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Sample records for multidrug-resistant tumor cells

  1. Reversal of multidrug resistance by 7-O-benzoylpyripyropene A in multidrug-resistant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Rho, M C; Hayashi, M; Fukami, A; Obata, R; Sunazuka, T; Tomoda, H; Komiyama, K; Omura, S

    2000-10-01

    7-O-Benzoylpyripyropene A (7-O-BzP), a semi-synthetic analog of pyripyropene, was investigated for its reversing effect on multidrug-resistant (MDR) tumor cells. 7-O-BzP (6.25 microg/ml) completely reversed resistance against vincristine and adriamycin in vincristine-resistant KB cells (VJ-300) and adriamycin-resistant P388 cells (P388/ADR), respectively. 7-O-BzP alone had no effect on the growth of drug sensitive and drug-resistant cells. 7-O-BzP (6.25 microg/ml) significantly enhanced accumulation of [3H]vincristine in VJ-300 cells and completely inhibited the binding of [3H]azidopine to the P-glycoprotein in VJ-300 cells and P388/ADR cells. The result suggests that 7-O-BzP effectively reverses P-glycoprotein-related MDR by interacting directly with P-glycoprotein in drug resistant VJ-300 and P388/ADR cells. PMID:11132967

  2. Cell biological mechanisms of multidrug resistance in tumors.

    PubMed

    Simon, S M; Schindler, M

    1994-04-26

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a generic term for the variety of strategies tumor cells use to evade the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. MDR is characterized by a decreased sensitivity of tumor cells not only to the drug employed for chemotherapy but also to a broad spectrum of drugs with neither obvious structural homology nor common targets. This pleiotropic resistance is one of the major obstacles to the successful treatment of tumors. MDR may result from structural or functional changes at the plasma membrane or within the cytoplasm, cellular compartments, or nucleus. Molecular mechanisms of MDR are discussed in terms of modifications in detoxification and DNA repair pathways, changes in cellular sites of drug sequestration, decreases in drug-target affinity, synthesis of specific drug inhibitors within cells, altered or inappropriate targeting of proteins, and accelerated removal or secretion of drugs.

  3. Cell Biological Mechanisms of Multidrug Resistance in Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford M.; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-04-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a generic term for the variety of strategies tumor cells use to evade the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. MDR is characterized by a decreased sensitivity of tumor cells not only to the drug employed for chemotherapy but also to a broad spectrum of drugs with neither obvious structural homology nor common targets. This pleotropic resistance is one of the major obstacles to the successful treatment of tumors. MDR may result from structural or functional changes at the plasma membrane or within the cytoplasm, cellular compartments, or nucleus. Molecular mechanisms of MDR are discussed in terms of modifications in detoxification and DNA repair pathways, changes in cellular sites of drug sequestration, decreases in drug-target affinity, synthesis of specific drug inhibitors within cells, altered or inappropriate targeting of proteins, and accelerated removal or secretion of drugs.

  4. Bisbenzylisoquinolines as modulators of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and multidrug resistance in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Frappier, F; Jossang, A; Soudon, J; Calvo, F; Rasoanaivo, P; Ratsimamanga-Urverg, S; Saez, J; Schrevel, J; Grellier, P

    1996-06-01

    Ten naturally occurring bisbenzylisoquinolines (BBIQ) and two dihydro derivatives belonging to five BBIQ subgroups were evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum growth and, in drug combination, to reverse the resistance to chloroquine of strain FcB1. The same alkaloids were also assessed in vitro for their potentiating activity against vinblastine with the multidrug-resistant clone CCRF-CEM/VLB, established from lymphoblastic acute leukemia. Three of the BBIQ tested had 50% inhibitory concentrations of less than 1 microM. The most potent antimalarial agent was cocsoline (50% inhibitory concentration, 0.22 microM). Regarding the chloroquine-potentiating effect, fangchinoline exhibited the highest biological activity whereas the remaining compounds displayed either antagonistic or slight synergistic effects. Against the multidrug-resistant cancer cell line, fangchinoline was also by far the most active compound. Although there were clear differences between the activities of tested alkaloids, no relevant structure-activity relationship could be established. Nevertheless, fangchinoline appears to be a new biochemical tool able to help in the comprehension of the mechanism of both chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum and multidrug resistance in tumor cells. PMID:8726022

  5. Bisbenzylisoquinolines as modulators of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and multidrug resistance in tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Frappier, F; Jossang, A; Soudon, J; Calvo, F; Rasoanaivo, P; Ratsimamanga-Urverg, S; Saez, J; Schrevel, J; Grellier, P

    1996-01-01

    Ten naturally occurring bisbenzylisoquinolines (BBIQ) and two dihydro derivatives belonging to five BBIQ subgroups were evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum growth and, in drug combination, to reverse the resistance to chloroquine of strain FcB1. The same alkaloids were also assessed in vitro for their potentiating activity against vinblastine with the multidrug-resistant clone CCRF-CEM/VLB, established from lymphoblastic acute leukemia. Three of the BBIQ tested had 50% inhibitory concentrations of less than 1 microM. The most potent antimalarial agent was cocsoline (50% inhibitory concentration, 0.22 microM). Regarding the chloroquine-potentiating effect, fangchinoline exhibited the highest biological activity whereas the remaining compounds displayed either antagonistic or slight synergistic effects. Against the multidrug-resistant cancer cell line, fangchinoline was also by far the most active compound. Although there were clear differences between the activities of tested alkaloids, no relevant structure-activity relationship could be established. Nevertheless, fangchinoline appears to be a new biochemical tool able to help in the comprehension of the mechanism of both chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum and multidrug resistance in tumor cells. PMID:8726022

  6. Laurus nobilis L. Seed Extract Reveals Collateral Sensitivity in Multidrug-Resistant P-Glycoprotein-Expressing Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Saab, Antoine M; Guerrini, Alessandra; Zeino, Maen; Wiench, Benjamin; Rossi, Damiano; Gambari, Roberto; Sacchetti, Gianni; Greten, Henry Johannes; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The frequent failure of standard cancer chemotherapy requires the development of novel drugs capable of killing otherwise drug-resistant tumors. Here, we have investigated a chloroform extract of Laurus nobilis seeds. Fatty acids and 23 constituents of the volatile fraction were identified by gas chromotography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), in good agreement with (1)H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectrum. Multidrug-resistant P-glycoprotein-expressing CEM/ADR5000 leukemia cells were hypersensitive (collaterally sensitive) toward this extract compared to drug-sensitive CCRF-CEM cells, whereas CEM/ADR5000 cells were 2586-fold resistant to doxorubicin as control drug. Collateral sensitivity was verified by measurement of apoptotic cells by flow cytometry. The log10IC50 values of 3 compounds in the extract (limonene, eucalyptol, oleic acid) did not correlate with mRNA expression of the P-glycoprotein-coding ABCB1/MDR1 gene and accumulation of the P-glycoprotein substrate rhodamine in the NCI panel of tumor cell lines. A microarray-based profile of 20 genes predicted resistance to doxorubicin and 7 other anticancer drugs involved in the multidrug resistance phenotype but not to limonene, eucalyptol and oleic acid. In conclusion, our results show that Laurus nobilis seed extract is suitable to kill multidrug-resistant P-glycoprotein expressing tumor cells.

  7. Activity of the dietary flavonoid, apigenin, against multidrug-resistant tumor cells as determined by pharmacogenomics and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mohamed; Kadioglu, Onat; Khalid, Hassan; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Apigenin is a common dietary flavonoid with considerable cytotoxic activity in vitro and in vivo. Despite many mechanistic studies, less is known about resistance factors hampering apigenin's activity. We investigated the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters BCRP/ABCG2, P-glycoprotein/ABCB1 and its close relative ABCB5. Multidrug-resistant cells overexpressing these ABC transporters were not cross-resistant toward apigenin. Moreover, apigenin inhibited not only P-glycoprotein but also BCRP by increasing cellular uptake of doxorubicin and synergistic inhibition of cell viability in combination with doxorubicin or docetaxel in multidrug-resistant cells. To perform in silico molecular docking studies, we first generated homology models for human P-glycoprotein and ABCB5 based on the crystal structure of murine P-glycoprotein. Their nucleotide binding domains (NDBs) revealed the highest degrees of sequence homologies (89%-100%), indicating that ATP binding and cleavage is of crucial importance for ABC transporters. Molecular docking of apigenin bound to the NDBs of P-glycoprotein and ABCB5 in molecular docking studies. Hence, apigenin may compete with ATP for NDB-binding leading to energy depletion to fuel the transport of ABC transporter substrates. Furthermore, we performed COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of transcriptome-wide mRNA expression profiles of the National Cancer Institute tumor cell line panel. Microarray-based mRNA expressions of genes of diverse biological functions (signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, ubiquitination, autophagy, metabolic activity, xenobiotic detoxification and microtubule formation) significantly predicted responsiveness of tumor cells to apigenin. In conclusion, apigenin's activity is not hampered by classical mechanisms of multidrug resistance and the inhibition of ABC transporters by apigenin indicates that apigenin may overcome multidrug resistance in otherwise refractory tumors.

  8. Reversal effect and mechanism of Ginkgo biloba exocarp extracts in multidrug resistance of mice S180 tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bi-Yuan; Gu, Yun-Hao; Cao, Chen-Jie; Wang, Jun; Han, Dong-Dong; Tang, Ying-Chao; Chen, Hua-Sheng; Xu, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the reversal effect and its related mechanism of Ginkgo biloba exocarp extracts (GBEEs) in obtained multidrug resistance (MDR) of mice S180 tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. In order to simulate the clinical PFC [cis-dichlorodiamineplatinum, cisplatin (DDP) + fluorouracil (FU), FU+cyclophosphamide and cyclophosphamide] scheme, a gradually increasing dose was administered in a phased induction in order to induce S180 cells in vivo and to make them obtain multidrug resistance. The results in vitro demonstrated that GBEE could significantly increase the IC50 of DDP on S180 MDR cells, increase the accumulation of Adriamycin (ADR) and rhodamine 123 (Rho 123), and reduce the efflux of Rho 123 of S180 MDR cells. The results from the in vivo treatment with a combination of GBEE and DDP to S180 MDR ascites tumor in mice demonstrated that each dose of GBEE could effectively reverse the drug-resistance of S180 MDR cells to DDP in order to extend the survival time of mice with ascite tumors and inhibit tumor growth in solid tumor mice. In addition, GBEE effectively inhibited the expression of MDR-1 mRNA and multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 mRNA in S180 MDR cells of ascites tumor in mice and improved the expression levels of cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-3, IL-18 and interferon-γ in the blood serum of S180 MDR tumor-bearing mice. The present study showed that the mechanism of GBEE reversal of MDR may be associated with the inhibition of the functional activity of P-glycoprotein, the downregulation of drug resistance related gene expression of S180 MDR cells and the improvement of the production of related serum cytokines of S180 MDR tumor mice. PMID:27698692

  9. Reversal effect and mechanism of Ginkgo biloba exocarp extracts in multidrug resistance of mice S180 tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bi-Yuan; Gu, Yun-Hao; Cao, Chen-Jie; Wang, Jun; Han, Dong-Dong; Tang, Ying-Chao; Chen, Hua-Sheng; Xu, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the reversal effect and its related mechanism of Ginkgo biloba exocarp extracts (GBEEs) in obtained multidrug resistance (MDR) of mice S180 tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. In order to simulate the clinical PFC [cis-dichlorodiamineplatinum, cisplatin (DDP) + fluorouracil (FU), FU+cyclophosphamide and cyclophosphamide] scheme, a gradually increasing dose was administered in a phased induction in order to induce S180 cells in vivo and to make them obtain multidrug resistance. The results in vitro demonstrated that GBEE could significantly increase the IC50 of DDP on S180 MDR cells, increase the accumulation of Adriamycin (ADR) and rhodamine 123 (Rho 123), and reduce the efflux of Rho 123 of S180 MDR cells. The results from the in vivo treatment with a combination of GBEE and DDP to S180 MDR ascites tumor in mice demonstrated that each dose of GBEE could effectively reverse the drug-resistance of S180 MDR cells to DDP in order to extend the survival time of mice with ascite tumors and inhibit tumor growth in solid tumor mice. In addition, GBEE effectively inhibited the expression of MDR-1 mRNA and multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 mRNA in S180 MDR cells of ascites tumor in mice and improved the expression levels of cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-3, IL-18 and interferon-γ in the blood serum of S180 MDR tumor-bearing mice. The present study showed that the mechanism of GBEE reversal of MDR may be associated with the inhibition of the functional activity of P-glycoprotein, the downregulation of drug resistance related gene expression of S180 MDR cells and the improvement of the production of related serum cytokines of S180 MDR tumor mice.

  10. Deregulation of apoptotic volume decrease and ionic movements in multidrug-resistant tumor cells: role of chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, K A; Andersen, E C; Hansen, C F; Klausen, T K; Hougaard, C; Lambert, I H; Hoffmann, E K

    2010-01-01

    Changes in cell volume and ion gradients across the plasma membrane play a pivotal role in the initiation of apoptosis. Here we explore the kinetics of apoptotic volume decrease (AVD) and ion content dynamics in wild-type (WT) and multidrug-resistant (MDR) Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EATC). In WT EATC, induction of apoptosis with cisplatin (5 muM) leads to three distinctive AVD stages: an early AVD(1) (4-12 h), associated with a 30% cell water loss; a transition stage AVD(T) ( approximately 12 to 32 h), where cell volume is partly recovered; and a secondary AVD(2) (past 32 h), where cell volume was further reduced. AVD(1) and AVD(2) were coupled to net loss of Cl(-), K(+), Na(+), and amino acids (ninhydrin-positive substances), whereas during AVD(T), Na(+) and Cl(-) were accumulated. MDR EATC was resistant to cisplatin, showing increased viability and less caspase 3 activation. Compared with WT EATC, MDR EATC underwent a less pronounced AVD(1,) an augmented AVD(T), and a delay in induction of AVD(2). Changes in AVD were associated with inhibition of Cl(-) loss during AVD(1), augmented NaCl uptake during AVD(T), and a delay of Cl(-) loss during AVD(2). Application of the anion channel inhibitor NS3728 inhibited AVD and completely abolished the differences in AVD, ionic movements, and caspase 3 activation between WT and MDR EATC. Finally, the maximal capacity of volume-regulated anion channel was found to be strongly repressed in MDR EATC. Together, these data suggest that impairment of AVD, primarily via modulation of NaCl movements, contribute to protection against apoptosis in MDR EATC.

  11. BRCA2-deficient sarcomatoid mammary tumors exhibit multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Janneke E; Sol, Wendy; Kersbergen, Ariena; Schlicker, Andreas; Guyader, Charlotte; Xu, Guotai; Wessels, Lodewyk; Borst, Piet; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven

    2015-02-15

    Pan- or multidrug resistance is a central problem in clinical oncology. Here, we use a genetically engineered mouse model of BRCA2-associated hereditary breast cancer to study drug resistance to several types of chemotherapy and PARP inhibition. We found that multidrug resistance was strongly associated with an EMT-like sarcomatoid phenotype and high expression of the Abcb1b gene, which encodes the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein could partly resensitize sarcomatoid tumors to the PARP inhibitor olaparib, docetaxel, and doxorubicin. We propose that multidrug resistance is a multifactorial process and that mouse models are useful to unravel this.

  12. Investigations on the cell metabolomics basis of multidrug resistance from tumor cells by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruixing; Zhuang, Xiaoyu; Zong, Li; Liu, Shu; Liu, Zhiqiang; Song, Fengrui

    2016-08-01

    Although anticancer drug resistance has been linked to high expression of P-glycoprotein and the enhanced DNA repair ability, the biochemical process and the underlying mechanisms of drug resistance are not clear. In order to clarify the biochemical mechanisms of drug resistance during anticancer drug treatment, we studied the metabolomics of MCF-7/S and MCF-7/Adr cell lines, the COC1 and COC1/DDP cell lines, including the metabolic pathways of multidrug-resistant tumor cells and the changes of endogenous substances in cells. The intracellular metabolites were profiled using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). In this study, 24 biomarkers in MCF-7/Adr cells and 15 biomarkers in COC1/DDP cells that are involved in some important metabolic pathways were putatively identified. Several metabolic pathways are changed in tumor cells showing drug resistance, such as protein synthesis pathways, cysteine synthesis, the glutamine metabolic pathway, and the ammonia cycle; the first of these are involved in the synthesis of some important proteins including membrane proteins, multidrug resistance-associated proteins, and P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Proteins related to drug resistance were overexpressed in multidrug-resistant tumor cells. These proteins depended on energy and play important roles in the emergence of drug resistance. The changes in glutathione and cysteine metabolic pathways showed that the cells can activate related metabolic pathways and reduce the cell apoptosis when they encounter oxidative damage. These findings indicate that drug resistance is likely associated with increased P-gp synthesis and reduced apoptosis of tumor cells. Graphical Abstract Drug resistance was charactered in the changing of genomics and proteomics. Like enhancing DNA repair, reducing uptake, high P-g protein expression. Here, we studied the changes of metabolite pathway which could be also play an imported role in drug resistance. PMID

  13. Four ardeemin analogs from endophytic Aspergillus fumigatus SPS-02 and their reversal effects on multidrug-resistant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua-Wei; Ying, Chen; Tang, Yi-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Four ardeemin derivatives, 5-N-acetylardeemin (1), 5-N-acetyl-15bβ-hydroxyardeemin (2), 5-N-acetyl-15b-didehydroardeemin (3), and 5-N-acetyl-16α-hydroxyardeemin (4), were isolated from the fermentation broth of an endophytic Aspergillus fumigatus SPS-02 associated with Artemisia annua L. The structures of these metabolites were elucidated by a combination of spectroscopic data, including 1D-, 2D-NMR and MS. In vitro chemosensitization assay indicated that these ardeemins had different activities of reversing the multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype in three cancer cell lines, leukemia doxorubicin resistant cell K562/DOX, human lung adenocarcinoma cis-platin-resistant cell A549/DDP, and ovarian cancer cisplatin-resistant cell SK-OV-S/DDP. Compound 4 exhibited the strongest MDR reversing effect at 5 μM concentration in K562/DOX and A549/DDP cell lines 5.2±0.18-fold, 8.2±0.23-fold, respectively, while compound 2 had the highest reversal capacity in SK-OV-S/DDP cell line with 10.8±0.28 fold. Preliminary investigation of their structureactivity relationship suggested that a OH group at C(15b) or C(16) in ardeemin plays a key role in reversing the MDR effect. It is the first report on ardeemin analogs from endophytic A. fumigatus with reversal effects on MDR cancer cell lines K562/DOX, A549/DDP and SK-OV-S/DDP. PMID:24443428

  14. Triptolide Induces Cell Killing in Multidrug-Resistant Tumor Cells via CDK7/RPB1 Rather than XPB or p44.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jun-Mei; Huan, Xia-Juan; Song, Shan-Shan; Zhou, Hu; Wang, Ying-Qing; Miao, Ze-Hong

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major cause of tumor treatment failure; therefore, drugs that can avoid this outcome are urgently needed. We studied triptolide, which directly kills MDR tumor cells with a high potency and a broad spectrum of cell death. Triptolide did not inhibit P-glycoprotein (P-gp) drug efflux and reduced P-gp and MDR1 mRNA resulting from transcription inhibition. Transcription factors including c-MYC, SOX-2, OCT-4, and NANOG were not correlated with triptolide-induced cell killing, but RPB1, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, was critical in mediating triptolide's inhibition of MDR cells. Triptolide elicited antitumor and anti-MDR activity through a universal mechanism: by activating CDK7 by phosphorylating Thr170 in both parental and MDR cell lines and in SK-OV-3 cells. The CDK7-selective inhibitor BS-181 partially rescued cell killing induced by 72-hour treatment of triptolide, which may be due to partial rescue of RPB1 degradation. We suggest that a precise phosphorylation site on RPB1 (Ser1878) was phosphorylated by CDK7 in response to triptolide. In addition, XPB and p44, two transcription factor TFIIH subunits, did not contribute to triptolide-driven RPB1 degradation and cell killing, although XPB was reported to covalently bind to triptolide. Several clinical trials are underway to test triptolide and its analogues for treating cancer and other diseases, so our data may help expand potential clinical uses of triptolide, as well as offer a compound that overcomes tumor MDR. Future investigations into the primary molecular target(s) of triptolide responsible for RPB1 degradation may suggest novel anti-MDR target(s) for therapeutic development. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1495-503. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197304

  15. Nanodrug delivery in reversing multidrug resistance in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kapse-Mistry, Sonali; Govender, Thirumala; Srivastava, Rohit; Yergeri, Mayur

    2014-01-01

    Different mechanisms in cancer cells become resistant to one or more chemotherapeutics is known as multidrug resistance (MDR) which hinders chemotherapy efficacy. Potential factors for MDR includes enhanced drug detoxification, decreased drug uptake, increased intracellular nucleophiles levels, enhanced repair of drug induced DNA damage, overexpression of drug transporter such as P-glycoprotein(P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP1, MRP2), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Currently nanoassemblies such as polymeric/solid lipid/inorganic/metal nanoparticles, quantum dots, dendrimers, liposomes, micelles has emerged as an innovative, effective, and promising platforms for treatment of drug resistant cancer cells. Nanocarriers have potential to improve drug therapeutic index, ability for multifunctionality, divert ABC-transporter mediated drug efflux mechanism and selective targeting to tumor cells, cancer stem cells, tumor initiating cells, or cancer microenvironment. Selective nanocarrier targeting to tumor overcomes dose-limiting side effects, lack of selectivity, tissue toxicity, limited drug access to tumor tissues, high drug doses, and emergence of multiple drug resistance with conventional or combination chemotherapy. Current review highlights various nanodrug delivery systems to overcome mechanism of MDR by neutralizing, evading, or exploiting the drug efflux pumps and those independent of drug efflux pump mechanism by silencing Bcl-2 and HIF1α gene expressions by siRNA and miRNA, modulating ceramide levels and targeting NF-κB. “Theragnostics” combining a cytotoxic agent, targeting moiety, chemosensitizing agent, and diagnostic imaging aid are highlighted as effective and innovative systems for tumor localization and overcoming MDR. Physical approaches such as combination of drug with thermal/ultrasound/photodynamic therapies to overcome MDR are focused. The review focuses on newer drug delivery systems developed to overcome

  16. Structure-activity relationship studies on benzofuran analogs of propafenone-type modulators of tumor cell multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Ecker, G; Chiba, P; Hitzler, M; Schmid, D; Visser, K; Cordes, H P; Csöllei, J; Seydel, J K; Schaper, K J

    1996-11-22

    A series of benzofurylethanolamine analogs of propafenone (1a) have been prepared and evaluated for multidrug resistance-reversing activity in two in vitro assay systems. As for propafenones, an excellent correlation of biological data with calculated lipophilicity values was found for benzofurans, whereby the latter generally had lower activity/lipophilicity ratios. Almost identical slopes of the regression lines were obtained for both propafenones and benzofurans. Multiple linear regression analysis of the complete data set yielded an equation with excellent predictive power (r2 cross-valid = 0.968). Interaction measurements with artificial membranes indicated that the differences in activity between these two series of compounds are not due to differences in the interaction pattern with biological membranes.

  17. Phorbol esters induce multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, R.L.; Patel, J.; Chabner, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms responsible for broad-based resistance to antitumor drugs derived from natural products (multidrug resistance) are incompletely understood. Agents known to reverse the multidrug-resistant phenotype (verapamil and trifluoperazine) can also inhibit the activity of protein kinase C. When the authors assayed human breast cancer cell lines for protein kinase C activity, they found that enzyme activity was 7-fold higher in the multidrug-resistance cancer cells compared with the control, sensitive parent cells. Exposure of drug-sensitive cells to the phorbol ester phorbol 12,13-dibutyate (P(BtO)/sub 2/) led to an increase in protein kinase C activity and induced a drug-resistance phenotype, whereas exposure of drug-resistant cells to P(BtO)/sub 2/ further increased drug resistance. In sensitive cells, this increased resistance was accomplished by a 3.5-fold increased phosphorylation of a 20-kDa particulate protein and a 35-40% decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and vincristine. P(BtO)/sub 2/ induced resistance to agents involved in the multidrug-resistant phenotype (doxorubicin and vincristine) but did not affect sensitivity to an unrelated alkylating agent (melphalan). The increased resistance was partially or fully reversible by the calcium channel blocker verapamil and by the calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine. These data suggest that stimulation of protein kinase C playus a role in the drug-transport changes in multidrug-resistant cells. This may occur through modulation of an efflux pump by protein phosphorylation.

  18. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moitra, Karobi

    2015-01-01

    The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed. PMID:26649310

  19. A highly tumor-targeted nanoparticle of podophyllotoxin penetrated tumor core and regressed multidrug resistant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Aniruddha; Ernsting, Mark J.; Undzys, Elijus; Li, Shyh-Dar

    2015-01-01

    Podophyllotoxin (PPT) exhibited significant activity against P-glycoprotein mediated multidrug resistant (MDR) tumor cell lines; however, due to its poor solubility and high toxicity, PPT cannot be dosed systemically, preventing its clinical use for MDR cancer. We developed a nanoparticle dosage form of PPT by covalently conjugating PPT and polyethylene glycol (PEG) with acetylated carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Ac) using one-pot esterification chemistry. The polymer conjugates self-assembled into nanoparticles (NPs) of variable sizes (20–120 nm) depending on the PPT-to-PEG molar ratio (2–20). The conjugate with a low PPT/PEG molar ratio of 2 yielded NPs with a mean diameter of 20 nm and released PPT at ~5%/day in serum, while conjugates with increased PPT/PEG ratios (5 and 20) produced bigger particles (30 nm and 120 nm respectively) that displayed slower drug release (~2.5%/day and ~1%/day respectively). The 20 nm particles exhibited 2- to 5-fold enhanced cell killing potency and 5- to 20-fold increased tumor delivery compared to the larger NPs. The biodistribution of the 20 nm PPT-NPs was highly selective to the tumor with 8-fold higher accumulation than all other examined tissues, while the larger PPT-NPs (30 and 100 nm) exhibited increased liver uptake. Within the tumor, >90% of the 20 nm PPT-NPs penetrated to the hypovascular core, while the larger particles were largely restricted in the hypervascular periphery. The 20 nm PPT-NPs displayed significantly improved efficacy against MDR tumors in mice compared to the larger PPT-NPs, native PPT and the standard taxane chemotherapies, with minimal toxicity. PMID:25818440

  20. Antivascular therapy for multidrug-resistant ovarian tumors by macitentan, a dual endothelin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Jin; Kim, Jang Seong; Kim, Seung Wook; Yun, Seok Joong; He, Junqin; Brantley, Emily; Fan, Dominic; Strickner, Panja; Lehembre, François; Regenass, Urs; Fidler, Isaiah J

    2012-02-01

    Endothelin receptors (ETRs) are often overexpressed in ovarian tumors, which can be resistant to conventional therapies. Thus, we investigated whether blockage of the ETR pathways using the dual ETR antagonist macitentan combined with taxol or cisplatinum can produce therapy for orthotopically growing multidrug-resistant (MDR) human ovarian carcinoma. In several studies, nude mice were injected in the peritoneal cavity with HeyA8-MDR human ovarian cancer cells. Ten days later, mice were randomized to receive vehicle (saline), macitentan (oral, daily), taxol (intraperitoneal, weekly), cisplatinum (intraperitoneal, weekly), macitentan plus taxol, or macitentan plus cisplatinum. Moribund mice were killed, and tumors were collected, weighed, and prepared for immunohistochemical analysis. The HeyA8-MDR tumors did not respond to taxol, cisplatinum, or macitentan administered as single agents. In contrast, combination therapy with macitentan and taxol or macitentan and cisplatinum significantly decreased the tumor incidence and weight and significantly increased the survival of mice and their general condition. Multiple immunohistochemical analyses revealed that treatment with macitentan and macitentan plus taxol or cisplatinum inhibited the phosphorylation of ETRs, decreased the levels of pVEGFR2, pAkt, and pMAPK in tumor cells after 2 weeks of treatment and induced a first wave of apoptosis in tumor-associated endothelial cells followed by apoptosis in surrounding tumor cells. Our study shows that ovarian cancer cells, which express the endothelin axis and are multidrug resistant, are exquisitely sensitive to treatment with a dual ET antagonist and can be resensitized to both taxol and cisplatinum. This combined therapy led to a significant reduction in tumor weight.

  1. IF7-Conjugated Nanoparticles Target Annexin 1 of Tumor Vasculature against P-gp Mediated Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, De-Hong; Liu, Ya-Rong; Luan, Xin; Liu, Hai-Jun; Gao, Yun-Ge; Wu, Hao; Fang, Chao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2015-08-19

    Multidrug resistance is the main cause of clinical chemotherapeutic failure. Antiangiogenic cancer therapy with nanomedicine that allows the targeted delivery of antiangiogenic agents to tumor endothelial cells may contribute to innovative strategies for treating multidrug-resistant cancers. In this study, we developed a new nanodrug delivery system (nano-DDS), with improved antiangiogenic efficacy against multidrug resistant human breast cancer MCF-7/ADR cells. Here, the IF7 ligand was a peptide designed to bind the annexin 1 (Anxa 1), a highly specific marker of the tumor vasculature surface, with high affinity and specificity. IF7-conjugated Anxa 1-targeting nanoparticles containing paclitaxel (IF7-PTX-NP) allowed controlled drug release and displayed favorable prolonged circulation in vivo. IF7-PTX-NP was significantly internalized by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) through the IF7-Anxa 1 interaction, and this facilitated uptake enhanced the expected antiangiogenic activity of inhibiting HUVEC proliferation, migration, and tube formation in a Matrigel plug relative to those of Taxol and PTX-NP. As IF7-PTX-NP targeted the tumor vessels, more nanoparticles accumulated in MCF-7/ADR tumors, and more importantly, induced significant apoptosis of the tumor vascular endothelial cells and necrosis of the tumor tissues. Low dose paclitaxel (1 mg/kg) formulated in IF7-PTX-NP showed significant anticancer efficacy, delaying the growth of MCF-7/ADR tumors. The same efficacy was only obtained with an 8-fold dose of paclitaxel (8 mg/kg) as Taxol plus XR9576, a potent P-gp inhibitor. The anticancer efficacy of IF7-PTX-NP was strongly associated with the improved antiangiogenic effect, evident as a dramatic reduction in the tumor microvessel density and pronounced increase in apoptotic tumor cells, with no obvious toxicity to the mice. This nano-DDS, which targets the tumor neovasculature, offers a promising strategy for the treatment of multidrug-resistant

  2. Inhibition of Snail Family Transcriptional Repressor 2 (SNAI2) Enhances Multidrug Resistance of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Rong-Jie; Lv, Ya-Ping; Jin, Wei; Meng, Chao; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Huang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    China accounts for almost half of the total number of liver cancer cases and deaths worldwide, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most primary liver cancer. Snail family transcriptional repressor 2 (SNAI2) is known as an epithelial to mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factor that drives neoplastic epithelial cells into mesenchymal phenotype. However, the roles of endogenous SNAI2 remain controversial in different types of malignant tumors. Herein, we surprisingly identify that anchorage-independent growth, including the formation of tumor sphere and soft agar colony, is significantly increased when SNAI2 expression is inhibited by shRNAs in HCC cells. Suppression of SNAI2 suffices to up-regulate several cancer stem genes. Although unrelated to the metastatic ability, SNAI2 inhibition does increase the efflux of Hoechst 33342 and enhance multidrug resistance in vitro and in vivo. In agreement with this data, we demonstrate for the first time that decreasing SNAI2 level can transcriptionally upregulate several ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter genes such as ABCB1. Moreover, ABC transporters’ inhibitor verapamil can rescue the multidrug resistance induced by SNAI2 inhibition. Our results implicate that SNAI2 behaves as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting multidrug resistance via suppressing ABC transporter genes in HCC cells. PMID:27760172

  3. Codelivery of Chemotherapeutics via Crosslinked Multilamellar Liposomal Vesicles to Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Kye-Il; Wong, Michael K.; Wang, Pin

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a significant challenge to effective cancer chemotherapy treatment. However, the development of a drug delivery system that allows for the sustained release of combined drugs with improved vesicle stability could overcome MDR in cancer cells. To achieve this, we have demonstrated codelivery of doxorubicin (Dox) and paclitaxel (PTX) via a crosslinked multilamellar vesicle (cMLV). This combinatorial delivery system achieves enhanced drug accumulation and retention, in turn resulting in improved cytotoxicity against tumor cells, including drug-resistant cells. Moreover, this delivery approach significantly overcomes MDR by reducing the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in cancer cells, thus improving antitumor activity in vivo. Thus, by enhancing drug delivery to tumors and lowering the apoptotic threshold of individual drugs, this combinatorial delivery system represents a potentially promising multimodal therapeutic strategy to overcome MDR in cancer therapy. PMID:25330237

  4. Metformin reverses multidrug resistance in human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel-7402/5-fluorouracil cells

    PubMed Central

    LING, SUNBIN; TIAN, YU; ZHANG, HAIQUAN; JIA, KAIQI; FENG, TINGTING; SUN, DEGUANG; GAO, ZHENMING; XU, FEI; HOU, ZHAOYUAN; LI, YAN; WANG, LIMING

    2014-01-01

    Metformin exhibits anti-proliferative effects in tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The present study investigated the ability of metformin to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) in human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel-7402/5-fluorouracil (5-Fu; Bel/Fu) cells. The synergistic anti-proliferative effect of metformin combined with 5-Fu was evaluated using a Cell Counting kit-8 assay. The variation in apoptotic rates and cell cycle distribution were evaluated using a flow cytometric assay and variations in target gene and protein expression were monitored using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that metformin had a synergistic anti-proliferative effect with 5-Fu in the Bel/Fu cells. The variations in the number of apoptotic cells and distribution of the cell cycle were consistent with the variability in cell viability. Metformin targeted the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, suppressed the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and transcriptionally downregulated the expression of multidrug resistance protein 1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1). Collectively, these findings suggested that metformin may target the AMPK/mTOR/HIF-1α/P-gp and MRP1 pathways to reverse MDR in hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25310259

  5. Role of multidrug resistance in photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diddens, Heyke C.

    1992-06-01

    Multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy is a well established phenomenon. One of the most common phenotypical changes in acquired or intrinsic multidrug resistance in human tumor cells is the overexpression of the mdrl gene product P-glycoprotein, which acts as an active efflux pump. Increased levels of P-glycoprotein are associated with resistance to a variety of anticancer drugs commonly used in tumor chemotherapy like anthracyclins, vinca- alcaloids, epipodophyllotoxins or actinomycin D. We investigated the efficacy or photodynamic therapy in the treatment of tumor cells expressing the multidrug resistance phenotype. Our data show that multidrug resistant cells are highly cross resistant to the phototoxic stain rhodamine 123 but exhibit only low degrees of cross resistance (2 - 3 -folds) to the photosensitizers Photosan-3, Clorin-2, methylene blue and meso-tetra (4- sulfonatophenyl) porphine (TPPS4). Resistance is associated with a decrease in intracellular accumulation of the photosensitizer. Verapamil, a membrane active compound known to enhance drug sensitivity in multidrug resistant cells by inhibition of P-glycoprotein, also increases phototoxicity in multidrug resistant cells. Our results imply that tumors expressing the multidrug resistance phenotype might fail to respond to photochemotherapy with rhodamine 123. On the other hand, multidrug resistance may not play an important role in photodynamic therapy with Photosan-3, Chlorin-2, methylene blue or TPPS4.

  6. P-glycoprotein antibody functionalized carbon nanotube overcomes the multidrug resistance of human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruibin; Wu, Ren'an; Zhao, Liang; Wu, Minghuo; Yang, Ling; Zou, Hanfa

    2010-03-23

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), which is related to cancer chemotherapy, tumor stem cells, and tumor metastasis, is a huge obstacle for the effective cancer therapy. One of the underlying mechanisms of MDR is the increased efflux of anticancer drugs by overexpressed P-glycoprotein (P-gp) of multidrug resistant cells. In this work, the antibody of P-gp (anti-P-gp) functionalized water-soluble single-walled carbon nanotubes (Ap-SWNTs) loaded with doxorubicin (Dox), Dox/Ap-SWNTs, were synthesized for challenging the MDR of K562 human leukemia cells. The resulting Ap-SWNTs could not only specifically recognize the multidrug resistant human leukemia cells (K562R), but also demonstrate the effective loading and controllable release performance for Dox toward the target K562R cells by exposing to near-infrared radiation (NIR). The recognition capability of Ap-SWNTs toward the K562R cells was confirmed by flow cytometry (FCM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The binding affinity of Ap-SWNTs toward drug-resistant K562R cells was ca. 23-fold higher than that toward drug-sensitive K562S cells. Additionally, CLSM indicated that Ap-SWNTs could specifically localize on the cell membrane of K562R cells and the fluorescence of Dox in K562R cells could be significantly enhanced after the employment of Ap-SWNTs as carrier. Moreover, the composite of Dox and Ap-SWNTs (Dox/Ap-SWNTs) expressed 2.4-fold higher cytotoxicity and showed the significant cell proliferation suppression toward K562R leukemia cells (p < 0.05) as compared with free Dox which is popularly employed in clinic trials. These results suggest that the Ap-SWNTs are the promising drug delivery vehicle for overcoming the MDR induced by the overexpression of P-gp on cell membrane. Ap-SWNTs loaded with drug molecules could be used to suppress the proliferation of multidrug resistant cells, destroy the tumor stem cells, and inhibit the metastasis of tumor.

  7. In vivo uptake of carbon-14-colchicine for identification of tumor multidrug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, B.M.; Rosa, E.; Biedler, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    A major limitation in the treatment of cancer with natural product chemotherapeutic agents is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). Multidrug resistance is attributed to enhanced expression of the multidrug resistance gene MDR1. Colchicine (CHC) is known to be one of the MDR drugs. The authors have previously demonstrated that it is possible to distinguish multidrug resistant tumors from the multidrug-sensitive tumors in vivo on the basis of tritium ({sup 3}H) uptake following injection of {sup 3}H-CHC. The present studies were carried out in xenografted animals using {sup 14}C-CHC which may be more indicative of {sup 11}C-labeled CHC distribution with regard to circulating metabolites, since metabolic processes following injection of (ring C, methoxy-{sup 11}C)-CHC may produce significant amounts of circulating 1l-carbon fragments (i.e., methanol and/or formaldehyde). Experiments were carried out at a dose of 2 mg/kg. Activity concentration per injected dose was approximately twice as great in sensitive as in resistant tumors (p < 0.05) at 60 min following intravenous injection of {sup 14}C-CHC. About 75% of total activity was CHC in the sensitive tumors. The findings are further confirmed by the quantitative autoradiographic evaluation of resistant and sensitive tumors. These studies confirm our previous observations that it is possible to noninvasively distinguish multidrug-resistant tumors from sensitive tumors in vivo based on uptake of an injected MDR drug using a{sup 14}C-labeled CHC at the same position and of comparable specific activity to a {sup 11}C-CHC tracer used for PET imaging. 16 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Enhancing Activity of Anticancer Drugs in Multidrug Resistant Tumors by Modulating P-Glycoprotein through Dietary Nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad; Maryam, Amara; Mehmood, Tahir; Zhang, Yaofang; Ma, Tonghui

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a principal mechanism by which tumors become resistant to structurally and functionally unrelated anticancer drugs. Resistance to chemotherapy has been correlated with overexpression of p-glycoprotein (p-gp), a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of membrane transporters. P-gp mediates resistance to a broad-spectrum of anticancer drugs including doxorubicin, taxol, and vinca alkaloids by actively expelling the drugs from cells. Use of specific inhibitors/blocker of p-gp in combination with clinically important anticancer drugs has emerged as a new paradigm for overcoming multidrug resistance. The aim of this paper is to review p-gp regulation by dietary nutraceuticals and to correlate this dietary nutraceutical induced-modulation of p-gp with activity of anticancer drugs. PMID:26514453

  9. Plasma membrane microorganization of LR73 multidrug-resistant cells revealed by FCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winckler, Pascale; Jaffiol, Rodolphe; Cailler, Aurélie; Morjani, Hamid; Jeannesson, Pierre; Deturche, Régis

    2011-03-01

    Tumoral cells could present a multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapeutic treatments. This drug resistance would be associated to biomechanisms occurring at the plasma membrane level, involving modification of membrane fluidity, drug permeability, presence of microdomains (rafts, caveolae...), and membrane proteins overexpression such as Pglycoprotein. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is the relevant method to investigate locally the fluidity of biological membranes through the lateral diffusion of a fluorescent membrane probe. Thus, we use FCS to monitor the plasma membrane local organization of LR73 carcinoma cells and three derived multidrug-resistant cancer cells lines. Measurements were conducted at the single cell level, which enabled us to get a detailed overview of the plasma membrane microviscosity distribution of each cell line studied. Moreover, we propose 2D diffusion simulation based on a Monte Carlo model to investigate the membrane organisation in terms of microdomains. This simulation allows us to relate the differences in the fluidity distributions with microorganization changes in plasma membrane of MDR cells.

  10. [Reversal effect of cinobufacini on multidrug resistance of Raji/ADR cells and its mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Wan, Ding-Ming; Cao, Wei-Jie

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the reversing effect of cinobufacini on multidrug resistance of Raji/ADR cells and its mechanisms. The growth inhibitory rate, half inhibitory concentration (IC50), reversing multiples to adriamycin- resistance were detected by MTT, and the curve of growth inhibitory rate was drawn; the MDR-1 and MRP-1 gene transcription was determined by RT-PCR; the expressions of P-gp and MRP-1 proteins were assayed by Western blot and flow cytometry. The results showed that the inhibitory rates of cinobufacini on Raji and Raji/ADR cells at 72 h were 75.6% and 69.3% respectively, the IC50 were 3.9 mmol/L and 4.6 mmol/L without significant difference (P > 0.05). The reversing multiples to adriamycin-resistance were 255.7 multiples, the transcription of mdr-1 and mrp-1 genes and the expression of P-gp and MRP-1 proteins significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in Raji/ADR cells after the treatment with cinobufotalin. It is concluded that cinobufotalin can reverse the adriamycin-resistance in Raji/ADR cells and the expression of P-gp and MRP-1 proteins were down-regulated through the transcriptional pathway. The cinobufotalin is an effective reversal agent for the multidrug resistance of tumors.

  11. Multidrug resistance protein 1 localization in lipid raft domains and prostasomes in prostate cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Gomà, Alba; Mir, Roser; Martínez-Soler, Fina; Tortosa, Avelina; Vidal, August; Condom, Enric; Pérez–Tomás, Ricardo; Giménez-Bonafé, Pepita

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the problems in prostate cancer (CaP) treatment is the appearance of the multidrug resistance phenotype, in which ATP-binding cassette transporters such as multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) play a role. Different localizations of the transporter have been reported, some of them related to the chemoresistant phenotype. Aim This study aimed to compare the localization of MRP1 in three prostate cell lines (normal, androgen-sensitive, and androgen-independent) in order to understand its possible role in CaP chemoresistance. Methods MRP1 and caveolae protein markers were detected using confocal microscopy, performing colocalization techniques. Lipid raft isolation made it possible to detect these proteins by Western blot analysis. Caveolae and prostasomes were identified by electron microscopy. Results We show that MRP1 is found in lipid raft fractions of tumor cells and that the number of caveolae increases with malignancy acquisition. MRP1 is found not only in the plasma membrane associated with lipid rafts but also in cytoplasmic accumulations colocalizing with the prostasome markers Caveolin-1 and CD59, suggesting that in CaP cells, MRP1 is localized in prostasomes. Conclusion We hypothesize that the presence of MRP1 in prostasomes could serve as a reservoir of MRP1; thus, taking advantage of the release of their content, MRP1 could be translocated to the plasma membrane contributing to the chemoresistant phenotype. The presence of MRP1 in prostasomes could serve as a predictor of malignancy in CaP. PMID:25525371

  12. Nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery to tumor neovasculature to combat P-gp expressing multidrug resistant cancer.

    PubMed

    Bai, Fan; Wang, Chao; Lu, Qin; Zhao, Mei; Ban, Fu-Qiang; Yu, De-Hong; Guan, Ying-Yun; Luan, Xin; Liu, Ya-Rong; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Fang, Chao

    2013-08-01

    Anticancer drug resistance is a common intractable obstacle in clinical cancer chemotherapy. Here, we hypothesize that antiangiogenic cancer therapy through the targeted delivery of antiangiogenic agents to the tumor endothelial cells (EC), not the resistant cancer cells, may have the potential of combating multidrug resistant cancer. The K237 peptide-conjugated paclitaxel loaded nanoparticles (K237-PTX-NP), which can target KDR receptors highly expressed in the tumor vasculature, were fabricated for this investigation and the human colorectal adenocarcinoma HCT-15 with naturally expressed P-gp on the cell surface was adopted as the resistant tumor model. The human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, a classical cell model mimicking tumor EC) were much more sensitive, in the cytotoxicity and apoptosis test, to K237-PTX-NP than Taxol and non-targeted PTX-NP. The enhanced antiangiogenic feature of K237-PTX-NP can be ascribed to the active internalization mediated by the interaction of K237 and KDR specifically highly expressed on the HUVEC, and the significantly extended intracellular drug retention. The tumor vessel targeting of K237-PTX-NP led to increased nanoparticle accumulation in HCT-15 tumors, and more importantly, induced significant apoptosis of tumor vascular EC and necrosis of tumor tissues. Low dose paclitaxel formulated in K237-PTX-NP (1 mg/kg) achieved significant anticancer efficacy of inhibiting the growth of HCT-15 tumors, but the same efficacy could be only obtained with 8 fold dose paclitaxel (8 mg/kg) in Taxol plus XR9576, a potent P-gp inhibitor. The anticancer efficacy of K237-PTX-NP was well related with the improved antiangiogenic effect shown in the dramatically decreased intratumoral microvessel density and pronouncedly increased apoptotic tumor cells, and such approach did not lead to obvious toxicity in the mice. These results suggest that the nanoparticles targeting drug to tumor neovasculature may be a promising strategy for the

  13. Establishment of a human hepatoma multidrug resistant cell line in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuan; Ling, Xian-Long; Li, Shi-Wei; Li, Xin-Qiang; Yan, Bin

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To establish a multidrug-resistant hepatoma cell line (SK-Hep-1), and to investigate its biological characteristics. METHODS: A highly invasive SK-Hep-1 cell line of human hepatocellular carcinoma, also known as malignant hepatoma was incubated with a high concentration of cisplatin (CDDP) to establish a CDDP-resistant cell subline (SK-Hep-1/CDDP). The 50% inhibitory dose (IC50) values and the resistance indexes [(IC50 SK-Hep-1/CDDP)/(IC50 SK-Hep-1)] for other chemotherapeutic agents and the growth curve of cells were all evaluated using cell counting kit-8 assays. The distribution of the cell cycles were detected by flow cytometry. Expression of acquired multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (MDR1, ABCB1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1) was compared with that in parent cells by Western blotting and immunofluorescence combined with laser scanning confocal microscopy. RESULTS: The SK-Hep-1/CDDP cells (IC50 = 70.61 ± 1.06 μg/mL) was 13.76 times more resistant to CDDP than the SK-Hep-1 cells (IC50 = 5.13 ± 0.09 μg/mL), and CDDP-resistant cells also demonstrated cross-resistance to many anti-tumor agents such as doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and vincristine. Similar morphologies were determined in both SK-Hep-1 and SK-Hep-1/CDDP groups. The cell cycle distribution of the SK-Hep-1/CDDP cell line exhibited a significantly increased percentage of cells in S (42.2% ± 2.65% vs 27.91% ± 2.16%, P < 0.01) and G2/M (20.67% ± 5.69% vs 12.14% ± 3.36%, P < 0.01) phases in comparison with SK-Hep-1 cells, while the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase decreased (37.5% ± 5.05% vs 59.83% ± 3.28%, P < 0.01). The levels of MDR1 and MRP1 were overexpressed in the SK-Hep-1/CDDP cells exhibiting the MDR phenotype. CONCLUSION: Multiple drug resistance of multiple drugs in the human hepatoma cell line SK-Hep-1/CDDP was closely related to the overexpression of MDR1 and MRP1. PMID:20458768

  14. ATP-dependent transport of vinblastine in vesicles from human multidrug-resistant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horio, M.; Gottesman, M.M.; Pastan, I. )

    1988-05-01

    Resistance of human cancer cells to multiple cytotoxic hydrophobic agents (multidrug resistance) is due to overexpression of the MDR1 gene, whose product is the plasma membrane P-glycoprotein. Plasma membrane vesicles partially purified from multidrug-resistant human KB carcinoma cells, but not from drug-sensitive cells, accumulate ({sup 3}H)vinblastine in an ATP-dependent manner. This transport is osmotically sensitive, with an apparent K{sub m} of 38 {mu}M for ATP and of {approx} 2 {mu}M for vinblastine. The nonhydrolyzable analog adenosine 5{prime}-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate does not substitute for ATP but is a competitive inhibitor of ATP for the transport process. Vanadate, and ATPase inhibitor, is a potent noncompetitive inhibitor of transport. These results indicate that hydrolysis of ATP is probably required for active transport vinblastine. Several other drugs to which multidrug-resistant cell lines are resistant inhibit transport, with relative potencies as follows: vincristine > actinomycin D > daunomycin > colchicine = puromycin. Verapamil and quinidine, which reverse the multidrug-resistance phenotype, are good inhibitors of the transport process. These results confirm that multidrug-resistant cells express an energy-dependent plasma membrane transporter for hydrophobic drugs, and establish a system for the detailed biochemical analysis of this transport process.

  15. A safe, simple and efficient doxorubicin prodrug hybrid micelle for overcoming tumor multidrug resistance and targeting delivery.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yuling; Yin, Mingxing; Hu, Xiaomeng; Zhuang, Xiangting; Sun, Yu; Guo, Yuanyuan; Tan, Songwei; Zhang, Zhiping

    2016-08-10

    A pH-sensitive prodrug, TPGS-CHN-DOX, was introduced by conjugating anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), onto d-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) via a cleavable Schiff base linkage. The prodrug was mixed with a PEGylated lipid to form a simple but multifunctional hybrid micelle system, which can realize high drug loading capability and biocompatibility, extended blood circulation time, inhibited drug resistance in cancer cells, improved therapeutic response, reduced side effects, and easy functionalities for targeting delivery. The hybrid micelles exhibited in vitro pH-sensitive drug release, enhanced cellular uptake and strengthened cytotoxicity on both drug-sensitive human breast cancer MCF-7 and resistant MCF-7/ADR cells. P-glycoprotein functional inhibition and mitochondria-associated cell apoptosis induced by TPGS were thought to play an important role in overcoming the multidrug resistance. As a result, the hybrid micelles demonstrated good anticancer efficacy in MCF-7/ADR xenograft model. Additionally, after modifying with a tumor-specific targeting peptic ligand, cRGD, the tumor growth/metastasis inhibition was further evidenced in integrin receptor overexpressed melanoma cancer B16F10 and even murine hepatocarcinoma H22 models. This TPGS-based pH-sensitive prodrug provides a safe and "Molecular economical" way in the rational design of prodrugs for overcoming multidrug resistance and targeting delivery, which can improve the potency for clinical use. PMID:27264552

  16. Microbial transformation of ginsenoside-Rg₁ by Absidia coerulea and the reversal activity of the metabolites towards multi-drug resistant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Qiao, Lirui; Xie, Dan; Zhang, Yi; Zou, Jianhua; Chen, Xiaoguang; Dai, Jungui

    2011-12-01

    Biotransformation of ginsenoside-Rg₁ (1) by the fungus Absidia coerulea AS 3.2462 yielded five metabolites (2-6). On the basis of spectroscopic data analyses, the metabolites were identified as ginsenoside-F₁ (2), 6α,12β-dihydroxydammar-3-one-20(S)-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), 3-oxo-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (4), 3-oxo-7β-hydroxy-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (5), and 3-oxo-7β,15α-dihydroxy-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (6), respectively. Among them, 5 and 6 are new compounds. These results indicated that Absidia coerulea AS 3.2462 could catalyze the specific C-3 dehydrogenation of derivatives of ginsenoside-Rg₁, as well as hydroxylation at the 7β and 15α positions. Metabolites 2, 4 and 5 exhibited moderate reversal activity towards A549/taxol MDR tumor cells in vitro. PMID:21946057

  17. Mitochondria-mediated apoptosis operating irrespective of multidrug resistance in breast cancer cells by the anticancer agent prodigiosin.

    PubMed

    Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Llagostera, Esther; Montaner, Beatriz; Scheffer, George L; Perez-Tomas, Ricardo

    2004-10-01

    Prodigiosin (PG) is a red pigment produced by Serratia marcescens with pro-apoptotic activity in haematopoietic and gastrointestinal cancer cell lines, but no marked toxicity in non-malignant cells. Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy among women in the European Union and better therapies are needed, especially for metastatic tumors. Moreover, multidrug resistance is a common phenomenon that appears during chemotherapy, necessitating more aggressive treatment as prognosis worsens. In this work, we extend our experiments on PG-induced apoptosis to breast cancer cells. PG was potently cytotoxic in both estrogen receptor positive (MCF-7) and negative (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines. Cytochrome c release, activation of caspases-9, -8 and -7 and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase protein typified the apoptotic event and caspase inhibition revealed that PG acts via the mitochondrial pathway. In a multidrug-resistant subline of MCF-7 cells that over-expresses the breast cancer resistance protein, the cytotoxic activity of PG was slightly reduced. However, flow-cytometry analysis of PG accumulation and efflux in MCF-7 sublines showed that PG is not a substrate for this resistance protein. These results suggest that PG is an interesting and potent new pro-apoptotic agent for the treatment of breast cancer even when multidrug resistance transporter molecules are present.

  18. Selective, covalent modification of beta-tubulin residue Cys-239 by T138067, an antitumor agent with in vivo efficacy against multidrug-resistant tumors.

    PubMed

    Shan, B; Medina, J C; Santha, E; Frankmoelle, W P; Chou, T C; Learned, R M; Narbut, M R; Stott, D; Wu, P; Jaen, J C; Rosen, T; Timmermans, P B; Beckmann, H

    1999-05-11

    Microtubules are linear polymers of alpha- and beta-tubulin heterodimers and are the major constituents of mitotic spindles, which are essential for the separation of chromosomes during mitosis. Here we describe a synthetic compound, 2-fluoro-1-methoxy-4-pentafluorophenylsulfonamidobenzene (T138067), which covalently and selectively modifies the beta1, beta2, and beta4 isotypes of beta-tubulin at a conserved cysteine residue, thereby disrupting microtubule polymerization. Cells exposed to T138067 become altered in shape, indicating a collapse of the cytoskeleton, and show an increase in chromosomal ploidy. Subsequently, these cells undergo apoptosis. Furthermore, T138067 exhibits cytotoxicity against tumor cell lines that exhibit substantial resistance to vinblastine, paclitaxel, doxorubicin, and actinomycin D. T138067 is also equally efficacious in inhibiting the growth of sensitive and multidrug-resistant human tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice. These observations suggest that T138067 may be clinically useful for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tumors.

  19. Targeted multidrug-resistance reversal in tumor based on PEG-PLL-PLGA polymer nano drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liting; Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Fei; Liu, Ping; Wang, Yonglu; Xia, Guohua; Liu, Ran; Li, Xueming; Yin, Haixiang; Jiang, Hulin; Chen, Baoan

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the reversal of multidrug resistance (MDR) and the biodistribution of nanoparticles (NPs) that target leukemia cells in a nude mice model via a surface-bound transferrin (Tf). The cytotoxic cargo of daunorubicin (DNR) and tetrandrine (Tet) was protected in the NPs by an outer coat composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-poly-L-lysine (PLL)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs. Injection of DNR-Tet-Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA NPs into nude mice bearing MDR leukemia cell K562/A02 xenografts was shown to inhibit tumor growth, and contemporaneous immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue showed the targeted NPs induced apoptosis in tumor cells. Targeted tumor cells exhibited a marked increase in Tf receptor expression, with noticeable decreases in P-glycoprotein, MDR protein, and nuclear factor κB, as assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Moreover, the concentration of DNR was shown to increase in plasma, tumor tissue, and major organs. Flow cytometry analysis with a near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye, NIR797, was used to study the effectiveness of Tf as a targeting group for leukemia cells, a finding that was supported by NIRF imaging in tumor-bearing nude mice. In summary, our studies show that DNR-Tet-Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA NPs provide a specific and effective means to target cytotoxic drugs to MDR tumor cells.

  20. Targeted multidrug-resistance reversal in tumor based on PEG-PLL-PLGA polymer nano drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liting; Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Fei; Liu, Ping; Wang, Yonglu; Xia, Guohua; Liu, Ran; Li, Xueming; Yin, Haixiang; Jiang, Hulin; Chen, Baoan

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the reversal of multidrug resistance (MDR) and the biodistribution of nanoparticles (NPs) that target leukemia cells in a nude mice model via a surface-bound transferrin (Tf). The cytotoxic cargo of daunorubicin (DNR) and tetrandrine (Tet) was protected in the NPs by an outer coat composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-poly-L-lysine (PLL)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs. Injection of DNR-Tet-Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA NPs into nude mice bearing MDR leukemia cell K562/A02 xenografts was shown to inhibit tumor growth, and contemporaneous immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue showed the targeted NPs induced apoptosis in tumor cells. Targeted tumor cells exhibited a marked increase in Tf receptor expression, with noticeable decreases in P-glycoprotein, MDR protein, and nuclear factor κB, as assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Moreover, the concentration of DNR was shown to increase in plasma, tumor tissue, and major organs. Flow cytometry analysis with a near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye, NIR797, was used to study the effectiveness of Tf as a targeting group for leukemia cells, a finding that was supported by NIRF imaging in tumor-bearing nude mice. In summary, our studies show that DNR-Tet-Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA NPs provide a specific and effective means to target cytotoxic drugs to MDR tumor cells. PMID:26213467

  1. Targeted multidrug-resistance reversal in tumor based on PEG-PLL-PLGA polymer nano drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liting; Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Fei; Liu, Ping; Wang, Yonglu; Xia, Guohua; Liu, Ran; Li, Xueming; Yin, Haixiang; Jiang, Hulin; Chen, Baoan

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the reversal of multidrug resistance (MDR) and the biodistribution of nanoparticles (NPs) that target leukemia cells in a nude mice model via a surface-bound transferrin (Tf). The cytotoxic cargo of daunorubicin (DNR) and tetrandrine (Tet) was protected in the NPs by an outer coat composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-poly-l-lysine (PLL)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs. Injection of DNR-Tet-Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA NPs into nude mice bearing MDR leukemia cell K562/A02 xenografts was shown to inhibit tumor growth, and contemporaneous immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue showed the targeted NPs induced apoptosis in tumor cells. Targeted tumor cells exhibited a marked increase in Tf receptor expression, with noticeable decreases in P-glycoprotein, MDR protein, and nuclear factor κB, as assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Moreover, the concentration of DNR was shown to increase in plasma, tumor tissue, and major organs. Flow cytometry analysis with a near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye, NIR797, was used to study the effectiveness of Tf as a targeting group for leukemia cells, a finding that was supported by NIRF imaging in tumor-bearing nude mice. In summary, our studies show that DNR-Tet-Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA NPs provide a specific and effective means to target cytotoxic drugs to MDR tumor cells. PMID:26213467

  2. A Multidrug-resistant Engineered CAR T Cell for Allogeneic Combination Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Valton, Julien; Guyot, Valérie; Marechal, Alan; Filhol, Jean-Marie; Juillerat, Alexandre; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe; Poirot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell represents a highly promising strategy to fight against multiple cancers. The clinical outcome of such therapies is intimately linked to the ability of effector cells to engraft, proliferate, and specifically kill tumor cells within patients. When allogeneic CAR T-cell infusion is considered, host versus graft and graft versus host reactions must be avoided to prevent rejection of adoptively transferred cells, host tissue damages and to elicit significant antitumoral outcome. This work proposes to address these three requirements through the development of multidrug-resistant T cell receptor αβ-deficient CAR T cells. We demonstrate that these engineered T cells displayed efficient antitumor activity and proliferated in the presence of purine and pyrimidine nucleoside analogues, currently used in clinic as preconditioning lymphodepleting regimens. The absence of TCRαβ at their cell surface along with their purine nucleotide analogues-resistance properties could prevent their alloreactivity and enable them to resist to lymphodepleting regimens that may be required to avoid their ablation via HvG reaction. By providing a basic framework to develop a universal T cell compatible with allogeneic adoptive transfer, this work is laying the foundation stone of the large-scale utilization of CAR T-cell immunotherapies. PMID:26061646

  3. Imatinib resistance in multidrug-resistant K562 human leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Assef, Yanina; Rubio, Fernanda; Coló, Georgina; del Mónaco, Silvana; Costas, Mónica A; Kotsias, Basilio A

    2009-05-01

    The multidrug resistance phenotype (MDR) is one of the major causes of failure in cancer chemotherapy and it is associated with the over-expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp or MDR1) in tumor cell membranes. A constitutive NF-kappaB activity has been observed in several haematological malignancies and this is associated with its anti-apoptotic role. In the present work, the relationship between NF-kappaB and MDR phenotype was evaluated in wild type K562 human leukemic cells (K562-WT) and in its vincristine-resistant counterpart, K562-Vinc cells. These data showed that K562-Vinc cells, which express an active P-gp, exhibited MDR phenotype. The resistant indexes (IC(50)(K562-Vinc)/IC(50)(K562-WT)) for structurally unrelated drugs like imatinib, doxorubicin and colchicine were 8.0+/-0.3, 2.8+/-0.4 and 44.8+/-8.8, respectively. The imatinib resistance was reversed by P-gp blockade suggesting the involvement of P-gp in imatinib transport. We observed that NF-kappaB was constitutively activated in both cell lines but in a lesser extent in K562-Vinc. The inhibition of NF-kappaB with BAY 11-7082 increased the cytotoxicity of imatinib in K562-Vinc cells but not in K562-WT. Further, the co-administration of imatinib and BAY 11-7082 sensitized multidrug-resistant K562 cells to cell death as detected by increased percentage of annexin V positive cells. The induced cell death in K562-Vinc cells was associated with activation of caspases 9 and 3. Finally, we provide data showing that BAY 11-7082 down-regulates the expression of P-gp suggesting that the activity of NF-kappaB could be functionally associated to this protein in K562 cells. Our results indicate that the vincristine-resistant K562 cells which developed MDR phenotype, exhibited resistance to imatinib associated with a functional P-gp over-expression. This resistance could be partially overcome by the inhibition of NF-kappaB pathway.

  4. Toxicity mechanisms of onion (Allium cepa) extracts and compounds in multidrug resistant erythroleukemic cell line.

    PubMed

    Votto, Ana P S; Domingues, Beatriz S; de Souza, Michele M; da Silva Júnior, Flavio M R; Caldas, Sergiane S; Filgueira, Daza M V B; Clementin, Rosilene M; Primel, Ednei G; Vallochi, Adriana L; Furlong, Eliana B; Trindade, Gilma S

    2010-01-01

    Onion (Allium cepa) is being studied as a potential anticancer agent, but little is known regarding its effect in multidrug resistance (MDR) cells. In this work, the cytotoxicity of crude onion extract (OE) and fractioned extract (aqueous, methanolic and ethyl acetate), as well as some onion compounds (quercetin and propyl disulfide) were evaluated in Lucena MDR human erythroleukemic and its K562 parental cell line. The capacity of OE to induce apoptosis and/or necrosis in these cells, the possible participation of oxidative stress and DNA damage were also assessed. Similar sensitivities were obtained for both tumoral cells, however only OE caused significant effects in the cells. In K562 cells, a significant increase of apoptosis was verified while the Lucena cells experienced a significant increase of necrosis. An antioxidant capacity was verified for OE discarding oxidative damage. However, OE provoked similar significant DNA damage in both cell lines. Thus, the OE capacity to overcome the MDR phenotype suggests anti-MDR action of OE.

  5. Cytotoxicity of novel sulfanilamides towards sensitive and multidrug-resistant leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    AlSalim, T; Saeed, M E M; Hadi, J S; Zeino, M; Gany, R; Kadioglu, O; Titinchi, S J J; Abbo, H S; Efferth, T

    2014-01-01

    Novel sulfa Schiff bases were synthesized and characterized by a reaction between aromatic sulfonamides and aromatic aldehydes or heterocyclic ketones in equimolar ratios. Their cytotoxicity was evaluated by the resazurin assay towards human sensitive CCRF-CEM and multidrug-resistant CEM/ADR5000 leukemia cells. Three of the tested compounds viz., 4-(anthracen-9-ylmethyleneamino)-N-(pyrimidin-2-yl)benzenesulfonamide (4), 4-(anthracen-9- ylmethyleneamino)benzenesulfonamide, (5) and 4-((3-phenylallylidene)amino)benzene-sulfonamide, (6) were cytotoxic (IC50 values: 5.38-19.96 µM). CEM/ADR5000 cells were not cross-resistant to these compounds, indicating activity against otherwise drug-resistant tumors. Compound 6 inhibited P-glycoprotein by increasing doxorubicin accumulation and reducing expression of P-glycoprotein in CEM/ADR5000 cells. A human P-glycoprotein homology model was used for molecular docking studies. Compound 6 and verapamil (a well-known P-glycoprotein inhibitor) docked with similar binding energies to the same binding pocket. PMID:24438524

  6. Self-assembling nanoparticles encapsulating zoledronic acid revert multidrug resistance in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gazzano, Elena; Salzano, Giuseppina; Giordano, Antonio; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Ghigo, Dario; Caraglia, Michele; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Riganti, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters makes tumor cells simultaneously resistant to several cytotoxic drugs. Impairing the energy metabolism of multidrug resistant (MDR) cells is a promising chemosensitizing strategy, but many metabolic modifiers are too toxic in vivo. We previously observed that the aminobisphosphonate zoledronic acid inhibits the activity of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), a master regulator of cancer cell metabolism. Free zoledronic acid, however, reaches low intratumor concentration. We synthesized nanoparticle formulations of the aminobisphosphonate that allow a higher intratumor delivery of the drug. We investigated whether they are effective metabolic modifiers and chemosensitizing agents against human MDR cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. At not toxic dosage, nanoparticles carrying zoledronic acid chemosensitized MDR cells to a broad spectrum of cytotoxic drugs, independently of the type of ABC transporters expressed. The nanoparticles inhibited the isoprenoid synthesis and the Ras/ERK1/2-driven activation of HIF-1α, decreased the transcription and activity of glycolytic enzymes, the glucose flux through the glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle, the electron flux through the mitochondrial respiratory chain, the synthesis of ATP. So doing, they lowered the ATP-dependent activity of ABC transporters, increasing the chemotherapy efficacy in vitro and in vivo. These effects were more pronounced in MDR cells than in chemosensitive ones and were due to the inhibition of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPPS), as demonstrated in FPPS-silenced tumors. Our work proposes nanoparticle formulations of zoledronic acid as the first not toxic metabolic modifiers, effective against MDR tumors. PMID:26372812

  7. High heterogeneity of plasma membrane microfluidity in multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Céline; Roche, Yann; Millot, Christine; Deturche, Régis; Royer, Pascal; Manfait, Michel; Plain, Jéro Me; Jeannesson, Pierre; Millot, Jean-Marc; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion-time distribution analysis (DDA) has been used to explore the plasma membrane fluidity of multidrug-resistant cancer cells (LR73 carcinoma cells) and also to characterize the influence of various membrane agents present in the extracellular medium. DDA is a recent single-molecule technique, based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), well suited to retrieve local organization of cell membrane. The method was conducted on a large number of living cells, which enabled us to get a detailed overview of plasma membrane microviscosity, and plasma membrane micro-organization, between the cells of the same line. Thus, we clearly reveal the higher heterogeneity of plasma membrane in multidrug-resistant cancer cells in comparison with the nonresistant ones (denoted sensitive cells). We also display distinct modifications related to a membrane fluidity modulator, benzyl alcohol, and two revertants of multidrug resistance, verapamil and cyclosporin-A. A relation between the distribution of the diffusion-time values and the modification of membrane lateral heterogeneities is proposed.

  8. High heterogeneity of plasma membrane microfluidity in multidrug-resistant cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Céline; Roche, Yann; Millot, Christine; Deturche, Régis; Royer, Pascal; Manfait, Michel; Plain, Jérôme; Jeannesson, Pierre; Millot, Jean-Marc; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2009-05-01

    Diffusion-time distribution analysis (DDA) has been used to explore the plasma membrane fluidity of multidrug-resistant cancer cells (LR73 carcinoma cells) and also to characterize the influence of various membrane agents present in the extracellular medium. DDA is a recent single-molecule technique, based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), well suited to retrieve local organization of cell membrane. The method was conducted on a large number of living cells, which enabled us to get a detailed overview of plasma membrane microviscosity, and plasma membrane micro-organization, between the cells of the same line. Thus, we clearly reveal the higher heterogeneity of plasma membrane in multidrug-resistant cancer cells in comparison with the nonresistant ones (denoted sensitive cells). We also display distinct modifications related to a membrane fluidity modulator, benzyl alcohol, and two revertants of multidrug resistance, verapamil and cyclosporin-A. A relation between the distribution of the diffusion-time values and the modification of membrane lateral heterogeneities is proposed.

  9. Assessment of multidrug resistance on cell coculture patterns using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kuss, Sabine; Polcari, David; Geissler, Matthias; Brassard, Daniel; Mauzeroll, Janine

    2013-06-01

    The emergence of resistance to multiple unrelated chemotherapeutic drugs impedes the treatment of several cancers. Although the involvement of ATP-binding cassette transporters has long been known, there is no in situ method capable of tracking this transporter-related resistance at the single-cell level without interfering with the cell's environment or metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) can quantitatively and noninvasively track multidrug resistance-related protein 1-dependent multidrug resistance in patterned adenocarcinoma cervical cancer cells. Nonresistant human cancer cells and their multidrug resistant variants are arranged in a side-by-side format using a stencil-based patterning scheme, allowing for precise positioning of target cells underneath the SECM sensor. SECM measurements of the patterned cells, performed with ferrocenemethanol and [Ru(NH3)6](3+) serving as electrochemical indicators, are used to establish a kinetic "map" of constant-height SECM scans, free of topography contributions. The concept underlying the work described herein may help evaluate the effectiveness of treatment administration strategies targeting reduced drug efflux. PMID:23686580

  10. Assessment of multidrug resistance on cell coculture patterns using scanning electrochemical microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kuss, Sabine; Polcari, David; Geissler, Matthias; Brassard, Daniel; Mauzeroll, Janine

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to multiple unrelated chemotherapeutic drugs impedes the treatment of several cancers. Although the involvement of ATP-binding cassette transporters has long been known, there is no in situ method capable of tracking this transporter-related resistance at the single-cell level without interfering with the cell’s environment or metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) can quantitatively and noninvasively track multidrug resistance-related protein 1–dependent multidrug resistance in patterned adenocarcinoma cervical cancer cells. Nonresistant human cancer cells and their multidrug resistant variants are arranged in a side-by-side format using a stencil-based patterning scheme, allowing for precise positioning of target cells underneath the SECM sensor. SECM measurements of the patterned cells, performed with ferrocenemethanol and [Ru(NH3)6]3+ serving as electrochemical indicators, are used to establish a kinetic “map” of constant-height SECM scans, free of topography contributions. The concept underlying the work described herein may help evaluate the effectiveness of treatment administration strategies targeting reduced drug efflux. PMID:23686580

  11. Overexpression of CDX2 in gastric cancer cells promotes the development of multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lin-Hai; Wei, Wei-Yuan; Cao, Wen-Long; Zhang, Xiao-Shi; Xie, Yu-Bo; Xiao, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Modulator of multidrug resistance (MDR) gene is a direct transcriptional target of CDX2. However, we still speculate whether CDX2 affects MDR through other ways. In this study, a cisplatin-resistant (SGC7901/DDP) and a 5-fluoro-2, 4(1h,3h)pyrimidinedione-resistant (BGC823/5-FU) gastric cancer cell line with stable overexpression of CDX2 were established. The influence of overexpression of CDX2 on MDR was assessed by measuring IC50 of SGC7901/DDP and BGC823/5-FU cells to cisplatin, doxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil, rate of doxorubicin efflux, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression detected by flow cytometry. In addition, we determined the in vivo effects of CDX2-overexpression lentiviral vector (LV-CDX2-GFP) on tumor size, and apoptotic cells in tumor tissues were detected by deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling and hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results showed that LV-CDX2-GFP led to up-regulation of CDX2 mRNA and protein expression. It significantly inhibited the sensitivity of SGC7901/DDP and BGC823/5-FU cells to cisplatin, doxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil. Flow cytometry confirmed that the percentage of apoptotic cells decreased after CDX2 up-regulation. This notion was further supported by the observation that up-regulation of CDX2 blocked entry into the M-phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, up-regulation of CDX2 significantly decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin. In molecular studies, quantitative reverse-transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting revealed that CDX2 up-regulation could suppress expression of Caspase-3, Caspase-9 and PTEN, and increased the expression of MDR1, MRP, mTOR, HIF-1α. PMID:25628941

  12. Protein kinase Cα protects against multidrug resistance in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se-Kyoung; Shehzad, Adeeb; Jung, Jae-Chang; Sonn, Jong-Kyung; Lee, Jae-Tae; Park, Jeen-Woo; Lee, Young-Sup

    2012-07-01

    Multidrug resistance is the phenomenon by which, after exposure to a single chemotherapeutic agent, cancer cells evade the agent's cytotoxic effects as well as become resistant to several classes of diverse drugs. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a family of transporter proteins that contribute to drug resistance via a n ATP - dependent drug efflux pump. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a prominent ABC superfamily protein encoded by the mdr gene which has the ability to mediate the cellular extrusion of xenobiotics and anticancer drugs from tumor cells. Exclusively expressed P-gp cells from the human colon cancer HCT15/DOX line showed resistance to doxorubicin while parental HCT15 cells treated with doxorubicin displayed typical signs of apoptosis. In order to verify the hypothesis that expression of MDR is controlled in part, by protein kinase C (PKC), expression patterns of different PKC isoforms were examined in both cell lines. Of the PKC isoforms evaluated, the membrane translocation and expression levels of PKCα were strikingly increased in HCT15/DOX cells. PKCα reversed doxorubicin-induced apoptosis through the scavenging of ROS as well as inhibition of PARP cleavage. In addition, inhibition of PKCα with Go6976, a specific inhibitor of classical PKC, led to reduced MDR expression and increased doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. Knockdown of PKCα by siRNA diminished the protective effects of PKCα for doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. These results suggested that over-expression and activity of PKCα is closely associated with the regulation of the MDR phenotype in human colon cancer HCT15 cells and provided insight into a new strategy for inhibiting doxorubicin resistance in human cancers. PMID:22639047

  13. Complexation study and anticellular activity enhancement by doxorubicin-cyclodextrin complexes on a multidrug-resistant adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Al-Omar, A; Abdou, S; De Robertis, L; Marsura, A; Finance, C

    1999-04-19

    Ability of molecular complexes of [Doxorubicin (DX)-cyclodextrin (Cd)] to enhance the anticellular activity of antineoplastic drug Doxorubicin and to reverse its multidrug resistance has been investigated. A spectroscopic study of the alpha, beta, and gamma-[DX-Cds] complexes has been investigated in relation to their biological effects on a multidrug resistant (MDR) human rectal adenocarcinoma cell line (HRT-18). A ten fold enhancement of DX anticellular activity in presence of beta-cyclodextrin alone was detected. PMID:10328296

  14. Increased sensitivity of multidrug-resistant myeloid leukemia cell lines to lovastatin.

    PubMed

    Maksumova, L; Ohnishi, K; Muratkhodjaev, F; Zhang, W; Pan, L; Takeshita, A; Ohno, R

    2000-08-01

    Lovastatin, a competitive inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase, reportedly inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of tumor cells with MDR-1 coded P-glycoprotein (Pgp) expression. In this study we investigated the sensitivity to lovastatin of eight myeloid leukemia cell lines: K562, NOMO-1, NB4 and its retinoic acid (RA) resistant subline NB4/RA, and their multidrug-resistant (MDR) sublines: K562/ADR, NOMO-1/ADR, NB4/MDR and NB4/RA/MDR. MTT and apoptosis assays revealed that K562/ADR, NOMO-1/ADR and NB4/RA/MDR were more sensitive to lovastatin than their parental cell lines, while NB4/MDR showed the same level of sensitivity as parental NB4 cells, which already were very sensitive to lovastatin. Significant elevation of transcript levels of HMG-CoA reductase was observed by semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis in more than three lovastatin-sensitive MDR sublines, but not in NB4/MDR compared with the parental cell lines. HMG-CoA reductase mRNA levels were up-regulated more than two-fold by the exposure to lovastatin in all of the parental non-Pgp-expressing cell lines. In NB4/MDR, HMG-CoA reductase mRNA level was elevated to a similar extent as in parental NB4, whereas in three other MDR sublines which showed preferential sensitivity to lovastatin, their HMG-CoA reductase mRNA levels were not significantly elevated after 24- and 48-h treatment with lovastatin. These results indicate a connection between drug resistance and regulation of the mevalonate pathway, and further strengthen the clinical possibility that drug resistant leukemias would be susceptible to treatment with lovastatin. PMID:10942241

  15. Multidrug resistance in a human leukemic cell line selected for resistance to trimetrexate.

    PubMed

    Arkin, H; Ohnuma, T; Kamen, B A; Holland, J F; Vallabhajosula, S

    1989-12-01

    Trimetrexate (TMQ) is a lipophilic antifolate shown to have antitumor activity in humans. TMQ-resistant sublines of the MOLT-3 human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line were developed and were designated as MOLT-3/TMQ200, MOLT-3/TMQ800, and MOLT-3/TMQ2500 based on degrees of resistance to TMQ. The TMQ resistance was accompanied by 5- to 7-fold increases in dihydrofolate reductase activity and markedly reduced cellular TMQ accumulation. Methotrexate accumulation was not impaired in TMQ-resistant cells. TMQ retention (efflux) was unchanged in these TMQ-resistant cells. Verapamil enhanced the TMQ accumulation in the resistant cells to the level seen in the parent cells but had no effects on the TMQ retention. These sublines were cross-resistant not only to methotrexate but also to vincristine, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and mitoxantrone. There was no cross-resistance to bleomycin or cisplatin. Resistance to vincristine, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and mitoxantrone was reversed by verapamil. TMQ resistance was only minimally reversed by verapamil and methotrexate resistance not affected at all. Both cellular accumulation and retention of vincristine and daunorubicin in the TMQ-resistant cells were markedly decreased. Verapamil enhanced both accumulation and retention of the drug. Plasma membrane fractions of the TMQ-resistant cells analyzed by urea-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by staining with Coomassie Blue revealed the presence of a distinct band with a molecular weight of 170,000. Immunoblot analysis with 125I-labeled monoclonal antibody raised against P-glycoprotein of multidrug-resistant Chinese hamster ovary cells (C219) cross-reacted with the Mr 170,000 protein of the TMQ-resistant cells. These results show that the TMQ-resistant cells displayed not only decreased TMQ uptake and increased dihydrofolate reductase but also characteristics associated with a classical multidrug-resistant phenotype. Multidrug resistance

  16. Targeting ABCB1-mediated tumor multidrug resistance by CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Li, Yong; Di, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yao; Wei, Meng-Ning; Huang, Jia-Rong; Wang, Kun; Shi, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-guided clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic (CRISPR) in combination with a CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) nuclease system is a new rapid and precise technology for genome editing. In the present study, we applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system to target ABCB1 (also named MDR1) gene which encodes a 170 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein/P-gp) transporting multiple types of chemotherapeutic drugs including taxanes, epipodophyllotoxins, vinca alkaloids and anthracyclines out of cells to contribute multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. Our data showed that knockout of ABCB1 by CRISPR/Cas9 system was succesfully archieved with two target sgRNAs in two MDR cancer cells due to the alteration of genome sequences. Knockout of ABCB1 by CRISPR/Cas9 system significantly enhances the sensitivity of ABCB1 substrate chemotherapeutic agents and the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin in MDR cancer cells. Although now there are lots of limitations to the application of CRISPR/Cas9 for editing cancer genes in human patients, our study provides valuable clues for the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology in the investigation and conquest of cancer MDR. PMID:27725879

  17. Knockdown of c-MET induced apoptosis in ABCB1-overexpressed multidrug-resistance cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hung, T-H; Li, Y-H; Tseng, C-P; Lan, Y-W; Hsu, S-C; Chen, Y-H; Huang, T-T; Lai, H-C; Chen, C-M; Choo, K-B; Chong, K-Y

    2015-05-01

    Inappropriate c-MET signaling in cancer can enhance tumor cell proliferation, survival, motility, and invasion. Inhibition of c-MET signaling induces apoptosis in a variety of cancers. It has also been recognized as a novel anticancer therapy approach. Furthermore, reports have also indicated that constitutive expression of P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) is involved in the HGF/c-MET-related pathway of multidrug resistance ABCB1-positive human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. We previously reported that elevated expression levels of PKCδ and AP-1 downstream genes, and HGF receptor (c-MET) and ABCB1, in the drug-resistant MES-SA/Dx5 cells. Moreover, leukemia cell lines overexpressing ABCB1 have also been shown to be more resistant to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate. These findings suggest that chemoresistant cancer cells may also develop a similar mechanism against chemotherapy agents. To circumvent clinical complications arising from drug resistance during cancer therapy, the present study was designed to investigate apoptosis induction in ABCB1-overexpressed cancer cells using c-MET-targeted RNA interference technology in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that cell viability decreased and apoptosis rate increased in c-MET shRNA-transfected HGF/c-MET pathway-positive MES-SA/Dx5 and MCF-7/ADR2 cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo reduction of tumor volume in mice harboring c-MET shRNA-knockdown MES-SA/Dx5 cells was clearly demonstrated. Our study demonstrated that downregulation of c-MET by shRNA-induced apoptosis in a multidrug resistance cell line.

  18. Cytotoxicity of Salvia miltiorrhiza Against Multidrug-Resistant Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Bohnert, Stefan; Thines, Eckhard; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Lamiaceae) is a well-known Chinese herb that possesses numerous therapeutic activities, including anticancer effects. In this study, the cytotoxicity and the biological mechanisms of S. miltiorrhiza (SM) root extract on diverse resistant and sensitive cancer cell lines were investigated. CEM/ADR5000 cells were 1.68-fold resistant to CCRF-CEM cells, while HCT116 (p53[Formula: see text] and U87.MG[Formula: see text]EGFR cells were hypersensitive (collateral sensitive) compared to their parental cells. SM root extract stimulated ROS generation, cell cycle S phase arrest and apoptosis. The induction of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway was validated by increased cleavage of caspase 3, 7, 9 and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). MAP kinases including JNK, ERK1/2 and p38 were obviously phosphorylated and nuclear P65 was downregulated upon SM treatment. Transcriptome-wide COMPARE analysis revealed that the expression of encoding genes with diverse functions were associated with the cellular response to cryptotanshinone, one of the main constituents of SM root extract. In conclusion, SM root extract exerted profound cytotoxicity towards various sensitive and resistant cancer cells and induced the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. PMID:27222067

  19. Tetrandrine and fangchinoline, bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids from Stephania tetrandra can reverse multidrug resistance by inhibiting P-glycoprotein activity in multidrug resistant human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan Fang; Wink, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The overexpression of ABC transporters is a common reason for multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. In this study, we found that the isoquinoline alkaloids tetrandrine and fangchinoline from Stephania tetrandra showed a significant synergistic cytotoxic effect in MDR Caco-2 and CEM/ADR5000 cancer cells in combination with doxorubicin, a common cancer chemotherapeutic agent. Furthermore, tetrandrine and fangchinoline increased the intracellular accumulation of the fluorescent P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrate rhodamine 123 (Rho123) and inhibited its efflux in Caco-2 and CEM/ADR5000 cells. In addition, tetrandrine and fangchinoline significantly reduced P-gp expression in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that tetrandrine and fangchinoline can reverse MDR by increasing the intracellular concentration of anticancer drugs, and thus they could serve as a lead for developing new drugs to overcome P-gp mediated drug resistance in clinic cancer therapy. PMID:24856768

  20. Polysaccharide-lecithin reverse micelles with enzyme-degradable triglyceride shell for overcoming tumor multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Su, Chia-Wei; Chen, San-Yuan; Liu, Dean-Mo

    2013-05-01

    A newly-designed drug carrier with enzyme-triggered release behavior and the ability to circumvent multidrug resistance was successfully developed. By optimizing the ratio of lecithin and polysaccharide in reverse micelles, encapsulation efficiency and encapsulation stability can be significantly improved.

  1. Reversal of Multidrug Resistance in Mouse Lymphoma Cells by Extracts and Flavonoids from Pistacia integerrima.

    PubMed

    Rauf, Abdur; Uddin, Ghias; Raza, Muslim; Ahmad, Bashir; Jehan, Noor; Siddiqui, Bina S; Molnar, Joseph; Csonka, Akos; Szabo, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of Pistacia integerrima has highlighted isolation of two known compounds naringenin (1) and dihydrokaempferol (2). A crude extract and these isolated compounds were here evaluated for their effects on reversion of multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein is a target for chemotherapeutic drugs from cancer cells. In the present study rhodamine- 123 exclusion screening test on human mdr1 gene transfected mouse gene transfected L5178 and L5178Y mouse T-cell lymphoma cells showed excellent MDR reversing effects in a dose dependent manner. In-silico molecular docking investigations demonstrated a common binding site for Rhodamine123, and compounds naringenin and dihydrokaempferol. Our results showed that the relative docking energies estimated by docking softwares were in satisfactory correlation with the experimental activities. Preliminary interaction profile of P-gp docked complexes were also analysed in order to understand the nature of binding modes of these compounds. Our computational investigation suggested that the compounds interactions with the hydrophobic pocket of P-gp are mainly related to the inhibitory activity. Moreover this study s a platform for the discovery of novel natural compounds from herbal origin, as inhibitor molecules against the P-glycoprotein for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26838254

  2. In silico identified targeted inhibitors of P-glycoprotein overcome multidrug resistance in human cancer cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Follit, Courtney A; Brewer, Frances K; Wise, John G; Vogel, Pia D

    2015-10-01

    Failure of cancer chemotherapies is often linked to the over expression of ABC efflux transporters like the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp expression in cells leads to the elimination of a variety of chemically unrelated, mostly cytotoxic compounds. Administration of chemotherapeutics during therapy frequently selects for cells that over express P-gp and are therefore capable of robustly exporting diverse compounds, including chemotherapeutics, from the cells. P-gp thus confers multidrug resistance to a majority of drugs currently available for the treatment of cancers and diseases like HIV/AIDS. The search for P-gp inhibitors for use as co-therapeutics to combat multidrug resistances has had little success to date. In a previous study (Brewer et al., Mol Pharmacol 86: 716-726, 2014), we described how ultrahigh throughput computational searches led to the identification of four drug-like molecules that specifically interfere with the energy harvesting steps of substrate transport and inhibit P-gp catalyzed ATP hydrolysis in vitro. In the present study, we demonstrate that three of these compounds reversed P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance of cultured prostate cancer cells to restore sensitivity comparable to naïve prostate cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic drug, paclitaxel. Potentiation concentrations of the inhibitors were <3 μmol/L. The inhibitors did not exhibit significant toxicity to noncancerous cells at concentrations where they reversed multidrug resistance in cancerous cells. Our results indicate that these compounds with novel mechanisms of P-gp inhibition are excellent leads for the development of co-therapeutics for the treatment of multidrug resistances. PMID:26516582

  3. In silico identified targeted inhibitors of P-glycoprotein overcome multidrug resistance in human cancer cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Follit, Courtney A; Brewer, Frances K; Wise, John G; Vogel, Pia D

    2015-01-01

    Failure of cancer chemotherapies is often linked to the over expression of ABC efflux transporters like the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp expression in cells leads to the elimination of a variety of chemically unrelated, mostly cytotoxic compounds. Administration of chemotherapeutics during therapy frequently selects for cells that over express P-gp and are therefore capable of robustly exporting diverse compounds, including chemotherapeutics, from the cells. P-gp thus confers multidrug resistance to a majority of drugs currently available for the treatment of cancers and diseases like HIV/AIDS. The search for P-gp inhibitors for use as co-therapeutics to combat multidrug resistances has had little success to date. In a previous study (Brewer et al., Mol Pharmacol 86: 716–726, 2014), we described how ultrahigh throughput computational searches led to the identification of four drug-like molecules that specifically interfere with the energy harvesting steps of substrate transport and inhibit P-gp catalyzed ATP hydrolysis in vitro. In the present study, we demonstrate that three of these compounds reversed P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance of cultured prostate cancer cells to restore sensitivity comparable to naïve prostate cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic drug, paclitaxel. Potentiation concentrations of the inhibitors were <3 μmol/L. The inhibitors did not exhibit significant toxicity to noncancerous cells at concentrations where they reversed multidrug resistance in cancerous cells. Our results indicate that these compounds with novel mechanisms of P-gp inhibition are excellent leads for the development of co-therapeutics for the treatment of multidrug resistances. PMID:26516582

  4. R-flurbiprofen reverses multidrug resistance, proliferation and metastasis in gastric cancer cells by p75(NTR) induction.

    PubMed

    Jin, Haifeng; Wang, Zhipeng; Liu, Lili; Gao, Liucun; Sun, Li; Li, Xiaohua; Zhao, Hongxi; Pan, Yanglin; Shi, Hai; Liu, Na; Hong, Liu; Liang, Jie; Wu, Qiong; Yang, Zhiping; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming

    2010-02-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can inhibit cell growth and metastasis, and induce cell apoptosis in cancerous cells. They have been shown to reduce incidence and mortality of gastric cancer by an unknown mechanism. NSAIDs often exert their effects by Cox-2 inhibition, and Cox-2 is overexpressed in gastric cancer cells. Nevertheless, when gastric cancer cells were treated with different NSAIDs, the non-Cox-2-inhibiting R-flurbiprofen was most effective at reducing proliferation of gastric cancer cells in vitro. R-Flurbiprofen prevented the metastatic characteristics of gastric cancer cells in vitro, and reduced tumor size and metastasis in vitro, when gastric cancer cells were injected into nude mice. R-Flurbiprofen also affected multidrug resistance, increasing the sensitivity of resistant gastric cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Mechanistically, R-flurbiprofen was found to have pleiotropic effects, changing levels of cell cycle factors like Cyclin D1 and CKD4, apoptotic protwins like caspase3 and Bcl-2, and protwins that affect metastasis, like metalloproteases. Consistent with reports on other cancer cell types, NSAID treatment with R-flurbiprofen increased levels of the tumor suppressor neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) in gastric cancer cells. The anticancer effects of R-flurbiprofen were found to require induction of p75(NTR) via the p38 signaling pathway, suggesting a possible mechanism of action. PMID:19916560

  5. Effects of highly purified anthraquinoid compounds from Aloe vera on sensitive and multidrug resistant leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Grimaudo, S; Tolomeo, M; Gancitano, R; Dalessandro, N; Aiello, E

    1997-01-01

    Folk medicine has attributed antitumor properties to preparations from Aloe vera. We have studied the effects of five purified compounds from the plant on human K562 leukemia and on its multidrug resistant (MDR) variant, K562/R. The glycosides aloin A and B, aloesin and aloeresin were devoid of antitumor activity up to 200 mu M concentrations. Only the aglycone aloe emodin produced reproducible antitumor effects, which, interestingly, were more pronounced in the MDR, P-glycoprotein overexpressing, cell line. Its IC50 was in fact 29 mu M in K562 and 10.5 mu M in K562/R. Aloe emodine caused mainly cytostasis and accumulation of the cells in the S and G(2)-M phases of the cell cycle during the first 48 h of treatment. Thereafter, massive cell death ensued. Research on the antitumor activity of compounds extracted from Aloe vera probably deserves continuation.

  6. Cell structure and cytokinesis alterations in multidrug-resistant Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Borges, V M; Lopes, U G; De Souza, W; Vannier-Santos, M A

    2005-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis may be obtained by in vitro selection with vinblastine. In order to determine whether this phenotype is linked to structural alterations, we analyzed the cell architecture by electron microscopy. The vinblastine resistant CL2 clone of L. (L.) amazonensis, but not wild-type parasites, showed a cytokinesis dysfunction. The CL2 promastigotes had multiple nuclei, kinetoplasts and flagella, suggesting that vinblastine resistance may be associated with truncated cell division. The subpellicular microtubule plasma membrane connection was also affected. Wild-type parasites treated with vinblastine displayed similar alterations, presenting lobulated and multinucleated cells. Taken together, these data indicate that antimicrotubule drug-selected parasites may show evidence of the mutation of cytoskeleton proteins, impairing normal cell function. PMID:15592939

  7. 5-Aminolaevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy in multidrug resistant leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Zhang, W J; Ohnishi, K; Yamada, I; Ohno, R; Hashimoto, K

    2001-07-01

    To verify if photodynamic therapy (PDT) could overcome multidrug resistance (MDR) when it it applied to eradicate minimal residual disease in patients with leukemia, we investigated the fluorescence kinetics of 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) and the effect of subsequent photodynamic therapy on MDR leukemia cells, which express P-glycoprotein (P-gp), as well as on their parent cells. Evaluation of PpIX accumulation by flow cytometry showed that PpIX accumulated at higher levels in mdr-1 gene-transduced MDR cells (NB4/MDR) and at lower levels in doxorubicin-induced MDR cells (NOMO-1/ADR) than in their parent cells. A P-gp inhibitor could not increase PpIX accumulation. Measurement of extracellular PpIX concentration by fluorescence spectrometry showed that P-gp did not mediate the fluorescence kinetics of ALA-induced PpIX production. Assessment of ferrochelatase activity using high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that PpIX accumulation in drug-induced MDR cells was probably regulated by this enzyme. Assessment of phototoxicity of PDT using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay showed that PDT was effective in NB4, NB4/MDR, NOMO-1 and NOMO-1/ADR cells, which accumulated high levels of PpIX, but not effective in K562 and K562/ADR cell lines, which accumulated relatively low levels of PpIX. These findings demonstrate that P-gp does not mediate the ALA-fluorescence kinetics, and multidrug resistant leukemia cells do not have cross-resistance to ALA-PDT. PMID:11470562

  8. Modulation of P-glycoprotein function and multidrug resistance in cancer cells by Thai plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Takano, M; Kakizoe, S; Kawami, M; Nagai, J; Patanasethnont, D; Sripanidkulchai, B; Yumoto, R

    2014-11-01

    The effects of ethanol extracts from Thai plants belonging to the families of Annonaceae, Rutaceae, and Zingiberaceae on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function and multidrug resistance were examined in paclitaxel-resistant HepG2 (PR-HepG2) cells. All the extracts tested, significantly increased the accumulation of [3H]paclitaxel, a P-gp substrate, in the cells. Among nine extracts, Z01 and Z02, extracts from Curcuma comosa and Kaempferia marginata (Zingiberaceae family), respectively, potently increased the accumulation. In addition, Z01 and Z02 increased the accumulation of other P-gp substrates, rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin, in PR-HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Increased accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin by Z01 and Z02 was also confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The effect of Z01 and Z02 pretreatment on the expression of MDR1 mRNA was also examined. The expression of MDR1 mRNA was not affected by the treatment of PR-HepG2 cells with these extracts for 48 hours. Cytotoxicity of paclitaxel was examined by XTT and protein assays in the absence and presence of Z02. Z02 potentiated the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in PR-HepG2 cells. These results suggest that Curcuma comosa and Kaempferia marginata belonging to Zingiberaceae are useful sources to search for new P-gp modulator(s) that can be used to overcome multidrug resistance of cancer cells.

  9. Circumvention of multi-drug resistance of cancer cells by Chinese herbal medicines

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells severely limits therapeutic outcomes. A proposed mechanism for MDR involves the efflux of anti-cancer drugs from cancer cells, primarily mediated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane transporters including P-glycoprotein. This article reviews the recent progress of using active ingredients, extracts and formulae from Chinese medicine (CM) in circumventing ABC transporters-mediated MDR. Among the ABC transporters, Pgp is the most extensively studied for its role in MDR reversal effects. While other MDR reversal mechanisms remain unclear, Pgp inhibition is a criterion for further mechanistic study. More mechanistic studies are needed to fully establish the pharmacological effects of potential MDR reversing agents. PMID:20653978

  10. Modulation of multidrug resistance gene expression in human breast cancer cells by (-)-gossypol-enriched cottonseed oil.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    P-glycoprotein, the product of the multidrug resistance 1 gene, acts as an efflux pump and prevents sufficient intracellular accumulation of several anticancer agents. Thus, it plays a major role in multidrug cancer resistance. Using the non-radioactive cell proliferation MTS assay, none of three ...

  11. Cytotoxicity of the Sesquiterpene Lactones Neoambrosin and Damsin from Ambrosia maritima Against Multidrug-Resistant Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Mohamed; Jacob, Stefan; Sandjo, Louis P.; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Khalid, Hassan E.; Opatz, Till; Thines, Eckhard; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a prevailing phenomenon leading to chemotherapy treatment failure in cancer patients. In the current study two known cytotoxic pseudoguaianolide sesquiterpene lactones; neoambrosin (1) and damsin (2) that circumvent MDR were identified. The two cytotoxic compounds were isolated using column chromatography, characterized using 1D and 2D NMR, MS, and compared with literature values. The isolated compounds were investigated for their cytotoxic potential using resazurin assays and thereafter confirmed with immunoblotting and in silico studies. MDR cells overexpressing ABC transporters (P-glycoprotein, BCRP, ABCB5) did not confer cross-resistance toward (1) and (2), indicating that these compounds are not appropriate substrates for any of the three ABC transporters analyzed. Resistance mechanisms investigated also included; the loss of the functions of the TP53 and the mutated EGFR. The HCT116 p53-/- cells were sensitive to 1 but resistant to 2. It was interesting to note that resistant cells transfected with oncogenic ΔEGFR exhibited hypersensitivity CS toward (1) and (2) (degrees of resistances were 0.18 and 0.15 for (1) and (2), respectively). Immunoblotting and in silico analyses revealed that 1 and 2 silenced c-Src kinase activity. It was hypothesized that inhibition of c-Src kinase activity may explain CS in EGFR-transfected cells. In conclusion, the significant cytotoxicity of 1 and 2 against different drug-resistant tumor cell lines indicate that they may be promising candidates to treat refractory tumors. PMID:26617519

  12. Cytotoxicity of the Sesquiterpene Lactones Neoambrosin and Damsin from Ambrosia maritima Against Multidrug-Resistant Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mohamed; Jacob, Stefan; Sandjo, Louis P; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Khalid, Hassan E; Opatz, Till; Thines, Eckhard; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a prevailing phenomenon leading to chemotherapy treatment failure in cancer patients. In the current study two known cytotoxic pseudoguaianolide sesquiterpene lactones; neoambrosin (1) and damsin (2) that circumvent MDR were identified. The two cytotoxic compounds were isolated using column chromatography, characterized using 1D and 2D NMR, MS, and compared with literature values. The isolated compounds were investigated for their cytotoxic potential using resazurin assays and thereafter confirmed with immunoblotting and in silico studies. MDR cells overexpressing ABC transporters (P-glycoprotein, BCRP, ABCB5) did not confer cross-resistance toward (1) and (2), indicating that these compounds are not appropriate substrates for any of the three ABC transporters analyzed. Resistance mechanisms investigated also included; the loss of the functions of the TP53 and the mutated EGFR. The HCT116 p53(-/-) cells were sensitive to 1 but resistant to 2. It was interesting to note that resistant cells transfected with oncogenic ΔEGFR exhibited hypersensitivity CS toward (1) and (2) (degrees of resistances were 0.18 and 0.15 for (1) and (2), respectively). Immunoblotting and in silico analyses revealed that 1 and 2 silenced c-Src kinase activity. It was hypothesized that inhibition of c-Src kinase activity may explain CS in EGFR-transfected cells. In conclusion, the significant cytotoxicity of 1 and 2 against different drug-resistant tumor cell lines indicate that they may be promising candidates to treat refractory tumors. PMID:26617519

  13. The multidrug-resistance transporter Abcc3 protects NK cells from chemotherapy in a murine model of malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Pessina, Sara; Cantini, Gabriele; Kapetis, Dimos; Cazzato, Emanuela; Di Ianni, Natalia; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Pellegatta, Serena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Abcc3, a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily, plays a role in multidrug resistance. Here, we found that Abcc3 is highly expressed in blood-derived NK cells but not in CD8+ T cells. In GL261 glioma-bearing mice treated with the alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) for 5 d, an early increased frequency of NK cells was observed. We also found that Abcc3 is strongly upregulated and functionally active in NK cells from mice treated with TMZ compared to controls. We demonstrate that Abcc3 is critical for NK cell survival during TMZ administration; more importantly, Akt, involved in lymphocyte survival, is phosphorylated only in NK cells expressing Abcc3. The resistance of NK cells to chemotherapy was accompanied by increased migration and homing in the brain at early time points. Cytotoxicity, evaluated by IFNγ production and specific lytic activity against GL261 cells, increased peripherally in the later phases, after conclusion of TMZ treatment. Intra-tumor increase of the NK effector subset as well as in IFNγ, granzymes and perforin-1 expression, were found early and persisted over time, correlating with a profound modulation on glioma microenvironment induced by TMZ. Our findings reveal an important involvement of Abcc3 in NK cell resistance to chemotherapy and have important clinical implications for patients treated with chemo-immunotherapy. PMID:27467914

  14. Synergistic effect of a novel cyclic pentadepsipeptide, neoN-methylsansalvamide, and paclitaxel on human multidrug resistance cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Seok; Phat, Chanvorleak; Choi, Sang-Un; Lee, Chan

    2013-06-01

    NeoN-methylsansalvamide is a novel low-molecular-weight cyclic pentadepsipeptide that exerts cytotoxic effects on various human cancer cell lines. Its structural analysis using liquid chromatography mass/mass spectrometry showed the cyclic structure sequence -phenylalanine-leucine-valine-N-methylleucine-leucic acid-. The intrinsic cytotoxic and multidrug resistance reversal effects of neoN-methylsansalvamide were evaluated on the human cancer cell lines MES-SA and HCT15 as well as on their multidrug resistance sublines (MES-SA/DX5 and HCT15/CL05, respectively) using the sulforhodamine B assay. The EC50 values of paclitaxel for MES-SA, HCT15, and for the multidrug resistance sublines MES-SA/DX5 and HCT15/CL05 were 1.00±0.20, 0.85±0.63, 10.00±0.53, and >1000 nmol/l, respectively. However, the EC50 values for paclitaxel including 3 μmol/l neoN-methylsansalvamide for MES-SA/DX5, HCT15, and HCT15/CL02 were 1.58±0.12, 0.10±0.02, and 288.40±21.02 nmol/l, respectively. The in-vitro multidrug resistance reversal activity of neoN-methylsansalvamide was similar to that of the control verapamil. These finding suggests that a novel cyclic pentadepsipeptide, neoN-methylsansalvamide, is effective in reversing multidrug resistance in vitro, and this activity may be a major applicable biological function of this compound. PMID:23411682

  15. Synergistic effect of a novel cyclic pentadepsipeptide, neoN-methylsansalvamide, and paclitaxel on human multidrug resistance cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Seok; Phat, Chanvorleak; Choi, Sang-Un; Lee, Chan

    2013-06-01

    NeoN-methylsansalvamide is a novel low-molecular-weight cyclic pentadepsipeptide that exerts cytotoxic effects on various human cancer cell lines. Its structural analysis using liquid chromatography mass/mass spectrometry showed the cyclic structure sequence -phenylalanine-leucine-valine-N-methylleucine-leucic acid-. The intrinsic cytotoxic and multidrug resistance reversal effects of neoN-methylsansalvamide were evaluated on the human cancer cell lines MES-SA and HCT15 as well as on their multidrug resistance sublines (MES-SA/DX5 and HCT15/CL05, respectively) using the sulforhodamine B assay. The EC50 values of paclitaxel for MES-SA, HCT15, and for the multidrug resistance sublines MES-SA/DX5 and HCT15/CL05 were 1.00±0.20, 0.85±0.63, 10.00±0.53, and >1000 nmol/l, respectively. However, the EC50 values for paclitaxel including 3 μmol/l neoN-methylsansalvamide for MES-SA/DX5, HCT15, and HCT15/CL02 were 1.58±0.12, 0.10±0.02, and 288.40±21.02 nmol/l, respectively. The in-vitro multidrug resistance reversal activity of neoN-methylsansalvamide was similar to that of the control verapamil. These finding suggests that a novel cyclic pentadepsipeptide, neoN-methylsansalvamide, is effective in reversing multidrug resistance in vitro, and this activity may be a major applicable biological function of this compound.

  16. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance-based extracellular metabolomic analysis of multidrug resistant Tca8113 oral squamous carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HUI; CHEN, JIAO; FENG, YUN; ZHOU, WENJIE; ZHANG, JIHUA; YU, YU; WANG, XIAOQIAN; ZHANG, PING

    2015-01-01

    A major obstacle of successful chemotherapy is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in the cancer cells, which is difficult to reverse. Metabolomic analysis, an emerging approach that has been increasingly applied in various fields, is able to reflect the unique chemical fingerprints of specific cellular processes in an organism. The assessment of such metabolite changes can be used to identify novel therapeutic biomarkers. In the present study, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to analyze the extracellular metabolomic spectrum of the Tca8113 oral squamous carcinoma cell line, in which MDR was induced using the carboplatin (CBP) and pingyangmycin (PYM) chemotherapy drugs in vitro. The data were analyzed using the principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) methods. The results demonstrated that the extracellular metabolomic spectrum of metabolites such as glutamate, glycerophosphoethanol amine, α-Glucose and β-Glucose for the drug-induced Tca8113 cells was significantly different from the parental Tca8113 cell line. A number of biochemicals were also significantly different between the groups based on their NMR spectra, with drug-resistant cells presenting relatively higher levels of acetate and lower levels of lactate. In addition, a significantly higher peak was observed at δ 3.35 ppm in the spectrum of the PYM-induced Tca8113 cells. Therefore, 1H NMR-based metabolomic analysis has a high potential for monitoring the formation of MDR during clinical tumor chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26137105

  17. Genistein modulates the decreased drug accumulation in non-P-glycoprotein mediated multidrug resistant tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Versantvoort, C. H.; Schuurhuis, G. J.; Pinedo, H. M.; Eekman, C. A.; Kuiper, C. M.; Lankelma, J.; Broxterman, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    In tumour cells the pharmacological basis for multidrug resistance (MDR) often appears to be a reduced cellular cytostatic drug accumulation caused by the drug efflux protein, P-glycoprotein (Pgp MDR), or by other drug transporters (non-Pgp MDR). Here we report the reversal of the decreased daunorubicin (DNR) accumulation in five non-Pgp MDR cell lines (GLC4/ADR, SW-1573/2R120, HT1080/DR4, MCF7/Mitox and HL60/ADR) by genistein. Genistein inhibited the enhanced DNR efflux in the GLC4/ADR cells. In these cells the decreased VP-16 accumulation was also reversed by genistein. Three other (iso)flavonoids biochanin A, apigenin and quercetin also increased the DNR accumulation in the GLC4/ADR cells. In contrast to the effects on non-Pgp MDR cells, 200 microM genistein did not increase the reduced DNR accumulation in three Pgp MDR cell lines (SW-1573/2R160, MCF7/DOX40 and KB8-5) or in the parental cell lines. In conclusion the use of genistein provides a means to probe non-Pgp related drug accumulation defects. Images Figure 1 Figure 6 PMID:8105867

  18. Enhanced doxorubicin delivery and cytotoxicity in multidrug resistant cancer cells using multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pilapong, Chalermchai; Keereeta, Yanee; Munkhetkorn, Samlee; Thongtem, Somchai; Thongtem, Titipun

    2014-01-01

    Carboxymethyl modified magnetic nanoparticles (CMC-MNPs) have been designed as a vehicle for drug delivery in both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant cancer cells. We have demonstrated that the CMC-MNPs were able to load doxorubicin (DOX) with a high loading efficiency while also maintaining a good colloidal stability in an aqueous solution. According to a drug release study, DOX-loaded CMC-MNPs showed that the pH-dependent drug release property had a much higher release rate in acidic pH. Compared to free DOX, the DOX-loaded CMC-MNPs showed higher DOX accumulation in drug-sensitive cancer cells and much higher accumulation in drug-resistant cancer cells. These results indicate that our nanoplatform is highly efficient as a drug delivery system in both normal cancer cells and MDR cancer cells. In addition, the DOX-loaded CMC-MNPs can also enhance cytotoxicity against drug-resistant cancer cells in comparison to free DOX. The results obtained in this research demonstrate that our nanoplatform may be a promising approach in cancer chemotherapy and for overcoming multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

  19. Reversal of multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells by Curcuma wenyujin and Chrysanthemum indicum.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Wei, D-D; Chen, Z; Wang, J-S; Kong, L-Y

    2011-06-15

    The emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR) is a big challenge to cancer chemotherapy. Plant-derived agents have great potential to prevent onset or delay progression of the carcinogenic process, and enhance the efficacy of mainstream antitumor agents. In this study, fractionated extracts of Curcuma wenyujin and Chrysanthemum indicum were tested for their potential to modulate the MDR phenotype and function of P-gp in MCF-7/ADR and A549/Taxol cells in vitro. Fractions C. wenyujin C10, E10 from Curcuma wenyujin, and C. indicum E10 from Chrysanthemum indicum, exhibited significant effects in sensitization of these resistant cancer cells at non-toxic concentration to doxorubicin and docetaxel by MTT method. They also increased the intracellular doxorubicin accumulation and retention in MCF-7/ADR cells. In mechanism study, an increase of Rh123 accumulation and a decrease of Rh123 efflux were observed in MCF-7/ADR cells treated with these fractions, indicating a blockage of the activity of P-gp. Furthermore, C. wenyujin C10 had the ability to down-regulate the expression of P-gp. All these fractions could enhance the apoptosis induced by doxorubicin in MCF-7/ADR cells, and restore the effect of docetaxel on the induction of G2/M arrest in A549/Taxol cells. C. wenyujin C10 and E10 also owned the ability to induce S phase arrest. These results showed the therapeutic value of the three fractions as potential MDR-reversing agents and warranted further investigations.

  20. Natural lignans from Arctium lappa modulate P-glycoprotein efflux function in multidrug resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Shan; Cheng, Xinlai; Wink, Michael

    2015-02-15

    Arctium lappa is a well-known traditional medicinal plant in China (TCM) and Europe that has been used for thousands of years to treat arthritis, baldness or cancer. The plant produces lignans as secondary metabolites which have a wide range of bioactivities. Yet, their ability to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells has not been explored. In this study, we isolated six lignans from A. lappa seeds, namely arctigenin, matairesinol, arctiin, (iso)lappaol A, lappaol C, and lappaol F. The MDR reversal potential of the isolated lignans and the underlying mechanism of action were studied using two MDR cancer cell lines, CaCo2 and CEM/ADR 5000 which overexpress P-gp and other ABC transporters. In two-drug combinations of lignans with the cytotoxic doxorubicin, all lignans exhibited synergistic effects in CaCo2 cells and matairesinol, arctiin, lappaol C and lappaol F display synergistic activity in CEM/ADR 5000 cells. Additionally, in three-drug combinations of lignans with the saponin digitonin and doxorubicin MDR reversal activity was even stronger enhanced. The lignans can increase the retention of the P-gp substrate rhodamine 123 in CEM/ADR 5000 cells, indicating that lignans can inhibit the activity of P-gp. Our study provides a first insight into the potential chemosensitizing activity of a series of natural lignans, which might be candidates for developing novel adjuvant anticancer agents.

  1. Natural lignans from Arctium lappa modulate P-glycoprotein efflux function in multidrug resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Shan; Cheng, Xinlai; Wink, Michael

    2015-02-15

    Arctium lappa is a well-known traditional medicinal plant in China (TCM) and Europe that has been used for thousands of years to treat arthritis, baldness or cancer. The plant produces lignans as secondary metabolites which have a wide range of bioactivities. Yet, their ability to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells has not been explored. In this study, we isolated six lignans from A. lappa seeds, namely arctigenin, matairesinol, arctiin, (iso)lappaol A, lappaol C, and lappaol F. The MDR reversal potential of the isolated lignans and the underlying mechanism of action were studied using two MDR cancer cell lines, CaCo2 and CEM/ADR 5000 which overexpress P-gp and other ABC transporters. In two-drug combinations of lignans with the cytotoxic doxorubicin, all lignans exhibited synergistic effects in CaCo2 cells and matairesinol, arctiin, lappaol C and lappaol F display synergistic activity in CEM/ADR 5000 cells. Additionally, in three-drug combinations of lignans with the saponin digitonin and doxorubicin MDR reversal activity was even stronger enhanced. The lignans can increase the retention of the P-gp substrate rhodamine 123 in CEM/ADR 5000 cells, indicating that lignans can inhibit the activity of P-gp. Our study provides a first insight into the potential chemosensitizing activity of a series of natural lignans, which might be candidates for developing novel adjuvant anticancer agents. PMID:25765837

  2. A Dual-Fluorescence High-Throughput Cell Line System for Probing Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Hall, Matthew D.; Auld, Douglas S.; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Fung, King-Leung

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The efflux pump P-glycoprotein (ATP-binding cassette B1, multidrug resistance [MDR] 1, P-gp) has long been known to contribute to MDR against cancer chemotherapeutics. We describe the development of a dual-fluorescent cell line system to allow multiplexing of drug-sensitive and P-gp-mediated MDR cell lines. The parental OVCAR-8 human ovarian carcinoma cell line and the isogenic MDR NCI/ADR-RES subline, which stably expresses high levels of endogenous P-gp, were transfected to express the fluorescent proteins Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein DsRed2 and enhanced green fluorescent protein, respectively. Co-culture conditions were defined, and fluorescent barcoding of each cell line allowed for the direct, simultaneous comparison of resistance to cytotoxic compounds in sensitive and MDR cell lines. We show that this assay system retains the phenotypes of the original lines and is suitable for multiplexing using confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, or laser scanning microplate cytometry in 1,536-well plates, enabling the high-throughput screening of large chemical libraries. PMID:19548831

  3. The phytoestrogen genistein enhances multidrug resistance in breast cancer cell lines by translational regulation of ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás; Arana, Maite Rocío; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris; Catania, Viviana Alicia; Theile, Dirk; Ruiz, María Laura; Weiss, Johanna

    2016-06-28

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy in women. Multidrug resistance due to overexpression of ABC drug transporters is a common cause of chemotherapy failure and disease recurrence. Genistein (GNT) is a phytoestrogen present in soybeans and hormone supplements. We investigated the effect of GNT on the expression and function of ABC transporters in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Results demonstrated an induction at the protein level of ABCC1 and ABCG2 and of ABCC1 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, respectively. MCF-7 cells showed a concomitant increase in doxorubicin and mitoxantrone efflux and resistance, dependent on ABCG2 activity. ABCC1 induction by GNT in MDA-MB-231 cells modified neither drug efflux nor chemoresistance due to simultaneous acute inhibition of the transporter activity by GNT. All inductions took place at the translational level, as no increment in mRNA was observed and protein increase was prevented by cycloheximide. miR-181a, already demonstrated to inhibit ABCG2 translation, was down-regulated by GNT, explaining translational induction. Effects were independent of classical estrogen receptors. Results suggest potential nutrient-drug interactions that could threaten chemotherapy efficacy, especially in ABCG2-expressing tumors treated with substrates of this transporter. PMID:27033456

  4. Nonthermal atmospheric plasma rapidly disinfects multidrug-resistant microbes by inducing cell surface damage.

    PubMed

    Kvam, Erik; Davis, Brian; Mondello, Frank; Garner, Allen L

    2012-04-01

    Plasma, a unique state of matter with properties similar to those of ionized gas, is an effective biological disinfectant. However, the mechanism through which nonthermal or "cold" plasma inactivates microbes on surfaces is poorly understood, due in part to challenges associated with processing and analyzing live cells on surfaces rather than in aqueous solution. Here, we employ membrane adsorption techniques to visualize the cellular effects of plasma on representative clinical isolates of drug-resistant microbes. Through direct fluorescent imaging, we demonstrate that plasma rapidly inactivates planktonic cultures, with >5 log(10) kill in 30 s by damaging the cell surface in a time-dependent manner, resulting in a loss of membrane integrity, leakage of intracellular components (nucleic acid, protein, ATP), and ultimately focal dissolution of the cell surface with longer exposure time. This occurred with similar kinetic rates among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. We observed no correlative evidence that plasma induced widespread genomic damage or oxidative protein modification prior to the onset of membrane damage. Consistent with the notion that plasma is superficial, plasma-mediated sterilization was dramatically reduced when microbial cells were enveloped in aqueous buffer prior to treatment. These results support the use of nonthermal plasmas for disinfecting multidrug-resistant microbes in environmental settings and substantiate ongoing clinical applications for plasma devices.

  5. Nonthermal Atmospheric Plasma Rapidly Disinfects Multidrug-Resistant Microbes by Inducing Cell Surface Damage

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brian; Mondello, Frank; Garner, Allen L.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma, a unique state of matter with properties similar to those of ionized gas, is an effective biological disinfectant. However, the mechanism through which nonthermal or “cold” plasma inactivates microbes on surfaces is poorly understood, due in part to challenges associated with processing and analyzing live cells on surfaces rather than in aqueous solution. Here, we employ membrane adsorption techniques to visualize the cellular effects of plasma on representative clinical isolates of drug-resistant microbes. Through direct fluorescent imaging, we demonstrate that plasma rapidly inactivates planktonic cultures, with >5 log10 kill in 30 s by damaging the cell surface in a time-dependent manner, resulting in a loss of membrane integrity, leakage of intracellular components (nucleic acid, protein, ATP), and ultimately focal dissolution of the cell surface with longer exposure time. This occurred with similar kinetic rates among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. We observed no correlative evidence that plasma induced widespread genomic damage or oxidative protein modification prior to the onset of membrane damage. Consistent with the notion that plasma is superficial, plasma-mediated sterilization was dramatically reduced when microbial cells were enveloped in aqueous buffer prior to treatment. These results support the use of nonthermal plasmas for disinfecting multidrug-resistant microbes in environmental settings and substantiate ongoing clinical applications for plasma devices. PMID:22232292

  6. Phospholipid-modified PEI-based nanocarriers for in vivo siRNA therapeutics against multidrug-resistant tumors.

    PubMed

    Essex, S; Navarro, G; Sabhachandani, P; Chordia, A; Trivedi, M; Movassaghian, S; Torchilin, V P

    2015-03-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein overexpression in solid tumors is a major factor in the failure of many forms of chemotherapy. Here we evaluated phospholipid-modified, low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine (DOPE-PEI) nanocarriers for intravenous delivery of anti-P-pg siRNA to tumors with the final goal of modulating MDR in breast cancer. First, we studied the biodistribution of DOPE-PEI nanocarriers and the effect of PEG coating in a subcutaneous breast tumor model. Four hours postinjection, PEGylated carriers showed an 8% injected dose (ID) accumulation in solid tumor via the enhanced permeability and retention effect and 22% ID in serum due to a prolonged, PEG-mediated circulation. Second, we established the therapeutic efficacy and safety of DOPE-PEI/siRNA-mediated P-gp downregulation in combination with doxorubicin (Dox) chemotherapy in MCF-7/MDR xenografts. Weekly injection of siRNA nanopreparations and Dox for up to 5 weeks sensitized the tumors to otherwise non-effective doses of Dox and decreased the tumor volume by threefold vs controls. This therapeutic improvement in response to Dox was attributed to the significant, sequence-specific P-gp downregulation in excised tumors mediated by the DOPE-PEI formulations. PMID:25354685

  7. Phospholipid-modified PEI-based nanocarriers for in vivo siRNA therapeutics against multi-drug resistant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sabhachandani, Pooja; Chordia, Aabha; Trivedi, Malav; Movassaghian, Sara; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein overexpression in solid tumors is a major factor in the failure of many forms of chemotherapy. Here, we evaluated phospholipid-modified, low molecular weight polyethylenimine (DOPE-PEI) nanocarriers for intravenous delivery of anti-P-pg siRNA to tumors with the final goal of modulating MDR in breast cancer. First, we studied the biodistribution of DOPE-PEI nanocarriers and the effect of PEG coating in a s.c. breast tumor model. Four hours post-injection, PEGylated carriers showed an 8% injected dose (ID) accumulation in solid tumor via the enhanced permeability and retention effect and 22% ID in serum due to a prolonged, PEG-mediated circulation. Second, we established the therapeutic efficacy and safety of DOPE-PEI/siRNA-mediated P-gp down-regulation in combination with Doxorubicin (Dox) chemotherapy in MCF-7/MDR xenografts. Weekly injection of siRNA nanopreparations and Dox for up to 5 weeks sensitized the tumors to otherwise non-effective doses of Dox and decreased the tumor volume by 3-fold versus controls. This therapeutic improvement in response to Dox was attributed to the significant, sequence-specific P-gp down-regulation in excised tumors mediated by the DOPE-PEI formulations. PMID:25354685

  8. The Effects and Mechanisms of Periplaneta americana Extract Reversal of Multi-Drug Resistance in BEL-7402/5-FU Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Falu; Liu, Junyong; Qiao, Tingting; Li, Ting; Shen, Qi; Peng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the reversing effects of extracts from P. americana on multidrug resistance of BEL-7402/5-FU cells, as well as a preliminary investigation on their mechanism of action. A methylthiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) method was applied to determine the multidrug resistance of BEL-7402/5-FU, while an intracellular drug accumulation assay was used to evaluate the effects of a column chromatography extract (PACC) and defatted extract (PADF) from P. americana on reversing multi-drug resistance. BEL-7402/5-FU reflected high resistance to 5-FU; PACC and PADF could promote drug accumulation in BEL-7402/5-FU cells, among which PADF was more effective than PACC. Moreover, results from the immunocytochemical method showed that PACC and PADF could downregulate the expression of drug resistance-associated proteins (P-gp, MRP, LRP); PACC and PADF had no effects on the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes (GST-π), but PACC could increase the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes (PKC). Results of real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR revealed that PACC and PADF were able to markedly inhibit the expression of multidrug resistance-associated genes (MDR1, LRP and MRP1); PACC presented a significant impact on the gene expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes, which increased the gene expression of GST-π and PKC. However, PADF had little impact on the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes. These results demonstrated that PACC and PADF extracted from P. americana could effectively reverse MDR in BEL-7402/5-FU cells, whose mechanism was to inhibit the expression of P-gp, MRP, and LRP, and that PADF was more effective in the reversal of MDR than did PACC. In addition, some of extracts from P. americana altered (sometimes increasing) the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes. PMID:27367657

  9. Enhanced chemosensitization in multidrug-resistant human breast cancer cells by inhibition of IL-6 and IL-8 production.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhi; Yang, Wei-Min; Chen, Li-Pai; Yang, Dong-Hua; Zhou, Qi; Zhu, Jin; Chen, Jun-Jiang; Huang, Ruo-Chun; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2012-10-01

    Drug resistance remains a major hurdle to successful cancer treatment. Many mechanisms such as overexpression of multidrug-resistance related proteins, increased drug metabolism, decreased apoptosis, and impairment of signal transduction pathway can contribute multidrug resistance (MDR). Recent studies strongly suggest a close link between cytokines and drug resistance. To identify new targets involved in drug resistance, we established a multidrug-resistant human breast cancer cell line MCF-7/R and examined the cytokine profile using cytokine antibody array technology. Among 120 cytokines/chemokines screened, IL-6, IL-8, and 13 other proteins were found to be markedly increased in drug-resistant MCF-7/R cell line as compared to sensitive MCF-7/S cell line, while 7 proteins were specifically reduced in drug-resistant MCF-7/R cells. Neutralizing antibodies against IL-6 and IL-8 partially reversed the drug resistance of MCF-7/R to paclitaxel and doxorubicin, while a neutralizing antibody against MCP-1 had no significant effect. Inhibition of endogenous IL-6 or IL-8 by siRNA technology significantly enhanced drug sensitivity of MCF-7/R cells. Furthermore, overexpression of IL-6 or IL-8 expression by transfection increased the ADM resistance in MCF-7/S cells. Our data suggest that increased expression levels of IL-6 and IL-8 may contribute to MDR in human breast cancer cells.

  10. Reversal effects of traditional Chinese herbs on multidrug resistance in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Wei, Dan-Dan; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Jun-Song; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2011-11-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) continues to be a major obstacle for successful anticancer therapy. In this work, fractions from 17 clinically used antitumour traditional Chinese medicinal herbs were tested for their potential to restore the sensitivity of MCF-7/ADR and A549/Taxol cells to a known antineoplastic agent. The effects of these fractions were evaluated by MTT method and an assay of the cellular accumulation of doxorubicin. Fractions from the PB group (herbs with the ability to promote blood circulation and remove blood stasis) showed more significant effects than fractions from the CH group (herbs with the ability to clear away heat and toxic materials). Fractions from CH₂Cl₂ extracts were more effective than fractions from EtOAc extracts. Five herbs (Curcuma wenyujin, Chrysanthemum indicum, Salvia chinensis, Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort. and Cassia tora L.) could sensitise these resistant cancer cells at a non-toxic concentration (10 µg mL⁻¹), and markedly increased doxorubicin accumulation in MCF-7/ADR cells, which necessitates further investigations on the active ingredients of these herbs and their underlying mechanisms.

  11. A role for multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4; ABCC4) in human dendritic cell migration.

    PubMed

    van de Ven, Rieneke; Scheffer, George L; Reurs, Anneke W; Lindenberg, Jelle J; Oerlemans, Ruud; Jansen, Gerrit; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Glasgow, Joel N; Pereboev, Alexander; Curiel, David T; Scheper, Rik J; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2008-09-15

    The capacity of dendritic cells (DCs) to migrate from peripheral organs to lymph nodes (LNs) is important in the initiation of a T cell-mediated immune response. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1) and the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1; ABCC1) have been shown to play a role in both human and murine DC migration. Here we show that a more recently discovered family member, MRP4 (ABCC4), is expressed on both epidermal and dermal human skin DCs and contributes to the migratory capacity of DCs. Pharmacological inhibition of MRP4 activity or down-regulation through RNAi in DCs resulted in reduced migration of DCs from human skin explants and of in vitro generated Langerhans cells. The responsible MRP4 substrate remains to be identified as exogenous addition of MRP4's known substrates prostaglandin E(2), leukotriene B(4) and D(4), or cyclic nucleotides (all previously implicated in DC migration) could not restore migration. This notwithstanding, our data show that MRP4 is an important protein, significantly contributing to human DC migration toward the draining lymph nodes, and therefore relevant for the initiation of an immune response and a possible target for immunotherapy.

  12. Rack1 Mediates the Interaction of P-Glycoprotein with Anxa2 and Regulates Migration and Invasion of Multidrug-Resistant Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Wu, Na; Wang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Fei; Tian, Ran; Ji, Wei; Ren, Xiubao; Niu, Ruifang

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug resistance is always associated with more rapid tumor recurrence and metastasis. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which is a well-known multidrug-efflux transporter, confers enhanced invasion ability in drug-resistant cells. Previous studies have shown that P-gp probably exerts its tumor-promoting function via protein-protein interaction. These interactions were implicated in the activation of intracellular signal transduction. We previously showed that P-gp binds to Anxa2 and promotes the invasiveness of multidrug-resistant (MDR) breast cancer cells through regulation of Anxa2 phosphorylation. However, the accurate mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, a co-immunoprecipitation coupled with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry-based interactomic approach was performed to screen P-gp binding proteins. We identified Rack1 as a novel P-gp binding protein. Knockdown of Rack1 significantly inhibited proliferation and invasion of MDR cancer cells. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that Rack1 functioned as a scaffold protein that mediated the binding of P-gp to Anxa2 and Src. We showed that Rack1 regulated P-gp activity, which was necessary for adriamycin-induced P-gp-mediated phosphorylation of Anxa2 and Erk1/2. Overall, the findings in this study augment novel insights to the understanding of the mechanism employed by P-gp for promoting migration and invasion of MDR cancer cells. PMID:27754360

  13. The multidrug resistance protein 1: a functionally important activation marker for murine Th1 cells.

    PubMed

    Prechtl, S; Roellinghoff, M; Scheper, R; Cole, S P; Deeley, R G; Lohoff, M

    2000-01-15

    Previously, we described the expression of an energy-dependent pump in resting murine Th2 (but not resting Th1) cells which extruded the fluorescent dye Fluo-3. After stimulation with Ag and APCs, Th1 cells also expressed this pump. Furthermore, expression of the murine multidrug resistance protein 1 (mrp1) correlated with the presence of the pump. In this study, we report that Fluo-3 is indeed transported by murine mrp1 or its human ortholog MRP1, as revealed by transfection of HEK 293 cells with mrp1 or MRP1 cDNA. Like antigenic activation, IL-2 dose-dependently enhanced the Fluo-3-extruding activity in murine Th1 cells. Although TNF-alpha and IL-12 by themselves only weakly enhanced Fluo-3 extrusion, each of them did so in strong synergism with IL-2. An Ab directed against mrp1 was used to quantify the expression of mrp1 protein in T cells at the single-cell level. Like the Fluo-3 pump, mrp1 protein expression was enhanced by IL-2. Immunohistochemical studies using confocal laser microscopy indicated that mrp1 is localized mainly at the plasma membrane. In addition, protein expression of mrp1 was induced in Vbeta8+CD4+ T cells 12 h after in vivo application of Staphylococcal enterotoxin B. Finally, mrp1 was functionally relevant during the activation process of Th1 cells, because T cell activation could be suppressed by exposure of cells to the mrp1 inhibitor MK571. Thus, we present mrp1 as a novel, functionally important activation marker for Th1 cells and short-term in vivo activated CD4+ T cells, whereas its expression seems to be constitutive in Th2 cells.

  14. Redox active copper chelate overcomes multidrug resistance in T-lymphoblastic leukemia cell by triggering apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Avishek; Basu, Soumya; Banerjee, Kaushik; Chakraborty, Paramita; Sarkar, Avijit; Chatterjee, Mitali; Chaudhuri, Soumitra Kumar

    2011-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by the over expression of drug efflux protein P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the major impediments to successful treatment of cancer. P-gp acts as an energy-dependent drug efflux pump and reduces the intracellular concentration of structurally unrelated drugs inside the cells. Therefore, there is an urgent need for development of new molecules that are less toxic to normal cell and preferentially effective against drug resistant malignant cells. In this preclinical study we report the apoptotic potential of copper N-(2-hydroxyacetophenone) glycinate (CuNG) on doxorubicin resistant T lymphoblastic leukaemia cells (CEM/ADR5000). To evaluate the cytotoxic effect of CuNG, we used different normal cell lines (NIH 3T3, Chang liver and human PBMC) and cancerous cell lines (CEM/ADR5000, parental sensitive CCRF-CEM, SiHa and 3LL) and conclude that CuNG preferentially kills cancerous cells, especially both leukemic cell types irrespective of their MDR status, while leaving normal cell totally unaffected. Moreover, CuNG involves reactive oxygen species (ROS) for induction of apoptosis in CEM/ADR5000 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. This is substantiated by our observation that antioxidant N-acetyle-cysteine (NAC) and PEG catalase could completely block ROS generation and, subsequently, abrogates CuNG induced apoptosis. On the other hand, uncomplexed ligand N-(2-hydroxyacetophenone) glycinate (NG) fails to generate a significant amount of ROS and concomitant induction of apoptosis in CEM/ADR5000 cells. Therefore, CuNG induces drug resistant leukemia cells to undergo apoptosis and proves to be a molecule having therapeutic potential to overcome MDR in cancer.

  15. Overcoming of multidrug resistance by introducing the apoptosis gene, bcl-Xs, into MRP-overexpressing drug resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Ohi, Y; Kim, R; Toge, T

    2000-05-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) is one of drug transport membranes that confer multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Multidrug resistance has been known to be associated with resistance to apoptosis. In this study, using MRP overexpressing multidrug resistant nasopharyngeal cancer cells, we examined the expression of apoptosis related genes including p53, p21WAF1, bax and bcl-Xs between drug sensitive KB and its resistant KB/7D cells. We also examined whether the introduction of apoptosis related gene could increase the sensitivity to anticancer drugs in association with apoptotic cell death. The relative resistances to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells evaluated by IC50 values were 3.6, 61.3, 10.4 and 10.5 to adriamycin (ADM), etoposide (VP-16), vincristine (VCR) and vindesine (VDS), respectively. The resistance to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells was associated with the attenuation of internucleosomal DNA ladder formation in apoptosis. Of important, the mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in KB/7D cells was decreased in one-fourth as compared to that of KB cells among the apoptosis genes. The mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in a bcl-Xs transfected clone (KB/7Dbcl-Xs) was increased about 2-fold compared to that of KB/7Dneo cells, while the mRNA expression of MRP gene was not significantly different in KB/7bcl-Xs and KB/7Dneo cells. The sensitivities to anticancer drugs including ADM, VCR and VDS except VP-16 were increased in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells, in turn, the relative resistance in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells was decreased to 1.4, 4.0, and 3.0 in ADM, VCR and VDS, respectively, as compared to those of KB/7Dneo cells. Of interest, the studies on the accumulation of [3H]VCR showed that the decrease of [3H]VCR accumulation in KB/7Dbcl-Xs was not significantly different from that of KB/7Dneo cells. Collectively, these results indicated that the mechanism(s) of drug resistance in KB/7D cells could be explained at least by two factors: a) reduced drug accumulation mediated by

  16. Deficiency of multidrug resistance 2 contributes to cell transformation through oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Tebbi, Ali; Levillayer, Florence; Jouvion, Grégory; Fiette, Laurence; Soubigou, Guillaume; Varet, Hugo; Boudjadja, Nesrine; Cairo, Stefano; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Suzuki, Ana Maria; Carninci, Piero; Carissimo, Annamaria; di Bernardo, Diego; Wei, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance 2 (Mdr2), also called adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette B4 (ABCB4), is the transporter of phosphatidylcholine (PC) at the canalicular membrane of mouse hepatocytes, which plays an essential role for bile formation. Mutations in human homologue MDR3 are associated with several liver diseases. Knockout of Mdr2 results in hepatic inflammation, liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Whereas the pathogenesis in Mdr2 −/− mice has been largely attributed to the toxicity of bile acids due to the absence of PC in the bile, the question of whether Mdr2 deficiency per se perturbs biological functions in the cell has been poorly addressed. As Mdr2 is expressed in many cell types, we used mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) derived from Mdr2 −/− embryos to show that deficiency of Mdr2 increases reactive oxygen species accumulation, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. We found that Mdr2 −/− MEFs undergo spontaneous transformation and that Mdr2 −/− mice are more susceptible to chemical carcinogen-induced intestinal tumorigenesis. Microarray analysis in Mdr2−/− MEFs and cap analysis of gene expression in Mdr2 −/− HCCs revealed extensively deregulated genes involved in oxidation reduction, fatty acid metabolism and lipid biosynthesis. Our findings imply a close link between Mdr2 −/−-associated tumorigenesis and perturbation of these biological processes and suggest potential extrahepatic functions of Mdr2/MDR3. PMID:26542370

  17. A role for multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4; ABCC4) in human dendritic cell migration

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Rieneke; Scheffer, George L.; Reurs, Anneke W.; Lindenberg, Jelle J.; Oerlemans, Ruud; Jansen, Gerrit; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Glasgow, Joel N.; Pereboev, Alexander; Curiel, David T.; Scheper, Rik J.

    2008-01-01

    The capacity of dendritic cells (DCs) to migrate from peripheral organs to lymph nodes (LNs) is important in the initiation of a T cell–mediated immune response. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1) and the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1; ABCC1) have been shown to play a role in both human and murine DC migration. Here we show that a more recently discovered family member, MRP4 (ABCC4), is expressed on both epidermal and dermal human skin DCs and contributes to the migratory capacity of DCs. Pharmacological inhibition of MRP4 activity or down-regulation through RNAi in DCs resulted in reduced migration of DCs from human skin explants and of in vitro generated Langerhans cells. The responsible MRP4 substrate remains to be identified as exogenous addition of MRP4's known substrates prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4 and D4, or cyclic nucleotides (all previously implicated in DC migration) could not restore migration. This notwithstanding, our data show that MRP4 is an important protein, significantly contributing to human DC migration toward the draining lymph nodes, and therefore relevant for the initiation of an immune response and a possible target for immunotherapy. PMID:18625884

  18. Regulation of Multi-drug Resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma cells is TRPC6/Calcium Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Liang; Liang, Chao; Chen, Enjiang; Chen, Wei; Liang, Feng; Zhi, Xiao; Wei, Tao; Xue, Fei; Li, Guogang; Yang, Qi; Gong, Weihua; Feng, Xinhua; Bai, Xueli; Liang, Tingbo

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is notoriously refractory to chemotherapy because of its tendency to develop multi-drug resistance (MDR), whose various underlying mechanisms make it difficult to target. The calcium signalling pathway is associated with many cellular biological activities, and is also a critical player in cancer. However, its role in modulating tumour MDR remains unclear. In this study, stimulation by doxorubicin, hypoxia and ionizing radiation was used to induce MDR in HCC cells. A sustained aggregation of intracellular calcium was observed upon these stimuli, while inhibition of calcium signalling enhanced the cells’ sensitivity to various drugs by attenuating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), Hif1-α signalling and DNA damage repair. The effect of calcium signalling is mediated via transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6), a subtype of calcium-permeable channel. An in vivo xenograft model of HCC further confirmed that inhibiting TRPC6 enhanced the efficacy of doxorubicin. In addition, we deduced that STAT3 activation is a downstream signalling pathway in MDR. Collectively, this study demonstrated that the various mechanisms regulating MDR in HCC cells are calcium dependent through the TRPC6/calcium/STAT3 pathway. We propose that targeting TRPC6 in HCC may be a novel antineoplastic strategy, especially combined with chemotherapy. PMID:27011063

  19. Deficiency of multidrug resistance 2 contributes to cell transformation through oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Tebbi, Ali; Levillayer, Florence; Jouvion, Grégory; Fiette, Laurence; Soubigou, Guillaume; Varet, Hugo; Boudjadja, Nesrine; Cairo, Stefano; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Suzuki, Ana Maria; Carninci, Piero; Carissimo, Annamaria; di Bernardo, Diego; Wei, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance 2 (Mdr2), also called adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette B4 (ABCB4), is the transporter of phosphatidylcholine (PC) at the canalicular membrane of mouse hepatocytes, which plays an essential role for bile formation. Mutations in human homologue MDR3 are associated with several liver diseases. Knockout of Mdr2 results in hepatic inflammation, liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Whereas the pathogenesis in Mdr2 (-/-) mice has been largely attributed to the toxicity of bile acids due to the absence of PC in the bile, the question of whether Mdr2 deficiency per se perturbs biological functions in the cell has been poorly addressed. As Mdr2 is expressed in many cell types, we used mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) derived from Mdr2 (-/-) embryos to show that deficiency of Mdr2 increases reactive oxygen species accumulation, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. We found that Mdr2 (-/-) MEFs undergo spontaneous transformation and that Mdr2 (-/-) mice are more susceptible to chemical carcinogen-induced intestinal tumorigenesis. Microarray analysis in Mdr2-/- MEFs and cap analysis of gene expression in Mdr2 (-/-) HCCs revealed extensively deregulated genes involved in oxidation reduction, fatty acid metabolism and lipid biosynthesis. Our findings imply a close link between Mdr2 (-/-) -associated tumorigenesis and perturbation of these biological processes and suggest potential extrahepatic functions of Mdr2/MDR3. PMID:26542370

  20. An AS1411 aptamer-conjugated liposomal system containing a bubble-generating agent for tumor-specific chemotherapy that overcomes multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zi-Xian; Chuang, Er-Yuan; Lin, Chia-Chen; Ho, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Kun-Ju; Cheng, Po-Yuan; Chen, Ko-Jie; Wei, Hao-Ji; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2015-06-28

    Recent research in chemotherapy has prioritized overcoming the multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells. In this work, liposomes that contain doxorubicin (DOX) and ammonium bicarbonate (ABC, a bubble-generating agent) are prepared and functionalized with an antinucleolin aptamer (AS1411 liposomes) to target DOX-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR), which overexpress nucleolin receptors. Free DOX and liposomes without functionalization with AS1411 (plain liposomes) were used as controls. The results of molecular dynamic simulations suggest that AS1411 functionalization may promote the affinity and specific binding of liposomes to the nucleolin receptors, enhancing their subsequent uptake by tumor cells, whereas plain liposomes enter cells with difficulty. Upon mild heating, the decomposition of ABC that is encapsulated in the liposomes enables the immediate activation of generation of CO2 bubbles, creating permeable defects in their lipid bilayers, and ultimately facilitating the swift intracellular release of DOX. In vivo studies in nude mice that bear tumors demonstrate that the active targeting of AS1411 liposomes can substantially increase the accumulation of DOX in the tumor tissues relative to free DOX or passively targeted plain liposomes, inhibiting tumor growth and reducing systemic side effects, including cardiotoxicity. The above findings indicate that liposomes that are functionalized with AS1411 represent an attractive therapeutic alternative for overcoming the MDR effect, and support a potentially effective strategy for cancer therapy.

  1. Natural paniceins from mediterranean sponge inhibit the multidrug resistance activity of Patched and increase chemotherapy efficiency on melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiorini, Laura; Tribalat, Marie-Aude; Sauvard, Lucy; Cazareth, Julie; Lalli, Enzo; Broutin, Isabelle; Thomas, Olivier P.; Mus-Veteau, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance has appeared to mitigate the efficiency of anticancer drugs and the possibility of successful cancer chemotherapy. The Hedgehog receptor Patched is a multidrug transporter expressed in several cancers and as such it represents a new target to circumvent chemotherapy resistance. We report herein that paniceins and especially panicein A hydroquinone, natural meroterpenoids produced by the Mediterranean sponge Haliclona (Soestella) mucosa, inhibit the doxorubicin efflux activity of Patched and enhance the cytotoxicity of this chemotherapeutic agent on melanoma cells in vitro. These results are supported by the molecular docking performed on the structure of the bacterial drug efflux pump AcrB and on the Patched model built from AcrB structure. Docking calculations show that panicein A hydroquinone interacts with AcrB and Patched model close to the doxorubicin binding site. This compound thus appears as the first antagonist of the doxorubicin efflux activity of Patched. The use of inhibitors of Patched drug efflux activity in combination with classical chemotherapy could represent a novel approach to reduce tumor drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis. PMID:26068979

  2. Curcumin promotes apoptosis in A549/DDP multidrug-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma cells through an miRNA signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Tao; Ti, Xinyu; Shi, Jieran; Wu, Changgui; Ren, Xinling; Yin, Hong

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} Curcumin had anti-cancer effects on A549/DDP multidrug-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma cells {yields} Curcumin promotes apoptosis in A549/DDP cells through a miRNA signaling pathway {yields} Curcumin induces A549/DDP cell apoptosis by downregulating miR-186* {yields} miR-186* may serve as a potential gene therapy target for refractory lung cancer that is sensitive to curcumin -- Abstract: Curcumin extracted from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa L. has been shown to have inhibitory effects on cancers through its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. Emerging evidence demonstrates that curcumin can overcome drug resistance to classical chemotherapies. Thus, the mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor activities of curcumin require further study. In our study, we first demonstrated that curcumin had anti-cancer effects on A549/DDP multidrug-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Further studies showed that curcumin altered miRNA expression; in particular, significantly downregulated the expression of miR-186* in A549/DDP. In addition, transfection of cells with a miR-186* inhibitor promoted A549/DDP apoptosis, and overexpression of miR-186* significantly inhibited curcumin-induced apoptosis in A549/DDP cells. These observations suggest that miR-186* may serve as a potential gene therapy target for refractory lung cancer that is sensitive to curcumin.

  3. Knockdown of HOXA10 reverses the multidrug resistance of human chronic mylogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells by downregulating P-gp and MRP-1.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ying-Jie; Jia, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Jian-Yong; Li, You-Jie; Wang, Hong; Xie, Shu-Yang

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) of leukemia cells is a major obstacle in chemotherapeutic treatment. The high expression and constitutive activation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein-1 (MRP-1) have been reported to play a vital role in enhancing cell resistance to anticancer drugs in many tumors. The present study aimed to investigate the reversal of MDR by silencing homeobox A10 (HOXA10) in adriamycin (ADR)-resistant human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) K562/ADM cells by modulating the expression of P-gp and MRP-1. K562/ADM cells were stably transfected with HOXA10-targeted short hairpin RNA (shRNA). The results of reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis showed that the mRNA and protein expression of HOXA10 was markedly suppressed following transfection with a shRNA-containing vector. The sensitivity of the K562/ADM cells to ADR was enhanced by the silencing of HOXA10, due to the increased intracellular accumulation of ADR. The accumulation of ADR induced by the silencing of HOXA10 may be due to the downregulation of P-gp and MRP-1. Western blot analysis revealed that downregulating HOXA10 inhibited the protein expression of P-gp and MRP-1. Taken together, these results suggest that knockdown of HOXA10 combats resistance and that HOXA10 is a potential target for resistant human CML. PMID:27035504

  4. Chemosensitizing effects of synthetic curcumin analogs on human multi-drug resistance leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Mapoung, Sariya; Pitchakarn, Pornsiri; Yodkeeree, Supachai; Ovatlarnporn, Chitchamai; Sakorn, Natee; Limtrakul, Pornngarm

    2016-01-25

    Curcumin analogs were synthesized and their multi-drug resistance (MDR) reversing properties were determined in human MDR leukemic (K562/Adr) cells. Four analogs, 1,7-bis-(3,4-dimethoxy-phenyl)-hepta-1,6-diene-3,5-dione (1J), 2,6-bis-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzylidene)-cyclohexanone (2A), 2,6-bis-(3,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-cyclohexanone (2F) and 2,6-bis-(3,4-dimethoxy-benzylidene)-cyclohexanone (2J) markedly increased the sensitivity of K562/Adr cells to paclitaxel (PTX) for 8-, 2-, 8- and 16- folds, respectively and vinblastine (Vin) for 5-, 3-, 12- and 30- folds, respectively. The accumulation of P-gp substrates, Calcein-AM, Rhodamine 123 and Doxorubicin, was significantly increased by 1J (up to 6-, 11- and 22- folds, respectively) and 2J (up to 7-, 12- and 17- folds, respectively). Besides 2A, 2F and 2J dramatically decreased P-gp expression in K562/Adr cells. These results could be summarized in the following way. Analog 1J inhibited only P-gp function, while 2A and 2F inhibited only P-gp expression. Interestingly, 2J exerts inhibition of both P-gp function and expression. The combination index (CI) of combination between 2J and PTX (0.09) or Vin (0.06) in K562/Adr cells indicated strong synergistic effects, which likely due to its MDR reversing activity. Moreover, these analogs showed less cytotoxicity to peripheral mononuclear cells (human) and red blood cells (human and rat) suggesting the safety of analogs for further animal and clinical studies. PMID:26689174

  5. Phospholipase D activation mediates cobalamin-induced downregulation of Multidrug Resistance-1 gene and increase in sensitivity to vinblastine in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Marguerite, Véronique; Gkikopoulou, Effrosyni; Alberto, Jean-Marc; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Merten, Marc

    2013-02-01

    Failure of cancer chemotherapy due to multidrug resistance is often associated with altered Multidrug Resistance-1 gene expression. Cobalamin is the cofactor of methionine synthase, a key enzyme of the methionine cycle which synthesizes methionine, the precursor of cell S-adenosyl-methionine synthesis. We previously showed that cobalamin was able to down-regulate Multidrug Resistance-1 gene expression. Herein we report that this effect occurs through cobalamin-activation of phospholipase D activity in HepG2 cells. Cobalamin-induced down-regulation of Multidrug Resistance-1 gene expression was similar to that induced by the phospholipase D activator oleic acid and was negatively modulated by the phospholipase D inhibitor n-butanol. Cobalamin increased cell S-adenosyl-methionine content, which is the substrate for phosphatidylethanolamine-methyltransferase-dependent phosphatidylcholine production. We showed that cobalamin-induced increase in cell phosphatidylcholine production was phosphatidylethanolamine-methyltransferase-dependent. Oleic acid-dependent activation of phospholipase D was accompanied by an increased sensitivity to vinblastine of HepG2 cells while n-butanol enhanced the resistance of the cells to vinblastine. These data indicate that cobalamin mediates down-regulation of Multidrug Resistance-1 gene expression through increased S-adenosyl-methionine and phosphatidylcholine productions and phospholipase D activation. This points out phospholipase D as a potential target to down-regulate Multidrug Resistance-1 gene expression for improving chemotherapy efficacy.

  6. Amplicon structure in multidrug-resistant murine cells: a nonrearranged region of genomic DNA corresponding to large circular DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ståhl, F; Wettergren, Y; Levan, G

    1992-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cell lines is frequently correlated with amplification of one or more mdr genes. Usually the amplified domain also includes several neighboring genes. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we have established a restriction map covering approximately 2,200 kb in the drug-sensitive mouse tumor cell line TC13K. The mapped region is located on mouse chromosome 5 and includes the three mdr genes, the gene for the calcium-binding sorcin protein, and a gene with unknown function designated class 5. Long-range maps of the amplified DNA sequences in five of six MDR sublines that had been independently derived from TC13K generally displayed the same pattern as did the parental cell line. All six MDR sublines exhibited numerous double minutes, and one of them displayed a homogeneously staining region in a subpopulation. Large circular molecules, most likely identical to one chromatid of the double minutes, were detected in four of the sublines by linearization with gamma irradiation. The size of the circles was about 2,500 kb, which correlated to a single unit of the amplified domain. We therefore propose that in four independent instances of MDR development, a single unit of about 2,500 kb has been amplified in the form of circular DNA molecules. The restriction enzyme map of the amplified unit is unchanged compared with that of the parental cell line, whereas the joining sites of the circular DNA molecules are not identical but are in the same region. Images PMID:1545798

  7. Feroniellin A-induced autophagy causes apoptosis in multidrug-resistant human A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kaewpiboon, Chutima; Surapinit, Serm; Malilas, Waraporn; Moon, Jeong; Phuwapraisirisan, Preecha; Tip-Pyang, Santi; Johnston, Randal N; Koh, Sang Seok; Assavalapsakul, Wanchai; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2014-04-01

    During the screening of natural chemicals that can reverse multidrug resistance in human A549 lung cancer cells resistant to etoposide (A549RT-eto), we discovered that Feroniellin A (FERO), a novel furanocoumarin, shows toxicity toward A549RT-eto cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. FERO reduced the expression of NF-κB, leading to downregulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded by MDR1, which eventually sensitized A549RT-eto cells to apoptosis. FERO specifically diminished transcription and promoter activity of MDR1 but did not inhibit the expression of other multidrug resistance genes MRP2 and BCRP. Moreover, co-administration of FERO with Bay11-7802, an inhibitor of NF-κB, accelerated apoptosis of A549RT-eto cells through decreased expression of P-gp, indicating that NF-κB is involved in multidrug resistance. Conversely, addition of Z-VAD, a pan-caspase inhibitor, blocked FERO-induced apoptosis in A549RT-eto cells but did not block downregulation of P-gp, indicating that a decrease in P-gp expression is necessary but not sufficient for FERO-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, we found that FERO also induces autophagy, which is characterized by the conversion of LC3 I to LC3 II, induction of GFP-LC3 puncta, enhanced expression of Beclin-1 and ATG5, and inactivation of mTOR. Furthermore, suppression of Beclin-1 by siRNA reduced FERO-induced apoptosis in A549RT-eto cells and activation of autophagy by rapamycin accelerated FERO-induced apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy plays an active role in FERO-induced apoptosis. Herein, we report that FERO reverses multidrug resistance in A549RT-eto cells and exerts its cytotoxic effect by induction of both autophagy and apoptosis, which suggests that FERO can be a useful anticancer drug for multidrug-resistant lung cancer. PMID:24535083

  8. Feroniellin A-induced autophagy causes apoptosis in multidrug-resistant human A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kaewpiboon, Chutima; Surapinit, Serm; Malilas, Waraporn; Moon, Jeong; Phuwapraisirisan, Preecha; Tip-Pyang, Santi; Johnston, Randal N; Koh, Sang Seok; Assavalapsakul, Wanchai; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2014-04-01

    During the screening of natural chemicals that can reverse multidrug resistance in human A549 lung cancer cells resistant to etoposide (A549RT-eto), we discovered that Feroniellin A (FERO), a novel furanocoumarin, shows toxicity toward A549RT-eto cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. FERO reduced the expression of NF-κB, leading to downregulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded by MDR1, which eventually sensitized A549RT-eto cells to apoptosis. FERO specifically diminished transcription and promoter activity of MDR1 but did not inhibit the expression of other multidrug resistance genes MRP2 and BCRP. Moreover, co-administration of FERO with Bay11-7802, an inhibitor of NF-κB, accelerated apoptosis of A549RT-eto cells through decreased expression of P-gp, indicating that NF-κB is involved in multidrug resistance. Conversely, addition of Z-VAD, a pan-caspase inhibitor, blocked FERO-induced apoptosis in A549RT-eto cells but did not block downregulation of P-gp, indicating that a decrease in P-gp expression is necessary but not sufficient for FERO-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, we found that FERO also induces autophagy, which is characterized by the conversion of LC3 I to LC3 II, induction of GFP-LC3 puncta, enhanced expression of Beclin-1 and ATG5, and inactivation of mTOR. Furthermore, suppression of Beclin-1 by siRNA reduced FERO-induced apoptosis in A549RT-eto cells and activation of autophagy by rapamycin accelerated FERO-induced apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy plays an active role in FERO-induced apoptosis. Herein, we report that FERO reverses multidrug resistance in A549RT-eto cells and exerts its cytotoxic effect by induction of both autophagy and apoptosis, which suggests that FERO can be a useful anticancer drug for multidrug-resistant lung cancer.

  9. Bypassing multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells with lipid/polymer particle assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Xu, Hui; Li, Zhen; Yao, Mingfei; Xie, Meng; Shen, Haijun; Shen, Song; Wang, Xinshi; Jin, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by the overexpression of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), remains one of the major obstacles to effective cancer chemotherapy. In this study, lipid/particle assemblies named LipoParticles (LNPs), consisting of a dimethyldidodecylammonium bromide (DMAB)-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticle core surrounded by a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) shell, were specially designed for anticancer drugs to bypass MDR in human breast cancer cells that overexpress P-gp. Methods Doxorubicin (DOX), a chemotherapy drug that is a P-gp substrate, was conjugated to PLGA and encapsulated in the self-assembled LNP structure. Physiochemical properties of the DOX-loaded LNPs were characterized in vitro. Cellular uptake, intracellular accumulation, and cytotoxicity were compared in parental Michigan Cancer Foundation (MCF)-7 cells and P-gp-overexpressing, resistant MCF-7/adriamycin (MCF-7/ADR) cells. Results This study found that the DOX formulated in LNPs showed a significantly increased accumulation in the nuclei of drug-resistant cells relative to the free drug, indicating that LNPs could alter intracellular traffic and bypass drug efflux. The cytotoxicity of DOX loaded-LNPs had a 30-fold lower half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value than free DOX in MCF-7/ADR, measured by the colorimetric cell viability (MTT) assay, correlated with the strong nuclear retention of the drug. Conclusion The results show that this core-shell lipid/particle structure could be a promising strategy to bypass MDR. PMID:22275834

  10. Targeting the ABCG2-overexpressing multidrug resistant (MDR) cancer cells by PPARγ agonists

    PubMed Central

    To, Kenneth K W; Tomlinson, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Multidrug resistance (MDR), usually mediated by overexpression of efflux transporters such as P-gp, ABCG2 and/or MRP1, remains a major obstacle hindering successful cancer chemotherapy. There has been great interest in the development of inhibitors towards these transporters to circumvent resistance. However, since the inhibition of transporter is not specific to cancer cells, a decrease in the cytotoxic drug dosing may be needed to prevent excess toxicity, thus undermining the potential benefit brought about by a drug efflux inhibitor. The design of potent MDR modulators specific towards resistant cancer cells and devoid of drug-drug interactions will be needed to effect MDR reversal. Experimental Approach Recent evidence suggests that the PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway may be exploited to alter ABCG2 subcellular localization, thereby circumventing MDR. Three PPARγ agonists (telmisartan, pioglitazone and rosiglitazone) that have been used in the clinics were tested for their effect on the PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway and possible reversal of ABCG2-mediated drug resistance. Key Results The PPARγ agonists were found to be weak ABCG2 inhibitors by drug efflux assay. They were also shown to elevate the reduced PTEN expression in a resistant and ABCG2-overexpressing cell model, which inhibit the PI3K-Akt pathway and lead to the relocalization of ABCG2 from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasma, thus apparently circumventing the ABCG2-mediated MDR. Conclusions and Implications Since this PPARγ/PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway regulating ABCG2 is only functional in drug-resistant cancer cells with PTEN loss, the PPARγ agonists identified may represent promising agents targeting resistant cells for MDR reversal. PMID:24032744

  11. Cucurbitacin B reverses multidrug resistance by targeting CIP2A to reactivate protein phosphatase 2A in MCF-7/adriamycin cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Fen; Zhang, Liang; Xiao, Xiangling; Duan, Chao; Huang, Qiuyue; Fan, Chunsheng; Li, Jian; Liu, Xuewen; Li, Shan; Liu, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is a human oncoprotein that is overexpressed in various tumors. A previous study found that CIP2A expression is associated with doxorubicin (Dox) resistance. In the present study, we investigated whether cucurbitacin B (CuB), a natural anticancer compound found in Cucurbitaceae, reversed multidrug resistance (MDR) and downregulated CIP2A expression in MCF-7/Adriamycin (MCF-7/Adr) cells, a human breast multidrug-resistant cancer cell line. CuB treatment significantly suppressed MCF-7/Adr cell proliferation, and reversed Dox resistance. CuB treatment also induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, decreased phosphorylation of Akt (pAkt). The suppression of pAkt was mediated through CuB-induced activation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Furthermore, CuB activated PP2A through the suppression of CIP2A. Silencing CIP2A enhanced CuB-induced growth inhibition, apoptosis and MDR inhibition in MCF-7/Adr cells. In conclusion, we found that enhancement of PP2A activity by inhibition of CIP2A promotes the reversal of MDR induced by CuB. PMID:27350399

  12. Fallopia japonica, a Natural Modulator, Can Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Safaa Yehia; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki; Ashour, Mohamed Lotfy; Wink, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy is controlled by the decrease of intracellular drug accumulation, increase of detoxification, and diminished propensity of cancer cells to undergo apoptosis. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane transporters with intracellular metabolic enzymes contribute to the complex and unresolved phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR). Natural products as alternative medicine have great potential to discover new MDR inhibitors with diverse modes of action. In this study, we characterized several extracts of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) plants (N = 16) for their interaction with ABC transporters, cytochrome P3A4 (CYP3A4), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities and their cytotoxic effect on different cancer cell lines. Fallopia japonica (FJ) (Polygonaceae) shows potent inhibitory effect on CYP3A4 P-glycoprotein activity about 1.8-fold when compared to verapamil as positive control. FJ shows significant inhibitory effect (39.81%) compared with the known inhibitor ketoconazole and 100 μg/mL inhibited GST activity to 14 μmol/min/mL. FJ shows moderate cytotoxicity in human Caco-2, HepG-2, and HeLa cell lines; IC50 values were 630.98, 198.80, and 317.37 µg/mL, respectively. LC-ESI-MS were used to identify and quantify the most abundant compounds, emodin, polydatin, and resveratrol, in the most active extract of FJ. Here, we present the prospect of using Fallopia japonica as natural products to modulate the function of ABC drug transporters. We are conducting future study to evaluate the ability of the major active secondary metabolites of Fallopia japonica to modulate MDR and their impact in case of failure of chemotherapy. PMID:26346937

  13. Effects of hypergravity on the expression of multidrug resistance proteins in human melanocytic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambers, B.; Stieber, C.; Grigorieva, O.; Block, I.; Bromeis, B.; Buravkova, L.; Gerzer, R.; Ivanova, K.

    In humans the skin serves as a barrier against potentially harmful effects of the environment Human melanocytes constitute the principal cells for skin pigmentation by synthesizing the pigment melanin Melanin acts as a scavenger for free radicals that may arise during metabolic stress The melanocytes are also able to secrete a wide range of signal molecules In previous studies we found that normal human melanocytes NHMs and non-metastatic melanoma cells respond to long-time exposure to hypergravity up to 5 g for 24 h with elevated efflux of guanosine 3 5 -cyclic monophosphate cGMP in the presence of phosphodiesterase PDE inhibitors e g 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine Cyclic GMP is known to play a signaling role in human melanocyte physiology It controls the signaling activities of nitric oxide NO in relation to melanogenesis as well as in melanocyte-extracellular matrix interactions that may be important for some pathological processes including metastasis The present study investigated the effects of hypergravity on the expression of the multidrug resistance proteins MRP 4 and 5 as highly selective cGMP exporters in non-stimulated and NO-stimulated NHMs and melanoma cells MCs on mRNA levels using semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis Hypergravity up to 5 g for 24 h was produced by horizontal centrifugal acceleration The NONOate DETA-NO 0 1 mM was used as a direct NO donor for cell stimulation For 5-g experiments the mRNA levels for the highly specific cGMP transporter MRP5 appeared to be

  14. Effect of Prostaglandin E2 on Multidrug Resistance Transporters In Human Placental Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gene T.; Dong, Yafeng; Zhou, Helen; He, Lily; Weiner, Carl P.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2, a major product of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, acts as an immunomodulator at the maternal-fetal interface during pregnancy. It exerts biologic function through interaction with E-prostanoid (EP) receptors localized to the placenta. The activation of the COX-2/PGE2/EP signal pathway can alter the expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, multidrug resistance protein 1 [P-glycoprotein (Pgp); gene: ABCB1], and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; gene: ABCG2), which function to extrude drugs and xenobiotics from cells. In the placenta, PGE2-mediated changes in ABC transporter expression could impact fetal drug exposure. Furthermore, understanding the signaling cascades involved could lead to strategies for the control of Pgp and BCRP expression levels. We sought to determine the impact of PGE2 signaling mechanisms on Pgp and BCRP in human placental cells. The treatment of placental cells with PGE2 up-regulated BCRP expression and resulted in decreased cellular accumulation of the fluorescent substrate Hoechst 33342. Inhibiting the EP1 and EP3 receptors with specific antagonists attenuated the increase in BCRP. EP receptor signaling results in activation of transcription factors, which can affect BCRP expression. Although PGE2 decreased nuclear factor κ-light chain-enhancer of activated B activation and increased activator protein 1, chemical inhibition of these inflammatory transcription factors did not blunt BCRP up-regulation by PGE2. Though PGE2 decreased Pgp mRNA, Pgp expression and function were not significantly altered. Overall, these findings suggest a possible role for PGE2 in the up-regulation of placental BCRP expression via EP1 and EP3 receptor signaling cascades. PMID:25261564

  15. [Cytological Study in vitro on Co-delivery of siRNA and Paclitaxel within Solid Lipid Nanoparticles to Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Tumors].

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Yao, Xinyu; Chen, Yuan; Sun, Xun; Lin, Yunzhu

    2016-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains the major obstacle to the success of clinical cancer chemotherapy. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded by the MDR1, is an important part with complex mechanisms associated with the MDR. In order to overcome the MDR of tumors, we in the present experimental design incorporated small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting MDR1 gene and anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) into the solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) to achieve the combinational therapeutic effects of genetherapy and chemotherapy. In this study, siRNA-PTX-SLNs were successfully prepared. The cytotoxicity of blank SLNs and siRNA-PTX-SLNs in MCF-7 cells and MCF-7/ADR cells were detected by MTT; and the uptake efficiency of PTX in MCF-7/ADR cells were detected via HPLC method; quantitative real-time PCR and flow cytometry were performed to investigate the silencing effect of siRNA-PTX- SLNs on MDR1 gene in MCF-7/ADR cells. The results showed that PTX loaded SLNs could significantly inhibit the growth of tumor cells, and more importantly, the MDR tumor cells treated with siRNA-PTX-SLNs showed the lowest viability. HPLC study showed that SLNs could enhance the cellular uptake for PTX. Meanwhile, siRNA delivered by SLNs significantly decreased the P-gp expression in MDR tumor cells, thus increased the cellular accumulation of rhodamine123 as a P-gp substrate. In conclusion, the MDR1 gene could be silenced by siRNA-PTX-SLNs, which could promote the growth inhibition efficiency of PTX on tumor cells, leading to synergetic effect on MDR tumor therapy. PMID:27382749

  16. Targeting miR-381-NEFL axis sensitizes glioblastoma cells to temozolomide by regulating stemness factors and multidrug resistance factors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zeyou; Yang, Jing; Xu, Gang; Wang, Wei; Liu, Changhong; Yang, Honghui; Yu, Zhibin; Lei, Qianqian; Xiao, Lan; Xiong, Jing; Zeng, Liang; Xiang, Juanjuan; Ma, Jian; Li, Guiyuan; Wu, Minghua

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-381 (miR-381) is a highly expressed onco-miRNA that is involved in malignant progression and has been suggested to be a good target for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) therapy. In this study, we employed two-dimensional fluorescence differential gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and MALDI–TOF/TOF-MS/MS to identify 27 differentially expressed proteins, including the significantly upregulated neurofilament light polypeptide (NEFL), in glioblastoma cells in which miR-381 expression was inhibited. We identified NEFL as a novel target molecule of miR-381 and a tumor suppressor gene. In human astrocytoma clinical specimens, NEFL was downregulated with increased levels of miR-381 expression. Either suppressing miR-381 or enforcing NEFL expression dramatically sensitized glioblastoma cells to temozolomide (TMZ), a promising chemotherapeutic agent for treating GBMs. The mechanism by which these cells were sensitized to TMZ was investigated by inhibiting various multidrug resistance factors (ABCG2, ABCC3, and ABCC5) and stemness factors (ALDH1, CD44, CKIT, KLF4, Nanog, Nestin, and SOX2). Our results further demonstrated that miR-381 overexpression reversed the viability of U251 cells exhibiting NEFL-mediated TMZ sensitivity. In addition, NEFL-siRNA also reversed the proliferation rate of U251 cells exhibiting locked nucleic acid (LNA)-anti-miR-381-mediated TMZ sensitivity. Overall, the miR-381-NEFL axis is important for TMZ resistance in GBM and may potentially serve as a novel therapeutic target for glioma. PMID:25605243

  17. Cosilencing of PKM-2 and MDR-1 Sensitizes Multidrug-Resistant Ovarian Cancer Cells to Paclitaxel in a Murine Model of Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Meghna; Ouyang, Qijun; Goldberg, Michael S; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2015-07-01

    Tumor multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious clinical challenge that significantly limits the effectiveness of cytotoxic chemotherapy. As such, complementary therapeutic strategies are being explored to prevent relapse. The altered metabolic state of cancer cells, which perform aerobic glycolysis, represents an interesting target that can enable discrimination between healthy cells and cancer cells. We hypothesized that cosilencing of genes responsible for aerobic glycolysis and for MDR would have synergistic antitumor effect. In this study, siRNA duplexes against pyruvate kinase M2 and multidrug resistance gene-1 were encapsulated in hyaluronic acid-based self-assembling nanoparticles. The particles were characterized for morphology, size, charge, encapsulation efficiency, and transfection efficiency. In vivo studies included biodistribution assessment, gene knockdown confirmation, therapeutic efficacy, and safety analysis. The benefit of active targeting of cancer cells was confirmed by modifying the particles' surface with a peptide targeted to epidermal growth factor receptor, which is overexpressed on the membranes of the SKOV-3 cancer cells. To augment the studies involving transplantation of a paclitaxel-resistant cell line, an in vivo paclitaxel resistance model was developed by injecting repeated doses of paclitaxel following tumor inoculation. The nanoparticles accumulated significantly in the tumors, hindering tumor volume doubling time (P < 0.05) upon combination therapy in both the wild-type (2-fold) and resistant (8-fold) xenograft models. Although previous studies indicated that silencing of MDR-1 alone sensitized MDR ovarian cancer to paclitaxel only modestly, these data suggest that concurrent silencing of PKM-2 improves the efficacy of paclitaxel against MDR ovarian cancer. PMID:25964202

  18. The cellular uptake mechanism, intracellular transportation, and exocytosis of polyamidoamine dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Mengjun; Sun, Yuqi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Guan, Guannan; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Chen, Dawei; Hu, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers, which can deliver drugs and genetic materials to resistant cells, are attracting increased research attention, but their transportation behavior in resistant cells remains unclear. In this paper, we performed a systematic analysis of the cellular uptake, intracellular transportation, and efflux of PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR cells) using sensitive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells) as the control. We found that the uptake rate of PAMAM-NH2 was much lower and exocytosis of PAMAM-NH2 was much greater in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells due to the elimination of PAMAM-NH2 from P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated protein in MCF-7/ADR cells. Macropinocytosis played a more important role in its uptake in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells. PAMAM-NH2 aggregated and became more degraded in the lysosomal vesicles of the MCF-7/ADR cells than in those of the MCF-7 cells. The endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex were found to participate in the exocytosis rather than endocytosis process of PAMAM-NH2 in both types of cells. Our findings clearly showed the intracellular transportation process of PAMAM-NH2 in MCF-7/ADR cells and provided a guide of using PAMAM-NH2 as a drug and gene vector in resistant cells. PMID:27536106

  19. The cellular uptake mechanism, intracellular transportation, and exocytosis of polyamidoamine dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Mengjun; Sun, Yuqi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Guan, Guannan; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Chen, Dawei; Hu, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers, which can deliver drugs and genetic materials to resistant cells, are attracting increased research attention, but their transportation behavior in resistant cells remains unclear. In this paper, we performed a systematic analysis of the cellular uptake, intracellular transportation, and efflux of PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR cells) using sensitive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells) as the control. We found that the uptake rate of PAMAM-NH2 was much lower and exocytosis of PAMAM-NH2 was much greater in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells due to the elimination of PAMAM-NH2 from P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated protein in MCF-7/ADR cells. Macropinocytosis played a more important role in its uptake in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells. PAMAM-NH2 aggregated and became more degraded in the lysosomal vesicles of the MCF-7/ADR cells than in those of the MCF-7 cells. The endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex were found to participate in the exocytosis rather than endocytosis process of PAMAM-NH2 in both types of cells. Our findings clearly showed the intracellular transportation process of PAMAM-NH2 in MCF-7/ADR cells and provided a guide of using PAMAM-NH2 as a drug and gene vector in resistant cells. PMID:27536106

  20. Effect of Ganoderma on drug-sensitive and multidrug-resistant small-cell lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sadava, David; Still, David W; Mudry, Ryan R; Kane, Susan E

    2009-05-18

    Multidrug resistance is a major problem in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Ganoderma lucidum is a widely used herb in traditional Chinese medicine. We tested the effects of Ganoderma on drug-sensitive (H69) and multi-drug resistant (VPA) human SCLC cells. Both cells showed equal cytotoxicity when incubated with extracts of mycelia of 9 species of Ganoderma, including G. lucidum. Cells treated with the IC(50) of cytotoxic Ganoderma and analyzed by flow cytometry-PI staining showed increases in S phase. When compared untreated controls or SCLC cells treated with extracts of non-cytotoxic Ganoderma species, cells treated with extracts of cytotoxic Ganoderma species responded with an induction of apoptosis similar to cells treated with the chemotherapeutic drugs etoposide and doxorubicin. This was shown by four criteria: increased DNA fragmentation within cells as measured by ELISA; increased TUNEL staining for DNA breaks; increased specific activities of caspases 3 and 9, but not caspase 8 by colorimetric assays, indicating the endogenous pathway; and similar patterns changes in the expressions of 9 genes involved in the cell cycle/apoptosis, as measured by RT-PCR and capillary electrophoresis. Pre-incubation of drug-resistant SCLC cells with cytotoxic Ganoderma reduced the IC(50) for etoposide (3.4-0.21 microM) and doxorubicin (0.19-0.04 microM). These results show that extracts of several species of Ganoderma are cytotoxic to both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant SCLC cells, are pro-apoptotic, induce gene expression patterns that are similar to SCLC cells treated with chemotherapeutic drugs, and can reverse resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs.

  1. Multidrug-resistant hela cells overexpressing MRP1 exhibit sensitivity to cell killing by hyperthermia: Interactions with etoposide

    SciTech Connect

    Souslova, Tatiana; Averill-Bates, Diana A. . E-mail: averill.diana@uqam.ca

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains one of the primary obstacles in cancer chemotherapy and often involves overexpression of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1). Regional hyperthermia is undergoing clinical investigation in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. This study evaluates whether hyperthermia can reverse MDR mediated by MRP1 in human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells. Methods and materials: Cytotoxicity of hyperthermia and/or etoposide was evaluated using sulforhodamine-B in HeLa cells overexpressing MRP1 and their drug-sensitive counterparts. Glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were quantified by spectrophotometry. GST isoenzymes were quantified by immunodetection. Caspase activation was evaluated by fluorometry and chromatin condensation by fluorescence microscopy using Hoechst 33258. Necrosis was determined using propidium iodide. Results: The major finding is that HeLa and HeLaMRP cells are both sensitive to cytotoxicity of hyperthermia (41-45 deg C). Hyperthermia induced activation of caspase 3 and chromatin condensation. Although total levels of cell killing were similar, there was a switch from apoptotic to necrotic cell death in MDR cells. This could be explained by decreased glutathione and GPx in MDR cells. MDR cells also contained very low levels of GST and were resistant to etoposide-induced apoptosis. Hyperthermia caused a modest increase in etoposide-induced apoptosis in HeLa and HeLaMRP cells, which required appropriate heat-drug scheduling. Conclusions: Hyperthermia could be useful in eliminating MDR cells that overexpress MRP1.

  2. Silencing clusterin gene transcription on effects of multidrug resistance reversing of human hepatoma HepG2/ADM cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjie; Sai, Wenli; Yao, Min; Gu, Hongbin; Yao, Yao; Qian, Qi; Yao, Dengfu

    2015-05-01

    Abnormal clusterin (CLU) expression is associated with multidrug resistance (MDR) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In the present study, the CLU expression was analyzed in human hepatoma cells and chemoresistant counterpart HepG2/ADM cells. Compared with L02 cells, the overexpression of cellular CLU was identified in HepG2, HepG2/ADM, SMMC7721, Hep3B ,and PLC cells and relatively lower expression in Bel-7404, SNU-739, and MHCC97H cells. Specific short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to silence CLU gene transcription were designed, and the most effective sequences were screened. After the HepG2/ADM cells transfected with shRNA-1, the inhibition of CLU expression was 73.68 % at messenger RNA (mRNA) level by real-time quantitative RT-PCR with obvious enhancement in cell chemosensitivity, increasing apoptosis induced by doxorubicin using fluorescence kit, and Rh-123 retention qualified with flow cytometry. Knockdown CLU also significantly decreased the drug efflux pump activity through the depression of MDR1/P-glycoprotein (q = 11.739, P < 0.001). Moreover, silencing CLU led to downregulation of β-catenin (q = 13.544, P = 0.001), suggesting that downregulation of CLU might be a key point to reverse multidrug resistance of HepG2/ADM cells. PMID:25600802

  3. Retroviral transfer of a murine cDNA for multidrug resistance confers pleiotropic drug resistance to cells without prior drug selection

    SciTech Connect

    Guild, B.C.; Mulligan, R.C.; Gros, P.; Housman, D.E.

    1988-03-01

    The authors have constructed a retrovirus expression vector that carries the murine mdr cDNA transcribed under the control of the human H4 histone promoter to examine the feasibility of efficiently transferring a multidrug resistance phenotype to cells without requiring drug selection. This approach will facilitate the transfer of mdr cDNA to hematopoietic progenitor cells for the study of multidrug resistance in vivo. The retrovirus vector pHmdr has been used for transmission and expression of the mdr cDNA in initially drug-sensitive NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Selection of pHmdr infectants in the cytotoxic agents colchicine or doxorubicin gave rise to highly multidrug-resistant colonies containing a single gene copy of the vector. Moreover, in the analysis of 12 cloned unselected NIH 3T3 cell infectants, a multidrug resistance phenotype was conferred by as few as two copies of the pHmdr vector. Overexpression of the mdr cDNA in drug-selected and unselected pHmdr infectants was directly related to cell survival in three cytotoxic agents tested. These results hold significant implications for the study of multidrug resistance in vivo.

  4. Synthesis of α,β-Unsaturated Carbonyl-Based Compounds, Oxime and Oxime Ether Analogs as Potential Anticancer Agents for Overcoming Cancer Multidrug Resistance by Modulation of Efflux Pumps in Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hua-Li; Leng, Jing; Zhang, Cheng-Pan; Jantan, Ibrahim; Amjad, Muhammad Wahab; Sher, Muhammad; Naeem-Ul-Hassan, Muhammad; Hussain, Muhammad Ajaz; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2016-04-14

    Sixty-nine novel α,β-unsaturated carbonyl based compounds, including cyclohexanone, tetralone, oxime, and oxime ether analogs, were synthesized. The antiproliferative activity determined by using seven different human cancer cell lines provided a structure-activity relationship. Compound 8ag exhibited high antiproliferative activity against Panc-1, PaCa-2, A-549, and PC-3 cell lines, with IC50 value of 0.02 μM, comparable to the positive control Erlotinib. The ten most active antiproliferative compounds were assessed for mechanistic effects on BRAF(V600E), EGFR TK kinases, and tubulin polymerization, and were investigated in vitro to reverse efflux-mediated resistance developed by cancer cells. Compound 8af exhibited the most potent BRAF(V600E) inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.9 μM. Oxime analog 7o displayed the most potent EGFR TK inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 0.07 μM, which was analogous to the positive control. Some analogs including 7f, 8af, and 8ag showed a dual role as anticancer and MDR reversal agents.

  5. Rapid identification of the multidrug resistance in the human leukemic cells by near-infrared Fourier transform Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beljebbar, Abdelilah; Morjani, Hamid; Sockalingum, Ganesh D.; Manfait, Michel

    1998-04-01

    In this work, we have studied the cancer cell lines sharing a common feature: the multi-drug resistance where P- glycoprotein is responsible for the active efflux of the drug out of the cell. For this, we have used two types of cells, MDR-human leukemic K562 cells and non-MDR acute promyelocytic leukemic HL60 cells. The comparison between normalized micro FT-Raman spectra of resistant and sensitive K652 cells shows a decrease in the intensity of the amide I and III bands and a down shift of the amide I band. On the other hand, control experiments with HL60 cells do not show any remarkable changes. Analysis of micro-FT-Raman spectra by resolution enhancement methods and by chemometrics tools reveal further information concerning the conformational changes of the cell constituents involved in the expression of the MDR-phenotype.

  6. Overcoming of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in K562/A02 cells using riccardin F and pakyonol, bisbibenzyl derivatives from liverworts.

    PubMed

    Ji, Mei; Shi, Yanquiu; Lou, Hongxiang

    2011-01-01

    Riccardin F and pakyonol, macrocyclic bisbibenzyls from Plagiochasm intermedium, have been confirmed to possess antifungic activities against Candida albicans. Herein, we evaluated their anti-tumor activity in vitro by employing K562 and K562/A02 cells, the well-known adriamycin (ADR)-induced multidrug resistance (MDR) tumor cell lines over-expressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp). 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays showed that riccardin F and pakyonol ranging from 0 to 6 μg/mL exhibited no inhibitory effects on the growth of the two cell lines. However, in the presence of 3 μg/mL riccardin F or pakyonol (non-cytotoxic concentration), the IC50 of ADR against K562/A02 cells decreased by 2.51- and 4.78-fold, respectively. Flow cytometry showed that riccardin F and pakyonol significantly enhanced the accumulation of ADR in K562/A02 cells. Furthermore, fluorescence intensity detection revealed that the two natural products remarkably increased the retention of rhodamine-123 in K562/A02 cells rather than in K562 cells, indicating that the major cause for riccardin F and pakyonol to reverse P-gp-mediated MDR in K562/A02 cells is probably due to the constrained transport activity of P-gp. This study explores the potential application of bisbibenzyl type compounds as modulators of P-gp-mediated MDR in tumor cells.

  7. Synergistic effect of cucurbitacin B in combination with curcumin via enhancing apoptosis induction and reversing multidrug resistance in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuqi; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Jiaying; Huang, Ziyuan; Hu, Haiyang; Qiao, Mingxi; Zhao, Xiuli; Chen, Dawei

    2015-12-01

    Cucurbitacin B is a plant-derived tetracyclic triterpenoid, which has been used for a variety of cancers, especially human hepatoma. Curcumin, isolated from a plant Curcuma longa also has found the anti-tumor property. In the present study, the synergistic effect of cucurbitacin B and curcumin was studied on BEL7402/5-Fu cells in vitro and BEL7402 tumor-bearing mice in vivo. The synergistic anticancer activity of these two compounds involves the two mechanisms. Firstly, curcumin synergistically enhanced the apoptosis of BEL7402/5-Fu cells induced by cucurbitacin B in the optimal mass ratio of 2:1 (cucurbitacin B:curcumin). The mechanism may result from the cell arresting in different phases of cell cycles and the apoptotic change of ultrastructure in BEL7402/5-Fu cells. Secondly, curcumin reversed the multidrug resistance (MDR) caused by cucurbitacin B in the optimized concentration of 67.9μM (25μg/ml). The mechanism was associated with the P-gp reduction, ΔΨm collapse and mitochondrial colocalization in BEL7402/5-Fu cells. The findings were consistent with the changes of the body weight and tumor volume, caspase3 activation and ATP down-regulation in vivo. In conclusion, cucurbitacin B in the combination with curcumin could serve as a novel, promising approach for human hepatoma.

  8. A Novel Nitrobenzoate Microtubule Inhibitor that Overcomes Multidrug Resistance Exhibits Antitumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan-Bo; Gong, Jian-Hua; Liu, Xiu-Jun; Wu, Shu-Ying; Li, Yi; Xu, Xian-Dong; Shang, Bo-Yang; Zhou, Jin-Ming; Zhu, Zhi-Ling; Si, Shu-Yi; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a major limitation for microtubule-binding agents in cancer treatment. Here we report a novel microtubule inhibitor (2-morpholin-4-yl-5-nitro-benzoic acid 4-methylsulfanyl-benzyl ester, IMB5046), its cytotoxicity against multidrug-resistant cell lines and its antitumor efficacy in animal models. IMB5046 disrupted microtubule structures in cells and inhibited purified tubulin polymerization in vitro. It bound to the colchicine pocket of tubulin. IMB5046 displayed potent cytotoxicity against multiple tumor cell lines with an IC50 range of 0.037-0.426 μM. Notably, several multidrug-resistant cell lines which were resistant to colchicine, vincristine and paclitaxel remained sensitive to IMB5046. IMB5046 was not a P-glycoprotein substrate. IMB5046 blocked cell cycle at G2/M phase and induced cell apoptosis. Microarray assay indicated that the differentially expressed genes after IMB5046 treatment were highly related to immune system, cell death and cancer. In a mouse xenograft model IMB5046 inhibited the growth of human lung tumor xenograft by 83% at a well-tolerated dose. It is concluded that IMB5046 is a tubulin polymerization inhibitor with novel chemical structure and can overcome multidrug resistance. It is a promising lead compound for cancer chemotherapy, especially for treatment of multidrug-resistant tumors. PMID:27510727

  9. A Novel Nitrobenzoate Microtubule Inhibitor that Overcomes Multidrug Resistance Exhibits Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yan-Bo; Gong, Jian-Hua; Liu, Xiu-Jun; Wu, Shu-Ying; Li, Yi; Xu, Xian-Dong; Shang, Bo-Yang; Zhou, Jin-Ming; Zhu, Zhi-Ling; Si, Shu-Yi; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a major limitation for microtubule-binding agents in cancer treatment. Here we report a novel microtubule inhibitor (2-morpholin-4-yl-5-nitro-benzoic acid 4-methylsulfanyl-benzyl ester, IMB5046), its cytotoxicity against multidrug-resistant cell lines and its antitumor efficacy in animal models. IMB5046 disrupted microtubule structures in cells and inhibited purified tubulin polymerization in vitro. It bound to the colchicine pocket of tubulin. IMB5046 displayed potent cytotoxicity against multiple tumor cell lines with an IC50 range of 0.037–0.426 μM. Notably, several multidrug-resistant cell lines which were resistant to colchicine, vincristine and paclitaxel remained sensitive to IMB5046. IMB5046 was not a P-glycoprotein substrate. IMB5046 blocked cell cycle at G2/M phase and induced cell apoptosis. Microarray assay indicated that the differentially expressed genes after IMB5046 treatment were highly related to immune system, cell death and cancer. In a mouse xenograft model IMB5046 inhibited the growth of human lung tumor xenograft by 83% at a well-tolerated dose. It is concluded that IMB5046 is a tubulin polymerization inhibitor with novel chemical structure and can overcome multidrug resistance. It is a promising lead compound for cancer chemotherapy, especially for treatment of multidrug-resistant tumors. PMID:27510727

  10. Increased proapoptotic activity of electron beam irradiated doxorubicin and epirubicin in multidrug-resistant human leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Paszel-Jaworska, A; Totoń, E; Dettlaff, K; Kaczmarek, A; Bednarski, W; Oszczapowicz, I; Jelińska, A; Rybczyńska, M

    2016-10-25

    This study evaluated the effect of electron beam irradiation on the cytotoxic activity of anthracycline antibiotics such as doxorubicin (DOX), epirubicin (EPI), and dunorubicin (DAU) in human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line CCRF-CEM and its multidrug-resistant variant CCRF-VCR1000 cell line characterized by the overexpression of ABCB1 gene. Drugs were irradiated at doses of 10 and 25 kGy. Data from EPR studies proved that the highest concentration of free radicals was found in DOX and that the number of stable free radicals is always greater after irradiation. In in vitro studies, a higher cytotoxic activity of irradiated DOX and EPI in multidrug-resistant CCRF-VCR1000 cells was observed. This tendency was maintained during the storage at 4 °C for 90 days. Changes in CCRF-CEM cells' viability were not dependent on the irradiation status and its dose and were only drug-concentration dependent in all measurement time points. It was proved that increased potency of 25 kGy e-beam irradiated drugs results from their enhanced proapoptotic activity. Apoptotic cell death observed in CCRF-VCR1000 cells treated with irradiated drugs was caspase-8, -9, and -3 dependent and related to the increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. No significant differences in the effects of irradiated and non-irradiated drugs on p53 and NFκB transcription factor level and their translocation to the nucleus were noted. Increased activity of the irradiated drugs was not dependent on ABCB1 level.

  11. Role of XIAP in the malignant phenotype of transitional cell cancer (TCC) and therapeutic activity of XIAP antisense oligonucleotides against multidrug-resistant TCC in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bilim, Vladimir; Kasahara, Takashi; Hara, Noboru; Takahashi, Kota; Tomita, Yoshihiko

    2003-01-01

    XIAP directly inhibits executor caspases, making it the most downstream antiapoptotic molecule. Here, we examined the expression and function of XIAP in normal urothelium and TCC. We also examined the therapeutic effect of xiap AS PODN on the cell cycle and apoptosis of multidrug-resistant T24 bladder cancer cells. XIAP was moderately expressed in normal transitional epithelium with prominent expression on the superficial layer cells. Seventy-nine of 108 (73.15%) tumor samples were positive for XIAP protein, but XIAP positivity was not correlated with tumor stage or grade. Moreover, 4 bladder cancer cell lines (SCaBER, HT1376, T24 and RT4) expressed similar levels of XIAP. xiap AS PODN dose-dependently reduced the XIAP protein level and induced apoptosis, leading to decreased cell viability by 87%. Combined administration with doxorubicin resulted in marked cytotoxicity due to escalation of apoptosis. Overexpression of XIAP in T24 cells resulted in a modest but statistically significant (p < 0.01) survival advantage compared to parental cells. Thus, XIAP expression may be critical for maintaining the viability and drug resistance of TCC, and endogenous XIAP levels are sufficient to protect cells from apoptosis. Our results suggest that XIAP may play an important role early in human TCC carcinogenesis. xiap AS may be a candidate for use as a cancer therapy for overcoming drug resistance in highly malignant TCC.

  12. Multidrug-resistance gene (P-glycoprotein) is expressed by endothelial cells at blood-brain barrier sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cordon-Cardo, C.; O'Brien, J.P.; Casals, D.; Biedler, J.L.; Melamed, M.R.; Bertino, J.R. ); Rittman-Grauer, L. )

    1989-01-01

    Endothelial cells of human capillary blood vessels at the blood-brain and other blood-tissue barrier sites express P-glycoprotein as detected by mouse monoclonal antibodies against the human multidrug-resistance gene product. This pattern of endothelial cell expression may indicate a physiological role for P-glycoprotein in regulating the entry of certain molecules into the central nervous system and other anatomic compartments, such as the testes. These tissues, which limit the access of systemic drugs, are known pharmacologic sanctuaries for metastatic cancer. P-glycoprotein expression in capillary endothelium of brain and testes and not other tissues (i.e., kidney and placenta) may in part explain this phenomenon and could have important implications in cancer chemotherapy.

  13. Membrane vesicles from multidrug-resistant human carcinoma cells contain a specific 150,000-170,000 dalton protein detected by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Cornwell, M.M.; Safa, A.R.; Felsted, R.L.; Gottesman, M.M.; Pastan, I.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have selected multidrug-resistant human KB carcinoma cells in high levels of colchicine (KB-C4) or vinblastine (KB-V1) which are cross-resistant to many other structurally unrelated chemotheraputic agents. To determine the mechanism of reduced drug accumulation, they measured /sup 3/H-vinblastine (/sup 3/H-VBL) association with membrane vesicles made from parental drug sensitive, drug-resistant and revertant cells. Membrane vesicles from highly multidrug resistant cells exhibited increased specific and saturable binding of vinblastine, (Kd = 1 ..mu..M) that was temperature dependent and trypsin sensitive. To identify the molecules which bind vinblastine, membrane vesicles were exposed to two photo-activatable analogs of vinblastine, (N-P-(azido-3,5,-(/sup 3/H)-benzoyl)-N'-..beta..-aminoethylvindisine (/sup 3/H-NAB) and N-P-(azido-3-(/sup 125/I)-solicyl)-N'-..beta..-aminoethylvindesine (/sup 125/I-NASV). The specific labeling of a 150,000-170,000 dalton protein in membrane vesicles from multidrug-resistant KB-C4 and KB-V1 cells was found. /sup 125/I-NASV labeling was inhibited by vinblastine, vincrinstine and verapamil but not by colchicine or dexamethasone. The 150,000-170,000 dalton protein may have an important role in the multidrug resistance phenotype.

  14. Piperine, a piperidine alkaloid from Piper nigrum re-sensitizes P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP dependent multidrug resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Lei, Yu; Jia, Yingjie; Li, Na; Wink, Michael; Ma, Yonggang

    2011-12-15

    Over-expression of P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP in tumor cells is one of the important mechanisms leading to multidrug resistance (MDR), which impairs the efficacy of chemotherapy. P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP are ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) transporters, which can expel a variety of lipophilic anti-cancer drugs and protect tumor cells. During a screening of MDR reversal agents among alkaloids of various structural types, a piperidine alkaloid, piperine (a main piperidine alkaloid in Piper nigurm) was identified as an inhibitor. Piperine can potentiate the cytotoxicity of anti-cancer drugs in resistant sublines, such as MCF-7/DOX and A-549/DDP, which were derived from MCF-7 and A-549 cell lines. At a concentration of 50 μM piperine could reverse the resistance to doxorubicin 32.16 and 14.14 folds, respectively. It also re-sensitized cells to mitoxantrone 6.98 folds. In addition, long-term treatment of cells by piperine inhibits transcription of the corresponding ABC transporter genes. These results suggest that piperine can reverse MDR by multiple mechanisms and it may be a promising lead compound for future studies.

  15. Screening for multidrug resistance in leukemia: cell reactivity to MRK-16 correlates with anthracycline retention and sensitivity of leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Michieli, M; Damiani, D; Michelutti, A; Grimaz, S; Geromin, A; Fanin, R; Russo, D; Masolini, P; Baccarani, M

    1996-09-01

    The biologic and clinical importance of the multidrug resistance (MDR) that is related with the overexpression of the P170 glycoprotein (Pgp) is widely recognized. However, a major issue that has not yet been solved is the definition of the degree of Pgp expression which is associated with a significant decrease of the sensitivity of the cells to chemotherapy. For this reason we studied the leukemic cells from 83 cases of acute leukemia. Leukemic cells were fixed in PLP and treated with saponine. Pgp expression was assayed by flow cytometry, using the anti Pgp monoclonal antibody MRK-16. Results were expressed both as the number of positive cells and by the intensity of the reaction as defined by the mean fluorescence index (MFI), i.e. the ratio between the mean fluorescence intensity of the MRK-16 incubated cells and of the IgG2a incubated cells. Thus, Pgp expression was compared with the results of two in vitro tests of cell sensitivity to anthracyclines, daunorubicin (DNR) cell retention and DNR cytotoxicity. We found that it was not the number of MRK-16 positive cells, but the degree of the reaction with MRK-16 (MFI) that significantly related to the anthracycline toxicity tests. Therefore, we propose that for clinical purposes a quick and cheap determination of Pgp-related MDR in leukemic cells may be obtained by measuring the MFI with MRK-16 in a standard flow cytometry assay and that the assay may indeed be sufficient to estimate Pgp expression as well as the influence of Pgp on cell sensitivity to anthracyclines. PMID:9021691

  16. Hepatocyte SLAMF3 reduced specifically the multidrugs resistance protein MRP-1 and increases HCC cells sensitization to anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Fouquet, Grégory; Debuysscher, Véronique; Ouled-Haddou, Hakim; Eugenio, Mélanie Simoes; Demey, Baptiste; Singh, Amrathlal Rabbind; Ossart, Christèle; Al Bagami, Mohammed; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Naassila, Mickael; Marcq, Ingrid; Bouhlal, Hicham

    2016-05-31

    Multidrug resistance MDR proteins (MRPs) are members of the C family of a group of proteins named ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. MRPs can transport drugs including anticancer drugs, nucleoside analogs, antimetabolites and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Drugs used in HCC therapy, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib, are substrates of uptake and/or efflux transporters. Variable expression of MRPs at the plasma membrane of tumor cells may contribute to drug resistance and subsequent clinical response. Recently, we reported that the hepatocyte SLAMF3 expression (Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Family member 3) was reduced in tumor cells from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to its high expression in adjacent tissues. In the present study, we make a strong correlation between induced SLAMF3 overexpression and the specific loss of MRP-1 expression and its functionalities as a drugs resistance transporter. No changes were observed on expression of ABCG2 and MDR. More importantly, we highlight a strong inverse correlation between MRP-1 and SLAMF3 expression in patients with HCC. We propose that the SLAMF3 overexpression in cancerous cells could represent a potential therapeutic strategy to improve the drugs sensibility of resistant cells and thus control the therapeutic failure in HCC patients. PMID:27081035

  17. [Relevance of animal models in the development of compounds targeting multidrug resistant cancer].

    PubMed

    Füredi, András; Tóth, Szilárd; Hámori, Lilla; Nagy, Veronika; Tóvári, József; Szakács, Gergely

    2015-12-01

    Anticancer compounds are typically identified in in vitro screens. Unfortunately, the in vitro drug sensitivity of cell lines does not reflect treatment efficiency in animal models, and neither show acceptable correlation to clinical results. While cell lines and laboratory animals can be readily "cured", the treatment of malignancies remains hampered by the multidrug resistance (MDR) of tumors. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) giving rise to spontaneous tumors offer a new possibility to characterize the evolution of drug resistance mechanisms and to target multidrug resistant cancer. PMID:26665195

  18. Quaternized Chitosan/Alginate-Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticles Enhance the Chemosensitization of Multidrug-Resistant Gastric Carcinoma by Regulating Cell Autophagy Activity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiujuan; Feng, Jing; Zhang, Ran; Wang, Jinda; Su, Tao; Tian, Zuhong; Han, Dong; Zhao, Chuanxu; Fan, Miaomiao; Li, Congye; Liu, Bing; Feng, Xuyang; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Chen, Yundai; Deng, Hongbing; Cao, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) and targeted therapies present major challenges in tumor chemotherapy. Nanoparticles (NPs) hold promise for use in cancer theranostics due to their advantages in terms of tumor-targeted cytotoxicity and imaging. In this study, we developed N-((2-hydroxy-3-trimethylammonium) propyl) chitosan chloride (HTCC)/alginate-encapsulated Fe3O4 magnetic NPs (HTCC-MNPs) and applied them to MDR gastric cancer both in vivo and in vitro. HTCC-MNPs were fabricated from sodium alginate (ALG), Fe3O4 and HTCC using an ionic gelation method. The sizes and physical characteristics of the NPs were determined using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and zeta potential analysis. The HTCC-MNPs exhibited excellent water solubility and biocompatibility as well as significantly reduced cell viability in the drug-resistant cancer cell line SGC7901/ADR, but not in normal gastric cells (P < 0.05). An analysis of LC3 expression demonstrated the involvement of autophagy in HTCC-MNP cytotoxicity. Additionally, apoptosis was verified using a DNA content assay. HTCC-MNPs led to mitochondrial membrane potential loss, decreased ATP production and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation compared to a control group (P < 0.05). Magnetic resonance imaging showed enrichment of HTCC-MNPs in tumor-bearing mice. In vivo bioluminescence imaging and tumor volume measurements revealed that HTCC-MNPs markedly inhibited in vivo tumor growth (P < 0.05). In conclusion, HTCC-MNPs significantly inhibited MDR gastric tumor growth and reduced tumor volume via the induction of cellular autophagy and apoptosis, which was attributed to mitochondrial dysfunction and excessive ROS accumulation. PMID:27305817

  19. Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein-1 (MRP-1)-dependent Glutathione Disulfide (GSSG) Efflux as a Critical Survival Factor for Oxidant-enriched Tumorigenic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, Gayle M; Biswas, Ayan; Khanna, Savita; Spieldenner, James M; Pan, Xueliang; Sen, Chandan K

    2016-05-01

    Endothelial cell tumors are the most common soft tissue tumors in infants. Tumor-forming endothelial (EOMA) cells are able to escape cell death fate despite excessive nuclear oxidant burden. Our previous work recognized perinuclear Nox-4 as a key contributor to EOMA growth. The objective of this work was to characterize the mechanisms by which EOMA cells evade oxidant toxicity and thrive. In EOMA cells, compared with in the cytosol, the nuclear GSSG/GSH ratio was 5-fold higher. Compared to the ratio observed in healthy murine aortic endothelial (MAE) cells, GSSG/GSH was over twice as high in EOMA cells. Multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP-1), an active GSSG efflux mechanism, showed 2-fold increased activity in EOMA compared with MAE cells. Hyperactive YB-1 and Ape/Ref-1 were responsible for high MRP-1 expression in EOMA. Proximity ligand assay demonstrated MRP-1 and YB-1 binding. Such binding enabled the nuclear targeting of MRP-1 in EOMA in a leptomycin-B-sensitive manner. MRP-1 inhibition as well as knockdown trapped nuclear GSSG, causing cell death of EOMA. Disulfide loading of cells by inhibition of GSSG reductase (bischoloronitrosourea) or thioredoxin reductase (auranofin) was effective in causing EOMA death as well. In sum, EOMA cells survive a heavy oxidant burden by rapid efflux of GSSG, which is lethal if trapped within the cell. A hyperactive MRP-1 system for GSSG efflux acts as a critical survival factor for these cells, making it a potential target for EOMA therapeutics. PMID:26961872

  20. CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles for overcoming multidrug resistance in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Shouju; Shi, Donghong; Zhou, Xianguang; Wang, Chunyan; Wu, Jiang; Zeng, Zhiyong; Li, Yanjun; Sun, Jing; Wang, Jiandong; Zhang, Longjiang; Teng, Zhaogang; Lu, Guangming

    2015-03-01

    Multidrug resistance is a major impediment for the successful chemotherapy in breast cancer. CD44 is over-expressed in multidrug resistant human breast cancer cells. CD44 monoclonal antibody exhibits anticancer potential by inhibiting proliferation and regulating P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux activity in multidrug resistant cells. Thereby, CD44 monoclonal antibody in combination with chemotherapeutic drug might be result in enhancing chemosensitivity and overcoming multidrug resistance. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the CD44 monoclonal antibody functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles containing doxorubicin on human breast resistant cancer MCF-7 cells. The data showed that CD44-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles increased cytotoxicity and enhanced the downregulation of P-glycoprotein in comparison to CD44 antibody. Moreover, CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles provided active target, which promoted more cellular uptake of DOX in the resistant cells and more retention of DOX in tumor tissues than unengineered counterpart. Animal studies of the resistant breast cancer xenografts demonstrated that CD44-engineered drug delivery system remarkably induced apoptosis and inhibited the tumor growth. Our results indicated that the CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based drug delivery system offers an effective approach to overcome multidrug resistance in human breast cancer.

  1. Chromosomal instability, tolerance of mitotic errors and multidrug resistance are promoted by tetraploidization in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Anastasia Y; Seget, Katarzyna; Moeller, Giuliana K; de Pagter, Mirjam S.; de Roos, Jeroen A D M; Dürrbaum, Milena; Kuffer, Christian; Müller, Stefan; Zaman, Guido J R; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Storchová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    Up to 80% of human cancers, in particular solid tumors, contain cells with abnormal chromosomal numbers, or aneuploidy, which is often linked with marked chromosomal instability. Whereas in some tumors the aneuploidy occurs by missegregation of one or a few chromosomes, aneuploidy can also arise during proliferation of inherently unstable tetraploid cells generated by whole genome doubling from diploid cells. Recent findings from cancer genome sequencing projects suggest that nearly 40% of tumors underwent whole genome doubling at some point of tumorigenesis, yet its contribution to cancer phenotypes and benefits for malignant growth remain unclear. Here, we investigated the consequences of a whole genome doubling in both cancerous and non-transformed p53 positive human cells. SNP array analysis and multicolor karyotyping revealed that induced whole-genome doubling led to variable aneuploidy. We found that chromosomal instability (CIN) is a frequent, but not a default outcome of whole genome doubling. The CIN phenotypes were accompanied by increased tolerance to mitotic errors that was mediated by suppression of the p53 signaling. Additionally, the expression of pro-apoptotic factors, such as iASPP and cIAP2, was downregulated. Furthermore, we found that whole genome doubling promotes resistance to a broad spectrum of chemotherapeutic drugs and stimulates anchorage-independent growth even in non-transformed p53-positive human cells. Taken together, whole genome doubling provides multifaceted benefits for malignant growth. Our findings provide new insight why genome-doubling promotes tumorigenesis and correlates with poor survival in cancer. PMID:26151317

  2. Reversal of multidrug resistance phenotype in human breast cancer cells using doxorubicin-liposome-microbubble complexes assisted by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhiting; Yan, Fei; Jin, Qiaofeng; Li, Fei; Wu, Junru; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-01-28

    The circumvention of multidrug resistance (MDR) plays a critically important role in the success of chemotherapy. The aim of this work is to investigate the effectiveness and possible mechanisms of the reversal of MDR phenotype in human breast cancer cells by using doxorubicin-liposome-microbubble complexes (DLMC) assisted by ultrasound (US). DLMC is fabricated through conjugating doxorubicin (DOX)-liposome (DL) to the surface of microbubbles (MBs) via the biotin-avidin linkage. The resulting drug-loaded complexes are then characterized and incubated with MCF-7/ADR human breast cancer cells and followed by US exposure. Our results show the more rapid cellular uptake, evident enhancement of nuclear accumulation and less drug efflux in the resistant cells treated by DLMC+US than those treated by DL, DL+verapamil under the same US treatment or DLMC without US. The enhanced drug delivery and cellular uptake also associated with the increase of cytotoxicity against MCF-7/ADR cells, lower MCF-7/ADR cell viability and higher apoptotic cells. Mechanism investigations further disclose a significant increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, enhanced DNA damage and obvious reduction of P-glycoprotein expression in the resistant cells treated with DLMC+US compared with the control cases of cells treated by DLMC, DL+US or DL+verapamil+US. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that DLMC in combination with US may provide an effective delivery of drug to sensitize cells to circumvent MDR and to enhance the therapeutic index of the chemotherapy.

  3. Clitocine reversal of P-glycoprotein associated multi-drug resistance through down-regulation of transcription factor NF-κB in R-HepG2 cell line.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianguo; Yeung, Chilam Au; Co, Ngai Na; Tsang, Tsun Yee; Yau, Esmond; Luo, Kewang; Wu, Ping; Wa, Judy Chan Yuet; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Kwok, Tim-Tak; Liu, Feiyan

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is one of the major reasons for failure in cancer chemotherapy and its suppression may increase the efficacy of therapy. The human multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene encodes the plasma membrane P-glycoprotein (P-gp) that pumps various anti-cancer agents out of the cancer cell. R-HepG2 and MES-SA/Dx5 cells are doxorubicin induced P-gp over-expressed MDR sublines of human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells and human uterine carcinoma MES-SA cells respectively. Herein, we observed that clitocine, a natural compound extracted from Leucopaxillus giganteus, presented similar cytotoxicity in multidrug resistant cell lines compared with their parental cell lines and significantly suppressed the expression of P-gp in R-HepG2 and MES-SA/Dx5 cells. Further study showed that the clitocine increased the sensitivity and intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin in R-HepG2 cells accompanying down-regulated MDR1 mRNA level and promoter activity, indicating the reversal effect of MDR by clitocine. A 5'-serial truncation analysis of the MDR1 promoter defined a region from position -450 to -193 to be critical for clitocine suppression of MDR1. Mutation of a consensus NF-κB binding site in the defined region and overexpression of NF-κB p65 could offset the suppression effect of clitocine on MDR1 promoter. By immunohistochemistry, clitocine was confirmed to suppress the protein levels of both P-gp and NF-κB p65 in R-HepG2 cells and tumors. Clitocine also inhibited the expression of NF-κB p65 in MES-SA/Dx5. More importantly, clitocine could suppress the NF-κB activation even in presence of doxorubicin. Taken together; our results suggested that clitocine could reverse P-gp associated MDR via down-regulation of NF-κB.

  4. The multidrug resistance pumps are inhibited by silibinin and apoptosis induced in K562 and KCL22 leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza; Saffari, Mojtaba; Raoofian, Reza; Yekaninejad, Mirsaeed; Dinehkabodi, Orkideh Saydi; Noori-Daloii, Ali Reza

    2014-05-01

    Silibinin have been introduced for several years as a potent antioxidant in the field of nutraceuticals. Based on wide persuasive effects of this drug, we have decided to investigate the effects of silibinin on chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in vitro models, K562 and KCL22 cell lines. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, microculture tetrazolium test (MTT assay) and real-time PCR were employed to evaluate the effects of silibinin on cell cytotoxicity, cell proliferation and expression of various multidrug resistance genes in these cell lines, respectively. Our results have shown that presence of silibinin has inhibitory effects on cell proliferation of K562 and KCL22 cell lines. Also, our data indicated that silibinin, in a dose-dependent manner with applying no cytotoxic effects, inhibited cell proliferation and reduced mRNA expression levels of some transporter genes e.g. MDR1, MRP3, MRP2, MRP1, MRP5, MRP4, ABCG2, ABCB11, MRP6 and MRP7. The multifarious in vitro inhibitory effects of silibinin are in agreement with growing body of evidence that silibinin would be an efficient anticancer agent in order to be used in multi-target therapy to prevail the therapeutic hold backs against CML. PMID:24522246

  5. Biodegradable cationic polymeric nanocapsules for overcoming multidrug resistance and enabling drug-gene co-delivery to cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Kuang; Law, Wing-Cheung; Aalinkeel, Ravikumar; Yu, Yun; Nair, Bindukumar; Wu, Jincheng; Mahajan, Supriya; Reynolds, Jessica L.; Li, Yukun; Lai, Cheng Kee; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.; Schwartz, Stanley A.; Prasad, Paras N.; Cheng, Chong

    2014-01-01

    Having unique architectural features, cationic polymeric nanocapsules (NCs) with well-defined covalently stabilized biodegradable structures were generated as potentially universal and safe therapeutic nanocarriers. These NCs were synthesized from allyl-functionalized cationic polylactide (CPLA) by highly efficient UV-induced thiol-ene interfacial cross-linking in transparent miniemulsions. With tunable nanoscopic sizes, negligible cytotoxicity and remarkable degradability, they are able to encapsulate doxorubicin (Dox) with inner cavities and bind interleukin-8 (IL-8) small interfering RNA (siRNA) with cationic shells. The Dox-encapsulated NCs can effectively bypass the P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated multidrug resistance of MCF7/ADR cancer cells, thereby resulting in increased intracellular drug concentration and reduced cell viability. In vitro studies also showed that the NCs loaded with Dox, IL-8 siRNA and both agents can be readily taken up by PC3 prostate cancer cells, resulting in a significant chemotherapeutic effect and/or IL-8 gene silencing.Having unique architectural features, cationic polymeric nanocapsules (NCs) with well-defined covalently stabilized biodegradable structures were generated as potentially universal and safe therapeutic nanocarriers. These NCs were synthesized from allyl-functionalized cationic polylactide (CPLA) by highly efficient UV-induced thiol-ene interfacial cross-linking in transparent miniemulsions. With tunable nanoscopic sizes, negligible cytotoxicity and remarkable degradability, they are able to encapsulate doxorubicin (Dox) with inner cavities and bind interleukin-8 (IL-8) small interfering RNA (siRNA) with cationic shells. The Dox-encapsulated NCs can effectively bypass the P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated multidrug resistance of MCF7/ADR cancer cells, thereby resulting in increased intracellular drug concentration and reduced cell viability. In vitro studies also showed that the NCs loaded with Dox, IL-8 siRNA and both

  6. New mouse xenograft model modulated by tumor-associated fibroblasts for human multi-drug resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    MA, YAN; LIN, ZHIQIANG; FALLON, JOHN K.; ZHAO, QIANG; LIU, DAN; WANG, YONGJUN; LIU, FENG

    2015-01-01

    We developed an MDR tumor model that is modulated by tumor-associated fibroblasts. Studies on proliferation of tumor cell lines including paclitaxel-sensitive and resistant cell lines were performed. The expressions of P-gp and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) antigen were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Quantitative P-gp analyses of different cell lines were accomplished by nanoUPLC-MS/MS. Tumor cell colony formation assay and established xenograft model was used to investigate the relationship between P-gp expression, fibroblast levels and tumorigenesis. The mouse xenograft model was developed after co-inoculation with MDR tumor cells and NIH/3T3 fibroblast cells. There was no correlation between tumorigenesis in vivo and the growth rate of cells in vitro. The proliferation among different cell lines had no significant differences, but the P-gp expression and tumor growth in the xenograft model were fairly different. P-gp determination and α-SMA immunofluorescence staining clarified the relationship between P-gp expression, fibroblast levels and tumorigenesis. It was more difficult for tumor cells with higher P-gp levels to recruit fibroblasts in vivo, resulting in lower tumorigenesis due to the lack of structural and chemical support during tumor progression. In the established paclitaxel-resistant mouse xenograft model, no obvious antitumor effect was observed after Taxol treatment, but a significant decrease in tumor size for the group treated with gemcitabine sensitive to the model. The results show that the added fibroblasts do not disturb the applicability of the model in MDR. Therefore, this mouse xenograft MDR model could serve as an effective tool for MDR research. PMID:26352907

  7. Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1), a "multitasking" ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter.

    PubMed

    Cole, Susan P C

    2014-11-01

    The multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) encoded by ABCC1 was originally discovered as a cause of multidrug resistance in tumor cells. However, it is now clear that MRP1 serves a broader role than simply mediating the ATP-dependent efflux of drugs from cells. The antioxidant GSH and the pro-inflammatory cysteinyl leukotriene C4 have been identified as key physiological organic anions effluxed by MRP1, and an ever growing body of evidence indicates that additional lipid-derived mediators are also substrates of this transporter. As such, MRP1 is a multitasking transporter that likely influences the etiology and progression of a host of human diseases.

  8. Silencing of ABCG2 by MicroRNA-3163 Inhibits Multidrug Resistance in Retinoblastoma Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhenhua; Liu, Peng; Zhao, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the function and regulation mechanism of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G, member 2 (ABCG2) in retinoblastoma cancer stem cells (RCSCs), a long-term culture of RCSCs from WERI-Rb1 cell line was successfully established based on the high expression level of ABCG2 on the surface of RCSCs. To further explore the molecular mechanism of ABCG2 on RCSCs, a microRNA that specifically targets ABCG2 was predicted. Subsequently, miR-3163 was selected and confirmed as the ABCG2-regulating microRNA. Overexpression of miR-3163 led to a significant decrease in ABCG2 expression. Additionally, ABCG2 loss-of-function induced anti-proliferation and apoptosis-promoting functions in RCSCs, and multidrug resistance to cisplatin, carboplatin, vincristine, doxorubicin, and etoposide was greatly improved in these cells. Our data suggest that miR-3163 has a significant impact on ABCG2 expression and can influence proliferation, apoptosis, and drug resistance in RCSCs. This work may provide new therapeutic targets for retinoblastoma. PMID:27247490

  9. Silencing of ABCG2 by MicroRNA-3163 Inhibits Multidrug Resistance in Retinoblastoma Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ming; Wei, Zhenhua; Liu, Peng; Zhao, Xiaoli

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the function and regulation mechanism of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G, member 2 (ABCG2) in retinoblastoma cancer stem cells (RCSCs), a long-term culture of RCSCs from WERI-Rb1 cell line was successfully established based on the high expression level of ABCG2 on the surface of RCSCs. To further explore the molecular mechanism of ABCG2 on RCSCs, a microRNA that specifically targets ABCG2 was predicted. Subsequently, miR-3163 was selected and confirmed as the ABCG2-regulating microRNA. Overexpression of miR-3163 led to a significant decrease in ABCG2 expression. Additionally, ABCG2 loss-of-function induced anti-proliferation and apoptosis-promoting functions in RCSCs, and multidrug resistance to cisplatin, carboplatin, vincristine, doxorubicin, and etoposide was greatly improved in these cells. Our data suggest that miR-3163 has a significant impact on ABCG2 expression and can influence proliferation, apoptosis, and drug resistance in RCSCs. This work may provide new therapeutic targets for retinoblastoma. PMID:27247490

  10. Visual detection of multidrug resistance gene in living cell using the molecular beacon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Ma, Yi; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in tumor cells. Detection of effective prognostic biomarkers and targets are of crucial importance to the management of individualized therapies. However, quantitative analysis of the drug resistance gene had been difficult because of technical limitations. In this study, we designed and used a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which served as a beacon for detecting human drug resistance indicater. Upon hybridizing with the target mRNA, the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacons (hDAuNP beacons) release the fluorophores attached at 5'end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The fluorescence properties of the beacon before and after the hybridization with the complementary DNA were confirmed in vitro. The hDAuNP beacons could be taken up by living cells with low inherent cytotoxicity and higher stability. hDAuNP beacon imaged by confocal laser scanning microscopy to detect the resistance gene expression. The detected fluorescence in MCF7and MCF7/ADR cells correlates with the specific drug resistance gene expression, which is consistent with the result from Q-PCR. Thus, this approach overcame many of the challenges of previous techniques by creating highly sensitive and effective intracellular probes for monitoring gene expression.

  11. Reversal of multidrug resistance of hepatocellular carcinoma cells by metformin through inhibiting NF-κB gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Yang, Jun-Ling; Wang, Yi-Lang; Wang, Han; Yao, Min; Wang, Li; Gu, Juan-Juan; Cai, Yin; Shi, Yun; Yao, Deng-Fu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To interfere with the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) with metformin and explore its effect in reversing multidrug resistance (MDR) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. METHODS Expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and NF-κB in human HepG2 or HepG2/adriamycin (ADM) cells treated with pCMV-NF-κB-small interference RNA (siRNA) with or without metformin, was analyzed by Western blot or fluorescence quantitative PCR. Cell viability was tested by CCK-8 assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry and Annexin-V-PE/7-AnnexinV apoptosis detection double staining assay, respectively. RESULTS P-gp overexpression in HepG2 and HepG2/ADM cells was closely related to mdr1 mRNA (3.310 ± 0.154) and NF-κB mRNA (2.580 ± 0.040) expression. NF-κB gene transcription was inhibited by specific siRNA with significant down-regulation of P-gp and enhanced HCC cell chemosensitivity to doxorubicin. After pretreatment with metformin, HepG2/ADM cells were sensitized to doxorubicin and P-gp was decreased through the NF-κB signaling pathway. The synergistic effect of metformin and NF-κB siRNA were found in HepG2/ADM cells with regard to proliferation inhibition, cell cycle arrest and inducing cell apoptosis. CONCLUSION Metformin via silencing NF-κB signaling could effectively reverse MDR of HCC cells by down-regulating MDR1/P-gp expression. PMID:27621764

  12. Cytotoxicity of Elaoephorbia drupifera and other Cameroonian medicinal plants against drug sensitive and multidrug resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major hurdle for cancer treatment worldwide and accounts for chemotherapy failure in over 90% of patients with metastatic cancer. Evidence of the cytotoxicity of Cameroonian plants against cancer cell lines including MDR phenotypes is been intensively and progressively provided. The present work was therefore designed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the methanol extracts of twenty-two Cameroonian medicinal plants against sensitive and MDR cancer cell lines. Methods The methanol maceration was used to obtain the crude plant extracts whilst the cytotoxicity of the studied extracts was determined using a resazurin reduction assay. Results A preliminary assay on leukemia CCRF-CEM cells at 40 μg/mL shows that six of the twenty plant extract were able to enhance less than 50% of the growth proliferation of CCRF-CEM cells. These include Crinum zeylanicum (32.22%), Entada abyssinica (34.67%), Elaoephorbia drupifera (35.05%), Dioscorea bulbifera (45.88%), Eremomastax speciosa (46.07%) and Polistigma thonningii (45.11%). Among these six plants, E. drupifera showed the best activity with IC50 values below or around 30 μg/mL against the nine tested cancer cell lines. The lowest IC50 value of 8.40 μg/mL was recorded with the extract of E. drupifera against MDA-MB231 breast cancer cell line. The IC50 values below 10 μg/mL were recorded with the extracts of E. drupifera against MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells, C. zeylanicum against HCT116 p53+/+ and HCT116p53-/- colon cancer cells and E. abyssinica against HCT116 p53+/+ cells. Conclusion The results of the present study provide evidence of the cytotoxic potential of some Cameroonian medicinal plants and a baseline information for the potential use of Elaoephorbia drupifera in the treatment of sensitive and drug-resistant cancer cell lines. PMID:24088184

  13. Teotihuacanin, a Diterpene with an Unusual Spiro-10/6 System from Salvia amarissima with Potent Modulatory Activity of Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Elihú; Fragoso-Serrano, Mabel; Toscano, Rubén A; García-Peña, María del Rosario; Ortega, Alfredo

    2015-07-01

    Teotihuacanin (1), an unusual rearranged clerodane diterpene with a new carbon skeleton containing a spiro-10/6 bicyclic system, was isolated from the leaves and flowers of Salvia amarissima. Its structure was determined through spectroscopic analyses. Its absolute configuration was established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 showed potent modulatory activity of multidrug resistance in vinblastine-resistant MCF-7 cancer cell line (reversal fold, RFMCF-7/Vin+ > 10703) at 25 μg/mL.

  14. IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) tyrosine kinase inhibitor cyclolignan PPP inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in multidrug resistant osteosarcoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhenfeng; Choy, Edwin; Harmon, David; Yang, Cao; Ryu, Keinosuke; Schwab, Joseph; Mankin, Henry; Hornicek, Francis J.

    2009-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is an important mediator of tumor-cell survival and demonstrates prognostic significance in sarcoma. To explore potential therapeutic strategies for interrupting signaling through this pathway, we assessed the ability of cyclolignan picropodophyllin (PPP), a member of the cyclolignan family, to selectively inhibit the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activity of IGF-1R in several sarcoma cell line model systems. Of the diverse sarcoma subtypes studied, osteosarcoma cell lines were found to be particularly sensitive to IGF-1R inhibition, including several multidrug resistant osteosarcoma cell lines with documented resistance to various conventional anticancer drugs. PPP shows relatively little toxicity in human osteoblast cell lines when compared to osteosarcoma cell lines. These studies demonstrate that PPP significantly inhibits IGF-1R expression and activation in both chemotherapy sensitive and resistant osteosarcoma cell lines. This inhibition of the IGF1-R pathway correlates with suppression of proliferation of osteosarcoma cell lines and with apoptosis induction as measured by monitoring PARP and its cleavage product and by quantitative measurement of apoptosis-associated CK18Asp396. Importantly, PPP increases the cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin in doxorubicin-resistant osteosarcoma cell lines U-2OSMR and KHOSMR. Furthermore, siRNA down-regulation of IGF-1R expression in drug resistant cell lines also caused re-sensitization to doxorubicin. Our data suggests that inhibition of IGF-1R with PPP offers a novel and selective therapeutic strategy for ostosarcoma, and at the same time, PPP is effective at reversing the drug-resistance phenotype in osteosarcoma cell lines. PMID:19638450

  15. Autonomously replicating episomes contain mdr1 genes in a multidrug-resistant human cell line.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J C; Choi, K H; von Hoff, D D; Roninson, I B; Wahl, G M

    1989-01-01

    Gene amplification in human tumor cells is frequently mediated by extrachromosomal elements (e.g., double minute chromosomes [DMs]). Recent experiments have shown that DMs can be formed from smaller, submicroscopic circular precursors referred to as episomes (S. M. Carroll, M. L. DeRose, P. Gaudray, C. M. Moore, D. R. Needham-Vandevanter, D. D. Von Hoff and G. M. Wahl, Mol. Biol. 8:1525-1533, 1988). To investigate whether episomes are generally involved as intermediates in gene amplification, we determined whether they mediate the amplification of the mdr1 gene, which when overexpressed engenders cross resistance to multiple lipophilic drugs. A variety of methods including electrophoresis of undigested DNAs in high-voltage gradients, NotI digestion, and production of double-strand breaks by gamma irradiation were used to distinguish between mdr1 sequences amplified on submicroscopic circular molecules and those amplified within DMs or chromosomal DNA. The gamma-irradiation procedure provides a new method for detecting and determining the size of circular molecules from 50 kilobases (kb) to greater than 1,000 kb. These methods revealed that some of the amplified mdr1 genes in vinblastine-resistant KB-V1 cells are contained in supercoiled circular molecules of approximately 600 and approximately 750 kb. Analysis of the replication of these molecules by a Meselson-Stahl density shift experiment demonstrated that they replicate approximately once in a cell cycle. The data lend further support to a model for gene amplification in which DMs are generally formed from smaller, autonomously replicating precursors.

  16. Trametenolic acid B reverses multidrug resistance in breast cancer cells through regulating the expression level of P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiaoyin; Wang, Junzhi; He, Haibo; Liu, Hongbing; Yan, Ximing; Zou, Kun

    2014-07-01

    Trametenolic acid B (TAB) is the main active composition of Trametes lactinea (Berk.) Pat which possesses antitumor activities. There was no report its antitumor effect through regulating P-glycoprotein (P-gp) so far, due toP-gp over expression is one of the most important mechanisms contributing to the multiple drug resistance phenotype. The present aim was to investigate the effects of TAB on P-gp in multidrug-resistant cells;Paclitaxel-resistant cell line MDA-MB-231/Taxol was established by stepwise exposure for 10 months.MDA-MB-231 cells and MDA-MB-231/Taxol cells were treated with TAB, and their growth was evaluated using MTT assays. Paclitaxel accumulation in the cells was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatogram(HPLC). The activity of P-gp was detected by intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 (Rho123), and the protein expression of P-gp was evaluated using western blot. Results indicated that the IC50 of MDA-MB-231/Taxol to paclitaxel (Taxol) was 33 times higher than that of nature MDA-MB-231. TAB increased the intracellular concentration of Taxol and inhibited the activity of P-gp and suppressed the expression of P-gp in MDA-MB-231/Taxol cells. Our present results showed that TAB could reverse Taxol resistance in MDA-MB-231/Taxol cells,mainly inhibiting the activity of P-gp and down-regulating the expression level of P-gp, and then enhancing the accumulation of chemotherapy agents.

  17. Induction of Multidrug Resistance of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells by Cocultured Stromal Cells via Upregulation of the PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Jin, Qing; Fu, Qiang; You, Peidong; Jiang, Xi; Yuan, Qin; Huang, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in multidrug resistance of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells induced by cocultured stromal cells. Human AML cell lines HL-60 and U937 were adhesion cocultured with human bone marrow stromal cell line HS-5 cells. Such coculturing induced HL-60 and U937 cells resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs including daunorubicin (DNR), homoharringtonine (HHT), and cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C). The coculturing-induced resistance of AML cells to DNR, HHT, and Ara-C can be partially reversed by inhibition of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Clinically, AML patients with a low level of PTEN and a high level of CCND1 had high relapse rates within 1 year, and newly diagnosed AML patients with extramedullary infiltration had a low level of PTEN. This study confirms the involvement of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in multidrug resistance in AML cells induced by stroma and suggests that the expression of PTEN and CCND1 may be a prognostic indicator for AML. PMID:27656831

  18. A phenolic ester from Aglaia loheri leaves reveals cytotoxicity towards sensitive and multidrug-resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bioactivity-guided fractionation of extracts of Aglaia loheri Blanco (Meliaceae) yielded a cytotoxic isolate, termed Maldi 531.2[M + H]+. This phenolic ester was further investigated for its in vitro cytotoxicity toward human CCRF-CEM leukemia cells and their multi-drug resistant (MDR) subline, CEM/ADR5000. The intrinsic mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and induction of apoptosis by this isolate were evaluated. Methods Chromatography techniques, mass spectrometry and proton NMR were employed to isolate Maldi 531.2[M + H]+. XTT cell proliferation and viability assay was used for cytotoxic test, and JC-1[5’,5’,6,6’,-tetrachloro-1,1’,3,3’-tetraethylbenzimidazoyl carbocyanine iodide was used to assess ΔΨm and initiation of apoptosis; Annexin V/FITC-PI staining was employed to analyse apoptosis. Results Maldi 531.2[M + H]+ was cytotoxic towards both CCRF-CEM and CEM/ADR5000 cells with IC50 values of 0.02 and 0.03 μM, respectively. The mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) of MDR cells was significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner leading to apoptosis as detected by flow cytometric Annexin V-FITC/ PI staining. Conclusion Maldi 531.2[M + H]+ may be a potential anti-cancer drug candidate whose mode of action include reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential and induction of apoptosis. PMID:24160768

  19. pH-Responsive therapeutic solid lipid nanoparticles for reducing P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux of multidrug resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Hung; Huang, Wen-Chia; Chiang, Wen-Hsuan; Liu, Te-I; Shen, Ming-Yin; Hsu, Yuan-Hung; Lin, Sung-Chyr; Chiu, Hsin-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel pH-responsive cholesterol-PEG adduct-coated solid lipid nanoparticles (C-PEG-SLNs) carrying doxorubicin (DOX) capable of overcoming multidrug resistance (MDR) breast cancer cells is presented. The DOX-loaded SLNs have a mean hydrodynamic diameter of ~100 nm and a low polydispersity index (under 0.20) with a high drug-loading efficiency ranging from 80.8% to 90.6%. The in vitro drug release profiles show that the DOX-loaded SLNs exhibit a pH-controlled drug release behavior with the maximum and minimum unloading percentages of 63.4% at pH 4.7 and 25.2% at pH 7.4, respectively. The DOX-loaded C-PEG-SLNs displayed a superior ability in inhibiting the proliferation of MCF-7/MDR cells. At a DOX concentration of 80 μM, the cell viabilities treated with C-PEG-SLNs were approximately one-third of the group treated with free DOX. The inhibition activity of C-PEG-SLNs could be attributed to the transport of C-PEG to cell membrane, leading to the change of the composition of the cell membrane and thus the inhibition of permeability glycoprotein activity. This hypothesis is supported by the confocal images showing the accumulation of DOX in the nuclei of cancer cells and the localization of C-PEG on the cell membranes. The results of in vivo study further demonstrated that the DOX delivered by the SLNs accumulates predominantly in tumor via enhanced permeability and retention effect, the enhanced passive tumor accumulation due to the loose intercellular junctions of endothelial cells lining inside blood vessels at tumor site, and the lack of lymphatic drainage. The growth of MCF-7/MDR xenografted tumor on Balb/c nude mice was inhibited to ~400 mm(3) in volume as compared with the free DOX treatment group, 1,140 mm(3), and the group treated with 1,2 distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)] solid lipid nanoparticles, 820 mm(3). Analysis of the body weight of nude mice and the histology of organs and tumor after the

  20. pH-Responsive therapeutic solid lipid nanoparticles for reducing P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux of multidrug resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Hung; Huang, Wen-Chia; Chiang, Wen-Hsuan; Liu, Te-I; Shen, Ming-Yin; Hsu, Yuan-Hung; Lin, Sung-Chyr; Chiu, Hsin-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel pH-responsive cholesterol-PEG adduct-coated solid lipid nanoparticles (C-PEG-SLNs) carrying doxorubicin (DOX) capable of overcoming multidrug resistance (MDR) breast cancer cells is presented. The DOX-loaded SLNs have a mean hydrodynamic diameter of ~100 nm and a low polydispersity index (under 0.20) with a high drug-loading efficiency ranging from 80.8% to 90.6%. The in vitro drug release profiles show that the DOX-loaded SLNs exhibit a pH-controlled drug release behavior with the maximum and minimum unloading percentages of 63.4% at pH 4.7 and 25.2% at pH 7.4, respectively. The DOX-loaded C-PEG-SLNs displayed a superior ability in inhibiting the proliferation of MCF-7/MDR cells. At a DOX concentration of 80 μM, the cell viabilities treated with C-PEG-SLNs were approximately one-third of the group treated with free DOX. The inhibition activity of C-PEG-SLNs could be attributed to the transport of C-PEG to cell membrane, leading to the change of the composition of the cell membrane and thus the inhibition of permeability glycoprotein activity. This hypothesis is supported by the confocal images showing the accumulation of DOX in the nuclei of cancer cells and the localization of C-PEG on the cell membranes. The results of in vivo study further demonstrated that the DOX delivered by the SLNs accumulates predominantly in tumor via enhanced permeability and retention effect, the enhanced passive tumor accumulation due to the loose intercellular junctions of endothelial cells lining inside blood vessels at tumor site, and the lack of lymphatic drainage. The growth of MCF-7/MDR xenografted tumor on Balb/c nude mice was inhibited to ~400 mm3 in volume as compared with the free DOX treatment group, 1,140 mm3, and the group treated with 1,2 distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)] solid lipid nanoparticles, 820 mm3. Analysis of the body weight of nude mice and the histology of organs and tumor after the

  1. pH-Responsive therapeutic solid lipid nanoparticles for reducing P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux of multidrug resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Hung; Huang, Wen-Chia; Chiang, Wen-Hsuan; Liu, Te-I; Shen, Ming-Yin; Hsu, Yuan-Hung; Lin, Sung-Chyr; Chiu, Hsin-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel pH-responsive cholesterol-PEG adduct-coated solid lipid nanoparticles (C-PEG-SLNs) carrying doxorubicin (DOX) capable of overcoming multidrug resistance (MDR) breast cancer cells is presented. The DOX-loaded SLNs have a mean hydrodynamic diameter of ~100 nm and a low polydispersity index (under 0.20) with a high drug-loading efficiency ranging from 80.8% to 90.6%. The in vitro drug release profiles show that the DOX-loaded SLNs exhibit a pH-controlled drug release behavior with the maximum and minimum unloading percentages of 63.4% at pH 4.7 and 25.2% at pH 7.4, respectively. The DOX-loaded C-PEG-SLNs displayed a superior ability in inhibiting the proliferation of MCF-7/MDR cells. At a DOX concentration of 80 μM, the cell viabilities treated with C-PEG-SLNs were approximately one-third of the group treated with free DOX. The inhibition activity of C-PEG-SLNs could be attributed to the transport of C-PEG to cell membrane, leading to the change of the composition of the cell membrane and thus the inhibition of permeability glycoprotein activity. This hypothesis is supported by the confocal images showing the accumulation of DOX in the nuclei of cancer cells and the localization of C-PEG on the cell membranes. The results of in vivo study further demonstrated that the DOX delivered by the SLNs accumulates predominantly in tumor via enhanced permeability and retention effect, the enhanced passive tumor accumulation due to the loose intercellular junctions of endothelial cells lining inside blood vessels at tumor site, and the lack of lymphatic drainage. The growth of MCF-7/MDR xenografted tumor on Balb/c nude mice was inhibited to ~400 mm(3) in volume as compared with the free DOX treatment group, 1,140 mm(3), and the group treated with 1,2 distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)] solid lipid nanoparticles, 820 mm(3). Analysis of the body weight of nude mice and the histology of organs and tumor after the

  2. Anticancer efficacy of a nitric oxide-modified derivative of bifendate against multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhiguang; Gu, Xiaoke; Lu, Bin; Chen, Yaqiong; Chen, Guojiang; Feng, Jiannan; Lin, Jizhen; Zhang, Yihua; Peng, Hui

    2016-06-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) not only actively transports a wide range of cytotoxic drugs across drug transporters but is also a complex interaction between a number of important cellular signalling pathways. Nitric oxide donors appear to be a new class of anticancer therapeutics for satisfying all the above conditions. Previously, we reported furoxan-based nitric oxide-releasing compounds that exhibited selective antitumour activity in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we demonstrate that bifendate (DDB)-nitric oxide, a synthetic furoxan-based nitric oxide-releasing derivative of bifendate, effectively inhibits the both sensitive and MDR tumour cell viability at a comparatively low concentration. Interestingly, the potency of DDB-nitric oxide is the independent of inhibition of the functions and expressions of three major ABC transporters. The mechanism of DDB-nitric oxide appears to be in two modes of actions by inducing mitochondrial tyrosine nitration and apoptosis, as well as by down-regulating HIF-1α expression and protein kinase B (AKT), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation in MDR cells. Moreover, the addition of a typical nitric oxide scavenger significantly attenuated all the effects of DDB-nitric oxide, indicating that the cytotoxicity of DDB-nitric oxide is as a result of higher levels of nitric oxide release in MDR cancer cells. Given that acquired MDR to nitric oxide donors is reportedly difficult to achieve and genetically unstable, compound like DDB-nitric oxide may be a new type of therapeutic agent for the treatment of MDR tumours.

  3. An Inactivated Antibiotic-Exposed Whole-Cell Vaccine Enhances Bactericidal Activities Against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Meng-Hooi; MatRahim, NorAziyah; NorAmdan, NurAsyura; Pang, Sui-Ping; Hashim, Sharina H.; Phoon, Wai-Hong; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination may be an alternative treatment for infection with multidrug-resistance (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. The study reported here evaluated the bactericidal antibody responses following immunization of mice using an inactivated whole-cell vaccine derived from antibiotic-exposed MDR A. baumannii (I-M28-47-114). Mice inoculated with I-M28-47 (non-antibiotic-exposed control) and I-M28-47-114 showed a high IgG antibody response by day 5 post-inoculation. Sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47-114 collected on day 30 resulted in 80.7 ± 12.0% complement-mediated bacteriolysis in vitro of the test MDR A. baumannii treated with imipenem, which was a higher level of bacteriolysis over sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47. Macrophage-like U937 cells eliminated 49.3 ± 11.6% of the test MDR A. baumannii treated with imipenem when opsonized with sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47-114, which was a higher level of elimination than observed for test MDR A. baumannii opsonized with sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47. These results suggest that vaccination with I-M28-47-114 stimulated antibody responses capable of mounting high bactericidal killing of MDR A. baumannii. Therefore, the inactivated antibiotic-exposed whole-cell vaccine (I-M28-47-114) has potential for development as a candidate vaccine for broad clearance and protection against MDR A. baumannii infections. PMID:26923424

  4. Characterization of Siphoviridae phage Z and studying its efficacy against multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae planktonic cells and biofilm.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Muhsin; Hussain, Tahir; Das, Chythanya Rajanna; Andleeb, Saadia

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm has many serious consequences for public health and is a major virulence factor contributing to the chronicity of infections. The aim of the current study was to isolate and characterize a bacteriophage that inhibits multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumonia (M) in planktonic form as well as biofilm. This phage, designated bacteriophage Z, was isolated from wastewater. Its adsorption rate to its host bacterium was significantly enhanced by MgCl2 and CaCl2. It has a wide range of pH and heat stability. From its one-step growth, latent time and burst size were determined to be 24 min and about 320 virions per cell, respectively. As analysed by transmission electron microscopy, phage Z had an icosahedral head of width 76±10 nm, length 92±14 nm and icosahedron side 38 nm, and a non-contractile tail 200±15 nm long and 14-29 nm wide. It belongs to the family Siphoviridae in the order Caudovirales. Six structural proteins ranging from 18 to 65 kDa in size were revealed by SDS-PAGE. The genome was found to comprise double-stranded DNA with an approximate size of 36 kb. Bacteria were grown in suspension and as biofilms to compare the susceptibility of both phenotypes to the phage lytic action. Phage Z was effective in reducing biofilm biomass after 24 and 48 h, showing more than twofold and threefold reduction, respectively. Biofilm cells and stationary-phase planktonic bacteria were killed at a lower rate than exponential-phase planktonic bacteria.

  5. Separate and Combined Effects of DNMT and HDAC Inhibitors in Treating Human Multi-Drug Resistant Osteosarcoma HosDXR150 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Capobianco, Enrico; Mora, Antonio; La Sala, Dario; Roberti, Annalisa; Zaki, Nazar; Badidi, Elarbi; Taranta, Monia; Cinti, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying multi-drug resistance (MDR) is one of the major challenges in current cancer research. A phenomenon which is common to both intrinsic and acquired resistance, is the aberrant alteration of gene expression in drug-resistant cancers. Although such dysregulation depends on many possible causes, an epigenetic characterization is considered a main driver. Recent studies have suggested a direct role for epigenetic inactivation of genes in determining tumor chemo-sensitivity. We investigated the effects of the inhibition of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) and hystone deacethylase (HDAC), considered to reverse the epigenetic aberrations and lead to the re-expression of de novo methylated genes in MDR osteosarcoma (OS) cells. Based on our analysis of the HosDXR150 cell line, we found that in order to reduce cell proliferation, co-treatment of MDR OS cells with DNMT (5-Aza-dC, DAC) and HDAC (Trichostatin A, TSA) inhibitors is more effective than relying on each treatment alone. In re-expressing epigenetically silenced genes induced by treatments, a very specific regulation takes place which suggests that methylation and de-acetylation have occurred either separately or simultaneously to determine MDR OS phenotype. In particular, functional relationships have been reported after measuring differential gene expression, indicating that MDR OS cells acquired growth and survival advantage by simultaneous epigenetic inactivation of both multiple p53-independent apoptotic signals and osteoblast differentiation pathways. Furthermore, co-treatment results more efficient in inducing the re-expression of some main pathways according to the computed enrichment, thus emphasizing its potential towards representing an effective therapeutic option for MDR OS. PMID:24756038

  6. Dielectrophoretic Microfluidic Chip Enables Single-Cell Measurements for Multidrug Resistance in Heterogeneous Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patient Samples.

    PubMed

    Khamenehfar, Avid; Gandhi, Maher K; Chen, Yuchun; Hogge, Donna E; Li, Paul C H

    2016-06-01

    The front-line treatment for adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is anthracycline-based combination chemotherapy. However, treatment outcomes remain suboptimal with relapses frequently observed. Among the mechanisms of treatment failure is multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by the ABCB1, ABCC1, and ABCG2 drug-efflux transporters. Although genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity between leukemic blast cells is a well-recognized phenomenon, there remains minimal data on differences in MDR activity at the individual cell level. Specifically, functional assays that can distinguish the variability in MDR activity between individual leukemic blasts are lacking. Here, we outline a new dielectrophoretic (DEP) chip-based assay. This assay permits measurement of drug accumulation in single cells, termed same-single-cell analysis in the accumulation mode (SASCA-A). Initially, the assay was optimized in pretherapy samples from 20 adults with AML whose leukemic blasts had MDR activity against the anthracyline daunorubicin (DNR) tested using multiple MDR inhibitors. Parameters tested were initial drug accumulation, time to achieve signal saturation, fold-increase of DNR accumulation with MDR inhibition, ease of cell trapping, and ease of maintaining the trapped cells stationary. This enabled categorization into leukemic blast cells with MDR activity (MDR(+)) and leukemic blast cells without MDR activity (MDR(-ve)). Leukemic blasts could also be distinguished from benign white blood cells (notably these also lacked MDR activity). MDR(-ve) blasts were observed to be enriched in samples taken from patients who went on to enter complete remission (CR), whereas MDR(+) blasts were frequently observed in patients who failed to achieve CR following front-line chemotherapy. However, pronounced variability in functional MDR activity between leukemic blasts was observed, with MDR(+) cells not infrequently seen in some patients that went on to achieve CR. Next, we tested MDR activity in two

  7. Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Display Impaired Th1 Responses and Enhanced Regulatory T-Cell Levels in Response to an Outbreak of Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis M and Ra Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Geffner, Laura; Yokobori, Noemí; Basile, Juan; Schierloh, Pablo; Balboa, Luciana; Romero, María Mercedes; Ritacco, Viviana; Vescovo, Marisa; González Montaner, Pablo; Lopez, Beatriz; Barrera, Lucía; Alemán, Mercedes; Abatte, Eduardo; Sasiain, María C.; de la Barrera, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    In Argentina, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) outbreaks emerged among hospitalized patients with AIDS in the early 1990s and thereafter disseminated to the immunocompetent community. Epidemiological, bacteriological, and genotyping data allowed the identification of certain MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis outbreak strains, such as the so-called strain M of the Haarlem lineage and strain Ra of the Latin America and Mediterranean lineage. In the current study, we evaluated the immune responses induced by strains M and Ra in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with active MDR-TB or fully drug-susceptible tuberculosis (S-TB) and in purified protein derivative-positive healthy controls (group N). Our results demonstrated that strain M was a weaker gamma interferon (IFN-γ) inducer than H37Rv for group N. Strain M induced the highest interleukin-4 expression in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from MDR- and S-TB patients, along with the lowest cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity in patients and controls. Hence, impairment of CTL activity is a hallmark of strain M and could be an evasion mechanism employed by this strain to avoid the killing of macrophages by M-specific CTL effectors. In addition, MDR-TB patients had an increased proportion of circulating regulatory T cells (Treg cells), and these cells were further expanded upon in vitro M. tuberculosis stimulation. Experimental Treg cell depletion increased IFN-γ expression and CTL activity in TB patients, with M- and Ra-induced CTL responses remaining low in MDR-TB patients. Altogether, these results suggest that immunity to MDR strains might depend upon a balance between the individual host response and the ability of different M. tuberculosis genotypes to drive Th1 or Th2 profiles. PMID:19720756

  8. Osthole shows the potential to overcome P-glycoprotein‑mediated multidrug resistance in human myelogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Jia, Xiu-Hong; Chen, Jie-Ru; Wang, Jian-Yong; Li, You-Jie

    2016-06-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) has been reported to play a pivotal role in tumor chemotherapy failure. Study after study has illustrated that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling cascade is involved in the MDR phenotype and is correlated with P-gp expression in many human malignancies. In the present study, osthole, an O-methylated coumarin, exhibited potent reversal capability of MDR in myelogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells. Simultaneously, the uptake and efflux of Rhodamine-123 (Rh-123) and the accumulation of doxorubicin assays combined with flow cytometric analysis suggested that osthole could increase intracellular drug accumulation. Furthermore, osthole decreased the expression of multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) at both the mRNA and protein levels. Further experiments elucidated that osthole could suppress P-gp expression by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway which might be the main mechanism accounting for the reversal potential of osthole in the MDR in K562/ADM cells. In conclusion, osthole combats MDR and could be a promising candidate for the development of novel MDR reversal modulators. PMID:27109742

  9. Multidrug efflux pumps and cancer stem cells: insights into multidrug resistance and therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Moitra, K; Lou, H; Dean, M

    2011-04-01

    Stem cells possess the dual properties of self-renewal and pluripotency. Self-renewal affords these populations the luxury of self-propagation, whereas pluripotency allows them to produce the multitude of cell types found in the body. Protection of the stem cell population from damage or death is critical because these cells need to remain intact throughout the life of an organism. The principal mechanism of protection is through expression of multifunctional efflux transporters--the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that are the "guardians" of the stem cell population. Ironically, it has been shown that these ABC efflux pumps also afford protection to cancer stem cells (CSCs), shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapeutic insult. It is therefore imperative to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the resistance of stem cells to chemotherapy, which could lead to the discovery of new therapeutic targets and improvement of current anticancer strategies. PMID:21368752

  10. Immunomodulatory Protein from Ganoderma microsporum Induces Pro-Death Autophagy through Akt-mTOR-p70S6K Pathway Inhibition in Multidrug Resistant Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ling-Yen; Hu, Ming-E; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Hsin, I-Lun; Ko, Jiunn-Liang; Tsai, Kan-Jen; Sheu, Gwo-Tarng

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance in cancer therapy is an unfavorable prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Elevation of intracellular calcium level in multidrug resistant (MDR) sublines leads to sensitization of MDR sublines to cell death. We demonstrated that a fungal protein from Ganoderma microsporum, GMI, elevates the intracellular calcium level and reduces the growth of MDR subline via autophagy and apoptosis, regardless of p-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpression, in mice xenograft tumors. In addition, we examined the roles of autophagy in the death of MDR A549 lung cancer sublines by GMI, thapsigargin (TG) and tunicamycin (TM) in vitro. Cytotoxicity of TG was inhibited by overexpressed P-gp. However, TM-induced death of MDR sublines was independent of P-gp level. Combinations of TG and TM with either docetaxel or vincristine showed no additional cytotoxic effects on MDR sublines. TG- and TM-mediated apoptosis of MDR sublines was demonstrated on Annexin-V assay and Western blot and repressed by pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK). Treatment of MDR sublines with TG and TM also augmented autophagy with accumulation of LC3-II proteins, breakdown of p62 and formation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs). Inhibition of ATG5 by shRNA silencing significantly reduced autophagy and cell death but not apoptosis following TG or TM treatment. GMI treatment inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt/S473 and p70S6K/T389. Interestingly, the phosphorylation of ERK was not associated with GMI-induced autophagy. We conclude that autophagy plays a pro-death role in acquired MDR and upregulation of autophagy by GMI via Akt/mTOR inhibition provides a potential strategy for overcoming MDR in the treatment of lung cancers.

  11. Nuclear Multidrug Resistance-Related Protein 1 Is Highly Associated with Better Prognosis of Human Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma through the Suppression of Cell Proliferation, Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Liang-Liang; Zhao, Jin-Long; Liu, Yuan; Wu, Jun-Zheng; Liu, Yan-Pu; Yu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Multidrug resistance-related protein 1 (MRP1) overexpression is a well acknowledged predictor of poor response to chemotherapy, but MRP1 also correlated to better prognosis in some reports, especially for patients not pretreated with chemotherapy. In our previous study, we found nuclear translocation of MRP1 in mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) for the first time. The purpose of this study was to further investigate the function of nuclear MRP1 in MEC. Materials and Methods Human MEC tissue samples of 125 patients were selected and stained using immunohistochemistry. The expression level of total MRP1/nuclear MRP1 of each sample was evaluated by expression index (EI) which was scored using both qualitative and quantitative analysis. The correlations between the clinicopathologic parameters and the EI of nuclear MRP1 were analyzed using Spearman’s rank correlation analysis, respectively. The effects of RNAi-mediated downregulation of nuclear MRP1 on MEC cells were assessed using flow cytometric analysis, MTT assay, plate colony formation assay, transwell invasion assay and monolayer wound healing assay. Results In this study, we found the EI of nuclear MRP1 was negatively correlated to the pathologic grading (r = -0.498, P<0.01) / clinical staging (r = -0.41, P<0.01) / tumor stage (r = -0.28, P = 0.02) / nodal stage (r = -0.29, P<0.01) of MEC patients. The RNAi-mediated downregulation of nuclear MRP1 further proved that the downregulation of nuclear MRP1 could increase the cell replication, growth speed, colony formation efficiency, migration and invasion ability of MEC cells. Conclusion Our results suggested that nuclear MRP1 is highly associated with better prognosis of human mucoepidermoid carcinoma and further study of its function mechanism would provide clues in developing new treatment modalities of MEC. PMID:26829120

  12. Co-encapsulation of chrysophsin-1 and epirubicin in PEGylated liposomes circumvents multidrug resistance in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Li; Tu, Wei-Chen

    2015-12-01

    Chrysophsin-1, an amphipathic alpha-helical antimicrobial peptide, is isolated from the gills of the red sea bream and possesses different structure and mechanism(s) in comparison with traditional multidrug resistance (MDR) modulators. For the purpose of reducing off-target normal cell toxicity, it is rational to incorporate chrysophsin-1 and epirubicin in a PEGylated liposomal formulation. In the present study, we report a multifunctional liposomes with epirubicin as an antineoplastic agent and an apoptosis inducer, as well as chrysophsin-1 as a MDR transporter inhibitor and an apoptosis modulator in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Co-incubation of HeLa cells with PEGylated liposomal formulation of epirubicin and chrysophsin-1 resulted in a significant increase in the cytotoxicity of epirubicin. The liposomal formulations of epirubicin and/or chrysophsin-1 were shown to considerably improve the intracellular H2O2 and O2(-) levels of HeLa cells. Furthermore, these treatments were found to extensively reduce mRNA expression levels of MDR1, MRP1, and MRP2. The addition of chrysophsin-1 in liposomes was demonstrated to substantially enhance the intracellular accumulation of epirubicin in HeLa cells. Moreover, the PEGylated liposomes of epirubicin and chrysophsin-1 were also found to significantly increase the mRNA expressions of p53, Bax, and Bcl-2. The ratio of Bax to Bcl-2 was noticeably amplified in the presence of these formulations. Apoptosis induction was also validated by chromatin condensation, a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, the increased sub-G1 phase of cell cycle, and more populations of apoptosis using annexin V/PI assay. These formulations were verified to increase the activity and mRNA expression levels of caspase-9 and caspases-3. Collectively, our findings provide the first evidence that cotreatment with free or liposomal chrysophsin-1 and epirubicin leads to cell death in human cervical cancer cells through the ROS

  13. P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance phenotype of L1210/VCR cells is associated with decreases of oligo- and/or polysaccharide contents.

    PubMed

    Fiala, R; Sulová, Z; El-Saggan, A H; Uhrík, B; Liptaj, T; Dovinová, I; Hanusovská, E; Drobná, Z; Barancík, M; Breier, A

    2003-11-20

    Multidrug resistance of murine leukaemic cell line L1210/VCR (obtained by adaptation of parental drug-sensitive L1210 cells to vincristine) is associated with overexpression of mdr1 gene product P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-the ATP-dependent drug efflux pump. 31P-NMR spectra of L1210 and L1210/VCR cells (the latter in the presence of vincristine) revealed, besides the decrease of ATP level, a considerable lower level of UDP-saccharides in L1210/VCR cells. Histochemical staining of negatively charged cell surface binding sites (mostly sialic acid) by ruthenium red (RR) revealed a compact layer of RR bound to the external coat of sensitive cells. In resistant cells cultivated in the absence or presence of vincristine, the RR layer is either reduced or absent. Consistently, resistant cells were found to be less sensitive to Concanavalin A (ConA). Moreover, differences in the amount and spectrum of glycoproteins interacting with ConA-Sepharose were demonstrated between sensitive and resistant cells. Finally, the content of glycogen in resistant cells is lower than in sensitive cells. All the above facts indicate that multidrug resistance of L1210/VCR cells mediated predominantly by drug efflux activity of Pgp is accompanied by a considerable depression of oligo- and/or polysaccharides biosynthesis.

  14. Inhibition of NF-kappaB activity by BAY 11-7082 increases apoptosis in multidrug resistant leukemic T-cell lines.

    PubMed

    García, Mariana G; Alaniz, Laura; Lopes, Eloisi C; Blanco, Guillermo; Hajos, Silvia E; Alvarez, Elida

    2005-12-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main reason for failure of cancer therapy with resistance to apoptosis being one of the mechanisms involved. Constitutive NF-kappaB activity has been detected in many tumors contributing to oncogenesis and tumor survival whereas inhibition of NF-kappaB activity has proved to enhance cell death induced by chemotherapeutic agents. Consequently, the use of BAY 11-7082, an irreversible inhibitor of IkappaB-alpha phosphorylation, could be beneficial in the treatment of certain tumors. Although there are several reports which demonstrate a transient activation of NF-kappaB by cytotoxic drugs, little is known about the role of NF-kappaB activation in the development of a chemoresistant phenotype in leukemic cells. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between NF-kappaB and the survival of murine leukemic drug resistant cell lines. The modulation of this transcription factor by BAY 11-7082 and the chemotherapeutic agents vincristine and doxorubicin was evaluated. The effect of BAY 11-7082 on the expression of genes containing NF-kappaB-binding sites was also studied. We found that the cell lines LBR-V160 and LBR-D160 (resistant to vincristine and doxorubicin, respectively) presented higher constitutive NF-kappaB activity than the sensitive LBR- and the active complex contained both p50 and p65 subunits. BAY 11-7082 (3.5 microM) inhibited constitutive NF-kappaB activity in the three cell lines whereas the anticancer agents did not. Treatment with BAY 11-7082 induced a higher percentage of apoptosis in LBR-V160 and LBR-D160 than in LBR-. Cells treated with BAY 11-7082 displayed modulation of NF-kappaB-inducible genes such as IL-10, IL-15, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta. Taken together, these data suggest that suppression of constitutive NF-kappaB activity by BAY 11-7082 may be a useful treatment for MDR leukemias.

  15. Arsenite-loaded nanoparticles inhibit PARP-1 to overcome multidrug resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Zongjun; Chi, Xiaoqin; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Huang, Dengtong; Jin, Jianbin; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the highest incidences in cancers; however, traditional chemotherapy often suffers from low efficiency caused by drug resistance. Herein, we report an arsenite-loaded dual-drug (doxorubicin and arsenic trioxide, i.e., DOX and ATO) nanomedicine system (FeAsOx@SiO2-DOX, Combo NP) with significant drug synergy and pH-triggered drug release for effective treatment of DOX resistant HCC cells (HuH-7/ADM). This nano-formulation Combo NP exhibits the synergistic effect of DNA damage by DOX along with DNA repair interference by ATO, which results in unprecedented killing efficiency on DOX resistant cancer cells. More importantly, we explored the possible mechanism is that the activity of PARP-1 is inhibited by ATO during the treatment of Combo NP, which finally induces apoptosis of HuH-7/ADM cells by poly (ADP-ribosyl) ation suppression and DNA lesions accumulation. This study provides a smart drug delivery strategy to develop a novel synergistic combination therapy for effectively overcome drug- resistant cancer cells. PMID:27484730

  16. Human intestinal cells modulate conjugational transfer of multidrug resistance plasmids between clinical Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Sommer, Morten O A

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation in the human gut microbiota is believed to play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence plasmids. However, the modulation of bacterial conjugation by the human host remains poorly understood and there is a need for controlled systems to study this process. We established an in vitro co-culture system to study the interaction between human intestinal cells and bacteria. We show that the conjugation efficiency of a plasmid encoding an extended spectrum beta-lactamase is reduced when clinical isolates of Escherichia coli are co-cultured with human intestinal cells. We show that filtered media from co-cultures contain a factor that reduces conjugation efficiency. Protease treatment of the filtered media eliminates this inhibition of conjugation. This data suggests that a peptide or protein based factor is secreted on the apical side of the intestinal cells exposed to bacteria leading to a two-fold reduction in conjugation efficiency. These results show that human gut epithelial cells can modulate bacterial conjugation and may have relevance to gene exchange in the gut.

  17. Molecular basis of preferential resistance to colchicine in multidrug-resistant human cells conferred by Gly-185 yields Val-185 substitution in P-glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Safa, A.R.; Stern, R.K.; Choi, Kyunghee; Agresti, M.; Tamai, Ikumi; Mehta, N.D.; Roninson, I.B. )

    1990-09-01

    Expression of P-glycoprotein, encoded by the human MDR1 gene, results in cross-resistance to many lipophilic cytotoxic drugs (multidrug resistance). P-glycoprotein is believed to function as an energy-dependent efflux pump that is responsible for decreased drug accumulation in multidrug-resistant cells. Previous work showed that preferential resistance to colchicine in a colchicine-selected multidrug-resistant cell line was caused by spontaneous mutations in the MDR1 gene that resulted in a Gly-185 {yields} Val-185 substitution in P-glycoprotein. The authors have now compared transfectant cell lines expressing the wild-type Gly-185 or the mutant Val-185 P-glycoprotein with regard to their levels of resistance to and accumulation and binding of different drugs. In cells expressing the mutant protein, increased resistance to colchicine and decreased resistance to vinblastine correlated with a decreased accumulation of colchicine and increased accumulation of vinblastine. Expression of the mutant P-glycoprotein also resulted in significantly increased resistance to epipodophyllotoxin and decreased resistance to vincristine and actinomycin D; smaller changes in resistance were observed for several other drugs. Unexpectedly, the mutant P-glycoprotein showed increased binding of photoactive analogs of vinblastine and verapamil and the photoactive compound azidopine and decreased binding of a photoactive colchicine analog. These results suggest that the Gly-185 {yields} Val-185 substitution affects not the initial drug-binding site of P-glycoprotein but another site, associated with the release of P-glycoprotein-bound drugs to the outside of the cell.

  18. Nanotechnology approaches for personalized treatment of multidrug resistant cancers.

    PubMed

    Minko, Tamara; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Pozharov, Vitaly

    2013-11-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapy is substantially limited by the resistance of cancer cells to anticancer drugs that fluctuates significantly in different patients. Under identical chemotherapeutic protocols, some patients may receive relatively ineffective doses of anticancer agents while other individuals obtain excessive amounts of drugs that induce severe adverse side effects on healthy tissues. The current review is focused on an individualized selection of drugs and targets to suppress multidrug resistance. Such selection is based on the molecular characteristics of a tumor from an individual patient that can potentially improve the treatment outcome and bring us closer to an era of personalized medicine. PMID:24120655

  19. Multidrug resistance: Physiological principles and nanomedical solutions.

    PubMed

    Kunjachan, Sijumon; Rychlik, Błażej; Storm, Gert; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2013-11-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a pathophysiological phenomenon employed by cancer cells which limits the prolonged and effective use of chemotherapeutic agents. MDR is primarily based on the over-expression of drug efflux pumps in the cellular membrane. Prominent examples of such efflux pumps, which belong to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of proteins, are Pgp (P-glycoprotein) and MRP (multidrug resistance-associated protein), nowadays officially known as ABCB1 and ABCC1. Over the years, several strategies have been evaluated to overcome MDR, based not only on the use of low-molecular-weight MDR modulators, but also on the implementation of 1-100(0) nm-sized drug delivery systems. In the present manuscript, after introducing the most important physiological principles of MDR, we summarize prototypic nanomedical strategies to overcome multidrug resistance, including the use of carrier materials with intrinsic anti-MDR properties, the use of nanomedicines to modify the mode of cellular uptake, and the co-formulation of chemotherapeutic drugs together with low- and high-molecular-weight MDR inhibitors within a single drug delivery system. While certain challenges still need to be overcome before such constructs and concepts can be widely applied in the clinic, the insights obtained and the progress made strongly suggest that nanomedicine formulations hold significant potential for improving the treatment of multidrug-resistant malignancies.

  20. The plant multidrug resistance ABC transporter AtMRP5 is involved in guard cell hormonal signalling and water use.

    PubMed

    Klein, Markus; Perfus-Barbeoch, Laetitia; Frelet, Annie; Gaedeke, Nicola; Reinhardt, Didier; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Martinoia, Enrico; Forestier, Cyrille

    2003-01-01

    Carbon dioxide uptake and water release through stomata, controlling the opening and closure of stomatal pore size in the leaf surface, is critical for optimal plant performance. Stomatal movements are regulated by multiple signalling pathways involving guard cell ion channels. Using reverse genetics, we recently isolated a T-DNA insertion mutant for the Arabidopsis ABC-transporter AtMRP5 (mrp5-1). Guard cells from mrp5-1 mutant plants were found to be insensitive to the sulfonylurea compound glibenclamide, which in the wild type induces stomatal opening in the dark. Here, we report that the knockout in AtMRP5 affects several signalling pathways controlling stomatal movements. Stomatal apertures of mrp5-1 and wild-type Ws-2 were identical in the dark. In contrast, opening of stomata of mrp5-1 plants was reduced in the light. In the light, stomatal closure of mrp5-1 was insensitive to external calcium and abscisic acid, a phytohormone responsible for stomatal closure during drought stress. In contrast to Ws-2, the phytohormone auxin could not stimulate stomatal opening in the mutant in darkness. All stomatal phenotypes were complemented in transgenic mrp5-1 plants transformed with a cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S-AtMRP5 construct. Both whole-plant and single-leaf gas exchange measurements demonstrated a reduced transpiration rate of mrp5-1 in the light. Excised leaves of mutant plants exhibited reduced water loss, and water uptake was strongly decreased at the whole-plant level. Finally, if plants were not watered, mrp5-1 plants survived much longer due to reduced water use. Analysis of CO2 uptake and transpiration showed that mrp5-1 plants have increased water use efficiency. Mutant plants overexpressing AtMRP5 under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter again exhibited wild-type characteristics. These results demonstrate that multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) are important components of guard cell functioning.

  1. Induction of multidrug resistance transporter ABCG2 by prolactin in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Alex Man Lai; Dalvi, Pooja; Lu, Xiaoli; Yang, Mingdong; Riddick, David S; Matthews, Jason; Clevenger, Charles V; Ross, Douglas D; Harper, Patricia A; Ito, Shinya

    2013-02-01

    The multidrug transporter, breast cancer resistance protein, ABCG2, is up-regulated in certain chemoresistant cancer cells and in the mammary gland during lactation. We investigated the role of the lactogenic hormone prolactin (PRL) in the regulation of ABCG2. PRL dose-dependently induced ABCG2 expression in T-47D human breast cancer cells. This induction was significantly reduced by short-interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2). Knockdown or pharmacologic inhibition of the down-stream signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 (STAT5) also blunted the induction of ABCG2 by PRL, suggesting a role for the JAK2/STAT5 pathway in PRL-induced ABCG2 expression. Corroborating these findings, we observed PRL-stimulated STAT5 recruitment to a region containing a putative γ-interferon activation sequence (GAS) element at -434 base pairs upstream of the ABCG2 transcription start site. Introduction of a single mutation to the -434 GAS element significantly attenuated PRL-stimulated activity of a luciferase reporter driven by the ABCG2 gene promoter and 5'-flanking region containing the -434 GAS motif. In addition, this GAS element showed strong copy number dependency in its response to PRL treatment. Interestingly, inhibitors against the mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositide-3-kinase signaling pathways significantly decreased the induction of ABCG2 by PRL without altering STAT5 recruitment to the GAS element. We conclude that the JAK2/STAT5 pathway is required but not sufficient for the induction of ABCG2 by PRL.

  2. Reconstituted high density lipoprotein mediated targeted co-delivery of HZ08 and paclitaxel enhances the efficacy of paclitaxel in multidrug-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangrong; Wang, Xiaoyi; Xu, Xiangting; Li, Min; Zhou, Jianping; Wang, Wei

    2016-09-20

    In the past decades, reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL) has been successfully developed as a drug carrier since the enhanced HDL-lipids uptake is demonstrated in several human cancers. In this paper, rHDL, for the first time, was utilized to co-encapsulate two hydrophobic drugs: an anticancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX), and a new reversal agent for P-gp (P-glycoprotein)-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer, N-cyano-1-[(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)methyl]-3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxy-N'-octyl-2(1H)-isoquinoline-carboximidamide (HZ08). We proposed this drug co-delivery strategy to reverse PTX resistance. The study aimed to develop a biomimetic nanovector, reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL), mediating targeted PTX-HZ08 delivery for cancer therapy. Using sodium cholate dialysis method, we successfully formulated dual-agent co-delivering rHDL nanoparticles (PTX-HZ08-rHDL NPs) with a typical spherical morphology, well-distributed size (~100nm), high drug encapsulation efficiency (approximately 90%), sustained drug release properties and exceptional stability even after storage for 1month or incubation in 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) DMEM for up to 2days. Results demonstrated that PTX-HZ08-rHDL NPs significantly enhanced anticancer efficacy in vitro, including higher cytotoxicity and better ability to induce cell apoptosis against both PTX-sensitive and -resistant MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MCF-7/PTX cells). Mechanism studies demonstrated that these improvements could be correlated with increased cellular uptake of PTX mediated by scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) as well as prolonged intracellular retention of PTX due to the HZ08 mediated drug-efflux inhibition. In addition, in vivo investigation showed that the PTX-HZ08-rHDL NPs were substantially safer, have higher tumor-targeted capacity and have stronger antitumor activity than the corresponding dosage of paclitaxel injection. These findings suggested that rHDL NPs could

  3. Asclepiasterol, a novel C21 steroidal glycoside derived from Asclepias curassavica, reverses tumor multidrug resistance by down-regulating P-glycoprotein expression.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei-Qi; Zhang, Rong-Rong; Wang, Jun; Ma, Yan; Li, Wen-Xue; Jiang, Ren-Wang; Cai, Shao-Hui

    2016-05-24

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a major cause of cancer therapy failure. In this study, we identified a novel C21 steroidal glycoside, asclepiasterol, capable of reversing P-gp-mediated MDR. Asclepiasterol (2.5 and 5.0μM) enhanced the cytotoxity of P-gp substrate anticancer drugs in MCF-7/ADR and HepG-2/ADM cells. MDR cells were more responsive to paclitaxel in the presence of asclepiasterol, and colony formation of MDR cells was only reduced upon treatment with a combination of asclepiasterol and doxorubicin. Consistent with these findings, asclepiasterol treatment increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and rhodamine 123 (Rh123) in MDR cells. Asclepiasterol decreased expression of P-gp protein without stimulating or suppressing MDR1 mRNA levels. Asclepiasterol-mediated P-gp suppression caused inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in two MDR cell types, and EGF, an activator of the MAPK/ERK pathway, reversed the P-gp down-regulation, implicating the MAPK/ERK pathway in asclepiasterol-mediated P-gp down-regulation. These results suggest that asclepiasterol could be developed as a modulator for reversing P-gp-mediated MDR in P-gp-overexpressing cancer variants.

  4. Asclepiasterol, a novel C21 steroidal glycoside derived from Asclepias curassavica, reverses tumor multidrug resistance by down-regulating P-glycoprotein expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Ma, Yan; Li, Wen-Xue; Jiang, Ren-Wang; Cai, Shao-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a major cause of cancer therapy failure. In this study, we identified a novel C21 steroidal glycoside, asclepiasterol, capable of reversing P-gp-mediated MDR. Asclepiasterol (2.5 and 5.0μM) enhanced the cytotoxity of P-gp substrate anticancer drugs in MCF-7/ADR and HepG-2/ADM cells. MDR cells were more responsive to paclitaxel in the presence of asclepiasterol, and colony formation of MDR cells was only reduced upon treatment with a combination of asclepiasterol and doxorubicin. Consistent with these findings, asclepiasterol treatment increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and rhodamine 123 (Rh123) in MDR cells. Asclepiasterol decreased expression of P-gp protein without stimulating or suppressing MDR1 mRNA levels. Asclepiasterol-mediated P-gp suppression caused inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in two MDR cell types, and EGF, an activator of the MAPK/ERK pathway, reversed the P-gp down-regulation, implicating the MAPK/ERK pathway in asclepiasterol-mediated P-gp down-regulation. These results suggest that asclepiasterol could be developed as a modulator for reversing P-gp-mediated MDR in P-gp-overexpressing cancer variants. PMID:27129170

  5. Nitric oxide storage and transport in cells are mediated by glutathione S-transferase P1-1 and multidrug resistance protein 1 via dinitrosyl iron complexes.

    PubMed

    Lok, Hiu Chuen; Suryo Rahmanto, Yohan; Hawkins, Clare L; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Morrow, Charles S; Townsend, Alan J; Ponka, Prem; Richardson, Des R

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen monoxide (NO) plays a role in the cytotoxic mechanisms of activated macrophages against tumor cells by inducing iron release. We showed that NO-mediated iron efflux from cells required glutathione (GSH) (Watts, R. N., and Richardson, D. R. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 4724-4732) and that the GSH-conjugate transporter, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), mediates this release potentially as a dinitrosyl-dithiol iron complex (DNIC; Watts, R. N., Hawkins, C., Ponka, P., and Richardson, D. R. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 7670-7675). Recently, glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (GST P1-1) was shown to bind DNICs as dinitrosyl-diglutathionyl iron complexes. Considering this and that GSTs and MRP1 form an integrated detoxification unit with chemotherapeutics, we assessed whether these proteins coordinately regulate storage and transport of DNICs as long lived NO intermediates. Cells transfected with GSTP1 (but not GSTA1 or GSTM1) significantly decreased NO-mediated 59Fe release from cells. This NO-mediated 59Fe efflux and the effect of GST P1-1 on preventing this were observed with NO-generating agents and also in cells transfected with inducible nitric oxide synthase. Notably, 59Fe accumulated in cells within GST P1-1-containing fractions, indicating an alteration in intracellular 59Fe distribution. Furthermore, electron paramagnetic resonance studies showed that MCF7-VP cells transfected with GSTP1 contain significantly greater levels of a unique DNIC signal. These investigations indicate that GST P1-1 acts to sequester NO as DNICs, reducing their transport out of the cell by MRP1. Cell proliferation studies demonstrated the importance of the combined effect of GST P1-1 and MRP1 in protecting cells from the cytotoxic effects of NO. Thus, the DNIC storage function of GST P1-1 and ability of MRP1 to efflux DNICs are vital in protection against NO cytotoxicity.

  6. The Effects and Molecular Mechanisms of MiR-106a in Multidrug Resistance Reversal in Human Glioma U87/DDP and U251/G Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu; Kan, Pengcheng; Xin, Xin; Zhu, Yu; Yang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy resistance is one of the major obstacles to effective glioma therapy. Currently, the mechanism underlying chemotherapy resistance is unclear. A recent study showed that miR-106a is an important molecule involved in chemotherapy resistance. To explore the effects and mechanisms of miR-106a on multidrug resistance reversal in human glioma cells, we silenced miR-106a expression in the cisplatin-resistant U87 (U87/DDP) and the gefitinib-resistant U251 (U251/G) glioma cell lines and measured the resulting drug sensitivity, cell apoptosis rate and rhodamine 123 content. In addition, we detected decreased expression of P-glycoprotein, MDR1, MRP1, GST-π, CDX2, ERCC1, RhoE, Bcl-2, Survivin and Topo-II, as well as reduced production of IL-6, IL-8 and TGF-β in these cell lines. Furthermore, we found decreased expression of p-AKT and transcriptional activation of NF-κB, Twist, AP-1 and Snail in these cell lines. These results suggest that miR-106a is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of human multidrug resistant glioma. PMID:25950430

  7. Multifunctional QD-based co-delivery of siRNA and doxorubicin to HeLa cells for reversal of multidrug resistance and real-time tracking.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Ming; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Mei-Xia; Tan, Cai-Ping; Li, Yi-Qun; Le, Xue-Yi; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2012-03-01

    Co-delivery of siRNA and chemotherapeutic agents has been developed to combat multidrug resistance in cancer therapy. Recently, we developed a series of quantum dots (QDs) functionalized by β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) coupled to amino acids, some of which can be used to facilitate the delivery of siRNA. In this study, two CdSe/ZnSe QDs modified with β-CD coupled to L-Arg or L-His were used to simultaneously deliver doxorubicin (Dox) and siRNA targeting the MDR1 gene to reverse the multidrug resistance of HeLa cells. In this co-delivery system, Dox was firstly encapsulated into the hydrophobic cavities of β-CD, resulting in bypass of P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated drug efflux. After complex formation of the mdr1 siRNA with Dox-loaded QDs via electrostatic interaction, significant down-regulation of mdr1 mRNA levels and P-gp expression was achieved as shown by RT-PCR and Western blotting experiments, respectively. The number of apoptotic HeLa cells after treatment with the complexes substantially exceeded the number of apoptotic cells induced by free Dox only. The intrinsic fluorescence of the QDs provided an approach to track the system by laser confocal microscopy. These multifunctional QDs are promising vehicles for the co-delivery of nucleic acids and chemotherapeutics and for real-time tracking of treatment.

  8. Enhanced expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 and reduced expression of aquaglyceroporin 3 in an arsenic-resistant human cell line.

    PubMed

    Lee, Te-Chang; Ho, I-Ching; Lu, Wen-Jen; Huang, Jin-ding

    2006-07-01

    Arsenic-resistant cells (R15), derived from a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (CL3), were 10-fold more resistant to sodium arsenite (As(III)). Because R15 cells accumulated less arsenic than parental CL3 cells, this arsenic resistance may be due to higher efflux and/or lower uptake of As(III). We therefore compared expression of the multidrug resistance-associated proteins MRP1, MRP2, and MRP3 in these two cell lines. MRP2 expression was 5-fold higher in R15 cells than in CL3 cells, whereas MRP1 and MRP3 expression levels were similar. Furthermore, verapamil and cyclosporin A, inhibitors of multidrug resistance transporters, significantly reduced the efflux of arsenic from R15. Thus, increased arsenic extrusion by MRP2 may contribute to arsenic resistance in R15 cells. We also examined the expression of several aquaglyceroporins (AQPs), which mediate As(III) uptake by cells. Little AQP7 or AQP9 mRNA was detected by reverse transcription-PCR in either cell line, whereas AQP3 mRNA expression was 2-fold lower in R15 cells than in CL3 cells. When AQP3 expression in CL3 cells was knocked down by RNA interference, CL3 cells accumulated less arsenic and became more resistant to As(III). Conversely, overexpression of AQP3 in human embryonic kidney 293T cells increased arsenic accumulation, and the cells were more susceptible to As(III) than 293T cells transfected with vector alone. These results suggest that AQP3 is involved in As(III) accumulation. Taken together, our results suggest that enhanced expression of MRP2 and lower expression of AQP3 are responsible for lower arsenic accumulation in arsenic-resistant R15 cells.

  9. Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Vikas; Sanchaita, Sinha; Singh, NP

    2010-01-01

    Emergence and spread of Acinetobacter species, resistant to most of the available antimicrobial agents, is an area of great concern. It is now being frequently associated with healthcare associated infections. Literature was searched at PUBMED, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Library, using the terms ‘Acinetobacter Resistance, multidrug resistant (MDR), Antimicrobial Therapy, Outbreak, Colistin, Tigecycline, AmpC enzymes, and carbapenemases in various combinations. The terms such as MDR, Extensively Drug Resistant (XDR), and Pan Drug Resistant (PDR) have been used in published literature with varied definitions, leading to confusion in the correlation of data from various studies. In this review various mechanisms of resistance in the Acinetobacter species have been discussed. The review also probes upon the current therapeutic options, including combination therapies available to treat infections due to resistant Acinetobacter species in adults as well as children. There is an urgent need to enforce infection control measures and antimicrobial stewardship programs to prevent the further spread of these resistant Acinetobacter species and to delay the emergence of increased resistance in the bacteria. PMID:20927292

  10. Multidrug-Resistant TB

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Helen; Coomans, Fons

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress (REBSP) is a little-known but potentially valuable right that can contribute to rights-based approaches to addressing multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). We argue that better understanding of the REBSP may help to advance legal and civil society action for health rights. While the REBSP does not provide an individual entitlement to have a new drug developed for MDR-TB, it sets up entitlements to expect a state to establish a legislative and policy framework aimed at developing scientific capacity to address the most important health issues and at disseminating the outcomes of scientific research. By making scientific findings available and accessible, people can be enabled to claim the use of science for social benefits. Inasmuch as the market fails to address neglected diseases such as MDR-TB, the REBSP provides a potential counterbalance to frame a positive obligation on states to both marshal their own resources and to coordinate the actions of multiple other actors towards this goal, including non-state actors. While the latter do not hold the same level of accountability as states, the REBSP can still enable the recognition of obligations at a level of “soft law” responsibilities. PMID:27780997

  11. Immunotherapy: A useful strategy to help combat multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Curiel, Tyler J.

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) renders cancer cells relatively invulnerable to treatment with many standard cytotoxic anti-cancer agents. Cancer immunotherapy could be an important adjunct other strategies to treat MDR positive cancers, as resistance to immunotherapy generally is unrelated to mechanisms of resistance to cytotoxic agents. Immunotherapy to combat MDR positive tumors could use any of the following strategies: direct immune attack against MDR positive cells, using MDR as an immune target to deliver cytotoxic agents, capitalization on other immune properties of MDR positive cells, or conditional immunotoxins expressed under MDR control. Additional insights into the immunogenic potential of some cytotoxic agents can also be brought to bear on these strategies. This review will highlight key concepts in cancer immunotherapy and illustrate immune principles and strategies that have been or could be used to help destroy MDR positive tumor cells, either alone or in rational combinations. PMID:22483359

  12. Bioreductive activation of mitoxantrone by NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase does not change its apoptotic stimuli properties in regard to sensitive and multidrug resistant leukaemia HL60 cells.

    PubMed

    Kostrzewa-Nowak, Dorota; Tarasiuk, Jolanta

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of bioreductive activation of antitumour drug, mitoxantrone (MX), by liver NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) on inducing apoptosis of human promyelocytic sensitive leukaemia HL60 cell line and its multidrug resistance (MDR) sublines exhibiting two different phenotypes of MDR related to the overexpression of P-glycoprotein (HL60/VINC) or MRP1 (HL60/DOX). It was found that non-activated as well as CPR-activated form of MX used at IC90 were able to influence cell cycle of sensitive HL60 as well as resistant cells and induce apoptosis. Interestingly, it was evidenced that HL60/VINC cells were more susceptible to undergo caspase-3/caspase-8-dependent apoptosis induced by both studied forms of MX compared to HL60 and HL60/DOX cells. However, the examined agent did not change the expression of Fas receptors on the surface of HL60 sensitive as well as resistant cells regardless of its form used in the study. Obtained results suggest that CPR-dependent reductive activation of MX does not change its apoptotic stimuli properties in regard to sensitive HL60 and multidrug resistant (HL60/VINC and HL60/DOX) leukaemia cells. Nevertheless, taking into account that side toxic effects observed in course of patient treatment with antitumour drugs are dose-dependent, it seems that the reported increase in antiproliferative activity and ability to induce apoptosis of MX after its reductive activation by exogenous CPR against the MDR cells overexpressing both P-glycoprotein and MRP1 at much more lower concentrations of this drug could be of clinical importance for the treatment of tumours resistant to classical chemotherapy. PMID:24076328

  13. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein-mediated transport by S-adenosylmethionine and cynarin in multidrug-resistant human uterine sarcoma MES-SA/Dx5 cells.

    PubMed

    Angelini, A; Di Pietro, R; Centurione, L; Castellani, M L; Conti, P; Porreca, E; Cuccurullo, F

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer chemotherapy is often mediated by the overexpression of the plasma membrane drug transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) encoded by multidrug resistance gene (MDR1). Various chemosensitizing agents are able to inhibit Pgp activity but their clinical application is limited by their toxicity. Furthermore, hepatotoxicity related to chemotherapy causes delays of treatment in cancer patients and often requires supplementation of anti-tumour therapy with hepatoprotective agents. In this in vitro study, we investigated the effectiveness of an endogenous hepatoprotective agent, S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), and a natural hepatoprotective compound, Cynarin (Cyn), to inhibit Pgp activity in order to evaluate their potential use as chemosensitizing agents. Human doxorubicin (doxo) resistant uterine sarcoma cells (MES-SA/Dx5) expressing high levels of Pgp were treated with two hepatoprotectors at various concentrations (1, 5 and 10 microM) that are clinically achievable, in the presence or absence of three different concentrations of doxo (2, 4 and 8 microM). In order to evaluate the effects of both hepatoprotectors, we measured the intracellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of doxo, the cellular GSH level, ROS production and catalase (CAT) activity. We found that treatment with 2, 4 and 8 microM doxo in the presence of SAMe or Cyn significantly increased the doxo accumulation and cytotoxicity on MES-SA/Dx5 cells, when compared to control cells receiving doxo alone. Moreover, treatment with SAMe or Cyn significantly increased GSH content, greater than 80 percent and 60 percent, respectively) and CAT activity greater than 60 and 150 percent, respectively) in resistant cancer cells, while ROS production was below the values of corresponding untreated control cells. Our in vitro findings provide a rationale for the potential clinical use of these hepatoprotectors both as chemosensitizing agents, to reverse Pgp-mediated MDR, and as antioxidants to

  14. The novel pyrrolo-1,5-benzoxazepine, PBOX-6, synergistically enhances the apoptotic effects of carboplatin in drug sensitive and multidrug resistant neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Jennifer C; Bright, Sandra A; Carroll, Eilis; Butini, Stefania; Campiani, Giuseppe; O'Meara, Anne; Williams, D Clive; Zisterer, Daniela M

    2014-02-15

    Neuroblastoma, a malignancy of neuroectoderrmal origin, accounts for 15% of childhood cancer deaths. Despite advances in understanding the biology, it remains one of the most difficult paediatric cancers to treat. A major obstacle in the effective treatment of neuroblastoma is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). There is thus a compelling demand for new treatment strategies for this cancer that can bypass such resistance mechanisms. The pyrrolo-1,5-benzoxazepine (PBOX) compounds are a series of novel microtubule-targeting agents that potently induce apoptosis in various cancer cell lines, ex vivo patient samples and in vivo cancer models. In this study we examined the ability of two members, PBOX-6 and -15, to exhibit anti-cancer effects in a panel of drug sensitive and MDR neuroblastoma cell lines. The PBOX compounds potently reduced the viability of all neuroblastoma cells examined and exhibited a lower fold resistance in MDR cells when compared to standard chemotherapeutics. In addition, the PBOX compounds synergistically enhanced apoptosis induced by etoposide, carboplatin and doxorubicin. Exposure of drug sensitive and resistant cell lines to PBOX-6/carboplatin induced cleavage of Bcl-2, a downregulation of Mcl-1 and a concomitant increase in Bak. Furthermore, activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9 was demonstrated. Finally, gene silencing of Mcl-1 by siRNA was shown to sensitise both drug sensitive and multidrug resistant cells to carboplatin-induced apoptosis demonstrating the importance of Mcl-1 downregulation in the apoptotic pathway mediated by the PBOX compounds in neuroblastoma. In conclusion, our findings indicate the potential of the PBOX compounds in enhancing chemosensitivity in neuroblastoma.

  15. Impaired NK cells' activity and increased numbers of CD4 + CD25+ regulatory T cells in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fan, Renhua; Xiang, Yangen; Yang, Li; Liu, Yanke; Chen, Pingsheng; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wenjun; Yin, Ke; Fu, Manjiao; Xu, Yixin; Wu, Jialin

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) often causes persistent infection and chemotherapy failure, which brings heavy burden of society and family. Many immune cell subsets and regulatory mechanisms may operate throughout the various stages of infection. The presence of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is thought to be an important mechanism that TB successfully evades the immune system. Tregs play a central role in the prevention of autoimmunity and in the control of immune responses. The role of Tregs in MDR-TB infection and persistence is inadequately documented. The current study was designed to determine whether CD4 + CD25+ regulatory T cells may modulate innate immunity (such as NK cells) against human tuberculosis. Our results indicated that the numbers of CD4 + CD25+ Treg cells increased in MDR-TB patients' blood, and the cytokine production of IL-10 increased from MDR-patients compared with healthy subjects, along with the lower activity and low CD69 expression of NK cells in patients. These results suggested that immunity to MDR-TB patients induced circulating CD4 + CD25+ T regulatory cells expansion, which may be related to the persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection, and to the balance between effectors immune responses and suppression immune responses. PMID:27156613

  16. Polyaromatic alkaloids from marine invertebrates as cytotoxic compounds and inhibitors of multidrug resistance caused by P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Quesada, A. R.; García Grávalos, M. D.; Fernández Puentes, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of several members of the family of lamellarins, polyaromatic alkaloids isolated from tunicates belonging to the genus Didemnum, on the growth of several tumour cell lines and on P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR), were investigated. Cytotoxicity experiments of lamellarins were performed on a panel of tumour cell lines, including two multidrug-resistant cell lines. Some lamellarins showed good anti-tumour activity, with similar levels of cytotoxicity against both the resistant and their corresponding parental cell lines. Two lamellarins displayed a high potency against lung carcinoma cells. Studies of the resistance modifier activity of the different lamellarins at non-toxic concentrations were also carried out in cells exhibiting MDR, and lamellarin I was selected for the highest chemosensitising activity. At non-toxic doses, verapamil and lamellarin I effectively increased the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin, vinblastine and daunorubicin in a concentration-dependent manner in multidrug-resistant cells, but the potency of lamellarin I as a MDR modulator was 9- to 16-fold higher than that of verapamil. In vitro measurements of rhodamine 123 accumulation in the multidrug-resistant Lo Vo/Dx cells suggest that lamellarin I reverses MDR by directly inhibiting the P-gp-mediated drug efflux. This work underscores the possibility of using these marine-derived compounds as a potential new source of anti-tumoral drugs active on resistant cells as well as of non-toxic modulators of the MDR phenotype. PMID:8795567

  17. Activating transcription factor 4 mediates a multidrug resistance phenotype of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells through transactivation of STAT3 expression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongwu; Chen, Xiong; Chen, Bin; Chen, Bei; Fan, Jianyong; Song, Weibing; Xie, Ziying; Jiang, Dan; Li, Qiuqiong; Zhou, Meihua; Sun, Dayong; Zhao, Yagang

    2014-11-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major challenge to the clinical treatment of esophageal cancer. The stress response gene activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is involved in homeostasis and cellular protection. However, relatively little is known about the expression and function of ATF4 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) MDR. In this study, we investigate the potential role and mechanisms of ATF4 in ESCC MDR. We demonstrated that overexpression of ATF4 promotes the MDR phenotype in ESCC cells, while depletion of ATF4 in the MDR ESCC cell line induces drug re-sensitization. We also demonstrated that ATF4 transactivates STAT3 expression by directly binding to the signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) promoter, resulting in MDR in ESCC cells. Significantly, inhibition of STAT3 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) or a selective inhibitor (JSI-124) reintroduces therapeutic sensitivity. In addition, increased Bcl-2, survivin, and MRP1 expression levels were observed in ATF4-overexpressing cells. In conclusion, ATF4 may promote MDR in ESCC cells through the up-regulation of STAT3 expression, and thus is an attractive therapeutic target to combat therapeutic resistance in ESCC.

  18. The synthetic ajoene analog SPA3015 induces apoptotic cell death through crosstalk between NF-κB and PPARγ in multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jee Won; Cho, Hyewon; Lee, Jae Yeon; Jeon, Youngsic; Kim, Su-Nam; Lee, Sang Jin; Bae, Gyu-Un; Yoon, Sungpil; Jeon, Raok; Kim, Yong Kee

    2016-10-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) caused by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpression impedes successful cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of SPA3015, a synthetic ajoene analog, in P-gp-overexpressing MDR cancer cells (KBV20C and MES-SA/DX5). Treatment with SPA3015 caused a dramatic decrease in the cell viabilities of both KBV20C and MES-SA/DX5 cells. This decrease was accompanied by apoptotic cell death without affecting the expression level or drug efflux function of P-gp. SPA3015 selectively suppressed NF-κB reporter gene activity, which led to decreased expression of NF-κB target genes such as CIAP1, CIAP2, XIAP, and Bcl-XL. Surprisingly, nuclear localization and DNA binding affinity of the p65 subunit were not affected by SPA3015, suggesting that SPA3015 inhibits the transcriptional activity of NF-κB at the nucleus. Indeed, SPA3015 treatment led to an increase in the physical interaction of p65 with PPARγ, which resulted in the inhibition of NF-κB activity. Our findings support the hypothesis that SPA3015 inhibits NF-κB transcriptional activity by facilitating the physical interaction of the p65 subunit and PPARγ, which leads to apoptotic cell death in MDR cancer cells.

  19. Adenovirus vector infection of non-small-cell lung cancer cells is a trigger for multi-drug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Tomono, Takumi; Kajita, Masahiro; Yano, Kentaro; Ogihara, Takuo

    2016-08-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-binding cassette protein involved in cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR). It has been reported that infection with some bacteria and viruses induces changes in the activities of various drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, including P-gp. Although human adenoviruses (Ad) cause the common cold, the effect of Ad infection on MDR in cancer has not been established. In this study, we investigated whether Ad infection is a cause of MDR in A549, H441 and HCC827 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, using an Ad vector system. We found that Ad vector infection of NSCLC cell lines induced P-gp mRNA expression, and the extent of induction was dependent on the number of Ad vector virus particles and the infection time. Heat-treated Ad vector, which is not infectious, did not alter P-gp mRNA expression. Uptake experiments with doxorubicin (DOX), a P-gp substrate, revealed that DOX accumulation was significantly decreased in Ad vector-infected A549 cells. The decrease of DOX uptake was blocked by verapamil, a P-gp inhibitor. Our results indicated that Ad vector infection of NSCLC cells caused MDR mediated by P-gp overexpression. The Ad vector genome sequence is similar to that of human Ad, and therefore human Ad infection of lung cancer patients may lead to chemoresistance in the clinical environment.

  20. Overexpression of the Gene Encoding the Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein Results in Increased ATP-Dependent Glutathione S-Conjugate Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Michael; Meijer, Coby; Zaman, Guido J. R.; Borst, Piet; Scheper, Rik J.; Mulder, Nanno H.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Jansen, Peter L. M.

    1994-12-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) is a 180- to 195-kDa glycoprotein associated with multidrug resistance of human tumor cells. MRP is mainly located in the plasma membrane and it confers resistance by exporting natural product drugs out of the cell. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of the MRP gene in human cancer cells increases the ATP-dependent glutathione S-conjugate carrier activity in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from these cells. The glutathione S-conjugate export carrier is known to mediate excretion of bivalent anionic conjugates from mammalian cells and is thought to play a role in the elimination of conjugated xenobiotics. Our results suggest that MRP can cause multidrug resistance by promoting the export of drug modification products from cells and they shed light on the reported link between drug resistance and cellular glutathione and glutathione S-transferase levels.

  1. Luteolin induces apoptosis in multidrug resistant cancer cells without affecting the drug transporter function: involvement of cell line-specific apoptotic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Prema S.; Satelli, Arun; Moridani, Majid; Jenkins, Marjorie; Rao, U. Subrahmanyeswara

    2011-01-01

    Bioflavonoids are of considerable interest to human health as these serve as antioxidant and anticancer agents. Although epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that luteolin, a natural bioflavonoid, exhibits chemopreventive properties, its effectiveness as an antiproliferative agent against multidrug resistant (MDR) cancers is unclear. We thus assessed the antiproliferative effects of luteolin and associated molecular mechanisms using two MDR cancer cell lines that express high levels of P-glycoprotein and ABCG2. In this paper, we demonstrate that luteolin induces apoptosis in P-glycoprotein- and ABCG2-expressing MDR cancer cells without affecting the transport functions of these drug transporters. Analysis of various proliferative signaling pathways indicated that luteolin-induced apoptosis involves reactive oxygen species generation, DNA damage, activation of ATR→Chk2→p53 signaling pathway, inhibition of NF-kB signaling pathway, activation of p38 pathway and depletion of anti-apoptotic proteins. Importantly, use of luteolin in these analyses also identified specific molecular characteristics of NCI-ADR/RES and MCF-7/MitoR cells that highlight their different tissue origins. These results suggest that luteolin possesses therapeutic potential to control the proliferation of MDR cancers without affecting the physiological function of drug transporters in the body tissues. PMID:21792893

  2. Prolonged weightlessness affects promyelocytic multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Piepmeier, E H; Kalns, J E; McIntyre, K M; Lewis, M L

    1997-12-15

    An immortalized promyelocytic cell line was studied to detect how doxorubicin uptake is affected by microgravity. The purpose of this experiment was to identify the effect that microgravity may have on multidrug resistance in leukocytes. HL60 cells and HL60 cells resistant to anthracycline (HL60/AR) were grown in RPMI and 10% FBS. Upon reaching orbit in the Space Shuttle Endeavour, the cells were robotically mixed with doxorubicin. Three days after mixing, cells were fixed with paraformaldehyde/glutaraldehyde. Ground control experiments were conducted concurrently using a robot identical to the one used on the Shuttle. Fixed cells were analyzed within 2 weeks of launch. Confocal micrographs identified changes in cell structure (transmittance), drug distribution (fluorescence), and microtubule polymerization (fluorescence). Flight cells showed a lack of cytoskeletal polymerization resulting in an overall amorphic globular shape. Doxorubicin distribution in ground cells included a large numbers of vesicles relative to flight cells. There was a greater amount of doxorubicin present in flight cells (85% +/- 9.7) than in ground control cells (43% +/- 26) as determined by image analysis. Differences in microtubule formation between flight cells and ground cells could be partially responsible for the differences in drug distribution. Cytoskeletal interactions are critical to the function of P-glycoprotein as a drug efflux pump responsible for multidrug resistance.

  3. NANOPREPARATIONS TO OVERCOME MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Niravkumar R.; Pattni, Bhushan S.; Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is the most widely exploited phenomenon by which cancer eludes chemotherapy. Broad variety of factors, ranging from the cellular ones, such as over-expression of efflux transporters, defective apoptotic machineries, and altered molecular targets, to the physiological factors such as higher interstitial fluid pressure, low extracellular pH, and formation of irregular tumor vasculature are responsible for multidrug resistance. A combination of various undesirable factors associated with biological surroundings together with poor solubility and instability of many potential therapeutic small & large molecules within the biological systems and systemic toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents has necessitated the need for nano-preparations to optimize drug delivery. The physiology of solid tumors presents numerous challenges for successful therapy. However, it also offers unique opportunities for the use of nanotechnology. Nanoparticles, up to 400 nm in size, have shown great promise for carrying, protecting and delivering potential therapeutic molecules with diverse physiological properties. In this review, various factors responsible for the MDR and the use of nanotechnology to overcome the MDR, the use of spheroid culture as well as the current technique of producing micro tumor tissues in vitro are discussed in detail. PMID:23973912

  4. Regulation of MAPKs Signaling Contributes to the Growth Inhibition of 1,7-Dihydroxy-3,4-dimethoxyxanthone on Multidrug Resistance A549/Taxol Cells.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Jian; Jiang, Hui; Zhu, Yan-Hong; Wang, Ya-Qin; Zhang, Wen; Luan, Jia-Jie

    2016-01-01

    1,7-Dihydroxy-3,4-dimethoxyxanthone (XAN) is a bioactive compound isolated from Securidaca inappendiculata Hassk. and validated with antiproliferative activities on a panel of cancer cell lines. This study was designed to investigate its growth inhibitory effects on multidrug resistance (MDR) non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell line A549/Taxol and explore the possible linkage between modulation of MAPKs and the bioactivities. Its growth inhibitory potency on the cells was estimated by MTT assay, and flow cytometric analysis was employed to investigate its potential cell cycle arrest and proapoptosis effects. Expressions of hallmark proteins were assessed by Western-Blot method. The results showed A549/Taxol cells were sensitive to XAN. XAN inhibited the proliferation of A549/Taxol cells in the time and concentration dependent manners. It acted as a potent inducer of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the cells. Western-Blot investigation validated the proapoptosis and cell cycle arrest activities of XAN and the potential of MDR reversion. Upregulation of p38 by XAN, which accounted for the cell cycle arrest at G2 phase, and the downregulation of ERK associated with the proapoptosis activity were also revealed. Further analysis found p53 may be the central role mediated the bioactivities of MAPKs in A549/Taxol cells. Based on these evidences, a conclusion has been deduced that XAN could be a potential agent for MDR NSCLC therapy targeting specifically MAPKs. PMID:27403196

  5. Regulation of MAPKs Signaling Contributes to the Growth Inhibition of 1,7-Dihydroxy-3,4-dimethoxyxanthone on Multidrug Resistance A549/Taxol Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Jian; Jiang, Hui; Zhu, Yan-Hong; Wang, Ya-Qin; Zhang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    1,7-Dihydroxy-3,4-dimethoxyxanthone (XAN) is a bioactive compound isolated from Securidaca inappendiculata Hassk. and validated with antiproliferative activities on a panel of cancer cell lines. This study was designed to investigate its growth inhibitory effects on multidrug resistance (MDR) non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell line A549/Taxol and explore the possible linkage between modulation of MAPKs and the bioactivities. Its growth inhibitory potency on the cells was estimated by MTT assay, and flow cytometric analysis was employed to investigate its potential cell cycle arrest and proapoptosis effects. Expressions of hallmark proteins were assessed by Western-Blot method. The results showed A549/Taxol cells were sensitive to XAN. XAN inhibited the proliferation of A549/Taxol cells in the time and concentration dependent manners. It acted as a potent inducer of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the cells. Western-Blot investigation validated the proapoptosis and cell cycle arrest activities of XAN and the potential of MDR reversion. Upregulation of p38 by XAN, which accounted for the cell cycle arrest at G2 phase, and the downregulation of ERK associated with the proapoptosis activity were also revealed. Further analysis found p53 may be the central role mediated the bioactivities of MAPKs in A549/Taxol cells. Based on these evidences, a conclusion has been deduced that XAN could be a potential agent for MDR NSCLC therapy targeting specifically MAPKs. PMID:27403196

  6. Pyrazine, 2-ethylpyridine, and 3-ethylpyridine are cigarette smoke components that alter the growth of normal and malignant human lung cells, and play a role in multidrug resistance development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Poo, Wak-Kim; Lin, Yu-Ling

    2015-02-01

    Lung cancer is one of the few human diseases for which the primary etiological agent, cigarette smoke (CS), has been described; however, the precise role of individual cigarette smoke toxicant in tumor development and progression remains to be elusive. The purpose of this study was to assess in vitro the effects of previously identified cigarette smoke components, pyrazine, 2-ethylpyridine, and 3-ethylpyridine, on non-tumorigenic (MRC5) and adenocarcinomic (A549) human lung cell lines. Our data showed that the administration of three cigarette smoke components in combination perturbed the proliferation of both normal and adenocarcinomic cells. Study of malignant cells revealed that CS components were cytotoxic at high concentration (10(-6) M) and stimulatory in a dose-dependent manner at lower concentrations (10(-8) M to 10(-10) M). This adverse effect was enhanced when adenocarcinomic cells were maintained in hypoxia resembling intratumoral environment. Furthermore, exposure to pyrazine, 2-ethylpyridine, and 3-ethylpyridine induced oxidative stress in both normal and malignant cells. Finally, assessment of P-gp activity revealed that multidrug resistance was induced in CS component exposed adenocarcinomic lung cells and the induction was augmented in hypoxia. Taken together, pyrazine, 2-ethylpyridine, and 3-ethylpyridine adversely altered both normal and diseased lung cells in vitro and data collected from this study may help lung cancer patients to understand the importance of quitting smoking during lung cancer treatment.

  7. Reversal of multidrug resistance in MCF-7/Adr cells by codelivery of doxorubicin and BCL2 siRNA using a folic acid-conjugated polyethylenimine hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin nanocarrier

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Wei; Su, Hua; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Tan, Cai-Ping; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2015-01-01

    Systemic administration of chemotherapy for cancer often faces drug resistance, limiting its applications in cancer therapy. In this study, we developed a simple multifunctional nanocarrier based on polyethylenimine (PEI) to codeliver doxorubicin (DOX) and BCL2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) for overcoming multidrug resistance (MDR) and enhancing apoptosis in MCF-7/Adr cancer cells by combining chemotherapy and RNA interference (RNAi) therapy. The low-molecular-weight branch PEI was used to conjugate hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and folic acid (FA), forming the codelivery nanocarrier (FA-HP-β-CD-PEI) to encapsulate DOX with the cavity HP-β-CD and bind siRNA with the positive charge of PEI for tumor-targeting codelivering drugs. The drug-loaded nanocomplexes (FA-HP-β-CD-PEI/DOX/siRNA) showed uniform size distribution, high cellular uptake, and significant gene suppression of BCL2, displaying the potential of overcoming MDR for enhancing the effect of anticancer drugs. Furthermore, the nanocomplexes achieved significant cell apoptosis through a mechanism of downregulating the antiapoptotic protein BCL2, resulted in improving therapeutic efficacy of the coadministered DOX by tumor targeting and RNA interference. Our study indicated that combined RNAi therapy and chemotherapy using our functional codelivery nanocarrier could overcome MDR and enhance apoptosis in MDR cancer cells for a potential application in treating MDR cancers. PMID:25960653

  8. Interrogation of multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) expression in human pancreatic carcinoma cells: correlation of 99mTc-Sestamibi uptake with western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Harpstrite, Scott E; Gu, Hannah; Natarajan, Radhika; Sharma, Vijay

    2014-10-01

    Histopathological studies indicate that ∼63% of pancreatic tumors express multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and its polymorphic variants. However, Pgp expression detected at the mRNA or protein level does not always correlate with functional transport activity. Because Pgp transport activity is affected by specific mutations and the phosphorylation state of the protein, altered or less active forms of Pgp may also be detected by PCR or immunohistochemistry, which do not accurately reflect the status of tumor cell resistance. To interrogate the status of the functional expression of MDR1 Pgp in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, cellular transport studies using Tc-Sestamibi were performed and correlated with western blot analysis. Biochemical transport assays in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, human epidermal carcinoma drug-sensitive KB-3-1 cells, and human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells (negative controls), and human epidermal carcinoma drug-resistant KB-8-5 cells, human breast carcinoma stably transfected with Pgp MCF-7/MDR1Pgp cells, and liver carcinoma HepG2 cells (positive controls) were performed. Protein levels were determined using a monoclonal antibody C219. Tc-Sestamibi demonstrates accumulation in human pancreatic carcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Uptake profiles are not affected by treatment with LY335979, a Pgp inhibitor, and correlate with western blot analysis. These cellular transport studies indicate an absence of Pgp at a functional level in MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. Because major pancreatic tumors originate from the pancreatic duct and Tc-Sestamibi undergoes a dominant hepatobiliary mode of excretion, it would not be a sensitive probe for imaging pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Following interrogation of the functional status of Pgp in other pancreatic carcinoma cells, chemotherapeutic drugs that are also MDR1 substrates could offer alternative therapeutics for treating pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

  9. Vitamin E derivative-based multifunctional nanoemulsions for overcoming multidrug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Nannan; Gao, Yanan; Ji, Hongyu; Wu, Linhua; Qi, Xuejing; Liu, Xiaona; Tang, Jingling

    2016-08-01

    The multidrug resistance (MDR), including intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance, is a major problem in tumor chemotherapy. Here, we proposed a strategy for modulating intrinsic and/or acquired multidrug resistance by altering the levels of Bax and Bcl-2 expression and inhibiting the transport function of P-gp, increasing the intracellular concentration of its substrate anticancer drugs. Vitamin E derivative-based nanoemulsions containing paclitaxel (MNEs-PTX) were fabricated in this study, and in vitro anticancer efficacy of the nanoemulsion system was evaluated in the paclitaxel-resistant human ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780/Taxol. The MNEs-PTX exhibited a remarkably enhanced antiproliferation effect on A2780/Taxol cells than free paclitaxel (PTX) (p < 0.01). Compared with that in the Taxol group, MNEs-PTX further decreased mitochondrial potential. Vitamin E derivative-based multifunctional nanoemulsion (MNEs) obviously increased intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 (P-gp substrate). Overexpression of Bcl-2 is generally associated with tumor drug resistance, we found that MNEs could reduce Bcl-2 protein level and increase Bax protein level. Taken together, our findings suggest that anticancer drugs associated with MNEs could play a role in the development of MDR in cancers. PMID:26710274

  10. Wnt5A regulates ABCB1 expression in multidrug-resistant cancer cells through activation of the non-canonical PKA/β-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tsai-Hsien; Hsu, Sheng-Chi; Cheng, Ching-Yi; Choo, Kong-Bung; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lan, Ying-Wei; Huang, Tsung-Teng; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Chong, Kowit-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance in cancer cells arises from altered drug permeability of the cell. We previously reported activation of the Wnt pathway in ABCB1-overexpressed human uterus sarcoma drug-resistant MES-SA/Dx5 cells through active β-catenin and associated transactivation activities, and upregulation of Wnt-targeting genes. In this study, Wnt5A was found to be significantly upregulated in MES-SA/Dx5 and MCF7/ADR2 cells, suggesting an important role for the Wnt5A signaling pathway in cancer drug resistance. Higher cAMP response elements and Tcf/Lef transcription activities were shown in the drug-resistant cancer cells. However, expression of Wnt target genes and CRE activities was downregulated in Wnt5A shRNA stably-transfected MES-SA/Dx5 cells. Cell viability of the drug-resistant cancer cells was also reduced by doxorubicin treatment and Wnt5A shRNA transfection, or by Wnt5A depletion. The in vitro data were supported by immunohistochemical analysis of 24 paired breast cancer biopsies obtained pre- and post-chemotherapeutic treatment. Wnt5A, VEGF and/or ABCB1 were significantly overexpressed after treatment, consistent with clinical chemoresistance. Taken together, the Wnt5A signaling pathway was shown to contribute to regulating the drug-resistance protein ABCB1 and β-catenin-related genes in antagonizing the toxic effects of doxorubicin in the MDR cell lines and in clinical breast cancer samples. PMID:25401518

  11. Nanopreparations to overcome multidrug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Niravkumar R; Pattni, Bhushan S; Abouzeid, Abraham H; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2013-11-01

    Multidrug resistance is the most widely exploited phenomenon by which cancer eludes chemotherapy. Broad variety of factors, ranging from the cellular ones, such as over-expression of efflux transporters, defective apoptotic machineries, and altered molecular targets, to the physiological factors such as higher interstitial fluid pressure, low extracellular pH, and formation of irregular tumor vasculature are responsible for multidrug resistance. A combination of various undesirable factors associated with biological surroundings together with poor solubility and instability of many potential therapeutic small & large molecules within the biological systems and systemic toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents has necessitated the need for nano-preparations to optimize drug delivery. The physiology of solid tumors presents numerous challenges for successful therapy. However, it also offers unique opportunities for the use of nanotechnology. Nanoparticles, up to 400 nm in size, have shown great promise for carrying, protecting and delivering potential therapeutic molecules with diverse physiological properties. In this review, various factors responsible for the MDR and the use of nanotechnology to overcome the MDR, the use of spheroid culture as well as the current technique of producing microtumor tissues in vitro are discussed in detail. PMID:23973912

  12. Reversal of multidrug resistance in breast cancer MCF-7/ADR cells by h-R3-siMDR1-PAMAM complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Liu, Jing; Guo, Nana; Zhang, Xiaoning

    2016-09-10

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) among breast cancer cells is the paramount obstacle for the successful chemotherapy. In this study, anti-EGFR antibody h-R3 was designed to self-assembled h-R3-siRNA-PAMAM-complexes (HSPCs) via electrostatic interactions for siRNA delivery. The physicochemical characterization, cell uptake, MDR1 silencing efficiency, cell migration, cell growth and cell apoptosis were investigated. The HSPCs presented lower cytotoxicity, higher cellular uptake and enhanced endosomal escape ability. Also, HSPCs encapsulating siMDR1 knockdowned 99.4% MDR1 gene with up to ∼6 times of enhancement compared to naked siMDR1, increased the doxorubicin accumulation, down-regulated P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression and suppressed cellular migration in breast cancer MCF-7/ADR cells. Moreover, the combination of anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) and siMDR1 loaded HSPCs showed synergistic effect on overcoming MDR, which inhibited cell growth and induced cell apoptosis. This h-R3-mediated siMDR1 delivery system could be a promising vector for effective siRNA therapy of drug resistant breast cancer. PMID:27444552

  13. Electroporation adopting trains of biphasic pulses enhances in vitro and in vivo the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin on multidrug resistant colon adenocarcinoma cells (LoVo).

    PubMed

    Meschini, Stefania; Condello, Maria; Lista, Pasquale; Vincenzi, Bruno; Baldi, Alfonso; Citro, Gennaro; Arancia, Giuseppe; Spugnini, Enrico P

    2012-09-01

    Few articles in the literature have focused on electroporation as a strategy to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) of tumour cells and they are mostly limited to the improved efficacy of bleomycin. We tested the application of trains of biphasic pulses to cell suspensions and to murine xenografts as a strategy to increase the uptake of doxorubicin (DOX) and to enhance its cytotoxicity against chemoresistant cells. The human colon adenocarcinoma cell line LoVo DX, expressing MDR phenotype with high levels of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), has been used. The in vitro and in vivo studies gave the following results: (i) the application of the electric pulses to the cell suspension, immediately before DOX administration, induced a significant increase of drug retention; (ii) confocal microscopy observations showed a remarkable increase of intranuclear accumulation of DOX induced by electroporation; (iii) cell survival assay revealed a decrease of cell viability in the cultures treated with the combination of electroporation and doxorubicin; (iv) scanning electron microscopy observations revealed consistent morphological changes after the combined exposure to electroporation and doxorubicin; (v) in implanted mice the combined treatment induced an evident slowdown on the tumour growth when compared to treatment with DOX alone; (vi) histopathological analysis evidenced tumour destruction and its replacement by scar tissue in the tumours treated with the combination of doxorubicin and electroporation.

  14. A combination of curcumin with either gramicidin or ouabain selectively kills cells that express the multidrug resistance-linked ABCG2 transporter.

    PubMed

    Rao, Divya K; Liu, Haiyan; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Mayer, Michael

    2014-11-01

    This paper introduces a strategy to kill selectively multidrug-resistant cells that express the ABCG2 transporter (also called breast cancer resistance protein, or BCRP). The approach is based on specific stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by ABCG2 transporters with subtoxic doses of curcumin combined with stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by Na(+),K(+)-ATPase with subtoxic doses of gramicidin A or ouabain. After 72 h of incubation with the drug combinations, the resulting overconsumption of ATP by both pathways inhibits the efflux activity of ABCG2 transporters, leads to depletion of intracellular ATP levels below the viability threshold, and kills resistant cells selectively over cells that lack ABCG2 transporters. This strategy, which was also tested on a clinically relevant human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7/FLV1), exploits the overexpression of ABCG2 transporters and induces caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death selectively in resistant cells. This work thus introduces a novel strategy to exploit collateral sensitivity (CS) with a combination of two clinically used compounds that individually do not exert CS. Collectively, this work expands the current knowledge on ABCG2-mediated CS and provides a potential strategy for discovery of CS drugs against drug-resistant cancer cells.

  15. The accumulation and efflux of lead partly depend on ATP-dependent efflux pump-multidrug resistance protein 1 and glutathione in testis Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaoxin; Ye, Jingping; Yu, Jun; Chen, Li; Zhou, Langhuan; Wang, Hong; Li, Zhen; Wang, Chunhong

    2014-05-01

    Since lead accumulation is toxic to cells, its excretion is crucial for organisms to survive the toxicity. In this study, mouse testis sertoli (TM4) and Mrp1 lower-expression TM4-sh cells were used to explore the lead accumulation characteristics, and the role of ATP-dependent efflux pump-multidrug resistance protein 1 (Mrp1) in lead excretion. TM4 cells possess Mrp-like transport activity. The expression levels of mrp1 mRNA and Mrp1 increased after lead treatments at first and then decreased. The maximum difference of relative mRNA expression reached 10 times. In the presence of lead acetate, the amount of cumulative lead in TM4-sh was much higher than that in TM4. After the treatment with lead acetate at 10-40 μM for 12h or 24h, the differences were about 2-8 times. After with the switch to lead-free medium, the cellular lead content in TM4-sh remains higher than that in TM4 cells at 1,3, 6, and 9h time points (P<0.01). Energy inhibitor sodium azide, Mrp inhibitors MK571 and glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis inhibitor BSO could block lead efflux from TM4 cells significantly. These results indicate that lead excretion may be mediated by Mrp1 and GSH in TM4 cells. Mrp1 could be one of the important intervention points for lead detoxification.

  16. Regulation of Mucin 1 and multidrug resistance protein 1 by honokiol enhances the efficacy of doxorubicin-mediated growth suppression in mammary carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Thulasiraman, Padmamalini; Johnson, Andrea Butts

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the link between chemoresistance and cancer progression may identify future targeted therapy for breast cancer. One of the mechanisms by which chemoresistance is attained in cancer cells is mediated through the expression of multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs). Acquiring drug resistance has been correlated to the emergence of metastasis, accounting for the progression of the disease. One of the diagnostic markers of metastatic progression is the overexpression of a transmembrane protein called Mucin 1 (MUC1) which has been implicated in reduced survival rate. The objective of this study was to understand the relationship between MUC1 and MRP1 using natural phenolic compound isolated from Magnolia grandiflora, honokiol, in mammary carcinoma cells. We provide evidence that honokiol suppresses the expression level of MUC1 and MRP1 in mammary carcinoma cells. In a time-dependent manner, honokiol-mediated reduction of MUC1 is followed by a reduction of MRP1 expression in the breast cancer cells. Additionally, silencing MUC1 suppresses the expression level of MRP1 and enhances the efficacy of doxorubicin, an MRP1 substrate. Taken together, these findings suggest MUC1 regulates the expression of MRP1 and provides a direct link between cancer progression and chemoresistance in mammary carcinoma cells.

  17. Apoptotic effect of a novel kefir product, PFT, on multidrug-resistant myeloid leukemia cells via a hole-piercing mechanism

    PubMed Central

    GHONEUM, MAMDOOH; GIMZEWSKI, JAMES

    2014-01-01

    We examined the apoptotic effect of a novel Probiotics Fermentation Technology (PFT) kefir grain product; PFT is a natural mixture composed primarily of Lactobacillus kefiri P-IF, a specific strain of L. kefiri with unique growth characteristics. The aim of this study was to examine the apoptotic effect of PFT on human multidrug-resistant (MDR) myeloid leukemia (HL60/AR) cells in vitro and explore the mechanistic approach underlying its effect. HL60/AR cells were cultured with PFT (0.6–5.0 mg/ml) for 3 days. The apoptotic effect of PFT was assessed through examination of percent apoptosis, caspase 3 activation, Bcl-2 expression levels and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). PFT induced apoptosis in HL60/AR cells in a dose-dependent manner which was maximal at 67.5% for 5 mg/ml. Induction of apoptosis was associated with activation of caspase 3, decreased expression of Bcl-2 and decreased polarization of MMP. In addition, PFT showed a unique characteristic of piercing holes in HL60/AR cells, as indicated by AFM studies. This hole induction may be responsible for the apoptotic effect on cancer cells. These results suggest that PFT may act as a potential therapy for the treatment of MDR leukemia. PMID:24430613

  18. CIAPIN1 confers multidrug resistance through up-regulation of MDR-1 and Bcl-L in LoVo/Adr cells and is independent of p53.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Fei; Li, Xiao-Hua; Shi, Yong-Quan; Wu, Yu-Yun; Li, Ning; He, Qiang; Ji, Qing; Wang, Rong-Quan; Yang, Shi-Ming; Fang, Dian-Chun

    2011-04-01

    Recent investigations discovered that CIAPIN1 might be another drug resistance-associated molecule in cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of CIAPIN1-related multidrug resistance (MDR) remain elusive. In the present study, we investigated the role and possible mechanisms of CIAPIN1 in MDR of human colon carcinoma LoVo/Adr cells which express the wild-type p53 gene. By using small interference RNA and gene transfection techniques, we found that knockdown of CIAPIN1 expression re-sensitized LoVo/Adr cells to anti-cancer drugs and up-regulation of CIAPIN1 in sensitive LoVo cells resulted in a distinct MDR phenotype. We further revealed that CIAPIN1 conferred the MDR phenotype in LoVo/Adr cells through up-regulating expression of MDR-1 (P-gp) and Bcl-xL. Finally, by analyzing the effect of inactivation of wild-type p53 on CIAPIN1-induced up-regulation of P-gp and Bcl-xL, we determined that CIAPIN1 could exhibit its MDR-related function independently of the p53 signaling pathway. Overall, the results presented here further suggest that over-expression of CIAPIN1 is an important mechanism of drug resistance in human cancers, even if not the sole one.

  19. Regulation of Mucin 1 and multidrug resistance protein 1 by honokiol enhances the efficacy of doxorubicin-mediated growth suppression in mammary carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Thulasiraman, Padmamalini; Johnson, Andrea Butts

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the link between chemoresistance and cancer progression may identify future targeted therapy for breast cancer. One of the mechanisms by which chemoresistance is attained in cancer cells is mediated through the expression of multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs). Acquiring drug resistance has been correlated to the emergence of metastasis, accounting for the progression of the disease. One of the diagnostic markers of metastatic progression is the overexpression of a transmembrane protein called Mucin 1 (MUC1) which has been implicated in reduced survival rate. The objective of this study was to understand the relationship between MUC1 and MRP1 using natural phenolic compound isolated from Magnolia grandiflora, honokiol, in mammary carcinoma cells. We provide evidence that honokiol suppresses the expression level of MUC1 and MRP1 in mammary carcinoma cells. In a time-dependent manner, honokiol-mediated reduction of MUC1 is followed by a reduction of MRP1 expression in the breast cancer cells. Additionally, silencing MUC1 suppresses the expression level of MRP1 and enhances the efficacy of doxorubicin, an MRP1 substrate. Taken together, these findings suggest MUC1 regulates the expression of MRP1 and provides a direct link between cancer progression and chemoresistance in mammary carcinoma cells. PMID:27221150

  20. Phosphorylation of the multidrug resistance associated glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Mellado, W.; Horwitz, S.B.

    1987-11-03

    Drug-resistant cell lines derived from the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774.2 express the multidrug resistant phenotype which includes the overexpression of a membrane glycoprotein (130-140 kilodaltons). Phosphorylation of this resistant-specific glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) in intact cells and in cell-free membrane fractions has been studied. The phosphorylated glycoprotein can be immunoprecipitated by a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for the glycoprotein. Phosphorylation studies done with partially purified membrane fractions derived from colchicine-resistant cells indicated that (a) phosphorylation of the glycoprotein in 1 mM MgCl/sub 2/ was enhanced a minimum of 2-fold by 10 ..mu..M cAMP and (b) the purified catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) phosphorylated partially purified glycoprotein that was not phosphorylated by (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP alone, suggesting that autophosphorylation was not involved. These results indicate that the glycoprotein is a phosphoprotein and that at least one of the kinases responsible for its phosphorylation is a membrane-associated protein kinase A. The state of phosphorylation of the glycoprotein, which is a major component of the multidrug resistance phenotype, may be related to the role of the glycoprotein in maintaining drug resistance.

  1. Multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein dampens SR-BI cholesteryl ester uptake from high density lipoproteins in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Spolitu, Stefano; Uda, Sabrina; Deligia, Stefania; Frau, Alessandra; Collu, Maria; Angius, Fabrizio; Batetta, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells are characterised by a high content of cholesterol esters (CEs), while tumor-bearing patients show low levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs). The origin and significance of high CE levels in cancer cell biology has not been completely clarified. Recent evidence that lymphoblastic cells selectively acquire exogenous CE from HDL via the scavenger receptor SR-BI has drawn attention to the additional membrane proteins involved in this pathway. P-glycopotein-MDR1 (P-gp) is a product of the MDR1 gene and confers resistance to antitumor drugs. Its possible role in plasma membrane cholesterol trafficking and CE metabolism has been suggested. In the present study this aspect was investigated in a lymphoblastic cell line selected for MDR1 resistance. CEM were made resistant by stepwise exposure to low (LR) and high (HR) doses of vincristine (VCR). P-gp activity ((3)H-vinblastine), CE content, CE and triglycerides (TG) synthesis ((14)C-oleate), neutral lipids and Dil-HDL uptake (fluorescence), SR-BI, ABCA1 and P-gp protein expression (western blotting) were determined. To better evaluate the relationship between CE metabolism and P-gp activity, the ACAT inhibitor Sandoz-58035 and the P-gp inhibitors progesterone, cyclosporine and verapamil were used. CE content and synthesis were similar in the parental and resistant cells. However, in the latter population, SR-BI protein expression increased, whereas CE-HDL uptake decreased. These changes correlated with the degree of VCR-resistance. As well as reverting MDR1-resistance, the inhibitors of P-gp activity induced the CE-HDL/SR-BI pathway by reactivating membrane cholesterol trafficking. Indeed, CE-HDL uptake, SRBI expression and CE content increased, whereas there was a decrease in cholesterol esterification. These results demonstrated that P-gp overexpression impairs anticancer drug uptake as well as the SR-BI mediated selective CE-HDL uptake. This suggests that these membrane proteins act in an opposite

  2. Contribution of aquaporin 9 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 to differential sensitivity to arsenite between primary cultured chorion and amnion cells prepared from human fetal membranes.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Yuta; Yuan, Bo; Kaise, Toshikazu; Takeichi, Makoto; Tanaka, Sachiko; Hirano, Toshihiko; Kroetz, Deanna L; Toyoda, Hiroo

    2011-12-01

    Arsenic trioxide (arsenite, As(III)) has shown a remarkable clinical efficacy, whereas its side effects are still a serious concern. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effects of As(III) on human-derived normal cells for revealing the mechanisms underlying these side effects. We examined the effects of As(III) on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion (A) cells prepared from human fetal membranes. A significant dose-dependent As(III)-mediated cytotoxicity was observed in the C-cells accompanied with an increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Higher concentrations of As(III) were required for the A-cells to show cytotoxicity and LDH release, suggesting that the C-cells were more sensitive to As(III) than the A-cells. The expression levels of aquaporin 9 (AQP9) were approximately 2 times higher in the C-cells than those in the A-cells. Both intracellular arsenic accumulation and its cytotoxicity in the C-cells were significantly abrogated by sorbitol, a competitive AQP9 inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. The protein expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 were downregulated by As(III) in the C-cells, but not in the A-cells. No significant differences in the expression levels of MRP1 were observed between C- and A-cells. The protein expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was hardly detected in both cells, although a detectable amount of its mRNA was observed. Cyclosporine A, a broad-spectrum inhibitor for ABC transporters, and MK571, a MRP inhibitor, but not PGP-4008, a P-gp specific inhibitor, potently sensitized both cells to As(III)-mediated cytotoxicity. These results suggest that AQP9 and MRP2 are involved in controlling arsenic accumulation in these normal cells, which then contribute to differential sensitivity to As(III) cytotoxicity between these cells.

  3. Green Tea Catechin-Based Complex Micelles Combined with Doxorubicin to Overcome Cardiotoxicity and Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tangjian; Liu, Jinjian; Ren, Jie; Huang, Fan; Ou, Hanlin; Ding, Yuxun; Zhang, Yumin; Ma, Rujiang; An, Yingli; Liu, Jianfeng; Shi, Linqi

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy for cancer treatment has been demonstrated to cause some side effects on healthy tissues and multidrug resistance of the tumor cells, which greatly limits therapeutic efficacy. To address these limitations and achieve better therapeutic efficacy, combination therapy based on nanoparticle platforms provides a promising approach through delivering different agents simultaneously to the same destination with synergistic effect. In this study, a novel green tea catechin-based polyion complex (PIC) micelle loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) and (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) was constructed through electrostatic interaction and phenylboronic acid-catechol interaction between poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lysine-co-lysine-phenylboronic acid) (PEG-PLys/PBA) and EGCG. DOX was co-loaded in the PIC micelles through π-π stacking interaction with EGCG. The phenylboronic acid-catechol interaction endowed the PIC micelles with high stability under physiological condition. Moreover, acid cleavability of phenylboronic acid-catechol interaction in the micelle core has significant benefits for delivering EGCG and DOX to same destination with synergistic effects. In addition, benefiting from the oxygen free radicals scavenging activity of EGCG, combination therapy with EGCG and DOX in the micelle core could protect the cardiomyocytes from DOX-mediated cardiotoxicity according to the histopathologic analysis of hearts. Attributed to modulation of EGCG on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity, this kind of PIC micelles could effectively reverse multidrug resistance of cancer cells. These results suggested that EGCG based PIC micelles could effectively overcome DOX induced cardiotoxicity and multidrug resistance. PMID:27375779

  4. Green Tea Catechin-Based Complex Micelles Combined with Doxorubicin to Overcome Cardiotoxicity and Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tangjian; Liu, Jinjian; Ren, Jie; Huang, Fan; Ou, Hanlin; Ding, Yuxun; Zhang, Yumin; Ma, Rujiang; An, Yingli; Liu, Jianfeng; Shi, Linqi

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy for cancer treatment has been demonstrated to cause some side effects on healthy tissues and multidrug resistance of the tumor cells, which greatly limits therapeutic efficacy. To address these limitations and achieve better therapeutic efficacy, combination therapy based on nanoparticle platforms provides a promising approach through delivering different agents simultaneously to the same destination with synergistic effect. In this study, a novel green tea catechin-based polyion complex (PIC) micelle loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) and (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) was constructed through electrostatic interaction and phenylboronic acid-catechol interaction between poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lysine-co-lysine-phenylboronic acid) (PEG-PLys/PBA) and EGCG. DOX was co-loaded in the PIC micelles through π-π stacking interaction with EGCG. The phenylboronic acid-catechol interaction endowed the PIC micelles with high stability under physiological condition. Moreover, acid cleavability of phenylboronic acid-catechol interaction in the micelle core has significant benefits for delivering EGCG and DOX to same destination with synergistic effects. In addition, benefiting from the oxygen free radicals scavenging activity of EGCG, combination therapy with EGCG and DOX in the micelle core could protect the cardiomyocytes from DOX-mediated cardiotoxicity according to the histopathologic analysis of hearts. Attributed to modulation of EGCG on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity, this kind of PIC micelles could effectively reverse multidrug resistance of cancer cells. These results suggested that EGCG based PIC micelles could effectively overcome DOX induced cardiotoxicity and multidrug resistance. PMID:27375779

  5. Butorphanol, a synthetic opioid, sensitizes ABCB1-mediated multidrug resistance via inhibition of the efflux function of ABCB1 in leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Zhang, Tao; Shan, Zhi-Ming; Qi, Min-Yue; Xiu, Huan-Huan; Liu, Lei; Wu, Shi-Zhe; Jia, Zhen; Xu, Kang-Qing

    2015-08-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a formidable challenge in the use of chemotherapy and represents a powerful obstacle to the treatment of leukemia. ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1) is a recognized factor which causes MDR and is closely related to poor outcome and relapse in leukemia. Ongoing research concerning the strategy for inhibiting the abnormally high activity of the ABCB1 transporter is critically needed. In the present study, we sought to elucidate the interaction between ABCB1 transporter and butorphanol. Our results showed that butorphanol significantly antagonized ABCB1-mediated drug efflux and increased the intracellular drug concentration by inhibiting the transport activity of ABCB1 in leukemia cells. Mechanistic investigations demonstrated that butorphanol did not alter the protein expression or localization of ABCB1 in HL60/VCR and K562/ADR cells. Furthermore, homology modeling indicated that butorphanol could fit into the large drug-binding cavity of ABCB1 and form a binding conformation. In conclusion, butorphanol reversed the ABCB1-mediated MDR in leukemia cells by directly suppressing the efflux activity of ABCB1. PMID:26062728

  6. NOTE: Dielectrophoretic analysis of changes in cytoplasmic ion levels due to ion channel blocker action reveals underlying differences between drug-sensitive and multidrug-resistant leukaemic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, L.; Shelmerdine, H.; Hughes, M. P.; Coley, H. M.; Hübner, Y.; Labeed, F. H.

    2008-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP)—the motion of particles in non-uniform AC fields—has been used in the investigation of cell electrophysiology. The technique offers the advantages of rapid determination of the conductance and capacitance of membrane and cytoplasm. However, it is unable to directly determine the ionic strengths of individual cytoplasmic ions, which has potentially limited its application in assessing cell composition. In this paper, we demonstrate how dielectrophoresis can be used to investigate the cytoplasmic ion composition by using ion channel blocking agents. By blocking key ion transporters individually, it is possible to determine their overall contribution to the free ions in the cytoplasm. We use this technique to evaluate the relative contributions of chloride, potassium and calcium ions to the cytoplasmic conductivities of drug sensitive and resistant myelogenous leukaemic (K562) cells in order to determine the contributions of individual ion channel activity in mediating multi-drug resistance in cancer. Results indicate that whilst K+ and Ca2+ levels were extremely similar between sensitive and resistant lines, levels of Cl- were elevated by three times to that in the resistant line, implying increased chloride channel activity. This result is in line with current theories of MDR, and validates the use of ion channel blockers with DEP to investigate ion channel function.

  7. Targeting Multidrug-resistant Staphylococci with an anti-rpoA Peptide Nucleic Acid Conjugated to the HIV-1 TAT Cell Penetrating Peptide.

    PubMed

    Abushahba, Mostafa Fn; Mohammad, Haroon; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections present a serious challenge to healthcare practitioners due to the emergence of resistance to numerous conventional antibiotics. Due to their unique mode of action, peptide nucleic acids are novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics to tackle the issue of bacterial multidrug resistance. In this study, we designed a peptide nucleic acid covalently conjugated to the HIV-TAT cell penetrating peptide (GRKKKRRQRRRYK) in order to target the RNA polymerase α subunit gene (rpoA) required for bacterial genes transcription. We explored the antimicrobial activity of the anti-rpoA construct (peptide nucleic acid-TAT) against methicillin-resistant S. aureus, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus, vancomycin-resistant S. aureus, linezolid-resistant S. aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis in pure culture, infected mammalian cell culture, and in an in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. The anti-rpoA construct led to a concentration-dependent inhibition of bacterial growth (at micromolar concentrations) in vitro and in both infected cell culture and in vivo in C. elegans. Moreover, rpoA gene silencing resulted in suppression of its message as well as reduced expression of two important methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin). This study confirms that rpoA gene is a potential target for development of novel antisense therapeutics to treat infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:27434684

  8. Mitochondria of a human multidrug-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma cell line constitutively express inducible nitric oxide synthase in the inner membrane.

    PubMed

    Fantappiè, Ornella; Sassoli, Chiara; Tani, Alessia; Nosi, Daniele; Marchetti, Serena; Formigli, Lucia; Mazzanti, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in pathways of stress conditions. They can be transported from one cell to another, bringing their features to the cell where they are transported. It has been shown in cancer cells overexpressing multidrug resistance (MDR) that mitochondria express proteins involved in drug resistance such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistant protein and multiple resistance protein-1. The MDR phenotype is associated with the constitutive expression of COX-2 and iNOS, whereas celecoxib, a specific inhibitor of COX-2 activity, reverses drug resistance of MDR cells by releasing cytochrome c from mitochondria. It is possible that COX-2 and iNOS are also expressed in mitochondria of cancer cells overexpressing the MDR phenotype. This study involved experiments using the human HCC PLC/PRF/5 cell line with and without MDR phenotype and melanoma A375 cells that do not express the MDR1 phenotype but they do iNOS. Western blot analysis, confocal immunofluorescence and immune electron microscopy showed that iNOS is localized in mitochondria of MDR1-positive cells, whereas COX-2 is not. Low and moderate concentrations of celecoxib modulate the expression of iNOS and P-gp in mitochondria of MDR cancer cells independently from inhibition of COX-2 activity. However, A375 cells that express iNOS also in mitochondria, were not MDR1 positive. In conclusion, iNOS can be localized in mitochondria of HCC cells overexpressing MDR1 phenotype, however this phenomenon appears independent from the MDR1 phenotype occurrence. The presence of iNOS in mitochondria of human HCC cells phenotype probably concurs to a more aggressive behaviour of cancer cells.

  9. Caveolin-1 regulates cell apoptosis and invasion ability in paclitaxel-induced multidrug-resistant A549 lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fei; Zhang, Long; Zhou, Yongxin; Yi, Xianghua

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect and potential mechanism of caveolin-1 (Cav1) knockdown in paclitaxel-resistant lung cancer A549/Taxol cells. The human paclitaxel-resistant lung cancer cell line A549/Taxol was transfected with a Cav1 shRNA lentiviral vector. Interference efficiency for Cav1 was detected by real-time PCR and Western blotting. A MTT assay was used to determine cell proliferation, and flow cytometry was used to detect the cell cycle stage and apoptosis. Cell migration and invasion capability were detected by a transwell assay. Protein levels of related signaling molecules were detected by Western blotting. We successfully constructed a stable A549/Taxol cell line expressing low levels of Cav1. Cav1 knockdown significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced G0/G1 arrest and cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. In addition, these effects correlated significantly with a reduction in cyclin D1 expression and activation of the Bcl-2/Bax-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Furthermore, knockdown of Cav1 inhibited cell migration and invasion, and this may be related to the inhibition of AKT and the subsequent decreased protein expression of MMP2, MMP7 and MMP9. PMID:26464635

  10. The HIF-2α-MALAT1-miR-216b axis regulates multi-drug resistance of hepatocellular carcinoma cells via modulating autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Cao, Weibin; Zang, Quanling; Li, Guixin; Guo, Xiangfei; Fan, Jianghe

    2016-09-23

    In this study, we firstly investigated the association among lncRNA MALAT1, HIF-1α and HIF-2α in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Then, we investigated the regulative effect of MALAT1 on multi-drug resistance (MDR) in HCC cells and the underlying mechanism. The results showed that MALAT1 was over two times higher in BEL-7402/5-FU cells than in BEL-7402 cells. It was HIF-2α, but not HIF-1α induced MALAT1 upregulation in HCC cells. Dual luciferase assay demonstrated that there were at least two binding sites of miR-26b in MALAT1. Therefore, we infer that there is a HIF-2α-MALAT1-miR-216b axis in HCC cells. Cell viability assay showed that both MALAT1 siRNA and miR-216b mimics reduced IC50 of 5-FU, ADR and MMC in BEL-7402/5-FU cells. MALAT1 siRNA and miR-216b mimics showed similar effect as 3-MA on reducing LC3-II levels, inhibiting p62 degradation and suppressing GFP-LC3 puncta formation in BEL-7402/5-FU cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that 3-MA treatment, MALAT1 siRNA and miR-216b mimics all promoted 5-FU induced apoptosis in BEL-7402/5-FU cells. Therefore, this study firstly revealed that there is a HIF-2α-MALAT1-miR-216b axis regulating MDR of HCC cells via modulating autophagy. PMID:27524242

  11. Synthesis of new steroidal inhibitors of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance and biological evaluation on K562/R7 erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    de Ravel, Marc Rolland; Alameh, Ghina; Melikian, Maxime; Mahiout, Zahia; Emptoz-Bonneton, Agnès; Matera, Eva-Laure; Lomberget, Thierry; Barret, Roland; Rocheblave, Luc; Walchshofer, Nadia; Beltran, Sonia; El Jawad, Lucienne; Mappus, Elisabeth; Grenot, Catherine; Pugeat, Michel; Dumontet, Charles; Le Borgne, Marc; Cuilleron, Claude Yves

    2015-02-26

    A simple route for improving the potency of progesterone as a modulator of P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance was established by esterification or etherification of hydroxylated 5α/β-pregnane-3,20-dione or 5β-cholan-3-one precursors. X-ray crystallography of representative 7α-, 11α-, and 17α-(2'R/S)-O-tetrahydropyranyl ether diastereoisomers revealed different combinations of axial-equatorial configurations of the anomeric oxygen. Substantial stimulation of accumulation and chemosensitization was observed on K562/R7 erythroleukemia cells resistant to doxorubicin, especially using 7α,11α-O-disubstituted derivatives of 5α/β-pregnane-3,20-dione, among which the 5β-H-7α-benzoyloxy-11α-(2'R)-O-tetrahydropyranyl ether 22a revealed promising properties (accumulation index 2.9, IC50 0.5 μM versus 1.2 and 10.6 μM for progesterone), slightly overcoming those of verapamil and cyclosporin A. Several 7α,12α-O-disubstituted derivatives of 5β-cholan-3-one proved even more active, especially the 7α-O-methoxymethyl-12α-benzoate 56 (accumulation index 3.8, IC50 0.2 μM). The panel of modulating effects from different O-substitutions at a same position suggests a structural influence of the substituent completing a simple protection against stimulating effects of hydroxyl groups on P-gp-mediated transport.

  12. β-casein nanovehicles for oral delivery of chemotherapeutic drug combinations overcoming P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Zeev, Maya; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; Livney, Yoav D.

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a primary obstacle to curative cancer therapy. We have previously demonstrated that β-casein (β-CN) micelles (β-CM) can serve as nanovehicles for oral delivery and target-activated release of hydrophobic drugs in the stomach. Herein we introduce a novel nanosystem based on β-CM, to orally deliver a synergistic combination of a chemotherapeutic drug (Paclitaxel) and a P-glycoprotein-specific transport inhibitor (Tariquidar) individually encapsulated within β-CM, for overcoming MDR in gastric cancer. Light microscopy, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential analyses revealed solubilization of these drugs by β-CN, suppressing drug crystallization. Spectrophotometry demonstrated high loading capacity and good encapsulation efficiency, whereas spectrofluorometry revealed high affinity of these drugs to β-CN. In vitro cytotoxicity assays exhibited remarkable synergistic efficacy against human MDR gastric carcinoma cells with P-glycoprotein overexpression. Oral delivery of β-CN - based nanovehicles carrying synergistic drug combinations to the stomach constitutes a novel efficacious therapeutic system that may overcome MDR in gastric cancer. PMID:26989076

  13. 3D-QSAR AND CONTOUR MAP ANALYSIS OF TARIQUIDAR ANALOGUES AS MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE PROTEIN-1 (MRP1) INHIBITORS

    PubMed Central

    Kakarla, Prathusha; Inupakutika, Madhuri; Devireddy, Amith R.; Gunda, Shravan Kumar; Willmon, Thomas Mark; Ranjana, KC; Shrestha, Ugina; Ranaweera, Indrika; Hernandez, Alberto J.; Barr, Sharla; Varela, Manuel F.

    2016-01-01

    One of the major obstacles to the successful chemotherapy towards several cancers is multidrug resistance of human cancer cells to anti-cancer drugs. An important contributor to multidrug resistance is the human multidrug resistance protein-1 transporter (MRP1), which is an efflux pump of the ABC (ATP binding cassette) superfamily. Thus, highly efficacious, third generation MRP1 inhibitors, like tariquidar analogues, are promising inhibitors of multidrug resistance and are under clinical trials. To maximize the efficacy of MRP1 inhibitors and to reduce systemic toxicity, it is important to limit the exposure of MRP1 inhibitors and anticancer drugs to normal tissues and to increase their co-localization with tumor cells. Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) associated with 3D-Quantitiative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies were performed on a series of tariquidar analogues, as selective MDR modulators. Best predictability was obtained with CoMFA model r2(non-cross-validated square of correlation coefficient) = 0.968, F value = 151.768 with five components, standard error of estimate = 0.107 while the CoMSIA yielded r2 = 0.982, F value = 60.628 with six components, and standard error of estimate = 0.154. These results indicate that steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic (lipophilic), and hydrogen bond donor substituents play significant roles in multidrug resistance modulation of tariquidar analogues upon MRP1. The tariquidar analogue and MRP1 binding and stability data generated from CoMFA and CoMSIA based 3D–contour maps may further aid in study and design of tariquidar analogues as novel, potent and selective MDR modulator drug candidates. PMID:26913287

  14. Chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum is not reversed by BIBW-22, a compound reversing the multidrug resistance phenotype in mammalian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dieckmann-Schuppert, A; Bamberger, U; Schwarz, R T

    1993-10-19

    The pteridine derivative BIBW-22 (4-[N-(2-hydroxy-2-methyl-propyl)-ethanolamino]-2,7-bis(cis-2,6-di methyl-morpholino)-6-phenylpteridine), which had been developed for the treatment of multidrug-resistant cancer and binds to P-glycoprotein, was tested against chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains in culture. Based on the result that BIBW-22 enhanced rather than lowered chloroquine resistance in vitro, it is concluded that chloroquine resistance in malaria parasites may not be mechanistically linked to the multidrug-resistant phenotype of chloroquine resistant P. falciparum. PMID:8240391

  15. Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 4 (MRP4/ABCC4) Controls Efflux Transport of Hesperetin Sulfates in Sulfotransferase 1A3-Overexpressing Human Embryonic Kidney 293 Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua; Wang, Xiao; Zhou, Xiaotong; Lu, Danyi; Ma, Zhiguo; Wu, Baojian

    2015-10-01

    Sulfonation is an important metabolic pathway for hesperetin. However, the mechanisms for the cellular disposition of hesperetin and its sulfate metabolites are not fully established. In this study, disposition of hesperetin via the sulfonation pathway was investigated using human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells overexpressing sulfotransferase 1A3. Two monosulfates, hesperetin-3'-O-sulfate (H-3'-S) and hesperetin-7-O-sulfate (H-7-S), were rapidly generated and excreted into the extracellular compartment upon incubation of the cells with hesperetin. Regiospecific sulfonation of hesperetin by the cell lysate followed the substrate inhibition kinetics (Vmax = 0.66 nmol/min per mg, Km = 12.9 μM, and Ksi= 58.1 μM for H-3'-S; Vmax = 0.29 nmol/min per mg, Km = 14.8 μM, and Ksi= 49.1 μM for H-7-S). The pan-multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) inhibitor MK-571 at 20 μM essentially abolished cellular excretion of both H-3'-S and H-7-S (the excretion activities were only 6% of the control), whereas the breast cancer resistance protein-selective inhibitor Ko143 had no effects on sulfate excretion. In addition, knockdown of MRP4 led to a substantial reduction (>47.1%; P < 0.01) in sulfate excretion. Further, H-3'-S and H-7-S were good substrates for transport by MRP4 according to the vesicular transport assay. Moreover, sulfonation of hesperetin and excretion of its metabolites were well characterized by a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model that integrated drug uptake and sulfonation with MRP4-mediated sulfate excretion. In conclusion, the exporter MRP4 controlled efflux transport of hesperetin sulfates in HEK293 cells. Due to significant expression in various organs/tissues (including the liver and kidney), MRP4 should be a determining factor for the elimination and body distribution of hesperetin sulfates.

  16. Contribution of aquaporin 9 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 to differential sensitivity to arsenite between primary cultured chorion and amnion cells prepared from human fetal membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshino, Yuta; Yuan, Bo; Kaise, Toshikazu; Takeichi, Makoto; Tanaka, Sachiko; Hirano, Toshihiko; Kroetz, Deanna L.; Toyoda, Hiroo

    2011-12-15

    Arsenic trioxide (arsenite, As{sup III}) has shown a remarkable clinical efficacy, whereas its side effects are still a serious concern. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effects of As{sup III} on human-derived normal cells for revealing the mechanisms underlying these side effects. We examined the effects of As{sup III} on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion (A) cells prepared from human fetal membranes. A significant dose-dependent As{sup III}-mediated cytotoxicity was observed in the C-cells accompanied with an increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Higher concentrations of As{sup III} were required for the A-cells to show cytotoxicity and LDH release, suggesting that the C-cells were more sensitive to As{sup III} than the A-cells. The expression levels of aquaporin 9 (AQP9) were approximately 2 times higher in the C-cells than those in the A-cells. Both intracellular arsenic accumulation and its cytotoxicity in the C-cells were significantly abrogated by sorbitol, a competitive AQP9 inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. The protein expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 were downregulated by As{sup III} in the C-cells, but not in the A-cells. No significant differences in the expression levels of MRP1 were observed between C- and A-cells. The protein expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was hardly detected in both cells, although a detectable amount of its mRNA was observed. Cyclosporine A, a broad-spectrum inhibitor for ABC transporters, and MK571, a MRP inhibitor, but not PGP-4008, a P-gp specific inhibitor, potently sensitized both cells to As{sup III}-mediated cytotoxicity. These results suggest that AQP9 and MRP2 are involved in controlling arsenic accumulation in these normal cells, which then contribute to differential sensitivity to As{sup III} cytotoxicity between these cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examination of effect of As{sup III} on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion

  17. ABC transporters as multidrug resistance mechanisms and the development of chemosensitizers for their reversal

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Cheol-Hee

    2005-01-01

    One of the major problems related with anticancer chemotherapy is resistance against anticancer drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a family of transporter proteins that are responsible for drug resistance and a low bioavailability of drugs by pumping a variety of drugs out cells at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. One strategy for reversal of the resistance of tumor cells expressing ABC transporters is combined use of anticancer drugs with chemosensitizers. In this review, the physiological functions and structures of ABC transporters, and the development of chemosensitizers are described focusing on well-known proteins including P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance associated protein, and breast cancer resistance protein. PMID:16202168

  18. Intracellular pH and the Control of Multidrug Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford; Roy, Deborshi; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-02-01

    Many anticancer drugs are classified as either weak bases or molecules whose binding to cellular structures is pH dependent. Accumulation of these drugs within tumor cells should be affected by transmembrane pH gradients. Indeed, development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells has been correlated with an alkaline shift of cytosolic pH. To examine the role of pH in drug partitioning, the distribution of two drugs, doxorubicin and daunomycin, was monitored in fibroblasts and myeloma cells. In both cell types the drugs rapidly accumulated within the cells. The highest concentrations were measured in the most acidic compartments-e.g., lysosomes. Modifying the cellular pH in drug-sensitive cells to mimic reported shifts in MDR caused an immediate change in the cellular drug concentration. Drug accumulation was enhanced by acidic shifts and reversed by alkaline shifts. All of these effects were rapid and reversible. These results demonstrate that the alkaline shift observed in MDR is sufficient to prevent the accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs independent of active drug efflux.

  19. Effect of multiple cysteine substitutions on the functionality of human multidrug resistance protein 1 expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells: identification of residues essential for function.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lei; Tam, Shui-Pang; Deeley, Roger G

    2012-07-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) is a broad-specificity membrane transporter belonging to the C branch of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. MRP1 confers resistance to various chemotherapeutic drugs and transports a wide range of conjugated organic anions. Several ABCC proteins, including MRP1, are unusual among ABC transporters in having a third membrane-spanning domain (MSD), MSD0, at their N termini. MRP1 lacking this additional MSD (ΔMRP1) is able to traffic to the plasma membrane of mammalian cells and to transport a number of well characterized substrates. A cysteineless (cysless) ΔMRP1 has been expressed in yeast and reported to be functional. However, we found that trafficking of such a construct in human cells was severely compromised, and, even when expressed in insect Sf21 cells, the protein had extremely low transport activity. Therefore, we have systematically examined the effects of substituting cysteines in the four domains of ΔMRP1, initially with alanine. These studies allowed us to identify five cysteines that cannot be replaced with alanine without inactivating the protein. Substitution of two of these residues with alternative amino acids has allowed us to produce an almost cysless form of ΔMRP1 that traffics to the plasma membrane and transports leukotriene C(4), 17β-estradiol 17-β-D-glucuronide, and estrone-3-sulfate with kinetic characteristics similar to those of the wild-type protein. The distribution of the remaining Cys residues is such that the protein will provide a useful template for a variety of cysteine based mutagenesis studies.

  20. Deficient activation of CD95 (APO-1/ Fas)-mediated apoptosis: a potential factor of multidrug resistance in human renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramp, U; Dejosez, M; Mahotka, C; Czarnotta, B; Kalinski, T; Wenzel, M; Lorenz, I; Müller, M; Krammer, P; Gabbert, H E; Gerharz, C D

    2000-01-01

    factor for the multidrug resistance phenotype of human RCCs. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10839301

  1. Factors influencing the transfection efficiency and cellular uptake mechanisms of Pluronic P123-modified polypropyleneimine/pDNA polyplexes in multidrug resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jijin; Hao, Junguo; Fang, Xiaoling; Sha, Xianyi

    2016-04-01

    Generally, the major obstacles for efficient gene delivery are cellular internalization and endosomal escape of nucleic acid such as plasmid DNA (pDNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA). We previously developed Pluronic P123 modified polypropyleneimine (PPI)/pDNA (P123-PPI/pDNA) polyplexes as a gene delivery system. The results showed that P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes revealed higher transfection efficiency than PPI/pDNA polyplexes in multidrug resistant breast cancer cells. As a continued effort, the present investigation on the factors influencing the transfection efficiency, cellular uptake mechanisms, and intracellular fate of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes is reported. The presence of P123 was the main factor influencing the transfection efficiency of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes in MCF-7/ADR cells, but other parameters, such as N/P ratio, FBS concentration, incubation time and temperature were important as well. The endocytic inhibitors against clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), caveolae-mediated endocytosis (CvME), and macropinocytosis were involved in the internalization to investigate their effects on the cellular uptake and transfection efficiency of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes in vitro. The data showed that the internalization of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes was obtained from both CME and CvME. Colocalization experiments with TRITC-transferrin (CME indicator), Alexa Fluor 555-CTB (CvME indicator), monoclonal anti-α-tubulin (microtubule indicator), and LysoTracker Green (Endosome/lysosome indicator) were carried out to confirm the internalization routes. The results showed that both CME and CvME played vital roles in the effective transfection of P123-PPI/pDNA polyplexes. Endosome/lysosome system and skeleton, including actin filament and microtubule, were necessary for the transportation after internalization. PMID:26741268

  2. Nonspecifically enhanced therapeutic effects of vincristine on multidrug-resistant cancers when coencapsulated with quinine in liposomes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuzhen; Qiu, Liyan

    2015-01-01

    The use of vincristine (VCR) to treat cancer has been limited by its dose-dependent toxicity and development of drug resistance after repeated administrations. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which quinine hydrochloride (QN) acts as a sensitizer for VCR. Our experiments used three kinds of multidrug-resistant cancer cells and demonstrated that QN worked by inducing intracellular depletion of adenosine triphosphate, increasing adenosine triphosphatase activity, and decreasing P-glycoprotein expression. Based on these results, we designed and prepared a VCR and QN codelivery liposome (VQL) and investigated the effect of coencapsulated QN on the in vitro cytotoxicity of VCR in cells and three-dimensional multicellular tumor spheroids. The antitumor effects of the formulation were also evaluated in multidrug-resistant tumor-bearing mice. The results of this in vivo study indicated that VQL could reverse VCR resistance. In addition, it reduced tumor volume 5.4-fold when compared with other test groups. The data suggest that VQL could be a promising nanoscaled therapeutic agent to overcome multidrug resistance, and may have important clinical implications for the treatment of cancer.

  3. Nonspecifically enhanced therapeutic effects of vincristine on multidrug-resistant cancers when coencapsulated with quinine in liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuzhen; Qiu, Liyan

    2015-01-01

    The use of vincristine (VCR) to treat cancer has been limited by its dose-dependent toxicity and development of drug resistance after repeated administrations. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which quinine hydrochloride (QN) acts as a sensitizer for VCR. Our experiments used three kinds of multidrug-resistant cancer cells and demonstrated that QN worked by inducing intracellular depletion of adenosine triphosphate, increasing adenosine triphosphatase activity, and decreasing P-glycoprotein expression. Based on these results, we designed and prepared a VCR and QN codelivery liposome (VQL) and investigated the effect of coencapsulated QN on the in vitro cytotoxicity of VCR in cells and three-dimensional multicellular tumor spheroids. The antitumor effects of the formulation were also evaluated in multidrug-resistant tumor-bearing mice. The results of this in vivo study indicated that VQL could reverse VCR resistance. In addition, it reduced tumor volume 5.4-fold when compared with other test groups. The data suggest that VQL could be a promising nanoscaled therapeutic agent to overcome multidrug resistance, and may have important clinical implications for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26170660

  4. Sirolimus induces apoptosis and reverses multidrug resistance in human osteosarcoma cells in vitro via increasing microRNA-34b expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Zhao, Rui-hua; Tseng, Kuo-Fu; Li, Kun-peng; Lu, Zhi-gang; Liu, Yuan; Han, Kun; Gan, Zhi-hua; Lin, Shu-chen; Hu, Hai-yan; Min, Da-liu

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Multi-drug resistance poses a critical bottleneck in chemotherapy. Given the up-regulation of mTOR pathway in many chemoresistant cancers, we examined whether sirolimus (rapamycin), a first generation mTOR inhibitor, might induce human osteosarcoma (OS) cell apoptosis and increase the sensitivity of OS cells to anticancer drugs in vitro. Methods: Human OS cell line MG63/ADM was treated with sirolimus alone or in combination with doxorubicin (ADM), gemcitabine (GEM) or methotrexate (MTX). Cell proliferation and apoptosis were detected using CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. MiRNAs in the cells were analyzed with miRNA microarray. The targets of miR-34b were determined based on TargetScan analysis and luciferase reporter assays. The expression of relevant mRNA and proteins was measured using qRT-PCR and Western blotting. MiR-34, PAK1 and ABCB1 levels in 40 tissue samples of OS patients were analyzed using qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization assays. Results: Sirolimus (1–100 nmol/L) dose-dependently suppressed the cell proliferation (IC50=23.97 nmol/L) and induced apoptosis. Sirolimus (10 nmol/L) significantly sensitized the cells to anticancer drugs, leading to decreased IC50 values of ADM, GEM and MTX (from 25.48, 621.41 and 21.72 μmol/L to 4.93, 73.92 and 6.77 μmol/L, respectively). Treatment of with sirolimus increased miR-34b levels by a factor of 7.5 in the cells. Upregulation of miR-34b also induced apoptosis and increased the sensitivity of the cells to the anticancer drugs, whereas transfection with miR-34b-AMO, an inhibitor of miR-34b, reversed the anti-proliferation effect of sirolimus. Two key regulators of cell cycle, apoptosis and multiple drug resistance, PAK1 and ABCB1, were demonstrated to be the direct targets of miR-34b. In 40 tissue samples of OS patients, significantly higher miR-34 ISH score and lower PAK5 and ABCB1 scores were detected in the chemo-sensitive group. Conclusion: Sirolimus increases the sensitivity of human OS

  5. Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1), a “Multitasking” ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Susan P. C.

    2014-01-01

    The multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) encoded by ABCC1 was originally discovered as a cause of multidrug resistance in tumor cells. However, it is now clear that MRP1 serves a broader role than simply mediating the ATP-dependent efflux of drugs from cells. The antioxidant GSH and the pro-inflammatory cysteinyl leukotriene C4 have been identified as key physiological organic anions effluxed by MRP1, and an ever growing body of evidence indicates that additional lipid-derived mediators are also substrates of this transporter. As such, MRP1 is a multitasking transporter that likely influences the etiology and progression of a host of human diseases. PMID:25281745

  6. Nanomedicine to overcome cancer multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Yi, Cheng; Luo, Na; Gong, Changyang

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is still considered to be one of the most severe diseases so far. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle against curative cancer chemotherapy. The over-expression of drug efflux pumps in cellular membrane plays a critical role in preventing cancer cells from conventional chemotherapy. Nanotechnology is emerging as a class of therapeutics for MDR. This review mainly focuses on some pivotal strategies to combat MDR, including the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, stealth nanoparticles to prolong circulation time, endosomal escape, active drug delivery, stimuli sensitive drug release, and targeted co-delivery of different compounds. While convinced challenges need combatting, large numbers of preclinical studies strongly suggest that nanomedicine formations have potential application for improving the treatment of MDR. PMID:25255871

  7. Reversal of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in MCF-7/Adr cancer cells by sesquiterpene coumarins.

    PubMed

    Kasaian, Jamal; Mosaffa, Fatemeh; Behravan, Javad; Masullo, Milena; Piacente, Sonia; Ghandadi, Morteza; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, fifteen sesquiterpene coumarins were isolated and purified from different Ferula species, and were tested for their MDR reversal properties. Enhancement of doxorubicin cytotoxicity in MCF-7/Adr cells (doxorubicin resistant derivatives of MCF-7 cells overexpressing P-gp), when combined with very non-toxic concentrations of the sesquiterpene coumarins (50 μM) including umbelliprenin, farnesiferol B, farnesiferol C and lehmferin, proved significant MDR reversal activity of these coumarins. Flow cytometric efflux assay confirmed that the intracellular accumulation of Rho123 was significantly increased in MCF-7/Adr cells when treated with sesquiterpene coumarins. A deeper insight into the structure-activity relationship of sesquiterpene coumarins revealed that ring-opened drimane-type sesquiterpene coumarins including farnesiferol B, farnesiferol C and lehmferin possessed the best inhibitory effects on P-gp pump efflux and they could be considered as lead scaffolds for further structure modifications.

  8. Vatalanib sensitizes ABCB1 and ABCG2-overexpressing multidrug resistant colon cancer cells to chemotherapy under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    To, Kenneth K W; Poon, Daniel C; Wei, Yuming; Wang, Fang; Lin, Ge; Fu, Li-wu

    2015-09-01

    Cancer microenvironment is characterized by significantly lower oxygen concentration. This hypoxic condition is known to reduce drug responsiveness to cancer chemotherapy via multiple mechanisms, among which the upregulation of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters confers resistance to a wide variety of structurally unrelated anticancer drugs. Vatalanib (PTK787/ZK22584) is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor for all isoforms of VEGFR, PDGFR and c-Kit, which exhibit potent anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the potentiation effect of vatalanib on the anticancer activity of conventional cytotoxic drugs in colon cancer cell lines under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Mechanistically, vatalanib was found to inhibit ABCG2 and ABCB1 efflux activity, presumably by acting as a competitive inhibitor and interfering with their ATPase activity. Under hypoxic growth condition, ABCG2 and ABCB1-overexpressing cells sorted out by FACS technique as side population (SP) were found to be significantly more responsive to SN-38 (ABCG2 and ABCB1 substrate anticancer drug) in the presence of vatalanib. The anchorage independent soft agar colony formation capacity of the SP cells was remarkably reduced upon treatment with a combination of SN-38 and vatalanib, compared to SN-38 alone. However, vatalanib, at concentrations that produced the circumvention of the transporters-mediated resistance, did not appreciably alter ABCG2/ABCB1 mRNA or protein expression levels or the phosphorylation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2). Our study thus advocates the further investigation of vatalanib for use in combination chemotherapy to eradicate drug-resistant cancer cells under hypoxia. PMID:26206183

  9. Multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP1, 2, 4 and 5) expression in human corneal cell culture models and animal corneal tissue.

    PubMed

    Verstraelen, Jessica; Reichl, Stephan

    2014-07-01

    Preclinical studies addressing the transcorneal absorption of ophthalmic drugs are mainly performed using ex vivo animal corneas and in vitro corneal cell culture models, leaving open the question of transferability to humans in an in vivo situation. While passive drug absorption through corneal tissue is well understood, little is known about the expression of transporter proteins and active drug transport in human and animal corneas as well as corneal cell culture models. Therefore, the aim of this study was to conduct an expression analysis of four multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP1, 2, 4 and 5) in various in vitro and ex vivo corneal models, leading to a better understanding of the comparability of different corneal models regarding drug absorption and transferability to humans. Two well-established in vitro human corneal models, the HCE-T epithelial model and the more organotypic Hemicornea construct, both of which are based on the SV40 immortalized human corneal epithelial cell line HCE-T, were analyzed, as were excised rabbit and porcine cornea. Specimens of abraded epithelia from human donor corneas were also tested. MRP mRNA expression was determined via reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Protein expression was examined using Western blot experiments and immunohistochemistry. The functional activity of the MRP efflux transporter was detected in transport assays using specific marker and inhibitor substances. The functional expression of all of the tested MRP transporters was detected in the HCE-T epithelial model. Hemicornea constructs displayed a similar expression pattern for MRP1, 4 and 5, whereas no MRP2 protein expression or activity was detected. However, excised animal corneas exhibited different expression profiles. In porcine cornea, no functional expression of MRP1, 2, or 5 was observed, and we failed to detect MRP4 expression in rabbit cornea. The results suggest that MRP1, 2, 4, and 5 are expressed in the human corneal

  10. TPGS/Phospholipids Mixed Micelles for Delivery of Icariside II to Multidrug-Resistant Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Huang, Houcai; Xia, Zhi; Wei, Yingjie; Yao, Nan; Zhang, Li; Yan, Hongmei; Jia, Xiaobin; Zhang, Zhenhai

    2016-09-01

    The biggest challenge for the treatment of multidrug resistant cancer is to deliver a high concentration of anticancer drugs to cancer cells. Icariside II is a flavonoid from Epimedium koreanum Nakai with remarkable anticancer properties, but poor solubility and significant efflux from cancer cells limited its clinical use. In our previous study, a self-assembled mixture of micelles (TPGS-Icariside II-phospholipid complex) was successfully constructed, which could substantially increase the solubility of Icariside II and inhibit the efflux on Caco-2 cells. In this study, we evaluate the anticancer effect of the mixed micelles encapsulating Icariside II (Icar-MC) on MCF-7/ADR, a multidrug-resistant breast cancer cell line. The cellular uptake of the micelles was confirmed by fluorescent coumarin-6-loaded micelles. The IC50 of Icar-MC in MCF-7/ADR was 2-fold less than the free drug. The in vitro study showed Icar-MC induced more apoptosis and lactate dehydrogenase release. Intravenous injection of Icar-MC into nude mice bearing MCF-7/ADR xenograft resulted in a better antitumor efficacy compared with the administration of free drug, without causing significant body weight changes in mice. The antitumor effect was further verified by magnetic resonance imaging and immunohistochemical assays for Ki-67, a proliferative indicator. Moreover, Icar-MC treatment also elevated Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and the expressions of cleaved caspase-3, -8, -9 and AIFM1 in tumors. This study suggests that phospholipid/TPGS mixed micelles might be a suitable drug delivery system for Icariside II to treat multidrug resistant breast cancer. PMID:26293804

  11. Novel polymer micelle mediated co-delivery of doxorubicin and P-glycoprotein siRNA for reversal of multidrug resistance and synergistic tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-ge; Zhu, Wen-jing; Liu, Yang; Yuan, Zhi-qiang; Yang, Shu-di; Chen, Wei-liang; Li, Ji-zhao; Zhou, Xiao-feng; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Xue-nong

    2016-01-01

    Co-delivery of chemotherapeutics and siRNA with different mechanisms in a single system is a promising strategy for effective cancer therapy with synergistic effects. In this study, a triblock copolymer micelle was prepared based on the polymer of N-succinyl chitosan–poly-L-lysine–palmitic acid (NSC–PLL–PA) to co-deliver doxorubicin (Dox) and siRNA–P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (Dox–siRNA-micelle). Dox–siRNA-micelle was unstable in pH 5.3 medium than in pH 7.4 medium, which corresponded with the in vitro rapid release of Dox and siRNA in acidic environments. The antitumor efficacy of Dox–siRNA-micelle in vitro significantly increased, especially in HepG2/ADM cells, which was due to the downregulation of P-gp. Moreover, almost all the Dox–siRNA-micelles accumulated in the tumor region beyond 24 h post-injection, and the co-delivery system significantly inhibited tumor growth with synergistic effects in vivo. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of Dox–siRNA-micelles in tumor-targeting and MDR reversal, and provided a promising strategy to develop a co-delivery system with synergistic effects for combined cancer therapy. PMID:27030638

  12. Multidrug resistance: an emerging crisis.

    PubMed

    Tanwar, Jyoti; Das, Shrayanee; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2014-01-01

    The resistance among various microbial species (infectious agents) to different antimicrobial drugs has emerged as a cause of public health threat all over the world at a terrifying rate. Due to the pacing advent of new resistance mechanisms and decrease in efficiency of treating common infectious diseases, it results in failure of microbial response to standard treatment, leading to prolonged illness, higher expenditures for health care, and an immense risk of death. Almost all the capable infecting agents (e.g., bacteria, fungi, virus, and parasite) have employed high levels of multidrug resistance (MDR) with enhanced morbidity and mortality; thus, they are referred to as "super bugs." Although the development of MDR is a natural phenomenon, the inappropriate use of antimicrobial drugs, inadequate sanitary conditions, inappropriate food-handling, and poor infection prevention and control practices contribute to emergence of and encourage the further spread of MDR. Considering the significance of MDR, this paper, emphasizes the problems associated with MDR and the need to understand its significance and mechanisms to combat microbial infections. PMID:25140175

  13. Multidrug resistance: an emerging crisis.

    PubMed

    Tanwar, Jyoti; Das, Shrayanee; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2014-01-01

    The resistance among various microbial species (infectious agents) to different antimicrobial drugs has emerged as a cause of public health threat all over the world at a terrifying rate. Due to the pacing advent of new resistance mechanisms and decrease in efficiency of treating common infectious diseases, it results in failure of microbial response to standard treatment, leading to prolonged illness, higher expenditures for health care, and an immense risk of death. Almost all the capable infecting agents (e.g., bacteria, fungi, virus, and parasite) have employed high levels of multidrug resistance (MDR) with enhanced morbidity and mortality; thus, they are referred to as "super bugs." Although the development of MDR is a natural phenomenon, the inappropriate use of antimicrobial drugs, inadequate sanitary conditions, inappropriate food-handling, and poor infection prevention and control practices contribute to emergence of and encourage the further spread of MDR. Considering the significance of MDR, this paper, emphasizes the problems associated with MDR and the need to understand its significance and mechanisms to combat microbial infections.

  14. Antitumor Agents 293. Non-toxic Dimethyl-4,4′-dimethoxy-5,6,5′,6′-dimethylenedioxybiphenyl-2,2′-dicarboxylate (DDB) Analogs Chemosensitize Multidrug Resistant Cancer Cells to Clinical Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Hsin-Yi; Ohkoshi, Emika; Goto, Masuo; Bastow, Kenneth F.; Nakagawa-Goto, Kyoko; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2012-01-01

    Novel dimethyl-4,4′-dimethoxy-5,6,5′,6′-dimethylenedioxybiphenyl-2,2′-dicarboxylate (DDB) analogs were designed and synthesized to improve their chemosensitizing action on KBvin (vincristine resistant nasopharyngeal carcinoma) cells, a multi-drug resistant cell line over-expressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that aromatic and bulky aliphatic side chains at the 2,2′-positions effectively and significantly sensitized P-gp overexpressing multidrug resistant (MDR) cells to anticancer drugs, such as paclitaxel (TAX), vincristine (VCR), and doxorubicin (DOX). DDB derivatives 16 and 23 showed 5–10 times more effective reversal ability than verapamil (VRP) for TAX and VCR. Analog 6 also exhibited five times greater chemosensitizing effect against DOX than VRP. Importantly, no cytotoxicity was observed by the active DDB analogs against both non-MDR and MDR cells, suggesting that DDB analogs serve as the novel lead compounds for the development of chemosensitizers to overcome MDR phenotype. The mechanism of action studies demonstrated that effective inhibition of P-glycoprotein by DDB analogs dramatically elevated cellular concentration of anticancer drugs. PMID:22612652

  15. Simulated microgravity reduces mRNA levels of multidrug resistance genes 4 and 5 in non-metastatic human melanoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiermann, Peter; Tsiockas, Wasiliki; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Gerzer, Rupert; Ivanova, Krassimira

    Multidrug resistance proteins (MRP) are members of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily that are able to export a large variety of substances into the extracellular space in-cluding nucleoside and nucleotide base analogs used in antiviral and anticancer therapy. MRP4 and 5 (MRP4/5) particularly transport cyclic nucleotides, e.g. guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophos-phate (cGMP). The second messenger cGMP, which is synthesized by the catalytic activity of the guanylyl cyclase (GC), plays an import role in vasodilatation, smooth muscle relaxation, and nitric oxide (NO)-induced perturbation of melanocyte-extracellular matrix interactions. In previous studies we have reported that different GC isoforms are responsible for cGMP synthe-sis in melanocytic cells. Normal human melanocytes and non-metastatic melanoma cell lines predominantly express the NO-sensitive soluble GC isoform (sGC), a heterodimeric protein consisting of α and β subunits. Metastatic melanoma cells lack the expression of the β sub-unit and show up-regulated activities of the particulate isoforms. We have further found that long-term exposure to hypergravity (5 g for 24 h) induced an increased cGMP export in normal human melanocytes, and non-metastatic, but not in metastatic human melanoma cells as a re-sult of up-regulated MRP4/5 expression. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether simulated microgravity may also alter the expression of MRP4/5 in non-metastatic melanoma cells. Experiments were performed using a fast-rotating clinostat (60 rpm) with one rotation axis. The non-metastatic 1F6 melanoma cells were exposed to simulated microgravity (up to 1.21x10-2 g) for 24 h. The mRNA analyses were performed by a relative calibrator-normalized and efficiency corrected quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Light Cycler R , Roche). Our data show a reduced expression of approximately 35% for MRP4 and of 50% for MRP5 in simulated microgravity in comparison to 1 g controls. Also, the

  16. Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles mediated co-delivery of paclitaxel and tetrandrine for overcoming multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lejiao; Li, Zhenyu; Shen, Jingyi; Zheng, Dandan; Tian, Xiaona; Guo, Hejian; Chang, Ping

    2015-07-15

    The objective of the study is to fabricate multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles for achieving co-delivery of conventional antitumor drug paclitaxel (PTX) and the multidrug resistance reversal agent tetrandrine (TET) expecting to overcome multidrug resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells. The nanoparticles were facile to prepare by self-assemble in situ drug loading approach. Namely, PTX and TET were solubilized in the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) micelles and simultaneously silica resources hydrolyze and condense to form nanoparticles. The obtained nanoparticles, denoted as PTX/TET-CTAB@MSN, exhibited pH-responsive release property with more easily released in the weak acidic environment. Studies on cellular uptake of nanoparticles demonstrated TET could markedly increase intracellular accumulation of nanoparticles. Furthermore, the PTX/TET-CTAB@MSN suppressed tumor cells growth more efficiently than only delivery of PTX (PTX-CTAB@MSN) or the free PTX. Moreover, the nanoparticle loading drugs with a PTX/TET molar ratio of 4.4:1 completely reversed the resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells to PTX and the resistance reversion index was 72.3. Mechanism research showed that both TET and CTAB could arrest MCF-7/ADR cells at G1 phase; and besides PTX arrested cells at G2 phase. This nanocarrier might have important potential in clinical implications for co-delivery of multiple drugs to overcome MDR. PMID:25956050

  17. Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles mediated co-delivery of paclitaxel and tetrandrine for overcoming multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lejiao; Li, Zhenyu; Shen, Jingyi; Zheng, Dandan; Tian, Xiaona; Guo, Hejian; Chang, Ping

    2015-07-15

    The objective of the study is to fabricate multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles for achieving co-delivery of conventional antitumor drug paclitaxel (PTX) and the multidrug resistance reversal agent tetrandrine (TET) expecting to overcome multidrug resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells. The nanoparticles were facile to prepare by self-assemble in situ drug loading approach. Namely, PTX and TET were solubilized in the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) micelles and simultaneously silica resources hydrolyze and condense to form nanoparticles. The obtained nanoparticles, denoted as PTX/TET-CTAB@MSN, exhibited pH-responsive release property with more easily released in the weak acidic environment. Studies on cellular uptake of nanoparticles demonstrated TET could markedly increase intracellular accumulation of nanoparticles. Furthermore, the PTX/TET-CTAB@MSN suppressed tumor cells growth more efficiently than only delivery of PTX (PTX-CTAB@MSN) or the free PTX. Moreover, the nanoparticle loading drugs with a PTX/TET molar ratio of 4.4:1 completely reversed the resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells to PTX and the resistance reversion index was 72.3. Mechanism research showed that both TET and CTAB could arrest MCF-7/ADR cells at G1 phase; and besides PTX arrested cells at G2 phase. This nanocarrier might have important potential in clinical implications for co-delivery of multiple drugs to overcome MDR.

  18. Involvement of miR-326 in chemotherapy resistance of breast cancer through modulating expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhongxing; Wu, Hui; Xia, James; Li, Yuhua; Zhang, Yawei; Huang, Ke; Wagar, Nicholas; Yoon, Younghyoun; Cho, Heidi T; Scala, Stefania; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2010-03-15

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP-1/ABCC1) transports a wide range of therapeutic agents and may play a critical role in the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells. However, the regulation of MRP-1 remains controversial. To explore whether miRNAs are involved in the regulation of MRP-1 expression and modulate the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents, we analyzed miRNA expression levels in VP-16-resistant MDR cell line, MCF-7/VP, in comparison with its parent cell line, MCF-7, using a miRNA microarray. MCF-7/VP overexpressed MRP-1 mRNA and protein not MDR-1 and BCRP. miR-326 was downregulated in MCF-7/VP compared to MCF-7. Additionally, miR-326 was downregulated in a panel of advanced breast cancer tissues and consistent reversely with expression levels of MRP-1. Furthermore, the elevated levels of miR-326 in the mimics-transfected VP-16-resistant cell line, MCF-7/VP, downregulated MRP-1 expression and sensitized these cells to VP-16 and doxorubicin. These findings demonstrate for the first time the involvement of miRNAs in multidrug resistance mediated by MRP-1 and suggest that miR-326 may be an efficient agent for preventing and reversing MDR in tumor cells.

  19. Multidrug Resistance Proteins (MRPs/ABCCs) in Cancer Chemotherapy and Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Tiwari, Amit K.

    2011-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a superfamily of membrane proteins that are best known for their ability to transport a wide variety of exogenous and endogenous substances across membranes against a concentration gradient via ATP hydrolysis. There are seven subfamilies of human ABC transporters, one of the largest being the ‘C’ subfamily (gene symbol ABCC). Nine ABCC subfamily members, the so-called Multidrug Resistance Proteins (MRPs) 1-9, have been implicated in mediating multidrug resistance in tumor cells to varying degrees as the efflux extrude chemotherapeutic compounds (or their metabolites) from malignant cells. Some of the MRPs are also known to either influence drug disposition in normal tissues or modulate the elimination of drugs (or their metabolites) via hepatobiliary or renal excretory pathways. In addition, the cellular efflux of physiologically important organic anions such as leukotriene C4 and cAMP is mediated by one or more of the MRPs. Finally, mutations in several MRPs are associated with human genetic disorders. In this review article, the current biochemical and physiological knowledge of MRP1-MRP9 in cancer chemotherapy and human genetic disease is summarized. The mutations in MRP2/ABCC2 leading to conjugated hyperbilirubinemia (Dubin-Johnson syndrome) and in MRP6/ABCC6 leading to the connective tissue disorder Pseudoxanthoma elasticum are also discussed. PMID:21740521

  20. A Salmonella nanoparticle mimic overcomes multidrug resistance in tumours.

    PubMed

    Mercado-Lubo, Regino; Zhang, Yuanwei; Zhao, Liang; Rossi, Kyle; Wu, Xiang; Zou, Yekui; Castillo, Antonio; Leonard, Jack; Bortell, Rita; Greiner, Dale L; Shultz, Leonard D; Han, Gang; McCormick, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is a food-borne pathogen that also selectively grows in tumours and functionally decreases P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a multidrug resistance transporter. Here we report that the Salmonella type III secretion effector, SipA, is responsible for P-gp modulation through a pathway involving caspase-3. Mimicking the ability of Salmonella to reverse multidrug resistance, we constructed a gold nanoparticle system packaged with a SipA corona, and found this bacterial mimic not only accumulates in tumours but also reduces P-gp at a SipA dose significantly lower than free SipA. Moreover, the Salmonella nanoparticle mimic suppresses tumour growth with a concomitant reduction in P-gp when used with an existing chemotherapeutic drug (that is, doxorubicin). On the basis of our finding that the SipA Salmonella effector is fundamental for functionally decreasing P-gp, we engineered a nanoparticle mimic that both overcomes multidrug resistance in cancer cells and increases tumour sensitivity to conventional chemotherapeutics. PMID:27452236

  1. Diversity among multidrug-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Enterococci are associated with both community- and hospital-acquired infections. Even though they do not cause severe systemic inflammatory responses, such as septic shock, enterococci present a therapeutic challenge because of their resistance to a vast array of antimicrobial drugs, including cell-wall active agents, all commercially available aminoglycosides, penicillin and ampicillin, and vancomycin. The combination of the latter two occurs disproportionately in strains resistant to many other antimicrobial drugs. The propensity of enterococci to acquire resistance may relate to their ability to participate in various forms of conjugation, which can result in the spread of genes as part of conjugative transposons, pheromone-responsive plasmids, or broad host-range plasmids. Enterococcal hardiness likely adds to resistance by facilitating survival in the environment (and thus enhancing potential spread from person to person) of a multidrug-resistant clone. The combination of these attributes within the genus Enterococcus suggests that these bacteria and their resistance to antimicrobial drugs will continue to pose a challenge. PMID:9452397

  2. Mechanisms of multidrug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Gottesman, Michael M

    2010-01-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy remains a major challenge in the treatment of cancer. Resistance exists against every effective anticancer drug and can develop by numerous mechanisms including decreased drug uptake, increased drug efflux, activation of detoxifying systems, activation of DNA repair mechanisms, evasion of drug-induced apoptosis, etc. In the first part of this chapter, we briefly summarize the current knowledge on individual cellular mechanisms responsible for MDR, with a special emphasis on ATP-binding cassette transporters, perhaps the main theme of this textbook. Although extensive work has been done to characterize MDR mechanisms in vitro, the translation of this knowledge to the clinic has not been crowned with success. Therefore, identifying genes and mechanisms critical to the development of MDR in vivo and establishing a reliable method for analyzing clinical samples could help to predict the development of resistance and lead to treatments designed to circumvent it. Our thoughts about translational research needed to achieve significant progress in the understanding of this complex phenomenon are therefore discussed in a third section. The pleotropic response of cancer cells to chemotherapy is summarized in a concluding diagram. PMID:19949920

  3. Fenretinide sensitizes multidrug-resistant human neuroblastoma cells to antibody-independent and ch14.18-mediated NK cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Shibina, Anastasia; Seidel, Diana; Somanchi, Srinivas S; Lee, Dean A; Stermann, Alexander; Maurer, Barry J; Lode, Holger N; Reynolds, C Patrick; Huebener, Nicole

    2013-04-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children. Combining passive immunotherapy with an antibody to the disialoganglioside GD2 (ch14.18/SP2/0) and cytokines with 13-cis-retinoic acid for post-myeloablative maintenance therapy increased survival in high-risk NB, but the overall prognosis for these children is still in need of improvement. Fenretinide (4-HPR) is a synthetic retinoid that has shown clinical activity in recurrent NB and is cytotoxic to a variety of cancer cells, in part via the accumulation of dihydroceramides, which are precursors of GD2. We investigated the effect of 4-HPR on CHO-derived, ch14.18-mediated anti-NB effector functions, complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), and antibody-dependent and antibody-independent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC and AICC, respectively). Here, we demonstrate for the first time that pretreatment of fenretinide-resistant NB cells with 4-HPR significantly enhanced ch14.18/CHO-mediated CDC and ADCC and AICC by both human natural killer cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Treatment with 4-HPR increased GD2 and death receptor (DR) expression in resistant NB cells and induced an enhanced granzyme B and perforin production by effector cells. Blocking of ganglioside synthesis with a glucosylceramide synthase inhibitor abrogated the increased ADCC response but had no effect on the AICC, indicating that GD2 induced by 4-HPR mediates the sensitization of NB cells for ADCC. We also showed that 4-HPR induced increased GD2 and DR expression in a resistant NB xenograft model that was associated with an increased ADCC and AICC response using explanted tumor target cells from 4-HPR-treated mice. In summary, these findings provide an important baseline for the combination of 4-HPR and passive immunotherapy with ch14.18/CHO in future clinical trials for high-risk NB patients.

  4. Enhancement of chlorpromazine antitumor activity by Pluronics F127/L81 nanostructured system against human multidrug resistant leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mello, Joyce C de; Moraes, Vivian Wr; Watashi, Carolina M; da Silva, Deyse C; Cavalcanti, Leide P; Franco, Margareth Kkd; Yokaichiya, Fabiano; de Araujo, Daniele R; Rodrigues, Tiago

    2016-09-01

    The development of specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, chemoresistance of tumor cells to TKIs has already been described, and several mechanisms account for the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotypes, including the overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This decreases the rate of healing and complete tumor remission. Nanotechnological tools have been studied to allow advances in this field. Poloxamers (Pluronics(®)) have been proposed as drug carriers to improve therapeutic efficacy and decrease side effects, even in cancer therapy, due to their ability to inhibit P-gp. Antipsychotic phenothiazines have been described as potent cytotoxic drugs against several types of tumor cells in vitro. Here, we show that nanostructured micellar systems containing the phenothiazine derivative chlorpromazine (CPZ) potentiated the cytotoxicity of free CPZ and increased the selectivity against CML tumor cells, demonstrating the pharmacological potential of these poloxamer-based nanostructured systems containing CPZ in cancer therapy. PMID:27265114

  5. Combination of Protoporphyrin IX-mediated Sonodynamic Treatment with Doxorubicin Synergistically Induced Apoptotic Cell Death of a Multidrug-Resistant Leukemia K562/DOX Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaobing; Jia, Yali; Su, Xiaomin; Wang, Pan; Zhang, Kun; Feng, Xiaolan; Liu, Quanhong

    2015-10-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of administration of doxorubicin (DOX) in combination with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX)-assisted low-level therapeutic ultrasound (US) in K562/DOX cells as a potential strategy in cancer therapy. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to determine the cytotoxicity of different treatments. Apoptosis was analyzed using annexin V-PE/7-amino-actinomycin D staining. Changes in DNA fragmentation, intracellular reactive oxygen species production, cellular membrane permeability, P-glycoprotein expression and DOX uptake were analyzed with flow cytometry. Under optimal conditions, PpIX-US significantly aggravated DOX-induced K562/DOX cell death, compared with either monotherapy. Synergistic potentiation of DNA damage, generation of reactive oxygen species and P-glycoprotein inhibition were observed. Plasma membrane integrity changed slightly after US exposure, and DOX uptake was notably improved after PpIX-US exposure. The results indicate that PpIX-US could increase the susceptibility of tumors to antineoplastic drugs, suggesting a clinical potential method for sonodynamic therapy-mediated tumor chemotherapy. PMID:26166458

  6. Amphiphilic Copolymeric Micelles for Doxorubicin and Curcumin Co-Delivery to Reverse Multidrug Resistance in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lv, Li; Qiu, Kaifeng; Yu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Chuxiong; Qin, Fengchao; Shi, Yonghui; Ou, Jiebin; Zhang, Tao; Zhu, Hua; Wu, Junyan; Liu, Chunxia; Li, Guocheng

    2016-05-01

    Development of multidrug resistance against chemotherapeutic drugs is one of the major obstacles to successful cancer therapy in the clinic. Thus far, amphiphilic polymeric micelles and chemosensitizers have been used to overcome multidrug resistance in cancer. The goals of this study were to prepare poly(ethylene glycol)-bock-poly(lactide) (PEG(2k)-PLA(5k)) micelles for co-delivery of the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (DOX) with a chemosensitizer curcumin (CUR), investigate the potential of the dual drug-loaded micelles ((DOX+CUR)-Micelles) to reverse multidrug resistance, and explore the underlying mechanisms. (DOX + CUR)-Micelles were prepared using an emulsion solvent evaporation method. The cellular uptake, drug efflux, down-regulation of P-glycoprotein expression and inhibition of ATP activity of (DOX+ CUR)-Micelles were studied in drug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells. In vitro analyses demonstrated that (DOX + CUR)-Micelles were superior to free DOX, free drug combination (DOX + CUR), and DOX-loaded micelles in inhibiting proliferation of MCF-7/ADR cells. This effect of (DOX + CUR)-Micelles was partially attributable to their highest cellular uptake, lowest efflux rate of DOX, and strongest effects on down-regulation of P-glycoprotein and inhibition of ATP activity. Additionally, (DOX+CUR)-Micelles showed increased tumor accumulation and strong inhibitory effect on tumor growth in the xenograft model of drug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells compared to that of other drug formulations. These results indicate that (DOX + CUR)-Micelles display potential for application in the therapy of drug-resistant breast carcinoma. PMID:27305819

  7. Intracellular Self-Assembly of Taxol Nanoparticles for Overcoming Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yue; Wang, Lin; Du, Wei; Ding, Zhanling; Zhang, Jia; Han, Tao; An, Linna; Zhang, Huafeng; Liang, Gaolin

    2015-08-10

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains the biggest challenge in treating cancers. Herein we propose the intracellular self-assembly of nanodrugs as a new strategy for overcoming MDR. By employing a biocompatible condensation reaction, we rationally designed a taxol derivative Ac-Arg-Val-Arg-Arg-Cys(StBu)-Lys(taxol)-2-cyanobenzothiazole (CBT-Taxol) which could be subjected to furin-controlled condensation and self-assembly of taxol nanoparticles (Taxol-NPs). In vitro and in vivo studies indicated that, compared with taxol, CBT-Taxol showed a 4.5-fold or 1.5-fold increase in anti-MDR effects, respectively, on taxol-resistant HCT 116 cancer cells or tumors without being toxic to the cells or the mice. Our results demonstrate that structuring protease-susceptible agents and assembling them intracellularly into nanodrugs could be a new optimal strategy for overcoming MDR.

  8. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles loading doxorubicin reverse multidrug resistance: performance and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jianan; He, Qianjun; Gao, Yu; Shi, Jianlin; Li, Yaping

    2011-10-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is one of the major obstacles for successful chemotherapy in cancer. One of the effective approaches to overcome MDR is to use nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery to increase drug accumulation in drug resistant cancer cells. In this work, we first report that the performance and mechanism of an inorganic engineered delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) loading doxorubicin (DMNs) to overcome the MDR of MCF-7/ADR (a DOX-resistant and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) over-expression cancer cell line). The experimental results showed that DMNs could enhance the cellular uptake of doxorubicin (DOX) and increase the cell proliferation suppression effect of DOX against MCF-7/ADR cells. The IC50 of DMNs against MCF-7/ADR cells was 8-fold lower than that of free DOX. However, an improved effect of DOX in DMNs against MCF-7 cells (a DOX-sensitive cancer cell line) was not found. The increased cellular uptake and nuclear accumulation of DOX delivered by DMNs in MCF-7/ADR cells was confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and could result from the down-regulation of P-gp and bypassing the efflux action by MSNs themselves. The cellular uptake mechanism of DMNs indicated that the macropinocytosis was one of the pathways for the uptake of DMNs by MCF-7/ADR cells. The in vivo biodistribution showed that DMNs induced a higher accumulation of DOX in drug resistant tumors than free DOX. These results suggested that MSNs could be an effective delivery system to overcome multidrug resistance.

  9. Notch1 is associated with the multidrug resistance of hypoxic osteosarcoma by regulating MRP1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Guo, D; Tang, B; Zhang, Y; Zhang, K; Nie, L

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia and Notch signaling pathway are closely related and both participate in cell proliferation and drug resistance of tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia and Notch signaling pathway in cell proliferation and drug resistance of osteosarcoma (OS) remain unclear. In this study, to further evaluate the role of hypoxia and Notch1 on drug resistance of OS, we investigated the influence of inhibiting Notch1 pathway by Notch1 small interference RNA (siRNA) on human MG-63 OS cells in hypoxia. Our data showed that hypoxia promoted OS cell proliferation, induced the G0/G1-S-G2/M phase transition, and increased multidrug resistance of human OS cells. Western blot analysis suggested that hypoxia increased the expression of HIF-1α, Notch1, and multidrug resistance protein-1 (MRP1) in human OS cells. Notch1 siRNA inhibits proliferation and increases apoptosis of hypoxic OS cells. Finally, these hypoxic OS cells can be sensitized to multidrug treatment through inhibition of the Notch protein expression by siRNA. Repression of the Notch protein expression resulted in down-regulation of MRP1 protein. These data support the conclusion that Notch signaling is up-regulated in human OS cells under hypoxia and Notch1 may represent a viable target to overcome chemoresistant OS cells in a hypoxic niche by regulating MRP1 gene expression. PMID:27468877

  10. Applications of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for the reversal of multidrug resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YINGHONG; COLE, SUSAN P.C.; CAI, TIANGE; CAI, YU

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy presents a major obstacle in the treatment of cancer patients, which directly affects the clinical success rate of cancer therapy. Current research aims to improve the efficiency of chemotherapy, whilst reducing toxicity to prolong the lives of cancer patients. As with good biocompatibility, high stability and drug release targeting properties, nanodrug delivery systems alter the mechanism by which drugs function to reverse MDR, via passive or active targeting, increasing drug accumulation in the tumor tissue or reducing drug elimination. Given the potential role of nanodrug delivery systems used in multidrug resistance, the present study summarizes the current knowledge on the properties of liposomes, lipid nanoparticles, polymeric micelles and mesoporous silica nanoparticles, together with their underlying mechanisms. The current review aims to provide a reliable basis and useful information for the development of new treatment strategies of multidrug resistance reversal using nanodrug delivery systems. PMID:27347092

  11. Down-regulation of the P-glycoprotein relevant for multidrug resistance by intracellular acidification through the crosstalk of MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Jin, Weina; Lu, Ying; Li, Qinghua; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Hongju; Chang, Guoqiang; Lin, Yani; Pang, Tianxiang

    2014-09-01

    In our previous study, we have found that the tumor multidrug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein could be reversed by sustained intracellular acidification through down-regulating the multidrug resistance gene 1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein expression. However, the molecular events linking the intracellular acidification and the regulation of P-glycoprotein remain unclear. In the present study, the molecular pathways involved in the regulation of P-glycoprotein expression by the intracellular acidification were investigated. We found that the P-glycoprotein expression was down-regulated by the intracellular acidification through inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in the resisitant K562/DOX cells. In the sensitive K562 and HL60 cell lines, the changes of the p38 MAPK expression after the acidification are not as obvious as that of K562/DOX cells, but the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is also observed, which indicates that the down-regulation of p38 MAPK by the intracellular acidification might be the resistant cell line specific. Blockade of ERK and JNK signaling by the inhibitors or RNA interference increased p38MAPK activities suggesting that cross-talk within MAPKs is also important for this response. Our study provides the first direct evidence that the reversal of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance by intracellular acidification is mediated by the crosstalk of MAPK signaling pathways.

  12. Overcoming drug efflux-based multidrug resistance in cancer with nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xue; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), which significantly decreases the efficacy of anticancer drugs and causes tumor recurrence, has been a major challenge in clinical cancer treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs for decades. Several mechanisms of overcoming drug resistance have been postulated. Well known P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and other drug efflux transporters are considered to be critical in pumping anticancer drugs out of cells and causing chemotherapy failure. Innovative theranostic (therapeutic and diagnostic) strategies with nanoparticles are rapidly evolving and are anticipated to offer opportunities to overcome these limits. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of drug efflux-mediated resistance and the application of multiple nanoparticle-based platforms to overcome chemoresistance and improve therapeutic outcome.

  13. Light-Responsive Biodegradable Nanomedicine Overcomes Multidrug Resistance via NO-Enhanced Chemosensitization.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jing; He, Qianjun; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Fuwu; Yang, Xiangyu; Wang, Zhe; Lu, Nan; Fan, Wenpei; Lin, Lisen; Niu, Gang; He, Nongyue; Song, Jibin; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-06-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is responsible for the relatively low effectiveness of chemotherapeutics. Herein, a nitric oxide (NO) gas-enhanced chemosensitization strategy is proposed to overcome MDR by construction of a biodegradable nanomedicine formula based on BNN6/DOX coloaded monomethoxy(polyethylene glycol)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (mPEG-PLGA). On one hand, the nanomedicine features high biocompatibility due to the high density of PEG and biodegradable PLGA. On the other hand, the nanoformula exhibits excellent stability under physiological conditions but exhibits stimuli-responsive decomposition of BNN6 for NO gas release upon ultraviolet-visible irradiation. More importantly, after NO release is triggered, gas molecules are generated that break the nanoparticle shell and lead to the release of doxorubicin. Furthermore, NO was demonstrated to reverse the MDR of tumor cells and enhance the chemosensitization for doxorubicin therapy.

  14. Multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis: molecular perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Rattan, A.; Kalia, A.; Ahmad, N.

    1998-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis seriously threaten tuberculosis (TB) control and prevention efforts. Molecular studies of the mechanism of action of antitubercular drugs have elucidated the genetic basis of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. Drug resistance in M. tuberculosis is attributed primarily to the accumulation of mutations in the drug target genes; these mutations lead either to an altered target (e.g., RNA polymerase and catalase-peroxidase in rifampicin and isoniazid resistance, respectively) or to a change in titration of the drug (e.g., InhA in isoniazid resistance). Development of specific mechanism-based inhibitors and techniques to rapidly detect multidrug resistance will require further studies addressing the drug and drug-target interaction. PMID:9621190

  15. [Travellers and multi-drug resistance bacteria].

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Nozomi

    2012-02-01

    The number of international travellers has increased. There is enormous diversity in medical backgrounds, purposes of travel, and travelling styles among travellers. Travellers are hospitalized abroad because of exotic and common diseases via medical tourism. This is one way of transporting and importing human bacteria between countries, including multi-drug resistant organisms. In developing countries, the antimicrobial resistance in Shigella sp. and Salmonella sp. have been a problem, because of this trend, the first choice of antibiotics has changed in some countries. Community acquired infections as well as hospital acquired infections with MRSA, multi-drug resistance (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ESBL have been a problem. This review will discuss the risk of MDR bacterial infectious diseases for travellers. PMID:22413540

  16. Multidrug Resistance Proteins (MRPs) and Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Gupta, Pranav; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are members of a protein superfamily that are known to translocate various substrates across membranes, including metabolic products, lipids and sterols, and xenobiotic drugs. Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) belong to the subfamily C in the ABC transporter superfamily. MRPs have been implicated in mediating multidrug resistance by actively extruding chemotherapeutic substrates. Moreover, some MRPs are known to be essential in physiological excretory or regulatory pathways. The importance of MRPs in cancer therapy is also implied by their clinical insights. Modulating the function of MRPs to re-sensitize chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy shows great promise in cancer therapy; thus, multiple MRP inhibitors have been developed recently. This review article summarizes the structure, distribution, and physiological as well as pharmacological function of MRP1-MRP9 in cancer chemotherapy. Several novel modulators targeting MRPs in cancer therapy are also discussed. PMID:25840885

  17. Multidrug Resistance Proteins (MRPs) and Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Gupta, Pranav; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are members of a protein superfamily that are known to translocate various substrates across membranes, including metabolic products, lipids and sterols, and xenobiotic drugs. Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) belong to the subfamily C in the ABC transporter superfamily. MRPs have been implicated in mediating multidrug resistance by actively extruding chemotherapeutic substrates. Moreover, some MRPs are known to be essential in physiological excretory or regulatory pathways. The importance of MRPs in cancer therapy is also implied by their clinical insights. Modulating the function of MRPs to re-sensitize chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy shows great promise in cancer therapy; thus, multiple MRP inhibitors have been developed recently. This review article summarizes the structure, distribution, and physiological as well as pharmacological function of MRP1-MRP9 in cancer chemotherapy. Several novel modulators targeting MRPs in cancer therapy are also discussed.

  18. Poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated multi-walled carbon nanotubes as an efficient drug carrier for overcoming multidrug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Jinping; Meziani, Mohammed J.; Sun Yaping; Cheng, Shuk Han

    2011-01-15

    The acquisition of multidrug resistance poses a serious problem in chemotherapy, and new types of transporters have been actively sought to overcome it. In the present study, poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated (PEGylated) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared and explored as drug carrier to overcome multidrug resistance. The prepared PEGylated MWCNTs penetrated into mammalian cells without damage plasma membrane, and its accumulation did not affect cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution. More importantly, PEGylated MWCNTs accumulated in the multidrug-resistant cancer cells as efficient as in the sensitive cancer cells. Intracellular translocation of PEGylated MWCNTs was visualized in both multidrug-resistant HepG2-DR cells and sensitive HepG2 cells, as judged by both fluorescent and transmission electron microscopy. PEGylated MWCNTs targeted cancer cells efficiently and multidrug-resistant cells failed to remove the intracellular MWCNTs. However, if used in combination with drugs without conjugation, PEGylated MWCNTs prompted drug efflux in MDR cells by stimulating the ATPase activity of P-glycoprotein. This study suggests that PEGylated MWCNTs can be developed as an efficient drug carrier to conjugate drugs for overcoming multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy.

  19. Implantable hydrogel embedded dark-gold nanoswitch as a theranostic probe to sense and overcome cancer multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Conde, João; Oliva, Nuria; Artzi, Natalie

    2015-03-17

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells is a substantial limitation to the success of chemotherapy. Here, we describe facile means to overcome resistance by silencing the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), before chemotherapeutic drug delivery in vivo with a single local application. Our platform contains hydrogel embedded with dark-gold nanoparticles modified with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-intercalated nanobeacons that serve as an ON/OFF molecular nanoswitch triggered by the increased MRP1 expression within the tumor tissue microenvironment. This nanoswitch can sense and overcome MDR prior to local drug release. The nanobeacons comprise a 5-FU intercalated DNA hairpin, which is labeled with a near-infrared (NIR) dye and a dark-quencher. The nanobeacons are designed to open and release the intercalated drug only upon hybridization of the DNA hairpin to a complementary target, an event that restores fluorescence emission due to nanobeacons conformational reorganization. Despite the cross-resistance to 5-FU, more than 90% tumor reduction is achieved in vivo in a triple-negative breast cancer model following 80% MRP1 silencing compared with the continuous tumor growth following only drug or nanobeacon administration. Our approach can be applied to reverse cross-resistance to other chemotherapeutic drugs and restore treatment efficacy. As a universal nanotheranostic probe, this platform can pave the way to early cancer detection and treatment. PMID:25733851

  20. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 may be involved in pregnane x receptor-activated overexpression of multidrug resistance 1 gene during acquired multidrug resistant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Ma, Zhiqiang; Liu, Haiyan; Liu, Pinghua; Xiao, Yu; Jiang, Xuehua; Wang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pregnane x receptor (PXR) - activated overexpression of the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene is an important way for tumor cells to acquire drug resistance. However, the detailed mechanism still remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether protein arginine methyl transferase 1(PRMT1) is involved in PXR - activated overexpression of MDR1 during acquired multidrug resistant. Experimental Design Arginine methyltransferase inhibitor 1 (AMI-1) was used to pharmacologically block PRMT1 in resistant breast cancer cells (MCF7/adr). The mRNA and protein levels of MDR1 were detected by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. Immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation were used to investigate the physical interaction between PXR and PRMT1. Then, 136 candidate compounds were screened for PRMT1 inhibitors. Lastly, luciferase reporter gene and nude mice bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts were adopted to investigate the anti-tumor effect of PRMT1 inhibitors when combined with adriamycin. Results AMI-1 significantly suppressed the expression of MDR1 in MCF7/adr cells and increased cells sensitivity of MCF7/adr to adriamycin. Physical interaction between PRMT1 and PXR exists in MCF7/adr cells, which could be disrupted by AMI-1. Those results suggest that PRMT1 may be involved in PXR-activated overexpression of MDR1 in resistant breast cancer cells, and AMI-1 may suppress MDR1 by disrupting the interaction between PRMT1 and PXR. Then, five compounds including rutin, isoquercitrin, salvianolic acid A, naproxen, and felodipline were identified to be PRMT1 inhibitors. Finally, those PRMT1 inhibitors were observed to significantly decrease MDR1 promoter activity in vitro and enhance the antitumor effect of adriamycin in nude mice that bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts. Conclusions PRMT1 may be an important co-activator of PXR in activating MDR1 gene during acquired resistance, and PRMT1 inhibitor combined with

  1. Insulin resistance contributes to multidrug resistance in HepG2 cells via activation of the PERK signaling pathway and upregulation of Bcl-2 and P-gp.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyue; Li, Linjing; Li, Jing; Cheng, Yan; Chen, Jing; Shen, Minghui; Zhang, Shangdi; Wei, Hulai

    2016-05-01

    Liver tumorigenesis frequently causes insulin resistance which may be used as an independent risk factor for evaluation of survival and post-surgery relapse of liver cancer patients. In the present study, HepG2/IR, an insulin resistant HepG2 cell line, was established by exposing HepG2 cells to 0.5 µmol/l of insulin for 72 h, and comparison of HepG2/IR with the parental HepG2 cells indicated that the HepG2/IR cells showed significantly enhanced resistance to the most frequently used chemotherapeutics for solid tumors, such as cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, vincristine and mitomycin. Flow cytometric analysis of cisplatin-treated HepG2/IR cells showed a significantly decreased hypodiploid peak and a significantly downregulated expression level of pro-apoptotic protein caspase-3 compared with the parental HepG2 cells. Our data further showed swollen endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in the cisplatin-treated HepG2/IR cells with significantly increased levels of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), phosphorylated protein kinase R-like ER kinase (p-PERK) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp). There was also an upregulated expression of anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) whereas no significant change was observed for CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), which is known to be induced by ER stress and to mediate apoptosis. Our results demonstrated that insulin resistance in HepG2 cells promoted a protective unfolded protein response and upregulated the expression of ER chaperone protein GRP78, which resulted in the phosphorylation of PERK kinase to activate the PERK-mediated ER stress signal transduction pathway and the upregulation of Bcl-2 and P-gp, leading to the inhibition of the caspase-3-dependent apoptosis pathway and to the survival of liver tumor cells. PMID:26935266

  2. Redox Regulation of Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Chemotherapy: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The development of multidrug resistance to cancer chemotherapy is a major obstacle to the effective treatment of human malignancies. It has been established that membrane proteins, notably multidrug resistance (MDR), multidrug resistance protein (MRP), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family encoding efflux pumps, play important roles in the development of multidrug resistance. Overexpression of these transporters has been observed frequently in many types of human malignancies and correlated with poor responses to chemotherapeutic agents. Evidence has accumulated showing that redox signals are activated in response to drug treatments that affect the expression and activity of these transporters by multiple mechanisms, including (a) conformational changes in the transporters, (b) regulation of the biosynthesis cofactors required for the transporter's function, (c) regulation of the expression of transporters at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and epigenetic levels, and (d) amplification of the copy number of genes encoding these transporters. This review describes various specific factors and their relevant signaling pathways that are involved in the regulation. Finally, the roles of redox signaling in the maintenance and evolution of cancer stem cells and their implications in the development of intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy are discussed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 99–133. PMID:18699730

  3. Repurposing ebselen for treatment of multidrug-resistant staphylococcal infections

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Younis, Waleed; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    Novel antimicrobials and new approaches to developing them are urgently needed. Repurposing already-approved drugs with well-characterized toxicology and pharmacology is a novel way to reduce the time, cost, and risk associated with antibiotic innovation. Ebselen, an organoselenium compound, is known to be clinically safe and has a well-known pharmacology profile. It has shown potent bactericidal activity against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA and VRSA). We demonstrated that ebselen acts through inhibition of protein synthesis and subsequently inhibited toxin production in MRSA. Additionally, ebselen was remarkably active and significantly reduced established staphylococcal biofilms. The therapeutic efficacy of ebselen was evaluated in a mouse model of staphylococcal skin infections. Ebselen 1% and 2% significantly reduced the bacterial load and the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in MRSA USA300 skin lesions. Furthermore, it acts synergistically with traditional antimicrobials. This study provides evidence that ebselen has great potential for topical treatment of MRSA skin infections and lays the foundation for further analysis and development of ebselen as a potential treatment for multidrug-resistant staphylococcal infections. PMID:26111644

  4. CdTe quantum dots with daunorubicin induce apoptosis of multidrug-resistant human hepatoma HepG2/ADM cells: in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gen; Shi, Lixin; Selke, Matthias; Wang, Xuemei

    2011-06-01

    Cadmium telluride quantum dots (Cdte QDs) have received significant attention in biomedical research because of their potential in disease diagnosis and drug delivery. In this study, we have investigated the interaction mechanism and synergistic effect of 3-mercaptopropionic acid-capped Cdte QDs with the anti-cancer drug daunorubicin (DNR) on the induction of apoptosis using drug-resistant human hepatoma HepG2/ADM cells. Electrochemical assay revealed that Cdte QDs readily facilitated the uptake of the DNR into HepG2/ADM cells. Apoptotic staining, DNA fragmentation, and flow cytometry analysis further demonstrated that compared with Cdte QDs or DNR treatment alone, the apoptosis rate increased after the treatment of Cdte QDs together with DNR in HepG2/ADM cells. We observed that Cdte QDs treatment could reduce the effect of P-glycoprotein while the treatment of Cdte QDs together with DNR can clearly activate apoptosis-related caspases protein expression in HepG2/ADM cells. Moreover, our in vivo study indicated that the treatment of Cdte QDs together with DNR effectively inhibited the human hepatoma HepG2/ADM nude mice tumor growth. The increased cell apoptosis rate was closely correlated with the enhanced inhibition of tumor growth in the studied animals. Thus, Cdte QDs combined with DNR may serve as a possible alternative for targeted therapeutic approaches for some cancer treatments.

  5. Photoexcited quantum dots for killing multidrug-resistant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Colleen M.; Goodman, Samuel M.; McDaniel, Jessica A.; Madinger, Nancy E.; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are an ever-growing threat because of the shrinking arsenal of efficacious antibiotics. Metal nanoparticles can induce cell death, yet the toxicity effect is typically nonspecific. Here, we show that photoexcited quantum dots (QDs) can kill a wide range of multidrug-resistant bacterial clinical isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhimurium. The killing effect is independent of material and controlled by the redox potentials of the photogenerated charge carriers, which selectively alter the cellular redox state. We also show that the QDs can be tailored to kill 92% of bacterial cells in a monoculture, and in a co-culture of E. coli and HEK 293T cells, while leaving the mammalian cells intact, or to increase bacterial proliferation. Photoexcited QDs could be used in the study of the effect of redox states on living systems, and lead to clinical phototherapy for the treatment of infections.

  6. Coencapsulated doxorubicin and bromotetrandrine lipid nanoemulsions in reversing multidrug resistance in breast cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi; Luo, Jingwen; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhi-Rong; Sun, Xun; Fu, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance has remained a major cause of treatment failure in chemotherapy due to the presence of P-glycoproteins (P-gp) that actively pump drugs from inside the cell to the outside. P-gp inhibitors were developed and coadministered with chemotherapeutic drugs to overcome the effect of efflux pumps thus enhancing the chemosensitivity of therapeutics. Our study aimed at developing a lipid nanoemulsion system for the coencapsulation of doxorubicin (DOX) and bromotetrandrine (W198) to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) in breast cancer. W198 was a potent P-gp inhibitor, and DOX was selected as a model compound which is a common substrate for P-gp. Coencapsulated DOX and W198 lipid nanoemulsions (DOX/W198-LNs) displayed significantly enhanced cytotoxicity in DOX-resistant human breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR) compared with DOX loaded lipid nanoemulsions (DOX-LNs) (p < 0.05), which is due to the enhanced intracellular uptake of DOX in MCF-7/ADR cells. The biodistribution study was performed using a nude mice xenograft model, which demonstrates enhanced tumor uptake of DOX in the DOX/W198-LN treated group. Compared with DOX solution, DOX/W198-LNs showed reduced cardiac toxicity and gastrointestinal injury in rats. Taken together, DOX/W198-LNs represent a promising formulation for overcoming MDR in breast cancer. PMID:25469833

  7. Multidrug resistance in pediatric urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Gaspari, Romolo J; Dickson, Eric; Karlowsky, James; Doern, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) represent a common infection in the pediatric population. Escherichia coli is the most common uropathogen in children, and antimicrobial resistance in this species complicates the treatment of pediatric UTIs. Despite the impact of resistance on empiric antibiotic choice, there is little data on multidrug resistance in pediatric patients. In this paper, we describe characteristics of multidrug-resistant E. coli in pediatric patients using a large national database of uropathogens antimicrobial sensitivities. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns to commonly prescribed antibiotics were performed on uropathogens isolated from children presenting to participating hospitals between 1999 and 2001. Data were analyzed separately for four pediatric age groups. Single and multidrug resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) were performed on all specimens. There were a total of 11,341 E. coli urine cultures from 343 infants (0-4 weeks), 1,801 toddlers (5 weeks-24 months), 6,742 preteens (2-12 years), and 2,455 teens (13-17 years). E. coli resistance to ampicillin peaked in toddlers (52.8%) but was high in preteens (52.1%), infants (50.4%), and teens (40.6%). Resistance to two or more antibiotics varied across age groups, with toddlers (27%) leading preteens (23.1%), infants (21%), and teens (15.9%). Resistance to three or more antibiotics was low in all age groups (range 3.1-5.2%). The most common co-resistance in all age groups was ampicillin/TMP-SMZ. In conclusion, less than half of all pediatric UTIs are susceptible to all commonly used antibiotics. In some age groups, there is a significant percentage of co-resistance between the two most commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin and TMP-SMZ).

  8. Multidrug resistance in pediatric urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Gaspari, Romolo J; Dickson, Eric; Karlowsky, James; Doern, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) represent a common infection in the pediatric population. Escherichia coli is the most common uropathogen in children, and antimicrobial resistance in this species complicates the treatment of pediatric UTIs. Despite the impact of resistance on empiric antibiotic choice, there is little data on multidrug resistance in pediatric patients. In this paper, we describe characteristics of multidrug-resistant E. coli in pediatric patients using a large national database of uropathogens antimicrobial sensitivities. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns to commonly prescribed antibiotics were performed on uropathogens isolated from children presenting to participating hospitals between 1999 and 2001. Data were analyzed separately for four pediatric age groups. Single and multidrug resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) were performed on all specimens. There were a total of 11,341 E. coli urine cultures from 343 infants (0-4 weeks), 1,801 toddlers (5 weeks-24 months), 6,742 preteens (2-12 years), and 2,455 teens (13-17 years). E. coli resistance to ampicillin peaked in toddlers (52.8%) but was high in preteens (52.1%), infants (50.4%), and teens (40.6%). Resistance to two or more antibiotics varied across age groups, with toddlers (27%) leading preteens (23.1%), infants (21%), and teens (15.9%). Resistance to three or more antibiotics was low in all age groups (range 3.1-5.2%). The most common co-resistance in all age groups was ampicillin/TMP-SMZ. In conclusion, less than half of all pediatric UTIs are susceptible to all commonly used antibiotics. In some age groups, there is a significant percentage of co-resistance between the two most commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin and TMP-SMZ). PMID:16922629

  9. Apoptosis Induction and Imaging of Cadmium-Telluride Quantum Dots with Wogonin in Multidrug-Resistant Leukemia K562/A02 Cell.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin; Liu, Hongyi; Huang, Dongliang; Mao, Xuhua; Hu, Xianyun; Jiang, Caiyun; Pu, Maomao; Zhang, Gen; Zeng, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Wogonin (5,7-dihydroxy-8-methoxyflavone) is one of the active components of flavonoids isolated from Scutellariae radix and possesses antitumor effect against leukemia. Cadmium-telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs) are a kind of nanoparticles with great potential in functioning as an efficient drug delivery vector in biomedical research. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of CdTe-QDs with Wogonin on the induction of apoptosis using drug-resistant human leukemia KA cells. Flow cytometry analysis, assay of morphology under electron microscope, quantitative analysis of tumor volume and micro-CT imaging demonstrated that compared with that by pure CdTe-QDs or wogonin, the apoptosis rate increased sharply when treated wirh CdTe-QDs together with wogonin on KA cells. These results proved that the nanocomposites readily overcame the barrier of drug-resistance and provoked cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo by facilitating the interaction between wogonin and KA cells. As known to all, it is an inevitable tendency that new effective therapies will take the place of conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy presenting significant disadvantages. According to this article, CdTe-QD combined with wogonin is a possible alternative for some cancer treatments. PMID:27455661

  10. Congenital Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Espiritu, Nora; Aguirre, Lino; Jave, Oswaldo; Sanchez, Luis; Kirwan, Daniela E.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a case of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in a Peruvian infant. His mother was diagnosed with disseminated TB, and treatment commenced 11 days postpartum. The infant was diagnosed with TB after 40 days and died at 2 months and 2 days of age. Congenital transmission of TB to the infant was suspected, because direct postpartum transmission was considered unlikely; also, thorough screening of contacts for TB was negative. Spoligotyping confirmed that both mother and baby were infected with identical strains of the Beijing family (SIT1). PMID:24821847

  11. Overcoming multidrug resistance in Dox-resistant neuroblastoma cell lines via treatment with HPMA copolymer conjugates containing anthracyclines and P-gp inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Koziolová, Eva; Janoušková, Olga; Cuchalová, Lucie; Hvězdová, Zuzana; Hraběta, Jan; Eckschlager, Tomáš; Sivák, Ladislav; Ulbrich, Karel; Etrych, Tomáš; Šubr, Vladimír

    2016-07-10

    Water-soluble N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer conjugates bearing the anticancer drugs doxorubicin (Dox) or pirarubicin (THP), P-gp inhibitors derived from reversin 121 (REV) or ritonavir (RIT)), or both anticancer drug and P-gp inhibitor were designed and synthesized. All biologically active molecules were attached to the polymer carrier via pH-sensitive spacer enabling controlled release in mild acidic environment modeling endosomes and lysosomes of tumor cells. The cytotoxicity of the conjugates against three sensitive and Dox-resistant neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines, applied alone or in combination, was studied in vitro. All conjugates containing THP displayed higher cytotoxicity against all three Dox-resistant NB cell lines compared with the corresponding Dox-containing conjugates. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of conjugates containing both drug and P-gp inhibitor was up to 10 times higher than that of the conjugate containing only drug. In general, the polymer-drug conjugates showed higher cytotoxicity when conjugates containing inhibitors were added 8 or 16h prior to treatment compared with conjugates bearing both the inhibitor and the drug. The difference in cytotoxicity was more pronounced at the 16-h time point. Moreover, higher inhibitor:drug ratios resulted in higher cytotoxicity. The cytotoxicity of the polymer-drug used in combination with polymer P-gp inhibitor was up to 84 times higher than that of the polymer-drug alone. PMID:27189135

  12. Anti-Microbial Dendrimers against Multidrug-Resistant P. aeruginosa Enhance the Angiogenic Effect of Biological Burn-wound Bandages

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Sayed, Philippe; Kaeppli, Ariane; Siriwardena, Thissa; Darbre, Tamis; Perron, Karl; Jafari, Paris; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Pioletti, Dominique P.; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2016-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has increased progressively and impedes further regression in mortality in burn patients. Such wound infections serve as bacterial reservoir for nosocomial infections and are associated with significant morbidity and costs. Anti-microbial polycationic dendrimers G3KL and G3RL, able to kill multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa, have been previously developed. The combination of these dendrimers with a class of biological bandages made of progenitor skin cells, which secrete growth factors, could positively impact wound-healing processes. However, polycations are known to be used as anti-angiogenic agents for tumor suppression. Since, neovascularization is pivotal in the healing of deep burn-wounds, the use of anti-microbial dendrimers may thus hinder the healing processes. Surprisingly, we have seen in this study that G3KL and G3RL dendrimers can have angiogenic effects. Moreover, we have shown that a dendrimer concentration ranging between 50 and 100 μg/mL in combination with the biological bandages can suppress bacterial growth without altering cell viability up to 5 days. These results show that antimicrobial dendrimers can be used in combination with biological bandages and could potentially improve the healing process with an enhanced angiogenesis. PMID:26912450

  13. [Innovative treatments for multidrug-resistant bacteria].

    PubMed

    Pierre, Tattevin; Aurélien, Lorleac'h; Matthieu, Revest

    2014-03-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria has accelerated sharply in the last decade. According to the World Health Organization they are responsible for an estimated 25 000 deaths in Europe each year. In addition, few new antibiotics are under development, raising the spectrum of a return to the "pre-antibiotic era". Non antibiotic antibacterial agents have recently attracted renewed interest. The most promising candidates are: i) phages (bacteria-infecting viruses) have been widely used in Eastern European countries since the 1930s but come up against logistic and regulatory obstacles due to the evolutionary nature of these biologic agents, while convincing clinical data are lacking; ii) bacteriocines are smallantibacterialpeptidesproducedby numerous bacteria; some have a rapid bactericidal effect, good tolerability, and a limited impact on the commensal flora; however, clinical use of bacteriocines is complicated by their fragility, poor penetration, and substantial risk of resistance selection ; iii) antisense oligonucleo tides act by inactivating genes through specific interaction with a complementary DNA or RNA fragment, potentially allowing specific inhibition of selected bacterial virulence factors. However, this therapeutic class may be more suitable for viral or genetic diseases than for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections, owing to the difficulty of delivering them inside bacteria. PMID:26427289

  14. Most drugs that reverse multidrug resistance also inhibit photoaffinity labeling of P-glycoprotein by a vinblastine analog

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, S.; Cornwell, M.M.; Kuwano, M.; Pastan, I.; Gottesman, M.M.

    1988-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant human KB carcinoma cells express a 170,000-dalton membrane glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) that can be photoaffinity labeled with the vinblastine analog N-(p-azido-(3-/sup 125/I)salicyl)-N'-(beta-aminoethyl)vindesine. Several agents that suppress the multidrug-resistant phenotype, including N-solanesyl-N,N'-bis(3,4-dimethylbenzyl)ethylenediamine, cepharanthine, quinidine, and reserpine, were found to inhibit photolabeling of P-glycoprotein at doses comparable to those that reverse multidrug resistance. However, the phenothiazines chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine, which also effectively reverse multidrug resistance, were poor inhibitors of the photoaffinity labeling of P-glycoprotein. Chloroquine, propranolol, or atropine, which only partially reversed the drug resistance, also did not inhibit photolabeling. Naphthalene sulfonamide calmodulin inhibitors, W7 and W5, as well as many other drugs that did not circumvent multidrug resistance, did not inhibit photolabeling. These studies suggest that most, but not all, agents that phenotypically suppress multidrug resistance also inhibit drug binding to a site on P-glycoprotein with which a photoaffinity analog of vinblastine interacts.

  15. How to Measure Export via Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Jessica M. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps are an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and are required for many pathogens to cause infection. They are also being harnessed to improve microbial biotechnological processes, including biofuel production. Therefore, scientists of many specialties must be able to accurately measure efflux activity. However, myriad methodologies have been described and the most appropriate method is not always clear. Within the scientific literature, many methods are misused or data arising are misinterpreted. The methods for measuring efflux activity can be split into two groups, (i) those that directly measure efflux and (ii) those that measure the intracellular accumulation of a substrate, which is then used to infer efflux activity. Here, we review the methods for measuring efflux and explore the most recent advances in this field, including single-cell or cell-free technologies and mass spectrometry, that are being used to provide more detailed information about efflux pump activity. PMID:27381291

  16. Reversing Cancer Multidrug Resistance in Xenograft Models via Orchestrating Multiple Actions of Functional Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Debin; Wang, Tingfang; Su, Zhigui; Xue, Lingjing; Mo, Ran; Zhang, Can

    2016-08-31

    A multistimuli responsive drug delivery system (DDS) based on sulfhydryl and amino-cofunctionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (SH/NH2-MSNs) has been developed, in which the multifunctional hyaluronic acid (HA) derivatives were grafted onto the SH/NH2-MSNs by disulfide bonds for targeting delivery, controlling drug release and reversing multidrug resistance (MDR). The doxorubicin (Dox) loaded multifunctional HA derivatives modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (Dox/HHS-MSNs) were enzyme and redox sensitive, which could respond to the intracellular stimuli of hyaluronidase (HAase) and glutathione (GSH) successively and prevent drug leakage before reaching the tumor tissues. The cellular uptake experiments showed that Dox/HHS-MSNs were vulnerable to be endocytosed into the Dox-resistant human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7/ADR) cells, efficiently realized the endolysosomal escape and remained in the cytoplasm. Because of orchestrating multiple actions above including active targeting, endolysosomal escape and efficient multilevel drug release, Dox/HHS-MSNs could induce the strongest apoptosis and cytotoxicity of MCF-7/ADR cells. Furthermore, a series of in vivo studies on MCF-7/ADR tumor-bearing xenograft mouse models demonstrated that Dox/HHS-MSNs possessed the enhanced tumor-targeting capacity and the best therapeutic efficacy to reverse cancer MDR. PMID:27420116

  17. Breaking the Spell: Combating Multidrug Resistant 'Superbugs'.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahper N; Khan, Asad U

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria have become a severe threat to community wellbeing. Conventional antibiotics are getting progressively more ineffective as a consequence of resistance, making it imperative to realize improved antimicrobial options. In this review we emphasized the microorganisms primarily reported of being resistance, referred as ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacteriaceae) accentuating their capacity to "escape" from routine antimicrobial regimes. The upcoming antimicrobial agents showing great potential and can serve as alternative therapeutic options are discussed. We also provided succinct overview of two evolving technologies; specifically network pharmacology and functional genomics profiling. Furthermore, In vivo imaging techniques can provide novel targets and a real time tool for potential lead molecule assessment. The employment of such approaches at prelude of a drug development process, will enables more informed decisions on candidate drug selection and will maximize or predict therapeutic potential before clinical testing.

  18. Nosocomial transmission of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Crudu, V; Merker, M; Lange, C; Noroc, E; Romancenco, E; Chesov, D; Günther, G; Niemann, S

    2015-12-01

    Nosocomial transmission of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) was ascertained by 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and spoligotyping at four hospitals in the Republic of Moldova, a high MDR-TB burden country. Overall, 5.1% of patients with pan-susceptible TB at baseline were identified with MDR-TB during in-patient treatment. In 75% of cases, the MDR-TB strain was genetically distinct from the non-MDR-TB strain at baseline, suggesting a high rate of nosocomial transmission of MDR-TB. The highest proportion (40.3%) of follow-up MDR-TB isolates was associated with the M. tuberculosis URAL 163-15 strain.

  19. Epidemiology and Treatment of Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitnick, Carole D.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Shin, Sonya S.

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistant tuberculosis is now thought to afflict between 1 and 2 million patients annually. Although significant regional variability in the distribution of disease has been recorded, surveillance data are limited by several factors. The true burden of disease is likely underestimated. Nevertheless, the estimated burden is substantial enough to warrant concerted action. A range of approaches is possible, but all appropriate interventions require scale-up of laboratories and early treatment with regimens containing a sufficient number of second-line drugs. Ambulatory treatment for most patients, and improved infection control, can facilitate scale-up with decreased risk of nosocomial transmission. Several obstacles have been considered to preclude worldwide scale-up of treatment, mostly attributable to inadequate human, drug, and financial resources. Further delays in scale-up, however, risk continued generation and transmission of resistant tuberculosis, as well as associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:18810684

  20. Intracellular targeted co-delivery of shMDR1 and gefitinib with chitosan nanoparticles for overcoming multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiwei; Yang, Guang; Shi, Yijie; Su, Chang; Liu, Ming; Feng, Bo; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, multidrug resistance and side effects of drugs limit the effectiveness of chemotherapies in clinics. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (MDR1), as a member of the ATP-binding cassette family, acts on transporting drugs into cell plasma across the membrane of cancer cells and leads to the occurrence of multidrug resistance, thus resulting in the failure of chemotherapy in cancer. The main aims of this research were to design a nanodelivery system for accomplishing the effective co-delivery of gene and antitumor drug and overcoming multidrug resistance effect. In this study, shMDR1 and gefitinib-encapsulating chitosan nanoparticles with sustained release, small particle size, and high encapsulation efficiency were prepared. The serum stability, protection from nuclease, and transfection efficiency of gene in vitro were investigated. The effects of co-delivery of shMDR1 and gefitinib in nanoparticles on reversing multidrug resistance were also evaluated by investigating the cytotoxicity, cellular uptake mechanism, and cell apoptosis on established gefitinib-resistant cells. The results demonstrated that chitosan nanoparticles entrapping gefitinib and shMDR1 had the potential to overcome the multidrug resistance and improve cancer treatment efficacy, especially toward resistant cells. PMID:26648717

  1. Intracellular targeted co-delivery of shMDR1 and gefitinib with chitosan nanoparticles for overcoming multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiwei; Yang, Guang; Shi, Yijie; Su, Chang; Liu, Ming; Feng, Bo; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, multidrug resistance and side effects of drugs limit the effectiveness of chemotherapies in clinics. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (MDR1), as a member of the ATP-binding cassette family, acts on transporting drugs into cell plasma across the membrane of cancer cells and leads to the occurrence of multidrug resistance, thus resulting in the failure of chemotherapy in cancer. The main aims of this research were to design a nanodelivery system for accomplishing the effective co-delivery of gene and antitumor drug and overcoming multidrug resistance effect. In this study, shMDR1 and gefitinib-encapsulating chitosan nanoparticles with sustained release, small particle size, and high encapsulation efficiency were prepared. The serum stability, protection from nuclease, and transfection efficiency of gene in vitro were investigated. The effects of co-delivery of shMDR1 and gefitinib in nanoparticles on reversing multidrug resistance were also evaluated by investigating the cytotoxicity, cellular uptake mechanism, and cell apoptosis on established gefitinib-resistant cells. The results demonstrated that chitosan nanoparticles entrapping gefitinib and shMDR1 had the potential to overcome the multidrug resistance and improve cancer treatment efficacy, especially toward resistant cells. PMID:26648717

  2. Enhanced glutathione depletion, protein adduct formation, and cytotoxicity following exposure to 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) in cells expressing human multidrug resistance protein-1 (MRP1) together with human glutathione S-transferase-M1 (GSTM1).

    PubMed

    Rudd, Lisa P; Kabler, Sandra L; Morrow, Charles S; Townsend, Alan J

    2011-11-15

    4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is one of the most reactive products of lipid peroxidation and has both cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in cells. Several enzymatic pathways have been reported to detoxify HNE, including conjugation by glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs). Removal of the resulting HNE-glutathione conjugate (HNE-SG) by an efflux transporter may be required for complete detoxification. We investigated the effect of expression of GSTM1 and/or the ABC efflux transporter protein, multidrug-resistance protein-1 (MRP1), on HNE-induced cellular toxicity. Stably transfected MCF7 cell lines were used to examine the effect of GSTM1 and/or MRP1 expression on HNE-induced cytotoxicity, GSH depletion, and HNE-protein adduct formation. Co-expression in the MCF7 cell line of GSTM1 with MRP1 resulted in a 2.3-fold sensitization to HNE cytotoxicity (0.44-fold IC(50) value relative to control) rather than the expected protection. Expression of either GSTM1 or MRP1 alone also resulted in slight sensitization to HNE cytotoxicity (0.79-fold and 0.71-fold decreases in IC(50) values, respectively). Co-expression of GSTM1 and MRP1 strongly enhanced the formation of HNE-protein adducts relative to the non-expressing control cell line, whereas expression of either MRP1 alone or GSTM1 alone yielded similarly low levels of HNE-protein adducts to that of the control cell line. Glutathione (GSH) levels were reduced by 10-20% in either the control cell line or the MCF7/GSTM1 cell line with the same HNE exposure for 60min. However, HNE induced >80% depletion of GSH in cells expressing MRP1 alone. Co-expression of both MRP1 and GSTM1 caused slightly greater GSH depletion, consistent with the greater protein adduct formation and cytotoxicity in this cell line. Since expression of GSTM1 or MRP1 alone did not strongly sensitize cells to HNE, or result in greater HNE-protein adducts than in the control cell line, these results indicate that MRP1 and GSTM1 collaborate to enhance HNE-protein adduct

  3. Characterization of multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein transport function with an organotechnetium cation

    SciTech Connect

    Piwnica-Worms, D.; Vallabhaneni, V.R.; Kronauge, J.F.

    1995-09-26

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in mammalian cells and tumors is associated with overexpression of an {approximately}170 integral membrane efflux transporter, the MDR1 P-glycoprotein. Hexakis(2-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile) technetium(I) (Tc-SESTAMIBI), a {gamma}-emitting lipophilic cationic metallopharmaceutical, has recently been shown to be a P-glycoprotein transport substrate. Exploiting the negligible lipid membrane adsorption properties of this organometallic substrate, we studied the transport kinetics, pharmacology, drug binding, and modulation of P-glycoprotein in cell preparations derived from a variety of species and selection strategies, including SW-1573, V79, Alex, and CHO drug-sensitive cells and in 77A, LZ-8, and Alex/A.5 MDR cells. Rapid cell accumulation (T{sub 1/2} {approx} 6 min) of the agent to a steady state was observed which was inversely proportional to immunodetectable levels of P-glycoprotein. Many MDR cytotoxic agents inhibited P-glycoprotein-mediated Tc-SESTAMIBI efflux, thereby enhancing organometallic cation accumulation. 70 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Wnt pathway activation and ABCB1 expression account for attenuation of Proteasome inhibitor-mediated apoptosis in multidrug-resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Kowit Yu; Hsu, Chih-Jung; Hung, Tsai-Hsien; Hu, Han-Shu; Huang, Tsung-Teng; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Wang, Chihuei; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Choo, Kong Bung; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Multiple drug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle to attenuating the effectiveness of chemotherapy to many human malignancies. Proteasome inhibition induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells and is recognized as a novel anticancer therapy approach. Despite its success, some multiple myeloma patients are resistant or become refractory to ongoing treatment by bortezomib suggesting that chemoresistant cancer cells may have developed a novel mechanism directed against the proteasome inhibitor. The present study aimed to investigate potential mechanism(s) of attenuation in a MDR cell line, MES-SA/Dx5. We found that compared to the parental human uterus sarcoma cell line MES-SA cells, MES-SA/Dx5 cells highly expressed the ABCB1 was more resistant to MG132 and bortezomib, escaping the proteasome inhibitor-induced apoptosis pathway. The resistance was reversed by co-treatment of MG132 and the ABCB1 inhibitor verapamil. The data indicated that ABCB1 might play a role in the efflux of MG132 from the MES-SA/Dx5 cells to reduce MG132-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, the canonical Wnt pathway was found activated only in the MES-SA/Dx5 cells through active β-catenin and related transactivation activities. Western blot analysis demonstrated that Wnt-targeting genes, including c-Myc and cyclin D1, were upregulated and were relevant in inhibiting the expression of p21 in MES-SA/Dx5 cells. On the other hand, MES-SA cells expressed high levels of p21 and downregulated cyclin D1 and caused cell cycle arrest. Together, our study demonstrated the existence and participation of ABCB1 and the Wnt pathway in an MDR cell line that attenuated proteasome inhibitor-induced apoptosis. PMID:25590413

  5. New flow cytometric method for detection of minimally expressed multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein on normal and acute leukemia cells using biotinylated MRK16 and streptavidin-RED670 conjugate.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, A; Shinjo, K; Ohnishi, K; Ohno, R

    1995-06-01

    To evaluate the expression of multidrug resistance (MDR) on normal and leukemia cells, we examined P-glycoprotein (P-gp) by a newly devised flow cytometric method, utilizing a biotinylated monoclonal antibody (mAb) against P-gp (MRK16), a streptavidin-RED670 conjugate (SA-RED670) and appropriate emission filters. The combination of biotinylated MRK16 (b-MRK16) and SA-RED670 resulted in higher sensitivity as compared with standard methods such as the use of streptavidin-phycoerythrin (SA-PE) conjugate. The sensitivity was examined in K562, K562/ADR, NOMO-1, NOMO-1/ADR and HL60 cells, and compared with the data obtained from reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of mdr-1 gene. P-gp positivity on flow cytometry was 10.4%, 99.9%, 1.4%, 90.4% and 0%, respectively. Mdr-1 mRNA was well expressed in K562/ADR and NOMO-1/ADR cells, but not in NOMO-1 and HL60 cells. In K562 cells, mdr-1 was found after 40 cycles of PCR, but not 25 cycles. These data are well correlated with those from the flow cytometry. We then studied the P-gp expression on normal peripheral blood cells and acute leukemia cells. P-gp was little expressed on peripheral lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. It was also little expressed on blast cells from 5 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (AML) and 5 acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) expressed P-gp at diagnosis, ranging from 8.5% to 34.5% (16.9 +/- 11.8%) and from 2.3% to 45.6% (24.0 +/- 17.8%), respectively. All 9 relapsed or refractory cases expressed P-gp, ranging from 21.1% to 99.8% (52.2 +/- 29.9%). Significant differences were found in APL, CD34-positive and relapse and refractory cases (P = 0.0006, 0.0007 and 0.0088, respectively). These results indicate that this flow cytometric analysis is useful for the evaluation of clinical MDR status and can identify a group of patients with resistant leukemia. PMID:7622426

  6. A Defined Tuberculosis Vaccine Candidate Boosts BCG and Protects Against Multidrug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bertholet, Sylvie; Ireton, Gregory C.; Ordway, Diane J.; Windish, Hillarie Plessner; Pine, Samuel O.; Kahn, Maria; Phan, Tony; Orme, Ian M.; Vedvick, Thomas S.; Baldwin, Susan L.; Coler, Rhea N.; Reed, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) childhood vaccine, tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious global health problem. A successful vaccine against TB that replaces or boosts BCG will include antigens that induce or recall appropriate T cell responses. Four Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens, including members of the virulence factor families PE/PPE and EsX, or antigens associated with latency were produced as a single recombinant fusion protein. When administered with the adjuvant GLA-SE, a stable oil-in-water nanoemulsion, the fusion protein ID93 was immunogenic in mice, guinea pigs, and cynomolgus monkeys. In mice, ID93/GLA-SE combination induced polyfunctional CD4 TH1-cell responses characterized by antigen-specific IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-2, as well as a reduction in the number of bacteria in the lungs of animals subsequently infected with virulent or multidrug resistant Mtb strains. Furthermore, boosting BCG-vaccinated guinea pigs with ID93/GLA-SE resulted in reduced pathology and fewer bacilli, and prevented the death of animals challenged with virulent Mtb. Finally, ID93 elicited polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in BCG-vaccinated or Mtb-exposed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This study establishes that the protein subunit vaccine ID93/GLA-SE protects against TB and MDR-TB in animals, and is a candidate for boosting the protective efficacy of the childhood BCG vaccine. PMID:20944089

  7. Folate-mediated mitochondrial targeting with doxorubicin-polyrotaxane nanoparticles overcomes multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fengjiao; Sun, Mingna; Du, Lingran; Peng, Wei; Li, Qiuli; Feng, Yinghong; Zhou, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to treatment with anticancer drugs is a significant obstacle and a fundamental cause of therapeutic failure in cancer therapy. Functional doxorubicin (DOX) nanoparticles for targeted delivery of the classical cytotoxic anticancer drug DOX to tumor cells, using folate-terminated polyrotaxanes along with dequalinium, have been developed and proven to overcome this resistance due to specific molecular features, including a size of approximately 101 nm, a zeta potential of 3.25 mV and drug-loading content of 18%. Compared with free DOX, DOX hydrochloride, DOX nanoparticles, and targeted DOX nanoparticles, the functional DOX nanoparticles exhibited the strongest anticancer efficacy in vitro and in the drug-resistant MCF-7/ Adr (DOX) xenograft tumor model. More specifically, the nanoparticles significantly increased the intracellular uptake of DOX, selectively accumulating in mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum after treatment, with release of cytochrome C as a result. Furthermore, the caspase-9 and caspase-3 cascade was activated by the functional DOX nanoparticles through upregulation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bid and suppression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, thereby enhancing apoptosis by acting on the mitochondrial signaling pathways. In conclusion, functional DOX nanoparticles may provide a strategy for increasing the solubility of DOX and overcoming multidrug-resistant cancers. PMID:25605018

  8. Involvement of CD147 on multidrug resistance through the regulation of P-glycoprotein expression in K562/ADR leukemic cell line.

    PubMed

    Somno, Aoranit; Anuchapreeda, Songyot; Chruewkamlow, Nuttapol; Pata, Supansa; Kasinrerk, Watchara; Chiampanichayakul, Sawitree

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between P-gp and CD147 in the regulation of MDR in leukemic cells has not been reported. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between CD147 and P-gp in the regulation of drug resistance in the K562/ADR leukemic cell line. The results showed that drug-resistant K562/ADR cells expressed significantly higher P-gp and CD147 levels than drug-free K562/ADR cells. To determine the regulatory effect of CD147 on P-gp expression, anti-CD147 antibody MEM-M6/6 significantly decreased P-gp and CD147 mRNA and protein levels. This is the first report to show that CD147 mediates MDR in leukemia through the regulation of P-gp expression. PMID:27656412

  9. Telatinib reverses chemotherapeutic multidrug resistance mediated by ABCG2 efflux transporter in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sodani, Kamlesh; Patel, Atish; Anreddy, Nagaraju; Singh, Satyakam; Yang, Dong-Hua; Kathawala, Rishil J; Kumar, Priyank; Talele, Tanaji T; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a phenomenon where cancer cells become simultaneously resistant to anticancer drugs with different structures and mechanisms of action. MDR has been shown to be associated with overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Here, we report that telatinib, a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, enhances the anticancer activity of ABCG2 substrate anticancer drugs by inhibiting ABCG2 efflux transporter activity. Co-incubation of ABCG2-overexpressing drug resistant cell lines with telatinib and ABCG2 substrate anticancer drugs significantly reduced cellular viability, whereas telatinib alone did not significantly affect drug sensitive and drug resistant cell lines. Telatinib at 1 μM did not significantly alter the expression of ABCG2 in ABCG2-overexpressing cell lines. Telatinib at 1 μM significantly enhanced the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-mitoxantrone (MX) in ABCG2-overexpressing cell lines. In addition, telatinib at 1 μM significantly reduced the rate of [3H]-MX efflux from ABCG2-overexpressing cells. Furthermore, telatinib significantly inhibited ABCG2-mediated transport of [3H]-E217βG in ABCG2 overexpressing membrane vesicles. Telatinib stimulated the ATPase activity of ABCG2 in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that telatinib might be a substrate of ABCG2. Binding interactions of telatinib were found to be in transmembrane region of homology modeled human ABCG2. In addition, telatinib (15 mg/kg) with doxorubicin (1.8 mg/kg) significantly decreased the growth rate and tumor size of ABCG2 overexpressing tumors in a xenograft nude mouse model. These results, provided that they can be translated to humans, suggesting that telatinib, in combination with specific ABCG2 substrate drugs may be useful in treating tumors that overexpress ABCG2. PMID:24565910

  10. Effects of Withania somnifera and Tinospora cordifolia extracts on the side population phenotype of human epithelial cancer cells: toward targeting multidrug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Maliyakkal, Naseer; Appadath Beeran, Asmy; Balaji, Sai A; Udupa, Nayanabhirama; Ranganath Pai, Sreedhara; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2015-03-01

    Recent reports suggest the existence of a subpopulation of stem-like cancer cells, termed as cancer stem cells (CSCs), which bear functional and phenotypic resemblance with the adult, tissue-resident stem cells. Side population (SP) assay based on differential efflux of Hoechst 33342 has been effectively used for the isolation of CSCs. The drug resistance properties of SP cells are typically due to the increased expression of ABC transporters leading to drug efflux. Conventionally used chemotherapeutic drugs may often leads to an enrichment of SP, revealing their inability to target the drug-resistant SP and CSCs. Thus, identification of agents that can reduce the SP phenotype is currently in vogue in cancer therapeutics. Withania somnifera (WS) and Tinospora cordifolia (TC) have been used in Ayurveda for treating various diseases, including cancer. In the current study, we have investigated the effects of ethanolic (ET) extracts of WS and TC on the cancer SP phenotype. Interestingly, we found significant decrease in SP on treatment with TC-ET, but not with WS-ET. The SP-inhibitory TC-ET was further fractionated into petroleum ether (TC-PET), dichloromethane (TC-DCM), and n-butyl alcohol (TC-nBT) fractions using bioactivity-guided fractionation. Our data revealed that TC-PET and TC-DCM, but not TC-nBT, significantly inhibited SP in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, flow cytometry-based functional assays revealed that TC-PET and TC-DCM significantly inhibited ABC-B1 and ABC-G2 transporters and sensitized cancer cells toward chemotherapeutic drug-mediated cytotoxicity. Thus, the TC-PET and TC-DCM may harbor phytochemicals with the potential to reverse the drug-resistant phenotype, thus improving the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25549922

  11. Effects of Withania somnifera and Tinospora cordifolia extracts on the side population phenotype of human epithelial cancer cells: toward targeting multidrug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Maliyakkal, Naseer; Appadath Beeran, Asmy; Balaji, Sai A; Udupa, Nayanabhirama; Ranganath Pai, Sreedhara; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2015-03-01

    Recent reports suggest the existence of a subpopulation of stem-like cancer cells, termed as cancer stem cells (CSCs), which bear functional and phenotypic resemblance with the adult, tissue-resident stem cells. Side population (SP) assay based on differential efflux of Hoechst 33342 has been effectively used for the isolation of CSCs. The drug resistance properties of SP cells are typically due to the increased expression of ABC transporters leading to drug efflux. Conventionally used chemotherapeutic drugs may often leads to an enrichment of SP, revealing their inability to target the drug-resistant SP and CSCs. Thus, identification of agents that can reduce the SP phenotype is currently in vogue in cancer therapeutics. Withania somnifera (WS) and Tinospora cordifolia (TC) have been used in Ayurveda for treating various diseases, including cancer. In the current study, we have investigated the effects of ethanolic (ET) extracts of WS and TC on the cancer SP phenotype. Interestingly, we found significant decrease in SP on treatment with TC-ET, but not with WS-ET. The SP-inhibitory TC-ET was further fractionated into petroleum ether (TC-PET), dichloromethane (TC-DCM), and n-butyl alcohol (TC-nBT) fractions using bioactivity-guided fractionation. Our data revealed that TC-PET and TC-DCM, but not TC-nBT, significantly inhibited SP in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, flow cytometry-based functional assays revealed that TC-PET and TC-DCM significantly inhibited ABC-B1 and ABC-G2 transporters and sensitized cancer cells toward chemotherapeutic drug-mediated cytotoxicity. Thus, the TC-PET and TC-DCM may harbor phytochemicals with the potential to reverse the drug-resistant phenotype, thus improving the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy.

  12. [Management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Tritar, F; Daghfous, H; Ben Saad, S; Slim-Saidi, L

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant TB in many countries has become a major public health problem and an obstacle to effective tuberculosis control. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), which is most often the result of poor adherence, is a particularly dangerous form of tuberculosis because it is caused by bacilli resistant to at least isoniazid and rifampicin, the two most effective anti-tuberculosis drugs. Techniques for rapid diagnosis of resistance have greatly improved the care of patients by allowing early treatment which remains complex and costly establishment, and requires skills and resources. The treatment is not standardized but it includes in all cases attack phase with five drugs (there must be an injectable agent and a fluoroquinolone that form the basis of the regimen) for eight months and a maintenance phase (without injectable agent) with a total duration of 20 months on average. Surgery may be beneficial as long as the lesions are localized and the patient has a good cardiorespiratory function. Evolution of MDR-TB treated is less favorable than tuberculosis with germ sensitive. The cure rate varies from 60 to 75% for MDR-TB, and drops to 30 to 40% for XDR-TB. Mortality remains high, ranging from 20 to 40% even up to 70-90% in people co-infected with HIV.

  13. Management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Iseman, M D

    1999-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) originally is the product of inadequate therapy; this may entail noncompliance with treatment, interrupted drug supplies, or inappropriate prescription. Patients may sequentially acquire resistance to several drugs through repetition of this process. Loss of activity of the major drugs greatly compromises the treatment process; most problematic is resistance to both isoniazid and rifampicin, so-called 'multidrug-resistant tuberculosis' (MDR-TB). Recent evidence indicates that MDR-TB is being transmitted to others, and particularly to persons with HIV infection/AIDS. Other situations in which epidemic spread of MDR-TB occurs include hospitals and prisons. In several areas of the world, ominous levels of MDR-TB have been identified in a recent WHO survey. Treatment of MDR-TB entails the use of poorly tolerated, second-line medications that are often toxic, and the duration of treatment must be extended to the range of two years. Resectional surgery may be required to effect cures in patients with advanced disease in which most of the first-line agents have been lost to resistance.

  14. Grape Seed Procyanidin Reversal of P-glycoprotein Associated Multi-Drug Resistance via Down-regulation of NF-κB and MAPK/ERK Mediated YB-1 Activity in A2780/T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng-qi; Duan, Lian; Huo, Qi-lu; Ren, Fei; Li, Guo-feng

    2013-01-01

    The expression and function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is associated with the phenotype of multi-drug resistance (MDR), leading chemotherapy failure of patients suffered with cancer. Grape seed procyanidin(GSP) is a natural polyphenol supplement with anti-inflammatory effect. Present study assessed a new use of GSP on the MDR reversal activity and its possible molecular mechanisms in MDR1-overpressing paclitaxel resistant ovarian cancer cells. Our results showed GSP significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel and adriamycin in paclitaxel resistant A2780/T cells but its parental A2780 cells. Furthermore, GSP strongly inhibited P-gp expression by blocking MDR1 gene transcription, as well as, increased the intracellular accumulation of the P-gp substrate rhodamine-123 in A2780/T cells. Nuclear factor-κB(NF-κB) activity, IκB degradation level and NF-κB/p65 nuclear translocation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) were markedly inhibited by pre-treatment with GSP. Meanwhile, GSP inhibited MAPK/ERK pathway by decreasing the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, resulting in reduced the Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) activation with blocking its nuclear translocation. Moreover, the up-regulation of P-gp expression, the activation of AKT/NF-κB and MAPK/ERK pathway induced by LPS was attenuated by GSP administration. Compared with PDTC and U1026, inhibitor of NF-κB and MAPK/ERK respectively, GSP showed the same tendency of down-regulating NF-κB and MAPK/ERK mediated YB-1 activities. Thus, GSP reverses P-gp associated MDR by inhibiting the function and expression of P-gp through down-regulation of NF-κB activity and MAPK/ERK pathway mediated YB-1 nuclear translocation, offering insight into the mechanism of reversing MDR by natural polyphenol supplement compounds. GSP could be a new potential MDR reversal agent used for combination therapy with chemotherapeutics in clinic. PMID:23967153

  15. Yu Ping Feng San reverses cisplatin-induced multi-drug resistance in lung cancer cells via regulating drug transporters and p62/TRAF6 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jian-Shu; Yan, Lu; Bi, Cathy W. C.; Chan, Gallant K. L.; Wu, Qi-Yun; Liu, Yun-Le; Huang, Yun; Yao, Ping; Du, Crystal Y. Q.; Dong, Tina T. X.; Tsim, Karl W. K.

    2016-01-01

    Yu Ping Feng San (YPFS), an ancient Chinese herbal decoction composed of Astragali Radix, Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma and Saposhnikoviae Radix, has been used in the clinic for treating immune deficiency. In cancer therapy, YPFS is being combined with chemotherapy drugs to achieve improved efficacy; however, scientific evidence to illustrate this combination effect is lacking. The present study aims to demonstrate the anti-drug resistance of YPFS in cisplatin (DDP)-resistant non-small cell lung cancer cells (A549/DDP). The application of YPFS exhibited a synergistic enhancement of DDP-induced cytotoxicity as well as of the apoptotic signalling molecules. DDP-induced expression of the multi-drug-resistance efflux transporters was markedly reduced in the presence of YPFS, resulting in a higher intracellular concentration of DDP. In addition, the application of YPFS increased DDP-induced ROS accumulation and MMP depletion, decreased p62/TRAF6 signalling in DDP-treated A549/DDP cells. The co-treatment of DDP and YPFS in tumour-bearing mice reduced the tumour size robustly (by more than 80%), which was much better than the effect of DDP alone. These results indicate that YPFS can notably improve the DDP-suppressed cancer effect, which may be a consequence of the elevation of intracellular DDP via the drug transporters as well as the down regulation of p62/TRAF6 signalling. PMID:27558312

  16. Dual Role of cAMP in the Transcriptional Regulation of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 4 (MRP4) in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Carozzo, Alejandro; Diez, Federico; Gomez, Natalia; Cabrera, Maia; Shayo, Carina; Davio, Carlos; Fernández, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic AMP represents one of the most studied signaling molecules and its role in proliferation and differentiation processes has been well established. Intracellular cAMP levels are tightly regulated where the MRP4 transporter plays a major role. In the present study, we sought to establish whether cAMP modulated MRP4 expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines. Quantitative PCR and western blot studies showed that cAMP-increasing agents enhanced MRP4 transcripts and protein levels in PANC-1 cells. Reporter luciferase experiments carried out in pancreatic AR42J cells showed that intracellular cAMP up-regulates MRP4 through an Epac2- and Rap1- mediated mechanism whereas extracellular cAMP reduced MRP4 promoter activity by a MEK/ERK-mediated pathway. Present results show that cAMP regulates MRP4 promoter activity, and further indicate that the balance between intracellular and extracellular cAMP levels determines MRP4 expression. PMID:25790437

  17. Intestinal absorption mechanisms of MTBH, a novel hesperetin derivative, in Caco-2 cells, and potential involvement of monocarboxylate transporter 1 and multidrug resistance protein 2.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenlin; Chen, Ruonan; Qian, Zhengyue; Meng, Xiaoming; Hu, Tingting; Li, Yangyang; Chen, Zhaolin; Huang, Cheng; Hu, Chaojie; Li, Jun

    2015-10-12

    Hesperetin, the aglycone of hesperidin, occurs naturally in citrus fruits. It exerts extensive pharmacological activities. However, hesperetin's poor solubility and low bioavailability limit its wide application. In order to overcome these limitations, recently a series of novel hesperitin derivatives containing Mannich base moieties were synthesized and the anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated, among which MTBH (8-methylene-tert-butylamine-3',5,7-trihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavanone) showed a significantly improved water solubility, and promising anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo compared with hesperitin. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the permeability and transport mechanisms of MTBH, using Caco-2 cell monolayer. MTBH was effectively absorbed by Caco-2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner in both directions at 7.5-480 μM. Moreover, MTBH showed pH dependent and TEER values independent transport in both directions. Transport of MTBH was obviously decreased in the presence of sodium azide (an ATP inhibitor) or CCCP (a proton-ionophore). MTBH transport was markedly reduced by MCT inhibitors quercetin or phloretin, and the substrate analogs l-lactate or benzoic acid. We verified MCT1, MCT3, MCT4, MCT5, and MCT6 were expressed in Caco-2 cells by western blot. Silence MCT1 with siRNA resulted in significant inhibition of MTBH uptake. The verapamil, a P-gp inhibitor, and Ko143, a BCRP inhibitor, had no effect on the transport of MTBH. However, MK-571 or probenecid, MRP2 inhibitors, led to an apparently decrease in the efflux of MTBH. In summary, MTBH was absorbed by transcellular passive diffusion and a pH dependent mechanism mediated by MCT1. MRP2 but P-gp or BCRP may be involved in the transport of MTBH. PMID:26231439

  18. UV-triggered Affinity Capture Identifies Interactions between the Plasmodium falciparum Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 (PfMDR1) and Antimalarial Agents in Live Parasitized Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Ralf; Ng, Caroline L.; Aissaoui, Hamed; Akabas, Myles H.; Boss, Christoph; Brun, Reto; Callaghan, Paul S.; Corminboeuf, Olivier; Fidock, David A.; Frame, Ithiel J.; Heidmann, Bibia; Le Bihan, Amélie; Jenö, Paul; Mattheis, Corinna; Moes, Suzette; Müller, Ingrid B.; Paguio, Michelle; Roepe, Paul D.; Siegrist, Romain; Voss, Till; Welford, Richard W. D.; Wittlin, Sergio; Binkert, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    A representative of a new class of potent antimalarials with an unknown mode of action was recently described. To identify the molecular target of this class of antimalarials, we employed a photo-reactive affinity capture method to find parasite proteins specifically interacting with the capture compound in living parasitized cells. The capture reagent retained the antimalarial properties of the parent molecule (ACT-213615) and accumulated within parasites. We identified several proteins interacting with the capture compound and established a functional interaction between ACT-213615 and PfMDR1. We surmise that PfMDR1 may play a role in the antimalarial activity of the piperazine-containing compound ACT-213615. PMID:23754276

  19. Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes as Carriers of Ruthenium Complexes to Antagonize Cancer Multidrug Resistance and Radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ni; Feng, Yanxian; Zeng, Lilan; Zhao, Zhennan; Chen, Tianfeng

    2015-07-15

    Multidrug resistance and radioresistance are major obstacles for successful cancer therapy. Due to the unique characteristics of high surface area, improved cellular uptake, and the possibility to be easily bound with therapeutics, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted increasing attention as potential nanodrug delivery systems. In this study, a CNT-based radiosensitive nanodrug delivery system was rationally designed to antagonize the multidrug resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma. The nanosystem was loaded with a potent anticancer ruthenium polypyridyl complex (RuPOP) via π-π interaction and formation of a hydrogen bond. The functionalized nanosystem (RuPOP@MWCNTs) enhanced the cellular uptake of RuPOP in liver cancer cells, especially drug-resistant R-HepG2 cells, through endocytosis. Consistently, the selective cellular uptake endowed the nanosystem amplified anticancer efficacy against R-HepG2 cells but not in normal cells. Interestingly, RuPOP@MWCNTs significantly enhanced the anticancer efficacy of clinically used X-ray against R-HepG2 cells through induction of apoptosis and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, with the involvement of ROS overproduction, which activated several downstream signaling pathways, including DNA damage-mediated p53 phosphorylation, activation of p38, and inactivation of AKT and ERK. Moreover, the nanosystem also effectively reduces the toxic side effects of loaded drugs and prolongs the blood circulation in vivo. Taken together, the results demonstrate the rational design of functionalized carbon nanotubes and their application as effective nanomedicine to overcome cancer multidrug resistance.

  20. Multidrug resistance protein 4/ ATP binding cassette transporter 4: a new potential therapeutic target for acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Copsel, Sabrina; Bruzzone, Ariana; May, Maria; Beyrath, Julien; Wargon, Victoria; Cany, Jeannette; Frans, G.M. Russel; Shayo, Carina; Davio, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Less than a third of adults patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are cured by current treatments, emphasizing the need for new approaches to therapy. We previously demonstrated that besides playing a role in drug-resistant leukemia cell lines, multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4/ABCC4) regulates leukemia cell proliferation and differentiation through the endogenous MRP4/ABCC4 substrate, cAMP. Here, we studied the role of MRP4/ABCC4 in tumor progression in a mouse xenograft model and in leukemic stem cells (LSCs) differentiation. We found a decrease in the mitotic index and an increase in the apoptotic index associated with the inhibition of tumor growth when mice were treated with rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor) and/or probenecid (MRPs inhibitor). Genetic silencing and pharmacologic inhibition of MRP4 reduced tumor growth. Furthermore, MRP4 knockdown induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vivo. Interestingly, when LSC population was isolated, we observed that increased cAMP levels and MRP4/ABCC4 blockade resulted in LSCs differentiation. Taken together, our findings show that MRP4/ABCC4 has a relevant role in tumor growth and apoptosis and in the eradication of LSCs, providing the basis for a novel promising target in AML therapy. PMID:25301721

  1. Trametinib modulates cancer multidrug resistance by targeting ABCB1 transporter

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Yao-Jun; Li, Yong; Zhao, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Mei, Xiao-Long; Xue, You-Qiu; Qin, Wu-Ming; Yang, Yang; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yao; Wei, Meng-Ning; Shi, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of adenine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is one of the main reasons of multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. Trametinib, a novel specific small-molecule mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitor, is currently used for the treatment of melanoma in clinic. In this study, we investigated the effect of trametinib on MDR mediated by ABC transporters. Trametinib significantly potentiated the effects of two ABCB1 substrates vincristine and doxorubicin on inhibition of growth, arrest of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells overexpressed ABCB1, but not ABCC1 and ABCG2. Furthermore, trametinib did not alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin. Mechanistically, trametinib potently blocked the drug-efflux activity of ABCB1 to increase the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin and stimulates the ATPase of ABCB1 without alteration of the expression of ABCB1. Importantly, trametinib remarkably enhanced the effect of vincristine against the xenografts of ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells in nude mice. The predicted binding mode showed the hydrophobic interactions of trametinib within the large drug binding cavity of ABCB1. Consequently, our findings may have important implications for use of trametinib in combination therapy for cancer treatment. PMID:25915534

  2. Status of Serum Zinc in Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Barman, N; Haque, M A; Uddin, M N; Ghosh, D; Rahman, M W; Islam, M T; Rahman, M Q; Rob, M A; Hossain, M A

    2016-01-01

    Zinc plays a vital role in the immune status. Its deficiency affects host defense by reducing the number of circulating T cells and phagocytosis activity of other cells which ultimately impair cell mediated immunity. The cell-mediated immunity plays a major role in the causation of pulmonary tuberculosis. The present study was carried out to estimate serum zinc level in newly detected multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in adult population. In this study total fifty (50) MDR-TB patients were enrolled conveniently from the in-patients departments of National Institute of Diseases of the Chest Hospital (NIDCH), Bangladesh. Serum zinc was estimated by atomic absorption spectrophotometry method from early morning fasting blood sample. Serum zinc level was assessed according to normal cut-off value 70-120 μgm/dl and 76% studied population were found lower than this value. The mean±SD serum zinc level was observed 60.40±8.91 μgm/dl. No associations were found between serum zinc level with age (p=0.11) and with sex (p=0.085) of the study population respectively. The low level of serum zinc in MDR-TB patients suggested impaired immune status of our study population.

  3. Genomic structure, gene expression, and promoter analysis of human multidrug resistance-associated protein 7

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Hsin-Hsin; Chang, Ming-Shi; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Huang, Jin-Ding

    2002-03-15

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) subfamily transporters associated with anticancer drug efflux are attributed to the multidrug-resistance of cancer cells. The genomic organization of human multidrug resistance-associated protein 7 (MRP7) was identified. The human MRP7 gene, consisting of 22 exons and 21 introns, greatly differs from other members of the human MRP subfamily. A splicing variant of human MRP7, MRP7A, expressed in most human tissues, was also characterized. The 1.93-kb promoter region of MRP7 was isolated and shown to support luciferase activity at a level 4- to 5-fold greater than that of the SV40 promoter. Basal MRP7 gene expression was regulated by 2 regions in the 5-flanking region at 1,780 1,287 bp, and at 611 to 208 bp. In Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, MRP7 promoter activity was increased by 226 percent by genotoxic 2-acetylaminofluorene and 347 percent by the histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A. The protein was expressed in the membrane fraction of transfected MDCK cells.

  4. Antimicrobial metallopolymers and their bioconjugates with conventional antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiuyang; Chen, Yung Pin; Miller, Kristen P; Ganewatta, Mitra S; Bam, Marpe; Yan, Yi; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Decho, Alan W; Tang, Chuanbing

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria are now becoming more resistant to most conventional antibiotics. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a complex of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial strains, has proven especially problematic in both hospital and community settings by deactivating conventional β-lactam antibiotics, including penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems, through various mechanisms, resulting in increased mortality rates and hospitalization costs. Here we introduce a class of charged metallopolymers that exhibit synergistic effects against MRSA by efficiently inhibiting activity of β-lactamase and effectively lysing bacterial cells. Various conventional β-lactam antibiotics, including penicillin-G, amoxicillin, ampicillin, and cefazolin, are protected from β-lactamase hydrolysis via the formation of unique ion-pairs between their carboxylate anions and cationic cobaltocenium moieties. These discoveries could provide a new pathway for designing macromolecular scaffolds to regenerate vitality of conventional antibiotics to kill multidrug-resistant bacteria and superbugs.

  5. Wallichinine reverses ABCB1-mediated cancer multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Lv, Min; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Qin, Wu-Ming; Yang, Yang; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yao; Huang, Jia-Rong; Wang, Kun; Wei, Meng-Ning; Cheng, Ke-Jun; Shi, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of ABCB1 in cancer cells is one of the main reasons of cancer multidrug resistance (MDR). Wallichinine is a compound isolated from piper wallichii and works as an antagonist of platelet activiating factor receptor to inhibit the gathering of blood platelet. In this study, we investigate the effect of wallichinine on cancer MDR mediated by ABCB1 transporter. Wallichinine significantly potentiates the effects of two ABCB1 substrates vincristine and doxorubicin on inhibition of growth, arrest of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis in ABCB1 overexpressing cancer cells. Furthermore, wallichinine do not alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin. Mechanistically, wallichinine blocks the drug-efflux activity of ABCB1 to increase the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin and stimulates the ATPase of ABCB1 without alteration of the expression of ABCB1. The predicted binding mode shows the hydrophobic interactions of wallichinine within the large drug binding cavity of ABCB1. At all, our study of the interaction of wallichinine with ABCB1 presented herein provides valuable clues for the development of novel MDR reversal reagents from natural products. PMID:27508017

  6. Wallichinine reverses ABCB1-mediated cancer multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Min; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Qin, Wu-Ming; Yang, Yang; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yao; Huang, Jia-Rong; Wang, Kun; Wei, Meng-Ning; Cheng, Ke-Jun; Shi, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of ABCB1 in cancer cells is one of the main reasons of cancer multidrug resistance (MDR). Wallichinine is a compound isolated from piper wallichii and works as an antagonist of platelet activiating factor receptor to inhibit the gathering of blood platelet. In this study, we investigate the effect of wallichinine on cancer MDR mediated by ABCB1 transporter. Wallichinine significantly potentiates the effects of two ABCB1 substrates vincristine and doxorubicin on inhibition of growth, arrest of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis in ABCB1 overexpressing cancer cells. Furthermore, wallichinine do not alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin. Mechanistically, wallichinine blocks the drug-efflux activity of ABCB1 to increase the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin and stimulates the ATPase of ABCB1 without alteration of the expression of ABCB1. The predicted binding mode shows the hydrophobic interactions of wallichinine within the large drug binding cavity of ABCB1. At all, our study of the interaction of wallichinine with ABCB1 presented herein provides valuable clues for the development of novel MDR reversal reagents from natural products. PMID:27508017

  7. Resin glycosides from Ipomoea wolcottiana as modulators of the multidrug resistance phenotype in vitro.

    PubMed

    Corona-Castañeda, Berenice; Rosas-Ramírez, Daniel; Castañeda-Gómez, Jhon; Aparicio-Cuevas, Manuel Alejandro; Fragoso-Serrano, Mabel; Figueroa-González, Gabriela; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio

    2016-03-01

    Recycling liquid chromatography was used for the isolation and purification of resin glycosides from the CHCl3-soluble extracts prepared using flowers of Ipomoea wolcottiana Rose var. wolcottiana. Bioassay-guided fractionation, using modulation of both antibiotic activity against multidrug-resistant strains of Gram-negative bacteria and vinblastine susceptibility in breast carcinoma cells, was used to isolate the active glycolipids as modulators of the multidrug resistance phenotype. An ester-type dimer, wolcottine I, one tetra- and three pentasaccharides, wolcottinosides I-IV, in addition to the known intrapilosin VII, were characterized by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In vitro assays established that none of these metabolites displayed antibacterial activity (MIC>512 μg/mL) against multidrug-resistant strains of Escherichia coli, and two nosocomial pathogens: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Shigella flexneri; however, when tested (25 μg/mL) in combination with tetracycline, kanamycin or chloramphenicol, they exerted a potentiation effect of the antibiotic susceptibility up to eightfold (64 μg/mL from 512 μg/mL). It was also determined that these non-cytotoxic (CI50>8.68 μM) agents modulated vinblastine susceptibility at 25 μg/mL in MFC-7/Vin(+) cells with a reversal factor (RFMCF-7/Vin(+)) of 2-130 fold.

  8. Discovery of N-(4-(3-(2-aminopyrimidin-4-yl)pyridin-2-yloxy)phenyl)-4-(4-methylthiophen-2-yl)phthalazin-1-amine (AMG 900), a highly selective, orally bioavailable inhibitor of aurora kinases with activity against multidrug-resistant cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Geuns-Meyer, Stephanie; Cee, Victor J; Deak, Holly L; Du, Bingfan; Hodous, Brian L; Nguyen, Hanh Nho; Olivieri, Philip R; Schenkel, Laurie B; Vaida, Karina R; Andrews, Paul; Bak, Annette; Be, Xuhai; Beltran, Pedro J; Bush, Tammy L; Chaves, Mary K; Chung, Grace; Dai, Yang; Eden, Patrick; Hanestad, Kelly; Huang, Liyue; Lin, Min-Hwa Jasmine; Tang, Jin; Ziegler, Beth; Radinsky, Robert; Kendall, Richard; Patel, Vinod F; Payton, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Efforts to improve upon the physical properties and metabolic stability of Aurora kinase inhibitor 14a revealed that potency against multidrug-resistant cell lines was compromised by increased polarity. Despite its high in vitro metabolic intrinsic clearance, 23r (AMG 900) showed acceptable pharmacokinetic properties and robust pharmacodynamic activity. Projecting from in vitro data to in vivo target coverage was not practical due to disjunctions between enzyme and cell data, complex and apparently contradictory indicators of binding kinetics, and unmeasurable free fraction in plasma. In contrast, it was straightforward to relate pharmacokinetics to pharmacodynamics and efficacy by following the time above a threshold concentration. On the basis of its oral route of administration, a selectivity profile that favors Aurora-driven pharmacology and its activity against multidrug-resistant cell lines, 23r was identified as a potential best-in-class Aurora kinase inhibitor. In phase 1 dose expansion studies with G-CSF support, 23r has shown promising single agent activity.

  9. Multidrug resistance proteins: role of P-glycoprotein, MRP1, MRP2, and BCRP (ABCG2) in tissue defense

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, Elaine M.; Deeley, Roger G.; Cole, Susan P.C. . E-mail: coles@post.queensu.ca

    2005-05-01

    In tumor cell lines, multidrug resistance is often associated with an ATP-dependent decrease in cellular drug accumulation which is attributed to the overexpression of certain ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins. ABC proteins that confer drug resistance include (but are not limited to) P-glycoprotein (gene symbol ABCB1), the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1, gene symbol ABCC1), MRP2 (gene symbol ABCC2), and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, gene symbol ABCG2). In addition to their role in drug resistance, there is substantial evidence that these efflux pumps have overlapping functions in tissue defense. Collectively, these proteins are capable of transporting a vast and chemically diverse array of toxicants including bulky lipophilic cationic, anionic, and neutrally charged drugs and toxins as well as conjugated organic anions that encompass dietary and environmental carcinogens, pesticides, metals, metalloids, and lipid peroxidation products. P-glycoprotein, MRP1, MRP2, and BCRP/ABCG2 are expressed in tissues important for absorption (e.g., lung and gut) and metabolism and elimination (liver and kidney). In addition, these transporters have an important role in maintaining the barrier function of sanctuary site tissues (e.g., blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebral spinal fluid barrier, blood-testis barrier and the maternal-fetal barrier or placenta). Thus, these ABC transporters are increasingly recognized for their ability to modulate the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity of xenobiotics. In this review, the role of these four ABC transporter proteins in protecting tissues from a variety of toxicants is discussed. Species variations in substrate specificity and tissue distribution of these transporters are also addressed since these properties have implications for in vivo models of toxicity used for drug discovery and development.

  10. Overcoming multidrug resistance with mesoporous silica nanorods as nanocarrier of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Li, Linlin; Huang, Xinglu; Liu, Tianlong; Liu, Huiyu; Hao, Nanjing; Chen, Dong; Zhang, Yanqi; Li, Laifeng; Tang, Fangqiong

    2012-06-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle to the effective chemotherapy in many human malignancies. Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems (NDDSs) have been reported to be able to bypass MDR, but the cancer therapeutic efficacy is still limited. In this study, we firstly designed the nonspherical mesoporous silica nanorods (MSNRs) with aspect ratio (AR) of 1.5 and 5 as drug delivery systems of doxorubicin to overcome multidrug resistance. For drug loading, the long-rod MSNRs (NLR, AR = 5) showed higher drug loading capacity of doxorubicin (DOX) than the short-rod MSNRs (NSR, AR = 1.5). NLR encapsulated DOX had increased intracellular DOX accumulation in drug-resistant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells compared with free DOX by observablly increased cellular uptake and significantly prolonged intracellular drug retention. It further exhibited increased cytotoxicity compared with free DOX under different drug concentrations. These findings may provide a new perspective for designing high-performance nanoparticulate drug delivery systems for bypassing multidrug resistance of cancer therapy.

  11. Indolcarboxamide is a preclinical candidate for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rao, Srinivasa P S; Lakshminarayana, Suresh B; Kondreddi, Ravinder R; Herve, Maxime; Camacho, Luis R; Bifani, Pablo; Kalapala, Sarath K; Jiricek, Jan; Ma, Ng L; Tan, Bee H; Ng, Seow H; Nanjundappa, Mahesh; Ravindran, Sindhu; Seah, Peck G; Thayalan, Pamela; Lim, Siao H; Lee, Boon H; Goh, Anne; Barnes, Whitney S; Chen, Zhong; Gagaring, Kerstin; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Pethe, Kevin; Kuhen, Kelli; Walker, John; Feng, Gu; Babu, Sreehari; Zhang, Lijun; Blasco, Francesca; Beer, David; Weaver, Margaret; Dartois, Veronique; Glynne, Richard; Dick, Thomas; Smith, Paul W; Diagana, Thierry T; Manjunatha, Ujjini H

    2013-12-01

    New chemotherapeutic compounds against multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) are urgently needed to combat drug resistance in tuberculosis (TB). We have identified and characterized the indolcarboxamides as a new class of antitubercular bactericidal agent. Genetic and lipid profiling studies identified the likely molecular target of indolcarboxamides as MmpL3, a transporter of trehalose monomycolate that is essential for mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Two lead candidates, NITD-304 and NITD-349, showed potent activity against both drug-sensitive and multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Mtb. Promising pharmacokinetic profiles of both compounds after oral dosing in several species enabled further evaluation for efficacy and safety. NITD-304 and NITD-349 were efficacious in treating both acute and chronic Mtb infections in mouse efficacy models. Furthermore, dosing of NITD-304 and NITD-349 for 2 weeks in exploratory rat toxicology studies revealed a promising safety margin. Finally, neither compound inhibited the activity of major cytochrome P-450 enzymes or the hERG (human ether-a-go-go related gene) channel. These results suggest that NITD-304 and NITD-349 should undergo further development as a potential treatment for multidrug-resistant TB. PMID:24307692

  12. Demonstrating a Multi-drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Amplification Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Linger, Yvonne; Kukhtin, Alexander; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Qu, Peter; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Cooney, Christopher G.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2014-01-01

    Simplifying microarray workflow is a necessary first step for creating MDR-TB microarray-based diagnostics that can be routinely used in lower-resource environments. An amplification microarray combines asymmetric PCR amplification, target size selection, target labeling, and microarray hybridization within a single solution and into a single microfluidic chamber. A batch processing method is demonstrated with a 9-plex asymmetric master mix and low-density gel element microarray for genotyping multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The protocol described here can be completed in 6 hr and provide correct genotyping with at least 1,000 cell equivalents of genomic DNA. Incorporating on-chip wash steps is feasible, which will result in an entirely closed amplicon method and system. The extent of multiplexing with an amplification microarray is ultimately constrained by the number of primer pairs that can be combined into a single master mix and still achieve desired sensitivity and specificity performance metrics, rather than the number of probes that are immobilized on the array. Likewise, the total analysis time can be shortened or lengthened depending on the specific intended use, research question, and desired limits of detection. Nevertheless, the general approach significantly streamlines microarray workflow for the end user by reducing the number of manually intensive and time-consuming processing steps, and provides a simplified biochemical and microfluidic path for translating microarray-based diagnostics into routine clinical practice. PMID:24796567

  13. Demonstrating a multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis amplification microarray.

    PubMed

    Linger, Yvonne; Kukhtin, Alexander; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Qu, Peter; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Cooney, Christopher G; Chandler, Darrell P

    2014-04-25

    Simplifying microarray workflow is a necessary first step for creating MDR-TB microarray-based diagnostics that can be routinely used in lower-resource environments. An amplification microarray combines asymmetric PCR amplification, target size selection, target labeling, and microarray hybridization within a single solution and into a single microfluidic chamber. A batch processing method is demonstrated with a 9-plex asymmetric master mix and low-density gel element microarray for genotyping multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The protocol described here can be completed in 6 hr and provide correct genotyping with at least 1,000 cell equivalents of genomic DNA. Incorporating on-chip wash steps is feasible, which will result in an entirely closed amplicon method and system. The extent of multiplexing with an amplification microarray is ultimately constrained by the number of primer pairs that can be combined into a single master mix and still achieve desired sensitivity and specificity performance metrics, rather than the number of probes that are immobilized on the array. Likewise, the total analysis time can be shortened or lengthened depending on the specific intended use, research question, and desired limits of detection. Nevertheless, the general approach significantly streamlines microarray workflow for the end user by reducing the number of manually intensive and time-consuming processing steps, and provides a simplified biochemical and microfluidic path for translating microarray-based diagnostics into routine clinical practice.

  14. Marine Natural Products as Models to Circumvent Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Long, Solida; Sousa, Emília; Kijjoa, Anake; Pinto, Madalena M M

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a serious health problem that in many cases leads to cancer treatment failure. The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which leads to premature efflux of drugs from cancer cells, is often responsible for MDR. On the other hand, a strategy to search for modulators from natural products to overcome MDR had been in place during the last decades. However, Nature limits the amount of some natural products, which has led to the development of synthetic strategies to increase their availability. This review summarizes the research findings on marine natural products and derivatives, mainly alkaloids, polyoxygenated sterols, polyketides, terpenoids, diketopiperazines, and peptides, with P-gp inhibitory activity highlighting the established structure-activity relationships. The synthetic pathways for the total synthesis of the most promising members and analogs are also presented. It is expected that the data gathered during the last decades concerning their synthesis and MDR-inhibiting activities will help medicinal chemists develop potential drug candidates using marine natural products as models which can deliver new ABC transporter inhibitor scaffolds. PMID:27399665

  15. ATP7B expression confers multidrug resistance through drug sequestration.

    PubMed

    Moinuddin, F M; Shinsato, Yoshinari; Komatsu, Masaharu; Mitsuo, Ryoichi; Minami, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Masatatsu; Kawahara, Kohich; Hirano, Hirofumi; Arita, Kazunori; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko

    2016-04-19

    We previously reported that ATP7B is involved in cisplatin resistance and ATP7A confers multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells.In this study, we show that ATP7B expressing cells also are resistant to doxorubicin, SN-38, etoposide, and paclitaxel as well as cisplatin.In ATP7B expressing cells, doxorubicin relocated from the nuclei to the late-endosome at 4 hours after doxorubicin exposure. EGFP-ATP7B mainly colocalized with doxorubicin.ATP7B has six metal binding sites (MBSs) in the N-terminal cytoplasmic region. To investigate the role of the MBSs of ATP7B in doxorubicin resistance, we used three mutant ATP7B (Cu0, Cu6 and M6C/S) expressing cells. Cu0 has no MBSs, Cu6 has only the sixth MBS and M6C/S carries CXXC to SXXS mutation in the sixth MBS. Cu6 expressing cells were less resistance to the anticancer agents than wild type ATP7B expressing cells, and had doxorubicin sequestration in the late-endosome. Cu0- and M6C/S-expressing cells were sensitive to doxorubicin. In these cells, doxorubicin did not relocalize to the late-endosome. EGFP-M6C/S mainly localized to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) even in the presence of copper. Thus the cysteine residues in the sixth MBS of ATP7B are essential for MDR phenotype.Finally, we found that ammonium chloride and tamoxifen suppressed late endosomal sequestration of doxorubicin, thereby attenuating drug resistance. These results suggest that the sequestration depends on the acidity of the vesicles partly.We here demonstrate that ATP7B confers MDR by facilitating nuclear drug efflux and late endosomal drug sequestration. PMID:26988911

  16. ATP7B expression confers multidrug resistance through drug sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Moinuddin, F M; Shinsato, Yoshinari; Komatsu, Masaharu; Mitsuo, Ryoichi; Minami, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Masatatsu; Kawahara, Kohich; Hirano, Hirofumi; Arita, Kazunori; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that ATP7B is involved in cisplatin resistance and ATP7A confers multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. In this study, we show that ATP7B expressing cells also are resistant to doxorubicin, SN-38, etoposide, and paclitaxel as well as cisplatin. In ATP7B expressing cells, doxorubicin relocated from the nuclei to the late-endosome at 4 hours after doxorubicin exposure. EGFP-ATP7B mainly colocalized with doxorubicin. ATP7B has six metal binding sites (MBSs) in the N-terminal cytoplasmic region. To investigate the role of the MBSs of ATP7B in doxorubicin resistance, we used three mutant ATP7B (Cu0, Cu6 and M6C/S) expressing cells. Cu0 has no MBSs, Cu6 has only the sixth MBS and M6C/S carries CXXC to SXXS mutation in the sixth MBS. Cu6 expressing cells were less resistance to the anticancer agents than wild type ATP7B expressing cells, and had doxorubicin sequestration in the late-endosome. Cu0- and M6C/S-expressing cells were sensitive to doxorubicin. In these cells, doxorubicin did not relocalize to the late-endosome. EGFP-M6C/S mainly localized to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) even in the presence of copper. Thus the cysteine residues in the sixth MBS of ATP7B are essential for MDR phenotype. Finally, we found that ammonium chloride and tamoxifen suppressed late endosomal sequestration of doxorubicin, thereby attenuating drug resistance. These results suggest that the sequestration depends on the acidity of the vesicles partly. We here demonstrate that ATP7B confers MDR by facilitating nuclear drug efflux and late endosomal drug sequestration. PMID:26988911

  17. Overexpression of lncRNA NEAT1 mitigates multidrug resistance by inhibiting ABCG2 in leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Caihua; Zhang, Jianying; Wang, Qingyan; Ren, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is a heterogeneous clonal disorder in which early hematopoietic cells fail to differentiate and do not undergo programmed cell death or apoptosis. Less than one-third of adult patients with leukemia are managed using current therapies due to the emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR), emphasizing the need for newer and more robust approaches. Recent reports have suggested that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) contribute to selective gene expression and, hence, could be manipulated effectively to halt the progression of cancer. However, little is known regarding the role of lncRNA in leukemia. Nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 (NEAT1) is a nuclear-restricted lncRNA involved in the pathogenesis of certain types of cancer. Deregulated expression of NEAT1 has been reported in a number of human malignancies, including leukemia and other solid tumors. The present study aimed to characterize the role of NEAT1 in the regulation of MDR in leukemia. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, it was demonstrated that NEAT1 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels were significantly downregulated in leukemia patient samples compared with those from healthy donors. Furthermore, NEAT1 mRNA expression was repressed in a number of leukemia cell lines, including K562, THP-1, HL-60 and Jurkat cells, compared with peripheral white blood control cells, consistent with the expression observed in patients with leukemia. In addition, the transfection of a NEAT1 overexpression plasmid into K562 and THP-1 leukemia cell lines alleviated MDR induced by cytotoxic agents, such as Alisertib and Bortezomib, through inhibition of ATP-binding cassette G2. Although more robust studies are warranted, the current findings provide the basis for the use of NEAT1 as a novel promising target in the treatment of leukemia. PMID:27446393

  18. Multidrug resistance reversal by co-delivery of tariquidar (XR9576) and paclitaxel using long-circulating liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Niravkumar R.; Rathi, Alok; Mongayt, Dmitriy; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major obstacles to the success of cancer chemotherapy is the multidrug resistance (MDR) often resulting due to the overexpression of drug efflux transporter pumps such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Highly efficacious third generation P-gp inhibitors, like tariquidar, have shown promising results in overcoming the MDR. However, P-gp is also expressed in normal tissues like blood brain barrier, gastrointestinal track, liver, spleen and kidney. To maximize the efficacy of P-gp inhibitor and reduce the systemic toxicity, it is important to limit the exposure of P-gp inhibitors and the anticancer drugs to normal tissues and increase their co-localization with tumor cells. In this study, we have investigated the co-delivery of the P-gp inhibitor, tariquidar, and cytotoxic drug, paclitaxel, into tumor cells to reverse the MDR using long-circulating liposomes. Tariquidar- and paclitaxel-loaded long-circulating liposomes showed significant resensitization of the resistant variant for paclitaxel, which could be correlated with an increased accumulation of paclitaxel in tumor cells. These results suggest that the co-delivery of the P-gp inhibitor, tariquidar, and the cytotoxicity inducer, paclitaxel, looks like a promising approach to overcome the MDR. PMID:21703341

  19. Characterization of a Multidrug-Resistant, Novel Bacteroides Genomospecies

    PubMed Central

    Salipante, Stephen J.; Kalapila, Aley; Pottinger, Paul S.; Hoogestraat, Daniel R.; Cummings, Lisa; Duchin, Jeffrey S.; Sengupta, Dhruba J.; Pergam, Steven A.; Cookson, Brad T.

    2015-01-01

    Metronidazole- and carbapenem-resistant Bacteroides fragilis are rare in the United States. We isolated a multidrug-resistant anaerobe from the bloodstream and intraabdominal abscesses of a patient who had traveled to India. Whole-genome sequencing identified the organism as a novel Bacteroides genomospecies. Physicians should be aware of the possibility for concomitant carbapenem- and metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides infections. PMID:25529016

  20. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, Somalia, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Sindani, Ireneaus; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Falzon, Dennis; Suleiman, Bashir; Arube, Peter; Adam, Ismail; Baghdadi, Samiha; Bassili, Amal; Zignol, Matteo

    2013-03-01

    In a nationwide survey in 2011, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) was found in 5.2% and 40.8% of patients with new and previously treated TB, respectively. These levels of drug resistance are among the highest ever documented in Africa and the Middle East. This finding presents a serious challenge for TB control in Somalia.

  1. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Veterinary Clinics, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Weiss, Reinhard; van der Reijden, Tanny; van den Broek, Peterhans; Baljer, Georg; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2011-01-01

    An increase in prevalence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter spp. in hospitalized animals was observed at the Justus-Liebig-University (Germany). Genotypic analysis of 56 isolates during 2000–2008 showed 3 clusters that corresponded to European clones I–III. Results indicate spread of genotypically related strains within and among veterinary clinics in Germany. PMID:21888812

  2. Epidemiology of Primary Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Vladimir Region, Russia.

    PubMed

    Ershova, Julia V; Volchenkov, Grigory V; Kaminski, Dorothy A; Somova, Tatiana R; Kuznetsova, Tatiana A; Kaunetis, Natalia V; Cegielski, J Peter; Kurbatova, Ekaterina V

    2015-11-01

    We studied the epidemiology of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Vladimir Region, Russia, in 2012. Most cases of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) were caused by transmission of drug-resistant strains, and >33% were in patients referred for testing after mass radiographic screening. Early diagnosis of drug resistance is essential for preventing transmission of MDR TB. PMID:26488585

  3. Epidemiology of Primary Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Vladimir Region, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Volchenkov, Grigory V.; Kaminski, Dorothy A.; Somova, Tatiana R.; Kuznetsova, Tatiana A.; Kaunetis, Natalia V.; Cegielski, J. Peter; Kurbatova, Ekaterina V.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the epidemiology of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Vladimir Region, Russia, in 2012. Most cases of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) were caused by transmission of drug-resistant strains, and >33% were in patients referred for testing after mass radiographic screening. Early diagnosis of drug resistance is essential for preventing transmission of MDR TB. PMID:26488585

  4. Epidemiology of Primary Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Vladimir Region, Russia.

    PubMed

    Ershova, Julia V; Volchenkov, Grigory V; Kaminski, Dorothy A; Somova, Tatiana R; Kuznetsova, Tatiana A; Kaunetis, Natalia V; Cegielski, J Peter; Kurbatova, Ekaterina V

    2015-11-01

    We studied the epidemiology of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Vladimir Region, Russia, in 2012. Most cases of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) were caused by transmission of drug-resistant strains, and >33% were in patients referred for testing after mass radiographic screening. Early diagnosis of drug resistance is essential for preventing transmission of MDR TB.

  5. Partial synthesis and biological evaluation of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids derivatives: potential modulators of multidrug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Ping; Sun, Hua; Jian, Xi-Xian; Chen, Qiao-Hong; Chen, Dong-Lin; Liu, Geng-Tao; Wang, Feng-Peng

    2012-01-01

    A series of new bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids was partially synthesized from tetrandrine and fangchinoline and evaluated for their ability to reverse P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. All the test compounds increased the intracellular accumulation rate of rhodamine 123 in MDR cells (Bel7402 and HCT8), and most exhibited more potent MDR-reversing activity relative to the reference compound verapamil. Compounds 8, 10, 13, and 14 enhanced intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin in Bel7402 and HCT8 cells. PMID:22587798

  6. The multidrug resistance (mdr1) gene product functions as an ATP channel.

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, E H; Prat, A G; Gerweck, L; Seneveratne, T; Arceci, R J; Kramer, R; Guidotti, G; Cantiello, H F

    1993-01-01

    The multidrug resistance (mdr1) gene product, P-glycoprotein, is responsible for the ATP-dependent extrusion of a variety of compounds, including chemotherapeutic drugs, from cells. The data presented here show that cells with increased levels of the P-glycoprotein release ATP to the medium in proportion to the concentration of the protein in their plasma membrane. Furthermore, measurements of whole-cell and single-channel currents with patch-clamp electrodes indicate that the P-glycoprotein serves as an ATP-conducting channel in the plasma membrane. These findings suggest an unusual role for the P-glycoprotein. PMID:7678345

  7. Polyethylene glycol-phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE)/vitamin E micelles for co-delivery of paclitaxel and curcumin to overcome multi-drug resistance in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Abouzeid, Abraham H; Patel, Niravkumar R; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2014-04-10

    The therapeutic potential of mixed micelles, made of PEG-PE and vitamin E co-loaded with curcumin and paclitaxel, was investigated against SK-OV-3 human ovarian adenocarcinoma along with its multi-drug resistant version SK-OV-3-paclitaxel-resistant (TR) cells in vitro and in vivo. The addition of curcumin at various concentrations did not significantly enhance the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel against SK-OV-3 in vitro. However, a clear synergistic effect was observed with the combination treatment against SK-OV-3TR in vitro. In vivo, this combination treatment produced a three-fold tumor inhibition with each of these cell lines. Our results indicate that such co-loaded mixed micelles could have significant clinical advantages for the treatment of resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:24440402

  8. Polyethylene Glycol–Phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG–PE)/Vitamin E Micelles for Co-Delivery of Paclitaxel and Curcumin to Overcome Multi-Drug Resistance in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Patel, Niravkumar R.

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of mixed micelles, made of PEG-PE and vitamin E co-loaded with curcumin and paclitaxel, was investigated against SK-OV-3 human ovarian adenocarcinoma along with its multi-drug resistant version SK-OV-3-paclitaxel-resistant (TR) cells in vitro and in vivo. The addition of curcumin at various concentrations did not significantly enhance the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel against SK-OV-3 in vitro. However, a clear synergistic effect was observed with the combination treatment against SK-OV-3TR in vitro. In vivo, this combination treatment produced a three-fold tumor inhibition with each of these cell lines. Our results indicate that such co-loaded mixed micelles could have significant clinical advantages for the treatment of resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:24440402

  9. A novel paclitaxel-loaded poly(epsilon-caprolactone)/Poloxamer 188 blend nanoparticle overcoming multidrug resistance for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yangqing; Tang, Lina; Sun, Leilei; Bao, Junbo; Song, Cunxian; Huang, Laiqiang; Liu, Kexin; Tian, Yan; Tian, Ge; Li, Zhen; Sun, Hongfan; Mei, Lin

    2010-06-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) of tumor cells is a major obstacle to the success of cancer chemotherapy. Poloxamers have been used in cancer therapy to overcome MDR. The objective of this research is to test the feasibility of paclitaxel-loaded poly(epsilon-caprolactone)/Poloxamer 188 (PCL/Poloxamer 188) nanoparticles to overcome MDR in a paclitaxel-resistant human breast cancer cell line. Paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles were prepared by a water-acetone solvent displacement method using commercial PCL and self-synthesized PCL/Poloxamer 188 compound, respectively. PCL/Poloxamer 188 nanoparticles were found to be of spherical shape and tended to have a rough and porous surface. The nanoparticles had an average size of around 220nm, with a narrow size distribution. The in vitro drug release profile of both nanoparticle formulations showed a clear biphasic release pattern. There was an increased level of uptake of PCL/Poloxamer 188 nanoparticles (PPNP) in the paclitaxel-resistant human breast cancer cell line MCF-7/TAX, in comparison with PCL nanoparticles. The cytotoxicity of PCL nanoparticles was higher than commercial Taxol in the MCF-7/TAX cell culture, but the differences were not significant. However, the PCL/Poloxamer 188 nanoparticles achieved a significantly higher level of cytotoxicity than both of PCL nanoparticle formulation and Taxol(R), indicating that paclitaxel-loaded PCL/Poloxamer 188 nanoparticles could overcome MDR in human breast cancer cells and therefore could have considerable therapeutic potential for breast cancer. PMID:19969111

  10. Folate decorated dual drug loaded nanoparticle: role of curcumin in enhancing therapeutic potential of nutlin-3a by reversing multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Das, Manasi; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K

    2012-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular tumor in children. Malfunctioning of many signaling pathways regulating cell survival or apoptosis, make the disease more vulnerable. Notably, resistance to chemotherapy mediated by MRP-1, lung-resistance protein (LRP) is the most challenging aspect to treat this disease. Presently, much attention has been given to the recently developed anticancer drug nutlin-3a because of its non-genotoxic nature and potency to activate tumor suppressor protein p53. However, being a substrate of multidrug resistance protein MRP1 and Pgp its application has become limited. Currently, research has step towards reversing Multi drug resistance (MDR) by using curcumin, however its clinical relevance is restricted by plasma instability and poor bioavailability. In the present investigation we tried to encapsulate nutlin-3a and curcumin in PLGA nanoparticle (NPs) surface functionalized with folate to enhance therapeutic potential of nutlin-3a by modulating MDR. We document that curcumin can inhibit the expression of MRP-1 and LRP gene/protein in a concentration dependent manner in Y79 cells. In vitro cellular cytotoxicity, cell cycle analysis and apoptosis studies were done to compare the effectiveness of native drugs (single or combined) and single or dual drug loaded nanoparticles (unconjugated/folate conjugated). The result demonstrated an augmented therapeutic efficacy of targeted dual drug loaded NPs (Fol-Nut-Cur-NPs) over other formulation. Enhanced expression or down regulation of proapoptotic/antiapoptotic proteins respectively and down-regulation of bcl2 and NFκB gene/protein by Fol-Nut-Cur-NPs substantiate the above findings. This is the first investigation exploring the role of curcumin as MDR modulator to enhance the therapeutic potentiality of nutlin-3a, which may opens new direction for targeting cancer with multidrug resistance phenotype. PMID:22470431

  11. Modulation of the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein: Detection with technetium-99m-sestamibi in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Luker, G.D.; Fracasso, P.M.; Dobkin, J.; Piwnica-Worms, D.

    1997-03-01

    Overexpression of the multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (Pgp) has been documented in nearly all forms of human cancers and increased levels of Pgp in some tumors correlate with poor response to treatment. Technetium-99m-sestamibi has recently been validated as a Pgp transport substrate. Pgp is also normally expressed along the biliary canalicular surface of hepatocytes and the luminal side of proximal tubule cells in the kidney, while not expressed in heart. Focused on these organs with known Pgp status, we present the findings on {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi showed normal, prompt clearance of the radiotracer from the liver and kidneys relative to the heart. After administration of the Pgp modulator, {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi was selectively retained in the liver and kidneys. Hepatobiliary and renal clearance of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi are Pgp-mediated, and inhibition of Pgp transport in these organs can be successfully imaged using {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi in patients. Similar results might be expected with this and related radiopharmaceuticals for functional imaging of Pgp transport and modulation in tumors. 34 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Diterpene Constituents of Euphorbia exigua L. and Multidrug Resistance Reversing Activity of the Isolated Diterpenes.

    PubMed

    Rédei, Dóra; Boros, Klára; Forgo, Peter; Molnár, Joseph; Kele, Zoltán; Pálinkó, István; Pinke, Gyula; Hohmann, Judit

    2015-08-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the MeOH extract obtained from the aerial parts of the annual weed Euphorbia exigua L. resulted in the isolation of two novel (1, 2) and one known (3) jatrophane diterpenes. Their structures were established by extensive 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopy and HR-ESI-MS. The isolated compounds were evaluated for multidrug resistance (MDR) reversing activity on human MDR gene-transfected L5178 mouse lymphoma cells; and all three compounds were found to modulate the intracellular drug accumulation.

  13. A pH-Responsive Carrier System that Generates NO Bubbles to Trigger Drug Release and Reverse P-Glycoprotein-Mediated Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ming-Fan; Liu, Hung-Yi; Lin, Kun-Ju; Chia, Wei-Tso; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2015-08-17

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) resulting from the overexpression of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp) increases the efflux of drugs and thereby limits the effectiveness of chemotherapy. To address this issue, this work develops an injectable hollow microsphere (HM) system that carries the anticancer agent irinotecan (CPT-11) and a NO-releasing donor (NONOate). Upon injection of this system into acidic tumor tissue, environmental protons infiltrate the shell of the HMs and react with their encapsulated NONOate to form NO bubbles that trigger localized drug release and serve as a Pgp-mediated MDR reversal agent. The site-specific drug release and the NO-reduced Pgp-mediated transport can cause the intracellular accumulation of the drug at a concentration that exceeds the cell-killing threshold, eventually inducing its antitumor activity. These results reveal that this pH-responsive HM carrier system provides a potentially effective method for treating cancers that develop MDR.

  14. Combination Approaches to Combat Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Roberta J.; Melander, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of infections caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria is a global health problem that is exacerbated by the dearth of novel classes of antibiotics entering the clinic over the past 40 years. Herein we describe recent developments toward combination therapies for the treatment of multi-drug resistant bacterial infections. These efforts include antibiotic-antibiotic combinations, and the development of adjuvants that either directly target resistance mechanisms such as the inhibition of β-lactamase enzymes, or indirectly target resistance by interfering with bacterial signaling pathways such as two-component systems. We also discuss screening of libraries of previously approved drugs to identify non-obvious antimicrobial adjuvants. PMID:23333434

  15. Brazilian experience in the management of multidrug-resistance.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Fernando Augusto Fiuza

    2010-01-01

    In this article the author reviews the evolution of the approach to multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in Brazil following the introduction of rifampicin associated to isoniazid and pyrazinamide (RHZ). It shows Brazil was one of the world's first countries to use the RHZ regimen within a treatment system, with a first line regimen, another one specific for meningo-encephalic forms, for re-treatment of recurrences or of patients who returned with active tuberculosis after abandoning treatment, and a reserve regimen. The system was applied nationwide with guaranteed cost-free provision of medication, and self-administered. The author evaluates the growth of drug resistance, the emergence of multidrug-resistance and how management of this form of the disease has been organised.

  16. Multidrug-resistant Fusarium keratitis: diagnosis and treatment considerations.

    PubMed

    Sara, Sergio; Sharpe, Kendall; Morris, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Mycotic keratitis is an ocular infective process derived from any fungal species capable of corneal invasion. Despite its rarity in developed countries, its challenging and elusive diagnosis may result in keratoplasty or enucleation following failed medical management. Filamentous fungi such as Fusarium are often implicated in mycotic keratitis. Bearing greater morbidity than its bacterial counterpart, mycotic keratitis requires early clinical suspicion and initiation of antifungal therapy to prevent devastating consequences. We describe a case of multidrug-resistant mycotic keratitis in a 46-year-old man who continued to decline despite maximal therapy and therapeutic keratoplasty. Finally, enucleation was performed as a means of source control preventing dissemination of a likely untreatable fungal infection into the orbit. Multidrug-resistant Fusarium is rare, and may progress to endophthalmitis. We discuss potential management options which may enhance diagnosis and outcome in this condition. PMID:27489066

  17. The FLT3 and PDGFR inhibitor crenolanib is a substrate of the multidrug resistance protein ABCB1 but does not inhibit transport function at pharmacologically relevant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Trevor J; Natarajan, Karthika; Shukla, Suneet; Doshi, Kshama A; Singh, Zeba N; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Baer, Maria R

    2015-04-01

    Background Crenolanib (crenolanib besylate, 4-piperidinamine, 1-[2-[5-[(3-methyl-3-oxetanyl)methoxy]-1H-benzimidazol-1-yl]-8-quinolinyl]-, monobenzenesulfonate) is a potent and specific type I inhibitor of fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) that targets the active kinase conformation and is effective against FLT3 with internal tandem duplication (ITD) with point mutations induced by, and conferring resistance to, type II FLT3 inhibitors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Crenolanib is also an inhibitor of platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha and beta and is in clinical trials in both gastrointestinal stromal tumors and gliomas. Methods We tested crenolanib interactions with the multidrug resistance-associated ATP-binding cassette proteins ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein), ABCG2 (breast cancer resistance protein) and ABCC1 (multidrug resistance-associated protein 1), which are expressed on AML cells and other cancer cells and are important components of the blood-brain barrier. Results We found that crenolanib is a substrate of ABCB1, as evidenced by approximate five-fold resistance of ABCB1-overexpressing cells to crenolanib, reversal of this resistance by the ABCB1-specific inhibitor PSC-833 and stimulation of ABCB1 ATPase activity by crenolanib. In contrast, crenolanib was not a substrate of ABCG2 or ABCC1. Additionally, it did not inhibit substrate transport by ABCB1, ABCG2 or ABCC1, at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. Finally, incubation of the FLT3-ITD AML cell lines MV4-11 and MOLM-14 with crenolanib at a pharmacologically relevant concentration of 500 nM did not induce upregulation of ABCB1 cell surface expression. Conclusions Thus ABCB1 expression confers resistance to crenolanib and likely limits crenolanib penetration of the central nervous system, but crenolanib at therapeutic concentrations should not alter cellular exposure to ABC protein substrate chemotherapy drugs.

  18. Multidrug Resistant Shigella flexneri Infection Simulating Intestinal Intussusception.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Srirangaraj; Kali, Arunava; Pradeep, Jothimani

    2016-01-01

    Shigella enteritis remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity in all age groups, in developing as well as developed countries. Owing to the emerging resistance to multiple antibiotics among Shigella spp., it has been recognized as a major global public health concern and warrants constant monitoring of its resistance pattern. We report a case of segmental ileitis caused by non.-ESBL producing multidrug resistant Shigella flexneri in an infant clinically mimicking intussusception, which was effectively treated by ceftriaxone. PMID:27013815

  19. Reversal of the multidrug resistance by drug combination using multifunctional liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Niravkumar R.

    One of the major obstacles to the success of cancer chemotherapy is the multi-drug resistance (MDR) that results due mainly to the over-expression of drug efflux transporter pumps such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Highly efficacious third generation P-gp inhibitors, like tariquidar, have shown promising results against MDR. However, P-gp is also expressed in normal tissues like the blood-brain barrier, gastrointestinal tract, liver and kidney. It is therefore important to limit the exposure of P-gp inhibitors to normal tissues and increase their co-localization with anticancer agents in tumor tissues to maximize the efficacy of a P-gp inhibitor. To minimize non-specific binding and increase its delivery to tumor tissues, liposomes, self-assembling phospholipid vesicles, were chosen as a drug delivery vehicle. The liposome has been identified as a system capable of carrying molecules with diverse physicochemical properties. It can also alter the pharmacokinetic profile of loaded molecules which is a concern with both tariquidar and paclitaxel. Liposomes can easily be surface-modified rendering them cell-specific as well as organelle-specific. The main objective of present study was to develop an efficient liposomal delivery system which would deliver therapeutic molecules of interest to tumor tissues and avoid interaction with normal tissues. In this study, the co-delivery of tariquidar and paclitaxel into tumor cells to reverse the MDR using long-circulating cationic liposomes was investigated. SKOV-3TR, the resistant variant of SKOV-3 and MCF-7/ADR, the resistant variant of MCF-7 were used as model cell lines. Uniform liposomal formulations were generated with high incorporation efficiency and no apparent decrease in tariquidar potency towards P-gp. Tariquidar- and paclitaxel- co-loaded long-circulating liposomes showed significant re-sensitization of SKOV-3TR and MCF-7/ADR for paclitaxel in vitro. Further modification of these liposomes with antitumor 2C5 resulted

  20. Icotinib antagonizes ABCG2-mediated multidrug resistance, but not the pemetrexed resistance mediated by thymidylate synthase and ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Suneet; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Robey, Robert W.; Zhang, Li; Yang, Dong-Hua; Talele, Tanaji T.; Bates, Susan E.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    ABCG2 is a potential biomarker causing multidrug resistance (MDR) in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). We conducted this study to investigate whether Icotinib, a small-molecule inhibitor of EGFR tyrosine kinase, could interact with ABCG2 transporter in NSCLC. Our results showed that Icotinib reversed ABCG2-mediated MDR by antagonizing the drug efflux function of ABCG2. Icotinib stimulated the ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner and inhibited the photolabeling of ABCG2 with [125I]-Iodoarylazidoprazosin, demonstrating that it interacts at the drug-binding pocket. Homology modeling predicted the binding conformation of Icotinib at Asn629 centroid-based grid of ABCG2. However, Icotinib at reversal concentration did not affect the expression levels of AKT and ABCG2. Furthermore, a combination of Icotinib and topotecan exhibited significant synergistic anticancer activity against NCI-H460/MX20 tumor xenografts. However, the inhibition of transport activity of ABCG2 was insufficient to overcome pemetrexed resistance in NCI-H460/MX20 cells, which was due to the co-upregulated thymidylate synthase (TS) and ABCG2 expression. This is the first report to show that the up-regulation of TS in ABCG2-overexpressing cell line NCI-H460/MX20 may play a role of resistance to pemetrexate. Our findings suggested different possible strategies of overcoming the resistance of topotecan and pemetrexed in the NSCLC patients. PMID:24980828

  1. Linezolid susceptibility in Helicobacter pylori, including strains with multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Boyanova, Lyudmila; Evstatiev, Ivailo; Gergova, Galina; Yaneva, Penka; Mitov, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    Only a few studies have evaluated Helicobacter pylori susceptibility to linezolid. The aim of the present study was to assess linezolid susceptibility in H. pylori, including strains with double/multidrug resistance. The susceptibility of 53 H. pylori strains was evaluated by Etest and a breakpoint susceptibility testing method. Helicobacter pylori resistance rates were as follows: amoxicillin, 1.9%; metronidazole, 37.7%; clarithromycin, 17.0%; tetracycline, 1.9%; levofloxacin, 24.5%; and linezolid (>4 mg/L), 39.6%. The linezolid MIC50 value was 31.2-fold higher than that of clarithromycin and 10.5-fold higher than that of levofloxacin; however, 4 of 11 strains with double/multidrug resistance were linezolid-susceptible. The MIC range of the oxazolidinone agent was larger (0.125-64 mg/L) compared with those in the previous two reports. The linezolid resistance rate was 2.2-fold higher in metronidazole-resistant strains and in strains resistant to at least one antibiotic compared with the remaining strains. Briefly, linezolid was less active against H. pylori compared with clarithromycin and levofloxacin, and linezolid resistance was linked to resistance to metronidazole as well as to resistance to at least one antibiotic. However, linezolid activity against some strains with double/multidrug resistance may render the agent appropriate to treat some associated H. pylori infections following in vitro susceptibility testing of the strains. Clinical trials are required to confirm this suggestion.

  2. Multidrug resistance protein 1 protects the choroid plexus epithelium and contributes to the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wijnholds, Jan; de Lange, Elizabeth C.M.; Scheffer, George L.; van den Berg, Dirk-Jan; Mol, Carla A.A.M.; van der Valk, Martin; Schinkel, Alfred H.; Scheper, Rik J.; Breimer, Douwe D.; Borst, Piet

    2000-01-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) is a transporter protein that helps to protect normal cells and tumor cells against the influx of certain xenobiotics. We previously showed that Mrp1 protects against cytotoxic drugs at the testis-blood barrier, the oral epithelium, and the kidney urinary collecting duct tubules. Here, we generated Mrp1/Mdr1a/Mdr1b triple-knockout (TKO) mice, and used them together with Mdr1a/Mdr1b double-knockout (DKO) mice to study the contribution of Mrp1 to the tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics of etoposide. We observed increased toxicity in the TKO mice, which accumulated etoposide in brown adipose tissue, colon, salivary gland, heart, and the female urogenital system. Immunohistochemical staining revealed the presence of Mrp1 in the oviduct, uterus, salivary gland, and choroid plexus (CP) epithelium. To explore the transport function of Mrp1 in the CP epithelium, we used TKO and DKO mice cannulated for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We show here that the lack of Mrp1 protein causes etoposide levels to increase about 10-fold in the CSF after intravenous administration of the drug. Our results indicate that Mrp1 helps to limit tissue distribution of certain drugs and contributes to the blood-CSF drug-permeability barrier. PMID:10675353

  3. Non-cytotoxic nanomaterials enhance antimicrobial activities of cefmetazole against multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan-Hui; Yen, Muh-Yong; Ho, Chao-Chi; Wu, Ping; Wang, Chien-Chun; Maurya, Pawan Kumar; Chen, Pai-Shan; Chen, Wei; Hsieh, Wan-Yu; Chen, Huei-Wen

    2013-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae has led to difficulties in treating patients, and novel strategies to prevent and treat this infection are urgently needed. Here, we examined 21 different nanomaterials for their potential activity against N. gonorrhoeae (ATCC 49226). Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 120 nm) showed the greatest potency for reducing N. gonorrhoeae colony formation (MIC: 12.5 µg/ml) and possessed the dominant influence on the antibacterial activity with their properties of the nanoparticles within a concentration range that did not induce cytotoxicity in human fibroblasts or epithelial cells. Electron microscopy revealed that the Ag NPs significantly reduced bacterial cell membrane integrity. Furthermore, the use of clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae showed that combined treatment with 120 nm Ag NPs and cefmetazole produced additive effects. This is the first report to screen the effectiveness of nanomaterials against N. gonorrhoeae, and our results indicate that 120 nm Ag NPs deliver low levels of toxicity to human epithelial cells and could be used as an adjuvant with antibiotic therapy, either for topical use or as a coating for biomaterials, to prevent or treat multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:23705013

  4. Pyrrolopyrimidine Derivatives as Novel Inhibitors of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1).

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sven Marcel; Stefan, Katja; Wiese, Michael

    2016-04-14

    Five series of pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidines were synthesized and evaluated with respect to potency and selectivity toward multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1). This transport protein is a major target to overcome multidrug resistance in cancer patients. We investigated differently substituted pyrrolopyrimidines using the doxorubicin selected and MRP1 overexpressing small cell lung cancer cell line H69 AR in a calcein AM and daunorubicin cell accumulation assay. New compounds with high potency and selectivity were identified. Piperazine residues at position 4 bearing large phenylalkyl side chains proved to be beneficial for MRP1 inhibition. Its replacement by an amino group led to decreased activity. Aliphatic and aliphatic-aromatic variations at position 5 and 6 revealed compounds with IC50 values in high nanomolar range. All investigated compounds had low affinity toward P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1). Pyrrolopyrimidines with small substituents showed moderate inhibition against breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2). PMID:26943020

  5. Characterization of site-specific glycosylation of secreted proteins associated with multi-drug resistance of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Qin, Hongqiang; Li, Ting; Cheng, Kai; Dong, Jiaqiang; Tian, Miaomiao; Chai, Na; Guo, Hao; Li, Jinjing; You, Xin; Dong, Mingming; Ye, Mingliang; Nie, Yongzhan; Zou, Hanfa; Fan, Daiming

    2016-05-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) remains a great obstacle to effective chemotherapy for gastric cancer. A number of secreted glycoproteins have been reported to be involved in the development of MDR in gastric cancer. However, whether glycosylation of secreted glycoproteins changes during MDR of gastric cancer is unclear. Our present work manifested that N-glycosites and site-specific glycoforms of secreted proteins in drug-resistant cell lines were distinctly different from those in the parental cell line for the first time. Further characterization highlighted the significance of some aberrantly glycosylated secretory proteins in MDR, suggesting that manipulating the glycosylation of specific glycoproteins could be a potential target for overcoming multi-drug resistance in gastric cancer.

  6. Characterization of site-specific glycosylation of secreted proteins associated with multi-drug resistance of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting; Cheng, Kai; Dong, Jiaqiang; Tian, Miaomiao; Chai, Na; Guo, Hao; Li, Jinjing; You, Xin; Dong, Mingming; Ye, Mingliang; Nie, Yongzhan; Zou, Hanfa; Fan, Daiming

    2016-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) remains a great obstacle to effective chemotherapy for gastric cancer. A number of secreted glycoproteins have been reported to be involved in the development of MDR in gastric cancer. However, whether glycosylation of secreted glycoproteins changes during MDR of gastric cancer is unclear. Our present work manifested that N-glycosites and site-specific glycoforms of secreted proteins in drug-resistant cell lines were distinctly different from those in the parental cell line for the first time. Further characterization highlighted the significance of some aberrantly glycosylated secretory proteins in MDR, suggesting that manipulating the glycosylation of specific glycoproteins could be a potential target for overcoming multi-drug resistance in gastric cancer. PMID:27015365

  7. A multidrug resistance plasmid contains the molecular switch for type VI secretion in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Brent S.; Ly, Pek Man; Irwin, Joshua N.; Pukatzki, Stefan; Feldman, Mario F.

    2015-01-01

    Infections with Acinetobacter baumannii, one of the most troublesome and least studied multidrug-resistant superbugs, are increasing at alarming rates. A. baumannii encodes a type VI secretion system (T6SS), an antibacterial apparatus of Gram-negative bacteria used to kill competitors. Expression of the T6SS varies among different strains of A. baumannii, for which the regulatory mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that several multidrug-resistant strains of A. baumannii harbor a large, self-transmissible resistance plasmid that carries the negative regulators for T6SS. T6SS activity is silenced in plasmid-containing, antibiotic-resistant cells, while part of the population undergoes frequent plasmid loss and activation of the T6SS. This activation results in T6SS-mediated killing of competing bacteria but renders A. baumannii susceptible to antibiotics. Our data show that a plasmid that has evolved to harbor antibiotic resistance genes plays a role in the differentiation of cells specialized in the elimination of competing bacteria. PMID:26170289

  8. A multidrug resistance plasmid contains the molecular switch for type VI secretion in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Weber, Brent S; Ly, Pek Man; Irwin, Joshua N; Pukatzki, Stefan; Feldman, Mario F

    2015-07-28

    Infections with Acinetobacter baumannii, one of the most troublesome and least studied multidrug-resistant superbugs, are increasing at alarming rates. A. baumannii encodes a type VI secretion system (T6SS), an antibacterial apparatus of Gram-negative bacteria used to kill competitors. Expression of the T6SS varies among different strains of A. baumannii, for which the regulatory mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that several multidrug-resistant strains of A. baumannii harbor a large, self-transmissible resistance plasmid that carries the negative regulators for T6SS. T6SS activity is silenced in plasmid-containing, antibiotic-resistant cells, while part of the population undergoes frequent plasmid loss and activation of the T6SS. This activation results in T6SS-mediated killing of competing bacteria but renders A. baumannii susceptible to antibiotics. Our data show that a plasmid that has evolved to harbor antibiotic resistance genes plays a role in the differentiation of cells specialized in the elimination of competing bacteria.

  9. Multidrug resistance-associated ABC transporters - too much of one thing, good for nothing.

    PubMed

    Prochazkova, Jirina; Lanova, Martina; Pachernik, Jiri

    2012-08-01

    Abstract Overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in cancer cells results in multidrug resistance (MDR) which leads to unsuccessful chemotherapy. The most important MDR-associated members of ABC superfamily are ABC B1/P-glycoprotein/MDR1, ABC C1/multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1), and ABC G2/BCRP. This study is not only focused on function, substrates, and localization of these popular proteins but also on other ABC C family members such as ABC C2-6/MRP2-6 and ABC C7/CFTR. Current research is mainly oriented on the cancer-promoting role of these proteins, but important lessons could also be learned from the physiological roles of these proteins or from polymorphisms affecting their function. Thorough knowledge of structure and detailed mechanism of efflux can aid in the discovery of new chemotherapy targets in the future. Although the best way on how to deal with MDR would be to prevent its development, we describe some new promising strategies on how to conquer both inherited and induced MDRs.

  10. Discovering Natural Product Modulators to Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chung-Pu; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance caused by the overexpression of ABC drug transporters is a major obstacle in clinical cancer chemotherapy. For several years, it appeared that direct inhibition of ABC transporters would be the cheapest and most efficient way to combat this problem. Unfortunately, progress in finding a potent, selective inhibitor to modulate ABC transporters and restore drug sensitivity in multidrug-resistant cancer cells has been slow and challenging. Candidate drugs should ideally be selective, potent and relatively non-toxic. Many researchers in recent years have turned their attention to utilizing natural products as the building blocks for the development of the next generation of inhibitors, especially after the disappointing results obtained from inhibitors of the first three generations at the clinical trial stage. The first step is to discover natural substances (distinct from the first three generation inhibitors) that are potent, selective and relatively non-toxic in order to be used clinically. Here, we present a brief overview of the prospect of using natural products to modulate the function of ABC drug transporters clinically and their impact on human physiology and pharmacology. PMID:21118092

  11. Interferon-Gamma Improves Macrophages Function against M. tuberculosis in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Khan, Taj Ali; Mazhar, Humaira; Saleha, Shamim; Tipu, Hamid Nawaz; Muhammad, Niaz; Abbas, Muhammad Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) that causes tuberculosis (TB) kills millions of infected people annually especially multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). On infection, macrophages recognize the mycobacteria by toll-like receptor (TLR) followed by phagocytosis and control of mycobacteria. In addition, macrophages also secrete IL-12 to induce IFN-γ production by T, which, in turn, increases the phagocytosis and oxidative burst. Individuals with defects in innate or adaptive immunity exhibit increased susceptibility to M. tuberculosis. Understanding these immunologic mechanisms will help in TB control. We aimed to investigate the immunopathologic mechanisms in MDR-TB and role of recombinant human interferon-gamma (rhIFN-γ). Study Design and Methods. Monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of MDR-TB patients and healthy subjects and were investigated for immunologic response by ELISA and flow cytometry. Results. Different functional and molecular anomalies were observed in macrophages. In addition, a defective immune response to M. tuberculosis from the patient's MDMs was characterized, which in turn improved by pretreatment with rhIFN-γ. Conclusion. This work highlights the fact that rhIFN-γ improves macrophages function against M. tuberculosis and treatment of patients with poor responsiveness to TB therapy may be needed in future to include IFN-γ as adjuvant therapy after the full characterization of pathological and molecular mechanisms in these and in other more multidrug-resistant TB patients. PMID:27478636

  12. Interferon-Gamma Improves Macrophages Function against M. tuberculosis in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Humaira; Muhammad, Niaz; Abbas, Muhammad Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) that causes tuberculosis (TB) kills millions of infected people annually especially multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). On infection, macrophages recognize the mycobacteria by toll-like receptor (TLR) followed by phagocytosis and control of mycobacteria. In addition, macrophages also secrete IL-12 to induce IFN-γ production by T, which, in turn, increases the phagocytosis and oxidative burst. Individuals with defects in innate or adaptive immunity exhibit increased susceptibility to M. tuberculosis. Understanding these immunologic mechanisms will help in TB control. We aimed to investigate the immunopathologic mechanisms in MDR-TB and role of recombinant human interferon-gamma (rhIFN-γ). Study Design and Methods. Monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of MDR-TB patients and healthy subjects and were investigated for immunologic response by ELISA and flow cytometry. Results. Different functional and molecular anomalies were observed in macrophages. In addition, a defective immune response to M. tuberculosis from the patient's MDMs was characterized, which in turn improved by pretreatment with rhIFN-γ. Conclusion. This work highlights the fact that rhIFN-γ improves macrophages function against M. tuberculosis and treatment of patients with poor responsiveness to TB therapy may be needed in future to include IFN-γ as adjuvant therapy after the full characterization of pathological and molecular mechanisms in these and in other more multidrug-resistant TB patients. PMID:27478636

  13. A Potato cDNA Encoding a Homologue of Mammalian Multidrug Resistant P-Glycoprotein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    A homologue of the multidrug resistance (MDR) gene was obtained while screening a potato stolon tip cDNA expression library with S-15-labeled calmodulin. The mammalian MDR gene codes for a membrane-bound P-glycoprotein (170-180 kDa) which imparts multidrug resistance to cancerous cells. The potato cDNA (PMDR1) codes for a polypeptide of 1313 amino acid residues (ca. 144 kDa) and its structural features are very similar to the MDR P-glycoprotein. The N-terminal half of the PMDR1-encoded protein shares striking homology with its C-terminal half, and each half contains a conserved ATP-binding site and six putative transmembrane domains. Southern blot analysis indicated that potato has one or two MDR-like genes. PMDR1 mRNA is constitutively expressed in all organs studied with higher expression in the stem and stolon tip. The PMDR1 expression was highest during tuber initiation and decreased during tuber development.

  14. Reversal of Multidrug Resistance and Computational Studies of Pistagremic Acid Isolated from Pistacia integerrima.

    PubMed

    Rauf, Abdur; Uddin, Ghias; Raza, Muslim; Ahmad, Aftab; Jehan, Noor; Ahmad, Bashir; Nisar, Muhammad; Molnar, Joseph; Csonka, Akos; Szabo, Diana; Khan, Ajmal; Farooq, Umar; Noor, Mah

    2016-01-01

    Pistagremic acid (PA) is a bioactive triterpenoid isolated from various parts of Pistacia integerrima plants. The aim of this research was to investigate PA for reversion of multidrug resistant (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein using rhodamine-123 exclusion study on a multidrug resistant human ABCB1 (ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B, member 1) gene-transfected mouse T-lymphoma cell line in vitro. Results were similar to those with verapamil as a positive control. Docking studies of PA and standard Rhodamine123 were carried out against a P-gp crystal structure which showed satisfactory results. Actually, PA cannot bind exactly where co-crystallized ligand of P-gp is already present. However, the docking study predicted that if a compound gives a lesser score then it may have some potency. The docking scores of PA and Rhodamine were similar. Therefore, we can conclude that there are certain important chemical features of PA which are responsible for the inhibiting potency of P-gp. PMID:27221936

  15. Environmental contamination by multidrug-resistant microorganisms after daily cleaning.

    PubMed

    Gavaldà, Laura; Pequeño, Sandra; Soriano, Ana; Dominguez, M Angeles

    2015-07-01

    We analyzed 91 samples of high-touch surfaces obtained within the first hour after daily cleaning in intensive care unit rooms occupied with patients with multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs). We determined that 22% of high-touch surfaces in rooms with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus patients and 5% of high-touch surfaces in rooms with multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa patients were colonized with the same strain as the patient. We postulated that textile cleaning wipes could be contaminated with MDROs and may contribute to its spreading within the room.

  16. [Old and new antibiotics for therapy of multidrug resistant bacteria].

    PubMed

    Pintado, V

    2016-09-01

    The lack of new antibiotics for multidrug-resistant bacteria is a matter of concern in microorganisms such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, ESBL- and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter baumannii, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcous aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. This situation has conditioned the reuse of "old" antibiotics (colistin, fosfomycin), the use of more recent antibiotics with new indications or dosage regimens (tigecycline, meropenem) and the introduction of "new" antibiotics (β-lactams, lipoglycopeptides, oxazolidinones) that are the subject of this review. PMID:27608312

  17. Drug treatment for multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections.

    PubMed

    Bassetti, Matteo; Righi, Elda; Esposito, Silvano; Petrosillo, Nicola; Nicolini, Laura

    2008-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged in the last decades as a major cause of healthcare-associated infections and nosocomial outbreaks. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii is a rapidly emerging pathogen in healthcare settings, where it causes infections that include bacteremia, pneumonia, meningitis, and urinary tract and wound infections. Antimicrobial resistance poses great limits for therapeutic options in infected patients, especially if the isolates are resistant to the carbapenems. Other therapeutic options include sulbactam, aminoglycosides, polymixyns and tigecycline. The discovery of new therapies coupled with the development of controlled clinical trial antibiotic testing combinations and the prevention of transmission of MDR Acinetobacter infection are essential to face this important hospital problem.

  18. Long-circulating PEG-PE micelles co-loaded with paclitaxel and elacridar (GG918) overcome multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Sarisozen, Can; Vural, Imran; Levchenko, Tatyana; Hincal, A Atilla; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2012-11-01

    Overexpression of drug efflux pump P-gp is one of the major reasons to cause multidrug resistance (MDR). To overcome P-gp mediated MDR, modulators, so called P-gp inhibitors, can be used to block efflux pump activity. Elacridar is one of the most potent P-gp inhibitors, which can cause irreversible and total P-gp blockage. Elacridar, among with other P-gp inhibitors, can be used in combination with anticancer drugs to enhance the effectiveness of chemotherapy against resistant tumor cells. On the other hand, P-gp is presented in normal tissues, thus non-selective blockage of P-gp can cause undesired side effects. Therefore, it is important to deliver P-gp inhibitor only to the tumor cells (along with anticancer drug) and limit its distribution in the body. In this study, we have developed PEG-PE-based long-circulating ca. 15 nm micelles co-loaded with elacridar and paclitaxel, and investigated their ability to overcome paclitaxel resistance in two cancer cell lines. Vitamin E, a common solubility enhancer for PEG-PE micelles, was found to have a negative effect on both particle size and encapsulation efficiencies. The human MDR1 gene-transfected and thus paclitaxel-resistant MDCKII-MDR1 P-gp overexpressing cells were used for cytotoxicity evaluation. Even though PEG-PE based micelles itself have a potential to enhance the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel, elacridar/paclitaxel-co-loaded micelles demonstrated the highest cytotoxicity compared to both free and micellar paclitaxel. The obtained results suggest that co-loading of paclitaxel and elacridar into micellar drug carriers results in promising preparations capable of overcoming paclitaxel resistance. PMID:23030458

  19. Multidrug resistance protein gene expression in Trichoplusia ni caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Jason; D'Souza, Olivia; Rheault, Mark; Donly, Cam

    2013-02-01

    Many insect species exhibit pesticide-resistant phenotypes. One of the mechanisms capable of contributing to resistance is the overexpression of multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter proteins. Here we describe the cloning of three genes encoding MDR proteins from Trichoplusia ni: trnMDR1, trnMDR2 and trnMDR3. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) detected trnMDR mRNA in the whole nervous system, midgut and Malpighian tubules of final instar T. ni caterpillars. To test whether these genes are upregulated in response to chemical challenge in this insect, qPCR was used to compare trnMDR mRNA levels in unchallenged insects with those of insects fed the synthetic pyrethroid, deltamethrin. Only limited increases were detected in a single gene, trnMDR2, which is the most weakly expressed of the three MDR genes, suggesting that increased multidrug resistance of this type is not a significant part of the response to deltamethrin exposure.

  20. Treatment for patients with multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii pulmonary infection

    PubMed Central

    PAN, TAO; LIU, XIAOYUN; XIANG, SHOUGUI; JI, WENLI

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections are common but have become increasingly resistant to drugs. The aim of the present study was to examine the combined treatment of traditional Chinese and Western medicine in 30 cases of pulmonary infection with multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Patients were divided into groups A and B according to drug treatments. Cefoperazone or sulbactam and tanreqing were administered in group A, and cefoperazone or sulbactam in group B. The curative effect and prognosis of the two groups were recorded and the remaining treatments were performed routinely in the clinic. For the combined therapy group, which was administered sulperazone and tanreqing, 8 patients were recovered, 6 patients had significant effects, 3 patients exhibited some improvement and 1 patient had no response. One of the patients did not survive after 28 days. By contrast, there were 4 patients that were successfully treated, 3 patients with significant effects, 2 patients with some improvement and 2 patients had no response in the sulperazone group, and 4 patients did not survive after 28 days. In conclusion, the combined therapy of cefoperazone or sulbactam supplemented with tanreqing was identified to be more effective than cefoperazone or sulbactam as monotherapy, for treating multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. PMID:27073447

  1. Characterization of a multidrug resistant C. difficile meat isolate.

    PubMed

    Mooyottu, Shankumar; Flock, Genevieve; Kollanoor-Johny, Anup; Upadhyaya, Indu; Jayarao, Bhushan; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a pathogen of significant public health concern causing a life-threatening, toxin-mediated enteric disease in humans. The incidence and severity of the disease associated with C. difficile have increased in the US with the emergence of hypervirulent strains and community associated outbreaks. The detection of genotypically similar and identical C. difficile strains implicated from human infections in foods and food animals indicates the potential role of food as a source of community associated C. difficile disease. One hundred samples each of ground beef, pork and chicken obtained from geographically distant grocery stores in Connecticut were tested for C. difficile. Positive isolates were characterized by ribotyping, antibiotic susceptibility, toxin production and whole genome sequencing. Of the 300 meat samples, only two pork samples tested positive for C. difficile indicating a very low prevalence of C. difficile in meat. The isolates were non toxigenic; however, genome characterization revealed the presence of several antibiotic resistance genes and mobile elements that can potentially contribute to generation of multidrug resistant toxigenic C. difficile by horizontal gene transfer. Further studies are warranted to investigate potential food-borne transmission of the meat isolates and development of multi-drug resistance in these strains.

  2. Multidrug-resistant organisms, wounds and topical antimicrobial protection.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Philip G; Welsby, Sarah; Towers, Victoria; Booth, Rebecca; Hogarth, Andrea; Rowlands, Victoria; Joseph, Alexis; Jones, Samantha A

    2012-08-01

    Multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) are increasingly implicated in both acute and chronic wound infections. The limited therapeutic options are further compromised by the fact that wound bacteria often co-exist within a biofilm community which enhances bacterial tolerance to antibiotics. As a consequence, topical antiseptics may be an important consideration for minimising the opportunity for wound infections involving MDROs. The objective of this research was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of a silver-containing gelling fibre dressing against a variety of MDROs in free-living and biofilm states, using stringent in vitro models designed to simulate a variety of wound conditions. MDROs included Acinetobacter baumannii, community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria. Clostridium difficile was also included in the study because it carries many of the characteristics seen in MDROs and evidence of multidrug resistance is emerging. Sustained in vitro antimicrobial activity of the silver-containing dressing was shown against 10 MDROs in a simulated wound fluid over 7 days, and inhibitory and bactericidal effects against both free-living and biofilm phenotypes were also consistently shown in simulated colonised wound surface models. The in vitro data support consideration of the silver-containing gelling fibre dressing as part of a protocol of care in the management of wounds colonised or infected with MDROs.

  3. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 is a determinant of arsenite resistance.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; Yoshino, Yuta; Fukushima, Hisayo; Markova, Svetlana; Takagi, Norio; Toyoda, Hiroo; Kroetz, Deanna L

    2016-01-01

    Although arsenic trioxide (arsenite, As(III)) has shown a remarkable efficacy in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, multidrug resistance is still a major concern for its clinical use. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4), which belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters, is localized to the basolateral membrane of hepatocytes and the apical membrane of renal proximal tubule cells. Due to its characteristic localization, MRP4 is proposed as a candidate in the elimination of arsenic and may contribute to resistance to As(III). To test this hypothesis, stable HEK293 cells overexpressing MRP4 or MRP2 were used to establish the role of these two transporters in As(III) resistance. The IC50 values of As(III) in MRP4 cells were approximately 6-fold higher than those in MRP2 cells, supporting an important role for MRP4 in resistance to As(III). The capacity of MRP4 to confer resistance to As(III) was further confirmed by a dramatic decrease in the IC50 values with the addition of MK571, an MRP4 inhibitor, and cyclosporine A, a well-known broad-spectrum inhibitor of ABC transporters. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the MRP2 cells to As(III) was similar to that of the parent cells, although insufficient formation of glutathione and/or Se conjugated arsenic compounds in the MRP2 cells might limit transport. Given that MRP4 is a major contributor to arsenic resistance in vitro, further investigation into the correlation between MRP4 expression and treatment outcome of leukemia patients treated with arsenic-based regimens is warranted. PMID:26497925

  4. Draft Genome of the Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain A155 Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Arivett, Brock A.; Fiester, Steven E.; Ream, David C.; Centrón, Daniela; Ramírez, Maria S.; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a bacterial pathogen with serious implications on human health, due to increasing reports of multidrug-resistant strains isolated from patients. Total DNA from the multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strain A155 clinical isolate was sequenced to greater than 65× coverage, providing high-quality contig assemblies. PMID:25814610

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Sequence Type 1407, a Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Anselmo, A.; Ciammaruconi, A.; Carannante, A.; Neri, A.; Fazio, C.; Fortunato, A.; Palozzi, A. M.; Vacca, P.; Fillo, S.; Lista, F.

    2015-01-01

    Gonorrhea may become untreatable due to the spread of resistant or multidrug-resistant strains. Cefixime-resistant gonococci belonging to sequence type 1407 have been described worldwide. We report the genome sequence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain G2891, a multidrug-resistant isolate of sequence type 1407, collected in Italy in 2013. PMID:26272575

  6. Multidrug-Resistant Shigella Infections in Patients with Diarrhea, Cambodia, 2014–2015

    PubMed Central

    Poramathikul, Kamonporn; Chiek, Sivhour; Oransathid, Wilawan; Ruekit, Sirigade; Nobthai, Panida; Lurchachaiwong, Woradee; Serichantalergs, Oralak; Lon, Chanthap; Swierczewski, Brett

    2016-01-01

    We observed multidrug resistance in 10 (91%) of 11 Shigella isolates from a diarrheal surveillance study in Cambodia. One isolate was resistant to fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins and showed decreased susceptibility to azithromycin. We found mutations in gyrA, parC, β-lactamase, and mphA genes. Multidrug resistance increases concern about shigellosis treatment options. PMID:27532684

  7. Multidrug-Resistant Shigella Infections in Patients with Diarrhea, Cambodia, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Poramathikul, Kamonporn; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Chiek, Sivhour; Oransathid, Wilawan; Ruekit, Sirigade; Nobthai, Panida; Lurchachaiwong, Woradee; Serichantalergs, Oralak; Lon, Chanthap; Swierczewski, Brett

    2016-09-01

    We observed multidrug resistance in 10 (91%) of 11 Shigella isolates from a diarrheal surveillance study in Cambodia. One isolate was resistant to fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins and showed decreased susceptibility to azithromycin. We found mutations in gyrA, parC, β-lactamase, and mphA genes. Multidrug resistance increases concern about shigellosis treatment options. PMID:27532684

  8. Different gap junction-propagated effects on cisplatin transfer result in opposite responses to cisplatin in normal cells versus tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Tao, Liang; Fan, Lixia; Peng, Yuexia; Yang, Kefan; Zhao, Yifan; Song, Qi; Wang, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Previous work has shown that gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) enhances cisplatin (Pt) toxicity in testicular tumor cells but decreases it in non-tumor testicular cells. In this study, these different GJIC-propagated effects were demonstrated in tumor versus non-tumor cells from other organ tissues (liver and lung). The downregulation of GJIC by several different manipulations (no cell contact, pharmacological inhibition, and siRNA suppression) decreased Pt toxicity in tumor cells but enhanced it in non-tumor cells. The in vivo results using xenograft tumor models were consistent with those from the above-mentioned cells. To better understand the mechanism(s) involved, we studied the effects of GJIC on Pt accumulation in tumor and non-tumor cells from the liver and lung. The intracellular Pt and DNA-Pt adduct contents clearly increased in non-tumor cells but decreased in tumor cells when GJIC was downregulated. Further analysis indicated that the opposite effects of GJIC on Pt accumulation in normal versus tumor cells from the liver were due to its different effects on copper transporter1 and multidrug resistance-associated protein2, membrane transporters attributed to intracellular Pt transfer. Thus, GJIC protects normal organs from cisplatin toxicity while enhancing it in tumor cells via its different effects on intracellular Pt transfer. PMID:26215139

  9. Turning the gun on cancer: Utilizing lysosomal P-glycoprotein as a new strategy to overcome multi-drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, Nicole; Lane, Darius J R; Richardson, Des R; Jansson, Patric J

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress plays a role in the development of drug resistance in cancer cells. Cancer cells must constantly and rapidly adapt to changes in the tumor microenvironment, due to alterations in the availability of nutrients, such as glucose, oxygen and key transition metals (e.g., iron and copper). This nutrient flux is typically a consequence of rapid growth, poor vascularization and necrosis. It has been demonstrated that stress factors, such as hypoxia and glucose deprivation up-regulate master transcription factors, namely hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which transcriptionally regulate the multi-drug resistance (MDR), transmembrane drug efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (Pgp). Interestingly, in addition to the established role of plasma membrane Pgp in MDR, a new paradigm of intracellular resistance has emerged that is premised on the ability of lysosomal Pgp to transport cytotoxic agents into this organelle. This mechanism is enabled by the topological inversion of Pgp via endocytosis resulting in the transporter actively pumping agents into the lysosome. In this way, classical Pgp substrates, such as doxorubicin (DOX), can be actively transported into this organelle. Within the lysosome, DOX becomes protonated upon acidification of the lysosomal lumen, causing its accumulation. This mechanism efficiently traps DOX, preventing its cytotoxic interaction with nuclear DNA. This review discusses these effects and highlights a novel mechanism by which redox-active and protonatable Pgp substrates can utilize lysosomal Pgp to gain access to this compartment, resulting in catastrophic lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cell death. Hence, a key MDR mechanism that utilizes Pgp (the "gun") to sequester protonatable drug substrates safely within lysosomes can be "turned on" MDR cancer cells to destroy them from within.

  10. Turning the gun on cancer: Utilizing lysosomal P-glycoprotein as a new strategy to overcome multi-drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, Nicole; Lane, Darius J R; Richardson, Des R; Jansson, Patric J

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress plays a role in the development of drug resistance in cancer cells. Cancer cells must constantly and rapidly adapt to changes in the tumor microenvironment, due to alterations in the availability of nutrients, such as glucose, oxygen and key transition metals (e.g., iron and copper). This nutrient flux is typically a consequence of rapid growth, poor vascularization and necrosis. It has been demonstrated that stress factors, such as hypoxia and glucose deprivation up-regulate master transcription factors, namely hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which transcriptionally regulate the multi-drug resistance (MDR), transmembrane drug efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (Pgp). Interestingly, in addition to the established role of plasma membrane Pgp in MDR, a new paradigm of intracellular resistance has emerged that is premised on the ability of lysosomal Pgp to transport cytotoxic agents into this organelle. This mechanism is enabled by the topological inversion of Pgp via endocytosis resulting in the transporter actively pumping agents into the lysosome. In this way, classical Pgp substrates, such as doxorubicin (DOX), can be actively transported into this organelle. Within the lysosome, DOX becomes protonated upon acidification of the lysosomal lumen, causing its accumulation. This mechanism efficiently traps DOX, preventing its cytotoxic interaction with nuclear DNA. This review discusses these effects and highlights a novel mechanism by which redox-active and protonatable Pgp substrates can utilize lysosomal Pgp to gain access to this compartment, resulting in catastrophic lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cell death. Hence, a key MDR mechanism that utilizes Pgp (the "gun") to sequester protonatable drug substrates safely within lysosomes can be "turned on" MDR cancer cells to destroy them from within. PMID:27154979

  11. Role of serum interleukin-6 in deciding therapy for multidrug resistant oral lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    Marwah, Akanksha; Kaushik, Smita; Garg, Vijay K.; Gupta, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a T cell mediated immune response. T cells locally present in the involved tissues release cytokines like interleukin-6 (IL-6), which contributes to pathogenesis of OLP. Also IL-6 has been associated with multidrug resistance protein (MRP) expression by keratinocytes. Correspondingly, upregulation of MRP was found in OLP. We conducted this study to evaluate the effects of various drugs on serum IL-6 in OLP; and correlation of these effects with the nature of clinical response and resistance pattern seen in OLP lesions with various therapeutic modalities. Thus we evaluated the role of serum IL-6 in deciding therapy for multidrug resistant OLP. Material and Methods Serum IL-6 was evaluated in 42 erosive OLP (EOLP) patients and 10 normal mucosa and 10 oral squamous cell carcinoma cases using ELISA technique. OLP patients were randomly divided into 3 groups of 14 patients each and were subjected to Pimecrolimus local application, oral Mycophenolate Mofetil (MMF) and Methotrexate (MTX) alongwith Pimecrolimus local application. IL-6 levels were evaluated before and after treatment. Results Serum IL-6 levels were raised above 3pg/ml in 26.19% erosive OLP (EOLP) cases (mean- 3.72±8.14). EOLP (5%) cases with IL-6 levels above 5pg/ml were resistant in MTX group. However significant decrease in serum IL-6 corresponding with the clinical resolution was seen in MMF group. Conclusions Significantly raised IL-6 levels in EOLP reflect the chronic inflammatory nature of the disease. As serum IL-6 levels significantly decreased in MMF group, correspondingly no resistance to treatment was noted. However with MTX there was no significant decrease in IL-6 and resistance to treatment was noted in some, especially plaque type lesions. Thus IL-6 can be a possible biomarker in deciding the best possible therapy for treatment resistant OLP. Key words:Lichen planus, biological markers, cytokines, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunosuppressive

  12. Early Biomarkers and Regulatory Innovation in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Robert S; Peppard, Thomas

    2015-10-15

    Biomarkers play an essential role in accelerating drug development. Sputum culture conversion using solid medium is the best-characterized tuberculosis biomarker, having been examined at the patient and trial levels in studies with thousands of subjects, and having recently been validated using data from 3 unsuccessful phase 3 trials. We presently are poised at the threshold of regulatory innovation for antibacterials to treat drug-resistant infections, in which Special Medical Use authorization restricted to patients with limited options could be based on the results of small clinical trials. Patients worldwide would be well served by licensing of new regimens for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis based on biomarker evidence commensurate with the urgency of the current global crisis. PMID:26409278

  13. Breaking the Spell: Combating Multidrug Resistant ‘Superbugs’

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahper N.; Khan, Asad U.

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria have become a severe threat to community wellbeing. Conventional antibiotics are getting progressively more ineffective as a consequence of resistance, making it imperative to realize improved antimicrobial options. In this review we emphasized the microorganisms primarily reported of being resistance, referred as ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacteriaceae) accentuating their capacity to “escape” from routine antimicrobial regimes. The upcoming antimicrobial agents showing great potential and can serve as alternative therapeutic options are discussed. We also provided succinct overview of two evolving technologies; specifically network pharmacology and functional genomics profiling. Furthermore, In vivo imaging techniques can provide novel targets and a real time tool for potential lead molecule assessment. The employment of such approaches at prelude of a drug development process, will enables more informed decisions on candidate drug selection and will maximize or predict therapeutic potential before clinical testing. PMID:26925046

  14. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis drug susceptibility and molecular diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Kalokhe, Ameeta S; Shafiq, Majid; Lee, James C; Ray, Susan M; Wang, Yun F; Metchock, Beverly; Anderson, Albert M; Nguyen, Minh Ly T

    2013-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB), defined by resistance to the 2 most effective first-line drugs, isoniazid and rifampin, is on the rise globally and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the increasing availability of novel rapid diagnostic tools for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) drug susceptibility testing, the clinical applicability of these methods is unsettled. In this study, the mechanisms of action and resistance of Mtb to isoniazid and rifampin, and the utility, advantages and limitations of the available Mtb drug susceptibility testing tools are reviewed, with particular emphasis on molecular methods with rapid turnaround including line probe assays, molecular beacon-based real-time polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing. The authors conclude that neither rapid molecular drug testing nor phenotypic methods are perfect in predicting Mtb drug susceptibility and therefore must be interpreted within the clinical context of each patient.

  15. Clonality of multidrug-resistant nontypeable strains of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Fusté, M C; Pineda, M A; Palomar, J; Viñas, M; Lorén, J G

    1996-01-01

    The genetic structure of a population of multidrug-resistant nontypeable (unencapsulated) Haemophilus influenzae strains isolated at a hospital in Barcelona, Spain, was investigated by using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis to determine the allelic variation in 15 structural loci. In our study we have also included some antimicrobial agent-susceptible strains isolated at the same hospital. All enzymes were polymorphic for two to eight electromorphs, and the analysis revealed 43 distinct electrophoretic types among the 44 isolates. The mean genetic diversity of the entire population was 0.55. Multilocus linkage disequilibrium analysis of the isolates revealed a strong association between alleles, suggesting little possibility of recombination. Furthermore, the dendrogram and the allele mismatch distribution are typical of a population with no extensive genetic mixing. PMID:8897179

  16. Silver nanoparticles: the powerful nanoweapon against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rai, M K; Deshmukh, S D; Ingle, A P; Gade, A K

    2012-05-01

    In the present scenario, pharmaceutical and biomedical sectors are facing the challenges of continuous increase in the multidrug-resistant (MDR) human pathogenic microbes. Re-emergence of MDR microbes is facilitated by drug and/or antibiotic resistance, which is acquired way of microbes for their survival and multiplication in uncomfortable environments. MDR bacterial infections lead to significant increase in mortality, morbidity and cost of prolonged treatments. Therefore, development, modification or searching the antimicrobial compounds having bactericidal potential against MDR bacteria is a priority area of research. Silver in the form of various compounds and bhasmas have been used in Ayurveda to treat several bacterial infections since time immemorial. As several pathogenic bacteria are developing antibiotic resistance, silver nanoparticles are the new hope to treat them. This review discusses the bactericidal potential of silver nanoparticles against the MDR bacteria. This multiactional nanoweapon can be used for the treatment and prevention of drug-resistant microbes.

  17. Metal nanobullets for multidrug resistant bacteria and biofilms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Wen; Hsu, Chia-Yen; Lai, Syu-Ming; Syu, Wei-Jhe; Wang, Ting-Yi; Lai, Ping-Shan

    2014-11-30

    Infectious diseases were one of the major causes of mortality until now because drug-resistant bacteria have arisen under broad use and abuse of antibacterial drugs. These multidrug-resistant bacteria pose a major challenge to the effective control of bacterial infections and this threat has prompted the development of alternative strategies to treat bacterial diseases. Recently, use of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) as antibacterial agents is one of the promising strategies against bacterial drug resistance. This review first describes mechanisms of bacterial drug resistance and then focuses on the properties and applications of metallic NPs as antibiotic agents to deal with antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant bacteria. We also provide an overview of metallic NPs as bactericidal agents combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria and their potential in vivo toxicology for further drug development.

  18. Preparation of silver nanoparticles fabrics against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanh, Truong Thi; Thu, Nguyen Thi; Hien, Nguyen Quoc; An, Pham Ngoc; Loan, Truong Thi Kieu; Hoa, Phan Thi

    2016-04-01

    The silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)/peco fabrics were prepared by immobilization of AgNPs on fabrics in which AgNPs were synthesized by γ-irradiation of the 10 mM AgNO3 chitosan solution at the dose of 17.6 kGy. The AgNPs size has been estimated to be about 11 nm from TEM image. The AgNPs content onto peco fabrics was of 143±6 mg/kg at the initial AgNPs concentration of 100 ppm. The AgNPs colloidal solution was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and TEM image. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs/peco fabrics after 60 washings against Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae was found to be over 99%. Effects of AgNPs fabics on multidrug-resistant pathogens from the clinical specimens were also tested.

  19. Bacteriophages: biosensing tools for multi-drug resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Tawil, N; Sacher, E; Mandeville, R; Meunier, M

    2014-03-21

    Pathogen detection is of utmost importance in many sectors, such as in the food industry, environmental quality control, clinical diagnostics, bio-defence and counter-terrorism. Failure to appropriately, and specifically, detect pathogenic bacteria can lead to serious consequences, and may ultimately be lethal. Public safety, new legislation, recent outbreaks in food contamination, and the ever-increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections have fostered a worldwide research effort targeting novel biosensing strategies. This review concerns phage-based analytical and biosensing methods targeted towards theranostic applications. We discuss and review phage-based assays, notably phage amplification, reporter phage, phage lysis, and bioluminescence assays for the detection of bacterial species, as well as phage-based biosensors, including optical (comprising SPR sensors and fiber optic assays), electrochemical (comprising amperometric, potentiometric, and impedimetric sensors), acoustic wave and magnetoelastic sensors.

  20. Functional expression of murine multidrug resistance in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, G.; Vera, J.C.; Rosen, O.M. ); Yang, Chiaping Huang; Horwitz, S.B. )

    1990-06-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) is associated with the overproduction of a plasma membrane glycoprotein, P glycoprotein. Here the authors report the functional expression of a member of the murine MDR family of proteins and show that Xenopus oocytes injected with RNA encoding the mouse mdr1b P glycoprotein develop a MDR-like phenotype. Immunological analysis indicated that oocytes injected with the mdr1b RNA synthesized a protein with the size and immunological characteristics of the mouse mdr1b P glycoprotein. These oocytes exhibited a decreased accumulation of ({sup 3}H)vinblastine and showed an increased capacity to extrude the drug compared to control oocytes not expressing the P glycoprotein. In addition, competition experiments indicated that verapamil, vincristine, daunomycin, and quinidine, but not colchicine, can overcome the rapid drug efflux conferred by the expression of the mouse P glycoprotein.

  1. An outbreak of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis among a family.

    PubMed

    Iliaz, Sinem; Caglar, Emel; Koksalan, Orhan Kaya; Chousein, Efsun Gonca Ugur

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem and it may be complicated by multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Wide transmission among immunocompetent contacts of the index case is possible. If you detect tuberculosis in two contacts of the index case, it is called an outbreak. The aim of our paper is to evaluate the characteristics of a MDR-TB outbreak affecting 7 people in a family treated during 2012-2014 in Istanbul Yedikule Training and Research Hospital for Chest Disease and Thoracic Surgery, Turkey. The cultures, spoligotyping, and DNA fingerprinting revealed the same Mycobacterium tuberculosis species as T1 genotype and ST53 subtype. All patients were negative for human immunodeficiency virus and free of other underlying diseases. PMID:27451825

  2. Antimicrobial properties of nanomolecules: potential candidates as antibiotics in the era of multi-drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kandi, Venkataramana; Kandi, Sabitha

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The emergence of multi-drug resistance among various microbial pathogens has been a cause of serious concern to the medical world, limiting the choice of antibiotics. Considering that it may take decades to synthesize new antimicrobial drugs that combat resistant pathogens, the search for alternatives to conventional antimicrobial agents has begun. METHODS: In his paper we attempted to review the physico-chemical properties of nanoparticles, their modes of action and potential use in medicine and research with special reference to antimicrobial properties. RESULTS: Nanomolecules and nanoparticles have in recent years been extensively studied for their utility not only as antibiotics but also as vehicles to carry antibiotics or other agents such as cancer chemotherapeutics to target sites and limit damage to host cells. CONCLUSION: Nanomolecules were positively evaluated for their antimicrobial activities. Anti-biofilm activities of nanoparticles, utility of nanomaterials as carrier agents of drugs signifies their importance in medicine and research. PMID:25968114

  3. The prevention and management of infections due to multidrug resistant organisms in haematology patients

    PubMed Central

    Trubiano, Jason A; Worth, Leon J; Thursky, Karin A; Slavin, Monica A

    2015-01-01

    Infections due to resistant and multidrug resistant (MDR) organisms in haematology patients and haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients are an increasingly complex problem of global concern. We outline the burden of illness and epidemiology of resistant organisms such as gram-negative pathogens, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE), and Clostridium difficile in haematology cohorts. Intervention strategies aimed at reducing the impact of these organisms are reviewed: infection prevention programmes, screening and fluoroquinolone prophylaxis. The role of newer therapies (e.g. linezolid, daptomycin and tigecycline) for treatment of resistant and MDR organisms in haematology populations is evaluated, in addition to the mobilization of older agents (e.g. colistin, pristinamycin and fosfomycin) and the potential benefit of combination regimens. PMID:24341410

  4. Human ABCG2: structure, function, and its role in multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Wei; Zhang, Jian-Ting

    2012-01-01

    Human ABCG2 is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily and is known to contribute to multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer chemotherapy. Among ABC transporters that are known to cause MDR, ABCG2 is particularly interesting for its potential role in protecting cancer stem cells and its complex oligomeric structure. Recent studies have also revealed that the biogenesis of ABCG2 could be modulated by small molecule compounds. These modulators, upon binding to ABCG2, accelerate the endocytosis and trafficking to lysosome for degradation and effectively reduce the half-life of ABCG2. Hence, targeting ABCG2 stability could be a new venue for therapeutic discovery to sensitize drug resistant human cancers. In this report, we review recent progress on understanding the structure, function, biogenesis, as well as physiological and pathophysiological functions of ABCG2. PMID:22509477

  5. Prevalence of Multidrug Resistant Pulmonary Tuberculosis in North Bihar

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Surya Deo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is caused by Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis which is resistant to both isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF), with or without any other anti tubercular drug. It is caused by resistant mutant strains due to inadequate treatment and poor compliance. Due to time taking conventional diagnostic methods, drug resistant strains continue to spread. Therefore rapid diagnosis and treatment of MDR-TB strains are prerequisites for the worldwide fight against TB. Objective To determine the prevalence of MDR TB in North Bihar by molecular diagnostic method and to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. Also, to find out the number of those diagnosed cases who were successfully initiated the treatment in MDR TB Centre of DMCH. Materials and Methods This six month observational study was carried out in IRL Darbhanga, Damien TB research Centre of the Darbhanga Medical College and Hospital, Bihar, India. During the period of February-July 2014, 256 sputum samples were collected from suspected cases of multidrug resistant tuberculosis, from 6 districts of North Bihar around Darbhanga. These samples were subjected to routine microscopy and culture to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Positive cases were subjected to drug sensitivity test by a molecular diagnostic method, Using Genotype MTBDR plus kit. Result Out of 256 sputum samples from suspected cases of MDR TB, 122 cases were microscopy positive for tuberculosis. Among these 122 cases, tuberculosis was confirmed by PCR in 114 cases. Finally with the help of Line Probe Assay (LPA), 39(15%) samples were found to have resistance to both INH and Rifampicin. Male female ratio was 4:1. Conclusion The Prevalence of Multi drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis in North Bihar is 15%. It needs early diagnosis by molecular diagnostic method and prompt treatment to reduce the spread of MDR TB cases. PMID:26674711

  6. Enhanced therapeutic effect of Adriamycin on multidrug resistant breast cancer by the ABCG2-siRNA loaded polymeric nanoparticles assisted with ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yanwei; Sun, Ying; Li, Fan; Zhang, Xiangyu; Xu, Yuanyuan; Duan, Yourong; Du, Lianfang

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression of the breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) confers resistance to Adriamycin (ADR) in breast cancer. The silencing of ABCG2 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) could be a promising approach to overcome multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. To deliver ABCG2-siRNA effectively into breast cancer cells, we used mPEG-PLGA-PLL (PEAL) nanoparticles (NPs) with ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD). PEAL NPs were prepared with an emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The NPs size was about 131.5 ± 6.5 nm. The siRNA stability in serum was enhanced. The intracellular ADR concentration increased after the introduction of siRNA-loaded NPs. After intravenous injection of PEAL NPs in tumor-bearing mice, the ABCG2-siRNA-loaded NPs with UTMD efficiently silenced the ABCG2 gene and enhanced the ADR susceptibility of MCF-7/ADR (ADR resistant human breast cancer cells). The siRNA-loaded NPs with UTMD + ADR showed better tumor inhibition effect and good safety in vivo. These results indicate that ADR-chemotherapy in combination with ABCG2-siRNA is an attractive strategy to treat breast cancer. PMID:26575421

  7. Nilotinib reverses ABCB1/P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance but increases cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin in a MDR xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-Yong; Wan, Li-Li; Yang, Quan-Jun; Han, Yong-Long; Li, Dan; Lu, Jin; Guo, Cheng

    2016-09-30

    The BCR-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), nilotinib, was developed to surmount resistance or intolerance to imatinib in patients with Philadelphia-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia. Recent studies have shown that nilotinib induces potent sensitization to anticancer agents by blocking the functions of ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in multidrug resistance (MDR). However, changes in P-gp expression or function affect the cardiac disposition and prolong the presence of both doxorubicin (DOX) and doxorubicinol (DOXol) in cardiac tissue, thus, enhancing the risk of cardiotoxicity. In this study, we used a MDR xenograft model to evaluate the antitumor activity, tissue distribution and cardiotoxicity of DOX when co-administered with nilotinib. This information will provide more insight into the pharmacological role of nilotinib in MDR reversal and the risk of DOX cardiotoxicity. Our results showed that nilotinib significantly enhanced DOX cytotoxicity and increased intracellular rhodamine 123 accumulation in MG63/DOX cells in vitro and strongly enhanced DOX inhibition of growth of P-gp-overexpressing MG63/DOX cell xenografts in nude mice. Additionally, nilotinib significantly increased DOX and DOXol accumulation in serum, heart, liver and tumor tissues. Importantly, nilotinib induced a disproportionate increase in DOXol in cardiac tissue. In the co-administration group, CBR1 and AKR1A1 protein levels were significantly increased in cardiac tissue, with more severe necrosis and vacuole formation. These results indicate that nilotinib reverses P-gp- mediated MDR by blocking the efflux function and potentiates DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. These findings represent a guide for the design of future clinical trials and studies of pharmacokinetic interactions and may be useful in guiding the use of nilotinib in combination therapy of cancer in clinical practice.

  8. Suppression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 expression induces inhibition of cell proliferation and tumor growth in human esophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xin; Ma, Ping; Sui, Cheng-Guang; Meng, Fan-Dong; Li, Yan; Fu, Li-Ye; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Yang; Jiang, You-Hong

    2014-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1) is a molecular chaperone involved in multidrug resistance and antiapoptosis in some human tumors, but its regulatory mechanisms have not been revealed in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). In this study, 138 specimens of ESCC were analyzed. TRAP1 was overexpressed in ESCC, particularly in poorly differentiated tumors. To further explore the molecular regulatory mechanism, we constructed specific small interfering RNA-expressing vectors targeting Trap1, and knocked down Trap1 expression in the esophageal cancer cell lines ECA109 and EC9706. Knockdown of Trap1 induced increases in reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial depolarization, which have been proposed as critical regulators of apoptosis. The cell cycle was arrested in G2/M phase, and in vitro inhibition of cell proliferation was confirmed with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide and bromodeoxyuridine assays. Furthermore, re-expression of TRAP1 in Trap1 small interfering RNA-transfected ESCC cells restored cell proliferation and cell apoptosis. Bioluminescence of subcutaneously xenografted ESCC tumor cells demonstrated significant inhibition of in vivo tumor growth by Trap1 knockdown. This study shows that TRAP1 was overexpressed in most patients with ESCC, and caused an increase in antiapoptosis potency. TRAP1 may be regarded as a target in ESCC biotherapy.

  9. Modulation of Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Varela, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial infections pose a serious public health concern, especially when an infectious disease has a multidrug resistant causative agent. Such multidrug resistant bacteria can compromise the clinical utility of major chemotherapeutic antimicrobial agents. Drug and multidrug resistant bacteria harbor several distinct molecular mechanisms for resistance. Bacterial antimicrobial agent efflux pumps represent a major mechanism of clinical resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is one of the largest groups of solute transporters to date and includes a significant number of bacterial drug and multidrug efflux pumps. We review recent work on the modulation of multidrug efflux pumps, paying special attention to those transporters belonging primarily to the MFS. PMID:25750934

  10. Draft genome sequence of Acinetobacter baumannii strain NCTC 13423, a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Michiels, Joran E; Van den Bergh, Bram; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a pathogen that is becoming increasingly important and causes serious hospital-acquired infections. We sequenced the genome of A. baumannii NCTC 13423, a multidrug-resistant strain belonging to the international clone II group, isolated from a human infection in the United Kingdom in 2003. The 3,937,944 bp draft genome has a GC-content of 39.0 % and a total of 3672 predicted protein-coding sequences. The availability of genome sequences of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolates will fuel comparative genomic studies to help understand the worrying spread of multidrug resistance in this pathogen. PMID:27594976

  11. Autophagy and Transporter-Based Multi-Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Priyank; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Degenhardt, Kurt; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    All the therapeutic strategies for treating cancers aim at killing the cancer cells via apoptosis (programmed cell death type I). Defective apoptosis endow tumor cells with survival. The cell can respond to such defects with autophagy. Autophagy is a cellular process by which cytoplasmic material is either degraded to maintain homeostasis or recycled for energy and nutrients in starvation. A plethora of evidence has shown that the role of autophagy in tumors is complex. A lot of effort is needed to underline the functional status of autophagy in tumor progression and treatment, and elucidate how to tweak autophagy to treat cancer. Furthermore, during the treatment of cancer, the limitation for the cure rate and survival is the phenomenon of multi drug resistance (MDR). The development of MDR is an intricate process that could be regulated by drug transporters, enzymes, anti-apoptotic genes or DNA repair mechanisms. Reports have shown that autophagy has a dual role in MDR. Furthermore, it has been reported that activation of a death pathway may overcome MDR, thus pointing the importance of other death pathways to regulate tumor cell progression and growth. Therefore, in this review we will discuss the role of autophagy in MDR tumors and a possible link amongst these phenomena. PMID:24710490

  12. PDE5 inhibitors, sildenafil and vardenafil, reverse multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux function of multidrug resistance protein 7 (ATP-binding Cassette C10) transporter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Jiang; Sun, Yue-Li; Tiwari, Amit K; Xiao, Zhi-Jie; Sodani, Kamlesh; Yang, Dong-Hua; Vispute, Saraubh G; Jiang, Wen-Qi; Chen, Si-Dong; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-08-01

    Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors are widely used in the treatment of male erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. Recently, several groups have evaluated the ability of PDE5 inhibitors for their anticancer activities. Previously, we had shown that sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil could reverse P-glycoprotein (ATP-binding cassette B1)-mediated MDR. In the present study, we determined whether these PDE5 inhibitors have the potential to reverse multidrug resistance protein 7 (MRP7; ATP-binding cassette C10)-mediated MDR. We found that sildenafil and vardenafil dose-dependently enhanced the sensitivity of MRP7-transfected HEK293 cells to paclitaxel, docetaxel and vinblastine, while tadalafil had only a minimal effect. Accumulation and efflux experiments demonstrated that sildenafil and vardenafil increased the intracellular accumulation of [(3)H]-paclitaxel by inhibiting the efflux of [(3 H]-paclitaxel in HEK/MRP7 cells. In addition, immunoblot and immunofluorescence analyses indicated that no significant alterations of MRP7 protein expression and localization in plasma membranes were found after treatment with sildenafil, vardenafil or tadalafil. These results demonstrate that sildenafil and vardenafil reverse MRP7-mediated a MDR through inhibition of the drug efflux function of MRP7. Our findings indicate a potentially novel use of PDE5 inhibitors as an adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent in clinical practice. PMID:22578167

  13. Use of a cloned multidrug resistance gene for coamplification and overproduction of major excreted protein, a transformation-regulated secreted acid protease

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, S.E.; Troen, B.R.; Gal, S.; Ueda, K.; Pastan, I.; Gottesman, M.M.

    1988-08-01

    Malignantly transformed mouse fibroblasts synthesize and secrete large amounts of major excreted protein (MEP), a 39,000-dalton precursor to an acid protease (cathepsin L). To evaluate the possible role of this protease in the transformed phenotype, the authors transfected cloned genes for mouse or human MEP into mouse MIH 3T3 cells with an expression vector for the dominant, selectable human multidrug resistance (MDR1) gene. The cotransfected MEP sequences were efficiently coamplified and transcribed during stepwise selection for multidrug resistance in colchicine. The transfected NIH 3T3 cell lines containing amplified MEP sequences synthesized as much MEP as did Kirsten sarcoma virus-transformed NIH 3T3 cells. The MEP synthesized by cells transfected with the cloned mouse and human MEP genes were also secreted. Elevated synthesis and secretion of MEP by NIH 3T3 cells did not change the nontransformed phenotype of these cells.

  14. Audiological Evaluation of Patients Taking Kanamycin for Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Bhagat, Sanjeev; Verma, Bhimsain; Singh, Ravinder; Singh, Surinderpal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of multidrug resistant tuberculosis is increasing in developing countries. Aminoglycosides are an integral part of second-line drugs, however ototoxicity is a major limitation for their use. This study aims to determine the extent of hearing loss in patients taking one of the commonly prescribed drugs for Multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), Kanamycin, at a Government Medical College, Patiala, Punjab, India, which is a 1200 bed tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 patients (68 males and 32 females) with confirmed diagnosis of MDR-TB were included in this study conducted between January 2012 and February 2014. Subjects were between 15 to 60 years of age, with a mean age of 37.46 ± 10.1. Pure tone audiometry (PTA) was performed before the start of the therapy, as a baseline, and was repeated after 1 week and 6 weeks of Kanamycin use to assess hearing loss as an effect of therapy. Results: Of the 100 patients examined, ototoxicity was found in 18 subjects post therapy. Incidence of high frequency hearing loss was 2% at week 1, and 12% after 6 weeks of follow up. However, 4% of the cases developed flat loss at week 6. The hearing loss was bilateral in 13 patients and unilateral in 5 patients. Ototoxicity was more common in males (66.67%) compared to females (33.3%). Maximum cases were found in the age group of 36 to 45 years (36.8%), the majority being from a rural background (83.3%). The association with socioeconomic status (P=0.024) and co-morbid conditions like diabetes and hypertension (P=0.001) reached statistical significance. Conclusion: Lack of specific guidelines to monitor patients taking aminoglycosides makes ototoxicity a major adverse effect of their use in MDR-TB. More studies are mandated to study the risk factors associated with the development of ototoxicity and for the development of alternate drugs for the treatment of MDR-TB. PMID:27429949

  15. Diversity and evolution of the small multidrug resistance protein family

    PubMed Central

    Bay, Denice C; Turner, Raymond J

    2009-01-01

    Background Members of the small multidrug resistance (SMR) protein family are integral membrane proteins characterized by four α-helical transmembrane strands that confer resistance to a broad range of antiseptics and lipophilic quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC) in bacteria. Due to their short length and broad substrate profile, SMR proteins are suggested to be the progenitors for larger α-helical transporters such as the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) and drug/metabolite transporter (DMT) superfamily. To explore their evolutionary association with larger multidrug transporters, an extensive bioinformatics analysis of SMR sequences (> 300 Bacteria taxa) was performed to expand upon previous evolutionary studies of the SMR protein family and its origins. Results A thorough annotation of unidentified/putative SMR sequences was performed placing sequences into each of the three SMR protein subclass designations, namely small multidrug proteins (SMP), suppressor of groEL mutations (SUG), and paired small multidrug resistance (PSMR) using protein alignments and phylogenetic analysis. Examination of SMR subclass distribution within Bacteria and Archaea taxa identified specific Bacterial classes that uniquely encode for particular SMR subclass members. The extent of selective pressure acting upon each SMR subclass was determined by calculating the rate of synonymous to non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions using Syn-SCAN analysis. SUG and SMP subclasses are maintained under moderate selection pressure in comparison to integron and plasmid encoded SMR homologues. Conversely, PSMR sequences are maintained under lower levels of selection pressure, where one of the two PSMR pairs diverges in sequence more rapidly than the other. SMR genomic loci surveys identified potential SMR efflux substrates based on its gene association to putative operons that encode for genes regulating amino acid biogenesis and QAC-like metabolites. SMR subclass protein transmembrane domain

  16. Multidrug resistance and ESBL-producing Salmonella spp. isolated from broiler processing plants.

    PubMed

    Ziech, Rosangela Estel; Lampugnani, Camila; Perin, Ana Paula; Sereno, Mallu Jagnow; Sfaciotte, Ricardo Antônio Pilegi; Viana, Cibeli; Soares, Vanessa Mendonça; Pinto, José Paes de Almeida Nogueira; Bersot, Luciano dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of multidrug-resistant, extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Salmonella spp. isolated from conveyor belts of broiler cutting rooms in Brazilian broiler processing plants. Ninety-eight strains of Salmonella spp. were analyzed. Multidrug resistance was determined by the disk diffusion test and the susceptibility of the isolated bacteria was evaluated against 18 antimicrobials from seven different classes. The double disk diffusion test was used to evaluate ESBL production. Of the 98 strains tested, 84 were multidrug resistant. The highest rates of resistance were against nalidixic acid (95%), tetracycline (91%), and the beta-lactams: ampicillin and cefachlor (45%), followed by streptomycin and gentamicin with 19% and 15% of strain resistance, respectively. By contrast, 97% of the strains were sensitive to chloramphenicol. 45% of the strains were positive for the presence of ESBL activity. In this study, high rates of multidrug resistance and ESBL production were observed in Salmonella spp.

  17. Reversing of multidrug resistance breast cancer by co-delivery of P-gp siRNA and doxorubicin via folic acid-modified core-shell nanomicelles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Chunlong; Wu, Jianzhong; Tang, Jinhai

    2016-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains one of major limitation for the successful treatment of many cancers including breast cancer. Co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and small interfering RNA (siRNA) has been developed because of its ability to generate synergistic anticancer effects via different mechanisms of action, to reverse MDR and increase the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs in cancer therapy. Herein, we employed a kind of efficient multifunctional tumor targeted nanomicelles (PECL3) for the co-delivery of hydrophobic anti-cancer drugs and siRNA. This kind of nanomicelles were constructed by folic acid (FA)-decorated PEG-b-(PCL-g-PEI)-b-PCL triblock copolymers, which were synthesized through "click chemistry" and "ring opening" polymerization. Driven by the "core-shell" structure and the electrostatic interaction, this triblock copolymer could efficiently encapsulate P-glycoprotein (P-gp) siRNA and doxorubicin (DOX). The obtained nanomicelles can prevent renal clearance, RNase degradation and aggregation in circulation. Compared to the non-specific delivery, these FA functionalized nanomicelles could efficiently deliver P-gp siRNA to reducing both P-gp expression levels and IC50 value of the DOX in DOX-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR). Additionally, in vivo results showed that DOX loaded PECL3 (D-PECL3) micelles could reduce toxicity of DOX on nontarget tissues and significantly inhibited MCF-7/ADR tumor growth through encapsulating DOX in the micelles and deliver them to target tumor region. Taken together, these results proof that PECL3 micelles could co-deliver siRNA and drug to inhibit MDR tumor growth. These results suggested that the co-delivery of DOX and siRNA in tumor-targeting nanomicelles could excite synergistic effect of gene therapy and chemotherapy, thus can efficiently reverse MDR cancer and kill the cancer cells. PMID:26655793

  18. Tumor cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  19. Pharmacokinetics of ertapenem in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Sander P; van Altena, Richard; Akkerman, Onno W; van Soolingen, Dick; van der Laan, Tridia; de Lange, Wiel C M; Kosterink, Jos G W; van der Werf, Tjip S; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) is becoming more challenging because of increased levels of drug resistance against second-line TB drugs. One promising group of antimicrobial drugs is carbapenems. Ertapenem is an attractive carbapenem for the treatment of MDR- and XDR-TB because its relatively long half-life enables once-daily dosing.A retrospective study was performed for all patients with suspected MDR-TB at the Tuberculosis Center Beatrixoord of the University Medical Center Groningen (Haren, the Netherlands) who received ertapenem as part of their treatment regimen between December 1, 2010 and March 1, 2013. Safety and pharmacokinetics were evaluated.18 patients were treated with 1000 mg ertapenem for a mean (range) of 77 (5-210) days. Sputum smear and culture were converted in all patients. Drug exposure was evaluated in 12 patients. The mean (range) area under the concentration-time curve up to 24 h was 544.9 (309-1130) h·mg·L(-1) The mean (range) maximum observed plasma concentration was 127.5 (73.9-277.9) mg·L(-1)In general, ertapenem treatment was well tolerated during MDR-TB treatment and showed a favourable pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile in MDR-TB patients. We conclude that ertapenem is a highly promising drug for the treatment of MDR-TB that warrants further investigation. PMID:26743484

  20. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: challenges of a global emergence].

    PubMed

    Comolet, T

    2015-10-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis, in particular Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR-TB) is an increasing global concern and a major burden for some developing countries, especially the BRICS. It is assumed that every year roughly 350 000 new MDR-TB cases occur in the world, on average in 20.5% of TB patients that have been previously treated but also in 3.5% of persons that have never been on TB treatment before. The global distribution of cases is very heterogeneous and is now better understood thanks to a growing number of specific surveys and routine surveillance systems: incidence is much higher in southern Africa and in all countries formerly part of the USSR. Countries with weak health systems and previously inefficient TB control programs are highly vulnerable to MDR epidemics because program failures do help creating, maintaining and spreading resistances. Global response is slowly rolled out and diagnosis capacities are on the rise (mostly with genotypic methods) but adequate and successful treatment and care is still limited to a minority of global cases. From a public health perspective the MDR-TB growing epidemics will not be controlled merely by the introduction of few new antibiotics because it is also linked to patient's compliance and adequate case management supported by efficient TB program. In depth quality improvement will only be achieved after previous errors are thoroughly analyzed and boldly corrected. PMID:26289547

  1. Global evolution of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clonal lineages.

    PubMed

    Zarrilli, Raffaele; Pournaras, Spyros; Giannouli, Maria; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2013-01-01

    The rapid expansion of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates exhibiting resistance to carbapenems and most or all available antibiotics during the last decade is a worrying evolution. The apparent predominance of a few successful multidrug-resistant lineages worldwide underlines the importance of elucidating the mode of spread and the epidemiology of A. baumannii isolates in single hospitals, at a country-wide level and on a global scale. The evolutionary advantage of the dominant clonal lineages relies on the capability of the A. baumannii pangenome to incorporate resistance determinants. In particular, the simultaneous presence of divergent strains of the international clone II and their increasing prevalence in international hospitals further support the ongoing adaptation of this lineage to the hospital environment. Indeed, genomic and genetic studies have elucidated the role of mobile genetic elements in the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes and substantiate the rate of genetic alterations associated with acquisition in A. baumannii of various resistance genes, including OXA- and metallo-β-lactamase-type carbapenemase genes. The significance of single nucleotide polymorphisms and transposon mutagenesis in the evolution of A. baumannii has been also documented. Establishment of a network of reference laboratories in different countries would generate a more complete picture and a fuller understanding of the importance of high-risk A. baumannii clones in the international dissemination of antibiotic resistance. PMID:23127486

  2. Mutagenesis of SugE, a small multidrug resistance protein.

    PubMed

    Son, Mike S; Del Castilho, Colin; Duncalf, Karen A; Carney, Dominic; Weiner, Joel H; Turner, Raymond J

    2003-12-26

    The small multidrug resistance protein family has two subclasses. In this study we used a mutation approach to see what is necessary to convert a SUG subgroup member into a quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) transporter. We chose four key residues (H24, M39, I43, and A44) conserved within SUGs but conserved differently within the QAC transporters. Altogether, seven mutants were generated in Citrobacter freundii SugE. Surprisingly, the mutated SugE demonstrated an increased sensitivity to representative QACs. Additionally, ethidium uptake is found to be more prominent in the hypersensitive mutants. We conducted orientation studies using topology reporter gene fusions which indicated that SugE and the QAC transporter EmrE both have their N- and C-termini in the cytoplasm as predicted. The results imply that SugE can be converted to a QAC transporter with only a single mutation. However, because hypersensitivity was observed, the SugE mutant proteins are behaving as importers rather than as exporters. PMID:14651958

  3. Purification of a Multidrug Resistance Transporter for Crystallization Studies

    PubMed Central

    Alegre, Kamela O.; Law, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization of integral membrane proteins is a challenging field and much effort has been invested in optimizing the overexpression and purification steps needed to obtain milligram amounts of pure, stable, monodisperse protein sample for crystallography studies. Our current work involves the structural and functional characterization of the Escherichia coli multidrug resistance transporter MdtM, a member of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). Here we present a protocol for isolation of MdtM to increase yields of recombinant protein to the milligram quantities necessary for pursuit of structural studies using X-ray crystallography. Purification of MdtM was enhanced by introduction of an elongated His-tag, followed by identification and subsequent removal of chaperonin contamination. For crystallization trials of MdtM, detergent screening using size exclusion chromatography determined that decylmaltoside (DM) was the shortest-chain detergent that maintained the protein in a stable, monodispersed state. Crystallization trials of MdtM performed using the hanging-drop diffusion method with commercially available crystallization screens yielded 3D protein crystals under several different conditions. We contend that the purification protocol described here may be employed for production of high-quality protein of other multidrug efflux members of the MFS, a ubiquitous, physiologically and clinically important class of membrane transporters. PMID:27025617

  4. Clinical management of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Valverde, Mercedes; Sojo-Dorado, Jesús; Pascual, Álvaro

    2013-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae showing resistance to cephalosporins due to extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) or plasmid-mediated AmpC enzymes, and those producing carbapenemases have spread worldwide during the last decades. Many of these isolates are also resistant to other first-line agents such as fluoroquinolones or aminoglycosides, leaving few available options for therapy. Thus, older drugs such as colistin and fosfomycin are being increasingly used. Infections caused by these bacteria are associated with increased morbidity and mortality compared with those caused by their susceptible counterparts. Most of the evidence supporting the present recommendations is from in vitro data, animal studies, and observational studies. While carbapenems are considered the drugs of choice for ESBL and AmpC producers, recent data suggest that certain alternatives may be suitable for some types of infections. Combined therapy seems superior to monotherapy in the treatment of invasive infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Optimization of dosage according to pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics data is important for the treatment of infections caused by isolates with borderline minimum inhibitory concentration due to low-level resistance mechanisms. The increasing frequency and the rapid spread of multidrug resistance among the Enterobacteriaceae is a true and complex public health problem. PMID:25165544

  5. Multidrug Resistant and Extensively Drug Resistant Bacteria: A Study

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Silpi; Singh, Priyanka; Rajurkar, Monali

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective. Antimicrobial resistance is now a major challenge to clinicians for treating patients. Hence, this short term study was undertaken to detect the incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR), extensively drug-resistant (XDR), and pandrug-resistant (PDR) bacterial isolates in a tertiary care hospital. Material and Methods. The clinical samples were cultured and bacterial strains were identified in the department of microbiology. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of different bacterial isolates was studied to detect MDR, XDR, and PDR bacteria. Results. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of 1060 bacterial strains was studied. 393 (37.1%) bacterial strains were MDR, 146 (13.8%) strains were XDR, and no PDR was isolated. All (100%) Gram negative bacterial strains were sensitive to colistin whereas all (100%) Gram positive bacterial strains were sensitive to vancomycin. Conclusion. Close monitoring of MDR, XDR, or even PDR must be done by all clinical microbiology laboratories to implement effective measures to reduce the menace of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:26942013

  6. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: challenges of a global emergence].

    PubMed

    Comolet, T

    2015-10-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis, in particular Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR-TB) is an increasing global concern and a major burden for some developing countries, especially the BRICS. It is assumed that every year roughly 350 000 new MDR-TB cases occur in the world, on average in 20.5% of TB patients that have been previously treated but also in 3.5% of persons that have never been on TB treatment before. The global distribution of cases is very heterogeneous and is now better understood thanks to a growing number of specific surveys and routine surveillance systems: incidence is much higher in southern Africa and in all countries formerly part of the USSR. Countries with weak health systems and previously inefficient TB control programs are highly vulnerable to MDR epidemics because program failures do help creating, maintaining and spreading resistances. Global response is slowly rolled out and diagnosis capacities are on the rise (mostly with genotypic methods) but adequate and successful treatment and care is still limited to a minority of global cases. From a public health perspective the MDR-TB growing epidemics will not be controlled merely by the introduction of few new antibiotics because it is also linked to patient's compliance and adequate case management supported by efficient TB program. In depth quality improvement will only be achieved after previous errors are thoroughly analyzed and boldly corrected.

  7. Emerging cephalosporin and multidrug-resistant gonorrhoea in Europe.

    PubMed

    Cole, M J; Spiteri, G; Chisholm, S A; Hoffmann, S; Ison, C A; Unemo, M; Van de Laar, M

    2014-11-13

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae has consistently developed resistance to antimicrobials used therapeutically for gonorrhoea and few antimicrobials remain for effective empiric first-line therapy. Since 2009 the European gonococcal antimicrobial surveillance programme (Euro-GASP) has been running as a sentinel surveillance system across Member States of the European Union (EU) and European Economic Area (EEA) to monitor antimicrobial susceptibility in N. gonorrhoeae. During 2011, N. gonorrhoeae isolates were collected from 21 participating countries, and 7.6% and 0.5% of the examined gonococcal isolates had in vitro resistance to cefixime and ceftriaxone, respectively. The rate of ciprofloxacin and azithromycin resistance was 48.7% and 5.3%, respectively. Two (0.1%) isolates displayed high-level resistance to azithromycin, i.e. a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥256 mg/L. The current report further highlights the public health need to implement the European response plan, including further strengthening of Euro-GASP, to control and manage the threat of multidrug resistant N. gonorrhoeae.

  8. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter spp.: Increasingly Problematic Nosocomial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have increasingly been resisting to antimicrobial therapy. Recently, resistance problem has been relatively much worsened in Gram-negative bacilli. Acinetobacter spp. are typical nosocomial pathogens causing infections and high mortality, almost exclusively in compromised hospital patients. Acinetobacter spp. are intrinsically less susceptible to antibiotics than Enterobacteriaceae, and have propensity to acquire resistance. A surveillance study in Korea in 2009 showed that resistance rates of Acinetobacter spp. were very high: to fluoroquinolone 67%, to amikacin 48%, to ceftazidime 66% and to imipenem 51%. Carbapenem resistance was mostly due to OXA type carbapenemase production in A. baumannii isolates, whereas it was due to metallo-β-lactamase production in non-baumannii Acinetobacter isolates. Colistin-resistant isolates were rare but started to be isolated in Korea. Currently, the infection caused by multidrug-resistant A. baumannii is among the most difficult ones to treat. Analysis at tertiary care hospital in 2010 showed that among the 1,085 isolates of Acinetobacter spp., 14.9% and 41.8% were resistant to seven, and to all eight antimicrobial agents tested, respectively. It is known to be difficult to prevent Acinetobacter spp. infection in hospitalized patients, because the organisms are ubiquitous in hospital environment. Efforts to control resistant bacteria in Korea by hospitals, relevant scientific societies and government agencies have only partially been successful. We need concerted multidisciplinary efforts to preserve the efficacy of currently available antimicrobial agents, by following the principles of antimicrobial stewardship. PMID:22028150

  9. Endobronchial valve treatment of destructive multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Levin, A.; Felker, I.; Tceymach, E.; Krasnov, D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND: In accordance with the existing hypothesis, the application of an endobronchial valve (EbV) leads to selective curative atelectasis of the affected part of the lung, contributing to early closure of cavities. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of EbV treatment on the course of tuberculosis (TB). METHODS: We compared the efficacy of EbV treatment and complex second-line treatment in treating patients with destructive pulmonary multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). Bacteriological conversion and closure of cavities were selected as criteria to assess the effectiveness of EbV application. A total of 102 patients with destructive MDR-TB were enrolled into the study and randomly divided into two groups: 49 patients had an EbV installed (intervention group) and 53 patients received complex second-line treatment (control group). Complex chemotherapy was administered to both groups throughout the study period. RESULTS: The cure rate in the short- and long-term follow-up periods in the intervention group was shown to be much higher, 95.9% by bacteriological conversion and 67.3% by cavity closure. On comparison with the control group, this was respectively 37.7% and 20.7% (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The application of EbV treatment can significantly improve the effectiveness of second-line chemotherapy regimens in MDR-TB patients. PMID:27776598

  10. Gatifloxacin for short, effective treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, C-Y; Van Deun, A; Rieder, H L

    2016-09-01

    The 9-month regimen for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) piloted in Bangladesh and used, with modifications, in Cameroon and Niger, has achieved treatment success in a very large proportion of patients; gatifloxacin (GFX) is likely to have played a critical role in this success. Two months after the publication of a study reporting that GFX and not moxifloxacin (MFX) was associated with dysglycaemia, the manufacturer announced the withdrawal of GFX from the market. The findings of that study may have less significance for the majority of MDR-TB patients living in high-incidence countries who are much younger, have a lower risk of dysglycaemia and suffer from a highly fatal condition. The problem of dysglycaemia is not limited to GFX use and may occur with other fluoroquinolones; furthermore, GFX-associated dysglycemia was manageable among those MDR-TB patients in Bangladesh and Niger in whom it occurred. GFX has now become unavailable in Bangladesh, Cameroon, Niger and other countries piloting the shorter MDR-TB regimens, depriving resource-poor countries of an efficacious, effective and inexpensive drug with a demonstrated good safety profile for the given indication. There is little reason not to make GFX available for MDR-TB treatment as long as the superiority of non-GFX-based MDR-TB regimens is not demonstrated. PMID:27510237

  11. Emerging cephalosporin and multidrug-resistant gonorrhoea in Europe.

    PubMed

    Cole, M J; Spiteri, G; Chisholm, S A; Hoffmann, S; Ison, C A; Unemo, M; Van de Laar, M

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae has consistently developed resistance to antimicrobials used therapeutically for gonorrhoea and few antimicrobials remain for effective empiric first-line therapy. Since 2009 the European gonococcal antimicrobial surveillance programme (Euro-GASP) has been running as a sentinel surveillance system across Member States of the European Union (EU) and European Economic Area (EEA) to monitor antimicrobial susceptibility in N. gonorrhoeae. During 2011, N. gonorrhoeae isolates were collected from 21 participating countries, and 7.6% and 0.5% of the examined gonococcal isolates had in vitro resistance to cefixime and ceftriaxone, respectively. The rate of ciprofloxacin and azithromycin resistance was 48.7% and 5.3%, respectively. Two (0.1%) isolates displayed high-level resistance to azithromycin, i.e. a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥256 mg/L. The current report further highlights the public health need to implement the European response plan, including further strengthening of Euro-GASP, to control and manage the threat of multidrug resistant N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:25411689

  12. Multidrug resistant citrobacter: an unusual cause of liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prabhat; Ghosh, Soumik; Rath, Deepak; Gadpayle, A K

    2013-01-01

    Liver abscesses are infectious, space occupying lesions in the liver, the two most common abscesses being pyogenic and amoebic. A pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) is a rare condition with a reported incidence of 20 per 100 000 hospital admissions in the western population. The right lobe of the liver is the most common site in both types of liver abscess. Clinical presentation is elusive with complaints of fever, right upper quadrant pain in the abdomen and hepatomegaly with or without jaundice. The aetiology of PLA has changed in the past few decades and may be of biliary, portal, arterial or traumatic origin, but many cases are still cryptogenic. The most common organisms causing PLA are Gram-negative aerobes, especially Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Studies have shown a high degree of antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated organism resulting in an overall lower mortality in PLA. Here, we present a case of PLA caused by multidrug-resistant Citrobacter freundii, which is an unusual organism to be isolated.

  13. Characterization of RarA, a Novel AraC Family Multidrug Resistance Regulator in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Veleba, Mark; Higgins, Paul G.; Gonzalez, Gerardo; Seifert, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional regulators, such as SoxS, RamA, MarA, and Rob, which upregulate the AcrAB efflux pump, have been shown to be associated with multidrug resistance in clinically relevant Gram-negative bacteria. In addition to the multidrug resistance phenotype, these regulators have also been shown to play a role in the cellular metabolism and possibly the virulence potential of microbial cells. As such, the increased expression of these proteins is likely to cause pleiotropic phenotypes. Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major nosocomial pathogen which can express the SoxS, MarA, Rob, and RamA proteins, and the accompanying paper shows that the increased transcription of ramA is associated with tigecycline resistance (M. Veleba and T. Schneiders, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 56:4466–4467, 2012). Bioinformatic analyses of the available Klebsiella genome sequences show that an additional AraC-type regulator is encoded chromosomally. In this work, we characterize this novel AraC-type regulator, hereby called RarA (Regulator of antibiotic resistance A), which is encoded in K. pneumoniae, Enterobacter sp. 638, Serratia proteamaculans 568, and Enterobacter cloacae. We show that the overexpression of rarA results in a multidrug resistance phenotype which requires a functional AcrAB efflux pump but is independent of the other AraC regulators. Quantitative real-time PCR experiments show that rarA (MGH 78578 KPN_02968) and its neighboring efflux pump operon oqxAB (KPN_02969_02970) are consistently upregulated in clinical isolates collected from various geographical locations (Chile, Turkey, and Germany). Our results suggest that rarA overexpression upregulates the oqxAB efflux pump. Additionally, it appears that oqxR, encoding a GntR-type regulator adjacent to the oqxAB operon, is able to downregulate the expression of the oqxAB efflux pump, where OqxR complementation resulted in reductions to olaquindox MICs. PMID:22644028

  14. [Retroperitoneal germ cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Borrell Palanca, A; García Garzón, J; Villamón Fort, R; Domenech Pérez, C; Martínez Lorente, A; Gunthner, S; García Sisamón, F

    1999-03-01

    We report a case of retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor in an 17 years old patient who presented with aedema and pain in left inferior extremity asociated with hemopthysis caused by pulmonar metastasis, who was treated with chemotherapy and resection of residual mass and pulmonary nodes. Dyagnosis was stableshed by fine neadle aspiration biopsy of the wass. We comment on the difficult of stableshing differential dyagnosis between retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor and metastasis of a testicular tumor. Dyagnosis is stableshed by the finding of a histologically malignant germ-cell tumor with normal testis. We considered physical examination and ecographyc exploration enough for a correct dyagnosis.

  15. Hydroxylated Dimeric Naphthoquinones Increase the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species, Induce Apoptosis of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells and Are Not Substrates of the Multidrug Resistance Proteins ABCB1 and ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Lapidus, Rena G.; Carter-Cooper, Brandon A.; Sadowska, Mariola; Choi, Eun Yong; Wonodi, Omasiri; Muvarak, Nidal; Natarajan, Karthika; Pidugu, Lakshmi S.; Jaiswal, Anil; Toth, Eric A.; Rassool, Feyruz V.; Etemadi, Arash; Sausville, Edward A.; Baer, Maria R.; Emadi, Ashkan

    2016-01-01

    Selective targeting of the oxidative state, which is a tightly balanced fundamental cellular property, is an attractive strategy for developing novel anti-leukemic chemotherapeutics with potential applications in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a molecularly heterogeneous disease. Dimeric naphthoquinones (BiQs) with the ability to undergo redox cycling and to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer cells are a novel class of compounds with unique characteristics that make them excellent candidates to be tested against AML cells. We evaluated the effect of two BiQ analogues and one monomeric naphthoquinone in AML cell lines and primary cells from patients. All compounds possess one halogen and one hydroxyl group on the quinone cores. Dimeric, but not monomeric, naphthoquinones demonstrated significant anti-AML activity in the cell lines and primary cells from patients with favorable therapeutic index compared to normal hematopoietic cells. BiQ-1 effectively inhibited clonogenicity and induced apoptosis as measured by Western blotting and Annexin V staining and mitochondrial membrane depolarization by flow cytometry. BiQ-1 significantly enhances intracellular ROS levels in AML cells and upregulates expression of key anti-oxidant protein, Nrf2. Notably, systemic exposure to BiQ-1 was well tolerated in mice. In conclusion, we propose that BiQ-induced therapeutic augmentation of ROS in AML cells with dysregulation of antioxidants kill leukemic cells while normal cells remain relatively intact. Further studies are warranted to better understand this class of potential chemotherapeutics. PMID:26797621

  16. IND2, a pyrimido[1”,2”:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline derivative, circumvents multi-drug resistance and causes apoptosis in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Lee, Crystal; Moore, Joshua; Mittal, Roopali; Suswam, Esther A.; Abbott, Kodye L; Pondugula, Satyanarayana R.; Manne, Upender; Narayanan, Narayanan K.; Trivedi, Piyush; Tiwari, Amit K.

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring condensed quinolines have anticancer properties. In efforts to find active analogues, we designed and synthesized eight polycyclic heterocycles with a pyrimido[1”,2”:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline framework (IND series). The compounds were evaluated for activity against colon (HCT-116 and S1-MI-80), prostate (PC3 and DU-145), breast (MCF-7 and MDAMB-231), ovarian (ov2008 and A2780), and hepatocellular (HepG2) cancer cells and against non-cancerous Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK), mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH/3T3), and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293). IND-2, a 4-chloro-2-methyl pyrimido[1”,2”:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline, exhibited more than tenfold selectivity and potent cytotoxic activity against colon cancer cells relative to the other cancer and non-cancer cells. With five additional colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, HCT-15, LS-180, LS-174, and LoVo), IND-2 had similar cytotoxicity and selectivity, and submicromolar concentrations caused changes in the morphology of HCT-116 and HCT-15 cells. IND-2 did not activate the transactivating function of the pregnane X receptor (PXR), indicating that it does not induce PXR-regulated ABCB1 or ABCG2 transporters. Indeed, IND-2 was not a substrate of ABCB1 or ABCG2, and it induced cytotoxicity in HEK293 cells overexpressing ABCB1 or ABCG2 to the same extent as in normal HEK293 cells. IND-2 was cytotoxic to resistant colon carcinoma S1-MI-80 cells, approximately three- and fivefold more than SN-38 and topotecan, respectively. In HCT-116 colon cancer cells, IND-2 produced concentration-dependent changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, leading to apoptosis, and sub-micromolar concentrations caused chromosomal DNA fragmentation. These findings suggest that, by increasing apoptosis, IND-2 has potential therapeutic efficacy for colorectal cancer. PMID:25537531

  17. Significance of multidrug resistance gene-related proteins in the postoperative chemotherapy of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Pengfei; Du, Yian; Yang, Litao; Fan, Sunfu; Wu, Jian; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious problem in chemotherapy and is one of the main reasons for a poor outcome of gastric cancer. Study on the key proteins in multidrug resistance is necessary for the treatment of gastric cancer. Methods: The expression of ToPo II, MRP and GST-π in 119 gastric cancers was retrospectively examined, and the results were analyzed in correlation with clinicopathological data. ToPo II negative, MRP positive and GST-π positive were regarded as three risk factors which may be associated with chemotherapy resistance and poor prognosis. Patients were divided into two groups: high-risk group (≥2 risk factors) and the low-risk group (<2 risk factors), and the tumor recurrence and patients’ survival time of the two groups were also analyzed. Results: The positive rates of ToPo II, MRP and GST-π were 73.9%, 42.9% and 51.3%, respectively. The positively correlation between the expression of MRP and GST-π had been found. A significant correlation was shown between ToPo II expression and the level of differentiation. Significant differences with GST-π expression were also found in relation to the sex and differentiation. In the high-risk group, the 3-year survival rate of patients with/without chemotherapy were 62.1% and 52.0%, 5-year survival rates were 44.8% and 40.0%, but the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). In the low-risk group, the 3-year survival rate of patients with/without chemotherapy were 81.2% and 51.5%, 5-year survival rates were 71.9% and 45.5%, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusions: Combined detection of MDR-related proteins ToPo II, MRP and GST-π may be prospectively valuable for postoperative individualized chemotherapy, and further predict the outcomes of gastric cancer patients. PMID:25550836

  18. Efflux transport of chrysin and apigenin sulfates in HEK293 cells overexpressing SULT1A3: The role of multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4/ABCC4).

    PubMed

    Li, Wan; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Xingwang; Wang, Huan; Wu, Baojian

    2015-11-01

    Efflux transport is a critical determinant to the pharmacokinetics of sulfate conjugates. Here we aimed to establish SULT1A3 stably transfected HEK293 cells, and to determine the contributions of BCRP and MRP transporters to excretion of chrysin and apigenin sulfates. The cDNA of SULT1A3 was stably introduced into HEK293 cells using a lentiviral vector, generating a sulfonation active cell line (i.e., SULT293 cells). Identification of sulfate transporters was achieved through chemical inhibition (using chemical inhibitors) and biological inhibition (using short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs)) methods. Sulfated metabolites were rapidly generated and excreted upon incubation of SULT293 cells with chrysin and apigenin. Ko143 (a selective BCRP inhibitor) did not show inhibitory effects on sulfate disposition, whereas the pan-MRP inhibitor MK-571 caused significant reductions (38.5-64.3%, p<0.001) in sulfate excretion and marked elevations (160-243%, p<0.05) in sulfate accumulation. Further, two efflux transporters (BCRP and MRP4) expressed in the cells were knocked-down by shRNA-mediated silencing. Neither sulfate excretion nor sulfate accumulation was altered in BCRP knocked-down cells as compared to scramble cells. By contrast, MRP4 knock-down led to moderate decreases (17.1-20.6%, p<0.05) in sulfate excretion and increases (125-135%, p<0.05) in sulfate accumulation. In conclusion, MRP4 was identified as an exporter for chrysin and apigenin sulfates. The SULT1A3 modified HEK293 cells were an appropriate tool to study SULT1A3-mediated sulfonation and to characterize BCRP/MRP4-mediated sulfate transport.

  19. Multiple granular cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Jones, J K; Kuo, T T; Griffiths, C M; Itharat, S

    1980-10-01

    Eleven cases of granular cell tumor were reviewed. In two of the cases multiple sites of involvement were seen. The tumor occurred in the oral cavity in both of these cases and each was initially wrongly diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma. The most common site was the subcutaneous tissue (nine patients) and the tongue was involved in three cases. In one patient the parotid gland was involved. Eight of the patients were females and three were males; seven were black and four were white. The importance of differentiating between squamous cell carcinoma and granular cell tumor is stressed, as is the need for a simple wide surgical excision. PMID:7421377

  20. The Anticancer Agent Prodigiosin Is Not a Multidrug Resistance Protein Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Elahian, Fatemeh; Moghimi, Bahareh; Dinmohammadi, Farideh; Ghamghami, Mahsa; Hamidi, Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    The brilliant red pigments prodiginines are natural secondary metabolites that are produced by select species of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. These molecules have received significant attention due to their reported antibacterial, antifungal, immunosuppressive, and anticancer activities. In this study, a Serratia marcescens SER1 strain was isolated and verified using 16s rDNA. The prodigiosin was purified using silica chromatography and was analyzed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The cell cytotoxic effects of the purified prodigiosin on multiple drug resistant cell lines that overexpress MDR1, BCRP, or MRP2 pumps were analyzed. Prodigiosin had nearly identical cytotoxic effects on the resistant cells in comparison to their parental lines. In agreement with the same prodigiosin cytotoxicity, FACS analysis of prodigiosin accumulation and efflux in MDR overexpressing cell lines also indicated that this pro-apoptotic agent operates independently of the presence of the MDR1, BCRP, or MRP transporter and may be a potential treatment for malignant cancer cells that overexpress multidrug resistance transporters. PMID:23373476

  1. The anticancer agent prodigiosin is not a multidrug resistance protein substrate.

    PubMed

    Elahian, Fatemeh; Moghimi, Bahareh; Dinmohammadi, Farideh; Ghamghami, Mahsa; Hamidi, Mehrdad; Mirzaei, Seyed Abbas

    2013-03-01

    The brilliant red pigments prodiginines are natural secondary metabolites that are produced by select species of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. These molecules have received significant attention due to their reported antibacterial, antifungal, immunosuppressive, and anticancer activities. In this study, a Serratia marcescens SER1 strain was isolated and verified using 16s rDNA. The prodigiosin was purified using silica chromatography and was analyzed by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. The cell cytotoxic effects of the purified prodigiosin on multiple drug resistant cell lines that overexpress MDR1, BCRP, or MRP2 pumps were analyzed. Prodigiosin had nearly identical cytotoxic effects on the resistant cells in comparison to their parental lines. In agreement with the same prodigiosin cytotoxicity, FACS analysis of prodigiosin accumulation and efflux in MDR overexpressing cell lines also indicated that this pro-apoptotic agent operates independently of the presence of the MDR1, BCRP, or MRP transporter and may be a potential treatment for malignant cancer cells that overexpress multidrug resistance transporters.

  2. Zebrafish Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Angelica; Amatruda, James F

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are malignant cancers that arise from embryonic precursors known as Primordial Germ Cells. GCTs occur in neonates, children, adolescents and young adults and can occur in the testis, the ovary or extragonadal sites. Because GCTs arise from pluripotent cells, the tumors can exhibit a wide range of different histologies. Current cisplatin-based combination therapies cures most patients, however at the cost of significant toxicity to normal tissues. While GWAS studies and genomic analysis of human GCTs have uncovered somatic mutations and loci that might confer tumor susceptibility, little is still known about the exact mechanisms that drive tumor development, and animal models that faithfully recapitulate all the different GCT subtypes are lacking. Here, we summarize current understanding of germline development in humans and zebrafish, describe the biology of human germ cell tumors, and discuss progress and prospects for zebrafish GCT models that may contribute to better understanding of human GCTs. PMID:27165367

  3. Biliary excretion of curcumin is mediated by multidrug resistance-associated protein 2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Hyun; Oh, Ju-Hee; Lee, Young-Joo

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin has a wide spectrum of pharmacological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anticancer properties. Recently, its potential as effective chemoprevention against cholangiocarcinoma, a highly malignant tumor of the bile duct with limited therapeutic options, was reported. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the contribution of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) to the biliary excretion of curcumin using Sprague-Dawley rats (SDR) and Eisai hyperbilirubinemic rats (EHBR). After intravenous administration of curcumin with a loading dose of 4.5 mg/kg, followed by a constant infusion of 18 mg/kg/h to the SDR and EHBR, the pharmacokinetic parameters of curcumin were estimated. In EHBR, the total area under the bile concentration-time curve from 0 to 80 min following curcumin administration was dramatically decreased (0.094%) compared to that in SDR. In addition, the plasma-to-bile and liver-to-bile clearances were both significantly decreased compared to SDR. These results provide the first evidence that Mrp2 mediates the biliary excretion of curcumin and thus may be a major factor in the control of exposure of curcumin to the bile duct. This study may be helpful to the potential use of curcumin as a treatment for bile duct cancer, and to understanding the genetic polymorphism of Mrp2 for clinical trials of curcumin.

  4. Global dissemination of a multidrug resistant Escherichia coli clone

    PubMed Central

    Petty, Nicola K.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Stanton-Cook, Mitchell; Skippington, Elizabeth; Totsika, Makrina; Forde, Brian M.; Phan, Minh-Duy; Gomes Moriel, Danilo; Peters, Kate M.; Davies, Mark; Rogers, Benjamin A.; Dougan, Gordon; Rodriguez-Baño, Jesús; Pascual, Alvaro; Pitout, Johann D. D.; Upton, Mathew; Paterson, David L.; Walsh, Timothy R.; Schembri, Mark A.; Beatson, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) is a globally disseminated, multidrug resistant (MDR) clone responsible for a high proportion of urinary tract and bloodstream infections. The rapid emergence and successful spread of E. coli ST131 is strongly associated with several factors, including resistance to fluoroquinolones, high virulence gene content, the possession of the type 1 fimbriae FimH30 allele, and the production of the CTX-M-15 extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL). Here, we used genome sequencing to examine the molecular epidemiology of a collection of E. coli ST131 strains isolated from six distinct geographical locations across the world spanning 2000–2011. The global phylogeny of E. coli ST131, determined from whole-genome sequence data, revealed a single lineage of E. coli ST131 distinct from other extraintestinal E. coli strains within the B2 phylogroup. Three closely related E. coli ST131 sublineages were identified, with little association to geographic origin. The majority of single-nucleotide variants associated with each of the sublineages were due to recombination in regions adjacent to mobile genetic elements (MGEs). The most prevalent sublineage of ST131 strains was characterized by fluoroquinolone resistance, and a distinct virulence factor and MGE profile. Four different variants of the CTX-M ESBL–resistance gene were identified in our ST131 strains, with acquisition of CTX-M-15 representing a defining feature of a discrete but geographically dispersed ST131 sublineage. This study confirms the global dispersal of a single E. coli ST131 clone and demonstrates the role of MGEs and recombination in the evolution of this important MDR pathogen. PMID:24706808

  5. Molecular characterization of clinical multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is a frequent nosocomial pathogen, with the multidrug-resistant (MDR) K. pneumoniae being a major public health concern, frequently causing difficult-to-treat infections worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular characterization of clinical MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates. Methods A total of 27 non-duplicate MDR K. pneumoniae isolates with a CTX-CIP-AK resistance pattern were investigated for the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes including extended spectrum β-lactamase genes (ESBLs), plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes, 16S rRNA methylase (16S-RMTase) genes, and integrons by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and DNA sequencing. Plasmid replicons were typed by PCR-based replicon typing (PBRT). Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were carried out to characterize the strain relatedness. Results All the isolates co-harbored 3 or more resistance determinants. OqxAB, CTX-M-type ESBLs and RmtB were the most frequent determinants, distributed among19 (70.4%),18 (66.7%) and 8 (29.6%) strains. Fourteen isolates harbored class 1 integrons, with orfD-aacA4 being the most frequent gene cassette array. Class 3 integrons were less frequently identified and contained the gene cassette array of blaGES-1-blaOXA-10-aac(6′)-Ib. IncFII replicon was most commonly found in this collection. One cluster was observed with ≥80% similarity among profiles obtained by PFGE, and one sequence type (ST) by MLST, namely ST11, was observed in the cluster. Conclusion K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)–producing ST11 was the main clone detected. Of particular concern was the high prevalence of multiple resistance determinants, classs I integrons and IncFII plasmid replicon among these MDR strains, which provide advantages for the rapid development of MDR strains. PMID:24884610

  6. Multidrug-resistant nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Cândido, Pedro Henrique Campanini; Nunes, Luciana de Souza; Marques, Elizabeth Andrade; Folescu, Tânia Wrobel; Coelho, Fábrice Santana; de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; Gomes, Karen Machado; Lourenço, Maria Cristina da Silva; Aguiar, Fábio Silva; Chitolina, Fernanda; Armstrong, Derek T; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Neves, Felipe Piedade Gonçalves; Mello, Fernanda Carvalho de Queiroz; Duarte, Rafael Silva

    2014-08-01

    Worldwide, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have become emergent pathogens of pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with an estimated prevalence ranging from 5 to 20%. This work investigated the presence of NTM in sputum samples of 129 CF patients (2 to 18 years old) submitted to longitudinal clinical supervision at a regional reference center in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. From June 2009 to March 2012, 36 NTM isolates recovered from 10 (7.75%) out of 129 children were obtained. Molecular identification of NTM was performed by using PCR restriction analysis targeting the hsp65 gene (PRA-hsp65) and sequencing of the rpoB gene, and susceptibility tests were performed that followed Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. For evaluating the genotypic diversity, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and/or enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence PCR (ERIC-PCR) was performed. The species identified were Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii (n = 24), M. abscessus subsp. abscessus (n = 6), Mycobacterium fortuitum (n = 3), Mycobacterium marseillense (n = 2), and Mycobacterium timonense (n = 1). Most of the isolates presented resistance to five or more of the antimicrobials tested. Typing profiles were mainly patient specific. The PFGE profiles indicated the presence of two clonal groups for M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and five clonal groups for M. abscesssus subsp. bolletii, with just one clone detected in two patients. Given the observed multidrug resistance patterns and the possibility of transmission between patients, we suggest the implementation of continuous and routine investigation of NTM infection or colonization in CF patients, including countries with a high burden of tuberculosis disease. PMID:24920766

  7. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis” may be nontuberculous mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, Abdolrazagh Hashemi; Heidarieh, Parvin; Bostanabad, Saeed Zaker; Khosravi, Azar Dokht; Hashemzadeh, Mohammad; Khandan, Solmaz; Biranvand, Maryam; Schraufnagel, Dean E.; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) presents a great challenge to public health, especially for developing countries. Some nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) cause the similar clinical and radiological characteristics with tuberculosis. We aimed to identify the frequency of NTM infections among subjects who were suspected to have MDR-TB due to lack of response to anti-TB treatment. Methods This retrospective study evaluated patients with suspected MDR-TB due to lack of sputum conversion after 2–3 months therapy with first line anti-TB treatment from 2009 through 2014. Cultures for mycobacteria were performed and identification was done to species level by phenotypic and molecular tests. The outcome of the patients with NTM disease and related risk factors for poor outcome were evaluated. Results Out of 117 consecutive strains isolated from suspected MDR-TB subjects, 35 (30%) strains were identified as NTM by using conventional and molecular approaches. Of these patients with positive NTM cultures, 32 (27%) patients met ATS/IDSA diagnostic criteria. Out of 32, 29 (90%) individuals with confirmed NTM diseases had underlying disorders including 8 subjects with malignancy, 5 with organ transplantations, and 4 with the human immunodeficiency virus. No known underlying disorder was found in 3 (9%) subjects. Treatment outcomes were available for 27 subjects, 17 (63%) of whom were cured and 10 (37%) had poor outcome including 6 (60%) who failed and 4 (40%) who died during treatment. Conclusion The high costs to the patient and society should lead health care providers to consider NTM in all patients suspected of having TB. PMID:25784643

  8. Human multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium bovis infection in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Chacon, Carlos A; Martínez-Guarneros, Armando; Couvin, David; González-Y-Merchand, Jorge A; Rivera-Gutierrez, Sandra; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro; De-la-Cruz López, Juan J; Gomez-Bustamante, Adriana; Gonzalez-Macal, Gabriela A; Gonçalves Rossi, Livia Maria; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel; Rastogi, Nalin; Vaughan, Gilberto

    2015-12-01

    Here, we describe the molecular characterization of six human Mycobacterium bovis clinical isolates, including three multidrug resistant (MDR) strains, collected in Mexico through the National Survey on Tuberculosis Drug Resistance (ENTB-2008), a nationally representative survey conducted during 2008-2009 in nine states with a stratified cluster sampling design. The genetic background of bovine M. bovis strains identified in three different states of Mexico was studied in parallel to assess molecular relatedness of bovine and human strains. Additionally, resistance to first and second line anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs and molecular identification of mutations conferring drug resistance was also performed. All strains were characterized by spoligotyping and 24-loci MIRU-VNTRs, and analyzed using the SITVIT2 (n = 112,000 strains) and SITVITBovis (n = 25,000 strains) proprietary databases of Institut Pasteur de la Guadeloupe. Furthermore, data from this study (n = 55 isolates), were also compared with genotypes recorded for M. bovis from USA (n = 203), Argentina (n = 726), as well as other isolates from Mexico (independent from the present study; n = 147), to determine any evidence for genetic relatedness between circulating M. bovis strains. The results showed that all human M. bovis cases were not genetically related between them or to any bovine strain. Interestingly, a high degree of genetic variability was observed amon