibited the intestinal Abcg2 and, thereby, increased the intestinal absorption of an ABCG2 substrate sulfasalazine in wild-type mice, but not in Abcg2 knockout mice. These results suggest that febuxostat might inhibit human ABCG2 at a clinical dose. Furthermore, the results of this study lead to a proposed new application of febuxostat for enhancing the bioavailability of ABCG2 substrate drugs, named febuxostat-boosted therapy, and also imply the potential risk of adverse effects by drug-drug interactions that could occur between febuxostat and ABCG2 substrate drugs. PMID:28082903

  8. Recombinant synthesis of human ABCG2 expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: an experimental methodological study.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Anna; Emmert, Dana; Wieschrath, Svenja; Hrycyna, Christine A; Wiese, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Human ABCG2 is an efflux protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. It is expressed in the plasma membrane of different cell types performing various physiological functions. It is the most recently discovered MDR transporter and its structure and function are still not well understood. Thus, expression and functional reconstitution of the protein in different variants and from different sources are important steps for its further investigation. In this work we describe a recombinant synthesis of human ABCG2 R482G from S. cerevisiae. We expressed the human ABCG2 R482G variant in S. cerevisiae and purified the protein from total yeast membranes. Using a panel of sixteen detergents, we analyzed the efficiency of extraction of ABCG2 from membranes by SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analysis. Based on these results, three detergents were selected for further purification studies and two of them, n-octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside and n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside, yielded functional protein after reconstitution into liposomes. We show here the first example of purified and reconstituted ABCG2 expressed in S. cerevisiae retaining drug-stimulated ATPase activity.

  9. ABCG2-mediated dyecycle violet efflux defined side population in benign and malignant prostate

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Grinu; Timm, Earl A.; Sotomayor, Paula; Godoy, Alejandro; Montecinos, Viviana P.; Smith, Gary J.; Huss, Wendy J.

    2010-01-01

    The efflux of Hoechst 33342 by ATP-binding cassette protein G2 (ABCG2) membrane pump allows reproducible identification of a subpopulation of cells by flow cytometric analysis termed the “side population” (SP). The SP identified by constitutive Hoechst efflux contains the stem/progenitor cell population from bone marrow and many solid organs, including prostate. DyeCycle Violet (DCV) is a cell membrane permeable, fluorescent vital dye that intercalates into DNA and is a substrate for ABCG2-mediated efflux. Therefore, DCV was evaluated in this study as a tool for identification of the SP from prostate cancer cell lines and from freshly harvested human prostate tissue. SPs that demonstrated ABCG2-mediated efflux of DCV were identified in the human prostate cancer cell lines CWR-R1, DU-145 and RWPE-1, but not in the BPH-1, LAPC-4 or PC-3 cell lines. Additionally, a SP was identified in enzymatically disaggregated prostate tumors from Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP), human benign prostate tissue and human prostate cancer tissue. The causal role of ABCG2-mediated efflux of DCV in the identification of the SP was confirmed by loss of the SP by incubation with the specific inhibitor of ABCG2, Fumitremorgin C. Expression of ABCG2 in the SP cells was confirmed by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis. Consequently, DCV represents an important new tool for isolation of viable candidate stem cells/cancer stem cells as a SP from cultured prostate cell lines, and prostate tissue specimens, without the requirement for instrumentation with ultra-violet excitation capability and minimizing the risk of damage to DNA in the sorted population. PMID:19270533

  10. Lack of ABCG2 Leads to Biventricular Dysfunction and Remodeling in Response to Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Bence M.; Nagaraj, Chandran; Egemnazarov, Bakytbek; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna; Stauber, Rudolf E.; Avian, Alexander; Olschewski, Horst; Olschewski, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The ATP-binding cassette (ABC)G2 transporter protects the heart from pressure overload-induced ventricular dysfunction but also protects cancer cells from chemotherapeutic agents. It is upregulated in the myocardium of heart failure patients and clears hypoxia-induced intracellular metabolites. This study employs ABCG2 knockout (KO) mice to elucidate the relevance of ABCG2 for cardiac and pulmonary vascular structure and function in chronic hypoxia, and uses human primary cardiac fibroblasts to investigate the potential role of ABCG2 in cardiac fibrosis. Methods and results: ABCG2 KO and control mice (n = 10) were subjected to 4 weeks normoxia or hypoxia. This allowed for investigation of the interaction between genotype and hypoxia (GxH). In hypoxia, KO mice showed pronounced right (RV) and left (LV) ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Compared to normoxia, end-diastolic pressure (EDP) was increased in control vs. KO mice by +1.1 ± 0.3 mmHg vs. +4.8 ± 0.3 mmHg, p for GxH < 0.001 (RV) and +3.9 ± 0.5 mmHg vs. +11.5 ± 1.6 mmHg, p for GxH = 0.110 (LV). The same applied for myocardial fibrosis with +0.3 ± 0.1% vs. 1.3 ± 0.2%, p for GxH = 0.036 (RV) and +0.06 ± 0.03% vs. +0.36 ± 0.08%, p for GxH = 0.002 (LV), whereas systolic function and capillary density was unaffected. ABCG2 deficiency did not influence hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension or vascular remodeling. In line with these observations, human cardiac fibroblasts showed increased collagen production upon ABCG2 silencing in hypoxia (p for GxH = 0.04). Conclusion: Here we provide evidence for the first time that ABCG2 membrane transporter can play a crucial role in ventricular dysfunction and fibrosis in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. PMID:28270772

  11. ROLE OF ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUB-FAMILY MEMBER 2 (ABCG2) IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    ATP binding cassette sub-family member 2 (ABCG2), is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily and a principal xenobiotic transporter. ABCG2 is also highly expressed in certain stem cell populations where it is thought to be related to stem cell plasticity, although the role o...

  12. High imatinib dose overcomes insufficient response associated with ABCG2 haplotype in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Delord, Marc; Rousselot, Philippe; Cayuela, Jean Michel; Sigaux, François; Guilhot, Joëlle; Preudhomme, Claude; Guilhot, François; Loiseau, Pascale; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Geromin, Daniela; Génin, Emmanuelle; Calvo, Fabien; Bruzzoni-Giovanelli, Heriberto

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacogenetic studies in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) typically use a candidate gene approach. In an alternative strategy, we analyzed the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in drug transporter genes on the molecular response to imatinib, using a DNA chip containing 857 SNPs covering 94 drug transporter genes. Two cohorts of CML patients treated with imatinib were evaluated: an exploratory cohort including 105 patients treated at 400 mg/d and a validation cohort including patients sampled from the 400 mg/d and 600 mg/d arms of the prospective SPIRIT trial (n=239). Twelve SNPs discriminating patients according to cumulative incidence of major molecular response (CI-MMR) were identified within the exploratory cohort. Three of them, all located within the ABCG2 gene, were validated in patients included in the 400 mg/d arm of the SPIRIT trial. We identified an ABCG2 haplotype (define as G-G, rs12505410 and rs2725252) as associated with significantly higher CI-MMR in patients treated at 400 mg/d. Interestingly, we found that patients carrying this ABCG2 “favorable” haplotype in the 400 mg arm reached similar CI-MMR rates that patients randomized in the imatinib 600 mg/d arm. Our results suggest that response to imatinib may be influenced by constitutive haplotypes in drug transporter genes. Lower response rates associated with “non-favorable” ABCG2 haplotypes may be overcome by increasing the imatinib daily dose up to 600 mg/d. PMID:24123600

  13. SIRT1 prevents hyperuricemia via the PGC-1α/PPARγ-ABCG2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Zhu, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Lei; Xue, Yu; Yang, Xue; Zou, He-Jian

    2016-08-01

    Silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1) plays several key roles in the regulation of lipid and glucose homoeostasis. In this study, we investigated the potential role of SIRT1 in hyperuricemia and explored possible mechanisms. Significant hyperuricemia was detected in C57BL/6 mice treated with oxonate and yeast polysaccharide. Resveratrol (RSV), a specific SIRT1 activator, was administered to the mice. SIRT1 suppressed the increased serum uric acid level but up-regulated the expression of urate transporter ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) in the ileum of hyperuricemic mice. In a human colon carcinoma cell line, SIRT1 promoted ABCG2 production through the deacetylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α), which then activated the effectors of PPARγ. Interestingly, the SIRT1-induced up-regulation of ABCG2 was significantly inhibited when PGC-1α or PPARγ was blocked by siRNA transfection. Our data demonstrated that SIRT1 and its activator, RSV, have clear anti-hyperuricemia functions in this mouse model. One possible mechanism is the activation of ABCG2 in the ileum through the PGC-1α/PPARγ pathway.

  14. Modulating Drug Resistance by Targeting BCRP/ABCG2 Using Retrovirus-Mediated RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jianhui; Liu, Wenlan; Deng, Tingting; Li, Zigang; Jin, Yi; Hu, Zhangli

    2014-01-01

    Background The BCRP/ABCG2 transporter, which mediates drug resistance in many types of cells, depends on energy provided by ATP hydrolysis. Here, a retrovirus encoding a shRNA targeting the ATP-binding domain of this protein was used to screen for highly efficient agents that could reverse drug resistance and improve cell sensitivity to drugs, thus laying the foundation for further studies and applications. Methodology/Principal Findings To target the ATP-binding domain of BCRP/ABCG2, pLenti6/BCRPsi shRNA recombinant retroviruses, with 20 bp target sequences starting from the 270th, 745th and 939th bps of the 6th exon, were constructed and packaged. The pLenti6/BCRPsi retroviruses (V-BCRPi) that conferred significant knockdown effects were screened using a drug-sensitivity experiment and flow cytometry. The human choriocarcinoma cell line JAR, which highly expresses endogenous BCRP/ABCG2, was injected under the dorsal skin of a hairless mouse to initiate a JAR cytoma. After injecting V-BCRPi-infected JAR tumor cells into the dorsal skin of hairless mice, BCRP/ABCG2 expression in the tumor tissue was determined using immunohistochemistry, fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. After intraperitoneal injection of BCRP/ABCG2-tolerant 5-FU, the tumor volume, weight change, and apoptosis rate of the tumor tissue were determined using in situ hybridization. V-BCRPi increased the sensitivity of the tumor histiocytes to 5-FU and improved the cell apoptosis-promoting effects of 5-FU in the tumor. Conclusions/Significance The goal of the in vivo and in vitro studies was to screen for an RNA interference recombinant retrovirus capable of stably targeting the ATP-binding domain of BCRP/ABCG2 (V-BCRPi) to inhibit its function. A new method to improve the chemo-sensitivity of breast cancer and other tumor cells was discovered, and this method could be used for gene therapy and functional studies of malignant tumors. PMID:25076217

  15. Abcg2 expression marks tissue-specific stem cells in multiple organs in a mouse progeny tracking model.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Soghra; Zhou, Sheng; Sorrentino, Brian P

    2012-02-01

    The side population phenotype is associated with the Hoechst dye efflux activity of the Abcg2 transporter and identifies hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the bone marrow. This association suggests the direct use of Abcg2 expression to identify adult stem cells in various other organs. We have generated a lineage tracing mouse model based on an allele that coexpresses both Abcg2 and a CreERT2 expression cassette. By crossing these mice with lox-STOP-lox reporter lines (LacZ or YFP), cells that express Abcg2 and their progeny were identified following treatment with tamoxifen (Tam). In the liver and kidney, in which mature cells express Abcg2, reporter gene expression verified the expected physiologic expression pattern of the recombinant allele. Long-term marking of HSCs was seen in multiple peripheral blood lineages from adult mice, demonstrating that Abcg2(+) bone marrow HSCs contribute to steady-state hematopoiesis. Stem cell tracing patterns were seen in the small intestine and in seminiferous tubules in the testis 20 months after Tam treatment, proving that stem cells from these organs express Abcg2. Interstitial cells from skeletal and cardiac muscle were labeled, and some cells were costained with endothelial markers, raising the possibility that these cells may function in the repair response to muscle injury. Altogether, these studies prove that Abcg2 is a stem cell marker for blood, small intestine, testicular germ cells, and possibly for injured skeletal and/or cardiac muscle and provide a new model for studying stem cell activity that does not require transplant-based assays.

  16. Bioluminescent imaging of drug efflux at the blood–brain barrier mediated by the transporter ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Wei, Bih-Rong; Chang, Ki-Eun; Shukla, Suneet; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Simpson, R. Mark; Gottesman, Michael M.; Hall, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a group of transmembrane proteins that maintain chemical homeostasis through efflux of compounds out of organelles and cells. Among other functions, ABC transporters play a key role in protecting the brain parenchyma by efflux of xenobiotics from capillary endothelial cells at the blood–brain barrier (BBB). They also prevent the entry of therapeutic drugs at the BBB, thereby limiting their efficacy. One of the key transporters playing this role is ABCG2. Although other ABC transporters can be studied through various imaging modalities, no specific probe exists for imaging ABCG2 function in vivo. Here we show that d-luciferin, the endogenous substrate of firefly luciferase, is a specific substrate for ABCG2. We hypothesized that ABCG2 function at the BBB could be evaluated by using bioluminescence imaging in transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase in the brain. Bioluminescence signal in the brain of mice increased with coadministration of the ABCG2 inhibitors Ko143, gefitinib, and nilotinib, but not an ABCB1 inhibitor. This method for imaging ABCG2 function at the BBB will facilitate understanding of the function and pharmacokinetic inhibition of this transporter. PMID:24297888

  17. Novel understanding of ABC transporters ABCB1/MDR/P-glycoprotein, ABCC2/MRP2, and ABCG2/BCRP in colorectal pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Vibeke; Svenningsen, Katrine; Knudsen, Lina Almind; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Holmskov, Uffe; Stensballe, Allan; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in colonic pathophysiology as they had recently been related to colorectal cancer (CRC) development. METHODS: Literature search was conducted on PubMed using combinations of the following terms: ABC transporters, ATP binding cassette transporter proteins, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative, colitis, Crohns disease, colorectal cancer, colitis, intestinal inflammation, intestinal carcinogenesis, ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp/CD243/MDR1), ABCC2/multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) and ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), Abcb1/Mdr1a, abcc2/Mrp2, abcg2/Bcrp, knock-out mice, tight junction, membrane lipid function. RESULTS: Recently, human studies reported that changes in the levels of ABC transporters were early events in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence leading to CRC. A link between ABCB1, high fat diet and gut microbes in relation to colitis was suggested by the animal studies. The finding that colitis was preceded by altered gut bacterial composition suggests that deletion of Abcb1 leads to fundamental changes of host-microbiota interaction. Also, high fat diet increases the frequency and severity of colitis in specific pathogen-free Abcb1 KO mice. The Abcb1 KO mice might thus serve as a model in which diet/environmental factors and microbes may be controlled and investigated in relation to intestinal inflammation. Potential molecular mechanisms include defective transport of inflammatory mediators and/or phospholipid translocation from one side to the other of the cell membrane lipid bilayer by ABC transporters affecting inflammatory response and/or function of tight junctions, phagocytosis and vesicle trafficking. Also, diet and microbes give rise to molecules which are potential substrates for the ABC transporters and which may additionally affect ABC transporter function through nuclear receptors and transcriptional regulation. Another critical role of ABCB1 was suggested by the finding that

  18. Natural allelic variants of bovine ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2: increased activity of the Ser581 variant and development of tools for the discovery of new ABCG2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Merino, Gracia; Real, Rebeca; Baro, Marta F; Gonzalez-Lobato, Lucia; Prieto, Julio G; Alvarez, Ana I; Marques, Margarita M

    2009-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 [breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)] is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily that actively extrudes xenotoxins from cells and is a major determinant of the bioavailability of many compounds. ABCG2 expression is strongly induced during lactation in the mammary gland and is related to the active secretion of drugs into the milk. The presence of drug residues and environmental pollutants in milk is an outstanding problem for human milk consumption and milk industrial processes, involving important risks to public health and the dairy industry. In cows, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in this protein has been described previously (Tyr581) and is associated with higher fat and protein percentages and lower milk yield. However, whether this amino acid substitution affects ABCG2-mediated drug transport in cows, including milk secretion, required further exploration. We cloned the two variants of bovine ABCG2 and evaluated the effect of this SNP on mitoxantrone accumulation assays performed in ovine primary fibroblasts transiently expressing either of the variants. It is interesting to note that statistically significant differences in activity between both variants were observed, and the Ser581 variant was related with an increased efflux activity. In addition, we demonstrated that genistein is a very good inhibitor of bovine ABCG2 and identified new inhibitors of the transporter, such as the macrocyclic lactones, ivermectin, and selamectin. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of these compounds on human and murine ABCG2 homologs was confirmed using transduced Marbin-Dabin canine kidney II cells. These findings may have important implications regarding the presence of drug residues in milk and drug interactions affecting the pharmacological behavior of ABCG2 substrates.

  19. Mutational Analysis of Threonine 402 Adjacent to the GXXXG Dimerization Motif in TM1 of ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Polgar, Orsolya; Ierano, Caterina; Tamaki, Akina; Stanley, Bradford; Ward, Yvona; Xia, Di; Tarasova, Nadya; Robey, Robert W.; Bates, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    ABCG2 is an ATP-binding cassette half-transporter important in normal tissue protection, drug distribution and excretion. ABCG2 requires homodimerization for function, though the mechanism for dimerization has not been elucidated. We carried out mutational analysis of threonine 402, three residues away from the GXXXG motif in TM1, to study its potential role in ABCG2 dimerization (TXXXGXXXG). Single mutations to leucine (T402L) or arginine (T402R) did not have significant impact on the ABCG2 protein. On the other hand, combining the T402 mutations with the GXXXG glycine to leucine mutations (T402L/G406L/G410L and T402R/G406L/G410L) resulted in substantially reduced expression, altered glycosylation, degradation by a proteosome independent pathway and partial retention in the ER as suggested by immunostaining, Endo H sensitivity and MG132 and bafilomycin failed effect. The T402L/G406L/G410L mutant when incubated with the ABCG2-substrate MX showed a shift on immunoblot analysis to the band representing the fully matured glycoprotein. The T402R/G406L/G410L mutant carrying the more drastic substitution was found to primarily localize intracellularly. The same set of mutations also displayed impaired dimerization in the TOXCAT assay for TM1 compared to the wild-type. Homology modeling of ABCG2 places the TXXXGXXXG motif at the dimer interface. These studies are consistent with a role for the extended TXXXGXXXG motif in ABCG2 folding, processing, and/or dimerization. PMID:20088606

  20. Genetic variation in the ABCG2 gene is associated with gout risk in the Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Jiri, Mutu; Zhang, Le; Lan, Bing; He, Na; Feng, Tian; Liu, Kai; Jin, Tianbo; Kang, Longli

    2016-01-01

    Gout is a common type of arthritis that is characterized by hyperuricemia, tophi, and joint inflammation. Current evidence suggests that heredity contributes to the progression of gout. Previous studies have shown that regulation of the ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) pathways plays a role in gout occurrence. To investigate and validate potential genetic associations with the risk of gout, we conducted a case-control study. We conducted 143 cases and 310 controls and genotyped seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ABCG2 gene. ABCG2 SNP association analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0 Statistical Package, PLINK Software, HaploView software package, and SHEsis software platform. We identified that four susceptibility SNPs were potentially associated with occurrence of gout. Rs2622621 and rs3114018 in ABCG2 can actually increase the risk of gout in log-additive model (rs2622621, odds ratio (OR) = 1.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.39-2.61, p < 0.001; rs3114018, OR = 1.55, 95% CI 1.13-2.13, p = 0.006). We found that rs17731799G/T-G/G and rs3114020 T/C-T/T in ABCG2 can actually increase the risk of gout in dominant model (rs17731799, OR = 1.67, 95% CI 1.05-2.66, p = 0.028; rs3114020, OR = 1.58, 95% CI 1.00-2.51, p = 0.048). The ABCG2 haplotype "GGCTCTC" (OR = 0.46, 95% CI 0.28-0.75, p = 0.0019) decreased the gout risk. Our results, combined with those from previous studies, suggest that genetic variation in ABCG2 may influence gout susceptibility in the Han population.

  1. Common dysfunctional variants of ABCG2 have stronger impact on hyperuricemia progression than typical environmental risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Takada, Yuzo; Oikawa, Yuji; Takada, Tappei; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Shimizu, Seiko; Kawamura, Yusuke; Chiba, Toshinori; Abe, Junko; Wakai, Kenji; Kawai, Sayo; Okada, Rieko; Tamura, Takashi; Shichijo, Yuka; Akashi, Airi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Sakurai, Yutaka; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Gout/hyperuricemia is a common multifactorial disease having typical environmental risks. Recently, common dysfunctional variants of ABCG2, a urate exporter gene also known as BCRP, are revealed to be a major cause of gout/hyperuricemia. Here, we compared the influence of ABCG2 dysfunction on serum uric acid (SUA) levels with other typical risk factors in a cohort of 5,005 Japanese participants. ABCG2 dysfunction was observed in 53.3% of the population investigated, and its population-attributable risk percent (PAR%) for hyperuricemia was 29.2%, much higher than those of the other typical environmental risks, i.e. overweight/obesity (BMI ≥ 25.0; PAR% = 18.7%), heavy drinking (>196 g/week (male) or >98 g/week (female) of pure alcohol; PAR% = 15.4%), and aging (≥60 years old; PAR% = 5.74%). SUA significantly increased as the ABCG2 function decreased (P = 5.99 × 10−19). A regression analysis revealed that ABCG2 dysfunction had a stronger effect than other factors; a 25% decrease in ABCG2 function was equivalent to “an increase of BMI by 1.97-point” or “552.1 g/week alcohol intake as pure ethanol” in terms of ability to increase SUA. Therefore, ABCG2 dysfunction originating from common genetic variants has a much stronger impact on the progression of hyperuricemia than other familiar risks. Our study provides a better understanding of common genetic factors for common diseases. PMID:24909660

  2. Effect of bovine ABCG2 polymorphism Y581S SNP on secretion into milk of enterolactone, riboflavin and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Otero, J A; Miguel, V; González-Lobato, L; García-Villalba, R; Espín, J C; Prieto, J G; Merino, G; Álvarez, A I

    2016-02-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter G2/breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP) is an efflux protein involved in the bioavailability and milk secretion of endogenous and exogenous compounds, actively affecting milk composition. A limited number of physiological substrates have been identified. However, no studies have reported the specific effect of this polymorphism on the secretion into milk of compounds implicated in milk quality such as vitamins or endogenous compounds. The bovine ABCG2 Y581S polymorphism is described as a gain-of-function polymorphism that increases milk secretion and decreases plasma levels of its substrates. This work aims to study the impact of Y581S polymorphism on plasma disposition and milk secretion of compounds such as riboflavin (vitamin B2), enterolactone, a microbiota-derived metabolite from the dietary lignan secoisolariciresinol and uric acid. In vitro transport of these compounds was assessed in MDCK-II cells overexpressing the bovine ABCG2 (WT-bABCG2) and its Y581S variant (Y581S-bABCG2). Plasma and milk levels were obtained from Y/Y homozygous and Y/S heterozygous cows. The results show that riboflavin was more efficiently transported in vitro by the Y581S variant, although no differences were noted in vivo. Both uric acid and enterolactone were substrates in vitro of the bovine ABCG2 variants and were actively secreted into milk with a two-fold increase in the milk/plasma ratio for Y/S with respect to Y/Y cows. The in vitro ABCG2-mediated transport of the drug mitoxantrone, as a model substrate, was inhibited by enterolactone in both variants, suggesting the possible in vivo use of this enterolignan to reduce ABCG2-mediated milk drug transfer in cows. The Y581S variant was inhibited to a lesser extent probably due to its higher transport capacity. All these findings point to a significant role of the ABCG2 Y581S polymorphism in the milk disposition of enterolactone and the endogenous molecules riboflavin and uric acid

  3. Down-regulation of ABCG2, a urate exporter, by parathyroid hormone enhances urate accumulation in secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Ryusei; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ikegami, Komei; Enoki, Yuki; Imafuku, Tadashi; Sakaguchi, Yoshiaki; Murata, Michiya; Nishida, Kento; Miyamura, Shigeyuki; Ishima, Yu; Tanaka, Motoko; Matsushita, Kazutaka; Komaba, Hirotaka; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2017-03-01

    Hyperuricemia occurs with increasing frequency among patients with hyperparathyroidism. However, the molecular mechanism by which the serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) affects serum urate levels remains unknown. This was studied in uremic rats with secondary hyperparathyroidism where serum urate levels were found to be increased and urate excretion in the intestine and kidney decreased, presumably due to down-regulation of the expression of the urate exporter ABCG2 in intestinal and renal epithelial membranes. These effects were prevented by administration of the calcimimetic cinacalcet, a PTH suppressor, suggesting that PTH may down-regulate ABCG2 expression. This was directly tested in intestinal Caco-2 cells where the expression of ABCG2 on the plasma membrane was down-regulated by PTH (1-34) while its mRNA level remained unchanged. Interestingly, an inactive PTH derivative (13-34) had no effect, suggesting that a posttranscriptional regulatory system acts through the PTH receptor to regulate ABCG2 plasma membrane expression. As found in an animal study, additional clinical investigations showed that treatment with cinacalcet resulted in significant reductions in serum urate levels together with decreases in PTH levels in patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism undergoing dialysis. Thus, PTH down-regulates ABCG2 expression on the plasma membrane to suppress intestinal and renal urate excretion, and the effects of PTH can be prevented by cinacalcet treatment.

  4. Pilot PET Study to Assess the Functional Interplay Between ABCB1 and ABCG2 at the Human Blood–Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, M; Römermann, K; Karch, R; Wulkersdorfer, B; Stanek, J; Philippe, C; Maier‐Salamon, A; Haslacher, H; Jungbauer, C; Wadsak, W; Jäger, W; Löscher, W; Hacker, M; Zeitlinger, M

    2016-01-01

    ABCB1 and ABCG2 work together at the blood–brain barrier (BBB) to limit brain distribution of dual ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates. In this pilot study we used positron emission tomography (PET) to assess brain distribution of two model ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates ([11C]elacridar and [11C]tariquidar) in healthy subjects without (c.421CC) or with (c.421CA) the ABCG2 single‐nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.421C>A. Subjects underwent PET scans under conditions when ABCB1 and ABCG2 were functional and during ABCB1 inhibition with high‐dose tariquidar. In contrast to the ABCB1‐selective substrate (R)‐[11C]verapamil, [11C]elacridar and [11C]tariquidar showed only moderate increases in brain distribution during ABCB1 inhibition. This provides evidence for a functional interplay between ABCB1 and ABCG2 at the human BBB and suggests that both ABCB1 and ABCG2 need to be inhibited to achieve substantial increases in brain distribution of dual ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates. During ABCB1 inhibition c.421CA subjects had significantly higher increases in [11C]tariquidar brain distribution than c.421CC subjects, pointing to impaired cerebral ABCG2 function. PMID:26940368

  5. Inhibition of c-Kit, VEGFR-2 (KDR), and ABCG2 by analogues of OSI-930.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jay P; Kuang, Ye-Hong; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Korlipara, Vijaya L

    2011-11-01

    The quinoline domain of OSI-930, a dual inhibitor of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) c-Kit and KDR, was modified in an effort to further understand the SAR of OSI-930, and the binding site characteristics of c-Kit and KDR. A series of 16 compounds with heteroatom substituted pyridyl and phenyl ring systems was synthesized and evaluated against a panel of kinases including c-Kit and KDR. Aminopyridyl derivative 6 was found to be the most active member of the series with 91% and 57% inhibition of c-Kit at 10μM and 1μM, respectively and 88% and 50% inhibition of KDR at 10μM and 1μM, respectively. The target compounds were also tested for their ability to inhibit efflux of mitoxantrone through inhibition of ATP dependent ABCG2 pump. Nitropyridyl derivative 5 and o-nitrophenyl derivative 7 exhibited complete inhibition of the ABCG2 pump with IC(50) values of 13.67μM and 16.67μM, respectively.

  6. The expressions of ABCC4 and ABCG2 xenobiotic transporters in human keratinocytes are proliferation-related.

    PubMed

    Bebes, Attila; Kis, Kornélia; Nagy, Tünde; Kurunczi, Anita; Polyánka, Hilda; Bata-Csörgo, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Lajos; Dobozy, Attila; Széll, Márta

    2012-01-01

    Xenobiotic transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily play important roles in maintaining the biochemical barrier of various tissues, but their precise functions in the skin are not yet known. Screening of the expressions of the known xenobiotic transporter genes in two in vitro keratinocyte differentiation models revealed that the ABCC4 and ABCG2 transporters are highly expressed in proliferating keratinocytes, their expressions decreasing along with differentiation. Abrogation of the ABCC4 and ABCG2 protein functions by siRNA-mediated silencing and chemical inhibition did not affect the proliferation of HaCaT cells. In contrast, disruption of the ABCG2 function had no effect on normal human epidermal keratinocyte proliferation, while the inhibition of ABCC-type transporters by probenecid resulted in a striking decrease in the proliferation of the cells. These results indicate that, besides their possible therapy-modulating effects, xenobiotic transporters may contribute significantly to other keratinocyte functions, such as cell proliferation.

  7. ABCG2pos lung mesenchymal stem cells are a novel pericyte subpopulation that contributes to fibrotic remodeling.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Shennea; Baskir, Rubin S; Gaskill, Christa; Menon, Swapna; Carrier, Erica J; Williams, Janice; Talati, Megha; Helm, Karen; Alford, Catherine E; Kropski, Jonathan A; Loyd, James; Wheeler, Lisa; Johnson, Joyce; Austin, Eric; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Meyrick, Barbara; West, James D; Klemm, Dwight J; Majka, Susan M

    2014-10-15

    Genesis of myofibroblasts is obligatory for the development of pathology in many adult lung diseases. Adult lung tissue contains a population of perivascular ABCG2(pos) mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) that are precursors of myofibroblasts and distinct from NG2 pericytes. We hypothesized that these MSC participate in deleterious remodeling associated with pulmonary fibrosis (PF) and associated hypertension (PH). To test this hypothesis, resident lung MSC were quantified in lung samples from control subjects and PF patients. ABCG2(pos) cell numbers were decreased in human PF and interstitial lung disease compared with control samples. Genetic labeling of lung MSC in mice enabled determination of terminal lineage and localization of ABCG2 cells following intratracheal administration of bleomycin to elicit fibrotic lung injury. Fourteen days following bleomycin injury enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-labeled lung MSC-derived cells were increased in number and localized to interstitial areas of fibrotic and microvessel remodeling. Finally, gene expression analysis was evaluated to define the response of MSC to bleomycin injury in vivo using ABCG2(pos) MSC isolated during the inflammatory phase postinjury and in vitro bleomycin or transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-treated cells. MSC responded to bleomycin treatment in vivo with a profibrotic gene program that was not recapitulated in vitro with bleomycin treatment. However, TGF-β1 treatment induced the appearance of a profibrotic myofibroblast phenotype in vitro. Additionally, when exposed to the profibrotic stimulus, TGF-β1, ABCG2, and NG2 pericytes demonstrated distinct responses. Our data highlight ABCG2(pos) lung MSC as a novel cell population that contributes to detrimental myofibroblast-mediated remodeling during PF.

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity Is Determinant for ABCB1 and ABCG2 Drug-Efflux Transporters Function

    PubMed Central

    Atisha-Fregoso, Yemil; Lima, Guadalupe; Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Baños-Peláez, Miguel; Fragoso-Loyo, Hilda; Jakez-Ocampo, Juan; Contreras-Yáñez, Irazú; Llorente, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare drug efflux function of ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with active disease and in remission. Methods Twenty two active RA patients (DAS28 ≥3.2) and 22 patients in remission (DAS28<2.6) were selected from an early RA clinic. All patients were evaluated at study inclusion and six months later. ABCB1 and ABCG2 functional activity was measured in peripheral lymphocytes by flow cytometry. The percentage of cells able to extrude substrates for ABCB1 and ABCG2 was recorded. Results Active patients had higher ABCB1 and ABCG2 activity compared with patients in remission (median [interquartile range]): 3.9% (1.4–22.2) vs (1.3% (0.6–3.2), p = 0.003 and 3.9% (1.1–13.3) vs 0.9% (0.5–1.9) p = 0.006 respectively. Both transporters correlated with disease activity assessed by DAS28, rho = 0.45, p = 0.002 and rho = 0.47, p = 0.001 respectively. Correlation was observed between the time from the beginning of treatment and transporter activity: rho = 0.34, p = 0.025 for ABCB1 and rho = 0.35, p = 0.018 for ABCG2. The linear regression model showed that DAS28 and the time from the onset of treatment are predictors of ABCB1 and ABCG2 functional activity, even after adjustment for treatment. After six months we calculated the correlation between change in DAS28 and change in the functional activity in both transporters and found a moderate and significant correlation for ABCG2 (rho = 0.28, p = 0.04) and a non-significant correlation for ABCB1 (rho = 0.22, p = 0.11). Conclusions Patients with active RA have an increased function of ABCB1 and ABCG2, and disease activity is the main determinant of this phenomena. PMID:27442114

  9. PDK2 and ABCG2 genes polymorphisms are correlated with blood glucose levels and uric acid in Tibetan gout patients.

    PubMed

    Ren, Y C; Jin, T B; Sun, X D; Geng, T T; Zhang, M X; Wang, L; Feng, T; Kang, L L; Chen, C

    2016-02-11

    Previous studies have shown that the PDK2 and ABCG2 genes play important roles in many aspects of gout development in European populations. However, a detailed genotype-phenotype analysis was not performed. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential association between variants in these two genes and metabolism-related quantitative phenotypes relevant to gout in a Chinese Tibetan population. In total, 316 Chinese Tibetan gout patients were recruited from rheumatology outpatient clinics and 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms in PDK2 and ABCG2 were genotyped, which were possible etiologic variants as identified in the HapMap Chinese Han Beijing population. A significant difference in blood glucose levels was detected between different genotypes of rs2728109 (P = 0.005) in the PDK2 gene. We also detected a significant difference in the mean serum uric levels between different genotypes of rs3114018 (P = 0.004) in the ABCG2 gene. All P values remained significant after Bonferroni's correction for multiple testing. Our data demonstrate potential roles for PDK2 and ABCG2 polymorphisms in the metabolic phenotypes of Tibetan gout patients, which may provide new insights into the etiology of gout. Further studies are required to confirm these findings.

  10. Down-regulation of ABCG2 and ABCB4 transporters in the placenta of rats exposed to cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lili; Zhou, Liang; Hu, Shuiwang; Zhou, Shanyu; Deng, Yingyu; Dong, Ming; Huang, Jianxun; Zeng, Yuli; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Na; Li, Hongling; Ding, Zhenhua

    2016-01-01

    As a maternal and developmental toxicant, cadmium (Cd) possesses weak penetrability through the placental barrier. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. To gain insight into the protein molecules associated with Cd toxicity in placenta and explore their roles in Cd transportation, a reproductive animal experiment was carried out using Sprague-Dawley rats. We performed proteomic analysis of the placenta by Difference Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE) combined with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Tandem Mass Spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). The DIGE assay identified 15 protein spots that were differentially expressed with a greater than 1.5-fold change in placenta of Cd-treated rats compared to the control rats. Based on the expression patterns and biological functions of the proteins, we selected the ABCG2 and ABCB4 transporter proteins for further analysis. Western blot analysis showed that Cd exposure could down-regulate the expression of ABCG2 and ABCB4 in the placenta. There was a negative dose-response relationship between Cd exposure and the expression of ABCG2 or ABCB4 protein. These results indicated that down-regulation of ABCG2 and ABCB4 transporters may regulate Cd across through placenta and thus affect the in vivo toxic effect of Cd to fetus. PMID:27203216

  11. Interaction of mammary bovine ABCG2 with AFB1 and its metabolites and regulation by PCB 126 in a MDCKII in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Manzini, L; Halwachs, S; Girolami, F; Badino, P; Honscha, W; Nebbia, C

    2017-02-14

    The ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter ABCG2 plays a key role in the mammary excretion of drugs and toxins in humans and animals. Aflatoxins (AF) are worldwide contaminants of food and feed commodities, while PCB 126 is a dioxin-like PCB which may contaminate milk and dairy products. Both compounds are known human carcinogens. The interactions between AF and bovine ABCG2 (bABCG2) as well as the effects of PCB 126 on its efflux activity have been investigated by means of the Hoechst H33342 transport assay in MDCKII cells stably expressing mammary bABCG2. Both AFB1 and its main milk metabolite AFM1 showed interaction with bABCG2 even at concentrations approaching the legal limits in feed and food commodities. Moreover, PCB 126 significantly enhanced bABCG2 functional activity. Specific inhibitors of either AhR (CH233191) or ABCG2 (Ko143) were able to reverse the PCB 126-induced increase in bABCG2 transport activity, showing the specific upregulation of the efflux protein by the AhR pathway. The incubation of PCB 126-pretreated cells with AFM1 was able to substantially reverse such effect, with still unknown mechanism(s). Overall, results from this study point to AFB1 and AFM1 as likely bABCG2 substrates. The PCB 126-dependent increased activity of the transporter could enhance the ABCG2-mediated excretion into dairy milk of chemicals (i.e., drugs and toxins) potentially harmful to neonates and consumers.

  12. Deregulation of the miR-222-ABCG2 regulatory module in tongue squamous cell carcinoma contributes to chemoresistance and enhanced migratory/invasive potential.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Luodan; Ren, Yuexin; Tang, Haikuo; Wang, Wei; He, Qianting; Sun, Jingjing; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Wang, Anxun

    2015-12-29

    Chemoresistance is often associated with other clinical characteristics such as enhanced migratory/invasive potential. However, the correlation and underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to elucidate the function of the miR-222-ABCG2 pathway in the correlation between cisplatin (DDP) resistance and enhanced cell migration/invasion in tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC). Using TSCC cell lines and primary cultures from TSCC cases, we first confirmed the correlation among DDP resistance (measured by IC50 values and ABCG2/ERCC1 expression), migratory/invasive potential (assessed by migration/invasion assays) and miR-222 expression. In TSCC cells, siRNA-mediated ABCG2 knockdown led to enhanced DDP responsiveness and reduced migratory/invasive potential, whereas ABCG2 overexpression induced DDP resistance and enhanced cell migration/invasion. Luciferase assays revealed that ABCG2 is a direct target of miR-222. In addition to reducing cell migration/invasion, functional analyses in TSCC cells indicated that miR-222 can reduce expression of the ABCG2 gene and enhance DDP responsiveness. However, co-transfection with ABCG2 cDNA restored both DDP resistance and migration/invasion. Moreover, miR-222 mimics and ABCG2 siRNA inhibited tumor growth and lung metastasis in vivo. Thus, our results verified that DDP resistance is correlated with enhanced migratory/invasive potential in TSCC. ABCG2 is a direct target of miR-222,and deregulation of the miR-222-ABCG2 regulatory module in TSCC contributes to both DDP resistance and enhanced migratory/invasive potential.

  13. Effect of bovine ABCG2 Y581S polymorphism on concentrations in milk of enrofloxacin and its active metabolite ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Otero, J A; García-Mateos, D; de la Fuente, A; Prieto, J G; Álvarez, A I; Merino, G

    2016-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2) is involved in the secretion of several drugs into milk. The bovine Y581S ABCG2 polymorphism increases the secretion into milk of the fluoroquinolone danofloxacin in Holstein cows. Danofloxacin and enrofloxacin are the fluoroquinolones most widely used in veterinary medicine. Both enrofloxacin (ENRO) and its active metabolite ciprofloxacin (CIPRO) reach milk at relatively high concentrations. The aim of this work was to study the effect of the bovine Y581S ABCG2 polymorphism on in vitro transport as well as on concentrations in plasma and in milk of ENRO and CIPRO. Experiments using cells overexpressing bovine ABCG2 showed the effects of ABCG2 on the transport of CIPRO, demonstrating more efficient in vitro transport of this antimicrobial by the S581 variant as compared with the Y581 variant. Animal studies administering 2.5mg/kg of ENRO subcutaneously to Y/Y 581 and Y/S 581 cows revealed that concentrations in plasma of ENRO and CIPRO were significantly lower in Y/S animals. Regardless of the genotype, the antimicrobial profile in milk after the administration of ENRO was predominantly of CIPRO. With respect to the genotype effects on the amounts of drugs present in milk, AUC0-24 values were more than 1.2 times higher in Y/S cows for ENRO and 2.2 times for CIPRO, indicating a greater capacity of Y581S to transfer these drugs into milk. These results emphasize the clinical relevance of this polymorphism as a factor affecting the concentrations in plasma and in milk of drugs of importance in veterinary medicine.

  14. Mithramycin represses basal and cigarette smoke-induced expression of ABCG2 and inhibits stem cell signaling in lung and esophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mary; Mathur, Aarti; Zhang, Yuwei; Xi, Sichuan; Atay, Scott; Hong, Julie A; Datrice, Nicole; Upham, Trevor; Kemp, Clinton D; Ripley, R Taylor; Wiegand, Gordon; Avital, Itzak; Fetsch, Patricia; Mani, Haresh; Zlott, Daniel; Robey, Robert; Bates, Susan E; Li, Xinmin; Rao, Mahadev; Schrump, David S

    2012-08-15

    Cigarette smoking at diagnosis or during therapy correlates with poor outcome in patients with lung and esophageal cancers, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we observed that exposure of esophageal cancer cells to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) led to upregulation of the xenobiotic pump ABCG2, which is expressed in cancer stem cells and confers treatment resistance in lung and esophageal carcinomas. Furthermore, CSC increased the side population of lung cancer cells containing cancer stem cells. Upregulation of ABCG2 coincided with increased occupancy of aryl hydrocarbon receptor, Sp1, and Nrf2 within the ABCG2 promoter, and deletion of xenobiotic response elements and/or Sp1 sites markedly attenuated ABCG2 induction. Under conditions potentially achievable in clinical settings, mithramycin diminished basal as well as CSC-mediated increases in AhR, Sp1, and Nrf2 levels within the ABCG2 promoter, markedly downregulated ABCG2, and inhibited proliferation and tumorigenicity of lung and esophageal cancer cells. Microarray analyses revealed that mithramycin targeted multiple stem cell-related pathways in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our findings provide a potential mechanistic link between smoking status and outcome of patients with lung and esophageal cancers, and support clinical use of mithramycin for repressing ABCG2 and inhibiting stem cell signaling in thoracic malignancies.

  15. Structural determinants of peripheral O-arylcarbamate FAAH inhibitors render them dual substrates for Abcb1 and Abcg2 and restrict their access to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Barrera, Borja; Armirotti, Andrea; Bertozzi, Sine M.; Scarpelli, Rita; Bandiera, Tiziano; Prieto, Julio G.; Duranti, Andrea; Tarzia, Giorgio; Merino, Gracia

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the main entry route for chemicals into the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Two transmembrane transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family – Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (ABCG2 in humans, Abcg2 in rodents) and P-glycoprotein (ABCB1 in humans, Abcb1 in rodents) – play a key role in mediating this process. Pharmacological and genetic evidence suggests that Abcg2 prevents CNS access to a group of highly potent and selective O-arylcarbamate fatty-acid amidohydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors, which include the compound URB937 (cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3′-carbamoyl-6-hydroxybiphenyl-3-yl ester). To define structure-activity relationships of the interaction of these molecules with Abcg2, in the present study we tested various peripherally restricted and non-restricted O-arylcarbamate FAAH inhibitors for their ability to serve as transport substrates in monolayer cultures of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney-II (MDCKII) cells over-expressing Abcg2. Surprisingly, we found that the majority of compounds tested – even those able to enter the CNS in vivo – were substrates for Abcg2 in vitro. Additional experiments in MDCKII cells overexpressing ABCB1 revealed that only those compounds that were dual substrates for ABCB1 and Abcg2 in vitro were also peripherally restricted in vivo. The extent of such restriction seems to depend upon other physicochemical features of the compounds, in particular the polar surface area. Consistent with these in vitro results, we found that URB937 readily enters the brain in dual knockout mice lacking both Abcg2 and Abcb1, whereas it is either partially or completely excluded from the brain of mice lacking either transporter alone. The results suggest that Abcg2 and Abcb1 act together to restrict the access of URB937 to the CNS. PMID:24993496

  16. Structural determinants of peripheral O-arylcarbamate FAAH inhibitors render them dual substrates for Abcb1 and Abcg2 and restrict their access to the brain.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Barrera, Borja; Armirotti, Andrea; Bertozzi, Sine M; Scarpelli, Rita; Bandiera, Tiziano; Prieto, Julio G; Duranti, Andrea; Tarzia, Giorgio; Merino, Gracia; Piomelli, Daniele

    2014-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the main entry route for chemicals into the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Two transmembrane transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family - breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2 in humans, Abcg2 in rodents) and P-glycoprotein (ABCB1 in humans, Abcb1 in rodents) - play a key role in mediating this process. Pharmacological and genetic evidence suggests that Abcg2 prevents CNS access to a group of highly potent and selective O-arylcarbamate fatty-acid amidohydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors, which include the compound URB937 (cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3'-carbamoyl-6-hydroxybiphenyl-3-yl ester). To define structure-activity relationships of the interaction of these molecules with Abcg2, in the present study we tested various peripherally restricted and non-restricted O-arylcarbamate FAAH inhibitors for their ability to serve as transport substrates in monolayer cultures of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney-II (MDCKII) cells over-expressing Abcg2. Surprisingly, we found that the majority of compounds tested - even those able to enter the CNS in vivo - were substrates for Abcg2 in vitro. Additional experiments in MDCKII cells overexpressing ABCB1 revealed that only those compounds that were dual substrates for ABCB1 and Abcg2 in vitro were also peripherally restricted in vivo. The extent of such restriction seems to depend upon other physicochemical features of the compounds, in particular the polar surface area. Consistent with these in vitro results, we found that URB937 readily enters the brain in dual knockout mice lacking both Abcg2 and Abcb1, whereas it is either partially or completely excluded from the brain of mice lacking either transporter alone. The results suggest that Abcg2 and Abcb1 act together to restrict the access of URB937 to the CNS.

  17. Oleic acid increases intestinal absorption of the BCRP/ABCG2 substrate, mitoxantrone, in mice.

    PubMed

    Aspenström-Fagerlund, Bitte; Tallkvist, Jonas; Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar; Glynn, Anders W

    2015-09-02

    The efflux transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) decrease intestinal absorption of many food toxicants. Oleic acid increases absorption of the specific BCRP substrate mitoxantrone (MXR), and also BCRP gene expression in human intestinal Caco-2 cells, suggesting that oleic acid affect the BCRP function. Here, we investigated the effect of oleic acid on intestinal absorption of MXR in mice. Mice were orally dosed with 2.4g oleic acid/kg b.w. and 1mg MXR/kg b.w., and sacrificed 30, 60, 90 or 120min after exposure, or were exposed to 0.6, 2.4 or 4.8g oleic acid/kg b.w. and 1mg MXR/kg b.w., and sacrificed 90min after exposure. Mice were also treated with Ko143 together with MXR and sacrificed after 60min, as a positive control of BCRP-mediated effects on MXR absorption. Absorption of MXR increased after exposure to oleic acid at all doses, and also after exposure to Ko143. Intestinal BCRP gene expression tended to increase 120min after oleic acid exposure. Our results in mice demonstrate that oleic acid decreases BCRP-mediated efflux, causing increased intestinal MXR absorption in mice. These findings may have implications in humans, concomitantly exposed to oleic acid and food contaminants that, similarly as MXR, are substrates of BCRP.

  18. Sorafenib overcomes irinotecan resistance in colorectal cancer by inhibiting the ABCG2 drug-efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Mazard, Thibault; Causse, Annick; Simony, Joelle; Leconet, Wilhem; Vezzio-Vie, Nadia; Torro, Adeline; Jarlier, Marta; Evrard, Alexandre; Del Rio, Maguy; Assenat, Eric; Martineau, Pierre; Ychou, Marc; Robert, Bruno; Gongora, Celine

    2013-10-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC), tumor resistance is a frequent cause of chemotherapy failure. Therefore, new treatment options are needed to improve survival of patients with irinotecan-refractory CRCs, particularly those bearing KRAS mutations that preclude the use of anti-EGFR therapies. In this study, we investigated whether sorafenib could reverse irinotecan resistance, thereby enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of routinely used irinotecan-based chemotherapy. We used both in vitro (the HCT116, SW48, SW620, and HT29 colon adenocarcinoma cell lines and four SN-38-resistant HCT-116 and SW48 clones) and in vivo models (nude mice xenografted with SN-38-resistant HCT116 cells) to test the efficacy of sorafenib alone or in combination with irinotecan or its active metabolite, SN-38. We have shown that sorafenib improved the antitumoral activity of irinotecan in vitro, in both parental and SN-38-resistant colon adenocarcinoma cell lines independently of their KRAS status, as well as in vivo, in xenografted mice. By inhibiting the drug-efflux pump ABCG2, sorafenib favors irinotecan intracellular accumulation and enhances its toxicity. Moreover, we found that sorafenib improved the efficacy of irinotecan by inhibiting the irinotecan-mediated p38 and ERK activation. In conclusion, our results show that sorafenib can suppress resistance to irinotecan and suggest that sorafenib could be used to overcome resistance to irinotecan-based chemotherapies in CRC, particularly in KRAS-mutated tumors.

  19. Target therapy of multiple myeloma by PTX-NPs and ABCG2 antibody in a mouse xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jun; Zhan, Xi; Shi, Fangfang; Li, Miao; Wu, Songyan; Luo, Shouhua; Zhang, Tianzhu; Zhang, Yu; Ming, Ji; Gu, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains to be an incurable disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ABCG2 monoclonal antibody (McAb) combined with paclitaxel (PTX) conjugated with Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) on MM progressed from cancer stem cells (CSCs)in non-obese-diabetic/severe-combined-immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mouse model. Mice were injected with MM CSCs as marked by CD138−CD34− phenotypes through tail veins. The developed MM mice were examined by micro-computer tomography scanning, ultrasonography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis. These mice were then intravenously treated with different combinations of NPs, PTX, McAb, PTX-NPs and melphalan/prednisone once a week for four weeks. The injected mice developed characteristic MM-associated syndromes, including lytic bone lesions, renal damages and proteinuria. All the treated mice showed decrease in bone lesions, renal damages and anemia but increase in apoptosis compared with the mice treated with NPs only. In particular, the treatment with ABCG2 McAb plus PTX-NPs induced the strongest therapeutic response and had an efficacy even better than that of melphalan/prednisone, a conventional regimen for MM patients. These data suggest that PTX-NPs with ABCG2 McAb can be developed into potential treatment regimens for patients with relapsed/refractory MM. PMID:26314844

  20. SOX4 contributes to the progression of cervical cancer and the resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug through ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Sun, R; Jiang, B; Qi, H; Zhang, X; Yang, J; Duan, J; Li, Y; Li, G

    2015-01-01

    SOX4, a member of the SOX (sex-determining region Y-related HMG box) transcription factor family, has been reported to be abnormally expressed in a wide variety of cancers, and to exert a pleiotropic function. However, its function in progression of cervical cancer (CC) remains unknown. In this study, we found that SOX4 was highly expressed in CC cells and tissues, and overexpression of SOX4 in CC CaSki cells enhanced tumor clone formation and cell proliferation, and accelerated cell cycle progress. Meanwhile, downregulation of SOX4 by shRNA in CaSki cells inhibited cell proliferation, and slowed cell cycle progress, indicating that SOX4 contributes to the development of CC. In addition, SOX4 overexpression by gene transfer reduced the sensitivity of CaSki cells in response to the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin, and SOX4 downregulation by RNA interference increased the sensitivity of CaSki cells in response to cisplatin. Moreover, SOX4 overexpression upregulated multiple drug resistant gene ABCG2, and SOX4 downregulation inhibited ABCG2 expression. Taken together, these results suggested that SOX4 functions to modulate cancer proliferation by regulation of cell cycle, and inhibit cancer cell sensitivity to therapeutic drug via upregulation of ABCG2. Thus, SOX4 may be a target for CC chemotherapy. PMID:26583330

  1. Target therapy of multiple myeloma by PTX-NPs and ABCG2 antibody in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cuiping; Xiong, Fei; Dou, Jun; Xue, Jun; Zhan, Xi; Shi, Fangfang; Li, Miao; Wu, Songyan; Luo, Shouhua; Zhang, Tianzhu; Zhang, Yu; Ming, Ji; Gu, Ning

    2015-09-29

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains to be an incurable disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ABCG2 monoclonal antibody (McAb) combined with paclitaxel (PTX) conjugated with Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) on MM progressed from cancer stem cells (CSCs) in non-obese-diabetic/severe-combined-immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mouse model. Mice were injected with MM CSCs as marked by CD138-CD34- phenotypes through tail veins. The developed MM mice were examined by micro-computer tomography scanning, ultrasonography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis. These mice were then intravenously treated with different combinations of NPs, PTX, McAb, PTX-NPs and melphalan/prednisone once a week for four weeks. The injected mice developed characteristic MM-associated syndromes, including lytic bone lesions, renal damages and proteinuria. All the treated mice showed decrease in bone lesions, renal damages and anemia but increase in apoptosis compared with the mice treated with NPs only. In particular, the treatment with ABCG2 McAb plus PTX-NPs induced the strongest therapeutic response and had an efficacy even better than that of melphalan/prednisone, a conventional regimen for MM patients. These data suggest that PTX-NPs with ABCG2 McAb can be developed into potential treatment regimens for patients with relapsed/refractory MM.

  2. Two novel SNPs of the ABCG2 gene and its associations with milk traits in Chinese Holsteins.

    PubMed

    Yue, Wangping; Fang, Xingtang; Zhang, Chunlei; Pang, Yonghong; Xu, Haixia; Gu, Chuanwen; Shao, Ruying; Lei, Chuzhao; Chen, Hong

    2011-06-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 (also known as breast cancer resistance protein, BCRP) belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transmembrane drug transporters, playing a crucial role in the protection of various cells and tissues against xenotoxins and/or endotoxins. Recently, several studies have proposed it as the potential gene underlying the QTL on bovine chromosome 6. Hence, in this study, the PCR-SSCP method was applied to detect two polymorphisms (A → C and A → G) in the target sequence coding nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) region of ABCG2 and evaluate its associations with milk production traits and mastitis-related traits among Chinese Holsteins. In the analyzed population, the allelic frequencies for the A and B alleles were 0.5990 and 0.4010, respectively and the genotypic frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium (P < 0.01). Moreover, significant statistical relationships between the polymorphisms of ABCG2 gene and following traits, including milk yields, milk protein percentage and somatic cell scores (SCS), were found (P < 0.05). When compared with AA genotype, BB genotype was associated with higher milk yields during 1st and 2nd lactations, as well as lower milk protein percentage and SCS. Thus, BB genotype is suggested to be a molecular marker for superior milk performance.

  3. Metabolic Interactions of Purine Derivatives with Human ABC Transporter ABCG2: Genetic Testing to Assess Gout Risk.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Aw, Wanping; Kaneko, Kiyoko

    2013-11-04

    In mammals, excess purine nucleosides are removed from the body by breakdown in the liver and excretion from the kidneys. Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism in humans. Two-thirds of uric acid in the human body is normally excreted through the kidney, whereas one-third undergoes uricolysis (decomposition of uric acid) in the gut. Elevated serum uric acid levels result in gout and could be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Recent studies have shown that human ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 plays a role of renal excretion of uric acid. Two non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), i.e., 421C>A (major) and 376C>T (minor), in the ABCG2 gene result in impaired transport activity, owing to ubiquitination-mediated proteosomal degradation and truncation of ABCG2, respectively. These genetic polymorphisms are associated with hyperuricemia and gout. Allele frequencies of those SNPs are significantly higher in Asian populations than they are in African and Caucasian populations. A rapid and isothermal genotyping method has been developed to detect the SNP 421C>A, where one drop of peripheral blood is sufficient for the detection. Development of simple genotyping methods would serve to improve prevention and early therapeutic intervention for high-risk individuals in personalized healthcare.

  4. Influence of the dual ABCB1 and ABCG2 inhibitor tariquidar on the disposition of oral imatinib in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Erin R; Smith, Nicola F; Figg, William D; Sparreboom, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Background Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor currently approved for treatment of several malignancies, has been shown to be a substrate for multiple efflux-transporter proteins, including ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein) and ABCG2 (BCRP). The effect of inhibiting these transporters on tissue exposure to imatinib remains unclear. Objective To assess the role of these transporters on drug disposition, 50 mg/kg imatinib was administered to Balb/C mice, 30 minutes after receiving tariquidar (10 mg/kg), an inhibitor of both ABCB1 and ABCG2, or vehicle, via oral gavage. Methods Quantitative determination of imatinib in mouse plasma, liver and brain was performed using a newly-developed and validated liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometric method. Results: Exposure to imatinib was 2.2-fold higher in plasma, liver and brain in mice that received tariquidar, as compared to those that received the vehicle (P = 0.001). The peak plasma concentration did not increase substantially, suggesting that tariquidar is affecting the distribution, metabolism and/or excretion of imatinib, rather than absorption. Though tariquidar increased the absolute exposure of imatinib, the brain-to-plasma ratio of imatinib was unaffected. Conclusion This study suggests that intentional inhibition of ABCB1 and ABCG2 function at the blood-brain barrier is unlikely to significantly improve clinical outcome of imatinib with currently used dosing regimens. PMID:19591692

  5. Three-dimensional structure of the human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in an inward-facing conformation

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Mark F.; Bikadi, Zsolt; Hazai, Eszter; Starborg, Tobias; Kelley, Lawrence; Chayen, Naomi E.; Ford, Robert C.; Mao, Qingcheng

    2015-01-01

    ABCG2 is an efflux drug transporter that plays an important role in drug resistance and drug disposition. In this study, the first three-dimensional structure of human full-length ABCG2 analysed by electron crystallography from two-dimensional crystals in the absence of nucleotides and transported substrates is reported at 2 nm resolution. In this state, ABCG2 forms a symmetric homodimer with a noncrystallographic twofold axis perpendicular to the two-dimensional crystal plane, as confirmed by subtomogram averaging. This configuration suggests an inward-facing configuration similar to murine ABCB1, with the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) widely separated from each other. In the three-dimensional map, densities representing the long cytoplasmic extensions from the transmembrane domains that connect the NBDs are clearly visible. The structural data have allowed the atomic model of ABCG2 to be refined, in which the two arms of the V-shaped ABCG2 homodimeric complex are in a more closed and narrower conformation. The structural data and the refined model of ABCG2 are compatible with the biochemical analysis of the previously published mutagenesis studies, providing novel insight into the structure and function of the transporter. PMID:26249353

  6. Double-transduced MDCKII cells to study human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) interplay in drug transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Poller, Birk; Wagenaar, Els; Tang, Seng Chuan; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2011-04-04

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) combination knockout mice display disproportionately increased brain penetration of shared substrates, including topotecan and several tyrosine kinase inhibitors, compared to mice deficient for only one transporter. To better study the interplay of both transporters also in vitro, we generated a transduced polarized MDCKII cell line stably coexpressing substantial levels of human ABCB1 and ABCG2 (MDCKII-ABCB1/ABCG2). Next, we measured concentration-dependent transepithelial transport of topotecan, sorafenib and sunitinib. By blocking either one or both of the transporters simultaneously, using specific inhibitors, we aimed to mimic the ABCB1-ABCG2 interplay at the blood-brain barrier in wild-type, single or combination knockout mice. ABCB1 and ABCG2 contributed to similar extents to topotecan transport, which was only partly saturable. For sorafenib transport, ABCG2 was the major determinant at low concentrations. However, saturation of ABCG2-mediated transport occurred at higher sorafenib concentrations, where ABCB1 was still fully active. Furthermore, sunitinib was transported equally by ABCB1 and ABCG2 at low concentrations, but ABCG2-mediated transport became saturated at lower concentrations than ABCB1-mediated transport. The relative impact of these transporters can thus be affected by the applied drug concentrations. A comparison of the in vitro observed (inverse) transport ratios and cellular accumulation of the drugs at low concentrations with in vivo brain penetration data from corresponding Abcb1a/1b⁻/⁻, Abcg2⁻/⁻ and Abcb1a/1b;Abcg2⁻/⁻ mouse strains revealed very similar qualitative patterns for each of the tested drugs. MDCKII-ABCB1/ABCG2 cells thus present a useful in vitro model to study the interplay of ABCB1 and ABCG2.

  7. A novel xenobiotic responsive element regulated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor is involved in the induction of BCRP/ABCG2 in LS174T cells.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Leslie M; Li, Haishan; Li, Linhao; Lynch, Caitlin; Xie, Yi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Ross, Douglas D; Wang, Hongbing

    2010-12-01

    Induction of the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) expression has been found in various tissues and cell-types after exposure to chemicals including 17β-estradiol, rosiglitazone, imatinib, as well as aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activators such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin, 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), and omeprazole. However, the mechanism(s) underlying AhR-related induction of ABCG2 is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate the AhR-dependent induction of ABCG2 expression in human colon adenocarcinoma LS174T cells. Importantly, a novel distal AhR-responsive element (AhRE5) located -2357/-2333bp upstream of the ABCG2 transcriptional start site has been identified and characterized as a functional unit pivotal to 3MC-mediated induction of ABCG2. Cell-based reporter assays revealed that deletion of AhRE5 and 4 dramatically attenuated 3MC-induced activation of ABCG2 reporter activity, while further deletion of the proximal AhRE3 and 2 only moderately changed the luciferase activities. Notably, site-directed mutation of the AhRE5 in the BCRP-3.8kb reporter construct alone resulted in approximately 80% decrease in 3MC activation of the ABCG2 promoter; additional mutation of the AhRE4 site had negligible effect on the ABCG2 promoter activity. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that treatment with 3MC significantly enhanced the recruitment of AhR to the AhRE5 occupied region, and mutation of the AhRE5 site clearly dissociated AhR protein from this promoter region. Together, these data show that the novel distal AhRE5 is critical for AhR-mediated transcriptional activation of ABCG2 gene expression in LS174T cells, and it may offer new strategies for early identification of ABCG2 inducers, which would be of benefit for preventing transporter-associated drug-drug interactions.

  8. A Novel Xenobiotic Responsive Element Regulated by Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor is Involved in the Induction of BCRP/ABCG2 in LS174T cells

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, Leslie M; Li, Haishan; Li, Linhao; Lynch, Caitlin; Xie, Yi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Ross, Douglas D; Wang, Hongbing

    2010-01-01

    Induction of the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) expression has been found in various tissues and cell-types after exposure to chemicals including 17β-estradiol, rosiglitazone, imatinib, as well as aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activators such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin, 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), and omeprazole. However, the mechanism(s) underlying AhR-related induction of ABCG2 is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate the AhR-dependent induction of ABCG2 expression in human colon adenocarcinoma LS174T cells. Importantly, a novel distal AhR responsive element (AhRE5) located −2357/−2333 bp upstream of the ABCG2 transcriptional start site has been identified and characterized as a functional unit pivotal to 3MC-mediated induction of ABCG2. Cell-based reporter assays revealed that deletion of AhRE5 and 4 dramatically attenuated 3MC-induced activation of ABCG2 reporter activity, while further deletion of the proximal AhRE3 and 2 only moderately changed the luciferase activities. Notably, site-directed mutation of the AhRE5 in the BCRP-3.8kb reporter construct alone resulted in approximately 80% decrease in 3MC activation of the ABCG2 promoter; additional mutation of the AhRE4 site had negligible effect on the ABCG2 promoter activity. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that treatment with 3MC significantly enhanced the recruitment of AhR to the AhRE5 occupied region, and mutation of the AhRE5 site clearly dissociated AhR protein from this promoter region. Together, these data show that the novel distal AhRE5 is critical for AhR-mediated transcriptional activation of ABCG2 gene expression in LS174T cells, and it may offer new strategies for early identification of ABCG2 inducers, which would be of benefit for preventing transporter-associated drug-drug interactions. PMID:20804740

  9. Effects of triclabendazole on secretion of danofloxacin and moxidectin into the milk of sheep: role of triclabendazole metabolites as inhibitors of the ruminant ABCG2 transporter.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Borja; González-Lobato, Lucía; Otero, Jon A; Real, Rebeca; Prieto, Julio G; Álvarez, Ana I; Merino, Gracia

    2013-11-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter G2/breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP) mediates drug-drug interactions that affect the secretion of drugs into milk. The aims of this study were: (1) to determine whether the major plasma metabolites of the flukicide triclabendazole (TCBZ), triclabendazole sulfoxide (TCBZSO) and triclabendazole sulfone (TCBZSO2), inhibit ovine and bovine ABCG2 and its Y581S variant in vitro, and (2) to examine whether coadministration of TCBZ with the ABCG2 substrates danofloxacin (a fluoroquinolone) and moxidectin (a milbemycin) affects the secretion of these drugs into the milk of sheep. TCBZSO and TCBZSO2 inhibited ruminant ABCG2 in vitro by reversing the reduced mitoxantrone accumulation and reducing basal to apical transport of nitrofurantoin in cells transduced with bovine variants (S581 and Y581) and the ovine variant of ABCG2. Coadministration of TCBZ with moxidectin or danofloxacin to sheep resulted in significantly reduced levels of moxidectin, but not danofloxacin, in the milk of TCBZ-treated sheep compared to sheep administered moxidectin or danofloxacin alone. The milk area under concentration time curve (AUC 0-48 h) was 2.99±1.41 μg h/mL in the group treated with TCBZ and moxidectin, and 7.75±3.58 μg h/mL in the group treated with moxidectin alone. The AUC (0-48 h) milk/plasma ratio was 37% lower in the group treated with TCBZ and moxidectin (7.34±1.51) than in the group treated with moxidectin alone (11.68±3.61). TCBZ metabolites appear to inhibit ruminant ABCG2 and affect the secretion of ABCG2 substrates into milk of sheep.

  10. Milk secretion of nitrofurantoin, as a specific BCRP/ABCG2 substrate, in assaf sheep: modulation by isoflavones.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M; Real, R; Mendoza, G; Merino, G; Prieto, J G; Alvarez, A I

    2009-10-01

    Studies on residues in milk used for human consumption have increased due to health concerns and priority interest in the control of potentially risky drugs. The protein BCRP/ABCG2, present in the mammary epithelia, actively extrudes drugs into milk and can be modulated by isoflavones. Nitrofurantoin is a specific BCRP substrate which is actively excreted into milk by this transporter. In this research, we studied nitrofurantoin transport into milk in four experimental groups: G1-calves fed forage with isoflavones; G2-calves fed forage with isoflavones and administered exogenous genistein and daidzein; G3-calves fed forage without isoflavones; G4-calves fed forage without isoflavones and administered exogenous genistein and daidzein. Results show increased levels of nitrofurantoin in milk from calves without isoflavones (G3) and decreased nitrofurantoin residues in milk when isoflavones were present, either by forage (G1 and G2) or by exogenous administration (G4). The values of C(max) in milk were significantly lower in those groups with isoflavones in forage (G1, G2). Plasma levels were low and unmodified among the groups. Inter-individual variation was high. All these results seem to point to a feasible control of drug secretion into milk through isoflavones in the diet when the drug is a good BCRP/ABCG2 substrate.

  11. Pelitinib (EKB-569) targets the up-regulation of ABCB1 and ABCG2 induced by hyperthermia to eradicate lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    To, Kenneth K W; Poon, Daniel C; Wei, Yuming; Wang, Fang; Lin, Ge; Fu, Liwu

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pelitinib is a potent irreversible EGFR TK inhibitor currently in clinical trials for the treatment of lung cancer. Hyperthermia has been applied concomitantly with chemotherapy and radiotherapy to enhance treatment outcome. In this study, we investigated the ability of the combination of pelitinib with other conventional anticancer drugs to specifically target cancer cells with up-regulated efflux transporters ABCB1/ABCG2 after hyperthermia as a novel way to eradicate the cancer stem-like cells responsible for cancer recurrence. Experimental Approach Alterations in intracellular topotecan accumulation, the efflux of fluorescent probe substrates, expression and ATPase activity of ABCB1/ABCG2 and tumoursphere formation capacity of side population (SP) cells sorted after hyperthermia were examined to elucidate the mechanism of pelitinib-induced chemosensitization. Key Results While pelitinib did not modulate ABCB1/ABCG2 expressions, the combination of pelitinib with transporter substrate anticancer drugs induced more marked apoptosis, specifically in cells exposed to hyperthermia. The flow cytometric assay showed that both ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated drug effluxes were significantly inhibited by pelitinib in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibition kinetics suggested that pelitinib is a competitive inhibitor of ABCB1/ABCG2, which is consistent with its ability to stimulate their ATPase activity. SP cells sorted after hyperthermia were found to be more resistant to anticancer drugs, presumably due to the up-regulation of ABCB1 and ABCG2. Importantly, pelitinib specifically enhanced the chemosensitivity but reduced the tumoursphere formation capacity of these SP cells. Conclusions and Implications This study demonstrated a novel approach, exploiting drug resistance, to selectively kill cancer stem-like cells after hyperthermia. PMID:25988710

  12. Targeted therapeutic effect of anti-ABCG2 antibody combined with nano silver and vincristine on mouse myeloma cancer stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Jun; He, Xiangfeng; Liu, Yunjing; Huang, Zhihai; Yang, Cuiping; Shi, Fangfang; Chen, Dengyu; Gu, Ning

    2013-12-01

    Studies from hematopoietic origin malignancies have demonstrated that multiple myeloma contain a rare population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for tumor multiresistance and recurrence. The goal of this study was to investigate targeted therapeutic effect of anti-ABCG2 monoclonal antibody (McAb) combined with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and vincristine (VCR) on myeloma CSCs. The characteristics of CD44+ CD24- cells that were isolated from the SP2/0 cells using magnetic activated cell sorting system were first identified. The results showed that the CD44+ CD24- cells exhibited higher proliferation, more colony formation, more side population fraction, and stronger tumorigenicity in BALB/c mice than the control cells. Moreover, CD44+ CD24- cells markedly up-regulated the ABCG2 expression, however, anti-ABCG2 McAb combined with AgNPs and VCR effectively inhibited the CD44+ CD24- cell growth and prolonged the survival of myeloma-bearing mice. We concluded that the CD44+ CD24- cells in mouse myeloma SP2/0 cell line posses CSC properties. Anti-ABCG2 McAb combined with AgNPs and VCR provide an efficient targeted therapeutic method for inhibiting myeloma CD44+ CD24- CSC growth in mice.

  13. Interaction of Isoflavones with the BCRP/ABCG2 Drug Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Bircsak, Kristin M; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2015-01-01

    This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the interactions between dietary isoflavones and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) G2 efflux transporter, which is also named the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Expressed in a variety of organs including the liver, kidneys, intestine, and placenta, BCRP mediates the disposition and excretion of numerous endogenous chemicals and xenobiotics. Isoflavones are a class of naturally-occurring compounds that are found at high concentrations in commonly consumed foods and dietary supplements. A number of isoflavones, including genistein and daidzein and their metabolites, interact with BCRP as substrates, inhibitors, and/or modulators of gene expression. To date, a variety of model systems have been employed to study the ability of isoflavones to serve as substrates and inhibitors of BCRP; these include whole cells, inverted plasma membrane vesicles, in situ organ perfusion, as well as in vivo rodent and sheep models. Evidence suggests that BCRP plays a role in mediating the disposition of isoflavones and in particular, their conjugated forms. Furthermore, as inhibitors, these compounds may aid in reversing multidrug resistance and sensitizing cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. This review will also highlight the consequences of altered BCRP expression and/or function on the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of chemicals following isoflavone exposure. PMID:26179608

  14. Interaction of Isoflavones with the BCRP/ABCG2 Drug Transporter.

    PubMed

    Bircsak, Kristin M; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2015-01-01

    This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the interactions between dietary isoflavones and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) G2 efflux transporter, which is also named the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Expressed in a variety of organs including the liver, kidneys, intestine, and placenta, BCRP mediates the disposition and excretion of numerous endogenous chemicals and xenobiotics. Isoflavones are a class of naturallyoccurring compounds that are found at high concentrations in commonly consumed foods and dietary supplements. A number of isoflavones, including genistein and daidzein and their metabolites, interact with BCRP as substrates, inhibitors, and/or modulators of gene expression. To date, a variety of model systems have been employed to study the ability of isoflavones to serve as substrates and inhibitors of BCRP; these include whole cells, inverted plasma membrane vesicles, in situ organ perfusion, as well as in vivo rodent and sheep models. Evidence suggests that BCRP plays a role in mediating the disposition of isoflavones and in particular, their conjugated forms. Furthermore, as inhibitors, these compounds may aid in reversing multidrug resistance and sensitizing cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. This review will also highlight the consequences of altered BCRP expression and/or function on the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of chemicals following isoflavone exposure.

  15. Intestinal Ciprofloxacin Efflux: The Role of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (ABCG2)

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J. A.; O'Reilly, D. A.; Sherlock, D. J.; Coleman, T.; Simmons, N. L.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal secretory movement of the fluoroquinolone antibiotic, ciprofloxacin, may limit its oral bioavailability. Active ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters such as breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) have been implicated in ciprofloxacin transport. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that BCRP alone mediates intestinal ciprofloxacin secretion. The involvement of ABC transport proteins in ciprofloxacin secretory flux was investigated with the combined use of transfected cell lines [bcrp1/BCRP-Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCKII) and multidrug resistance-related protein 4 (MRP4)-human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293] and human intestinal Caco-2 cells, combined with pharmacological inhibition using 3-(6-isobutyl-9-methoxy-1,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4,6, 7,12,12a-octahydropyrazino[1′,2′:1,6]pyrido[3,4-b]indol-3-yl)-propionic acid tert-butyl ester (Ko143), cyclosporine, 3-[[3-[2-(7-chloroquinolin-2-yl)vinyl]phenyl]-(2-dimethylcarbamoylethylsulfanyl)methylsulfanyl] propionic acid (MK571), and verapamil as ABC-selective inhibitors. In addition, the regional variation in secretory capacity was investigated using male Han Wistar rat intestine mounted in Ussing chambers, and the first indicative measurements of ciprofloxacin transport by ex vivo human jejunum were made. Active, Ko143-sensitive ciprofloxacin secretion was observed in bcrp1-MDCKII cell layers, but in low-passage (BCRP-expressing) Caco-2 cell layers only a 54% fraction was Ko143-sensitive. Ciprofloxacin accumulation was lower in MRP4-HEK293 cells than in the parent line, indicating that ciprofloxacin is also a substrate for this transporter. Ciprofloxacin secretion by Caco-2 cell layers was not inhibited by MK571. Secretory flux showed marked regional variability in the rat intestine, increasing from the duodenum to peak in the ileum. Ciprofloxacin secretion was present in human jejunum and was reduced by Ko143 but showed marked interindividual variability. Ciprofloxacin is a substrate for human

  16. Involvement of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in the secretion of danofloxacin into milk: interaction with ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Real, R; Egido, E; Pérez, M; González-Lobato, L; Barrera, B; Prieto, J G; Alvarez, A I; Merino, G

    2011-08-01

    Danofloxacin, a veterinary fluoroquinolone antimicrobial drug, is actively secreted into milk by an as yet unknown mechanism. One of the main determinants of active drug secretion into milk is the transporter (BCRP/ABCG2). The main purpose was to determine whether danofloxacin is an in vitro substrate for Bcrp1/BCRP and to assess its involvement in danofloxacin secretion into milk. In addition, the role of potential drug-drug interactions in this process was assessed using ivermectin. Danofloxacin was transported in vitro by Bcrp1/BCRP, and ivermectin efficiently blocked this transport. Experiments with Bcrp1(-/-) mice showed no evidence of the involvement of Bcrp1 in plasma pharmacokinetics of danofloxacin. However, the milk concentration and milk-to-plasma ratio of danofloxacin were almost twofold higher in wild-type compared with Bcrp1(-/-) mice. The in vivo interaction with ivermectin was studied in sheep after co-administration of danofloxacin (1.25 mg/kg, i.m.) and ivermectin (0.2 mg/kg, s.c.). Ivermectin had no significant effect on the plasma levels of danofloxacin but significantly decreased danofloxacin concentrations in milk by almost 40%. Concomitant administration of multiple drugs, often used in veterinary therapy, may not only affect their pharmacological activity but also their secretion into milk, because of potential drug-drug interactions mediated by BCRP.

  17. The role of multidrug transporters in drug availability, metabolism and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bodó, Adrienn; Bakos, Eva; Szeri, Flóra; Váradi, András; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2003-04-11

    Multidrug resistance is frequently observed when treating cancer patients with chemotherapeutic agents. A variety of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, localized in the cell membrane, cause this phenomenon by extruding a variety of chemotherapeutic agents from the tumor cells. However, the major physiological role of the multidrug transporters is the protection of our cells and tissues against xenobiotics, and these transporters play a key role in drug availability, metabolism and toxicity. Three major groups of ABC transporters are involved in multidrug resistance: the classical P-glycoprotein MDR1, the multidrug resistance associated proteins (MRP1, MRP2, and probably MRP3, MRP4 and MRP5), and the ABCG2 protein, an ABC half-transporter. All these proteins were shown to catalyze an ATP-dependent active transport of chemically unrelated compounds. MDR1 (P-glycoprotein) and ABCG2 preferentially extrude large hydrophobic, positively charged molecules, while the members of the MRP family can extrude both hydrophobic uncharged molecules and water-soluble anionic compounds. By examining the interactions of the multidrug transporters with pharmacological and toxic agents, a prediction for the cellular and tissue distribution of these compounds can be achieved. Oral bioavailability, entering the blood-brain and blood-CSF barrier, reaching the fetus through the placenta, liver and kidney secretion, cellular entry for affecting intracellular targets, are all questions, which can be addressed by basic in vitro studies on the multidrug resistance proteins. Investigation of the substrate interactions and modulation of multidrug transporters may pave the way for predictive toxicology and pharmacogenomics. Here we show that by using in vitro assay systems it is possible to measure the interactions of multidrug transporters with various drugs and toxic agents. We focus on the characterisation of the MRP1 and MRP3 proteins, their relevance in chemoresistance of cancer and in

  18. The gut microbiota ellagic acid-derived metabolite urolithin A and its sulfate conjugate are substrates for the drug efflux transporter breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP).

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Miguel, Verónica; Merino, Gracia; Lucas, Ricardo; Morales, Juan C; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco; Alvarez, Ana I; Espín, Juan C

    2013-05-08

    The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is a drug efflux transporter that can affect the pharmacological and toxicological properties of many molecules. Urolithins, metabolites produced by the gut microbiota from ellagic acid (EA) and ellagitannins, have been acknowledged with in vivo anti-inflammatory and cancer chemopreventive properties. This study evaluated whether urolithins (Uro-A, -B, -C, and -D) and their main phase II metabolites Uro-A sulfate, Uro-A glucuronide, and Uro-B glucuronide as well as their precursor EA were substrates for ABCG2/BCRP. Parental and Bcrp1-transduced MDCKII cells were used for active transport assays. Uro-A and, to a lesser extent, Uro-A sulfate showed a significant increase in apically directed translocation in Bcrp1-transduced cells. Bcrp1 did not show affinity for the rest of the tested compounds. Data were confirmed for murine, human, bovine, and ovine BCRP-transduced subclones as well as with the use of the selective BCRP inhibitor Ko143. The transport inhibition by Uro-A was analyzed by flow cytometry compared to Ko143 using the antineoplastic agent mitoxantrone as a model substrate. Results showed that Uro-A was able to inhibit mitoxantrone transport in a dose-dependent manner. This study reports for the first time that Uro-A and its sulfate conjugate are ABCG2/BCRP substrates. The results suggest that physiologically relevant concentrations of these gut microbiota-derived metabolites could modulate ABCG2/BCRP-mediated transport processes and mechanisms of cancer drug resistance. Further in vivo investigations are warranted.

  19. Development of a model for functional studies of ABCG2 (breast cancer resistance protein) efflux employing a standard BeWo clone (B24).

    PubMed

    Crowe, Andrew; Keelan, Jeffrey A

    2012-10-01

    Human choriocarcinoma-derived BeWo cells express high levels of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) with no functional P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (ABCB1) activity, making them a potential model to study bidirectional ABCG2-mediated drug transport. However, the original BeWo clone (B24) available to researchers does not form confluent monolayers with tight junctions required by the model. Our aim was to adapt culture conditions to attempt to generate confluent BeWo monolayers for drug transport studies using the standard B24 clone. BeWo cells (B24; American Type Culture collection [ATCC]) were cultured in six-well plates or polycarbonate millicell inserts in a number of media formulations, growth supplements, and basement membrane substitutes. Cells were examined for confluence by microscopy, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) was measured daily; monolayer permeability was assessed when TEER had stabilized. Optimal growth rates were achieved in culture conditions consisting of Medium 199 (M199) supplemented with epidermal growth factor (EGF; 20 ng/mL), vitamin supplements, and 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) with collagen coating. A TEER of 170 Ω in 0.6 cm(2) inserts was achieved 2 weeks after seeding under optimal conditions. The cell-impermeable diffusion marker 5(6) carboxy-2,7dichlorodihydrofluorescein (C-DCDHF) had a permeability coefficient of 3.5×10(-6) cm/s, indicative of minimal paracellular permeability. ABCG2 expression, as determined by immunoblotting, remained unaffected by confluency. In conclusion, we describe culture conditions for the B24 BeWo clone that facilitate the formation of monolayers with tighter junctions and reduced paracellular transport compared to previously published models. These growth conditions provide a good model of ABCG2-mediated drug transport in a human placental cell line.

  20. The effects of ABCG2 on the viability, proliferation and paracrine actions of kidney side population cells under oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Bao; Meng, Qiu-Hong; Du, De-Wei; Sun, Ji-Feng; Wang, Jian-Bo; Han, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Bcrp1/ABCG2 is exclusively expressed in side population (SP) cells, however, it has not been fully elucidated whether it has an impact on the viability, proliferation and paracrine actions in kidney SP cells under oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by reoxygenation. In this study, we found that 2-h OGD did not injure SP cells (sub-lethal OGD) but induced SP cells proliferation 48 and 72 h after reoxygenation; whereas 4-h OGD markedly injured the cells (lethal OGD) and led to apoptosis 24-72 h after reoxygenation. Fumitremorgin C, an inhibitor of ABCG2, attenuated both the proliferation and viability of SP cells. Sub-lethal and lethal OGD induced the increase in the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor, insulin-like growth factor 1, hepatocyte growth factor, and stromal cell-derived factor-1α in kidney SP cells, which was inhibited by Fumitremorgin C. Collectively, these findings provide evidence for a crucial role for the ABCG2 expression in the viability, proliferation and paracrine actions of kidney SP cells after OGD.

  1. The antiepileptic drug lamotrigine is a substrate of mouse and human breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Römermann, Kerstin; Helmer, Renate; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is the major problem in the treatment of epilepsy. One hypothesis to explain AED resistance suggests that seizure-induced overexpression of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts AEDs to reach their brain targets. Various studies examined whether AEDs are substrates of P-glycoprotein (Pgp; MDR1; ABCB1), whereas information about the potential role of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) is scanty. We used a highly sensitive in vitro assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA) with MDCKII cells transduced with murine Bcrp1 or human BCRP to evaluate whether AEDs are substrates of this major efflux transporter. Six of 7 AEDs examined, namely phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, levetiracetam, topiramate, and valproate, were not transported by Bcrp at therapeutic concentrations, whereas lamotrigine exhibited a marked asymmetric, Bcrp-mediated transport in the CETA, which could be almost completely inhibited with the Bcrp inhibitor Ko143. Significant but less marked transport of lamotrigine was determined in MDCK cells transfected with human BCRP. Lamotrigine is also a substrate of human Pgp, so that this drug is the first AED that has been identified as a dual substrate of the two major human efflux transporters at the BBB. Previous in vivo studies have demonstrated a synergistic or cooperative role of Pgp and Bcrp in the efflux of dual substrates at the BBB, so that transport of lamotrigine by Pgp and BCRP may be an important mechanism of pharmacoresistance in epilepsy patients in whom both transporters are overexpressed.

  2. Kinetic Modeling of ABCG2 Transporter Heterogeneity: A Quantitative, Single-Cell Analysis of the Side Population Assay

    PubMed Central

    Prasanphanich, Adam F.; White, Douglas E.; Gran, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    The side population (SP) assay, a technique used in cancer and stem cell research, assesses the activity of ABC transporters on Hoechst staining in the presence and absence of transporter inhibition, identifying SP and non-SP cell (NSP) subpopulations by differential staining intensity. The interpretation of the assay is complicated because the transporter-mediated mechanisms fail to account for cell-to-cell variability within a population or adequately control the direct role of transporter activity on staining intensity. We hypothesized that differences in dye kinetics at the single-cell level, such as ABCG2 transporter-mediated efflux and DNA binding, are responsible for the differential cell staining that demarcates SP/NSP identity. We report changes in A549 phenotype during time in culture and with TGFβ treatment that correlate with SP size. Clonal expansion of individually sorted cells re-established both SP and NSPs, indicating that SP membership is dynamic. To assess the validity of a purely kinetics-based interpretation of SP/NSP identity, we developed a computational approach that simulated cell staining within a heterogeneous cell population; this exercise allowed for the direct inference of the role of transporter activity and inhibition on cell staining. Our simulated SP assay yielded appropriate SP responses for kinetic scenarios in which high transporter activity existed in a portion of the cells and little differential staining occurred in the majority of the population. With our approach for single-cell analysis, we observed SP and NSP cells at both ends of a transporter activity continuum, demonstrating that features of transporter activity as well as DNA content are determinants of SP/NSP identity. PMID:27851764

  3. Dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibitor Palomid 529 penetrates the blood-brain barrier without restriction by ABCB1 and ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan; Buil, Levi; Sherris, David; Beijnen, Jos H; van Tellingen, Olaf

    2013-09-01

    Palomid 529, a novel dual mTORC1/2 inhibitor has displayed interesting activities in experimental models and is a candidate for clinical evaluation. We have assessed the interaction of Palomid 529 with ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug efflux transporters ABCB1 (P-gp/P-glycoprotein) and ABCG2 (BCRP/Breast Cancer Resistant Protein) by in vitro transwell assays, and their effects on the brain penetration using drug disposition analysis of i.v. and oral Palomid 529 in wild-type (WT) and Abcb1 and/or Abcg2 knockout (KO) mice. Palomid 529 lacked affinity for these transporters in vitro, in contrast to GDC-0941, a small molecule PI3K inhibitor, which we used as control substance for in vitro transport. The plasma AUCi.v. of micronized and DMSO formulated Palomid 529 was similar in WT and KO mice. Importantly, the brain and brain tumor concentration of Palomid 529 at a high dose (54 mg/kg) was also similar in both strains, whereas a less than 1.4-fold difference (p < 0.05) was found at the low (5.4 mg/kg) dose. Because of poor solubility, the oral bioavailability of micronized Palomid 529 was only 5%. Olive oil or spray-dried formulation greatly improved the bioavailability up to 50%. Finally, Palomid 529 effectively inhibits the orthotopic U87 glioblastoma growth. In summary, Palomid 529 is the first mTOR targeting drug lacking affinity for ABCB1/ABCG2 and having good brain penetration. This warrants further evaluation of Palomid 529 for treatment of high-grade gliomas and other intracranial malignancies.

  4. Cobalt Chloride Induces Expression and Function of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in Human Renal Proximal Tubular Epithelial Cell Line HK-2.

    PubMed

    Nishihashi, Katsuki; Kawashima, Kei; Nomura, Takami; Urakami-Takebayashi, Yumiko; Miyazaki, Makoto; Takano, Mikihisa; Nagai, Junya

    2017-01-01

    The human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family, is a drug transporter restricting absorption and enhancing excretion of many compounds including anticancer drugs. The cis-regulatory elements in the BCRP promoter include a hypoxia response element, i.e., the DNA binding site for hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). In this study, we investigated the effect of cobalt chloride, a chemical inducer of HIF-1α, on the expression and function of BCRP in human renal proximal tubular cell line HK-2. Cobalt chloride treatment significantly increased the mRNA expression of not only glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), a typical HIF-1 target gene mRNA, but also ABCG2 mRNA in HK-2 cells. The BCRP inhibitor Ko143-sensitive accumulation of BCRP substrates such as Hoechst33342 and mitoxantrone was significantly enhanced by cobalt chloride treatment. In addition, treatment with cobalt chloride significantly increased the Ko143-sensitive accumulation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled methotrexate in HK-2 cells. Furthermore, cobalt chloride treatment attenuated the cytotoxicity induced by mitoxantrone and methotrexate, which might be, at least in part, due to the increase in BCRP-mediated transport activity via HIF-1 activation. These findings indicate that HIF-1 activation protects renal proximal tubular cells against BCRP substrate-induced cytotoxicity by enhancing the expression and function of BCRP in renal proximal tubular cells.

  5. The Full-Size ABCG Transporters Nb-ABCG1 and Nb-ABCG2 Function in Pre- and Postinvasion Defense against Phytophthora infestans in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yusuke; Ojika, Makoto; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Jones, David A; Kawakita, Kazuhito; Takemoto, Daigo

    2016-05-01

    The sesquiterpenoid capsidiol is the major phytoalexin produced by Nicotiana and Capsicum species. Capsidiol is produced in plant tissues attacked by pathogens and plays a major role in postinvasion defense by inhibiting pathogen growth. Using virus-induced gene silencing-based screening, we identified two Nicotiana benthamiana (wild tobacco) genes encoding functionally redundant full-size ABCG (PDR-type) transporters, Nb-ABCG1/PDR1 and Nb-ABCG2/PDR2, which are essential for resistance to the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans Silencing of Nb-ABCG1/2 compromised secretion of capsidiol, revealing Nb-ABCG1/2 as probable exporters of capsidiol. Accumulation of plasma membrane-localized Nb-ABCG1 and Nb-ABCG2 was observed at the site of pathogen penetration. Silencing of EAS (encoding 5-epi-aristolochene synthase), a gene for capsidiol biosynthesis, reduced resistance to P. infestans, but penetration by P. infestans was not affected. By contrast, Nb-ABCG1/2-silenced plants showed reduced penetration defense, indicating that Nb-ABCG1/2 are involved in preinvasion defense against P. infestans Plastidic GGPPS1 (geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase) was also found to be required for preinvasion defense, thereby suggesting that plastid-produced diterpene(s) are the antimicrobial compounds active in preinvasion defense. These findings suggest that N. benthamiana ABCG1/2 are involved in the export of both antimicrobial diterpene(s) for preinvasion defense and capsidiol for postinvasion defense against P. infestans.

  6. Acyclovir is a substrate for the human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2): implications for renal tubular transport and acyclovir-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gunness, Patrina; Aleksa, Katarina; Koren, Gideon

    2011-09-01

    The human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is widely expressed in human tissues, including the kidney. In mice, Bcrp1 (murine BCRP ortholog) mediates the transport of acyclovir into breast milk. It is plausible that acyclovir is also a substrate for the human BCRP. The objective of the study was to determine whether acyclovir is a substrate for human BCRP. Transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells (containing the wild-type ABCG2 gene) were exposed to [8-(14)C]acyclovir (1 µmol/L) in the presence or absence of the BCRP inhibitor fumitremorgin C (FTC). Intracellular acyclovir accumulation was assessed using a liquid scintillation counter. Coexposure to FTC resulted in a significant (5-fold) increase in the intracellular accumulation of acyclovir. The results suggest that acyclovir is a substrate for human BCRP. The study is the first to provide direct evidence for the role of human BCRP in acyclovir transport and its potential significance with respect to renal tubular transport of acyclovir and the direct renal tubular insult induced by the drug.

  7. Additive composite ABCG2, SLC2A9 and SLC22A12 scores of high-risk alleles with alcohol use modulate gout risk.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hung-Pin; Chung, Chia-Min; Min-Shan Ko, Albert; Lee, Su-Shin; Lai, Han-Ming; Lee, Chien-Hung; Huang, Chung-Ming; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the contribution of urate transporter genes and alcohol use to the risk of gout/tophi. Eight variants of ABCG2, SLC2A9, SLC22A12, SLC22A11 and SLC17A3 were genotyped in male individuals in a case-control study with 157 gout (33% tophi), 106 asymptomatic hyperuricaemia and 295 control subjects from Taiwan. The multilocus profiles of the genetic risk scores for urate gene variants were used to evaluate the risk of asymptomatic hyperuricaemia, gout and tophi. ABCG2 Q141K (T), SLC2A9 rs1014290 (A) and SLC22A12 rs475688 (C) under an additive model and alcohol use independently predicted the risk of gout (respective odds ratio for each factor=2.48, 2.03, 1.95 and 2.48). The additive composite Q141K, rs1014290 and rs475688 scores of high-risk alleles were associated with gout risk (P<0.0001). We observed the supramultiplicative interaction effect of genetic urate scores and alcohol use on gout and tophi risk (P for interaction=0.0452, 0.0033). The synergistic effect of genetic urate score 5-6 and alcohol use indicates that these combined factors correlate with gout and tophi occurrence.

  8. The bovine ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 Tyr581Ser single-nucleotide polymorphism increases milk secretion of the fluoroquinolone danofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Otero, Jon A; Real, Rebeca; de la Fuente, Álvaro; Prieto, Julio G; Marqués, Margarita; Álvarez, Ana I; Merino, Gracia

    2013-03-01

    The bovine adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein) polymorphism Tyr581Ser (Y581S) has recently been shown to increase in vitro transepithelial transport of antibiotics. Since this transporter has been extensively related to the active secretion of drugs into milk, the potential in vivo effect of this polymorphism on secretion of xenobiotics in livestock could have striking consequences for milk production, the dairy industry, and public health. Our purpose was to study the in vivo effect of this polymorphism on the secretion of danofloxacin, a widely used veterinary antibiotic, into milk. Danofloxacin (1.25 mg/kg) was administered to six Y/Y 581 homozygous and six Y/S 581 heterozygous lactating cows, and plasma and milk samples were collected and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. No differences were found in the pharmacokinetic parameters of danofloxacin in plasma between the two groups of animals. In contrast, Y/S heterozygous cows showed a 2-fold increase in danofloxacin levels in milk. In addition, the pharmacokinetic elimination parameters, mean residence time and elimination half-life, were significantly lower in the milk of the animals carrying the Y/S polymorphism. These in vivo results are in agreement with our previously published in vitro data, which showed a greater capacity of the S581 variant in accumulation assays, and demonstrate, for the first time, an important effect of the Y581S single-nucleotide polymorphism on antibiotic secretion into cow milk. These findings could be extended to other ABCG2 substrates, and may be relevant for the treatment of mastitis and for the design of accurate and novel strategies to handle milk residues.

  9. Elevated expression of Nrf2 mediates multidrug resistance in CD133+ head and neck squamous cell carcinoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bao-Cai; Li, Jing; Yu, Wen-Fa; Zhang, Guo-Zheng; Wang, Hui-Min; Ma, Hui-Min

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein ABC sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2) in cancer stem cells (CSCs) plays a major role in chemotherapeutic drug efflux, which results in therapy failure and tumor relapse. In addition to downregulating apoptosis in CSCs, it has been reported that the transcriptional upregulation of the redox sensing factor Nrf2 is involved in the upregulation of ABCG2 expression and consequent chemoresistance. The current study investigated the presence of cancer stem-like side population (SP) cells from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) samples, and evaluated the Nrf2 expression profile and multidrug resistance properties of HNSCC stem cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting was used for SP cells detection, while reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used for the analysis of Nrf2 expression. The present study identified ~2.1% SP cells present in HNSCC specimens, which were positive for cluster of differentiation (CD)133 expression and displayed significantly elevated messenger RNA expression of Nrf2, compared with non-SP cells. These data suggest that the ABC transporter ABCG2 is highly upregulated in SP cells, and this results in multidrug resistance. In addition, these CD133+ cells underwent rapid proliferation and exhibited high self-renewal and tumorigenic properties. Taken together, the present findings suggest that elevated expression of Nrf2 mediated drug resistance in HNSCC CSCs, which may be one of the causative factors for cancer treatment failure. Therefore, novel anti-cancer drugs that downregulate the Nrf2 signaling pathway could effectively improve the treatment and survival rate of patients with HNSCC. PMID:28101198

  10. IL-17A exacerbates cisplatin-based resistance of OVCA via upregulating the expression of ABCG2 and MDR1 through Gli1-mediated Hh signaling.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiulong; Liu, Wenxing; Wang, Yue; Liu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Hongjian; Li, Zhijun; Li, Hongzhao; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Deng, Weimin

    2016-07-18

    The major obstacle of the tumor chemotherapy, including ovarian cancer (OVCA), is drug resistance. However, the relevance of IL-17A with drug-resistance of OVCA has been poorly elaborated. In this study, we used 2 human OVCA cell lines to investigate the effects of IL-17A on cisplatin (CDDP or DDP)-based resistance in OVCA cells and the underlying mechanisms. Meanwhile, IL-17A-deficient mice and ID8 were used to verify the IL-17A's effects on OVCA chemo-resistance in vivo. Moreover, the relationship between IL-17A level and relevant indices were primarily assessed in ovarian specimens from 55 patients with OVCA. We found that rhIL-17A exacerbated DDP-based resistance of OVCA cells via up-regulating the expression of ABCG2 and MDR1 through Gli1-mediated Hh signal pathway. Animal experiment demonstrated that IL-17A significantly recede DDP-based treatment for ID8 tumor. Similar results were observed in preliminary clinical investigation. Our findings suggest that inhibiting IL-17A/IL-17RA-Gli1 signal may improve the resistance of OVCA to DDP.

  11. Interaction of enrofloxacin with breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2): influence of flavonoids and role in milk secretion in sheep.

    PubMed

    Pulido, Mivis M; Molina, Antonio J; Merino, Gracia; Mendoza, Gracia; Prieto, Julio G; Alvarez, Ana I

    2006-08-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)/ABCG2 is a high-capacity efflux transporter with wide substrate specificity located in apical membranes of epithelia, which is involved in drug availability. BCRP is responsible for the active secretion of clinically and toxicologically important substrates to milk. The present study shows BCRP expression in sheep and cow by immunoblotting with MAb (BXP-53). Vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity with specific BCRP substrates and inhibitors was measured in bovine mammary gland homogenates. To assess the role of BCRP in ruminant mammary gland we tested the fluoroquinolone enrofloxacin (ENRO). In polarized cell lines, ENRO was transported by Bcrp1/BCRP with secretory/absorptive ratios of 6.5 and 2 respectively. The efflux was blocked by the BCRP inhibitor Ko143. ENRO pharmacokinetics in plasma and milk was studied in sheep after co-administration of drug (2.5 mg/kg, i.v.) and genistein (0.8 mg/kg, i.m.) or albendazole sulfoxide (2 mg/kg, i.v) as BCRP inhibitors. Concomitant administration of BCRP inhibitors with ENRO had no significant effect on the plasma disposition kinetics of ENRO but decreased ENRO concentrations in milk.

  12. Mutations in the bovine ABCG2 and the ovine MSTN gene added to the few quantitative trait nucleotides identified in farm animals: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, M H

    2010-01-01

    The progress in molecular genetics in animal breeding is moderately effective as compared to traditional animal breeding using quantitative genetic approaches. There is an extensive disparity between the number of reported quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and their linked genetic variations in cattle, pig, and chicken. The identification of causative mutations affecting quantitative traits is still very challenging and hampered by the cloudy relationship between genotype and phenotype. There are relatively few reports in which a successful identification of a causative mutation for an animal production trait was demonstrated. The examples that have attracted considerable attention from the animal breeding community are briefly summarized and presented in a table. In this mini-review, the recent progress in mapping quantitative trait nucleotides (QTNs) are reviewed, including the ABCG2 gene mutation that underlies a QTL for fat and protein content and the ovine MSTN gene mutation that causes muscular hypertrophy in Texel sheep. It is concluded that the progress in molecular genetics might facilitate the elucidation of the genetic architecture of QTLs, so that also the high-hanging fruits can be harvested in order to contribute to efficient and sustainable animal production.

  13. Enhancement of the Effect of Methyl Pyropheophorbide-a-Mediated Photodynamic Therapy was Achieved by Increasing ROS via Inhibition of Nrf2-HO-1 or Nrf2-ABCG2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tian, Si; Yong, Min; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Li; Pan, Li; Chen, Qing; Li, Kai-Ting; Kong, Yu-Han; Jiang, Yuan; Yu, Ting-He; Yu, Le-Hua; Bai, Ding-Qun

    2017-03-27

    Emerging evidence indicates that the transcription factor nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (-NRF2) plays an essential role in cellular defense against oxidative stress; its activation has been related to cytoprotection. Here, we investigated the role of Nrf2 in improving the efficacy of methyl pyropheophorbide-a-mediated photodynamic therapy (Mppa-PDT) via the downregulation of Nrf2 in human ovarian cancer A2780 cells and SKOV3 cells. We found that Nrf2 translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in vitro and in vivo, and the expression of Nrf2 and P-Nrf2 increased through a possible mechanism regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) after Mppa-PDT treatment. Furthermore, cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by Mppa-PDT increased after Nrf2down-regulation. Nrf2 down -regulation increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels by attenuating antioxidants or pumping Mppa out of cells, which resulted from the inhibition of Nrf2-HO-1 or Nrf2-ABCG2 signaling. In addition, SKOV3 cells exhibited increased resistance to Mppa-PDT, and the expression levels of P-Nrf2 and ABCG2 were higher in SKOV3 cells than in A2780 cells, suggesting that Nrf2-ABCG2 signaling might be involved in the intrinsic resistanceto Mppa-PDT. Taken together, these results provided evidence that Nrf2 down-regulation can enhance the effect of Mppa-PDT.

  14. Up-regulation of hepatic ABCC2, ABCG2, CYP1A1 and GST in multixenobiotic-resistant killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from the Sydney Tar Ponds, Nova Scotia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Paetzold, S Christine; Ross, Neil W; Richards, Robert C; Jones, Martha; Hellou, Jocelyne; Bard, Shannon M

    2009-07-01

    Cellular defence against accumulation of toxic xenobiotics includes metabolism by phase I and II enzymes and export of toxicants and their metabolites via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Liver gene expression of representatives of these three protein groups was examined in a population of multixenobiotic-resistant killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from the Sydney Tar Ponds, Nova Scotia, Canada. The Tar Ponds are heavily polluted with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls and heavy metals. The relationship among ABC transporters ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCC2, ABCG2, phase I enzyme cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) and phase II enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST-mu) was investigated by quantifying hepatic transcript abundance. In Tar Pond killifish, hepatic mRNA expression levels of ABCC2, ABCG2, CYP1A1 and GST-mu were elevated compared to reference sites, suggesting that hydrophobic contaminants undergo phase I and II metabolism and are then excreted into the bile of these fish. Hepatic ABCB1 and ABCB11 mRNA were not up-regulated in Tar Pond fish compared to two reference sites, indicating that these two proteins are not involved in conferring multixenobiotic resistance to Tar Pond killifish. The results suggest instead that liver up-regulation of phase I and II enzymes and complementary ABC transporters ABCC2 and ABCG2 may confer contaminant resistance to Tar Pond fish.

  15. Inhibitory effect of epirubicin-loaded lipid microbubbles with conjugated anti-ABCG2 antibody combined with therapeutic ultrasound on multiple myeloma cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fangfang; Yang, Fang; He, Xiangfeng; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Songyan; Li, Miao; Zhang, Yunxia; Di, Wu; Dou, Jun; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) technique is thought to improve the chemotherapeutic agent delivery from microbubbles (MBs) in tumor tissues and reduce the side effects in non-tumor tissues. Multiple myeloma (MM) is a bone marrow cancer and remains to be an incurable disease. In this study, we used the UTMD technique to investigate the inhibitory effect of our developed novel reagent on MM cancer stem cells (CD138(-)CD34(-)MM CSCs) that are MM cells with CD138(-)CD34(-) phenotypes, responsible for MM-initiating potential, drug resistance and eventual relapse. The preparatory steps of novel reagent was first epirubicin (EPI)-loaded in the lipid MBs that was consisted of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000]-biotin, dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylglycerol and 25-NBD-cholesterol, then anti-ABCG2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) was conjugated onto the MB surface to form EPI-MBs+mAb. CD138(-)CD34(-)MM CSCs were isolated from human MM RPMI 8226 cell line by the magnetic associated cell sorting method. The results showed that the attenuated proliferation, migration and invasion ability, and increased apoptosis were observed when MM CSCs were incubated with a various agents. EPI-MBs+mAb combined with therapeutic ultrasound significantly promoted the MM CSC apoptosis compared with EPI, EPI-MBs alone or EPI-MBs+mAb without ultrasound exposure. These results suggest that the developed EPI-MBs+mAb combined with therapeutic ultrasound remarkably induced MM CSC apoptosis in vitro.

  16. Mouse breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) mediates etoposide resistance and transport, but etoposide oral availability is limited primarily by P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Allen, John D; Van Dort, Sonja C; Buitelaar, Marije; van Tellingen, Olaf; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2003-03-15

    The breast cancer resistance protein [BCRP (BCRP/ABCG2)] has not previously been directly identified as a source of resistance to epipodophyllotoxins.However, when P-glycoprotein (P-gp)- and Mrp1-deficient mouse fibroblast and kidney cell lines were selected for resistance to etoposide, amplification and overexpression of Bcrp1 emerged as the dominant resistance mechanism in five of five cases. Resistance was accompanied by reduced intracellular etoposide accumulation. Bcrp1 sequence in all of the resistant lines was wild-type in the region spanning the R482 mutation hot spot known to alter the substrate specificity of mouse Bcrp1 (mouse cognate of BCRP) and human BCRP. Transduced wild-type Bcrp1 cDNA mediated resistance to etoposide and teniposide in fibroblast lines and trans-epithelial etoposide transport in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells. Bcrp1-mediated etoposide resistance was reversed by two structurally different BCRP/Bcrp1 inhibitors, GF120918 and Ko143. BCRP/Bcrp1 (inhibition) might thus impact on the antitumor activity and pharmacokinetics of epipodophyllotoxins. However, treatment of P-gp-deficient mice with GF120918 did not improve etoposide oral uptake, suggesting that Bcrp1 activity is not a major limiting factor in this process. In contrast, use of GF120918 to inhibit P-gp in wild-type mice increased the plasma levels of etoposide after oral administration 4-5-fold. It may thus be worthwhile to test inhibition of P-gp in humans to improve the oral availability of etoposide.

  17. Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) in clinical pharmacokinetics and drug interactions: practical recommendations for clinical victim and perpetrator drug-drug interaction study design.

    PubMed

    Lee, Caroline A; O'Connor, Meeghan A; Ritchie, Tasha K; Galetin, Aleksandra; Cook, Jack A; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle; Ellens, Harma; Feng, Bo; Taub, Mitchell E; Paine, Mary F; Polli, Joseph W; Ware, Joseph A; Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) limits intestinal absorption of low-permeability substrate drugs and mediates biliary excretion of drugs and metabolites. Based on clinical evidence of BCRP-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and the c.421C>A functional polymorphism affecting drug efficacy and safety, both the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency recommend preclinical evaluation and, when appropriate, clinical assessment of BCRP-mediated DDIs. Although many BCRP substrates and inhibitors have been identified in vitro, clinical translation has been confounded by overlap with other transporters and metabolic enzymes. Regulatory recommendations for BCRP-mediated clinical DDI studies are challenging, as consensus is lacking on the choice of the most robust and specific human BCRP substrates and inhibitors and optimal study design. This review proposes a path forward based on a comprehensive analysis of available data. Oral sulfasalazine (1000 mg, immediate-release tablet) is the best available clinical substrate for intestinal BCRP, oral rosuvastatin (20 mg) for both intestinal and hepatic BCRP, and intravenous rosuvastatin (4 mg) for hepatic BCRP. Oral curcumin (2000 mg) and lapatinib (250 mg) are the best available clinical BCRP inhibitors. To interrogate the worst-case clinical BCRP DDI scenario, study subjects harboring the BCRP c.421C/C reference genotype are recommended. In addition, if sulfasalazine is selected as the substrate, subjects having the rapid acetylator phenotype are recommended. In the case of rosuvastatin, subjects with the organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 c.521T/T genotype are recommended, together with monitoring of rosuvastatin's cholesterol-lowering effect at baseline and DDI phase. A proof-of-concept clinical study is being planned by a collaborative consortium to evaluate the proposed BCRP DDI study design.

  18. ABCG2/BCRP decreases the transfer of a food-born chemical carcinogen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) in perfused term human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, Paeivi Kummu, Maria; Kangas, Tiina; Ilves, Mika; Immonen, Elina; Rysae, Jaana; Pirilae, Rauna; Lastumaeki, Anni; Vaehaekangas, Kirsi H.

    2008-10-15

    We have studied the role of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters in fetal exposure to carcinogens using 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) a known substrate for ABC transporters as a model compound. In perfusion of human term placenta, transfer of {sup 14}C-PhIP (2 {mu}M) through the placenta resulted in fetal-to-maternal concentration ratio (FM ratio) of 0.72 {+-} 0.09 at 6 h. The specific ABCG2 inhibitor KO143 increased the transfer of {sup 14}C-PhIP from maternal to fetal circulation (FM ratio 0.90 {+-} 0.08 at 6 h, p < 0.05) while the ABCC1/ABCC2 inhibitor probenecid had no effect (FM ratio at 6 h 0.75 {+-} 0.10, p = 0.84). There was a negative correlation between the expression of ABCG2 protein in perfused tissue and the FM ratio of {sup 14}C-PhIP (R = - 0.81, p < 0.01) at the end of the perfusion. The expression of ABCC2 protein did not correlate with FM ratio of PhIP (R: - 0.11, p = 0.76). In addition, PhIP induced the expression of ABC transporters in BeWo cells at mRNA level. In conclusion, our data indicates that ABCG2 decreases placental transfer of {sup 14}C-PhIP in perfused human placenta. Also, PhIP may modify ABC transporter expression in choriocarinoma cells.

  19. Sulfonation of raloxifene in HEK293 cells overexpressing SULT1A3: Involvement of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4/ABCC4) in excretion of sulfate metabolites.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaotong; Wang, Shaoxiang; Sun, Hua; Wu, Baojian

    2015-12-01

    Excretion of sulfate metabolites is an essential process in disposition of raloxifene via the sulfonation pathway. However, the transporters responsible for excretion of raloxifene sulfates remain undefined. Here, sulfonation of raloxifene and excretion of its sulfate metabolites were investigated using SULT1A3-overexpressing HEK293 cells (or SULT293 cells) with significant expression of BCRP and MRP4. SULT293 cell lysate catalyzed the sulfonation of raloxifene at both 6-OH and 4'-OH groups, generating raloxifene-6-sulfate (R-6-S) and raloxifene-4'-sulfate (R-4'-S), respectively. Sulfate formation followed the Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km = 0.49 μM and Vmax = 5.79 pmol/min/mg for R-6-S; Km = 0.33 μM and Vmax = 1.25 pmol/min/mg for R-4'-S). As expected, the recombinant SULT1A3 enzyme showed a high similarity in raloxifene sulfonation profiles with the lysate preparation. Ko143, a selective inhibitor of BCRP, significantly decreased the excretion rates of raloxifene sulfates (maximal 66.1%) while increasing the intracellular sulfates (maximal 282%). As a result, the apparent efflux clearance (CLef,app, representing the efflux efficiency of raloxifene sulfates) was substantially reduced (maximal 85.6%). Likewise, the pan-MRP inhibitor MK-571 significantly deceased the excretion rates (maximal 69.6%) and CLef,app values (maximal 96.0%) of raloxifene sulfates while increasing the intracellular sulfates (maximal 667%). Further, the short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting BCRP significantly reduced (maximal 35.0%) sulfate excretion. Use of BCRP shRNA also caused significant decreases (maximal 52.5%) in the CLef,app values. Silencing of MRP4 by shRNA led to a substantial alteration in sulfate disposition (i.e., 28.6-37.8% reductions in sulfate excretion, 30.5-59.3% elevations in intracellular sulfates, and 44.8-47.7% deceases in CLef,app values). In conclusion, two sulfate metabolites R-6-S and R-4'-S were generated from raloxifene in SULT293 cells. Cellular excretion of the raloxifene sulfates was mainly mediated by BCRP and MRP4.

  20. Human multidrug resistance ABCB and ABCG transporters: participation in a chemoimmunity defense system.

    PubMed

    Sarkadi, Balázs; Homolya, László; Szakács, Gergely; Váradi, András

    2006-10-01

    In this review we give an overview of the physiological functions of a group of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins, which were discovered, and still referred to, as multidrug resistance (MDR) transporters. Although they indeed play an important role in cancer drug resistance, their major physiological function is to provide general protection against hydrophobic xenobiotics. With a highly conserved structure, membrane topology, and mechanism of action, these essential transporters are preserved throughout all living systems, from bacteria to human. We describe the general structural and mechanistic features of the human MDR-ABC transporters and introduce some of the basic methods that can be applied for the analysis of their expression, function, regulation, and modulation. We treat in detail the biochemistry, cell biology, and physiology of the ABCB1 (MDR1/P-glycoprotein) and the ABCG2 (MXR/BCRP) proteins and describe emerging information related to additional ABCB- and ABCG-type transporters with a potential role in drug and xenobiotic resistance. Throughout this review we demonstrate and emphasize the general network characteristics of the MDR-ABC transporters, functioning at the cellular and physiological tissue barriers. In addition, we suggest that multidrug transporters are essential parts of an innate defense system, the "chemoimmunity" network, which has a number of features reminiscent of classical immunology.

  1. Activity of the dietary flavonoid, apigenin, against multidrug-resistant tumor cells as determined by pharmacogenomics and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mohamed; Kadioglu, Onat; Khalid, Hassan; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Apigenin is a common dietary flavonoid with considerable cytotoxic activity in vitro and in vivo. Despite many mechanistic studies, less is known about resistance factors hampering apigenin's activity. We investigated the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters BCRP/ABCG2, P-glycoprotein/ABCB1 and its close relative ABCB5. Multidrug-resistant cells overexpressing these ABC transporters were not cross-resistant toward apigenin. Moreover, apigenin inhibited not only P-glycoprotein but also BCRP by increasing cellular uptake of doxorubicin and synergistic inhibition of cell viability in combination with doxorubicin or docetaxel in multidrug-resistant cells. To perform in silico molecular docking studies, we first generated homology models for human P-glycoprotein and ABCB5 based on the crystal structure of murine P-glycoprotein. Their nucleotide binding domains (NDBs) revealed the highest degrees of sequence homologies (89%-100%), indicating that ATP binding and cleavage is of crucial importance for ABC transporters. Molecular docking of apigenin bound to the NDBs of P-glycoprotein and ABCB5 in molecular docking studies. Hence, apigenin may compete with ATP for NDB-binding leading to energy depletion to fuel the transport of ABC transporter substrates. Furthermore, we performed COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of transcriptome-wide mRNA expression profiles of the National Cancer Institute tumor cell line panel. Microarray-based mRNA expressions of genes of diverse biological functions (signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, ubiquitination, autophagy, metabolic activity, xenobiotic detoxification and microtubule formation) significantly predicted responsiveness of tumor cells to apigenin. In conclusion, apigenin's activity is not hampered by classical mechanisms of multidrug resistance and the inhibition of ABC transporters by apigenin indicates that apigenin may overcome multidrug resistance in otherwise refractory tumors.

  2. Imidazoacridinone-dependent lysosomal photodestruction: a pharmacological Trojan horse approach to eradicate multidrug-resistant cancers

    PubMed Central

    Adar, Y; Stark, M; Bram, E E; Nowak-Sliwinska, P; van den Bergh, H; Szewczyk, G; Sarna, T; Skladanowski, A; Griffioen, A W; Assaraf, Y G

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a primary hindrance to curative cancer therapy. Thus, introduction of novel strategies to overcome MDR is of paramount therapeutic significance. Sequestration of chemotherapeutics in lysosomes is an established mechanism of drug resistance. Here, we show that MDR cells display a marked increase in lysosome number. We further demonstrate that imidazoacridinones (IAs), which are cytotoxic fluorochromes, undergo a dramatic compartmentalization in lysosomes because of their hydrophobic weak base nature. We hence developed a novel photoactivation-based pharmacological Trojan horse approach to target and eradicate MDR cancer cells based on photo-rupture of IA-loaded lysosomes and tumor cell lysis via formation of reactive oxygen species. Illumination of IA-loaded cells resulted in lysosomal photodestruction and restoration of parental cell drug sensitivity. Lysosomal photodestruction of MDR cells overexpressing the key MDR efflux transporters ABCG2, ABCB1 or ABCC1 resulted in 10- to 52-fold lower IC50 values of various IAs, thereby restoring parental cell sensitivity. Finally, in vivo application of this photodynamic therapy strategy after i.v. injection of IAs in human ovarian tumor xenografts in the chorioallantoic membrane model revealed selective destruction of tumors and their associated vasculature. These findings identify lysosomal sequestration of IAs as an Achilles heel of MDR cells that can be harnessed to eradicate MDR tumor cells via lysosomal photodestruction. PMID:22476101

  3. The effect of low pH on breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2)-mediated transport of methotrexate, 7-hydroxymethotrexate, methotrexate diglutamate, folic acid, mitoxantrone, topotecan, and resveratrol in in vitro drug transport models.

    PubMed

    Breedveld, Pauline; Pluim, Dick; Cipriani, Greta; Dahlhaus, Femke; van Eijndhoven, Maria A J; de Wolf, Cornelia J F; Kuil, Annemieke; Beijnen, Jos H; Scheffer, George L; Jansen, Gerrit; Borst, Piet; Schellens, Jan H M

    2007-01-01

    Some cellular uptake systems for (anti)folates function optimally at acidic pH. We have tested whether this also applies to efflux from cells by breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2), which has been reported to transport folic acid, methotrexate, and methotrexate di- and triglutamate at physiological pH. Using Spodoptera frugiperda-BCRP membrane vesicles, we showed that the ATP-dependent vesicular transport of 1 muM methotrexate by BCRP is 5-fold higher at pH 5.5 than at physiological pH. The transport of methotrexate was saturable at pH 5.5, with apparent Km and Vmax values of 1.3 +/- 0.2 mM and 44 +/- 2.5 nmol/mg of protein/min, respectively, but was linear with drug concentration at pH 7.3 up to 6 mM methotrexate. In contrast to recent reports, we did not detect transport of methotrexate diglutamate at physiological pH, but we did find transport at pH 5.5. We also found that 7-hydroxy-methotrexate, the major metabolite of methotrexate, is transported by BCRP both at physiological pH and (more efficiently) at low pH. The pH effect was also observed in intact BCRP-overexpressing cells: we found a 3-fold higher level of resistance to both methotrexate and the prototypical BCRP substrate mitoxantrone at pH 6.5 as at physiological pH. Furthermore, with MDCKII-BCRP monolayers, we found that resveratrol, which is a neutral compound at pH < or = 7.4, is efficiently transported by BCRP at pH 6.0, whereas we did not detect active transport at pH 7.4. We conclude that BCRP transports substrate drugs more efficiently at low pH, independent of the dissociation status of the substrate.

  4. Breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) reduces systemic exposure of the dietary carcinogens aflatoxin B1, IQ and Trp-P-1 but also mediates their secretion into breast milk.

    PubMed

    van Herwaarden, Antonius E; Wagenaar, Els; Karnekamp, Barbara; Merino, Gracia; Jonker, Johan W; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2006-01-01

    The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) usually protects the body from a wide variety of environmental and dietary xenotoxins by reducing their net uptake from intestine and by increasing their hepatobiliary, intestinal and renal elimination. BCRP is also highly expressed in lactating mammary glands in mice, and this expression is conserved in cows and humans. As a result, BCRP substrates can be secreted into milk. We investigated whether different classes of dietary carcinogens are substrates of Bcrp1/BCRP and the implications for systemic exposure and breast milk contamination. Using polarized cell lines, we found that Bcrp1 transports the heterocyclic amines 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) and 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-1) and the potent human hepatocarcinogen aflatoxin B1, and decreases their cellular accumulation up to 10-fold. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies showed that [14C]IQ, [14C]Trp-P-1 and [3H]aflatoxin B1 plasma levels were substantially lower in wild-type compared with Bcrp1-/- mice, after both oral and intravenous administration, demonstrating that Bcrp1 restricts systemic exposure to these carcinogens. Moreover, Bcrp1 mediates transfer of [14C]IQ, [14C]Trp-P-1 and [3H]aflatoxin into milk, with 3.4+/-0.6, 2.6+/-0.3 and 3.8+/-0.5-fold higher milk to plasma ratios, respectively, in lactating wild-type versus Bcrp1-/- mice. We have thus identified Bcrp1/BCRP as one of the molecular mechanisms by which heterocyclic amines and aflatoxin are transferred into milk, thereby posing a health risk to breast-fed infants and dairy consumers. Paradoxically, Bcrp1/BCRP appears to have both protective and adverse roles with respect to exposure to dietary carcinogens.

  5. Effect of variations in the amounts of P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), BCRP (ABCG2) and CYP3A4 along the human small intestine on PBPK models for predicting intestinal first pass.

    PubMed

    Bruyère, Arnaud; Declèves, Xavier; Bouzom, Francois; Ball, Kathryn; Marques, Catie; Treton, Xavier; Pocard, Marc; Valleur, Patrice; Bouhnik, Yoram; Panis, Yves; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Mouly, Stephane

    2010-10-04

    It is difficult to predict the first-pass effect in the human intestine due to a lack of scaling factors for correlating in vitro and in vivo data. We have quantified cytochrome P450/3A4 (CYP3A4) and two ABC transporters, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) and the breast cancer resistant protein BCRP (ABCG2), throughout the human small intestine to determine the scaling factors for predicting clearance from intestinal microsomes and develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. CYP3A4, P-gp and BCRP proteins were quantified by Western blotting and/or enzyme activities in small intestine samples from 19 donors, and mathematical trends of these expressions with intestinal localization were established. Microsome fractions were prepared and used to calculate the amount of microsomal protein per gram of intestine (MPPGI). Our results showed a trend in CYP3A4 expression decrease from the upper to the lower small intestine while P-gp expression is increasing. In contrast, BCRP expression did not vary significantly with position, but varied greatly between individuals. The MPPGI (mg microsomal protein per centimeter intestine) remained constant along the length of the small intestine, at about 1.55 mg/cm. Moreover, intrinsic clearance measured with specific CYP3A4 substrates (midazolam and an in-house Servier drug) and intestinal microsomes was well correlated with the amount of CYP3A4 (R(2) > 0.91, p < 0.01). In vivo data were more accurately predicted using PBPK models of blood concentrations of these two substrates based on the segmental distributions of these enzymes and MPPGI determined in this study. Thus, these mathematical trends can be used to predict drug absorption at different intestinal sites and their metabolism can be predicted with the MPPGI.

  6. mRNA expression profile of multidrug-resistant genes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia of children, a prognostic value for ABCA3 and ABCA2.

    PubMed

    Rahgozar, Soheila; Moafi, Alireza; Abedi, Marjan; Entezar-E-Ghaem, Mansureh; Moshtaghian, Jamal; Ghaedi, Kamran; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Montazeri, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is an important cause of treatment failure in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ABC family of membrane transporters is proposed, albeit with controversy, to be involved in this process. The present study aims to investigate the mRNA expression profile of several genes of this family, including ABCA2, ABCA3, ABCB1/MDR1, MRP1/ABCC1, MRP3/ABCC3, ABCG2/BCRP, and the intracellular transporter MVP/LRP, in childhood ALL, and to evaluate their association with response to therapy. Some genes in the present research are being studied for the first time in Iran. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we evaluated 27 children with ALL at diagnosis and 15 children with normal bone marrow. The status of response to therapy was assessed one year after the onset of therapy through investigating the IgH/TCRγ gene rearrangements. Our findings indicate a considerable and direct relationship between mRNA expression levels of ABCA2, ABCA3, MDR1, and MRP1 genes and positive minimal residual disease (MRD) measured after one year of treatment. Statistical analysis revealed that expression of these genes higher than the cutoff point will raise the risk of MRD by 15-, 6.25-, 12-, and 9-fold, respectively. No relationship was found between of MVP/LRP, MRP3 and ABCG2 genes expression and ALL prognoses. Considering the direct and significant relationship between the increased expression of ABCA2, ABCA3, MDR1, and MRP1 genes and positive risk of MRD in children with ALL, evaluating the expression profile of these genes on diagnosis may identify high risk individuals and help plan a more efficient treatment strategy.

  7. mRNA expression profile of multidrug-resistant genes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia of children, a prognostic value for ABCA3 and ABCA2

    PubMed Central

    Rahgozar, Soheila; Moafi, Alireza; Abedi, Marjan; Entezar-e-ghaem, Mansureh; Moshtaghian, Jamal; Ghaedi, Kamran; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Montazeri, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is an important cause of treatment failure in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ABC family of membrane transporters is proposed, albeit with controversy, to be involved in this process. The present study aims to investigate the mRNA expression profile of several genes of this family, including ABCA2, ABCA3, ABCB1/MDR1, MRP1/ABCC1, MRP3/ABCC3, ABCG2/BCRP, and the intracellular transporter MVP/LRP, in childhood ALL, and to evaluate their association with response to therapy. Some genes in the present research are being studied for the first time in Iran. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we evaluated 27 children with ALL at diagnosis and 15 children with normal bone marrow. The status of response to therapy was assessed one year after the onset of therapy through investigating the IgH/TCRγ gene rearrangements. Our findings indicate a considerable and direct relationship between mRNA expression levels of ABCA2, ABCA3, MDR1, and MRP1 genes and positive minimal residual disease (MRD) measured after one year of treatment. Statistical analysis revealed that expression of these genes higher than the cutoff point will raise the risk of MRD by 15-, 6.25-, 12-, and 9-fold, respectively. No relationship was found between of MVP/LRP, MRP3 and ABCG2 genes expression and ALL prognoses. Considering the direct and significant relationship between the increased expression of ABCA2, ABCA3, MDR1, and MRP1 genes and positive risk of MRD in children with ALL, evaluating the expression profile of these genes on diagnosis may identify high risk individuals and help plan a more efficient treatment strategy. PMID:24145140

  8. MDRO - Multidrug-Resistant Organisms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hazards (Lack of) PPE Slips/Trips/Falls Stress Tuberculosis Universal Precautions Workplace Violence Use of Medical Lasers ... PRSP - Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis (MDR) TB is covered in HealthCare Wide Hazards ...

  9. A molecular understanding of ATP-dependent solute transport by multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP1.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiu-bao

    2007-03-01

    Over a million new cases of cancers are diagnosed each year in the United States and over half of these patients die from these devastating diseases. Thus, cancers cause a major public health problem in the United States and worldwide. Chemotherapy remains the principal mode to treat many metastatic cancers. However, occurrence of cellular multidrug resistance (MDR) prevents efficient killing of cancer cells, leading to chemotherapeutic treatment failure. Numerous mechanisms of MDR exist in cancer cells, such as intrinsic or acquired MDR. Overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp or ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP or ABCG2) and/or multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP1 or ABCC1), confers an acquired MDR due to their capabilities of transporting a broad range of chemically diverse anticancer drugs. In addition to their roles in MDR, there is substantial evidence suggesting that these drug transporters have functions in tissue defense. Basically, these drug transporters are expressed in tissues important for absorption, such as in lung and gut, and for metabolism and elimination, such as in liver and kidney. In addition, these drug transporters play an important role in maintaining the barrier function of many tissues including blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebral spinal fluid barrier, blood-testis barrier and the maternal-fetal barrier. Thus, these ATP-dependent drug transporters play an important role in the absorption, disposition and elimination of the structurally diverse array of the endobiotics and xenobiotics. In this review, the molecular mechanism of ATP-dependent solute transport by MRP1 will be addressed.

  10. Multidrug-Resistant TB

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Helen; Coomans, Fons

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress (REBSP) is a little-known but potentially valuable right that can contribute to rights-based approaches to addressing multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). We argue that better understanding of the REBSP may help to advance legal and civil society action for health rights. While the REBSP does not provide an individual entitlement to have a new drug developed for MDR-TB, it sets up entitlements to expect a state to establish a legislative and policy framework aimed at developing scientific capacity to address the most important health issues and at disseminating the outcomes of scientific research. By making scientific findings available and accessible, people can be enabled to claim the use of science for social benefits. Inasmuch as the market fails to address neglected diseases such as MDR-TB, the REBSP provides a potential counterbalance to frame a positive obligation on states to both marshal their own resources and to coordinate the actions of multiple other actors towards this goal, including non-state actors. While the latter do not hold the same level of accountability as states, the REBSP can still enable the recognition of obligations at a level of “soft law” responsibilities. PMID:27780997

  11. Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Vikas; Sanchaita, Sinha; Singh, NP

    2010-01-01

    Emergence and spread of Acinetobacter species, resistant to most of the available antimicrobial agents, is an area of great concern. It is now being frequently associated with healthcare associated infections. Literature was searched at PUBMED, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Library, using the terms ‘Acinetobacter Resistance, multidrug resistant (MDR), Antimicrobial Therapy, Outbreak, Colistin, Tigecycline, AmpC enzymes, and carbapenemases in various combinations. The terms such as MDR, Extensively Drug Resistant (XDR), and Pan Drug Resistant (PDR) have been used in published literature with varied definitions, leading to confusion in the correlation of data from various studies. In this review various mechanisms of resistance in the Acinetobacter species have been discussed. The review also probes upon the current therapeutic options, including combination therapies available to treat infections due to resistant Acinetobacter species in adults as well as children. There is an urgent need to enforce infection control measures and antimicrobial stewardship programs to prevent the further spread of these resistant Acinetobacter species and to delay the emergence of increased resistance in the bacteria. PMID:20927292

  12. Multidrug resistance proteins restrain the intestinal absorption of trans-resveratrol in rats.

    PubMed

    Juan, M Emília; González-Pons, Eulalia; Planas, Joana M

    2010-03-01

    trans-Resveratrol, a natural antioxidant, has been described as a nutraceutic compound with important beneficial effects on health, but its low oral bioavailability hinders its therapeutic activity. Here, we studied the mechanisms of apical transport of trans-resveratrol in enterocytes and the role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the secretion of resveratrol glucuronide and sulfate resulting from the rapid intracellular metabolism. An intestinal perfusion method with recirculation in vivo was used in rats. Jejunal loops were perfused with increasing concentrations of trans-resveratrol and results showed that its uptake occurs by simple diffusion without the participation of a mediated transport. The apparent diffusion constant was 8.1 +/- 0.3 microL/(5 min.mg dry weight). The glycoprotein-P (Pgp, ABCB1), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2, ABCC2), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) located in the apical membrane of enterocytes were investigated using specific inhibitors. The Pgp inhibitors verapamil (5 micromol/L) and cyclosporin A (5 micromol/L) did not affect the efflux of trans-resveratrol and its conjugates. The MRP2 inhibitors probenecid (2 mmol/L) and MK571 (10 micromol/L) reduced the efflux of glucuronide by 61 and 55%, respectively, and of sulfate by 43 and 28%, respectively. The BCRP inhibitor Ko143 (0.5 micromol/L) decreased the secretion of glucuronide by 64% and of sulfate by 46%. Our experiments identify MRP2 and BCRP as the 2 apical transporters involved in the efflux of resveratrol conjugates.

  13. Association of Multi-Drug Resistance Gene Polymorphisms with Pancreatic Cancer Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Motofumi; Okazaki, Taro; Suzuki, Hideo; Abbruzzese, James L.; Li, Donghui

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of multi-drug resistance genes that are associated with clinical outcome in patients with potentially resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma who were treated with preoperative gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. METHODS We selected 8 SNPs of 7 drug resistance genes; MDR1 (ABCB1), MRP1-5 (ABCC1-5), and BCRP (ABCG2), which have been reported to be important in mediating drug resistance. Genotype was determined by the Taqman method. The associations of genotype with tumor response to therapy and overall survival (OS) were evaluated using log-rank test, Cox regression, and logistic regression models. RESULTS MRP5 A-2G AA genotype showed significant association with OS (log-rank P =.010). The hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) was 1.65 (1.11-2.45) after adjusting for clinical predictors. The MRP2 G40A GG genotype had a weak association with reduced OS (log-rank P =.097). A combined effect of the two genotypes on OS was observed. Patients with none of the adverse genotypes had a median survival time (MST) of 34.0 months, and those with 1-2 deleterious alleles had a significantly lower MST of 20.7 months, respectively (log-rank P =.006). MRP2 G40A GG genotype was also significantly associated with poor histological response to chemoradiotherapy (P =.028). CONCLUSIONS These observations suggest a potential role of polymorphic variants of drug resistance genes to predict a therapeutic efficacy and survival of patients with potentially resectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:20922799

  14. Effect of Prostaglandin E2 on Multidrug Resistance Transporters In Human Placental Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gene T.; Dong, Yafeng; Zhou, Helen; He, Lily; Weiner, Carl P.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2, a major product of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, acts as an immunomodulator at the maternal-fetal interface during pregnancy. It exerts biologic function through interaction with E-prostanoid (EP) receptors localized to the placenta. The activation of the COX-2/PGE2/EP signal pathway can alter the expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, multidrug resistance protein 1 [P-glycoprotein (Pgp); gene: ABCB1], and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; gene: ABCG2), which function to extrude drugs and xenobiotics from cells. In the placenta, PGE2-mediated changes in ABC transporter expression could impact fetal drug exposure. Furthermore, understanding the signaling cascades involved could lead to strategies for the control of Pgp and BCRP expression levels. We sought to determine the impact of PGE2 signaling mechanisms on Pgp and BCRP in human placental cells. The treatment of placental cells with PGE2 up-regulated BCRP expression and resulted in decreased cellular accumulation of the fluorescent substrate Hoechst 33342. Inhibiting the EP1 and EP3 receptors with specific antagonists attenuated the increase in BCRP. EP receptor signaling results in activation of transcription factors, which can affect BCRP expression. Although PGE2 decreased nuclear factor κ-light chain-enhancer of activated B activation and increased activator protein 1, chemical inhibition of these inflammatory transcription factors did not blunt BCRP up-regulation by PGE2. Though PGE2 decreased Pgp mRNA, Pgp expression and function were not significantly altered. Overall, these findings suggest a possible role for PGE2 in the up-regulation of placental BCRP expression via EP1 and EP3 receptor signaling cascades. PMID:25261564

  15. Multidrug toxicity involving sumatriptan.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Jessica L; Vorce, Shawn P; Levine, Barry; Hughes, Rhome L; Bosy, Thomas Z

    2015-01-01

    A multidrug fatality involving sumatriptan is reported. Sumatriptan is a tryptamine derivative that acts at 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors and is used for the treatment of migraines. The decedent was a 21-year-old white female found dead in bed by her spouse. No signs of physical trauma were observed and a large number of prescription medications were discovered at the scene. Toxicological analysis of the central blood revealed sumatriptan at a concentration of 1.03 mg/L. Following therapeutic dosing guidelines, sumatriptan concentrations do not exceed 0.095 mg/L. Sumatriptan was isolated by solid-phase extraction and analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring mode. A tissue distribution study was completed with the following concentrations measured: 0.61 mg/L in femoral blood, 0.56 mg/L in iliac blood, 5.01 mg/L in urine, 0.51 mg/kg in liver, 3.66 mg/kg in kidney, 0.09 mg/kg in heart, 0.32 mg/kg in spleen, 0.01 mg/kg in brain, 15.99 mg/kg in lung and 78.54 mg/45 mL in the stomach contents. Carisoprodol, meprobamate, fluoxetine, doxylamine, orphenadrine, dextromethorphan and hydroxyzine were also present in the blood at the following concentrations: 3.35, 2.36, 0.63, 0.19, 0.06, 0.55 and 0.16 mg/L. The medical examiner ruled the cause of death as acute mixed drug toxicity and the manner of death as accident.

  16. The choreography of multidrug export.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Rupak; Gutmann, Daniel A P; Khoo, Yvonne S K; Fagg, Lisa A; van Veen, Hendrik W

    2011-06-01

    Multidrug transporters have a crucial role in causing the drug resistance that can arise in infectious micro-organisms and tumours. These integral membrane proteins mediate the export of a broad range of unrelated compounds from cells, including antibiotics and anticancer agents, thus reducing the concentration of these compounds to subtoxic levels in target cells. In spite of intensive research, it is not clear exactly how multidrug transporters work. The present review focuses on recent advancements in the biochemistry and structural biology of bacterial and human multidrug ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters. These advancements point to a common mechanism in which polyspecific drug-binding surfaces in the membrane domains are alternately exposed to the inside and outside surface of the membrane in response to the ATP-driven dimerization of nucleotide-binding domains and their dissociation following ATP hydrolysis.

  17. Pien Tze Huang Overcomes Multidrug Resistance and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells via Suppression of TGF-β Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Aling; Chen, Hongwei; Chen, Youqin; Lin, Wei; Liu, Liya; Sferra, Thomas J.; Peng, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The traditional Chinese medicine formula Pien Tze Huang (PZH) has long been used as a folk remedy for cancer. To elucidate the mode of action of PZH against cancer, in the present study we used a 5-FU resistant human colorectal carcinoma cell line (HCT-8/5-FU) to evaluate the effects of PZH on multidrug resistance (MDR) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) as well as the activation of TGF-β pathway. We found that PZH dose-dependently inhibited the viability of HCT-8/5-FU cells which were insensitive to treatment of 5-FU and ADM, demonstrating the ability of PZH to overcome chemoresistance. Furthermore, PZH increased the intercellular accumulation of Rhodamine-123 and downregulated the expression of ABCG2 in HCT-8/5-FU cells. In addition, drug resistance induced the process of EMT in HCT-8 cells as evidenced by EMT-related morphological changes and alteration in the expression of EMT-regulatory factors, which however was neutralized by PZH treatment. Moreover, PZH inhibited MDR/EMT-enhanced migration and invasion capabilities of HCT-8 cells in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed MDR-induced activation of TGF-β signaling in HCT-8/5-FU cells. Taken together, our study suggests that PZH can effectively overcome MDR and inhibit EMT in human colorectal carcinoma cells via suppression of the TGF-β pathway. PMID:25505925

  18. Pien Tze Huang Overcomes Multidrug Resistance and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells via Suppression of TGF-β Pathway.

    PubMed

    Shen, Aling; Chen, Hongwei; Chen, Youqin; Lin, Jiumao; Lin, Wei; Liu, Liya; Sferra, Thomas J; Peng, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The traditional Chinese medicine formula Pien Tze Huang (PZH) has long been used as a folk remedy for cancer. To elucidate the mode of action of PZH against cancer, in the present study we used a 5-FU resistant human colorectal carcinoma cell line (HCT-8/5-FU) to evaluate the effects of PZH on multidrug resistance (MDR) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) as well as the activation of TGF-β pathway. We found that PZH dose-dependently inhibited the viability of HCT-8/5-FU cells which were insensitive to treatment of 5-FU and ADM, demonstrating the ability of PZH to overcome chemoresistance. Furthermore, PZH increased the intercellular accumulation of Rhodamine-123 and downregulated the expression of ABCG2 in HCT-8/5-FU cells. In addition, drug resistance induced the process of EMT in HCT-8 cells as evidenced by EMT-related morphological changes and alteration in the expression of EMT-regulatory factors, which however was neutralized by PZH treatment. Moreover, PZH inhibited MDR/EMT-enhanced migration and invasion capabilities of HCT-8 cells in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed MDR-induced activation of TGF-β signaling in HCT-8/5-FU cells. Taken together, our study suggests that PZH can effectively overcome MDR and inhibit EMT in human colorectal carcinoma cells via suppression of the TGF-β pathway.

  19. Hepatocyte SLAMF3 reduced specifically the multidrugs resistance protein MRP-1 and increases HCC cells sensitization to anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Eugenio, Mélanie Simoes; Demey, Baptiste; Singh, Amrathlal Rabbind; Ossart, Christèle; Bagami, Mohammed Al; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Naassila, Mickael

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance MDR proteins (MRPs) are members of the C family of a group of proteins named ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. MRPs can transport drugs including anticancer drugs, nucleoside analogs, antimetabolites and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Drugs used in HCC therapy, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib, are substrates of uptake and/or efflux transporters. Variable expression of MRPs at the plasma membrane of tumor cells may contribute to drug resistance and subsequent clinical response. Recently, we reported that the hepatocyte SLAMF3 expression (Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Family member 3) was reduced in tumor cells from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to its high expression in adjacent tissues. In the present study, we make a strong correlation between induced SLAMF3 overexpression and the specific loss of MRP-1 expression and its functionalities as a drugs resistance transporter. No changes were observed on expression of ABCG2 and MDR. More importantly, we highlight a strong inverse correlation between MRP-1 and SLAMF3 expression in patients with HCC. We propose that the SLAMF3 overexpression in cancerous cells could represent a potential therapeutic strategy to improve the drugs sensibility of resistant cells and thus control the therapeutic failure in HCC patients. PMID:27081035

  20. Hepatocyte SLAMF3 reduced specifically the multidrugs resistance protein MRP-1 and increases HCC cells sensitization to anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Fouquet, Grégory; Debuysscher, Véronique; Ouled-Haddou, Hakim; Eugenio, Mélanie Simoes; Demey, Baptiste; Singh, Amrathlal Rabbind; Ossart, Christèle; Al Bagami, Mohammed; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Naassila, Mickael; Marcq, Ingrid; Bouhlal, Hicham

    2016-05-31

    Multidrug resistance MDR proteins (MRPs) are members of the C family of a group of proteins named ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. MRPs can transport drugs including anticancer drugs, nucleoside analogs, antimetabolites and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Drugs used in HCC therapy, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib, are substrates of uptake and/or efflux transporters. Variable expression of MRPs at the plasma membrane of tumor cells may contribute to drug resistance and subsequent clinical response. Recently, we reported that the hepatocyte SLAMF3 expression (Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Family member 3) was reduced in tumor cells from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to its high expression in adjacent tissues. In the present study, we make a strong correlation between induced SLAMF3 overexpression and the specific loss of MRP-1 expression and its functionalities as a drugs resistance transporter. No changes were observed on expression of ABCG2 and MDR. More importantly, we highlight a strong inverse correlation between MRP-1 and SLAMF3 expression in patients with HCC. We propose that the SLAMF3 overexpression in cancerous cells could represent a potential therapeutic strategy to improve the drugs sensibility of resistant cells and thus control the therapeutic failure in HCC patients.

  1. Proton-dependent multidrug efflux systems.

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, I T; Brown, M H; Skurray, R A

    1996-01-01

    Multidrug efflux systems display the ability to transport a variety of structurally unrelated drugs from a cell and consequently are capable of conferring resistance to a diverse range of chemotherapeutic agents. This review examines multidrug efflux systems which use the proton motive force to drive drug transport. These proteins are likely to operate as multidrug/proton antiporters and have been identified in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Such proton-dependent multidrug efflux proteins belong to three distinct families or superfamilies of transport proteins: the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), the small multidrug resistance (SMR) family, and the resistance/ nodulation/cell division (RND) family. The MFS consists of symporters, antiporters, and uniporters with either 12 or 14 transmembrane-spanning segments (TMS), and we show that within the MFS, three separate families include various multidrug/proton antiport proteins. The SMR family consists of proteins with four TMS, and the multidrug efflux proteins within this family are the smallest known secondary transporters. The RND family consists of 12-TMS transport proteins and includes a number of multidrug efflux proteins with particularly broad substrate specificity. In gram-negative bacteria, some multidrug efflux systems require two auxiliary constituents, which might enable drug transport to occur across both membranes of the cell envelope. These auxiliary constituents belong to the membrane fusion protein and the outer membrane factor families, respectively. This review examines in detail each of the characterized proton-linked multidrug efflux systems. The molecular basis of the broad substrate specificity of these transporters is discussed. The surprisingly wide distribution of multidrug efflux systems and their multiplicity in single organisms, with Escherichia coli, for instance, possessing at least nine proton-dependent multidrug efflux systems with overlapping specificities, is examined. We also

  2. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin: a potential drug transporter modulator capable of reducing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients.

  3. Role of multidrug resistance in photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diddens, Heyke C.

    1992-06-01

    Multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy is a well established phenomenon. One of the most common phenotypical changes in acquired or intrinsic multidrug resistance in human tumor cells is the overexpression of the mdrl gene product P-glycoprotein, which acts as an active efflux pump. Increased levels of P-glycoprotein are associated with resistance to a variety of anticancer drugs commonly used in tumor chemotherapy like anthracyclins, vinca- alcaloids, epipodophyllotoxins or actinomycin D. We investigated the efficacy or photodynamic therapy in the treatment of tumor cells expressing the multidrug resistance phenotype. Our data show that multidrug resistant cells are highly cross resistant to the phototoxic stain rhodamine 123 but exhibit only low degrees of cross resistance (2 - 3 -folds) to the photosensitizers Photosan-3, Clorin-2, methylene blue and meso-tetra (4- sulfonatophenyl) porphine (TPPS4). Resistance is associated with a decrease in intracellular accumulation of the photosensitizer. Verapamil, a membrane active compound known to enhance drug sensitivity in multidrug resistant cells by inhibition of P-glycoprotein, also increases phototoxicity in multidrug resistant cells. Our results imply that tumors expressing the multidrug resistance phenotype might fail to respond to photochemotherapy with rhodamine 123. On the other hand, multidrug resistance may not play an important role in photodynamic therapy with Photosan-3, Chlorin-2, methylene blue or TPPS4.

  4. Identification of the hepatic efflux transporters of organic anions using double-transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells expressing human organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1)/multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, OATP1B1/multidrug resistance 1, and OATP1B1/breast cancer resistance protein.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Soichiro; Maeda, Kazuya; Kondo, Chihiro; Hirano, Masaru; Sasaki, Makoto; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2005-09-01

    Until recently, it was generally believed that the transport of various organic anions across the bile canalicular membrane was mainly mediated by multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2/ABCC2). However, a number of new reports have shown that some organic anions are also substrates of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1/ABCB1) and/or breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), implying MDR1 and BCRP could also be involved in the biliary excretion of organic anions in humans. In the present study, we constructed new double-transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCKII) cells expressing organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1)/MDR1 and OATP1B1/BCRP, and we investigated the transcellular transport of four kinds of organic anions, estradiol-17beta-d-glucuronide (EG), estrone-3-sulfate (ES), pravastatin (PRA), and cerivastatin (CER), to identify which efflux transporters mediate the biliary excretion of compounds using double-transfected cells. We observed the vectorial transport of EG and ES in all the double transfectants. MRP2 showed the highest efflux clearance of EG among these efflux transporters, whereas BCRP-mediated clearance of ES was the highest in these double transfectants. In addition, two kinds of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors, CER and PRA, were also substrates of all these efflux transporters. The rank order of the efflux clearance of PRA mediated by each transporter was the same as that of EG, whereas the contribution of MDR1 to the efflux of CER was relatively greater than for PRA. This experimental system is very useful for identifying which transporters are involved in the biliary excretion of organic anions that cannot easily penetrate the plasma membrane.

  5. Structural and mechanistic diversity of multidrug transporters.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Jarrod J; Bruner, Steven D

    2016-10-26

    Covering: 2009 to mid 2016Multidrug transporters are common and prevalent in all orders of life, having diverse functions from the removal of toxins, resistance to cytotoxins, and the transport of specific eluents. In addition, multidrug transporters pose a significant threat to modern medicine. Able to transport structurally diverse small molecule drugs, these transporters are implicated in antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria, as well as chemotherapeutic-resistance cancer cells. Although important in such resistance, a relatively small number of multidrug transporters have been structurally characterized, primarily due to the difficulty in purifying and crystallizing active membrane proteins and protein complexes. This review will cover recent structural breakthroughs in the past six years that have led to increased knowledge of the mechanisms of multidrug transporter chemistry, and the role of these transporters in exporting secondary metabolites.

  6. Multidrug resistance: an emerging crisis.

    PubMed

    Tanwar, Jyoti; Das, Shrayanee; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2014-01-01

    The resistance among various microbial species (infectious agents) to different antimicrobial drugs has emerged as a cause of public health threat all over the world at a terrifying rate. Due to the pacing advent of new resistance mechanisms and decrease in efficiency of treating common infectious diseases, it results in failure of microbial response to standard treatment, leading to prolonged illness, higher expenditures for health care, and an immense risk of death. Almost all the capable infecting agents (e.g., bacteria, fungi, virus, and parasite) have employed high levels of multidrug resistance (MDR) with enhanced morbidity and mortality; thus, they are referred to as "super bugs." Although the development of MDR is a natural phenomenon, the inappropriate use of antimicrobial drugs, inadequate sanitary conditions, inappropriate food-handling, and poor infection prevention and control practices contribute to emergence of and encourage the further spread of MDR. Considering the significance of MDR, this paper, emphasizes the problems associated with MDR and the need to understand its significance and mechanisms to combat microbial infections.

  7. Deletions of multidrug resistance gene loci in breast cancer leads to the down-regulation of its expression and predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Litviakov, Nikolai V.; Cherdyntseva, Nadezhda V.; Tsyganov, Matvey M.; Slonimskaya, Elena M.; Ibragimova, Marina K.; Kazantseva, Polina V.; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Choinzonov, Eugeniy L.

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is intensively used for the treatment of primary breast cancer. In our previous studies, we reported that clinical tumor response to NAC is associated with the change of multidrug resistance (MDR) gene expression in tumors after chemotherapy. In this study we performed a combined analysis of MDR gene locus deletions in tumor DNA, MDR gene expression and clinical response to NAC in 73 BC patients. Copy number variations (CNVs) in biopsy specimens were tested using high-density microarray platform CytoScanTM HD Array (Affymetrix, USA). 75%–100% persons having deletions of MDR gene loci demonstrated the down-regulation of MDR gene expression. Expression of MDR genes was 2–8 times lower in patients with deletion than in patients having no deletion only in post-NAC tumors samples but not in tumor tissue before chemotherapy. All patients with deletions of ABCB1 ABCB 3 ABCC5 gene loci – 7q21.1, 6p21.32, 3q27 correspondingly, and most patients having deletions in ABCC1 (16p13.1), ABCC2 (10q24), ABCG1 (21q22.3), ABCG2 (4q22.1), responded favorably to NAC. The analysis of all CNVs, including both amplification and deletion showed that the frequency of 13q14.2 deletion was 85% among patients bearing tumor with the deletion at least in one MDR gene locus versus 9% in patients with no deletions. Differences in the frequency of 13q14.2 deletions between the two groups were statistically significant (p = 2.03 ×10−11, Fisher test, Bonferroni-adjusted p = 1.73 × 10−8). In conclusion, our study for the first time demonstrates that deletion MDR gene loci can be used as predictive marker for tumor response to NAC. PMID:26799285

  8. Deciphering the molecular basis of multidrug recognition: crystal structures of the Staphylococcus aureus multidrug binding transcription regulator QacR.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Maria A; Brennan, Richard G

    2003-03-01

    Multidrug transporters and their transcriptional regulators are key components of bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR). How these multidrug binding proteins can recognize such chemically disparate compounds represents a fascinating question from a structural standpoint and an important question in future drug development efforts. The Staphylococcus aureus multidrug binding regulator, QacR, is soluble and recognizes an especially wide range of structurally dissimilar compounds, properties making it an ideal model system for deciphering the molecular basis of multidrug recognition. Recent structures of QacR have afforded the first view of any MDR protein bound to multiple drugs, revealing key structural features of multidrug recognition, including a multisite binding pocket.

  9. Multidrug transporters as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Liang, X-J; Aszalos, A

    2006-08-01

    Transport molecules can significantly affect the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugs. An important transport molecule, the 170 kDa P-glycoprotein (Pgp), is constitutively expressed at several organ sites in the human body. Pgp is expressed at the blood-brain barrier, in the kidneys, liver, intestines and in certain T cells. Other transporters such as the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) and MRP2 also contribute to drug distribution in the human body, although to a lesser extent than Pgp. These three transporters, and especially Pgp, are often targets of drugs. Pgp can be an intentional or unintentional target. It is directly targeted when one wants to block its function by a modifier drug so that another drug, also a substrate of Pgp, can penetrate the cell membrane, which would otherwise be impermeable. Unintentional targeting occurs when several drugs are administered to a patient and as a consequence, the physiological function of Pgp is blocked at different organ sites. Like Pgp, MRP1 also has the capacity to mediate transport of many drugs and other compounds. MRP1 has a protective role in preventing accumulation of toxic compounds and drugs in epithelial tissue covering the choroid plexus/cerebrospinal fluid compartment, oral epithelium, sertoli cells, intesticular tubules and urinary collecting duct cells. MRP2 primarily transports weakly basic drugs and bilirubin from the liver to bile. Most compounds that efficiently block Pgp have only low affinity for MRP1 and MRP2. There are only a few effective and specific MRP inhibitors available. Drug targeting of these transporters may play a role in cancer chemotherapy and in the pharmacokinetics of substrate drugs.

  10. What is Multidrug and Extensively Drug Resistant TB?

    MedlinePlus

    ... org > Lung Health and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Tuberculosis (TB) What Is Multidrug and Extensively Drug Resistant TB? Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis ( MDR TB ) is a very dangerous form of ...

  11. Interactions between riluzole and ABCG2/BCRP transporter.

    PubMed

    Milane, Aline; Vautier, Sarah; Chacun, Hélène; Meininger, Vincent; Bensimon, Gilbert; Farinotti, Robert; Fernandez, Christine

    2009-03-06

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative fatal disease. Drugs used in this disease need to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Only riluzole is approved for ALS treatment. We have investigated riluzole as a breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) substrate by studying its brain transport in CF1 mdr1a (-/-) mice and its intracellular uptake on BeWo cells (human placental choriocarcinoma cell line). We have also investigated the effect of riluzole on BCRP expression level and on its activity using the prazocin as a test probe for brain transport and intracellular uptake. Assays on mdr1a (-/-) mice and BeWo cells showed a higher uptake of riluzole when pretreated with a BCRP inhibitor. After repeated doses of riluzole, BCRP activity was increased in CF1 mdr1a (-/-) mice, riluzole uptake was decrease and both BCRP expression and activity were increased in BeWo cells. In conclusion, we report in this study that riluzole is transported by BCRP at the BBB level and can enhance its function. These results taken with our previous studies on riluzole and P-glycoprotein show that drug-drug interactions between riluzole and efflux transporters substrates may occur at the BBB level and should be taken into account in future clinical trial design in ALS.

  12. Inhibition of Multidrug Resistance-Linked P-Glycoprotein (ABCB1) Function by 5′-Fluorosulfonylbenzoyl 5′-Adenosine: Evidence for an ATP Analog That Interacts With Both Drug-Substrate- and Nucleotide-Binding Sites†

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuma, Shinobu; Chufan, Eduardo; Nandigama, Krishnamachary; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M.; Durell, Stewart R.; Appella, Ettore; Sauna, Zuben E.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2011-01-01

    5′-fluorosulfonylbenzonyl 5′-adenosine (FSBA) is an ATP analog that covalently modifies several residues in the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of several ATPases, kinases and other proteins. P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis for the efflux of amphipathic anticancer agents from cancer cells. We investigated the interactions of FSBA with P-gp to study the catalytic cycle of ATP hydrolysis. Incubation of P-gp with FSBA inhibited ATP hydrolysis (IC50= 0.21 mM) and the binding of 8-azido[α–32P]ATP (IC50= 0.68 mM). In addition, 14C-FSBA crosslinks to P-gp, suggesting that FSBA-mediated inhibition of ATP hydrolysis is irreversible due to covalent modification of P-gp. However, when the NBDs were occupied with a saturating concentration of ATP prior to treatment, FSBA stimulated ATP hydrolysis by P-gp. Furthermore, FSBA inhibited the photocrosslinking of P-gp with [125I]-Iodoaryl-azidoprazosin (IAAP; IC50 = 0.17 mM). As IAAP is a transport substrate for P-gp, this suggests that FSBA affects not only the NBDs, but also the transport-substrate site in the transmembrane domains. Consistent with these results, FSBA blocked efflux of rhodamine 123 from P-gp-expressing cells. Additionally, mass spectrometric analysis identified FSBA crosslinks to residues within or nearby the NBDs but not in the transmembrane domains and docking of FSBA in a homology model of human P-gp NBDs supports the biochemical studies. Thus, FSBA is an ATP analog that interacts with both the drug-binding and ATP-binding sites of P-gp, but fluorosulfonyl-mediated crosslinking is observed only at the NBDs. PMID:21452853

  13. Ceramide glycosylation potentiates cellular multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y Y; Han, T Y; Giuliano, A E; Cabot, M C

    2001-03-01

    Ceramide glycosylation, through glucosylceramide synthase (GCS), allows cellular escape from ceramide-induced programmed cell death. This glycosylation event confers cancer cell resistance to cytotoxic anticancer agents [Liu, Y. Y., Han, T. Y., Giuliano, A. E., and M. C. Cabot. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 1140-1146]. We previously found that glucosylceramide, the glycosylated form of ceramide, accumulates in adriamycin-resistant breast carcinoma cells, in vinblastine-resistant epithelioid carcinoma cells, and in tumor specimens from patients showing poor response to chemotherapy. Here we show that multidrug resistance can be increased over baseline and then totally reversed in human breast cancer cells by GCS gene targeting. In adriamycin-resistant MCF-7-AdrR cells, transfection of GCS upgraded multidrug resistance, whereas transfection of GCS antisense markedly restored cellular sensitivity to anthracyclines, Vinca alkaloids, taxanes, and other anticancer drugs. Sensitivity to the various drugs by GCS antisense transfection increased 7- to 240-fold and was consistent with the resumption of ceramide-caspase-apoptotic signaling. GCS targeting had little influence on cellular sensitivity to either 5-FU or cisplatin, nor did it modify P-glycoprotein expression or rhodamine-123 efflux. GCS antisense transfection did enhance rhodamine-123 uptake compared with parent MCF-7-AdrR cells. This study reveals that GCS is a novel mechanism of multidrug resistance and positions GCS antisense as an innovative force to overcome multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy.

  14. Multidrug Resistance: Physiological Principles and Nanomedical Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Gert; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug (MDR) resistance is a pathophysiological phenomenon employed by cancer cells which limits the prolonged and effective use of chemotherapeutic agents. MDR is primarily based on the over-expression of drug efflux pumps in the cellular membrane. Prominent examples of such efflux pumps, which belong to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of proteins, are Pgp (P-glycoprotein) and MRP (multidrug resistance-associated protein), nowadays officially known as ABCB1 and ABCC1. Over the years, several strategies have been evaluated to overcome MDR, based not only on the use of low-molecular-weight MDR modulators, but also on the implementation of 1-100(0) nm-sized drug delivery systems. In the present manuscript, after introducing the most important physiological principles of MDR, we summarize prototypic nanomedical strategies to overcome multidrug resistance, including the use of carrier materials with intrinsic anti-MDR properties, the use of nanomedicines to modify the mode of cellular uptake, and the co-formulation of chemotherapeutic drugs together with low- and high-molecular-weight MDR inhibitors within a single drug delivery system. While certain challenges still need to be overcome before such constructs and concepts can be widely applied in the clinic, the insights obtained and the progress made strongly suggest that nanomedicine formulations hold significant potential for improving the treatment of multidrug-resistant malignancies. PMID:24120954

  15. [Travellers and multi-drug resistance bacteria].

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Nozomi

    2012-02-01

    The number of international travellers has increased. There is enormous diversity in medical backgrounds, purposes of travel, and travelling styles among travellers. Travellers are hospitalized abroad because of exotic and common diseases via medical tourism. This is one way of transporting and importing human bacteria between countries, including multi-drug resistant organisms. In developing countries, the antimicrobial resistance in Shigella sp. and Salmonella sp. have been a problem, because of this trend, the first choice of antibiotics has changed in some countries. Community acquired infections as well as hospital acquired infections with MRSA, multi-drug resistance (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ESBL have been a problem. This review will discuss the risk of MDR bacterial infectious diseases for travellers.

  16. Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter meningitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ira; Kapdi, Muznah

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter species have emerged as one of the most troublesome pathogens for healthcare institutions globally. In more recent times, nosocomial infections involving the central nervous system, skin and soft tissue, and bone have emerged as highly problematic. Acinetobacter species infection is common in intensive care units; however, Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis is rarely reported. Here, we report two cases of Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis which was multidrug resistance and ultimately required the carbapenem group of drugs for the treatment.

  17. Multidrug efflux pumps in Staphylococcus aureus and their clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Jang, Soojin

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is rapidly spreading among bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that causes a variety of diseases in humans. For the last two decades, bacterial multidrug efflux pumps have drawn attention due to their potential association with clinical multidrug resistance. Numerous researchers have demonstrated efflux-mediated resistance in vitro and in vivo and found novel multidrug transporters using advanced genomic information about bacteria. This article aims to provide a concise summary of multidrug efflux pumps and their important clinical implications, focusing on recent findings concerning S. aureus efflux pumps.

  18. Multidrug resistance in pediatric urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Gaspari, Romolo J; Dickson, Eric; Karlowsky, James; Doern, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) represent a common infection in the pediatric population. Escherichia coli is the most common uropathogen in children, and antimicrobial resistance in this species complicates the treatment of pediatric UTIs. Despite the impact of resistance on empiric antibiotic choice, there is little data on multidrug resistance in pediatric patients. In this paper, we describe characteristics of multidrug-resistant E. coli in pediatric patients using a large national database of uropathogens antimicrobial sensitivities. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns to commonly prescribed antibiotics were performed on uropathogens isolated from children presenting to participating hospitals between 1999 and 2001. Data were analyzed separately for four pediatric age groups. Single and multidrug resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) were performed on all specimens. There were a total of 11,341 E. coli urine cultures from 343 infants (0-4 weeks), 1,801 toddlers (5 weeks-24 months), 6,742 preteens (2-12 years), and 2,455 teens (13-17 years). E. coli resistance to ampicillin peaked in toddlers (52.8%) but was high in preteens (52.1%), infants (50.4%), and teens (40.6%). Resistance to two or more antibiotics varied across age groups, with toddlers (27%) leading preteens (23.1%), infants (21%), and teens (15.9%). Resistance to three or more antibiotics was low in all age groups (range 3.1-5.2%). The most common co-resistance in all age groups was ampicillin/TMP-SMZ. In conclusion, less than half of all pediatric UTIs are susceptible to all commonly used antibiotics. In some age groups, there is a significant percentage of co-resistance between the two most commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin and TMP-SMZ).

  19. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in central Asia.

    PubMed

    Cox, Helen Suzanne; Orozco, Juan Daniel; Male, Roy; Ruesch-Gerdes, Sabine; Falzon, Dennis; Small, Ian; Doshetov, Darebay; Kebede, Yared; Aziz, Mohammed

    2004-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has emerged as a major threat to TB control, particularly in the former Soviet Union. To determine levels of drug resistance within a directly observed treatment strategy (DOTS) program supported by Médecins Sans Frontières in two regions in Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, Central Asia, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of smear-positive TB patients in selected districts of Karakalpakstan (Uzbekistan) and Dashoguz (Turkmenistan). High levels of MDR-TB were found in both regions. In Karakalpakstan, 14 (13%) of 106 new patients were infected with MDR-TB; 43 (40%) of 107 previously treated patients were similarly infected. The proportions for Dashoguz were 4% (4/105 patients) and 18% (18/98 patients), respectively. Overall, 27% of patients with positive smear results whose infections were treated through the DOTS program in Karakalpakstan and 11% of similar patients in Dashoguz were infected with multidrug-resistant strains of TB on admission. These results show the need for concerted action by the international community to contain transmission and reduce the effects of MDR-TB.

  20. Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis in Central Asia

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, Juan Daniel; Male, Roy; Ruesch-Gerdes, Sabine; Falzon, Dennis; Small, Ian; Doshetov, Darebay; Kebede, Yared; Aziz, Mohammed

    2004-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has emerged as a major threat to TB control, particularly in the former Soviet Union. To determine levels of drug resistance within a directly observed treatment strategy (DOTS) program supported by Médecins Sans Frontières in two regions in Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, Central Asia, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of smear-positive TB patients in selected districts of Karakalpakstan (Uzbekistan) and Dashoguz (Turkmenistan). High levels of MDR-TB were found in both regions. In Karakalpakstan, 14 (13%) of 106 new patients were infected with MDR-TB; 43 (40%) of 107 previously treated patients were similarly infected. The proportions for Dashoguz were 4% (4/105 patients) and 18% (18/98 patients), respectively. Overall, 27% of patients with positive smear results whose infections were treated through the DOTS program in Karakalpakstan and 11% of similar patients in Dashoguz were infected with multidrug-resistant strains of TB on admission. These results show the need for concerted action by the international community to contain transmission and reduce the effects of MDR-TB. PMID:15200821

  1. NANOPREPARATIONS TO OVERCOME MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Niravkumar R.; Pattni, Bhushan S.; Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is the most widely exploited phenomenon by which cancer eludes chemotherapy. Broad variety of factors, ranging from the cellular ones, such as over-expression of efflux transporters, defective apoptotic machineries, and altered molecular targets, to the physiological factors such as higher interstitial fluid pressure, low extracellular pH, and formation of irregular tumor vasculature are responsible for multidrug resistance. A combination of various undesirable factors associated with biological surroundings together with poor solubility and instability of many potential therapeutic small & large molecules within the biological systems and systemic toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents has necessitated the need for nano-preparations to optimize drug delivery. The physiology of solid tumors presents numerous challenges for successful therapy. However, it also offers unique opportunities for the use of nanotechnology. Nanoparticles, up to 400 nm in size, have shown great promise for carrying, protecting and delivering potential therapeutic molecules with diverse physiological properties. In this review, various factors responsible for the MDR and the use of nanotechnology to overcome the MDR, the use of spheroid culture as well as the current technique of producing micro tumor tissues in vitro are discussed in detail. PMID:23973912

  2. Studies on pyrrolopyrimidines as selective inhibitors of multidrug-resistance-associated protein in multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouming; Folkes, Adrian; Chuckowree, Irina; Cockcroft, Xiaoling; Sohal, Sukhjit; Miller, Warren; Milton, John; Wren, Stephen P; Vicker, Nigel; Depledge, Paul; Scott, John; Smith, Lyndsay; Jones, Hazel; Mistry, Prakash; Faint, Richard; Thompson, Deanne; Cocks, Simon

    2004-03-11

    Multidrug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein (Pgp) or multidrug-resistance-associated protein (MRP) remains a major obstacle for successful treatment of cancer. Inhibition of Pgp and MRP transport is important for high efficacy of anticancer drugs. While several Pgp inhibitors have entered clinical trials, the development of specific MRP1 inhibitors is still in its infancy. In our screening program, we have identified a pyrrolopyrimidine (4) as a novel and selective MRP1 inhibitor. Subsequent SAR work on the 4-position of the template revealed the phenethylpiperazine side chain as a potent replacement of the benzylthio group of the lead molecule. Introduction of groups at the 2-position seems to have no detrimental effect on activity. Modifications to the nitrile group at the 7-position resulted in the identification of analogues with groups, such as amides, with superior pharmacokinetic profiles. In vivo efficacy has been demonstrated by xenograft studies on selected compounds.

  3. Multidrug Efflux Systems in Microaerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zeling; Yan, Aixin

    2015-01-01

    Active drug efflux constitutes an important mechanism of antibiotic and multidrug resistance in bacteria. Understanding the distribution, expression, and physiological functions of multidrug efflux pumps, especially under physiologically and clinically relevant conditions of the pathogens, is the key to combat drug resistance. In animal hosts, most wounded, infected and inflamed tissues display low oxygen tensions. In this article, we summarize research development on multidrug efflux pumps in the medicinally relevant microaerobic and anaerobic pathogens and their implications in the effort to combat drug-resistant infections. PMID:27025630

  4. Structural basis of RND-type multidrug exporters

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Akihito; Nakashima, Ryosuke; Sakurai, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug exporters are intrinsic membrane transporters that act as cellular self-defense mechanism. The most notable characteristics of multidrug exporters is that they export a wide range of drugs and toxic compounds. The overexpression of these exporters causes multidrug resistance. Multidrug-resistant pathogens have become a serious problem in modern chemotherapy. Over the past decade, investigations into the structure of bacterial multidrug exporters have revealed the multidrug recognition and export mechanisms. In this review, we primarily discuss RND-type multidrug exporters particularly AcrAB-TolC, major drug exporter in Gram-negative bacteria. RND-type drug exporters are tripartite complexes comprising a cell membrane transporter, an outer membrane channel and an adaptor protein. Cell membrane transporters and outer membrane channels are homo-trimers; however, there is no consensus on the number of adaptor proteins in these tripartite complexes. The three monomers of a cell membrane transporter have varying conformations (access, binding, and extrusion) during transport. Drugs are exported following an ordered conformational change in these three monomers, through a functional rotation mechanism coupled with the proton relay cycle in ion pairs, which is driven by proton translocation. Multidrug recognition is based on a multisite drug-binding mechanism, in which two voluminous multidrug-binding pockets in cell membrane exporters recognize a wide range of substrates as a result of permutations at numerous binding sites that are specific for the partial structures of substrate molecules. The voluminous multidrug-binding pocket may have numerous binding sites even for a single substrate, suggesting that substrates may move between binding sites during transport, an idea named as multisite-drug-oscillation hypothesis. This hypothesis is consistent with the apparently broad substrate specificity of cell membrane exporters and their highly efficient

  5. Structural basis of RND-type multidrug exporters.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Akihito; Nakashima, Ryosuke; Sakurai, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug exporters are intrinsic membrane transporters that act as cellular self-defense mechanism. The most notable characteristics of multidrug exporters is that they export a wide range of drugs and toxic compounds. The overexpression of these exporters causes multidrug resistance. Multidrug-resistant pathogens have become a serious problem in modern chemotherapy. Over the past decade, investigations into the structure of bacterial multidrug exporters have revealed the multidrug recognition and export mechanisms. In this review, we primarily discuss RND-type multidrug exporters particularly AcrAB-TolC, major drug exporter in Gram-negative bacteria. RND-type drug exporters are tripartite complexes comprising a cell membrane transporter, an outer membrane channel and an adaptor protein. Cell membrane transporters and outer membrane channels are homo-trimers; however, there is no consensus on the number of adaptor proteins in these tripartite complexes. The three monomers of a cell membrane transporter have varying conformations (access, binding, and extrusion) during transport. Drugs are exported following an ordered conformational change in these three monomers, through a functional rotation mechanism coupled with the proton relay cycle in ion pairs, which is driven by proton translocation. Multidrug recognition is based on a multisite drug-binding mechanism, in which two voluminous multidrug-binding pockets in cell membrane exporters recognize a wide range of substrates as a result of permutations at numerous binding sites that are specific for the partial structures of substrate molecules. The voluminous multidrug-binding pocket may have numerous binding sites even for a single substrate, suggesting that substrates may move between binding sites during transport, an idea named as multisite-drug-oscillation hypothesis. This hypothesis is consistent with the apparently broad substrate specificity of cell membrane exporters and their highly efficient

  6. BRCA2-deficient sarcomatoid mammary tumors exhibit multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Janneke E; Sol, Wendy; Kersbergen, Ariena; Schlicker, Andreas; Guyader, Charlotte; Xu, Guotai; Wessels, Lodewyk; Borst, Piet; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven

    2015-02-15

    Pan- or multidrug resistance is a central problem in clinical oncology. Here, we use a genetically engineered mouse model of BRCA2-associated hereditary breast cancer to study drug resistance to several types of chemotherapy and PARP inhibition. We found that multidrug resistance was strongly associated with an EMT-like sarcomatoid phenotype and high expression of the Abcb1b gene, which encodes the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein could partly resensitize sarcomatoid tumors to the PARP inhibitor olaparib, docetaxel, and doxorubicin. We propose that multidrug resistance is a multifactorial process and that mouse models are useful to unravel this.

  7. Epidemiology and Treatment of Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitnick, Carole D.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Shin, Sonya S.

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistant tuberculosis is now thought to afflict between 1 and 2 million patients annually. Although significant regional variability in the distribution of disease has been recorded, surveillance data are limited by several factors. The true burden of disease is likely underestimated. Nevertheless, the estimated burden is substantial enough to warrant concerted action. A range of approaches is possible, but all appropriate interventions require scale-up of laboratories and early treatment with regimens containing a sufficient number of second-line drugs. Ambulatory treatment for most patients, and improved infection control, can facilitate scale-up with decreased risk of nosocomial transmission. Several obstacles have been considered to preclude worldwide scale-up of treatment, mostly attributable to inadequate human, drug, and financial resources. Further delays in scale-up, however, risk continued generation and transmission of resistant tuberculosis, as well as associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:18810684

  8. Breaking the Spell: Combating Multidrug Resistant 'Superbugs'.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahper N; Khan, Asad U

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria have become a severe threat to community wellbeing. Conventional antibiotics are getting progressively more ineffective as a consequence of resistance, making it imperative to realize improved antimicrobial options. In this review we emphasized the microorganisms primarily reported of being resistance, referred as ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacteriaceae) accentuating their capacity to "escape" from routine antimicrobial regimes. The upcoming antimicrobial agents showing great potential and can serve as alternative therapeutic options are discussed. We also provided succinct overview of two evolving technologies; specifically network pharmacology and functional genomics profiling. Furthermore, In vivo imaging techniques can provide novel targets and a real time tool for potential lead molecule assessment. The employment of such approaches at prelude of a drug development process, will enables more informed decisions on candidate drug selection and will maximize or predict therapeutic potential before clinical testing.

  9. Protein abundance of clinically relevant multidrug transporters along the entire length of the human intestine.

    PubMed

    Drozdzik, Marek; Gröer, Christian; Penski, Jette; Lapczuk, Joanna; Ostrowski, Marek; Lai, Yurong; Prasad, Bhagwat; Unadkat, Jashvant D; Siegmund, Werner; Oswald, Stefan

    2014-10-06

    Intestinal transporters are crucial determinants in the oral absorption of many drugs. We therefore studied the mRNA expression (N = 33) and absolute protein content (N = 10) of clinically relevant transporters in healthy epithelium of the duodenum, the proximal and distal jejunum and ileum, and the ascending, transversal, descending, and sigmoidal colon of six organ donors (24-54 years). In the small intestine, the abundance of nearly all studied proteins ranged between 0.2 and 1.6 pmol/mg with the exception of those of OCT3 (<0.1 pmol/mg) and PEPT1 (2.6-4.9 pmol/mg) that accounted for ∼50% of all measured transporters. OATP1A2 was not detected in any intestinal segment. ABCB1, ABCG2, PEPT1, and ASBT were significantly more abundant in jejunum and ileum than in colon. In contrast to this, the level of expression of ABCC2, ABCC3, and OCT3 was found to be highest in colon. Site-dependent differences in the levels of gene and protein expression were observed for ABCB1 and ASBT. Significant correlations between mRNA and protein levels have been found for ABCG2, ASBT, OCT3, and PEPT1 in the small intestine. Our data provide further physiological pieces of the puzzle required to predict intestinal drug absorption in humans.

  10. Management of multidrug resistant bacterial endemic.

    PubMed

    Zahar, J-R; Lesprit, P

    2014-09-01

    The fight against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacilli (MDRGNB), especially extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae, is about to be lost in our country. The emergence of new resistance mechanisms to carbapenems in these Enterobacteriaceae exposes patients to a risk of treatment failure without any other therapeutic options. This dramatic situation is paradoxical because we are well aware of the 2 major factors responsible for this situation: 1) MDRO cross-transmission, associated with a low compliance to standard precautions, especially hand hygiene, and 2) overexposure of patients to antibiotics. The implementation of a "search and isolate" policy, which was justified to control the spread of some MDRO that remained rare in the country, was not associated with a better adherence to standard precautions. The antibiotic policy and the measures implemented to control antibiotic consumptions have rarely been enforced and have shown inconsistent results. Notably, no significant decrease of antibiotic consumption has been observed. There is no excuse for these poor results, because some authors evaluating the effectiveness of programs for the control of MDRO have reported their positive effects on antimicrobial resistance without any detrimental effects. It is now urgent to deal with the 2 major factors by establishing an educational and persuasive program with quantified and opposable objectives. Firstly, we have to improve the observance of hand hygiene above 70%. Secondly, we have to define and reach a target for the reduction of antibiotic consumption both in community and in hospital settings.

  11. Mechanisms of multidrug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Gottesman, Michael M

    2010-01-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy remains a major challenge in the treatment of cancer. Resistance exists against every effective anticancer drug and can develop by numerous mechanisms including decreased drug uptake, increased drug efflux, activation of detoxifying systems, activation of DNA repair mechanisms, evasion of drug-induced apoptosis, etc. In the first part of this chapter, we briefly summarize the current knowledge on individual cellular mechanisms responsible for MDR, with a special emphasis on ATP-binding cassette transporters, perhaps the main theme of this textbook. Although extensive work has been done to characterize MDR mechanisms in vitro, the translation of this knowledge to the clinic has not been crowned with success. Therefore, identifying genes and mechanisms critical to the development of MDR in vivo and establishing a reliable method for analyzing clinical samples could help to predict the development of resistance and lead to treatments designed to circumvent it. Our thoughts about translational research needed to achieve significant progress in the understanding of this complex phenomenon are therefore discussed in a third section. The pleotropic response of cancer cells to chemotherapy is summarized in a concluding diagram.

  12. Diversity among multidrug-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Enterococci are associated with both community- and hospital-acquired infections. Even though they do not cause severe systemic inflammatory responses, such as septic shock, enterococci present a therapeutic challenge because of their resistance to a vast array of antimicrobial drugs, including cell-wall active agents, all commercially available aminoglycosides, penicillin and ampicillin, and vancomycin. The combination of the latter two occurs disproportionately in strains resistant to many other antimicrobial drugs. The propensity of enterococci to acquire resistance may relate to their ability to participate in various forms of conjugation, which can result in the spread of genes as part of conjugative transposons, pheromone-responsive plasmids, or broad host-range plasmids. Enterococcal hardiness likely adds to resistance by facilitating survival in the environment (and thus enhancing potential spread from person to person) of a multidrug-resistant clone. The combination of these attributes within the genus Enterococcus suggests that these bacteria and their resistance to antimicrobial drugs will continue to pose a challenge. PMID:9452397

  13. [Management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Tritar, F; Daghfous, H; Ben Saad, S; Slim-Saidi, L

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant TB in many countries has become a major public health problem and an obstacle to effective tuberculosis control. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), which is most often the result of poor adherence, is a particularly dangerous form of tuberculosis because it is caused by bacilli resistant to at least isoniazid and rifampicin, the two most effective anti-tuberculosis drugs. Techniques for rapid diagnosis of resistance have greatly improved the care of patients by allowing early treatment which remains complex and costly establishment, and requires skills and resources. The treatment is not standardized but it includes in all cases attack phase with five drugs (there must be an injectable agent and a fluoroquinolone that form the basis of the regimen) for eight months and a maintenance phase (without injectable agent) with a total duration of 20 months on average. Surgery may be beneficial as long as the lesions are localized and the patient has a good cardiorespiratory function. Evolution of MDR-TB treated is less favorable than tuberculosis with germ sensitive. The cure rate varies from 60 to 75% for MDR-TB, and drops to 30 to 40% for XDR-TB. Mortality remains high, ranging from 20 to 40% even up to 70-90% in people co-infected with HIV.

  14. Tripartite assembly of RND multidrug efflux pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daury, Laetitia; Orange, François; Taveau, Jean-Christophe; Verchère, Alice; Monlezun, Laura; Gounou, Céline; Marreddy, Ravi K. R.; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle; Pos, Klaas M.; Lambert, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    Tripartite multidrug efflux systems of Gram-negative bacteria are composed of an inner membrane transporter, an outer membrane channel and a periplasmic adaptor protein. They are assumed to form ducts inside the periplasm facilitating drug exit across the outer membrane. Here we present the reconstitution of native Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexAB-OprM and Escherichia coli AcrAB-TolC tripartite Resistance Nodulation and cell Division (RND) efflux systems in a lipid nanodisc system. Single-particle analysis by electron microscopy reveals the inner and outer membrane protein components linked together via the periplasmic adaptor protein. This intrinsic ability of the native components to self-assemble also leads to the formation of a stable interspecies AcrA-MexB-TolC complex suggesting a common mechanism of tripartite assembly. Projection structures of all three complexes emphasize the role of the periplasmic adaptor protein as part of the exit duct with no physical interaction between the inner and outer membrane components.

  15. Structural basis and dynamics of multidrug recognition in a minimal bacterial multidrug resistance system

    PubMed Central

    Habazettl, Judith; Allan, Martin; Jensen, Pernille Rose; Sass, Hans-Jürgen; Thompson, Charles J.; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    TipA is a transcriptional regulator found in diverse bacteria. It constitutes a minimal autoregulated multidrug resistance system against numerous thiopeptide antibiotics. Here we report the structures of its drug-binding domain TipAS in complexes with promothiocin A and nosiheptide, and a model of the thiostrepton complex. Drug binding induces a large transition from a partially unfolded to a globin-like structure. The structures rationalize the mechanism of promiscuous, yet specific, drug recognition: (i) a four-ring motif present in all known TipA-inducing antibiotics is recognized specifically by conserved TipAS amino acids; and (ii) the variable part of the antibiotic is accommodated within a flexible cleft that rigidifies upon drug binding. Remarkably, the identified four-ring motif is also the major interacting part of the antibiotic with the ribosome. Hence the TipA multidrug resistance mechanism is directed against the same chemical motif that inhibits protein synthesis. The observed identity of chemical motifs responsible for antibiotic function and resistance may be a general principle and could help to better define new leads for antibiotics. PMID:25489067

  16. Structural basis for the blockade of MATE multidrug efflux pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, Martha; Symersky, Jindrich; Nie, Rongxin; Lu, Min

    2015-08-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters underpin multidrug resistance by using the H+ or Na+ electrochemical gradient to extrude different drugs across cell membranes. MATE transporters can be further parsed into the DinF, NorM and eukaryotic subfamilies based on their amino-acid sequence similarity. Here we report the 3.0 Å resolution X-ray structures of a protonation-mimetic mutant of an H+-coupled DinF transporter, as well as of an H+-coupled DinF and a Na+-coupled NorM transporters in complexes with verapamil, a small-molecule pharmaceutical that inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug extrusion. Combining structure-inspired mutational and functional studies, we confirm the biological relevance of our crystal structures, reveal the mechanistic differences among MATE transporters, and suggest how verapamil inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug efflux. Our findings offer insights into how MATE transporters extrude chemically and structurally dissimilar drugs and could inform the design of new strategies for tackling multidrug resistance.

  17. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Much More Than Antibiotic Resistance Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Paula; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Reales-Calderon, Jose Antonio; Corona, Fernando; Lira, Felipe; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Bernardini, Alejandra; Sanchez, Maria Blanca; Martinez, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are antibiotic resistance determinants present in all microorganisms. With few exceptions, they are chromosomally encoded and present a conserved organization both at the genetic and at the protein levels. In addition, most, if not all, strains of a given bacterial species present the same chromosomally-encoded efflux pumps. Altogether this indicates that multidrug efflux pumps are ancient elements encoded in bacterial genomes long before the recent use of antibiotics for human and animal therapy. In this regard, it is worth mentioning that efflux pumps can extrude a wide range of substrates that include, besides antibiotics, heavy metals, organic pollutants, plant-produced compounds, quorum sensing signals or bacterial metabolites, among others. In the current review, we present information on the different functions that multidrug efflux pumps may have for the bacterial behaviour in different habitats as well as on their regulation by specific signals. Since, in addition to their function in non-clinical ecosystems, multidrug efflux pumps contribute to intrinsic, acquired, and phenotypic resistance of bacterial pathogens, the review also presents information on the search for inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps, which are currently under development, in the aim of increasing the susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to antibiotics. PMID:27681908

  18. Structural basis for the blockade of MATE multidrug efflux pumps

    DOE PAGES

    Radchenko, Martha; Symersky, Jindrich; Nie, Rongxin; ...

    2015-08-06

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters underpin multidrug resistance by using the H+ or Na+ electrochemical gradient to extrude different drugs across cell membranes. MATE transporters can be further parsed into the DinF, NorM and eukaryotic subfamilies based on their amino-acid sequence similarity. Here we report the 3.0 Å resolution X-ray structures of a protonation-mimetic mutant of an H+-coupled DinF transporter, as well as of an H+-coupled DinF and a Na+-coupled NorM transporters in complexes with verapamil, a small-molecule pharmaceutical that inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug extrusion. Combining structure-inspired mutational and functional studies, we confirm the biological relevance of our crystalmore » structures, reveal the mechanistic differences among MATE transporters, and suggest how verapamil inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug efflux. Our findings offer insights into how MATE transporters extrude chemically and structurally dissimilar drugs and could inform the design of new strategies for tackling multidrug resistance.« less

  19. Structural basis for the blockade of MATE multidrug efflux pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Radchenko, Martha; Symersky, Jindrich; Nie, Rongxin; Lu, Min

    2015-08-06

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters underpin multidrug resistance by using the H+ or Na+ electrochemical gradient to extrude different drugs across cell membranes. MATE transporters can be further parsed into the DinF, NorM and eukaryotic subfamilies based on their amino-acid sequence similarity. Here we report the 3.0 Å resolution X-ray structures of a protonation-mimetic mutant of an H+-coupled DinF transporter, as well as of an H+-coupled DinF and a Na+-coupled NorM transporters in complexes with verapamil, a small-molecule pharmaceutical that inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug extrusion. Combining structure-inspired mutational and functional studies, we confirm the biological relevance of our crystal structures, reveal the mechanistic differences among MATE transporters, and suggest how verapamil inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug efflux. Our findings offer insights into how MATE transporters extrude chemically and structurally dissimilar drugs and could inform the design of new strategies for tackling multidrug resistance.

  20. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Much More Than Antibiotic Resistance Determinants.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Paula; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Reales-Calderon, Jose Antonio; Corona, Fernando; Lira, Felipe; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Bernardini, Alejandra; Sanchez, Maria Blanca; Martinez, Jose Luis

    2016-02-16

    Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are antibiotic resistance determinants present in all microorganisms. With few exceptions, they are chromosomally encoded and present a conserved organization both at the genetic and at the protein levels. In addition, most, if not all, strains of a given bacterial species present the same chromosomally-encoded efflux pumps. Altogether this indicates that multidrug efflux pumps are ancient elements encoded in bacterial genomes long before the recent use of antibiotics for human and animal therapy. In this regard, it is worth mentioning that efflux pumps can extrude a wide range of substrates that include, besides antibiotics, heavy metals, organic pollutants, plant-produced compounds, quorum sensing signals or bacterial metabolites, among others. In the current review, we present information on the different functions that multidrug efflux pumps may have for the bacterial behaviour in different habitats as well as on their regulation by specific signals. Since, in addition to their function in non-clinical ecosystems, multidrug efflux pumps contribute to intrinsic, acquired, and phenotypic resistance of bacterial pathogens, the review also presents information on the search for inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps, which are currently under development, in the aim of increasing the susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to antibiotics.

  1. Phorbol esters induce multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, R.L.; Patel, J.; Chabner, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms responsible for broad-based resistance to antitumor drugs derived from natural products (multidrug resistance) are incompletely understood. Agents known to reverse the multidrug-resistant phenotype (verapamil and trifluoperazine) can also inhibit the activity of protein kinase C. When the authors assayed human breast cancer cell lines for protein kinase C activity, they found that enzyme activity was 7-fold higher in the multidrug-resistance cancer cells compared with the control, sensitive parent cells. Exposure of drug-sensitive cells to the phorbol ester phorbol 12,13-dibutyate (P(BtO)/sub 2/) led to an increase in protein kinase C activity and induced a drug-resistance phenotype, whereas exposure of drug-resistant cells to P(BtO)/sub 2/ further increased drug resistance. In sensitive cells, this increased resistance was accomplished by a 3.5-fold increased phosphorylation of a 20-kDa particulate protein and a 35-40% decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and vincristine. P(BtO)/sub 2/ induced resistance to agents involved in the multidrug-resistant phenotype (doxorubicin and vincristine) but did not affect sensitivity to an unrelated alkylating agent (melphalan). The increased resistance was partially or fully reversible by the calcium channel blocker verapamil and by the calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine. These data suggest that stimulation of protein kinase C playus a role in the drug-transport changes in multidrug-resistant cells. This may occur through modulation of an efflux pump by protein phosphorylation.

  2. Salvage therapy for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Seung, K J; Becerra, M C; Atwood, S S; Alcántara, F; Bonilla, C A; Mitnick, C D

    2014-05-01

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), defined as Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to both isoniazid and rifampicin, is challenging under the best of circumstances, and particularly in resource-limited settings. For patients who remain persistently sputum-culture-positive despite therapy with second-line TB drugs, treatment options are limited, especially if disease is too advanced for resective surgery. Salvage therapy refers to the design of a regimen combining new and previously used drugs in a final effort to attain sputum conversion before declaring treatment to have failed. We retrospectively evaluated the outcomes of salvage therapy in 213 Peruvian patients. Salvage regimens included a median of two new drugs (range 1-6) and nine (range 5-13) total (new plus previously used) drugs. The most frequently used new drug was moxifloxacin, followed by capreomycin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, kanamycin and clarithromycin. Culture conversion occurred in 65 (30.5%) patients. Salvage regimens that included moxifloxacin were significantly more likely to be followed by culture conversion (OR 2.2; p 0.02). Later-generation fluoroquinolones such as moxifloxacin should be used in salvage therapy but also in the initial treatment of MDR-TB, if the best clinical strategy is to use the most effective drugs when the patient has the best chance for cure. New TB drugs are most likely to be initially used in salvage patients, in conditions similar to those described here. Close bacteriological monitoring of these patients will be essential, as useful information about the best way to use these new drugs can be gained from analysis of salvage therapy cohorts.

  3. Thio and Seleno Rhodamine Derivatives as Reversal Agents of Multidrug Resistance in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    rhodamine-induced photosensitized inhibition of Pgp results in greater chemo- sensitivity and/or enhanced phototoxicity . The completed work demonstrates...that substituent effects among the various rhodamine analogues impact their phototoxicity towards either chemosensitive AUXB1 cells or multidrug...for the photosensitizers in the multidrug-resistant CRIR12 cells. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Photodynamic therapy , photosensitizers, multidrug resistance, P

  4. Bedaquiline: a novel antitubercular drug for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nagabushan, H; Roopadevi, H S

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) are emerging global health threats. Bedaquiline is a new antituberculous drug belonging to the diarylquinoline class that efficiently inhibits the adenosine triphosphate synthase enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is a bactericidal and long-acting drug. It inhibits both dormant as well as replicating bacterial sub-populations and thus shortens the duration of TB treatment. This drug has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration in December 2012 for the management of multidrug resistant-TB. The drug marks the introduction of a new addition to the TB armamentarium after four decades.

  5. Multidrug resistant tuberculosis diagnosed by synovial fluid analysis.

    PubMed

    van Zeller, M; Monteiro, R; Ramalho, J; Almeida, I; Duarte, R

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem worldwide. HIV co-infection is contributing to an increased incidence of the disease, particularly that caused by multidrug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT). We describe an HIV-infected patient with pleural and lymph node tuberculosis diagnosed by pleural effusion characteristics and biopsy specimens, without MT identification, that further presented with knee-joint involvement. Arthrocentesis allowed MT isolation and drug susceptibility testing, resulting in a diagnosis of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and an appropriate treatment regimen. MT identification and drug susceptibility tests are very important, especially for HIV co-infected patients.

  6. Modulation of Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Varela, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial infections pose a serious public health concern, especially when an infectious disease has a multidrug resistant causative agent. Such multidrug resistant bacteria can compromise the clinical utility of major chemotherapeutic antimicrobial agents. Drug and multidrug resistant bacteria harbor several distinct molecular mechanisms for resistance. Bacterial antimicrobial agent efflux pumps represent a major mechanism of clinical resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is one of the largest groups of solute transporters to date and includes a significant number of bacterial drug and multidrug efflux pumps. We review recent work on the modulation of multidrug efflux pumps, paying special attention to those transporters belonging primarily to the MFS. PMID:25750934

  7. Epidemiology of Primary Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Vladimir Region, Russia.

    PubMed

    Ershova, Julia V; Volchenkov, Grigory V; Kaminski, Dorothy A; Somova, Tatiana R; Kuznetsova, Tatiana A; Kaunetis, Natalia V; Cegielski, J Peter; Kurbatova, Ekaterina V

    2015-11-01

    We studied the epidemiology of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Vladimir Region, Russia, in 2012. Most cases of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) were caused by transmission of drug-resistant strains, and >33% were in patients referred for testing after mass radiographic screening. Early diagnosis of drug resistance is essential for preventing transmission of MDR TB.

  8. [Multi-drug resistant bacteria, a complex mechanism].

    PubMed

    Hilaire, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria are said to be multidrug resistant when they are only sensitive to a small number of antibiotics used as treatments. This problem of resistance appeared in hospitals soon after antibiotics were first used. In the 1960s, strains of staphylococcus became resistant to penicillin.

  9. Multidrug-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in US Meat and Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Andrew E.; Contente-Cuomo, Tania; Buchhagen, Jordan; Liu, Cindy M.; Watson, Lindsey; Pearce, Kimberly; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Bowers, Jolene; Driebe, Elizabeth M.; Engelthaler, David M.; Keim, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    We characterized the prevalence, antibiotic susceptibility profiles, and genotypes of Staphylococcus aureus among US meat and poultry samples (n = 136). S. aureus contaminated 47% of samples, and multidrug resistance was common among isolates (52%). S. aureus genotypes and resistance profiles differed significantly among sample types, suggesting food animal–specific contamination. PMID:21498385

  10. Multidrug-Resistant Pathogens in Hospitalized Syrian Children

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Diana Faour; Hoffmann, Yoav; Shahar, Naama; Ocampo, Smadar; Salomon, Liora; Zonis, Zeev

    2017-01-01

    Since 2013, wounded and ill children from Syria have received treatment in Israel. Screening cultures indicated that multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens colonized 89 (83%) of 107 children. For 58% of MDR infections, the pathogen was similar to that identified during screening. MDR screening of these children is valuable for purposes of isolation and treatment. PMID:27618479

  11. Invasive Infections with Multidrug-Resistant Yeast Candida auris, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Morales-López, Soraya E.; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M.; Ceballos-Garzón, Andrés; Martínez, Heidys P.; Rodríguez, Gerson J.; Álvarez-Moreno, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    Candida auris is an emerging multidrug-resistant fungus that causes a wide range of symptoms. We report finding 17 cases of C. auris infection that were originally misclassified but correctly identified 27.5 days later on average. Patients with a delayed diagnosis of C. auris had a 30-day mortality rate of 35.2%. PMID:27983941

  12. bmr3, a third multidrug transporter gene of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, R; Murata, M

    1997-01-01

    A third multidrug transporter gene named bmr3 was cloned from Bacillus subtilis. Although Bmr3 shows relatively low homology to Bmr and Blt, the substrate specificities of these three transporters overlap. Northern hybridization analysis showed that expression of the bmr3 gene was dependent on the growth phase. PMID:9023234

  13. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, Somalia, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Sindani, Ireneaus; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Falzon, Dennis; Suleiman, Bashir; Arube, Peter; Adam, Ismail; Baghdadi, Samiha; Bassili, Amal; Zignol, Matteo

    2013-03-01

    In a nationwide survey in 2011, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) was found in 5.2% and 40.8% of patients with new and previously treated TB, respectively. These levels of drug resistance are among the highest ever documented in Africa and the Middle East. This finding presents a serious challenge for TB control in Somalia.

  14. Successful Treatment of Multiple Multidrug Resistant Intracranial Tuberculomata

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Hazel F.; Mellick, Ross S.; Post, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year-old Bangladesh-born man presented with a month history of evolving neurological symptoms in the context of a six-month history of fever, night sweats, and axillary lymphadenopathy. He was subsequently diagnosed with multiple multidrug resistant intracranial tuberculomata and was successfully treated over two years. Intracranial multidrug resistant tuberculosis has a high mortality and successful treatment is rarely reported. Management is complex and requires consideration of the penetration and likely effect of antituberculous agents within the central nervous system. We discuss the role of various antituberculous agents, the duration of therapy, the utility of corticosteroids, the value of intrathecal and systemic therapy, and the need for rapid diagnosis. PMID:28127479

  15. Molecular fingerprinting of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, M. D.; Ward, L. R.; Rowe, B.; Threlfall, E. J.

    1998-01-01

    For epidemiologic investigations, the primary subdivision of Salmonella Typhi is vi-phage typing; 106 Vi-phage types are defined. For multidrug-resistant strains the most common types have been M1 (Pakistan) and E1 (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and the Arabian Gulf); a strain untypable with the Vi phages has been responsible for a major epidemic in Tajikistan. Most often, isolates from the Indian subcontinent have been resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim; but in the 1997 Tajikistan outbreak, the epidemic strain was also resistant to ciprofloxacin. For multidrug-resistant strains, subdivision within phage type can be achieved by plasmid profile typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. PMID:9621206

  16. Lipids modulate the conformational dynamics of a secondary multidrug transporter

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Chloé; Stein, Richard A; Masureel, Matthieu; Roth, Aurélie; Mishra, Smriti; Dawaliby, Rosie; Konijnenberg, Albert; Sobott, Frank; Govaerts, Cédric; Mchaourab, Hassane S

    2017-01-01

    Direct interactions with lipids have emerged as key determinants of the folding, structure and function of membrane proteins, but an understanding of how lipids modulate protein dynamics is still lacking. Here, we systematically explored the effects of lipids on the conformational dynamics of the proton-powered, multidrug transporter LmrP from Lactococcus lactis utilizing the pattern of distances between spin label pairs previously shown to fingerprint alternating access of the protein. We uncover at the molecular level how the lipid headgroups shape the conformational energy landscape of the transporter. The model emerging from our data hypothesizes a direct interaction between lipid headgroups and a conserved motif of charged residues that control the conformational equilibrium through an interplay of electrostatic interactions within the protein. Together, our data lay the foundation for a comprehensive model of secondary multidrug transport in lipid bilayers. PMID:27399258

  17. RND multidrug efflux pumps: what are they good for?

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ortega, Carolina; Olivares, Jorge; Martínez, José L

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps are chromosomally encoded genetic elements capable of mediating resistance to toxic compounds in several life forms. In bacteria, these elements are involved in intrinsic and acquired resistance to antibiotics. Unlike other well-known horizontally acquired antibiotic resistance determinants, genes encoding for multidrug efflux pumps belong to the core of bacterial genomes and thus have evolved over millions of years. The selective pressure stemming from the use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections is relatively recent in evolutionary terms. Therefore, it is unlikely that these elements have evolved in response to antibiotics. In the last years, several studies have identified numerous functions for efflux pumps that go beyond antibiotic extrusion. In this review we present some examples of these functions that range from bacterial interactions with plant or animal hosts, to the detoxification of metabolic intermediates or the maintenance of cellular homeostasis.

  18. RND multidrug efflux pumps: what are they good for?

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Ortega, Carolina; Olivares, Jorge; Martínez, José L.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps are chromosomally encoded genetic elements capable of mediating resistance to toxic compounds in several life forms. In bacteria, these elements are involved in intrinsic and acquired resistance to antibiotics. Unlike other well-known horizontally acquired antibiotic resistance determinants, genes encoding for multidrug efflux pumps belong to the core of bacterial genomes and thus have evolved over millions of years. The selective pressure stemming from the use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections is relatively recent in evolutionary terms. Therefore, it is unlikely that these elements have evolved in response to antibiotics. In the last years, several studies have identified numerous functions for efflux pumps that go beyond antibiotic extrusion. In this review we present some examples of these functions that range from bacterial interactions with plant or animal hosts, to the detoxification of metabolic intermediates or the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. PMID:23386844

  19. Multidrug Resistant Shigella flexneri Infection Simulating Intestinal Intussusception

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, Srirangaraj; Kali, Arunava; Pradeep, Jothimani

    2016-01-01

    Shigella enteritis remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity in all age groups, in developing as well as developed countries. Owing to the emerging resistance to multiple antibiotics among Shigella spp., it has been recognized as a major global public health concern and warrants constant monitoring of its resistance pattern. We report a case of segmental ileitis caused by non.-ESBL producing multidrug resistant Shigella flexneri in an infant clinically mimicking intussusception, which was effectively treated by ceftriaxone. PMID:27013815

  20. Isolation of multidrug-resistant Salmonella in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Phoon, Yee Wei; Chan, Yuen Yue Candice; Koh, Tze Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Salmonella is a well-recognised problem worldwide, especially in developing countries such as India, where non-typhoidal Salmonella infections and enteric fever are endemic. Antimicrobial resistance, particularly to fluoroquinolones, is common and leads to the frequent use of alternative agents, such as azithromycin. We herein describe the first reported case of azithromycin-resistant Salmonella gastroenteritis in a Singaporean patient. PMID:26311915

  1. Tackling Threats and Future Problems of Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Medina, Eva; Pieper, Dietmar Helmut

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of the antibiotic era, the overuse and inappropriate consumption and application of antibiotics have driven the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Antimicrobial resistance increases the morbidity, mortality, length of hospitalization and healthcare costs. Among Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and among the Gram-negative bacteria, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBLs)-producing bacteria have become a major global healthcare problem in the 21st century. The pressure to use antibiotics guarantees that the spread and prevalence of these as well as of future emerging multidrug-resistant pathogens will be a persistent phenomenon. The unfeasibility of reversing antimicrobial resistance back towards susceptibility and the critical need to treat bacterial infection in modern medicine have burdened researchers and pharmaceutical companies to develop new antimicrobials effective against these difficult-to-treat multidrug-resistant pathogens. However, it can be anticipated that antibiotic resistance will continue to develop more rapidly than new agents to treat these infections become available and a better understanding of the molecular, evolutionary and ecological mechanisms governing the spread of antibiotic resistance is needed. The only way to curb the current crisis of antimicrobial resistance will be to develop entirely novel strategies to fight these pathogens such as combining antimicrobial drugs with other agents that counteract and obstruct the antibiotic resistant mechanisms expressed by the pathogen. Furthermore, as many antibiotics are often inappropriately prescribed, a more personalized approach based on precise diagnosis tools will ensure that proper treatments can be promptly applied leading to more targeted and effective therapies. However, in more general terms, also the overall use and release of antibiotics in the environment needs to be

  2. Imipenem: a potent inducer of multidrug resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Han-Yueh; Chang, Kai-Chih; Kuo, Jai-Wei; Yueh, Hui-Wen; Liou, Ming-Li

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the progression of multidrug resistance upon exposure to imipenem in Acinetobacter baumannii. Eighteen A. baumannii strains, including two reference strains (ATCC 19606 and ATCC 17978), four clinical strains (AB56, AB242, AB273 and AB279) and 12 antibiotic-selected mutant strains, were used in this study. Imipenem-selected mutants were generated from imipenem-susceptible strains (ATCC 19606, ATCC 17978 and AB242) by multistep selection resistance. Amikacin-, ciprofloxacin-, colistin-, meropenem- and ceftazidime-selected mutants were also generated from the two reference strains and were used for comparison. Antibiotic susceptibilities in the absence and presence of the efflux pump inhibitors carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine (NMP) were examined in the three imipenem-selected mutants and the three clinical multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates. Expression profiles of the antimicrobial resistance genes in the imipenem-selected mutants and their parental strains were also determined. The results showed that imipenem was more likely, compared with the other antibiotics, to induce a MDR phenotype in the two reference strains. Differences in OXA-51-like carbapenemase, efflux pumps or/and AmpC β-lactamase expression were observed in the three imipenem-selected mutants. Moreover, a reduction in imipenem or amikacin resistance was observed when the imipenem-selected mutants and clinical isolates were exposed to NMP and CCCP. This study concluded that imipenem might be a potent inducer of multidrug resistance in A. baumannii strains. OXA-51-like carbapenemase combined with other resistance mechanisms may contribute to the development of multidrug resistance in A. baumannii. Monitoring the use of carbapenems is required to reduce the spread of MDR A. baumannii in hospitals.

  3. Multidrug Resistant Shigella flexneri Infection Simulating Intestinal Intussusception.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Srirangaraj; Kali, Arunava; Pradeep, Jothimani

    2016-01-01

    Shigella enteritis remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity in all age groups, in developing as well as developed countries. Owing to the emerging resistance to multiple antibiotics among Shigella spp., it has been recognized as a major global public health concern and warrants constant monitoring of its resistance pattern. We report a case of segmental ileitis caused by non.-ESBL producing multidrug resistant Shigella flexneri in an infant clinically mimicking intussusception, which was effectively treated by ceftriaxone.

  4. Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps: mechanisms, physiology and pharmacological exploitations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingjing; Deng, Ziqing; Yan, Aixin

    2014-10-17

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) refers to the capability of bacterial pathogens to withstand lethal doses of structurally diverse drugs which are capable of eradicating non-resistant strains. MDR has been identified as a major threat to the public health of human being by the World Health Organization (WHO). Among the four general mechanisms that cause antibiotic resistance including target alteration, drug inactivation, decreased permeability and increased efflux, drug extrusion by the multidrug efflux pumps serves as an important mechanism of MDR. Efflux pumps not only can expel a broad range of antibiotics owing to their poly-substrate specificity, but also drive the acquisition of additional resistance mechanisms by lowering intracellular antibiotic concentration and promoting mutation accumulation. Over-expression of multidrug efflux pumps have been increasingly found to be associated with clinically relevant drug resistance. On the other hand, accumulating evidence has suggested that efflux pumps also have physiological functions in bacteria and their expression is subject tight regulation in response to various of environmental and physiological signals. A comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of drug extrusion, and regulation and physiological functions of efflux pumps is essential for the development of anti-resistance interventions. In this review, we summarize the development of these research areas in the recent decades and present the pharmacological exploitation of efflux pump inhibitors as a promising anti-drug resistance intervention.

  5. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily as Targets for Modulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanath; He, Guixin; Kakarla, Prathusha; Shrestha, Ugina; Ranjana, K C; Ranaweera, Indrika; Willmon, T Mark; Barr, Sharla R; Hernandez, Alberto J; Varela, Manuel F

    2016-01-01

    Causative agents of infectious disease that are multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens represent a serious public health concern due to the increasingly difficult nature of achieving efficacious clinical treatments. Of the various acquired and intrinsic antimicrobial agent resistance determinants, integral-membrane multidrug efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily constitute a major mechanism of bacterial resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) encompasses thousands of known related secondary active and passive solute transporters, including multidrug efflux pumps, from bacteria to humans. This review article addresses recent developments involving the targeting by various modulators of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps from the major facilitator superfamily. It is currently of tremendous interest to modulate bacterial multidrug efflux pumps in order to eventually restore the clinical efficacy of therapeutic agents against recalcitrant bacterial infections. Such MFS multidrug efflux pumps are good targets for modulation.

  6. Linsitinib (OSI-906) antagonizes ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 and subfamily C member 10-mediated drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Kathawala, Rishil J; Wang, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Patel, Atish; Shukla, Suneet; Robey, Robert W; Talele, Tanaji T; Ashby, Charles R; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Bates, Susan E; Fu, Li-Wu; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-06-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of linsitinib on the reversal of multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by the overexpression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) subfamily members ABCB1, ABCG2, ABCC1 and ABCC10. Our results indicate for the first time that linsitinib significantly potentiate the effect of anti-neoplastic drugs mitoxantrone (MX) and SN-38 in ABCG2-overexpressing cells; paclitaxel, docetaxel and vinblastine in ABCC10-overexpressing cells. Linsitinib moderately enhanced the cytotoxicity of vincristine in cell lines overexpressing ABCB1, whereas it did not alter the cytotoxicity of substrates of ABCC1. Furthermore, linsitinib significantly increased the intracellular accumulation and decreased the efflux of [(3)H]-MX in ABCG2-overexpressing cells and [(3)H]-paclitaxel in ABCC10-overexpressing cells. However, linsitinib, at a concentration that reversed MDR, did not significantly alter the expression levels of either the ABCG2 or ABCC10 transporter proteins. Furthermore, linsitinib did not significantly alter the intracellular localization of ABCG2 or ABCC10. Moreover, linsitinib stimulated the ATPase activity of ABCG2 in a concentration-dependent manner. Overall, our study suggests that linsitinib attenuates ABCG2- and ABCC10-mediated MDR by directly inhibiting their function as opposed to altering ABCG2 or ABCC10 protein expression.

  7. A Multidrug ABC Transporter with a Taste for Salt

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, Daniel A. P.; Venter, Henrietta; Barrera, Nelson P.; Seeger, Markus A.; Woebking, Barbara; Matak-Vinkovic, Dijana; Balakrishnan, Lekshmy; Yao, Yao; U, Edmond C. Y.; Shilling, Richard A.; Robinson, Carol V.; Thorn, Peter; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2009-01-01

    Background LmrA is a multidrug ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter from Lactococcus lactis with no known physiological substrate, which can transport a wide range of chemotherapeutic agents and toxins from the cell. The protein can functionally replace the human homologue ABCB1 (also termed multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein MDR1) in lung fibroblast cells. Even though LmrA mediates ATP-dependent transport, it can use the proton-motive force to transport substrates, such as ethidium bromide, across the membrane by a reversible, H+-dependent, secondary-active transport reaction. The mechanism and physiological context of this reaction are not known. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined ion transport by LmrA in electrophysiological experiments and in transport studies using radioactive ions and fluorescent ion-selective probes. Here we show that LmrA itself can transport NaCl by a similar secondary-active mechanism as observed for ethidium bromide, by mediating apparent H+-Na+-Cl− symport. Remarkably, LmrA activity significantly enhances survival of high-salt adapted lactococcal cells during ionic downshift. Conclusions/Significance The observations on H+-Na+-Cl− co-transport substantiate earlier suggestions of H+-coupled transport by LmrA, and indicate a novel link between the activity of LmrA and salt stress. Our findings demonstrate the relevance of investigations into the bioenergetics of substrate translocation by ABC transporters for our understanding of fundamental mechanisms in this superfamily. This study represents the first use of electrophysiological techniques to analyze substrate transport by a purified multidrug transporter. PMID:19593434

  8. Presence of Multidrug Resistant Enteric Bacteria in Dairy Farm Topsoil

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, J. M.; Ellington, B. A.; Varela, M. F.

    2008-01-01

    In addition to human and veterinary medicine, antibiotics are extensively used in agricultural settings, such as for treatment of infections, growth enhancement and prophylaxis in food animals, leading to selection of drug and multidrug resistant bacteria. In order to help circumvent the problem of bacterial antibiotic resistance, it is first necessary to understand the scope of the problem. However, is it not fully understood how widespread antibiotic resistant bacteria are in agricultural settings. The lack of such surveillance data is especially evident in dairy farm environments, such as soil. It is also unknown to what extent various physiological modulators, such as salycilate, a component of aspirin and known model modulator of multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) genes, influence bacterial multidrug resistance. We isolated and identified enteric soil bacteria from local dairy farms within Roosevelt County, NM, determined the resistance profiles to antibiotics associated with mar, such as chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, penicillin G and tetracycline. We then purified and characterized plasmid DNA and detected mar phenotypic activity. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of antibiotics for the isolates ranged between 6 - >50 μg/mL for chloramphenicol, 2–8 μg/mL for nalidixic acid, 25- >300 μg/mL for penicillin G and 1- > 80 μg/mL for tetracycline. On the other hand, the many of the isolates had significantly enhanced MICs for the same antibiotics in the presence of 5 mM salycilate. Plasmid DNA extracted from 12 randomly chosen isolates ranged in size between 6 and 12.5kb and in several cases conferred resistances to chloramphenicol and penicillin G. It is concluded that enteric bacteria from dairy farm topsoil are multi-drug resistant and harbor antibiotic resistance plasmids. A role for dairy topsoil in zoonosis is suggested, thus implicating this environment as a reservoir for bacterial resistance development against clinically relevant

  9. Clinical implications of the global multidrug-resistant tuberculosis epidemic.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kartik; Abubakar, Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) is a significant threat to global health estimated to account for nearly half a million new cases and over 200,000 deaths in 2013. The number of MDR TB cases in the UK has risen over the last 15 years, with ever more complex clinical cases and associated challenging public health and societal implications. In this review, we provide an overview of the epidemiology of MDR TB globally and in the UK, outline the clinical management of MDR TB and summarise recent advances in diagnostics and prospects for new treatment.

  10. Reversers of the multidrug resistance transporter P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Stein, Wilfred D

    2002-05-01

    Multidrug resistance can arise from the presence of the membrane-bound pump, P-glycoprotein, in a tumor. Major efforts have been made to develop inhibitors of this pump, and a number of promising blockers have reached late stages of clinical trials. The kinetics of the inhibition of P-glycoprotein is complex, with binding sites that can interact synergistically. Reversers of increased affinity and specificity could, in principle, be developed on the basis of these synergies, and offer some promise in cancer therapeutics.

  11. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: current epidemiology, therapeutic regimens, new drugs].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Ayerbe, C; Vivancos, M J; Moreno, S

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug and extensively resistant tuberculosis are especially severe forms of the disease for which no efficacious therapy exists in many cases. All the countries in the world have registered cases, although most of them are diagnosed in resource-limited countries from Asia, Africa and South America. For adequate treatment, first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs have to be judiciously used, but the development of new drugs with full activity, good tolerability and little toxicity is urgently needed. There are some drugs in development, some of which are already available through expanded-access programs.

  12. Clonal distribution of multidrug-resistant Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed

    Girlich, Delphine; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2015-04-01

    A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme including 7 housekeeping genes was used to evaluate whether the current spread of multidrug-resistant Enterobacter cloacae isolates worldwide might be associated to specific successful clones. Fifty E. cloacae clinical isolates of worldwide origin, with various β-lactamase content, and recovered at different periods of time were studied. Forty-four sequence types were identified, highlighting a high clonal diversity with 3 main lineages. This study revealed that a precise identification of the isolates by sequencing of the chromosomal ampC gene of E. cloacae would provide a significant added value to improve the reliability of the MLST scheme.

  13. Chloramphenicol and expression of multidrug efflux pump in Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Ghisalberti, Didier; Masi, Muriel; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Chevalier, Jacqueline

    2005-03-25

    Chloramphenicol has been reported to act as an inducer of the multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli. A resistant variant able to grow on plates containing 64 microg/ml chloramphenicol was obtained from the Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048-type strain. Chloramphenicol resistance was due to an active efflux of this antibiotic and it was associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones and tetracycline, but not to aminoglycoside or beta-lactam antibiotics. MDR in the chloramphenicol-resistant variant is linked to the overexpression of the major AcrAB-TolC efflux system. This overexpression seems unrelated to the global Mar and the local AcrR regulatory pathways.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Computer Simulations of Multidrug RND Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Ruggerone, Paolo; Vargiu, Attilio V; Collu, Francesca; Fischer, Nadine; Kandt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Over-expression of multidrug efflux pumps of the Resistance Nodulation Division (RND) protein super family counts among the main causes for microbial resistance against pharmaceuticals. Understanding the molecular basis of this process is one of the major challenges of modern biomedical research, involving a broad range of experimental and computational techniques. Here we review the current state of RND transporter investigation employing molecular dynamics simulations providing conformational samples of transporter components to obtain insights into the functional mechanism underlying efflux pump-mediated antibiotics resistance in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  15. On the physics of multidrug efflux through a biomolecular complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishima, Hirokazu; Oshima, Hiraku; Yasuda, Satoshi; Amano, Ken-ichi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2013-11-01

    Insertion and release of a solute into and from a vessel comprising biopolymers is a fundamental function in a biological system. A typical example is found in a multidrug efflux transporter. "Multidrug efflux" signifies that solutes such as drug molecules with diverse properties can be handled. In our view, the mechanism of the multidrug efflux is not chemically specific but rather has to be based on a physical factor. In earlier works, we showed that the spatial distribution of the solute-vessel potential of mean force (PMF) induced by the solvent plays imperative roles in the insertion/release process. The PMF can be decomposed into the energetic and entropic components. The entropic component, which originates from the translational displacement of solvent molecules, is rather insensitive to the solute-solvent and vessel inner surface-solvent affinities. This feature is not shared with the energetic component. When the vessel inner surface is neither solvophobic nor solvophilic, the solvents within the vessel cavity and in the bulk offer almost the same environment to any solute with solvophobicity or solvophilicity, and the energetic component becomes much smaller than the entropic component (i.e., the latter predominates over the former). Our idea is that the multidrug efflux can be realized if the insertion/release process is accomplished by the entropic component exhibiting the insensitivity to the solute properties. However, we have recently argued that the entropic release of the solute is not feasible as long as the vessel geometry is fixed. Here we consider a model of TolC, a cylindrical vessel possessing an entrance at one end and an exit at the other end for the solute. The spatial distribution of the PMF is calculated by employing the three-dimensional integral equation theory with rigid-body models in which the constituents interact only through hard-body potentials. Since the behavior of these models is purely entropic in origin, our analysis is

  16. Molecular Dynamics Computer Simulations of Multidrug RND Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Ruggerone, Paolo; Vargiu, Attilio V.; Collu, Francesca; Fischer, Nadine; Kandt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Over-expression of multidrug efflux pumps of the Resistance Nodulation Division (RND) protein super family counts among the main causes for microbial resistance against pharmaceuticals. Understanding the molecular basis of this process is one of the major challenges of modern biomedical research, involving a broad range of experimental and computational techniques. Here we review the current state of RND transporter investigation employing molecular dynamics simulations providing conformational samples of transporter components to obtain insights into the functional mechanism underlying efflux pump-mediated antibiotics resistance in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:24688701

  17. Worldwide Endemicity of a Multidrug-Resistant Staphylococcus capitis Clone Involved in Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Simões, Patricia; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Picaud, Jean-Charles; Laurent, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    A multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus capitis clone, NRCS-A, has been isolated from neonatal intensive care units in 17 countries throughout the world. S. capitis NRCS-A prevalence is high in some neonatal intensive care units in France. These data highlight the worldwide endemicity and epidemiologic relevance of this multidrug-resistant, coagulase-negative staphylococci clone. PMID:28221122

  18. Human Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Newport Infections, Wisconsin, 2003–2005

    PubMed Central

    Archer, John R.; Sotir, Mark J.; Monson, Timothy A.; Kazmierczak, James J.

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of Salmonella Newport infections among Wisconsin residents during 2003–2005. Multidrug resistance prevalence was substantially greater in Wisconsin than elsewhere in the United States. Persons with multidrug-resistant infections were more likely than persons with susceptible infections to report exposure to cattle, farms, and unpasteurized milk. PMID:18217570

  19. Natural History of Multi-Drug Resistant Organisms in a New Military Medical Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus 14 (3) Enterococcus (faecium and faecalis) 11 (2) The remaining 11 species each comprised less than 2% of total 169 (32...environment plays in the transmission of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MDRO) is increasingly...Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); Klebsiella pneumoniea; and Clostridium difficile. Multidrug- resistance (MDR

  20. Undetected multidrug-resistant tuberculosis amplified by first-line therapy in mixed infection.

    PubMed

    Hingley-Wilson, Suzanne M; Casey, Rosalyn; Connell, David; Bremang, Samuel; Evans, Jason T; Hawkey, Peter M; Smith, Grace E; Jepson, Annette; Philip, Stuart; Kon, Onn Min; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-07-01

    Infections with >1 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain(s) are underrecognized. We show, in vitro and in vivo, how first-line treatment conferred a competitive growth advantage to amplify a multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis strain in a patient with mixed infection. Diagnostic techniques that identify mixed tubercle bacilli populations are needed to curb the spread of multidrug resistance.

  1. Use of Spatial Information to Predict Multidrug Resistance in Tuberculosis Patients, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsien-Ho; Shin, Sonya S.; Contreras, Carmen; Asencios, Luis; Paciorek, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether spatiotemporal information could help predict multidrug resistance at the time of tuberculosis diagnosis, we investigated tuberculosis patients who underwent drug susceptibility testing in Lima, Peru, during 2005–2007. We found that crude representation of spatial location at the level of the health center improved prediction of multidrug resistance. PMID:22516236

  2. In Silico Prediction of Inhibition of Promiscuous Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2)

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yi-Lung; Shih, Yu-Hsuan; Tsai, Fu-Yuan; Leong, Max K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer resistant protein has an essential role in active transport of endogenous substances and xenobiotics across extracellular and intracellular membranes along with P-glycoprotein. It also plays a major role in multiple drug resistance and permeation of blood-brain barrier. Therefore, it is of great importance to derive theoretical models to predict the inhibition of both transporters in the process of drug discovery and development. Hitherto, very limited BCRP inhibition predictive models have been proposed as compared with its P-gp counterpart. Methodology/Principal Findings An in silico BCRP inhibition model was developed in this study using the pharmacophore ensemble/support vector machine scheme to take into account the promiscuous nature of BCRP. The predictions by the PhE/SVM model were found to be in good agreement with the observed values for those molecules in the training set (n = 22, r2 = 0.82,  = 0.73, RMSE  =  0.40, s = 0.24), test set (n = 97, q2 = 0.75–0.89, RMSE  = 0.31, s = 0.21), and outlier set (n = 16, q2 = 0.72–0.91, RMSE  =  0.29, s = 0.17). When subjected to a variety of statistical validations, the developed PhE/SVM model consistently met the most stringent criteria. A mock test by HIV protease inhibitors also asserted its predictivity. Conclusions/Significance It was found that this accurate, fast, and robust PhE/SVM model can be employed to predict the BCRP inhibition of structurally diverse molecules that otherwise cannot be carried out by any other methods in a high-throughput fashion to design therapeutic agents with insignificant drug toxicity and unfavorable drug–drug interactions mediated by BCRP to enhance clinical efficacy and/or circumvent drug resistance. PMID:24614353

  3. Repurposing ebselen for treatment of multidrug-resistant staphylococcal infections

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Younis, Waleed; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    Novel antimicrobials and new approaches to developing them are urgently needed. Repurposing already-approved drugs with well-characterized toxicology and pharmacology is a novel way to reduce the time, cost, and risk associated with antibiotic innovation. Ebselen, an organoselenium compound, is known to be clinically safe and has a well-known pharmacology profile. It has shown potent bactericidal activity against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA and VRSA). We demonstrated that ebselen acts through inhibition of protein synthesis and subsequently inhibited toxin production in MRSA. Additionally, ebselen was remarkably active and significantly reduced established staphylococcal biofilms. The therapeutic efficacy of ebselen was evaluated in a mouse model of staphylococcal skin infections. Ebselen 1% and 2% significantly reduced the bacterial load and the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in MRSA USA300 skin lesions. Furthermore, it acts synergistically with traditional antimicrobials. This study provides evidence that ebselen has great potential for topical treatment of MRSA skin infections and lays the foundation for further analysis and development of ebselen as a potential treatment for multidrug-resistant staphylococcal infections. PMID:26111644

  4. Multidrug resistance protein gene expression in Trichoplusia ni caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Jason; D'Souza, Olivia; Rheault, Mark; Donly, Cam

    2013-02-01

    Many insect species exhibit pesticide-resistant phenotypes. One of the mechanisms capable of contributing to resistance is the overexpression of multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter proteins. Here we describe the cloning of three genes encoding MDR proteins from Trichoplusia ni: trnMDR1, trnMDR2 and trnMDR3. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) detected trnMDR mRNA in the whole nervous system, midgut and Malpighian tubules of final instar T. ni caterpillars. To test whether these genes are upregulated in response to chemical challenge in this insect, qPCR was used to compare trnMDR mRNA levels in unchallenged insects with those of insects fed the synthetic pyrethroid, deltamethrin. Only limited increases were detected in a single gene, trnMDR2, which is the most weakly expressed of the three MDR genes, suggesting that increased multidrug resistance of this type is not a significant part of the response to deltamethrin exposure.

  5. Photoexcited quantum dots for killing multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Colleen M; Goodman, Samuel M; McDaniel, Jessica A; Madinger, Nancy E; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are an ever-growing threat because of the shrinking arsenal of efficacious antibiotics. Metal nanoparticles can induce cell death, yet the toxicity effect is typically nonspecific. Here, we show that photoexcited quantum dots (QDs) can kill a wide range of multidrug-resistant bacterial clinical isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhimurium. The killing effect is independent of material and controlled by the redox potentials of the photogenerated charge carriers, which selectively alter the cellular redox state. We also show that the QDs can be tailored to kill 92% of bacterial cells in a monoculture, and in a co-culture of E. coli and HEK 293T cells, while leaving the mammalian cells intact, or to increase bacterial proliferation. Photoexcited QDs could be used in the study of the effect of redox states on living systems, and lead to clinical phototherapy for the treatment of infections.

  6. Multidrug Efflux Pumps in Staphylococcus aureus: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sofia Santos; Viveiros, Miguel; Amaral, Leonard; Couto, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of infections caused by multi- or pan-resistant bacteria in the hospital or in the community settings is an increasing health concern. Albeit there is no single resistance mechanism behind multiresistance, multidrug efflux pumps, proteins that cells use to detoxify from noxious compounds, seem to play a key role in the emergence of these multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. During the last decades, experimental data has established their contribution to low level resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria and their potential role in the appearance of MDR phenotypes, by the extrusion of multiple, unrelated compounds. Recent studies suggest that efflux pumps may be used by the cell as a first-line defense mechanism, avoiding the drug to reach lethal concentrations, until a stable, more efficient alteration occurs, that allows survival in the presence of that agent. In this paper we review the current knowledge on MDR efflux pumps and their intricate regulatory network in Staphylococcus aureus, a major pathogen, responsible from mild to life-threatening infections. Particular emphasis will be given to the potential role that S. aureus MDR efflux pumps, either chromosomal or plasmid-encoded, have on resistance towards different antimicrobial agents and on the selection of drug - resistant strains. We will also discuss the many questions that still remain on the role of each specific efflux pump and the need to establish appropriate methodological approaches to address all these questions. PMID:23569469

  7. Photoexcited quantum dots for killing multidrug-resistant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Colleen M.; Goodman, Samuel M.; McDaniel, Jessica A.; Madinger, Nancy E.; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are an ever-growing threat because of the shrinking arsenal of efficacious antibiotics. Metal nanoparticles can induce cell death, yet the toxicity effect is typically nonspecific. Here, we show that photoexcited quantum dots (QDs) can kill a wide range of multidrug-resistant bacterial clinical isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhimurium. The killing effect is independent of material and controlled by the redox potentials of the photogenerated charge carriers, which selectively alter the cellular redox state. We also show that the QDs can be tailored to kill 92% of bacterial cells in a monoculture, and in a co-culture of E. coli and HEK 293T cells, while leaving the mammalian cells intact, or to increase bacterial proliferation. Photoexcited QDs could be used in the study of the effect of redox states on living systems, and lead to clinical phototherapy for the treatment of infections.

  8. The secondary resistome of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Bimal; Cain, Amy K.; Doerrler, William T.; Boinett, Christine J.; Fookes, Maria C.; Parkhill, Julian; Guardabassi, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae causes severe lung and bloodstream infections that are difficult to treat due to multidrug resistance. We hypothesized that antimicrobial resistance can be reversed by targeting chromosomal non-essential genes that are not responsible for acquired resistance but essential for resistant bacteria under therapeutic concentrations of antimicrobials. Conditional essentiality of individual genes to antimicrobial resistance was evaluated in an epidemic multidrug-resistant clone of K. pneumoniae (ST258). We constructed a high-density transposon mutant library of >430,000 unique Tn5 insertions and measured mutant depletion upon exposure to three clinically relevant antimicrobials (colistin, imipenem or ciprofloxacin) by Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing (TraDIS). Using this high-throughput approach, we defined three sets of chromosomal non-essential genes essential for growth during exposure to colistin (n = 35), imipenem (n = 1) or ciprofloxacin (n = 1) in addition to known resistance determinants, collectively termed the “secondary resistome”. As proof of principle, we demonstrated that inactivation of a non-essential gene not previously found linked to colistin resistance (dedA) restored colistin susceptibility by reducing the minimum inhibitory concentration from 8 to 0.5 μg/ml, 4-fold below the susceptibility breakpoint (S ≤ 2 μg/ml). This finding suggests that the secondary resistome is a potential target for developing antimicrobial “helper” drugs that restore the efficacy of existing antimicrobials. PMID:28198411

  9. Multidrug resistance: a transport system of antitumor agents and xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Tsuruo, T

    1990-01-01

    Resistance of tumors to a variety of chemotherapeutic agents presents a major problem in cancer treatment. Resistance to such agents as doxorubicin, Vinca alkaloids, and actinomycin D can be acquired by tumor cells after treatment with a single drug. The gene responsible for multidrug resistance, termed mdr1, encodes a membrane glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) that acts as a pump to transport various cytotoxic agents including various xenobiotics out of the cell. The amount of P-glycoprotein expression has been measured in tumor samples and was found to be elevated in intrinsically drug-resistant cancers of the colon, kidney, and adrenal as well as in some tumors that acquired drug resistance after chemotherapy. The protein was also found to be elevated in cells treated with xenobiotics. P-glycoprotein has been shown to bind anticancer drugs and several resistance-reversing agents including calcium channel blockers, and to be an ATPase. We recently reconstituted the purified P-glycoprotein into artificial liposomes. Reconstituted P-glycoprotein showed ATPase activity, ATP-dependent drug-transport activity, and calcium channel blocker-binding activity. This model provides many advantages for studies of the biochemical functions of P-glycoprotein. In addition to these basic interests, the protein is of considerable interest as a target for cancer chemotherapy because it appears to be involved in both acquired multidrug resistance and intrinsic drug resistance in human cancer. The selective killing of tumor cells expressing P-glycoprotein could be very important in future cancer therapy.

  10. The secondary resistome of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jana, Bimal; Cain, Amy K; Doerrler, William T; Boinett, Christine J; Fookes, Maria C; Parkhill, Julian; Guardabassi, Luca

    2017-02-15

    Klebsiella pneumoniae causes severe lung and bloodstream infections that are difficult to treat due to multidrug resistance. We hypothesized that antimicrobial resistance can be reversed by targeting chromosomal non-essential genes that are not responsible for acquired resistance but essential for resistant bacteria under therapeutic concentrations of antimicrobials. Conditional essentiality of individual genes to antimicrobial resistance was evaluated in an epidemic multidrug-resistant clone of K. pneumoniae (ST258). We constructed a high-density transposon mutant library of >430,000 unique Tn5 insertions and measured mutant depletion upon exposure to three clinically relevant antimicrobials (colistin, imipenem or ciprofloxacin) by Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing (TraDIS). Using this high-throughput approach, we defined three sets of chromosomal non-essential genes essential for growth during exposure to colistin (n = 35), imipenem (n = 1) or ciprofloxacin (n = 1) in addition to known resistance determinants, collectively termed the "secondary resistome". As proof of principle, we demonstrated that inactivation of a non-essential gene not previously found linked to colistin resistance (dedA) restored colistin susceptibility by reducing the minimum inhibitory concentration from 8 to 0.5 μg/ml, 4-fold below the susceptibility breakpoint (S ≤ 2 μg/ml). This finding suggests that the secondary resistome is a potential target for developing antimicrobial "helper" drugs that restore the efficacy of existing antimicrobials.

  11. Multidrug Efflux Pumps in Staphylococcus aureus: an Update.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sofia Santos; Viveiros, Miguel; Amaral, Leonard; Couto, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of infections caused by multi- or pan-resistant bacteria in the hospital or in the community settings is an increasing health concern. Albeit there is no single resistance mechanism behind multiresistance, multidrug efflux pumps, proteins that cells use to detoxify from noxious compounds, seem to play a key role in the emergence of these multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. During the last decades, experimental data has established their contribution to low level resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria and their potential role in the appearance of MDR phenotypes, by the extrusion of multiple, unrelated compounds. Recent studies suggest that efflux pumps may be used by the cell as a first-line defense mechanism, avoiding the drug to reach lethal concentrations, until a stable, more efficient alteration occurs, that allows survival in the presence of that agent. In this paper we review the current knowledge on MDR efflux pumps and their intricate regulatory network in Staphylococcus aureus, a major pathogen, responsible from mild to life-threatening infections. Particular emphasis will be given to the potential role that S. aureus MDR efflux pumps, either chromosomal or plasmid-encoded, have on resistance towards different antimicrobial agents and on the selection of drug - resistant strains. We will also discuss the many questions that still remain on the role of each specific efflux pump and the need to establish appropriate methodological approaches to address all these questions.

  12. Effect of multidrug resistance 1/P-glycoprotein on the hypoxia-induced multidrug resistance of human laryngeal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Dawei; Zhou, Liang; Huang, Jiameng; Xiao, Xiyan

    2016-08-01

    In a previous study, it was demonstrated that hypoxia upregulated the multidrug resistance (MDR) of laryngeal cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs, with multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1)/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression also being upregulated. The present study aimed to investigate the role and mechanism of MDR1/P-gp on hypoxia-induced MDR in human laryngeal carcinoma cells. The sensitivity of laryngeal cancer cells to multiple drugs and cisplatin-induced apoptosis was determined by CCK-8 assay and Annexin-V/propidium iodide staining analysis, respectively. The accumulation of rhodamine 123 (Rh123) in the cells served as an estimate of drug accumulation and was evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM). MDR1/P-gp expression was inhibited using interference RNA, and the expression of the MDR1 gene was analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. As a result, the sensitivity to multiple chemotherapeutic agents and the apoptosis rate of the hypoxic laryngeal carcinoma cells increased following a decrease in MDR1/P-gp expression (P<0.05). Additionally, FCM analysis of fluorescence intensity indicated that the downregulated expression of MDR1/P-gp markedly increased intracellular Rh123 accumulation (P<0.05). Such results suggest that MDR1/P-gp serves an important role in regulating hypoxia-induced MDR in human laryngeal carcinoma cells through a decrease in intracellular drug accumulation.

  13. Safety and effectiveness of home intravenous antibiotic therapy for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Mujal, A; Sola, J; Hernandez, M; Villarino, M-A; Machado, M-L; Baylina, M; Tajan, J; Oristrell, J

    2015-06-01

    Home intravenous antibiotic therapy is an alternative to hospital admission for moderately severe infections. However, few studies have analyzed its safety and effectiveness in the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. The purpose of this study is to analyze the safety and effectiveness of home intravenous antibiotic therapy in multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. We analyzed prospectively all patients admitted to our service who underwent home intravenous antibiotic therapy during the period 2008-2012. All the treatments were administered by caretakers or self-administered by patients, through elastomeric infusion devices. Effectiveness was evaluated by analyzing the readmission rate for poor infection control. Safety was evaluated by analyzing adverse events, catheter-related complications, and readmissions not related to poor infection control. There were 433 admissions (in 355 patients) for home intravenous antibiotic therapy during the study period. There were 226 (52.2 %) admissions due to multidrug-resistant bacterial infections and 207 (47.8 %) due to non-multidrug-resistant infections. Hospital readmissions in patients with multidrug-resistant infections were uncommon. Multidrug-resistant enterococcal infections, healthcare-associated infections, and carbapenem therapy were independent variables associated with increased readmissions due to poor infection control. Readmissions not related to poor infection control, adverse events, and catheter-related complications were similar in multidrug-resistant compared to non-multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Home intravenous therapy, administered by patients or their caretakers using elastomeric infusion pumps, was safe and effective for the treatment of most multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

  14. Susceptibility of Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Urine Isolates to Oral Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Zucchi, Paola C.; Chen, Alice; Raux, Brian R.; Kirby, James E.; McCoy, Christopher; Eliopoulos, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing resistance among Gram-negative uropathogens limits treatment options, and susceptibility data for multidrug-resistant isolates are limited. We assessed the activity of five oral agents against 91 multidrug-resistant Gram-negative urine isolates that were collected from emergency department/hospitalized patients. Fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin were most active (>75% susceptibility). Susceptibilities to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, ciprofloxacin, and ampicillin were ≤40%; empirical use of these agents likely provides inadequate coverage in areas with a high prevalence of multidrug-resistant uropathogens. PMID:26883704

  15. Preparation of silver nanoparticles fabrics against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanh, Truong Thi; Thu, Nguyen Thi; Hien, Nguyen Quoc; An, Pham Ngoc; Loan, Truong Thi Kieu; Hoa, Phan Thi

    2016-04-01

    The silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)/peco fabrics were prepared by immobilization of AgNPs on fabrics in which AgNPs were synthesized by γ-irradiation of the 10 mM AgNO3 chitosan solution at the dose of 17.6 kGy. The AgNPs size has been estimated to be about 11 nm from TEM image. The AgNPs content onto peco fabrics was of 143±6 mg/kg at the initial AgNPs concentration of 100 ppm. The AgNPs colloidal solution was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and TEM image. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs/peco fabrics after 60 washings against Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae was found to be over 99%. Effects of AgNPs fabics on multidrug-resistant pathogens from the clinical specimens were also tested.

  16. How to Measure Export via Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Jessica M. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps are an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and are required for many pathogens to cause infection. They are also being harnessed to improve microbial biotechnological processes, including biofuel production. Therefore, scientists of many specialties must be able to accurately measure efflux activity. However, myriad methodologies have been described and the most appropriate method is not always clear. Within the scientific literature, many methods are misused or data arising are misinterpreted. The methods for measuring efflux activity can be split into two groups, (i) those that directly measure efflux and (ii) those that measure the intracellular accumulation of a substrate, which is then used to infer efflux activity. Here, we review the methods for measuring efflux and explore the most recent advances in this field, including single-cell or cell-free technologies and mass spectrometry, that are being used to provide more detailed information about efflux pump activity. PMID:27381291

  17. Bacteriophages: biosensing tools for multi-drug resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Tawil, N; Sacher, E; Mandeville, R; Meunier, M

    2014-03-21

    Pathogen detection is of utmost importance in many sectors, such as in the food industry, environmental quality control, clinical diagnostics, bio-defence and counter-terrorism. Failure to appropriately, and specifically, detect pathogenic bacteria can lead to serious consequences, and may ultimately be lethal. Public safety, new legislation, recent outbreaks in food contamination, and the ever-increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections have fostered a worldwide research effort targeting novel biosensing strategies. This review concerns phage-based analytical and biosensing methods targeted towards theranostic applications. We discuss and review phage-based assays, notably phage amplification, reporter phage, phage lysis, and bioluminescence assays for the detection of bacterial species, as well as phage-based biosensors, including optical (comprising SPR sensors and fiber optic assays), electrochemical (comprising amperometric, potentiometric, and impedimetric sensors), acoustic wave and magnetoelastic sensors.

  18. Nanomedicinal strategies to treat multidrug-resistant tumors: current progress

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaowei; Mumper, Russell J

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major impediment to the success of cancer chemotherapy. P-glycoprotein is an important and the best-known membrane transporter involved in MDR. Several strategies have been used to address MDR, especially P-glycoprotein-mediated drug resistance in tumors. However, clinical success has been limited, largely due to issues regarding lack of efficacy and/or safety. Nanoparticles have shown the ability to target tumors based on their unique physical and biological properties. To date, nanoparticles have been investigated primarily to address P-glycoprotein and the observed improved anticancer efficacy suggests that nanomedicinal strategies provide a new opportunity to overcome MDR. This article focuses on nanotechnology-based formulations and current nanomedicine approaches to address MDR in tumors and discusses the proposed mechanisms of action. PMID:20528455

  19. Cell biological mechanisms of multidrug resistance in tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, S M; Schindler, M

    1994-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a generic term for the variety of strategies tumor cells use to evade the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. MDR is characterized by a decreased sensitivity of tumor cells not only to the drug employed for chemotherapy but also to a broad spectrum of drugs with neither obvious structural homology nor common targets. This pleiotropic resistance is one of the major obstacles to the successful treatment of tumors. MDR may result from structural or functional changes at the plasma membrane or within the cytoplasm, cellular compartments, or nucleus. Molecular mechanisms of MDR are discussed in terms of modifications in detoxification and DNA repair pathways, changes in cellular sites of drug sequestration, decreases in drug-target affinity, synthesis of specific drug inhibitors within cells, altered or inappropriate targeting of proteins, and accelerated removal or secretion of drugs. PMID:7909602

  20. [ABC transporter proteins in multidrug resistance of microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Balková, K; Gbelská, Y

    2007-08-01

    The ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporter family includes membrane proteins that can transport a wide variety of substrates across biological membranes. These proteins play an essential role in the protection of cells from toxic compounds/metabolites. Their overexpression which leads to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in pathogens and enables cancer cells to survive chemotherapy is of major concern for human health. Mutations in ABC transporters are implicated in a number of Mendelian disorders such as cystic fibrosis, adrenoleukodystrophy and cholesterol and bile transport defects. In microbial cells, several homologues of human ABC transporters were identified. Their further molecular biological study can contribute to better understanding and treatment of MDR or diseases caused by dysfunction of ABC transporter proteins. A review is presented of the state of the art in ABC transporter proteins in both prokaryotic and eucaryotic cells. The role of microbial ABC transporters in the development of drug resistance is analyzed.

  1. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Epidemiology, treatment, prevention and diagnostic research].

    PubMed

    Perronne, C; de Truchis, P

    1995-01-01

    The recent augmentation of the prevalence of multidrug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis is related to the high incidence of tuberculosis in HIV infected people, especially in those with low social status and no medical care; several nosocomial epidemics of MDR tuberculosis were observed in American and European institutions where HIV-infected persons were hospitalized; these MDR tuberculosis were associated with a high mortality-rate and frequent nosocomial transmission to immunocompromised contacts and care workers. The rapid institution of an adequate treatment with ancient antituberculosis agents (cycloserin, capreomycin, aminoglycosides) and/or new drugs (rifabutine, ofloxacin, sparfloxacin, etc) is necessary to avoid mortality and to diminish transmission. Prevention of MDR tuberculosis transmission is very important: patient isolation, adequate and prolonged therapy, better detection of resistance with gene-amplification methods (PCR) which are under investigation.

  2. Lacidipine and josamycin: two new multidrug resistance modulators.

    PubMed

    Crosta, L; Candiloro, V; Meli, M; Tolomeo, M; Rausa, L; Dusonchet, L

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we report the results obtained treating a multidrug resistant (MDR) murine erythroleukemia cell line with daunomycin (DNM) in association with two new modulators characterized by a favourable therapeutic index, lacidipine (LCD), a dihydropyridine calcium antagonist, and josamycin (JSM), a macrolide antibiotic. LCD and JSM exhibited a greater MDR reversal activity than verapamil (VRP) and erythromycin (ERY) respectively. The accumulation of DNM in the DRTL cells exposed to modulators was similar to that of the parental cell line FLC. In the case of LCD, it was possible to ascertain that at a very low concentration this molecule can circumvent MDR without modifying DNM accumulation, suggesting that multiple different determinants may be responsible for MDR other than P-170 in this cell line.

  3. Clusters of Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cases, Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Kristin; Heersma, Herre; Van Soolingen, Dick

    2009-01-01

    Molecular surveillance of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) was implemented in Europe as case reporting in 2005. For all new MDR TB cases detected from January 2003 through June 2007, countries reported case-based epidemiologic data and DNA fingerprint patterns of MDR TB strains when available. International clusters were detected and analyzed. From 2003 through mid-2007 in Europe, 2,494 cases of MDR TB were reported from 24 European countries. Epidemiologic and molecular data were linked for 593 (39%) cases, and 672 insertion sequence 6110 DNA fingerprint patterns were reported from 19 countries. Of these patterns, 288 (43%) belonged to 18 European clusters; 7 clusters (242/288 cases, 84%) were characterized by strains of the Beijing genotype family, including the largest cluster (175/288 cases, 61%). Both clustering and the Beijing genotype were associated with strains originating in eastern European countries. Molecular cluster detection contributes to identification of transmission profile, risk factors, and control measures. PMID:19624920

  4. Breaking the Spell: Combating Multidrug Resistant ‘Superbugs’

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahper N.; Khan, Asad U.

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria have become a severe threat to community wellbeing. Conventional antibiotics are getting progressively more ineffective as a consequence of resistance, making it imperative to realize improved antimicrobial options. In this review we emphasized the microorganisms primarily reported of being resistance, referred as ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacteriaceae) accentuating their capacity to “escape” from routine antimicrobial regimes. The upcoming antimicrobial agents showing great potential and can serve as alternative therapeutic options are discussed. We also provided succinct overview of two evolving technologies; specifically network pharmacology and functional genomics profiling. Furthermore, In vivo imaging techniques can provide novel targets and a real time tool for potential lead molecule assessment. The employment of such approaches at prelude of a drug development process, will enables more informed decisions on candidate drug selection and will maximize or predict therapeutic potential before clinical testing. PMID:26925046

  5. Multidrug-resistant pathogens in the food supply.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Marjorie E

    2015-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance, including multidrug resistance (MDR), is an increasing problem globally. MDR bacteria are frequently detected in humans and animals from both more- and less-developed countries and pose a serious concern for human health. Infections caused by MDR microbes may increase morbidity and mortality and require use of expensive drugs and prolonged hospitalization. Humans may be exposed to MDR pathogens through exposure to environments at health-care facilities and farms, livestock and companion animals, human food, and exposure to other individuals carrying MDR microbes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention classifies drug-resistant foodborne bacteria, including Campylobacter, Salmonella Typhi, nontyphoidal salmonellae, and Shigella, as serious threats. MDR bacteria have been detected in both meat and fresh produce. Salmonellae carrying genes coding for resistance to multiple antibiotics have caused numerous foodborne MDR outbreaks. While there is some level of resistance to antimicrobials in environmental bacteria, the widespread use of antibiotics in medicine and agriculture has driven the selection of a great variety of microbes with resistance to multiple antimicrobials. MDR bacteria on meat may have originated in veterinary health-care settings or on farms where animals are given antibiotics in feed or to treat infections. Fresh produce may be contaminated by irrigation or wash water containing MDR bacteria. Livestock, fruits, and vegetables may also be contaminated by food handlers, farmers, and animal caretakers who carry MDR bacteria. All potential sources of MDR bacteria should be considered and strategies devised to reduce their presence in foods. Surveillance studies have documented increasing trends in MDR in many pathogens, although there are a few reports of the decline of certain multidrug pathogens. Better coordination of surveillance programs and strategies for controlling use of antimicrobials need to be implemented in

  6. Nanodrug delivery in reversing multidrug resistance in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kapse-Mistry, Sonali; Govender, Thirumala; Srivastava, Rohit; Yergeri, Mayur

    2014-01-01

    Different mechanisms in cancer cells become resistant to one or more chemotherapeutics is known as multidrug resistance (MDR) which hinders chemotherapy efficacy. Potential factors for MDR includes enhanced drug detoxification, decreased drug uptake, increased intracellular nucleophiles levels, enhanced repair of drug induced DNA damage, overexpression of drug transporter such as P-glycoprotein(P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP1, MRP2), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Currently nanoassemblies such as polymeric/solid lipid/inorganic/metal nanoparticles, quantum dots, dendrimers, liposomes, micelles has emerged as an innovative, effective, and promising platforms for treatment of drug resistant cancer cells. Nanocarriers have potential to improve drug therapeutic index, ability for multifunctionality, divert ABC-transporter mediated drug efflux mechanism and selective targeting to tumor cells, cancer stem cells, tumor initiating cells, or cancer microenvironment. Selective nanocarrier targeting to tumor overcomes dose-limiting side effects, lack of selectivity, tissue toxicity, limited drug access to tumor tissues, high drug doses, and emergence of multiple drug resistance with conventional or combination chemotherapy. Current review highlights various nanodrug delivery systems to overcome mechanism of MDR by neutralizing, evading, or exploiting the drug efflux pumps and those independent of drug efflux pump mechanism by silencing Bcl-2 and HIF1α gene expressions by siRNA and miRNA, modulating ceramide levels and targeting NF-κB. “Theragnostics” combining a cytotoxic agent, targeting moiety, chemosensitizing agent, and diagnostic imaging aid are highlighted as effective and innovative systems for tumor localization and overcoming MDR. Physical approaches such as combination of drug with thermal/ultrasound/photodynamic therapies to overcome MDR are focused. The review focuses on newer drug delivery systems developed to overcome

  7. Targeted multidrug delivery system to overcome chemoresistance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuan; Soroush, Fariborz; Tong, Zhaohui; Kiani, Mohammad F; Wang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy has been widely used in breast cancer patients to reduce tumor size. However, most anticancer agents cannot differentiate between cancerous and normal cells, resulting in severe systemic toxicity. In addition, acquired drug resistance during the chemotherapy treatment further decreases treatment efficacy. With the proper treatment strategy, nanodrug carriers, such as liposomes/immunoliposomes, may be able to reduce undesired side effects of chemotherapy, to overcome the acquired multidrug resistance, and to further improve the treatment efficacy. In this study, a novel combinational targeted drug delivery system was developed by encapsulating antiangiogenesis drug bevacizumab into liposomes and encapsulating chemotherapy drug doxorubicin (DOX) into immunoliposomes where the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) antibody was used as a targeting ligand. This novel combinational system was tested in vitro using a HER2 positive and multidrug resistant breast cancer cell line (BT-474/MDR), and in vivo using a xenograft mouse tumor model. In vitro cell culture experiments show that immunoliposome delivery led to a high cell nucleus accumulation of DOX, whereas free DOX was observed mostly near the cell membrane and in cytoplasm due to the action of P-gp. Combining liposomal bevacizumab with immunoliposomal DOX achieved the best tumor growth inhibition and the lowest toxicity. Tumor size decreased steadily within a 60-day observation period indicating a potential synergistic effect between DOX and bevacizumab through the targeted delivery. Our findings clearly indicate that tumor growth was significantly delayed in the combinational liposomal drug delivery group. This novel combinational therapy has great potential for the treatment of patients with HER2/MDR double positive breast cancer. PMID:28176940

  8. The Assembly Motif of a Bacterial Small Multidrug Resistance Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Bradley E.; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    Multidrug transporters such as the small multidrug resistance (SMR) family of bacterial integral membrane proteins are capable of conferring clinically significant resistance to a variety of common therapeutics. As antiporter proteins of ∼100 amino acids, SMRs must self-assemble into homo-oligomeric structures for efflux of drug molecules. Oligomerization centered at transmembrane helix four (TM4) has been implicated in SMR assembly, but the full complement of residues required to mediate its self-interaction remains to be characterized. Here, we use Hsmr, the 110-residue SMR family member of the archaebacterium Halobacterium salinarum, to determine the TM4 residue motif required to mediate drug resistance and SMR self-association. Twelve single point mutants that scan the central portion of the TM4 helix (residues 85–104) were constructed and were tested for their ability to confer resistance to the cytotoxic compound ethidium bromide. Six residues were found to be individually essential for drug resistance activity (Gly90, Leu91, Leu93, Ile94, Gly97, and Val98), defining a minimum activity motif of 90GLXLIXXGV98 within TM4. When the propensity of these mutants to dimerize on SDS-PAGE was examined, replacements of all but Ile resulted in ∼2-fold reduction of dimerization versus the wild-type antiporter. Our work defines a minimum activity motif of 90GLXLIXXGV98 within TM4 and suggests that this sequence mediates TM4-based SMR dimerization along a single helix surface, stabilized by a small residue heptad repeat sequence. These TM4-TM4 interactions likely constitute the highest affinity locus for disruption of SMR function by directly targeting its self-assembly mechanism. PMID:19224913

  9. Ontogeny, aging, and gender-related changes in hepatic multidrug resistant protein genes in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiong-Ni; Hou, Wei-Yu; Xu, Shang-Fu; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Liu, Jie

    2017-02-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins (Mrps) are efflux transporters playing important roles in endogenous substances and xenobiotics transport out of the liver. Children, elderly, gender and physio-pathological conditions could influence their expression and result in changes in drug disposition.

  10. Sinomenine reverses multidrug resistance in bladder cancer cells via P-glycoprotein-dependent and independent manners.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yule; Zhang, Linlin; Lu, Xinlan; Wu, Kaijie; Zeng, Jin; Gao, Yang; Shi, Qi; Wang, Xinyang; Chang, Luke S; He, Dalin

    2014-01-01

    P-Glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance is a frequent event during chemotherapy and a key obstacle for bladder cancer therapy. Search for strategies to reverse multidrug resistance is a promising approach to improve the management of bladder cancer. In the present study, we reported a novel P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistant cell model 253J/DOX, which was generated from human bladder cancer 253J cell line. Furthermore, we found that the multidrug resistant phenotype of 253J/DOX cells could be overcome by sinomenine, an alkaloid derived from the stem of Sinomenium acutum. Mechanistically, the chemosensitive effect by sinomenine was mediated by down-regulating P-glycoprotein expression, as well as triggering apoptotic pathways. The chemosensitive effect of sinomenine may make it a prime candidate agent to target bladder cancer.

  11. Divide and conquer: processive transport enables multidrug transporters to tackle challenging drugs

    PubMed Central

    Fluman, Nir; Bibi, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug transporters are membrane proteins that catalyze efflux of antibiotics and other toxic compounds from cells, thereby conferring drug resistance on various organisms. Unlike most solute transporters that transport a single type of compound or similar analogues, multidrug transporters are extremely promiscuous. They transport a broad spectrum of dissimilar drugs and represent a serious obstacle to antimicrobial or anticancer chemotherapy. Many challenging aspects of multidrug transporters, which are unique, have been studied in detail, including their ability to interact with chemically unrelated drugs, and how they utilize energy to drive efflux of compounds that are not only structurally but electrically different. A new and surprising dimension of the promiscuous nature of multidrug transporters has been described recently: they can move long molecules through the membrane in a processive manner. PMID:28357213

  12. Multidrug resistance and ESBL-producing Salmonella spp. isolated from broiler processing plants.

    PubMed

    Ziech, Rosangela Estel; Lampugnani, Camila; Perin, Ana Paula; Sereno, Mallu Jagnow; Sfaciotte, Ricardo Antônio Pilegi; Viana, Cibeli; Soares, Vanessa Mendonça; Pinto, José Paes de Almeida Nogueira; Bersot, Luciano dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of multidrug-resistant, extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Salmonella spp. isolated from conveyor belts of broiler cutting rooms in Brazilian broiler processing plants. Ninety-eight strains of Salmonella spp. were analyzed. Multidrug resistance was determined by the disk diffusion test and the susceptibility of the isolated bacteria was evaluated against 18 antimicrobials from seven different classes. The double disk diffusion test was used to evaluate ESBL production. Of the 98 strains tested, 84 were multidrug resistant. The highest rates of resistance were against nalidixic acid (95%), tetracycline (91%), and the beta-lactams: ampicillin and cefachlor (45%), followed by streptomycin and gentamicin with 19% and 15% of strain resistance, respectively. By contrast, 97% of the strains were sensitive to chloramphenicol. 45% of the strains were positive for the presence of ESBL activity. In this study, high rates of multidrug resistance and ESBL production were observed in Salmonella spp.

  13. Dihydropyridines and multidrug resistance: previous attempts, present state, and future trends.

    PubMed

    Zarrin, Abdolhossein; Mehdipour, Ahmad R; Miri, Ramin

    2010-11-01

    Multidrug resistance is defined as the resistance of a tumor cell to the cytotoxic action of divergent drugs used in chemotherapy. Dihydropyridines are a class of calcium channel antagonists that were discovered to have a multidrug resistance reversing effect and prompted investigations resulting in the synthesis of hundreds of new derivatives. Most of the investigators tried to achieve two goals: a decrease in Ca²(+) channel-blocking activity and an increase in the multidrug resistance reversing effect. Most of the synthesized compounds failed in the later stages of studies especially in clinical trials because of pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic limitations. Therefore, it will be necessary to include new methods, such as combinatorial synthesis, and, more importantly, to apply computational methods based on global structure-activity relationship models that consider all problems. Moreover, some compounds should be synthesized that are effective on several multidrug resistance targets.

  14. Outcomes of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis among Binational Cases in El Paso, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Gustavo; Acuna-Villaorduna, Carlos; Escobedo, Miguel; Vlasich, Esteban; Rivera, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is more commonly seen among foreign-born patients. We report outcomes for 46 patients with MDR-TB who were born in Mexico and treated along the United States–Mexico border. According to our definition, 30 were cured, 3 showed treatment failure, 3 died, and 10 abandoned treatment. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis can be successfully treated on an ambulatory basis. PMID:21036837

  15. Identification of New Drug Targets in Multi-Drug Resistant Bacterial Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Identification of New Drug Targets in Multi-Drug Resistant Bacterial Infections PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Andrew M. Gulick, PhD...Identification of New Drug Targets in Multi-Drug Resistant Bacterial Infections 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0218 5c... infections . Recently, community-acquired infections , infections in wounded U.S. service members, and infections in residents of long-term care facilities

  16. Inhibitory effect of steroidal alkaloids on drug transport and multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Y; Harel-Orbital, T; Gaffield, W; Liscovitch, M

    2001-01-01

    Intrinsic or acquired resistance of tumor cells to multiple cytotoxic drugs (multidrug resistance MDR) is a major cause of failure of cancer chemotherapy. MDR is often caused by elevated expression of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or multidrug resistance protein (MRP). A number of compounds, termed chemosensitizers, have little or no cytotoxic action of their own, but inhibit (P-gp) or MRP-mediated drug export and are capable of sensitizing MDR cells to the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. Here we examined the ability of steroidal alkaloids of plant origin, namely the Veratrum sp. alkaloid cyclopamine and the Lycopersicon sp. alkaloid tomatidine, to act as potent and effective chemosensitizers in multidrug resistant tumor cells. Drug uptake was determined by measuring accumulation of tetramethylrosamine in multidrug resistant NCI AdrR human adenocarcinoma cells. Resistance to adriamycin and vinblastine was determined by utilizing the MTT cell survival assay. Cyclopamine and tomatidine elevate tetramethylrosamine uptake by NCI AdrR cells and sensitize the cells to the cytotoxic action of adriamycin and vinblastine. In both cases these agents are comparable in patency and efficacy to verapamil, a reversal agent commonly used in MDR research. It is concluded that steroidal alkaloids of plant origin act as inhibitors of P-gp-mediated drug transport and multidrug resistance and therefore may serve as chemosensitizers in combination chemotherapy with conventional cytotoxic drugs for treating multidrug resistant cancer.

  17. Role of uL3 in Multidrug Resistance in p53-Mutated Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Annapina; Saide, Assunta; Smaldone, Silvia; Faraonio, Raffaella; Russo, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most common causes of death among adults. Chemotherapy is crucial in determining patient survival and quality of life. However, the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) continues to pose a significant challenge in the management of cancer. In this study, we analyzed the role of human ribosomal protein uL3 (formerly rpL3) in multidrug resistance. Our studies revealed that uL3 is a key determinant of multidrug resistance in p53-mutated lung cancer cells by controlling the cell redox status. We established and characterized a multidrug resistant Calu-6 cell line. We found that uL3 down-regulation correlates positively with multidrug resistance. Restoration of the uL3 protein level re-sensitized the resistant cells to the drug by regulating the reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, glutathione content, glutamate release, and cystine uptake. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and luciferase assays demonstrated that uL3 coordinated the expression of stress-response genes acting as transcriptional repressors of solute carrier family 7 member 11 (xCT) and glutathione S-transferase α1 (GST-α1), independently of Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Altogether our results describe a new function of uL3 as a regulator of oxidative stress response genes and advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying multidrug resistance in cancers. PMID:28273808

  18. Multidrug-Resistant Organism Infections in Patients with Left Ventricular Assist Devices.

    PubMed

    Donahey, Elisabeth E; Polly, Derek M; Vega, J David; Lyon, Marshall; Butler, Javed; Nguyen, Duc; Pekarek, Ann; Wittersheim, Kristin; Kilgo, Patrick; Paciullo, Christopher A

    2015-12-01

    Left ventricular assist devices improve survival prospects in patients with end-stage heart failure; however, infection complicates up to 59% of implantation cases. How many of these infections are caused by multidrug-resistant organisms is unknown. We sought to identify the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of multidrug-resistant organism infection in patients who have left ventricular assist devices. We retrospectively evaluated the incidence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the independent risk factors associated with them in 57 patients who had permanent left ventricular assist devices implanted at our institution from May 2007 through October 2011. Outcomes included death, transplantation, device explantation, number of subsequent hospital admissions, and number of subsequent admissions related to infection. Infections were categorized in accordance with criteria from the Infectious Diseases Council of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Multidrug-resistant organism infections developed in 18 of 57 patients (31.6%)-a high incidence. We found 3 independent risk factors: therapeutic goal (destination therapy vs bridging), P=0.01; body mass index, P=0.04; and exposed velour at driveline exit sites, P=0.004. We found no significant differences in mortality, transplantation, or device explantation rates; however, there was a statistically significant increase in postimplantation hospital admissions in patients with multidrug-resistant organism infection. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the medical literature concerning multidrug-resistant organism infection in patients who have permanent left ventricular assist devices.

  19. Efflux pump gene hefA of Helicobacter pylori plays an important role in multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether efflux systems contribute to multidrug resistance of H pylori. METHODS: A chloramphenicol-induced multidrug resistance model of six susceptible H pylori strains (5 isolates and H pylori NCTC11637) was developed. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains were selected and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of erythromycin, metronidazole, penicillin G, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin in multidrug resistant strains and their parent strains was determined by agar dilution tests. The level of mRNA expression of hefA was assessed by fluorescence real-time quantitative PCR. A H pylori LZ1026 knockout mutant (ΔH pylori LZ1026) for (putative) efflux protein was constructed by inserting the kanamycin resistance cassette from pEGFP-N2 into hefA, and its susceptibility profiles to 10 antibiotics were evaluated. RESULTS: The MIC of six multidrug-resistant strains (including 5 clinical isolates and H pylori NCTC11637) increased significantly (≥ 4-fold) compared with their parent strains. The expression level of hefA gene was significantly higher in the MDR strains than in their parent strains (P = 0.033). A H pylori LZ1026 mutant was successfully constructed and the ΔH pylori LZ1026 was more susceptible to four of the 10 antibiotics. All the 20 strains displayed transcripts for hefA that confirmed the in vitro expression of these genes. CONCLUSION: The efflux pump gene hefA plays an important role in multidrug resistance of H pylori. PMID:18777600

  20. Audiological Evaluation of Patients Taking Kanamycin for Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Bhagat, Sanjeev; Verma, Bhimsain; Singh, Ravinder; Singh, Surinderpal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of multidrug resistant tuberculosis is increasing in developing countries. Aminoglycosides are an integral part of second-line drugs, however ototoxicity is a major limitation for their use. This study aims to determine the extent of hearing loss in patients taking one of the commonly prescribed drugs for Multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), Kanamycin, at a Government Medical College, Patiala, Punjab, India, which is a 1200 bed tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 patients (68 males and 32 females) with confirmed diagnosis of MDR-TB were included in this study conducted between January 2012 and February 2014. Subjects were between 15 to 60 years of age, with a mean age of 37.46 ± 10.1. Pure tone audiometry (PTA) was performed before the start of the therapy, as a baseline, and was repeated after 1 week and 6 weeks of Kanamycin use to assess hearing loss as an effect of therapy. Results: Of the 100 patients examined, ototoxicity was found in 18 subjects post therapy. Incidence of high frequency hearing loss was 2% at week 1, and 12% after 6 weeks of follow up. However, 4% of the cases developed flat loss at week 6. The hearing loss was bilateral in 13 patients and unilateral in 5 patients. Ototoxicity was more common in males (66.67%) compared to females (33.3%). Maximum cases were found in the age group of 36 to 45 years (36.8%), the majority being from a rural background (83.3%). The association with socioeconomic status (P=0.024) and co-morbid conditions like diabetes and hypertension (P=0.001) reached statistical significance. Conclusion: Lack of specific guidelines to monitor patients taking aminoglycosides makes ototoxicity a major adverse effect of their use in MDR-TB. More studies are mandated to study the risk factors associated with the development of ototoxicity and for the development of alternate drugs for the treatment of MDR-TB. PMID:27429949

  1. ▼Bedaquiline for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    Resistance to drugs used to treat tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem that threatens progress made in TB management and control worldwide. It may result from improper use of antibiotics, including prescription of non-standard treatment regimens and poor adherence to drug therapy. Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) is defined as resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin, with or without resistance to other first-line drugs. Extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) refers to resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampicin, and to any fluoroquinolone, and to any of the three second-line injectables  (amikacin, capreomycin and kanamycin). In 2012, DTB discussed the investigation, management and treatment of patients with MDR- and XDR-TB. Earlier this year, ▼bedaquiline (Sirturo) and ▼delamanid (Deltyba) were authorised by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) under its 'conditional market authorisation' scheme for use as part of an appropriate combination regimen for pulmonary MDR-TB in adult patients "when an effective treatment regimen cannot otherwise be composed for reasons of resistance or tolerability." In this article, we review the evidence for bedaquiline in the management of MDR-TB.

  2. Endobronchial valve treatment of destructive multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Levin, A.; Felker, I.; Tceymach, E.; Krasnov, D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND: In accordance with the existing hypothesis, the application of an endobronchial valve (EbV) leads to selective curative atelectasis of the affected part of the lung, contributing to early closure of cavities. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of EbV treatment on the course of tuberculosis (TB). METHODS: We compared the efficacy of EbV treatment and complex second-line treatment in treating patients with destructive pulmonary multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). Bacteriological conversion and closure of cavities were selected as criteria to assess the effectiveness of EbV application. A total of 102 patients with destructive MDR-TB were enrolled into the study and randomly divided into two groups: 49 patients had an EbV installed (intervention group) and 53 patients received complex second-line treatment (control group). Complex chemotherapy was administered to both groups throughout the study period. RESULTS: The cure rate in the short- and long-term follow-up periods in the intervention group was shown to be much higher, 95.9% by bacteriological conversion and 67.3% by cavity closure. On comparison with the control group, this was respectively 37.7% and 20.7% (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The application of EbV treatment can significantly improve the effectiveness of second-line chemotherapy regimens in MDR-TB patients. PMID:27776598

  3. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: challenges of a global emergence].

    PubMed

    Comolet, T

    2015-10-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis, in particular Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR-TB) is an increasing global concern and a major burden for some developing countries, especially the BRICS. It is assumed that every year roughly 350 000 new MDR-TB cases occur in the world, on average in 20.5% of TB patients that have been previously treated but also in 3.5% of persons that have never been on TB treatment before. The global distribution of cases is very heterogeneous and is now better understood thanks to a growing number of specific surveys and routine surveillance systems: incidence is much higher in southern Africa and in all countries formerly part of the USSR. Countries with weak health systems and previously inefficient TB control programs are highly vulnerable to MDR epidemics because program failures do help creating, maintaining and spreading resistances. Global response is slowly rolled out and diagnosis capacities are on the rise (mostly with genotypic methods) but adequate and successful treatment and care is still limited to a minority of global cases. From a public health perspective the MDR-TB growing epidemics will not be controlled merely by the introduction of few new antibiotics because it is also linked to patient's compliance and adequate case management supported by efficient TB program. In depth quality improvement will only be achieved after previous errors are thoroughly analyzed and boldly corrected.

  4. Multidrug resistant Enterobacteriaceae in New Zealand: a current perspective.

    PubMed

    Toombs-Ruane, L J; Benschop, J; Burgess, S; Priest, P; Murdoch, D R; French, N P

    2017-03-01

    In this article we review mechanisms and potential transmission pathways of multidrug resistance in Enterobacteriaceae, with an emphasis on extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-production. This provides background to better understand challenges presented by this important group of antimicrobial resistant bacteria, and inform measures aimed at prevention and control of antimicrobial resistance in general. Humans and animals interact at various levels; household pets cohabit with humans, and other animals interact with people through direct contact, as well as through the food chain and the environment. These interactions offer opportunity for bacteria such as ESBL-producers to be shared and transmitted between species and, in turn, increase the risk of zoonotic and reverse-zoonotic disease transmission. A key step in curtailing antimicrobial resistance is improved stewardship of antimicrobials, including surveillance of their use, better infection-control and prevention, and a better understanding of prescribing practice in both veterinary and medical professions in New Zealand. This will also require prospective observational studies to examine risk factors for antimicrobial resistance. Due to the interconnectedness of humans, animals and the environment actions to effect the changes required should be undertaken using a One Health approach.

  5. Demonstrating a Multi-drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Amplification Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Linger, Yvonne; Kukhtin, Alexander; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Qu, Peter; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Cooney, Christopher G.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2014-01-01

    Simplifying microarray workflow is a necessary first step for creating MDR-TB microarray-based diagnostics that can be routinely used in lower-resource environments. An amplification microarray combines asymmetric PCR amplification, target size selection, target labeling, and microarray hybridization within a single solution and into a single microfluidic chamber. A batch processing method is demonstrated with a 9-plex asymmetric master mix and low-density gel element microarray for genotyping multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The protocol described here can be completed in 6 hr and provide correct genotyping with at least 1,000 cell equivalents of genomic DNA. Incorporating on-chip wash steps is feasible, which will result in an entirely closed amplicon method and system. The extent of multiplexing with an amplification microarray is ultimately constrained by the number of primer pairs that can be combined into a single master mix and still achieve desired sensitivity and specificity performance metrics, rather than the number of probes that are immobilized on the array. Likewise, the total analysis time can be shortened or lengthened depending on the specific intended use, research question, and desired limits of detection. Nevertheless, the general approach significantly streamlines microarray workflow for the end user by reducing the number of manually intensive and time-consuming processing steps, and provides a simplified biochemical and microfluidic path for translating microarray-based diagnostics into routine clinical practice. PMID:24796567

  6. Intracellular pH and the Control of Multidrug Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford; Roy, Deborshi; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-02-01

    Many anticancer drugs are classified as either weak bases or molecules whose binding to cellular structures is pH dependent. Accumulation of these drugs within tumor cells should be affected by transmembrane pH gradients. Indeed, development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells has been correlated with an alkaline shift of cytosolic pH. To examine the role of pH in drug partitioning, the distribution of two drugs, doxorubicin and daunomycin, was monitored in fibroblasts and myeloma cells. In both cell types the drugs rapidly accumulated within the cells. The highest concentrations were measured in the most acidic compartments-e.g., lysosomes. Modifying the cellular pH in drug-sensitive cells to mimic reported shifts in MDR caused an immediate change in the cellular drug concentration. Drug accumulation was enhanced by acidic shifts and reversed by alkaline shifts. All of these effects were rapid and reversible. These results demonstrate that the alkaline shift observed in MDR is sufficient to prevent the accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs independent of active drug efflux.

  7. Multidrug resistant citrobacter: an unusual cause of liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prabhat; Ghosh, Soumik; Rath, Deepak; Gadpayle, A K

    2013-04-22

    Liver abscesses are infectious, space occupying lesions in the liver, the two most common abscesses being pyogenic and amoebic. A pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) is a rare condition with a reported incidence of 20 per 100 000 hospital admissions in the western population. The right lobe of the liver is the most common site in both types of liver abscess. Clinical presentation is elusive with complaints of fever, right upper quadrant pain in the abdomen and hepatomegaly with or without jaundice. The aetiology of PLA has changed in the past few decades and may be of biliary, portal, arterial or traumatic origin, but many cases are still cryptogenic. The most common organisms causing PLA are Gram-negative aerobes, especially Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Studies have shown a high degree of antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated organism resulting in an overall lower mortality in PLA. Here, we present a case of PLA caused by multidrug-resistant Citrobacter freundii, which is an unusual organism to be isolated.

  8. Intracellular pH and the control of multidrug resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, S; Roy, D; Schindler, M

    1994-01-01

    Many anticancer drugs are classified as either weak bases or molecules whose binding to cellular structures is pH dependent. Accumulation of these drugs within tumor cells should be affected by transmembrane pH gradients. Indeed, development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells has been correlated with an alkaline shift of cytosolic pH. To examine the role of pH in drug partitioning, the distribution of two drugs, doxorubicin and daunomycin, was monitored in fibroblasts and myeloma cells. In both cell types the drugs rapidly accumulated within the cells. The highest concentrations were measured in the most acidic compartments--e.g., lysosomes. Modifying the cellular pH in drug-sensitive cells to mimic reported shifts in MDR caused an immediate change in the cellular drug concentration. Drug accumulation was enhanced by acidic shifts and reversed by alkaline shifts. All of these effects were rapid and reversible. These results demonstrate that the alkaline shift observed in MDR is sufficient to prevent the accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs independent of active drug efflux. Images PMID:8302842

  9. Vitamin E Reverses Multidrug Resistance In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jingling; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Yongjun; Racette, Kelly; Wang, Dun; Liu, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle to successful and effective chemotherapeutic treatments of cancers. This study explored the reversal effects of vitamin E on MDR tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, elucidating the potential mechanism of this reversal. VE at a concentration of 50 μM exhibited a significant reversal of the MDR effect (compared to only PTX in DMSO, p < 0.05) in two human MDR cell lines (H460/taxR and KB-8-5). The MDR cell xenograft model was established to investigate the effect of VE on reversing MDR in vivo. Mice intravenously injected with Taxol (10 mg/kg) with VE (500 mg/kg, IP) showed an ability to overcome the MDR. VE and its derivatives can significantly increase intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin (P-gp substrate), but not alter the levels of P-gp expression. These treatments also did not decrease the levels of intracellular ATP, but were still able to inhibit the verapamil-induced ATPase activity of P-gp. The new application of VE as an MDR sensitizer will be attractive due to the safety of this treatment. PMID:23624302

  10. Inorganic Nanocarriers Overcoming Multidrug Resistance for Cancer Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gan; Mi, Peng; Chu, Chengchao; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer multidrug resistance (MDR) could lead to therapeutic failure of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and has become one of the main obstacles to successful cancer treatment. Some advanced drug delivery platforms, such as inorganic nanocarriers, demonstrate a high potential for cancer theranostic to overcome the cancer‐specific limitation of conventional low‐molecular‐weight anticancer agents and imaging probes. Specifically, it could achieve synergetic therapeutic effects, demonstrating stronger killing effects to MDR cancer cells by combining the inorganic nanocarriers with other treatment manners, such as RNA interference and thermal therapy. Moreover, the inorganic nanocarriers could provide imaging functions to help monitor treatment responses, e.g., drug resistance and therapeutic effects, as well as analyze the mechanism of MDR by molecular imaging modalities. In this review, the mechanisms involved in cancer MDR and recent advances of applying inorganic nanocarriers for MDR cancer imaging and therapy are summarized. The inorganic nanocarriers may circumvent cancer MDR for effective therapy and provide a way to track the therapeutic processes for real‐time molecular imaging, demonstrating high performance in studying the interaction of nanocarriers and MDR cancer cells/tissues in laboratory study and further shedding light on elaborate design of nanocarriers that could overcome MDR for clinical translation. PMID:27980988

  11. Targeting Protein Kinases to Reverse Multidrug Resistance in Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Shen, Jacson; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J.; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Sarcomas are a group of cancers that arise from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. They can be classified into over 50 subtypes, accounting for approximately 1% of adult and 15% of pediatric cancers. Wide surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are the most common treatments for the majority of sarcomas. Among these therapies, chemotherapy can palliate symptoms and prolong life for some sarcoma patients. However, sarcoma cells can have intrinsic or acquired resistance after treatment with chemotherapeutics drugs, leading to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR attenuates the efficacy of anticancer drugs and results in treatment failure for sarcomas. Therefore, overcoming MDR is an unmet need for sarcoma therapy. Certain protein kinases demonstrate aberrant expression and/or activity in sarcoma cells, which have been found to be involved in the regulation of sarcoma cell progression, such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and survival. Inhibiting these protein kinases may not only decrease the proliferation and growth of sarcoma cells, but also reverse their resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs to subsequently reduce the doses of anticancer drugs and decrease drug side-effects. The discovery of novel strategies targeting protein kinases opens a door to a new area of sarcoma research and provides insight into the mechanisms of MDR in chemotherapy. This review will focus on the recent studies in targeting protein kinase to reverse chemotherapeutic drug resistance in sarcoma. PMID:26827688

  12. Emerging cephalosporin and multidrug-resistant gonorrhoea in Europe.

    PubMed

    Cole, M J; Spiteri, G; Chisholm, S A; Hoffmann, S; Ison, C A; Unemo, M; Van de Laar, M

    2014-11-13

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae has consistently developed resistance to antimicrobials used therapeutically for gonorrhoea and few antimicrobials remain for effective empiric first-line therapy. Since 2009 the European gonococcal antimicrobial surveillance programme (Euro-GASP) has been running as a sentinel surveillance system across Member States of the European Union (EU) and European Economic Area (EEA) to monitor antimicrobial susceptibility in N. gonorrhoeae. During 2011, N. gonorrhoeae isolates were collected from 21 participating countries, and 7.6% and 0.5% of the examined gonococcal isolates had in vitro resistance to cefixime and ceftriaxone, respectively. The rate of ciprofloxacin and azithromycin resistance was 48.7% and 5.3%, respectively. Two (0.1%) isolates displayed high-level resistance to azithromycin, i.e. a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥256 mg/L. The current report further highlights the public health need to implement the European response plan, including further strengthening of Euro-GASP, to control and manage the threat of multidrug resistant N. gonorrhoeae.

  13. Demonstrating a multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis amplification microarray.

    PubMed

    Linger, Yvonne; Kukhtin, Alexander; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Qu, Peter; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Cooney, Christopher G; Chandler, Darrell P

    2014-04-25

    Simplifying microarray workflow is a necessary first step for creating MDR-TB microarray-based diagnostics that can be routinely used in lower-resource environments. An amplification microarray combines asymmetric PCR amplification, target size selection, target labeling, and microarray hybridization within a single solution and into a single microfluidic chamber. A batch processing method is demonstrated with a 9-plex asymmetric master mix and low-density gel element microarray for genotyping multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The protocol described here can be completed in 6 hr and provide correct genotyping with at least 1,000 cell equivalents of genomic DNA. Incorporating on-chip wash steps is feasible, which will result in an entirely closed amplicon method and system. The extent of multiplexing with an amplification microarray is ultimately constrained by the number of primer pairs that can be combined into a single master mix and still achieve desired sensitivity and specificity performance metrics, rather than the number of probes that are immobilized on the array. Likewise, the total analysis time can be shortened or lengthened depending on the specific intended use, research question, and desired limits of detection. Nevertheless, the general approach significantly streamlines microarray workflow for the end user by reducing the number of manually intensive and time-consuming processing steps, and provides a simplified biochemical and microfluidic path for translating microarray-based diagnostics into routine clinical practice.

  14. Starvation, detoxification, and multidrug resistance in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Changhan; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Longo, Valter D.

    2013-01-01

    The selection of chemotherapy drugs is based on the cytotoxicity to specific tumor cell types and the relatively low toxicity to normal cells and tissues. However, the toxicity to normal cells poses a major clinical challenge, particularly when malignant cells have acquired resistance to chemotherapy. This drug resistance of cancer cells results from multiple factors including individual variation, genetic heterogeneity within a tumor, and cellular evolution. Much progress in the understanding of tumor cell resistance has been made in the past 35 years, owing to milestone discoveries such as the identification and characterization of ABC transporters. Nonetheless, the complexity of the genetic and epigenetic rewiring of cancer cells makes drug resistance an equally complex phenomenon that is difficult to overcome. In this review, we discuss how the remarkable changes in the levels of glucose, IGF-I, IGFBP-1 and in other proteins caused by fasting have the potential to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy against tumors by protecting normal cells and tissues and possibly by diminishing multidrug resistance in malignant cells. PMID:22391012

  15. What's new in multidrug-resistant pathogens in the ICU?

    PubMed

    Zilahi, Gabor; Artigas, Antonio; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio

    2016-12-01

    Over the last several decades, antibacterial drug use has become widespread with their misuse being an ever-increasing phenomenon. Consequently, antibacterial drugs have become less effective or even ineffective, resulting in a global health security emergency. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) varies widely among regions and countries. The primary aim of antibiotic stewardship programs is to supervise the three most influential factors contributing to the development and transmission of MDROs, namely: (1) appropriate antibiotic prescribing; (2) early detection and prevention of cross-colonization of MDROs; and (3) elimination of reservoirs. In the future, it is expected that a number of countries will experience a rise in MDROs. These infections will be associated with a high consumption of healthcare resources manifested by a prolonged hospital stay and high mortality. As a counteractive strategy, minimization of broad-spectrum antibiotic use and prompt antibiotic administration will aid in reduction of antibiotic resistance. Innovative management approaches include development and implementation of rapid diagnostic tests that will help in both shortening the duration of therapy and allowing early targeted therapy. The institution of more accessible therapeutic drug monitoring will help to optimize drug administration and support a patient-specific approach. Areas where further research is required are investigation into the heterogeneity of critically ill patients and the need for new antibacterial drug development.

  16. Multiwavelength videomicrofluorometry for multiparametric investigations of multidrug resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocchi, Emmanuelle; Salmon, Jean-Marie; Vigo, Jean; Viallet, Pierre M.

    1996-05-01

    A major problem in the cancer chemotherapy is the development of resistance to a whole range of drugs not only similar to the drugs used for resistance induction but also to some functionally and structurally unrelated. It's one of the multifactorial causes of failure of chemotherapy. Thus it appears essential to evaluate the multi-drug resistance (MDR) in living cells populations to: detect the MDR phenotype, to discriminate between resistant and sensitive cells, to identify mechanisms which are involved in the induction or the reversion of resistance and to study the cytotoxic process. Such a challenge implies the use of multiparametric approach that has been possible using a protocol involving microfluorometry connected to numerical image analysis on single living cells. This protocol relays on the correlation existing between the decreased intracellular accumulation of some fluorescent probes such as Hoechst 33342 (Ho342) and Rhodamine 123 (R123) in resistant cells. The simultaneous estimation of the fluorescence intensities of these probes has required the use of a third probe, the Nile Red, for cell contour delineation. The analysis of parameters related to Ho342 and R123 allows the discrimination of sensitive and resistant cells. So the multiparametric approach using multi-wavelength image analysis, which appears to be a powerful technique, has allowed us to show on human lymphoblastoid CCRF-CEM cells lines that the cytotoxic effects could be different depending on the cell resistance or on the cytotoxic drug used: Adriamycine, Vinblastine and the different cell behavior could be used for cell differentiation.

  17. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: epidemiology and risk factors].

    PubMed

    Smaoui Fourati, S; Mzid, H; Marouane, C; Kammoun, S; Messadi-Akrout, F

    2015-08-01

    Despite the availability of potent drugs and the availability of vaccine, tuberculosis remains until today one of the most worrying infectious diseases because of both its morbidity and mortality. This serious health problem is further complicated by the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) or extensively drug-resistant strains (XDR). The number of MDR and XDR strains has continued to increase in recent years. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the risk factors leading to the emergence of MDR-TB strains to improve its overall management. Most studies indicate that the irregular previous treatment of tuberculosis with poor adherence is the main risk factor found. Other risk factors such as digestive issues, age, sex, and immunosuppression have been reported by several studies. In Tunisia, MDR-TB prevalence remains low with 0.8% among new cases and 12% among the restatements but control of this disease is necessary and remains essentially preventive. It is based on real preventive strategies planned according to local and updated regional data.

  18. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: epidemiology, risk factors and case finding.

    PubMed

    Caminero, J A

    2010-04-01

    Although the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) epidemic is a very recent problem, many studies have attempted to understand it. We now have good estimates of the current burden (approximately 500 000 MDR-TB cases worldwide), and following the introduction of potential MDR-TB control strategies projections of these figures are being estimated. The projected trends in tuberculosis (TB) and MDR-TB incidence vary. Risk factors for resistance can be divided into two categories: 1) those facilitating the selection of resistance in the community and 2) the specific conditions that appear to increase some patients' vulnerability to resistance. The epidemiological situation varies greatly across countries, principally due to poor treatment practices and poor implementation of control programmes in the past-and even today, to a lesser degree-and recent data have suggested that national TB programmes that use existing drugs efficiently can postpone and even reverse the MDR-TB epidemic. Other factors that have also contributed to this epidemic situation are analysed in this article. The recognition of factors leading to the epidemic in some regions and the identification of populations at risk will assist in focusing case-finding efforts. From an individual perspective, treatment failures with first-line rifampicin-containing regimens and contacts of MDR-TB cases have the highest rates of resistance. Patients previously treated for TB and the other risk factors analysed in this article should be prioritised in case finding.

  19. An adaptive multimeme algorithm for designing HIV multidrug therapies.

    PubMed

    Neri, Ferrante; Toivanen, Jari; Cascella, Giuseppe Leonardo; Ong, Yew-Soon

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a period representation for modeling the multidrug HIV therapies and an Adaptive Multimeme Algorithm (AMmA) for designing the optimal therapy. The period representation offers benefits in terms of flexibility and reduction in dimensionality compared to the binary representation. The AMmA is a memetic algorithm which employs a list of three local searchers adaptively activated by an evolutionary framework. These local searchers, having different features according to the exploration logic and the pivot rule, have the role of exploring the decision space from different and complementary perspectives and, thus, assisting the standard evolutionary operators in the optimization process. Furthermore, the AMmA makes use of an adaptation which dynamically sets the algorithmic parameters in order to prevent stagnation and premature convergence. The numerical results demonstrate that the application of the proposed algorithm leads to very efficient medication schedules which quickly stimulate a strong immune response to HIV. The earlier termination of the medication schedule leads to lesser unpleasant side effects for the patient due to strong antiretroviral therapy. A numerical comparison shows that the AMmA is more efficient than three popular metaheuristics. Finally, a statistical test based on the calculation of the tolerance interval confirms the superiority of the AMmA compared to the other methods for the problem under study.

  20. Interaction of forskolin with the P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Ming s, D.I.; Seamon, K.B. ); Speicher, L.A.; Tew, K.D. ); Ruoho, A.E. )

    1991-08-27

    Forskolin and 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, an analogue that does not activate adenylyl cyclase, were tested for their ability to enhance the cytotoxic effects of adriamycin in human ovarian carcinoma cells, SKOV3, which are sensitive to adriamycin and express low levels of P-glycoprotein, and a variant cell line, SKVLB, which overexpresses the P-glycoprotein and has the multidrug reing ance (MDR) phenotype. Forskolin and 1,9-dideoxyforskolin both increased the cytotoxic effects of adriamycin in SKVLB cells, yet had no effect on SKOV3 cells. Two photoactive derivatives of forskolin have been synthesized, 7-O-((2-(3-(4-azido-3-({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)propionamido)ethyl)carbamyl)forskolin, {sup 125}I-6-AIPP-Fsk, and 6-O-((2-(3-(4-azido-3-({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)propionamido)ethyl)carbamyl)forskolin, {sup 125}I-6-AIPP-Fsk, which exhibit specificity for labeling the glucose transporter and aing lyl cyclase, respectively. Both photolabels identified a 140-kDa protein in membranes from SKVLB cells whose labeling was inhibited by forskolin and 1,9-dideoxyforskolin. The data are consistent with forskolin binding to the P-glycoprotein analogous to that of other chemosensitizing drugs that have been shown to partially reverse MDR. The ability of forskolin photolabels to specifically label the transporter, the adenylyl cyclase, and the P-glycoprotein suggests that these proteins may share a common biing g domain for forskolin analogues.

  1. Marine Natural Products as Models to Circumvent Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Long, Solida; Sousa, Emília; Kijjoa, Anake; Pinto, Madalena M M

    2016-07-08

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a serious health problem that in many cases leads to cancer treatment failure. The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which leads to premature efflux of drugs from cancer cells, is often responsible for MDR. On the other hand, a strategy to search for modulators from natural products to overcome MDR had been in place during the last decades. However, Nature limits the amount of some natural products, which has led to the development of synthetic strategies to increase their availability. This review summarizes the research findings on marine natural products and derivatives, mainly alkaloids, polyoxygenated sterols, polyketides, terpenoids, diketopiperazines, and peptides, with P-gp inhibitory activity highlighting the established structure-activity relationships. The synthetic pathways for the total synthesis of the most promising members and analogs are also presented. It is expected that the data gathered during the last decades concerning their synthesis and MDR-inhibiting activities will help medicinal chemists develop potential drug candidates using marine natural products as models which can deliver new ABC transporter inhibitor scaffolds.

  2. Clinical management of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Valverde, Mercedes; Sojo-Dorado, Jesús; Pascual, Álvaro

    2013-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae showing resistance to cephalosporins due to extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) or plasmid-mediated AmpC enzymes, and those producing carbapenemases have spread worldwide during the last decades. Many of these isolates are also resistant to other first-line agents such as fluoroquinolones or aminoglycosides, leaving few available options for therapy. Thus, older drugs such as colistin and fosfomycin are being increasingly used. Infections caused by these bacteria are associated with increased morbidity and mortality compared with those caused by their susceptible counterparts. Most of the evidence supporting the present recommendations is from in vitro data, animal studies, and observational studies. While carbapenems are considered the drugs of choice for ESBL and AmpC producers, recent data suggest that certain alternatives may be suitable for some types of infections. Combined therapy seems superior to monotherapy in the treatment of invasive infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Optimization of dosage according to pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics data is important for the treatment of infections caused by isolates with borderline minimum inhibitory concentration due to low-level resistance mechanisms. The increasing frequency and the rapid spread of multidrug resistance among the Enterobacteriaceae is a true and complex public health problem. PMID:25165544

  3. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter spp.: Increasingly Problematic Nosocomial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have increasingly been resisting to antimicrobial therapy. Recently, resistance problem has been relatively much worsened in Gram-negative bacilli. Acinetobacter spp. are typical nosocomial pathogens causing infections and high mortality, almost exclusively in compromised hospital patients. Acinetobacter spp. are intrinsically less susceptible to antibiotics than Enterobacteriaceae, and have propensity to acquire resistance. A surveillance study in Korea in 2009 showed that resistance rates of Acinetobacter spp. were very high: to fluoroquinolone 67%, to amikacin 48%, to ceftazidime 66% and to imipenem 51%. Carbapenem resistance was mostly due to OXA type carbapenemase production in A. baumannii isolates, whereas it was due to metallo-β-lactamase production in non-baumannii Acinetobacter isolates. Colistin-resistant isolates were rare but started to be isolated in Korea. Currently, the infection caused by multidrug-resistant A. baumannii is among the most difficult ones to treat. Analysis at tertiary care hospital in 2010 showed that among the 1,085 isolates of Acinetobacter spp., 14.9% and 41.8% were resistant to seven, and to all eight antimicrobial agents tested, respectively. It is known to be difficult to prevent Acinetobacter spp. infection in hospitalized patients, because the organisms are ubiquitous in hospital environment. Efforts to control resistant bacteria in Korea by hospitals, relevant scientific societies and government agencies have only partially been successful. We need concerted multidisciplinary efforts to preserve the efficacy of currently available antimicrobial agents, by following the principles of antimicrobial stewardship. PMID:22028150

  4. Common errors in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis management.

    PubMed

    Monedero, Ignacio; Caminero, Jose A

    2014-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), defined as being resistant to at least rifampicin and isoniazid, has an increasing burden and threatens TB control. Diagnosis is limited and usually delayed while treatment is long lasting, toxic and poorly effective. MDR-TB management in scarce-resource settings is demanding however it is feasible and extremely necessary. In these settings, cure rates do not usually exceed 60-70% and MDR-TB management is novel for many TB programs. In this challenging scenario, both clinical and programmatic errors are likely to occur. The majority of these errors may be prevented or alleviated with appropriate and timely training in addition to uninterrupted procurement of high-quality drugs, updated national guidelines and laws and an overall improvement in management capacities. While new tools for diagnosis and shorter and less toxic treatment are not available in developing countries, MDR-TB management will remain complex in scarce resource settings. Focusing special attention on the common errors in diagnosis, regimen design and especially treatment delivery may benefit patients and programs with current outdated tools. The present article is a compilation of typical errors repeatedly observed by the authors in a wide range of countries during technical assistant missions and trainings.

  5. Effects of mefloquine use on Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Khim, Nimol; Andrianaranjaka, Voahangy; Popovici, Jean; Kim, Saorin; Ratsimbasoa, Arsene; Benedet, Christophe; Barnadas, Celine; Durand, Remy; Thellier, Marc; Legrand, Eric; Musset, Lise; Menegon, Michela; Severini, Carlo; Nour, Bakri Y M; Tichit, Magali; Bouchier, Christiane; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2014-10-01

    Numerous studies have indicated a strong association between amplification of the multidrug resistance-1 gene and in vivo and in vitro mefloquine resistance of Plasmodium falciparum. Although falciparum infection usually is not treated with mefloquine, incorrect diagnosis, high frequency of undetected mixed infections, or relapses of P. vivax infection triggered by P. falciparum infections expose non-P. falciparum parasites to mefloquine. To assess the consequences of such unintentional treatments on P. vivax, we studied variations in number of Pvmdr-1 (PlasmoDB accession no. PVX_080100, NCBI reference sequence NC_009915.1) copies worldwide in 607 samples collected in areas with different histories of mefloquine use from residents and from travelers returning to France. Number of Pvmdr-1 copies correlated with drug use history. Treatment against P. falciparum exerts substantial collateral pressure against sympatric P. vivax, jeopardizing future use of mefloquine against P. vivax. A drug policy is needed that takes into consideration all co-endemic species of malaria parasites.

  6. Genetic Drivers of Multidrug Resistance in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Kelley R.; Jimenez Ortigosa, Cristina; Shor, Erika; Perlin, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Both the incidence of invasive fungal infections and rates of multidrug resistance associated with fungal pathogen Candida glabrata have increased in recent years. In this perspective, we will discuss the mechanisms underlying the capacity of C. glabrata to rapidly develop resistance to multiple drug classes, including triazoles and echinocandins. We will focus on the extensive genetic diversity among clinical isolates of C. glabrata, which likely enables this yeast to survive multiple stressors, such as immune pressure and antifungal exposure. In particular, over half of C. glabrata clinical strains collected from U.S. and non-U.S. sites have mutations in the DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2, leading to a mutator phenotype and increased frequencies of drug-resistant mutants in vitro. Furthermore, recent studies and data presented here document extensive chromosomal rearrangements among C. glabrata strains, resulting in a large number of distinct karyotypes within a single species. By analyzing clonal, serial isolates derived from individual patients treated with antifungal drugs, we were able to document chromosomal changes occurring in C. glabrata in vivo during the course of antifungal treatment. Interestingly, we also show that both MSH2 genotypes and chromosomal patterns cluster consistently into specific strain types, indicating that C. glabrata has a complex population structure where genomic variants arise, perhaps during the process of adaptation to environmental changes, and persist over time. PMID:28018323

  7. Identification of a multidrug efflux pump in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ankita; Mallik, Dhriti; Kar, Debasish; Ghosh, Anindya S

    2016-07-01

    Cell wall impermeability and active efflux of drugs are among the primary reasons for drug resistance in mycobacteria. Efflux pumps are tripartite membrane localized transport proteins that expel drug molecules outside the cells. Several of such efflux pumps are annotated in mycobacteria, but few have been characterized, like MSMEG_2991, a putative efflux pump permease of Mycobacterium smegmatis To substantiate this, we overexpressed MSMEG_2991 protein in Escherichia coli 2443. Expression of MSMEG_2991 elevated the resistance towards structurally unrelated groups of antibiotics. An active antibiotic efflux pump nature of MSMEG_2991 was revealed by assessing the acquisition of ciprofloxacin in the absence and presence of the efflux pump inhibitor, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone, indicating the involvement of proton-motive force (pmf) during the efflux activity. MSMEG_2991 expression elevated biofilm formation in E. coli by 4-fold, keeping parity to some of the earlier reported efflux pumps. In silico analysis suggested the presence of 12 transmembrane helices in MSMEG_2991 resembling EmrD efflux pump of E. coli Based on in vivo and in silico analyses, MSMEG_2991 may be designated as a pmf-mediated multidrug efflux pump protein that expels diverse groups of antibiotics and might as well be involved in the biofilm enhancement.

  8. Multidrug resistance in fungi: regulation of transporter-encoding gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sanjoy; Moye-Rowley, W. Scott

    2014-01-01

    A critical risk to the continued success of antifungal chemotherapy is the acquisition of resistance; a risk exacerbated by the few classes of effective antifungal drugs. Predictably, as the use of these drugs increases in the clinic, more resistant organisms can be isolated from patients. A particularly problematic form of drug resistance that routinely emerges in the major fungal pathogens is known as multidrug resistance. Multidrug resistance refers to the simultaneous acquisition of tolerance to a range of drugs via a limited or even single genetic change. This review will focus on recent progress in understanding pathways of multidrug resistance in fungi including those of most medical relevance. Analyses of multidrug resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided the most detailed outline of multidrug resistance in a eukaryotic microorganism. Multidrug resistant isolates of S. cerevisiae typically result from changes in the activity of a pair of related transcription factors that in turn elicit overproduction of several target genes. Chief among these is the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-encoding gene PDR5. Interestingly, in the medically important Candida species, very similar pathways are involved in acquisition of multidrug resistance. In both C. albicans and C. glabrata, changes in the activity of transcriptional activator proteins elicits overproduction of a protein closely related to S. cerevisiae Pdr5 called Cdr1. The major filamentous fungal pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, was previously thought to acquire resistance to azole compounds (the principal antifungal drug class) via alterations in the azole drug target-encoding gene cyp51A. More recent data indicate that pathways in addition to changes in the cyp51A gene are important determinants in A. fumigatus azole resistance. We will discuss findings that suggest azole resistance in A. fumigatus and Candida species may share more mechanistic similarities than previously thought. PMID:24795641

  9. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in veterinary medicine--emergence of an underestimated pathogen?

    PubMed

    Müller, Stefanie; Janssen, Traute; Wieler, Lothar H

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of multidrug resistant bacteria causing infections in animals has continuously been increasing. While the relevance of ESBL (extended spectrum beta-lactamase)-producing Enterobacteriaceae spp. and MRSA (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is unquestionable, knowledge about multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in veterinary medicine is scarce. This is a worrisome situation, as A. baumannii are isolated from veterinary clinical specimens with rising frequency. The remarkable ability of A. baumannii to develop multidrug resistance and the high risk of transmission are known in human medicine for years. Despite this, data regarding A. baumannii isolates of animal origin are missing. Due to the changing role of companion animals with closer contact between animal and owner, veterinary intensive care medicine is steadily developing. It can be assumed that the number of "high risk" patients with an enhanced risk for hospital acquired infections will be rising simultaneously. Thus, development and spread of multidrug resistant pathogens is envisioned to rise. It is possible, that A. baumannii will evolve into a veterinary nosocomial pathogen similar to ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and MRSA. The lack of attention paid to A. baumannii in veterinary medicine is even more worrying, as first reports indicate a transmission between humans and animals. Essential questions regarding the role of livestock, especially as a potential source of multidrug resistant isolates, remain unanswered. This review summarizes the current knowledge on A. baumannii in veterinary medicine for the first time. It underlines the utmost significance of further investigations of A. baumannii animal isolates, particularly concerning epidemiology and resistance mechanisms.

  10. Virulence and Genomic Feature of Multidrug Resistant Campylobacter jejuni Isolated from Broiler Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haihong; Ren, Ni; Han, Jing; Foley, Steven L.; Iqbal, Zahid; Cheng, Guyue; Kuang, Xiuhua; Liu, Jie; Liu, Zhenli; Dai, Menghong; Wang, Yulian; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the molecular mechanism involved in multidrug resistance and virulence of Campylobacter jejuni isolated from broiler chickens. The virulence of six multidrug resistant C. jejuni was determined by in vitro and in vivo methods. The de novo whole genome sequencing technology and molecular biology methods were used to analyze the genomic features associated with the multidrug resistance and virulence of a selected isolate (C. jejuni 1655). The comparative genomic analyses revealed a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms, deletions, rearrangements, and inversions in C. jejuni 1655 compared to reference C. jejuni genomes. The co-emergence of Thr-86-Ile mutation in gyrA gene, A2075G mutation in 23S rRNA gene, tetO, aphA and aadE genes and pTet plasmid in C. jejuni 1655 contributed its multidrug resistance to fluoroquinolones, macrolides, tetracycline, and aminoglycosides. The combination of multiple virulence genes may work together to confer the relative higher virulence in C. jejuni 1655. The co-existence of mobile gene elements (e.g., pTet) and CRISPR-Cas system in C. jejuni 1655 may play an important role in the gene transfer and immune defense. The present study provides basic information of phenotypic and genomic features of C. jejuni 1655, a strain recently isolated from a chicken displaying multidrug resistance and relatively high level of virulence. PMID:27790202

  11. Insight into determinants of substrate binding and transport in a multidrug efflux protein.

    PubMed

    Alegre, Kamela O; Paul, Stephanie; Labarbuta, Paola; Law, Christopher J

    2016-03-10

    Multidrug resistance arising from the activity of integral membrane transporter proteins presents a global public health threat. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, transporter proteins belonging to the major facilitator superfamily make a considerable contribution to multidrug resistance by catalysing efflux of myriad structurally and chemically different antimicrobial compounds. Despite their clinical relevance, questions pertaining to mechanistic details of how these promiscuous proteins function remain outstanding, and the role(s) played by individual amino acid residues in recognition, binding and subsequent transport of different antimicrobial substrates by multidrug efflux members of the major facilitator superfamily requires illumination. Using in silico homology modelling, molecular docking and mutagenesis studies in combination with substrate binding and transport assays, we identified several amino acid residues that play important roles in antimicrobial substrate recognition, binding and transport by Escherichia coli MdtM, a representative multidrug efflux protein of the major facilitator superfamily. Furthermore, our studies suggested that 'aromatic clamps' formed by tyrosine and phenylalanine residues located within the substrate binding pocket of MdtM may be important for antimicrobial substrate recognition and transport by the protein. Such 'clamps' may be a structurally and functionally important feature of all major facilitator multidrug efflux proteins.

  12. CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles for overcoming multidrug resistance in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Shouju; Shi, Donghong; Zhou, Xianguang; Wang, Chunyan; Wu, Jiang; Zeng, Zhiyong; Li, Yanjun; Sun, Jing; Wang, Jiandong; Zhang, Longjiang; Teng, Zhaogang; Lu, Guangming

    2015-03-01

    Multidrug resistance is a major impediment for the successful chemotherapy in breast cancer. CD44 is over-expressed in multidrug resistant human breast cancer cells. CD44 monoclonal antibody exhibits anticancer potential by inhibiting proliferation and regulating P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux activity in multidrug resistant cells. Thereby, CD44 monoclonal antibody in combination with chemotherapeutic drug might be result in enhancing chemosensitivity and overcoming multidrug resistance. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the CD44 monoclonal antibody functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles containing doxorubicin on human breast resistant cancer MCF-7 cells. The data showed that CD44-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles increased cytotoxicity and enhanced the downregulation of P-glycoprotein in comparison to CD44 antibody. Moreover, CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles provided active target, which promoted more cellular uptake of DOX in the resistant cells and more retention of DOX in tumor tissues than unengineered counterpart. Animal studies of the resistant breast cancer xenografts demonstrated that CD44-engineered drug delivery system remarkably induced apoptosis and inhibited the tumor growth. Our results indicated that the CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based drug delivery system offers an effective approach to overcome multidrug resistance in human breast cancer.

  13. Human multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium bovis infection in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Chacon, Carlos A; Martínez-Guarneros, Armando; Couvin, David; González-Y-Merchand, Jorge A; Rivera-Gutierrez, Sandra; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro; De-la-Cruz López, Juan J; Gomez-Bustamante, Adriana; Gonzalez-Macal, Gabriela A; Gonçalves Rossi, Livia Maria; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel; Rastogi, Nalin; Vaughan, Gilberto

    2015-12-01

    Here, we describe the molecular characterization of six human Mycobacterium bovis clinical isolates, including three multidrug resistant (MDR) strains, collected in Mexico through the National Survey on Tuberculosis Drug Resistance (ENTB-2008), a nationally representative survey conducted during 2008-2009 in nine states with a stratified cluster sampling design. The genetic background of bovine M. bovis strains identified in three different states of Mexico was studied in parallel to assess molecular relatedness of bovine and human strains. Additionally, resistance to first and second line anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs and molecular identification of mutations conferring drug resistance was also performed. All strains were characterized by spoligotyping and 24-loci MIRU-VNTRs, and analyzed using the SITVIT2 (n = 112,000 strains) and SITVITBovis (n = 25,000 strains) proprietary databases of Institut Pasteur de la Guadeloupe. Furthermore, data from this study (n = 55 isolates), were also compared with genotypes recorded for M. bovis from USA (n = 203), Argentina (n = 726), as well as other isolates from Mexico (independent from the present study; n = 147), to determine any evidence for genetic relatedness between circulating M. bovis strains. The results showed that all human M. bovis cases were not genetically related between them or to any bovine strain. Interestingly, a high degree of genetic variability was observed among bovine strains. Several autochthonous and presumably imported strains were identified. The emergence of drug-resistant M. bovis is an important public health problem that jeopardizes the success of TB control programs in the region.

  14. A multifaceted analysis of HIV-1 protease multidrug resistance phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Great strides have been made in the effective treatment of HIV-1 with the development of second-generation protease inhibitors (PIs) that are effective against historically multi-PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Nevertheless, mutation patterns that confer decreasing susceptibility to available PIs continue to arise within the population. Understanding the phenotypic and genotypic patterns responsible for multi-PI resistance is necessary for developing PIs that are active against clinically-relevant PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Results In this work, we use globally optimal integer programming-based clustering techniques to elucidate multi-PI phenotypic resistance patterns using a data set of 398 HIV-1 protease sequences that have each been phenotyped for susceptibility toward the nine clinically-approved HIV-1 PIs. We validate the information content of the clusters by evaluating their ability to predict the level of decreased susceptibility to each of the available PIs using a cross validation procedure. We demonstrate the finding that as a result of phenotypic cross resistance, the considered clinical HIV-1 protease isolates are confined to ~6% or less of the clinically-relevant phenotypic space. Clustering and feature selection methods are used to find representative sequences and mutations for major resistance phenotypes to elucidate their genotypic signatures. We show that phenotypic similarity does not imply genotypic similarity, that different PI-resistance mutation patterns can give rise to HIV-1 isolates with similar phenotypic profiles. Conclusion Rather than characterizing HIV-1 susceptibility toward each PI individually, our study offers a unique perspective on the phenomenon of PI class resistance by uncovering major multidrug-resistant phenotypic patterns and their often diverse genotypic determinants, providing a methodology that can be applied to understand clinically-relevant phenotypic patterns to aid in the design of novel inhibitors that

  15. Principles for designing future regimens for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Brigden, Grania; Nyang'wa, Bern-Thomas; du Cros, Philipp; Varaine, Francis; Hughes, Jennifer; Rich, Michael; Horsburgh, C Robert; Mitnick, Carole D; Nuermberger, Eric; McIlleron, Helen; Phillips, Patrick P J; Balasegaram, Manica

    2014-01-01

    Fewer than 20% of patients with multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis are receiving treatment and there is an urgent need to scale up treatment programmes. One of the biggest barriers to scale-up is the treatment regimen, which is lengthy, complex, ineffective, poorly tolerated and expensive. For the first time in over 50 years, new drugs have been developed specifically to treat tuberculosis, with bedaquiline and potentially delamanid expected to be available soon for treatment of MDR cases. However, if the new drugs are merely added to the current treatment regimen, the new regimen will be at least as lengthy, cumbersome and toxic as the existing one. There is an urgent need for strategy and evidence on how to maximize the potential of the new drugs to improve outcomes and shorten treatment. We devised eight key principles for designing future treatment regimens to ensure that, once they are proven safe in clinical trials, they will be clinically effective and programmatically practicable. Regimens should contain at least one new class of drug; be broadly applicable for use against MDR and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains; contain three to five effective drugs, each from a different drug class; be delivered orally; have a simple dosing schedule; have a good side-effect profile that allows limited monitoring; last a maximum of 6 months; and have minimal interaction with antiretrovirals. Following these principles will maximize the potential of new compounds and help to overcome the clinical and programmatic disadvantages and scale-up constraints that plague the current regimen.

  16. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and migration to Europe.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, S; Lönnroth, K; Nellums, L B; Olaru, I D; Nathavitharana, R R; Norredam, M; Friedland, J S

    2017-03-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in low-incidence countries in Europe is more prevalent among migrants than the native population. The impact of the recent increase in migration to EU and EEA countries with a low incidence of TB (<20 cases per 100 000) on MDR-TB epidemiology is unclear. This narrative review synthesizes evidence on MDR-TB and migration identified through an expert panel and database search. A significant proportion of MDR-TB cases in migrants result from reactivation of latent infection. Refugees and asylum seekers may have a heightened risk of MDR-TB infection and worse outcomes. Although concerns have been raised around 'health tourists' migrating for MDR-TB treatment, numbers are probably small and data are lacking. Migrants experience significant barriers to testing and treatment for MDR-TB, exacerbated by increasingly restrictive health systems. Screening for latent MDR-TB is highly problematic because current tests cannot distinguish drug-resistant latent infection, and evidence-based guidance for treatment of latent infection in contacts of MDR patients is lacking. Although there is evidence that transmission of TB from migrants to the general population is low-it predominantly occurs within migrant communities-there is a human rights obligation to improve the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of MDR-TB in migrants. Further research is needed into MDR-TB and migration, the impact of screening on detection or prevention, and the potential consequences of failing to treat and prevent MDR-TB among migrants in Europe. An evidence-base is urgently needed to inform guidelines for effective approaches for MDR-TB management in migrant populations in Europe.

  17. Multidrug-resistant nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Cândido, Pedro Henrique Campanini; Nunes, Luciana de Souza; Marques, Elizabeth Andrade; Folescu, Tânia Wrobel; Coelho, Fábrice Santana; de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; Gomes, Karen Machado; Lourenço, Maria Cristina da Silva; Aguiar, Fábio Silva; Chitolina, Fernanda; Armstrong, Derek T; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Neves, Felipe Piedade Gonçalves; Mello, Fernanda Carvalho de Queiroz; Duarte, Rafael Silva

    2014-08-01

    Worldwide, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have become emergent pathogens of pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with an estimated prevalence ranging from 5 to 20%. This work investigated the presence of NTM in sputum samples of 129 CF patients (2 to 18 years old) submitted to longitudinal clinical supervision at a regional reference center in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. From June 2009 to March 2012, 36 NTM isolates recovered from 10 (7.75%) out of 129 children were obtained. Molecular identification of NTM was performed by using PCR restriction analysis targeting the hsp65 gene (PRA-hsp65) and sequencing of the rpoB gene, and susceptibility tests were performed that followed Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. For evaluating the genotypic diversity, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and/or enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence PCR (ERIC-PCR) was performed. The species identified were Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii (n = 24), M. abscessus subsp. abscessus (n = 6), Mycobacterium fortuitum (n = 3), Mycobacterium marseillense (n = 2), and Mycobacterium timonense (n = 1). Most of the isolates presented resistance to five or more of the antimicrobials tested. Typing profiles were mainly patient specific. The PFGE profiles indicated the presence of two clonal groups for M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and five clonal groups for M. abscesssus subsp. bolletii, with just one clone detected in two patients. Given the observed multidrug resistance patterns and the possibility of transmission between patients, we suggest the implementation of continuous and routine investigation of NTM infection or colonization in CF patients, including countries with a high burden of tuberculosis disease.

  18. Multi-drug intoxication fatality involving atorvastatin: A case report.

    PubMed

    Cibickova, Lubica; Caran, Tomas; Dobias, Martin; Ondra, Peter; Vorisek, Viktor; Cibicek, Norbert

    2015-12-01

    Mixed antihypertensive drug intoxication poses a significant risk for patient mortality. In tandem to antihypertensives, hypolipidemic medicines (especially statins) are often prescribed. Among their well-known adverse effects belongs rhabdomyolysis. We report a case of fatal multi-drug overdose in a 65-year-old female alcoholic. The patient was unconscious at admission. Empty blister packs indicated the abuse of 250 tablets of urapidil, 42 tablets of verapamil/trandolapril, 50 tablets of moxonidin, 80 tablets of atorvastatin and 80 tablets of diacerein. Standard measures (gastric lavage, activated charcoal, mechanical ventilation, massive doses of vasopressors, volume expansion, diuretics and alkalinization) failed to provide sufficient drug elimination and hemodynamic support and the sufferer deceased on the fourth day. Dramatic elevations of serum myoglobin (34,020 μg/L) and creatine kinase (219 μkat/L) were accompanied by rise in cardiac troponin I and creatinine. Gas chromatography revealed ethanol 1.17 g/kg (blood) and 2.81 g/kg (urine). Thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography of gastric content and urine verified verapamil, moxonidin and urapidil fragment (diacerein method was unavailable). Atorvastatin and trandolapril concentrations (LC-MS(n)) equaled 277.7 μg/L and 57.5 μg/L, resp. (serum) and 8.15 μg/L and 602.3 μg/L, resp. (urine). Histology confirmed precipitates of myoglobin with acute necrosis of proximal renal tubules in association with striated muscle rhabdomyolysis and myocardial dystrophy. Cardiogenic-distributive shock in conjunction with acute renal failure due to the combined self-poisoning with vasoactive agents and atorvastatin were determined to be this decedent's immediate cause of death. The manner of death was assigned to be suicidal.

  19. Progression of leprosy disability after discharge: is multidrug therapy enough?

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Anna Maria; Campos, Dayse Pereira; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; da Costa Nery, José Augusto; Düppre, Nádia Cristina; Rangel, Emanuel; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Penna, Maria Lucia Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the risk factors related to worsening of physical disabilities after treatment discharge among patients with leprosy administered 12 consecutive monthly doses of multidrug therapy (MDT/WHO). Methods Cohort study was carried out at the Leprosy Laboratory in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated patients with multibacillary leprosy treated (MDT/WHO) between 1997 and 2007. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the relationship between the onset of physical disabilities after release from treatment and epidemiological and clinical characteristics. Results The total observation time period for the 368 patients was 1 570 person-years (PY), averaging 4.3 years per patient. The overall incidence rate of worsening of disability was 6.5/100 PY. Among those who began treatment with no disability, the incidence rate of physical disability was 4.5/100 PY. Among those who started treatment with Grade 1 or 2 disabilities, the incidence rate of deterioration was 10.5/100 PY. The survival analysis evidenced that when disability grade was 1, the risk was 1.61 (95% CI: 1.02–2.56), when disability was 2, the risk was 2.37 (95% CI 1.35–4.16), and when the number of skin lesions was 15 or more, an HR = 1.97 (95% CI: 1.07–3.63). Patients with neuritis showed a 65% increased risk of worsening of disability (HR = 1.65 [95% CI: 1.08–2.52]). Conclusion Impairment at diagnosis was the main risk factor for neurological worsening after treatment/MDT. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of reactional episodes remain the main means of preventing physical disabilities. PMID:23937704

  20. Potential strategies for the eradication of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Huwaitat, Rawan; McCloskey, Alice P; Gilmore, Brendan F; Laverty, Garry

    2016-07-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is one of the leading threats to society. The increasing burden of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infection is particularly concerning as such bacteria are demonstrating resistance to nearly all currently licensed therapies. Various strategies have been hypothesized to treat multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections including: targeting the Gram-negative outer membrane; neutralization of lipopolysaccharide; inhibition of bacterial efflux pumps and prevention of protein folding. Silver and silver nanoparticles, fusogenic liposomes and nanotubes are potential strategies for extending the activity of licensed, Gram-positive selective, antibiotics to Gram-negatives. This may serve as a strategy to fill the current void in pharmaceutical development in the short term. This review outlines the most promising strategies that could be implemented to solve the threat of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections.

  1. Substrate-bound structure of the E. coli multidrug resistance transporter MdfA

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Jie; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Yue; Fan, Junping; Wang, Xianping; Zhao, Yongfang; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a serious threat to public health. Proton motive force-driven antiporters from the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) constitute a major group of multidrug-resistance transporters. Currently, no reports on crystal structures of MFS antiporters in complex with their substrates exist. The E. coli MdfA transporter is a well-studied model system for biochemical analyses of multidrug-resistance MFS antiporters. Here, we report three crystal structures of MdfA-ligand complexes at resolutions up to 2.0 Å, all in the inward-facing conformation. The substrate-binding site sits proximal to the conserved acidic residue, D34. Our mutagenesis studies support the structural observations of the substrate-binding mode and the notion that D34 responds to substrate binding by adjusting its protonation status. Taken together, our data unveil the substrate-binding mode of MFS antiporters and suggest a mechanism of transport via this group of transporters. PMID:26238402

  2. Treatment of multidrug-resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa using extended-infusion antimicrobial regimens.

    PubMed

    Heil, Emily L; Lowery, Ashleigh V; Thom, Kerri A; Nicolau, David P

    2015-01-01

    In the management of multidrug-resistant infections in critically ill patients with multiorgan dysfunction, consideration must be given to the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of an antimicrobial agent to optimize dosing. We describe a 25-year-old woman who was undergoing thrice-weekly hemodialysis and developed multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia secondary to infected left and right ventricular assist devices. After multiple courses of antibiotics, her blood cultures revealed that the infecting organism was becoming progressively more resistant to antibiotic options. Cefepime 2 g administered over 3 hours/day (in combination with colistimethate) provided adequate drug levels for multidrug-resistant, cefepime-intermediate P. aeruginosa bacteremia in this patient. We present the clinical case of this patient, followed by a discussion of possible therapeutic approaches to be considered, including illustration of the principles of using extended-infusion antimicrobial regimens, and present the patient's resulting clinical course.

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of a multidrug efflux pump, SmfY, from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh; Minato, Yusuke; Chen, Jing; Mizushima, Tohru; Ogawa, Wakano; Kuroda, Teruo; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa

    2007-04-01

    We cloned a gene smfY for multidrug efflux pump from chromosomal DNA of Serratia marcescens using drug-hypersensitive Escherichia coli KAM32 as the host, and characterized the pump. E. coli KAM32/pESM42 carrying the smfY showed significantly increased MICs of various drugs including DAPI, norfloxacin, benzalkonium chloride, acriflavine and ethidium bromide, compared with the control. We also detected energy-dependent ethidium and acriflavine efflux due to the SmfY. Sequence analysis revealed that the SmfY was a multidrug efflux pump of the MF (Major Facilitator) superfamily transporters. This is the first report of a multidrug efflux pump belonging to the MF superfamily in S. marcescens.

  4. DIGRE: Drug-Induced Genomic Residual Effect Model for Successful Prediction of Multidrug Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J; Tang, H; Li, Y; Zhong, R; Wang, T; Wong, STC; Xiao, G; Xie, Y

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug regimens are a promising strategy for improving therapeutic efficacy and reducing side effects, especially for complex disorders such as cancer. However, the use of multidrug therapies is very challenging, due to a lack of understanding of the mechanisms of drug interactions. We herein present a novel computational approach—Drug-Induced Genomic Residual Effect (DIGRE) Computational Model—to predict drug combination effects by explicitly modeling drug response curves and gene expression changes after drug treatments. The prediction performance of DIGRE was evaluated using two datasets: (i) OCI-LY3 B-lymphoma cells treated with 14 different drugs and (ii) MCF breast cancer cells treated with combinations of gefitinib and docetaxel at different doses. In both datasets, the predicted drug combination effects significantly correlated with the experimental results. The results indicated the model was useful in predicting drug combination effects, which may greatly facilitate the discovery of new, effective multidrug therapies. PMID:26225227

  5. Diverse and abundant multi-drug resistant E. coli in Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ghaderpour, Aziz; Ho, Wing Sze; Chew, Li-Lee; Bong, Chui Wei; Chong, Ving Ching; Thong, Kwai-Lin; Chai, Lay Ching

    2015-01-01

    E.coli, an important vector distributing antimicrobial resistance in the environment, was found to be multi-drug resistant, abundant, and genetically diverse in the Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia. One-third (34%) of the estuarine E. coli was multi-drug resistant. The highest antibiotic resistance prevalence was observed for aminoglycosides (83%) and beta-lactams (37%). Phylogenetic groups A and B1, being the most predominant E. coli, demonstrated the highest antibiotic resistant level and prevalence of integrons (integron I, 21%; integron II, 3%). Detection of phylogenetic group B23 downstream of fishing villages indicates human fecal contamination as a source of E. coli pollution. Enteroaggregative E. coli (1%) were also detected immediately downstream of the fishing village. The results indicated multi-drug resistance among E. coli circulating in Matang estuaries, which could be reflective of anthropogenic activities and aggravated by bacterial and antibiotic discharges from village lack of a sewerage system, aquaculture farms and upstream animal husbandry.

  6. [Exploration of the Factors Influencing Multi-Drug Cancer Chemotherapy in the Elderly - A Retrospective Study].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Kentaro; Tamura, Kazuo; Kiyomi, Fumiaki; Takamatsu, Yasushi; Kamimura, Hidetoshi

    2016-12-01

    Multi-drug administration is problematic in elderly patients, and the situation is further complicated in those with cancer, owing to a high possibility of side effects and augmentation due to interactions between concomitant or previous drugs the patients are receiving and the anti-cancer drugs administered. Analysis of the factors that influence the likelihood of cancer chemotherapy multi-drug administration in the elderly showed that age alone was a fundamental risk factor for multi-drug administration, comorbidities, and drug interactions. In addition, the risks of drug interaction with chemotherapy were approximately 5.8 fold for drugs administered to treat hypertension, and approximately 10.3 fold for cardiovascular agents. Because of increased cancer morbidity, it is important to reduce the risks associated with the treatment.

  7. Dual Action Antifungal Small Molecule Modulates Multidrug Efflux and TOR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar-Guturja, Tanvi; Gunaherath, G. M. Kamal B.; Kithsiri Wijeratne, E. M.; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Averette, Anna F.; Lee, Soo Chan; Kim, Taeyup; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Tripodi, Farida; Ammar, Ron; Döhl, Katja; Niewola-Staszkowska, Karolina; Schmitt, Lutz; Loewith, Robbie J.; Roth, Frederick P.; Sanglard, Dominique; Andes, David; Nislow, Corey; Coccetti, Paola; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Heitman, Joseph; Leslie Gunatilaka, A. A.; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new strategies to treat invasive fungal infections, which are a leading cause of human mortality. We establish two activities of the natural product beauvericin, which potentiates the activity of the most widely deployed class of antifungal against the leading human fungal pathogens, blocks the emergence of drug resistance, and renders resistant pathogens responsive to treatment in mammalian infection models. Harnessing genome sequencing of beauvericin-resistant mutants, affinity purification of a biotinylated beauvericin analog, and biochemical and genetic assays reveals that beauvericin blocks multidrug efflux and inhibits the global regulator TORC1 kinase, thereby activating protein kinase CK2 and inhibiting the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Substitutions in the multidrug transporter Pdr5 that enable beauvericin efflux impair antifungal efflux, thereby impeding resistance to the drug combination. Thus, dual targeting of multidrug efflux and TOR signaling provides a powerful, broadly effective therapeutic strategy for fungal infectious disease that evades resistance. PMID:27571477

  8. [Significance of efflux pumps in multidrug resistance of Gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Wiercińska, Olga; Chojecka, Agnieszka; Kanclerski, Krzysztof; Rőhm-Rodowald, Ewa; Jakimiak, Bożenna

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of multidrug. resistance of bacteria is a serious problem of modern medicine. This resistance largely is a consequence of abuse and improper use of antibacterial substances, especially antibiotics and chemotherapeutics in hospital settings. Multidrug resistance is caused by a number of interacting mechanisms of resistance. Recent studies have indicated that efflux pumps and systems of efflux pumps are an important determinant of this phenomenon. Contribute to this particular RND efflux systems of Gram-negative bacteria, which possess a wide range of substrates such as antibiotics, dyes, detergents, toxins and active substances of disinfectants and antiseptics. These transporters are usually encoded on bacterial chromosomes. Genes encoding efflux pumps' proteins may also be carried on plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Such pumps are usually specific to a small group of substrates, but as an additional mechanism of resistance may contribute to the multidrug resistance.

  9. Applications of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for the reversal of multidrug resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YINGHONG; COLE, SUSAN P.C.; CAI, TIANGE; CAI, YU

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy presents a major obstacle in the treatment of cancer patients, which directly affects the clinical success rate of cancer therapy. Current research aims to improve the efficiency of chemotherapy, whilst reducing toxicity to prolong the lives of cancer patients. As with good biocompatibility, high stability and drug release targeting properties, nanodrug delivery systems alter the mechanism by which drugs function to reverse MDR, via passive or active targeting, increasing drug accumulation in the tumor tissue or reducing drug elimination. Given the potential role of nanodrug delivery systems used in multidrug resistance, the present study summarizes the current knowledge on the properties of liposomes, lipid nanoparticles, polymeric micelles and mesoporous silica nanoparticles, together with their underlying mechanisms. The current review aims to provide a reliable basis and useful information for the development of new treatment strategies of multidrug resistance reversal using nanodrug delivery systems. PMID:27347092

  10. The multidrug transporters belonging to major facilitator superfamily in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    De Rossi, Edda; Arrigo, Patrizio; Bellinzoni, Marco; Silva, Pedro A. E.; Martín, Carlos; Aínsa, José A.; Guglierame, Paola; Riccardi, Giovanna

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance play an important role in the insurgence of tuberculosis. Detailed knowledge of the molecular basis of drug recognition and transport by multidrug transport systems is required for the development of new antibiotics that are not extruded or of inhibitors that block the multidrug transporter and allow traditional antibiotics to be effective. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We have undertaken the inventory of the drug transporters subfamily, included in the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), encoded by the complete genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). These proteins were identified on the basis of their characteristic stretches of amino acids and transmembrane segments (TMS) number. CONCLUSIONS: Genome analysis and searches of homology between the identified transporters and proteins characterized in other organisms revealed 16 open reading frames encoding putative drug efflux pumps belonging to MFS. In the case of two of them, we also have demonstrated that they function as drug efflux proteins. PMID:12520088

  11. Modulation of multidrug resistance gene expression in human breast cancer cells by (-)-gossypol-enriched cottonseed oil.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    P-glycoprotein, the product of the multidrug resistance 1 gene, acts as an efflux pump and prevents sufficient intracellular accumulation of several anticancer agents. Thus, it plays a major role in multidrug cancer resistance. Using the non-radioactive cell proliferation MTS assay, none of three ...

  12. Are all drug addicts impulsive? Effects of antisociality and extent of multidrug use on cognitive and motor impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, Jasmin; Gonzalez, Raul; Bechara, Antoine; Martin, Eileen M

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the influence of antisociality and extent of multidrug use on cognitive and motor impulsivity among substance-dependent individuals (SDIs) that used primarily cocaine and/or heroin. One hundred currently abstinent male SDIs participated in the study. Extent of multidrug use and degree of antisociality, assessed with the Socialization Scale of the California Psychological Inventory (So-CPI), were used to classify participants into one of four groups: high antisocial/low multidrug use, high antisocial/high multidrug use, low antisocial/low multidrug use, and low antisocial/high multidrug use. All subjects completed the Iowa Gambling Task to assess cognitive impulsivity and the Stroop Task to measure motor impulsivity. Contrary to expectations, antisociality was associated with more advantageous performance on the Iowa Gambling Task, independent of extent of multidrug use. In contrast, greater multidrug use was associated with general psychomotor slowing on the Stroop Task. Results suggest that a subclinical form of antisociality may have a paradoxically facilitating effect on decision-making and cognitive impulsivity among SDIs.

  13. Structures of a Na+-coupled, substrate-bound MATE multidrug transporter.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min; Symersky, Jindrich; Radchenko, Martha; Koide, Akiko; Guo, Yi; Nie, Rongxin; Koide, Shohei

    2013-02-05

    Multidrug transporters belonging to the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family expel dissimilar lipophilic and cationic drugs across cell membranes by dissipating a preexisting Na(+) or H(+) gradient. Despite its clinical relevance, the transport mechanism of MATE proteins remains poorly understood, largely owing to a lack of structural information on the substrate-bound transporter. Here we report crystal structures of a Na(+)-coupled MATE transporter NorM from Neisseria gonorrheae in complexes with three distinct translocation substrates (ethidium, rhodamine 6G, and tetraphenylphosphonium), as well as Cs(+) (a Na(+) congener), all captured in extracellular-facing and drug-bound states. The structures revealed a multidrug-binding cavity festooned with four negatively charged amino acids and surprisingly limited hydrophobic moieties, in stark contrast to the general belief that aromatic amino acids play a prominent role in multidrug recognition. Furthermore, we discovered an uncommon cation-π interaction in the Na(+)-binding site located outside the drug-binding cavity and validated the biological relevance of both the substrate- and cation-binding sites by conducting drug resistance and transport assays. Additionally, we uncovered potential rearrangement of at least two transmembrane helices upon Na(+)-induced drug export. Based on our structural and functional analyses, we suggest that Na(+) triggers multidrug extrusion by inducing protein conformational changes rather than by directly competing for the substrate-binding amino acids. This scenario is distinct from the canonical antiport mechanism, in which both substrate and counterion compete for a shared binding site in the transporter. Collectively, our findings provide an important step toward a detailed and mechanistic understanding of multidrug transport.

  14. The emergence and outbreak of multidrug-resistant typhoid fever in China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Meiying; Li, Xinlan; Liao, Qiaohong; Li, Fang; Zhang, Jing; Kan, Biao

    2016-06-22

    Typhoid fever remains a severe public health problem in developing countries. The emergence of resistant typhoid, particularly multidrug-resistant typhoid infections, highlights the necessity of monitoring the resistance characteristics of this invasive pathogen. In this study, we report a typhoid fever outbreak caused by multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains with an ACSSxtT pattern. Resistance genes conferring these phenotypes were harbored by a large conjugative plasmid, which increases the threat of Salmonella Typhi and thus requires close surveillance for dissemination of strains containing such genes.

  15. Outbreak of mastitis in sheep caused by multi-drug resistant Enterococcus faecalis in Sardinia, Italy.

    PubMed

    Sanciu, G; Marogna, G; Paglietti, B; Cappuccinelli, P; Leori, G; Rappelli, P

    2013-03-01

    An outbreak of infective mastitis due to Enterococcus faecalis occurred in an intensive sheep farm in north Sardinia (Italy). E. faecalis, which is only rarely isolated from sheep milk, was unexpectedly found in 22·3% of positive samples at microbiological examination. Forty-five out of the 48 E. faecalis isolates showed the same multi-drug resistance pattern (cloxacillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, clindamycin, oxytetracycline). E. faecalis isolates were analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and all 45 multi-drug resistant strains showed an indistinguishable macrorestiction profile, indicating their clonal origin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an outbreak of mastitis in sheep caused by E. faecalis.

  16. [The role of cell wall organization and active efflux pump systems in multidrug resistance of bacteria].

    PubMed

    Hasdemir, Ufuk

    2007-04-01

    Multiple antibiotic resistance of clinically important bacteria are of major concern worldwide. Alterations of drug targets or enzymatic inactivation of antimicrobial agents are the well known mechanisms of antimicrobial drug resistance. Besides these well known mechanisms, recent studies have shown that a further resistance mechanism, active drug efflux, has become increasingly important in the current threat of multidrug resistance. It involves certain bacterial transport proteins which pump out toxic antimicrobial compounds from the cell. Drug efflux pump proteins in bacteria fall into five distinct protein super families [ATP binding cassette super family (ABC), Major facilitator super family (MFS), Small multidrug resistance super family (SMR), Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) super family, Resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) super family] and are mostly encoded by chromosomal genes. Among them, the members of RND protein super family are widely distrubuted in Gram negative bacteria and play siginificant role in both, intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance of these bacteria with very wide substrate specificity. RND type multidrug efflux proteins usually function together with an outer membrane canal protein (OMP) and a membrane fusion protein (MFP) to pump out drugs. AcrAB-TolC of Escherichia coli and MexAB-OprM of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the typical examples of these tripartite systems. They are constitutively expressed in wild type cells and play significant role in intrinsic resistance of these bacteria. However, multidrug resistance which is of major clinical significance, rises as a result of overexpression of these pump systems due to mutations and elevated levels of resistance are recorded to structurally unrelated antimicrobial drugs such as fluoroquinolones, beta-lactams, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, aminoglycosides and toxic compunds. Synthesis of RND type pump proteins are regulated by complex genetic

  17. Molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiang-hua; Song, Xiu-yu; Ma, Xiao-bo; Zhang, Shi-yang; Zhang, Jia-qin

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of healthcare-associated infections worldwide. Selective pressure, the extensive use of antibiotics, and the conjugational transmission of antibiotic resistance genes across bacterial species and genera facilitate the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) K. pneumoniae. Here, we examined the occurrence, phenotypes and genetic features of MDR K. pneumoniae isolated from patients in intensive care units (ICUs) at the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University in Xiamen, China, from January to December 2011. Thirty-eight MDR K. pneumoniae strains were collected. These MDR K. pneumoniae isolates possessed at least seven antibiotic resistance determinants, which contribute to the high-level resistance of these bacteria to aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones and β-lactams. Among these isolates, 24 strains were extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producers, 2 strains were AmpC producers, and 12 strains were both ESBL and AmpC producers. The 38 MDR isolates also contained class I (28/38) and class II integrons (10/38). All 28 class I-positive isolates contained aacC1, aacC4, orfX, orfX' and aadA1 genes. β-lactam resistance was conferred through bla SHV (22/38), bla TEM (10/38), and bla CTX-M (7/38). The highly conserved bla KPC-2 (37/38) and bla OXA-23(1/38) alleles were responsible for carbapenem resistance, and a gyrAsite mutation (27/38) and the plasmid-mediated qnrB gene (13/38) were responsible for quinolone resistance. Repetitive-sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR) fingerprinting of these MDR strains revealed the presence of five groups and sixteen patterns. The MDR strains from unrelated groups showed different drug resistance patterns; however, some homologous strains also showed different drug resistance profiles. Therefore, REP-PCR-based analyses can provide information to evaluate the epidemic status of nosocomial infection caused by MDR K. pneumoniae; however, this test lacks the power to discriminate some

  18. Acquired Multidrug Antifungal Resistance in Candida lusitaniae during Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Asner, Sandra A.; Giulieri, Stefano; Diezi, Manuel; Marchetti, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    -flurocytosine. This clinical report describes resistance of C. lusitaniae to all common antifungals. While candins or azole resistance followed monotherapy, multidrug antifungal resistance emerged during combined therapy. PMID:26438490

  19. Multidrug Efflux Pumps from Enterobacteriaceae, Vibrio cholerae and Staphylococcus aureus Bacterial Food Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jody L.; He, Gui-Xin; Kakarla, Prathusha; KC, Ranjana; Kumar, Sanath; Lakra, Wazir Singh; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Ranaweera, Indrika; Shrestha, Ugina; Tran, Thuy; Varela, Manuel F.

    2015-01-01

    Foodborne illnesses caused by bacterial microorganisms are common worldwide and constitute a serious public health concern. In particular, microorganisms belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae families of Gram-negative bacteria, and to the Staphylococcus genus of Gram-positive bacteria are important causative agents of food poisoning and infection in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Recently, variants of these bacteria have developed resistance to medically important chemotherapeutic agents. Multidrug resistant Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter spp., and Staphylococcus aureus are becoming increasingly recalcitrant to clinical treatment in human patients. Of the various bacterial resistance mechanisms against antimicrobial agents, multidrug efflux pumps comprise a major cause of multiple drug resistance. These multidrug efflux pump systems reside in the biological membrane of the bacteria and actively extrude antimicrobial agents from bacterial cells. This review article summarizes the evolution of these bacterial drug efflux pump systems from a molecular biological standpoint and provides a framework for future work aimed at reducing the conditions that foster dissemination of these multidrug resistant causative agents through human populations. PMID:25635914

  20. Modified live Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccine, AQUAVAC-ESC, lacks multidrug resistance plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasmid mediated antibiotic resistance was first discovered in Edwardsiella ictaluri in the early 1990’s, and in 2007 an E. ictaluri isolate harboring an IncA/C plasmid was recovered from a moribund channel catfish infected with the bacterium. Due to the identification of multidrug resistance plasm...

  1. Increased Risk for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Migratory Workers, Armenia

    PubMed Central

    Crape, Byron; Grigoryan, Ruzanna; Martirosyan, Hripsime; Petrosyan, Varduhi

    2015-01-01

    To understand use of tuberculosis (TB) services for migrant workers, we conducted a cross-sectional census of 95 migrant workers with TB from Armenia by using medical record reviews and face-to-face interviews. Prolonged time between diagnosis and treatment, treatment interruption, and treatment defaults caused by migrant work might increase the risk for multidrug-resistant TB. PMID:25695488

  2. Multidrug efflux pumps from Enterobacteriaceae, Vibrio cholerae and Staphylococcus aureus bacterial food pathogens.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jody L; He, Gui-Xin; Kakarla, Prathusha; K C, Ranjana; Kumar, Sanath; Lakra, Wazir Singh; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Ranaweera, Indrika; Shrestha, Ugina; Tran, Thuy; Varela, Manuel F

    2015-01-28

    Foodborne illnesses caused by bacterial microorganisms are common worldwide and constitute a serious public health concern. In particular, microorganisms belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae families of Gram-negative bacteria, and to the Staphylococcus genus of Gram-positive bacteria are important causative agents of food poisoning and infection in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Recently, variants of these bacteria have developed resistance to medically important chemotherapeutic agents. Multidrug resistant Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter spp., and Staphylococcus aureus are becoming increasingly recalcitrant to clinical treatment in human patients. Of the various bacterial resistance mechanisms against antimicrobial agents, multidrug efflux pumps comprise a major cause of multiple drug resistance. These multidrug efflux pump systems reside in the biological membrane of the bacteria and actively extrude antimicrobial agents from bacterial cells. This review article summarizes the evolution of these bacterial drug efflux pump systems from a molecular biological standpoint and provides a framework for future work aimed at reducing the conditions that foster dissemination of these multidrug resistant causative agents through human populations.

  3. Biofilm-Forming Capability of Highly Virulent, Multidrug-Resistant Candida auris

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Leighann; Ramage, Gordon; Kean, Ryan; Borman, Andrew; Johnson, Elizabeth M.; Richardson, Malcolm D.

    2017-01-01

    The emerging multidrug-resistant yeast pathogen Candida auris has attracted considerable attention as a source of healthcare–associated infections. We report that this highly virulent yeast has the capacity to form antifungal resistant biofilms sensitive to the disinfectant chlorhexidine in vitro. PMID:28098553

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain from Chile.

    PubMed

    Opazo, Andrés; Lopes, Bruno S; García, Patricia; Domínguez Yévenes, Mariana; Lima, Celia; Bello-Toledo, Helia; González-Rocha, Gerardo; Amyes, Sebastian G B

    2015-07-02

    Acinetobacter baumannii strain Ab5 was isolated in the year 2007 in Chile, being one of the first multidrug-resistant (MDR) cases reported in the country. Here, we present the very first draft genome sequence of an MDR Chilean strain, which shows the presence of diverse resistance and acquired virulence genes.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain from Chile

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Bruno S.; García, Patricia; Domínguez Yévenes, Mariana; Lima, Celia; Bello-Toledo, Helia; González-Rocha, Gerardo; Amyes, Sebastian G. B.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii strain Ab5 was isolated in the year 2007 in Chile, being one of the first multidrug-resistant (MDR) cases reported in the country. Here, we present the very first draft genome sequence of an MDR Chilean strain, which shows the presence of diverse resistance and acquired virulence genes. PMID:26139713

  6. Worldwide Occurrence of Integrative Conjugative Element Encoding Multidrug Resistance Determinants in Epidemic Vibrio cholerae O1

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Michel A.; Fonseca, Erica L.; Andrade, Bruno N.; Cabral, Adriana C.; Vicente, Ana Carolina P.

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, there has been an increase of cholera epidemics caused by multidrug resistant strains. Particularly, the integrative and conjugative element (ICE) seems to play a major role in the emergence of multidrug resistant Vibrio cholerae. This study fully characterized, by whole genome sequencing, new ICEs carried by multidrug resistant V. cholerae O1 strains from Nigeria (2010) (ICEVchNig1) and Nepal (1994) (ICEVchNep1). The gene content and gene order of these two ICEs are the same, and identical to ICEVchInd5, ICEVchBan5 and ICEVchHai1 previously identified in multidrug resistant V. cholerae O1. This ICE is characterized by dfrA1, sul2, strAB and floR antimicrobial resistance genes, and by unique gene content in HS4 and HS5 ICE regions. Screening for ICEs, in publicly available V. cholerae genomes, revealed the occurrence and widespread distribution of this ICE among V. cholerae O1. Metagenomic analysis found segments of this ICE in marine environments far from the direct influence of the cholera epidemic. Therefore, this study revealed the epidemiology of a spatio-temporal prevalent ICE in V. cholerae O1. Its occurrence and dispersion in V. cholerae O1 strains from different continents throughout more than two decades can be indicative of its role in the fitness of the current pandemic lineage. PMID:25265418

  7. [Caring for a patient carrying multi-drug resistant bacteria at home].

    PubMed

    Kereun, François

    2015-01-01

    Private practice health professionals play a role in the fight against healthcare-associated infections. The management of the home care of a patient carrying multi-drug resistant bacteria reveals the weaknesses in the community-hospital link. Providing care in complete safety for the caregiver as well as the patient is a major challenge. A private practice nurse shares his experience.

  8. Polysaccharide-lecithin reverse micelles with enzyme-degradable triglyceride shell for overcoming tumor multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Su, Chia-Wei; Chen, San-Yuan; Liu, Dean-Mo

    2013-05-08

    A newly-designed drug carrier with enzyme-triggered release behavior and the ability to circumvent multidrug resistance was successfully developed. By optimizing the ratio of lecithin and polysaccharide in reverse micelles, encapsulation efficiency and encapsulation stability can be significantly improved.

  9. Pheromone killing of multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecalis V583 by native commensal strains

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Michael S.; Rauch, Marcus; Ramsey, Matthew M.; Himes, Paul R.; Varahan, Sriram; Manson, Janet M.; Lebreton, Francois; Hancock, Lynn Ernest

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecalis possess numerous mobile elements that encode virulence and antibiotic resistance traits as well as new metabolic pathways, often constituting over one-quarter of the genome. It was of interest to determine how this large accretion of mobile elements affects competitive growth in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract consortium. We unexpectedly observed that the prototype clinical isolate strain V583 was actively killed by GI tract flora, whereas commensal enterococci flourished. It was found that killing of V583 resulted from lethal cross-talk between accumulated mobile elements and that this cross-talk was induced by a heptapeptide pheromone produced by native E. faecalis present in the fecal consortium. These results highlight two important aspects of the evolution of multidrug-resistant enterococci: (i) the accretion of mobile elements in E. faecalis V583 renders it incompatible with commensal strains, and (ii) because of this incompatibility, multidrug-resistant strains sharing features found in V583 cannot coexist with commensal strains. The accumulation of mobile elements in hospital isolates of enterococci can include those that are inherently incompatible with native flora, highlighting the importance of maintaining commensal populations as means of preventing colonization and subsequent infection by multidrug-resistant strains. PMID:26039987

  10. First Genome Sequence of a Mexican Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Graña-Miraglia, Lucía; Lozano, Luis; Castro-Jaimes, Semiramis; Cevallos, Miguel A.; Volkow, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen worldwide. Here, we present the draft genome of the first multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolate, sampled from a tertiary hospital in Mexico City. This genome will provide a starting point for studying the genomic diversity of this species in Mexico. PMID:27013043

  11. Antibiotic exposure can induce various bacterial virulence phenotypes in multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is one of the most prevalent bacterial foodborne diseases in the United States and causes an estimated 1 million human cases every year. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella has emerged as a public health issue as it has been associated with increased morbidity in humans and mortality in...

  12. The leukotriene LTD4 receptor antagonist MK571 specifically modulates MRP associated multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Gekeler, V; Ise, W; Sanders, K H; Ulrich, W R; Beck, J

    1995-03-08

    The multidrug resistant cell lines HL60/AR and GLC4/ADR show high overexpression of the gene encoding the multidrug resistance associated protein MRP compared to their drug sensitive parental counterparts. This and the virtual absence of mdr1/P-glycoprotein gene expression was proven by a complementary DNA polymerase chain reaction (cDNA-PCR) approach. Applying a 72-hour tetrazolium based colorimetric MTT-assay we demonstrate on both MDR sublines a dose-dependent modulation of drug resistances by the leukotriene LTD4 receptor antagonist MK571. A complete reversal of vincristine resistances was achieved at final MK571 concentrations of 30 microM (HL60/AR) or 50 microM (GLC4/ADR) which by itself did not disturb cellular proliferation. The drug resistance of a mdr1/P-gp overexpressing multidrug-resistant HL60 subline, in contrast, was not significantly affected by MK571. Similar effects were seen using the glutathione (GSH) synthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Our results point to a relationship between MRP and a conjugate transporter and identify MK571 as a new tool structure for developing modulators specific for a MRP associated multidrug resistance.

  13. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation and Successful Resolution of Multidrug-Resistant-Organism Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Eva; Ballon-Landa, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    We report a case in which fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) utilized for relapsing Clostridium difficile colitis successfully eradicated colonization with several multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs). FMT may have an additive benefit of reducing MDRO carriage and should be further investigated as a potential measure to eradicate additional potentially virulent organisms beyond C. difficile. PMID:25878340

  14. Colistin methanesulfonate against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in an in vitro pharmacodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Lisa A; Hovde, Laurie B; Mitropoulos, Isaac F; Schafer, Jeremy; Rotschafer, John C

    2007-09-01

    Using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model, a multidrug-resistant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii was exposed to colistin methanesulfonate alone and in combination with ceftazidime. Pre- and postexposure colistin sulfate MICs were determined. A single daily dose of colistin methanesulfonate combined with continuous-infusion ceftazidime prevented regrowth and postexposure MIC increases.

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Antimicrobial Compounds in Plant Extracts against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, Yoko; Rabenstein, John D.; Rhea, Joshua; Crouch, Marie-Laure; Mocek, Ulla M.; Kittell, Patricia Emmett; Morgan, Margie A.; Nichols, Wesley Stephen; Van Benschoten, M. M.; Hardy, William David; Liu, George Y.

    2013-01-01

    The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrobial activity were identified by fractionating each plant extract using high performance liquid chromatography, and determining the antimicrobial activity of each fraction against A. baumannii. The chemical structures of the fractions inhibiting >40% of the bacterial growth were elucidated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The six most active compounds were identified as: ellagic acid in Rosa rugosa; norwogonin in Scutellaria baicalensis; and chebulagic acid, chebulinic acid, corilagin, and terchebulin in Terminalia chebula. The most potent compound was identified as norwogonin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 128 µg/mL, and minimum bactericidal concentration of 256 µg/mL against clinically relevant strains of A. baumannii. Combination studies of norwogonin with ten anti-Gram negative bacterial agents demonstrated that norwogonin did not enhance the antimicrobial activity of the synthetic antibiotics chosen for this study. In conclusion, of all identified antimicrobial compounds, norwogonin was the most potent against multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Further studies are warranted to ascertain the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of norwogonin for infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:23630600

  16. Pheromone killing of multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecalis V583 by native commensal strains.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Michael S; Rauch, Marcus; Ramsey, Matthew M; Himes, Paul R; Varahan, Sriram; Manson, Janet M; Lebreton, Francois; Hancock, Lynn Ernest

    2015-06-09

    Multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecalis possess numerous mobile elements that encode virulence and antibiotic resistance traits as well as new metabolic pathways, often constituting over one-quarter of the genome. It was of interest to determine how this large accretion of mobile elements affects competitive growth in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract consortium. We unexpectedly observed that the prototype clinical isolate strain V583 was actively killed by GI tract flora, whereas commensal enterococci flourished. It was found that killing of V583 resulted from lethal cross-talk between accumulated mobile elements and that this cross-talk was induced by a heptapeptide pheromone produced by native E. faecalis present in the fecal consortium. These results highlight two important aspects of the evolution of multidrug-resistant enterococci: (i) the accretion of mobile elements in E. faecalis V583 renders it incompatible with commensal strains, and (ii) because of this incompatibility, multidrug-resistant strains sharing features found in V583 cannot coexist with commensal strains. The accumulation of mobile elements in hospital isolates of enterococci can include those that are inherently incompatible with native flora, highlighting the importance of maintaining commensal populations as means of preventing colonization and subsequent infection by multidrug-resistant strains.

  17. Geraniol Restores Antibiotic Activities against Multidrug-Resistant Isolates from Gram-Negative Species▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Vannina; Muselli, Alain; Bernardini, Antoine François; Berti, Liliane; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Amaral, Leonard; Bolla, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    The essential oil of Helichrysum italicum significantly reduces the multidrug resistance of Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Combinations of the two most active fractions of the essential oil with each other or with phenylalanine arginine β-naphthylamide yield synergistic activity. Geraniol, a component of one fraction, significantly increased the efficacy of β-lactams, quinolones, and chloramphenicol. PMID:19258278

  18. [Perspectives of inhibition of multidrug resistance during cancer chemotherapy, in vitro and in vivo experiments].

    PubMed

    Engi, Helga

    2009-03-29

    The development of pharmacological agents able to counteract the mechanisms of multidrug resistance in oncology has remained a major goal for the past ten years. Our purpose was to find multidrug resistance reversal agents less toxic than verapamil among various synthetic compounds: cinnamylidene ketones; 1,4-dihydropyridines; phenothiazines; heat shock 90 inhibitor peptides; betti base derivative of tylosin and among some naturally occurring plant derived jatrophane and lathyrane-type diterpenes. The first part of this thesis presents the inhibition of multidrug resistance through inhibition of the P-glycoprotein efflux pump in various cell lines. In general, the newly identified multidrug resistance modifiers were able to enhance the antiproliferative activity of selected anticancer drugs in a synergistic or additive way in in vitro experiments. The in vitro activity of betti base derivative of tylosin was confirmed by further in vivo efficacy studies in DBA/2 mice. As an alternative way of antitumor effect, apoptosis inductions of resistance modifiers were studied. The substituted dihydropyridine 13 was the most promising apoptosis inducer on mouse lymphoma cells. Human cytomegalovirus was used in a modified in vitro model for characterizing lathyrane compounds with antipromotion effect on human lung cancer cells. All the six macrocyclic lathyrane-type diterpenoids reduced the promotion in vitro , except latilagascene D, decreased IE-antigen expression of cytomegalovirus to prevent progression of tumor malignancy.

  19. Structural mechanism of the simultaneous binding of two drugs to a multidrug-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Maria A; Miller, Marshall C; Brennan, Richard G

    2004-01-01

    The structural basis of simultaneous binding of two or more different drugs by any multidrug-binding protein is unknown and also how this can lead to a noncompetitive, uncompetitive or cooperative binding mechanism. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the Staphylococcus aureus multidrug-binding transcription repressor, QacR, bound simultaneously to ethidium (Et) and proflavin (Pf). The structure underscores the plasticity of the multidrug-binding pocket and reveals an alternative, Pf-induced binding mode for Et. To monitor the simultaneous binding of Pf and Et to QacR, as well as to determine the effects on the binding affinity of one drug when the other drug is prebound, a novel application of near-ultraviolet circular dichroism (UVCD) was developed. The UVCD equilibrium-binding studies revealed identical affinities of Pf for QacR in the presence or absence of Et, but significantly diminished affinity of Et for QacR when Pf is prebound, findings that are readily explicable by their structures. The principles for simultaneous binding of two different drugs discerned here are likely employed by the multidrug efflux transporters. PMID:15257299

  20. Novel Levofloxacin-Resistant Multidrug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 11A Isolates, South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miey; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Han-Sung; Park, Ji Young; Song, Wonkeun; Cho, Hyoun Chan

    2016-01-01

    Of 608 Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical strains isolated at a hospital in South Korea during 2009–2014, sixteen (2.6%) were identified as levofloxacin resistant. The predominant serotype was 11A (9 isolates). Two novel sequence types of multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae with serotype 11A were identified, indicating continuous diversification of resistant strains. PMID:27767906

  1. Intestinal Decontamination of Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae After Recurrent Infections in an Immunocompromised Host

    PubMed Central

    Kronman, Matthew P.; Zerr, Danielle M.; Qin, Xuan; Englund, Janet; Cornell, Cathy; Sanders, Jean E.; Myers, Jeffrey; Rayar, Jaipreet; Berry, Jessica E.; Adler, Amanda L.; Weissman, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Enterobacteriaceae infections are associated with increased morbidity. We describe a 20-year-old hematopoietic cell transplantation recipient with recurrent MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae infection, prolonged intestinal colonization, and subsequent intestinal decontamination. Further study should evaluate stool surveillance, molecular typing, and fecal microbiota transplantation for patients with intestinal MDR Enterobacteriaceae carriage. PMID:25041704

  2. Multidrug resistance and ESBL-producing Salmonella spp. isolated from broiler processing plants

    PubMed Central

    Ziech, Rosangela Estel; Lampugnani, Camila; Perin, Ana Paula; Sereno, Mallu Jagnow; Sfaciotte, Ricardo Antônio Pilegi; Viana, Cibeli; Soares, Vanessa Mendonça; de Almeida Nogueira Pinto, José Paes; dos Santos Bersot, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of multidrug-resistant, extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Salmonella spp. isolated from conveyor belts of broiler cutting rooms in Brazilian broiler processing plants. Ninety-eight strains of Salmonella spp. were analyzed. Multidrug resistance was determined by the disk diffusion test and the susceptibility of the isolated bacteria was evaluated against 18 antimicrobials from seven different classes. The double disk diffusion test was used to evaluate ESBL production. Of the 98 strains tested, 84 were multidrug resistant. The highest rates of resistance were against nalidixic acid (95%), tetracycline (91%), and the beta-lactams: ampicillin and cefachlor (45%), followed by streptomycin and gentamicin with 19% and 15% of strain resistance, respectively. By contrast, 97% of the strains were sensitive to chloramphenicol. 45% of the strains were positive for the presence of ESBL activity. In this study, high rates of multidrug resistance and ESBL production were observed in Salmonella spp. PMID:26887244

  3. Recycling antibiotics into GUMBOS: A new combination strategy to combat multi-drug resistant bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria, coupled with the lack of new antibiotics in development, is fast evolving into a global crisis. New strategies utilizing existing antibacterial agents are urgently needed. We propose one such strategy in which four outmoded ß-lactam antibiotics (amp...

  4. Pre-Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Strain Associated with Disseminated Tuberculosis in a Pet Dog

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, João; Canto, Ana; Albuquerque, Teresa; Leal, Nuno; Macedo, Rita; Portugal, Isabel; Cunha, Mónica V.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to isoniazid, ethambutol, and streptomycin was detected in a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, belonging to the Beijing family lineage, isolated from two nodule exudates of a Yorkshire terrier with generalized tuberculosis. This report alerts medical practitioners to the risk of dissemination of pre-multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (preMDR-TB) through exposure to M. tuberculosis-shedding pets. PMID:24153119

  5. Draft Genome Sequences of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter sp. Strains from Colombian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Falquet, Laurent; Reguero, María T.; Mantilla, José R.; Valenzuela, Emilia M.; González, Elsa; Cepeda, Alexandra; Escalante, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of the strains Acinetobacter baumannii 107m, Acinetobacter nosocomialis 28F, and Acinetobacter pittii 42F, isolated from Colombian hospitals, are reported here. These isolates are causative of nosocomial infections and are classified as multidrug resistant, as they showed resistance to four different antibiotic groups. PMID:24285656

  6. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii reaches a new frontier: prosthetic hip joint infection.

    PubMed

    Hischebeth, G T R; Wimmer, M D; Molitor, E; Seifert, H; Gravius, S; Bekeredjian-Ding, I

    2015-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen primarily in countries with a high prevalence of multidrug resistance. Here we report the detection of a bla OXA23 carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii strain in a German patient with prosthetic hip joint infection following several hip joint surgeries but no history of foreign travel.

  7. Comparative genomics of the IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids belonging to the IncA/C plasmid family are widely distributed among Salmonella and other enterobacterial isolates from agricultural sources and have, at least once, also been identified in a drug resistant Yersinia pestis isolate (IP275) from Madagascar. Here, we...

  8. [The risk of infection with patients with multi-drug resistant bacteria in the operating room].

    PubMed

    Latroche, Marie-France; Roche, Géraldine; Velardo, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    The risk of infection in the operating theatre is constant and multifactorial. It can be contained through a prevention process. The organisation, implementation, monitoring and the results of the patient pathway are all sources for the analysis of practices, quality and professional progress in order to limit the risks of transmitting multi-drug or highly resistant bacteria.

  9. 4-Isoxazolyl-1,4-dihydropyridines exhibit binding at the multidrug-resistance transporter.

    PubMed

    Hulubei, Victoria; Meikrantz, Scott B; Quincy, David A; Houle, Tina; McKenna, John I; Rogers, Mark E; Steiger, Scott; Natale, N R

    2012-11-15

    The 4-isoxazolyl-dihydropyridines (IDHPs) exhibit inhibition of the multidrug-resistance transporter (MDR-1), and exhibit an SAR distinct from their activity at voltage gated calcium channels (VGCC). Among the four most active IDHPs, three were branched at C-5 of the isoxazole, including the most active analog, 1k.

  10. Genome Resequencing of the Virulent and Multidrug-Resistant Reference Strain Clostridium difficile 630

    PubMed Central

    Bunk, Boyke; Thürmer, Andrea; Spröer, Cathrin; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Abt, Birte; Gronow, Sabine; Liesegang, Heiko; Daniel, Rolf; Overmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    We resequenced the complete genome of the virulent and multidrug-resistant pathogen Clostridium difficile strain 630. A combination of single-molecule real-time and Illumina sequencing technology revealed the presence of an additional rRNA gene cluster, additional tRNAs, and the absence of a transposon in comparison to the published and reannotated genome sequence. PMID:25858846

  11. IND2, a pyrimido[1”,2”:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline derivative, circumvents multi-drug resistance and causes apoptosis in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Lee, Crystal; Moore, Joshua; Mittal, Roopali; Suswam, Esther A.; Abbott, Kodye L; Pondugula, Satyanarayana R.; Manne, Upender; Narayanan, Narayanan K.; Trivedi, Piyush; Tiwari, Amit K.

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring condensed quinolines have anticancer properties. In efforts to find active analogues, we designed and synthesized eight polycyclic heterocycles with a pyrimido[1”,2”:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline framework (IND series). The compounds were evaluated for activity against colon (HCT-116 and S1-MI-80), prostate (PC3 and DU-145), breast (MCF-7 and MDAMB-231), ovarian (ov2008 and A2780), and hepatocellular (HepG2) cancer cells and against non-cancerous Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK), mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH/3T3), and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293). IND-2, a 4-chloro-2-methyl pyrimido[1”,2”:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline, exhibited more than tenfold selectivity and potent cytotoxic activity against colon cancer cells relative to the other cancer and non-cancer cells. With five additional colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, HCT-15, LS-180, LS-174, and LoVo), IND-2 had similar cytotoxicity and selectivity, and submicromolar concentrations caused changes in the morphology of HCT-116 and HCT-15 cells. IND-2 did not activate the transactivating function of the pregnane X receptor (PXR), indicating that it does not induce PXR-regulated ABCB1 or ABCG2 transporters. Indeed, IND-2 was not a substrate of ABCB1 or ABCG2, and it induced cytotoxicity in HEK293 cells overexpressing ABCB1 or ABCG2 to the same extent as in normal HEK293 cells. IND-2 was cytotoxic to resistant colon carcinoma S1-MI-80 cells, approximately three- and fivefold more than SN-38 and topotecan, respectively. In HCT-116 colon cancer cells, IND-2 produced concentration-dependent changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, leading to apoptosis, and sub-micromolar concentrations caused chromosomal DNA fragmentation. These findings suggest that, by increasing apoptosis, IND-2 has potential therapeutic efficacy for colorectal cancer. PMID:25537531

  12. IND-2, a pyrimido[1″,2″:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline derivative, circumvents multi-drug resistance and causes apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Lee, Crystal; Moore, Joshua; Mittal, Roopali; Suswam, Esther A; Abbott, Kodye L; Pondugula, Satyanarayana R; Manne, Upender; Narayanan, Narayanan K; Trivedi, Piyush; Tiwari, Amit K

    2015-02-01

    Naturally occurring condensed quinolines have anticancer properties. In efforts to find active analogues, we designed and synthesized eight polycyclic heterocycles with a pyrimido[1″,2″:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline framework (IND series). The compounds were evaluated for activity against colon (HCT-116 and S1-MI-80), prostate (PC3 and DU-145), breast (MCF-7 and MDAMB-231), ovarian (ov2008 and A2780), and hepatocellular (HepG2) cancer cells and against non-cancerous Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK), mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH/3T3), and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293). IND-2, a 4-chloro-2-methyl pyrimido[1″,2″:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline, exhibited more than ten-fold selectivity and potent cytotoxic activity against colon cancer cells relative to the other cancer and non-cancer cells. With five additional colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, HCT-15, LS-180, LS-174, and LoVo), IND-2 had similar cytotoxicity and selectivity, and sub-micromolar concentrations caused changes in the morphology of HCT-116 and HCT-15 cells. IND-2 did not activate the transactivating function of the pregnane X receptor (PXR), indicating that it does not induce PXR-regulated ABCB1 or ABCG2 transporters. Indeed, IND-2 was not a substrate of ABCB1 or ABCG2, and it induced cytotoxicity in HEK293 cells overexpressing ABCB1 or ABCG2 to the same extent as in normal HEK293 cells. IND-2 was cytotoxic to resistant colon carcinoma S1-MI-80 cells, approximately three- and five-fold more than SN-38 and topotecan, respectively. In HCT-116 colon cancer cells, IND-2 produced concentration-dependent changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, leading to apoptosis, and sub-micromolar concentrations caused chromosomal DNA fragmentation. These findings suggest that, by increasing apoptosis, IND-2 has potential therapeutic efficacy for colorectal cancer.

  13. An Autocrine Cytokine/JAK/STAT-Signaling Induces Kynurenine Synthesis in Multidrug Resistant Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Campia, Ivana; Buondonno, Ilaria; Castella, Barbara; Rolando, Barbara; Kopecka, Joanna; Gazzano, Elena; Ghigo, Dario; Riganti, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistant cancer cells are hard to eradicate for the inefficacy of conventional anticancer drugs. Besides escaping the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy, they also bypass the pro-immunogenic effects induced by anticancer drugs: indeed they are not well recognized by host dendritic cells and do not elicit a durable anti-tumor immunity. It has not yet been investigated whether multidrug resistant cells have a different ability to induce immunosuppression than chemosensitive ones. We addressed this issue in human and murine chemosensitive and multidrug resistant cancer cells. Results We found that the activity and expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1), which catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan into the immunosuppressive metabolite kynurenine, was higher in all the multidrug resistant cells analyzed and that IDO1 inhibition reduced the growth of drug-resistant tumors in immunocompetent animals. In chemoresistant cells the basal activity of JAK1/STAT1 and JAK1/STAT3 signaling was higher, the STAT3 inhibitor PIAS3 was down-regulated, and the autocrine production of STAT3-target and IDO1-inducers cytokines IL-6, IL-4, IL-1β, IL-13, TNF-α and CD40L, was increased. The disruption of the JAK/STAT signaling lowered the IDO1 activity and reversed the kynurenine-induced pro-immunosuppressive effects, as revealed by the restored proliferation of T-lymphocytes in STAT-silenced chemoresistant cells. Conclusions Our work shows that multidrug resistant cells have a stronger immunosuppressive attitude than chemosensitive cells, due to the constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT/IDO1 axis, thus resulting chemo- and immune-evasive. Disrupting this axis may significantly improve the efficacy of chemo-immunotherapy protocols against resistant tumors. PMID:25955018

  14. Multidrug Resistant CTX-M-Producing Escherichia coli: A Growing Threat among HIV Patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Padmavathy, Kesavaram; Padma, Krishnan; Rajasekaran, Sikhamani

    2016-01-01

    Extended Spectrum β-Lactamases (ESBLs) confer resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and CTX-M types have emerged as the most prominent ESBLs worldwide. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of CTX-M positive ESBL-producing urinary E. coli isolates from HIV patients and to establish the association of multidrug resistance, phylogeny, and virulence profile with CTX-M production. A total of 57 ESBL producers identified among 76 E. coli strains isolated from HIV patients from South India were screened for blaCTX-M, AmpC production, multidrug resistance, and nine virulence associated genes (VAGs), fimH, pap, afa/dra, sfa/foc, iutA, fyuA, iroN, usp, and kpsMII. The majority (70.2%) of the ESBL producers harbored blaCTX-M and were AmpC coproducers. Among the CTX-M producers, 47.5% were found to be UPEC, 10% harbored as many as 7 VAGs, and 45% possessed kpsMII. Multidrug resistance (CIPRSXTRGENR) was significantly more common among the CTX-M producers compared to the nonproducers (70% versus 41.2%). However, 71.4% of the multidrug resistant CTX-M producers exhibited susceptibility to nitrofurantoin thereby making it an effective alternative to cephalosporins/fluoroquinolones. The emergence of CTX-M-producing highly virulent, multidrug resistant uropathogenic E. coli is of significant public health concern in countries like India with a high burden of HIV/AIDS. PMID:27123344

  15. Inhibition of the multidrug efflux pump LmrS from Staphylococcus aureus by cumin spice Cuminum cyminum.

    PubMed

    Kakarla, Prathusha; Floyd, Jared; Mukherjee, MunMun; Devireddy, Amith R; Inupakutika, Madhuri A; Ranweera, Indrika; Kc, Ranjana; 'Shrestha, Ugina; Cheeti, Upender Rao; Willmon, Thomas Mark; Adams, Jaclyn; Bruns, Merissa; Gunda, Shravan Kumar; Varela, Manuel F

    2017-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a serious causative agent of infectious disease. Multidrug-resistant strains like methicillin-resistant S. aureus compromise treatment efficacy, causing significant morbidity and mortality. Active efflux represents a major antimicrobial resistance mechanism. The proton-driven multidrug efflux pump, LmrS, actively exports structurally distinct antimicrobials. To circumvent resistance and restore clinical efficacy of antibiotics, efflux pump inhibitors are necessary, and natural edible spices like cumin are potential candidates. The mode of cumin antibacterial action and underlying mechanisms behind drug resistance inhibition, however, are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that cumin inhibits LmrS drug transport. We found that cumin inhibited bacterial growth and LmrS ethidium transport in a dosage-dependent manner. We demonstrate that cumin is antibacterial toward a multidrug-resistant host and that resistance modulation involves multidrug efflux inhibition.

  16. Characterization of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli by antimicrobial resistance profiles, plasmid replicon typing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aim: Plasmid characterization has particular clinical importance because genes encoding significant traits including antimicrobial resistance are frequently carried on plasmids. The objective of this study was to examine the distribution of multidrug resistance (MDR) in Escherichia coli in relation ...

  17. Functional cyclic AMP response element in the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) promoter modulates epidermal growth factor receptor pathway- or androgen withdrawal-mediated BCRP/ABCG2 transcription in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Natarajan, Karthika; Safren, Lowell; Hamburger, Anne W; Hussain, Arif; Ross, Douglas D

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorylated cyclic-AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (p-CREB) is a downstream effector of a variety of important signaling pathways. We investigated whether the human BCRP promoter contains a functional cAMP response element (CRE). 8Br-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased the activity of a BCRP promoter reporter construct and BCRP mRNA in human carcinoma cells. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway activation also led to an increase in p-CREB and in BCRP promoter reporter activity via two major downstream EGFR signaling pathways: the phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT, ERK and CREB, while simultaneously enhancing BCRP mRNA and functional protein expression. EGF-stimulated CREB phosphorylation and BCRP induction were diminished by inhibition of EGFR, PI3K/AKT or RAS/MAPK signaling. CREB silencing using RNA interference reduced basal levels of BCRP mRNA and diminished the induction of BCRP by EGF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that a putative CRE site on the BCRP promoter bound p-CREB by a point mutation of the CRE site abolished EGF-induced stimulation of BCRP promoter reporter activity. Furthermore, the CREB co-activator, cAMP-regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC2), is involved in CREB-mediated BCRP transcription: androgen depletion of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells increased both CREB phosphorylation and CRTC2 nuclear translocation, and enhanced BCRP expression. Silencing CREB or CRTC2 reduced basal BCRP expression and BCRP induction under androgen-depletion conditions. This novel CRE site plays a central role in mediating BCRP gene expression in several human cancer cell lines following activation of multiple cancer-relevant signaling pathways.

  18. Most drugs that reverse multidrug resistance also inhibit photoaffinity labeling of P-glycoprotein by a vinblastine analog

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, S.; Cornwell, M.M.; Kuwano, M.; Pastan, I.; Gottesman, M.M.

    1988-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant human KB carcinoma cells express a 170,000-dalton membrane glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) that can be photoaffinity labeled with the vinblastine analog N-(p-azido-(3-/sup 125/I)salicyl)-N'-(beta-aminoethyl)vindesine. Several agents that suppress the multidrug-resistant phenotype, including N-solanesyl-N,N'-bis(3,4-dimethylbenzyl)ethylenediamine, cepharanthine, quinidine, and reserpine, were found to inhibit photolabeling of P-glycoprotein at doses comparable to those that reverse multidrug resistance. However, the phenothiazines chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine, which also effectively reverse multidrug resistance, were poor inhibitors of the photoaffinity labeling of P-glycoprotein. Chloroquine, propranolol, or atropine, which only partially reversed the drug resistance, also did not inhibit photolabeling. Naphthalene sulfonamide calmodulin inhibitors, W7 and W5, as well as many other drugs that did not circumvent multidrug resistance, did not inhibit photolabeling. These studies suggest that most, but not all, agents that phenotypically suppress multidrug resistance also inhibit drug binding to a site on P-glycoprotein with which a photoaffinity analog of vinblastine interacts.

  19. A therapeutic delivery system for chronic osteomyelitis via a multi-drug implant based on three-dimensional printing technology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weigang; Ye, Chenyi; Zheng, Qixin; Wu, Gui; Cheng, Zhaohui

    2016-08-01

    Chronic osteomyelitis is difficult to be cured and often relapses, which presents to be a great challenge to clinicians. We conducted this original study to explore the efficiency of therapeutic alliance for chronic osteomyelitis by a multi-drug implant based on three-dimensional printing technology. We designed and fabricated preciously a multi-drug implant with a multi-layered concentric cylinder construction by three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. Levofloxacin and tobramycin were incorporated into the drug implant in a specific sequence. The drug release property of the drug implant was assayed in vitro We also developed an animal model of chronic osteomyelitis to estimate the effect of the 3D printed multi-drug implant. The results showed that the multi-drug implant had a sustained and programmed drug release property. Levofloxacin and tobramycin which were released from the multi-drug implant worked in tandem to enhance pharmacodynamic action which was similar to a tumor chemotherapy program and were sufficient to treat chronic osteomyelitis. These findings imply that the administration of 3D printed multi-drug implant would be a potential therapeutic method for chronic osteomyelitis. Further studies are required.

  20. What do proton motive force driven multidrug resistance transporters have in common?

    PubMed

    Mazurkiewicz, Piotr; Driessen, Arnold J M; Konings, Wil N

    2005-01-01

    The extensive progress of genome sequencing projects in recent years has demonstrated that multidrug resistance (MDR) transporters are widely spread among all domains of life. This indicates that they play crucial roles in the survival of organisms. Moreover, antibiotic and chemotherapeutic treatments have revealed that microorganisms and cancer cells may use MDR transporters to fight the cytotoxic action of drugs. Currently, several MDR extrusion systems are being investigated in detail. It is expected that understanding of the molecular basis of multidrug recognition and the transport mechanisms will allow a more rational design of new drugs which either will not be recognized and expelled by or will efficiently inhibit the activity of the MDR transporters. MDR transporters either utilize ATP hydrolysis or an ion motive force as an energy source to drive drugs out of the cell. This review summarizes the recent progress in the field of bacterial proton motive force driven MDR transporters.

  1. Management of multidrug-resistant TB: novel treatments and their expansion to low resource settings.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Derek J; Lewis, Joseph M

    2016-03-01

    Despite overall progress in global TB control, the rising burden of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) threatens to undermine efforts to end the worldwide epidemic. Of the 27 countries classified as high burden for MDR-TB, 17 are in 'low' or 'low-middle' income countries. Shorter, all oral and less toxic multidrug combinations are required to improve treatment outcomes in these settings. Suitability for safe co-administration with HIV drugs is also desirable. A range of strategies and several new drugs (including bedaquiline, delamanid and linezolid) are currently undergoing advanced clinical evaluations to define their roles in achieving these aims. However, several clinical questions and logistical challenges need to be overcome before these new MDR-TB treatments fulfil their potential.

  2. Induction of Multidrug Tolerance in Plasmodium falciparum by Extended Artemisinin Pressure.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Sandie; Ben Haddou, Tanila; Ramadani, Arba Pramundita; Ariey, Frédéric; Iriart, Xavier; Beghain, Johann; Bouchier, Christiane; Witkowski, Benoit; Berry, Antoine; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Benoit-Vical, Françoise

    2015-10-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in Southeast Asia threatens global malaria control strategies. Whether delayed parasite clearance, which exposes larger parasite numbers to artemisinins for longer times, selects higher-grade resistance remains unexplored. We investigated whether long-lasting artemisinin pressure selects a novel multidrug-tolerance profile. Although 50% inhibitory concentrations for 10 antimalarial drugs tested were unchanged, drug-tolerant parasites showed higher recrudescence rates for endoperoxides, quinolones, and an antifolate, including partner drugs of recommended combination therapies, but remained susceptible to atovaquone. Moreover, the age range of intraerythrocytic stages able to resist artemisinin was extended to older ring forms and trophozoites. Multidrug tolerance results from drug-induced quiescence, which enables parasites to survive exposure to unrelated antimalarial drugs that inhibit a variety of metabolic pathways. This novel resistance pattern should be urgently monitored in the field because this pattern is not detected by current assays and represents a major threat to antimalarial drug policy.

  3. Antibiotic resistance determinants of a group of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in China.

    PubMed

    Xiao-Min, Xu; You-Fen, Fan; Wei-Yun, Feng; Zu-Huang, Mi; Xing-Bei, Weng

    2014-06-01

    A group of Acinetobacter baumannii confers multidrug resistance, but the molecular epidemiology and multidrug resistance mechanisms are poorly understood. Nineteen isolates were identified, and the antimicrobial susceptibility profile was determined using the disc diffusion method. Then, PCR of 78 kinds of resistance-associated genes were performed. A novel variant of blaADC gene: blaADC-67 gene (Genbank accession No. JX169789) was prevalent in all 19 isolates. Moreover, ISAba1 could also provide strong promoter to upregulate the expression of blaADC67 to confer resistance to beta-lactam. This is the first report of emergence of blaADC-67 in A. baumannii worldwide, which might confer resistance to beta-lactam.

  4. Antimicrobial Organometallic Dendrimers with Tunable Activity against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abd-El-Aziz, Alaa S; Agatemor, Christian; Etkin, Nola; Overy, David P; Lanteigne, Martin; McQuillan, Katherine; Kerr, Russell G

    2015-11-09

    Multidrug-resistant pathogens are an increasing threat to public health. In an effort to curb the virulence of these pathogens, new antimicrobial agents are sought. Here we report a new class of antimicrobial organometallic dendrimers with tunable activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria that included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Mechanistically, these redox-active, cationic organometallic dendrimers induced oxidative stress on bacteria and also disrupted the microbial cell membrane. The minimum inhibitory concentrations, which provide a quantitative measure of the antimicrobial activity of these dendrimers, were in the low micromolar range. AlamarBlue cell viability assay also confirms the antimicrobial activity of these dendrimers. Interestingly, these dendrimers were noncytotoxic to epidermal cell lines and to mammalian red blood cells, making them potential antimicrobial platforms for topical applications.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a bacteriophage phiEap-2 infecting multidrug resistant Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Erna; Wei, Xiao; Ma, Yanyan; Yin, Zhe; Li, Huan; Lin, Weishi; Wang, Xuesong; Li, Chao; Shen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Ruixiang; Yang, Huiying; Jiang, Aimin; Yang, Wenhui; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Xiangna

    2016-06-20

    Enterobacter aerogenes (Enterobacteriaceae) is an important opportunistic pathogen that causes hospital-acquired pneumonia, bacteremia, and urinary tract infections. Recently, multidrug-resistant E. aerogenes have been a public health problem. To develop an effective antimicrobial agent, bacteriophage phiEap-2 was isolated from sewage and its genome was sequenced because of its ability to lyse the multidrug-resistant clinical E. aerogenes strain 3-SP. Morphological observations suggested that the phage belongs to the Siphoviridae family. Comparative genome analysis revealed that phage phiEap-2 is related to the Salmonella phage FSL SP-031 (KC139518). All of the structural gene products (except capsid protein) encoded by phiEap-2 had orthologous gene products in FSL SP-031 and Serratia phage Eta (KC460990). Here, we report the complete genome sequence of phiEap-2 and major findings from the genomic analysis. Knowledge of this phage might be helpful for developing therapeutic strategies against E. aerogenes.

  6. Molecular mechanism of ATP-dependent solute transport by multidrug resistance-associated protein 1.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiu-bao

    2010-01-01

    Millions of new cancer patients are diagnosed each year and over half of these patients die from this devastating disease. Thus, cancer causes a major public health problem worldwide. Chemotherapy remains the principal mode to treat many metastatic cancers. However, occurrence of cellular multidrug resistance (MDR) prevents efficient killing of cancer cells, leading to chemotherapeutic treatment failure. Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters, such as P-glycoprotein, breast cancer resistance protein and/or multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), confers an acquired MDR due to their capabilities of transporting a broad range of chemically diverse anticancer drugs across the cell membrane barrier. In this review, the molecular mechanism of ATP-dependent solute transport by MRP1 will be addressed.

  7. Reversal of ABC drug transporter-mediated multidrug resistance in cancer cells: Evaluation of current strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chung-Pu; Calcagno, Anna Maria; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2008-01-01

    Overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters that actively efflux a variety of amphipathic compounds can cause multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells, which is a major obstacle in the success of cancer chemotherapy. The development of synthetic small molecule compounds or the identification of natural products that block ABC transporter-mediated efflux has been the conventional approach used to combat MDR. The strategy of using chemosensitizers, however, has not been successful in clinical cancer chemotherapy. Therefore, alternative approaches to identify or to synthesize compounds that can induce selective toxicity in cancer cells overexpressing one or more ABC transporters have been undertaken. This review summarizes the recent advances in identifying strategies to restore sensitivity to chemotherapeutics in multidrug resistant cancer cells. PMID:19079736

  8. Antimicrobial metallopolymers and their bioconjugates with conventional antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiuyang; Chen, Yung Pin; Miller, Kristen P; Ganewatta, Mitra S; Bam, Marpe; Yan, Yi; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Decho, Alan W; Tang, Chuanbing

    2014-04-02

    Bacteria are now becoming more resistant to most conventional antibiotics. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a complex of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial strains, has proven especially problematic in both hospital and community settings by deactivating conventional β-lactam antibiotics, including penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems, through various mechanisms, resulting in increased mortality rates and hospitalization costs. Here we introduce a class of charged metallopolymers that exhibit synergistic effects against MRSA by efficiently inhibiting activity of β-lactamase and effectively lysing bacterial cells. Various conventional β-lactam antibiotics, including penicillin-G, amoxicillin, ampicillin, and cefazolin, are protected from β-lactamase hydrolysis via the formation of unique ion-pairs between their carboxylate anions and cationic cobaltocenium moieties. These discoveries could provide a new pathway for designing macromolecular scaffolds to regenerate vitality of conventional antibiotics to kill multidrug-resistant bacteria and superbugs.

  9. [Antimicrobial therapy in severe infections with multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterias].

    PubMed

    Duszyńska, Wiesława

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria pose a serious and rapidly emerging threat to patients in healthcare settings, and are especially prevalent and problematic in intensive therapy units. Recently, the emergence of pandrug-resistance in Gram-negative bacteria poses additional concerns. This review examines the clinical impact and epidemiology of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria as a cause of increased morbidity and mortality among ITU patients. Beta-lactamases, cephalosporinases and carbapenemases play the most important role in resistance to antibiotics. Despite the tendency to increased resistance, carbapenems administered by continuous infusion remain the most effective drugs in severe sepsis. Drug concentration monitoring, albeit rarely used in practice, is necessary to ensure an effective therapeutic effect.

  10. Management of multidrug-resistant TB: novel treatments and their expansion to low resource settings

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Derek J.; Lewis, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite overall progress in global TB control, the rising burden of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) threatens to undermine efforts to end the worldwide epidemic. Of the 27 countries classified as high burden for MDR-TB, 17 are in ‘low’ or ‘low–middle’ income countries. Shorter, all oral and less toxic multidrug combinations are required to improve treatment outcomes in these settings. Suitability for safe co-administration with HIV drugs is also desirable. A range of strategies and several new drugs (including bedaquiline, delamanid and linezolid) are currently undergoing advanced clinical evaluations to define their roles in achieving these aims. However, several clinical questions and logistical challenges need to be overcome before these new MDR-TB treatments fulfil their potential. PMID:26884496

  11. The dissemination of multidrug-resistant Enterobacter cloacae throughout the UK and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Moradigaravand, Danesh; Reuter, Sandra; Martin, Veronique; Peacock, Sharon J; Parkhill, Julian

    2016-09-26

    Enterobacter cloacae is a clinically important Gram-negative member of the Enterobacteriaceae, which has increasingly been recognized as a major pathogen in nosocomial infections. Despite this, knowledge about the population structure and the distribution of virulence factors and antibiotic-resistance determinants of this species is scarce. In this study, we analysed a systematic collection of multidrug-resistant E. cloacae isolated between 2001 and 2011 from bloodstream infections across hospitals in the UK and Ireland. We found that the population is characterized by the presence of multiple clones formed at widely different time periods in the past. The clones exhibit a high degree of geographical heterogeneity, which indicates extensive dissemination of these E. cloacae clones across the UK and Ireland. These findings suggest that a diverse, community-based, commensal population underlies multidrug-resistant E. cloacae infections within hospitals.

  12. Induction of Multidrug Tolerance in Plasmodium falciparum by Extended Artemisinin Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Sandie; Ben Haddou, Tanila; Ramadani, Arba Pramundita; Ariey, Frédéric; Iriart, Xavier; Beghain, Johann; Bouchier, Christiane; Witkowski, Benoit; Berry, Antoine; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in Southeast Asia threatens global malaria control strategies. Whether delayed parasite clearance, which exposes larger parasite numbers to artemisinins for longer times, selects higher-grade resistance remains unexplored. We investigated whether long-lasting artemisinin pressure selects a novel multidrug-tolerance profile. Although 50% inhibitory concentrations for 10 antimalarial drugs tested were unchanged, drug-tolerant parasites showed higher recrudescence rates for endoperoxides, quinolones, and an antifolate, including partner drugs of recommended combination therapies, but remained susceptible to atovaquone. Moreover, the age range of intraerythrocytic stages able to resist artemisinin was extended to older ring forms and trophozoites. Multidrug tolerance results from drug-induced quiescence, which enables parasites to survive exposure to unrelated antimalarial drugs that inhibit a variety of metabolic pathways. This novel resistance pattern should be urgently monitored in the field because this pattern is not detected by current assays and represents a major threat to antimalarial drug policy. PMID:26401601

  13. Fructose restores susceptibility of multidrug-resistant Edwardsiella tarda to kanamycin.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-bin; Peng, Bo; Han, Yi; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2015-03-06

    Edwardsiella tarda, the causative agent of Edwardsiellosis, imposes medical challenges in both the clinic and aquaculture. The emergence of multidrug resistant strains makes antibiotic treatment impractical. The identification of molecules that facilitate or promote antibiotic efficacy is in high demand. In the present study, we aimed to identify small molecules whose abundance is correlated with kanamycin resistance in E. tarda by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We found that the abundance of fructose was greatly suppressed in kanamycin-resistant strains. The incubation of kanamycin-resistant bacteria with exogenous fructose sensitized the bacteria to kanamycin. Moreover, the fructose also functioned in bacteria persisters and biofilm. The synergistic effects of fructose and kanamycin were validated in a mouse model. Furthermore, the mechanism relies on fructose in activating TCA cycle to produce NADH, which generates proton motive force to increase the uptake of the antibiotics. Therefore, we present a novel approach in fighting against multidrug resistant bacteria through exploration of antibiotic-suppressed molecules.

  14. Ribosomal mutations promote the evolution of antibiotic resistance in a multidrug environment.

    PubMed

    Gomez, James E; Kaufmann-Malaga, Benjamin B; Wivagg, Carl N; Kim, Peter B; Silvis, Melanie R; Renedo, Nikolai; Ioerger, Thomas R; Ahmad, Rushdy; Livny, Jonathan; Fishbein, Skye; Sacchettini, James C; Carr, Steven A; Hung, Deborah T

    2017-02-21

    Antibiotic resistance arising via chromosomal mutations is typically specific to a particular antibiotic or class of antibiotics. We have identified mutations in genes encoding ribosomal components in Mycobacterium smegmatis that confer resistance to several structurally and mechanistically unrelated classes of antibiotics and enhance survival following heat shock and membrane stress. These mutations affect ribosome assembly and cause large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic changes, including the downregulation of the catalase KatG, an activating enzyme required for isoniazid sensitivity, and upregulation of WhiB7, a transcription factor involved in innate antibiotic resistance. Importantly, while these ribosomal mutations have a fitness cost in antibiotic-free medium, in a multidrug environment they promote the evolution of high-level, target-based resistance. Further, suppressor mutations can then be easily acquired to restore wild-type growth. Thus, ribosomal mutations can serve as stepping-stones in an evolutionary path leading to the emergence of high-level, multidrug resistance.

  15. Interview as intervention: the case of young adult multidrug users in the club scene.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Steven P; Surratt, Hilary L; Buttram, Mance E; Levi-Minzi, Maria A; Chen, Minxing

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on changes in substance use and substance dependence symptoms-without intervention-among young adult multidrug users in the club scene, ages 18-29, (N = 444) who participated in a natural history study. Computer-assisted personal interviews at baseline and 6-, 12-, and 18-month follow-ups included well-tested measures of substance use and dependence. Changes in substance dependence symptoms and drug use frequencies were calculated using Cohen's d statistic. Mean age was 22; 40% were female; 58% were Hispanic, 17% White, and 21% Black. At 18-month follow-up assessment, participants reported significantly fewer days of cocaine (d = -.85 at 18 months), ecstasy (d = -.93), benzodiazepine (d = -.82), and prescription opioid (d = -.81) use, as well as reduced substance dependence symptoms (d = -.42). These results, together with data from focus groups with completers, suggest that comprehensive health and social risk assessments may have quite strong intervention effects among young adult multidrug users.

  16. Severe infection with multidrug-resistant Salmonella choleraesuis in a young patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Ferstl, Philip G; Reinheimer, Claudia; Jozsa, Katalin; Zeuzem, Stefan; Kempf, Volkhard AJ; Waidmann, Oliver; Grammatikos, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    Massive global spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella spp. expressing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and additional resistance to fluoroquinolones has often been attributed to high international mobility as well as excessive use of oral antibiotics in livestock farming. However, MDR Salmonella spp. have not been mentioned as a widespread pathogen in clinical settings so far. We demonstrate the case of a 25-year-old male with primary sclerosing cholangitis who tested positive for MDR Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis expressing ESBL and fluoroquinolone resistance. The pathogen was supposedly acquired during a trip to Thailand, causing severe fever, cholangitis and pancreatitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis in Europe expressing such a multidrug resistance pattern. ESBL resistance of Salmonella enterica spp. should be considered in patients with obstructive biliary tract pathology and travel history in endemic countries. PMID:28373776

  17. Isolation and characterization of a bacteriophage phiEap-2 infecting multidrug resistant Enterobacter aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Erna; Wei, Xiao; Ma, Yanyan; Yin, Zhe; Li, Huan; Lin, Weishi; Wang, Xuesong; Li, Chao; Shen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Ruixiang; Yang, Huiying; Jiang, Aimin; Yang, Wenhui; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Xiangna

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes (Enterobacteriaceae) is an important opportunistic pathogen that causes hospital-acquired pneumonia, bacteremia, and urinary tract infections. Recently, multidrug-resistant E. aerogenes have been a public health problem. To develop an effective antimicrobial agent, bacteriophage phiEap-2 was isolated from sewage and its genome was sequenced because of its ability to lyse the multidrug-resistant clinical E. aerogenes strain 3-SP. Morphological observations suggested that the phage belongs to the Siphoviridae family. Comparative genome analysis revealed that phage phiEap-2 is related to the Salmonella phage FSL SP-031 (KC139518). All of the structural gene products (except capsid protein) encoded by phiEap-2 had orthologous gene products in FSL SP-031 and Serratia phage Eta (KC460990). Here, we report the complete genome sequence of phiEap-2 and major findings from the genomic analysis. Knowledge of this phage might be helpful for developing therapeutic strategies against E. aerogenes. PMID:27320081

  18. Molecular modeling of the human multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1)

    SciTech Connect

    DeGorter, Marianne K.; Conseil, Gwenaelle; Deeley, Roger G.; Campbell, Robert L.; Cole, Susan P.C.

    2008-01-04

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a 190 kDa member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transmembrane transporters that is clinically relevant for its ability to confer multidrug resistance by actively effluxing anticancer drugs. Knowledge of the atomic structure of MRP1 is needed to elucidate its transport mechanism, but only low resolution structural data are currently available. Consequently, comparative modeling has been used to generate models of human MRP1 based on the crystal structure of the ABC transporter Sav1866 from Staphylococcus aureus. In these Sav1866-based models, the arrangement of transmembrane helices differs strikingly from earlier models of MRP1 based on the structure of the bacterial lipid transporter MsbA, both with respect to packing of the twelve helices and their interactions with the nucleotide binding domains. The functional importance of Tyr{sup 324} in transmembrane helix 6 predicted to project into the substrate translocation pathway was investigated.

  19. IMP3 protein promotes chemoresistance in breast cancer cells by regulating breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) expression.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sanjoy; Pursell, Bryan; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-05-03

    IMP3, a member of a family of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNA-binding proteins (IMPs), is expressed preferentially in triple-negative breast cancers, which are resistant to many chemotherapeutics. However, the mechanisms by which it impacts breast cancer have not been elucidated. We hypothesized a role for IMP3 in chemoresistance based on these observations. Depletion of IMP3 expression in triple-negative breast cancer cells increased their sensitivity to doxorubicin and mitoxantrone significantly but not to taxol. Given that doxorubicin and mitoxantrone are effluxed by breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), we assessed whether IMP3 regulates BCRP. The data obtained demonstrate that IMP3 binds to BCRP mRNA and regulates BCRP expression. These findings are significant because they provide insight into the mechanism by which IMP3 contributes to aggressive cancers, and they highlight the potential for targeting this mRNA-binding protein for the clinical management of cancer.

  20. Role of OmpA in the Multidrug Resistance Phenotype of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Fàbrega, Anna; Roca, Ignasi; Sánchez-Encinales, Viviana; Vila, Jordi; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a nosocomial pathogen with an increased prevalence of multidrug-resistant strains. The role of the outer membrane protein A (OmpA) in antimicrobial resistance remains poorly understood. In this report, disruption of the ompA gene led to decreased MICs of chloramphenicol, aztreonam, and nalidixic acid. We have characterized, for the first time, the contribution of OmpA in the antimicrobial resistance phenotype of A. baumannii. PMID:24379205

  1. Thermotolerance and multidrug resistance in bacteria isolated from equids and their environment.

    PubMed

    Singh, B R

    2009-06-13

    Sixty-nine vaginal swabs and 138 rectal swabs collected from 195 equids were analysed for the presence of thermotolerant bacteria, that is, bacteria surviving at 60+/-0.1 degrees C for one hour. Thermotolerant Escherichia coli, Enterobacter species, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus species and Pseudomonas species were isolated from 41, 16, nine, three and three of the 138 rectal swabs, respectively; seven of the E coli and two of the Enterobacter species isolates survived pasteurisation at 63.8+/-0.1 degrees C for 30 minutes. All except three E coli, two Enterobacter species and one Proteus species isolate were resistant to three or more antimicrobial drugs, that is, they were multidrug resistant. Thermotolerant E coli, Enterobacter species and Proteus species were isolated from 11, two and two of the 69 vaginal swabs, respectively, but only one isolate of E coli survived pasteurisation at 63.8+/-0.1 degrees C for 30 minutes. All except two of the E coli isolates were multidrug resistant. None of the four thermotolerant isolates from nine soil samples collected on four of the farms where the equids were kept was pasteurisation resistant, but they were all multidrug resistant. Of the 10 pasteurisation-resistant isolates, nine were multidrug resistant but none was resistant to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, cotrimazine, cotrimoxazole or streptomycin. All the isolates grew at 42+/-0.1 degrees C but none grew at 46+/-0.1 degrees C or above. The Enterobacter isolates were more tolerant to pasteurisation than the E coli isolates, particularly during the first few minutes of exposure.

  2. IMPACT OF SEPSIS CLASSIFICATION AND MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE STATUS ON OUTCOME AMONG PATIENTS TREATED WITH APPROPRIATE THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Jason P.; Lane, Michael A.; Kollef, Marin H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of sepsis classification and multidrug resistance status on outcome in patients receiving appropriate initial antibiotic therapy. Design A retrospective cohort study. Setting Barnes-Jewish Hospital, a 1250-bed teaching hospital. Patients Individuals with Enterobacteriaceae sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock that received appropriate initial antimicrobial therapy between June 2009 and December 2013. Interventions Clinical outcomes were compared according to multidrug resistance status, sepsis classification, demographics, severity of illness, comorbidities, and antimicrobial treatment. Measurements and Main Results We identified 510 patients with Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia and sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock. Sixty-seven patients (13.1%) were non-survivors. Mortality increased significantly with increasing severity of sepsis (3.5%, 9.9%, and 28.6%, for sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock, respectively, p<0.05). Time to antimicrobial therapy was not significantly associated with outcome. APACHE II was more predictive of mortality than age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index. Multidrug resistance status did not result in excess mortality. Length of intensive care unit and hospital stay increased with more severe sepsis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, African-American race, sepsis severity, APACHE II score, solid organ cancer, cirrhosis, and transfer from an outside hospital were all predictors of mortality. Conclusions Our results support sepsis severity, but not multidrug resistance status as being an important predictor of death when all patients receive appropriate initial antibiotic therapy. Future sepsis trials should attempt to provide appropriate antimicrobial therapy and take sepsis severity into careful account when determining outcomes. PMID:25855900

  3. Molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Shigella spp. of food origin.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ashraf M; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2015-02-02

    Shigella spp. are the causative agents of food-borne shigellosis, an acute enteric infection. The emergence of multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Shigella presents an increasing challenge for clinicians in the treatment of shigellosis. Several studies worldwide have characterized the molecular basis of antibiotic resistance in clinical Shigella isolates of human origin, however, to date, no such characterization has been reported for Shigella spp. of food origin. In this study, we characterized the genetic basis of multidrug resistance in Shigella spp. isolated from 1600 food samples (800 meat products and 800 dairy products) collected from different street venders, butchers, retail markets, and slaughterhouses in Egypt. Twenty-four out of 27 Shigella isolates (88.9%) showed multidrug resistance phenotypes to at least three classes of antimicrobials. The multidrug-resistant Shigella spp. were as follows: Shigella flexneri (66.7%), Shigella sonnei (18.5%), and Shigella dysenteriae (3.7%). The highest resistance was to streptomycin (100.0%), then to kanamycin (95.8%), nalidixic acid (95.8%), tetracycline (95.8%), spectinomycin (93.6%), ampicillin (87.5%), and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (87.5%). PCR and DNA sequencing were used to screen and characterize integrons and antibiotic resistance genes. Our results indicated that 11.1% and 74.1% of isolates were positive for class 1 and class 2 integrons, respectively. Beta-lactamase-encoding genes were identified in 77.8% of isolates, and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes were identified in 44.4% of isolates. These data provide useful information to better understand the molecular basis of antimicrobial resistance in Shigella spp. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance in Shigella spp. isolated from food.

  4. A case of acute postoperative keratitis after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty by multidrug resistant Klebsiella

    PubMed Central

    Bajracharya, Leena; Sharma, Binita; Gurung, Reeta

    2015-01-01

    A healthy lady of 42 years underwent deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty for granular dystrophy. The very next day, it was complicated by development of infectious keratitis. The organism was identified as multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. Donor corneal button may be implicated in the transmission of infection in an otherwise uneventful surgery and follow-up. Nosocomial infections are usually severe, rapidly progressive and difficult to treat. Finally, the lady had to undergo therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty for complete resolution of infection. PMID:26044477

  5. Novel Bis-Indole Agents Active Against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Michael R.; Bajaksouzian, Saralee; Good, Caryn E.; Butler, Michelle M.; Williams, John D.; Peet, Norton P.; Bowlin, Terry L.; Endimiani, Andrea; Bonomo, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro activity of five novel Microbiotix bis-indole agents (MBXs) against 30 multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii (including 18 resistant to carbapenems) was evaluated. Overall, MIC90s ranged from 1-8 μg/ml, whereas those for imipenem were > 64 μg/ml. MBX 1196 was the most potent (MIC90 1 μg/ml). MBXs are compounds that are highly effective against MDR A. baumannii. PMID:21146724

  6. Multidrug-resistant Achromobacter animicus causing wound infection in a street child in Mwanza, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Moremi, Nyambura; Claus, Heike; Hingi, Marko; Vogel, Ulrich; Mshana, Stephen E

    2017-02-10

    Achromobacter animicus (A. animicus) is an aerobic, motile, gram-negative, non-fermenting small bacillus that can also grow anaerobically with potassium nitrate. It has been isolated from sputum of humans suffering from respiratory infections. Literature regarding the role of A. animicus in wound infections is limited. We report a first case of a chronic post-traumatic wound infection caused by a multidrug-resistant A. animicus in a street child from Africa and accompanied diagnostic challenges.

  7. Multiple Clones within Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium Phage Type DT104

    PubMed Central

    Markogiannakis, Antonis; Tassios, Panayotis T.; Lambiri, Maria; Ward, Linda R.; Kourea-Kremastinou, Jenny; Legakis, Nicholas J.; Vatopoulos, Alkiviadis C.

    2000-01-01

    Six distinct clones were present among Greek multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium phage type DT104, since isolates belonging to resistance phenotypes including the ACSSuT (ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides, and tetracycline) core could be distinguished with respect to their pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, int1 integron structures, and presence or absence of antibiotic resistance genes ant(3")-Ia, pse-1, and tem-1. PMID:10699039

  8. Increasing Incidence of Multidrug Resistance Among Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Bacterial Isolates.

    PubMed

    Rutter, W Cliff; Burgess, Donna R; Burgess, David S

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are common pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with increasing multidrug resistance (MDR). This study characterized antimicrobial susceptibility trends among organisms isolated from the respiratory tract of CF patients. Microbiological culture and sensitivity results for all CF patients were collected from January 2010 through December 2014. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were obtained using Phoenix(®) and Etest(®) methods. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines were used to remove duplicate isolates and develop antimicrobial susceptibility reports. MDR was defined as resistance to one agent in three or more antibiotic classes or oxacillin resistance in S. aureus. Overall, 542 bacterial isolates from 376 cultures were analyzed for trends. P. aeruginosa (41%), S. aureus (40%), and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (8%) were the most commonly isolated organisms. Multidrug-resistant organism isolation increased from 39% to 49% (r = 0.76, p = 0.13), while representing 47.6% of all isolates. Multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa incidence increased each year from 26% to 43% (r = 0.89, p = 0.046), while P. aeruginosa isolation decreased from 47% to 38% over the study period (r = -0.93, p = 0.02). MRSA accounted for 62.6% of all S. aureus isolated, while overall multidrug-resistant S. aureus incidence was 73.1% in all cultures. MDR among common pathogens in CF continues to increase. Empiric therapy for CF exacerbations should be targeted to previous antimicrobial susceptibility, and P. aeruginosa and S. aureus should be empirically covered.

  9. Directly observed treatment, short-course strategy and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: are any modifications required?

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, I.; Rigouts, L.; Van Deun, A.; Portaels, F.

    2000-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) should be defined as tuberculosis with resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampicin because these drugs are the cornerstone of short-course chemotherapy, and combined isoniazid and rifampicin resistance requires prolonged treatment with second-line agents. Short-course chemotherapy is a key ingredient in the tuberculosis control strategy known as directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS). For populations in which multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is endemic, the outcome of the standard short-course chemotherapy regimen remains uncertain. Unacceptable failure rates have been reported and resistance to additional agents may be induced. As a consequence there have been calls for well-functioning DOTS programmes to provide additional services in areas with high rates of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. These "DOTS-plus for MDRTB programmes" may need to modify all five elements of the DOTS strategy: the treatment may need to be individualized rather than standardized; laboratory services may need to provide facilities for on-site culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing; reliable supplies of a wide range of expensive second-line agents would have to be supplied; operational studies would be required to determine the indications for and format of the expanded programmes; financial and technical support from international organizations and Western governments would be needed in addition to that obtained from local governments. PMID:10743297

  10. Reducing the price of treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis through the Global Drug Facility

    PubMed Central

    Cordier-Lassalle, Thierry; Keravec, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Problem Many countries have limited experience of securing the best prices for drugs and have little negotiating power. This is particularly true for the complex, lengthy and expensive regimens used to treat multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Approach The Stop TB Partnership’s Global Drug Facility is dedicated to improving worldwide access to antituberculosis medicines and diagnostic techniques that meet international quality standards. Local setting The Global Drug Facility is able to secure price reductions through competitive tendering among prequalified drug manufacturers and by consolidating orders to achieve large purchase volumes. Consolidating the market in this way increases the incentives for suppliers of quality-assured medicines. Relevant changes In 2013 the Global Drug Facility reduced the price of the second-line drugs it supplies for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: the overall cost of the longest and most expensive treatment regimen for a patient decreased by 26% – from 7890 United States dollars (US$) in 2011 to US$ 5822 in 2013. Lessons learnt The price of treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis supplied by the Global Drug Facility was reduced by consolidating orders to achieve large purchase volumes, by international, competitive bidding and by the existence of donor-funded medicine stockpiles. The rise in the number of suppliers of internationally quality-assured drugs was also important. The savings achieved from lower drug costs could be used to increase the number of patients on high-quality treatment. PMID:26229192

  11. Transported Substrate Determines Exchange Rate in the Multidrug Resistance Transporter EmrE*

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Emma A.; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    EmrE, a small multidrug resistance transporter, serves as an ideal model to study coupling between multidrug recognition and protein function. EmrE has a single small binding pocket that must accommodate the full range of diverse substrates recognized by this transporter. We have studied a series of tetrahedral compounds, as well as several planar substrates, to examine multidrug recognition and transport by EmrE. Here we show that even within this limited series, the rate of interconversion between the inward- and outward-facing states of EmrE varies over 3 orders of magnitude. Thus, the identity of the bound substrate controls the rate of this critical step in the transport process. The binding affinity also varies over a similar range and is correlated with substrate hydrophobicity within the tetrahedral substrate series. Substrate identity influences both the ground-state and transition-state energies for the conformational exchange process, highlighting the coupling between substrate binding and transport required for alternating access antiport. PMID:24448799

  12. Resin glycosides from Ipomoea wolcottiana as modulators of the multidrug resistance phenotype in vitro.

    PubMed

    Corona-Castañeda, Berenice; Rosas-Ramírez, Daniel; Castañeda-Gómez, Jhon; Aparicio-Cuevas, Manuel Alejandro; Fragoso-Serrano, Mabel; Figueroa-González, Gabriela; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio

    2016-03-01

    Recycling liquid chromatography was used for the isolation and purification of resin glycosides from the CHCl3-soluble extracts prepared using flowers of Ipomoea wolcottiana Rose var. wolcottiana. Bioassay-guided fractionation, using modulation of both antibiotic activity against multidrug-resistant strains of Gram-negative bacteria and vinblastine susceptibility in breast carcinoma cells, was used to isolate the active glycolipids as modulators of the multidrug resistance phenotype. An ester-type dimer, wolcottine I, one tetra- and three pentasaccharides, wolcottinosides I-IV, in addition to the known intrapilosin VII, were characterized by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In vitro assays established that none of these metabolites displayed antibacterial activity (MIC>512 μg/mL) against multidrug-resistant strains of Escherichia coli, and two nosocomial pathogens: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Shigella flexneri; however, when tested (25 μg/mL) in combination with tetracycline, kanamycin or chloramphenicol, they exerted a potentiation effect of the antibiotic susceptibility up to eightfold (64 μg/mL from 512 μg/mL). It was also determined that these non-cytotoxic (CI50>8.68 μM) agents modulated vinblastine susceptibility at 25 μg/mL in MFC-7/Vin(+) cells with a reversal factor (RFMCF-7/Vin(+)) of 2-130 fold.

  13. Dynamic equilibrium on DNA defines transcriptional regulation of a multidrug binding transcriptional repressor, LmrR.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Misaki; Shimada, Ichio

    2017-03-21

    LmrR is a multidrug binding transcriptional repressor that controls the expression of a major multidrug transporter, LmrCD, in Lactococcus lactis. Promiscuous compound ligations reduce the affinity of LmrR for the lmrCD operator by several fold to release the transcriptional repression; however, the affinity reduction is orders of magnitude smaller than that of typical transcriptional repressors. Here, we found that the transcriptional regulation of LmrR is achieved through an equilibrium between the operator-bound and non-specific DNA-adsorption states in vivo. The effective dissociation constant of LmrR for the lmrCD operator under the equilibrium is close to the endogenous concentration of LmrR, which allows a substantial reduction of LmrR occupancy upon compound ligations. Therefore, LmrR represents a dynamic type of transcriptional regulation of prokaryotic multidrug resistance systems, where the small affinity reduction induced by compounds is coupled to the functional relocalization of the repressor on the genomic DNA via nonspecific DNA adsorption.

  14. Inhibition of Snail Family Transcriptional Repressor 2 (SNAI2) Enhances Multidrug Resistance of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Rong-Jie; Lv, Ya-Ping; Jin, Wei; Meng, Chao; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Huang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    China accounts for almost half of the total number of liver cancer cases and deaths worldwide, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most primary liver cancer. Snail family transcriptional repressor 2 (SNAI2) is known as an epithelial to mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factor that drives neoplastic epithelial cells into mesenchymal phenotype. However, the roles of endogenous SNAI2 remain controversial in different types of malignant tumors. Herein, we surprisingly identify that anchorage-independent growth, including the formation of tumor sphere and soft agar colony, is significantly increased when SNAI2 expression is inhibited by shRNAs in HCC cells. Suppression of SNAI2 suffices to up-regulate several cancer stem genes. Although unrelated to the metastatic ability, SNAI2 inhibition does increase the efflux of Hoechst 33342 and enhance multidrug resistance in vitro and in vivo. In agreement with this data, we demonstrate for the first time that decreasing SNAI2 level can transcriptionally upregulate several ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter genes such as ABCB1. Moreover, ABC transporters’ inhibitor verapamil can rescue the multidrug resistance induced by SNAI2 inhibition. Our results implicate that SNAI2 behaves as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting multidrug resistance via suppressing ABC transporter genes in HCC cells. PMID:27760172

  15. Multidrug Efflux Pumps at the Crossroad between Antibiotic Resistance and Bacterial Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Blanco, Paula; Martínez, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps can be involved in bacterial resistance to antibiotics at different levels. Some efflux pumps are constitutively expressed at low levels and contribute to intrinsic resistance. In addition, their overexpression may allow higher levels of resistance. This overexpression can be transient, in the presence of an effector (phenotypic resistance), or constitutive when mutants in the regulatory elements of the expression of efflux pumps are selected (acquired resistance). Efflux pumps are present in all cells, from human to bacteria and are highly conserved, which indicates that they are ancient elements in the evolution of different organisms. Consequently, it has been suggested that, besides antibiotic resistance, bacterial multidrug efflux pumps would likely contribute to other relevant processes of the microbial physiology. In the current article, we discuss some specific examples of the role that efflux pumps may have in the bacterial virulence of animals’ and plants’ pathogens, including the processes of intercellular communication. Based in these evidences, we propose that efflux pumps are at the crossroad between resistance and virulence of bacterial pathogens. Consequently, the comprehensive study of multidrug efflux pumps requires addressing these functions, which are of relevance for the bacterial–host interactions during infection. PMID:27708632

  16. Diverse and abundant multi-drug resistant E. coli in Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ghaderpour, Aziz; Ho, Wing Sze; Chew, Li-Lee; Bong, Chui Wei; Chong, Ving Ching; Thong, Kwai-Lin; Chai, Lay Ching

    2015-01-01

    E.coli, an important vector distributing antimicrobial resistance in the environment, was found to be multi-drug resistant, abundant, and genetically diverse in the Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia. One-third (34%) of the estuarine E. coli was multi-drug resistant. The highest antibiotic resistance prevalence was observed for aminoglycosides (83%) and beta-lactams (37%). Phylogenetic groups A and B1, being the most predominant E. coli, demonstrated the highest antibiotic resistant level and prevalence of integrons (integron I, 21%; integron II, 3%). Detection of phylogenetic group B23 downstream of fishing villages indicates human fecal contamination as a source of E. coli pollution. Enteroaggregative E. coli (1%) were also detected immediately downstream of the fishing village. The results indicated multi-drug resistance among E. coli circulating in Matang estuaries, which could be reflective of anthropogenic activities and aggravated by bacterial and antibiotic discharges from village lack of a sewerage system, aquaculture farms and upstream animal husbandry. PMID:26483759

  17. High heterogeneity of plasma membrane microfluidity in multidrug-resistant cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Céline; Roche, Yann; Millot, Christine; Deturche, Régis; Royer, Pascal; Manfait, Michel; Plain, Jérôme; Jeannesson, Pierre; Millot, Jean-Marc; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2009-05-01

    Diffusion-time distribution analysis (DDA) has been used to explore the plasma membrane fluidity of multidrug-resistant cancer cells (LR73 carcinoma cells) and also to characterize the influence of various membrane agents present in the extracellular medium. DDA is a recent single-molecule technique, based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), well suited to retrieve local organization of cell membrane. The method was conducted on a large number of living cells, which enabled us to get a detailed overview of plasma membrane microviscosity, and plasma membrane micro-organization, between the cells of the same line. Thus, we clearly reveal the higher heterogeneity of plasma membrane in multidrug-resistant cancer cells in comparison with the nonresistant ones (denoted sensitive cells). We also display distinct modifications related to a membrane fluidity modulator, benzyl alcohol, and two revertants of multidrug resistance, verapamil and cyclosporin-A. A relation between the distribution of the diffusion-time values and the modification of membrane lateral heterogeneities is proposed.

  18. Many chromosomal genes modulate MarA-mediated multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Cristian; Levy, Stuart B

    2010-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli can be associated with overexpression of marA, a transcription factor that upregulates multidrug efflux and downregulates membrane permeability. Using random transposome mutagenesis, we found that many chromosomal genes and environmental stimuli affected MarA-mediated antibiotic resistance. Seven genes affected resistance mediated by MarA in an antibiotic-specific way; these were mostly genes encoding unrelated enzymes, transporters, and unknown proteins. Other genes affected MarA-mediated resistance to all antibiotics tested. These genes were acrA, acrB, and tolC (which encode the major MarA-regulated multidrug efflux pump AcrAB-TolC), crp, cyaA, hns, and pcnB (four genes involved in global regulation of gene expression), and the unknown gene damX. The last five genes affected MarA-mediated MDR by altering marA expression or MarA function specifically on acrA. These findings demonstrate that MarA-mediated MDR is regulated at multiple levels by different genes and stimuli, which makes it both complex and fine-tuned and interconnects it with global cell regulation and metabolism. Such a regulation could contribute to the adaptation and spread of MDR strains and may be targeted to treat antibiotic-resistant E. coli and related pathogens.

  19. Multidrug resistance pattern of bacterial agents isolated from patient with chronic sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Rezai, Mohammad Sadegh; Pourmousa, Rostam; Dadashzadeh, Roksana; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatment of chronic sinusitis is complicated due to increase of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The aim of this study was to determine the multidrug resistance (MDR) pattern of the bacteria causing chronic sinusitis in north of Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on patients with chronic sinusitis. Bacterial susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined according to the CLSI 2013 standards. Double-disk synergy (DDS) test was performed for the detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria; also methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRSA) strains were identified by MRSA screen agar. The MDR isolates were defined as resistant to 3 or more antibiotics. Data were analyzed using SPSS 17 software. Descriptive statistics was used to describe the features of the data in this study. Results: The rate of ESBL-producing bacteria was 28.75-37.03% among enterobacteriaceae and the rate of MRSA was 42.75%-60% among Staphylococcus strains. The most detectable rate of the MDR bacterial isolates was Gram-negative bacteria 39 (76.47%) and Enterobacter spp. 19(70.37%) was the most multidrug resistant isolate among Gram negative bacteria. Also 36 (73.46%) of the gram positive bacterial isolated were multidrug resistance and Staphylococcus aureus 9(90%) was the most MDR among Gram positive bacteria. Conclusion: Antimicrobial resistance is increasing in chronic bacterial sinusitis. The emergence of MRSA and ESBL bacteria causing chronic sinusitis is increasing. PMID:27386063

  20. High isolation rates of multidrug-resistant bacteria from water and carpets of mosques

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed Ali, Mostafa Mohamed; Alemary, Fuoad; Alrtail, Amna; Rzeg, Moftah M.; Albakush, Abdulla M.; Ghenghesh, Khalifa Sifaw

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is little information regarding the isolation of antimicrobial-resistant potentially pathogenic bacteria from water and carpets of mosques worldwide. The objective of the present investigation is to determine the bacteriological quality of water and carpets of mosques in Elkhomes city in Libya. Methods Potentially pathogenic bacteria were isolated from water samples (n=44) and dust samples from carpets (n=50) of 50 mosques in Elkhomes city, Libya, using standard bacteriological procedures. Susceptibility of isolated bacteria to antimicrobial agents was determined by the disc-diffusion method. Results Of the water samples examined, 12 (27.3%) were positive for Escherichia coli, 10 (22.7%) for Klebsiella spp., and 15 (34.1%) for other enteric bacteria. Of the dust samples of carpets examined, 6 (12%) were positive for E. coli, 33 (66%) for Klebsiella spp., and 30 (60%) for Staphylococcus spp. Multidrug resistance (MDR, resistance to three or more antimicrobial groups) was found among 48.7% (19/37) and 46.9% (30/64) of the examined enterobacteria from water and carpets, respectively, and among 66.7% (20/30) of Staphylococcus spp. from carpets. In addition, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated from a carpet of one mosque. Conclusion Presence of multidrug-resistant potentially pathogenic bacteria in examined water and carpets indicate that mosques as communal environments may play a role in the spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria in the community and pose a serious health risk to worshipers. PMID:25128691

  1. Inhibition of multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes by peptides isolated from combinatorial phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Flachbartova, Z; Pulzova, L; Bencurova, E; Potocnakova, L; Comor, L; Bednarikova, Z; Bhide, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to isolate and characterize novel antimicrobial peptides from peptide phage library with antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes. Combinatorial phage-display library was used to affinity select peptides binding to the cell surface of multidrug resistant L. monocytogenes. After several rounds of affinity selection followed by sequencing, three peptides were revealed as the most promising candidates. Peptide L2 exhibited features common to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), and was rich in Asp, His and Lys residues. Peptide L3 (NSWIQAPDTKSI), like peptide L2, inhibited bacterial growth in vitro, without any hemolytic or cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells. L1 peptide showed no inhibitory effect on Listeria. Structurally, peptides L2 and L3 formed random coils composed of α-helix and β-sheet units. Peptides L2 and L3 exhibited antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant isolates of L. monocytogenes with no haemolytic or toxic effects. Both peptides identified in this study have the potential to be beneficial in human and veterinary medicine.

  2. A primer on the mechanics of P-glycoprotein the multidrug transporter.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, M; Spiers, J P

    2007-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) the multidrug transporter is a well-characterised member of the super-family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, and mediates the clearance of xenotoxins against steep concentration gradients at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. The primary function of this protein is to prevent the uptake of toxic compounds from the gut into the body, and to protect vital structures such as the brain, cerebrospinal fluid, testis, foetus and bone marrow against toxins. Although P-gp transports a wide range of compounds, which is advantageous, it can also be a disadvantage and may interfere with the delivery of drugs to target tissues resulting in multidrug resistance. In the present review: (i) we consider our current understanding of the structure of P-glycoprotein, (ii) discuss substrate binding and its coupling to ATPase activity, (iii) provide insight into key features which define P-glycoprotein substrates/inhibitors and the ability to predict potential substrates in silico, (iv) provide an overview of existing models of pump function and (v) present emerging concepts into the regulation of P-glycoprotein expression, with particular reference to multidrug resistance.

  3. Microbiological evaluation of the efficacy of two new biodetergents on multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In the last few years, several outbreaks of nosocomial infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogenic agents have been observed, and various biocides products were developed in order to control this phenomenon. We investigated the efficacy of two natural biodetergents composed of plants and kelps extracts, BATT1 and BATT2, against multidrug-resistant strains. Methods In-vitro antibacterial efficacy of BATT1 and BATT2 against nosocomial multidrug-resistant isolates was assessed using a suspension-inhibition test, with and without bovine serum albumin (BSA). The test was also carried out on glass surfaces with and without BSA. Results In vitro tests with both biocidal disinfectants at 25% concentration demonstrated an overall drop in bacterial, mould and yeast counts after 10 min of contact with or without organic substances. For Pseudomonas aeruginosa, it was necessary to use undiluted disinfectants with and without an organic substance. The same results were obtained in tests carried out on glass surfaces for all strains. Conclusions The natural products BATT1 and BATT2 behave like good biocides even in presence of organic substances. The use of both disinfectants may be beneficial for reducing hospital-acquired pathogens that are not susceptible to disinfectants. However, it has to be stressed that all these experiments were carried out in vitro and they still require validation from use in clinical practice. PMID:20015394

  4. MFS multidrug transporters in pathogenic fungi: do they have real clinical impact?

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Catarina; Dias, Paulo J.; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Teixeira, Miguel C.

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by opportunistic fungal pathogens have reached concerning numbers due to the increase of the immunocrompromised human population and to the development of antifungal resistance. This resistance is often attributed to the action of multidrug efflux pumps, belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily and the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). Although many studies have focused on the role of ABC multidrug efflux transporters, little is still known on the part played by the Drug:H+ Antiporter (DHA) family of the MFS in this context. This review summarizes current knowledge on the role in antifungal drug resistance, mode of action and phylogenetic relations of DHA transporters, from the model yeast S. cerevisiae to pathogenic yeasts and filamentous fungi. Through the compilation of the predicted DHA transporters in the medically relevant Candida albicans, C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, C. lusitaniae, C. tropicalis, C. guilliermondii, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus species, the fact that only 5% of the DHA transporters from these organisms have been characterized so far is evidenced. The role of these transporters in antifungal drug resistance and in pathogen-host interaction is described and their clinical relevance discussed. Given the knowledge gathered for these few DHA transporters, the need to carry out a systematic characterization of the DHA multidrug efflux pumps in fungal pathogens, with emphasis on their clinical relevance, is highlighted. PMID:24904431

  5. Unaltered expression of multidrug resistance transporters in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-resistant rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Payen, L; Courtois, A; Langouët, S; Guillouzo, A; Fardel, O

    2001-01-02

    Rat liver epithelial cells resistant to the chemical carcinogen 3MC, termed F258/3MC cells and generated by long-term exposure of parental F258 cells to the PAH, were characterized, especially with respect to expression of multidrug resistance transporters such as P-glycoprotein, MRP1 and MRP2. F258/3MC cells were found to be cross-resistant to other PAHs such as BP and dimethylbenz(a)anthracene but remained sensitive to known substrates of multidrug resistance efflux pumps such as doxorubicin and vincristine. They did not display either decreased cellular PAH accumulation or increased PAH efflux. In addition, P-glycoprotein and MRP2 mRNA levels were not, or only barely detected, in F258/3MC cells and in their parental counterparts whereas these PAH-resistant and sensitive cells showed closed levels of MRP1 mRNAs and activity. Moreover, P-gp- and MRP1-overexpressing cells were shown to display similar accumulation and efflux of BP than those found in P-gp- and MRP1-negative control cells. These data therefore suggest that multidrug resistance transporters do not contribute to PAH resistance in PAH-selected liver cells.

  6. Vitamin E derivative-based multifunctional nanoemulsions for overcoming multidrug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Nannan; Gao, Yanan; Ji, Hongyu; Wu, Linhua; Qi, Xuejing; Liu, Xiaona; Tang, Jingling

    2016-08-01

    The multidrug resistance (MDR), including intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance, is a major problem in tumor chemotherapy. Here, we proposed a strategy for modulating intrinsic and/or acquired multidrug resistance by altering the levels of Bax and Bcl-2 expression and inhibiting the transport function of P-gp, increasing the intracellular concentration of its substrate anticancer drugs. Vitamin E derivative-based nanoemulsions containing paclitaxel (MNEs-PTX) were fabricated in this study, and in vitro anticancer efficacy of the nanoemulsion system was evaluated in the paclitaxel-resistant human ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780/Taxol. The MNEs-PTX exhibited a remarkably enhanced antiproliferation effect on A2780/Taxol cells than free paclitaxel (PTX) (p < 0.01). Compared with that in the Taxol group, MNEs-PTX further decreased mitochondrial potential. Vitamin E derivative-based multifunctional nanoemulsion (MNEs) obviously increased intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 (P-gp substrate). Overexpression of Bcl-2 is generally associated with tumor drug resistance, we found that MNEs could reduce Bcl-2 protein level and increase Bax protein level. Taken together, our findings suggest that anticancer drugs associated with MNEs could play a role in the development of MDR in cancers.

  7. Characterization of putative multidrug resistance transporters of the major facilitator-superfamily expressed in Salmonella Typhi.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Aqsa; Ismat, Fouzia; Iqbal, Mazhar; Haque, Abdul; De Zorzi, Rita; Mirza, Osman; Walz, Thomas; Rahman, Moazur

    2015-05-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by efflux pumps is a well-known phenomenon in infectious bacteria. Although much work has been carried out to characterize multidrug efflux pumps in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, such information is still lacking for many deadly pathogens. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the substrate specificity of previously uncharacterized transporters of Salmonella Typhi to identify their role in the development of multidrug resistance. S. Typhi genes encoding putative members of the major facilitator superfamily were cloned and expressed in the drug-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strain KAM42, and tested for transport of 25 antibacterial compounds, including representative antibiotics of various classes, antiseptics, dyes and detergents. Of the 15 tested putative transporters, STY0901, STY2458 and STY4874 exhibited a drug-resistance phenotype. Among these, STY4874 conferred resistance to at least ten of the tested antimicrobials: ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, levofloxacin, kanamycin, streptomycin, gentamycin, nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol, ethidium bromide, and acriflavine, including fluoroquinolone antibiotics, which were drugs of choice to treat S. Typhi infections. Cell-based functional studies using ethidium bromide and acriflavine showed that STY4874 functions as a H(+)-dependent exporter. These results suggest that STY4874 may be an important drug target, which can now be tested by studying the susceptibility of a STY4874-deficient S. Typhi strain to antimicrobials.

  8. Metformin reverses multidrug resistance in human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel-7402/5-fluorouracil cells

    PubMed Central

    LING, SUNBIN; TIAN, YU; ZHANG, HAIQUAN; JIA, KAIQI; FENG, TINGTING; SUN, DEGUANG; GAO, ZHENMING; XU, FEI; HOU, ZHAOYUAN; LI, YAN; WANG, LIMING

    2014-01-01

    Metformin exhibits anti-proliferative effects in tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The present study investigated the ability of metformin to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) in human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel-7402/5-fluorouracil (5-Fu; Bel/Fu) cells. The synergistic anti-proliferative effect of metformin combined with 5-Fu was evaluated using a Cell Counting kit-8 assay. The variation in apoptotic rates and cell cycle distribution were evaluated using a flow cytometric assay and variations in target gene and protein expression were monitored using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that metformin had a synergistic anti-proliferative effect with 5-Fu in the Bel/Fu cells. The variations in the number of apoptotic cells and distribution of the cell cycle were consistent with the variability in cell viability. Metformin targeted the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, suppressed the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and transcriptionally downregulated the expression of multidrug resistance protein 1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1). Collectively, these findings suggested that metformin may target the AMPK/mTOR/HIF-1α/P-gp and MRP1 pathways to reverse MDR in hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25310259

  9. Multidrug Efflux Pumps at the Crossroad between Antibiotic Resistance and Bacterial Virulence.

    PubMed

    Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Blanco, Paula; Martínez, José L

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps can be involved in bacterial resistance to antibiotics at different levels. Some efflux pumps are constitutively expressed at low levels and contribute to intrinsic resistance. In addition, their overexpression may allow higher levels of resistance. This overexpression can be transient, in the presence of an effector (phenotypic resistance), or constitutive when mutants in the regulatory elements of the expression of efflux pumps are selected (acquired resistance). Efflux pumps are present in all cells, from human to bacteria and are highly conserved, which indicates that they are ancient elements in the evolution of different organisms. Consequently, it has been suggested that, besides antibiotic resistance, bacterial multidrug efflux pumps would likely contribute to other relevant processes of the microbial physiology. In the current article, we discuss some specific examples of the role that efflux pumps may have in the bacterial virulence of animals' and plants' pathogens, including the processes of intercellular communication. Based in these evidences, we propose that efflux pumps are at the crossroad between resistance and virulence of bacterial pathogens. Consequently, the comprehensive study of multidrug efflux pumps requires addressing these functions, which are of relevance for the bacterial-host interactions during infection.

  10. Transported substrate determines exchange rate in the multidrug resistance transporter EmrE.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Emma A; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A

    2014-03-07

    EmrE, a small multidrug resistance transporter, serves as an ideal model to study coupling between multidrug recognition and protein function. EmrE has a single small binding pocket that must accommodate the full range of diverse substrates recognized by this transporter. We have studied a series of tetrahedral compounds, as well as several planar substrates, to examine multidrug recognition and transport by EmrE. Here we show that even within this limited series, the rate of interconversion between the inward- and outward-facing states of EmrE varies over 3 orders of magnitude. Thus, the identity of the bound substrate controls the rate of this critical step in the transport process. The binding affinity also varies over a similar range and is correlated with substrate hydrophobicity within the tetrahedral substrate series. Substrate identity influences both the ground-state and transition-state energies for the conformational exchange process, highlighting the coupling between substrate binding and transport required for alternating access antiport.

  11. Green Tea Catechin-Based Complex Micelles Combined with Doxorubicin to Overcome Cardiotoxicity and Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tangjian; Liu, Jinjian; Ren, Jie; Huang, Fan; Ou, Hanlin; Ding, Yuxun; Zhang, Yumin; Ma, Rujiang; An, Yingli; Liu, Jianfeng; Shi, Linqi

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy for cancer treatment has been demonstrated to cause some side effects on healthy tissues and multidrug resistance of the tumor cells, which greatly limits therapeutic efficacy. To address these limitations and achieve better therapeutic efficacy, combination therapy based on nanoparticle platforms provides a promising approach through delivering different agents simultaneously to the same destination with synergistic effect. In this study, a novel green tea catechin-based polyion complex (PIC) micelle loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) and (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) was constructed through electrostatic interaction and phenylboronic acid-catechol interaction between poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lysine-co-lysine-phenylboronic acid) (PEG-PLys/PBA) and EGCG. DOX was co-loaded in the PIC micelles through π-π stacking interaction with EGCG. The phenylboronic acid-catechol interaction endowed the PIC micelles with high stability under physiological condition. Moreover, acid cleavability of phenylboronic acid-catechol interaction in the micelle core has significant benefits for delivering EGCG and DOX to same destination with synergistic effects. In addition, benefiting from the oxygen free radicals scavenging activity of EGCG, combination therapy with EGCG and DOX in the micelle core could protect the cardiomyocytes from DOX-mediated cardiotoxicity according to the histopathologic analysis of hearts. Attributed to modulation of EGCG on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity, this kind of PIC micelles could effectively reverse multidrug resistance of cancer cells. These results suggested that EGCG based PIC micelles could effectively overcome DOX induced cardiotoxicity and multidrug resistance. PMID:27375779

  12. Cytotoxicity of rhein, the active metabolite of sennoside laxatives, is reduced by multidrug resistance-associated protein 1

    PubMed Central

    van Gorkom, B A P; Timmer-Bosscha, H; de Jong, S; van der Kolk, D M; Kleibeuker, J H; de Vries, E G E

    2002-01-01

    Anthranoid laxatives, belonging to the anthraquinones as do anthracyclines, possibly increase colorectal cancer risk. Anthracyclines interfere with topoisomerase II, intercalate DNA and are substrates for P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1. P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 protect colonic epithelial cells against xenobiotics. The aim of this study was to analyse the interference of anthranoids with these natural defence mechanisms and the direct cytotoxicity of anthranoids in cancer cell lines expressing these mechanisms in varying combinations. A cytotoxicity profile of rhein, aloe emodin and danthron was established in related cell lines exhibiting different levels of topoisomerases, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and P-glycoprotein. Interaction of rhein with multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 was studied by carboxy fluorescein efflux and direct cytotoxicity by apoptosis induction. Rhein was less cytotoxic in the multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 overexpressing GLC4/ADR cell line compared to GLC4. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 inhibition with MK571 increased rhein cytotoxicity. Carboxy fluorescein efflux was blocked by rhein. No P-glycoprotein dependent rhein efflux was observed, nor was topoisomerase II responsible for reduced toxicity. Rhein induced apoptosis but did not intercalate DNA. Aloe emodin and danthron were no substrates for MDR mechanisms. Rhein is a substrate for multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and induces apoptosis. It could therefore render the colonic epithelium sensitive to cytotoxic agents, apart from being toxic in itself. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1494–1500. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600255 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11986786

  13. The enriched fraction of Elephantopus scaber Triggers apoptosis and inhibits multi-drug resistance transporters in human epithelial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Beeran, Asmy Appadath; Maliyakkal, Naseer; Rao, Chamallamudi Mallikarjuna; Udupa, Nayanabhirama

    2015-01-01

    Background: Medicinal plants have played an important role in the development of clinically useful anticancer agents. Elephantopus scaber (Asteraceae) (ES) is widely used in Indian traditional system of medicine for the treatment of various ailments including cancer. Objective: To investigate anticancer effects of ES in human epithelial cancer cells. Materials and Methods: Cytotoxicity of ethanolic extract of ES (ES-ET) and its fractions, such as ES Petroleum ether fraction (ES-PET), ES Dichloromethane fraction (ES DCM), n Butyl alcohol fraction (ES-BT), and ES-Rest (ES-R) were assessed in human epithelial cancer cell lines using sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide assay and Hoechst 33342 assays were used to gauge induction of apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis and micronuclei assay were used to assess cell cycle specific pharmacological effects and drug induced genotoxicty. Further, the ability of ES to inhibit multi drug resistant (MDR) transporters (ABC-B1 and ABC-G2) was determined by Rhodamine (Rho) and Mitoxantrone (MXR) efflux assays. Results: The enriched fraction of ES (ES DCM) possessed dose-dependent potent cytotoxicity in human epithelial cancer cells. Further, treatment of cancer cells (HeLa, A549, MCF-7, and Caco-2) with ES DCM showed hall mark properties of apoptosis (membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation etc.). Similarly, ES DCM caused enhanced sub G0 content and micronuclei formation indicating the induction of apoptosis and drug induced genotoxicity in cancer cells, respectively. Interestingly, ES DCM inhibited MDR transporters (ABC B1 and ABC G2) in cancer cells. Conclusion: The enriched fraction of ES imparted cytotoxic effects, triggered apoptosis, induced genotoxicity, and inhibited MDR transporters in human epithelial cancer cells. Thus, ES appears to be potential anticancer agent. PMID:25829763

  14. Efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance in the multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7: identification of a novel MexS variant involved in upregulation of the mexEF-oprN multidrug efflux operon

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious problem in medical settings. P. aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7 is resistant to fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and most β-lactams but not imipenem. In this study, enhanced efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance of PA7 was shown to reflect increased expression of two resistance nodulation cell division (RND) -type multidrug efflux operons, mexEF-oprN and mexXY-oprA. Such a clinical isolate has rarely been reported because MexEF-OprN-overproducing mutants often increase susceptibility to aminoglycosides apparently owing to impairment of the MexXY system. A mutant of PA7 lacking three RND-type multidrug efflux operons (mexAB-oprM, mexEF-oprN, and mexXY-oprA) was susceptible to all anti-pseudomonas agents we tested, supporting an idea that these RND-type multidrug efflux transporters are molecular targets to overcome multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa. mexEF-oprN-upregulation in P. aeruginosa PA7 was shown due to a MexS variant harboring the Valine-155 amino acid residue. This is the first genetic evidence shown that a MexS variant causes mexEF-oprN-upregulation in P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. PMID:25653649

  15. [Epidemiological features of multidrug resistant bacteria isolated from urine samples at the Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital in Rabat, Morocco].

    PubMed

    Zohoun, A; Ngoh, E; Bajjou, T; Sekhsokh, Y; Elhamzaoui, S

    2010-08-01

    Hospital-acquired multidrug resistant bacteria infections are a serious public health issue causing increased morbidity, mortality and care cost. These risks underscore the need for health care institutions to maintain active panels to monitor, prevent, and manage hospital-acquired infections. The purpose of this study was to assess the epidemiology of urinary tract infection involving multidrug resistant bacteria at the Microbiology Laboratory of the Mohammed-V Military Teaching Hospital in Rabat. Study was carried out retrospectively on bacteria isolated from 10,243 urinary samples collected from January 1 to December 31, 2008. A total of 1,439 non-redundant bacteria (14.1%) meeting the criteria of urinary infection were identified. One hundred and three of the 1,439 bacteria isolated (7%) were multidrug resistant. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were more common in in-patients (63.1%). Mean patient age was 53.8 +/- 18.2 and the M/F sex ratio was 2.2. The most common multi-drug resistant bacteria were Enterobacteria producing extended spectrum bêta-lactamase (54.4% including 40.8% of Klebsiella pneumonia) and non-fermenting bacteria (45.6% including 26.2% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. and 19.4% of Acinetobacter baumannii. These bacteria were resistant to the most commonly used antibiotics but remained highly sensitive to colistin, imipenem and amikacin.

  16. Honeydew honey as a potent antibacterial agent in eradication of multi-drug resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates from cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Majtan, Juraj; Majtanova, Lubica; Bohova, Jana; Majtan, Viktor

    2011-04-01

    Multi-drug resistance in nosocomial pathogens is a continually evolving and alarming problem in health care units. Since ancient times, honey has been used successfully for the treatment of a broad spectrum of infections with no risk of resistance development. This study investigated the antibacterial activity of two natural honeys, namely honeydew and manuka, against 20 nosocomial multi-drug resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia) isolates from cancer patients. An antibiotic susceptibility test was carried out using the disk diffusion method with 20 antibiotic disks. The antibacterial activity of honey was determined using a broth dilution method. The concentration of honey used in the study was within the range of 3.75% to 25% (w/v). All 20 clinical isolates were multi-drug resistant against 11 to 19 antibiotics. The MICs for honeydew honey ranged from 6.25% to 17.5%, while those for active manuka honey ranged from 7.5% to 22.5%. Honeydew honey had lower MICs than manuka honey against 16 of the tested isolates. This study showed that Slovak honeydew honey has exceptional antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant S. maltophilia isolates and was more efficient than manuka honey (UMF 15+). Honeydew honey with strong antibacterial activity could be used as a potential agent to eradicate multi-drug resistant clinical isolates.

  17. Expression, detergent solubilization, and purification of a membrane transporter, the MexB multidrug resistance protein.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Forum H; Jeffery, Constance J

    2010-12-03

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), the ability of a cancer cell or pathogen to be resistant to a wide range of structurally and functionally unrelated anti-cancer drugs or antibiotics, is a current serious problem in public health. This multidrug resistance is largely due to energy-dependent drug efflux pumps. The pumps expel anti-cancer drugs or antibiotics into the external medium, lowering their intracellular concentration below a toxic threshold. We are studying multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that causes infections in patients with many types of injuries or illness, for example, burns or cystic fibrosis, and also in immuno-compromised cancer, dialysis, and transplantation patients. The major MDR efflux pumps in P. aeruginosa are tripartite complexes comprised of an inner membrane proton-drug antiporter (RND), an outer membrane channel (OMF), and a periplasmic linker protein (MFP). The RND and OMF proteins are transmembrane proteins. Transmembrane proteins make up more than 30% of all proteins and are 65% of current drug targets. The hydrophobic transmembrane domains make the proteins insoluble in aqueous buffer. Before a transmembrane protein can be purified, it is necessary to find buffer conditions containing a mild detergent that enable the protein to be solubilized as a protein detergent complex (PDC). In this example, we use an RND protein, the P. aeruginosa MexB transmembrane transporter, to demonstrate how to express a recombinant form of a transmembrane protein, solubilize it using detergents, and then purify the protein detergent complexes. This general method can be applied to the expression, purification, and solubilization of many other recombinantly expressed membrane proteins. The protein detergent complexes can later be used for biochemical or biophysical characterization including X-ray crystal structure determination or crosslinking studies.

  18. The Heterodimeric ABC Transporter EfrCD Mediates Multidrug Efflux in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Hürlimann, Lea M.; Corradi, Valentina; Hohl, Michael; Bloemberg, Guido V.; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial infections with Enterococcus faecalis are an emerging health problem. However, drug efflux pumps contributing to intrinsic drug resistance are poorly studied in this Gram-positive pathogen. In this study, we functionally investigated seven heterodimeric ABC transporters of E. faecalis that are annotated as drug efflux pumps. Deletion of ef0789-ef0790 on the chromosome of E. faecalis resulted in increased susceptibility to daunorubicin, doxorubicin, ethidium, and Hoechst 33342, and the corresponding transporter was named EfrCD. Unexpectedly, the previously described heterodimeric multidrug ABC transporter EfrAB contributes marginally to drug efflux in the endogenous context of E. faecalis. In contrast, heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis revealed that EfrAB, EfrCD, and the product of ef2226-ef2227 (EfrEF) mediate the efflux of fluorescent substrates and confer resistance to multiple dyes and drugs, including fluoroquinolones. Four of seven transporters failed to exhibit drug efflux activity for the set of drugs and dyes tested, even upon overexpression in L. lactis. Since all seven transporters were purified as heterodimers after overexpression in L. lactis, a lack of drug efflux activity is not attributed to poor expression or protein aggregation. Reconstitution of the purified multidrug transporters EfrAB, EfrCD, and EfrEF in proteoliposomes revealed functional coupling between ATP hydrolysis and drug binding. Our analysis creates an experimental basis for the accurate prediction of drug efflux transporters and indicates that many annotated multidrug efflux pumps might be incapable of drug transport and thus might fulfill other physiological functions in the cell. PMID:27381387

  19. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of two-component response regulators in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Yang, Liu; Zeng, Xianfei; Danzheng, Jiacuo; Zheng, Qing; Liu, Jiayun; Liu, Feng; Xin, Yijuan; Cheng, Xiaodong; Su, Mingquan; Ma, Yueyun; Hao, Xiaoke

    2015-07-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) have been reported to exhibit a sensing and responding role under drug stress that induces drug resistance in several bacterial species. However, the relationship between TCSs and multidrug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has not been comprehensively analysed to date. In this study, 90 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates were analysed using 15-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit (MIRU)-variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) typing and repetitive extragenic palindromic (rep)-PCR-based DNA fingerprinting. The results showed that all of the isolates were of the Beijing lineage, and strains with a drug-susceptible phenotype had not diverged into similar genotype clusters. Expression analysis of 13 response regulators of TCSs using real-time PCR and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) proteomic analysis demonstrated that four response regulator genes (devR, mtrA, regX3 and Rv3143) were significantly upregulated in multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains compared with the laboratory strain H37Rv as well as drug-susceptible and isoniazid-monoresistant strains (P<0.05). DNA sequencing revealed that the promoter regions of devR, mtrA, regX3 and Rv3143 did not contain any mutations. Moreover, expression of the four genes could be induced by most of the four first-line antitubercular agents. In addition, either deletion or overexpression of devR in Mycobacterium bovis BCG did not alter its sensitivity to the four antitubercular drugs. This suggests that upregulation of devR, which is common in MDR-TB strains, might be induced by drug stress and hypoxic adaptation following the acquisition of multidrug resistance.

  20. Population Genetics Study of Isoniazid Resistance Mutations and Evolution of Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis†

    PubMed Central

    Hazbón, Manzour Hernando; Brimacombe, Michael; Bobadilla del Valle, Miriam; Cavatore, Magali; Guerrero, Marta Inírida; Varma-Basil, Mandira; Billman-Jacobe, Helen; Lavender, Caroline; Fyfe, Janet; García-García, Lourdes; León, Clara Inés; Bose, Mridula; Chaves, Fernando; Murray, Megan; Eisenach, Kathleen D.; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Cave, M. Donald; Ponce de León, Alfredo; Alland, David

    2006-01-01

    The molecular basis for isoniazid resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is complex. Putative isoniazid resistance mutations have been identified in katG, ahpC, inhA, kasA, and ndh. However, small sample sizes and related potential biases in sample selection have precluded the development of statistically valid and significant population genetic analyses of clinical isoniazid resistance. We present the first large-scale analysis of 240 alleles previously associated with isoniazid resistance in a diverse set of 608 isoniazid-susceptible and 403 isoniazid-resistant clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. We detected 12 mutant alleles in isoniazid-susceptible isolates, suggesting that these alleles are not involved in isoniazid resistance. However, mutations in katG, ahpC, and inhA were strongly associated with isoniazid resistance, while kasA mutations were associated with isoniazid susceptibility. Remarkably, the distribution of isoniazid resistance-associated mutations was different in isoniazid-monoresistant isolates from that in multidrug-resistant isolates, with significantly fewer isoniazid resistance mutations in the isoniazid-monoresistant group. Mutations in katG315 were significantly more common in the multidrug-resistant isolates. Conversely, mutations in the inhA promoter were significantly more common in isoniazid-monoresistant isolates. We tested for interactions among mutations and resistance to different drugs. Mutations in katG, ahpC, and inhA were associated with rifampin resistance, but only katG315 mutations were associated with ethambutol resistance. There was also a significant inverse association between katG315 mutations and mutations in ahpC or inhA and between mutations in kasA and mutations in ahpC. Our results suggest that isoniazid resistance and the evolution of multidrug-resistant strains are complex dynamic processes that may be influenced by interactions between genes and drug-resistant phenotypes. PMID:16870753

  1. Reversal effect of Tween-20 on multidrug resistance in tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shouhui; Liu, Jinjuan; Chen, Yongqiang; Jiang, Jihong

    2012-04-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major barrier for chemotherapy of many cancers. Non-ionic surfactants have great potential to reverse the MDR by preventing onset or delay progression of the carcinogenic process. However, the role of Tween-20 in the development of MDR remains unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the reversal effect and potential mechanism of Tween-20 on tumor cells in vitro. Alamar Blue assay was used to examine the reversal index of Tween-20 to vincristine (VCR), doxorubicin (DOX) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in KBv200, HepG2/R and Bel-7402/5-FU, respectively. Morphological change was determined by Gimsa and Hoechst 33258 staining. The acumulation of DOX was confirmed by spectrofluorimetric assay. Cell cycle analysis was performed using flow cytometry. The mRNA and protein expression levels of MDR were assessed by semiquantitative RT-PCR and dot blot, respectively. The results showed that Tween-20 at concentrations of 0.0025%, 0.005%, 0.01% had little cytotoxicity. When combined with the cancer drugs, it significantly promoted the sensitivity of MDR cells. Fluorescence staining confirmed that the percentage of apoptotic cell increased when combined with Tween-20. This notion was further supported by the observation that Tween-20 treatment potentiated VIN-induced G2/M arrest of the cell cycle. Furthermore, Tween-20 treatment increased significantly intracellular accumulation of DOX. RT-PCR and dot blot revealed that Tween-20 could downregulate the expression of MDR and P-glycoprotein. Low concentrations of Tween-20 can efficiently reverse the multidrug resistance phenotype by enhancing accumulation of the anticancer drugs. The potential mechanism may be via inhibiting the multidrug-resistant gene expression.

  2. Clinical Oxidative Stress during Leprosy Multidrug Therapy: Impact of Dapsone Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Schalcher, Taysa Ribeiro; Borges, Rosivaldo S.; Coleman, Michael D.; Batista Júnior, João; Salgado, Claudio G.; Vieira, Jose Luiz F.; Romão, Pedro R. T.; Oliveira, Fabio R.; Monteiro, Marta Chagas

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to assess the oxidative stress in leprosy patients under multidrug therapy (MDT; dapsone, clofazimine and rifampicin), evaluating the nitric oxide (NO) concentration, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, glutathione (GSH) levels, total antioxidant capacity, lipid peroxidation, and methemoglobin formation. For this, we analyzed 23 leprosy patients and 20 healthy individuals from the Amazon region, Brazil, aged between 20 and 45 years. Blood sampling enabled the evaluation of leprosy patients prior to starting multidrug therapy (called MDT 0) and until the third month of multidrug therapy (MDT 3). With regard to dapsone (DDS) plasma levels, we showed that there was no statistical difference in drug plasma levels between multibacillary (0.518±0.029 µg/mL) and paucibacillary (0.662±0.123 µg/mL) patients. The methemoglobin levels and numbers of Heinz bodies were significantly enhanced after the third MDT-supervised dose, but this treatment did not significantly change the lipid peroxidation and NO levels in these leprosy patients. In addition, CAT activity was significantly reduced in MDT-treated leprosy patients, while GSH content was increased in these patients. However, SOD and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity levels were similar in patients with and without treatment. These data suggest that MDT can reduce the activity of some antioxidant enzyme and influence ROS accumulation, which may induce hematological changes, such as methemoglobinemia in patients with leprosy. We also explored some redox mechanisms associated with DDS and its main oxidative metabolite DDS-NHOH and we explored the possible binding of DDS to the active site of CYP2C19 with the aid of molecular modeling software. PMID:24465659

  3. Structural comparison of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Ranaweera, Indrika; Shrestha, Ugina; Ranjana, K.C.; Kakarla, Prathusha; Willmon, T. Mark; Hernandez, Alberto J.; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Barr, Sharla R.; Varela, Manuel F.

    2016-01-01

    The biological membrane is an efficient barrier against water-soluble substances. Solute transporters circumvent this membrane barrier by transporting water-soluble solutes across the membrane to the other sides. These transport proteins are thus required for all living organisms. Microorganisms, such as bacteria, effectively exploit solute transporters to acquire useful nutrients for growth or to expel substances that are inhibitory to their growth. Overall, there are distinct types of related solute transporters that are grouped into families or superfamilies. Of these various transporters, the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) represents a very large and constantly growing group and are driven by solute- and ion-gradients, making them passive and secondary active transporters, respectively. Members of the major facilitator superfamily transport an extreme variety of structurally different substrates such as antimicrobial agents, amino acids, sugars, intermediary metabolites, ions, and other small molecules. Importantly, bacteria, especially pathogenic ones, have evolved multidrug efflux pumps which belong to the major facilitator superfamily. Furthermore, members of this important superfamily share similar primary sequences in the form of highly conserved sequence motifs that confer useful functional properties during transport. The transporters of the superfamily also share similarities in secondary structures, such as possessing 12- or 14-membrane spanning α-helices and the more recently described 3-helix structure repeat element, known as the MFS fold. The three-dimensional structures of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps have been determined for only a few members of the superfamily, all drug pumps of which are surprisingly from Escherichia coli. This review briefly summarizes the structural properties of the bacterial multidrug efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily in a comparative manner and provides future directions for study. PMID:27065631

  4. Prevalence and characterization of multidrug-resistant zoonotic Enterobacter spp. in poultry of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Shuvro Prokash; Sultana, Munawar; Hossain, M Anwar

    2013-05-01

    Poultry and poultry products are major contributors of zoonotic pathogens. Limited data are available on Enterobacter spp. as a potent zoonotic pathogen in poultry. The present study is a first endeavor on the emergence of multidrug-resistant zoonotic Enterobacter spp. and its prevalence arising from poultry in Bangladesh. Cloacal swabs from poultry samples of five different farms at Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh were collected and from 106 isolates, 18 presumptive Enterobacter spp. were obtained. Antibiogram using 19 used antibiotics belonging to 15 major groups revealed that all of the 18 isolates were completely resistant to penicillin and rifampicin, but differed in their drug resistance pattern against ampicillin (94.4%), clindamycin (94.4%), erythromycin (94.4%), vancomycin (88.9%), sulfonamides (72.2%), imipenem (66.6%), streptomycin (55.6%), nitrofurantoin (33.3%), doxycycline (33.3%), tetracyclines (33.3%), cefepime (11.1%), and gentamicin (5.6%). All Enterobacter spp. were found to be plasmid free, implying that multidrug-resistant properties are chromosomal borne. The vanA and sulI were detected by polymerase chain reaction assay in 17 and 13 isolates, respectively. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA distributed the 18 multidrug-resistant Enterobacter spp. into three genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis of the representatives of the three genotypes using partial 16S rRNA gene sequence (approximately 900 bp) showed that the genotypically diverse groups belonged to Enterobacter hormaechei, E. cloacae, and E. cancerogenus, respectively. The clinical significance of the close relative Enterobacter spp. is indicative of their zoonotic potential. Therefore, urgent intervention is required to limit the emergence and spread of these bacteria in poultry feed as well as prudent use of antibiotics among poultry farmers in Bangladesh.

  5. Carbapenem Susceptibility and Multidrug-Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Hashem, Hany; Hanora, Amro; Abdalla, Salah; Shawky, Alaa; Saad, Alaa

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a serious concern for antimicrobial therapy, as the common isolates exhibit variable grades of resistance, involving beta-lactamase enzymes, beside native defense mechanisms. Objectives The present study was designed to determine the occurrence of Metallo-β- Lactamases (MBL) and Amp C harboring P. aeruginosa isolates from Suez Canal university hospital in Ismailia, Egypt. Methods A total of 147 P. aeruginosa isolates, recovered from 311 patients during a 10-month period, were collected between May 2013 and February 2014; the isolates were collected from urine, wound and sputum. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determined by agar dilution methods was ≥2 μg/mL for meropenem and imipenem. Identification of P. aeruginosa was confirmed using API 20NE. Metallo-β- Lactamases and Amp C were detected based on different phenotypic methods. Results Overall, 26.5% of P. aeruginosa isolates (39/147) were carbapenem resistant isolates. Furthermore, 64.1% (25/39) were MBL producers, these isolates were screened by the combined disc and disc diffusion methods to determine the ability of MBL production. Both MBL and Amp C harbored P. aeruginosa isolates were 28% (7/25). Sixty-four percent of P. aeruginosa isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR) (16/25). The sensitivity toward polymyxin, imipenem, norfloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam and gentamicin was 99%, 91%, 88%, 82% and 78%, respectively. The resistance rate towards cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefepime, aztreonam and meropenem was 98.6%, 86%, 71.4%, 34% and 30%, respectively. Conclusions Multidrug resistance was significantly associated with MBL production in P. aeruginosa. Early detection of MBL-producing P. aeruginosa and hospital antibiotic policy prescription helps proper antimicrobial therapy and avoidance of dissemination of these multidrug resistance isolates. PMID:28138370

  6. 3D scaffold with effective multidrug sequential release against bacteria biofilm.

    PubMed

    García-Alvarez, Rafaela; Izquierdo-Barba, Isabel; Vallet-Regí, María

    2017-02-01

    Bone infection is a feared complication following surgery or trauma that remains as an extremely difficult disease to deal with. So far, the outcome of therapy could be improved with the design of 3D implants, which combine the merits of osseous regeneration and local multidrug therapy so as to avoid bacterial growth, drug resistance and the feared side effects. Herein, hierarchical 3D multidrug scaffolds based on nanocomposite bioceramic and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) prepared by rapid prototyping with an external coating of gelatin-glutaraldehyde (Gel-Glu) have been fabricated. These 3D scaffolds contain three antimicrobial agents (rifampin, levofloxacin and vancomycin), which have been localized in different compartments of the scaffold to obtain different release kinetics and more effective combined therapy. Levofloxacin was loaded into the mesopores of nanocomposite bioceramic part, vancomycin was localized into PVA biopolymer part and rifampin was loaded in the external coating of Gel-Glu. The obtained results show an early and fast release of rifampin followed by sustained and prolonged release of vancomycin and levofloxacin, respectively, which are mainly governed by the progressive in vitro degradability rate of these scaffolds. This combined therapy is able to destroy Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria biofilms as well as inhibit the bacteria growth. In addition, these multifunctional scaffolds exhibit excellent bioactivity as well as good biocompatibility with complete cell colonization of preosteoblast in the entire surface, ensuring good bone regeneration. These findings suggest that these hierarchical 3D multidrug scaffolds are promising candidates as platforms for local bone infection therapy.

  7. Amikacin Concentrations Predictive of Ototoxicity in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Modongo, Chawangwa; Pasipanodya, Jotam G.; Zetola, Nicola M.; Williams, Scott M.; Sirugo, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycosides, such as amikacin, are used to treat multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. However, ototoxicity is a common problem and is monitored using peak and trough amikacin concentrations based on World Health Organization recommendations. Our objective was to identify clinical factors predictive of ototoxicity using an agnostic machine learning method. We used classification and regression tree (CART) analyses to identify clinical factors, including amikacin concentration thresholds that predicted audiometry-confirmed ototoxicity among 28 multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Botswana. Amikacin concentrations were measured for all patients. The quantitative relationship between predictive factors and the probability of ototoxicity were then identified using probit analyses. The primary predictors of ototoxicity on CART analyses were cumulative days of therapy, followed by cumulative area under the concentration-time curve (AUC), which improved on the primary predictor by 87%. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.97 on the test set. Peak and trough were not predictors in any tree. When algorithms were forced to pick peak and trough as primary predictors, the area under the receiver operating curve fell to 0.46. Probit analysis revealed that the probability of ototoxicity increased sharply starting after 6 months of therapy to near maximum at 9 months. A 10% probability of ototoxicity occurred with a threshold cumulative AUC of 87,232 days · mg · h/liter, while that of 20% occurred at 120,000 days · mg · h/liter. Thus, cumulative amikacin AUC and duration of therapy, and not peak and trough concentrations, should be used as the primary decision-making parameters to minimize the likelihood of ototoxicity in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:26248372

  8. Selection of a Multidrug Resistance Plasmid by Sublethal Levels of Antibiotics and Heavy Metals

    PubMed Central

    Gullberg, Erik; Albrecht, Lisa M.; Karlsson, Christoffer; Sandegren, Linus

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT How sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals select for clinically important multidrug resistance plasmids is largely unknown. Carriage of plasmids generally confers substantial fitness costs, implying that for the plasmid-carrying bacteria to be maintained in the population, the plasmid cost needs to be balanced by a selective pressure conferred by, for example, antibiotics or heavy metals. We studied the effects of low levels of antibiotics and heavy metals on the selective maintenance of a 220-kbp extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) plasmid identified in a hospital outbreak of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. The concentrations of antibiotics and heavy metals required to maintain plasmid-carrying bacteria, the minimal selective concentrations (MSCs), were in all cases below (almost up to 140-fold) the MIC of the plasmid-free susceptible bacteria. This finding indicates that the very low antibiotic and heavy metal levels found in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficiently high to maintain multiresistance plasmids. When resistance genes were moved from the plasmid to the chromosome, the MSC decreased, showing that MSC for a specific resistance conditionally depends on genetic context. This finding suggests that a cost-free resistance could be maintained in a population by an infinitesimally low concentration of antibiotic. By studying the effect of combinations of several compounds, it was observed that for certain combinations of drugs each new compound added lowered the minimal selective concentration of the others. This combination effect could be a significant factor in the selection of multidrug resistance plasmids/bacterial clones in complex multidrug environments. PMID:25293762

  9. Drug Repurposing of the Anthelmintic Niclosamide to Treat Multidrug-Resistant Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hamdoun, Sami; Jung, Philipp; Efferth, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Multidrug resistance, a major problem that leads to failure of anticancer chemotherapy, requires the development of new drugs. Repurposing of established drugs is a promising approach for overcoming this problem. An example of such drugs is niclosamide, a known anthelmintic that is now known to be cytotoxic and cytostatic against cancer cells. In this study, niclosamide showed varying activity against different cancer cell lines. It revealed better activity against hematological cancer cell lines CCRF-CEM, CEM/ADR5000, and RPMI-8226 compared to the solid tumor cell lines MDA-MB-231, A549, and HT-29. The multidrug resistant CEM/ADR5000 cells were similar sensitive as their sensitive counterpart CCRF-CEM (resistance ration: 1.24). Furthermore, niclosamide caused elevations in reactive oxygen species and glutathione (GSH) levels in leukemia cells. GSH synthetase (GS) was predicted as a target of niclosamide. Molecular docking showed that niclosamide probably binds to the ATP-binding site of GS with a binding energy of -9.40 kcal/mol. Using microscale thermophoresis, the binding affinity between niclosamide and recombinant human GS was measured (binding constant: 5.64 μM). COMPARE analyses of the NCI microarray database for 60 cell lines showed that several genes, including those involved in lipid metabolism, correlated with cellular responsiveness to niclosamide. Hierarchical cluster analysis showed five major branches with significant differences between sensitive and resistant cell lines (p = 8.66 × 105). Niclosamide significantly decreased nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) activity as predicted by promoter binding motif analysis. In conclusion, niclosamide was more active against hematological malignancies compared to solid tumors. The drug was particularly active against the multidrug-resistant CEM/ADR5000 leukemia cells. Inhibition of GSH synthesis and NFAT signaling were identified as relevant mechanisms for the anticancer activity of niclosamide

  10. Structural comparison of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily.

    PubMed

    Ranaweera, Indrika; Shrestha, Ugina; Ranjana, K C; Kakarla, Prathusha; Willmon, T Mark; Hernandez, Alberto J; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Barr, Sharla R; Varela, Manuel F

    The biological membrane is an efficient barrier against water-soluble substances. Solute transporters circumvent this membrane barrier by transporting water-soluble solutes across the membrane to the other sides. These transport proteins are thus required for all living organisms. Microorganisms, such as bacteria, effectively exploit solute transporters to acquire useful nutrients for growth or to expel substances that are inhibitory to their growth. Overall, there are distinct types of related solute transporters that are grouped into families or superfamilies. Of these various transporters, the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) represents a very large and constantly growing group and are driven by solute- and ion-gradients, making them passive and secondary active transporters, respectively. Members of the major facilitator superfamily transport an extreme variety of structurally different substrates such as antimicrobial agents, amino acids, sugars, intermediary metabolites, ions, and other small molecules. Importantly, bacteria, especially pathogenic ones, have evolved multidrug efflux pumps which belong to the major facilitator superfamily. Furthermore, members of this important superfamily share similar primary sequences in the form of highly conserved sequence motifs that confer useful functional properties during transport. The transporters of the superfamily also share similarities in secondary structures, such as possessing 12- or 14-membrane spanning α-helices and the more recently described 3-helix structure repeat element, known as the MFS fold. The three-dimensional structures of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps have been determined for only a few members of the superfamily, all drug pumps of which are surprisingly from Escherichia coli. This review briefly summarizes the structural properties of the bacterial multidrug efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily in a comparative manner and provides future directions for study.

  11. Susceptibilities of Candida albicans multidrug transporter mutants to various antifungal agents and other metabolic inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Sanglard, D; Ischer, F; Monod, M; Bille, J

    1996-01-01

    Some Candida albicans isolates from AIDS patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis are becoming resistant to the azole antifungal agent fluconazole after prolonged treatment with this compound. Most of the C. albicans isolates resistant to fluconazole fail to accumulate this antifungal agent, and this has been considered a cause of resistance. This phenomenon was shown to be linked to an increase in the amounts of mRNA of a C. albicans ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter gene called CDR1 and of a gene conferring benomyl resistance (BENr), the product of which belongs to the class of major facilitator multidrug efflux transporters (D. Sanglard, K. Kuchler, F. Ischer, J. L. Pagani, M. Monod, and J. Bille, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 39:2378-2386, 1995). To analyze the roles of these multidrug transporters in the efflux of azole antifungal agents, we constructed C. albicans mutants with single and double deletion mutations of the corresponding genes. The mutants were tested for their susceptibilities to these antifungal agents. Our results indicated that the delta cdr1 C. albicans mutant was hypersusceptible to the azole derivatives fluconazole, itraconazole, and ketoconazole, thus showing that the ABC transporter Cdr1 can use these compounds as substrates. The delta cdr1 mutant was also hypersusceptible to other antifungal agents (terbinafine and amorolfine) and to different metabolic inhibitors (cycloheximide, brefeldin A, and fluphenazine). The same mutant was slightly more susceptible than the wild type to nocodazole, cerulenin, and crystal violet but not to amphotericin B, nikkomycin Z, flucytosine, or pradimicin. In contrast, the delta ben mutant was rendered more susceptible only to the mutagen 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide. However, this mutation increased the susceptibilities of the cells to cycloheximide and cerulenin when the mutation was constructed in a delta cdr1 background. The assay used in the present study could be implemented with new antifungal

  12. Multidrug-resistant Combined Infections in a Liver Transplanted Patient: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Amedeo; Montin, Umberto; Violi, Paola; Soldani, Fabio; Mazzi, Romualdo; Merighi, Mara; Kanani, Faheem; Concia, Ercole; Tedeschi, Umberto

    2016-04-07

    We report a case of successfully treated multiple liver abscesses in a liver-transplanted patient, sustained by combined multidrug-resistant infections. Two months after a liver transplant, a computed tomography scan revealed the presence of multiple abscesses in the liver graft. Blood cultures and abscessual liver fluid were both positive for acquired colistin- and carbapenem- resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and an extended-spectrum of beta-lactamases-producing Enterobacter aerogenes. The treatment strategy consisted of different prolonged antimicrobial combinations and draining of the abscesses with complete recovery of the liver lesions.

  13. Antibiotic Trends Amid Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Infections in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Leanne H; Lee, Susan

    2017-03-01

    Isolates from ICUs most commonly find multidrug-resistant (MDR) gram-negative bacteria. The purpose of this article is to discuss the significant impact MDR gram-negative infections are having on ICUs, the threat on health and mortality, and effective and new approaches aimed to combat MDR gram-negative infections in critically ill populations. Inappropriate antibiotic therapies for suspected or documented infections are the leading cause of the emergence of bacterial resistance. A variety of strategies are aimed at combatting this international burden via antibiotic stewardship programs. Studies are demonstrating promise against the virulence MDR gram-negative infections have posed.

  14. Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in solid organ transplant recipients with bacteremias.

    PubMed

    Wan, Q Q; Ye, Q F; Yuan, H

    2015-03-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) remain as life-threatening complications and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality among solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria can cause serious bacteremias in these recipients. Reviews have aimed to investigate MDR Gram-negative bacteremias; however, they were lacking in SOT recipients in the past. To better understand the characteristics of bacteremias due to MDR Gram-negative bacteria, optimize preventive and therapeutic strategies, and improve the outcomes of SOT recipients, this review summarize the epidemiology, clinical and laboratory characteristics, and explores the mechanisms, prevention, and treatment of MDR Gram-negative bacteria.

  15. Fatal Pulmonary Infection Due to Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium abscessus in a Patient with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Ardito, Fausta; Fiscarelli, Ersilia; La Sorda, Marilena; D'Argenio, Patrizia; Ricciotti, Gabriella; Fadda, Giovanni

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of fatal pulmonary infection caused by Mycobacterium abscessus in a young patient with cystic fibrosis, who underwent bipulmonary transplantation after a 1-year history of severe lung disease. Fifteen days after surgery he developed septic fever with progressive deterioration in lung function. M. abscessus, initially isolated from a pleural fluid specimen, was then recovered from repeated blood samples, suggesting a disseminated nature of the mycobacterial disease. Drug susceptibility testing assay, performed on two sequential isolates of the microorganism, showed a pattern of multidrug resistance. Despite aggressive therapy with several antimycobacterial drugs, including clarithromycin, the infection persisted, and the patient died. PMID:11158161

  16. Difficulties in Demonstrating Superiority of an Antibiotic for Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria in Nonrandomized Studies

    PubMed Central

    Eliopoulos, George M.; Stafford, Kristen A.; Boutin, Mallory; Evans, Scott R.; Harris, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery and development of new antimicrobials is critically important, especially as multidrug-resistant bacteria continue to emerge. Little has been written about the epidemiological issues in nonrandomized trials aiming to evaluate the superiority of one antibiotic over another. In this manuscript, we outline some of the methodological difficulties in demonstrating superiority and discuss potential approaches to these problems. Many of the difficulties arise due to confounding by indication, which we define and explain. Epidemiological methods including restriction, matching, stratification, multivariable regression, propensity scores, and instrumental variables are discussed. PMID:24982037

  17. Pneumocephalus as a complication of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, P; Vishad, V; Pappachan, Joseph M; Laly, D C; Jayaprakash, R; Ranjith, V T

    2008-03-01

    Pneumocephalus implies air inside the cranial vault, which usually results from cranio-facial trauma. Occasionally, meningitis caused by gas-forming organisms can result in pneumocephalus. Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis can, on rare occasions, cause pneumocephalus as a complication. The drug of choice for K. pneumoniae meningitis is a third-generation cephalosporin, and resistance to these drugs is unusual. We report a case of multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae meningitis resulting from chronic suppurative otitis media, which was later complicated by pneumocephalus. The patient was successfully managed with meropenam and amikacin, the only antibiotics to which these bacilli showed no resistance.

  18. First report of an OXA-48-producing multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain from Gaza, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Al Laham, Nahed; Chavda, Kalyan D; Mediavilla, Jose R; Jacobs, Michael R; Bonomo, Robert A; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2015-07-01

    We report the first multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain producing the carbapenemase OXA-48 (Pm-OXA-48) isolated at Al-Shifa hospital in Gaza, Palestine. Draft genome sequencing of Pm-OXA-48 identified 16 antimicrobial resistance genes, encoding resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, phenicols, streptothricin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complete sequencing of the bla(OXA-48)-harboring plasmid revealed that it is a 72 kb long IncL/M plasmid, harboring carbapenemase gene bla(OXA-48), extended spectrum β-lactamase gene bla(CTX-M-14), and aminoglycoside resistance genes strA, strB, and aph(3')-VIb.

  19. Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP) with Multidrug-Resistant (MDR) Pathogens: Optimal Treatment?

    PubMed

    Bailey, Kristina L; Kalil, Andre C

    2015-08-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) due to multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDR) is an emerging problem worldwide. Both gram-negative and gram-positive microorganisms are associated with VAP. We first describe the magnitude of the problem of MDR VAP followed by its clinical impact on survival outcomes, with the primary aim to review the optimal antibiotic choices to treat patients with MDR VAP. We discuss the challenges of intravenous and inhaled antibiotic treatments, as well as of monotherapy and combination antimicrobial therapies.

  20. The Impact of Cell Density and Mutations in a Model of Multidrug Resistance in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Greene, James; Lavi, Orit; Gottesman, Michael M.; Levy, Doron

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we develop a mathematical framework for describing multidrug resistance in cancer. To reflect the complexity of the underlying interplay between cancer cells and the therapeutic agent, we assume that the resistance level is a continuous parameter. Our model is written as a system of integro-differential equations that are parametrized by the resistance level. This model incorporates the cell-density and mutation dependence. Analysis and simulations of the model demonstrate how the dynamics evolves to a selection of one or more traits corresponding to different levels of resistance. The emerging limit distribution with nonzero variance is the desirable modeling outcome as it represents tumor heterogeneity. PMID:24553772

  1. Characterization of an IncA/C Multidrug Resistance Plasmid in Vibrio alginolyticus.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lianwei; Li, Ruichao; Lin, Dachuan; Zhou, Yuanjie; Fu, Aisi; Ding, Qiong; Chan, Edward Wai Chi; Yao, Wen; Chen, Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Cephalosporin-resistant Vibrio alginolyticus was first isolated from food products, with β-lactamases encoded by blaPER-1, blaVEB-1, and blaCMY-2 being the major mechanisms mediating their cephalosporin resistance. The complete sequence of a multidrug resistance plasmid, pVAS3-1, harboring the blaCMY-2 and qnrVC4 genes was decoded in this study. Its backbone exhibited genetic homology to known IncA/C plasmids recoverable from members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, suggesting its possible origin in Enterobacteriaceae.

  2. Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in Chuuk State Federated States of Micronesia, 2008-2009.

    PubMed

    Fred, D; Desai, M; Song, R; Bamrah, S; Pavlin, B I; Heetderks, A; Ekiek, M J

    2010-04-01

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) is a growing public health concern, particularly for the Pacific, where rates of tuberculosis infection are extremely high. In May 2008, a cluster of patients with MDR TB were identified in Chuuk State, Federated States of Micronesia. A multi-agency investigation led to the eventual discovery of 21 cases, and over 100 latent TB infections. Incomplete implementation of Directly Observed Therapy (DOT) and contact investigation were major contributors to the outbreak. The problem of MDR TB in Chuuk was controlled only after a concerted effort on the part of multiple agencies coupled with the highest level of political commitment.

  3. ABC transporters as multidrug resistance mechanisms and the development of chemosensitizers for their reversal

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Cheol-Hee

    2005-01-01

    One of the major problems related with anticancer chemotherapy is resistance against anticancer drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a family of transporter proteins that are responsible for drug resistance and a low bioavailability of drugs by pumping a variety of drugs out cells at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. One strategy for reversal of the resistance of tumor cells expressing ABC transporters is combined use of anticancer drugs with chemosensitizers. In this review, the physiological functions and structures of ABC transporters, and the development of chemosensitizers are described focusing on well-known proteins including P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance associated protein, and breast cancer resistance protein. PMID:16202168

  4. Colonization of Libyan civil war casualties with multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Koole, K; Ellerbroek, P M; Lagendijk, R; Leenen, L P H; Ekkelenkamp, M B

    2013-07-01

    In November 2011 51 Libyan war casualties were admitted to the Major Incident Hospital in Utrecht and from there were transferred to 26 other Dutch hospitals. Cultures and clinical data were collected to establish the prevalence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria in this patient group and to identify the associated risk factors. The prevalence of MDR bacteria was 59% (30/51 patients); extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing enterobacteriaceae were most common (26/51 patients: 51%). The major risk factor for carriage of MDR bacteria was the presence of open wounds at admission to the Major Incident Hospital.

  5. The effect of terminal cleaning on environmental contamination rates of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Strassle, Paula; Thom, Kerri A; Johnson, J Kristie; Johnsonm, J Kristie; Leekha, Surbhi; Lissauer, Matthew; Zhu, Jingkun; Harris, Anthony D

    2012-12-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii environmental contamination before and after discharge cleaning in rooms of infected/colonized patients. 46.9% of rooms and 15.3% of sites were found contaminated precleaning, and 25% of rooms and 5.5% of sites were found contaminated postcleaning. Cleaning significantly decreased environmental contamination of A baumannii; however, persistent contamination represents a significant risk factor for transmission. Further studies on this and more effective cleaning methods are needed.

  6. A case of intravascular lymphoma complicated with Fournier's syndrome due to multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Hiroyasu; Yoshida, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Fournier's syndrome is the fulminant necrotizing fasciitis of the external genitalia. The occurrence of Fournier's syndrome in patients with hematologic malignancies has been reported. Here we report a case of an intravascular lymphoma complicated with Fournier's syndrome due to multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP). A 71-year-old Japanese man received intensive chemotherapy for recurring intravascular lymphoma. Blood culture revealed MDRP, and physical examination led to the diagnosis of Fournier's syndrome. Aggressive treatment that comprised granulocyte transfusion, granulocyte stimulating factor, endotoxin filtration, appropriate antibiotic coverage, and aggressive surgical therapy was administered, and this lead to the successful recovery from sepsis and Fournier's syndrome.

  7. Enterococcus faecalis as multidrug resistance strains in clinical isolates in Imam Reza Hospital in Kermanshah, Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, F; Ghafourian, S; Mohebi, R; Taherikalani, M; Pakzad, I; Valadbeigi, H; Hatami, V; Sadeghifard, N

    2015-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the prevalence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus in E. faecalis and E. faecium and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, then dominant genes responsible for vancomycin resistance were determined. For this propose, 180 clinical isolates of Enterococcus were subjected for identification and antibiotic susceptibility assay. Then, the gene responsible vancomycin resistant strains were determined. The results demonstrated the E. faecalis as a dominant Enterococcus. Resistance to erythromycin was dominant and multidrug resistance strains observed in E. faecalis. vanA was responsible for vancomycin resistance. In conclusion, a high rate of resistance to antibiotics in Enterococcus is clearly problematic, and a novel strategy is needed to decrease resistance in Enterococcus.

  8. Rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis and multidrug resistance with the microscopic observation drug susceptibility assay in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Giacomazzi, C G; Cespedes-Alvarado, C G; Losada-Cabruja, E A; McDermott, J L; Rojas-Andrade, C A; Varnier, O E

    2010-06-01

    A collaborative project was established between the Alli Causai Foundation in Ambato, Ecuador, and the University of Genoa, Italy, to introduce the microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS) assay for the rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Ecuador. A total of 507 samples were evaluated during a 10-month period, and DNA was extracted from each isolate and sent to Genoa for confirmatory molecular analysis. M. tuberculosis was identified in 45 samples by MODS, and drug resistance was observed in approximately 21% of the isolates, with four multidrug-resistant strains detected in two patients.

  9. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in transplant recipients: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Huaman, Moises A; Brawley, Robert; Ashkin, David

    2017-04-01

    Transplant recipients are at increased risk of tuberculosis (TB). We describe a case of pulmonary and vertebral multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) in a kidney transplant patient who required neurosurgical intervention and unfortunately developed fatal nosocomial complications. Thirteen transplant recipients with MDR-TB were previously reported in the literature (one hematopoietic cell transplant, one heart transplant, one lung transplant, one heart-lung transplant, and nine kidney transplant recipients). Extrapulmonary disease, severe treatment complications, and deaths were observed in patients who developed MDR-TB after transplantation.

  10. Laser thermal ablation of multidrug-resistant bacteria using functionalized gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mocan, Lucian; Tabaran, Flaviu A; Mocan, Teodora; Pop, Teodora; Mosteanu, Ofelia; Agoston-Coldea, Lucia; Matea, Cristian T; Gonciar, Diana; Zdrehus, Claudiu; Iancu, Cornel

    2017-01-01

    The issue of multidrug resistance (MDR) has become an increasing threat to public health. One alternative strategy against MDR bacteria would be to construct therapeutic vectors capable of physically damaging these microorganisms. Gold nanoparticles hold great promise for the development of such therapeutic agents, since the nanoparticles exhibit impressive properties, of which the most important is the ability to convert light into heat. This property has scientific significance since is exploited to develop nano-photothermal vectors to destroy bacteria at a molecular level. The present paper summarizes the latest advancements in the field of nanotargeted laser hyperthermia of MDR bacteria mediated by gold nanoparticles. PMID:28356741

  11. Intrathecal/Intraventricular Linezolid in Multidrug-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis Ventriculitis

    PubMed Central

    Lich, Brian F.; Conner, Andrew K.; Burks, Joshua D.; Glenn, Chad A.; Sughrue, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of intrathecal antibiotic therapy for the treatment of ventriculitis and/or meningitis has demonstrated efficacy especially when sterilization of the cerebrospinal fluid is not possible with intravenous antibiotics alone. Case Description We describe the successful treatment of Enterococcus faecalis ventriculitis utilizing intrathecal linezolid in a 32-year-old female patient with severe allergy to vancomycin, prohibitive bacterial susceptibilities, and failure of previous attempts to sterilize the cerebrospinal fluid despite multimodal treatment. Conclusion Intrathecal linezolid is a useful treatment in the setting of multidrug-resistant bacterial ventriculitis. We present a useful dosing regimen for the administration of intrathecal linezolid. PMID:27867829

  12. Genome-wide re-sequencing of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium leprae Airaku-3.

    PubMed

    Singh, P; Benjak, A; Carat, S; Kai, M; Busso, P; Avanzi, C; Paniz-Mondolfi, A; Peter, C; Harshman, K; Rougemont, J; Matsuoka, M; Cole, S T

    2014-10-01

    Genotyping and molecular characterization of drug resistance mechanisms in Mycobacterium leprae enables disease transmission and drug resistance trends to be monitored. In the present study, we performed genome-wide analysis of Airaku-3, a multidrug-resistant strain with an unknown mechanism of resistance to rifampicin. We identified 12 unique non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) including two in the transporter-encoding ctpC and ctpI genes. In addition, two SNPs were found that improve the resolution of SNP-based genotyping, particularly for Venezuelan and South East Asian strains of M. leprae.

  13. Draft Genomic Analysis of an Avian Multidrug Resistant Morganella morganii Isolate Carrying qnrD1

    PubMed Central

    Jones-Dias, Daniela; Clemente, Lurdes; Moura, Inês B.; Sampaio, Daniel A.; Albuquerque, Teresa; Vieira, Luís; Manageiro, Vera; Caniça, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Morganella morganii is a commensal bacterium and opportunistic pathogen often present in the gut of humans and animals. We report the 4.3 Mbp draft genome sequence of a M. morganii isolated in association with an Escherichia coli from broilers in Portugal that showed macroscopic lesions consistent with colisepticemia. The analysis of the genome matched the multidrug resistance phenotype and enabled the identification of several clinically important and potentially mobile acquired antibiotic resistance genes, including the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinant qnrD1. Mobile genetic elements, prophages, and pathogenicity factors were also detected, improving our understanding toward this human and animal opportunistic pathogen. PMID:27826290

  14. Management of emerging multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in a low-prevalence setting.

    PubMed

    Catho, G; Couraud, S; Grard, S; Bouaziz, A; Sénéchal, A; Valour, F; Perpoint, T; Braun, E; Biron, F; Ferry, T; Chidiac, C; Freymond, N; Perrot, E; Souquet, P-J; Maury, J-M; Tronc, F; Veziris, N; Lina, G; Dumitrescu, O; Ader, F

    2015-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) is an emerging concern in communities with a low TB prevalence and a high standard of public health. Twenty-three consecutive adult MDR TB patients who were treated at our institution between 2007 and 2013 were reviewed for demographic characteristics and anti-TB treatment management, which included surgical procedures and long-term patient follow-up. This report of our experience emphasizes the need for an individualized approach as MDR TB brings mycobacterial disease management to a higher level of expertise, and for a balance to be found between international current guidelines and patient-tailored treatment strategies.

  15. A review of intravenous minocycline for treatment of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter infections.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, David J; Garavaglia-Wilson, Alexandria

    2014-12-01

    Options for treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii infections are extremely limited. Minocycline intravenous is active against many MDR strains of Acinetobacter, and Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoints exist to guide interpretation of minocycline susceptibility results with Acinetobacter. In addition, minocycline intravenous holds a US Food and Drug Administration indication for treatment of infections caused by Acinetobacter. There is an accumulating amount of literature reporting successful use of minocycline intravenous for treatment of serious MDR Acinetobacter infections, particularly for nosocomial pneumonia. These results, coupled with the generally favorable tolerability of minocycline intravenous, support its use as a viable therapeutic option for treatment of MDR Acinetobacter infections.

  16. Multidrug-resistant Candida auris: 'new kid on the block' in hospital-associated infections?

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, A; Voss, A; Meis, J F

    2016-11-01

    Since being first reported in an ear swab in 2009, and in blood cultures in 2011, invasive infections with Candida auris have been reported in many countries across several continents. We review current knowledge of the epidemiology of this emerging multidrug-resistant pathogen. The importance of species identification and the inadequacies of many widely used identification systems are considered. We recommend that hospitals develop their own policies for the prevention and control of infections with this pathogen. Elements of such policies and the limitations of the existing knowledge base are discussed.

  17. The impact of multidrug resistance on outcomes in ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Tedja, Rudy; Nowacki, Amy; Fraser, Thomas; Fatica, Cynthia; Griffiths, Lori; Gordon, Steven; Isada, Carlos; van Duin, David

    2014-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms in ventilator-associated pneumonia were found in 49 of 107 patients and were associated with home antibiotics, pre-ventilator-associated pneumonia hospital stay, and health care exposure. Overall, MDR organisms were associated with increased mortality (P = .006). On multivariate analysis, MDR status was modulated by organism class. In nonfermenting gram-negative rods, no association between MDR and mortality was found, but, in all other organisms, MDR was associated with increased mortality risk (hazard ratio, 6.15; 95% confidence interval: 1.80-21.05, P = .004).

  18. Multidrug efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria and their role in antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jessica M A; Richmond, Grace E; Piddock, Laura J V

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria express a plethora of efflux pumps that are capable of transporting structurally varied molecules, including antibiotics, out of the bacterial cell. This efflux lowers the intracellular antibiotic concentration, allowing bacteria to survive at higher antibiotic concentrations. Overexpression of some efflux pumps can cause clinically relevant levels of antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative pathogens. This review discusses the role of efflux in resistance of clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacteria, the regulatory mechanisms that control efflux pump expression, the recent advances in our understanding of efflux pump structure and how inhibition of efflux is a promising future strategy for tackling multidrug resistance in Gram-negative pathogens.

  19. Multivalent Aptamer-RNA Conjugates for Simple and Efficient Delivery of Doxorubicin/siRNA into Multidrug-Resistant Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyosook; Lee, Soo Hyeon; Hwang, Yeonju; Yoo, Hyundong; Jung, Heesun; Kim, Sun Hwa; Mok, Hyejung

    2017-04-01

    Multivalent aptamer-siRNA conjugates containing multiple mucin-1 aptamers and BCL2-specific siRNA are synthesized, and doxorubicin, an anthracycline anticancer drug, is loaded into these conjugates through intercalation with nucleic acids. These doxorubicin-incorporated multivalent aptamer-siRNA conjugates are transfected to mucin-1 overexpressing MCF-7 breast cancer cells and their multidrug-resistant cell lines. Doxorubicin-incorporated multivalent aptamer-siRNA conjugates exert promising anticancer effects, such as activation of caspase-3/7 and decrease of cell viability, on multidrug-resistant cancer cells because of their high intracellular uptake efficiency. Thus, this delivery system is an efficient tool for combination oncotherapy with chemotherapeutics and nucleic acid drugs to overcome multidrug resistance.

  20. Isolation and molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria from imported flamingos in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Maiko; Ahmed, Ashraf M; Noda, Ayako; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Fukumoto, Yukio; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2009-11-24

    Imported animals, especially those from developing countries, may constitute a potential hazard to native animals and to public health. In this study, a new flock of lesser flamingos imported from Tanzania to Hiroshima Zoological Park were screened for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, integrons and antimicrobial resistance genes. Thirty-seven Gram-negative bacterial isolates were obtained from the flamingos. Seven isolates (18.9%) showed multidrug resistance phenotypes, the most common being against: ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and nalidixic acid. Molecular analyses identified class 1 and class 2 integrons, beta-lactamase-encoding genes, blaTEM-1 and blaCTX-M-2 and the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, qnrS and qnrB. This study highlights the role of animal importation in the dissemination of multidrug-resistant bacteria, integrons and antimicrobial resistance genes from one country to another.

  1. Isolation and molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant halophilic bacteria from shrimp farm effluents of Parangipettai coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Sundaramanickam, Arumugam; Kumar, Poominathan Suresh; Kumaresan, Saravanan; Balasubramanian, Thangavel

    2015-08-01

    Multidrug resistance of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from an aquaculture farm effluent in Parangipettai, at the southeastern coast of India, was investigated. In the initial screening, 27 antibiotic-resistant strains were isolated. All the strains were tested for antibiotic susceptibility against chloramphenicol with varying concentrations. From these, two highly resistant strains, i.e. S1 and S5, were isolated. The selected strains were identified by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequencing techniques and confirmed as Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus flexus. Both the antibiotic-resistant strains were further utilized for multidrug susceptibility test by using various antibiotics. These two strains showed antibiotic resistance to 14 of 17 antibiotics tested. Both microdilution assay and well assay methods were used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for the sensitive strains. Both the tests were shown to be almost similar. Our study highlights the occurrence of multidrug-resistant bacteria in the shrimp farm effluents.

  2. Bacillus subtilis from Soybean Food Shows Antimicrobial Activity for Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii by Affecting the adeS Gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tieshan; Su, Jianrong

    2016-12-28

    Exploring novel antibiotics is necessary for multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. Because the probiotics in soybean food have antimicrobial activities, we investigated their effects on multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Nineteen multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains were clinifcally isolated as an experimental group and 11 multidrug-sensitive strains as controls. The growth rates of all bacteria were determined by using the analysis for xCELLigence Real-Time Cell. The combination of antibiotics showed synergistic effects on the strains in the control group but no effect on the strains in the experimental group. Efflux pump gene adeS was absent in all the strains from the control group, whereas it exists in all the strains from the experimental group. Furthermore, all the strains lost multidrug resistance when an adeS inhibitor was used. One strain of probiotics isolated from soybean food showed high antimicrobial activity for multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. The isolated strain belongs to Bacillus subtilis according to 16S RNA analysis. Furthermore, E. coli showed multidrug resistance when it was transformed with the adeS gene from A. baumannii whereas the resistant bacteria could be inhibited completely by isolated Bacillus subtilis. Thus, probiotics from soybean food provide potential antibiotics against multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria.

  3. In silico identified targeted inhibitors of P-glycoprotein overcome multidrug resistance in human cancer cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Follit, Courtney A; Brewer, Frances K; Wise, John G; Vogel, Pia D

    2015-01-01

    Failure of cancer chemotherapies is often linked to the over expression of ABC efflux transporters like the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp expression in cells leads to the elimination of a variety of chemically unrelated, mostly cytotoxic compounds. Administration of chemotherapeutics during therapy frequently selects for cells that over express P-gp and are therefore capable of robustly exporting diverse compounds, including chemotherapeutics, from the cells. P-gp thus confers multidrug resistance to a majority of drugs currently available for the treatment of cancers and diseases like HIV/AIDS. The search for P-gp inhibitors for use as co-therapeutics to combat multidrug resistances has had little success to date. In a previous study (Brewer et al., Mol Pharmacol 86: 716–726, 2014), we described how ultrahigh throughput computational searches led to the identification of four drug-like molecules that specifically interfere with the energy harvesting steps of substrate transport and inhibit P-gp catalyzed ATP hydrolysis in vitro. In the present study, we demonstrate that three of these compounds reversed P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance of cultured prostate cancer cells to restore sensitivity comparable to naïve prostate cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic drug, paclitaxel. Potentiation concentrations of the inhibitors were <3 μmol/L. The inhibitors did not exhibit significant toxicity to noncancerous cells at concentrations where they reversed multidrug resistance in cancerous cells. Our results indicate that these compounds with novel mechanisms of P-gp inhibition are excellent leads for the development of co-therapeutics for the treatment of multidrug resistances. PMID:26516582

  4. Multidrug-resistant pathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from wild birds in a veterinary hospital.

    PubMed

    Borges, C A; Beraldo, L G; Maluta, R P; Cardozo, M V; Barboza, K B; Guastalli, E A L; Kariyawasam, S; DebRoy, C; Ávila, F A

    2017-02-01

    Wild birds are carriers of Escherichia coli. However, little is known about their role as reservoirs for extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). In this work we investigated E. coli strains carrying virulence genes related to human and animal ExPEC isolated from free-living wild birds treated in a veterinary hospital. Multidrug resistance was found in 47.4% of the strains, but none of them were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producers. Not only the virulence genes, but also the serogroups (e.g. O1 and O2) detected in the isolates of E. coli have already been implicated in human and bird diseases. The sequence types detected were also found in wild, companion and food animals, environmental and human clinical isolates in different countries. Furthermore, from the 19 isolates, 17 (89.5%) showed a degree of pathogenicity on an in vivo infection model. The isolates showed high heterogeneity by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis indicating that E. coli from these birds are clonally diverse. Overall, the results showed that wild birds can be reservoirs and/or vectors of highly pathogenic and multidrug-resistant E. coli that have the potential to cause disease in humans and poultry.

  5. A multidrug resistance plasmid contains the molecular switch for type VI secretion in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Brent S.; Ly, Pek Man; Irwin, Joshua N.; Pukatzki, Stefan; Feldman, Mario F.

    2015-01-01

    Infections with Acinetobacter baumannii, one of the most troublesome and least studied multidrug-resistant superbugs, are increasing at alarming rates. A. baumannii encodes a type VI secretion system (T6SS), an antibacterial apparatus of Gram-negative bacteria used to kill competitors. Expression of the T6SS varies among different strains of A. baumannii, for which the regulatory mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that several multidrug-resistant strains of A. baumannii harbor a large, self-transmissible resistance plasmid that carries the negative regulators for T6SS. T6SS activity is silenced in plasmid-containing, antibiotic-resistant cells, while part of the population undergoes frequent plasmid loss and activation of the T6SS. This activation results in T6SS-mediated killing of competing bacteria but renders A. baumannii susceptible to antibiotics. Our data show that a plasmid that has evolved to harbor antibiotic resistance genes plays a role in the differentiation of cells specialized in the elimination of competing bacteria. PMID:26170289

  6. Genetic diversity of multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical and non clinical samples in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Bendary, M M; Solyman, S M; Azab, M M; Mahmoud, N F; Hanora, A M

    2016-08-31

    In recent years, the increasing incidence of diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) has been noted in the university hospitals of El-Sharkia and Assuit governorates - Egypt. Therefore, we studied the genetic relatedness of multidrug resistant S. aureus isolates from different sources in the above mentioned governorates. One hundred and fifty six S. aureus isolates were divided into 5 different groups, 1 non clinical isolates from different food products and 4 different clinical isolates of human and animal sources in the 2 different governorates. Epidemiological characteristics of 156 S. aureus isolates were determined by phenotypic methods including quantitative antibiogram typing and biofilm production. Genetic typing of 35 multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates (7 from each group) based on 16S rRNA gene sequence, virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene profiles was done. The genetic relatedness of the highest virulent strain from each group was detected based on different single locus sequence typing and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). S. aureus strains isolated from different sources and geographical areas showed high diversity. The genetic typing revealed different sequence types and different sequences of coa and spa genes. S. aureus isolates were found highly diverse in Egypt.

  7. Bedaquiline for the treatment of pulmonary, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in adults.

    PubMed

    Gras, J

    2013-06-01

    After AIDS, tuberculosis (TB) is the leading killer worldwide due to a single infectious agent. Recently, drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis elicited even more severe versions of TB. Bedaquiline inhibits mycobacterial ATP synthase. It shows potent and selective activity in vitro against M. tuberculosis, and in vivo against murine models of TB. Bedaquiline can be combined with antituberculosis and antiretroviral agents. The product displays good oral absorption, has a long terminal half-life and is metabolized mainly by cytochrome P450 3A4. In a phase II clinical trial in patients with multidrug-resistant TB, bedaquiline (combined with the standard five-drug, second-line TB regimen), showed a time to 50% culture negative conversion of 78 days, with 81.0% and 52.4% efficacy at weeks 24 and 104, respectively. Bedaquiline was generally safe and well tolerated. At the end of 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved bedaquiline (Sirturo®) as part of a combination therapy to treat adults with multidrug-resistant TB.

  8. Tolerance to drug-induced cell death favours the acquisition of multidrug resistance in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, W; Leprohon, P; Ouellette, M

    2011-01-01

    The control of the protozoan parasite Leishmania relies on few drugs with unknown cellular targets and unclear mode of action. Several antileishmanials, however, were shown to induce apoptosis in Leishmania and this death mechanism was further studied in drug-sensitive and drug-resistant Leishmania infantum. In sensitive parasites, antimonials (SbIII), miltefosine (MF) and amphotericin B (AMB), but not paromomycin (PARO), triggered apoptotic cell death associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, Leishmania mutants resistant to SbIII, MF or AMB not only failed to undergo apoptosis following exposure to their respective drugs, but also were more tolerant towards apoptosis induced by other antileishmanials, provided that these killed Leishmania via ROS production. Such tolerance favored the rapid acquisition of multidrug resistance. PARO killed Leishmania in a non-apoptotic manner and failed to produce ROS. PARO resistance neither protected against drug-induced apoptosis nor provided an increased rate of acquisition of resistance to other antileishmanials. However, the PARO-resistant mutant, but not SbIII-, MF- or AMB-resistant mutants, became rapidly cross-resistant to methotrexate, a model drug also not producing ROS. Our results therefore link the mode of killing of drugs to tolerance to cell death and to a facilitated emergence of multidrug resistance. These findings may have fundamental implications in the field of chemotherapeutic interventions. PMID:21881603

  9. Long-term molecular surveillance of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Spain.

    PubMed

    Gavín, Patricia; Iglesias, María José; Jiménez, María Soledad; Rodríguez-Valín, Elena; Ibarz, Daniel; Lezcano, María Antonia; Revillo, María José; Martín, Carlos; Samper, Sofía

    2012-06-01

    The data presented here span 11 years (1998-2008) of monitoring of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) clustering through molecular typing techniques in Spain. The molecular and epidemiological data of 480 multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates were analyzed. Thirty-one clusters involving 157 (32.7%) patients were identified. The proportion of immigrants increased substantially over the study period reaching 65% in 2008; however, the clustering rate remained stable indicating that local transmission was little influenced by imported MDR-TB. The three major clusters respond to the persistence of two autochthonous strains throughout the study period and an extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium bovis outbreak with only two cases was reported since 2002. Molecular and epidemiological evidence for the importation of new strains and their spread within the community was found. Immigrant-only clusters most often grouped patients infected abroad with strains belonging to rare spoligotypes. Conversely, widespread spoligotypes of the Latin-American and Mediterranean (LAM) and Haarlem families were responsible for the majority of the MDR-TB local transmission. The demonstration of clusters spanning several Spanish regions that have been ongoing throughout the study period makes it advisable to maintain a continuous molecular surveillance in order to monitor the spread of MDR-TB.

  10. Identification and Characterization of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Albert Isolates in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Davina; Grass, Julian; Brown, Allison C.; Bicknese, Amelia; Tolar, Beth; Joseph, Lavin A.; Plumblee, Jodie R.; Walker, Carrie; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J.; Whichard, Jean M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is one of the most common causes of bacterial foodborne illness in the United States. Although most Salmonella infections are self-limiting, antimicrobial treatment of invasive salmonellosis is critical. The primary antimicrobial treatment options include fluoroquinolones or extended-spectrum cephalosporins, and resistance to these antimicrobial drugs may complicate treatment. At present, S. enterica is composed of more than 2,600 unique serotypes, which vary greatly in geographic prevalence, ecological niche, and the ability to cause human disease, and it is important to understand and mitigate the source of human infection, particularly when antimicrobial resistance is found. In this study, we identified and characterized 19 S. enterica serotype Albert isolates collected from food animals, retail meat, and humans in the United States during 2005 to 2013. All five isolates from nonhuman sources were obtained from turkeys or ground turkey, and epidemiologic data suggest poultry consumption or live-poultry exposure as the probable source of infection. S. enterica serotype Albert also appears to be geographically localized to the midwestern United States. All 19 isolates displayed multidrug resistance, including decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. Turkeys are a likely source of multidrug-resistant S. enterica serotype Albert, and circulation of resistance plasmids, as opposed to the expansion of a single resistant strain, is playing a role. More work is needed to understand why these resistance plasmids spread and how their presence and the serotype they reside in contribute to human disease. PMID:25733501

  11. The Role of Cell Density and Intratumoral Heterogeneity in Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lavi, Orit; Greene, James M.; Levy, Doron; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent data have demonstrated that cancer drug resistance reflects complex biological factors including tumor heterogeneity, varying growth, differentiation, apoptosis pathways, and cell density. As a result, there is a need to find new ways to incorporate these complexities in the mathematical modeling of multidrug resistance. Here, we derive a novel structured population model that describes the behavior of cancer cells under selection with cytotoxic drugs. Our model is designed to estimate intratumoral heterogeneity as a function of the resistance level and time. This updated model of the multidrug resistance problem integrates both genetic and epigenetic changes, density-dependence, and intratumoral heterogeneity. Our results suggest that treatment acts as a selection process, while genetic/epigenetic alterations rates act as a diffusion process. Application of our model to cancer treatment suggests that reducing alteration rates as a first step in treatment causes a reduction in tumor heterogeneity, and may improve targeted therapy. The new insight provided by this model could help to dramatically change the ability of clinical oncologists to design new treatment protocols and analyze the response of patients to therapy. Major Findings We suggest that chemotherapeutic treatment acts as a selection process in the effective drug concentrations range, while genetic/epigenetic alterations act as a diffusion process that results in trait spread based on different stress signals. Application of our model to cancer treatment suggests that reducing the alteration rate as a first step in treatment causes a reduction in tumor heterogeneity, and may improve targeted therapy. PMID:24163380

  12. Spread of Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 8-ST63 Multidrug-Resistant Recombinant Clone, Spain