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Sample records for multidrug resistant pseudomonas

  1. Multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from nosocomial respiratory and urinary infections in Aleppo, Syria.

    PubMed

    Mahfoud, Maysa; Al Najjar, Mona; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak

    2015-02-19

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a serious clinical challenge due to its frequent involvement in nosocomial infections and its tendency towards multidrug resistance. This study uncovered antibiotic susceptibility patterns in 177 isolates from inpatients in three key hospitals in Aleppo, the largest city in Syria. Exceptionally low susceptibility to most routinely used antibiotics was uncovered; resistance to ciprofloxacin and gentamicin was 64.9% and 70.3%, respectively. Contrarily, susceptibility to colistin was the highest (89.1%). Multidrug resistance was rife, found at a rate of 53.67% among studied P. aeruginosa isolates.

  2. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Due to Multidrug- and Non-Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Cillóniz, Catia; Gabarrús, Albert; Ferrer, Miquel; Puig de la Bellacasa, Jorge; Rinaudo, Mariano; Mensa, Josep; Niederman, Michael S; Torres, Antoni

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is not a frequent pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, in patients with severe CAP, P aeruginosa can be the etiology in 1.8% to 8.3% of patients, with a case-fatality rate of 50% to 100%. We describe the prevalence, clinical characteristics, outcomes, and risk factors associated with CAP resulting from multidrug-resistant (MDR) and non-MDR P aeruginosa. Prospective observational study of 2,023 consecutive adult patients with CAP with definitive etiology. P aeruginosa was found in 77 (4%) of the 2,023 cases with microbial etiology. In 22 (32%) of the 68 cases of P aeruginosa with antibiogram data, the isolates were MDR. Inappropriate therapy was present in 49 (64%) cases of P aeruginosa CAP, including 17/22 (77%) cases of MDR P aeruginosa CAP. Male sex, chronic respiratory disease, C-reactive protein <12.35 mg/dL, and pneumonia severity index risk class IV to V were independently associated with P aeruginosa CAP. Prior antibiotic treatment was more frequent in MDR P aeruginosa CAP compared with non-MDR P aeruginosa (58% vs 29%, P = .029), and was the only risk factor associated with CAP resulting from MDR P aeruginosa. In the multivariate analysis, age ≥65 years, CAP resulting from P aeruginosa, chronic liver disease, neurologic disease, nursing home, criteria of ARDS, acute renal failure, ICU admission, and inappropriate empiric treatment were the factors associated with 30-day mortality. P aeruginosa is an individual risk factor associated with mortality in CAP. The risk factors described can help clinicians to suspect P aeruginosa and MDR P aeruginosa. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hospital costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition.

    PubMed

    Morales, Eva; Cots, Francesc; Sala, Maria; Comas, Mercè; Belvis, Francesc; Riu, Marta; Salvadó, Margarita; Grau, Santiago; Horcajada, Juan P; Montero, Maria Milagro; Castells, Xavier

    2012-05-23

    We aimed to assess the hospital economic costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition. A retrospective study of all hospital admissions between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2006 was carried out in a 420-bed, urban, tertiary-care teaching hospital in Barcelona (Spain). All patients with a first positive clinical culture for P. aeruginosa more than 48 h after admission were included. Patient and hospitalization characteristics were collected from hospital and microbiology laboratory computerized records. According to antibiotic susceptibility, isolates were classified as non-resistant, resistant and multi-drug resistant. Cost estimation was based on a full-costing cost accounting system and on the criteria of clinical Activity-Based Costing methods. Multivariate analyses were performed using generalized linear models of log-transformed costs. Cost estimations were available for 402 nosocomial incident P. aeruginosa positive cultures. Their distribution by antibiotic susceptibility pattern was 37.1% non-resistant, 29.6% resistant and 33.3% multi-drug resistant. The total mean economic cost per admission of patients with multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa strains was higher than that for non-resistant strains (15,265 vs. 4,933 Euros). In multivariate analysis, resistant and multi-drug resistant strains were independently predictive of an increased hospital total cost in compared with non-resistant strains (the incremental increase in total hospital cost was more than 1.37-fold and 1.77-fold that for non-resistant strains, respectively). P. aeruginosa multi-drug resistance independently predicted higher hospital costs with a more than 70% increase per admission compared with non-resistant strains. Prevention of the nosocomial emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms is essential to limit the strong economic impact.

  4. Hospital costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We aimed to assess the hospital economic costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition. Methods A retrospective study of all hospital admissions between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2006 was carried out in a 420-bed, urban, tertiary-care teaching hospital in Barcelona (Spain). All patients with a first positive clinical culture for P. aeruginosa more than 48 h after admission were included. Patient and hospitalization characteristics were collected from hospital and microbiology laboratory computerized records. According to antibiotic susceptibility, isolates were classified as non-resistant, resistant and multi-drug resistant. Cost estimation was based on a full-costing cost accounting system and on the criteria of clinical Activity-Based Costing methods. Multivariate analyses were performed using generalized linear models of log-transformed costs. Results Cost estimations were available for 402 nosocomial incident P. aeruginosa positive cultures. Their distribution by antibiotic susceptibility pattern was 37.1% non-resistant, 29.6% resistant and 33.3% multi-drug resistant. The total mean economic cost per admission of patients with multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa strains was higher than that for non-resistant strains (15,265 vs. 4,933 Euros). In multivariate analysis, resistant and multi-drug resistant strains were independently predictive of an increased hospital total cost in compared with non-resistant strains (the incremental increase in total hospital cost was more than 1.37-fold and 1.77-fold that for non-resistant strains, respectively). Conclusions P. aeruginosa multi-drug resistance independently predicted higher hospital costs with a more than 70% increase per admission compared with non-resistant strains. Prevention of the nosocomial emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms is essential to limit the strong economic impact. PMID:22621745

  5. Treatment of multidrug-resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa using extended-infusion antimicrobial regimens.

    PubMed

    Heil, Emily L; Lowery, Ashleigh V; Thom, Kerri A; Nicolau, David P

    2015-01-01

    In the management of multidrug-resistant infections in critically ill patients with multiorgan dysfunction, consideration must be given to the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of an antimicrobial agent to optimize dosing. We describe a 25-year-old woman who was undergoing thrice-weekly hemodialysis and developed multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia secondary to infected left and right ventricular assist devices. After multiple courses of antibiotics, her blood cultures revealed that the infecting organism was becoming progressively more resistant to antibiotic options. Cefepime 2 g administered over 3 hours/day (in combination with colistimethate) provided adequate drug levels for multidrug-resistant, cefepime-intermediate P. aeruginosa bacteremia in this patient. We present the clinical case of this patient, followed by a discussion of possible therapeutic approaches to be considered, including illustration of the principles of using extended-infusion antimicrobial regimens, and present the patient's resulting clinical course.

  6. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo de; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-12-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosa isolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed.

  7. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; de Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-01-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosaisolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosaisolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed. PMID:26676375

  8. [Outbreak of nosocomial urinary tract infections due to a multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Boutiba-Ben Boubaker, I; Boukadida, J; Triki, O; Hannachi, N; Ben Redjeb, S

    2003-04-01

    An outbreak of a multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa including imipenem resistance occurred in the urology intensive care unit at Charles Nicolle Hospital (Tunis). All isolates presented the same antibiotic resistance pattern and were only susceptible to colistin. The epidemic strain was detected in different sites of this unit. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis after enzymatic restriction using XbaI was performed in order to establish an epidemiologic link between these infections. Genotypic analysis showed two different patterns and the environmental source was identified in both cases. Although the same antibiotype was harbored by all the isolates, two outbreaks occurring in the same period were identified. The strengthening of hygiene measures allowed to stop the outbreak spreading. Since the hospital environment is the major source of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contamination, a continuous surveillance of the patients and the environmental sources is required for the implementation efficient control measures.

  9. A case of intravascular lymphoma complicated with Fournier's syndrome due to multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Hiroyasu; Yoshida, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Fournier's syndrome is the fulminant necrotizing fasciitis of the external genitalia. The occurrence of Fournier's syndrome in patients with hematologic malignancies has been reported. Here we report a case of an intravascular lymphoma complicated with Fournier's syndrome due to multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP). A 71-year-old Japanese man received intensive chemotherapy for recurring intravascular lymphoma. Blood culture revealed MDRP, and physical examination led to the diagnosis of Fournier's syndrome. Aggressive treatment that comprised granulocyte transfusion, granulocyte stimulating factor, endotoxin filtration, appropriate antibiotic coverage, and aggressive surgical therapy was administered, and this lead to the successful recovery from sepsis and Fournier's syndrome.

  10. Multidrug Resistant Pseudomonas Mycotic Pseudoaneurysm following Cardiac Transplant Bridged by Ventricular Assistant Device

    PubMed Central

    Williams, M.; Horvath, R.

    2017-01-01

    Mycotic pseudoaneurysm of aorta following cardiac surgery is rare but is highly fatal if it is unrecognized and untreated. Here, we report a case of a 45-year-old male patient who presented with rapidly progressive multiple pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta infected with multidrug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa at 5 weeks after cardiac transplantation, on a background of prior bridging therapy with left ventricular assistant device (LVAD). The patient was successfully treated with the newer cephalosporin, Ceftolozane/Tazobactam, in combination with surgery. This is the first reported case of mycotic pseudoaneurysm infected with MDR Pseudomonas. This case also highlights the importance of high vigilance and timely multimodality treatment in the diagnosis and management of mycotic pseudoaneurysm following cardiac transplant, especially in patients who had LVAD. PMID:28386491

  11. An international multicenter retrospective study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial pneumonia: impact of multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Micek, Scott T; Wunderink, Richard G; Kollef, Marin H; Chen, Catherine; Rello, Jordi; Chastre, Jean; Antonelli, Massimo; Welte, Tobias; Clair, Bernard; Ostermann, Helmut; Calbo, Esther; Torres, Antoni; Menichetti, Francesco; Schramm, Garrett E; Menon, Vandana

    2015-05-06

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial pneumonia (Pa-NP) is associated with considerable morbidity, prolonged hospitalization, increased costs, and mortality. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with Pa-NP to determine 1) risk factors for multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains and 2) whether MDR increases the risk for hospital death. Twelve hospitals in 5 countries (United States, n = 3; France, n = 2; Germany, n = 2; Italy, n = 2; and Spain, n = 3) participated. We compared characteristics of patients who had MDR strains to those who did not and derived regression models to identify predictors of MDR and hospital mortality. Of 740 patients with Pa-NP, 226 patients (30.5%) were infected with MDR strains. In multivariable analyses, independent predictors of multidrug-resistance included decreasing age (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96-0.98), diabetes mellitus (AOR 1.90, 95% CI 1.21-3.00) and ICU admission (AOR 1.73, 95% CI 1.06-2.81). Multidrug-resistance, heart failure, increasing age, mechanical ventilation, and bacteremia were independently associated with in-hospital mortality in the Cox Proportional Hazards Model analysis. Among patients with Pa-NP the presence of infection with a MDR strain is associated with increased in-hospital mortality. Identification of patients at risk of MDR Pa-NP could facilitate appropriate empiric antibiotic decisions that in turn could lead to improved hospital survival.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of VIM-2-Producing Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa ST175, an Epidemic High-Risk Clone.

    PubMed

    Viedma, Esther; Juan, Carlos; Otero, Joaquín R; Oliver, Antonio; Chaves, Fernando

    2013-04-11

    The VIM-2-producing multidrug-resistant high-risk clone Pseudomonas aeruginosa sequence type (ST) 175 was isolated in the setting of a large outbreak in Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre (Spain) from 2007 to 2010. This strain was resistant to all β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, and aminoglycosides, with the exception of amikacin, and has become an endemic clone in our institution.

  13. Carbapenem Susceptibility and Multidrug-Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Hashem, Hany; Hanora, Amro; Abdalla, Salah; Shawky, Alaa; Saad, Alaa

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a serious concern for antimicrobial therapy, as the common isolates exhibit variable grades of resistance, involving beta-lactamase enzymes, beside native defense mechanisms. Objectives The present study was designed to determine the occurrence of Metallo-β- Lactamases (MBL) and Amp C harboring P. aeruginosa isolates from Suez Canal university hospital in Ismailia, Egypt. Methods A total of 147 P. aeruginosa isolates, recovered from 311 patients during a 10-month period, were collected between May 2013 and February 2014; the isolates were collected from urine, wound and sputum. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determined by agar dilution methods was ≥2 μg/mL for meropenem and imipenem. Identification of P. aeruginosa was confirmed using API 20NE. Metallo-β- Lactamases and Amp C were detected based on different phenotypic methods. Results Overall, 26.5% of P. aeruginosa isolates (39/147) were carbapenem resistant isolates. Furthermore, 64.1% (25/39) were MBL producers, these isolates were screened by the combined disc and disc diffusion methods to determine the ability of MBL production. Both MBL and Amp C harbored P. aeruginosa isolates were 28% (7/25). Sixty-four percent of P. aeruginosa isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR) (16/25). The sensitivity toward polymyxin, imipenem, norfloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam and gentamicin was 99%, 91%, 88%, 82% and 78%, respectively. The resistance rate towards cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefepime, aztreonam and meropenem was 98.6%, 86%, 71.4%, 34% and 30%, respectively. Conclusions Multidrug resistance was significantly associated with MBL production in P. aeruginosa. Early detection of MBL-producing P. aeruginosa and hospital antibiotic policy prescription helps proper antimicrobial therapy and avoidance of dissemination of these multidrug resistance isolates. PMID:28138370

  14. Targeting bacterial adherence inhibits multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection following burn injury.

    PubMed

    Huebinger, Ryan M; Stones, Daniel H; de Souza Santos, Marcela; Carlson, Deborah L; Song, Juquan; Vaz, Diana Pereira; Keen, Emma; Wolf, Steven E; Orth, Kim; Krachler, Anne Marie

    2016-12-20

    Classical antimicrobial drugs target proliferation and therefore place microbes under extreme selective pressure to evolve resistance. Alternative drugs that target bacterial virulence without impacting survival directly offer an attractive solution to this problem, but to date few such molecules have been discovered. We previously discovered a widespread group of bacterial adhesins, termed Multivalent Adhesion Molecules (MAMs) that are essential for initial binding of bacteria to host tissues and virulence. Thus, targeting MAM-based adherence is a promising strategy for displacing pathogens from host tissues and inhibiting infection. Here, we show that topical application of polymeric microbeads functionalized with the adhesin MAM7 to a burn infected with multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa substantially decreased bacterial loads in the wound and prevented the spread of the infection into adjacent tissues. As a consequence, the application of this adhesion inhibitor allowed for vascularization and wound healing, and maintained local and systemic inflammatory responses to the burn. We propose that MAM7-functionalized microbeads can be used as a topical treatment, to reduce bacterial attachment and hence prevent bacterial colonization and infection of wounds. As adhesion is not required for microbial survival, this anti-infective strategy has the potential to treat multidrug-resistant infections and limit the emergence of drug-resistant pathogens.

  15. Targeting bacterial adherence inhibits multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection following burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Huebinger, Ryan M.; Stones, Daniel H.; de Souza Santos, Marcela; Carlson, Deborah L.; Song, Juquan; Vaz, Diana Pereira; Keen, Emma; Wolf, Steven E.; Orth, Kim; Krachler, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Classical antimicrobial drugs target proliferation and therefore place microbes under extreme selective pressure to evolve resistance. Alternative drugs that target bacterial virulence without impacting survival directly offer an attractive solution to this problem, but to date few such molecules have been discovered. We previously discovered a widespread group of bacterial adhesins, termed Multivalent Adhesion Molecules (MAMs) that are essential for initial binding of bacteria to host tissues and virulence. Thus, targeting MAM-based adherence is a promising strategy for displacing pathogens from host tissues and inhibiting infection. Here, we show that topical application of polymeric microbeads functionalized with the adhesin MAM7 to a burn infected with multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa substantially decreased bacterial loads in the wound and prevented the spread of the infection into adjacent tissues. As a consequence, the application of this adhesion inhibitor allowed for vascularization and wound healing, and maintained local and systemic inflammatory responses to the burn. We propose that MAM7-functionalized microbeads can be used as a topical treatment, to reduce bacterial attachment and hence prevent bacterial colonization and infection of wounds. As adhesion is not required for microbial survival, this anti-infective strategy has the potential to treat multidrug-resistant infections and limit the emergence of drug-resistant pathogens. PMID:27996032

  16. VIM-2–producing Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa ST175 Clone, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Viedma, Esther; Juan, Carlos; Villa, Jennifer; Barrado, Laura; Orellana, M. Ángeles; Sanz, Francisca; Otero, Joaquín R.; Oliver, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    A total of 183 patients were colonized or infected with multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates at a hospital in Spain during 2007–2010; prevalence increased over this period from 2.8% to 15.3%. To characterize these isolates, we performed molecular epidemiologic and drug resistance analysis. Genotyping showed that 104 (56.8%) isolates belonged to a single major clone (clone B), which was identified by multilocus sequence typing as sequence type (ST) 175. This clone was initially isolated from 5 patients in 2008, and then isolated from 23 patients in 2009 and 76 patients in 2010. PCR analysis of clone B isolates identified the blaVIM-2 gene in all but 1 isolate, which harbored blaIMP-22. ST175 isolates were susceptible to only amikacin (75%) and colistin (100%). Emergence of the ST175 clone represents a major health problem because it compromises therapy for treatment of P. aeruginosa nosocomial infections. PMID:22840969

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of the Triclosan- and Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain B10W Isolated from Municipal Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Chuanqing; Nelson, Matthew; Cao, Guangxiang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the triclosan- and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain B10W, obtained from municipal wastewater in Hawaii. The bacterium has a 6.7-Mb genome, contains 6,391 coding sequences and 78 RNAs, with an average G+C content of 66.2 mol%. PMID:28104659

  18. Successful Management of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pneumonia after Kidney Transplantation in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    PARK, Kyung-Mee; NAM, Hyun-Suk; WOO, Heung-Myong

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT An 8-year-old male mongrel dog that had undergone renal transplantation was presented 25 days later with an acute cough, anorexia and exercise intolerance. During the investigation, neutrophilic leukocytosis was noted, and thoracic radiographs revealed caudal lung lobe infiltration. While being treated with two broad-spectrum antibiotics, clinical signs worsened. Pneumonia due to infection with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas (P.) aeruginosa, sensitive only to imipenem and amikacin, was confirmed by bacteria isolation. After treatment with imipenem-cilastatin without reducing the immunosuppressant dose, clinical signs completely resolved. During the 2-year follow-up period, no recurrence was observed. To the best of authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of pneumonia caused by MDR P. aeruginosa in a renal recipient dog and successful management of this disease. PMID:23842146

  19. Utilization of colistin for treatment of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Sabuda, Deana M; Laupland, Kevin; Pitout, Johann; Dalton, Bruce; Rabin, Harvey; Louie, Thomas; Conly, John

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colistin is uncommonly used in clinical practice; however, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms has rekindled interest in this potentially toxic therapeutic option. The present study describes the authors’ experience with colistin in the management of patients who were infected with metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL)-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa within the Calgary Health Region (Calgary, Alberta). METHOD: Adult patients who received colistimethate sodium (colistin) between January 2000 and December 2005 were identified via pharmacy records, and their charts were reviewed retrospectively. Patients with cystic fibrosis were excluded. Patient demographics, clinical course and relevant laboratory data were extracted. RESULTS: Twenty-eight courses of colistin were received by 22 patients. The majority of these treatments were directed at MBL-producing Pseudomonas. One-half of the patients received nebulized colistin. Intravenous (IV) colistin was administered to 12 patients for a mean ± SD of 14.7±13.8 days (range 3.7 to 46 days). The highest IV dose used was 125 mg every 6 h or 6 mg/kg/day. Eight of 12 patients (67%) treated with IV colistin responded either fully or partially. Two patients received IV colistin as outpatients. Adverse effects considered to be due to colistin included drug fever, nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity. Five of nine patients (56%) who had complete data available for evaluation had at least a doubling of creatinine levels from baseline. CONCLUSION: Patients in the present study received both IV and nebulized colistin for multidrug-resistant P aeruginosa. The use of IV colistin was associated with a favourable response, but mild nephrotoxicity occurred in two-third of patients. It was concluded that colistin may be a useful drug when choices are limited. PMID:19436571

  20. Invitro Apramycin Activity against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kang, Anthony D; Smith, Kenneth P; Eliopoulos, George M; Berg, Anders H; McCoy, Christopher; Kirby, James E

    2017-03-16

    The in vitro activity of apramycin was compared to that of amikacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin against multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant, and pandrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Apramycin demonstrated an MIC50/MIC90 of 8/32μg/ml for A. baumannii and 16/32μg/ml for P. aeruginosa. Only 2% of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa had an MIC greater than an epidemiological cutoff value of 64μg/ml. In contrast, the MIC50/MIC90 for amikacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin were ≥64/>256μg/ml for A. baumannii with 57%, 95%, and 74% of isolates demonstrating resistance, respectively, and the MIC50/MIC90 were ≥8/256μg/ml for P. aeruginosa with 27%, 50%, and 57% of strains demonstrating resistance, respectively. Apramycin appears to offer promising in vitro activity against highly resistant pathogens. It therefore may warrant further pre-clinical study to assess potential for repurposing as a human therapeutic and relevance as a scaffold for further medicinal chemistry exploration.

  1. Suboptimal chlorine treatment of drinking water leads to selection of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Richa; Upreti, R K; Jain, S R; Prasad, K N; Seth, P K; Chaturvedi, U C

    2004-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the spectrum of bacteria present in the River Gomti water before and after chlorination for drinking purposes. We observed that the strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that survived chlorination on three out of seven occasions were resistant to almost all the antibiotics tested. The chlorine-resistant bacteria had mucoid colonies and grew better at 24 degrees C. All attempts to isolate the plasmid responsible for chlorine resistance were unsuccessful. Laboratory experiments using different strains of the P. aeruginosa in distilled water showed that only the resistant strain survived chlorine treatment at a dose of < or =500 microg/L. Similar results were obtained when water collected from seven different sites on the River Gomti was treated with graded doses of chlorine. At the higher dose of chlorine, all the bacteria died in 30 min, whereas with lower doses all the bacteria survived. The present study underscores the importance of measuring water chlorine concentrations to assure they are sufficiently high to remove pathogenic bacteria from drinking water. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of the selection of multidrug-resistant bacteria by suboptimal chlorine treatment of water.

  2. Virulence Gene Profiles of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated From Iranian Hospital Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Nastaran; Momtaz, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The most common hospital-acquired pathogen is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is a multidrug resistant bacterium causing systemic infections. Objectives: The present study was carried out in order to investigate the distribution of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from various types of hospital infections in Iran. Patients and Methods: Two-hundred and seventeen human infection specimens were collected from Baqiyatallah and Payambaran hospitals in Tehran, Iran. The clinical samples were cultured immediately and samples positive for P. aeruginosa were analyzed for the presence of antibiotic resistance and bacterial virulence genes using PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion methodology with Müeller–Hinton agar. Results: Fifty-eight out of 127 (45.66%) male infection specimens and 44 out of 90 (48.88%) female infection specimens harbored P. aeruginosa. Also, 65% (in male specimens) and 21% (in female specimens) of respiratory system infections were positive for P. aeruginosa, which was a high rate. The genes encoding exoenzyme S (67.64%) and phospholipases C (45.09%) were the most common virulence genes found among the strains. The incidences of various β-lactams encoding genes, including blaTEM, blaSHV, blaOXA, blaCTX-M, blaDHA, and blaVEB were 94.11%, 16.66%, 15.68%, 18.62%, 21.56%, and 17.64%, respectively. The most commonly detected fluoroquinolones encoding gene was gyrA (15. 68%). High resistance levels to penicillin (100%), tetracycline (90.19%), streptomycin (64.70%), and erythromycin (43.13%) were observed too. Conclusions: Our findings should raise awareness about antibiotic resistance in hospitalized patients in Iran. Clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing antibiotics, especially in cases of human infections. PMID:25763199

  3. Multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa survey in a stream receiving effluents from ineffective wastewater hospital plants.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Mary Joyce Targino Lopes; Pontes, Gemilson; Serra, Paula Takita; Balieiro, Antonio; Castro, Diogo; Pieri, Fabio Alessandro; Crainey, James Lee; Nogueira, Paulo Afonso; Orlandi, Patricia Puccinelli

    2016-08-24

    Multi-drug resistant forms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRPA) are a major source of nosocomial infections and when discharged into streams and rivers from hospital wastewater treatment plants (HWWTP) they are known to be able to persist for extended periods. In the city of Manaus (Western Brazilian Amazon), the effluent of three HWWTPs feed into the urban Mindu stream which crosses the city from its rainforest source before draining into the Rio Negro. The stream is routinely used by Manaus residents for bathing and cleaning (of clothes as well as domestic utensils) and, during periods of flooding, can contaminate wells used for drinking water. 16S rRNA metagenomic sequence analysis of 293 cloned PCR fragments, detected an abundance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) at the stream's Rio Negro drainage site, but failed to detect it at the stream's source. An array of antimicrobial resistance profiles and resistance to all 14 tested antimicrobials was detected among P. aeruginosa cultures prepared from wastewater samples taken from water entering and being discharged from a Manaus HWWTP. Just one P. aeruginosa antimicrobial resistance profile, however, was detected from cultures made from Mindu stream isolates. Comparisons made between P. aeruginosa isolates' genomic DNA restriction enzyme digest fingerprints, failed to determine if any of the P. aeruginosa found in the Mindu stream were of HWWTP origin, but suggested that Mindu stream P. aeruginosa are from diverse origins. Culturing experiments also showed that P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and the extent of biofilm formation produced were both significantly higher in multi drug resistant forms of P. aeruginosa. Our results show that a diverse range of MDRPA are being discharged in an urban stream from a HWWTP in Manaus and that P. aeruginosa strains with ampicillin and amikacin can persist well within it.

  4. Management of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the intensive care unit: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Maraolo, Alberto Enrico; Cascella, Marco; Corcione, Silvia; Cuomo, Arturo; Nappa, Salvatore; Borgia, Guglielmo; De Rosa, Francesco Giuseppe; Gentile, Ivan

    2017-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is one of the most important causes of healthcare-related infections among Gram-negative bacteria. The best therapeutic approach is controversial, especially for multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains as well as in the setting of most severe patients, such as in the intensive care unit (ICU). Areas covered: This article addresses several points. First, the main microbiological aspects of PA, focusing on its wide array of resistance mechanisms. Second, risk factors and the worse outcome linked to MDR-PA infection. Third, the pharmacological peculiarity of ICU patients, that makes the choice of a proper antimicrobial therapy difficult. Eventually, the current therapeutic options against MDR-PA are reviewed, taking into account the main variables that drive antimicrobial optimization in critically ill patients. Literature search was carried out using Pubmed and Web of Science. Expert commentary: Methodologically rigorous studies are urgently needed to clarify crucial aspects of the treatment against MDR-PA, namely monotherapy versus combination therapy in empiric and targeted settings. In the meanwhile, useful options are represented by newly approved drugs, such as ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam. In critically ill patients, at least as empirical approach, a combination therapy is a prudent choice when a MDR-PA strain is suspected.

  5. Phylogenetic study of metallo-β-lactamase producing multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from burn patients.

    PubMed

    Jena, Jayanti; Debata, Nagen Kumar; Sahoo, Rajesh Kumar; Subudhi, Enketeswara

    2015-12-01

    The present study was carried out to understand the clonal relationship using enterobacteriaceae repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) among metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) producing multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from burn victims and their susceptibility to commonly used anti-pseudomonal agents. In the present study 94 non-duplicate P. aeruginosa strains from the wound samples of burn patients were included. Identification of the isolates was done by biochemical methods and antibiotic sensitivity was done by disc diffusion method following CLSI (Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute) guidelines. By using imipenem (IPM)-EDTA disk diffusion/double disc synergy method carbapenem resistant organisms were tested for MBL. To define the clonal relationship ERIC-PCR was used. Of the 94 isolates, 18 (19.14%) were found resistant to IPM and MBL production was shown 11 (11.70%) by the IPM-EDTA disc diffusion method. From dendrogram of the ERIC-PCR profile four major clusters were obtained (A, B, C and D). Cluster B contained the majority of the isolates (6 strains 1, 4, 8, 9, 10 and 11). This study using ERIC-PCR of randomly collected isolates exhibits high genetic diversity which rules out cross contamination frequency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  6. In vitro synergistic effect of ciprofloxacin with aminoglycosides against multidrug resistant-Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Firdous; Akhtar, Naeem; Hameed, Abdul

    2013-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an increasingly prevalent nosocomial human pathogen. Infections with multidrug-resistant (MDR) P. aeruginosa are currently a treatment challenge and requires search for better treatment options. To determine in vitro synergistic effect of ciprofloxacin in combination with amikacin and gentamicin against MDR P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Antibiotic resistance pattern of 100 identified clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa was determined against eight antibiotics by disc diffusion method at Microbiology Laboratory, Holy Family Hospital, Rawalpindi. For 30 selected MDR isolates, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of amikacin and gentamicin were determined separately by agar diffusion method followed by combined activity of ciprofloxacin with amikacin and gentamicin by checkerboard agar dilution technique. Antibiotic resistance pattern of P. aeruginosa isolates was; gentamicin and carbenicillin (94%), amikacin and piperacillin (92%), ceftazidime (90%), colistin (87%), ciprofloxacin (79%) and imipenem (72%). MICs against 30 selected MDR isolates ranged from 32 to >128μg/mL for amikacin, and >128μg/mL for gentamicin. Synergistic effect was observed in 12/30(40%) isolates for AK+CIP and in 05/30 (16.7%) for CN+CIP. Ciprofloxacin in combination with amikacin and gentamicin showed synergistic effect and no antagonistic effect against MDR P. aeruginosa.

  7. Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Expression Patterns and Contribution to Antibiotic Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    De Kievit, Teresa R.; Parkins, Michael D.; Gillis, Richard J.; Srikumar, Ramakrishnan; Ceri, Howard; Poole, Keith; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Storey, Douglas G.

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms are intrinsically resistant to antimicrobial chemotherapies. At present, very little is known about the physiological changes that occur during the transition from the planktonic to biofilm mode of growth. The resistance of P. aeruginosa biofilms to numerous antimicrobial agents that are substrates subject to active efflux from planktonic cells suggests that efflux pumps may substantially contribute to the innate resistance of biofilms. In this study, we investigated the expression of genes associated with two multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps, MexAB-OprM and MexCD-OprJ, throughout the course of biofilm development. Using fusions to gfp, we were able to analyze spatial and temporal expression of mexA and mexC in the developing biofilm. Remarkably, expression of mexAB-oprM and mexCD-oprJ was not upregulated but rather decreased over time in the developing biofilm. Northern blot analysis confirmed that these pumps were not hyperexpressed in the biofilm. Furthermore, spatial differences in mexAB-oprM and mexCD-oprJ expression were observed, with maximal activity occurring at the biofilm substratum. Using a series of MDR mutants, we assessed the contribution of the MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN, and MexXY efflux pumps to P. aeruginosa biofilm resistance. These analyses led to the surprising discovery that the four characterized efflux pumps do not play a role in the antibiotic-resistant phenotype of P. aeruginosa biofilms. PMID:11353623

  8. Description of genomic islands associated to the multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone ST277.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Melise Chaves; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Asensi, Marise Dutra; Carvalho-Assef, Ana Paula D'Alincourt

    2016-08-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone ST277 is disseminated in Brazil where it is mainly associated with the presence of metallo-β-lactamase SPM-1. Furthermore, it carries the class I integron In163 and a 16S rRNA methylase rmtD that confers aminoglycoside resistance. To analyze the genetic characteristics that might be responsible for the success of this endemic clone, genomes of four P. aeruginosa strains that were isolated in distinct years and in different Brazilian states were sequenced. The strains differed regarding the presence of the genes blaSPM-1 and rmtD. Genomic comparisons that included genomes of other clones that have spread worldwide from this species were also performed. These analyses revealed a 763,863bp region in the P. aeruginosa chromosome that concentrates acquired genetic structures comprising two new genomic islands (PAGI-13 and PAGI-14), a mobile element that could be used for ST277 fingerprinting and a recently reported Integrative and Conjugative Element (ICE) associated to blaSPM-1. The genetic elements rmtD and In163 are inserted in PAGI-13 while PAGI-14 has genes encoding proteins related to type III restriction system and phages. The data reported in this study provide a basis for a clearer understanding of the genetic content of clone ST277 and illustrate the mechanisms that are responsible for the success of these endemic clones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis and its effective treatment with topical colistimethate

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Samrat; Agrawal, Deepshikha

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the clinical outcome in multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA) bacterial keratitis and report the successful use of an alternative antibiotic, topical colistimethate in some of them. The medical records of 12 culture-proven MDR-PA keratitis patients, all exhibiting in vitro resistance by Kirby–Bauer disc diffusion method to ≥ three classes of routinely used topical antibiotics were reviewed. Eight patients were treated with 0.3% ciprofloxacin or ofloxacin, 1 patient with 5% imipenem/cilastatin and 3 patients with 1.6% colistimethate. The outcomes in 8 eyes treated with only fluoroquinolones were evisceration in 4 eyes, therapeutic corneal graft in 1 eye, phthisis bulbi in 1 eye, and no improvement in 2 eyes. The eye treated with imipenem/cilastin required a therapeutic corneal graft. All the three eyes treated with 1.6% colistimethate healed. Colistimethate may prove to be an effective alternative antibiotic in the treatment of MDR-PA keratitis. PMID:27050354

  10. Molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated in a burn center.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Silva, Keila de Cássia Ferreira; Calomino, Mariana Alcântara; Deutsch, Gabriela; de Castilho, Selma Rodrigues; de Paula, Geraldo Renato; Esper, Luciana Maria Ramires; Teixeira, Lenise Arneiro

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize molecularly multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates collected from burn center (BC) patients and environment in a hospital localized in Rio de Janeiro city, RJ, Brazil. Thirty-five P. aeruginosa isolates were studied. The antimicrobial resistance was tested by disk diffusion method as recommended by CLSI. The assessment of virulence (exoS and exoU) and resistance (blaPER-1, blaCTX-M, blaOXA-10, blaGES-1, blaVIM, blaIMP, blaSPM-1, blaKPC, blaNDM and blaSIM) genes were achieved through PCR and biofilm forming capacity was determined using a microtiter plates based-assay, as described previously. Genotyping was performed using Multilocus sequence typing (MLST). High rate of P. aeruginosa (71.4%; 25/35) were classified as MDR, of them 64% (16/25) were related to clone A, the most prevalent clone found in the BC studied. A total of eight carbapenems resistant isolates were detected; three belonging to clone A and five carrying the exoU virulence gene. In addition, clone A isolates were also biofilm producers. Two new sequence types (ST) were detected in this study: ST2236, grouped in to clone A; and ST2237, classified in the different clones, displaying carbapenem resistance and exoU virulence gene. The high prevalence of biofilm producers and multiresistant P. aeruginosa isolates in BC indicates that prevention programs need to be implemented to avoid infection in highly susceptible patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Multidrug- and Carbapenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Children, United States, 1999-2012.

    PubMed

    Logan, Latania K; Gandra, Sumanth; Mandal, Siddhartha; Klein, Eili Y; Levinson, Jordan; Weinstein, Robert A; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2016-11-16

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infection. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) (>3 classes) and carbapenem-resistant (CR) P aeruginosa are significant threats globally. We used a large reference-laboratory database to study the epidemiology of P aeruginosa in children in the United States. Antimicrobial susceptibility data from the Surveillance Network were used to phenotypically identify MDR and CR P aeruginosa isolates in children aged 1 to 17 years between January 1999 and July 2012. Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate trends in the prevalence of MDR and CR P aeruginosa. Isolates from infants (<1 year old) and patients with cystic fibrosis were excluded. Among the isolates tested, the crude proportion of MDR P aeruginosa increased from 15.4% in 1999 to 26% in 2012, and the proportion of CR P aeruginosa increased from 9.4% in 1999 to 20% in 2012. The proportion of both MDR and CR P aeruginosa increased each year by 4% (odds ratio [OR], 1.04 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-1.04] and 1.04 [95% CI, 1.04-1.05], respectively). In multivariable analysis, both MDR and CR P aeruginosa were more common in the intensive care setting, among children aged 13 to 17 years, in respiratory specimens, and in the West North Central region. In addition, resistance to other antibiotic classes (aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, cephalosporins, and piperacillin-tazobactam) often used to treat P aeruginosa increased. Rates of MDR and CR P aeruginosa infection in children are rising nationally. Aggressive prevention strategies, including instituting antimicrobial stewardship programs in pediatric settings, are essential for combating antimicrobial resistance. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Enzymatic quorum quenching increases antibiotic susceptibility of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, S; Sharma, P; Harjai, K; Capalash, N

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is increasing emergence of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRPA) strains and drug resistance is positively-correlated with biofilm-forming ability. Since about 10% of P. aeruginosa genome is controlled by quorum sensing (QS), alteration in its antibiotic susceptibility by targeting QS was the focus of the present study. Materials and Methods One day biofilms of PAO1 and three urinary tract infection MDRPA isolates (PA2, PA8 and PA18) were formed in 96-well microtiter plate. Biofilms were exposed to concentration gradient of ciprofloxacin and gentamicin to obtain Minimum Biofilm Eradication Concentration (MBEC) by direct enumeration method. Susceptibility of 24 h biofilms was evaluated by treatment with ciprofloxacin and gentamicin per se and in combination with lactonase. The effect was also examined on 72 h biofilms by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Results Lactonase treatment did not have any effect on growth of the selected strains but 73.42, 69.1, 77.34 and 72.5% reduction of biofilm was observed after lactonase (1 unit) treatment, respectively. Antibiotics in combination with lactonase (0.3 units) resulted in an increased susceptibility of the biofilm forms by>3.3, 4, 5 and 1.5 folds of MBEC, for ciprofloxacin and>6.67, 12.5, 6 and>2.5 folds, for gentamicin respectively, which could be due to the disruption of biofilm by lactonase treatment as shown by scanning electron microscopy. Also there was significant reduction (p<0.001) in virulence factor production by the strains. Conclusion Lactonase treatment increased antibiotic susceptibility of the biofilms of MDRPA isolates underscoring the potential of quorum quenching in antimicrobial therapeutics. PMID:22347576

  13. The analysis of distribution of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas and Bacillus species from burn patients and burn ward environment.

    PubMed

    Panghal, Manju; Singh, Khushboo; Kadyan, Sangeeta; Chaudary, Uma; Yadav, J P

    2015-06-01

    Infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria act as a risk factor for mortality in burns patients. So keeping in view the crucial importance of reliable therapeutic decisions of multidrug resistance bacteria and role of hospital environment in bacteria colonization, our study is based on the evaluation of distribution of Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. in burn patients and burn ward environment. The present prospective analysis was conducted on the patients undergoing treatment in the Burn ward of Pt. B.D. Sharma University of Health Sciences, Rohtak, Haryana, during the period of January 2012 to March 2013. The multidrug resistant bacteria were characterized by following the CLSI guidelines. Molecular identification isolates were done by amplifying and sequencing 16S rDNA. In our study out of 510 samples of 280 burn patients, 263 samples were observed sterile and bacterial isolates were obtained from 247 samples. In burn patients out of 247 samples 43 MDR strains, and in burn ward out of 60 samples 4 MDR strain were observed. After 16S rDNA amplification of MDR isolates the prevalent bacterium was belonged to the genus Bacillus (8 species; 26 isolates) followed by genus Pseudomonas (5 species; 17 isolates). The burn ward environment isolates were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Bacillus cereus and Acinetobacter baumanii. The major finding of our study is the predominance of B. cereus followed by P. aeruginosa in burn patients of Pt. B.D. Sharma University of Health Sciences, Rohtak, Haryana. While considering the role of hospital environment, no direct role of environmental isolates was observed in transfer of bacterial infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. Incidence of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas Spp. in ICU Patients with Special Reference to ESBL, AMPC, MBL and Biofilm Production

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Richa; Malik, Abida; Rizvi, Meher; Ahmed, S. Moied

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas spp. have been reported to be the important cause of ICU infections. The appearance of ESBL, AmpC and MBL genes and their spread among bacterial pathogens is a matter of great concern. Biofilm production also attributes to antimicrobial resistance due to close cell to cell contact that permits bacteria to more effectively transfer plasmids to one another. This study aimed at determining the incidence of ESBL, AmpC, MBL and biofilm producing Pseudomonas spp. in ICU patients. Material and Methods: The clinical specimens were collected aseptically from 150 ICU patients from February 2012 to October 2013. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility was performed according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. ESBLs and AmpC were detected phenotypically and genotypically. MBL was detected by modified Hodge and imipenem-EDTA double-disk synergy test. Results: Pseudomonas spp. 35(28%) were the most prevalent pathogen in ICU infections. Multidrug resistance and biofilm production was observed in 80.1% and 60.4% isolates, respectively. Prevalence of ESBL, AmpC and MBL was 22.9%, 42.8% and 14.4%, respectively. The average hospital stay was 25 days and was associated with 20% mortality. Conclusions: A regular surveillance is required to detect ESBL, AmpC and MBL producers especially in ICU patients. Carbapenems should be judiciously used to prevent their spread. The effective antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones and piperacillin-tazobactum should be used after sensitivity testing. PMID:27013841

  15. In vivo challenging of polymyxins and levofloxacin eye drop against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Kazuki; Miyake, Taku; Koike, Naohito; Hattori, Takaaki; Kumakura, Shigeto; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Fujita, Koji; Kuroda, Masahiko; Ito, Norihiko; Goto, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to establish a rabbit multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP) keratitis model, and test the efficacy of levofloxacin, colistin methanesulfate (CL-M), colistin sulfate (CL-S) and polymyxin B (PL-B) against MDRP infection. In a rabbit eye, making a 2-mm circular corneal excision, and MDRP strain #601 or representative P. aeruginosa strain IID1210 were instilled into the corneal concavity. IID1210 was used to confirm this model developed P. aeruginosa keratitis. After MDRP keratitis developed, we treated the eyes with levofloxacin, CL-M, CL-S or PL-B eye drops. The infected eyes were evaluated by clinical score, histopathological examination and viable bacterial count (CFU). Rabbits developed MDRP keratitis reproducibly after instilled the bacteria into the corneal lesion. MDRP produced severe keratitis similarly with IID1210, as shown by slit lamp examination and clinical score. In MDRP keratitis models, clinical scores and viable bacterial counts were significantly lower in levofloxacin- and CL-M-treated groups compared with PBS-treated group, but the magnitudes of reduction were not remarkable. However, clinical scores were dramatically lowered in CL-S- and PL-B-treated groups compared with PBS-treated group. CL-S- and PL-B-treated group were kept corneal translucency and little influx of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in histopathological examination. In addition, both CL-S- and PL-B-treated groups were not detected viable bacteria in infected cornea. Using our MDRP keratitis model, we showed that topical levofloxacin and CL-M are not adequately effective, while CL-S and PL-B are efficacious in controlling MDRP keratitis. Especially, PL-B, which is commercially available eye drop, might be most effective against MDRP.

  16. Sequence Types 235, 111, and 132 Predominate among Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Izdebski, Radosław; Butic, Iva; Jelic, Marko; Abram, Maja; Koscak, Iva; Baraniak, Anna; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Gniadkowski, Marek; Tambic Andrasevic, Arjana

    2014-01-01

    A population analysis of 103 multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Croatian hospitals was performed. Twelve sequence types (STs) were identified, with a predominance of international clones ST235 (serotype O11 [41%]), ST111 (serotype O12 [15%]), and ST132 (serotype O6 [11%]). Overexpression of the natural AmpC cephalosporinase was common (42%), but only a few ST235 or ST111 isolates produced VIM-1 or VIM-2 metallo-β-lactamases or PER-1 or GES-7 extended-spectrum β-lactamases. PMID:25070098

  17. Comparative in vitro activities of beta-lactam-tobramycin combinations against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and multidrug-resistant gram-negative enteric bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Fass, R J

    1982-01-01

    Piperacillin was more consistently active than tobramycin, carbenicillin, moxalactam, or ceftriaxone against strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from blood cultures and against multidrug-resistant strains. Moxalactam and ceftriaxone were more consistently active than tobramycin, carbenicillin, or piperacillin against multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Synergy between beta-lactam antibiotics and tobramycin was frequently observed against strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from blood cultures but not against multidrug-resistant organisms. Piperacillin plus tobramycin was the most active antibiotic combination against P. aeruginosa. Moxalactam plus tobramycin and ceftriaxone plus tobramycin were the most active antibiotic combinations against Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:6810755

  18. Isolation of NDM-1-producing multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas putida from a paediatric case of acute gastroenteritis, India.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, D; Dey, S; Kadam, S; Kalal, S; Jali, S; Koley, H; Sinha, R; Nag, D; Kholkute, S D; Roy, S

    2015-05-01

    Pseudomonas putida is an uncommon opportunistic pathogen, usually susceptible to antimicrobial agents. Data concerning resistance to antimicrobial agents in clinical P. putida isolates are limited. To the best of our knowledge we report for the first time the isolation of NDM-1-producing multidrug-resistant P. putida from a case of acute gastroenteritis. The isolate showed resistance to a wide range of antimicrobials, including fluoroquinolones, third-generation cephalosporins and carbapenems. The isolate also exhibited multiple mutations in the quinolone resistance determining region and showed the presence of qepA, bla TEM , bla OXA1 and bla OXA7 genes. The present study highlights the importance of looking for the relatively rare aetiological agents in clinical samples that do not yield common pathogens.

  19. Nanoscale analysis of the effects of antibiotics and CX1 on a Pseudomonas aeruginosa multidrug-resistant strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formosa, C.; Grare, M.; Jauvert, E.; Coutable, A.; Regnouf-de-Vains, J. B.; Mourer, M.; Duval, R. E.; Dague, E.

    2012-08-01

    Drug resistance is a challenge that can be addressed using nanotechnology. We focused on the resistance of the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and investigated, using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), the behavior of a reference strain and of a multidrug resistant clinical strain, submitted to two antibiotics and to an innovative antibacterial drug (CX1). We measured the morphology, surface roughness and elasticity of the bacteria under physiological conditions and exposed to the antibacterial molecules. To go further in the molecules action mechanism, we explored the bacterial cell wall nanoscale organization using functionalized AFM tips. We have demonstrated that affected cells have a molecularly disorganized cell wall; surprisingly long molecules being pulled off from the cell wall by a lectin probe. Finally, we have elucidated the mechanism of action of CX1: it destroys the outer membrane of the bacteria as demonstrated by the results on artificial phospholipidic membranes and on the resistant strain.

  20. Efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance in the multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7: identification of a novel MexS variant involved in upregulation of the mexEF-oprN multidrug efflux operon

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious problem in medical settings. P. aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7 is resistant to fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and most β-lactams but not imipenem. In this study, enhanced efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance of PA7 was shown to reflect increased expression of two resistance nodulation cell division (RND) -type multidrug efflux operons, mexEF-oprN and mexXY-oprA. Such a clinical isolate has rarely been reported because MexEF-OprN-overproducing mutants often increase susceptibility to aminoglycosides apparently owing to impairment of the MexXY system. A mutant of PA7 lacking three RND-type multidrug efflux operons (mexAB-oprM, mexEF-oprN, and mexXY-oprA) was susceptible to all anti-pseudomonas agents we tested, supporting an idea that these RND-type multidrug efflux transporters are molecular targets to overcome multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa. mexEF-oprN-upregulation in P. aeruginosa PA7 was shown due to a MexS variant harboring the Valine-155 amino acid residue. This is the first genetic evidence shown that a MexS variant causes mexEF-oprN-upregulation in P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. PMID:25653649

  1. In vitro antibacterial activity of rifampicin in combination with imipenem, meropenem and doripenem against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi-Fan; Liu, Chang-Pan; Wang, Nai-Yu; Shih, Shou-Chuan

    2016-08-24

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has emerged as one of the most important healthcare-associated pathogens. Colistin is regarded as the last-resort antibiotic for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, but is associated with high rates of acute kidney injury. The aim of this in vitro study is to search for an alternative treatment to colistin for multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa infections. Multidrug and carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates were collected between January 2009 and December 2012 at MacKay Memorial Hospital. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for various antibiotic combinations. Carbapenemase-producing genes including bla VIM, other β-lactamase genes and porin mutations were screened by PCR and sequencing. The efficacy of carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem, doripenem) with or without rifampicin was correlated with the type of porin mutation (frameshift mutation, premature stop codon mutation) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates without carbapenemase-producing genes. Of the 71 multidrug-resistant clinical P. aeruginosa isolates, only six harboured the bla VIM gene. Imipenem, meropenem and doripenem were significantly more effective (reduced fold-change of MICs) when combined with rifampicin in bla VIM-negative isolates, especially in isolates with porin frameshift mutation. Imipenem + rifampicin combination has a low MIC against multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa, especially in isolates with porin frameshift mutation. The imipenem + rifampicin combination may provide an alternative treatment to colistin for multidrug -resistant P. aeruginosa infections, especially for patients with renal insufficiency.

  2. Multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci: Three major threats to hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Satlin, Michael J; Walsh, Thomas J

    2017-08-16

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients are uniquely threatened by the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria because these patients rely on immediate active antimicrobial therapy to combat bacterial infections. This review describes the epidemiology and treatment considerations for three challenging MDR bacterial pathogens in HSCT recipients: MDR Enterobacteriaceae, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE). These bacteria are common causes of infection in this population and bacteremias caused by these organisms are associated with high mortality rates. Carbapenems remain the treatments of choice for serious infections due to ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in HSCT recipients. Administration of β-lactam agents as an extended infusion is associated with improved outcomes in patients with severe infections caused by P. aeruginosa. Older agents used for the treatment of CRE and MDR P. aeruginosa infections, such as polymyxins and aminoglycosides, have major limitations. Newer agents, such as ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam have great potential for the treatment of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapemenase-producing CRE and MDR P. aeruginosa, respectively, but more pre-clinical and clinical data are needed to better evaluate their efficacy. Daptomycin dosages ≥ 8 mg/kg/day are recommended to treat VRE infections in this population, particularly in the setting of increasing daptomycin resistance. Strategies to prevent these infections include strict adherence to recommended infection control practices and multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship. Lastly, gastrointestinal screening to guide empirical therapy and the use of polymerase chain reaction-based rapid diagnostics may decrease the time to administration of appropriate therapy for these infections, thereby leading to improved outcomes

  3. Superbugs in the coming new decade; multidrug resistance and prospects for treatment of Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 2010.

    PubMed

    Nordmann, Patrice; Naas, Thierry; Fortineau, Nicolas; Poirel, Laurent

    2007-10-01

    New resistance problems have emerged recently among hospital and community-acquired pathogens such as in Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Hospital-acquired and now community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus are emerging worldwide whereas vancomycin-resistant S. aureus remain extremely rare. Hospital-acquired outbreaks of vancomycin-resistant enterococci and multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are increasingly reported worldwide. Whereas novel molecules are being developed for treating Gram-positive infections, difficult to non possible-to-treat pandrug-resistant P. aeruginosa infections may become a therapeutic challenge soon.

  4. Multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children undergoing chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Caselli, Désirée; Cesaro, Simone; Ziino, Ottavio; Zanazzo, Giulio; Manicone, Rosaria; Livadiotti, Susanna; Cellini, Monica; Frenos, Stefano; Milano, Giuseppe M.; Cappelli, Barbara; Licciardello, Maria; Beretta, Chiara; Aricò, Maurizio; Castagnola, Elio

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one leading gram-negative organism associated with nosocomial infections. Bacteremia is life-threatening in the immunocompromised host. Increasing frequency of multi-drug-resistant (MDRPA) strains is concerning. We started a retrospective survey in the pediatric hematology oncology Italian network. Between 2000 and 2008, 127 patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia were reported from 12 centers; 31.4% of isolates were MDRPA. Death within 30 days of a positive blood culture occurred in 19.6% (25/127) of total patients; in patients with MDRPA infection it occurred in 35.8% (14/39). In the multivariate analysis, only MDRPA had significant association with infection-related death. This is the largest series of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia cases from pediatric hematology oncology centers. Monitoring local bacterial isolates epidemiology is mandatory and will allow empiric antibiotic therapy to be tailored to reduce fatalities. PMID:20305140

  5. Unraveling genomic and phenotypic nature of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa VRFPA04 isolated from keratitis patient.

    PubMed

    N, Murugan; J, Malathi; V, Umashankar; H N, Madhavan

    2016-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa VRFPA04, obtained from a keratitis patient was found to exhibit resistance to betalactam (Penicillins, cephalosporins, including carbapenems, except aztreonam), aminoglycosides, quinolone group of drugs and susceptible to colistin. The complete genome sequencing of the ocular isolate to measure and ascertain the degree of multidrug resistance in VRFPA04 strain resulted in 6,818,030bp (6.8Mb) genome sizes, which happen to be the third largest genome available in the Genbank to date. Two chromosomally integrated class I integrons carrying blaVIM-2 carbapenemase gene, multiple secretory systems consisting of types I-VI and VIII proteins and ocular virulence factors exo-T, Y, U and exotoxin A, a gene that inhibits protein synthesis which could have caused corneal cell death and Phytohormone auxin biosynthetic protein were detected in the genome of VRFPA04 Genome. In addition, 58 Regions of Genomic Plasticity (RGPs) regions, multiple phage genomes, genomic islands, CRISPR genes and RND family efflux pumps, such as MexCD-OprJ and MexEF-OprN and its regulators, MexT and MexR, were unraveled in VRFPA04. Thus, the current study reveals the virulence factors and resistome nature of an ocular isolate P aeruginosa VRFPA04 genome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Diabetic Foot Gangrene Patient with Multi-drug Resistant Pseudomonas Putida Infection in Karawaci District, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Hardjo Lugito, Nata Pratama; Nawangsih, Cucu; Moksidy, Jevany Claudia; Kurniawan, Andree; Tjiang, Margaret Merlyn

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a rod-shaped, non fermenting Gram-negative organism frequently found in the environment that utilizes aerobic metabolism, previously thought to be of low pathogenicity. It had been reported as cause of skin and soft tissue infection, especially in immunocompromised patients. A female green grocer, 51 year-old came to internal medicine out-patient clinic with gangrene and osteomyelitis on her 1st, 2nd and 3rd digit and wound on the sole of the right foot since 1 month prior. The patient had history of uncontrolled diabetes since a year ago. She was given ceftriaxone 2 grams b.i.d, metronidazole 500 mg t.i.d empirically and then amikacin 250 mg b.i.d, followed by amputation of the digits and wound debridement. The microorganism's culture from pus revealed multi drug resistant Pseudomonas putida. She recovered well after antibiotics and surgery. PMID:25722620

  7. Effectiveness of Antipseudomonal Antibiotics and Mechanisms of Multidrug Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    El ZOWALATYl, Mohamed E; Gyetvaii, Bpla

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading human pathogen that causes serious infections at various tissues and organs leading to life threatening health problems and possible deadly outcomes. Resistance patterns vary widely whether it is from hospitals or community acquired infections. Reporting resistance profiles to a certain antibiotics provide valuable information in a given setting, but may be extrapolated outside the sampling location. In the present study, P. aeruginosa isolates were screened to determine their susceptibilities against anti-pseudomonal antimicrobial agents and possible existing mechanisms of resistance were determined. Eighty-six isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered. Isolates representing different resistance profiles were screened for the existence of three different resistance mechanisms including drug inactivation due to metallo-β-lactamases, drug impermeability by outer membrane proteins and drug efflux. All tested isolates showed uniform susceptibility (100%, n = 86/86) to piperacillin, meropenem, amikacin, and polymyxin B. A single isolate was found to be imipenem resistant (99%, n = 85/86). The possible mechanisms of resistance of P. aeruginosa to imipenem involve active drug efflux pumps, outer membrane impermeability as well as drug inactivating enzymes. These findings demonstrate the fundamental importance of the in vitro susceptibility testing of antibiotics prior to antipseudomonal therapy and highlight the need for a continuous antimicrobial resistance surveillance programs to monitor the changing resistance patterns so that clinicians and health care officials are updated as to the most effective therapeutic agents to combat the serious outcomes of P. aeruginosa infections.

  8. Detection of Quorum Sensing Activity in the Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain GB11

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huey Jia; Ee, Robson; Cheong, Yuet Meng; Tan, Wen-Si; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    A multidrug-resistant clinical bacteria strain GB11 was isolated from a wound swab on the leg of a patient. Identity of stain GB11 as Pseudomonas aeruginosa was validated by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Detection of the production of signaling molecules, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), was conducted using three different bacterial biosensors. A total of four different AHLs were found to be produced by strain GB11, namely N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl homoserine lactone (C8-HSL) and N-3-oxo-dodecanoylhomoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) using high resolution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Of these detected AHLs, 3-oxo-C12-HSL was found to be the most abundant AHL produced by P. aeruginosa GB11. PMID:25019635

  9. Short Synthetic β-Sheet Antimicrobial Peptides for the Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Burn Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guansheng; Cheng, Junchi; Liang, Zhen Chang; Xu, Liang; Lou, Weiyang; Bao, Chang; Ong, Zhan Yuin; Dong, Huihui; Yang, Yi Yan; Fan, Weimin

    2017-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is often implicated in burn wound infections; its inherent drug resistance often renders these infections extremely challenging to treat. This is further compounded by the problem of emerging drug resistance and the dearth of novel antimicrobial drug discovery in recent years. In the perennial search for effective antimicrobial compounds, the authors identify short synthetic β-sheet folding peptides, IRIKIRIK (IK8L), IRIkIrIK (IK8-2D), and irikirik (IK8D) as prime candidates owing to their high potency against Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, the peptides are first assayed against 20 clinically isolated multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains in comparison with the conventional antibiotics imipenem and ceftazidime, and IK8L is demonstrated to be the most effective. IK8L also exhibits superior antibacterial killing kinetics compared to imipenem and ceftazidime. From transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and protein release analyses, IK8L shows membrane-lytic antimicrobial mechanism. Repeated use of IK8L does not induce drug resistance, while the bacteria develop resistance against the antibiotics after several times of treatment at sublethal doses. Analysis of mouse blood serum chemistry reveals that peptide does not induce systemic toxicity. The potential utility of IK8L in the in vivo treatment of P. aeruginosa-infected burn wounds is further demonstrated in a mouse model.

  10. RT-PCR detection of exotoxin genes expression in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tartor, Y H; El-Naenaeey, E Y

    2016-01-22

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for causing a wide variety of acute and chronic infections with significant levels of morbidity and mortality. These infections are very hard to eradicate because of the expression of numerous virulence factors and the intrinsic resistance against antibiotics. Herein, this study analyzed antimicrobial susceptibility of PA isolated from broiler chickens and cattle as well as expression of five significant exotoxin genes (exoU, exoS, toxA, lasB, and phzM) and ecfX as internal control. Genomic DNA was amplified employing oprL gene for species specific detection of PA. The highest resistance was found to ampicillin, erythromycin, followed by, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline, intermediately sensitive to ceftazidime, cefoperazone, and highly sensitive to gentamicin, levofloxacin, imipenem, ciprofloxacin and colistin. It appears that exoU+ and increased resistance to SXT may be co-selected traits. Vast majority of PA isolates expressed exoS (78.6%), exoU (71.4%) and both in more virulent strains. The ubiquity of toxA, lasB, exoU and exoS among PA clinical isolates is consistent with an important role for these virulence factors in chicken respiratory diseases and cattle mastitis that can be highlighted as potential therapeutic targets for treatment of infections caused by heterogeneous and resistant PA strains.

  11. Art-175 Is a Highly Efficient Antibacterial against Multidrug-Resistant Strains and Persisters of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Briers, Yves; Walmagh, Maarten; Grymonprez, Barbara; Biebl, Manfred; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Defraine, Valerie; Michiels, Jan; Cenens, William; Aertsen, Abram; Miller, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Artilysins constitute a novel class of efficient enzyme-based antibacterials. Specifically, they covalently combine a bacteriophage-encoded endolysin, which degrades the peptidoglycan, with a targeting peptide that transports the endolysin through the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Art-085, as well as Art-175, its optimized homolog with increased thermostability, are each composed of the sheep myeloid 29-amino acid (SMAP-29) peptide fused to the KZ144 endolysin. In contrast to KZ144, Art-085 and Art-175 pass the outer membrane and kill Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including multidrug-resistant strains, in a rapid and efficient (∼5 log units) manner. Time-lapse microscopy confirms that Art-175 punctures the peptidoglycan layer within 1 min, inducing a bulging membrane and complete lysis. Art-175 is highly refractory to resistance development by naturally occurring mutations. In addition, the resistance mechanisms against 21 therapeutically used antibiotics do not show cross-resistance to Art-175. Since Art-175 does not require an active metabolism for its activity, it has a superior bactericidal effect against P. aeruginosa persisters (up to >4 log units compared to that of the untreated controls). In summary, Art-175 is a novel antibacterial that is well suited for a broad range of applications in hygiene and veterinary and human medicine, with a unique potential to target persister-driven chronic infections. PMID:24752267

  12. Art-175 is a highly efficient antibacterial against multidrug-resistant strains and persisters of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Briers, Yves; Walmagh, Maarten; Grymonprez, Barbara; Biebl, Manfred; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Defraine, Valerie; Michiels, Jan; Cenens, William; Aertsen, Abram; Miller, Stefan; Lavigne, Rob

    2014-07-01

    Artilysins constitute a novel class of efficient enzyme-based antibacterials. Specifically, they covalently combine a bacteriophage-encoded endolysin, which degrades the peptidoglycan, with a targeting peptide that transports the endolysin through the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Art-085, as well as Art-175, its optimized homolog with increased thermostability, are each composed of the sheep myeloid 29-amino acid (SMAP-29) peptide fused to the KZ144 endolysin. In contrast to KZ144, Art-085 and Art-175 pass the outer membrane and kill Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including multidrug-resistant strains, in a rapid and efficient (∼ 5 log units) manner. Time-lapse microscopy confirms that Art-175 punctures the peptidoglycan layer within 1 min, inducing a bulging membrane and complete lysis. Art-175 is highly refractory to resistance development by naturally occurring mutations. In addition, the resistance mechanisms against 21 therapeutically used antibiotics do not show cross-resistance to Art-175. Since Art-175 does not require an active metabolism for its activity, it has a superior bactericidal effect against P. aeruginosa persisters (up to >4 log units compared to that of the untreated controls). In summary, Art-175 is a novel antibacterial that is well suited for a broad range of applications in hygiene and veterinary and human medicine, with a unique potential to target persister-driven chronic infections. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Distribution of the Strains of Multidrug-resistant, Extensively Drug-resistant, and Pandrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian; Moghim, Sharareh; Isfahani, Bahram Nasr; Fazeli, Hossein; Poursina, Farkhondeh; Yadegari, Sima; Nasirmoghadas, Pourya; Hosseininassab Nodoushan, Seyed Abolfazl

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic and Gram-negative pathogen that is used as the most important factor in burn wound infections, and due to the rapid acquisition of multidrug resistance (MDR), it causes high mortality rates in these sectors. Thus, diagnosis and assessment of antibiotic resistance patterns are very important in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate antibiotic resistance pattern and determining P. aeruginosa MDR. Materials and Methods: In this study, phenotypic, biochemical, and polymerase chain reaction tests were used to identify P. aeruginosa from 120 wound burn samples that 96 samples were detected to P. aeruginosa species. In the next step, according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute standard guidelines, antibiogram test was performed by disk diffusion method for amikacin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, gentamicin, cefepime, aztreonam, meropenem, colistin, ceftazidime, and piperacillin-tazobactam antibiotics. Antibiotic data were analyzed by WHONET software; finally, the rate of antibiotic resistance and MDR strains was determined. Results: The highest antibiotic resistance belonged to amikacin (94.8%) and norfloxacin (90.6%); in contrast, colistin (8.3%) had the lowest and the MDR strains were MDR (95.8%) and extensively drug resistance (XDR) (87.5%). Conclusion: In this study, there was MDR with an alarming rate including MDR (95.8%), XDR (87.5%), and pan-drug resistance (0%). As a result, given antibiotics to patients should be controlled by the antibiogram results to avoid increasing MDR strains. PMID:28706882

  14. Distribution of the Strains of Multidrug-resistant, Extensively Drug-resistant, and Pandrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Burn Patients.

    PubMed

    Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian; Moghim, Sharareh; Isfahani, Bahram Nasr; Fazeli, Hossein; Poursina, Farkhondeh; Yadegari, Sima; Nasirmoghadas, Pourya; Hosseininassab Nodoushan, Seyed Abolfazl

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic and Gram-negative pathogen that is used as the most important factor in burn wound infections, and due to the rapid acquisition of multidrug resistance (MDR), it causes high mortality rates in these sectors. Thus, diagnosis and assessment of antibiotic resistance patterns are very important in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate antibiotic resistance pattern and determining P. aeruginosa MDR. In this study, phenotypic, biochemical, and polymerase chain reaction tests were used to identify P. aeruginosa from 120 wound burn samples that 96 samples were detected to P. aeruginosa species. In the next step, according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute standard guidelines, antibiogram test was performed by disk diffusion method for amikacin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, gentamicin, cefepime, aztreonam, meropenem, colistin, ceftazidime, and piperacillin-tazobactam antibiotics. Antibiotic data were analyzed by WHONET software; finally, the rate of antibiotic resistance and MDR strains was determined. The highest antibiotic resistance belonged to amikacin (94.8%) and norfloxacin (90.6%); in contrast, colistin (8.3%) had the lowest and the MDR strains were MDR (95.8%) and extensively drug resistance (XDR) (87.5%). In this study, there was MDR with an alarming rate including MDR (95.8%), XDR (87.5%), and pan-drug resistance (0%). As a result, given antibiotics to patients should be controlled by the antibiogram results to avoid increasing MDR strains.

  15. Identification and Characterization of Inhibitors of Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Novel Agents for Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lomovskaya, Olga; Warren, Mark S.; Lee, Angela; Galazzo, Jorge; Fronko, Richard; Lee, May; Blais, Johanne; Cho, Deidre; Chamberland, Suzanne; Renau, Tom; Leger, Roger; Hecker, Scott; Watkins, Will; Hoshino, Kazuki; Ishida, Hiroko; Lee, Ving J.

    2001-01-01

    Whole-cell assays were implemented to search for efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) of the three multidrug resistance efflux pumps (MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN) that contribute to fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Secondary assays were developed to identify lead compounds with exquisite activities as inhibitors. A broad-spectrum EPI which is active against all three known Mex efflux pumps from P. aeruginosa and their close Escherichia coli efflux pump homolog (AcrAB-TolC) was discovered. When this compound, MC-207,110, was used, the intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa to fluoroquinolones was decreased significantly (eightfold for levofloxacin). Acquired resistance due to the overexpression of efflux pumps was also decreased (32- to 64-fold reduction in the MIC of levofloxacin). Similarly, 32- to 64-fold reductions in MICs in the presence of MC-207,110 were observed for strains with overexpressed efflux pumps and various target mutations that confer resistance to levofloxacin (e.g., gyrA and parC). We also compared the frequencies of emergence of levofloxacin-resistant variants in the wild-type strain at four times the MIC of levofloxacin (1 μg/ml) when it was used either alone or in combination with EPI. In the case of levofloxacin alone, the frequency was ∼10−7 CFU/ml. In contrast, with an EPI, the frequency was below the level of detection (<10−11). In summary, we have demonstrated that inhibition of efflux pumps (i) decreased the level of intrinsic resistance significantly, (ii) reversed acquired resistance, and (iii) resulted in a decreased frequency of emergence of P. aeruginosa strains that are highly resistant to fluoroquinolones. PMID:11120952

  16. IMP-43 and IMP-44 Metallo-β-Lactamases with Increased Carbapenemase Activities in Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Shimojima, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Two novel IMP-type metallo-β-lactamase variants, IMP-43 and IMP-44, were identified in multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates obtained in medical settings in Japan. Analysis of their predicted amino acid sequences revealed that IMP-43 had an amino acid substitution (Val67Phe) compared with IMP-7 and that IMP-44 had two substitutions (Val67Phe and Phe87Ser) compared with IMP-11. The amino acid residue at position 67 is located at the end of a loop close to the active site, consisting of residues 60 to 66 in IMP-1, and the amino acid residue at position 87 forms a hydrophobic patch close to the active site with other amino acids. An Escherichia coli strain expressing blaIMP-43 was more resistant to doripenem and meropenem but not to imipenem than one expressing blaIMP-7. An E. coli strain expressing blaIMP-44 was more resistant to doripenem, imipenem and meropenem than one expressing blaIMP-11. IMP-43 had more efficient catalytic activities against all three carbapenems than IMP-7, indicating that the Val67Phe substitution contributed to increased catalytic activities against carbapenems. IMP-44 had more efficient catalytic activities against all carbapenems tested than IMP-11, as well as increased activities compared with IMP-43, indicating that both the Val67Phe and Phe87Ser substitutions contributed to increased catalytic activities against carbapenems. PMID:23836174

  17. IMP-43 and IMP-44 metallo-β-lactamases with increased carbapenemase activities in multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Shimojima, Masahiro; Kirikae, Teruo

    2013-09-01

    Two novel IMP-type metallo-β-lactamase variants, IMP-43 and IMP-44, were identified in multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates obtained in medical settings in Japan. Analysis of their predicted amino acid sequences revealed that IMP-43 had an amino acid substitution (Val67Phe) compared with IMP-7 and that IMP-44 had two substitutions (Val67Phe and Phe87Ser) compared with IMP-11. The amino acid residue at position 67 is located at the end of a loop close to the active site, consisting of residues 60 to 66 in IMP-1, and the amino acid residue at position 87 forms a hydrophobic patch close to the active site with other amino acids. An Escherichia coli strain expressing blaIMP-43 was more resistant to doripenem and meropenem but not to imipenem than one expressing blaIMP-7. An E. coli strain expressing blaIMP-44 was more resistant to doripenem, imipenem and meropenem than one expressing blaIMP-11. IMP-43 had more efficient catalytic activities against all three carbapenems than IMP-7, indicating that the Val67Phe substitution contributed to increased catalytic activities against carbapenems. IMP-44 had more efficient catalytic activities against all carbapenems tested than IMP-11, as well as increased activities compared with IMP-43, indicating that both the Val67Phe and Phe87Ser substitutions contributed to increased catalytic activities against carbapenems.

  18. Chlorin e6 mediated photodynamic inactivation for multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis in mice in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Feng; Deichelbohrer, Mona; Tschernig, Thomas; Laschke, Matthias W.; Szentmáry, Nóra; Hüttenberger, Dirk; Foth, Hans-Jochen; Seitz, Berthold; Bischoff, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Following corneal epithelium scratches, mouse corneas were infected with the multidrug resistant (MDR) P. aeruginosa strain PA54. 24 hours later, 0% (for control group), 0.01%, 0.05% or 0.1% Chlorin e6 (Ce6), a second generation photosensitizer derived from chlorophyll, was combined with red light, for photodynamic inactivation (PDI). 1 hour or 2 days later, entire mouse eyes were enucleated and homogenized for counting colony forming units (CFU) of P. aeruginosa. For comparison, 0.1% Ce6 mediated PDI was started at 12 hours post infection, and 0.005% methylene blue mediated PDI 24 hours post infection. Clinical scores of corneal manifestation were recorded daily. Compared to the control, CFU 1 hour after PDI started 24 hours post infection in the 0.01% Ce6 and 0.05% Ce6 groups were significantly lower (more than one log10 reduction), the CFU 2 days post PDI higher in the 0.1% Ce6 group, clinical score lower in the 0.1% Ce6 group at 1 day post PDI. These findings suggest that PDI with Ce6 and red light has a transient efficacy in killing MDR-PA in vivo, and repetitive PDI treatments are required to fully resolve the infection. Before its clinical application, the paradoxical bacterial regrowth post PDI has to be further studied. PMID:28295043

  19. Efflux pump regulatory genes mutations in multidrug resistance Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from wound infections in Isfahan hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Vaez, Hamid; Faghri, Jamshid; Isfahani, Bahram Nasr; Moghim, Sharareh; Yadegari, Sima; Fazeli, Hossein; Moghofeei, Mohsen; Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multidrug resistance Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-P. aeruginosa) is a worldwide threat for public health. Hyperexpression of efflux pump systems (MexAB-OprM and MexCD-OprJ), which is a well-known mechanisms for MDR emerging, is controlled by regulatory genes, mexR and nfxB, respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate point mutations in mexR and nfxB genes in MDR- P. aeruginosa isolated from wound infections. Materials and Methods: A total of 34 P. aeruginosa cultures obtained from wound infections were analyzed. Among them eight isolates identified as MDR-P. aeruginosa and were subjected to determination of mutations in mexR and nfxB genes. Results: We detected eight-point mutations in mexR and 12-point mutations in nfxB. The most common mutations were common G327-A (eight isolates), G384-A (eight isolates), G411-A (eight isolates). Mutations in A371-C and A372-C were the predominant substitution which was seen in nfxB. Amino acid substitutions were also found at position 124 and 126 for NfxB and MexR, respectively. Conclusions: P. aeruginosa isolates with mutation in efflux pump regulatory genes such as mexR and nfxB could be a main factor contributed to antibiotic resistance and must be considered in antibiotic treatment. PMID:24949288

  20. Efflux pump regulatory genes mutations in multidrug resistance Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from wound infections in Isfahan hospitals.

    PubMed

    Vaez, Hamid; Faghri, Jamshid; Isfahani, Bahram Nasr; Moghim, Sharareh; Yadegari, Sima; Fazeli, Hossein; Moghofeei, Mohsen; Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-P. aeruginosa) is a worldwide threat for public health. Hyperexpression of efflux pump systems (MexAB-OprM and MexCD-OprJ), which is a well-known mechanisms for MDR emerging, is controlled by regulatory genes, mexR and nfxB, respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate point mutations in mexR and nfxB genes in MDR- P. aeruginosa isolated from wound infections. A total of 34 P. aeruginosa cultures obtained from wound infections were analyzed. Among them eight isolates identified as MDR-P. aeruginosa and were subjected to determination of mutations in mexR and nfxB genes. We detected eight-point mutations in mexR and 12-point mutations in nfxB. The most common mutations were common G327-A (eight isolates), G384-A (eight isolates), G411-A (eight isolates). Mutations in A371-C and A372-C were the predominant substitution which was seen in nfxB. Amino acid substitutions were also found at position 124 and 126 for NfxB and MexR, respectively. P. aeruginosa isolates with mutation in efflux pump regulatory genes such as mexR and nfxB could be a main factor contributed to antibiotic resistance and must be considered in antibiotic treatment.

  1. Activity of AMP2041 against human and animal multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Cabassi, Clotilde Silvia; Sala, Andrea; Santospirito, Davide; Alborali, Giovanni Loris; Carretto, Edoardo; Ghibaudo, Giovanni; Taddei, Simone

    2017-03-23

    Antimicrobial resistance is a growing threat to public health. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a relevant pathogen causing human and animal infections, frequently displaying high levels of resistance to commonly used antimicrobials. The increasing difficulty to develop new effective antibiotics have discouraged investment in this area and only a few new antibiotics are currently under development. An approach to overcome antibiotic resistance could be based on antimicrobial peptides since they offer advantages over currently used microbicides. The antimicrobial activity of the synthetic peptide AMP2041 was evaluated against 49 P. aeruginosa clinical strains with high levels of antimicrobial resistance, isolated from humans (n = 19) and animals (n = 30). In vitro activity was evaluated by a microdilution assay for lethal dose 90% (LD90), while the activity over time was performed by time-kill assay with 12.5 µg/ml of AMP2014. Evidences for a direct membrane damage were investigated on P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 reference strain, on animal isolate PA-VET 38 and on human isolate PA-H 24 by propidium iodide and on P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 by scanning electron microscopy. AMP2041 showed a dose-dependent activity, with a mean (SEM) LD90 of 1.69 and 3.3 µg/ml for animal and human strains, respectively. AMP2041 showed microbicidal activity on P. aeruginosa isolates from a patient with cystic fibrosis (CF) and resistance increased from first infection isolate (LD90 = 0.3 μg/ml) to the mucoid phenotype (LD90 = 10.4 μg/ml). The time-kill assay showed a time-dependent bactericidal effect of AMP2041 and LD90 was reached within 20 min for all the strains. The stain-dead assay showed an increasing of membrane permeabilization and SEM analysis revealed holes, dents and bursts throughout bacterial cell wall after 30 min of incubation with AMP2041. The obtained results assessed for the first time the good antimicrobial activity of AMP2041 on P. aeruginosa strains of

  2. In vitro and in vivo Pharmacodynamics of Colistin and Aztreonam Alone and in Combination against Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Yuka; Hagihara, Mao; Kato, Hideo; Hirai, Jun; Nishiyama, Naoya; Koizumi, Yusuke; Sakanashi, Daisuke; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Hazuki; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2017-01-01

    Reports of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with high antimicrobial resistance have steadily emerged, threatening the utility of a mainstay in antipseudomonal therapy. This study evaluated the antimicrobial activities of various combination therapies against P. aeruginosa with high antimicrobial resistance, including multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa (MDRP) using an in vitro and in vivo study. We evaluated 24 combination therapies, including colistin, aztreonam, meropenem, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, amikacin, rifampicin, arbekacin and piperacillin against 15 MDRP isolates detected at Aichi Medical University Hospital with the break-point checkerboard method. Based on the results of the in vitro study, we evaluated antimicrobial activity against highly antimicrobial-resistant P. aeruginosa with an in vivo murine thigh infection model. The combination regimens including colistin and aztreonam showed higher antimicrobial activity against the 15 MDRP isolates. In the in vivo study, the high-dose colistin monotherapy (16 mg/kg every 12 h) achieved greater log10 CFU changes than the normal-dose colistin regimen (8 mg/kg every 12 h) against 5 P. aeruginosa isolates, including 2 MDRP isolates (p < 0.05). Aztreonam monotherapy (400 mg every 8 h) yielded bacterial densities similar to untreated control mice for the MDRP isolate evaluated. The combination therapy with a higher dose of colistin had superior antimicrobial activity against 5 P. aeruginosa with colistin (MIC 0.5 μg/ml) and aztreonam (MIC ≥128 μg/ml) than colistin monotherapy. The data suggest that the combination treatment of colistin and aztreonam could be the most useful for treating highly resistant P. aeruginosa with a higher susceptibility to colistin, including MDRP infections. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Eradication of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas Biofilm with Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saiqa I.; Golberg, Alexander; McCormack, Michael C.; Yarmush, Martin L.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Austen, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a significant problem, accounting for over eighty percent of microbial infections in the body. Biofilm eradication is problematic due to increased resistance to antibiotics and antimicrobials as compared to planktonic cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) on biofilm-infected mesh. Prolene mesh was infected with bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa and treated with PEF using a concentric electrode system to derive, in a single experiment, the critical electric field strength needed to kill bacteria. The effect of the electric field strength and the number of pulses (with a fixed pulse length duration and frequency) on bacterial eradication was investigated. For all experiments, biofilm formation and disruption were confirmed with bioluminescent imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Computation and statistical methods were used to analyze treatment efficiency and to compare it to existing theoretical models. In all experiments 1500 V are applied through a central electrode, with pulse duration of 50 μs, and pulse delivery frequency of 2 Hz. We found that the critical electric field strength (Ecr) needed to eradicate 100–80% of bacteria in the treated area was 121 ± 14 V/mm when 300 pulses were applied, and 235 ± 6.1 V/mm when 150 pulses were applied. The area at which 100–80% of bacteria were eradicated was 50.5 ± 9.9 mm2 for 300 pulses, and 13.4 ± 0.65 mm2 for 150 pulses. 80% threshold eradication was not achieved with 100 pulses. The results indicate that increased efficacy of treatment is due to increased number of pulses delivered. In addition, we that showed the bacterial death rate as a function of the electrical field follows the statistical Weibull model for 150 and 300 pulses. We hypothesize that in the clinical setting, combining systemic antibacterial therapy with PEF will yield a synergistic effect leading to improved eradication of mesh infections. PMID

  4. Genomic analyses of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1 resequenced by single-molecule real-time sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Shen, Mengyu; Le, Shuai; Tan, Yinling; Li, Ming; Zhao, Xia; Shen, Wei; Yang, Yuhui; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Hongbin; Li, Shu; Rao, Xiancai; Hu, Fuquan; Lu, Shuguang

    2016-01-01

    As a third-generation sequencing (TGS) method, single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology provides long read length, and it is well suited for resequencing projects and de novo assembly. In the present study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1 was characterized and resequenced using SMRT technology. PA1 was also subjected to genomic, comparative and pan-genomic analyses. The multidrug resistant strain PA1 possesses a 6,498,072 bp genome and a sequence type of ST-782. The genome of PA1 was also visualized, and the results revealed the details of general genome annotations, virulence factors, regulatory proteins (RPs), secretion system proteins, type II toxin–antitoxin (T–A) pairs and genomic islands. Whole genome comparison analysis suggested that PA1 exhibits similarity to other P. aeruginosa strains but differs in terms of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) regions, such as prophages and genomic islands. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA sequences demonstrated that PA1 is closely related to PAO1, and P. aeruginosa strains can be divided into two main groups. The pan-genome of P. aeruginosa consists of a core genome of approximately 4,000 genes and an accessory genome of at least 6,600 genes. The present study presented a detailed, visualized and comparative analysis of the PA1 genome, to enhance our understanding of this notorious pathogen. PMID:27765811

  5. Aloe vera Gel: Effective Therapeutic Agent against Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Recovered from Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Maryam; Azad, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Mousavi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Aloe vera is an herbal medicinal plant with biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic ones, and immunomodulatory properties. The purpose of this study was investigation of in vitro antimicrobial activity of A. vera gel against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients with burn wound infections. Methods. During a 6-month study, 140 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from patients admitted to the burn wards of a hospital in Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was carried out against the pathogens using the A. vera gel and antibiotics (imipenem, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin). Results. The antibiogram revealed that 47 (33.6%) of all isolates were MDR P. aeruginosa. The extract isolated from A. vera has antibacterial activity against all of isolates. Also, 42 (89.4%) isolates were inhibited by A. vera gel extract at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≤ 200 µg/mL. MIC value of A. vera gel for other isolates (10.6%) was 800 µg/mL. All of MDR P. aeruginosa strains were inhibited by A. vera at similar MIC50 and MIC90 200 µg/mL. Conclusion. Based on our results, A. vera gel at various concentrations can be used as an effective antibacterial agent in order to prevent wound infection caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:26266047

  6. Time-kill effect of levofloxacin on multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii: synergism with imipenem and colistin.

    PubMed

    Safarika, A; Galani, I; Pistiki, A; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, E J

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we challenged the concept that levofloxacin should not be used for the management of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) when minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) exceed 2 μg/ml. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) and genetically distinct isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 49) and Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 29) from patients with VAP were exposed over time to levofloxacin, imipenem, colistin and their combinations. Synergy between levofloxacin and imipenem was found in 55.3 % and between levofloxacin and colistin in 90.9 % of isolates of P. aeruginosa within the first 4 h of growth. Synergy with imipenem but not with colistin was dependent of the MIC. Synergy between levofloxacin and imipenem was found in 58.6 % of isolates of A. baumannii after 24 h of growth. Considerable synergy was found between levofloxacin and colistin, reaching 84.8 % of isolates of A.baumannii after 6 h of growth. Synergy was independent from the MIC. These results create hopes that levofloxacin can be used as combination therapy for infections by MDR bacteria.

  7. Aloe vera Gel: Effective Therapeutic Agent against Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Recovered from Burn Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Fazeli, Maryam; Azad, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Mousavi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Aloe vera is an herbal medicinal plant with biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic ones, and immunomodulatory properties. The purpose of this study was investigation of in vitro antimicrobial activity of A. vera gel against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients with burn wound infections. Methods. During a 6-month study, 140 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from patients admitted to the burn wards of a hospital in Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was carried out against the pathogens using the A. vera gel and antibiotics (imipenem, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin). Results. The antibiogram revealed that 47 (33.6%) of all isolates were MDR P. aeruginosa. The extract isolated from A. vera has antibacterial activity against all of isolates. Also, 42 (89.4%) isolates were inhibited by A. vera gel extract at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≤ 200 µg/mL. MIC value of A. vera gel for other isolates (10.6%) was 800 µg/mL. All of MDR P. aeruginosa strains were inhibited by A. vera at similar MIC50 and MIC90 200 µg/mL. Conclusion. Based on our results, A. vera gel at various concentrations can be used as an effective antibacterial agent in order to prevent wound infection caused by P. aeruginosa.

  8. Eradication of multidrug-resistant pseudomonas biofilm with pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saiqa I; Blumrosen, Gaddi; Vecchio, Daniela; Golberg, Alexander; McCormack, Michael C; Yarmush, Martin L; Hamblin, Michael R; Austen, William G

    2016-03-01

    Biofilm formation is a significant problem, accounting for over eighty percent of microbial infections in the body. Biofilm eradication is problematic due to increased resistance to antibiotics and antimicrobials as compared to planktonic cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) on biofilm-infected mesh. Prolene mesh was infected with bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa and treated with PEF using a concentric electrode system to derive, in a single experiment, the critical electric field strength needed to kill bacteria. The effect of the electric field strength and the number of pulses (with a fixed pulse length duration and frequency) on bacterial eradication was investigated. For all experiments, biofilm formation and disruption were confirmed with bioluminescent imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Computation and statistical methods were used to analyze treatment efficiency and to compare it to existing theoretical models. In all experiments 1500 V are applied through a central electrode, with pulse duration of 50 μs, and pulse delivery frequency of 2 Hz. We found that the critical electric field strength (Ecr) needed to eradicate 100-80% of bacteria in the treated area was 121 ± 14 V/mm when 300 pulses were applied, and 235 ± 6.1 V/mm when 150 pulses were applied. The area at which 100-80% of bacteria were eradicated was 50.5 ± 9.9 mm(2) for 300 pulses, and 13.4 ± 0.65 mm(2) for 150 pulses. 80% threshold eradication was not achieved with 100 pulses. The results indicate that increased efficacy of treatment is due to increased number of pulses delivered. In addition, we that showed the bacterial death rate as a function of the electrical field follows the statistical Weibull model for 150 and 300 pulses. We hypothesize that in the clinical setting, combining systemic antibacterial therapy with PEF will yield a synergistic effect leading to improved

  9. Chlorine Dioxide is a Better Disinfectant than Sodium Hypochlorite against Multi-Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Hinenoya, Atsushi; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Yasuda, Noritomo; Shima, Ayaka; Morino, Hirofumi; Koizumi, Tomoko; Fukuda, Toshiaki; Miura, Takanori; Shibata, Takashi; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated and compared the antibacterial activity of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) on various multidrug-resistant strains in the presence of bovine serum albumin and sheep erythrocytes to mimic the blood contamination that frequently occurs in the clinical setting. The 3 most important species that cause nosocomial infections, i.e., methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP), and multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRA), were evaluated, with three representative strains of each. At a 10-ppm concentration, ClO2 drastically reduced the number of bacteria of all MDRP and MDRA strains, and 2 out of 3 MRSA strains. However, 10 ppm of NaClO did not significantly kill any of the 9 strains tested in 60 seconds (s). In addition, 100 ppm of ClO2 completely killed all MRSA strains, whereas 100 ppm of NaClO failed to significantly lower the number of 2 MRSA strains and 1 MDRA strain. A time-course experiment demonstrated that, within 15 s, 100 ppm of ClO2, but not 100 ppm of NaClO, completely killed all tested strains. Taken together, these data suggest that ClO2 is more effective than NaClO against MRSA, MDRP, and MDRA, and 100 ppm is an effective concentration against these multidrug-resistant strains, which cause fatal nosocomial infections.

  10. Dissemination of genetically related IMP-6-producing multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa ST235 in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jung Sik; Yang, Ji Woo; Kim, Hye Mee; Byeon, Jeongheum; Kim, Hwa Su; Yoo, Jae Il; Chung, Gyung Tae; Lee, Yeong Seon

    2012-04-01

    The present study aimed to describe the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates obtained from non-tertiary care hospitals and geriatric hospitals in South Korea. Of the 644 isolates, 224 were carbapenem-resistant, amongst which 41 (18.3%) were MBL-producers and the major MBL type was IMP-6 (35 isolates). IMP-6-producing isolates were multidrug-resistant and showed higher minimum inhibitory concentrations for meropenem than imipenem. All of the IMP-6-producing isolates had class 1 integrons with amplification sizes of 4.5 kb/5.5 kb (34 isolates) or 3.0 kb (1 isolate); 4.5 kb/5.5 kb integrons had bla(IMP-6)-qac-aacA4-bla(OXA-1)-aadA1 (5.5 kb) and aadB-cmlA-bla(OXA-10)-aadA1 (4.5 kb). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis indicated that all IMP-6-producing P. aeruginosa from various geographic areas had nearly identical patterns with >85% similarity. All IMP-6-producing isolates showed high genetic similarity to those obtained from tertiary care hospitals and had the same integron type, indicating the spread of these strains to the three types of hospitals nationwide. These data show the wide spreading of clonally related IMP-6-producing P. aeruginosa (sequence type 235) through tertiary, non-tertiary and geriatric hospitals in South Korea. Continuous monitoring and thorough infection control should be performed in all types of hospitals to prevent further spreading of MBL-producing P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  11. Unexpected challenges in treating multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria: resistance to ceftazidime-avibactam in archived isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Marisa L; Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M; Hujer, Andrea M; Domitrovic, T Nicholas; Hujer, Kristine M; Hurless, Kelly N; Tuohy, Marion; Hall, Geraldine; Bonomo, Robert A

    2015-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a notoriously difficult-to-treat pathogen that is a common cause of severe nosocomial infections. Investigating a collection of β-lactam-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolates from a decade ago, we uncovered resistance to ceftazidime-avibactam, a novel β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combination. The isolates were systematically analyzed through a variety of genetic, biochemical, genomic, and microbiological methods to understand how resistance manifests to a unique drug combination that is not yet clinically released. We discovered that avibactam was able to inactivate different AmpC β-lactamase enzymes and that blaPDC regulatory elements and penicillin-binding protein differences did not contribute in a major way to resistance. By using carefully selected combinations of antimicrobial agents, we deduced that the greatest barrier to ceftazidime-avibactam is membrane permeability and drug efflux. To overcome the constellation of resistance determinants, we show that a combination of antimicrobial agents (ceftazidime/avibactam/fosfomycin) targeting multiple cell wall synthetic pathways can restore susceptibility. In P. aeruginosa, efflux, as a general mechanism of resistance, may pose the greatest challenge to future antibiotic development. Our unexpected findings create concern that even the development of antimicrobial agents targeted for the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacteria may encounter clinically important resistance. Antibiotic therapy in the future must consider these factors. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Infections in intensive care unit adult patients harboring multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: implications for prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Borgatta, B; Lagunes, L; Imbiscuso, A T; Larrosa, M N; Lujàn, M; Rello, J

    2017-01-16

    The purpose of this paper was to report the burden and characteristics of infection by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA) in clinical samples from intensive care unit (ICU) adults, and to identify predictors. This was a retrospective observational study at four medical-surgical ICUs. The case cohort comprised adults with documented isolation of an MDR-PA strain from a clinical specimen during ICU stay. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors for MDR-PA infection. During the study period, 5667 patients were admitted to the ICU and P. aeruginosa was isolated in 504 (8.8%). MDR-PA was identified in 142 clinical samples from 104 patients (20.6%); 62 (43.6%) of these samples appeared to be true infections. One hundred and eighteen (83.1%) isolates were susceptible only to amikacin and colistin, and 13 (9.2%) were susceptible only to colistin. Overall, the MIC50 to meropenem was 16 μg/mL and the MIC90 was >32 μg/mL, with 60.4% of respiratory samples being MIC >32 μg/mL to meropenem. Independent predictors for MDR-PA infection were fever/hypothermia [odds ratio (OR) 9.09], recent antipseudomonal cephalosporin therapy (OR 6.31), vasopressors at infection onset (OR 4.40), and PIRO (predisposition, infection, response, and organ dysfunction) score >2 (OR 2.06). This study provides novel information that may be of use for the clinical management of patients harboring MDR-PA and for the control of the spread of this organism.

  13. Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa outbreaks in two hospitals: association with contaminated hospital waste-water systems.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, A S; Cubbon, M D; Karunaharan, R N; Pope, C F; Planche, T D

    2012-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-P) expressing VIM-metallo-beta-lactamase is an emerging infection control problem. The source of many such infections is unclear, though there are reports of hospital outbreaks of P. aeruginosa related to environmental contamination, including tap water. We describe two outbreaks of MDR-P, sensitive only to colistin, in order to highlight the potential for hospital waste-water systems to harbour this organism. The outbreaks were investigated by a combination of descriptive epidemiology, inspection and microbiological sampling of the environment, and molecular strain typing. The outbreaks occurred in two English hospitals; each involved a distinct genotype of MDR-P. One outbreak was hospital-wide, involving 85 patients, and the other was limited to four cases in one specialized medical unit. Extensive environmental sampling in each outbreak yielded MDR-P only from the waste-water systems. Inspection of the environment and estates records revealed many factors that may have contributed to contamination of clinical areas, including faulty sink, shower and toilet design, clean items stored near sluices, and frequent blockages and leaks from waste pipes. Blockages were due to paper towels, patient wipes, or improper use of bedpan macerators. Control measures included replacing sinks and toilets with easier-to-clean models less prone to splashback, educating staff to reduce blockages and inappropriate storage, reviewing cleaning protocols, and reducing shower flow rates to reduce flooding. These measures were followed by significant reductions in cases. The outbreaks highlight the potential of hospital waste systems to act as a reservoir of MDR-P and other nosocomial pathogens. Copyright © 2012 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Diverse Genetic Background of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Mainland China, and Emergence of an Extensively Drug-Resistant ST292 Clone in Kunming

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xin; Wu, Yue; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Kudinha, Timothy; Bazaj, Alda; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    For a better understanding of the multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA) epidemiology in mainland China, a nationwide surveillance network of 27 tertiary hospitals was established. Non-duplicate MDR-PA isolates from 254 cases of nosocomial infections, were collected during the period August 2011 to July 2012. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of nine antimicrobial agents were determined by broth micro-dilution method according to the CLSI guidelines [M7-A10]. Genotyping analysis was performed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The presence of acquired carbapenemases was also determined by molecular approaches for 233 carbapenem-resistant isolates. Carbapenemase genes were detected in 19 (8.2%) isolates, with 13 of these isolates encoding IMP-type enzymes, five with VIM-2, and one with KPC-2. MLST analysis revealed significant genetic diversity among the MDR-PA isolates studied, and 91 STs (including 17 novel STs) were identified. However, a long-term outbreak of an emerging extensively drug-resistant (XDR) ST292/PFGE genotype A clone was detected in a hospital from Southwest China. This study has demonstrated that MDR-PA in mainland China have evolved from diverse genetic backgrounds. Evidence of clonal dissemination of the organism and nosocomial outbreaks in some regions, suggest a need to strengthen existing infection control measures. PMID:27198004

  15. An integrated approach to control a prolonged outbreak of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Knoester, M; de Boer, M G J; Maarleveld, J J; Claas, E C J; Bernards, A T; de Jonge, E; van Dissel, J T; Veldkamp, K E

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we aim to provide insight into the complexity of outbreak management in an intensive care unit (ICU) setting. In October 2010 four patients on the ICU of our tertiary care centre were colonized or infected with a multidrug-resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA). An outbreak investigation was carried out and infection control measures were taken in an attempt to identify a potential source and stop transmission. The outbreak investigation included descriptive epidemiology, comprising retrospective case finding by reviewing the laboratory information system back to 2004 and prospective case finding by patient screening for MDR-PA. Furthermore, microbiological analysis, environmental screening and a case-control study were carried out. Infection control measures consisted of re-education of healthcare personnel on basic hygiene measures, auditing of hygiene procedures used in daily practice by infection control practitioners, and stepwise up-regulation of isolation measures. From February 2009 to January 2012, 44 patients on our ICU were found to be MDR-PA positive. MDR-PA isolates of the 44 patients showed two distinct AFLP patterns, with homology within each of the AFLP clusters of more than 93%. The VIM metallo-β-lactamase gene was detected in 20 of 21 tested isolates. A descriptive epidemiology investigation identified the rooms with the highest numbers of MDR-PA positive patients. The case-control study showed three factors to be independently associated with MDR-PA positivity: admission to ICU subunit 1 (OR, 6.1; 95% CI, 1.7, 22), surgery prior to or during admission (OR, 5.7; 95% CI, 1.6, 20) and being warmed-up with the warm-air blanket (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.2, 11). After three environmental screening rounds, with sampling of sinks, furniture and devices in the ICU, without revealing a clear common source, a fourth environmental investigation included culturing of faucet aerators. Two faucets were found to be positive for MDR-PA and

  16. Oxidative Stress Induction of the MexXY Multidrug Efflux Genes and Promotion of Aminoglycoside Resistance Development in Pseudomonas aeruginosa ▿

    PubMed Central

    Fraud, Sebastien; Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) (e.g., peroxide) was shown to induce expression of the PA5471 gene, which was previously shown to be required for antimicrobial induction of the MexXY components of the MexXY-OprM multidrug efflux system and aminoglycoside resistance determinant in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. mexXY was also induced by peroxide exposure, and this too was PA5471 dependent. The prospect of ROS promoting mexXY expression and aminoglycoside resistance recalls P. aeruginosa infection of the chronically inflamed lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, where the organism is exposed to ROS and where MexXY-OprM predominates as the mechanism of aminoglycoside resistance. While ROS did not enhance aminoglycoside resistance in vitro, long-term (8-day) exposure of P. aeruginosa to peroxide (mimicking chronic in vivo ROS exposure) increased aminoglycoside resistance frequency, dependent upon PA5471 and mexXY. This enhanced resistance frequency was also seen in a mutant strain overexpressing PA5471, in the absence of peroxide, suggesting that induction of PA5471 by peroxide was key to peroxide enhancement of aminoglycoside resistance frequency. Resistant mutants selected following peroxide exposure were typically pan-aminoglycoside-resistant, with mexXY generally required for this resistance. Moreover, PA5471 was required for mexXY expression and aminoglycoside resistance in these as well as several CF isolates examined. PMID:21173187

  17. The Widespread Multidrug-Resistant Serotype O12 Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clone Emerged through Concomitant Horizontal Transfer of Serotype Antigen and Antibiotic Resistance Gene Clusters.

    PubMed

    Thrane, Sandra Wingaard; Taylor, Véronique L; Freschi, Luca; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Boyle, Brian; Laroche, Jérôme; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Lévesque, Roger C; Lam, Joseph S; Jelsbak, Lars

    2015-09-22

    The O-specific antigen (OSA) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide is highly varied by sugar identity, side chains, and bond between O-repeats. These differences classified P. aeruginosa into 20 distinct serotypes. In the past few decades, O12 has emerged as the predominant serotype in clinical settings and outbreaks. These serotype O12 isolates exhibit high levels of resistance to various classes of antibiotics. Here, we explore how the P. aeruginosa OSA biosynthesis gene clusters evolve in the population by investigating the association between the phylogenetic relationships among 83 P. aeruginosa strains and their serotypes. While most serotypes were closely linked to the core genome phylogeny, we observed horizontal exchange of OSA biosynthesis genes among phylogenetically distinct P. aeruginosa strains. Specifically, we identified a "serotype island" ranging from 62 kb to 185 kb containing the P. aeruginosa O12 OSA gene cluster, an antibiotic resistance determinant (gyrA(C248T)), and other genes that have been transferred between P. aeruginosa strains with distinct core genome architectures. We showed that these genes were likely acquired from an O12 serotype strain that is closely related to P. aeruginosa PA7. Acquisition and recombination of the "serotype island" resulted in displacement of the native OSA gene cluster and expression of the O12 serotype in the recipients. Serotype switching by recombination has apparently occurred multiple times involving bacteria of various genomic backgrounds. In conclusion, serotype switching in combination with acquisition of an antibiotic resistance determinant most likely contributed to the dissemination of the O12 serotype in clinical settings. Infection rates in hospital settings by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones have increased during the past decades, and serotype O12 is predominant among these epidemic strains. It is not known why the MDR phenotype is associated with serotype

  18. An usual approach to treatment of a case of multidrug resistance Pseudomonas aeruginosa peritonitis: parenteral and intraperitoneal aminoglycosides and parenteral colistin

    PubMed Central

    May, Ian; Abu-Khdeir, Maha; Blackwood, Roland Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are becoming more common and increasingly more difficult to treat due to the continued development of drug resistance. While sensitivity to colistin (polymyxin E) is well known, it is frequently avoided due to concerns of nephrotoxicity. Reported here is a case of a multi-drug resistance pseudomonal typhlitis, bacteremia and pleural cavity infection that required significant intensive care, and serial abdominal washouts. Intra-peritoneal tobramycin in combination with broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics including colistin were used. Several instillations of tobramycin into the abdominal cavity along with concomitant IV administration of colistin, ceftazidime and tobramycin and per os colistin, tobramycin and nystatin resulted in the clearance of the pseudomonal infection without any evidence of toxicity from the treatment. Intra-abdominal tobramycin with parenteral colistin therapy can be used in complicated clinical settings with appropriate nephroprotection. PMID:24470950

  19. Application of the multifactor dimensionality reduction method in evaluation of the roles of multiple genes/enzymes in multidrug-resistant acquisition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

    PubMed

    Yao, Z; Peng, Y; Bi, J; Xie, C; Chen, X; Li, Y; Ye, X; Zhou, J

    2016-03-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRPA) infections are major threats to healthcare-associated infection control and the intrinsic molecular mechanisms of MDRPA are also unclear. We examined 348 isolates of P. aeruginosa, including 188 MDRPA and 160 non-MDRPA, obtained from five tertiary-care hospitals in Guangzhou, China. Significant correlations were found between gene/enzyme carriage and increased rates of antimicrobial resistance (P < 0·01). gyrA mutation, OprD loss and metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) presence were identified as crucial molecular risk factors for MDRPA acquisition by a combination of univariate logistic regression and a multifactor dimensionality reduction approach. The MDRPA rate was also elevated with the increase in positive numbers of those three determinants (P < 0·001). Thus, gyrA mutation, OprD loss and MBL presence may serve as predictors for early screening of MDRPA infections in clinical settings.

  20. In vitro susceptibility of multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from clinical specimens at Bugando Medical Centre, Tanzania to Piperacillin-Tazobactam.

    PubMed

    Petro, Daudi; Mushi, Martha F; Moremi, Nyambura; Iddi, Shabani; Mirambo, Mariam; Seni, Jeremiah; Mshana, Stephen E

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas spp. and Klebsiella pneumoniae are common causes of serious health care associated infections (HCAIs) worldwide. The treatment options for infections caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) organisms are limited to tigecycline and carbapenems. A total of 172 isolates of multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas. spp and extended-spectrum β- (ESBL) producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from clinical specimens at the Bugando Medical Centre were tested for their in vitro susceptibility to piperacillin-tazobactam 100/10μg using disc diffusion test as recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI). Out of 59 multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas spp, 54 (92.0%) were susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam while of 113 ESBL producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, 55 (48.7%) were susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam 100/10μg. Also, 20 (34.0%) of the Pseudomonas spp were both ESBL producers and susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam 100/10μg. A significant proportion of Pseudomonas spp isolates from clinical specimens in our setting are susceptible to piperacillin/tazobactam. This study shows that piperacillin-tazobactam offer a better option to clinicians for the treatment of health care associated infections due to Pseudomonas spp. and ESBL producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in our setting and other health facilities where these organisms are of significance.

  1. A Galleria mellonella infection model reveals double and triple antibiotic combination therapies with enhanced efficacy versus a multidrug-resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Krezdorn, Jessica; Adams, Sophie; Coote, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the inhibitory effect of antibiotic combinations in vitro with efficacy in Galleria mellonella larvae in vivo to identify efficacious combinations that target Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa NCTC 13437, a multidrug-resistant strain resistant to β-lactams and aminoglycosides, was used. Susceptibility to cefotaxime, piperacillin, meropenem, amikacin, levofloxacin and colistin alone, or in dual or triple combinations, was measured in vitro via a 24 h time-kill assay. In vitro results were then compared with the efficacy of the same dual or triple antibiotic combinations versus G. mellonella larvae infected with P. aeruginosa. G. mellonella haemolymph burden of P. aeruginosa was determined over 96 h post-infection and treatment with the most potent combination therapies. Many dual and triple combinations of antibiotics displayed synergistic inhibition of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa in vitro. There was little correlation between combinations that were synergistic in vitro and those that showed enhanced efficacy in vivo versus infected G. mellonella larvae. The most potent dual and triple combinations in vivo were cefotaxime plus piperacillin, and meropenem plus piperacillin and amikacin, respectively. Fewer combinations were found to offer enhanced therapeutic benefit in vivo compared with in vitro. The therapeutic benefit arising from treatment with antibiotic combinations in vivo correlated with reduced larval burden of P. aeruginosa. This study has identified antibiotic combinations that merit further investigation for their clinical potential and has demonstrated the utility of using G. mellonella to screen for novel antibiotic treatments that demonstrate efficacy in vivo.

  2. Multidrug-Resistant Sequence Type 235 Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates Producing IMP-26 with Increased Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing Activities in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Tatsuya; Nhung, Pham Hong; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Tsuchiya, Mitsuhiro; Phuong, Doan Mai; Anh, Nguyen Quoc; Ohmagari, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Forty clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa were obtained in a medical setting in Hanoi, Vietnam. Whole genomes of all 40 isolates were sequenced by MiSeq (Illumina), and phylogenic trees were constructed from the single nucleotide polymorphism concatemers. Of these 40 isolates, 24 (60.0%) harbored metallo-β-lactamase-encoding genes, including blaIMP-15, blaIMP-26, blaIMP-51, and/or blaNDM-1. Of these 24 isolates, 12 harbored blaIMP-26 and belonged to sequence type 235 (ST235). Escherichia coli expressing blaIMP-26 was significantly more resistant to doripenem and meropenem than E. coli expressing blaIMP-1 and blaIMP-15. IMP-26 showed higher catalytic activity against doripenem and meropenem than IMP-1 and against all carbapenems tested, including doripenem, imipenem, meropenem, and panipenem, than did IMP-15. These data suggest that clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant ST235 P. aeruginosa producing IMP-26 with increased carbapenem-hydrolyzing activities are spreading in medical settings in Vietnam. PMID:27600046

  3. Multidrug-Resistant Sequence Type 235 Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates Producing IMP-26 with Increased Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing Activities in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tada, Tatsuya; Nhung, Pham Hong; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Tsuchiya, Mitsuhiro; Phuong, Doan Mai; Anh, Nguyen Quoc; Ohmagari, Norio; Kirikae, Teruo

    2016-11-01

    Forty clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa were obtained in a medical setting in Hanoi, Vietnam. Whole genomes of all 40 isolates were sequenced by MiSeq (Illumina), and phylogenic trees were constructed from the single nucleotide polymorphism concatemers. Of these 40 isolates, 24 (60.0%) harbored metallo-β-lactamase-encoding genes, including blaIMP-15, blaIMP-26, blaIMP-51, and/or blaNDM-1 Of these 24 isolates, 12 harbored blaIMP-26 and belonged to sequence type 235 (ST235). Escherichia coli expressing blaIMP-26 was significantly more resistant to doripenem and meropenem than E. coli expressing blaIMP-1 and blaIMP-15 IMP-26 showed higher catalytic activity against doripenem and meropenem than IMP-1 and against all carbapenems tested, including doripenem, imipenem, meropenem, and panipenem, than did IMP-15. These data suggest that clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant ST235 P. aeruginosa producing IMP-26 with increased carbapenem-hydrolyzing activities are spreading in medical settings in Vietnam. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Resistome and pathogenomics of multidrug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa VRFPA03, VRFPA05 recovered from alkaline chemical keratitis and post-operative endophthalmitis patient.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Nandagopal; Malathi, Jambulingam; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Madhavan, Hajib NarahariRao

    2016-03-01

    Eye infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important cause of ocular morbidity. We presents the whole genomic comparative analysis of two P. aeruginosa VRFPA03 and VRFPA05 isolated from alkaline chemical injury mediated keratitis and post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis patients, respectively. The blaDIM-1 gene in VRFPA03 and the blaGes-9 gene in VRFPA05 were identified and reported for the first time from an ocular isolate. The current study revealed novel integrons In1107 and In1108, comprised of multidrug-resistant genes. Ocular virulence factors mainly mediated by exoenzymes T, Y, and U and exotoxin A, elastase B, and phenazine-specific methyltransferase. Genomic analysis uncovered multiple known and unknown factors involved in P. aeruginosa mediated ocular infection, which may lead to drug discovery and diagnostic markers to improve human vision care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Vikas; Sanchaita, Sinha; Singh, NP

    2010-01-01

    Emergence and spread of Acinetobacter species, resistant to most of the available antimicrobial agents, is an area of great concern. It is now being frequently associated with healthcare associated infections. Literature was searched at PUBMED, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Library, using the terms ‘Acinetobacter Resistance, multidrug resistant (MDR), Antimicrobial Therapy, Outbreak, Colistin, Tigecycline, AmpC enzymes, and carbapenemases in various combinations. The terms such as MDR, Extensively Drug Resistant (XDR), and Pan Drug Resistant (PDR) have been used in published literature with varied definitions, leading to confusion in the correlation of data from various studies. In this review various mechanisms of resistance in the Acinetobacter species have been discussed. The review also probes upon the current therapeutic options, including combination therapies available to treat infections due to resistant Acinetobacter species in adults as well as children. There is an urgent need to enforce infection control measures and antimicrobial stewardship programs to prevent the further spread of these resistant Acinetobacter species and to delay the emergence of increased resistance in the bacteria. PMID:20927292

  6. Profile of Virulence Factors in the Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains of Human Urinary Tract Infections (UTI)

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Asghar; Honarmand, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Putative virulence factors are responsible for the pathogenicity of UTIs caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Resistance of P. aeruginosa to commonly used antibiotics is caused by the extreme overprescription of those antibiotics. Objectives: The goal of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of virulence factors and the antibiotic resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa isolates in UTI cases in Iran. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and fifty urine samples were collected from patients who suffered from UTIs. Samples were cultured immediately, and those that were P. aeruginosa-positive were analyzed for the presence of virulence genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) was performed using the disk diffusion method. Results: Of the 250 urine samples analyzed, 8 samples (3.2%) were positive for P. aeruginosa. The prevalence of P. aeruginosa in male and female patients was 2.7% and 3.5%, respectively, (P = 0.035). In patients less than 10 years old, it was 4.2%, and in patients more than 55 years old, it was 4.2%. These were the most commonly infected groups. The highest levels of resistance were seen against ampicillin (87.5%), norfloxacin (62.5%), gentamycin (62.5%), amikacin (62.5%), and aztreonam (62.5%), while the lowest were seen for meropenem (0%), imipenem (12.5%), and polymyxin B (12.5%). LasB (87.5%), pclH (75%), pilB (75%), and exoS (75%) were the most commonly detected virulence factors in the P. aeruginosa isolates. Conclusions: It is logical to first prescribe meropenem, imipenem, and polymyxin B in cases of UTIs caused by P. aeruginosa. Medical practitioners should be aware of the presence of levels of antibiotic resistance in hospitalized UTI patients in Iran. PMID:26756017

  7. Clinically Relevant Plasma Concentrations of Colistin in Combination with Imipenem Enhance Pharmacodynamic Activity against Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa at Multiple Inocula▿†

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Phillip J.; Forrest, Alan; Bulitta, Jürgen B.; Tsuji, Brian T.; Sidjabat, Hanna E.; Paterson, David L.; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger L.

    2011-01-01

    The use of combination antibiotic therapy may be beneficial against rapidly emerging resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study was to systematically investigate in vitro bacterial killing and resistance emergence with colistin alone and in combination with imipenem against multidrug-resistant (MDR) P. aeruginosa. Time-kill studies were conducted over 48 h using 5 clinical isolates and ATCC 27853 at two inocula (∼106 and ∼108 CFU/ml); MDR, non-MDR, and colistin-heteroresistant and -resistant strains were included. Nine colistin-imipenem combinations were investigated. Microbiological response was examined by log changes at 6, 24, and 48 h. Colistin combined with imipenem at clinically relevant concentrations increased the levels of killing of MDR and colistin-heteroresistant isolates at both inocula. Substantial improvements in activity with combinations were observed across 48 h with all colistin concentrations at the low inoculum and with colistin at 4× and 16× MIC (or 4 and 32 mg/liter) at the high inoculum. Combinations were additive or synergistic against imipenem-resistant isolates (MICs, 16 and 32 mg/liter) at the 106-CFU inoculum in 9, 11, and 12 of 18 cases (i.e., 9 combinations across 2 isolates) at 6, 24, and 48 h, respectively, and against the same isolates at the 108-CFU inoculum in 11, 7, and 8 cases, respectively. Against a colistin-resistant strain (MIC, 128 mg/liter), combinations were additive or synergistic in 9 and 8 of 9 cases at 24 h at the 106- and 108-CFU inocula, respectively, and in 5 and 7 cases at 48 h. This systematic study provides important information for optimization of colistin-imipenem combinations targeting both colistin-susceptible and colistin-resistant subpopulations. PMID:21876058

  8. Rapid identification of international multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones by multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis and investigation of their susceptibility to lytic bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Larché, Jérôme; Pouillot, Flavie; Essoh, Christiane; Libisch, Balázs; Straut, Monica; Lee, Je Chul; Soler, Charles; Lamarca, Richard; Gleize, Elodie; Gabard, Jérôme; Vergnaud, Gilles; Pourcel, Christine

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated over a period of 12 months in two French hospitals and to test their susceptibility to bacteriophages. A total of 47 MDR isolates recovered from hospitalized patients were genotyped using multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis. The genotypes were distributed into five clones (including 19, 5, 5, 3, and 3 isolates, respectively) and 12 singletons. Comparison to 77 MDR strains from three other countries, and MLST analysis of selected isolates showed the predominance of international MDR clones. The larger clone, CC235, contained 59 isolates displaying different antibiotic resistance mechanisms, including the presence of the GES1, VIM-2, VIM-4, and IMP-1 β-lactamases. Three newly isolated P. aeruginosa bacteriophages were found to lyse 42 of the 44 analyzed strains, distributed into the different clonal complexes. This pilot study suggests that systematic genotyping of P. aeruginosa MDR strains could improve our epidemiological understanding of transmission at both the local (hospital) and the national level and that phage therapy could be an alternative or a complementary treatment to antibiotics for treating MDR-infected patients.

  9. Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections pose growing threat to health care-associated infection control in the hospitals of Southern China: a case-control surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yang; Bi, Jiaqi; Shi, Jing; Li, Ying; Ye, Xiaohua; Chen, Xiaofeng; Yao, Zhenjiang

    2014-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRPA) is one of the most common agents among health care-associated infections. There is a lack of data on the clinical features of MDRPA from Southern China. A case-control surveillance study of P aeruginosa was conducted based on surveillance from July 2008-December 2012, in 5 hospitals of Guangzhou, China. Data were analyzed by univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression using Stata 13 (StataCorp, College Station, TX). Of the 348 P aeruginosa strains, the prevalence of MDRPA was 54%, and it has increased over time. Isolates of P aeruginosa showed increased resistance to most antimicrobials during this time period. Independent risk factors were tracheal intubation insertion (odds ratio [OR], 2.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-4.23; P = .02) and use of carbapenem (odds ratio [OR], 3.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.75-6.47; P < .01). The distribution of MDRPA infections was uneven among the 5 hospitals (P = .01). Being infected with MDRPA strains resulted in longer duration of hospitalization (39 vs 24 days) and higher mortality (49% vs 20%). The infections of MDRPA were severe issues. More stringent measures should be applied for those with independent predictors of MDRPA infections because they may induce adverse clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Synergistic Killing of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa at Multiple Inocula by Colistin Combined with Doripenem in an In Vitro Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Phillip J.; Tsuji, Brian T.; Bulitta, Jurgen B.; Forrest, Alan; Jacob, Jovan; Sidjabat, Hanna E.; Paterson, David L.; Nation, Roger L.; Li, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Combination therapy may be required for multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study was to systematically investigate bacterial killing and emergence of colistin resistance with colistin and doripenem combinations against MDR P. aeruginosa. Studies were conducted in a one-compartment in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for 96 h at two inocula (∼106 and ∼108 CFU/ml) against a colistin-heteroresistant reference strain (ATCC 27853) and a colistin-resistant MDR clinical isolate (19147 n/m). Four combinations utilizing clinically achievable concentrations were investigated. Microbiological response was examined by log changes and population analysis profiles. Colistin (constant concentrations of 0.5 or 2 mg/liter) plus doripenem (peaks of 2.5 or 25 mg/liter every 8 h; half-life, 1.5 h) substantially increased bacterial killing against both strains at the low inoculum, while combinations containing colistin at 2 mg/liter increased activity against ATCC 27853 at the high inoculum; only colistin at 0.5 mg/liter plus doripenem at 2.5 mg/liter failed to improve activity against 19147 n/m at the high inoculum. Combinations were additive or synergistic against ATCC 27853 in 16 and 11 of 20 cases (4 combinations across 5 sample points) at the 106- and 108-CFU/ml inocula, respectively; the corresponding values for 19147 n/m were 16 and 9. Combinations containing doripenem at 25 mg/liter resulted in eradication of 19147 n/m at the low inoculum and substantial reductions in regrowth (including to below the limit of detection at ∼50 h) at the high inoculum. Emergence of colistin-resistant subpopulations of ATCC 27853 was substantially reduced and delayed with combination therapy. This investigation provides important information for optimization of colistin-doripenem combinations. PMID:21911563

  11. In vitro and in vivo properties of a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that combats multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Adawi, Azmi; Bisignano, Carlo; Genovese, Tiziana; Filocamo, Angela; Khouri-Assi, Camellia; Neville, Anat; Feuerstein, Giora Z; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Neville, Lewis F

    2012-09-01

    The development of an anti-bacterial drug in the form of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting an exposed virulence factor, represents an innovative therapeutic strategy. Consequently, a fully human IgG1 mAb (LST-007) targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) flagellin type b was recombinantly expressed and characterized in vitro and in an infection model driven by a multidrug resistant (MDR) PA strain. LST-007 demonstrated a highly specific binding towards whole PA bacteria harboring flagellin type b and its recombinant counterpart, with a K(D) of 7.4x10(-10) M. In bioactivity assays, LST-007 or titers of Cmax sera derived from pharmacokinetic studies, markedly attenuated PA motility in an equipotent manner. In vivo, parenteral LST-007 (20 mg/kg) given as a single or double-dosing paradigm post-infection, afforded survival (up to 75% at Day 7) in a lethal model of pneumonia driven by the intratracheal (i.t.) instillation of an LD(80) of the MDR PA isolate. This protective effect was markedly superior to that of imipenem (30% survival at Day 7) and totally devoid with an irrelevant, human isotype mAb. These data lay credence that LST-007 may be a valuable adjunct to the limited list of anti-bacterials that can tackle MDR PA strains, thereby warranting its continued development for eventual clinical evaluation.

  12. Prevalence of Multidrug-resistant, Extensively Drug-resistant, and Pandrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a Tertiary Level Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Gill, JS; Arora, Sunil; Khanna, SP; Kumar, KVS Hari

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is common in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), leading to increased morbidity and mortality. The organism is classified into various phenotypes based on the drug resistance pattern, namely, drug-resistant (DR), multi-DR (MDR), extensively DR (XDR), and pan-DR (PDR). We aim to study the incidence of P. aeruginosa phenotypes in a tertiary level ICU. Materials and Methods: We conducted this prospective, observational study for 2 years (January 2014-December 2015) and collected appropriate clinical samples (blood, urine, wound discharge, etc.,) from all the patients admitted to ICU. We excluded patients with known septicemia and P. aeruginosa infection. Group 1 comprised a total 1915 patient samples and Group 2 comprised 100 active surveillance samples, collected from the medical staff and the hospital environment. The data were analyzed using appropriate statistical methods, and a P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: We isolated 597 pathogenic bacteria out of 1915 specimens, giving a culture positivity rate of 31.2%. Klebsiella (43%), Acinetobacter (22%), and P. aeruginosa (15%) were the top three isolated bacteria. None of the surveillance samples grew P. aeruginosa. Antibiotic resistance studies revealed that 47.7% of P. aeruginosa isolates were DR, 50% were MDR, and 2.3% were XDR phenotype. None of the strains showed PDR phenotype. Conclusion: Our data revealed a high prevalence of DR phenotypes of P. aeruginosa in the ICU. Judicious use of antibiotics and strict infection control measures are essential to reduce the prevalence of drug resistance. PMID:27942195

  13. Green synthesis of Al2O3 nanoparticles and their bactericidal potential against clinical isolates of multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mohammad A; Khan, Haris M; Alzohairy, Mohammad A; Jalal, Mohammad; Ali, Syed G; Pal, Ruchita; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    -β-lactamases strains of P. aeruginosa, regardless of their drug resistance patterns and mechanisms. The results elucidated the clinical significance of Al2O3-NPs in developing an effective antibacterial therapeutic regimen against the multi-drug resistant bacterial infections. The use of leaf extract of lemongrass for the synthesis of Al2O3-NPs appears to be cost effective, nontoxic, eco-friendly and its strong antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant strains of P. aeruginosa offers compatibility for pharmaceutical and other biomedical applications.

  14. Multifocal Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Producing the PER-1 Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase in Northern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Laura; Mantengoli, Elisabetta; Migliavacca, Roberta; Nucleo, Elisabetta; Pollini, Simona; Spalla, Melissa; Daturi, Rossana; Romero, Egidio; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2004-01-01

    Forty-four nonreplicate clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that were resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ceftazidime and cefepime) and aztreonam, that putatively produced an acquired extended- spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), according to the results of a double-disk synergy test, and that had been involved in nosocomial outbreaks were obtained from six different hospitals in northern Italy and screened for the presence of blaPER ESBL determinants. Twenty isolates, associated with nine independent outbreaks that occurred in five hospitals in the Milan area and its surroundings during 1995-2000, were found to carry an acquired blaPER-1 gene. PER-1 producers representative of the nine outbreaks exhibited a multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype, including resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins, aztreonam, meropenem, aminoglycosides, and in most cases, imipenem and ciprofloxacin. An analysis of macrorestriction profiles of their genomic DNAs by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed an overall clonal diversity of the PER-1 producers, although interhospital clonal spread was also observed. The blaPER-1 gene was not transferable and appeared to be chromosomally located. An analysis of the EcoRI and EcoRV restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the blaPER-1 locus revealed identical patterns for all isolates, and the characterization of a 1.9-kb region containing blaPER-1 revealed a conserved structure in representatives of the various clonal lineages. The present findings indicate that MDR P. aeruginosa clones producing the PER-1 ESBL are endemic to this area of northern Italy, where they have been circulating since the mid-1990s and have been associated with several nosocomial outbreaks. PMID:15184430

  15. Increased prevalence and clonal dissemination of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa with the blaIMP-1 gene cassette in Hiroshima.

    PubMed

    Kouda, Syuntaro; Ohara, Masaru; Onodera, Makoto; Fujiue, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Megumi; Kohara, Tadahiro; Kashiyama, Seiya; Hayashida, Shizue; Harino, Toshie; Tsuji, Takahiro; Itaha, Hideyuki; Gotoh, Naomasa; Matsubara, Akio; Usui, Tsuguru; Sugai, Motoyuki

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dissemination of metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL)-encoding genes among multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from major hospitals in the Hiroshima region. During July to December from 2004 to 2006, a surveillance of eight major hospitals in the Hiroshima region identified 387 non-duplicate isolates resistant to imipenem (MIC >or= 16 mg/L). They were screened for resistance to amikacin (MIC >or= 64 mg/L) and ciprofloxacin (MIC >or= 4 mg/L) and MBL-encoding genes. The structure of the variable regions of the integrons was determined using PCR mapping. Clonality was assessed using PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The frequency of MBL-positive isolates in MDR P. aeruginosa isolates significantly increased from 42.3% in 2004 to 81.4% in 2006. Most of the MBL-positive isolates produced IMP-1 followed by VIM-2. The bla(IMP-1) and bla(VIM-2) genes were present in class 1 integrons. Characterization of the variable regions of the integron showed the presence of six different gene cassette arrays in bla(IMP-1) cassettes and a single array in bla(VIM-2) cassettes. The IMP-1 producers belonged to two clonal lineages using PFGE and MLST analyses and the integron variations correlated well with the clonal complexes. Among them, strains positive for a newly identified In113-derived bla(IMP-1) gene cassette array were most widely distributed in Hiroshima. This study shows a dramatic increase in MBL genes, primarily bla(IMP-1), in MDR P. aeruginosa isolates in Hiroshima during these 3 years. In addition, MDR P. aeruginosa with the newly discovered In113-derived bla(IMP-1) gene cassette array appears to be clonally expanding.

  16. [Travellers and multi-drug resistance bacteria].

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Nozomi

    2012-02-01

    The number of international travellers has increased. There is enormous diversity in medical backgrounds, purposes of travel, and travelling styles among travellers. Travellers are hospitalized abroad because of exotic and common diseases via medical tourism. This is one way of transporting and importing human bacteria between countries, including multi-drug resistant organisms. In developing countries, the antimicrobial resistance in Shigella sp. and Salmonella sp. have been a problem, because of this trend, the first choice of antibiotics has changed in some countries. Community acquired infections as well as hospital acquired infections with MRSA, multi-drug resistance (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ESBL have been a problem. This review will discuss the risk of MDR bacterial infectious diseases for travellers.

  17. The Effect of Infection Control Nurses on the Occurrence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Healthcare-Acquired Infection and Multidrug-Resistant Strains in Critically-Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; He, Linxi; Liu, Chunfeng; Rong, Jian; Shi, Yongyan; Song, Wenliang; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Lijie

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infections in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), which have a high incidence, increase treatment costs and mortality, and seriously threaten the safety of critically ill children. It is essential to seek convenient and effective methods to control and prevent healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs). This research was conducted to study the effect of infection control nurses on the occurrence of P. aeruginosa HAIs and multi-drug resistance (MDR) strains in PICU. Methods The clinical data was divided into two groups, with the age ranging from 1 month to 14 years. One group of the critically ill patients(N = 3,722) was admitted to PICU from 2007 to 2010, without the management of infection control nurses. The other group of the critically ill patients (N = 3,943) was admitted to PICU from 2011 to 2013, with the management of infection control nurses. Compare the mortality, morbidity and the incidence of acquired P. aeruginosa infections to evaluate the effect of infection control nurses. Results After implementation of the post of infection control nurses, the patient's overall mortality fell from 4.81% to 3.73%. Among the patients with endotracheal intubation more than 48 hours, the incidence of endotracheal intubation-related pneumonia decreased from 44.6% to 34.32%. The mortality of patients with endotracheal intubation decreased from 16.96% to 10.17%, and the morbidity of HAIs with P. aeruginosa decreased from 1.89% to 1.07%. The mutual different rate (MDR) dropped from 67.95% to 44.23%. There were remarkable differences in these rates between the two groups (p<0.05). Conclusion Implementing the post of infection control nurses is associated with effectively reducing the HAI rate, especially the incidence and morbidity of P. aeruginosa HAIs, reducing PICU mortality, improving P. aeruginosa drug resistance. PMID:26630032

  18. Multidrug-Resistant TB

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Helen; Coomans, Fons

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress (REBSP) is a little-known but potentially valuable right that can contribute to rights-based approaches to addressing multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). We argue that better understanding of the REBSP may help to advance legal and civil society action for health rights. While the REBSP does not provide an individual entitlement to have a new drug developed for MDR-TB, it sets up entitlements to expect a state to establish a legislative and policy framework aimed at developing scientific capacity to address the most important health issues and at disseminating the outcomes of scientific research. By making scientific findings available and accessible, people can be enabled to claim the use of science for social benefits. Inasmuch as the market fails to address neglected diseases such as MDR-TB, the REBSP provides a potential counterbalance to frame a positive obligation on states to both marshal their own resources and to coordinate the actions of multiple other actors towards this goal, including non-state actors. While the latter do not hold the same level of accountability as states, the REBSP can still enable the recognition of obligations at a level of “soft law” responsibilities. PMID:27780997

  19. Control of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients by a Novel Bundle Including Remodeling of Sanitary and Water Supply Systems.

    PubMed

    Kossow, Annelene; Kampmeier, Stefanie; Willems, Stefanie; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Groll, Andreas H; Burckhardt, Birgit; Claudia, Rossig; Groth, Christoph; Idelevich, Evgeny A; Kipp, Frank; Mellmann, Alexander; Stelljes, Matthias

    2017-09-15

    Infections by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRPa) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Humid environments can serve as a reservoir and source of infection by this pathogen. To minimize the risk of infection from these reservoirs, we performed extensive remodeling of sanitation and water installations as the focus of our hygiene bundle. During the reconstruction of our transplantation unit (April 2011-April 2014) we implemented several technical modifications to reduce environmental contamination by and subsequent spreading of MDRPa, including a newly designed shower drain, disinfecting siphons underneath the sinks, and rimless toilets. During a 3-year study period (2012-2014), we tracked the number of patients affected by MDRPa (colonized and/or infected) and the outcome of infected patients, and monitored the environmental occurrence of this pathogen. We further performed whole-genome sequencing of nosocomial MDRPa strains to evaluate genotypic relationships between isolates. Whereas 31 (9.2%; 18 colonized, 13 infected) patients were affected in 2012 and 2013, the number decreased to 3 in 2014 (17%; 3 colonized, 0 infected). Lethality by MDRPa similarly decreased from 3.6% to 0%. Environmental detection of MDRPa decreased in toilets from 18.9% in 2012-2013 to 6.1% in the following year and from 8.1% to 3.0%, respectively, in shower outlets. Whole-genome sequencing showed close relationships between environmental and patient-derived isolates. Hospital construction measures aimed at controlling environmental contamination by and spread of MDRPa are effective at minimizing the risk of highly lethal MDRPa infections.

  20. Successful Use of Ceftolozane-Tazobactam to Treat a Pulmonary Exacerbation of Cystic Fibrosis Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Vickery, Stephen B; McClain, David; Wargo, Kurt A

    2016-10-01

    Ceftolozane-tazobactam, a novel β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor, was recently approved for the treatment of complicated urinary tract and intraabdominal infections, as monotherapy and in combination with metronidazole, respectively. Ceftolozane-tazobactam exhibits a wide spectrum of activity against both gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria including multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and some anaerobic bacteria. Although not currently approved for any pulmonary indication, studies have demonstrated excellent distribution to epithelial lining fluid, indicating that it may be an alternative agent to use in the treatment of respiratory tract infections caused by MDRP. aeruginosa. Unfortunately, data are lacking regarding the use of ceftolozane-tazobactam in the treatment of respiratory tract infections including patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). We describe the first case report, to our knowledge, of a 25-year-old white man successfully treated with ceftolozane-tazobactam for a pulmonary exacerbation of his CF caused by MDRP. aeruginosa. He was admitted for his fourth hospitalization in 7 months for a pulmonary exacerbation of his CF. After blood and sputum were cultured, prednisone, cefepime, inhaled tobramycin, and intravenous ciprofloxacin were started. On day 4, after no signs of clinical improvement, respiratory cultures revealed nonmucoid MDRP. aeruginosa, susceptible only to colistin. β-Lactam therapy was subsequently changed to ceftolozane-tazobactam 3 g intravenously every 8 hours while continuing ciprofloxacin and inhaled tobramycin. Ceftolozane-tazobactam susceptibility was determined by the Etest method (minimum inhibitory concentration 1.5 μg/ml). By day 3 of therapy, the patient showed signs of clinical improvement and was discharged after completion of a 12-day course of antibiotics. Until additional research is available, we hope this evidence will provide consideration of ceftolozane-tazobactam for this novel off

  1. Breaking the Spell: Combating Multidrug Resistant 'Superbugs'.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahper N; Khan, Asad U

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria have become a severe threat to community wellbeing. Conventional antibiotics are getting progressively more ineffective as a consequence of resistance, making it imperative to realize improved antimicrobial options. In this review we emphasized the microorganisms primarily reported of being resistance, referred as ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacteriaceae) accentuating their capacity to "escape" from routine antimicrobial regimes. The upcoming antimicrobial agents showing great potential and can serve as alternative therapeutic options are discussed. We also provided succinct overview of two evolving technologies; specifically network pharmacology and functional genomics profiling. Furthermore, In vivo imaging techniques can provide novel targets and a real time tool for potential lead molecule assessment. The employment of such approaches at prelude of a drug development process, will enables more informed decisions on candidate drug selection and will maximize or predict therapeutic potential before clinical testing.

  2. Cross-Resistance between Triclosan and Antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Mediated by Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Exposure of a Susceptible Mutant Strain to Triclosan Selects nfxB Mutants Overexpressing MexCD-OprJ

    PubMed Central

    Chuanchuen, Rungtip; Beinlich, Kerry; Hoang, Tung T.; Becher, Anna; Karkhoff-Schweizer, RoxAnn R.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2001-01-01

    Triclosan is an antiseptic frequently added to items as diverse as soaps, lotions, toothpaste, and many commonly used household fabrics and plastics. Although wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa expresses the triclosan target enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase, it is triclosan resistant due to expression of the MexAB-OprM efflux system. Exposure of a susceptible Δ(mexAB-oprM) strain to triclosan selected multidrug-resistant bacteria at high frequencies. These bacteria hyperexpressed the MexCD-OprJ efflux system due to mutations in its regulatory gene, nfxB. The MICs of several drugs for these mutants were increased up to 500-fold, including the MIC of ciprofloxacin, which was increased 94-fold. Whereas the MexEF-OprN efflux system also participated in triclosan efflux, this antimicrobial was not a substrate for MexXY-OprM. PMID:11158736

  3. Role of multidrug resistance in photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diddens, Heyke C.

    1992-06-01

    Multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy is a well established phenomenon. One of the most common phenotypical changes in acquired or intrinsic multidrug resistance in human tumor cells is the overexpression of the mdrl gene product P-glycoprotein, which acts as an active efflux pump. Increased levels of P-glycoprotein are associated with resistance to a variety of anticancer drugs commonly used in tumor chemotherapy like anthracyclins, vinca- alcaloids, epipodophyllotoxins or actinomycin D. We investigated the efficacy or photodynamic therapy in the treatment of tumor cells expressing the multidrug resistance phenotype. Our data show that multidrug resistant cells are highly cross resistant to the phototoxic stain rhodamine 123 but exhibit only low degrees of cross resistance (2 - 3 -folds) to the photosensitizers Photosan-3, Clorin-2, methylene blue and meso-tetra (4- sulfonatophenyl) porphine (TPPS4). Resistance is associated with a decrease in intracellular accumulation of the photosensitizer. Verapamil, a membrane active compound known to enhance drug sensitivity in multidrug resistant cells by inhibition of P-glycoprotein, also increases phototoxicity in multidrug resistant cells. Our results imply that tumors expressing the multidrug resistance phenotype might fail to respond to photochemotherapy with rhodamine 123. On the other hand, multidrug resistance may not play an important role in photodynamic therapy with Photosan-3, Chlorin-2, methylene blue or TPPS4.

  4. Chlorinated phenols control the expression of the multi-drug resistance efflux pump MexAB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by activating NalC

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sudeshna; Cremers, Claudia M.; Jakob, Ursula; Love, Nancy G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary NalC is a TetR type regulator that represses the multidrug efflux pump MexAB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we explain the mechanism of NalC mediated regulation of MexAB-OprM. We show that NalC non-covalently binds chlorinated phenols and chemicals containing chlorophenol sidechains such as triclosan. NalC-chlorinated phenol binding results in its dissociation from promoter DNA and up-regulation of NalC’s downstream targets, including the MexR antirepressor ArmR. ArmR up-regulation and MexR-ArmR complex formation have previously been shown to upregulate MexAB-OprM. In vivo mexB and armR expression analyses were used to corroborate in vitro NalC chlorinated phenol binding. We also show that the interaction between chlorinated phenols and NalC is reversible, such that removal of these chemicals restored NalC promoter DNA binding. Thus, the NalC-chlorinated phenol interaction is likely a pertinent physiological mechanism that P. aeruginosa uses to control expression of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump. PMID:21231970

  5. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Resistance to the Max

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to a variety of antimicrobials and can develop resistance during anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy both of which compromise treatment of infections caused by this organism. Resistance to multiple classes of antimicrobials (multidrug resistance) in particular is increasingly common in P. aeruginosa, with a number of reports of pan-resistant isolates treatable with a single agent, colistin. Acquired resistance in this organism is multifactorial and attributable to chromosomal mutations and the acquisition of resistance genes via horizontal gene transfer. Mutational changes impacting resistance include upregulation of multidrug efflux systems to promote antimicrobial expulsion, derepression of ampC, AmpC alterations that expand the enzyme's substrate specificity (i.e., extended-spectrum AmpC), alterations to outer membrane permeability to limit antimicrobial entry and alterations to antimicrobial targets. Acquired mechanisms contributing to resistance in P. aeruginosa include β-lactamases, notably the extended-spectrum β-lactamases and the carbapenemases that hydrolyze most β-lactams, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, and 16S rRNA methylases that provide high-level pan-aminoglycoside resistance. The organism's propensity to grow in vivo as antimicrobial-tolerant biofilms and the occurrence of hypermutator strains that yield antimicrobial resistant mutants at higher frequency also compromise anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy. With limited therapeutic options and increasing resistance will the untreatable P. aeruginosa infection soon be upon us? PMID:21747788

  6. Use of aztreonam in association with cefepime for the treatment of nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to β-lactams in ICU patients: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Hervé; Marciniak, Sandra; Zogheib, Elie; Mammeri, Hedi; Friggeri, Arnaud; Ammenouche, Nacim; Levrard, Mélanie; Airapetian, Norair; Tinturier, François; Mahjoub, Yazine

    2015-06-01

    Resistance to all β-lactams is emerging among Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) clinical isolates. Aztreonam and cefepime act synergistically in vitro against AmpC overproducing PA isolates. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of this treatment in ICU patients infected with multidrug-resistant PA. Retrospective study (2 years, 2 ICUs) in a tertiary university hospital. Inclusion criteria were proven infection with evidence of a bacterial strain of PA resistant to all β-lactams and treated with the association of at least aztreonam plus cefepime. Treatment was considered effective for pneumonia using CPIS scores at the end of treatment and for other infections, using the SOFA score and signs of infection improvement at the end of treatment. Infectious episodes were classified as cure or failure. Thirteen patients were included (10 nosocomial pneumonia, 3 nosocomial intra-abdominal infections). The median [25th-75th percentiles] admission SAPS2 score was 54 [51-69] and the median SOFA score at the beginning of infection was 7 [4-8]. The median CPIS scores for pneumonia at the beginning and end of treatment were 9 [7-10.5] and 2 [0.75-5.5]. The duration of treatment with the combination of aztreonam plus cefepime was 14 days [9.5-16]. Nine episodes were classified as cures and 4 as failures, indicating a clinical efficacy of 69.2%. Overall mortality was 38.5%. These data suggest that the association of cefepime plus aztreonam could be an attractive alternative in the treatment of infections with multidrug-resistant PA to all β-lactams with a clinical efficacy rate of 69%. Copyright © 2015 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein Modulator of Multidrug Efflux Gene Expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Denis M.; Cao, Lily; Fraud, Sebastien; Wilke, Mark S.; Pacey, Angela; Klinoski, Rachael; Strynadka, Natalie C.; Dean, Charles R.; Poole, Keith

    2007-01-01

    nalC multidrug-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa show enhanced expression of the mexAB-oprM multidrug efflux system as a direct result of the production of a ca. 6,100-Da protein, PA3719, in these mutants. Using a bacterial two-hybrid system, PA3719 was shown to interact in vivo with MexR, a repressor of mexAB-oprM expression. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies confirmed a high-affinity interaction (equilibrium dissociation constant [KD], 158.0 ± 18.1 nM) of PA3719 with MexR in vitro. PA3719 binding to and formation of a complex with MexR obviated repressor binding to its operator, which overlaps the efflux operon promoter, suggesting that mexAB-oprM hyperexpression in nalC mutants results from PA3719 modulation of MexR repressor activity. Consistent with this, MexR repression of mexA transcription in an in vitro transcription assay was alleviated by PA3719. Mutations in MexR compromising its interaction with PA3719 in vivo were isolated and shown to be located internally and distributed throughout the protein, suggesting that they impacted PA3719 binding by altering MexR structure or conformation rather than by having residues interacting specifically with PA3719. Four of six mutant MexR proteins studied retained repressor activity even in a nalC strain producing PA3719. Again, this is consistent with a PA3719 interaction with MexR being necessary to obviate MexR repressor activity. The gene encoding PA3719 has thus been renamed armR (antirepressor for MexR). A representative “noninteracting” mutant MexR protein, MexRI104F, was purified, and ITC confirmed that it bound PA3719 with reduced affinity (5.4-fold reduced; KD, 853.2 ± 151.1 nM). Consistent with this, MexRI104F repressor activity, as assessed using the in vitro transcription assay, was only weakly compromised by PA3719. Finally, two mutations (L36P and W45A) in ArmR compromising its interaction with MexR have been isolated and mapped to a putative C-terminal α-helix of the

  8. Coexistence of multidrug resistance mechanisms and virulence genes in carbapenem resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from a tertiary care hospital, South India.

    PubMed

    Ellappan, Kalaiarasan; Belgode Narasimha, Harish; Kumar, Saravana

    2017-09-08

    This study aimed to identify the multiple drug resistance mechanisms and various virulence genes in high level carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa (CARPA) isolates collected from patients hospitalized in a tertiary care hospital, South India. A total of 156 CARPA isolates were included in this study. Multiplex PCR was optimized to detect carbapenemases and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) genes, respectively. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) was optimized to evaluate OprD deficiency. Efflux pump activity was determined by Phenylalanine-Arginine Beta-Naphthylamide (PAβN) assay and expression of mexA and mexC genes were evaluated by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR). The presence of virulence genes (exoS, algD, algU, lasR and rhlR) and (plcH and lasB) were detected by qRT-PCR and RT-PCR, respectively. Genes encoding for carbapenemases and ESBL were detected in 49% (blaVIM, 23%, blaNDM-1, 17%, blaVIM alongside blaNDM-1, 7% and blaIMP, 1%) and 4% (blaVEB, 4%) of CARPA isolates, respectively. Loss of OprD porin was observed in 9 (6%) isolates, two of which were harboring blaVIM gene. Among PAβN positive isolates, mexA expression was significantly up-regulated. AlgD expression was detected in 93% of CARPA isolates, followed by, algU (89%), rhlR (84%), lasR (81%) and exoS (76%). The lasB and plcH genes were detected in 94% and 92% of isolates, respectively. Co-existence of multiple antimicrobial resistance mechanisms together with virulence genes in carbapenem resistant isolates has become an emerging threat. This is alarming. Hence, continuous monitoring of multi drug resistant pathogens is important for clinicians to consider therapeutic options against such infections. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Multidrug resistance: an emerging crisis.

    PubMed

    Tanwar, Jyoti; Das, Shrayanee; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2014-01-01

    The resistance among various microbial species (infectious agents) to different antimicrobial drugs has emerged as a cause of public health threat all over the world at a terrifying rate. Due to the pacing advent of new resistance mechanisms and decrease in efficiency of treating common infectious diseases, it results in failure of microbial response to standard treatment, leading to prolonged illness, higher expenditures for health care, and an immense risk of death. Almost all the capable infecting agents (e.g., bacteria, fungi, virus, and parasite) have employed high levels of multidrug resistance (MDR) with enhanced morbidity and mortality; thus, they are referred to as "super bugs." Although the development of MDR is a natural phenomenon, the inappropriate use of antimicrobial drugs, inadequate sanitary conditions, inappropriate food-handling, and poor infection prevention and control practices contribute to emergence of and encourage the further spread of MDR. Considering the significance of MDR, this paper, emphasizes the problems associated with MDR and the need to understand its significance and mechanisms to combat microbial infections.

  10. In169, a new class 1 integron that encoded bla(IMP-18) in a multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martinez, Guillermina; Garza-Ramos, Ulises Jesús; Reyna-Flores, Fernando Luis; Gaytán-Martínez, Jesús; Lorenzo-Bautista, Isaí Guillermo; Silva-Sanchez, Jesús

    2010-05-01

    Carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa may be due to the presence of metallo-beta-lactamases (MbetaL). The genes that encode these enzymes can be located in association with aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes on class 1 integrons. This study describes the bla(IMP-18) class 1 integron array (In169) from a carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolate obtained at the Centro Medico Nacional La Raza (CMNR) in Mexico City and compares it to other bla(IMP)-type producers. Twenty six multiresistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolates were recovered between June and December 2004 and tested by MicroScan and CLSI agar dilution methods. The MbetaL production was screened by a disk approximation test and MbetaL Etest strips, whereas MbetaL genes and integrons were detected using PCR primers. DNA sequence analysis was carried out by BLAST, and epidemiological typing was performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). A Southern hybridization analysis was performed with a bla(IMP) specific DNA probe. Nine of 26 P. aeruginosa isolates were imipenem-resistant with unique PFGE patterns (no clonal relation), and only one strain (5106) was positive for MbetaL production, corresponding to the IMP-type. The class 1 integron encoding the MbetaL was characterized: it contained the IMP-18, two copies of aadA2 and OXA-2 genes, corresponding to a new class 1 integron array, denoted In169. P. aeruginosa isolate 5106 is genetically related to bla(IMP-18) positive P. aeruginosa isolate from a distant hospital (Hospital Infantil de Morelia). This report is the first to describe the bla(IMP-18) in two genetically related isolates from two different institutions. Copyright 2010 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative studies on the activity of basil--an essential oil from Ocimum basilicum L.--against multidrug resistant clinical isolates of the genera Staphylococcus, Enterococcus and Pseudomonas by using different test methods.

    PubMed

    Opalchenova, G; Obreshkova, D

    2003-07-01

    The essential oil basil is obtained from the aerial parts of Ocimum basilicum L. After gas chromatographic separation, the following components were identified: linalol (54.95%), methylchavikol (11.98%), methylcinnamat (7.24%) and linolen (0.14%). The activity of basil against multidrug resistant clinical isolates from the genera Staphylococcus, Enterococcus and Pseudomonas has been studied. For this purpose, standard and modified broth macrodilution methods were used and time kill kinetic of basil was studied. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were reported between 0.0030% and 0.0007% (v/v). These concentrations were compared with the inhibitory concentrations (ICs) and the logs of the bacterial counts reduction both obtained by basil diluted in 1% Tween (Tw) 80, saline test solution (STS) and spiritus vini (Sv) 95 degrees instead in a broth. The data, obtained after application of different methods of investigation and validated with membrane filtration, showed a strong inhibitory effect of basil on the test bacteria. The chosen bacteria are widespread and pose serious therapeutic difficulties because of their high level of resistance. For this reason, the results obtained were considered encouraging.

  12. Role of type IV pili in virulence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 6605: correlation of motility, multidrug resistance, and HR-inducing activity on a nonhost plant.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Fumiko; Ichinose, Yuki

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the role of type IV pili in the virulence of phytopathogenic bacteria, four mutant strains for pilus biogenesis-related genes were generated in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 6605. PilA encodes the pilin protein as a major subunit of type IV pili, and the pilO product is reported to be required for pilus assembly. The fimU and fimT genes are predicted to produce minor pilins. Western blot analysis revealed that pilA, pilO, and fimU mutants but not the fimT mutant failed to construct type IV pili. Although the swimming motility of all mutant strains was not impaired in liquid medium, they showed remarkably reduced motilities on semisolid agar medium, suggesting that type IV pili are required for surface motilities. Virulence toward host tobacco plants and hypersensitive response-inducing ability in nonhost Arabidopsis leaves of pilA, pilO, and fimU mutant strains were reduced. These results might be a consequence of reduced expression of type III secretion system-related genes in the mutant strains. Further, all mutant strains showed enhanced expression of resistance-nodulation-division family members mexA, mexB, and oprM, and higher tolerance to antimicrobial compounds. These results indicate that type IV pili are an important virulence factor of this pathogen.

  13. Assessment of the effectiveness of silver-coated dressing, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%), citric acid (3%), and silver sulfadiazine (1%) for topical antibacterial effects against the multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting full-skin thickness burn wounds on rats.

    PubMed

    Yabanoglu, Hakan; Basaran, Ozgur; Aydogan, Cem; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Karakayali, Feza; Moray, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of four different topical antimicrobial dressings on a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa contaminated full-thickness burn wound rat model. A total of 40 adult male Wistar albino rats were used. The control group (group 1), silver sulfadiazine (1%) group 2, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%) group 3, citric acid (3%) group 4, and silver-coated dressing group 5 were compared to assess the antibacterial effects of a daily application to a 30% full-skin thickness burn wound seeded 10 minutes earlier with 10(8) CFU (colony forming unit)/0.5 mL of a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain. Five groups (1 control group and 4 treatment groups) were compared. The administration of third-degree burns to all rats was confirmed based on histopathologic data. The tissue cultures from groups 2 and 5 exhibited significant differences compared to those of the other 3 groups, whereas no significant differences were observed between groups 1, 3, and 4. The effectiveness of the treatments was as follows: 1% silver sulfadiazine > silver-coated dressing > 3% citric acid > 0.5% chlorhexidine acetate > control group. Our results supported the efficacy of topical therapy by silver sulfadiazine and silver-coated dressing on infections caused by multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas spp.

  14. Assessment of the Effectiveness of Silver-Coated Dressing, Chlorhexidine Acetate (0.5%), Citric Acid (3%), and Silver Sulfadiazine (1%) for Topical Antibacterial Effects Against the Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infecting Full-Skin Thickness Burn Wounds on Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yabanoglu, Hakan; Basaran, Ozgur; Aydogan, Cem; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Karakayali, Feza; Moray, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of four different topical antimicrobial dressings on a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa contaminated full-thickness burn wound rat model. A total of 40 adult male Wistar albino rats were used. The control group (group 1), silver sulfadiazine (1%) group 2, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%) group 3, citric acid (3%) group 4, and silver-coated dressing group 5 were compared to assess the antibacterial effects of a daily application to a 30% full-skin thickness burn wound seeded 10 minutes earlier with 108 CFU (colony forming unit)/0.5 mL of a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain. Five groups (1 control group and 4 treatment groups) were compared. The administration of third-degree burns to all rats was confirmed based on histopathologic data. The tissue cultures from groups 2 and 5 exhibited significant differences compared to those of the other 3 groups, whereas no significant differences were observed between groups 1, 3, and 4. The effectiveness of the treatments was as follows: 1% silver sulfadiazine > silver-coated dressing > 3% citric acid > 0.5% chlorhexidine acetate > control group. Our results supported the efficacy of topical therapy by silver sulfadiazine and silver-coated dressing on infections caused by multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas spp. PMID:24229034

  15. Multifunctional micelle delivery system for overcoming multidrug resistance of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li; Wu, Lei; Jiang, Shanshan; Yang, Dandan; He, Huiyang; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Peng

    2017-09-13

    Doxorubicin, as an anthracycline, plays an important role in chemotherapy. But multidrug resistance tremendously retards the anticancer effect of doxorubicin and results in the failure of chemotherapy. Multifunctional micelles emerge as a valid strategy to load doxorubicin by physical encapsulation or chemical binding to be delivered to cancer cells against multidrug resistance. In this review, mechanism of multidrug resistance of doxorubicin is simply described. Multifunctional co-delivery micelles of doxorubicin and main multidrug resistance modulators have been summarized in detail. Doxorubicin-loaded multifunctional polymeric micelles are also introduced to alleviate multidrug resistance of doxorubicin, in which polymers act as multidrug resistance modulators.

  16. Ceramide glycosylation potentiates cellular multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y Y; Han, T Y; Giuliano, A E; Cabot, M C

    2001-03-01

    Ceramide glycosylation, through glucosylceramide synthase (GCS), allows cellular escape from ceramide-induced programmed cell death. This glycosylation event confers cancer cell resistance to cytotoxic anticancer agents [Liu, Y. Y., Han, T. Y., Giuliano, A. E., and M. C. Cabot. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 1140-1146]. We previously found that glucosylceramide, the glycosylated form of ceramide, accumulates in adriamycin-resistant breast carcinoma cells, in vinblastine-resistant epithelioid carcinoma cells, and in tumor specimens from patients showing poor response to chemotherapy. Here we show that multidrug resistance can be increased over baseline and then totally reversed in human breast cancer cells by GCS gene targeting. In adriamycin-resistant MCF-7-AdrR cells, transfection of GCS upgraded multidrug resistance, whereas transfection of GCS antisense markedly restored cellular sensitivity to anthracyclines, Vinca alkaloids, taxanes, and other anticancer drugs. Sensitivity to the various drugs by GCS antisense transfection increased 7- to 240-fold and was consistent with the resumption of ceramide-caspase-apoptotic signaling. GCS targeting had little influence on cellular sensitivity to either 5-FU or cisplatin, nor did it modify P-glycoprotein expression or rhodamine-123 efflux. GCS antisense transfection did enhance rhodamine-123 uptake compared with parent MCF-7-AdrR cells. This study reveals that GCS is a novel mechanism of multidrug resistance and positions GCS antisense as an innovative force to overcome multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy.

  17. In vitro activity of S-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)isothiourea hydrochloride and novel structurally related compounds against multidrug-resistant bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Audrey; Perry, John D; James, Arthur L; Stanforth, Stephen P; Carnell, Sonya; Wilkinson, Kathryn; Anjam Khan, C M; De Soyza, Anthony; Gould, F Kate

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the antimicrobial activities of S-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)isothiourea hydrochloride (A22) and a series of structurally related compounds against multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 21 compounds were determined against 18 strains of pathogenic bacteria in addition to Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=19) and Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) (n=20) isolated from the sputa of cystic fibrosis patients. Selected compounds were tested against further isolates, including P. aeruginosa (n=100), BCC (n=12) and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (n=19). The interaction of S-(4-chlorobenzyl)isothiourea hydrochloride (C2) in combination with conventional antimicrobials was examined against 10 P. aeruginosa strains. Selected compounds were also tested against Enterobacteriaceae producing NDM-1 carbapenemase (n=64) and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (n=37). Of the 21 compounds, 14 showed antimicrobial activity that was generally more pronounced against Gram-negative bacteria. Against P. aeruginosa, the most active compound was C2 [MIC for 50% of the organisms (MIC(50))=32μg/mL]. This compound was also the most active against BCC, with all isolates inhibited by 64μg/mL. For all ten strains of P. aeruginosa subjected to combination testing with C2 and conventional antimicrobials, a bactericidal effect was achieved with at least one combination. C2 and A22 both showed strong activity [MIC for 90% of the organisms (MIC(90))=4μg/mL] against Enterobacteriaceae that produced NDM-1 carbapenemase. Finally, S-(4-chlorobenzyl)-N-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)isothiourea hydrochloride showed good activity (MIC(90)=8μg/mL) against MRSA. This work establishes the activity of isothiourea derivatives against a broad range of clinically important MDR bacteria. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  18. Whole-Genome Sequence of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain BAMCPA07-48, Isolated from a Combat Injury Wound

    PubMed Central

    Sanjar, Fatemeh; Karna, S. L. Rajasekhar; Chen, Tsute; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BAMCPA07-48, isolated from a combat injury wound. The closed genome sequence of this isolate is a valuable resource for pathogenome characterization of P. aeruginosa associated with wounds, which will aid in the development of a higher-resolution phylogenomic framework for molecular-guided pathogen-surveillance. PMID:27389262

  19. Molecular epidemiology provides evidence of genotypic heterogeneity of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype O:12 outbreak isolates from a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Bingen, E; Bonacorsi, S; Rohrlich, P; Duval, M; Lhopital, S; Brahimi, N; Vilmer, E; Goering, R V

    1996-01-01

    Ribotyping randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were used for the epidemiologic evaluation of eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa O:12 isolates obtained from eight children and two P. aeruginosa O:12 environmental isolates from a hematology ward. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were able to discriminate isolates that were indistinguishable by biochemical typing, O serotyping or ribotyping. PMID:8940479

  20. Geraniol Restores Antibiotic Activities against Multidrug-Resistant Isolates from Gram-Negative Species▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Vannina; Muselli, Alain; Bernardini, Antoine François; Berti, Liliane; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Amaral, Leonard; Bolla, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    The essential oil of Helichrysum italicum significantly reduces the multidrug resistance of Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Combinations of the two most active fractions of the essential oil with each other or with phenylalanine arginine β-naphthylamide yield synergistic activity. Geraniol, a component of one fraction, significantly increased the efficacy of β-lactams, quinolones, and chloramphenicol. PMID:19258278

  1. Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Southwestern Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Luisa Maria; Rozo, Juan C.; Forero, Liliana; van Soolingen, Dick

    2011-01-01

    Using spoligotyping, we identified 13 genotypes and 17 orphan types among 160 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients in Valle del Cauca, Colombia. The Beijing genotype represented 15.6% of the isolates and was correlated with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, female sex of the patients, and residence in Buenaventura and may represent a new public health threat. PMID:21762581

  2. Multidrug Resistance: Physiological Principles and Nanomedical Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Gert; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug (MDR) resistance is a pathophysiological phenomenon employed by cancer cells which limits the prolonged and effective use of chemotherapeutic agents. MDR is primarily based on the over-expression of drug efflux pumps in the cellular membrane. Prominent examples of such efflux pumps, which belong to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of proteins, are Pgp (P-glycoprotein) and MRP (multidrug resistance-associated protein), nowadays officially known as ABCB1 and ABCC1. Over the years, several strategies have been evaluated to overcome MDR, based not only on the use of low-molecular-weight MDR modulators, but also on the implementation of 1-100(0) nm-sized drug delivery systems. In the present manuscript, after introducing the most important physiological principles of MDR, we summarize prototypic nanomedical strategies to overcome multidrug resistance, including the use of carrier materials with intrinsic anti-MDR properties, the use of nanomedicines to modify the mode of cellular uptake, and the co-formulation of chemotherapeutic drugs together with low- and high-molecular-weight MDR inhibitors within a single drug delivery system. While certain challenges still need to be overcome before such constructs and concepts can be widely applied in the clinic, the insights obtained and the progress made strongly suggest that nanomedicine formulations hold significant potential for improving the treatment of multidrug-resistant malignancies. PMID:24120954

  3. Breaking the Spell: Combating Multidrug Resistant ‘Superbugs’

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahper N.; Khan, Asad U.

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria have become a severe threat to community wellbeing. Conventional antibiotics are getting progressively more ineffective as a consequence of resistance, making it imperative to realize improved antimicrobial options. In this review we emphasized the microorganisms primarily reported of being resistance, referred as ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacteriaceae) accentuating their capacity to “escape” from routine antimicrobial regimes. The upcoming antimicrobial agents showing great potential and can serve as alternative therapeutic options are discussed. We also provided succinct overview of two evolving technologies; specifically network pharmacology and functional genomics profiling. Furthermore, In vivo imaging techniques can provide novel targets and a real time tool for potential lead molecule assessment. The employment of such approaches at prelude of a drug development process, will enables more informed decisions on candidate drug selection and will maximize or predict therapeutic potential before clinical testing. PMID:26925046

  4. AKT as locus of cancer multidrug resistance and fragility.

    PubMed

    Radisavljevic, Ziv

    2013-04-01

    Complexity and robustness of cancer hypoxic microenvironment are supported by the robust signaling networks of autocrine and paracrine elements creating powerful interactome for multidrug resistance. These elements generate a positive feedback loops responsible for the extreme robustness and multidrug resistance in solid cancer, leukemia, myeloma, and lymphoma. Phosphorylated AKT is a cancer multidrug resistance locus. Targeting that locus by oxidant/antioxidant balance modulation, positive feedback loops are converted into negative feedback loops, leading to disappearance of multidrug resistance. This is a new principle for targeting cancer multidrug resistance by the locus chemotherapy inducing a phenomenon of loops conversion. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. WCK 5107 (Zidebactam) and WCK 5153 Are Novel Inhibitors of PBP2 Showing Potent "β-Lactam Enhancer" Activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Including Multidrug-Resistant Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing High-Risk Clones.

    PubMed

    Moya, Bartolome; Barcelo, Isabel M; Bhagwat, Sachin; Patel, Mahesh; Bou, German; Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M; Bonomo, Robert A; Oliver, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    Zidebactam and WCK 5153 are novel β-lactam enhancers that are bicyclo-acyl hydrazides (BCH), derivatives of the diazabicyclooctane (DBO) scaffold, targeted for the treatment of serious infections caused by highly drug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. In this study, we determined the penicillin-binding protein (PBP) inhibition profiles and the antimicrobial activities of zidebactam and WCK 5153 against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including multidrug-resistant (MDR) metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-producing high-risk clones. MIC determinations and time-kill assays were conducted for zidebactam, WCK 5153, and antipseudomonal β-lactams using wild-type PAO1, MexAB-OprM-hyperproducing (mexR), porin-deficient (oprD), and AmpC-hyperproducing (dacB) derivatives of PAO1, and MBL-expressing clinical strains ST175 (blaVIM-2) and ST111 (blaVIM-1). Furthermore, steady-state kinetics was used to assess the inhibitory potential of these compounds against the purified VIM-2 MBL. Zidebactam and WCK 5153 showed specific PBP2 inhibition and did not inhibit VIM-2 (apparent Ki [Kiapp] > 100 μM). MICs for zidebactam and WCK 5153 ranged from 2 to 32 μg/ml (amdinocillin MICs > 32 μg/ml). Time-kill assays revealed bactericidal activity of zidebactam and WCK 5153. LIVE-DEAD staining further supported the bactericidal activity of both compounds, showing spheroplast formation. Fixed concentrations (4 or 8 μg/ml) of zidebactam and WCK 5153 restored susceptibility to all of the tested β-lactams for each of the P. aeruginosa mutant strains. Likewise, antipseudomonal β-lactams (CLSI breakpoints), in combination with 4 or 8 μg/ml of zidebactam or WCK 5153, resulted in enhanced killing. Certain combinations determined full bacterial eradication, even with MDR MBL-producing high-risk clones. β-Lactam-WCK enhancer combinations represent a promising β-lactam "enhancer-based" approach to treat MDR P. aeruginosa infections, bypassing the need for MBL inhibition. Copyright © 2017 American Society for

  6. MexCD-OprJ Multidrug Efflux System of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Involvement in Chlorhexidine Resistance and Induction by Membrane-Damaging Agents Dependent upon the AlgU Stress Response Sigma Factor▿

    PubMed Central

    Fraud, Sebastien; Campigotto, Aaron J.; Chen, Zhilin; Poole, Keith

    2008-01-01

    The biocide chlorhexidine (CHX) as well as additional membrane-active agents were shown to induce expression of the mexCD-oprJ multidrug efflux operon, dependent upon the AlgU stress response sigma factor. Hyperexpression of this efflux system in nfxB mutants was also substantially AlgU dependent. CHX resistance correlated with efflux gene expression in various mutants, consistent with MexCD-OprJ being a determinant of CHX resistance. PMID:18838593

  7. Antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas spp. isolated from wastewater and wastewater-impacted marine coastal zone.

    PubMed

    Luczkiewicz, Aneta; Kotlarska, Ewa; Artichowicz, Wojciech; Tarasewicz, Katarzyna; Fudala-Ksiazek, Sylwia

    2015-12-01

    In this study, species distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of cultivated Pseudomonas spp. were studied in influent (INF), effluent (EFF), and marine outfall (MOut) of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The susceptibility was tested against 8 antimicrobial classes, active against Pseudomonas spp.: aminoglycosides, carbapenems, broad-spectrum cephalosporins from the 3rd and 4th generation, extended-spectrum penicillins, as well as their combination with the β-lactamase inhibitors, monobactams, fluoroquinolones, and polymyxins. Among identified species, resistance to all antimicrobials but colistin was shown by Pseudomonas putida, the predominant species in all sampling points. In other species, resistance was observed mainly against ceftazidime, ticarcillin, ticarcillin-clavulanate, and aztreonam, although some isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, and Pseudomonas protegens showed multidrug-resistance (MDR) phenotype. Among P. putida, resistance to β-lactams and to fluoroquinolones as well as multidrug resistance become more prevalent after wastewater treatment, but the resistance rate decreased in marine water samples. Obtained data, however, suggests that Pseudomonas spp. are equipped or are able to acquire a wide range of antibiotic resistance mechanisms, and thus should be monitored as possible source of resistance genes.

  8. Multidrug resistance in pediatric urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Gaspari, Romolo J; Dickson, Eric; Karlowsky, James; Doern, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) represent a common infection in the pediatric population. Escherichia coli is the most common uropathogen in children, and antimicrobial resistance in this species complicates the treatment of pediatric UTIs. Despite the impact of resistance on empiric antibiotic choice, there is little data on multidrug resistance in pediatric patients. In this paper, we describe characteristics of multidrug-resistant E. coli in pediatric patients using a large national database of uropathogens antimicrobial sensitivities. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns to commonly prescribed antibiotics were performed on uropathogens isolated from children presenting to participating hospitals between 1999 and 2001. Data were analyzed separately for four pediatric age groups. Single and multidrug resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) were performed on all specimens. There were a total of 11,341 E. coli urine cultures from 343 infants (0-4 weeks), 1,801 toddlers (5 weeks-24 months), 6,742 preteens (2-12 years), and 2,455 teens (13-17 years). E. coli resistance to ampicillin peaked in toddlers (52.8%) but was high in preteens (52.1%), infants (50.4%), and teens (40.6%). Resistance to two or more antibiotics varied across age groups, with toddlers (27%) leading preteens (23.1%), infants (21%), and teens (15.9%). Resistance to three or more antibiotics was low in all age groups (range 3.1-5.2%). The most common co-resistance in all age groups was ampicillin/TMP-SMZ. In conclusion, less than half of all pediatric UTIs are susceptible to all commonly used antibiotics. In some age groups, there is a significant percentage of co-resistance between the two most commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin and TMP-SMZ).

  9. Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter meningitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ira; Kapdi, Muznah

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter species have emerged as one of the most troublesome pathogens for healthcare institutions globally. In more recent times, nosocomial infections involving the central nervous system, skin and soft tissue, and bone have emerged as highly problematic. Acinetobacter species infection is common in intensive care units; however, Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis is rarely reported. Here, we report two cases of Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis which was multidrug resistance and ultimately required the carbapenem group of drugs for the treatment.

  10. [Fosfomycin--its significance for treatment of diseases due to multidrug-resistant bacteria].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Fosfomycin is a bactericidal phosphonic acid derivative, which engages by inhibiting pyruvyltransferase at an early stage in the peptidoglycan synthesis. It shows a broad spectrum of activity that includes many multidrug-resistant gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Fosfomycin is active against most strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and several multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, e.g., Escherichia coli strains expressing extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains with decreased susceptibilities to carbapenems. Most methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains as well as enterococci with and without vancomycin resistance are also sensitive to fosfomycin. During the last decade, a variety of studies showed that fosfomycin is not only suitable for treating uncomplicated urinary tract diseases, but also for the treatment of many other diseases caused by bacterial pathogens with and without multidrug resistance. However, large controlled studies demonstrating the efficacy of the drug to treat diseases caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are still missing. Considering the low number of antibacterial agents with good activity against multidrug-resistant bacteria, fosfomycin should be evaluated as an important antibiotic for the treatment of several severe illnesses due to these pathogens. However, because some multidrug-resistant bacteria are also resistant to fosfomycin, this agent should only be applied if the pathogen is sensitive to this drug. In addition, because rapid development of resistance cannot be excluded if fosfomycin will be applied alone, this drug should only be given in combination with other effective drugs for the treatment of serious systemic diseases due to multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens.

  11. Yeast ABC proteins involved in multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Piecuch, Agata; Obłąk, Ewa

    2014-03-01

    Pleiotropic drug resistance is a complex phenomenon that involves many proteins that together create a network. One of the common mechanisms of multidrug resistance in eukaryotic cells is the active efflux of a broad range of xenobiotics through ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often used as a model to study such activity because of the functional and structural similarities of its ABC transporters to mammalian ones. Numerous ABC transporters are found in humans and some are associated with the resistance of tumors to chemotherapeutics. Efflux pump modulators that change the activity of ABC proteins are the most promising candidate drugs to overcome such resistance. These modulators can be chemically synthesized or isolated from natural sources (e.g., plant alkaloids) and might also be used in the treatment of fungal infections. There are several generations of synthetic modulators that differ in specificity, toxicity and effectiveness, and are often used for other clinical effects.

  12. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in central Asia.

    PubMed

    Cox, Helen Suzanne; Orozco, Juan Daniel; Male, Roy; Ruesch-Gerdes, Sabine; Falzon, Dennis; Small, Ian; Doshetov, Darebay; Kebede, Yared; Aziz, Mohammed

    2004-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has emerged as a major threat to TB control, particularly in the former Soviet Union. To determine levels of drug resistance within a directly observed treatment strategy (DOTS) program supported by Médecins Sans Frontières in two regions in Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, Central Asia, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of smear-positive TB patients in selected districts of Karakalpakstan (Uzbekistan) and Dashoguz (Turkmenistan). High levels of MDR-TB were found in both regions. In Karakalpakstan, 14 (13%) of 106 new patients were infected with MDR-TB; 43 (40%) of 107 previously treated patients were similarly infected. The proportions for Dashoguz were 4% (4/105 patients) and 18% (18/98 patients), respectively. Overall, 27% of patients with positive smear results whose infections were treated through the DOTS program in Karakalpakstan and 11% of similar patients in Dashoguz were infected with multidrug-resistant strains of TB on admission. These results show the need for concerted action by the international community to contain transmission and reduce the effects of MDR-TB.

  13. Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis in Central Asia

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, Juan Daniel; Male, Roy; Ruesch-Gerdes, Sabine; Falzon, Dennis; Small, Ian; Doshetov, Darebay; Kebede, Yared; Aziz, Mohammed

    2004-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has emerged as a major threat to TB control, particularly in the former Soviet Union. To determine levels of drug resistance within a directly observed treatment strategy (DOTS) program supported by Médecins Sans Frontières in two regions in Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, Central Asia, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of smear-positive TB patients in selected districts of Karakalpakstan (Uzbekistan) and Dashoguz (Turkmenistan). High levels of MDR-TB were found in both regions. In Karakalpakstan, 14 (13%) of 106 new patients were infected with MDR-TB; 43 (40%) of 107 previously treated patients were similarly infected. The proportions for Dashoguz were 4% (4/105 patients) and 18% (18/98 patients), respectively. Overall, 27% of patients with positive smear results whose infections were treated through the DOTS program in Karakalpakstan and 11% of similar patients in Dashoguz were infected with multidrug-resistant strains of TB on admission. These results show the need for concerted action by the international community to contain transmission and reduce the effects of MDR-TB. PMID:15200821

  14. Interplay Between Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence During Disease Promoted by Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Geisinger, Edward; Isberg, Ralph R

    2017-02-15

    Diseases caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospitals are the outcome of complex relationships between several dynamic factors, including bacterial pathogenicity, the fitness costs of resistance in the human host, and selective forces resulting from interventions such as antibiotic therapy. The emergence and fate of mutations that drive antibiotic resistance are governed by these interactions. In this review, we will examine how different forms of antibiotic resistance modulate bacterial fitness and virulence potential, thus influencing the ability of pathogens to evolve in the context of nosocomial infections. We will focus on 3 important multidrug-resistant pathogens that are notoriously problematic in hospitals: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Staphylococcus aureus. An understanding of how antibiotic resistance mutations shape the pathobiology of multidrug-resistant infections has the potential to drive novel strategies that can control the development and spread of drug resistance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Intrinsic Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants in the Superbug Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Murray, Justine L; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M; Whiteley, Marvin

    2015-10-27

    Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria pose a serious threat in the clinic. This is particularly true for opportunistic pathogens that possess high intrinsic resistance. Though many studies have focused on understanding the acquisition of bacterial resistance upon exposure to antimicrobials, the mechanisms controlling intrinsic resistance are not well understood. In this study, we subjected the model opportunistic superbug Pseudomonas aeruginosa to 14 antimicrobials under highly controlled conditions and assessed its response using expression- and fitness-based genomic approaches. Our results reveal that gene expression changes and mutant fitness in response to sub-MIC antimicrobials do not correlate on a genomewide scale, indicating that gene expression is not a good predictor of fitness determinants. In general, fewer fitness determinants were identified for antiseptics and disinfectants than for antibiotics. Analysis of gene expression and fitness data together allowed the prediction of antagonistic interactions between antimicrobials and insight into the molecular mechanisms controlling these interactions. Infections involving multidrug-resistant pathogens are difficult to treat because the therapeutic options are limited. These infections impose a significant financial burden on infected patients and on health care systems. Despite years of antimicrobial resistance research, we lack a comprehensive understanding of the intrinsic mechanisms controlling antimicrobial resistance. This work uses two fine-scale genomic approaches to identify genetic loci important for antimicrobial resistance of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our results reveal that antibiotics have more resistance determinants than antiseptics/disinfectants and that gene expression upon exposure to antimicrobials is not a good predictor of these resistance determinants. In addition, we show that when used together, genomewide gene expression and fitness profiling can provide

  16. Reversal of multidrug resistance by surfactants.

    PubMed Central

    Woodcock, D. M.; Linsenmeyer, M. E.; Chojnowski, G.; Kriegler, A. B.; Nink, V.; Webster, L. K.; Sawyer, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    Cremophor EL, a pharmacologically inactive solubilising agent, has been shown to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR). Using flow cytometric evaluation of equilibrium intracellular levels of daunorubicin (DNR), we found that eight other surface active agents will also reverse MDR. All the active detergents contain polyethoxylated moieties but have no similarities in their hydrophobic components. The properties of three polyethoxylated surfactants that showed the lowest toxicities, Cremophor, Tween 80 and Solutol HS15, were examined in more detail. The concentrations of Tween 80 and Solutol required to reverse DNR exclusion were 10-fold lower than for Cremophor. However while concentrations greater than or equal to 1:10(2) of the former two surfactants resulted in breakdown of cells, even 1:10 of Cremophor did not lyse cells. Studies of the effects of Cremophor on the uptake and efflux of DNR in normal and MDR cell types showed that Cremophor increases intracellular DNR primarily by locking the rapid efflux from the cells. This blockage of drug efflux may be mediated by a substantial alteration in the fluidity of cell membranes induced by Cremophor, as shown by decreased fluorescence anisotropy of a membrane probe. Consistent with these data, coinjection of adriamycin plus Cremophor into mice carrying a multidrug resistant P388 transplantable tumour significantly increased the survival time of the mice compared with adriamycin treatment alone. PMID:1637678

  17. NANOPREPARATIONS TO OVERCOME MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Niravkumar R.; Pattni, Bhushan S.; Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is the most widely exploited phenomenon by which cancer eludes chemotherapy. Broad variety of factors, ranging from the cellular ones, such as over-expression of efflux transporters, defective apoptotic machineries, and altered molecular targets, to the physiological factors such as higher interstitial fluid pressure, low extracellular pH, and formation of irregular tumor vasculature are responsible for multidrug resistance. A combination of various undesirable factors associated with biological surroundings together with poor solubility and instability of many potential therapeutic small & large molecules within the biological systems and systemic toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents has necessitated the need for nano-preparations to optimize drug delivery. The physiology of solid tumors presents numerous challenges for successful therapy. However, it also offers unique opportunities for the use of nanotechnology. Nanoparticles, up to 400 nm in size, have shown great promise for carrying, protecting and delivering potential therapeutic molecules with diverse physiological properties. In this review, various factors responsible for the MDR and the use of nanotechnology to overcome the MDR, the use of spheroid culture as well as the current technique of producing micro tumor tissues in vitro are discussed in detail. PMID:23973912

  18. Carbenicillin resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tebar, A; Rojo, F; Dámaso, D; Vázquez, D

    1982-01-01

    Four strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa obtained from clinical isolates which are carbenicillin resistant were studied to find the cause(s) of resistance to this beta-lactam antibiotic. The electrophoresis patterns of the four strains (PH20610, PH20815, PH4011, and PH4301) were found to be different from those of a wild-type strain, P. aeruginosa NCTC 10662, and appeared to lack penicillin-binding protein 2. Affinity of other penicillin-binding proteins from strains PH20610 and PH20815 for carbenicillin seemed to be normal or slightly diminished. Electrophoretic patterns of penicillin-binding proteins from strains PH4011 and PH4301 had more profound differences, since the affinities of their penicillin-binding proteins 1a, 1b, and 4 for carbenicillin were decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude relative to the preparations from the wild-type strain. Kinetic studies on binding of carbenicillin to penicillin-binding proteins both in isolated membrane preparations and in intact cells revealed that carbenicillin penetration into resistant cells was a much slower process than in susceptible cells, suggesting that the outer envelope structures serve as an efficient barrier against carbenicillin entry into our P. aeruginosa strains from clinical isolates. PMID:6821456

  19. Epidemiology and Treatment of Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitnick, Carole D.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Shin, Sonya S.

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistant tuberculosis is now thought to afflict between 1 and 2 million patients annually. Although significant regional variability in the distribution of disease has been recorded, surveillance data are limited by several factors. The true burden of disease is likely underestimated. Nevertheless, the estimated burden is substantial enough to warrant concerted action. A range of approaches is possible, but all appropriate interventions require scale-up of laboratories and early treatment with regimens containing a sufficient number of second-line drugs. Ambulatory treatment for most patients, and improved infection control, can facilitate scale-up with decreased risk of nosocomial transmission. Several obstacles have been considered to preclude worldwide scale-up of treatment, mostly attributable to inadequate human, drug, and financial resources. Further delays in scale-up, however, risk continued generation and transmission of resistant tuberculosis, as well as associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:18810684

  20. Diversity among multidrug-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Enterococci are associated with both community- and hospital-acquired infections. Even though they do not cause severe systemic inflammatory responses, such as septic shock, enterococci present a therapeutic challenge because of their resistance to a vast array of antimicrobial drugs, including cell-wall active agents, all commercially available aminoglycosides, penicillin and ampicillin, and vancomycin. The combination of the latter two occurs disproportionately in strains resistant to many other antimicrobial drugs. The propensity of enterococci to acquire resistance may relate to their ability to participate in various forms of conjugation, which can result in the spread of genes as part of conjugative transposons, pheromone-responsive plasmids, or broad host-range plasmids. Enterococcal hardiness likely adds to resistance by facilitating survival in the environment (and thus enhancing potential spread from person to person) of a multidrug-resistant clone. The combination of these attributes within the genus Enterococcus suggests that these bacteria and their resistance to antimicrobial drugs will continue to pose a challenge. PMID:9452397

  1. Studies on pyrrolopyrimidines as selective inhibitors of multidrug-resistance-associated protein in multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouming; Folkes, Adrian; Chuckowree, Irina; Cockcroft, Xiaoling; Sohal, Sukhjit; Miller, Warren; Milton, John; Wren, Stephen P; Vicker, Nigel; Depledge, Paul; Scott, John; Smith, Lyndsay; Jones, Hazel; Mistry, Prakash; Faint, Richard; Thompson, Deanne; Cocks, Simon

    2004-03-11

    Multidrug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein (Pgp) or multidrug-resistance-associated protein (MRP) remains a major obstacle for successful treatment of cancer. Inhibition of Pgp and MRP transport is important for high efficacy of anticancer drugs. While several Pgp inhibitors have entered clinical trials, the development of specific MRP1 inhibitors is still in its infancy. In our screening program, we have identified a pyrrolopyrimidine (4) as a novel and selective MRP1 inhibitor. Subsequent SAR work on the 4-position of the template revealed the phenethylpiperazine side chain as a potent replacement of the benzylthio group of the lead molecule. Introduction of groups at the 2-position seems to have no detrimental effect on activity. Modifications to the nitrile group at the 7-position resulted in the identification of analogues with groups, such as amides, with superior pharmacokinetic profiles. In vivo efficacy has been demonstrated by xenograft studies on selected compounds.

  2. BRCA2-deficient sarcomatoid mammary tumors exhibit multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Janneke E; Sol, Wendy; Kersbergen, Ariena; Schlicker, Andreas; Guyader, Charlotte; Xu, Guotai; Wessels, Lodewyk; Borst, Piet; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven

    2015-02-15

    Pan- or multidrug resistance is a central problem in clinical oncology. Here, we use a genetically engineered mouse model of BRCA2-associated hereditary breast cancer to study drug resistance to several types of chemotherapy and PARP inhibition. We found that multidrug resistance was strongly associated with an EMT-like sarcomatoid phenotype and high expression of the Abcb1b gene, which encodes the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein could partly resensitize sarcomatoid tumors to the PARP inhibitor olaparib, docetaxel, and doxorubicin. We propose that multidrug resistance is a multifactorial process and that mouse models are useful to unravel this.

  3. [The role of cell wall organization and active efflux pump systems in multidrug resistance of bacteria].

    PubMed

    Hasdemir, Ufuk

    2007-04-01

    Multiple antibiotic resistance of clinically important bacteria are of major concern worldwide. Alterations of drug targets or enzymatic inactivation of antimicrobial agents are the well known mechanisms of antimicrobial drug resistance. Besides these well known mechanisms, recent studies have shown that a further resistance mechanism, active drug efflux, has become increasingly important in the current threat of multidrug resistance. It involves certain bacterial transport proteins which pump out toxic antimicrobial compounds from the cell. Drug efflux pump proteins in bacteria fall into five distinct protein super families [ATP binding cassette super family (ABC), Major facilitator super family (MFS), Small multidrug resistance super family (SMR), Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) super family, Resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) super family] and are mostly encoded by chromosomal genes. Among them, the members of RND protein super family are widely distrubuted in Gram negative bacteria and play siginificant role in both, intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance of these bacteria with very wide substrate specificity. RND type multidrug efflux proteins usually function together with an outer membrane canal protein (OMP) and a membrane fusion protein (MFP) to pump out drugs. AcrAB-TolC of Escherichia coli and MexAB-OprM of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the typical examples of these tripartite systems. They are constitutively expressed in wild type cells and play significant role in intrinsic resistance of these bacteria. However, multidrug resistance which is of major clinical significance, rises as a result of overexpression of these pump systems due to mutations and elevated levels of resistance are recorded to structurally unrelated antimicrobial drugs such as fluoroquinolones, beta-lactams, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, aminoglycosides and toxic compunds. Synthesis of RND type pump proteins are regulated by complex genetic

  4. Radioiodinated agents for imaging multidrug resistant tumors.

    PubMed

    Kortylewicz, Zbigniew P; Augustine, Ann M; Nearman, Jessica; McGarry, Jonathon; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina

    2009-03-01

    Diagnostic agents enabling characterization of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumors can aid in the selection of chemotherapy regimens. We report here synthesis and evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals based on the second-generation MDR-reversing drug MS-209. 5-[3-{4-(2-Phenyl-2-(4'-[(125)I]iodo-phenyl)acetyl)piperazin-1-yl}-2-hydroxypropoxy]quino-line (17) was prepared from the 4'-tributylstannyl precursor (16) in >95% radiochemical yield. (16) was synthesized in a six-step process with the overall yield of 25%. In vitro studies were conducted in MES-SA (drug-sensitive) and MES-SA/Dx5 (MDR) human uterine sarcoma cell lines. In vivo studies were performed in athymic mice bearing MES-SA and MES-SA/Dx5 xenografts. The uptake of (17) is higher in MES-SA than MES-SA/Dx5 cells. The uptake and efflux of (17) depend on temperature and concentration, and indicate active transport mechanism(s). Incubation of drug sensitive MES-SA cells with verapamil or (15), a nonradioactive analog of (17), alters the cellular retention of radioactivity only marginally. However, MES-SA/Dx5 cells retain approximately 12% more of (17) when incubated with 10 muM verapamil. The addition of (15) or high concentrations of (17) also increase the uptake of (17) in MES-SA/Dx5 up to 200%, depending on the concentration and temperature. The dependence of (17) uptake on the MDR status is also evident in the ex vivo binding studies. In vivo tests in mice xenografted simultaneously with both tumor cell lines indicate distinct pharmacokinetics for each tumor. The absorption half-life in MES-SA/Dx5 xenograft is approximately 10x shorter and the mean residence time approximately 50% shorter compared to MES-SA xenograft in the same mouse. Radioiodinated derivatives of MS-209 appear to be good indicators of multidrug resistance.

  5. Management of multidrug resistant bacterial endemic.

    PubMed

    Zahar, J-R; Lesprit, P

    2014-09-01

    The fight against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacilli (MDRGNB), especially extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae, is about to be lost in our country. The emergence of new resistance mechanisms to carbapenems in these Enterobacteriaceae exposes patients to a risk of treatment failure without any other therapeutic options. This dramatic situation is paradoxical because we are well aware of the 2 major factors responsible for this situation: 1) MDRO cross-transmission, associated with a low compliance to standard precautions, especially hand hygiene, and 2) overexposure of patients to antibiotics. The implementation of a "search and isolate" policy, which was justified to control the spread of some MDRO that remained rare in the country, was not associated with a better adherence to standard precautions. The antibiotic policy and the measures implemented to control antibiotic consumptions have rarely been enforced and have shown inconsistent results. Notably, no significant decrease of antibiotic consumption has been observed. There is no excuse for these poor results, because some authors evaluating the effectiveness of programs for the control of MDRO have reported their positive effects on antimicrobial resistance without any detrimental effects. It is now urgent to deal with the 2 major factors by establishing an educational and persuasive program with quantified and opposable objectives. Firstly, we have to improve the observance of hand hygiene above 70%. Secondly, we have to define and reach a target for the reduction of antibiotic consumption both in community and in hospital settings.

  6. Mechanisms of multidrug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Gottesman, Michael M

    2010-01-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy remains a major challenge in the treatment of cancer. Resistance exists against every effective anticancer drug and can develop by numerous mechanisms including decreased drug uptake, increased drug efflux, activation of detoxifying systems, activation of DNA repair mechanisms, evasion of drug-induced apoptosis, etc. In the first part of this chapter, we briefly summarize the current knowledge on individual cellular mechanisms responsible for MDR, with a special emphasis on ATP-binding cassette transporters, perhaps the main theme of this textbook. Although extensive work has been done to characterize MDR mechanisms in vitro, the translation of this knowledge to the clinic has not been crowned with success. Therefore, identifying genes and mechanisms critical to the development of MDR in vivo and establishing a reliable method for analyzing clinical samples could help to predict the development of resistance and lead to treatments designed to circumvent it. Our thoughts about translational research needed to achieve significant progress in the understanding of this complex phenomenon are therefore discussed in a third section. The pleotropic response of cancer cells to chemotherapy is summarized in a concluding diagram.

  7. Spoilage potentials and antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas spp. isolated from cheeses.

    PubMed

    Arslan, S; Eyi, A; Özdemir, F

    2011-12-01

    Pseudomonas spp. are aerobic, gram-negative bacteria that are recognized as major food spoilage microorganisms. A total of 32 (22.9%) Pseudomonas spp. from 140 homemade white cheese samples collected from the open-air public bazaar were isolated and characterized. The aim of the present study was to investigate the biochemical characteristics, the production of extracellular enzymes, slime and β-lactamase, and antimicrobial susceptibility of Pseudomonas spp. isolated from cheeses. The identified isolates including Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens biovar V, and P. pseudoalcaligenes ssp. citrulli were found to produce extracellular enzymes, respectively: protease and lecithinase production (100%), and lipase activity (85.7, 42.9, 100, and 100%, and nonlipolytic, respectively). The isolates did not produce slime and had no detectable β-lactamase activity. The antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates was tested using the disk diffusion method. Pseudomonas spp. had the highest resistance to penicillin G (100%), then sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim (28.1%). However, all Pseudomonas spp. isolates were 100% susceptible to ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, amikacin, gentamicin, and imipenem. Multidrug-resistance patterns were not observed among these isolates. In this study, Pseudomonas spp., exhibiting spoilage features, were isolated mainly from cheeses. Isolation of this organism from processed milk highlights the need to improve the hygienic practices. All of the stages in the milk processing chain during manufacturing have to be under control to achieve the quality and safety of dairy products.

  8. Phorbol esters induce multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, R.L.; Patel, J.; Chabner, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms responsible for broad-based resistance to antitumor drugs derived from natural products (multidrug resistance) are incompletely understood. Agents known to reverse the multidrug-resistant phenotype (verapamil and trifluoperazine) can also inhibit the activity of protein kinase C. When the authors assayed human breast cancer cell lines for protein kinase C activity, they found that enzyme activity was 7-fold higher in the multidrug-resistance cancer cells compared with the control, sensitive parent cells. Exposure of drug-sensitive cells to the phorbol ester phorbol 12,13-dibutyate (P(BtO)/sub 2/) led to an increase in protein kinase C activity and induced a drug-resistance phenotype, whereas exposure of drug-resistant cells to P(BtO)/sub 2/ further increased drug resistance. In sensitive cells, this increased resistance was accomplished by a 3.5-fold increased phosphorylation of a 20-kDa particulate protein and a 35-40% decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and vincristine. P(BtO)/sub 2/ induced resistance to agents involved in the multidrug-resistant phenotype (doxorubicin and vincristine) but did not affect sensitivity to an unrelated alkylating agent (melphalan). The increased resistance was partially or fully reversible by the calcium channel blocker verapamil and by the calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine. These data suggest that stimulation of protein kinase C playus a role in the drug-transport changes in multidrug-resistant cells. This may occur through modulation of an efflux pump by protein phosphorylation.

  9. Multidrug-resistant typhoid fever: a review.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Karande, Sunil

    2011-05-28

    Multidrug-resistant typhoid fever (MDRTF) is defined as typhoid fever caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains (S. Typhi), which are resistant to the first-line recommended drugs for treatment such as chloramphenicol, ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Since the mid-1980s, MDRTF has caused outbreaks in several countries in the developing world, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality, especially in affected children below five years of age and those who are malnourished. Two methods were used to gather the information presented in this article. First PubMed was searched for English language references to published relevant articles. Secondly, chapters on typhoid fever in standard textbooks of paediatric infectious diseases and preventive and social medicine were reviewed. Although there are no pathognomonic clinical features of MDRTF at the onset of the illness, high fever ( > 104°F), toxaemia, abdominal distension, abdominal tenderness, hepatomegaly and splenomegaly are often reported. The gold standard for the diagnosis of MDRTF is bacterial isolation of the organism in blood cultures. Ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone are the drugs most commonly used for treatment of MDRTF and produce good clinical results. MDRTF remains a major public health problem, particularly in developing countries. Mass immunization in endemic areas with either the oral live attenuated Typhi 21a or the injectable unconjugated Vi typhoid vaccine, rational use of antibiotics, improvement in public sanitation facilities, availability of clean drinking water, promotion of safe food handling practices and public health education are vital in the prevention of MDRTF.

  10. Emergence of colistin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa at Tabriz hospitals, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Goli, Hamid Reza; Nahaei, Mohammad Reza; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Hasani, Alka; Samadi Kafil, Hossein; Aghazadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The prevalence of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main reason of new drugs resurgence such as colistin. The main objectives of this study were to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern and the rate of colistin resistance along with its correlation with overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM efflux pumps among P. aeruginosa isolates. Materials and Methods: Hundred clinical isolates were collected from 100 patients during 6 months in 2014. Susceptibility to the eight antibiotics was investigated using Kirby-Bauer and agar dilution methods. The Quantitative Real-time PCR was used to determine the expression levels of efflux genes. Results: Resistance rates to various antibiotics were as follows: ticarcillin (73%), ciprofloxacin (65%), aztreonam (60%), ceftazidime (55%), gentamicin (55%), imipenem (49%), piperacillin/tazobactam (34%) and colistin (2%). In disk diffusion method, only two isolates were non susceptible to colistin, however in agar dilution method the two isolates were confirmed as resistant and two others were intermediate resistant. Sixty eight (68%) isolates were multi-drug resistant and 10 isolates were susceptible to all tested antibiotics. Both colistin resistant isolates showed overexpression of both efflux pumps, but two intermediate resistant isolates exhibited reduction of efflux genes expression. Conclusions: Emergence of colistin resistance is increasing in P. aeruginosa indicating great challenge in the treatment of infections caused by MDR strains of this organism in Iran. ParRS may promote either induced or constitutive resistance to colistin through the activation of distinct mechanisms such as MDR efflux pumps, and LPS modification. PMID:27092226

  11. Epidemiology of Primary Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Vladimir Region, Russia.

    PubMed

    Ershova, Julia V; Volchenkov, Grigory V; Kaminski, Dorothy A; Somova, Tatiana R; Kuznetsova, Tatiana A; Kaunetis, Natalia V; Cegielski, J Peter; Kurbatova, Ekaterina V

    2015-11-01

    We studied the epidemiology of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Vladimir Region, Russia, in 2012. Most cases of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) were caused by transmission of drug-resistant strains, and >33% were in patients referred for testing after mass radiographic screening. Early diagnosis of drug resistance is essential for preventing transmission of MDR TB.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: arsenal of resistance mechanisms, decades of changing resistance profiles, and future antimicrobial therapies.

    PubMed

    El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Al Thani, Asmaa A; Webster, Thomas J; El Zowalaty, Ahmed E; Schweizer, Herbert P; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Marei, Hany E; Ashour, Hossam M

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most serious public health issues facing humans since the discovery of antimicrobial agents. The frequent, prolonged, and uncontrolled use of antimicrobial agents are major factors in the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant bacterial strains, including multidrug-resistant variants. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of nosocomial infections. The abundant data on the increased resistance to antipseudomonal agents support the need for global action. There is a paucity of new classes of antibiotics active against P. aeruginosa. Here, we discuss recent antibacterial resistance profiles and mechanisms of resistance by P. aeruginosa. We also review future potential methods for controlling antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as phage therapy, nanotechnology and antipseudomonal vaccines.

  13. Antibacterial effects of water soluble green tea extracts on multi-antibiotic resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Jazani, N Hosseini; Shahabi, Sh; Ali, A Abdi

    2007-05-01

    In this research we evaluated the antibacterial activity of water soluble green tea extracts on 43 hospital isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A total of 43 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were collected from clinical specimens at two hospitals in Tehran, Iran. The susceptibilities of isolates to different antibiotics were tested using agar disk diffusion method. Antibacterial activity of water soluble green tea extract was measured by Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentrations (MBCs). 35.6% of isolated strains showed resistance to 5 antibiotics or more and 55.8% of all strains were Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) strains. The average MICs and MBCs of the extract against all strains of Pseudomonas auroginosa were 2.06 +/- 1.76 and 2.54 +/- 2.22 mg mL(-1) respectively.Our study suggests that green tea has significant activity with bactericidal action on multi-drug resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  14. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: a descriptive study in a city hospital

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, (MRAB) is an important cause of hospital acquired infection. The purpose of this study is to determine the risk factors for MRAB in a city hospital patient population. Methods This study is a retrospective review of a city hospital epidemiology data base and includes 247 isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (AB) from 164 patients. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii was defined as resistance to more than three classes of antibiotics. Using the non-MRAB isolates as the control group, the risk factors for the acquisition of MRAB were determined. Results Of the 247 AB isolates 72% (177) were multidrug resistant. Fifty-eight percent (143/247) of isolates were highly resistant (resistant to imipenem, amikacin, and ampicillin-sulbactam). Of the 37 patients who died with Acinetobacter colonization/infection, 32 (86%) patients had the organism recovered from the respiratory tract. The factors which were found to be significantly associated (p ≤ 0.05) with multidrug resistance include the recovery of AB from multiple sites, mechanical ventilation, previous antibiotic exposure, and the presence of neurologic impairment. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter was associated with significant mortality when compared with sensitive strains (p ≤ 0.01). When surgical patients (N = 75) were considered separately, mechanical ventilation and multiple isolates remained the factors significantly associated with the development of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter. Among surgical patients 46/75 (61%) grew a multidrug resistant strain of AB and 37/75 (40%) were resistant to all commonly used antibiotics including aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, carbepenems, extended spectrum penicillins, and quinolones. Thirty-five percent of the surgical patients had AB cultured from multiple sites and 57% of the Acinetobacter isolates were associated with a co-infecting organism, usually a Staphylococcus or Pseudomonas. As in medical

  15. Polymyxin Susceptibility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Linked to the MexXY-OprM Multidrug Efflux System

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Gilmour, Christie; Hao, Youai

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome-targeting antimicrobial, spectinomycin (SPC), strongly induced the mexXY genes of the MexXY-OprM multidrug efflux system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and increased susceptibility to the polycationic antimicrobials polymyxin B and polymyxin E, concomitant with a decrease in expression of the polymyxin resistance-promoting lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification loci, arnBCADTEF and PA4773-74. Consistent with the SPC-promoted reduction in arn and PA4773-74 expression being linked to mexXY, expression of these LPS modification loci was moderated in a mutant constitutively expressing mexXY and enhanced in a mutant lacking the efflux genes. Still, the SPC-mediated increase in polymyxin susceptibility was retained in mutants lacking arnB and/or PA4773-74, an indication that their reduced expression in SPC-treated cells does not explain the enhanced polymyxin susceptibility. That the polymyxin susceptibility of a mutant strain lacking mexXY was unaffected by SPC exposure, however, was an indication that the unknown polymyxin resistance ‘mechanism’ is also influenced by the MexXY status of the cell. In agreement with SPC and MexXY influencing polymyxin susceptibility as a result of changes in the LPS target of these agents, SPC treatment yielded a decline in common polysaccharide antigen (CPA) synthesis in wild-type P. aeruginosa but not in the ΔmexXY mutant. A mutant lacking CPA still showed the SPC-mediated decline in polymyxin MICs, however, indicating that the loss of CPA did not explain the SPC-mediated MexXY-dependent increase in polymyxin susceptibility. It is possible, therefore, that some additional change in LPS promoted by SPC-induced mexXY expression impacted CPA synthesis or its incorporation into LPS and that this was responsible for the observed changes in polymyxin susceptibility. PMID:26369970

  16. Transcriptome Profiling of Antimicrobial Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Khaledi, Ariane; Schniederjans, Monika; Pohl, Sarah; Rainer, Roman; Bodenhofer, Ulrich; Xia, Boyang; Klawonn, Frank; Bruchmann, Sebastian; Preusse, Matthias; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Dötsch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Emerging resistance to antimicrobials and the lack of new antibiotic drug candidates underscore the need for optimization of current diagnostics and therapies to diminish the evolution and spread of multidrug resistance. As the antibiotic resistance status of a bacterial pathogen is defined by its genome, resistance profiling by applying next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies may in the future accomplish pathogen identification, prompt initiation of targeted individualized treatment, and the implementation of optimized infection control measures. In this study, qualitative RNA sequencing was used to identify key genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance in 135 clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from diverse geographic and infection site origins. By applying transcriptome-wide association studies, adaptive variations associated with resistance to the antibiotic classes fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and β-lactams were identified. Besides potential novel biomarkers with a direct correlation to resistance, global patterns of phenotype-associated gene expression and sequence variations were identified by predictive machine learning approaches. Our research serves to establish genotype-based molecular diagnostic tools for the identification of the current resistance profiles of bacterial pathogens and paves the way for faster diagnostics for more efficient, targeted treatment strategies to also mitigate the future potential for resistance evolution. PMID:27216077

  17. Salvage therapy for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Seung, K J; Becerra, M C; Atwood, S S; Alcántara, F; Bonilla, C A; Mitnick, C D

    2014-05-01

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), defined as Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to both isoniazid and rifampicin, is challenging under the best of circumstances, and particularly in resource-limited settings. For patients who remain persistently sputum-culture-positive despite therapy with second-line TB drugs, treatment options are limited, especially if disease is too advanced for resective surgery. Salvage therapy refers to the design of a regimen combining new and previously used drugs in a final effort to attain sputum conversion before declaring treatment to have failed. We retrospectively evaluated the outcomes of salvage therapy in 213 Peruvian patients. Salvage regimens included a median of two new drugs (range 1-6) and nine (range 5-13) total (new plus previously used) drugs. The most frequently used new drug was moxifloxacin, followed by capreomycin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, kanamycin and clarithromycin. Culture conversion occurred in 65 (30.5%) patients. Salvage regimens that included moxifloxacin were significantly more likely to be followed by culture conversion (OR 2.2; p 0.02). Later-generation fluoroquinolones such as moxifloxacin should be used in salvage therapy but also in the initial treatment of MDR-TB, if the best clinical strategy is to use the most effective drugs when the patient has the best chance for cure. New TB drugs are most likely to be initially used in salvage patients, in conditions similar to those described here. Close bacteriological monitoring of these patients will be essential, as useful information about the best way to use these new drugs can be gained from analysis of salvage therapy cohorts.

  18. Antibiotic resistant airborne bacteria and their multidrug resistance pattern at University teaching referral Hospital in South Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Fithamlak Bisetegen; Wadilo, Fiseha Wada; Arota, Amsalu Amache; Abraham, Yishak Leka

    2017-04-12

    Hospitals provide a reservoir of microorganisms, many of which are multi-resistant to antibiotics. Emergence of multi-drug resistant strains in a hospital environment, particularly in developing countries is an increasing problem to infection treatment. This study aims at assessing antibiotic resistant airborne bacterial isolates. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Wolaita Sodo university teaching and referral Hospital. Indoor air samples were collected by using passive air sampling method. Sample processing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were done following standard bacteriological techniques. The data was analyzed using SPSS version 20. Medically important bacterial pathogens, Coagulase negative staphylococci (29.6%), Staphylococcus aureus (26.3%), Enterococci species, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium (16.5%), Acinetobacter species (9.5%), Escherichia coli (5.8%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.3%) were isolated. Antibiotic resistance rate ranging from 7.5 to 87.5% was detected for all isolates. Acinetobacter species showed a high rate of resistance for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin (78.2%) and ciprofloxacin (82.6%), 28 (38.9%) of S. aureus isolates were meticillin resistant, and 7.5% Enterococci isolates of were vancomycin resistant. 75.3% of all bacterial pathogen were multi-drug resistant. Among them, 74.6% were gram positive and 84% were gram negative. Multi-drug resistance were observed among 84.6% of P. aeruginosa, of 82.5% Enterococcii, E. coli 78.6%, S. aureus 76.6%, and Coagulase negative staphylococci of 73.6%. Indoor environment of the hospital was contaminated with airborne microbiotas, which are common cause of post-surgical site infection in the study area. Bacterial isolates were highly resistant to commonly used antibiotics with high multi-drug resistance percentage. So air quality of hospital environment, in restricted settings deserves attention, and requires long-term surveillance to protect both

  19. Characterization of a multidrug-resistant, novel Bacteroides genomospecies.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Stephen J; Kalapila, Aley; Pottinger, Paul S; Hoogestraat, Daniel R; Cummings, Lisa; Duchin, Jeffrey S; Sengupta, Dhruba J; Pergam, Steven A; Cookson, Brad T; Butler-Wu, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Metronidazole- and carbapenem-resistant Bacteroides fragilis are rare in the United States. We isolated a multidrug-resistant anaerobe from the bloodstream and intraabdominal abscesses of a patient who had traveled to India. Whole-genome sequencing identified the organism as a novel Bacteroides genomospecies. Physicians should be aware of the possibility for concomitant carbapenem- and metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides infections.

  20. [Multi-drug resistant bacteria, a complex mechanism].

    PubMed

    Hilaire, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria are said to be multidrug resistant when they are only sensitive to a small number of antibiotics used as treatments. This problem of resistance appeared in hospitals soon after antibiotics were first used. In the 1960s, strains of staphylococcus became resistant to penicillin.

  1. Conessine as a novel inhibitor of multidrug efflux pump systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Siriyong, Thanyaluck; Srimanote, Potjanee; Chusri, Sasitorn; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-Ek; Suaisom, Channarong; Tipmanee, Varomyalin; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2017-08-14

    Holarrhena antidysenterica has been employed as an ethnobotanical plant for the treatment of dysentery, diarrhoea, fever, and bacterial infections. Biological activities of the principle compound, conessine including anti-diarrhoea and anti-plasmodial effects were documented. Our previous study reported potency of Holarrhena antidysenterica extract and conessine as resistance modifying agents against extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. This study aimed to investigate (i) whether conessine, a steroidal alkaloid compound, could act as a resistance modifying agent against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and (ii) whether MexAB-OprM efflux pump involved in the mechanism. Conessine combined with various antibiotics were determined for synergistic activity against P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain K767 (wild-type), K1455 (MexAB-OprM overexpressed), and K1523 (MexB deletion). H33342 accumulation assay was used to evaluate efflux pump inhibition while NPN uptake assay was assessed membrane permeabilization. Conessine significantly reduced MICs of all antibiotics by at least 8-fold in MexAB-OprM overexpressed strain. The levels were comparable to those obtained in wild-type strain for cefotaxime, levofloxacin, and tetracycline. With erythromycin, novobiocin, and rifampicin, MICs were 4- to 8-fold less than MICs of the wild-type strain. Loss of MexAB-OprM due to deletion of mexB affected susceptibility to almost all antibiotics, except novobiocin. Synergistic activities between other antibiotics (except novobiocin) and conessine observed in MexB deletion strain suggested that conessine might inhibit other efflux systems present in P. aeruginosa. Inhibition of H33342 efflux in the tested strains clearly demonstrated that conessine inhibited MexAB-OprM pump. In contrast, the mode of action as a membrane permeabilizer was not observed after treatment with conessine as evidenced by no accumulation of 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine. The results suggested that

  2. Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli: Infection Control Implications.

    PubMed

    Adler, Amos; Friedman, N Deborah; Marchaim, Dror

    2016-12-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a common iatrogenic complication of both modern life and medical care. Certain multidrug resistant and extensively drug resistant Gram-negative organisms pose the biggest challenges to health care today, predominantly owing to a lack of therapeutic options. Containing the spread of these organisms is challenging, and in reality, the application of multiple control measures during an evolving outbreak makes it difficult to measure the relative impact of each measure. This article reviews the usefulness of various infection control measures in containing the spread of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A light in multidrug resistance: photodynamic treatment of multidrug-resistant tumors.

    PubMed

    Capella, Márcia Alves Marques; Capella, Luiz Sabbatini

    2003-01-01

    The major drawback of cancer chemotherapy is the development of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tumor cells, which are cross-resistant to a broad range of structurally and functionally unrelated agents, making it difficult to treat these tumors. In the last decade, a number of authors have studied the effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT), a combination of visible light with photosensitizing agents, on MDR cells. The results, although still inconclusive, have raised the possibility of treating MDR tumors by PDT. This review examines the growing literature concerning the responses of MDR cells to PDT, while stressing the need for the development of new photosensitizers that possess the necessary characteristics for the photodynamic treatment of this class of tumor. Copyright 2003 National Science Council, ROC and S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. Thermotolerance and multidrug resistance in bacteria isolated from equids and their environment.

    PubMed

    Singh, B R

    2009-06-13

    Sixty-nine vaginal swabs and 138 rectal swabs collected from 195 equids were analysed for the presence of thermotolerant bacteria, that is, bacteria surviving at 60+/-0.1 degrees C for one hour. Thermotolerant Escherichia coli, Enterobacter species, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus species and Pseudomonas species were isolated from 41, 16, nine, three and three of the 138 rectal swabs, respectively; seven of the E coli and two of the Enterobacter species isolates survived pasteurisation at 63.8+/-0.1 degrees C for 30 minutes. All except three E coli, two Enterobacter species and one Proteus species isolate were resistant to three or more antimicrobial drugs, that is, they were multidrug resistant. Thermotolerant E coli, Enterobacter species and Proteus species were isolated from 11, two and two of the 69 vaginal swabs, respectively, but only one isolate of E coli survived pasteurisation at 63.8+/-0.1 degrees C for 30 minutes. All except two of the E coli isolates were multidrug resistant. None of the four thermotolerant isolates from nine soil samples collected on four of the farms where the equids were kept was pasteurisation resistant, but they were all multidrug resistant. Of the 10 pasteurisation-resistant isolates, nine were multidrug resistant but none was resistant to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, cotrimazine, cotrimoxazole or streptomycin. All the isolates grew at 42+/-0.1 degrees C but none grew at 46+/-0.1 degrees C or above. The Enterobacter isolates were more tolerant to pasteurisation than the E coli isolates, particularly during the first few minutes of exposure.

  5. Bedaquiline: a novel antitubercular drug for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nagabushan, H; Roopadevi, H S

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) are emerging global health threats. Bedaquiline is a new antituberculous drug belonging to the diarylquinoline class that efficiently inhibits the adenosine triphosphate synthase enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is a bactericidal and long-acting drug. It inhibits both dormant as well as replicating bacterial sub-populations and thus shortens the duration of TB treatment. This drug has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration in December 2012 for the management of multidrug resistant-TB. The drug marks the introduction of a new addition to the TB armamentarium after four decades.

  6. [Epidemiological features of multidrug resistant bacteria isolated from urine samples at the Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital in Rabat, Morocco].

    PubMed

    Zohoun, A; Ngoh, E; Bajjou, T; Sekhsokh, Y; Elhamzaoui, S

    2010-08-01

    Hospital-acquired multidrug resistant bacteria infections are a serious public health issue causing increased morbidity, mortality and care cost. These risks underscore the need for health care institutions to maintain active panels to monitor, prevent, and manage hospital-acquired infections. The purpose of this study was to assess the epidemiology of urinary tract infection involving multidrug resistant bacteria at the Microbiology Laboratory of the Mohammed-V Military Teaching Hospital in Rabat. Study was carried out retrospectively on bacteria isolated from 10,243 urinary samples collected from January 1 to December 31, 2008. A total of 1,439 non-redundant bacteria (14.1%) meeting the criteria of urinary infection were identified. One hundred and three of the 1,439 bacteria isolated (7%) were multidrug resistant. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were more common in in-patients (63.1%). Mean patient age was 53.8 +/- 18.2 and the M/F sex ratio was 2.2. The most common multi-drug resistant bacteria were Enterobacteria producing extended spectrum bêta-lactamase (54.4% including 40.8% of Klebsiella pneumonia) and non-fermenting bacteria (45.6% including 26.2% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. and 19.4% of Acinetobacter baumannii. These bacteria were resistant to the most commonly used antibiotics but remained highly sensitive to colistin, imipenem and amikacin.

  7. Resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance in multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nafees; Javaid, Arshad; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Ming, Long Chiau; Ahmad, Izaz; Khan, Amer Hayat

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are the backbone of multidrug resistant tuberculosis treatment regimens. Despite the high burden of multidrug resistant tuberculosis in the country, little is known about drug resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance among multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients from Pakistan. To evaluate drug resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance in multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients. This was a cross-sectional study conducted at a programmatic management unit of drug resistant tuberculosis, Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar, Pakistan. Two hundred and forty-three newly diagnosed multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients consecutively enrolled for treatment at study site from January 1, 2012 to July 28, 2013 were included in the study. A standardized data collection form was used to collect patients' socio-demographic, microbiological, and clinical data. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis. High degree of drug resistance (median 5 drugs, range 2-8) was observed. High proportion of patients was resistant to all five first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs (62.6%), and more than half were resistant to second line drugs (55.1%). The majority of the patients were ofloxacin resistant (52.7%). Upon multivariate analysis previous tuberculosis treatment at private (OR=1.953, p=0.034) and public private mix (OR=2.824, p=0.046) sectors were predictors of ofloxacin resistance. The high degree of drug resistance observed, particularly to fluoroquinolones, is alarming. We recommend the adoption of more restrictive policies to control non-prescription sale of fluoroquinolones, its rational use by physicians, and training doctors in both private and public-private mix sectors to prevent further increase in fluoroquinolones resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Multidrug-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in US Meat and Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Andrew E.; Contente-Cuomo, Tania; Buchhagen, Jordan; Liu, Cindy M.; Watson, Lindsey; Pearce, Kimberly; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Bowers, Jolene; Driebe, Elizabeth M.; Engelthaler, David M.; Keim, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    We characterized the prevalence, antibiotic susceptibility profiles, and genotypes of Staphylococcus aureus among US meat and poultry samples (n = 136). S. aureus contaminated 47% of samples, and multidrug resistance was common among isolates (52%). S. aureus genotypes and resistance profiles differed significantly among sample types, suggesting food animal–specific contamination. PMID:21498385

  9. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Somalia, 2010–2011

    PubMed Central

    Sindani, Ireneaus; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Falzon, Dennis; Suleiman, Bashir; Arube, Peter; Adam, Ismail; Baghdadi, Samiha; Bassili, Amal

    2013-01-01

    In a nationwide survey in 2011, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) was found in 5.2% and 40.8% of patients with new and previously treated TB, respectively. These levels of drug resistance are among the highest ever documented in Africa and the Middle East. This finding presents a serious challenge for TB control in Somalia. PMID:23621911

  10. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, Somalia, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Sindani, Ireneaus; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Falzon, Dennis; Suleiman, Bashir; Arube, Peter; Adam, Ismail; Baghdadi, Samiha; Bassili, Amal; Zignol, Matteo

    2013-03-01

    In a nationwide survey in 2011, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) was found in 5.2% and 40.8% of patients with new and previously treated TB, respectively. These levels of drug resistance are among the highest ever documented in Africa and the Middle East. This finding presents a serious challenge for TB control in Somalia.

  11. Increasing Incidence of Multidrug Resistance Among Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Bacterial Isolates.

    PubMed

    Rutter, W Cliff; Burgess, Donna R; Burgess, David S

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are common pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with increasing multidrug resistance (MDR). This study characterized antimicrobial susceptibility trends among organisms isolated from the respiratory tract of CF patients. Microbiological culture and sensitivity results for all CF patients were collected from January 2010 through December 2014. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were obtained using Phoenix(®) and Etest(®) methods. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines were used to remove duplicate isolates and develop antimicrobial susceptibility reports. MDR was defined as resistance to one agent in three or more antibiotic classes or oxacillin resistance in S. aureus. Overall, 542 bacterial isolates from 376 cultures were analyzed for trends. P. aeruginosa (41%), S. aureus (40%), and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (8%) were the most commonly isolated organisms. Multidrug-resistant organism isolation increased from 39% to 49% (r = 0.76, p = 0.13), while representing 47.6% of all isolates. Multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa incidence increased each year from 26% to 43% (r = 0.89, p = 0.046), while P. aeruginosa isolation decreased from 47% to 38% over the study period (r = -0.93, p = 0.02). MRSA accounted for 62.6% of all S. aureus isolated, while overall multidrug-resistant S. aureus incidence was 73.1% in all cultures. MDR among common pathogens in CF continues to increase. Empiric therapy for CF exacerbations should be targeted to previous antimicrobial susceptibility, and P. aeruginosa and S. aureus should be empirically covered.

  12. RND efflux pump mediated antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a major issue worldwide.

    PubMed

    Puzari, Minakshi; Chetia, Pankaj

    2017-02-01

    Therapeutic failures against diseases due to resistant Gram-negative bacteria have become a major threat nowadays as confirmed by surveillance reports across the world. One of the methods of development of multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is by means of RND efflux pumps. Inhibition of these pumps might help to combat the antibiotic resistance problem, for which the structure and regulation of the pumps have to be known. Moreover, judicious antibiotic use is needed to control the situation. This paper focuses on the issue of antibiotic resistance as well as the structure, regulation and inhibition of the efflux pumps present in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  13. Multidrug resistant tuberculosis diagnosed by synovial fluid analysis.

    PubMed

    van Zeller, M; Monteiro, R; Ramalho, J; Almeida, I; Duarte, R

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem worldwide. HIV co-infection is contributing to an increased incidence of the disease, particularly that caused by multidrug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT). We describe an HIV-infected patient with pleural and lymph node tuberculosis diagnosed by pleural effusion characteristics and biopsy specimens, without MT identification, that further presented with knee-joint involvement. Arthrocentesis allowed MT isolation and drug susceptibility testing, resulting in a diagnosis of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and an appropriate treatment regimen. MT identification and drug susceptibility tests are very important, especially for HIV co-infected patients.

  14. Microbiological evaluation of the efficacy of two new biodetergents on multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In the last few years, several outbreaks of nosocomial infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogenic agents have been observed, and various biocides products were developed in order to control this phenomenon. We investigated the efficacy of two natural biodetergents composed of plants and kelps extracts, BATT1 and BATT2, against multidrug-resistant strains. Methods In-vitro antibacterial efficacy of BATT1 and BATT2 against nosocomial multidrug-resistant isolates was assessed using a suspension-inhibition test, with and without bovine serum albumin (BSA). The test was also carried out on glass surfaces with and without BSA. Results In vitro tests with both biocidal disinfectants at 25% concentration demonstrated an overall drop in bacterial, mould and yeast counts after 10 min of contact with or without organic substances. For Pseudomonas aeruginosa, it was necessary to use undiluted disinfectants with and without an organic substance. The same results were obtained in tests carried out on glass surfaces for all strains. Conclusions The natural products BATT1 and BATT2 behave like good biocides even in presence of organic substances. The use of both disinfectants may be beneficial for reducing hospital-acquired pathogens that are not susceptible to disinfectants. However, it has to be stressed that all these experiments were carried out in vitro and they still require validation from use in clinical practice. PMID:20015394

  15. Isolation of multidrug-resistant Salmonella in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Phoon, Yee Wei; Chan, Yuen Yue Candice; Koh, Tze Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Salmonella is a well-recognised problem worldwide, especially in developing countries such as India, where non-typhoidal Salmonella infections and enteric fever are endemic. Antimicrobial resistance, particularly to fluoroquinolones, is common and leads to the frequent use of alternative agents, such as azithromycin. We herein describe the first reported case of azithromycin-resistant Salmonella gastroenteritis in a Singaporean patient. PMID:26311915

  16. Multidrug Resistant Shigella flexneri Infection Simulating Intestinal Intussusception

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, Srirangaraj; Kali, Arunava; Pradeep, Jothimani

    2016-01-01

    Shigella enteritis remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity in all age groups, in developing as well as developed countries. Owing to the emerging resistance to multiple antibiotics among Shigella spp., it has been recognized as a major global public health concern and warrants constant monitoring of its resistance pattern. We report a case of segmental ileitis caused by non.-ESBL producing multidrug resistant Shigella flexneri in an infant clinically mimicking intussusception, which was effectively treated by ceftriaxone. PMID:27013815

  17. Multidrug Resistant Shigella flexneri Infection Simulating Intestinal Intussusception.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Srirangaraj; Kali, Arunava; Pradeep, Jothimani

    2016-01-01

    Shigella enteritis remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity in all age groups, in developing as well as developed countries. Owing to the emerging resistance to multiple antibiotics among Shigella spp., it has been recognized as a major global public health concern and warrants constant monitoring of its resistance pattern. We report a case of segmental ileitis caused by non.-ESBL producing multidrug resistant Shigella flexneri in an infant clinically mimicking intussusception, which was effectively treated by ceftriaxone.

  18. Multidrug-Resistant Candida: Epidemiology, Molecular Mechanisms, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Patterson, Thomas F

    2017-08-15

    Invasive Candida infections remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in hospitalized and immunocompromised or critically ill patients. A limited number of antifungal agents from only a few drug classes are available to treat patients with these serious infections. Resistance can be either intrinsic or acquired. Resistance mechanisms are not exchanged between Candida; thus, acquired resistance either emerges in response to an antifungal selection pressure in the individual patient or, more rarely, occur due to horizontal transmission of resistant strains between patients. Although multidrug resistance is uncommon, increasing reports of multidrug resistance to the azoles, echinocandins, and polyenes have occurred in several Candida species, most notably Candida glabrata and more recently Candida auris. Drivers are overall antifungal use, subtherapeutic drug levels at sites of infection/colonization, drug sequestration in the biofilm matrix, and, in the setting of outbreaks, suboptimal infection control. Moreover, recent research suggests that DNA mismatch repair gene mutations may facilitate acquisition of resistance mutations in C. glabrata specifically. Diagnosis of antifungal-resistant Candida infections is critical to the successful management of patients with these infections. Reduction of unnecessary use of antifungals via antifungal stewardship is critical to limit multidrug resistance emergence. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. The evolution of antimicrobial peptide resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is shaped by strong epistatic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jochumsen, Nicholas; Marvig, Rasmus L.; Damkiær, Søren; Jensen, Rune Lyngklip; Paulander, Wilhelm; Molin, Søren; Jelsbak, Lars; Folkesson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Colistin is an antimicrobial peptide that has become the only remaining alternative for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections, but little is known of how clinical levels of colistin resistance evolve. We use in vitro experimental evolution and whole-genome sequencing of colistin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients to reconstruct the molecular evolutionary pathways open for high-level colistin resistance. We show that the evolution of resistance is a complex, multistep process that requires mutation in at least five independent loci that synergistically create the phenotype. Strong intergenic epistasis limits the number of possible evolutionary pathways to resistance. Mutations in transcriptional regulators are essential for resistance evolution and function as nodes that potentiate further evolution towards higher resistance by functionalizing and increasing the effect of the other mutations. These results add to our understanding of clinical antimicrobial peptide resistance and the prediction of resistance evolution. PMID:27694971

  20. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Much More Than Antibiotic Resistance Determinants.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Paula; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Reales-Calderon, Jose Antonio; Corona, Fernando; Lira, Felipe; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Bernardini, Alejandra; Sanchez, Maria Blanca; Martinez, Jose Luis

    2016-02-16

    Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are antibiotic resistance determinants present in all microorganisms. With few exceptions, they are chromosomally encoded and present a conserved organization both at the genetic and at the protein levels. In addition, most, if not all, strains of a given bacterial species present the same chromosomally-encoded efflux pumps. Altogether this indicates that multidrug efflux pumps are ancient elements encoded in bacterial genomes long before the recent use of antibiotics for human and animal therapy. In this regard, it is worth mentioning that efflux pumps can extrude a wide range of substrates that include, besides antibiotics, heavy metals, organic pollutants, plant-produced compounds, quorum sensing signals or bacterial metabolites, among others. In the current review, we present information on the different functions that multidrug efflux pumps may have for the bacterial behaviour in different habitats as well as on their regulation by specific signals. Since, in addition to their function in non-clinical ecosystems, multidrug efflux pumps contribute to intrinsic, acquired, and phenotypic resistance of bacterial pathogens, the review also presents information on the search for inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps, which are currently under development, in the aim of increasing the susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to antibiotics.

  1. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Much More Than Antibiotic Resistance Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Paula; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Reales-Calderon, Jose Antonio; Corona, Fernando; Lira, Felipe; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Bernardini, Alejandra; Sanchez, Maria Blanca; Martinez, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are antibiotic resistance determinants present in all microorganisms. With few exceptions, they are chromosomally encoded and present a conserved organization both at the genetic and at the protein levels. In addition, most, if not all, strains of a given bacterial species present the same chromosomally-encoded efflux pumps. Altogether this indicates that multidrug efflux pumps are ancient elements encoded in bacterial genomes long before the recent use of antibiotics for human and animal therapy. In this regard, it is worth mentioning that efflux pumps can extrude a wide range of substrates that include, besides antibiotics, heavy metals, organic pollutants, plant-produced compounds, quorum sensing signals or bacterial metabolites, among others. In the current review, we present information on the different functions that multidrug efflux pumps may have for the bacterial behaviour in different habitats as well as on their regulation by specific signals. Since, in addition to their function in non-clinical ecosystems, multidrug efflux pumps contribute to intrinsic, acquired, and phenotypic resistance of bacterial pathogens, the review also presents information on the search for inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps, which are currently under development, in the aim of increasing the susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to antibiotics. PMID:27681908

  2. Tackling Threats and Future Problems of Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Medina, Eva; Pieper, Dietmar Helmut

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of the antibiotic era, the overuse and inappropriate consumption and application of antibiotics have driven the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Antimicrobial resistance increases the morbidity, mortality, length of hospitalization and healthcare costs. Among Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and among the Gram-negative bacteria, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBLs)-producing bacteria have become a major global healthcare problem in the 21st century. The pressure to use antibiotics guarantees that the spread and prevalence of these as well as of future emerging multidrug-resistant pathogens will be a persistent phenomenon. The unfeasibility of reversing antimicrobial resistance back towards susceptibility and the critical need to treat bacterial infection in modern medicine have burdened researchers and pharmaceutical companies to develop new antimicrobials effective against these difficult-to-treat multidrug-resistant pathogens. However, it can be anticipated that antibiotic resistance will continue to develop more rapidly than new agents to treat these infections become available and a better understanding of the molecular, evolutionary and ecological mechanisms governing the spread of antibiotic resistance is needed. The only way to curb the current crisis of antimicrobial resistance will be to develop entirely novel strategies to fight these pathogens such as combining antimicrobial drugs with other agents that counteract and obstruct the antibiotic resistant mechanisms expressed by the pathogen. Furthermore, as many antibiotics are often inappropriately prescribed, a more personalized approach based on precise diagnosis tools will ensure that proper treatments can be promptly applied leading to more targeted and effective therapies. However, in more general terms, also the overall use and release of antibiotics in the environment needs to be

  3. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Harboring OXA-24 Carbapenemase, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Joshi; Merino, María; Viedma, Esther; Poza, Margarita; Sanz, Francisca; Otero, Joaquín R.; Chaves, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    In February 2006, a patient colonized with a multidrug-resistant sequence type 56 Acinetobacter baumannii strain was admitted to a hospital in Madrid, Spain. This strain spread rapidly and caused a large outbreak in the hospital. Clinicians should be alert for this strain because its spread would have serious health consequences. PMID:21749771

  4. Multidrug Resistant Mycobacterium leprae from Patients with Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Shinji; Matsuoka, Masanori; Nakata, Noboru; Kai, Masanori; Maeda, Yumi; Hashimoto, Ken; Kimura, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Kashiwabara, Yoshiko

    2001-01-01

    Sequences of the folP1, rpoB, and gyrA genes were analyzed for 88 isolates of Mycobacterium leprae from leprosy patients in Japan, Haiti, Indonesia, Pakistan, and the Philippines. Thirteen isolates (14.8%) showed representative mutations in more than two genes, suggesting the emergence of multidrug-resistant M. leprae. PMID:11709358

  5. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Veterinary Clinics, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Weiss, Reinhard; van der Reijden, Tanny; van den Broek, Peterhans; Baljer, Georg; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2011-01-01

    An increase in prevalence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter spp. in hospitalized animals was observed at the Justus-Liebig-University (Germany). Genotypic analysis of 56 isolates during 2000–2008 showed 3 clusters that corresponded to European clones I–III. Results indicate spread of genotypically related strains within and among veterinary clinics in Germany. PMID:21888812

  6. Invasive Infections with Multidrug-Resistant Yeast Candida auris, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Morales-López, Soraya E.; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M.; Ceballos-Garzón, Andrés; Martínez, Heidys P.; Rodríguez, Gerson J.; Álvarez-Moreno, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    Candida auris is an emerging multidrug-resistant fungus that causes a wide range of symptoms. We report finding 17 cases of C. auris infection that were originally misclassified but correctly identified 27.5 days later on average. Patients with a delayed diagnosis of C. auris had a 30-day mortality rate of 35.2%. PMID:27983941

  7. Multidrug-Resistant Pathogens in Hospitalized Syrian Children

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Diana Faour; Hoffmann, Yoav; Shahar, Naama; Ocampo, Smadar; Salomon, Liora; Zonis, Zeev

    2017-01-01

    Since 2013, wounded and ill children from Syria have received treatment in Israel. Screening cultures indicated that multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens colonized 89 (83%) of 107 children. For 58% of MDR infections, the pathogen was similar to that identified during screening. MDR screening of these children is valuable for purposes of isolation and treatment. PMID:27618479

  8. Molecular Surveillance for Multidrug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Naman K.; Alker, Alisa P.; Sem, Rithy; Susanti, Agustina Ika; Muth, Sinuon; Maguire, Jason D.; Duong, Socheat; Ariey, Frederic; Meshnick, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted surveillance for multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Cambodia during 2004–2006 by assessing molecular changes in pfmdr1. The high prevalence of isolates with multiple pfmdr1 copies found in western Cambodia near the Thai border, where artesunate–mefloquine therapy failures occur, contrasts with isolates from eastern Cambodia, where this combination therapy remains highly effective. PMID:18826834

  9. Invasive Infections with Multidrug-Resistant Yeast Candida auris, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Morales-López, Soraya E; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M; Ceballos-Garzón, Andrés; Martínez, Heidys P; Rodríguez, Gerson J; Álvarez-Moreno, Carlos A; Rodríguez, José Y

    2017-01-01

    Candida auris is an emerging multidrug-resistant fungus that causes a wide range of symptoms. We report finding 17 cases of C. auris infection that were originally misclassified but correctly identified 27.5 days later on average. Patients with a delayed diagnosis of C. auris had a 30-day mortality rate of 35.2%.

  10. Molecular fingerprinting of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, M. D.; Ward, L. R.; Rowe, B.; Threlfall, E. J.

    1998-01-01

    For epidemiologic investigations, the primary subdivision of Salmonella Typhi is vi-phage typing; 106 Vi-phage types are defined. For multidrug-resistant strains the most common types have been M1 (Pakistan) and E1 (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and the Arabian Gulf); a strain untypable with the Vi phages has been responsible for a major epidemic in Tajikistan. Most often, isolates from the Indian subcontinent have been resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim; but in the 1997 Tajikistan outbreak, the epidemic strain was also resistant to ciprofloxacin. For multidrug-resistant strains, subdivision within phage type can be achieved by plasmid profile typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. PMID:9621206

  11. Combination Approaches to Combat Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Roberta J.; Melander, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of infections caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria is a global health problem that is exacerbated by the dearth of novel classes of antibiotics entering the clinic over the past 40 years. Herein we describe recent developments toward combination therapies for the treatment of multi-drug resistant bacterial infections. These efforts include antibiotic-antibiotic combinations, and the development of adjuvants that either directly target resistance mechanisms such as the inhibition of β-lactamase enzymes, or indirectly target resistance by interfering with bacterial signaling pathways such as two-component systems. We also discuss screening of libraries of previously approved drugs to identify non-obvious antimicrobial adjuvants. PMID:23333434

  12. Drug resistance profile and biofilm forming potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from contact lenses in Karachi-Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The contaminated contact lens provides Pseudomonas aeruginosa an ideal site for attachment and biofilm production. Continuous contact of the eye to the biofilm-infested lens can lead to serious ocular diseases, such as keratitis (corneal ulcers). The biofilms also prevent effective penetration of the antibiotics, which increase the chances of antibiotic resistance. Methods For this study, 22 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were obtained from 36 contact lenses and 14 contact lens protective fluid samples. These isolates were tested against eight commonly used antibiotics using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The biofilm forming potential of these isolates was also evaluated using various qualitative and quantitative techniques. Finally, a relationship between biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance was also examined. Results The isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa tested were found resistant to most of the antibiotics tested. Qualitative and quantitative biofilm analysis revealed that most of the isolates exhibited strong biofilm production. The biofilm production was significantly higher in isolates that were multi-drug resistant (p < 0.0001). Conclusion Our study indicates that multi-drug resistant, biofilm forming Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates are mainly involved in contact lens associated infections. This appears to be the first report from Pakistan, which analyzes both antibiotic resistance profile and biofilm forming potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from contact lens of the patients with contact lens associated infections. PMID:24134792

  13. Imipenem: a potent inducer of multidrug resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Han-Yueh; Chang, Kai-Chih; Kuo, Jai-Wei; Yueh, Hui-Wen; Liou, Ming-Li

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the progression of multidrug resistance upon exposure to imipenem in Acinetobacter baumannii. Eighteen A. baumannii strains, including two reference strains (ATCC 19606 and ATCC 17978), four clinical strains (AB56, AB242, AB273 and AB279) and 12 antibiotic-selected mutant strains, were used in this study. Imipenem-selected mutants were generated from imipenem-susceptible strains (ATCC 19606, ATCC 17978 and AB242) by multistep selection resistance. Amikacin-, ciprofloxacin-, colistin-, meropenem- and ceftazidime-selected mutants were also generated from the two reference strains and were used for comparison. Antibiotic susceptibilities in the absence and presence of the efflux pump inhibitors carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine (NMP) were examined in the three imipenem-selected mutants and the three clinical multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates. Expression profiles of the antimicrobial resistance genes in the imipenem-selected mutants and their parental strains were also determined. The results showed that imipenem was more likely, compared with the other antibiotics, to induce a MDR phenotype in the two reference strains. Differences in OXA-51-like carbapenemase, efflux pumps or/and AmpC β-lactamase expression were observed in the three imipenem-selected mutants. Moreover, a reduction in imipenem or amikacin resistance was observed when the imipenem-selected mutants and clinical isolates were exposed to NMP and CCCP. This study concluded that imipenem might be a potent inducer of multidrug resistance in A. baumannii strains. OXA-51-like carbapenemase combined with other resistance mechanisms may contribute to the development of multidrug resistance in A. baumannii. Monitoring the use of carbapenems is required to reduce the spread of MDR A. baumannii in hospitals.

  14. Modulation of Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Varela, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial infections pose a serious public health concern, especially when an infectious disease has a multidrug resistant causative agent. Such multidrug resistant bacteria can compromise the clinical utility of major chemotherapeutic antimicrobial agents. Drug and multidrug resistant bacteria harbor several distinct molecular mechanisms for resistance. Bacterial antimicrobial agent efflux pumps represent a major mechanism of clinical resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is one of the largest groups of solute transporters to date and includes a significant number of bacterial drug and multidrug efflux pumps. We review recent work on the modulation of multidrug efflux pumps, paying special attention to those transporters belonging primarily to the MFS. PMID:25750934

  15. Genome Evolution and Plasticity of Serratia marcescens, an Important Multidrug-Resistant Nosocomial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi, Atsushi; Nagaya, Yutaka; Pradel, Elizabeth; Ooka, Tadasuke; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Katsura, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Ken; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Parkhill, Julian; Sebaihia, Mohamed; Coulthurst, Sarah J.; Gotoh, Naomasa; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Ewbank, Jonathan J.; Hayashi, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is an important nosocomial pathogen that can cause an array of infections, most notably of the urinary tract and bloodstream. Naturally, it is found in many environmental niches, and is capable of infecting plants and animals. The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant strains producing extended-spectrum or metallo beta-lactamases now pose a threat to public health worldwide. Here we report the complete genome sequences of two carefully selected S. marcescens strains, a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate (strain SM39) and an insect isolate (strain Db11). Our comparative analyses reveal the core genome of S. marcescens and define the potential metabolic capacity, virulence, and multidrug resistance of this species. We show a remarkable intraspecies genetic diversity, both at the sequence level and with regards genome flexibility, which may reflect the diversity of niches inhabited by members of this species. A broader analysis with other Serratia species identifies a set of approximately 3,000 genes that characterize the genus. Within this apparent genetic diversity, we identified many genes implicated in the high virulence potential and antibiotic resistance of SM39, including the metallo beta-lactamase and multiple other drug resistance determinants carried on plasmid pSMC1. We further show that pSMC1 is most closely related to plasmids circulating in Pseudomonas species. Our data will provide a valuable basis for future studies on S. marcescens and new insights into the genetic mechanisms that underlie the emergence of pathogens highly resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents. PMID:25070509

  16. In vitro antimicrobial activity of five essential oils on multidrug resistant Gram-negative clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Sakkas, Hercules; Gousia, Panagiota; Economou, Vangelis; Sakkas, Vassilios; Petsios, Stefanos; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy

    2016-01-01

    Aim/Background: The emergence of drug-resistant pathogens has drawn attention on medicinal plants for potential antimicrobial properties. The objective of the present study was the investigation of the antimicrobial activity of five plant essential oils on multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Materials and Methods: Basil, chamomile blue, origanum, thyme, and tea tree oil were tested against clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 6), Escherichia coli (n = 4), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 7), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 5) using the broth macrodilution method. Results: The tested essential oils produced variable antibacterial effect, while Chamomile blue oil demonstrated no antibacterial activity. Origanum, Thyme, and Basil oils were ineffective on P. aeruginosa isolates. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration values ranged from 0.12% to 1.50% (v/v) for tea tree oil, 0.25-4% (v/v) for origanum and thyme oil, 0.50% to >4% for basil oil and >4% for chamomile blue oil. Compared to literature data on reference strains, the reported MIC values were different by 2SD, denoting less successful antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant isolates. Conclusions: The antimicrobial activities of the essential oils are influenced by the strain origin (wild, reference, drug sensitive, or resistant) and it should be taken into consideration whenever investigating the plants’ potential for developing new antimicrobials. PMID:27366345

  17. Presence of Multidrug Resistant Enteric Bacteria in Dairy Farm Topsoil

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, J. M.; Ellington, B. A.; Varela, M. F.

    2008-01-01

    In addition to human and veterinary medicine, antibiotics are extensively used in agricultural settings, such as for treatment of infections, growth enhancement and prophylaxis in food animals, leading to selection of drug and multidrug resistant bacteria. In order to help circumvent the problem of bacterial antibiotic resistance, it is first necessary to understand the scope of the problem. However, is it not fully understood how widespread antibiotic resistant bacteria are in agricultural settings. The lack of such surveillance data is especially evident in dairy farm environments, such as soil. It is also unknown to what extent various physiological modulators, such as salycilate, a component of aspirin and known model modulator of multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) genes, influence bacterial multidrug resistance. We isolated and identified enteric soil bacteria from local dairy farms within Roosevelt County, NM, determined the resistance profiles to antibiotics associated with mar, such as chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, penicillin G and tetracycline. We then purified and characterized plasmid DNA and detected mar phenotypic activity. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of antibiotics for the isolates ranged between 6 - >50 μg/mL for chloramphenicol, 2–8 μg/mL for nalidixic acid, 25- >300 μg/mL for penicillin G and 1- > 80 μg/mL for tetracycline. On the other hand, the many of the isolates had significantly enhanced MICs for the same antibiotics in the presence of 5 mM salycilate. Plasmid DNA extracted from 12 randomly chosen isolates ranged in size between 6 and 12.5kb and in several cases conferred resistances to chloramphenicol and penicillin G. It is concluded that enteric bacteria from dairy farm topsoil are multi-drug resistant and harbor antibiotic resistance plasmids. A role for dairy topsoil in zoonosis is suggested, thus implicating this environment as a reservoir for bacterial resistance development against clinically relevant

  18. Regulation of multidrug resistance in pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2010-02-01

    Infections by opportunistic pathogenic fungi, especially Candida species, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus, are a serious medical problem in immunocompromised patients. Different classes of antimycotic drugs are available to treat fungal infections, but the pathogens can develop resistance to all these agents. A major mechanism of antifungal drug resistance is the overexpression of efflux pumps of the ABC transporter and major facilitator superfamilies, which confer resistance to many structurally and functionally unrelated toxic compounds. For some pathogenic fungi, like Candida albicans and Candida glabrata, the most important drug transporters, transcription factors controlling their expression, and mutations that cause the constitutive upregulation of the efflux pumps in drug-resistant clinical isolates have been identified. For other important pathogens comparatively little is known about the role of transporters in antimycotic resistance. This review summarizes our current knowledge about efflux pump-mediated drug resistance and its regulation in human-pathogenic fungi.

  19. Intravenous immunoglobulin enhances the killing activity and autophagy of neutrophils isolated from immunocompromised patients against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hidemasa; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Naoko; Kamikubo, Yasuhiko; Higuchi, Takeshi; Shiga, Shuichi; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Kondo, Tadakazu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Adachi, Souichi

    2015-08-14

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is periodically administered to immunocompromised patients together with antimicrobial agents. The evidence that supports the effectiveness of IVIG is mostly based on data from randomized clinical trials; the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. A recent study revealed that killing of multidrug-resistant bacteria and drug-sensitive strains by neutrophils isolated from healthy donors is enhanced by an IVIG preparation. However, the effectiveness of IVIG in immunocompromised patients remains unclear. The present study found that IVIG increased both killing activity and O2(-) release by neutrophils isolated from six patients receiving immune-suppressive drugs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); these neutrophils killed both multidrug-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Moreover, IVIG increased the autophagy of the neutrophils, which is known to play an important role in innate immunity. These results suggest that IVIG promotes both the killing activity and autophagy of neutrophils isolated from immunocompromised patients against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  20. Combination antibiotic therapy for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tängdén, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Combination antibiotic therapy for Gram-negative sepsis is controversial. The present review provides a brief summary of the existing knowledge on combination therapy for severe infections with multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas spp., Acinetobacter spp., and Enterobacteriaceae. Empirical combination antibiotic therapy is recommended for severe sepsis and septic shock to reduce mortality related to inappropriate antibiotic treatment. Because definitive combination therapy has not been proven superior to monotherapy in meta-analyses, it is generally advised to de-escalate antibiotic therapy when the antibiotic susceptibility profile is known, although it cannot be excluded that some subgroups of patients might still benefit from continued combination therapy. Definitive combination therapy is recommended for carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and should also be considered for severe infections with Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter spp. when beta-lactams cannot be used. Because resistance to broad-spectrum beta-lactams is increasing in Gram-negative bacteria and because no new antibiotics are expected to become available in the near future, the antibacterial potential of combination therapy should be further explored. In vitro data suggest that combinations can be effective even if the bacteria are resistant to the individual antibiotics, although existing evidence is insufficient to support the choice of combinations and explain the synergistic effects observed. In vitro models can be used to screen for effective combinations that can later be validated in animal or clinical studies. Further, in the absence of clinical evidence, in vitro data might be useful in supporting therapeutic decisions for severe infections with multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

  1. Multidrug evolutionary strategies to reverse antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Baym, Michael; Stone, Laura K; Kishony, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic treatment has two conflicting effects: the desired, immediate effect of inhibiting bacterial growth and the undesired, long-term effect of promoting the evolution of resistance. Although these contrasting outcomes seem inextricably linked, recent work has revealed several ways by which antibiotics can be combined to inhibit bacterial growth while, counterintuitively, selecting against resistant mutants. Decoupling treatment efficacy from the risk of resistance can be achieved by exploiting specific interactions between drugs, and the ways in which resistance mutations to a given drug can modulate these interactions or increase the sensitivity of the bacteria to other compounds. Although their practical application requires much further development and validation, and relies on advances in genomic diagnostics, these discoveries suggest novel paradigms that may restrict or even reverse the evolution of resistance. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Multidrug evolutionary strategies to reverse antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Baym, Michael; Stone, Laura K.; Kishony, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic treatment has two conflicting effects: the desired, immediate effect of inhibiting bacterial growth and the undesired, long-term effect of promoting the evolution of resistance. Although these contrasting outcomes seem inextricably linked, recent work has revealed several ways by which antibiotics can be combined to inhibit bacterial growth while, counterintuitively, selecting against resistant mutants. Decoupling treatment efficacy from the risk of resistance can be achieved by exploiting specific interactions between drugs, and the ways in which resistance mutations to a given drug can modulate these interactions or increase the sensitivity of the bacteria to other compounds. Although their practical application requires much further development and validation, and relies on advances in genomic diagnostics, these discoveries suggest novel paradigms that may restrict or even reverse the evolution of resistance. PMID:26722002

  3. The secondary resistome of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Bimal; Cain, Amy K.; Doerrler, William T.; Boinett, Christine J.; Fookes, Maria C.; Parkhill, Julian; Guardabassi, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae causes severe lung and bloodstream infections that are difficult to treat due to multidrug resistance. We hypothesized that antimicrobial resistance can be reversed by targeting chromosomal non-essential genes that are not responsible for acquired resistance but essential for resistant bacteria under therapeutic concentrations of antimicrobials. Conditional essentiality of individual genes to antimicrobial resistance was evaluated in an epidemic multidrug-resistant clone of K. pneumoniae (ST258). We constructed a high-density transposon mutant library of >430,000 unique Tn5 insertions and measured mutant depletion upon exposure to three clinically relevant antimicrobials (colistin, imipenem or ciprofloxacin) by Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing (TraDIS). Using this high-throughput approach, we defined three sets of chromosomal non-essential genes essential for growth during exposure to colistin (n = 35), imipenem (n = 1) or ciprofloxacin (n = 1) in addition to known resistance determinants, collectively termed the “secondary resistome”. As proof of principle, we demonstrated that inactivation of a non-essential gene not previously found linked to colistin resistance (dedA) restored colistin susceptibility by reducing the minimum inhibitory concentration from 8 to 0.5 μg/ml, 4-fold below the susceptibility breakpoint (S ≤ 2 μg/ml). This finding suggests that the secondary resistome is a potential target for developing antimicrobial “helper” drugs that restore the efficacy of existing antimicrobials. PMID:28198411

  4. The secondary resistome of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jana, Bimal; Cain, Amy K; Doerrler, William T; Boinett, Christine J; Fookes, Maria C; Parkhill, Julian; Guardabassi, Luca

    2017-02-15

    Klebsiella pneumoniae causes severe lung and bloodstream infections that are difficult to treat due to multidrug resistance. We hypothesized that antimicrobial resistance can be reversed by targeting chromosomal non-essential genes that are not responsible for acquired resistance but essential for resistant bacteria under therapeutic concentrations of antimicrobials. Conditional essentiality of individual genes to antimicrobial resistance was evaluated in an epidemic multidrug-resistant clone of K. pneumoniae (ST258). We constructed a high-density transposon mutant library of >430,000 unique Tn5 insertions and measured mutant depletion upon exposure to three clinically relevant antimicrobials (colistin, imipenem or ciprofloxacin) by Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing (TraDIS). Using this high-throughput approach, we defined three sets of chromosomal non-essential genes essential for growth during exposure to colistin (n = 35), imipenem (n = 1) or ciprofloxacin (n = 1) in addition to known resistance determinants, collectively termed the "secondary resistome". As proof of principle, we demonstrated that inactivation of a non-essential gene not previously found linked to colistin resistance (dedA) restored colistin susceptibility by reducing the minimum inhibitory concentration from 8 to 0.5 μg/ml, 4-fold below the susceptibility breakpoint (S ≤ 2 μg/ml). This finding suggests that the secondary resistome is a potential target for developing antimicrobial "helper" drugs that restore the efficacy of existing antimicrobials.

  5. Multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium in Four Animal Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jennifer G.; Tengelsen, Leslie A.; Smith, Kirk E.; Bender, Jeff B.; Frank, Rodney K.; Grendon, John H.; Rice, Daniel H.; Thiessen, Ann Marie B.; Gilbertson, Catherine Jo; Sivapalasingam, Sumathi; Barrett, Timothy J.; Besser, Thomas E.; Hancock, Dale D.

    2005-01-01

    In 1999 and 2000, 3 state health departments reported 4 outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness due to Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in employees, clients, and client animals from 3 companion animal veterinary clinics and 1 animal shelter. More than 45 persons and companion animals became ill. Four independent investigations resulted in the testing of 19 human samples and >200 animal samples; 18 persons and 36 animals were culture-positive for S. Typhimurium. One outbreak was due to multidrug-resistant S. Typhimurium R-type ACKSSuT, while the other 3 were due to multidrug-resistant S. Typhimurium R-type ACSSuT DT104. This report documents nosocomial transmission of S. Typhimurium and demonstrates that companion animal facilities may serve as foci of transmission for salmonellae between animals and humans if adequate precautions are not followed. PMID:16102313

  6. Successful Treatment of Multiple Multidrug Resistant Intracranial Tuberculomata

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Hazel F.; Mellick, Ross S.; Post, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year-old Bangladesh-born man presented with a month history of evolving neurological symptoms in the context of a six-month history of fever, night sweats, and axillary lymphadenopathy. He was subsequently diagnosed with multiple multidrug resistant intracranial tuberculomata and was successfully treated over two years. Intracranial multidrug resistant tuberculosis has a high mortality and successful treatment is rarely reported. Management is complex and requires consideration of the penetration and likely effect of antituberculous agents within the central nervous system. We discuss the role of various antituberculous agents, the duration of therapy, the utility of corticosteroids, the value of intrathecal and systemic therapy, and the need for rapid diagnosis. PMID:28127479

  7. Expression, detergent solubilization, and purification of a membrane transporter, the MexB multidrug resistance protein.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Forum H; Jeffery, Constance J

    2010-12-03

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), the ability of a cancer cell or pathogen to be resistant to a wide range of structurally and functionally unrelated anti-cancer drugs or antibiotics, is a current serious problem in public health. This multidrug resistance is largely due to energy-dependent drug efflux pumps. The pumps expel anti-cancer drugs or antibiotics into the external medium, lowering their intracellular concentration below a toxic threshold. We are studying multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that causes infections in patients with many types of injuries or illness, for example, burns or cystic fibrosis, and also in immuno-compromised cancer, dialysis, and transplantation patients. The major MDR efflux pumps in P. aeruginosa are tripartite complexes comprised of an inner membrane proton-drug antiporter (RND), an outer membrane channel (OMF), and a periplasmic linker protein (MFP). The RND and OMF proteins are transmembrane proteins. Transmembrane proteins make up more than 30% of all proteins and are 65% of current drug targets. The hydrophobic transmembrane domains make the proteins insoluble in aqueous buffer. Before a transmembrane protein can be purified, it is necessary to find buffer conditions containing a mild detergent that enable the protein to be solubilized as a protein detergent complex (PDC). In this example, we use an RND protein, the P. aeruginosa MexB transmembrane transporter, to demonstrate how to express a recombinant form of a transmembrane protein, solubilize it using detergents, and then purify the protein detergent complexes. This general method can be applied to the expression, purification, and solubilization of many other recombinantly expressed membrane proteins. The protein detergent complexes can later be used for biochemical or biophysical characterization including X-ray crystal structure determination or crosslinking studies.

  8. Bioprospecting marine actinomycetes for multidrug-resistant pathogen control from Rameswaram coastal area, Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Wahaab, Femina; Subramaniam, Kalidass

    2017-08-07

    A potent Streptomyces bacillaris strain RAM25C4 was isolated for controlling methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multidrug-resistant bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A total of 131 actinomycetes were isolated from the Rameswaram coastal region, Tamil Nadu, India. Among 131 actinomycetes, maximum number of actinomycetes (55%) isolated at the distance of 3-6 m from seashore. Out of 131 actinomycetes, 85% of the actinomycetes exhibited different degree of antagonistic activity against test pathogens. The antagonistic activity evaluated using actinomycetes direct culture filtrate and culture filtrate extracts. Among these culture filtrate, extracts had supreme antagonistic activity against multidrug-resistant bacteria and the solvent ethyl acetate was the best for extracting secondary metabolites from actinomycetes. In HPTLC analysis, the presence of macrolides, terpenoids, and quinolones was identified in RAM25C4 extract. In GC-MS analysis, various potent compounds such as phenolic compound-2,6-di-tert-butylphenol, alkaloid compound-1H, 5H, pyrrolo (1' 2':3, 4) imidazo, and quinolone compound-1,4-benzenediol, 2,5-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl) were identified in the ethyl acetate extract of RAM25C4. The phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence of RAM25C4 isolate was deposited in NCBI with name Streptomyces bacillaris strain RAM25C4 and accession number KM513543.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of octenidine against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Marin, R; Aires-de-Sousa, M; Nordmann, P; Kieffer, N; Poirel, L

    2017-08-19

    Multidrug-resistant (MR) Gram-negative (GN) pathogens pose a major and growing threat for healthcare systems, as therapy of infections is often limited due to the lack of available systemic antibiotics. Well-tolerated antiseptics, such as octenidine dihydrochloride (OCT), may be a very useful tool in infection control to reduce the dissemination of MRGN. This study aimed to investigate the bactericidal activity of OCT against international epidemic clones of MRGN. A set of five different species (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was studied to prove OCT efficacy without organic load, under "clean conditions" (0.3 g/L albumin) and under "dirty conditions" (3 g/L albumin + 3 mL/L defibrinated sheep blood), according to an official test norm (EN13727). We used five clonally unrelated isolates per species, including a susceptible wild-type strain, and four MRGN isolates, corresponding to either the 3MRGN or 4MRGN definition of multidrug resistance. A contact time of 1 min was fully effective for all isolates by using different OCT concentrations (0.01% and 0.05%), with a bacterial reduction factor of >5 log10 systematically observed. Growth kinetics were determined with two different wild-type strains (A. baumannii and K. pneumoniae), proving a time-dependent efficacy of OCT. These results highlight that OCT may be extremely useful to eradicate emerging highly resistant Gram-negative pathogens associated with nosocomial infections.

  10. Combating multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Thu, Aung Myint; Phyo, Aung Pyae; Landier, Jordi; Parker, Daniel M; Nosten, François H

    2017-08-01

    Over the past 50 years, Plasmodium falciparum has developed resistance against all antimalarial drugs used against it: chloroquine, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, quinine, piperaquine and mefloquine. More recently, resistance to the artemisinin derivatives and the resulting failure of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) are threatening all major gains made in malaria control. Each time resistance has developed progressively, with delayed clearance of parasites first emerging only in a few regions, increasing in prevalence and geographic range, and then ultimately resulting in the complete failure of that antimalarial. Drawing from this repeated historical chain of events, this article presents context-specific approaches for combating drug-resistant P. falciparum malaria. The approaches begin with a context of drug-sensitive parasites and focus on the prevention of the emergence of drug resistance. Next, the approaches address a scenario in which resistance has emerged and is increasing in prevalence and geographic extent, with interventions focused on disrupting transmission through vector control, early diagnosis and treatment, and the use of new combination therapies. Elimination is also presented as an approach for addressing the imminent failure of all available antimalarials. The final drug resistance context presented is one in which all available antimalarials have failed; leaving only personal protection and the use of new antimalarials (or new combinations of antimalarials) as a viable strategy for dealing with complete resistance. All effective strategies and contexts require a multipronged, holistic approach. © 2017 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia fergusonii: a Case of Acute Cystitis▿

    PubMed Central

    Savini, Vincenzo; Catavitello, Chiara; Talia, Marzia; Manna, Assunta; Pompetti, Franca; Favaro, Marco; Fontana, Carla; Febbo, Fabio; Balbinot, Andrea; Di Berardino, Fabio; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Di Zacomo, Silvia; Esattore, Francesca; D'Antonio, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    We report a case in which Escherichia fergusonii, an emerging pathogen in various types of infections, was associated with cystitis in a 52-year-old woman. The offending strain was found to be multidrug resistant. Despite in vitro activity, beta-lactam treatment failed because of a lack of patient compliance with therapy. The work confirms the pathogenic potential of E. fergusonii. PMID:18256229

  12. A Salmonella nanoparticle mimic overcomes multidrug resistance in tumours

    PubMed Central

    Mercado-Lubo, Regino; Zhang, Yuanwei; Zhao, Liang; Rossi, Kyle; Wu, Xiang; Zou, Yekui; Castillo, Antonio; Leonard, Jack; Bortell, Rita; Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Han, Gang; McCormick, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is a food-borne pathogen that also selectively grows in tumours and functionally decreases P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a multidrug resistance transporter. Here we report that the Salmonella type III secretion effector, SipA, is responsible for P-gp modulation through a pathway involving caspase-3. Mimicking the ability of Salmonella to reverse multidrug resistance, we constructed a gold nanoparticle system packaged with a SipA corona, and found this bacterial mimic not only accumulates in tumours but also reduces P-gp at a SipA dose significantly lower than free SipA. Moreover, the Salmonella nanoparticle mimic suppresses tumour growth with a concomitant reduction in P-gp when used with an existing chemotherapeutic drug (that is, doxorubicin). On the basis of our finding that the SipA Salmonella effector is fundamental for functionally decreasing P-gp, we engineered a nanoparticle mimic that both overcomes multidrug resistance in cancer cells and increases tumour sensitivity to conventional chemotherapeutics. PMID:27452236

  13. Structural basis and dynamics of multidrug recognition in a minimal bacterial multidrug resistance system

    PubMed Central

    Habazettl, Judith; Allan, Martin; Jensen, Pernille Rose; Sass, Hans-Jürgen; Thompson, Charles J.; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    TipA is a transcriptional regulator found in diverse bacteria. It constitutes a minimal autoregulated multidrug resistance system against numerous thiopeptide antibiotics. Here we report the structures of its drug-binding domain TipAS in complexes with promothiocin A and nosiheptide, and a model of the thiostrepton complex. Drug binding induces a large transition from a partially unfolded to a globin-like structure. The structures rationalize the mechanism of promiscuous, yet specific, drug recognition: (i) a four-ring motif present in all known TipA-inducing antibiotics is recognized specifically by conserved TipAS amino acids; and (ii) the variable part of the antibiotic is accommodated within a flexible cleft that rigidifies upon drug binding. Remarkably, the identified four-ring motif is also the major interacting part of the antibiotic with the ribosome. Hence the TipA multidrug resistance mechanism is directed against the same chemical motif that inhibits protein synthesis. The observed identity of chemical motifs responsible for antibiotic function and resistance may be a general principle and could help to better define new leads for antibiotics. PMID:25489067

  14. Novel Levofloxacin-Resistant Multidrug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 11A Isolates, South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miey; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Han-Sung; Park, Ji Young; Song, Wonkeun; Cho, Hyoun Chan

    2016-01-01

    Of 608 Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical strains isolated at a hospital in South Korea during 2009–2014, sixteen (2.6%) were identified as levofloxacin resistant. The predominant serotype was 11A (9 isolates). Two novel sequence types of multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae with serotype 11A were identified, indicating continuous diversification of resistant strains. PMID:27767906

  15. Arbekacin: another novel agent for treating infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Arbekacin sulfate (ABK), an aminoglycoside antibiotic, was discovered in 1972 and was derived from dibekacin to stabilize many common aminoglycoside modifying enzymes. ABK shows broad antimicrobial activities against not only Gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) but also Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. ABK has been approved as an injectable formulation in Japan since 1990, under the trade name Habekacin, for the treatment of patients with pneumonia and sepsis caused by MRSA. The drug has been used in more than 250,000 patients, and its clinical benefit and safety have been proven over two decades. ABK currently shows promise for the application for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections such as multidrug-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii because of its synergistic effect in combination with beta-lactams. PMID:25298740

  16. Underreported Threat of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Nemser, Bennett; Singh, Angad; Sankin, Alyssa; Schluger, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) in Africa may be more prevalent than previously appreciated. Factors leading to development of drug resistance need to be understood to develop appropriate control strategies for national programs. We gathered estimates of MDR TB rates for 39 of 46 countries in Africa. The relationship between MDR TB rates and independent factors was analyzed by using correlation and linear regression models. Our findings indicate that drug resistance surveys in Africa are critically needed. MDR TB rates must be assessed in countries without these surveys. In countries that have conducted a drug resistance survey, a new survey will determine evolution of drug resistance rates. We found no correlation between high MDR rates and TB incidence, HIV/TB co-infection rates, or year of introduction of rifampin. Results show that the retreatment failure rate was the most predictive indicator for MDR TB. Current category II drug regimens may increase MDR TB. PMID:18759999

  17. Development of hydroxyapatite-chitosan gel sunscreen combating clinical multidrug-resistant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsy, Reda; Ali, Sameh S.; El-Shetehy, Mohamed

    2017-09-01

    The several harmful effects on infected human skin resulting from exposure to the sun's UV radiation generate an interest in the development of a multifunctional hydroxyapatite-chitosan (HAp-chitosan) gel that works as an antibacterial sunscreen agent for skin care. In this work, HAp-chitosan gel was synthesized via coprecipitation method by dissolving chitosan in phosphoric acid and adding HAp. The characteristics of HAp-chitosan composite were investigated by conventional techniques, such as XRD, FTIR, and SEM techniques, while its sunscreen property was investigated by UV-spectroscopy. In addition to the influence of the gel on bacterial cell morphology, the antibacterial activity of HAp-chitosan gel against clinical multidrug resistant skin pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been studied. The results revealed the formation of HAp-chitosan gel having nanosized particles, which confers protection against UV-radiation. The antibacterial activity records showed that chitosan-HAp gel exhibits a significant effect on the growth and ultrastructure of multi-drug resistant bacterial activities. Therefore, the chitosan-HAp gel is promising for skin health care as an antibacterial sunscreen.

  18. Multidrug-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci in food animals.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, K; Zhang, Y

    2012-11-01

    To study the antimicrobial resistance of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) in animals. In the present study, a total of 87 CoNS recovered from food animals were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, resistance gene identification and conjugation. Of the seven species studied, Staphylococcus lentus, Staphylococcus sciuri, Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus haemolyticus accounted for over 96% of the isolates. In addition to β-lactam resistance (100%), high percentages of CoNS were resistant to tetracycline (67·8%), erythromycin (36·7%), clindamycin (27·5%) and quinopristin/dalfopristin (14·9%). Importantly, 47 (54%) isolates were resistant to at least three antimicrobial classes, including six CoNS resistant to six antimicrobial classes. The common genes for the above-mentioned resistance phenotypes were mec(A), tet(M), erm(A) and vga(A)(LC) , which were identified from 68·7%, 61%, 56·2% and 69·2% of the isolates, respectively. tet(M) was conjugatively transferable from 10 tetracycline-resistant CoNS to a Enterococcus strain, underlining the potential of antimicrobial resistance transfer from Staphylococcus to the commensal bacteria in human. Multidrug resistance and resistance to non-β-lactam antimicrobials are common in CoNS in animals. The data improve our understanding on the extent to which CoNS contribute to the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance in the food production environment. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. The antimicrobial activity of thyme essential oil against multidrug resistant clinical bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz, Monika; Łysakowska, Monika; Denys, Paweł; Kowalczyk, Edward

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of thyme essential oil against clinical multidrug resistant strains of Staphylococcus, Enterococcus, Escherichia, and Pseudomonas genus. The antibacterial activity of oil was tested against standard strains of bacteria and 120 clinical strains isolated from patients with infections of the oral cavity, abdominal cavity, respiratory and genitourinary tracts, skin, and from the hospital environment. Agar diffusion was used to determine the microbial growth inhibition of bacterial growth at various concentrations of oil from Thymus vulgaris. Susceptibility testing to antibiotics was carried out using disk diffusion. Thyme essential oil strongly inhibited the growth of the clinical strains of bacteria tested. The use of phytopharmaceuticals based on an investigated essential oil from thyme in the prevention and treatment of various human infections may be reasonable.

  20. Retrospective Study on Multidrug-Resistant Bacterium Infections After Rigid Internal Fixation of Mandibular Fracture.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhangao; Zhou, Zhongwei; Li, Peng; Zeng, Wei; Qing, Hai; Tang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    To retrospectively investigate infection by multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDRB) after rigid internal fixation (RIF) of mandibular fracture and determine risk factors and cure methods. From 2009 through 2014, 933 patients with mandibular fracture were enrolled in the study. Fifteen variables were statistically analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression methods to investigate risk factors for MDRB infection after RIF of mandibular fracture. Sixteen of 933 patients (1.71%) developed MDRB infection. Of these, 6 were infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), 6 with multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA), 1 with extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumonia, 1 with extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli, 1 with multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, and 1 with multidrug-resistant Enterobacter cloacae. Univariate analysis showed that risk factors of MDRB infection after RIF of mandibular fracture were age, obesity (body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2) for Asians), polytrauma (Injury Severity Score >16), preoperative infection, open fractures, comminuted fractures accompanied by other facial fractures, and teeth involving the fracture line. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that obesity, preoperative infection, and open fractures were independent risk factors of MDRB infection. After systemic anti-infection treatments with vancomycin, piperacillin, tazobactam, local drainage, and debridement, the infections were under control. Fourteen patients achieved clinical healing at an average time of 8.71 months, and 2 did not achieve clinical healing. The overall mean follow-up was 18.81 months. MDRB infections occurring after RIF of mandibular fracture were caused mainly by MRSA and MDR-PA. Obesity, preoperative infection, and open fractures were the main risk factors. To lower risk, surgical debridement should be performed sooner once acute infection has been controlled

  1. Identification of the High-affinity Substrate-binding Site of the Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion (MATE) Family Transporter from Pseudomonas stutzeri*

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Laiyin; Grell, Ernst; Malviya, Viveka Nand; Xie, Hao; Wang, Jingkang; Michel, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters exist in all three domains of life. They confer multidrug resistance by utilizing H+ or Na+ electrochemical gradients to extrude various drugs across the cell membranes. The substrate binding and the transport mechanism of MATE transporters is a fundamental process but so far not fully understood. Here we report a detailed substrate binding study of NorM_PS, a representative MATE transporter from Pseudomonas stutzeri. Our results indicate that NorM_PS is a proton-dependent multidrug efflux transporter. Detailed binding studies between NorM_PS and 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) were performed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and spectrofluorometry. Two exothermic binding events were observed from ITC data, and the high-affinity event was directly correlated with the extrusion of DAPI. The affinities are about 1 μm and 0.1 mm for the high and low affinity binding, respectively. Based on our homology model of NorM_PS, variants with mutations of amino acids that are potentially involved in substrate binding, were constructed. By carrying out the functional characterization of these variants, the critical amino acid residues (Glu-257 and Asp-373) for high-affinity DAPI binding were determined. Taken together, our results suggest a new substrate-binding site for MATE transporters. PMID:27235402

  2. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed. PMID:26649310

  3. Activity of topical antimicrobial agents against multidrug-resistant bacteria recovered from burn patients.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Jessie S; Guymon, Charles H; Mende, Katrin; Wolf, Steven E; Hospenthal, Duane R; Murray, Clinton K

    2010-12-01

    Topical antimicrobials are employed for prophylaxis and treatment of burn wound infections despite no established susceptibility breakpoints, which are becoming vital in an era of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria. We compared two methods of determining topical antimicrobial susceptibilities. Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Acinetobacter baumanii-calcoaceticus (ABC) from burn patients were tested using broth microdilution and agar well diffusion to determine minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and zones of inhibition (ZI). Isolates had systemic antibiotic resistance and clonality determined. MDR included resistance to antibiotics in three or more classes. We assessed 22 ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, 20 ABC (75% MDR), 20 P. aeruginosa (45% MDR), and 20 MRSA isolates. The most active agents were mupirocin for MRSA and mafenide acetate for the gram-negatives with moderate MICs/ZI found with silver sulfadiazene, silver nitrate, and honey. MDR and non-MDR isolates had similar topical resistance. There was no clonality associated with resistance patterns. Despite several methods to test bacteria for topical susceptibility, no defined breakpoints exist and standards need to be established. We recommend continuing to use silver products for prophylaxis against gram-negatives and mafenide acetate for treatment, and mupirocin for MRSA. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Photoexcited quantum dots for killing multidrug-resistant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Colleen M.; Goodman, Samuel M.; McDaniel, Jessica A.; Madinger, Nancy E.; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are an ever-growing threat because of the shrinking arsenal of efficacious antibiotics. Metal nanoparticles can induce cell death, yet the toxicity effect is typically nonspecific. Here, we show that photoexcited quantum dots (QDs) can kill a wide range of multidrug-resistant bacterial clinical isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhimurium. The killing effect is independent of material and controlled by the redox potentials of the photogenerated charge carriers, which selectively alter the cellular redox state. We also show that the QDs can be tailored to kill 92% of bacterial cells in a monoculture, and in a co-culture of E. coli and HEK 293T cells, while leaving the mammalian cells intact, or to increase bacterial proliferation. Photoexcited QDs could be used in the study of the effect of redox states on living systems, and lead to clinical phototherapy for the treatment of infections.

  5. Photoexcited quantum dots for killing multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Colleen M; Goodman, Samuel M; McDaniel, Jessica A; Madinger, Nancy E; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are an ever-growing threat because of the shrinking arsenal of efficacious antibiotics. Metal nanoparticles can induce cell death, yet the toxicity effect is typically nonspecific. Here, we show that photoexcited quantum dots (QDs) can kill a wide range of multidrug-resistant bacterial clinical isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhimurium. The killing effect is independent of material and controlled by the redox potentials of the photogenerated charge carriers, which selectively alter the cellular redox state. We also show that the QDs can be tailored to kill 92% of bacterial cells in a monoculture, and in a co-culture of E. coli and HEK 293T cells, while leaving the mammalian cells intact, or to increase bacterial proliferation. Photoexcited QDs could be used in the study of the effect of redox states on living systems, and lead to clinical phototherapy for the treatment of infections.

  6. Multidrug resistance protein gene expression in Trichoplusia ni caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Jason; D'Souza, Olivia; Rheault, Mark; Donly, Cam

    2013-02-01

    Many insect species exhibit pesticide-resistant phenotypes. One of the mechanisms capable of contributing to resistance is the overexpression of multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter proteins. Here we describe the cloning of three genes encoding MDR proteins from Trichoplusia ni: trnMDR1, trnMDR2 and trnMDR3. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) detected trnMDR mRNA in the whole nervous system, midgut and Malpighian tubules of final instar T. ni caterpillars. To test whether these genes are upregulated in response to chemical challenge in this insect, qPCR was used to compare trnMDR mRNA levels in unchallenged insects with those of insects fed the synthetic pyrethroid, deltamethrin. Only limited increases were detected in a single gene, trnMDR2, which is the most weakly expressed of the three MDR genes, suggesting that increased multidrug resistance of this type is not a significant part of the response to deltamethrin exposure.

  7. Alternating antibiotic treatments constrain evolutionary paths to multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungsoo; Lieberman, Tami D; Kishony, Roy

    2014-10-07

    Alternating antibiotic therapy, in which pairs of drugs are cycled during treatment, has been suggested as a means to inhibit the evolution of de novo resistance while avoiding the toxicity associated with more traditional combination therapy. However, it remains unclear under which conditions and by what means such alternating treatments impede the evolution of resistance. Here, we tracked multistep evolution of resistance in replicate populations of Staphylococcus aureus during 22 d of continuously increasing single-, mixed-, and alternating-drug treatment. In all three tested drug pairs, the alternating treatment reduced the overall rate of resistance by slowing the acquisition of resistance to one of the two component drugs, sometimes as effectively as mixed treatment. This slower rate of evolution is reflected in the genome-wide mutational profiles; under alternating treatments, bacteria acquire mutations in different genes than under corresponding single-drug treatments. To test whether this observed constraint on adaptive paths reflects trade-offs in which resistance to one drug is accompanied by sensitivity to a second drug, we profiled many single-step mutants for cross-resistance. Indeed, the average cross-resistance of single-step mutants can help predict whether or not evolution was slower in alternating drugs. Together, these results show that despite the complex evolutionary landscape of multidrug resistance, alternating-drug therapy can slow evolution by constraining the mutational paths toward resistance.

  8. Successful treatment of multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa osteomyelitis after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation with a combination of colistin and tigecycline.

    PubMed

    Stanzani, Marta; Tumietto, Fabio; Giannini, Maria Benedetta; Bianchi, Giuseppe; Nanetti, Anna; Vianelli, Nicola; Arpinati, Mario; Giovannini, Maddalena; Bonifazi, Francesca; Bandini, Giuseppe; Baccarani, Michele

    2007-12-01

    A case of osteomyelitis caused by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is reported in a patient who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. The patient was successfully treated by prolonged administration of a full dose of colistin and tigecycline, and surgical curettage with the positioning of resorbable calcium sulfate pellets loaded with colistin.

  9. Overcoming drug resistance in multi-drug resistant cancers and microorganisms: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Avner, Benjamin S; Fialho, Arsenio M; Chakrabarty, Ananda M

    2012-01-01

    Resistance development against multiple drugs is a common feature among many pathogens--including bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, viruses, and parasites--and also among cancers. The reasons are two-fold. Most commonly-used rationally-designed small molecule drugs or monoclonal antibodies, as well as antibiotics, strongly inhibit a key single step in the growth and proliferation of the pathogen or cancer cells. The disease agents quickly change or switch off this single target, or activate the efflux mechanisms to pump out the drug, thereby becoming resistant to the drug. A second problem is the way drugs are designed. The pharmaceutical industry chooses to use, by high-throughput screening, compounds that are maximally inhibitory to the key single step in the growth of the pathogen or cancer, thereby promoting selective pressure. An ideal drug would be one that inhibits multiple steps in the disease progression pathways with less stringency in these steps. Low levels of inhibition at multiple steps provide cumulative strong inhibitory effect, but little incentives or ability on the part of the pathogen/cancer to develop resistance. Such intelligent drug design involving multiple less stringent inhibitory steps is beyond the scope of the drug industry and requires evolutionary wisdom commonly possessed by bacteria. This review surveys assessments of the current clinical situation with regard to drug resistance in P. aeruginosa, and examines tools currently employed to limit this trend. We then provide a conceptual framework in which we explore the similarities between multi-drug resistance in pathogens and in cancers. We summarize promising work on anti-cancer drugs derived from the evolutionary wisdom of bacteria such as P. aeruginosa, and how such strategies can be the basis for how to look for candidate protein/peptide antibiotic drugs from bioengineered bugs. Such multi-domain proteins, unlike diffusible antibiotics, are not diffusible because of their

  10. Synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptide DP7 combined with antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaozhe; Li, Zhan; Li, Xiaolu; Tian, Yaomei; Fan, Yingzi; Yu, Chaoheng; Zhou, Bailing; Liu, Yi; Xiang, Rong; Yang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria present a great threat to public health. In this study, the synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and antibiotics on several multidrug-resistant bacterial strains were studied, and their synergistic effects on azithromycin (AZT)-resistance genes were analyzed to determine the relationships between antimicrobial resistance and these synergistic effects. A checkerboard method was used to evaluate the synergistic effects of AMPs (DP7 and CLS001) and several antibiotics (gentamicin, vancomycin [VAN], AZT, and amoxicillin) on clinical bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Escherichia coli). The AZT-resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, mefA, and msrA) were identified in the resistant strains using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. For all the clinical isolates tested that were resistant to different antibiotics, DP7 had high antimicrobial activity (≤32 mg/L). When DP7 was combined with VAN or AZT, the effect was most frequently synergistic. When we studied the resistance genes of the AZT-resistant isolates, the synergistic effect of DP7-AZT occurred most frequently in highly resistant strains or strains carrying more than two AZT-resistance genes. A transmission electron microscopic analysis of the S. aureus strain synergistically affected by DP7-AZT showed no noteworthy morphological changes, suggesting that a molecular-level mechanism plays an important role in the synergistic action of DP7-AZT. AMP DP7 plus the antibiotic AZT or VAN is more effective, especially against highly antibiotic-resistant strains.

  11. Synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptide DP7 combined with antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaozhe; Li, Zhan; Li, Xiaolu; Tian, Yaomei; Fan, Yingzi; Yu, Chaoheng; Zhou, Bailing; Liu, Yi; Xiang, Rong; Yang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria present a great threat to public health. In this study, the synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and antibiotics on several multidrug-resistant bacterial strains were studied, and their synergistic effects on azithromycin (AZT)-resistance genes were analyzed to determine the relationships between antimicrobial resistance and these synergistic effects. A checkerboard method was used to evaluate the synergistic effects of AMPs (DP7 and CLS001) and several antibiotics (gentamicin, vancomycin [VAN], AZT, and amoxicillin) on clinical bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Escherichia coli). The AZT-resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, mefA, and msrA) were identified in the resistant strains using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. For all the clinical isolates tested that were resistant to different antibiotics, DP7 had high antimicrobial activity (≤32 mg/L). When DP7 was combined with VAN or AZT, the effect was most frequently synergistic. When we studied the resistance genes of the AZT-resistant isolates, the synergistic effect of DP7–AZT occurred most frequently in highly resistant strains or strains carrying more than two AZT-resistance genes. A transmission electron microscopic analysis of the S. aureus strain synergistically affected by DP7–AZT showed no noteworthy morphological changes, suggesting that a molecular-level mechanism plays an important role in the synergistic action of DP7–AZT. AMP DP7 plus the antibiotic AZT or VAN is more effective, especially against highly antibiotic-resistant strains. PMID:28356719

  12. Antiplasmid activity of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate from Alpinia galanga against multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Latha, C; Shriram, Varsha D; Jahagirdar, Sheetal S; Dhakephalkar, Prashant K; Rojatkar, Supada R

    2009-06-25

    Alpinia galanga (L.) Swartz is traditionally used in the treatment of various ailments across India, China, and Southeast Asian countries. In India it is a reputed drug in indigenous system of medicine and largely used as antibacterial and antiseptic. In southern India the rhizomes has been used as a domestic remedy against bacterial infections. To identify a potential antiplasmid compound from Alpinia galanga against multi-drug resistant bacteria. The crude rhizome extract of Alpinia galanga was prepared in acetone. Antibacterial activity was checked by MIC and antiplasmid activity was checked by SIC. The principal compound responsible for the antiplasmid activity, in the crude extract, was identified by bioassay guided fractionation using hexane-acetone. Antibiotic resistance profile of plasmid harboring strains and plasmid cured strains was determined by disc diffusion method. The crude acetone extract of the rhizomes of Alpinia galanga exhibited antiplasmid activity against Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli and vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecalis with an efficiency of 92%, 82% and 8% respectively at 400 microg/ml SIC. The principal compound responsible for the activity was identified as 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate. 1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate demonstrated the ability to cure plasmid encoded antibiotic resistance in various multi-drug resistant bacterial strains of clinical isolates such as Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella typhi, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus with curing efficiency of 66%, 75%, 70%, 32% and 6% respectively at SIC of 400-800 microg/ml. 1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate mediated R-plasmid curing significantly reduced the minimal inhibitory concentration of antibiotics required to inhibit growth of bacteria, thus making the antibiotic treatment more effective.

  13. Epidemiologic analysis: Prophylaxis and multidrug-resistance in surgery.

    PubMed

    Solís-Téllez, H; Mondragón-Pinzón, E E; Ramírez-Marino, M; Espinoza-López, F R; Domínguez-Sosa, F; Rubio-Suarez, J F; Romero-Morelos, R D

    Surgical site infection is defined as an infection related to the surgical procedure in the area of manipulation occurring within the first 30 postoperative days. The diagnostic criteria include: purulent drainage, isolation of microorganisms, and signs of infection. To describe the epidemiologic characteristics and differences among the types of prophylactic regimens associated with hospital-acquired infections at the general surgery service of a tertiary care hospital. The electronic case records of patients that underwent general surgery at a tertiary care hospital within the time frame of January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2014 were reviewed. A convenience sample of 728 patients was established and divided into the following groups: Group 1: n=728 for the epidemiologic study; Group 2: n=638 for the evaluation of antimicrobial prophylaxis; and Group 3: n=50 for the evaluation of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains in the intensive care unit. The statistical analysis was carried out with the SPSS 19 program, using the Mann-Whitney U test and the chi-square test. A total of 728 procedures were performed (65.9% were elective surgeries). Three hundred twelve of the patients were males and 416 were females. Only 3.98% of the patients complied with the recommended antimicrobial prophylaxis, and multidrug-resistant bacterial strains were found in the intensive care unit. A single prophylactic dose is effective, but adherence to this recommendation was not adequate. The prophylactic guidelines are not strictly adhered to in our environment. There was a significant association between the development of nosocomial infections from multidrug-resistant germs and admission to the intensive care unit. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter spp.: Increasingly Problematic Nosocomial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have increasingly been resisting to antimicrobial therapy. Recently, resistance problem has been relatively much worsened in Gram-negative bacilli. Acinetobacter spp. are typical nosocomial pathogens causing infections and high mortality, almost exclusively in compromised hospital patients. Acinetobacter spp. are intrinsically less susceptible to antibiotics than Enterobacteriaceae, and have propensity to acquire resistance. A surveillance study in Korea in 2009 showed that resistance rates of Acinetobacter spp. were very high: to fluoroquinolone 67%, to amikacin 48%, to ceftazidime 66% and to imipenem 51%. Carbapenem resistance was mostly due to OXA type carbapenemase production in A. baumannii isolates, whereas it was due to metallo-β-lactamase production in non-baumannii Acinetobacter isolates. Colistin-resistant isolates were rare but started to be isolated in Korea. Currently, the infection caused by multidrug-resistant A. baumannii is among the most difficult ones to treat. Analysis at tertiary care hospital in 2010 showed that among the 1,085 isolates of Acinetobacter spp., 14.9% and 41.8% were resistant to seven, and to all eight antimicrobial agents tested, respectively. It is known to be difficult to prevent Acinetobacter spp. infection in hospitalized patients, because the organisms are ubiquitous in hospital environment. Efforts to control resistant bacteria in Korea by hospitals, relevant scientific societies and government agencies have only partially been successful. We need concerted multidisciplinary efforts to preserve the efficacy of currently available antimicrobial agents, by following the principles of antimicrobial stewardship. PMID:22028150

  15. Concordance of Resistance Profiles in Households of Patients With Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Jonathan B.; Mitnick, Carole D.; Atwood, Sidney S.; Chalco, Katiuska; Bayona, Jaime; Becerra, Mercedes C.

    2014-01-01

    We estimated the proportion of household contacts whose drug-susceptibility test results matched those of the purported source patient with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Ninety-nine (88.4%) contacts had isolates resistant to isoniazid and rifampin, and 41 (36.6%) contacts had isolates with results that also matched the purported source for ethambutol, streptomycin, and pyrazinamide. PMID:24170196

  16. Concordance of resistance profiles in households of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Parr, Jonathan B; Mitnick, Carole D; Atwood, Sidney S; Chalco, Katiuska; Bayona, Jaime; Becerra, Mercedes C

    2014-02-01

    We estimated the proportion of household contacts whose drug-susceptibility test results matched those of the purported source patient with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Ninety-nine (88.4%) contacts had isolates resistant to isoniazid and rifampin, and 41 (36.6%) contacts had isolates with results that also matched the purported source for ethambutol, streptomycin, and pyrazinamide.

  17. Reversers of the multidrug resistance transporter P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Stein, Wilfred D

    2002-05-01

    Multidrug resistance can arise from the presence of the membrane-bound pump, P-glycoprotein, in a tumor. Major efforts have been made to develop inhibitors of this pump, and a number of promising blockers have reached late stages of clinical trials. The kinetics of the inhibition of P-glycoprotein is complex, with binding sites that can interact synergistically. Reversers of increased affinity and specificity could, in principle, be developed on the basis of these synergies, and offer some promise in cancer therapeutics.

  18. Recurrence after treatment for pulmonary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Mercedes C; Appleton, Sasha C; Franke, Molly F; Chalco, Katiuska; Bayona, Jaime; Murray, Megan B; Mitnick, Carole D

    2010-09-15

    We estimated the proportion of recurrence within 2 years among adults cured by individualized multidrug-resistant tuberculosis regimens in Peru. Among 310 individuals with at least 24 months of follow-up, 16 experienced an episode of recurrent tuberculosis. If we assume the worst for treatment effectiveness-that all 16 episodes were caused by the original tuberculosis strain-then 5.2% (95% confidence interval, 3.0%-8.2%) experienced true relapse. This is an upper-bound estimate of relapse on which new regimens must improve.

  19. Clonal distribution of multidrug-resistant Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed

    Girlich, Delphine; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2015-04-01

    A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme including 7 housekeeping genes was used to evaluate whether the current spread of multidrug-resistant Enterobacter cloacae isolates worldwide might be associated to specific successful clones. Fifty E. cloacae clinical isolates of worldwide origin, with various β-lactamase content, and recovered at different periods of time were studied. Forty-four sequence types were identified, highlighting a high clonal diversity with 3 main lineages. This study revealed that a precise identification of the isolates by sequencing of the chromosomal ampC gene of E. cloacae would provide a significant added value to improve the reliability of the MLST scheme.

  20. Clinical implications of the global multidrug-resistant tuberculosis epidemic.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kartik; Abubakar, Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) is a significant threat to global health estimated to account for nearly half a million new cases and over 200,000 deaths in 2013. The number of MDR TB cases in the UK has risen over the last 15 years, with ever more complex clinical cases and associated challenging public health and societal implications. In this review, we provide an overview of the epidemiology of MDR TB globally and in the UK, outline the clinical management of MDR TB and summarise recent advances in diagnostics and prospects for new treatment.

  1. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: current epidemiology, therapeutic regimens, new drugs].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Ayerbe, C; Vivancos, M J; Moreno, S

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug and extensively resistant tuberculosis are especially severe forms of the disease for which no efficacious therapy exists in many cases. All the countries in the world have registered cases, although most of them are diagnosed in resource-limited countries from Asia, Africa and South America. For adequate treatment, first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs have to be judiciously used, but the development of new drugs with full activity, good tolerability and little toxicity is urgently needed. There are some drugs in development, some of which are already available through expanded-access programs.

  2. Therapeutic options and emerging alternatives for multidrug resistant staphylococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Magana, Maria; Ioannidis, Anastasios; Magiorkinis, Emmanouil; Ursu, Oleg; Bologa, Cristian G; Chatzipanagiotou, Stylianos; Hamblin, Michael R; Tegos, George P

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains the single biggest challenge in infectious disease in the civilized world. Moreover, vancomycin resistance is also spreading, leading to fears of untreatable infections as were common in ancient times. Molecular microbiology and bioinformatics have revealed many of the mechanisms involved in resistance development. Mobile genetic elements, up-regulated virulence factors and multi-drug efflux pumps have been implicated. A range of approved antibiotics from the glycopeptide, lipopeptide, pleuromutilin, macrolide, oxazolidinone, lincosamide, aminoglycoside, tetracycline, steptogramin, and cephalosporin classes has been employed to treat MRSA infections. The upcoming pipeline of drugs for MRSA includes some new compounds from the above classes, together with fluoroquinolones, antibacterial peptide mimetics, aminomethylciclines, porphyrins, peptide deformylase inhibitors, oxadiazoles, and diaminopyrimidines. A range of non-drug alternative approaches has emerged for MRSA treatment. Bacteriophage-therapy including purified lysins has made a comeback after being discovered in the 1930s. Quorum-sensing inhibitors are under investigation. Small molecule inhibitors of multi-drug efflux pumps may potentiate existing antibiotics. The relative failure of staphylococcal vaccines is being revisited by efforts with multi-valent vaccines and improved adjuvants. Photodynamic therapy uses non-toxic photosensitizers and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species that can nonspecifically destroy bacteria while preserving host cells. Preparation of nanoparticles can kill bacteria themselves, as well as improve the delivery of anti-bacterial drugs. Anti-MRSA drug discovery remains an exciting field with great promise for the future.

  3. Repurposing ebselen for treatment of multidrug-resistant staphylococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Thangamani, Shankar; Younis, Waleed; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-06-26

    Novel antimicrobials and new approaches to developing them are urgently needed. Repurposing already-approved drugs with well-characterized toxicology and pharmacology is a novel way to reduce the time, cost, and risk associated with antibiotic innovation. Ebselen, an organoselenium compound, is known to be clinically safe and has a well-known pharmacology profile. It has shown potent bactericidal activity against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA and VRSA). We demonstrated that ebselen acts through inhibition of protein synthesis and subsequently inhibited toxin production in MRSA. Additionally, ebselen was remarkably active and significantly reduced established staphylococcal biofilms. The therapeutic efficacy of ebselen was evaluated in a mouse model of staphylococcal skin infections. Ebselen 1% and 2% significantly reduced the bacterial load and the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in MRSA USA300 skin lesions. Furthermore, it acts synergistically with traditional antimicrobials. This study provides evidence that ebselen has great potential for topical treatment of MRSA skin infections and lays the foundation for further analysis and development of ebselen as a potential treatment for multidrug-resistant staphylococcal infections.

  4. Repurposing ebselen for treatment of multidrug-resistant staphylococcal infections

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Younis, Waleed; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    Novel antimicrobials and new approaches to developing them are urgently needed. Repurposing already-approved drugs with well-characterized toxicology and pharmacology is a novel way to reduce the time, cost, and risk associated with antibiotic innovation. Ebselen, an organoselenium compound, is known to be clinically safe and has a well-known pharmacology profile. It has shown potent bactericidal activity against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA and VRSA). We demonstrated that ebselen acts through inhibition of protein synthesis and subsequently inhibited toxin production in MRSA. Additionally, ebselen was remarkably active and significantly reduced established staphylococcal biofilms. The therapeutic efficacy of ebselen was evaluated in a mouse model of staphylococcal skin infections. Ebselen 1% and 2% significantly reduced the bacterial load and the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in MRSA USA300 skin lesions. Furthermore, it acts synergistically with traditional antimicrobials. This study provides evidence that ebselen has great potential for topical treatment of MRSA skin infections and lays the foundation for further analysis and development of ebselen as a potential treatment for multidrug-resistant staphylococcal infections. PMID:26111644

  5. How multidrug resistance in typhoid fever affects treatment options.

    PubMed

    Tatavarthy, Aparna; Luna, Vicki A; Amuso, Philip T

    2014-09-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (S. Typhi) is an enteric pathogen that causes typhoid fever. The infection can be severe, with significant morbidity and mortality, requiring antimicrobial therapy. Cases of S. Typhi infection in the United States and other developed countries are often associated with travel to endemic regions. The empirical use of first-line drugs for therapy, including ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, has resulted in transmissible multidrug resistance. With the global increase in multidrug-resistant S. Typhi, use of ciprofloxacin, with excellent oral absorption, few side effects, and cost-effectiveness, has become popular for treatment. However, decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility due to point mutations in the S. Typhi genes gyrA and/or parC has caused treatment failures, necessitating alternative therapeutic options. S. Typhi is typically genetically homogenous, with phylogenetic and epidemiological studies showing that identical clones and diverse S. Typhi types often coexist in the same geographic region. Studies investigating point mutations have demonstrated that selective pressure from empirical use of first-line drugs and fluoroquinolones has led to the global emergence of haplotype H-58. Antibiotic resistance is subject to high selective pressure in S. Typhi and thus demands careful use of antimicrobials. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Paclitaxel Nanocrystals for Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Huang, Leaf; Liu, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Here we described a paclitaxel (PTX) nanocrystals formulation using D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) as the sole excipient for overcoming multidrug resistance (MDR), a key challenge in current cancer therapy. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first report on PTX nanocrystals which can reverse MDR. TPGS serves as a surfactant to stabilize the nanocrystals and a P-gp inhibitor to reverse MDR. The size and morphology of the nanocrystals were studied by transmission electron microscopy and the crystalline structure was determined by powder X-ray diffraction. In vitro drug release profile showed that the nanocrystals exhibited sustained release kinetics compared to Taxol which is the clinical paclitaxel formulation. The cytotoxicity and antitumor efficacy in xenograft models were also investigated. It is demonstrated that PTX/TPGS nanocrystals have significant advantages over Taxol in achieving better therapeutic effect in Taxol-resistant cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, which was also confirmed by apoptosis assays. We envision that further development of this type of nanocrystals will provide a novel strategy for drug delivery and multidrug resistance treatment. PMID:20420443

  7. Characterization of a multidrug resistant C. difficile meat isolate.

    PubMed

    Mooyottu, Shankumar; Flock, Genevieve; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Upadhyaya, Indu; Jayarao, Bhushan; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2015-01-02

    Clostridium difficile is a pathogen of significant public health concern causing a life-threatening, toxin-mediated enteric disease in humans. The incidence and severity of the disease associated with C. difficile have increased in the US with the emergence of hypervirulent strains and community associated outbreaks. The detection of genotypically similar and identical C. difficile strains implicated from human infections in foods and food animals indicates the potential role of food as a source of community associated C. difficile disease. One hundred samples each of ground beef, pork and chicken obtained from geographically distant grocery stores in Connecticut were tested for C. difficile. Positive isolates were characterized by ribotyping, antibiotic susceptibility, toxin production and whole genome sequencing. Of the 300 meat samples, only two pork samples tested positive for C. difficile indicating a very low prevalence of C. difficile in meat. The isolates were non toxigenic; however, genome characterization revealed the presence of several antibiotic resistance genes and mobile elements that can potentially contribute to generation of multidrug resistant toxigenic C. difficile by horizontal gene transfer. Further studies are warranted to investigate potential food-borne transmission of the meat isolates and development of multi-drug resistance in these strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence and genotypic relatedness of carbapenem resistance among multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa in tertiary hospitals across Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased infection caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa has raised awareness of the resistance situation worldwide. Carbapenem resistance among MDR (CR-MDR) P. aeruginosa has become a serious life-threatening problem due to the limited therapeutic options. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence, the antibiotic susceptibility patterns and the relatedness of CR-MDR P. aeruginosa in tertiary hospitals across Thailand. Methods MDR P. aeruginosa from eight tertiary hospitals across Thailand were collected from 2007–2009. Susceptibility of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates was determined according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guideline. Selected CR-MDR P. aeruginosa isolates were genetically analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Results About 261 clinical isolates were identified as MDR P. aeruginosa and approximately 71.65% were found to be CR-MDR P. aeruginosa. The result showed that the meropenem resistance rate was the highest reaching over 50% in every hospitals. Additionally, the type of hospitals was a major factor affecting the resistance rate, as demonstrated by significantly higher CR-MDR rates among university and regional hospitals. The fingerprinting map identified 107 clones with at least 95% similarity. Only 4 clones were detected in more than one hospital. Conclusions Although the antibiotic resistance rate was high, the spreading of CR-MDR was found locally. Specific strains of CR-MDR did not commonly spread from one hospital to another. Importantly, clonal dissemination ratio indicated limited intra-hospital transmission in Thailand. PMID:22970983

  9. Prevalence and genotypic relatedness of carbapenem resistance among multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa in tertiary hospitals across Thailand.

    PubMed

    Khuntayaporn, Piyatip; Montakantikul, Preecha; Mootsikapun, Piroon; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Chomnawang, Mullika Traidej

    2012-09-13

    Increased infection caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa has raised awareness of the resistance situation worldwide. Carbapenem resistance among MDR (CR-MDR) P. aeruginosa has become a serious life-threatening problem due to the limited therapeutic options. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence, the antibiotic susceptibility patterns and the relatedness of CR-MDR P. aeruginosa in tertiary hospitals across Thailand. MDR P. aeruginosa from eight tertiary hospitals across Thailand were collected from 2007-2009. Susceptibility of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates was determined according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guideline. Selected CR-MDR P. aeruginosa isolates were genetically analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. About 261 clinical isolates were identified as MDR P. aeruginosa and approximately 71.65% were found to be CR-MDR P. aeruginosa. The result showed that the meropenem resistance rate was the highest reaching over 50% in every hospitals. Additionally, the type of hospitals was a major factor affecting the resistance rate, as demonstrated by significantly higher CR-MDR rates among university and regional hospitals. The fingerprinting map identified 107 clones with at least 95% similarity. Only 4 clones were detected in more than one hospital. Although the antibiotic resistance rate was high, the spreading of CR-MDR was found locally. Specific strains of CR-MDR did not commonly spread from one hospital to another. Importantly, clonal dissemination ratio indicated limited intra-hospital transmission in Thailand.

  10. Natural product modulators to overcome multidrug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cort, Aysegul; Ozben, Tomris

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a condition that makes cells simultaneously unresponsive to different drugs, unrelated to their chemical structure and mechanism of action. MDR caused by the presence and overexpression of ABC transporters makes obstacles in cancer treatment and lower the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Natural products are investigated by many researchers as MDR modulators for their low toxicity and potent, selective behavior. When coadministered, MDR modulators compete with cytotoxic agents for binding to the active site of the membrane transporters and reduce drug efflux. Natural product-based drugs are important in struggling against drug resistance during cancer therapy. This review is focused on the potential mechanisms against drug resistance, the development of inhibitors for ABC drug transporters, natural product modulators, and nanoparticle drug delivery.

  11. Characterization of multidrug-resistant diabetic foot ulcer enterococci.

    PubMed

    Semedo-Lemsaddek, Teresa; Mottola, Carla; Alves-Barroco, Cynthia; Cavaco-Silva, Patrícia; Tavares, Luís; Oliveira, Manuela

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent chronic progressive disease with complications that include diabetic-foot ulcers. Enterococci isolated from diabetic-foot infections were identified, evaluated by macro-restriction analysis, and screened for virulence traits and antimicrobial resistance. All isolates were considered multidrug-resistant, cytolysin and gelatinase producers, and the majority also demonstrated the ability to produce biofilms. These results indicate the importance of enterococci in diabetic-foot infection development and persistence, especially regarding their biofilm-forming ability and resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. Multiwavelength videomicrofluorometry for multiparametric investigations of multidrug resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocchi, Emmanuelle; Salmon, Jean-Marie; Vigo, Jean; Viallet, Pierre M.

    1996-05-01

    A major problem in the cancer chemotherapy is the development of resistance to a whole range of drugs not only similar to the drugs used for resistance induction but also to some functionally and structurally unrelated. It's one of the multifactorial causes of failure of chemotherapy. Thus it appears essential to evaluate the multi-drug resistance (MDR) in living cells populations to: detect the MDR phenotype, to discriminate between resistant and sensitive cells, to identify mechanisms which are involved in the induction or the reversion of resistance and to study the cytotoxic process. Such a challenge implies the use of multiparametric approach that has been possible using a protocol involving microfluorometry connected to numerical image analysis on single living cells. This protocol relays on the correlation existing between the decreased intracellular accumulation of some fluorescent probes such as Hoechst 33342 (Ho342) and Rhodamine 123 (R123) in resistant cells. The simultaneous estimation of the fluorescence intensities of these probes has required the use of a third probe, the Nile Red, for cell contour delineation. The analysis of parameters related to Ho342 and R123 allows the discrimination of sensitive and resistant cells. So the multiparametric approach using multi-wavelength image analysis, which appears to be a powerful technique, has allowed us to show on human lymphoblastoid CCRF-CEM cells lines that the cytotoxic effects could be different depending on the cell resistance or on the cytotoxic drug used: Adriamycine, Vinblastine and the different cell behavior could be used for cell differentiation.

  13. Nanodrug delivery in reversing multidrug resistance in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kapse-Mistry, Sonali; Govender, Thirumala; Srivastava, Rohit; Yergeri, Mayur

    2014-01-01

    Different mechanisms in cancer cells become resistant to one or more chemotherapeutics is known as multidrug resistance (MDR) which hinders chemotherapy efficacy. Potential factors for MDR includes enhanced drug detoxification, decreased drug uptake, increased intracellular nucleophiles levels, enhanced repair of drug induced DNA damage, overexpression of drug transporter such as P-glycoprotein(P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP1, MRP2), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Currently nanoassemblies such as polymeric/solid lipid/inorganic/metal nanoparticles, quantum dots, dendrimers, liposomes, micelles has emerged as an innovative, effective, and promising platforms for treatment of drug resistant cancer cells. Nanocarriers have potential to improve drug therapeutic index, ability for multifunctionality, divert ABC-transporter mediated drug efflux mechanism and selective targeting to tumor cells, cancer stem cells, tumor initiating cells, or cancer microenvironment. Selective nanocarrier targeting to tumor overcomes dose-limiting side effects, lack of selectivity, tissue toxicity, limited drug access to tumor tissues, high drug doses, and emergence of multiple drug resistance with conventional or combination chemotherapy. Current review highlights various nanodrug delivery systems to overcome mechanism of MDR by neutralizing, evading, or exploiting the drug efflux pumps and those independent of drug efflux pump mechanism by silencing Bcl-2 and HIF1α gene expressions by siRNA and miRNA, modulating ceramide levels and targeting NF-κB. “Theragnostics” combining a cytotoxic agent, targeting moiety, chemosensitizing agent, and diagnostic imaging aid are highlighted as effective and innovative systems for tumor localization and overcoming MDR. Physical approaches such as combination of drug with thermal/ultrasound/photodynamic therapies to overcome MDR are focused. The review focuses on newer drug delivery systems developed to overcome

  14. Multidrug-resistant pathogens in the food supply.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Marjorie E

    2015-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance, including multidrug resistance (MDR), is an increasing problem globally. MDR bacteria are frequently detected in humans and animals from both more- and less-developed countries and pose a serious concern for human health. Infections caused by MDR microbes may increase morbidity and mortality and require use of expensive drugs and prolonged hospitalization. Humans may be exposed to MDR pathogens through exposure to environments at health-care facilities and farms, livestock and companion animals, human food, and exposure to other individuals carrying MDR microbes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention classifies drug-resistant foodborne bacteria, including Campylobacter, Salmonella Typhi, nontyphoidal salmonellae, and Shigella, as serious threats. MDR bacteria have been detected in both meat and fresh produce. Salmonellae carrying genes coding for resistance to multiple antibiotics have caused numerous foodborne MDR outbreaks. While there is some level of resistance to antimicrobials in environmental bacteria, the widespread use of antibiotics in medicine and agriculture has driven the selection of a great variety of microbes with resistance to multiple antimicrobials. MDR bacteria on meat may have originated in veterinary health-care settings or on farms where animals are given antibiotics in feed or to treat infections. Fresh produce may be contaminated by irrigation or wash water containing MDR bacteria. Livestock, fruits, and vegetables may also be contaminated by food handlers, farmers, and animal caretakers who carry MDR bacteria. All potential sources of MDR bacteria should be considered and strategies devised to reduce their presence in foods. Surveillance studies have documented increasing trends in MDR in many pathogens, although there are a few reports of the decline of certain multidrug pathogens. Better coordination of surveillance programs and strategies for controlling use of antimicrobials need to be implemented in

  15. Antibiotic resistance pattern and evaluation of metallo-beta lactamase genes (VIM and IMP) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing MBL enzyme, isolated from patients with secondary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Shirani, Kiana; Ataei, Behrouz; Roshandel, Fardad

    2016-01-01

    One of the most common causes of hospital-acquired secondary infections in hospitalized patients is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of IMP and VIM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (carbapenem resistant and producer MBL enzyme) in patients with secondary immunodeficiency. In a cross sectional study, 96 patients with secondary immunodeficiency hospitalized in the Al-Zahra hospital were selected. Carbapenem resistant strains isolated and modified Hodge test was performed in order to confirm the presence of the metallo carbapenemase enzyme. Under the standard conditions they were sent to the central laboratory for investigating nosocomial infection Multiplex PCR. Of 96 samples 28.1% were IMP positive, 5.2% VIM positive and 3.1% both VIM and IMP positive. The prevalence of multidrug resistance in the IMP and/or VIM negative samples was 29%, while all 5 VIM positive samples have had multidrug resistance. Also the prevalence of multi-drug resistance in IMP positive samples were 96.3% and in IMP and VIM positive samples were 100%. According to Fisher's test, the prevalence of multi-drug resistance based on gene expression has significant difference (P < 0.001). Based on the results of this study it can be concluded that, a significant percentage of patients with secondary immunodeficiency that suffer nosocomial infections with multidrug resistance, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are probably MBL-producing gene positive. Therefore the cause of infection should be considered in the hospital care system to identify their features, the presence of genes involved in the development of multi-drug resistance and antibiotic therapy.

  16. Antibiotic resistance pattern and evaluation of metallo-beta lactamase genes (VIM and IMP) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains producing MBL enzyme, isolated from patients with secondary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Kiana; Ataei, Behrouz; Roshandel, Fardad

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the most common causes of hospital-acquired secondary infections in hospitalized patients is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of IMP and VIM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains (carbapenem resistant and producer MBL enzyme) in patients with secondary immunodeficiency. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study, 96 patients with secondary immunodeficiency hospitalized in the Al-Zahra hospital were selected. Carbapenem resistant strains isolated and modified Hodge test was performed in order to confirm the presence of the metallo carbapenemase enzyme. Under the standard conditions they were sent to the central laboratory for investigating nosocomial infection Multiplex PCR. Results: Of 96 samples 28.1% were IMP positive, 5.2% VIM positive and 3.1% both VIM and IMP positive. The prevalence of multidrug resistance in the IMP and/or VIM negative samples was 29%, while all 5 VIM positive samples have had multidrug resistance. Also the prevalence of multi-drug resistance in IMP positive samples were 96.3% and in IMP and VIM positive samples were 100%. According to Fisher’s test, the prevalence of multi-drug resistance based on gene expression has significant difference (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study it can be concluded that, a significant percentage of patients with secondary immunodeficiency that suffer nosocomial infections with multidrug resistance, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are probably MBL-producing gene positive. Therefore the cause of infection should be considered in the hospital care system to identify their features, the presence of genes involved in the development of multi-drug resistance and antibiotic therapy. PMID:27563634

  17. ▼Bedaquiline for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    Resistance to drugs used to treat tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem that threatens progress made in TB management and control worldwide. It may result from improper use of antibiotics, including prescription of non-standard treatment regimens and poor adherence to drug therapy. Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) is defined as resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin, with or without resistance to other first-line drugs. Extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) refers to resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampicin, and to any fluoroquinolone, and to any of the three second-line injectables  (amikacin, capreomycin and kanamycin). In 2012, DTB discussed the investigation, management and treatment of patients with MDR- and XDR-TB. Earlier this year, ▼bedaquiline (Sirturo) and ▼delamanid (Deltyba) were authorised by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) under its 'conditional market authorisation' scheme for use as part of an appropriate combination regimen for pulmonary MDR-TB in adult patients "when an effective treatment regimen cannot otherwise be composed for reasons of resistance or tolerability." In this article, we review the evidence for bedaquiline in the management of MDR-TB.

  18. The Assembly Motif of a Bacterial Small Multidrug Resistance Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Bradley E.; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    Multidrug transporters such as the small multidrug resistance (SMR) family of bacterial integral membrane proteins are capable of conferring clinically significant resistance to a variety of common therapeutics. As antiporter proteins of ∼100 amino acids, SMRs must self-assemble into homo-oligomeric structures for efflux of drug molecules. Oligomerization centered at transmembrane helix four (TM4) has been implicated in SMR assembly, but the full complement of residues required to mediate its self-interaction remains to be characterized. Here, we use Hsmr, the 110-residue SMR family member of the archaebacterium Halobacterium salinarum, to determine the TM4 residue motif required to mediate drug resistance and SMR self-association. Twelve single point mutants that scan the central portion of the TM4 helix (residues 85–104) were constructed and were tested for their ability to confer resistance to the cytotoxic compound ethidium bromide. Six residues were found to be individually essential for drug resistance activity (Gly90, Leu91, Leu93, Ile94, Gly97, and Val98), defining a minimum activity motif of 90GLXLIXXGV98 within TM4. When the propensity of these mutants to dimerize on SDS-PAGE was examined, replacements of all but Ile resulted in ∼2-fold reduction of dimerization versus the wild-type antiporter. Our work defines a minimum activity motif of 90GLXLIXXGV98 within TM4 and suggests that this sequence mediates TM4-based SMR dimerization along a single helix surface, stabilized by a small residue heptad repeat sequence. These TM4-TM4 interactions likely constitute the highest affinity locus for disruption of SMR function by directly targeting its self-assembly mechanism. PMID:19224913

  19. Influence of Clinical Breakpoint Changes from CLSI 2009 to EUCAST 2011 Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Guidelines on Multidrug Resistance Rates of Gram-Negative Rods

    PubMed Central

    Wolfensberger, Aline; Kuster, Stefan P.; Böttger, Erik C.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) rates of Gram-negative rods were analyzed comparing CLSI 2009 and EUCAST 2011 antibiotic susceptibility testing guidelines. After EUCAST 2011 was applied, the MDR rates increased for Klebsiella pneumoniae (2.2%), Enterobacter cloacae (1.1%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (0.7%), and Escherichia coli (0.4%). A total of 24% of Enterobacteriaceae MDR isolates and 12% of P. aeruginosa MDR isolates were categorized as MDR due to breakpoint changes. PMID:23596246

  20. Influence of clinical breakpoint changes from CLSI 2009 to EUCAST 2011 antimicrobial susceptibility testing guidelines on multidrug resistance rates of Gram-negative rods.

    PubMed

    Hombach, Michael; Wolfensberger, Aline; Kuster, Stefan P; Böttger, Erik C

    2013-07-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) rates of Gram-negative rods were analyzed comparing CLSI 2009 and EUCAST 2011 antibiotic susceptibility testing guidelines. After EUCAST 2011 was applied, the MDR rates increased for Klebsiella pneumoniae (2.2%), Enterobacter cloacae (1.1%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (0.7%), and Escherichia coli (0.4%). A total of 24% of Enterobacteriaceae MDR isolates and 12% of P. aeruginosa MDR isolates were categorized as MDR due to breakpoint changes.

  1. Detection of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis gene using plasmonics nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin-Neng; Yan, Fei; Zhang, Yan; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the use of plasmonics-based nanoprobes for detection of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis gene. The plasmonics nanoprobe is composed of a silver nanoparticle pre-coated with a stem-loop DNA probe that is tagged with a Raman label at one end of the stem region, while the other end of the probe is covalently conjugated to the nanoparticle via a thiol-silver bond. The loop region is designed to detect a specific target gene sequence. In the absence of target, the Raman label is in close proximity to the metal surface, resulting in an intense SERS signal upon laser excitation. In the presence of the target DNA sequence, hybridization between the target and probe disrupts the stem-loop configuration, separating the Raman label from the metal surface and quenching the SERS signal. In this study, we successfully demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of using plasmonics nanoprobes for the detection of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis gene.

  2. [Monitoring the incidence of multidrug-resistant bacteria in microbiology laboratories using Bacterio software].

    PubMed

    Ledru, Sylvie; Canonne, Jean-Paul

    2002-03-23

    Since 1997, the microbiology laboratory of the hospital center in Lens has monitored hospital ecology and epidemiology to provide rapid information that help to adapt probabilistic antibiotherapy and to estimate the impact of hygienic preventive measures on the incidence of multidrug-resistant bacteria (MRB). Monitoring with statistical software (Epi-Info) could be pursued and improved on with Bacterio, a specific software for microbiology laboratories. We studied the incidence of MRB not only in clinical specimens but also in ecologic specimens to detect BMR colonization. In the year 2000, the incidence reached 4.11 for 1000 hospitalization days and 3.34 for 100 admissions. This clearly differed from clinical activity. From 1998 to 2000 the incidence of BMR remained stable. BMR was detected within 48 hours after admission in 22.9% of cases. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ticarcillin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the most common BMR in our hospital. Extended broad spectrum beta-lactamase enterobacterii and Acinetobacter baumannii represented respectively 23% and 13% of the MRB. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia represented a minority and no vancomycin-resistant enterococci were found. Bacterio is a software well adapted to the use of microbiological data banks. Continuous monitoring of the incidence of BMR is very useful in the clinical care and hospital hygiene units.

  3. Combination therapy with polymyxin B and netropsin against clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Joon-hui; Bhat, Abhayprasad; Kim, Chang-Jin; Yong, Dongeun; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Polymyxins are last-resort antibiotics for treating infections of Gram-negative bacteria. The recent emergence of polymyxin-resistant bacteria, however, urgently demands clinical optimisation of polymyxin use to minimise further evolution of resistance. In this study we developed a novel combination therapy using minimal concentrations of polymyxin B. After large-scale screening of Streptomyces secondary metabolites, we identified a reliable polymixin synergist and confirmed as netropsin using high-pressure liquid chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry followed by in vitro assays using various Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. To evaluate the effectiveness of combining polymixin B and netropsin in vivo, we performed survival analysis on greater wax moth Galleria mellonella infected with colistin-resistant clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates as well as Escherichia coli, Shigella flexineri, Salmonella typhimuruim, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The survival of infected G. mellonella was significantly higher when treated with polymyxin B and netropsin in combination than when treated with polymyxin B or netropsin alone. We propose a netropsin combination therapy that minimises the use of polymyxin B when treating infections with multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:27306928

  4. Crystal structures of OprN and OprJ, outer membrane factors of multidrug tripartite efflux pumps of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Yonehara, Ryo; Yamashita, Eiki; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    The genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes tripartite efflux pumps that extrude functionally and structurally dissimilar antibiotics from the bacterial cell. MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN, and MexXY-OprM are the main tripartite efflux pumps responsible for multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa. The outer membrane factors OprN, OprJ, and OprM are essential components of functional tripartite efflux pumps. To elucidate the structural basis of multidrug resistance, we determined the crystal structures of OprN and OprJ. These structures revealed several features, including tri-acylation of the N-terminal cysteine, a small pore in the β-barrel domain, and a tightly sealed gate in the α-barrel domain. Despite the overall similarity of OprN, OprJ, and OprM, a comparison of their structures and electrostatic distributions revealed subtle differences at the periplasmic end of the α-barrel domain. These results suggested that the overall structures of these outer membrane factors are specifically optimized for particular tripartite efflux pumps. Proteins 2016; 84:759-769. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Enhancement of neutrophil autophagy by an IVIG preparation against multidrug-resistant bacteria as well as drug-sensitive strains.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Hidemasa; Kitamura, Naoko; Yamamoto, Sho; Higuchi, Takeshi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Kamikubo, Yasuhiko; Kondo, Tadakazu; Yamashita, Kouhei; Sasada, Masataka; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Adachi, Souichi

    2015-07-01

    Autophagy occurs in human neutrophils after the phagocytosis of multidrug-resistant bacteria and drug-sensitive strains, including Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The present study detected autophagy by immunoblot analysis of LC3B conversion, by confocal scanning microscopic examination of LC3B aggregate formation and by transmission electron microscopic examination of bacteria-containing autophagosomes. Patients with severe bacterial infections are often treated with IVIG alongside antimicrobial agents. Here, we showed that IVIG induced neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis of multidrug-resistant strains. Compared with untreated neutrophils, neutrophils exposed to IVIG showed increased levels of bacterial cell killing, phagocytosis, O(2)(-) release, MPO release, and NET formation. IVIG also increased autophagy in these cells. Inhibiting the late phase of autophagy (fusion of lysosomes with autophagosomes) with bafilomycin A1-reduced, neutrophil-mediated bactericidal activity. These findings indicate that autophagy plays a critical role in the bactericidal activity mediated by human neutrophils. Furthermore, the autophagosomes within the neutrophils contained bacteria only and their organelles only, or both bacteria and their organelles, a previously undocumented observation. Taken together, these results suggest that the contents of neutrophil autophagosomes may be derived from specific autophagic systems, which provide the neutrophil with an advantage. Thus, IVIG promotes the neutrophil-mediated killing of multidrug-resistant bacteria as well as drug-sensitive strains.

  6. Use of Spatial Information to Predict Multidrug Resistance in Tuberculosis Patients, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsien-Ho; Shin, Sonya S.; Contreras, Carmen; Asencios, Luis; Paciorek, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether spatiotemporal information could help predict multidrug resistance at the time of tuberculosis diagnosis, we investigated tuberculosis patients who underwent drug susceptibility testing in Lima, Peru, during 2005–2007. We found that crude representation of spatial location at the level of the health center improved prediction of multidrug resistance. PMID:22516236

  7. Worldwide Endemicity of a Multidrug-Resistant Staphylococcus capitis Clone Involved in Neonatal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Butin, Marine; Martins-Simões, Patricia; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Picaud, Jean-Charles; Laurent, Frédéric

    2017-03-01

    A multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus capitis clone, NRCS-A, has been isolated from neonatal intensive care units in 17 countries throughout the world. S. capitis NRCS-A prevalence is high in some neonatal intensive care units in France. These data highlight the worldwide endemicity and epidemiologic relevance of this multidrug-resistant, coagulase-negative staphylococci clone.

  8. Worldwide Endemicity of a Multidrug-Resistant Staphylococcus capitis Clone Involved in Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Simões, Patricia; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Picaud, Jean-Charles; Laurent, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    A multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus capitis clone, NRCS-A, has been isolated from neonatal intensive care units in 17 countries throughout the world. S. capitis NRCS-A prevalence is high in some neonatal intensive care units in France. These data highlight the worldwide endemicity and epidemiologic relevance of this multidrug-resistant, coagulase-negative staphylococci clone. PMID:28221122

  9. Human Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Newport Infections, Wisconsin, 2003–2005

    PubMed Central

    Archer, John R.; Sotir, Mark J.; Monson, Timothy A.; Kazmierczak, James J.

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of Salmonella Newport infections among Wisconsin residents during 2003–2005. Multidrug resistance prevalence was substantially greater in Wisconsin than elsewhere in the United States. Persons with multidrug-resistant infections were more likely than persons with susceptible infections to report exposure to cattle, farms, and unpasteurized milk. PMID:18217570

  10. Undetected multidrug-resistant tuberculosis amplified by first-line therapy in mixed infection.

    PubMed

    Hingley-Wilson, Suzanne M; Casey, Rosalyn; Connell, David; Bremang, Samuel; Evans, Jason T; Hawkey, Peter M; Smith, Grace E; Jepson, Annette; Philip, Stuart; Kon, Onn Min; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-07-01

    Infections with >1 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain(s) are underrecognized. We show, in vitro and in vivo, how first-line treatment conferred a competitive growth advantage to amplify a multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis strain in a patient with mixed infection. Diagnostic techniques that identify mixed tubercle bacilli populations are needed to curb the spread of multidrug resistance.

  11. Off-Label Use of Bedaquiline in Children and Adolescents with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Achar, Jay; Hewison, Cathy; Cavalheiro, Ana P; Skrahina, Alena; Cajazeiro, Junia; Nargiza, Parpieva; Herboczek, Krzysztof; Rajabov, Assliddin S; Hughes, Jennifer; Ferlazzo, Gabriella; Seddon, James A; du Cros, Philipp

    2017-10-01

    We describe 27 children and adolescents <18 years of age who received bedaquiline during treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. We report good treatment responses and no cessation attributable to adverse effects. Bedaquiline could be considered for use with this age group for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis when treatment options are limited.

  12. An H+-Coupled Multidrug Efflux Pump, PmpM, a Member of the MATE Family of Transporters, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    He, Gui-Xin; Kuroda, Teruo; Mima, Takehiko; Morita, Yuji; Mizushima, Tohru; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa

    2004-01-01

    We cloned the gene PA1361 (we designated the gene pmpM), which seemed to encode a multidrug efflux pump belonging to the MATE family, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the PCR method using the drug-hypersensitive Escherichia coli KAM32 strain as a host. Cells of E. coli possessing the pmpM gene showed elevated resistance to several antimicrobial agents. We observed energy-dependent efflux of ethidium from cells possessing the pmpM gene. We found that PmpM is an H+-drug antiporter, and this finding is the first reported case of an H+-coupled efflux pump in the MATE family. Disruption and reintroduction of the pmpM gene in P. aeruginosa revealed that PmpM is functional and that benzalkonium chloride, fluoroquinolones, ethidium bromide, acriflavine, and tetraphenylphosphonium chloride are substrates for PmpM in this microorganism. PMID:14679249

  13. MexZ-mediated regulation of mexXY multidrug efflux pump expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by binding on the mexZ-mexX intergenic DNA.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Eda, Shima; Gotoh, Nobuyuki; Yoshihara, Eisaku; Nakae, Taiji

    2004-09-01

    MexZ is a transcriptional regulator of the mexXY multidrug transporter operon, which confers aminoglycoside resistance on Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Highly purified MexZ showed direct binding with a specific site of the mexZ-mexX intergenic DNA when probed by a gel retardation assay. Both in vitro chemical cross-linking experiments and an in vivo two-hybrid expression system showed that the active form of MexZ, which is capable of binding the intergenic DNA, appeared to be a dimer. These results explain the mechanism by which MexZ represses transcription of the mexXY operon, but do not explain the substrate-induced hyperproduction of MexXY. The presence of inducer antibiotic in the gel-retardation assay mixture failed to detect altered MexZ-probe DNA interaction suggesting the possible involvement of an additional regulator.

  14. How to Measure Export via Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Jessica M. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps are an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and are required for many pathogens to cause infection. They are also being harnessed to improve microbial biotechnological processes, including biofuel production. Therefore, scientists of many specialties must be able to accurately measure efflux activity. However, myriad methodologies have been described and the most appropriate method is not always clear. Within the scientific literature, many methods are misused or data arising are misinterpreted. The methods for measuring efflux activity can be split into two groups, (i) those that directly measure efflux and (ii) those that measure the intracellular accumulation of a substrate, which is then used to infer efflux activity. Here, we review the methods for measuring efflux and explore the most recent advances in this field, including single-cell or cell-free technologies and mass spectrometry, that are being used to provide more detailed information about efflux pump activity. PMID:27381291

  15. [ABC transporter proteins in multidrug resistance of microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Balková, K; Gbelská, Y

    2007-08-01

    The ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporter family includes membrane proteins that can transport a wide variety of substrates across biological membranes. These proteins play an essential role in the protection of cells from toxic compounds/metabolites. Their overexpression which leads to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in pathogens and enables cancer cells to survive chemotherapy is of major concern for human health. Mutations in ABC transporters are implicated in a number of Mendelian disorders such as cystic fibrosis, adrenoleukodystrophy and cholesterol and bile transport defects. In microbial cells, several homologues of human ABC transporters were identified. Their further molecular biological study can contribute to better understanding and treatment of MDR or diseases caused by dysfunction of ABC transporter proteins. A review is presented of the state of the art in ABC transporter proteins in both prokaryotic and eucaryotic cells. The role of microbial ABC transporters in the development of drug resistance is analyzed.

  16. Cell biological mechanisms of multidrug resistance in tumors.

    PubMed

    Simon, S M; Schindler, M

    1994-04-26

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a generic term for the variety of strategies tumor cells use to evade the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. MDR is characterized by a decreased sensitivity of tumor cells not only to the drug employed for chemotherapy but also to a broad spectrum of drugs with neither obvious structural homology nor common targets. This pleiotropic resistance is one of the major obstacles to the successful treatment of tumors. MDR may result from structural or functional changes at the plasma membrane or within the cytoplasm, cellular compartments, or nucleus. Molecular mechanisms of MDR are discussed in terms of modifications in detoxification and DNA repair pathways, changes in cellular sites of drug sequestration, decreases in drug-target affinity, synthesis of specific drug inhibitors within cells, altered or inappropriate targeting of proteins, and accelerated removal or secretion of drugs.

  17. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Epidemiology, treatment, prevention and diagnostic research].

    PubMed

    Perronne, C; de Truchis, P

    1995-01-01

    The recent augmentation of the prevalence of multidrug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis is related to the high incidence of tuberculosis in HIV infected people, especially in those with low social status and no medical care; several nosocomial epidemics of MDR tuberculosis were observed in American and European institutions where HIV-infected persons were hospitalized; these MDR tuberculosis were associated with a high mortality-rate and frequent nosocomial transmission to immunocompromised contacts and care workers. The rapid institution of an adequate treatment with ancient antituberculosis agents (cycloserin, capreomycin, aminoglycosides) and/or new drugs (rifabutine, ofloxacin, sparfloxacin, etc) is necessary to avoid mortality and to diminish transmission. Prevention of MDR tuberculosis transmission is very important: patient isolation, adequate and prolonged therapy, better detection of resistance with gene-amplification methods (PCR) which are under investigation.

  18. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter Extremity Infections in Soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Kimberly A.; McAllister, C. Kenneth; Gray, Paula J.

    2005-01-01

    War wound infection and osteomyelitis caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter species have been prevalent during the 2003–2005 military operations in Iraq. Twenty-three soldiers wounded in Iraq and subsequently admitted to our facility from March 2003 to May 2004 had wound cultures positive for Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex. Eighteen had osteomyelitis, 2 burn infection, and 3 deep wound infection. Primary therapy for these infections was directed antimicrobial agents for an average of 6 weeks. All soldiers initially improved, regardless of the specific type of therapy. Patients were followed up to 23 months after completing therapy, and none had recurrent infection with Acinetobacter species. Despite the drug resistance that infecting organisms demonstrated in this series, a regimen of carefully selected extended antimicrobial-drug therapy appears effective for osteomyelitis caused by MDR Acinetobacter spp. PMID:16102310

  19. Nanomedicinal strategies to treat multidrug-resistant tumors: current progress

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaowei; Mumper, Russell J

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major impediment to the success of cancer chemotherapy. P-glycoprotein is an important and the best-known membrane transporter involved in MDR. Several strategies have been used to address MDR, especially P-glycoprotein-mediated drug resistance in tumors. However, clinical success has been limited, largely due to issues regarding lack of efficacy and/or safety. Nanoparticles have shown the ability to target tumors based on their unique physical and biological properties. To date, nanoparticles have been investigated primarily to address P-glycoprotein and the observed improved anticancer efficacy suggests that nanomedicinal strategies provide a new opportunity to overcome MDR. This article focuses on nanotechnology-based formulations and current nanomedicine approaches to address MDR in tumors and discusses the proposed mechanisms of action. PMID:20528455

  20. Cell biological mechanisms of multidrug resistance in tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, S M; Schindler, M

    1994-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a generic term for the variety of strategies tumor cells use to evade the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. MDR is characterized by a decreased sensitivity of tumor cells not only to the drug employed for chemotherapy but also to a broad spectrum of drugs with neither obvious structural homology nor common targets. This pleiotropic resistance is one of the major obstacles to the successful treatment of tumors. MDR may result from structural or functional changes at the plasma membrane or within the cytoplasm, cellular compartments, or nucleus. Molecular mechanisms of MDR are discussed in terms of modifications in detoxification and DNA repair pathways, changes in cellular sites of drug sequestration, decreases in drug-target affinity, synthesis of specific drug inhibitors within cells, altered or inappropriate targeting of proteins, and accelerated removal or secretion of drugs. PMID:7909602

  1. Multidrug-resistant enterococci: the dawn of a new era in resistant pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Antony, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    Resistant enterococci, especially vancomycin-resistant enterococci, have rapidly become an important nosocomial pathogen. They are increasingly prevalent among hospitalized patients, patients with serious chronic illnesses, and immunosuppressed patients. Risk factors identified include previous antibiotics, exposure to contaminated equipment, and close proximity to infected patients. Treatment of multidrug-resistant pathogens has become increasingly difficult, with increased morbidity and mortality in these patients. Strict infection control measures remain the mainstay in the management of these infections. PMID:9770953

  2. Biocidal activity of metalloacid-coated surfaces against multidrug-resistant microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The antimicrobial effects of a coating of molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) has been recently described. The metalloacid material produces oxonium ions (H3O+), which creates an acidic pH that is an effective, non specific antimicrobial. We determined the in vitro antimicrobial activity of molybdenum trioxide metalloacid-coated surfaces. Methods Metalloacid-coated and non-coated (control) surfaces were contaminated by exposing them for 15 minutes to microbial suspensions containing 105 cfu/mL. Eleven microorganisms responsible for nosocomial infections were tested: two Staphylococcus aureus strains (the hetero-vancomycin intermediate MRSA Mu50 strain and a ST80-PVL-producing MRSA strain); a vancomycin-resistant vanA Enterococcus faecium strain; three extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae strains; a MBL-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain; a multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain; a toxin-producing Clostridium difficile strain; and two fungi (Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus). The assay tested the ability of the coated surfaces to kill microorganisms. Results Against all non-sporulating microorganisms tested, metalloacid-coated surfaces exhibited significant antimicrobial activity relative to that of the control surfaces within two to six hours after contact with the microorganisms (p < 0.001). Microorganism survival on the coated surfaces was greatly impaired, whereas microorganism survival on control surfaces remained substantial. Conclusions We suggest that, facing the continuing shedding of microorganisms in the vicinity of colonized or infected patients, the continuous biocidal effect of hydroxonium oxides against multidrug-resistant microorganisms may help limit environmental contamination between consecutive cleaning procedures. PMID:23148568

  3. Population Genetics Study of Isoniazid Resistance Mutations and Evolution of Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis†

    PubMed Central

    Hazbón, Manzour Hernando; Brimacombe, Michael; Bobadilla del Valle, Miriam; Cavatore, Magali; Guerrero, Marta Inírida; Varma-Basil, Mandira; Billman-Jacobe, Helen; Lavender, Caroline; Fyfe, Janet; García-García, Lourdes; León, Clara Inés; Bose, Mridula; Chaves, Fernando; Murray, Megan; Eisenach, Kathleen D.; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Cave, M. Donald; Ponce de León, Alfredo; Alland, David

    2006-01-01

    The molecular basis for isoniazid resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is complex. Putative isoniazid resistance mutations have been identified in katG, ahpC, inhA, kasA, and ndh. However, small sample sizes and related potential biases in sample selection have precluded the development of statistically valid and significant population genetic analyses of clinical isoniazid resistance. We present the first large-scale analysis of 240 alleles previously associated with isoniazid resistance in a diverse set of 608 isoniazid-susceptible and 403 isoniazid-resistant clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. We detected 12 mutant alleles in isoniazid-susceptible isolates, suggesting that these alleles are not involved in isoniazid resistance. However, mutations in katG, ahpC, and inhA were strongly associated with isoniazid resistance, while kasA mutations were associated with isoniazid susceptibility. Remarkably, the distribution of isoniazid resistance-associated mutations was different in isoniazid-monoresistant isolates from that in multidrug-resistant isolates, with significantly fewer isoniazid resistance mutations in the isoniazid-monoresistant group. Mutations in katG315 were significantly more common in the multidrug-resistant isolates. Conversely, mutations in the inhA promoter were significantly more common in isoniazid-monoresistant isolates. We tested for interactions among mutations and resistance to different drugs. Mutations in katG, ahpC, and inhA were associated with rifampin resistance, but only katG315 mutations were associated with ethambutol resistance. There was also a significant inverse association between katG315 mutations and mutations in ahpC or inhA and between mutations in kasA and mutations in ahpC. Our results suggest that isoniazid resistance and the evolution of multidrug-resistant strains are complex dynamic processes that may be influenced by interactions between genes and drug-resistant phenotypes. PMID:16870753

  4. Effect of multidrug resistance 1/P-glycoprotein on the hypoxia-induced multidrug resistance of human laryngeal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Dawei; Zhou, Liang; Huang, Jiameng; Xiao, Xiyan

    2016-08-01

    In a previous study, it was demonstrated that hypoxia upregulated the multidrug resistance (MDR) of laryngeal cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs, with multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1)/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression also being upregulated. The present study aimed to investigate the role and mechanism of MDR1/P-gp on hypoxia-induced MDR in human laryngeal carcinoma cells. The sensitivity of laryngeal cancer cells to multiple drugs and cisplatin-induced apoptosis was determined by CCK-8 assay and Annexin-V/propidium iodide staining analysis, respectively. The accumulation of rhodamine 123 (Rh123) in the cells served as an estimate of drug accumulation and was evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM). MDR1/P-gp expression was inhibited using interference RNA, and the expression of the MDR1 gene was analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. As a result, the sensitivity to multiple chemotherapeutic agents and the apoptosis rate of the hypoxic laryngeal carcinoma cells increased following a decrease in MDR1/P-gp expression (P<0.05). Additionally, FCM analysis of fluorescence intensity indicated that the downregulated expression of MDR1/P-gp markedly increased intracellular Rh123 accumulation (P<0.05). Such results suggest that MDR1/P-gp serves an important role in regulating hypoxia-induced MDR in human laryngeal carcinoma cells through a decrease in intracellular drug accumulation.

  5. Antibiotic resistance determinants of a group of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in China.

    PubMed

    Xiao-Min, Xu; You-Fen, Fan; Wei-Yun, Feng; Zu-Huang, Mi; Xing-Bei, Weng

    2014-06-01

    A group of Acinetobacter baumannii confers multidrug resistance, but the molecular epidemiology and multidrug resistance mechanisms are poorly understood. Nineteen isolates were identified, and the antimicrobial susceptibility profile was determined using the disc diffusion method. Then, PCR of 78 kinds of resistance-associated genes were performed. A novel variant of blaADC gene: blaADC-67 gene (Genbank accession No. JX169789) was prevalent in all 19 isolates. Moreover, ISAba1 could also provide strong promoter to upregulate the expression of blaADC67 to confer resistance to beta-lactam. This is the first report of emergence of blaADC-67 in A. baumannii worldwide, which might confer resistance to beta-lactam.

  6. A multifaceted analysis of HIV-1 protease multidrug resistance phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Great strides have been made in the effective treatment of HIV-1 with the development of second-generation protease inhibitors (PIs) that are effective against historically multi-PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Nevertheless, mutation patterns that confer decreasing susceptibility to available PIs continue to arise within the population. Understanding the phenotypic and genotypic patterns responsible for multi-PI resistance is necessary for developing PIs that are active against clinically-relevant PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Results In this work, we use globally optimal integer programming-based clustering techniques to elucidate multi-PI phenotypic resistance patterns using a data set of 398 HIV-1 protease sequences that have each been phenotyped for susceptibility toward the nine clinically-approved HIV-1 PIs. We validate the information content of the clusters by evaluating their ability to predict the level of decreased susceptibility to each of the available PIs using a cross validation procedure. We demonstrate the finding that as a result of phenotypic cross resistance, the considered clinical HIV-1 protease isolates are confined to ~6% or less of the clinically-relevant phenotypic space. Clustering and feature selection methods are used to find representative sequences and mutations for major resistance phenotypes to elucidate their genotypic signatures. We show that phenotypic similarity does not imply genotypic similarity, that different PI-resistance mutation patterns can give rise to HIV-1 isolates with similar phenotypic profiles. Conclusion Rather than characterizing HIV-1 susceptibility toward each PI individually, our study offers a unique perspective on the phenomenon of PI class resistance by uncovering major multidrug-resistant phenotypic patterns and their often diverse genotypic determinants, providing a methodology that can be applied to understand clinically-relevant phenotypic patterns to aid in the design of novel inhibitors that

  7. Prevalence and Antimicrobial-Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Swimming Pools and Hot Tubs

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Jonathan K.; Lee, Jiyoung

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen in recreational waters and the primary cause of hot tub folliculitis and otitis externa. The aim of this surveillance study was to determine the background prevalence and antimicrobial resistance profile of P. aeruginosa in swimming pools and hot tubs. A convenience sample of 108 samples was obtained from three hot tubs and eight indoor swimming pools. Water and swab samples were processed using membrane filtration, followed by confirmation with polymerase chain reaction. Twenty-three samples (21%) were positive for P. aeruginosa, and 23 isolates underwent susceptibility testing using the microdilution method. Resistance was noted to several antibiotic agents, including amikacin (intermediate), aztreonam, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, imipenem, meropenem (intermediate), ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, tobramycin (intermediate), and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The results of this surveillance study indicate that 96% of P. aeruginosa isolates tested from swimming pools and hot tubs were multidrug resistant. These results may have important implications for cystic fibrosis patients and other immune-suppressed individuals, for whom infection with multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa would have greater impact. Our results underlie the importance of rigorous facility maintenance, and provide prevalence data on the occurrence of antimicrobial resistant strains of this important recreational water-associated and nosocomial pathogen. PMID:21556203

  8. Prevalence and antimicrobial-resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in swimming pools and hot tubs.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Jonathan K; Lee, Jiyoung

    2011-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen in recreational waters and the primary cause of hot tub folliculitis and otitis externa. The aim of this surveillance study was to determine the background prevalence and antimicrobial resistance profile of P. aeruginosa in swimming pools and hot tubs. A convenience sample of 108 samples was obtained from three hot tubs and eight indoor swimming pools. Water and swab samples were processed using membrane filtration, followed by confirmation with polymerase chain reaction. Twenty-three samples (21%) were positive for P. aeruginosa, and 23 isolates underwent susceptibility testing using the microdilution method. Resistance was noted to several antibiotic agents, including amikacin (intermediate), aztreonam, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, imipenem, meropenem (intermediate), ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, tobramycin (intermediate), and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The results of this surveillance study indicate that 96% of P. aeruginosa isolates tested from swimming pools and hot tubs were multidrug resistant. These results may have important implications for cystic fibrosis patients and other immune-suppressed individuals, for whom infection with multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa would have greater impact. Our results underlie the importance of rigorous facility maintenance, and provide prevalence data on the occurrence of antimicrobial resistant strains of this important recreational water-associated and nosocomial pathogen.

  9. Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens: current and emerging therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Karaiskos, Ilias; Giamarellou, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In the era of multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant (XDR) and even pandrug-resistant Gram-negative microorganisms, the medical community is facing the threat of untreatable infections particularly those caused by carbapenemase-producing bacteria, that is, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. Therefore, all the presently available antibiotics, as well as for the near future compounds, are presented and discussed. Areas covered: Current knowledge concerning mechanisms of action, in vitro activity and interactions, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics, clinical efficacy and toxicity issues for revived and novel antimicrobial agents overcoming current resistance mechanisms, including colistin, tigecycline, fosfomycin, temocillin, carbapenems, and antibiotics still under development for the near future such as plazomicin, eravacycline and carbapenemase inhibitors is discussed. Expert opinion: Colistin is active in vitro and effective in vivo against XDR carbapenemase-producing microorganisms in the critically ill host, whereas tigecycline, with the exception of P. aeruginosa, has a similar spectrum of activity. The efficacy of combination therapy in bacteremias and ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by K. pneumoniae carbapenemase producers seems to be obligatory, whereas in cases of P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii its efficacy is questionable. Fosfomycin, which is active against P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae, although promising, shares poor experience in XDR infections. The in vivo validity of the newer potent compounds still necessitates the evaluation of Phase III clinical trials particularly in XDR infections. PMID:24766095

  10. Antibiotics: Pharmacokinetics, toxicity, resistance and multidrug efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Çiğdem; Özcengiz, Gülay

    2017-06-01

    The discovery of penicillin followed by streptomycin, tetracycline, cephalosporins and other natural, semi-synthetic and synthetic antimicrobials completely revolutionized medicine by reducing human morbidity and mortality from most of the common infections. However, shortly after they were introduced to clinical practice, the development of resistance was emerged. The decreasing interest from antibiotic industry in spite of rapid global emergence of antibiotic resistance is a tough dilemma from the pointview of public health. The efficiency of antimicrobial treatment is determined by both pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In spite of their selective toxicity, antibiotics still cause severe, life-threatening adverse reactions in host body mostly due to defective drug metabolism or excessive dosing regimen. The present article aims at updating current knowledge on pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics concepts and models, toxicity of antibiotics as well as antibiotic resistance mechanisms, resistome analyses and search for novel antibiotic resistance determinants with special emphasis given to the-state-of-the-art regarding multidrug efflux pumps and their additional physiological functions in stress adaptation and virulence of bacteria. All these issues are highly linked to each other and not only important for most efficient and prolonged use of current antibiotics, but also for discovery and development of new antibiotics and novel inhibitors of antibiotic resistance determinants of pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Emerging cephalosporin and multidrug-resistant gonorrhoea in Europe.

    PubMed

    Cole, M J; Spiteri, G; Chisholm, S A; Hoffmann, S; Ison, C A; Unemo, M; Van de Laar, M

    2014-11-13

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae has consistently developed resistance to antimicrobials used therapeutically for gonorrhoea and few antimicrobials remain for effective empiric first-line therapy. Since 2009 the European gonococcal antimicrobial surveillance programme (Euro-GASP) has been running as a sentinel surveillance system across Member States of the European Union (EU) and European Economic Area (EEA) to monitor antimicrobial susceptibility in N. gonorrhoeae. During 2011, N. gonorrhoeae isolates were collected from 21 participating countries, and 7.6% and 0.5% of the examined gonococcal isolates had in vitro resistance to cefixime and ceftriaxone, respectively. The rate of ciprofloxacin and azithromycin resistance was 48.7% and 5.3%, respectively. Two (0.1%) isolates displayed high-level resistance to azithromycin, i.e. a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥256 mg/L. The current report further highlights the public health need to implement the European response plan, including further strengthening of Euro-GASP, to control and manage the threat of multidrug resistant N. gonorrhoeae.

  12. Starvation, detoxification, and multidrug resistance in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Changhan; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Longo, Valter D.

    2013-01-01

    The selection of chemotherapy drugs is based on the cytotoxicity to specific tumor cell types and the relatively low toxicity to normal cells and tissues. However, the toxicity to normal cells poses a major clinical challenge, particularly when malignant cells have acquired resistance to chemotherapy. This drug resistance of cancer cells results from multiple factors including individual variation, genetic heterogeneity within a tumor, and cellular evolution. Much progress in the understanding of tumor cell resistance has been made in the past 35 years, owing to milestone discoveries such as the identification and characterization of ABC transporters. Nonetheless, the complexity of the genetic and epigenetic rewiring of cancer cells makes drug resistance an equally complex phenomenon that is difficult to overcome. In this review, we discuss how the remarkable changes in the levels of glucose, IGF-I, IGFBP-1 and in other proteins caused by fasting have the potential to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy against tumors by protecting normal cells and tissues and possibly by diminishing multidrug resistance in malignant cells. PMID:22391012

  13. Multidrug resistant Enterobacteriaceae in New Zealand: a current perspective.

    PubMed

    Toombs-Ruane, L J; Benschop, J; Burgess, S; Priest, P; Murdoch, D R; French, N P

    2017-03-01

    In this article we review mechanisms and potential transmission pathways of multidrug resistance in Enterobacteriaceae, with an emphasis on extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-production. This provides background to better understand challenges presented by this important group of antimicrobial resistant bacteria, and inform measures aimed at prevention and control of antimicrobial resistance in general. Humans and animals interact at various levels; household pets cohabit with humans, and other animals interact with people through direct contact, as well as through the food chain and the environment. These interactions offer opportunity for bacteria such as ESBL-producers to be shared and transmitted between species and, in turn, increase the risk of zoonotic and reverse-zoonotic disease transmission. A key step in curtailing antimicrobial resistance is improved stewardship of antimicrobials, including surveillance of their use, better infection-control and prevention, and a better understanding of prescribing practice in both veterinary and medical professions in New Zealand. This will also require prospective observational studies to examine risk factors for antimicrobial resistance. Due to the interconnectedness of humans, animals and the environment actions to effect the changes required should be undertaken using a One Health approach.

  14. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: epidemiology, risk factors and case finding.

    PubMed

    Caminero, J A

    2010-04-01

    Although the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) epidemic is a very recent problem, many studies have attempted to understand it. We now have good estimates of the current burden (approximately 500 000 MDR-TB cases worldwide), and following the introduction of potential MDR-TB control strategies projections of these figures are being estimated. The projected trends in tuberculosis (TB) and MDR-TB incidence vary. Risk factors for resistance can be divided into two categories: 1) those facilitating the selection of resistance in the community and 2) the specific conditions that appear to increase some patients' vulnerability to resistance. The epidemiological situation varies greatly across countries, principally due to poor treatment practices and poor implementation of control programmes in the past-and even today, to a lesser degree-and recent data have suggested that national TB programmes that use existing drugs efficiently can postpone and even reverse the MDR-TB epidemic. Other factors that have also contributed to this epidemic situation are analysed in this article. The recognition of factors leading to the epidemic in some regions and the identification of populations at risk will assist in focusing case-finding efforts. From an individual perspective, treatment failures with first-line rifampicin-containing regimens and contacts of MDR-TB cases have the highest rates of resistance. Patients previously treated for TB and the other risk factors analysed in this article should be prioritised in case finding.

  15. Purification of a Multidrug Resistance Transporter for Crystallization Studies

    PubMed Central

    Alegre, Kamela O.; Law, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization of integral membrane proteins is a challenging field and much effort has been invested in optimizing the overexpression and purification steps needed to obtain milligram amounts of pure, stable, monodisperse protein sample for crystallography studies. Our current work involves the structural and functional characterization of the Escherichia coli multidrug resistance transporter MdtM, a member of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). Here we present a protocol for isolation of MdtM to increase yields of recombinant protein to the milligram quantities necessary for pursuit of structural studies using X-ray crystallography. Purification of MdtM was enhanced by introduction of an elongated His-tag, followed by identification and subsequent removal of chaperonin contamination. For crystallization trials of MdtM, detergent screening using size exclusion chromatography determined that decylmaltoside (DM) was the shortest-chain detergent that maintained the protein in a stable, monodispersed state. Crystallization trials of MdtM performed using the hanging-drop diffusion method with commercially available crystallization screens yielded 3D protein crystals under several different conditions. We contend that the purification protocol described here may be employed for production of high-quality protein of other multidrug efflux members of the MFS, a ubiquitous, physiologically and clinically important class of membrane transporters. PMID:27025617

  16. Association between clinical antibiotic resistance and susceptibility of Pseudomonas in the cystic fibrosis lung

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Gunther; Mahrt, Niels; Tueffers, Leif; Barbosa, Camilo; Harjes, Malte; Adolph, Gernot; Friedrichs, Anette; Krenz-Weinreich, Annegret; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Cystic fibrosis patients suffer from chronic lung infections that require long-term antibiotic therapy. Pseudomonas readily evolve resistance, rendering antibiotics ineffective. In vitro experiments suggest that resistant bacteria may be treated by exploiting their collateral sensitivity to other antibiotics. Here, we investigate correlations of sensitivity and resistance profiles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that naturally adapted to antibiotics in the cystic fibrosis lung. Methodology: Resistance profiles for 13 antibiotics were obtained using broth dilution, E-test and VITEK mass spectroscopy. Genetic variants were determined from whole-genome sequences and interrelationships among isolates were analyzed using 13 MLST loci. Result: Our study focused on 45 isolates from 13 patients under documented treatment with antibiotics. Forty percent of these were clinically resistant and 15% multi-drug resistant. Colistin resistance was found once, despite continuous colistin treatment and even though colistin resistance can readily evolve experimentally in the laboratory. Patients typically harbored multiple genetically and phenotypically distinct clones. However, genetically similar clones often had dissimilar resistance profiles. Isolates showed mutations in genes encoding cell wall synthesis, alginate production, efflux pumps and antibiotic modifying enzymes. Cross-resistance was commonly observed within antibiotic classes and between aminoglycosides and β-lactam antibiotics. No evidence was found for consistent phenotypic resistance to one antibiotic and sensitivity to another within one genotype. Conclusions and implications: Evidence supporting potential collateral sensitivity in clinical P. aeruginosa isolates remains equivocal. However, cross-resistance within antibiotic classes is common. Colistin therapy is promising since resistance to it was rare despite its intensive use in the studied patients. PMID:27193199

  17. Nonthermal Atmospheric Plasma Rapidly Disinfects Multidrug-Resistant Microbes by Inducing Cell Surface Damage

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brian; Mondello, Frank; Garner, Allen L.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma, a unique state of matter with properties similar to those of ionized gas, is an effective biological disinfectant. However, the mechanism through which nonthermal or “cold” plasma inactivates microbes on surfaces is poorly understood, due in part to challenges associated with processing and analyzing live cells on surfaces rather than in aqueous solution. Here, we employ membrane adsorption techniques to visualize the cellular effects of plasma on representative clinical isolates of drug-resistant microbes. Through direct fluorescent imaging, we demonstrate that plasma rapidly inactivates planktonic cultures, with >5 log10 kill in 30 s by damaging the cell surface in a time-dependent manner, resulting in a loss of membrane integrity, leakage of intracellular components (nucleic acid, protein, ATP), and ultimately focal dissolution of the cell surface with longer exposure time. This occurred with similar kinetic rates among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. We observed no correlative evidence that plasma induced widespread genomic damage or oxidative protein modification prior to the onset of membrane damage. Consistent with the notion that plasma is superficial, plasma-mediated sterilization was dramatically reduced when microbial cells were enveloped in aqueous buffer prior to treatment. These results support the use of nonthermal plasmas for disinfecting multidrug-resistant microbes in environmental settings and substantiate ongoing clinical applications for plasma devices. PMID:22232292

  18. The Bacterial Contamination of Allogeneic Bone and Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria in Tissue Bank

    PubMed Central

    Binte Atique, Fahmida; Rahman Khalil, Md. Masudur

    2014-01-01

    Present study was carried out for the microbiological evaluation of allogeneic bone processed from femoral heads. A total 60 bacterial isolates comprising five different species including Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., Klebsiella spp., Bacillus spp., and Pseudomonas spp. were characterized based on their cultural and biochemical characteristics. Average bioburden was ranged from 5.7 × 101 to 3.9 × 104 cfu/gm. The majority (81.7%) of the microbial contaminants were detected as Gram positive with the predominant organism being skin commensal coagulase negative Staphylococci (43.3%). Antimicrobial resistance was evaluated by the activities of 14 broad and narrow spectrum antibiotic discs. Comparing the overall pattern, marked resistance was noted against Penicillin and Amoxicillin 100% (60/60). The most effective single antibiotics were Gentamicin, Tobramycin, and Ofloxacin which were bactericidal against 100% (60/60) isolates. Multidrug resistance (MDR) was confirmed in 70% (42/60) of the samples. Among them, the most prevalent antibiotypes were Penicillin, Amoxicillin, Oxacillin, Polymyxin, and Cefpodoxime (80% of total MDR). The study results revealed higher contamination rate on bone allografts and recommend the implementation of good tissue banking practices during tissue procurement, processing, and storage in order to minimize the chances of contamination. PMID:25133161

  19. Nonthermal atmospheric plasma rapidly disinfects multidrug-resistant microbes by inducing cell surface damage.

    PubMed

    Kvam, Erik; Davis, Brian; Mondello, Frank; Garner, Allen L

    2012-04-01

    Plasma, a unique state of matter with properties similar to those of ionized gas, is an effective biological disinfectant. However, the mechanism through which nonthermal or "cold" plasma inactivates microbes on surfaces is poorly understood, due in part to challenges associated with processing and analyzing live cells on surfaces rather than in aqueous solution. Here, we employ membrane adsorption techniques to visualize the cellular effects of plasma on representative clinical isolates of drug-resistant microbes. Through direct fluorescent imaging, we demonstrate that plasma rapidly inactivates planktonic cultures, with >5 log(10) kill in 30 s by damaging the cell surface in a time-dependent manner, resulting in a loss of membrane integrity, leakage of intracellular components (nucleic acid, protein, ATP), and ultimately focal dissolution of the cell surface with longer exposure time. This occurred with similar kinetic rates among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. We observed no correlative evidence that plasma induced widespread genomic damage or oxidative protein modification prior to the onset of membrane damage. Consistent with the notion that plasma is superficial, plasma-mediated sterilization was dramatically reduced when microbial cells were enveloped in aqueous buffer prior to treatment. These results support the use of nonthermal plasmas for disinfecting multidrug-resistant microbes in environmental settings and substantiate ongoing clinical applications for plasma devices.

  20. Toxic Electrophiles Induce Expression of the Multidrug Efflux Pump MexEF-OprN in Pseudomonas aeruginosa through a Novel Transcriptional Regulator, CmrA.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Paulo; Jeannot, Katy; Plésiat, Patrick; Llanes, Catherine

    2017-08-01

    The multidrug efflux system MexEF-OprN is produced at low levels in wild-type strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa However, in so-called nfxC mutants, mutational alteration of the gene mexS results in constitutive overexpression of the pump, along with increased resistance of the bacterium to chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, and trimethoprim. In this study, analysis of in vitro-selected chloramphenicol-resistant clones of strain PA14 led to the identification of a new class of MexEF-OprN-overproducing mutants (called nfxC2) exhibiting alterations in an as-yet-uncharacterized gene, PA14_38040 (homolog of PA2047 in strain PAO1). This gene is predicted to encode an AraC-like transcriptional regulator and was called cmrA (for chloramphenicol resistance activator). In nfxC2 mutants, the mutated CmrA increases its proper gene expression and upregulates the operon mexEF-oprN through MexS and MexT, resulting in a multidrug resistance phenotype without significant loss in bacterial virulence. Transcriptomic experiments demonstrated that CmrA positively regulates a small set of 11 genes, including PA14_38020 (homolog of PA2048), which is required for the MexS/T-dependent activation of mexEF-oprN PA2048 codes for a protein sharing conserved domains with the quinol monooxygenase YgiN from Escherichia coli Interestingly, exposure of strain PA14 to toxic electrophilic molecules (glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and cinnamaldehyde) strongly activates the CmrA pathway and upregulates MexEF-OprN and, thus, increases the resistance of P. aeruginosa to the pump substrates. A picture emerges in which MexEF-OprN is central in the response of the pathogen to stresses affecting intracellular redox homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Susceptibility of Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Urine Isolates to Oral Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Zucchi, Paola C.; Chen, Alice; Raux, Brian R.; Kirby, James E.; McCoy, Christopher; Eliopoulos, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing resistance among Gram-negative uropathogens limits treatment options, and susceptibility data for multidrug-resistant isolates are limited. We assessed the activity of five oral agents against 91 multidrug-resistant Gram-negative urine isolates that were collected from emergency department/hospitalized patients. Fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin were most active (>75% susceptibility). Susceptibilities to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, ciprofloxacin, and ampicillin were ≤40%; empirical use of these agents likely provides inadequate coverage in areas with a high prevalence of multidrug-resistant uropathogens. PMID:26883704

  2. Multi drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Pathogen burden and associated antibiogram in a tertiary care hospital of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Waheed; Qasim, Muhammad; Rahman, Hazir; Bari, Fazli; Khan, Saadullah; Rehman, Zia Ur; Khan, Zahid; Dworeck, Tamara; Muhammad, Noor

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important pathogen of both community and hospital acquired infections, and a major threat to public health for continuous emergence of multi-drug resistance. Current prevalence and pattern of multidrug resistance in the clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa is reported here. Samples were collected from September 2013 to January 2014 tertiary care hospital, Peshawar. Samples were subjected to phenotypic and molecular based detection of P. aeruginosa and were further processed for multidrug resistance pattern. Out of 3700 samples, 102 were identified as MDR P. aeruginosa. Prevalence of MDR isolates were found in pus (34.3%), wounds (28.4%), urine (19.6%), blood (14.7%) and sputum (2.9%) respectively. Isolates were more resistant to Sulphamethoxazole/Trimethoprim (98.04%), Amoxycillin/Clavulanic acid, Doxycycline and Chloramphenicol (95.1%) each, while least resistant to Imipenem (43.1%), Cefoperazone/Sulbactam (50.98%) and Amikacin (53.9%). Extensive MDR pattern was observed in P. aeruginosa was found as (n = 17, 16.6%) isolates were resistant to all four classes of antibiotics. Increased burden of MDR P. aeruginosa was documented in the study. Moreover, some isolates were even resistant to four classes of antibiotics. Findings of the study will be helpful to devise an appropriate antibiotic treatment strategy against MDR P. aeruginosa to cope the chances of evolving resistant pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Unaltered expression of multidrug resistance transporters in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-resistant rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Payen, L; Courtois, A; Langouët, S; Guillouzo, A; Fardel, O

    2001-01-02

    Rat liver epithelial cells resistant to the chemical carcinogen 3MC, termed F258/3MC cells and generated by long-term exposure of parental F258 cells to the PAH, were characterized, especially with respect to expression of multidrug resistance transporters such as P-glycoprotein, MRP1 and MRP2. F258/3MC cells were found to be cross-resistant to other PAHs such as BP and dimethylbenz(a)anthracene but remained sensitive to known substrates of multidrug resistance efflux pumps such as doxorubicin and vincristine. They did not display either decreased cellular PAH accumulation or increased PAH efflux. In addition, P-glycoprotein and MRP2 mRNA levels were not, or only barely detected, in F258/3MC cells and in their parental counterparts whereas these PAH-resistant and sensitive cells showed closed levels of MRP1 mRNAs and activity. Moreover, P-gp- and MRP1-overexpressing cells were shown to display similar accumulation and efflux of BP than those found in P-gp- and MRP1-negative control cells. These data therefore suggest that multidrug resistance transporters do not contribute to PAH resistance in PAH-selected liver cells.

  4. Clinical management of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Valverde, Mercedes; Sojo-Dorado, Jesús; Pascual, Álvaro

    2013-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae showing resistance to cephalosporins due to extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) or plasmid-mediated AmpC enzymes, and those producing carbapenemases have spread worldwide during the last decades. Many of these isolates are also resistant to other first-line agents such as fluoroquinolones or aminoglycosides, leaving few available options for therapy. Thus, older drugs such as colistin and fosfomycin are being increasingly used. Infections caused by these bacteria are associated with increased morbidity and mortality compared with those caused by their susceptible counterparts. Most of the evidence supporting the present recommendations is from in vitro data, animal studies, and observational studies. While carbapenems are considered the drugs of choice for ESBL and AmpC producers, recent data suggest that certain alternatives may be suitable for some types of infections. Combined therapy seems superior to monotherapy in the treatment of invasive infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Optimization of dosage according to pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics data is important for the treatment of infections caused by isolates with borderline minimum inhibitory concentration due to low-level resistance mechanisms. The increasing frequency and the rapid spread of multidrug resistance among the Enterobacteriaceae is a true and complex public health problem. PMID:25165544

  5. Targeting protein kinases to reverse multidrug resistance in sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Shen, Jacson; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-02-01

    Sarcomas are a group of cancers that arise from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. They can be classified into over 50 subtypes, accounting for approximately 1% of adult and 15% of pediatric cancers. Wide surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are the most common treatments for the majority of sarcomas. Among these therapies, chemotherapy can palliate symptoms and prolong life for some sarcoma patients. However, sarcoma cells can have intrinsic or acquired resistance after treatment with chemotherapeutics drugs, leading to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR attenuates the efficacy of anticancer drugs and results in treatment failure for sarcomas. Therefore, overcoming MDR is an unmet need for sarcoma therapy. Certain protein kinases demonstrate aberrant expression and/or activity in sarcoma cells, which have been found to be involved in the regulation of sarcoma cell progression, such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and survival. Inhibiting these protein kinases may not only decrease the proliferation and growth of sarcoma cells, but also reverse their resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs to subsequently reduce the doses of anticancer drugs and decrease drug side-effects. The discovery of novel strategies targeting protein kinases opens a door to a new area of sarcoma research and provides insight into the mechanisms of MDR in chemotherapy. This review will focus on the recent studies in targeting protein kinase to reverse chemotherapeutic drug resistance in sarcoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Targeting Protein Kinases to Reverse Multidrug Resistance in Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Shen, Jacson; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J.; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Sarcomas are a group of cancers that arise from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. They can be classified into over 50 subtypes, accounting for approximately 1% of adult and 15% of pediatric cancers. Wide surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are the most common treatments for the majority of sarcomas. Among these therapies, chemotherapy can palliate symptoms and prolong life for some sarcoma patients. However, sarcoma cells can have intrinsic or acquired resistance after treatment with chemotherapeutics drugs, leading to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR attenuates the efficacy of anticancer drugs and results in treatment failure for sarcomas. Therefore, overcoming MDR is an unmet need for sarcoma therapy. Certain protein kinases demonstrate aberrant expression and/or activity in sarcoma cells, which have been found to be involved in the regulation of sarcoma cell progression, such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and survival. Inhibiting these protein kinases may not only decrease the proliferation and growth of sarcoma cells, but also reverse their resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs to subsequently reduce the doses of anticancer drugs and decrease drug side-effects. The discovery of novel strategies targeting protein kinases opens a door to a new area of sarcoma research and provides insight into the mechanisms of MDR in chemotherapy. This review will focus on the recent studies in targeting protein kinase to reverse chemotherapeutic drug resistance in sarcoma. PMID:26827688

  7. Characterization of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli by antimicrobial resistance profiles, plasmid replicon typing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aim: Plasmid characterization has particular clinical importance because genes encoding significant traits including antimicrobial resistance are frequently carried on plasmids. The objective of this study was to examine the distribution of multidrug resistance (MDR) in Escherichia coli in relation ...

  8. Clusters of Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cases, Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Kristin; Heersma, Herre; Van Soolingen, Dick

    2009-01-01

    Molecular surveillance of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) was implemented in Europe as case reporting in 2005. For all new MDR TB cases detected from January 2003 through June 2007, countries reported case-based epidemiologic data and DNA fingerprint patterns of MDR TB strains when available. International clusters were detected and analyzed. From 2003 through mid-2007 in Europe, 2,494 cases of MDR TB were reported from 24 European countries. Epidemiologic and molecular data were linked for 593 (39%) cases, and 672 insertion sequence 6110 DNA fingerprint patterns were reported from 19 countries. Of these patterns, 288 (43%) belonged to 18 European clusters; 7 clusters (242/288 cases, 84%) were characterized by strains of the Beijing genotype family, including the largest cluster (175/288 cases, 61%). Both clustering and the Beijing genotype were associated with strains originating in eastern European countries. Molecular cluster detection contributes to identification of transmission profile, risk factors, and control measures. PMID:19624920

  9. Preparation of silver nanoparticles fabrics against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanh, Truong Thi; Thu, Nguyen Thi; Hien, Nguyen Quoc; An, Pham Ngoc; Loan, Truong Thi Kieu; Hoa, Phan Thi

    2016-04-01

    The silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)/peco fabrics were prepared by immobilization of AgNPs on fabrics in which AgNPs were synthesized by γ-irradiation of the 10 mM AgNO3 chitosan solution at the dose of 17.6 kGy. The AgNPs size has been estimated to be about 11 nm from TEM image. The AgNPs content onto peco fabrics was of 143±6 mg/kg at the initial AgNPs concentration of 100 ppm. The AgNPs colloidal solution was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and TEM image. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs/peco fabrics after 60 washings against Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae was found to be over 99%. Effects of AgNPs fabics on multidrug-resistant pathogens from the clinical specimens were also tested.

  10. Bacteriophages: biosensing tools for multi-drug resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Tawil, N; Sacher, E; Mandeville, R; Meunier, M

    2014-03-21

    Pathogen detection is of utmost importance in many sectors, such as in the food industry, environmental quality control, clinical diagnostics, bio-defence and counter-terrorism. Failure to appropriately, and specifically, detect pathogenic bacteria can lead to serious consequences, and may ultimately be lethal. Public safety, new legislation, recent outbreaks in food contamination, and the ever-increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections have fostered a worldwide research effort targeting novel biosensing strategies. This review concerns phage-based analytical and biosensing methods targeted towards theranostic applications. We discuss and review phage-based assays, notably phage amplification, reporter phage, phage lysis, and bioluminescence assays for the detection of bacterial species, as well as phage-based biosensors, including optical (comprising SPR sensors and fiber optic assays), electrochemical (comprising amperometric, potentiometric, and impedimetric sensors), acoustic wave and magnetoelastic sensors.

  11. Multidrug Resistance in Quinolone-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria Isolated from Hospital Effluent and the Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant.

    PubMed

    Vaz-Moreira, Ivone; Varela, Ana Rita; Pereira, Thamiris V; Fochat, Romário C; Manaia, Célia M

    2016-03-01

    This study is aimed to assess if hospital effluents represent an important supplier of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria that, being discharged in the municipal collector, may be disseminated in the environment and bypassed in water quality control systems. From a set of 101 non-Escherichia coli Gram-negative bacteria with reduced susceptibility to quinolones, was selected a group of isolates comprised by those with the highest indices of MDR (defined as nonsusceptibility to at least one agent in six or more antimicrobial categories, MDR ≥6) or resistance to meropenem or ceftazidime (n = 25). The isolates were identified and characterized for antibiotic resistance phenotype, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes, and other genetic elements and conjugative capacity. The isolates with highest MDR indices were mainly from hospital effluent and comprised ubiquitous bacterial groups of the class Gammaproteobacteria, of the genera Aeromonas, Acinetobacter, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, and Pseudomonas, and of the class Flavobacteriia, of the genera Chryseobacterium and Myroides. In this group of 25 strains, 19 identified as Gammaproteobacteria harbored at least one PMQR gene (aac(6')-Ib-cr, qnrB, qnrS, or oqxAB) or a class 1 integron gene cassette encoding aminoglycoside, sulfonamide, or carbapenem resistance. Most of the E. coli J53 transconjugants with acquired antibiotic resistance resulted from conjugation with Enterobacteriaceae. These transconjugants demonstrated acquired resistance to a maximum of five classes of antibiotics, one or more PMQR genes and/or a class 1 integron gene cassette. This study shows that ubiquitous bacteria, other than those monitored in water quality controls, are important vectors of antibiotic resistance and can be disseminated from hospital effluent to aquatic environments. This information is relevant to support management options aiming at the control of this public health problem.

  12. Resistance to pefloxacin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Michea-Hamzehpour, M; Lucain, C; Pechere, J C

    1991-01-01

    Mechanisms of resistance to pefloxacin were investigated in four isogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains: S (parent isolate; MIC, 2 micrograms/ml), PT1 and PT2 (posttherapy isolates obtained in animals; MICs, 32 and 128 micrograms/ml, respectively), and PT2-r (posttherapy isolate obtained after six in vitro subpassages of PT2; MIC, 32 micrograms/ml). [2-3H]adenine incorporation (indirect evidence of DNA gyrase activity) in EDTA-permeabilized cells was less affected by pefloxacin in PT2 and PT2-r (50% inhibitory concentration, 0.27 and 0.26 microgram/ml, respectively) than it was in S and PT1 (50% inhibitory concentration, 0.04 and 0.05 microgram/ml, respectively). Reduced [14C]pefloxacin labeling of intact cells in strains PT1 and PT2 correlated with more susceptibility to EDTA and the presence of more calcium (P less than 0.05) and phosphorus in the outer membrane fractions. Outer membrane protein analysis showed reduced expression of protein D2 (47 kDa) in strains PT1 and PT2. Other proteins were apparently similar in all strains. The addition of calcium chloride (2 mM) to the sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized samples of outer membrane proteins, before heating and Western blotting, probed with monoclonal antibody anti-OmpF showed electrophoretic mobility changes of OmpF in strains PT1 and PT2 which were not seen in strain S. Calcium-induced changes were reversed with ethyleneglycoltetraacetate. Decreased [14C]pefloxacin labeling was further correlated with an altered lipopolysaccharide pattern and increased 3-deoxy-D-mannooctulosonic acid concentration (P less than 0.01). These findings suggested that resistance to pefloxacin is associated with altered DNA gyrase in strain PT2-r, with altered permeability in PT1, and with both mechanisms in PT2. The decreased expression of protein D2 and the higher calcium and lipopolysaccharide contents of the outer membrane could be responsible for the permeability deficiency in P. aeruginosa. Images PMID:1645509

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reveals High Intrinsic Resistance to Penem Antibiotics: Penem Resistance Mechanisms and Their Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Kiyomi; Gotoh, Naomasa; Nishino, Takeshi

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits high intrinsic resistance to penem antibiotics such as faropenem, ritipenem, AMA3176, sulopenem, Sch29482, and Sch34343. To investigate the mechanisms contributing to penem resistance, we used the laboratory strain PAO1 to construct a series of isogenic mutants with an impaired multidrug efflux system MexAB-OprM and/or impaired chromosomal AmpC β-lactamase. The outer membrane barrier of PAO1 was partially eliminated by inducing the expression of the plasmid-encoded Escherichia coli major porin OmpF. Susceptibility tests using the mutants and the OmpF expression plasmid showed that MexAB-OprM and the outer membrane barrier, but not AmpC β-lactamase, are the main mechanisms involved in the high intrinsic penem resistance of PAO1. However, reducing the high intrinsic penem resistance of PAO1 to the same level as that of penem-susceptible gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli required the loss of either both MexAB-OprM and AmpC β-lactamase or both MexAB-OprM and the outer membrane barrier. Competition experiments for penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) revealed that the affinity of PBP 1b and PBP 2 for faropenem were about 1.8- and 1.5-fold lower, than the respective affinity for imipenem. Loss of the outer membrane barrier, MexAB, and AmpC β-lactamase increased the susceptibility of PAO1 to almost all penems tested compared to the susceptibility of the AmpC-deficient PAO1 mutants to imipenem. Thus, it is suggested that the high intrinsic penem resistance of P. aeruginosa is generated from the interplay among the outer membrane barrier, the active efflux system, and AmpC β-lactamase but not from the lower affinity of PBPs for penems. PMID:11408209

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa reveals high intrinsic resistance to penem antibiotics: penem resistance mechanisms and their interplay.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, K; Gotoh, N; Nishino, T

    2001-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits high intrinsic resistance to penem antibiotics such as faropenem, ritipenem, AMA3176, sulopenem, Sch29482, and Sch34343. To investigate the mechanisms contributing to penem resistance, we used the laboratory strain PAO1 to construct a series of isogenic mutants with an impaired multidrug efflux system MexAB-OprM and/or impaired chromosomal AmpC beta-lactamase. The outer membrane barrier of PAO1 was partially eliminated by inducing the expression of the plasmid-encoded Escherichia coli major porin OmpF. Susceptibility tests using the mutants and the OmpF expression plasmid showed that MexAB-OprM and the outer membrane barrier, but not AmpC beta-lactamase, are the main mechanisms involved in the high intrinsic penem resistance of PAO1. However, reducing the high intrinsic penem resistance of PAO1 to the same level as that of penem-susceptible gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli required the loss of either both MexAB-OprM and AmpC beta-lactamase or both MexAB-OprM and the outer membrane barrier. Competition experiments for penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) revealed that the affinity of PBP 1b and PBP 2 for faropenem were about 1.8- and 1.5-fold lower, than the respective affinity for imipenem. Loss of the outer membrane barrier, MexAB, and AmpC beta-lactamase increased the susceptibility of PAO1 to almost all penems tested compared to the susceptibility of the AmpC-deficient PAO1 mutants to imipenem. Thus, it is suggested that the high intrinsic penem resistance of P. aeruginosa is generated from the interplay among the outer membrane barrier, the active efflux system, and AmpC beta-lactamase but not from the lower affinity of PBPs for penems.

  15. Multidrug resistance and ESBL-producing Salmonella spp. isolated from broiler processing plants.

    PubMed

    Ziech, Rosangela Estel; Lampugnani, Camila; Perin, Ana Paula; Sereno, Mallu Jagnow; Sfaciotte, Ricardo Antônio Pilegi; Viana, Cibeli; Soares, Vanessa Mendonça; Pinto, José Paes de Almeida Nogueira; Bersot, Luciano dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of multidrug-resistant, extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Salmonella spp. isolated from conveyor belts of broiler cutting rooms in Brazilian broiler processing plants. Ninety-eight strains of Salmonella spp. were analyzed. Multidrug resistance was determined by the disk diffusion test and the susceptibility of the isolated bacteria was evaluated against 18 antimicrobials from seven different classes. The double disk diffusion test was used to evaluate ESBL production. Of the 98 strains tested, 84 were multidrug resistant. The highest rates of resistance were against nalidixic acid (95%), tetracycline (91%), and the beta-lactams: ampicillin and cefachlor (45%), followed by streptomycin and gentamicin with 19% and 15% of strain resistance, respectively. By contrast, 97% of the strains were sensitive to chloramphenicol. 45% of the strains were positive for the presence of ESBL activity. In this study, high rates of multidrug resistance and ESBL production were observed in Salmonella spp.

  16. Variability of cutaneous and nasal population levels between patients colonized and infected by multidrug-resistant bacteria in two Brazilian intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Nicoli, Jacques R; Oliveira, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare cutaneous and nasal population levels between patients colonized and infected by multidrug-resistant organisms in two intensive care units. Methods: A prospective cohort study was performed in adult intensive care units of two hospitals in Belo Horizonte, Brazil (April 2012 to February 2013). Clinical and demographic data were first collected by reviewing patients’ charts. Then, samples collected with nasal, groin, and perineum swabs were cultivated in selective media for 48 h at 37°C. After isolation, determination of antimicrobial susceptibility and biochemical identification were performed. Results: A total of 53 cases of colonization were observed by the following bacteria in decreasing frequencies: imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (50.9%), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (43.4%), extended-spectrum beta-lactamase–producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (37.7%), imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (32.1%), oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (7.5%), and imipenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (5.7%). Among these colonization cases, 26 (49.0%) were followed by infection with bacteria phenotypically similar to those of the colonization. A relation between high population levels of colonization by most of the multidrug-resistant organisms at anatomical sites and a subsequent infection was observed. After colonization/infection, bacterial population levels decreased progressively and spontaneously until disappearance by day 45 in all the anatomical sites and for all the multidrug-resistant organisms. Conclusion: There was a correlation between high population levels of colonization by multidrug-resistant organisms at anatomical sites and a subsequent infection. Reduction in multidrug-resistant organism populations after colonization at anatomical sites could be a preventive measure to reduce evolution to infection as well as transmission of these bacteria between patients in intensive care unit. PMID:26770762

  17. Diversity and antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas spp. from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Vaz-Moreira, Ivone; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M

    2012-06-01

    Pseudomonas spp. are common inhabitants of aquatic environments, including drinking water. Multi-antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa is widely reported and deeply characterized. However, the information regarding other species and environmental isolates of this genus is scant. This study was designed based on the hypothesis that members of the genus Pseudomonas given their high prevalence, wide distribution in waters and genetic plasticity can be important reservoirs of antibiotic resistance in drinking water. With this aim, the diversity and antibiotic resistance phenotypes of Pseudomonas isolated from different drinking water sources were evaluated. The genotypic diversity analyses were based on six housekeeping genes (16S rRNA, rpoD, rpoB, gyrB, recA and ITS) and on pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Susceptibility to 21 antibiotics of eight classes was tested using the ATB PSE EU (08) and disk diffusion methods. Pseudomonas spp. were isolated from 14 of the 32 sampled sites. A total of 55 non-repetitive isolates were affiliated to twenty species. Although the same species were isolated from different sampling sites, identical genotypes were never observed in distinct types of water (water treatment plant/distribution system, tap water, cup fillers, biofilm, and mineral water). In general, the prevalence of antibiotic resistance was low and often the resistance patterns were related with the species and/or the strain genotype. Resistance to ticarcillin, ticarcillin with clavulanic acid, fosfomycin and cotrimoxazol were the most prevalent (69-84%). No resistance to piperacillin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, imipenem or meropenem was observed. This study demonstrates that Pseudomonas spp. are not so widespread in drinking water as commonly assumed. Nevertheless, it suggests that water Pseudomonas can spread acquired antibiotic resistance, preferentially via vertical transmission. Copyright

  18. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of diabetic foot ulcer with multidrug-resistant organism infection.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaoyan; Jin, Peng; Chu, Yuejie; Feng, Shuhong; Wang, Penghua

    2014-03-01

    The objective was to determine multidrug-resistant organisms' (MDROs) profile in diabetic foot ulcers (DFU), antibiotic resistance of MDROs, and to find the potential risk factors for infection with MDROs. In 157 patients with DFU admitted to Tianjin Metabolic Disease Hospital, China, from January 2011 to January 2012, microbiological specimens were taken on admission. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the infection of MDROs. Potential risk factors for MDRO-positive specimens were examined using univariate and multivariate analyses. Seventy-eight MDRO strains were isolated from patients in the MDRO+ group, among which the top 3 were Staphylococcus aureus (16.7%), Enterobacter spp (16.7%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (15.4%). Most of the MDROs were resistant to at least 8 kinds of commonly used antibiotics. Gram-negative MDROs showed 23% to 50% resistance to third-generation cephalosporins. The resistant rates of Gram-positive MDROs to fluoroquinolone were more than 70%; penicillin and semisynthetic penicillin were 57% to 100% resistant. Previous hospitalization (odds ratio [OR] = 3.000; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.100-8.182; P = .032), previous duration of antibiotic therapy (OR = 1.078; 95% CI = 1.001-1.160; P = .046), ulcer type (OR = 7.185; 95% CI = 2.115-24.408; P = .002), ulcer size (OR = 1.403; 95% CI = 1.042-1.888; P = .026), and osteomyelitis (OR = 3.390; 95% CI = 1.178-9.756; P = .024) were associated with MDRO infection in patients with DFU.

  19. Acquired Multidrug Antifungal Resistance in Candida lusitaniae during Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Asner, Sandra A.; Giulieri, Stefano; Diezi, Manuel; Marchetti, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    -flurocytosine. This clinical report describes resistance of C. lusitaniae to all common antifungals. While candins or azole resistance followed monotherapy, multidrug antifungal resistance emerged during combined therapy. PMID:26438490

  20. Safety and effectiveness of home intravenous antibiotic therapy for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Mujal, A; Sola, J; Hernandez, M; Villarino, M-A; Machado, M-L; Baylina, M; Tajan, J; Oristrell, J

    2015-06-01

    Home intravenous antibiotic therapy is an alternative to hospital admission for moderately severe infections. However, few studies have analyzed its safety and effectiveness in the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. The purpose of this study is to analyze the safety and effectiveness of home intravenous antibiotic therapy in multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. We analyzed prospectively all patients admitted to our service who underwent home intravenous antibiotic therapy during the period 2008-2012. All the treatments were administered by caretakers or self-administered by patients, through elastomeric infusion devices. Effectiveness was evaluated by analyzing the readmission rate for poor infection control. Safety was evaluated by analyzing adverse events, catheter-related complications, and readmissions not related to poor infection control. There were 433 admissions (in 355 patients) for home intravenous antibiotic therapy during the study period. There were 226 (52.2 %) admissions due to multidrug-resistant bacterial infections and 207 (47.8 %) due to non-multidrug-resistant infections. Hospital readmissions in patients with multidrug-resistant infections were uncommon. Multidrug-resistant enterococcal infections, healthcare-associated infections, and carbapenem therapy were independent variables associated with increased readmissions due to poor infection control. Readmissions not related to poor infection control, adverse events, and catheter-related complications were similar in multidrug-resistant compared to non-multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Home intravenous therapy, administered by patients or their caretakers using elastomeric infusion pumps, was safe and effective for the treatment of most multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

  1. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: challenges of a global emergence].

    PubMed

    Comolet, T

    2015-10-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis, in particular Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR-TB) is an increasing global concern and a major burden for some developing countries, especially the BRICS. It is assumed that every year roughly 350 000 new MDR-TB cases occur in the world, on average in 20.5% of TB patients that have been previously treated but also in 3.5% of persons that have never been on TB treatment before. The global distribution of cases is very heterogeneous and is now better understood thanks to a growing number of specific surveys and routine surveillance systems: incidence is much higher in southern Africa and in all countries formerly part of the USSR. Countries with weak health systems and previously inefficient TB control programs are highly vulnerable to MDR epidemics because program failures do help creating, maintaining and spreading resistances. Global response is slowly rolled out and diagnosis capacities are on the rise (mostly with genotypic methods) but adequate and successful treatment and care is still limited to a minority of global cases. From a public health perspective the MDR-TB growing epidemics will not be controlled merely by the introduction of few new antibiotics because it is also linked to patient's compliance and adequate case management supported by efficient TB program. In depth quality improvement will only be achieved after previous errors are thoroughly analyzed and boldly corrected.

  2. Genetic Drivers of Multidrug Resistance in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Kelley R.; Jimenez Ortigosa, Cristina; Shor, Erika; Perlin, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Both the incidence of invasive fungal infections and rates of multidrug resistance associated with fungal pathogen Candida glabrata have increased in recent years. In this perspective, we will discuss the mechanisms underlying the capacity of C. glabrata to rapidly develop resistance to multiple drug classes, including triazoles and echinocandins. We will focus on the extensive genetic diversity among clinical isolates of C. glabrata, which likely enables this yeast to survive multiple stressors, such as immune pressure and antifungal exposure. In particular, over half of C. glabrata clinical strains collected from U.S. and non-U.S. sites have mutations in the DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2, leading to a mutator phenotype and increased frequencies of drug-resistant mutants in vitro. Furthermore, recent studies and data presented here document extensive chromosomal rearrangements among C. glabrata strains, resulting in a large number of distinct karyotypes within a single species. By analyzing clonal, serial isolates derived from individual patients treated with antifungal drugs, we were able to document chromosomal changes occurring in C. glabrata in vivo during the course of antifungal treatment. Interestingly, we also show that both MSH2 genotypes and chromosomal patterns cluster consistently into specific strain types, indicating that C. glabrata has a complex population structure where genomic variants arise, perhaps during the process of adaptation to environmental changes, and persist over time. PMID:28018323

  3. Information concerning multidrug-resistant bacterial colonization or infection in the medical transfer letter.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, A; Laporte, S; Faure, S; Tiv, M; Chavanet, P; Belpois-Duchamp, C; Astruc, K; Aho-Glélé, L S

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the proportion of transfer letters that contained information relative to infection or colonization by multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria and factors associated with the presence of that information. Patients for whom at least one of these selected MDR bacteria (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, or MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was isolated during their hospitalization and who were transferred to another health care facility between 2009 and 2012 were included. Information of the MDR bacterium and the mention of isolation precautions were evaluated in the electronic medical record. Information (mention of MDR bacterium or isolation precaution) was present in 57% [52; 65] of records. Full information (genus and species, concept of MDR bacterium and mention of isolation precaution) was found in 20% [16; 25]. The presence of a dedicated item in the standard medical discharge letter was associated with more frequent information. Less information was retrieved with P. aeruginosa cases than with the other 2 MDR bacteria. The presence of the information has improved, but it is still insufficiently reported. Measures to improve information are needed. Indeed, information on MDR bacterial colonization or infection is the first step for isolation precautions. An item could be added to all standard medical discharge letters. An item could also be added to the indicators used to assess quality and safety in healthcare facilities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Inducible NorA-mediated multidrug resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Kaatz, G W; Seo, S M

    1995-01-01

    The NorA protein of Staphylococcus aureus mediates the active efflux of hydrophilic fluoroquinolones from the cell, conferring low-level resistance upon the organism. The protein also is capable of transporting additional structurally diverse compounds, indicating that it has a broad substrate specificity. Increased transcription of the norA gene, leading to a greater quantity of the NorA protein within the cytoplasmic membrane, is felt to be the mechanism by which strains possessing such changes resist fluoroquinolones. S. aureus SA-1199 and its in vivo-selected derivative SA-1199B are fluoroquinolone-susceptible and -resistant isolates, respectively; SA-1199B resists hydrophilic fluoroquinolones via a NorA-mediated mediated mechanism in a constitutive manner. SA-1199-3 is an in vitro-produced derivative of SA-1199 in which NorA-mediated multidrug resistance is expressed inducibly. Compared with organisms exposed to subinhibitory concentrations of a NorA substrate for the first time, preexposure of SA-1199-3 to such a compound followed by growth in the presence of that substrate results in the elimination of a 2- to 6-h period of organism killing that occurs prior to the onset of logarithmic growth. The uptake of radiolabeled fluoroquinolone is markedly reduced by preexposure of SA-1199-3 to NorA substrates: such prior exposure also results in a dramatic increase in RNa transcripts that hybridize with a norA probe. Preexposure of SA-1199 and SA-1199B to such substrates results in small increases or no increases in these transcripts. No sequence differences between SA-1199 and SA-1199-3 within the norA gene or flanking DNA were found. It appears likely that the regulation of norA in SA-1193, which may be effected by one or more genetic loci outside the norA region of the chromosome, differs from that of SA-1199 and SA-1199B. PMID:8592996

  5. Human multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium bovis infection in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Chacon, Carlos A; Martínez-Guarneros, Armando; Couvin, David; González-Y-Merchand, Jorge A; Rivera-Gutierrez, Sandra; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro; De-la-Cruz López, Juan J; Gomez-Bustamante, Adriana; Gonzalez-Macal, Gabriela A; Gonçalves Rossi, Livia Maria; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel; Rastogi, Nalin; Vaughan, Gilberto

    2015-12-01

    Here, we describe the molecular characterization of six human Mycobacterium bovis clinical isolates, including three multidrug resistant (MDR) strains, collected in Mexico through the National Survey on Tuberculosis Drug Resistance (ENTB-2008), a nationally representative survey conducted during 2008-2009 in nine states with a stratified cluster sampling design. The genetic background of bovine M. bovis strains identified in three different states of Mexico was studied in parallel to assess molecular relatedness of bovine and human strains. Additionally, resistance to first and second line anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs and molecular identification of mutations conferring drug resistance was also performed. All strains were characterized by spoligotyping and 24-loci MIRU-VNTRs, and analyzed using the SITVIT2 (n = 112,000 strains) and SITVITBovis (n = 25,000 strains) proprietary databases of Institut Pasteur de la Guadeloupe. Furthermore, data from this study (n = 55 isolates), were also compared with genotypes recorded for M. bovis from USA (n = 203), Argentina (n = 726), as well as other isolates from Mexico (independent from the present study; n = 147), to determine any evidence for genetic relatedness between circulating M. bovis strains. The results showed that all human M. bovis cases were not genetically related between them or to any bovine strain. Interestingly, a high degree of genetic variability was observed among bovine strains. Several autochthonous and presumably imported strains were identified. The emergence of drug-resistant M. bovis is an important public health problem that jeopardizes the success of TB control programs in the region.

  6. Effective Targeted Photothermal Ablation of Multidrug Resistant Bacteria and Their Biofilms with NIR-Absorbing Gold Nanocrosses.

    PubMed

    Teng, Choon Peng; Zhou, Tielin; Ye, Enyi; Liu, Shuhua; Koh, Leng Duei; Low, Michelle; Loh, Xian Jun; Win, Khin Yin; Zhang, Lianhui; Han, Ming-Yong

    2016-08-01

    With the rapid evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria, antibiotic-resistant bacteria (in particular, multidrug-resistant bacteria) and their biofilms have been becoming more and more difficult to be effectively treated with conventional antibiotics. As such, there is a great demand to develop a nonantibiotic approach in efficiently eliminating such bacteria. Here, multibranched gold nanocrosses with strong near-infrared absorption falling in the biological window, which heat up quickly under near-infrared-light irradiation are presented. The gold nanocrosses are conjugated to secondary and primary antibodies for targeting PcrV, a type III secretion protein, which is uniquely expressed on the bacteria superbug, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The conjugated gold nanocrosses are capable of completely destroying P. aeruginosa and its biofilms upon near-infrared-light irradiation for 5 min with an 800 nm laser at a low power density of ≈3.0 W cm(-2) . No bacterial activity is detected after 48 h postirradiation, which indicates that the heat generated from the irradiated plasmonic gold nanocrosses attached to bacteria is effective in eliminating and preventing the re-growth of the bacteria. Overall, the conjugated gold nanocrosses allow targeted and effective photothermal ablation of multidrug-resistant bacteria and their biofilms in the localized region with reduced nonspecific damage to normal tissue.

  7. Liposomal nanoformulations of rhodamine for targeted photodynamic inactivation of multidrug resistant gram negative bacteria in sewage treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Vimaladevi, Mohan; Divya, Kurunchi Chellapathi; Girigoswami, Agnishwar

    2016-09-01

    The antimicrobial photodynamic therapy is an alternative method for killing bacterial cells in view of the rising problem of antibiotic resistance microorganisms. The present study examined the effect of a water soluble photosensitizer, Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in stealth liposomes on multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of visible light. Liposomes were prepared with cholesterol and phospholipids that extracted from hen eggs in a cost effective way and characterized by light microscopy, particle size analyzer, electron microscopy, steady state spectrophotometry and spectrofluorometry. The photoefficacies of R6G in polymer encapsulated liposomes and positively charged liposomes are much higher compared to the free R6G (R6G in water) in terms of singlet oxygen quantum yield. This high potential of producing more reactive oxygen species (ROS) by liposomal nanoformulated R6G leads to efficient photodynamic inactivation of multidrug resistant gram negative bacteria in waste water. Though the singlet oxygen quantum yield of polymer coated liposomal R6G was higher than the cationic liposomal formulation, a faster decrease in bacterial survival was observed for positively charged liposomal R6G treated bacteria due to electrostatic charge interactions. Therefore, it can be concluded that the positively charged liposomal nanoformulations of laser dyes are efficient for photodynamic inactivation of multiple drug resistant gram negative microorganisms.

  8. Dihydropyridines and multidrug resistance: previous attempts, present state, and future trends.

    PubMed

    Zarrin, Abdolhossein; Mehdipour, Ahmad R; Miri, Ramin

    2010-11-01

    Multidrug resistance is defined as the resistance of a tumor cell to the cytotoxic action of divergent drugs used in chemotherapy. Dihydropyridines are a class of calcium channel antagonists that were discovered to have a multidrug resistance reversing effect and prompted investigations resulting in the synthesis of hundreds of new derivatives. Most of the investigators tried to achieve two goals: a decrease in Ca²(+) channel-blocking activity and an increase in the multidrug resistance reversing effect. Most of the synthesized compounds failed in the later stages of studies especially in clinical trials because of pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic limitations. Therefore, it will be necessary to include new methods, such as combinatorial synthesis, and, more importantly, to apply computational methods based on global structure-activity relationship models that consider all problems. Moreover, some compounds should be synthesized that are effective on several multidrug resistance targets.

  9. Molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiang-hua; Song, Xiu-yu; Ma, Xiao-bo; Zhang, Shi-yang; Zhang, Jia-qin

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of healthcare-associated infections worldwide. Selective pressure, the extensive use of antibiotics, and the conjugational transmission of antibiotic resistance genes across bacterial species and genera facilitate the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) K. pneumoniae. Here, we examined the occurrence, phenotypes and genetic features of MDR K. pneumoniae isolated from patients in intensive care units (ICUs) at the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University in Xiamen, China, from January to December 2011. Thirty-eight MDR K. pneumoniae strains were collected. These MDR K. pneumoniae isolates possessed at least seven antibiotic resistance determinants, which contribute to the high-level resistance of these bacteria to aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones and β-lactams. Among these isolates, 24 strains were extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producers, 2 strains were AmpC producers, and 12 strains were both ESBL and AmpC producers. The 38 MDR isolates also contained class I (28/38) and class II integrons (10/38). All 28 class I-positive isolates contained aacC1, aacC4, orfX, orfX' and aadA1 genes. β-lactam resistance was conferred through bla SHV (22/38), bla TEM (10/38), and bla CTX-M (7/38). The highly conserved bla KPC-2 (37/38) and bla OXA-23(1/38) alleles were responsible for carbapenem resistance, and a gyrAsite mutation (27/38) and the plasmid-mediated qnrB gene (13/38) were responsible for quinolone resistance. Repetitive-sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR) fingerprinting of these MDR strains revealed the presence of five groups and sixteen patterns. The MDR strains from unrelated groups showed different drug resistance patterns; however, some homologous strains also showed different drug resistance profiles. Therefore, REP-PCR-based analyses can provide information to evaluate the epidemic status of nosocomial infection caused by MDR K. pneumoniae; however, this test lacks the power to discriminate some

  10. Antimicrobial resistance determinant microarray for analysis of multi-drug resistant isolates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taitt, Chris Rowe; Leski, Tomasz; Stenger, David; Vora, Gary J.; House, Brent; Nicklasson, Matilda; Pimentel, Guillermo; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Craft, David; Waterman, Paige E.; Lesho, Emil P.; Bangurae, Umaru; Ansumana, Rashid

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections in personnel wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan has made it challenging for physicians to choose effective therapeutics in a timely fashion. To address the challenge of identifying the potential for drug resistance, we have developed the Antimicrobial Resistance Determinant Microarray (ARDM) to provide DNAbased analysis for over 250 resistance genes covering 12 classes of antibiotics. Over 70 drug-resistant bacteria from different geographic regions have been analyzed on ARDM, with significant differences in patterns of resistance identified: genes for resistance to sulfonamides, trimethoprim, chloramphenicol, rifampin, and macrolide-lincosamidesulfonamide drugs were more frequently identified in isolates from sources in Iraq/Afghanistan. Of particular concern was the presence of genes responsible for resistance to many of the last-resort antibiotics used to treat war traumaassociated infections.

  11. Inhibitory effect of steroidal alkaloids on drug transport and multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Y; Harel-Orbital, T; Gaffield, W; Liscovitch, M

    2001-01-01

    Intrinsic or acquired resistance of tumor cells to multiple cytotoxic drugs (multidrug resistance MDR) is a major cause of failure of cancer chemotherapy. MDR is often caused by elevated expression of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or multidrug resistance protein (MRP). A number of compounds, termed chemosensitizers, have little or no cytotoxic action of their own, but inhibit (P-gp) or MRP-mediated drug export and are capable of sensitizing MDR cells to the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. Here we examined the ability of steroidal alkaloids of plant origin, namely the Veratrum sp. alkaloid cyclopamine and the Lycopersicon sp. alkaloid tomatidine, to act as potent and effective chemosensitizers in multidrug resistant tumor cells. Drug uptake was determined by measuring accumulation of tetramethylrosamine in multidrug resistant NCI AdrR human adenocarcinoma cells. Resistance to adriamycin and vinblastine was determined by utilizing the MTT cell survival assay. Cyclopamine and tomatidine elevate tetramethylrosamine uptake by NCI AdrR cells and sensitize the cells to the cytotoxic action of adriamycin and vinblastine. In both cases these agents are comparable in patency and efficacy to verapamil, a reversal agent commonly used in MDR research. It is concluded that steroidal alkaloids of plant origin act as inhibitors of P-gp-mediated drug transport and multidrug resistance and therefore may serve as chemosensitizers in combination chemotherapy with conventional cytotoxic drugs for treating multidrug resistant cancer.

  12. What's new in multidrug-resistant pathogens in the ICU?

    PubMed

    Zilahi, Gabor; Artigas, Antonio; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio

    2016-12-01

    Over the last several decades, antibacterial drug use has become widespread with their misuse being an ever-increasing phenomenon. Consequently, antibacterial drugs have become less effective or even ineffective, resulting in a global health security emergency. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) varies widely among regions and countries. The primary aim of antibiotic stewardship programs is to supervise the three most influential factors contributing to the development and transmission of MDROs, namely: (1) appropriate antibiotic prescribing; (2) early detection and prevention of cross-colonization of MDROs; and (3) elimination of reservoirs. In the future, it is expected that a number of countries will experience a rise in MDROs. These infections will be associated with a high consumption of healthcare resources manifested by a prolonged hospital stay and high mortality. As a counteractive strategy, minimization of broad-spectrum antibiotic use and prompt antibiotic administration will aid in reduction of antibiotic resistance. Innovative management approaches include development and implementation of rapid diagnostic tests that will help in both shortening the duration of therapy and allowing early targeted therapy. The institution of more accessible therapeutic drug monitoring will help to optimize drug administration and support a patient-specific approach. Areas where further research is required are investigation into the heterogeneity of critically ill patients and the need for new antibacterial drug development.

  13. Inorganic Nanocarriers Overcoming Multidrug Resistance for Cancer Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gan; Mi, Peng; Chu, Chengchao; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer multidrug resistance (MDR) could lead to therapeutic failure of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and has become one of the main obstacles to successful cancer treatment. Some advanced drug delivery platforms, such as inorganic nanocarriers, demonstrate a high potential for cancer theranostic to overcome the cancer‐specific limitation of conventional low‐molecular‐weight anticancer agents and imaging probes. Specifically, it could achieve synergetic therapeutic effects, demonstrating stronger killing effects to MDR cancer cells by combining the inorganic nanocarriers with other treatment manners, such as RNA interference and thermal therapy. Moreover, the inorganic nanocarriers could provide imaging functions to help monitor treatment responses, e.g., drug resistance and therapeutic effects, as well as analyze the mechanism of MDR by molecular imaging modalities. In this review, the mechanisms involved in cancer MDR and recent advances of applying inorganic nanocarriers for MDR cancer imaging and therapy are summarized. The inorganic nanocarriers may circumvent cancer MDR for effective therapy and provide a way to track the therapeutic processes for real‐time molecular imaging, demonstrating high performance in studying the interaction of nanocarriers and MDR cancer cells/tissues in laboratory study and further shedding light on elaborate design of nanocarriers that could overcome MDR for clinical translation. PMID:27980988

  14. Common errors in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis management.

    PubMed

    Monedero, Ignacio; Caminero, Jose A

    2014-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), defined as being resistant to at least rifampicin and isoniazid, has an increasing burden and threatens TB control. Diagnosis is limited and usually delayed while treatment is long lasting, toxic and poorly effective. MDR-TB management in scarce-resource settings is demanding however it is feasible and extremely necessary. In these settings, cure rates do not usually exceed 60-70% and MDR-TB management is novel for many TB programs. In this challenging scenario, both clinical and programmatic errors are likely to occur. The majority of these errors may be prevented or alleviated with appropriate and timely training in addition to uninterrupted procurement of high-quality drugs, updated national guidelines and laws and an overall improvement in management capacities. While new tools for diagnosis and shorter and less toxic treatment are not available in developing countries, MDR-TB management will remain complex in scarce resource settings. Focusing special attention on the common errors in diagnosis, regimen design and especially treatment delivery may benefit patients and programs with current outdated tools. The present article is a compilation of typical errors repeatedly observed by the authors in a wide range of countries during technical assistant missions and trainings.

  15. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: epidemiology and risk factors].

    PubMed

    Smaoui Fourati, S; Mzid, H; Marouane, C; Kammoun, S; Messadi-Akrout, F

    2015-08-01

    Despite the availability of potent drugs and the availability of vaccine, tuberculosis remains until today one of the most worrying infectious diseases because of both its morbidity and mortality. This serious health problem is further complicated by the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) or extensively drug-resistant strains (XDR). The number of MDR and XDR strains has continued to increase in recent years. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the risk factors leading to the emergence of MDR-TB strains to improve its overall management. Most studies indicate that the irregular previous treatment of tuberculosis with poor adherence is the main risk factor found. Other risk factors such as digestive issues, age, sex, and immunosuppression have been reported by several studies. In Tunisia, MDR-TB prevalence remains low with 0.8% among new cases and 12% among the restatements but control of this disease is necessary and remains essentially preventive. It is based on real preventive strategies planned according to local and updated regional data.

  16. Multidrug resistance after inappropriate tuberculosis treatment: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    van der Werf, Marieke J.; Langendam, Miranda W.; Huitric, Emma; Manissero, Davide

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the evidence for the postulation that inappropriate tuberculosis (TB) regimens are a risk for development of multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB. MEDLINE, EMBASE and other databases were searched for relevant articles in January 2011. Cohort studies including TB patients who received treatment were selected and data on treatment regimen, drug susceptibility testing results and genotyping results before treatment and at failure or relapse were abstracted from the articles. Four studies were included in the systematic review and two were included in the meta-analysis. In these two studies the risk of developing MDR-TB in patients who failed treatment and used an inappropriate treatment regimen was increased 27-fold (RR 26.7, 95% CI 5.0–141.7) when compared with individuals who received an appropriate treatment regimen. This review provides evidence that supports the general opinion that the development of MDR-TB can be caused by inadequate treatment, given the drug susceptibility pattern of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli. It should be noted that only two studies provided data for the meta-analysis. The information can be used to advocate for adequate treatment for patients based on drug resistance profiles. PMID:22005918

  17. Effects of mefloquine use on Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Khim, Nimol; Andrianaranjaka, Voahangy; Popovici, Jean; Kim, Saorin; Ratsimbasoa, Arsene; Benedet, Christophe; Barnadas, Celine; Durand, Remy; Thellier, Marc; Legrand, Eric; Musset, Lise; Menegon, Michela; Severini, Carlo; Nour, Bakri Y M; Tichit, Magali; Bouchier, Christiane; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2014-10-01

    Numerous studies have indicated a strong association between amplification of the multidrug resistance-1 gene and in vivo and in vitro mefloquine resistance of Plasmodium falciparum. Although falciparum infection usually is not treated with mefloquine, incorrect diagnosis, high frequency of undetected mixed infections, or relapses of P. vivax infection triggered by P. falciparum infections expose non-P. falciparum parasites to mefloquine. To assess the consequences of such unintentional treatments on P. vivax, we studied variations in number of Pvmdr-1 (PlasmoDB accession no. PVX_080100, NCBI reference sequence NC_009915.1) copies worldwide in 607 samples collected in areas with different histories of mefloquine use from residents and from travelers returning to France. Number of Pvmdr-1 copies correlated with drug use history. Treatment against P. falciparum exerts substantial collateral pressure against sympatric P. vivax, jeopardizing future use of mefloquine against P. vivax. A drug policy is needed that takes into consideration all co-endemic species of malaria parasites.

  18. Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance-1 gene polymorphism in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Faway, Emilie; Musset, Lise; Pelleau, Stéphane; Volney, Béatrice; Casteras, Jessica; Caro, Valérie; Menard, Didier; Briolant, Sébastien; Legrand, Eric

    2016-11-08

    Plasmodium vivax malaria is a major public health problem in French Guiana. Some cases of resistance to chloroquine, the first-line treatment used against P. vivax malaria, have been described in the Brazilian Amazon region. The aim of this study is to investigate a possible dispersion of chloroquine-resistant P. vivax isolates in French Guiana. The genotype, polymorphism and copy number variation, of the P. vivax multidrug resistance gene-1 (pvmdr1) have been previously associated with modification of the susceptibility to chloroquine. The pvmdr1 gene polymorphism was evaluated by sequencing and copy number variation was assessed by real-time PCR, in P. vivax isolates obtained from 591 symptomatic patients from 1997 to 2013. The results reveal that 1.0% [95% CI 0.4-2.2] of French Guiana isolates carry the mutations Y976F and F1076L, and that the proportion of isolates with multiple copies of pvmdr1 has significantly decreased over time, from 71.3% (OR = 6.2 [95% CI 62.9-78.7], p < 0.0001) in 1997-2004 to 12.8% (OR = 0.03 [95% CI 9.4-16.9], p < 0.0001) in 2009-2013. A statistically significant relationship was found between Guf-A (harboring the single mutation T958M) and Sal-1 (wild type) alleles and pvmdr1 copy number. Few P. vivax isolates harboring chloroquine-resistant mutations in the pvmdr1 gene are circulating in French Guiana. However, the decrease in the prevalence of isolates carrying multiple copies of pvmdr1 might indicate that the P. vivax population in French Guiana is evolving towards a decreased susceptibility to chloroquine.

  19. Multidrug resistance in fungi: regulation of transporter-encoding gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sanjoy; Moye-Rowley, W. Scott

    2014-01-01

    A critical risk to the continued success of antifungal chemotherapy is the acquisition of resistance; a risk exacerbated by the few classes of effective antifungal drugs. Predictably, as the use of these drugs increases in the clinic, more resistant organisms can be isolated from patients. A particularly problematic form of drug resistance that routinely emerges in the major fungal pathogens is known as multidrug resistance. Multidrug resistance refers to the simultaneous acquisition of tolerance to a range of drugs via a limited or even single genetic change. This review will focus on recent progress in understanding pathways of multidrug resistance in fungi including those of most medical relevance. Analyses of multidrug resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided the most detailed outline of multidrug resistance in a eukaryotic microorganism. Multidrug resistant isolates of S. cerevisiae typically result from changes in the activity of a pair of related transcription factors that in turn elicit overproduction of several target genes. Chief among these is the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-encoding gene PDR5. Interestingly, in the medically important Candida species, very similar pathways are involved in acquisition of multidrug resistance. In both C. albicans and C. glabrata, changes in the activity of transcriptional activator proteins elicits overproduction of a protein closely related to S. cerevisiae Pdr5 called Cdr1. The major filamentous fungal pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, was previously thought to acquire resistance to azole compounds (the principal antifungal drug class) via alterations in the azole drug target-encoding gene cyp51A. More recent data indicate that pathways in addition to changes in the cyp51A gene are important determinants in A. fumigatus azole resistance. We will discuss findings that suggest azole resistance in A. fumigatus and Candida species may share more mechanistic similarities than previously thought. PMID:24795641

  20. Kitchen phytochemicals from Allium cepa - their role in multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gunpreet; Gupta, Vikas; Christopher, Ajay Francis; Bansal, Renu; Bansal, Parveen

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is increasingly becoming a concern to public health. Current antibiotics have failed to bring desirable results to many bacterial infections due to multi-resistant strains. So, concerted efforts are being made to curve this with the help of dietary phytohemicals. A number of dietary phytochemical are being put to trials for antimicrobial activity; however it is worthwhile to search such a part of diet that is very frequently used by major population. Keeping this view in mind an effort has been made to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of most common vegetable component Allium cepa. Methanolic and aqueous extracts were prepared from Allium cepa and antibacterial activity was tested on four pathogenic bacteria (Gram-positive and Gram negative) Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus Subtilis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using Disc diffusion method and Minimum inhibitory concentration by the Microtitre well plate method. Conventional antibiotic discs of Tetracycline and Gentamycin were used as positive control. Among the two extracts, methanolic extract exhibited a significant antimicrobial activity on the test organisms Ps. aeruginosa (17.5mm) and B. subtilis (11.3mm). The minimum inhibitory concentration value for Ps. aeruginosa was 500μl and for B. subtilis was 250μl for methanolic extract. The growth of other two bacteria i.e. E. coli and S. aureus were not inhibited by methanolic as well as aqueous extract that indicates non susceptibility to aqueous and methanol extract of Allium cepa. From the study, it was concluded that the commonly used Allium cepa possess potent antibacterial property against Bacillus Subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  1. S9788 modulation of P-glycoprotein- and Multidrug-related protein-mediated multidrug resistance by Servier 9788 in doxorubicin-resistant MCF7 cells.

    PubMed

    Bichat, F; Solis-Recendez, G; Poullain, M G; Poupon, M F; Khayat, D; Bastian, G

    1998-08-15

    Inherent or acquired resistance to multiple natural drugs, termed multidrug resistance (MDR), represents a major obstacle to chemotherapy. Expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in MCF7mdr and MCF7R resistant cells was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. MCF7R, but not the MDR1 gene-transfected MCF7mdr cells, expressed multidrug-related protein (MRP) concomitantly. Efficacy of an MDR modulator, designated as Servier 9788 (S9788), was estimated by doxorubicin (Dox) sensitization, Dox incorporation, and functional rhodamine 123 assay on MCF7 cell lines. Results showed that S9788 modulates the P-gp-associated MDR of MCF7mdr cells as well as the Multidrug-related protein-associated MDR of MCF7R cells.

  2. Role of uL3 in Multidrug Resistance in p53-Mutated Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Annapina; Saide, Assunta; Smaldone, Silvia; Faraonio, Raffaella; Russo, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most common causes of death among adults. Chemotherapy is crucial in determining patient survival and quality of life. However, the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) continues to pose a significant challenge in the management of cancer. In this study, we analyzed the role of human ribosomal protein uL3 (formerly rpL3) in multidrug resistance. Our studies revealed that uL3 is a key determinant of multidrug resistance in p53-mutated lung cancer cells by controlling the cell redox status. We established and characterized a multidrug resistant Calu-6 cell line. We found that uL3 down-regulation correlates positively with multidrug resistance. Restoration of the uL3 protein level re-sensitized the resistant cells to the drug by regulating the reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, glutathione content, glutamate release, and cystine uptake. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and luciferase assays demonstrated that uL3 coordinated the expression of stress-response genes acting as transcriptional repressors of solute carrier family 7 member 11 (xCT) and glutathione S-transferase α1 (GST-α1), independently of Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Altogether our results describe a new function of uL3 as a regulator of oxidative stress response genes and advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying multidrug resistance in cancers. PMID:28273808

  3. Efflux pump gene hefA of Helicobacter pylori plays an important role in multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether efflux systems contribute to multidrug resistance of H pylori. METHODS: A chloramphenicol-induced multidrug resistance model of six susceptible H pylori strains (5 isolates and H pylori NCTC11637) was developed. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains were selected and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of erythromycin, metronidazole, penicillin G, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin in multidrug resistant strains and their parent strains was determined by agar dilution tests. The level of mRNA expression of hefA was assessed by fluorescence real-time quantitative PCR. A H pylori LZ1026 knockout mutant (ΔH pylori LZ1026) for (putative) efflux protein was constructed by inserting the kanamycin resistance cassette from pEGFP-N2 into hefA, and its susceptibility profiles to 10 antibiotics were evaluated. RESULTS: The MIC of six multidrug-resistant strains (including 5 clinical isolates and H pylori NCTC11637) increased significantly (≥ 4-fold) compared with their parent strains. The expression level of hefA gene was significantly higher in the MDR strains than in their parent strains (P = 0.033). A H pylori LZ1026 mutant was successfully constructed and the ΔH pylori LZ1026 was more susceptible to four of the 10 antibiotics. All the 20 strains displayed transcripts for hefA that confirmed the in vitro expression of these genes. CONCLUSION: The efflux pump gene hefA plays an important role in multidrug resistance of H pylori. PMID:18777600

  4. Ontogeny, aging, and gender-related changes in hepatic multidrug resistant protein genes in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiong-Ni; Hou, Wei-Yu; Xu, Shang-Fu; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Liu, Jie

    2017-02-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins (Mrps) are efflux transporters playing important roles in endogenous substances and xenobiotics transport out of the liver. Children, elderly, gender and physio-pathological conditions could influence their expression and result in changes in drug disposition.

  5. Sinomenine reverses multidrug resistance in bladder cancer cells via P-glycoprotein-dependent and independent manners.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yule; Zhang, Linlin; Lu, Xinlan; Wu, Kaijie; Zeng, Jin; Gao, Yang; Shi, Qi; Wang, Xinyang; Chang, Luke S; He, Dalin

    2014-01-01

    P-Glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance is a frequent event during chemotherapy and a key obstacle for bladder cancer therapy. Search for strategies to reverse multidrug resistance is a promising approach to improve the management of bladder cancer. In the present study, we reported a novel P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistant cell model 253J/DOX, which was generated from human bladder cancer 253J cell line. Furthermore, we found that the multidrug resistant phenotype of 253J/DOX cells could be overcome by sinomenine, an alkaloid derived from the stem of Sinomenium acutum. Mechanistically, the chemosensitive effect by sinomenine was mediated by down-regulating P-glycoprotein expression, as well as triggering apoptotic pathways. The chemosensitive effect of sinomenine may make it a prime candidate agent to target bladder cancer.

  6. Audiological Evaluation of Patients Taking Kanamycin for Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Bhagat, Sanjeev; Verma, Bhimsain; Singh, Ravinder; Singh, Surinderpal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of multidrug resistant tuberculosis is increasing in developing countries. Aminoglycosides are an integral part of second-line drugs, however ototoxicity is a major limitation for their use. This study aims to determine the extent of hearing loss in patients taking one of the commonly prescribed drugs for Multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), Kanamycin, at a Government Medical College, Patiala, Punjab, India, which is a 1200 bed tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 patients (68 males and 32 females) with confirmed diagnosis of MDR-TB were included in this study conducted between January 2012 and February 2014. Subjects were between 15 to 60 years of age, with a mean age of 37.46 ± 10.1. Pure tone audiometry (PTA) was performed before the start of the therapy, as a baseline, and was repeated after 1 week and 6 weeks of Kanamycin use to assess hearing loss as an effect of therapy. Results: Of the 100 patients examined, ototoxicity was found in 18 subjects post therapy. Incidence of high frequency hearing loss was 2% at week 1, and 12% after 6 weeks of follow up. However, 4% of the cases developed flat loss at week 6. The hearing loss was bilateral in 13 patients and unilateral in 5 patients. Ototoxicity was more common in males (66.67%) compared to females (33.3%). Maximum cases were found in the age group of 36 to 45 years (36.8%), the majority being from a rural background (83.3%). The association with socioeconomic status (P=0.024) and co-morbid conditions like diabetes and hypertension (P=0.001) reached statistical significance. Conclusion: Lack of specific guidelines to monitor patients taking aminoglycosides makes ototoxicity a major adverse effect of their use in MDR-TB. More studies are mandated to study the risk factors associated with the development of ototoxicity and for the development of alternate drugs for the treatment of MDR-TB. PMID:27429949

  7. Outcomes of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis among Binational Cases in El Paso, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Gustavo; Acuna-Villaorduna, Carlos; Escobedo, Miguel; Vlasich, Esteban; Rivera, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is more commonly seen among foreign-born patients. We report outcomes for 46 patients with MDR-TB who were born in Mexico and treated along the United States–Mexico border. According to our definition, 30 were cured, 3 showed treatment failure, 3 died, and 10 abandoned treatment. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis can be successfully treated on an ambulatory basis. PMID:21036837

  8. In vitro activities of a novel nanoemulsion against Burkholderia and other multidrug-resistant cystic fibrosis-associated bacterial species.

    PubMed

    LiPuma, John J; Rathinavelu, Sivaprakash; Foster, Bridget K; Keoleian, Jordan C; Makidon, Paul E; Kalikin, Linda M; Baker, James R

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory tract infection, most often involving opportunistic bacterial species with broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance, is the primary cause of death in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). Species within the Burkholderia cepacia complex are especially problematic in this patient population. We investigated a novel surfactant-stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsion (NB-401) for activity against 150 bacterial isolates recovered primarily from CF respiratory tract specimens. These specimens included 75 Burkholderia isolates and 75 isolates belonging to other CF-relevant species including Pseudomonas, Achromobacter, Pandoraea, Ralstonia, Stenotrophomonas, and Acinetobacter. Nearly one-third of the isolates were multidrug resistant, and 20 (13%) were panresistant based on standard antibiotic testing. All isolates belonging to the same species were genotyped to ensure that each isolate was a distinct strain. The MIC(90) of NB-401 was 125 microg/ml. We found no decrease in activity against multidrug-resistant or panresistant strains. MBC testing showed no evidence of tolerance to NB-401. We investigated the activity of NB-401 against a subset of strains grown as a biofilm and against planktonic strains in the presence of CF sputum. Although the activity of NB-401 was decreased under both conditions, the nanoemulsion remained bactericidal for all strains tested. These results support NB-401's potential role as a novel antimicrobial agent for the treatment of infection due to CF-related opportunistic pathogens.

  9. Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L X

    1996-01-01

    During the past decade the number and gravity of tuberculosis (TB) cases has continued to increase, both in developing and industrialized nations. Coupled with the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), the possibility that untreatable forms of the disease may become widespread has arisen. In China, the prevalence rate of smear-positive cases from three national surveys in 1979, 1984-1985 and 1990 was 187, 156 and 134/100,000, respectively, thus giving an annual average reduction rate of only 3.0%. This may be due to the accumulation of chronic cases, which is not surprising given that as many as 84.3% of new smear-positive cases received non-organized chemotherapy. To counteract this situation, a strategy was developed in Beijing to practice fully supervised chemotherapy for all new smear-positive cases. This is now 90% with a cure rate also of 90%. As a result, the prevalence rate of smear-positive cases has dropped, with an average annual reduction of 17%. Building upon this success, the World Bank Loan TB Control Project in China has been carried out in 12 provinces with 550 million people since 1992. The main objective of this project is to provide fully supervised, 6-month short-course chemotherapy for all newly detected smear-positive cases. The cure rate based on cohort analysis was 88% in 1993. Complete data are not available on resistance although the initial and acquired resistance rates were 28.1 and 41.1%, respectively. MDR-TB treated with ofloxacin has been increasing since 1992, with 317 cases reported during the period 1992-1995, of which 77% showed sputum conversion.

  10. Bloodstream infections caused by multi-drug resistant Proteus mirabilis: Epidemiology, risk factors and impact of multi-drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Korytny, Alexander; Riesenberg, Klaris; Saidel-Odes, Lisa; Schlaeffer, Fransisc; Borer, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of antimicrobial co-resistance among ESBL-producing Enterobactereaceae is extremely high in Israel. Multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strains (MDR-PM), resistant to almost all antibiotic classes have been described. The aim was to determine the risk factors for bloodstream infections caused by MDR-PM and clinical outcomes. A retrospective case-control study. Adult patients with PM bacteremia during 7 years were identified retrospectively and their files reviewed for demographics, underlying diseases, Charlson Comorbidity Index, treatment and outcome. One hundred and eighty patients with PM-bloodstream infection (BSI) were included; 90 cases with MDR-PM and 90 controls with sensitive PM (S-PM). Compared to controls, cases more frequently were from nursing homes, had recurrent hospital admissions in the past year and received antibiotic therapy in the previous 3 months, were bedridden and suffered from peripheral vascular disease and peptic ulcer disease (p < 0.001). Two-thirds of the MDR-PM isolates were ESBL-producers vs 4.4% of S-PM isolates (p < 0.001, OR = 47.6, 95% CI = 15.9-142.6). In-hospital crude mortality rate of patients with MDR-PM BSI was 37.7% vs 23.3% in those with S-PM BSI (p = 0.0359, OR = 2, 95% CI = 1.4-3.81). PM bacteremia in elderly and functionally-dependent patients is likely to be caused by nearly pan-resistant PM strains in the institution; 51.8% of the patients received inappropriate empiric antibiotic treatment. The crude mortality rate of patients with MDR-PM BSI was significantly higher than that of patients with S-PM BSI.

  11. Quantitative Contributions of Target Alteration and Decreased Drug Accumulation to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fluoroquinolone Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bruchmann, Sebastian; Dötsch, Andreas; Nouri, Bianka; Chaberny, Iris F.

    2013-01-01

    Quinolone antibiotics constitute a clinically successful and widely used class of broad-spectrum antibiotics; however, the emergence and spread of resistance increasingly limits the use of fluoroquinolones in the treatment and management of microbial disease. In this study, we evaluated the quantitative contributions of quinolone target alteration and efflux pump expression to fluoroquinolone resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We generated isogenic mutations in hot spots of the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of gyrA, gyrB, and parC and inactivated the efflux regulator genes so as to overexpress the corresponding multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps. We then introduced the respective mutations into the reference strain PA14 singly and in various combinations. Whereas the combined inactivation of two efflux regulator-encoding genes did not lead to resistance levels higher than those obtained by inactivation of only one efflux regulator-encoding gene, the combination of mutations leading to increased efflux and target alteration clearly exhibited an additive effect. This combination of target alteration and overexpression of efflux pumps was commonly observed in clinical P. aeruginosa isolates; however, these two mechanisms were frequently found not to be sufficient to explain the level of fluoroquinolone resistance. Our results suggest that there are additional mechanisms, independent of the expression of the MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN, and/or MexXY-OprM efflux pump, that increase ciprofloxacin resistance in isolates with mutations in the QRDRs. PMID:23274661

  12. Multidrug-Resistant Organism Infections in Patients with Left Ventricular Assist Devices.

    PubMed

    Donahey, Elisabeth E; Polly, Derek M; Vega, J David; Lyon, Marshall; Butler, Javed; Nguyen, Duc; Pekarek, Ann; Wittersheim, Kristin; Kilgo, Patrick; Paciullo, Christopher A

    2015-12-01

    Left ventricular assist devices improve survival prospects in patients with end-stage heart failure; however, infection complicates up to 59% of implantation cases. How many of these infections are caused by multidrug-resistant organisms is unknown. We sought to identify the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of multidrug-resistant organism infection in patients who have left ventricular assist devices. We retrospectively evaluated the incidence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the independent risk factors associated with them in 57 patients who had permanent left ventricular assist devices implanted at our institution from May 2007 through October 2011. Outcomes included death, transplantation, device explantation, number of subsequent hospital admissions, and number of subsequent admissions related to infection. Infections were categorized in accordance with criteria from the Infectious Diseases Council of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Multidrug-resistant organism infections developed in 18 of 57 patients (31.6%)-a high incidence. We found 3 independent risk factors: therapeutic goal (destination therapy vs bridging), P=0.01; body mass index, P=0.04; and exposed velour at driveline exit sites, P=0.004. We found no significant differences in mortality, transplantation, or device explantation rates; however, there was a statistically significant increase in postimplantation hospital admissions in patients with multidrug-resistant organism infection. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the medical literature concerning multidrug-resistant organism infection in patients who have permanent left ventricular assist devices.

  13. The MerR-Like Regulator BrlR Confers Biofilm Tolerance by Activating Multidrug Efflux Pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Julie; Schurr, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    A defining characteristic of biofilms is antibiotic tolerance that can be up to 1,000-fold greater than that of planktonic cells. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, biofilm tolerance to antimicrobial agents requires the biofilm-specific MerR-type transcriptional regulator BrlR. However, the mechanism by which BrlR mediates biofilm tolerance has not been elucidated. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling indicated that brlR was required for maximal expression of genes associated with antibiotic resistance, in particular those encoding the multidrug efflux pumps MexAB-OprM and MexEF-OprN. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed a direct regulation of these genes by BrlR, with DNA binding assays confirming BrlR binding to the promoter regions of the mexAB-oprM and mexEF-oprN operons. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis further indicated BrlR to be an activator of mexAB-oprM and mexEF-oprN gene expression. Moreover, immunoblot analysis confirmed increased MexA abundance in cells overexpressing brlR. Inactivation of both efflux pumps rendered biofilms significantly more susceptible to five different classes of antibiotics by affecting MIC but not the recalcitrance of biofilms to killing by bactericidal agents. Overexpression of either efflux pump in a ΔbrlR strain partly restored tolerance of ΔbrlR biofilms to antibiotics. Expression of brlR in mutant biofilms lacking both efflux pumps partly restored antimicrobial tolerance of biofilms to wild-type levels. Our results indicate that BrlR acts as an activator of multidrug efflux pumps to confer tolerance to P. aeruginosa biofilms and to resist the action of antimicrobial agents. PMID:23687276

  14. The MerR-like regulator BrlR confers biofilm tolerance by activating multidrug efflux pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Liao, Julie; Schurr, Michael J; Sauer, Karin

    2013-08-01

    A defining characteristic of biofilms is antibiotic tolerance that can be up to 1,000-fold greater than that of planktonic cells. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, biofilm tolerance to antimicrobial agents requires the biofilm-specific MerR-type transcriptional regulator BrlR. However, the mechanism by which BrlR mediates biofilm tolerance has not been elucidated. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling indicated that brlR was required for maximal expression of genes associated with antibiotic resistance, in particular those encoding the multidrug efflux pumps MexAB-OprM and MexEF-OprN. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed a direct regulation of these genes by BrlR, with DNA binding assays confirming BrlR binding to the promoter regions of the mexAB-oprM and mexEF-oprN operons. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis further indicated BrlR to be an activator of mexAB-oprM and mexEF-oprN gene expression. Moreover, immunoblot analysis confirmed increased MexA abundance in cells overexpressing brlR. Inactivation of both efflux pumps rendered biofilms significantly more susceptible to five different classes of antibiotics by affecting MIC but not the recalcitrance of biofilms to killing by bactericidal agents. Overexpression of either efflux pump in a ΔbrlR strain partly restored tolerance of ΔbrlR biofilms to antibiotics. Expression of brlR in mutant biofilms lacking both efflux pumps partly restored antimicrobial tolerance of biofilms to wild-type levels. Our results indicate that BrlR acts as an activator of multidrug efflux pumps to confer tolerance to P. aeruginosa biofilms and to resist the action of antimicrobial agents.

  15. Preliminary survey of local bacteriophages with lytic activity against multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Latz, Simone; Wahida, Adam; Arif, Assuda; Häfner, Helga; Hoß, Mareike; Ritter, Klaus; Horz, Hans-Peter

    2016-10-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) represent a potential alternative for combating multi-drug resistant bacteria. Because of their narrow host range and the ever emergence of novel pathogen variants the continued search for phages is a prerequisite for optimal treatment of bacterial infections. Here we performed an ad hoc survey in the surroundings of a University hospital for the presence of phages with therapeutic potential. To this end, 16 aquatic samples of different origins and locations were tested simultaneously for the presence of phages with lytic activity against five current, but distinct strains each from the ESKAPE-group (i.e., Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter cloacae). Phages could be isolated for 70% of strains, covering all bacterial species except S. aureus. Apart from samples from two lakes, freshwater samples were largely devoid of phages. By contrast, one liter of hospital effluent collected at a single time point already contained phages active against two-thirds of tested strains. In conclusion, phages with lytic activity against nosocomial pathogens are unevenly distributed across environments with the prime source being the immediate hospital vicinity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Viper metalloproteinase (Agkistrodon halys pallas) with antimicrobial activity against multi-drug resistant human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Samy, Ramar Perumal; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam; Chow, Vincent T K; Ho, Bow

    2008-07-01

    Metalloproteinases are abundant enzymes in crotalidae and viperidae snake venoms. Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) comprise a family of zinc-dependent enzymes, which display many different biological activities. A 23.1 kDa protein was isolated from Agkistrodon halys (pallas, Chinese viper) snake venom. The toxin is a single chain polypeptide with a molecular weight of 23146.61 and an N-terminal sequence (MIQVLLVTICLAVFPYQGSSIILES) relatively similar to that of other metalloprotein-like proteases isolated from the snake venoms of the Viperidae family. The antibacterial effect of Agkistrodon halys metalloproteinase (AHM) on Burkholderia pseudomallei (strains TES and KHW), Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Gram-negative bacteria) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacterium) was studied at a concentration 120 microM. Interestingly, we found that the metalloproteinase exhibited antibacterial properties and was more active against S. aureus, P. vulgaris, P. mirabilis and multi-drug resistant B. pseudomallei (strain KHW) bacteria. AHM variants with high bacteriostatic activity (MIC 1.875-60 microM) also tended to be less cytotoxic against U-937 human monocytic cells up to 1 mM concentrations. These results suggest that this metalloprotein exerts its antimicrobial effect by altering membrane packing and inhibiting mechanosensitive targets. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. A traceless reversible polymeric colistin prodrug to combat multidrug-resistant (MDR) gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chongyu; Schneider, Elena K; Wang, Jiping; Kempe, Kristian; Wilson, Paul; Velkov, Tony; Li, Jian; Davis, Thomas P; Whittaker, Michael R; Haddleton, David M

    2017-02-05

    Colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) is the only prodrug of colistin available for clinical use for the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria. Owing to its slow and variable release, an alternative is urgently required to improve effectiveness. Herein we describe a PEGylated colistin prodrug whereby the PEG is attached via a cleavable linker (col-aaPEG) introducing an acetic acid terminated poly (ethylene glycol) methyl ether (aaPEG) onto the Thr residue of colistin. Due to the labile ester containing link, this prodrug is converted back into active colistin in vitro within 24h. Compared to CMS, it showed a similar or better antimicrobial performance against two MDR isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii through in vitro disk diffusion, broth dilution and time-kill studies. In a mouse infection model, col-aaPEG displayed acceptable bacterial killing against P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and no nephrotoxicity was found after systemic administration, suggesting it to be a potential alternative for CMS.

  18. Exogenous l-Valine Promotes Phagocytosis to Kill Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin-hai; Liu, Shi-rao; Peng, Bo; Li, Dan; Cheng, Zhi-xue; Zhu, Jia-xin; Zhang, Song; Peng, Yu-ming; Li, Hui; Zhang, Tian-tuo; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria presents a severe threat to public health and causes extensive losses in livestock husbandry and aquaculture. Effective strategies to control such infections are in high demand. Enhancing host immunity is an ideal strategy with fewer side effects than antibiotics. To explore metabolite candidates, we applied a metabolomics approach to investigate the metabolic profiles of mice after Klebsiella pneumoniae infection. Compared with the mice that died from K. pneumoniae infection, mice that survived the infection displayed elevated levels of l-valine. Our analysis showed that l-valine increased macrophage phagocytosis, thereby reducing the load of pathogens; this effect was not only limited to K. pneumoniae but also included Escherichia coli clinical isolates in infected tissues. Two mechanisms are involved in this process: l-valine activating the PI3K/Akt1 pathway and promoting NO production through the inhibition of arginase activity. The NO precursor l-arginine is necessary for l-valine-stimulated macrophage phagocytosis. The valine-arginine combination therapy effectively killed K. pneumoniae and exerted similar effects in other Gram-negative (E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria. Our study extends the role of metabolism in innate immunity and develops the possibility of employing the metabolic modulator-mediated innate immunity as a therapy for bacterial infections. PMID:28321214

  19. Bactericidal activity of herbal volatile oil extracts against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Intorasoot, Amornrat; Chornchoem, Piyaorn; Sookkhee, Siriwoot; Intorasoot, Sorasak

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study is to investigate the antibacterial activity of 10 volatile oils extracted from medicinal plants, including galangal (Alpinia galanga Linn.), ginger (Zingiber officinale), plai (Zingiber cassumunar Roxb.), lime (Citrus aurantifolia), kaffir lime (Citrus hystrix DC.), sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum Linn.), tree basil (Ocimum gratissimum), lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus DC.), clove (Syzygium aromaticum), and cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum) against four standard strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and 30 clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii (MDR-A. baumannii). Materials and Methods: Agar diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were employed for the determination of bactericidal activity of water distilled medicinal plants. Tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) was used as positive control in this study. Results: The results indicated the volatile oil extracted from cinnamon exhibited potent antibacterial activity against the most common human pathogens, S. aureus, E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and A. baumannii. Most of volatile oil extracts were less effective against non-fermentative bacteria, P. aeruginosa. In addition, volatile oil extracted from cinnamon, clove, and tree basil possessed potent bactericidal activity against MDR-A. baumannii with MBC90 of 0.5, 1, and 2 mg/mL, respectively. Conclusions: The volatile oil extracts would be useful as alternative natural product for the treatment of the most common human pathogens and MDR-A. baumannii infections. PMID:28512603

  20. Bactericidal activity of herbal volatile oil extracts against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Intorasoot, Amornrat; Chornchoem, Piyaorn; Sookkhee, Siriwoot; Intorasoot, Sorasak

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the antibacterial activity of 10 volatile oils extracted from medicinal plants, including galangal (Alpinia galanga Linn.), ginger (Zingiber officinale), plai (Zingiber cassumunar Roxb.), lime (Citrus aurantifolia), kaffir lime (Citrus hystrix DC.), sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum Linn.), tree basil (Ocimum gratissimum), lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus DC.), clove (Syzygium aromaticum), and cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum) against four standard strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and 30 clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii (MDR-A. baumannii). Agar diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were employed for the determination of bactericidal activity of water distilled medicinal plants. Tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) was used as positive control in this study. The results indicated the volatile oil extracted from cinnamon exhibited potent antibacterial activity against the most common human pathogens, S. aureus, E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and A. baumannii. Most of volatile oil extracts were less effective against non-fermentative bacteria, P. aeruginosa. In addition, volatile oil extracted from cinnamon, clove, and tree basil possessed potent bactericidal activity against MDR-A. baumannii with MBC90 of 0.5, 1, and 2 mg/mL, respectively. The volatile oil extracts would be useful as alternative natural product for the treatment of the most common human pathogens and MDR-A. baumannii infections.

  1. Active screening of multi-drug resistant bacteria effectively prevent and control the potential infections.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yuguo; Ma, Guoliang; Peng, Lin; Ren, Yufeng; Zhang, Fengmei

    2015-03-01

    Our objective is to determine if actively screen the multi-drug resistant bacteria (MDRB) infection in intensive care unit (ICU) to prevent, control, and decrease the infection rate and transmission of MDRB. The patients admitted in ICU of one hospital in 2013 were analyzed. The throat swab, blood, defecation, and urine of patients were actively collected for bacteria cultures to screen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Acinetobacter baumannii in patients. All patients received screening of MDRB infection and colonization within 2 days and after 2 days of admission, the results showed that there were 418 infectious bacterial strains in total and P. aeruginosa was the main bacterium. The asymptomatic infection rates of P. aeruginosa, K. pneumonia, E. coli, S. aureus, and A. baumannii were 39.02, 24.74, 44.00, 29.17, and 33.33 %, respectively; the symptomatic infection rates were 60.98, 75.26, 56.00, 70.83, and 66.67 %. 59.70 % patients received antibiotics treatment, 27.45 % patients received trachea cannula, 32.95 % patients received mechanism ventilation, 2.27 % patients received arterial cannula or venous cannula and 4.00 % patients received indwelling urinary catheters. The main MDRB in ICU is P. aeruginosa. The active screening of MDRB infection and colonization can provide the opportunity to take the life-saving measure against MDRB and treat patients. This can decrease the infection risk and the nosocomial transmission of MDRB.

  2. The emergence and outbreak of multidrug-resistant typhoid fever in China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Meiying; Li, Xinlan; Liao, Qiaohong; Li, Fang; Zhang, Jing; Kan, Biao

    2016-06-22

    Typhoid fever remains a severe public health problem in developing countries. The emergence of resistant typhoid, particularly multidrug-resistant typhoid infections, highlights the necessity of monitoring the resistance characteristics of this invasive pathogen. In this study, we report a typhoid fever outbreak caused by multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains with an ACSSxtT pattern. Resistance genes conferring these phenotypes were harbored by a large conjugative plasmid, which increases the threat of Salmonella Typhi and thus requires close surveillance for dissemination of strains containing such genes.

  3. The Genome Sequence of an Oxytetracycline-Resistant Isolate of the Fish Pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis Harbors a Multidrug Resistance Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Bohle, Harry; Henríquez, Patricio; Grothusen, Horst; Navas, Esteban; Bustamante, Fernando; Bustos, Patricio

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The amount of antibiotics needed to counteract frequent piscirickettsiosis outbreaks is a major concern for the Chilean salmon industry. Resistance to antibiotics may contribute to this issue. To understand the genetics underlying Piscirickettsia salmonis-resistant phenotypes, the genome of AY3800B, an oxytetracycline-resistant isolate bearing a multidrug resistance plasmid, is presented here. PMID:28153906

  4. Gatifloxacin for short, effective treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, C-Y; Van Deun, A; Rieder, H L

    2016-09-01

    The 9-month regimen for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) piloted in Bangladesh and used, with modifications, in Cameroon and Niger, has achieved treatment success in a very large proportion of patients; gatifloxacin (GFX) is likely to have played a critical role in this success. Two months after the publication of a study reporting that GFX and not moxifloxacin (MFX) was associated with dysglycaemia, the manufacturer announced the withdrawal of GFX from the market. The findings of that study may have less significance for the majority of MDR-TB patients living in high-incidence countries who are much younger, have a lower risk of dysglycaemia and suffer from a highly fatal condition. The problem of dysglycaemia is not limited to GFX use and may occur with other fluoroquinolones; furthermore, GFX-associated dysglycemia was manageable among those MDR-TB patients in Bangladesh and Niger in whom it occurred. GFX has now become unavailable in Bangladesh, Cameroon, Niger and other countries piloting the shorter MDR-TB regimens, depriving resource-poor countries of an efficacious, effective and inexpensive drug with a demonstrated good safety profile for the given indication. There is little reason not to make GFX available for MDR-TB treatment as long as the superiority of non-GFX-based MDR-TB regimens is not demonstrated.

  5. Marine Natural Products as Models to Circumvent Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Long, Solida; Sousa, Emília; Kijjoa, Anake; Pinto, Madalena M M

    2016-07-08

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a serious health problem that in many cases leads to cancer treatment failure. The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which leads to premature efflux of drugs from cancer cells, is often responsible for MDR. On the other hand, a strategy to search for modulators from natural products to overcome MDR had been in place during the last decades. However, Nature limits the amount of some natural products, which has led to the development of synthetic strategies to increase their availability. This review summarizes the research findings on marine natural products and derivatives, mainly alkaloids, polyoxygenated sterols, polyketides, terpenoids, diketopiperazines, and peptides, with P-gp inhibitory activity highlighting the established structure-activity relationships. The synthetic pathways for the total synthesis of the most promising members and analogs are also presented. It is expected that the data gathered during the last decades concerning their synthesis and MDR-inhibiting activities will help medicinal chemists develop potential drug candidates using marine natural products as models which can deliver new ABC transporter inhibitor scaffolds.

  6. Vitamin E Reverses Multidrug Resistance In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jingling; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Yongjun; Racette, Kelly; Wang, Dun; Liu, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle to successful and effective chemotherapeutic treatments of cancers. This study explored the reversal effects of vitamin E on MDR tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, elucidating the potential mechanism of this reversal. VE at a concentration of 50 μM exhibited a significant reversal of the MDR effect (compared to only PTX in DMSO, p < 0.05) in two human MDR cell lines (H460/taxR and KB-8-5). The MDR cell xenograft model was established to investigate the effect of VE on reversing MDR in vivo. Mice intravenously injected with Taxol (10 mg/kg) with VE (500 mg/kg, IP) showed an ability to overcome the MDR. VE and its derivatives can significantly increase intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin (P-gp substrate), but not alter the levels of P-gp expression. These treatments also did not decrease the levels of intracellular ATP, but were still able to inhibit the verapamil-induced ATPase activity of P-gp. The new application of VE as an MDR sensitizer will be attractive due to the safety of this treatment. PMID:23624302

  7. Imidazolium salts with antifungal potential against multidrug-resistant dermatophytes.

    PubMed

    Dalla Lana, D F; Donato, R K; Bündchen, C; Guez, C M; Bergamo, V Z; de Oliveira, L F S; Machado, M M; Schrekker, H S; Fuentefria, A M

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the antidermatophytic action of a complementary set imidazolium salts (IMS), determining structure-activity relationships and characterizing the IMS toxicological profiles. The susceptibility evaluation of 45 dermatophytic clinical isolates, treated in vitro with eleven different IMS (ionic compounds) and commercial antifungals (nonionic compounds), was performed by broth microdilution, following the standard norm of CLSI M38-A2. All dermatophytes were inhibited by IMS, where the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were observed for salts with n-hexadecyl segment in the cation side chain, containing either the chloride or methanesulfonate anion. 1-n-Hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C16 MImCl) and 1-n-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium methanesulfonate (C16 MImMeS) acted as fungicides, even in extremely low concentrations, wherein C16 MImMeS exerted this effect on 100% of the tested dermatophytes. Some of these IMS provoked evident alterations on the fungi cell morphology, causing a total cell damage of ≥ 70%. Importantly, none of the screened IMS were cytotoxic, mutagenic or genotoxic to human leucocyte cells. This report demonstrates for the first time the strong antifungal potential of IMS against multidrug-resistant dermatophytes, without presenting toxicity to human leucocyte cells at MIC. The expressive antifungal activity of IMS, combined with the in vitro nontoxicity, makes them promising compounds for the safe and effective treatment of dermatophytoses, mainly when this skin mycosis is unresponsive to conventional drugs. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Demonstrating a Multi-drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Amplification Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Linger, Yvonne; Kukhtin, Alexander; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Qu, Peter; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Cooney, Christopher G.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2014-01-01

    Simplifying microarray workflow is a necessary first step for creating MDR-TB microarray-based diagnostics that can be routinely used in lower-resource environments. An amplification microarray combines asymmetric PCR amplification, target size selection, target labeling, and microarray hybridization within a single solution and into a single microfluidic chamber. A batch processing method is demonstrated with a 9-plex asymmetric master mix and low-density gel element microarray for genotyping multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The protocol described here can be completed in 6 hr and provide correct genotyping with at least 1,000 cell equivalents of genomic DNA. Incorporating on-chip wash steps is feasible, which will result in an entirely closed amplicon method and system. The extent of multiplexing with an amplification microarray is ultimately constrained by the number of primer pairs that can be combined into a single master mix and still achieve desired sensitivity and specificity performance metrics, rather than the number of probes that are immobilized on the array. Likewise, the total analysis time can be shortened or lengthened depending on the specific intended use, research question, and desired limits of detection. Nevertheless, the general approach significantly streamlines microarray workflow for the end user by reducing the number of manually intensive and time-consuming processing steps, and provides a simplified biochemical and microfluidic path for translating microarray-based diagnostics into routine clinical practice. PMID:24796567

  9. Endobronchial valve treatment of destructive multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Levin, A.; Felker, I.; Tceymach, E.; Krasnov, D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND: In accordance with the existing hypothesis, the application of an endobronchial valve (EbV) leads to selective curative atelectasis of the affected part of the lung, contributing to early closure of cavities. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of EbV treatment on the course of tuberculosis (TB). METHODS: We compared the efficacy of EbV treatment and complex second-line treatment in treating patients with destructive pulmonary multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). Bacteriological conversion and closure of cavities were selected as criteria to assess the effectiveness of EbV application. A total of 102 patients with destructive MDR-TB were enrolled into the study and randomly divided into two groups: 49 patients had an EbV installed (intervention group) and 53 patients received complex second-line treatment (control group). Complex chemotherapy was administered to both groups throughout the study period. RESULTS: The cure rate in the short- and long-term follow-up periods in the intervention group was shown to be much higher, 95.9% by bacteriological conversion and 67.3% by cavity closure. On comparison with the control group, this was respectively 37.7% and 20.7% (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The application of EbV treatment can significantly improve the effectiveness of second-line chemotherapy regimens in MDR-TB patients. PMID:27776598

  10. Multidrug resistant citrobacter: an unusual cause of liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prabhat; Ghosh, Soumik; Rath, Deepak; Gadpayle, A K

    2013-04-22

    Liver abscesses are infectious, space occupying lesions in the liver, the two most common abscesses being pyogenic and amoebic. A pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) is a rare condition with a reported incidence of 20 per 100 000 hospital admissions in the western population. The right lobe of the liver is the most common site in both types of liver abscess. Clinical presentation is elusive with complaints of fever, right upper quadrant pain in the abdomen and hepatomegaly with or without jaundice. The aetiology of PLA has changed in the past few decades and may be of biliary, portal, arterial or traumatic origin, but many cases are still cryptogenic. The most common organisms causing PLA are Gram-negative aerobes, especially Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Studies have shown a high degree of antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated organism resulting in an overall lower mortality in PLA. Here, we present a case of PLA caused by multidrug-resistant Citrobacter freundii, which is an unusual organism to be isolated.

  11. Intracellular pH and the Control of Multidrug Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford; Roy, Deborshi; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-02-01

    Many anticancer drugs are classified as either weak bases or molecules whose binding to cellular structures is pH dependent. Accumulation of these drugs within tumor cells should be affected by transmembrane pH gradients. Indeed, development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells has been correlated with an alkaline shift of cytosolic pH. To examine the role of pH in drug partitioning, the distribution of two drugs, doxorubicin and daunomycin, was monitored in fibroblasts and myeloma cells. In both cell types the drugs rapidly accumulated within the cells. The highest concentrations were measured in the most acidic compartments-e.g., lysosomes. Modifying the cellular pH in drug-sensitive cells to mimic reported shifts in MDR caused an immediate change in the cellular drug concentration. Drug accumulation was enhanced by acidic shifts and reversed by alkaline shifts. All of these effects were rapid and reversible. These results demonstrate that the alkaline shift observed in MDR is sufficient to prevent the accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs independent of active drug efflux.

  12. Intracellular pH and the control of multidrug resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, S; Roy, D; Schindler, M

    1994-01-01

    Many anticancer drugs are classified as either weak bases or molecules whose binding to cellular structures is pH dependent. Accumulation of these drugs within tumor cells should be affected by transmembrane pH gradients. Indeed, development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells has been correlated with an alkaline shift of cytosolic pH. To examine the role of pH in drug partitioning, the distribution of two drugs, doxorubicin and daunomycin, was monitored in fibroblasts and myeloma cells. In both cell types the drugs rapidly accumulated within the cells. The highest concentrations were measured in the most acidic compartments--e.g., lysosomes. Modifying the cellular pH in drug-sensitive cells to mimic reported shifts in MDR caused an immediate change in the cellular drug concentration. Drug accumulation was enhanced by acidic shifts and reversed by alkaline shifts. All of these effects were rapid and reversible. These results demonstrate that the alkaline shift observed in MDR is sufficient to prevent the accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs independent of active drug efflux. Images PMID:8302842

  13. Demonstrating a multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis amplification microarray.

    PubMed

    Linger, Yvonne; Kukhtin, Alexander; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Qu, Peter; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Cooney, Christopher G; Chandler, Darrell P

    2014-04-25

    Simplifying microarray workflow is a necessary first step for creating MDR-TB microarray-based diagnostics that can be routinely used in lower-resource environments. An amplification microarray combines asymmetric PCR amplification, target size selection, target labeling, and microarray hybridization within a single solution and into a single microfluidic chamber. A batch processing method is demonstrated with a 9-plex asymmetric master mix and low-density gel element microarray for genotyping multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The protocol described here can be completed in 6 hr and provide correct genotyping with at least 1,000 cell equivalents of genomic DNA. Incorporating on-chip wash steps is feasible, which will result in an entirely closed amplicon method and system. The extent of multiplexing with an amplification microarray is ultimately constrained by the number of primer pairs that can be combined into a single master mix and still achieve desired sensitivity and specificity performance metrics, rather than the number of probes that are immobilized on the array. Likewise, the total analysis time can be shortened or lengthened depending on the specific intended use, research question, and desired limits of detection. Nevertheless, the general approach significantly streamlines microarray workflow for the end user by reducing the number of manually intensive and time-consuming processing steps, and provides a simplified biochemical and microfluidic path for translating microarray-based diagnostics into routine clinical practice.

  14. Hearing loss in children treated for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Seddon, James A; Thee, Stephanie; Jacobs, Kayleen; Ebrahim, Adam; Hesseling, Anneke C; Schaaf, H Simon

    2013-04-01

    The aminoglycosides and polypeptides are vital drugs for the management of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB). Both classes of drug cause hearing loss. We aimed to determine the extent of hearing loss in children treated for MDR-TB. In this retrospective study, children (<15 years) admitted to Brooklyn Chest Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa, from January 2009 until December 2010, were included if treated for MDR-TB with injectable drugs. Hearing was assessed and classified using audiometry and otoacoustic emissions. Ninety-four children were included (median age: 43 months). Of 93 tested, 28 (30%) were HIV-infected. Twenty-three (24%) children had hearing loss. Culture-confirmed, as opposed to presumed, diagnosis of TB was a risk factor for hearing loss (OR: 4.12; 95% CI: 1.13-15.0; p = 0.02). Seven of 11 (64%) children classified as having hearing loss using audiometry had progression of hearing loss after finishing the injectable drug. Hearing loss is common in children treated for MDR-TB. Alternative drugs are required for the treatment of paediatric MDR-TB. Copyright © 2012 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Variation in definitions and isolation procedures for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria: a survey of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Research Network.

    PubMed

    Drees, Marci; Pineles, Lisa; Harris, Anthony D; Morgan, Daniel J

    2014-04-01

    To assess definitions, experience, and infection control practices for multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB), including Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas species, in acute care hospitals. Cross-sectional survey. US and international members of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) Research Network. Online survey that included definitions, infection control procedures, and microbiology capability related to MDR-GNB and other MDR bacteria. From November 2012 through February 2013, 66 of 170 SHEA Research Network members responded (39% response rate), representing 26 states and 15 countries. More than 80% of facilities reported experience with each MDR-GNB isolate, and 78% had encountered GNB resistant to all antibiotics except colistin (62% Acinetobacter, 59% Pseudomonas, and 52% Enterobacteriaceae species). Participants varied regarding their definitions of "multidrug resistant," with 14 unique definitions for Acinetobacter, 18 for Pseudomonas, and 22 for Enterobacteriaceae species. Substantial variation also existed in isolation practices. Although isolation was commonly used for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), approximately 20% of facilities did not isolate for MDR Pseudomonas or Acinetobacter. The majority of those that isolated MDR organisms also removed isolation using a wide variety of criteria. Facilities vary significantly in their approach to preventing MDR-GNB transmission. Although practices for MRSA and VRE are relatively standardized, emerging pathogens CRE and other MDR-GNB have highly varied definitions and management. This confusion makes communication difficult, and varied use of isolation may contribute to emergence of these organisms. Public health agencies need to promote standard definitions and management to enable broader initiatives to limit emergence of MDR-GNB.

  16. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in cancer: role of ABC multidrug transporters.

    PubMed

    Ozvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Cserepes, Judit; Elkind, N Barry; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2005-01-01

    Recent antitumor drug research has seen the development of a large variety of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) with increasing specificity and selectivity. These are highly promising agents for specific inhibition of malignant cell growth and metastasis. However, their therapeutic potential also depends on access to their intracellular targets, which may be significantly affected by certain ABC membrane transporters. It has been recently shown that several human multidrug transporter ABC proteins interact with specific TKIs, and the ABCG2 transporter has an especially high affinity for some of these kinase inhibitors. These results indicate that multidrug resistance protein modulation by TKIs may be an important factor in the treatment of cancer patients; moreover, the extrusion of TKIs by multidrug transporters may result in tumor cell TKI resistance. Interaction with multidrug resistance ABC transporters may also significantly modify the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of TKIs in patients.

  17. Multidrug-resistant nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Cândido, Pedro Henrique Campanini; Nunes, Luciana de Souza; Marques, Elizabeth Andrade; Folescu, Tânia Wrobel; Coelho, Fábrice Santana; de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; Gomes, Karen Machado; Lourenço, Maria Cristina da Silva; Aguiar, Fábio Silva; Chitolina, Fernanda; Armstrong, Derek T; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Neves, Felipe Piedade Gonçalves; Mello, Fernanda Carvalho de Queiroz; Duarte, Rafael Silva

    2014-08-01

    Worldwide, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have become emergent pathogens of pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with an estimated prevalence ranging from 5 to 20%. This work investigated the presence of NTM in sputum samples of 129 CF patients (2 to 18 years old) submitted to longitudinal clinical supervision at a regional reference center in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. From June 2009 to March 2012, 36 NTM isolates recovered from 10 (7.75%) out of 129 children were obtained. Molecular identification of NTM was performed by using PCR restriction analysis targeting the hsp65 gene (PRA-hsp65) and sequencing of the rpoB gene, and susceptibility tests were performed that followed Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. For evaluating the genotypic diversity, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and/or enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence PCR (ERIC-PCR) was performed. The species identified were Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii (n = 24), M. abscessus subsp. abscessus (n = 6), Mycobacterium fortuitum (n = 3), Mycobacterium marseillense (n = 2), and Mycobacterium timonense (n = 1). Most of the isolates presented resistance to five or more of the antimicrobials tested. Typing profiles were mainly patient specific. The PFGE profiles indicated the presence of two clonal groups for M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and five clonal groups for M. abscesssus subsp. bolletii, with just one clone detected in two patients. Given the observed multidrug resistance patterns and the possibility of transmission between patients, we suggest the implementation of continuous and routine investigation of NTM infection or colonization in CF patients, including countries with a high burden of tuberculosis disease.

  18. Principles for designing future regimens for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Brigden, Grania; Nyang'wa, Bern-Thomas; du Cros, Philipp; Varaine, Francis; Hughes, Jennifer; Rich, Michael; Horsburgh, C Robert; Mitnick, Carole D; Nuermberger, Eric; McIlleron, Helen; Phillips, Patrick P J; Balasegaram, Manica

    2014-01-01

    Fewer than 20% of patients with multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis are receiving treatment and there is an urgent need to scale up treatment programmes. One of the biggest barriers to scale-up is the treatment regimen, which is lengthy, complex, ineffective, poorly tolerated and expensive. For the first time in over 50 years, new drugs have been developed specifically to treat tuberculosis, with bedaquiline and potentially delamanid expected to be available soon for treatment of MDR cases. However, if the new drugs are merely added to the current treatment regimen, the new regimen will be at least as lengthy, cumbersome and toxic as the existing one. There is an urgent need for strategy and evidence on how to maximize the potential of the new drugs to improve outcomes and shorten treatment. We devised eight key principles for designing future treatment regimens to ensure that, once they are proven safe in clinical trials, they will be clinically effective and programmatically practicable. Regimens should contain at least one new class of drug; be broadly applicable for use against MDR and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains; contain three to five effective drugs, each from a different drug class; be delivered orally; have a simple dosing schedule; have a good side-effect profile that allows limited monitoring; last a maximum of 6 months; and have minimal interaction with antiretrovirals. Following these principles will maximize the potential of new compounds and help to overcome the clinical and programmatic disadvantages and scale-up constraints that plague the current regimen.

  19. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and migration to Europe.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, S; Lönnroth, K; Nellums, L B; Olaru, I D; Nathavitharana, R R; Norredam, M; Friedland, J S

    2017-03-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in low-incidence countries in Europe is more prevalent among migrants than the native population. The impact of the recent increase in migration to EU and EEA countries with a low incidence of TB (<20 cases per 100 000) on MDR-TB epidemiology is unclear. This narrative review synthesizes evidence on MDR-TB and migration identified through an expert panel and database search. A significant proportion of MDR-TB cases in migrants result from reactivation of latent infection. Refugees and asylum seekers may have a heightened risk of MDR-TB infection and worse outcomes. Although concerns have been raised around 'health tourists' migrating for MDR-TB treatment, numbers are probably small and data are lacking. Migrants experience significant barriers to testing and treatment for MDR-TB, exacerbated by increasingly restrictive health systems. Screening for latent MDR-TB is highly problematic because current tests cannot distinguish drug-resistant latent infection, and evidence-based guidance for treatment of latent infection in contacts of MDR patients is lacking. Although there is evidence that transmission of TB from migrants to the general population is low-it predominantly occurs within migrant communities-there is a human rights obligation to improve the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of MDR-TB in migrants. Further research is needed into MDR-TB and migration, the impact of screening on detection or prevention, and the potential consequences of failing to treat and prevent MDR-TB among migrants in Europe. An evidence-base is urgently needed to inform guidelines for effective approaches for MDR-TB management in migrant populations in Europe.

  20. Multidrug-Resistant Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cândido, Pedro Henrique Campanini; Nunes, Luciana de Souza; Marques, Elizabeth Andrade; Folescu, Tânia Wrobel; Coelho, Fábrice Santana; de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; Gomes, Karen Machado; Lourenço, Maria Cristina da Silva; Aguiar, Fábio Silva; Chitolina, Fernanda; Armstrong, Derek T.; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Neves, Felipe Piedade Gonçalves; Mello, Fernanda Carvalho de Queiroz

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have become emergent pathogens of pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with an estimated prevalence ranging from 5 to 20%. This work investigated the presence of NTM in sputum samples of 129 CF patients (2 to 18 years old) submitted to longitudinal clinical supervision at a regional reference center in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. From June 2009 to March 2012, 36 NTM isolates recovered from 10 (7.75%) out of 129 children were obtained. Molecular identification of NTM was performed by using PCR restriction analysis targeting the hsp65 gene (PRA-hsp65) and sequencing of the rpoB gene, and susceptibility tests were performed that followed Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. For evaluating the genotypic diversity, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and/or enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence PCR (ERIC-PCR) was performed. The species identified were Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii (n = 24), M. abscessus subsp. abscessus (n = 6), Mycobacterium fortuitum (n = 3), Mycobacterium marseillense (n = 2), and Mycobacterium timonense (n = 1). Most of the isolates presented resistance to five or more of the antimicrobials tested. Typing profiles were mainly patient specific. The PFGE profiles indicated the presence of two clonal groups for M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and five clonal groups for M. abscesssus subsp. bolletii, with just one clone detected in two patients. Given the observed multidrug resistance patterns and the possibility of transmission between patients, we suggest the implementation of continuous and routine investigation of NTM infection or colonization in CF patients, including countries with a high burden of tuberculosis disease. PMID:24920766

  1. Principles for designing future regimens for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nyang’wa, Bern-Thomas; du Cros, Philipp; Varaine, Francis; Hughes, Jennifer; Rich, Michael; Horsburgh, C Robert; Mitnick, Carole D; Nuermberger, Eric; McIlleron, Helen; Phillips, Patrick PJ; Balasegaram, Manica

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Fewer than 20% of patients with multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis are receiving treatment and there is an urgent need to scale up treatment programmes. One of the biggest barriers to scale-up is the treatment regimen, which is lengthy, complex, ineffective, poorly tolerated and expensive. For the first time in over 50 years, new drugs have been developed specifically to treat tuberculosis, with bedaquiline and potentially delamanid expected to be available soon for treatment of MDR cases. However, if the new drugs are merely added to the current treatment regimen, the new regimen will be at least as lengthy, cumbersome and toxic as the existing one. There is an urgent need for strategy and evidence on how to maximize the potential of the new drugs to improve outcomes and shorten treatment. We devised eight key principles for designing future treatment regimens to ensure that, once they are proven safe in clinical trials, they will be clinically effective and programmatically practicable. Regimens should contain at least one new class of drug; be broadly applicable for use against MDR and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains; contain three to five effective drugs, each from a different drug class; be delivered orally; have a simple dosing schedule; have a good side-effect profile that allows limited monitoring; last a maximum of 6 months; and have minimal interaction with antiretrovirals. Following these principles will maximize the potential of new compounds and help to overcome the clinical and programmatic disadvantages and scale-up constraints that plague the current regimen. PMID:24391302

  2. Reversion of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance by guggulsterone in multidrug-resistant human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Bin; Xu, Lu-Zhong; Li, Ling; Fu, Jun; Mao, Xia-Ping

    2012-11-05

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) presents a serious problem in cancer chemotherapy. Our previous studies have shown that guggulsterone could reverse MDR through inhibiting the function and expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The present study is to further investigate the reversal effects of guggulsterone on MDR in drug-resistant cancer cell lines. The effects of guggulsterone on MDR1mRNA gene expression, intracellular pH, P-gp ATPase activity and glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) expression were assessed by RT-PCR, Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope using the pH-sensitive fluorescent probe BCECF-AM, Pgp-Glo assay system, and flow cytometric technology, respectively. The results showed that guggulsterone ranging from 2.5 to 80 μM significantly promoted the activity of P-gp ATPase in a dose-dependent manner. The intracellular pH of K562/DOX cells was found to be higher than K562 cells. After treatment with guggulsterone (1, 3, 10, 30, 100 μM), intracellular pH of K562/DOX cells decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. However, the present study revealed that guggulsterone ranging from 3 to 100 μM had little influence on MDR1 gene expression in K562/DOX cells. Further, the isogenic doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7/DOX cells exhibited a 4.9-fold increase in GCS level as compared with parental MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. After treatment with guggulsterone (0.1, 1, 10 μM) for 48 h, MCF-7/DOX cells were found to have no change of GCS protein expression amount. Guggulsterone might be a potent MDR reversal agent, and its mechanism on MDR needs more research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Significance of efflux pumps in multidrug resistance of Gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Wiercińska, Olga; Chojecka, Agnieszka; Kanclerski, Krzysztof; Rőhm-Rodowald, Ewa; Jakimiak, Bożenna

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of multidrug. resistance of bacteria is a serious problem of modern medicine. This resistance largely is a consequence of abuse and improper use of antibacterial substances, especially antibiotics and chemotherapeutics in hospital settings. Multidrug resistance is caused by a number of interacting mechanisms of resistance. Recent studies have indicated that efflux pumps and systems of efflux pumps are an important determinant of this phenomenon. Contribute to this particular RND efflux systems of Gram-negative bacteria, which possess a wide range of substrates such as antibiotics, dyes, detergents, toxins and active substances of disinfectants and antiseptics. These transporters are usually encoded on bacterial chromosomes. Genes encoding efflux pumps' proteins may also be carried on plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Such pumps are usually specific to a small group of substrates, but as an additional mechanism of resistance may contribute to the multidrug resistance.

  4. Diverse and abundant multi-drug resistant E. coli in Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ghaderpour, Aziz; Ho, Wing Sze; Chew, Li-Lee; Bong, Chui Wei; Chong, Ving Ching; Thong, Kwai-Lin; Chai, Lay Ching

    2015-01-01

    E.coli, an important vector distributing antimicrobial resistance in the environment, was found to be multi-drug resistant, abundant, and genetically diverse in the Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia. One-third (34%) of the estuarine E. coli was multi-drug resistant. The highest antibiotic resistance prevalence was observed for aminoglycosides (83%) and beta-lactams (37%). Phylogenetic groups A and B1, being the most predominant E. coli, demonstrated the highest antibiotic resistant level and prevalence of integrons (integron I, 21%; integron II, 3%). Detection of phylogenetic group B23 downstream of fishing villages indicates human fecal contamination as a source of E. coli pollution. Enteroaggregative E. coli (1%) were also detected immediately downstream of the fishing village. The results indicated multi-drug resistance among E. coli circulating in Matang estuaries, which could be reflective of anthropogenic activities and aggravated by bacterial and antibiotic discharges from village lack of a sewerage system, aquaculture farms and upstream animal husbandry.

  5. CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles for overcoming multidrug resistance in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Shouju; Shi, Donghong; Zhou, Xianguang; Wang, Chunyan; Wu, Jiang; Zeng, Zhiyong; Li, Yanjun; Sun, Jing; Wang, Jiandong; Zhang, Longjiang; Teng, Zhaogang; Lu, Guangming

    2015-03-01

    Multidrug resistance is a major impediment for the successful chemotherapy in breast cancer. CD44 is over-expressed in multidrug resistant human breast cancer cells. CD44 monoclonal antibody exhibits anticancer potential by inhibiting proliferation and regulating P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux activity in multidrug resistant cells. Thereby, CD44 monoclonal antibody in combination with chemotherapeutic drug might be result in enhancing chemosensitivity and overcoming multidrug resistance. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the CD44 monoclonal antibody functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles containing doxorubicin on human breast resistant cancer MCF-7 cells. The data showed that CD44-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles increased cytotoxicity and enhanced the downregulation of P-glycoprotein in comparison to CD44 antibody. Moreover, CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles provided active target, which promoted more cellular uptake of DOX in the resistant cells and more retention of DOX in tumor tissues than unengineered counterpart. Animal studies of the resistant breast cancer xenografts demonstrated that CD44-engineered drug delivery system remarkably induced apoptosis and inhibited the tumor growth. Our results indicated that the CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based drug delivery system offers an effective approach to overcome multidrug resistance in human breast cancer.

  6. In vitro antibacterial potency of Butea monosperma Lam. against 12 clinically isolated multidrug resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Mahesh Chandra; Padhy, Rabindra Nath

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial activity, using cold and hot extraction procedures with five solvents, petroleum ether, acetone, ethanol, methanol and water to validate medicinal uses of Butea monosperma Lam (B. monosperma) in controlling infections; and to qualitatively estimate phytochemical constituents of leaf-extracts of the plant. Methods The antibacterial activity of leaf-extracts was evaluated by the agar-well diffusion method against clinically isolated 12 Gram-positive and -negative multidrug resistant (MDR) pathogenic bacteria in vitro. Values of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of leaf-extracts against each bacterium were obtained in a 96-well micro-titre plate, by broth dilution micro-titre plate technique. Results The presence of tannins, flavonoids, starch, glycosides and carbohydrates in different leaf extracts was established. Pathogenic bacteria used were, Acinetobacter sp., Chromobacterium violaceum, Citrobacter freundii, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Shigella sp., Enterococcus sp., Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), methicillin resistant S. aureus and vancomycin resistant S. aureus, along with standard bacterial strains. These MDR bacteria had been recorded to have significant inhibitions by leaf extracts, obtained by cold and hot extraction procedures with five solvents. In addition, the hot aqueous extract against Enterococcus sp. had the highest inhibition zone-size (21 mm). Ciprofloxacin 30 µg/disc was the positive/reference control and the diluting solvent, 10% dimethyl sulphoxide was the negative control. Recorded MIC values of different extracts ranged between 0.23 and 13.30 mg/mL, and MBC values were 0.52 to 30.00 mg/mL, for these bacteria. Conclusions Leaf-extracts with hot water and ethanol had shown significant antibacterial activity against all bacteria. B. monosperma leaf-extract could be used in treating infectious

  7. Monitoring in vitro antibacterial efficacy of 26 Indian spices against multidrug resistant urinary tract infecting bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rath, Sibanarayan; Padhy, Rabindra N

    2014-09-01

    To screen methanolic extracts of 26 commonly used Indian spices against nine species of uropathogenic bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), isolated from clinical samples of a tertiary care hospital for antibacterial activity. Bacterial strains were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity testing by Kirby-Bauer's disc diffusion method. Monitoring antibacterial potentiality of spice extracts was done by the agar-well diffusion method with multidrug resistant (MDR) strains of nine uropathogens. The Gram-positive (GP) bacteria E. faecalis and S. aureus were resistant to 16 of the 21 antibiotics used. Among the Gram-negative (GN) bacteria, resistant patterns were A. baumannii and E. aerogenes to 12, C. freundii to 14, E. coli to 12, K. pneumoniae to 10, P. mirabilis to 11, and P. aeruginosa to 15 antibiotics of the 18 antibiotics used. The most effective 15 spices, having at least 25-29 mm as the size of the zone of inhibition, were Allium cepa, Brassica juncea, Cinnamomum tamala, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Coriandrum sativum, Cuminum cyminum, Curcuma longa, Mentha spicata, Murraya koenigii, Nigella sativa, Papaver somniferum, Piper nigrum, S. aromaticum, Trachyspermum ammi, and Trigonella foenum for at least one of the GP or GN MDR bacterial strains used. Moderate control capacity was registered by nine spices, Curcuma amada, Foeniculum vulgare, Illicium verum, Mentha spicata, Papaver somniferum, Syzygium aromaticum, Trachyspermum ammi, Trigonella foenum, and Zingiber officinale. However, the best two spices for controlling all the pathogens used were C. zeylanicum and C. longa, with the highest value of 29 mm as the inhibition zone size. The most effective and unique 16 spice plants recorded for the in vitro control of MDR uropathogens could further be pursued for the development of complementary

  8. High level of resistance to aztreonam and ticarcillin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from soil of different crops in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pitondo-Silva, André; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Fernandes, Ana Flavia Tonelli; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be found in water, soil, plants and, human and animal fecal samples. It is an important nosocomial pathogenic agent characterized by an intrinsic resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents and the ability to develop high-level (acquired) multidrug resistance through some mechanisms, among them, by the acquisition of plasmids and integrons, which are mobile genetic elements. In this study, 40 isolates from Brazilian soil were analyzed for antibiotic resistance, presence of integrons and plasmidial profile. The results demonstrated that the vast majority of the isolates have shown resistance for aztreonam (92.5%, n=37) and ticarcillin (85%, n=34), four isolates presented plasmids and eight isolates possess the class 1 integron. These results demonstrated that environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa possess surprising antibiotic resistance profile to aztreonam and ticarcillin, two antimicrobial agents for clinical treatment of cystic fibrosis patients and other infections occurred by P. aeruginosa.

  9. Susceptibility patterns and cross resistances of antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a teaching hospital of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Gençer, Serap; Ak, Öznur; Benzonana, Nur; Batırel, Ayşe; Özer, Serdar

    2002-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the third most common pathogen responsible for nosocomial infections and the prevalence of multiple resistant isolates has been increasing. Ninety-nine clinical isolates were studied in order to assess the current levels of susceptibility and cross-resistances of widely used antipseudomonal antibiotics against P. aeruginosa and to determine some resistance mechanisms by phenotypic methods. Methods MICs of isolates for nine antipseudomonal antibiotics were determined by the E test method. Results Thirty-six percent of isolates were resistant to more than one group of antibiotics. The rates of susceptible isolates were ciprofloxacin 75%, amikacin 73%, ceftazidime 65%, meropenem 63%, imipenem 63%, piperacillin/tazobactam 60%, cefoperazone/sulbactam 59%, cefepime 54% and tobramycin 44%. The majority of carbapenem resistant isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin and amikacin. Conclusion Ciprofloxacin seems to be the most active agent against P. aeruginosa followed by amikacin in our unit. The usefulness of combinations of these antibiotics and β-lactams should be tested in treating multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa. PMID:12437779

  10. Extensively and pan-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis: clinical features, risk factors, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Merle; Vira, Divya; Medikonda, Radhika; Kumar, Nagendra

    2016-02-01

    Emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR), extensively drug resistant (XDR), and pan-drug resistant (PDR) strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pose a significant therapeutic challenge. Managing XDR and PDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis would be extremely difficult due to paucity of safe and effective topical medications. We aim to describe the clinical features, risk factors, and outcome of XDR and PDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis. A retrospective chart review of consecutive cases of XDR and PDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis were identified from Ocular Microbiology Department. XDR and PDR were defined based on criteria established by Centers for Disease Control and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. The following data was collected: age, gender, occupation, symptom duration, systemic and ocular risk factors, infiltrate characteristics, antimicrobial susceptibility, complications, surgical interventions, presenting, and final visual acuity and final outcome. Complete success was defined as resolution of the infiltrate with scar formation on medical treatment alone. Partial success was the resolution following tissue adhesive application. Failure was an inadequate response to medical therapy with progressive increase in infiltrate, corneal melting, and/or perforation necessitating one or more therapeutic penetrating keratoplasties or evisceration. Fifteen eyes of 13 patients were included. Seven (53.8 %) were male with left eye involvement in nine (60 %) cases. Most common risk factors were bandage contact lens (6, 40 %), topical steroids (5, 33.3 %), previous therapeutic graft (4, 26.6 %), and ocular surface disorder (OSD) following Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS) (4, 26.6 %). Of 15 isolates, six (40 %) were sensitive only to imipenem, three (20 %) to colistin, two (13.3 %) to neomycin, one (6.7 %) each to imipenem and colistin, imipenem and ceftazidime, and azithromycin respectively. One isolate was resistant to all antibiotics

  11. Study of Multidrug Membrane Transporter of Single Living Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cells Using Size-Dependent Plasmonic Nanoparticle Optical Probes†

    PubMed Central

    Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Lee, Kerry J.; Desai, Tanvi; Xu, Xiao-Hong Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug membrane transporters (efflux pumps) in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes are responsible for impossible treatments of a wide variety of diseases, including infections and cancer, underscoring the importance of better understanding their structures and functions for design of effective therapies. In this study, we designed and synthesized two silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) solution with average diameters of 13.1 ± 2.5 nm (8.1–38.6 nm) and 91.0 ± 9.3 nm (56–120 nm), and used the size-dependent plasmonic spectra of single NPs to probe the size-dependent transport kinetics of MexAB-OprM (multidrug transporter) in Pseudomonas (P.) aeruginosa in real-time at nanometer resolution. We found that the accumulation of intracellular NPs in wild-type (WT) cells was higher than in nalB1 (over-expression of MexAB-OprM), but less than ΔABM (deletion of MexAB-OprM). In the presence of proton ionophores (CCCP, inhibitor of proton-motive-force), we found that intracellular NPs in nalB1 were nearly doubled. These results suggest that the MexAB-OprM is responsible for the extrusion of NPs out of cells and NPs (orders of magnitude larger than conventional antibiotics) are the substrates of the transporter, which indicates that the substrates may trigger the assembly of the efflux pump optimized for the extrusion of the encountered substrates. We found that the smaller NPs stayed longer inside the cells than larger NPs, suggesting the size-dependent efflux kinetics of the cells. This study shows that multi-sized NPs can be used to mimic various sizes of antibiotics for probing the size-dependent efflux kinetics of multidrug membrane transporters in single living cells. PMID:20540528

  12. Anti-Microbial Dendrimers against Multidrug-Resistant P. aeruginosa Enhance the Angiogenic Effect of Biological Burn-wound Bandages

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Sayed, Philippe; Kaeppli, Ariane; Siriwardena, Thissa; Darbre, Tamis; Perron, Karl; Jafari, Paris; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Pioletti, Dominique P.; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2016-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has increased progressively and impedes further regression in mortality in burn patients. Such wound infections serve as bacterial reservoir for nosocomial infections and are associated with significant morbidity and costs. Anti-microbial polycationic dendrimers G3KL and G3RL, able to kill multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa, have been previously developed. The combination of these dendrimers with a class of biological bandages made of progenitor skin cells, which secrete growth factors, could positively impact wound-healing processes. However, polycations are known to be used as anti-angiogenic agents for tumor suppression. Since, neovascularization is pivotal in the healing of deep burn-wounds, the use of anti-microbial dendrimers may thus hinder the healing processes. Surprisingly, we have seen in this study that G3KL and G3RL dendrimers can have angiogenic effects. Moreover, we have shown that a dendrimer concentration ranging between 50 and 100 μg/mL in combination with the biological bandages can suppress bacterial growth without altering cell viability up to 5 days. These results show that antimicrobial dendrimers can be used in combination with biological bandages and could potentially improve the healing process with an enhanced angiogenesis. PMID:26912450

  13. In vitro characterization of multivalent adhesion molecule 7-based inhibition of multidrug-resistant bacteria isolated from wounded military personnel.

    PubMed

    Krachler, Anne Marie; Mende, Katrin; Murray, Clinton; Orth, Kim

    2012-07-01

    Treatment of wounded military personnel at military medical centers is often complicated by colonization and infection of wounds with pathogenic bacteria. These include nosocomially transmitted, often multidrug-resistant pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. We analyzed the efficacy of multivalent adhesion molecule (MAM) 7-based anti-adhesion treatment of host cells against aforementioned pathogens in a tissue culture infection model. Herein, we observed that a correlation between two important hallmarks of virulence, attachment and cytotoxicity, could serve as a useful predictor for the success of MAM7-based inhibition against bacterial infections. Initially, we characterized 20 patient isolates (five from each pathogen mentioned above) in terms of genotypic diversity, antimicrobial susceptibility and important hallmarks of pathogenicity (biofilm formation, attachment to and cytotoxicity toward cultured host cells). All isolates displayed a high degree of genotypic diversity, which was also reflected by large strain-to-strain variability in terms of biofilm formation, attachment and cytotoxicity within each group of pathogen. Using non-pathogenic bacteria expressing MAM7 or latex beads coated with recombinant MAM7 for anti-adhesion treatment, we showed a decrease in cytotoxicity, indicating that MAM7 has potential as a prophylactic agent to attenuate infection by multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens.

  14. In vitro characterization of multivalent adhesion molecule 7-based inhibition of multidrug-resistant bacteria isolated from wounded military personnel

    PubMed Central

    Krachler, Anne Marie; Mende, Katrin; Murray, Clinton; Orth, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of wounded military personnel at military medical centers is often complicated by colonization and infection of wounds with pathogenic bacteria. These include nosocomially transmitted, often multidrug-resistant pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. We analyzed the efficacy of multivalent adhesion molecule (MAM) 7-based anti-adhesion treatment of host cells against aforementioned pathogens in a tissue culture infection model. Herein, we observed that a correlation between two important hallmarks of virulence, attachment and cytotoxicity, could serve as a useful predictor for the success of MAM7-based inhibition against bacterial infections. Initially, we characterized 20 patient isolates (five from each pathogen mentioned above) in terms of genotypic diversity, antimicrobial susceptibility and important hallmarks of pathogenicity (biofilm formation, attachment to and cytotoxicity toward cultured host cells). All isolates displayed a high degree of genotypic diversity, which was also reflected by large strain-to-strain variability in terms of biofilm formation, attachment and cytotoxicity within each group of pathogen. Using non-pathogenic bacteria expressing MAM7 or latex beads coated with recombinant MAM7 for anti-adhesion treatment, we showed a decrease in cytotoxicity, indicating that MAM7 has potential as a prophylactic agent to attenuate infection by multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:22722243

  15. Engineered cationic antimicrobial peptides to overcome multidrug resistance by ESKAPE pathogens.

    PubMed

    Deslouches, Berthony; Steckbeck, Jonathan D; Craigo, Jodi K; Doi, Yohei; Burns, Jane L; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2015-02-01

    Multidrug resistance constitutes a threat to the medical achievements of the last 50 years. In this study, we demonstrated the abilities of two de novo engineered cationic antibiotic peptides (eCAPs), WLBU2 and WR12, to overcome resistance from 142 clinical isolates representing the most common multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens and to display a lower propensity to select for resistant bacteria in vitro compared to that with colistin and LL37. The results warrant an exploration of eCAPs for use in clinical settings. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Engineered Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides To Overcome Multidrug Resistance by ESKAPE Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Deslouches, Berthony; Steckbeck, Jonathan D.; Craigo, Jodi K.; Doi, Yohei; Burns, Jane L.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance constitutes a threat to the medical achievements of the last 50 years. In this study, we demonstrated the abilities of two de novo engineered cationic antibiotic peptides (eCAPs), WLBU2 and WR12, to overcome resistance from 142 clinical isolates representing the most common multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens and to display a lower propensity to select for resistant bacteria in vitro compared to that with colistin and LL37. The results warrant an exploration of eCAPs for use in clinical settings. PMID:25421473

  17. Identification and Antibacterial Activity of Bacteria Isolated from Marine Sponge Haliclona (Reniera) sp. against Multi-Drug Resistant Human Pathogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhanu Asagabaldan, Meezan; Ayuningrum, D.; Kristiana, R.; Sabdono, A.; Radjasa, O. K.; Trianto, A.

    2017-02-01

    The marine sponge Haliclona (Reniera) sp. was a potential source of natural bioactive compounds. This sponge widely distributed along the coast of Panjang Island, Jepara, Indonesia. The aims of this research were to isolate the associated bacteria with Haliclona (Reniera) sp. and to screen the antibacterial activity against Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) bacteria. Amount five bacteria were isolated using media selective for bacteria. The antibacterial activities of bacteria were performed by overlay methods. The bacteria strain PSP. 39-04 had the best activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Enterobacter cloaceae. Based on colony morphology and phylogenetic characterization using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, PSP 39-04 was closely related with Chromohalobacter salixigens strain DSM3043.

  18. Use of maggot therapy for treating a diabetic foot ulcer colonized by multidrug resistant bacteria in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Marilia A.R.Q.; Ferraz, Julianny B.; Junior, Miguel A.A.; Moura, Andrew D.; da Costa, Maria E.S.M.; Costa, Fagner J.M.D.; Neto, Valter F.A.; Neto, Renato M.; Gama, Renata A.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the efficacy of maggot therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer infected with multidrug resistant microorganisms. A 74 year old female patient with diabetes for over 30 years, was treated with maggot therapy using larvae of Chrysomya megacephala. The microbiological samples were collected to evaluate aetiology of the infection. The therapy done for 43 days resulted in a reduction of necrosis and the ulcer's retraction of 0.7 cm2 in area. Analysis of the bacteriological swabs revealed the presence of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Further studies need to be done to confirm the role of maggot therapy in wound healing using a large sample and a proper study design. PMID:25963495

  19. Use of maggot therapy for treating a diabetic foot ulcer colonized by multidrug resistant bacteria in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Marilia A R Q; Ferraz, Julianny B; Junior, Miguel A A; Moura, Andrew D; da Costa, Maria E S M; Costa, Fagner J M D; Neto, Valter F A; Neto, Renato M; Gama, Renata A

    2015-03-01

    This study reports the efficacy of maggot therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer infected with multidrug resistant microorganisms. A 74 year old female patient with diabetes for over 30 years, was treated with maggot therapy using larvae of Chrysomya megacephala. The microbiological samples were collected to evaluate aetiology of the infection. The therapy done for 43 days resulted in a reduction of necrosis and the ulcer's retraction of 0.7 cm [2] in area. Analysis of the bacteriological swabs revealed the presence of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Further studies need to be done to confirm the role of maggot therapy in wound healing using a large sample and a proper study design.

  20. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in veterinary medicine--emergence of an underestimated pathogen?

    PubMed

    Müller, Stefanie; Janssen, Traute; Wieler, Lothar H

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of multidrug resistant bacteria causing infections in animals has continuously been increasing. While the relevance of ESBL (extended spectrum beta-lactamase)-producing Enterobacteriaceae spp. and MRSA (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is unquestionable, knowledge about multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in veterinary medicine is scarce. This is a worrisome situation, as A. baumannii are isolated from veterinary clinical specimens with rising frequency. The remarkable ability of A. baumannii to develop multidrug resistance and the high risk of transmission are known in human medicine for years. Despite this, data regarding A. baumannii isolates of animal origin are missing. Due to the changing role of companion animals with closer contact between animal and owner, veterinary intensive care medicine is steadily developing. It can be assumed that the number of "high risk" patients with an enhanced risk for hospital acquired infections will be rising simultaneously. Thus, development and spread of multidrug resistant pathogens is envisioned to rise. It is possible, that A. baumannii will evolve into a veterinary nosocomial pathogen similar to ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and MRSA. The lack of attention paid to A. baumannii in veterinary medicine is even more worrying, as first reports indicate a transmission between humans and animals. Essential questions regarding the role of livestock, especially as a potential source of multidrug resistant isolates, remain unanswered. This review summarizes the current knowledge on A. baumannii in veterinary medicine for the first time. It underlines the utmost significance of further investigations of A. baumannii animal isolates, particularly concerning epidemiology and resistance mechanisms.

  1. Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) PCI-24781 enhances chemotherapy induced apoptosis in multidrug resistant sarcoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cao; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J.; Wood, Kirkham B; Schwab, Joseph H; Liu, Xianzhe; Mankin, Henry; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2013-01-01

    The anti-tumor activity of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI) on multi-drug resistant sarcoma cell lines has never been previously described. Four multidrug resistant sarcoma cell lines treated with HDACI PCI-24781 resulted in dose-dependent accumulation of acetylated histones, p21 and PARP cleavage products. Growth of these cell lines was inhibited by PCI-24781 at IC50 of 0.43 to 2.7. When we looked for synergy of PCI-24781 with chemotherapeutic agents, we found that PCI-24781 reverses drug resistance in all four multidrug resistant sarcoma cell lines and synergizes with chemotherapeutic agents to enhance caspase-3/7 activity. Expression of RAD51 (a marker for DNA double-strand break repair) was inhibited and the expression of GADD45α (a marker for growth arrest and DNA-damage) was induced by PCI-24781 in multidrug resistant sarcoma cell lines. In conclusion, HDACI PCI-24781 synergizes with chemotherapeutic drugs to induce apoptosis and reverses drug resistance in multidrug resistant sarcoma cell lines. PMID:21508354

  2. Tracking down antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in a wastewater network.

    PubMed

    Slekovec, Céline; Plantin, Julie; Cholley, Pascal; Thouverez, Michelle; Talon, Daniel; Bertrand, Xavier; Hocquet, Didier

    2012-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa-containing wastewater released by hospitals is treated by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), generating sludge, which is used as a fertilizer, and effluent, which is discharged into rivers. We evaluated the risk of dissemination of antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa (AR-PA) from the hospital to the environment via the wastewater network. Over a 10-week period, we sampled weekly 11 points (hospital and urban wastewater, untreated and treated water, sludge) of the wastewater network and the river upstream and downstream of the WWTP of a city in eastern France. We quantified the P. aeruginosa load by colony counting. We determined the susceptibility to 16 antibiotics of 225 isolates, which we sorted into three categories (wild-type, antibiotic-resistant and multidrug-resistant). Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) were identified by gene sequencing. All non-wild-type isolates (n = 56) and a similar number of wild-type isolates (n = 54) were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. Almost all the samples (105/110, 95.5%) contained P. aeruginosa, with high loads in hospital wastewater and sludge (≥3×10(6) CFU/l or/kg). Most of the multidrug-resistant isolates belonged to ST235, CC111 and ST395. They were found in hospital wastewater and some produced ESBLs such as PER-1 and MBLs such as IMP-29. The WWTP greatly reduced P. aeruginosa counts in effluent, but the P. aeruginosa load in the river was nonetheless higher downstream than upstream from the WWTP. We conclude that the antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa released by hospitals is found in the water downstream from the WWTP and in sludge, constituting a potential risk of environmental contamination.

  3. Potential strategies for the eradication of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Huwaitat, Rawan; McCloskey, Alice P; Gilmore, Brendan F; Laverty, Garry

    2016-07-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is one of the leading threats to society. The increasing burden of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infection is particularly concerning as such bacteria are demonstrating resistance to nearly all currently licensed therapies. Various strategies have been hypothesized to treat multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections including: targeting the Gram-negative outer membrane; neutralization of lipopolysaccharide; inhibition of bacterial efflux pumps and prevention of protein folding. Silver and silver nanoparticles, fusogenic liposomes and nanotubes are potential strategies for extending the activity of licensed, Gram-positive selective, antibiotics to Gram-negatives. This may serve as a strategy to fill the current void in pharmaceutical development in the short term. This review outlines the most promising strategies that could be implemented to solve the threat of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections.

  4. Transport of amphipathic anions by human multidrug resistance protein 3.

    PubMed

    Zeng, H; Liu, G; Rea, P A; Kruh, G D

    2000-09-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and the canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter (cMOAT or MRP2) are ATP-binding cassette transporters that confer resistance to some anticancer drugs and efflux glutathione and glucuronate conjugates from the cell. The MRP subfamily of ABC transporters, however, contains at least four other members of which MRP3 (MOAT-D) bears the closest structural resemblance to MRP1. Although transfection studies have established that human MRP3 confers increased resistance to several anticancer agents, neither the substrate selectivity nor physiological functions of this transporter have been determined. Here we report the results of investigations of the in vitro transport properties of cloned human MRP3 using membrane vesicles prepared from MRP3-transfected HEK293 cells. It is shown that the expression of MRP3 is specifically associated with enhancement of the MgATP-dependent transport into membrane vesicles of the glucuronide estradiol 17-beta-D-glucuronide (E(2)17betaG), the glutathione conjugates 2,4-dinitrophenyl S-glutathione (DNP-SG) and leukotriene C4 (LTC4), the antimetabolite methotrexate, and the bile acid glycocholate. DNP-SG, LTC4, and E(2)17betaG are transported at moderate affinity and low capacity with Km and Vmax values of 5.7 +/- 1.7 microM and 3.8 +/- 0.1 pmol/mg/min, 5.3 +/- 2.6 microM and 20.2 +/- 5.9 pmol/mg/min, and 25.6 +/- 5.4 microM and 75.6 +/- 5.9 pmol/mg/min, respectively. Methotrexate and glycocholate are transported at low affinity and high capacity with Km and Vmax values of 776 +/- 319 microM and 288 +/- 54 pmol/mg/min and 248 +/- 113 microM and 183 +/- 34 pmol/mg/min, respectively. On the basis of these findings, the osmotic dependence of the transport measured and its inability to transport taurocholate, MRP3, like MRP1 and cMOAT, is concluded to be competent in the transport of glutathione S-conjugates, glucuronides, and methotrexate, albeit at low to moderate affinity. In

  5. Aggressive regimens for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis reduce recurrence.

    PubMed

    Franke, Molly F; Appleton, Sasha C; Mitnick, Carole D; Furin, Jennifer J; Bayona, Jaime; Chalco, Katiuska; Shin, Sonya; Murray, Megan; Becerra, Mercedes C

    2013-03-01

    Recurrent tuberculosis disease occurs within 2 years in as few as 1% and as many as 29% of individuals successfully treated for multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis. A better understanding of treatment-related factors associated with an elevated risk of recurrent tuberculosis after cure is urgently needed to optimize MDR tuberculosis therapy. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among adults successfully treated for MDR tuberculosis in Peru. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to examine whether receipt of an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion from positive to negative was associated with a reduced rate of recurrent tuberculosis. Among 402 patients, the median duration of follow-up was 40.5 months (interquartile range, 21.2-53.4). Receipt of an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion was associated with a lower risk of recurrent tuberculosis (hazard ratio, 0.40 [95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.96]; P = .04). A baseline diagnosis of diabetes mellitus also predicted recurrent tuberculosis (hazard ratio, 10.47 [95% confidence interval, 2.17-50.60]; P = .004). Individuals who received an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion experienced a lower rate of recurrence after cure. Efforts to ensure that an aggressive regimen is accessible to all patients with MDR tuberculosis, such as minimization of sequential ineffective regimens, expanded drug access, and development of new MDR tuberculosis compounds, are critical to reducing tuberculosis recurrence in this population. Patients with diabetes mellitus should be carefully managed during initial treatment and followed closely for recurrent disease.

  6. Mortality in Patients With Septic Shock by Multidrug Resistant Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Busani, Stefano; Serafini, Giulia; Mantovani, Elena; Venturelli, Claudia; Giannella, Maddalena; Viale, Pierluigi; Mussini, Cristina; Cossarizza, Andrea; Girardis, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Patients with septic shock by multidrug resistant (MDR) microorganism maybe considered a specific population of critical patients at very high risk of death in whom the effects of standard sepsis treatment has never been assessed. The objective of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate the risk factors for 30-day mortality and the impact of sepsis management in patients with septic shock caused by MDR bacteria. Patients with septic shock by MDR bacteria admitted to the mixed intensive care unit (ICU) of Modena University Hospital during a 6-year period were studied. The clinical and microbiological characteristics and sepsis treatments provided were analyzed and compared between survivors (S) and nonsurvivors (NS) at 30 days after septic shock appearance. Ninety-four patients were studied. All therapeutic interventions applied to patients during their ICU stay did not show statistical significance between S and NS groups, except for administration of immunoglobulin M (IgM) preparation which were provided more frequently in S group ( P < .05). At the multivariate adjusted analysis, preexisting cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 2.965) and Acinetobacter baumannii infections (OR = 3.197) were independently correlated with an increased risk of 30-day mortality, whereas treatment with IgM preparation was protective (OR = 0.283). This retrospective study showed that in patients with septic shock caused by MDR bacteria, history of cancer and infection sustained by A baumannii increase the risk of mortality and that standard sepsis treatments do not seem to provide any protective effect. Adjunctive therapy with IgM preparation seems to be beneficial, but further appropriate studies are needed to confirm the results observed.

  7. Comparison of levofloxacin versus moxifloxacin for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Koh, Won-Jung; Lee, Seung Heon; Kang, Young Ae; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Choi, Jae Chol; Lee, Jae Ho; Jang, Seung Hun; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Jung, Ki Hwan; Kim, Ki Uk; Choi, Sang Bong; Ryu, Yon Ju; Chan Kim, Kyung; Um, Soojung; Kwon, Yong Soo; Kim, Yee Hyung; Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Kyeongman; Hwang, Yong Il; Kim, Se Joong; Lee, Young Seok; Heo, Eun Young; Lee, Juhee; Ki, Yeo Woon; Shim, Tae Sun; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2013-10-01

    Levofloxacin (LFX) and moxifloxacin (MXF) are the two most frequently recommended fluoroquinolones for treatment of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). However, studies comparing the effectiveness of LFX and MXF among patients with MDR-TB are lacking. To compare the effectiveness of LFX and MXF in terms of culture conversion after 3 months of treatment for MDR-TB. In this prospective multicenter randomized open label trial, we randomly assigned 182 patients with MDR-TB (sensitive to LFX and MXF) to receive either LFX (750 mg/day; 90 patients) or MXF (400 mg/day; 92 patients) with a background drug regimen. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who achieved sputum culture conversion at 3 months of treatment. Secondary outcomes were time to culture conversion and time to smear conversion, with data censored at 3 months, and the proportions of adverse drug reactions. At 3 months of treatment, 68 (88.3%) of the 77 patients in the LFX group and 67 (90.5%) of the 74 in the MXF group showed conversion to negative sputum cultures (odds ratio for LFX compared with MXF, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.27-2.20). Adverse drug reactions were reported in six patients (7.7%) in the LFX group and four (5.2%) in the MXF group (P = 0.75). The choice of LFX or MXF for treatment of patients with MDR-TB may not affect sputum culture conversion at 3 months of treatment. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01055145).

  8. Aggressive Regimens for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Reduce Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Molly F.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Mitnick, Carole D.; Furin, Jennifer J.; Bayona, Jaime; Chalco, Katiuska; Shin, Sonya; Murray, Megan; Becerra, Mercedes C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Recurrent tuberculosis disease occurs within 2 years in as few as 1% and as many as 29% of individuals successfully treated for multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis. A better understanding of treatment-related factors associated with an elevated risk of recurrent tuberculosis after cure is urgently needed to optimize MDR tuberculosis therapy. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among adults successfully treated for MDR tuberculosis in Peru. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to examine whether receipt of an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion from positive to negative was associated with a reduced rate of recurrent tuberculosis. Results. Among 402 patients, the median duration of follow-up was 40.5 months (interquartile range, 21.2–53.4). Receipt of an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion was associated with a lower risk of recurrent tuberculosis (hazard ratio, 0.40 [95% confidence interval, 0.17–0.96]; P = .04). A baseline diagnosis of diabetes mellitus also predicted recurrent tuberculosis (hazard ratio, 10.47 [95% confidence interval, 2.17–50.60]; P = .004). Conclusions. Individuals who received an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion experienced a lower rate of recurrence after cure. Efforts to ensure that an aggressive regimen is accessible to all patients with MDR tuberculosis, such as minimization of sequential ineffective regimens, expanded drug access, and development of new MDR tuberculosis compounds, are critical to reducing tuberculosis recurrence in this population. Patients with diabetes mellitus should be carefully managed during initial treatment and followed closely for recurrent disease. PMID:23223591

  9. Detection of Multidrug Resistant (MDR) and Extremely Drug Resistant (XDR) P. Aeruginosa Isolated from Patients in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Saderi, Horieh; Owlia, Parviz

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was done to detect multidrug resistant (MDR) and extremely drug resistant (XDR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa among strains isolated from patients in Tehran, Iran, due to importance of these phenotypes in treatment of human infections. Methods: Eighty eight P. aeruginosa were isolated from patients in Tehran, Iran, and identified by routine methods and PCR for oprL gene. Their antimicrobial susceptibility to 16 antimicrobial agents from 7 antimicrobial categories (aminoglycosides, carbapenems, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, penicillins/ß-lactamase inhibitors, monobactams, polymyxins) were determined by disk diffusion method, according to recommendation of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Characterization of P. aeruginosa isolates as MDR and XDR was done according to standardized international terminology presented by European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2011. MDR was defined as acquired non-susceptibility to at least one agent in ≥3 antimicrobial categories and XDR was defined as non-susceptibility to at least one agent in ≥6 antimicrobial categories. Results: The rates of susceptibility to antimicrobials were as follows: gentamicin 27.3%, tobramycin 54.5%, amikacin 56.8%, netilmicin 36.4%, imipenem 55.7%, meropenem 55.7%, doripenem 60.2%, ceftazidime 63.6%, cefepime 56.8%, ciprofloxacin 59.1%, levofloxacin 60.2%, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid 37.5%, piperacillin-tazobactam 63.6%, aztreonam 43.2%, colistin 90.9%, polymyxin 95.5%. Altogether, 48 (54.5%) and 29 (33%) isolates were characterized as MDR and XDR, respectively. Discussion: The high frequency of antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in Iran makes epidemiological surveillance of susceptibility of this bacterium more essential for the best selection of empirical antibiotics. PMID:26351496

  10. Urinary tract infections associated with multidrug resistant enteric bacilli: characterization and genetical studies.

    PubMed

    Noor, Nabeela; Ajaz, Munazza; Rasool, Sheikh Ajaz; Pirzada, Zaid A

    2004-07-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most commonly prevalent infections in clinical practice. Escherichia coli is the causative agent in about 85% of community-acquired UTIs, followed by Klebsiella that accounts for 6 to 17% of such infections. Present study is based on the isolation-identification and antibiotic resistance pattern of about 60 indigenous bacterial isolates from UTI patients. Prevalence rates were consistent with those from major recent studies reported in the literature, i.e. 73% isolates were identified as E. coli, 16% as K. pneumoniae and 11% as Proteus sp. Bases of identification included morpho-cultural and biochemical characteristics. To assess the breadth of multidrug resistance among these isolates, culture medium incorporation method was employed using ampicillin, fosfomycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and three aminoglycosides (kanamycin, gentamicin, and streptomycin). Of these isolates, 30% offered multidrug resistance to three or more agents. Among multidrug resistant isolates, 100% were resistant to ampicillin, 47% to streptomycin, 41% to chloramphenicol, gentamicin and tetracycline, 35% offered resistance to kanamycin while only 6% showed resistance to fosfomycin. After curing treatment with acridine orange, some of the isolates lost their resistance, thereby indicating the extrachromosomal location of the resistance determinants. Plasmid DNA (bearing multidrug resistant genes) was isolated from the uncured cells, and was stably transformed into the competent cured recipient cells.

  11. Genome Sequences of Multidrug-Resistant, Colistin-Susceptible and -Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Isolates from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Matthew A.; Timme, Ruth; Lomonaco, Sara; Lascols, Christine; Fisher, Debra J.; Sharma, Shashi K.; Strain, Errol; Allard, Marc W.; Brown, Eric W.; McFarland, Melinda A.; Croley, Tim; Hammack, Thomas S.; Weigel, Linda M.; Anderson, Kevin; Hodge, David R.; Pillai, Segaran P.; Morse, Stephen A.; Khan, Erum

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and spread of colistin resistance among multidrug-resistant (MDR) Klebsiella pneumoniae represent a critical threat to global health. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of 10 MDR, colistin-susceptible and -resistant K. pneumoniae clinical isolates obtained in Pakistan between 2010 and 2013. PMID:27979956

  12. Drug Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae Isolated from ICU, Babol, Northern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Bayani, Masoomeh; Siadati, Sepideh; Rajabnia, Ramzan; Taher, Ali Asghar

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria are spread throughout the world which causes nosocomial infections, especially in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). This study aimed to investigate the resistance pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae isolated from patients in the ICU. During 2011-2012, 30 isolates for each P. aeruginosa and E. cloacae were collected from the patients who acquired nosocomial infection after admition to the ICU at the hospitals affiliated to Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, northern Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed for five category antibiotics by microdilution method. The data were analyzed by SPSS version 20 and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. The highest resistance rate of P. aeruginosa was seen to amikacin (53.3%) followed by ceftazidime (43.3%). Also, 16.7% of E. cloacae was resistant to ceftazidime. Among P. aeruginosa isolates,18 (60%) were MDR while no E. cloacae isolates were MDR. The significant correlation was only demonstrated between MDR P. aeruginosa and the reason of hospitalization (P=0.004). In conclusion, there was alarming amount of P. aeruginosa MDR in patients in the ICU which could lead to a hazardous outcome for the patients. Therefore, new prevention policies regarding to hospital infection should be established. Also, the periodical assessment of bacterial resistance pattern particularly in ICUs should be performed. PMID:24551814

  13. Carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: association with virulence genes and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Rossi Gonçalves, Iara; Dantas, Raquel Cristina Cavalcanti; Ferreira, Melina Lorraine; Batistão, Deivid William da Fonseca; Gontijo-Filho, Paulo Pinto; Ribas, Rosineide Marques

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes frequently nosocomial infections, currently becoming more difficult to treat due to the various resistance mechanisms and different virulence factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk factors independently associated with the development of bacteremia by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa, the frequency of virulence genes in metallo-β-lactamases producers and to evaluate their ability to produce biofilm. We conducted a case-control study in the Uberlândia Federal University - Hospital Clinic, Brazil. Polymerase Chain Reaction was performed for metallo-β-lactamases and virulence genes. Adhesion and biofilm assays were done by quantitative tests. Among the 157 strains analyzed, 73.9% were multidrug-resistant, 43.9% were resistant to carbapenems, 16.1% were phenotypically positive for metallo-β-lactamases, and of these, 10.7% were positive for blaSPM gene and 5.3% positive for blaVIM. The multivariable analysis showed that mechanical ventilation, enteral/nasogastric tubes, primary bacteremia with unknown focus, and inappropriate therapy were independent risk factors associated with bacteremia. All tested strains were characterized as strongly biofilm producers. A higher mortality was found among patients with bacteremia by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strains, associated independently with extrinsic risk factors, however it was not evident the association with the presence of virulence and metallo-β-lactamases genes. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Bactericidal activity and mechanism of action of copper-sputtered flexible surfaces against multidrug-resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ballo, Myriam K S; Rtimi, Sami; Mancini, Stefano; Kiwi, John; Pulgarin, César; Entenza, José M; Bizzini, Alain

    2016-07-01

    Using direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS), we generated flexible copper polyester surfaces (Cu-PES) and investigated their antimicrobial activity against a range of multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens including eight Gram-positive isolates (three methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA], four vancomycin-resistant enterococci, one methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis) and four Gram-negative strains (one extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing [ESBL] Escherichia coli, one ESBL Klebsiella pneumoniae, one imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and one ciprofloxacin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii). Bactericidal activity (≥3 log10 CFU reduction of the starting inoculum) was reached within 15-30 min exposure to Cu-PES. Antimicrobial activity of Cu-PES persisted in the absence of oxygen and against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria containing elevated levels of catalases, indicating that reactive oxygen species (ROS) do not play a primary role in the killing process. The decrease in cell viability of MRSA ATCC 43300 and Enterococcus faecalis V583 correlated with the progressive loss of cytoplasmic membrane integrity both under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, suggesting that Cu-PES mediated killing is primarily induced by disruption of the cytoplasmic membrane function. Overall, we here present novel antimicrobial copper surfaces with improved stability and sustainability and provide further insights into their mechanism of killing.

  15. identification of Pseudomonas spp. as amoeba-resistant microorganisms in isolates of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    José Maschio, Vinicius; Corção, Gertrudes; Rott, Marilise Brittes

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a "Trojan horse" of the microbial world. The aim of this study was to identify the presence of Pseudomonas as an amoeba-resistant microorganism in 12 isolates of Acanthamoeba. All isolates showed the genus Pseudomonas spp. as amoeba-resistant microorganisms. Thus, one can see that the Acanthamoeba isolates studied are hosts of Pseudomonas.

  16. Molecular Characterization of Multidrug Resistant Hospital Isolates Using the Antimicrobial Resistance Determinant Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Leski, Tomasz A.; Vora, Gary J.; Barrows, Brian R.; Pimentel, Guillermo; House, Brent L.; Nicklasson, Matilda; Wasfy, Momtaz; Abdel-Maksoud, Mohamed; Taitt, Chris Rowe

    2013-01-01

    Molecular methods that enable the detection of antimicrobial resistance determinants are critical surveillance tools that are necessary to aid in curbing the spread of antibiotic resistance. In this study, we describe the use of the Antimicrobial Resistance Determinant Microarray (ARDM) that targets 239 unique genes that confer resistance to 12 classes of antimicrobial compounds, quaternary amines and streptothricin for the determination of multidrug resistance (MDR) gene profiles. Fourteen reference MDR strains, which either were genome, sequenced or possessed well characterized drug resistance profiles were used to optimize detection algorithms and threshold criteria to ensure the microarray's effectiveness for unbiased characterization of antimicrobial resistance determinants in MDR strains. The subsequent testing of Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae hospital isolates revealed the presence of several antibiotic resistance genes [e.g. belonging to TEM, SHV, OXA and CTX-M classes (and OXA and CTX-M subfamilies) of β-lactamases] and their assemblages which were confirmed by PCR and DNA sequence analysis. When combined with results from the reference strains, ∼25% of the ARDM content was confirmed as effective for representing allelic content from both Gram-positive and –negative species. Taken together, the ARDM identified MDR assemblages containing six to 18 unique resistance genes in each strain tested, demonstrating its utility as a powerful tool for molecular epidemiological investigations of antimicrobial resistance in clinically relevant bacterial pathogens. PMID:23936031

  17. Molecular characterization of multidrug resistant hospital isolates using the antimicrobial resistance determinant microarray.

    PubMed

    Leski, Tomasz A; Vora, Gary J; Barrows, Brian R; Pimentel, Guillermo; House, Brent L; Nicklasson, Matilda; Wasfy, Momtaz; Abdel-Maksoud, Mohamed; Taitt, Chris Rowe

    2013-01-01

    Molecular methods that enable the detection of antimicrobial resistance determinants are critical surveillance tools that are necessary to aid in curbing the spread of antibiotic resistance. In this study, we describe the use of the Antimicrobial Resistance Determinant Microarray (ARDM) that targets 239 unique genes that confer resistance to 12 classes of antimicrobial compounds, quaternary amines and streptothricin for the determination of multidrug resistance (MDR) gene profiles. Fourteen reference MDR strains, which either were genome, sequenced or possessed well characterized drug resistance profiles were used to optimize detection algorithms and threshold criteria to ensure the microarray's effectiveness for unbiased characterization of antimicrobial resistance determinants in MDR strains. The subsequent testing of Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae hospital isolates revealed the presence of several antibiotic resistance genes [e.g. belonging to TEM, SHV, OXA and CTX-M classes (and OXA and CTX-M subfamilies) of β-lactamases] and their assemblages which were confirmed by PCR and DNA sequence analysis. When combined with results from the reference strains, ~25% of the ARDM content was confirmed as effective for representing allelic content from both Gram-positive and -negative species. Taken together, the ARDM identified MDR assemblages containing six to 18 unique resistance genes in each strain tested, demonstrating its utility as a powerful tool for molecular epidemiological investigations of antimicrobial resistance in clinically relevant bacterial pathogens.

  18. Multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms may determine Crohn's disease behavior in patients from Rio de Janeiro

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ana Teresa P; Fróes, Renata S B; Esberard, Barbara C; Santos, Juliana C V C; Rapozo, Davy C. M.; Grinman, Ana B; Simão, Tatiana A; Neto, Pedro Nicolau; Luiz, Ronir R; Carneiro, Antonio José V; de Souza, Heitor S P; Ribeiro-Pinto, Luis Felipe

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Conflicting data from studies on the potential role of multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease may result from the analysis of genetically and geographically distinct populations. Here, we investigated whether multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms are associated with inflammatory bowel diseases in patients from Rio de Janeiro. METHODS: We analyzed 123 Crohn's disease patients and 83 ulcerative colitis patients to determine the presence of the multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms C1236T, G2677T and C3435T. In particular, the genotype frequencies of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients were analyzed. Genotype-phenotype associations with major clinical characteristics were established, and estimated risks were calculated for the mutations. RESULTS: No significant difference was observed in the genotype frequencies of the multidrug resistance 1 G2677T/A and C3435T polymorphisms between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients. In contrast, the C1236T polymorphism was significantly more common in Crohn's disease than in ulcerative colitis (p = 0.047). A significant association was also found between the multidrug resistance 1 C3435T polymorphism and the stricturing form of Crohn's disease (OR: 4.13; p = 0.009), whereas no association was found with penetrating behavior (OR: 0.33; p = 0.094). In Crohn's disease, a positive association was also found between the C3435T polymorphism and corticosteroid resistance/refractoriness (OR: 4.14; p = 0.010). However, no significant association was found between multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms and UC subphenotypic categories. CONCLUSION: The multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphism C3435T is associated with the stricturing phenotype and an inappropriate response to therapy in Crohn's disease. This association with Crohn's disease may support additional pathogenic roles for the multidrug resistance 1 gene in regulating gut

  19. Prevalence of Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria on Fresh Vegetables Collected from Farmers' Markets in Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Karumathil, Deepti Prasad; Yin, Hsin-Bai; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2016-08-01

    This study determined the prevalence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii on fresh vegetables collected from farmers' markets in Connecticut. One hundred samples each of fresh carrots, potatoes, and lettuce were sampled and streaked on selective media, namely Leeds Acinetobacter and MDR Acinetobacter agars. All morphologically different colonies from MDR Acinetobacter agar were identified by using Gram staining, biochemical tests, and PCR. In addition, susceptibility of the isolates to 10 antibiotics commonly used in humans, namely imipenem, ceftriaxone, cefepime, minocycline, erythromycin, colistin-sulfate, streptomycin, neomycin, doxycycline, and rifampin was determined by using an antibiotic disk diffusion assay. The results revealed that only two samples of potato and one sample of lettuce yielded A. baumannii. In addition, all carrot samples were found to be negative for the organism. However, several other opportunistic, MDR human pathogens, such as Burkholderia cepacia (1% potatoes, 5% carrots, and none in lettuce), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (6% potatoes, 2% lettuce, and none in carrots), and Pseudomonas luteola (9% potatoes, 3% carrots, and none in lettuce) were recovered from the vegetables. Antibiotic susceptibility screening of the isolates revealed high resistance rates for the following: ceftriaxone (6 of 6), colistin-sulfate (5 of 6), erythromycin (5 of 6), and streptomycin (4 of 6) in B. cepacia; colistin-sulfate (11 of 11) and imipenem (10 of 11) in P. luteola; colistin-sulfate (8 of 8), ceftriaxone (8 of 8), cefepime (7 of 8), erythromycin (5 of 8), and imipenem (4 of 8) in S. maltophilia; and imipenem (3 of 3), ceftriaxone (3 of 3), erythromycin (3 of 3), and streptomycin (3 of 3) in A. baumannii. The results revealed the presence of MDR bacteria, including human pathogens on fresh produce, thereby highlighting the potential health risk in consumers, especially those with a compromised immune system.

  20. Prevention of Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant Organisms during Catheter Exchange using Antimicrobial Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, Joel; Jiang, Ying; Hachem, Ray; Chaftari, Ann-Marie; Raad, Issam I.

    2014-01-01

    Exchanging a central venous catheter (CVC) over a guide wire for a fresh uncoated CVC in the presence of bacteremia can result in cross-infection of the newly exchanged CVC. A recent retrospective clinical study showed that exchanging a catheter over a guide wire in the presence of bacteremia using an antimicrobial minocycline-rifampin (M/R) catheter may improve outcomes. To expand on this, we developed an in vitro cross-contamination model of exchange to evaluate the efficacy of different antimicrobial CVCs in preventing cross-contamination of multidrug-resistant organisms during exchange. Uncoated CVCs were allowed to form biofilm by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. After 24 h, the biofilm-colonized CVCs were placed in a glass tube containing bovine calf serum plus Mueller-Hinton broth, and each catheter was exchanged over a guide wire for a fresh uncoated or an M/R-, chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHX/SS)-, or chlorhexidine-M/R (CHX-M/R)-coated CVC. Cross-contamination of exchanged catheters was enumerated by sonication and quantitative plating methods. The exchange of M/R CVCs completely prevented cross-contamination by MRSA biofilms compared to control exchanged CVCs (P < 0.0001). Exchange with CHX/SS CVCs reduced but did not completely prevent cross-contamination by MRSA (P = 0.005). Exchange with CHX-M/R CVCs completely prevented cross-contamination by MRSA, P. aeruginosa, and C. albicans biofilms (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, CHX-M/R CVCs were superior to M/R CVCs against P. aeruginosa and C. albicans (P = 0.003) and were superior to CHX/SS CVCs against MRSA and P. aeruginosa (P = 0.01). In conclusion, exchange with the novel CHX-M/R CVC was the only exchange effective in completely and concurrently preventing cross-contamination from bacteria and Candida. PMID:24957841

  1. Molecular characterization of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients with urinary tract infections in Southern Poland.

    PubMed

    Pobiega, Monika; Maciąg, Joanna; Chmielarczyk, Agnieszka; Romaniszyn, Dorota; Pomorska-Wesolowska, Monika; Ziolkowski, Grzegorz; Heczko, Piotr B; Bulanda, Malgorzata; Wojkowska-Mach, Jadwiga

    2015-11-01

    Due to the clinical threat posed by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa and importance of virulence factors produced in infection, 21 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa were analyzed. 42.8% metallo-beta-lactamases-positive strains were identified. 85.7% of strains were meropenem resistant. 14.2% of strains were MDR; 38%, extensively drug-resistant (XDR). ExoY was present in all strains; exoT, in 95.2%; exoS, in 90.5%; exoU, in 47.6%. Eight XDR strains were typed using multilocus sequence typing: 4 as ST235, 2 as ST260, 2 as ST654 and ST234. MDR P. aeruginosa were isolated from hospitalized patients and among those from the community. Our study demonstrates the serious clinical issues posed by MDR P. aeruginosa and underscores the need for new treatment.

  2. Increased cellular internalization of amphiphiles in a multidrug-resistant CHO cell line.

    PubMed

    Boscoboinik, D; Epand, R M

    1989-10-30

    The uptake of labeled palmitoyl carnitine and palmitoyl lysophosphatidylcholine by CHO cells was studied by measuring the extractability of these amphiphiles by bovine serum albumin. A multidrug-resistant cell line, CHRC5, showed a more rapid uptake, compared with the parental line, of these amphiphiles into a pool that was no longer susceptible to extraction with bovine serum albumin. The more rapid uptake by the drug-resistant cell line was reversed back to the rates observed with the parental cell line in the presence of verapamil, quinacrine or cyclosporin A. These latter three drugs also reverse the multidrug-resistant phenotype. These results demonstrate a relationship between the rate of amphiphile uptake and multidrug resistance.

  3. Extra-pulmonary primary multidrug-resistant tubercular lymphadenitis in an HIV negative patient

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Surya; Saheer, S; Hassan, Ghulam; Parengal, Jabeed

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman without any history of prior antituberculosis treatment presented with cervical lymphadenopathy and a cold abscess near medial end of clavicle of 5 months duration. Pus culture and sensitivity revealed Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to rifampicin and isoniazid. Thus she was diagnosed as a case of primary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and treated with second line drugs according to culture susceptibility pattern. On completion of therapy, patent showed good clinical response. This case highlights the observation that even extra-pulmonary primary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis can be successfully treated with currently available second line drugs. PMID:22605844

  4. Virulence and Genomic Feature of Multidrug Resistant Campylobacter jejuni Isolated from Broiler Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haihong; Ren, Ni; Han, Jing; Foley, Steven L.; Iqbal, Zahid; Cheng, Guyue; Kuang, Xiuhua; Liu, Jie; Liu, Zhenli; Dai, Menghong; Wang, Yulian; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the molecular mechanism involved in multidrug resistance and virulence of Campylobacter jejuni isolated from broiler chickens. The virulence of six multidrug resistant C. jejuni was determined by in vitro and in vivo methods. The de novo whole genome sequencing technology and molecular biology methods were used to analyze the genomic features associated with the multidrug resistance and virulence of a selected isolate (C. jejuni 1655). The comparative genomic analyses revealed a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms, deletions, rearrangements, and inversions in C. jejuni 1655 compared to reference C. jejuni genomes. The co-emergence of Thr-86-Ile mutation in gyrA gene, A2075G mutation in 23S rRNA gene, tetO, aphA and aadE genes and pTet plasmid in C. jejuni 1655 contributed its multidrug resistance to fluoroquinolones, macrolides, tetracycline, and aminoglycosides. The combination of multiple virulence genes may work together to confer the relative higher virulence in C. jejuni 1655. The co-existence of mobile gene elements (e.g., pTet) and CRISPR-Cas system in C. jejuni 1655 may play an important role in the gene transfer and immune defense. The present study provides basic information of phenotypic and genomic features of C. jejuni 1655, a strain recently isolated from a chicken displaying multidrug resistance and relatively high level of virulence. PMID:27790202

  5. A novel multidrug resistance plasmid isolated from an Escherichia coli strain resistant to aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Li, Shasha; Xie, Zhijing; Yang, Fangfang; Sun, Yani; Zhu, Yanli; Zhao, Xiaomin; Jiang, Shijin

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies have reported several different plasmids that confer multidrug resistance (MDR) including resistance to aminoglycosides. In this study, we investigated the aminoglycoside resistance patterns for 224 Escherichia coli isolates from diseased chickens and ducks in China, characterized a novel MDR plasmid, and collected prevalence data on similar resistance plasmids. Antibiotic susceptibilities were determined using disc diffusion and the microdilution method. The plasmid pXZ was analysed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) with EcoRI and SalI, and sequenced. The prevalence of similar resistance plasmids was assessed by multiplex PCR and by RFLP analysis. Among the 224 E. coli isolates, 189 (84.4%) were resistant to streptomycin, 125 (55.8%) were resistant to kanamycin, 116 (51.8%) were resistant to gentamicin, 106 (47.3%) were resistant to neomycin and 98 (43.8%) were resistant to amikacin. Among the 224 E. coli isolates, 17 contained a plasmid with the MDR-encoding region of pXZ, which showed high-level resistance to aminoglycosides (MICs of gentamicin and amikacin ≥ 512 mg/L). The plasmid pXZ was digested into five fragments by EcoRI and six fragments by SalI. The plasmid pXZ was a circular DNA molecule of 76635 bp with a 51.65% guanine + cytosine content and included four resistance genes (rmtB, fosA3, bla(TEM-1) and bla(CTX-M-24)). A novel MDR plasmid, pXZ, harbouring four resistance genes (rmtB, fosA3, bla(TEM-1) and bla(CTX-M)) was identified. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an aminoglycoside resistance plasmid harbouring the fosA3 gene.

  6. Barriers to reaching the targets for tuberculosis control: multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Blöndal, Kai

    2007-05-01

    The development and expansion of WHOs DOTS strategy was successful, with 83% of the worlds population living in countries or parts of countries covered by this strategy by the end of 2004. Treatment success in the 2003 DOTS cohort of 1.7 million patients was 82% on average, close to the 85% target. Treatment success was below average in the African Region (72%), which can be partly attributed to occurrence of HIV co-infection, and in the European Region (75%), partly due to drug resistance. Drug resistance, specifically multidrug resistance and extensive drug resistance, is a serious threat to public health in all countries, especially in the Russian Federation, where the highest rates of multidrug resistance are presently accompanied by a rapid increase in HIV infection. Based on the experience of the first projects approved by the Green Light Committee, the treatment success of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is lower than that of drug-susceptible cases, but nevertheless reaches 70%. The collaborative effort of different organizations, professionals and communities is needed to address the development and spread of multidrug resistance and extensive drug resistance, which combined with the epidemic of HIV infection is one of the barriers to dealing effectively with TB. This effort should be directed towards facilitating the diagnosis and treatment of TB patients, in particular by improving access to drug susceptibility testing and strengthening treatment delivery by rigorous adherence to DOTS as outlined by the Stop TB Partnership.

  7. ACSSuT Multi-Drug Resistance Among Salmonella Isolates of Animal Origin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BACKGROUND: Multi-drug resistant (MDR) Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 (DT104) emerged in the mid-1990’s in humans and animals with infection resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. DT104 was characterized by resistance to Ampicillin, Chloramphenicol, Streptomycin, Sulfa, and Tetracycline (AC...

  8. Modified live Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccine, AQUAVAC-ESC, lacks multidrug resistance plasmids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plasmid mediated antibiotic resistance was first discovered in Edwardsiella ictaluri in the early 1990’s, and in 2007 an E. ictaluri isolate harboring an IncA/C plasmid was recovered from a moribund channel catfish infected with the bacterium. Due to the identification of multidrug resistance plasm...

  9. Prevalence and multidrug resistance of Escherichia coli from community acquired infections in Lagos, Nigeria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Escherichia coli is one of the most frequent causes of bacterial infections among humans. The emergence of multi-drug resistance (MDR; resistance to >2 more antimicrobials) in E. coli is of great concern due to the complications encountered in its treatment in a resource constrained economy. In th...

  10. Primary Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 2 Regions, Eastern Siberia, Russian Federation

    PubMed Central

    Zhdanova, Svetlana; Ogarkov, Oleg; Boyarinova, Galina; Alexeeva, Galina; Pholwat, Suporn; Zorkaltseva, Elena; Houpt, Eric R.; Savilov, Eugeniy

    2013-01-01

    Of 235 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients who had not received tuberculosis treatment in the Irkutsk oblast and the Sakha Republic (Yakutia), eastern Siberia, 61 (26%) were multidrug resistant. A novel strain, S 256, clustered among these isolates and carried eis-related kanamycin resistance, indicating a need for locally informed diagnosis and treatment strategies. PMID:24047678

  11. Primary multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 2 regions, Eastern Siberia, Russian Federation.

    PubMed

    Zhdanova, Svetlana; Heysell, Scott K; Ogarkov, Oleg; Boyarinova, Galina; Alexeeva, Galina; Pholwat, Suporn; Zorkaltseva, Elena; Houpt, Eric R; Savilov, Eugeniy

    2013-10-01

    Of 235 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients who had not received tuberculosis treatment in the Irkutsk oblast and the Sakha Republic (Yakutia), eastern Siberia, 61 (26%) were multidrug resistant. A novel strain, S 256, clustered among these isolates and carried eis-related kanamycin resistance, indicating a need for locally informed diagnosis and treatment strategies.

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter sp. Strains from Colombian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Falquet, Laurent; Reguero, María T.; Mantilla, José R.; Valenzuela, Emilia M.; González, Elsa; Cepeda, Alexandra; Escalante, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of the strains Acinetobacter baumannii 107m, Acinetobacter nosocomialis 28F, and Acinetobacter pittii 42F, isolated from Colombian hospitals, are reported here. These isolates are causative of nosocomial infections and are classified as multidrug resistant, as they showed resistance to four different antibiotic groups. PMID:24285656

  13. Pre-multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strain associated with disseminated tuberculosis in a pet dog.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Ana; Perdigão, João; Canto, Ana; Albuquerque, Teresa; Leal, Nuno; Macedo, Rita; Portugal, Isabel; Cunha, Mónica V

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to isoniazid, ethambutol, and streptomycin was detected in a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, belonging to the Beijing family lineage, isolated from two nodule exudates of a Yorkshire terrier with generalized tuberculosis. This report alerts medical practitioners to the risk of dissemination of pre-multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (preMDR-TB) through exposure to M. tuberculosis-shedding pets.

  14. Pre-Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Strain Associated with Disseminated Tuberculosis in a Pet Dog

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, João; Canto, Ana; Albuquerque, Teresa; Leal, Nuno; Macedo, Rita; Portugal, Isabel; Cunha, Mónica V.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to isoniazid, ethambutol, and streptomycin was detected in a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, belonging to the Beijing family lineage, isolated from two nodule exudates of a Yorkshire terrier with generalized tuberculosis. This report alerts medical practitioners to the risk of dissemination of pre-multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (preMDR-TB) through exposure to M. tuberculosis-shedding pets. PMID:24153119

  15. Biofilm-Forming Capability of Highly Virulent, Multidrug-Resistant Candida auris

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Leighann; Ramage, Gordon; Kean, Ryan; Borman, Andrew; Johnson, Elizabeth M.; Richardson, Malcolm D.

    2017-01-01

    The emerging multidrug-resistant yeast pathogen Candida auris has attracted considerable attention as a source of healthcare–associated infections. We report that this highly virulent yeast has the capacity to form antifungal resistant biofilms sensitive to the disinfectant chlorhexidine in vitro. PMID:28098553

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain from Chile

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Bruno S.; García, Patricia; Domínguez Yévenes, Mariana; Lima, Celia; Bello-Toledo, Helia; González-Rocha, Gerardo; Amyes, Sebastian G. B.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii strain Ab5 was isolated in the year 2007 in Chile, being one of the first multidrug-resistant (MDR) cases reported in the country. Here, we present the very first draft genome sequence of an MDR Chilean strain, which shows the presence of diverse resistance and acquired virulence genes. PMID:26139713

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain from Chile.

    PubMed

    Opazo, Andrés; Lopes, Bruno S; García, Patricia; Domínguez Yévenes, Mariana; Lima, Celia; Bello-Toledo, Helia; González-Rocha, Gerardo; Amyes, Sebastian G B

    2015-07-02

    Acinetobacter baumannii strain Ab5 was isolated in the year 2007 in Chile, being one of the first multidrug-resistant (MDR) cases reported in the country. Here, we present the very first draft genome sequence of an MDR Chilean strain, which shows the presence of diverse resistance and acquired virulence genes. Copyright © 2015 Opazo et al.

  18. Comparative genomics of the IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid family

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids belonging to the IncA/C plasmid family are widely distributed among Salmonella and other enterobacterial isolates from agricultural sources and have, at least once, also been identified in a drug resistant Yersinia pestis isolate (IP275) from Madagascar. Here, we...

  19. Transmission of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in rural Bangladesh: lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Gumusboga, A; Aung, K J M; Rigouts, L; Van Deun, A

    2012-09-21

    We report community transmission of multidrug-resistant (MDR-) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) documented by fingerprinting, with secondary cases appearing over a period of 10 years. The index case failed MDR-TB treatment, with amplification to XDR-TB after refusing treatment when first diagnosed and developing pre-XDR-TB on private treatment. Some of the first MDR-TB patients were not started on appropriate treatment due to delayed diagnosis or to excessively rigid application of National TB Programme guidelines. Early presumptive MDR- and XDR-TB diagnosis and removal of barriers, such as obligatory hospitalisation, could have stopped this trend of resistance amplification and transmission.

  20. Antibiotic resistance: What is so special about multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria?

    PubMed Central

    Exner, Martin; Bhattacharya, Sanjay; Christiansen, Bärbel; Gebel, Jürgen; Goroncy-Bermes, Peter; Hartemann, Philippe; Heeg, Peter; Ilschner, Carola; Kramer, Axel; Larson, Elaine; Merkens, Wolfgang; Mielke, Martin; Oltmanns, Peter; Ross, Birgit; Rotter, Manfred; Schmithausen, Ricarda Maria; Sonntag, Hans-Günther; Trautmann, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    In the past years infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria have dramatically increased in all parts of the world. This consensus paper is based on presentations, subsequent discussions and an appraisal of current literature by a panel of international experts invited by the Rudolf Schülke Stiftung, Hamburg. It deals with the epidemiology and the inherent properties of Gram-negative bacteria, elucidating the patterns of the spread of antibiotic resistance, highlighting reservoirs as well as transmission pathways and risk factors for infection, mortality, treatment and prevention options as well as the consequences of their prevalence in livestock. Following a global, One Health approach and based on the evaluation of the existing knowledge about these pathogens, this paper gives recommendations for prevention and infection control measures as well as proposals for various target groups to tackle the threats posed by Gram-negative bacteria and prevent the spread and emergence of new antibiotic resistances. PMID:28451516

  1. Finding Novel Antibiotic Substances from Medicinal Plants – Antimicrobial Properties of Nigella Sativa Directed against Multidrug-resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bakal, Seher Nancy; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2017-01-01

    The progressive rise in multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial strains poses serious problems in the treatment of infectious diseases. While the number of newly developed antimicrobial compounds has greatly fallen, the resistance of pathogens against commonly prescribed drugs is further increasing. This rise in resistance illustrates the need for developing novel therapeutic and preventive antimicrobial options. The medicinal herb Nigella sativa and its derivatives constitute promising candidates. In a comprehensive literature survey (using the PubMed data base), we searched for publications on the antimicrobial effects of N. sativa particularly directed against MDR bacterial strains. In vitro studies published between 2000 and 2015 revealed that N. sativa exerted potent antibacterial effects against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative species including resistant strains. For instance, N. sativa inhibited the growth of bacteria causing significant gastrointestinal morbidity such as Salmonella, Helicobacter pylori, and Escherichia coli. However, Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa displayed resistance against black cumin seed extracts. In conclusion, our literature survey revealed potent antimicrobial properties of N. sativa against MDR strains in vitro that should be further investigated in order to develop novel therapeutic perspectives for combating infectious diseases particularly caused by MDR strains. PMID:28386474

  2. A potential plasmid-curing agent, 8-epidiosbulbin E acetate, from Dioscorea bulbifera L. against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shriram, Varsha; Jahagirdar, Sheetal; Latha, C; Kumar, Vinay; Puranik, Vedavati; Rojatkar, Supada; Dhakephalkar, Prashant K; Shitole, M G

    2008-11-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of an aqueous methanolic extract of Dioscorea bulbifera L. bulbs was performed using organic solvents. A novel plasmid-curing compound was identified as 8-epidiosbulbin E acetate (EEA) (norditerpene) on the basis of modern spectroscopic analysis and X-ray crystallography. EEA exhibited broad-spectrum plasmid-curing activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria, including vancomycin-resistant enterococci. EEA cured antibiotic resistance plasmids (R-plasmids) from clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with 12-48% curing efficiency. The reference plasmids of Bacillus subtilis (pUB110), E. coli (RP4), P. aeruginosa (RIP64) and Salmonella typhi (R136) were cured with efficiency ranging from 16% to 64%. EEA-mediated R-plasmid curing decreased the minimal inhibitory concentration of antibiotics against MDR bacteria, thus making antibiotic treatment more effective. The antibiotic resistance pattern revealed that the compound was effective in the reversal of bacterial resistance to various antibiotics. In addition, the compound did not show any cytotoxicity against a broad range of human cancer cell lines, namely MCF-7 (breast cancer), SiHa (cervical cancer) and A431 (epidermal carcinoma), and hence has the potential to be used as a lead compound for drug discovery programmes.

  3. Finding Novel Antibiotic Substances from Medicinal Plants - Antimicrobial Properties of Nigella Sativa Directed against Multidrug-resistant Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bakal, Seher Nancy; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M

    2017-03-01

    The progressive rise in multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial strains poses serious problems in the treatment of infectious diseases. While the number of newly developed antimicrobial compounds has greatly fallen, the resistance of pathogens against commonly prescribed drugs is further increasing. This rise in resistance illustrates the need for developing novel therapeutic and preventive antimicrobial options. The medicinal herb Nigella sativa and its derivatives constitute promising candidates. In a comprehensive literature survey (using the PubMed data base), we searched for publications on the antimicrobial effects of N. sativa particularly directed against MDR bacterial strains. In vitro studies published between 2000 and 2015 revealed that N. sativa exerted potent antibacterial effects against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative species including resistant strains. For instance, N. sativa inhibited the growth of bacteria causing significant gastrointestinal morbidity such as Salmonella, Helicobacter pylori, and Escherichia coli. However, Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa displayed resistance against black cumin seed extracts. In conclusion, our literature survey revealed potent antimicrobial properties of N. sativa against MDR strains in vitro that should be further investigated in order to develop novel therapeutic perspectives for combating infectious diseases particularly caused by MDR strains.

  4. Enterococcus faecalis as multidrug resistance strains in clinical isolates in Imam Reza Hospital in Kermanshah, Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, F; Ghafourian, S; Mohebi, R; Taherikalani, M; Pakzad, I; Valadbeigi, H; Hatami, V; Sadeghifard, N

    2015-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the prevalence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus in E. faecalis and E. faecium and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, then dominant genes responsible for vancomycin resistance were determined. For this propose, 180 clinical isolates of Enterococcus were subjected for identification and antibiotic susceptibility assay. Then, the gene responsible vancomycin resistant strains were determined. The results demonstrated the E. faecalis as a dominant Enterococcus. Resistance to erythromycin was dominant and multidrug resistance strains observed in E. faecalis. vanA was responsible for vancomycin resistance. In conclusion, a high rate of resistance to antibiotics in Enterococcus is clearly problematic, and a novel strategy is needed to decrease resistance in Enterococcus.

  5. Emergence of Imipenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates from Egypt Coharboring VIM and IMP Carbapenemases.

    PubMed

    El-Domany, Ramadan Ahmed; Emara, Mohamed; El-Magd, Mohammed A; Moustafa, Walaa H; Abdeltwab, Nesma M

    2017-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important human pathogen and the leading cause of nosocomial infections. P. aeruginosa is characterized by massive intrinsic resistance to a multiple classes of antibiotics with carbapenems being the most potent inhibitor of P. aeruginosa and considered the first choice for its treatment. Therefore, it is crucial to investigate novel mechanisms of resistance of P. aeruginosa to carbapenems for achieving successful therapy. A total of 114 P. aeruginosa isolates from two university hospitals in Egypt were recruited in this study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed that 50 isolates (43.8%) exhibited multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype, of them 14 isolates (12.2%) were imipenem (IPM)-resistant. Of these 14 isolates, 13 isolates (11.4%) exhibited the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) phenotype. MBLs encoding genes, VIM and IMP, were identified by PCR. PCR results revealed that four isolates harbored the VIM gene alone, one isolate harbored IMP gene alone, and four isolates harbored both genes. The correct size of PCR products of VIM and IMP genes (390 and 188 bp, respectively) were sequenced to confirm results of PCR and to look for any possible polymorphism among MBL genes of tested isolates. Data analysis of these sequences showed 100% identity of nucleotide sequences of MBL genes among tested Egyptian patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report of IMP carbapenemase-encoding gene in Africa and the first detection of the emergence of P. aeruginosa coproducing VIM and IMP genes in Egypt.

  6. Induction of apoptosis and reversal of permeability glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance of MCF-7/ADM by ginsenoside Rh2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Gong, Jian; Zhang, Huilai; Kong, Di

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a phenomenon that cancer cells develop a cross-resistant phenotype against several unrelated drugs, and permeability glycoprotein derived from the overexpression of multidrug resistance gene 1 has been taken as the most significant cause of multidrug resistance. In the present study, ginsenoside Rh2 was used to reverse permeability glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance of MCF-7/ADM cell line. Effects of ginsenoside Rh2 on the apoptotic process and caspase-3 activity of MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADM cell lines were determined using flow cytometry and microplate reader. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium test was conducted to assess the IC50 values of ginsenoside Rh2 and adriamycin on MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADM cultures; Rhodamin 123 assay was used to assess the retention of permeability glycoprotein after ginsenoside Rh2 treatment; flow cytometry and real time polymerase chain reaction were used to determine the expression levels of permeability glycoprotein and multidrug resistance gene 1 in drug-resistant cells and their parental cells after exposure to ginsenoside Rh2. The results showed that ginsenoside Rh2, except for inducing apoptosis, had the ability to reverse multidrug resistance in MCF-7/ADM cell line without changing the expression levels of permeability glycoprotein and multidrug resistance gene 1. Our findings provided some valuable information for the application of ginsenoside Rh2 in cancer therapy, especially for multidrug resistance reversal in clinic. PMID:26191135

  7. Induction of apoptosis and reversal of permeability glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance of MCF-7/ADM by ginsenoside Rh2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Gong, Jian; Zhang, Huilai; Kong, Di

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a phenomenon that cancer cells develop a cross-resistant phenotype against several unrelated drugs, and permeability glycoprotein derived from the overexpression of multidrug resistance gene 1 has been taken as the most significant cause of multidrug resistance. In the present study, ginsenoside Rh2 was used to reverse permeability glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance of MCF-7/ADM cell line. Effects of ginsenoside Rh2 on the apoptotic process and caspase-3 activity of MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADM cell lines were determined using flow cytometry and microplate reader. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium test was conducted to assess the IC50 values of ginsenoside Rh2 and adriamycin on MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADM cultures; Rhodamin 123 assay was used to assess the retention of permeability glycoprotein after ginsenoside Rh2 treatment; flow cytometry and real time polymerase chain reaction were used to determine the expression levels of permeability glycoprotein and multidrug resistance gene 1 in drug-resistant cells and their parental cells after exposure to ginsenoside Rh2. The results showed that ginsenoside Rh2, except for inducing apoptosis, had the ability to reverse multidrug resistance in MCF-7/ADM cell line without changing the expression levels of permeability glycoprotein and multidrug resistance gene 1. Our findings provided some valuable information for the application of ginsenoside Rh2 in cancer therapy, especially for multidrug resistance reversal in clinic.

  8. Isolation and Genetic Analysis of Multidrug Resistant Bacteria from Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Shailesh K.; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Severe diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) patients visiting Sir Sunderlal Hospital, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, were selected for this study. Bacteria were isolated from swab and deep tissue of 42 patients, for examining their prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity. DFUs of majority of the patients were found infected with Enterococcus spp. (47.61%), Escherichia coli (35.71%), Staphylococcus spp. (33.33%), Alcaligenes spp. (30.95%), Pseudomonas spp. (30.95%), and Stenotrophomonas spp. (30.95%). Antibiotic susceptibility assay of 142 bacteria with 16 antibiotics belonging to eight classes showed the presence of 38 (26.76%) isolates with multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotypes. MDR character appeared to be governed by integrons as class 1 integrons were detected in 26 (68.42%) isolates. Altogether six different arrays of genes (aadA1, aadB, aadAV, dhfrV, dhfrXII, and dhfrXVII) were found within class 1 integron. Gene cassette dhfrAXVII-aadAV (1.6 kb) was present in 12 (3 Gram positive and 9 Gram negative) isolates and was conserved across all the isolates as evident from RFLP analysis. In addition to the presence of class 1 integron, six β-lactamase resistance encoding genes namely blaTEM, blaSHV, blaOXA, blaCTX−M−gp1, blaCTX−M−gp2, and blaCTX−M−gp9 and two methicillin resistance genes namely mecA and femA and vancomycin resistance encoding genes (vanA and vanB) were identified in different isolates. Majority of the MDR isolates were positive for blaTEM (89.47%), blaOXA (52.63%), and blaCTX−M−gp1 (34.21%). To our knowledge, this is the first report of molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from DFUs from North India. In conclusion, findings of this study suggest that class-1 integrons and β-lactamase genes contributed to the MDR in above bacteria. PMID:26779134

  9. Isolation and Genetic Analysis of Multidrug Resistant Bacteria from Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Shailesh K; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Severe diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) patients visiting Sir Sunderlal Hospital, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, were selected for this study. Bacteria were isolated from swab and deep tissue of 42 patients, for examining their prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity. DFUs of majority of the patients were found infected with Enterococcus spp. (47.61%), Escherichia coli (35.71%), Staphylococcus spp. (33.33%), Alcaligenes spp. (30.95%), Pseudomonas spp. (30.95%), and Stenotrophomonas spp. (30.95%). Antibiotic susceptibility assay of 142 bacteria with 16 antibiotics belonging to eight classes showed the presence of 38 (26.76%) isolates with multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotypes. MDR character appeared to be governed by integrons as class 1 integrons were detected in 26 (68.42%) isolates. Altogether six different arrays of genes (aadA1, aadB, aadAV, dhfrV, dhfrXII, and dhfrXVII) were found within class 1 integron. Gene cassette dhfrAXVII-aadAV (1.6 kb) was present in 12 (3 Gram positive and 9 Gram negative) isolates and was conserved across all the isolates as evident from RFLP analysis. In addition to the presence of class 1 integron, six β-lactamase resistance encoding genes namely bla TEM, bla SHV, bla OXA, bla CTX-M-gp1, bla CTX-M-gp2, and bla CTX-M-gp9 and two methicillin resistance genes namely mecA and femA and vancomycin resistance encoding genes (vanA and vanB) were identified in different isolates. Majority of the MDR isolates were positive for bla TEM (89.47%), bla OXA (52.63%), and bla CTX-M-gp1 (34.21%). To our knowledge, this is the first report of molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from DFUs from North India. In conclusion, findings of this study suggest that class-1 integrons and β-lactamase genes contributed to the MDR in above bacteria.

  10. Population-Based Drug Resistance Surveillance of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Taiwan, 2007-2014

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shin-Yuan; Lin, Keng-Yu; Jou, Ruwen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent of drug resistance in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases, we conducted a retrospective, population-based analysis using drug susceptibility testing (DST) results of MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates obtained from 2007–2014 in Taiwan. Methods M. tuberculosis isolates collected from 1,331 MDR-TB cases were included in this survey. Treatment histories, age, sex, chest radiograph and bacteriological results of patients were analyzed. Standard DST was performed to assess resistance to the following drugs: isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RIF), streptomycin (SM), ethambutol (EMB), amikacin (AM), kanamycin (KM), capreomycin (CAP), ofloxacin (OFX), moxifloxacin (MOX), levofloxacin (LVX), gatifloxacin (GAT), para-aminosalicylate (PAS), ethionamide (EA), and pyrazinamide (PZA). The Cochran-Armitage trend test was used for statistical analysis. Results We observed a significant increasing trend in portion of new MDR-TB cases, from 59.5% to 80.2% (p < 0.0001), and significant decreasing trend of portion in the 15-44-year-old age group (p < 0.05). Of the MDR M. tuberculosis isolates tested, 6.2% were resistant to AM, 8.6% were resistant to KM, 4.6% were resistant to CAP, 19.5% were resistant to OFX, 17.1% were resistant to MOX, 16.0% were resistant to LVX, 5.8% were resistant to GAT, 9.5% were resistant to PAS, 28.5% were resistant to EA and 33.3% were resistant to PZA. Fifty (3.8%) extensively drug-resistant TB cases were identified. No significant differences were found in drug resistance frequencies between new and previously treated MDR cases. However, we observed significant decreases in the rates of AM resistance (p < 0.05), OFX resistance (p < 0.00001), PAS resistance (p < 0.00001), EA resistance (p < 0.05) and PZA resistance (p < 0.05). Moreover, younger age groups had higher rates of resistance to fluoroquinolones. Conclusion A policy implemented in 2007 to restrict the prescription of fluoroquinolones was

  11. The leukotriene LTD4 receptor antagonist MK571 specifically modulates MRP associated multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Gekeler, V; Ise, W; Sanders, K H; Ulrich, W R; Beck, J

    1995-03-08

    The multidrug resistant cell lines HL60/AR and GLC4/ADR show high overexpression of the gene encoding the multidrug resistance associated protein MRP compared to their drug sensitive parental counterparts. This and the virtual absence of mdr1/P-glycoprotein gene expression was proven by a complementary DNA polymerase chain reaction (cDNA-PCR) approach. Applying a 72-hour tetrazolium based colorimetric MTT-assay we demonstrate on both MDR sublines a dose-dependent modulation of drug resistances by the leukotriene LTD4 receptor antagonist MK571. A complete reversal of vincristine resistances was achieved at final MK571 concentrations of 30 microM (HL60/AR) or 50 microM (GLC4/ADR) which by itself did not disturb cellular proliferation. The drug resistance of a mdr1/P-gp overexpressing multidrug-resistant HL60 subline, in contrast, was not significantly affected by MK571. Similar effects were seen using the glutathione (GSH) synthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Our results point to a relationship between MRP and a conjugate transporter and identify MK571 as a new tool structure for developing modulators specific for a MRP associated multidrug resistance.

  12. Colonization with Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria – On the Efficiency of Local Decolonization Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Münch, Julia; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Müller, Martin; Kellert, Viktor; Wiemer, Dorothea Franziska; Hinz, Rebecca; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Frickmann, Hagen

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness of a disinfectant-based decolonization strategy for multidrug-resistant bacteria like extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Gram-negative bacteria with or without additional fluoroquinolon and carbapenem resistance as well as vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was assessed. Between 2011 and 2015, 25 patients from Libya, Syria, and the Ukraine with war traumata were treated at the Bundeswehr hospital Hamburg. The patients were heavily colonized and infected with multidrug-resistant bacteria, altogether comprising 371 distinct combinations of pathogens and isolation sites. Local disinfection was assessed for effectiveness regarding successful decolonization of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Altogether, 170 cases of successful decolonization were observed, comprising 95 (55.8%) such events at sampling sites that were accessible to disinfecting procedures. The remaining 75 (44.2%) decolonization events had to be considered as spontaneous. In contrast, 95 out of 172 (55.2%) colonized isolation sites that were accessible to disinfection procedures were successfully decolonized. Patient compliance with the enforced hygiene procedures was associated with decolonization success. Systemic antibiotic therapy did not relevantly affect isolation time. Disinfecting washing moderately supports local decolonization of multidrug-resistant pathogens in comparison with spontaneous decolonization rates if the patients’ compliance with the applied hygiene procedures is ensured. PMID:28690877

  13. Colonization with Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria - On the Efficiency of Local Decolonization Procedures.

    PubMed

    Münch, Julia; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Müller, Martin; Kellert, Viktor; Wiemer, Dorothea Franziska; Hinz, Rebecca; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Frickmann, Hagen

    2017-06-01

    The effectiveness of a disinfectant-based decolonization strategy for multidrug-resistant bacteria like extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Gram-negative bacteria with or without additional fluoroquinolon and carbapenem resistance as well as vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was assessed. Between 2011 and 2015, 25 patients from Libya, Syria, and the Ukraine with war traumata were treated at the Bundeswehr hospital Hamburg. The patients were heavily colonized and infected with multidrug-resistant bacteria, altogether comprising 371 distinct combinations of pathogens and isolation sites. Local disinfection was assessed for effectiveness regarding successful decolonization of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Altogether, 170 cases of successful decolonization were observed, comprising 95 (55.8%) such events at sampling sites that were accessible to disinfecting procedures. The remaining 75 (44.2%) decolonization events had to be considered as spontaneous. In contrast, 95 out of 172 (55.2%) colonized isolation sites that were accessible to disinfection procedures were successfully decolonized. Patient compliance with the enforced hygiene procedures was associated with decolonization success. Systemic antibiotic therapy did not relevantly affect isolation time. Disinfecting washing moderately supports local decolonization of multidrug-resistant pathogens in comparison with spontaneous decolonization rates if the patients' compliance with the applied hygiene procedures is ensured.

  14. Bactericidal Activity of Methanol Extracts of Crabapple Mangrove Tree (Sonneratia caseolaris Linn.) Against Multi-Drug Resistant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Yompakdee, C; Thunyaharn, S; Phaechamud, T

    2012-05-01

    The crabapple mangrove tree, Sonneratia caseolaris Linn. (Family: Sonneratiaceae), is one of the foreshore plants found in estuarine and tidal creek areas and mangrove forests. Bark and fruit extracts from this plant have previously been shown to have an anti-oxidative or cytotoxic effect, whereas flower extracts of this plant exhibited an antimicrobial activity against some bacteria. According to the traditional folklore, it is medicinally used as an astringent and antiseptic. Hence, this investigation was carried out on the extract of the leaves, pneumatophore and different parts of the flower or fruit (stamen, calyx, meat of fruit, persistent calyx of fruit and seeds) for antibacterial activity using the broth microdilution method. The antibacterial activity was evaluated against five antibiotic-sensitive species (three Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria) and six drug-resistant species (Gram-positive i.e. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium and Gram-negative i.e. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-Escherichia coli, multidrug-resistant-Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acenetobacter baumannii). The methanol extracts from all tested parts of the crabapple mangrove tree exhibited antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, but was mainly a bactericidal against the Gram-negative bacteria, including the multidrug-resistant strains, when compared with only bacteriostatic on the Gram-positive bacteria. Using Soxhlet apparatus, the extracts obtained by sequential extraction with hexane, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate revealed no discernable antibacterial activity and only slightly, if at all, reduced the antibacterial activity of the subsequently obtained methanol extract. Therefore, the active antibacterial compounds of the crabapple mangrove tree should have a rather polar structure.

  15. Investigation of the relationship between altered intracellular pH and multidrug resistance in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Boscoboinik, D.; Gupta, R. S.; Epand, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    The intracellular pH of a number of multidrug resistant cell lines was compared with that of their parental lines using the fluorescent probe bis-carboxyethylcarboxyfluorescein. In four different cases, cells having 5-fold resistance or more exhibited an intracellular pH which was 0.10-0.17 units higher than that of the parental cell line. A CHO cell line, AB1, and its 180-fold resistant counterpart, CHRC5, were further investigated with regard to the role of Na+/H+ antiport. The Na+/H+ antiport activity was greater at any intracellular pH for the CHRC5 cells than the AB1 cells. To investigate the possible role of higher intracellular pH in multidrug resistance, the effect of several agents which are either known to reverse multidrug resistance or inhibit Na+/H+ antiport activity were examined. Verapamil was found to reverse multidrug resistance but had no effect on intracellular pH while amiloride, which acidifies the cytoxol by blocking Na+/H+ antiport activity, did not cause reversal of drug resistance. In contrast to verapamil, treatment of CHRC5 cells with cyclosporin A had a parallel effect on reversal of their drug resistant phenotype and a lowering of their intracellular pH to that of the sensitive cell level. However, cyclosporin was ineffective in either lowering the intracellular pH or reversing drug resistance in DC3F/ADX cells. Therefore, except for the effect of cyclosporin A on the CHRC5 line, the effects of other agents on reversal of multidrug resistance and intracellular pH did not correlate with each other. PMID:2158805

  16. Investigation of the relationship between altered intracellular pH and multidrug resistance in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Boscoboinik, D; Gupta, R S; Epand, R M

    1990-04-01

    The intracellular pH of a number of multidrug resistant cell lines was compared with that of their parental lines using the fluorescent probe bis-carboxyethylcarboxyfluorescein. In four different cases, cells having 5-fold resistance or more exhibited an intracellular pH which was 0.10-0.17 units higher than that of the parental cell line. A CHO cell line, AB1, and its 180-fold resistant counterpart, CHRC5, were further investigated with regard to the role of Na+/H+ antiport. The Na+/H+ antiport activity was greater at any intracellular pH for the CHRC5 cells than the AB1 cells. To investigate the possible role of higher intracellular pH in multidrug resistance, the effect of several agents which are either known to reverse multidrug resistance or inhibit Na+/H+ antiport activity were examined. Verapamil was found to reverse multidrug resistance but had no effect on intracellular pH while amiloride, which acidifies the cytoxol by blocking Na+/H+ antiport activity, did not cause reversal of drug resistance. In contrast to verapamil, treatment of CHRC5 cells with cyclosporin A had a parallel effect on reversal of their drug resistant phenotype and a lowering of their intracellular pH to that of the sensitive cell level. However, cyclosporin was ineffective in either lowering the intracellular pH or reversing drug resistance in DC3F/ADX cells. Therefore, except for the effect of cyclosporin A on the CHRC5 line, the effects of other agents on reversal of multidrug resistance and intracellular pH did not correlate with each other.

  17. Applications of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for the reversal of multidrug resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YINGHONG; COLE, SUSAN P.C.; CAI, TIANGE; CAI, YU

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy presents a major obstacle in the treatment of cancer patients, which directly affects the clinical success rate of cancer therapy. Current research aims to improve the efficiency of chemotherapy, whilst reducing toxicity to prolong the lives of cancer patients. As with good biocompatibility, high stability and drug release targeting properties, nanodrug delivery systems alter the mechanism by which drugs function to reverse MDR, via passive or active targeting, increasing drug accumulation in the tumor tissue or reducing drug elimination. Given the potential role of nanodrug delivery systems used in multidrug resistance, the present study summarizes the current knowledge on the properties of liposomes, lipid nanoparticles, polymeric micelles and mesoporous silica nanoparticles, together with their underlying mechanisms. The current review aims to provide a reliable basis and useful information for the development of new treatment strategies of multidrug resistance reversal using nanodrug delivery systems. PMID:27347092

  18. Substrate-bound structure of the E. coli multidrug resistance transporter MdfA

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Jie; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Yue; Fan, Junping; Wang, Xianping; Zhao, Yongfang; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a serious threat to public health. Proton motive force-driven antiporters from the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) constitute a major group of multidrug-resistance transporters. Currently, no reports on crystal structures of MFS antiporters in complex with their substrates exist. The E. coli MdfA transporter is a well-studied model system for biochemical analyses of multidrug-resistance MFS antiporters. Here, we report three crystal structures of MdfA-ligand complexes at resolutions up to 2.0 Å, all in the inward-facing conformation. The substrate-binding site sits proximal to the conserved acidic residue, D34. Our mutagenesis studies support the structural observations of the substrate-binding mode and the notion that D34 responds to substrate binding by adjusting its protonation status. Taken together, our data unveil the substrate-binding mode of MFS antiporters and suggest a mechanism of transport via this group of transporters. PMID:26238402

  19. Health system delay in treatment of multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rifat, Mahfuza; Hall, John; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Husain, Ashaque; Milton, Abul Hasnat

    2015-11-16

    Bangladesh is one of the 27 high burden countries for multidrug resistant tuberculosis listed by the World Health Organization. Delay in multidrug resistant tuberculosis treatment may allow progression of the disease and affect the attempts to curb transmission of drug resistant tuberculosis. The main objective of this study was to investigate the health system delay in multidrug resistant tuberculosis treatment in Bangladesh and to explore the factors related to the delay. Information related to the delay was collected as part of a previously conducted case-control study. The current study restricts analysis to patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis who were diagnosed using rapid diagnostic methods (Xpert MTB/RIF or the line probe assay). Information was collected by face-to-face interviews and through record reviews from all three Government hospitals providing multidrug resistant tuberculosis services, from September 2012 to April 2013. Multivariable regression analysis was performed using Bootstrap variance estimators. Definitions were as follows: Provider delay: time between visiting a provider for first consultation on MDR-TB related symptom to visiting a designated diagnostic centre for testing; Diagnostic delay: time from date of diagnostic sample provided to date of result; Treatment initiation delay: time between the date of diagnosis and date of treatment initiation; Health system delay: time between visiting a provider to start of treatment. Health system delay was derived by adding provider delay, diagnostic delay and treatment initiation delay. The 207 multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients experienced a health system delay of median 7.1 weeks. The health system delay consists of provider delay (median 4 weeks), diagnostic delay (median 5 days) and treatment initiation delay (median 10 days). Health system delay (Coefficient: 37.7; 95 %; CI 15.0-60.4; p 0.003) was associated with the visit to private practitioners for first consultation

  20. Overproduction of the multidrug efflux pump MexEF-OprN does not impair Pseudomonas aeruginosa fitness in competition tests, but produces specific changes in bacterial regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Jorge; Alvarez-Ortega, Carolina; Linares, Juan F; Rojo, Fernando; Köhler, Thilo; Martínez, José Luis

    2012-08-01

    It is generally assumed that acquisition of antibiotic resistance leads to non-specific fitness costs. We have tested the alternative hypothesis that acquisition of antibiotic resistance may not always produce