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Sample records for multifunctional particles magnetic

  1. Exploring multifunctional potential of commercial ferrofluids by magnetic particle hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakellari, Despoina; Mathioudaki, Stella; Kalpaxidou, Zoi; Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Angelakeris, Makis

    2015-04-01

    In this work we examine a selection of commercially available magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as candidates for magnetic particle hyperthermia applications combining their primary modality with additional heat triggered actions. Contrary to lab-made magnetic nanoparticles, commercial ferrofluids may be rapidly pushed through the medical approval processes since their applicability has already been addressed successfully (i.e., formulation, reproducibility, toxicity and quality assurance) in conjunction with the strong companies‧ drive in the fast delivery of the new therapy to the patient. Four samples are under study with variable hydrodynamic diameters from two companies (Micromod and Chemicell) consisting of iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles. The tunable magnetic heating characteristics of the ferrofluids were correlated with particle, field and colloidal solution features. Our work revealed a size-dependent magnetic heating efficiency together with fast thermal response, features that are crucial for adequate thermal efficiency combined with minimum treatment duration and show the potential of such materials as multifunctional theranostic agents.

  2. Size-Dependent Photodynamic Anticancer Activity of Biocompatible Multifunctional Magnetic Submicron Particles in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyong-Hoon; Nam, Ki Chang; Malkinski, Leszek; Choi, Eun Ha; Jung, Jin-Seung; Park, Bong Joo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, newly designed biocompatible multifunctional magnetic submicron particles (CoFe₂O₄-HPs-FAs) of well-defined sizes (60, 133, 245, and 335 nm) were fabricated for application as a photosensitizer delivery agent for photodynamic therapy in cancer cells. To provide selective targeting of cancer cells and destruction of cancer cell functionality, basic cobalt ferrite (CoFe₂O₄) particles were covalently bonded with a photosensitizer (PS), which comprises hematoporphyrin (HP), and folic acid (FA) molecules. The magnetic properties of the CoFe₂O₄ particles were finely adjusted by controlling the size of the primary CoFe₂O₄ nanograins, and secondary superstructured composite particles were formed by aggregation of the nanograins. The prepared CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA exhibited high water solubility, good MR-imaging capacity, and biocompatibility without any in vitro cytotoxicity. In particular, our CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA exhibited remarkable photodynamic anticancer efficiency via induction of apoptotic death in PC-3 prostate cancer cells in a particle size- and concentration-dependent manner. This size-dependent effect was determined by the specific surface area of the particles because the number of HP molecules increased with decreasing size and increasing surface area. These results indicate that our CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA may be applicable for photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a PS delivery material and a therapeutic agent for MR-imaging based PDT owing to their high saturation value for magnetization and superparamagnetism. PMID:27607999

  3. Size-Dependent Photodynamic Anticancer Activity of Biocompatible Multifunctional Magnetic Submicron Particles in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyong-Hoon; Nam, Ki Chang; Malkinski, Leszek; Choi, Eun Ha; Jung, Jin-Seung; Park, Bong Joo

    2016-09-06

    In this study, newly designed biocompatible multifunctional magnetic submicron particles (CoFe₂O₄-HPs-FAs) of well-defined sizes (60, 133, 245, and 335 nm) were fabricated for application as a photosensitizer delivery agent for photodynamic therapy in cancer cells. To provide selective targeting of cancer cells and destruction of cancer cell functionality, basic cobalt ferrite (CoFe₂O₄) particles were covalently bonded with a photosensitizer (PS), which comprises hematoporphyrin (HP), and folic acid (FA) molecules. The magnetic properties of the CoFe₂O₄ particles were finely adjusted by controlling the size of the primary CoFe₂O₄ nanograins, and secondary superstructured composite particles were formed by aggregation of the nanograins. The prepared CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA exhibited high water solubility, good MR-imaging capacity, and biocompatibility without any in vitro cytotoxicity. In particular, our CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA exhibited remarkable photodynamic anticancer efficiency via induction of apoptotic death in PC-3 prostate cancer cells in a particle size- and concentration-dependent manner. This size-dependent effect was determined by the specific surface area of the particles because the number of HP molecules increased with decreasing size and increasing surface area. These results indicate that our CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA may be applicable for photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a PS delivery material and a therapeutic agent for MR-imaging based PDT owing to their high saturation value for magnetization and superparamagnetism.

  4. Multifunctionality in molecular magnetism.

    PubMed

    Pinkowicz, Dawid; Czarnecki, Bernard; Reczyński, Mateusz; Arczyński, Mirosław

    2015-01-01

    Molecular magnetism draws from the fundamental ideas of structural chemistry and combines them with experimental physics resulting in one of the highest profile current topics, namely molecular materials that exhibit multifunctionality. Recent advances in the design of new generations of multifunctional molecular magnets that retain the functions of the building blocks and exhibit non-trivial magnetic properties at higher temperatures provide promising evidence that they may be useful for the future construction of nanoscale devices. This article is not a complete review but is rather an introduction into thefascinating world of multifunctional solids with magnetism as the leitmotif. We provide a subjective selection and discussion of the most inspiring examples of multifunctional molecular magnets: magnetic sponges, guest-responsive magnets, molecular magnets with ionic conductivity, photomagnets and non-centrosymmetric and chiral magnets.

  5. Multifunctional Fluorescent-Magnetic Polymeric Colloidal Particles: Preparations and Bioanalytical Applications.

    PubMed

    Kaewsaneha, Chariya; Tangboriboonrat, Pramuan; Polpanich, Duangporn; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2015-10-28

    Fluorescent-magnetic particles (FMPs) play important roles in modern materials, especially as nanoscale devices in the biomedical field. The interesting features of FMPs are attributed to their dual detection ability, i.e., fluorescent and magnetic modes. Functionalization of FMPs can be performed using several types of polymers, allowing their use in various applications. The synergistic potentials for unique multifunctional, multilevel targeting nanoscale devices as well as combination therapies make them particularly attractive for biomedical applications. However, the synthesis of FMPs is challenging and must be further developed. In this review article, we summarized the most recent representative works on polymer-based FMP systems that have been applied particularly in the bioanalytical field. PMID:26439897

  6. Multifunctional Fluorescent-Magnetic Polymeric Colloidal Particles: Preparations and Bioanalytical Applications.

    PubMed

    Kaewsaneha, Chariya; Tangboriboonrat, Pramuan; Polpanich, Duangporn; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2015-10-28

    Fluorescent-magnetic particles (FMPs) play important roles in modern materials, especially as nanoscale devices in the biomedical field. The interesting features of FMPs are attributed to their dual detection ability, i.e., fluorescent and magnetic modes. Functionalization of FMPs can be performed using several types of polymers, allowing their use in various applications. The synergistic potentials for unique multifunctional, multilevel targeting nanoscale devices as well as combination therapies make them particularly attractive for biomedical applications. However, the synthesis of FMPs is challenging and must be further developed. In this review article, we summarized the most recent representative works on polymer-based FMP systems that have been applied particularly in the bioanalytical field.

  7. Multifunctional layered magnetic composites.

    PubMed

    Siglreitmeier, Maria; Wu, Baohu; Kollmann, Tina; Neubauer, Martin; Nagy, Gergely; Schwahn, Dietmar; Pipich, Vitaliy; Faivre, Damien; Zahn, Dirk; Fery, Andreas; Cölfen, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    A fabrication method of a multifunctional hybrid material is achieved by using the insoluble organic nacre matrix of the Haliotis laevigata shell infiltrated with gelatin as a confined reaction environment. Inside this organic scaffold magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) are synthesized. The amount of MNPs can be controlled through the synthesis protocol therefore mineral loadings starting from 15 wt % up to 65 wt % can be realized. The demineralized organic nacre matrix is characterized by small-angle and very-small-angle neutron scattering (SANS and VSANS) showing an unchanged organic matrix structure after demineralization compared to the original mineralized nacre reference. Light microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy studies of stained samples show the presence of insoluble proteins at the chitin surface but not between the chitin layers. Successful and homogeneous gelatin infiltration in between the chitin layers can be shown. The hybrid material is characterized by TEM and shows a layered structure filled with MNPs with a size of around 10 nm. Magnetic analysis of the material demonstrates superparamagnetic behavior as characteristic for the particle size. Simulation studies show the potential of collagen and chitin to act as nucleators, where there is a slight preference of chitin over collagen as a nucleator for magnetite. Colloidal-probe AFM measurements demonstrate that introduction of a ferrogel into the chitin matrix leads to a certain increase in the stiffness of the composite material. PMID:25671158

  8. Multifunctional layered magnetic composites

    PubMed Central

    Siglreitmeier, Maria; Wu, Baohu; Kollmann, Tina; Neubauer, Martin; Nagy, Gergely; Schwahn, Dietmar; Pipich, Vitaliy; Faivre, Damien; Zahn, Dirk; Fery, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Summary A fabrication method of a multifunctional hybrid material is achieved by using the insoluble organic nacre matrix of the Haliotis laevigata shell infiltrated with gelatin as a confined reaction environment. Inside this organic scaffold magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) are synthesized. The amount of MNPs can be controlled through the synthesis protocol therefore mineral loadings starting from 15 wt % up to 65 wt % can be realized. The demineralized organic nacre matrix is characterized by small-angle and very-small-angle neutron scattering (SANS and VSANS) showing an unchanged organic matrix structure after demineralization compared to the original mineralized nacre reference. Light microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy studies of stained samples show the presence of insoluble proteins at the chitin surface but not between the chitin layers. Successful and homogeneous gelatin infiltration in between the chitin layers can be shown. The hybrid material is characterized by TEM and shows a layered structure filled with MNPs with a size of around 10 nm. Magnetic analysis of the material demonstrates superparamagnetic behavior as characteristic for the particle size. Simulation studies show the potential of collagen and chitin to act as nucleators, where there is a slight preference of chitin over collagen as a nucleator for magnetite. Colloidal-probe AFM measurements demonstrate that introduction of a ferrogel into the chitin matrix leads to a certain increase in the stiffness of the composite material. PMID:25671158

  9. Multifunctional particles: Magnetic nanocrystals and gold nanorods coated with fluorescent dye-doped silica shells

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Andrew T.; Smith, Danielle K.; Patel, Reken N.; Ress, David; Korgel, Brian A.

    2008-07-15

    Multifunctional colloidal core-shell nanoparticles of magnetic nanocrystals (of iron oxide or FePt) or gold nanorods encapsulated in silica shells doped with the fluorescent dye, Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate (Rubpy) were synthesized. The as-prepared magnetic nanocrystals are initially hydrophobic and were coated with silica using a microemulsion approach, while the as-prepared gold nanorods are hydrophilic and were coated with silica using a Stoeber type of process. Each approach yielded monodisperse nanoparticles with uniform fluorescent dye-doped silica shells. These colloidal heterostructures have the potential to be used as dual-purpose tags-exhibiting a fluorescent signal that could be combined with either dark-field optical contrast (in the case of the gold nanorods), or enhanced contrast in magnetic resonance images (in the case of magnetic nanocrystal cores). The optical and magnetic properties of the fluorescent silica-coated gold nanorods and magnetic nanocrystals are reported. - Graphical abstract: Colloidal gold nanorods and iron platinum and iron oxide nanocrystals were encapsulated with fluorescent dye-doped silica shells using a generic coating strategy. These heterostructures are promising contrast agents for dual-mode medical imaging. Their optical and magnetic properties were studied and are reported here.

  10. Multifunctional Particles: Magnetic Nanocrystals and Gold Nanorods Coated with Fluorescent Dye-Doped Silica Shells

    PubMed Central

    Heitsch, Andrew T.; Smith, Danielle K.; Patel, Reken E.; Ress, David; Korgel, Brian A.

    2008-01-01

    Multifunctional colloidal core-shell nanoparticles of magnetic nanocrystals (of iron oxide or FePt) or gold nanorods encapsulated in silica shells doped with the fluorescent dye, Tris(2,2′-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate (Rubpy) were synthesized. The as-prepared magnetic nanocrystals are initially hydrophobic and were coated with silica using a microemulsion approach, while the as-prepared gold nanorods are hydrophilic and were coated with silica using a Stöber-type of process. Each approach yielded monodisperse nanoparticles with uniform fluorescent dye-doped silica shells. These colloidal heterostructures have the potential to be used as dual-purpose tags—exhibiting a fluorescent signal that could be combined with either dark-field optical contrast (in the case of the gold nanorods), or enhanced contrast in magnetic resonance images (in the case of magnetic nanocrystal cores). The optical and magnetic properties of the fluorescent silica-coated gold nanorods and magnetic nanocrystals are reported. PMID:19578476

  11. Magnetically Attached Multifunction Maintenance Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Joffe, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    A versatile mobile telerobot, denoted the magnetically attached multifunction maintenance rover (MAGMER), has been proposed for use in the inspection and maintenance of the surfaces of ships, tanks containing petrochemicals, and other large ferromagnetic structures. As its name suggests, this robot would utilize magnetic attraction to adhere to a structure. As it moved along the surface of the structure, the MAGMER would perform tasks that could include close-up visual inspection by use of video cameras, various sensors, and/or removal of paint by water-jet blasting, laser heating, or induction heating. The water-jet nozzles would be mounted coaxially within compressed-air-powered venturi nozzles that would collect the paint debris dislodged by the jets. The MAGMER would be deployed, powered, and controlled from a truck, to which it would be connected by hoses for water, compressed air, and collection of debris and by cables for electric power and communication (see Figure 1). The operation of the MAGMER on a typical large structure would necessitate the use of long cables and hoses, which can be heavy. To reduce the load of the hoses and cables on the MAGMER and thereby ensure its ability to adhere to vertical and overhanging surfaces, the hoses and cables would be paid out through telescopic booms that would be parts of a MAGMER support system. The MAGMER would move by use of four motorized, steerable wheels, each of which would be mounted in an assembly that would include permanent magnets and four pole pieces (see Figure 2). The wheels would protrude from between the pole pieces by only about 3 mm, so that the gap between the pole pieces and the ferromagnetic surface would be just large enough to permit motion along the surface but not so large as to reduce the magnetic attraction excessively. In addition to the wheel assemblies, the MAGMER would include magnetic adherence enhancement fixtures, which would comprise arrays of permanent magnets and pole pieces

  12. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  13. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Metal oxide containing polymers and particularly styrene, acrylic or protein polymers containing fine, magnetic iron oxide particles are formed by combining a NO.sub.2 -substituted polymer with an acid such as hydrochloric acid in the presence of metal, particularly iron particles. The iron is oxidized to fine, black Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 particles which deposit selectively on the polymer particles. Nitrated polymers are formed by reacting functionally substituted, nitrated organic compounds such as trinitrobenzene sulfonate or dinitrofluoro benzene with a functionally coreactive polymer such as an amine modified acrylic polymer or a protein. Other transition metals such as cobalt can also be incorporated into polymers using this method.

  14. Bioinspired multifunctional Janus particles for droplet manipulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Hongcheng; Xie, Zhuoying; Shum, Ho Cheung; Wang, Baoping; Gu, Zhongze

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by the nipple arrays covering mosquitoes' eyes and the heterogeneous textured bumps on beetles' backs, we have developed a new kind of Janus particle with multiplexed features, such as different boss arrays and wettability compartmentalized on the same surface, and an anisotropic color and magnetic properties. The prepared Janus particles can be anchored at the air-water interface and act as a highly flexible barrier for preventing coalescence of water droplets. The incorporation of magnetic nanoparticles can give the Janus particles magnetic responsiveness for controlled transportation and coalescence of liquid marbles, while the structural colors in the Janus particles can be employed for barcoding of the encapsulated liquid marbles. We believe that these small Janus particles have great potential as components for constructing intelligent interfacial objects.

  15. Multifunctional clickable and protein-repellent magnetic silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estupiñán, Diego; Bannwarth, Markus B.; Mylon, Steven E.; Landfester, Katharina; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael; Crespy, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles are versatile materials whose physicochemical surface properties can be precisely adjusted. Because it is possible to combine several functionalities in a single carrier, silica-based materials are excellent candidates for biomedical applications. However, the functionality of the nanoparticles can get lost upon exposure to biological media due to uncontrolled biomolecule adsorption. Therefore, it is important to develop strategies that reduce non-specific protein-particle interactions without losing the introduced surface functionality. Herein, organosilane chemistry is employed to produce magnetic silica nanoparticles bearing differing amounts of amino and alkene functional groups on their surface as orthogonally addressable chemical functionalities. Simultaneously, a short-chain zwitterion is added to decrease the non-specific adsorption of biomolecules on the nanoparticles surface. The multifunctional particles display reduced protein adsorption after incubation in undiluted fetal bovine serum as well as in single protein solutions (serum albumin and lysozyme). Besides, the particles retain their capacity to selectively react with biomolecules. Thus, they can be covalently bio-functionalized with an antibody by means of orthogonal click reactions. These features make the described multifunctional silica nanoparticles a promising system for the study of surface interactions with biomolecules, targeting, and bio-sensing.Silica nanoparticles are versatile materials whose physicochemical surface properties can be precisely adjusted. Because it is possible to combine several functionalities in a single carrier, silica-based materials are excellent candidates for biomedical applications. However, the functionality of the nanoparticles can get lost upon exposure to biological media due to uncontrolled biomolecule adsorption. Therefore, it is important to develop strategies that reduce non-specific protein-particle interactions without losing the

  16. Multifunctional clickable and protein-repellent magnetic silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Estupiñán, Diego; Bannwarth, Markus B; Mylon, Steven E; Landfester, Katharina; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael; Crespy, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Silica nanoparticles are versatile materials whose physicochemical surface properties can be precisely adjusted. Because it is possible to combine several functionalities in a single carrier, silica-based materials are excellent candidates for biomedical applications. However, the functionality of the nanoparticles can get lost upon exposure to biological media due to uncontrolled biomolecule adsorption. Therefore, it is important to develop strategies that reduce non-specific protein-particle interactions without losing the introduced surface functionality. Herein, organosilane chemistry is employed to produce magnetic silica nanoparticles bearing differing amounts of amino and alkene functional groups on their surface as orthogonally addressable chemical functionalities. Simultaneously, a short-chain zwitterion is added to decrease the non-specific adsorption of biomolecules on the nanoparticles surface. The multifunctional particles display reduced protein adsorption after incubation in undiluted fetal bovine serum as well as in single protein solutions (serum albumin and lysozyme). Besides, the particles retain their capacity to selectively react with biomolecules. Thus, they can be covalently bio-functionalized with an antibody by means of orthogonal click reactions. These features make the described multifunctional silica nanoparticles a promising system for the study of surface interactions with biomolecules, targeting, and bio-sensing. PMID:26781542

  17. Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles for Targeted Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun; Jena, Prasanna K.; Behera, Sumita; Lockey, Richard F.; Mohapatra, Subhra; Mohapatra, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    A major problem associated with therapy is the inability to deliver pharmaceuticals to a specific site of the body without causing nonspecific toxicity. Development of magnetic nanoparticles and techniques for their safe transport and concentration in specific sites in the body would constitute a powerful tool for gene/drug therapy in vivo. Furthermore, drug delivery in vitro could improve further if the drugs were modified with antibodies, proteins or ligands. For in vivo experiments, magnetic nanoparticles were conjugated with plasmid DNA expressing GFP and then coated with chitosan. These particles were injected into mice through tail vein and directed to heart and kidney by means of external magnets of 25 gauss or 2kA –kA/m. These particles were concentrated in the lungs, heart, and kidney of mice and the expression of GFP in these sites were monitored. The expression of GFP in specific locations was visualized by whole-body fluorescent imaging and the concentration of these particles in the designated body locations was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. In another model system, we used atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and Carcino Embryonic Antigen (CEA) antibodies coupled to the chitosan coated magnetic nanoparticles to target cells in vitro. The present work demonstrates that a simple external magnetic field is all that is necessary to target a drug to a specific site inside the body without the need to functionalize the nanoparticles. However, the option to use magnetic targeting with external magnets on functionalized nanoparticles could prove as a more efficient means of drug delivery. PMID:19446653

  18. Multifunctional encoded particles for high-throughput biomolecule analysis.

    PubMed

    Pregibon, Daniel C; Toner, Mehmet; Doyle, Patrick S

    2007-03-01

    High-throughput screening for genetic analysis, combinatorial chemistry, and clinical diagnostics benefits from multiplexing, which allows for the simultaneous assay of several analytes but necessitates an encoding scheme for molecular identification. Current approaches for multiplexed analysis involve complicated or expensive processes for encoding, functionalizing, or decoding active substrates (particles or surfaces) and often yield a very limited number of analyte-specific codes. We present a method based on continuous-flow lithography that combines particle synthesis and encoding and probe incorporation into a single process to generate multifunctional particles bearing over a million unique codes. By using such particles, we demonstrate a multiplexed, single-fluorescence detection of DNA oligomers with encoded particle libraries that can be scanned rapidly in a flow-through microfluidic channel. Furthermore, we demonstrate with high specificity the same multiplexed detection using individual multiprobe particles.

  19. Multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles: design, synthesis, and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinhao; Gu, Hongwei; Xu, Bing

    2009-08-18

    The combination of nanotechnology and molecular biology has developed into an emerging research area: nanobiotechnology. Magnetic nanoparticles are well-established nanomaterials that offer controlled size, ability to be manipulated externally, and enhancement of contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). As a result, these nanoparticles could have many applications in biology and medicine, including protein purification, drug delivery, and medical imaging. Because of the potential benefits of multimodal functionality in biomedical applications, researchers would like to design and fabricate multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles. Currently, there are two strategies to fabricate magnetic nanoparticle-based multifunctional nanostructures. The first, molecular functionalization, involves attaching antibodies, proteins, and dyes to the magnetic nanoparticles. The other method integrates the magnetic nanoparticles with other functional nanocomponents, such as quantum dots (QDs) or metallic nanoparticles. Because they can exhibit several features synergistically and deliver more than one function simultaneously, such multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles could have unique advantages in biomedical applications. In this Account, we review examples of the design and biomedical application of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles. After their conjugation with proper ligands, antibodies, or proteins, the biofunctional magnetic nanoparticles exhibit highly selective binding. These results indicate that such nanoparticles could be applied to biological medical problems such as protein purification, bacterial detection, and toxin decorporation. The hybrid nanostructures, which combine magnetic nanoparticles with other nanocomponents, exhibit paramagnetism alongside features such as fluorescence or enhanced optical contrast. Such structures could provide a platform for enhanced medical imaging and controlled drug delivery. We expect that the combination of unique structural

  20. Fabrication of Novel Magnetic Nanoparticles of Multifunctionality for Water Decontamination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Qian, Jieshu; Pan, Bingcai

    2016-01-19

    Efficient and powerful water purifiers are in increasing need because we are facing a more and more serious problem of water pollution. Here, we demonstrate the design of versatile magnetic nanoadsorbents (M-QAC) that exhibit excellent disinfection and adsorption performances at the same time. The M-QAC is constructed by a Fe3O4 core surrounded by a polyethylenimine-derived corona. When dispersed in water, the M-QAC particles are able to interact simultaneously with multiple contaminants, including pathogens and heavy metallic cations and anions, in minutes. Subsequently, the M-QACs along with those contaminants can be easily removed and recollected by using a magnet. Meanwhile, the mechanisms of disinfection are investigated by using TEM and SEM, and the adsorption mechanisms are analyzed by XPS. In a practical application, M-QACs are applied to polluted river water 8000-fold greater in mass, producing clean water with the concentrations of all major pollutants below the drinking water standard of China. The adsorption ability of M-QAC could be regenerated for continuous use in a facile manner. With more virtues, such as low-cost fabrication and easy scaling up, the M-QAC have been shown to be a very promising multifunctional water purifier with rational design and to have great potential for real water purification applications. PMID:26695341

  1. Theranostics with Multifunctional Magnetic Gold Nanoshells: Photothermal Therapy and T2* Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Melancon, Marites P.; Elliott, Andrew; Ji, Xiaojun; Shetty, Anil; Yang, Zhi; Tian, Mei; Taylor, Brian; Stafford, R. Jason; Li, Chun

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the multifunctional imaging and therapeutic capabilities of core-shell nanoparticles composed of a superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) core and a gold shell (SPIO@AuNS). Materials and Methods The magnetic/optical properties of SPIO@AuNS were examined both in an agar gel phantom and in vivo by evaluating contrast-enhanced MRI and by measuring near-infrared (NIR) light-induced temperature changes mediated by SPIO@AuNS. In addition, the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of 111In-labeled SPIO@AuNS after intravenous injection in mice bearing A431 tumors were evaluated in the presence and absence of an external magnet. Results In agar phantoms containing SPIO@AuNS, a significant contrast enhancement in T2-weighted MRI was observed and a linear increase in temperature was observed with increasing concentration and laser output power when irradiated with NIR light centered at an 808-nm. In vivo, T2*-MRI delineated SPIO@AuNS and magnetic resonance temperature imaging of the same tumors revealed significant temperature elevations when intratumorally injected with SPIO@AuNS (1 × 1011 particles/mouse) and irradiated with NIR light (65.70 ± 0.69°C vs. 44.23 ± 0.24°C for saline + laser). Biodistribution studies in mice intravenously injected with 111In-labeled-SPIO@AuNS(1 × 1013 particles/mouse) had an approximately 2-fold increase in SPIO@AuNS delivered into tumors in the presence of an external magnet compared to tumors without the magnet. Conclusions Owing to its ability to mediate efficient photothermal ablation of cancer cells under MRI guidance, as well as the ability to be directed to solid tumors with an external magnetic field gradient, multifunctional SPIO@AuNS is a promising theranostic nano-platform. PMID:21150791

  2. Multifunctional Magnetic-fluorescent Nanocomposites for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corr, Serena A.; Rakovich, Yury P.; Gun'ko, Yurii K.

    2008-03-01

    Nanotechnology is a fast-growing area, involving the fabrication and use of nano-sized materials and devices. Various nanocomposite materials play a number of important roles in modern science and technology. Magnetic and fluorescent inorganic nanoparticles are of particular importance due to their broad range of potential applications. It is expected that the combination of magnetic and fluorescent properties in one nanocomposite would enable the engineering of unique multifunctional nanoscale devices, which could be manipulated using external magnetic fields. The aim of this review is to present an overview of bimodal “two-in-one” magnetic-fluorescent nanocomposite materials which combine both magnetic and fluorescent properties in one entity, in particular those with potential applications in biotechnology and nanomedicine. There is a great necessity for the development of these multifunctional nanocomposites, but there are some difficulties and challenges to overcome in their fabrication such as quenching of the fluorescent entity by the magnetic core. Fluorescent-magnetic nanocomposites include a variety of materials including silica-based, dye-functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and quantum dots-magnetic nanoparticle composites. The classification and main synthesis strategies, along with approaches for the fabrication of fluorescent-magnetic nanocomposites, are considered. The current and potential biomedical uses, including biological imaging, cell tracking, magnetic bioseparation, nanomedicine and bio- and chemo-sensoring, of magnetic-fluorescent nanocomposites are also discussed.

  3. Multifunctional Magnetic-fluorescent Nanocomposites for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a fast-growing area, involving the fabrication and use of nano-sized materials and devices. Various nanocomposite materials play a number of important roles in modern science and technology. Magnetic and fluorescent inorganic nanoparticles are of particular importance due to their broad range of potential applications. It is expected that the combination of magnetic and fluorescent properties in one nanocomposite would enable the engineering of unique multifunctional nanoscale devices, which could be manipulated using external magnetic fields. The aim of this review is to present an overview of bimodal “two-in-one” magnetic-fluorescent nanocomposite materials which combine both magnetic and fluorescent properties in one entity, in particular those with potential applications in biotechnology and nanomedicine. There is a great necessity for the development of these multifunctional nanocomposites, but there are some difficulties and challenges to overcome in their fabrication such as quenching of the fluorescent entity by the magnetic core. Fluorescent-magnetic nanocomposites include a variety of materials including silica-based, dye-functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and quantum dots-magnetic nanoparticle composites. The classification and main synthesis strategies, along with approaches for the fabrication of fluorescent-magnetic nanocomposites, are considered. The current and potential biomedical uses, including biological imaging, cell tracking, magnetic bioseparation, nanomedicine and bio- and chemo-sensoring, of magnetic-fluorescent nanocomposites are also discussed.

  4. Multifunctional fluorescent and magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvan, Subramanian T.

    2012-03-01

    Hybrid multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) are emerging as useful probes for magnetic based targeting, delivery, cell separation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and fluorescence-based bio-labeling applications. Assessing from the literature, the development of multifunctional NPs for multimodality imaging is still in its infancy state. This report focuses on our recent work on quantum dots (QDs), magnetic NPs (MNPs) and bi-functional NPs (composed of either QDs or rare-earth NPs, and magnetic NPs - iron oxide or gadolinium oxide) for multimodality imaging based biomedical applications. The combination of MRI and fluorescence would ally each other in improving the sensitivity and resolution, resulting in improved and early diagnosis of the disease. The challenges in this area are discussed.

  5. Multifunctional biocompatible coatings on magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkova, A. V.; Sorokina, O. N.; Rosenfeld, M. A.; Kovarski, A. L.

    2012-11-01

    Methods for coating formation on magnetic nanoparticles used in biology and medicine are considered. Key requirements to the coatings are formulated, namely, biocompatibility, stability, the possibility of attachment of pharmaceutical agents, and the absence of toxicity. The behaviour of nanoparticle/coating nanosystems in the body including penetration through cellular membranes and the excretion rates and routes is analyzed. Parameters characterizing the magnetic properties of these systems and their magnetic controllability are described. Factors limiting the applications of magnetically controlled nanosystems for targeted drug delivery are discussed. The bibliography includes 405 references.

  6. Magnetic Particle Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R.

    2010-02-01

    Rapid advances in the synthesis of superparamagnetic nanoparticles has stimulated widespread interest in their use as contrast agents for visualizing biological processes with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). With this approach, strong particle magnetism alters the MRI signal from nearby water protons and this, in turn, affects observed image contrast. Magnetic particle detection with MRI is therefore indirect and suffers from several associated problems, including poor quantification and tissuedependent performance. Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) overcomes these by directly measuring the amount of superparamagnetic material at each location. Mass sensitivity, spatial resolution, and imaging time is also comparable to or better than that achieved with MRI. Moreover, MPI is relatively inexpensive, meets all current safety guidelines, is quantitative, provides unambiguous contrast with tissue-independent performance, and can detect lower particle concentrations. Here, the basic principles behind MPI are described, factors affecting sensitivity and resolution are discussed, and potential utility for biomedical use is examined.

  7. Multifunctional magnetic rotator for micro and nanorheological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarev, Alexander; Aprelev, Alexey; Zakharov, Mikhail N.; Korneva, Guzeliya; Gogotsi, Yury; Kornev, Konstantin G.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the development of a multifunctional magnetic rotator that has been built and used during the last five years by two groups from Clemson and Drexel Universities studying the rheological properties of microdroplets. This magnetic rotator allows one to generate rotating magnetic fields in a broad frequency band, from hertz to tens kilohertz. We illustrate its flexibility and robustness by conducting the rheological studies of simple and polymeric fluids at the nano and microscale. First we reproduce a temperature-dependent viscosity of a synthetic oil used as a viscosity standard. Magnetic rotational spectroscopy with suspended nickel nanorods was used in these studies. As a second example, we converted the magnetic rotator into a pump with precise controlled flow modulation. Using multiwalled carbon nanotubes, we were able to estimate the shear modulus of sickle hemoglobin polymer. We believe that this multifunctional magnetic system will be useful not only for micro and nanorheological studies, but it will find much broader applications requiring remote controlled manipulation of micro and nanoobjects.

  8. Multifunctional magnetic rotator for micro and nanorheological studies.

    PubMed

    Tokarev, Alexander; Aprelev, Alexey; Zakharov, Mikhail N; Korneva, Guzeliya; Gogotsi, Yury; Kornev, Konstantin G

    2012-06-01

    We report on the development of a multifunctional magnetic rotator that has been built and used during the last five years by two groups from Clemson and Drexel Universities studying the rheological properties of microdroplets. This magnetic rotator allows one to generate rotating magnetic fields in a broad frequency band, from hertz to tens kilohertz. We illustrate its flexibility and robustness by conducting the rheological studies of simple and polymeric fluids at the nano and microscale. First we reproduce a temperature-dependent viscosity of a synthetic oil used as a viscosity standard. Magnetic rotational spectroscopy with suspended nickel nanorods was used in these studies. As a second example, we converted the magnetic rotator into a pump with precise controlled flow modulation. Using multiwalled carbon nanotubes, we were able to estimate the shear modulus of sickle hemoglobin polymer. We believe that this multifunctional magnetic system will be useful not only for micro and nanorheological studies, but it will find much broader applications requiring remote controlled manipulation of micro and nanoobjects.

  9. Multifunctional magnetic rotator for micro and nanorheological studies

    PubMed Central

    Tokarev, Alexander; Aprelev, Alexey; Zakharov, Mikhail N.; Korneva, Guzeliya; Gogotsi, Yury; Kornev, Konstantin G.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the development of a multifunctional magnetic rotator that has been built and used during the last five years by two groups from Clemson and Drexel Universities studying the rheological properties of microdroplets. This magnetic rotator allows one to generate rotating magnetic fields in a broad frequency band, from hertz to tens kilohertz. We illustrate its flexibility and robustness by conducting the rheological studies of simple and polymeric fluids at the nano and microscale. First we reproduce a temperature-dependent viscosity of a synthetic oil used as a viscosity standard. Magnetic rotational spectroscopy with suspended nickel nanorods was used in these studies. As a second example, we converted the magnetic rotator into a pump with precise controlled flow modulation. Using multiwalled carbon nanotubes, we were able to estimate the shear modulus of sickle hemoglobin polymer. We believe that this multifunctional magnetic system will be useful not only for micro and nanorheological studies, but it will find much broader applications requiring remote controlled manipulation of micro and nanoobjects. PMID:22755665

  10. Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles for Medical Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chen; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have attracted enormous research attention due to their unique magnetic properties that enable the detection by the non-invasive medical imaging modality—magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By incorporating advanced features, such as specific targeting, multimodality, therapeutic delivery, the detectability and applicability of MNPs have been dramatically expanded. A delicate design on structure, composition and surface chemistry is essential to achieving desired properties in MNP systems, such as high imaging contrast and chemical stability, non-fouling surface, target specificity and/or multimodality. This article presents the design fundamentals on the development of MNP systems, from discussion of material selection for nanoparticle cores and coatings, strategies for chemical synthesis and surface modification and their merits and limitations, to conjugation of special biomolecules for intended functions, and reviews the recent advances in the field. PMID:20593005

  11. Multiple emulsions as soft templates for the synthesis of multifunctional silicone porous particles.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Neus; Kolen'ko, Yury V; Solans, Conxita; Rodríguez-Abreu, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Multiple emulsion templating is a versatile strategy for the synthesis of porous particles. The present work addresses the synthesis of multifunctional poly(dimethylsiloxane) porous particles using multiple water-in-oil-in-water emulsions as soft templates with an oil phase constituted by a crosslinkable poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oil. Herewith, the impact of the viscosity of PDMS oil (i.e., molecular weight) on the properties of both the emulsion templates and the resulting particles was evaluated. The viscosity of PDMS oil has a strong effect on the size and polydispersity of the emulsion templates as well as on the mechanical properties of the derived particles. The elastic modulus can be tuned by mixing PDMS oils of different viscosities to form bimodal crosslinked networks. Iron oxide nanoparticles can be readily incorporated into the emulsion templates to provide additional functionalities to the silicone particles, such as magnetic separation or magnetic hyperthermia. The synthesized composite magnetic particles were found to be useful as recoverable absorbent materials (e.g., for oil spills) by taking advantage of their high buoyancy and high hydrophobicity. PMID:25313489

  12. Organophosphorous modifications of multifunctional magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kalska-Szostko, B; Orzechowska, E; Wykowska, U

    2013-11-01

    In the presented study, efforts have been undertaken to obtain the magnetic nanowires of multisegmental internal structure by AC and DC electrodeposition methods. The core-shell nanowires were obtained by wetting chemical deposition followed by thermal crystallization and electrodeposition. Such nanowires were tested to obtain functionalization by organophosphorous compounds and finally immobilize enzymes like trypsin. All obtained nanostructures were tested by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  13. Multifunctional Upconversion-Magnetic Hybrid Nanostructured Materials: Synthesis and Bioapplications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaomin; Zhao, Dongyuan; Zhang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    The combination of nanotechnology and biology has developed into an emerging research area: nano-biotechnology. Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have attracted a great deal of attention in bioapplications due to their high chemical stability, low toxicity, and high signal-to-noise ratio. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are also well-established nanomaterials that offer controlled size, ability to be manipulated externally, and enhancement of contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). As a result, these nanoparticles could have many applications in biology and medicine, including protein purification, drug delivery, and medical imaging. Because of the potential benefits of multimodal functionality in biomedical applications, researchers would like to design and fabricate multifunctional upconversion-magnetic hybrid nanostructured materials. The hybrid nanostructures, which combine UCNPs with MNPs, exhibit upconversion fluorescence alongside superparamagnetism property. Such structures could provide a platform for enhanced bioimaging and controlled drug delivery. We expect that the combination of unique structural characteristics and integrated functions of multifunctional upconversion-magnetic nanoparticles will attract increasing research interest and could lead to new opportunities in nano-bioapplications. PMID:23650477

  14. Magnetic flocculation of paramagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tsouris, C.; Scott, T.C.

    1994-09-01

    An experimental apparatus has been assembled for the flocculation study of paramagnetic particles under the influence of a strong magnetic field. A magnetic field of strength up to 6 T is generated by a cryogenic magnet operating near liquid helium temperatures. Experimental information is obtained from fluctuation and intensity measurements of light passing through a particle suspension located in a uniform magnetic field. Particle flocculation is described by a Brownian flocculation model in which hydrodynamic, van der Waals, double-layer, and magnetic forces are incorporated for the estimation of the particle flocculation rate. A population-balance model is employed in conjunction with the flocculation model to predict the evolution of the particle size and composition or magnetic susceptibility with time. The effects of magnetic-field strength, magnetic susceptibility of the particles, particle size, and zeta potential are investigated. Results show that particle size and magnetic susceptibility each play an important role in the selective flocculation of particles of different properties.

  15. Magnetic and optical properties of multifunctional core-shell radioluminescence nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongyu; Colvin, Daniel C.; Qi, Bin; Moore, Thomas; He, Jian; Mefford, O. Thompson; Alexis, Frank; Gore, John C.; Anker, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    When X-rays irradiate radioluminescence nanoparticles, they generate visible and near infrared light that can penetrate through centimeters of tissue. X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) maps the location of these radioluminescent contrast agents at high resolution by scanning a narrow X-ray beam through the tissue sample and collecting the luminescence at every position. Adding magnetic functionality to these radioluminescent particles would enable them to be guided, oriented, and heated using external magnetic fields, while their location and spectrum could be imaged with XLT and complementary magnetic resonance imaging. In this work, multifunctional monodispersed magnetic radioluminescent nanoparticles were developed as potential drug delivery carriers and radioluminescence imaging agents. The particles consisted of a spindle-shaped magnetic γ-Fe2O3 core and a radioluminescent europium-doped gadolinium oxide shell. Particles with solid iron oxide cores displayed saturation magnetizations consistent with their ~13% core volume, however, the iron oxide quenched their luminescence. In order to increase the luminescence, we partially etched the iron oxide core in oxalic acid while preserving the radioluminescent shell. The core size was controlled by the etching time which in turn affected the particles’ luminescence and magnetic properties. Particles with intermediate core sizes displayed both strong magnetophoresis and luminescence properties. They also served as MRI contrast agents with relaxivities of up to 58 mM−1s−1 (r2) and 120 mM−1s−1 (r2*). These particles offer promising multimodal MRI/fluorescence/X-ray luminescence contrast agents. Our core-shell synthesis technique offers a flexible method to control particle size, shape, and composition for a wide range of biological applications of magnetic/luminescent nanoparticles. PMID:24520183

  16. Multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoshells: combining two-photon luminescence imaging, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiulong; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Shanshan; Kong, Ni; Xu, Hong; Fu, Qihua; Gu, Hongchen; Ye, Jian

    2014-11-01

    With the increasing need for multi-purpose analysis in the biomedical field, traditional single diagnosis methods cannot meet the requirements. Therefore new multifunctional technologies and materials for the integration of sample collection, sensing and imaging are in great demand. Core-shell nanoparticles offer a unique platform to combine multifunctions in a single particle. In this work, we have constructed a novel type of core-shell superparamagnetic nanoshell (Fe₃O₄@SiO₂@Au), composed of a Fe₃O₄ cluster core, a thin Au shell and a SiO₂ layer in between. The obtained multifunctional nanoparticles combine the magnetic properties and plasmonic optical properties effectively, which were well investigated by a number of experimental characterization methods and theoretical simulations. We have demonstrated that Fe₃O₄@SiO₂@Au nanoparticles can be utilized for two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman scattering (NIR SERS) and cell collection by magnetic separation. The TPL intensity could be further greatly enhanced through the plasmon coupling effect in the self-assembled nanoparticle chains, which were triggered by an external magnetic field. In addition, Fe₃O₄@SiO₂@Au nanoparticles may have great potential applications such as enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photo-thermotherapy. Successful combination of multifunctions including magnetic response, biosensing and bioimaging in single nanoparticles allows further manipulation, real-time tracking, and intracellular molecule analysis of live cells at a single-cell level. PMID:25329447

  17. Multifunctional nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Klimov, Victor I.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Crooker, Scott A.; Kim, Hyungrak

    2010-06-22

    Multifunctional nanocomposites are provided including a core of either a magnetic material or an inorganic semiconductor, and, a shell of either a magnetic material or an inorganic semiconductor, wherein the core and the shell are of differing materials, such multifunctional nanocomposites having multifunctional properties including magnetic properties from the magnetic material and optical properties from the inorganic semiconductor material. Various applications of such multifunctional nanocomposites are also provided.

  18. Multifunctional nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Klimov, Victor I.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Crooker, Scott A.; Kim, Hyungrak

    2007-08-28

    Multifunctional nanocomposites are provided including a core of either a magnetic material or an inorganic semiconductor, and, a shell of either a magnetic material or an inorganic semiconductor, wherein the core and the shell are of differing materials, such multifunctional nanocomposites having multifunctional properties including magnetic properties from the magnetic material and optical properties from the inorganic semiconductor material. Various applications of such multifunctional nanocomposites are also provided.

  19. Multifunctional carbon nanomaterial hybrids for magnetic manipulation and targeting.

    PubMed

    Quyen Chau, Ngoc Do; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Kostarelos, Kostas; Bianco, Alberto

    2015-12-18

    Nanosized materials and multifunctional nanoscale platforms have attracted in the last years considerable interest in a variety of different fields including biomedicine. Carbon nanotubes and graphene are some of the most widely used carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) due to their unique morphology and structure and their characteristic physicochemical properties. Their high surface area allows efficient drug loading and bioconjugation and makes them the ideal platforms for decoration with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). In the biomedical area, MNPs are of particular importance due to their broad range of potential applications in drug delivery, non-invasive tumor imaging and early detection based on their optical and magnetic properties. The remarkable characteristics of CNMs and MNPs can be combined leading to CNM/MNP hybrids which offer numerous promising, desirable and strikingly advantageous properties for improved performance in comparison to the use of either material alone. In this minireview, we attempt to comprehensively report the most recent advances made with CNMs conjugated to different types of MNPs for magnetic targeting, magnetic manipulation, capture and separation of cells towards development of magnetic carbon-based devices.

  20. Development of Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles for Genetic Engineering and Tracking of Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Adams, Christopher; Israel, Liron Limor; Ostrovsky, Stella; Taylor, Arthur; Poptani, Harish; Lellouche, Jean-Paul; Chari, Divya

    2016-04-01

    Genetic modification of cell transplant populations and cell tracking ability are key underpinnings for effective cell therapies. Current strategies to achieve these goals utilize methods which are unsuitable for clinical translation because of related safety issues, and multiple protocol steps adding to cost and complexity. Multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) offering dual mode gene delivery and imaging contrast capacity offer a valuable tool in this context. Despite their key benefits, there is a critical lack of neurocompatible and multifunctional particles described for use with transplant populations for neurological applications. Here, a systematic screen of MNPs (using a core shown to cause contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) bearing various surface chemistries (polyethylenimine (PEI) and oxidized PEI and hybrids of oxidized PEI/alginic acid, PEI/chitosan and PEI/polyamidoamine) is performed to test their ability to genetically engineer neural stem cells (NSCs; a cell population of high clinical relevance for central nervous system disorders). It is demonstrated that gene delivery to NSCs can be safely achieved using two of the developed formulations (PEI and oxPEI/alginic acid) when used in conjunction with oscillating magnetofection technology. After transfection, intracellular particles can be detected by histological procedures with labeled cells displaying contrast in MRI (for real time cell tracking). PMID:26867130

  1. Photocatalytic/Magnetic Composite Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Chang-Yu; Goswami, Yogi; Garretson, Charles; Andino, Jean; Mazyck, David

    2007-01-01

    Photocatalytic/magnetic composite particles have been invented as improved means of exploiting established methods of photocatalysis for removal of chemical and biological pollutants from air and water. The photocatalytic components of the composite particles are formulated for high levels of photocatalytic activity, while the magnetic components make it possible to control the movements of the particles through the application of magnetic fields. The combination of photocatalytic and magnetic properties can be exploited in designing improved air- and water treatment reactors.

  2. Alternating Magnetic Field Controlled, Multifunctional Nano-Reservoirs: Intracellular Uptake and Improved Biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Santaneel; Ghoshmitra, Somesree; Cai, Tong; Diercks, David R.; Mills, Nathaniel C.; Hynds, Dianna L.

    2010-01-01

    Biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles hold great therapeutic potential, but conventional particles can be toxic. Here, we report the synthesis and alternating magnetic field dependent actuation of a remotely controllable, multifunctional nano-scale system and its marked biocompatibility with mammalian cells. Monodisperse, magnetic nanospheres based on thermo-sensitive polymer network poly(ethylene glycol) ethyl ether methacrylate- co-poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate were synthesized using free radical polymerization. Synthesized nanospheres have oscillating magnetic field induced thermo-reversible behavior; exhibiting desirable characteristics comparable to the widely used poly- N-isopropylacrylamide-based systems in shrinkage plus a broader volumetric transition range. Remote heating and model drug release were characterized for different field strengths. Nanospheres containing nanoparticles up to an iron concentration of 6 mM were readily taken up by neuron-like PC12 pheochromocytoma cells and had reduced toxicity compared to other surface modified magnetic nanocarriers. Furthermore, nanosphere exposure did not inhibit the extension of cellular processes (neurite outgrowth) even at high iron concentrations (6 mM), indicating minimal negative effects in cellular systems. Excellent intracellular uptake and enhanced biocompatibility coupled with the lack of deleterious effects on neurite outgrowth and prior Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of PEG-based carriers suggest increased therapeutic potential of this system for manipulating axon regeneration following nervous system injury.

  3. Plasmonic/Magnetic Multifunctional nanoplatform for Cancer Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, M.; Oza, Goldie; Velumani, S.; Ramirez, Jose Tapia; Garcia-Sierra, Francisco; Andrade, Norma Barragan; Vera, A.; Leija, L.; Garza-Navarro, Marco A.

    2016-01-01

    A multifunctional magneto-plasmonic CoFe2O4@Au core-shell nanoparticle was developed by iterative-seeding based method. This nanocargo consists of a cobalt ferrite kernel as a core (Nk) and multiple layers of gold as a functionalizable active stratum, (named as Nk@A after fifth iteration). Nk@A helps in augmenting the physiological stability and enhancing surface plasmon resonance (SPR) property. The targeted delivery of Doxorubicin using Nk@A as a nanopayload is demonstrated in this report. The drug release profile followed first order rate kinetics optimally at pH 5.4, which is considered as an endosomal pH of cells. The cellular MR imaging showed that Nk@A is an efficient T2 contrast agent for both L6 (r2-118.08 mM−1s−1) and Hep2 (r2-217.24 mM−1s−1) cells. Microwave based magnetic hyperthermia studies exhibited an augmentation in the temperature due to the transformation of radiation energy into heat at 2.45 GHz. There was an enhancement in cancer cell cytotoxicity when hyperthermia combined with chemotherapy. Hence, this single nanoplatform can deliver 3-pronged theranostic applications viz., targeted drug-delivery, T2 MR imaging and hyperthermia. PMID:27721391

  4. Multi-function magnetic jack control drive mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bollinger, L.R.; Crawford, D.C.

    1983-10-06

    A multi-function magnetic jack control drive mechanism for controlling a nuclear reactor is provided. The mechanism includes an elongate pressure housing in which a plurality of closely spaced drive rods are located. Each drive rod is connected to a rod which is insertable in the reactor core. An electromechanical stationary latch device is provided which is actuatable to hold each drive rod stationary with respect to the pressure housing. An electromechanical movable latch device is also provided for each one of the drive rods. Each movable latch device is provided with a base and is actuatable to hold a respective drive rod stationary with respect to the base. An electromechanical lift device is further provided for each base which is actuatable for moving a respective base longitudinally along the pressure housing. In this manner, one or more drive rods can be moved in the pressure housing by sequentially and repetitively operating the electromechanical devices. Preferably, each latch device includes a pair of opposed latches which grip teeth located on the respective drive rod. Two, three, or four drive rods can be located symmetrically about the longitudinal axis of the pressure housing.

  5. Multi-function magnetic jack control drive mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bollinger, Lawrence R.; Crawford, Donald C.

    1986-01-01

    A multi-function magnetic jack control drive mechanism for controlling a nuclear reactor is provided. The mechanism includes an elongate pressure housing in which a plurality of closely spaced drive rods are located. Each drive rod is connected to a rod which is insertable in the reactor core. An electromechanical stationary latch device is provided which is actuatable to hold each drive rod stationary with respect to the pressure housing. An electromechanical movable latch device is also provided for each one of the drive rods. Each movable latch device is provided with a base and is actuatable to hold a respective drive rod stationary with respect to the base. An electromechanical lift device is further provided for each base which is actuatable for moving a respective base longitudinally along the pressure housing. In this manner, one or more drive rods can be moved in the pressure housing by sequentially and repetitively operating the electromechanical devices. Preferably, each latch device includes a pair of opposed latches which grip teeth located on the respective drive rod. Two, three, or four drive rods can be located symmetrically about the longitudinal axis of the pressure housing.

  6. Engineering the multifunctional surface on magnetic nanoparticles for targeted biomedical applications: a chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Humphrey H P

    2011-10-01

    Research on multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles for biomedicines has experienced rapid growth because of the progressive advancements in nanotechnology and in modern biotechnology. However, the design of multifunctional surfaces on magnetic nanoparticles generally lacks a systematic approach. This article will try to unfold the complex chemistry in constructing a multifunctional surface, and layout a simplified guide for researchers to follow, particularly those from nonchemistry backgrounds. A number of design principles with critical rationales are to be introduced and followed by four main strategies: multifunctionality on a polymer chain, use of block copolymers, cocondensation of alkoxysilanes and of the secondary reaction on groups, with a particular reference to the use of alkoxysilanes. Nanoparticles of higher complexity are expected to be reported in the near future. These advanced systems are likely to be designed from some more logical, strategic mechanisms rather than the 'pick-and-mix' approaches we have seen in the last decade.

  7. A general strategy for fabricating flexible magnetic silica nanofibrous membranes with multifunctionality.

    PubMed

    Si, Yang; Yan, Chengcheng; Hong, Feifei; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2015-08-14

    Flexible, magnetic, and hierarchical porous NiFe2O4@SiO2 nanofibrous membranes were prepared by combining the gelatin method with electrospun nanofibers. The membranes exhibited prominent mechanical strength and mesoporosity, as well as multifunctionality of magnetic responsiveness, dye adsorption, and emulsion separation. PMID:26095072

  8. Multifunctional inverse opal particles for drug delivery and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Huan; Ye, Baofen; Shang, Luoran; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-06-01

    Particle-based delivery systems have a demonstrated value for drug discovery and development. Here, we report a new type of particle-based delivery system that has controllable release and is self-monitoring. The particles were composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) hydrogel with an inverse opal structure. The presence of macropores in the particles provides channels for active drug loading and release from the materials.Particle-based delivery systems have a demonstrated value for drug discovery and development. Here, we report a new type of particle-based delivery system that has controllable release and is self-monitoring. The particles were composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) hydrogel with an inverse opal structure. The presence of macropores in the particles provides channels for active drug loading and release from the materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02324f

  9. Multifunctional inverse opal particles for drug delivery and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Huan; Ye, Baofen; Shang, Luoran; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-06-28

    Particle-based delivery systems have a demonstrated value for drug discovery and development. Here, we report a new type of particle-based delivery system that has controllable release and is self-monitoring. The particles were composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) hydrogel with an inverse opal structure. The presence of macropores in the particles provides channels for active drug loading and release from the materials.

  10. Multifunctional inverse opal particles for drug delivery and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Huan; Ye, Baofen; Shang, Luoran; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-06-28

    Particle-based delivery systems have a demonstrated value for drug discovery and development. Here, we report a new type of particle-based delivery system that has controllable release and is self-monitoring. The particles were composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) hydrogel with an inverse opal structure. The presence of macropores in the particles provides channels for active drug loading and release from the materials. PMID:26035621

  11. Heparinized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles as multifunctional growth factor delivery carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Liu, Chaoqun; Fan, Luna; Shi, Jiahua; Liu, Zhiqiang; Li, Ruifang; Sun, Liwei

    2012-12-01

    Well-defined magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSNs) with a core/shell structure were prepared via a one pot synthesis. Sphere-like magnetite aggregates were obtained as cores of the final nanoparticles by assembly in the presence of polyvinyl pyrrolidone and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. The nanoparticles have the property of superparamagnetism with a saturation magnetization value of 20.3 emu g-1. In addition, the combination of heparin and fluorescence-labeled MMSNs endows the resultant particles (denoted as MFMSNs-HP) with magnetism and fluorescence properties, excellent dispersity in the buffer solutions and cell culture media, anticoagulant activity in the blood stream, and the controlled release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Furthermore, the bFGF cell viability assays indicate that MFMSNs-HP has nearly no toxicity to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) up to a concentration of 200 μg ml-1, and the proliferation activity of bFGF incorporated into MFMSNs-HP could be retained for at least 6 days. All of these suggest that MFMSNs-HP may serve as a multifunctional carrier for the delivery of growth factors.

  12. Magnetic Particle Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Luiz C.A.; A. Rios, Rachel V.R.; Fabris, Jose D.; Lago, Rachel M.; Sapag, Karim

    2004-01-01

    An exciting laboratory environment is activated by the preparation and novel use of magnetic materials to decontaminate water through adsorption and magnetic removal of metals and organics. This uncomplicated technique is also adaptable to the possible application of adsorbents to numerous other environmental substances.

  13. Particles trajectories in magnetic filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.

    2015-07-15

    The motion of a particle in a spatially harmonic magnetic field is a basic problem involved, for example, in the mechanism of formation of a collisionless shock. In such settings, it is generally reasoned that particles entering a Weibel generated turbulence are trapped inside it, provided their Larmor radius in the peak field is smaller than the field coherence length. The goal of this work is to put this heuristic conclusion on firm ground by studying, both analytically and numerically, such motion. A toy model is analyzed, consisting of a relativistic particle entering a region of space occupied by a spatially harmonic field. The particle penetrates the magnetic structure in a direction aligned with the magnetic filaments. Although the conclusions are not trivial, the main result is confirmed.

  14. Multifunctional nanoparticles for upconversion luminescence/MR multimodal imaging and magnetically targeted photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Yang, Kai; Li, Yonggang; Zeng, Xiao; Shao, Mingwang; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Liu, Zhuang

    2012-03-01

    Theranostics, the combination of diagnostics and therapies, has become a new concept in the battles with various major diseases such as cancer. Herein, we develop multifunctional nanoparticles (MFNPs) with highly integrated functionalities including upconversion luminescence, superparamagnetism, and strong optical absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) region with high photostability. In vivo dual modal optical/magnetic resonance imaging of mice uncovers that by placing a magnet nearby the tumor, MFNPs tend to migrate toward the tumor after intravenous injection and show high tumor accumulation, which is ~8 folds higher than that without magnetic targeting. NIR laser irradiation is then applied to the tumors grown on MFNP-injected mice under magnetic tumor-targeting, obtaining an outstanding photothermal therapeutic efficacy with 100% of tumor elimination in a murine breast cancer model. We present here a strategy for multimodal imaging-guided, magnetically targeted physical cancer therapy and highlight the promise of using multifunctional nanostructures for cancer theranostics.

  15. Magnetic particle characterization-magnetophoretic mobility and particle size.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen; Boland, Eugene D; Todd, Paul W; Hanley, Thomas R

    2016-06-01

    Quantitative characterization of magnetic particles is useful for analysis and separation of labeled cells and magnetic particles. A particle velocimeter is used to directly measure the magnetophoretic mobility, size, and other parameters of magnetic particle suspensions. The instrument provides quantitative video analysis of particles and their motion. The trajectories of magnetic particles in an isodynamic magnetic field are recorded using a high-definition camera/microscope system for image collection. Image analysis software then converts the image data to the parameters of interest. The distribution of magnetophoretic mobility is determined by combining fast image analysis with velocimetry measurements. Particle size distributions have been characterized to provide a better understanding of sample quality. The results have been used in the development and operation of analyzer protocols for counting particle concentrations accurately and measuring magnetic susceptibility and size for simultaneous display for routine application to particle suspensions and magnetically labeled biological cells. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  16. Multifunctional hybrid nanocomposites with magnetically controlled reversible shape-memory effect.

    PubMed

    Razzaq, Muhammad Yasar; Behl, Marc; Kratz, Karl; Lendlein, Andreas

    2013-10-25

    Magneto-sensitivity and a thermo-sensitive reversible shape-memory effect have been successfully integrated into a hybrid nanocomposite, resulting in a magnetically controlled actuator. The complex requirements for gaining this multifunctionality are fulfilled by combining netpoints on the molecular and nano level in a polyesterurethane network prepared from hydroxyl group decorated magnetic nanoparticles, crystallizable star-shaped poly(ω-pentadecalactone) precursors, and a diisocyanate.

  17. Isolation of technogenic magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Catinon, Mickaël; Ayrault, Sophie; Boudouma, Omar; Bordier, Louise; Agnello, Gregory; Reynaud, Stéphane; Tissut, Michel

    2014-03-15

    Technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs) emitted by various industrial sources, such as smelting plants, end up after atmospheric transfer on the soil surface. In the present study, we characterised the origin and composition of such particles emitted by a large iron smelting plant and deposited on particular substrates, namely tombstones, which act as a very interesting and appropriate matrix when compared to soil, tree bark, lichens or attic dust. The isolation and subsequent description of TMPs require a critical step of separation between different components of the sample and the magnetic particles; here, we described an efficient protocol that fulfils such a requirement: it resorts to water suspension, sonication, repeated magnetic extraction, sedimentation, sieving and organic matter destruction at 550 °C in some instances. The isolated TMPs displayed a noticeable crystalline shape with variable compositions: a) pure iron oxides, b) iron+Cr, Ni or Zn, and c) a complex structure containing Ca, Si, Mg, and Mn. Using Scanning Electron Microscope Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX), we obtained profiles of various and distinct magnetic particles, which allowed us to identify the source of the TMPs. PMID:24419285

  18. Contactless magnetic manipulation of magnetic particles in a fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokura, S.; Hara, M.; Kawaguchi, N.; Amemiya, N.

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate contactless magnetic manipulation of a magnetic particle along a designated orbit among other magnetic particles suspended in a fluid at rest or in motion, and also to understand the behaviors of those surrounding particles during the contactless magnetic manipulation. In addition, the possibility of breaking up chains of clustered magnetic particles under such conditions was also studied. We first describe contactless magnetic manipulation of magnetic particles by feedback control in which the feedback signal was the measured coordinates of the tracked particle. By the feedback control monitoring the location of the tracked particle using a high-speed image analyzer, the reach of the dipole magnetic field created by the magnetized magnetic particles could be kept relatively small. As a result, the tracked magnetic particle could be dragged along the designated orbit by magnetic force. Second, we describe the breaking up of chains of clustered magnetic particles using an alternating magnetic force. The results showed that chain-clustered magnetic particles that had been aggregated under the condition of contactless magnetic manipulation could be broken up reproducibly by an alternating magnetic field. These results constitute useful information for advancements in the handling of magnetic micro- or nanoparticles.

  19. Traveling wave magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Patrick; Ruckert, Martin A; Klauer, Peter; Kullmann, Walter H; Jakob, Peter M; Behr, Volker C

    2014-02-01

    Most 3-D magnetic particle imaging (MPI) scanners currently use permanent magnets to create the strong gradient field required for high resolution MPI. However, using permanent magnets limits the field of view (FOV) due to the large amount of energy required to move the field free point (FFP) from the center of the scanner. To address this issue, an alternative approach called "Traveling Wave MPI" is here presented. This approach employs a novel gradient system, the dynamic linear gradient array, to cover a large FOV while dynamically creating a strong magnetic gradient. The proposed design also enables the use of a so-called line-scanning mode, which simplifies the FFP trajectory to a linear path through the 3-D volume. This results in simplified mathematics, which facilitates the image reconstruction. PMID:24132006

  20. Multifunctional wood materials with magnetic, superhydrophobic and anti-ultraviolet properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Wentao; Gao, Likun; Sun, Qingfeng; Jin, Chunde; Lu, Yun; Li, Jian

    2015-03-01

    Multifunctional wood materials with magnetic, superhydrophobic and anti-ultraviolet properties were obtained successfully by precipitated CoFe2O4 nanoparticles on the wood surface and then treated with a layer of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS). The as-fabricated wood composites exhibited excellent magnetic property and the water contact angle of the OTS-modified magnetic wood surface reached as high as 150°, revealed the superhydrophobic property. Moreover, accelerated aging tests suggested that the treated wood composites also have an excellent anti-ultraviolet property.

  1. A Multifunctional Biomaterial with NIR Long Persistent Phosphorescence, Photothermal Response and Magnetism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiling; Li, Yang; Qin, Xixi; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-09-20

    There are many reports on long persistent phosphors (LPPs) applied in bioimaging. However, there are few reports on LPPs applied in photothermal therapy (PTT), and an integrated system with multiple functions of diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we fabricate effective multifunctional phosphors Zn3 Ga2 SnO8 : Cr(3+) , Nd(3+) , Gd(3+) with NIR persistent phosphorescence, photothermal response and magnetism. Such featured materials can act as NIR optical biolabels and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents for tracking the early cancer cells, but also as photothermal therapeutic agent for killing the cancer cells. This new multifunctional biomaterial is expected to open a new possibility of setting up an advanced imaging-guided therapy system featuring a high resolution for bioimaging and low side effects for the photothermal ablation of tumors.

  2. Investigations on the magnetization behavior of magnetic composite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichholz, Christian; Knoll, Johannes; Lerche, Dietmar; Nirschl, Hermann

    2014-11-01

    In life sciences the application of surface functionalized magnetic composite particles is establishing in diagnostics and in downstream processing of modern biotechnology. These magnetic composite particles consist of non-magnetic material, e.g. polystyrene, which serves as a matrix for the second magnetic component, usually colloidal magnetite. Because of the multitude of magnetic cores these magnetic beads show a complex magnetization behavior which cannot be described with the available approaches for homogeneous magnetic material. Therefore, in this work a new model for the magnetization behavior of magnetic composite particles is developed. By introducing an effective magnetization and considering an overall demagnetization factor the deviation of the demagnetization of homogeneously magnetized particles is taken into account. Calculated and experimental results show a good agreement which allows for the verification of the adapted model of particle magnetization. Besides, a newly developed magnetic analyzing centrifuge is used for the characterization of magnetic composite particle systems. The experimental results, also used for the model verification, give both, information about the magnetic properties and the interaction behavior of particle systems. By adding further components to the particle solution, such as salts or proteins, industrial relevant systems can be reconstructed. The analyzing tool can be used to adapt industrial processes without time-consuming preliminary tests with large samples in the process equipments.

  3. Multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles for targeted imaging and therapy

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Jason R.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have become important tools for the imaging of prevalent diseases, such as cancer, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and others. While first generation nanoparticles were fairly nonspecific, newer generations have been targeted to specific cell types and molecular targets via affinity ligands. Commonly, these ligands emerge from phage or small molecule screens, or are based on antibodies or aptamers. Secondary reporters and combined therapeutic molecules have further opened potential clinical applications of these materials. This review summarizes some of the recent biomedical applications of these newer magnetic nanomaterials. PMID:18508157

  4. Particle Transport in Therapeutic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Ishwar K.; Ganguly, Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles, in ferrofluids or as magnetic microspheres, offer magnetic maneuverability, biochemical surface functionalization, and magnetic relaxation under the influence of an alternating field. The use of these properties for clinical applications requires an understanding of particles, forces, and scalar transport at various length scales. This review explains the behavior of magnetic nano- and microparticles during magnetic drug targeting and magnetic fluid hyperthermia, and the microfluidic transport of these particles in bioMEMS (biomedical microelectromechanical systems) devices for ex vivo therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Magnetic particle transport, the momentum interaction of these particles with a host fluid in a flow, and thermal transport in a particle-infused tissue are characterized through the governing electrodynamic, hydrodynamic, and scalar transport equations.

  5. Highly Oxidized Multifunctional Organic Compounds Observed in Tropospheric Particles: A Field and Laboratory Study.

    PubMed

    Mutzel, Anke; Poulain, Laurent; Berndt, Torsten; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Rodigast, Maria; Böge, Olaf; Richters, Stefanie; Spindler, Gerald; Sipilä, Mikko; Jokinen, Tuija; Kulmala, Markku; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2015-07-01

    Very recent studies have reported the existence of highly oxidized multifunctional organic compounds (HOMs) with O/C ratios greater than 0.7. Because of their low vapor pressure, these compounds are often referred as extremely low-volatile organic compounds (ELVOCs), and thus, they are able to contribute significantly to organic mass in tropospheric particles. While HOMs have been successfully detected in the gas phase, their fate after uptake into particles remains unclear to date. Hence, the present study was designed to detect HOMs and related oxidation products in the particle phase and, thus, to shed light on their fate after phase transfer. To this end, aerosol chamber investigations of α-pinene ozonolysis were conducted under near environmental precursor concentrations (2.4 ppb) in a continuous flow reactor. The chemical characterization shows three classes of particle constituents: (1) intact HOMs that contain a carbonyl group, (2) particle-phase decomposition products, and (3) highly oxidized organosulfates (suggested to be addressed as HOOS). Besides chamber studies, HOM formation was also investigated during a measurement campaign conducted in summer 2013 at the TROPOS research station Melpitz. During this field campaign, gas-phase HOM formation was found to be correlated with an increase in the oxidation state of the organic aerosol.

  6. Note: On-chip multifunctional fluorescent-magnetic Janus helical microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, G.; Decanini, D.; Leroy, L.; Haghiri-Gosnet, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    Microswimmers integrated into microfluidic devices that are capable of self-illumination through fluorescence could revolutionize many aspects of technology, especially for biological applications. Few illumination and propulsion techniques of helical microswimmers inside microfluidic channels have been demonstrated. This paper presents the fabrication, detachment, and magnetic propulsions of multifunctional fluorescent-magnetic helical microswimmers integrated inside microfluidics. The fabrication process is based on two-photon laser lithography to pattern 3-D nanostructures from fluorescent photoresist coupled with conventional microfabrication techniques for magnetic thin film deposition by shadowing. After direct integration inside a microfluidic device, injected gas bubble allows gentle detachment of the integrated helical microswimmers whose magnetic propulsion can then be directly applied inside the microfluidic channel using external electromagnetic coil setup. With their small scale, fluorescence, excellent resistance to liquid/gas surface tension, and robust propulsion capability inside the microfluidic channel, the microswimmers can be used as high-resolution and large-range mobile micromanipulators inside microfluidic channels.

  7. Magnetic Janus Particles and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Bin

    Magnetic properties are important since they enable the manipulation of particle behavior remotely and therefore provide the means to direct a particle's orientation and translation. Magnetic Janus particles combine magnetic properties with anisotropy and thus are potential building blocks for complex structures that can be assembled from a particle suspension and can be directed through external fields. In this thesis, a method for the fabrication of three types of magnetic Janus particles with distinct magnetic properties is introduced, the assembly behavior of magnetic Janus particles in external magnetic and electric fields is systematically studied, and two potential applications of magnetic Janus particles are successfully tested. Janus particles with different magnetic properties are fabricated by varying the deposition rate of iron in an Ar/O2 atmosphere using physical vapor deposition (PVD). The extent of oxidation for each type of iron oxide is precisely controlled by the time it is exposed to the Ar/O 2 atmosphere during deposition. Two of the three magnetic Janus particles produced show distinct assembly behavior into staggered and double chain structures, whereas the third shows no assembly behavior under an external magnetic field. The effect of the iron oxide cap thickness (≤ 50 nm) on the Janus particle assembly behavior is studied resulting in a deposition rate diagram that shows the relationship between the assembly behavior and the deposition rate. The cap materials for staggered chain, double chain, and no assembly behavior are assigned as Fe1-xO, Fe3O 4, and Fe2O3, respectively, based on optical appearance and physical properties. The assignment is further confirmed by in-depth material characterization with scanning and transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The magnetic hardness of the iron oxides is tested using the magneto-optic Kerr effect

  8. Synthesis and characterization of monodisperse, mesoporous, and magnetic sub-micron particles doped with a near-infrared fluorescent dye

    SciTech Connect

    Le Guevel, Xavier; Nooney, Robert; McDonagh, Colette; MacCraith, Brian D.

    2011-06-15

    Recently, multifunctional silica nanoparticles have been investigated extensively for their potential use in biomedical applications. We have prepared sub-micron monodisperse and stable multifunctional mesoporous silica particles with a high level of magnetization and fluorescence in the near infrared region using an one-pot synthesis technique. Commercial magnetite nanocrystals and a conjugated-NIR-dye were incorporated inside the particles during the silica condensation reaction. The particles were then coated with polyethyleneglycol to stop aggregation. X-ray diffraction, N{sub 2} adsorption analysis, TEM, fluorescence and absorbance measurements were used to structurally characterize the particles. These mesoporous silica spheres have a large surface area (1978 m{sup 2}/g) with 3.40 nm pore diameter and a high fluorescence in the near infrared region at {lambda}=700 nm. To explore the potential of these particles for drug delivery applications, the pore accessibility to hydrophobic drugs was simulated by successfully trapping a hydrophobic ruthenium dye complex inside the particle with an estimated concentration of 3 wt%. Fluorescence imaging confirmed the presence of both NIR dye and the post-grafted ruthenium dye complex inside the particles. These particles moved at approximately 150 {mu}m/s under the influence of a magnetic field, hence demonstrating the multifunctionality and potential for biomedical applications in targeting and imaging. - Graphical Abstract: Hydrophobic fluorescent Ruthenium complex has been loaded into the mesopores as a surrogate drug to simulate drug delivery and to enhance the multifunctionality of the magnetic NIR emitting particles. Highlights: > Monodisperse magnetic mesoporous silica particles emitting in the near infrared region are obtained in one-pot synthesis. > We prove the capacity of such particles to uptake hydrophobic dye to mimic drug loading. > Loaded fluorescent particles can be moved under a magnetic field in a

  9. Relativistic Shocks: Particle Acceleration and Magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, L.; Keshet, U.; Lemoine, M.

    2015-10-01

    We review the physics of relativistic shocks, which are often invoked as the sources of non-thermal particles in pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets, and as possible sources of ultra-high energy cosmic-rays. We focus on particle acceleration and magnetic field generation, and describe the recent progress in the field driven by theory advances and by the rapid development of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In weakly magnetized or quasi parallel-shocks (i.e. where the magnetic field is nearly aligned with the flow), particle acceleration is efficient. The accelerated particles stream ahead of the shock, where they generate strong magnetic waves which in turn scatter the particles back and forth across the shock, mediating their acceleration. In contrast, in strongly magnetized quasi-perpendicular shocks, the efficiencies of both particle acceleration and magnetic field generation are suppressed. Particle acceleration, when efficient, modifies the turbulence around the shock on a long time scale, and the accelerated particles have a characteristic energy spectral index of s_{γ}˜eq2.2 in the ultra-relativistic limit. We discuss how this novel understanding of particle acceleration and magnetic field generation in relativistic shocks can be applied to high-energy astrophysical phenomena, with an emphasis on PWNe and GRB afterglows.

  10. Characterization of magnetically fractionated magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Othman, N. B.; Enpuku, K.

    2013-11-01

    We have characterized fractionated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for magnetic particle imaging. Original Ferucarbotran particles were magnetically divided into three fractionated MNPs called MS1, MS2, and MS3. Harmonic spectra from the three fractionated MNPs were measured at excitation fields of 2.8 and 28 mT with a frequency of 10 kHz. MS1 showed a 2.5-fold increase in the harmonic spectrum over that of the original MNPs. To understand the origin of the enhancement in the harmonic spectrum from MS1, we explored the magnetic properties of the MS series, such as distributions of effective core size and anisotropy energy barrier, and the correlation between them. Using these results, we performed numerical simulations of the harmonic spectra based on the Langevin equation. The simulation results quantitatively explained the experimental results of the fractionated MS series. It was also clarified that MS1 includes a large portion of the MNPs that are responsible for the harmonic spectrum.

  11. Multifunctional Single-Phase Photocatalysts: Extended Near Infrared Photoactivity and Reliable Magnetic Recyclability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoning; Zhu, Zhu; Li, Feng; Huang, Yan; Hu, Xiang; Huang, Haoliang; Peng, Ranran; Zhai, Xiaofang; Fu, Zhengping; Lu, Yalin

    2015-10-01

    A practical photocatalyst should be able to integrate together various functions including the extended solar conversion, a feasible and economic recyclability, and above the room temperature operation potential, et al., in order to fulfill the spreading application needs in nowadays. In this report, a multifunctional single-phase photocatalyst which possesses a high photoactivity extended into the near infrared region, an easy magnetic recyclability and the high temperature stability was developed by doping Co into a new layer-structured Bi7Fe3Ti3O21 material. Light absorption and photocatalytic activity of the resulted Bi7Fe3-xCoxTi3O21 photocatalyst were extended to the long wavelength as far as 800 nm. Its strong ferromagnetism above the room temperature enables the nanopowders fully recyclable in viscous solutions simply with a magnet bar in an experimental demonstration. Furthermore, such photoactivity and magnetic recyclability were heavily tested under high-temperature and high-viscosity conditions, which was intended to simulate the actual industrial environments. This work brings the bright light to a full availability of a new multifunctional photocatalyst, via integrating the much enhanced ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, optoelectronic properties, most importantly, into a single-phase structure.

  12. Multifunctional nanocomposite based on halloysite nanotubes for efficient luminescent bioimaging and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Jia, Lei; Luo, Yi-Feng; Xu, Jun; Chen, Ru-Hua; Ge, Zhi-Jun; Ma, Tie-Liang; Chen, Hong; Zhu, Tao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    A novel multifunctional halloysite nanotube (HNT)-based Fe3O4@HNT-polyethyleneimine-Tip-Eu(dibenzoylmethane)3 nanocomposite (Fe-HNT-Eu NC) with both photoluminescent and magnetic properties was fabricated by a simple one-step hydrothermal process combined with the coupling grafting method, which exhibited high suspension stability and excellent photophysical behavior. The as-prepared multifunctional Fe-HNT-Eu NC was characterized using various techniques. The results of cell viability assay, cell morphological observation, and in vivo toxicity assay indicated that the NC exhibited excellent biocompatibility over the studied concentration range, suggesting that the obtained Fe-HNT-Eu NC was a suitable material for bioimaging and biological applications in human hepatic adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, the biocompatible Fe-HNT-Eu NC displayed superparamagnetic behavior with high saturation magnetization and also functioned as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in vitro and in vivo. The results of the MRI tests indicated that the Fe-HNT-Eu NC can significantly decrease the T2 signal intensity values of the normal liver tissue and thus make the boundary between the normal liver and transplanted cancer more distinct, thus effectively improving the diagnosis effect of cancers. PMID:27698562

  13. Multifunctional Single-Phase Photocatalysts: Extended Near Infrared Photoactivity and Reliable Magnetic Recyclability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoning; Zhu, Zhu; Li, Feng; Huang, Yan; Hu, Xiang; Huang, Haoliang; Peng, Ranran; Zhai, XiaoFang; Fu, Zhengping; Lu, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    A practical photocatalyst should be able to integrate together various functions including the extended solar conversion, a feasible and economic recyclability, and above the room temperature operation potential, et al., in order to fulfill the spreading application needs in nowadays. In this report, a multifunctional single-phase photocatalyst which possesses a high photoactivity extended into the near infrared region, an easy magnetic recyclability and the high temperature stability was developed by doping Co into a new layer-structured Bi7Fe3Ti3O21 material. Light absorption and photocatalytic activity of the resulted Bi7Fe3-xCoxTi3O21 photocatalyst were extended to the long wavelength as far as 800 nm. Its strong ferromagnetism above the room temperature enables the nanopowders fully recyclable in viscous solutions simply with a magnet bar in an experimental demonstration. Furthermore, such photoactivity and magnetic recyclability were heavily tested under high-temperature and high-viscosity conditions, which was intended to simulate the actual industrial environments. This work brings the bright light to a full availability of a new multifunctional photocatalyst, via integrating the much enhanced ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, optoelectronic properties, most importantly, into a single-phase structure. PMID:26503907

  14. Multifunctional nanocomposite based on halloysite nanotubes for efficient luminescent bioimaging and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Jia, Lei; Luo, Yi-Feng; Xu, Jun; Chen, Ru-Hua; Ge, Zhi-Jun; Ma, Tie-Liang; Chen, Hong; Zhu, Tao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    A novel multifunctional halloysite nanotube (HNT)-based Fe3O4@HNT-polyethyleneimine-Tip-Eu(dibenzoylmethane)3 nanocomposite (Fe-HNT-Eu NC) with both photoluminescent and magnetic properties was fabricated by a simple one-step hydrothermal process combined with the coupling grafting method, which exhibited high suspension stability and excellent photophysical behavior. The as-prepared multifunctional Fe-HNT-Eu NC was characterized using various techniques. The results of cell viability assay, cell morphological observation, and in vivo toxicity assay indicated that the NC exhibited excellent biocompatibility over the studied concentration range, suggesting that the obtained Fe-HNT-Eu NC was a suitable material for bioimaging and biological applications in human hepatic adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, the biocompatible Fe-HNT-Eu NC displayed superparamagnetic behavior with high saturation magnetization and also functioned as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in vitro and in vivo. The results of the MRI tests indicated that the Fe-HNT-Eu NC can significantly decrease the T2 signal intensity values of the normal liver tissue and thus make the boundary between the normal liver and transplanted cancer more distinct, thus effectively improving the diagnosis effect of cancers.

  15. Synthesis of magnetic and upconversion nanocapsules as multifunctional drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shanshan; Chen, Yinyin; Liu, Bei; He, Fei; Ma, Ping'an; Deng, Xiaoran; Cheng, Ziyong; Lin, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Multifunctional hollow nanocapsules with magnetic and upconversion luminescence properties were synthesized. Hollow Fe3O4@SiO2 was firstly prepared by using rodlike β-FeOOH as the template followed by silica coating, calcinations and reduction. Then Fe3O4@SiO2@α-NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ nanocapsules (FeSiUCNP) were synthesized by the hydrothermal transformation of the Y(Yb3+, Er3+)(OH)CO3 (YOC) deposited onto the surface of nanocapsules through a urea-assisted homogeneous precipitation method. The hollow nanocapsules with porous structure provide space and entrance for the drug molecules. Due to the outside shell of α-NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+, the nanomaterial shows upconverting red emission upon 980 nm NIR-light excitation. Moreover, the nanocomposites with hollow magnetite core exhibit a high relaxivity with r2 value of 183 mM-1 s-1, which reveal the potential as T2-weighted contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The as-prepared nanocapsules can be performed as anti-cancer drug carriers for investigation of drug loading/release properties, which demonstrated a sustained drug release pattern and a comparable cytotoxicity with free doxorubicin (DOX). The multifunctional nanocapsules incorporated upconverting luminescence, T2-weighted MRI imaging and drug targeting delivery modalities have great potential for theranostic applications in cancer treatment.

  16. Template-Stripped Multifunctional Wedge and Pyramid Arrays for Magnetic Nanofocusing and Optical Sensing.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shailabh; Johnson, Timothy W; Wood, Christopher K; Qu, Tao; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Otto, Lauren M; Shaver, Jonah; Long, Nicholas J; Victora, Randall H; Edel, Joshua B; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2016-04-13

    We present large-scale reproducible fabrication of multifunctional ultrasharp metallic structures on planar substrates with capabilities including magnetic field nanofocusing and plasmonic sensing. Objects with sharp tips such as wedges and pyramids made with noble metals have been extensively used for enhancing local electric fields via the lightning-rod effect or plasmonic nanofocusing. However, analogous nanofocusing of magnetic fields using sharp tips made with magnetic materials has not been widely realized. Reproducible fabrication of sharp tips with magnetic as well as noble metal layers on planar substrates can enable straightforward application of their material and shape-derived functionalities. We use a template-stripping method to produce plasmonic-shell-coated nickel wedge and pyramid arrays at the wafer-scale with tip radius of curvature close to 10 nm. We further explore the magnetic nanofocusing capabilities of these ultrasharp substrates, deriving analytical formulas and comparing the results with computer simulations. These structures exhibit nanoscale spatial control over the trapping of magnetic microbeads and nanoparticles in solution. Additionally, enhanced optical sensing of analytes by these plasmonic-shell-coated substrates is demonstrated using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. These methods can guide the design and fabrication of novel devices with applications including nanoparticle manipulation, biosensing, and magnetoplasmonics.

  17. Template-Stripped Multifunctional Wedge and Pyramid Arrays for Magnetic Nanofocusing and Optical Sensing.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shailabh; Johnson, Timothy W; Wood, Christopher K; Qu, Tao; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Otto, Lauren M; Shaver, Jonah; Long, Nicholas J; Victora, Randall H; Edel, Joshua B; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2016-04-13

    We present large-scale reproducible fabrication of multifunctional ultrasharp metallic structures on planar substrates with capabilities including magnetic field nanofocusing and plasmonic sensing. Objects with sharp tips such as wedges and pyramids made with noble metals have been extensively used for enhancing local electric fields via the lightning-rod effect or plasmonic nanofocusing. However, analogous nanofocusing of magnetic fields using sharp tips made with magnetic materials has not been widely realized. Reproducible fabrication of sharp tips with magnetic as well as noble metal layers on planar substrates can enable straightforward application of their material and shape-derived functionalities. We use a template-stripping method to produce plasmonic-shell-coated nickel wedge and pyramid arrays at the wafer-scale with tip radius of curvature close to 10 nm. We further explore the magnetic nanofocusing capabilities of these ultrasharp substrates, deriving analytical formulas and comparing the results with computer simulations. These structures exhibit nanoscale spatial control over the trapping of magnetic microbeads and nanoparticles in solution. Additionally, enhanced optical sensing of analytes by these plasmonic-shell-coated substrates is demonstrated using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. These methods can guide the design and fabrication of novel devices with applications including nanoparticle manipulation, biosensing, and magnetoplasmonics. PMID:26837912

  18. Template-Stripped Multifunctional Wedge and Pyramid Arrays for Magnetic Nanofocusing and Optical Sensing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We present large-scale reproducible fabrication of multifunctional ultrasharp metallic structures on planar substrates with capabilities including magnetic field nanofocusing and plasmonic sensing. Objects with sharp tips such as wedges and pyramids made with noble metals have been extensively used for enhancing local electric fields via the lightning-rod effect or plasmonic nanofocusing. However, analogous nanofocusing of magnetic fields using sharp tips made with magnetic materials has not been widely realized. Reproducible fabrication of sharp tips with magnetic as well as noble metal layers on planar substrates can enable straightforward application of their material and shape-derived functionalities. We use a template-stripping method to produce plasmonic-shell-coated nickel wedge and pyramid arrays at the wafer-scale with tip radius of curvature close to 10 nm. We further explore the magnetic nanofocusing capabilities of these ultrasharp substrates, deriving analytical formulas and comparing the results with computer simulations. These structures exhibit nanoscale spatial control over the trapping of magnetic microbeads and nanoparticles in solution. Additionally, enhanced optical sensing of analytes by these plasmonic-shell-coated substrates is demonstrated using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. These methods can guide the design and fabrication of novel devices with applications including nanoparticle manipulation, biosensing, and magnetoplasmonics. PMID:26837912

  19. Multifunctional magnetic-hollow gold nanospheres for bimodal cancer cell imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ling-Yu; Yang, Xiao-Quan; An, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Kai; Qin, Meng-Yao; Fang, Bi-Yun; Li, Cheng; Xuan, Yang; Zhang, Xiao-Shuai; Zhao, Yuan-Di; Ma, Zhi-Ya

    2015-08-01

    Multifunctional nanocomposites combining imaging and therapeutic functions have great potential for cancer diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we developed a novel theranostic agent based on hollow gold nanospheres (HGNs) and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO). Taking advantage of the excellent magnetic properties of SPIO and strong near-infrared (NIR) absorption property of HGNs, such nanocomposites were applied to targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photoacoustic imaging (PAI) of cancer cells. In vitro results demonstrated they displayed significant contrast enhancement for T2-weighted MRI and strong PAI signal enhancement. Simultaneously, the nanocomposites exhibited a high photothermal effect under the irradiation of the near-infrared laser and can be used as efficient photothermal therapy (PTT) agents for selective killing of cancer cells. All these results indicated that such nanocomposites combined with MRI-PAI and PTT functionality can have great potential for effective cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  20. Multifunctional magnetic-hollow gold nanospheres for bimodal cancer cell imaging and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ling-Yu; Yang, Xiao-Quan; An, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Kai; Qin, Meng-Yao; Fang, Bi-Yun; Li, Cheng; Xuan, Yang; Zhang, Xiao-Shuai; Zhao, Yuan-Di; Ma, Zhi-Ya

    2015-08-01

    Multifunctional nanocomposites combining imaging and therapeutic functions have great potential for cancer diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we developed a novel theranostic agent based on hollow gold nanospheres (HGNs) and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO). Taking advantage of the excellent magnetic properties of SPIO and strong near-infrared (NIR) absorption property of HGNs, such nanocomposites were applied to targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photoacoustic imaging (PAI) of cancer cells. In vitro results demonstrated they displayed significant contrast enhancement for T2-weighted MRI and strong PAI signal enhancement. Simultaneously, the nanocomposites exhibited a high photothermal effect under the irradiation of the near-infrared laser and can be used as efficient photothermal therapy (PTT) agents for selective killing of cancer cells. All these results indicated that such nanocomposites combined with MRI-PAI and PTT functionality can have great potential for effective cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  1. Water-Dispersible, Multifunctional, Magnetic, Luminescent Silica-Encapsulated Composite Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, E.; Wong, S.; Zhou, H.; Chen, J.; Sutter, E.; Feygenson, M.; Aronson, M.C.

    2010-02-05

    A multifunctional one-dimensional nanostructure incorporating both CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) within a SiO{sub 2}-nanotube matrix is successfully synthesized based on the self-assembly of preformed functional NPs, allowing for control over the size and amount of NPs contained within the composite nanostructures. This specific nanostructure is distinctive because both the favorable photoluminescent and magnetic properties of QD and NP building blocks are incorporated and retained within the final silica-based composite, thus rendering it susceptible to both magnetic guidance and optical tracking. Moreover, the resulting hydrophilic nanocomposites are found to easily enter into the interiors of HeLa cells without damage, thereby highlighting their capability not only as fluorescent probes but also as possible drug-delivery vehicles of interest in nanobiotechnology.

  2. Synthesis of magnetic and upconversion nanocapsules as multifunctional drug delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shanshan; Chen, Yinyin; Liu, Bei; He, Fei; Ma, Ping’an; Deng, Xiaoran; Cheng, Ziyong Lin, Jun

    2015-09-15

    Multifunctional hollow nanocapsules with magnetic and upconversion luminescence properties were synthesized. Hollow Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} was firstly prepared by using rodlike β-FeOOH as the template followed by silica coating, calcinations and reduction. Then Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}@α-NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+},Er{sup 3+} nanocapsules (FeSiUCNP) were synthesized by the hydrothermal transformation of the Y(Yb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+})(OH)CO{sub 3} (YOC) deposited onto the surface of nanocapsules through a urea-assisted homogeneous precipitation method. The hollow nanocapsules with porous structure provide space and entrance for the drug molecules. Due to the outside shell of α-NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, the nanomaterial shows upconverting red emission upon 980 nm NIR-light excitation. Moreover, the nanocomposites with hollow magnetite core exhibit a high relaxivity with r{sub 2} value of 183 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1}, which reveal the potential as T{sub 2}-weighted contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The as-prepared nanocapsules can be performed as anti-cancer drug carriers for investigation of drug loading/release properties, which demonstrated a sustained drug release pattern and a comparable cytotoxicity with free doxorubicin (DOX). The multifunctional nanocapsules incorporated upconverting luminescence, T{sub 2}-weighted MRI imaging and drug targeting delivery modalities have great potential for theranostic applications in cancer treatment. - Graphical abstract: Multifunctional hollow nanocapsules with upconverting luminescence, T{sub 2}-weighted MRI imaging and drug targeting delivery modalities were synthesized for cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Multifunctional porous Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}@α-NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+},Er{sup 3+} nanocapsules were synthesized. • The nanocapsules show upconverting red emission upon 980 nm NIR-light excitation. • The nanocapsules exihibit potential as T{sub 2}-weighted contrast agents

  3. A multi-functional testing instrument for heat assisted magnetic recording media

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H. Z. Chen, Y. J.; Leong, S. H.; An, C. W.; Ye, K. D.; Hu, J. F.; Yin, M. J.

    2014-05-07

    With recent developments in heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), characterization of HAMR media is becoming very important. We present a multi-functional instrument for testing HAMR media, which integrates HAMR writing, reading, and a micro-magneto-optic Kerr effect (μ-MOKE) testing function. A potential application of the present instrument is to make temperature dependent magnetic property measurement using a pump-probe configuration. In the measurement, the media is heated up by a heating (intense) beam while a testing (weak) beam is overlapped with the heating beam for MOKE measurement. By heating the media with different heating beam power, magnetic measurements by MOKE at different temperatures can be performed. Compared to traditional existing tools such as the vibrating sample magnetometer, the present instrument provides localized and efficient heating at the measurement spot. The integration of HAMR writing and μ-MOKE system can also facilitate a localized full investigation of the magnetic media by potential correlation of HAMR head independent write/read performance to localized magnetic properties.

  4. Fuzzy, copper-based multi-functional composite particles serving simultaneous catalytic and signal-enhancing roles.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangming; Hu, Yingmo; An, Qi; Luan, Xinglong; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Yihe

    2016-04-28

    Multifunctional plasmonic particles serving simultaneously as catalysts and label-free reporting agents are highly pursued due to their great potential in enhancing reaction operational efficiencies. Copper is an abundant and economic resource, and it possesses practical applicability in industries, but no dual-functional copper-based catalytic and self-reporting particles have been reported so far. This study proposes a facile strategy to prepare high-performance dual-functional copper-based composite particles that catalyze reactions and simultaneously serve as a SERS (surface enhanced Raman spectra) active, label-free reporting agent. Polyelectrolyte-modified reduced graphene oxide particles are used as the reactive precursors in the fabrication method. Upon adding Cu(NO3)2 solutions into the precursor dispersions, composite particles comprised by copper/copper oxide core and polyelectrolyte-graphene shell were facilely obtained under sonication. The as-prepared composite particles efficiently catalyzed the conversion of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol and simultaneously acted as the SERS-active substrate to give enhanced Raman spectra of the produced 4-aminophenol. Taking advantage of the assembling capabilities of polyelectrolyte shells, the composite particles could be further assembled onto a planar substrate to catalyze organic reactions, facilitating their application in various conditions. We expect this report to promote the fabrication and application of copper-based multifunctional particles. PMID:27091497

  5. Multifunctional nanoprobe for cancer cell targeting and simultaneous fluorescence/magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhenzhen; Wu, Yafeng; Zhao, Yuewu; Mi, Li; Wang, Jintao; Wang, Jimin; Zhao, Jinjin; Wang, Lixin; Liu, Anran; Li, Ying; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin

    2016-09-28

    Multifunctional nanoprobes with distinctive magnetic and fluorescent properties are highly useful in accurate and early cancer diagnosis. In this study, nanoparticles of Fe3O4 core with fluorescent SiO2 shell (MFS) are synthesized by a facile improved Stöber method. These nanoparticles owning a significant core-shell structure exhibit good dispersion, stable fluorescence, low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility. TLS11a aptamer (Apt1), a specific membrane protein for human liver cancer cells which could be internalized into cells, is conjugated to the MFS nanoparticles through the formation of amide bond working as a target-specific moiety. The attached TLS11a aptamers on nanoparticles are very stable and can't be hydrolyzed by DNA hydrolytic enzyme in vivo. Both fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging show significant uptake of aptamer conjugated nanoprobe by HepG2 cells compared to 4T1, SGC-7901 and MCF-7 cells. In addition, with the increasing concentration of the nanoprobe, T2-weighted MRI images of the as-treated HepG2 cells are significantly negatively enhanced, indicating that a high magnetic field gradient is generated by MFS-Apt1 which has been specifically captured by HepG2 cells. The relaxivity of nanoprobe is calculated to be 11.5 mg(-1)s(-1). The MR imaging of tumor-bearing nude mouse is also confirmed. The proposed multifunctional nanoprobe with the size of sub-100 nm has the potential to provide real-time imaging in early liver cancer cell diagnosis. PMID:27619098

  6. Magnetic tweezers for manipulation of magnetic particles in single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimian, H.; Giesguth, M.; Dietz, K.-J.; Reiss, G.; Herth, S.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic tweezers gain increasing interest for applications in biology. Here, a setup of magnetic tweezers is introduced using micropatterned conducting lines on transparent glass slides. Magnetic particles of 1 μm diameter were injected in barley cell vacuoles using a microinject system under microscopic control. Time dependent tracking of the particles after application of a magnetic field was used to determine the viscosity of vacuolar sap in vivo relative to water and isolated vacuolar fluid. The viscosity of vacuolar sap in cells was about 2-fold higher than that of extracted vacuolar fluid and 5 times higher than that of water.

  7. Self-assembly of smallest magnetic particles

    PubMed Central

    Mehdizadeh Taheri, Sara; Michaelis, Maria; Friedrich, Thomas; Förster, Beate; Drechsler, Markus; Römer, Florian M.; Bösecke, Peter; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Weber, Birgit; Rehberg, Ingo; Rosenfeldt, Sabine; Förster, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The assembly of tiny magnetic particles in external magnetic fields is important for many applications ranging from data storage to medical technologies. The development of ever smaller magnetic structures is restricted by a size limit, where the particles are just barely magnetic. For such particles we report the discovery of a kind of solution assembly hitherto unobserved, to our knowledge. The fact that the assembly occurs in solution is very relevant for applications, where magnetic nanoparticles are either solution-processed or are used in liquid biological environments. Induced by an external magnetic field, nanocubes spontaneously assemble into 1D chains, 2D monolayer sheets, and large 3D cuboids with almost perfect internal ordering. The self-assembly of the nanocubes can be elucidated considering the dipole–dipole interaction of small superparamagnetic particles. Complex 3D geometrical arrangements of the nanodipoles are obtained under the assumption that the orientation of magnetization is freely adjustable within the superlattice and tends to minimize the binding energy. On that basis the magnetic moment of the cuboids can be explained. PMID:26554000

  8. Probing fine magnetic particles with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1991-12-31

    Because thermal neutrons are scattered both by nuclei and by unpaired electrons, they provide an ideal probe for studying the atomic and magnetic structures of fine-grained magnetic materials, including nanocrystalline solids, thin epitaxial layers, and colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles, known as ferrofluids. Diffraction, surface reflection, and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are the techniques used. With the exception of surface reflection, these methods are described in this article. The combination of SANS with refractive-index matching and neutron polarisation analysis is particularly powerful because it allows the magnetic and atomic structures to be determined independently. This technique has been used to study both dilute and concentrated ferrofluid suspensions of relatively monodisperse cobalt particles, subjected to a series of applied magnetic fields. The size of the cobalt particle core and the surrounding surfactant layer were determined. The measured interparticle structure factor agrees well with a recent theory that allows correlations in binary mixtures of magnetic particles to be calculated in the case of complete magnetic alignment. When one of the species in such a binary mixture is a nonmagnetic, cyclindrical macromolecule, application of a magnetic field leads to some degree of alignment of the nonmagnetic species. This result has been demonstrated with tobacco mosaic virus suspended in a water-based ferrofluid.

  9. Probing fine magnetic particles with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1991-01-01

    Because thermal neutrons are scattered both by nuclei and by unpaired electrons, they provide an ideal probe for studying the atomic and magnetic structures of fine-grained magnetic materials, including nanocrystalline solids, thin epitaxial layers, and colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles, known as ferrofluids. Diffraction, surface reflection, and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are the techniques used. With the exception of surface reflection, these methods are described in this article. The combination of SANS with refractive-index matching and neutron polarisation analysis is particularly powerful because it allows the magnetic and atomic structures to be determined independently. This technique has been used to study both dilute and concentrated ferrofluid suspensions of relatively monodisperse cobalt particles, subjected to a series of applied magnetic fields. The size of the cobalt particle core and the surrounding surfactant layer were determined. The measured interparticle structure factor agrees well with a recent theory that allows correlations in binary mixtures of magnetic particles to be calculated in the case of complete magnetic alignment. When one of the species in such a binary mixture is a nonmagnetic, cyclindrical macromolecule, application of a magnetic field leads to some degree of alignment of the nonmagnetic species. This result has been demonstrated with tobacco mosaic virus suspended in a water-based ferrofluid.

  10. Self-assembly of smallest magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh Taheri, Sara; Michaelis, Maria; Friedrich, Thomas; Förster, Beate; Drechsler, Markus; Römer, Florian M; Bösecke, Peter; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Weber, Birgit; Rehberg, Ingo; Rosenfeldt, Sabine; Förster, Stephan

    2015-11-24

    The assembly of tiny magnetic particles in external magnetic fields is important for many applications ranging from data storage to medical technologies. The development of ever smaller magnetic structures is restricted by a size limit, where the particles are just barely magnetic. For such particles we report the discovery of a kind of solution assembly hitherto unobserved, to our knowledge. The fact that the assembly occurs in solution is very relevant for applications, where magnetic nanoparticles are either solution-processed or are used in liquid biological environments. Induced by an external magnetic field, nanocubes spontaneously assemble into 1D chains, 2D monolayer sheets, and large 3D cuboids with almost perfect internal ordering. The self-assembly of the nanocubes can be elucidated considering the dipole-dipole interaction of small superparamagnetic particles. Complex 3D geometrical arrangements of the nanodipoles are obtained under the assumption that the orientation of magnetization is freely adjustable within the superlattice and tends to minimize the binding energy. On that basis the magnetic moment of the cuboids can be explained.

  11. Multifunctional poly (lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles for luminescence/magnetic resonance imaging and photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Jin; Park, Ga Young; Oh, Kyung Taek; Oh, Nam Muk; Kwag, Dong Sup; Youn, Yu Seok; Oh, Young Taik; Park, Jin Woo; Lee, Eun Seong

    2012-09-15

    Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) coupled with methoxy poly (ethylene glycol) (mPEG) or chlorin e6 (Ce6) was synthesized using the Steglich esterification method. PLGA-linked mPEG (PLGA-mPEG), PLGA-linked Ce6 (PLGA-Ce6), and Fe(3)O(4) were utilized to constitute multifunctional PLGA nanoparticles (∼160 nm) via the multi-emulsion W(1)/O/W(2) (water-in-oil-in-water) method. The photo-sensitizing properties of Ce6 molecules anchored to PLGA nanoparticles enabled in vivo luminescence imaging and photodynamic therapy for the tumor site. The encapsulation of Fe(3)O(4) allowed high contrast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the tumor in vivo. Overall, PLGA nanoparticles resulted in a significant tumor volume regression for the light-illuminated KB tumor in vivo and enhanced the contrast at the tumor region, compared to that of Feridex(®) (commercial contrast agent). PMID:22664459

  12. The magnetic particle plume solar sail concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, William H.

    2000-01-01

    A magnetic particle space radiator was proposed in the late 1950s as a means to dissipate waste heat from space nuclear systems. The concept was a plume of hot magnetic particles confined to and traversing a magnetic field produced by super conducting magnets in the space vehicle. The large surface area of the hot particles was expected to effectively radiate away the heat. The cooling particles followed along the lines of the magnetic field and eventually returned to the vehicle where they again picked up a fresh charge of waste heat for return out to the plume. This paper presents a new concept for consideration. The same basic magnetic particle plume idea is proposed in this paper, except the purpose of the plume would be to receive momentum (and possibly electric power) from the solar wind in the manner of a solar sail. Recent nano-technologies allow the magnetic particles to be 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller than envisioned for the heat radiator, and the magnetic field would be stronger than we envisioned in the '50s. The application of the magnetic solar sail would be for propelling space-faring vehicles on long duration exploration of the solar system and possibly beyond. A first look is provided at the elements of the system, together with an estimate of the thrust potential and the approximate weights of the system. The system appears to have the potential to develop on the order of 50lb and 100lb of thrust and weight on the order of 15,000lb .

  13. Mechanism of particle flocculation by magnetic seeding

    SciTech Connect

    Yiacoumi, S.; Rountree, D.A.; Tsouris, C.

    1996-12-25

    Magnetic seeding flocculation of micrometer-sized particles in liquid suspensions is investigated. Primary forces acting on individual particles, including gravity and magnetic attraction, as well as van der Waals, electrostatic, magnetic dipole, and hydrodynamic interparticle forces, are examined and quantified. A mathematical statement of the overall relative velocity is developed from the net force acting on a particle. From this, the equation of relative motion for two particles in cylindrical coordinates is derived. A computer model is then used to solve this equation repeatedly to find the particle trajectory borderline between collision and noncollision, thus determining the collision efficiency and collision frequency. The effects of a variety of parameters on flocculation performance are then explored. It is found that some factors have unexpected and complex influences on the collision efficiency and collision frequency, particularly the particle size ratio and the direction of the magnetic field. Magnetic separation has been used for desulfurization of coal, and separation and concentration of mining ores and wastes, and nuclear reactor coolant water filtration.

  14. Chaotic magnetic fields: Particle motion and energization

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, Brahmananda; Ram, Abhay K.; Li, Gang; Li, Xiaocan

    2014-02-11

    Magnetic field line equations correspond to a Hamiltonian dynamical system, so the features of a Hamiltonian systems can easily be adopted for discussing some essential features of magnetic field lines. The integrability of the magnetic field line equations are discussed by various authors and it can be shown that these equations are, in general, not integrable. We demonstrate several examples of realistic chaotic magnetic fields, produced by asymmetric current configurations. Particular examples of chaotic force-free field and non force-free fields are shown. We have studied, for the first time, the motion of a charged particle in chaotic magnetic fields. It is found that the motion of a charged particle in a chaotic magnetic field is not necessarily chaotic. We also showed that charged particles moving in a time-dependent chaotic magnetic field are energized. Such energization processes could play a dominant role in particle energization in several astrophysical environments including solar corona, solar flares and cosmic ray propagation in space.

  15. Synthesis and Properties of Magnetic Fine Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhongxun

    Magnetic fine particles with a variety of compositions and sizes have been prepared by aerosol and coprecipitation technique. Their magnetic properties are shown to be either similar to or quite different from those of their bulk counterparts. Iron oxide, barium iron oxide and neodynium iron based fine particles have been synthesized by an aerosol technique which produced particles with average size of about 100 nm. It was found that the as-received samples were usually in thermally unstable states because of their short residence time (seconds) at the high temperature when they were created. Heat treatment turned these as -received particles into more stable phases. The final product depended on temperature, environment and composition of the initial solution. Cation and anion effects and solvent effects on the formation and morphology of the final particle have been also observed. Manganese ferrite fine particles have been made by hydroxide induced coprecipitation of mixed iron and manganese salt solutions. The particle size appeared to be an unique function of the ratio of the metallic ion concentration to the hydroxide ion concentration when the digestion conditions were fixed. The system which used ferric salt created small MnFe_2 O_4 particles with size controllable between 5 and 25 nm. The digestion process could be described by an Ostwald ripening in which OH^- acts as a catalyst. Variation of cations showed that their oxidation states had a strong influence on the particle size. The system which used ferrous salt, however, produced larger ferrite particles (above 50 nm) with single ferrite phase (Mn_ xFe_{3-x}O_4 with x <= 0.7). Dissolution and renucleation/growth occurred during digestion. For larger particles, the magnetizations were the same as for the bulk of the phases present, while the coercivities were more system dependent. We have found that nanoscale particles, on the other hand, showed profound size effects. The saturation magnetization of

  16. Multi-functional liposomes showing radiofrequency-triggered release and magnetic resonance imaging for tumor multi-mechanism therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bin; Han, Shuping; Li, Hongyan; Zhao, Feifei; Su, Xiangjie; Cao, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2015-03-01

    Recently, nanoplatforms with multiple functions, such as tumor-targeting drug carriers, MRI, optical imaging, thermal therapy etc., have become popular in the field of cancer research. The present study reports a novel multi-functional liposome for cancer theranostics. A dual targeted drug delivery with radiofrequency-triggered drug release and imaging based on the magnetic field influence was used advantageously for tumor multi-mechanism therapy. In this system, the surface of fullerene (C60) was decorated with iron oxide nanoparticles, and PEGylation formed a hybrid nanosystem (C60-Fe3O4-PEG2000). Thermosensitive liposomes (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC) with DSPE-PEG2000-folate wrapped up the hybrid nanosystem and docetaxel (DTX), which were designed to combine features of biological and physical (magnetic) drug targeting for fullerene radiofrequency-triggered drug release. The magnetic liposomes not only served as powerful tumor diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, but also as powerful agents for photothermal ablation of tumors. Furthermore, a remarkable thermal therapy combined chemotherapy multi-functional liposome nanoplatform converted radiofrequency energy into thermal energy to release drugs from thermosensitive liposomes, which was also observed during both in vitro and in vivo treatment. The multi-functional liposomes also could selectively kill cancer cells in highly localized regions via their excellent active tumor targeting and magnetic targeted abilities.

  17. Multi-functional liposomes showing radiofrequency-triggered release and magnetic resonance imaging for tumor multi-mechanism therapy.

    PubMed

    Du, Bin; Han, Shuping; Li, Hongyan; Zhao, Feifei; Su, Xiangjie; Cao, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2015-03-12

    Recently, nanoplatforms with multiple functions, such as tumor-targeting drug carriers, MRI, optical imaging, thermal therapy etc., have become popular in the field of cancer research. The present study reports a novel multi-functional liposome for cancer theranostics. A dual targeted drug delivery with radiofrequency-triggered drug release and imaging based on the magnetic field influence was used advantageously for tumor multi-mechanism therapy. In this system, the surface of fullerene (C60) was decorated with iron oxide nanoparticles, and PEGylation formed a hybrid nanosystem (C60-Fe3O4-PEG2000). Thermosensitive liposomes (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC) with DSPE-PEG2000-folate wrapped up the hybrid nanosystem and docetaxel (DTX), which were designed to combine features of biological and physical (magnetic) drug targeting for fullerene radiofrequency-triggered drug release. The magnetic liposomes not only served as powerful tumor diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, but also as powerful agents for photothermal ablation of tumors. Furthermore, a remarkable thermal therapy combined chemotherapy multi-functional liposome nanoplatform converted radiofrequency energy into thermal energy to release drugs from thermosensitive liposomes, which was also observed during both in vitro and in vivo treatment. The multi-functional liposomes also could selectively kill cancer cells in highly localized regions via their excellent active tumor targeting and magnetic targeted abilities.

  18. Magnetic microswimmers: Controlling particle approach through magnetic and hydrodynamic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkati, Farshad; Cheang, U. Kei; Kim, Minjun; Fu, Henry

    2015-11-01

    We investigate magnetic microswimmers actuated by a rotating magnetic field that may be useful for drug delivery, micro-surgery, or diagnostics in human body. For modular swimmers, assembly and disassembly requires understanding the interactions between the swimmer and other modules in the fluid. Here, we discuss possible mechanisms for a frequency-dependent attraction/repulsion between a three-bead, achiral swimmer and other magnetic particles, which represent modular assembly elements. We first investigate the hydrodynamic interaction between a swimmer and nearby particle by studying the Lagrangian trajectories in the vicinity of the swimmer. Then we show that the magnetic forces can be attractive or repulsive depending on the spatial arrangement of the swimmer and particle, with a magnitude that decreases with increasing frequency. Combining magnetic and hydrodynamic effects allows us to understand the overall behavior of magnetic particles near the swimmer. Interestingly, we find that the frequency of rotation can be used to control when the particle can closely approach the swimmer, with potential application to assembly.

  19. Dust particle dynamics in magnetized plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudabadi, M.; Mashayek, F.

    2005-07-15

    In this paper, the structure of a plasma sheath in the presence of an oblique magnetic field is investigated, and dynamics of a dust particle embedded in the sheath is elaborated. To simulate the sheath, a weakly collisional two-fluid model is implemented. For various magnitudes and directions of the magnetic field and chamber pressures, different plasma parameters including the electron and ion densities, ion flow velocity, and electric potential are calculated. A complete set of forces acting on the dust particle originating from the electric field in the sheath, the static magnetic field, gravity, and ion and neutral drags is taken into account. Through the trapping potential energy, the particle stable and unstable equilibria are studied while the particle is stationary inside the sheath. Other features such as the possibility of the dust levitation and trapping in the sheath, and the effect of the Lorentz force on the charged dust particle motion are also examined. An interesting feature is captured for the variation of the particle charge as a function of the magnetic field magnitude.

  20. Multifunctional mesoporous nanocomposites with magnetic, optical, and sensing features: synthesis, characterization, and their oxygen-sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyan; Li, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Song, Hang

    2013-01-29

    In this paper, the fabrication, characterization, and application in oxygen sensing are reported for a novel multifunctional nanomaterial of [Ru(bpy)(2)phen-MMS] (bpy, 2,2'-bipyridyl; phen, phenathrolin) which was simply prepared by covalently grafting the ruthenium(II) polypyridyl compounds into the channels of magnetic mesoporous silica nanocomposites (MMS). Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, N(2) adsorption-desorption, a superconducting quantum interference device, UV-vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectra were used to characterize the samples. The well-designed multifunctional nanocomposites show superparamagnetic behavior and ordered mesoporous characteristics and exhibit a strong red-orange metal-to-ligand charge transfer emission. In addition, the obtained nanocomposites give high performance in oxygen sensing with high sensitivity (I(0)/I(100) = 5.2), good Stern-Volmer characteristics (R(2) = 0.9995), and short response/recovery times (t↓ = 6 s and t↑ = 12 s). The magnetic, mesoporous, luminescent, and oxygen-sensing properties of this multifunctional nanostructure make it hold great promise as a novel multifunctional oxygen-sensing system for chemical/biosensor.

  1. Fuzzy, copper-based multi-functional composite particles serving simultaneous catalytic and signal-enhancing roles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangming; Hu, Yingmo; An, Qi; Luan, Xinglong; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Yihe

    2016-04-01

    Multifunctional plasmonic particles serving simultaneously as catalysts and label-free reporting agents are highly pursued due to their great potential in enhancing reaction operational efficiencies. Copper is an abundant and economic resource, and it possesses practical applicability in industries, but no dual-functional copper-based catalytic and self-reporting particles have been reported so far. This study proposes a facile strategy to prepare high-performance dual-functional copper-based composite particles that catalyze reactions and simultaneously serve as a SERS (surface enhanced Raman spectra) active, label-free reporting agent. Polyelectrolyte-modified reduced graphene oxide particles are used as the reactive precursors in the fabrication method. Upon adding Cu(NO3)2 solutions into the precursor dispersions, composite particles comprised by copper/copper oxide core and polyelectrolyte-graphene shell were facilely obtained under sonication. The as-prepared composite particles efficiently catalyzed the conversion of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol and simultaneously acted as the SERS-active substrate to give enhanced Raman spectra of the produced 4-aminophenol. Taking advantage of the assembling capabilities of polyelectrolyte shells, the composite particles could be further assembled onto a planar substrate to catalyze organic reactions, facilitating their application in various conditions. We expect this report to promote the fabrication and application of copper-based multifunctional particles.Multifunctional plasmonic particles serving simultaneously as catalysts and label-free reporting agents are highly pursued due to their great potential in enhancing reaction operational efficiencies. Copper is an abundant and economic resource, and it possesses practical applicability in industries, but no dual-functional copper-based catalytic and self-reporting particles have been reported so far. This study proposes a facile strategy to prepare high

  2. Magnetization measurements on fine cobalt particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Respaud, M.; Broto, J. M.; Rakoto, H.; Ousset, J. C.; Osuna, J.; Ould Ely, T.; Amiens, C.; Chaudret, B.; Askenazy, S.

    1998-05-01

    We measure the magnetization of fine cobalt particles by SQUID and pulsed magnetic fields up to 35 T. These measurements have been made on two samples (C1, C2) with nonagglomerated particles. The analysis of the magnetic meaurements evidences very narrow log-normal size distribution centered around 1.5 nm (≅150 atoms) and 1.9 nm (≅310 atoms) for C1 and C2, respectively. Magnetization at 4.2 K seems to saturate in fields up to 5 T leading to an enhanced mean magnetic moment per atom compared to bulk value (1.72 μB). However, magnetization measurements up to 35 T do not permit to reach saturation, and show a continuous increase of μCo reaching 2.1±0.1 μB (C1) and 1.9±0.1 μB (C2). The effective magnetic anisotropies are found to be larger than those of bulk materials and decrease with increasing particle size. These features are associated with the large influence of the surface atoms.

  3. Synthesis of Self-Assembled Multifunctional Nanocomposite Catalysts with Highly Stabilized Reactivity and Magnetic Recyclability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xu; Cheng, Gong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a multifunctional Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite catalyst with highly stabilized reactivity and magnetic recyclability was synthesized by a self-assembled method. The magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were coated with a thin layer of the SiO2 to obtain a negatively charged surface. Then positively charged poly(ethyleneimine) polymer (PEI) was self-assembled onto the Fe3O4@SiO2 by electrostatic interaction. Next, negatively charged glutathione capped gold nanoparticles (GSH-AuNPs) were electrostatically self-assembled onto the Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI. After that, silver was grown on the surface of the nanocomposite due to the reduction of the dopamine in the alkaline solution. An about 5 nm thick layer of polydopamine (PDA) was observed to form the Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite was carefully characterized by the SEM, TEM, FT-IR, XRD and so on. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite shows a high saturation magnetization (Ms) of 48.9 emu/g, which allows it to be attracted rapidly to a magnet. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite was used to catalyze the reduction of p-nitrophenol (4-NP) to p-aminophenol (4-AP) as a model system. The reaction kinetic constant k was measured to be about 0.56 min‑1 (R2 = 0.974). Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for 8 times, which didn’t show much decrease of the catalytic capability.

  4. Synthesis of Self-Assembled Multifunctional Nanocomposite Catalysts with Highly Stabilized Reactivity and Magnetic Recyclability

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xu; Cheng, Gong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a multifunctional Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite catalyst with highly stabilized reactivity and magnetic recyclability was synthesized by a self-assembled method. The magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were coated with a thin layer of the SiO2 to obtain a negatively charged surface. Then positively charged poly(ethyleneimine) polymer (PEI) was self-assembled onto the Fe3O4@SiO2 by electrostatic interaction. Next, negatively charged glutathione capped gold nanoparticles (GSH-AuNPs) were electrostatically self-assembled onto the Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI. After that, silver was grown on the surface of the nanocomposite due to the reduction of the dopamine in the alkaline solution. An about 5 nm thick layer of polydopamine (PDA) was observed to form the Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite was carefully characterized by the SEM, TEM, FT-IR, XRD and so on. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite shows a high saturation magnetization (Ms) of 48.9 emu/g, which allows it to be attracted rapidly to a magnet. The Fe3O4@SiO2@PEI-Au/Ag@PDA nanocomposite was used to catalyze the reduction of p-nitrophenol (4-NP) to p-aminophenol (4-AP) as a model system. The reaction kinetic constant k was measured to be about 0.56 min−1 (R2 = 0.974). Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for 8 times, which didn’t show much decrease of the catalytic capability. PMID:27147586

  5. Multifunctional layered gadolinium hydroxide nanoplates for ultrahigh field magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and fluorescence bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Li, Lei; Yu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Daquan; Sun, Tianying; Li, Xue; Sun, Ling; Lui, Su; Huang, Xiaoqi; Bi, Feng; Wang, Huaiyu; Zhu, Hongyan; Gong, Qiyong

    2014-12-01

    The commonly used clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents are generally suitable for MR systems with a magnetic field less than 3.0 T. However, these agents show low contrast efficacy for MR systems with ultrahigh fields ≥ 7.0 T, which is the direction that next-generation MRI scanners are heading. A new contrast agent consisting of layered gadolinium hydroxide nanoplates doped with Ce and Tb (LGdH:Ce,Tb NPs) is presented herein. This material exhibits excellent negative (T2) contrast agent efficacy for 7.0 T MRI with a high r2/r1 ratio of 48.80, whereas it exhibits a lower r2/r1 ratio of 30.60 for 3.0 T MRI. Its performance as a T2 contrast agent in ultrahigh field MRI of subcutaneous liver tumor-bearing nude mice is investigated, demonstrating its ability to be used as a negative target T2 contrast agent to distinguish hepatic carcinoma from healthy tissues. Furthermore, the multifunctionality of the LGdH:Ce,Tb NPs as a contrast agent in X-ray computed tomography (CT) and fluorescence bioimaging is also presented, suggesting the possibility of integrating these imaging technologies for in-depth exploration of bioimaging. PMID:26000375

  6. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Guiding Relativistic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, S.; Demoulin, P.; Dasso, S.; Klein, K. L.

    2011-01-01

    The origin and the propagation of relativistic solar particles (0.5 to few Ge V) in the interplanetary medium remains a debated topic. These relativistic particles, detected at the Earth by neutron monitors have been previously accelerated close to the Sun and are guided by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines, connecting the acceleration site and the Earth. Usually, the nominal Parker spiral is considered for ensuring the magnetic connection to the Earth. However, in most GLEs the IMF is highly disturbed, and the active regions associated to the GLEs are not always located close to the solar footprint of the nominal Parker spiral. A possible explanation is that relativistic particles are propagating in transient magnetic structures, such as Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). In order to check this interpretation, we studied in detail the interplanetary medium where the particles propagate for 10 GLEs of the last solar cycle. Using the magnetic field and the plasma parameter measurements (ACE/MAG and ACE/SWEPAM), we found widely different IMF configurations. In an independent approach we develop and apply an improved method of the velocity dispersion analysis to energetic protons measured by SoHO/ERNE. We determined the effective path length and the solar release time of protons from these data and also combined them with the neutron monitor data. We found that in most of the GLEs, protons propagate in transient magnetic structures. Moreover, the comparison between the interplanetary magnetic structure and the interplanetary length suggest that the timing of particle arrival at Earth is dominantly determined by the type of IMF in which high energetic particles are propagating. Finally we find that these energetic protons are not significantly scattered during their transport to Earth.

  7. Flow-controlled magnetic particle manipulation

    DOEpatents

    Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J [Richland, WA; Holman, David A [Las Vegas, NV

    2011-02-22

    Inventive methods and apparatus are useful for collecting magnetic materials in one or more magnetic fields and resuspending the particles into a dispersion medium, and optionally repeating collection/resuspension one or more times in the same or a different medium, by controlling the direction and rate of fluid flow through a fluid flow path. The methods provide for contacting derivatized particles with test samples and reagents, removal of excess reagent, washing of magnetic material, and resuspension for analysis, among other uses. The methods are applicable to a wide variety of chemical and biological materials that are susceptible to magnetic labeling, including, for example, cells, viruses, oligonucleotides, proteins, hormones, receptor-ligand complexes, environmental contaminants and the like.

  8. Dicopper(II) metallacyclophanes as multifunctional magnetic devices: a joint experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Castellano, María; Ruiz-García, Rafael; Cano, Joan; Ferrando-Soria, Jesús; Pardo, Emilio; Fortea-Pérez, Francisco R; Stiriba, Salah-Eddine; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc

    2015-03-17

    Metallosupramolecular complexes constitute an important advance in the emerging fields of molecular spintronics and quantum computation and a useful platform in the development of active components of spintronic circuits and quantum computers for applications in information processing and storage. The external control of chemical reactivity (electro- and photochemical) and physical properties (electronic and magnetic) in metallosupramolecular complexes is a current challenge in supramolecular coordination chemistry, which lies at the interface of several other supramolecular disciplines, including electro-, photo-, and magnetochemistry. The specific control of current flow or spin delocalization through a molecular assembly in response to one or many input signals leads to the concept of developing a molecule-based spintronics that can be viewed as a potential alternative to the classical molecule-based electronics. A great variety of factors can influence over these electronically or magnetically coupled, metallosupramolecular complexes in a reversible manner, electronic or photonic external stimuli being the most promising ones. The response ability of the metal centers and/or the organic bridging ligands to the application of an electric field or light irradiation, together with the geometrical features that allow the precise positioning in space of substituent groups, make these metal-organic systems particularly suitable to build highly integrated molecular spintronic circuits. In this Account, we describe the chemistry and physics of dinuclear copper(II) metallacyclophanes with oxamato-containing dinucleating ligands featuring redox- and photoactive aromatic spacers. Our recent works on dicopper(II) metallacyclophanes and earlier ones on related organic cyclophanes are now compared in a critical manner. Special focus is placed on the ligand design as well as in the combination of experimental and computational methods to demonstrate the multifunctionality

  9. Polydopamine-Coated Magnetic Composite Particles with an Enhanced Photothermal Effect.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Rui; Wang, Sheng; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Xinguo; Fu, Deliang; Shen, Shun; Yang, Wuli

    2015-07-29

    Recently, photothermal therapy (PTT) that utilizes photothermal conversion (PTC) agents to ablate cancer under near-infrared (NIR) irradiation has attracted a growing amount of attention because of its excellent therapeutic efficacy and improved target selectivity. Therefore, exploring novel PTC agents with an outstanding photothermal effect is a current research focus. Herein, we reported a polydopamine-coated magnetic composite particle with an enhanced PTC effect, which was synthesized simply through coating polydopamine (PDA) on the surface of magnetic Fe3O4 particles. Compared with magnetic Fe3O4 particles and PDA nanospheres, the core-shell nanomaterials exhibited an increased NIR absorption, and thus, an enhanced photothermal effect was obtained. We demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo effects of the photothermal therapy using our composite particles and their ability as a contrast agent in the T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. These results indicated that the multifunctional composite particles with enhanced photothermal effect are superior to magnetic Fe3O4 particles and PDA nanospheres alone. PMID:26151502

  10. Polydopamine-Coated Magnetic Composite Particles with an Enhanced Photothermal Effect.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Rui; Wang, Sheng; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Xinguo; Fu, Deliang; Shen, Shun; Yang, Wuli

    2015-07-29

    Recently, photothermal therapy (PTT) that utilizes photothermal conversion (PTC) agents to ablate cancer under near-infrared (NIR) irradiation has attracted a growing amount of attention because of its excellent therapeutic efficacy and improved target selectivity. Therefore, exploring novel PTC agents with an outstanding photothermal effect is a current research focus. Herein, we reported a polydopamine-coated magnetic composite particle with an enhanced PTC effect, which was synthesized simply through coating polydopamine (PDA) on the surface of magnetic Fe3O4 particles. Compared with magnetic Fe3O4 particles and PDA nanospheres, the core-shell nanomaterials exhibited an increased NIR absorption, and thus, an enhanced photothermal effect was obtained. We demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo effects of the photothermal therapy using our composite particles and their ability as a contrast agent in the T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. These results indicated that the multifunctional composite particles with enhanced photothermal effect are superior to magnetic Fe3O4 particles and PDA nanospheres alone.

  11. Highly selective isolation and purification of heme proteins in biological samples using multifunctional magnetic nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yating; Li, Yan; Wei, Yun

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic particles with suitable surface modification are capable of binding proteins selectively, and magnetic separations have advantages of rapidity, convenience, and high selectivity. In this paper, new magnetic nanoparticles modified with imidazolium ionic liquid (Fe3O4 @SiO2 @ILs) were successfully fabricated. N-Methylimidazolium was immobilized onto silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles via γ-chloropropyl modification as a magnetic nanoadsorbent for heme protein separation. The particle size was about 90 nm without significant aggregation during the preparation process. Hemoglobin as one of heme proteins used in this experiment was compared with other nonheme proteins. It has been found that the magnetic nanoparticles can be used for more rapid, efficient, and specific adsorption of hemoglobin with a binding capacity as high as 5.78 mg/mg. In comparison with other adsorption materials of proteins in the previous reports, Fe3 O4 @SiO2 @ILs magnetic nanoparticles exhibit the excellent performance in isolation of heme proteins with higher binding capacity and selectivity. In addition, a short separation time makes the functionalized nanoparticles suitable for purifying unstable proteins, as well as having other potential applications in a variety of biomedical fields.

  12. Particle Deconfinement in a Bent Magnetic Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Renaud Gueroult and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2012-09-06

    Coils misalignment in a magnetic mirror can produce additional particle transport. The magnetic field non axi-symmetry is responsible for radial and longitudinal drifts in a way much similar to the neo-classical transport in a tandem mirror cell distorted by end plugs. Accordingly, a regime exhibiting large radial displacements - similar to the resonant regime in tandem mirrors - can be obtained by confining ions azimuthally, for example by means of a properly tuned radial electric field. Because of the mass dependence of the magnetic field non-homogeneity drift velocities, the azimuthal trapping is mass specific, allowing in principle the filtering of a specific species based on its mass.

  13. Particle deconfinement in a bent magnetic mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Gueroult, Renaud; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2012-11-15

    Coils misalignment in a magnetic mirror can produce additional particle transport. The magnetic field non axi-symmetry is responsible for radial and longitudinal drifts in a way much similar to the neo-classical transport in a tandem mirror cell distorted by end plugs. Accordingly, a regime exhibiting large radial displacements--similar to the resonant regime in tandem mirrors--can be obtained by confining ions azimuthally, for example by means of a properly tuned radial electric field. Because of the mass dependence of the magnetic field non-homogeneity drift velocities, the azimuthal trapping is mass specific, allowing, in principle, the filtering of a specific species based on its mass.

  14. Mechanical and dynamic characteristics of encapsulated microbubbles coupled by magnetic nanoparticles as multifunctional imaging and drug delivery agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Yin, Leilei; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Wu, Junru; Xu, Di; Zhang, Dong

    2014-11-01

    Development of magnetic encapsulated microbubble agents that can integrate multiple diagnostic and therapeutic functions is a key focus in both biomedical engineering and nanotechnology and one which will have far-reaching impact on medical diagnosis and therapies. However, properly designing multifunctional agents that can satisfy particular diagnostic/therapeutic requirements has been recognized as rather challenging, because there is a lack of comprehensive understanding of how the integration of magnetic nanoparticles to microbubble encapsulating shells affects their mechanical properties and dynamic performance in ultrasound imaging and drug delivery. Here, a multifunctional imaging contrast and in-situ gene/drug delivery agent was synthesized by coupling super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) into albumin-shelled microbubbles. Systematical studies were performed to investigate the SPIO-concentration-dependence of microbubble mechanical properties, acoustic scattering response, inertial cavitation activity and ultrasound-facilitated gene transfection effect. These demonstrated that, with the increasing SPIO concentration, the microbubble mean diameter and shell stiffness increased and ultrasound scattering response and inertial cavitation activity could be significantly enhanced. However, an optimized ultrasound-facilitated vascular endothelial growth factor transfection outcome would be achieved by adopting magnetic albumin-shelled microbubbles with an appropriate SPIO concentration of 114.7 µg ml-1. The current results would provide helpful guidance for future development of multifunctional agents and further optimization of their diagnostic/therapeutic performance in clinic.

  15. Magnetic properties of nano-composite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xia

    Chemical synthesis routes for hollow spherical BaFe12O 19, hollow mesoporous spherical BaFe12O19, worm-shape BaFe12O19 and FeCo particles were developed. These structured particles have great potentials for the applications including magnetic recording medium, catalyst support, and energy storage. Magnetically exchange coupled hard/soft SrFe12O19/FeCo and MnBi/FeCo composites were synthesized through a newly proposed process of magnetic self-assembly. These exchange coupled composites can be potentially used as rare-earth free permanent magnets. Hollow spherical BaFe12O19 particles (shell thickness ˜5 nm) were synthesized from eth-ylene glycol assisted spray pyrolysis. Hollow mesoporous spherical BaFe12O19 particles (shell thickness ˜100 nm) were synthesized from ethanol assisted spray pyrolysis, followed by alkaline ethylene glycol etching at 185 °C. An alpha-Fe2O3 and BaCO3 nanoparticle mixture was synthesized with reverse microemulsion, followed by annealing at 900 °C for 2 hours to get worm-shape BaFe 12O19 particles, which consisted of 3-7 stacked hexagonal plates. FeCo nanoparticles were synthesized by reducing FeCl2 and CoCl2 in diphenyl ether with n-butyllithium at 200 °C in an inert gas environment. The surfactant of oleic acid was used in the synthesis to make particles well dispersed in nonpolar solvents (such as hexane). SrFe12O19/FeCo core/shell particles were prepared through a magnetic self-assembly process. The as-synthesized soft FeCo nanoparticles were magnetically attracted by hard SrFe12O19 parti-cles, forming a SrFe12O19/FeCo core/shell structure. The magnetic self-assembly mechanism was confirmed by applying alternating-current demagnetization to the core/shell particles, which re-sulted in a separation of SrFe 12O19 and FeCo particles. MnBi/FeCo composites were synthesized, and the exchange coupling between MnBi and FeCo phases was demonstrated by smooth magnetic hysteresis loop of MnBi/FeCo composites. The thermal stability of Mn

  16. Design of multifunctional magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/mitoxantrone-loaded liposomes for both magnetic resonance imaging and targeted cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Yingna; Zhang, Linhua; Zhu, Dunwan; Song, Cunxian

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-targeting multifunctional liposomes simultaneously loaded with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent and anticancer drug, mitoxantrone (Mit), were developed for targeted cancer therapy and ultrasensitive MRI. The gonadorelin-functionalized MION/Mit-loaded liposome (Mit-GML) showed significantly increased uptake in luteinizing hormone–releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor overexpressing MCF-7 (Michigan Cancer Foundation-7) breast cancer cells over a gonadorelin-free MION/Mit-loaded liposome (Mit-ML) control, as well as in an LHRH receptor low-expressing Sloan-Kettering HER2 3+ Ovarian Cancer (SK-OV-3) cell control, thereby leading to high cytotoxicity against the MCF-7 human breast tumor cell line. The Mit-GML formulation was more effective and less toxic than equimolar doses of free Mit or Mit-ML in the treatment of LHRH receptors overexpressing MCF-7 breast cancer xenografts in mice. Furthermore, the Mit-GML demonstrated much higher T2 enhancement than did Mit-ML controls in vivo. Collectively, the study indicates that the integrated diagnostic and therapeutic design of Mit-GML nanomedicine potentially allows for the image-guided, target-specific treatment of cancer. PMID:25187709

  17. Magnetic particle-mediated magnetoreception

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jeremy; Boyd, Alastair; House, Michael; Woodward, Robert; Mathes, Falko; Cowin, Gary; Saunders, Martin; Baer, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Behavioural studies underpin the weight of experimental evidence for the existence of a magnetic sense in animals. In contrast, studies aimed at understanding the mechanistic basis of magnetoreception by determining the anatomical location, structure and function of sensory cells have been inconclusive. In this review, studies attempting to demonstrate the existence of a magnetoreceptor based on the principles of the magnetite hypothesis are examined. Specific attention is given to the range of techniques, and main animal model systems that have been used in the search for magnetite particulates. Anatomical location/cell rarity and composition are identified as two key obstacles that must be addressed in order to make progress in locating and characterizing a magnetite-based magnetoreceptor cell. Avenues for further study are suggested, including the need for novel experimental, correlative, multimodal and multidisciplinary approaches. The aim of this review is to inspire new efforts towards understanding the cellular basis of magnetoreception in animals, which will in turn inform a new era of behavioural research based on first principles. PMID:26333810

  18. Two novel multi-functional magnetic adsorbents for effective removal of hydrophilic and hydrophobic nitroaromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ma, Yan; Li, Aimin; Zhou, Qing; Zhou, Weiwei; Jin, Jing

    2015-08-30

    Two novel multi-functional magnetic resins named GMA30-1 and GMA30-2 were fabricated and investigated for the removal of 4-nitrotoluene-2-sulfonic acid (NTS) and 2-nitrotoluene (o-MNT). Strong base resin (GMA30-1) and weak base resin (GMA30-2) possess large surface area of 718m(2)/g and 559m(2)/g, and anion exchange capacity of 1.49mmol/g and 1.81mmol/g, respectively. The adsorption isotherms of o-MNT onto two resins were both well described by Langmuir equation. While the adsorption isotherms of NTS could be separated into two segments at a certain initial concentration and each segment followed different trends. At lower concentrations, the adsorption of NTS was driven by Van der Waal's force, exhibiting an exothermic process. With the increase of concentrations, the electrostatic force dominated and the enthalpy change (ΔH) turned to positive, indicating an endothermic process. In binary systems, the decrease in the uptake of NTS was slighter than that of o-MNT because of the additional anion exchange interaction. The adsorption capacity of NTS decreased as pH increased while the adsorption of o-MNT was not significantly affected by pH. Chloride ions reduced the adsorption of NTS by competitive effect. The desorption efficiency of NTS and o-MNT was close to 100% for 10 cycles.

  19. Effect of humic acid on ciprofloxacin removal by magnetic multifunctional resins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Cheng, Jiade; Jin, Jing; Zhou, Qing; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Qingqing; Li, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Background organic matter significantly influences the removal of emerging contaminants in natural water. In this work, the adsorption of ciprofloxacin (CPX) onto a series of magnetic multifunctional resins (GMA10-GMA90) in the presence and absence of humic acid (HA) was conducted to demonstrate the effect of HA. Both hydrophobic and ion exchange interactions contributed to CPX adsorption. Negative charge-assisted hydrogen bonds also participated in the adsorption process, resulting in the high adsorption amount of anionic CPX onto the negatively charged GMA30 under basic solutions. HA could impact CPX adsorption not only as a competitive adsorbate but also as an additional adsorbent. At pH 5.6, the additional adsorption sites provided by adsorbed HA molecules on the resins dominated and thus facilitated the adsorption process. While at pH 10, HA inhibited the adsorption of CPX by directly competing for ion exchange sites and coexisting with CPX in the solution. The ratio of the amount of CPX adsorbed by dissolved HA to that by the resin reached as high as 1.61 for GMA90. The adsorbed HA molecules onto the resins could provide additional adsorption sites for CPX as proven by the enhanced CPX adsorption in HA-preloading systems at pH 5.6. PMID:27464502

  20. Biomolecular environment, quantification, and intracellular interaction of multifunctional magnetic SERS nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Büchner, Tina; Drescher, Daniela; Merk, Virginia; Traub, Heike; Guttmann, Peter; Werner, Stephan; Jakubowski, Norbert; Schneider, Gerd; Kneipp, Janina

    2016-08-15

    Multifunctional composite nanoprobes consisting of iron oxide nanoparticles linked to silver and gold nanoparticles, Ag-Magnetite and Au-Magnetite, respectively, were introduced by endocytic uptake into cultured fibroblast cells. The cells containing the non-toxic nanoprobes were shown to be displaceable in an external magnetic field and can be manipulated in microfluidic channels. The distribution of the composite nanostructures that are contained in the endosomal system is discussed on the basis of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) mapping, quantitative laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) micromapping, and cryo soft X-ray tomography (cryo soft-XRT). Cryo soft-XRT of intact, vitrified cells reveals that the composite nanoprobes form intra-endosomal aggregates. The nanoprobes provide SERS signals from the biomolecular composition of their surface in the endosomal environment. The SERS data indicate the high stability of the nanoprobes and of their plasmonic properties in the harsh environment of endosomes and lysosomes. The spectra point at the molecular composition at the surface of the Ag-Magnetite and Au-Magnetite nanostructures that is very similar to that of other composite structures, but different from the composition of pure silver and gold SERS nanoprobes used for intracellular investigations. As shown by the LA-ICP-MS data, the uptake efficiency of the magnetite composites is approximately two to three times higher than that of the pure gold and silver nanoparticles. PMID:27353290

  1. Effect of humic acid on ciprofloxacin removal by magnetic multifunctional resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Cheng, Jiade; Jin, Jing; Zhou, Qing; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Qingqing; Li, Aimin

    2016-07-01

    Background organic matter significantly influences the removal of emerging contaminants in natural water. In this work, the adsorption of ciprofloxacin (CPX) onto a series of magnetic multifunctional resins (GMA10-GMA90) in the presence and absence of humic acid (HA) was conducted to demonstrate the effect of HA. Both hydrophobic and ion exchange interactions contributed to CPX adsorption. Negative charge-assisted hydrogen bonds also participated in the adsorption process, resulting in the high adsorption amount of anionic CPX onto the negatively charged GMA30 under basic solutions. HA could impact CPX adsorption not only as a competitive adsorbate but also as an additional adsorbent. At pH 5.6, the additional adsorption sites provided by adsorbed HA molecules on the resins dominated and thus facilitated the adsorption process. While at pH 10, HA inhibited the adsorption of CPX by directly competing for ion exchange sites and coexisting with CPX in the solution. The ratio of the amount of CPX adsorbed by dissolved HA to that by the resin reached as high as 1.61 for GMA90. The adsorbed HA molecules onto the resins could provide additional adsorption sites for CPX as proven by the enhanced CPX adsorption in HA-preloading systems at pH 5.6.

  2. Synthesis of Multifunctional Magnetic NanoFlakes for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Hyperthermia, and Targeting.

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IOs) are intrinsically theranostic agents that could be used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and local hyperthermia or tissue thermal ablation. Yet, effective hyperthermia and high MR contrast have not been demonstrated within the same nanoparticle configuration. Here, magnetic nanoconstructs are obtained by confining multiple, ∼ 20 nm nanocubes (NCs) within a deoxy-chitosan core. The resulting nanoconstructs—magnetic nanoflakes (MNFs)—exhibit a hydrodynamic diameter of 156 ± 3.6 nm, with a polydispersity index of ∼0.2, and are stable in PBS up to 7 days. Upon exposure to an alternating magnetic field of 512 kHz and 10 kA m–1, MNFs provide a specific absorption rate (SAR) of ∼75 W gFe–1, which is 4–15 times larger than that measured for conventional IOs. Moreover, the same nanoconstructs provide a remarkably high transverse relaxivity of ∼500 (mM s)−1, at 1.41T. MNFs represent a first step toward the realization of nanoconstructs with superior relaxometric and ablation properties for more effective theranostics. PMID:25003520

  3. Biodegradable Magnetic Particles for Cellular MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkansah, Michael Kwasi

    Cell transplantation has the potential to treat numerous diseases and injuries. While magnetic particle-enabled, MRI-based cell tracking has proven useful for visualizing the location of cell transplants in vivo, current formulations of particles are either too weak to enable single cell detection or have non-degradable polymer matrices that preclude clinical translation. Furthermore, the off-label use of commercial agents like Feridex®, Bangs beads and ferumoxytol for cell tracking significantly stunts progress in the field, rendering it needlessly susceptible to market externalities. The recent phasing out of Feridex from the market, for example, heightens the need for a dedicated agent specifically designed for MRI-based cell tracking. To this end, we engineered clinically viable, biodegradable particles of iron oxide made using poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and demonstrated their utility in two MRI-based cell tracking paradigms in vivo. Both micro- and nanoparticles (2.1±1.1 μm and 105±37 nm in size) were highly magnetic (56.7-83.7 wt% magnetite), and possessed excellent relaxometry (r2* relaxivities as high as 614.1 s-1mM-1 and 659.1 s -1mM-1 at 4.7 T respectively). Magnetic PLGA micropartides enabled the in vivo monitoring of neural progenitor cell migration to the olfactory bulb in rat brains over 2 weeks at 11.7 T with ˜2-fold greater contrast-to-noise ratio and ˜4-fold better sensitivity at detecting migrated cells in the olfactory bulb than Bangs beads. Highly magnetic PLGA nanoparticles enabled MRI detection (at 11.7 T) of up to 10 rat mesenchymal cells transplanted into rat brain at 100-μm resolution. Highly magnetic PLGA particles were also shown to degrade by 80% in mice liver over 12 weeks in vivo. Moreover, no adverse effects were observed on cellular viability and function in vitro after labeling a wide range of cells. Magnetically labeled rat mesenchymal and neural stem cells retained their ability to differentiate into multiple

  4. Homogeneous Biosensing Based on Magnetic Particle Labels.

    PubMed

    Schrittwieser, Stefan; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang J; Lentijo-Mozo, Sergio; Soulantica, Katerina; Dieckhoff, Jan; Ludwig, Frank; Guenther, Annegret; Tschöpe, Andreas; Schotter, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    The growing availability of biomarker panels for molecular diagnostics is leading to an increasing need for fast and sensitive biosensing technologies that are applicable to point-of-care testing. In that regard, homogeneous measurement principles are especially relevant as they usually do not require extensive sample preparation procedures, thus reducing the total analysis time and maximizing ease-of-use. In this review, we focus on homogeneous biosensors for the in vitro detection of biomarkers. Within this broad range of biosensors, we concentrate on methods that apply magnetic particle labels. The advantage of such methods lies in the added possibility to manipulate the particle labels by applied magnetic fields, which can be exploited, for example, to decrease incubation times or to enhance the signal-to-noise-ratio of the measurement signal by applying frequency-selective detection. In our review, we discriminate the corresponding methods based on the nature of the acquired measurement signal, which can either be based on magnetic or optical detection. The underlying measurement principles of the different techniques are discussed, and biosensing examples for all techniques are reported, thereby demonstrating the broad applicability of homogeneous in vitro biosensing based on magnetic particle label actuation. PMID:27275824

  5. Homogeneous Biosensing Based on Magnetic Particle Labels

    PubMed Central

    Schrittwieser, Stefan; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Lentijo-Mozo, Sergio; Soulantica, Katerina; Dieckhoff, Jan; Ludwig, Frank; Guenther, Annegret; Tschöpe, Andreas; Schotter, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    The growing availability of biomarker panels for molecular diagnostics is leading to an increasing need for fast and sensitive biosensing technologies that are applicable to point-of-care testing. In that regard, homogeneous measurement principles are especially relevant as they usually do not require extensive sample preparation procedures, thus reducing the total analysis time and maximizing ease-of-use. In this review, we focus on homogeneous biosensors for the in vitro detection of biomarkers. Within this broad range of biosensors, we concentrate on methods that apply magnetic particle labels. The advantage of such methods lies in the added possibility to manipulate the particle labels by applied magnetic fields, which can be exploited, for example, to decrease incubation times or to enhance the signal-to-noise-ratio of the measurement signal by applying frequency-selective detection. In our review, we discriminate the corresponding methods based on the nature of the acquired measurement signal, which can either be based on magnetic or optical detection. The underlying measurement principles of the different techniques are discussed, and biosensing examples for all techniques are reported, thereby demonstrating the broad applicability of homogeneous in vitro biosensing based on magnetic particle label actuation. PMID:27275824

  6. Magnetic particle imaging of blood coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kenya; Song, Ruixiao; Hiratsuka, Samu

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the feasibility of visualizing blood coagulation using a system for magnetic particle imaging (MPI). A magnetic field-free line is generated using two opposing neodymium magnets and transverse images are reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals received by a gradiometer coil, using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization algorithm. Our MPI system was used to image the blood coagulation induced by adding CaCl2 to whole sheep blood mixed with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The "MPI value" was defined as the pixel value of the transverse image reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals. MPI values were significantly smaller for coagulated blood samples than those without coagulation. We confirmed the rationale of these results by calculating the third-harmonic signals for the measured viscosities of samples, with an assumption that the magnetization and particle size distribution of MNPs obey the Langevin equation and log-normal distribution, respectively. We concluded that MPI can be useful for visualizing blood coagulation.

  7. Magnetic particle imaging of blood coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kenya Song, Ruixiao; Hiratsuka, Samu

    2014-06-23

    We investigated the feasibility of visualizing blood coagulation using a system for magnetic particle imaging (MPI). A magnetic field-free line is generated using two opposing neodymium magnets and transverse images are reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals received by a gradiometer coil, using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization algorithm. Our MPI system was used to image the blood coagulation induced by adding CaCl{sub 2} to whole sheep blood mixed with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The “MPI value” was defined as the pixel value of the transverse image reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals. MPI values were significantly smaller for coagulated blood samples than those without coagulation. We confirmed the rationale of these results by calculating the third-harmonic signals for the measured viscosities of samples, with an assumption that the magnetization and particle size distribution of MNPs obey the Langevin equation and log-normal distribution, respectively. We concluded that MPI can be useful for visualizing blood coagulation.

  8. Multi-functional Magnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yallapu, Murali M.; Othman, Shadi F.; Curtis, Evan T.; Gupta, Brij K.; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a multi-layer approach for the synthesis of water-dispersible superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and drug delivery applications. In this approach, iron oxide core nanoparticles were obtained by precipitation of iron salts in the presence of ammonia and provided β-cyclodextrin and pluronic polymer (F127) coatings. This formulation (F127250) was highly water dispersible which allowed encapsulation of the anti-cancer drug(s) in β-cyclodextrin and pluronic polymer for sustained drug release. The F127250 formulation has exhibited superior hyperthermia effects over time under alternating magnetic field compared to pure magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) and β-cyclodextrin coated nanoparticles (CD200). Additionally, the improved MRI characteristics were also observed for the F127250 formulation in agar gel and in cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells (A12780CP) compared to MNP and CD200 formulations. Furthermore, the drug loaded formulation of F127250 exhibited many folds of imaging contrast properties. Due to the internalization capacity of the F127250 formulation, its curcumin loaded formulation (F127250-CUR) exhibited almost equivalent inhibition effects on A2780CP (ovarian), MDA-MB-231 (breast), and PC3 (prostate) cancer cells even though curcumin release was only 40%. The improved therapeutic effects were verified by examining molecular effects using Western blotting and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies. F127250-CUR also exhibited haemocompatibility, suggesting a nanochemo-therapuetic agent for cancer therapy. PMID:21167595

  9. Flocculation of paramagnetic particles in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Tsouris, C.; Scott, T.C.

    1995-05-01

    Flocculation of paramagnetic particles under the influence of a strong magnetic field is reported in this article. Experimental information is obtained from fluctuation and intensity measurements of light passing through a particle suspension introduced in a uniform magnetic field. The magnetic field of strengths up to 6 T is generated by a cryogenic magnet operating at liquid helium temperatures. The phenomenon is analyzed by a Brownian flocculation model in which hydrodynamic, van der Waals, double-layer, and magnetic forces are incorporated for the estimation of the particle-flocculation rate. A population balance is employed in conjunction with the flocculation model to predict the evolution of the particle state with time. The effects of such important parameters as strength of the magnetic field, magnetic susceptibility of the particles, particle size, and zeta potential are investigated. Results show that particle size and magnetic susceptibility each play an important role in the selective flocculation of particles of different properties.

  10. A multifunctional mesoporous Fe3O4/SiO2/CdTe magnetic-fluorescent composite nanoprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Naiqiang; Wu, Ping; Liang, Guo; Cheng, Wenjing

    2016-03-01

    A multifunctional mesoporous, magnetic and fluorescent Fe3O4/SiO2/CdTe nanoprobe with well-defined core-shell nanostructures was prepared. This multifunctional nanoprobe was synthesized through a novel method mainly including two steps. The first step involved the controlled growth of mesoporous silica layer onto the surface of Fe3O4 nanoparticle using tetraethyl orthosilicate as silica source, cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as template, and 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene as pore swelling agents. The second step involved the layer-by-layer assembly of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane and fluorescent CdTe quantum dots with the mesoporous Fe3O4/SiO2 nanoparticles. The well-designed nanoprobe exhibits strong excitonic photoluminescence and superparamagnetism at room temperature. In attention, the mesoporous silica layer of the nanoprobe with great loading capacity makes it a promising candidate as targeted drug delivery platform.

  11. Particle astronomy with a superconducting magnet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.

    1972-01-01

    The magnetic spectrometer measures deflections of charged particles moving in a magnetic field and provides a direct means of determining the rigidity of charged primary cosmic rays up to about 100 GV/c rigidity. The underlying concepts of the method are reviewed, and factors delineating the applicable momentum range and accuracy are described along with calibration techniques. Previous experiments employing this technique are summarized, and prospects for future applications are evaluated with emphasis on separate measurement of electron and positron spectra and on isotopic separation.

  12. CpG-loaded multifunctional cationic nanohydrogel particles as self-adjuvanting glycopeptide antitumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Sebastian; Nuhn, Lutz; Palitzsch, Björn; Glaffig, Markus; Stergiou, Natascha; Gerlitzki, Bastian; Schmitt, Edgar; Kunz, Horst; Zentel, Rudolf

    2015-03-11

    Self-adjuvanting antitumor vaccines by multifunctional cationic nanohydrogels loaded with CpG. A conjugate consisting of tumor-associated MUC1-glycopeptide B-cell epitope and tetanus toxin T-cell epitope P2 is linked to cationic nanogels. Oligonucleotide CpG complexation enhances toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulated T-cell proliferation and rapid immune activation. This co-delivery promotes induction of specific MUC1-antibodies binding to human breast tumor cells without external adjuvant.

  13. Batch extracting process using magnetic particle held solvents

    DOEpatents

    Nunez, L.; Vandergrift, G.F.

    1995-11-21

    A process is described for selectively removing metal values which may include catalytic values from a mixture containing same, wherein a magnetic particle is contacted with a liquid solvent which selectively dissolves the metal values to absorb the liquid solvent onto the magnetic particle. Thereafter the solvent-containing magnetic particles are contacted with a mixture containing the heavy metal values to transfer metal values into the solvent carried by the magnetic particles, and then magnetically separating the magnetic particles. Ion exchange resins may be used for selective solvents. 5 figs.

  14. Magnetic interaction of Janus magnetic particles suspended in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Yujin; Kang, Tae Gon; Hulsen, Martien A.; den Toonder, Jaap M. J.; Anderson, Patrick D.

    2016-02-01

    We studied the magnetic interaction between circular Janus magnetic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid under the influence of an externally applied uniform magnetic field. The particles are equally compartmentalized into paramagnetic and nonmagnetic sides. A direct numerical scheme is employed to solve the magnetic particulate flow in the Stokes flow regime. Upon applying the magnetic field, contrary to isotropic paramagnetic particles, a single Janus particle can rotate due to the magnetic torque created by the magnetic anisotropy of the particle. In a two-particle problem, the orientation of each particle is found to be an additional factor that affects the critical angle separating the nature of magnetic interaction. Using multiparticle problems, we show that the orientation of the particles has a significant influence on the dynamics of the particles, the fluid flow induced by the actuated particles, and the final conformation of the particles. Straight and staggered chain structures observed experimentally can be reproduced numerically in a multiple particle problem.

  15. Magnetic interaction of Janus magnetic particles suspended in a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Seong, Yujin; Kang, Tae Gon; Hulsen, Martien A; den Toonder, Jaap M J; Anderson, Patrick D

    2016-02-01

    We studied the magnetic interaction between circular Janus magnetic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid under the influence of an externally applied uniform magnetic field. The particles are equally compartmentalized into paramagnetic and nonmagnetic sides. A direct numerical scheme is employed to solve the magnetic particulate flow in the Stokes flow regime. Upon applying the magnetic field, contrary to isotropic paramagnetic particles, a single Janus particle can rotate due to the magnetic torque created by the magnetic anisotropy of the particle. In a two-particle problem, the orientation of each particle is found to be an additional factor that affects the critical angle separating the nature of magnetic interaction. Using multiparticle problems, we show that the orientation of the particles has a significant influence on the dynamics of the particles, the fluid flow induced by the actuated particles, and the final conformation of the particles. Straight and staggered chain structures observed experimentally can be reproduced numerically in a multiple particle problem.

  16. Morphology and magnetism of multifunctional nanostructured γ-Fe2O3 films: Simulation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, R. F.; Bahiana, M.; Paterno, L. G.; Soler, M. A. G.; Sinnecker, J. P.; Wen, J. G.; Morais, P. C.

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces a new approach for simulating magnetic properties of nanocomposites comprising magnetic particles embedded in a non-magnetic matrix, taking into account the 3D structure of the system in which particles’ positions correctly mimic real samples. The proposed approach develops a multistage simulation procedure in which the size and distribution of particles within the host matrix is firstly attained by means of the Cell Dynamic System (CDS) model. The 3D structure provided by the CDS step is further employed in a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of zero-field-cooled/field-cooled (ZFC/FC) and magnetic hysteresis loops (M×H curves) for the system. Simulations are aimed to draw a realistic picture of the as-produced ultra-thin films comprising maghemite nanoparticles dispersed in polyaniline. Comparison (ZFC/FC and M×H curves) between experiments and simulations regarding the maximum of the ZFC curve (TMAX), remanence (MR/Ms) and coercivity (HC) revealed the accuracy of the multistage approach proposed here while providing information about the system's morphology and magnetic properties. For a typical sample the value we found experimentally for TMAX (54 K) was very close to the value provided by the simulation (53 K). For the parameters depending on the nanoparticle clustering the experimental values were consistently lower (MR/Ms=0.32 and HC=210 Oe) than the values we found in the simulation (MR/Ms=0.53 and HC=274 Oe). Indeed, the approach introduced here is very promising for the design of real magnetic nanocomposite samples with optimized features.

  17. Magnetic Particle Testing, RQA/M1-5330.16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center.

    As one in the series of classroom training handbooks, prepared by the U.S. space program, instructional material is presented in this volume concerning familiarization and orientation on magnetic particle testing. The subject is divided under the following headings: Introduction, Principles of Magnetic Particle Testing, Magnetic Particle Test…

  18. Regenerable adsorbents for removal of arsenic from contaminated waters and synthesis and characterization of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles for environmental and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdugo Gonzalez, Brenda

    . Docetaxel was loaded on these multifunctional nanoparticles and released studies were performed at 37°C. The presence of magnetite, colloidal gold and gold nanoshells in the PLGA nanoparticles was revealed by the coloration acquired by the polymeric nanoparticles. The release of drug from the polymeric nanoparticles showed a biphasic behavior with an initial burst followed by a prolonged slow release. There was no effect of the presence of magnetic or metallic particles on docetaxel release.

  19. Microfluidic ultralow interfacial tensiometry with magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Scott S H; Wexler, Jason S; Wan, Jiandi; Stone, Howard A

    2013-01-01

    We describe a technique that measures ultralow interfacial tensions using paramagnetic spheres in a co-flow microfluidic device designed with a magnetic section. Our method involves tuning the distance between the co-flowing interface and the magnet's center, and observing the behavior of the spheres as they approach the liquid-liquid interface-the particles either pass through or are trapped by the interface. Using threshold values of the magnet-to-interface distance, we make estimates of the two-fluid interfacial tension. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique for measuring very low interfacial tensions, O(10(-6)-10(-5)) N m(-1), by testing solutions of different surfactant concentrations, and we show that our results are comparable with measurements made using a spinning drop tensiometer. PMID:23154819

  20. Particle deconfinement in a bent magnetic mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Gueroult, Renaud; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2012-11-06

    Here, coils misalignment in a magnetic mirror can produce additional particle transport. The magnetic field non axi-symmetry is responsible for radial and longitudinal drifts in a way much similar to the neo-classical transport in a tandem mirror cell distorted by end plugs. Accordingly, a regime exhibiting large radial displacements––similar to the resonant regime in tandem mirrors––can be obtained by confining ions azimuthally, for example by means of a properly tuned radial electric field. Because of the mass dependence of the magnetic field non-homogeneity drift velocities, the azimuthal trapping is mass specific, allowing, in principle, the filtering of a specific species based on its mass.

  1. Particle deconfinement in a bent magnetic mirror

    DOE PAGES

    Gueroult, Renaud; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2012-11-06

    Here, coils misalignment in a magnetic mirror can produce additional particle transport. The magnetic field non axi-symmetry is responsible for radial and longitudinal drifts in a way much similar to the neo-classical transport in a tandem mirror cell distorted by end plugs. Accordingly, a regime exhibiting large radial displacements––similar to the resonant regime in tandem mirrors––can be obtained by confining ions azimuthally, for example by means of a properly tuned radial electric field. Because of the mass dependence of the magnetic field non-homogeneity drift velocities, the azimuthal trapping is mass specific, allowing, in principle, the filtering of a specific speciesmore » based on its mass.« less

  2. Tracer design for magnetic particle imaging (invited)

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) uses safe iron oxide nanoparticle tracers to offer fundamentally new capabilities for medical imaging, in applications as vascular imaging and ultra-sensitive cancer therapeutics. MPI is perhaps the first medical imaging platform to intrinsically exploit nanoscale material properties. MPI tracers contain magnetic nanoparticles whose tunable, size-dependent magnetic properties can be optimized by selecting a particular particle size and narrow size-distribution. In this paper we present experimental MPI measurements acquired using a homemade MPI magnetometer: a zero-dimensional MPI imaging system designed to characterize tracer performance by measuring the derivative of the time-varying tracer magnetization, M’(H(t)), at a driving frequency of 25 kHz. We show that MPI performance is optimized by selecting phase-pure magnetite tracers of a particular size and narrow size distribution; in this work, tracers with 20 nm median diameter, log-normal distribution shape parameter, σv, equal to 0.26, and hydrodynamic diameter equal to 30 nm showed the best performance. Furthermore, these optimized MPI tracers show 4 × greater signal intensity (measured at the third harmonic) and 20% better spatial resolution compared with commercial nanoparticles developed for MRI. PMID:22434939

  3. Trajectory dependent particle response for anisotropic mono domain particles in magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeser, M.; Bente, K.; Neumann, A.; Buzug, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    In magnetic particle imaging, scanners use different spatial sampling techniques to cover the field of view (FOV). As spatial encoding is realized by a selective low field region (a field-free-point, or field-free-line), this region has to be moved through the FOV on specific sampling trajectories. To achieve these trajectories complex time dependent magnetic fields are necessary. Due to the superposition of the selection field and the homogeneous time dependent fields, particles at different spatial positions experience different field sequences. As a result, the dynamic behaviour of those particles can be strongly spatially dependent. So far, simulation studies that determined the trajectory quality have used the Langevin function to model the particle response. This however, neglects the dynamic relaxation of the particles, which is highly affected by magnetic anisotropy. More sophisticated models based on stochastic differential equations that include these effects were only used for one dimensional excitation. In this work, a model based on stochastic differential equations is applied to two-dimensional trajectory field sequences, and the effects of these field sequences on the particle response are investigated. The results show that the signal of anisotropic particles is not based on particle parameters such as size and shape alone, but is also determined by the field sequence that a particle ensemble experiences at its spatial position. It is concluded, that the particle parameters can be optimized in terms of the used trajectory.

  4. Electromagnetic scattering by optically anisotropic magnetic particle.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhifang; Chui, S T

    2004-05-01

    The Mie theory for electromagnetic scattering by spherical particle is extended to the case of magnetic particle with gyromagnetic type of permeability. Specifically, we first construct for the magnetic induction B(I) inside the particle a new set of vector basis functions, which are the solution of the wave equation for B(I) and expanded in terms of the usual vector spherical wave functions (VSWF's) with different values of wave vector k(l). The relationship between k(l) and the frequency is obtained as the eigenvalues of an eigensystem determined by the permeability tensor. The incident and scattered fields are expanded as usual in terms of the VSWF's. By matching the boundary conditions, a linear set of coupled equations for the expansion coefficients are obtained and then solved for the solution to the scattering problem. Preliminary numerical results are presented for the case in which the scattering is due solely to the optical anisotropy within the particle. The scattering efficiency is found to exhibit miscellaneous dependence on the incident angle, the polarization, the degree of anisotropy, as well as the size parameter. In addition, the possibility of the photonic Hall effect for one Mie scatterer is confirmed.

  5. A facile fabrication of spherical and beanpod-like magnetic-fluorescent particles with targeting functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan-Lin; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Cheng, Gong; Hong, Guang-Yan; Ni, Jia-Zuan

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic-fluorescent particles with targeting functionalities were fabricated by a modified Stöber method and two shapes (spherical and beanpod-like) were obtained by simply tuning the reaction temperature. The two multifunctional probes combined the useful functions of magnetism, fluorescence and FA (folic acid)-targeting recognition into one entity. The products were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, by a superconducting quantum interference device and by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The experimental results show that the products possessed rapid magnetic response, relatively strong fluorescent signal, higher photostability and FA-targeting recognition as well as good water-dispersibility, suggesting that they would have potential medical applications in biolabeling and bioimaging.

  6. Weighted iterative reconstruction for magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopp, T.; Rahmer, J.; Sattel, T. F.; Biederer, S.; Weizenecker, J.; Gleich, B.; Borgert, J.; Buzug, T. M.

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging technique capable of imaging the distribution of superparamagnetic particles at high spatial and temporal resolution. For the reconstruction of the particle distribution, a system of linear equations has to be solved. The mathematical solution to this linear system can be obtained using a least-squares approach. In this paper, it is shown that the quality of the least-squares solution can be improved by incorporating a weighting matrix using the reciprocal of the matrix-row energy as weights. A further benefit of this weighting is that iterative algorithms, such as the conjugate gradient method, converge rapidly yielding the same image quality as obtained by singular value decomposition in only a few iterations. Thus, the weighting strategy in combination with the conjugate gradient method improves the image quality and substantially shortens the reconstruction time. The performance of weighting strategy and reconstruction algorithms is assessed with experimental data of a 2D MPI scanner.

  7. EDITORIAL: Cluster issue on fine particle magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorani, D.

    2008-07-01

    This Cluster issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics arises from the 6th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism (ICFPM) held in Rome during 9-12 October 2007 at the headquarters of the National Research Council (NCR). It contains a collection of papers based on both invited and contributed presentations at the meeting. The ICFPM Conferences have previously been held in Rome, Italy (1991), Bangor, UK (1996), Barcelona, Spain (1999), Pittsburgh, USA (2002) and London, UK (2004). The aim of this series of Conferences is to bring together the experts in the field of nanoparticle magnetism at a single forum to discuss recent developments in both theoretical and experimental aspects, and technological applications. The Conference programme included sessions on: new materials, novel synthesis and processing techniques, with special emphasis on self-organized magnetic arrays; theory and modelling; surface and interface properties; transport properties; spin dynamics; magnetization reversal mechanisms; magnetic recording media and permanent magnets; biomedical applications and advanced investigation techniques. I would like to thank the European Physical Society and the Innovative Magnetic and Superconducting Materials and Devices Project of the Materials and Devices Department and the Institute of Structure of Matter (ISM) of CNR for their support. Thanks are also due to the members of the Programme Committee, to the local Organizing Committee, chaired by Elisabetta Agostinelli and to all the Conference participants. I am also indebted to the many scientists who contributed to assuring the high-quality of this Cluster by donating their time to reviewing the manuscripts contained herein. Finally, I'd like to dedicate this issue to the memories of Jean Louis Dormann, a great expert in nanoparticle magnetism, who was one of the promoters and first organizers of this series of Conferences, and of Grazia Ianni, the Conference secretary, who died before her

  8. Method of using triaxial magnetic fields for making particle structures

    DOEpatents

    Martin, James E.; Anderson, Robert A.; Williamson, Rodney L.

    2005-01-18

    A method of producing three-dimensional particle structures with enhanced magnetic susceptibility in three dimensions by applying a triaxial energetic field to a magnetic particle suspension and subsequently stabilizing said particle structure. Combinations of direct current and alternating current fields in three dimensions produce particle gel structures, honeycomb structures, and foam-like structures.

  9. Magnetic Particle Recovery of Serial Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    D. Utrata; M.J. Johnson

    2003-10-01

    One method used by crime labs to recover obliterated serial numbers in steel firearms (ferrous samples) is the magnetic particle technique. The use of this method is predicated on the detection of metal deformation present under stamped serial numbers after the visible stamp has been removed. Equipment specialized for this detection is not used in these attempts; a portable magnetic yoke used typically for flaw detection on large weldments or structures, along with dry visible magnetic powders, have been the tools of criminologists working in this area. Crime labs have reported low success rates using these tools [1, 2]. This is not surprising when one considers that little formal development has apparently evolved for use in such investigations since the publication of seminal work in this area some time ago [3]. The aim of this project is to investigate specific aspects of magnetic particle inspection for serial number recovery. This includes attempts to understand the magnetic characteristics of different steels that affect their performance in the test, such as varying results for carbon steels and alloy steels after different thermal and forming treatments. Also investigated are the effects of the nature of the sample magnetization (AC, rectified DC, and true DC) and the use of various detection media, such as visible powders and fluorescent sprays, on test outcome. Additionally, some aspects of surface preparation of firearm samples prior to number recovery were included in this work. The scope of this report includes a brief overview of the magnetic particle inspection method in general and its applications to forensic serial number recovery. This is followed by a description of how such investigations were simulated on lab samples, including a look at how the microstructure of a given steel will affect its performance in the test. Investigations into the serial number recovery in a series of ferromagnetic firearms (both steel and certain stainless steels

  10. A STUDY OF MULTISTAGE/MULTIFUNCTION COLUMN FOR FINE PARTICLE SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Shiao-Hung Chiang

    1999-10-01

    A non-agitated multi-stage column was constructed and applied to wastewater treatment. Preliminary oil/water separation tests were performed. Excellent separation results verifies the multi-function feature of the multi-stage column. Hydrodynamic behavior is considered as the underlying cause for the separation performance. Therefore, a series of experiments were carried out to investigate the hydrodynamic parameters, including gas holdups and liquid circulating velocities. The experimental data will be used to create a mathematical model to simulate the multi-stage column process. The model will further shed light on the future scale-up of the MSTLFLO process.

  11. A Study of Multistage/Multifunction Column for Fine Particle Separation.

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, S.

    1997-09-15

    A non-agitated multi-stage column was constructed and applied to wastewater treatment. Preliminary oil/water separation tests were performed. Excellent separation results verifies the multi-function feature of the multi-stage column. Hydrodynamic behavior is considered as the underlying cause for the separation performance. Therefore, a series of experiments were carried out to investigate the hydrodynamic parameters, including gas holdups and liquid circulating velocities. The experimental data will be used to create a mathematical model to simulate the multi-stage column process. The model will further shed light on the future scale-up of the MSTLFLO process.

  12. Effect of particle interactions on thermoremanent magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, A. J.; Niemerg, M.; Bates, D.

    2013-12-01

    Paleomagnetism has a dizzying array of protocols for determining the strength of the Earth's magnetic field in the past from measurements of the magnetic memory in rocks. Some, such as variants of the Thellier-Thellier method, try to isolate the signal from an "ideal" fraction of magnetic minerals, discarding the contribution of "non-ideal" minerals; others, like the multi-specimen method, try to glean useful information from all of the minerals. The "ideal" remanence carriers behave like single-domain (SD) magnets with uniaxial anisotropy, and their behavior is predicted by Louis Néel's theory of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM). Non-ideal carriers are not at all well understood, but every paleointensity method relies on assumptions about their nature to either remove their signal or make use of it. One way to explore the boundary between ideal and non-ideal is to look at the behavior of SD magnets as they are brought increasingly close together, thus increasing the strength of the magnetostatic coupling between them. Magnetostatic coupling greatly increases the complexity of such a system. Instead of just two stable states, many must be found. Instead of one energy barrier, there is a network of connections between stable states over energy barriers. Instead of one rate for the relaxation of a system towards equilibrium, there are several. It is particularly difficult to find the transition states at the top of the energy barriers. We have developed software that does all of the above. A method from algebraic geometry called homotopy continuation is used to find all stable states and transition states. The software can track changes in these states with magnetic field, temperature, or other external variables. We use it to model TRM acquisition in small systems of interacting particles, and examine its behavior under various paleointensity tests.

  13. Associated Particle Tagging (APT) in Magnetic Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; Stave, Sean C.; Chichester, David; Dale, Daniel; Kim, Yujong; Harmon, Frank

    2012-10-16

    Summary In Brief The Associated Particle Tagging (APT) project, a collaboration of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Idaho State University (ISU)/Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), has completed an exploratory study to assess the role of magnetic spectrometers as the linchpin technology in next-generation tagged-neutron and tagged-photon active interrogation (AI). The computational study considered two principle concepts: (1) the application of a solenoidal alpha-particle spectrometer to a next-generation, large-emittance neutron generator for use in the associated particle imaging technique, and (2) the application of tagged photon beams to the detection of fissile material via active interrogation. In both cases, a magnetic spectrometer momentum-analyzes charged particles (in the neutron case, alpha particles accompanying neutron generation in the D-T reaction; in the tagged photon case, post-bremsstrahlung electrons) to define kinematic properties of the relevant neutral interrogation probe particle (i.e. neutron or photon). The main conclusions of the study can be briefly summarized as follows: Neutron generator: • For the solenoidal spectrometer concept, magnetic field strengths of order 1 Tesla or greater are required to keep the transverse size of the spectrometer smaller than 1 meter. The notional magnetic spectrometer design evaluated in this feasibility study uses a 5-T magnetic field and a borehole radius of 18 cm. • The design shows a potential for 4.5 Sr tagged neutron solid angle, a factor of 4.5 larger than achievable with current API neutron-generator designs. • The potential angular resolution for such a tagged neutron beam can be less than 0.5o for modest Si-detector position resolution (3 mm). Further improvement in angular resolution can be made by using Si-detectors with better position resolution. • The report documents several features of a notional generator design incorporating the

  14. Particle flocculation and filtration by high-gradient magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tsouris, C.; Yiacoumi, S.

    1997-01-01

    Flocculation and filtration of micrometer-sized particles in a high-gradient magnetic field (HGMF) were investigated. Experiments were conducted using a cryogenic magnet of 6 Tesla maximum strength. Hematite particles were used for flocculation and filtration experiments. A new approach of using magnetic fields to enhance separation of weakly magnetic particles was also investigated. This approach is based on magnetic seeding which involves flocculation of existing non-magnetic particles with injected paramagnetic particles. A particle-flocculation model was developed based on trajectory analysis. External forces due to gravity and magnetism, and interparticle forces such as electrostatic, hydrodynamic, magnetic dipole, and van der Waals forces, were taken into consideration in these models.

  15. Test particles in a magnetized conformastatic spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Piñeres, Antonio C.; Capistrano, Abraão J. S.; Quevedo, Hernando

    2016-06-01

    A class of exact conformastatic solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell field equations is presented in which the gravitational and electromagnetic potentials are completely determined by a harmonic function. We derive the equations of motion for neutral and charged particles in a spacetime background characterized by this class of solutions. As an example, we focus on the analysis of a particular harmonic function, which generates a singularity-free and asymptotically flat spacetime that describes the gravitational field of a punctual mass endowed with a magnetic field. In this particular case, we investigate the main physical properties of equatorial circular orbits. We show that due to the electromagnetic interaction, it is possible to have charged test particles which stay at rest with respect to a static observer located at infinity. Additionally, we obtain an analytic expression for the perihelion advance of test particles and the corresponding explicit value in the case of a punctual magnetic mass. We show that the analytical expressions obtained from our analysis are sufficient for being confronted with observations in order to establish whether such objects can exist in nature.

  16. Multi-functional core-shell hybrid nanogels for pH-dependent magnetic manipulation, fluorescent pH-sensing, and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weitai; Shen, Jing; Gai, Zheng; Hong, Kunlun; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2011-12-01

    Remotely optical sensing and drug delivery using an environmentally-guided magnetically-driven hybrid nanogel particle could allow for medical diagnostics and treatment. Such multifunctional hybrid nanogels (<200 nm) were prepared through the first synthesis of magnetic Ni NPs, followed by a moderate growth of fluorescent metallic Ag on the surface of Ni NPs, and then a coverage of a pH-responsive copolymer gel shell of poly(ethylene glycol-co-methacrylic acid) [p(EG-MAA)] onto the Ni-Ag bimetallic NP cores (18 ± 5 nm). The introduction of the pH-responsive p(EG-MAA) gel shell onto the magnetic and fluorescent Ni-Ag NPs makes the polymer-bound Ni-Ag NPs responsive to pH over the physiologically important range 5.0-7.4. The hybrid nanogels can adapt to surrounding pH and regulate the sensitivity in response to external magnetic field (such as a small magnet of 0.1 T), resulting in the accumulation of the hybrid nanogels within the duration from hours to a few seconds as the pH value decreases from 7.4 to 5.0. The pH-dependent magnetic response characteristic of the hybrid nanogels were further integrated with the pH change to fluorescent signal transduction and pH-regulated anticancer drug (a model drug 5-fluorouracil) delivery functions. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. The multiple responsive hybrid nanogel that can be manipulated in tandem endogenous and exogenous activation should enhance our ability to address the complexity of biological systems. PMID:21944827

  17. Review of progress in magnetic particle inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenmann, David J.; Enyart, Darrel; Lo, Chester; Brasche, Lisa

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic particle inspection (MPI) has been widely utilized for decades, and sees considerable use in the aerospace industry with a majority of the steel parts being inspected with MPI at some point in the lifecycle. Typical aircraft locations inspected are landing gear, engine components, attachment hardware, and doors. In spite of its numerous applications the method remains poorly understood, and there are many aspects of that method which would benefit from in-depth study. This shortcoming is due to the fact that MPI combines the complicated nature of electromagnetics, metallurgical material effects, fluid-particle motion dynamics, and physiological human factors into a single inspection. To promote understanding of the intricate method issues that affect sensitivity, or to assist with the revision of industry specifications and standards, research studies will be prioritized through the guidance of a panel of industry experts, using an approach which has worked successfully in the past to guide fluorescent penetrant inspection (FPI) research efforts.

  18. HER2 Targeted Breast Cancer Therapy with Switchable "Off/On" Multifunctional "Smart" Magnetic Polymer Core-Shell Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Vivek, Raju; Thangam, Ramar; Kumar, Selvaraj Rajesh; Rejeeth, Chandrababu; Kumar, Gopal Senthil; Sivasubramanian, Srinivasan; Vincent, Savariar; Gopi, Dhanaraj; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2016-01-27

    Multifunctional magnetic polymer nanocombinations are gaining importance in cancer nanotheranostics due to their safety and their potential in delivering targeted functions. Herein, we report a novel multifunctional core-shell magnetic polymer therapeutic nanocomposites (NCs) exhibiting pH dependent "Off-On" release of drug against breast cancer cells. The NCs are intact in blood circulation ("Off" state), i.e., at physiological pH, whereas activated ("On" state) at intracellular acidic pH environment of the targeted breast cancer cells. The NCs are prepared by coating the cannonball (iron nanocore) with hydrophobic nanopockets of pH-responsive poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer nanoshell that allows efficient loading of therapeutics. Further, the nanocore-polymer shell is stabilized by poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and functionalized with a targeting HER2 ligand. The prepared Her-Fe3O4@PLGA-PVP nanocomposites facilitate packing of anticancer drug (Tamoxifen) without premature release in the bloodstream, recognizing the target cells through binding of Herceptin antibody to HER2, a cell surface receptor expressed by breast cancer cells to promote HER2 receptor mediated endocytosis and finally releasing the drug at the intracellular site of tumor cells ("On" state) to induce apoptosis. The therapeutic efficiency of hemo/cytocompatible NCs drug delivery system (DDS) in terms of targeted delivery and sustained release of therapeutic agent against breast cancer cells was substantiated by in vitro and in vivo studies. The multifunctional properties of Her-Tam-Fe3O4@PLGA-PVP NCs may open up new avenues in cancer therapy through overcoming the limitations of conventional cancer therapy. PMID:26771508

  19. Synthesis of multifunctional Ag@Au@phenol formaldehyde resin particles loaded with folic acids for photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Xu, Qi-Zhi; Jin, Sheng-Yu; Lu, Yang; Zhao, Yang; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2012-07-23

    Multifunctional Ag@Au@ phenol formaldehyde resin (PFR) particles loaded with folic acids (FA) have been designed for killing tumor cells through photothermy conversion under the irradiation of near-infrared (NIR) light. Possessing the virtue of good fluorescence, low toxicity, and good targeting, the nanocomposite consists of an Ag core, an Au layer, a PFR shell, and folic acids on the PFR shell. The Ag@PFR core-shell structure can be prepared with a simple hydrothermal method after preheating. We then filled the PFR shell with a layer of Au by heating and modified the shell with polyelectrolyte to change its surface charge state. To capture tumor cells actively, FA molecules were attached onto the surface of the Ag@Au@PFR particles in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethly aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). Owing to the excellent property of Au NPs and Ag NPs as photothermal conversion agents, the Ag@Au@ PFR@FA particles can be utilized to kill tumor cells when exposed to NIR light.

  20. Multifunctional Nanocarpets for Cancer Theranostics: Remotely Controlled Graphene Nanoheaters for Thermo-Chemosensitisation and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandra Kurup Sasikala, Arathyram; Thomas, Reju George; Unnithan, Afeesh Rajan; Saravanakumar, Balasubramaniam; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2016-02-01

    A new paradigm in cancer theranostics is enabled by safe multifunctional nanoplatform that can be applied for therapeutic functions together with imaging capabilities. Herein, we develop a multifunctional nanocomposite consisting of Graphene Oxide-Iron Oxide -Doxorubicin (GO-IO-DOX) as a theranostic cancer platform. The smart magnetic nanoplatform acts both as a hyperthermic agent that delivers heat when an alternating magnetic field is applied and a chemotherapeutic agent in a cancer environment by providing a pH-dependent drug release to administer a synergistic anticancer treatment with an enhanced T2 contrast for MRI. The novel GO-IO-DOX nanocomposites were tested in vitro and were observed to exhibit an enhanced tumoricidal effect through both hyperthermia and cancer cell-specific DOX release along with an excellent MRI performance, enabling a versatile theranostic platform for cancer. Moreover the localized antitumor effects of GO-IO-DOX increased substantially as a result of the drug sensitization through repeated application of hyperthermia.

  1. Multifunctional Nanocarpets for Cancer Theranostics: Remotely Controlled Graphene Nanoheaters for Thermo-Chemosensitisation and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra Kurup Sasikala, Arathyram; Thomas, Reju George; Unnithan, Afeesh Rajan; Saravanakumar, Balasubramaniam; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2016-01-01

    A new paradigm in cancer theranostics is enabled by safe multifunctional nanoplatform that can be applied for therapeutic functions together with imaging capabilities. Herein, we develop a multifunctional nanocomposite consisting of Graphene Oxide-Iron Oxide -Doxorubicin (GO-IO-DOX) as a theranostic cancer platform. The smart magnetic nanoplatform acts both as a hyperthermic agent that delivers heat when an alternating magnetic field is applied and a chemotherapeutic agent in a cancer environment by providing a pH-dependent drug release to administer a synergistic anticancer treatment with an enhanced T2 contrast for MRI. The novel GO-IO-DOX nanocomposites were tested in vitro and were observed to exhibit an enhanced tumoricidal effect through both hyperthermia and cancer cell-specific DOX release along with an excellent MRI performance, enabling a versatile theranostic platform for cancer. Moreover the localized antitumor effects of GO-IO-DOX increased substantially as a result of the drug sensitization through repeated application of hyperthermia. PMID:26841709

  2. Multifunctional Nanocarpets for Cancer Theranostics: Remotely Controlled Graphene Nanoheaters for Thermo-Chemosensitisation and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandra Kurup Sasikala, Arathyram; Thomas, Reju George; Unnithan, Afeesh Rajan; Saravanakumar, Balasubramaniam; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2016-01-01

    A new paradigm in cancer theranostics is enabled by safe multifunctional nanoplatform that can be applied for therapeutic functions together with imaging capabilities. Herein, we develop a multifunctional nanocomposite consisting of Graphene Oxide–Iron Oxide -Doxorubicin (GO-IO-DOX) as a theranostic cancer platform. The smart magnetic nanoplatform acts both as a hyperthermic agent that delivers heat when an alternating magnetic field is applied and a chemotherapeutic agent in a cancer environment by providing a pH-dependent drug release to administer a synergistic anticancer treatment with an enhanced T2 contrast for MRI. The novel GO-IO-DOX nanocomposites were tested in vitro and were observed to exhibit an enhanced tumoricidal effect through both hyperthermia and cancer cell-specific DOX release along with an excellent MRI performance, enabling a versatile theranostic platform for cancer. Moreover the localized antitumor effects of GO-IO-DOX increased substantially as a result of the drug sensitization through repeated application of hyperthermia. PMID:26841709

  3. Magnetic force microscopy investigation of the magnetization reversal of permalloy particles at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurgazizov, N. I.; Khanipov, T. F.; Bizyaev, D. A.; Bukharaev, A. A.; Chuklanov, A. P.

    2014-09-01

    The magnetization reversal of an array of permalloy particles formed by scanning probe lithography on the silicon dioxide surface has been investigated in the temperature range from room temperature to 800 K. Using scanning magnetic force microscopy and numerical calculations of the magnetic anisotropy field of a particle at different temperatures, it has been shown that an increase in the temperature leads to a decrease in the external magnetic field required to reverse the magnetization direction of the particle. From the obtained results, it has been concluded that the magnetization reversal of the studied particles is accompanied by the formation of an intermediate state with an inhomogeneous magnetization structure.

  4. Magnetic-Particle-Sensing Based Diagnostic Protocols and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Takamura, Tsukasa; Ko, Pil Ju; Sharma, Jaiyam; Yukino, Ryoji; Ishizawa, Shunji; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic particle-labeled biomaterial detection has attracted much attention in recent years for a number of reasons; easy manipulation by external magnetic fields, easy functionalization of the surface, and large surface-to-volume ratio, to name but a few. In this review, we report on our recent investigations into the detection of nano-sized magnetic particles. First, the detection by Hall magnetic sensor with lock-in amplifier and alternative magnetic field is summarized. Then, our approach to detect sub-200 nm diameter target magnetic particles via relatively large micoro-sized “columnar particles” by optical microscopy is described. Subsequently, we summarize magnetic particle detection based on optical techniques; one method is based on the scattering of the magnetically-assembled nano-sized magnetic bead chain in rotating magnetic fields and the other one is based on the reflection of magnetic target particles and porous silicon. Finally, we report recent works with reference to more familiar industrial products (such as smartphone-based medical diagnosis systems and magnetic removal of unspecific-binded nano-sized particles, or “magnetic washing”). PMID:26053747

  5. Microstripes for transport and separation of magnetic particles

    PubMed Central

    Donolato, Marco; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple technique for creating an on-chip magnetic particle conveyor based on exchange-biased permalloy microstripes. The particle transportation relies on an array of stripes with a spacing smaller than their width in conjunction with a periodic sequence of four different externally applied magnetic fields. We demonstrate the controlled transportation of a large population of particles over several millimeters of distance as well as the spatial separation of two populations of magnetic particles with different magnetophoretic mobilities. The technique can be used for the controlled selective manipulation and separation of magnetically labelled species. PMID:22655020

  6. Microstripes for transport and separation of magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Donolato, Marco; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2012-06-01

    We present a simple technique for creating an on-chip magnetic particle conveyor based on exchange-biased permalloy microstripes. The particle transportation relies on an array of stripes with a spacing smaller than their width in conjunction with a periodic sequence of four different externally applied magnetic fields. We demonstrate the controlled transportation of a large population of particles over several millimeters of distance as well as the spatial separation of two populations of magnetic particles with different magnetophoretic mobilities. The technique can be used for the controlled selective manipulation and separation of magnetically labelled species.

  7. Remote Control of T Cell Activation Using Magnetic Janus Particles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwahun; Yi, Yi; Yu, Yan

    2016-06-20

    We report a strategy for using magnetic Janus microparticles to control the stimulation of T cell signaling with single-cell precision. To achieve this, we designed Janus particles that are magnetically responsive on one hemisphere and stimulatory to T cells on the other side. By manipulating the rotation and locomotion of Janus particles under an external magnetic field, we could control the orientation of the particle-cell recognition and thereby the initiation of T cell activation. This study demonstrates a step towards employing anisotropic material properties of Janus particles to control single-cell activities without the need of complex magnetic manipulation devices.

  8. EDITORIAL: Energetic particles in magnetic confinement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toi, K.

    2006-10-01

    Energetic alpha particle physics plays an obviously crucial role in burning fusion plasmas. Good confinement of them is required to sustain fusion burn and to avoid damage of the first wall. Because of this importance for nuclear fusion research, Y. Kolesnichenko and the late D. Sigmar initiated a series of IAEA technical (committee) meetings (TCM, since the 8th meeting TM) in order to exchange information on the behaviour of energetic particles in magnetic confinement devices. The role of the TMs has become increasingly important since burning plasma projects such as ITER are in preparation. After every TM, invited speakers are encouraged to publish an adapted and extended version of their contributions to the meeting as an article in a special issue of Nuclear Fusion. An exception was the 8th TM the articles of which were published in a special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (2004 46 S1-118). These special issues attract much interest in the subject. The 9th IAEA TM of this series was held in Takayama, Japan, 9-11 November 2005, and 53 papers including 16 invited talks were presented. A total of 11 papers based on these invited talks are included in this special issue of Nuclear Fusion and are preceded by a conference summary. Experimental results of energetic ion driven global instabilities such as Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs), energetic particle modes (EPMs) and fishbone instabilities were presented from several tokamaks (JET, JT-60U, DIII-D and ASDEX Upgrade), helical/stellarator devices (LHD and CHS) and spherical tori (NSTX and MAST). Experimental studies from JET and T-10 tokamaks on the interaction of ion cyclotron waves with energetic ions and runaway electrons were also presented. Theoretical works on AEs, EPMs and nonlinear phenomena induced by energetic particles were presented and compared with experimental data. Extensive numerical codes have been developed and applied to obtain predictions of energetic particle behaviour in future ITER

  9. Multidimensional x-space magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Patrick W; Conolly, Steven M

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a promising new medical imaging tracer modality with potential applications in human angiography, cancer imaging, in vivo cell tracking, and inflammation imaging. Here we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that multidimensional MPI is a linear shift-invariant imaging system with an analytic point spread function. We also introduce a fast image reconstruction method that obtains the intrinsic MPI image with high signal-to-noise ratio via a simple gridding operation in x-space. We also demonstrate a method to reconstruct large field-of-view (FOV) images using partial FOV scanning, despite the loss of first harmonic image information due to direct feedthrough contamination. We conclude with the first experimental test of multidimensional x-space MPI.

  10. In situ assembly of monodisperse, multifunctional silica microspheres embedded with magnetic and fluorescent nanoparticles and their application in adsorption of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianhui; Ren, Xiaozhen; Tong, Lizhu; Chen, Xiaodong; Yang, Xuwei; Yang, Hua

    2013-11-14

    Many efforts have been devoted towards the fabrication of multifunctional (mesoporous, magnetic and fluorescent) nanocomposites due to their growing applications as adsorbents, catalysts, and biomedical application, etc. Novel, flower-structured multifunctional Fe3O4/YVO4:Eu(3+)@SiO2 microspheres were successfully synthesized through a simple self-assembled process. The as-obtained products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N2 adsorption-desorption, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The results reveal that the novel composites exhibit typical mesoporous structure, narrow size distribution, good monodispersity, excellent luminescent properties and superparamagnetic features. The effects of magnetic field on the luminescent intensity of multifunctional composites have been discussed in our manuscript. Furthermore, the adsorption experiments indicate that the resulting multifunctional composites are powerful adsorbents for the removal of methylene blue from water with a maximum adsorption efficiency of 98%. It is envisioned that multifunctional composites with high surface area are of particular interest for adsorption of pollutants, separation, and water purification.

  11. Fluorescent-magnetic Janus particles prepared via seed emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Kaewsaneha, Chariya; Bitar, Ahmad; Tangboriboonrat, Pramuan; Polpanich, Duangporn; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2014-06-15

    Anisotropic polymeric colloidal or Janus particles possessing simultaneous magnetic and fluorescent properties were successfully prepared via the swelling-diffusion or the in situ emulsion polymerization method. In the swelling-diffusion process, magnetic emulsions (an organic ferrofluid dispersed in aqueous medium) were synthesized and used for seeds of submicron magnetic Janus particles. After swelling the anisotropic particles obtained by 1-pyrene-carboxaldehyde fluorescent dye dissolved in tetrahydrofuran, well-defined fluorescent-magnetic Janus particles were produced. In the in situ emulsion polymerization, styrene monomer mixed with fluorescent dye monomers, i.e., 1-pyrenylmethyl methacrylate (PyMMA) or fluorescein dimethacrylate (FDMA), and an oil-soluble initiator (2,2'-azobis(2-isobutyronitrile)) were emulsified in the presence of magnetic seed emulsions. The confocal microscopic images showed the fluorescent-magnetic Janus particles with high fluorescent intensity when a fluorescent crosslinker monomer FDMA was employed. PMID:24767504

  12. Projection x-space magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Patrick W; Konkle, Justin J; Zheng, Bo; Saritas, Emine U; Conolly, Steven M

    2012-05-01

    Projection magnetic particle imaging (MPI) can improve imaging speed by over 100-fold over traditional 3-D MPI. In this work, we derive the 2-D x-space signal equation, 2-D image equation, and introduce the concept of signal fading and resolution loss for a projection MPI imager. We then describe the design and construction of an x-space projection MPI scanner with a field gradient of 2.35 T/m across a 10 cm magnet free bore. The system has an expected resolution of 3.5 × 8.0 mm using Resovist tracer, and an experimental resolution of 3.8 × 8.4 mm resolution. The system images 2.5 cm × 5.0 cm partial field-of views (FOVs) at 10 frames/s, and acquires a full field-of-view of 10 cm × 5.0 cm in 4 s. We conclude by imaging a resolution phantom, a complex "Cal" phantom, mice injected with Resovist tracer, and experimentally confirm the theoretically predicted x-space spatial resolution.

  13. Multifunctional Fe3O4-TiO2 nanocomposites for magnetic resonance imaging and potential photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Leyong; Ren, Wenzhi; Xiang, Lingchao; Zheng, Jianjun; Chen, Bin; Wu, Aiguo

    2013-02-01

    Multifunctional Fe3O4-TiO2 nanocomposites with Janus structure for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and potential photodynamic therapy (PDT) were synthesized, in which Fe3O4 was used as a MRI contrast agent and TiO2 as an inorganic photosensitizer for PDT. Their morphology, structure, and MRI and PDT performance were characterized, respectively. Moreover, the location of Fe3O4-TiO2 nanocomposites in MCF-7 cells was also investigated by the staining of Prussian blue and alizarin red, respectively. The results showed that the as-prepared Fe3O4-TiO2 nanocomposites had good T2-weighted MRI performance, and the MCF-7 cells incubated with nanocomposites could be killed under the irradiation of UV light. Compared with traditional organic photosensitizers, TiO2 inorganic photosensitizers could have more stable PDT performance due to their nanoscale size and anti-photodegradable stability. Therefore, the as-prepared Fe3O4-TiO2 nanocomposites could have potential applications as a new kind of multifunctional agent for both MRI and PDT.

  14. Size Effects on the Magnetic Properties of Nanoscale Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianping

    Finite size effects on the magnetic properties of nanoscale particles have been studied in this work. The first system studied was MnFe_2O _4 prepared by coprecipitation followed by digestion. The particles were single crystals with an average diameter controllable from 5 nm to 25 nm. These particles have a higher inversion degree of metal ion distribution between the tetrahedral sites and octahedral sites of the spinel structure than those synthesized with ceramic methods. This higher inversion leads to a higher Curie temperature. We found that the structure of the particles can be varied by heat treatment. The Curie temperature of the particles decreased after heat treatment in inert gas, however, it increased after heat treatment in air. The size effects show in two aspects on the MnFe_2O _4 particles. First, the Curie temperature decreased as particles size was reduced, which was explained by finite size scaling. Second, the saturation magnetization decreased as particle size decreased because of the existence of a nonmagnetic layer on the surface of MnFe_2 O_4 particles. The second system studied was Co particles synthesized with an inverse micelle technique. The particles were small (1-5 nm) and had a narrow size distribution. The Co particles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and showed a set of consistent magnetic data in magnetic moment per particle, coercivity, and blocking temperature. We found the anisotropy constant and saturation magnetization of Co particles had a strong size dependence. The anisotropy constant was above the bulk value of Co and increased as particle size decreased. The saturation magnetization increased as the particle became smaller. The magnetic properties of Co particles also strongly suggested a core/shell structure in each particle. But no physical inhomogeneity was observed. We have also studied ligand effects on the magnetic properties of Co particles. The magnetization of the Co particles was quenched by 36%, 27

  15. Magnetic particle motions within living cells. Physical theory and techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Valberg, P A; Butler, J P

    1987-01-01

    Body tissues are not ferromagnetic, but ferromagnetic particles can be present as contaminants or as probes in the lungs and in other organs. The magnetic domains of these particles can be aligned by momentary application of an external magnetic field; the magnitude and time course of the resultant remanent field depend on the quantity of magnetic material and the degree of particle motion. The interpretation of magnetometric data requires an understanding of particle magnetization, agglomeration, random motion, and both rotation and translation in response to magnetic fields. We present physical principles relevant to magnetometry and suggest models for intracellular particle motion driven by thermal, elastic, or cellular forces. The design principles of instrumentation for magnetizing intracellular particles and for detecting weak remanent magnetic fields are described. Such magnetic measurements can be used for noninvasive studies of particle clearance from the body or of particle motion within body tissues and cells. Assumptions inherent to this experimental approach and possible sources of artifact are considered and evaluated. PMID:3676435

  16. Multifunctional pH-sensitive magnetic nanoparticles for simultaneous imaging, sensing and targeted intracellular anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S.; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2008-12-01

    A novel multifunctional magnetic nanocarrier was fabricated for synchronous cancer therapy and sensing. The nanocarrier, programed to display a response to environmental stimuli (pH value), was synthesized by coupling doxorubicin (DOX) to adipic dihydrazide-grafted gum arabic modified magnetic nanoparticles (ADH-GAMNP) via the hydrolytically degradable pH-sensitive hydrazone bond. The resultant nanocarrier, DOX-ADH-GAMNP, had a mean diameter of 13.8 nm and the amount of DOX coupled was about 6.52 mg g-1. Also, it exhibited pH triggered release of DOX in an acidic environment (pH 5.0) but was relatively stable at physiological pH (pH 7.4). Furthermore, both GAMNP and DOX were found to possess fluorescence properties when excited in the near-infrared region due to the two-photon absorption mechanism. The coupling of DOX to GAMNP resulted in a reversible self-quenching of fluorescence through the fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) between the donor GAMNP and acceptor DOX. The release of DOX from DOX-ADH-GAMNP when exposed to acidic media indicated the recovery of fluorescence from both GAMNP and DOX. The change in the fluorescence intensity of DOX-ADH-GAMNP on the release of DOX can act as a potential sensor to sense the delivery of the drug. The analysis of zeta potential and plasmon absorbance in different pH conditions also confirmed the pH sensitivity of the product. This multifunctional nanocarrier is a significant breakthrough in developing a drug delivery vehicle that combines drug targeting as well as sensing and therapy at the same time.

  17. Magnetic particle-scanning for ultrasensitive immunodetection on-chip.

    PubMed

    Cornaglia, Matteo; Trouillon, Raphaël; Tekin, H Cumhur; Lehnert, Thomas; Gijs, Martin A M

    2014-08-19

    We describe the concept of magnetic particle-scanning for on-chip detection of biomolecules: a magnetic particle, carrying a low number of antigens (Ag's) (down to a single molecule), is transported by hydrodynamic forces and is subjected to successive stochastic reorientations in an engineered magnetic energy landscape. The latter consists of a pattern of substrate-bound small magnetic particles that are functionalized with antibodies (Ab's). Subsequationuent counting of the captured Ag-carrying particles provides the detection signal. The magnetic particle-scanning principle is investigated in a custom-built magneto-microfluidic chip and theoretically described by a random walk-based model, in which the trajectory of the contact point between an Ag-carrying particle and the small magnetic particle pattern is described by stochastic moves over the surface of the mobile particle, until this point coincides with the position of an Ag, resulting in the binding of the particle. This model explains the particular behavior of previously reported experimental dose-response curves obtained for two different ligand-receptor systems (biotin/streptavidin and TNF-α) over a wide range of concentrations. Our model shows that magnetic particle-scanning results in a very high probability of immunocomplex formation for very low Ag concentrations, leading to an extremely low limit of detection, down to the single molecule-per-particle level. When compared to other types of magnetic particle-based surface coverage assays, our strategy was found to offer a wider dynamic range (>8 orders of magnitude), as the system does not saturate for concentrations as high as 10(11) Ag molecules in a 5 μL drop. Furthermore, by emphasizing the importance of maximizing the encounter probability between the Ag and the Ab to improve sensitivity, our model also contributes to explaining the behavior of other particle-based heterogeneous immunoassays.

  18. Para- and dia-magnetic particle flocculation in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Tsouris, C.; Scott, T.C.; Harris, M.T.

    1995-04-01

    An experimental apparatus has been assembled for the study of high-gradient magnetic separations of para- and dia-magnetic particles suspended in a liquid. The components of this system include a cryogenic magnet, equipment for light-intensity measurements, and a dynamic light-scattering technique for transient particle-size measurements. The flocculation of paramagnetic hematite particles of approximately 200-nm diameter under the influence of a uniform magnetic field is experimentally investigated. The effect of solution pH on particle growth as a result of flocculation is examined with and without the presence of the magnetic field.

  19. Full particle orbit effects in regular and stochastic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shun; Cambon, Benjamin; Leoncini, Xavier; Vittot, Michel; del Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Garbet, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    We present a numerical study of charged particle motion in a time-independent magnetic field in cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field model consists of an unperturbed reversed-shear (non-monotonic q-profile) helical part and a perturbation consisting of a superposition of modes. Contrary to most of the previous studies, the particle trajectories are computed by directly solving the full Lorentz force equations of motion in a six-dimensional phase space using a sixth-order, implicit, symplectic Gauss-Legendre method. The level of stochasticity in the particle orbits is diagnosed using averaged, effective Poincare sections. It is shown that when only one mode is present, the particle orbits can be stochastic even though the magnetic field line orbits are not stochastic (i.e., fully integrable). The lack of integrability of the particle orbits in this case is related to separatrix crossing and the breakdown of the global conservation of the magnetic moment. Some perturbation consisting of two modes creates resonance overlapping, leading to Hamiltonian chaos in magnetic field lines. Then, the particle orbits exhibit a nontrivial dynamics depending on their energy and pitch angle. It is shown that the regions where the particle motion is stochastic decrease as the energy increases. The non-monotonicity of the q-profile implies the existence of magnetic ITBs (internal transport barriers) which correspond to shearless flux surfaces located in the vicinity of the q-profile minimum. It is shown that depending on the energy, these magnetic ITBs might or might not confine particles. That is, magnetic ITBs act as an energy-dependent particle confinement filter. Magnetic field lines in reversed-shear configurations exhibit topological bifurcations (from homoclinic to heteroclinic) due to separatrix reconnection. We show that a similar but more complex scenario appears in the case of particle orbits that depend in a non-trivial way on the energy and pitch angle of the

  20. Preparation and characterization of magnetic chitosan particles for hyperthermia application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Ho; Im, Ki-Hyeong; Lee, Se-Ho; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Doug-Youn; Lee, Yong-Keun; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2005-05-01

    The size and shape of magnetic chitosan particles were found to be dependent on both the barium ferrite/chitosan (BF/C) ratio and viscosity of a chitosan solution. The saturation magnetization of magnetic chitosan particles varied directly with the BF/C ratio, while coercivity remained almost constant. Notably, incorporated chitosan was shown to exert substantial activity with regard to low cytotoxicity and high heating rate.

  1. Prospective of ultradispersic magnetic particles in biological experiments in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechitailo, Galina S.; Kuznetsov, Anatoli; Malashin, S.

    All organisms on Earth use gravity for their lifecycles. Microgravity disturbs the lifecycles significantly: orientation ability is damaged, thermo and mass exchange processes are changed, adaptation mechanisms are destroyed. A recovering the normal life cycle of organism in future long-term mission requires an artificial gravity which is complicate and not realistic with present technologies. We propose to use a magnetic properties of the biological objects for recovering of the gravity-dependent biological processes in organism during space flight. Based on result of magnetic properties investigation in gravity-sensitive plant cells, we have prepared and carried out the experiments on space station MIR. For the experiments, Magnitogravistat device was designed and installed on the station. The aim of the experiment was to replace a gravity factor of plant with a magnetic factor. The magnetic effect is based on the fact, that a magnetic particle of V volume is under the force F=ΔæVHgradH in the magnetic gradient gradH, where Δæ is the difference between the magnetic susceptibility of particle and media. When the particles are placed into the cell, the cell can be managed by the magnetic field. In laboratory experiment the iron-carbon particles of 1-2 um with nanostructurised surface and high adsorption properties have been used. The particles can be suspended in water and adsorbed chemicals including cell metabolites. In strong magnetic field, the particles can be agglomerated and the liquid substrate can be replaced. The local magnetic field near the particles can influence on cell processes. The magnetic field causes a cell differentiation and can influence on cell proliferation. A new space experiment with magnetic particles is planned to get a knowledge on cell influence and to improve a cell metabolism.

  2. Configurations and control of magnetic fields for manipulating magnetic particles in microfluidic applications: magnet systems and manipulation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cao, Quanliang; Han, Xiaotao; Li, Liang

    2014-08-01

    The use of a magnetic field for manipulating the motion of magnetic particles in microchannels has attracted increasing attention in microfluidic applications. Generation of a flexible and controllable magnetic field plays a crucial role in making better use of the particle manipulation technology. Recent advances in the development of magnet systems and magnetic field control methods have shown that it has great potential for effective and accurate manipulation of particles in microfluidic systems. Starting with the analysis of magnetic forces acting on the particles, this review gives the configurations and evaluations of three main types of magnet system proposed in microfluidic applications. The interaction mechanisms of magnetic particles with magnetic fields are also discussed.

  3. Magnetic interaction of Janus magnetic particles suspended in a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Seong, Yujin; Kang, Tae Gon; Hulsen, Martien A; den Toonder, Jaap M J; Anderson, Patrick D

    2016-02-01

    We studied the magnetic interaction between circular Janus magnetic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid under the influence of an externally applied uniform magnetic field. The particles are equally compartmentalized into paramagnetic and nonmagnetic sides. A direct numerical scheme is employed to solve the magnetic particulate flow in the Stokes flow regime. Upon applying the magnetic field, contrary to isotropic paramagnetic particles, a single Janus particle can rotate due to the magnetic torque created by the magnetic anisotropy of the particle. In a two-particle problem, the orientation of each particle is found to be an additional factor that affects the critical angle separating the nature of magnetic interaction. Using multiparticle problems, we show that the orientation of the particles has a significant influence on the dynamics of the particles, the fluid flow induced by the actuated particles, and the final conformation of the particles. Straight and staggered chain structures observed experimentally can be reproduced numerically in a multiple particle problem. PMID:26986377

  4. Quantifying of magnetically separated particles using Hall-effect sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehasni, R.; Latreche, M. E.; Feliachi, M.

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, we present a modeling of a captured ferromagnetic particles quantifying method based on the detection and evaluation of the magnetic field variation caused by the particle static buildup. The detecting element is a Hall-effect sensor (probe) associated to the particle capture element which is an electromagnet with iron core. From a known value of the magnetic field measured at the particle static buildup locality, we predict the particle global concentration in the treated material sample (powder or liquid). This prediction is achieved by solving the inverse problem for the captured particles magnetic field variation. Such a resolution is based on an iterative resolution of the forward problem until obtaining the global particle concentration related to the measured value of the field variation. Because an exact value can not be obtained we retain the value that minimizes an error function. To minimize such a function we have used the Tabu searching method.

  5. Quantifying the motion of magnetic particles in excised tissue: Effect of particle properties and applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Sandip; Ramaswamy, Bharath; Horton, Emily; Gangapuram, Sruthi; Nacev, Alek; Depireux, Didier; Shimoji, Mika; Shapiro, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a method to investigate how magnetic particle characteristics affect their motion inside tissues under the influence of an applied magnetic field. Particles are placed on top of freshly excised tissue samples, a calibrated magnetic field is applied by a magnet underneath each tissue sample, and we image and quantify particle penetration depth by quantitative metrics to assess how particle sizes, their surface coatings, and tissue resistance affect particle motion. Using this method, we tested available fluorescent particles from Chemicell of four sizes (100 nm, 300 nm, 500 nm, and 1 μm diameter) with four different coatings (starch, chitosan, lipid, and PEG/P) and quantified their motion through freshly excised rat liver, kidney, and brain tissues. In broad terms, we found that the applied magnetic field moved chitosan particles most effectively through all three tissue types (as compared to starch, lipid, and PEG/P coated particles). However, the relationship between particle properties and their resulting motion was found to be complex. Hence, it will likely require substantial further study to elucidate the nuances of transport mechanisms and to select and engineer optimal particle properties to enable the most effective transport through various tissue types under applied magnetic fields.

  6. The H1 linker histones: multifunctional proteins beyond the nucleosomal core particle

    PubMed Central

    Hergeth, Sonja P; Schneider, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The linker histone H1 family members are a key component of chromatin and bind to the nucleosomal core particle around the DNA entry and exit sites. H1 can stabilize both nucleosome structure and higher-order chromatin architecture. In general, H1 molecules consist of a central globular domain with more flexible tail regions at both their N- and C-terminal ends. The existence of multiple H1 subtypes and a large variety of posttranslational modifications brings about a considerable degree of complexity and makes studying this protein family challenging. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the function of linker histones and their subtypes beyond their role as merely structural chromatin components. We summarize current findings on the role of H1 in heterochromatin formation, transcriptional regulation and embryogenesis with a focus on H1 subtypes and their specific modifications. PMID:26474902

  7. Uranus' magnetic field and particle drifts in its inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Ho, C. Wing; Huang, Tian-Sen; Alexander, Claudia J.

    1998-09-01

    Both the Q3 model (dipole and quadrupole) and OCT model (Q3 plus octupole) of Uranus' magnetic field within 5 RU are expressed in α and β (Euler potentials) coordinate systems. By using the α and β coordinates of magnetic fields, we calculate the drift paths and velocities for the zero second invariant (J=0) charged particles with different total energies. Many aspects of Uranus' magnetic field are similar to those of Neptune [Ho et al., 1997], such as a warped zero magnetic scalar potential surface and a region of local distorted magnetic field lines that gives rise to a large ``open'' area on the planetary surface when the field lines are mapped from this region. It is found that the OCT model gives a map of magnetic field coordinates on the planetary surface that better explains the Voyager 2 ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) data of Herbert and Sandel [1994] than the Q3 model. The grossly distorted α and β contours on the planetary surface may explain the incomplete aurora circles around both magnetic poles, and weak UV emissions are found lying along a belt that coincides remarkably well with the OCT magnetic equator. In addition, tracing of drift paths of J=0 charged particles shows that the weak emission along the magnetic equator is due to the precipitation of J=0 particles, or particles with a large equatorial pitch angle. In particular, the low-energy J=0 particles tend to drift toward a planet in three concentrated regions where UV emissions are observed.

  8. Nanostructured magnetic particles with polystyrene and their magnetorheological applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fei Fei; Choi, Hyoung Jin

    2011-03-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluids are known to be colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles in a non-magnetic fluid, and exposure to a magnetic field transforms the fluid into a plastic-like solid in milliseconds. To improve the stability against sedimentation and uniform dispersion, two different MR candidates, soft magnetic carbonyl iron (CI) microspheres and magnetite (Fe3O4) particles were modified with polystyrene to be applied for MR fluids in this study. After modification, their unique morphology, crystalline structure and magnetic properties were examined in addition to MR performance and sedimentation characteristics. It was found that this embedded morphology not only effectively prevents direct contact of the magnetic species thus improving particle dispersion but also leads to obvious change in their density, compared with the traditional polymer coating method with a core-shell structure. PMID:21449461

  9. Magnetofluidic concentration and separation of non-magnetic particles using two magnet arrays.

    PubMed

    Hejazian, Majid; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-07-01

    The present paper reports the use of diluted ferrofluid and two arrays of permanent magnets for the size-selective concentration of non-magnetic particles. The micro magnetofluidic device consists of a straight channels sandwiched between two arrays of permanent magnets. The permanent magnets create multiple capture zones with minimum magnetic field strength along the channel. The complex interaction between magnetic forces and hydrodynamic force allows the device to operate in different regimes suitable for concentration of non-magnetic particles with small difference in size. Our experimental results show that non-magnetic particles with diameters of 3.1 μm and 4.8 μm can be discriminated and separated with this method. The results from this study could be used as a guide for the design of size-sensitive separation devices for particle and cell based on negative magnetophoresis. PMID:27478527

  10. Magnetofluidic concentration and separation of non-magnetic particles using two magnet arrays.

    PubMed

    Hejazian, Majid; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-07-01

    The present paper reports the use of diluted ferrofluid and two arrays of permanent magnets for the size-selective concentration of non-magnetic particles. The micro magnetofluidic device consists of a straight channels sandwiched between two arrays of permanent magnets. The permanent magnets create multiple capture zones with minimum magnetic field strength along the channel. The complex interaction between magnetic forces and hydrodynamic force allows the device to operate in different regimes suitable for concentration of non-magnetic particles with small difference in size. Our experimental results show that non-magnetic particles with diameters of 3.1 μm and 4.8 μm can be discriminated and separated with this method. The results from this study could be used as a guide for the design of size-sensitive separation devices for particle and cell based on negative magnetophoresis.

  11. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Yates, T. Y.

    2008-10-15

    Magnetic field fluctuation-induced particle transport has been directly measured in the high-temperature core of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. Measurement of radial particle transport is achieved by combining various interferometry techniques, including Faraday rotation, conventional interferometry, and differential interferometry. It is observed that electron convective particle flux and its divergence exhibit a significant increase during a sawtooth crash. In this paper, we describe the basic techniques employed to determine the particle flux.

  12. Manipulation of Magnetic Particles for Use in Photonic Biosensor Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebe, Craig

    Trapping magnetic nanoparticles in wells in a photonic crystal biosensor array using magnetophoresis is desirable because it would allow for covalent bonding of antibodies onto the particles which would lead to an increase in sensitivity of the sensor. It was hypothesized that this could be achieved by engineering a magnetic field at each well by placing a, "magnetic tip," under each well and exposing the array to a uniform magnetic field which would create a magnetic gradient at each well in order to trap magnetic particles. A computational COMSOL model was created to determine the ideal shapes for the magnetic tips, but fabrication factors and the COMSOL model led to the tips being the same shape as the wells. Dip coating, centrifuging, and electrophoresis of iron oxide particles were tried as methods to fabricate magnetic tips. Electroplating the particles was determined to be the best method. Microscale arrays were fabricated and tested with micron scale beads in 3 different well sizes. Then smaller grooves were created by drop casting PMMA groves using PDMS imprints of CDs. Electron beam lithography and stamping into spin coated PMMA were also tried briefly. Trapping of 350 nm magnetic beads was attempted but was unsuccessful. Probably this occurred because the gradient produced by the magnetic tips was not strong enough to overcome the hydrodynamic forces of water that was swept over the array with Couette flows to clean the surface.

  13. Multifunctional reduction-responsive SPIO&DOX-loaded PEGylated polymeric lipid vesicles for magnetic resonance imaging-guided drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng; Yang, Weitao; Du, Hongli; Guo, Fangfang; Wang, Hanjie; Chang, Jin; Gong, Xiaoqun; Zhang, Bingbo

    2016-04-01

    Multifunctional superparamagnetic iron-oxide (SPIO)-based nanoparticles have been emerging as candidate nanosystems for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Here, we report the use of reduction- responsive SPIO/doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether (PEG)ylated polymeric lipid vesicles (SPIO&DOX-PPLVs) as a novel theranostic system for tumor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis and controlled drug delivery. These SPIO&DOX-PPLVs are composed of SPIOs that function as MR contrast agents for tumor enhancement and PPLVs as polymer matrices for encapsulating SPIO and antitumor drugs. The in vitro characterizations show that the SPIO&DOX-PPLVs have nanosized structures (˜80 nm), excellent colloidal stability, good biocompatibility, as well as T 2-weighted MRI capability with a relatively high T 2 relaxivity (r 2 = 213.82 mM-1 s-1). In vitro drug release studies reveal that the release rate of DOX from the SPIO&DOX-PPLVs is accelerated in the reduction environment. An in vitro cellular uptake study and an antitumor study show that the SPIO&DOX-PPLVs have magnetic targeting properties and effective antitumor activity. In vivo studies show the SPIO&DOX-PPLVs have excellent T 2-weighted tumor targeted MRI capability, image-guided drug delivery capability, and high antitumor effects. These results suggest that the SPIO&DOX-PPLVs are promising nanocarriers for MRI diagnosis and cancer therapy applications.

  14. Multifunctional reduction-responsive SPIO&DOX-loaded PEGylated polymeric lipid vesicles for magnetic resonance imaging-guided drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Yang, Weitao; Du, Hongli; Guo, Fangfang; Wang, Hanjie; Chang, Jin; Gong, Xiaoqun; Zhang, Bingbo

    2016-04-22

    Multifunctional superparamagnetic iron-oxide (SPIO)-based nanoparticles have been emerging as candidate nanosystems for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Here, we report the use of reduction- responsive SPIO/doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether (PEG)ylated polymeric lipid vesicles (SPIO&DOX-PPLVs) as a novel theranostic system for tumor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis and controlled drug delivery. These SPIO&DOX-PPLVs are composed of SPIOs that function as MR contrast agents for tumor enhancement and PPLVs as polymer matrices for encapsulating SPIO and antitumor drugs. The in vitro characterizations show that the SPIO&DOX-PPLVs have nanosized structures (∼80 nm), excellent colloidal stability, good biocompatibility, as well as T2-weighted MRI capability with a relatively high T2 relaxivity (r2 = 213.82 mM(-1) s(-1)). In vitro drug release studies reveal that the release rate of DOX from the SPIO&DOX-PPLVs is accelerated in the reduction environment. An in vitro cellular uptake study and an antitumor study show that the SPIO&DOX-PPLVs have magnetic targeting properties and effective antitumor activity. In vivo studies show the SPIO&DOX-PPLVs have excellent T2-weighted tumor targeted MRI capability, image-guided drug delivery capability, and high antitumor effects. These results suggest that the SPIO&DOX-PPLVs are promising nanocarriers for MRI diagnosis and cancer therapy applications. PMID:26941226

  15. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2015-09-25

    Hysteresis loops and Magnetic Barkhausen Noise in a single crystal α-iron containing a nonmagnetic particle were simulated based on the Laudau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The analyses of domain morphologies and hysteresis loops show that reversal magnetization process is control by nucleation of reversed domains at nonmagnetic particle when the particle size reaches a particle value. In such a situation, the value of nucleation field is determined by the size of nonmagnetic particles, and moreover, coercive field and Magnetic Barkhausen Noise signal are strongly affected by the nucleation field of reversed domains.

  16. Pump-free transport of magnetic particles in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danckwardt, Nils Z.; Franzreb, Matthias; Guber, Andreas E.; Saile, Volker

    2011-11-01

    The use of magnetic particles in microfluidic devices offers new possibilities and a new degree of freedom to sequential synthesis and preparative or analytical procedures in very small volumes. In contrast to most of the traditional approaches where the liquid phase is flushed or pumped along a solid phase, the transport of magnetic particles through a microfluidic channel has the advantage of reduced reagent consumption and simpler, smaller systems. By lining up different reservoirs along the transport direction, reactions with different agents can be accomplished. Here, we present a pump and valve-free microfluidic particle transport system. By creating a simple and very effective layout of soft magnetic structures, which concentrate an external homogeneous magnetic field, a passive, thus easy to operate structure was generated. Most importantly, this layout is based on a simple tube by which fluidic and magnetic parts are separated. The tube itself is disposable and can be replaced prior to vital reactions, thus helping reduce sample cross-contaminations without affecting the particle transport properties. The layout of the device was thoroughly examined by a computer simulation of the particle trajectories, and the results were confirmed by experiments on a micro-machined demonstrator, which revealed an effective transport speed of up to 5 mm/s in 30 mT magnetic fields. Thus, we present a microfluidic transport device that combines the advantages of magnetic particles in microfluidic systems with a simple single-use technology for, e.g., bioanalytical purposes.

  17. Particle acceleration near X-type magnetic neutral lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deeg, Hans-Jorg; Borovsky, Joseph E.; Duric, Nebojsa

    1991-01-01

    The behavior of charged particles near X-type magnetic neutral lines is investigated. The magnetic field is taken to be hyperbolic and time stationary, with a uniform electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field. The general properties of the orbits of noninteracting particles in that field geometry are examined. Approximate analytic solutions to the orbit equations are derived by considering a magnetic-insulation picture where there is a hole in the magnetic insulation around the neutral line. Scaling laws for the dependence of the energy gain on strengths of the magnetic and electric fields are derived. The kinetic-energy distribution function for accelerated particles is derived for particles flowing past the neutral line. These analytic derivations are supported by computer simulations, in which the relativistic equations of motion for single test particles are numerically solved and the orbits and kinetic-energy gains of the particles are obtained. A number of simulations were performed and one parameter at a time was varied. Applications of the results to magnetic-neutral-line regions in space physics and astrophysics are possible.

  18. Particle acceleration and transport in a chaotic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Li, G.; Dasgupta, B.

    2012-12-01

    Time-dependent chaotic magnetic field can arise from a simple asymmetric current wire-loop system (CWLS). Such simple CWLSs exist, for example, in solar flares. Indeed one can use an ensemble of such systems to model solar active region magnetic field [1,2]. Here we use test particle simulation to investigate particle transport and energization in such a time-dependent chaotic magnetic field, and through induction, a chaotic electric field. We first construct an ensemble of simple systems based on the estimated size and field strength of solar active region. By following the trajectories of single charged particles, we will examine how particle energy is changed. Diffusion coefficients in both real space and momentum space can be calculated as well as the average trapped time of the particles within chaotic field region. Particle energy spectrum as a function of time will be examined. [1] Dasgupta, B. and Abhay K. Ram, (2007) Chaotic magnetic fields due to asymmetric current configurations -application to cross field diffusion of particles in cosmic rays, (Presented at the 49th Annual Meeting of the DPP, APS, Abstract # BP8.00102) [2] G. Li, B. Dasgupta, G. Webb, and A. K. Ram, (2009) Particle Motion and Energization in a Chaotic Magnetic Field, AIP Conf. Proc. 1183, pp. 201-211; doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3266777

  19. Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry, magnetorelaxometry and magnetic particle spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Frank; Remmer, Hilke; Kuhlmann, Christian; Wawrzik, Thilo; Arami, Hamed; Ferguson, R. Mathew; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity and spatial resolution in Magnetic Particle Imaging are affected by magnetic properties of the nanoparticle tracers used during imaging. Here, we have carried out a comprehensive magnetic characterization of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles that were designed for MPI. We used ac susceptometry, fluxgate magnetorelaxometry, and magnetic particle spectroscopy to evaluate the tracer’s magnetic core size, hydrodynamic size, and magnetic anisotropy. Our results present a self-consistent set of magnetic and structural parameters for the tracers that is consistent with direct measurements of size using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering and that can be used to better understand their MPI performance. PMID:25729125

  20. Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry, magnetorelaxometry and magnetic particle spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Frank; Remmer, Hilke; Kuhlmann, Christian; Wawrzik, Thilo; Arami, Hamed; Ferguson, R. Mathew; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2014-06-01

    Sensitivity and spatial resolution in magnetic particle imaging are affected by magnetic properties of the nanoparticle tracers used during imaging. Here, we have carried out a comprehensive magnetic characterization of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles that were designed for MPI. We used ac susceptometry, fluxgate magnetorelaxometry, and magnetic particle spectroscopy to evaluate the tracer's magnetic core size, hydrodynamic size, and magnetic anisotropy. Our results present a self-consistent set of magnetic and structural parameters for the tracers that is consistent with direct measurements of size using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering and that can be used to better understand their MPI performance.

  1. Nonvolatile, reversible electric-field controlled switching of remanent magnetization in multifunctional ferromagnetic/ferroelectric hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandlmaier, A.; Geprägs, S.; Woltersdorf, G.; Gross, R.; Goennenwein, S. T. B.

    2011-08-01

    In spin-mechanics, the magnetoelastic coupling in ferromagnetic/ferroelectric hybrid devices is exploited in order to realize an electric-voltage control of magnetization orientation. To this end, different voltage-induced elastic strain states are used to generate different magnetization orientations. In our approach, we take advantage of the hysteretic expansion and contraction of a commercial piezoelectric actuator as a function of electrical voltage to deterministically select one of two electro-remanent elastic strain states. We investigate the resulting magnetic response in a nickel thin film/piezoelectric actuator hybrid device at room temperature, using simultaneous magneto-optical Kerr effect and magnetotransport measurements. The magnetic properties of the hybrid can be consistently described in a macrospin model, i.e., in terms of a single magnetic domain. At zero external magnetic field, the magnetization orientation in the two electro-remanent strain states differs by 15°, which corresponds to a magnetoresistance change of 0.5%. These results demonstrate that the spin-mechanics scheme indeed enables a nonvolatile electrically read- and writable memory bit where the information is encoded in a magnetic property.

  2. Magnetic particles in European eel ( Anguilla Anguilla) and carp ( Cyprinus Carpio). Magnetic susceptibility and remanence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, M.; Walker, M. M.

    1987-03-01

    We present an investigation of samples of the skull and backbone of eel and carp that was made in order to search for magnetic material with a possible connection to a magnetic sense organ. Room temperature measurements of magnetic susceptibility and remanence gave evidence of minute amounts of ferro- or ferrimagnetic precipitates in the fish tissues. The magnetic data implied that the magnetic material consisted of particles with a size distribution in the range between single domain and truly multidomain sizes. The results did not allow us to draw any conclusion about the physiological function of the magnetic particles.

  3. Optimization of magnetic switches for single particle and cell transport

    SciTech Connect

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Yellen, Benjamin B.; Murdoch, David M.; Kim, CheolGi

    2014-06-28

    The ability to manipulate an ensemble of single particles and cells is a key aim of lab-on-a-chip research; however, the control mechanisms must be optimized for minimal power consumption to enable future large-scale implementation. Recently, we demonstrated a matter transport platform, which uses overlaid patterns of magnetic films and metallic current lines to control magnetic particles and magnetic-nanoparticle-labeled cells; however, we have made no prior attempts to optimize the device geometry and power consumption. Here, we provide an optimization analysis of particle-switching devices based on stochastic variation in the particle's size and magnetic content. These results are immediately applicable to the design of robust, multiplexed platforms capable of transporting, sorting, and storing single cells in large arrays with low power and high efficiency.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokrollahi, H.; Khorramdin, A.; Isapour, Gh.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants.

  5. Particle acceleration in axisymmetric, magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1977-01-01

    The potential drop in the polar cap region of a rotating, magnetized neutron star is found assuming that the magnetic field is dipolar, with the field aligned (or anti-aligned) with the rotation axis. The curvature of the field lines is of critical importance. Charge flow is assumed to be along magnetic field lines. The electric field has a maximum at radius 1.5 R and the magnitude and functional form of the current is determined.

  6. Stochastic particle acceleration in multiple magnetic islands during reconnection.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Masahiro

    2012-03-30

    A nonthermal particle acceleration mechanism involving the interaction of a charged particle with multiple magnetic islands is proposed. The original Fermi acceleration model, which assumes randomly distributed magnetic clouds moving at random velocity V(c) in the interstellar medium, is known to be of second-order acceleration of O(V(c)/c)(2) owing to the combination of head-on and head-tail collisions. In this Letter, we reconsider the original Fermi model by introducing multiple magnetic islands during reconnection instead of magnetic clouds. We discuss that the energetic particles have a tendency to be distributed outside the magnetic islands, and they mainly interact with reconnection outflow jets. As a result, the acceleration efficiency becomes first order of O(V(A)/c), where V(A) and c are the Alfvén velocity and the speed of light, respectively.

  7. Brownian dynamics of charged particles in a constant magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, L. J.; Piel, A.; Miskovic, Z. L.; Shukla, P. K.

    2009-05-15

    Numerical algorithms are proposed for simulating the Brownian dynamics of charged particles in an external magnetic field, taking into account the Brownian motion of charged particles, damping effect, and the effect of magnetic field self-consistently. Performance of these algorithms is tested in terms of their accuracy and long-time stability by using a three-dimensional Brownian oscillator model with constant magnetic field. Step-by-step recipes for implementing these algorithms are given in detail. It is expected that these algorithms can be directly used to study particle dynamics in various dispersed systems in the presence of a magnetic field, including polymer solutions, colloidal suspensions, and, particularly, complex (dusty) plasmas. The proposed algorithms can also be used as thermostat in the usual molecular dynamics simulation in the presence of magnetic field.

  8. Magnetic and electrical properties of Martian particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olhoeft, G. R.

    1991-01-01

    The only determinations of the magnetic properties of Martian materials come from experiments on the two Viking Landers. The results suggest Martian soil containing 1 to 10 percent of a highly magnetic phase. Though the magnetic phase mineral was not conclusively identified, the predominate interpretation is that the magnetic phase is probably maghemite. The electrical properties of the surface of Mars were only measured remotely by observations with Earth based radar, microwave radiometry, and inference from radio-occultation of Mars orbiting spacecraft. No direct measurements of electrical properties on Martian materials have been performed.

  9. Optical, magnetic and electrical properties of multifunctional Cr3+: Polyethylene oxide (PEO) + polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveen Kumar, K.; Rao, J. L.; Ratnakaram, Y. C.

    2015-11-01

    Multifunctional polymer composite films of PEO + PVP and also doped with Cr3+ ions in different concentrations have been synthesized by a solution casting method. The semi-crystalline nature of the polymer films was confirmed by XRD studies. Raman spectral analysis confirms the complex formation of the polymer with dopant ions. The optical absorption spectrum of Cr3+ doped polymer exhibits three absorption bands pertaining to Cr3+ ions in octahedral symmetry. From the absorption spectrum, Racah parameters were evaluated. The red emission at 614 nm (4T2g→4A2g) has been observed for the Cr3+: PEO + PVP polymer under the UV excitation. EPR spectra of Cr3+ ions doped polymers at different concentrations of Cr3+ ions exhibit resonance signals which are characteristic of Cr3+ ions in the octahedral symmetry. Cr3+: PEO + PVP revealed the superparamagnetic nature based on the trends on Vibrational Sample Magnetometer profiles. Cr3+(0.1 wt%): PEO + PVP polymer reveals high ionic conductivity in the order of 1.14 × 10-5 S/cm at 373 K. Dielectric constant behaviour has also been analysed with respect to frequency.

  10. Composite of coated magnetic alloy particle

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2000-01-01

    A composite structure and method for manufacturing same, the composite structure being comprised of metal particles and an inorganic bonding media. The method comprises the steps of coating particles of a metal powder with a thin layer of an inorganic bonding media selected from the group of powders consisting of a ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic. The particles are assembled in a cavity and heat, with or without the addition of pressure, is thereafter applied to the particles until the layer of inorganic bonding media forms a strong bond with the particles and with the layer of inorganic bonding media on adjacent particles. The resulting composite structure is strong and remains cohesive at high temperatures.

  11. Conformal coating of non-spherical magnetic particles using microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Byeong-Ui; Hakimi, Navid; Hwang, Dae Kun; Tsai, Scott; Department of Mechanical; Industrial Engineering Team; Department of Chemical Engineering Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    We present the conformal coating of non-spherical magnetic particles in a microfluidic channel. We first prepare three-dimensional (3D) bullet-shaped magnetic microparticles using stop-flow lithography. We then suspend the bullet-shaped microparticles in an aqueous solution, and flow the particle suspension with a co-flow of a non-aqueous mixture. A magnetic field gradient from a permanent magnet pulls the microparticles in the transverse direction to the fluid flow, until the particles reach the interface between the immiscible fluids. In a physical domain characterized by a low particle Reynolds number and a high magnetic Bond number, we observe that the microparticles cross the oil-water interface, and then become coated by a thin film of the aqueous fluid. When we increase the two-fluid interfacial tension by reducing the surfactant concentration, we observe that the particles become trapped at the interface. We use this observation to approximate the magnetic susceptibility of the manufactured non-spherical microparticles, which are not known a priori. Using fluorescence imaging, we confirm the uniformity of the thin film coating along the surface of the bullet-shaped particles.

  12. Lens-free imaging of magnetic particles in DNA assays.

    PubMed

    Colle, Frederik; Vercruysse, Dries; Peeters, Sara; Liu, Chengxun; Stakenborg, Tim; Lagae, Liesbet; Del-Favero, Jurgen

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel opto-magnetic system for the fast and sensitive detection of nucleic acids. The system is based on a lens-free imaging approach resulting in a compact and cheap optical readout of surface hybridized DNA fragments. In our system magnetic particles are attracted towards the detection surface thereby completing the labeling step in less than 1 min. An optimized surface functionalization combined with magnetic manipulation was used to remove all nonspecifically bound magnetic particles from the detection surface. A lens-free image of the specifically bound magnetic particles on the detection surface was recorded by a CMOS imager. This recorded interference pattern was reconstructed in software, to represent the particle image at the focal distance, using little computational power. As a result we were able to detect DNA concentrations down to 10 pM with single particle sensitivity. The possibility of integrated sample preparation by manipulation of magnetic particles, combined with the cheap and highly compact lens-free detection makes our system an ideal candidate for point-of-care diagnostic applications.

  13. Magnetic hetero-flocculation of paramagnetic colloidal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ebner, A.D.; Ritter, J.A.; Ploehn, H.J.

    2000-05-01

    The feasibility of a high-gradient magnetic separation process, utilizing magnetite as the energizable element in lieu of stainless steel wool, is evaluated by means of an equilibrium, two-particle, magnetic hetero-flocculation model. The model calculates the net force, defined as the sum of the magnetic, electrostatic, and van der Waals forces, exerted on a paramagnetic nanoparticle that is in the proximity of a fixed magnetite particle. Since the nanoparticle-magnetite system is assumed to be in direct contact with the moving fluid, the influence of the hydrodynamic force on the magnetic attractive force between the two particles is also explored. This model clearly reveals the ranges and conditions over which each of these various forces contributes to the net force relative to Brownian (thermal) motion. The model also reveals the feasibility of using magnetite particles instead of stainless steel as the energizable element for high-gradient magnetic separation. Important variables investigated include the size and surface charge of the particles, the magnetic field, the flow velocity, the electrolyte concentration, and the magnetic susceptibility of the nanoparticle.

  14. General route to multifunctional uniform yolk/mesoporous silica shell nanocapsules: a platform for simultaneous cancer-targeted imaging and magnetically guided drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingyu; Wang, Tingting; Yang, Lei; Liu, Cong; Wang, Chungang; Liu, Haiyan; Wang, Y Andrew; Su, Zhongmin

    2012-09-24

    Hollow mesoporous SiO(2) (mSiO(2)) nanostructures with movable nanoparticles (NPs) as cores, so-called yolk-shell nanocapsules (NCs), have attracted great research interest. However, a highly efficient, simple and general way to produce yolk-mSiO(2) shell NCs with tunable functional cores and shell compositions is still a great challenge. A facile, general and reproducible strategy has been developed for fabricating discrete, monodisperse and highly uniform yolk-shell NCs under mild conditions, composed of mSiO(2) shells and diverse functional NP cores with different compositions and shapes. These NPs can be Fe(3)O(4) NPs, gold nanorods (GNRs), and rare-earth upconversion NRs, endowing the yolk-mSiO(2) shell NCs with magnetic, plasmonic, and upconversion fluorescent properties. In addition, multifunctional yolk-shell NCs with tunable interior hollow spaces and mSiO(2) shell thickness can be precisely controlled. More importantly, fluorescent-magnetic-biotargeting multifunctional polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified fluorescent Fe(3)O(4)@mSiO(2) yolk-shell nanobioprobes as an example for simultaneous targeted fluorescence imaging and magnetically guided drug delivery to liver cancer cells is also demonstrated. This synthetic approach can be easily extended to the fabrication of multifunctional yolk@mSiO(2) shell nanostructures that encapsulate various functional movable NP cores, which construct a potential platform for the simultaneous targeted delivery of drug/gene/DNA/siRNA and bio-imaging.

  15. The advantages and challenges of superconducting magnets in particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbershagen, Alexander; Calzolaio, Ciro; Meer, David; Sanfilippo, Stéphane; Schippers, Marco

    2016-08-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current developments in superconducting magnets for applications in proton and ion therapy. It summarizes the benefits and challenges regarding the utilization of these magnets in accelerating systems (e.g. superconducting cyclotrons) and gantries. The paper also provides examples of currently used superconducting particle therapy systems and proposed designs.

  16. Microfluidic conformal coating of non-spherical magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Moon, Byeong-Ui; Hakimi, Navid; Hwang, Dae Kun; Tsai, Scott S H

    2014-09-01

    We present the conformal coating of non-spherical magnetic particles in a co-laminar flow microfluidic system. Whereas in the previous reports spherical particles had been coated with thin films that formed spheres around the particles; in this article, we show the coating of non-spherical particles with coating layers that are approximately uniform in thickness. The novelty of our work is that while liquid-liquid interfacial tension tends to minimize the surface area of interfaces-for example, to form spherical droplets that encapsulate spherical particles-in our experiments, the thin film that coats non-spherical particles has a non-minimal interfacial area. We first make bullet-shaped magnetic microparticles using a stop-flow lithography method that was previously demonstrated. We then suspend the bullet-shaped microparticles in an aqueous solution and flow the particle suspension with a co-flow of a non-aqueous mixture. A magnetic field gradient from a permanent magnet pulls the microparticles in the transverse direction to the fluid flow, until the particles reach the interface between the immiscible fluids. We observe that upon crossing the oil-water interface, the microparticles become coated by a thin film of the aqueous fluid. When we increase the two-fluid interfacial tension by reducing surfactant concentration, we observe that the particles become trapped at the interface, and we use this observation to extract an approximate magnetic susceptibility of the manufactured non-spherical microparticles. Finally, using fluorescence imaging, we confirm the uniformity of the thin film coating along the entire curved surface of the bullet-shaped particles. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of conformal coating of non-spherical particles using microfluidics. PMID:25332731

  17. Remanent state studies of truncated conical magnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, M.; Redjdal, M.; Humphrey, F. B.; Ross, C. A.

    2001-06-01

    The remanent state of truncated conical particles is investigated as a function of their size, aspect ratio, and anisotropy, using a micromagnetic model based on the Landau{endash}Lifshitz{endash}Gilbert equation. Particles with a base diameter smaller than three times the exchange length show a {open_quotes}flower{close_quotes} state, while larger particles show a {open_quotes}vortex{close_quotes} magnetization state. The critical size for this transition increases with increasing anisotropy. Small flower-state particles show abrupt reorientation from out-of-plane to in-plane magnetization at a critical aspect ratio of 0.9. For vortex-state particles, the axial remanence gradually increases as the aspect ratio increases, and high aspect ratio particles have significant remanence even at larger diameters. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Colloidal self assembly of non-magnetic particles in magnetic nanofluid

    SciTech Connect

    Jadav, Mudra; Patel, Rajesh E-mail: rpat7@yahoo.co

    2015-06-24

    Here we present a technique using magnetic nanofluid to induce bidispersed suspension of nonmagnetic particles to assemble into colloidal chain, triangle, rectangle, ring-flower configurations. By changing the amplitude and direction of the magnetic field, we could tune the structure of nonmagnetic particles in magnetic nanofluid. The structures are assembled using magneto static interactions between effectively nonmagnetic particles dispersed in magnetizable magnetic nanofluid. The assembly of complex structures out of simple colloidal building blocks is of practical interest in photonic crystals and DNA biosensors.

  19. Proposal to Search for Magnetically Charged Particles with Magnetic Charge 1e

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Michael K.; Fryberger, David

    2015-11-02

    A model for composite elementary Standard Model (SM) particles based upon magnetically bound vorton pairs, we briefly introduce here, predicts the existence of a complete family of magnetically charged particles, as well as their neutral isotopic partners (all counterparts to the SM elementary particles), in which the lowest mass (charged) particle would be an electrically neutral stable lepton, but which carries a magnetic charge equivalent to 1e. This new particle, which we call a magneticon (a counterpart to the electron) would be pair produced at all e+e- colliders at an Ecm above twice its mass. In addition, PP and PPbar colliders should also be able to produce these new particles through the Drell-Yan process. To our knowledge, no monopole search experiment has been sensitive to such a low-charged magnetic monopole above a particle mass of about 5 GeV/c2. Hence, we propose that a search for such a stable particle of magnetic charge 1e should be undertaken. We have taken the ATLAS detector at the LHC as an example in which this search might be done. To this end, we modeled the magnetic fields and muon trigger chambers of this detector. We show results from a simple Monte Carlo simulation program to indicate how these particles might look in the detector and describe how one might search for these new particles in the ATLAS data stream.

  20. Conformational changes of a single magnetic particle string within gels.

    PubMed

    An, Hai-Ning; Groenewold, Jan; Picken, S J; Mendes, Eduardo

    2014-02-21

    Magnetorheological (MR) gels consist of micron sized magnetic particles inside a gel matrix. Before physical cross-linking, the suspension is subjected to a small magnetic field which creates a particle string structure. After cross-linking, the string is kept within the gel at room temperature. Under an external homogeneous magnetic field and mechanical deformation, the soft swollen gel matrix allows the string to largely rearrange at microscopic scales. With the help of two homemade magneto cells mounted on an optical microscope, we were able to follow the conformational change and instabilities of a single magnetic particle string under the combined influence of shear (or stretch) and the magnetic field. In the absence of mechanical deformation, an external magnetic field, applied in the perpendicular direction to the string, breaks it into small pieces generating periodic structures like sawteeth. When an external magnetic field is applied parallel to the pre-aligned string, it exhibits a length contraction. However, under shear strain perpendicular to the original pre-structured string (and magnetic field), the string breaks and short string segments tilt, making an angle with the original direction that is smaller than that of the applied shear (non-affine). The difference in tilt angle scales with the inverse length of the small segments L-1 and the magnetic flux density B, reflecting the ability of the gel matrix to expel solvents under local stress.

  1. Rotating magnetic field induced oscillation of magnetic particles for in vivo mechanical destruction of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Muroski, Megan E; Petit, Dorothée C M C; Mansell, Rhodri; Vemulkar, Tarun; Morshed, Ramin A; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Horbinski, Craig M; Huang, Xinlei; Zhang, Lingjiao; Cowburn, Russell P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-02-10

    Magnetic particles that can be precisely controlled under a magnetic field and transduce energy from the applied field open the way for innovative cancer treatment. Although these particles represent an area of active development for drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia, the in vivo anti-tumor effect under a low-frequency magnetic field using magnetic particles has not yet been demonstrated. To-date, induced cancer cell death via the oscillation of nanoparticles under a low-frequency magnetic field has only been observed in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate the successful use of spin-vortex, disk-shaped permalloy magnetic particles in a low-frequency, rotating magnetic field for the in vitro and in vivo destruction of glioma cells. The internalized nanomagnets align themselves to the plane of the rotating magnetic field, creating a strong mechanical force which damages the cancer cell structure inducing programmed cell death. In vivo, the magnetic field treatment successfully reduces brain tumor size and increases the survival rate of mice bearing intracranial glioma xenografts, without adverse side effects. This study demonstrates a novel approach of controlling magnetic particles for treating malignant glioma that should be applicable to treat a wide range of cancers. PMID:26708022

  2. Rotating magnetic field induced oscillation of magnetic particles for in vivo mechanical destruction of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Muroski, Megan E; Petit, Dorothée C M C; Mansell, Rhodri; Vemulkar, Tarun; Morshed, Ramin A; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Horbinski, Craig M; Huang, Xinlei; Zhang, Lingjiao; Cowburn, Russell P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-02-10

    Magnetic particles that can be precisely controlled under a magnetic field and transduce energy from the applied field open the way for innovative cancer treatment. Although these particles represent an area of active development for drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia, the in vivo anti-tumor effect under a low-frequency magnetic field using magnetic particles has not yet been demonstrated. To-date, induced cancer cell death via the oscillation of nanoparticles under a low-frequency magnetic field has only been observed in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate the successful use of spin-vortex, disk-shaped permalloy magnetic particles in a low-frequency, rotating magnetic field for the in vitro and in vivo destruction of glioma cells. The internalized nanomagnets align themselves to the plane of the rotating magnetic field, creating a strong mechanical force which damages the cancer cell structure inducing programmed cell death. In vivo, the magnetic field treatment successfully reduces brain tumor size and increases the survival rate of mice bearing intracranial glioma xenografts, without adverse side effects. This study demonstrates a novel approach of controlling magnetic particles for treating malignant glioma that should be applicable to treat a wide range of cancers.

  3. Noncommutative magnetic moment of charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Adorno, T. C.; Gitman, D. M.; Shabad, A. E.; Vassilevich, D. V.

    2011-10-15

    It has been argued that in noncommutative field theories, the sizes of physical objects cannot be taken smaller than an ''elementary length'' related to noncommutativity parameters. By gauge covariantly extending field equations of noncommutative U(1){sub *} theory to cover the presence of external sources, we find electric and magnetic fields produced by an extended static charge. We find that such a charge, apart from being an ordinary electric monopole, is also a magnetic dipole. By writing off the existing experimental clearance in the value of the lepton magnetic moments for the present effect, we get the bound on noncommutativity at the level of 10{sup 4} TeV.

  4. A particle astrophysics magnet spectrometer facility for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormes, J. F.; Israel, M. H.; Mewaldt, R.; Wiedenbeck, M.

    1987-01-01

    Planning for and design tradeoff studies related to the particle astrophysics magnet spectrometer known as Astromag are presented. This facility is being planned for the Space Station Freedom and address questions regarding the origin and acceleration of cosmic rays, explore the synthesis of elements by making detailed measurements of cosmic ray isotopic composition, and search for evidence of antimatter and other cosmologically significant particles. This work was supported by an international study team which includes particle physicists and cosmic ray physicists.

  5. Magnetic control of particle injection in plasma based accelerators.

    PubMed

    Vieira, J; Martins, S F; Pathak, V B; Fonseca, R A; Mori, W B; Silva, L O

    2011-06-01

    The use of an external transverse magnetic field to trigger and to control electron self-injection in laser- and particle-beam driven wakefield accelerators is examined analytically and through full-scale particle-in-cell simulations. A magnetic field can relax the injection threshold and can be used to control main output beam features such as charge, energy, and transverse dynamics in the ion channel associated with the plasma blowout. It is shown that this mechanism could be studied using state-of-the-art magnetic fields in next generation plasma accelerator experiments.

  6. Multifunctional envelope-type mesoporous silica nanoparticles for pH-responsive drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Ai, Kelong; Liu, Jianhua; Sun, Guoying; Yin, Qi; Lu, Lehui

    2015-08-01

    A novel multifunctional envelope-type mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MEMSN) system combining the merits of pH-responsiveness, non-toxicity and biological specificity, is demonstrated for drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This system is constructed by immobilizing acetals on the surface of mesoporous silica, and then coupling to ultra small lanthanide doped upconverting nanoparticle, which act as a gate keeper. The anticancer drug DOX is thus locked in the pores, and its burst release can be achieved under acidic environment on account of the hydrolyzation reactions of acetals. The nanogated drug release system is highly efficacious for cancer therapy both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, the nanocomposite could be harmlessly metabolized and degraded into apparently non-toxic products within a few days. The nanoscale effect of the system allows for passive tumor targeting and increased tumor accumulation of the probes via the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect, which is visualized by MRI in vivo. Therefore, such nanosystem should be of great significance in the future development of highly efficient and tumor targeted drug delivery vehicles for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25988726

  7. Multifunctional Setup for Studying Human Motor Control Using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, Electromyography, Motion Capture, and Virtual Reality.

    PubMed

    Talkington, William J; Pollard, Bradley S; Olesh, Erienne V; Gritsenko, Valeriya

    2015-09-03

    The study of neuromuscular control of movement in humans is accomplished with numerous technologies. Non-invasive methods for investigating neuromuscular function include transcranial magnetic stimulation, electromyography, and three-dimensional motion capture. The advent of readily available and cost-effective virtual reality solutions has expanded the capabilities of researchers in recreating "real-world" environments and movements in a laboratory setting. Naturalistic movement analysis will not only garner a greater understanding of motor control in healthy individuals, but also permit the design of experiments and rehabilitation strategies that target specific motor impairments (e.g. stroke). The combined use of these tools will lead to increasingly deeper understanding of neural mechanisms of motor control. A key requirement when combining these data acquisition systems is fine temporal correspondence between the various data streams. This protocol describes a multifunctional system's overall connectivity, intersystem signaling, and the temporal synchronization of recorded data. Synchronization of the component systems is primarily accomplished through the use of a customizable circuit, readily made with off the shelf components and minimal electronics assembly skills.

  8. On magnetic guidance of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backe, H.

    2016-04-01

    High precision beta decay experiments with polarized neutrons, employing magnetic guiding fields for the decay electrons in combination with energy dispersive detectors, initiated detailed studies of the point spread function (PSF) for homogeneous magnetic fields. A PSF describes the radial probability distribution of mono-energetic electrons at the detector plane which were emitted from a point-like source. With regard to accuracy considerations for high-precision experiments unwanted singularities occur as function of the radial detector coordinate which have recently been discussed in detail by Dubbers (2015) [3]. In the present article mathematical inconsistencies in the approximations to calculate PSFs have been corrected. In addition, numerical orbit calculations have been performed for inhomogeneous magnetic fields which show that, on the one hand, generalizations on the basis of adiabaticity considerations must be handled with care but indicate, on the other hand, that non-adiabaticity would not prevent a proposed check of magnetic field configurations.

  9. Microfluidic conformal coating of non-spherical magnetic particles

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Byeong-Ui; Hakimi, Navid; Hwang, Dae Kun; Tsai, Scott S. H.

    2014-01-01

    We present the conformal coating of non-spherical magnetic particles in a co-laminar flow microfluidic system. Whereas in the previous reports spherical particles had been coated with thin films that formed spheres around the particles; in this article, we show the coating of non-spherical particles with coating layers that are approximately uniform in thickness. The novelty of our work is that while liquid-liquid interfacial tension tends to minimize the surface area of interfaces—for example, to form spherical droplets that encapsulate spherical particles—in our experiments, the thin film that coats non-spherical particles has a non-minimal interfacial area. We first make bullet-shaped magnetic microparticles using a stop-flow lithography method that was previously demonstrated. We then suspend the bullet-shaped microparticles in an aqueous solution and flow the particle suspension with a co-flow of a non-aqueous mixture. A magnetic field gradient from a permanent magnet pulls the microparticles in the transverse direction to the fluid flow, until the particles reach the interface between the immiscible fluids. We observe that upon crossing the oil-water interface, the microparticles become coated by a thin film of the aqueous fluid. When we increase the two-fluid interfacial tension by reducing surfactant concentration, we observe that the particles become trapped at the interface, and we use this observation to extract an approximate magnetic susceptibility of the manufactured non-spherical microparticles. Finally, using fluorescence imaging, we confirm the uniformity of the thin film coating along the entire curved surface of the bullet-shaped particles. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of conformal coating of non-spherical particles using microfluidics. PMID:25332731

  10. Magnetic particle capture for biomagnetic fluid flow in stenosed aortic bifurcation considering particle-fluid coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Sayan; Banerjee, Moloy

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles drug carriers continue to attract considerable interest for drug targeting in the treatment of cancer and other pathological conditions. Guiding magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the help of an external magnetic field to its target is the basic principle behind the Magnetic Drug Targeting (MDT). It is essential to couple the ferrohydrodynamic (FHD) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles when magnetic fields are applied to blood as a biomagnetic fluid. The present study is devoted to study on MDT technique by particle tracking in the presence of a non uniform magnetic field in a stenosed aortic bifurcation. The present numerical model of biomagnetic fluid dynamics (BFD) takes into accounts both magnetization and electrical conductivity of blood. The blood flow in the bifurcation is considered to be incompressible and Newtonian. An Eulerian-Lagrangian technique is adopted to resolve the hemodynamic flow and the motion of the magnetic particles in the flow using ANSYS FLUENT two way particle-fluid coupling. An implantable infinitely long cylindrical current carrying conductor is used to create the requisite magnetic field. Targeted transport of the magnetic particles in a partly occluded vessel differs distinctly from the same in a regular unblocked vessel. Results concerning the velocity and temperature field indicate that the presence of the magnetic field influences the flow field considerably and the disturbances increase as the magnetic field strength increases. The insert position is also varied to observe the variation in flow as well as temperature field. Parametric investigation is conducted and the influence of the particle size (dp), flow Reynolds number (Re) and external magnetic field strength (B0) on the "capture efficiency" (CE) is reported. The difference in CE is also studied for different particle loading condition. According to the results, the magnetic field increased the particle concentration in the target region

  11. Multifunctional Sn- and Fe-Codoped In2O3 Colloidal Nanocrystals: Plasmonics and Magnetism.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Bharat; Shanker, G Shiva; Nag, Angshuman

    2014-07-01

    We prepared Fe- and Sn-codoped colloidal In2O3 nanocrystals (∼6 nm). Sn doping provides free electrons in the conduction band, originating localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and electrical conductivity. The LSPR band can be tuned between 2000 and >3000 nm, depending on the extent and kind of dopant ions. Fe doping, on the other hand, provides unpaired electrons, resulting in weak ferromagnetism at room temperature. Fe doping shifts the LSPR band of 10% Sn-doped In2O3 nanocrystals to a longer wavelength along with a reduction in intensity, suggesting trapping of charge carriers around the dopant centers, whereas Sn doping increases the magnetization of 10% Fe-doped In2O3 nanocrystals, probably because of the free electron mediated interactions between distant magnetic ions. The combination of plasmonics and magnetism, in addition to electronic conductivity and visible-light transparency, is a unique feature of our colloidal codoped nanocrystals.

  12. Charged-particle motion in multidimensional magnetic-field turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacalone, J.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    We present a new analysis of the fundamental physics of charged-particle motion in a turbulent magnetic field using a numerical simulation. The magnetic field fluctuations are taken to be static and to have a power spectrum which is Kolmogorov. The charged particles are treated as test particles. It is shown that when the field turbulence is independent of one coordinate (i.e., k lies in a plane), the motion of these particles across the magnetic field is essentially zero, as required by theory. Consequently, the only motion across the average magnetic field direction that is allowed is that due to field-line random walk. On the other hand, when a fully three-dimensional realization of the turbulence is considered, the particles readily cross the field. Transport coefficients both along and across the ambient magnetic field are computed. This scheme provides a direct computation of the Fokker-Planck coefficients based on the motions of individual particles, and allows for comparison with analytic theory.

  13. Magnetic pumping of particles in the outer Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism of magnetic pumping consists of two processes, the adiabatic motion of charged particles in a time varying magnetic field and their pitch-angle diffusion. The result is a systematic increase in the energy of charged particles trapped in mirror (and particularly, magnetospheric) magnetic fields. A numerical model of the mechanism is constructed, compared with analytic theory where possible, and, through elementary exercises, is used to predict the consequences of the process for cases that are not tractable by analytical means. For energy dependent pitch angle diffusion rates, characteristic 'two temperature' distributions are produced. Application of the model to the outer Jovian magnetosphere shows that beyond 20 Jupiter radii in the outer magnetosphere, particles may be magnetically pumped to energies of the order of 1 - 2 MeV. Two temperature distribution functions with "break points" at 1 - 4 KeV for electrons and 8 - 35 KeV for ions are predicted.

  14. 3D fibre deposition and stereolithography techniques for the design of multifunctional nanocomposite magnetic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Roberto; D'Amora, Ugo; Russo, Teresa; Ronca, Alfredo; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds based on poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) were fabricated by 3D fibre deposition modelling (FDM) and stereolithography techniques. In addition, hybrid coaxial and bilayer magnetic scaffolds were produced by combining such techniques. The aim of the current research was to analyse some structural and functional features of 3D magnetic scaffolds obtained by the 3D fibre deposition technique and by stereolithography as well as features of multimaterial scaffolds in the form of coaxial and bilayer structures obtained by the proper integration of such methods. The compressive mechanical behaviour of these scaffolds was investigated in a wet environment at 37 °C, and the morphological features were analysed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray micro-computed tomography. The capability of a magnetic scaffold to absorb magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in water solution was also assessed. confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to assess the in vitro biological behaviour of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on 3D structures. Results showed that a wide range of mechanical properties, covering those spanning hard and soft tissues, can be obtained by 3D FDM and stereolithography techniques. 3D virtual reconstruction and SEM showed the precision with which the scaffolds were fabricated, and a good-quality interface between poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) based scaffolds was observed for bilayer and coaxial scaffolds. Magnetised scaffolds are capable of absorbing water solution of MNPs, and a preliminary information on cell adhesion and spreading of hMSCs was obtained without the application of an external magnetic field.

  15. 3D fibre deposition and stereolithography techniques for the design of multifunctional nanocomposite magnetic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Roberto; D'Amora, Ugo; Russo, Teresa; Ronca, Alfredo; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds based on poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) were fabricated by 3D fibre deposition modelling (FDM) and stereolithography techniques. In addition, hybrid coaxial and bilayer magnetic scaffolds were produced by combining such techniques. The aim of the current research was to analyse some structural and functional features of 3D magnetic scaffolds obtained by the 3D fibre deposition technique and by stereolithography as well as features of multimaterial scaffolds in the form of coaxial and bilayer structures obtained by the proper integration of such methods. The compressive mechanical behaviour of these scaffolds was investigated in a wet environment at 37 °C, and the morphological features were analysed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray micro-computed tomography. The capability of a magnetic scaffold to absorb magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in water solution was also assessed. confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to assess the in vitro biological behaviour of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on 3D structures. Results showed that a wide range of mechanical properties, covering those spanning hard and soft tissues, can be obtained by 3D FDM and stereolithography techniques. 3D virtual reconstruction and SEM showed the precision with which the scaffolds were fabricated, and a good-quality interface between poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) based scaffolds was observed for bilayer and coaxial scaffolds. Magnetised scaffolds are capable of absorbing water solution of MNPs, and a preliminary information on cell adhesion and spreading of hMSCs was obtained without the application of an external magnetic field. PMID:26420041

  16. Magnetized particle motion around non-Schwarzschild black hole immersed in an external uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayimbaev, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    The motion of a magnetized particle orbiting around non-Schwarzschild black hole immersed in an external uniform magnetic field is considered. The influence of deformation parameter h to effective potential of the radial motion of the magnetized particle around non-Schwarzschild black hole using Hamilton-Jacobi formalism is studied. We have obtained numerical values of area Δ ρ where magnetized particles can move which is expanding (narrowing) due to the effect of the negative (positive) deformation. Finally, we have studied the collision of two particles (magnetized-neutral, magnetized-magnetized, magnetized-charged) in non-Schwarzschild spacetime and got the center-of-mass energy (E_{c.m}) for the particles. Moreover, we have found the capture radius (r_{cap}) - the distance from the central object to the point where particles collide and fall down to the central compact object. It is shown that non-Schwarzschild black holes could also act as particle accelerators with arbitrarily high center-of-mass energy.

  17. Very high coercivity magnetic stripes produced by particle rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, R.B.

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes a current research program at Sandia National Laboratories whereby magnetic stripes are produced through the use of a new particle rotation technology. This new process allows the stripes to be produced in bulk and then held in a latent state so that they may be encoded at a later date. Since particle rotation is less dependent on the type of magnetic particle used, very high coercivity particles could provide a way to increase both magnetic tamper-resistance and accidental erasure protection. This research was initially funded by the Department of Energy, Office of Safeguard and Security as a portion of their Science and Technology Base Development, Advanced Security Concepts program. Current program funding is being provided by Sandia National Laboratories as part of their Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

  18. Multifunctional iron platinum stealth immunomicelles: targeted detection of human prostate cancer cells using both fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Dale L.; Monson, Todd C.; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi S.; Bisoffi, Marco; Sillerud, Laurel O.

    2011-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are the most common type of contrast agents used in contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Still, there is a great deal of room for improvement, and nanoparticles with increased MRI relaxivities are needed to increase the contrast enhancement in MRI applied to various medical conditions including cancer. We report the synthesis of superparamagnetic iron platinum nanoparticles (SIPPs) and subsequent encapsulation using PEGylated phospholipids to create stealth immunomicelles (DSPE-SIPPs) that can be specifically targeted to human prostate cancer cell lines and detected using both MRI and fluorescence imaging. SIPP cores and DSPE-SIPPs were 8.5 ± 1.6 nm and 42.9 ± 8.2 nm in diameter, respectively, and the SIPPs had a magnetic moment of 120 A m2/kg iron. J591, a monoclonal antibody against prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was conjugated to the DSPE-SIPPs (J591-DSPE-SIPPs), and specific targeting of J591-DSPE-SIPPs to PSMA-expressing human prostate cancer cell lines was demonstrated using fluorescence confocal microscopy. The transverse relaxivity of the DSPE-SIPPs, measured at 4.7 Tesla, was 300.6 ± 8.5 s−1 mM−1, which is 13-fold better than commercially available SPIONs (23.8 ± 6.9 s−1 mM−1) and ~3-fold better than reported relaxivities for Feridex® and Resovist®. Our data suggest that J591-DSPE-SIPPs specifically target human prostate cancer cells in vitro, are superior contrast agents in T2-weighted MRI, and can be detected using fluorescence imaging. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the synthesis of multifunctional SIPP micelles and using SIPPs for the specific detection of prostate cancer. PMID:22121333

  19. MD Simulation of Particle Orientation in Magnetic Inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher; Günal

    1997-03-01

    We have done molecular-dynamics type simulations of particle re-orientation in a magnetic colloid, by a magnetic field during tape and disk manufacture. The model takes into account switching (in a Stoner- Wohlfarth model) as well as particle translation and rotation in response to magnetic, steric, Brownian, and hydrodynamic drag forces and torques. Magnetic interactions are fully included; hysteresis loops with and without magnetic interaction will be displayed, with corresponding Δ M curves. Images of the network structure at various points of the hysteresis loop will be shown. Further information is available at http:// www.mint.ua.edu/colloids/march.html.

  20. Magnetic field flow phenomena in a falling particle receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Kenneth M.; Ho, Clifford; Anderson, Ryan; Christian, Joshua; Babiniec, Sean; Ortega, Jesus

    2016-05-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) falling particle receivers are being pursued as a desired means for utilizing low-cost, high-absorptance particulate materials that can withstand high concentration ratios (˜1000 suns), operating temperatures above 700 °C, and inherent storage capabilities which can be used to reduce to levelized cost of electricity (LCOE)1. Although previous falling particle receiver designs have proven outlet temperatures above 800 °C, and thermal efficiencies between 80-90%, performance challenges still exist to operate at higher concentration ratios above 1000 suns and greater solar absorptance levels. To increase absorptance, these receivers will require enhanced particle residence time within a concentrated beam of sunlight. Direct absorption solid particle receivers that can enhance this residence time will have the potential to achieve heat-transfer media temperatures2 over 1000 °C. However, depending on particle size and external forces (e.g., external wind and flow due to convective heat losses), optimized particle flow can be severely affected, which can reduce receiver efficiency. To reduce particle flow destabilization and increase particle residence time on the receiver an imposed magnetic field is proposed based on a collimated design for two different methodologies. These include systems with ferromagnetic and charged particle materials. The approaches will be analytically evaluated based on magnetic field strength, geometry, and particle parameters, such as magnetic moment. A model is developed using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code ANSYS FLUENT to analyze these approaches for a ˜2 MWth falling particle receiver at Sandia National Laboratories5,6. Here, assessment will be made with respect to ferromagnetic particles such as iron-oxides, as well as charged particles. These materials will be parametrically assessed (e.g., type, size, dipole moment and geometry) over a range of magnetic permeability, μ values. Modeling

  1. Multifunctional Biocompatible Graphene Oxide Quantum Dots Decorated Magnetic Nanoplatform for Efficient Capture and Two-Photon Imaging of Rare Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are extremely rare cells in blood containing billions of other cells. The selective capture and identification of rare cells with sufficient sensitivity is a real challenge. Driven by this need, this manuscript reports the development of a multifunctional biocompatible graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) coated, high-luminescence magnetic nanoplatform for the selective separation and diagnosis of Glypican-3 (GPC3)-expressed Hep G2 liver cancer tumor CTCs from infected blood. Experimental data show that an anti-GPC3-antibody-attached multifunctional nanoplatform can be used for selective Hep G2 hepatocellular carcinoma tumor cell separation from infected blood containing 10 tumor cells/mL of blood in a 15 mL sample. Reported data indicate that, because of an extremely high two-photon absorption cross section (40530 GM), an anti-GPC3-antibody-attached GOQDs-coated magnetic nanoplatform can be used as a two-photon luminescence platform for selective and very bright imaging of a Hep G2 tumor cell in a biological transparency window using 960 nm light. Experimental results with nontargeted GPC3(−) and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells show that multifunctional-nanoplatform-based cell separation, followed by two-photon imaging, is highly selective for Hep G2 hepatocellular carcinoma tumor cells. PMID:25939643

  2. Multifunctional biocompatible graphene oxide quantum dots decorated magnetic nanoplatform for efficient capture and two-photon imaging of rare tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yongliang; Pramanik, Avijit; Tchounwou, Christine; Pedraza, Francisco; Crouch, Rebecca A; Chavva, Suhash Reddy; Vangara, Aruna; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Jones, Stacy; Sardar, Dhiraj; Hawker, Craig; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2015-05-27

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are extremely rare cells in blood containing billions of other cells. The selective capture and identification of rare cells with sufficient sensitivity is a real challenge. Driven by this need, this manuscript reports the development of a multifunctional biocompatible graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) coated, high-luminescence magnetic nanoplatform for the selective separation and diagnosis of Glypican-3 (GPC3)-expressed Hep G2 liver cancer tumor CTCs from infected blood. Experimental data show that an anti-GPC3-antibody-attached multifunctional nanoplatform can be used for selective Hep G2 hepatocellular carcinoma tumor cell separation from infected blood containing 10 tumor cells/mL of blood in a 15 mL sample. Reported data indicate that, because of an extremely high two-photon absorption cross section (40530 GM), an anti-GPC3-antibody-attached GOQDs-coated magnetic nanoplatform can be used as a two-photon luminescence platform for selective and very bright imaging of a Hep G2 tumor cell in a biological transparency window using 960 nm light. Experimental results with nontargeted GPC3(-) and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells show that multifunctional-nanoplatform-based cell separation, followed by two-photon imaging, is highly selective for Hep G2 hepatocellular carcinoma tumor cells.

  3. Particle size dependent rheological property in magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie; Pei, Lei; Xuan, Shouhu; Yan, Qifan; Gong, Xinglong

    2016-06-01

    The influence of the particle size on the rheological property of magnetic fluid was studied both by the experimental and computer simulation methods. Firstly, the magnetic fluids were prepared by dispersing Fe3O4 nanospheres with size varied from 40 nm to 100 nm and 200 nm in the solution. Then, the rheological properties were investigated and it was found that the relative magnetorheological effects increased with increasing the particle size. Finally, the molecular dynamic simulation was used to analyze the mechanical characteristics of the magnetic fluid and the chain-like model agreed well with the experimental result. The authentic chain-like structure observed by a microscope agreed with the simulation results. The three particles composed of the similar cluster nanostructure, thus they exhibited similar magnetic property. To this end, the unique assembling microstructures was the origination of the mechanical difference. And it was found that the higher MR (magnetorheological) effects of the large particle based magnetic fluid was originated from the stronger assembling microstructure under the applying magnetic field.

  4. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation in Relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Richardson, G.; Sol, H.; Preece, R.; Fishman, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient parallel magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. New simulations with an ambient perpendicular magnetic field show the strong interaction between the relativistic jet and the magnetic fields. The magnetic fields are piled up by the jet and the jet electrons are bent, which creates currents and displacement currents. At the nonlinear stage, the magnetic fields are reversed by the current and the reconnection may take place. Due to these dynamics the jet and ambient electron are strongly accelerated in both parallel and perpendicular directions.

  5. The interplanetary magnetic structure that guides solar relativistic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, S.; Démoulin, P.; Dasso, S.; Klein, K.-L.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Relating in-situ measurements of relativistic solar particles to their parent activity in the corona requires understanding the magnetic structures that guide them from their acceleration site to the Earth. Relativistic particle events are observed at times of high solar activity, when transient magnetic structures such as interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) often shape the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). They may introduce interplanetary paths that are longer than nominal, and magnetic connections rooted far from the nominal Parker spiral. Aims: We present a detailed study of the IMF configurations during ten relativistic solar particle events of the 23rd activity cycle to elucidate the actual IMF configuration that guides the particles to the Earth, where they are measured by neutron monitors. Methods: We used magnetic field (MAG) and plasma parameter measurements (SWEPAM) from the ACE spacecraft and determined the interplanetary path lengths of energetic particles through a modified version of the velocity dispersion analysis based on energetic particle measurements with SoHO/ERNE. Results: We find that the majority (7/10) of the events is detected in the vicinity of an ICME. Their interplanetary path lengths are found to be longer (1.5-2.6 AU) than those of the two events propagating in the slow solar wind (1.3 AU). The longest apparent path length is found in an event within the fast solar wind, probably caused by enhanced pitch angle scattering. The derived path lengths imply that the first energetic and relativistic protons are released at the Sun at the same time as electron beam emitting type III radio bursts. Conclusions: The timing of the first high-energy particle arrival on Earth is mainly determined by the type of IMF in which the particles propagate. Initial arrival times are as expected from Parker's model in the slow solar wind, and significantly longer in or near transient structures such as ICMEs.

  6. Magnetic assembly of nonmagnetic particles into photonic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    He, Le; Hu, Yongxing; Kim, Hyoki; Ge, Jianping; Kwon, Sunghoon; Yin, Yadong

    2010-11-10

    We report the rapid formation of photonic crystal structures by assembly of uniform nonmagnetic colloidal particles in ferrofluids using external magnetic fields. Magnetic manipulation of nonmagnetic particles with size down to a few hundred nanometers, suitable building blocks for producing photonic crystals with band gaps located in the visible regime, has been difficult due to their weak magnetic dipole moment. Increasing the dipole moment of magnetic holes has been limited by the instability of ferrofluids toward aggregation at high concentration or under strong magnetic field. By taking advantage of the superior stability of highly surface-charged magnetite nanocrystal-based ferrofluids, in this paper we have been able to successfully assemble 185 nm nonmagnetic polymer beads into photonic crystal structures, from 1D chains to 3D assemblies as determined by the interplay of magnetic dipole force and packing force. In a strong magnetic field with large field gradient, 3D photonic crystals with high reflectance (83%) in the visible range can be rapidly produced within several minutes, making this general strategy promising for fast creation of large-area photonic crystals using nonmagnetic particles as building blocks.

  7. Dynamics of an active magnetic particle in a rotating magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Cēbers, A; Ozols, M

    2006-02-01

    The motion of an active (self-propelling) particle with a permanent magnetic moment under the action of a rotating magnetic field is considered. We show that below a critical frequency of the external field the trajectory of a particle is a circle. For frequencies slightly above the critical point the particle moves on an approximately circular trajectory and from time to time jumps to another region of space. Symmetry of the particle trajectory depends on the commensurability of the field period and the period of the orientational motion of the particle. We also show how our results can be used to study the properties of naturally occurring active magnetic particles, so-called magnetotactic bacteria. PMID:16605340

  8. Enhanced magnetic anisotropy and heating efficiency in multi-functional manganese ferrite/graphene oxide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Anh-Tuan; Duy Giang, Chu; Thi Tam, Le; Tuan, Ta Quoc; Phan, Vu Ngoc; Alonso, Javier; Devkota, Jagannath; Garaio, Eneko; Ángel García, José; Martín-Rodríguez, Rosa; Fdez-Gubieda, Ma Luisa; Srikanth, Hariharan; Phan, Manh-Huong

    2016-04-01

    A promising nanocomposite material composed of MnFe2O4 (MFO) nanoparticles of ˜17 nm diameter deposited onto graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets was successfully synthesized using a modified co-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and selected area electron diffraction confirmed the quality of the synthesized samples. Fourier transform infrared measurements and analysis evidenced that the MFO nanoparticles were attached to the GO surface. Magnetic measurements and analysis using the modified Langevin model evidenced the superparamagnetic characteristic of both the bare MFO nanoparticles and the MFO-GO nanocomposite at room temperature, and an appreciable increase of the effective anisotropy for the MFO-GO sample. Magnetic hyperthermia experiments performed by both calorimetric and ac magnetometry methods indicated that relative to the bare MFO nanoparticles, the heating efficiency of the MFO-GO nanocomposite was similar at low ac fields (0-300 Oe) but became progressively larger with increasing ac fields (>300 Oe). This has been related to the higher effective anisotropy of the MFO-GO nanocomposite. In comparison with the bare MFO nanoparticles, a smaller reduction in the heating efficiency was observed in the MFO-GO composites when embedded in agar or when their concentration was increased, indicating that the GO helped minimize the physical rotation and aggregation of the MFO nanoparticles. These findings can be of practical importance in exploiting this type of nanocomposite for advanced hyperthermia. Magnetoimpedance-based biodetection studies also indicated that the MFO-GO nanocomposite could be used as a promising magnetic biomarker in biosensing applications.

  9. Enhanced magnetic anisotropy and heating efficiency in multi-functional manganese ferrite/graphene oxide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Le, Anh-Tuan; Giang, Chu Duy; Tam, Le Thi; Tuan, Ta Quoc; Phan, Vu Ngoc; Alonso, Javier; Devkota, Jagannath; Garaio, Eneko; García, José Ángel; Martín-Rodríguez, Rosa; Fdez-Gubieda, Ma Luisa; Srikanth, Hariharan; Phan, Manh-Huong

    2016-04-15

    A promising nanocomposite material composed of MnFe2O4 (MFO) nanoparticles of ∼17 nm diameter deposited onto graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets was successfully synthesized using a modified co-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and selected area electron diffraction confirmed the quality of the synthesized samples. Fourier transform infrared measurements and analysis evidenced that the MFO nanoparticles were attached to the GO surface. Magnetic measurements and analysis using the modified Langevin model evidenced the superparamagnetic characteristic of both the bare MFO nanoparticles and the MFO-GO nanocomposite at room temperature, and an appreciable increase of the effective anisotropy for the MFO-GO sample. Magnetic hyperthermia experiments performed by both calorimetric and ac magnetometry methods indicated that relative to the bare MFO nanoparticles, the heating efficiency of the MFO-GO nanocomposite was similar at low ac fields (0-300 Oe) but became progressively larger with increasing ac fields (>300 Oe). This has been related to the higher effective anisotropy of the MFO-GO nanocomposite. In comparison with the bare MFO nanoparticles, a smaller reduction in the heating efficiency was observed in the MFO-GO composites when embedded in agar or when their concentration was increased, indicating that the GO helped minimize the physical rotation and aggregation of the MFO nanoparticles. These findings can be of practical importance in exploiting this type of nanocomposite for advanced hyperthermia. Magnetoimpedance-based biodetection studies also indicated that the MFO-GO nanocomposite could be used as a promising magnetic biomarker in biosensing applications.

  10. Enhanced magnetic anisotropy and heating efficiency in multi-functional manganese ferrite/graphene oxide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Le, Anh-Tuan; Giang, Chu Duy; Tam, Le Thi; Tuan, Ta Quoc; Phan, Vu Ngoc; Alonso, Javier; Devkota, Jagannath; Garaio, Eneko; García, José Ángel; Martín-Rodríguez, Rosa; Fdez-Gubieda, Ma Luisa; Srikanth, Hariharan; Phan, Manh-Huong

    2016-04-15

    A promising nanocomposite material composed of MnFe2O4 (MFO) nanoparticles of ∼17 nm diameter deposited onto graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets was successfully synthesized using a modified co-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and selected area electron diffraction confirmed the quality of the synthesized samples. Fourier transform infrared measurements and analysis evidenced that the MFO nanoparticles were attached to the GO surface. Magnetic measurements and analysis using the modified Langevin model evidenced the superparamagnetic characteristic of both the bare MFO nanoparticles and the MFO-GO nanocomposite at room temperature, and an appreciable increase of the effective anisotropy for the MFO-GO sample. Magnetic hyperthermia experiments performed by both calorimetric and ac magnetometry methods indicated that relative to the bare MFO nanoparticles, the heating efficiency of the MFO-GO nanocomposite was similar at low ac fields (0-300 Oe) but became progressively larger with increasing ac fields (>300 Oe). This has been related to the higher effective anisotropy of the MFO-GO nanocomposite. In comparison with the bare MFO nanoparticles, a smaller reduction in the heating efficiency was observed in the MFO-GO composites when embedded in agar or when their concentration was increased, indicating that the GO helped minimize the physical rotation and aggregation of the MFO nanoparticles. These findings can be of practical importance in exploiting this type of nanocomposite for advanced hyperthermia. Magnetoimpedance-based biodetection studies also indicated that the MFO-GO nanocomposite could be used as a promising magnetic biomarker in biosensing applications. PMID:26933975

  11. First-order particle acceleration in magnetically driven flows

    DOE PAGES

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2016-03-02

    In this study, we demonstrate that particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. Some examples of such flows include spontaneous turbulent reconnection and decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, where a magnetic field relaxes to a lower-energy configuration and transfers part of its energy to kinetic motions of the fluid. We show that this energy transfer, which normally causes turbulent cascade and heating of the fluid, also results in a first-order acceleration of non-thermal particles. Since it is generic, this acceleration mechanism is likely to play a role in the production of non-thermal particle distribution inmore » magnetically dominant environments such as the solar chromosphere, pulsar magnetospheres, jets from supermassive black holes, and γ-ray bursts.« less

  12. Magnetic-luminescent spherical particles synthesized by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Norma L.; Flores, Dora L.; Hirata, Gustavo A.

    2015-07-01

    The combination of magnetic and luminescent properties in a single particle system, opens-up a wide range of potential applications in biotechnology and biomedicine. In this work, we performed the synthesis of magnetic-luminescent Gd2O3:Eu3+@Fe2O3 particles by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis performed in a tubular furnace. In order to achieve the composite formation, commercial superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were coated with a luminescent Eu3+-doped Gd2O3 shell in a low-cost one-step process. The spray pyrolysis method yields deagglomerated spherical shape magneto/luminescent particles. The photoluminescence spectra under UV excitation (λExc = 265 nm) of the magnetic Gd2O3:Eu3+@Fe2O3 compound showed the characteristic red emission of Eu3+ (λEm = 612 nm). This magneto/luminescent system will find applications in biomedicine and biotechnology.

  13. Spray pyrolysis synthesis of particles possessing magnetic and luminescent properties: application of magnetic/luminescent particles in immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosev, D.; Nichkova, M.; Dumas, R. K.; Liu, Kai; Kennedy, I. M.

    2006-01-01

    Many types of fluorescent nanoparticles have been investigated as alternatives to conventional organic dyes in biochemistry. In addition, magnetic beads are another type of particle that have a long history of biological applications. In this work we apply flame spray pyrolysis in order to engineer a novel type of nanoparticle that has both luminescent and magnetic properties. The particles have magnetic cores of iron oxide doped with cobalt and neodymium and luminescent shells of europium-doped gadolinium oxide (Eu:Gd IIO 3). Measurements on a Vibrating Sample Magnetometer showed an overall paramagnetic response of these composite particles. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed spectra typical of the Eu ion in a Gd IIO 3 host; a narrow emission peak centered near 615 nm. Our synthesis method offers low-cost, high-rate synthesis allowing a wide range of biological applications of magnetic/fluorescent core/shell particles. We demonstrate an immunoassay using the magnetic and fluorescent properties of the particles for separation and detection purposes.

  14. Multifunctional semiconductor micro-Hall devices for magnetic, electric, and photo-detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbertson, A. M.; Cohen, L. F.; Sadeghi, Hatef; Lambert, C. J.; Panchal, V.; Kazakova, O.; Solin, S. A.

    2015-12-07

    We report the real-space voltage response of InSb/AlInSb micro-Hall devices to local photo-excitation, electric, and magnetic fields at room temperature using scanning probe microscopy. We show that the ultrafast generation of localised photocarriers results in conductance perturbations analogous to those produced by local electric fields. Experimental results are in good agreement with tight-binding transport calculations in the diffusive regime. The magnetic, photo, and charge sensitivity of a 2 μm wide probe are evaluated at a 10 μA bias current in the Johnson noise limit (valid at measurement frequencies > 10 kHz) to be, respectively, 500 nT/√Hz; 20 pW/√Hz (λ = 635 nm) comparable to commercial photoconductive detectors; and 0.05 e/√Hz comparable to that of single electron transistors. These results demonstrate the remarkably versatile sensing attributes of simple semiconductor micro-Hall devices that can be applied to a host of imaging and sensing applications.

  15. Multifunctional semiconductor micro-Hall devices for magnetic, electric, and photo-detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbertson, A. M.; Sadeghi, Hatef; Panchal, V.; Kazakova, O.; Lambert, C. J.; Solin, S. A.; Cohen, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    We report the real-space voltage response of InSb/AlInSb micro-Hall devices to local photo-excitation, electric, and magnetic fields at room temperature using scanning probe microscopy. We show that the ultrafast generation of localised photocarriers results in conductance perturbations analogous to those produced by local electric fields. Experimental results are in good agreement with tight-binding transport calculations in the diffusive regime. The magnetic, photo, and charge sensitivity of a 2 μm wide probe are evaluated at a 10 μA bias current in the Johnson noise limit (valid at measurement frequencies > 10 kHz) to be, respectively, 500 nT/√Hz; 20 pW/√Hz (λ = 635 nm) comparable to commercial photoconductive detectors; and 0.05 e/√Hz comparable to that of single electron transistors. These results demonstrate the remarkably versatile sensing attributes of simple semiconductor micro-Hall devices that can be applied to a host of imaging and sensing applications.

  16. A particle astrophysics magnet facility: ASTROMAG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormes, Jonathan F. (Editor); Israel, Martin H. (Editor); Mewaldt, Richard A. (Editor); Wiedenbeck, Mark E. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The primary scientific objectives of ASTROMAG are to: examine cosmological models by searching for antimatter and dark matter candidates; study the origin and evolution of matter in the galaxy by direct sampling of galactic matter; and study the origin and acceleration of the relativistic particle plasma in the galaxy and its effects on the dynamics and evolution of the galaxy. These general scientific objectives will be met by ASTROMAG with particle detection instruments designed to make the following observations: search, for anti-nuclei of helium and heavier element; measure the spectra of anti-protons and positrons; measure the isotopic composition of cosmic ray nuclei at energies of several GeV/amu; and measure the energy spectra of cosmic ray nuclei to very high energies.

  17. Astromag - Particle astrophysics magnet facility for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. Vernon

    1989-01-01

    The Astromag (for astrophysics magnet) superconducting magnet facility to be flown aboard the Space Station in the late 1990s is described together with its scientific objectives. The Astromag facility is basically a magnetic spectrometer capable of determining the momentum per unit charge and the sign of the charge of fully ionized cosmic rays. The Astromag's science goals include investigating the origin and the evolution of matter in the Galaxy by direct sampling of Galactic material, examining cosmological models by searching for antimatter and an evidence of dark matter, and studying the origin of extremely energetic particles and their effects on the dynamics and evolution of the Galaxy. The Astromag's instrumentation will include an array of particle detectors (the WIZard instrument), a large spectrometer (LISA), and a stack of passive high-resolution track detectors in the Astromag's magnetic field (the SCIN/MAGIC instrument).

  18. Improved field free line magnetic particle imaging using saddle coils.

    PubMed

    Erbe, Marlitt; Sattel, Timo F; Buzug, Thorsten M

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a novel tracer-based imaging method detecting the distribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles in vivo in three dimensions and in real time. Conventionally, MPI uses the signal emitted by SPIO tracer material located at a field free point (FFP). To increase the sensitivity of MPI, however, an alternative encoding scheme collecting the particle signal along a field free line (FFL) was proposed. To provide the magnetic fields needed for line imaging in MPI, a very efficient scanner setup regarding electrical power consumption is needed. At the same time, the scanner needs to provide a high magnetic field homogeneity along the FFL as well as parallel to its alignment to prevent the appearance of artifacts, using efficient radon-based reconstruction methods arising for a line encoding scheme. This work presents a dynamic FFL scanner setup for MPI that outperforms all previously presented setups in electrical power consumption as well as magnetic field quality.

  19. Multifunctional NaYF4:Yb, Er@mSiO2@Fe3O4-PEG nanoparticles for UCL/MR bioimaging and magnetically targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bei; Li, Chunxia; Ma, Ping'an; Chen, Yinyin; Zhang, Yuanxin; Hou, Zhiyao; Huang, Shanshan; Lin, Jun

    2015-02-01

    A low toxic multifunctional nanoplatform, integrating both mutimodal diagnosis methods and antitumor therapy, is highly desirable to assure its antitumor efficiency. In this work, we show a convenient and adjustable synthesis of multifunctional nanoparticles NaYF4:Yb, Er@mSiO2@Fe3O4-PEG (MFNPs) based on different sizes of up-conversion nanoparticles (UCNPs). With strong up-conversion fluorescence offered by UCNPs, superparamagnetism properties attributed to Fe3O4 nanoparticles and porous structure coming from the mesoporous SiO2 shell, the as-obtained MFNPs can be utilized not only as a contrast agent for dual modal up-conversion luminescence (UCL)/magnetic resonance (MR) bio-imaging, but can also achieve an effective magnetically targeted antitumor chemotherapy both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the UCL intensity of UCNPs and the magnetic properties of Fe3O4 in the MFNPs were carefully balanced. Silica coating and further PEG modifying can improve the hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of the as-synthesized MFNPs, which was confirmed by the in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility and in vivo long-time bio-distributions tests. Those results revealed that the UCNPs based magnetically targeted drug carrier system we synthesized has great promise in the future for multimodal bio-imaging and targeted cancer therapy.

  20. Frequency Mixing Magnetic Detection Scanner for Imaging Magnetic Particles in Planar Samples.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyobong; Lim, Eul-Gyoon; Jeong, Jae-Chan; Chang, Jiho; Shin, Sung-Woong; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2016-06-09

    The setup of a planar Frequency Mixing Magnetic Detection (p-FMMD) scanner for performing Magnetic Particles Imaging (MPI) of flat samples is presented. It consists of two magnetic measurement heads on both sides of the sample mounted on the legs of a u-shaped support. The sample is locally exposed to a magnetic excitation field consisting of two distinct frequencies, a stronger component at about 77 kHz and a weaker field at 61 Hz. The nonlinear magnetization characteristics of superparamagnetic particles give rise to the generation of intermodulation products. A selected sum-frequency component of the high and low frequency magnetic field incident on the magnetically nonlinear particles is recorded by a demodulation electronics. In contrast to a conventional MPI scanner, p-FMMD does not require the application of a strong magnetic field to the whole sample because mixing of the two frequencies occurs locally. Thus, the lateral dimensions of the sample are just limited by the scanning range and the supports. However, the sample height determines the spatial resolution. In the current setup it is limited to 2 mm. As examples, we present two 20 mm × 25 mm p-FMMD images acquired from samples with 1 µm diameter maghemite particles in silanol matrix and with 50 nm magnetite particles in aminosilane matrix. The results show that the novel MPI scanner can be applied for analysis of thin biological samples and for medical diagnostic purposes.

  1. Particle energization through time-periodic helical magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Brandenburg, Axel; Dasgupta, Brahmananda; Niklasson, Eyvind; Ram, Abhay

    2014-04-01

    We solve for the motion of charged particles in a helical time-periodic ABC (Arnold-Beltrami-Childress) magnetic field. The magnetic field lines of a stationary ABC field with coefficients A=B=C=1 are chaotic, and we show that the motion of a charged particle in such a field is also chaotic at late times with positive Lyapunov exponent. We further show that in time-periodic ABC fields, the kinetic energy of a charged particle can increase indefinitely with time. At late times the mean kinetic energy grows as a power law in time with an exponent that approaches unity. For an initial distribution of particles, whose kinetic energy is uniformly distributed within some interval, the probability density function of kinetic energy is, at late times, close to a Gaussian but with steeper tails.

  2. Extreme Particle Acceleration via Magnetic Reconnection in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerutti, Benoit; Uzdensky, D. A.; Begelman, M. C.

    2012-01-01

    The discovery by Agile and Fermi of intense day-long synchrotron gamma-ray flares above 100 MeV in the Crab Nebula challenges classical models of pulsar wind nebulae and particle acceleration. We argue that the flares are powered by magnetic reconnection in the nebula. Using relativistic test-particle simulations, we show that particles are naturally focused into a thin fan beam, deep inside the reconnection layer where the magnetic field is small. The particles then suffer less from synchrotron losses and pile up at the maximum energy given by the electric potential drop in the layer. Applying this model to the Crab Nebula, we find that the emerging synchrotron emission spectrum above 100 MeV is consistent with the September 2010 flare observations. No detectable emission is expected at other wavelengths. This scenario provides a viable explanation for the Crab Nebula gamma-ray flares.

  3. Small oscillations of two interacting particles in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Pino, L. A.; Curilef, S.

    2016-11-01

    The classical behavior of two interacting particles in the presence of a uniform magnetic field is studied in the small oscillations approximation. Using the Lagrangian formalism, the equations of motion are derived, as are their solutions and constants of motion. Normal modes of oscillations and their corresponding normal coordinates are obtained that strongly depend on the initial condition; therefore, we observe that the oscillation along the line that joins the particles is non-isochronous. In addition, particular attention has been paid to the planar motion, without the pseudomomentum component parallel to the magnetic field, where one longitudinal mode and two transversal modes are obtained.

  4. Using triaxial magnetic fields to create high susceptibility particle composites.

    PubMed

    Martin, James E; Venturini, Eugene; Gulley, Gerald L; Williamson, Jonathan

    2004-02-01

    We report on the use of triaxial magnetic fields to create a variety of isotropic and anisotropic magnetic particle/polymer composites with significantly enhanced magnetic susceptibilities. A triaxial field is a superposition of three orthogonal ac magnetic fields, each generated by a Helmholtz coil in series resonance with a tunable capacitor bank. Field frequencies are in the range of 150-400 Hz. Because both the field amplitudes and frequencies can be varied, a rich variety of structures can be created. Perhaps the most unusual effects occur when either two or three of the field components are heterodyned to give beat frequencies on the order of 1 Hz. This leads to a striking particle dynamics that evolves into surprising structures during resin gelation. These structures are found to have perhaps the highest susceptibility that a particle composite can have. The susceptibility anisotropy of these composites can be controlled over a wide range by judicious adjustment of the relative field amplitudes. These experimental data are supported by large-scale Brownian dynamics simulations of the complex many-body interactions that occur in triaxial magnetic fields. These simulations show that athermal three-dimensional field heterodyning leads to structures with a susceptibility that is as high as that achieved with thermal annealing. Thus with coherent particle motions we can achieve magnetostatic energies that are quite close to the ground state. PMID:14995450

  5. Radial distribution of charged particles in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Sjue, S K L; Broussard, L J; Makela, M; McGaughey, P L; Young, A R; Zeck, B A

    2015-02-01

    The radial spread of charged particles emitted from a point source in a magnetic field is a potential source of systematic error for any experiment where magnetic fields guide charged particles to detectors with finite size. Assuming uniform probability as a function of the phase along the particle's helical trajectory, an analytic solution for the radial probability distribution function follows which applies to experiments in which particles are generated throughout a volume that spans a sufficient length along the axis of a homogeneous magnetic field. This approach leads to the same result as a different derivation given by Dubbers et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 763, 112-119 (2014). But the constant phase approximation does not strictly apply to finite source volumes or fixed positions, which lead to local maxima in the radial distribution of emitted particles at the plane of the detector. A simple method is given to calculate such distributions, then the effect is demonstrated with data from a (207)Bi electron-conversion source in the superconducting solenoid magnet spectrometer of the Ultracold Neutron facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Implications for neutron beta decay spectroscopy are discussed. PMID:25725818

  6. Coupled particle-fluid transport and magnetic separation in microfluidic systems with passive magnetic functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khashan, Saud A.; Furlani, Edward P.

    2013-03-01

    A study is presented of coupled particle-fluid transport and field-directed particle capture in microfluidic systems with passive magnetic functionality. These systems consist of a microfluidic flow cell on a substrate that contains embedded magnetic elements. Two systems are considered that utilize soft- and hard-magnetic elements, respectively. In the former, an external field is applied to magnetize the elements, and in the latter, they are permanently magnetized. The field produced by the magnetized elements permeates into the flow cell giving rise to an attractive force on magnetic particles that flow through it. The systems are studied using a novel numerical/closed-form modelling approach that combines numerical transport analysis with closed-form field analysis. Particle-fluid transport is computed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), while the magnetic force that governs particle capture is obtained in closed form. The CFD analysis takes into account dominant particle forces and two-way momentum transfer between the particles and the fluid. The two-way particle-fluid coupling capability is an important feature of the model that distinguishes it from more commonly used and simplified one-way coupling analysis. The model is used to quantify the impact of two-way particle-fluid coupling on both the capture efficiency and the flow pattern in the systems considered. Many effects such as particle-induced flow-enhanced capture efficiency and flow circulation are studied that cannot be predicted using one-way coupling analysis. In addition, dilute particle dispersions are shown to exhibit significant localized particle-fluid coupling near the capture regions, which contradicts the commonly held view that two-way coupling can be ignored when analysing high-gradient magnetic separation involving such particle systems. Overall, the model demonstrates that two-way coupling needs to be taken into account for rigorous predictions of capture efficiency, especially

  7. Controlling temperature in magnetic hyperthermia with low Curie temperature particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astefanoaei, Iordana; Dumitru, Ioan; Chiriac, Horia; Stancu, Alexandru

    2014-05-01

    Hyperthermia induced by the heating of magnetic particles (MPs) in alternating magnetic field receives a considerable attention in cancer therapy. An interesting development in the studies dedicated to magnetically based hyperthermia is the possibility to control the temperature using MPs with selective magnetic absorption properties. This paper analyzes the temperature field determined by the heating of MPs having low Curie temperature (a FeCrNbB particulate system) injected within a malignant tissue, subjected to an ac magnetic field. The temperature evolution within healthy and tumor tissues was analyzed by finite element method simulations in a thermo-fluid model. The cooling effect produced by blood flowing in blood vessels was considered. This effect is intensified at the increase of blood velocity. The FeCrNbB particles, having the Curie temperature close to the therapeutic range, transfer the heat more homogeneous in the tumor keeping the temperature within the therapeutic range in whole tumor volume. Having the possibility to automatically control the temperature within a tumor, these particle type opens new research horizons in the magnetic hyperthermia.

  8. Heating Characteristics of Transformer Oil-Based Magnetic Fluids of Different Magnetic Particle Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skumiel, A.; Hornowski, T.; Józefczak, A.

    2011-04-01

    The heating ability of mineral oil-based magnetic fluids with different magnetic particle concentrations is studied. The calorimetric measurements were carried out in an alternating magnetic field of 500 A · m-1 to 2500 A · m-1 amplitude and of 1500 kHz frequency. The revealed H n law-type dependence of the temperature increase rate, (d T/d t) t=0, on the amplitude of the magnetic field indicates the presence of superparamagnetic and partially ferromagnetic particles in the tested samples since n > 2. The specific absorption rate (SAR) defined as the rate of energy absorption per unit mass increases with a decrease of the volume fraction of the dispersed phase. This can be explained by the formation of aggregates in the samples with a higher concentration of magnetic particles.

  9. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2015-07-01

    The magnetic hysteresis loops and Barkhausen noise of a single α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated to investigate into the magnetic hardening due to Cu-rich precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Phase field method basing Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is used for this simulation. The results show that the presence of the nonmagnetic particle could result in magnetic hardening by making the nucleation of reversed domains difficult. The coercive field is found to increase, while the intensity of Barkhausen noise voltage is decreased when the nonmagnetic particle is introduced. Simulations demonstrate the impact of nucleation field of reversed domainsmore » on the magnetization reversal behavior and the magnetic properties.« less

  10. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2015-07-01

    The magnetic hysteresis loops and Barkhausen noise of a single α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated to investigate into the magnetic hardening due to Cu-rich precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Phase field method basing Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is used for this simulation. The results show that the presence of the nonmagnetic particle could result in magnetic hardening by making the nucleation of reversed domains difficult. The coercive field is found to increase, while the intensity of Barkhausen noise voltage is decreased when the nonmagnetic particle is introduced. Simulations demonstrate the impact of nucleation field of reversed domains on the magnetization reversal behavior and the magnetic properties.

  11. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang; Li, Yulan

    2015-07-15

    The magnetic hysteresis loops and Barkhausen noise of a single α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated to investigate into the magnetic hardening due to Cu-rich precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Phase field method basing Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is used for this simulation. The results show that the presence of the nonmagnetic particle could result in magnetic hardening by making the nucleation of reversed domains difficult. The coercive field is found to increase, while the intensity of Barkhausen noise voltage is decreased when the nonmagnetic particle is introduced. Simulations demonstrate the impact of nucleation field of reversed domains on the magnetization reversal behavior and the magnetic properties.

  12. Physical properties of elongated magnetic particles: magnetization and friction coefficient anisotropies.

    PubMed

    Vereda, Fernando; de Vicente, Juan; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque

    2009-06-01

    Anisotropy counts: A brief review of the main physical properties of elongated magnetic particles (EMPs) is presented. The most important characteristic of an EMP is the additional contribution of shape anisotropy to the total anisotropy energy of the particle, when compared to spherical magnetic particles. The electron micrograph shows Ni-ferrite microrods fabricated by the authors.We present an overview of the main physical properties of elongated magnetic particles (EMPs), including some of their more relevant properties in suspension. When compared to a spherical magnetic particle, the most important characteristic of an EMP is an additional contribution of shape anisotropy to the total anisotropy energy of the particle. Increasing aspect ratios also lead to an increase in both the critical single-domain size of a magnetic particle and its resistance to thermally activated spontaneous reversal of the magnetization. For single-domain EMPs, magnetization reversal occurs primarily by one of two modes, coherent rotation or curling, the latter being facilitated by larger aspect ratios. When EMPs are used to prepare colloidal suspensions, other physical properties come into play, such as their anisotropic friction coefficient and the consequent enhanced torque they experience in a shear flow, their tendency to align in the direction of an external field, to form less dense sediments and to entangle into more intricate aggregates. From a more practical point of view, EMPs are discussed in connection with two interesting types of magnetic colloids: magnetorheological fluids and suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia. Advances reported in the literature regarding the use of EMPs in these two systems are included. In the final section, we present a summary of the most relevant methods documented in the literature for the fabrication of EMPs, together with a list of the most common ferromagnetic materials that have been synthesized in the form of EMPs. PMID:19434654

  13. Physical properties of elongated magnetic particles: magnetization and friction coefficient anisotropies.

    PubMed

    Vereda, Fernando; de Vicente, Juan; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque

    2009-06-01

    Anisotropy counts: A brief review of the main physical properties of elongated magnetic particles (EMPs) is presented. The most important characteristic of an EMP is the additional contribution of shape anisotropy to the total anisotropy energy of the particle, when compared to spherical magnetic particles. The electron micrograph shows Ni-ferrite microrods fabricated by the authors.We present an overview of the main physical properties of elongated magnetic particles (EMPs), including some of their more relevant properties in suspension. When compared to a spherical magnetic particle, the most important characteristic of an EMP is an additional contribution of shape anisotropy to the total anisotropy energy of the particle. Increasing aspect ratios also lead to an increase in both the critical single-domain size of a magnetic particle and its resistance to thermally activated spontaneous reversal of the magnetization. For single-domain EMPs, magnetization reversal occurs primarily by one of two modes, coherent rotation or curling, the latter being facilitated by larger aspect ratios. When EMPs are used to prepare colloidal suspensions, other physical properties come into play, such as their anisotropic friction coefficient and the consequent enhanced torque they experience in a shear flow, their tendency to align in the direction of an external field, to form less dense sediments and to entangle into more intricate aggregates. From a more practical point of view, EMPs are discussed in connection with two interesting types of magnetic colloids: magnetorheological fluids and suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia. Advances reported in the literature regarding the use of EMPs in these two systems are included. In the final section, we present a summary of the most relevant methods documented in the literature for the fabrication of EMPs, together with a list of the most common ferromagnetic materials that have been synthesized in the form of EMPs.

  14. Fe3O4@Graphene Oxide@Ag Particles for Surface Magnet Solid-Phase Extraction Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SMSPE-SERS): From Sample Pretreatment to Detection All-in-One.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yi; Deng, Rong; Yang, Liyuan; Yu, Shihua; Xu, Shuping; Xu, Weiqing

    2016-06-01

    A multifunctional magnetic graphene surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was fabricated successfully by the layer-by-layer assembly of silver and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles (NPs) on the magnetic ferroferric oxide particles (Fe3O4@GO@Ag). This ternary particle possesses magnetic properties, SERS activity, and adsorption ability simultaneously. Owing to the multifunction of this Fe3O4@GO@Ag ternary complex, we put forward a new method called a surface magnetic solid-phase extraction (SMSPE) technique, for the SERS detections of pesticide residues on the fruit peels. SMSPE integrates many sample pretreatment procedures, such as surface extraction, separation sample, and detection, all-in-one. So this method shows great superiority in simplicity, rapidity, and high efficiency above other standard methods. The whole detection process can be finished within 20 min including the sample pretreatment and SERS detection. Owing to the high density of Ag NPs, the detection sensitivity is high enough that the lowest detectable concentrations are 0.48 and 40 ng/cm(2) for thiram and thiabendazole, which are much lower than the maximal residue limits in fruit prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This multifunctional ternary particle and its corresponding analytical method have been proven to be applicable for practical samples and also valuable for other surface analysis. PMID:27191584

  15. Shape, size, and distribution of magnetic particles in Bjurbole chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nava, David F.

    1994-01-01

    Chondrules from the Bjurbole chondritic meteorite (L4) exhibit saturation remanence magnetization (SIRM) values which vary over three orders of magnitude. REM values (Natural Remanence Magnetization/SIRM) for Allende (C3V) and Chainpur (LL3) are less than 0.01 but in Bjurbole some chondrules were found to have REM values greater than 0.1 with several greater than 0.2. REM values greater than 0.1 are abnormal and cannot be acquired during weak field cooling. If exposure to a strong field (whatever the source) during the chondrules' history is responsible for the high REM values, was such history associated with a different processing which might have resulted in different shape, size, and distribution of metal particles compared to chondrules having REM values of less than 0.01? Furthermore, magnetic hysteresis results show a broad range of magnetic hardness and other intrinsic magnetic properties. These features must be related to (1) size and amount of metal; and (2) properties of, and amount of, tetrataenite in the chondrules (all chondrules thus far subjected to thermomagnetic analysis show the presence of tetrataenite). A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study is underway to determine the relationship between the shape, size, and distribution of metal particles within individual chondrules and the magnetic properties of these chondrules. Results from the SEM study in conjunction with magnetic property data may also help to discern effects from possible lightning strikes in the nebula prior to incorporation of the chondrules into the parent body.

  16. Enhanced doxorubicin delivery and cytotoxicity in multidrug resistant cancer cells using multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pilapong, Chalermchai; Keereeta, Yanee; Munkhetkorn, Samlee; Thongtem, Somchai; Thongtem, Titipun

    2014-01-01

    Carboxymethyl modified magnetic nanoparticles (CMC-MNPs) have been designed as a vehicle for drug delivery in both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant cancer cells. We have demonstrated that the CMC-MNPs were able to load doxorubicin (DOX) with a high loading efficiency while also maintaining a good colloidal stability in an aqueous solution. According to a drug release study, DOX-loaded CMC-MNPs showed that the pH-dependent drug release property had a much higher release rate in acidic pH. Compared to free DOX, the DOX-loaded CMC-MNPs showed higher DOX accumulation in drug-sensitive cancer cells and much higher accumulation in drug-resistant cancer cells. These results indicate that our nanoplatform is highly efficient as a drug delivery system in both normal cancer cells and MDR cancer cells. In addition, the DOX-loaded CMC-MNPs can also enhance cytotoxicity against drug-resistant cancer cells in comparison to free DOX. The results obtained in this research demonstrate that our nanoplatform may be a promising approach in cancer chemotherapy and for overcoming multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

  17. PEG-conjugated highly dispersive multifunctional magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes for cellular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandare, Jayant J.; Jalota-Badhwar, Archana; Satavalekar, Sneha D.; Bhansali, Sujit G.; Aher, Naval D.; Kharas, Firuza; Banerjee, Shashwat S.

    2012-01-01

    We report synthesis of a highly versatile multicomponent nanosystem by covalently decorating the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4), poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and fluorophore fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). The resulting Fe3O4-PEG-FITC-CNT nanosystem demonstrates high dispersion ability in an aqueous medium, magnetic responsiveness, and fluorescent capacity. Transmission electron microscopy images revealed that Fe3O4 nanoparticles were well anchored onto the surfaces of the CNT. In vitro time kinetic experiments using confocal microscopy demonstrated a higher uptake of the Fe3O4-PEG-FITC-CNT nanosystem localized at the perinuclear region of MCF7 cells compared to the free FITC. In addition, the CNT nanosystem demonstrated no evidence of toxicity on cell growth. Surface conjugation of multicomponents, combined with in vitro non-toxicity, enhanced cellular uptake for FITC and site specific targeting ability makes this fluorescent Fe3O4-PEG-FITC-CNT nanosystem an ideal candidate for bioimaging, both in vitro and in vivo.

  18. A General and Facile Strategy to Fabricate Multifunctional Nanoprobes for Simultaneous (19)F Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Optical/Thermal Imaging, and Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Gaofei; Li, Nannan; Tang, Juan; Xu, Suying; Wang, Leyu

    2016-09-01

    (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), due to its high sensitivity and negligible background, is anticipated to be a powerful noninvasive, sensitive, and accurate molecular imaging technique. However, the major challenge of (19)F MRI is to increase the number of (19)F atoms while maintaining the solubility and molecular mobility of the probe. Here, we successfully developed a facile and general strategy to synthesize the multifunctional (19)F MRI nanoprobes by encapsulating the hydrophobic inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) into a hybrid polymer micelle consisting of hydrolysates of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane (PDTES) and oleylamine-functionalized poly(succinimide) (PSIOAm). Due to their good water dispersibility, excellent molecular mobility resulting from the ultrathin coating, and high (19)F atom numbers, these nanoprobes generate a separate sharp singlet of (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal (at -82.8 ppm) with half peak width of ∼28 Hz, which is highly applicable for (19)F MRI. Significantly, by varying the inorganic core from metals (Au), oxides (Fe3O4), fluorides (NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+)), and phosphates (YPO4) to semiconductors (Cu7S4 and Ag2S, ZnS:Mn(2+)) NPs, which renders the nanoprobes' multifunctional properties such as photothermal ability (Au, Cu7S4), magnetism (Fe3O4), fluorescence (ZnS:Mn(2+)), near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence (Ag2S), and upconversion (UC) luminescence. Meanwhile, the as-prepared nanoprobes possess relatively small sizes (about 50 nm), which is beneficial for long-time circulation. The proof-of-concept in vitro (19)F NMR and photothermal ablation of ZnS:Mn(2+)@PDTES/PSIOAm and Cu7S4@PDTES/PSIOAm nanoprobes further suggest that these nanoprobes hold wide potentials for multifunctional applications in biomedical fields. PMID:27534896

  19. A General and Facile Strategy to Fabricate Multifunctional Nanoprobes for Simultaneous (19)F Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Optical/Thermal Imaging, and Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Gaofei; Li, Nannan; Tang, Juan; Xu, Suying; Wang, Leyu

    2016-09-01

    (19)F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), due to its high sensitivity and negligible background, is anticipated to be a powerful noninvasive, sensitive, and accurate molecular imaging technique. However, the major challenge of (19)F MRI is to increase the number of (19)F atoms while maintaining the solubility and molecular mobility of the probe. Here, we successfully developed a facile and general strategy to synthesize the multifunctional (19)F MRI nanoprobes by encapsulating the hydrophobic inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) into a hybrid polymer micelle consisting of hydrolysates of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane (PDTES) and oleylamine-functionalized poly(succinimide) (PSIOAm). Due to their good water dispersibility, excellent molecular mobility resulting from the ultrathin coating, and high (19)F atom numbers, these nanoprobes generate a separate sharp singlet of (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal (at -82.8 ppm) with half peak width of ∼28 Hz, which is highly applicable for (19)F MRI. Significantly, by varying the inorganic core from metals (Au), oxides (Fe3O4), fluorides (NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+)), and phosphates (YPO4) to semiconductors (Cu7S4 and Ag2S, ZnS:Mn(2+)) NPs, which renders the nanoprobes' multifunctional properties such as photothermal ability (Au, Cu7S4), magnetism (Fe3O4), fluorescence (ZnS:Mn(2+)), near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence (Ag2S), and upconversion (UC) luminescence. Meanwhile, the as-prepared nanoprobes possess relatively small sizes (about 50 nm), which is beneficial for long-time circulation. The proof-of-concept in vitro (19)F NMR and photothermal ablation of ZnS:Mn(2+)@PDTES/PSIOAm and Cu7S4@PDTES/PSIOAm nanoprobes further suggest that these nanoprobes hold wide potentials for multifunctional applications in biomedical fields.

  20. Simultaneous diamagnetic and magnetic particle trapping in ferrofluid microflows via a single permanent magnet

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yilong; Kumar, Dhileep Thanjavur; Lu, Xinyu; Kale, Akshay; DuBose, John; Song, Yongxin; Wang, Junsheng; Li, Dongqing; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2015-01-01

    Trapping and preconcentrating particles and cells for enhanced detection and analysis are often essential in many chemical and biological applications. Existing methods for diamagnetic particle trapping require the placement of one or multiple pairs of magnets nearby the particle flowing channel. The strong attractive or repulsive force between the magnets makes it difficult to align and place them close enough to the channel, which not only complicates the device fabrication but also restricts the particle trapping performance. This work demonstrates for the first time the use of a single permanent magnet to simultaneously trap diamagnetic and magnetic particles in ferrofluid flows through a T-shaped microchannel. The two types of particles are preconcentrated to distinct locations of the T-junction due to the induced negative and positive magnetophoretic motions, respectively. Moreover, they can be sequentially released from their respective trapping spots by simply increasing the ferrofluid flow rate. In addition, a three-dimensional numerical model is developed, which predicts with a reasonable agreement the trajectories of diamagnetic and magnetic particles as well as the buildup of ferrofluid nanoparticles. PMID:26221197

  1. Simultaneous diamagnetic and magnetic particle trapping in ferrofluid microflows via a single permanent magnet.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yilong; Kumar, Dhileep Thanjavur; Lu, Xinyu; Kale, Akshay; DuBose, John; Song, Yongxin; Wang, Junsheng; Li, Dongqing; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2015-07-01

    Trapping and preconcentrating particles and cells for enhanced detection and analysis are often essential in many chemical and biological applications. Existing methods for diamagnetic particle trapping require the placement of one or multiple pairs of magnets nearby the particle flowing channel. The strong attractive or repulsive force between the magnets makes it difficult to align and place them close enough to the channel, which not only complicates the device fabrication but also restricts the particle trapping performance. This work demonstrates for the first time the use of a single permanent magnet to simultaneously trap diamagnetic and magnetic particles in ferrofluid flows through a T-shaped microchannel. The two types of particles are preconcentrated to distinct locations of the T-junction due to the induced negative and positive magnetophoretic motions, respectively. Moreover, they can be sequentially released from their respective trapping spots by simply increasing the ferrofluid flow rate. In addition, a three-dimensional numerical model is developed, which predicts with a reasonable agreement the trajectories of diamagnetic and magnetic particles as well as the buildup of ferrofluid nanoparticles.

  2. Simultaneous diamagnetic and magnetic particle trapping in ferrofluid microflows via a single permanent magnet.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yilong; Kumar, Dhileep Thanjavur; Lu, Xinyu; Kale, Akshay; DuBose, John; Song, Yongxin; Wang, Junsheng; Li, Dongqing; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2015-07-01

    Trapping and preconcentrating particles and cells for enhanced detection and analysis are often essential in many chemical and biological applications. Existing methods for diamagnetic particle trapping require the placement of one or multiple pairs of magnets nearby the particle flowing channel. The strong attractive or repulsive force between the magnets makes it difficult to align and place them close enough to the channel, which not only complicates the device fabrication but also restricts the particle trapping performance. This work demonstrates for the first time the use of a single permanent magnet to simultaneously trap diamagnetic and magnetic particles in ferrofluid flows through a T-shaped microchannel. The two types of particles are preconcentrated to distinct locations of the T-junction due to the induced negative and positive magnetophoretic motions, respectively. Moreover, they can be sequentially released from their respective trapping spots by simply increasing the ferrofluid flow rate. In addition, a three-dimensional numerical model is developed, which predicts with a reasonable agreement the trajectories of diamagnetic and magnetic particles as well as the buildup of ferrofluid nanoparticles. PMID:26221197

  3. Nonthermal Particle Acceleration and Radiation in Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    Many spectacular and violent phenomena in the high-energy universe exhibit nonthermal radiation spectra, from which we infer power-law energy distributions of the radiating particles. Relativistic magnetic reconnection, recognized as a leading mechanism of nonthermal particle acceleration, can efficiently transfer magnetic energy to energetic particles. We present a comprehensive particle-in-cell study of particle acceleration in 2D relativistic reconnection in both electron-ion and pair plasmas without guide field. We map out the power-law index α and the high-energy cutoff of the electron energy spectrum as functions of three key parameters: the system size (and initial layer length) L, the ambient plasma magnetization σ, and the ion/electron mass ratio (from 1 to 1836). We identify the transition between small- and large-system regimes: for small L, the system size affects the slope and extent of the high-energy spectrum, while for large enough L, α and the cutoff energy are independent of L. We compare high energy particle spectra and radiative (synchrotron and inverse Compton) signatures of the electrons, for pair and electron-ion reconnection. The latter cases maintain highly relativistic electrons, but include a range of different magnetizations yielding sub- to highly-relativistic ions. Finally, we show how nonthermal acceleration and radiative signatures alter when the radiation back-reaction becomes important. These results have important implications for assessing the promise and the limitations of relativistic reconnection as an astrophysically-important particle acceleration mechanism. This work is funded by NSF, DOE, and NASA.

  4. In vivo magnetic enrichment, photoacoustic diagnosis, and photothermal purging of infected blood using multifunctional gold and magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Shashkov, Evgeny; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Beenken, Karen E; Basnakian, Alexei G; Shirtliff, Mark E; Kim, Jin-Woo; Smeltzer, Mark S; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections are a primary cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Bacteremia is a particular concern owing to the possibility of septic shock and the development of metastatic infections. Treatment of bacteremia is increasingly compromised by the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains, creating an urgent need for alternative therapy. Here, we introduce a method for in vivo photoacoustic (PA) detection and photothermal (PT) eradication of Staphylococcus aureus in tissue and blood. We show that this method could be applicable for label-free diagnosis and treatment of in the bloodstream using intrinsic near-infrared absorption of endogenous carotenoids with nonlinear PA and PT contrast enhancement. To improve sensitivity and specificity for detection of circulating bacteria cells (CBCs), two-color gold and multilayer magnetic nanoparticles with giant amplifications of PA and PT contrasts were functionalized with an antibody cocktail for molecular targeting of S. aureus surface-associated markers such as protein A and lipoprotein. With a murine model, the utility of this approach was demonstrated for ultrasensitive detection of CBCs with threshold sensitivity as low as 0.5 CBCs/mL, in vivo magnetic enrichment of CBCs, PT eradication of CBCs, and real-time monitoring of therapeutic efficacy by CBC counting. Our PA-PT nano-theranostic platform, which integrates in vivo multiplex targeting, magnetic enrichment, signal amplification, multicolor recognition, and feedback control, could be used as a biological tool to gain insights on dissemination pathways of CBCs, infection progression by bacteria re-seeding, and sepsis development and treatment, and could potentially be feasible in humans, especially using bypass schematic. PMID:23049814

  5. In Vivo Magnetic Enrichment, Photoacoustic Diagnosis, and Photothermal Purging of Infected Blood Using Multifunctional Gold and Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Shashkov, Evgeny; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Beenken, Karen E.; Basnakian, Alexei G.; Shirtliff, Mark E.; Kim, Jin-Woo; Smeltzer, Mark S.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections are a primary cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Bacteremia is a particular concern owing to the possibility of septic shock and the development of metastatic infections. Treatment of bacteremia is increasingly compromised by the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains, creating an urgent need for alternative therapy. Here, we introduce a method for in vivo photoacoustic (PA) detection and photothermal (PT) eradication of Staphylococcus aureus in tissue and blood. We show that this method could be applicable for label-free diagnosis and treatment of in the bloodstream using intrinsic near-infrared absorption of endogenous carotenoids with nonlinear PA and PT contrast enhancement. To improve sensitivity and specificity for detection of circulating bacteria cells (CBCs), two-color gold and multilayer magnetic nanoparticles with giant amplifications of PA and PT contrasts were functionalized with an antibody cocktail for molecular targeting of S. aureus surface-associated markers such as protein A and lipoprotein. With a murine model, the utility of this approach was demonstrated for ultrasensitive detection of CBCs with threshold sensitivity as low as 0.5 CBCs/mL, in vivo magnetic enrichment of CBCs, PT eradication of CBCs, and real-time monitoring of therapeutic efficacy by CBC counting. Our PA-PT nano-theranostic platform, which integrates in vivo multiplex targeting, magnetic enrichment, signal amplification, multicolor recognition, and feedback control, could be used as a biological tool to gain insights on dissemination pathways of CBCs, infection progression by bacteria re-seeding, and sepsis development and treatment, and could potentially be feasible in humans, especially using bypass schematic. PMID:23049814

  6. Apparatus and method for continuous separation of magnetic particles from non-magnetic fluids

    DOEpatents

    Oder, Robin R.; Jamison, Russell E.

    2010-02-09

    A magnetic separator vessel (1) for separating magnetic particles from non-magnetic fluid includes a separation chamber having an interior and exterior wall, a top and bottom portion; a magnet (3) having first and second poles (2) positioned adjacent to the exterior wall, wherein the first pole is substantially diametrically opposed to the second pole; a inlet port (5) is directed into the top portion of the separation chamber, wherein the inlet port (5) is positioned adjacent to one of the first and second poles (2), wherein the inlet port (5) is adapted to transfer a mixture into the separation chamber; an underflow port (6) in communication with the bottom portion, wherein the underflow port (6) is adapted to receive the magnetic particles; and an overflow port (9) in communication with the separation chamber, wherein the overflow port (9) is adapted to receive the non-magnetic fluid.

  7. Variation of Magnetic Particle Imaging Tracer Performance With Amplitude and Frequency of the Applied Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Khandhar, Amit P.; Kemp, Scott J.; Ota, Satoshi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Takemura, Yasushi; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic response of magnetic particle imaging (MPI) tracers varies with the slew rate of the applied magnetic field, as well as with the tracer's average magnetic core size. Currently, 25 kHz and 20 mT/μ0 drive fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. We studied how several different sizes of monodisperse MPI tracers behaved under different drive field amplitude and frequency, using magnetic particle spectrometry and ac hysteresis for drive field conditions at 16, 26, and 40 kHz, with field amplitudes from 5 to 40 mT/μ0. We observed that both field amplitude and frequency can influence the tracer behavior, but that the magnetic behavior is consistent when the slew rate (the product of field amplitude and frequency) is consistent. However, smaller amplitudes provide a correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of a minor hysteresis loop. PMID:26023242

  8. Probing the magnetic topologies of magnetic clouds by means of solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Reames, D. V.

    1991-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) have been used as probes of magnetic cloud topologies. The rapid access of SEPs to the interiors of many clouds indicates that the cloud field lines extend back to the sun and hence are not plasmoids. The small modulation of galactic cosmic rays associated with clouds also suggests that the magnetic fields of clouds are not closed.

  9. Oleic acid coated magnetic nano-particles: Synthesis and characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, Biswajit Goyal, P. S.

    2015-06-24

    Magnetic nano particles of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} coated with oleic acid were synthesized using wet chemical route, which involved co-precipitation of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions. The nano particles were characterized using XRD, TEM, FTIR, TGA and VSM. X-ray diffraction studies showed that nano particles consist of single phase Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} having inverse spinel structure. The particle size obtained from width of Bragg peak is about 12.6 nm. TEM analysis showed that sizes of nano particles are in range of 6 to 17 nm with a dominant population at 12 - 14 nm. FTIR and TGA analysis showed that -COOH group of oleic acid is bound to the surface of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles and one has to heat the sample to 278° C to remove the attached molecule from the surface. Further it was seen that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles exhibit super paramagnetism with a magnetization of about 53 emu/ gm.

  10. Structural and magnetic characterization of YIG particles prepared using microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldomir, D.; Teijeiro, A. G.; Rivas, J.; Vaqueiro, P.; Paz, S. B.; López Quintela, A.

    1995-02-01

    Yttrium-iron-garnet (YIG) particles have been synthesized using the microemulsion technique. A comparison of ferrite powders obtained by this method and those prepared by sol-gel and solid state reactions is reported. We have studied both the magnetic and structural properties and have found a dependence on annealing temperatures.

  11. Radial distribution of charged particles in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Sjue, S. K. L. Broussard, L. J.; Makela, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Young, A. R.; Zeck, B. A.

    2015-02-15

    The radial spread of charged particles emitted from a point source in a magnetic field is a potential source of systematic error for any experiment where magnetic fields guide charged particles to detectors with finite size. Assuming uniform probability as a function of the phase along the particle’s helical trajectory, an analytic solution for the radial probability distribution function follows which applies to experiments in which particles are generated throughout a volume that spans a sufficient length along the axis of a homogeneous magnetic field. This approach leads to the same result as a different derivation given by Dubbers et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 763, 112–119 (2014). But the constant phase approximation does not strictly apply to finite source volumes or fixed positions, which lead to local maxima in the radial distribution of emitted particles at the plane of the detector. A simple method is given to calculate such distributions, then the effect is demonstrated with data from a {sup 207}Bi electron-conversion source in the superconducting solenoid magnet spectrometer of the Ultracold Neutron facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Implications for neutron beta decay spectroscopy are discussed.

  12. Torsion stiffness of a protein pair determined by magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Janssen, X J A; van Noorloos, J M; Jacob, A; van Ijzendoorn, L J; de Jong, A M; Prins, M W J

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate the ability to measure torsion stiffness of a protein complex by applying a controlled torque on a magnetic particle. As a model system we use protein G bound to an IgG antibody. The protein pair is held between a magnetic particle and a polystyrene substrate. The angular orientation of the magnetic particle shows an oscillating behavior upon application of a rotating magnetic field. The amplitude of the oscillation increases with a decreasing surface coverage of antibodies on the substrate and with an increasing magnitude of the applied field. For decreasing antibody coverage, the torsion spring constant converges to a minimum value of 1.5 × 10(3) pN·nm/rad that corresponds to a torsion modulus of 4.5 × 10(4) pN·nm(2). This torsion stiffness is an upper limit for the molecular bond between the particle and the surface that is tentatively assigned to a single protein G-IgG protein pair. This assignment is supported by interpreting the measured stiffness with a simple mechanical model that predicts a two orders of magnitude larger stiffness for the protein G-IgG complex than values found for micrometer length dsDNA. This we understand from the structural properties of the molecules, i.e., DNA is a long and flexible chain-like molecule, whereas the antibody-antigen couple is orders of magnitude smaller and more globular in shape due to the folding of the molecules.

  13. Nonadiabatic behavior of the magnetic moment of a charged particle in a dipole magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, Sadayoshi; Sato, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Akira

    1990-01-01

    This paper investigates the dynamic behavior of the magnetic moment of a particle confined in a magnetic dipole field in the presence of a low-frequency electrostatic wave. It is shown that there exist two kinds of resonances (the bounce-E x B drift resonance and the wave-drift resonance) by which the adiabaticity of the magnetic moment is broken. The unstable conditions obtained by theoretical considerations showed good agreement with the numerical results.

  14. Study of the structuralization of the magnetic particles in magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomco, L.; Kopcansky, P.; Koneracka, M.; Kellnerova, V.

    1994-03-01

    A magnetic field induced agglomeration of magnetic particles in magnetic fluids (mineral oil and kerosene based) with several volume concentrations was studied by means of optical microscope equipped with a video camera. Scrutiny of the video revealed that time evolution of the aggregation process results from two processes i.e.: (1) the formation of new (or primary) agglomerations (t less than or equal to 2s); and (2) the coalescence of primary agglomerations (t greater than 2s).

  15. Magnetic particles as affinity matrix for purification of antithrombin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercês, A. A. D.; Maciel, J. C.; Carvalho Júnior, L. B.

    2015-11-01

    Immobilization of biomolecules onto insoluble supports is an important tool for the fabrication of a diverse range of functional materials. It provides advantages: enhanced stability and easy separation. In this work two different magnetic composites were synthesized (MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS) to human antithrombin purification. The magnetic particles (MAG) were obtained by co-precipitation method of iron salts II and III and subsequently coated with polyaniline (MAG-PANI particles). Dacron (polyethylene terephthalate) suffered a hydrazinolysis reaction to obtain a powder (Dacron hydrazide) which was subsequently magnetized (mDAC particles) also by co-precipitation method. Heparan sulfate (HS) was immobilized to MAG-PANI and mDAC retained respectively 35μg and 38.6μg per of support. The magnetic composite containing HS immobilized (MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS) was incubated with human blood plasma (1mL) and then washed with NaCl gradients. Electrophoresis of proteins present in eluates showed bands of antithrombin (58kDa). A reduction in the antithrombin activity was detected in plasma that were incubated in the composites magnetic with HS immobilized, suggesting that the antithrombin was removed of the human blood plasma and then purified. Therefore, the above results suggest that both preparations: MAG-PANI-HS and mDAC-HS are able to affinity purify antithrombin, an important component of blood coagulation.

  16. Bacterial turbulence reduction by passive magnetic particle chains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuo-An; I, Lin

    2013-09-01

    We report the experimental observation of the bacterial turbulence reduction in dense E. coli suspensions by increasing the coupling of passive particle additives (paramagnetic particles). Applying an external magnetic field induces magnetic dipoles for particles and causes the formation of vertical chain bundles, which are hard for bacterial flows to tilt and break. The larger effective drag coefficient of chains causes slow horizontal motion of chains, which in turn form obstacles to suppress bacterial flows through the strong correlation in coherent bacterial clusters and intercluster interaction. The interruption of the upward energy flow from individual self-propelling bacteria to the larger scale in the bacterial turbulence with multiscaled coherent flow by the chain bundle leads to more severe suppression in the low frequency (wave number) regimes of the power spectra. PMID:24125341

  17. Bacterial turbulence reduction by passive magnetic particle chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kuo-An; I, Lin

    2013-09-01

    We report the experimental observation of the bacterial turbulence reduction in dense E. coli suspensions by increasing the coupling of passive particle additives (paramagnetic particles). Applying an external magnetic field induces magnetic dipoles for particles and causes the formation of vertical chain bundles, which are hard for bacterial flows to tilt and break. The larger effective drag coefficient of chains causes slow horizontal motion of chains, which in turn form obstacles to suppress bacterial flows through the strong correlation in coherent bacterial clusters and intercluster interaction. The interruption of the upward energy flow from individual self-propelling bacteria to the larger scale in the bacterial turbulence with multiscaled coherent flow by the chain bundle leads to more severe suppression in the low frequency (wave number) regimes of the power spectra.

  18. Particle acceleration, magnetization and radiation in relativistic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derishev, Evgeny V.; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms of particle acceleration and radiation, as well as magnetic field build-up and decay in relativistic collisionless shocks, are open questions with important implications to various phenomena in high-energy astrophysics. While the Weibel instability is possibly responsible for magnetic field build-up and diffusive shock acceleration is a model for acceleration, both have problems and current particle-in-cell simulations show that particles are accelerated only under special conditions and the magnetic field decays on a very short length-scale. We present here a novel model for the structure and the emission of highly relativistic collisionless shocks. The model takes into account (and is based on) non-local energy and momentum transport across the shock front via emission and absorption of high-energy photons. This leads to a pre-acceleration of the fluid and pre-amplification of the magnetic fields in the upstream region. Both have drastic implications on the shock structure. The model explains the persistence of the shock-generated magnetic field at large distances from the shock front. The dissipation of this magnetic field results in a continuous particle acceleration within the downstream region. A unique feature of the model is the existence of an `attractor', towards which any shock will evolve. The model is applicable to any relativistic shock, but its distinctive features show up only for sufficiently large compactness. We demonstrate that prompt and afterglow gamma-ray bursts' shocks satisfy the relevant conditions, and we compare their observations with the predictions of the model.

  19. Chaotic motion of charged particles in toroidal magnetic configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Cambon, Benjamin; Leoncini, Xavier; Vittot, Michel; Dumont, Rémi; Garbet, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    We study the motion of a charged particle in a tokamak magnetic field and discuss its chaotic nature. Contrary to most of recent studies, we do not make any assumption on any constant of the motion and solve numerically the cyclotron gyration using Hamiltonian formalism. We take advantage of a symplectic integrator allowing us to make long-time simulations. First considering an idealized magnetic configuration, we add a nongeneric perturbation corresponding to a magnetic ripple, breaking one of the invariant of the motion. Chaotic motion is then observed and opens questions about the link between chaos of magnetic field lines and chaos of particle trajectories. Second, we return to an axisymmetric configuration and tune the safety factor (magnetic configuration) in order to recover chaotic motion. In this last setting with two constants of the motion, the presence of chaos implies that no third global constant exists, we highlight this fact by looking at variations of the first order of the magnetic moment in this chaotic setting. We are facing a mixed phase space with both regular and chaotic regions and point out the difficulties in performing a global reduction such as gyrokinetics.

  20. Chaotic motion of charged particles in toroidal magnetic configurations.

    PubMed

    Cambon, Benjamin; Leoncini, Xavier; Vittot, Michel; Dumont, Rémi; Garbet, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    We study the motion of a charged particle in a tokamak magnetic field and discuss its chaotic nature. Contrary to most of recent studies, we do not make any assumption on any constant of the motion and solve numerically the cyclotron gyration using Hamiltonian formalism. We take advantage of a symplectic integrator allowing us to make long-time simulations. First considering an idealized magnetic configuration, we add a nongeneric perturbation corresponding to a magnetic ripple, breaking one of the invariant of the motion. Chaotic motion is then observed and opens questions about the link between chaos of magnetic field lines and chaos of particle trajectories. Second, we return to an axisymmetric configuration and tune the safety factor (magnetic configuration) in order to recover chaotic motion. In this last setting with two constants of the motion, the presence of chaos implies that no third global constant exists, we highlight this fact by looking at variations of the first order of the magnetic moment in this chaotic setting. We are facing a mixed phase space with both regular and chaotic regions and point out the difficulties in performing a global reduction such as gyrokinetics.

  1. Correlation-Based Image Reconstruction Methods for Magnetic Particle Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Yasutoshi; Kuwabara, Tsuyoshi; Honma, Takumi; Nakagawa, Yohei

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI), in which the nonlinear interaction between internally administered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and electromagnetic waves irradiated from outside of the body is utilized, has attracted attention for its potential to achieve early diagnosis of diseases such as cancer. In MPI, the local magnetic field distribution is scanned, and the magnetization signal from MNPs within a selected region is detected. However, the signal sensitivity and image resolution are degraded by interference from magnetization signals generated by MNPs outside of the selected region, mainly because of imperfections (limited gradients) in the local magnetic field distribution. Here, we propose new methods based on correlation information between the observed signal and the system function—defined as the interaction between the magnetic field distribution and the magnetizing properties of MNPs. We performed numerical analyses and found that, although the images were somewhat blurred, image artifacts could be significantly reduced and accurate images could be reconstructed without the inverse-matrix operation used in conventional image reconstruction methods.

  2. Fractional dynamics of charged particles in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronel-Escamilla, A.; Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Alvarado-Méndez, E.; Guerrero-Ramírez, G. V.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.

    2016-02-01

    In many physical applications the electrons play a relevant role. For example, when a beam of electrons accelerated to relativistic velocities is used as an active medium to generate Free Electron Lasers (FEL), the electrons are bound to atoms, but move freely in a magnetic field. The relaxation time, longitudinal effects and transverse variations of the optical field are parameters that play an important role in the efficiency of this laser. The electron dynamics in a magnetic field is a means of radiation source for coupling to the electric field. The transverse motion of the electrons leads to either gain or loss energy from or to the field, depending on the position of the particle regarding the phase of the external radiation field. Due to the importance to know with great certainty the displacement of charged particles in a magnetic field, in this work we study the fractional dynamics of charged particles in magnetic fields. Newton’s second law is considered and the order of the fractional differential equation is (0;1]. Based on the Grünwald-Letnikov (GL) definition, the discretization of fractional differential equations is reported to get numerical simulations. Comparison between the numerical solutions obtained on Euler’s numerical method for the classical case and the GL definition in the fractional approach proves the good performance of the numerical scheme applied. Three application examples are shown: constant magnetic field, ramp magnetic field and harmonic magnetic field. In the first example the results obtained show bistability. Dissipative effects are observed in the system and the standard dynamic is recovered when the order of the fractional derivative is 1.

  3. Quantitative Magnetic Separation of Particles and Cells Using Gradient Magnetic Ratcheting.

    PubMed

    Murray, Coleman; Pao, Edward; Tseng, Peter; Aftab, Shayan; Kulkarni, Rajan; Rettig, Matthew; Di Carlo, Dino

    2016-04-13

    Extraction of rare target cells from biosamples is enabling for life science research. Traditional rare cell separation techniques, such as magnetic activated cell sorting, are robust but perform coarse, qualitative separations based on surface antigen expression. A quantitative magnetic separation technology is reported using high-force magnetic ratcheting over arrays of magnetically soft micropillars with gradient spacing, and the system is used to separate and concentrate magnetic beads based on iron oxide content (IOC) and cells based on surface expression. The system consists of a microchip of permalloy micropillar arrays with increasing lateral pitch and a mechatronic device to generate a cycling magnetic field. Particles with higher IOC separate and equilibrate along the miropillar array at larger pitches. A semi-analytical model is developed that predicts behavior for particles and cells. Using the system, LNCaP cells are separated based on the bound quantity of 1 μm anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) particles as a metric for expression. The ratcheting cytometry system is able to resolve a ±13 bound particle differential, successfully distinguishing LNCaP from PC3 populations based on EpCAM expression, correlating with flow cytometry analysis. As a proof-of-concept, EpCAM-labeled cells from patient blood are isolated with 74% purity, demonstrating potential toward a quantitative magnetic separation instrument. PMID:26890496

  4. Quantitative Magnetic Separation of Particles and Cells Using Gradient Magnetic Ratcheting.

    PubMed

    Murray, Coleman; Pao, Edward; Tseng, Peter; Aftab, Shayan; Kulkarni, Rajan; Rettig, Matthew; Di Carlo, Dino

    2016-04-13

    Extraction of rare target cells from biosamples is enabling for life science research. Traditional rare cell separation techniques, such as magnetic activated cell sorting, are robust but perform coarse, qualitative separations based on surface antigen expression. A quantitative magnetic separation technology is reported using high-force magnetic ratcheting over arrays of magnetically soft micropillars with gradient spacing, and the system is used to separate and concentrate magnetic beads based on iron oxide content (IOC) and cells based on surface expression. The system consists of a microchip of permalloy micropillar arrays with increasing lateral pitch and a mechatronic device to generate a cycling magnetic field. Particles with higher IOC separate and equilibrate along the miropillar array at larger pitches. A semi-analytical model is developed that predicts behavior for particles and cells. Using the system, LNCaP cells are separated based on the bound quantity of 1 μm anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) particles as a metric for expression. The ratcheting cytometry system is able to resolve a ±13 bound particle differential, successfully distinguishing LNCaP from PC3 populations based on EpCAM expression, correlating with flow cytometry analysis. As a proof-of-concept, EpCAM-labeled cells from patient blood are isolated with 74% purity, demonstrating potential toward a quantitative magnetic separation instrument.

  5. Theory of using magnetic deflections to combine charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckbeck, Mackenzie K.; Doyle, Barney Lee

    2014-09-01

    Several radiation effects projects in the Ion Beam Lab (IBL) have recently required two disparate charged particle beams to simultaneously strike a single sample through a single port of the target chamber. Because these beams have vastly different mass–energy products (MEP), the low-MEP beam requires a large angle of deflection toward the sample by a bending electromagnet. A second electromagnet located further upstream provides a means to compensate for the small angle deflection experienced by the high-MEP beam during its path through the bending magnet. This paper derives the equations used to select the magnetic fields required by these two magnets to achieve uniting both beams at the target sample. A simple result was obtained when the separation of the two magnets was equivalent to the distance from the bending magnet to the sample, and the equations is given by: Bs= 1/2(rc/rs) Bc, where Bs and Bc are the magnetic fields in the steering and bending magnet and rc/rs is the ratio of the radii of the bending magnet to that of the steering magnet. This result is not dependent upon the parameters of the high MEP beam, i.e. energy, mass, charge state. Therefore, once the field of the bending magnet is set for the low-MEP beam, and the field in the steering magnet is set as indicted in the equation, the trajectory path of any high-MEP beam will be directed into the sample.

  6. Beaming of Particles and Synchrotron Radiation in Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Daniel; Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-08-01

    Relativistic reconnection has been invoked as a mechanism for particle acceleration in numerous astrophysical systems. According to idealized analytical models, reconnection produces a bulk relativistic outflow emerging from the reconnection sites (X-points). The resulting radiation is therefore highly beamed. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate particle and radiation beaming, finding a very different picture. Instead of having a relativistic average bulk motion with an isotropic electron velocity distribution in its rest frame, we find that the bulk motion of the particles in X-points is similar to their Lorentz factor γ, and the particles are beamed within ˜ 5/γ . On the way from the X-point to the magnetic islands, particles turn in the magnetic field, forming a fan confined to the current sheet. Once they reach the islands they isotropize after completing a full Larmor gyration and their radiation is no longer strongly beamed. The radiation pattern at a given frequency depends on where the corresponding emitting electrons radiate their energy. Lower-energy particles that cool slowly spend most of their time in the islands and their radiation is not highly beamed. Only particles that quickly cool at the edge of the X-points generate a highly beamed fan-like radiation pattern. The radiation emerging from these fast cooling particles is above the burn-off limit (˜100 MeV in the overall rest frame of the reconnecting plasma). This has significant implications for models of gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei that invoke beaming in that frame at much lower energies.

  7. Influence of magnetic field on the orientation of anisotropic magnetic particles at liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Newton, Bethany J; Brakke, Kenneth A; Buzza, D Martin A

    2014-12-21

    We study theoretically the influence of an external magnetic field on the orientation of an ellipsoidal magnetic particle adsorbed at a liquid interface. Using the finite element program Surface Evolver, we calculate the equilibrium meniscus shape around the ellipsoidal particle and its equilibrium tilt angle with respect to the undeformed interface θt when a magnetic field B is applied perpendicular to the interface. We find that as we increase field strength, θt increases and at a critical magnetic field Bc1 and tilt angle θc1, the particle undergoes a discontinuous transition to the 'perpendicular' orientation (θt = 90°). Our results agree qualitatively with the simplified theory of Bresme and Faraudo [F. Bresme and J. Faraudo, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter, 2007, 19, 375110] which assumes that the liquid interface is flat, while they agree quantitatively with recent lattice-Boltzmann simulations of Davies et al. [G. Davies et al., Soft Matter, 2014, 10, 6742] which account for the deformation of the liquid meniscus. We also show for the first time that upon reducing the external magnetic field, at a critical magnetic field Bc2 < Bc1, the particle undergoes a second discontinuous transition from the perpendicular orientation to a finite tilt angle θc2 < θc1. In other words, for micron-sized particles where the thermal energy kBT is negligible compared to the interfacial energy, the tilt angle vs. magnetic field curve exhibits hysteresis behaviour. Due to the higher degree of accuracy of the Surface Evolver method, we are able to analyse the behaviour of the particles near these orientational transitions accurately and study how the critical quantities Bc1, Bc2, θc1 and θc2 vary with particle aspect ratio and contact angle.

  8. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN RELATIVISTIC MAGNETIZED COLLISIONLESS ELECTRON-ION SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Spitkovsky, Anatoly E-mail: anatoly@astro.princeton.edu

    2011-01-10

    We investigate shock structure and particle acceleration in relativistic magnetized collisionless electron-ion shocks by means of 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations with ion-to-electron mass ratios (m{sub i} /m{sub e} ) ranging from 16 to 1000. We explore a range of inclination angles between the pre-shock magnetic field and the shock normal. In 'subluminal' shocks, where relativistic particles can escape ahead of the shock along the magnetic field lines, ions are efficiently accelerated via the first-order Fermi process. The downstream ion spectrum consists of a relativistic Maxwellian and a high-energy power-law tail, which contains {approx}5% of ions and {approx}30% of ion energy. Its slope is -2.1 {+-} 0.1. The scattering is provided by short-wavelength non-resonant modes produced by Bell's instability, whose growth is seeded by the current of shock-accelerated ions that propagate ahead of the shock. Upstream electrons enter the shock with lower energy than ions (albeit by only a factor of {approx}5 << m{sub i} /m{sub e} ), so they are more strongly tied to the field. As a result, only {approx}1% of the incoming electrons are accelerated at the shock before being advected downstream, where they populate a steep power-law tail (with slope -3.5 {+-} 0.1). For 'superluminal' shocks, where relativistic particles cannot outrun the shock along the field, the self-generated turbulence is not strong enough to permit efficient Fermi acceleration, and the ion and electron downstream spectra are consistent with thermal distributions. The incoming electrons are heated up to equipartition with ions, due to strong electromagnetic waves emitted by the shock into the upstream. Thus, efficient electron heating ({approx}>15% of the upstream ion energy) is the universal property of relativistic electron-ion shocks, but significant nonthermal acceleration of electrons ({approx}>2% by number, {approx}>10% by energy, with slope flatter than -2.5) is hard to achieve in

  9. Targeted multifunctional gold-based nanoshells for magnetic resonance-guided laser ablation of head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melancon, Marites P.; Lu, Wei; Zhong, Meng; Zhou, Min; Liang, Gan; Elliott, Andrew M.; Hazle, John D.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Li, Chun; Stafford, R. Jason

    2011-01-01

    Image-guided thermal ablation of tumors is becoming a more widely accepted minimally invasive alternative to surgery for patients who are not good surgical candidates, such as patients with advanced head and neck cancer. In this study, multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide coated with gold nanoshell (SPIO@Au NS) that have both optical and magnetic properties was conjugated with the targeting agent, C225 monoclonal antibody, against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). C225-SPIO@Au NS have an average a diameter of 82±4.4 nm, contain 142±15 antibodies per nanoshell, have an absorption peak in the near infrared (~800 nm), and have transverse relaxivity (r2) of 193 and 353 mM−1s−1 versus Feridex of 171 and 300 mM−1s−1, using 1.5T and 7T MR scanners, respectively. Specific targeting of the synthesized C225-SPIO@Au NS was tested in vitro using A431 cells and oral cancer cells, FaDu, OSC-19, and HN5, all of which overexpress EGFR. Selective binding was achieved using C225-SPIO@Au NS but not with the non-targeting PEG-SPIO@Au NS and blocking group (excess of C225 + C225-SPIO@Au NS). In vivo biodistribution on mice bearing A431 tumors also showed selective targeting of C225-SPIO@Au NS compared with the non-targeting and blocking groups. The selective photothermal ablation of the nanoshells shows that without laser treatment there were no cell death and among the groups that were treated with laser at a power of 36 W/cm2 for 3 minutes, only the cells treated with C225-SPIO@Au NS had cell killing (p < 0.001). In summary, successful synthesis and characterization of targeted C225-SPIO@Au NS demonstrating both superparamagnetic and optical properties has been achieved. We have shown both in vitro and in vivo that these nanoshells are MR-active and can be selectively heated up for simultaneous imaging and photothermal ablation therapy. PMID:21745689

  10. Targeted multifunctional gold-based nanoshells for magnetic resonance-guided laser ablation of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Melancon, Marites P; Lu, Wei; Zhong, Meng; Zhou, Min; Liang, Gan; Elliott, Andrew M; Hazle, John D; Myers, Jeffrey N; Li, Chun; Stafford, R Jason

    2011-10-01

    Image-guided thermal ablation of tumors is becoming a more widely accepted minimally invasive alternative to surgery for patients who are not good surgical candidates, such as patients with advanced head and neck cancer. In this study, multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide coated with gold nanoshell (SPIO@Au NS) that have both optical and magnetic properties was conjugated with the targeting agent, C225 monoclonal antibody, against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). C225-SPIO@Au NS have an average a diameter of 82 ± 4.4 nm, contain 142 ± 15 antibodies per nanoshell, have an absorption peak in the near infrared (~800 nm), and have transverse relaxivity (r(2)) of 193 and 353 mM(-1) s(-1) versus Feridex™ of 171 and 300 mM(-1) s(-1), using 1.5 T and 7 T MR scanners, respectively. Specific targeting of the synthesized C225-SPIO@Au NS was tested in vitro using A431 cells and oral cancer cells, FaDu, OSC19, and HN5, all of which overexpress EGFR. Selective binding was achieved using C225-SPIO@Au NS but not with the non-targeting PEG-SPIO@Au NS and blocking group (excess of C225 + C225-SPIO@Au NS). In vivo biodistribution on mice bearing A431 tumors also showed selective targeting of C225-SPIO@Au NS compared with the non-targeting and blocking groups. The selective photothermal ablation of the nanoshells shows that without laser treatment there were no cell death and among the groups that were treated with laser at a power of 36 W/cm(2) for 3 min, only the cells treated with C225-SPIO@Au NS had cell killing (p < 0.001). In summary, successful synthesis and characterization of targeted C225-SPIO@Au NS demonstrating both superparamagnetic and optical properties has been achieved. We have shown both in vitro and in vivo that these nanoshells are MR-active and can be selectively heated up for simultaneous imaging and photothermal ablation therapy. PMID:21745689

  11. Coordinates for Mapping the Distribution of Magnetically Trapped Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McIlwain, Carl E.

    1961-01-01

    Dipole representations of the earth's magnetic field have been found to have insufficient accuracy for the study of magnetically trapped particles. A coordinate system consisting of the magnitude of the magnetic field B, and the integral invariant I has been found to adequately organize, measurements made at different geographic locations. It is shown in the present paper, that a parameter L = f(B,I) can be defined which retains most of the desirable properties of I and which has the additional property of organizing measurements along lines of force. Since the parameter L is the analog of a physical distance in a dipole field (the equatorial radius of a magnetic shell), it is usually found to present fewer conceptual difficulties than the integral invariant I.

  12. Reflected Charged Particle Populations around Dipolar Lunar Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey

    2016-10-01

    In this work we analyze and compare the reflected particle populations for both a horizontal and a vertical dipole model embedded in the lunar surface, representing the solar wind interaction with two different lunar magnetic anomaly (LMA) structures. Using the 3D full-kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D, in combination with a test-particle approach to generate particle trajectories, we focus on the ion and electron dynamics. Whereas the vertical model electrostatically reflects ions upward under both near-parallel and near-perpendicular angles with respect to the lunar surface, the horizontal model only has a significant shallow component. Characterizing the electron dynamics, we find that the interplay of the mini-magnetosphere electric and magnetic fields is capable of temporarily trapping low-energy electrons and possibly ejecting them upstream. Our results are in agreement with recent high-resolution observations. Low- to medium-altitude ion and electron observations might be excellent indicators to complement orbital magnetic field measurements and better uncover the underlying magnetic field structure. The latter is of particular importance in defining the correlation between LMAs and lunar swirls, and further testing the solar wind shielding hypothesis for albedo markings due to space weathering. Observing more reflected ions does not necessarily point to the existence of a mini-magnetosphere.

  13. Development of training modules for magnetic particle inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Daigo; Eisenmann, David J.; Enyart, Darrel; Nakagawa, Norio; Lo, Chester; Orman, David

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic particle inspection (MPI) is a nondestructive evaluation technique used with ferromagnetic materials. Although the application of this method may appear straightforward, MPI combines the complicated nature of electromagnetics, metallurgical material effects, fluid-particle motion dynamics, and physiological human factors into a single inspection. To fully appreciate industry specifications such as ASTM E-1444, users should develop a basic understanding of the many factors that are involved in MPI. We have developed a series of MPI training modules that are aimed at addressing this requirement. The modules not only offer qualitative explanations, but also show quantitative explanations in terms of measurement and numerical simulation data in many instances. There are five modules in all. Module ♯1 shows characteristics of waveforms and magnetizing methods. This allows MPI practitioners to make optimum choice of waveform and magnetizing method. Module ♯2 explains how material properties relate to the magnetic characteristics. Module ♯3 shows the strength of the excitation field or the flux leakage from a crack and how it compares to the detectability of a crack by MPI. Module ♯4 shows how specimen status may influence defect detection. Module ♯5 shows the effects of particle properties on defect detection.

  14. Biomarker detection of global infectious diseases based on magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Carinelli, Soledad; Martí, Mercè; Alegret, Salvador; Pividori, María Isabel

    2015-09-25

    Infectious diseases affect the daily lives of millions of people all around the world, and are responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths, mostly in the developing world. Although most of these major infectious diseases are treatable, the early identification of individuals requiring treatment remains a major issue. The incidence of these diseases would be reduced if rapid diagnostic tests were widely available at the community and primary care level in low-resource settings. Strong research efforts are thus being focused on replacing standard clinical diagnostic methods, such as the invasive detection techniques (biopsy or endoscopy) or expensive diagnostic and monitoring methods, by affordable and sensitive tests based on novel biomarkers. The development of new methods that are needed includes solid-phase separation techniques. In this context, the integration of magnetic particles within bioassays and biosensing devices is very promising since they greatly improve the performance of a biological reaction. The diagnosis of clinical samples with magnetic particles can be easily achieved without pre-enrichment, purification or pretreatment steps often required for standard methods, simplifying the analytical procedures. The biomarkers can be specifically isolated and preconcentrated from complex biological matrixes by magnetic actuation, increasing specificity and the sensitivity of the assay. This review addresses these promising features of the magnetic particles for the detection of biomarkers in emerging technologies related with infectious diseases affecting global health, such as malaria, influenza, dengue, tuberculosis or HIV.

  15. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Emission from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Fishman, G. Jerry; Hartmann, D. H.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), supernova remnants, and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration' is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different spectral properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations of relativistic jets and try to make a connection with observations.

  16. Selective activation of mechanosensitive ion channels using magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Steven; McBain, Stuart; Dobson, Jon; El Haj, Alicia J

    2008-08-01

    This study reports the preliminary development of a novel magnetic particle-based technique that permits the application of highly localized mechanical forces directly to specific regions of an ion-channel structure. We demonstrate that this approach can be used to directly and selectively activate a mechanosensitive ion channel of interest, namely TREK-1. It is shown that manipulation of particles targeted against the extended extracellular loop region of TREK-1 leads to changes in whole-cell currents consistent with changes in TREK-1 activity. Responses were absent when particles were coated with RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) peptide or when magnetic fields were applied in the absence of magnetic particles. It is concluded that changes in whole-cell current are the result of direct force application to the extracellular loop region of TREK-1 and thus these results implicate this region of the channel structure in mechano-gating. It is hypothesized that the extended loop region of TREK-1 may act as a tension spring that acts to regulate sensitivity to mechanical forces, in a nature similar to that described for MscL. The development of a technique that permits the direct manipulation of mechanosensitive ion channels in real time without the need for pharmacological drugs has huge potential benefits not only for basic biological research of ion-channel gating mechanisms, but also potentially as a tool for the treatment of human diseases caused by ion-channel dysfunction.

  17. Magnetic Particle Detection (MPD) for In-Vitro Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R.; Littke, Matthew H.; Wang, Wei; Xiong, Yijia; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-05-15

    In-vitro tests intended for evaluating the potential health effects of magnetic nanoparticles generally require an accurate measure of cell dose to promote the consistent use and interpretation of biological response. Here, a simple low-cost inductive sensor is developed for quickly determining the total mass of magnetic nanoparticles that is bound to the plasma membrane and internalized by cultured cells. Sensor operation exploits an oscillating magnetic field (f0 = 250 kHz) together with the nonlinear response of particle magnetization to generate a harmonic signal (f3 = 750 kHz) that varies linearly with particulate mass (R2 > 0.999) and is sufficiently sensitive for detecting ~ 100 ng of carboxyl-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles in under a second. When exploited for measuring receptor-mediated nanoparticle uptake in RAW 264.7 macrophages, results show that achieved dosimetry performance is comparable with relatively expensive analytical techniques that are much more time-consuming and labor-intensive to perform. Described sensing is therefore potentially better suited for low-cost in-vitro assays that require fast and quantitative magnetic particle detection.

  18. Structure organization and magnetic properties of microscale ferrogels: The effect of particle magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhkov, Aleksandr V.; Melenev, Petr V.; Balasoiu, Maria; Raikher, Yuriy L.

    2016-08-01

    The equilibrium structure and magnetic properties of a ferrogel object of small size (microferrogel(MFG)) are investigated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics. As a generic model of a microferrogel (MFG), a sample with a lattice-like mesh is taken. The solid phase of the MFG consists of magnetic (e.g., ferrite) nanoparticles which are mechanically linked to the mesh making some part of its nodes. Unlike previous models, the finite uniaxial magnetic anisotropy of the particles, as it is the case for real ferrogels, is taken into account. For comparison, two types of MFGs are considered: MFG-1, which dwells in virtually non-aggregated state independently of the presence of an external magnetic field, and MFG-2, which displays aggregation yet under zero field. The structure states of the samples are analyzed with the aid of angle-resolved radial distribution functions and cluster counts. The results reveal the crucial role of the matrix elasticity on the structure organization as well as on magnetization of both MFGs. The particle anisotropy, which plays insignificant role in MFG-1 (moderate interparticle magnetodipole interaction), becomes an important factor in MFG-2 (strong interaction). There, the restrictions imposed on the particle angular freedom by the elastic matrix result in notable diminution of the particle chain lengths as well as the magnetization of the sample. The approach proposed enables one to investigate a large variety of MFGs, including those of capsule type and to purposefully choose the combination of their magnetoelastic parameters.

  19. Structure organization and magnetic properties of microscale ferrogels: The effect of particle magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Ryzhkov, Aleksandr V; Melenev, Petr V; Balasoiu, Maria; Raikher, Yuriy L

    2016-08-21

    The equilibrium structure and magnetic properties of a ferrogel object of small size (microferrogel(MFG)) are investigated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics. As a generic model of a microferrogel (MFG), a sample with a lattice-like mesh is taken. The solid phase of the MFG consists of magnetic (e.g., ferrite) nanoparticles which are mechanically linked to the mesh making some part of its nodes. Unlike previous models, the finite uniaxial magnetic anisotropy of the particles, as it is the case for real ferrogels, is taken into account. For comparison, two types of MFGs are considered: MFG-1, which dwells in virtually non-aggregated state independently of the presence of an external magnetic field, and MFG-2, which displays aggregation yet under zero field. The structure states of the samples are analyzed with the aid of angle-resolved radial distribution functions and cluster counts. The results reveal the crucial role of the matrix elasticity on the structure organization as well as on magnetization of both MFGs. The particle anisotropy, which plays insignificant role in MFG-1 (moderate interparticle magnetodipole interaction), becomes an important factor in MFG-2 (strong interaction). There, the restrictions imposed on the particle angular freedom by the elastic matrix result in notable diminution of the particle chain lengths as well as the magnetization of the sample. The approach proposed enables one to investigate a large variety of MFGs, including those of capsule type and to purposefully choose the combination of their magnetoelastic parameters. PMID:27544124

  20. Quantification in histopathology—Can magnetic particles help?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchels, John; Hawkins, Peter; Luxton, Richard; Rhodes, Anthony

    2007-04-01

    Every year, more than 270,000 people are diagnosed with cancer in the UK alone; this means that one in three people worldwide contract cancer within their lifetime. Histopathology is the principle method for confirming cancer and directing treatment. In this paper, a novel application of magnetic particles is proposed to help address the problem of subjectivity in histopathology. Preliminary results indicate that magnetic nanoparticles cannot only be used to assist diagnosis through improving quantification but also potentially increase throughput, hence offering a way of dramatically reducing costs within the routine histopathology laboratory.

  1. Magnetic Particle Imaging with Tailored Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P.; Kemp, Scott J.; Arami, Hamed; Saritas, Emine U.; Croft, Laura R.; Konkle, Justin; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Halkola, Aleksi; Rahmer, Jürgen; Borgert, Jörn; Conolly, Steven M.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) shows promise for medical imaging, particularly in angiography of patients with chronic kidney disease. As the first biomedical imaging technique that truly depends on nanoscale materials properties, MPI requires highly optimized magnetic nanoparticle tracers to generate quality images. Until now, researchers have relied on tracers optimized for MRI T2*-weighted imaging that are suboptimal for MPI. Here, we describe new tracers tailored to MPI's unique physics, synthesized using an organic-phase process and functionalized to ensure biocompatibility and adequate in vivo circulation time. Tailored tracers showed up to 3x greater SNR and better spatial resolution than existing commercial tracers in MPI images of phantoms. PMID:25438306

  2. Magnetic particle hyperthermia--a promising tumour therapy?

    PubMed

    Dutz, Silvio; Hergt, Rudolf

    2014-11-14

    We present a critical review of the state of the art of magnetic particle hyperthermia (MPH) as a minimal invasive tumour therapy. Magnetic principles of heating mechanisms are discussed with respect to the optimum choice of nanoparticle properties. In particular, the relation between superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic single domain nanoparticles is clarified in order to choose the appropriate particle size distribution and the role of particle mobility for the relaxation path is discussed. Knowledge of the effect of particle properties for achieving high specific heating power provides necessary guidelines for development of nanoparticles tailored for tumour therapy. Nanoscale heat transfer processes are discussed with respect to the achievable temperature increase in cancer cells. The need to realize a well-controlled temperature distribution in tumour tissue represents the most serious problem of MPH, at present. Visionary concepts of particle administration, in particular by means of antibody targeting, are far from clinical practice, yet. On the basis of current knowledge of treating cancer by thermal damaging, this article elucidates possibilities, prospects, and challenges for establishment of MPH as a standard medical procedure. PMID:25337919

  3. Magnetic particle hyperthermia—a promising tumour therapy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutz, Silvio; Hergt, Rudolf

    2014-11-01

    We present a critical review of the state of the art of magnetic particle hyperthermia (MPH) as a minimal invasive tumour therapy. Magnetic principles of heating mechanisms are discussed with respect to the optimum choice of nanoparticle properties. In particular, the relation between superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic single domain nanoparticles is clarified in order to choose the appropriate particle size distribution and the role of particle mobility for the relaxation path is discussed. Knowledge of the effect of particle properties for achieving high specific heating power provides necessary guidelines for development of nanoparticles tailored for tumour therapy. Nanoscale heat transfer processes are discussed with respect to the achievable temperature increase in cancer cells. The need to realize a well-controlled temperature distribution in tumour tissue represents the most serious problem of MPH, at present. Visionary concepts of particle administration, in particular by means of antibody targeting, are far from clinical practice, yet. On the basis of current knowledge of treating cancer by thermal damaging, this article elucidates possibilities, prospects, and challenges for establishment of MPH as a standard medical procedure.

  4. Multifunctional NaYF4:Yb, Er@mSiO2@Fe3O4-PEG nanoparticles for UCL/MR bioimaging and magnetically targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bei; Li, Chunxia; Ma, Ping'an; Chen, Yinyin; Zhang, Yuanxin; Hou, Zhiyao; Huang, Shanshan; Lin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    A low toxic multifunctional nanoplatform, integrating both mutimodal diagnosis methods and antitumor therapy, is highly desirable to assure its antitumor efficiency. In this work, we show a convenient and adjustable synthesis of multifunctional nanoparticles NaYF4:Yb, Er@mSiO2@Fe3O4-PEG (MFNPs) based on different sizes of up-conversion nanoparticles (UCNPs). With strong up-conversion fluorescence offered by UCNPs, superparamagnetism properties attributed to Fe3O4 nanoparticles and porous structure coming from the mesoporous SiO2 shell, the as-obtained MFNPs can be utilized not only as a contrast agent for dual modal up-conversion luminescence (UCL)/magnetic resonance (MR) bio-imaging, but can also achieve an effective magnetically targeted antitumor chemotherapy both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the UCL intensity of UCNPs and the magnetic properties of Fe3O4 in the MFNPs were carefully balanced. Silica coating and further PEG modifying can improve the hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of the as-synthesized MFNPs, which was confirmed by the in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility and in vivo long-time bio-distributions tests. Those results revealed that the UCNPs based magnetically targeted drug carrier system we synthesized has great promise in the future for multimodal bio-imaging and targeted cancer therapy.A low toxic multifunctional nanoplatform, integrating both mutimodal diagnosis methods and antitumor therapy, is highly desirable to assure its antitumor efficiency. In this work, we show a convenient and adjustable synthesis of multifunctional nanoparticles NaYF4:Yb, Er@mSiO2@Fe3O4-PEG (MFNPs) based on different sizes of up-conversion nanoparticles (UCNPs). With strong up-conversion fluorescence offered by UCNPs, superparamagnetism properties attributed to Fe3O4 nanoparticles and porous structure coming from the mesoporous SiO2 shell, the as-obtained MFNPs can be utilized not only as a contrast agent for dual modal up-conversion luminescence (UCL)/magnetic

  5. Fully automated DNA extraction from blood using magnetic particles modified with a hyperbranched polyamidoamine dendrimer.

    PubMed

    Yoza, Brandon; Arakaki, Atsushi; Maruyama, Kohei; Takeyama, Haruko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial and artificial magnetic particles were modified using a polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer and outer shell amines determined. Bacterial magnetic particles were the most consistently modified. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis showed that the artificial magnetic particles were structurally damaged by the modification process including sonication. Furthermore, laser particle analysis of the magnetite also revealed damage. Small quantities of dendrimer-modified bacterial magnetic particles were used to extract DNA from blood. The efficiency of DNA recovery was consistently about 30 ng of DNA using 2-10 microg of dendrimer-modified bacterial magnetite. This technique was fully automated using newly developed liquid handling robots and bacterial magnetic particles.

  6. Multiplexed detection of foodborne pathogens based on magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Delfina; Liébana, Susana; Pividori, María Isabel

    2015-09-25

    This paper addresses the novel approaches for the multiplex detection of food poisoning bacteria, paying closer attention to three of the most common pathogens involved in food outbreaks: Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes. End-point and real-time PCR, classical immunological techniques, biosensors, microarrays and microfluidic platforms, as well as commercial kits for multiplex detection of food pathogens will be reviewed, with special focus on the role of magnetic particles in these approaches. Although the immunomagnetic separation for capturing single bacteria from contaminating microflora and interfering food components has demonstrated to improve the performance on these approaches, the integration of magnetic particles for multiplex detection of bacteria is still in a preliminary stage and requires further studies. PMID:25858812

  7. Three-dimensional interplanetary stream magnetism and energetic particle motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barouch, E.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1976-01-01

    Cosmic rays interact with mesoscale configurations of the interplanetary magnetic field. A technique is presented for calculating such configurations in the inner solar system, which are due to streams and source conditions near the sun, and maps of magnetic field are constructed for some plausible stream and source conditions. One effect of these mesoscale configurations on galactic cosmic rays is shown to be an out-of-the-ecliptic gradient drift sufficient to explain Forbush decreases. The effects on solar energetic particles include small polar drifts due to the field gradients and a possibly large modification of the time-intensity profiles and anisotropy characteristics due to the formation of mirror configurations in space. If a diffusion model is applicable to solar particles, the true diffusion coefficient will be masked by the effects of streams. A conceptual model which incorporates these ideas and those of several other models is presented.

  8. Magnetic Field Generation and Particle Energization in Relativistic Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Edison; Boettcher, Markus; Smith, Ian

    2012-10-01

    We present Particle-in-Cell simulation results of magnetic field generation by relativistic shear flows in collisionless electron-ion (e-ion) and electron-positron (e+e-) plasmas. In the e+e- case, small current filaments are first generated at the shear interface due to streaming instabilities of the interpenetrating particles from boundary perturbations. Such current filaments create transverse magnetic fields which coalesce into larger and larger flux tubes with alternating polarity, eventually forming ordered flux ropes across the entire shear boundary layer. Particles are accelerated across field lines to form power-law tails by semi-coherent electric fields sustained by oblique Langmuir waves. In the e-ion case, a single laminar slab of transverse flux rope is formed at the shear boundary, sustained by thin current sheets on both sides due to different drift velocities of electrons and ions. The magnetic field has a single polarity for the entire boundary layer. Electrons are heated to a fraction of the ion energy, but there is no evidence of power-law tail forming in this case.

  9. Particle acceleration and plasma dynamics during magnetic reconnection in the magnetically dominated regime

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fan; Liu, Yi -Hsin; Daughton, William; Li, Hui

    2015-06-17

    Magnetic reconnection is thought to be the driver for many explosive phenomena in the universe. The energy release and particle acceleration during reconnection have been proposed as a mechanism for producing high-energy emissions and cosmic rays. We carry out two- and three-dimensional (3D) kinetic simulations to investigate relativistic magnetic reconnection and the associated particle acceleration. The simulations focus on electron–positron plasmas starting with a magnetically dominated, force-free current sheet (σ ≡ B2 / (4πnemec2) >> 1). For this limit, we demonstrate that relativistic reconnection is highly efficient at accelerating particles through a first-order Fermi process accomplished by the curvature drift of particles along the electric field induced by the relativistic flows. This mechanism gives rise to the formation of hard power-law spectra f α (γ - 1)-p and approaches p = 1 for sufficiently large σ and system size. Eventually most of the available magnetic free energy is converted into nonthermal particle kinetic energy. An analytic model is presented to explain the key results and predict a general condition for the formation of power-law distributions. The development of reconnection in these regimes leads to relativistic inflow and outflow speeds and enhanced reconnection rates relative to nonrelativistic regimes. In the 3D simulation, the interplay between secondary kink and tearing instabilities leads to strong magnetic turbulence, but does not significantly change the energy conversion, reconnection rate, or particle acceleration. This paper suggests that relativistic reconnection sites are strong sources of nonthermal particles, which may have important implications for a variety of high-energy astrophysical problems.

  10. Particle acceleration and plasma dynamics during magnetic reconnection in the magnetically dominated regime

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Fan; Liu, Yi -Hsin; Daughton, William; Li, Hui

    2015-06-17

    Magnetic reconnection is thought to be the driver for many explosive phenomena in the universe. The energy release and particle acceleration during reconnection have been proposed as a mechanism for producing high-energy emissions and cosmic rays. We carry out two- and three-dimensional (3D) kinetic simulations to investigate relativistic magnetic reconnection and the associated particle acceleration. The simulations focus on electron–positron plasmas starting with a magnetically dominated, force-free current sheet (σ ≡ B2 / (4πnemec2) >> 1). For this limit, we demonstrate that relativistic reconnection is highly efficient at accelerating particles through a first-order Fermi process accomplished by the curvature driftmore » of particles along the electric field induced by the relativistic flows. This mechanism gives rise to the formation of hard power-law spectra f α (γ - 1)-p and approaches p = 1 for sufficiently large σ and system size. Eventually most of the available magnetic free energy is converted into nonthermal particle kinetic energy. An analytic model is presented to explain the key results and predict a general condition for the formation of power-law distributions. The development of reconnection in these regimes leads to relativistic inflow and outflow speeds and enhanced reconnection rates relative to nonrelativistic regimes. In the 3D simulation, the interplay between secondary kink and tearing instabilities leads to strong magnetic turbulence, but does not significantly change the energy conversion, reconnection rate, or particle acceleration. This paper suggests that relativistic reconnection sites are strong sources of nonthermal particles, which may have important implications for a variety of high-energy astrophysical problems.« less

  11. Optical measurement of anisotropic magnetic susceptibility for diamagnetic fine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Kohki; Mogi, Iwao; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an apparatus that allows the observation of the transient rotational motion of fine particles under a high magnetic field in order to determine anisotropic magnetic susceptibility. The anisotropic susceptibilities of spherical nanoparticles of bismuth and commercially available carbon nanofibers were determined. The estimated Δχ = 3.9 × 10-5 of spherical bismuth nanoparticles with a diameter of 370 nm was fairly consistent with the value determined previously by the magnetic field dependence of diffraction peak intensity in the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, but was slightly smaller than the value for the bulk crystal. In contrast, the transient behavior of carbon nanofibers did not obey the theoretical motion of a single crystal. The wide distribution of fiber lengths, the irregularity of the structure in the fiber, and the connections between the fibers are suggested for the anomalous behavior.

  12. Method for using magnetic particles in droplet microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Gaurav Jitendra (Inventor); Kim, Chang-Jin (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Methods of utilizing magnetic particles or beads (MBs) in droplet-based (or digital) microfluidics are disclosed. The methods may be used in enrichment or separation processes. A first method employs the droplet meniscus to assist in the magnetic collection and positioning of MBs during droplet microfluidic operations. The sweeping movement of the meniscus lifts the MBs off the solid surface and frees them from various surface forces acting on the MBs. A second method uses chemical additives to reduce the adhesion of MBs to surfaces. Both methods allow the MBs on a solid surface to be effectively moved by magnetic force. Droplets may be driven by various methods or techniques including, for example, electrowetting, electrostatic, electromechanical, electrophoretic, dielectrophoretic, electroosmotic, thermocapillary, surface acoustic, and pressure.

  13. Ferromagnetic particles as magnetic resonance imaging temperature sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hankiewicz, J. H.; Celinski, Z.; Stupic, K. F.; Anderson, N. R.; Camley, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an important technique for identifying different types of tissues in a body or spatial information about composite materials. Because temperature is a fundamental parameter reflecting the biological status of the body and individual tissues, it would be helpful to have temperature maps superimposed on spatial maps. Here we show that small ferromagnetic particles with a strong temperature-dependent magnetization, can be used to produce temperature-dependent images in magnetic resonance imaging with an accuracy of about 1 °C. This technique, when further developed, could be used to identify inflammation or tumours, or to obtain spatial maps of temperature in various medical interventional procedures such as hyperthermia and thermal ablation. This method could also be used to determine temperature profiles inside nonmetallic composite materials. PMID:27503610

  14. Ferromagnetic particles as magnetic resonance imaging temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankiewicz, J. H.; Celinski, Z.; Stupic, K. F.; Anderson, N. R.; Camley, R. E.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an important technique for identifying different types of tissues in a body or spatial information about composite materials. Because temperature is a fundamental parameter reflecting the biological status of the body and individual tissues, it would be helpful to have temperature maps superimposed on spatial maps. Here we show that small ferromagnetic particles with a strong temperature-dependent magnetization, can be used to produce temperature-dependent images in magnetic resonance imaging with an accuracy of about 1 °C. This technique, when further developed, could be used to identify inflammation or tumours, or to obtain spatial maps of temperature in various medical interventional procedures such as hyperthermia and thermal ablation. This method could also be used to determine temperature profiles inside nonmetallic composite materials.

  15. Ferromagnetic particles as magnetic resonance imaging temperature sensors.

    PubMed

    Hankiewicz, J H; Celinski, Z; Stupic, K F; Anderson, N R; Camley, R E

    2016-08-09

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an important technique for identifying different types of tissues in a body or spatial information about composite materials. Because temperature is a fundamental parameter reflecting the biological status of the body and individual tissues, it would be helpful to have temperature maps superimposed on spatial maps. Here we show that small ferromagnetic particles with a strong temperature-dependent magnetization, can be used to produce temperature-dependent images in magnetic resonance imaging with an accuracy of about 1 °C. This technique, when further developed, could be used to identify inflammation or tumours, or to obtain spatial maps of temperature in various medical interventional procedures such as hyperthermia and thermal ablation. This method could also be used to determine temperature profiles inside nonmetallic composite materials.

  16. Targeted dual-contrast T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of tumors using multifunctional gadolinium-labeled superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Zhuang, Yeming; Sun, Yun; Dai, Antao; Shi, Xiangyang; Wu, Dongmei; Li, Fuyou; Hu, He; Yang, Shiping

    2011-07-01

    Development of a multifunctional nanoparticle (NP) system allowing for dual-contrast T(1)- and T(2)-weighted targeted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of tumors could significantly improve the diagnosis accuracy. In this study, superparamagnetic silica-coated iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) NPs) with a diameter of approximately 21 nm were synthesized via a thermal decomposition approach and were aminated through silanization. The amine-functionalized Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) NPs enabled the covalent conjugation of a paramagnetic gadolinium complex (Gd-DTPA, DTPA: diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid) and an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide as a targeting ligand onto their surface. The formed Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2)(Gd-DTPA)-RGD NPs are water-dispersible, stable, and biocompatible as confirmed by MTT cell viability assay. Relaxivity measurements show that they have a T(1) relaxivity (r(1)) of 4.2 mM(-1) s(-1) and T(2) relaxivity (r(2)) of 17.4 mM(-1) s(-1) at the Gd/Fe molar ratio of 0.3:1, suggesting a possibility to use them as both T(1) positive and T(2) negative contrast agents. In vitro and in vivo MR imaging experiments show that the developed multifunctional Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2)(Gd-DTPA)-RGD NPs enable targeted dual-contrast T(1)- and T(2)-weighted MR imaging of tumor cells over-expressing high-affinity α(v)β(3) integrin in vitro and in vivo. Our results clearly indicate that the approach to forming multifunctional Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2)(Gd-DTPA)-RGD NPs could be extended for fabricating other biologically active NPs for T(1)- and T(2)-weighted MR imaging of other biological systems with high accuracy.

  17. Irregular Magnetic Fields and Energetic Particles near the Termination Shock

    SciTech Connect

    Giacalone, J.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2004-09-15

    The physics of magnetic field-line meandering and the associated energetic-particle transport in the outer heliosphere is discussed. We assume that the heliospheric magnetic field, which is frozen into the solar-wind plasma, is composed of both an average and random component. The power in the random component is dominated by spatial scales that are very large (by a few orders of magnitude) compared to the shock thickness. The results from recent numerical simulations are presented. They reveal a number of characteristics which may be related to recent Voyager 1 observations of energetic particles and fields. For instance, low-energy (tens of keV) particles are seen well upstream of the shock that also have large pitch-angle anisotropies. Furthermore, low-energy particles are readily accelerated by the shock, even though their mean-free paths are very large compared to their gyroradii. When averaging over the entire system, the downstream spectra are qualitatively consistent with the theory of diffusive shock acceleration.

  18. Simulations of Energetic Particles Interacting with Dynamical Magnetic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M.; Shalchi, A.

    2016-02-01

    We explore the transport of energetic particles in interplanetary space by using test-particle simulations. In previous work such simulations have been performed by using either magnetostatic turbulence or undamped propagating plasma waves. In the current paper we simulate for the first time particle transport in dynamical turbulence. To do so we employ two models, namely the damping model of dynamical turbulence and the random sweeping model. We compute parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients and compare our numerical findings with solar wind observations. We show that good agreement can be found between simulations and the Palmer consensus range for both dynamical turbulence models if the ratio of turbulent magnetic field and mean field is δB/B0 = 0.5.

  19. Online reconstruction of 3D magnetic particle imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopp, T.; Hofmann, M.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging is a quantitative functional imaging technique that allows imaging of the spatial distribution of super-paramagnetic iron oxide particles at high temporal resolution. The raw data acquisition can be performed at frame rates of more than 40 volumes s‑1. However, to date image reconstruction is performed in an offline step and thus no direct feedback is available during the experiment. Considering potential interventional applications such direct feedback would be mandatory. In this work, an online reconstruction framework is implemented that allows direct visualization of the particle distribution on the screen of the acquisition computer with a latency of about 2 s. The reconstruction process is adaptive and performs block-averaging in order to optimize the signal quality for a given amount of reconstruction time.

  20. Consistent energy barrier distributions in magnetic particle chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslett, O.; Ruta, S.; Chantrell, R. W.; Barker, J.; Friedman, G.; Hovorka, O.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate long-time thermal activation behaviour in magnetic particle chains of variable length. Chains are modelled as Stoner-Wohlfarth particles coupled by dipolar interactions. Thermal activation is described as a hopping process over a multidimensional energy landscape using the discrete orientation model limit of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert dynamics. The underlying master equation is solved by diagonalising the associated transition matrix, which allows the evaluation of distributions of time scales of intrinsic thermal activation modes and their energy representation. It is shown that as a result of the interaction dependence of these distributions, increasing the particle chain length can lead to acceleration or deceleration of the overall relaxation process depending on the initialisation procedure.

  1. Online reconstruction of 3D magnetic particle imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopp, T.; Hofmann, M.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging is a quantitative functional imaging technique that allows imaging of the spatial distribution of super-paramagnetic iron oxide particles at high temporal resolution. The raw data acquisition can be performed at frame rates of more than 40 volumes s-1. However, to date image reconstruction is performed in an offline step and thus no direct feedback is available during the experiment. Considering potential interventional applications such direct feedback would be mandatory. In this work, an online reconstruction framework is implemented that allows direct visualization of the particle distribution on the screen of the acquisition computer with a latency of about 2 s. The reconstruction process is adaptive and performs block-averaging in order to optimize the signal quality for a given amount of reconstruction time.

  2. Optimizing magnetite nanoparticles for mass sensitivity in magnetic particle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Matthew; Minard, Kevin R.; Khandhar, Amit P.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic particle imaging (MPI), using magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) as tracer material, shows great promise as a platform for fast tomographic imaging. To date, the magnetic properties of MNPs used in imaging have not been optimized. As nanoparticle magnetism shows strong size dependence, the authors explore how varying MNP size impacts imaging performance in order to determine optimal MNP characteristics for MPI at any driving field frequency f0. Methods: Monodisperse MNPs of varying size were synthesized and their magnetic properties characterized. Their MPI response was measured experimentally using a custom-built MPI transceiver designed to detect the third harmonic of MNP magnetization. The driving field amplitude H0=6 mT μ0−1 and frequency f0=250 kHz were chosen to be suitable for imaging small animals. Experimental results were interpreted using a model of dynamic MNP magnetization that is based on the Langevin theory of superparamagnetism and accounts for sample size distribution and size-dependent magnetic relaxation. Results: The experimental results show a clear variation in the MPI signal intensity as a function of MNP diameter that is in agreement with simulated results. A maximum in the plot of MPI signal vs MNP size indicates there is a particular size that is optimal for the chosen f0. Conclusions: The authors observed that MNPs 15 nm in diameter generate maximum signal amplitude in MPI experiments at 250 kHz. The authors expect the physical basis for this result, the change in magnetic relaxation with MNP size, will impact MPI under other experimental conditions. PMID:21520874

  3. Tailoring the magnetic and pharmacokinetic properties of iron oxide magnetic particle imaging tracers

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Richard Mathew; Khandhar, Amit P; Arami, Hamed; Hua, Loc; Hovorka, Ondrej; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an attractive new modality for imaging distributions of iron oxide nanoparticle tracers in vivo. With exceptional contrast, high sensitivity, and good spatial resolution, MPI shows promise for clinical imaging in angiography and oncology. Critically, MPI requires high-quality iron oxide nanoparticle tracers with tailored magnetic and surface properties to achieve its full potential. In this review, we discuss optimizing iron oxide nanoparticles’ physical, magnetic, and pharmacokinetic properties for MPI, highlighting results from our recent work in which we demonstrated tailored, biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticle tracers that provided two times better linear spatial resolution and five times better signal-to-noise ratio than Resovist. PMID:23787461

  4. Mixing of nanosize particles by magnetically assisted impaction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scicolone, James V.

    approach based on use of small magnetic particles as mixing media is introduced that achieves a high-degree of mixing at scales of about a micron. The method is tested for binary mixture of alumina/silica and silica/titania. Various parameters such as processing time, size of the magnets, and magnetic particle to powder mixed ratio are considered. Experiments are carried out in batch containers in liquid and dry mediums, as well as a fluidized bed set-up. Homogeneity of Mixing (HoM), defined as the compliment of the Intensity of Segregation, was evaluated at the micron scale through field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and the energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Secondary electron images, along with elemental mappings, were used to visualize the change in agglomerate sizes. Compositional percent data of each element were obtained through an EDS spatial distribution point analysis and used to obtain quantitative analysis on the homogeneity of the mixture. The effect of magnet impaction on mixing quality was examined on the HoM of binary mixtures. The research shows that HoM improved with magnetically assisted impaction mixing techniques indicating that the HoM depends on the product of processing time with the number of magnets. In a fluidized bed set-up, MAIM not only improved dispersion, but it was also found that the magnetic particles served to break down the larger agglomerates, to reduce the minimum fluidization velocity, to delay the onset of bubbling, and to convert the fluidization behavior of ABF powder to APF. Thus MAIM techniques may be used to achieve mixing of nanopowders at a desired HoM through adjusting the number of magnets and processing time; and its inherent advantages are its simplicity, an environmentally benign operation, and reduced cost as compared with wet mixing techniques.

  5. Multifunctional iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, M.; Denis, C.; Van Stappen, T.; De Meester, L.; Geukens, N.; Gils, A.; Verbiest, T.

    2015-03-01

    Multifunctional nanoparticles have attracted a lot of attention since they can combine interesting properties like magnetism, fluorescence or plasmonic effects. As a core material, iron oxide nanoparticles have been the subject of intensive research. These cost-effective and non-toxic particles are used nowadays in many applications. We developed a heterobifunctional PEG ligand that can be used to introduce functional groups (carboxylic acids) onto the surface of the NP. Via click chemistry, a siloxane functionality was added to this ligand, for a subsequent covalent ligand exchange reaction. The functionalized nanoparticles have an excellent colloidal stability in complex environments like buffers and serum or plasma. Antibodies were coupled to the introduced carboxylic acids and these NP-antibody bioconjugates were brought into contact with Legionella bacteria for magnetic separation experiments.

  6. Finite magnetic relaxation in x-space magnetic particle imaging: comparison of measurements and ferrohydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhavalikar, R.; Hensley, D.; Maldonado-Camargo, L.; Croft, L. R.; Ceron, S.; Goodwill, P. W.; Conolly, S. M.; Rinaldi, C.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging tomographic imaging technology that detects magnetic nanoparticle tracers by exploiting their non-linear magnetization properties. In order to predict the behavior of nanoparticles in an imager, it is possible to use a non-imaging MPI relaxometer or spectrometer to characterize the behavior of nanoparticles in a controlled setting. In this paper we explore the use of ferrohydrodynamic magnetization equations for predicting the response of particles in an MPI relaxometer. These include a magnetization equation developed by Shliomis (Sh) which has a constant relaxation time and a magnetization equation which uses a field-dependent relaxation time developed by Martsenyuk, Raikher and Shliomis (MRSh). We compare the predictions from these models with measurements and with the predictions based on the Langevin function that assumes instantaneous magnetization response of the nanoparticles. The results show good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the ferrohydrodynamic models and the measurements without the use of fitting parameters and provide further evidence of the potential of ferrohydrodynamic modeling in MPI.

  7. PREFACE: Fifth International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankhurst, Quentin

    2005-01-01

    In September 2004, the UK Nanomagnetism Network and the London Centre for Nanotechnology hosted the 5th International Conference on Fine Particle Magnetism. The objective of the meeting, as in Rome (1991), Bangor (1996), Barcelona (1999) and Pittsburgh (2002), was to explore latest developments in the fundamentals and applications of nanoscale magnetic clusters, particles and grains. This particular conference had a very broad remit, and encompassed the interdisciplinary breadth of much of today's innovative work on nanoscale magnetic materials. In recognition of this, symposia were organised around the themes of biomagnetism and Earth and the environment, alongside the familiar themes of fundamental properties, applications, and imaging and characterisation. The aim was that this wide-ranging scope would provide the participants with new insights into how researchers from other disciplines approach similar problems to their own, which would help in their own work. This seemed to be borne out by the lively and good-natured discussion that the talks and posters generated. In keeping with this goal of combining cutting edge research with educating ourselves across traditional disciplinary boundaries, we are very pleased to have received such excellent support from the contributing authors for this proceedings volume. The papers contained herein are an accurate reflection of the topics covered, and include several review style papers. We hope that these proceedings will provide the reader with an understanding of the current vibrancy of research into fine particle magnetism. Furthermore, we hope that this volume sets the scene for the continuing cross-border work between physical scientists, life scientists, social scientists, clinicians and engineers that promises to make this field a very lively one in the years to come.

  8. Hydrodynamic modeling of targeted magnetic-particle delivery in a blood vessel.

    PubMed

    Weng, Huei Chu

    2013-03-01

    Since the flow of a magnetic fluid could easily be influenced by an external magnetic field, its hydrodynamic modeling promises to be useful for magnetically controllable delivery systems. It is desirable to understand the flow fields and characteristics before targeted magnetic particles arrive at their destination. In this study, we perform an analysis for the effects of particles and a magnetic field on biomedical magnetic fluid flow to study the targeted magnetic-particle delivery in a blood vessel. The fully developed solutions of velocity, flow rate, and flow drag are derived analytically and presented for blood with magnetite nanoparticles at body temperature. Results reveal that in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles, a minimum magnetic field gradient (yield gradient) is required to initiate the delivery. A magnetic driving force leads to the increase in velocity and has enhancing effects on flow rate and flow drag. Such a magnetic driving effect can be magnified by increasing the particle volume fraction.

  9. Highly sensitive detection of protein biomarkers via nuclear magnetic resonance biosensor with magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles

    PubMed Central

    Jeun, Minhong; Park, Sungwook; Lee, Hakho; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic-based biosensors are attractive for on-site detection of biomarkers due to the low magnetic susceptibility of biological samples. Here, we report a highly sensitive magnetic-based biosensing system that is composed of a miniaturized nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) device and magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles (NFPs). The sensing performance, also identified as the transverse relaxation (R2) rate, of the NMR device is directly related to the magnetic properties of the NFPs. Therefore, we developed magnetically engineered NFPs (MnMg-NFP) and used them as NMR agents to exhibit a significantly improved R2 rate. The magnetization of the MnMg-NFPs was increased by controlling the Mn and Mg cation concentration and distribution during the synthesis process. This modification of the Mn and Mg cation directly contributed to improving the R2 rate. The miniaturized NMR system, combined with the magnetically engineered MnMg-NFPs, successfully detected a small amount of infectious influenza A H1N1 nucleoprotein with high sensitivity and stability. PMID:27799772

  10. Nonaqueous magnetic nanoparticle suspensions with controlled particle size and nuclear magnetic resonance properties.

    PubMed

    Meledandri, Carla J; Stolarczyk, Jacek K; Ghosh, Swapankumar; Brougham, Dermot F

    2008-12-16

    We report the preparation of monodisperse maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanoparticle suspensions in heptane, by thermal decomposition of iron(III) acetylacetonate in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine surfactants. By varying the surfactant/Fe precursor mole ratio during synthesis, control was exerted both over the nanocrystal core size, in the range from 3 to 6 nm, and over the magnetic properties of the resulting nanoparticle dispersions. We report field-cycling 1H NMR relaxation analysis of the superparamagnetic relaxation rate enhancement of nonaqueous suspensions for the first time. This approach permits measurement of the relaxivity and provides information on the saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy energy of the suspended particles. The saturation magnetization was found to be in the expected range for maghemite particles of this size. The anisotropy energy was found to increase significantly with decreasing particle size, which we attribute to increased shape anisotropy. This study can be used as a guide for the synthesis of maghemite nanoparticles with selected magnetic properties for a given application.

  11. Synthesis of Cell-Adhesive Anisotropic Multifunctional Particles by Stop Flow Lithography and Streptavidin-Biotin Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bong, Ki Wan; Kim, Jae Jung; Cho, Hansang; Lim, Eugene; Doyle, Patrick S; Irimia, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Cell-adhesive particles are of significant interest in biotechnology, the bioengineering of complex tissues, and biomedical research. Their applications range from platforms to increase the efficiency of anchorage-dependent cell culture to building blocks to loading cells in heterogeneous structures to clonal-population growth monitoring to cell sorting. Although useful, currently available cell-adhesive particles can accommodate only homogeneous cell culture. Here, we report the design of anisotropic hydrogel microparticles with tunable cell-adhesive regions as first step toward micropatterned cell cultures on particles. We employed stop flow lithography (SFL), the coupling reaction between amine and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) and streptavidin-biotin chemistry to adjust the localization of conjugated collagen and poly-L-lysine on the surface of microscale particles. Using the new particles, we demonstrate the attachment and formation of tight junctions between brain endothelial cells. We also demonstrate the geometric patterning of breast cancer cells on particles with heterogeneous collagen coatings. This new approach avoids the exposure of cells to potentially toxic photoinitiators and ultraviolet light and decouples in time the microparticle synthesis and the cell culture steps to take advantage of the most recent advances in cell patterning available for traditional culture substrates. PMID:26545155

  12. Studying astrophysical particle acceleration mechanisms with colliding magnetized laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W.; Deng, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fiksel, G.; Nilson, P.; Haberberger, D.; Chang, P.-Y.; Barnak, D.

    2015-11-01

    Significant particle energization is observed to occur in many astrophysical environments, and in the standard models this acceleration occurs as a part of the energy conversion processes associated with collisionless shocks or magnetic reconnection. A recent generation of laboratory experiments conducted using magnetized laser-produced plasmas has opened opportunities to study these particle acceleration processes in the laboratory. Ablated plasma plumes are externally magnetized using an externally-applied magnetic field in combination with a low-density background plasma. Colliding unmagnetized plasmas demonstrated ion-driven Weibel instability while colliding magnetized plasmas drive magnetic reconnection. Both magnetized and unmagnetized colliding plasma are modeled with electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations which provide an end-to-end model of the experiments. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we provide predictions of particle acceleration driven by reconnection, resulting from both direct x-line acceleration and Fermi-like acceleration at contracting magnetic fields lines near magnetic islands.

  13. Rocket observation of soft energetic particles at the magnetic equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Results from a rocket-borne ion mass spectrometer flown near the magnetic equator at 0108 LMT, March 10, 1970, exhibit an unusual background current above 200 km. This current is observed to increase 3.5 orders of magnitude between 200 and 260 km before maximizing to a fixed value from 260 km to the 295 km apogee of the flight. Properties of the background combined with laboratory measurements have permitted probable identification of the background source as 2-20 keV electrons or protons. Maximum electron fluxes have been estimated to be of the order 10 to the 10th power particles/sq cm-sec-ster in accord with ISIS-1 satellite measurements at higher altitudes. The background was not observed on an earlier flight at 1938 LMT, suggesting the particles to be trapped in a blet which drifted below 300 km between the two flights. The low altitude penetration of these fluxes may have been related to the great magnetic storm of March 8. Simultaneous measurements of the thermal ion distribution are compared with these results and qualitatively suggest that the soft energetic particles are responsible for an observed O2(+) and NO(+) enhancement.

  14. Particle Dynamics Discrimination Between Current Sheet Magnetic Field Reversal and Magnetic Neutral Line Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. F., Jr.; Holland, D. L.; Svetich, J.

    2014-12-01

    We consider dynamical signatures of ion motion that discriminate between a current sheet magnetic field reversal and a magnetic neutral line field. These two related dynamical systems have been studied previously as chaotic scattering systems with application to the Earth's magnetotail. Both systems exhibit chaotic scattering over a wide range of parameter values. The structure and properties of their respective phase spaces have been used to elucidate potential dynamical signatures that affect spacecraft measured ion distributions. In this work we consider the problem of discrimination between these two magnetic structures using charged particle dynamics. For example we show that signatures based on the well known energy resonance in the current sheet field provide good discrimination since the resonance is not present in the neutral line case. While both fields can lead to fractal exit region structuring, their characteristics are different and also may provide some field discrimination. Application to magnetotail field and particle parameters will be presented

  15. Multifunctional Magnetic Gd(3+) -Based Coordination Polymer Nanoparticles: Combination of Magnetic Resonance and Multispectral Optoacoustic Detections for Tumor-Targeted Imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    An, Qiao; Liu, Jing; Yu, Meng; Wan, Jiaxun; Li, Dian; Wang, Changchun; Chen, Chunying; Guo, Jia

    2015-11-11

    To overcome traditional barriers in optical imaging and microscopy, optoacoustic-imaging has been changed to combine the accuracy of spectroscopy with the depth resolution of ultrasound, achieving a novel modality with powerful in vivo imaging. However, magnetic resonance imaging provides better spatial and anatomical resolution. Thus, a single hybrid nanoprobe that allows for simultaneous multimodal imaging is significant not only for cutting edge research in imaging science, but also for accurate clinical diagnosis. A core-shell-structured coordination polymer composite microsphere has been designed for in vivo multimodality imaging. It consists of a Fe3 O4 nanocluster core, a carbon sandwiched layer, and a carbocyanine-Gd(III) (Cy-Gd(III) ) coordination polymer outer shell (Fe3 O4 @C@Cy-Gd(III) ). Folic acid-conjugated poly(ethylene glycol) chains are embedded within the coordination polymer shell to achieve extended circulation and targeted delivery of probe particles in vivo. Control of Fe3 O4 core grain sizes results in optimal r2 relaxivity (224.5 × 10(-3) m(-1) s(-1) ) for T2 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Cy-Gd(III) coordination polymers are also regulated to obtain a maximum 25.1% of Cy ligands and 5.2% of Gd(III) ions for near-infrared fluorescence and T1 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. The results demonstrate their impressive abilities for targeted, multimodal, and reliable imaging.

  16. Magnetization of nano-fine particles of Pd/Ni alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunomura, N.; Teranishi, T.; Miyake, M.; Oki, A.; Yamada, S.; Toshima, N.; Hori, H.

    1998-01-01

    In order to investigate the giant magnetic moment problem in nano-fine Pd alloys particles, enough amount of Pd/Ni fine particles with quite narrow diameter distribution have been prepared by chemical method. The magnetization of Pd/Ni alloy ultrafine particles has been systematically investigated by using a SQUID magnetometer. The magnetization remarkably increases above the concentration of 8% of Ni. This result indicates the giant moment in the ultrafine Pd/Ni alloy particles.

  17. Particle distributions in collisionless magnetic reconnection: An implicit Particle-In-Cell (PIC) description

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, D.W.; Francis, G.E.; Max, C.E.

    1990-06-29

    Evidence from magnetospheric and solar flare research supports the belief that collisionless magnetic reconnection can proceed on the Alfven-wave crossing timescale. Reconnection behavior that occurs this rapidly in collisionless plasmas is not well understood because underlying mechanisms depend on the details of the ion and electron distributions in the vicinity of the emerging X-points. We use the direct implicit Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code AVANTI to study the details of these distributions as they evolve in the self-consistent E and B fields of magnetic reconnection. We first consider a simple neutral sheet model. We observe rapid movement of the current-carrying electrons away from the emerging X-point. Later in time an oscillation of the trapped magnetic flux is found, superimposed upon continued linear growth due to plasma inflow at the ion sound speed. The addition of a current-aligned and a normal B field widen the scope of our studies.

  18. Human erythrocytes as nanoparticle carriers for magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Markov, D E; Boeve, H; Gleich, B; Borgert, J; Antonelli, A; Sfara, C; Magnani, M

    2010-11-01

    The potential of red blood cells (RBCs) loaded with iron oxide nanoparticles as a tracer material for magnetic particle imaging (MPI) has been investigated. MPI is an emerging, quantitative medical imaging modality which holds promise in terms of sensitivity in combination with spatial and temporal resolution. Steady-state and dynamic magnetization measurements, supported by semi-empirical modeling, were employed to analyze the MPI signal generation using RBCs as novel biomimetic constructs. Since the superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) bulk material that is used in this study contains nanoparticles with different sizes, it is suggested that during the RBC loading procedure, a preferential entrapment of nanoparticles with hydrodynamic diameter ≤60 nm occurs by size-selection through the erythrocyte membrane pores. This affects the MPI signal of an erythrocyte-based tracer, compared to bulk. The reduced signal is counterbalanced by a higher in vivo stability of the SPIO-loaded RBCs constructs for MPI applications.

  19. Human erythrocytes as nanoparticle carriers for magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Markov, D E; Boeve, H; Gleich, B; Borgert, J; Antonelli, A; Sfara, C; Magnani, M

    2010-11-01

    The potential of red blood cells (RBCs) loaded with iron oxide nanoparticles as a tracer material for magnetic particle imaging (MPI) has been investigated. MPI is an emerging, quantitative medical imaging modality which holds promise in terms of sensitivity in combination with spatial and temporal resolution. Steady-state and dynamic magnetization measurements, supported by semi-empirical modeling, were employed to analyze the MPI signal generation using RBCs as novel biomimetic constructs. Since the superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) bulk material that is used in this study contains nanoparticles with different sizes, it is suggested that during the RBC loading procedure, a preferential entrapment of nanoparticles with hydrodynamic diameter ≤60 nm occurs by size-selection through the erythrocyte membrane pores. This affects the MPI signal of an erythrocyte-based tracer, compared to bulk. The reduced signal is counterbalanced by a higher in vivo stability of the SPIO-loaded RBCs constructs for MPI applications. PMID:20959685

  20. Simulating Magnetized Laboratory Plasmas with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2009-01-01

    The creation of plasmas in the laboratory continues to generate excitement in the physics community. Despite the best efforts of the intrepid plasma diagnostics community, the dynamics of these plasmas remains a difficult challenge to both the theorist and the experimentalist. This dissertation describes the simulation of strongly magnetized laboratory plasmas with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), a method born of astrophysics but gaining broad support in the engineering community. We describe the mathematical formulation that best characterizes a strongly magnetized plasma under our circumstances of interest, and we review the SPH method and its application to astrophysical plasmas based on research by Phillips [1], Buerve [2], and Price and Monaghan [3]. Some modifications and extensions to this method are necessary to simulate terrestrial plasmas, such as a treatment of magnetic diffusion based on work by Brookshaw [4] and by Atluri [5]; we describe these changes as we turn our attention toward laboratory experiments. Test problems that verify the method are provided throughout the discussion. Finally, we apply our method to the compression of a magnetized plasma performed by the Compact Toroid Injection eXperiment (CTIX) [6] and show that the experimental results support our computed predictions.

  1. Magnetic particle detection in unshielded environment using orthogonal fluxgate gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrefai, Ahmed L.; Sasada, Ichiro

    2015-05-01

    A new detection system for magnetic particles, which can operate in an unshielded environment, is developed using a fundamental mode orthogonal fluxgate gradiometer. The proposed detection system offers the advantages of cost, size, and weight reduction as compared to contamination detection systems using superconducting quantum interference device sensor. The detection system can be used to detect metallic contamination in foods or lithium ion battery production lines. The system has been investigated numerically to optimize various design parameters of the system. Experimental setup has been developed to evaluate some of the numerically predicted results. Steel balls were successfully detected down to the diameter of 50 μm.

  2. Magnetic particle detection in unshielded environment using orthogonal fluxgate gradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Elrefai, Ahmed L. Sasada, Ichiro

    2015-05-07

    A new detection system for magnetic particles, which can operate in an unshielded environment, is developed using a fundamental mode orthogonal fluxgate gradiometer. The proposed detection system offers the advantages of cost, size, and weight reduction as compared to contamination detection systems using superconducting quantum interference device sensor. The detection system can be used to detect metallic contamination in foods or lithium ion battery production lines. The system has been investigated numerically to optimize various design parameters of the system. Experimental setup has been developed to evaluate some of the numerically predicted results. Steel balls were successfully detected down to the diameter of 50 μm.

  3. Spinless Particle in a Magnetic Field Under Minimal Length Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirfakhrian, S. M.

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we studied the Klein-Gordon equation in a generalised uncertainty principle (GUP) framework which predicts a minimal uncertainty in position. We considered a spinless particle in this framework in the presence of a magnetic field, applied in the z-direction, which varies as {1 over {{x^2}}}. We found the energy eigenvalues of this system and also obtained the correspounding eigenfunctions, using the numerical method. When GUP parameter tends to zero, our solutions were in agreement with those obtained in the absence of GUP.

  4. Digital microfluidic magnetic separation for particle-based immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Ng, Alphonsus H C; Choi, Kihwan; Luoma, Robert P; Robinson, John M; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2012-10-16

    We introduce a new format for particle-based immunoassays relying on digital microfluidics (DMF) and magnetic forces to separate and resuspend antibody-coated paramagnetic particles. In DMF, fluids are electrostatically controlled as discrete droplets (picoliters to microliters) on an array of insulated electrodes. By applying appropriate sequences of potentials to these electrodes, multiple droplets can be manipulated simultaneously and various droplet operations can be achieved using the same device design. This flexibility makes DMF well-suited for applications that require complex, multistep protocols such as immunoassays. Here, we report the first particle-based immunoassay on DMF without the aid of oil carrier fluid to enable droplet movement (i.e., droplets are surrounded by air instead of oil). This new format allowed the realization of a novel on-chip particle separation and resuspension method capable of removing greater than 90% of unbound reagents in one step. Using this technique, we developed methods for noncompetitive and competitive immunoassays, using thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and 17β-estradiol (E2) as model analytes, respectively. We show that, compared to conventional methods, the new DMF approach reported here reduced reagent volumes and analysis time by 100-fold and 10-fold, respectively, while retaining a level of analytical performance required for clinical screening. Thus, we propose that the new technique has great potential for eventual use in a fast, low-waste, and inexpensive instrument for the quantitative analysis of proteins and small molecules in low sample volumes. PMID:23013543

  5. Voltage-driven spin-transfer torque in a magnetic particle

    SciTech Connect

    Gartland, P. Davidović, D.

    2015-10-26

    We discuss a spin-transfer torque device, where the role of the soft ferromagnetic layer is played by a magnetic particle or a magnetic molecule, in weak tunnel contact with two spin polarized leads. We investigate if the magnetization of the particle can be manipulated electronically, in the regime where the critical current for magnetization switching is negligibly weak, which could be due to the reduced particle dimensions. Using master equation simulations to evaluate the effects of spin-orbit anisotropy energy fluctuations on spin-transfer, we obtain reliable reading and writing of the magnetization state of such magnetic particle, and find that the device relies on a critical voltage rather than a critical current. The critical voltage is governed by the spin-orbit energy shifts of discrete levels in the particle. This finding opens a possibility to significantly reduce the power dissipation involved in spin-transfer torque switching, by using very small magnetic particles or molecules.

  6. Aggregation process of paramagnetic particles in fluid in the magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Pei, Ning; Cheng, Xiaoye; Huang, Zheyong; Wang, Xiang; Yang, Kai; Wang, Ye; Gong, Yongyong

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic targeting is a promising therapeutic strategy for localizing systemically delivered magnetic responsive drugs or cells to target tissue, but excessive aggregation of magnetic particles could result in vascular embolization. To analyze the reason for embolization, the attractive process of magnetic particles in magnetic field (MF) was studied in this paper by analyzing the form of the aggregated paramagnetic particles while the particle suspension flowed through a tube, which served as a model of blood vessels. The effects of magnetic flux density and fluid velocity on the formation of aggregated paramagnetic particles were investigated. The number of large aggregated clusters dramatically increased with increment in the magnetic flux density and decreased with increment in the fluid velocity. The analysis of accumulative process demonstrates the MF around initially attracted particles was focused, which induced the formation of clusters and increased the possibility of embolism. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:323-330, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Many particle magnetic dipole-dipole and hydrodynamic interactions in magnetizable stent assisted magnetic drug targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cregg, P. J.; Murphy, Kieran; Mardinoglu, Adil; Prina-Mello, Adriele

    2010-08-01

    The implant assisted magnetic targeted drug delivery system of Avilés, Ebner and Ritter is considered both experimentally ( in vitro) and theoretically. The results of a 2D mathematical model are compared with 3D experimental results for a magnetizable wire stent. In this experiment a ferromagnetic, coiled wire stent is implanted to aid collection of particles which consist of single domain magnetic nanoparticles (radius ≈10 nm). In order to model the agglomeration of particles known to occur in this system, the magnetic dipole-dipole and hydrodynamic interactions for multiple particles are included. Simulations based on this mathematical model were performed using open source C++ code. Different initial positions are considered and the system performance is assessed in terms of collection efficiency. The results of this model show closer agreement with the measured in vitro experimental results and with the literature. The implications in nanotechnology and nanomedicine are based on the prediction of the particle efficiency, in conjunction with the magnetizable stent, for targeted drug delivery.

  8. Multifunctional magnetic nanowires: A novel breakthrough for ultrasensitive detection and isolation of rare cancer cells from non-metastatic early breast cancer patients using small volumes of blood.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wooyoung; Lee, Sooyeon; Chang, Hee Jin; Lee, Eun Sook; Cho, Youngnam

    2016-11-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are recognized as promising biomarkers for diagnosis and indication of the prognosis of several epithelial cancers. However, at present, CTC monitoring is available only for advanced-stage patients rather than for those at an early stage of cancer. This is because of the extraordinary rarity of CTCs and the limited sensitivity of current methods. Herein, we report the development of multifunctional magnetic nanowires for the efficient isolation and detection of CTCs from the blood of patients, especially those with non-metastatic early-stage cancer. The nanowires, which are equipped with a high density of magnetic nanoparticles and five different types of antibodies (Ab mixture_mPpyNWs), offer a significant improvement in cell-isolation efficiency, even from very small amounts of blood (250 μL-1 mL). Notably, CTCs were isolated and identified in 29 out of 29 patients (100%) with non-metastatic early breast cancer, indicating that this procedure allowed detection of CTCs with greater accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. In addition, we demonstrated in situ "naked eye" identification of the captured cancer cells via a simple colorimetric immunoassay. Our results show that antibody-functionalized magnetic nanowires offer great potential for a broad range of practical clinical applications, including early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer. PMID:27552318

  9. Multifunctional magnetic nanowires: A novel breakthrough for ultrasensitive detection and isolation of rare cancer cells from non-metastatic early breast cancer patients using small volumes of blood.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wooyoung; Lee, Sooyeon; Chang, Hee Jin; Lee, Eun Sook; Cho, Youngnam

    2016-11-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are recognized as promising biomarkers for diagnosis and indication of the prognosis of several epithelial cancers. However, at present, CTC monitoring is available only for advanced-stage patients rather than for those at an early stage of cancer. This is because of the extraordinary rarity of CTCs and the limited sensitivity of current methods. Herein, we report the development of multifunctional magnetic nanowires for the efficient isolation and detection of CTCs from the blood of patients, especially those with non-metastatic early-stage cancer. The nanowires, which are equipped with a high density of magnetic nanoparticles and five different types of antibodies (Ab mixture_mPpyNWs), offer a significant improvement in cell-isolation efficiency, even from very small amounts of blood (250 μL-1 mL). Notably, CTCs were isolated and identified in 29 out of 29 patients (100%) with non-metastatic early breast cancer, indicating that this procedure allowed detection of CTCs with greater accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. In addition, we demonstrated in situ "naked eye" identification of the captured cancer cells via a simple colorimetric immunoassay. Our results show that antibody-functionalized magnetic nanowires offer great potential for a broad range of practical clinical applications, including early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer.

  10. Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Ferguson, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25 kHz and 20 mT/μ0 excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (Ho) and frequency (ω). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2 kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52 mT/μ0. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (ωHo) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories. PMID:25422528

  11. Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Shah, Saqlain A; Ferguson, R M; Krishnan, K M

    2014-10-28

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25 kHz and 20 mT/μ0 excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (Ho ) and frequency (ω). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2 kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52 mT/μ0. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (ωH o) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories. PMID:25422528

  12. Plasmonic nanoantennas for multipurpose particle manipulation and enhanced optical magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roxworthy, Brian James

    surface, likely by means of fs-augmented near-field gradient forces. Using this particle-fusing behavior as inspiration, a novel class of "capped" nanoantennas is designed, and their plasmonic response is theoretically investigated. The specific example of capped-bowtie nanoantennas (c-BNAs) is chosen, and it is shown that the c-BNAs have the unique ability to simultaneously enhance both magnetic and electric fields by more than three and four orders of magnitude, respectively. This ability improves on currently available designs that enhance magnetic fields at the expense of a mitigated electric response. The spectral response of the c-BNAs is dominated by two distinct resonant peaks: one in the visible (VIS) and one in the near-infrared (NIR), and the spectral behavior of the c-BNAs is examined as a function of cap thickness, bowtie gap spacing, and c-BNA array spacing. Finally, a new pillar-bowtie nanoantenna (p-BNA) design, comprising Au BNA arrays suspended on 500 nm tall SiO2 pillars, is introduced as a candidate system to show, for the first time, that the mechanical degree of freedom (DOF) can be used to create in situ reconfigurable plasmonic nanoantennas. Reconfigurability is achieved using electron-beam manipulation in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), whereby the electron beam induces strong electromagnetic gradient forces in the p-BNA gap that causes the two arms to deform toward the common gap center. In characterizing this behavior as a function of SEM accelerating voltage and magnification, design curves are produced that enable controlled, repeatable fabrication of nanoantennas with gap sizes as small as 5 nm by actuation of the mechanical DOF of the pillars. As a proof of this novel design principle, the optical response of two, 10 x 10 modified p-BNA regions comprising 5- and 15-nm gap antennas is characterized using spatially localized reflection spectroscopy based on a supercontinuum optical source. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  13. Intracellular performance of tailored nanoparticle tracers in magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arami, Hamed; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a quantitative mass-sensitive, tracer-based imaging technique, with potential applications in various cellular imaging applications. The spatial resolution of MPI, in the first approximation, improves by decreasing the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the field-derivative of the magnetization, dm/dH of the nanoparticle (NP) tracers. The FWHM of dm/dH depends critically on NPs' size, size distribution, and their environment. However, there is limited information on the MPI performance of the NPs after their internalization into cells. In this work, 30 to 150 μg of the iron oxide NPs were incubated in a lysosome-like acidic buffer (0.2 ml, 20 mM citric acid, pH 4.7) and investigated by vibrating sample magnetometry, magnetic particle spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The FWHM of the dm/dH curves of the NPs increased with incubation time and buffer to NPs ratio, consistent with a decrease in the median core size of the NPs from ˜20.1 ± 0.98 to ˜18.5 ± 3.15 nm. Further, these smaller degraded NPs formed aggregates that responded to the applied field by hysteretic reversal at higher field values and increased the FWHM. The rate of core size decrease and aggregation were inversely proportional to the concentration of the incubated NPs, due to their slower biodegradation kinetics. The results of this model experiment show that the MPI performance of the NPs in the acidic environments of the intracellular organelles (i.e., lysosomes and endosomes) can be highly dependent on their rate of internalization, residence time, and degradation.

  14. Magnetic particle imaging: current developments and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Duschka, Robert L; Ahlborg, Mandy; Bringout, Gael; Debbeler, Christina; Graeser, Matthias; Kaethner, Christian; Lüdtke-Buzug, Kerstin; Medimagh, Hanne; Stelzner, Jan; Buzug, Thorsten M; Barkhausen, Jörg; Vogt, Florian M; Haegele, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a novel imaging method that was first proposed by Gleich and Weizenecker in 2005. Applying static and dynamic magnetic fields, MPI exploits the unique characteristics of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). The SPIONs’ response allows a three-dimensional visualization of their distribution in space with a superb contrast, a very high temporal and good spatial resolution. Essentially, it is the SPIONs’ superparamagnetic characteristics, the fact that they are magnetically saturable, and the harmonic composition of the SPIONs’ response that make MPI possible at all. As SPIONs are the essential element of MPI, the development of customized nanoparticles is pursued with the greatest effort by many groups. Their objective is the creation of a SPION or a conglomerate of particles that will feature a much higher MPI performance than nanoparticles currently available commercially. A particle’s MPI performance and suitability is characterized by parameters such as the strength of its MPI signal, its biocompatibility, or its pharmacokinetics. Some of the most important adjuster bolts to tune them are the particles’ iron core and hydrodynamic diameter, their anisotropy, the composition of the particles’ suspension, and their coating. As a three-dimensional, real-time imaging modality that is free of ionizing radiation, MPI appears ideally suited for applications such as vascular imaging and interventions as well as cellular and targeted imaging. A number of different theories and technical approaches on the way to the actual implementation of the basic concept of MPI have been seen in the last few years. Research groups around the world are working on different scanner geometries, from closed bore systems to single-sided scanners, and use reconstruction methods that are either based on actual calibration measurements or on theoretical models. This review aims at giving an overview of current developments and

  15. Intracellular performance of tailored nanoparticle tracers in magnetic particle imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Arami, Hamed; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2014-05-07

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a quantitative mass-sensitive, tracer-based imaging technique, with potential applications in various cellular imaging applications. The spatial resolution of MPI, in the first approximation, improves by decreasing the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the field-derivative of the magnetization, dm/dH of the nanoparticle (NP) tracers. The FWHM of dm/dH depends critically on NPs’ size, size distribution, and their environment. However, there is limited information on the MPI performance of the NPs after their internalization into cells. In this work, 30 to 150 μg of the iron oxide NPs were incubated in a lysosome-like acidic buffer (0.2 ml, 20 mM citric acid, pH 4.7) and investigated by vibrating sample magnetometry, magnetic particle spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The FWHM of the dm/dH curves of the NPs increased with incubation time and buffer to NPs ratio, consistent with a decrease in the median core size of the NPs from ∼20.1 ± 0.98 to ∼18.5 ± 3.15 nm. Further, these smaller degraded NPs formed aggregates that responded to the applied field by hysteretic reversal at higher field values and increased the FWHM. The rate of core size decrease and aggregation were inversely proportional to the concentration of the incubated NPs, due to their slower biodegradation kinetics. The results of this model experiment show that the MPI performance of the NPs in the acidic environments of the intracellular organelles (i.e., lysosomes and endosomes) can be highly dependent on their rate of internalization, residence time, and degradation.

  16. Design of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI)

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yimeng; Lai, Pui To; Leung, Cheung Hoi; Pong, Philip W. T.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a promising medical imaging technique producing quantitative images of the distribution of tracer materials (superparamagnetic nanoparticles) without interference from the anatomical background of the imaging objects (either phantoms or lab animals). Theoretically, the MPI platform can image with relatively high temporal and spatial resolution and sensitivity. In practice, the quality of the MPI images hinges on both the applied magnetic field and the properties of the tracer nanoparticles. Langevin theory can model the performance of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and predict the crucial influence of nanoparticle core size on the MPI signal. In addition, the core size distribution, anisotropy of the magnetic core and surface modification of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles also determine the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the MPI images. As a result, through rational design of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, the performance of MPI could be effectively optimized. In this review, the performance of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in MPI is investigated. Rational synthesis and modification of superparamagnetic nanoparticles are discussed and summarized. The potential medical application areas for MPI, including cardiovascular system, oncology, stem cell tracking and immune related imaging are also analyzed and forecasted. PMID:24030719

  17. Relaxation in x-space magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Croft, Laura R; Goodwill, Patrick W; Conolly, Steven M

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging modality that noninvasively images the spatial distribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs). MPI has demonstrated high contrast and zero attenuation with depth, and MPI promises superior safety compared to current angiography methods, X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging angiography. Nanoparticle relaxation can delay the SPIO magnetization, and in this work we investigate the open problem of the role relaxation plays in MPI scanning and its effect on the image. We begin by amending the x-space theory of MPI to include nanoparticle relaxation effects. We then validate the amended theory with experiments from a Berkeley x-space relaxometer and a Berkeley x-space projection MPI scanner. Our theory and experimental data indicate that relaxation reduces SNR and asymmetrically blurs the image in the scanning direction. While relaxation effects can have deleterious effects on the MPI scan, we show theoretically and experimentally that x-space reconstruction remains robust in the presence of relaxation. Furthermore, the role of relaxation in x-space theory provides guidance as we develop methods to minimize relaxation-induced blurring. This will be an important future area of research for the MPI community.

  18. Enhancement of iron content in spinach plants stimulated by magnetic nano particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulianto, Agus; Astuti, Budi; Amalia, Saptaria Rosa

    2016-04-01

    In our previous study, the iron content in spinach plants could be detected by magnetic susceptibility values. In the present work, magnetic nano particles were found from the iron sand. The magnetic nano particles are synthesis by using co-precipitation process and sol-gel technique. The stimulation of magnetic nano particles in the plant has been done by the provision of magnetic nano particles in growing media. After certain time, plant samples was characterized using susceptibility-meter MS2B and atomic absorption spectroscopy to measure the magnetic susceptibility and the amount of iron content that absorbed of the plant, respectively. The iron content in the spinach plants was increased when the magnetic nano particles was injected in the growing media.

  19. Nonlinearity of dynamic magnetization in a superparamagnetic clustered-particle suspension with regard to particle rotatability under oscillatory field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trisnanto, Suko Bagus; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka

    2016-02-01

    The magnetization induced by oscillatory magnetic-field in a polydispersive superparamagnetic-suspension shows a nonlinearity which strongly depends on the applied frequency. Referring to the initially-measured complex magnetic-susceptibility in function of field-strength, the highly-nonlinear curve of dynamic magnetization at low frequency tends to be linear at higher frequency. Likewise, the dynamic susceptibility appears to be less field-strength dependent at higher frequency, emphasizing a frequency-dependence of magnetically-induced particle-dynamics. This finding is attributable to the imaginary part of magnetization which saturates at lower field-strength of low-frequency magnetic-field. Hence, Brownian relaxation losses should be constant after the saturation due to a confinement of particle rotations.

  20. High performance wash-free magnetic bioassays through microfluidically enhanced particle specificity.

    PubMed

    Bechstein, Daniel J B; Lee, Jung-Rok; Ooi, Chin Chun; Gani, Adi W; Kim, Kyunglok; Wilson, Robert J; Wang, Shan X

    2015-06-30

    Magnetic biosensors have emerged as a sensitive and versatile platform for high performance medical diagnostics. These magnetic biosensors require well-tailored magnetic particles as detection probes, which need to give rise to a large and specific biological signal while showing very low nonspecific binding. This is especially important in wash-free bioassay protocols, which do not require removal of particles before measurement, often a necessity in point of care diagnostics. Here we show that magnetic interactions between magnetic particles and magnetized sensors dramatically impact particle transport and magnetic adhesion to the sensor surfaces. We investigate the dynamics of magnetic particles' biomolecular binding and magnetic adhesion to the sensor surface using microfluidic experiments. We elucidate how flow forces can inhibit magnetic adhesion, greatly diminishing or even eliminating nonspecific signals in wash-free magnetic bioassays, and enhancing signal to noise ratios by several orders of magnitude. Our method is useful for selecting and optimizing magnetic particles for a wide range of magnetic sensor platforms.

  1. Employment of a novel magnetically multifunctional purifying material for determination of toxic highly chlorinated polychlorinated biphenyls at trace levels in soil samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiabin; Pan, Muyun; Gan, Ning; Cao, Yuting; Wu, Dazhen

    2014-10-17

    In this study, we developed a magnetically multifunctional purifying material for efficient removal of matrix interferences, especially certain organochlorine pesticide (DDT, DDE, and DDD), during the determination of toxic highly chlorinated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at trace levels in soil samples. The multifunctional adsorbent (CMCD-NH2-MNPs) was prepared by grafting carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin on the surface of amino-functionalized magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. CMCD-NH2-MNPs has stronger host-guest complexation with DDT, DDE, and DDD, but the same adsorbent shows weaker adsorption ability toward highly chlorinated PCBs (from tetra- to octa-chlorinated PCBs) owing to their steric hindrance effect. Based on this principle, a simple and rapid gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed for six indicator PCBs (PCB28, PCB52, PCB101, PCB138, PCB153, and PCB180) in soil. Comparative studies were conducted to determine the clean-up efficiency of the following three techniques: (i) Oasis-HLB, (ii) multi-layer silica column, and (iii) dSPE employing CMCD-NH2-MNPs. The results indicate that CMCD-NH2-MNPs as the purification material can easily and effectively remove DDT, DDE, and DDD in soil samples within a short duration of time. The recoveries for highly chlorinated PCBs were in the range of 85.4-102.2%, with RSDs varying between 1.0 and 6.5%. The proposed method was verified as one of the most effective clean-up procedures for the analysis of highly chlorinated PCBs in real soil samples.

  2. Solar magnetic connections in gradual solar energetic particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S.; Arge, C.

    2003-04-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are assumed to be produced in coronal and interplanetary shocks driven by fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Most of these SEP-associated fast CMEs are large in angular extent and intersect the ecliptic plane. In some cases, however, their angular extents lie completely outside the ecliptic plane. If we assume that the associated coronal shocks share the CME angular extents, the magnetic field lines connecting the Earth with the solar source surface (positioned at 2.5 Rs from Sun center) are confined to the ecliptic plane, and SEPs undergo no cross-field diffusion, then such SEP events should not be observed. One explanation for these observed SEP events is that the solar coronal connection of the field lines at Earth does not lie in the ecliptic plane in the solar coronal regions where shock acceleration takes place, which is thought to occur between ~2-10 Rs. To test this idea, the interplanetary magnetic field must be traced from Earth back to these coronal regions. A simple way to do this is to use the potential source surface and Schatten current sheet models in combination along with the assumption of constant solar wind flow speed along magnetic field lines. This approach allows interplanetary field lines to be traced from 1 AU back to coronal regions and therefore determine whether high latitudinal connections can explain the SEPs from high-latitude CMEs. We select Wind EPACT SEP events and associated narrow or high-latitude Lasco CMEs to test for high-latitude connections using the magnetic field model.

  3. Encouragement of Enzyme Reaction Utilizing Heat Generation from Ferromagnetic Particles Subjected to an AC Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masashi; Aki, Atsushi; Mizuki, Toru; Maekawa, Toru; Usami, Ron; Morimoto, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method of activating an enzyme utilizing heat generation from ferromagnetic particles under an ac magnetic field. We immobilize α-amylase on the surface of ferromagnetic particles and analyze its activity. We find that when α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids, that is, ferromagnetic particles, on which α-amylase molecules are immobilized, are subjected to an ac magnetic field, the particles generate heat and as a result, α-amylase on the particles is heated up and activated. We next prepare a solution, in which α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids and free, nonimmobilized chitinase are dispersed, and analyze their activities. We find that when the solution is subjected to an ac magnetic field, the activity of α-amylase immobilized on the particles increases, whereas that of free chitinase hardly changes; in other words, only α-amylase immobilized on the particles is selectively activated due to heat generation from the particles. PMID:25993268

  4. Encouragement of Enzyme Reaction Utilizing Heat Generation from Ferromagnetic Particles Subjected to an AC Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masashi; Aki, Atsushi; Mizuki, Toru; Maekawa, Toru; Usami, Ron; Morimoto, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method of activating an enzyme utilizing heat generation from ferromagnetic particles under an ac magnetic field. We immobilize α-amylase on the surface of ferromagnetic particles and analyze its activity. We find that when α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids, that is, ferromagnetic particles, on which α-amylase molecules are immobilized, are subjected to an ac magnetic field, the particles generate heat and as a result, α-amylase on the particles is heated up and activated. We next prepare a solution, in which α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids and free, nonimmobilized chitinase are dispersed, and analyze their activities. We find that when the solution is subjected to an ac magnetic field, the activity of α-amylase immobilized on the particles increases, whereas that of free chitinase hardly changes; in other words, only α-amylase immobilized on the particles is selectively activated due to heat generation from the particles.

  5. Magnetic particle hyperthermia: Néel relaxation in magnetic nanoparticles under circularly polarized field.

    PubMed

    de Châtel, P F; Nándori, I; Hakl, J; Mészáros, S; Vad, K

    2009-03-25

    The mechanism of magnetization reversal in single-domain ferromagnetic particles is of interest in many applications, in most of which losses must be minimized. In cancer therapy by hyperthermia the opposite requirement prevails: the specific loss power should be maximized. Of the mechanisms of dissipation, here we study the effect of Néel relaxation on magnetic nanoparticles unable to move or rotate and compare the losses in linearly and circularly polarized fields. We present exact analytical solutions of the Landau-Lifshitz equation as derived from the Gilbert equation and use the calculated time-dependent magnetizations to find the energy loss per cycle. In frequencies lower than the Larmor frequency, linear polarization is found to be the better source of heat power, at high frequencies (beyond the Larmor frequency) circular polarization is preferable.

  6. Nondestructive Testing Magnetic Particle RQA/M1-5330.11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center.

    As one in the series of programmed instruction handbooks, prepared by the U. S. space program, home study material is presented in this volume concerning familiarization and orientation on magnetic particle properties. The subject is presented under the following headings: Magnetism, Producing a Magnetic Field, Magnetizing Currents, Materials and…

  7. Magnetization Reversal Process of Single Crystal α-Fe Containing a Nonmagnetic Particle

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiu-Lin; Liu, Wei

    2015-09-25

    The magnetization reversal process and hysteresis loops in a single crystal α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated in this work based on the Landau-Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. The evolutions of the magnetic domain morphology are studied, and our analyses show that the magnetization reversal process is affected by the interaction between the moving domain wall and the existing nonmagnetic particles. This interaction strongly depends on the size of the particles, and it is found that particles with a particular size contribute the most to magnetic hardening.

  8. Advanced spray-dried design, physicochemical characterization, and aerosol dispersion performance of vancomycin and clarithromycin multifunctional controlled release particles for targeted respiratory delivery as dry powder inhalation aerosols.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Woong; Li, Xiaojian; Vogt, Frederick G; Hayes, Don; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Park, Eun-Seok; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-10-15

    Respirable microparticles/nanoparticles of the antibiotics vancomycin (VCM) and clarithromycin (CLM) were successfully designed and developed by novel organic solution advanced spray drying from methanol solution. Formulation optimization was achieved through statistical experimental design of pump feeding rates of 25% (Low P), 50% (Medium P) and 75% (High P). Systematic and comprehensive physicochemical characterization and imaging were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), hot-stage microscopy (HSM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Karl Fischer titration (KFT), laser size diffraction (LSD), gravimetric vapor sorption (GVS), confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) and spectroscopy for chemical imaging mapping. These novel spray-dried (SD) microparticulate/nanoparticulate dry powders displayed excellent aerosol dispersion performance as dry powder inhalers (DPIs) with high values in emitted dose (ED), respirable fraction (RF), and fine particle fraction (FPF). VCM DPIs displayed better aerosol dispersion performance compared to CLM DPIs which was related to differences in the physicochemical and particle properties of VCM and CLM. In addition, organic solution advanced co-spray drying particle engineering design was employed to successfully produce co-spray-dried (co-SD) multifunctional microparticulate/nanoparticulate aerosol powder formulations of VCM and CLM with the essential lung surfactant phospholipid, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), for controlled release pulmonary nanomedicine delivery as inhalable dry powder aerosols. Formulation optimization was achieved through statistical experimental design of molar ratios of co-SD VCM:DPPC and co-SD CLM:DPPC. XRPD and DSC confirmed that the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid-state was preserved following spray drying. Co-SD VCM:DPPC and co-SD CLM:DPPC dry powder aerosols demonstrated controlled release of antibiotic drug that was fitted to various

  9. Core-shell composite particles composed of biodegradable polymer particles and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Chiemi; Ushimaru, Kazunori; Horiishi, Nanao; Tsuge, Takeharu; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka

    2015-05-01

    Core-shell composite particles with biodegradability and superparamagnetic behavior were prepared using a Pickering emulsion for targeted drug delivery based on magnetic guidance. The composite particles were composed of a core of biodegradable polymer and a shell of assembled magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. It was found that the dispersibility of the nanoparticles is crucial for controlling the core-shell structure. The addition of a small amount of dispersant into the nanoparticle's suspension could improve the dispersibility and led to the formation of composite particles with a thin magnetic shell covering a polymeric core. The composite particles were also fabricated with a model drug loaded into the core, which was released via hydrolysis of the core under strong alkaline conditions. Because the core can also be biodegraded by lipase, this result suggests that the slow release of the drug from the composite particles should occur inside the body.

  10. Development and validation of rapid magnetic particle based extraction protocols

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to control and eradicate transboundary animal diseases, early diagnosis and reaction is essential for the implementation of control activities. Thus, mobile diagnostic units which allow analytical testing close to the site of occurrence could provide valuable support for centralized laboratories. Consequently, the availability of diagnostic tests using mobile amplification and detection technologies has been increasing over the past years. However, methods enabling rapid and simple nucleic acid extraction also under resource-limited settings are still scarce. Methods In the present study rapid extraction protocols based on magnetic particle technology have been developed. For this purpose, the two open extraction platforms KingFisher™ Duo (Thermo Fisher Scientific) and BioSprint® 15 (Qiagen) as well as the fully automated EZ1® advanced XL instrument (Qiagen) were used. All protocols were validated in comparison to standard manual extraction using blood and serum samples from animals infected with Schmallenberg virus or bovine viral diarrhea virus. Results All newly developed protocols allowed a complete extraction within 30 minutes of time. The fully automated EZ1-extraction yielded the highest reproducibility, whereas slightly higher intra- and inter-assay variations were observed using the open platforms. Compared to the manual procedure, the analytical sensitivity of all the rapid protocols was 1 log10 step reduced for extraction from blood samples. For sera a reduced dynamic range could only be observed using the maximally shortened BioSprint 15 protocol. Validation using clinical samples showed an excellent concordance of all the rapid extraction protocols to the standard manual extraction procedure, independent of sample materials and target viruses. Conclusions The results of this study show that the speed-optimized novel extraction protocols allow rapid and simple nucleic acid extractions for a variety of target viruses without

  11. Solar Energetic Particle transport along meandering interplanetary magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laitinen, Timo; Kopp, Andreas; Effenberger, Frederic; Dalla, Silvia; Marsh, Mike

    2016-04-01

    Recent multi-spacecraft Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) observations have challenged the traditional view of SEP production and interplanetary transport. In several events, the SEP intensities rise fast even at 180 degree longitudinal distance from the flare location. For many events the anisotropy of the SEPs has been found to depend on the observer's longitude, being stronger at locations that are well magnetically connected to the assumed SEP source region, as compared to wider longitudinal reaches. This suggests that interplanetary transport is an important factor for the SEP cross-field extent. The traditional modelling approach, with diffusive cross-field propagation, however, requires diffusion across the mean magnetic field much faster than that supported by current theories. We study the temporal and spatial evolution of SEP intensities and anisotropy using a new SEP transport model, FP+FLRW, which incorporates field-line random walk (FLRW) into the Fokker-Planck (FP) transport modelling framework. The FP+FLRW model was introduced by Laitinen et al (2013), who found using full-orbit simulations that the cross-field propagation of particles early in an SEP event is not diffusive, but dominated by deterministic propagation along stochastically meandering turbulent field-lines. We have extended the FP+FLRW model to a Parker spiral geometry, and show that it is able to reproduce the observed fast access of SEPs to a wide range of longitudes. The observed Gaussian shaped distribution of peak intensities versus longitude, having a sigma=30-50 degrees, is reproduced already for a narrow source region, while using realistic interplanetary transport conditions. We compare the anisotropy evolution of an SEP event given by the FP+FLRW model to that given by the traditional FP approach, and discuss the implications of our findings for the SEP event origins, source width and the role of interplanetary turbulence in the interpretation of the SEP observations.

  12. Self-organization of magnetic particles at fluid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Maxim

    Understanding principles that govern emergent behavior in systems with complex interactions has puzzled scientists for many years. In my work I studied seemingly simple but highly non-trivial system of magnetic micro-particles suspended at fluid interface and energized by an external vertical AC magnetic field. It can be considered as a prototype for probing the interplay of individual interactions on the collective response of system to the external driving. The first part of this work is focused on experimental study of self-organization in this system. In a certain region of parameters formation of localized snake-like structures with accompanying large-scale symmetric surface flows is observed. Characteristics of the self-organized structure as well as flows strongly depend on parameters of the external driving. Increased driving leads to a spontaneous symmetry breaking of the surface flows which results in a self-propulsion of the "snake". This observation leads to an idea of controlled design of a self-propelled swimmer. Numerical calculations based on a phenomenological model proposed for the description of such system successfully reproduces self-organization of the snake-like structures, self-propulsion under spontaneous and artificial symmetry breaking. Increase in the number of the particles promotes a formation of multiple snakes which are in turn unstable with respect to self-induced flows and become mobile swimmers. Such ensemble effectively mixes the surface of liquid. Experimental study of such two-dimensional mixing is the focus of the second part of this work. Results of molecular-dynamics simulations based on proposed theoretical model are reported.

  13. High performance wash-free magnetic bioassays through microfluidically enhanced particle specificity

    PubMed Central

    Bechstein, Daniel J.B.; Lee, Jung-Rok; Ooi, Chin Chun; Gani, Adi W.; Kim, Kyunglok; Wilson, Robert J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic biosensors have emerged as a sensitive and versatile platform for high performance medical diagnostics. These magnetic biosensors require well-tailored magnetic particles as detection probes, which need to give rise to a large and specific biological signal while showing very low nonspecific binding. This is especially important in wash-free bioassay protocols, which do not require removal of particles before measurement, often a necessity in point of care diagnostics. Here we show that magnetic interactions between magnetic particles and magnetized sensors dramatically impact particle transport and magnetic adhesion to the sensor surfaces. We investigate the dynamics of magnetic particles’ biomolecular binding and magnetic adhesion to the sensor surface using microfluidic experiments. We elucidate how flow forces can inhibit magnetic adhesion, greatly diminishing or even eliminating nonspecific signals in wash-free magnetic bioassays, and enhancing signal to noise ratios by several orders of magnitude. Our method is useful for selecting and optimizing magnetic particles for a wide range of magnetic sensor platforms. PMID:26123868

  14. Biodegradable and magnetic core-shell composite particle prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Chiemi; Ushimaru, Kazunori; Horiishi, Nanao; Tsuge, Takeharu; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka

    2016-02-01

    The present paper describes optimization of preparation conditions of a core-shell composite particle, and its heat generation by alternating magnetic fields. The composite particles are prepared with a modified emulsion solvent diffusion method, which is combined with Pickering emulsion stabilized by magnetic nanoparticles. In this method, the magnetic nanoparticles act as an emulsifier, and its amount and size are crucial to morphology of the composite particles. The magnetic nanoparticles of 8-9 nm would be strongly adsorbed at a liquid-liquid interface rather than the larger nanoparticles. At the optimized concentration of the magnetic nanoparticle’s suspension for the preparation, small and uniform composite particles are obtained since the amount of the nanoparticles is enough to prevent coalescence of droplets during the formation of the composites. The heat generation by alternating magnetic fields emerged certainly. This result suggests the composite particles have a property as a heat-generating carrier for hyperthermia treatment.

  15. Multi-color magnetic particle imaging for cardiovascular interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haegele, Julian; Vaalma, Sarah; Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Barkhausen, Jörg; Vogt, Florian M.; Borgert, Jörn; Rahmer, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) uses magnetic fields to visualize the spatial distribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs). Guidance of cardiovascular interventions is seen as one possible application of MPI. To safely guide interventions, the vessel lumen as well as all required interventional devices have to be visualized and be discernible from each other. Until now, different tracer concentrations were used for discerning devices from blood in MPI, because only one type of SPIO could be imaged at a time. Recently, it was shown for 3D MPI that it is possible to separate different signal sources in one volume of interest, i.e. to visualize and discern different SPIOs or different binding states of the same SPIO. The approach was termed multi-color MPI. In this work, the use of multi-color MPI for differentiation of a SPIO coated guide wire (Terumo Radifocus 0.035″) from the lumen of a vessel phantom filled with diluted Resovist is demonstrated. This is achieved by recording dedicated system functions of the coating material containing solid Resovist and of liquid Resovist, which allows separation of their respective signal in the image reconstruction process. Assigning a color to the different signal sources results in a differentiation of guide wire and vessel phantom lumen into colored images.

  16. Orientational order and translational dynamics of magnetic particle assemblies in liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Peroukidis, Stavros D; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2016-08-10

    Implementing extensive molecular dynamics simulations we explore the organization of magnetic particle assemblies (clusters) in a uniaxial liquid crystalline matrix comprised of rodlike particles. The magnetic particles are modelled as soft dipolar spheres with diameter significantly smaller than the width of the rods. Depending on the dipolar strength coupling the magnetic particles arrange into head-to-tail configurations forming various types of clusters including rings (closed loops) and chains. In turn, the liquid crystalline matrix induces long range orientational ordering to these structures and promotes their diffusion along the director of the phase. Different translational dynamics are exhibited as the liquid crystalline matrix transforms either from isotropic to nematic or from nematic to smectic state. This is caused due to different collective motion of the magnetic particles into various clusters in the anisotropic environments. Our results offer a physical insight for understanding both the structure and dynamics of magnetic particle assemblies in liquid crystalline matrices.

  17. Orientational order and translational dynamics of magnetic particle assemblies in liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Peroukidis, Stavros D; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2016-08-10

    Implementing extensive molecular dynamics simulations we explore the organization of magnetic particle assemblies (clusters) in a uniaxial liquid crystalline matrix comprised of rodlike particles. The magnetic particles are modelled as soft dipolar spheres with diameter significantly smaller than the width of the rods. Depending on the dipolar strength coupling the magnetic particles arrange into head-to-tail configurations forming various types of clusters including rings (closed loops) and chains. In turn, the liquid crystalline matrix induces long range orientational ordering to these structures and promotes their diffusion along the director of the phase. Different translational dynamics are exhibited as the liquid crystalline matrix transforms either from isotropic to nematic or from nematic to smectic state. This is caused due to different collective motion of the magnetic particles into various clusters in the anisotropic environments. Our results offer a physical insight for understanding both the structure and dynamics of magnetic particle assemblies in liquid crystalline matrices. PMID:27460190

  18. Preparation and characterization of temperature-responsive magnetic composite particles for multi-modal cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Aihua; Chen, Qi; Ai, Fanrong; Wang, Deping; Huang, Wenhai

    2011-10-01

    The temperature-responsive magnetic composite particles were synthesized by emulsion-free polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and acrylamide (Am) in the presence of oleic acid-modified Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles. The magnetic properties and heat generation ability of the composite particles were characterized. Furthermore, temperature and alternating magnetic field (AMF) triggered drug release behaviors of vitamin B(12)-loaded composite particles were also examined. It was found that composite particles enabled drug release to be controlled through temperature changes in the neighborhood of lower critical solution temperature. Continuous application of AMF resulted in an accelerated release of the loaded drug. On the other hand, intermittent AMF application to the composite particles resulted in an "on-off", stepwise release pattern. Longer release duration and larger overall release could be achieved by intermittent application of AMF as compared to continuous magnetic field. Such composite particles may be used for magnetic drug targeting followed by simultaneous hyperthermia and drug release.

  19. Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Krishnan, K. M.; Ferguson, R. M.

    2014-10-28

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25 kHz and 20 mT/μ{sub 0} excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (H{sub o}) and frequency (ω). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2 kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52 mT/μ{sub 0}. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (ωH{sub o}) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories.

  20. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of -0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process. PMID:27104527

  1. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of −0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process. PMID:27104527

  2. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-04-20

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of -0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process.

  3. Magnetic microgels, a promising candidate for enhanced magnetic adsorbent particles in bioseparation: synthesis, physicochemical characterization, and separation performance.

    PubMed

    Turcu, Rodica; Socoliuc, Vlad; Craciunescu, Izabell; Petran, Anca; Paulus, Anja; Franzreb, Matthias; Vasile, Eugeniu; Vekas, Ladislau

    2015-02-01

    For specific applications in the field of high gradient magnetic separation of biomaterials, magnetic nanoparticle clusters of controlled size and high magnetic moment in an external magnetic field are of particular interest. We report the synthesis and characterization of magnetic microgels designed for magnetic separation purposes, as well as the separation efficiency of the obtained microgel particles. High magnetization magnetic microgels with superparamagnetic behaviour were obtained in a two-step synthesis procedure by a miniemulsion technique using highly stable ferrofluid on a volatile nonpolar carrier. Spherical clusters of closely packed hydrophobic oleic acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles were coated with cross linked polymer shells of polyacrylic acid, poly-N-isopropylacrylamide, and poly-3-acrylamidopropyl trimethylammonium chloride. The morphology, size distribution, chemical surface composition, and magnetic properties of the magnetic microgels were determined using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. Magnetically induced phase condensation in aqueous suspensions of magnetic microgels was investigated by optical microscopy and static light scattering. The condensed phase consists of elongated oblong structures oriented in the direction of the external magnetic field and may grow up to several microns in thickness and tens or even hundreds of microns in length. The dependence of phase condensation magnetic supersaturation on the magnetic field intensity was determined. The experiments using high gradient magnetic separation show high values of separation efficiency (99.9-99.97%) for the magnetic microgels. PMID:25519891

  4. Atmospheric Effects of Solar Energetic Particle Events In Magnetized and Non-Magnetized Regions of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolitz, R.; Dong, C.; Lillis, R. J.; Curry, S.; Brain, D. A.; Larson, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Solar and shock-accelerated heliospheric energetic charged particles represent an important if irregular source of energy to the Martian upper atmosphere. A Monte Carlo code has been developed to track a population of protons in an atmosphere and account for energy loss to collisional processes including heating, ionization, excitation, and charge transfer. The model framework is open to multiple planetary-specific inputs (e.g. three-dimensional neutral densities, electric and magnetic fields) and uses an adaptive trace algorithm to accurately model collisions in dense and sparse atmospheric regions. Applying 3-D models of electric and magnetic fields from the Michigan Mars MHD code and 1-D neutral densities from the Mars Global Thermosphere Ionosphere Model (M-GITM), we use this model to calculate volume rates of relevant proton-mediated energy loss processes in the Martian upper atmosphere. The model will be improved to generate ionization and heating rates in areas of strong and weak crustal magnetic fields for solar energetic particle events observed by the SEP instrument on MAVEN. Ultimately this will form part of a comprehensive model of solar wind interactions with Mars.

  5. Aharonov-Bohm scattering of relativistic Dirac particles with an anomalous magnetic moment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Qionggui

    2005-10-15

    The Aharonov-Bohm scattering of relativistic spin-1/2 particles with an anomalous magnetic moment are studied. The scattering cross sections for unpolarized and polarized particles are obtained by solving the Dirac-Pauli equation. It is somewhat unexpected that the results are in general the same as those for particles without an anomalous magnetic moment. However, when the incident energy takes some special values, the cross section for polarized particles is dramatically changed. In these cases the helicity of scattered particles is not conserved. In particular, the helicity of particles scattered in the backward direction is all reversed. In the nonrelativistic limit, a very simple relation between the polarized directions of the incident and scattered particles is found, for both general and special incident energies. For particles without an anomalous magnetic moment this relation can be drawn from previous results but it appears to be unnoticed.

  6. Investigation of the temperature field in the magnetic hyperthermia using FeCrNbB magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astefanoaei, Iordana; Chiriac, Horia; Stancu, Alexandru

    2016-09-01

    The control of the temperature field within malignant tissues is an important task in the magnetic hyperthermia. The temperature analysis is a good method to focus the main parameters which can improve the heating mechanisms of the magnetic particles injected within tissues when the magnetic fields are applied. This paper analyses the temperature effects induced within tumoral tissues by the super-paramagnetic systems as FeCrNbB, magnetite and maghemite when an external time-dependent magnetic field is applied. A 3D temperature model which predicts the temperature field in a tumoral tissue was developed. The heat generation by Néel and Brown relaxations was modeled using the thermal and magnetic properties of the FeCrNbB particles experimentally determined. Interconnection between particle parameters (composition, size, magnetic and thermal properties), optimum dosage (volume concentration) and the magnetic field parameters (frequency and magnetic field intensity) was studied. The FeCrNbB magnetic systems have a particular behavior with the frequency and amplitude of the AC magnetic field. The temperature gradients induced within the tumor as a result of the heating in the magnetic field are smaller than the ones induced by the magnetite systems. This temperature behaviour can be an advantage in the controlled heating of the tumors.

  7. Evidence for the presence of biogenic magnetic particles in the nocturnal migratory brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weidong; Wan, Guijun; Xu, Jingjing; Li, Xiaoming; Liu, Yuxin; Qi, Liping; Chen, Fajun

    2016-01-01

    Biogenic magnetic particles have been detected in some migratory insects, which implies the basis of magnetoreception mechanism for orientation and navigation. Here, the biogenic magnetic particles in the migratory brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens were qualitatively measured by SQUID magnetometry, and their characteristics were further determined by Prussian Blue staining, electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results indicate that there were remarkable magnetic materials in the abdomens and not in the head or thorax of the 3rd–5th instar nymphs, and in macropterous and brachypterous female and male adults of BPH. The size of magnetic particles was shown to be between 50–450 nm with a shape factor estimate of between 0.8–1.0 for all the tested BPHs. Moreover, the amount of magnetic particles was associated with the developmental stage (the 3rd–5th instar), wing form (macropterous vs. brachypterous) and sex. The macropterous female adults had the largest amount of magnetic particles. Although the existence of magnetic particles in the abdomens of BPH provides sound basis for the assumption of magnetic orientation, further behavioral studies and complementary physical characterization experiments should be conducted to determine whether the orientation behavior of BPH is associated with the magnetic particles detected in this study. PMID:26727944

  8. Droplet-based microfluidic washing module for magnetic particle-based assays

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hun; Xu, Linfeng; Oh, Kwang W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a continuous flow droplet-based microfluidic platform for magnetic particle-based assays by employing in-droplet washing. The droplet-based washing was implemented by traversing functionalized magnetic particles across a laterally merged droplet from one side (containing sample and reagent) to the other (containing buffer) by an external magnetic field. Consequently, the magnetic particles were extracted to a parallel-synchronized train of washing buffer droplets, and unbound reagents were left in an original train of sample droplets. To realize the droplet-based washing function, the following four procedures were sequentially carried in a droplet-based microfluidic device: parallel synchronization of two trains of droplets by using a ladder-like channel network; lateral electrocoalescence by an electric field; magnetic particle manipulation by a magnetic field; and asymmetrical splitting of merged droplets. For the stable droplet synchronization and electrocoalescence, we optimized droplet generation conditions by varying the flow rate ratio (or droplet size). Image analysis was carried out to determine the fluorescent intensity of reagents before and after the washing step. As a result, the unbound reagents in sample droplets were significantly removed by more than a factor of 25 in the single washing step, while the magnetic particles were successfully extracted into washing buffer droplets. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate a magnetic particle-based immunoassay with streptavidin-coated magnetic particles and fluorescently labelled biotin in the proposed continuous flow droplet-based microfluidic platform. PMID:25379098

  9. Evidence for the presence of biogenic magnetic particles in the nocturnal migratory brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weidong; Wan, Guijun; Xu, Jingjing; Li, Xiaoming; Liu, Yuxin; Qi, Liping; Chen, Fajun

    2016-01-05

    Biogenic magnetic particles have been detected in some migratory insects, which implies the basis of magnetoreception mechanism for orientation and navigation. Here, the biogenic magnetic particles in the migratory brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens were qualitatively measured by SQUID magnetometry, and their characteristics were further determined by Prussian Blue staining, electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results indicate that there were remarkable magnetic materials in the abdomens and not in the head or thorax of the 3(rd)-5(th) instar nymphs, and in macropterous and brachypterous female and male adults of BPH. The size of magnetic particles was shown to be between 50-450 nm with a shape factor estimate of between 0.8-1.0 for all the tested BPHs. Moreover, the amount of magnetic particles was associated with the developmental stage (the 3(rd)-5(th) instar), wing form (macropterous vs. brachypterous) and sex. The macropterous female adults had the largest amount of magnetic particles. Although the existence of magnetic particles in the abdomens of BPH provides sound basis for the assumption of magnetic orientation, further behavioral studies and complementary physical characterization experiments should be conducted to determine whether the orientation behavior of BPH is associated with the magnetic particles detected in this study.

  10. The Behaviors of Ferro-Magnetic Nano-Particles In and Around Blood Vessels under Applied Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Nacev, A.; Beni, C.; Bruno, O.; Shapiro, B.

    2010-01-01

    In magnetic drug delivery, therapeutic magnetizable particles are typically injected into the blood stream and magnets are then used to concentrate them to disease locations. The behavior of such particles in-vivo is complex and is governed by blood convection, diffusion (in blood and in tissue), extravasation, and the applied magnetic fields. Using physical first-principles and a sophisticated vessel-membrane-tissue (VMT) numerical solver, we comprehensively analyze in detail the behavior of magnetic particles in blood vessels and surrounding tissue. For any blood vessel (of any size, depth, and blood velocity) and tissue properties, particle size and applied magnetic fields, we consider a Krogh tissue cylinder geometry and solve for the resulting spatial distribution of particles. We find that there are three prototypical behaviors (blood velocity dominated, magnetic force dominated, and boundary-layer formation) and that the type of behavior observed is uniquely determined by three non-dimensional numbers (the magnetic-Richardson number, mass Péclet number, and Renkin reduced diffusion coefficient). Plots and equations are provided to easily read out which behavior is found under which circumstances (Figures 5, 6, 7, and 8). We compare our results to previously published in-vitro and in-vivo magnetic drug delivery experiments. Not only do we find excellent agreement between our predictions and prior experimental observations, but we are also able to qualitatively and quantitatively explain behavior that was previously not understood. PMID:21278859

  11. Magnetic properties in an ash flow tuff with continuous grain size variation: a natural reference for magnetic particle granulometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Till, J.L.; Jackson, M.J.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Solheid, P.

    2011-01-01

    The Tiva Canyon Tuff contains dispersed nanoscale Fe-Ti-oxide grains with a narrow magnetic grain size distribution, making it an ideal material in which to identify and study grain-size-sensitive magnetic behavior in rocks. A detailed magnetic characterization was performed on samples from the basal 5 m of the tuff. The magnetic materials in this basal section consist primarily of (low-impurity) magnetite in the form of elongated submicron grains exsolved from volcanic glass. Magnetic properties studied include bulk magnetic susceptibility, frequency-dependent and temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility, anhysteretic remanence acquisition, and hysteresis properties. The combined data constitute a distinct magnetic signature at each stratigraphic level in the section corresponding to different grain size distributions. The inferred magnetic domain state changes progressively upward from superparamagnetic grains near the base to particles with pseudo-single-domain or metastable single-domain characteristics near the top of the sampled section. Direct observations of magnetic grain size confirm that distinct transitions in room temperature magnetic susceptibility and remanence probably denote the limits of stable single-domain behavior in the section. These results provide a unique example of grain-size-dependent magnetic properties in noninteracting particle assemblages over three decades of grain size, including close approximations of ideal Stoner-Wohlfarth assemblages, and may be considered a useful reference for future rock magnetic studies involving grain-size-sensitive properties.

  12. Magnetically modulated refractive index of a magnetic fluid film based on cigar-shaped ferrite submicron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mormile, P.; Petti, L.; Rippa, M.; Guo, J.; Song, W.; Zhou, J.

    2010-10-01

    Light beam propagation at a prism-magnetic fluid film interface is experimentally studied. The magnetic fluid is made through dispersion of synthesized cigar-shaped sub-micron particles of Fe2O3 in an oil solution. This was injected into a glass cell with an active area of 10mm2 and a depth ranging from 10 microns to 30 microns whose base is a glass microscope slide and on the top it was covered with a glass prism. The set up was developed by one of the authors to measure light switching at a prism-liquid crystal interface in a previous publication.1 Polarized Light (TE or TM) from a He-Ne laser impinges at the prism-magnetic film interface. The external reflected light is detected by a photodiode connected to a data acquisition system. Since the properties of the magnetic fluid can be modulated by external magnetic fields, we investigated the effects of the magnetic field on the refractive index of the magnetic fluid. For our magnetic fluid, the reflection of light has been investigated as a function of particles concentration and thickness of the films with a wavelength of 633nm and both TE and TM polarization, and applied magnetic fields up to 25 Oe. It was found that the intensity of reflected light increases with increasing magnetic field up to 4 times the initial value, and saturates at 20 Oe for TE light, while decreases with increasing magnetic field up to 4 times less for TM light with the same saturation value. Moreover, under a given magnetic field, the output light increases with the increasing film thickness in TE polarization, and decreases with the increasing film thickness in TM case. The refractive index of the magnetic fluid depends on the concentration of the dilute oil-based magnetic fluid under zero field. These behaviors are explained in terms of the organization of the submicron particles when the magnetic field is applied.2 The cigar-shaped sub-micron particles are oriented along their long axis to form an organized mesostructure. The

  13. Biosensing based on magnetically induced self-assembly of particles in magnetic colloids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Morimoto, Yoshitaka; Takamura, Tsukasa; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2012-03-01

    Superparamagnetic beads and nonmagnetic beads of different sizes were assembled to form a "ring-structure" in a magnetorheological (MR) fluid solution by the application of external magnetic fields. For superparamagnetic beads and non-magnetic beads functionalized with probe and target molecules, respectively, the ring-structure was maintained even after removing the external magnetic field due to biomolecular bonding. Several experiments are described, including the formation process of ring-structures with and without molecular interactions, the accelerating effect of external magnetic fields, and the effect of biotin concentration on the structures of the rings. We define the small nonmagnetic particles as "petals" because the whole structure looks like a flower. The number of remnant ring petals was a function of the concentration of target molecules in the concentration range of 0.0768 ng/ml-3.8419 ng/ml which makes this protocol a promising method for biosensing. Not only was the formation process rapid, but the resulting two-dimensional colloidal system also offers a simple method for reducing reagent consumption and waste generation.

  14. Small-scale Magnetic Islands in the Solar Wind and Their Role in Particle Acceleration. II. Particle Energization inside Magnetically Confined Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga V.; Zank, Gary P.; Li, Gang; Malandraki, Olga E.; le Roux, Jakobus A.; Webb, Gary M.

    2016-08-01

    We explore the role of heliospheric magnetic field configurations and conditions that favor the generation and confinement of small-scale magnetic islands associated with atypical energetic particle events (AEPEs) in the solar wind. Some AEPEs do not align with standard particle acceleration mechanisms, such as flare-related or simple diffusive shock acceleration processes related to interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs). As we have shown recently, energetic particle flux enhancements may well originate locally and can be explained by particle acceleration in regions filled with small-scale magnetic islands with a typical width of ˜0.01 au or less, which is often observed near the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). The particle energization is a consequence of magnetic reconnection-related processes in islands experiencing either merging or contraction, observed, for example, in HCS ripples. Here we provide more observations that support the idea and the theory of particle energization produced by small-scale-flux-rope dynamics (Zank et al. and Le Roux et al.). If the particles are pre-accelerated to keV energies via classical mechanisms, they may be additionally accelerated up to 1-1.5 MeV inside magnetically confined cavities of various origins. The magnetic cavities, formed by current sheets, may occur at the interface of different streams such as CIRs and ICMEs or ICMEs and coronal hole flows. They may also form during the HCS interaction with interplanetary shocks (ISs) or CIRs/ICMEs. Particle acceleration inside magnetic cavities may explain puzzling AEPEs occurring far beyond ISs, within ICMEs, before approaching CIRs as well as between CIRs.

  15. Small-scale Magnetic Islands in the Solar Wind and Their Role in Particle Acceleration. II. Particle Energization inside Magnetically Confined Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga V.; Zank, Gary P.; Li, Gang; Malandraki, Olga E.; le Roux, Jakobus A.; Webb, Gary M.

    2016-08-01

    We explore the role of heliospheric magnetic field configurations and conditions that favor the generation and confinement of small-scale magnetic islands associated with atypical energetic particle events (AEPEs) in the solar wind. Some AEPEs do not align with standard particle acceleration mechanisms, such as flare-related or simple diffusive shock acceleration processes related to interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs). As we have shown recently, energetic particle flux enhancements may well originate locally and can be explained by particle acceleration in regions filled with small-scale magnetic islands with a typical width of ˜0.01 au or less, which is often observed near the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). The particle energization is a consequence of magnetic reconnection-related processes in islands experiencing either merging or contraction, observed, for example, in HCS ripples. Here we provide more observations that support the idea and the theory of particle energization produced by small-scale-flux-rope dynamics (Zank et al. and Le Roux et al.). If the particles are pre-accelerated to keV energies via classical mechanisms, they may be additionally accelerated up to 1–1.5 MeV inside magnetically confined cavities of various origins. The magnetic cavities, formed by current sheets, may occur at the interface of different streams such as CIRs and ICMEs or ICMEs and coronal hole flows. They may also form during the HCS interaction with interplanetary shocks (ISs) or CIRs/ICMEs. Particle acceleration inside magnetic cavities may explain puzzling AEPEs occurring far beyond ISs, within ICMEs, before approaching CIRs as well as between CIRs.

  16. Multifunctional surfaces produced by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we create a multifunctional metal surface by producing a hierarchical nano/microstructure with femtosecond laser pulses. The multifunctional surface exhibits combined effects of dramatically enhanced broadband absorption, superhydrophobicity, and self-cleaning. The superhydrophobic effect is demonstrated by a falling water droplet repelled away from a structured surface with 30% of the droplet kinetic energy conserved, while the self-cleaning effect is shown by each water droplet taking away a significant amount of dust particles on the altered surface. The multifunctional surface is useful for light collection and water/dust repelling.

  17. Novel magnetic Fe onion-like fullerene micrometer-sized particles of narrow size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snovski, Ron; Grinblat, Judith; Margel, Shlomo

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic polydivinylbenzene (PDVB)/magnetite micrometer-sized particles of narrow size distribution were prepared by entrapping Fe(CO)5 within the pores of uniform porous PDVB particles, followed by the thermal decomposition of the encapsulated Fe(CO)5 at 300 °C in a sealed cell under inert atmosphere. Magnetic Fe onion-like fullerene micrometer-sized particles of narrow size distribution have been prepared by the thermal decomposition of the PDVB/magnetite magnetic microspheres at 1100 °C under inert atmosphere. The graphitic coating protects the elemental iron particles from oxidation and thereby preserves their very high magnetic moment for at least a year. Characterization of these unique magnetic carbon graphitic particles was also performed.

  18. Stopping power for arbitrary angle between test particle velocity and magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Cereceda, Carlo; Peretti, Michel de; Deutsch, Claude

    2005-02-01

    Using the longitudinal dielectric function derived previously for charged test particles in helical movement around magnetic field lines, the numerical convergence of the series involved is found and the double numerical integrations on wave vector components are performed yielding the stopping power for arbitrary angle between the test particle velocity and magnetic field. Calculations are performed for particle Larmor radius larger and shorter than Debye length, i.e., for protons in a cold magnetized plasma and for thermonuclear {alpha} particles in a dense, hot, and strongly magnetized plasma. A strong decrease is found for the energy loss as the angle varies from 0 to {pi}/2. The range of thermonuclear {alpha} particles as a function of the velocity angle with respect to the magnetic field is also given.

  19. Approximate Integrals of rf-driven Particle Motion in Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    I.Y. Dodin; N.J. Fisch

    2004-04-26

    For a particle moving in nonuniform magnetic field under the action of an rf wave, ponderomotive effects result from rf-driven oscillations nonlinearly coupled with Larmor rotation. Using Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalism, we show how, despite this coupling, two independent integrals of the particle motion are approximately conserved. Those are the magnetic moment of free Larmor rotation and the quasi-energy of the guiding center motion parallel to the magnetic field. Under the assumption of non-resonant interaction of the particle with the rf field, these integrals represent adiabatic invariants of the particle motion.

  20. Biomolecular environment, quantification, and intracellular interaction of multifunctional magnetic SERS nanoprobes† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6an00890a

    PubMed Central

    Büchner, Tina; Drescher, Daniela; Merk, Virginia; Traub, Heike; Guttmann, Peter; Werner, Stephan; Jakubowski, Norbert; Schneider, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctional composite nanoprobes consisting of iron oxide nanoparticles linked to silver and gold nanoparticles, Ag–Magnetite and Au–Magnetite, respectively, were introduced by endocytic uptake into cultured fibroblast cells. The cells containing the non-toxic nanoprobes were shown to be displaceable in an external magnetic field and can be manipulated in microfluidic channels. The distribution of the composite nanostructures that are contained in the endosomal system is discussed on the basis of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) mapping, quantitative laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) micromapping, and cryo soft X-ray tomography (cryo soft-XRT). Cryo soft-XRT of intact, vitrified cells reveals that the composite nanoprobes form intra-endosomal aggregates. The nanoprobes provide SERS signals from the biomolecular composition of their surface in the endosomal environment. The SERS data indicate the high stability of the nanoprobes and of their plasmonic properties in the harsh environment of endosomes and lysosomes. The spectra point at the molecular composition at the surface of the Ag–Magnetite and Au–Magnetite nanostructures that is very similar to that of other composite structures, but different from the composition of pure silver and gold SERS nanoprobes used for intracellular investigations. As shown by the LA-ICP-MS data, the uptake efficiency of the magnetite composites is approximately two to three times higher than that of the pure gold and silver nanoparticles. PMID:27353290

  1. Core-shell hybrid upconversion nanoparticles carrying stable nitroxide radicals as potential multifunctional nanoprobes for upconversion luminescence and magnetic resonance dual-modality imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan; Kang, Ning; Xu, Ting; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Guo, Xiangqun

    2015-03-01

    Nitroxide radicals, such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) and its derivatives, have recently been used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). However, their rapid one-electron bioreduction to diamagnetic N-hydroxy species when administered intravenously has limited their use in in vivo applications. In this article, a new approach of silica coating for carrying stable radicals was proposed. A 4-carboxyl-TEMPO nitroxide radical was covalently linked with 3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane to produce a silanizing TEMPO radical. Utilizing a facile reaction based on the copolymerization of silanizing TEMPO radicals with tetraethyl orthosilicate in reverse microemulsion, a TEMPO radicals doped SiO2 nanostructure was synthesized and coated on the surface of NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) to generate a novel multifunctional nanoprobe, PEGylated UCNP@TEMPO@SiO2 for upconversion luminescence (UCL) and magnetic resonance dual-modality imaging. The electron spin resonance (ESR) signals generated by the TEMPO@SiO2 show an enhanced reduction resistance property for a period of time of up to 1 h, even in the presence of 5 mM ascorbic acid. The longitudinal relaxivity of PEGylated UCNPs@TEMPO@SiO2 nanocomposites is about 10 times stronger than that for free TEMPO radicals. The core-shell NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 UCNPs synthesized by this modified user-friendly one-pot solvothermal strategy show a significant enhancement of UCL emission of up to 60 times more than the core NaYF4:Yb,Er. Furthermore, the PEGylated UCNP@TEMPO@SiO2 nanocomposites were further used as multifunctional nanoprobes to explore their performance in the UCL imaging of living cells and T1-weighted MRI in vitro and in vivo.Nitroxide radicals, such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) and its derivatives, have recently been used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electron

  2. Core-shell hybrid upconversion nanoparticles carrying stable nitroxide radicals as potential multifunctional nanoprobes for upconversion luminescence and magnetic resonance dual-modality imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan; Kang, Ning; Xu, Ting; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Guo, Xiangqun

    2015-03-01

    Nitroxide radicals, such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) and its derivatives, have recently been used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). However, their rapid one-electron bioreduction to diamagnetic N-hydroxy species when administered intravenously has limited their use in in vivo applications. In this article, a new approach of silica coating for carrying stable radicals was proposed. A 4-carboxyl-TEMPO nitroxide radical was covalently linked with 3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane to produce a silanizing TEMPO radical. Utilizing a facile reaction based on the copolymerization of silanizing TEMPO radicals with tetraethyl orthosilicate in reverse microemulsion, a TEMPO radicals doped SiO2 nanostructure was synthesized and coated on the surface of NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) to generate a novel multifunctional nanoprobe, PEGylated UCNP@TEMPO@SiO2 for upconversion luminescence (UCL) and magnetic resonance dual-modality imaging. The electron spin resonance (ESR) signals generated by the TEMPO@SiO2 show an enhanced reduction resistance property for a period of time of up to 1 h, even in the presence of 5 mM ascorbic acid. The longitudinal relaxivity of PEGylated UCNPs@TEMPO@SiO2 nanocomposites is about 10 times stronger than that for free TEMPO radicals. The core-shell NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 UCNPs synthesized by this modified user-friendly one-pot solvothermal strategy show a significant enhancement of UCL emission of up to 60 times more than the core NaYF4:Yb,Er. Furthermore, the PEGylated UCNP@TEMPO@SiO2 nanocomposites were further used as multifunctional nanoprobes to explore their performance in the UCL imaging of living cells and T1-weighted MRI in vitro and in vivo.Nitroxide radicals, such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) and its derivatives, have recently been used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electron

  3. Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) for NMR and MRI researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saritas, Emine U.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Croft, Laura R.; Konkle, Justin J.; Lu, Kuan; Zheng, Bo; Conolly, Steven M.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new tracer imaging modality that is gaining significant interest from NMR and MRI researchers. While the physics of MPI differ substantially from MRI, it employs hardware and imaging concepts that are familiar to MRI researchers, such as magnetic excitation and detection, pulse sequences, and relaxation effects. Furthermore, MPI employs the same superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) contrast agents that are sometimes used for MR angiography and are often used for MRI cell tracking studies. These SPIOs are much safer for humans than iodine or gadolinium, especially for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients. The weak kidneys of CKD patients cannot safely excrete iodine or gadolinium, leading to increased morbidity and mortality after iodinated X-ray or CT angiograms, or after gadolinium-MRA studies. Iron oxides, on the other hand, are processed in the liver, and have been shown to be safe even for CKD patients. Unlike the “black blood” contrast generated by SPIOs in MRI due to increased T2∗ dephasing, SPIOs in MPI generate positive, “bright blood” contrast. With this ideal contrast, even prototype MPI scanners can already achieve fast, high-sensitivity, and high-contrast angiograms with millimeter-scale resolutions in phantoms and in animals. Moreover, MPI shows great potential for an exciting array of applications, including stem cell tracking in vivo, first-pass contrast studies to diagnose or stage cancer, and inflammation imaging in vivo. So far, only a handful of prototype small-animal MPI scanners have been constructed worldwide. Hence, MPI is open to great advances, especially in hardware, pulse sequence, and nanoparticle improvements, with the potential to revolutionize the biomedical imaging field.

  4. TIME-DEPENDENT PERPENDICULAR TRANSPORT OF FAST CHARGED PARTICLES IN A TURBULENT MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Fraschetti, F.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2011-06-20

    We present an analytic derivation of the temporal dependence of the perpendicular transport coefficient of charged particles in magnetostatic turbulence, for times smaller than the time needed for charged particles to travel the turbulence correlation length. This time window is left unexplored in most transport models. In our analysis all magnetic scales are taken to be much larger than the particle gyroradius, so that perpendicular transport is assumed to be dominated by the guiding center motion. Particle drift from the local magnetic field lines (MFLs) and magnetic field line random walk are evaluated separately for slab and three-dimensional (3D) isotropic turbulence. Contributions of wavelength scales shorter and longer than the turbulence coherence length are compared. In contrast to the slab case, particles in 3D isotropic turbulence unexpectedly diffuse from local MFLs; this result questions the common assumption that particle magnetization is independent of turbulence geometry. Extensions of this model will allow for a study of solar wind anisotropies.

  5. Low-latitude particle precipitation and associated local magnetic disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Rassoul, H.K. ); Rohrbaugh, R.P.; Tinsley, B.A. )

    1992-04-01

    The time variations of optical emissions during low-latitude auroral events have been shown to correlate well with those of magnetograms in the region where the aurorae are observed. Two events not previously reported are analyzed and are shown to confirm the nature of the correlations found for two earlier events. The maximum optical emissions at mid-latitudes occur in concert with the maximum positive (northward) excursions in the H trace and with rapid fluctuations in the D trace of nearby magnetograms. The fluctuation in {Delta}D is usually from the east (positive) to the west (negative) in the vicinity of the {Delta}H perturbation. The positive excursions in H at low-latitude observatories at the time of the maximum optical emissions are associated with negative H excursions at high latitude observatories in the same longitude sector. The source of the particles has been inferred to be the ring current, with precipitation occurring when the {vert bar}Dst{vert bar} index is large at the time of the large short term excursions in the local magnetic field. This result is consistent with the funding of Voss and Smith (1979), derived from a series of rocket measurements of precipitating heavy particles, that the flux correlates better with the product of {vert bar}Dst{vert bar} and the exponential of K{sub p} than with either alone. In the present case it is shown that the product of {vert bar}Dst{vert bar} and the amplitude of the short term excursions in the horizontal component in local magnetograms has better time resolution and better correlation with the observed emission rates than the index using K{sub p}.

  6. Comparison of Influenza Virus Particle Purification Using Magnetic Sulfated Cellulose Particles with an Established Centrifugation Method for Analytics.

    PubMed

    Serve, Anja; Pieler, Michael Martin; Benndorf, Dirk; Rapp, Erdmann; Wolff, Michael Werner; Reichl, Udo

    2015-11-01

    A method for the purification of influenza virus particles using novel magnetic sulfated cellulose particles is presented and compared to an established centrifugation method for analytics. Therefore, purified influenza A virus particles from adherent and suspension MDCK host cell lines were characterized on the protein level with mass spectrometry to compare the viral and residual host cell proteins. Both methods allowed one to identify all 10 influenza A virus proteins, including low-abundance proteins like the matrix protein 2 and nonstructural protein 1, with a similar impurity level of host cell proteins. Compared to the centrifugation method, use of the novel magnetic sulfated cellulose particles reduced the influenza A virus particle purification time from 3.5 h to 30 min before mass spectrometry analysis.

  7. Plasma particle and energy reflection at a wall with an obliquely incident magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, R.J.

    1985-07-01

    The particle and energy reflection coefficients are calculated for a plasma incident at a wall with an obliquely incident magnetic field. The salient result of these calculations is that the reflection coefficients can approach unity when the magnetic field is incident at grazing angles. This reflection of particles and energy will be an important process in determining the particle and energy balance in the edge plasma.

  8. Special solutions for magnetic separation problems using force and energy conditions for ferro-particles capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandulyak, Anna; Sandulyak, Alexander; Belgacem, Fethi B. M.; Kiselev, Dmitriy

    2016-03-01

    While trying to solve the equation for the ferro-particle movement in the zone of magnetic separation, it is necessary to provisionally perform a comparative evaluation of forces influencing the ferro-particle in order to define the dominating ones, and specify the task at hand. Here, we consider various solutions of the problem and definitions of magnetic separation parameters based on the traditionally used forces and/or energy conditions of ferro-particle capture.

  9. Novel multifunctional NiFe2O4/ZnO hybrids for dye removal by adsorption, photocatalysis and magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hua-Yue; Jiang, Ru; Fu, Yong-Qian; Li, Rong-Rong; Yao, Jun; Jiang, Sheng-Tao

    2016-04-01

    Novel multifunctional NiFe2O4/ZnO hybrids were prepared by a hydrothermal method and their physicochemical properties were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, TGA, VSM, BET and UV-vis DRS. The adsorption and photocatalytic performance of NiFe2O4/ZnO hybrids were systematically investigated using congo red as a model contaminant. With the introduction of NiFe2O4, NiFe2O4/ZnO hybrids can absorb the whole light from 300 nm to 700 nm. The adsorption capacity (221.73 mg g-1) of NiFe2O4/ZnO hybrids is higher than those of NiFe2O4, ZnO and mechanically mixed NiFe2O4/ZnO hybrids. The removal of congo red solution (20 mg L-1) by NiFe2O4/ZnO hybrids was about 94.55% under simulated solar light irradiation for 10 min. rad OH and h+ play important roles in the decolorization of congo red solution by NiFe2O4/ZnO hybrids under simulated solar light irradiation. The decolorization efficiency of congo red solution is 97.23% for the fifth time by NiFe2O4/ZnO hybrids under simulate solar light irradiation, indicating the high photostability and durability. NO3- and Cl- anions which are ubiquitous components in dye-containing wastewater have negligible influence on the effectiveness of NiFe2O4/ZnO hybrids. Moreover, the magnetic NiFe2O4/ZnO hybrids can be easily separated from the reacted solution by an external magnet.

  10. Controlled capillary assembly of magnetic Janus particles at fluid-fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qingguang; Davies, Gary B; Harting, Jens

    2016-08-21

    Capillary interactions can be used to direct assembly of particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces. Precisely controlling the magnitude and direction of capillary interactions to assemble particles into favoured structures for materials science purposes is desirable but challenging. In this paper, we investigate capillary interactions between magnetic Janus particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces. We develop a pair-interaction model that predicts that these particles should arrange into a side-side configuration, and carry out simulations that confirm the predictions of our model. Finally, we investigate the monolayer structures that form when many magnetic Janus particles adsorb at the interface. We find that the particles arrange into long, straight chains exhibiting little curvature, in contrast with capillary interactions between ellipsoidal particles. We further find a regime in which highly ordered, lattice-like monolayer structures form, which can be tuned dynamically using an external magnetic field.

  11. Fabrication of chiral amino acid ionic liquid modified magnetic multifunctional nanospheres for centrifugal chiral chromatography separation of racemates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yating; Tian, Ailin; Wang, Xiong; Qi, Jing; Wang, Fengkang; Ma, Ying; Ito, Yoichiro; Wei, Yun

    2015-06-26

    As the rapid development of nanotechnology, the magnetic nanospheres modified with special chiral selective ligands show a great potentiality in enantiomeric separation. In this study, magnetic nanospheres modified with task-specific chiral ionic liquid were designed for the separation of chiral amino acids. These modified magnetic nanospheres were effective in a direct chiral separation of five racemic amino acids (D- and L-cysteine, D- and L-arginine, D- and L-leucine, D- and L-glutamine and D- and L-tryptophan). Furthermore, a new online method for complete separation of the enantiomers via the magnetic nanospheres was established with centrifugal chiral chromatography using a spiral tube assembly mounted on a type-J coil planet centrifuge. One kind of chiral compounds, D- and L-tryptophan was resolved well using this method. These results demonstrated that the modified nanospheres display a good chiral recognition ability, and can be used as a potential material for chiral separation of various racemates.

  12. {Interball-1 Plasma, Magnetic Field, and Energetic Particle Observations}

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, David G.

    1998-01-01

    Funding from NASA was received in two installments. The first installment supported research using Russian/Czech/Slovak/French Interball-1 plasma, magnetic field, and energetic particles observations in the vicinity of the magnetopause. The second installment provided salary support to review unsolicited proposals to NASA for data recovery and archiving, and also to survey ISTP data provision efforts. Two papers were published under the auspices of the grant. Sibeck et al. reported Interball-1 observations of a wave on the magnetopause with an amplitude in excess of 5 R(sub E), the largest ever reported to date. They attributed the wave to a hot flow anomaly striking the magnetopause and suggested that the hot flow anomaly itself formed during the interaction of an IMF discontinuity with the bow shock. Nemecek et al. used Interball-1's VDP Faraday cup to identify large transient increases in the magnetosheath density. They noted large variations in simultaneous Wind observations of the IMF cone angle, but were unable to establish any relationship between the cone angle variations at Wind and the density variations at Interball-1. Funds from the second installment were used to review over 20 proposals from various researchers in the scientific community who sought NASA support to restore or archive past observations. It also supported a survey of ISTP data provisions which was used as input to a Senior Review of ongoing NASA ISTP programs.

  13. Linearity and Shift Invariance for Quantitative Magnetic Particle Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kuan; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Saritas, Emine U.; Zheng, Bo; Conolly, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a promising tracer imaging modality that employs a kidney-safe contrast agent and does not use ionizing radiation. MPI already shows high contrast and sensitivity in small animal imaging, with great potential for many clinical applications, including angiography, cancer detection, inflammation imaging, and treatment monitoring. Currently, almost all clinically relevant imaging techniques can be modeled as systems with linearity and shift invariance (LSI), characteristics crucial for quantification and diagnostic utility. In theory, MPI has been proven to be LSI. However, in practice, high-pass filters designed to remove unavoidable direct feedthrough interference also remove information crucial to ensuring LSI in MPI scans. In this work, we present a complete theoretical and experimental description of the image artifacts from filtering. We then propose and validate a robust algorithm to completely restore the lost information for the x-space MPI method. We provide the theoretical, simulated, and experimental proof that our algorithm indeed restores the LSI properties of MPI. PMID:23568496

  14. Trajectory of Charged Particle in Combined Electric and Magnetic Fields Using Interactive Spreadsheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tambade, Popat S.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to graphically illustrate to the students the physical phenomenon of motion of charged particle under the action of simultaneous electric and magnetic fields by simulating particle motion on a computer. Differential equations of motions are solved analytically and path of particle in three-dimensional space are…

  15. Effect of non-Newtonian characteristics of blood on magnetic particle capture in occluded blood vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Sayan; Banerjee, Moloy

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles drug carriers continue to attract considerable interest for drug targeting in the treatment of cancer and other pathological conditions. Magnetic carrier particles with surface-bound drug molecules are injected into the vascular system upstream from the desired target site, and are captured at the target site via a local applied magnetic field. Herein, a numerical investigation of steady magnetic drug targeting (MDT) using functionalized magnetic micro-spheres in partly occluded blood vessel having a 90° bent is presented considering the effects of non-Newtonian characteristics of blood. An Eulerian-Lagrangian technique is adopted to resolve the hemodynamic flow and the motion of the magnetic particles in the flow using ANSYS FLUENT. An implantable infinitely long cylindrical current carrying conductor is used to create the requisite magnetic field. Targeted transport of the magnetic particles in a partly occluded vessel differs distinctly from the same in a regular unblocked vessel. Parametric investigation is conducted and the influence of the insert configuration and its position from the central plane of the artery (zoffset), particle size (dp) and its magnetic property (χ) and the magnitude of current (I) on the "capture efficiency" (CE) is reported. Analysis shows that there exists an optimum regime of operating parameters for which deposition of the drug carrying magnetic particles in a target zone on the partly occluded vessel wall can be maximized. The results provide useful design bases for in vitro set up for the investigation of MDT in stenosed blood vessels.

  16. Estimation of the Oblongness of Aggregates of Magnetic Particles Formed in Static Magnetic Field Using ESR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokina, Olga N.; Kovarski, Alexander L.; Dzheparov, Fridrikh S.

    2010-12-01

    Aggregation process in magnetic fluid has been investigated by electron spin resonance method. A low molecular paramagnet (paramagnetic sensor) has been added to magnetite hydrosol and its ESR spectra have been analyzed. Fraction of aggregated particles and aggregate oblongness have been calculated using new theoretical model for the ESR spectra of paramagnetic sensor in diluted magnetic media containing elongated structures.

  17. Magnetic and optical manipulation of spherical metal-coated Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenness, Nathan J.; Erb, Randall M.; Yellen, Benjamin B.; Clark, Robert L.

    2010-08-01

    Spherical colloids with asymmetric surface properties, e.g., 'Janus' particles with two unique faces, are an emerging class of materials that can provide mechanisms for controlling colloidal particle dynamics. Several reports in the literature detail the fabrication of Janus particles as well as their behavior under the influence of external electric, magnetic and optical fields. Here we present an in depth study of the magnetic and optical properties of 10 μm spherical metal-coated Janus particles, and we demonstrate new mechanisms to control their assembly, transport, and achieve total positional and orientational control at the single particle level. Through the application of external magnetic fields Janus particles formed kinked-chain assemblies. Janus particles can also be transported in rotating magnetic field via hydrodynamic surface effects. Optical fields can control the rotation and clustering of Janus particles at low laser power, but not at higher powers due to the formation of cavitation bubbles and large scattering forces. The unique magnetic and optical properties of Janus particles were leveraged to engineer 'dot' Janus particles that can be utilized to achieve near holonomic control of a single colloid in an optomagnetic trap.

  18. Cytoplasmic motions, rheology, and structure probed by a novel magnetic particle method

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The motions of magnetic particles contained within organelles of living cells were followed by measuring magnetic fields generated by the particles. The alignment of particles was sensed magnetometrically and was manipulated by external fields, allowing non-invasive detection of particle motion as well as examination of cytoplasmic viscoelasticity. Motility and rheology data are presented for pulmonary macrophages isolated from lungs of hamsters 1 d after the animals had breathed airborne gamma-Fe2O3 particles. The magnetic directions of particles within phagosomes and secondary lysosomes were aligned, and the weak magnetic field produced by the particles was recorded. For dead cells, this remanent field was constant, but for viable macrophages, the remanent field decreased rapidly so that only 42% of its initial magnitude remained 5 min after alignment. A twisting field was applied perpendicular to the direction of alignment and the rate at which particles reoriented to this new direction was followed. The same twisting was repeated for particles suspended in a series of viscosity standards. Based on this approach, the low-shear apparent intracellular viscosity was estimated to be 1.2-2.7 X 10(3) Pa.s (1.2-2.7 X 10(4) poise). Time-lapse video microscopy confirmed the alignment of ingested particles upon magnetization and showed persistent cellular motility during randomization of alignment. Cytochalasin D and low temperature both reduced cytoplasmic activity and remanent-field decay, but affected rheology differently. Magnetic particles were observed in association with the microtubule organizing center by immunofluorescence microscopy; magnetization did not affect microtubule distribution. However, both vimentin intermediate filaments and f-actin reorganized after magnetization. These data demonstrate that magnetometry of isolated phagocytic cells can probe organelle movements, rheology, and physical properties of the cytoskeleton in living cells. PMID:4040136

  19. Simulation of magnetic drug targeting through tracheobronchial airways in the presence of an external non-uniform magnetic field using Lagrangian magnetic particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourmehran, O.; Rahimi-Gorji, M.; Gorji-Bandpy, M.; Gorji, T. B.

    2015-11-01

    Drug delivery technologies are an important area within biomedicine. Targeted drug delivery aims to reduce the undesired side effects of drug usage by directing or capturing the active agents near a desired site within the body. Herein, a numerical investigation of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) using aerosol drugs named polystyrene particle (PMS40) in human lung is presented considering one-way coupling on the transport and capture of the magnetic particle. A realistic 3D geometry based on CT scan images is provided for CFD simulation. An external non-uniform magnetic field is applied. Parametric investigation is conducted and the influence of particle diameter, magnetic source position, and magnetic number (Mn) on the deposition efficiency and particle behavior is reported. According to the results, the magnetic field increased deposition efficiency of particles in a target region, the efficiency of deposition and MDT technique has a direct relation with increasing the particle diameter for magnetic number of 1 Tesla (T) and lower (Mn≤1(T)). Also it can be seen that there is an inverse relation between the particle diameter and deposition efficiency when Mn is more than 1 (T).

  20. A multifunctional magnetic nanocarrier bearing fluorescent dye for targeted drug delivery by enhanced two-photon triggered release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S.; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2009-05-01

    We report a novel nanoformulation for targeted drug delivery which utilizes nanophotonics through the fusion of nanotechnology with biomedical application. The approach involves an energy-transferring magnetic nanoscopic co-assembly fabricated of rhodamine B (RDB) fluorescent dye grafted gum arabic modified Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle and photosensitive linker by which dexamethasone drug is conjugated to the magnetic nano-assembly. The advantage offered by this nanoformulation is the indirect photo-triggered-on-demand drug release by efficient up-converting energy of the near-IR (NIR) light to higher energy and intraparticle energy transfer from the dye grafted magnetic nanoparticle to the linker for drug release by cleavage. The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be of ultra-small size (13.33 nm) and are monodispersed in an aqueous suspension. Dexamethasone (Dexa) drug conjugated to RDB-GAMNP by photosensitive linker showed appreciable release of Dexa by photo-triggered response on exposure to radiation having a wavelength in the NIR region whereas no detectable release was observed in the dark. Photo-triggered response for the nanoformulation not bearing the rhodamine B dye was drastically less as less Dexa was released on exposure to NIR radiation which suggest that the photo-cleavage of linker and release of Dexa mainly originated from the indirect excitation through the uphill energy conversions based on donor-acceptor model FRET. The promising pathway of nanophotonics for the on-demand release of the drug makes this nanocarrier very promising for applications in nanomedicine.

  1. High-gradient permanent magnet apparatus and its use in particle collection

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Mengdawn; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Avens, Larry R.

    2016-07-12

    A high-gradient permanent magnet apparatus for capturing paramagnetic particles, the apparatus comprising: (i) at least two permanent magnets positioned with like poles facing each other; (ii) a ferromagnetic spacer separating the like poles; and (iii) a magnetizable porous filling material in close proximity to the at least two permanent magnets. Also described is a method for capturing paramagnetic particles in which a gas or liquid sample containing the paramagnetic particles is contacted with the high-gradient permanent magnet apparatus described above; wherein, during the contacting step, the gas or liquid sample contacts the magnetizable porous filling material of the high-gradient permanent magnet apparatus, and at least a portion of the paramagnetic particles in the gas or liquid sample is captured on the magnetizable porous filling material.

  2. Particles deposition induced by the magnetic field in the coronary bypass graft model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, Sandor I.; Totorean, Alin F.; Vekas, Ladislau

    2016-03-01

    Bypass graft failures is a complex process starting with intimal hyperplasia development which involve many hemodynamic and biological factors. This work presents experimental results regarding the possibility to use magnetic drug delivery to prevent the development of the intimal hyperplasia using a simplified but intuitive model. The primary goal is to understand the magnetic particle deposition in the anastomosis region of the bypass graft taking into account the complex flow field created in this area which involves recirculation region, flow mixing and presence of particles with high residence time. The three-dimensional geometry model was used to simulate the motion and accumulation of the particles under the magnetic field influence in anastomotic region of the coronary bypass graft. The flow patterns are evaluated both numerically and experimentally and show a good correlation in term of flow parameters like vortex length and flow stagnation point positions. Particle depositions are strongly dependent on the magnet position and consequently of the magnetic field intensity and field gradient. Increased magnetic field controlled by the magnet position induces increased particle depositions in the bypass graft anastomosis. The result shows that particle depositions depend on the bypass graft angle, and the deposition shape and particle accumulation respectively, depend by the flow pattern in the anastomosis region.

  3. Molecular analysis of magnetotactic bacteria and development of functional bacterial magnetic particles for nano-biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Tadashi; Suzuki, Takeyuki; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2007-04-01

    Biomineralization is an elaborate process that produces complex nano-structures consisting of organic and inorganic components of uniform size and highly ordered morphology that self-assemble into structures in a hierarchical manner. Magnetotactic bacteria synthesize nano-sized magnetite crystals that are highly consistent in size and morphology within bacterial species; each particle is surrounded by a thin organic membrane, which facilitates their use for various biotechnological applications. Recent molecular studies, including mutagenesis, whole genome, transcriptome and comprehensive proteome analyses, have elucidated the processes important to bacterial magnetite formation. Some of the genes and proteins identified from these studies have enabled us, through genetic engineering, to express proteins efficiently, with their activity preserved, onto bacterial magnetic particles, leading to the simple preparation of functional protein-magnetic particle complexes. This review describes the recent advances in the fundamental analysis of bacterial magnetic particles and the development of surface-protein-modified magnetic particles for biotechnological applications.

  4. Temperature-Switchable Agglomeration of Magnetic Particles Designed for Continuous Separation Processes in Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Anja S; Heinzler, Raphael; Ooi, Huey Wen; Franzreb, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this work was the synthesis and characterization of thermally switchable magnetic particles for use in biotechnological applications such as protein purification and enzymatic conversions. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization was employed to synthesize poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes via a "graft-from" approach on the surface of magnetic microparticles. The resulting particles were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis and their temperature-dependent agglomeration behavior was assessed. The influence of several factors on particle agglomeration (pH, temperature, salt type, and particle concentration) was evaluated. The results showed that a low pH value (pH 3-4), a kosmotropic salt (ammonium sulfate), and a high particle concentration (4 g/L) resulted in improved agglomeration at elevated temperature (40 °C). Recycling of particles and reversibility of the temperature-switchable agglomeration were successfully demonstrated for ten heating-cooling cycles. Additionally, enhanced magnetic separation was observed for the modified particles. Ionic monomers were integrated into the polymer chain to create end-group functionalized particles as well as two- and three-block copolymer particles for protein binding. The adsorption of lactoferrin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme to these ion exchange particles was evaluated and showed a binding capacity of up to 135 mg/g. The dual-responsive particles combined magnetic and thermoresponsive properties for switchable agglomeration, easy separability, and efficient protein adsorption. PMID:26069936

  5. Temperature-Switchable Agglomeration of Magnetic Particles Designed for Continuous Separation Processes in Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Anja S; Heinzler, Raphael; Ooi, Huey Wen; Franzreb, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this work was the synthesis and characterization of thermally switchable magnetic particles for use in biotechnological applications such as protein purification and enzymatic conversions. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization was employed to synthesize poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes via a "graft-from" approach on the surface of magnetic microparticles. The resulting particles were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis and their temperature-dependent agglomeration behavior was assessed. The influence of several factors on particle agglomeration (pH, temperature, salt type, and particle concentration) was evaluated. The results showed that a low pH value (pH 3-4), a kosmotropic salt (ammonium sulfate), and a high particle concentration (4 g/L) resulted in improved agglomeration at elevated temperature (40 °C). Recycling of particles and reversibility of the temperature-switchable agglomeration were successfully demonstrated for ten heating-cooling cycles. Additionally, enhanced magnetic separation was observed for the modified particles. Ionic monomers were integrated into the polymer chain to create end-group functionalized particles as well as two- and three-block copolymer particles for protein binding. The adsorption of lactoferrin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme to these ion exchange particles was evaluated and showed a binding capacity of up to 135 mg/g. The dual-responsive particles combined magnetic and thermoresponsive properties for switchable agglomeration, easy separability, and efficient protein adsorption.

  6. COLLECTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICLES BY A HIGH-GRADIENT PERMANENT MAGNETIC METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Mengdawn; Allman, Steve L; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Avens, Larry R

    2014-01-01

    We report on the use of magnetic force in collection of airborne particles by a high- gradient permanent magnetic separation (HGPMS) device. Three aerosol particles of different magnetic susceptibility (NaCl, CuO, and Fe2O3) were generated in the electrical mobility size range of 10 to 200 nm and were used to study HGPMS collection. One HGPMS matrix element, made of stainless steel wool, was used in the device configuration. Three flow rates were selected to simulate the environmental wind speeds of interest to the study. Magnetic force was found to exhibit an insignificant effect on the separation of NaCl particles, even in the HGPMS configuration. Diffusion was a major mechanism in the removal of the diamagnetic particles; however, diffusion is insignificant under the influence of a high-gradient magnetic field for paramagnetic or ferromagnetic particles. The HGPMS showed high-performance collection (> 99%) of paramagnetic CuO and ferromagnetic Fe2O3 particles for particle sizes greater than or equal to 60 nm. As the wind speed increases, the influence of the magnetic force weakens, and the capability to remove particles from the gas stream diminishes. The results suggest that the HGPMS principle could be explored for development of an advanced miniaturized passive aerosol collector.

  7. Hierarchical multifunctional nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2014-03-01

    Nanocomposites; including nano-materials such as nano-particles, nanoclays, nanofibers, nanotubes, and nanosheets; are of significant importance in the rapidly developing field of nanotechnology. Due to the nanometer size of these inclusions, their physicochemical characteristics differ significantly from those of micron size and bulk materials. The field of nanocomposites involves the study of multiphase materials where at least one of the constituent phases has one dimension less than 100 nm. This is the range where the phenomena associated with the atomic and molecular interaction strongly influence the macroscopic properties of materials. Since the building blocks of nanocomposites are at nanoscale, they have an enormous surface area with numerous interfaces between the two intermix phases. The special properties of the nano-composite arise from the interaction of its phases at the interface and/or interphase regions. By contrast, in a conventional composite based on micrometer sized filler such as carbon fibers, the interfaces between the filler and matrix constitutes have a much smaller surface-to-volume fraction of the bulk materials, and hence influence the properties of the host structure to a much smaller extent. The optimum amount of nanomaterials in the nanocomposites depends on the filler size, shape, homogeneity of particles distribution, and the interfacial bonding properties between the fillers and matrix. The promise of nanocomposites lies in their multifunctionality, i.e., the possibility of realizing unique combination of properties unachievable with traditional materials. The challenges in reaching this promise are tremendous. They include control over the distribution in size and dispersion of the nanosize constituents, and tailoring and understanding the role of interfaces between structurally or chemically dissimilar phases on bulk properties. While the properties of the matrix can be improved by the inclusions of nanomaterials, the

  8. Highly temperature responsive core-shell magnetic particles: synthesis, characterization and colloidal properties.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mahbubor; Chehimi, Mohamed M; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2011-08-15

    Temperature responsive magnetic polymer submicron particles were prepared by two step seed emulsion polymerization process. First, magnetic seed polymer particles were obtained by emulsion polymerization of styrene using potassium persulfate (KPS) as an initiator and divinylbenzne (DVB) as a cross-linker in the presence of oil-in-water magnetic emulsion (organic ferrofluid droplets). Thereafter, DVB cross-linked magnetic polymer particles were used as seed in the precipitation polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) to induce thermosensitive PNIPAM shell onto the hydrophobic polymer surface of the cross-linked magnetic polymer particles. To impart cationic functional groups in the thermosensitive PNIPAM backbone, the functional monomer aminoethylmethacrylate hydrochloride (AEMH) was used to polymerize with NIPAM while N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) and 2, 2'-azobis (2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (V-50) were used as a cross-linker and as an initiator respectively. The effect of seed to monomer (w/w) ratio along with seed nature on the final particle morphology was investigated. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) results demonstrated particles swelling at below volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) and deswelling above the VPTT. The perfect core (magnetic) shell (polymer) structure of the particles prepared was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The chemical composition of the particles were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effect of temperature, pH, ionic strength on the colloidal properties such as size and zeta potential of the micron sized thermo-sensitive magnetic particles were also studied. In addition, a short mechanistic discussion on the formation of core-shell morphology of magnetic polymer particles has also been discussed. PMID:21570083

  9. Magnetic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) and cellulose particles for MRI-based cell tracking.

    PubMed

    Nkansah, Michael K; Thakral, Durga; Shapiro, Erik M

    2011-06-01

    Biodegradable, superparamagnetic microparticles and nanoparticles of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and cellulose were designed, fabricated, and characterized for magnetic cell labeling. Monodisperse nanocrystals of magnetite were incorporated into microparticles and nanoparticles of PLGA and cellulose with high efficiency using an oil-in-water single emulsion technique. Superparamagnetic cores had high magnetization (72.1 emu/g). The resulting polymeric particles had smooth surface morphology and high magnetite content (43.3 wt % for PLGA and 69.6 wt % for cellulose). While PLGA and cellulose nanoparticles displayed highest r 2* values per millimole of iron (399 sec(-1) mM(-1) for cellulose and 505 sec(-1) mM(-1) for PLGA), micron-sized PLGA particles had a much higher r 2* per particle than either. After incubation for a month in citrate buffer (pH 5.5), magnetic PLGA particles lost close to 50% of their initial r 2* molar relaxivity, while magnetic cellulose particles remained intact, preserving over 85% of their initial r 2* molar relaxivity. Lastly, mesenchymal stem cells and human breast adenocarcinoma cells were magnetically labeled using these particles with no detectable cytotoxicity. These particles are ideally suited for noninvasive cell tracking in vivo via MRI and due to their vastly different degradation properties, offer unique potential for dedicated use for either short (PLGA-based particles) or long-term (cellulose-based particles) experiments. PMID:21404328

  10. In-vitro study of penetration of magnetic particles into the human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Lakodina, Nina A.; Kosobutsky, Igor D.; Bogomolova, Nina V.; Altshuler, Gregory B.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2000-10-01

    We present experimental study of penetration of magnetic particles into the human skin in vitro. The administration of the particles through he skin into the body leads to localization and retention of the particles at the desired site. This technology can be used for selective damage of tumor cells by hyperthermia or to remove unwanted or excess hair. The maximal depth of particle penetration into the skin achieved in this paper was 0.7mm.

  11. Self-assembly of graphene oxide coated soft magnetic carbonyl iron particles and their magnetorheology

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W. L.; Choi, H. J.

    2014-05-07

    The surface of carbonyl iron (CI) microspheres was modified with graphene oxide (GO) as a coating material using 4-aminobenzoic acid as the grafting agent. The morphology, elemental composition, and magnetic properties of the GO-coated CI (GO/CI) particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry, respectively, confirming their composite formation. The magnetorheological (MR) performance of the GO/CI particle-based suspension was examined using a rotational rheometer connected to a magnetic field supply. The GO/CI particles suspension exhibited typical MR properties with increasing shear stress and viscosity depending on the applied magnetic field strength.

  12. Tracking and identifying a magnetic spheroid target using unscented particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mingming; Liu, Daming; Lian, Liting; Yu, Zhou

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we use the recursive Bayesian estimation method to solve the tracking and identification problem of a target modeled by an equivalent magnetic spheroid. Target positions, velocity, heading, magnetic moments and size are defined as the state vector, which is estimated from noisy magnetic field measurements by a sequential Monte Carlo based method known as particle filter. In order to improve the performance of the filter, the unscented Kalman filter is applied to generate the transition prior as the proposal distribution. A simulated experiment is given to test the performance of the unscented particle filter, and the results show that the filter is suitable for magnetic target's track and identification.

  13. Fe3O4@Au/polyaniline multifunctional nanocomposites: their preparation and optical, electrical and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qiaozhen; Shi, Minmin; Cheng, Yunan; Wang, Mang; Chen, Hong-zheng

    2008-07-01

    Fe3O4@Au/polyaniline (PANI) nanocomposites were fabricated by in situ polymerization in the presence of mercaptocarboxylic acid. The mercaptocarboxylic acid was used to introduce hydrogen bonding and/or electrostatic interaction; it acts as a template in the formation of Fe3O4@Au/PANI nanorods. The morphology and structure of the resulting nanocomposites were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS). It was found that the nanocomposites were rod-like with an average diameter of 153 nm, and they exhibited a core-shell structure. A UV-visible spectrometer, semiconductor parameter analyzer and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) were used to characterize the optical, electrical and magnetic properties of the Fe3O4@Au/PANI nanocomposites. It was interesting to find that these properties are dependent on the molar ratio of Au to Fe3O4 when the molar ratio of Fe3O4@Au to PANI is fixed. The magnetic property of the Fe3O4@Au/PANI nanocomposite is very close to superparamagnetic behavior.

  14. FeS nanoplates as a multifunctional nano-theranostic for magnetic resonance imaging guided photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Yang, Guangbao; Chen, Lei; Cheng, Liang; Wang, Lu; Ge, Cuicui; Liu, Zhuang

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we develop magnetic iron sulfide (FeS) nanoplates as a theranostic agent for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided photothermal therapy of cancer. FeS nanoplates are synthesized via a simple one-step method and then functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The obtained PEGylated FeS (FeS-PEG) nanoplates exhibit high NIR absorbance together with strong superparamagnetism. The r2 relaxivity of FeS-PEG nanoplates is determined to be 209.8 mM-1S-1, which appears to be much higher than that of iron oxide nanoparticles and several types of clinical approved T2-contrast agents. After intravenous (i.v.) injection, those nanoplates show high accumulation in the tumor as revealed by MR imaging. Highly effective photothermal ablation of tumors is then achieved in a mouse tumor model upon i.v. injection of FeS-PEG at a moderate dose (20 mg/kg) followed by 808-nm NIR laser irradiation. Importantly, it has been found that PEGylated FeS nanoplates after systemic administration could be gradually excreted from major organs of mice, and show no appreciable toxicity to the treated animals even at a dose (100 mg/kg) 5 times as high as that used for imaging & treatment. Our results demonstrate that PEGylated FeS nanoplates may be a promising class of theranostic nano-agents with a good potential for future clinical translation.

  15. An ultrasensitive label-free electrochemical immunosensor based on signal amplification strategy of multifunctional magnetic graphene loaded with cadmium ions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Faying; Li, Yueyun; Dong, Yunhui; Jiang, Liping; Wang, Ping; Liu, Qing; Liu, Hui; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Herein, a novel and ultrasensitive label-free electrochemical immunosensor was proposed for quantitative detection of human Immunoglobulin G (IgG). The amino functionalized magnetic graphenes nanocomposites (NH2-GS-Fe3O4) were prepared to bond gold and silver core-shell nanoparticles (Au@Ag NPs) by constructing stable Au-N and Ag-N bond between Au@Ag NPs and -NH2. Subsequently, the Au@Ag/GS-Fe3O4 was applied to absorb cadmium ion (Cd2+) due to the large surface area, high conductivity and exceptional adsorption capability. The functional nanocomposites of gold and silver core-shell magnetic graphene loaded with cadmium ion (Au@Ag/GS-Fe3O4/Cd2+) can not only increase the electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) but also improve the effective immobilization of antibodies because of synergistic effect presented in Au@Ag/GS-Fe3O4/Cd2+, which greatly extended the scope of detection. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed immunosensor was used for the detection of IgG with good linear relation in the range from 5 fg/mL to 50 ng/mL with a low detection limit of 2 fg/mL (S/N = 3). Furthermore, the proposed immunosensor showed high sensitivity, special selectivity and long-term stability, which had promising application in bioassay analysis. PMID:26880596

  16. a Study of the Magnetic and Structural Properties of Small Iron and Cobalt Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Sunita Bhardwaj

    The magnetic and structural properties of Fe and Co particles with different surface chemistries have been investigated in the size range of 50-400 A. The particles were prepared by vapor deposition in an inert environment. Particles with different surface chemistries were obtained: passivated with oxygen (Metal(Fe,Co)/FeO), sandwiched between two silver films (Metal(Fe,Co)/Ag), and surrounded by a Mg matrix (Metal(Fe,Co)/Mg). The effect of surface chemistry and particle size on the magnetic properties was studied. An attempt was made to explain the origin of high coercivity and reduced magnetization in small ferromagnetic particles by studying their microstructure, hysteresis, magnetization, exchange coupling and magnetic interactions. Magnetization, Mossbauer and structural data clearly show a "core-shell" morphology, where the core is metallic and the shell is polycrystalline Fe(Co)-oxide. The results indicate that the oxide shell controls both the magnitude and the temperature dependence of coercivity. The exchange coupling at the core-shell interface results in large anisotropy, which not only enhances the coercivity, but also causes larger switching field distributions. The surface oxide shell also contributes towards a reduction in magnetization of the small ferromagnetic particles by inducing strong pinning of the moments at the core-shell interface.

  17. Effect of dipolar nanoparticle interaction on transverse magnetic susceptibility: particle pair model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plowman, Elizabeth; Hovorka, Ondrej; Friedman, Gennady

    2014-03-01

    Determining nanoparticle dipolar interactions from experimental measurement of magnetic moments is a classical inverse problem in magnetism. It is important in a variety of applications including magnetic information storage and Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI). Historically, magnetic moment relaxation has been used to characterize system parameters including dipolar interactions. However, the results are sensitive to particle size distribution. We demonstrate that dipolar coupling strength in a nanoparticle-pair can be determined from transverse magnetic susceptibility, a readily measured parameter. Moreover, we demonstrate that this method is insensitive to particle size, rendering it more robust for real-world experiments. We present both analytical and numerical models for transient and steady-state transverse magnetic susceptibility and resulting interaction strength of our two-particle system. In the analytical model master equation is employed. The particles are assumed to be immobile and the set of possible states is discrete. In the numerical models both master equation and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert dynamics are employed. In these models random particle anisotropy directions are taken into account. The results of each model are compared. National Science Foundation GRFP.

  18. Particles Sorting in Micro Channel Using Designed Micro Electromagnets of Magnetic Field Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Yung-Chiang; Wu, Chen-Ming; Lin, Shih-Hao

    2016-06-01

    In this study, microelectromagnet, microchannel, syringe pump, and controlling devices were integrated to form a particle sorting system. A simple, two-dimensional, relatively quick fabricating and easily operating microelectromagnet was designed. Polystyrene particles and magnetic beads were pumped into the microchannel with the syringe pump, and it was observed that the magnetic beads were attracted to one of two outlets by the microelectromagnet, which features a gradually changing magnetic field. The polystyrene particles would move to another outlet because of different-width micro channel, and it completed the separation of the particles. Based on experimental results, the magnetic flux density of the microelectromagnet was 2.3 Gauss for a 12.5-μm average distance between electrodes at 1.0-μm increments, and the magnetic force was 0.22 pN for 2.8-μm magnetic beads. The separating rate was greater for larger distance increment and smaller average distance between the electrodes. The separating rate of the magnetic beads increased as the electric current increased and flow velocity decreased. When the flow velocity was 0.333 μm/s and electric current was 1 A, the separating rate was 90%. The separating rate of the polystyrene particles increased as the flow velocity increased and was 85% when the flow velocity was 0.6 μm/s. These results demonstrate that this particle sorting system has potential applications in bio-molecular studies.

  19. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Emission from Relativistic Jets and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hartmann, D. H.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizunno, Y.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    We performed numerical simulations of particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission from shocks in order to understand the observed emission from relativistic jets and supernova remnants. The investigation involves the study of collisionless shocks, where the Weibel instability is responsible for particle acceleration as well as magnetic field generation. A 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell (RPIC) code has been used to investigate the shock processes in electron-positron plasmas. The evolution of theWeibe1 instability and its associated magnetic field generation and particle acceleration are studied with two different jet velocities (0 = 2,5 - slow, fast) corresponding to either outflows in supernova remnants or relativistic jets, such as those found in AGNs and microquasars. Slow jets have intrinsically different structures in both the generated magnetic fields and the accelerated particle spectrum. In particular, the jet head has a very weak magnetic field and the ambient electrons are strongly accelerated and dragged by the jet particles. The simulation results exhibit jitter radiation from inhomogeneous magnetic fields, generated by the Weibel instability, which has different spectral properties than standard synchrotron emission in a homogeneous magnetic field.

  20. Magnetic Absorption of Ultrashort Laser Pulses by Metallic Nano-Particles of Spheroidal Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorchuk, N. I.; Tomchuk, P. M.

    The theory for the energy of magnetic absorption by particles of a nonspherical shape by irradiation of the ultrashort laser pulses of different duration and carrying frequencies is developed. For the particles having the oblate or prolate spheroidal shape there has been found a dependence of this energy on the orientation of the magnetic field upon particle, degree of its deviation from the spherical form, pulse duration, and the magnitude of carrier frequency of the laser ray. An appreciable absorption growth at the length of free electron pass large comparing to the particle size is established. The phenomenological and kinetic approach is compared each with other.

  1. Particle Diffusion in Chaotic Magnetic Fields Generated by Asymmetric Current Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, A. K.; Dasgupta, B.

    2008-12-01

    The observed cross-field diffusion of charged particles in cosmic rays is assumed to be due to the chaotic nature of the interplanetary/intergalactic magnetic fields. Among the classic works on this subject have been those of Parker [1] and Jokipii [2]. Parker considered the passage of cosmic ray particles and energetic solar particles in a large scale magnetic field containing small scale irregularities. In the context of cosmic ray propagation, Jokipii considered a small fluctuating component, added on to a uniform magnetic field, to study the spatial transport of particles. In these studies the irregular component of the magnetic field is prescribed in an ad hoc fashion. In contrast, we consider asymmetric, nonlinear, steady-state magnetic fields, in three spatial dimensions, generated by currents flowing in circular loops and straight lines [3]. These magnetic fields are completely deterministic and, for certain range of parameters, chaotic. We will present analytical and numerical studies on the spatial characteristics of these fields. The motion of charged particles in the nonlinear and chaotic magnetic fields is determined using the Lorentz equation. A particle moving in a deterministic chaotic magnetic field superposed on a uniform background magnetic field is found to undergo spatial transport. This shows that chaotic magnetic fields generated by simple current configurations can produce cross-field diffusion. A detailed analysis of particle motion and diffusion along with application to space plasmas will be presented. [1] E.N. Parker, Planet. Space Sci. 13, 9 (1965). [2] J.R. Jokipii, Astrophys. J. 146, 480 (1966), and J.R. Jokipii, Astrophys. J. 149, 405 (1967). [3] A.K. Ram and B. Dasgupta, Eos Trans. AGU 87 (52), Fall Meet. Suppl. Abstract NG31B-1593 (2006); and Eos Trans. AGU 88 (52), Fall Meet. Suppl. Abstract NG21B-0522 (2007).

  2. High-throughput top-down fabrication of uniform magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, Julia; Nasrullah, Azeem; Sherlock, Timothy; Wang, Yi-Ju; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Willson, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Ion Beam Aperture Array Lithography was applied to top-down fabrication of large dense (10(8)-10(9) particles/cm(2)) arrays of uniform micron-scale particles at rates hundreds of times faster than electron beam lithography. In this process, a large array of helium ion beamlets is formed when a stencil mask containing an array of circular openings is illuminated by a broad beam of energetic (5-8 keV) ions, and is used to write arrays of specific repetitive patterns. A commercial 5-micrometer metal mesh was used as a stencil mask; the mesh size was adjusted by shrinking the stencil openings using conformal sputter-deposition of copper. Thermal evaporation from multiple sources was utilized to form magnetic particles of varied size and thickness, including alternating layers of gold and permalloy. Evaporation of permalloy layers in the presence of a magnetic field allowed creation of particles with uniform magnetic properties and pre-determined magnetization direction. The magnetic properties of the resulting particles were characterized by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry. Since the orientation of the particles on the substrate before release into suspension is known, the orientation-dependent magnetic properties of the particles could be determined. PMID:22693574

  3. High-throughput top-down fabrication of uniform magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, Julia; Nasrullah, Azeem; Sherlock, Timothy; Wang, Yi-Ju; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Willson, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Ion Beam Aperture Array Lithography was applied to top-down fabrication of large dense (10(8)-10(9) particles/cm(2)) arrays of uniform micron-scale particles at rates hundreds of times faster than electron beam lithography. In this process, a large array of helium ion beamlets is formed when a stencil mask containing an array of circular openings is illuminated by a broad beam of energetic (5-8 keV) ions, and is used to write arrays of specific repetitive patterns. A commercial 5-micrometer metal mesh was used as a stencil mask; the mesh size was adjusted by shrinking the stencil openings using conformal sputter-deposition of copper. Thermal evaporation from multiple sources was utilized to form magnetic particles of varied size and thickness, including alternating layers of gold and permalloy. Evaporation of permalloy layers in the presence of a magnetic field allowed creation of particles with uniform magnetic properties and pre-determined magnetization direction. The magnetic properties of the resulting particles were characterized by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry. Since the orientation of the particles on the substrate before release into suspension is known, the orientation-dependent magnetic properties of the particles could be determined.

  4. Small-scale gradients of charged particles in the heliospheric magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fan; Giacalone, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Using numerical simulations of charged-particles propagating in the heliospheric magnetic field, we study small-scale gradients, or 'dropouts,' in the intensity of solar energetic particles seen at 1 AU. We use two turbulence models, the foot-point random motion model and the two-component model, to generate fluctuating magnetic fields similar to spacecraft observations at 1 AU. The turbulence models include a Kolmogorov-like magnetic field power spectrum containing a broad range of spatial scales from those that lead to large-scale field-line random walk to small scales leading to resonant pitch-angle scattering of energetic particles. We release energetic protons (20 keV-10 MeV) from a spatially compact and instantaneous source. The trajectories of energetic charged particles in turbulent magnetic fields are numerically integrated. Spacecraft observations are mimicked by collecting particles in small windows when they pass the windows at a distance of 1 AU. We show that small-scale gradients in the intensity of energetic particles and velocity dispersions observed by spacecraft can be reproduced using the foot-point random motion model. However, no dropouts are seen in simulations using the two-component magnetic turbulence model. We also show that particle scattering in the solar wind magnetic field needs to be infrequent for intensity dropouts to form.

  5. Fundamentals and application of magnetic particles in cell isolation and enrichment: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plouffe, Brian D.; Murthy, Shashi K.; Lewis, Laura H.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic sorting using magnetic beads has become a routine methodology for the separation of key cell populations from biological suspensions. Due to the inherent ability of magnets to provide forces at a distance, magnetic cell manipulation is now a standardized process step in numerous processes in tissue engineering, medicine, and in fundamental biological research. Herein we review the current status of magnetic particles to enable isolation and separation of cells, with a strong focus on the fundamental governing physical phenomena, properties and syntheses of magnetic particles and on current applications of magnet-based cell separation in laboratory and clinical settings. We highlight the contribution of cell separation to biomedical research and medicine and detail modern cell-separation methods (both magnetic and non-magnetic). In addition to a review of the current state-of-the-art in magnet-based cell sorting, we discuss current challenges and available opportunities for further research, development and commercialization of magnetic particle-based cell-separation systems.

  6. Fundamentals and Application of Magnetic Particles in Cell Isolation and Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Plouffe, Brian D.; Murthy, Shashi K.; Lewis, Laura H.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic sorting using magnetic beads has become a routine methodology for the separation of key cell populations from biological suspensions. Due to the inherent ability of magnets to provide forces at a distance, magnetic cell manipulation is now a standardized process step in numerous processes in tissue engineering, medicine, and in fundamental biological research. Herein we review the current status of magnetic particles to enable isolation and separation of cells, with a strong focus on the fundamental governing physical phenomena, properties and syntheses of magnetic particles and on current applications of magnet-based cell separation in laboratory and clinical settings. We highlight the contribution of cell separation to biomedical research and medicine and detail modern cell separation methods (both magnetic and non-magnetic). In addition to a review of the current state-of-the-art in magnet-based cell sorting, we discuss current challenges and available opportunities for further research, development and commercialization of magnetic particle-based cell separation systems. PMID:25471081

  7. Prediction of particle orientation in simple upsetting process of NdFeB magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chao-Cheng; Hsiao, Po-Jen; You, Jr-Shiang; Chen, Yen-Ju; Chang, Can-Xun

    2013-12-16

    The magnetic properties of NdFeB magnets are strongly affected by crystallographic texture which is highly associated with particle orientation. This study proposed a method for predicting the particle orientation in the simple upsetting process of NdFeB magnets. The method is based on finite element simulation with flow net analysis. The magnets in a cylindrical form were compressed by two flat dies in a chamber filled with argon at 750°C. Three forming speeds were taken into account in order to obtain flow stress curves used in simulations. The micrographs of the cross sections of the deformed magnets show that the particle deformation significantly increases with the compression. The phenomenon was also predicted by the proposed method. Both simulated and experimental results show that the inhomogeneity of the texture of the NdFeB magnets can be increased by the simple upsetting process. The predicted particle orientations were in a good agreement with those examined in the deformed magnets. The proposed method for predicting particle orientations can also be used in other forming processes of NdFeB magnets.

  8. [Effects of the size of magnetic particles of immobilized enzyme reactors on the digestion performance].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiao; Zhou, Lianqi; Tian, Fang; Zhang, Yangjun; Qian, Xiaohong

    2013-02-01

    We applied immobilized enzyme reactors prepared with different sizes of magnetic particles into protein and proteome digestion. In addition, the influences of different sizes of the magnetic particles were studied on the reunion, enzyme efficiency and leakage sites. The experimental results showed that in comparison with the submicron magnetic particles, the amount of trypsin immobilized on the magnetic nanoparticles was 3. 5 times more than that of the submicron magnetic particles. However, the enzymatic efficiency was at the same level when the same amount of trypsin was used, and the reunion phenomenon was obviously improved when the size of the magnetic nanoparticles increased. Taking the immobilized enzyme reactor of 20 nm magnetic nanoparticles as an example, the digestion performance was further examined. The experimental results showed that rapid digestion could be achieved within 1 mm when the mass ratio of the trypsin and bovine serum albumin was 1:1. The peptide number of 0 missed cleavage site and the sequence coverage changed little after the protein was digested for 10 mm. It was concluded that the digestion efficiency of the immobilized enzyme reactor was much better than that of the in-solution digestion. When the immobilized enzyme reactors and the free trypsin were used for digestion, little differences of the leakage sites were found. Therefore, the immobilized enzyme reactors prepared with different sizes of magnetic particles can be applied in proteomic research for quick and efficient digestion.

  9. Influence of defects on the structural and magnetic properties of multifunctional La2NiMnO6 thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, HZ; Burgess, J; Ada, E; Street, S; Gupta, A.; Iliev, M N; Kellock, A J; Magen Dominguez, Cesar; Varela del Arco, Maria; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    Thin films of the double perovskite La2NiMnO6 (LNMO) have been grown on various lattice-matched substrates (SrTiO3, LaAlO3, NdGaO3 and MgO) by pulsed laser deposition under varying oxygen background pressure (25 - 800 mTorr). The out-of-plane lattice constant of the LNMO film initially decreases with increasing pressure, likely caused by a reduction in the defect concentration and improved structural ordering, before leveling off at higher pressures. Scanning transmission electron microscopy results show that the films are epitaxial, and the interface is sharp and coherent. While very few defects are observed by STEM in a film grown at high oxygen pressure (800 mTorr), a film grown at a lower pressure (100 mTorr) shows the formation of defects that extend throughout the thickness except for a very thin layer near the interface. The Raman spectra of the films are dominated by two broad peaks at around 540 cm-1 and 685 cm-1, which are assigned to the antisymmetric stretching (AS) and symmetric stretching (S) modes of MnO6 and NiO6 octahedra, respectively. The Raman peaks of the LNMO thin films grown in 800 mTorr background O2 are blue shifted in comparison to those of LNMO bulk, and the shift increases with decreasing film thickness, indicating the increased influence of strain. The critical thickness for strain relaxation as determined from the Raman spectra is between 40 - 80 nm. The strain is observed to have a negligible influence on the magnetic properties for films grown at high oxygen pressures. However, films grown at low pressures exhibit degraded magnetic properties, which can be attributed to a combination of B-site cation disorder and an increase in the concentration of Mn3+ and Ni3+ Jahn-Teller ions caused by oxygen defects. With increasing oxygen pressure during growth, the paramagnetic-ferromagnetic transition temperature (~280 K) gets sharper and the saturation magnetization at low temperatures is enhanced. Based on electron energy loss spectroscopy

  10. Bulk particle size distribution and magnetic properties of particle-sized fractions from loess and paleosol samples in Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zan, Jinbo; Fang, Xiaomin; Yang, Shengli; Yan, Maodu

    2015-01-01

    studies demonstrate that particle size separation based on gravitational settling and detailed rock magnetic measurements of the resulting fractionated samples constitutes an effective approach to evaluating the relative contributions of pedogenic and detrital components in the loess and paleosol sequences on the Chinese Loess Plateau. So far, however, similar work has not been undertaken on the loess deposits in Central Asia. In this paper, 17 loess and paleosol samples from three representative loess sections in Central Asia were separated into four grain size fractions, and then systematic rock magnetic measurements were made on the fractions. Our results demonstrate that the content of the <4 μm fraction in the Central Asian loess deposits is relatively low and that the samples generally have a unimodal particle distribution with a peak in the medium-coarse silt range. We find no significant difference between the particle size distributions obtained by the laser diffraction and the pipette and wet sieving methods. Rock magnetic studies further demonstrate that the medium-coarse silt fraction (e.g., the 20-75 μm fraction) provides the main control on the magnetic properties of the loess and paleosol samples in Central Asia. The contribution of pedogenically produced superparamagnetic (SP) and stable single-domain (SD) magnetic particles to the bulk magnetic properties is very limited. In addition, the coarsest fraction (>75 μm) exhibits the minimum values of χ, χARM, and SIRM, demonstrating that the concentrations of ferrimagnetic grains are not positively correlated with the bulk particle size in the Central Asian loess deposits.

  11. Asymptotic dependence of the relaxation time of the magnetization of a ferromagnetic particle on the anisotropy of the particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, C. N.; Cregg, P. J.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    1992-01-01

    It is known that the direction of the magnetization vector of very fine single-domain ferromagnetic particles fluctuates under the influence of thermal agitation. Perturbation theory is applied rigorously to a singular integral equation to derive an asymptotic formula for the relaxation time of the magnetization, for the case of uniaxial anisotropy and an applied magnetic field. The result agrees with that of Brown [Phys. Rev. 130, 1677 (1963)] as described succinctly by Aharoni [Phys. Rev. 177, 793 (1969)]. It should be emphasized that both Gilbert's equation and the earlier Landau-Lifshitz equation are merely phenomenological equations, which are used to explain the time decay of the average magnetization. Brown suggested that the Gilbert equation should be augmented by a white-noise driving term in order to explain the effect of thermal fluctuations of the surroundings on the magnetization.

  12. Particle Acceleration in Collapsing Magnetic Traps with a Braking Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borissov, Alexei; Neukirch, Thomas; Threlfall, James

    2016-05-01

    Collapsing magnetic traps (CMTs) are one proposed mechanism for generating non-thermal particle populations in solar flares. CMTs occur if an initially stretched magnetic field structure relaxes rapidly into a lower-energy configuration, which is believed to happen as a by-product of magnetic reconnection. A similar mechanism for energising particles has also been found to operate in the Earth's magnetotail. One particular feature proposed to be of importance for particle acceleration in the magnetotail is that of a braking plasma jet, i.e. a localised region of strong flow encountering stronger magnetic field which causes the jet to slow down and stop. Such a feature has not been included in previously proposed analytical models of CMTs for solar flares. In this work we incorporate a braking plasma jet into a well studied CMT model for the first time. We present results of test particle calculations in this new CMT model. We observe and characterise new types of particle behaviour caused by the magnetic structure of the jet braking region, which allows electrons to be trapped both in the braking jet region and the loop legs. We compare and contrast the behaviour of particle orbits for various parameter regimes of the underlying trap by examining particle trajectories, energy gains and the frequency with which different types of particle orbit are found for each parameter regime.

  13. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOEpatents

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1990-03-19

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations (dB/dt) in the particle beam.

  14. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOEpatents

    Danby, Gordon T.; Jackson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations in the particle beam.

  15. Nonresonant Charged-Particle Acceleration by Electrostatic Waves Propagating across Fluctuating Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, A V; Neishtadt, A I; Vasiliev, A A; Zelenyi, L M

    2015-10-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the effect of nonresonant charged-particle acceleration by an electrostatic wave propagating across the background magnetic field. We show that in the absence of resonance (i.e., when particle velocities are much smaller than the wave phase velocity) particles can be accelerated by electrostatic waves provided that the adiabaticity of particle motion is destroyed by magnetic field fluctuations. Thus, in a system with stochastic particle dynamics the electrostatic wave should be damped even in the absence of Landau resonance. The proposed mechanism is responsible for the acceleration of particles that cannot be accelerated via resonant wave-particle interactions. Simplicity of this straightforward acceleration scenario indicates a wide range of possible applications. PMID:26550729

  16. Novel hybrid multifunctional magnetoelectric porous composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, P.; Gonçalves, R.; Lopes, A. C.; Venkata Ramana, E.; Mendiratta, S. K.; Lanceros-Mendez, S.

    2015-12-01

    Novel multifunctional porous films have been developed by the integration of magnetic CoFe2O4 (CFO) nanoparticles into poly(vinylidene fluoride)-Trifuoroethylene (P(VDF-TrFE)), taking advantage of the synergies of the magnetostrictive filler and the piezoelectric polymer. The porous films show a piezoelectric response with an effective d33 coefficient of -22 pC/N-1, a maximum magnetization of 12 emu g-1 and a maximum magnetoelectric coefficient of 9 mV cm-1 Oe-1. In this way, a multifunctional membrane has been developed suitable for advanced applications ranging from biomedical to water treatment.

  17. Theoretical predictions for spatially-focused heating of magnetic nanoparticles guided by magnetic particle imaging field gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhavalikar, Rohan; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) transfer some of the field's energy to their surroundings in the form of heat, a property that has attracted significant attention for use in cancer treatment through hyperthermia and in developing magnetic drug carriers that can be actuated to release their cargo externally using magnetic fields. To date, most work in this field has focused on the use of AMFs that actuate heat release by nanoparticles over large regions, without the ability to select specific nanoparticle-loaded regions for heating while leaving other nanoparticle-loaded regions unaffected. In parallel, magnetic particle imaging (MPI) has emerged as a promising approach to image the distribution of magnetic nanoparticle tracers in vivo, with sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The underlying principle in MPI is the application of a selection magnetic field gradient, which defines a small region of low bias field, superimposed with an AMF (of lower frequency and amplitude than those normally used to actuate heating by the nanoparticles) to obtain a signal which is proportional to the concentration of particles in the region of low bias field. Here we extend previous models for estimating the energy dissipation rates of magnetic nanoparticles in uniform AMFs to provide theoretical predictions of how the selection magnetic field gradient used in MPI can be used to selectively actuate heating by magnetic nanoparticles in the low bias field region of the selection magnetic field gradient. Theoretical predictions are given for the spatial decay in energy dissipation rate under magnetic field gradients representative of those that can be achieved with current MPI technology. These results underscore the potential of combining MPI and higher amplitude/frequency actuation AMFs to achieve selective magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) guided by MPI.

  18. Development of magnetic luminescent core/shell nanocomplex particles with fluorescence using Rhodamine 6G

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hee Uk; Song, Yoon Seok; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► A simple method was developed to synthesize Co-B/SiO{sub 2}/dye/SiO{sub 2} composite particles. ► The magnetic particle shows that highly luminescent and core/shell particles are formed. ► Such core/shell particles can be easily suspended in water. ► The magnetic particles could detect fluorescence for the application of biosensor. -- Abstract: A simple and reproducible method was developed to synthesize a novel class of Co-B/SiO{sub 2}/dye/SiO{sub 2} composite core/shell particles. Using a single cobalt core, Rhodamine 6G of organic dye molecules was entrapped in a silica shell, resulting in core/shell particles of ∼200 nm diameter. Analyses using a variety of techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibration sample magnetometry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and fluorescence intensity demonstrated that dye molecules were trapped inside the core/shell particles. A photoluminescence investigation showed that highly luminescent and photostable core/shell particles were formed. Such core/shell particles can be easily suspended in water. The synthesized magnetic particles could be used to detect fluorescence on glass substrate arrays for bioassay and biosensor applications.

  19. Addressing of LnCaP Cell Using Magnetic Particles Assisted Impedimetric Microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dung Thi Xuan; Tran, Trong Binh; Nguyen, Phuong-Diem; Min, Junhong

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we provide a facile, effective technique for a simple isolation and enrichment of low metastatic prostate tumor cell LNCaP using biocompatible, magnetic particles asissted impedimetric sensing system. Hydrophobic cell membrane anchors (BAM) were generated onto magnetic particles which diameters vary from 50 nm to 5 μm and were used to capture LNCaP cells from the suspension. Finally, magnetic particle-LNCaP complex were addressed onto the surface of the interdigitated microelectrode (IDM). Cell viability was monitored by our laboratory developed-technique Electrical Cell Substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS). The results reavealed that 50 nm-magnetic particles showed best performance in terms of cell separation and cell viability. This technique provides a simple and efficient method for the direct addressing of LNCaP cell on the surface and enhances better understanding of cell behavior for cancer management in the near future. PMID:27455737

  20. Hybrid Particle Code Simulations of Mars: The Role of Crustal Magnetic Fields in Ionospheric Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, S. H.; Ledvina, S. A.

    2014-07-01

    Using the three dimensional hybrid particle code, the role of neutral winds in the escape of ionospheric ions is investigated. The results in terms of loss rates and interaction around the crustal magnetic fields will be presented.

  1. Particle-Based Microfluidic Device for Providing High Magnetic Field Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Adam Y. (Inventor); Wong, Tak S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A microfluidic device for manipulating particles in a fluid has a device body that defines a main channel therein, in which the main channel has an inlet and an outlet. The device body further defines a particulate diverting channel therein, the particulate diverting channel being in fluid connection with the main channel between the inlet and the outlet of the main channel and having a particulate outlet. The microfluidic device also has a plurality of microparticles arranged proximate or in the main channel between the inlet of the main channel and the fluid connection of the particulate diverting channel to the main channel. The plurality of microparticles each comprises a material in a composition thereof having a magnetic susceptibility suitable to cause concentration of magnetic field lines of an applied magnetic field while in operation. A microfluidic particle-manipulation system has a microfluidic particle-manipulation device and a magnet disposed proximate the microfluidic particle-manipulation device.

  2. Vision system using linear CCD cameras in fluorescent magnetic particle inspection of axles of railway wheelsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Hongwei; Li, Luming; Deng, Yuanhui

    2005-05-01

    Automatic magnetic particle inspection based vision system using CCD camera is a new development of magnetic particle inspection. A vision system using linear CCD cameras in semiautomatic fluorescent magnetic particle inspection of axles of railway wheelsets is presented in this paper. The system includes four linear CCD cameras, a PCI data acquisition & logic control card, and an industrial computer. The unique characteristic of striation induced by UV light flicker in scanning image acquired by linear CCD camera are investigated, and some digital image processing methods for images of magnetic particle indications are designed to identify the cracks, including image pre-processing using wavelet, edge detection based connected region using Candy operator and double thresholds. The experimental results show that the system can detect the article cracks effectively, and may improve inspection quality highly and increase productivity practically.

  3. On the relativistic classical motion of a radiating spinning particle in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Arnab; Rajeev, S.G.

    2011-04-15

    Research Highlights: > We propose classical equations of motion for a charged particle with magnetic moment. > We account for radiation reaction as well. > Unlike previous proposals we do not have runaway solutions. > We find that the particle loses energy even in a constant magnetic field for a particular spin-polarized state. - Abstract: We propose classical equations of motion for a charged particle with magnetic moment, taking radiation reaction into account. This generalizes the Landau-Lifshitz equations for the spinless case. In the special case of spin-polarized motion in a constant magnetic field (synchrotron motion) we verify that the particle does lose energy. Previous proposals did not predict dissipation of energy and also suffered from runaway solutions analogous to those of the Lorentz-Dirac equations of motion.

  4. Use of mucolytics to enhance magnetic particle retention at a model airway surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ally, Javed; Roa, Wilson; Amirfazli, A.

    A previous study has shown that retention of magnetic particles at a model airway surface requires prohibitively strong magnetic fields. As mucus viscoelasticity is the most significant factor contributing to clearance of magnetic particles from the airway surface, mucolytics are considered in this study to reduce mucus viscoelasticity and enable particle retention with moderate strength magnetic fields. The excised frog palate model was used to simulate the airway surface. Two mucolytics, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and dextran sulfate (DS) were tested. NAC was found to enable retention at moderate field values (148 mT with a gradient of 10.2 T/m), whereas DS was found to be effective only for sufficiently large particle concentrations at the airway surface. The possible mechanisms for the observed behavior with different mucolytics are also discussed based on aggregate formation and the loading of cilia.

  5. Addressing of LnCaP Cell Using Magnetic Particles Assisted Impedimetric Microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dung Thi Xuan; Tran, Trong Binh; Nguyen, Phuong-Diem; Min, Junhong

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we provide a facile, effective technique for a simple isolation and enrichment of low metastatic prostate tumor cell LNCaP using biocompatible, magnetic particles asissted impedimetric sensing system. Hydrop