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Sample records for multimillion atom quantum

  1. Multi-million atom electronic structure calculations for quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Muhammad

    Quantum dots grown by self-assembly process are typically constructed by 50,000 to 5,000,000 structural atoms which confine a small, countable number of extra electrons or holes in a space that is comparable in size to the electron wavelength. Under such conditions quantum dots can be interpreted as artificial atoms with the potential to be custom tailored to new functionality. In the past decade or so, these nanostructures have attracted significant experimental and theoretical attention in the field of nanoscience. The new and tunable optical and electrical properties of these artificial atoms have been proposed in a variety of different fields, for example in communication and computing systems, medical and quantum computing applications. Predictive and quantitative modeling and simulation of these structures can help to narrow down the vast design space to a range that is experimentally affordable and move this part of nanoscience to nano-Technology. Modeling of such quantum dots pose a formidable challenge to theoretical physicists because: (1) Strain originating from the lattice mismatch of the materials penetrates deep inside the buffer surrounding the quantum dots and require large scale (multi-million atom) simulations to correctly capture its effect on the electronic structure, (2) The interface roughness, the alloy randomness, and the atomistic granularity require the calculation of electronic structure at the atomistic scale. Most of the current or past theoretical calculations are based on continuum approach such as effective mass approximation or k.p modeling capturing either no or one of the above mentioned effects, thus missing some of the essential physics. The Objectives of this thesis are: (1) to model and simulate the experimental quantum dot topologies at the atomistic scale; (2) to theoretically explore the essential physics i.e. long range strain, linear and quadratic piezoelectricity, interband optical transition strengths, quantum confined

  2. Study of alloy disorder in quantum dots through multi-million atom simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilmeck, Gerhard; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Boykin, T. B.; Bowen, R. C.; von Allmen, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    A tight binding model which includes s, p, d, s orbitals is used to examine the electronic structures of an ensemble of dome-shaped In0.6 Ga0.4 As quantum dots. Given ensembles of identically sized quantum dots, variations in composition and configuration yield a linewidth broadening of less than 0.35 meV, much smaller than the total broadening determined from photoluminescence experiments. It is also found that the computed disorder-induced broadening is very sensitive to the applied boundary conditions, so that care must be taken to ensure proper convergence of the numerical results. Examination of local eigenenergies as functions of position shows similar convergence problems and indicates that an inaccurate resolution of the equilibrium atomic positions due to truncation of the simulation domain may be the source of the slow ground state convergence.

  3. Multimillion Atom Simulations of Nanoenergetic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    mechanisms of detonation of nanostructured materials consisting of Al nanoparticles encapsulated in nanophase RDX and oxidizers. Quantum ...adaptive hierarchical quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular dynamics (MD) simulation framework, which invokes higher accuracy simulations only when and...scales of quantum -mechanically accurate and well validated, chemically reactive atomistic simulations—1.72 billion-atom reactive MD and 1.68 trillion

  4. Multimillion atom molecular dynamics simulations of glasses and ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashishta, Priya; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro

    1999-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are a powerful tool for studying physical and chemical phenomena in materials. In these lectures we shall review the molecular dynamics method and its implementation on parallel computer architectures. Using the molecular dynamics method we will study a number of materials in different ranges of density, temperature, and uniaxial strain. These include structural correlations in silica glass under pressure, crack propagation in silicon nitride films, sintering of silicon nitride nanoclusters, consolidation of nanophase materials, and dynamic fracture. Multimillion atom simulations of oxidation of aluminum nanoclusters and nanoindentation in silicon nitride will also be discussed.

  5. Multimillion Atom Simulations of Nanostructured Materials on Parallel Computers ---Sintering and Consolidation, Fracture, and Oxidation---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashishta, P.; Bachlechner, M. E.; Campbell, T.; Kalia, R. K.; Kikuchi, H.; Kodiyalam, S.; Nakano, A.; Ogata, S.; Shimojo, F.; Walsh, P.

    Multiresolution molecular-dynamics approach for multimillion atom simulations has been used to investigate structural properties, mechanical failure in ceramic materials, and atomic-level stresses in nanoscale semiconductor/ceramic mesas (Si/Si3N4). Crack propagation and fracture in silicon nitride, silicon carbide, gallium arsenide, and nanophase ceramics are investigated. We observe a crossover from slow to rapid fracture and a correlation between the speed of crack propagation and morphology of fracture surface. A 100 million atom simulation is carried out to study crack propagation in GaAs. Mechanical failure in the Si/Si3N4 interface is studied by applying tensile strain parallel to the interface. Ten million atom molecular dynamics simulations are performed to determine atomic-level stress distributions in a 54 nm nanopixel on a 0.1 μm silicon substrate. Multimillion atom simulations of oxidation of aluminum nanoclusters and nanoindentation in silicon nitride are also discussed.

  6. Scaling of Multimillion-Atom Biological Molecular Dynamics Simulation on a Petascale Supercomputer.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Roland; Lindner, Benjamin; Petridis, Loukas; Smith, Jeremy C

    2009-10-13

    A strategy is described for a fast all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of multimillion-atom biological systems on massively parallel supercomputers. The strategy is developed using benchmark systems of particular interest to bioenergy research, comprising models of cellulose and lignocellulosic biomass in an aqueous solution. The approach involves using the reaction field (RF) method for the computation of long-range electrostatic interactions, which permits efficient scaling on many thousands of cores. Although the range of applicability of the RF method for biomolecular systems remains to be demonstrated, for the benchmark systems the use of the RF produces molecular dipole moments, Kirkwood G factors, other structural properties, and mean-square fluctuations in excellent agreement with those obtained with the commonly used Particle Mesh Ewald method. With RF, three million- and five million-atom biological systems scale well up to ∼30k cores, producing ∼30 ns/day. Atomistic simulations of very large systems for time scales approaching the microsecond would, therefore, appear now to be within reach.

  7. Multimillion atom simulation of materials on parallel computers — nanopixel, interfacial fracture, nanoindentation, and oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashishta, Priya; Bachlechner, Martina; Nakano, Aiichiro; Campbell, Timothy J.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Kodiyalam, Sanjay; Ogata, Shuji; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Walsh, Phillip

    2001-10-01

    We have developed scalable space-time multiresolution algorithms to enable molecular dynamics simulations involving up to a billion atoms on massively parallel computers. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study stress domains and interfacial fracture in semiconductor/dielectric nanopixels, nanoindentation, and oxidation of metallic nanoparticles.

  8. Multimillion-atom molecular dynamics simulation of atomic level stresses in Si(111)/Si3N4(0001) nanopixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Omeltchenko, Andrey; Nakano, Aiichiro; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Vashishta, Priya; Ebbsjö, Ingvar; Madhukar, Anupam; Messina, Paul

    1998-04-01

    Ten million atom multiresolution molecular-dynamics simulations are performed on parallel computers to determine atomic-level stress distributions in a 54 nm nanopixel on a 0.1 μm silicon substrate. Effects of surfaces, edges, and lattice mismatch at the Si(111)/Si3N4(0001) interface on the stress distributions are investigated. Stresses are found to be highly inhomogeneous in the nanopixel. The top surface of silicon nitride has a compressive stress of +3 GPa and the stress is tensile, -1 GPa, in silicon below the interface.

  9. Shock-induced poration, cholesterol flip-flop and small interfering RNA transfection in a phospholipid membrane: Multimillion atom, microsecond molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit

    Biological cell membranes provide mechanical stability to cells and understanding their structure, dynamics and mechanics are important biophysics problems. Experiments coupled with computational methods such as molecular dynamics (MD) have provided insight into the physics of membranes. We use long-time and large-scale MD simulations to study the structure, dynamics and mechanical behavior of membranes. We investigate shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water using MD simulations based on a reactive force field. We observe a focused jet at the onset of bubble shrinkage and a secondary shock wave upon bubble collapse. The jet length scales linearly with the nanobubble radius, as observed in experiments on micron-to-millimeter size bubbles. Shock induces dramatic structural changes, including an ice-VII-like structural motif at a particle velocity of 1 km/s. The incipient ice VII formation and the calculated Hugoniot curve are in good agreement with experimental results. We also investigate molecular mechanisms of poration in lipid bilayers due to shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles. Our multimillion-atom MD simulations reveal that the jet impact generates shear flow of water on bilayer leaflets and pressure gradients across them. This transiently enhances the bilayer permeability by creating nanopores through which water molecules translocate rapidly across the bilayer. Effects of nanobubble size and temperature on the porosity of lipid bilayers are examined. The second research project focuses on cholesterol (CHOL) dynamics in phospholipid bilayers. Several experimental and computational studies have been performed on lipid bilayers consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and CHOL molecules. CHOL interleaflet transport (flip-flop) plays an important role in interleaflet coupling and determining CHOL flip-flop rate has been elusive. Various studies report that the rate ranges between milliseconds to seconds. We calculate CHOL flip-flop rates by

  10. Quantum tweezer for atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudarev, Artem; Schreck, Florian; Meyrath, Todd; Hanssen, Jay; Chuu, Chih-Sung; Raizen, Mark; Niu, Qian

    2004-05-01

    We consider a quantum dot well, created by a tightly focused laser beam, placed in the center of a BEC confined in a quasi-one-dimensional configuration [1]. We show that for certain parameters it is possible to extract a single atom from a BEC by raising the depth of the well at a given rate. This is possible due to rapid decoupling of the quantum dot and BEC reservoir when the state with a single atom in the dot is just below a chemical potential of the BEC. The analysis is done for realistic experimental parameters for a ^87Rb condensate where the density is limited by three-body collisions. The realization of atomic number states should enable many applications in quantum state engineering [2]. [1] Roberto B. Diener, Biao Wu, Mark G. Raizen, and Qian Niu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 070401 (2002). [2] Artem M. Dudarev, Roberto B. Diener, Biao Wu, Mark G. Raizen, Qian Niu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 010402 (2003).

  11. Quantum information with Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Saffman, M.; Walker, T. G.; Moelmer, K.

    2010-07-15

    Rydberg atoms with principal quantum number n>>1 have exaggerated atomic properties including dipole-dipole interactions that scale as n{sup 4} and radiative lifetimes that scale as n{sup 3}. It was proposed a decade ago to take advantage of these properties to implement quantum gates between neutral atom qubits. The availability of a strong long-range interaction that can be coherently turned on and off is an enabling resource for a wide range of quantum information tasks stretching far beyond the original gate proposal. Rydberg enabled capabilities include long-range two-qubit gates, collective encoding of multiqubit registers, implementation of robust light-atom quantum interfaces, and the potential for simulating quantum many-body physics. The advances of the last decade are reviewed, covering both theoretical and experimental aspects of Rydberg-mediated quantum information processing.

  12. Atomic Quantum Sensors in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zoest, T.; Müller, T.; Wendrich, T.; Gilowski, M.; Rasel, E. M.; Ertmer, W.; Könemann, T.; Lämmerzahl, C.; Dittus, H. J.; Vogel, A.; Bongs, K.; Sengstock, K.; Lewoczko-Adamczyk, W.; Peters, A.; Steinmetz, T.; Reichel, J.; Nandi, G.; Schleich, W.; Walser, R.

    In this article we present actual projects concerning high resolution measurements developed for future space missions based on ultracold atoms at the Institut für Quantenoptik (IQ) of the University of Hannover. This work involves the realization of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a microgravitational environment and of an inertial atomic quantum sensor.

  13. Nonlinear and quantum atom optics.

    PubMed

    Rolston, S L; Phillips, W D

    2002-03-14

    Coherent matter waves in the form of Bose-Einstein condensates have led to the development of nonlinear and quantum atom optics - the de Broglie wave analogues of nonlinear and quantum optics with light. In nonlinear atom optics, four-wave mixing of matter waves and mixing of combinations of light and matter waves have been observed; such progress culminated in the demonstration of phase-coherent matter-wave amplification. Solitons represent another active area in nonlinear atom optics: these non-dispersing propagating modes of the equation that governs Bose-Einstein condensates have been created experimentally, and observed subsequently to break up into vortices. Quantum atom optics is concerned with the statistical properties and correlations of matter-wave fields. A first step in this area is the measurement of reduced number fluctuations in a Bose-Einstein condensate partitioned into a series of optical potential wells.

  14. Teleportation of an atomic ensemble quantum state.

    PubMed

    Dantan, A; Treps, N; Bramati, A; Pinard, M

    2005-02-11

    We propose a protocol to achieve high fidelity quantum state teleportation of a macroscopic atomic ensemble using a pair of quantum-correlated atomic ensembles. We show how to prepare this pair of ensembles using quasiperfect quantum state transfer processes between light and atoms. Our protocol relies on optical joint measurements of the atomic ensemble states and magnetic feedback reconstruction.

  15. Atomic quantum state teleportation and swapping.

    PubMed

    Kuzmich, A; Polzik, E S

    2000-12-25

    A set of protocols for atoms-photons and atoms-atoms quantum state teleportation and swapping utilizing Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen light is proposed. The protocols work for polarization quantum states of multiphoton light pulses and macroscopic samples of atoms, i.e., for continuous quantum variables. A simple free space interaction of polarized light with a spin polarized atomic ensemble is shown to suffice for these protocols. Feasibility of experimental realization using gas samples of atoms is analyzed.

  16. "Electronium": A Quantum Atomic Teaching Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budde, Marion; Niedderer, Hans; Scott, Philip; Leach, John

    2002-01-01

    Outlines an alternative atomic model to the probability model, the descriptive quantum atomic model Electronium. Discusses the way in which it is intended to support students in learning quantum-mechanical concepts. (Author/MM)

  17. Atomic physics: A milestone in quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Stephen D.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers require many quantum bits to perform complex calculations, but devices with more than a few bits are difficult to program. A device based on five atomic quantum bits shows a way forward. See Letter p.63

  18. Atomic displacements in quantum crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusseault, Marisa; Boninsegni, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Displacements of atoms and molecules away from lattice sites in helium and parahydrogen solids at low temperature have been studied by means of quantum Monte Carlo simulations. In the bcc phases of 3He and 4He, atomic displacements are largely quantum-mechanical in character, even at melting. The computed Lindemann ratio at melting is found to be in good agreement with experimental results for 4He. Unlike the case of helium, in solid parahydrogen there exists near melting a significant thermal contribution to molecular vibrations, accounting for roughly half of the total effect. Although the Lindemann ratio at melting is in quantitative agreement with experiment, computed molecular mean square fluctuations feature a clear temperature dependence, in disagreement with recent experimental observations.

  19. Programmable atom-photon quantum interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Christoph; Eich, Pascal; Schug, Michael; Müller, Philipp; Eschner, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We present the implementation of a programmable atom-photon quantum interface, employing a single trapped +40Ca ion and single photons. Depending on its mode of operation, the interface serves as a bidirectional atom-photon quantum-state converter, as a source of entangled atom-photon states, or as a quantum frequency converter of single photons. The interface lends itself particularly to interfacing ions with spontaneous parametric down-conversion-based single-photon or entangled-photon-pair sources.

  20. Quantum teleportation between remote atomic-ensemble quantum memories.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiao-Hui; Xu, Xiao-Fan; Li, Che-Ming; Yuan, Zhen-Sheng; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2012-12-11

    Quantum teleportation and quantum memory are two crucial elements for large-scale quantum networks. With the help of prior distributed entanglement as a "quantum channel," quantum teleportation provides an intriguing means to faithfully transfer quantum states among distant locations without actual transmission of the physical carriers [Bennett CH, et al. (1993) Phys Rev Lett 70(13):1895-1899]. Quantum memory enables controlled storage and retrieval of fast-flying photonic quantum bits with stationary matter systems, which is essential to achieve the scalability required for large-scale quantum networks. Combining these two capabilities, here we realize quantum teleportation between two remote atomic-ensemble quantum memory nodes, each composed of ∼10(8) rubidium atoms and connected by a 150-m optical fiber. The spin wave state of one atomic ensemble is mapped to a propagating photon and subjected to Bell state measurements with another single photon that is entangled with the spin wave state of the other ensemble. Two-photon detection events herald the success of teleportation with an average fidelity of 88(7)%. Besides its fundamental interest as a teleportation between two remote macroscopic objects, our technique may be useful for quantum information transfer between different nodes in quantum networks and distributed quantum computing.

  1. Individual Atoms in their Quantum Ground State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Eyal; Sompet, Pimonpan; Fung, Yin Hsien; Andersen, Mikkel F.

    2016-05-01

    An ultimate control of pure quantum states is an excellent platform for various quantum science and engineering. In this work, we perform quantum manipulation of individual Rubidium atoms in a tightly focus optical tweezer in order to cool them into their vibrational ground state via Raman sideband cooling. Our experimental scheme involves a combination of Raman sideband transitions and optical pumping of the atoms that couples two magnetic field sublevels indifferent to magnetic noise thus providing a much longer atomic coherence time compared to previous cooling schemes. By installing most of the atoms in their ground state, we managed to achieve two-dimensional cooling on the way to create a full nil entropy quantum state of single atoms and single molecules. We acknowledge the Marsden Fund, CORE and DWC for their support.

  2. Quantum dots with single-atom precision.

    PubMed

    Fölsch, Stefan; Martínez-Blanco, Jesús; Yang, Jianshu; Kanisawa, Kiyoshi; Erwin, Steven C

    2014-07-01

    Quantum dots are often called artificial atoms because, like real atoms, they confine electrons to quantized states with discrete energies. However, although real atoms are identical, most quantum dots comprise hundreds or thousands of atoms, with inevitable variations in size and shape and, consequently, unavoidable variability in their wavefunctions and energies. Electrostatic gates can be used to mitigate these variations by adjusting the electron energy levels, but the more ambitious goal of creating quantum dots with intrinsically digital fidelity by eliminating statistical variations in their size, shape and arrangement remains elusive. We used a scanning tunnelling microscope to create quantum dots with identical, deterministic sizes. By using the lattice of a reconstructed semiconductor surface to fix the position of each atom, we controlled the shape and location of the dots with effectively zero error. This allowed us to construct quantum dot molecules whose coupling has no intrinsic variation but could nonetheless be tuned with arbitrary precision over a wide range. Digital fidelity opens the door to quantum dot architectures free of intrinsic broadening-an important goal for technologies from nanophotonics to quantum information processing as well as for fundamental studies of confined electrons.

  3. Quantum Optics with Single Atoms and Photons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Computation 2, 1 (2002). 2. “ Quantum teleportation of light beams,” T. C. Zhang, K. W. Goh, C. W. Chou, P. Lodahl, and H. J. Kimble, Phys. Rev. A67, 033802...code) Final Technical Report ONR Grant Number N00014-02-1-0828 Quantum Optics with Single Atoms and Photons Submitted to Office of Naval Research...exploit recently discovered pos- sibilities in the microscopic realm of quantum mechanics to accomplish tasks that would otherwise be impossible by

  4. Deterministic quantum teleportation of atomic qubits.

    PubMed

    Barrett, M D; Chiaverini, J; Schaetz, T; Britton, J; Itano, W M; Jost, J D; Knill, E; Langer, C; Leibfried, D; Ozeri, R; Wineland, D J

    2004-06-17

    Quantum teleportation provides a means to transport quantum information efficiently from one location to another, without the physical transfer of the associated quantum-information carrier. This is achieved by using the non-local correlations of previously distributed, entangled quantum bits (qubits). Teleportation is expected to play an integral role in quantum communication and quantum computation. Previous experimental demonstrations have been implemented with optical systems that used both discrete and continuous variables, and with liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. Here we report unconditional teleportation of massive particle qubits using atomic (9Be+) ions confined in a segmented ion trap, which aids individual qubit addressing. We achieve an average fidelity of 78 per cent, which exceeds the fidelity of any protocol that does not use entanglement. This demonstration is also important because it incorporates most of the techniques necessary for scalable quantum information processing in an ion-trap system.

  5. Deterministic quantum teleportation with atoms.

    PubMed

    Riebe, M; Häffner, H; Roos, C F; Hänsel, W; Benhelm, J; Lancaster, G P T; Körber, T W; Becher, C; Schmidt-Kaler, F; James, D F V; Blatt, R

    2004-06-17

    Teleportation of a quantum state encompasses the complete transfer of information from one particle to another. The complete specification of the quantum state of a system generally requires an infinite amount of information, even for simple two-level systems (qubits). Moreover, the principles of quantum mechanics dictate that any measurement on a system immediately alters its state, while yielding at most one bit of information. The transfer of a state from one system to another (by performing measurements on the first and operations on the second) might therefore appear impossible. However, it has been shown that the entangling properties of quantum mechanics, in combination with classical communication, allow quantum-state teleportation to be performed. Teleportation using pairs of entangled photons has been demonstrated, but such techniques are probabilistic, requiring post-selection of measured photons. Here, we report deterministic quantum-state teleportation between a pair of trapped calcium ions. Following closely the original proposal, we create a highly entangled pair of ions and perform a complete Bell-state measurement involving one ion from this pair and a third source ion. State reconstruction conditioned on this measurement is then performed on the other half of the entangled pair. The measured fidelity is 75%, demonstrating unequivocally the quantum nature of the process.

  6. Quantum Electrodynamics of Atomic Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, Miguel; Faupin, Jérémy; Fröhlich, Jürg; Schubnel, Baptiste

    2015-07-01

    A simple model of an atom interacting with the quantized electromagnetic field is studied. The atom has a finite mass m, finitely many excited states and an electric dipole moment, , where and is proportional to the elementary electric charge. The interaction of the atom with the radiation field is described with the help of the Ritz Hamiltonian, , where is the electric field, cut off at large frequencies. A mathematical study of the Lamb shift, the decay channels and the life times of the excited states of the atom is presented. It is rigorously proven that these quantities are analytic functions of the momentum of the atom and of the coupling constant , provided and and are sufficiently small. The proof relies on a somewhat novel inductive construction involving a sequence of `smooth Feshbach-Schur maps' applied to a complex dilatation of the original Hamiltonian, which yields an algorithm for the calculation of resonance energies that converges super-exponentially fast.

  7. Quantum teleportation with atoms trapped in cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hai-Woong

    2004-09-01

    We propose a scheme to implement the quantum teleportation protocol with single atoms trapped in cavities. The scheme is based on the adiabatic passage and the polarization measurement. We show that it is possible to teleport the internal state of an atom trapped in a cavity to an atom trapped in another cavity with the success probability of 1/2 and the fidelity of 1. The scheme is resistant to a number of considerable imperfections such as the violation of the Lamb-Dicke condition, weak atom-cavity coupling, spontaneous emission, and detection inefficiency.

  8. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  9. Quantum model of the Thomson helium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazaryan, E. M.; Shakhnazaryan, V. A.; Sarkisyan, H. A.; Gusev, A. A.

    2014-03-01

    A quantum model of the Thomson helium atom is considered within the framework of stationary perturbation theory. It is shown that from a formal point of view this problem is similar to that of two-electron states in a parabolic quantum dot. The ground state energy of the quantum Thomson helium atom is estimated on the basis of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. The ground state energies obtained in the first order of perturbation theory and qualitative estimate provide, respectively, upper and lower estimates of eigenvalues derived by numerically solving the problem for a quantum model. The conditions under which the Kohn theorem holds in this system, when the values of resonance absorption frequencies are independent of the Coulomb interaction between electrons, are discussed.

  10. Atom-by-Atom Construction of a Quantum Device.

    PubMed

    Petta, Jason R

    2017-03-28

    Scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) are conventionally used to probe surfaces with atomic resolution. Recent advances in STM include tunneling from spin-polarized and superconducting tips, time-domain spectroscopy, and the fabrication of atomically precise Si nanoelectronics. In this issue of ACS Nano, Tettamanzi et al. probe a single-atom transistor in silicon, fabricated using the precision of a STM, at microwave frequencies. While previous studies have probed such devices in the MHz regime, Tettamanzi et al. probe a STM-fabricated device at GHz frequencies, which enables excited-state spectroscopy and measurements of the excited-state lifetime. The success of this experiment will enable future work on quantum control, where the wave function must be controlled on a time scale that is much shorter than the decoherence time. We review two major approaches that are being pursued to develop spin-based quantum computers and highlight some recent progress in the atom-by-atom fabrication of donor-based devices in silicon. Recent advances in STM lithography may enable practical bottom-up construction of large-scale quantum devices.

  11. First principle thousand atom quantum dot calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Li, Jingbo

    2004-03-30

    A charge patching method and an idealized surface passivation are used to calculate the single electronic states of IV-IV, III-V, II-VI semiconductor quantum dots up to a thousand atoms. This approach scales linearly and has a 1000 fold speed-up compared to direct first principle methods with a cost of eigen energy error of about 20 meV. The calculated quantum dot band gaps are parametrized for future references.

  12. Cold atom quantum sensors for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-07-01

    Quantum sensors based on cold atoms offer the opportunity to perform highly accurate measurements of physical phenomena related to time, gravity and rotation. The deployment of such technologies in the microgravity environment of space may enable further enhancement of their performance, whilst permitting the detection of these physical phenomena over much larger scales than is possible with a ground-based instrument. In this talk, I will present an overview of the activities of the UK National Quantum Hub in Sensors and Metrology in developing cold atoms technology for space. Our activities are focused in two main areas: optical clocks and atom interferometers. I will also discuss our contributions to recent initiatives including STE-QUEST and AI-GOAT, the ESA/NASA initiative aiming at an atom interferometer gravitational wave detector in space.

  13. Trapped Atomic Ions and Quantum Information Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wineland, D. J.; Leibfried, D.; Bergquist, J. C.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Seidelin, S.; Shiga, N.

    2006-11-07

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a large-scale information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high-fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. This is still well in the future. NIST and other groups are addressing part of the scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly-parallel and scalable processing. In the near term, some simple quantum processing protocols are being used to aid in quantum metrology, such as in atomic clocks. As the number of qubits increases, Schroedinger's cat paradox and the measurement problem in quantum mechanics become more apparent; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on these fundamental issues.

  14. Trapped Atomic Ions and Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wineland, D. J.; Leibfried, D.; Bergquist, J. C.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Knill, M.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Seidelin, S.; Shiga, N.; Wesenberg, J. H.

    2006-11-01

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a large-scale information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high-fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. This is still well in the future. NIST and other groups are addressing part of the scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly-parallel and scalable processing. In the near term, some simple quantum processing protocols are being used to aid in quantum metrology, such as in atomic clocks. As the number of qubits increases, Schrödinger's cat paradox and the measurement problem in quantum mechanics become more apparent; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on these fundamental issues.

  15. Quantum and Classical Electrostatics Among Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, T. P.; Obolensky, O. I.; Ogurtsov, A. Y.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    Quantum theory has been unquestionably successful at describing physics at the atomic scale. However, it becomes more difficult to apply as the system size grows. On the other hand, classical physics breaks down at sufficiently short length scales but is clearly correct at larger distances. The purpose of methods such as QM/MM is to gain the advantages of both quantum and classical regimes: quantum theory should provide accuracy at the shortest scales, and classical theory, with its somewhat more tractable computational demands, allows results to be computed for systems that would be inaccessible with a purely quantum approach. This strategy will be most effective when one knows with good accuracy the length scale at which quantum calculations are no longer necessary and classical calculations are sufficient. To this end, we have performed both classical and quantum calculations for systems comprising a small number of atoms for which experimental data is also available. The classical calculations are fully exact; the quantum calculations are at the MP4(SDTQ)/aug-cc-pV5Z and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z levels. The precision of both sets of calculations along with the existence of experimental results allows us to draw conclusions about the range of utility of the respective calculations. This research was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the NIH, NLM and utilized the computational resources of the NIH HPC Biowulf cluster.

  16. Quantum Phonon Optics: Squeezing Quantum Noise in the Atomic Displacements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Nori, F.

    1996-03-01

    We have investigated(X. Hu and F. Nori, Physical Review B, in press; preprints.) coherent and squeezed quantum states of phonons. Squeezed states are interesting because they allow the possibility of modulating the quantum fluctuations of atomic displacements below the zero-point quantum noise level of phonon vacuum states. We have studiedfootnotemark[1] the possibility of squeezing quantum noise in the atomic displacement using a polariton-based approach and also a method based on the three-phonon anharmonic interaction. Our focus here is on the first approach. We have diagonalized the polariton Hamiltonian and calculated the corresponding expectation values and fluctuations of both the atomic displacement and the lattice amplitude operators (the later is the phonon analog of the electric field operator for photons). Our results shows that squeezing of quantum fluctuations in the atomic displacements can be achieved with appropriate initial states of both photon and phonon fields. The degree of squeezing is directly related to the crystal susceptibility, which is indicative of the interaction strength between the incident light and the crystal.

  17. Optimal control of complex atomic quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    van Frank, S.; Bonneau, M.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Hild, S.; Gross, C.; Cheneau, M.; Bloch, I.; Pichler, T.; Negretti, A.; Calarco, T.; Montangero, S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum technologies will ultimately require manipulating many-body quantum systems with high precision. Cold atom experiments represent a stepping stone in that direction: a high degree of control has been achieved on systems of increasing complexity. However, this control is still sub-optimal. In many scenarios, achieving a fast transformation is crucial to fight against decoherence and imperfection effects. Optimal control theory is believed to be the ideal candidate to bridge the gap between early stage proof-of-principle demonstrations and experimental protocols suitable for practical applications. Indeed, it can engineer protocols at the quantum speed limit – the fastest achievable timescale of the transformation. Here, we demonstrate such potential by computing theoretically and verifying experimentally the optimal transformations in two very different interacting systems: the coherent manipulation of motional states of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the crossing of a quantum phase transition in small systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. We also show that such processes are robust with respect to perturbations, including temperature and atom number fluctuations. PMID:27725688

  18. Optimal control of complex atomic quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Frank, S.; Bonneau, M.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Hild, S.; Gross, C.; Cheneau, M.; Bloch, I.; Pichler, T.; Negretti, A.; Calarco, T.; Montangero, S.

    2016-10-01

    Quantum technologies will ultimately require manipulating many-body quantum systems with high precision. Cold atom experiments represent a stepping stone in that direction: a high degree of control has been achieved on systems of increasing complexity. However, this control is still sub-optimal. In many scenarios, achieving a fast transformation is crucial to fight against decoherence and imperfection effects. Optimal control theory is believed to be the ideal candidate to bridge the gap between early stage proof-of-principle demonstrations and experimental protocols suitable for practical applications. Indeed, it can engineer protocols at the quantum speed limit – the fastest achievable timescale of the transformation. Here, we demonstrate such potential by computing theoretically and verifying experimentally the optimal transformations in two very different interacting systems: the coherent manipulation of motional states of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the crossing of a quantum phase transition in small systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. We also show that such processes are robust with respect to perturbations, including temperature and atom number fluctuations.

  19. Quantum Phases of Atom-Molecule Mixtures of Fermionic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Nicolas

    2011-03-01

    Nicolas Lopez (University of California, Riverside, USA) Chi-Yong Lin (National Dong Hwa University, Taiwan) Shan-Wen Tsai (University of California, Riverside, USA) Cold atom experiments have realized a variety of multicomponent quantum mixtures, including Bose-Fermi atomic mixtures. Mixtures of fermionic atoms and diatomic molecules, which are boson, have also been obtained by tuning of the interactions with external fields. We study many-body correlations in such a system where the molecules are weakly bound and therefore pairs of fermionic atoms easily convert into and dissociate from the bound molecule state and this exchange mediates a long-range interaction between the fermions. We consider a simple many-body Hamiltonian that includes the destruction of fermionic atom pairs to form single bosonic molecules and vice versa. We employ a functional renomalization-group approach and calculate the renormalized frequency-dependent interaction vertices and fermion self-energies. We find an instability from the disordered quantum liquid phase to a BCS phase and calculate the energy scale for the transition. The unusual frequency-dependence of this mediated interaction leads to strong renormalization of the self-energy, and also affects the couplings in the BCS channel.

  20. Quantum Phases of Atom-Molecule Mixtures of Fermionic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Valdez, Nicolas; Tsai, Shan-Wen; Lin, Chi-Yong

    2010-03-01

    Cold atom experiments have realized a variety of multicomponent quantum mixtures, including Bose-Fermi atomic mixtures. Mixtures of fermionic atoms and diatomic molecules, which are boson, have also been obtained by tuning of the interactions with external fields [1]. We study many-body correlations in such a system where the molecules are weakly bound and therefore pairs of fermionic atoms easily convert into and dissociate from the bound molecule state. This exchange mediates a long-range interaction between the fermions. We consider a simple many-body Hamiltonian that includes the destruction of fermionic atom pairs to form single bosonic molecules and vice versa [2]. We employ a functional renomalization-group approach and calculate the renormalized frequency-dependent interaction vertices and fermion self-energies. We find an instability from the disordered quantum liquid phase to a BCS phase and calculate the energy scale for the transition. The unusual frequency-dependence of this mediated interaction leads to strong renormalization of the self-energy, and also affects the couplings in the BCS channel. [1] M. Greiner, C. A. Regal, J. T. Stewart, and D. S. Jin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 110401 (2005) [2] E. Timmermans, K. Furuya, P. W. Milonni, and A. K. Kerman, Phys. Lett. A 285, 228 (2001)

  1. Quantum Phases of Atom-Molecule Mixtures of Fermionic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Nicolas; Tsai, Shan-Wen; Timmermans, Eddy; Lin, Chi-Yong

    2011-05-01

    Cold atom experiments have realized a variety of multicomponent quantum mixtures, including Bose-Fermi atomic mixtures. Mixtures of fermionic atoms and diatomic molecules, which are boson, have also been obtained by tuning of the interactions with external fields. We study many-body correlations in such a system where the molecules are weakly bound and therefore pairs of fermionic atoms easily convert into and dissociate from the bound molecule state and this exchange mediates a long-range interaction between the fermions. We consider a simple many-body Hamiltonian that includes the destruction of fermionic atom pairs to form single bosonic molecules and vice versa. We employ a functional renomalization-group approach and calculate the renormalized frequency-dependent interaction vertices and fermion self-energies. We find an instability from the disordered quantum liquid phase to a BCS phase and calculate the energy scale for the transition. The unusual frequency-dependence of this mediated interaction leads to strong renormalization of the self-energy, and also affects the couplings in the BCS channel.

  2. Quantum-classical electron distributions in atoms and atomic ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, Joseph A.

    1988-01-01

    A quantum-classical approach is used to obtain the velocity distributions in atoms and positive and negative ions in both ground and excited states. In the analysis, Hartree-Fock electronic wavefunctions are used to determine the radial electron distributions, and the central-field approximation is used to study the the dynamic properties of the localized electrons. The distributions for the outer and inner shells are found to agree well with exact results obtained by numerical calculations.

  3. Quantum-Gas Microscope for Fermionic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheuk, Lawrence W.; Nichols, Matthew A.; Okan, Melih; Gersdorf, Thomas; Ramasesh, Vinay V.; Bakr, Waseem S.; Lompe, Thomas; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2015-05-01

    We realize a quantum-gas microscope for fermionic 40K atoms trapped in an optical lattice, which allows one to probe strongly correlated fermions at the single-atom level. We combine 3D Raman sideband cooling with high-resolution optics to simultaneously cool and image individual atoms with single-lattice-site resolution at a detection fidelity above 95%. The imaging process leaves the atoms predominantly in the 3D motional ground state of their respective lattice sites, inviting the implementation of a Maxwell's demon to assemble low-entropy many-body states. Single-site-resolved imaging of fermions enables the direct observation of magnetic order, time-resolved measurements of the spread of particle correlations, and the detection of many-fermion entanglement.

  4. Entanglement and quantum teleportation with multi-atom ensembles.

    PubMed

    Polzik, E S; Julsgaard, B; Sherson, J; Sørensen, J L

    2003-07-15

    Atomic ensembles containing a large number of atoms have been proved to be an effective medium for quantum-state (quantum information) engineering and processing via their coupling with multi-photon light pulses. The general mechanism of this coupling, which involves continuous quantum variables for light and atoms, is described. The efficient quantum interface between light and atoms has led to the recent demonstration of an entangled state of two macroscopic atomic objects, more precisely two caesium gas samples. Based on this result, a proposal for teleportation of an entangled state of two atomic samples (entanglement swapping) is presented.

  5. Cold Atoms, Statistical Physics and Quantum Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-22

    to be the development of robust theoretical techniques for the simulations of ultra-cold Bose gases and other quantum phenomena, such theoretical...finite-temperature effects in atom-chip interferometry of Bose -Einstein condensates, R. G. Scott, et al., Physical Review A, 063624 (2009). A copy of...March 2009. Mr Hodder was supported through a University of Otago Scholarship. He initially developed a simple single-site Hubbard model, which can be

  6. Quantum Control in an Atomic Spin System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. S.; Woods, W.; Potts, J. R.; Ponsor, S.; Gardner, J. R.

    1998-11-01

    The experimental work described here investigates the physics of coherent quantum control in an atomic spin system. This type of system is very attractive for precision studies of coherent control for a number of reasons, including the ease with which it may be manipulated experimentally and the relative simplicity of its theoretical description. To this end, we are studying quantum control of the spin wavefunction of ground state (F=3) ^85Rb atoms confined in a vapor-cell MOT. Application of uniform magnetic and optical fields to this system results in an anharmonic ladder of seven levels whose state can be manipulated arbitrarily using radio-frequency rotating magnetic fields. Using the optimal control formalism of Shi and Rabitz, we have developed a numerical model of this system which predicts the appropriate control pulse shape given the initial and desired final state of the system. As predicted, we find that the control pulse which causes a given system evolution is not unique, allowing the construction of control pulses with multiple goals, such as evolution through specified intermediate states. This freedom should allow for the construction of control pulses that both produce the desired final state and are robust to decoherence effects. This type of precise control may find application in the development of quantum computation devices as well as in other types of nano-technology. An experimental implementation of quantum control in this system, already underway in our lab, will be presented.

  7. Atomic scale quantum circuits in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusko, A.; Korkusinski, M.; Saraiva, A.; Delgado, A.; Koiller, B.; Hawrylak, P.

    The atomic scale circuits in Si are now realized by manipulation of dangling bonds on Si surface or incorporating dopant atoms in Si by STM techniques. We describe the electronic properties of these atomic scale quantum dot circuits (QDC) by the extended Hubbard-Kanamori Hamiltonian (HK), including on site Coulomb repulsion (U) and interdot hopping (t) , direct interaction (V) and exchange (J) terms. The interdot terms strongly depend on dopant position (RD) in Si lattice--small changes in RD strongly impact t, Vand J. We study how disorder in RD impacts QDC electronic properties, in particular the interplay of disorder and interactions. With no disorder in RD the energy spectrum (ES) of quantum dot chain at half-filling as a function of U / t (V , J = 0) shows a transition from ES dominated by kinetic energy (U / t < < 1) to ES dominated by Coulomb interactions for U / t > > 1 . The excited states group by single particle energy spacing (Hubbard bands) for weak (strong) interactions. In the weak interaction regime, disorder leads to localization, which strongly affects the electronic properties. We explore the effect of interactions and disorder on HK atomic scale circuits and potential many-body localized phases using Lanczos and Density Matrix Renormalization Group approaches.

  8. Quantum Gas Microscope for Fermionic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okan, Melih; Cheuk, Lawrence; Nichols, Matthew; Lawrence, Katherine; Zhang, Hao; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Strongly interacting fermions define the properties of complex matter throughout nature, from atomic nuclei and modern solid state materials to neutron stars. Ultracold atomic Fermi gases have emerged as a pristine platform for the study of many-fermion systems. In this poster we demonstrate the realization of a quantum gas microscope for fermionic 40 K atoms trapped in an optical lattice and the recent experiments which allows one to probe strongly correlated fermions at the single atom level. We combine 3D Raman sideband cooling with high- resolution optics to simultaneously cool and image individual atoms with single lattice site resolution at a detection fidelity above 95%. The imaging process leaves the atoms predominantly in the 3D motional ground state of their respective lattice sites, inviting the implementation of a Maxwell's demon to assemble low-entropy many-body states. Single-site resolved imaging of fermions enables the direct observation of magnetic order, time resolved measurements of the spread of particle correlations, and the detection of many-fermion entanglement. NSF, AFOSR-PECASE, AFOSR-MURI on Exotic Phases of Matter, ARO-MURI on Atomtronics, ONR, a Grant from the Army Research Office with funding from the DARPA OLE program, and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

  9. Quantum control and quantum tomography on neutral atom qudits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa Martinez, Hector

    Neutral atom systems are an appealing platform for the development and testing of quantum control and measurement techniques. This dissertation presents experimental investigations of control and measurement tools using as a testbed the 16-dimensional hyperfine manifold associated with the electronic ground state of cesium atoms. On the control side, we present an experimental realization of a protocol to implement robust unitary transformations in the presence of static and dynamic perturbations. We also present an experimental realization of inhomogeneous quantum control. Specifically, we demonstrate our ability to perform two different unitary transformations on atoms that see different light shifts from an optical addressing field. On the measurement side, we present experimental realizations of quantum state and process tomography. The state tomography project encompasses a comprehensive evaluation of several measurement strategies and state estimation algorithms. Our experimental results show that in the presence of experimental imperfections, there is a clear tradeoff between accuracy, efficiency and robustness in the reconstruction. The process tomography project involves an experimental demonstration of efficient reconstruction by using a set of intelligent probe states. Experimental results show that we are able to reconstruct unitary maps in Hilbert spaces with dimension ranging from d=4 to d=16. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a unitary process in d=16 is successfully reconstructed in the laboratory.

  10. Quantum dynamics in ultracold atomic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiong-Yi; Reid, Margaret D.; Opanchuk, Bogdan; Polkinghorne, Rodney; Rosales-Zárate, Laura E. C.; Drummond, Peter D.

    2012-02-01

    We review recent developments in the theory of quantum dynamics in ultracold atomic physics, including exact techniques and methods based on phase-space mappings that are applicable when the complexity becomes exponentially large. Phase-space representations include the truncated Wigner, positive- P and general Gaussian operator representations which can treat both bosons and fermions. These phase-space methods include both traditional approaches using a phase-space of classical dimension, and more recent methods that use a non-classical phase-space of increased dimensionality. Examples used include quantum Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) entanglement of a four-mode BEC, time-reversal tests of dephasing in single-mode traps, BEC quantum collisions with up to 106 modes and 105 interacting particles, quantum interferometry in a multi-mode trap with nonlinear absorption, and the theory of quantum entropy in phase-space. We also treat the approach of variational optimization of the sampling error, giving an elementary example of a nonlinear oscillator.

  11. Quantum entanglement in multiparticle systems of two-level atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Deb, Ram Narayan

    2011-09-15

    We propose the necessary and sufficient condition for the presence of quantum entanglement in arbitrary symmetric pure states of two-level atomic systems. We introduce a parameter to quantify quantum entanglement in such systems. We express the inherent quantum fluctuations of a composite system of two-level atoms as a sum of the quantum fluctuations of the individual constituent atoms and their correlation terms. This helps to separate out and study solely the quantum correlations among the atoms and obtain the criterion for the presence of entanglement in such multiatomic systems.

  12. Implementing quantum electrodynamics with ultracold atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, V.; Hebenstreit, F.; Jendrzejewski, F.; Oberthaler, M. K.; Berges, J.

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the experimental engineering of model systems for the description of quantum electrodynamics (QED) in one spatial dimension via a mixture of bosonic 23Na and fermionic 6Li atoms. The local gauge symmetry is realized in an optical superlattice, using heteronuclear boson–fermion spin-changing interactions which preserve the total spin in every local collision. We consider a large number of bosons residing in the coherent state of a Bose–Einstein condensate on each link between the fermion lattice sites, such that the behavior of lattice QED in the continuum limit can be recovered. The discussion about the range of possible experimental parameters builds, in particular, upon experiences with related setups of fermions interacting with coherent samples of bosonic atoms. We determine the atomic system’s parameters required for the description of fundamental QED processes, such as Schwinger pair production and string breaking. This is achieved by benchmark calculations of the atomic system and of QED itself using functional integral techniques. Our results demonstrate that the dynamics of one-dimensional QED may be realized with ultracold atoms using state-of-the-art experimental resources. The experimental setup proposed may provide a unique access to longstanding open questions for which classical computational methods are no longer applicable.

  13. Bohr's Creation of his Quantum Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbron, John

    2013-04-01

    Fresh letters throw new light on the content and state of Bohr's mind before and during his creation of the quantum atom. His mental furniture then included the atomic models of the English school, the quantum puzzles of Continental theorists, and the results of his own studies of the electron theory of metals. It also included the poetry of Goethe, plays of Ibsen and Shakespeare, novels of Dickens, and rhapsodies of Kierkegaard and Carlyle. The mind that held these diverse ingredients together oscillated between enthusiasm and dejection during the year in which Bohr took up the problem of atomic structure. He spent most of that year in England, which separated him for extended periods from his close-knit family and friends. Correspondence with his fianc'ee, Margrethe Nørlund, soon to be published, reports his ups and downs as he adjusted to J.J. Thomson, Ernest Rutherford, the English language, and the uneven course of his work. In helping to smooth out his moods, Margrethe played an important and perhaps an enabling role in his creative process.

  14. Cold atom quantum emulation of ultrafast processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Shankari; Geiger, Zachary; Fujiwara, Kurt; Singh, Kevin; Senaratne, Ruwan; Weld, David

    2016-05-01

    Pulsed lasers are an invaluable probe of fast electron dynamics in condensed matter systems. However, despite tremendous progress, physical limitations on lasers and a lack of exact theoretical models still limit the exploration of ultrafast processes in solids. We discuss a possible complementary approach, in which lattice-trapped cold neutral atoms driven far from equilibrium are used as a quantum emulator of ultrafast physics at sub-cycle timescales. The cold atom context is in many ways a natural choice for such experiments: equilibration timescales are more than ten orders of magnitude slower than those in solids, and strong driving forces are easily produced and manipulated. Our experimental approach uses ultracold strontium in optical traps. Multiple stable isotopes and a long-lived metastable state provide control over interaction strengths, while a narrow-linewidth transition expands the typical cold-atom toolbox of readout techniques. We discuss initial efforts in quantum emulation of tunnel ionization and development of a platform for more complicated endeavors, including the study of multiple-pulse sequences and recollision processes. We acknowledge support from the NSF GRFP, the AFOSR, the ARO and DURIP program, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the University of California Office of the President.

  15. Multi-Million Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shocked Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    chose this system for two reasons: First, accurate and widely tested atomistic models are available (van Beest et. al., 1990; Yuan and Cormack...Surface (PES) We have identified a model of silica (van Beest et. al., 1990) that has been extensively tested and that predicts several polymorphic...states (Saika-Voivod et. al., 2004). This model, hereafter denoted as the BKS model after its authors (van Beest et. al., 1990), assumes that the

  16. Entanglement of single-atom quantum bits at a distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehring, D. L.; Maunz, P.; Olmschenk, S.; Younge, K. C.; Matsukevich, D. N.; Duan, L.-M.; Monroe, C.

    2007-09-01

    Quantum information science involves the storage, manipulation and communication of information encoded in quantum systems, where the phenomena of superposition and entanglement can provide enhancements over what is possible classically. Large-scale quantum information processors require stable and addressable quantum memories, usually in the form of fixed quantum bits (qubits), and a means of transferring and entangling the quantum information between memories that may be separated by macroscopic or even geographic distances. Atomic systems are excellent quantum memories, because appropriate internal electronic states can coherently store qubits over very long timescales. Photons, on the other hand, are the natural platform for the distribution of quantum information between remote qubits, given their ability to traverse large distances with little perturbation. Recently, there has been considerable progress in coupling small samples of atomic gases through photonic channels, including the entanglement between light and atoms and the observation of entanglement signatures between remotely located atomic ensembles. In contrast to atomic ensembles, single-atom quantum memories allow the implementation of conditional quantum gates through photonic channels, a key requirement for quantum computing. Along these lines, individual atoms have been coupled to photons in cavities, and trapped atoms have been linked to emitted photons in free space. Here we demonstrate the entanglement of two fixed single-atom quantum memories separated by one metre. Two remotely located trapped atomic ions each emit a single photon, and the interference and detection of these photons signals the entanglement of the atomic qubits. We characterize the entangled pair by directly measuring qubit correlations with near-perfect detection efficiency. Although this entanglement method is probabilistic, it is still in principle useful for subsequent quantum operations and scalable quantum

  17. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    You, J Q; Nori, Franco

    2011-06-29

    Superconducting circuits based on Josephson junctions exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence and can behave like artificial atoms. Recent technological advances have made it possible to implement atomic-physics and quantum-optics experiments on a chip using these artificial atoms. This Review presents a brief overview of the progress achieved so far in this rapidly advancing field. We not only discuss phenomena analogous to those in atomic physics and quantum optics with natural atoms, but also highlight those not occurring in natural atoms. In addition, we summarize several prospective directions in this emerging interdisciplinary field.

  18. Modeling of atomic systems for atomic clocks and quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Bindiya

    This dissertation reports the modeling of atomic systems for atomic clocks and quantum information. This work is motivated by the prospects of optical frequency standards with trapped ions and the quantum computation proposals with neutral atoms in optical lattices. Extensive calculations of the electric-dipole matrix elements in monovalent atoms are conducted using the relativistic all-order method. This approach is a linearized version of the coupled-cluster method, which sums infinite sets of many-body perturbation theory terms. All allowed transitions between the lowest ns, np1/2, np 3/2 states and a large number of excited states of alkali-metal atoms are evaluated using the all-order method. For Ca+ ion, additional allowed transitions between nd5/2, np 3/2, nf5/2, nf 7/2 states and a large number of excited states are evaluated. We combine D1 lines measurements by Miller et al. [18] with our all-order calculations to determine the values of the electric-dipole matrix elements for the 4pj - 3d j' transitions in K and for the 5pj - 4dj' transitions in Rb to high precision. The resulting electric-dipole matrix elements are used for the high-precision calculation of frequency-dependent polarizabilities of ground state of alkali atoms. Our values of static polarizabilities are found to be in excellent agreement with available experiments. Calculations were done for the wavelength in the range 300--1600 nm, with particular attention to wavelengths of common infrared lasers. We parameterize our results so that they can be extended accurately to arbitrary wavelengths above 800 nm. Our data can be used to predict the oscillation frequencies of optically-trapped atoms, and particularly the ratios of frequencies of different species held in the same trap. We identify wavelengths at which two different alkali atoms have the same oscillation frequency. We present results of all-order calculations of static and frequency-dependent polarizabilities of excited np1/2 and np3

  19. Atomically thin quantum light-emitting diodes

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Berraquero, Carmen; Barbone, Matteo; Kara, Dhiren M.; Chen, Xiaolong; Goykhman, Ilya; Yoon, Duhee; Ott, Anna K.; Beitner, Jan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Atatüre, Mete

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides are optically active, layered materials promising for fast optoelectronics and on-chip photonics. We demonstrate electrically driven single-photon emission from localized sites in tungsten diselenide and tungsten disulphide. To achieve this, we fabricate a light-emitting diode structure comprising single-layer graphene, thin hexagonal boron nitride and transition metal dichalcogenide mono- and bi-layers. Photon correlation measurements are used to confirm the single-photon nature of the spectrally sharp emission. These results present the transition metal dichalcogenide family as a platform for hybrid, broadband, atomically precise quantum photonics devices. PMID:27667022

  20. Atomically thin quantum light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios-Berraquero, Carmen; Barbone, Matteo; Kara, Dhiren M.; Chen, Xiaolong; Goykhman, Ilya; Yoon, Duhee; Ott, Anna K.; Beitner, Jan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Atatüre, Mete

    2016-09-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides are optically active, layered materials promising for fast optoelectronics and on-chip photonics. We demonstrate electrically driven single-photon emission from localized sites in tungsten diselenide and tungsten disulphide. To achieve this, we fabricate a light-emitting diode structure comprising single-layer graphene, thin hexagonal boron nitride and transition metal dichalcogenide mono- and bi-layers. Photon correlation measurements are used to confirm the single-photon nature of the spectrally sharp emission. These results present the transition metal dichalcogenide family as a platform for hybrid, broadband, atomically precise quantum photonics devices.

  1. A Green's function quantum average atom model

    DOE PAGES

    Starrett, Charles Edward

    2015-05-21

    A quantum average atom model is reformulated using Green's functions. This allows integrals along the real energy axis to be deformed into the complex plane. The advantage being that sharp features such as resonances and bound states are broadened by a Lorentzian with a half-width chosen for numerical convenience. An implementation of this method therefore avoids numerically challenging resonance tracking and the search for weakly bound states, without changing the physical content or results of the model. A straightforward implementation results in up to a factor of 5 speed-up relative to an optimized orbital based code.

  2. Trapping atoms using nanoscale quantum vacuum forces.

    PubMed

    Chang, D E; Sinha, K; Taylor, J M; Kimble, H J

    2014-07-10

    Quantum vacuum forces dictate the interaction between individual atoms and dielectric surfaces at nanoscale distances. For example, their large strengths typically overwhelm externally applied forces, which makes it challenging to controllably interface cold atoms with nearby nanophotonic systems. Here we theoretically show that it is possible to tailor the vacuum forces themselves to provide strong trapping potentials. Our proposed trapping scheme takes advantage of the attractive ground-state potential and adiabatic dressing with an excited state whose potential is engineered to be resonantly enhanced and repulsive. This procedure yields a strong metastable trap, with the fraction of excited-state population scaling inversely with the quality factor of the resonance of the dielectric structure. We analyse realistic limitations to the trap lifetime and discuss possible applications that might emerge from the large trap depths and nanoscale confinement.

  3. Quantum Computation by Optically Coupled Steady Atoms/Quantum-Dots Inside a Quantum Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, P.; Wang, K. L.; Roychowdhury, V. P.; Anantram, M. P.; Mor, T.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We present a model for quantum computation using $n$ steady 3-level atoms kept inside a quantum cavity, or using $n$ quantum-dots (QDs) kept inside a quantum cavity. In this model one external laser is pointed towards all the atoms/QDs, and $n$ pairs of electrodes are addressing the atoms/QDs, so that each atom is addressed by one pair. The energy levels of each atom/QD are controlled by an external Stark field given to the atom/QD by its external pair of electrodes. Transition between two energy levels of an individual atom/ QD are controlled by the voltage on its electrodes, and by the external laser. Interactions between two atoms/ QDs are performed with the additional help of the cavity mode (using on-resonance condition). Laser frequency, cavity frequency, and energy levels are far off-resonance most of the time, and they are brought to the resonance (using the Stark effect) only at the time of operations. Steps for a controlled-NOT gate between any two atoms/QDs have been described for this model. Our model demands some challenging technological efforts, such as manufacturing single-electron QDs inside a cavity. However, it promises big advantages over other existing models which are currently implemented, and might enable a much easier scale-up, to compute with many more qubits.

  4. Atom-chip-based generation of entanglement for quantum metrology.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Max F; Böhi, Pascal; Li, Yun; Hänsch, Theodor W; Sinatra, Alice; Treutlein, Philipp

    2010-04-22

    Atom chips provide a versatile quantum laboratory for experiments with ultracold atomic gases. They have been used in diverse experiments involving low-dimensional quantum gases, cavity quantum electrodynamics, atom-surface interactions, and chip-based atomic clocks and interferometers. However, a severe limitation of atom chips is that techniques to control atomic interactions and to generate entanglement have not been experimentally available so far. Such techniques enable chip-based studies of entangled many-body systems and are a key prerequisite for atom chip applications in quantum simulations, quantum information processing and quantum metrology. Here we report the experimental generation of multi-particle entanglement on an atom chip by controlling elastic collisional interactions with a state-dependent potential. We use this technique to generate spin-squeezed states of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate; such states are a useful resource for quantum metrology. The observed reduction in spin noise of -3.7 +/- 0.4 dB, combined with the spin coherence, implies four-partite entanglement between the condensate atoms; this could be used to improve an interferometric measurement by -2.5 +/- 0.6 dB over the standard quantum limit. Our data show good agreement with a dynamical multi-mode simulation and allow us to reconstruct the Wigner function of the spin-squeezed condensate. The techniques reported here could be directly applied to chip-based atomic clocks, currently under development.

  5. Cold atom dynamics in a quantum optical lattice potential.

    PubMed

    Maschler, Christoph; Ritsch, Helmut

    2005-12-31

    We study a generalized cold atom Bose-Hubbard model, where the periodic optical potential is formed by a cavity field with quantum properties. On the one hand, the common coupling of all atoms to the same mode introduces cavity-mediated long-range atom-atom interactions, and, on the other hand, atomic backaction on the field introduces atom-field entanglement. This modifies the properties of the associated quantum phase transitions and allows for new correlated atom-field states, including superposition of different atomic quantum phases. After deriving an approximative Hamiltonian including the new long-range interaction terms, we exhibit central physical phenomena at generic configurations of few atoms in few wells. We find strong modifications of population fluctuations and next-nearest-neighbor correlations near the phase transition point.

  6. Coherent quantum depletion of an interacting atom condensate.

    PubMed

    Kira, M

    2015-03-13

    Sufficiently strong interactions promote coherent quantum transitions in spite of thermalization and losses, which are the adversaries of delicate effects such as reversibility and correlations. In atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), strong atom-atom interactions can eject atoms from the BEC to the normal component, yielding quantum depletion instead of temperature depletion. A recent experiment has already been verified to overcome losses. Here I show that it also achieves coherent quantum-depletion dynamics in a BEC swept fast enough from weak to strong atom-atom interactions. The elementary coherent process first excites the normal component into a liquid state that evolves into a spherical shell state, where the atom occupation peaks at a finite momentum to shield 50% of the BEC atoms from annihilation. The identified coherent processes resemble ultrafast semiconductor excitations expanding the scope of BEC explorations to many-body non-equilibrium studies.

  7. Layered quantum Hall insulators with ultracold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora, A.; Szirmai, G.; Lewenstein, M.

    2011-11-15

    We consider a generalization of the two-dimensional (2D) quantum Hall insulator to a noncompact, non-Abelian gauge group, the Heisenberg-Weyl group. We show that this kind of insulator is actually a layered three-dimensional (3D) insulator with nontrivial topology. We further show that nontrivial combinations of quantized transverse conductivities can be engineered with the help of a staggered potential. We investigate the robustness and topological nature of this conductivity and connect it to the surface modes of the system. We also propose a simple experimental realization with ultracold atoms in 3D confined to a 2D square lattice with the third dimension being mapped to a gauge coordinate.

  8. Steady state quantum discord for circularly accelerated atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jiawei; Yu, Hongwei

    2015-12-15

    We study, in the framework of open quantum systems, the dynamics of quantum entanglement and quantum discord of two mutually independent circularly accelerated two-level atoms in interaction with a bath of fluctuating massless scalar fields in the Minkowski vacuum. We assume that the two atoms rotate synchronically with their separation perpendicular to the rotating plane. The time evolution of the quantum entanglement and quantum discord of the two-atom system is investigated. For a maximally entangled initial state, the entanglement measured by concurrence diminishes to zero within a finite time, while the quantum discord can either decrease monotonically to an asymptotic value or diminish to zero at first and then followed by a revival depending on whether the initial state is antisymmetric or symmetric. When both of the two atoms are initially excited, the generation of quantum entanglement shows a delayed feature, while quantum discord is created immediately. Remarkably, the quantum discord for such a circularly accelerated two-atom system takes a nonvanishing value in the steady state, and this is distinct from what happens in both the linear acceleration case and the case of static atoms immersed in a thermal bath.

  9. Quantum Teleportation of High-dimensional Atomic Momenta State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qurban, Misbah; Abbas, Tasawar; Rameez-ul-Islam; Ikram, Manzoor

    2016-06-01

    Atomic momenta states of the neutral atoms are known to be decoherence resistant and therefore present a viable solution for most of the quantum information tasks including the quantum teleportation. We present a systematic protocol for the teleportation of high-dimensional quantized momenta atomic states to the field state inside the cavities by applying standard cavity QED techniques. The proposal can be executed under prevailing experimental scenario.

  10. Quantum Network of Atom Clocks: A Possible Implementation with Neutral Atoms.

    PubMed

    Kómár, P; Topcu, T; Kessler, E M; Derevianko, A; Vuletić, V; Ye, J; Lukin, M D

    2016-08-05

    We propose a protocol for creating a fully entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state of neutral atoms in spatially separated optical atomic clocks. In our scheme, local operations make use of the strong dipole-dipole interaction between Rydberg excitations, which give rise to fast and reliable quantum operations involving all atoms in the ensemble. The necessary entanglement between distant ensembles is mediated by single-photon quantum channels and collectively enhanced light-matter couplings. These techniques can be used to create the recently proposed quantum clock network based on neutral atom optical clocks. We specifically analyze a possible realization of this scheme using neutral Yb ensembles.

  11. Quantum Network of Atom Clocks: A Possible Implementation with Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kómár, P.; Topcu, T.; Kessler, E. M.; Derevianko, A.; Vuletić, V.; Ye, J.; Lukin, M. D.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a protocol for creating a fully entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state of neutral atoms in spatially separated optical atomic clocks. In our scheme, local operations make use of the strong dipole-dipole interaction between Rydberg excitations, which give rise to fast and reliable quantum operations involving all atoms in the ensemble. The necessary entanglement between distant ensembles is mediated by single-photon quantum channels and collectively enhanced light-matter couplings. These techniques can be used to create the recently proposed quantum clock network based on neutral atom optical clocks. We specifically analyze a possible realization of this scheme using neutral Yb ensembles.

  12. Quantum-mechanical transport equation for atomic systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical transport equation (QMTE) is derived which should be applicable to a wide range of problems involving the interaction of radiation with atoms or molecules which are also subject to collisions with perturber atoms. The equation follows the time evolution of the macroscopic atomic density matrix elements of atoms located at classical position R and moving with classical velocity v. It is quantum mechanical in the sense that all collision kernels or rates which appear have been obtained from a quantum-mechanical theory and, as such, properly take into account the energy-level variations and velocity changes of the active (emitting or absorbing) atom produced in collisions with perturber atoms. The present formulation is better suited to problems involving high-intensity external fields, such as those encountered in laser physics.

  13. Nanophotonic quantum phase switch with a single atom.

    PubMed

    Tiecke, T G; Thompson, J D; de Leon, N P; Liu, L R; Vuletić, V; Lukin, M D

    2014-04-10

    By analogy to transistors in classical electronic circuits, quantum optical switches are important elements of quantum circuits and quantum networks. Operated at the fundamental limit where a single quantum of light or matter controls another field or material system, such a switch may enable applications such as long-distance quantum communication, distributed quantum information processing and metrology, and the exploration of novel quantum states of matter. Here, by strongly coupling a photon to a single atom trapped in the near field of a nanoscale photonic crystal cavity, we realize a system in which a single atom switches the phase of a photon and a single photon modifies the atom's phase. We experimentally demonstrate an atom-induced optical phase shift that is nonlinear at the two-photon level, a photon number router that separates individual photons and photon pairs into different output modes, and a single-photon switch in which a single 'gate' photon controls the propagation of a subsequent probe field. These techniques pave the way to integrated quantum nanophotonic networks involving multiple atomic nodes connected by guided light.

  14. Quantum Monte Carlo for atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, R.N.

    1989-11-01

    The diffusion quantum Monte Carlo with fixed nodes (QMC) approach has been employed in studying energy-eigenstates for 1--4 electron systems. Previous work employing the diffusion QMC technique yielded energies of high quality for H{sub 2}, LiH, Li{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O. Here, the range of calculations with this new approach has been extended to include additional first-row atoms and molecules. In addition, improvements in the previously computed fixed-node energies of LiH, Li{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O have been obtained using more accurate trial functions. All computations were performed within, but are not limited to, the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. In our computations, the effects of variation of Monte Carlo parameters on the QMC solution of the Schroedinger equation were studied extensively. These parameters include the time step, renormalization time and nodal structure. These studies have been very useful in determining which choices of such parameters will yield accurate QMC energies most efficiently. Generally, very accurate energies (90--100% of the correlation energy is obtained) have been computed with single-determinant trail functions multiplied by simple correlation functions. Improvements in accuracy should be readily obtained using more complex trial functions.

  15. Nanophotonic quantum computer based on atomic quantum transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, S N; Moiseev, S A

    2015-10-31

    We propose a scheme of a quantum computer based on nanophotonic elements: two buses in the form of nanowaveguide resonators, two nanosized units of multiatom multiqubit quantum memory and a set of nanoprocessors in the form of photonic quantum transistors, each containing a pair of nanowaveguide ring resonators coupled via a quantum dot. The operation modes of nanoprocessor photonic quantum transistors are theoretically studied and the execution of main logical operations by means of them is demonstrated. We also discuss the prospects of the proposed nanophotonic quantum computer for operating in high-speed optical fibre networks. (quantum computations)

  16. A quantum network with atoms and photons (QNET-AP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Ronald E.; Lee, Patricia; Deacon, Keith S.; Tunick, Arnold; Quraishi, Qudsia; Stack, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Enabling secure communication, unparalleled computing capabilities, and fundamental nonlocality physics exploration, the development of quantum repeaters is the key quantum information processing technology advance needed for implementing real world quantum networks beyond the laboratory environment. Currently, components exist for intra-laboratory quantum networks but no system exists for connecting distant ( 1 km ) quantum memories in the real world. We present a physics analysis of quantum repeater network designs for intracity optical fiber connections between nodes based on atomic memories and linear optics. Long distances will necessitate the use of (1) two-photon Hong-Ou-Mandel style interference between atomic ensembles for entanglement swapping, and (2) photonic qubit wavelength conversion between atomic emissions and photons at telecommunication wavelengths in fiber. We report on our experimental progress towards implementing A Quantum Network with Atoms and Photons (QNET-AP), a quantum repeater network test-bed, between the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland (UMD).

  17. Quantum Atomic Clock Synchronization: An Entangled Concept of Nonlocal Simultaneity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, D.; Dowling, J.; Williams, C.; Jozsa, R.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate that two spatially separated parties (Alice and Bob) can utilize shared prior quantum entanglement, as well as a classical information channel, to establish a synchronized pair of atomic clocks.

  18. The Quantum Atomic Model "Electronium": A Successful Teaching Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budde, Marion; Niedderer, Hans; Scott, Philip; Leach, John

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the quantum atomic model Electronium. Outlines the Bremen teaching approach in which this model is used, and analyzes the learning of two students as they progress through the teaching unit. (Author/MM)

  19. Quantum memory, entanglement and sensing with room temperature atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K.; Wasilewski, W.; Krauter, H.; Fernholz, T.; Nielsen, B. M.; Petersen, J. M.; Renema, J. J.; Balabas, M. V.; Owari, M.; Plenio, M. B.; Serafini, A.; Wolf, M. M.; Muschik, C. A.; Cirac, J. I.; Müller, J. H.; Polzik, E. S.

    2011-01-01

    Room temperature atomic ensembles in a spin-protected environment are useful systems both for quantum information science and metrology. Here we utilize a setup consisting of two atomic ensembles as a memory for quantum information initially encoded in the polarization state of two entangled light modes. We also use the ensembles as a radio frequency entanglement-assisted magnetometer with projection noise limited sensitivity below femtoTesla/. The performance of the quantum memory as well as the magnetometer was improved by spin-squeezed or entangled atomic states generated by quantum non demolition measurements. Finally, we present preliminary results of long lived entangled atomic states generated by dissipation. With the method presented, one should be able to generate an entangled steady state.

  20. Voltage-controlled quantum light from an atomically thin semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chitraleema; Kinnischtzke, Laura; Goodfellow, Kenneth M; Beams, Ryan; Vamivakas, A Nick

    2015-06-01

    Although semiconductor defects can often be detrimental to device performance, they are also responsible for the breadth of functionality exhibited by modern optoelectronic devices. Artificially engineered defects (so-called quantum dots) or naturally occurring defects in solids are currently being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to high-resolution metrology. In parallel, the quantum confinement exhibited by atomically thin materials (semi-metals, semiconductors and insulators) has ushered in an era of flatland optoelectronics whose full potential is still being articulated. In this Letter we demonstrate the possibility of leveraging the atomically thin semiconductor tungsten diselenide (WSe2) as a host for quantum dot-like defects. We report that this previously unexplored solid-state quantum emitter in WSe2 generates single photons with emission properties that can be controlled via the application of external d.c. electric and magnetic fields. These new optically active quantum dots exhibit excited-state lifetimes on the order of 1 ns and remarkably large excitonic g-factors of 10. It is anticipated that WSe2 quantum dots will provide a novel platform for integrated solid-state quantum photonics and quantum information processing, as well as a rich condensed-matter physics playground with which to explore the coupling of quantum dots and atomically thin semiconductors.

  1. Quantum simulation of disordered systems with cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garreau, Jean-Claude

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the physics of quantum disorder in relation with a series of experiments using laser-cooled atoms exposed to "kicks" of a standing wave, realizing a paradigmatic model of quantum chaos, the kicked rotor. This dynamical system can be mapped onto a tight-binding Hamiltonian with pseudo-disorder, formally equivalent to the Anderson model of quantum disorder, with quantum chaos playing the role of disorder. This provides a very good quantum simulator for the Anderson physics. xml:lang="fr"

  2. Quantum Electrodynamics Effects in Heavy Ions and Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Shabaev, V. M.; Andreev, O. V.; Bondarev, A. I.; Glazov, D. A.; Kozhedub, Y. S.; Maiorova, A. V.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Plunien, G.; Volotka, A. V.

    2011-05-11

    Quantum electrodynamics theory of heavy ions and atoms is considered. The current status of calculations of the binding energies, the hyperfine splitting and g factor values in heavy few-electron ions is reviewed. The theoretical predictions are compared with available experimental data. A special attention is focused on tests of quantum electrodynamics in strong electromagnetic fields and on determination of the fundamental constants. Recent progress in calculations of the parity nonconservation effects with heavy atoms and ions is also reported.

  3. Spectroscopy of atomic and molecular ions using quantum logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, P. O.; Rosenband, T.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Bergquist, J. C.; Wineland, D. J.

    2006-10-01

    Recently developed techniques for quantum computation using trapped ions allow precise coherent control of the internal and external states of single atoms. Here we report how these techniques can be employed to perform precision spectroscopy of atomic and molecular ions that lack accessible transitions for laser cooling and detection. Furthermore, we discuss how quantum logic can be used to laser-cool molecules to near their rotational and vibrational ground state by avoiding detrimental spontaneous emission of photons from the molecule.

  4. Single-Atom Single-Photon Quantum Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehring, David; Bochmann, Joerg; Muecke, Martin; Specht, Holger; Weber, Bernhard; Wilk, Tatjana; Rempe, Gerhard

    2008-05-01

    By combining atom trapping techniques and cavity cooling schemes we are able to trap a single neutral atom inside a high-finesse cavity for several tens of seconds. We show that our coupled atom-cavity system can be used to generate single photons in a controlled way. With our long trapping times and high single-photon production efficiency, the non-classical properties of the emitted light can be shown in the photon correlations of a single atom. In a similar atom-cavity setup, we investigate the interface between atoms and photons by entangling a single atom with a single photon emitted into the cavity and by further mapping the quantum state of the atom onto a second single photon. These schemes are intrinsically deterministic and establish the basic element required to realize a distributed quantum network with individual atoms at rest as quantum memories and single flying photons as quantum messengers. This work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, and the European Union SCALA and CONQUEST programs. D. L. M. acknowledges support from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  5. Photon Pairs for Scalable Quantum Communication with Atomic Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmich, A.; Bowen, W. P.; Boozer, A. D.; Boca, A.; Chou, C.; Duan, L.-M.; Kimble, H. J.

    2003-05-01

    Quantum information science attempts to exploit capabilities from the quantum realm to accomplish tasks that are otherwise impossible in the classical domain. In this regard, a significant advance is the invention of a protocol by Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) for the realization of scalable long distance quantum communication and the distribution of entanglement over quantum networks [1]. Here we report the first enabling step in the realization of the protocol of DLCZ, namely the observation of quantum correlations for photon pairs generated in the collective emission from an atomic ensemble. An optically thick sample of three-level atoms in a lambda-configuration is exploited to produce correlated photons. The atomic sample for our experiment is provided by Cesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We find a significant violation of the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality clearly demonstrating the nonclassical character of the correlations between the two photons generated by sequential (write,read) beams. Moreover, the measured coincidence rates clearly demonstrate the cooperative nature of the emission process. These capabilities should help to enable other advances in the field of quantum information, including the implementation of quantum memory and fully controllable single-photon sources, which, combined together, pave the avenue for realization of universal quantum computation. [1] L.-M. Duan, M. Lukin, J. I. Cirac, and P. Zoller, Nature 414, 413 (2001).

  6. Quantum-Classical Connection for Hydrogen Atom-Like Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syam, Debapriyo; Roy, Arup

    2011-01-01

    The Bohr-Sommerfeld quantum theory specifies the rules of quantization for circular and elliptical orbits for a one-electron hydrogen atom-like system. This article illustrates how a formula connecting the principal quantum number "n" and the length of the major axis of an elliptical orbit may be arrived at starting from the quantum…

  7. Ultracold atoms for simulation of many body quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, David A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Feynman famously proposed simulating quantum physics using other, better controlled, quantum systems. This vision is now a reality within the realm of ultracold atomic physics. We discuss how these systems can be used to simulate many body physics, concentrating the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in 2D physics and the role of disorder.

  8. A Quantum Model of Atoms (the Energy Levels of Atoms).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafie, Francois

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the model for all atoms which was developed on the same basis as Bohr's model for the hydrogen atom. Calculates the radii and the energies of the orbits. Demonstrates how the model obeys the de Broglie's hypothesis that the moving electron exhibits both wave and particle properties. (Author/ASK)

  9. Quantum Rabi model in the Brillouin zone with ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felicetti, Simone; Rico, Enrique; Sabin, Carlos; Ockenfels, Till; Koch, Johannes; Leder, Martin; Grossert, Christopher; Weitz, Martin; Solano, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    The quantum Rabi model describes the interaction between a two-level quantum system and a single bosonic mode. We propose a method to perform a quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi model, introducing an implementation of the two-level system provided by the occupation of Bloch bands in the first Brillouin zone by ultracold atoms in tailored optical lattices. The effective qubit interacts with a quantum harmonic oscillator implemented in an optical dipole trap. Our realistic proposal allows one to experimentally investigate the quantum Rabi model for extreme parameter regimes, which are not achievable with natural light-matter interactions. When the simulated wave function exceeds the validity region of the simulation, we identify a generalized version of the quantum Rabi model in a periodic phase space.

  10. Ultracold-atom quantum simulator for attosecond science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, Simon; Förster, Johann; Saenz, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    A quantum simulator based on ultracold optically trapped atoms for simulating the physics of atoms and molecules in ultrashort intense laser fields is introduced. The slowing down by about 13 orders of magnitude allows one to watch in slow motion the tunneling and recollision processes that form the heart of attosecond science. The extreme flexibility of the simulator promises a deeper understanding of strong-field physics, especially for many-body systems beyond the reach of classical computers. The quantum simulator can experimentally straightforwardly be realized and is shown to recover the ionization characteristics of atoms in the different regimes of laser-matter interaction.

  11. Topological Quantum Information in a 3D Neutral Atom Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-02

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0051 TOPOLOGICAL QUANTUM INFORMATION IN A 3D NEUTRAL ATOM ARRAY David Weiss PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY Final Report 01/02/2015...v Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 12-23-2014 Final 12-01-2008-9-30-2014 (DARPA) TOPOLOGICAL QUANTUM INFORMATION IN A 3D NEUTRAL ATOM ARRAY FA9550-09...using neutral atoms in an optical lattice, with the ultimate end to execute a version of the Kitaev toric code Hamiltonian model . Toward that end we

  12. Quantum Yield Heterogeneity among Single Nonblinking Quantum Dots Revealed by Atomic Structure-Quantum Optics Correlation.

    PubMed

    Orfield, Noah J; McBride, James R; Wang, Feng; Buck, Matthew R; Keene, Joseph D; Reid, Kemar R; Htoon, Han; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2016-02-23

    Physical variations in colloidal nanostructures give rise to heterogeneity in expressed optical behavior. This correlation between nanoscale structure and function demands interrogation of both atomic structure and photophysics at the level of single nanostructures to be fully understood. Herein, by conducting detailed analyses of fine atomic structure, chemical composition, and time-resolved single-photon photoluminescence data for the same individual nanocrystals, we reveal inhomogeneity in the quantum yields of single nonblinking "giant" CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (g-QDs). We find that each g-QD possesses distinctive single exciton and biexciton quantum yields that result mainly from variations in the degree of charging, rather than from volume or structure inhomogeneity. We further establish that there is a very limited nonemissive "dark" fraction (<2%) among the studied g-QDs and present direct evidence that the g-QD core must lack inorganic passivation for the g-QD to be "dark". Therefore, in contrast to conventional QDs, ensemble photoluminescence quantum yield is principally defined by charging processes rather than the existence of dark g-QDs.

  13. Scalable quantum information processing with photons and atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jian-Wei

    Over the past three decades, the promises of super-fast quantum computing and secure quantum cryptography have spurred a world-wide interest in quantum information, generating fascinating quantum technologies for coherent manipulation of individual quantum systems. However, the distance of fiber-based quantum communications is limited due to intrinsic fiber loss and decreasing of entanglement quality. Moreover, probabilistic single-photon source and entanglement source demand exponentially increased overheads for scalable quantum information processing. To overcome these problems, we are taking two paths in parallel: quantum repeaters and through satellite. We used the decoy-state QKD protocol to close the loophole of imperfect photon source, and used the measurement-device-independent QKD protocol to close the loophole of imperfect photon detectors--two main loopholes in quantum cryptograph. Based on these techniques, we are now building world's biggest quantum secure communication backbone, from Beijing to Shanghai, with a distance exceeding 2000 km. Meanwhile, we are developing practically useful quantum repeaters that combine entanglement swapping, entanglement purification, and quantum memory for the ultra-long distance quantum communication. The second line is satellite-based global quantum communication, taking advantage of the negligible photon loss and decoherence in the atmosphere. We realized teleportation and entanglement distribution over 100 km, and later on a rapidly moving platform. We are also making efforts toward the generation of multiphoton entanglement and its use in teleportation of multiple properties of a single quantum particle, topological error correction, quantum algorithms for solving systems of linear equations and machine learning. Finally, I will talk about our recent experiments on quantum simulations on ultracold atoms. On the one hand, by applying an optical Raman lattice technique, we realized a two-dimensional spin-obit (SO

  14. Quantum phase gate using single atom nonlinearlity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Shigeki; Oka, Hisaki; Kojima, Kunihiro; Hofmann, Holger F.; Sasaki, Keiji

    2005-08-01

    The nonlinear optical response obtained from a single two level atom in a one-sided cavity is studied using a model system, where a infinite atomic layer sits in front of a reflecting mirror. When the atomic layer is placed at the antinode of input field, the result given by finite difference time domain method coupled with the optical Bloch equations is consistent with previous analytical result [ H F. Hofmann, K. Kojima, S. Takeuchi, and K. Sasaki, J. Opt. B 5, 218 (2003) ] based on one-dimensional atom model.

  15. Single-Atom Gating of Quantum State Superpositions

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Christopher

    2010-04-28

    The ultimate miniaturization of electronic devices will likely require local and coherent control of single electronic wavefunctions. Wavefunctions exist within both physical real space and an abstract state space with a simple geometric interpretation: this state space - or Hilbert space - is spanned by mutually orthogonal state vectors corresponding to the quantized degrees of freedom of the real-space system. Measurement of superpositions is akin to accessing the direction of a vector in Hilbert space, determining an angle of rotation equivalent to quantum phase. Here we show that an individual atom inside a designed quantum corral1 can control this angle, producing arbitrary coherent superpositions of spatial quantum states. Using scanning tunnelling microscopy and nanostructures assembled atom-by-atom we demonstrate how single spins and quantum mirages can be harnessed to image the superposition of two electronic states. We also present a straightforward method to determine the atom path enacting phase rotations between any desired state vectors. A single atom thus becomes a real-space handle for an abstract Hilbert space, providing a simple technique for coherent quantum state manipulation at the spatial limit of condensed matter.

  16. Quantum superchemistry: dynamical quantum effects in coupled atomic and molecular Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Hope, J J; Olsen, M K

    2001-04-09

    We show that in certain parameter regimes there is a macroscopic dynamical breakdown of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Stochastic field equations for coupled atomic and molecular condensates are derived using the functional positive- P representation. These equations describe the full quantum state of the coupled condensates and include the commonly used Gross-Pitaevskii equation as the noiseless limit. The full quantum theory includes the spontaneous processes which will become significant when the atomic population is low. The experimental signature of the quantum effects will be the time scale of the revival of the atomic population after a near total conversion to the molecular condensate.

  17. Quantum Phases of Atom-Molecule Mixtures of Fermionic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Nicolas; Tsai, Shan-Wen

    2009-11-01

    Cold atom experiments have observed atom-molecule mixtures by tuning the interactions between particles.footnotetextM.L. Olsen, J. D. Perreault, T. D. Cumby, and D. S. Jin, Phys. Rev. A 80, 030701(R) (2009) We study many particle interactions by examaning a simple model that describes the destruction of fermionic atom pairs to form single bosonic molecules and vice versa. A set of functional Renomalization Group equationsfootnotetextR. Shankar, Rev. Mod. Phys., Vol 66 No. 1, January 1994^,footnotetextS.W. Tsai, A.H. Castro Neto, R. Shankar, D.K. Campbell, Phys. Rev. B 72, 054531 (2005) describing these processes are set up and solved numerically. The Self Energy of the fermions are attained as a function of frequency and we search for frequency dependent instabilities that could denote a transition from a disordered liquid to a BCS phase. (Financial support from NSF DMR-084781 and UC-Lab Fees Research Program.)

  18. Quantum repeaters based on atomic ensembles and linear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangouard, Nicolas; Simon, Christoph; de Riedmatten, Hugues; Gisin, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of quantum states over long distances is limited by photon loss. Straightforward amplification as in classical telecommunications is not an option in quantum communication because of the no-cloning theorem. This problem could be overcome by implementing quantum repeater protocols, which create long-distance entanglement from shorter-distance entanglement via entanglement swapping. Such protocols require the capacity to create entanglement in a heralded fashion, to store it in quantum memories, and to swap it. One attractive general strategy for realizing quantum repeaters is based on the use of atomic ensembles as quantum memories, in combination with linear optical techniques and photon counting to perform all required operations. Here the theoretical and experimental status quo of this very active field are reviewed. The potentials of different approaches are compared quantitatively, with a focus on the most immediate goal of outperforming the direct transmission of photons.

  19. Quantum degenerate mixture of ytterbium and lithium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Anders H.; Khramov, Alexander; Dowd, William H.; Jamison, Alan O.; Ivanov, Vladyslav V.; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2011-07-15

    We have produced a quantum degenerate mixture of fermionic alkali-metal {sup 6}Li and bosonic spin-singlet {sup 174}Yb gases. This was achieved using sympathetic cooling of lithium atoms by evaporatively cooled ytterbium atoms in a far-off-resonant optical dipole trap. We observe the coexistence of Bose-condensed (T/T{sub c}{approx_equal}0.8) {sup 174}Yb with 2.3x10{sup 4} atoms and Fermi degenerate (T/T{sub F}{approx_equal}0.3) {sup 6}Li with 1.2x10{sup 4} atoms. Quasipure Bose-Einstein condensates of up to 3x10{sup 4} {sup 174}Yb atoms can be produced in single-species experiments. Our results mark a significant step toward studies of few- and many-body physics with mixtures of alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms, and for the production of paramagnetic polar molecules in the quantum regime. Our methods also establish a convenient scheme for producing quantum degenerate ytterbium atoms in a 1064 nm optical dipole trap.

  20. Quantum galvanometer by interfacing a vibrating nanowire and cold atoms.

    PubMed

    Kálmán, O; Kiss, T; Fortágh, J; Domokos, P

    2012-01-11

    We evaluate the coupling of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of ultracold, paramagnetic atoms to the magnetic field of the current in a mechanically vibrating carbon nanotube within the frame of a full quantum theory. We find that the interaction is strong enough to sense quantum features of the nanowire current noise spectrum by means of hyperfine-state-selective atom counting. Such a nondestructive measurement of the electric current via its magnetic field corresponds to the classical galvanometer scheme, extended to the quantum regime of charge transport. The calculated high sensitivity of the interaction in the nanowire-BEC hybrid systems opens up the possibility of quantum control, which may be further extended to include other relevant degrees of freedom.

  1. Building a quantum processor using photons and atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa Barragan, Eden; Namazi, Mehdi; Jordaan, Bertus; Rind, Samuel; Kupchak, Connor

    2015-05-01

    Given the recent experimental success in regard to the advancement of quantum devices, we are now at the point where we must interconnect many of them in order to bring about the first generation of quantum processing machines. In this elementary quantum processor, individual nodes must be equipped with the functionality to perform several key tasks in order to meet the criteria necessary for quantum information processing. Namely, some nodes need to be able to receive, store and retrieve photonic qubits (quantum memories), while other nodes must be geared toward the manipulation of qubits (quantum gates). In this work we will present our progress regarding the construction of a many-device quantum processor capable of storing and processing photonic polarization qubits. We will discuss our recent experiments in which we have tested the feasibility of using room temperature ensembles as a node to process quantum information, by performing coherent state quantum process tomography (csQPT) of an optically-induced phase shift in a electromagnetically induced transparency N-type atomic medium. Moreover, we will also present our recent experiment in which we have explored the interconnection of several quantum devices by cascading the storage processes of two room temperature single-photon level polarization qubit memories. This work was supported by the US-Navy Office of Naval Research (grant number N00141410801) and the National Science Foundation (grant number PHY-1404398).

  2. Polarization-dependent atomic dipole traps behind a circular aperture for neutral-atom quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen-Christandl, Katharina; Copsey, Bert D.

    2011-02-01

    The neutral-atom quantum computing community has successfully implemented almost all necessary steps for constructing a neutral-atom quantum computer. We present computational results of a study aimed at solving the remaining problem of creating a quantum memory with individually addressable sites for quantum computing. The basis of this quantum memory is the diffraction pattern formed by laser light incident on a circular aperture. Very close to the aperture, the diffraction pattern has localized bright and dark spots that can serve as red-detuned or blue-detuned atomic dipole traps. These traps are suitable for quantum computing even for moderate laser powers. In particular, for moderate laser intensities (~100 W/cm2) and comparatively small detunings (~1000-10 000 linewidths), trap depths of ~1 mK and trap frequencies of several to tens of kilohertz are achieved. Our results indicate that these dipole traps can be moved by tilting the incident laser beams without significantly changing the trap properties. We also explored the polarization dependence of these dipole traps. We developed a code that calculates the trapping potential energy for any magnetic substate of any hyperfine ground state of any alkali-metal atom for any laser detuning much smaller than the fine-structure splitting for any given electric field distribution. We describe details of our calculations and include a summary of different notations and conventions for the reduced matrix element and how to convert it to SI units. We applied this code to these traps and found a method for bringing two traps together and apart controllably without expelling the atoms from the trap and without significant tunneling probability between the traps. This approach can be scaled up to a two-dimensional array of many pinholes, forming a quantum memory with single-site addressability, in which pairs of atoms can be brought together and apart for two-qubit gates for quantum computing.

  3. Polarization-dependent atomic dipole traps behind a circular aperture for neutral-atom quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen-Christandl, Katharina; Copsey, Bert D.

    2011-02-15

    The neutral-atom quantum computing community has successfully implemented almost all necessary steps for constructing a neutral-atom quantum computer. We present computational results of a study aimed at solving the remaining problem of creating a quantum memory with individually addressable sites for quantum computing. The basis of this quantum memory is the diffraction pattern formed by laser light incident on a circular aperture. Very close to the aperture, the diffraction pattern has localized bright and dark spots that can serve as red-detuned or blue-detuned atomic dipole traps. These traps are suitable for quantum computing even for moderate laser powers. In particular, for moderate laser intensities ({approx}100 W/cm{sup 2}) and comparatively small detunings ({approx}1000-10 000 linewidths), trap depths of {approx}1 mK and trap frequencies of several to tens of kilohertz are achieved. Our results indicate that these dipole traps can be moved by tilting the incident laser beams without significantly changing the trap properties. We also explored the polarization dependence of these dipole traps. We developed a code that calculates the trapping potential energy for any magnetic substate of any hyperfine ground state of any alkali-metal atom for any laser detuning much smaller than the fine-structure splitting for any given electric field distribution. We describe details of our calculations and include a summary of different notations and conventions for the reduced matrix element and how to convert it to SI units. We applied this code to these traps and found a method for bringing two traps together and apart controllably without expelling the atoms from the trap and without significant tunneling probability between the traps. This approach can be scaled up to a two-dimensional array of many pinholes, forming a quantum memory with single-site addressability, in which pairs of atoms can be brought together and apart for two-qubit gates for quantum computing.

  4. Quantum Walks with Neutral Atoms: Quantum Interference Effects of One and Two Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robens, Carsten; Brakhane, Stefan; Meschede, Dieter; Alberti, A.

    We report on the state of the art of quantum walk experiments with neutral atoms in state-dependent optical lattices. We demonstrate a novel state-dependent transport technique enabling the control of two spin-selective sublattices in a fully independent fashion. This transport technique allowed us to carry out a test of single-particle quantum interference based on the violation of the Leggett-Garg inequality and, more recently, to probe two-particle quantum interference effects with neutral atoms cooled into the motional ground state. These experiments lay the groundwork for the study of discrete-time quantum walks of strongly interacting, indistinguishable particles to demonstrate quantum cellular automata of neutral atoms.

  5. Quantum Chemical Topology: Knowledgeable atoms in peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2012-06-01

    The need to improve atomistic biomolecular force fields remains acute. Fortunately, the abundance of contemporary computing power enables an overhaul of the architecture of current force fields, which typically base their electrostatics on fixed atomic partial charges. We discuss the principles behind the electrostatics of a more realistic force field under construction, called QCTFF. At the heart of QCTFF lies the so-called topological atom, which is a malleable box, whose shape and electrostatics changes in response to a changing environment. This response is captured by a machine learning method called Kriging. Kriging directly predicts each multipole moment of a given atom (i.e. the output) from the coordinates of the nuclei surrounding this atom (i.e. the input). This procedure yields accurate interatomic electrostatic energies, which form the basis for future-proof progress in force field design.

  6. Quantum magnetometers as a base for atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagitov, E. A.; Ermak, S. V.; Petrenko, M. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of the atomic clock based on two quantum magnetometer system development is demonstrated. One of the magnetometers is self-oscillation type, another is Mz- type magnetometer based on end-state UHF resonance. The laser pumping of 87Rb atoms placed into antirelaxation coated sell is provided. The magnetometers frequency difference fluctuations experimental results are represented and Allan deviation is determined. The role of the radio-optical resonance frequency light shift different components is denoted for the determination of the quantum magnetometers optimal operation mode. The effect of the light shift compensation is demonstrated.

  7. Using pseudopotentials within the interacting quantum atoms approach.

    PubMed

    Tiana, Davide; Francisco, E; Blanco, M A; Pendás, A Martín

    2009-07-09

    A general strategy to extend the interacting quantum atoms (IQA) approach to pseudopotential or effective core potential electronic structure calculations is presented. With the protocol proposed here, the scope of IQA thinking opens to chemical bonding problems in heavy-atom systems, as well as to larger molecules than those presently allowed by computational limitations. We show that, provided that interatomic surfaces are computed from core-reconstructed densities, reasonable results are obtained by integrating reduced density matrices built from the pseudowave functions. Comparison with all-electron results in a few test systems shows that exchange-correlation energies are better reproduced than Coulombic contributions, an effect which is traced to inadequate atomic populations and leakage of the core population into the surrounding quantum atoms.

  8. Light atom quantum oscillations in UC and US

    DOE PAGES

    Yiu, Yuen; Aczel, Adam A.; Granroth, Garrett E.; ...

    2016-01-19

    High energy vibrational scattering in the binary systems UC and US is measured using time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering. A clear set of well-defined peaks equally separated in energy is observed in UC, corresponding to harmonic oscillations of the light C atoms in a cage of heavy U atoms. The scattering is much weaker in US and only a few oscillator peaks are visible. We show how the difference between the materials can be understood by considering the neutron scattering lengths and masses of the lighter atoms. Monte Carlo ray tracing is used to simulate the scattering, with near quantitative agreementmore » with the data in UC, and some differences with US. The possibility of observing anharmonicity and anisotropy in the potentials of the light atoms is investigated in UC. Lastly, the observed data is well accounted for by considering each light atom as a single atom isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator.« less

  9. Light atom quantum oscillations in UC and US

    SciTech Connect

    Yiu, Yuen; Aczel, Adam A.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Stone, Matthew B.; Buyers, W. J. L.; Lin, J. Y. Y.; Samolyuk, German D.; Stocks, George Malcolm; Nagler, Stephen E.

    2016-01-19

    High energy vibrational scattering in the binary systems UC and US is measured using time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering. A clear set of well-defined peaks equally separated in energy is observed in UC, corresponding to harmonic oscillations of the light C atoms in a cage of heavy U atoms. The scattering is much weaker in US and only a few oscillator peaks are visible. We show how the difference between the materials can be understood by considering the neutron scattering lengths and masses of the lighter atoms. Monte Carlo ray tracing is used to simulate the scattering, with near quantitative agreement with the data in UC, and some differences with US. The possibility of observing anharmonicity and anisotropy in the potentials of the light atoms is investigated in UC. Lastly, the observed data is well accounted for by considering each light atom as a single atom isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator.

  10. One-dimensional quantum pump simulated by cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yun-Chang; Zhu, Ming-Han; Liu, Zheng-Qin

    2015-05-01

    Quantum pump set up in one-dimensional (1D) channel was proposed by the cold atom simulation. The target pumping system is driven by the double time-dependent potentials. We investigated that the system can be achieved via the study of the cold atoms simulation. And by using the Floquet scattering method and the related transport theories in the mesoscopic systems, simulations of the pumping processes were presented in detail.

  11. Quantum Logic with Cavity Photons From Single Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holleczek, Annemarie; Barter, Oliver; Rubenok, Allison; Dilley, Jerome; Nisbet-Jones, Peter B. R.; Langfahl-Klabes, Gunnar; Marshall, Graham D.; Sparrow, Chris; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Poulios, Konstantinos; Kuhn, Axel; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate quantum logic using narrow linewidth photons that are produced with an a priori nonprobabilistic scheme from a single 87Rb atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity. We use a controlled-not gate integrated into a photonic chip to entangle these photons, and we observe nonclassical correlations between photon detection events separated by periods exceeding the travel time across the chip by 3 orders of magnitude. This enables quantum technology that will use the properties of both narrow-band single photon sources and integrated quantum photonics.

  12. Non-Adiabatic Holonomic Quantum Gates in an atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi Mousolou, Vahid; Canali, Carlo M.; Sjoqvist, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Quantum computation is essentially the implementation of a universal set of quantum gate operations on a set of qubits, which is reliable in the presence of noise. We propose a scheme to perform robust gates in an atomic four-level system using the idea of non-adiabatic holonomic quantum computation proposed in [1]. The gates are realized by applying sequences of short laser pulses that drive transitions between the four energy levels in such a way that the dynamical phases vanish. [4pt] [1] E. Sjoqvist, D.M. Tong, B. Hessmo, M. Johansson, K. Singh, arXiv:1107.5127v2 [quant-ph

  13. Interplay of weak interactions in the atom-by-atom condensation of xenon within quantum boxes.

    PubMed

    Nowakowska, Sylwia; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Kawai, Shigeki; Ivas, Toni; Nowakowski, Jan; Fatayer, Shadi; Wäckerlin, Christian; Nijs, Thomas; Meyer, Ernst; Björk, Jonas; Stöhr, Meike; Gade, Lutz H; Jung, Thomas A

    2015-01-21

    Condensation processes are of key importance in nature and play a fundamental role in chemistry and physics. Owing to size effects at the nanoscale, it is conceptually desired to experimentally probe the dependence of condensate structure on the number of constituents one by one. Here we present an approach to study a condensation process atom-by-atom with the scanning tunnelling microscope, which provides a direct real-space access with atomic precision to the aggregates formed in atomically defined 'quantum boxes'. Our analysis reveals the subtle interplay of competing directional and nondirectional interactions in the emergence of structure and provides unprecedented input for the structural comparison with quantum mechanical models. This approach focuses on-but is not limited to-the model case of xenon condensation and goes significantly beyond the well-established statistical size analysis of clusters in atomic or molecular beams by mass spectrometry.

  14. Quantum Electrodynamics of Heavy Ions and Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Shabaev, V. M.; Artemyev, A. N.; Glazov, D. A.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Volotka, A. V.; Yerokhin, V. A.

    2006-11-07

    The present status of quantum electrodynamics (QED) theory of heavy few-electrons is reviewed. The theoretical results are compared with available experimental data. A special attention is focused on tests of QED at strong fields and on determination of the fundamental constants. A recent progress on calculations of the QED corrections to the parity nonconserving 6s-7s transition amplitude in neutral Cs is also discussed.

  15. Liquid quantum droplets of ultracold magnetic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier-Barbut, Igor; Schmitt, Matthias; Wenzel, Matthias; Kadau, Holger; Pfau, Tilman

    2016-11-01

    The simultaneous presence of two competing inter-particle interactions can lead to the emergence of new phenomena in a many-body system. Among others, such effects are expected in dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates, subject to dipole-dipole interaction and short-range repulsion. Magnetic quantum gases and in particular Dysprosium gases, offering a comparable short-range contact and a long-range dipolar interaction energy, remarkably exhibit such emergent phenomena. In addition an effective cancellation of mean-field effects of the two interactions results in a pronounced importance of quantum-mechanical beyond mean-field effects. For a weakly dominant dipolar interaction the striking consequence is the existence of a new state of matter equilibrated by the balance between weak mean-field attraction and beyond mean-field repulsion. Though exemplified here in the case of dipolar Bose gases, this state of matter should appear also with other microscopic interactions types, provided a competition results in an effective cancellation of the total mean-field. The macroscopic state takes the form of so-called quantum droplets. We present the effects of a long-range dipolar interaction between these droplets.

  16. Quantum atom optics with fermions from molecular dissociation.

    PubMed

    Kheruntsyan, K V

    2006-03-24

    We study a fermionic atom optics counterpart of parametric down-conversion with photons. This can be realized through dissociation of a Bose-Einstein condensate of molecular dimers consisting of fermionic atoms. We present a theoretical model describing the quantum dynamics of dissociation and find analytic solutions for mode occupancies and atomic pair correlations, valid in the short time limit. The solutions are used to identify upper bounds for the correlation functions, which are applicable to any fermionic system and correspond to ideal particle number-difference squeezing.

  17. Early atomic models - from mechanical to quantum (1904-1913)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baily, C.

    2013-01-01

    A complete history of early atomic models would fill volumes, but a reasonably coherent tale of the path from mechanical atoms to the quantum can be told by focusing on the relevant work of three great contributors to atomic physics, in the critically important years between 1904 and 1913: J.J. Thomson, Ernest Rutherford and Niels Bohr. We first examine the origins of Thomson's mechanical atomic models, from his ethereal vortex atoms in the early 1880's, to the myriad "corpuscular" atoms he proposed following the discovery of the electron in 1897. Beyond qualitative predictions for the periodicity of the elements, the application of Thomson's atoms to problems in scattering and absorption led to quantitative predictions that were confirmed by experiments with high-velocity electrons traversing thin sheets of metal. Still, the much more massive and energetic α-particles being studied by Rutherford were better suited for exploring the interior of the atom, and careful measurements on the angular dependence of their scattering eventually allowed him to infer the existence of an atomic nucleus. Niels Bohr was particularly troubled by the radiative instability inherent to any mechanical atom, and succeeded in 1913 where others had failed in the prediction of emission spectra, by making two bold hypotheses that were in contradiction to the laws of classical physics, but necessary in order to account for experimental facts.

  18. Gradient Echo Quantum Memory in Warm Atomic Vapor

    PubMed Central

    Pinel, Olivier; Hosseini, Mahdi; Sparkes, Ben M.; Everett, Jesse L.; Higginbottom, Daniel; Campbell, Geoff T.; Lam, Ping Koy; Buchler, Ben C.

    2013-01-01

    Gradient echo memory (GEM) is a protocol for storing optical quantum states of light in atomic ensembles. The primary motivation for such a technology is that quantum key distribution (QKD), which uses Heisenberg uncertainty to guarantee security of cryptographic keys, is limited in transmission distance. The development of a quantum repeater is a possible path to extend QKD range, but a repeater will need a quantum memory. In our experiments we use a gas of rubidium 87 vapor that is contained in a warm gas cell. This makes the scheme particularly simple. It is also a highly versatile scheme that enables in-memory refinement of the stored state, such as frequency shifting and bandwidth manipulation. The basis of the GEM protocol is to absorb the light into an ensemble of atoms that has been prepared in a magnetic field gradient. The reversal of this gradient leads to rephasing of the atomic polarization and thus recall of the stored optical state. We will outline how we prepare the atoms and this gradient and also describe some of the pitfalls that need to be avoided, in particular four-wave mixing, which can give rise to optical gain. PMID:24300586

  19. Gradient echo quantum memory in warm atomic vapor.

    PubMed

    Pinel, Olivier; Hosseini, Mahdi; Sparkes, Ben M; Everett, Jesse L; Higginbottom, Daniel; Campbell, Geoff T; Lam, Ping Koy; Buchler, Ben C

    2013-11-11

    Gradient echo memory (GEM) is a protocol for storing optical quantum states of light in atomic ensembles. The primary motivation for such a technology is that quantum key distribution (QKD), which uses Heisenberg uncertainty to guarantee security of cryptographic keys, is limited in transmission distance. The development of a quantum repeater is a possible path to extend QKD range, but a repeater will need a quantum memory. In our experiments we use a gas of rubidium 87 vapor that is contained in a warm gas cell. This makes the scheme particularly simple. It is also a highly versatile scheme that enables in-memory refinement of the stored state, such as frequency shifting and bandwidth manipulation. The basis of the GEM protocol is to absorb the light into an ensemble of atoms that has been prepared in a magnetic field gradient. The reversal of this gradient leads to rephasing of the atomic polarization and thus recall of the stored optical state. We will outline how we prepare the atoms and this gradient and also describe some of the pitfalls that need to be avoided, in particular four-wave mixing, which can give rise to optical gain.

  20. Control of quantum magnets by atomic exchange bias.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shichao; Choi, Deung-Jang; Burgess, Jacob A J; Rolf-Pissarczyk, Steffen; Loth, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Mixing of discretized states in quantum magnets has a radical impact on their properties. Managing this effect is key for spintronics in the quantum limit. Magnetic fields can modify state mixing and, for example, mitigate destabilizing effects in single-molecule magnets. The exchange bias field has been proposed as a mechanism for localized control of individual nanomagnets. Here, we demonstrate that exchange coupling with the magnetic tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope provides continuous tuning of spin state mixing in an individual nanomagnet. By directly measuring spin relaxation time with electronic pump-probe spectroscopy, we find that the exchange interaction acts analogously to a local magnetic field that can be applied to a specific atom. It can be tuned in strength by up to several tesla and cancel external magnetic fields, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of complete control over individual quantum magnets with atomically localized exchange coupling.

  1. Control of quantum magnets by atomic exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shichao; Choi, Deung-Jang; Burgess, Jacob A. J.; Rolf-Pissarczyk, Steffen; Loth, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Mixing of discretized states in quantum magnets has a radical impact on their properties. Managing this effect is key for spintronics in the quantum limit. Magnetic fields can modify state mixing and, for example, mitigate destabilizing effects in single-molecule magnets. The exchange bias field has been proposed as a mechanism for localized control of individual nanomagnets. Here, we demonstrate that exchange coupling with the magnetic tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope provides continuous tuning of spin state mixing in an individual nanomagnet. By directly measuring spin relaxation time with electronic pump-probe spectroscopy, we find that the exchange interaction acts analogously to a local magnetic field that can be applied to a specific atom. It can be tuned in strength by up to several tesla and cancel external magnetic fields, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of complete control over individual quantum magnets with atomically localized exchange coupling.

  2. Fidelity for kicked atoms with gravity near a quantum resonance.

    PubMed

    Dubertrand, Rémy; Guarneri, Italo; Wimberger, Sandro

    2012-03-01

    Kicked atoms under a constant Stark or gravity field are investigated for experimental setups with cold and ultracold atoms. The parametric stability of the quantum dynamics is studied using the fidelity. In the case of a quantum resonance, it is shown that the behavior of the fidelity depends on arithmetic properties of the gravity parameter. Close to a quantum resonance, the long-time asymptotics of the fidelity is studied by means of a pseudoclassical approximation introduced by Fishman et al. [J. Stat. Phys. 110, 911 (2003)]. The long-time decay of fidelity arises from the tunneling out of pseudoclassical stable islands, and a simple ansatz is proposed which satisfactorily reproduces the main features observed in numerical simulations.

  3. Fidelity for kicked atoms with gravity near a quantum resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubertrand, Rémy; Guarneri, Italo; Wimberger, Sandro

    2012-03-01

    Kicked atoms under a constant Stark or gravity field are investigated for experimental setups with cold and ultracold atoms. The parametric stability of the quantum dynamics is studied using the fidelity. In the case of a quantum resonance, it is shown that the behavior of the fidelity depends on arithmetic properties of the gravity parameter. Close to a quantum resonance, the long-time asymptotics of the fidelity is studied by means of a pseudoclassical approximation introduced by Fishman [J. Stat. Phys.JSTPBS0022-471510.1023/A:1022176306198 110, 911 (2003)]. The long-time decay of fidelity arises from the tunneling out of pseudoclassical stable islands, and a simple ansatz is proposed which satisfactorily reproduces the main features observed in numerical simulations.

  4. Quantum Coherence between Two Atoms beyond Q=1015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. W.; Hume, D. B.; Thorpe, M. J.; Wineland, D. J.; Rosenband, T.

    2011-04-01

    We place two atoms in quantum superposition states and observe coherent phase evolution for 3.4×1015 cycles. Correlation signals from the two atoms yield information about their relative phase even after the probe radiation has decohered. This technique allowed a frequency comparison of two Al+27 ions with fractional uncertainty 3.7-0.8+1.0×10-16/τ/s. Two measures of the Q factor are reported: The Q factor derived from quantum coherence is 3.4-1.1+2.4×1016, and the spectroscopic Q factor for a Ramsey time of 3 s is 6.7×1015. We demonstrate a method to detect the individual quantum states of two Al+ ions in a Mg+-Al+-Al+ linear ion chain without spatially resolving the ions.

  5. Editorial . Quantum fluctuations and coherence in optical and atomic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschner, Jürgen; Gatti, Alessandra; Maître, Agnès; Morigi, Giovanna

    2003-03-01

    From simple interference fringes, over molecular wave packets, to nonlinear optical patterns - the fundamental interaction between light and matter leads to the formation of structures in many areas of atomic and optical physics. Sophisticated technology in experimental quantum optics, as well as modern computational tools available to theorists, have led to spectacular achievements in the investigation of quantum structures. This special issue is dedicated to recent developments in this area. It presents a selection of examples where quantum dynamics, fluctuations, and coherence generate structures in time or in space or where such structures are observed experimentally. The examples range from coherence phenomena in condensed matter, over atoms in optical structures, entanglement in light and matter, to quantum patterns in nonlinear optics and quantum imaging. The combination of such seemingly diverse subjects formed the basis of a successful European TMR network, "Quantum Structures" (visit http://cnqo.phys.strath.ac.uk/~gianluca/QSTRUCT/). This special issue partly re.ects the results and collaborations of the network, going however well beyond its scope by including contributions from a global community and from many related topics which were not addressed directly in the network. The aim of this issue is to present side by side these di.erent topics, all of which are loosely summarized under quantum structures, to highlight their common aspects, their di.erences, and the progress which resulted from the mutual exchange of results, methods, and knowledge. To guide the reader, we have organized the articles into subsections which follow a rough division into structures in material systems and structures in optical .elds. Nevertheless, in the following introduction we point out connections between the contributions which go beyond these usual criteria, thus highlighting the truly interdisciplinary nature of quantum structures. Much of the progress in atom optics

  6. Quantum oscillations of nitrogen atoms in uranium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Aczel, Adam A; Granroth, Garrett E; MacDougall, Gregory J; Buyers, W. J. L.; Abernathy, Douglas L; Samolyuk, German D; Stocks, George Malcolm; Nagler, Stephen E

    2012-01-01

    The vibrational excitations of crystalline solids corresponding to acoustic or optic one phonon modes appear as sharp features in measurements such as neutron spectroscopy. In contrast, many-phonon excitations generally produce a complicated, weak, and featureless response. Here we present time-of-flight neutron scattering measurements for the binary solid uranium nitride (UN), showing well-defined, equally-spaced, high energy vibrational modes in addition to the usual phonons. The spectrum is that of a single atom, isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator and characterizes independent motions of light nitrogen atoms, each found in an octahedral cage of heavy uranium atoms. This is an unexpected and beautiful experimental realization of one of the fundamental, exactly-solvable problems in quantum mechanics. There are also practical implications, as the oscillator modes must be accounted for in the design of generation IV nuclear reactors that plan to use UN as a fuel.

  7. Robust quantum memory using magnetic-field-independent atomic qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Jost, J. D.; Demarco, B.; Ben-Kish, A.; Blakestad, B.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Leibfried, D.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schmidt, P.; Wineland, D. J.

    2006-03-01

    Scalable quantum information processing requires physical systems capable of reliably storing coherent superpositions for times over which quantum error correction can be implemented. We experimentally demonstrate a robust quantum memory using a magnetic-field-independent hyperfine transition in ^9Be^+ atomic ion qubits at a field B = 0.01194 T. Qubit superpositions are created and analyzed with two-photon stimulated-Raman transitions. We observe the single physical qubit memory coherence time to be greater than 10 seconds, an improvement of approximately five orders of magnitude from previous experiments. The probability of memory error for this qubit during the measurement period (the longest timescale in our system) is approximately 1.4 x 10-5 which is below fault-tolerance threshold for common quantum error correcting codes.

  8. Atomic vs. quantum dot open shell spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katriel, Jacob; Montgomery, H. E.

    2017-02-01

    Hund's rules apply to pairs of atomic states which, in the limit of weak interelectronic repulsion, belong to a common configuration. We examine the asymptotic behavior of the energy difference between states belonging to such pairs (Δ E ) as a function of the nuclear charge (Z) at both Z →∞ (ignoring relativistic effects) and at Z →Zc , where Zc is the critical charge below which the outermost electron is not bound. We find that the ratio Δ/E Z2 is non-monotonic, having a maximum at some intermediate value of Z. This non-monotonicity is shown to account for the sign reversal in the difference between the corresponding interelectronic repulsion energies. For analogous open shell systems with confining potentials (such as Hooke's atom or the infinite spherical well), the corresponding function of the energy difference, in terms of which the interelectronic repulsion energy is given as a first derivative with respect to the parameter that characterizes the strength of the one-body potential (such as the harmonic force constant or the well radius, respectively), is monotonic in this parameter. This implies that the relative magnitude of the interelectronic repulsion energies that characterizes the strong one-body limit (usually, the ordering naively expected on the basis of Hund's rule) remains valid along the whole isoelectronic sequence.

  9. A Modular Quantum System of Trapped Atomic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hucul, David Alexander

    Scaling up controlled quantum systems to involve large numbers of qubits remains one of the outstanding challenges of quantum information science. One path toward scalability is the use of a modular architecture where adjacent qubits may be entangled with applied electromagnetic fields, and remote qubits may be entangled using photon interference. Trapped atomic ion qubits are one of the most promising platforms for scaling up quantum systems by combining long coherence times with high fidelity entangling operations between proximate and remote qubits. In this thesis, I present experimental progress on combining entanglement between remote atomic ions separated by 1 meter with near-field entanglement between atomic ions in the same ion trap. I describe the experimental improvements to increase the remote entanglement rate by orders of magnitude to nearly 5 per second. This is the first experimental demonstration where the remote entanglement rate exceeds the decoherence rate of the entangled qubits. The flexibility of creating remote entanglement through photon interference is demonstrated by using the interference of distinguishable photons without sacrificing remote entanglement rate or fidelity. Next I describe the use of master clock in combination with a frequency comb to lock the phases of all laser-induced interactions between remote ion traps while removing optical phase stability requirements. The combination of both types of entanglement gates to create a small quantum network are described. Finally, I present ways to mitigate cross talk between photonic and memory qubits by using different trapped ion species. I show preliminary work on performing state detection of nuclear spin 0 ions by using entanglement between atomic ion spin and photon polarization. These control techniques may be important for building a large-scale modular quantum system.

  10. Photonic Quantum Logic with Narrowband Light from Single Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenok, Allison; Holleczek, Annemarie; Barter, Oliver; Dilley, Jerome; Nisbet-Jones, Peter B. R.; Langfahl-Klabes, Gunnar; Kuhn, Axel; Sparrow, Chris; Marshall, Graham D.; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Poulios, Konstantinos; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    Atom-cavity sources of narrowband photons are a promising candidate for the future development of quantum technologies. Likewise, integrated photonic circuits have established themselves as a fore-running contender in quantum computing, security, and communication. Here we report on recent achievements to interface these two technologies: Atom-cavity sources coupled to integrated photonic circuits. Using narrow linewidth photons emitted from a single 87 Rb atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity we demonstrate the successful operation of an integrated control-not gate. Furthermore, we are able to verify the generation of post-selected entanglement upon successful operation of the gate. We are able to see non-classical correlations in detection events that are up to three orders of magnitude farther apart than the time needed for light to travel across the chip. Our hybrid approach will facilitate the future development of technologies that benefit from the advantages of both integrated quantum circuits and atom-cavity photon sources. Now at: National Physics Laboratory.

  11. Construction of a single atom trap for quantum information protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Margaret E.; Baker, Paul M.; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Duke Physics Department Team

    2016-05-01

    The field of quantum information science addresses outstanding problems such as achieving fundamentally secure communication and solving computationally hard problems. Great progress has been made in the field, particularly using photons coupled to ions and super conducting qubits. Neutral atoms are also interesting for these applications and though the technology for control of neutrals lags behind that of trapped ions, they offer some key advantages: primarily coupling to optical frequencies closer to the telecom band than trapped ions or superconducting qubits. Here we report progress on constructing a single atom trap for 87 Rb. This system is a promising platform for studying the technical problems facing neutral atom quantum computing. For example, most protocols destroy the trap when reading out the neutral atom's state; we will investigate an alternative non-destructive state detection scheme. We detail the experimental systems involved and the challenges addressed in trapping a single atom. All of our hardware components are off the shelf and relatively inexpensive. Unlike many other systems, we place a high numerical aperture lens inside our vacuum system to increase photon collection efficiency. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the ARO through Grant # W911NF1520047.

  12. Efficient teleportation between remote single-atom quantum memories.

    PubMed

    Nölleke, Christian; Neuzner, Andreas; Reiserer, Andreas; Hahn, Carolin; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2013-04-05

    We demonstrate teleportation of quantum bits between two single atoms in distant laboratories. Using a time-resolved photonic Bell-state measurement, we achieve a teleportation fidelity of (88.0 ± 1.5)%, largely determined by our entanglement fidelity. The low photon collection efficiency in free space is overcome by trapping each atom in an optical cavity. The resulting success probability of 0.1% is almost 5 orders of magnitude larger than in previous experiments with remote material qubits. It is mainly limited by photon propagation and detection losses and can be enhanced with a cavity-based deterministic Bell-state measurement.

  13. Delocalization and quantum chaos in atom-field systems.

    PubMed

    Bastarrachea-Magnani, M A; López-del-Carpio, B; Chávez-Carlos, J; Lerma-Hernández, S; Hirsch, J G

    2016-02-01

    Employing efficient diagonalization techniques, we perform a detailed quantitative study of the regular and chaotic regions in phase space in the simplest nonintegrable atom-field system, the Dicke model. A close correlation between the classical Lyapunov exponents and the quantum Participation Ratio of coherent states on the eigenenergy basis is exhibited for different points in the phase space. It is also shown that the Participation Ratio scales linearly with the number of atoms in chaotic regions and with its square root in the regular ones.

  14. Cold atom simulation of interacting relativistic quantum field theories.

    PubMed

    Cirac, J Ignacio; Maraner, Paolo; Pachos, Jiannis K

    2010-11-05

    We demonstrate that Dirac fermions self-interacting or coupled to dynamic scalar fields can emerge in the low energy sector of designed bosonic and fermionic cold atom systems. We illustrate this with two examples defined in two spacetime dimensions. The first one is the self-interacting Thirring model. The second one is a model of Dirac fermions coupled to a dynamic scalar field that gives rise to the Gross-Neveu model. The proposed cold atom experiments can be used to probe spectral or correlation properties of interacting quantum field theories thereby presenting an alternative to lattice gauge theory simulations.

  15. Quantum entanglement for helium atom in the Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yen-Chang; Fang, Te-Kuei; Ho, Yew Kam

    2015-03-15

    In the present work, we present an investigation on quantum entanglement of the two-electron helium atom immersed in weakly coupled Debye plasmas, modeled by the Debye-Hückel, or screened Coulomb, potential to mimic the interaction between two charged particles inside the plasma. Quantum entanglement is related to correlation effects in a multi-particle system. In a bipartite system, a measurement made on one of the two entangled particles affects the outcome of the other particle, even if such two particles are far apart. Employing wave functions constructed with configuration interaction B-spline basis, we have quantified von Neumann entropy and linear entropy for a series of He {sup 1,3}S{sup e} and {sup 1,3}P{sup o} states in plasma-embedded helium atom.

  16. Microscopic theory and quantum simulation of atomic heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolongo, Aris; Umari, Paolo; Baroni, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Quantum simulation methods based on electronic-structure theory are deemed unfit to cope with atomic heat transport within the Green-Kubo formalism, because quantum-mechanical energy densities and currents are inherently ill-defined at the atomic scale. We show that, although this difficulty would also affect classical simulations, thermal conductivity is indeed insensitive to such ill-definedness by virtue of a kind of gauge invariance resulting from energy extensivity and conservation. On the basis of these findings, we derive an expression for the adiabatic energy flux from density-functional theory, which allows heat transport to be simulated using ab initio equilibrium molecular dynamics. Our methodology is demonstrated by comparing its predictions to those of classical equilibrium and ab initio non-equilibrium (Müller-Plathe) simulations for a liquid-argon model, and by applying it to heavy water at ambient conditions.

  17. Atomic electron energies including relativistic effects and quantum electrodynamic corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoyagi, M.; Chen, M. H.; Crasemann, B.; Huang, K. N.; Mark, H.

    1977-01-01

    Atomic electron energies have been calculated relativistically. Hartree-Fock-Slater wave functions served as zeroth-order eigenfunctions to compute the expectation of the total Hamiltonian. A first order correction to the local approximation was thus included. Quantum-electrodynamic corrections were made. For all orbitals in all atoms with 2 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 106, the following quantities are listed: total energies, electron kinetic energies, electron-nucleus potential energies, electron-electron potential energies consisting of electrostatic and Breit interaction (magnetic and retardation) terms, and vacuum polarization energies. These results will serve for detailed comparison of calculations based on other approaches. The magnitude of quantum electrodynamic corrections is exhibited quantitatively for each state.

  18. Towards quantum turbulence in cold atomic fermionic superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgac, Aurel; McNeil Forbes, Michael; Wlazłowski, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Fermionic superfluids provide a new realization of quantum turbulence, accessible to both experiment and theory, yet relevant to phenomena from both cold atoms to nuclear astrophysics. In particular, the strongly interacting Fermi gas realized in cold-atom experiments is closely related to dilute neutron matter in neutron star crusts. Unlike the liquid superfluids 4He (bosons) and 3He (fermions), where quantum turbulence has been studied in laboratory for decades, superfluid Fermi gases stand apart for a number of reasons. They admit a rather reliable theoretical description based on density functional theory called the time-dependent superfluid local density approximation that describes both static and dynamic phenomena. Cold atom experiments demonstrate exquisite control over particle number, spin polarization, density, temperature, and interaction strength. Topological defects such as domain walls and quantized vortices, which lie at the heart of quantum turbulence, can be created and manipulated with time-dependent external potentials, and agree with the time-dependent theoretical techniques. While similar experimental and theoretical control exists for weakly interacting Bose gases, the unitary Fermi gas is strongly interacting. The resulting vortex line density is extremely high, and quantum turbulence may thus be realized in small systems where classical turbulence is suppressed. Fermi gases also permit the study of exotic superfluid phenomena such as the Larkin-Ovchinnikov-Fulde-Ferrell pairing mechanism for polarized superfluids which may give rise to 3D supersolids, and a pseudo-gap at finite temperatures that might affect the regime of classical turbulence. The dynamics associated with these phenomena has only started to be explored. Finally, superfluid mixtures have recently been realized, providing experimental access to phenomena like Andreev-Bashkin entrainment predicted decades ago. Superfluid Fermi gases thus provide a rich forum for addressing

  19. Charge transport and localization in atomically coherent quantum dot solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitham, Kevin; Yang, Jun; Savitzky, Benjamin H.; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Wise, Frank; Hanrath, Tobias

    2016-05-01

    Epitaxial attachment of quantum dots into ordered superlattices enables the synthesis of quasi-two-dimensional materials that theoretically exhibit features such as Dirac cones and topological states, and have major potential for unprecedented optoelectronic devices. Initial studies found that disorder in these structures causes localization of electrons within a few lattice constants, and highlight the critical need for precise structural characterization and systematic assessment of the effects of disorder on transport. Here we fabricated superlattices with the quantum dots registered to within a single atomic bond length (limited by the polydispersity of the quantum dot building blocks), but missing a fraction (20%) of the epitaxial connections. Calculations of the electronic structure including the measured disorder account for the electron localization inferred from transport measurements. The calculations also show that improvement of the epitaxial connections will lead to completely delocalized electrons and may enable the observation of the remarkable properties predicted for these materials.

  20. Experiments with Ultracold Quantum-degenerate Fermionic Lithium Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Experimental methods of laser and evaporative cooling, used in the production of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates have recently been extended to realize quantum degeneracy in trapped Fermi gases. Fermi gases are a new rich system to explore the implications of Pauli exclusion on scattering properties of the system, and ultimately fermionic superfluidity. We have produced a new macroscopic quantum system, in which a degenerate Li-6 Fermi gas coexists with a large and stable Na-23 BEC. This was accomplished using inter-species sympathetic cooling of fermionic 6Li in a thermal bath of bosonic Na-23. We have achieved high numbers of both fermions (less than 10(exp 5) and bosons (less than 10(exp 6), and Li-6 quantum degeneracy corresponding to one half of the Fermi temperature. This is the first time that a Fermi sea was produced with a condensate as a "refrigerator".

  1. Long-distance quantum communication with neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Razavi, Mohsen; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2006-04-15

    The architecture proposed by Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) for long-distance quantum communication with atomic ensembles is analyzed. Its fidelity and throughput in entanglement distribution, entanglement swapping, and quantum teleportation is derived within a framework that accounts for multiple excitations in the ensembles as well as loss and asymmetries in the channel. The DLCZ performance metrics that are obtained are compared to the corresponding results for the trapped-atom quantum communication architecture that has been proposed by a team from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Northwestern University (MIT and NU). Both systems are found to be capable of high-fidelity entanglement distribution. However, the DLCZ scheme only provides conditional teleportation and repeater operation, whereas the MIT-NU architecture affords full Bell-state measurements on its trapped atoms. Moreover, it is shown that achieving unity conditional fidelity in DLCZ teleportation and repeater operation requires ideal photon-number resolving detectors. The maximum conditional fidelities for DLCZ teleportation and repeater operation that can be realized with nonresolving detectors are 1/2 and 2/3, respectively.

  2. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H.; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-01

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (˜0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  3. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    SciTech Connect

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H.; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  4. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  5. Quantum-Mechanical Definition of Atoms and Chemical Bonds in Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    AFRL-RQ-ED-TR-2014-0025 Quantum-Mechanical Definition of Atoms and Chemical Bonds in Molecules P.W. Langhoff J.D. Mills J.A...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 Oct 2013 - 15 Oct 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantum-Mechanical Definition of Atoms and Chemical Bonds in Molecules...indistinguishable electrons to particular atomic nuclei in a chemical aggregate has seemingly precluded quantum-mechanical definition of fragment atomic

  6. The Effect of Vacuum Fluctuations on Quantum Metrology for a Uniformly Accelerated Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yao

    2016-12-01

    We studied, in the framework of open quantum systems, the dynamics of the quantum Fisher information of the parameters of the initial atomic state and atomic transition frequency for a uniformly accelerated polarizable two-level atom coupled in the multipolar scheme to a bath of fluctuating vacuum electromagnetic fields in Minkowski space-time. Our results show that the vacuum fluctuations in Minkowski space-time always make the quantum Fisher information decay, thus degrade the precision of the parameter estimation. The acceleration of the atom makes the quantum Fisher information of initial parameters of atomic state decay faster than those in case with static atom in Minkowski vacuum and even those in case with static atom in Minkowski thermal bath with corresponding Unruh temperature. The maxima of quantum Fisher information of atomic frequency and the optimal measurement time are shown to be smaller than those in the static atom in vacuum case as well as those in the corresponding thermal case.

  7. The Effect of Vacuum Fluctuations on Quantum Metrology for a Uniformly Accelerated Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yao

    2017-03-01

    We studied, in the framework of open quantum systems, the dynamics of the quantum Fisher information of the parameters of the initial atomic state and atomic transition frequency for a uniformly accelerated polarizable two-level atom coupled in the multipolar scheme to a bath of fluctuating vacuum electromagnetic fields in Minkowski space-time. Our results show that the vacuum fluctuations in Minkowski space-time always make the quantum Fisher information decay, thus degrade the precision of the parameter estimation. The acceleration of the atom makes the quantum Fisher information of initial parameters of atomic state decay faster than those in case with static atom in Minkowski vacuum and even those in case with static atom in Minkowski thermal bath with corresponding Unruh temperature. The maxima of quantum Fisher information of atomic frequency and the optimal measurement time are shown to be smaller than those in the static atom in vacuum case as well as those in the corresponding thermal case.

  8. An architecture for quantum computation with magnetically trapped Holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffman, Mark; Hostetter, James; Booth, Donald; Collett, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    Outstanding challenges for scalable neutral atom quantum computation include correction of atom loss due to collisions with untrapped background gas, reduction of crosstalk during state preparation and measurement due to scattering of near resonant light, and the need to improve quantum gate fidelity. We present a scalable architecture based on loading single Holmium atoms into an array of Ioffe-Pritchard traps. The traps are formed by grids of superconducting wires giving a trap array with 40 μm period, suitable for entanglement via long range Rydberg gates. The states | F = 5 , M = 5 > and | F = 7 , M = 7 > provide a magic trapping condition at a low field of 3.5 G for long coherence time qubit encoding. The F = 11 level will be used for state preparation and measurement. The availability of different states for encoding, gate operations, and measurement, spectroscopically isolates the different operations and will prevent crosstalk to neighboring qubits. Operation in a cryogenic environment with ultra low pressure will increase atom lifetime and Rydberg gate fidelity by reduction of blackbody induced Rydberg decay. We will present a complete description of the architecture including estimates of achievable performance metrics. Work supported by NSF award PHY-1404357.

  9. The Quantum World of Ultra-Cold Atoms and Light - Book 1: Foundations of Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Crispin; Zoller, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Abstract The Table of Contents is as follows: * I - THE PHYSICAL BACKGROUND * 1. Controlling the Quantum World * 1.1 Quantum Optics * 1.2 Quantum Information * 2. Describing the Quantum World * 2.1 Classical Stochastic Processes * 2.2. Theoretical Quantum Optics * 2.3. Quantum Stochastic Methods * 2.4. Ultra-Cold Atoms * II - CLASSICAL STOCHASTIC METHODS * 3. Physics in a Noisy World * 3.1. Brownian Motion and the Thermal Origin of Noise * 3.2. Brownian Motion, Friction, Noise and Temperature * 3.3. Measurement in a Fluctuating System * 4. Stochastic Differential Equations * 4.1. Ito Stochastic Differential Equation * 4.2. The Fokker-Planck Equation * 4.3. The Stratonovich Stochastic Differential Equation * 4.4. Systems with Many Variables * 4.5. Numerical Simulation of Stochastic Differential Equations * 5. The Fokker-Planck Equation * 5.1. Fokker-Planck Equation in One Dimension * 5.2. Eigenfunctions of the Fokker-Planck Equation * 5.3. Many-Variable Fokker-Planck Equations * 6. Master Equations and Jump Processes * 6.1. The Master Equation * 7. Applications of Random Processes * 7.1. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck Process * 7.2. Johnson Noise * 7.3. Complex Variable Oscillator Processes * 8. The Markov Limit * 8.1. The White Noise Limit * 8.2. Interpretation and Generalizations of the White Noise Limit * 8.3. Linear Non-Markovian Stochastic Differential Equations * 9. Adiabatic Elimination of Fast Variables * 9.1 Slow and Fast Variables * 9.2. Other Applications of the Adiabatic Elimination Method * III - FIELDS, QUANTA AND ATOMS * 10. Ideal Bose and Fermi Systems * 10.1. The Quantum Gas * 10.2. Thermal States * 10.3. Fluctuations in the Ideal Bose Gas * 10.4. Bosonic Quantum Gaussian Systems * 10.5. Coherent States * 10.6. Fluctuations in Systems of Fermions * 10.7. Two-Level Systems and Pauli Matrices * 11. Quantum Fields * 11.1 Kinds of Quantum Field * 11.2 Coherence and Correlation Functions * 12. Atoms, Light and their Interaction * 12.1. Interaction with the

  10. Quantum Phases of Fermionic Cold Atoms Through Pairing and Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Nicolas; Tsai, Shan-Wen; Timmermans, E.; Lin, Chi-Yong

    2011-03-01

    Cold atom experiments have realized molecule creation consisting of paired fermions and dissociation of weakly bound molecules into correlated fermions by tuning of the interactions with external fields [1,2]. We study many-body correlations in such system where molecules are weakly bound and therefore pairs of fermionic atoms convert into and dissociate from the bound molecule state. This exchange mediates a long-range interaction between the fermions. We consider a simple many-body Hamiltonian that includes the destruction of fermionic atom pairs to form single bosonic molecules and vice versa. We employ a functional renormalization-group approach to search for instabilities from the disordered quantum liquid phase that may arise from a boson mediated fermion-fermion interaction. We calculate the renormalized frequency-dependent fermion interactions vertices and renormalized molecular binding energy.

  11. Continuous Measurement Quantum State Tomography of Atomic Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riofrio Almeida, Carlos A.

    Quantum state tomography is a fundamental tool in quantum information processing tasks. It allows us to estimate the state of a quantum system by measuring different observables on many identically prepared copies of the system. Usually, one makes projective measurements of an "informationally complete" set of observables and repeats them enough times so that good estimates of their expectation values are obtained. This is, in general, a very time-consuming task that requires a large number of measurements. There are, however, systems in which the data acquisition can be done more efficiently. In fact, an ensemble of quantum systems can be prepared and manipulated by external fields while being continuously probed collectively, producing enough information to estimate its state. This provides a basis for continuous measurement quantum tomography, and is the main topic of this dissertation. This method, based on weak continuous measurement, has the advantage of being fast, accurate, and almost nonperturbative. In this work, we present a extensive discussion and a generalization of the protocol proposed in [1], which was experimentally achieved in [2] using cold cesium atoms. In this protocol, an ensemble of identically prepared systems is collectively probed and controlled in a time-dependent manner so as to create an informationally complete continuous measurement record. The measurement history is then inverted to determine the state at the initial time. To achieve this, we use two different estimation methods: the widely used maximum likelihood and the novel compressed sensing algorithms. The general formalism is applied to the case of reconstruction of the quantum state encoded in the magnetic sub-levels of a large-spin alkali atom, 133Cs. We extend the applicability of the protocol in [1] to the more ambitious case of reconstruction of states in the full 16-dimensional electronic-ground subspace ( F = 3, F = 4), controlled by microwaves and radio

  12. Quantum State Control of Trapped Atomic and Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seck, Christopher M.

    Full quantum control of a molecule would have a significant impact in molecular coherent control (alignment and orientation) and ultracold and quantum chemistry, quantum computing and simulation as well as hybrid quantum devices, and precision spectroscopy of importance to fundamental physics research. Precision spectroscopy of even simple diatomic molecules offers the possibility of uncovering physics beyond the standard model, specifically time variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio, which is currently constrained by astronomical molecular observations at the 10-16 1/yr level and laboratory atomic measurements at the 10-17 1/yr level. To achieve this level of measurement and to avoid the complications of diatomic structure on traditional spectroscopy methods, molecular quantum logic spectroscopy (mQLS) will be the spectroscopy technique of choice. We discuss development of in-house external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) systems and improvements to the Libbrecht-Hall circuit, which is a well-known, low-noise current driver for narrow-linewidth diode lasers. However, as the current approaches the maximum set limit, the noise in the laser current increases dramatically. This behavior is documented and simple circuit modifications to alleviate this issue are explored. We cool trapped AlH+ molecules to their ground rotational-vibrational quantum state using an electronically-exciting broadband laser to simultaneously drive cooling resonances from many different rotational levels. We demonstrate rotational cooling on the 140(20) ms timescale from room temperature to 3.8 K, with the ground state population increasing from 3% to 95.4%. Since QLS does not require the high gate fidelities usually associated with quantum computation and quantum simulation, it is possible to make simplifying choices in ion species and quantum protocols at the expense of some fidelity. We demonstrate sideband cooling and motional state detection protocols for 138Ba+ of sufficient fidelity

  13. Towards experimental quantum-field tomography with ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Steffens, A; Friesdorf, M; Langen, T; Rauer, B; Schweigler, T; Hübener, R; Schmiedmayer, J; Riofrío, C A; Eisert, J

    2015-07-03

    The experimental realization of large-scale many-body systems in atomic-optical architectures has seen immense progress in recent years, rendering full tomography tools for state identification inefficient, especially for continuous systems. To work with these emerging physical platforms, new technologies for state identification are required. Here we present first steps towards efficient experimental quantum-field tomography. Our procedure is based on the continuous analogues of matrix-product states, ubiquitous in condensed-matter theory. These states naturally incorporate the locality present in realistic physical settings and are thus prime candidates for describing the physics of locally interacting quantum fields. To experimentally demonstrate the power of our procedure, we quench a one-dimensional Bose gas by a transversal split and use our method for a partial quantum-field reconstruction of the far-from-equilibrium states of this system. We expect our technique to play an important role in future studies of continuous quantum many-body systems.

  14. Bounding quantum-gravity-inspired decoherence using atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minář, Jiří; Sekatski, Pavel; Sangouard, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Hypothetical models have been proposed in which explicit collapse mechanisms prevent the superposition principle from holding at large scales. In particular, the model introduced by Ellis et al. [J. Ellis et al., Phys. Lett. B 221, 113 (1989), 10.1016/0370-2693(89)91482-2] suggests that quantum gravity might be responsible for the collapse of the wave function of massive objects in spatial superpositions. We consider here a recent experiment reporting on interferometry with atoms delocalized over half a meter for a time scale of 1 s [T. Kovachy et al., Nature (London) 528, 530 (2015), 10.1038/nature16155] and show that the corresponding data strongly bound quantum-gravity-induced decoherence and rule it out in the parameter regime considered originally.

  15. Non-Abelian quantum holonomy of hydrogenlike atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mousolou, Vahid Azimi; Canali, Carlo M.; Sjoeqvist, Erik

    2011-09-15

    We study the Uhlmann holonomy [Rep. Math. Phys. 24, 229 (1986)] of quantum states for hydrogenlike atoms where the intrinsic spin and orbital angular momentum are coupled by the spin-orbit interaction and are subject to a slowly varying magnetic field. We show that the holonomy for the orbital angular momentum and spin subsystems is non-Abelian while the holonomy of the whole system is Abelian. Quantum entanglement in the states of the whole system is crucially related to the non-Abelian gauge structure of the subsystems. We analyze the phase of the Wilson loop variable associated with the Uhlmann holonomy and find a relation between the phase of the whole system and corresponding marginal phases. Based on the results for the model system, we provide evidence that the phase of the Wilson loop variable and the mixed-state geometric phase [E. Sjoeqvist et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2845 (2000).] are generally inequivalent.

  16. Single-atom edgelike states via quantum interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelegrí, G.; Polo, J.; Turpin, A.; Lewenstein, M.; Mompart, J.; Ahufinger, V.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate how quantum interference may lead to the appearance of robust edgelike states of a single ultracold atom in a two-dimensional optical ribbon. We show that these states can be engineered within the manifold of either local ground states of the sites forming the ribbon or states carrying one unit of angular momentum. In the former case, we show that the implementation of edgelike states can be extended to other geometries, such as tilted square lattices. In the latter case, we suggest using the winding number associated to the angular momentum as a synthetic dimension.

  17. Quantum theory of cold bosonic atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Tilahun, Dagim; Duine, R. A.; MacDonald, A. H.

    2011-09-15

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices undergo a quantum phase transition from a superfluid to a Mott insulator as the lattice potential depth is increased. We describe an approximate theory of interacting bosons in optical lattices which provides a qualitative description of both superfluid and insulator states. The theory is based on a change of variables in which the boson coherent state amplitude is replaced by an effective potential which promotes phase coherence between different number states on each lattice site. It is illustrated here by applying it to uniform and fully frustrated lattice cases but is simple enough that it can be applied to spatially inhomogeneous lattice systems.

  18. Synchronization of active atomic clocks via quantum and classical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Alexander; Hammerer, Klemens

    2016-10-01

    Superradiant lasers based on atomic ensembles exhibiting ultranarrow optical transitions can emit light of unprecedented spectral purity and may serve as active atomic clocks. We consider two frequency-detuned active atomic clocks, which are coupled in a cascaded setup, i.e., as master and slave lasers, and study the synchronization of the slave to the master clock. In a setup where both atomic ensembles are coupled to a common cavity mode, such synchronization phenomena have been predicted by Xu et al. [M. Xu, D. A. Tieri, E. C. Fine, J. K. Thompson, and M. J. Holland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 154101 (2014)., 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.154101] and experimentally observed by Weiner et al. (J. M. Weiner et al., arXiv:1503.06464). Here we demonstrate that synchronization still occurs in cascaded setups but exhibits distinctly different phase diagrams. We study the characteristics of synchronization in comparison to the case of coupling through a common cavity. We also consider synchronization through a classical channel where light of the master laser is measured phase sensitively and the slave laser is injection locked by feedback and compare to the results achievable by coupling through quantum channels.

  19. Single atom detection in ultracold quantum gases: a review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Ott, Herwig

    2016-05-01

    The recent advances in single atom detection and manipulation in experiments with ultracold quantum gases are reviewed. The discussion starts with the basic principles of trapping, cooling and detecting single ions and atoms. The realization of single atom detection in ultracold quantum gases is presented in detail and the employed methods, which are based on light scattering, electron scattering, field ionization and direct neutral particle detection are discussed. The microscopic coherent manipulation of single atoms in a quantum gas is also covered. Various examples are given in order to highlight the power of these approaches to study many-body quantum systems.

  20. Two-Dimensional Double-Quantum Spectra Reveal Collective Resonances in an Atomic Vapor

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xingcan; Richter, Marten; Li, Hebin; Bristow, Alan D.; Falvo, Cyril; Mukamel, Shaul; Cundiff, Steven T.

    2013-01-01

    We report the observation of double-quantum coherence signals in a gas of potassium atoms at twice the frequency of the one-quantum coherences. Since a single atom does not have a state at the corresponding energy, this observation must be attributed to a collective resonance involving multiple atoms. These resonances are induced by weak interatomic dipole-dipole interactions, which means that the atoms cannot be treated in isolation, even at a low density of 1012 cm−3. PMID:23003037

  1. Interplay between Switching Driven by the Tunneling Current and Atomic Force of a Bistable Four-Atom Si Quantum Dot.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shiro; Maeda, Keisuke; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Abe, Masayuki; Zobač, Vladimír; Pou, Pablo; Rodrigo, Lucia; Mutombo, Pingo; Pérez, Ruben; Jelínek, Pavel; Morita, Seizo

    2015-07-08

    We assemble bistable silicon quantum dots consisting of four buckled atoms (Si4-QD) using atom manipulation. We demonstrate two competing atom switching mechanisms, downward switching induced by tunneling current of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and opposite upward switching induced by atomic force of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Simultaneous application of competing current and force allows us to tune switching direction continuously. Assembly of the few-atom Si-QDs and controlling their states using versatile combined AFM/STM will contribute to further miniaturization of nanodevices.

  2. Positron scattering from hydrogen atom embedded in dense quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Arka; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ghoshal, Arijit; Ratnavelu, K.

    2013-08-15

    Scattering of positrons from the ground state of hydrogen atoms embedded in dense quantum plasma has been investigated by applying a formulation of the three-body collision problem in the form of coupled multi-channel two-body Lippmann-Schwinger equations. The interactions among the charged particles in dense quantum plasma have been represented by exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. Variationally determined hydrogenic wave function has been employed to calculate the partial-wave scattering amplitude. Plasma screening effects on various possible mode of fragmentation of the system e{sup +}+H(1s) during the collision, such as 1s→1s and 2s→2s elastic collisions, 1s→2s excitation, positronium formation, elastic proton-positronium collisions, have been reported in the energy range 13.6-350 eV. Furthermore, a comparison has been made on the plasma screening effect of a dense quantum plasma with that of a weakly coupled plasma for which the plasma screening effect has been represented by the Debye model. Our results for the unscreened case are in fair agreement with some of the most accurate results available in the literature.

  3. Clustering of ions at atomic dimensions in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Padma K.; Eliasson, Bengt; Eliasson

    2013-08-01

    By means of particle simulations of the equations of motion for ions interacting among themselves under the influence of newly discovered Shukla-Eliasson attractive force (SEAF) in a dense quantum plasma, we demonstrate that the SEAF can bring ions closer at atomic dimensions. We present simulation results of the dynamics of an ensemble of ions in the presence of the SEAF without and with confining external potentials and collisions between ions and degenerate electrons. Our particle simulations reveal that under the SEAF, ions attract each other, come closer, and form ionic clusters in the bath of degenerate electrons that shield ions. Furthermore, an external confining potential produces robust ion clusters that can have cigar- and ball-like shapes, which remain stable when the confining potential is removed. The stability of ion clusters is discussed. Our results may have applications to solid density plasmas (density exceeding 1023 per cm3), where the electrons will be degenerate and quantum forces due to the electron recoil effect caused by the overlapping of electron wave functions and electron tunneling through the Bohm potential, electron-exchange and electron-exchange and electron correlations associated with electron-1/2 spin effect, and the quantum statistical pressure of the degenerate electrons play a decisive role.

  4. Valence atom with bohmian quantum potential: the golden ratio approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The alternative quantum mechanical description of total energy given by Bohmian theory was merged with the concept of the golden ratio and its appearance as the Heisenberg imbalance to provide a new density-based description of the valence atomic state and reactivity charge with the aim of clarifying their features with respect to the so-called DFT ground state and critical charge, respectively. Results The results, based on the so-called double variational algorithm for chemical spaces of reactivity, are fundamental and, among other issues regarding chemical bonding, solve the existing paradox of using a cubic parabola to describe a quadratic charge dependency. Conclusions Overall, the paper provides a qualitative-quantitative explanation of chemical reactivity based on more than half of an electronic pair in bonding, and provide new, more realistic values for the so-called “universal” electronegativity and chemical hardness of atomic systems engaged in reactivity (analogous to the atoms-in-molecules framework). PMID:23146157

  5. Atom Interferometry with Ultracold Quantum Gases in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jason; D'Incao, Jose; Chiow, Sheng-Wey; Yu, Nan

    2015-05-01

    Precision atom interferometers (AI) in space promise exciting technical capabilities for fundamental physics research, with proposals including unprecedented tests of the weak equivalence principle, precision measurements of the fine structure and gravitational constants, and detection of gravity waves and dark energy. Consequently, multiple AI-based missions have been proposed to NASA, including a dual-atomic-species interferometer that is to be integrated into the Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) onboard the International Space Station. In this talk, I will discuss our plans and preparation at JPL for the proposed flight experiments to use the CAL facility to study the leading-order systematics expected to corrupt future high-precision measurements of fundamental physics with AIs in microgravity. The project centers on the physics of pairwise interactions and molecular dynamics in these quantum systems as a means to overcome uncontrolled shifts associated with the gravity gradient and few-particle collisions. We will further utilize the CAL AI for proof-of-principle tests of systematic mitigation and phase-readout techniques for use in the next-generation of precision metrology experiments based on AIs in microgravity. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  6. Casimir Forces and Quantum Friction from Ginzburg Radiation in Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Jamir; Recati, Alessio; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically propose an experimentally viable scheme to use an impurity atom in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, in order to realize condensed-matter analogs of quantum vacuum effects. In a suitable atomic level configuration, the collisional interaction between the impurity atom and the density fluctuations in the condensate can be tailored to closely reproduce the electric-dipole coupling of quantum electrodynamics. By virtue of this analogy, we recover and extend the paradigm of electromagnetic vacuum forces to the domain of cold atoms, showing in particular the emergence, at supersonic atomic speeds, of a novel power-law scaling of the Casimir force felt by the atomic impurity, as well as the occurrence of a quantum frictional force, accompanied by the Ginzburg emission of Bogoliubov quanta. Observable consequences of these quantum vacuum effects in realistic spectroscopic experiments are discussed.

  7. Casimir Forces and Quantum Friction from Ginzburg Radiation in Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensates.

    PubMed

    Marino, Jamir; Recati, Alessio; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2017-01-27

    We theoretically propose an experimentally viable scheme to use an impurity atom in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, in order to realize condensed-matter analogs of quantum vacuum effects. In a suitable atomic level configuration, the collisional interaction between the impurity atom and the density fluctuations in the condensate can be tailored to closely reproduce the electric-dipole coupling of quantum electrodynamics. By virtue of this analogy, we recover and extend the paradigm of electromagnetic vacuum forces to the domain of cold atoms, showing in particular the emergence, at supersonic atomic speeds, of a novel power-law scaling of the Casimir force felt by the atomic impurity, as well as the occurrence of a quantum frictional force, accompanied by the Ginzburg emission of Bogoliubov quanta. Observable consequences of these quantum vacuum effects in realistic spectroscopic experiments are discussed.

  8. Chiral quantum optics with V-level atoms and coherent quantum feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimond, Pierre-Olivier; Pichler, Hannes; Rauschenbeutel, Arno; Zoller, Peter

    2016-09-01

    We study the dissipative dynamics of an atom in a V-level configuration driven by lasers and coupled to a semi-infinite waveguide. The coupling to the waveguide is chiral, in that each transition interacts only with the modes propagating in a given direction, and this direction is opposite for the two transitions. The waveguide is terminated by a mirror which coherently feeds the photon stream emitted by one transition back to the atom. First, we are interested in the dynamics of the atom in the Markovian limit where the time delay in the feedback is negligible. Specifically, we study the conditions under which the atom evolves towards a pure "dark" stationary state, where the photons emitted by both transitions interfere destructively thanks to the coherent feedback, and the overall emission vanishes. This is a single-atom analog of the quantum dimer, where a pair of laser-driven two-level atoms is coupled to a unidirectional waveguide and dissipates towards a pure entangled dark state. Our setup should be feasible with current state-of-the-art experiments. Second, we extend our study to non-Markovian regimes and investigate the effect of the feedback retardation on the steady state.

  9. The Quantum Mathematical Modelling of Adsorption of Atoms on Heme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassim, Hasan Abu; Yusof, Norhasliza; Devi, V. R.; Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    2008-01-01

    The heme group is known to be primarily responsible for the breathing system. We generate the heme group by using density functional theory and by using the protons, neutrons and the electrons. We use the electron-electron repulsive Coulomb interaction, the electron-proton attractive interaction as well as the nuclear-nuclear attractive interaction. It is said that people who have heart problems should eat less salt. Therefore, we calculate the adsorption of several atoms of Na, one at a time, on the heme molecule. We wanted to reduce the effect of Na adsorption, so we calculated the adsorption of Li atoms on the heme group. We compare the adsorption energy of Na with that of Li on heme group. We find that the Na and Li adsorption curves cross. Therefore, the effect of Li is to reduce the effect of Na. Therefore, a special salt can be made which has a small quantity of Li added to the ordinary table salt. This kind of salt can be useful for the people who are suffereing with heart problems. Our calculation is done by using simulation of molecules in the computer and hence it is a low cost and fast yielding method. We optimized the geometry of a heme molecule with and without Na and Li atoms. Our calculated bond distance are in agreement with those known. The quantity of salt is determined by the number of Na atoms adsorbed in the centre of the porphyrin rings. We solve the quantum mechanical Schroedinger equation for all of the electrons. The minimum energy configuration is determined which gives the bond distances and angles. After the geometry of the molecule is determined we obtain the bond energy of the full system.

  10. Quasideterministic generation of maximally entangled states of two mesoscopic atomic ensembles by adiabatic quantum feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Di Lisi, Antonio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Vitali, David

    2005-09-15

    We introduce an efficient, quasideterministic scheme to generate maximally entangled states of two atomic ensembles. The scheme is based on quantum nondemolition measurements of total atomic populations and on adiabatic quantum feedback conditioned by the measurements outputs. The high efficiency of the scheme is tested and confirmed numerically for ideal photodetection as well as in the presence of losses.

  11. Cavity-based quantum networks with single atoms and optical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiserer, Andreas; Rempe, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    Distributed quantum networks will allow users to perform tasks and to interact in ways which are not possible with present-day technology. Their implementation is a key challenge for quantum science and requires the development of stationary quantum nodes that can send and receive as well as store and process quantum information locally. The nodes are connected by quantum channels for flying information carriers, i.e., photons. These channels serve both to directly exchange quantum information between nodes and to distribute entanglement over the whole network. In order to scale such networks to many particles and long distances, an efficient interface between the nodes and the channels is required. This article describes the cavity-based approach to this goal, with an emphasis on experimental systems in which single atoms are trapped in and coupled to optical resonators. Besides being conceptually appealing, this approach is promising for quantum networks on larger scales, as it gives access to long qubit coherence times and high light-matter coupling efficiencies. Thus, it allows one to generate entangled photons on the push of a button, to reversibly map the quantum state of a photon onto an atom, to transfer and teleport quantum states between remote atoms, to entangle distant atoms, to detect optical photons nondestructively, to perform entangling quantum gates between an atom and one or several photons, and even provides a route toward efficient heralded quantum memories for future repeaters. The presented general protocols and the identification of key parameters are applicable to other experimental systems.

  12. Quantum interference of fast atoms scattered off crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravielle, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    The striking observation of interference structures produced by grazing impact of fast atoms on crystal surfaces reported a few years ago [1,2] has given rise to the development of a powerful surface analysis technique. This article gives a brief account of the main features of the process, using the Surface Eikonal (SE) approximation as a theoretical tool to analyze the different mechanisms responsible for the quantum interference. The SE approach is a semiclassical method based on the use of the eikonal wave function, which takes into account the coherent superposition of transition amplitudes for different axially channeled trajectories. It has proved to provide a quite good description of experimental diffraction patterns for different collision systems.

  13. Ab initio quantum transport in atomic carbon chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botello-Méndez, Andrés R.; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Banhart, Florian; NAPS Team; Carbyne Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Carbyne, the sp-hybridized phase of carbon, is still a missing link in the family of carbon allotropes. Recently, detailed electrical measurements and first-principles electronic transport calculations have been performed on monoatomic carbon chains. When the 1D system is under strain, the current-voltage curves exhibit a semiconducting behavior, which corresponds to the polyyne structure of the atomic chain with alternating single and triple bonds. Conversely, when the chain is unstrained, the ohmic behavior is observed in agreement with the metallic cumulene structure with double bonds, confirming recent theoretical predictions, namely that a metal-insulator transition can be induced by adjusting the strain. The key role of the contacting leads is also scrutinized by ab initio quantum conductance calculations, explaining the rectifying behavior measured in monoatomic carbon chains in a non-symmetric contact configuration.

  14. Dynamic sensitivity of photon-dressed atomic ensemble with quantum criticality

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jinfeng; Kuang Leman; Li Yong; Liao Jieqiao; Sun, C. P.

    2009-12-15

    We study the dynamic sensitivity of an atomic ensemble dressed by a single-mode cavity field (called a photon-dressed atomic ensemble), which is described by the Dicke model near the quantum critical point. It is shown that when an extra atom in a pure initial state passes through the cavity, the photon-dressed atomic ensemble will experience a quantum phase transition showing an explicit sudden change in its dynamics characterized by the Loschmidt echo of this quantum critical system. With such dynamic sensitivity, the Dicke model can resemble the cloud chamber for detecting a flying particle by the enhanced trajectory due to the classical phase transition.

  15. Atomic quantum dots coupled to a reservoir of a superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Recati, A; Fedichev, P O; Zwerger, W; von Delft, J; Zoller, P

    2005-02-04

    We study the dynamics of an atomic quantum dot, i.e., a single atom in a tight optical trap which is coupled to a superfluid reservoir via laser transitions. Quantum interference between the collisional interactions and the laser induced coupling results in a tunable dot-bath coupling, allowing an essentially complete decoupling from the environment. Quantum dots embedded in a 1D Luttinger liquid of cold bosonic atoms realize a spin-boson model with Ohmic coupling, which exhibits a dissipative phase transition and allows us to directly measure atomic Luttinger parameters.

  16. Quantum annealing with ultracold atoms in a multimode optical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torggler, Valentin; Krämer, Sebastian; Ritsch, Helmut

    2017-03-01

    A dilutely filled N -site optical lattice near zero temperature within a high-Q multimode cavity can be mapped to a spin ensemble with tailorable interactions at all length scales. The effective full site to site interaction matrix can be dynamically controlled by the application of up to N (N +1 )/2 laser beams of suitable geometry, frequency, and power, which allows for the implementation of quantum annealing dynamics relying on the all-to-all effective spin coupling controllable in real time. Via an adiabatic sweep starting from a superfluid initial state one can find the lowest-energy stationary state of this system. As the cavity modes are lossy, errors can be amended and the ground state can still be reached even from a finite temperature state via ground-state cavity cooling. The physical properties of the final atomic state can be directly and almost nondestructively read off from the cavity output fields. As an example we simulate a quantum Hopfield associative memory scheme.

  17. Positron impact excitations of hydrogen atom embedded in dense quantum plasmas: Formation of Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2014-11-15

    Formation of Rydberg atoms due to 1 s → nlm excitations of hydrogen by positron impact, for arbitrary n, l, m, in dense quantum plasma has been investigated using a distorted wave theory which includes screened dipole polarization potential. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. Making use of a simple variationally determined hydrogen wave function, it has been possible to obtain the distorted wave scattering amplitude in a closed analytical form. A detailed study has been made to explore the structure of differential and total cross sections in the energy range 20–300 eV of incident positron. For the unscreened case, our results agree nicely with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, such a study on the differential and total cross sections for 1 s → nlm inelastic positron-hydrogen collisions in dense quantum plasma is the first reported in the literature.

  18. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and lithium cluster properties. [Atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Properties of small lithium clusters with sizes ranging from n = 1 to 5 atoms were investigated using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Cluster geometries were found from complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. A detailed development of the QMC method leading to the variational QMC (V-QMC) and diffusion QMC (D-QMC) methods is shown. The many-body aspect of electron correlation is introduced into the QMC importance sampling electron-electron correlation functions by using density dependent parameters, and are shown to increase the amount of correlation energy obtained in V-QMC calculations. A detailed analysis of D-QMC time-step bias is made and is found to be at least linear with respect to the time-step. The D-QMC calculations determined the lithium cluster ionization potentials to be 0.1982(14) (0.1981), 0.1895(9) (0.1874(4)), 0.1530(34) (0.1599(73)), 0.1664(37) (0.1724(110)), 0.1613(43) (0.1675(110)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 1 through 5, respectively; in good agreement with experimental results shown in the brackets. Also, the binding energies per atom was computed to be 0.0177(8) (0.0203(12)), 0.0188(10) (0.0220(21)), 0.0247(8) (0.0310(12)), 0.0253(8) (0.0351(8)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 2 through 5, respectively. The lithium cluster one-electron density is shown to have charge concentrations corresponding to nonnuclear attractors. The overall shape of the electronic charge density also bears a remarkable similarity with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model shape for the given number of valence electrons.

  19. Coverage-dependent quantum versus classical scattering of thermal neon atoms from Li/Cu(100).

    PubMed

    Maclaren, D A; Huang, C; Levi, A C; Allison, W

    2008-09-07

    We show that subtle variations in surface structure can enhance quantum scattering and quench atom-surface energy transfer. The scattering of thermal energy neon atoms from a lithium overlayer on a copper substrate switches between a classical regime, dominated by multiphonon interactions, and a quantum regime, dominated by elastic diffraction. The transition is achieved by simple tailoring of the lithium coverage and quantum scattering dominates only in the narrow coverage range of theta=0.3-0.6 ML. The results are described qualitatively using a modified Debye-Waller model that incorporates an approximate quantum treatment of the adsorbate-substrate vibration.

  20. Quantum State Transmission in a Superconducting Charge Qubit-Atom Hybrid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Deshui; Valado, María Martínez; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-12-06

    Hybrids consisting of macroscopic superconducting circuits and microscopic components, such as atoms and spins, have the potential of transmitting an arbitrary state between different quantum species, leading to the prospective of high-speed operation and long-time storage of quantum information. Here we propose a novel hybrid structure, where a neutral-atom qubit directly interfaces with a superconducting charge qubit, to implement the qubit-state transmission. The highly-excited Rydberg atom located inside the gate capacitor strongly affects the behavior of Cooper pairs in the box while the atom in the ground state hardly interferes with the superconducting device. In addition, the DC Stark shift of the atomic states significantly depends on the charge-qubit states. By means of the standard spectroscopic techniques and sweeping the gate voltage bias, we show how to transfer an arbitrary quantum state from the superconducting device to the atom and vice versa.

  1. Quantum State Transmission in a Superconducting Charge Qubit-Atom Hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Deshui; Valado, María Martínez; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Hybrids consisting of macroscopic superconducting circuits and microscopic components, such as atoms and spins, have the potential of transmitting an arbitrary state between different quantum species, leading to the prospective of high-speed operation and long-time storage of quantum information. Here we propose a novel hybrid structure, where a neutral-atom qubit directly interfaces with a superconducting charge qubit, to implement the qubit-state transmission. The highly-excited Rydberg atom located inside the gate capacitor strongly affects the behavior of Cooper pairs in the box while the atom in the ground state hardly interferes with the superconducting device. In addition, the DC Stark shift of the atomic states significantly depends on the charge-qubit states. By means of the standard spectroscopic techniques and sweeping the gate voltage bias, we show how to transfer an arbitrary quantum state from the superconducting device to the atom and vice versa. PMID:27922087

  2. Quantum controlled-phase-flip gate between a flying optical photon and a Rydberg atomic ensemble

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Y. M.; Lin, G. W.; Xia, Keyu; Lin, X. M.; Niu, Y. P.; Gong, S. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum controlled-phase-flip (CPF) gate between a flying photon qubit and a stationary atomic qubit could allow the linking of distant computational nodes in a quantum network. Here we present a scheme to realize quantum CPF gate between a flying optical photon and an atomic ensemble based on cavity input-output process and Rydberg blockade. When a flying single-photon pulse is reflected off the cavity containing a Rydberg atomic ensemble, the dark resonance and Rydberg blockade induce a conditional phase shift for the photon pulse, thus we can achieve the CPF gate between the photon and the atomic ensemble. Assisted by Rydberg blockade interaction, our scheme works in the N-atoms strong-coupling regime and significantly relaxes the requirement of strong coupling of single atom to photon in the optical cavity. PMID:25966448

  3. Quantum State Transmission in a Superconducting Charge Qubit-Atom Hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deshui; Valado, María Martínez; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-12-01

    Hybrids consisting of macroscopic superconducting circuits and microscopic components, such as atoms and spins, have the potential of transmitting an arbitrary state between different quantum species, leading to the prospective of high-speed operation and long-time storage of quantum information. Here we propose a novel hybrid structure, where a neutral-atom qubit directly interfaces with a superconducting charge qubit, to implement the qubit-state transmission. The highly-excited Rydberg atom located inside the gate capacitor strongly affects the behavior of Cooper pairs in the box while the atom in the ground state hardly interferes with the superconducting device. In addition, the DC Stark shift of the atomic states significantly depends on the charge-qubit states. By means of the standard spectroscopic techniques and sweeping the gate voltage bias, we show how to transfer an arbitrary quantum state from the superconducting device to the atom and vice versa.

  4. Protecting quantum coherence of two-level atoms from vacuum fluctuations of electromagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaobao; Tian, Zehua; Wang, Jieci; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-03-15

    In the framework of open quantum systems, we study the dynamics of a static polarizable two-level atom interacting with a bath of fluctuating vacuum electromagnetic field and explore under which conditions the coherence of the open quantum system is unaffected by the environment. For both a single-qubit and two-qubit systems, we find that the quantum coherence cannot be protected from noise when the atom interacts with a non-boundary electromagnetic field. However, with the presence of a boundary, the dynamical conditions for the insusceptible of quantum coherence are fulfilled only when the atom is close to the boundary and is transversely polarizable. Otherwise, the quantum coherence can only be protected in some degree in other polarizable direction. -- Highlights: •We study the dynamics of a two-level atom interacting with a bath of fluctuating vacuum electromagnetic field. •For both a single and two-qubit systems, the quantum coherence cannot be protected from noise without a boundary. •The insusceptible of the quantum coherence can be fulfilled only when the atom is close to the boundary and is transversely polarizable. •Otherwise, the quantum coherence can only be protected in some degree in other polarizable direction.

  5. Quantum Transport in Gated Dangling-Bond Atomic Wires.

    PubMed

    Bohloul, S; Shi, Q; Wolkow, Robert A; Guo, Hong

    2017-01-11

    A single line of dangling bonds (DBs) on Si(100)-2 × 1:H surface forms a perfect metallic atomic-wire. In this work, we investigate quantum transport properties of such dangling bond wires (DBWs) by a state-of-the-art first-principles technique. It is found that the conductance of the DBW can be gated by electrostatic potential and orbital overlap due to only a single DB center (DBC) within a distance of ∼16 Å from the DBW. The gating effect is more pronounced for two DBCs and especially, when these two DB "gates" are within ∼3.9 Å from each other. These effective length scales are in excellent agreement with those measured in scanning tunnelling microscope experiments. By analyzing transmission spectrum and density of states of DBC-DBW systems, with or without subsurface doping, for different length of the DBW, distance between DBCs and the DBW, and distance between DB gates, we conclude that charge transport in a DBW can be regulated to have both an on-state and an off-state using only one or two DBs.

  6. Quantum coherent phenomena in superconducting circuits and ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Kaushik

    This thesis consists of theoretical studies of superconducting qubits, and trapped bosons and fermions at ultracold temperature. In superconducting qubits I analyze the resonant properties and decoherence behavior of dc SQUID phase qubits, in which one junction acts as a phase qubit and the rest of the device provides isolation from dissipation and noise in the bias lead. Typically qubit states in phase qubits are detected by tunneling it to the voltage state. I propose an alternate non-destructive readout mechanism which relies on the difference in the magnetic flux through the SQUID loop due to state of the qubit. I also study decoherence effects in a dc SQUID phase qubit caused by the isolation circuit. When the frequency of the qubit is at least two times larger than the resonance frequency of the isolation circuit, I find that the decoherence time of the qubit is two orders of magnitude larger than the typical ohmic regime, where the frequency of the qubit is much smaller than the resonance frequency of the isolation circuit. This theory is extended to other similar superconducting quantum devices and has been applied to experiments from the group at the University of Maryland. I also demonstrate, theoretically, vacuum Rabi oscillations, analogous to circuit-QED, in superconducting qubits coupled to an environment with resonance. The result obtained gives an exact analytical expression for coherent oscillation of state between the system (the qubit) and the environment with resonance. Next I investigate ultracold atoms in harmonically confined optical lattices. They exhibit a 'wedding cake structure' of alternating Mott shells with different number of bosons per site. In regions between the Mott shells, a superfluid phase emerges at low temperatures which at higher temperatures becomes a normal Bose liquid. Using finite-temperature quantum field theoretic techniques, I find analytically the properties of the superfluid, Bose liquid, and Mott insulating regions

  7. Quantum-mechanical definition of atoms and their interactions in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhoff, Peter; Ben-Nun, Michal; Mills, Jeffrey; Boatz, Jerry; Gallup, Gordon

    2014-05-01

    Assignments of indistinguishable electrons to particular atomic nuclei in a molecule are generally regarded as meaningless, as are associated definitions of fragment atomic and atomic-interaction operators. As a consequence, a generally agreed upon quantum-mechanical definition of a ``chemical bond'' between atoms in a molecule is largely absent. In the present report, a computationally-viable quantum-mechanical definition of chemical bonding between atoms in a molecule is presented based on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the Couloumb Hamiltonian operator, and the conditional context afforded by representation theory. An orthonormal (Eisenschitz-London) outer product of atomic spectral eigenstates is employed to provide meaningful assignments of electrons to particular atomic nuclei in a molecule, as well as support of corresponding well-defined self-adjoint atomic and atomic-interaction fragment operators. Total molecular energies obtained in this representation are partitioned into a sum of atomic terms which describe distributions of atomic energy promotions for the individual atoms and a pairwise-atomic sum of distributions among universal interaction energies which describe chemical bonds among the constituent atoms. Illustrative clarifying applications are reported. Supported in part by US Air Force Research Laboratory.

  8. Lars Onsager Prize Talk: Quantum fluids: from liquid helium to cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethick, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    The study of quantum liquids has led to ideas and concepts of broad applicability. I shall illustrate this by examples from the physics of liquid helium-3, heavy-fermion compounds, quark-gluon plasmas and cold atomic gases.

  9. The Correspondence Principle and the Founding of the Atomic Quantum Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hua-Xiang

    1995-01-01

    Presents a brief historical review and a discussion of the Bohr theory aimed at helping readers understand more completely the development of atomic quantum physics and comprehend more precisely and profoundly the essence of the correspondence principle. (JRH)

  10. Synthesis, Characterization, and Multimillion-Atom Simulation of Halogen-Based Energetic Materials for Agent Defeat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    calorimeter was built (see Fig. 2) and used to measure (see Fig. 3) the heat of formation of I2O6. The DSC curve showed an exotherm with an onset of 179 ºC...and a peak of 197 ºC for the decomposition of I2O6 to I2O5 and dioxygen, and an endotherm with an onset of 393 ºC and a peak of 424 ºC for the...overestimates the bond lengths about 2-3%. In some bonds, the overestimation can be as large as 5%. Although VDW correction definitely decreases the volume

  11. The quantum measurement effect of interaction without interaction for an atomic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Yi

    When an atomic beam collectively and harmonically vibrates perpendicular to the wave vector of the beam, the number of atoms reaching the atomic detector will have a vibrant factor Δt / T if the measurement time interval Δt is shorter than the period T. This new quantum mechanical measurement effect for an atomic beam is called interaction without interaction: though the translational motion of the atomic beam does not interact with its collective and transverse harmonic vibration, the latter will have an effect on the measured number of atoms associated with the former. From the new measurement effect the classical harmonic vibration's period is evaluated. We give a clear physical picture and a satisfactory physical interpretation for the measurement effect based on the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics. We present an experimental proposal to verify this measurement effect for an ion beam instead of an atomic beam.

  12. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Metal atom clusters are studied based on the application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches. Because these large 'molecular' systems pose special practical computational problems in the application of the quantum mechanical methods, there is a special need to find simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Research is therefore directed towards various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculations.

  13. Transfer of quantum correlations from light to atoms in the case of irreversible evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbachev, V. N.; Trubilko, A. I.

    2010-10-15

    We consider the irreversible dynamics of two two-level atoms that interact with a bipartite broad-band electromagnetic field in an entangled state that forms a heat bath with a quantum correlation. Using Ito's stochastic integration technique, we have derived a kinetic equation for atoms and found their steady state, which turns out to be inseparable and leads to a violation of Bell's inequalities. The application of the atomic state found as a quantum channel for teleportation is considered. We have calculated the channel quality or fidelity that determines the possibilities for using the channel, in particular, characterizes its security. The process of teleportation by means of a quantum channel formed by an entangled heat bath is considered. Comparison of two (atomic and light) channels has shown that they have different properties with regard to separability and identical properties with regard to nonlocality. This means that nonlocality can be completely transferred from light to atoms.

  14. Quantum speedup of an atom coupled to a photonic-band-gap reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Nan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Han-Zhuang

    2017-01-01

    For a model of an atom embedded in a photonic-band-gap reservoir, it was found that the speedup of quantum evolution is subject to the atomic frequency changes. In this work, we propose different points of view on speeding up the evolution. We show that the atomic embedded position, the width of the band gap and the defect mode also play an important role in accelerating the evolution. By changing the embedded position of the atom and the coupling strength with the defect mode, the speedup region lies even outside the band-gap region, where the non-Markovian effect is weak. The mechanism for the speedup is due to the interplay of atomic excited population and the non-Markovianity. The feasible experimental system composed of quantum dots in the photonic crystal is discussed. These results provide new degree of freedoms to depress the quantum speed limit time in photonic crystals.

  15. Quantum feedback control of atomic ensembles and spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi; Byrnes, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Cold atomic ensembles and spinor Bose-Einstein condensates are potential candidates for quantum memories as they have long coherence times and can be coherently controlled. Unlike most candidates for quantum memories, which are genuine or effective single-particle systems, in atomic ensembles the quantum information is stored as a spin coherent state involving a very large number of atoms. A typical task with such ensembles is to drive the state towards a particular quantum state. While such quantum control methods are well developed for qubit systems, it is a nontrivial task to extend quantum control methods to the many-particle case. The objective of this work is to deterministically steer an arbitrary state of the atomic ensemble into a desired spin coherent state. To this end, we design our control law using stochastic stability theory, the quantum filtering theorem, and phase contrast imaging. We apply our control laws to different axes and show that it is possible to manipulate the atoms into different target states.

  16. Let Students Derive, by Themselves, Two-Dimensional Atomic and Molecular Quantum Chemistry from Scratch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ge, Yingbin

    2016-01-01

    Hands-on exercises are designed for undergraduate physical chemistry students to derive two-dimensional quantum chemistry from scratch for the H atom and H[subscript 2] molecule, both in the ground state and excited states. By reducing the mathematical complexity of the traditional quantum chemistry teaching, these exercises can be completed…

  17. Configuring Electronic States in an Atomically Precise Array of Quantum Boxes.

    PubMed

    Nowakowska, Sylwia; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Piquero-Zulaica, Ignacio; Nowakowski, Jan; Kawai, Shigeki; Wäckerlin, Christian; Matena, Manfred; Nijs, Thomas; Fatayer, Shadi; Popova, Olha; Ahsan, Aisha; Mousavi, S Fatemeh; Ivas, Toni; Meyer, Ernst; Stöhr, Meike; Ortega, J Enrique; Björk, Jonas; Gade, Lutz H; Lobo-Checa, Jorge; Jung, Thomas A

    2016-07-01

    A 2D array of electronically coupled quantum boxes is fabricated by means of on-surface self-assembly assuring ultimate precision of each box. The quantum states embedded in the boxes are configured by adsorbates, whose occupancy is controlled with atomic precision. The electronic interbox coupling can be maintained or significantly reduced by proper arrangement of empty and filled boxes.

  18. A quantum gate between a flying optical photon and a single trapped atom.

    PubMed

    Reiserer, Andreas; Kalb, Norbert; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2014-04-10

    The steady increase in control over individual quantum systems supports the promotion of a quantum technology that could provide functionalities beyond those of any classical device. Two particularly promising applications have been explored during the past decade: photon-based quantum communication, which guarantees unbreakable encryption but which still has to be scaled to high rates over large distances, and quantum computation, which will fundamentally enhance computability if it can be scaled to a large number of quantum bits (qubits). It was realized early on that a hybrid system of light qubits and matter qubits could solve the scalability problem of each field--that of communication by use of quantum repeaters, and that of computation by use of an optical interconnect between smaller quantum processors. To this end, the development of a robust two-qubit gate that allows the linking of distant computational nodes is "a pressing challenge". Here we demonstrate such a quantum gate between the spin state of a single trapped atom and the polarization state of an optical photon contained in a faint laser pulse. The gate mechanism presented is deterministic and robust, and is expected to be applicable to almost any matter qubit. It is based on reflection of the photonic qubit from a cavity that provides strong light-matter coupling. To demonstrate its versatility, we use the quantum gate to create atom-photon, atom-photon-photon and photon-photon entangled states from separable input states. We expect our experiment to enable various applications, including the generation of atomic and photonic cluster states and Schrödinger-cat states, deterministic photonic Bell-state measurements, scalable quantum computation and quantum communication using a redundant quantum parity code.

  19. A quantum gate between a flying optical photon and a single trapped atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiserer, Andreas; Kalb, Norbert; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2014-04-01

    The steady increase in control over individual quantum systems supports the promotion of a quantum technology that could provide functionalities beyond those of any classical device. Two particularly promising applications have been explored during the past decade: photon-based quantum communication, which guarantees unbreakable encryption but which still has to be scaled to high rates over large distances, and quantum computation, which will fundamentally enhance computability if it can be scaled to a large number of quantum bits (qubits). It was realized early on that a hybrid system of light qubits and matter qubits could solve the scalability problem of each field--that of communication by use of quantum repeaters, and that of computation by use of an optical interconnect between smaller quantum processors. To this end, the development of a robust two-qubit gate that allows the linking of distant computational nodes is ``a pressing challenge''. Here we demonstrate such a quantum gate between the spin state of a single trapped atom and the polarization state of an optical photon contained in a faint laser pulse. The gate mechanism presented is deterministic and robust, and is expected to be applicable to almost any matter qubit. It is based on reflection of the photonic qubit from a cavity that provides strong light-matter coupling. To demonstrate its versatility, we use the quantum gate to create atom-photon, atom-photon-photon and photon-photon entangled states from separable input states. We expect our experiment to enable various applications, including the generation of atomic and photonic cluster states and Schrödinger-cat states, deterministic photonic Bell-state measurements, scalable quantum computation and quantum communication using a redundant quantum parity code.

  20. Non-local correlation and quantum discord in two atoms in the non-degenerate model

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.-B.A.

    2012-12-15

    By using geometric quantum discord (GQD) and measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN), quantum correlation is investigated for two atoms in the non-degenerate two-photon Tavis-Cummings model. It is shown that there is no asymptotic decay for MIN while asymptotic decay exists for GQD. Quantum correlations can be strengthened by introducing the dipole-dipole interaction. The evolvement period of quantum correlation gets shorter with the increase in the dipole-dipole parameter. It is found that there exists not only quantum nonlocality without entanglement but also quantum nonlocality without quantum discord. Also, the MIN and GQD are raised rather than entanglement, and also with weak initial entanglement, there are MIN and entanglement in a interval of death quantum discord. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Geometric quantum discord (GQD) and measurement induced nonlocality (MIN) are used to investigate the correlations of two two-level atoms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is no asymptotic decay for MIN while asymptotic decay exists for GQD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum correlations can be strengthened by introducing the dipole-dipole interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There exists not only quantum nonlocality without entanglement but also without discord. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weak initial entanglement leads to MIN and entanglement in intervals of death discord.

  1. Multimillion-year climatic effects on palm species diversity in Africa.

    PubMed

    Blach-Overgaard, Anne; Kissling, W Daniel; Dransfield, John; Balslev, Henrik; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2013-11-01

    Past climatic changes have caused extinction, speciation, and range dynamics, but assessing the influence of past multimillion-year climatic imprints on present-day biodiversity patterns remains challenging. We analyzed a new continental-scale data set to examine the importance of paleoclimatic effects on current gradients in African palm richness patterns. Using climate reconstructions from the late Miocene (-10 mya), the Pliocene (-3 mya), and the Last Glacial Maximum (0.021 mya), we found that African palm diversity patterns exhibit pronounced historical legacies related to long-term climate change. Notably, pre-Pleistocene paleoprecipitation variables differentially affected current diversity patterns of palms grouped by contrasting habitat requirements. Accounting for present-day environment, rain forest palms exhibit greater species richness in localities where Pliocene precipitation was relatively high, whereas open-habitat palms show higher species richness in areas of relatively low precipitation during the Miocene Epoch. Our results demonstrate that diversity-climate relationships among African palm species include multimillion-year lagged dynamics, i.e., with historical legacies persisting across much longer time periods than commonly recognized.

  2. Electronic and Quantum Transport Properties of Atomically Identified Si Point Defects in Graphene.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; Zhou, Wu; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2014-05-15

    We report high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images displaying a range of inclusions of isolated silicon atoms at the edges and inner zones of graphene layers. Whereas the incorporation of Si atoms to a graphene armchair edge involves no reconstruction of the neighboring carbon atoms, the inclusion of a Si atom to a zigzag graphene edge entails the formation of five-membered carbon rings. In all the observed atomic edge terminations, a Si atom is found bridging two C atoms in a 2-fold coordinated configuration. The atomic-scale observations are underpinned by first-principles calculations of the electronic and quantum transport properties of the structural anomalies. Experimental estimations of Si-doped graphene band gaps realized by means of transport measurements may be affected by a low doping rate of 2-fold coordinated Si atoms at the graphene edges, and 4-fold coordinated at inner zones due to the apparition of mobility gaps.

  3. Controlling Atomic, Solid-State and Hybrid Systems for Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullans, Michael John

    Quantum information science involves the use of precise control over quantum systems to explore new technologies. However, as quantum systems are scaled up they require an ever deeper understanding of many-body physics to achieve the required degree of control. Current experiments are entering a regime which requires active control of a mesoscopic number of coupled quantum systems or quantum bits (qubits). This thesis describes several approaches to this goal and shows how mesoscopic quantum systems can be controlled and utilized for quantum information tasks. The first system we consider is the nuclear spin environment of GaAs double quantum dots containing two electrons. We show that the through appropriate control of dynamic nuclear polarization one can prepare the nuclear spin environment in three distinct collective quantum states which are useful for quantum information processing with electron spin qubits. We then investigate a hybrid system in which an optical lattice is formed in the near field scattering off an array of metallic nanoparticles by utilizing the plasmonic resonance of the nanoparticles. We show that such a system would realize new regimes of dense, ultra-cold quantum matter and can be used to create a quantum network of atoms and plasmons. Finally we investigate quantum nonlinear optical systems. We show that the intrinsic nonlinearity for plasmons in graphene can be large enough to make a quantum gate for single photons. We also consider two nonlinear optical systems based on ultracold gases of atoms. In one case, we demonstrate an all-optical single photon switch using cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) and slow light. In the second case, we study few photon physics in strongly interacting Rydberg polariton systems, where we demonstrate the existence of two and three photon bound states and study their properties.

  4. Progress toward a spin squeezed optical atomic clock beyond the standard quantum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2015-05-01

    State of the art optical lattice atomic clocks have reached a relative inaccuracy level of 10-18, already making them the most stable time references in existence. One restriction on the precision of these clocks is the projection noise caused by the measurement of the atomic state. This limit, known as the standard quantum limit (SQL), can be overcome by entangling the atoms. By performing spin squeezing, it is possible to robustly generate such entanglement and therefore surpass the SQL of precision in optical atomic clocks. I will report on recent experimental progress toward realizing spin squeezing in an 171Yb optical lattice clock. A high-finesse micromirror-based optical cavity mediates the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating the entanglement. By exceeding the SQL in this state of the art system, we are aiming to advance precision time metrology, as well as expanding the boundaries of quantum control and measurement.

  5. Progress toward a spin squeezed optical atomic clock beyond the standard quantum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2014-05-01

    State of the art optical lattice atomic clocks have reached a relative inaccuracy level of 10-18, already making them the most stable time references in existence. One restriction on the precision of these clocks is the projection noise caused by the measurement of the atomic state. This limit, known as the standard quantum limit (SQL), can be overcome by entangling the atoms. By performing spin squeezing, we can robustly generate such entanglement and surpass the SQL of precision in optical atomic clocks. I will report on recent experimental progress toward realizing spin squeezing in an 171Yb optical lattice clock. A high-finesse micromirror-based optical cavity mediates the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating the entanglement. By exceeding the SQL in this state of the art system, we are aiming to advance precision time metrology, as well as expanding the boundaries of quantum control and measurement. Supported by DARPA QUASAR and NSERC.

  6. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits.

    PubMed

    Debnath, S; Linke, N M; Figgatt, C; Landsman, K A; Wright, K; Monroe, C

    2016-08-04

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch-Jozsa and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels.

  7. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, S.; Linke, N. M.; Figgatt, C.; Landsman, K. A.; Wright, K.; Monroe, C.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch-Jozsa and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels.

  8. Some reflections on the role of semi-classical atomic models in the teaching and learning of introductory quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Colm

    2016-03-01

    The role of "semi-classical" (Bohr-Sommerfeld) and "semi-quantum-mechanical" (atomic orbital) models in the context of the teaching of atomic theory is considered. It is suggested that an appropriate treatment of such models can serve as a useful adjunct to quantum mechanical study of atomic systems.

  9. Measurements of quantum defect in Rydberg D-states for lithium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashkin, D. A.; Saakyan, S. A.; Sautenkov, V. A.; Zelener, B. B.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed an effective spectroscopic method for measure the energy spectra of highly excited ultracold atoms using the registration of resonance fluorescence of atoms in magneto-optical trap during two-step cw excitation of Rydberg states by uv laser. Using this method it was obtained the value of the quantum defect was determined for Rydberg states nD of lithium-7 atoms δ = 0.00192(17).

  10. An integrated quantum repeater at telecom wavelength with single atoms in optical fiber cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uphoff, Manuel; Brekenfeld, Manuel; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    Quantum repeaters promise to enable quantum networks over global distances by circumventing the exponential decrease in success probability inherent in direct photon transmission. We propose a realistic, functionally integrated quantum-repeater implementation based on single atoms in optical cavities. Entanglement is directly generated between the single-atom quantum memory and a photon at telecom wavelength. The latter is collected with high efficiency and adjustable temporal and spectral properties into a spatially well-defined cavity mode. It is heralded by a near-infrared photon emitted from a second, orthogonal cavity. Entanglement between two remote quantum memories can be generated via an optical Bell-state measurement, while we propose entanglement swapping based on a highly efficient, cavity-assisted atom-atom gate. Our quantum-repeater scheme eliminates any requirement for wavelength conversion such that only a single system is needed at each node. We investigate a particular implementation with rubidium and realistic parameters for Fabry-Perot cavities based on hbox {CO}_2 laser-machined optical fibers. We show that the scheme enables the implementation of a rather simple quantum repeater that outperforms direct entanglement generation over large distances and does not require any improvements in technology beyond the state of the art.

  11. Fast adiabatic quantum state transfer and entanglement generation between two atoms via dressed states

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jin-Lei; Ji, Xin; Zhang, Shou

    2017-01-01

    We propose a dressed-state scheme to achieve shortcuts to adiabaticity in atom-cavity quantum electrodynamics for speeding up adiabatic two-atom quantum state transfer and maximum entanglement generation. Compared with stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, the dressed-state scheme greatly shortens the operation time in a non-adiabatic way. By means of some numerical simulations, we determine the parameters which can guarantee the feasibility and efficiency both in theory and experiment. Besides, numerical simulations also show the scheme is robust against the variations in the parameters, atomic spontaneous emissions and the photon leakages from the cavity.

  12. Exploring Quantum Degenerate Bose-Fermi Mixtures Toward Cooper Pairing of Fermionic Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Deborah Jin

    2011-04-20

    We have been exploring interaction dynamics in an ultracold, trapped gas of bosonic and fermionic atoms. Investigation of this new class of quantum degenerate gases concentrates on interaction dominated phenomena such as sympathetic cooling, phase separation, excitations, Feshbach resonances, and the effects of quantum degeneracy. In addition to exploring these new phenomena, we seek to understand and ultimately control the interactions in the gas. In particular, effective interactions between the fermionic atoms will be explored in the context of the longer term goal of realizing Cooper pairing of atoms.

  13. The Stark effect in atomic Rydberg states through a quantum defect approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez, J. M.; Martín, I.; Velasco, A. M.

    A basis set of quantum defect orbitals (QDOs) has been adopted for the diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix of nonhydrogenic atoms in the presence of an external electric field, so that the Stark structure of the Rydberg states has been possible to determine. The presently obtained Stark maps are in excellent agreement with those resulting from theory and experiment, as reported in the literature for a few representative atoms. The adequacy of the Stark quantum defect orbital (SQDO) procedure for accurately dealing with properties related to the Stark effect in atoms is suggested.

  14. Interference control of nonlinear excitation in a multi-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guoqing; Tan, Zheng; Zou, Bichen; Zhu, Yifu

    2014-12-01

    We show that by manipulating quantum interference in a multi-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) system, the nonlinear excitation of the cavity-atom polariton can be resonantly enhanced while the linear excitation is suppressed. Under the appropriate conditions, it is possible to selectively enhance or suppress the polariton excitation with two free-pace laser fields. We report on an experiment with cold Rb atoms in an optical cavity and present experimental results that demonstrate such interference control of the CQED excitation and its direct application to studies of all-optical switching and cross-phase modulation of the cavity-transmitted light.

  15. Mesoscopic atomic entanglement for precision measurements beyond the standard quantum limit.

    PubMed

    Appel, J; Windpassinger, P J; Oblak, D; Hoff, U B; Kjaergaard, N; Polzik, E S

    2009-07-07

    Squeezing of quantum fluctuations by means of entanglement is a well-recognized goal in the field of quantum information science and precision measurements. In particular, squeezing the fluctuations via entanglement between 2-level atoms can improve the precision of sensing, clocks, metrology, and spectroscopy. Here, we demonstrate 3.4 dB of metrologically relevant squeezing and entanglement for greater, similar 10(5) cold caesium atoms via a quantum nondemolition (QND) measurement on the atom clock levels. We show that there is an optimal degree of decoherence induced by the quantum measurement which maximizes the generated entanglement. A 2-color QND scheme used in this paper is shown to have a number of advantages for entanglement generation as compared with a single-color QND measurement.

  16. Quantum diffraction effects on the atomic polarization collision in partially ionized dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Young-Dae

    2014-04-15

    The influence of quantum diffraction on the electron-atom polarization collision process is investigated in partially ionized dense plasmas. The pseudopotential model and eikonal method are employed to obtain the eikonal phase shift and eikonal cross section as functions of the impact parameter, collision energy, Debye length, electron de Broglie wavelength, and atomic polarizability. The results show that the eikonal phase shift for the electron-hydrogen atom polarization collision decreases with an increase of the electron de Broglie wavelength. It is important to note that the influence of quantum diffraction produces the repulsive part in the electron-atom polarization interaction. It is also found that the quantum diffraction effect enhances the differential eikonal cross section. Additionally, the total eikonal cross section decreases with increasing electron de Broglie wavelength. The variations of the eikonal cross section due to the influence of finite size of the de Broglie wavelength and Debye radius are also discussed.

  17. Quantum computing with atomic qubits and Rydberg interactions: progress and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffman, M.

    2016-10-01

    We present a review of quantum computation with neutral atom qubits. After an overview of architectural options and approaches to preparing large qubit arrays we examine Rydberg mediated gate protocols and fidelity for two- and multi-qubit interactions. Quantum simulation and Rydberg dressing are alternatives to circuit based quantum computing for exploring many body quantum dynamics. We review the properties of the dressing interaction and provide a quantitative figure of merit for the complexity of the coherent dynamics that can be accessed with dressing. We conclude with a summary of the current status and an outlook for future progress.

  18. Quantum spintronics: engineering and manipulating atom-like spins in semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Awschalom, David D; Bassett, Lee C; Dzurak, Andrew S; Hu, Evelyn L; Petta, Jason R

    2013-03-08

    The past decade has seen remarkable progress in isolating and controlling quantum coherence using charges and spins in semiconductors. Quantum control has been established at room temperature, and electron spin coherence times now exceed several seconds, a nine-order-of-magnitude increase in coherence compared with the first semiconductor qubits. These coherence times rival those traditionally found only in atomic systems, ushering in a new era of ultracoherent spintronics. We review recent advances in quantum measurements, coherent control, and the generation of entangled states and describe some of the challenges that remain for processing quantum information with spins in semiconductors.

  19. Experimental Issues in Coherent Quantum-State Manipulation of Trapped Atomic Ions

    PubMed Central

    Wineland, D. J.; Monroe, C.; Itano, W. M.; Leibfried, D.; King, B. E.; Meekhof, D. M.

    1998-01-01

    Methods for, and limitations to, the generation of entangled states of trapped atomic ions are examined. As much as possible, state manipulations are described in terms of quantum logic operations since the conditional dynamics implicit in quantum logic is central to the creation of entanglement. Keeping with current interest, some experimental issues in the proposal for trappedion quantum computation by J. I. Cirac and P. Zoller (University of Innsbruck) are discussed. Several possible decoherence mechanisms are examined and what may be the more important of these are identified. Some potential applications for entangled states of trapped-ions which lie outside the immediate realm of quantum computation are also discussed. PMID:28009379

  20. Transport of atoms in a quantum conveyor belt

    SciTech Connect

    Browaeys, A.; Haeffner, H.; McKenzie, C.; Rolston, S. L.; Helmerson, K.; Phillips, W. D.

    2005-11-15

    We have performed experiments using a three-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate of sodium atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice to explore some unusual properties of band structure. In particular, we investigate the loading of a condensate into a moving lattice and find nonintuitive behavior. We also revisit the behavior of atoms, prepared in a single quasimomentum state, in an accelerating lattice. We generalize this study to a cloud whose atoms have a large quasimomentum spread, and show that the cloud behaves differently from atoms in a single Bloch state. Finally, we compare our findings with recent experiments performed with fermions in an optical lattice.

  1. Probing the quantum vacuum with an artificial atom in front of a mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoi, I.-C.; Kockum, A. F.; Tornberg, L.; Pourkabirian, A.; Johansson, G.; Delsing, P.; Wilson, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum fluctuations of the vacuum are both a surprising and fundamental phenomenon of nature. Understood as virtual photons, they still have a very real impact, for instance, in the Casimir effects and the lifetimes of atoms. Engineering vacuum fluctuations is therefore becoming increasingly important to emerging technologies. Here, we shape vacuum fluctuations using a superconducting circuit analogue of a mirror, creating regions in space where they are suppressed. Moving an artificial atom through these regions and measuring the spontaneous emission lifetime of the atom provides us with the spectral density of the vacuum fluctuations. Using the paradigm of waveguide quantum electrodynamics, we significantly improve over previous studies of the interaction of an atom with its mirror image, observing a spectral density as low as 0.02 quanta, a factor of 50 below the mirrorless result. This demonstrates that we can hide the atom from the vacuum, even though it is exposed in free space.

  2. Universal quantum gates for photon-atom hybrid systems assisted by bad cavities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guan-Yu; Liu, Qian; Wei, Hai-Rui; Li, Tao; Ai, Qing; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-04-12

    We present two deterministic schemes for constructing a CNOT gate and a Toffoli gate on photon-atom and photon-atom-atom hybrid quantum systems assisted by bad cavities, respectively. They are achieved by cavity-assisted photon scattering and work in the intermediate coupling region with bad cavities, which relaxes the difficulty of their implementation in experiment. Also, bad cavities are feasible for fast quantum operations and reading out information. Compared with previous works, our schemes do not need any auxiliary qubits and measurements. Moreover, the schematic setups for these gates are simple, especially that for our Toffoli gate as only a quarter wave packet is used to interact the photon with each of the atoms every time. These atom-cavity systems can be used as the quantum nodes in long-distance quantum communication as their relatively long coherence time is suitable for multi-time operations between the photon and the system. Our calculations show that the average fidelities and efficiencies of our two universal hybrid quantum gates are high with current experimental technology.

  3. Nano Electronics on Atomically Controlled van der Waals Quantum Heterostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-30

    electrical characteristics. Both large-area chemical vapor - deposited (CVD) single-crystalline h-BN layers and h-BN microflakes mechanically cleaved from a...dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) materials for the realization of novel quantum electronic states. We employed molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) combined with...novel quantum electronic states. We employed molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) combined with nanofabrication techniques to form functional nanostructures

  4. Quantum Cloning of an Unknown 2-Atom State via Entangled Cluster States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.-z.; Zhong, F.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presented a scheme for cloning a 2-atom state in the QED cavity with the help of Victor who is the state's preparer. The cloning scheme has two steps. In the first step, the scheme requires probabilistic teleportation of a 2-atom state that is unknown in advance, and uses a 4-atom cluster state as quantum channel. In the second step, perfect copies of the 2-atom entangled state may be realized with the assistance of Victor. The finding is that our scheme has two outstanding advantages: it is not sensitive to the cavity decay, and Bell state is easy to identify.

  5. A two-dimensional algebraic quantum liquid produced by an atomic simulator of the quantum Lifshitz model

    PubMed Central

    Po, Hoi Chun; Zhou, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Bosons have a natural instinct to condense at zero temperature. It is a long-standing challenge to create a high-dimensional quantum liquid that does not exhibit long-range order at the ground state, as either extreme experimental parameters or sophisticated designs of microscopic Hamiltonians are required for suppressing the condensation. Here we show that synthetic gauge fields for ultracold atoms, using either the Raman scheme or shaken lattices, provide physicists a simple and practical scheme to produce a two-dimensional algebraic quantum liquid at the ground state. This quantum liquid arises at a critical Lifshitz point, where a two-dimensional quartic dispersion emerges in the momentum space, and many fundamental properties of two-dimensional bosons are changed in its proximity. Such an ideal simulator of the quantum Lifshitz model allows experimentalists to directly visualize and explore the deconfinement transition of topological excitations, an intriguing phenomenon that is difficult to access in other systems. PMID:26268154

  6. A two-dimensional algebraic quantum liquid produced by an atomic simulator of the quantum Lifshitz model.

    PubMed

    Po, Hoi Chun; Zhou, Qi

    2015-08-13

    Bosons have a natural instinct to condense at zero temperature. It is a long-standing challenge to create a high-dimensional quantum liquid that does not exhibit long-range order at the ground state, as either extreme experimental parameters or sophisticated designs of microscopic Hamiltonians are required for suppressing the condensation. Here we show that synthetic gauge fields for ultracold atoms, using either the Raman scheme or shaken lattices, provide physicists a simple and practical scheme to produce a two-dimensional algebraic quantum liquid at the ground state. This quantum liquid arises at a critical Lifshitz point, where a two-dimensional quartic dispersion emerges in the momentum space, and many fundamental properties of two-dimensional bosons are changed in its proximity. Such an ideal simulator of the quantum Lifshitz model allows experimentalists to directly visualize and explore the deconfinement transition of topological excitations, an intriguing phenomenon that is difficult to access in other systems.

  7. The Scales of Time, Length, Mass, Energy, and Other Fundamental Physical Quantities in the Atomic World and the Use of Atomic Units in Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Boon K.; Li, Wai-Kee

    2011-01-01

    This article is divided into two parts. In the first part, the atomic unit (au) system is introduced and the scales of time, space (length), and speed, as well as those of mass and energy, in the atomic world are discussed. In the second part, the utility of atomic units in quantum mechanical and spectroscopic calculations is illustrated with…

  8. Quantum gas microscopy with spin, atom-number, and multilayer readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiss, Philipp M.; Ma, Ruichao; Tai, M. Eric; Simon, Jonathan; Greiner, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Atom- and site-resolved experiments with ultracold atoms in optical lattices provide a powerful platform for the simulation of strongly correlated materials. In this Rapid Communication, we present a toolbox for the preparation, control, and site-resolved detection of a tunnel-coupled bilayer degenerate quantum gas. Using a collisional blockade, we engineer occupation-dependent interplane transport which enables us to circumvent light-assisted pair loss during imaging and count n =0 to n =3 atoms per site. We obtain the first number- and site-resolved images of the Mott insulator "wedding cake" structure and observe the emergence of antiferromagnetic ordering across a magnetic quantum phase transition. We are further able to employ the bilayer system for spin-resolved readout of a mixture of two hyperfine states. This work opens the door to direct detection of entanglement and Kosterlitz-Thouless-type phase dynamics, as well as studies of coupled planar quantum materials.

  9. Entanglement detection in a coupled atom-field system via quantum Fisher information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkhalaf, Safoura Sadat; Smerzi, Augusto

    2017-02-01

    We consider a system of finite number of particles collectively interacting with a single-mode coherent field inside a cavity. Depending on the strength of the initial field compared to the number of atoms, we consider three regimes of weak-, intermediate-, and strong-field interaction. The dynamics of multiparticle entanglement detected by quantum Fisher information and spin squeezing are studied in each regime. It is seen that in the weak-field regime, spin squeezing and quantum Fisher information coincide. However, by increasing the initial field population toward the strong-field regime, quantum Fisher information is more effective in detecting entanglement compared to spin squeezing. In addition, in the two-atom system, we also study concurrence. In this case, the quantum Fisher information as a function of time is in good agreement with concurrence in predicting entanglement peaks.

  10. Information-recycling beam splitters for quantum enhanced atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Haine, S A

    2013-02-01

    We propose a scheme to significantly enhance the sensitivity of atom interferometry performed with Bose-Einstein condensates. When an optical two-photon Raman transition is used to split the condensate into two modes, some information about the number of atoms in one of the modes is contained in one of the optical modes. We introduce a simple model to describe this process, and find that by processing this information in an appropriate way, the phase sensitivity of atom interferometry can be enhanced by more than a factor of 10 for realistic parameters.

  11. Transfer behavior of quantum states between atoms in photonic crystal coupled cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ke; Li Zhiyuan

    2010-03-15

    In this article, we discuss the one-excitation dynamics of a quantum system consisting of two two-level atoms each interacting with one of two coupled single-mode cavities via spontaneous emission. When the atoms and cavities are tuned into resonance, a wide variety of time-evolution behaviors can be realized by modulating the atom-cavity coupling strength g and the cavity-cavity hopping strength {lambda}. The dynamics is solved rigorously via the eigenproblem of an ordinary coupled linear system and simple analytical solutions are derived at several extreme situations of g and {lambda}. In the large hopping limit where g<<{lambda}, the behavior of the system is the linear superposition of a fast and slow periodic oscillation. The quantum state transfers from one atom to the other atom accompanied with weak excitation of the cavity mode. In the large coupling limit where g>>{lambda}, the time-evolution behavior of the system is characterized by the usual slowly varying carrier envelope superimposed upon a fast and violent oscillation. At a certain instant, the energy is fully transferred from the one quantum subsystem to the other. When the two interaction strengths are comparable in magnitude, the dynamics acts as a continuous pulse having irregular frequency and line shape of peaks and valleys, and the complicated time-evolution behaviors are ascribed to the violent competition between all the one-excitation quantum states. The coupled quantum system of atoms and cavities makes a good model to study cavity quantum electrodynamics with great freedoms of many-body interaction.

  12. Quantum Simulations of Many-Body Systems with Ultra-Cold Atoms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-28

    Conference "Frontiers of Nonlinear Physics" Nizhny Novgorod, Russia, July 2007 22. Invited talk at Institute Henri Poincare , Centre Emile Borel... Henri Poincare , Paris, France. April 23 - July 20, 2007. Non-equilibrium quantum dynamics of many-body systems of cold atoms. 13. Conference...34Recent progress in the studies of quantum gases: theory and experiments", Institut Henri Poincare , Paris, France. June 27 - June 29, 2007

  13. Accessing the quantum Hall regime in cold atom traps using circularly polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Rachel; Yan, Bin; Greene, Chris H.

    2016-05-01

    There has been considerable interest in designing cold atom experiments to explore the quantum Hall effect with the extreme control allowed in such trapped atom systems. Many theoretical proposals and experimental attempts have been made in the effort to construct a cold atom fractional quantum Hall experiment, but so far, the fractional quantum Hall regime has proven difficult to achieve in experimental setups. One method for reaching the quantum Hall effect consists of rapidly rotating a cold atom system in a harmonic trap to near the centrifugal limit, where the system's Hamiltonian matches the two-dimensional magnetic field Hamiltonian. This condition could be reached in a few-body system through a scheme which increases the angular momentum of the particles in the trap through precision photon excitations. According to the hyperspherical framework from few-body theory, when particle interactions break the harmonic energy spectrum degeneracy, it becomes possible for circularly polarized light to excite the system selectively into the high angular momentum states required for the quantum Hall effect. We will discuss possible experimental systems where this technique could be applicable and challenges that these systems may face.

  14. Geometry-Induced Memory Effects in Isolated Quantum Systems: Cold-Atom Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chen-Yen; Chien, Chih-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Memory effects result from the history-dependent behavior of a system, are abundant in our daily life, and have broad applications. Here, we explore the possibilities of generating memory effects in simple isolated quantum systems. By utilizing geometrical effects from a class of lattices supporting flatbands consisting of localized states, memory effects could be observed in ultracold atoms in optical lattices. As the optical lattice continuously transforms from a triangular lattice into a kagome lattice with a flatband, history-dependent density distributions manifest quantum memory effects even in noninteracting systems, including fermionic as well as bosonic systems, in the proper ranges of temperatures. Rapid growth of ultracold technology predicts a bright future for quantum memory-effect systems, and here two prototypical applications of geometry-induced quantum memory effects are proposed: A cold-atom-based accelerometer using an atomic differentiator to record the mechanical change rate of a coupled probe, and an atomic quantum memory cell for storing information with write-in and readout schemes.

  15. Quantum fuel with multilevel atomic coherence for ultrahigh specific work in a photonic Carnot engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkpençe, Deniz; Müstecaplıoǧlu, Özgür E.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate scaling of work and efficiency of a photonic Carnot engine with a number of quantum coherent resources. Specifically, we consider a generalization of the "phaseonium fuel" for the photonic Carnot engine, which was first introduced as a three-level atom with two lower states in a quantum coherent superposition by M. O. Scully, M. Suhail Zubairy, G. S. Agarwal, and H. Walther [Science 299, 862 (2003), 10.1126/science.1078955], to the case of N +1 level atoms with N coherent lower levels. We take into account atomic relaxation and dephasing as well as the cavity loss and derive a coarse-grained master equation to evaluate the work and efficiency analytically. Analytical results are verified by microscopic numerical examination of the thermalization dynamics. We find that efficiency and work scale quadratically with the number of quantum coherent levels. Quantum coherence boost to the specific energy (work output per unit mass of the resource) is a profound fundamental difference of quantum fuel from classical resources. We consider typical modern resonator set ups and conclude that multilevel phaseonium fuel can be utilized to overcome the decoherence in available systems. Preparation of the atomic coherences and the associated cost of coherence are analyzed and the engine operation within the bounds of the second law is verified. Our results bring the photonic Carnot engines much closer to the capabilities of current resonator technologies.

  16. Fast generation of three-atom singlet state by transitionless quantum driving

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen; Chen, Ye-Hong; Xia, Yan; Song, Jie; Huang, Bi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by “transitionless quantum driving”, we construct shortcuts to adiabatic passage in a three-atom system to create a singlet state with the help of quantum zeno dynamics and non-resonant lasers. The influence of various decoherence processes is discussed by numerical simulation and the results reveal that the scheme is fast and robust against decoherence and operational imperfection. We also investigate how to select the experimental parameters to control the cavity dissipation and atomic spontaneous emission which will have an application value in experiment. PMID:26931812

  17. Measuring correlations of cold-atom systems using multiple quantum probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streif, Michael; Buchleitner, Andreas; Jaksch, Dieter; Mur-Petit, Jordi

    2016-11-01

    We present a nondestructive method to probe a complex quantum system using multiple-impurity atoms as quantum probes. Our protocol provides access to different equilibrium properties of the system by changing its coupling to the probes. In particular, we show that measurements with two probes reveal the system's nonlocal two-point density correlations, for probe-system contact interactions. We illustrate our findings with analytic and numerical calculations for the Bose-Hubbard model in the weakly and strongly interacting regimes, under conditions relevant to ongoing experiments in cold-atom systems.

  18. Experimental study of the role of atomic interactions on quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Henderson, K; Kelkar, H; Gutiérrez-Medina, B; Li, T C; Raizen, M G

    2006-04-21

    We report an experimental study of quantum transport for atoms confined in a periodic potential and compare between thermal and Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) initial conditions. We observe ballistic transport for all values of well depth and initial conditions, and the measured expansion velocity for thermal atoms is in excellent agreement with a single-particle model. For weak wells, the expansion of the BEC is also in excellent agreement with single-particle theory, using an effective temperature. We observe a crossover to a new regime for the BEC case as the well depth is increased, indicating the importance of interactions on quantum transport.

  19. Heralded high-efficiency quantum repeater with atomic ensembles assisted by faithful single-photon transmission.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2015-10-27

    Quantum repeater is one of the important building blocks for long distance quantum communication network. The previous quantum repeaters based on atomic ensembles and linear optical elements can only be performed with a maximal success probability of 1/2 during the entanglement creation and entanglement swapping procedures. Meanwhile, the polarization noise during the entanglement distribution process is harmful to the entangled channel created. Here we introduce a general interface between a polarized photon and an atomic ensemble trapped in a single-sided optical cavity, and with which we propose a high-efficiency quantum repeater protocol in which the robust entanglement distribution is accomplished by the stable spatial-temporal entanglement and it can in principle create the deterministic entanglement between neighboring atomic ensembles in a heralded way as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. Meanwhile, the simplified parity-check gate makes the entanglement swapping be completed with unity efficiency, other than 1/2 with linear optics. We detail the performance of our protocol with current experimental parameters and show its robustness to the imperfections, i.e., detuning and coupling variation, involved in the reflection process. These good features make it a useful building block in long distance quantum communication.

  20. Heralded high-efficiency quantum repeater with atomic ensembles assisted by faithful single-photon transmission

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Quantum repeater is one of the important building blocks for long distance quantum communication network. The previous quantum repeaters based on atomic ensembles and linear optical elements can only be performed with a maximal success probability of 1/2 during the entanglement creation and entanglement swapping procedures. Meanwhile, the polarization noise during the entanglement distribution process is harmful to the entangled channel created. Here we introduce a general interface between a polarized photon and an atomic ensemble trapped in a single-sided optical cavity, and with which we propose a high-efficiency quantum repeater protocol in which the robust entanglement distribution is accomplished by the stable spatial-temporal entanglement and it can in principle create the deterministic entanglement between neighboring atomic ensembles in a heralded way as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. Meanwhile, the simplified parity-check gate makes the entanglement swapping be completed with unity efficiency, other than 1/2 with linear optics. We detail the performance of our protocol with current experimental parameters and show its robustness to the imperfections, i.e., detuning and coupling variation, involved in the reflection process. These good features make it a useful building block in long distance quantum communication. PMID:26502993

  1. Controlled rephasing of single spin-waves in a quantum memory based on cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrera, Pau; Albrecht, Boris; Heinze, Georg; Cristiani, Matteo; de Riedmatten, Hugues; Quantum Photonics With Solids; Atoms Team

    2015-05-01

    Quantum memories for light allow a reversible transfer of quantum information between photons and long lived matter quantum bits. In atomic ensembles, this information is commonly stored in the form of single collective spin excitations (spin-waves). In this work we demonstrate that we can actively control the dephasing of the spin-waves created in a quantum memory based on a cold Rb87 atomic ensemble. The control is provided by an external magnetic field gradient, which induces an inhomogeneous broadening of the atomic hyperfine levels. We show that acting on this gradient allows to control the dephasing of individual spin-waves and to induce later a rephasing. The spin-waves are then mapped into single photons, and we demonstrate experimentally that the active rephasing preserves the sub-Poissonian statistics of the retrieved photons. Finally we show that this rephasing control enables the creation and storage of multiple spin-waves in different temporal modes, which can be selectively readout. This is an important step towards the implementation of a functional temporally multiplexed quantum memory for quantum repeaters. We acknowledge support from the ERC starting grant, the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, the Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional, and the International PhD- fellowship program ``la Caixa''-Severo Ochoa @ICFO.

  2. Atomic spin-chain realization of a model for quantum criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toskovic, R.; van den Berg, R.; Spinelli, A.; Eliens, I. S.; van den Toorn, B.; Bryant, B.; Caux, J.-S.; Otte, A. F.

    2016-07-01

    The ability to manipulate single atoms has opened up the door to constructing interesting and useful quantum structures from the ground up. On the one hand, nanoscale arrangements of magnetic atoms are at the heart of future quantum computing and spintronic devices; on the other hand, they can be used as fundamental building blocks for the realization of textbook many-body quantum models, illustrating key concepts such as quantum phase transitions, topological order or frustration as a function of system size. Here, we use low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy to construct arrays of magnetic atoms on a surface, designed to behave like spin-1/2 XXZ Heisenberg chains in a transverse field, for which a quantum phase transition from an antiferromagnetic to a paramagnetic phase is predicted in the thermodynamic limit. Site-resolved measurements on these finite-size realizations reveal a number of sudden ground state changes when the field approaches the critical value, each corresponding to a new domain wall entering the chains. We observe that these state crossings become closer for longer chains, suggesting the onset of critical behaviour. Our results present opportunities for further studies on quantum behaviour of many-body systems, as a function of their size and structural complexity.

  3. Quantum simulations of lattice gauge theories using ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Erez; Cirac, J Ignacio; Reznik, Benni

    2016-01-01

    Can high-energy physics be simulated by low-energy, non-relativistic, many-body systems such as ultracold atoms? Such ultracold atomic systems lack the type of symmetries and dynamical properties of high energy physics models: in particular, they manifest neither local gauge invariance nor Lorentz invariance, which are crucial properties of the quantum field theories which are the building blocks of the standard model of elementary particles. However, it turns out, surprisingly, that there are ways to configure an atomic system to manifest both local gauge invariance and Lorentz invariance. In particular, local gauge invariance can arise either as an effective low-energy symmetry, or as an exact symmetry, following from the conservation laws in atomic interactions. Hence, one could hope that such quantum simulators may lead to a new type of (table-top) experiments which will be used to study various QCD (quantum chromodynamics) phenomena, such as the confinement of dynamical quarks, phase transitions and other effects, which are inaccessible using the currently known computational methods. In this report, we review the Hamiltonian formulation of lattice gauge theories, and then describe our recent progress in constructing the quantum simulation of Abelian and non-Abelian lattice gauge theories in 1  +  1 and 2  +  1 dimensions using ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

  4. Interaction between two SU(1 , 1) quantum systems and a two-level atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, M. Sebawe; Khalil, E. M.; Obada, A. S.-F.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a two-level atom interacting with two coupled quantum systems that can be represented in terms of su(1 , 1) Lie algebra. The wave function that is obtained using the evolution operator for the atom is initially in a superposition state and the coupled su(1 , 1) systems in a pair coherent Barut-Girardello coherent state. We then discuss atomic inversion, where more periods of revivals are observed and compared with a single su(1 , 1) quantum system. For entanglement and squeezing phenomena, the atomic angles coherence and phase as well as the detuning are effective parameters. The second-order correlation function displays Bunching and anti-Bunching behavior.

  5. Atomic thermal motion effect on efficiency of a high-speed quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, Kirill; Golubeva, Tania; Golubev, Yuri

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the influence of atomic thermal motion on the efficiency of multimode quantum memory in two configurations: over the free expand of atoms cooled beforehand in a magneto-optical trap, and over complete mixing of atoms in a closed cell at room temperature. We consider the high-speed quantum memory, and assume that writing and retrieval are short enough, and the displacements of atoms during these stages are negligibly small. At the same time we take in account thermal motion during the storage time, which, as well known, must be much longer than durations of all the other memory processes for successful application of memory cell in communication and computation. We will analyze this influence in terms of eigenmodes of the full memory cycle and show that distortion of the eigenmodes, caused by thermal motion, leads to the efficiency reduction. We will demonstrate, that in the multimode memory this interconnection has complicated character.

  6. Spectroscopy of systems of two identical atoms: effects of quantum interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, A. A.; Yudson, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    Several effects of quantum interference in spectroscopy of a system of two atoms are discussed. (i) In the system of spatially separated atoms in a one-dimensional (1D) geometry (a single-mode waveguide or photon crystal), a (meta)stable excited entangled state can be formed, its decay being very sensitive to the distance between the atoms and to perturbations which cause a difference between their resonance frequencies. (ii) In a system of closely located atoms in 3D space, the extreme sensitivity of absorption and fluorescence spectra to the direction of the applied magnetic field is demonstrated. These theoretical predictions can be useful for the quantum information processing and ultrasensitive measurements.

  7. X-ray structure refinement using aspherical atomic density functions obtained from quantum-mechanical calculations.

    PubMed

    Jayatilaka, Dylan; Dittrich, Birger

    2008-05-01

    An approach is outlined for X-ray structure refinement using atomic density fragments obtained by Hirshfeld partitioning of quantum-mechanical density fragments. Results are presented for crystal structure refinements of urea and benzene using these 'Hirshfeld atoms'. Using this procedure, the quantum-mechanical non-spherical electron density is taken into account in the structural model based on the conformation found in the crystal. Contrary to current consensus in structure refinement, the anisotropic displacement parameters of H atoms can be reproduced from neutron diffraction measurements simply from a least-squares fit using the Hirshfeld atoms derived from the BLYP level of theory and including a simple point-charge model to treat the crystal environment.

  8. Quantum coherence in the interaction of light with a two-level atom and semiconductor microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erenso, Daniel Bekele

    We have studied quantum statistical properties including squeezing and entanglement, and conditional measurements in a two level atom, semiconductor quantum well and quantum dots interacting with light and a degenerate parametric oscillator. For a two-level atom in a coherently driven cavity and damped by a broad-band squeezed vacuum, we have studied atomic inversion, fluorescent spectrum, and the intensity correlations of the transmitted and fluorescent photons in the bad cavity limit using the Fokker-Planck equation. For semiconductor quantum well with a single exciton mode in a microcavity driven by squeezed vacuum in the low exciton density regime, we have studied the intensity, spectrum, and intensity correlations for the fluorescent light by solving the quantum Langevin equations. We have also derived an expression for the Q-function of the field and using this function we have studied the intracavity photon number distribution and the quadrature fluctuations for the field. For identical semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) interacting with a quantized cavity field, using quantum mechanical as well as semiclassical treatment, we have investigated the time evolution of the states of the QDs, the photon number distribution and the quadratures variances for the cavity field. Specifically, we consider two QDs initially prepared in a Bell and three QDs in a GHZ entangled excitonic states and the field in coherent, squeezed coherent, squeezed vacuum or thermal states at the initial time. By considering the light from a degenerate parametric oscillator, we have also discussed conditional measurements as probes of quantum dynamics and show that they provide novel ways to characterize quantum fluctuations.

  9. Interacting single atoms with nanophotonics for chip-integrated quantum networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alton, Daniel James

    Underlying matter and light are their building blocks of tiny atoms and photons. The ability to control and utilize matter-light interactions down to the elementary single atom and photon level at the nano-scale opens up exciting studies at the frontiers of science with applications in medicine, energy, and information technology. Of these, an intriguing front is the development of quantum networks where N ≫ 1 single-atom nodes are coherently linked by single photons, forming a collective quantum entity potentially capable of performing quantum computations and simulations. Here, a promising approach is to use optical cavities within the setting of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). However, since its first realization in 1992 by Kimble et al., current proof-of-principle experiments have involved just one or two conventional cavities. To move beyond to N ≫ 1 nodes, in this thesis we investigate a platform born from the marriage of cavity QED and nanophotonics, where single atoms at ˜100 nm near the surfaces of lithographically fabricated dielectric photonic devices can strongly interact with single photons, on a chip. Particularly, we experimentally investigate three main types of devices: microtoroidal optical cavities, optical nanofibers, and nanophotonic crystal based structures. With a microtoroidal cavity, we realized a robust and efficient photon router where single photons are extracted from an incident coherent state of light and redirected to a separate output with high efficiency. We achieved strong single atom-photon coupling with atoms located ~100 nm near the surface of a microtoroid, which revealed important aspects in the atom dynamics and QED of these systems including atom-surface interaction effects. We present a method to achieve state-insensitive atom trapping near optical nanofibers, critical in nanophotonic systems where electromagnetic fields are tightly confined. We developed a system that fabricates high quality nanofibers with high

  10. Spontaneous decay of an atom excited in a dense and disordered atomic ensemble: Quantum microscopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraptsev, A. S.; Sokolov, I. M.

    2014-07-01

    On the basis of general theoretical results developed previously [I. M. Sokolov et al., J. Exp. Theor. Phys. 112, 246 (2011), 10.1134/S106377611101016X], we analyze spontaneous decay of a single atom inside cold atomic clouds under conditions when the averaged interatomic separation is less than or comparable with the wavelength of quasiresonant radiation. Beyond the decay dynamics we analyze shifts of resonance as well as distortion of the spectral shape of the atomic transition.

  11. Mesoscopic transport and interferometry with wave packets of ultracold atoms: Effects of quantum coherence and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Kunal K.

    2011-09-15

    We propose a way to simulate mesoscopic transport processes with counterpropagating wave packets of ultracold atoms in quasi-one-dimensional (1D) waveguides and show quantitative agreement with analytical results. The method allows the study of a broad range of transport processes at the level of individual modes, not possible in electronic systems. Typically suppressed effects of quantum coherence become manifest, along with the effects of tunable interactions, which can be used to develop a simpler type of sensitive atom interferometer.

  12. Correlation, relativistic, and quantum electrodynamics effects on the atomic structure of eka-thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Gaigalas, Gediminas; Gaidamauskas, Erikas; Rudzikas, Zenonas; Magnani, Nicola; Caciuffo, Roberto

    2010-02-15

    Large-scale multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations have been performed for the superheavy element eka-thorium, Z=122. The resulting atomic structure is compared with that obtained by various computational approaches involving different degrees of approximation in order to elucidate the role that correlation, relativistic, Breit, and quantum electrodynamics corrections play in determining the low-energy atomic spectrum. The accuracy of the calculations is assessed by comparing theoretical results obtained for thorium with available experimental data.

  13. Emergence of correlated optics in one-dimensional waveguides for classical and quantum atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruostekoski, Janne; Javanainen, Juha

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the emergence of correlated optical phenomena in the transmission of light through a waveguide that confines classical or ultracold quantum degenerate atomic ensembles. The conditions of the correlated collective response are identified in terms of atom density, thermal broadening, and photon losses by using stochastic Monte Carlo simulations and transfer matrix methods of transport theory. We also calculate the "cooperative Lamb shift" for the waveguide transmission resonance, and discuss line shifts that are specific to effectively one-dimensional waveguide systems.

  14. Short-scale atomic clock based on the quantum magnetometers system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermak, S. V.; Sagitov, E. A.; Smolin, R. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    The experimental results of dependence of Allan variance as averaging time for system of two quantum magnetometers with laser pumping of the alkaline atoms are presented. Also the role of different components of luminous frequency shift of a radio optical resonance in case of an optimum operation mode of quantum magnetometers in such system is noted. It is shown that the effect of compensation of luminous shift components allows to reduce Allan variance in times of averaging more, than hundreds of seconds in comparison with the quantum standard of frequency on 0-0 transition.

  15. Quantum Two-breathers Formed by Ultracold Bosonic Atoms in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bing

    2016-06-01

    Two-discrete breathers are the bound states of two localized modes that can appear in classical nonlinear lattices. I investigate the quantum signature of two-discrete breathers in the system of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices, which is modeled as Bose-Hubbard model containing n bosons. When the number of bosons is small, I find numerically quantum two-breathers by making use of numerical diagonalization and perturbation theory. For the cases of a large number of bosons, I can successfully construct quantum two-breather states in the Hartree approximation.

  16. Cooperative ring exchange and quantum melting of vortex lattices in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Tarun Kanti; Baskaran, G.

    2004-02-01

    Cooperative ring exchange is suggested as a mechanism of quantum melting of vortex lattices in a rapidly rotating quasi-two-dimensional atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). Using an approach pioneered by Kivelson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 873 (1986)] for the fractional quantized Hall effect, we calculate the condition for quantum melting instability by considering large-correlated ring exchanges in a two-dimensional Wigner crystal of vortices in a strong 'pseudomagnetic field' generated by the background superfluid Bose particles. BEC may be profitably used to address issues of quantum melting of a pristine Wigner solid devoid of complications of real solids.

  17. Nonequilibrium forces between atoms and dielectrics mediated by a quantum field

    SciTech Connect

    Behunin, Ryan O.; Hu, Bei-Lok

    2011-07-15

    In this paper we give a first principles microphysics derivation of the nonequilibrium forces between an atom, treated as a three-dimensional harmonic oscillator, and a bulk dielectric medium modeled as a continuous lattice of oscillators coupled to a reservoir. We assume no direct interaction between the atom and the medium but there exist mutual influences transmitted via a common electromagnetic field. By employing concepts and techniques of open quantum systems we introduce coarse-graining to the physical variables--the medium, the quantum field, and the atom's internal degrees of freedom, in that order--to extract their averaged effects from the lowest tier progressively to the top tier. The first tier of coarse-graining provides the averaged effect of the medium upon the field, quantified by a complex permittivity (in the frequency domain) describing the response of the dielectric to the field in addition to its back action on the field through a stochastic forcing term. The last tier of coarse-graining over the atom's internal degrees of freedom results in an equation of motion for the atom's center of mass from which we can derive the force on the atom. Our nonequilibrium formulation provides a fully dynamical description of the atom's motion including back-action effects from all other relevant variables concerned. In the long-time limit we recover the known results for the atom-dielectric force when the combined system is in equilibrium or in a nonequilibrium stationary state.

  18. A surface-patterned chip as a strong source of ultracold atoms for quantum technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nshii, C. C.; Vangeleyn, M.; Cotter, J. P.; Griffin, P. F.; Hinds, E. A.; Ironside, C. N.; See, P.; Sinclair, A. G.; Riis, E.; Arnold, A. S.

    2013-05-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are central to modern precision measurements. They are also increasingly important as an enabling technology for experimental cavity quantum electrodynamics, quantum information processing and matter-wave interferometry. Although significant progress has been made in miniaturizing atomic metrological devices, these are limited in accuracy by their use of hot atomic ensembles and buffer gases. Advances have also been made in producing portable apparatus that benefits from the advantages of atoms in the microkelvin regime. However, simplifying atomic cooling and loading using microfabrication technology has proved difficult. In this Letter we address this problem, realizing an atom chip that enables the integration of laser cooling and trapping into a compact apparatus. Our source delivers ten thousand times more atoms than previous magneto-optical traps with microfabricated optics and, for the first time, can reach sub-Doppler temperatures. Moreover, the same chip design offers a simple way to form stable optical lattices. These features, combined with simplicity of fabrication and ease of operation, make these new traps a key advance in the development of cold-atom technology for high-accuracy, portable measurement devices.

  19. A surface-patterned chip as a strong source of ultracold atoms for quantum technologies.

    PubMed

    Nshii, C C; Vangeleyn, M; Cotter, J P; Griffin, P F; Hinds, E A; Ironside, C N; See, P; Sinclair, A G; Riis, E; Arnold, A S

    2013-05-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are central to modern precision measurements. They are also increasingly important as an enabling technology for experimental cavity quantum electrodynamics, quantum information processing and matter-wave interferometry. Although significant progress has been made in miniaturizing atomic metrological devices, these are limited in accuracy by their use of hot atomic ensembles and buffer gases. Advances have also been made in producing portable apparatus that benefits from the advantages of atoms in the microkelvin regime. However, simplifying atomic cooling and loading using microfabrication technology has proved difficult. In this Letter we address this problem, realizing an atom chip that enables the integration of laser cooling and trapping into a compact apparatus. Our source delivers ten thousand times more atoms than previous magneto-optical traps with microfabricated optics and, for the first time, can reach sub-Doppler temperatures. Moreover, the same chip design offers a simple way to form stable optical lattices. These features, combined with simplicity of fabrication and ease of operation, make these new traps a key advance in the development of cold-atom technology for high-accuracy, portable measurement devices.

  20. Topology, localization, and quantum information in atomic, molecular and optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Norman Ying

    The scientific interface between atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) physics, condensed matter, and quantum information science has recently led to the development of new insights and tools that bridge the gap between macroscopic quantum behavior and detailed microscopic intuition. While the dialogue between these fields has sharpened our understanding of quantum theory, it has also raised a bevy of new questions regarding the out-of-equilibrium dynamics and control of many-body systems. This thesis is motivated by experimental advances that make it possible to produce and probe isolated, strongly interacting ensembles of disordered particles, as found in systems ranging from trapped ions and Rydberg atoms to ultracold polar molecules and spin defects in the solid state. The presence of strong interactions in these systems underlies their potential for exploring correlated many-body physics and this thesis presents recent results on realizing fractionalization and localization. From a complementary perspective, the controlled manipulation of individual quanta can also enable the bottom-up construction of quantum devices. To this end, this thesis also describes blueprints for a room-temperature quantum computer, quantum credit cards and nanoscale quantum thermometry.

  1. A quantum computer on the basis of an atomic quantum transistor with built-in quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, S. A.; Andrianov, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    A quantum transistor based quantum computer where the multiqubit quantum memory is a component of the quantum transistor and, correspondingly, takes part in the performance of quantum logical operations is considered. Proceeding from the generalized Jaynes-Cummings model, equations for coefficients of the wave function of the quantum system under consideration have been obtained for different stages of its evolution in processes of performing logical operations. The solution of the system of equations allows one to establish requirements that are imposed on the parameters of the initial Hamiltonian and must be satisfied for the effective operation of the computer; it also demonstrates the possibility of a universal set of quantum operations. Thus, based on the proposed approach, the possibility of constructing a compact multiatomic ensemble based on quantum computer using a quantum transistor for the implementation of two-qubit gates has been demonstrated.

  2. Quantum Coulomb systems: some exact results in the atomic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballenegger, V.; Martin, Ph. A.

    2002-04-01

    We review a number of exact results concerning the recombined electron-proton gas. The recombination problem can be formulated in precise terms in the atomic limit. In this limit one lets the density and the temperature tend to zero in a coupled way so that the resulting energy-entropy balance favors the formation of certain chemical species. This enables to develop a clear understanding of the dielectric versus conducting behavior in the system. In particular, we give a first principle derivation of the dielectric constant of the dilute atomic gas without presupposing the existence of atoms. The analysis relies on the path integral representation of the Coulomb gas together with Mayer diagrammatic techniques.

  3. Communication: Heavy atom quantum diffraction by scattering from surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moix, Jeremy M; Pollak, Eli

    2011-01-07

    Typically one expects that when a heavy particle collides with a surface, the scattered angular distribution will follow classical mechanics. The heavy mass usually assures that the coherence length of the incident particle in the direction of the propagation of the particle (the parallel direction) will be much shorter than the characteristic lattice length of the surface, thus leading to a classical description. Recent work on molecular interferometry has shown that extreme collimation of the beam creates a perpendicular coherence length which is sufficiently long so as to observe interference of very heavy species passing through a grating. Here we show, using quantum mechanical simulations, that the same effect will lead to quantum diffraction of heavy particles colliding with a surface. The effect is robust with respect to the incident energy, the angle of incidence, and the mass of the particle.

  4. A single-atom quantum memory in silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Freer, Solomon; Simmons, Stephanie; Laucht, Arne; ...

    2017-03-20

    Long coherence times and fast gate operations are desirable but often conflicting requirements for physical qubits. This conflict can be resolved by resorting to fast qubits for operations, and by storing their state in a ‘quantum memory’ while idle. The 31P donor in silicon comes naturally equipped with a fast qubit (the electron spin) and a long-lived qubit (the 31P nuclear spin), coexisting in a bound state at cryogenic temperatures. Here, we demonstrate storage and retrieval of quantum information from a single donor electron spin to its host phosphorus nucleus in isotopically-enriched 28Si. The fidelity of the memory process ismore » characterised via both state and process tomography. We report an overall process fidelity Fp ! 81%, a memory fidelity Fm ! 92%, and memory storage times up to 80 ms. These values are limited by a transient shift of the electron spin resonance frequency following highpower radiofrequency pulses.« less

  5. A single-atom quantum memory in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, Solomon; Simmons, Stephanie; Laucht, Arne; Muhonen, Juha T.; Dehollain, Juan P.; Kalra, Rachpon; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A.; Hudson, Fay E.; Itoh, Kohei M.; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Jamieson, David N.; Dzurak, Andrew S.; Morello, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Long coherence times and fast gate operations are desirable but often conflicting requirements for physical qubits. This conflict can be resolved by resorting to fast qubits for operations, and by storing their state in a ‘quantum memory’ while idle. The 31P donor in silicon comes naturally equipped with a fast qubit (the electron spin) and a long-lived qubit (the 31P nuclear spin), coexisting in a bound state at cryogenic temperatures. Here, we demonstrate storage and retrieval of quantum information from a single donor electron spin to its host phosphorus nucleus in isotopically enriched 28Si. The fidelity of the memory process is characterised via both state and process tomography. We report an overall process fidelity {F}p≈ 81%, and memory storage times up to 80 ms. These values are limited by a transient shift of the electron spin resonance frequency following high-power radiofrequency pulses.

  6. Robust quantum logic in neutral atoms via adiabatic Rydberg dressing

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Tyler; Cook, Robert L.; Hankin, Aaron M.; Jau, Yuan -Yu; Biedermann, Grant W.; Deutsch, Ivan H.

    2015-01-28

    We study a scheme for implementing a controlled-Z (CZ) gate between two neutral-atom qubits based on the Rydberg blockade mechanism in a manner that is robust to errors caused by atomic motion. By employing adiabatic dressing of the ground electronic state, we can protect the gate from decoherence due to random phase errors that typically arise because of atomic thermal motion. In addition, the adiabatic protocol allows for a Doppler-free configuration that involves counterpropagating lasers in a σ+- orthogonal polarization geometry that further reduces motional errors due to Doppler shifts. The residual motional error is dominated by dipole-dipole forces acting on doubly-excited Rydberg atoms when the blockade is imperfect. As a result, for reasonable parameters, with qubits encoded into the clock states of 133Cs, we predict that our protocol could produce a CZ gate in < 10 μs with error probability on the order of 10-3.

  7. Robust quantum logic in neutral atoms via adiabatic Rydberg dressing

    DOE PAGES

    Keating, Tyler; Cook, Robert L.; Hankin, Aaron M.; ...

    2015-01-28

    We study a scheme for implementing a controlled-Z (CZ) gate between two neutral-atom qubits based on the Rydberg blockade mechanism in a manner that is robust to errors caused by atomic motion. By employing adiabatic dressing of the ground electronic state, we can protect the gate from decoherence due to random phase errors that typically arise because of atomic thermal motion. In addition, the adiabatic protocol allows for a Doppler-free configuration that involves counterpropagating lasers in a σ+/σ- orthogonal polarization geometry that further reduces motional errors due to Doppler shifts. The residual motional error is dominated by dipole-dipole forces actingmore » on doubly-excited Rydberg atoms when the blockade is imperfect. As a result, for reasonable parameters, with qubits encoded into the clock states of 133Cs, we predict that our protocol could produce a CZ gate in < 10 μs with error probability on the order of 10-3.« less

  8. Measurement noise 100 times lower than the quantum-projection limit using entangled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosten, Onur; Engelsen, Nils J.; Krishnakumar, Rajiv; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum metrology uses quantum entanglement—correlations in the properties of microscopic systems—to improve the statistical precision of physical measurements. When measuring a signal, such as the phase shift of a light beam or an atomic state, a prominent limitation to achievable precision arises from the noise associated with the counting of uncorrelated probe particles. This noise, commonly referred to as shot noise or projection noise, gives rise to the standard quantum limit (SQL) to phase resolution. However, it can be mitigated down to the fundamental Heisenberg limit by entangling the probe particles. Despite considerable experimental progress in a variety of physical systems, a question that persists is whether these methods can achieve performance levels that compare favourably with optimized conventional (non-entangled) systems. Here we demonstrate an approach that achieves unprecedented levels of metrological improvement using half a million 87Rb atoms in their ‘clock’ states. The ensemble is 20.1 ± 0.3 decibels (100-fold) spin-squeezed via an optical-cavity-based measurement. We directly resolve small microwave-induced rotations 18.5 ± 0.3 decibels (70-fold) beyond the SQL. The single-shot phase resolution of 147 microradians achieved by the apparatus is better than that achieved by the best engineered cold atom sensors despite lower atom numbers. We infer entanglement of more than 680 ± 35 particles in the atomic ensemble. Applications include atomic clocks, inertial sensors, and fundamental physics experiments such as tests of general relativity or searches for electron electric dipole moment. To this end, we demonstrate an atomic clock measurement with a quantum enhancement of 10.5 ± 0.3 decibels (11-fold), limited by the phase noise of our microwave source.

  9. Quantum phase transition of alkaline-earth fermionic atoms confined in an optical superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Valencia, J.; Franco, R.; Figueira, M. S.

    2013-03-01

    Using the density matrix renormalization group method, we evaluate the spin and charge gaps of alkaline-earth fermionic atoms in a periodic one-dimensional optical superlattice. The number of delocalized atoms is equal to the lattice size and we consider an antiferromagnetic coupling between delocalized and localized atoms. We found a quantum phase transition from a Kondo insulator spin liquid state without confining potential to a charge-gapped antiferromagnetic state with nonzero potential. For each on-site coupling, there is a critical potential point for which the spin gap vanishes and its value increases linearly with the local interaction.

  10. Relativistic (SR-ZORA) quantum theory of atoms in molecules properties.

    PubMed

    Anderson, James S M; Rodríguez, Juan I; Ayers, Paul W; Götz, Andreas W

    2017-01-15

    The Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) is used to elucidate the effects of relativity on chemical systems. To do this, molecules are studied using density-functional theory at both the nonrelativistic level and using the scalar relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation. Relativistic effects on the QTAIM properties and topology of the electron density can be significant for chemical systems with heavy atoms. It is important, therefore, to use the appropriate relativistic treatment of QTAIM (Anderson and Ayers, J. Phys. Chem. 2009, 115, 13001) when treating systems with heavy atoms. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Focusing a helium atom beam using a quantum-reflection mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schewe, H. Christian; Zhao, Bum Suk; Meijer, Gerard; Schöllkopf, Wieland

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrate one-dimensional (1D) focusing of a thermal helium atom beam by quantum reflection from a cylindrical concave quartz mirror at near-grazing incidence. The smallest width of the focus achieved is 1.8 μm, essentially limited by spherical aberration. The various effects that contribute to the finite focal width have been investigated. We propose to apply near-grazing reflection from two concave elliptical mirrors in a Kirkpatrick-Baez arrangement for two-dimensional (2D) focusing of a helium atom beam, paving the way for a helium atom microprobe.

  12. Rydberg Excitation of Single Atoms for Applications in Quantum Information and Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Hankin, Aaron Michael

    2014-08-01

    With the advent of laser cooling and trapping, neutral atoms have become a foundational source of accuracy for applications in metrology and are showing great potential for their use as qubits in quantum information. In metrology, neutral atoms provide the most accurate references for the measurement of time and acceleration. The unsurpassed stability provided by these systems make neutral atoms an attractive avenue to explore applications in quantum information and computing. However, to fully investigate the eld of quantum information, we require a method to generate entangling interactions between neutral-atom qubits. Recent progress in the use of highly-excited Rydberg states for strong dipolar interactions has shown great promise for controlled entanglement using the Rydberg blockade phenomenon. I report the use of singly-trapped 133Cs atoms as qubits for applications in metrology and quantum information. Each atom provides a physical basis for a single qubit by encoding the required information into the ground-state hyper ne structure of 133Cs. Through the manipulation of these qubits with microwave and optical frequency sources, we demonstrate the capacity for arbitrary single-qubit control by driving qubit rotations in three orthogonal directions on the Bloch sphere. With this control, we develop an atom interferometer that far surpasses the force sensitivity of other approaches by applying the well-established technique of lightpulsed atom-matterwave interferometry to single atoms. Following this, we focus on two-qubit interactions using highly-excited Rydberg states. Through the development of a unique single-photon approach to Rydberg excitation using an ultraviolet laser at 319 nm, we observe the Rydberg blockade interaction between atoms separated by 6.6(3) m. Motivated by the observation of Rydberg blockade, we study the application of Rydberg-dressed states for a quantum controlled-phase gate. Using a realistic simulation of the

  13. Multimode Raman light-atom interface in warm atomic ensemble as multiple three-mode quantum operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parniak, Michał; Pęcak, Daniel; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2016-11-01

    We analyse the properties of a Raman quantum light-atom interface in long atomic ensemble and its applications as a quantum memory or two-mode squeezed state generator. We consider the weak-coupling regime and include both Stokes and anti-Stokes scattering and the effects of Doppler broadening in buffer gas assuming frequent velocity-averaging collisions. We find the Green functions describing multimode transformation from input to output fields of photons and atomic excitations. Proper mode basis is found via singular value decomposition for short interaction times. It reveals that triples of modes are coupled by a transformation equivalent to a combination of two beamsplitters and a two-mode squeezing operation. We analyse the possible transformations on an example of warm rubidium-87 vapour. The model we present bridges the gap between the Stokes only and anti-Stokes only interactions providing simple, universal description in a temporally and longitudinally multimode situation. Our results also provide an easy way to find an evolution of the states in a Schrödinger picture thus facilitating understanding and design.

  14. Dynamics and quantum entanglement of two-level atoms in de Sitter spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Zehua; Jing, Jiliang

    2014-11-15

    In the framework of open quantum systems, we study the internal dynamics of both freely falling and static two-level atoms interacting with quantized conformally coupled massless scalar field in de Sitter spacetime. We find that the atomic transition rates depend on both the nature of de Sitter spacetime and the motion of atoms, interestingly the steady states for both cases are always driven to being purely thermal, regardless of the atomic initial states. This thermalization phenomenon is structurally similar to what happens to an elementary quantum system immersed in a thermal field, and thus reveals the thermal nature of de Sitter spacetime. Besides, we find that the thermal baths will drive the entanglement shared by the freely falling atom (the static atom) and its auxiliary partner, a same two-level atom which is isolated from external fields, to being sudden death, and the proper time for the entanglement to be extinguished is computed. We also analyze that such thermalization and disentanglement phenomena, in principle, could be understood from the perspective of table-top simulation experiment.

  15. Quantum chaos of atoms in a resonator driven by an external resonant field

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, G.P.; Bulgakov, E.N.; Holm, D.D. Kirensky Institute of Physics, Research Educational Center for Nonlinear Processes at Krasnoyarsk Polytechnical Institute, Theoretical Department at Krasnoyarsk State University, 660036, Krasnoyarsk Theoretical Division, MS-B284, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 )

    1994-06-01

    A system of [ital N] two-level atoms in a resonator is considered interacting with a resonant eigenmode field and with an external coherent field, with a frequency slightly different from the frequency of the atomic transition. A model Hamiltonian is constructed for describing the slow quantum dynamics of the system, and a set of closed [ital c]-number equations for time-dependent quantum expectation values is derived in the boson and spin coherent states. In the region of parameters for developed chaos in the semiclassical limit (when the radiation field is considered classically) we show that the semiclassical approximation is violated by quantum effects at the time scale [tau][sub [h bar

  16. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide.

    PubMed

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-07-21

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold (23)Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry.

  17. Dynamics of a three level atom interacting with a detuned SU (1,1) quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. M. A.; Abdalla, M. Sebawe; Khalil, E. M.; Obada, A.-S. F.

    2013-09-01

    Starting from the interaction between a 3-level atom in the cascade configuration with an SU(1, 1) quantum system, an effective Hamiltonian for a 2-level atom with the presence of a Stark shift structure is obtained under large detuning and adiabatic elimination. The evolution operator for the new system is obtained and expectation values for different dynamical observables are obtained taking the initial state of the SU(1, 1) system to be a Perelomov coherent state and a superposition state for the 2-level atom. Atomic inversion, atomic variable squeezing and degree of entanglement are investigated for various values of the involved parameters. The effect of the Stark shift parameters is displayed in these phenomena.

  18. Two-photon gateway in one-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kubanek, A; Ourjoumtsev, A; Schuster, I; Koch, M; Pinkse, P W H; Murr, K; Rempe, G

    2008-11-14

    Single atoms absorb and emit light from a resonant laser beam photon by photon. We show that a single atom strongly coupled to an optical cavity can absorb and emit resonant photons in pairs. The effect is observed in a photon correlation experiment on the light transmitted through the cavity. We find that the atom-cavity system transforms a random stream of input photons into a correlated stream of output photons, thereby acting as a two-photon gateway. The phenomenon has its origin in the quantum anharmonicity of the energy structure of the atom-cavity system. Future applications could include the controlled interaction of two photons by means of one atom.

  19. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide

    PubMed Central

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold 23Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry. PMID:27440516

  20. Atomic electric fields revealed by a quantum mechanical approach to electron picodiffraction.

    PubMed

    Müller, Knut; Krause, Florian F; Béché, Armand; Schowalter, Marco; Galioit, Vincent; Löffler, Stefan; Verbeeck, Johan; Zweck, Josef; Schattschneider, Peter; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2014-12-15

    By focusing electrons on probes with a diameter of 50 pm, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is currently crossing the border to probing subatomic details. A major challenge is the measurement of atomic electric fields using differential phase contrast (DPC) microscopy, traditionally exploiting the concept of a field-induced shift of diffraction patterns. Here we present a simplified quantum theoretical interpretation of DPC. This enables us to calculate the momentum transferred to the STEM probe from diffracted intensities recorded on a pixel array instead of conventional segmented bright-field detectors. The methodical development yielding atomic electric field, charge and electron density is performed using simulations for binary GaN as an ideal model system. We then present a detailed experimental study of SrTiO3 yielding atomic electric fields, validated by comprehensive simulations. With this interpretation and upgraded instrumentation, STEM is capable of quantifying atomic electric fields and high-contrast imaging of light atoms.

  1. Correlated Quantum Dynamics of a Single Atom Collisionally Coupled to an Ultracold Finite Bosonic Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krönke, Sven; Knörzer, Johannes; Schmelcher, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We explore the correlated quantum dynamics of a single atom with a spatio-temporally localized coupling to a finite bosonic ensemble [arXiv:1410.8676]. The single atom is initially prepared in a coherent state of low energy and oscillates in a harmonic trap. An ensemble of NA interacting bosons is held in a displaced trap such that it is periodically penetrated by the single atom. The non-equilibrium quantum dynamics of the total system is simulated by means of an ab-initio method. Here, we focus on characterizing the impact of the peculiar inter-species coupling and the thereby induced inter-species correlations on the subsystem states: At instants of not too imbalanced excess energy distribution among the subsystems, inter-species correlations prove to be significant. A phase-space analysis for the single atom reveals that these correlations manifests themselves in short phases of strong deviations from a coherent state. In the bosonic ensemble, the single atom mainly induces singlet and delayed doublet excitations, for which we offer analytical insights with a stroboscopic time-dependent perturbation theory approach. When increasing the ensemble size, its maximal dynamical quantum depletion is shown to decrease faster than 1 /NA for a fixed excess energy.

  2. Quantum synchronization of many coupled atoms for an ultranarrow linewidth laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peiru; Xu, Minghui; Tieri, David; Zhu, Bihui; Rey, Ana Maria; Hazzard, Kaden; Holland, Murray

    2014-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the effect of quantum synchronization on many coupled two-level atoms acting as high quality oscillators. We show that quantum synchronization - the spontaneous alignment of the phase (of the two-level superposition) between different atoms - provides a potential approach to produce robust atomic coherences and coherent light with ultranarrow linewidth and extreme phase stability. The atoms may be coupled either through their direct dipole-dipole interactions or, as in a superradiant laser, through an optical cavity. We develop a variety of analytic and computational approaches for this problem, including exact open quantum system methods for small systems, semiclassical theories, and approaches that make use of the permutation symmetry of identically coupled ensembles. We investigate the first and second order coherence properties of both the optical and atomic degrees of freedom. We study synchronization in both the steady-state, as well as during the dynamically applied pulse sequences of Rabi and Ramsey interferometry. This work was supported by the DARPA QuASAR program, the NSF, and NIST.

  3. Atom and Electron Pump Based on Oscillating Wells: Classical versus Quantum features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, Joshua; Ruppert, Kevin; Das, Kunal

    2015-05-01

    The transport dynamics of ultracold atoms in quasi one-dimensional (1D) waveguides share much in common with that of electrons and holes in nanowires. In the latter system, biasless transport by time-varying potential, commonly called quantum pumping, has been much researched theoretically as a mechanism that can provide significant control over the current. With scant experimental success, ultracold atoms provide a promising alternate for exploring quantum pumps. Prior studies of quantum pumps have generally focused on using potential barriers as the pump elements. In this study, we undertake a first detailed study of the scattering dynamics involved in using quantum wells to drive the pumping. Specifically, we do a comparative study using quantum, classical and semiclassical picture in a common wavepacket approach that also allows direct comparison of quantum versus classical features. Notably, a static well, unlike a barrier, does not reflect; but oscillating ones do even in the classical limit, and moreover, particles can be trapped in wells indefinitely. Such features lead to distinctive features for well-based pumps that can have both practical and fundamental physics implications. Our study is done in the context of several different pump configurations. Supported by NSF Grant No. PHY-1313871 and grants from PASSHE-FPDC and Kutztown University.

  4. Resonant optical control of the spin of a single Cr atom in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente-Sampietro, A.; Utsumi, H.; Boukari, H.; Kuroda, S.; Besombes, L.

    2017-01-01

    A Cr atom in a semiconductor host carries a localized spin with an intrinsic large spin to strain coupling, which is particularly promising for the development of hybrid spin-mechanical systems and coherent mechanical spin driving. We demonstrate here that the spin of an individual Cr atom inserted in a semiconductor quantum dot can be controlled optically. We first show that a Cr spin can be prepared by resonant optical pumping. Monitoring the time dependence of the intensity of the resonant fluorescence of the quantum dot during this process permits us to probe the dynamics of the optical initialization of the Cr spin. Using this initialization and readout technique we measured a Cr spin relaxation time at T =5 K in the microsecond range. We finally demonstrate that, under a resonant single-mode laser field, the energy of any spin state of an individual Cr atom can be independently tuned by using the optical Stark effect.

  5. Sensing of mechanical motion at the quantum level via a hybrid atom-optomechanical setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seok, Hyojun; Bariani, Francesco; Singh, Swati; Vengalattore, Mukund; Meystre, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    We consider a hybrid quantum system in which an optomechanical cavity is coupled to a Fabry-Pérot cavity containing a trapped cold atomic ensemble. We show that it is possible to cool the mechanics to the ground state from room temperature outside the resolved-sideband regime by optically coupling it to the internal levels of the atoms. We also find that while in the familiar homodyne detection of small displacements this system exhibits the same standard quantum limit as traditional cavity optomechanics, it is possible to engineer the optical response of the atoms so as to realize a back-action evading measurement scheme. We acknowledge financial support from NSF, ARO and the DARPA QuaSAR and ORCHID programs.

  6. Prospects of charged-oscillator quantum-state generation with Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Robin; Minář, Jiří; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2016-10-01

    We explore the possibility of engineering quantum states of a charged mechanical oscillator by coupling it to a stream of atoms in superpositions of high-lying Rydberg states. Our scheme relies on the driving of a two-phonon resonance within the oscillator by coupling it to an atomic two-photon transition. This approach effectuates a controllable open system dynamics on the oscillator that in principle permits versatile dissipative creation of squeezed and other nonclassical states which are central to sensing applications or for studies of fundamental questions concerning the boundary between classical and quantum-mechanical descriptions of macroscopic objects. We show that these features survive thermal coupling of the oscillator with the environment. We perform a detailed feasibility study finding that current state-of-the-art parameters result in atom-oscillator couplings which are too weak to efficiently implement the proposed oscillator state preparation protocol. Finally, we comment on ways to circumvent the present limitations.

  7. Creating fractional quantum Hall states with atomic clusters using light-assisted insertion of angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junyi; Beugnon, Jérôme; Nascimbene, Sylvain

    2016-10-01

    We describe a protocol to prepare clusters of ultracold bosonic atoms in strongly interacting states reminiscent of fractional quantum Hall states. Our scheme consists in injecting a controlled amount of angular momentum to an atomic gas using Raman transitions carrying orbital angular momentum. By injecting one unit of angular momentum per atom, one realizes a single-vortex state, which is well described by mean-field theory for large enough particle numbers. We also present schemes to realize fractional quantum Hall states, namely, the bosonic Laughlin and Moore-Read states. We investigate the requirements for adiabatic nucleation of such topological states, in particular comparing linear Landau-Zener ramps and arbitrary ramps obtained from optimized control methods. We also show that this protocol requires excellent control over the isotropic character of the trapping potential.

  8. A quantum transport model for atomic line radiation in plasmas*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, Joël

    2017-02-01

    Emission and absorption lines in plasmas are investigated theoretically using a phase space formulation of quantum electrodynamics. A transport equation for the one-photon Wigner function is derived and formulated in terms of the noncommutative Moyal product. This equation reduces to the standard radiative transfer equation at the large spectral band limit, when the characteristic spectral band of the emission and absorption coefficients is larger than the inverse photon absorption length and time. We examine deviations to this limit. An ideal slab geometry is considered. The Wigner function relative to hydrogen Lyman α in stellar atmospheric conditions is calculated.

  9. Quantum Tunneling Enabled Self-Assembly of Hydrogen Atoms on Cu(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, April D.; Peng, Guowen; Mattera, Michael F.; Lewis, Emily A.; Murphy, Colin J.; Kyriakou, Georgios; Mavrikakis, Manos; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2012-11-27

    Atomic and molecular self-assembly are key phenomena that underpin many important technologies. Typically, thermally enabled diffusion allows a system to sample many areas of configurational space, and ordered assemblies evolve that optimize interactions between species. Herein we describe a system in which the diffusion is quantum tunneling in nature and report the self-assembly of H atoms on a Cu(111) surface into complex arrays based on local clustering followed by larger scale islanding of these clusters. By scanning tunneling microscope tip-induced scrambling of H atom assemblies, we are able to watch the atomic scale details of H atom self-assembly in real time. The ordered arrangements we observe are complex and very different from those formed by H on other metals that occur in much simpler geometries. We contrast the diffusion and assembly of H with D, which has a much slower tunneling rate and is not able to form the large islands observed with H over equivalent time scales. Using density functional theory, we examine the interaction of H atoms on Cu(111) by calculating the differential binding energy as a function of H coverage. At the temperature of the experiments (5 K), H(D) diffusion by quantum tunneling dominates. The quantum-tunneling-enabled H and D diffusion is studied using a semiclassically corrected transition state theory coupled with density functional theory. This system constitutes the first example of quantum-tunneling-enabled self-assembly, while simultaneously demonstrating the complex ordering of H on Cu(111), a catalytically relevant surface.

  10. Quantum discord and entanglement of two atoms in a micromaser-type system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xue-Qun; Wang, Fu-Zhong

    2016-06-01

    The correlations dynamics of two atoms in the case of a micromaser-type system is investigated. We show that the entangled state can be created by initially maximally mixed state and there exist collapse and revival phenomena for the time evolutions of both entanglement and quantum discord under the system considered as the field is initially in the Fock state. Our results confirm that entanglement and quantum discord have similar behaviors in certain time ranges, such as their oscillations during the time evolution being almost in phase, but they also present significant differences, such as quantum discord being maintained even after the complete loss of entanglement. Furthermore, we exhibit clearly that the dynamics of quantum discord under the action of environment are intimately related to the generation and evolution of entanglement.

  11. Hyperparallel optical quantum computation assisted by atomic ensembles embedded in double-sided optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-08-01

    We propose an effective, scalable, hyperparallel photonic quantum computation scheme in which photonic qubits are hyperencoded both in the spatial degrees of freedom (DOF) and the polarization DOF of each photon. The deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-cnot) gate on a two-photon system is attainable with our interesting interface between the polarized photon and the collective spin wave (magnon) of an atomic ensemble embedded in a double-sided optical cavity, and it doubles the operations in the conventional quantum cnot gate. Moreover, we present a compact hyper-cnotN gate on N +1 hyperencoded photons with only two auxiliary cavity-magnon systems, not more, and it can be faithfully constituted with current experimental techniques. Our proposal enables various applications with the hyperencoded photons in quantum computing and quantum networks.

  12. Atomic layer deposition of lead sulfide quantum dots on nanowire surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Neil P; Jung, Hee Joon; Trejo, Orlando; McDowell, Matthew T; Hryciw, Aaron; Brongersma, Mark; Sinclair, Robert; Prinz, Fritz B

    2011-03-09

    Quantum dots provide unique advantages in the design of novel optoelectronic devices owing to the ability to tune their properties as a function of size. Here we demonstrate a new technique for fabrication of quantum dots during the nucleation stage of atomic layer deposition (ALD) of PbS. Islands with sub-10 nm diameters were observed during the initial ALD cycles by transmission electron microscopy, and in situ observations of the coalescence and sublimation behavior of these islands show the possibility of further modifying the size and density of dots by annealing. The ALD process can be used to cover high-aspect-ratio nanostructures, as demonstrated by the uniform coating of a Si nanowire array with a single layer of PbS quantum dots. Photoluminescence measurements on the quantum dot/nanowire composites show a blue shift when the number of ALD cycles is decreased, suggesting a route to fabricate unique three-dimensional nanostructured devices such as solar cells.

  13. Two-Dimensional Arrays of Neutral Atom Quantum Gates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-20

    Kim, Robert R. Mcleod, M. Saffman, Kelvin H. Wagner. Doppler-free, multiwavelength acousto - optic deflector for two-photon addressing arrays of Rb...bottle beam trap, Optics Letters, (04 2009): 0. doi: 10.1364/OL.34.001159 10/19/2012 7.00 M. Saffman, D . Oblak, J. Appel, E. Polzik. Spin...Atoms in Microscopic Optical Traps, Physical Review Letters, ( 2 2006): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.063001 10/19/2012 21.00 L H Pedersen, K

  14. Quantum Rabi model for N-state atoms.

    PubMed

    Albert, Victor V

    2012-05-04

    A tractable N-state Rabi Hamiltonian is introduced by extending the parity symmetry of the two-state model. The single-mode case provides a few-parameter description of a novel class of periodic systems, predicting that the ground state of certain four-state atom-cavity systems will undergo parity change at strong-coupling. A group-theoretical treatment provides physical insight into dynamics and a modified rotating wave approximation obtains accurate analytical energies. The dissipative case can be applied to study excitation energy transfer in molecular rings or chains.

  15. Simulating quantum spin models using Rydberg-excited atomic ensembles in magnetic microtrap arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, Shannon; Glaetzle, Alexander W.; Hannaford, Peter

    2017-04-01

    We propose a scheme to simulate lattice spin models based on strong, long-range interacting Rydberg atoms stored in a large-spacing array of magnetic microtraps. Each spin is encoded in a collective spin state involving a single nS or (n+1)S Rydberg atom excited from an ensemble of ground-state alkali atoms prepared via Rydberg blockade. After the excitation laser is switched off, the Rydberg spin states on neighbouring lattice sites interact via general XXZ spin–spin interactions. To read out the collective spin states we propose a single Rydberg atom triggered avalanche scheme in which the presence of a single Rydberg atom conditionally transfers a large number of ground-state atoms in the trap to an untrapped state which can be readily detected by site-resolved absorption imaging. Such a quantum simulator should allow the study of quantum spin systems in almost arbitrary one-dimensional and two-dimensional configurations. This paves the way towards engineering exotic spin models, such as spin models based on triangular-symmetry lattices which can give rise to frustrated-spin magnetism.

  16. Bloch Oscillations of Cold Atoms in a Cavity: Effects of Quantum Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, B.; O'Dell, D. H. J.

    2013-05-01

    We extend our theory of Bloch oscillations of cold atoms inside an optical cavity [Venkatesh et al., Phys. Rev. A 80, 063834 (2009)] to include the effects of quantum noise. The noise acts as a form of quantum measurement backaction by perturbing the coupleddynamics of the atoms and the light. We take it into account by solving the Heiseberg-Langevin equations for linearized fluctuations about the atomic and optical meanfields and examine how this influences the signal-to-noise ratio of a measurement of external forces using this system. In particular, we investigate the effects of changing the number of atoms, the intracavity lattice depth, and the atom-light coupling strength, and show how resonances between the Bloch oscillation dynamics and the quasiparticle spectrum have a strong influence on the signal-to-noise ratio. One of the hurdles we overcome along the way is the proper treatment of fluctuations about time-dependent meanfields in the cold atom cavity-QED context.

  17. Bloch oscillations of cold atoms in a cavity: Effects of quantum noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, B. Prasanna; O'Dell, D. H. J.

    2013-07-01

    We extend our theory of Bloch oscillations of cold atoms inside an optical cavity [Venkatesh , Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.80.063834 80, 063834 (2009)] to include the effects of quantum noise arising from coupling to external modes. The noise acts as a form of quantum measurement backaction by perturbing the coupled dynamics of the atoms and the light. We take it into account by solving the Heisenberg-Langevin equations for linearized fluctuations about the atomic and optical mean fields and examine how this influences the signal-to-noise ratio of a measurement of external forces using this system. In particular, we investigate the effects of changing the number of atoms, the intracavity lattice depth, and the atom-light coupling strength, and show how resonances between the Bloch oscillation dynamics and the quasiparticle spectrum have a strong influence on the signal-to-noise ratio, as well as heating effects. One of the hurdles we overcome in this paper is the proper treatment of fluctuations about time-dependent mean fields in the context of cold-atom cavity QED.

  18. Isotope Dependence and Quantum Effects on Atomic Hydrogen Diffusion in Liquid Water.

    PubMed

    Walker, J A; Mezyk, S P; Roduner, E; Bartels, D M

    2016-03-03

    Relative diffusion coefficients were determined in water for the D, H, and Mu isotopes of atomic hydrogen by measuring their diffusion-limited spin-exchange rate constants with Ni(2+) as a function of temperature. H and D atoms were generated by pulse radiolysis of water and measured by time-resolved pulsed EPR. Mu atoms are detected by muonium spin resonance. To isolate the atomic mass effect from solvent isotope effect, we measured all three spin-exchange rates in 90% D2O. The diffusion depends on the atomic mass, demonstrating breakdown of Stokes-Einstein behavior. The diffusion can be understood using a combination of water "cavity diffusion" and "hopping" mechanisms, as has been proposed in the literature. The H/D isotope effect agrees with previous modeling using ring polymer molecular dynamics. The "quantum swelling" effect on muonium due to its larger de Broglie wavelength does not seem to slow its "hopping" diffusion as much as predicted in previous work. Quantum effects of both the atom mass and the water librations have been modeled using RPMD and a qTIP4P/f quantized flexible water model. These results suggest that the muonium diffusion is very sensitive to the Mu versus water potential used.

  19. Preparation of reduced-quantum-uncertainty input states for an atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleier-Smith, M. H.; Leroux, I. D.; Vuletić, V.

    2009-08-01

    Atomic clocks have reached the Standard Quantum Limit (SQL) of precision,1 set by the projection noise inherent in measurements on uncorrelated atoms. It is possible to overcome this limit by entangling the atoms to generate a "squeezed state" of the atomic ensemble. We use the collective interaction of an atomic ensemble with a far-detuned light field in an optical resonator to prepare squeezed states by two different methods: quantum non-demolition (QND) measurement and Hamiltonian evolution. We apply both methods to an ensemble of 5 x 104 87Rb atoms in a superposition of hyperfine clock states. We measure the suppression of projection noise and compare it to the accompanying reduction in signal, thereby quantifying the net gain in spectroscopic sensitivity. By QND measurement, with resolution up to 9 dB below the projection noise level, we achieve 3.0(8) dB of metrologically relevant squeezing. Whereas the measurement-based approach relies on knowledge of the (randomly distributed) measurement outcome to produce a conditionally squeezed state, the method of Hamiltonian evolution produces a known squeezed state independent of detector performance. We mimic the dynamics of the one-axis twisting Hamiltonian, proposed as a generator of squeezed states by Kitagawa and Ueda,2 by using the atom-induced frequency shift of the resonator mode and the corresponding resonator-field-induced shift of the atomic transition frequency to introduce an effective interaction among the atoms. The resulting deterministic squeezing is sufficient to allow a 6.0(4) dB improvement in spectroscopic sensitivity over the SQL.

  20. Magnetic-film atom chip with 10 μm period lattices of microtraps for quantum information science with Rydberg atoms.

    PubMed

    Leung, V Y F; Pijn, D R M; Schlatter, H; Torralbo-Campo, L; La Rooij, A L; Mulder, G B; Naber, J; Soudijn, M L; Tauschinsky, A; Abarbanel, C; Hadad, B; Golan, E; Folman, R; Spreeuw, R J C

    2014-05-01

    We describe the fabrication and construction of a setup for creating lattices of magnetic microtraps for ultracold atoms on an atom chip. The lattice is defined by lithographic patterning of a permanent magnetic film. Patterned magnetic-film atom chips enable a large variety of trapping geometries over a wide range of length scales. We demonstrate an atom chip with a lattice constant of 10 μm, suitable for experiments in quantum information science employing the interaction between atoms in highly excited Rydberg energy levels. The active trapping region contains lattice regions with square and hexagonal symmetry, with the two regions joined at an interface. A structure of macroscopic wires, cutout of a silver foil, was mounted under the atom chip in order to load ultracold (87)Rb atoms into the microtraps. We demonstrate loading of atoms into the square and hexagonal lattice sections simultaneously and show resolved imaging of individual lattice sites. Magnetic-film lattices on atom chips provide a versatile platform for experiments with ultracold atoms, in particular for quantum information science and quantum simulation.

  1. Magnetic-film atom chip with 10 μm period lattices of microtraps for quantum information science with Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, V. Y. F.; Pijn, D. R. M.; Schlatter, H.; Torralbo-Campo, L.; La Rooij, A. L.; Mulder, G. B.; Naber, J.; Soudijn, M. L.; Tauschinsky, A.; Abarbanel, C.; Hadad, B.; Golan, E.; Folman, R.; Spreeuw, R. J. C.

    2014-05-01

    We describe the fabrication and construction of a setup for creating lattices of magnetic microtraps for ultracold atoms on an atom chip. The lattice is defined by lithographic patterning of a permanent magnetic film. Patterned magnetic-film atom chips enable a large variety of trapping geometries over a wide range of length scales. We demonstrate an atom chip with a lattice constant of 10 μm, suitable for experiments in quantum information science employing the interaction between atoms in highly excited Rydberg energy levels. The active trapping region contains lattice regions with square and hexagonal symmetry, with the two regions joined at an interface. A structure of macroscopic wires, cutout of a silver foil, was mounted under the atom chip in order to load ultracold 87Rb atoms into the microtraps. We demonstrate loading of atoms into the square and hexagonal lattice sections simultaneously and show resolved imaging of individual lattice sites. Magnetic-film lattices on atom chips provide a versatile platform for experiments with ultracold atoms, in particular for quantum information science and quantum simulation.

  2. Magnetic-film atom chip with 10 μm period lattices of microtraps for quantum information science with Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, V. Y. F.; Pijn, D. R. M.; Schlatter, H.; Torralbo-Campo, L.; La Rooij, A. L.; Mulder, G. B.; Naber, J.; Soudijn, M. L.; Tauschinsky, A.; Spreeuw, R. J. C.; Abarbanel, C.; Hadad, B.; Golan, E.; Folman, R.

    2014-05-15

    We describe the fabrication and construction of a setup for creating lattices of magnetic microtraps for ultracold atoms on an atom chip. The lattice is defined by lithographic patterning of a permanent magnetic film. Patterned magnetic-film atom chips enable a large variety of trapping geometries over a wide range of length scales. We demonstrate an atom chip with a lattice constant of 10 μm, suitable for experiments in quantum information science employing the interaction between atoms in highly excited Rydberg energy levels. The active trapping region contains lattice regions with square and hexagonal symmetry, with the two regions joined at an interface. A structure of macroscopic wires, cutout of a silver foil, was mounted under the atom chip in order to load ultracold {sup 87}Rb atoms into the microtraps. We demonstrate loading of atoms into the square and hexagonal lattice sections simultaneously and show resolved imaging of individual lattice sites. Magnetic-film lattices on atom chips provide a versatile platform for experiments with ultracold atoms, in particular for quantum information science and quantum simulation.

  3. Spin-Orbit Interactions and Quantum Spin Dynamics in Cold Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tscherbul, Timur V.; Brumer, Paul; Buchachenko, Alexei A.

    2016-09-01

    We present accurate ab initio and quantum scattering calculations on a prototypical hybrid ion-atom system Yb+ -Rb, recently suggested as a promising candidate for the experimental study of open quantum systems, quantum information processing, and quantum simulation. We identify the second-order spin-orbit (SO) interaction as the dominant source of hyperfine relaxation in cold Yb+ -Rb collisions. Our results are in good agreement with recent experimental observations [L. Ratschbacher et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 160402 (2013)] of hyperfine relaxation rates of trapped Yb+ immersed in an ultracold Rb gas. The calculated rates are 4 times smaller than is predicted by the Langevin capture theory and display a weak T-0.3 temperature dependence, indicating significant deviations from statistical behavior. Our analysis underscores the deleterious nature of the SO interaction and implies that light ion-atom combinations such as Yb+ -Li should be used to minimize hyperfine relaxation and decoherence of trapped ions in ultracold atomic gases.

  4. A photon-photon quantum gate based on a single atom in an optical resonator.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Bastian; Welte, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2016-08-11

    That two photons pass each other undisturbed in free space is ideal for the faithful transmission of information, but prohibits an interaction between the photons. Such an interaction is, however, required for a plethora of applications in optical quantum information processing. The long-standing challenge here is to realize a deterministic photon-photon gate, that is, a mutually controlled logic operation on the quantum states of the photons. This requires an interaction so strong that each of the two photons can shift the other's phase by π radians. For polarization qubits, this amounts to the conditional flipping of one photon's polarization to an orthogonal state. So far, only probabilistic gates based on linear optics and photon detectors have been realized, because "no known or foreseen material has an optical nonlinearity strong enough to implement this conditional phase shift''. Meanwhile, tremendous progress in the development of quantum-nonlinear systems has opened up new possibilities for single-photon experiments. Platforms range from Rydberg blockade in atomic ensembles to single-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics. Applications such as single-photon switches and transistors, two-photon gateways, nondestructive photon detectors, photon routers and nonlinear phase shifters have been demonstrated, but none of them with the ideal information carriers: optical qubits in discriminable modes. Here we use the strong light-matter coupling provided by a single atom in a high-finesse optical resonator to realize the Duan-Kimble protocol of a universal controlled phase flip (π phase shift) photon-photon quantum gate. We achieve an average gate fidelity of (76.2 ± 3.6) per cent and specifically demonstrate the capability of conditional polarization flipping as well as entanglement generation between independent input photons. This photon-photon quantum gate is a universal quantum logic element, and therefore could perform most existing two-photon operations

  5. A photon-photon quantum gate based on a single atom in an optical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Bastian; Welte, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    That two photons pass each other undisturbed in free space is ideal for the faithful transmission of information, but prohibits an interaction between the photons. Such an interaction is, however, required for a plethora of applications in optical quantum information processing. The long-standing challenge here is to realize a deterministic photon-photon gate, that is, a mutually controlled logic operation on the quantum states of the photons. This requires an interaction so strong that each of the two photons can shift the other’s phase by π radians. For polarization qubits, this amounts to the conditional flipping of one photon’s polarization to an orthogonal state. So far, only probabilistic gates based on linear optics and photon detectors have been realized, because “no known or foreseen material has an optical nonlinearity strong enough to implement this conditional phase shift”. Meanwhile, tremendous progress in the development of quantum-nonlinear systems has opened up new possibilities for single-photon experiments. Platforms range from Rydberg blockade in atomic ensembles to single-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics. Applications such as single-photon switches and transistors, two-photon gateways, nondestructive photon detectors, photon routers and nonlinear phase shifters have been demonstrated, but none of them with the ideal information carriers: optical qubits in discriminable modes. Here we use the strong light-matter coupling provided by a single atom in a high-finesse optical resonator to realize the Duan-Kimble protocol of a universal controlled phase flip (π phase shift) photon-photon quantum gate. We achieve an average gate fidelity of (76.2 ± 3.6) per cent and specifically demonstrate the capability of conditional polarization flipping as well as entanglement generation between independent input photons. This photon-photon quantum gate is a universal quantum logic element, and therefore could perform most existing two

  6. Quantum memory effects in noninteracting cold-atom systems: Hysteresis loop and lattice transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Chihchun; Metcalf, Mekena; Lai, Chenyen

    2016-05-01

    Memory effects are observable in magnetization, rechargeable batteries, and many systems exhibiting history-dependent states. Quantum memory effects are observable, for instance, in atomic superfluids. A counter-intuitive question is whether quantum memory effects can exist in noninteracting systems. Here we present two examples of cold-atom systems demonstrating memory effects in noninteracting systems. The first example is a ring-shaped potential loaded with noninteracting fermions. An artificial vector potential drives a current and with a tunable dissipative background, the current lags behind the driving and exhibits hysteresis loops. The dissipative energy can be controlled by the coupling between the fermions and the background. In the second example, cold atoms loaded in a tunable optical lattice transformed from the triangular to the kagome geometry. The kagome lattice supports a flat-band consisting of degenerate localized states. Quantum memory effects are observable after a lattice transformation as the steady-state density depends on the rate of the transformation. The versatility of memory effects in cold-atom systems promises novel applications in atomtronics.

  7. Three-dimensional theory of quantum memories based on {Lambda}-type atomic ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Zeuthen, Emil; Grodecka-Grad, Anna; Soerensen, Anders S.

    2011-10-15

    We develop a three-dimensional theory for quantum memories based on light storage in ensembles of {Lambda}-type atoms, where two long-lived atomic ground states are employed. We consider light storage in an ensemble of finite spatial extent and we show that within the paraxial approximation the Fresnel number of the atomic ensemble and the optical depth are the only important physical parameters determining the quality of the quantum memory. We analyze the influence of these parameters on the storage of light followed by either forward or backward read-out from the quantum memory. We show that for small Fresnel numbers the forward memory provides higher efficiencies, whereas for large Fresnel numbers the backward memory is advantageous. The optimal light modes to store in the memory are presented together with the corresponding spin waves and outcoming light modes. We show that for high optical depths such {Lambda}-type atomic ensembles allow for highly efficient backward and forward memories even for small Fresnel numbers F(greater-or-similar sign)0.1.

  8. Quantum dynamics of finite atomic and molecular systems through density matrix methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorndyke, Brian

    We develop a mixed quantum-classical formulation to describe the dynamics of few- and many-body atomic systems by applying a partial Wigner transform over the quantum Liouville equation of motion. In this approach, the density operator becomes a function in quasiclassical phase space, while remaining an operator over a subset of quantal variables. By taking appropriate limits and introducing an effective potential, we derive equations of motion describing quasiclassical nuclear trajectories coupled to quantal electronic evolution. We also introduce a variable timestep procedure to account for the disparity between slow nuclear motion and fast electronic fluctuations. Our mixed quantum-classical method is applied to the study of three simple one-dimensional two-state models. The first model represents the photoinduced desorption of an alkali atom from a metal surface, where near-resonant electron transfer is important. A second model explores a binary collision under conditions where two avoided crossings are present. The third model follows the photoinduced dissociation of the sodium iodide complex, whose long-range attractive surface results in oscillations of internuclear distance. Quantities such as state populations and quantum coherence are computed, and found to be in excellent agreement with precise quantal results obtained through fast Fourier transform grid methods. Having validated our approach, we turn to the study of alkali atoms embedded in rare gas clusters, treating the alkali atom-rare gas interactions with l-dependent semi-local pseudopotentials. Light emission from the electronic motion of the alkali atom is derived in the semiclassical limit, and computational methods to render the simulation feasible for a many-atom cluster are discussed. The formalism is applied to lithium atoms in helium clusters, where the cluster configuration and the electronic population dynamics of the lithium atom are monitored over time. We study both the ground and

  9. Ultracold atomic collisions in tight harmonic traps: Quantum-defect model and application to metastable helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Peach, Gillian; Whittingham, Ian B.; Beams, Timothy J.

    2004-09-01

    We analyze a system of two colliding ultracold atoms under strong harmonic confinement from the viewpoint of quantum defect theory and formulate a generalized self-consistent method for determining the allowed energies. We also present two highly efficient computational methods for determining the bound state energies and eigenfunctions of such systems. The perturbed harmonic oscillator problem is characterized by a long asymptotic region beyond the effective range of the interatomic potential. The first method, which is based on quantum defect theory and is an adaptation of a technique developed by one of the authors (G.P.) for highly excited states in a modified Coulomb potential, is very efficient for integrating through this outer region. The second method is a direct numerical solution of the radial Schroedinger equation using a discrete variable representation of the kinetic energy operator and a scaled radial coordinate grid. The methods are applied to the case of trapped spin-polarized metastable helium atoms. The calculated eigenvalues agree very closely for the two methods, and with the eigenvalues computed using the generalized self-consistent method.

  10. Partially ferromagnetic electromagnet for trapping and cooling neutral atoms to quantum degeneracy

    SciTech Connect

    Fauquembergue, M.; Riou, J-F.; Guerin, W.; Rangwala, S.; Moron, F.; Villing, A.; Le Coq, Y.; Bouyer, P.; Aspect, A.; Lecrivain, M.

    2005-10-15

    We have developed a compact partially ferromagnetic electromagnet to produce an Ioffe-Pritchard trap for neutral atoms. Our structure permits strong magnetic confinement with low power consumption. Compared to the previous iron-core electromagnet [B. Desruelle, V. Boyer, P. Bouyer, G. Birkl, M. Lecrivain, F. Alves, C. Westbrook, and A. Aspect, Eur. Phys. J. D 1, 255 (1998)], it allows for easy compensation of remnant fields and very high stability, along with cost-effective realization and compactness. We describe and characterize our apparatus and demonstrate trapping and cooling of {sup 87}Rb atoms to quantum degeneracy. Pure Bose-Einstein condensates containing 10{sup 6} atoms are routinely realized on a half-minute cycle. In addition we test the stability of the magnetic trap by producing atom lasers.

  11. Ab Initio Study on Atomic Structures and Physical Properties of CdSe Quantum Nanodots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-25

    CdSe quantum dots , with magic number (( CdSe )13, ( CdSe )19, ( CdSe )33 and ( CdSe )34 ). Effects of organic ligand binding on the stability of CdSe as well...calculations of optical absorption spectra for CdSe quantum dots , with magic number (( CdSe )13, ( CdSe )19, ( CdSe )33 and ( CdSe )34 ), have been calculated in...1 AOARD-08-4037 Title of Proposed Project: Ab initio study on atomic structures and physical

  12. Nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of mixed quantum classical ensembles: application to noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kantorovich, L N

    2002-08-26

    Using the nonequilibrium statistical operator method, we suggest a new general method of treating dynamics of a combined system consisting of interacting classical and quantum parts. The method is illustrated on the tip dynamics in the noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) where a macroscopic tip interacts with a quantum microscopic system (the surface and the nanotip). The derived general equation of motion for the tip and the Fokker-Planck equation, applicable even at low temperatures, contain memory effects and a friction term which should (at least partially) be responsible for the observed energy dissipation in NC-AFM experiments.

  13. Quantum and classical study of surface characterization by three-dimensional helium atom scattering.

    PubMed

    Moix, Jeremy M; Pollak, Eli; Allison, William

    2011-01-14

    Exact time-dependent wavepacket calculations of helium atom scattering from model symmetric, chiral, and hexagonal surfaces are presented and compared with their classical counterparts. Analysis of the momentum distribution of the scattered wavepacket provides a convenient method to obtain the resulting energy and angle resolved scattering distributions. The classical distributions are characterized by standard rainbow scattering from corrugated surfaces. It is shown that the classical results are closely related to their quantum counterparts and capture the qualitative features appearing therein. Both the quantum and classical distributions are capable of distinguishing between the structures of the three surfaces.

  14. From single atoms to self-assembled quantum single-atomic nanowires: noble metal atoms on black phosphorene monolayers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X J; Shan, Wen-Wen; He, Hao; Xue, Xinlian; Guo, Z X; Li, S F

    2017-03-15

    Transition metal (TM) nanostructures, such as one dimensional (1D) nanowires with/without substrates, usually possess drastically different properties from their bulk counterparts, due to their distinct stacking and electronic confinement. Correspondingly, it is of great importance to establish the dominant driving force in forming 1D single-metal-atom-wires (SMAWs). Here, with first-principles calculations, taking the black phosphorene (BP) monolayer as a prototype 2D substrate, we investigate the energetic and kinetic properties of all the 5d-TM atoms on the 2D substrate to reveal the mechanism of formation of SMAWs. In contrast to other 5d- and 4d-TMs, noble metal elements Pd and Pt are found to prefer to grow along the trough in an atom-by-atom manner, self-assembling into SMAWs with a significant magic growth behavior. This is due to distinct binding energies and diffusion barriers along the trough, i.e., zig-zag direction, as compared to other directions of the BP. The present findings are valuable in the fabrication and modulation of 1D nanostructures which can be anticipated to possess desirable functionalities for potential applications such as in nanocatalysis, nanosensors, and related areas.

  15. Probing the Quantum States of a Single Atom Transistor at Microwave Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Tettamanzi, Giuseppe Carlo; Hile, Samuel James; House, Matthew Gregory; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y

    2017-03-28

    The ability to apply gigahertz frequencies to control the quantum state of a single P atom is an essential requirement for the fast gate pulsing needed for qubit control in donor-based silicon quantum computation. Here, we demonstrate this with nanosecond accuracy in an all epitaxial single atom transistor by applying excitation signals at frequencies up to ≈13 GHz to heavily phosphorus-doped silicon leads. These measurements allow the differentiation between the excited states of the single atom and the density of states in the one-dimensional leads. Our pulse spectroscopy experiments confirm the presence of an excited state at an energy ≈9 meV, consistent with the first excited state of a single P donor in silicon. The relaxation rate of this first excited state to the ground state is estimated to be larger than 2.5 GHz, consistent with theoretical predictions. These results represent a systematic investigation of how an atomically precise single atom transistor device behaves under radio frequency excitations.

  16. High numerical aperture diffractive optical elements for neutral atom quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A. L.; Kemme, S. A.; Wendt, J. R.; Carter, T. R.; Samora, S.

    2013-03-01

    The viability of neutral atom based quantum computers is dependent upon scalability to large numbers of qubits. Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) offer the possibility to scale up to many qubit systems by enabling the manipulation of light to collect signal or deliver a tailored spatial trapping pattern. DOEs have an advantage over refractive microoptics since they do not have measurable surface sag, making significantly larger numerical apertures (NA) accessible with a smaller optical component. The smaller physical size of a DOE allows the micro-lenses to be placed in vacuum with the atoms, reducing aberration effects that would otherwise be introduced by the cell walls of the vacuum chamber. The larger collection angle accessible with DOEs enable faster quantum computation speeds. We have designed a set of DOEs for collecting the 852 nm fluorescence from the D2 transition in trapped cesium atoms, and compare these DOEs to several commercially available refractive micro-lenses. The largest DOE is able to collect over 20% of the atom's radiating sphere whereas the refractive micro-optic is able to collect just 8% of the atom's radiating sphere.

  17. Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms at Addressable Optical Lattice Sites and Atoms in Confined Geometries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-13

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We have performed a set of experiments using arrays of 1D Bose gases in various configurations. Uncoupled 1D gases have been...used to study the limits of statistical mechanics near integrable points. We have shown that nearly integrable gases thermalize at an even slower...NAME(S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 ultracold atoms, optical lattices, 1D gases

  18. Dissipative stabilization of quantum-feedback-based multipartite entanglement with Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiao-Qiang; Wu, Jin-Hui; Yi, Xue-Xi

    2017-02-01

    A quantum-feedback-based scheme is proposed for generating multipartite entanglements of Rydberg atoms in a dissipative optical cavity. The Rydberg blockade mechanism efficiently prevents double excitations of the system, which is further exploited to speed up the stabilization of an entangled state with a single Rydberg state excitation. The corresponding feedback operations are greatly simplified, since only one regular atom needs to be controlled during the whole process, irrespective of the number of particles. The form of the entangled state is also adjustable via regulating the Rabi frequencies of driving fields. Moreover, a relatively long lifetime of the high-lying Rydberg level guarantees a high fidelity in a realistic situation.

  19. Nonlinear Quantum Optics in a Waveguide: Distinct Single Photons Strongly Interacting at the Single Atom Level

    SciTech Connect

    Kolchin, Pavel; Oulton, Rupert F.; Zhang Xiang

    2011-03-18

    We propose a waveguide-QED system where two single photons of distinct frequency or polarization interact strongly. The system consists of a single ladder-type three level atom coupled to a waveguide. When both optical transitions are coupled strongly to the waveguide's mode, we show that a control photon tuned to the upper transition induces a {pi} phase shift and tunneling of a probe photon tuned to the otherwise reflective lower transition. Furthermore, the system exhibits single photon scattering by a classical control beam. Waveguide-QED schemes could be an alternative to high quality cavities or dense atomic ensembles in quantum information processing.

  20. YinYang atom: a simple combined ab initio quantum mechanical molecular mechanical model.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yihan; Kong, Jing

    2007-05-10

    A simple interface is proposed for combined quantum mechanical (QM) molecular mechanical (MM) calculations for the systems where the QM and MM regions are connected through covalent bonds. Within this model, the atom that connects the two regions, called YinYang atom here, serves as an ordinary MM atom to other MM atoms and as a hydrogen-like atom to other QM atoms. Only one new empirical parameter is introduced to adjust the length of the connecting bond and is calibrated with the molecule propanol. This model is tested with the computation of equilibrium geometries and protonation energies for dozens of molecules. Special attention is paid on the influence of MM point charges on optimized geometry and protonation energy, and it is found that it is important to maintain local charge-neutrality in the MM region in order for the accurate calculation of the protonation and deprotonation energies. Overall the simple YinYang atom model yields comparable results to some other QM/MM models.

  1. Robustness of topologically protected edge states in quantum walk experiments with neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, Thorsten; Brakhane, Stefan; Alt, Wolfgang; Meschede, Dieter; Asbóth, Janos K.; Alberti, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Discrete-time quantum walks allow Floquet topological insulator materials to be explored using controllable systems such as ultracold atoms in optical lattices. By numerical simulations, we study the robustness of topologically protected edge states in the presence of decoherence in one- and two-dimensional discrete-time quantum walks. We also develop a simple analytical model quantifying the robustness of these edge states against either spin or spatial dephasing, predicting an exponential decay of the population of topologically protected edge states. Moreover, we present an experimental proposal based on neutral atoms in spin-dependent optical lattices to realize spatial boundaries between distinct topological phases. Our proposal includes also a scheme to implement spin-dependent discrete shift operations in a two-dimensional optical lattice. We analyze under realistic decoherence conditions the experimental feasibility of observing unidirectional, dissipationless transport of matter waves along boundaries separating distinct topological domains.

  2. Quantum-confined electronic states in atomically well-defined graphene nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Sampsa K; Sun, Zhixiang; Boneschanscher, Mark P; Uppstu, Andreas; Ijäs, Mari; Harju, Ari; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël; Liljeroth, Peter

    2011-12-02

    Despite the enormous interest in the properties of graphene and the potential of graphene nanostructures in electronic applications, the study of quantum-confined states in atomically well-defined graphene nanostructures remains an experimental challenge. Here, we study graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with well-defined edges in the zigzag direction, grown by chemical vapor deposition on an Ir(111) substrate by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. We measure the atomic structure and local density of states of individual GQDs as a function of their size and shape in the range from a couple of nanometers up to ca. 20 nm. The results can be quantitatively modeled by a relativistic wave equation and atomistic tight-binding calculations. The observed states are analogous to the solutions of the textbook "particle-in-a-box" problem applied to relativistic massless fermions.

  3. Inertial rotation measurement with atomic spins: From angular momentum conservation to quantum phase theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Yuan, H.; Tang, Z.; Quan, W.; Fang, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Rotation measurement in an inertial frame is an important technology for modern advanced navigation systems and fundamental physics research. Inertial rotation measurement with atomic spin has demonstrated potential in both high-precision applications and small-volume low-cost devices. After rapid development in the last few decades, atomic spin gyroscopes are considered a promising competitor to current conventional gyroscopes—from rate-grade to strategic-grade applications. Although it has been more than a century since the discovery of the relationship between atomic spin and mechanical rotation by Einstein [Naturwissenschaften, 3(19) (1915)], research on the coupling between spin and rotation is still a focus point. The semi-classical Larmor precession model is usually adopted to describe atomic spin gyroscope measurement principles. More recently, the geometric phase theory has provided a different view of the rotation measurement mechanism via atomic spin. The theory has been used to describe a gyroscope based on the nuclear spin ensembles in diamond. A comprehensive understanding of inertial rotation measurement principles based on atomic spin would be helpful for future applications. This work reviews different atomic spin gyroscopes and their rotation measurement principles with a historical overlook. In addition, the spin-rotation coupling mechanism in the context of the quantum phase theory is presented. The geometric phase is assumed to be the origin of the measurable rotation signal from atomic spins. In conclusion, with a complete understanding of inertial rotation measurements using atomic spin and advances in techniques, wide application of high-performance atomic spin gyroscopes is expected in the near future.

  4. Quantum-enhanced protocols with mixed states using cold atoms in dipole traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzyzanowska, K.; Copley-May, M.; Romain, R.; MacCormick, C.; Bergamini, S.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the use of cold atoms in dipole traps to demonstrate experimentally a particular class of protocols for computation and metrology based on mixed states. Modelling of the system shows that, for a specific class of problems (tracing, phase estimation), a quantum advantage can be achieved over classical algorithms for very realistic conditions and strong decoherence. We discuss the results of the models and the experimental implementation.

  5. Observability of quantum criticality and a continuous supersolid in atomic gases.

    PubMed

    Diehl, S; Baranov, M; Daley, A J; Zoller, P

    2010-04-23

    We analyze the Bose-Hubbard model with a three-body hard-core constraint by mapping the system to a theory of two coupled bosonic degrees of freedom. We find striking features that could be observable in experiments, including a quantum Ising critical point on the transition from atomic to dimer superfluidity at unit filling, and a continuous supersolid phase for strongly bound dimers.

  6. Highly charged ions for atomic clocks, quantum information, and search for α variation.

    PubMed

    Safronova, M S; Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V; Safronova, U I; Porsev, S G; Kozlov, M G

    2014-07-18

    We propose 10 highly charged ions as candidates for the development of next generation atomic clocks, quantum information, and search for α variation. They have long-lived metastable states with transition wavelengths to the ground state between 170-3000 nm, relatively simple electronic structure, stable isotopes, and high sensitivity to α variation (e.g., Sm(14+), Pr(10+), Sm(13+), Nd(10+)). We predict their properties crucial for the experimental exploration and highlight particularly attractive systems for these applications.

  7. Breit and Quantum Electrodynamics Energy Contributions in Multielectron Atoms from the Relativistic Screened Hydrogenic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Rocco, Héctor O.; Lanzini, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The correction to the Coulomb repulsion between two electrons due to the exchange of a transverse photon, referred to as the Breit interaction, as well as the main quantum electrodynamics contributions to the atomic energies (self-energy and vacuum polarization), are calculated using the recently formulated relativistic screened hydrogenic model. Comparison with the results of multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations and experimental X- ray energies is made.

  8. Requirements for fault-tolerant factoring on an atom-optics quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Devitt, Simon J; Stephens, Ashley M; Munro, William J; Nemoto, Kae

    2013-01-01

    Quantum information processing and its associated technologies have reached a pivotal stage in their development, with many experiments having established the basic building blocks. Moving forward, the challenge is to scale up to larger machines capable of performing computational tasks not possible today. This raises questions that need to be urgently addressed, such as what resources these machines will consume and how large will they be. Here we estimate the resources required to execute Shor's factoring algorithm on an atom-optics quantum computer architecture. We determine the runtime and size of the computer as a function of the problem size and physical error rate. Our results suggest that once the physical error rate is low enough to allow quantum error correction, optimization to reduce resources and increase performance will come mostly from integrating algorithms and circuits within the error correction environment, rather than from improving the physical hardware.

  9. Simple and efficient absorption filter for single photons from a cold atom quantum memory.

    PubMed

    Stack, Daniel T; Lee, Patricia J; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2015-03-09

    The ability to filter unwanted light signals is critical to the operation of quantum memories based on neutral atom ensembles. Here we demonstrate an efficient frequency filter which uses a vapor cell filled with (85)Rb and a buffer gas to attenuate both residual laser light and noise photons by nearly two orders of magnitude with little loss to the single photons associated with our cold (87)Rb quantum memory. This simple, passive filter provides an additional 18 dB attenuation of our pump laser and erroneous spontaneous emissions for every 1 dB loss of the single photon signal. We show that the addition of a frequency filter increases the non-classical correlations and the retrieval efficiency of our quantum memory by ≈ 35%.

  10. Quantum and Classical Description of H Atom Under Magnetic Field and Quadrupole Trap Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mahecha, J.; Salas, J. P.

    2006-12-01

    A discussion regarding the energy levels spectrum of quantum systems whose classical analogous has states of chaotic motion is presented. The chaotic dynamics of the classical underlying system has its manifestation in the wave functions (in the form of 'scars') and in the energy levels (in the form of 'statistical repulsion' of the energy levels). The above mentioned signatures are named 'quantum chaos'. A typical study of quantum chaos requires finding accurate energy eigenvalues of highly excited states, to calculate the nearest neighbors spacing between levels, to perform the 'unfolding' of the spectrum in order to separate the fluctuations, and finally to find the probability distribution of the unfolded spectrum. This is exemplified by the hydrogen atom under uniform magnetic field and a quadrupole electric field.

  11. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits: from the Dynamical Casimir effect to Majorana fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nori, Franco

    2012-02-01

    This talk will present an overview of some of our recent results on atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits. Particular emphasis will be given to photons interacting with qubits, interferometry, the Dynamical Casimir effect, and also studying Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits.[4pt] References available online at our web site:[0pt] J.Q. You, Z.D. Wang, W. Zhang, F. Nori, Manipulating and probing Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits, (2011). Arxiv. J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting coplanar waveguide, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 147003 (2009). [0pt] J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in superconducting microwave circuits, Phys. Rev. A 82, 052509 (2010). [0pt] C.M. Wilson, G. Johansson, A. Pourkabirian, J.R. Johansson, T. Duty, F. Nori, P. Delsing, Observation of the Dynamical Casimir Effect in a superconducting circuit. Nature, in press (Nov. 2011). P.D. Nation, J.R. Johansson, M.P. Blencowe, F. Nori, Stimulating uncertainty: Amplifying the quantum vacuum with superconducting circuits, Rev. Mod. Phys., in press (2011). [0pt] J.Q. You, F. Nori, Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits, Nature 474, 589 (2011). [0pt] S.N. Shevchenko, S. Ashhab, F. Nori, Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interferometry, Phys. Reports 492, 1 (2010). [0pt] I. Buluta, S. Ashhab, F. Nori. Natural and artificial atoms for quantum computation, Reports on Progress in Physics 74, 104401 (2011). [0pt] I.Buluta, F. Nori, Quantum Simulators, Science 326, 108 (2009). [0pt] L.F. Wei, K. Maruyama, X.B. Wang, J.Q. You, F. Nori, Testing quantum contextuality with macroscopic superconducting circuits, Phys. Rev. B 81, 174513 (2010). [0pt] J.Q. You, X.-F. Shi, X. Hu, F. Nori, Quantum emulation of a spin system with topologically protected ground states using superconducting quantum circuit, Phys. Rev. A 81, 063823 (2010).

  12. A Total Measure of Multi-Particle Quantum Correlations in Atomic Schrödinger Cat States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Ram Narayan

    2017-04-01

    We propose a total measure of multi-particle quantum correlation in a system of N two-level atoms (N qubits). We construct a parameter that encompasses all possible quantum correlations among N two-level atoms in arbitrary symmetric pure states and define its numerical value to be the total measure of the net atom-atom correlations. We use that parameter to quantify the total quantum correlations in atomic Schrödinger cat states, which are generated by the dispersive interaction in a cavity. We study the variation of the net amount of quantum correlation as we vary the number of atoms from N=2 to N=100 and obtain some interesting results. We also study the variation of the net correlation, for fixed interaction time, as we increase the number of atoms in the excited state of the initial system, and notice some interesting features. We also observe the behaviour of the net quantum correlation as we continuously increase the interaction time, for the general state of N two-level atoms in a dispersive cavity.

  13. CP(N - 1) quantum field theories with alkaline-earth atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laflamme, C.; Evans, W.; Dalmonte, M.; Gerber, U.; Mejía-Díaz, H.; Bietenholz, W.; Wiese, U.-J.; Zoller, P.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a cold atom implementation to attain the continuum limit of (1 + 1) -d CP(N - 1) quantum field theories. These theories share important features with (3 + 1) -d QCD, such as asymptotic freedom and θ-vacua. Moreover, their continuum limit can be accessed via the mechanism of dimensional reduction. In our scheme, the CP(N - 1) degrees of freedom emerge at low energies from a ladder system of SU(N) quantum spins, where the N spin states are embodied by the nuclear Zeeman states of alkaline-earth atoms, trapped in an optical lattice. Based on Monte Carlo results, we establish that the continuum limit can be demonstrated by an atomic quantum simulation by employing the feature of asymptotic freedom. We discuss a protocol for the adiabatic preparation of the ground state of the system, the real-time evolution of a false θ-vacuum state after a quench, and we propose experiments to unravel the phase diagram at non-zero density.

  14. Quantum simulation of the Hubbard model with dopant atoms in silicon

    PubMed Central

    Salfi, J.; Mol, J. A.; Rahman, R.; Klimeck, G.; Simmons, M. Y.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.; Rogge, S.

    2016-01-01

    In quantum simulation, many-body phenomena are probed in controllable quantum systems. Recently, simulation of Bose–Hubbard Hamiltonians using cold atoms revealed previously hidden local correlations. However, fermionic many-body Hubbard phenomena such as unconventional superconductivity and spin liquids are more difficult to simulate using cold atoms. To date the required single-site measurements and cooling remain problematic, while only ensemble measurements have been achieved. Here we simulate a two-site Hubbard Hamiltonian at low effective temperatures with single-site resolution using subsurface dopants in silicon. We measure quasi-particle tunnelling maps of spin-resolved states with atomic resolution, finding interference processes from which the entanglement entropy and Hubbard interactions are quantified. Entanglement, determined by spin and orbital degrees of freedom, increases with increasing valence bond length. We find separation-tunable Hubbard interaction strengths that are suitable for simulating strongly correlated phenomena in larger arrays of dopants, establishing dopants as a platform for quantum simulation of the Hubbard model. PMID:27094205

  15. Compact quantum gates for hybrid photon-atom systems assisted by Faraday rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Yang, Guo-Jian; Zhang, Mei

    2017-02-01

    We present some compact circuits for a deterministic quantum computing on the hybrid photon-atom systems, including the Fredkin gate and SWAP gate. These gates are constructed by exploiting the optical Faraday rotation induced by an atom trapped in a single-sided optical microcavity. The control qubit of our gates is encoded on the polarization states of the single photon, and the target qubit is encoded on the ground states of an atom confined in an optical microcavity. Since the decoherence of the flying qubit with atmosphere for a long distance is negligible and the stationary qubits are trapped inside single-sided microcavities, our gates are robust. Moreover, ancillary single photon is not needed and only some linear-optical devices are adopted, which makes our protocols efficient and practical. Our schemes need not meet the condition that the transmission for the uncoupled cavity is balanceable with the reflectance for the coupled cavity, which is different from the quantum computation with a double-sided optical microcavity. Our calculations show that the fidelities of the two hybrid quantum gates are high with the available experimental technology.

  16. Experimental progress towards a Rydberg atom-photon-superconductor quantum interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacs, J. A.; Pritchard, J. D.; Xia, T.; Beck, M. A.; McDermott, R.; Saffman, M.

    2015-05-01

    Hybrid quantum computation exploits the individual strengths of various quantum technologies, enabling realization of a scalable quantum device capable of both fast gates and long coherence times. Our method combines the long coherence times of neutral atoms with the fast gates of superconducting qubits. We discuss experimental progress towards single atom trapping close to a superconducting resonator, including optimization of the resonator to maximize the quality factor and coupling strength for preliminary experiments performed at 4 K. We use a new resonator design, incorporating 3D micro fabricated structures, that allows for strong electric field coupling to an atom trapped ~ 50 μ m above the resonator. Our scheme uses a novel two-photon Rydberg excitation via the 6S1 / 2 --> 5D5 / 2 quadrupole transition to enable direct excitation of nP3 / 2 states for strong electric-dipole coupling to the cavity. This significantly reduces the Doppler mismatch compared to previous two-photon excitation schemes to enable high fidelity operations. First spectroscopy and Rabi oscillation results will be shown. Work supported by NSF award PHY-1212448.

  17. Quantum solitons with emergent interactions in a model of cold atoms on the triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Hiroaki T.; Akagi, Yutaka; Shannon, Nic

    2016-02-01

    Cold atoms bring new opportunities to study quantum magnetism, and in particular, to simulate quantum magnets with symmetry greater than SU(2 ) . Here we explore the topological excitations which arise in a model of cold atoms on the triangular lattice with SU(3 ) symmetry. Using a combination of homotopy analysis and analytic field theory we identify a family of solitonic wave functions characterized by integer charge Q =(QA,QB,QC) , with QA+QB+QC=0 . We use a numerical approach, based on a variational wave function, to explore the stability of these solitons on a finite lattice. We find that solitons with charge Q =(1 ,1 ,-2 ) spontaneously decay into a pair of solitons with elementary topological charge, and emergent interactions. This result suggests that it could be possible to realize a class of interacting soliton, with no classical analog, using cold atoms. It also suggests the possibility of a new form of quantum spin liquid, with gauge group U(1 )×U(1 ) .

  18. Quantum simulation of the Hubbard model with dopant atoms in silicon.

    PubMed

    Salfi, J; Mol, J A; Rahman, R; Klimeck, G; Simmons, M Y; Hollenberg, L C L; Rogge, S

    2016-04-20

    In quantum simulation, many-body phenomena are probed in controllable quantum systems. Recently, simulation of Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonians using cold atoms revealed previously hidden local correlations. However, fermionic many-body Hubbard phenomena such as unconventional superconductivity and spin liquids are more difficult to simulate using cold atoms. To date the required single-site measurements and cooling remain problematic, while only ensemble measurements have been achieved. Here we simulate a two-site Hubbard Hamiltonian at low effective temperatures with single-site resolution using subsurface dopants in silicon. We measure quasi-particle tunnelling maps of spin-resolved states with atomic resolution, finding interference processes from which the entanglement entropy and Hubbard interactions are quantified. Entanglement, determined by spin and orbital degrees of freedom, increases with increasing valence bond length. We find separation-tunable Hubbard interaction strengths that are suitable for simulating strongly correlated phenomena in larger arrays of dopants, establishing dopants as a platform for quantum simulation of the Hubbard model.

  19. Imaging quantum stereodynamics through Fraunhofer scattering of NO radicals with rare-gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onvlee, Jolijn; Gordon, Sean D. S.; Vogels, Sjoerd N.; Auth, Thomas; Karman, Tijs; Nichols, Bethan; van der Avoird, Ad; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.; Brouard, Mark; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T.

    2016-10-01

    Stereodynamics describes how the vector properties of molecules, such as the directions in which they move and the axes about which they rotate, affect the probabilities (or cross-sections) of specific processes or transitions that occur on collision. The main aspects of stereodynamics in inelastic atom-molecule collisions can often be understood from classical considerations, in which the particles are represented by billiard-ball-like hard objects. In a quantum picture, however, the collision is described in terms of matter waves, which can also scatter into the region of the geometrical shadow of the object and reveal detailed information on the pure quantum-mechanical contribution to the stereodynamics. Here we present measurements of irregular diffraction patterns for NO radicals colliding with rare-gas atoms that can be explained by the analytical Fraunhofer model. They reveal a hitherto overlooked dependence on (or 'propensity rule' for) the magnetic quantum number m of the molecules, and a previously unrecognized type of quantum stereodynamics that has no classical analogue or interpretation.

  20. Imaging quantum stereodynamics through Fraunhofer scattering of NO radicals with rare-gas atoms.

    PubMed

    Onvlee, Jolijn; Gordon, Sean D S; Vogels, Sjoerd N; Auth, Thomas; Karman, Tijs; Nichols, Bethan; van der Avoird, Ad; Groenenboom, Gerrit C; Brouard, Mark; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T

    2017-03-01

    Stereodynamics describes how the vector properties of molecules, such as the directions in which they move and the axes about which they rotate, affect the probabilities (or cross-sections) of specific processes or transitions that occur on collision. The main aspects of stereodynamics in inelastic atom-molecule collisions can often be understood from classical considerations, in which the particles are represented by billiard-ball-like hard objects. In a quantum picture, however, the collision is described in terms of matter waves, which can also scatter into the region of the geometrical shadow of the object and reveal detailed information on the pure quantum-mechanical contribution to the stereodynamics. Here we present measurements of irregular diffraction patterns for NO radicals colliding with rare-gas atoms that can be explained by the analytical Fraunhofer model. They reveal a hitherto overlooked dependence on (or 'propensity rule' for) the magnetic quantum number m of the molecules, and a previously unrecognized type of quantum stereodynamics that has no classical analogue or interpretation.

  1. Tunable two-dimensional arrays of single Rydberg atoms for realizing quantum Ising models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labuhn, Henning; Barredo, Daniel; Ravets, Sylvain; de Léséleuc, Sylvain; Macrì, Tommaso; Lahaye, Thierry; Browaeys, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    Spin models are the prime example of simplified many-body Hamiltonians used to model complex, strongly correlated real-world materials. However, despite the simplified character of such models, their dynamics often cannot be simulated exactly on classical computers when the number of particles exceeds a few tens. For this reason, quantum simulation of spin Hamiltonians using the tools of atomic and molecular physics has become a very active field over the past years, using ultracold atoms or molecules in optical lattices, or trapped ions. All of these approaches have their own strengths and limitations. Here we report an alternative platform for the study of spin systems, using individual atoms trapped in tunable two-dimensional arrays of optical microtraps with arbitrary geometries, where filling fractions range from 60 to 100 per cent. When excited to high-energy Rydberg D states, the atoms undergo strong interactions whose anisotropic character opens the way to simulating exotic matter. We illustrate the versatility of our system by studying the dynamics of a quantum Ising-like spin-1/2 system in a transverse field with up to 30 spins, for a variety of geometries in one and two dimensions, and for a wide range of interaction strengths. For geometries where the anisotropy is expected to have small effects on the dynamics, we find excellent agreement with ab initio simulations of the spin-1/2 system, while for strongly anisotropic situations the multilevel structure of the D states has a measurable influence. Our findings establish arrays of single Rydberg atoms as a versatile platform for the study of quantum magnetism.

  2. Tunable two-dimensional arrays of single Rydberg atoms for realizing quantum Ising models.

    PubMed

    Labuhn, Henning; Barredo, Daniel; Ravets, Sylvain; de Léséleuc, Sylvain; Macrì, Tommaso; Lahaye, Thierry; Browaeys, Antoine

    2016-06-30

    Spin models are the prime example of simplified many-body Hamiltonians used to model complex, strongly correlated real-world materials. However, despite the simplified character of such models, their dynamics often cannot be simulated exactly on classical computers when the number of particles exceeds a few tens. For this reason, quantum simulation of spin Hamiltonians using the tools of atomic and molecular physics has become a very active field over the past years, using ultracold atoms or molecules in optical lattices, or trapped ions. All of these approaches have their own strengths and limitations. Here we report an alternative platform for the study of spin systems, using individual atoms trapped in tunable two-dimensional arrays of optical microtraps with arbitrary geometries, where filling fractions range from 60 to 100 per cent. When excited to high-energy Rydberg D states, the atoms undergo strong interactions whose anisotropic character opens the way to simulating exotic matter. We illustrate the versatility of our system by studying the dynamics of a quantum Ising-like spin-1/2 system in a transverse field with up to 30 spins, for a variety of geometries in one and two dimensions, and for a wide range of interaction strengths. For geometries where the anisotropy is expected to have small effects on the dynamics, we find excellent agreement with ab initio simulations of the spin-1/2 system, while for strongly anisotropic situations the multilevel structure of the D states has a measurable influence. Our findings establish arrays of single Rydberg atoms as a versatile platform for the study of quantum magnetism.

  3. Hydrogen-hydrogen interaction in planar biphenyl: a theoretical study based on the interacting quantum atoms and Hirshfeld atomic energy partitioning methods.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Kiamars; Van Alsenoy, Christian

    2014-10-05

    The nature of H-H interaction between ortho-hydrogen atoms in planar biphenyl is investigated by two different atomic energy partitioning methods, namely fractional occupation iterative Hirshfeld (FOHI) and interacting quantum atoms (IQA), and compared with the traditional virial-based approach of quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). In agreement with Bader's hypothesis of H-H bonding, partitioning the atomic energy into intra-atomic and interatomic terms reveals that there is a net attractive interaction between the ortho-hydrogens in the planar biphenyl. This falsifies the classical view of steric repulsion between the hydrogens. In addition, in contrast to the traditional QTAIM energy analysis, both FOHI and IQA show that the total atomic energy of the ortho-hydrogens remains almost constant when they participate in the H-H interaction. Although, the interatomic part of atomic energy of the hydrogens plays a stabilizing role during the formation of the H-H bond, it is almost compensated by the destabilizing effects of the intra-atomic parts and consequently, the total energy of the hydrogens remains constant. The trends in the changes of intra-atomic and interatomic energy terms of ortho-hydrogens during H-H bond formation are very similar to those observed for the H2 molecule.

  4. Atomic quantum simulation of dynamical gauge fields coupled to fermionic matter: from string breaking to evolution after a quench.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, D; Dalmonte, M; Müller, M; Rico, E; Stebler, P; Wiese, U-J; Zoller, P

    2012-10-26

    Using a Fermi-Bose mixture of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice, we construct a quantum simulator for a U(1) gauge theory coupled to fermionic matter. The construction is based on quantum links which realize continuous gauge symmetry with discrete quantum variables. At low energies, quantum link models with staggered fermions emerge from a Hubbard-type model which can be quantum simulated. This allows us to investigate string breaking as well as the real-time evolution after a quench in gauge theories, which are inaccessible to classical simulation methods.

  5. Atoms and quantum dots with a large number of electrons: The ground-state energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Herve; Rueedi, Rico

    2010-03-15

    We compute the ground-state energy of atoms and quantum dots with a large number N of electrons. Both systems are described by a nonrelativistic Hamiltonian of electrons in a d-dimensional space. The electrons interact via the Coulomb potential. In the case of atoms (d=3), the electrons are attracted by the nucleus via the Coulomb potential. In the case of quantum dots (d=2), the electrons are confined by an external potential, whose shape can be varied. We show that the dominant terms of the ground-state energy are those given by a semiclassical Hartree-exchange energy, whose N{yields}{infinity} limit corresponds to Thomas-Fermi theory. This semiclassical Hartree-exchange theory creates oscillations in the ground-state energy as a function of N. These oscillations reflect the dynamics of a classical particle moving in the presence of the Thomas-Fermi potential. The dynamics is regular for atoms and some dots, but in general in the case of dots, the motion contains a chaotic component. We compute the correlation effects. They appear at the order NlnN for atoms, in agreement with available data. For dots, they appear at the order N.

  6. Correlated quantum dynamics of a single atom collisionally coupled to an ultracold finite bosonic ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krönke, Sven; Knörzer, Johannes; Schmelcher, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We explore the correlated quantum dynamics of a single atom, regarded as an open system, with a spatio-temporally localized coupling to a finite bosonic environment. The single atom, initially prepared in a coherent state of low energy, oscillates in a one-dimensional harmonic trap and thereby periodically penetrates an interacting ensemble of NA bosons held in a displaced trap. We show that the inter-species energy transfer accelerates with increasing NA and becomes less complete at the same time. System-environment correlations prove to be significant except for times when the excess energy distribution among the subsystems is highly imbalanced. These correlations result in incoherent energy transfer processes, which accelerate the early energy donation of the single atom and stochastically favour certain energy transfer channels, depending on the instantaneous direction of transfer. Concerning the subsystem states, the energy transfer is mediated by non-coherent states of the single atom and manifests itself in singlet and doublet excitations in the finite bosonic environment. These comprehensive insights into the non-equilibrium quantum dynamics of an open system are gained by ab initio simulations of the total system with the recently developed multi-layer multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method for bosons.

  7. A hybrid quantum system of atoms trapped on ultrathin optical fibers coupled to superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolston, S. L.; Anderson, J. R.; Chukwu, U.; Grover, J.; Hertzberg, J. B.; Hoffman, J. E.; Kordell, P.; Lee, J.; Lobb, C. J.; Orozco, L. A.; Ravets, S.; Solano, P.; Voigt, K. D.; Wellstood, F. C.; Wong-Campos, J. D.; Beadie, G.; Fatemi, F. K.

    2013-09-01

    Hybrid quantum systems can be formed that combine the strengths of multiple platforms while avoiding the weaknesses. Here we report on progress toward a hybrid quantum system of neutral atom spins coupled to superconducting qubits. We trap laser-cooled rubidium atoms in the evanescent field of an ultrathin optical fiber, which will be suspended a few microns above a superconducting circuit that resonates at the hyperfine frequency of the Rb atoms, allowing magnetic coupling between the atoms and superconductor. As this will be done in a dilution refrigerator environment, the technical demands on the optical fiber is severe. We have developed and optimized a tapered fiber fabrication system, achieving optical transmission in excess of 99.95% , and fibers that can sustain 400 mW of optical power in a UHV environment. We have also optimized tapered fibers that can support higher order optical modes with high transmission (> 97%), which may be useful for different optical potential geometries. We have developed an in-situ tunable high-Q superconducting microwave resonator that can be tuned to within the resonator linewidth of the 6.8 GHz frequency of the Rb hyperfine transition.

  8. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. I. System-bath modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H.; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-09-28

    An accurate system-bath model to investigate the quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphene is presented. The system comprises a hydrogen atom and the carbon atom from graphene that forms the covalent bond, and it is described by a previously developed 4D potential energy surface based on density functional theory ab initio data. The bath describes the rest of the carbon lattice and is obtained from an empirical force field through inversion of a classical equilibrium correlation function describing the hydrogen motion. By construction, model building easily accommodates improvements coming from the use of higher level electronic structure theory for the system. Further, it is well suited to a determination of the system-environment coupling by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. This paper details the system-bath modeling and shows its application to the quantum dynamics of vibrational relaxation of a chemisorbed hydrogen atom, which is here investigated at T = 0 K with the help of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Paper II deals with the sticking dynamics.

  9. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. I. System-bath modeling.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-28

    An accurate system-bath model to investigate the quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphene is presented. The system comprises a hydrogen atom and the carbon atom from graphene that forms the covalent bond, and it is described by a previously developed 4D potential energy surface based on density functional theory ab initio data. The bath describes the rest of the carbon lattice and is obtained from an empirical force field through inversion of a classical equilibrium correlation function describing the hydrogen motion. By construction, model building easily accommodates improvements coming from the use of higher level electronic structure theory for the system. Further, it is well suited to a determination of the system-environment coupling by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. This paper details the system-bath modeling and shows its application to the quantum dynamics of vibrational relaxation of a chemisorbed hydrogen atom, which is here investigated at T = 0 K with the help of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Paper II deals with the sticking dynamics.

  10. Quantum signature for laser-driven correlated excitation of Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huaizhi; Li, Yong; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Zheng, Shi-Biao

    2017-01-01

    The excitation dynamics of a laser-driven Rydberg-atom system exhibits a cooperative effect due to the interatomic Rydberg-Rydberg interaction, but the large many-body system with inhomogeneous Rydberg coupling is hard to exactly solve or numerically study by density-matrix equations. In this paper, we find that the laser-driven Rydberg-atom system with most of the atoms being in the ground state can be described by a simplified interaction model resembling the optical Kerr effect if the distance-dependent Rydberg-Rydberg interaction is replaced by an infinite-range coupling. We can then quantitatively study the effect of the quantum fluctuations on the Rydberg excitation with the interatomic correlation involved and analytically calculate the statistical characteristics of the excitation dynamics in the steady state, revealing the quantum signature of the driven-dissipative Rydberg-atom system. The results obtained here will be of great interest for other spin-1/2 systems with spin-spin coupling.

  11. Effects of detuning and atomic motion parameter on the dynamical behavior of the entanglement between two-level atom and SU(1,1) quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Khalek, S.; Quthami, M.; Ahmed, M. M. A.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of the atomic inversion and von Neumann entropy for a moving and non-moving two-level atom interacting with multi SU(1,1) quantum system. The wave function and system density matrix using specific initial conditions are obtained. The effects of initial atomic state position and detuning parameters are examined in the absence and presence of the atomic motion effect. Important phenomena such as entanglement sudden death, sudden birth and long-living entanglement are explored during time evolution. The results show that the detuning parameter and excitation number is very useful in generating a high amount of entanglement.

  12. Quantum well effect based on hybridization bandgap in deep subwavelength coupled meta-atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongqiang; Li, Yunhui; Wu, Qian; Jiang, Haitao; Zhang, Yewen; Chen, Hong

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, quantum well (QW) effect in a hybridization bandgap (HBG) structure via hiring deep subwavelength coupled meta-atoms is investigated. Subwavelength zero-index-metamaterial-based resonators acting as meta-atoms are side-coupled to a microstrip, forming the HBG structure. Both numerical and microwave experimental results confirm that, through properly hiring another set of meta-atoms, band mismatch between two HBGs can be introduced resulting in the HBG QW effect. Compared with the conventional QW structure based on Bragg interferences in photonic crystal, the device length of the proposed HBG QW structure can be reduced to only 1/4, demonstrating well the deep subwavelength property. Therefore, the above features make our design of HBG QW structures suitable to be utilized as multi-channel filters or multiplexers in microwave and optical communication system.

  13. Thermal entanglement in two-atom cavity QED and the entangled quantum Otto engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Sanqiu; He, Jizhou

    2009-04-01

    The simple system of two two-level identical atoms couple to single-mode optical cavity in the resonance case is studied for investigating the thermal entanglement. It is interesting to see that the critical temperature is only dependent on the coefficient of atom-atom dipole-dipole interaction. Based on the mode, we construct and investigate a entangled quantum Otto engine (QOE). Expressions for several important performance parameters such as the heat transferred, the work done in a cycle, and the efficiency of the entangled QOE in zero G are derived in terms of thermal concurrence. Some intriguing features and their qualitative explanations are given. Furthermore, the validity of the second law of thermodynamics is confirmed in the entangled QOE. The results obtained here have general significance and will be helpful to understand deeply the performance of an entangled QOE.

  14. Quantum Otto engine of a two-level atom with single-mode fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhui; Wu, Zhaoqi; He, Jizhou

    2012-04-01

    We establish a quantum Otto engine (QOE) of a two-level atom, which is confined in a one-dimensional (1D) harmonic trap and is coupled to single-mode radiation fields. Besides two adiabatic processes, the QOE cycle consists of two isochoric processes, along one of which the two-level atom as the working substance interacts with a single-mode radiation field. Based on the semigroup approach, we derive the time for completing any adiabatic process and then present a performance analysis of the heat engine model. Furthermore, we generalize the results to the performance optimization for a QOE of a single two-level atom trapped in a 1D power-law potential. Our result shows that the efficiency at maximum power output is dependent on the trap exponent θ but is independent of the energy spectrum index σ.

  15. Quantum Otto engine of a two-level atom with single-mode fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhui; Wu, Zhaoqi; He, Jizhou

    2012-04-01

    We establish a quantum Otto engine (QOE) of a two-level atom, which is confined in a one-dimensional (1D) harmonic trap and is coupled to single-mode radiation fields. Besides two adiabatic processes, the QOE cycle consists of two isochoric processes, along one of which the two-level atom as the working substance interacts with a single-mode radiation field. Based on the semigroup approach, we derive the time for completing any adiabatic process and then present a performance analysis of the heat engine model. Furthermore, we generalize the results to the performance optimization for a QOE of a single two-level atom trapped in a 1D power-law potential. Our result shows that the efficiency at maximum power output is dependent on the trap exponent θ but is independent of the energy spectrum index σ.

  16. Thermal entanglement in two-atom cavity QED and the entangled quantum Otto engine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Sanqiu; He, Jizhou

    2009-04-01

    The simple system of two two-level identical atoms couple to single-mode optical cavity in the resonance case is studied for investigating the thermal entanglement. It is interesting to see that the critical temperature is only dependent on the coefficient of atom-atom dipole-dipole interaction. Based on the mode, we construct and investigate a entangled quantum Otto engine (QOE). Expressions for several important performance parameters such as the heat transferred, the work done in a cycle, and the efficiency of the entangled QOE in zero G are derived in terms of thermal concurrence. Some intriguing features and their qualitative explanations are given. Furthermore, the validity of the second law of thermodynamics is confirmed in the entangled QOE. The results obtained here have general significance and will be helpful to understand deeply the performance of an entangled QOE.

  17. Exploring Few- and Many-Body Dipolar Quantum Phenomena with Ultracold Erbium Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferlaino, Francesca

    2016-05-01

    Given their strong magnetic moment and exotic electronic configuration, rare-earth atoms disclose a plethora of intriguing phenomena in ultracold quantum physics with dipole-dipole interaction. Here, we report on the first degenerate Fermi gas of erbium atoms, based on direct cooling of identical fermions via dipolar collisions. We reveal universal scattering laws between identical dipolar fermions close to zero temperature, and we demonstrate the long-standing prediction of a deformed Fermi surface in dipolar gas. Finally, we present the first experimental study of an extended Bose-Hubbard model using bosonic Er atoms in a three-dimensional optical lattice and we report on the first observation of nearest-neighbor interactions.

  18. Quantum Monte Carlo of atomic and molecular systems with heavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitas, Lubos; Kulahlioglu, Adem; Melton, Cody; Bennett, Chandler

    2015-03-01

    We carry out quantum Monte Carlo calculations of atomic and molecular systems with several heavy atoms such as Mo, W and Bi. In particular, we compare the correlation energies vs their lighter counterparts in the same column of the periodic table in order to reveal trends with regard to the atomic number Z. One of the observations is that the correlation energy for the isoelectronic valence space/states is mildly decreasing with increasing Z. Similar observation applies also to the fixed-node errors, supporting thus our recent observation that the fixed-node error increases with electronic density for the same (or similar) complexity of the wave function and bonding. In addition, for Bi systems we study the impact of the spin-orbit on the electronic structure, in particular, on binding, correlation and excitation energies.

  19. Quantum mechanical study of atomic hydrogen interaction with a fluorinated boron-substituted coronene radical.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Smith, Sean C; Nanbu, Shinkoh; Nakamura, Hiroki

    2009-04-08

    In this work we study the transmission of atomic hydrogen across a fluorinated boron-substituted coronene radical (C(19)H(12)BF(6)) as a model for partially fluorinated and boron-doped nanotubes or fullerenes. Complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) methods are employed to calculate the potential energy surfaces for both ground and excited electronic states, and one-dimensional R-matrix propagation is utilized to investigate the transmission/reflection dynamics of atomic hydrogen, through the central six-member ring of the fluorinated boron-substituted coronene radical. The quantum scattering includes resonance effects as well as non-adiabatic transitions between the ground and excited electronic states. Within the sudden approximation, both centre and off-centre approach trajectories have been investigated. Implications for atomic hydrogen encapsulation by carbon nanotube and fullerene are discussed.

  20. Improving Sensitivity and Bandwidth of an Atomic Magnetometer using Quantum Non-Demolition Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Vishal; Vasilakis, Georgios; Romalis, Michael

    2009-05-01

    The fundamental sensitivity of an atomic magnetometer is limited by spin projection noise. In the case of uniform spin relaxation, it is well understood that it is not possible to improve the sensitivity using spin squeezing induced by quantum non-demolition (QND) measurement for measurement time scales longer than spin relaxation time [1, 2]. It is however possible to increase the bandwidth of the magnetometer using QND measurement. Here we experimentally demonstrate, in excellent agreement with the theory, an improvement in the bandwidth of our scalar alkali vapor atomic magnetometer using continuous QND measurement. We also investigate the possibility of improving sensitivity of our magnetometer in the special case in which the spin relaxation is time dependent. The case of time dependent spin relaxation naturally arises in high polarization regime in an alkali-alkali spin-exchange relaxation dominated atomic sample. [1] S. F. Huelga, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3865 -- 3868, 1997. [2] M. Auzinsh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 173002, 2004.

  1. Directly probing anisotropy in atom-molecule collisions through quantum scattering resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Ayelet; Shagam, Yuval; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Żuchowski, Piotr S.; Pawlak, Mariusz; Janssen, Liesbeth M. C.; Moiseyev, Nimrod; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T.; van der Avoird, Ad; Koch, Christiane P.; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropy is a fundamental property of particle interactions. It occupies a central role in cold and ultracold molecular processes, where orientation-dependent long-range forces have been studied in ultracold polar molecule collisions. In the cold collisions regime, quantization of the intermolecular degrees of freedom leads to quantum scattering resonances. Although these states have been shown to be sensitive to details of the interaction potential, the effect of anisotropy on quantum resonances has so far eluded experimental observation. Here, we directly measure the anisotropy in atom-molecule interactions via quantum resonances by changing the quantum state of the internal molecular rotor. We observe that a quantum scattering resonance at a collision energy of kB × 270 mK appears in the Penning ionization of molecular hydrogen with metastable helium only if the molecule is rotationally excited. We use state-of-the-art ab initio theory to show that control over the rotational state effectively switches the anisotropy on or off, disentangling the isotropic and anisotropic parts of the interaction.

  2. Quantum chaos in ultracold collisions of gas-phase erbium atoms.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Albert; Mark, Michael; Aikawa, Kiyotaka; Ferlaino, Francesca; Bohn, John L; Makrides, Constantinos; Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-03-27

    Atomic and molecular samples reduced to temperatures below one microkelvin, yet still in the gas phase, afford unprecedented energy resolution in probing and manipulating the interactions between their constituent particles. As a result of this resolution, atoms can be made to scatter resonantly on demand, through the precise control of a magnetic field. For simple atoms, such as alkalis, scattering resonances are extremely well characterized. However, ultracold physics is now poised to enter a new regime, where much more complex species can be cooled and studied, including magnetic lanthanide atoms and even molecules. For molecules, it has been speculated that a dense set of resonances in ultracold collision cross-sections will probably exhibit essentially random fluctuations, much as the observed energy spectra of nuclear scattering do. According to the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture, such fluctuations would imply chaotic dynamics of the underlying classical motion driving the collision. This would necessitate new ways of looking at the fundamental interactions in ultracold atomic and molecular systems, as well as perhaps new chaos-driven states of ultracold matter. Here we describe the experimental demonstration that random spectra are indeed found at ultralow temperatures. In the experiment, an ultracold gas of erbium atoms is shown to exhibit many Fano-Feshbach resonances, of the order of three per gauss for bosons. Analysis of their statistics verifies that their distribution of nearest-neighbour spacings is what one would expect from random matrix theory. The density and statistics of these resonances are explained by fully quantum mechanical scattering calculations that locate their origin in the anisotropy of the atoms' potential energy surface. Our results therefore reveal chaotic behaviour in the native interaction between ultracold atoms.

  3. Chaotic quantum ratchets and filters with cold atoms in optical lattices: Properties of Floquet states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Gwang-Ok

    The -kicked rotor is a paradigm of quantum chaos. Its realisation with clouds of cold atoms in pulsed optical lattices demonstrated the well-known quantum chaos phenomenon of 'dynamical localisation'. In those experi ments by several groups world-wide, the £-kicks were applied at equal time intervals. However, recent theoretical and experimental work by the cold atom group at UCL Monteiro et al 2002, Jonckheere et al 2003, Jones et al 2004 showed that novel quantum and classical dynamics arises if the atomic cloud is pulsed with repeating sequences of unequally spaced kicks. In Mon teiro et al 2002 it was found that the energy absorption rates depend on the momentum of the atoms relative to the optical lattice hence a type of chaotic ratchet was proposed. In Jonckheere et al and Jones et al, a possible mechanism for selecting atoms according to their momenta (velocity filter) was investigated. The aim of this thesis was to study the properties of the underlying eigen values and eigenstates. Despite the unequally-spaced kicks, these systems are still time-periodic, so we in fact investigated the Floquet states, which are eigenstates of U(T), the one-period time evolution operator. The Floquet states and corresponding eigenvalues were obtained by diagonalising a ma trix representation of the operator U(T). It was found that the form of the eigenstates enables us to analyse qual itatively the atomic momentum probability distributions, N(p) measured experimentally. In particular, the momentum width of the individual eigen states varies strongly with < p > as expected from the theoretical and ex- perimental results obtained previously. In addition, at specific < p > close to values which in the experiment yield directed motion (ratchet transport), the probability distribution of the individual Floquet states is asymmetric, mirroring the asymmetric N(p) measured in clouds of cesium atoms. In the penultimate chapter, the spectral fluctuations (eigenvalue statis tics) are

  4. Slow light enhanced atomic frequency comb quantum memories in photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chenzhi; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong; Peng, Jiangde

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a slow light-enhanced quantum memory with high efficiency based on atomic frequency comb (AFC) in ion-doped photonic crystal waveguide (PCW). The performance of the quantum memory is investigated theoretically, considering the impact of the signal bandwidth. Both the forward and backward retrieval schemes are analyzed. In the forward retrieval scheme, the analysis shows that a moderate slow light effect can improve the retrieval efficiency to above 50% with very high fidelity, even when the intrinsic optical depth is very low and the signal bandwidth is comparable with the AFC bandwidth. In the backward retrieval scheme, retrieval efficiency larger than 90% can be obtained and fidelity can remain above 90% for signal with bandwidth much narrower than AFC bandwidth, when moderate slow light is introduced into waveguide with low intrinsic optical depth. Although the phase mismatching effect limits the slow light enhancement on retrieval efficiency and decreases the fidelity for signal with bandwidth approaching AFC bandwidth, we design a modified atomic frequency comb structure (MAFC) based on which a moderate slow light can make the retrieval efficiency larger than 85% and keep the fidelity above 80%. Our calculations show that the proposed scheme provides a promising way to realize high efficiency on-chip quantum memory.

  5. Temporal Purity and Quantum Interference of Single Photons from Two Independent Cold Atomic Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Peng; Gu, Zhenjie; Cao, Rong; Wen, Rong; Ou, Z. Y.; Chen, J. F.; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-07-01

    The temporal purity of single photons is crucial to the indistinguishability of independent photon sources for the fundamental study of the quantum nature of light and the development of photonic technologies. Currently, the technique for single photons heralded from time-frequency entangled biphotons created in nonlinear crystals does not guarantee the temporal-quantum purity, except using spectral filtering. Nevertheless, an entirely different situation is anticipated for narrow-band biphotons with a coherence time far longer than the time resolution of a single-photon detector. Here we demonstrate temporally pure single photons with a coherence time of 100 ns, directly heralded from the time-frequency entangled biphotons generated by spontaneous four-wave mixing in cold atomic ensembles, without any supplemented filters or cavities. A near-perfect purity and indistinguishability are both verified through Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum interference using single photons from two independent cold atomic ensembles. The time-frequency entanglement provides a route to manipulate the pure temporal state of the single-photon source.

  6. Atomic electric fields revealed by a quantum mechanical approach to electron picodiffraction

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Knut; Krause, Florian F.; Béché, Armand; Schowalter, Marco; Galioit, Vincent; Löffler, Stefan; Verbeeck, Johan; Zweck, Josef; Schattschneider, Peter; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    By focusing electrons on probes with a diameter of 50 pm, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is currently crossing the border to probing subatomic details. A major challenge is the measurement of atomic electric fields using differential phase contrast (DPC) microscopy, traditionally exploiting the concept of a field-induced shift of diffraction patterns. Here we present a simplified quantum theoretical interpretation of DPC. This enables us to calculate the momentum transferred to the STEM probe from diffracted intensities recorded on a pixel array instead of conventional segmented bright-field detectors. The methodical development yielding atomic electric field, charge and electron density is performed using simulations for binary GaN as an ideal model system. We then present a detailed experimental study of SrTiO3 yielding atomic electric fields, validated by comprehensive simulations. With this interpretation and upgraded instrumentation, STEM is capable of quantifying atomic electric fields and high-contrast imaging of light atoms. PMID:25501385

  7. Universal diffraction of atoms and molecules from a quantum reflection grating

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bum Suk; Zhang, Weiqing; Schöllkopf, Wieland

    2016-01-01

    Since de Broglie’s work on the wave nature of particles, various optical phenomena have been observed with matter waves of atoms and molecules. However, the analogy between classical and atom/molecule optics is not exact because of different dispersion relations. In addition, according to de Broglie’s formula, different combinations of particle mass and velocity can give the same de Broglie wavelength. As a result, even for identical wavelengths, different molecular properties such as electric polarizabilities, Casimir-Polder forces, and dissociation energies modify (and potentially suppress) the resulting matter-wave optical phenomena such as diffraction intensities or interference effects. We report on the universal behavior observed in matter-wave diffraction of He atoms and He2 and D2 molecules from a ruled grating. Clear evidence for emerging beam resonances is observed in the diffraction patterns, which are quantitatively the same for all three particles and only depend on the de Broglie wavelength. A model, combining secondary scattering and quantum reflection, permits us to trace the observed universal behavior back to the peculiar principles of quantum reflection. PMID:27034979

  8. Performance of the density matrix functional theory in the quantum theory of atoms in molecules.

    PubMed

    García-Revilla, Marco; Francisco, E; Costales, A; Martín Pendás, A

    2012-02-02

    The generalization to arbitrary molecular geometries of the energetic partitioning provided by the atomic virial theorem of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) leads to an exact and chemically intuitive energy partitioning scheme, the interacting quantum atoms (IQA) approach, that depends on the availability of second-order reduced density matrices (2-RDMs). This work explores the performance of this approach in particular and of the QTAIM in general with approximate 2-RDMs obtained from the density matrix functional theory (DMFT), which rests on the natural expansion (natural orbitals and their corresponding occupation numbers) of the first-order reduced density matrix (1-RDM). A number of these functionals have been implemented in the promolden code and used to perform QTAIM and IQA analyses on several representative molecules and model chemical reactions. Total energies, covalent intra- and interbasin exchange-correlation interactions, as well as localization and delocalization indices have been determined with these functionals from 1-RDMs obtained at different levels of theory. Results are compared to the values computed from the exact 2-RDMs, whenever possible.

  9. Atomic-Scale Nuclear Spin Imaging Using Quantum-Assisted Sensors in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajoy, A.; Bissbort, U.; Lukin, M. D.; Walsworth, R. L.; Cappellaro, P.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear spin imaging at the atomic level is essential for the understanding of fundamental biological phenomena and for applications such as drug discovery. The advent of novel nanoscale sensors promises to achieve the long-standing goal of single-protein, high spatial-resolution structure determination under ambient conditions. In particular, quantum sensors based on the spin-dependent photoluminescence of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have recently been used to detect nanoscale ensembles of external nuclear spins. While NV sensitivity is approaching single-spin levels, extracting relevant information from a very complex structure is a further challenge since it requires not only the ability to sense the magnetic field of an isolated nuclear spin but also to achieve atomic-scale spatial resolution. Here, we propose a method that, by exploiting the coupling of the NV center to an intrinsic quantum memory associated with the nitrogen nuclear spin, can reach a tenfold improvement in spatial resolution, down to atomic scales. The spatial resolution enhancement is achieved through coherent control of the sensor spin, which creates a dynamic frequency filter selecting only a few nuclear spins at a time. We propose and analyze a protocol that would allow not only sensing individual spins in a complex biomolecule, but also unraveling couplings among them, thus elucidating local characteristics of the molecule structure.

  10. Universal diffraction of atoms and molecules from a quantum reflection grating.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bum Suk; Zhang, Weiqing; Schöllkopf, Wieland

    2016-03-01

    Since de Broglie's work on the wave nature of particles, various optical phenomena have been observed with matter waves of atoms and molecules. However, the analogy between classical and atom/molecule optics is not exact because of different dispersion relations. In addition, according to de Broglie's formula, different combinations of particle mass and velocity can give the same de Broglie wavelength. As a result, even for identical wavelengths, different molecular properties such as electric polarizabilities, Casimir-Polder forces, and dissociation energies modify (and potentially suppress) the resulting matter-wave optical phenomena such as diffraction intensities or interference effects. We report on the universal behavior observed in matter-wave diffraction of He atoms and He2 and D2 molecules from a ruled grating. Clear evidence for emerging beam resonances is observed in the diffraction patterns, which are quantitatively the same for all three particles and only depend on the de Broglie wavelength. A model, combining secondary scattering and quantum reflection, permits us to trace the observed universal behavior back to the peculiar principles of quantum reflection.

  11. Dynamics of the fully stripped ion-hydrogen atom charge exchange process in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling-yu; Wan, Jiang-feng; Zhao, Xiao-ying; Xiao, Guo-qing; Duan, Wen-shan; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2014-09-15

    The plasma screening effects of dense quantum plasmas on charge exchange processes of a fully stripped ion colliding with a hydrogen atom are studied by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. The inter-particle interactions are described by the exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. It is found that in weak screening conditions, cross sections increase with the increase of the ionic charge Z. However, in strong screening conditions, the dependence of cross sections on the ionic charge is related to the incident particle energy. At high energies, cross sections show a linear increase with the increase of Z, whereas at low energies, cross sections for Z≥4 become approximately the same. The He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+} impacting charge exchange cross sections in dense quantum plasmas are also compared with those in weakly coupled plasmas. The interactions are described by the static screened Coulomb potential. It is found that for both He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+}, the oscillatory screening effects of dense quantum plasmas are almost negligible in weak screening conditions. However, in strong screening conditions, the oscillatory screening effects enhance the screening effects of dense quantum plasmas, and the enhancement becomes more and more significant with the increase of the screening parameter and the ionic charge.

  12. Scattering of He Atoms from a Microstructured Grating: Quantum Reflection Probabilities and Diffraction Patterns.

    PubMed

    Miret-Artés, Salvador; Pollak, Eli

    2017-03-02

    The quantum reflection measured previously by Zhao et al. ( Phys. Rev. A 2008 , 78 , 010902(R) ) for the scattering of He atoms off of a microstructured grating is described and analyzed theoretically. Using the close-coupling formalism with a complex absorbing potential and describing the long-range interaction in terms of the Casimir-van der Waals potential, we find probabilities and diffraction patterns that are in fairly good agreement with the experimental results. The central outcomes of this study are two-fold. First is the theoretical confirmation that, indeed, the phenomenon of quantum reflection may be detected not only through the elastic peak but also in terms of a quantum reflected diffraction pattern. Second, we demonstrate that the phenomenon of quantum reflection is the result of a coherent process where all of the potential regions are involved on an equal footing. It is a nonlocal property and cannot be related only to the long-range badlands region of the potential of interaction.

  13. Quantum confinement in amorphous TiO(2) films studied via atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    King, David M; Du, Xiaohua; Cavanagh, Andrew S; Weimer, Alan W

    2008-11-05

    Despite the significant recent increase in quantum-based optoelectronics device research, few deposition techniques can reliably create the required functional nanoscale systems. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used here to study the quantum effects attainable through the use of this ångström-level controlled growth process. Size-dependent quantum confinement has been demonstrated using TiO(2) layers of nanoscale thickness applied to the surfaces of silicon wafers. TiO(2) films were deposited at 100 °C using TiCl(4) and H(2)O(2) in a viscous flow ALD reactor, at a rate of 0.61 Å/cycle. The low-temperature process was utilized to guarantee the amorphous deposition of TiO(2) layers and post-deposition thermal annealing was employed to promote crystallite-size modification. Hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced the residual chlorine that remained from a typical TiCl(4)-H(2)O ALD process at this temperature, down to 1.6%. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to quantify the optical properties both below and above the bandgap energy. A central composite design was employed to map the surface response of the film thickness-dependent bandgap shift for the as-deposited case and up to a thermal annealing temperature of 550 °C. The Brus model was used to develop a correlation between the amorphous TiO(2) film thickness and the quantum length to promote equivalent bandgap shifts.

  14. Applications of Quantum Theory of Atomic and Molecular Scattering to Problems in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, F. Bary

    1995-01-01

    The general status of a grant to investigate the applications of quantum theory in atomic and molecular scattering problems in hypersonic flow is summarized. Abstracts of five articles and eleven full-length articles published or submitted for publication are included as attachments. The following topics are addressed in these articles: fragmentation of heavy ions (HZE particles); parameterization of absorption cross sections; light ion transport; emission of light fragments as an indicator of equilibrated populations; quantum mechanical, optical model methods for calculating cross sections for particle fragmentation by hydrogen; evaluation of NUCFRG2, the semi-empirical nuclear fragmentation database; investigation of the single- and double-ionization of He by proton and anti-proton collisions; Bose-Einstein condensation of nuclei; and a liquid drop model in HZE particle fragmentation by hydrogen.

  15. Quantum Storage of Orbital Angular Momentum Entanglement in an Atomic Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Shi, Shuai; Xiang, Guo-Yong; Wang, Xi-Shi; Jiang, Yun-Kun; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-02-01

    Constructing a quantum memory for a photonic entanglement is vital for realizing quantum communication and network. Because of the inherent infinite dimension of orbital angular momentum (OAM), the photon's OAM has the potential for encoding a photon in a high-dimensional space, enabling the realization of high channel capacity communication. Photons entangled in orthogonal polarizations or optical paths had been stored in a different system, but there have been no reports on the storage of a photon pair entangled in OAM space. Here, we report the first experimental realization of storing an entangled OAM state through the Raman protocol in a cold atomic ensemble. We reconstruct the density matrix of an OAM entangled state with a fidelity of 90.3 % ±0.8 % and obtain the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality parameter S of 2.41 ±0.06 after a programed storage time. All results clearly show the preservation of entanglement during the storage.

  16. Excited-state spectroscopy on an individual quantum dot using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cockins, Lynda; Miyahara, Yoichi; Bennett, Steven D; Clerk, Aashish A; Grutter, Peter

    2012-02-08

    We present a new charge sensing technique for the excited-state spectroscopy of individual quantum dots, which requires no patterned electrodes. An oscillating atomic force microscope cantilever is used as a movable charge sensor as well as gate to measure the single-electron tunneling between an individual self-assembled InAs quantum dot and back electrode. A set of cantilever dissipation versus bias voltage curves measured at different cantilever oscillation amplitudes forms a diagram analogous to the Coulomb diamond usually measured with transport measurements. The excited-state levels as well as the electron addition spectrum can be obtained from the diagram. In addition, a signature which can result from inelastic tunneling by phonon emission or a peak in the density of states of the electrode is also observed, which demonstrates the versatility of the technique.

  17. Interaction-free measurements by quantum Zeno stabilization of ultracold atoms

    PubMed Central

    Peise, J.; Lücke, B.; Pezzé, L.; Deuretzbacher, F.; Ertmer, W.; Arlt, J.; Smerzi, A.; Santos, L.; Klempt, C.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanics predicts that our physical reality is influenced by events that can potentially happen but factually do not occur. Interaction-free measurements (IFMs) exploit this counterintuitive influence to detect the presence of an object without requiring any interaction with it. Here we propose and realize an IFM concept based on an unstable many-particle system. In our experiments, we employ an ultracold gas in an unstable spin configuration, which can undergo a rapid decay. The object—realized by a laser beam—prevents this decay because of the indirect quantum Zeno effect and thus, its presence can be detected without interacting with a single atom. Contrary to existing proposals, our IFM does not require single-particle sources and is only weakly affected by losses and decoherence. We demonstrate confidence levels of 90%, well beyond previous optical experiments. PMID:25869121

  18. Quantum-state tomography of a single nuclear spin qubit of an optically manipulated ytterbium atom

    SciTech Connect

    Noguchi, Atsushi; Kozuma, Mikio; Eto, Yujiro; Ueda, Masahito

    2011-09-15

    A single Yb atom is loaded into a high-finesse optical cavity with a moving lattice, and its nuclear spin state is manipulated using a nuclear magnetic resonance technique. A highly reliable quantum state control with fidelity and purity greater than 0.98 and 0.96, respectively, is confirmed by the full quantum state tomography; a projective measurement with high speed (500 {mu}s) and high efficiency (0.98) is accomplished using the cavity QED technique. Because a hyperfine coupling is induced only when the projective measurement is operational, the long coherence times (T{sub 1}=0.49 s and T{sub 2}=0.10 s) are maintained.

  19. Simulating compact quantum electrodynamics with ultracold atoms: probing confinement and nonperturbative effects.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Erez; Cirac, J Ignacio; Reznik, Benni

    2012-09-21

    Recently, there has been much interest in simulating quantum field theory effects of matter and gauge fields. In a recent work, a method for simulating compact quantum electrodynamics (CQED) using Bose-Einstein condensates has been suggested. We suggest an alternative approach, which relies on single atoms in an optical lattice, carrying 2l + 1 internal levels, which converges rapidly to CQED as l increases. That enables the simulation of CQED in 2 + 1 dimensions in both the weak and the strong coupling regimes, hence, allowing us to probe confinement as well as other nonperturbative effects of the theory. We provide an explicit construction for the case l = 1 which is sufficient for simulating the effect of confinement between two external static charges.

  20. Quantum Degenerate Mixtures of Alkali and Alkaline-Earth-Like Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Hideaki; Takasu, Yosuke; Yamaoka, Yoshifumi; Doyle, John M.; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2011-05-20

    We realize simultaneous quantum degeneracy in mixtures consisting of the alkali and alkaline-earth-like atoms Li and Yb. This is accomplished within an optical trap by sympathetic cooling of the fermionic isotope {sup 6}Li with evaporatively cooled bosonic {sup 174}Yb and, separately, fermionic {sup 173}Yb. Using cross-thermalization studies, we also measure the elastic s-wave scattering lengths of both Li-Yb combinations, |a{sub {sup 6}Li-{sup 174}Yb}|=1.0{+-}0.2 nm and |a{sub {sup 6}Li-{sup 173}Yb}|=0.9{+-}0.2 nm. The equality of these lengths is found to be consistent with mass-scaling analysis. The quantum degenerate mixtures of Li and Yb, as realized here, can be the basis for creation of ultracold molecules with electron spin degrees of freedom, studies of novel Efimov trimers, and impurity probes of superfluid systems.

  1. An ultra-high optical depth cold atomic ensemble for quantum memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparkes, B. M.; Bernu, J.; Hosseini, M.; Geng, J.; Glorieux, Q.; Altin, P. A.; Lam, P. K.; Robins, N. P.; Buchler, B. C.

    2013-12-01

    Quantum memories for light lie at the heart of long-distance provably-secure communication. Demand for a functioning quantum memory, with high efficiency and coherence times approaching a millisecond, is therefore at a premium. Here we report on work towards this goal, with the development of a 87Rb magneto-optical trap with a peak optical depth of 1000 for the D2 F = 2 → F' = 3 transition using spatial and temporal dark spots. With this purpose-built cold atomic ensemble we implemented the gradient echo memory (GEM) scheme on the D1 line. Our data shows a memory efficiency of 80 ± 2% and coherence times up to 195 μs.

  2. Intrinsic Atomic Orbitals: An Unbiased Bridge between Quantum Theory and Chemical Concepts.

    PubMed

    Knizia, Gerald

    2013-11-12

    Modern quantum chemistry can make quantitative predictions on an immense array of chemical systems. However, the interpretation of those predictions is often complicated by the complex wave function expansions used. Here we show that an exceptionally simple algebraic construction allows for defining atomic core and valence orbitals, polarized by the molecular environment, which can exactly represent self-consistent field wave functions. This construction provides an unbiased and direct connection between quantum chemistry and empirical chemical concepts, and can be used, for example, to calculate the nature of bonding in molecules, in chemical terms, from first principles. In particular, we find consistency with electronegativities (χ), C 1s core-level shifts, resonance substituent parameters (σR), Lewis structures, and oxidation states of transition-metal complexes.

  3. Transition from Molecular Vibrations to Phonons in Atomically Precise Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Beecher, Alexander N; Dziatko, Rachel A; Steigerwald, Michael L; Owen, Jonathan S; Crowther, Andrew C

    2016-12-28

    We use micro-Raman spectroscopy to measure the vibrational structure of the atomically precise cadmium selenide quantum dots Cd35Se20X30L30, Cd56Se35X42L42, and Cd84Se56X56L56. These quantum dots have benzoate (X) and n-butylamine (L) ligands and tetrahedral (Td) shape with edges that range from 1.7 to 2.6 nm in length. Investigating this previously unexplored size regime allows us to identify the transition from molecular vibrations to bulk phonons in cadmium selenide quantum dots for the first time. Room-temperature Raman spectra have broad CdSe peaks at 175 and 200 cm(-1). Density functional theory calculations assign these peaks to molecular surface and interior vibrational modes, respectively, and show that the interior, surface, and ligand atom motion is strongly coupled. The interior peak intensity increases relative to the surface peak as the cluster size increases due to the relative increase in the polarizability of interior modes with quantum dot size. The Raman spectra do not change with temperature for molecular Cd35Se20X30L30, while the interior peak narrows and shifts to higher energy as temperature decreases for Cd84Se56X56L56, a spectral evolution typical of a phonon. This result shows that the single bulk unit cell contained within Cd84Se56X56L56 is sufficient to apply a phonon confinement model, and that Cd56Se35X42L42, with its 2.1 nm edge length, marks the boundary between molecular vibrations and phonons.

  4. Generalized quantum similarity in atomic systems: A quantifier of relativistic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, A. L.; Angulo, J. C.; Antolín, J.; López-Rosa, S.

    2017-02-01

    Quantum similarity between Hartree-Fock and Dirac-Fock electron densities reveals the depth of relativistic effects on the core and valence regions in atomic systems. The results emphasize the relevance of differences in the outermost subshells, as pointed out in recent studies by means of Shannon-like functionals. In this work, a generalized similarity functional allows us to go far beyond the Shannon-based analyses. The numerical results for systems throughout the Periodic Table show that discrepancies between the relativistic and non-relativistic descriptions are patently governed by shell-filling patterns.

  5. Classical-quantum correspondence for ionization in fast ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J. |; Reinhold, C.O.

    1994-10-01

    We analyze the interplay between classical and quantum dynamics in ionization of atoms by fast charged particles The convergence to the classical limit is studied as a function of the momentum transferred to the electron during the collision, the impact parameter. the energy and angle of the emitted electron, and the initial state of the target. One goal is to assess the validity of exact classical (CTMC) methods and approximate classical models such as the Thomson model. Applications to data for electron ejection at large angles are presented. The connection between collisional ionization by charged particles and ionization by half-cycle pulses is discussed.

  6. Universal quantum computation in a neutral-atom decoherence-free subspace

    SciTech Connect

    Brion, E.; Pedersen, L. H.; Moelmer, K.; Chutia, S.; Saffman, M.

    2007-03-15

    In this paper, we propose a way to achieve protected universal computation in a neutral-atom quantum computer subject to collective dephasing. Our proposal relies on the existence of a decoherence-free subspace (DFS), resulting from symmetry properties of the errors. After briefly describing the physical system and the error model considered, we show how to encode information into the DFS and build a complete set of safe universal gates. Finally, we provide numerical simulations for the fidelity of the different gates in the presence of time-dependent phase errors and discuss their performance and practical feasibility.

  7. Bilayers of Rydberg atoms as a quantum simulator for unconventional superconductors.

    PubMed

    Hague, J P; MacCormick, C

    2012-11-30

    In condensed matter, it is often difficult to untangle the effects of competing interactions, and this is especially problematic for superconductors. Quantum simulators may help: here we show how exploiting the properties of highly excited Rydberg states of cold fermionic atoms in a bilayer lattice can simulate electron-phonon interactions in the presence of strong correlation--a scenario found in many unconventional superconductors. We discuss the core features of the simulator, and use numerics to compare with condensed matter analogues. Finally, we illustrate how to achieve a practical, tunable implementation of the simulation using "painted spot" potentials.

  8. Quantum size effects in TiO2 thin films grown by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Tallarida, Massimo; Das, Chittaranjan; Schmeisser, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    We study the atomic layer deposition of TiO2 by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Ti precursor, titanium isopropoxide, was used in combination with H2O on Si/SiO2 substrates that were heated at 200 °C. The low growth rate (0.15 Å/cycle) and the in situ characterization permitted to follow changes in the electronic structure of TiO2 in the sub-nanometer range, which are influenced by quantum size effects. The modified electronic properties may play an important role in charge carrier transport and separation, and increase the efficiency of energy conversion systems.

  9. Prediction of quantum many-body chaos in the protactinium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viatkina, A. V.; Kozlov, M. G.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2017-02-01

    The energy-level spectrum of the protactinium atom (Pa, Z =91 ) is simulated with a configuration interaction calculation. Levels belonging to the separate manifolds of a given total angular momentum and parity Jπ exhibit distinct properties of many-body quantum chaos. Moreover, an extremely strong enhancement of small perturbations takes place. As an example, effective three-electron interaction is investigated and found to play a significant role in the system. Chaotic properties of the eigenstates allow one to develop a statistical theory and predict probabilities of different processes in chaotic systems.

  10. Quantum Coherent Atomic Tunneling between Two Trapped Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Smerzi, A.; Fantoni, S.; Giovanazzi, S.

    1997-12-01

    We study the coherent atomic tunneling between two zero-temperature Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) confined in a double-well magnetic trap. Two Gross-Pitaevskii equations for the self-interacting BEC amplitudes, coupled by a transfer matrix element, describe the dynamics in terms of the interwell phase difference and population imbalance. In addition to the anharmonic generalization of the familiar ac Josephson effect and plasma oscillations occurring in superconductor junctions, the nonlinear BEC tunneling dynamics sustains a self-maintained population imbalance: a novel {open_quotes}macroscopic quantum self-trapping{close_quotes} effect. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Spontaneous quantum Hall effect in an atomic spinor Bose-Fer mi mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhi-Fang; Li, Xiaopeng; Zoller, Peter; Liu, W. Vincent

    2015-03-01

    We study a mixture of spin-1 bosonic and spin-1/2 fermionic cold atoms, e.g., Rb-87 and Li-6,confined in a triangular optical lattice. With fermions at 3/4 filling, Fermi surface nesting leads to spontaneous formation of various spin textures of bosons in the ground state, such as collinear, coplanar and even non-coplanar spin orders. The phase diagram is mapped out with varying boson tunneling and Bose-Fermi interactions. Most significantly, in one non-coplanar state the mixture is found to exhibit spontaneous quantum Hall effect in fermions and crystalline superfluidity in bosons, both driven by interaction.

  12. Virial theorem in the Kohn-Sham density-functional theory formalism: accurate calculation of the atomic quantum theory of atoms in molecules energies.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Juan I; Ayers, Paul W; Götz, Andreas W; Castillo-Alvarado, F L

    2009-07-14

    A new approach for computing the atom-in-molecule [quantum theory of atoms in molecule (QTAIM)] energies in Kohn-Sham density-functional theory is presented and tested by computing QTAIM energies for a set of representative molecules. In the new approach, the contribution for the correlation-kinetic energy (T(c)) is computed using the density-functional theory virial relation. Based on our calculations, it is shown that the conventional approach where atomic energies are computed using only the noninteracting part of the kinetic energy might be in error by hundreds of kJ/mol.

  13. Variational Average-Atom in Quantum Plasmas (VAAQP) - A check of thermodynamic consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piron, R.; Blenski, T.; Cichocki, B.

    2009-12-01

    A new code called VAAQP (Variational Average-Atom in Quantum Plasmas) is presented. The conceptual model on which the code is based, as well as the important results of previous studies are briefly discussed. The code is based on a new fully variational model of equilibrium dense plasmas employing a quantal treatment of all electrons. VAAQP can calculate the Average-Atom structure and the mean ionization from the variational equations satisfying the virial theorem and without imposing the neutrality of the Wigner-Seitz sphere. The formula obtained for the electron pressure is simple and does not require any numerical differentiation. A description of the principal features of the code is given. The thermodynamic consistency of the results obtained with VAAQP is shown by a comparison with another approach for the aluminium 2 eV isotherm. An initial comparison to an INFERNO-type model is also presented.

  14. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches in the study of metal atom clusters requires simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential (ECP) technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculation were examined. The ECP molecular integral formulae were modified to bring out the shell characteristics as a first step towards fulfilling the increasing need to speed up the computation of the ECP integrals. Work on the relationships among the derivatives of the molecular integrals that extends some of the techniques pioneered by Komornicki for the calculation of the gradients of the electronic energy was completed and a formulation of the ECP approach that quite naturally unifies the various state-of-the-art "shape- and Hamiltonian-consistent" techniques was discovered.

  15. Visualization and dimensional scaling for some three-body problems in atomic and molecular quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Goong; Ding Zhonghai; Perronnet, Alain; Zhang Zhigang

    2008-06-15

    Three-body problems in atomic and molecular quantum mechanics, comprising one electron-two nuclei and two electron-one nucleus, are studied from their Schroedinger-Born-Oppenheimer models. The following are main topics of interest in this paper: (1) review of foundational mathematical properties of the multiparticle Schroedinger operator, (2) visualization of H{sub 2}{sup +} (hydrogen molecular ion)-like and He (helium)-like molecular and atomic states, and (3) spectrum of He obtained by the large-dimension scaling limit. The authors begin with topic (1) for the tutorial purpose and devote topics (2) and (3) to new contributions of the analytical, numerical, and visualization nature. Relevant heuristics, graphics, proofs, and calculations are presented.

  16. Protein-protected luminescent noble metal quantum clusters: an emerging trend in atomic cluster nanoscience.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Chaudhari, Kamalesh; Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2012-01-01

    Noble metal quantum clusters (NMQCs) are the missing link between isolated noble metal atoms and nanoparticles. NMQCs are sub-nanometer core sized clusters composed of a group of atoms, most often luminescent in the visible region, and possess intriguing photo-physical and chemical properties. A trend is observed in the use of ligands, ranging from phosphines to functional proteins, for the synthesis of NMQCs in the liquid phase. In this review, we briefly overview recent advancements in the synthesis of protein protected NMQCs with special emphasis on their structural and photo-physical properties. In view of the protein protection, coupled with direct synthesis and easy functionalization, this hybrid QC-protein system is expected to have numerous optical and bioimaging applications in the future, pointers in this direction are visible in the literature.

  17. Quantum dynamic of sticking of a H atom on a graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Morisset, S; Allouche, A

    2008-07-14

    A quantum study of the sticking of a hydrogen atom chemisorbed onto graphite (0001) surface was carried out also including the phonon modes of the system in the collinear scattering approximation. A new model was developed to extract the substrate vibrational modes from density functional theory (DFT) calculation and include them in the total system dynamics. The resulting coupled-channel equations are numerically developed along time using the wave packet methods. The sticking coefficients are calculated for hydrogen atoms incident energies ranging from 0.17 and 1.3 eV for a surface temperature of 10 K and between 0.17 and 0.2 eV for a surface temperature of 150 K. The results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental work.

  18. Nonequilibrium forces between atoms and dielectrics mediated by a quantum field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behunin, Ryan O.; Hu, Bei-Lok

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we give a first principles microphysics derivation of the nonequilibrium forces between an atom, treated as a three-dimensional harmonic oscillator, and a bulk dielectric medium modeled as a continuous lattice of oscillators coupled to a reservoir. We assume no direct interaction between the atom and the medium but there exist mutual influences transmitted via a common electromagnetic field. By employing concepts and techniques of open quantum systems we introduce coarse-graining to the physical variables—the medium, the quantum field, and the atom’s internal degrees of freedom, in that order—to extract their averaged effects from the lowest tier progressively to the top tier. The first tier of coarse-graining provides the averaged effect of the medium upon the field, quantified by a complex permittivity (in the frequency domain) describing the response of the dielectric to the field in addition to its back action on the field through a stochastic forcing term. The last tier of coarse-graining over the atom’s internal degrees of freedom results in an equation of motion for the atom’s center of mass from which we can derive the force on the atom. Our nonequilibrium formulation provides a fully dynamical description of the atom’s motion including back-action effects from all other relevant variables concerned. In the long-time limit we recover the known results for the atom-dielectric force when the combined system is in equilibrium or in a nonequilibrium stationary state.

  19. Optically excited structural transition in atomic wires on surfaces at the quantum limit.

    PubMed

    Frigge, T; Hafke, B; Witte, T; Krenzer, B; Streubühr, C; Samad Syed, A; Mikšić Trontl, V; Avigo, I; Zhou, P; Ligges, M; von der Linde, D; Bovensiepen, U; Horn-von Hoegen, M; Wippermann, S; Lücke, A; Sanna, S; Gerstmann, U; Schmidt, W G

    2017-03-29

    Transient control over the atomic potential-energy landscapes of solids could lead to new states of matter and to quantum control of nuclear motion on the timescale of lattice vibrations. Recently developed ultrafast time-resolved diffraction techniques combine ultrafast temporal manipulation with atomic-scale spatial resolution and femtosecond temporal resolution. These advances have enabled investigations of photo-induced structural changes in bulk solids that often occur on timescales as short as a few hundred femtoseconds. In contrast, experiments at surfaces and on single atomic layers such as graphene report timescales of structural changes that are orders of magnitude longer. This raises the question of whether the structural response of low-dimensional materials to femtosecond laser excitation is, in general, limited. Here we show that a photo-induced transition from the low- to high-symmetry state of a charge density wave in atomic indium (In) wires supported by a silicon (Si) surface takes place within 350 femtoseconds. The optical excitation breaks and creates In-In bonds, leading to the non-thermal excitation of soft phonon modes, and drives the structural transition in the limit of critically damped nuclear motion through coupling of these soft phonon modes to a manifold of surface and interface phonons that arise from the symmetry breaking at the silicon surface. This finding demonstrates that carefully tuned electronic excitations can create non-equilibrium potential energy surfaces that drive structural dynamics at interfaces in the quantum limit (that is, in a regime in which the nuclear motion is directed and deterministic). This technique could potentially be used to tune the dynamic response of a solid to optical excitation, and has widespread potential application, for example in ultrafast detectors.

  20. QED in a time-dependent double cavity and creation of entanglement between noninteracting atoms via quantum eraser technique

    SciTech Connect

    Cirone, Markus A.; Rzazewski, Kazimierz

    1999-03-11

    We discuss two striking features of quantum mechanics: The concepts of vacuum and of entanglement. We first study the radiation field inside a double cavity (a cavity which contains a reflecting mirror). If the mirror is rapidly removed, peculiar quantum phenomena, such as photon creation from vacuum and squeezing, occur. We discuss then a gedanken experiment which employs the double cavity to create entanglement between two atoms. The atoms cross the double cavity and interact with its two independent radiation fields. After the atoms leave the cavity, the mirror is suddenly removed. Measurement of the radiation field inside the cavity can give rise to entanglement between the atoms. The method can be extended to an arbitrary number of atoms, providing thus an N-particle GHZ state.

  1. Optical response of two-level atoms with reflection geometry as a model of a quantum phase gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Hisaki; Takeuchi, Shigeki; Sasaki, Keiji

    2005-07-01

    The nonlinear optical response obtained from a model system of a quantum phase gate is investigated. The model system consists of a thin infinite atomic layer of two-level atoms placed in front of a perfect reflecting mirror. The optical response obtained from the model system is semiclassically analyzed using the finite difference time domain method with the optical Bloch equations. It is shown that a nonlinear phase shift of π is achieved when the atomic layer is placed at an antinode of the input field. This result is consistent with the theoretical result obtained from a one-dimensional atom model [H. F. Hofmann, K. Kojima, S. Takeuchi, and K. Sasaki, J. Opt. B: Quantum Semiclassical Opt. 5, 218 (2003)]. The dependence of the nonlinear phase shift on the position of the atomic layer is also studied in detail.

  2. Dynamics of quantum correlation and coherence for two atoms coupled with a bath of fluctuating massless scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiming; Situ, Haozhen

    2017-02-01

    In this article, the dynamics of quantum correlation and coherence for two atoms interacting with a bath of fluctuating massless scalar field in the Minkowski vacuum is investigated. We firstly derive the master equation that describes the system evolution with initial Bell-diagonal state. Then we discuss the system evolution for three cases of different initial states: non-zero correlation separable state, maximally entangled state and zero correlation state. For non-zero correlation initial separable state, quantum correlation and coherence can be protected from vacuum fluctuations during long time evolution when the separation between the two atoms is relatively small. For maximally entangled initial state, quantum correlation and coherence overall decrease with evolution time. However, for the zero correlation initial state, quantum correlation and coherence are firstly generated and then drop with evolution time; when separation is sufficiently small, they can survive from vacuum fluctuations. For three cases, quantum correlation and coherence first undergo decline and then fluctuate to relatively stable values with the increasing distance between the two atoms. Specially, for the case of zero correlation initial state, quantum correlation and coherence occur periodically revival at fixed zero points and revival amplitude declines gradually with increasing separation of two atoms.

  3. The Strange World of Ultracold Atomic Collisions: A Cornucopia of Quantum Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Carl J.

    1996-11-01

    The phenomenal experimental success of laser cooling and atom trapping has has helped to reinvigorate the field of atomic physics and has spawned the field of ultracold atomic collisions. This talk presents an overview of ultracold atomic collisions with an emphasis on some of the remarkable quantum phenomena -- including the Wigner threshold law -- that are inherent in these collisions. Additionally, we discuss the importance of ultracold collisions in Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of weakly interacting atomic systems and their role in the development of an atom laser and atomic clocks. Ultracold atomic collisions can be loosely broken into two classes of problems, collisions of ground state atoms (including metastable atoms) and the collision of atoms in external electric fields. In this latter class is the field of photoassociation spectroscopy. Theoretical analysis of the photoassociation spectrum of the Na2 purely long-range 0^-g state has recently produced three remarkable results. The first two results include the currently most accurate determination of the Na(3P) lifetime and the observation of the predicted but previously unobserved effect of retardation in the interaction between two atoms(K. M. Jones, P. S. Julienne, P. D. Lett, W. D. Phillips, E. Tiesinga, and C. J. Williams, Europhys. Lett. 35), 85 (1996).. Finally, the scattering length for the collision of two Na(3S) atoms in their F=1, M_F=-1 hyperfine state was extracted from the intensities and widths of the 0^-g spectra(E. Tiesinga, C. J. Williams, P. S. Julienne, K. M. Jones, P. D. Lett, and W. D. Phillips, J. Res. Nat. Inst. Stand. Technol. 101) (1996, in press).. Similar types of results have also been obtained in Li_2, K_2, and Rb_2. Ground state scattering lengths are essential for both modeling the formation of a BEC and for understanding collisional loss processes in a BEC. Similar collisional processes are important in pressure shifts in atomic clocks. We use the value of the of the

  4. Optical Bragg, atomic Bragg and cavity QED detections of quantum phases and excitation spectra of ultracold atoms in bipartite and frustrated optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Jinwu; Zhang, K.Y.; Li, Yan; Chen, Yan; Zhang, W.P.

    2013-01-15

    Ultracold atoms loaded on optical lattices can provide unprecedented experimental systems for the quantum simulations and manipulations of many quantum phases and quantum phase transitions between these phases. However, so far, how to detect these quantum phases and phase transitions effectively remains an outstanding challenge. In this paper, we will develop a systematic and unified theory of using the optical Bragg scattering, atomic Bragg scattering or cavity QED to detect the ground state and the excitation spectrum of many quantum phases of interacting bosons loaded in bipartite and frustrated optical lattices. The physically measurable quantities of the three experiments are the light scattering cross sections, the atom scattered clouds and the cavity leaking photons respectively. We show that the two photon Raman transition processes in the three detection methods not only couple to the density order parameter, but also the valence bond order parameter due to the hopping of the bosons on the lattice. This valence bond order coupling is very sensitive to any superfluid order or any valence bond (VB) order in the quantum phases to be probed. These quantum phases include not only the well-known superfluid and Mott insulating phases, but also other important phases such as various kinds of charge density waves (CDW), valence bond solids (VBS), and CDW-VBS phases with both CDW and VBS orders unique to frustrated lattices, and also various kinds of supersolids. We analyze respectively the experimental conditions of the three detection methods to probe these various quantum phases and their corresponding excitation spectra. We also address the effects of a finite temperature and a harmonic trap. We contrast the three scattering methods with recent in situ measurements inside a harmonic trap and argue that the two kinds of measurements are complementary to each other. The combination of both kinds of detection methods could be used to match the combination of

  5. Atom-chip based quantum gravimetry for the precise determination of absolute local gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abend, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a novel technique for the precise measurement of absolute local gravity based on cold atom interferometry. Atom interferometry utilizes the interference of matter waves interrogated by laser light to read out inertial forces. Today's generation of these devices typically operate with test mass samples, that consists of ensembles of laser cooled atoms. Their performance is limited by the velocity spread and finite-size of the test masses that impose systematic uncertainties at the level of a few μGal. Rather than laser cooled atoms we employ quantum degenerate ensembles, so called Bose-Einstein condensates, as ultra-sensitive probes for gravity. These sources offer unique properties in temperature as well as in ensemble size that will allow to overcome the current limitations with the next generation of sensors. Furthermore, atom-chip technologies offer the possibility to generate Bose-Einstein condensates in a fast and reliable way. We show a lab-based prototype that uses the atom-chip itself to retro-reflect the interrogation laser and thus serving as inertial reference inside the vacuum. With this setup it is possible to demonstrate all necessary steps to measure gravity, including the preparation of the source, spanning an interferometer as well as the detection of the output signal, within an area of 1 cm3 right below the atom-chip and to analyze relevant systematic effects. In the framework of the center of excellence geoQ a next generation device is under construction at the Institut für Quantenoptik, that will allow for in-field measurements. This device will feature a state-of-the-art atom-chip source with a high-flux of ultra-cold atoms at a repetition rate of 1-2 Hz. In cooperation with the Müller group at the Institut für Erdmessung the sensor will be characterized in the laboratory first, to be ultimately employed in campaigns to measure the Fennoscandian uplift at the level of 1 μGal. The presented work is part of the center of

  6. Partitioning dynamic electron correlation energy: Viewing Møller-Plesset correlation energies through Interacting Quantum Atom (IQA) energy partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonagh, James L.; Vincent, Mark A.; Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2016-10-01

    Here MP2, MP3 and MP4(SDQ) are energy-partitioned for the first time within the Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA) context, as proof-of-concept for H2, He2 and HF. Energies are decomposed into four primary energy contributions: (i) atomic self-energies, and atomic interaction energies comprising of (ii) Coulomb, (iii) exchange and (iv) dynamic election correlation terms. We generate and partition one- and two-particle density-matrices to obtain all atomic energy components. This work suggests that, in terms of Van der Waals dispersion, the correlation energies represent an atomic stabilisation, by proximity to other atoms, as opposed to direct interactions with other nearby atoms.

  7. Radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device meta-atoms and metamaterials: Experiment, theory and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daimeng

    Metamaterials are 1D, 2D or 3D arrays of artificial atoms. The artificial atoms, called "meta-atoms", can be any component with tailorable electromagnetic properties, such as resonators, LC circuits, nano particles, and so on. By designing the properties of individual meta-atoms and the interaction created by putting them in a lattice, one can create a metamaterial with intriguing properties not found in nature. My Ph. D. work examines the meta-atoms based on radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices (rf-SQUIDs); their tunability with dc magnetic field, rf magnetic field, and temperature are studied. The rf-SQUIDs are superconducting split ring resonators in which the usual capacitance is supplemented with a Josephson junction, which introduces strong nonlinearity in the rf properties. At relatively low rf magnetic field, a magnetic field tunability of the resonant frequency of up to 80 THz/Gauss by dc magnetic field is observed, and a total frequency tunability of 100% is achieved. The macroscopic quantum superconducting metamaterial also shows manipulative self-induced broadband transparency due to a qualitatively novel nonlinear mechanism that is different from conventional electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) or its classical analogs. A near complete disappearance of resonant absorption under a range of applied rf flux is observed experimentally and explained theoretically. The transparency comes from the intrinsic bi-stability and can be tuned on/ off easily by altering rf and dc magnetic fields, temperature and history. Hysteretic in situ 100% tunability of transparency paves the way for auto-cloaking metamaterials, intensity dependent filters, and fast-tunable power limiters. An rf-SQUID metamaterial is shown to have qualitatively the same behavior as a single rf-SQUID with regards to dc flux, rf flux and temperature tuning. The two-tone response of self-resonant rf-SQUID meta-atoms and metamaterials is then studied here via

  8. High electron mobility, quantum Hall effect and anomalous optical response in atomically thin InSe

    DOE PAGES

    Bandurin, Denis A.; Tyurnina, Anastasia V.; Yu, Geliang L.; ...

    2016-11-21

    A decade of intense research on two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals has revealed that their properties can differ greatly from those of the parent compound. These differences are governed by changes in the band structure due to quantum confinement and are most profound if the underlying lattice symmetry changes. Here we report a high-quality 2D electron gas in few-layer InSe encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride under an inert atmosphere. Carrier mobilities are found to exceed 103 cm2 V–1s–1 and 104 cm2 V–1 s–1 at room and liquid-helium temperatures, respectively, allowing the observation of the fully developed quantum Hall effect. The conductionmore » electrons occupy a single 2D subband and have a small effective mass. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals that the bandgap increases by more than 0.5 eV with decreasing the thickness from bulk to bilayer InSe. The band-edge optical response vanishes in monolayer InSe, which is attributed to the monolayer's mirror-plane symmetry. As a result, encapsulated 2D InSe expands the family of graphene-like semiconductors and, in terms of quality, is competitive with atomically thin dichalcogenides and black phosphorus.« less

  9. High teleportation rates using cold-atom-ensemble-based quantum repeaters with Rydberg blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solmeyer, Neal; Li, Xiao; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2016-04-01

    We present a simplified version of a repeater protocol in a cold neutral-atom ensemble with Rydberg excitations optimized for two-node entanglement generation and describe a protocol for quantum teleportation. Our proposal draws from previous proposals [B. Zhao et al., Phys. Rev. A 81, 052329 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevA.81.052329; Y. Han et al., Phys. Rev. A 81, 052311 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevA.81.052311] that described efficient and robust protocols for long-distance entanglement with many nodes. Using realistic experimental values, we predict an entanglement generation rate of ˜25 Hz and a teleportation rate of ˜5 Hz . Our predicted rates match the current state-of-the-art experiments for entanglement generation and teleportation between quantum memories. With improved efficiencies we predict entanglement generation and teleportation rates of ˜7.8 and ˜3.6 kHz, respectively, representing a two-order-of-magnitude improvement over the currently realized values. Cold-atom ensembles with Rydberg excitations are promising candidates for repeater nodes because collective effects in the ensemble can be used to deterministically generate a long-lived ground-state memory which may be efficiently mapped onto a directionally emitted single photon.

  10. High electron mobility, quantum Hall effect and anomalous optical response in atomically thin InSe.

    PubMed

    Bandurin, Denis A; Tyurnina, Anastasia V; Yu, Geliang L; Mishchenko, Artem; Zólyomi, Viktor; Morozov, Sergey V; Kumar, Roshan Krishna; Gorbachev, Roman V; Kudrynskyi, Zakhar R; Pezzini, Sergio; Kovalyuk, Zakhar D; Zeitler, Uli; Novoselov, Konstantin S; Patanè, Amalia; Eaves, Laurence; Grigorieva, Irina V; Fal'ko, Vladimir I; Geim, Andre K; Cao, Yang

    2017-03-01

    A decade of intense research on two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals has revealed that their properties can differ greatly from those of the parent compound. These differences are governed by changes in the band structure due to quantum confinement and are most profound if the underlying lattice symmetry changes. Here we report a high-quality 2D electron gas in few-layer InSe encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride under an inert atmosphere. Carrier mobilities are found to exceed 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 10(4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room and liquid-helium temperatures, respectively, allowing the observation of the fully developed quantum Hall effect. The conduction electrons occupy a single 2D subband and have a small effective mass. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals that the bandgap increases by more than 0.5 eV with decreasing the thickness from bulk to bilayer InSe. The band-edge optical response vanishes in monolayer InSe, which is attributed to the monolayer's mirror-plane symmetry. Encapsulated 2D InSe expands the family of graphene-like semiconductors and, in terms of quality, is competitive with atomically thin dichalcogenides and black phosphorus.

  11. Quantum phases and transitions of many-body systems realized using cold atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Stephen Christopher

    In recent years, new advances in techniques for trapping and cooling atoms have allowed the production of atomic gases at low-enough temperatures and high-enough densities for collective quantum-mechanical effects to become important. This thesis describes theoretical investigations of certain many-body physics problems motivated by these experimental developments. It consists of two main parts. In the first, I investigate the array of phases exhibited by degenerate mixtures of bosons and fermions with a Feshbach resonance, a bound molecular state whose energy can be tuned with a magnetic field. These phases are distinguished by the presence or absence of a bosonic condensate and also by the different Luttinger constraints that are shown to apply to the Fermi surface(s). The second part is concerned with bosons in an optical lattice, in which a periodic potential is produced by counterpropagating lasers. Spinless bosons are known to exhibit a quantum phase transition between a Mott insulator and a superfluid state, while bosons with spin have a much richer phase structure. I consider, in particular, a phase transition with a spinless order parameter, and show that the long-time dynamics of spin-carrying excitations is governed by a nontrivial fixed point. The corresponding anomalous exponents are found using a renormalization-group calculation.

  12. High electron mobility, quantum Hall effect and anomalous optical response in atomically thin InSe

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurin, Denis A.; Tyurnina, Anastasia V.; Yu, Geliang L.; Mishchenko, Artem; Zólyomi, Viktor; Morozov, Sergey V.; Kumar, Roshan Krishna; Gorbachev, Roman V.; Kudrynskyi, Zakhar R.; Pezzini, Sergio; Kovalyuk, Zakhar D.; Zeitler, Uli; Novoselov, Konstantin S.; Patanè, Amalia; Eaves, Laurence; Grigorieva, Irina V.; Fal'ko, Vladimir I.; Geim, Andre K.; Cao, Yang

    2016-11-21

    A decade of intense research on two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals has revealed that their properties can differ greatly from those of the parent compound. These differences are governed by changes in the band structure due to quantum confinement and are most profound if the underlying lattice symmetry changes. Here we report a high-quality 2D electron gas in few-layer InSe encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride under an inert atmosphere. Carrier mobilities are found to exceed 103 cm2 V–1s–1 and 104 cm2 V–1 s–1 at room and liquid-helium temperatures, respectively, allowing the observation of the fully developed quantum Hall effect. The conduction electrons occupy a single 2D subband and have a small effective mass. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals that the bandgap increases by more than 0.5 eV with decreasing the thickness from bulk to bilayer InSe. The band-edge optical response vanishes in monolayer InSe, which is attributed to the monolayer's mirror-plane symmetry. As a result, encapsulated 2D InSe expands the family of graphene-like semiconductors and, in terms of quality, is competitive with atomically thin dichalcogenides and black phosphorus.

  13. Classical and quantum analysis of quasiresonance in grazing atom-surface collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, Antonia; Palao, Jose P.; Heller, Eric J.

    2009-05-15

    Quasiresonance is a general effect that may arise from the coupling between approximately resonant degrees of freedom in a system perturbed by some transient interaction. In a process induced by a slowly switching on and off of the coupling interaction, quasiresonance is characterized by the existence of significant ranges of initial states in the perturbed system over which some very specific and efficient transfer of energy between the approximately resonant degrees of freedom occurs. This work presents a classical and quantum analysis of quasiresonant processes in grazing incident angle atom-surface collisions. The momentum transfer between the normal components to an index direction is investigated. For fast atoms with grazing angle of incidence there is an interval of azimuthal angles around the index directions, the quasiresonance region, in which the energy transfer can be very efficient. This effect is reflected in quantum diffraction patterns with large nonspecular peaks, associated with the parallel to the surface and normal to the index direction momentum component. We demonstrate the essentially classical underlying mechanism for the persistence of a pattern of diffraction peak intensities for incidence close to an index direction. The analysis also shows that the size of the quasiresonance region is approximately equal to the spectral width of the diffraction pattern.

  14. High electron mobility, quantum Hall effect and anomalous optical response in atomically thin InSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandurin, Denis A.; Tyurnina, Anastasia V.; Yu, Geliang L.; Mishchenko, Artem; Zólyomi, Viktor; Morozov, Sergey V.; Kumar, Roshan Krishna; Gorbachev, Roman V.; Kudrynskyi, Zakhar R.; Pezzini, Sergio; Kovalyuk, Zakhar D.; Zeitler, Uli; Novoselov, Konstantin S.; Patanè, Amalia; Eaves, Laurence; Grigorieva, Irina V.; Fal'Ko, Vladimir I.; Geim, Andre K.; Cao, Yang

    2016-11-01

    A decade of intense research on two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals has revealed that their properties can differ greatly from those of the parent compound. These differences are governed by changes in the band structure due to quantum confinement and are most profound if the underlying lattice symmetry changes. Here we report a high-quality 2D electron gas in few-layer InSe encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride under an inert atmosphere. Carrier mobilities are found to exceed 103 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and 104 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 at room and liquid-helium temperatures, respectively, allowing the observation of the fully developed quantum Hall effect. The conduction electrons occupy a single 2D subband and have a small effective mass. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals that the bandgap increases by more than 0.5 eV with decreasing the thickness from bulk to bilayer InSe. The band-edge optical response vanishes in monolayer InSe, which is attributed to the monolayer's mirror-plane symmetry. Encapsulated 2D InSe expands the family of graphene-like semiconductors and, in terms of quality, is competitive with atomically thin dichalcogenides and black phosphorus.

  15. QSATS: MPI-driven quantum simulations of atomic solids at zero temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinde, Robert J.

    2011-11-01

    We describe QSATS, a parallel code for performing variational path integral simulations of the quantum mechanical ground state of monatomic solids. QSATS is designed to treat Boltzmann quantum solids, in which individual atoms are permanently associated with distinguishable crystal lattice sites and undergo large-amplitude zero-point motions around these sites. We demonstrate the capabilities of QSATS by using it to compute the total energy and potential energy of hexagonal close packed solid 4He at the density ρ=4.61421×10a0-3. Program summaryProgram title:QSATS Catalogue identifier: AEJE_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEJE_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7329 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 61 685 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77. Computer: QSATS should execute on any distributed parallel computing system that has the Message Passing Interface (MPI) [1] libraries installed. Operating system: Unix or Linux. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes, parallelized using MPI [1]. RAM: The memory requirements of QSATS depend on both the number of atoms in the crystal and the number of replicas in the variational path integral chain. For parameter sets A and C (described in the long write-up), approximately 4.5 Mbytes and 12 Mbytes, respectively, are required for data storage by QSATS (exclusive of the executable code). Classification: 7.7, 16.13. External routines: Message Passing Interface (MPI) [1] Nature of problem: QSATS simulates the quantum mechanical ground state for a monatomic crystal characterized by large-amplitude zero-point motions of individual (distinguishable) atoms around their nominal lattice sites. Solution method: QSATS employs

  16. Control of Quantum Echo and Bell State Swapping of Two Atomic Qubits in the Two-Mode Vacuum Field Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Juan; Luo, An; Peng, Zhao-Hui; Zhou, Bing-Ju; Liu, Ming-Wei; Jia, Chun-Xia; Jiang, Chun-Lei

    2016-11-01

    We investigate quantum echo control and Bell state swapping for two atomic qubits (TAQs) coupling to two-mode vacuum cavity field (TMVCF) environment via two-photon resonance. We discuss the effect of initial entanglement factor 𝜃 and relative coupling strength R= g 1/ g 2 on quantum state fidelity of TAQs, and analyze the relation between three kinds of quantum entanglement( C( ρ a ), C( ρ f ), S( ρ a )) and quantum state fidelity, then reveal physical essence of quantum echo of TAQs. It is shown that in the identical coupling case R=1, periodic quantum echo of TAQs with π cycle is always produced, and the value of fidelity can be controlled by choosing appropriate 𝜃 and atom-filed interaction time. In the non-identical coupling case R≠1, quantum echoes with periods of π, 2 π and 4 π can be formed respectively by adjusting R. The characteristics of quantum echo results from the non-Markovianity of TMVCF environment, and then we propose Bell state swapping scheme between TAQs and two-mode cavity field.

  17. Non-linear optics of coupled quantum dots and atomic systems with coherent control fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumba, Mambwe

    Presented herein is an investigation of quantum systems with coherent optical control fields. Three such systems are examined. The first consists of two dipole-dipole coupled quantum dots or dimers which behave as an effective three or four-level system whose susceptibility and hence transmissivity for an optical beam at some frequency may be switched on or off in response to a coherent control field. The second quantum system consists of a model cluster of three coupled dots that is shown to display light intermittency or blinking when irradiated by a coherent field. Results indicate that the observed variation in rate, intensity and duration of blinking times occasioned by the rare but observable rapid blinking at higher rate and intensity (superradiance) can be traced back to the groupings of states in different manifolds that the coupled system is capable of being found in at any given time. It is shown, however, that the experimentally observed blinking can not be entirely accounted for by dipole-dipole coupling alone. The third system investigated consists of Rubidium atoms in a cell placed in a ring cavity. A coherent control field drives the system. A mathematical model of the system is developed which consists of propagating a gaussian beam around the system and examining the output spectrum when a steady state value of the electromagnetic field is attained in the Rubidium cell. Some interesting features occurring in the output spectrum of the field at some cavity detuning are reproduced and match those experimentally observed.

  18. Recent developments in quantum Monte Carlo methods for electronic structure of atomic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitas, Lubos

    2004-03-01

    Recent developments of quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) for electronic structure calculations of clusters, other nanomaterials and quantum systems will be reviewed. QMC methodology is based on a combination of analytical insights about properties of exact wavefunctions, explicit treatment of electron-electron correlation and robustness of computational stochastic techniques. In the course of QMC development for calculations of real materials, small and medium size clusters proved to be invaluable systems both for testing and for revealing unique insights into electron correlation effects in nanostructured materials. The method shows remarkable accuracy which will be demonstrated on calculations of magnetic states of transition metal atoms encapsulated in silicon cluster cages, optical excitations in quantum nanodots and molecules and on studies of reactions in biomolecular metallic centers. Indeed, in some cases QMC turned out to be the only feasible method to provide the necessary accuracy. I will also discuss current QMC developments in using correlated sampling techniques for efficient evaluation of energy differences, efforts to reach beyond the fixed-node approximation and on incorporating QMC methods into multi-scale simulation approaches. In collaboration with P. Sen, L.K. Wagner, Z.M. Helms, M. Bajdich, G. Drobny, and J.C. Grossman. Supported by NSF, ONR and DARPA.

  19. Cu2O quantum dots emitting visible light grown by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min Young; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Park, Il-Kyu

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the fabrication of the Cu2O quantum dots (QDs) emitting a controlled wavelength in the visible spectral range prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Cu2O thin film layers formed on the Al2O3 surface showed large density of islands via Volmer-Weber growth mode, which resulting in QD formation. As the number of ALD cycles was increased from 60 to 480, the spatial density and mean diameter of the Cu2O QDs increased systematically from 4.02 × 1011/cm2 to 2.56×1012/cm2 and from 2.1 to 3.2 nm, respectively. The absorption spectral results indicated that the electron energy transition in the Cu2O QDs was a direct process with the optical band gaps decreasing from 2.71 to 2.15 eV with increasing QD size from 2.1 to 3.2 nm because of the quantum confinement effect. The Cu2O QDs showed broad emission peaks composed of multiple elementary emission spectra corresponding to the Cu2O QD ensembles with a different size distribution. As the size of Cu2O QDs decreased, the shoulder peaks at the higher energy side developed due to the quantum confinement effect.

  20. Atomic quantum simulation of a three-dimensional U(1) gauge-Higgs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuno, Yoshihito; Sakane, Shinya; Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Ichinose, Ikuo; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we study theoretically atomic quantum simulations of a U(1) gauge-Higgs model on a three-dimensional (3D) spatial lattice by using an extended Bose-Hubbard model with intersite repulsions on a 3D optical lattice. Here, the phase and density fluctuations of the boson variable on each site of the optical lattice describe the vector potential and the electric field on each link of the gauge-model lattice, respectively. The target gauge model is different from the standard Wilson-type U(1) gauge-Higgs model because it has plaquette and Higgs interactions with asymmetric couplings in the space-time directions. Nevertheless, the corresponding quantum simulation is still important as it provides us with a platform to study unexplored time-dependent phenomena characteristic of each phase in the general gauge-Higgs models. To determine the phase diagram of the gauge-Higgs model at zero temperature, we perform Monte Carlo simulations of the corresponding 3+1-dimensional U(1) gauge-Higgs model, and obtain the confinement and Higgs phases. To investigate the dynamical properties of the gauge-Higgs model, we apply the Gross-Pitaevskii equations to the extended Bose-Hubbard model. We simulate the time evolution of an electric flux that initially is put on a straight line connecting two external point charges. We also calculate the potential energy between this pair of charges and obtain the string tension in the confinement phase. Finally, we propose a feasible experimental setup for the atomic simulations of this quantum gauge-Higgs model on the 3D optical lattice. These results may serve as theoretical guides for future experiments.

  1. Nanofabrication for On-Chip Optical Levitation, Atom-Trapping, and Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norte, Richard Alexander

    a final value of Qm = 5.8(1.1) x 105, representing more than an order of magnitude improvement over the conventional limits of SiO2 for a pendulum geometry. Our technique may enable new opportunities for mechanical sensing and facilitate observations of quantum behavior in this class of mechanical systems. We then give a detailed overview of the techniques used to produce high-aspect-ratio nanostructures with applications in a wide range of quantum optics experiments. The ability to fabricate such nanodevices with high precision opens the door to a vast array of experiments which integrate macroscopic optical setups with lithographically engineered nanodevices. Coupled with atom-trapping experiments in the Kimble Lab, we use these techniques to realize a new waveguide chip designed to address ultra-cold atoms along lithographically patterned nanobeams which have large atom-photon coupling and near 4pi Steradian optical access for cooling and trapping atoms. We describe a fully integrated and scalable design where cold atoms are spatially overlapped with the nanostring cavities in order to observe a resonant optical depth of d0 ≈ 0.15. The nanodevice illuminates new possibilities for integrating atoms into photonic circuits and engineering quantum states of atoms and light on a microscopic scale. We then describe our work with superconducting microwave resonators coupled to a phononic cavity towards the goal of building an integrated device for quantum-limited microwave-to-optical wavelength conversion. We give an overview of our characterizations of several types of substrates for fabricating a low-loss high-frequency electromechanical system. We describe our electromechanical system fabricated on a SiN membrane which consists of a 12 GHz superconducting LC resonator coupled capacitively to the high frequency localized modes of a phononic nanobeam. Using our suspended membrane geometry we isolate our system from substrates with significant loss tangents

  2. Million Atom Pseudopotential Manybody Theory of Electronic Structure and Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunger, Alex

    2003-03-01

    Semiconductor Quantum Dots that are of sufficient structural quality (good crystallinity, surface passivation, size uniformity) to produce ultra sharp spectroscopic lines worthy of a detailed theoretical effort tend to be rather BIG, containing thousands to million atoms. Yet, in this size regime, the only theoretical methods available are effective-mass based, particle-in-a-box approaches, that neglect multi-band and inter-valley coupling, leading to significant qualitative errors.(A. Zunger,Phys. Stat. Sol. (a) 190), 467 (2002). While LDA-based methods are capable of solving the Single-Particle problem even for ˜1,000 atom dots, the all important many-body problem can be currently addressed only for considerably smaller dots. I will present here a computational alternative which addresses both the single-particle and the Manybody parts of the problem for 10^3 to 10^6 atom dots .The method is applicable both to ``free Standing" (e.g. colloidal) dots of CdSe, InP, InAs and Si, as well as to the strained, ``self-assembled" epitaxial dots of, e.g., InGaAs/GaAs. It is based on a ``Linear Combination of Bulk Bands" (LCBB) approach that expands the dot states in terms of plane wave based (pseudopotential) Bloch states throughout the Brillouin zone. The manybody part is treated via Configuration Interaction. I will illustrate how this method addresses some of the recent striking experimental observations on semiconductor quantum dots:(i) Scaling laws for band gaps and exchange interactions (ii) Rapid Auger transitions in colloidal dots (iii) Coulomb Blocade and Spin Blockade in colloidal dots (iv) Charged Excitons (e.g. Trions) in Self-assembled dots, and (v) excitonic Fine-Structure in self assembled dots.

  3. Regular and Chaotic Quantum Dynamics of Two-Level Atoms in a Selfconsistent Radiation Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konkov, L. E.; Prants, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    Dynamics of two-level atoms interacting with their own radiation field in a single-mode high-quality resonator is considered. The dynamical system consists of two second-order differential equations, one for the atomic SU(2) dynamical-group parameter and another for the field strength. With the help of the maximal Lyapunov exponent for this set, we numerically investigate transitions from regularity to deterministic quantum chaos in such a simple model. Increasing the collective coupling constant b is identical with 8(pi)N(sub 0)(d(exp 2))/hw, we observed for initially unexcited atoms a usual sharp transition to chaos at b(sub c) approx. equal to 1. If we take the dimensionless individual Rabi frequency a = Omega/2w as a control parameter, then a sequence of order-to-chaos transitions has been observed starting with the critical value a(sub c) approx. equal to 0.25 at the same initial conditions.

  4. The Optical Properties of CdSe Quantum Dots by Using Spray-Atomization Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmani, C. H.; Abdullah, S.; Rusop, M.

    2013-06-01

    Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs) is inorganic material by using spray-atomization method which is the novelty to find out the optical properties for the CdSe QDs. The Selenium (Se) precursor and Cadmium (Cd) precursor were prepared first. Se precursor by using sodium sulfite aqueous was mixed with selenium (Se) powder. For Cd precursor was used cadmium chloride (CdCI) as the Cd precursor. From previous research, CdSe QDs was obtained by using capping agent such as tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) and trioctylphosphine (TOP). These capping agent are hazardous to environment and human. By using spray-atomization method it is more safe and economically. The photoluminescence (PL) was used to investigate the optical properties and to investigate the energy band gap from PL result. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) was used to know the surface morphology of CdSe QDs. By PL result, the energy band gap was calculate and the comparison was investigate between the size of particle and the energy band gap. This important in this paper is to investigate the optical properties of CdSe QDs by using sprays-atomization method and to relate with the particle size.

  5. Non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Avijit; Ray, Debasis

    2015-03-01

    The non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by the bound valence electron in the ground state 3s of atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas is investigated theoretically. The incident photon energy is assumed to be much smaller than the 3s-3p excitation energy. The alkali atom sodium is first formulated as an effective one-electron problem in which the attractive interaction between the valence electron and the atomic ion core is simulated by a spherically symmetric model potential. The Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential model is then used to mimic the effective two-body (valence-core) interaction within quantum plasmas. Non-relativistic calculations performed within the electric dipole approximation indicate that the non-resonant elastic photon scattering cross-section undergoes a dramatic growth by several orders of magnitude as the quantum wave number increases. A qualitative explanation of this phenomenon is presented. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, a similar growth is observed at larger values of the quantum wave number. Our computed relevant atomic data are in very good agreement with the experimental as well as the previous theoretical data for the zero-screening (free atom) case, and with the very limited, accurate theoretical results available for the case of exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction, without the cosine screening term.

  6. Non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Avijit Ray, Debasis

    2015-03-15

    The non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by the bound valence electron in the ground state 3s of atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas is investigated theoretically. The incident photon energy is assumed to be much smaller than the 3s-3p excitation energy. The alkali atom sodium is first formulated as an effective one-electron problem in which the attractive interaction between the valence electron and the atomic ion core is simulated by a spherically symmetric model potential. The Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential model is then used to mimic the effective two-body (valence-core) interaction within quantum plasmas. Non-relativistic calculations performed within the electric dipole approximation indicate that the non-resonant elastic photon scattering cross-section undergoes a dramatic growth by several orders of magnitude as the quantum wave number increases. A qualitative explanation of this phenomenon is presented. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, a similar growth is observed at larger values of the quantum wave number. Our computed relevant atomic data are in very good agreement with the experimental as well as the previous theoretical data for the zero-screening (free atom) case, and with the very limited, accurate theoretical results available for the case of exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction, without the cosine screening term.

  7. Femtosecond two-photon photoassociation of hot magnesium atoms: A quantum dynamical study using thermal random phase wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Amaran, Saieswari; Kosloff, Ronnie; Tomza, Michał; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Pawłowski, Filip; Moszynski, Robert; Rybak, Leonid; Levin, Liat; Amitay, Zohar; Berglund, J. Martin; Reich, Daniel M.; Koch, Christiane P.

    2013-10-28

    Two-photon photoassociation of hot magnesium atoms by femtosecond laser pulses, creating electronically excited magnesium dimer molecules, is studied from first principles, combining ab initio quantum chemistry and molecular quantum dynamics. This theoretical framework allows for rationalizing the generation of molecular rovibrational coherence from thermally hot atoms [L. Rybak, S. Amaran, L. Levin, M. Tomza, R. Moszynski, R. Kosloff, C. P. Koch, and Z. Amitay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 273001 (2011)]. Random phase thermal wavefunctions are employed to model the thermal ensemble of hot colliding atoms. Comparing two different choices of basis functions, random phase wavefunctions built from eigenstates are found to have the fastest convergence for the photoassociation yield. The interaction of the colliding atoms with a femtosecond laser pulse is modeled non-perturbatively to account for strong-field effects.

  8. Correlated input-port, matter-wave interferometer: Quantum-noise limits to the atom-laser gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Jonathan P.

    1998-06-01

    I derive the quantum phase-noise limit to the sensitivity of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in which the incident quantum particles enter via both input ports. I show that if the incident particles are entangled and correlated properly, then the phase sensitivity scales asymptotically like the Heisenberg-limited Δφ=O(1/N), for large N, where N is the number of particles incident per unit time. (In a one-input-port device, the sensitivity can be at best Δφ=1/N.) My calculation applies to bosons or fermions of arbitrary integer or half-integer spin. Applications to optical, atom-beam, and atom-laser gyroscopes are discussed-in particular, an atom-laser can be used to obtain the required entanglements for achieving this Heisenberg-limited sensitivity with atomic matter waves.

  9. Atomic quantum simulation of the lattice gauge-Higgs model: Higgs couplings and emergence of exact local gauge symmetry.

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Ichinose, Ikuo; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2013-09-13

    Recently, the possibility of quantum simulation of dynamical gauge fields was pointed out by using a system of cold atoms trapped on each link in an optical lattice. However, to implement exact local gauge invariance, fine-tuning the interaction parameters among atoms is necessary. In the present Letter, we study the effect of violation of the U(1) local gauge invariance by relaxing the fine-tuning of the parameters and showing that a wide variety of cold atoms is still a faithful quantum simulator for a U(1) gauge-Higgs model containing a Higgs field sitting on sites. The clarification of the dynamics of this gauge-Higgs model sheds some light upon various unsolved problems, including the inflation process of the early Universe. We study the phase structure of this model by Monte Carlo simulation and also discuss the atomic characteristics of the Higgs phase in each simulator.

  10. Topology, Localization, and Quantum Information in Atomic, Molecular and Optical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-07

    manipulation of individual quanta can also enable the bottom-up construction of quantum devices. To this end, this thesis also describes blueprints for a room-temperature quantum computer, quantum credit cards and nanoscale quantum thermometry.

  11. Quantum yield of chlorine-atom formation in the photodissociation of chlorine peroxide (ClOOCl) at 308 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, M. J.; Colussi, A. J.; Molina, L. T.; Schindler, R. N.; Tso, T.-L.

    1990-01-01

    The production of Cl atoms in the laser flash photolysis of ClOOCl at 308 nm has been investigated by time-resolved atomic resonance fluorescence at 235 K. A value of phi = 1.03 +/-0.12 has been obtained for the primary quantum yield based on an absorption cross section ratio sigma(245)/phi(308) = 22 for ClOOCl at 245 and 308 nm.

  12. Robustness of fractional quantum Hall states with dipolar atoms in artificial gauge fields

    SciTech Connect

    Grass, T.; Baranov, M. A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2011-10-15

    The robustness of fractional quantum Hall states is measured as the energy gap separating the Laughlin ground state from excitations. Using thermodynamic approximations for the correlation functions of the Laughlin state and the quasihole state, we evaluate the gap in a two-dimensional system of dipolar atoms exposed to an artificial gauge field. For Abelian fields, our results agree well with the results of exact diagonalization for small systems but indicate that the large value of the gap predicted [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 070404 (2005)] was overestimated. However, we are able to show that the small gap found in the Abelian scenario dramatically increases if we turn to non-Abelian fields squeezing the Landau levels.

  13. Quantum turbulence—from superfluid helium to atomic Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Makoto

    2009-04-01

    This paper reviews recent developments in the physics of quantum turbulence (QT). QT was discovered in superfluid 4He in the 1950s, while the research has taken a new direction since the middle of the 1990s. QT is comprised of quantized vortices that are definite topological defects and expected to give a prototype of turbulence much simpler than usual classical turbulence. We give a general introduction and brief review of classical turbulence followed by a description of the dynamics of quantized vortices. After mentioning the modern research trends in QT, we discuss the energy spectra, the energy cascade and the possible dissipation mechanism of QT at very low temperatures. The last part is devoted to QT in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates.

  14. Electro-Optic Quantum Memory for Light Using Two-Level Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hétet, G.; Longdell, J. J.; Alexander, A. L.; Lam, P. K.; Sellars, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    We present a simple quantum memory scheme that allows for the storage of a light field in an ensemble of two-level atoms. The technique is analogous to the NMR gradient echo for which the imprinting and recalling of the input field are performed by controlling a linearly varying broadening. Our protocol is perfectly efficient in the limit of high optical depths and the output pulse is emitted in the forward direction. We provide a numerical analysis of the protocol together with an experiment performed in a solid state system. In close agreement with our model, the experiment shows a total efficiency of up to 15%, and a recall efficiency of 26%. We suggest simple realizable improvements for the experiment to surpass the no-cloning limit.

  15. Quantum size effects in TiO2 thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chittaranjan; Schmeisser, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Summary We study the atomic layer deposition of TiO2 by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Ti precursor, titanium isopropoxide, was used in combination with H2O on Si/SiO2 substrates that were heated at 200 °C. The low growth rate (0.15 Å/cycle) and the in situ characterization permitted to follow changes in the electronic structure of TiO2 in the sub-nanometer range, which are influenced by quantum size effects. The modified electronic properties may play an important role in charge carrier transport and separation, and increase the efficiency of energy conversion systems. PMID:24605275

  16. Magnetically tuned, robust and efficient filtering system for spatially multimode quantum memory in warm atomic vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dąbrowski, M.; Chrapkiewicz, R.; Wasilewski, W.

    2016-11-01

    Warm atomic vapor quantum memories are simple and robust, yet suffer from a number of parasitic processes which produce excess noise. For operating in a single-photon regime precise filtering of the output light is essential. Here, we report a combination of magnetically tuned absorption and Faraday filters, both light-direction insensitive, which stop the driving lasers and attenuate spurious fluorescence and four-wave mixing while transmitting narrowband Stokes and anti-Stokes photons generated in write-in and readout processes. We characterize both filters with respect to adjustable working parameters. We demonstrate a significant increase in the signal-to-noise ratio upon applying the filters seen qualitatively in measurements of correlation between the Raman scattered photons.

  17. Confinement and Lattice Quantum-Electrodynamic Electric Flux Tubes Simulated with Ultracold Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zohar, Erez; Reznik, Benni

    2011-12-30

    We propose a method for simulating (2+1)D compact lattice quantum-electrodynamics, using ultracold atoms in optical lattices. In our model local Bose-Einstein condensates' (BECs) phases correspond to the electromagnetic vector potential, and the local number operators represent the conjugate electric field. The well-known gauge-invariant Kogut-Susskind Hamiltonian is obtained as an effective low-energy theory. The field is then coupled to external static charges. We show that in the strong coupling limit this gives rise to ''electric flux tubes'' and to confinement. This can be observed by measuring the local density deviations of the BECs, and is expected to hold even, to some extent, outside the perturbative calculable regime.

  18. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in atomic crystal layers from in-plane magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yafei; Zeng, Junjie; Deng, Xinzhou; Yang, Fei; Pan, Hui; Qiao, Zhenhua

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically demonstrate that with in-plane magnetization, the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) can be realized in two-dimensional atomic crystal layers with preserved inversion symmetry but broken out-of-plane mirror reflection symmetry. By taking the honeycomb lattice system as an example, we find that the low-buckled structure satisfying the symmetry criteria is crucial to induce QAHE. The topologically nontrivial bulk gap carrying a Chern number of C =±1 opens in the vicinity of the saddle points M , where the band dispersion exhibits strong anisotropy. We further show that the QAHE with electrically tunable Chern number can be achieved in Bernal-stacked multilayer systems, and the applied interlayer potential differences can dramatically decrease the critical magnetization to make the QAHE experimentally feasible.

  19. Atomic-Scale Visualization of Quantum Interference on a Weyl Semimetal Surface by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Xu, Su-Yang; Bian, Guang; Guo, Cheng; Chang, Guoqing; Sanchez, Daniel S; Belopolski, Ilya; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shin-Ming; Zhang, Xiao; Sankar, Raman; Alidoust, Nasser; Chang, Tay-Rong; Wu, Fan; Neupert, Titus; Chou, Fangcheng; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Yao, Nan; Bansil, Arun; Jia, Shuang; Lin, Hsin; Hasan, M Zahid

    2016-01-26

    Weyl semimetals may open a new era in condensed matter physics, materials science, and nanotechnology after graphene and topological insulators. We report the first atomic scale view of the surface states of a Weyl semimetal (NbP) using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy. We observe coherent quantum interference patterns that arise from the scattering of quasiparticles near point defects on the surface. The measurements reveal the surface electronic structure both below and above the chemical potential in both real and reciprocal spaces. Moreover, the interference maps uncover the scattering processes of NbP's exotic surface states. Through comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations, we further discover that the orbital and/or spin texture of the surface bands may suppress certain scattering channels on NbP. These results provide a comprehensive understanding of electronic properties on Weyl semimetal surfaces.

  20. Long term operation of high quantum efficiency GaAs(Cs,O) photocathodes using multiple recleaning by atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, D. A.; Krantz, C.; Wolf, A.; Jaroshevich, A. S.; Kosolobov, S. N.; Scheibler, H. E.; Terekhov, A. S.

    2009-09-01

    Atomic hydrogen, produced by thermal dissociation of H2 molecules inside a hot tungsten capillary, is shown to be an efficient tool for multiple recleaning of degraded surfaces of high quantum efficiency transmission-mode GaAs photocathodes within an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) multichamber photoelectron gun. Ultraviolet quantum yield photoemission spectroscopy has been used to study the removal of surface pollutants and the degraded (Cs,O)-activation layer during the cleaning procedure. For photocathodes grown by the liquid-phase epitaxy technique, the quantum efficiency is found to be stable at about 20% over a large number of atomic hydrogen cleaning cycles. A slow degradation of the quantum efficiency is observed for photocathodes grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, although they reached a higher initial quantum efficiency of about 30%-35%. Study of the spatial distributions of photoluminescence intensity on these photocathodes proved that this overall degradation is likely due to insertion of a dislocation network into the mechanically strained photocathode heterostructures during multiple heating cycles and is not due to the atomic hydrogen treatment itself.

  1. Identifying Student and Teacher Difficulties in Interpreting Atomic Spectra Using a Quantum Model of Emission and Absorption of Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two…

  2. The Journey from Classical to Quantum Thinking: An Analysis of Student Understanding through the Lens of Atomic Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Sandhya Kolla

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation aims to explore how students think about atomic absorption and emission of light in the area of introductory quantum chemistry. In particular, the impact of classical ideas of electron position and energy on student understanding of spectra is studied. The analysis was undertaken to discover how student learning can be…

  3. Generation of single photons with highly tunable wave shape from a cold atomic quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Georg; Farrera, Pau; Albrecht, Boris; de Riedmatten, Hugues; Ho, Melvyn; Chavez, Matias; Teo, Colin; Sangouard, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    We report on a single photon source with highly tunable photon shape based on a cold ensemble of Rubidium atoms. We follow the DLCZ scheme to implement an emissive quantum memory, which can be operated as a photon pair source with controllable delay. We find that the temporal wave shape of the emitted read photon can be precisely controlled by changing the shape of the driving read pulse. We generate photons with temporal durations varying over three orders of magnitude up to 10 μs without a significant change of the read-out efficiency. We prove the non-classicality of the emitted photons by measuring their antibunching, showing near single photon behavior at low excitation probabilities. We also show that the photons are emitted in a pure state by measuring unconditional autocorrelation functions. Finally, to demonstrate the usability of the source for realistic applications, we create ultra-long single photons with a rising exponential or doubly peaked time-bin wave shape which are important for several quantum information tasks. ICREA-Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, Barcelona, Spain.

  4. Atomic layer deposition of quantum-confined ZnO nanostructures.

    PubMed

    King, David M; Johnson, Samantha I; Li, Jianhua; Du, Xiaohua; Liang, Xinhua; Weimer, Alan W

    2009-05-13

    The modulation of optoelectronic properties, such as the bandgap of a pure-component semiconductor material, is a useful ability that can be achieved by few techniques. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used here to experimentally demonstrate the ability to deposit films that exhibit quantum confinement on three-dimensional surfaces. Polycrystalline ZnO films ranging from approximately 1.5 to 15 nm in thickness were deposited via ALD using diethylzinc and hydrogen peroxide at 100 degrees C. Conformal, pinhole-free films were deposited on Si wafers and on nanosized spherical SiO(2) particles using an augmented central composite design strategy. Powder x-ray diffraction was used to measure the crystallite size of the films and monitor size evolution on the basis of the number of ALD cycles and thermal annealing post-treatments. The absorbance of the ZnO films on Si wafers and SiO(2) particles was measured using spectroscopic ellipsometry and diffuse transmittance techniques, respectively. Post-deposition annealing steps increased the crystallite size of the films, independently of the coating thickness. The ZnO bandgap was increasingly blue-shifted for films of decreasing crystallite size, approaching +0.3 eV at dimensions of 2-3 nm. The nonlinear bandgap response correlated well with the Brus model. This work represents an experimental demonstration of quantum confinement using ALD on two- and three-dimensional substrates.

  5. Ultrafast quantum nondemolition measurement based on diamond-shaped artificial atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küng, Bruno; Dumur, Etienne; Diniz, Igor; Feofanov, Alexey; Weissl, Thomas; Naud, Cécile; Guichard, Wiebke; Auffèves, Alexia; Buisson, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of a quantum nondemolition readout scheme based on a superconducting artificial atom with two internal degrees of freedom. In comparison with the most widely employed readout scheme for superconducting qubits, the dispersive readout in a circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture, our approach promises a significantly stronger measurement signal. This should allow for a high-fidelity readout in a single shot. Our device consists of two transmons (i.e., small capacitively shunted Josephson junctions) coupled via a large inductance. The resulting circuit exhibits a symmetric and an antisymmetric oscillation which we use as a logical and ancilla qubit, respectively. The Josephson non-linearity leads to a cross-Kerr-like coupling of the two oscillations. This allows us to read out the logical qubit state by measuring the ancilla qubit frequency. To measure the ancilla qubit frequency, we couple it to a superconducting microwave resonator, allowing for a large amplitude and a fast response of the transmitted microwave signal. At the same time, the logical qubit remains weakly coupled and far detuned from the resonator, preventing qubit relaxation due to the Purcell effect.

  6. Atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effects determine infrared CH intensities of hydrocarbons: a quantum theory of atoms in molecules model.

    PubMed

    Silva, Arnaldo F; Richter, Wagner E; Meneses, Helen G C; Bruns, Roy E

    2014-11-14

    Atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effects determine most of the infrared fundamental CH intensities of simple hydrocarbons, methane, ethylene, ethane, propyne, cyclopropane and allene. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules/charge-charge flux-dipole flux model predicted the values of 30 CH intensities ranging from 0 to 123 km mol(-1) with a root mean square (rms) error of only 4.2 km mol(-1) without including a specific equilibrium atomic charge term. Sums of the contributions from terms involving charge flux and/or dipole flux averaged 20.3 km mol(-1), about ten times larger than the average charge contribution of 2.0 km mol(-1). The only notable exceptions are the CH stretching and bending intensities of acetylene and two of the propyne vibrations for hydrogens bound to sp hybridized carbon atoms. Calculations were carried out at four quantum levels, MP2/6-311++G(3d,3p), MP2/cc-pVTZ, QCISD/6-311++G(3d,3p) and QCISD/cc-pVTZ. The results calculated at the QCISD level are the most accurate among the four with root mean square errors of 4.7 and 5.0 km mol(-1) for the 6-311++G(3d,3p) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. These values are close to the estimated aggregate experimental error of the hydrocarbon intensities, 4.0 km mol(-1). The atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effect is much larger than the charge effect for the results of all four quantum levels. Charge transfer-counter polarization effects are expected to also be important in vibrations of more polar molecules for which equilibrium charge contributions can be large.

  7. Determining the quantum-coherent to semiclassical transition in atomic-scale quasi-one-dimensional metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Bent; Simmons, Michelle Y.

    2016-08-01

    Atomic-scale silicon wires, patterned by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and degenerately doped with phosphorus (P), have attracted significant interest owing to their exceptionally low resistivity and semiclassical Ohmic conduction at temperatures as low as T =4.2 K . Here, we investigate the transition from semiclassical diffusive to quantum-coherent conduction in a 4.6 nm wide wire as we decrease the measurement temperature. By analyzing the temperature dependence of universal conductance fluctuations (UCFs) and one-dimensional (1D) weak localization (WL)—fundamental manifestations of quantum-coherent transport in quasi-1D metals—we show that transport evolves from quantum coherent to semiclassical at T ˜4 K . Remarkably, our study confirms that universal concepts of mesoscopic physics such as UCF and 1D WL retain their validity in quasi-1D metallic conductors down to the atomic scale.

  8. Hydrogen atom in a quantum plasma environment under the influence of Aharonov-Bohm flux and electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falaye, Babatunde James; Sun, Guo-Hua; Silva-Ortigoza, Ramón; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the confinement influences of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux and electric and magnetic fields directed along the z axis and encircled by quantum plasmas on the hydrogen atom. The all-inclusive effects result in a strongly attractive system while the localizations of quantum levels change and the eigenvalues decrease. We find that the combined effect of the fields is stronger than a solitary effect and consequently there is a substantial shift in the bound state energy of the system. We also find that to perpetuate a low-energy medium for the hydrogen atom in quantum plasmas, a strong electric field and weak magnetic field are required, whereas the AB flux field can be used as a regulator. The application of the perturbation technique utilized in this paper is not restricted to plasma physics; it can also be applied in molecular physics.

  9. Hydrogen atom in a quantum plasma environment under the influence of Aharonov-Bohm flux and electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Falaye, Babatunde James; Sun, Guo-Hua; Silva-Ortigoza, Ramón; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the confinement influences of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux and electric and magnetic fields directed along the z axis and encircled by quantum plasmas on the hydrogen atom. The all-inclusive effects result in a strongly attractive system while the localizations of quantum levels change and the eigenvalues decrease. We find that the combined effect of the fields is stronger than a solitary effect and consequently there is a substantial shift in the bound state energy of the system. We also find that to perpetuate a low-energy medium for the hydrogen atom in quantum plasmas, a strong electric field and weak magnetic field are required, whereas the AB flux field can be used as a regulator. The application of the perturbation technique utilized in this paper is not restricted to plasma physics; it can also be applied in molecular physics.

  10. A New One-dimensional Quantum Material - Ta2Pd3Se8 Atomic Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue; Liu, Jinyu; Hu, Jin; Yue, Chunlei; Mao, Zhiqiang; Wei, Jiang; Antipina, Liubov; Sorokin, Pavel; Sanchez, Ana

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotube, there has been a persistent effort to search for other one dimensional (1D) quantum systems. However, only a few examples have been found. We report a new 1D example - semiconducting Ta2Pd3Se8. We demonstrate that the Ta2Pd3Se8 nanowire as thin as 1.3nm can be easily obtained by applying simple mechanical exfoliation from its bulk counterpart. High resolution TEM shows an intrinsic 1D chain-like crystalline morphology on these nano wires, indicating weak bonding between these atomic chains. Theoretical calculation shows a direct bandgap structure, which evolves from 0.53eV in the bulk to 1.04eV in single atomic chain. The field effect transistor based on Ta2Pd3Se8 nanowire achieved a promising performance with 104On/Off ratio and 80 cm2V-1s-1 mobility. Low temperature transport study reflects two different mechanisms, variable range hopping and thermal activation, which dominate the transport properties at different temperature regimes. Ta2Pd3Se8 nanowire provides an intrinsic 1D material system for the study low dimensional condensed matter physics.

  11. Multiphoton amplification processes and quantum-path interferences in a coherently driven atomic vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Soler, J.J.; Font, J.L.; Vilaseca, R.; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Kul'minskii, A.

    2003-10-01

    We develop a theoretical model of two-photon amplification in laser-driven potassium atoms and use it to analyze the recent experiments reported by Pfister et al. [Phys. Rev. A 60, R4249 (1999)]. The model takes into account most of the essential factors influencing the amplification process, including the atomic hyperfine structure (which makes multiphoton emission possible) and the simultaneous interaction with intense drive and probe beams with arbitrary detunings. We determine the origin and analyze the properties of different multiphoton gain resonances that appear in the light-matter interaction. In particular, the influence of the drive and probe field amplitudes and detunings on the strength and frequency of the two-photon amplification resonance is studied in detail, showing clearly the differences with respect to the behavior of single-photon or other multiphoton amplification processes. In addition, we investigate interferences between different quantum pathways originating from the hyperfine structure and determine the conditions under which they can enhance or suppress multiphoton resonances. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with the observations, indicating that it can be used to understand recent experiments on two-photon lasing reported by Pfister et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 4512 (2001)].

  12. Auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo with a localized basis--applications to atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saidi, Wissam A.; Zhang, Shiwei; Krakauer, Henry

    2006-03-01

    We extended the recently introduced phaseless auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo approach [1] to any single-particle basis, and applied it to study atoms and molecules using localized Gaussian basis. This method maps the interacting many-body problem into a linear combination of non-interacting problems using a complex Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation, and controls the phase/sign problem using a trial wave function. It employs a random walk approach in Slater determinant space to project the many-body ground state of the system. The computational cost scales as a low power of system size. In all of the presented results the trial wave function was from a Hartree-Fock calculation. The obtained total energies of the atoms and molecules agree to within a few milli Hartrees with the exact value from full configuration interaction or density matrix renormalization group. The results are comparable in accuracy to those of CCSD(T) for equilibrium geometries but are superior for bond breaking. [1] S. Zhang and H. Krakauer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 136401 (2003).

  13. Quantum molecular dynamics study of expanded beryllium: evolution from warm dense matter to atomic fluid.

    PubMed

    Li, Dafang; Liu, Haitao; Zeng, Siliang; Wang, Cong; Wu, Zeqing; Zhang, Ping; Yan, Jun

    2014-07-31

    By performing quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, we investigate the equation of states, electrical and optical properties of the expanded beryllium at densities two to one-hundred lower than the normal solid density, and temperatures ranging from 5000 to 30000 K. With decreasing the density of Be, the optical response evolves from the one characteristic of a simple metal to the one of an atomic fluid. By fitting the optical conductivity spectra with the Drude-Smith model, it is found that the conducting electrons become localized at lower densities. In addition, the negative derivative of the electrical resistivity on temperature at density about eight lower than the normal solid density demonstrates that the metal to nonmetal transition takes place in the expanded Be. To interpret this transition, the electronic density of states is analyzed systematically. Furthermore, a direct comparison of the Rosseland opacity obtained by using QMD and the standard opacity code demonstrates that QMD provides a powerful tool to validate plasma models used in atomic physics approaches in the warm dense matter regime.

  14. Full quantum mechanical analysis of atomic three-grating Mach–Zehnder interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, A.S.; Davidović, M.; Božić, M.

    2015-02-15

    Atomic three-grating Mach–Zehnder interferometry constitutes an important tool to probe fundamental aspects of the quantum theory. There is, however, a remarkable gap in the literature between the oversimplified models and robust numerical simulations considered to describe the corresponding experiments. Consequently, the former usually lead to paradoxical scenarios, such as the wave–particle dual behavior of atoms, while the latter make difficult the data analysis in simple terms. Here these issues are tackled by means of a simple grating working model consisting of evenly-spaced Gaussian slits. As is shown, this model suffices to explore and explain such experiments both analytically and numerically, giving a good account of the full atomic journey inside the interferometer, and hence contributing to make less mystic the physics involved. More specifically, it provides a clear and unambiguous picture of the wavefront splitting that takes place inside the interferometer, illustrating how the momentum along each emerging diffraction order is well defined even though the wave function itself still displays a rather complex shape. To this end, the local transverse momentum is also introduced in this context as a reliable analytical tool. The splitting, apart from being a key issue to understand atomic Mach–Zehnder interferometry, also demonstrates at a fundamental level how wave and particle aspects are always present in the experiment, without incurring in any contradiction or interpretive paradox. On the other hand, at a practical level, the generality and versatility of the model and methodology presented, makes them suitable to attack analogous problems in a simple manner after a convenient tuning. - Highlights: • A simple model is proposed to analyze experiments based on atomic Mach–Zehnder interferometry. • The model can be easily handled both analytically and computationally. • A theoretical analysis based on the combination of the position and

  15. Quantum dynamics of an excited alkali atom in a noble gas cluster: lithium attached to a helium cluster.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Thorndyke, Brian; Reyes, Andrés; Micha, David A

    2007-12-28

    An alkali atom-noble gas cluster system is considered as a model for solvation effects in optical spectra, within a quantum-classical description based on the density operator of a many-atom system and its partial Wigner transform. This leads to an eikonal-time-dependent molecular orbital treatment suitable for a time-dependent description of the coupling of light emission and atom dynamics in terms of the time-dependent electric dipole of the whole system. As an application, we consider an optically excited lithium atom as the dopant in a helium cluster at 0.5 K. We describe the motions of the excited Li atom interacting with a cluster of He atoms and calculate the time-dependent electric dipole of the Li-He(99) system during the dynamics. The electronic Hamiltonian is taken as a sum of three-body Li-He diatomic potentials including electronic polarization and repulsion, with l-dependent atomic pseudopotentials for Li and He, while we use a modified pair potential for He-He. The calculations involve the coupling of 12 quantum states with 300 classical degrees of freedom. We present results for the dynamics and spectra of a Li atom interacting with a model cluster surface of He atoms and also interacting with a droplet of He. We have found that the Li atom is attracted or repulsed from the He surface, depending on the orientation of its 2p orbitals. The spectra and dynamics of Li inside and at the surface of a cluster are found to be strongly dependent on its electronic states, its velocity direction, and whether light is present during emission or not.

  16. Cold Atomic Fermi Gases: Effective Interactions and Quantum Monte Carlo Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbreth, Christopher Newman

    Cold atomic Fermi gases are clean, highly experimentally tunable systems with connections to many different fields of physics. However, in the strongly-interacting regime they are nonperturbative and difficult to study theoretically. One challenge is to calculate the energy spectra of few-body cold atom systems along the crossover from a gas of molecular dimers [the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) regime] to a gas described by Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory. The configuration-interaction (CI) method is widely used for such problems, but the finite model spaces employed require carefully chosen interactions with good convergence characteristics. Here we study a recently introduced effective interaction for the unitary Fermi gas in the CI approach, extending it to the BEC-BCS crossover and examining its properties analytically and numerically. We find it exhibits fast convergence, which allows us to accurately calculate the low-lying energy spectrum of three- and four-particle systems along the crossover. For larger systems of cold atoms, the superfluid phase transition is a subject of principal interest, but is still incompletely understood. Realistic ab initio calculations of the heat capacity across the superfluid phase transition have not to date been achieved, and the nature of the pseudogap effect in the unitary regime is still a subject of debate. Here we apply the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFMC) method to shed light on the superfluid phase transition by studying a finite-size unitary trapped gas in the canonical ensemble. The AFMC method permits fully nonperturbative calculations without introducing uncontrolled approximations, but can be computationally intensive. Our calculations are made feasible by introducing a new stabilization technique to improve the scaling of the method with the size of the single-particle model space. Applying this method, we present new results concerning the signatures of the superfluid phase transition and

  17. New power source from fractional quantum energy levels of atomic hydrogen that surpasses internal combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, R. L.; Ray, P.; Dhandapani, B.; Nansteel, M.; Chen, X.; He, J.

    2002-12-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscopy was recorded on microwave discharges of helium with 2% hydrogen. Novel emission lines were observed with energies of q·13.6 eV where q=1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9, or 11 or these lines inelastically scattered by helium atoms wherein 21.2 eV was absorbed in the excitation of He (1s 2) to He (1s 12p 1). These lines were identified as hydrogen transitions to electronic energy levels below the 'ground' state corresponding to fractional quantum numbers. Significant line broadening corresponding to an average hydrogen atom temperature of 33-38 eV was observed for helium-hydrogen discharge plasmas; whereas pure hydrogen showed no excessive broadening corresponding to an average hydrogen atom temperature of ≈3 eV. Since a significant increase in H temperature was observed with helium-hydrogen discharge plasmas, and energetic hydrino lines were observed at short wavelengths in the corresponding microwave plasmas that required a very significant reaction rate due to low photon detection efficiency in this region, the power balance was measured on the helium-hydrogen microwave plasmas. With a microwave input power of 30 W, the thermal output power was measured to be at least 300 W corresponding to a reactor temperature rise from room temperature to 900 °C within 90 s, a power density of 30 MW/m 3, and an energy balance of about -4×10 5 kJ/mol H 2 compared to the enthalpy of combustion of hydrogen of -241.8 kJ/mol H 2.

  18. Variational theory of average-atom and superconfigurations in quantum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Blenski, T; Cichocki, B

    2007-05-01

    Models of screened ions in equilibrium plasmas with all quantum electrons are important in opacity and equation of state calculations. Although such models have to be derived from variational principles, up to now existing models have not been fully variational. In this paper a fully variational theory respecting virial theorem is proposed-all variables are variational except the parameters defining the equilibrium, i.e., the temperature T, the ion density ni and the atomic number Z. The theory is applied to the quasiclassical Thomas-Fermi (TF) atom, the quantum average atom (QAA), and the superconfigurations (SC) in plasmas. Both the self-consistent-field (SCF) equations for the electronic structure and the condition for the mean ionization Z* are found from minimization of a thermodynamic potential. This potential is constructed using the cluster expansion of the plasma free energy from which the zero and the first-order terms are retained. In the zero order the free energy per ion is that of the quantum homogeneous plasma of an unknown free-electron density n0 = Z* ni occupying the volume 1/ni. In the first order, ions submerged in this plasma are considered and local neutrality is assumed. These ions are considered in the infinite space without imposing the neutrality of the Wigner-Seitz (WS) cell. As in the Inferno model, a central cavity of a radius R is introduced, however, the value of R is unknown a priori. The charge density due to noncentral ions is zero inside the cavity and equals en0 outside. The first-order contribution to free energy per ion is the difference between the free energy of the system "central ion+infinite plasma" and the free energy of the system "infinite plasma." An important part of the approach is an "ionization model" (IM), which is a relation between the mean ionization charge Z* and the first-order structure variables. Both the IM and the local neutrality are respected in the minimization procedure. The correct IM in the TF case

  19. Variational theory of average-atom and superconfigurations in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blenski, T.; Cichocki, B.

    2007-05-01

    Models of screened ions in equilibrium plasmas with all quantum electrons are important in opacity and equation of state calculations. Although such models have to be derived from variational principles, up to now existing models have not been fully variational. In this paper a fully variational theory respecting virial theorem is proposed—all variables are variational except the parameters defining the equilibrium, i.e., the temperature T , the ion density ni and the atomic number Z . The theory is applied to the quasiclassical Thomas-Fermi (TF) atom, the quantum average atom (QAA), and the superconfigurations (SC) in plasmas. Both the self-consistent-field (SCF) equations for the electronic structure and the condition for the mean ionization Z* are found from minimization of a thermodynamic potential. This potential is constructed using the cluster expansion of the plasma free energy from which the zero and the first-order terms are retained. In the zero order the free energy per ion is that of the quantum homogeneous plasma of an unknown free-electron density n0=Z*ni occupying the volume 1/ni . In the first order, ions submerged in this plasma are considered and local neutrality is assumed. These ions are considered in the infinite space without imposing the neutrality of the Wigner-Seitz (WS) cell. As in the Inferno model, a central cavity of a radius R is introduced, however, the value of R is unknown a priori. The charge density due to noncentral ions is zero inside the cavity and equals en0 outside. The first-order contribution to free energy per ion is the difference between the free energy of the system “central ion+infinite plasma” and the free energy of the system “infinite plasma.” An important part of the approach is an “ionization model” (IM), which is a relation between the mean ionization charge Z* and the first-order structure variables. Both the IM and the local neutrality are respected in the minimization procedure. The correct IM

  20. Variational theory of average-atom and superconfigurations in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Blenski, T.

    2007-05-15

    Models of screened ions in equilibrium plasmas with all quantum electrons are important in opacity and equation of state calculations. Although such models have to be derived from variational principles, up to now existing models have not been fully variational. In this paper a fully variational theory respecting virial theorem is proposed--all variables are variational except the parameters defining the equilibrium, i.e., the temperature T, the ion density n{sub i} and the atomic number Z. The theory is applied to the quasiclassical Thomas-Fermi (TF) atom, the quantum average atom (QAA), and the superconfigurations (SC) in plasmas. Both the self-consistent-field (SCF) equations for the electronic structure and the condition for the mean ionization Z* are found from minimization of a thermodynamic potential. This potential is constructed using the cluster expansion of the plasma free energy from which the zero and the first-order terms are retained. In the zero order the free energy per ion is that of the quantum homogeneous plasma of an unknown free-electron density n{sub 0}=Z*n{sub i} occupying the volume 1/n{sub i}. In the first order, ions submerged in this plasma are considered and local neutrality is assumed. These ions are considered in the infinite space without imposing the neutrality of the Wigner-Seitz (WS) cell. As in the Inferno model, a central cavity of a radius R is introduced, however, the value of R is unknown a priori. The charge density due to noncentral ions is zero inside the cavity and equals en{sub 0} outside. The first-order contribution to free energy per ion is the difference between the free energy of the system 'central ion+infinite plasma' and the free energy of the system 'infinite plasma'. An important part of the approach is an 'ionization model' (IM), which is a relation between the mean ionization charge Z* and the first-order structure variables. Both the IM and the local neutrality are respected in the minimization procedure

  1. Quantum versus semiclassical description of light interaction with atomic ensembles: Revision of the Maxwell-Bloch equations and single-photon superradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinsky, Anatoly A.; Zhang, Xiwen; Scully, Marlan O.

    2015-07-01

    Interaction of atoms with quantum states of light is a long-standing problem that apart from fundamental physics has potential applications for optical quantum-state storage, quantum communication, and quantum information. A fully quantum mechanical treatment of this problem is usually very complicated mathematically. Here we show, however, that quantum mechanical evolution equations describing single-photon emission (absorption) by atomic ensembles can be written in a form equivalent to the semiclassical Maxwell-Bloch equations. This connection allows us to find exact analytical solutions of the fully quantum mechanical problem. We also found that semiclassical Maxwell-Bloch equations should be written in a form different from those commonly used. Namely, the classical limit of the quantum problem gives a propagation equation with the Laplacian operator on the right-hand side rather than with the second-order time derivative.

  2. Probing quantum confinement at the atomic scale with optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, James G.

    2001-09-01

    either donor-bound electrons or excitons indicate differences, where the bound-exciton model provides a significantly better fit to the data. The same spin physics enabled our measurement of the heterojunction interfacial field, which we find to be less than 1.3 kV/cm at the sites responsible for optical NMR. Other simulations show the promise of optical NMR as a tool in future studies aimed at atomic-level characterization of quantum-confined systems such as quantum dots and wells.

  3. Regular and chaotic quantum dynamics in atom-diatom reactive collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gevorkyan, A. S.; Nyman, G.

    2008-05-15

    A new microirreversible 3D theory of quantum multichannel scattering in the three-body system is developed. The quantum approach is constructed on the generating trajectory tubes which allow taking into account influence of classical nonintegrability of the dynamical quantum system. When the volume of classical chaos in phase space is larger than the quantum cell in the corresponding quantum system, quantum chaos is generated. The probability of quantum transitions is constructed for this case. The collinear collision of the Li + (FH) {sup {yields}}(LiF) + H system is used for numerical illustration of a system generating quantum (wave) chaos.

  4. The effects of two-dimensional bifurcations and quantum beats in a system of combined atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopes with quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, V. Ch.; Krevchik, V. D.; Semenov, M. B.; Krevchik, P. V.; Zaytsev, R. V.; Egorov, I. A.

    2016-11-01

    The field and temperature dependence of the probability of two-dimensional dissipative tunneling is studied in the framework of one-instanton approximation for a model double-well oscillator potential in an external electric field at finite temperature with account for the influence of two local phonon modes for quantum dots in a system of a combined atomic force and a scanning tunneling microscope. It is demonstrated that in the mode of synchronous parallel transfer of tunneling particles from the cantilever tip to the quantum dot the two local phonon modes result in the occurrence of two stable peaks in the curve of the 2D dissipative tunneling probability as a function of the field. Qualitative comparison of the theoretical curve in the limit of weak dissociation and the experimental current-voltage characteristic for quantum dots that grow from colloidal gold under a cantilever tip at the initial stage of quantum-dot formation when the quantum dot size does not exceed 10 nm is performed. It is established that one of the two stable peaks that correspond to interaction of tunneling particles with two local phonon modes in the temperature dependence of the 2D dissipative tunneling probability can be split in two, which corresponds to the tunneling channel interference mechanism. It is found that the theoretically predicted and experimentally observed mode of quantum beats occurs near the bifurcation point.

  5. High charge mobility in two-dimensional percolative networks of PbSe quantum dots connected by atomic bonds

    PubMed Central

    Evers, Wiel H.; Schins, Juleon M.; Aerts, Michiel; Kulkarni, Aditya; Capiod, Pierre; Berthe, Maxime; Grandidier, Bruno; Delerue, Christophe; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; van Overbeek, Carlo; Peters, Joep L.; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Siebbeles, Laurens D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional networks of quantum dots connected by atomic bonds have an electronic structure that is distinct from that of arrays of quantum dots coupled by ligand molecules. We prepared atomically coherent two-dimensional percolative networks of PbSe quantum dots connected via atomic bonds. Here, we show that photoexcitation leads to generation of free charges that eventually decay via trapping. The charge mobility probed with an AC electric field increases with frequency from 150±15 cm2 V−1 s−1 at 0.2 terahertz to 260±15 cm2 V−1 s−1 at 0.6 terahertz. Gated four-probe measurements yield a DC electron mobility of 13±2 cm2 V−1 s−1. The terahertz mobilities are much higher than for arrays of quantum dots coupled via surface ligands and are similar to the highest DC mobilities reported for PbSe nanowires. The terahertz mobility increases only slightly with temperature in the range of 15–290 K. The extent of straight segments in the two-dimensional percolative networks limits the mobility, rather than charge scattering by phonons. PMID:26400049

  6. Quantum dots - artificial atoms, large molecules, or small pieces of bulk? Insights from time-domain ab ignition studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezhdo, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Quantum dots (QD) are quasi-zero dimensional structures with a unique combination of solid-state and atom-like properties. Unlike bulk or atomic materials, QD properties can be modified continuously by changing QD shape and size. Often, the bulk and atomic viewpoints contradict each other. The atomic view suggests strong electron-hole and charge-phonon interactions, and slow energy relaxation due to mismatch between electronic energy gaps and phonon frequencies. The bulk view advocates that the kinetic energy of quantum confinement is greater than electron-hole interactions, that charge-phonon coupling is weak, and that the relaxation through quasi-continuous bands is rapid. QDs exhibit new physical phenomena. The phonon bottleneck to electron energy relaxation and generation of multiple excitons can improve efficiencies of photovoltaic devices. Our state-of-the-art non-adiabatic molecular dynamics techniques, implemented within time-dependent density-functional-theory, allow us to model QDs at the atomistic level and in time-domain, providing a unifying description of quantum dynamics on the nanoscale.

  7. Quantum tomography of the full hyperfine manifold of atomic spins via continuous measurement on an ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riofrío, Carlos A.; Jessen, Poul S.; Deutsch, Ivan H.

    2011-08-01

    Quantum state reconstruction based on weak continuous measurement has the advantage of being fast, accurate and almost non-perturbative. In this work we present a pedagogical review of the protocol proposed by Silberfarb et al (2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 030402), whereby an ensemble of identically prepared systems is collectively probed and controlled in a time-dependent manner so as to create an informationally complete continuous measurement record. The measurement history is then inverted to determine the state at the initial time through a maximum-likelihood estimate. The general formalism is applied to the case of reconstruction of the quantum state encoded in the magnetic sublevels of a large-spin alkali atom, 133Cs. We detail two different protocols for control. Using magnetic interactions and a quadratic ac Stark shift, we can reconstruct a chosen hyperfine manifold F, e.g. the seven-dimensional F = 3 manifold in the electronic ground state of Cs. We review the procedure as implemented in experiments (Smith et al 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 180403). We extend the protocol to the more ambitious case of reconstruction of states in the full 16-dimensional electronic ground subspace (F = 3⊕F = 4), controlled by microwaves and radio-frequency (RF) magnetic fields. We give detailed derivations of all physical interactions, approximations, numerical methods and fitting procedures, tailored to the realistic experimental setting. For the case of light-shift and magnetic control, reconstruction fidelities of ~0.95 have been achieved, limited primarily by inhomogeneities in the light-shift. For the case of microwave/RF-control we simulate fidelity >0.97, limited primarily by signal-to-noise.

  8. Quantum correlations by four-wave mixing in an atomic vapor in a nonamplifying regime: Quantum beam splitter for photons

    SciTech Connect

    Glorieux, Quentin; Guidoni, Luca; Guibal, Samuel; Likforman, Jean-Pierre; Coudreau, Thomas

    2011-11-15

    We study the generation of intensity quantum correlations using four-wave mixing in a rubidium vapor. The absence of cavities in these experiments allows to deal with several spatial modes simultaneously. In the standard amplifying configuration, we measure relative intensity squeezing up to 9.2 dB below the standard quantum limit. We also theoretically identify and experimentally demonstrate an original regime where, despite no overall amplification, quantum correlations are generated. In this regime, a four-wave mixing setup can play the role of a photonic beam splitter with nonclassical properties, that is, a device that splits a coherent state input into two quantum-correlated beams.

  9. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen interacting with single-walled carbon nanotubes: multiple H-atom adsorbates.

    PubMed

    McAfee, Jason L; Poirier, Bill

    2011-02-21

    In a previous paper [J. L. McAfee and B. Poirier, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 064701 (2009)], using spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT), the authors reported a binding energy of 0.755 eV, for a single hydrogen atom adsorbed on a pristine (unrelaxed) (5,5) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) substrate. A full three-dimensional (3D) potential energy surface (PES) for the SWNT-H system was also developed, and used in a quantum dynamics calculation to compute all rovibrational bound states, and associated equatorial and longitudinal adsorbate migration rates. A highly pronounced preference for the latter migration pathway at ambient temperatures was observed. In this work, we extend the aforementioned study to include multiple H-atom adsorbates. Extensive DFT calculations are performed, in order to ascertain the most relevant dynamical pathways. For two adsorbates, the SWNT-H-H system is found to exhibit highly site-specific binding, as well as long-range correlation and pronounced binding energy enhancement. The latter effect is even more pronounced in the full-hydrogenation limit, increasing the per-adsorbate binding energy to 2.6 eV. To study migration dynamics, a single-hole model is developed, for which the binding energy drops to 2.11 eV. A global 3D PES is developed for the hole migration model, using 40 radial × 18 cylindrical ab initio geometries, fit to a Fourier basis with radially dependent expansion coefficients (rms error 4.9 meV). As compared with the single-adsorbate case, the hole migration PES does not exhibit separate chemisorption and physisorption wells. The barrier to longitudinal migration is also found to be much lower. Quantum dynamics calculations for all rovibrational states are then performed (using a mixed spectral basis/phase-space optimized discrete variable representation), and used to compute longitudinal migration rates. Ramifications for the use of SWNTs as potential hydrogen storage materials are discussed.

  10. Correlation of atomic structure and photoluminescence of the same quantum dot: pinpointing surface and internal defects that inhibit photoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Orfield, Noah J; McBride, James R; Keene, Joseph D; Davis, Lloyd M; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2015-01-27

    In a size regime where every atom counts, rational design and synthesis of optimal nanostructures demands direct interrogation of the effects of structural divergence of individuals on the ensemble-averaged property. To this end, we have explored the structure-function relationship of single quantum dots (QDs) via precise observation of the impact of atomic arrangement on QD fluorescence. Utilizing wide-field fluorescence microscopy and atomic number contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (Z-STEM), we have achieved correlation of photoluminescence (PL) data and atomic-level structural information from individual colloidal QDs. This investigation of CdSe/CdS core/shell QDs has enabled exploration of the fine structural factors necessary to control QD PL. Additionally, we have identified specific morphological and structural anomalies, in the form of internal and surface defects, that consistently vitiate QD PL.

  11. Localized phase structures growing out of quantum fluctuations in a quench of tunnel-coupled atomic condensates.

    PubMed

    Neuenhahn, Clemens; Polkovnikov, Anatoli; Marquardt, Florian

    2012-08-24

    We investigate the relative phase between two weakly interacting 1D condensates of bosonic atoms after suddenly switching on the tunnel coupling. The following phase dynamics is governed by the quantum sine-Gordon equation. In the semiclassical limit of weak interactions, we observe the parametric amplification of quantum fluctuations leading to the formation of breathers with a finite lifetime. The typical lifetime and density of these "quasibreathers" are derived employing exact solutions of the classical sine-Gordon equation. Both depend on the initial relative phase between the condensates, which is considered as a tunable parameter.

  12. Bell's Inequality and Universal Quantum Gates in a Cold-Atom Chiral Fermionic p-Wave Superfluid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Chuanwei; Tewari, Sumanta; Das Sarma, S.

    2007-11-30

    We propose and analyze a probabilistic scheme to entangle two spatially separated topological qubits in a p{sub x}+ip{sub y} superfluid using controlled collisions between atoms in movable dipole traps and unpaired atoms inside vortex cores in the superfluid. We discuss how to test the violation of Bell's inequality with the generated entanglement. A set of universal quantum gates is shown to be implementable deterministically using the entanglement despite the fact that the entangled states can be created only probabilistically.

  13. Observing quantum gases in real time: Single-atom detection on a chip

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, A.; Bender, H.; Stibor, A.; Fortagh, J.; Zimmermann, C.

    2009-07-15

    Single magnetically trapped {sup 87}Rb atoms on an atom chip are detected with 67{+-}12 % efficiency by three photon ionization and subsequent ion detection in a channel electron multiplier. State selective detection of single atoms and high-resolution optical spectroscopy on trapped atom clouds are demonstrated. The temperature and particle density of a trapped atomic gas is monitored in situ and in real time with negligible atom loss due to ionization below 5%.

  14. Atomic Force Microscopy of Vertically Stacked Focused-Ion-Beam Induced Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luengo-Kovac, Marta; Saucer, Timothy; Martin, Andrew; Millunchick, Joanna; Sih, Vanessa

    2013-03-01

    Control over the positioning of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) could facilitate the coupling of QDs to photonic crystal cavities and has applications in the development of high-efficiency solar cells. QDs grown through self-assembly nucleate at random spatial locations. However, a focused ion beam (FIB) can be used to create preferential sites for QD nucleation, and this pattern can be transferred to subsequent layers of QDs, either due to strain or residual effects of the templating. Multilayer QD stacks can therefore maintain the lateral pattern of the initial layer while separating QDs from material damage induced by the patterning. Multilayer QD structures were grown on FIB-patterned GaAs(001) substrates with 10 nm thick GaAs spacers between the layers. The substrates were patterned with sixteen square arrays of holes with spacings of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 μm each at FIB dwell times of 1.0, 3.0, 6.0, and 9.0 ms. We report on the effects of multilayer QD growth on the initial layers through atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging of single, two-, and three-layer FIB-templated QD samples.

  15. Tuning Fermi-surface properties through quantum confinement in metallic metalattices: New metals from old atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi, Vincent H.; Han, J. E.

    2001-03-01

    We describe a new class of nanoscale structured metals wherein the effects of quantum confinement are combined with dispersive metallic electronic states to induce modifications to the fundamental low-energy microscopic properties of a three-dimensional metal: the density of states, the distribution of Fermi velocities, and the collective electronic response (J. E. Han and Vincent H. Crespi, to appear in Phys. Rev. Lett.). The metalattice, metal-infiltrated colloidal lattice, possesses two very different length scales, lattice constants of metal atoms and of colloidal spheres. We compute the electronic properties of the metalattice using an empirical tight-binding method. As a result of the hierarchy in the two length scales, electronic states bifurcate into two classes with weak and strong dispersion. The dispersive states reflect the symmetry of the colloidal lattice and have major contribution to the transport properties such as inversion of Fermi velocity and optical response. We also discuss the magnetic structure of the metalattice with magnetic infiltrants such as Pd and Rh.

  16. Quantum Monte Carlo Method for Heavy Atomic and Molecular Systems with Spin-Orbit Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, Cody; Mitas, Lubos

    We present a new quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method that can treat spin-orbit and other types of spin-depentent interactions explicitly. It is based on generalization of the fixed-phase and projection of the nonlocal operators with spinor trial wave functions. For testing the method we calculate several atomic and molecular systems such as Bi, W, Pb, PbH and PbO, some of them with both large- and small-core pseudopotentials. We validate the quality of the results against other correlated methods such as configuration interaction in two-component formalism. We find excellent agreement with extrapolated values for the total energies and we are able to reliably reproduce experimental values of excitation energies, electron affinity and molecular binding. We show that in order to obtain the agreement with experimental values the explicit inclusion of the spin-orbit interactions is crucial. U.S. D.O.E. grant de-sc0012314 and NERSC Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  17. Self-heterodyne detection of the in situ phase of an atomic superconducting quantum interference device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, R.; Kumar, A.; Eckel, S.; Jendrzejewski, F.; Campbell, G. K.; Edwards, Mark; Tiesinga, E.

    2015-09-01

    We present theoretical and experimental analysis of an interferometric measurement of the in situ phase drop across and current flow through a rotating barrier in a toroidal Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). This experiment is the atomic analog of the rf-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The phase drop is extracted from a spiral-shaped density profile created by the spatial interference of the expanding toroidal BEC and a reference BEC after release from all trapping potentials. We characterize the interferometer when it contains a single particle, which is initially in a coherent superposition of a torus and reference state, as well as when it contains a many-body state in the mean-field approximation. The single-particle picture is sufficient to explain the origin of the spirals, to relate the phase-drop across the barrier to the geometry of a spiral, and to bound the expansion times for which the in situ phase can be accurately determined. Mean-field estimates and numerical simulations show that the interatomic interactions shorten the expansion time scales compared to the single-particle case. Finally, we compare the mean-field simulations with our experimental data and confirm that the interferometer indeed accurately measures the in situ phase drop.

  18. The strength of actinide-element bonds from the quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qian-Rui; Kingham, Jennifer R; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas

    2015-02-14

    [AnX(3)](2)(μ-η(2):η(2)-N(2)) (An = Th-Pu; X = F, Cl, Br, Me, H, OPh) have been studied using relativistic density functional theory. Geometric and vibrational data suggest that metal→N(2) charge transfer maximises at the protactinium systems, which feature the longest N-N bonds and the smallest σ(N-N), as a result of partial population of the N-N π* orbitals. There is very strong correlation of the standard quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules (QTAIM) metrics - bond critical point ρ, ∇(2)ρ and H and delocalisation indices - with An-N and N-N bond lengths and σ(N-N), but the correlation with An-N interaction energies is very poor. A similar situation exists for the other systems studied; neutral and cationic actinide monoxide and dioxides, and AnL(3+) and AnL(3)(3+) (L = pyridine (Py), pyrazine (Pz) and triazine (Tz)) with the exception of some of the ∇(2)ρ data, for which moderate to good correlations with energy data are sometimes seen. By contrast, in almost all cases there is very strong correlation of interaction and bond energies with |ΔQ(QTAIM)(An)|, a simple QTAIM metric which measures the amount of charge transferred to or from the actinide on compound formation.

  19. Study of Atoms and Molecules with Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwanto, Wirawan; Suewattana, Malliga; Krakauer, Henry; Zhang, Shiwei; Walter, Eric J.

    2006-03-01

    We study the ground-state properties of second-row atoms and molecules using the phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AF QMC) method. This method projects the many-body ground state from a trial wave function by means of random walks in the Slater-determinant space. We use a single Slater-determinant trial wave function obtained from density-functional theory (DFT) or Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations. The calculations were done with a plane-wave basis and supercells with periodic boundary condition. We investigate the finite-size effects and the accuracy of pseudopotentials within DFT, HF, and AF QMC frameworks. Pseudopotentials generated from both LDA (OPIUM) and HF are employed. We find that the many-body QMC calculations show a greater sensitivity to the accuracy of the pseudopotentials. With reliable pseudopotentials, the ionization potentials and dissociation energies obtained using AF QMC are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. S. Zhang and H. Krakauer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 136401 (2003) http://opium.sourceforge.net I. Ovcharenko, A. Aspuru-Guzik, and W. A. Lester, J. Chem. Phys. 114, 7790 (2001)

  20. Quantum dot binding to DNA: single-molecule imaging with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Kungang; Zhang, Wen; Chen, Yongsheng

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between nanoparticles (NPs) and DNA is of significance for both application and implication research of NPs. In this study, a single-molecule imaging technique based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to probe the NP-DNA interactions with quantum dots (QDs) as model NPs. Reproducible high-quality images of single DNA molecules in air and in liquids were acquired on mica by optimizing sample preparation conditions. Furthermore, the binding of QDs to DNA was explored using AFM. The DNA concentration was found to be a key factor influencing AFM imaging quality. In air and liquids, the optimal DNA concentration for imaging DNA molecules was approximately 2.5 and 0.25 μg/mL, and that for imaging DNA binding with QDs was 0.5 and 0.25 μg/mL, respectively. In the presence of QDs, the DNA conformation was altered with the formation of DNA condensates. Finally, the fine conformation of QD-DNA binding sites was examined to analyze the binding mechanisms. This work will benefit investigations of NP-DNA interactions and the understanding of the structure of NP-DNA bioconjugates. See accompanying article by Wang DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200309.

  1. Propagation of Structural Disorder in Epitaxially Connected Quantum Dot Solids from Atomic to Micron Scale.

    PubMed

    Savitzky, Benjamin H; Hovden, Robert; Whitham, Kevin; Yang, Jun; Wise, Frank; Hanrath, Tobias; Kourkoutis, Lena F

    2016-09-14

    Epitaxially connected superlattices of self-assembled colloidal quantum dots present a promising route toward exquisite control of electronic structure through precise hierarchical structuring across multiple length scales. Here, we uncover propagation of disorder as an essential feature in these systems, which intimately connects order at the atomic, superlattice, and grain scales. Accessing theoretically predicted exotic electronic states and highly tunable minibands will therefore require detailed understanding of the subtle interplay between local and long-range structure. To that end, we developed analytical methods to quantitatively characterize the propagating disorder in terms of a real paracrystal model and directly observe the dramatic impact of angstrom scale translational disorder on structural correlations at hundreds of nanometers. Using this framework, we discover improved order accompanies increasing sample thickness and identify the substantial effect of small fractions of missing epitaxial bonds on statistical disorder. These results have significant experimental and theoretical implications for the elusive goals of long-range carrier delocalization and true miniband formation.

  2. Classical and quantum dynamical regimes in the bound space projected dynamics of strongly driven H Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümel, R.; Hillermeier, C.; Smilansky, U.

    1990-12-01

    The bound space projected dynamics of the one dimensional model of H Rydberg atoms subjected to strong microwave radiation exhibits three dynamical regimes: (i) perturbatively localized, (ii) chaotic, (iii) external field dominated. This classification holds classically as well as quantum mechanically. The spectral properties of the bound space projected dipole operator dominating regime (iii) are studied analytically. A semiclassical analysis shows that its eigenfunctions, projected on the unperturbed basis states | n> of the one dimensional model, decay like n -7/3.

  3. Quantum interference in a four-level system of a {sup 87}Rb atom: Effects of spontaneously generated coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dongsheng; Zheng Yujun

    2011-01-15

    In this work, the effects of quantum interference and spontaneously generated coherence (SGC) are theoretically analyzed in a four-level system of a {sup 87}Rb atom. For the effects of SGC, we find that a new kind of electromagnetically induced transparency channel can be induced due to destructive interference, and the nonlinear Kerr absorption can be coherently narrowed or eliminated under different strengths of the coupling and switching fields.

  4. Quantum optics. All-optical routing of single photons by a one-atom switch controlled by a single photon.

    PubMed

    Shomroni, Itay; Rosenblum, Serge; Lovsky, Yulia; Bechler, Orel; Guendelman, Gabriel; Dayan, Barak

    2014-08-22

    The prospect of quantum networks, in which quantum information is carried by single photons in photonic circuits, has long been the driving force behind the effort to achieve all-optical routing of single photons. We realized a single-photon-activated switch capable of routing a photon from any of its two inputs to any of its two outputs. Our device is based on a single atom coupled to a fiber-coupled, chip-based microresonator. A single reflected control photon toggles the switch from high reflection (R ~ 65%) to high transmission (T ~ 90%), with an average of ~1.5 control photons per switching event (~3, including linear losses). No additional control fields are required. The control and target photons are both in-fiber and practically identical, making this scheme compatible with scalable architectures for quantum information processing.

  5. The emergence of Quantum Schools: Munich, Göttingen and Copenhagen as new centers of atomic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, M.

    2001-01-01

    The institutes of Arnold Sommerfeld in Munich, Niels Bohr in Copenhagen, and Max Born in Göttingen became the leading centers for the study of quantum theory in the first decades of the twentieth century. Although founded for a broader range of theoretical physics, the quantum became the major topic of research in Munich after the Bohr-Sommerfeld-model of the atom (1913-16). The heyday came in the 1920s, when Bohr's and Born's institutes started operation and became further attractive centers for ambitious theorists all over the world. The discovery of quantum mechanics (1925) should be regarded not only as the achievement of a few young geniuses (in particular Werner Heisenberg and Wolfgang Pauli) but also as the result of a collaborative effort emerging in the new social and intellectual environment of their teachers' schools in Munich, Göttingen and Copenhagen.

  6. Quantum phase transition of a Bose gas in a lattice with a controlled number of atoms per site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xu

    2005-05-01

    We have studied the superfluid-Mott insulator quantum phase transition [1] of a gas of ^87Rb atoms in an optical lattice. We are able to prepare the gas with a controllable number of one, two, or three atoms per lattice site, as verified with photoassociation spectroscopy. We measure momentum distributions using standard time-of-flight imaging techniques. These are similar to those of ref. [1], and exhibit narrow peaks at moderate lattice strengths. We find that the width of these peaks increases for lattice heights greater than about 13 times the recoil energy [2], and we observe interesting differences in this behavior, depending on the number of atoms per site. The data suggest that the quantum phase transition occurs at higher lattice strength with larger site occupation. We acknowledge the support of this work by the R. A. Welch Foundation, The N. S. F., and the D.O.E. Quantum Optics Initiative. [1] Markus Greiner et al., Nature 415, 39 (2002). [2] Thilo St"oferle et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 130403 (2004).

  7. Schemes generating entangled states and entanglement swapping between photons and three-level atoms inside optical cavities for quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Jino; Kang, Min-Sung; Hong, Chang-Ho; Yang, Hyeon; Choi, Seong-Gon

    2017-01-01

    We propose quantum information processing schemes based on cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) for quantum communication. First, to generate entangled states (Bell and Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger [GHZ] states) between flying photons and three-level atoms inside optical cavities, we utilize a controlled phase flip (CPF) gate that can be implemented via cavity QED). Subsequently, we present an entanglement swapping scheme that can be realized using single-qubit measurements and CPF gates via optical cavities. These schemes can be directly applied to construct an entanglement channel for a communication system between two users. Consequently, it is possible for the trust center, having quantum nodes, to accomplish the linked channel (entanglement channel) between the two separate long-distance users via the distribution of Bell states and entanglement swapping. Furthermore, in our schemes, the main physical component is the CPF gate between the photons and the three-level atoms in cavity QED, which is feasible in practice. Thus, our schemes can be experimentally realized with current technology.

  8. Dynamics of the Chemistry of Electronically Excited Atoms in Defined Quantum States.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-15

    excited atom concentration by atomic absorption spectroscopy in the vacuum ultraviolet (6). Relatively efficient electronic to vibrational energy transfer...by the use of atomic absorption spectroscopy , permitted observation of both ground and electronically excited state bromine atoms. The deactivation of

  9. Quantum control of ultracold atoms and molecules via linearly chirped laser pulses and optical frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Thomas A.

    This work investigates the potential of performing high yield quantum control operations on atomic and molecular systems using frequency modulated laser fields. The effectiveness of a single laser pulse in creating desired superposition states within the valence shell of Rubidium and the utilization of a single pulse train in order to perform internal state cooling of diatomic hetero-nuclear molecules, in this case KRb, are investigated. These methods are an alternative to the current protocol in the field of quantum control which typically calls for the employment of two laser fields, be they single pulses or pulse trains. Manipulation of the state of the valence electron within Rubidium was studied for two different models of the hyperfine levels of the 5s and 5p orbitals: a three level Λ system and the more realistic four level system accounting for all allowed optical transitions. Numerical analysis of the population dynamics that occur within the system during the time of interaction with the pulse was carried out for various values of the field parameters as well as for two different forms of the pulse envelope. Population inversion within the hyperfine levels of the 5s orbital of Rubidium is demonstrated for a single linearly polarized, linearly down chirped, laser pulse of nanosecond duration and beam intensity on the order of kWcm2 . Superpositions of equally populated hyperfine states, a phenomenon which is crucial in the development of qubits, were also observed for certain values of the field parameters. The results of this analysis are applicable to 85Rb and 87Rb and both the D1 and D2 transitions and are valid for the two models used. For the case of internal state cooling, the power spectrum of a standard pulse train was compared to that of a pulse with sinusoidal phase modulation revealing that the envelope of the frequency comb associated with such a pulse train is controllable via the phase modulation. Thus through frequency modulation the

  10. Velocity-dependent quantum phase slips in 1D atomic superfluids

    PubMed Central

    Tanzi, Luca; Scaffidi Abbate, Simona; Cataldini, Federica; Gori, Lorenzo; Lucioni, Eleonora; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni; D’Errico, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Quantum phase slips are the primary excitations in one-dimensional superfluids and superconductors at low temperatures but their existence in ultracold quantum gases has not been demonstrated yet. We now study experimentally the nucleation rate of phase slips in one-dimensional superfluids realized with ultracold quantum gases, flowing along a periodic potential. We observe a crossover between a regime of temperature-dependent dissipation at small velocity and interaction and a second regime of velocity-dependent dissipation at larger velocity and interaction. This behavior is consistent with the predicted crossover from thermally-assisted quantum phase slips to purely quantum phase slips. PMID:27188334

  11. Optical and Atomic Force Microscopy Characterization of PbI2 Quantum Dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mu, R.; Tung, Y. S.; Ueda, A.; Henderson, D. O.

    1997-01-01

    Lead iodide (PbI2) clusters were synthesized from the chemical reaction of NaI (or KI) with Pb(NO3)2 in H2O, D2O, CH3OH, and C3H7OH media. The observation of the absorption features above 350 nm with the help of integrating sphere accessory strongly suggests the quantum dot formation of PbI2 in solution. Spectral comparison between the synthesized PbI2 clusters in solution and PbI2 nanophase by impregnation of PbI2 in four different pore-sized porous silica indicates that the PbI2 cluster size in solution is less than 2.5 nm in lateral dimension. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements show that the PbL clusters deposited onto three different molecularly flat surfaces are single-layered. The measured height is 1.0 - 0.1 nm. The swollen layer thickness can be attributed to the intralayer contraction from the strong lateral interaction among PbI2 molecules, which is supported by ab initio calculation. Raman scattering measurement of LO and TO modes of PbI2 in bulk and in the confined state were also conducted in 50-150 cu cm region. The observed three bands at 74, %, 106 1/cm are assigned to TO2, LO2, and LO, mode, respectively. The relatively small red-shift in LO modes may be caused by the surface phonon polaritons of PbI2 nanophase in the porous silica.

  12. The interaction between a single two-level atom coupled to an N-level quantum system through three couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, M. Sebawe; Ahmed, M. M. A.; Khalil, E. M.; Obada, A. S.-F.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the problem of three types of interaction between an N-level quantum system and a two-level atom where three coupling parameters are involved. The system can be deduced from the Heisenberg chain. The canonical transformation is used to remove two coupling parameters from the system and consequently it is reduced to atom-atom interaction. The wave function is calculated using the evolution operator and hence we have managed to obtain the expectation value of some dynamical operators. During our study of the atomic inversion we noted that the collapses period is shifted up when we take the effect of λ2 into consideration. While it is shifted up and down in the presence of λ3. The atomic angle plays a crucial role for controlling the degree of entanglement. For the variance squeezing we noted that the coupling parameter λ2 shows amounts of squeezing more than the case of λ3. Similar behavior is noted for the entropy squeezing.

  13. Quantum Optical Lattices for Emergent Many-Body Phases of Ultracold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F.; Mekhov, Igor B.

    2015-12-01

    Confining ultracold gases in cavities creates a paradigm of quantum trapping potentials. We show that this allows us to bridge models with global collective and short-range interactions as novel quantum phases possess properties of both. Some phases appear solely due to quantum light-matter correlations. Because of a global, but spatially structured, interaction, the competition between quantum matter and light waves leads to multimode structures even in single-mode cavities, including delocalized dimers of matter-field coherences (bonds), beyond density orders as supersolids and density waves.

  14. Quantum theory of two-photon correlated-spontaneous-emission lasers: Exact atom-field interaction Hamiltonian approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, N.; Zhu, S. )

    1989-11-15

    A quantum theory of two-photon correlated-spontaneous-emission lasers (CEL's) is developed, starting from the exact atom-field interaction Hamiltonian for cascade three-level atoms interacting with a single-mode radiation field. We consider the situation where the active atoms are prepared initially in a coherent superposition of three atomic levels and derive a master equation for the field-density operator by using a quantum theory for coherently pumped lasers. The master equation is transformed into a Fokker-Planck equation for the antinormal-ordering {ital Q} function. The drift coefficients of the Fokker-Planck equation enable us to study the steady-state operation of the two-photon CEL's analytically. We have studied both resonant two-photon CEL for which there is no threshold, and off-resonant two-photon CEL for which there exists a threshold. In both cases the initial atomic coherences provide phase locking, and squeezing in the phase quadrature of the field is found. The off-resonant two-photon CEL can build up from a vacuum when its linear gain is larger than the cavity loss (even without population inversion). Maximum squeezing is found in the no-population-inversion region with the laser intensities far below saturation in both cases, which are more than 90% for the resonant two-photon CEL and nearly 50% for the off-resonant one. Approximate steady-state {ital Q} functions are obtained for the resonant two-photon CEL and, in certain circumstances, for the off-resonant one.

  15. Quantum-mechanical theory including angular momenta analysis of atom-atom collisions in a laser field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of two atoms colliding in the presence of an intense radiation field, such as that of a laser, is investigated. The radiation field, which couples states of different electronic symmetry, is described by the number state representation while the electronic degrees of freedom (plus spin-orbit interaction) are discussed in terms of a diabatic representation. The total angular momentum of the field-free system and the angular momentum transferred by absorption (or emission) of a photon are explicitly considered in the derivation of the coupled scattering equations. A model calculation is discussed for the Xe + F collision system.

  16. Quantum and thermal phase transitions in a bosonic atom-molecule mixture in a two-dimensional optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Forges de Parny, L.; Rousseau, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    We study the ground state and the thermal phase diagram of a two-species Bose-Hubbard model, with U(1 ) ×Z2 symmetry, describing atoms and molecules on a two-dimensional optical lattice interacting via a Feshbach resonance. Using quantum Monte Carlo simulations and mean-field theory, we show that the conversion between the two species, coherently coupling the atomic and molecular states, has a crucial impact on the Mott-superfluid transition and stabilizes an insulating phase with a gap controlled by the conversion term—the Feshbach insulator—instead of a standard Mott-insulating phase. Depending on the detuning between atoms and molecules, this model exhibits three phases: the Feshbach insulator, a molecular condensate coexisting with noncondensed atoms, and a mixed atomic-molecular condensate. Employing finite-size scaling analysis, we observe three-dimensional (3D) X Y (3D Ising) transition when U(1 ) (Z2) symmetry is broken, whereas the transition is first order when both U(1 ) and Z2 symmetries are spontaneously broken. The finite-temperature phase diagram is also discussed. The thermal disappearance of the molecular superfluid leads to a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition with unusual universal jump in the superfluid density. The loss of the quasi-long-range coherence of the mixed atomic and molecular superfluid is more subtle since only atoms exhibit conventional Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless criticality. We also observe a signal compatible with a classical first-order transition between the mixed superfluid and the normal Bose liquid at low temperature.

  17. Quantum Simulation and Phase Diagram of the Transverse Field Ising Model with Three Atomic Spins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-25

    promising right now [4]. As first consid- ered by Richard Feynman [5], a quantum simulator controls interacting quantum bits (qubits) to implement... Feynman , Int. J. Theor. Phys. 21, 467 (1982). [6] S. Lloyd, Science 273, 1073 (1996). [7] E. Farhi, J. Goldstone, S. Gutmann, J. Lapan, A. Lundgren, and

  18. Quantum mechanical limits to the control of atom-diatom chemical reactions through the polarisation of the reactants.

    PubMed

    Aldegunde, Jesús; Javier Aoiz, F; de Miranda, Marcelo P

    2008-02-28

    This article considers the extent to which one can control the reactivity of atom-diatom systems through reactant polarisation. Three different limits for reactivity manipulation are defined: "absolute" limits that do not depend on the reaction dynamics but can only be obtained for particular combinations of quantum numbers, "unconstrained" limits that depend on dynamics but not on constraints imposed by any particular experimental setup, and "constrained" limits that depend on dynamics and also on the constraints imposed by a particular experimental setup. Methods for calculation of these limits are presented and applied to the benchmark F + H2 reaction. The variations of the maximum and minimum reactivity one can obtain are analysed in terms of reaction mechanisms and steric constraints. Tables listing the minimum and maximum values of angular momentum polarisation moments of rank up to 4, and integer and half-integer quantum numbers up to 5, are also presented.

  19. New microwave excitation signal generating circuit for quantum frequency standard on the atoms of caesium Cs133

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, A. A.; Davydov, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    In this work the study, design, development and experimental results of a new microwave excitation signal generating circuit are presented. New design of this circuit is based on the method of direct digital synthesis. The results of theoretical calculations and experimental researches show that the new design not only has a high precision, but also has an improvement in the spectral characteristics of the output signal. Range of generated output frequencies is expanded, that leads to the possibility of detuning the frequency of the neighboring resonance of spectral line and adjust the C-field in quantum frequency standard. Experimental research of the metrological characteristics of the quantum frequency standard on the atoms of caesium with a new functional unit showed an improvement in the daily frequency stability.

  20. Model of a realistic InP surface quantum dot extrapolated from atomic force microscopy results.

    PubMed

    Barettin, Daniele; De Angelis, Roberta; Prosposito, Paolo; Auf der Maur, Matthias; Casalboni, Mauro; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2014-05-16

    We report on numerical simulations of a zincblende InP surface quantum dot (QD) on In₀.₄₈Ga₀.₅₂ buffer. Our model is strictly based on experimental structures, since we extrapolated a three-dimensional dot directly by atomic force microscopy results. Continuum electromechanical, [Formula: see text] bandstructure and optical calculations are presented for this realistic structure, together with benchmark calculations for a lens-shape QD with the same radius and height of the extrapolated dot. Interesting similarities and differences are shown by comparing the results obtained with the two different structures, leading to the conclusion that the use of a more realistic structure can provide significant improvements in the modeling of QDs fact, the remarkable splitting for the electron p-like levels of the extrapolated dot seems to prove that a realistic experimental structure can reproduce the right symmetry and a correct splitting usually given by atomistic calculations even within the multiband [Formula: see text] approach. Moreover, the energy levels and the symmetry of the holes are strongly dependent on the shape of the dot. In particular, as far as we know, their wave function symmetries do not seem to resemble to any results previously obtained with simulations of zincblende ideal structures, such as lenses or truncated pyramids. The magnitude of the oscillator strengths is also strongly dependent on the shape of the dot, showing a lower intensity for the extrapolated dot, especially for the transition between the electrons and holes ground state, as a result of a relevant reduction of the wave functions overlap. We also compare an experimental photoluminescence spectrum measured on an homogeneous sample containing about 60 dots with a numerical ensemble average derived from single dot calculations. The broader energy range of the numerical spectrum motivated us to perform further verifications, which have clarified some aspects of the experimental