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Sample records for multimodal genome-wide screens

  1. Ultrafast laser nanosurgery in microfluidics for genome-wide screenings

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Yakar, Adela; Bourgeois, Frederic

    2009-01-01

    Summary The use of ultrafast laser pulses in surgery has allowed for unprecedented precision with minimal collateral damage to surrounding tissues. For these reasons, ultrafast laser nanosurgery, as an injury model, has gained tremendous momentum in experimental biology ranging from in-vitro manipulations of subcellular structures to in-vivo studies in whole living organisms. For example, femtosecond laser nanosurgery on such model organism as the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has opened new opportunities for in-vivo nerve regeneration studies. Meanwhile, the development of novel microfluidic devices has brought the control in experimental environment to the level required for precise nanosurgery in various animal models. Merging microfluidics and laser nanosurgery has recently improved the specificities and increased the speed of laser surgeries enabling fast genome-wide screenings that can more readily decode the genetic map of various biological processes. PMID:19278850

  2. Genome-wide screening and identification of antigens for rickettsial vaccine development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The capacity to identify immunogens for vaccine development by genome-wide screening has been markedly enhanced by the availability of complete microbial genome sequences coupled to rapid proteomic and bioinformatic analysis. Critical to this genome-wide screening is in vivo testing in the context o...

  3. A genome-wide CRISPR library for high-throughput genetic screening in Drosophila cells.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Andrew R; Kong, Lesheng; Liu, Ji-Long

    2015-06-20

    The simplicity of the CRISPR/Cas9 system of genome engineering has opened up the possibility of performing genome-wide targeted mutagenesis in cell lines, enabling screening for cellular phenotypes resulting from genetic aberrations. Drosophila cells have proven to be highly effective in identifying genes involved in cellular processes through similar screens using partial knockdown by RNAi. This is in part due to the lower degree of redundancy between genes in this organism, whilst still maintaining highly conserved gene networks and orthologs of many human disease-causing genes. The ability of CRISPR to generate genetic loss of function mutations not only increases the magnitude of any effect over currently employed RNAi techniques, but allows analysis over longer periods of time which can be critical for certain phenotypes. In this study, we have designed and built a genome-wide CRISPR library covering 13,501 genes, among which 8989 genes are targeted by three or more independent single guide RNAs (sgRNAs). Moreover, we describe strategies to monitor the population of guide RNAs by high throughput sequencing (HTS). We hope that this library will provide an invaluable resource for the community to screen loss of function mutations for cellular phenotypes, and as a source of guide RNA designs for future studies.

  4. A Genome-Wide CRISPR Library for High-Throughput Genetic Screening in Drosophila Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Andrew R.; Kong, Lesheng; Liu, Ji-Long

    2015-01-01

    The simplicity of the CRISPR/Cas9 system of genome engineering has opened up the possibility of performing genome-wide targeted mutagenesis in cell lines, enabling screening for cellular phenotypes resulting from genetic aberrations. Drosophila cells have proven to be highly effective in identifying genes involved in cellular processes through similar screens using partial knockdown by RNAi. This is in part due to the lower degree of redundancy between genes in this organism, whilst still maintaining highly conserved gene networks and orthologs of many human disease-causing genes. The ability of CRISPR to generate genetic loss of function mutations not only increases the magnitude of any effect over currently employed RNAi techniques, but allows analysis over longer periods of time which can be critical for certain phenotypes. In this study, we have designed and built a genome-wide CRISPR library covering 13,501 genes, among which 8989 genes are targeted by three or more independent single guide RNAs (sgRNAs). Moreover, we describe strategies to monitor the population of guide RNAs by high throughput sequencing (HTS). We hope that this library will provide an invaluable resource for the community to screen loss of function mutations for cellular phenotypes, and as a source of guide RNA designs for future studies. PMID:26165496

  5. Genome-wide deficiency screen for the genomic regions responsible for heat resistance in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Temperature adaptation is one of the most important determinants of distribution and population size of organisms in nature. Recently, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping and gene expression profiling approaches have been used for detecting candidate genes for heat resistance. However, the resolution of QTL mapping is not high enough to examine the individual effects of various genes in each QTL. Heat stress-responsive genes, characterized by gene expression profiling studies, are not necessarily responsible for heat resistance. Some of these genes may be regulated in association with the heat stress response of other genes. Results To evaluate which heat-responsive genes are potential candidates for heat resistance with higher resolution than previous QTL mapping studies, we performed genome-wide deficiency screen for QTL for heat resistance. We screened 439 isogenic deficiency strains from the DrosDel project, covering 65.6% of the Drosophila melanogaster genome in order to map QTL for thermal resistance. As a result, we found 19 QTL for heat resistance, including 3 novel QTL outside the QTL found in previous studies. Conclusion The QTL found in this study encompassed 19 heat-responsive genes found in the previous gene expression profiling studies, suggesting that they were strong candidates for heat resistance. This result provides new insights into the genetic architecture of heat resistance. It also emphasizes the advantages of genome-wide deficiency screen using isogenic deficiency libraries. PMID:21696597

  6. Yeast genome-wide screen reveals dissimilar sets of host genes affecting replication of RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Panavas, Tadas; Serviene, Elena; Brasher, Jeremy; Nagy, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    Viruses are devastating pathogens of humans, animals, and plants. To further our understanding of how viruses use the resources of infected cells, we systematically tested the yeast single-gene-knockout library for the effect of each host gene on the replication of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), a positive-strand RNA virus of plants. The genome-wide screen identified 96 host genes whose absence either reduced or increased the accumulation of the TBSV replicon. The identified genes are involved in the metabolism of nucleic acids, lipids, proteins, and other compounds and in protein targeting/transport. Comparison with published genome-wide screens reveals that the replication of TBSV and brome mosaic virus (BMV), which belongs to a different supergroup among plus-strand RNA viruses, is affected by vastly different yeast genes. Moreover, a set of yeast genes involved in vacuolar targeting of proteins and vesicle-mediated transport both affected replication of the TBSV replicon and enhanced the cytotoxicity of the Parkinson's disease-related α-synuclein when this protein was expressed in yeast. In addition, a set of host genes involved in ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolism affected both TBSV replication and the cytotoxicity of a mutant huntingtin protein, a candidate agent in Huntington's disease. This finding suggests that virus infection and disease-causing proteins might use or alter similar host pathways and may suggest connections between chronic diseases and prior virus infection. PMID:15883361

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome-wide screen exposes multiple CD8+ T cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, A S; Klein, M R; Corrah, T; Fox, A; Jaye, A; McAdam, K P; Brookes, R H

    2005-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I-restricted CD8+ T cells play a role in protective immunity against tuberculosis yet relatively few epitopes specific for the causative organism, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, are reported. Here a total genome-wide screen of M. tuberculosis was used to identify putative HLA-B*3501 T cell epitopes. Of 479 predicted epitopes, 13 with the highest score were synthesized and used to restimulate lymphocytes from naturally exposed HLA-B*3501 healthy individuals in cultured and ex vivo enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays for interferon (IFN)-γ. All 13 peptides elicited a response that varied considerably between individuals. For three peptides CD8+ T cell lines were expanded and four of the 13 were recognized permissively through the HLA-B7 supertype family. Although further testing is required we show the genome-wide screen to be feasible for the identification of unknown mycobacterial antigens involved in immunity against natural infection. While the mechanisms of protective immunity against M. tuberculosis infection remain unclear, conventional class I-restricted CD8+ T cell responses appear to be widespread throughout the genome. PMID:15762882

  8. Genome-wide Linkage Screen in Familial Parkinson Disease Identifies Loci on Chromosomes 3 and 18

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaoyi; Martin, Eden R.; Liu, Yutao; Mayhew, Gregory; Vance, Jeffery M.; Scott, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a complex, multifactorial neurodegenerative disease with substantial evidence for genetic risk factors. We conducted a genome-wide linkage screen of 5824 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 278 families of European, non-Hispanic descent to localize regions that harbor susceptibility loci for PD. By using parametric and nonparametric linkage analyses and allowing for genetic heterogeneity among families, we found two loci for PD. Significant evidence for linkage was detected on chromosome 18q11 (maximum lod score [MLOD] = 4.1) and suggestive evidence for linkage was obtained on chromosome 3q25 (MLOD = 2.5). These results were strongest in families not previously screened for linkage, and simulation studies suggest that these findings are likely due to locus heterogeneity rather than random statistical error. The finding of two loci (one highly statistically significant) suggests that additional PD susceptibility genes might be identified through targeted candidate gene studies in these regions. PMID:19327735

  9. A Genome-wide RNAi screening method to discover novel genes involved in virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Debasis; Cherry, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Systematic and comprehensive analysis of host cell proteins involved in virus infection has been difficult in large part due to the lack of robust unbiased methods for their identification. Recent technological breakthroughs allowing development of cell-based genetic screens have greatly facilitated our understanding of virus-host interactions. These include instrumentation for processing in microtiter plates (e.g. 384 well), coupled with sensitive readers and off-the-shelf analysis and informatics pipelines. Because viruses are a significant threat to human health, a better understanding of the cellular factors that impact infection would pave the way for the development of new therapeutics. Here we describe the development and implementation of a genome-wide siRNA screen against a virus using human cells. PMID:26164699

  10. A human genome-wide loss-of-function screen identifies effective chikungunya antiviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Karlas, Alexander; Berre, Stefano; Couderc, Thérèse; Varjak, Margus; Braun, Peter; Meyer, Michael; Gangneux, Nicolas; Karo-Astover, Liis; Weege, Friderike; Raftery, Martin; Schönrich, Günther; Klemm, Uwe; Wurzlbauer, Anne; Bracher, Franz; Merits, Andres; Meyer, Thomas F.; Lecuit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a globally spreading alphavirus against which there is no commercially available vaccine or therapy. Here we use a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify 156 proviral and 41 antiviral host factors affecting CHIKV replication. We analyse the cellular pathways in which human proviral genes are involved and identify druggable targets. Twenty-one small-molecule inhibitors, some of which are FDA approved, targeting six proviral factors or pathways, have high antiviral activity in vitro, with low toxicity. Three identified inhibitors have prophylactic antiviral effects in mouse models of chikungunya infection. Two of them, the calmodulin inhibitor pimozide and the fatty acid synthesis inhibitor TOFA, have a therapeutic effect in vivo when combined. These results demonstrate the value of loss-of-function screening and pathway analysis for the rational identification of small molecules with therapeutic potential and pave the way for the development of new, host-directed, antiviral agents. PMID:27177310

  11. A Genome-Wide Screen with Nicotinamide to Identify Sirtuin-Dependent Pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Choy, John S.; Qadri, Bayan; Henry, Leah; Shroff, Kunal; Bifarin, Olatomiwa; Basrai, Munira A.

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuins are evolutionarily conserved NAD-dependent deacetylases that catalyze the cleavage of NAD+ into nicotinamide (NAM), which can act as a pan-sirtuin inhibitor in unicellular and multicellular organisms. Sirtuins regulate processes such as transcription, DNA damage repair, chromosome segregation, and longevity extension in yeast and metazoans. The founding member of the evolutionarily conserved sirtuin family, SIR2, was first identified in budding yeast. Subsequent studies led to the identification of four yeast SIR2 homologs HST1, HST2, HST3, and HST4. Understanding the downstream physiological consequences of inhibiting sirtuins can be challenging since most studies focus on single or double deletions of sirtuins, and mating defects in SIR2 deletions hamper genome-wide screens. This represents an important gap in our knowledge of how sirtuins function in highly complex biological processes such as aging, metabolism, and chromosome segregation. In this report, we used a genome-wide screen to explore sirtuin-dependent processes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by identifying deletion mutants that are sensitive to NAM. We identified 55 genes in total, 36 of which have not been previously reported to be dependent on sirtuins. We find that genome stability pathways are particularly vulnerable to loss of sirtuin activity. Here, we provide evidence that defects in sister chromatid cohesion renders cells sensitive to growth in the presence of NAM. The results of our screen provide a broad view of the biological pathways sensitive to inhibition of sirtuins, and advance our understanding of the function of sirtuins and NAD+ biology. PMID:26646153

  12. Genome-wide siRNA screen reveals coupling between mitotic apoptosis and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Martínez, Laura A; Karamysheva, Zemfira N; Warrington, Ross; Li, Bing; Wei, Shuguang; Xie, Xian-Jin; Roth, Michael G; Yu, Hongtao

    2014-01-01

    The antimitotic anti-cancer drugs, including taxol, perturb spindle dynamics, and induce prolonged, spindle checkpoint-dependent mitotic arrest in cancer cells. These cells then either undergo apoptosis triggered by the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway or exit mitosis without proper cell division in an adaptation pathway. Using a genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen in taxol-treated HeLa cells, we systematically identify components of the mitotic apoptosis and adaptation pathways. We show that the Mad2 inhibitor p31comet actively promotes mitotic adaptation through cyclin B1 degradation and has a minor separate function in suppressing apoptosis. Conversely, the pro-apoptotic Bcl2 family member, Noxa, is a critical initiator of mitotic cell death. Unexpectedly, the upstream components of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway and the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 contribute to mitotic adaption. Our results reveal crosstalk between the apoptosis and adaptation pathways during mitotic arrest. PMID:25024437

  13. A genome-wide RNAi screen identifies multiple RSK-dependent regulators of cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, Gromoslaw A.; Zhang, Jianmin; Zubrowski, Matthew J.; Edelman, Elena J.; Luo, Biao; Yu, Min; Ng, Lydia W.; Scherber, Cally M.; Schott, Benjamin J.; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Irimia, Daniel; Root, David E.; Haber, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    To define the functional pathways regulating epithelial cell migration, we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen using 55,000 pooled lentiviral shRNAs targeting ∼11,000 genes, selecting for transduced cells with increased motility. A stringent validation protocol generated a set of 31 genes representing diverse pathways whose knockdown dramatically enhances cellular migration. Some of these pathways share features of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and together they implicate key regulators of transcription, cellular signaling, and metabolism, as well as novel modulators of cellular trafficking, such as DLG5. In delineating downstream pathways mediating these migration phenotypes, we observed universal activation of ERKs and a profound dependence on their RSK effectors. Pharmacological inhibition of RSK dramatically suppresses epithelial cell migration induced by knockdown of all 31 genes, suggesting that convergence of diverse migratory pathways on this kinase may provide a therapeutic opportunity in disorders of cell migration, including cancer metastasis. PMID:21062900

  14. Genome-wide association study of coronary and aortic calcification in lung cancer screening CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Bob D.; van Setten, Jessica; de Jong, Pim A.; Mali, Willem P.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Arterial calcification has been related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and osteoporosis. However, little is known about the role of genetics and exact pathways leading to arterial calcification and its relation to bone density changes indicating osteoporosis. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide association study of arterial calcification burden, followed by a look-up of known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction (MI), and bone mineral density (BMD) to test for a shared genetic basis between the traits. The study included a subcohort of the Dutch-Belgian lung cancer screening trial comprised of 2,561 participants. Participants underwent baseline CT screening in one of two hospitals participating in the trial. Low-dose chest CT images were acquired without contrast enhancement and without ECG-synchronization. In these images coronary and aortic calcifications were identified automatically. Subsequently, the detected calcifications were quantified using coronary artery calcium Agatston and volume scores. Genotype data was available for these participants. A genome-wide association study was conducted on 10,220,814 SNPs using a linear regression model. To reduce multiple testing burden, known CAD/MI and BMD SNPs were specifically tested (45 SNPs from the CARDIoGRAMplusC4D consortium and 60 SNPS from the GEFOS consortium). No novel significant SNPs were found. Significant enrichment for CAD/MI SNPs was observed in testing Agatston and coronary artery calcium volume scores. Moreover, a significant enrichment of BMD SNPs was shown in aortic calcium volume scores. This may indicate genetic relation of BMD SNPs and arterial calcification burden.

  15. Genome-wide CRISPR screen in a mouse model of tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sidi; Sanjana, Neville E.; Zheng, Kaijie; Shalem, Ophir; Lee, Kyungheon; Shi, Xi; Scott, David A.; Song, Jun; Pan, Jen Q.; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho; Zhang, Feng; Sharp, Phillip A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Genetic screens are powerful tools for identifying genes responsible for diverse phenotypes. Here we describe a genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9-mediated loss-of-function screen in tumor growth and metastasis. We mutagenized a non-metastatic mouse cancer cell line using a genome-scale library with 67,405 single guide RNAs (sgRNAs). The mutant cell pool rapidly generates metastases when transplanted into immunocompromised mice. Enriched sgRNAs in lung metastases and late stage primary tumors were found to target a small set of genes, suggesting specific loss-of-function mutations drive tumor growth and metastasis. Individual sgRNAs and a small pool of 624 sgRNAs targeting the top scoring genes from the primary screen dramatically accelerate metastasis. In all of these experiments, the effect of mutations on primary tumor growth positively correlates with the development of metastases. Our study demonstrates Cas9-based screening as a robust method to systematically assay gene phenotypes in cancer evolution in vivo. PMID:25748654

  16. Parallel chemical genetic and genome-wide RNAi screens identify cytokinesis inhibitors and targets.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Ulrike S; Kiger, Amy A; Richter, Constance; Perlman, Zachary E; Perrimon, Norbert; Mitchison, Timothy J; Field, Christine M

    2004-12-01

    Cytokinesis involves temporally and spatially coordinated action of the cell cycle and cytoskeletal and membrane systems to achieve separation of daughter cells. To dissect cytokinesis mechanisms it would be useful to have a complete catalog of the proteins involved, and small molecule tools for specifically inhibiting them with tight temporal control. Finding active small molecules by cell-based screening entails the difficult step of identifying their targets. We performed parallel chemical genetic and genome-wide RNA interference screens in Drosophila cells, identifying 50 small molecule inhibitors of cytokinesis and 214 genes important for cytokinesis, including a new protein in the Aurora B pathway (Borr). By comparing small molecule and RNAi phenotypes, we identified a small molecule that inhibits the Aurora B kinase pathway. Our protein list provides a starting point for systematic dissection of cytokinesis, a direction that will be greatly facilitated by also having diverse small molecule inhibitors, which we have identified. Dissection of the Aurora B pathway, where we found a new gene and a specific small molecule inhibitor, should benefit particularly. Our study shows that parallel RNA interference and small molecule screening is a generally useful approach to identifying active small molecules and their target pathways.

  17. Parallel Chemical Genetic and Genome-Wide RNAi Screens Identify Cytokinesis Inhibitors and Targets

    PubMed Central

    Kiger, Amy A; Richter, Constance; Perlman, Zachary E; Perrimon, Norbert; Mitchison, Timothy J; Field, Christine M

    2004-01-01

    Cytokinesis involves temporally and spatially coordinated action of the cell cycle and cytoskeletal and membrane systems to achieve separation of daughter cells. To dissect cytokinesis mechanisms it would be useful to have a complete catalog of the proteins involved, and small molecule tools for specifically inhibiting them with tight temporal control. Finding active small molecules by cell-based screening entails the difficult step of identifying their targets. We performed parallel chemical genetic and genome-wide RNA interference screens in Drosophila cells, identifying 50 small molecule inhibitors of cytokinesis and 214 genes important for cytokinesis, including a new protein in the Aurora B pathway (Borr). By comparing small molecule and RNAi phenotypes, we identified a small molecule that inhibits the Aurora B kinase pathway. Our protein list provides a starting point for systematic dissection of cytokinesis, a direction that will be greatly facilitated by also having diverse small molecule inhibitors, which we have identified. Dissection of the Aurora B pathway, where we found a new gene and a specific small molecule inhibitor, should benefit particularly. Our study shows that parallel RNA interference and small molecule screening is a generally useful approach to identifying active small molecules and their target pathways. PMID:15547975

  18. Genome-Wide RNAi Screening to Dissect the TGF-β Signal Transduction Pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaochu; Xu, Lan

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family of cytokines figures prominently in regulation of embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis from Drosophila to mammals. Genetic defects affecting TGF-β signaling underlie developmental disorders and diseases such as cancer in human. Therefore, delineating the molecular mechanism by which TGF-β regulates cell biology is critical for understanding normal biology and disease mechanisms. Forward genetic screens in model organisms and biochemical approaches in mammalian tissue culture were instrumental in initial characterization of the TGF-β signal transduction pathway. With complete sequence information of the genomes and the advent of RNA interference (RNAi) technology, genome-wide RNAi screening emerged as a powerful functional genomics approach to systematically delineate molecular components of signal transduction pathways. Here, we describe a protocol for image-based whole-genome RNAi screening aimed at identifying molecules required for TGF-β signaling into the nucleus. Using this protocol we examined >90 % of annotated Drosophila open reading frames (ORF) individually and successfully uncovered several novel factors serving critical roles in the TGF-β pathway. Thus cell-based high-throughput functional genomics can uncover new mechanistic insights on signaling pathways beyond what the classical genetics had revealed.

  19. Visual Genome-Wide RNAi Screening to Identify Human Host Factors Required for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Macedo Dossin, Fernando; Choi, Seo Yeon; Kim, Nam Youl; Kim, Hi Chul; Jung, Sung Yong; Schenkman, Sergio; Almeida, Igor C.; Emans, Neil; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H.

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, a neglected tropical infection that affects millions of people in the Americas. Current chemotherapy relies on only two drugs that have limited efficacy and considerable side effects. Therefore, the development of new and more effective drugs is of paramount importance. Although some host cellular factors that play a role in T. cruzi infection have been uncovered, the molecular requirements for intracellular parasite growth and persistence are still not well understood. To further study these host-parasite interactions and identify human host factors required for T. cruzi infection, we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen using cellular microarrays of a printed siRNA library that spanned the whole human genome. The screening was reproduced 6 times and a customized algorithm was used to select as hits those genes whose silencing visually impaired parasite infection. The 162 strongest hits were subjected to a secondary screening and subsequently validated in two different cell lines. Among the fourteen hits confirmed, we recognized some cellular membrane proteins that might function as cell receptors for parasite entry and others that may be related to calcium release triggered by parasites during cell invasion. In addition, two of the hits are related to the TGF-beta signaling pathway, whose inhibition is already known to diminish levels of T. cruzi infection. This study represents a significant step toward unveiling the key molecular requirements for host cell invasion and revealing new potential targets for antiparasitic therapy. PMID:21625474

  20. Genome-wide Screen of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Identifies New Virulence Factors.

    PubMed

    Zrieq, Rafat; Sana, Thibault G; Vergin, Sandra; Garvis, Steve; Volfson, Irina; Bleves, Sophie; Voulhoux, Romé; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a human opportunistic pathogen that causes mortality in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients. While many virulence factors of this pathogen have already been identified, several remain to be discovered. In this respect we set an unprecedented genome-wide screen of a P. aeruginosa expression library based on a yeast growth phenotype. Fifty-one candidates were selected in athree-round screening process. The robustness of the screen was validated by the selection of three well known secreted proteins including one demonstrated virulence factor, the protease LepA. Further in silico sorting of the 51 candidates highlighted three potential new Pseudomonas effector candidates (Pec). By testing the cytotoxicity of wild type P. aeruginosa vs. pec mutants toward macrophages and the virulence in the Caenorhabditis elegans model, we demonstrated that the three selected Pecs are novel virulence factors of P. aeruginosa. Additional cellular localization experiments in the host revealed specific localization for Pec1 and Pec2 that could inform about their respective functions.

  1. Genome-wide Screen of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Identifies New Virulence Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zrieq, Rafat; Sana, Thibault G.; Vergin, Sandra; Garvis, Steve; Volfson, Irina; Bleves, Sophie; Voulhoux, Romé; Hegemann, Johannes H.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a human opportunistic pathogen that causes mortality in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients. While many virulence factors of this pathogen have already been identified, several remain to be discovered. In this respect we set an unprecedented genome-wide screen of a P. aeruginosa expression library based on a yeast growth phenotype. Fifty-one candidates were selected in athree-round screening process. The robustness of the screen was validated by the selection of three well known secreted proteins including one demonstrated virulence factor, the protease LepA. Further in silico sorting of the 51 candidates highlighted three potential new Pseudomonas effector candidates (Pec). By testing the cytotoxicity of wild type P. aeruginosa vs. pec mutants toward macrophages and the virulence in the Caenorhabditis elegans model, we demonstrated that the three selected Pecs are novel virulence factors of P. aeruginosa. Additional cellular localization experiments in the host revealed specific localization for Pec1 and Pec2 that could inform about their respective functions. PMID:26636043

  2. Genome-wide association screens for Achilles tendon and ACL tears and tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Thomas R.; Roos, Andrew K.; Kleimeyer, John P.; Ahmed, Marwa A.; Goodlin, Gabrielle T.; Fredericson, Michael; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Avins, Andrew L.; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2017-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy or rupture and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture are substantial injuries affecting athletes, associated with delayed recovery or inability to return to competition. To identify genetic markers that might be used to predict risk for these injuries, we performed genome-wide association screens for these injuries using data from the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort consisting of 102,979 individuals. We did not find any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with either of these injuries with a p-value that was genome-wide significant (p<5x10-8). We found, however, four and three polymorphisms with p-values that were borderline significant (p<10−6) for Achilles tendon injury and ACL rupture, respectively. We then tested SNPs previously reported to be associated with either Achilles tendon injury or ACL rupture. None showed an association in our cohort with a false discovery rate of less than 5%. We obtained, however, moderate to weak evidence for replication in one case; specifically, rs4919510 in MIR608 had a p-value of 5.1x10-3 for association with Achilles tendon injury, corresponding to a 7% chance of false replication. Finally, we tested 2855 SNPs in 90 candidate genes for musculoskeletal injury, but did not find any that showed a significant association below a false discovery rate of 5%. We provide data containing summary statistics for the entire genome, which will be useful for future genetic studies on these injuries. PMID:28358823

  3. An Efficient Genome-Wide Fusion Partner Screening System for Secretion of Recombinant Proteins in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jung-Hoon; Hyun Sung, Bong; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Park, Soon-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Mook; Kim, Mi-Jin; Lee, Cho-Ryong; Sohn, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    To produce rarely secreted recombinant proteins in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we developed a novel genome-wide optimal translational fusion partner (TFP) screening system that involves recruitment of an optimal secretion signal and fusion partner. A TFP library was constructed from a genomic and truncated cDNA library by using the invertase-based signal sequence trap technique. The efficiency of the system was demonstrated using two rarely secreted proteins, human interleukin (hIL)-2 and hIL-32. Optimal TFPs for secretion of hIL-2 and hIL-32 were easily selected, yielding secretion of these proteins up to hundreds of mg/L. Moreover, numerous uncovered yeast secretion signals and fusion partners were identified, leading to efficient secretion of various recombinant proteins. Selected TFPs were found to be useful for the hypersecretion of other recombinant proteins at yields of up to several g/L. This screening technique could provide new methods for the production of various types of difficult-to-express proteins. PMID:26195161

  4. Characterizing Protein Interactions Employing a Genome-Wide siRNA Cellular Phenotyping Screen

    PubMed Central

    Suratanee, Apichat; Schaefer, Martin H.; Betts, Matthew J.; Soons, Zita; Mannsperger, Heiko; Harder, Nathalie; Oswald, Marcus; Gipp, Markus; Ramminger, Ellen; Marcus, Guillermo; Männer, Reinhard; Rohr, Karl; Wanker, Erich; Russell, Robert B.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Eils, Roland; König, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing the activating and inhibiting effect of protein-protein interactions (PPI) is fundamental to gain insight into the complex signaling system of a human cell. A plethora of methods has been suggested to infer PPI from data on a large scale, but none of them is able to characterize the effect of this interaction. Here, we present a novel computational development that employs mitotic phenotypes of a genome-wide RNAi knockdown screen and enables identifying the activating and inhibiting effects of PPIs. Exemplarily, we applied our technique to a knockdown screen of HeLa cells cultivated at standard conditions. Using a machine learning approach, we obtained high accuracy (82% AUC of the receiver operating characteristics) by cross-validation using 6,870 known activating and inhibiting PPIs as gold standard. We predicted de novo unknown activating and inhibiting effects for 1,954 PPIs in HeLa cells covering the ten major signaling pathways of the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, and made these predictions publicly available in a database. We finally demonstrate that the predicted effects can be used to cluster knockdown genes of similar biological processes in coherent subgroups. The characterization of the activating or inhibiting effect of individual PPIs opens up new perspectives for the interpretation of large datasets of PPIs and thus considerably increases the value of PPIs as an integrated resource for studying the detailed function of signaling pathways of the cellular system of interest. PMID:25255318

  5. A genome-wide screen identifies genes that affect somatic homolog pairing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Jack R; Larschan, Erica; D'Souza, Ryan; Marshall, Lauren S; Dempsey, Kyle E; Johnson, Justine E; Mellone, Barbara G; Kuroda, Mitzi I

    2012-07-01

    In Drosophila and other Dipterans, homologous chromosomes are in close contact in virtually all nuclei, a phenomenon known as somatic homolog pairing. Although homolog pairing has been recognized for over a century, relatively little is known about its regulation. We performed a genome-wide RNAi-based screen that monitored the X-specific localization of the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex, and we identified 59 candidate genes whose knockdown via RNAi causes a change in the pattern of MSL staining that is consistent with a disruption of X-chromosomal homolog pairing. Using DNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), we confirmed that knockdown of 17 of these genes has a dramatic effect on pairing of the 359 bp repeat at the base of the X. Furthermore, dsRNAs targeting Pr-set7, which encodes an H4K20 methyltransferase, cause a modest disruption in somatic homolog pairing. Consistent with our results in cultured cells, a classical mutation in one of the strongest candidate genes, pebble (pbl), causes a decrease in somatic homolog pairing in developing embryos. Interestingly, many of the genes identified by our screen have known roles in diverse cell-cycle events, suggesting an important link between somatic homolog pairing and the choreography of chromosomes during the cell cycle.

  6. A genome-wide CRISPR screen identifies a restricted set of HIV host dependency factors.

    PubMed

    Park, Ryan J; Wang, Tim; Koundakjian, Dylan; Hultquist, Judd F; Lamothe-Molina, Pedro; Monel, Blandine; Schumann, Kathrin; Yu, Haiyan; Krupzcak, Kevin M; Garcia-Beltran, Wilfredo; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Krogan, Nevan J; Marson, Alexander; Sabatini, David M; Lander, Eric S; Hacohen, Nir; Walker, Bruce D

    2017-02-01

    Host proteins are essential for HIV entry and replication and can be important nonviral therapeutic targets. Large-scale RNA interference (RNAi)-based screens have identified nearly a thousand candidate host factors, but there is little agreement among studies and few factors have been validated. Here we demonstrate that a genome-wide CRISPR-based screen identifies host factors in a physiologically relevant cell system. We identify five factors, including the HIV co-receptors CD4 and CCR5, that are required for HIV infection yet are dispensable for cellular proliferation and viability. Tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase 2 (TPST2) and solute carrier family 35 member B2 (SLC35B2) function in a common pathway to sulfate CCR5 on extracellular tyrosine residues, facilitating CCR5 recognition by the HIV envelope. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) mediates cell aggregation, which is required for cell-to-cell HIV transmission. We validated these pathways in primary human CD4(+) T cells through Cas9-mediated knockout and antibody blockade. Our findings indicate that HIV infection and replication rely on a limited set of host-dispensable genes and suggest that these pathways can be studied for therapeutic intervention.

  7. A Genome-Wide CRISPR Screen in Toxoplasma Identifies Essential Apicomplexan Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sidik, Saima M.; Huet, Diego; Ganesan, Suresh M.; Huynh, My-Hang; Wang, Tim; Nasamu, Armiyaw S.; Thiru, Prathapan; Saeij, Jeroen P.J.; Carruthers, Vern B.; Niles, Jacquin C.; Lourido, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Apicomplexan parasites are leading causes of human and livestock diseases—like malaria and toxoplasmosis—yet most of their genes remain uncharacterized. Here, we present the first genome-wide genetic screen of an apicomplexan. We adapted CRISPR/Cas9 to assess the contribution of each gene from the human parasite Toxoplasma gondii during infection of fibroblasts. Our analysis defines ~200 previously uncharacterized, fitness-conferring genes unique to the phylum, from which 16 were investigated, revealing essential functions during infection of human cells. Secondary screens identify as an invasion factor the claudin-like apicomplexan microneme protein (CLAMP), which resembles mammalian tight-junction proteins and localizes to secretory organelles, making it critical to the initiation of infection. CLAMP is present throughout sequenced apicomplexan genomes, and is essential during the asexual stages of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. These results provide broad-based functional information on T. gondii genes and will facilitate future approaches to expand the horizon of antiparasitic interventions. PMID:27594426

  8. Genome-wide CRISPR screen for essential cell growth mediators in mutant KRAS colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Rana, Tariq M; Yau, Edwin H; Kummetha, Indrasena Reddy; Lichinchi, Gianluigi; Tang, Rachel; Zhang, Yunlin

    2017-09-27

    Targeting mutant KRAS signaling pathways continues to attract attention as a therapeutic strategy for KRAS-driven tumors. In this study, we exploited the power of the CRISPR-Cas9 system to identify genes affecting the tumor xenograft growth of human mutant KRAS colorectal cancers (KRASMUT CRC). Using pooled lentiviral single guide RNA libraries, we conducted a genome-wide loss-of-function genetic screen in an isogenic pair of human CRC cell lines harboring mutant or wild-type KRAS. The screen identified novel and established synthetic enhancers or synthetic lethals for KRASMUT CRC, including targetable metabolic genes. Notably, genetic disruption or pharmacologic inhibition of the metabolic enzymes NAD kinase (NADK) or ketohexokinase (KHK) were growth inhibitory in vivo. Additionally, the chromatin remodeling protein INO80C was identified as a novel tumor suppressor in KRASMUT colorectal and pancreatic tumor xenografts. Our findings define a novel targetable set of therapeutic targets for KRASMUT tumors. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. A genome-wide RNA interference screen identifies two novel components of the metazoan secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wendler, Franz; Gillingham, Alison K; Sinka, Rita; Rosa-Ferreira, Cláudia; Gordon, David E; Franch-Marro, Xavier; Peden, Andrew A; Vincent, Jean-Paul; Munro, Sean

    2010-01-01

    Genetic screens in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified many proteins involved in the secretory pathway, most of which have orthologues in higher eukaryotes. To investigate whether there are additional proteins that are required for secretion in metazoans but are absent from yeast, we used genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) to look for genes required for secretion of recombinant luciferase from Drosophila S2 cells. This identified two novel components of the secretory pathway that are conserved from humans to plants. Gryzun is distantly related to, but distinct from, the Trs130 subunit of the TRAPP complex but is absent from S. cerevisiae. RNAi of human Gryzun (C4orf41) blocks Golgi exit. Kish is a small membrane protein with a previously uncharacterised orthologue in yeast. The screen also identified Drosophila orthologues of almost 60% of the yeast genes essential for secretion. Given this coverage, the small number of novel components suggests that contrary to previous indications the number of essential core components of the secretory pathway is not much greater in metazoans than in yeasts. PMID:19942856

  10. Genome-Wide Screen of Genes Required for Caffeine Tolerance in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    García-Santamarina, Sarela; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong Uk; Sansó, Miriam; Zuin, Alice; Pérez, Pilar; Ayté, José; Hidalgo, Elena

    2009-01-01

    Background An excess of caffeine is cytotoxic to all eukaryotic cell types. We aim to study how cells become tolerant to a toxic dose of this drug, and the relationship between caffeine and oxidative stress pathways. Methodology/Principal Findings We searched for Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutants with inhibited growth on caffeine-containing plates. We screened a collection of 2,700 haploid mutant cells, of which 98 were sensitive to caffeine. The genes mutated in these sensitive clones were involved in a number of cellular roles including the H2O2-induced Pap1 and Sty1 stress pathways, the integrity and calcineurin pathways, cell morphology and chromatin remodeling. We have investigated the role of the oxidative stress pathways in sensing and promoting survival to caffeine. The Pap1 and the Sty1 pathways are both required for normal tolerance to caffeine, but only the Sty1 pathway is activated by the drug. Cells lacking Pap1 are sensitive to caffeine due to the decreased expression of the efflux pump Hba2. Indeed, ?hba2 cells are sensitive to caffeine, and constitutive activation of the Pap1 pathway enhances resistance to caffeine in an Hba2-dependent manner. Conclusions/Significance With our caffeine-sensitive, genome-wide screen of an S. pombe deletion collection, we have demonstrated the importance of some oxidative stress pathway components on wild-type tolerance to the drug. PMID:19672306

  11. Functional genome-wide siRNA screen identifies KIAA0586 as mutated in Joubert syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Roosing, Susanne; Hofree, Matan; Kim, Sehyun; Scott, Eric; Copeland, Brett; Romani, Marta; Silhavy, Jennifer L; Rosti, Rasim O; Schroth, Jana; Mazza, Tommaso; Miccinilli, Elide; Zaki, Maha S; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Milisa-Drautz, Joanne; Dobyns, William B; Mikati, Mohamed A; İncecik, Faruk; Azam, Matloob; Borgatti, Renato; Romaniello, Romina; Boustany, Rose-Mary; Clericuzio, Carol L; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Strømme, Petter; Boltshauser, Eugen; Stanzial, Franco; Mirabelli-Badenier, Marisol; Moroni, Isabella; Bertini, Enrico; Emma, Francesco; Steinlin, Maja; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Johnson, Colin A; Freilinger, Michael; Vaux, Keith K; Gabriel, Stacey B; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Ideker, Trey; Dynlacht, Brian D; Lee, Ji Eun; Valente, Enza Maria; Kim, Joon; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2015-01-01

    Defective primary ciliogenesis or cilium stability forms the basis of human ciliopathies, including Joubert syndrome (JS), with defective cerebellar vermis development. We performed a high-content genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen to identify genes regulating ciliogenesis as candidates for JS. We analyzed results with a supervised-learning approach, using SYSCILIA gold standard, Cildb3.0, a centriole siRNA screen and the GTex project, identifying 591 likely candidates. Intersection of this data with whole exome results from 145 individuals with unexplained JS identified six families with predominantly compound heterozygous mutations in KIAA0586. A c.428del base deletion in 0.1% of the general population was found in trans with a second mutation in an additional set of 9 of 163 unexplained JS patients. KIAA0586 is an orthologue of chick Talpid3, required for ciliogenesis and Sonic hedgehog signaling. Our results uncover a relatively high frequency cause for JS and contribute a list of candidates for future gene discoveries in ciliopathies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06602.001 PMID:26026149

  12. Genome-wide functional screen identifies a compendium of genes affecting sensitivity to tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Pereira, Ana M; Sims, David; Dexter, Tim; Fenwick, Kerry; Assiotis, Ioannis; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Mitsopoulos, Costas; Hakas, Jarle; Zvelebil, Marketa; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan

    2012-02-21

    Therapies that target estrogen signaling have made a very considerable contribution to reducing mortality from breast cancer. However, resistance to tamoxifen remains a major clinical problem. Here we have used a genome-wide functional profiling approach to identify multiple genes that confer resistance or sensitivity to tamoxifen. Combining whole-genome shRNA screening with massively parallel sequencing, we have profiled the impact of more than 56,670 RNA interference reagents targeting 16,487 genes on the cellular response to tamoxifen. This screen, along with subsequent validation experiments, identifies a compendium of genes whose silencing causes tamoxifen resistance (including BAP1, CLPP, GPRC5D, NAE1, NF1, NIPBL, NSD1, RAD21, RARG, SMC3, and UBA3) and also a set of genes whose silencing causes sensitivity to this endocrine agent (C10orf72, C15orf55/NUT, EDF1, ING5, KRAS, NOC3L, PPP1R15B, RRAS2, TMPRSS2, and TPM4). Multiple individual genes, including NF1, a regulator of RAS signaling, also correlate with clinical outcome after tamoxifen treatment.

  13. A Genome-wide CRISPR Screen in Toxoplasma Identifies Essential Apicomplexan Genes.

    PubMed

    Sidik, Saima M; Huet, Diego; Ganesan, Suresh M; Huynh, My-Hang; Wang, Tim; Nasamu, Armiyaw S; Thiru, Prathapan; Saeij, Jeroen P J; Carruthers, Vern B; Niles, Jacquin C; Lourido, Sebastian

    2016-09-08

    Apicomplexan parasites are leading causes of human and livestock diseases such as malaria and toxoplasmosis, yet most of their genes remain uncharacterized. Here, we present the first genome-wide genetic screen of an apicomplexan. We adapted CRISPR/Cas9 to assess the contribution of each gene from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii during infection of human fibroblasts. Our analysis defines ∼200 previously uncharacterized, fitness-conferring genes unique to the phylum, from which 16 were investigated, revealing essential functions during infection of human cells. Secondary screens identify as an invasion factor the claudin-like apicomplexan microneme protein (CLAMP), which resembles mammalian tight-junction proteins and localizes to secretory organelles, making it critical to the initiation of infection. CLAMP is present throughout sequenced apicomplexan genomes and is essential during the asexual stages of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. These results provide broad-based functional information on T. gondii genes and will facilitate future approaches to expand the horizon of antiparasitic interventions.

  14. Functional genome-wide siRNA screen identifies KIAA0586 as mutated in Joubert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roosing, Susanne; Hofree, Matan; Kim, Sehyun; Scott, Eric; Copeland, Brett; Romani, Marta; Silhavy, Jennifer L; Rosti, Rasim O; Schroth, Jana; Mazza, Tommaso; Miccinilli, Elide; Zaki, Maha S; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Milisa-Drautz, Joanne; Dobyns, William B; Mikati, Mohamed A; İncecik, Faruk; Azam, Matloob; Borgatti, Renato; Romaniello, Romina; Boustany, Rose-Mary; Clericuzio, Carol L; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Strømme, Petter; Boltshauser, Eugen; Stanzial, Franco; Mirabelli-Badenier, Marisol; Moroni, Isabella; Bertini, Enrico; Emma, Francesco; Steinlin, Maja; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Johnson, Colin A; Freilinger, Michael; Vaux, Keith K; Gabriel, Stacey B; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Ideker, Trey; Dynlacht, Brian D; Lee, Ji Eun; Valente, Enza Maria; Kim, Joon; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2015-05-30

    Defective primary ciliogenesis or cilium stability forms the basis of human ciliopathies, including Joubert syndrome (JS), with defective cerebellar vermis development. We performed a high-content genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen to identify genes regulating ciliogenesis as candidates for JS. We analyzed results with a supervised-learning approach, using SYSCILIA gold standard, Cildb3.0, a centriole siRNA screen and the GTex project, identifying 591 likely candidates. Intersection of this data with whole exome results from 145 individuals with unexplained JS identified six families with predominantly compound heterozygous mutations in KIAA0586. A c.428del base deletion in 0.1% of the general population was found in trans with a second mutation in an additional set of 9 of 163 unexplained JS patients. KIAA0586 is an orthologue of chick Talpid3, required for ciliogenesis and Sonic hedgehog signaling. Our results uncover a relatively high frequency cause for JS and contribute a list of candidates for future gene discoveries in ciliopathies.

  15. Novel skin phenotypes revealed by a genome-wide mouse reverse genetic screen

    PubMed Central

    Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Vancollie, Valerie E.; Heath, Emma; Smedley, Damian P.; Estabel, Jeanne; Sunter, David; DiTommaso, Tia; White, Jacqueline K.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Smyth, Ian; Steel, Karen P.; Watt, Fiona M.

    2014-01-01

    Permanent stop-and-shop large-scale mouse mutant resources provide an excellent platform to decipher tissue phenogenomics. Here we analyse skin from 538 knockout mouse mutants generated by the Sanger Institute Mouse Genetics Project. We optimize immunolabelling of tail epidermal wholemounts to allow systematic annotation of hair follicle, sebaceous gland and interfollicular epidermal abnormalities using ontology terms from the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. Of the 50 mutants with an epidermal phenotype, 9 map to human genetic conditions with skin abnormalities. Some mutant genes are expressed in the skin, whereas others are not, indicating systemic effects. One phenotype is affected by diet and several are incompletely penetrant. In-depth analysis of three mutants, Krt76, Myo5a (a model of human Griscelli syndrome) and Mysm1, provides validation of the screen. Our study is the first large-scale genome-wide tissue phenotype screen from the International Knockout Mouse Consortium and provides an open access resource for the scientific community. PMID:24721909

  16. Screen and clean: a tool for identifying interactions in genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Devlin, Bernie; Ringquist, Steven; Trucco, Massimo; Roeder, Kathryn

    2010-04-01

    Epistasis could be an important source of risk for disease. How interacting loci might be discovered is an open question for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Most researchers limit their statistical analyses to testing individual pairwise interactions (i.e., marginal tests for association). A more effective means of identifying important predictors is to fit models that include many predictors simultaneously (i.e., higher-dimensional models). We explore a procedure called screen and clean (SC) for identifying liability loci, including interactions, by using the lasso procedure, which is a model selection tool for high-dimensional regression. We approach the problem by using a varying dictionary consisting of terms to include in the model. In the first step the lasso dictionary includes only main effects. The most promising single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are identified using a screening procedure. Next the lasso dictionary is adjusted to include these main effects and the corresponding interaction terms. Again, promising terms are identified using lasso screening. Then significant terms are identified through the cleaning process. Implementation of SC for GWAS requires algorithms to explore the complex model space induced by the many SNPs genotyped and their interactions. We propose and explore a set of algorithms and find that SC successfully controls Type I error while yielding good power to identify risk loci and their interactions. When the method is applied to data obtained from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium study of Type 1 Diabetes it uncovers evidence supporting interaction within the HLA class II region as well as within Chromosome 12q24.

  17. Screen and Clean: a tool for identifying interactions in genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Devlin, Bernie; Ringquist, Steven; Trucco, Massimo; Roeder, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Epistasis could be an important source of risk for disease. How interacting loci might be discovered is an open question for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Most researchers limit their statistical analyses to testing individual pairwise interactions (i.e., marginal tests for association). A more effective means of identifying important predictors is to fit models that include many predictors simultaneously (i.e., higher dimensional models). We explore a procedure called screen and clean (SC) for identifying liability loci, including interactions, by using the lasso procedure, which is a model selection tool for high dimensional regression. We approach the problem by using a varying dictionary consisting of terms to include in the model. In the first step the lasso dictionary includes only main effects. The most promising SNPs are identified using a screening procedure. Next the lasso dictionary is adjusted to include these main effects and the corresponding interaction terms. Again, promising terms are identified using lasso screening. Then significant terms are identified through the cleaning process. Implementation of SC for GWAS requires algorithms to explore the complex model space induced by the many SNPs genotyped and their interactions. We propose and explore a set of algorithms and find that SC successfully controls Type I error while yielding good power to identify risk loci and their interactions. When the method is applied to data obtained from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium study of Type 1 Diabetes it uncovers evidence supporting interaction within the HLA class II region as well as within Chromosome 12q24. PMID:20088021

  18. From The Cover: Genome-wide RNA interference screen identifies previously undescribed regulators of polyglutamine aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nollen, Ellen A. A.; Garcia, Susana M.; van Haaften, Gijs; Kim, Soojin; Chavez, Alejandro; Morimoto, Richard I.; Plasterk, Ronald H. A.

    2004-04-01

    Protein misfolding and the formation of aggregates are increasingly recognized components of the pathology of human genetic disease and hallmarks of many neurodegenerative disorders. As exemplified by polyglutamine diseases, the propensity for protein misfolding is associated with the length of polyglutamine expansions and age-dependent changes in protein-folding homeostasis, suggesting a critical role for a protein homeostatic buffer. To identify the complement of protein factors that protects cells against the formation of protein aggregates, we tested transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strains expressing polyglutamine expansion yellow fluorescent protein fusion proteins at the threshold length associated with the age-dependent appearance of protein aggregation. We used genome-wide RNA interference to identify genes that, when suppressed, resulted in the premature appearance of protein aggregates. Our screen identified 186 genes corresponding to five principal classes of polyglutamine regulators: genes involved in RNA metabolism, protein synthesis, protein folding, and protein degradation; and those involved in protein trafficking. We propose that each of these classes represents a molecular machine collectively comprising the protein homeostatic buffer that responds to the expression of damaged proteins to prevent their misfolding and aggregation. protein misfolding | neurodegenerative diseases

  19. Genome-wide RNAi screen reveals ALK1 mediates LDL uptake and transcytosis in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kraehling, Jan R.; Chidlow, John H.; Rajagopal, Chitra; Sugiyama, Michael G.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Lee, Monica Y.; Zhang, Xinbo; Ramírez, Cristina M.; Park, Eon Joo; Tao, Bo; Chen, Keyang; Kuruvilla, Leena; Larriveé, Bruno; Folta-Stogniew, Ewa; Ola, Roxana; Rotllan, Noemi; Zhou, Wenping; Nagle, Michael W.; Herz, Joachim; Williams, Kevin Jon; Eichmann, Anne; Lee, Warren L.; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Sessa, William C.

    2016-01-01

    In humans and animals lacking functional LDL receptor (LDLR), LDL from plasma still readily traverses the endothelium. To identify the pathways of LDL uptake, a genome-wide RNAi screen was performed in endothelial cells and cross-referenced with GWAS-data sets. Here we show that the activin-like kinase 1 (ALK1) mediates LDL uptake into endothelial cells. ALK1 binds LDL with lower affinity than LDLR and saturates only at hypercholesterolemic concentrations. ALK1 mediates uptake of LDL into endothelial cells via an unusual endocytic pathway that diverts the ligand from lysosomal degradation and promotes LDL transcytosis. The endothelium-specific genetic ablation of Alk1 in Ldlr-KO animals leads to less LDL uptake into the aortic endothelium, showing its physiological role in endothelial lipoprotein metabolism. In summary, identification of pathways mediating LDLR-independent uptake of LDL may provide unique opportunities to block the initiation of LDL accumulation in the vessel wall or augment hepatic LDLR-dependent clearance of LDL. PMID:27869117

  20. A Genome-Wide Screen Indicates Correlation between Differentiation and Expression of Metabolism Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Akhilesh; Singh, Anupama; Meena, Anil; Ghosal, Ritika; Ranganathan, Madhav; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus) embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation. PMID:23717462

  1. Genome-wide overexpression screen for sodium acetate resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Peña, Pedro V; Glasker, Steven; Srienc, Friedrich

    2013-03-10

    The production of biofuels from cellulosic biomass is a promising technology for developing a renewable source of energy. Efforts to produce ethanol from cellulosic biomass using microbes, such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, face major challenges, including the need for detoxification. Here, we apply a strategy to discover genetic alterations that lead to improved robustness of S. cerevisiae in the presence of acetate, which is present at toxic concentrations in hemicellulose hydrolysates. Acetate in its protonated form (acetic acid) enters the cell through passive diffusion and dissociates into a proton and acetate, acidifying the cytosol and inhibiting cell function, an effect that is exacerbated in the presence of sodium. Through flow cytometry analysis, implemented as part of a novel cell culture technique, the Cytostat, we characterized the deleterious effects of sodium acetate on growth and on cell size homeostasis. Further, using the Cytostat to screen a genome-wide, gene overexpression library, we identified that overexpressing the ENA2 gene, a P-type sodium pump ATPase, provides a significant growth improvement in the presence of sodium acetate. Together, our data support the proposed mechanism for the synergistic growth inhibition exerted by acetate and sodium, as well as the mechanism that develops resistance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Genome-wide RNAi screen identifies networks involved in intestinal stem cell regulation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiankun; Han, Lili; Singh, Shree Ram; Liu, Hanhan; Neumüller, Ralph A; Yan, Dong; Hu, Yanhui; Liu, Ying; Liu, Wei; Lin, Xinhua; Hou, Steven X

    2015-02-24

    The intestinal epithelium is the most rapidly self-renewing tissue in adult animals and maintained by intestinal stem cells (ISCs) in both Drosophila and mammals. To comprehensively identify genes and pathways that regulate ISC fates, we performed a genome-wide transgenic RNAi screen in adult Drosophila intestine and identified 405 genes that regulate ISC maintenance and lineage-specific differentiation. By integrating these genes into publicly available interaction databases, we further developed functional networks that regulate ISC self-renewal, ISC proliferation, ISC maintenance of diploid status, ISC survival, ISC-to-enterocyte (EC) lineage differentiation, and ISC-to-enteroendocrine (EE) lineage differentiation. By comparing regulators among ISCs, female germline stem cells, and neural stem cells, we found that factors related to basic stem cell cellular processes are commonly required in all stem cells, and stem-cell-specific, niche-related signals are required only in the unique stem cell type. Our findings provide valuable insights into stem cell maintenance and lineage-specific differentiation.

  3. Genome-Wide Screening of Genes Regulated by DNA Methylation in Colon Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Galamb, Orsolya; Wichmann, Barna; Sipos, Ferenc; Péterfia, Bálint; Csabai, István; Kovalszky, Ilona; Semsey, Szabolcs; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2012-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is accompanied by changes in the DNA methylation pattern. Our aim was to test a novel approach for identification of transcripts at whole transcript level which are regulated by DNA methylation. Our approach is based on comparison of data obtained from transcriptome profiling of primary human samples and in vitro cell culture models. Epithelial cells were collected by LCM from normal, adenoma, and tumorous colonic samples. Using gene expression analysis, we identified downregulated genes in the tumors compared to normal tissues. In parallel 3000 upregulated genes were determined in HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cell culture model after DNA demethylation treatment. Of the 2533 transcripts showing reduced expression in the tumorous samples, 154 had increased expression as a result of DNA demethylation treatment. Approximately 2/3 of these genes had decreased expression already in the adenoma samples. Expression of five genes (GCG, NMES-1, LRMP, FAM161B and PTGDR), was validated using RT-PCR. PTGDR showed ambiguous results, therefore it was further studied to verify the extent of DNA methylation and its effect on the protein level. Results confirmed that our approach is suitable for genome-wide screening of genes which are regulated or inactivated by DNA methylation. Activity of these genes possibly interferes with tumor progression, therefore genes identified can be key factors in the formation and in the progression of the disease. PMID:23049694

  4. Genome-wide screening for methylation-silenced genes in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Khamas, Ahmed; Ishikawa, Toshiaki; Mogushi, Kaoru; Iida, Satoru; Ishiguro, Megumi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Uetake, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2012-08-01

    Identification of methylation-silenced genes in colorectal cancer (CRC) is of great importance. We employed oligonucleotide microarrays to identify differences in global gene expression of five CRC cell lines (HCT116, RKO, Colo320, SW480 and HT29) that were analyzed before and after treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycitidine. Selected candidates were subjected to methylation-specific PCR and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR using 15 CRC cell lines and 23 paired tumor and normal samples from CRC patients. After 5-aza-2'-deoxycitidine treatment, 139 genes were re-expressed in all 5 CRC cell lines collectively with a fold change of more than 1.5 in at least one cell line. These genes include known methylated and silenced genes in CRC. After applying study selection criteria we identified 20 candidates. The GADD45B and THSD1 genes were selected for further analysis. Among 15 colon cancer cell lines, methylation was only identified in THSD1 (27%). THSD1 methylation was subsequently investigated in 23 colorectal tumors and methylation was detected in 9% of the analyzed samples; the observed promoter hypermethylation was cancer-specific. THSD1 mRNA down-regulation was observed in tumor tissues. This genome-wide screening led to the identification of genes putatively affected by methylation in CRC. The THSD1 gene may play a role in the tumorigenesis of CRC.

  5. Human genome-wide RNAi screen reveals host factors required for enterovirus 71 replication

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kan Xing; Phuektes, Patchara; Kumar, Pankaj; Goh, Germaine Yen Lin; Moreau, Dimitri; Chow, Vincent Tak Kwong; Bard, Frederic; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a neurotropic enterovirus without antivirals or vaccine, and its host-pathogen interactions remain poorly understood. Here we use a human genome-wide RNAi screen to identify 256 host factors involved in EV71 replication in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells. Enrichment analyses reveal overrepresentation in processes like mitotic cell cycle and transcriptional regulation. We have carried out orthogonal experiments to characterize the roles of selected factors involved in cell cycle regulation and endoplasmatic reticulum-associated degradation. We demonstrate nuclear egress of CDK6 in EV71 infected cells, and identify CDK6 and AURKB as resistance factors. NGLY1, which co-localizes with EV71 replication complexes at the endoplasmatic reticulum, supports EV71 replication. We confirm importance of these factors for EV71 replication in a human neuronal cell line and for coxsackievirus A16 infection. A small molecule inhibitor of NGLY1 reduces EV71 replication. This study provides a comprehensive map of EV71 host factors and reveals potential antiviral targets. PMID:27748395

  6. A genome-wide screen indicates correlation between differentiation and expression of metabolism related genes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Priti; Kumar, Brijesh; Shende, Akhilesh; Singh, Anupama; Meena, Anil; Ghosal, Ritika; Ranganathan, Madhav; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus) embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation.

  7. A Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Identifies Regulators of Cholesterol-Modified Hedgehog Secretion in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ruel, Laurent; Lacas-Gervais, Sandra; Schaub, Sébastien; Thérond, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) proteins are secreted molecules that function as organizers in animal development. In addition to being palmitoylated, Hh is the only metazoan protein known to possess a covalently-linked cholesterol moiety. The absence of either modification severely disrupts the organization of numerous tissues during development. It is currently not known how lipid-modified Hh is secreted and released from producing cells. We have performed a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila melanogaster cells to identify regulators of Hh secretion. We found that cholesterol-modified Hh secretion is strongly dependent on coat protein complex I (COPI) but not COPII vesicles, suggesting that cholesterol modification alters the movement of Hh through the early secretory pathway. We provide evidence that both proteolysis and cholesterol modification are necessary for the efficient trafficking of Hh through the ER and Golgi. Finally, we identified several putative regulators of protein secretion and demonstrate a role for some of these genes in Hh and Wingless (Wg) morphogen secretion in vivo. These data open new perspectives for studying how morphogen secretion is regulated, as well as provide insight into regulation of lipid-modified protein secretion. PMID:22432040

  8. Drosophila Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Identifies Multiple Regulators of HIF–Dependent Transcription in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Dekanty, Andrés; Romero, Nuria M.; Bertolin, Agustina P.; Thomas, María G.; Leishman, Claudia C.; Perez-Perri, Joel I.; Boccaccio, Graciela L.; Wappner, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are a family of evolutionary conserved alpha-beta heterodimeric transcription factors that induce a wide range of genes in response to low oxygen tension. Molecular mechanisms that mediate oxygen-dependent HIF regulation operate at the level of the alpha subunit, controlling protein stability, subcellular localization, and transcriptional coactivator recruitment. We have conducted an unbiased genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila cells aimed to the identification of genes required for HIF activity. After 3 rounds of selection, 30 genes emerged as critical HIF regulators in hypoxia, most of which had not been previously associated with HIF biology. The list of genes includes components of chromatin remodeling complexes, transcription elongation factors, and translational regulators. One remarkable hit was the argonaute 1 (ago1) gene, a central element of the microRNA (miRNA) translational silencing machinery. Further studies confirmed the physiological role of the miRNA machinery in HIF–dependent transcription. This study reveals the occurrence of novel mechanisms of HIF regulation, which might contribute to developing novel strategies for therapeutic intervention of HIF–related pathologies, including heart attack, cancer, and stroke. PMID:20585616

  9. Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Identifies Novel Host Proteins Required for Alphavirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gwen M.; Kielian, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The enveloped alphaviruses include important and emerging human pathogens such as Chikungunya virus and Eastern equine encephalitis virus. Alphaviruses enter cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and exit by budding from the plasma membrane. While there has been considerable progress in defining the structure and function of the viral proteins, relatively little is known about the host factors involved in alphavirus infection. We used a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify host factors that promote or inhibit alphavirus infection in human cells. Fuzzy homologue (FUZ), a protein with reported roles in planar cell polarity and cilia biogenesis, was required for the clathrin-dependent internalization of both alphaviruses and the classical endocytic ligand transferrin. The tetraspanin membrane protein TSPAN9 was critical for the efficient fusion of low pH-triggered virus with the endosome membrane. FUZ and TSPAN9 were broadly required for infection by the alphaviruses Sindbis virus, Semliki Forest virus, and Chikungunya virus, but were not required by the structurally-related flavivirus Dengue virus. Our results highlight the unanticipated functions of FUZ and TSPAN9 in distinct steps of alphavirus entry and suggest novel host proteins that may serve as targets for antiviral therapy. PMID:24367265

  10. Systematic high-content genome-wide RNAi screens of endothelial cell migration and morphology

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Steven P.; Gould, Cathryn M.; Nowell, Cameron J.; Karnezis, Tara; Achen, Marc G.; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Stacker, Steven A.

    2017-01-01

    Many cell types undergo migration during embryogenesis and disease. Endothelial cells line blood vessels and lymphatics, which migrate during development as part of angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and other types of vessel remodelling. These processes are also important in wound healing, cancer metastasis and cardiovascular conditions. However, the molecular control of endothelial cell migration is poorly understood. Here, we present a dataset containing siRNA screens that identify known and novel components of signalling pathways regulating migration of lymphatic endothelial cells. These components are compared to signalling in blood vascular endothelial cells. Further, using high-content microscopy, we captured a dataset of images of migrating cells following transfection with a genome-wide siRNA library. These datasets are suitable for the identification and analysis of genes involved in endothelial cell migration and morphology, and for computational approaches to identify signalling networks controlling the migratory response and integration of cell morphology, gene function and cell signaling. This may facilitate identification of protein targets for therapeutically modulating angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in the context of human disease. PMID:28248931

  11. Genome-wide in silico screening for microRNA genetic variability in livestock species.

    PubMed

    Jevsinek Skok, D; Godnic, I; Zorc, M; Horvat, S; Dovc, P; Kovac, M; Kunej, T

    2013-12-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate target gene expression. Previous studies have shown that microRNA gene variability can interfere with its function, resulting in phenotypic variation. Polymorphisms within microRNA genes present a source of novel biomarkers for phenotypic traits in animal breeding. However, little is known about microRNA genetic variability in livestock species, which is also due to incomplete data in genomic resource databases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform a genome-wide in silico screening of genomic sources and determine the genetic variability of microRNA genes in livestock species using mirna sniper 3.0 (http://www.integratomics-time.com/miRNA-SNiPer/), a new version of our previously developed tool. By examining Ensembl and miRBase genome builds, it was possible to design a tool-based generated search of 16 genomes including four livestock species: pig, horse, cattle and chicken. The analysis revealed 65 polymorphisms located within mature microRNA regions in these four species, including 28% within the seed region in cattle and chicken. Polymorphic microRNA genes in cattle and chicken were further examined for mapping to quantitative trait loci regions associated with production and health traits. The developed bioinformatics tool enables the analysis of polymorphic microRNA genes and prioritization of potential regulatory polymorphisms and therefore contributes to the development of microRNA-based biomarkers in livestock species. The assembled catalog and the developed tool can serve the animal science community to efficiently select microRNA SNPs for further quantitative and molecular genetic evaluations of their phenotypic effects and causal associations with livestock production traits.

  12. A Genome-Wide Enhancer Screen Implicates Sphingolipid Composition in Vacuolar ATPase Function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Finnigan, Gregory C.; Ryan, Margret; Stevens, Tom H.

    2011-01-01

    The function of the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) enzyme complex is to acidify organelles; this process is critical for a variety of cellular processes and has implications in human disease. There are five accessory proteins that assist in assembly of the membrane portion of the complex, the V0 domain. To identify additional elements that affect V-ATPase assembly, trafficking, or enzyme activity, we performed a genome-wide enhancer screen in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with two mutant assembly factor alleles, VMA21 with a dysfunctional ER retrieval motif (vma21QQ) and vma21QQ in combination with voa1Δ, a nonessential assembly factor. These alleles serve as sensitized genetic backgrounds that have reduced V-ATPase enzyme activity. Genes were identified from a variety of cellular pathways including a large number of trafficking-related components; we characterized two redundant gene pairs, HPH1/HPH2 and ORM1/ORM2. Both sets demonstrated synthetic growth defects in combination with the vma21QQ allele. A loss of either the HPH or ORM gene pairs alone did not result in a decrease in vacuolar acidification or defects in V-ATPase assembly. While the Hph proteins are not required for V-ATPase function, Orm1p and Orm2p are required for full V-ATPase enzyme function. Consistent with the documented role of the Orm proteins in sphingolipid regulation, we have found that inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis alleviates Orm-related growth defects. PMID:21196517

  13. A genome-wide CRISPR screen in primary immune cells to dissect regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Parnas, Oren; Jovanovic, Marko; Eisenhaure, Thomas M.; Herbst, Rebecca H.; Dixit, Atray; Ye, Chun Jimmie; Przybylski, Dariusz; Platt, Randall J.; Tirosh, Itay; Sanjana, Neville E.; Shalem, Ophir; Satija, Rahul; Raychowdhury, Raktima; Mertins, Philipp; Carr, Steven A.; Zhang, Feng; Hacohen, Nir; Regev, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Finding the components of cellular circuits and determining their functions systematically remains a major challenge in mammalian cells. Here, we introduced genome-wide pooled CRISPR-Cas9 libraries into dendritic cells (DCs) to identify genes that control the induction of tumor necrosis factor (Tnf) by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a key process in the host response to pathogens, mediated by the Tlr4 pathway. We found many of the known regulators of Tlr4 signaling, as well as dozens of previously unknown candidates that we validated. By measuring protein markers and mRNA profiles in DCs that are deficient in the known or candidate genes, we classified the genes into three functional modules with distinct effects on the canonical responses to LPS, and highlighted functions for the PAF complex and oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) complex. Our findings uncover new facets of innate immune circuits in primary cells, and provide a genetic approach for dissection of mammalian cell circuits. PMID:26189680

  14. Identification of novel modulators of mitochondrial function by a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Shi, Xiaoying; Padmanabhan, Ranjani; Wang, Qiong; Wu, Zhidan; Stevenson, Susan C.; Hild, Marc; Garza, Dan; Li, Hao

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with many human diseases. There has not been a systematic genetic approach for identifying regulators of basal mitochondrial biogenesis and function in higher eukaryotes. We performed a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila cells using mitochondrial Citrate synthase (CS) activity as the primary readout. We screened 13,071 dsRNAs and identified 152 genes that modulate CS activity. These modulators are involved in a wide range of biological processes and pathways including mitochondrial-related functions, transcriptional and translational regulation, and signaling pathways. Selected hits among the 152 genes were further analyzed for their effect on mitochondrial CS activity in transgenic flies or fly mutants. We confirmed a number of gene hits including HDAC6, Rpd3(HDAC1), CG3249, vimar, Src42A, klumpfuss, barren, and smt3 which exert effects on mitochondrial CS activities in vivo, demonstrating the value of Drosophila genome-wide RNAi screens for identifying genes and pathways that modulate mitochondrial function. PMID:18042644

  15. Genome-wide screening for DNA variants associated with reading and language traits

    PubMed Central

    Gialluisi, A; Newbury, D F; Wilcutt, E G; Olson, R K; DeFries, J C; Brandler, W M; Pennington, B F; Smith, S D; Scerri, T S; Simpson, N H; Luciano, M; Evans, D M; Bates, T C; Stein, J F; Talcott, J B; Monaco, A P; Paracchini, S; Francks, C; Fisher, S E

    2014-01-01

    Reading and language abilities are heritable traits that are likely to share some genetic influences with each other. To identify pleiotropic genetic variants affecting these traits, we first performed a genome-wide association scan (GWAS) meta-analysis using three richly characterized datasets comprising individuals with histories of reading or language problems, and their siblings. GWAS was performed in a total of 1862 participants using the first principal component computed from several quantitative measures of reading- and language-related abilities, both before and after adjustment for performance IQ. We identified novel suggestive associations at the SNPs rs59197085 and rs5995177 (uncorrected P ≈ 10–7 for each SNP), located respectively at the CCDC136/FLNC and RBFOX2 genes. Each of these SNPs then showed evidence for effects across multiple reading and language traits in univariate association testing against the individual traits. FLNC encodes a structural protein involved in cytoskeleton remodelling, while RBFOX2 is an important regulator of alternative splicing in neurons. The CCDC136/FLNC locus showed association with a comparable reading/language measure in an independent sample of 6434 participants from the general population, although involving distinct alleles of the associated SNP. Our datasets will form an important part of on-going international efforts to identify genes contributing to reading and language skills. PMID:25065397

  16. Advances in genome-wide RNAi cellular screens: a case study using the Drosophila JAK/STAT pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genome-scale RNA-interference (RNAi) screens are becoming ever more common gene discovery tools. However, whilst every screen identifies interacting genes, less attention has been given to how factors such as library design and post-screening bioinformatics may be effecting the data generated. Results Here we present a new genome-wide RNAi screen of the Drosophila JAK/STAT signalling pathway undertaken in the Sheffield RNAi Screening Facility (SRSF). This screen was carried out using a second-generation, computationally optimised dsRNA library and analysed using current methods and bioinformatic tools. To examine advances in RNAi screening technology, we compare this screen to a biologically very similar screen undertaken in 2005 with a first-generation library. Both screens used the same cell line, reporters and experimental design, with the SRSF screen identifying 42 putative regulators of JAK/STAT signalling, 22 of which verified in a secondary screen and 16 verified with an independent probe design. Following reanalysis of the original screen data, comparisons of the two gene lists allows us to make estimates of false discovery rates in the SRSF data and to conduct an assessment of off-target effects (OTEs) associated with both libraries. We discuss the differences and similarities between the resulting data sets and examine the relative improvements in gene discovery protocols. Conclusions Our work represents one of the first direct comparisons between first- and second-generation libraries and shows that modern library designs together with methodological advances have had a significant influence on genome-scale RNAi screens. PMID:23006893

  17. Identification of novel genes involved in light-dependent CRY degradation through a genome-wide RNAi screen.

    PubMed

    Sathyanarayanan, Sriram; Zheng, Xiangzhong; Kumar, Shailesh; Chen, Chun-Hong; Chen, Dechun; Hay, Bruce; Sehgal, Amita

    2008-06-01

    Circadian clocks regulate many different physiological processes and synchronize these to environmental light:dark cycles. In Drosophila, light is transmitted to the clock by a circadian blue light photoreceptor CRYPTOCHROME (CRY). In response to light, CRY promotes the degradation of the circadian clock protein TIMELESS (TIM) and then is itself degraded. To identify novel genes involved in circadian entrainment, we performed an unbiased genome-wide screen in Drosophila cells using a sensitive and quantitative assay that measures light-induced degradation of CRY. We systematically knocked down the expression of approximately 21,000 genes and identified those that regulate CRY stability. These genes include ubiquitin ligases, signal transduction molecules, and redox molecules. Many of the genes identified in the screen are specific for CRY degradation and do not affect degradation of the TIM protein in response to light, suggesting that, for the most part, these two pathways are distinct. We further validated the effect of three candidate genes on CRY stability in vivo by assaying flies mutant for each of these genes. This work identifies a novel regulatory network involved in light-dependent CRY degradation and demonstrates the power of a genome-wide RNAi approach for understanding circadian biology.

  18. Systematic Genome-wide Screening and Prediction of microRNAs in EBOV During the 2014 Ebolavirus Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yue; Wang, Yuzhuo; Zhang, Xianglilan; Liu, Wenli; Fan, Hang; Yao, Hongwu; Lin, Baihan; Zhu, Ping; Yuan, Wenjun; Tong, Yigang; Cao, Wuchun

    2015-01-01

    Recently, several thousand people have been killed by the Ebolavirus disease (EVD) in West Africa, yet no current antiviral medications and treatments are available. Systematic investigation of ebolavirus whole genomes during the 2014 outbreak may shed light on the underlying mechanisms of EVD development. Here, using the genome-wide screening in ebolavirus genome sequences, we predicted four putative viral microRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs) and seven putative mature microRNAs (miRNAs). Combing bioinformatics analysis and prediction of the potential ebolavirus miRNA target genes, we suggest that two ebolavirus coding possible miRNAs may be silence and down-regulate the target genes NFKBIE and RIPK1, which are the central mediator of the pathways related with host cell defense mechanism. Additionally, the ebolavirus exploits the miRNAs to inhibit the NF-kB and TNF factors to evade the host defense mechanisms that limit replication by killing infected cells, or to conversely trigger apoptosis as a mechanism to increase virus spreading. This is the first study to use the genome-wide scanning to predict microRNAs in the 2014 outbreak EVD and then to apply systematic bioinformatics to analyze their target genes. We revealed a potential mechanism of miRNAs in ebolavirus infection and possible therapeutic targets for Ebola viral infection treatment. PMID:26011078

  19. Genome-wide genetic screening with chemically mutagenized haploid embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Forment, Josep V; Herzog, Mareike; Coates, Julia; Konopka, Tomasz; Gapp, Bianca V; Nijman, Sebastian M; Adams, David J; Keane, Thomas M; Jackson, Stephen P

    2017-01-01

    In model organisms, classical genetic screening via random mutagenesis provides key insights into the molecular bases of genetic interactions, helping to define synthetic lethality, synthetic viability and drug-resistance mechanisms. The limited genetic tractability of diploid mammalian cells, however, precludes this approach. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of classical genetic screening in mammalian systems by using haploid cells, chemical mutagenesis and next-generation sequencing, providing a new tool to explore mammalian genetic interactions.

  20. Evaluation and Design of Genome-Wide CRISPR/SpCas9 Knockout Screens.

    PubMed

    Hart, Traver; Tong, Amy Hin Yan; Chan, Katie; Van Leeuwen, Jolanda; Seetharaman, Ashwin; Aregger, Michael; Chandrashekhar, Megha; Hustedt, Nicole; Seth, Sahil; Noonan, Avery; Habsid, Andrea; Sizova, Olga; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Climie, Ryan; Tworzyanski, Leanne; Lawson, Keith; Sartori, Maria Augusta; Alibeh, Sabriyeh; Tieu, David; Masud, Sanna; Mero, Patricia; Weiss, Alexander; Brown, Kevin R; Usaj, Matej; Billmann, Maximilian; Rahman, Mahfuzur; Constanzo, Michael; Myers, Chad L; Andrews, Brenda J; Boone, Charles; Durocher, Daniel; Moffat, Jason

    2017-08-07

    The adaptation of CRISPR/SpCas9 technology to mammalian cell lines is transforming the study of human functional genomics. Pooled libraries of CRISPR guide RNAs (gRNAs) targeting human protein-coding genes and encoded in viral vectors have been used to systematically create gene knockouts in a variety of human cancer and immortalized cell lines, in an effort to identify whether these knockouts cause cellular fitness defects. Previous work has shown that CRISPR screens are more sensitive and specific than pooled-library shRNA screens in similar assays, but currently there exists significant variability across CRISPR library designs and experimental protocols. In this study, we reanalyze 17 genome-scale knockout screens in human cell lines from three research groups, using three different genome-scale gRNA libraries. Using the Bayesian Analysis of Gene Essentiality algorithm to identify essential genes, we refine and expand our previously defined set of human core essential genes from 360 to 684 genes. We use this expanded set of reference core essential genes, CEG2, plus empirical data from six CRISPR knockout screens to guide the design of a sequence-optimized gRNA library, the Toronto KnockOut version 3.0 (TKOv3) library. We then demonstrate the high effectiveness of the library relative to reference sets of essential and nonessential genes, as well as other screens using similar approaches. The optimized TKOv3 library, combined with the CEG2 reference set, provide an efficient, highly optimized platform for performing and assessing gene knockout screens in human cell lines. Copyright © 2017 Hart et al.

  1. Evaluation and Design of Genome-Wide CRISPR/SpCas9 Knockout Screens

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Traver; Tong, Amy Hin Yan; Chan, Katie; Van Leeuwen, Jolanda; Seetharaman, Ashwin; Aregger, Michael; Chandrashekhar, Megha; Hustedt, Nicole; Seth, Sahil; Noonan, Avery; Habsid, Andrea; Sizova, Olga; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Climie, Ryan; Tworzyanski, Leanne; Lawson, Keith; Sartori, Maria Augusta; Alibeh, Sabriyeh; Tieu, David; Masud, Sanna; Mero, Patricia; Weiss, Alexander; Brown, Kevin R.; Usaj, Matej; Billmann, Maximilian; Rahman, Mahfuzur; Constanzo, Michael; Myers, Chad L.; Andrews, Brenda J.; Boone, Charles; Durocher, Daniel; Moffat, Jason

    2017-01-01

    The adaptation of CRISPR/SpCas9 technology to mammalian cell lines is transforming the study of human functional genomics. Pooled libraries of CRISPR guide RNAs (gRNAs) targeting human protein-coding genes and encoded in viral vectors have been used to systematically create gene knockouts in a variety of human cancer and immortalized cell lines, in an effort to identify whether these knockouts cause cellular fitness defects. Previous work has shown that CRISPR screens are more sensitive and specific than pooled-library shRNA screens in similar assays, but currently there exists significant variability across CRISPR library designs and experimental protocols. In this study, we reanalyze 17 genome-scale knockout screens in human cell lines from three research groups, using three different genome-scale gRNA libraries. Using the Bayesian Analysis of Gene Essentiality algorithm to identify essential genes, we refine and expand our previously defined set of human core essential genes from 360 to 684 genes. We use this expanded set of reference core essential genes, CEG2, plus empirical data from six CRISPR knockout screens to guide the design of a sequence-optimized gRNA library, the Toronto KnockOut version 3.0 (TKOv3) library. We then demonstrate the high effectiveness of the library relative to reference sets of essential and nonessential genes, as well as other screens using similar approaches. The optimized TKOv3 library, combined with the CEG2 reference set, provide an efficient, highly optimized platform for performing and assessing gene knockout screens in human cell lines. PMID:28655737

  2. Whole-animal genome-wide RNAi screen identifies networks regulating male germline stem cells in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Ge, Qinglan; Chan, Brian; Liu, Hanhan; Singh, Shree Ram; Manley, Jacob; Lee, Jae; Weideman, Ann Marie; Hou, Gerald; Hou, Steven X.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are regulated both intrinsically and externally, including by signals from the local environment and distant organs. To identify genes and pathways that regulate stem-cell fates in the whole organism, we perform a genome-wide transgenic RNAi screen through ubiquitous gene knockdowns, focusing on regulators of adult Drosophila testis germline stem cells (GSCs). Here we identify 530 genes that regulate GSC maintenance and differentiation. Of these, we further knock down 113 selected genes using cell-type-specific Gal4s and find that more than half were external regulators, that is, from the local microenvironment or more distal sources. Some genes, for example, versatile (vers), encoding a heterochromatin protein, regulates GSC fates differentially in different cell types and through multiple pathways. We also find that mitosis/cytokinesis proteins are especially important for male GSC maintenance. Our findings provide valuable insights and resources for studying stem cell regulation at the organismal level. PMID:27484291

  3. Genome-wide RNAi screen identifies SEC61A and VCP as conserved regulators of Sindbis virus entry

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Debasis; Rose, Patrick P.; Hanna, Sheri L.; Gold, Beth; Hopkins, Kaycie C.; Lyde, Randolph B.; Marks, Michael S.; Cherry, Sara

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Alphaviruses are a large class of insect-borne human pathogens and little is known about the host factor requirements for infection. To identify such factors we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen using model Drosophila cells and validated 94 genes that impacted infection of Sindbis virus (SINV), the prototypical alphavirus. We identified a conserved role for SEC61A and VCP in facilitating SINV entry in insects and mammals. SEC61A and VCP selectively regulate trafficking of the entry receptor NRAMP2, and loss of these proteins, or pharmacological inhibition, leads to altered NRAMP2 trafficking to lysosomal compartments, and proteolytic digestion within lysosomes. NRAMP2 is the major iron transporter in cells, and loss of NRAMP2 attenuates intracellular iron transport. Thus, this study reveals new genes and pathways involved in both infection and iron homeostasis that may serve as targets for antiviral therapeutics or for iron imbalance disorders. PMID:24332855

  4. A genome-wide Drosophila screen for heat nociception identifies α2δ3 as an evolutionarily conserved pain gene.

    PubMed

    Neely, G Gregory; Hess, Andreas; Costigan, Michael; Keene, Alex C; Goulas, Spyros; Langeslag, Michiel; Griffin, Robert S; Belfer, Inna; Dai, Feng; Smith, Shad B; Diatchenko, Luda; Gupta, Vaijayanti; Xia, Cui-Ping; Amann, Sabina; Kreitz, Silke; Heindl-Erdmann, Cornelia; Wolz, Susanne; Ly, Cindy V; Arora, Suchir; Sarangi, Rinku; Dan, Debasis; Novatchkova, Maria; Rosenzweig, Mark; Gibson, Dustin G; Truong, Darwin; Schramek, Daniel; Zoranovic, Tamara; Cronin, Shane J F; Angjeli, Belinda; Brune, Kay; Dietzl, Georg; Maixner, William; Meixner, Arabella; Thomas, Winston; Pospisilik, J Andrew; Alenius, Mattias; Kress, Michaela; Subramaniam, Sai; Garrity, Paul A; Bellen, Hugo J; Woolf, Clifford J; Penninger, Josef M

    2010-11-12

    Worldwide, acute, and chronic pain affects 20% of the adult population and represents an enormous financial and emotional burden. Using genome-wide neuronal-specific RNAi knockdown in Drosophila, we report a global screen for an innate behavior and identify hundreds of genes implicated in heat nociception, including the α2δ family calcium channel subunit straightjacket (stj). Mice mutant for the stj ortholog CACNA2D3 (α2δ3) also exhibit impaired behavioral heat pain sensitivity. In addition, in humans, α2δ3 SNP variants associate with reduced sensitivity to acute noxious heat and chronic back pain. Functional imaging in α2δ3 mutant mice revealed impaired transmission of thermal pain-evoked signals from the thalamus to higher-order pain centers. Intriguingly, in α2δ3 mutant mice, thermal pain and tactile stimulation triggered strong cross-activation, or synesthesia, of brain regions involved in vision, olfaction, and hearing.

  5. Genome-wide screen for inositol auxotrophy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae implicates lipid metabolism in stress response signaling

    PubMed Central

    Villa-García, Manuel J.; Choi, Myung Sun; Hinz, Flora I.; Gaspar, María L.; Jesch, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Inositol auxotrophy (Ino− phenotype) in budding yeast has classically been associated with misregulation of INO1 and other genes involved in lipid metabolism. To identify all non-essential yeast genes that are necessary for growth in the absence of inositol, we carried out a genome-wide phenotypic screening for deletion mutants exhibiting Ino− phenotypes under one or more growth conditions. We report the identification of 419 genes, including 385 genes not previously reported, which exhibit this phenotype when deleted. The identified genes are involved in a wide range of cellular processes, but are particularly enriched in those affecting transcription, protein modification, membrane trafficking, diverse stress responses, and lipid metabolism. Among the Ino− mutants involved in stress response, many exhibited phenotypes that are strengthened at elevated temperature and/or when choline is present in the medium. The role of inositol in regulation of lipid metabolism and stress response signaling is discussed. PMID:21136082

  6. A functional genome-wide genetic screening identifies new pathways controlling the G1/S transcriptional wave.

    PubMed

    Gaspa, Laura; González-Medina, Alberto; Hidalgo, Elena; Ayté, José

    2016-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe MBF complex activates the transcription of genes required for DNA synthesis and S phase. The MBF complex contains several proteins, including the core components Cdc10, Res1 and Res2, the co-repressor proteins Yox1 and Nrm1 and the co-activator Rep2. It has recently been shown how MBF is regulated when either the DNA damage or the DNA synthesis checkpoints are activated. However, how MBF is regulated in a normal unperturbed cell cycle is still not well understood. We have set up a genome-wide genomic screen searching for global regulators of MBF. We have crossed our knock-out collection library with a reporter strain that allows the measurement of MBF activity in live cells by flow cytometry. We confirm previously known regulators of MBF and show that COP9/signalosome and tRNA methyltransferases also regulate MBF activity.

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein quality control and degradation: genome-wide screen for ERAD components.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Antje; Wolf, Dieter H

    2005-01-01

    In this chapter, a genetic approach is presented that leads to the isolation of mutants and to the identification of proteins involved in protein quality control and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). The method makes use of a genomic screen of a yeast deletion library (EUROSCARF). Transformation of each of the approx 5000 strains deleted in one nonvital gene each with a CPY* chimera containing CPY* C-terminally fused to a transmembrane domain and the cytosolic Leu2 protein (3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase) constitutes the basic screening procedure. Because of a Leu2p deficiency in all deletion strains, cells can grow only when the CTL* chimera is present. As the CPY* module of CTL* will be recognized in ERAD-proficient cells, CTL* will be degraded and the strain is unable to grow. Therefore the absence of genes necessary for ER quality control and ERAD will allow cell growth and indicate the necessity of the respective gene for these processes.

  8. Genome-Wide RNAi Screens in C. elegans to Identify Genes Influencing Lifespan and Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Amit; Rae, Robbie

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference is a rapid, inexpensive, and highly effective tool used to inhibit gene function. In C. elegans, whole genome screens have been used to identify genes involved with numerous traits including aging and innate immunity. RNAi in C. elegans can be carried out via feeding, soaking, or injection. Here we outline protocols used to maintain, grow, and carry out RNAi via feeding in C. elegans and determine whether the inhibited genes are essential for lifespan or innate immunity.

  9. A Genome-Wide Screen of Genes Involved in Cadmium Tolerance in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Patrick J.; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk; Park, Han-Oh; Hayles, Jacqueline; Russell, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Cadmium is a worldwide environmental toxicant responsible for a range of human diseases including cancer. Cellular injury from cadmium is minimized by stress-responsive detoxification mechanisms. We explored the genetic requirements for cadmium tolerance by individually screening mutants from the fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) haploid deletion collection for inhibited growth on agar growth media containing cadmium. Cadmium-sensitive mutants were further tested for sensitivity to oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide) and osmotic stress (potassium chloride). Of 2649 mutants screened, 237 were sensitive to cadmium, of which 168 were cadmium specific. Most were previously unknown to be involved in cadmium tolerance. The 237 genes represent a number of pathways including sulfate assimilation, phytochelatin synthesis and transport, ubiquinone (Coenzyme Q10) biosynthesis, stress signaling, cell wall biosynthesis and cell morphology, gene expression and chromatin remodeling, vacuole function, and intracellular transport of macromolecules. The ubiquinone biosynthesis mutants are acutely sensitive to cadmium but only mildly sensitive to hydrogen peroxide, indicating that Coenzyme Q10 plays a larger role in cadmium tolerance than just as an antioxidant. These and several other mutants turn yellow when exposed to cadmium, suggesting cadmium sulfide accumulation. This phenotype can potentially be used as a biomarker for cadmium. There is remarkably little overlap with a comparable screen of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid deletion collection, indicating that the two distantly related yeasts utilize significantly different strategies for coping with cadmium stress. These strategies and their relation to cadmium detoxification in humans are discussed. PMID:18684775

  10. A genome-wide screen of genes involved in cadmium tolerance in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Patrick J; Vashisht, Ajay A; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk; Park, Han-Oh; Hayles, Jacqueline; Russell, Paul

    2008-11-01

    Cadmium is a worldwide environmental toxicant responsible for a range of human diseases including cancer. Cellular injury from cadmium is minimized by stress-responsive detoxification mechanisms. We explored the genetic requirements for cadmium tolerance by individually screening mutants from the fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) haploid deletion collection for inhibited growth on agar growth media containing cadmium. Cadmium-sensitive mutants were further tested for sensitivity to oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide) and osmotic stress (potassium chloride). Of 2649 mutants screened, 237 were sensitive to cadmium, of which 168 were cadmium specific. Most were previously unknown to be involved in cadmium tolerance. The 237 genes represent a number of pathways including sulfate assimilation, phytochelatin synthesis and transport, ubiquinone (Coenzyme Q10) biosynthesis, stress signaling, cell wall biosynthesis and cell morphology, gene expression and chromatin remodeling, vacuole function, and intracellular transport of macromolecules. The ubiquinone biosynthesis mutants are acutely sensitive to cadmium but only mildly sensitive to hydrogen peroxide, indicating that Coenzyme Q10 plays a larger role in cadmium tolerance than just as an antioxidant. These and several other mutants turn yellow when exposed to cadmium, suggesting cadmium sulfide accumulation. This phenotype can potentially be used as a biomarker for cadmium. There is remarkably little overlap with a comparable screen of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid deletion collection, indicating that the two distantly related yeasts utilize significantly different strategies for coping with cadmium stress. These strategies and their relation to cadmium detoxification in humans are discussed.

  11. Nickel-resistance determinants in Acidiphilium sp. PM identified by genome-wide functional screening.

    PubMed

    San Martin-Uriz, Patxi; Mirete, Salvador; Alcolea, Pedro J; Gomez, Manuel J; Amils, Ricardo; Gonzalez-Pastor, Jose E

    2014-01-01

    Acidiphilium spp. are conspicuous dwellers of acidic, metal-rich environments. Indeed, they are among the most metal-resistant organisms; yet little is known about the mechanisms behind the metal tolerance in this genus. Acidiphilium sp. PM is an environmental isolate from Rio Tinto, an acidic, metal-laden river located in southwestern Spain. The characterization of its metal resistance revealed a remarkable ability to tolerate high Ni concentrations. Here we report the screening of a genomic library of Acidiphilium sp. PM to identify genes involved in Ni resistance. This approach revealed seven different genes conferring Ni resistance to E. coli, two of which form an operon encoding the ATP-dependent protease HslVU (ClpQY). This protease was found to enhance resistance to both Ni and Co in E. coli, a function not previously reported. Other Ni-resistance determinants include genes involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the synthesis of branched amino acids. The diversity of molecular functions of the genes recovered in the screening suggests that Ni resistance in Acidiphilium sp. PM probably relies on different molecular mechanisms.

  12. Genome-wide RNAi screening identifies host restriction factors critical for in vivo AAV transduction.

    PubMed

    Mano, Miguel; Ippodrino, Rudy; Zentilin, Lorena; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-09-08

    Viral vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) hold great promise for in vivo gene transfer; several unknowns, however, still limit the vectors' broader and more efficient application. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput, whole-genome siRNA screening aimed at identifying cellular factors regulating AAV transduction. We identified 1,483 genes affecting vector efficiency more than 4-fold and up to 50-fold, either negatively or positively. Most of these factors have not previously been associated to AAV infection. The most effective siRNAs were independent from the virus serotype or analyzed cell type and were equally evident for single-stranded and self-complementary AAV vectors. A common characteristic of the most effective siRNAs was the induction of cellular DNA damage and activation of a cell cycle checkpoint. This information can be exploited for the development of more efficient AAV-based gene delivery procedures. Administration of the most effective siRNAs identified by the screening to the liver significantly improved in vivo AAV transduction efficiency.

  13. Genome-Wide Screen for Oxalate-Sensitive Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, V.; Stotz, H. U.; Hippchen, K.; Bakalinsky, A. T.

    2007-01-01

    Oxalic acid is an important virulence factor produced by phytopathogenic filamentous fungi. In order to discover yeast genes whose orthologs in the pathogen may confer self-tolerance and whose plant orthologs may protect the host, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion library consisting of 4,827 haploid mutants harboring deletions in nonessential genes was screened for growth inhibition and survival in a rich medium containing 30 mM oxalic acid at pH 3. A total of 31 mutants were identified that had significantly lower cell yields in oxalate medium than in an oxalate-free medium. About 35% of these mutants had not previously been detected in published screens for sensitivity to sorbic or citric acid. Mutants impaired in endosomal transport, the rgp1Δ, ric1Δ, snf7Δ, vps16Δ, vps20Δ, and vps51Δ mutants, were significantly overrepresented relative to their frequency among all verified yeast open reading frames. Oxalate exposure to a subset of five mutants, the drs2Δ, vps16Δ, vps51Δ, ric1Δ, and rib4Δ mutants, was lethal. With the exception of the rib4Δ mutant, all of these mutants are impaired in vesicle-mediated transport. Indirect evidence is provided suggesting that the sensitivity of the rib4Δ mutant, a riboflavin auxotroph, is due to oxalate-mediated interference with riboflavin uptake by the putative monocarboxylate transporter Mch5. PMID:17644632

  14. A Genome-Wide Screen for Dendritically Localized RNAs Identifies Genes Required for Dendrite Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Mala; Edmund, Hendia; Ennis, Darragh; Schlueter, Marissa A.; Marot, Jessica E.; Tambasco, Janet; Barlow, Ida; Sigurbjornsdottir, Sara; Mathew, Renjith; Vallés, Ana Maria; Wojciech, Waldemar; Roth, Siegfried; Davis, Ilan; Leptin, Maria; Gavis, Elizabeth R.

    2016-01-01

    Localizing messenger RNAs at specific subcellular sites is a conserved mechanism for targeting the synthesis of cytoplasmic proteins to distinct subcellular domains, thereby generating the asymmetric protein distributions necessary for cellular and developmental polarity. However, the full range of transcripts that are asymmetrically distributed in specialized cell types, and the significance of their localization, especially in the nervous system, are not known. We used the EP-MS2 method, which combines EP transposon insertion with the MS2/MCP in vivo fluorescent labeling system, to screen for novel localized transcripts in polarized cells, focusing on the highly branched Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization neurons. Of a total of 541 lines screened, we identified 55 EP-MS2 insertions producing transcripts that were enriched in neuronal processes, particularly in dendrites. The 47 genes identified by these insertions encode molecularly diverse proteins, and are enriched for genes that function in neuronal development and physiology. RNAi-mediated knockdown confirmed roles for many of the candidate genes in dendrite morphogenesis. We propose that the transport of mRNAs encoded by these genes into the dendrites allows their expression to be regulated on a local scale during the dynamic developmental processes of dendrite outgrowth, branching, and/or remodeling. PMID:27260999

  15. A Genome-Wide Screen for Dendritically Localized RNAs Identifies Genes Required for Dendrite Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Mala; Edmund, Hendia; Ennis, Darragh; Schlueter, Marissa A; Marot, Jessica E; Tambasco, Janet; Barlow, Ida; Sigurbjornsdottir, Sara; Mathew, Renjith; Vallés, Ana Maria; Wojciech, Waldemar; Roth, Siegfried; Davis, Ilan; Leptin, Maria; Gavis, Elizabeth R

    2016-08-09

    Localizing messenger RNAs at specific subcellular sites is a conserved mechanism for targeting the synthesis of cytoplasmic proteins to distinct subcellular domains, thereby generating the asymmetric protein distributions necessary for cellular and developmental polarity. However, the full range of transcripts that are asymmetrically distributed in specialized cell types, and the significance of their localization, especially in the nervous system, are not known. We used the EP-MS2 method, which combines EP transposon insertion with the MS2/MCP in vivo fluorescent labeling system, to screen for novel localized transcripts in polarized cells, focusing on the highly branched Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization neurons. Of a total of 541 lines screened, we identified 55 EP-MS2 insertions producing transcripts that were enriched in neuronal processes, particularly in dendrites. The 47 genes identified by these insertions encode molecularly diverse proteins, and are enriched for genes that function in neuronal development and physiology. RNAi-mediated knockdown confirmed roles for many of the candidate genes in dendrite morphogenesis. We propose that the transport of mRNAs encoded by these genes into the dendrites allows their expression to be regulated on a local scale during the dynamic developmental processes of dendrite outgrowth, branching, and/or remodeling.

  16. Genome-wide RNAi screening identifies host restriction factors critical for in vivo AAV transduction

    PubMed Central

    Mano, Miguel; Ippodrino, Rudy; Zentilin, Lorena; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Viral vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) hold great promise for in vivo gene transfer; several unknowns, however, still limit the vectors’ broader and more efficient application. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput, whole-genome siRNA screening aimed at identifying cellular factors regulating AAV transduction. We identified 1,483 genes affecting vector efficiency more than 4-fold and up to 50-fold, either negatively or positively. Most of these factors have not previously been associated to AAV infection. The most effective siRNAs were independent from the virus serotype or analyzed cell type and were equally evident for single-stranded and self-complementary AAV vectors. A common characteristic of the most effective siRNAs was the induction of cellular DNA damage and activation of a cell cycle checkpoint. This information can be exploited for the development of more efficient AAV-based gene delivery procedures. Administration of the most effective siRNAs identified by the screening to the liver significantly improved in vivo AAV transduction efficiency. PMID:26305933

  17. Nickel-Resistance Determinants in Acidiphilium sp. PM Identified by Genome-Wide Functional Screening

    PubMed Central

    San Martin-Uriz, Patxi; Mirete, Salvador; Alcolea, Pedro J.; Gomez, Manuel J.; Amils, Ricardo; Gonzalez-Pastor, Jose E.

    2014-01-01

    Acidiphilium spp. are conspicuous dwellers of acidic, metal-rich environments. Indeed, they are among the most metal-resistant organisms; yet little is known about the mechanisms behind the metal tolerance in this genus. Acidiphilium sp. PM is an environmental isolate from Rio Tinto, an acidic, metal-laden river located in southwestern Spain. The characterization of its metal resistance revealed a remarkable ability to tolerate high Ni concentrations. Here we report the screening of a genomic library of Acidiphilium sp. PM to identify genes involved in Ni resistance. This approach revealed seven different genes conferring Ni resistance to E. coli, two of which form an operon encoding the ATP-dependent protease HslVU (ClpQY). This protease was found to enhance resistance to both Ni and Co in E. coli, a function not previously reported. Other Ni-resistance determinants include genes involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the synthesis of branched amino acids. The diversity of molecular functions of the genes recovered in the screening suggests that Ni resistance in Acidiphilium sp. PM probably relies on different molecular mechanisms. PMID:24740277

  18. A genome-wide screen for identifying all regulators of a target gene

    PubMed Central

    Baptist, Guillaume; Pinel, Corinne; Ranquet, Caroline; Izard, Jérôme; Ropers, Delphine; de Jong, Hidde; Geiselmann, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a new screening methodology for identifying all genes that control the expression of a target gene through genetic or metabolic interactions. The screen combines mutant libraries with luciferase reporter constructs, whose expression can be monitored in vivo and over time in different environmental conditions. We apply the method to identify the genes that control the expression of the gene acs, encoding the acetyl coenzyme A synthetase, in Escherichia coli. We confirm most of the known genetic regulators, including CRP–cAMP, IHF and components of the phosphotransferase system. In addition, we identify new regulatory interactions, many of which involve metabolic intermediates or metabolic sensing, such as the genes pgi, pfkA, sucB and lpdA, encoding enzymes in glycolysis and the TCA cycle. Some of these novel interactions were validated by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. More generally, we observe that a large number of mutants directly or indirectly influence acs expression, an effect confirmed for a second promoter, sdhC. The method is applicable to any promoter fused to a luminescent reporter gene in combination with a deletion mutant library. PMID:23892289

  19. Genome-wide barcoded transposon screen for cancer drug sensitivity in haploid mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pettitt, Stephen J.; Krastev, Dragomir B.; Pemberton, Helen N.; Fontebasso, Yari; Frankum, Jessica; Rehman, Farah L.; Brough, Rachel; Song, Feifei; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Rafiq, Rumana; Wallberg, Fredrik; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Fenwick, Kerry; Armisen-Garrido, Javier; Swain, Amanda; Gulati, Aditi; Campbell, James; Ashworth, Alan; Lord, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a screen for cellular response to drugs that makes use of haploid embryonic stem cells. We generated ten libraries of mutants with piggyBac gene trap transposon integrations, totalling approximately 100,000 mutant clones. Random barcode sequences were inserted into the transposon vector to allow the number of cells bearing each insertion to be measured by amplifying and sequencing the barcodes. These barcodes were associated with their integration sites by inverse PCR. We exposed these libraries to commonly used cancer drugs and profiled changes in barcode abundance by Ion Torrent sequencing in order to identify mutations that conferred sensitivity. Drugs tested included conventional chemotherapeutics as well as targeted inhibitors of topoisomerases, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), Hsp90 and WEE1. PMID:28248920

  20. Genome-wide in vivo screen identifies novel host regulators of metastatic colonization.

    PubMed

    van der Weyden, Louise; Arends, Mark J; Campbell, Andrew D; Bald, Tobias; Wardle-Jones, Hannah; Griggs, Nicola; Velasco-Herrera, Martin Del Castillo; Tüting, Thomas; Sansom, Owen J; Karp, Natasha A; Clare, Simon; Gleeson, Diane; Ryder, Edward; Galli, Antonella; Tuck, Elizabeth; Cambridge, Emma L; Voet, Thierry; Macaulay, Iain C; Wong, Kim; Spiegel, Sarah; Speak, Anneliese O; Adams, David J

    2017-01-12

    Metastasis is the leading cause of death for cancer patients. This multi-stage process requires tumour cells to survive in the circulation, extravasate at distant sites, then proliferate; it involves contributions from both the tumour cell and tumour microenvironment ('host', which includes stromal cells and the immune system). Studies suggest the early steps of the metastatic process are relatively efficient, with the post-extravasation regulation of tumour growth ('colonization') being critical in determining metastatic outcome. Here we show the results of screening 810 mutant mouse lines using an in vivo assay to identify microenvironmental regulators of metastatic colonization. We identify 23 genes that, when disrupted in mouse, modify the ability of tumour cells to establish metastatic foci, with 19 of these genes not previously demonstrated to play a role in host control of metastasis. The largest reduction in pulmonary metastasis was observed in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) transporter spinster homologue 2 (Spns2)-deficient mice. We demonstrate a novel outcome of S1P-mediated regulation of lymphocyte trafficking, whereby deletion of Spns2, either globally or in a lymphatic endothelial-specific manner, creates a circulating lymphopenia and a higher percentage of effector T cells and natural killer (NK) cells present in the lung. This allows for potent tumour cell killing, and an overall decreased metastatic burden.

  1. Genome-Wide Overexpression Screen Identifies Genes Able to Bypass p16-Mediated Senescence in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Jae; Škalamera, Dubravka; Dahmer-Heath, Mareike; Shakhbazov, Konstanin; Ranall, Max V; Fox, Carly; Lambie, Duncan; Stevenson, Alexander J; Yaswen, Paul; Gonda, Thomas J; Gabrielli, Brian

    2017-03-01

    Malignant melanomas often arise from nevi, which result from initial oncogene-induced hyperproliferation of melanocytes that are maintained in a CDKN2A/p16-mediated senescent state. Thus, genes that can bypass this senescence barrier are likely to contribute to melanoma development. We have performed a gain-of-function screen of 17,030 lentivirally expressed human open reading frames (ORFs) in a melanoma cell line containing an inducible p16 construct to identify such genes. Genes known to bypass p16-induced senescence arrest, including the human papilloma virus 18 E7 gene ( HPV18E7), and genes such as the p16-binding CDK6 with expected functions, as well as panel of novel genes, were identified, including high-mobility group box (HMGB) proteins. A number of these were further validated in two other models of p16-induced senescence. Tissue immunohistochemistry demonstrated higher levels of CDK6 in primary melanomas compared with normal skin and nevi. Reduction of CDK6 levels drove melanoma cells expressing functional p16 into senescence, demonstrating its contribution to bypass senescence.

  2. Genome-wide screen for genes with effects on distinct iron uptake activities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Knight, Simon A B; Courel, Maïté; Santos, Renata; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Dancis, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    We screened a collection of 4847 haploid knockout strains (EUROSCARF collection) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for iron uptake from the siderophore ferrioxamine B (FOB). A large number of mutants showed altered uptake activities, and a few turned yellow when grown on agar plates with added FOB, indicating increased intracellular accumulation of undissociated siderophores. A subset consisting of 197 knockouts with altered uptake was examined further for regulated activities that mediate cellular uptake of iron from other siderophores or from iron salts. Hierarchical clustering analysis grouped the data according to iron sources and according to mutant categories. In the first analysis, siderophores grouped together with the exception of enterobactin, which grouped with iron salts, suggesting a reductive pathway of iron uptake for this siderophore. Mutant groupings included three categories: (i) high-FOB uptake, high reductase, low-ferrous transport; (ii) isolated high- or low-FOB transport; and (iii) induction of all activities. Mutants with statistically altered uptake activities included genes encoding proteins with predominant localization in the secretory pathway, nucleus, and mitochondria. Measurements of different iron-uptake activities in the yeast knockout collection make possible distinctions between genes with general effects on iron metabolism and those with pathway-specific effects.

  3. Genome-Wide Screen for Genes With Effects on Distinct Iron Uptake Activities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Knight, Simon A. B.; Courel, Maïté; Santos, Renata; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Dancis, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    We screened a collection of 4847 haploid knockout strains (EUROSCARF collection) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for iron uptake from the siderophore ferrioxamine B (FOB). A large number of mutants showed altered uptake activities, and a few turned yellow when grown on agar plates with added FOB, indicating increased intracellular accumulation of undissociated siderophores. A subset consisting of 197 knockouts with altered uptake was examined further for regulated activities that mediate cellular uptake of iron from other siderophores or from iron salts. Hierarchical clustering analysis grouped the data according to iron sources and according to mutant categories. In the first analysis, siderophores grouped together with the exception of enterobactin, which grouped with iron salts, suggesting a reductive pathway of iron uptake for this siderophore. Mutant groupings included three categories: (i) high-FOB uptake, high reductase, low-ferrous transport; (ii) isolated high- or low-FOB transport; and (iii) induction of all activities. Mutants with statistically altered uptake activities included genes encoding proteins with predominant localization in the secretory pathway, nucleus, and mitochondria. Measurements of different iron-uptake activities in the yeast knockout collection make possible distinctions between genes with general effects on iron metabolism and those with pathway-specific effects. PMID:15489514

  4. Genome-Wide Screen for Haploinsufficient Cell Size Genes in the Opportunistic Yeast Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Chaillot, Julien; Cook, Michael A.; Corbeil, Jacques; Sellam, Adnane

    2016-01-01

    One of the most critical but still poorly understood aspects of eukaryotic cell proliferation is the basis for commitment to cell division in late G1 phase, called Start in yeast and the Restriction Point in metazoans. In all species, a critical cell size threshold coordinates cell growth with cell division and thereby establishes a homeostatic cell size. While a comprehensive survey of cell size genetic determinism has been performed in the saprophytic yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, very little is known in pathogenic fungi. As a number of critical Start regulators are haploinsufficient for cell size, we applied a quantitative analysis of the size phenome, using elutriation-barcode sequencing methodology, to 5639 barcoded heterozygous deletion strains of the opportunistic yeast Candida albicans. Our screen identified conserved known regulators and biological processes required to maintain size homeostasis in the opportunistic yeast C. albicans. We also identified novel C. albicans-specific size genes and provided a conceptual framework for future mechanistic studies. Interestingly, some of the size genes identified were required for fungal pathogenicity suggesting that cell size homeostasis may be elemental to C. albicans fitness or virulence inside the host. PMID:28040776

  5. Genome-Wide Screen for Haploinsufficient Cell Size Genes in the Opportunistic Yeast Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chaillot, Julien; Cook, Michael A; Corbeil, Jacques; Sellam, Adnane

    2017-02-09

    One of the most critical but still poorly understood aspects of eukaryotic cell proliferation is the basis for commitment to cell division in late G1 phase, called Start in yeast and the Restriction Point in metazoans. In all species, a critical cell size threshold coordinates cell growth with cell division and thereby establishes a homeostatic cell size. While a comprehensive survey of cell size genetic determinism has been performed in the saprophytic yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, very little is known in pathogenic fungi. As a number of critical Start regulators are haploinsufficient for cell size, we applied a quantitative analysis of the size phenome, using elutriation-barcode sequencing methodology, to 5639 barcoded heterozygous deletion strains of the opportunistic yeast Candida albicans Our screen identified conserved known regulators and biological processes required to maintain size homeostasis in the opportunistic yeast C. albicans We also identified novel C. albicans-specific size genes and provided a conceptual framework for future mechanistic studies. Interestingly, some of the size genes identified were required for fungal pathogenicity suggesting that cell size homeostasis may be elemental to C. albicans fitness or virulence inside the host. Copyright © 2017 Chaillot et al.

  6. Genome-Wide Expression Screening Discloses Long Noncoding RNAs Involved in Thyroid Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Li, Wei; Yan, Pearlly; Bundschuh, Ralf; Brock, Pamela; Senter, Leigha; Ringel, Matthew D; de la Chapelle, Albert; He, Huiling

    2016-11-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) regulate pathological processes, yet their potential roles in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) are poorly understood. To profile transcriptionally dysregulated lncRNAs in PTC and identify lncRNAs associated with clinicopathological characteristics. We performed RNA sequencing of 12 paired PTC tumors and matched noncancerous tissues and correlated the expression of lncRNAs with clinical parameters. The 2 most significantly dysregulated lncRNAs were studied in an Ohio PTC cohort (n = 109) and in PTC data (n = 497) from The Cancer Genome Atlas. A combination of laboratory-based studies and computational analysis using clinical data and samples and a publically available database. Correlation between expression values and clinical parameters. We identified 218 lncRNAs showing differential expression in PTC (fold change ≥ 2.0, P < .01). Significant correlation was observed between the expression of 2 lncRNAs (XLOC_051122 and XLOC_006074) and 1) lymph node metastasis (N stage) and 2) BRAF(V600E) mutation. Among patients with wild-type BRAF, the expression of these 2 lncRNAs showed significantly higher levels in the patients with lymph node metastasis. In silico analysis of these lncRNAs pinpointed cell movement and cellular growth and proliferation as targeted functions. Comprehensive expression screening identified 2 novel lncRNAs associated with risk factors of adverse prognosis in PTC patients. These lncRNAs may be novel players in PTC carcinogenesis.

  7. Genome-wide screening for genetic loci associated with noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    White, Cory H; Ohmen, Jeffrey D; Sheth, Sonal; Zebboudj, Amina F; McHugh, Richard K; Hoffman, Larry F; Lusis, Aldons J; Davis, Richard C; Friedman, Rick A

    2009-04-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is one of the more common sources of environmentally induced hearing loss in adults. In a mouse model, Castaneous (CAST/Ei) is an inbred strain that is resistant to NIHL, while the C57BL/6J strain is susceptible. We have used the genome-tagged mice (GTM) library of congenic strains, carrying defined segments of the CAST/Ei genome introgressed onto the C57BL/6J background, to search for loci modifying the noise-induced damage seen in the C57BL/6J strain. NIHL was induced by exposing 6-8-week old mice to 108 dB SPL intensity noise. We tested the hearing of each mouse strain up to 23 days after noise exposure using auditory brainstem response (ABR). This study identifies a number of genetic loci that modify the initial response to damaging noise, as well as long-term recovery. The data suggest that multiple alleles within the CAST/Ei genome modify the pathogenesis of NIHL and that screening congenic libraries for loci that underlie traits of interest can be easily carried out in a high-throughput fashion.

  8. Genome-wide RNAi screening identifies protein damage as a regulator of osmoprotective gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Lamitina, Todd; Huang, Chunyi George; Strange, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The detection, stabilization, and repair of stress-induced damage are essential requirements for cellular life. All cells respond to osmotic stress-induced water loss with increased expression of genes that mediate accumulation of organic osmolytes, solutes that function as chemical chaperones and restore osmotic homeostasis. The signals and signaling mechanisms that regulate osmoprotective gene expression in animal cells are poorly understood. Here, we show that gpdh-1 and gpdh-2, genes that mediate the accumulation of the organic osmolyte glycerol, are essential for survival of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans during osmotic stress. Expression of GFP driven by the gpdh-1 promoter (Pgpdh-1::GFP) is detected only during hypertonic stress but is not induced by other stressors. Using Pgpdh-1::GFP expression as a phenotype, we screened ≈16,000 genes by RNAi feeding and identified 122 that cause constitutive activation of gpdh-1 expression and glycerol accumulation. Many of these genes function to regulate protein translation and cotranslational protein folding and to target and degrade denatured proteins, suggesting that the accumulation of misfolded proteins functions as a signal to activate osmoprotective gene expression and organic osmolyte accumulation in animal cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, 73% of these protein-homeostasis genes have been shown to slow age-dependent protein aggregation in C. elegans. Because diverse environmental stressors and numerous disease states result in protein misfolding, mechanisms must exist that discriminate between osmotically induced and other forms of stress-induced protein damage. Our findings provide a foundation for understanding how these damage-selectivity mechanisms function. PMID:16880390

  9. Genome-Wide Screen Reveals sec21 Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Are Methotrexate-Resistant

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lai H.; Flibotte, Stephane; Sinha, Sunita; Chiang, Jennifer; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance is a consequence of how most modern medicines work. Drugs exert pressure on cells that causes death or the evolution of resistance. Indeed, highly specific drugs are rendered ineffective by a single DNA mutation. In this study, we apply the drug methotrexate, which is widely used in cancer and rheumatoid arthritis, and perform evolution experiments on Baker’s yeast to ask the different ways in which cells become drug resistant. Because of the conserved nature of biological pathways between yeast and man, our results can inform how the same mechanism may operate to render human cells resistant to treatment. Exposure of cells to small molecules and drug therapies imposes a strong selective pressure. As a result, cells rapidly acquire mutations in order to survive. These include resistant variants of the drug target as well as those that modulate drug transport and detoxification. To systematically explore how cells acquire drug resistance in an unbiased manner, rapid cost-effective approaches are required. Methotrexate, as one of the first rationally designed anticancer drugs, has served as a prototypic example of such acquired resistance. Known methotrexate resistance mechanisms include mutations that increase expression of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) target as well as those that maintain function yet reduce the drug’s binding affinity. Recent evidence suggests that target-independent, epistatic mutations can also result in resistance to methotrexate. Currently, however, the relative contribution of such unlinked resistance mutations is not well understood. To address this issue, we took advantage of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model eukaryotic system that combined with whole-genome sequencing and a rapid screening methodology, allowed the identification of causative mutations that modulate resistance to methotrexate. We found a recurrent missense mutation in SEC21 (orthologous to human COPG1), which we confirmed in 10 de novo

  10. Genes required for growth at high hydrostatic pressure in Escherichia coli K-12 identified by genome-wide screening.

    PubMed

    Black, S Lucas; Dawson, Angela; Ward, F Bruce; Allen, Rosalind J

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that much of the global microbial biosphere is believed to exist in high pressure environments, the effects of hydrostatic pressure on microbial physiology remain poorly understood. We use a genome-wide screening approach, combined with a novel high-throughput high-pressure cell culture method, to investigate the effects of hydrostatic pressure on microbial physiology in vivo. The Keio collection of single-gene deletion mutants in Escherichia coli K-12 was screened for growth at a range of pressures from 0.1 MPa to 60 MPa. This led to the identification of 6 genes, rodZ, holC, priA, dnaT, dedD and tatC, whose products were required for growth at 30 MPa and a further 3 genes, tolB, rffT and iscS, whose products were required for growth at 40 MPa. Our results support the view that the effects of pressure on cell physiology are pleiotropic, with DNA replication, cell division, the cytoskeleton and cell envelope physiology all being potential failure points for cell physiology during growth at elevated pressure.

  11. Genome-wide siRNA screen reveals amino acid starvation-induced autophagy requires SCOC and WAC

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, Nicole C; Jefferies, Harold B J; Alemu, Endalkachew A; Saunders, Rebecca E; Howell, Michael; Johansen, Terje; Tooze, Sharon A

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process by which cytoplasmic components are sequestered and transported by autophagosomes to lysosomes for degradation, enabling recycling of these components and providing cells with amino acids during starvation. It is a highly regulated process and its deregulation contributes to multiple diseases. Despite its importance in cell homeostasis, autophagy is not fully understood. To find new proteins that modulate starvation-induced autophagy, we performed a genome-wide siRNA screen in a stable human cell line expressing GFP–LC3, the marker-protein for autophagosomes. Using stringent validation criteria, our screen identified nine novel autophagy regulators. Among the hits required for autophagosome formation are SCOC (short coiled-coil protein), a Golgi protein, which interacts with fasciculation and elongation protein zeta 1 (FEZ1), an ULK1-binding protein. SCOC forms a starvation-sensitive trimeric complex with UVRAG (UV radiation resistance associated gene) and FEZ1 and may regulate ULK1 and Beclin 1 complex activities. A second candidate WAC is required for starvation-induced autophagy but also acts as a potential negative regulator of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The identification of these novel regulatory proteins with diverse functions in autophagy contributes towards a fuller understanding of autophagosome formation. PMID:22354037

  12. A genome-wide imaging-based screening to identify genes involved in synphilin-1 inclusion formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Yang, Qian; Zheng, Ju; Zhu, Xuefeng; Hao, Xinxin; Song, Jia; Lebacq, Tom; Franssens, Vanessa; Winderickx, Joris; Nystrom, Thomas; Liu, Beidong

    2016-01-01

    Synphilin-1 is a major component of Parkinson’s disease (PD) inclusion bodies implicated in PD pathogenesis. However, the machinery controlling synphilin-1 inclusion formation remains unclear. Here, we investigated synphilin-1 inclusion formation using a systematic genome-wide, high-content imaging based screening approach (HCI) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By combining with a secondary screening for mutants showing significant changes on fluorescence signal intensity, we filtered out hits that significantly decreased the expression level of synphilin-1. We found 133 yeast genes that didn’t affect synphilin-1 expression but that were required for the formation of synphilin-1 inclusions. Functional enrichment and physical interaction network analysis revealed these genes to encode for functions involved in cytoskeleton organization, histone modification, sister chromatid segregation, glycolipid biosynthetic process, DNA repair and replication. All hits were confirmed by conventional microscopy. Complementation assays were performed with a selected group of mutants, results indicated that the observed phenotypic changes in synphilin-1 inclusion formation were directly caused by the loss of corresponding genes of the deletion mutants. Further growth assays of these mutants showed a significant synthetic sick effect upon synphilin-1 expression, which supports the hypothesis that matured inclusions represent an end stage of several events meant to protect cells against the synphilin-1 cytotoxicity. PMID:27440388

  13. A genome-wide RNA interference screen in Drosophila melanogaster cells for new components of the Hh signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Nybakken, Kent; Vokes, Steven A; Lin, Ting-Yi; McMahon, Andrew P; Perrimon, Norbert

    2005-12-01

    Members of the Hedgehog (Hh) family of signaling proteins are powerful regulators of developmental processes in many organisms and have been implicated in many human disease states. Here we report the results of a genome-wide RNA interference screen in Drosophila melanogaster cells for new components of the Hh signaling pathway. The screen identified hundreds of potential new regulators of Hh signaling, including many large protein complexes with pleiotropic effects, such as the coat protein complex I (COPI) complex, the ribosome and the proteasome. We identified the multimeric protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and two new kinases, the D. melanogaster orthologs of the vertebrate PITSLRE and cyclin-dependent kinase-9 (CDK9) kinases, as Hh regulators. We also identified a large group of constitutive and alternative splicing factors, two nucleoporins involved in mRNA export and several RNA-regulatory proteins as potent regulators of Hh signal transduction, indicating that splicing regulation and mRNA transport have a previously unrecognized role in Hh signaling. Finally, we showed that several of these genes have conserved roles in mammalian Hh signaling.

  14. A genome-wide screen identifies conserved protein hubs required for cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Toret, Christopher P.; D’Ambrosio, Michael V.; Vale, Ronald D.; Simon, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Cadherins and associated catenins provide an important structural interface between neighboring cells, the actin cytoskeleton, and intracellular signaling pathways in a variety of cell types throughout the Metazoa. However, the full inventory of the proteins and pathways required for cadherin-mediated adhesion has not been established. To this end, we completed a genome-wide (∼14,000 genes) ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) screen that targeted Ca2+-dependent adhesion in DE-cadherin–expressing Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells in suspension culture. This novel screen eliminated Ca2+-independent cell–cell adhesion, integrin-based adhesion, cell spreading, and cell migration. We identified 17 interconnected regulatory hubs, based on protein functions and protein–protein interactions that regulate the levels of the core cadherin–catenin complex and coordinate cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesion. Representative proteins from these hubs were analyzed further in Drosophila oogenesis, using targeted germline RNAi, and adhesion was analyzed in Madin–Darby canine kidney mammalian epithelial cell–cell adhesion. These experiments reveal roles for a diversity of cellular pathways that are required for cadherin function in Metazoa, including cytoskeleton organization, cell–substrate interactions, and nuclear and cytoplasmic signaling. PMID:24446484

  15. Genes Required for Growth at High Hydrostatic Pressure in Escherichia coli K-12 Identified by Genome-Wide Screening

    PubMed Central

    Black, S. Lucas; Dawson, Angela; Ward, F. Bruce; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that much of the global microbial biosphere is believed to exist in high pressure environments, the effects of hydrostatic pressure on microbial physiology remain poorly understood. We use a genome-wide screening approach, combined with a novel high-throughput high-pressure cell culture method, to investigate the effects of hydrostatic pressure on microbial physiology in vivo. The Keio collection of single-gene deletion mutants in Escherichia coli K-12 was screened for growth at a range of pressures from 0.1 MPa to 60 MPa. This led to the identification of 6 genes, rodZ, holC, priA, dnaT, dedD and tatC, whose products were required for growth at 30 MPa and a further 3 genes, tolB, rffT and iscS, whose products were required for growth at 40 MPa. Our results support the view that the effects of pressure on cell physiology are pleiotropic, with DNA replication, cell division, the cytoskeleton and cell envelope physiology all being potential failure points for cell physiology during growth at elevated pressure. PMID:24040140

  16. Integrated platform for genome-wide screening and construction of high-density genetic interaction maps in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Kampmann, Martin; Bassik, Michael C.; Weissman, Jonathan S.

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge of the postgenomic era is to understand how human genes function together in normal and disease states. In microorganisms, high-density genetic interaction (GI) maps are a powerful tool to elucidate gene functions and pathways. We have developed an integrated methodology based on pooled shRNA screening in mammalian cells for genome-wide identification of genes with relevant phenotypes and systematic mapping of all GIs among them. We recently demonstrated the potential of this approach in an application to pathways controlling the susceptibility of human cells to the toxin ricin. Here we present the complete quantitative framework underlying our strategy, including experimental design, derivation of quantitative phenotypes from pooled screens, robust identification of hit genes using ultra-complex shRNA libraries, parallel measurement of tens of thousands of GIs from a single double-shRNA experiment, and construction of GI maps. We describe the general applicability of our strategy. Our pooled approach enables rapid screening of the same shRNA library in different cell lines and under different conditions to determine a range of different phenotypes. We illustrate this strategy here for single- and double-shRNA libraries. We compare the roles of genes for susceptibility to ricin and Shiga toxin in different human cell lines and reveal both toxin-specific and cell line-specific pathways. We also present GI maps based on growth and ricin-resistance phenotypes, and we demonstrate how such a comparative GI mapping strategy enables functional dissection of physical complexes and context-dependent pathways. PMID:23739767

  17. Identification of Drosophila Zfh2 as a mediator of hypercapnic immune regulation by a genome-wide RNAi screen

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Jae; Hu, Jennifer A.; Krupinski, Thomas; Casalino-Matsuda, S. Marina; Sporn, Peter H. S.; Sznajder, Jacob I.; Beitel, Greg J.

    2015-01-01

    Hypercapnia, elevated partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) in blood and tissue, develops in many patients with chronic severe obstructive pulmonary disease and other advanced lung disorders. Patients with advanced disease frequently develop bacterial lung infections, and hypercapnia is a risk factor for mortality in such individuals. We previously demonstrated that hypercapnia suppresses induction of NF-κB-regulated innate immune response genes required for host defense in human, mouse and Drosophila cells, and increases mortality from bacterial infections in both mice and Drosophila. However, the molecular mediator(s) of hypercapnic immune suppression are undefined. Here, we report a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila S2* cells stimulated with bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN). The screen identified 16 genes with human orthologs whose knockdown reduced hypercapnic suppression of the gene encoding the antimicrobial peptide (AMPs) Diptericin (Dipt), but did not increase Dipt mRNA levels in air. In vivo tests of one of the strongest screen hits, Zfh2 (mammalian orthologs ZFHX3/ATBF1 and ZFHX4), demonstrate that reducing zfh2 function using a mutation or RNAi improves survival of flies exposed to elevated CO2 and infected with S. aureus. Tissue-specific knockdown of zfh2 in the fat body, the major immune and metabolic organ of the fly, mitigates hypercapnia-induced reductions in Dipt and other AMPs and improves resistance of CO2-exposed flies to infection. Zfh2 mutations also partially rescue hypercapnia-induced delays in egg hatching, suggesting that Zfh2's role in mediating responses to hypercapnia extends beyond the immune system. Together, these results identify Zfh2 as the first in vivo mediator of hypercapnic immune suppression. PMID:26643480

  18. Genome-wide screen uncovers novel pathways for tRNA processing and nuclear–cytoplasmic dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingyan; Bao, Alicia; Chatterjee, Kunal; Wan, Yao; Hopper, Anita K.

    2015-01-01

    Transfer ribonucleic acids (tRNAs) are essential for protein synthesis. However, key gene products involved in tRNA biogenesis and subcellular movement remain to be discovered. We conducted the first comprehensive unbiased analysis of the role of nearly an entire proteome in tRNA biology and describe 162 novel and 12 previously known Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene products that function in tRNA processing, turnover, and subcellular movement. tRNA nuclear export is of particular interest because it is essential, but the known tRNA exporters (Los1 [exportin-t] and Msn5 [exportin-5]) are unessential. We report that mutations of CRM1 (Exportin-1), MEX67/MTR2 (TAP/p15), and five nucleoporins cause accumulation of unspliced tRNA, a hallmark of defective tRNA nuclear export. CRM1 mutation genetically interacts with los1Δ and causes altered tRNA nuclear–cytoplasmic distribution. The data implicate roles for the protein and mRNA nuclear export machineries in tRNA nuclear export. Mutations of genes encoding actin cytoskeleton components and mitochondrial outer membrane proteins also cause accumulation of unspliced tRNA, likely due to defective splicing on mitochondria. Additional gene products, such as chromatin modification enzymes, have unanticipated effects on pre-tRNA end processing. Thus, this genome-wide screen uncovered putative novel pathways for tRNA nuclear export and extensive links between tRNA biology and other aspects of cell physiology. PMID:26680305

  19. A Bow-Tie Genetic Architecture for Morphogenesis Suggested by a Genome-Wide RNAi Screen in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Matthew D.; Zhou, Elinor; Kiontke, Karin; Fradin, Hélène; Maldonado, Grayson; Martin, Daniel; Shah, Khushbu; Fitch, David H. A.

    2011-01-01

    During animal development, cellular morphogenesis plays a fundamental role in determining the shape and function of tissues and organs. Identifying the components that regulate and drive morphogenesis is thus a major goal of developmental biology. The four-celled tip of the Caenorhabditis elegans male tail is a simple but powerful model for studying the mechanism of morphogenesis and its spatiotemporal regulation. Here, through a genome-wide post-embryonic RNAi-feeding screen, we identified 212 components that regulate or participate in male tail tip morphogenesis. We constructed a working hypothesis for a gene regulatory network of tail tip morphogenesis. We found regulatory roles for the posterior Hox genes nob-1 and php-3, the TGF-β pathway, nuclear hormone receptors (e.g. nhr-25), the heterochronic gene blmp-1, and the GATA transcription factors egl-18 and elt-6. The majority of the pathways converge at dmd-3 and mab-3. In addition, nhr-25 and dmd-3/mab-3 regulate each others' expression, thus placing these three genes at the center of a complex regulatory network. We also show that dmd-3 and mab-3 negatively regulate other signaling pathways and affect downstream cellular processes such as vesicular trafficking (e.g. arl-1, rme-8) and rearrangement of the cytoskeleton (e.g. cdc-42, nmy-1, and nmy-2). Based on these data, we suggest that male tail tip morphogenesis is governed by a gene regulatory network with a bow-tie architecture. PMID:21408209

  20. A Genome-wide siRNA Screen Reveals Diverse Cellular Processes and Pathways that Mediate Genome Stability

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Renee D.; Soni, Deena V.; Wollman, Roy; Hahn, Angela T.; Yee, Muh-Ching; Guan, Anna; Hesley, Jayne A.; Miller, Steven C.; Cromwell, Evan F.; Solow-Cordero, David E.; Meyer, Tobias; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Signaling pathways that respond to DNA damage are essential for the maintenance of genome stability and are linked to many diseases, including cancer. Here, a genome-wide siRNA screen was employed to identify novel genes involved in genome stabilization by monitoring phosphorylation of the histone variant H2AX, an early mark of DNA damage. We identified hundreds of genes whose down-regulation led to elevated levels of H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and revealed new links to cellular complexes and to genes with unclassified functions. We demonstrate a widespread role for mRNA processing factors in preventing DNA damage, which in some cases is caused by aberrant RNA-DNA structures. Furthermore, we connect increased γH2AX levels to the neurological disorder, Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) syndrome, and we find a role for several CMT proteins in the DNA damage response. These data indicate that preservation of genome stability is mediated by a larger network of biological processes than previously appreciated. PMID:19647519

  1. Genome-wide siRNA Screening at Biosafety Level 4 Reveals a Crucial Role for Fibrillarin in Henipavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Deffrasnes, Celine; Marsh, Glenn A; Foo, Chwan Hong; Rootes, Christina L; Gould, Cathryn M; Grusovin, Julian; Monaghan, Paul; Lo, Michael K; Tompkins, S Mark; Adams, Timothy E; Lowenthal, John W; Simpson, Kaylene J; Stewart, Cameron R; Bean, Andrew G D; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2016-03-01

    Hendra and Nipah viruses (genus Henipavirus, family Paramyxoviridae) are highly pathogenic bat-borne viruses. The need for high biocontainment when studying henipaviruses has hindered the development of therapeutics and knowledge of the viral infection cycle. We have performed a genome-wide siRNA screen at biosafety level 4 that identified 585 human proteins required for henipavirus infection. The host protein with the largest impact was fibrillarin, a nucleolar methyltransferase that was also required by measles, mumps and respiratory syncytial viruses for infection. While not required for cell entry, henipavirus RNA and protein syntheses were greatly impaired in cells lacking fibrillarin, indicating a crucial role in the RNA replication phase of infection. During infection, the Hendra virus matrix protein co-localized with fibrillarin in cell nucleoli, and co-associated as a complex in pulldown studies, while its nuclear import was unaffected in fibrillarin-depleted cells. Mutagenesis studies showed that the methyltransferase activity of fibrillarin was required for henipavirus infection, suggesting that this enzyme could be targeted therapeutically to combat henipavirus infections.

  2. Genome-wide siRNA Screening at Biosafety Level 4 Reveals a Crucial Role for Fibrillarin in Henipavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Chwan Hong; Rootes, Christina L.; Gould, Cathryn M.; Grusovin, Julian; Monaghan, Paul; Lo, Michael K.; Tompkins, S. Mark; Adams, Timothy E.; Lowenthal, John W.; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Stewart, Cameron R.; Bean, Andrew G. D.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Hendra and Nipah viruses (genus Henipavirus, family Paramyxoviridae) are highly pathogenic bat-borne viruses. The need for high biocontainment when studying henipaviruses has hindered the development of therapeutics and knowledge of the viral infection cycle. We have performed a genome-wide siRNA screen at biosafety level 4 that identified 585 human proteins required for henipavirus infection. The host protein with the largest impact was fibrillarin, a nucleolar methyltransferase that was also required by measles, mumps and respiratory syncytial viruses for infection. While not required for cell entry, henipavirus RNA and protein syntheses were greatly impaired in cells lacking fibrillarin, indicating a crucial role in the RNA replication phase of infection. During infection, the Hendra virus matrix protein co-localized with fibrillarin in cell nucleoli, and co-associated as a complex in pulldown studies, while its nuclear import was unaffected in fibrillarin-depleted cells. Mutagenesis studies showed that the methyltransferase activity of fibrillarin was required for henipavirus infection, suggesting that this enzyme could be targeted therapeutically to combat henipavirus infections. PMID:27010548

  3. Genome-wide siRNA screen identifies the retromer as a cellular entry factor for human papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Lipovsky, Alex; Popa, Andreea; Pimienta, Genaro; Wyler, Michael; Bhan, Ashima; Kuruvilla, Leena; Guie, Marie-Aude; Poffenberger, Adrian C.; Nelson, Christian D. S.; Atwood, Walter J.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Despite major advances in our understanding of many aspects of human papillomavirus (HPV) biology, HPV entry is poorly understood. To identify cellular genes required for HPV entry, we conducted a genome-wide screen for siRNAs that inhibited infection of HeLa cells by HPV16 pseudovirus. Many retrograde transport factors were required for efficient infection, including multiple subunits of the retromer, which initiates retrograde transport from the endosome to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). The retromer has not been previously implicated in virus entry. Furthermore, HPV16 capsid proteins arrive in the TGN/Golgi in a retromer-dependent fashion during entry, and incoming HPV proteins form a stable complex with retromer subunits. We propose that HPV16 directly engages the retromer at the early or late endosome and traffics to the TGN/Golgi via the retrograde pathway during cell entry. These results provide important insights into HPV entry, identify numerous potential antiviral targets, and suggest that the role of the retromer in infection by other viruses should be assessed. PMID:23569269

  4. Genome-wide siRNA screen identifies the retromer as a cellular entry factor for human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Lipovsky, Alex; Popa, Andreea; Pimienta, Genaro; Wyler, Michael; Bhan, Ashima; Kuruvilla, Leena; Guie, Marie-Aude; Poffenberger, Adrian C; Nelson, Christian D S; Atwood, Walter J; DiMaio, Daniel

    2013-04-30

    Despite major advances in our understanding of many aspects of human papillomavirus (HPV) biology, HPV entry is poorly understood. To identify cellular genes required for HPV entry, we conducted a genome-wide screen for siRNAs that inhibited infection of HeLa cells by HPV16 pseudovirus. Many retrograde transport factors were required for efficient infection, including multiple subunits of the retromer, which initiates retrograde transport from the endosome to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). The retromer has not been previously implicated in virus entry. Furthermore, HPV16 capsid proteins arrive in the TGN/Golgi in a retromer-dependent fashion during entry, and incoming HPV proteins form a stable complex with retromer subunits. We propose that HPV16 directly engages the retromer at the early or late endosome and traffics to the TGN/Golgi via the retrograde pathway during cell entry. These results provide important insights into HPV entry, identify numerous potential antiviral targets, and suggest that the role of the retromer in infection by other viruses should be assessed.

  5. Iterative sure independence screening EM-Bayesian LASSO algorithm for multi-locus genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Tamba, Cox Lwaka; Ni, Yuan-Li; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association study (GWAS) entails examining a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a limited sample with hundreds of individuals, implying a variable selection problem in the high dimensional dataset. Although many single-locus GWAS approaches under polygenic background and population structure controls have been widely used, some significant loci fail to be detected. In this study, we used an iterative modified-sure independence screening (ISIS) approach in reducing the number of SNPs to a moderate size. Expectation-Maximization (EM)-Bayesian least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (BLASSO) was used to estimate all the selected SNP effects for true quantitative trait nucleotide (QTN) detection. This method is referred to as ISIS EM-BLASSO algorithm. Monte Carlo simulation studies validated the new method, which has the highest empirical power in QTN detection and the highest accuracy in QTN effect estimation, and it is the fastest, as compared with efficient mixed-model association (EMMA), smoothly clipped absolute deviation (SCAD), fixed and random model circulating probability unification (FarmCPU), and multi-locus random-SNP-effect mixed linear model (mrMLM). To further demonstrate the new method, six flowering time traits in Arabidopsis thaliana were re-analyzed by four methods (New method, EMMA, FarmCPU, and mrMLM). As a result, the new method identified most previously reported genes. Therefore, the new method is a good alternative for multi-locus GWAS. PMID:28141824

  6. A Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Reveals MAP Kinase Phosphatases as Key ERK Pathway Regulators during Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shen-Hsi; Kalkan, Tuzer; Morrisroe, Claire; Smith, Austin; Sharrocks, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells represent potentially important therapeutic agents in regenerative medicine. Complex interlinked transcriptional and signaling networks control the fate of these cells towards maintenance of pluripotency or differentiation. In this study we have focused on how mouse embryonic stem cells begin to differentiate and lose pluripotency and, in particular, the role that the ERK MAP kinase and GSK3 signaling pathways play in this process. Through a genome-wide siRNA screen we have identified more than 400 genes involved in loss of pluripotency and promoting the onset of differentiation. These genes were functionally associated with the ERK and/or GSK3 pathways, providing an important resource for studying the roles of these pathways in controlling escape from the pluripotent ground state. More detailed analysis identified MAP kinase phosphatases as a focal point of regulation and demonstrated an important role for these enzymes in controlling ERK activation kinetics and subsequently determining early embryonic stem cell fate decisions. PMID:23271975

  7. Genome-wide screen identifies a novel p97/CDC-48-dependent pathway regulating ER-stress-induced gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Marza, Esther; Taouji, Saïd; Barroso, Kim; Raymond, Anne-Aurélie; Guignard, Léo; Bonneu, Marc; Pallares-Lupon, Néstor; Dupuy, Jean-William; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Rosenbaum, Jean; Palladino, Francesca; Dupuy, Denis; Chevet, Eric

    2015-03-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) activates the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR(ER)) to restore ER homeostasis. The AAA(+) ATPase p97/CDC-48 plays key roles in ER stress by promoting both ER protein degradation and transcription of UPR(ER) genes. Although the mechanisms associated with protein degradation are now well established, the molecular events involved in the regulation of gene transcription by p97/CDC-48 remain unclear. Using a reporter-based genome-wide RNAi screen in combination with quantitative proteomic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have identified RUVB-2, a AAA(+) ATPase, as a novel repressor of a subset of UPR(ER) genes. We show that degradation of RUVB-2 by CDC-48 enhances expression of ER stress response genes through an XBP1-dependent mechanism. The functional interplay between CDC-48 and RUVB-2 in controlling transcription of select UPR(ER) genes appears conserved in human cells. Together, these results describe a novel role for p97/CDC-48, whereby its role in protein degradation is integrated with its role in regulating expression of ER stress response genes.

  8. High-Content Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Reveals CCR3 as a Key Mediator of Neuronal Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianmin; Wang, Huaishan; Sherbini, Omar; Ling-Lin Pai, Emily; Kang, Sung-Ung; Kwon, Ji-Sun; Yang, Jia; He, Wei; Wang, Hong; Eacker, Stephen M; Chi, Zhikai; Mao, Xiaobo; Xu, Jinchong; Jiang, Haisong; Andrabi, Shaida A; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal loss caused by ischemic injury, trauma, or disease can lead to devastating consequences for the individual. With the goal of limiting neuronal loss, a number of cell death pathways have been studied, but there may be additional contributors to neuronal death that are yet unknown. To identify previously unknown cell death mediators, we performed a high-content genome-wide screening of short, interfering RNA (siRNA) with an siRNA library in murine neural stem cells after exposure to N-methyl-N-nitroso-N'-nitroguanidine (MNNG), which leads to DNA damage and cell death. Eighty genes were identified as key mediators for cell death. Among them, 14 are known cell death mediators and 66 have not previously been linked to cell death pathways. Using an integrated approach with functional and bioinformatics analysis, we provide possible molecular networks, interconnected pathways, and/or protein complexes that may participate in cell death. Of the 66 genes, we selected CCR3 for further evaluation and found that CCR3 is a mediator of neuronal injury. CCR3 inhibition or deletion protects murine cortical cultures from oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced cell death, and CCR3 deletion in mice provides protection from ischemia in vivo. Taken together, our findings suggest that CCR3 is a previously unknown mediator of cell death. Future identification of the neural cell death network in which CCR3 participates will enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of neural cell death.

  9. A genome-wide screen to identify genes controlling the rate of entry into mitosis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Moris, Naomi; Shrivastava, Jaya; Jeffery, Linda; Li, Juan-Juan; Hayles, Jacqueline; Nurse, Paul

    2016-11-16

    We have carried out a haploinsufficiency (HI) screen in fission yeast using heterozygous deletion diploid mutants of a genome-wide set of cell cycle genes to identify genes encoding products whose level determines the rate of progression through the cell cycle. Cell size at division was used as a measure of advancement or delay of the G2-M transition of rod-shaped fission yeast cells. We found that 13 mutants were significantly longer or shorter (greater than 10%) than control cells at cell division. These included mutants of the cdc2, cdc25, wee1 and pom1 genes, which have previously been shown to play a role in the timing of entry into mitosis, and which validate this approach. Seven of these genes are involved in regulation of the G2-M transition, 5 for nuclear transport and one for nucleotide metabolism. In addition we identified 4 more genes that were 8-10% longer or shorter than the control that also had roles in regulation of the G2-M transition or in nuclear transport. The genes identified here are all conserved in human cells, suggesting that this dataset will be useful as a basis for further studies to identify rate-limiting steps for progression through the cell cycle in other eukaryotes.

  10. Iterative sure independence screening EM-Bayesian LASSO algorithm for multi-locus genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Tamba, Cox Lwaka; Ni, Yuan-Li; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association study (GWAS) entails examining a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a limited sample with hundreds of individuals, implying a variable selection problem in the high dimensional dataset. Although many single-locus GWAS approaches under polygenic background and population structure controls have been widely used, some significant loci fail to be detected. In this study, we used an iterative modified-sure independence screening (ISIS) approach in reducing the number of SNPs to a moderate size. Expectation-Maximization (EM)-Bayesian least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (BLASSO) was used to estimate all the selected SNP effects for true quantitative trait nucleotide (QTN) detection. This method is referred to as ISIS EM-BLASSO algorithm. Monte Carlo simulation studies validated the new method, which has the highest empirical power in QTN detection and the highest accuracy in QTN effect estimation, and it is the fastest, as compared with efficient mixed-model association (EMMA), smoothly clipped absolute deviation (SCAD), fixed and random model circulating probability unification (FarmCPU), and multi-locus random-SNP-effect mixed linear model (mrMLM). To further demonstrate the new method, six flowering time traits in Arabidopsis thaliana were re-analyzed by four methods (New method, EMMA, FarmCPU, and mrMLM). As a result, the new method identified most previously reported genes. Therefore, the new method is a good alternative for multi-locus GWAS.

  11. A genome-wide RNAi screen in mouse embryonic stem cells identifies Mp1 as a key mediator of differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Westerman, Bart A.; Braat, A. Koen; Taub, Nicole; Potman, Marko; Vissers, Joseph H.A.; Blom, Marleen; Verhoeven, Els; Stoop, Hans; Gillis, Ad; Velds, Arno; Nijkamp, Wouter; Beijersbergen, Roderick; Huber, Lukas A.; Looijenga, Leendert H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite intense investigation of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that regulate pluripotency, the process of initial fate commitment of embryonic stem (ES) cells is still poorly understood. We used a genome-wide short hairpin RNA screen in mouse ES cells to identify genes that are essential for initiation of differentiation. Knockdown of the scaffolding protein Mek binding protein 1 (Mp1, also known as Lamtor3 or Map2k1ip1) stimulated self-renewal of ES cells, blocked differentiation, and promoted proliferation. Fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4) signaling is required for initial fate commitment of ES cells. Knockdown of Mp1 inhibited FGF4-induced differentiation but did not alter FGF4-driven proliferation. This uncoupling of differentiation and proliferation was also observed when oncogenic Ras isoforms were overexpressed in ES cells. Knockdown of Mp1 redirected FGF4 signaling from differentiation toward pluripotency and up-regulated the pluripotency-related genes Esrrb, Rex1, Tcl1, and Sox2. We also found that human germ cell tumors (GCTs) express low amounts of Mp1 in the invasive embryonic carcinoma and seminoma histologies and higher amounts of Mp1 in the noninvasive carcinoma in situ precursor and differentiated components. Knockdown of Mp1 in invasive GCT cells resulted in resistance to differentiation, thereby showing a functional role for Mp1 both in normal differentiation of ES cells and in germ cell cancer. PMID:22143885

  12. Genome-wide siRNA screen identifies UNC50 as a regulator of Shiga toxin 2 trafficking.

    PubMed

    Selyunin, Andrey S; Iles, Lakesla R; Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra

    2017-10-02

    Shiga toxins 1 and 2 (STx1 and STx2) undergo retrograde trafficking to reach the cytosol. Early endosome-to-Golgi transport allows the toxins to evade degradation in lysosomes. Targeting this trafficking step has therapeutic promise, but the mechanism of trafficking for the more potent toxin STx2 is unclear. To identify host factors required for early endosome-to-Golgi trafficking of STx2, we performed a viability-based genome-wide siRNA screen in HeLa cells. 564, 535, and 196 genes were found to be required for toxicity induced by STx1 only, STx2 only, and both toxins, respectively. We focused on validating endosome/Golgi-localized hits specific for STx2 and found that depletion of UNC50 blocked early endosome-to-Golgi trafficking and induced lysosomal degradation of STx2. UNC50 acted by recruiting GBF1, an ADP ribosylation factor-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARF-GEF), to the Golgi. These results provide new information about STx2 trafficking mechanisms and may advance efforts to generate therapeutically viable toxin-trafficking inhibitors. © 2017 Selyunin et al.

  13. High-Content Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Reveals CCR3 as a Key Mediator of Neuronal Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaishan; Sherbini, Omar; Ling-lin Pai, Emily; Kwon, Ji-Sun; He, Wei; Wang, Hong; Chi, Zhikai; Xu, Jinchong; Jiang, Haisong; Andrabi, Shaida A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal loss caused by ischemic injury, trauma, or disease can lead to devastating consequences for the individual. With the goal of limiting neuronal loss, a number of cell death pathways have been studied, but there may be additional contributors to neuronal death that are yet unknown. To identify previously unknown cell death mediators, we performed a high-content genome-wide screening of short, interfering RNA (siRNA) with an siRNA library in murine neural stem cells after exposure to N-methyl-N-nitroso-N′-nitroguanidine (MNNG), which leads to DNA damage and cell death. Eighty genes were identified as key mediators for cell death. Among them, 14 are known cell death mediators and 66 have not previously been linked to cell death pathways. Using an integrated approach with functional and bioinformatics analysis, we provide possible molecular networks, interconnected pathways, and/or protein complexes that may participate in cell death. Of the 66 genes, we selected CCR3 for further evaluation and found that CCR3 is a mediator of neuronal injury. CCR3 inhibition or deletion protects murine cortical cultures from oxygen-glucose deprivation–induced cell death, and CCR3 deletion in mice provides protection from ischemia in vivo. Taken together, our findings suggest that CCR3 is a previously unknown mediator of cell death. Future identification of the neural cell death network in which CCR3 participates will enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of neural cell death. PMID:27822494

  14. A genome wide screen identifies PAPP-AA mediated IGFR signaling as a novel regulator of habituation learning

    PubMed Central

    Wolman, Marc A.; Jain, Roshan A.; Marsden, Kurt C.; Bell, Hannah; Skinner, Julianne; Hayer, Katharina E.; Hogenesch, John B.; Granato, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Habituation represents a fundamental form of learning, yet the underlying molecular genetic mechanisms are not well defined. Here we report on a genome-wide genetic screen, coupled with whole genome sequencing, that identified 14 zebrafish startle habituation mutants including mutants of the vertebrate specific gene pregnancy associated plasma protein-aa (pappaa). PAPP-AA encodes an extracellular metalloprotease known to increase IGF bioavailability thereby enhancing IGF receptor signaling. We find that pappaa is expressed by startle circuit neurons, and expression of wildtype, but not a metalloprotease-inactive version of pappaa restores habituation in pappaa mutants. Furthermore, acutely inhibiting IGF1R function in wild-type reduces habituation, while activation of IGF1R downstream effectors in pappaa mutants restores habituation, demonstrating that pappaa promotes learning by acutely and locally increasing IGF bioavailability. In sum, our results define the first functional gene set for habituation learning in a vertebrate, and identify PAPPAA-regulated IGF signaling as a novel mechanism regulating habituation learning. PMID:25754827

  15. Genome-wide screen for modulation of hepatic apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) secretion.

    PubMed

    Miles, Rebecca R; Perry, William; Haas, Joseph V; Mosior, Marian K; N'Cho, Mathias; Wang, Jian W J; Yu, Peng; Calley, John; Yue, Yong; Carter, Quincy; Han, Bomie; Foxworthy, Patricia; Kowala, Mark C; Ryan, Timothy P; Solenberg, Patricia J; Michael, Laura F

    2013-03-01

    Control of plasma cholesterol levels is a major therapeutic strategy for management of coronary artery disease (CAD). Although reducing LDL cholesterol (LDL-c) levels decreases morbidity and mortality, this therapeutic intervention only translates into a 25-40% reduction in cardiovascular events. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high LDL-c level is not the only risk factor for CAD; low HDL cholesterol (HDL-c) is an independent risk factor for CAD. Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) is the major protein component of HDL-c that mediates reverse cholesterol transport from tissues to the liver for excretion. Therefore, increasing ApoA-I levels is an attractive strategy for HDL-c elevation. Using genome-wide siRNA screening, targets that regulate hepatocyte ApoA-I secretion were identified through transfection of 21,789 siRNAs into hepatocytes whereby cell supernatants were assayed for ApoA-I. Approximately 800 genes were identified and triaged using a convergence of information, including genetic associations with HDL-c levels, tissue-specific gene expression, druggability assessments, and pathway analysis. Fifty-nine genes were selected for reconfirmation; 40 genes were confirmed. Here we describe the siRNA screening strategy, assay implementation and validation, data triaging, and example genes of interest. The genes of interest include known and novel genes encoding secreted enzymes, proteases, G-protein-coupled receptors, metabolic enzymes, ion transporters, and proteins of unknown function. Repression of farnesyltransferase (FNTA) by siRNA and the enzyme inhibitor manumycin A caused elevation of ApoA-I secretion from hepatocytes and from transgenic mice expressing hApoA-I and cholesterol ester transfer protein transgenes. In total, this work underscores the power of functional genetic assessment to identify new therapeutic targets.

  16. Reliance of Wolbachia on High Rates of Host Proteolysis Revealed by a Genome-Wide RNAi Screen of Drosophila Cells.

    PubMed

    White, Pamela M; Serbus, Laura R; Debec, Alain; Codina, Adan; Bray, Walter; Guichet, Antoine; Lokey, R Scott; Sullivan, William

    2017-04-01

    Wolbachia are gram-negative, obligate, intracellular bacteria carried by a majority of insect species worldwide. Here we use a Wolbachia-infected Drosophila cell line and genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screening to identify host factors that influence Wolbachia titer. By screening an RNAi library targeting 15,699 transcribed host genes, we identified 36 candidate genes that dramatically reduced Wolbachia titer and 41 that increased Wolbachia titer. Host gene knockdowns that reduced Wolbachia titer spanned a broad array of biological pathways including genes that influenced mitochondrial function and lipid metabolism. In addition, knockdown of seven genes in the host ubiquitin and proteolysis pathways significantly reduced Wolbachia titer. To test the in vivo relevance of these results, we found that drug and mutant inhibition of proteolysis reduced levels of Wolbachia in the Drosophila oocyte. The presence of Wolbachia in either cell lines or oocytes dramatically alters the distribution and abundance of ubiquitinated proteins. Functional studies revealed that maintenance of Wolbachia titer relies on an intact host Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation pathway (ERAD). Accordingly, electron microscopy studies demonstrated that Wolbachia is intimately associated with the host ER and dramatically alters the morphology of this organelle. Given Wolbachia lack essential amino acid biosynthetic pathways, the reliance of Wolbachia on high rates of host proteolysis via ubiquitination and the ERAD pathways may be a key mechanism for provisioning Wolbachia with amino acids. In addition, the reliance of Wolbachia on the ERAD pathway and disruption of ER morphology suggests a previously unsuspected mechanism for Wolbachia's potent ability to prevent RNA virus replication. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. Genome-Wide CRISPR Screen Identifies Regulators of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase as Suppressors of Liver Tumors in Mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Chun-Qing; Li, Yingxiang; Mou, Haiwei; Moore, Jill; Park, Angela; Pomyen, Yotsawat; Hough, Soren; Kennedy, Zachary; Fischer, Andrew; Yin, Hao; Anderson, Daniel G; Conte, Darryl; Zender, Lars; Wang, Xin Wei; Thorgeirsson, Snorri; Weng, Zhiping; Xue, Wen

    2017-04-01

    It has been a challenge to identify liver tumor suppressors or oncogenes due to the genetic heterogeneity of these tumors. We performed a genome-wide screen to identify suppressors of liver tumor formation in mice, using CRISPR-mediated genome editing. We performed a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9-based knockout screen of P53-null mouse embryonic liver progenitor cells that overexpressed MYC. We infected p53(-/-);Myc;Cas9 hepatocytes with the mGeCKOa lentiviral library of 67,000 single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs), targeting 20,611 mouse genes, and transplanted the transduced cells subcutaneously into nude mice. Within 1 month, all the mice that received the sgRNA library developed subcutaneous tumors. We performed high-throughput sequencing of tumor DNA and identified sgRNAs increased at least 8-fold compared to the initial cell pool. To validate the top 10 candidate tumor suppressors from this screen, we collected data from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using the Cancer Genome Atlas and COSMIC databases. We used CRISPR to inactivate candidate tumor suppressor genes in p53(-/-);Myc;Cas9 cells and transplanted them subcutaneously into nude mice; tumor formation was monitored and tumors were analyzed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Mice with liver-specific disruption of p53 were given hydrodynamic tail-vein injections of plasmids encoding Myc and sgRNA/Cas9 designed to disrupt candidate tumor suppressors; growth of tumors and metastases was monitored. We compared gene expression profiles of liver cells with vs without tumor suppressor gene disrupted by sgRNA/Cas9. Genes found to be up-regulated after tumor suppressor loss were examined in liver cancer cell lines; their expression was knocked down using small hairpin RNAs, and tumor growth was examined in nude mice. Effects of the MEK inhibitors AZD6244, U0126, and trametinib, or the multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib, were examined in human and mouse HCC cell lines. We identified 4 candidate liver tumor

  18. Genome-wide screens for sensitivity to ionizing radiation identify the fission yeast nonhomologous end joining factor Xrc4.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Yu, Yang; Suo, Fang; Sun, Ling-Ling; Zhao, Dan; Du, Li-Lin

    2014-05-21

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is the main means for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. Molecular understanding of NHEJ has benefited from analyses in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In human cells, the DNA ligation reaction of the classical NHEJ pathway is carried out by a protein complex composed of DNA ligase IV (LigIV) and XRCC4. In S. cerevisiae, this reaction is catalyzed by a homologous complex composed of Dnl4 and Lif1. Intriguingly, no homolog of XRCC4 has been found in S. pombe, raising the possibility that such a factor may not always be required for classical NHEJ. Here, through screening the ionizing radiation (IR) sensitivity phenotype of a genome-wide fission yeast deletion collection in both the vegetative growth state and the spore state, we identify Xrc4, a highly divergent homolog of human XRCC4. Like other fission yeast NHEJ factors, Xrc4 is critically important for IR resistance of spores, in which no homologous recombination templates are available. Using both extrachromosomal and chromosomal DSB repair assays, we show that Xrc4 is essential for classical NHEJ. Exogenously expressed Xrc4 colocalizes with the LigIV homolog Lig4 at the chromatin region of the nucleus in a mutually dependent manner. Furthermore, like their human counterparts, Xrc4 and Lig4 interact with each other and this interaction requires the inter-BRCT linker and the second BRCT domain of Lig4. Our discovery of Xrc4 suggests that an XRCC4 family protein is universally required for classical NHEJ in eukaryotes. Copyright © 2014 Li et al.

  19. 140 Genome-wide CRISPR/cas9 Knockout Screens in Human Glioblastoma Identify Genetic Vulnerabilities.

    PubMed

    Noorani, Imran

    2016-08-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor with a poor prognosis. Identifying the genetic vulnerabilities of cancer is a novel method for discovering new cancer therapeutic targets. The genetic vulnerabilities of glioblastoma are poorly understood, however. The recent CRISPR/cas9 genetic knockout approach has been proposed as a useful method for high-throughput screening of such genetic liabilities. We established human glioblastoma stem cell lines from 5 patients with primary glioblastoma. The validity of these cell lines was confirmed by demonstrating expression of nestin and SOX2 with RT-PCR, and of CD133 with flow cytometry. Cell lines were subcutaneously injected into mice to track tumor growth in vivo. Lentiviral transfection of a cas9 vector followed by antibiotic selection led to generation of stable cas9-expressing cell lines. A genome-wide library containing 123 411 CRISPR guide RNAs (6 guide RNAs per gene, targeting 19 050 genes) was lentivirally transfected into these cell lines. DNA was extracted from cells and sequenced with Illumina Hi-Seq at day 1 and day 25 after transfection. These patient-derived stem cell lines displayed clonal sphere growth of between 42% and 61%, with a median time survival time of 40 days when transplanted into immunocompromised mice. High-throughput sequencing revealed significant depletion of CRISPR guide RNAs for 1190 genes, with a high degree of overlap between independent replicates for a given cell line. Analysis of gene function using ontology databases demonstrated that DNA repair pathways, RNA and protein synthesis, and regulators of cell proliferation were significantly depleted genes. Moreover, a number of genes specific for neuronal proliferation and differentiation were identified. Comparison with known genetic vulnerabilities of other cancer types revealed a specific profile of genetic liabilities unique to glioblastoma. We have identified a unique genetic vulnerability profile for glioblastoma

  20. A Genome-Wide Arrayed cDNA Screen to Identify Functional Modulators of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Rex, Elizabeth B; Shukla, Nikhil; Gu, Shenyan; Bredt, David; DiSepio, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Cellular signaling is in part regulated by the composition and subcellular localization of a series of protein interactions that collectively form a signaling complex. Using the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) as a proof-of-concept target, we developed a platform to identify functional modulators (or auxiliary proteins) of α7nAChR signaling. The Broad cDNA library was transiently cotransfected with α7nAChR cDNA in HEK293T cells in a high-throughput fashion. Using this approach in combination with a functional assay, we identified positive modulators of α7nAChR activity. We identified known positive modulators/auxiliary proteins present in the cDNA library that regulate α7nAChR signaling, in addition to identifying novel modulators of α7nAChR signaling. These included NACHO, SPDYE11, TCF4, and ZC3H12A, all of which increased PNU-120596-mediated nicotine-dependent calcium flux. Importantly, these auxiliary proteins did not modulate GluR1(o)-mediated Ca flux. To elucidate a possible mechanism of action, we employed an α7nAChR-HA surface staining assay. NACHO enhanced α7nAChR surface expression; however, the mechanism responsible for the SPDYE11-, TCF4-, and ZC3H12A-dependent modulation of α7nAChR has yet to be defined. This report describes the development and validation of a high-throughput, genome-wide cDNA screening platform coupled to FLIPR functional assays in order to identify functional modulators of α7nAChR signaling.

  1. Institutional Profile: The Sheffield RNAi screening facility: a service for high-throughput, genome-wide Drosophila RNAi screens.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen

    2010-12-01

    The Sheffield RNAi Screening Facility (SRSF) was established in November 2008, as Britain's first Drosophila RNAi screening centre, funded by the University of Sheffield, Biomedical Sciences Department and the Wellcome Trust. The SRSF was formed to service the needs of research groups wanting to carry out high-throughput RNAi screens with Drosophila cells. The rationale for the SRSF is to provide RNAi libraries and the specialist equipment and expertise to do such screens. The facility supports both plate reader assays, high-content microscopy as well as the equipment needed to process these samples in a high-throughput fashion. The SRSF can either be used to identify genes involved in disease representing future drug targets, or to identify genes involved in drug resistance and efficacy.

  2. Genome-Wide and Species-Wide In Silico Screening for Intragenic MicroRNAs in Human, Mouse and Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Godnic, Irena; Zorc, Minja; Jevsinek Skok, Dasa; Calin, George Adrian; Horvat, Simon; Dovc, Peter; Kovac, Milena; Kunej, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) involved in regulation of gene expression. Intragenic miRNAs, especially those exhibiting a high degree of evolutionary conservation, have been shown to be coordinately regulated and/or expressed with their host genes, either with synergistic or antagonistic correlation patterns. However, the degree of cross-species conservation of miRNA/host gene co-location is not known and co-expression information is incomplete and fragmented among several studies. Using the genomic resources (miRBase and Ensembl) we performed a genome-wide in silico screening (GWISS) for miRNA/host gene pairs in three well-annotated vertebrate species: human, mouse, and chicken. Approximately half of currently annotated miRNA genes resided within host genes: 53.0% (849/1,600) in human, 48.8% (418/855) in mouse, and 42.0% (210/499) in chicken, which we present in a central publicly available Catalog of intragenic miRNAs (http://www.integratomics-time.com/miR-host/catalog). The miRNA genes resided within either protein-coding or ncRNA genes, which include long intergenic ncRNAs (lincRNAs) and small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). Twenty-seven miRNA genes were found to be located within the same host genes in all three species and the data integration from literature and databases showed that most (26/27) have been found to be co-expressed. Particularly interesting are miRNA genes located within genes encoding for miRNA silencing machinery (DGCR8, DICER1, and SND1 in human and Cnot3, Gdcr8, Eif4e, Tnrc6b, and Xpo5 in mouse). We furthermore discuss a potential for phenotype misattribution of miRNA host gene polymorphism or gene modification studies due to possible collateral effects on miRNAs hosted within them. In conclusion, the catalog of intragenic miRNAs and identified 27 miRNA/host gene pairs with cross-species conserved co-location, co-expression, and potential co-regulation, provide excellent candidates for further functional annotation of

  3. Seed-effect modeling improves the consistency of genome-wide loss-of-function screens and identifies synthetic lethal vulnerabilities in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Alok; Peddinti, Gopal; Akimov, Yevhen; Wennerberg, Krister; Kuznetsov, Sergey; Tang, Jing; Aittokallio, Tero

    2017-06-01

    Genome-wide loss-of-function profiling is widely used for systematic identification of genetic dependencies in cancer cells; however, the poor reproducibility of RNA interference (RNAi) screens has been a major concern due to frequent off-target effects. Currently, a detailed understanding of the key factors contributing to the sub-optimal consistency is still a lacking, especially on how to improve the reliability of future RNAi screens by controlling for factors that determine their off-target propensity. We performed a systematic, quantitative analysis of the consistency between two genome-wide shRNA screens conducted on a compendium of cancer cell lines, and also compared several gene summarization methods for inferring gene essentiality from shRNA level data. We then devised novel concepts of seed essentiality and shRNA family, based on seed region sequences of shRNAs, to study in-depth the contribution of seed-mediated off-target effects to the consistency of the two screens. We further investigated two seed-sequence properties, seed pairing stability, and target abundance in terms of their capability to minimize the off-target effects in post-screening data analysis. Finally, we applied this novel methodology to identify genetic interactions and synthetic lethal partners of cancer drivers, and confirmed differential essentiality phenotypes by detailed CRISPR/Cas9 experiments. Using the novel concepts of seed essentiality and shRNA family, we demonstrate how genome-wide loss-of-function profiling of a common set of cancer cell lines can be actually made fairly reproducible when considering seed-mediated off-target effects. Importantly, by excluding shRNAs having higher propensity for off-target effects, based on their seed-sequence properties, one can remove noise from the genome-wide shRNA datasets. As a translational application case, we demonstrate enhanced reproducibility of genetic interaction partners of common cancer drivers, as well as identify novel

  4. Genome-wide siRNA screen of genes regulating the LPS-induced NF-κB and TNF-α responses in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Katz, Samuel; Dutta, Bhaskar; Benet, Zachary L.; Sun, Jing; Fraser, Iain D.C.

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian innate immune system senses many bacterial stimuli through the toll-like receptor (TLR) family. Activation of the TLR4 receptor by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the most widely studied TLR pathway due to its central role in host responses to gram-negative bacterial infection and its contribution to endotoxemia and sepsis. Here we describe a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify genes regulating the mouse macrophage TNF-α and NF-κB responses to LPS. We include a secondary validation screen conducted with six independent siRNAs per gene to facilitate removal of off-target screen hits. We also provide microarray data from the same LPS-treated macrophage cells to facilitate downstream data analysis. These data provide a resource for analyzing gene function in the predominant pathway driving inflammatory signaling and cytokine expression in mouse macrophages. PMID:28248925

  5. Genome Wide Screening of Candidate Genes for Improving Piglet Birth Weight Using High and Low Estimated Breeding Value Populations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lifan; Zhou, Xiang; Michal, Jennifer J.; Ding, Bo; Li, Rui; Jiang, Zhihua

    2014-01-01

    Birth weight is an economically important trait in pig production because it directly impacts piglet growth and survival rate. In the present study, we performed a genome wide survey of candidate genes and pathways associated with individual birth weight (IBW) using the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip on 24 high (HEBV) and 24 low estimated breeding value (LEBV) animals. These animals were selected from a reference population of 522 individuals produced by three sires and six dam lines, which were crossbreds with multiple breeds. After quality-control, 43,257 SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), including 42,243 autosomal SNPs and 1,014 SNPs on chromosome X, were used in the data analysis. A total of 27 differentially selected regions (DSRs), including 1 on Sus scrofa chromosome 1 (SSC1), 1 on SSC4, 2 on SSC5, 4 on SSC6, 2 on SSC7, 5 on SSC8, 3 on SSC9, 1 on SSC14, 3 on SSC18, and 5 on SSCX, were identified to show the genome wide separations between the HEBV and LEBV groups for IBW in piglets. A DSR with the most number of significant SNPs (including 7 top 0.1% and 31 top 5% SNPs) was located on SSC6, while another DSR with the largest genetic differences in FST was found on SSC18. These regions harbor known functionally important genes involved in growth and development, such as TNFRSF9 (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 9), CA6 (carbonic anhydrase VI) and MDFIC (MyoD family inhibitor domain containing). A DSR rich in imprinting genes appeared on SSC9, which included PEG10 (paternally expressed 10), SGCE (sarcoglycan, epsilon), PPP1R9A (protein phosphatase 1, regulatory subunit 9A) and ASB4 (ankyrin repeat and SOCS box containing 4). More importantly, our present study provided evidence to support six quantitative trait loci (QTL) regions for pig birth weight, six QTL regions for average birth weight (ABW) and three QTL regions for litter birth weight (LBW) reported previously by other groups. Furthermore, gene ontology analysis with 183 genes

  6. Genome wide screening of candidate genes for improving piglet birth weight using high and low estimated breeding value populations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lifan; Zhou, Xiang; Michal, Jennifer J; Ding, Bo; Li, Rui; Jiang, Zhihua

    2014-01-01

    Birth weight is an economically important trait in pig production because it directly impacts piglet growth and survival rate. In the present study, we performed a genome wide survey of candidate genes and pathways associated with individual birth weight (IBW) using the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip on 24 high (HEBV) and 24 low estimated breeding value (LEBV) animals. These animals were selected from a reference population of 522 individuals produced by three sires and six dam lines, which were crossbreds with multiple breeds. After quality-control, 43,257 SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), including 42,243 autosomal SNPs and 1,014 SNPs on chromosome X, were used in the data analysis. A total of 27 differentially selected regions (DSRs), including 1 on Sus scrofa chromosome 1 (SSC1), 1 on SSC4, 2 on SSC5, 4 on SSC6, 2 on SSC7, 5 on SSC8, 3 on SSC9, 1 on SSC14, 3 on SSC18, and 5 on SSCX, were identified to show the genome wide separations between the HEBV and LEBV groups for IBW in piglets. A DSR with the most number of significant SNPs (including 7 top 0.1% and 31 top 5% SNPs) was located on SSC6, while another DSR with the largest genetic differences in F ST was found on SSC18. These regions harbor known functionally important genes involved in growth and development, such as TNFRSF9 (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 9), CA6 (carbonic anhydrase VI) and MDFIC (MyoD family inhibitor domain containing). A DSR rich in imprinting genes appeared on SSC9, which included PEG10 (paternally expressed 10), SGCE (sarcoglycan, epsilon), PPP1R9A (protein phosphatase 1, regulatory subunit 9A) and ASB4 (ankyrin repeat and SOCS box containing 4). More importantly, our present study provided evidence to support six quantitative trait loci (QTL) regions for pig birth weight, six QTL regions for average birth weight (ABW) and three QTL regions for litter birth weight (LBW) reported previously by other groups. Furthermore, gene ontology analysis with 183 genes

  7. Genome-wide chemical mutagenesis screens allow unbiased saturation of the cancer genome and identification of drug resistance mutations

    PubMed Central

    Brammeld, Jonathan S.; Petljak, Mia; Martincorena, Inigo; Williams, Steven P.; Alonso, Luz Garcia; Dalmases, Alba; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela; Price, Stacey; Barthorpe, Syd; Tarpey, Patrick; Alifrangis, Constantine; Bignell, Graham; Vidal, Joana; Young, Jamie; Stebbings, Lucy; Beal, Kathryn; Stratton, Michael R.; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Garnett, Mathew; Montagut, Clara; Iorio, Francesco; McDermott, Ultan

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance is an almost inevitable consequence of cancer therapy and ultimately proves fatal for the majority of patients. In many cases, this is the consequence of specific gene mutations that have the potential to be targeted to resensitize the tumor. The ability to uniformly saturate the genome with point mutations without chromosome or nucleotide sequence context bias would open the door to identify all putative drug resistance mutations in cancer models. Here, we describe such a method for elucidating drug resistance mechanisms using genome-wide chemical mutagenesis allied to next-generation sequencing. We show that chemically mutagenizing the genome of cancer cells dramatically increases the number of drug-resistant clones and allows the detection of both known and novel drug resistance mutations. We used an efficient computational process that allows for the rapid identification of involved pathways and druggable targets. Such a priori knowledge would greatly empower serial monitoring strategies for drug resistance in the clinic as well as the development of trials for drug-resistant patients. PMID:28179366

  8. A genome-wide screening uncovers the role of CCAR2 as an antagonist of DNA end resection.

    PubMed

    López-Saavedra, Ana; Gómez-Cabello, Daniel; Domínguez-Sánchez, María Salud; Mejías-Navarro, Fernando; Fernández-Ávila, María Jesús; Dinant, Christoffel; Martínez-Macías, María Isabel; Bartek, Jiri; Huertas, Pablo

    2016-08-09

    There are two major and alternative pathways to repair DNA double-strand breaks: non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination. Here we identify and characterize novel factors involved in choosing between these pathways; in this study we took advantage of the SeeSaw Reporter, in which the repair of double-strand breaks by homology-independent or -dependent mechanisms is distinguished by the accumulation of green or red fluorescence, respectively. Using a genome-wide human esiRNA (endoribonuclease-prepared siRNA) library, we isolate genes that control the recombination/end-joining ratio. Here we report that two distinct sets of genes are involved in the control of the balance between NHEJ and HR: those that are required to facilitate recombination and those that favour NHEJ. This last category includes CCAR2/DBC1, which we show inhibits recombination by limiting the initiation and the extent of DNA end resection, thereby acting as an antagonist of CtIP.

  9. Genome-wide chemical mutagenesis screens allow unbiased saturation of the cancer genome and identification of drug resistance mutations.

    PubMed

    Brammeld, Jonathan S; Petljak, Mia; Martincorena, Inigo; Williams, Steven P; Alonso, Luz Garcia; Dalmases, Alba; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela; Price, Stacey; Barthorpe, Syd; Tarpey, Patrick; Alifrangis, Constantine; Bignell, Graham; Vidal, Joana; Young, Jamie; Stebbings, Lucy; Beal, Kathryn; Stratton, Michael R; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Garnett, Mathew; Montagut, Clara; Iorio, Francesco; McDermott, Ultan

    2017-04-01

    Drug resistance is an almost inevitable consequence of cancer therapy and ultimately proves fatal for the majority of patients. In many cases, this is the consequence of specific gene mutations that have the potential to be targeted to resensitize the tumor. The ability to uniformly saturate the genome with point mutations without chromosome or nucleotide sequence context bias would open the door to identify all putative drug resistance mutations in cancer models. Here, we describe such a method for elucidating drug resistance mechanisms using genome-wide chemical mutagenesis allied to next-generation sequencing. We show that chemically mutagenizing the genome of cancer cells dramatically increases the number of drug-resistant clones and allows the detection of both known and novel drug resistance mutations. We used an efficient computational process that allows for the rapid identification of involved pathways and druggable targets. Such a priori knowledge would greatly empower serial monitoring strategies for drug resistance in the clinic as well as the development of trials for drug-resistant patients.

  10. Genome-wide screening for risk loci of idiopathic recurrent miscarriage in a Han Chinese population: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Li Wang; Zeng Chan Wang; Cui Xie; Xiao Feng Liu; Mao Sheng Yang

    2010-06-01

    The etiology of recurrent miscarriage (RM) is extremely heterogeneous, including genetic, immunologic, anatomic, endocrinological, and infectious anomalies. About 50% of RM is unexplained or poorly understood, which is called idiopathic recurrent miscarriage (IRM). The primary aim of this study was to identify the genetic loci that might be susceptible to IRM. Forty-four Han Chinese patients with IRM during the first trimester of their pregnancies and 44 healthy sex- and ethnic-matched controls were enrolled in this study. A case-control and genome-wide study was performed and 430 polymorphic microsatellite markers were analyzed. Three loci, 6q27 (D6S446, P = .028), 9q33.1 (D9S1776, P = .037), and Xp22.11 (DXS1226, P = .008), significantly associated with IRM were found. This work identified 3 genetic regions that might harbor genes predisposed to IRM and provided new insights for future genetic and etiological study of IRM. Further study is required to confirm it.

  11. A genome-wide screening uncovers the role of CCAR2 as an antagonist of DNA end resection

    PubMed Central

    López-Saavedra, Ana; Gómez-Cabello, Daniel; Domínguez-Sánchez, María Salud; Mejías-Navarro, Fernando; Fernández-Ávila, María Jesús; Dinant, Christoffel; Martínez-Macías, María Isabel; Bartek, Jiri; Huertas, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    There are two major and alternative pathways to repair DNA double-strand breaks: non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination. Here we identify and characterize novel factors involved in choosing between these pathways; in this study we took advantage of the SeeSaw Reporter, in which the repair of double-strand breaks by homology-independent or -dependent mechanisms is distinguished by the accumulation of green or red fluorescence, respectively. Using a genome-wide human esiRNA (endoribonuclease-prepared siRNA) library, we isolate genes that control the recombination/end-joining ratio. Here we report that two distinct sets of genes are involved in the control of the balance between NHEJ and HR: those that are required to facilitate recombination and those that favour NHEJ. This last category includes CCAR2/DBC1, which we show inhibits recombination by limiting the initiation and the extent of DNA end resection, thereby acting as an antagonist of CtIP. PMID:27503537

  12. Ex vivo genome-wide RNAi screening of the Drosophila Toll signaling pathway elicited by a larva-derived tissue extract.

    PubMed

    Kanoh, Hirotaka; Kuraishi, Takayuki; Tong, Li-Li; Watanabe, Ryo; Nagata, Shinji; Kurata, Shoichiro

    2015-11-13

    Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), so-called "danger signals," play important roles in host defense and pathophysiology in mammals and insects. In Drosophila, the Toll pathway confers damage responses during bacterial infection and improper cell-fate control. However, the intrinsic ligands and signaling mechanisms that potentiate innate immune responses remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that a Drosophila larva-derived tissue extract strongly elicits Toll pathway activation via the Toll receptor. Using this extract, we performed ex vivo genome-wide RNAi screening in Drosophila cultured cells, and identified several signaling factors that are required for host defense and antimicrobial-peptide expression in Drosophila adults. These results suggest that our larva-derived tissue extract contains active ingredients that mediate Toll pathway activation, and the screening data will shed light on the mechanisms of damage-related Toll pathway signaling in Drosophila.

  13. Cas-Database: web-based genome-wide guide RNA library design for gene knockout screens using CRISPR-Cas9.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeongbin; Kim, Jin-Soo; Bae, Sangsu

    2016-07-01

    CRISPR-derived RNA guided endonucleases (RGENs) have been widely used for both gene knockout and knock-in at the level of single or multiple genes. RGENs are now available for forward genetic screens at genome scale, but single guide RNA (sgRNA) selection at this scale is difficult. We develop an online tool, Cas-Database, a genome-wide gRNA library design tool for Cas9 nucleases from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9). With an easy-to-use web interface, Cas-Database allows users to select optimal target sequences simply by changing the filtering conditions. Furthermore, it provides a powerful way to select multiple optimal target sequences from thousands of genes at once for the creation of a genome-wide library. Cas-Database also provides a web application programming interface (web API) for advanced bioinformatics users. Free access at http://www.rgenome.net/cas-database/ sangsubae@hanyang.ac.kr or jskim01@snu.ac.kr Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. Cas-Database: web-based genome-wide guide RNA library design for gene knockout screens using CRISPR-Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeongbin; Kim, Jin-Soo; Bae, Sangsu

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: CRISPR-derived RNA guided endonucleases (RGENs) have been widely used for both gene knockout and knock-in at the level of single or multiple genes. RGENs are now available for forward genetic screens at genome scale, but single guide RNA (sgRNA) selection at this scale is difficult. Results: We develop an online tool, Cas-Database, a genome-wide gRNA library design tool for Cas9 nucleases from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9). With an easy-to-use web interface, Cas-Database allows users to select optimal target sequences simply by changing the filtering conditions. Furthermore, it provides a powerful way to select multiple optimal target sequences from thousands of genes at once for the creation of a genome-wide library. Cas-Database also provides a web application programming interface (web API) for advanced bioinformatics users. Availability and implementation: Free access at http://www.rgenome.net/cas-database/. Contact: sangsubae@hanyang.ac.kr or jskim01@snu.ac.kr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153724

  15. Comparative Genome-Wide Screening Identifies a Conserved Doxorubicin Repair Network That Is Diploid Specific in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Westmoreland, Tammy J.; Wickramasekara, Sajith M.; Guo, Andrew Y.; Selim, Alice L.; Winsor, Tiffany S.; Greenleaf, Arno L.; Blackwell, Kimberly L.; Olson, John A.; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Bennett, Craig B.

    2009-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic doxorubicin (DOX) induces DNA double-strand break (DSB) damage. In order to identify conserved genes that mediate DOX resistance, we screened the Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid deletion collection and identified 376 deletion strains in which exposure to DOX was lethal or severely reduced growth fitness. This diploid screen identified 5-fold more DOX resistance genes than a comparable screen using the isogenic haploid derivative. Since DSB damage is repaired primarily by homologous recombination in yeast, and haploid cells lack an available DNA homolog in G1 and early S phase, this suggests that our diploid screen may have detected the loss of repair functions in G1 or early S phase prior to complete DNA replication. To test this, we compared the relative DOX sensitivity of 30 diploid deletion mutants identified under our screening conditions to their isogenic haploid counterpart, most of which (n = 26) were not detected in the haploid screen. For six mutants (bem1Δ, ctf4Δ, ctk1Δ, hfi1Δ,nup133Δ, tho2Δ) DOX-induced lethality was absent or greatly reduced in the haploid as compared to the isogenic diploid derivative. Moreover, unlike WT, all six diploid mutants displayed severe G1/S phase cell cycle progression defects when exposed to DOX and some were significantly enhanced (ctk1Δ and hfi1Δ) or deficient (tho2Δ) for recombination. Using these and other “THO2-like” hypo-recombinogenic, diploid-specific DOX sensitive mutants (mft1Δ, thp1Δ, thp2Δ) we utilized known genetic/proteomic interactions to construct an interactive functional genomic network which predicted additional DOX resistance genes not detected in the primary screen. Most (76%) of the DOX resistance genes detected in this diploid yeast screen are evolutionarily conserved suggesting the human orthologs are candidates for mediating DOX resistance by impacting on checkpoint and recombination functions in G1 and/or early S phases. PMID:19503795

  16. Automated cell analysis tool for a genome-wide RNAi screen with support vector machine based supervised learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remmele, Steffen; Ritzerfeld, Julia; Nickel, Walter; Hesser, Jürgen

    2011-03-01

    RNAi-based high-throughput microscopy screens have become an important tool in biological sciences in order to decrypt mostly unknown biological functions of human genes. However, manual analysis is impossible for such screens since the amount of image data sets can often be in the hundred thousands. Reliable automated tools are thus required to analyse the fluorescence microscopy image data sets usually containing two or more reaction channels. The herein presented image analysis tool is designed to analyse an RNAi screen investigating the intracellular trafficking and targeting of acylated Src kinases. In this specific screen, a data set consists of three reaction channels and the investigated cells can appear in different phenotypes. The main issue of the image processing task is an automatic cell segmentation which has to be robust and accurate for all different phenotypes and a successive phenotype classification. The cell segmentation is done in two steps by segmenting the cell nuclei first and then using a classifier-enhanced region growing on basis of the cell nuclei to segment the cells. The classification of the cells is realized by a support vector machine which has to be trained manually using supervised learning. Furthermore, the tool is brightness invariant allowing different staining quality and it provides a quality control that copes with typical defects during preparation and acquisition. A first version of the tool has already been successfully applied for an RNAi-screen containing three hundred thousand image data sets and the SVM extended version is designed for additional screens.

  17. Genome-wide siRNA screen of genes regulating the LPS-induced TNF-α response in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Katz, Samuel; Dutta, Bhaskar; Wang, Ze; Fraser, Iain D.C.

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian innate immune system senses many bacterial stimuli through the toll-like receptor (TLR) family. Activation of the TLR4 receptor by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the most widely studied TLR pathway due to its central role in host responses to gram-negative bacterial infection and its contribution to endotoxemia and sepsis. Here we describe a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify genes regulating the human macrophage TNF-α response to LPS. We include a secondary validation screen conducted with six independent siRNAs per gene to facilitate removal of off-target screen hits. We also provide microarray data from the same LPS-treated macrophage cells to facilitate downstream data analysis. Tertiary screening with multiple TLR ligands and a microbial extract demonstrate that novel screen hits have broad effects on the innate inflammatory response to microbial stimuli. These data provide a resource for analyzing gene function in the predominant pathway driving inflammatory cytokine expression in human macrophages. PMID:28248930

  18. A genome-wide Drosophila screen for heat nociception identifies α2δ3 as an evolutionary-conserved pain gene

    PubMed Central

    Neely, G. Gregory; Hess, Andreas; Costigan, Michael; Keene, Alex C.; Goulas, Spyros; Langeslag, Michiel; Griffin, Robert S; Belfer, Inna; Dai, Feng; Smith, Shad; Diatchenko, Luda; Gupta, Vaijayanti; Xia, Cui-ping; Amann, Sabina; Kreitz, Silke; Heindl-Erdmann, Cornelia; Wolz, Susanne; Ly, Cindy V.; Arora, Suchir; Sarangi, Rinku; Dan, Debasis; Novatchkova, Maria; Rosenzweig, Mark; Gibson, Dustin; Truong, Darwin; Schramek, Daniel; Zoranovic, Tamara; Cronin, Shane J. F.; Angjeli, Belinda; Brune, Kay; Dietzl, Georg; Maixner, William; Meixner, Arabella; Thomas, Winston; Pospisilik, J. Andrew; Alenius, Mattias; Kress, Michaela; Subramaniam, Sai; Garrity, Paul A.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Woolf, Clifford J.; Penninger, Josef M.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Worldwide, acute and chronic pain affects 20% of the adult population and represents an enormous financial and emotional burden. Using genome-wide neuronal-specific RNAi knock-down in Drosophila, we report a global screen for an innate behavior and identify hundreds of novel genes implicated in heat nociception, including the α2δ-family calcium channel subunit straightjacket (stj). Mice mutant for the stj ortholog CACNA2D3 (α2δ3) also exhibit impaired behavioral heat pain sensitivity. In addition, in humans, α2δ3 SNP variants associate with reduced sensitivity to acute noxious heat and chronic back pain. Functional imaging in α2δ3 mutant mice revealed impaired transmission of thermal pain evoked signals from the thalamus to higher order pain centers. Intriguingly, in α2δ3 mutant mice thermal pain and tactile stimulation triggered strong cross-activation or synesthesia of brain regions involved in vision, olfaction, and hearing. PMID:21074052

  19. A Genome-wide CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) Screen Identifies NEK7 as an Essential Component of NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation.

    PubMed

    Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L; Chauhan, Dhruv; Schmidt, Tobias; Ebert, Thomas S; Reinhardt, Julia; Endl, Elmar; Hornung, Veit

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are high molecular weight protein complexes that assemble in the cytosol upon pathogen encounter. This results in caspase-1-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine maturation, as well as a special type of cell death, known as pyroptosis. The Nlrp3 inflammasome plays a pivotal role in pathogen defense, but at the same time, its activity has also been implicated in many common sterile inflammatory conditions. To this effect, several studies have identified Nlrp3 inflammasome engagement in a number of common human diseases such as atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer disease, or gout. Although it has been shown that known Nlrp3 stimuli converge on potassium ion efflux upstream of Nlrp3 activation, the exact molecular mechanism of Nlrp3 activation remains elusive. Here, we describe a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9 screen in immortalized mouse macrophages aiming at the unbiased identification of gene products involved in Nlrp3 inflammasome activation. We employed a FACS-based screen for Nlrp3-dependent cell death, using the ionophoric compound nigericin as a potassium efflux-inducing stimulus. Using a genome-wide guide RNA (gRNA) library, we found that targeting Nek7 rescued macrophages from nigericin-induced lethality. Subsequent studies revealed that murine macrophages deficient in Nek7 displayed a largely blunted Nlrp3 inflammasome response, whereas Aim2-mediated inflammasome activation proved to be fully intact. Although the mechanism of Nek7 functioning upstream of Nlrp3 yet remains elusive, these studies provide a first genetic handle of a component that specifically functions upstream of Nlrp3. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 genome-wide mutant screen for resistance to the antimicrobial peptide alfalfa snakin-1.

    PubMed

    Ayub, Nicolás D; Fox, Ana R; García, Araceli N; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Angeletti, Mauro; Pagano, Elba; Soto, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Snakin-1, a peptide produced by higher plants, has broad-spectrum antibiotic activity, inhibiting organisms ranging from Bacteria to Eukaryotes. However, the mode of action against target organisms is poorly understood. As a first step to elucidate the mechanism, we screened a mutation library of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 in LB and agar medium supplemented with alfalfa snakin-1 (MsSN1). We identified three biofilm formation-related Pseudomonas mutants that showed increased resistance to MsSN1. Genetic, physiological and bioinformatics analysis validated the results of the mutant screens, indicating that bacterial adhesion protein lapA is probably the target of MsSN1. Collectively, these findings suggest that snakin-1 acts on microbial adhesion properties. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. A Functional Genome-Wide In Vivo Screen Identifies New Regulators of Signalling Pathways during Early Xenopus Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Siwei; Li, Jingjing; Lea, Robert; Amaya, Enrique; Dorey, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic development requires exquisite regulation of several essential processes, such as patterning of tissues and organs, cell fate decisions, and morphogenesis. Intriguingly, these diverse processes are controlled by only a handful of signalling pathways, and mis-regulation in one or more of these pathways may result in a variety of congenital defects and diseases. Consequently, investigating how these signalling pathways are regulated at the molecular level is essential to understanding the mechanisms underlying vertebrate embryogenesis, as well as developing treatments for human diseases. Here, we designed and performed a large-scale gain-of-function screen in Xenopus embryos aimed at identifying new regulators of MAPK/Erk, PI3K/Akt, BMP, and TGF-β/Nodal signalling pathways. Our gain-of-function screen is based on the identification of gene products that alter the phosphorylation state of key signalling molecules, which report the activation state of the pathways. In total, we have identified 20 new molecules that regulate the activity of one or more signalling pathways during early Xenopus development. This is the first time that such a functional screen has been performed, and the findings pave the way toward a more comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the activity of important signalling pathways under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:24244509

  2. Genome-wide CRISPR screens reveal a Wnt-FZD5 signaling circuit as a druggable vulnerability of RNF43-mutant pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Steinhart, Zachary; Pavlovic, Zvezdan; Chandrashekhar, Megha; Hart, Traver; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Robitaille, Mélanie; Brown, Kevin R; Jaksani, Sridevi; Overmeer, René; Boj, Sylvia F; Adams, Jarrett; Pan, James; Clevers, Hans; Sidhu, Sachdev; Moffat, Jason; Angers, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Forward genetic screens with CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing enable high-resolution detection of genetic vulnerabilities in cancer cells. We conducted genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 screens in RNF43-mutant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, which rely on Wnt signaling for proliferation. Through these screens, we discovered a unique requirement for a Wnt signaling circuit: engaging FZD5, one of the ten Frizzled receptors encoded in the human genome. Our results uncover an underappreciated level of context-dependent specificity at the Wnt receptor level. We further derived a panel of recombinant antibodies that reports the expression of nine FZD proteins and confirms that FZD5 functional specificity cannot be explained by protein expression patterns. Additionally, antibodies that specifically bind FZD5 and FZD8 robustly inhibited the growth of RNF43-mutant PDAC cells grown in vitro and as xenografts in vivo, providing orthogonal support for the functional specificity observed genetically. Proliferation of a patient-derived PDAC cell line harboring an RNF43 variant was also selectively inhibited by the FZD5 antibodies, further demonstrating their use as a potential targeted therapy. Tumor organoid cultures from colorectal carcinoma patients that carried RNF43 mutations were also sensitive to the FZD5 antibodies, highlighting the potential generalizability of these findings beyond PDAC. Our results show that CRIPSR-based genetic screens can be leveraged to identify and validate cell surface targets for antibody development and therapy.

  3. A Genome-Wide Screen Reveals that the Vibrio cholerae Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System Modulates Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Yves A.; Chao, Michael C.; Sasabe, Jumpei; Davis, Brigid M.

    2015-01-01

    Diverse environmental stimuli and a complex network of regulatory factors are known to modulate expression of Vibrio cholerae's principal virulence factors. However, there is relatively little known about how metabolic factors impinge upon the pathogen's well-characterized cascade of transcription factors that induce expression of cholera toxin and the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP). Here, we used a transposon insertion site (TIS) sequencing-based strategy to identify new factors required for expression of tcpA, which encodes the major subunit of TCP, the organism's chief intestinal colonization factor. Besides identifying most of the genes known to modulate tcpA expression, the screen yielded ptsI and ptsH, which encode the enzyme I (EI) and Hpr components of the V. cholerae phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS). In addition to reduced expression of TcpA, strains lacking EI, Hpr, or the associated EIIAGlc protein produced less cholera toxin (CT) and had a diminished capacity to colonize the infant mouse intestine. The PTS modulates virulence gene expression by regulating expression of tcpPH and aphAB, which themselves control expression of toxT, the central activator of virulence gene expression. One mechanism by which PTS promotes virulence gene expression appears to be by modulating the amounts of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP). Our findings reveal that the V. cholerae PTS is an additional modulator of the ToxT regulon and demonstrate the potency of loss-of-function TIS sequencing screens for defining regulatory networks. PMID:26056384

  4. A genome-wide screen reveals a role for microRNA-1 in modulating cardiac cell polarity.

    PubMed

    King, Isabelle N; Qian, Li; Liang, Jianping; Huang, Yu; Shieh, Joseph T C; Kwon, Chulan; Srivastava, Deepak

    2011-04-19

    Many molecular pathways involved in heart disease have their roots in evolutionarily ancient developmental programs that depend critically on gene dosage and timing. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) modulate gene dosage posttranscriptionally, and among these, the muscle-specific miR-1 is particularly important for developing and maintaining somatic/skeletal and cardiac muscle. To identify pathways regulated by miR-1, we performed a forward genetic screen in Drosophila using wing-vein patterning as a biological assay. We identified several unexpected genes that genetically interacted with dmiR-1, one of which was kayak, encodes a developmentally regulated transcription factor. Additional studies directed at this genetic relationship revealed a previously unappreciated function of dmiR-1 in regulating the polarity of cardiac progenitor cells. The mammalian ortholog of kayak, c-Fos, was dysregulated in hearts of gain- or loss-of-function miR-1 mutant mice in a stress-dependent manner. These findings illustrate the power of Drosophila-based screens to find points of intersection between miRNAs and conserved pathways in mammals.

  5. Genome-wide screening of transcription factor deletion targets in Escherichia coli for enhanced production of lactate-based polyesters.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Ryosuke; Kodama, Yu; Matsumoto, Ken'ichiro; Ooi, Toshihiko; Taguchi, Seiichi

    2017-05-01

    Engineered Escherichia coli is a useful platform for production of lactate (LA)-based polyester poly[LA-co-3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB)] from renewable sugars. Here we screened all non-lethal transcription factor deletions of E. coli for efficient production of the polymer. This approach aimed at drawing out the latent potential of the host for efficient polymer production via indirect positive effects. Among 252 mutants from Keio Collection tested, eight mutants (ΔpdhR, ΔcspG, ΔyneJ, ΔchbR, ΔyiaU, ΔcreB, ΔygfI and ΔnanK) accumulated greater amount of polymer (6.2-10.1 g/L) compared to the parent strain E. coli BW25113 (5.1 g/L). The mutants increased polymer production per cell (1.1-1.5-fold) without significant change in cell density. The yield of the polymer from glucose was also higher for the selected mutants (0.34-0.38 g/g) than the parent strain (0.27 g/g). Therefore, the deletions of transcription factors should channel the carbon flux towards polymer production. It should be noted that the screening employed in this study identified beneficial mutants without analyzing causal relationship between the mutation and the enhanced polymer production. This approach, therefore, should be applicable to broad range of fermentation productions.

  6. Genome Wide Association Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastiani, Paola; Solovieff, Nadia

    The availability of high throughput technology for parallel genotyping has opened the field of genetics to genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These studies generate massive amount of genetic data that challenge investigators with issues related to data management, statistical analysis of large data sets, visualization, and annotation of results. We will review the common approach to analysis of GWAS data and then discuss options to learn more from these data.

  7. Genome-wide screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes required to foster tolerance towards industrial wheat straw hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Francisco B; Teixeira, Miguel C; Mira, Nuno P; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Domingues, Lucília

    2014-12-01

    The presence of toxic compounds derived from biomass pre-treatment in fermentation media represents an important drawback in second-generation bio-ethanol production technology and overcoming this inhibitory effect is one of the fundamental challenges to its industrial production. The aim of this study was to systematically identify, in industrial medium and at a genomic scale, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes required for simultaneous and maximal tolerance to key inhibitors of lignocellulosic fermentations. Based on the screening of EUROSCARF haploid mutant collection, 242 and 216 determinants of tolerance to inhibitory compounds present in industrial wheat straw hydrolysate (WSH) and in inhibitor-supplemented synthetic hydrolysate were identified, respectively. Genes associated to vitamin metabolism, mitochondrial and peroxisomal functions, ribosome biogenesis and microtubule biogenesis and dynamics are among the newly found determinants of WSH resistance. Moreover, PRS3, VMA8, ERG2, RAV1 and RPB4 were confirmed as key genes on yeast tolerance and fermentation of industrial WSH.

  8. CRISPR genome-wide screening identifies dependence on the proteasome subunit PSMC6 for Bortezomib sensitivity in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chang-Xin; Kortüm, K Martin; Zhu, Yuan Xiao; Bruins, Laura A; Jedlowski, Patrick; Votruba, Patrick G; Luo, Moulun; Stewart, Robert A; Ahmann, Jonathan; Braggio, Esteban; Stewart, A Keith

    2017-09-27

    Bortezomib (BTZ) is highly effective in the treatment of Multiple Myeloma (MM), however emergent drug resistance is common. Consequently, we employed CRISPR targeting 19,052 human genes to identify unbiased targets that contribute to BTZ resistance. Specifically, we engineered an RPMI8226 MM cell line to express Cas9 and a lentiviral-vector CRISPR library and cultured derived cells in doses of BTZ lethal to parental cells. Sequencing was performed on surviving cells to identify inactivated genes responsible for drug resistance. From two independent whole genome screens, we selected 31 candidate genes and constructed a second CRISPR sgRNA library, specifically targeting each of these 31 genes with four sgRNAs. After secondary screening for BTZ resistance, the top 20 "resistance" genes were selected for individual validation. Of these 20 targets the proteasome regulatory subunit PSMC6 was the only gene validated to reproducibly confer BTZ resistance. We confirmed that inhibition of chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity by BTZ was significantly reduced in cells lacking PSMC6. We individually investigated other members of the PSMC group (PSMC1 to 5) and found that deficiency in each of those subunits also imparts BTZ resistance. We found 36 mutations in 19S proteasome subunits out of 895 patients in the IA10 release of the CoMMapss study (https://www.themmfr.org/). Our findings demonstrate that the PSMC6 subunit is the most prominent target required for BTZ sensitivity in MM cells and should be examined in drug refractory populations. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Genome-wide screen of human bromodomain-containing proteins identifies Cecr2 as a novel DNA damage response protein.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seul-Ki; Park, Eun-Jung; Lee, Han-Sae; Lee, Ye Seul; Kwon, Jongbum

    2012-07-01

    The formation of γ-H2AX foci after DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) is crucial for the cellular response to this lethal DNA damage. We previously have shown that BRG1, a chromatin remodeling enzyme, facilitates DSB repair by stimulating γ-H2AX formation, and this function of BRG1 requires the binding of BRGI to acetylated histone H3 on γ-H2AX-containing nucleosomes using its bromodomain (BRD), a protein module that specifically recognizes acetyl-Lys moieties. We also have shown that the BRD of BRG1, when ectopically expressed in cells, functions as a dominant negative inhibitor of the BRG1 activity to stimulate γ-H2AX and DSB repair. Here, we found that BRDs from a select group of proteins have no such activity, suggesting that the γ-H2AX inhibition activity of BRG1 BRD is specific. This finding led us to search for more BRDs that exhibit γ-H2AX inhibition activity in the hope of finding additional BRD-containing proteins involved in DNA damage responses. We screened a total of 52 individual BRDs present in 38 human BRD-containing proteins, comprising 93% of all human BRDs. We identified the BRD of cat eye syndrome chromosome region candidate 2 (Cecr2), which recently was shown to form a novel chromatin remodeling complex with unknown cellular functions, as having a strong γ-H2AX inhibition activity. This activity of Cecr2 BRD is specific because it depends on the chromatin binding affinity of Cecr2 BRD. Small interfering RNA knockdown experiments showed that Cecr2 is important for γ-H2AX formation and DSB repair. Therefore, our genomewide screen identifies Cecr2 as a novel DNA damage response protein.

  10. New regulators of a high affinity Ca2+ influx system revealed through a genome-wide screen in yeast.

    PubMed

    Martin, D Christian; Kim, Hyemin; Mackin, Nancy A; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Evangelista, Carlos C; Beaudry, Veronica G; Dudgeon, Drew D; Naiman, Daniel Q; Erdman, Scott E; Cunningham, Kyle W

    2011-03-25

    The bakers' yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae utilizes a high affinity Ca(2+) influx system (HACS) to survive assaults by mating pheromones, tunicamycin, and azole-class antifungal agents. HACS consists of two known subunits, Cch1 and Mid1, that are homologous and analogous to the catalytic α-subunits and regulatory α2δ-subunits of mammalian voltage-gated calcium channels, respectively. To search for additional subunits and regulators of HACS, a collection of gene knock-out mutants was screened for abnormal uptake of Ca(2+) after exposure to mating pheromone or to tunicamycin. The screen revealed that Ecm7 is required for HACS function in most conditions. Cycloheximide chase experiments showed that Ecm7 was stabilized by Mid1, and Mid1 was stabilized by Cch1 in non-signaling conditions, suggesting they all interact. Ecm7 is a member of the PMP-22/EMP/MP20/Claudin superfamily of transmembrane proteins that includes γ-subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels. Eleven additional members of this superfamily were identified in yeast, but none was required for HACS activity in response to the stimuli. Remarkably, many dozens of genes involved in vesicle-mediated trafficking and protein secretion were required to prevent spontaneous activation of HACS. Taken together, the findings suggest that HACS and calcineurin monitor performance of the membrane trafficking system in yeasts and coordinate compensatory processes. Conservation of this quality control system in Candida glabrata suggests that many pathogenic species of fungi may utilize HACS and calcineurin to resist azoles and other compounds that target membrane biosynthesis.

  11. A novel genome-wide in vivo screen for metastatic suppressors in human colon cancer identifies the positive WNT-TCF pathway modulators TMED3 and SOX12

    PubMed Central

    Duquet, Arnaud; Melotti, Alice; Mishra, Sonakshi; Malerba, Monica; Seth, Chandan; Conod, Arwen; Ruiz i Altaba, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    The progression of tumors to the metastatic state involves the loss of metastatic suppressor functions. Finding these, however, is difficult as in vitro assays do not fully predict metastatic behavior, and the majority of studies have used cloned cell lines, which do not reflect primary tumor heterogeneity. Here, we have designed a novel genome-wide screen to identify metastatic suppressors using primary human tumor cells in mice, which allows saturation screens. Using this unbiased approach, we have tested the hypothesis that endogenous colon cancer metastatic suppressors affect WNT-TCF signaling. Our screen has identified two novel metastatic suppressors: TMED3 and SOX12, the knockdown of which increases metastatic growth after direct seeding. Moreover, both modify the type of self-renewing spheroids, but only knockdown of TMED3 also induces spheroid cell spreading and lung metastases from a subcutaneous xenograft. Importantly, whereas TMED3 and SOX12 belong to different families involved in protein secretion and transcriptional regulation, both promote endogenous WNT-TCF activity. Treatments for advanced or metastatic colon cancer may thus not benefit from WNT blockers, and these may promote a worse outcome. PMID:24920608

  12. Clustering patterns of LOD scores for asthma-related phenotypes revealed by a genome-wide screen in 295 French EGEA families.

    PubMed

    Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Dizier, Marie-Hélène; Krähenbühl, Christine; Lemainque, Arnaud; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Betard, Christine; Bousquet, Jean; Charpin, Denis; Gormand, Frédéric; Guilloud-Bataille, Michel; Just, Jocelyne; Le Moual, Nicole; Maccario, Jean; Matran, Régis; Neukirch, Françoise; Oryszczyn, Marie-Pierre; Paty, Evelyne; Pin, Isabelle; Rosenberg-Bourgin, Myriam; Vervloet, Daniel; Kauffmann, Francine; Lathrop, Mark; Demenais, Florence

    2004-12-15

    A genome-wide scan for asthma phenotypes was conducted in the whole sample of 295 EGEA families selected through at least one asthmatic subject. In addition to asthma, seven phenotypes involved in the main asthma physiopathological pathways were considered: SPT (positive skin prick test response to at least one of 11 allergens), SPTQ score being the number of positive skin test responses to 11 allergens, Phadiatop (positive specific IgE response to a mixture of allergens), total IgE levels, eosinophils, bronchial responsiveness (BR) to methacholine challenge and %predicted FEV(1). Four regions showed evidence for linkage (Pscreens, 6q14 appears to be a new region potentially linked to %FEV(1). To determine which of these various asthma phenotypes are more likely to share common genetic determinants, a principal component analysis was applied to the genome-wide LOD scores. This analysis revealed clustering of LODs for asthma, SPT and Phadiatop on one axis and clustering of LODs for %FEV(1), BR and SPTQ on the other, while LODs for IgE and eosinophils appeared to be independent from all other LODs. These results provide new insights into the potential sharing of genetic determinants by asthma-related phenotypes.

  13. A genome-wide screen for promoter methylation in lung cancer identifies novel methylation markers for multiple malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shames, David S; Girard, Luc; Gao, Boning; Sato, Mitsuo; Lewis, Cheryl M; Shivapurkar, Narayan; Jiang, Aixiang; Perou, Charles M; Kim, Young H; Pollack, Jonathan R; Fong, Kwun M; Lam, Chi-Leung; Wong, Maria; Shyr, Yu; Nanda, Rita; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Gerald, William; Euhus, David M; Shay, Jerry W; Gazdar, Adi F; Minna, John D

    2006-12-01

    Promoter hypermethylation coupled with loss of heterozygosity at the same locus results in loss of gene function in many tumor cells. The "rules" governing which genes are methylated during the pathogenesis of individual cancers, how specific methylation profiles are initially established, or what determines tumor type-specific methylation are unknown. However, DNA methylation markers that are highly specific and sensitive for common tumors would be useful for the early detection of cancer, and those required for the malignant phenotype would identify pathways important as therapeutic targets. In an effort to identify new cancer-specific methylation markers, we employed a high-throughput global expression profiling approach in lung cancer cells. We identified 132 genes that have 5' CpG islands, are induced from undetectable levels by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine in multiple non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, and are expressed in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells. As expected, these genes were also expressed in normal lung, but often not in companion primary lung cancers. Methylation analysis of a subset (45/132) of these promoter regions in primary lung cancer (n = 20) and adjacent nonmalignant tissue (n = 20) showed that 31 genes had acquired methylation in the tumors, but did not show methylation in normal lung or peripheral blood cells. We studied the eight most frequently and specifically methylated genes from our lung cancer dataset in breast cancer (n = 37), colon cancer (n = 24), and prostate cancer (n = 24) along with counterpart nonmalignant tissues. We found that seven loci were frequently methylated in both breast and lung cancers, with four showing extensive methylation in all four epithelial tumors. By using a systematic biological screen we identified multiple genes that are methylated with high penetrance in primary lung, breast, colon, and prostate cancers. The cross-tumor methylation pattern we observed for these novel markers suggests

  14. A Genome-Wide Screen for Promoter Methylation in Lung Cancer Identifies Novel Methylation Markers for Multiple Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shames, David S; Girard, Luc; Gao, Boning; Sato, Mitsuo; Lewis, Cheryl M; Shivapurkar, Narayan; Jiang, Aixiang; Perou, Charles M; Kim, Young H; Pollack, Jonathan R; Fong, Kwun M; Lam, Chi-Leung; Wong, Maria; Shyr, Yu; Nanda, Rita; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Gerald, William; Euhus, David M; Shay, Jerry W; Gazdar, Adi F; Minna, John D

    2006-01-01

    Background Promoter hypermethylation coupled with loss of heterozygosity at the same locus results in loss of gene function in many tumor cells. The “rules” governing which genes are methylated during the pathogenesis of individual cancers, how specific methylation profiles are initially established, or what determines tumor type-specific methylation are unknown. However, DNA methylation markers that are highly specific and sensitive for common tumors would be useful for the early detection of cancer, and those required for the malignant phenotype would identify pathways important as therapeutic targets. Methods and Findings In an effort to identify new cancer-specific methylation markers, we employed a high-throughput global expression profiling approach in lung cancer cells. We identified 132 genes that have 5′ CpG islands, are induced from undetectable levels by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine in multiple non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, and are expressed in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells. As expected, these genes were also expressed in normal lung, but often not in companion primary lung cancers. Methylation analysis of a subset (45/132) of these promoter regions in primary lung cancer (n = 20) and adjacent nonmalignant tissue (n = 20) showed that 31 genes had acquired methylation in the tumors, but did not show methylation in normal lung or peripheral blood cells. We studied the eight most frequently and specifically methylated genes from our lung cancer dataset in breast cancer (n = 37), colon cancer (n = 24), and prostate cancer (n = 24) along with counterpart nonmalignant tissues. We found that seven loci were frequently methylated in both breast and lung cancers, with four showing extensive methylation in all four epithelial tumors. Conclusions By using a systematic biological screen we identified multiple genes that are methylated with high penetrance in primary lung, breast, colon, and prostate cancers. The cross-tumor methylation

  15. Genome-Wide CRISPR-Cas9 Screen Identifies MicroRNAs That Regulate Myeloid Leukemia Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jared; Hu, Ruozhen; Mosbruger, Timothy L; Dahlem, Timothy J; Stephens, W Zac; Rao, Dinesh S; Round, June L; O'Connell, Ryan M

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian microRNA expression is dysregulated in human cancer. However, the functional relevance of many microRNAs in the context of tumor biology remains unclear. Using CRISPR-Cas9 technology, we performed a global loss-of-function screen to simultaneously test the functions of individual microRNAs and protein-coding genes during the growth of a myeloid leukemia cell line. This approach identified evolutionarily conserved human microRNAs that suppress or promote cell growth, revealing that microRNAs are extensively integrated into the molecular networks that control tumor cell physiology. miR-155 was identified as a top microRNA candidate promoting cellular fitness, which we confirmed with two distinct miR-155-targeting CRISPR-Cas9 lentiviral constructs. Further, we performed anti-correlation functional profiling to predict relevant microRNA-tumor suppressor gene or microRNA-oncogene interactions in these cells. This analysis identified miR-150 targeting of p53, a connection that was experimentally validated. Taken together, our study describes a powerful genetic approach by which the function of individual microRNAs can be assessed on a global level, and its use will rapidly advance our understanding of how microRNAs contribute to human disease.

  16. Genome-wide gain-of-function screen for genes that induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Škalamera, Dubravka; Dahmer-Heath, Mareike; Stevenson, Alexander J; Pinto, Cletus; Shah, Esha T; Daignault, Sheena M; Said, Nur Akmarina B M; Davis, Melissa; Haass, Nikolas K; Williams, Elizabeth D; Hollier, Brett G; Thompson, Erik W; Gabrielli, Brian; Gonda, Thomas J

    2016-09-20

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental program that has been implicated in progression, metastasis and therapeutic resistance of some carcinomas. To identify genes whose overexpression drives EMT, we screened a lentiviral expression library of 17000 human open reading frames (ORFs) using high-content imaging to quantitate cytoplasmic vimentin. Hits capable of increasing vimentin in the mammary carcinoma-derived cell line MDA-MB-468 were confirmed in the non-tumorigenic breast-epithelial cell line MCF10A. When overexpressed in this model, they increased the rate of cell invasion through Matrigel™, induced mesenchymal marker expression and reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin. In gene-expression datasets derived from breast cancer patients, the expression of several novel genes correlated with expression of known EMT marker genes, indicating their in vivo relevance. As EMT-associated properties are thought to contribute in several ways to cancer progression, genes identified in this study may represent novel targets for anti-cancer therapy.

  17. Genome-wide RNAi screen for synthetic lethal interactions with the C. elegans kinesin-5 homolog BMK-1

    PubMed Central

    Maia, André F.; Tanenbaum, Marvin E.; Galli, Matilde; Lelieveld, Daphne; Egan, David A.; Gassmann, Reto; Sunkel, Claudio E.; van den Heuvel, Sander; Medema, René H.

    2015-01-01

    Kinesins are a superfamily of microtubule-based molecular motors that perform various transport needs and have essential roles in cell division. Among these, the kinesin-5 family has been shown to play a major role in the formation and maintenance of the bipolar mitotic spindle. Moreover, recent work suggests that kinesin-5 motors may have additional roles. In contrast to most model organisms, the sole kinesin-5 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans, bmk-1, is not required for successful mitosis and animals lacking bmk-1 are viable and fertile. To gain insight into factors that may act redundantly with BMK-1 in spindle assembly and to identify possible additional cellular pathways involving BMK-1, we performed a synthetic lethal screen using the bmk-1 deletion allele ok391. We successfully knocked down 82% of the C. elegans genome using RNAi and assayed viability in bmk-1(ok391) and wild type strains using an automated high-throughput approach based on fluorescence microscopy. The dataset includes a final list of 37 synthetic lethal interactions whose further study is likely to provide insight into kinesin-5 function. PMID:25984351

  18. Genome-wide gain-of-function screen for genes that induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Škalamera, Dubravka; Dahmer-Heath, Mareike; Stevenson, Alexander J.; Pinto, Cletus; Shah, Esha T.; Daignault, Sheena M.; Said, Nur Akmarina B.M.; Davis, Melissa; Haass, Nikolas K.; Williams, Elizabeth D.; Hollier, Brett G.; Thompson, Erik W.; Gabrielli, Brian; Gonda, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental program that has been implicated in progression, metastasis and therapeutic resistance of some carcinomas. To identify genes whose overexpression drives EMT, we screened a lentiviral expression library of 17000 human open reading frames (ORFs) using high-content imaging to quantitate cytoplasmic vimentin. Hits capable of increasing vimentin in the mammary carcinoma-derived cell line MDA-MB-468 were confirmed in the non-tumorigenic breast-epithelial cell line MCF10A. When overexpressed in this model, they increased the rate of cell invasion through Matrigel™, induced mesenchymal marker expression and reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin. In gene-expression datasets derived from breast cancer patients, the expression of several novel genes correlated with expression of known EMT marker genes, indicating their in vivo relevance. As EMT-associated properties are thought to contribute in several ways to cancer progression, genes identified in this study may represent novel targets for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:27876705

  19. A Genome-Wide Screen to Identify Transcription Factors Expressed in Pelvic Ganglia of the Lower Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Carrie B.; Ireland, Sara; Fleming, Nicole L.; Yu, Jing; Valerius, M. Todd; Georgas, Kylie; Chiu, Han Sheng; Brennan, Jane; Armstrong, Jane; Little, Melissa H.; McMahon, Andrew P.; Southard-Smith, E. Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Relative positions of neurons within mature murine pelvic ganglia based on expression of neurotransmitters have been described. However the spatial organization of developing innervation in the murine urogenital tract (UGT) and the gene networks that regulate specification and maturation of neurons within the pelvic ganglia of the lower urinary tract (LUT) are unknown. We used whole-mount immunohistochemistry and histochemical stains to localize neural elements in 15.5 days post coitus (dpc) fetal mice. To identify potential regulatory factors expressed in pelvic ganglia, we surveyed expression patterns for known or probable transcription factors (TF) annotated in the mouse genome by screening a whole-mount in situ hybridization library of fetal UGTs. Of the 155 genes detected in pelvic ganglia, 88 encode TFs based on the presence of predicted DNA-binding domains. Neural crest (NC)-derived progenitors within the LUT were labeled by Sox10, a well-known regulator of NC development. Genes identified were categorized based on patterns of restricted expression in pelvic ganglia, pelvic ganglia and urethral epithelium, or pelvic ganglia and urethral mesenchyme. Gene expression patterns and the distribution of Sox10+, Phox2b+, Hu+, and PGP9.5+ cells within developing ganglia suggest previously unrecognized regional segregation of Sox10+ progenitors and differentiating neurons in early development of pelvic ganglia. Reverse transcription-PCR of pelvic ganglia RNA from fetal and post-natal stages demonstrated that multiple TFs maintain post-natal expression, although Pax3 is extinguished before weaning. Our analysis identifies multiple potential regulatory genes including TFs that may participate in segregation of discrete lineages within pelvic ganglia. The genes identified here are attractive candidate disease genes that may now be further investigated for their roles in malformation syndromes or in LUT dysfunction. PMID:22988430

  20. Genome-Wide Screening Identifies Six Genes That Are Associated with Susceptibility to Escherichia coli Microcin PDI

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhe; Orfe, Lisa H.; Lu, Shao-Yeh; Besser, Thomas E.; Call, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    The microcin PDI inhibits a diverse group of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains. Coculture of a single-gene knockout library (BW25113; n = 3,985 mutants) against a microcin PDI-producing strain (E. coli 25) identified six mutants that were not susceptible (ΔatpA, ΔatpF, ΔdsbA, ΔdsbB, ΔompF, and ΔompR). Complementation of these genes restored susceptibility in all cases, and the loss of susceptibility was confirmed through independent gene knockouts in E. coli O157:H7 Sakai. Heterologous expression of E. coli ompF conferred susceptibility to Salmonella enterica and Yersinia enterocolitica strains that are normally unaffected by microcin PDI. The expression of chimeric OmpF and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the K47G48N49 region within the first extracellular loop of E. coli OmpF is a putative binding site for microcin PDI. OmpR is a transcriptional regulator for ompF, and consequently loss of susceptibility by the ΔompR strain most likely is related to this function. Deletion of AtpA and AtpF, as well as AtpE and AtpH (missed in the original library screen), resulted in the loss of susceptibility to microcin PDI and the loss of ATP synthase function. Coculture of a susceptible strain in the presence of an ATP synthase inhibitor resulted in a loss of susceptibility, confirming that a functional ATP synthase complex is required for microcin PDI activity. In trans expression of ompF in the ΔdsbA and ΔdsbB strains did not restore a susceptible phenotype, indicating that these proteins are probably involved with the formation of disulfide bonds for OmpF or microcin PDI. PMID:26209678

  1. A genome-wide screen for genetic variants that modify the recruitment of REST to its target genes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rory; Richter, Nadine; Bogu, Gireesh K; Bhinge, Akshay; Teng, Siaw Wei; Choo, Siew Hua; Andrieux, Lise O; de Benedictis, Cinzia; Jauch, Ralf; Stanton, Lawrence W

    2012-01-01

    Increasing numbers of human diseases are being linked to genetic variants, but our understanding of the mechanistic links leading from DNA sequence to disease phenotype is limited. The majority of disease-causing nucleotide variants fall within the non-protein-coding portion of the genome, making it likely that they act by altering gene regulatory sequences. We hypothesised that SNPs within the binding sites of the transcriptional repressor REST alter the degree of repression of target genes. Given that changes in the effective concentration of REST contribute to several pathologies-various cancers, Huntington's disease, cardiac hypertrophy, vascular smooth muscle proliferation-these SNPs should alter disease-susceptibility in carriers. We devised a strategy to identify SNPs that affect the recruitment of REST to target genes through the alteration of its DNA recognition element, the RE1. A multi-step screen combining genetic, genomic, and experimental filters yielded 56 polymorphic RE1 sequences with robust and statistically significant differences of affinity between alleles. These SNPs have a considerable effect on the the functional recruitment of REST to DNA in a range of in vitro, reporter gene, and in vivo analyses. Furthermore, we observe allele-specific biases in deeply sequenced chromatin immunoprecipitation data, consistent with predicted differenes in RE1 affinity. Amongst the targets of polymorphic RE1 elements are important disease genes including NPPA, PTPRT, and CDH4. Thus, considerable genetic variation exists in the DNA motifs that connect gene regulatory networks. Recently available ChIP-seq data allow the annotation of human genetic polymorphisms with regulatory information to generate prior hypotheses about their disease-causing mechanism.

  2. [Application of genome-wide genechip for screening and identifying genes related to CD133(+)CD200(+) colorectal cancer stem cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanshan; Li, Lixuan; Huang, Zaiwei; Xin, Xiaomin; Xiao, Bing

    2013-12-01

    To screen and identity genes related to CD133(+)CD200(+) colorectal cancer stem cells. The two subpopulations of colorectal cancer cells, namely CD133(+)CD200(+) and CD133(-)CD200(-) cells, were sorted and verified by flow cytometry. The gene expression profiles of CD133(+)CD200(+)and CD133(-)CD200(-) colorectal cancer cells were examined using Affymetrix Human U133 Plus2.0 genome-wide genechip. The differentially expressed genes between the two cell subpopulations were analyzed to identify the genes responsible for the main effect in association with colorectal cancer stem cells. Real-time quantitative PCR was performed to confirm some of the differentially expressed genes identified by genechip. The genechip result showed that 655 genes were differentially expressed in CD133(+)CD200(+) colorectal cancer stem cells by at least 3 folds, including 290 up-regulated and 365 down-regulated ones. Bioinformatics analysis and gene co-expression network building identified 3 genes (MDM2, PRKACG, and CACNA1G) with specific expression in CD133(+)CD200(+) colorectal cancer stem cells, and this result was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR analysis. A specific gene expression profile of colorectal cancer stem cells has been established through screening and identifying genes related to CD133(+)CD200(+)colorectal cancer stem cells by gene genechip technique, which provides a basis for further study of gene targeting therapy of colorectal cancer.

  3. Identification and classification of genes required for tolerance to freeze-thaw stress revealed by genome-wide screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion strains.

    PubMed

    Ando, Akira; Nakamura, Toshihide; Murata, Yoshinori; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shima, Jun

    2007-03-01

    Yeasts used in bread making are exposed to freeze-thaw stress during frozen-dough baking. To clarify the genes required for freeze-thaw tolerance, genome-wide screening was performed using the complete deletion strain collection of diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screening identified 58 gene deletions that conferred freeze-thaw sensitivity. These genes were then classified based on their cellular function and on the localization of their products. The results showed that the genes required for freeze-thaw tolerance were frequently involved in vacuole functions and cell wall biogenesis. The highest numbers of gene products were components of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. Next, the cross-sensitivity of the freeze-thaw-sensitive mutants to oxidative stress and to cell wall stress was studied; both of these are environmental stresses closely related to freeze-thaw stress. The results showed that defects in the functions of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase conferred sensitivity to oxidative stress and to cell wall stress. In contrast, defects in gene products involved in cell wall assembly conferred sensitivity to cell wall stress but not to oxidative stress. Our results suggest the presence of at least two different mechanisms of freeze-thaw injury: oxidative stress generated during the freeze-thaw process, and defects in cell wall assembly.

  4. Using genome-wide CRISPR library screening with library resistant DCK to find new sources of Ara-C drug resistance in AML

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Morito; Rathe, Susan K.; Bailey, Natashay J.; Aumann, Natalie K.; Jones, Justine M.; Veldhuijzen, G. Willemijn; Moriarity, Branden S.; Largaespada, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can display de novo or acquired resistance to cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a primary component of induction chemotherapy. To identify genes capable of independently imposing Ara-C resistance, we applied a genome-wide CRISPR library to human U937 cells and exposed to them to Ara-C. Interestingly, all drug resistant clones contained guide RNAs for DCK. To avoid DCK gene modification, gRNA resistant DCK cDNA was created by the introduction of silent mutations. The CRISPR screening was repeated using the gRNA resistant DCK, and loss of SLC29A was identified as also being capable of conveying Ara-C drug resistance. To determine if loss of Dck results in increased sensitivity to other drugs, we conducted a screen of 446 FDA approved drugs using two Dck-defective BXH-2 derived murine AML cell lines and their Ara-C sensitive parental lines. Both cell lines showed an increase in sensitivity to prednisolone. Guide RNA resistant cDNA rescue was a legitimate strategy and multiple DCK or SLC29A deficient human cell clones were established with one clone becoming prednisolone sensitive. Dck-defective leukemic cells may become prednisolone sensitive indicating prednisolone may be an effective adjuvant therapy in some cases of DCK-negative AML. PMID:27808171

  5. A genome-wide CRISPR screen reconciles the role of N-linked glycosylation in galectin-3 transport to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Sarah E; Menzies, Sam A; Popa, Stephanie J; Savinykh, Natalia; Petrunkina Harrison, Anna; Lehner, Paul J; Moreau, Kevin

    2017-10-01

    Galectins are a family of lectin binding proteins expressed both intracellularly and extracellularly. Galectin-3 (Gal-3, also known as LGALS3) is expressed at the cell surface; however, Gal-3 lacks a signal sequence, and the mechanism of Gal-3 transport to the cell surface remains poorly understood. Here, using a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9 forward genetic screen for regulators of Gal-3 cell surface localization, we identified genes encoding glycoproteins, enzymes involved in N-linked glycosylation, regulators of ER-Golgi trafficking and proteins involved in immunity. The results of this screening approach led us to address the controversial role of N-linked glycosylation in the transport of Gal-3 to the cell surface. We find that N-linked glycoprotein maturation is not required for Gal-3 transport from the cytosol to the extracellular space, but is important for cell surface binding. Additionally, secreted Gal-3 is predominantly free and not packaged into extracellular vesicles. These data support a secretion pathway independent of N-linked glycoproteins and extracellular vesicles. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Novel Connections Between DNA Replication, Telomere Homeostasis, and the DNA Damage Response Revealed by a Genome-Wide Screen for TEL1/ATM Interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Piening, Brian D.; Huang, Dongqing; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2013-01-01

    Tel1 is the budding yeast ortholog of the mammalian tumor suppressor and DNA damage response (DDR) kinase ATM. However, tel1-Δ cells, unlike ATM-deficient cells, do not exhibit sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, but do display shortened (but stably maintained) telomere lengths. Neither the extent to which Tel1p functions in the DDR nor the mechanism by which Tel1 contributes to telomere metabolism is well understood. To address the first question, we present the results from a comprehensive genome-wide screen for genetic interactions with tel1-Δ that cause sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and/or ionizing radiation, along with follow-up characterizations of the 13 interactions yielded by this screen. Surprisingly, many of the tel1-Δ interactions that confer DNA damage sensitivity also exacerbate the short telomere phenotype, suggesting a connection between these two phenomena. Restoration of normal telomere length in the tel1-Δ xxx-Δ mutants results in only minor suppression of the DNA damage sensitivity, demonstrating that the sensitivity of these mutants must also involve mechanisms independent of telomere length. In support of a model for increased replication stress in the tel1-Δ xxx-Δ mutants, we show that depletion of dNTP pools through pretreatment with hydroxyurea renders tel1-Δ cells (but not wild type) MMS-sensitive, demonstrating that, under certain conditions, Tel1p does indeed play a critical role in the DDR. PMID:23378069

  7. Using genome-wide CRISPR library screening with library resistant DCK to find new sources of Ara-C drug resistance in AML.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Morito; Rathe, Susan K; Bailey, Natashay J; Aumann, Natalie K; Jones, Justine M; Veldhuijzen, G Willemijn; Moriarity, Branden S; Largaespada, David A

    2016-11-03

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can display de novo or acquired resistance to cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a primary component of induction chemotherapy. To identify genes capable of independently imposing Ara-C resistance, we applied a genome-wide CRISPR library to human U937 cells and exposed to them to Ara-C. Interestingly, all drug resistant clones contained guide RNAs for DCK. To avoid DCK gene modification, gRNA resistant DCK cDNA was created by the introduction of silent mutations. The CRISPR screening was repeated using the gRNA resistant DCK, and loss of SLC29A was identified as also being capable of conveying Ara-C drug resistance. To determine if loss of Dck results in increased sensitivity to other drugs, we conducted a screen of 446 FDA approved drugs using two Dck-defective BXH-2 derived murine AML cell lines and their Ara-C sensitive parental lines. Both cell lines showed an increase in sensitivity to prednisolone. Guide RNA resistant cDNA rescue was a legitimate strategy and multiple DCK or SLC29A deficient human cell clones were established with one clone becoming prednisolone sensitive. Dck-defective leukemic cells may become prednisolone sensitive indicating prednisolone may be an effective adjuvant therapy in some cases of DCK-negative AML.

  8. Genome-wide screen of cell-cycle regulators in normal and tumor cells identifies a differential response to nucleosome depletion

    PubMed Central

    Sokolova, Maria; Turunen, Mikko; Mortusewicz, Oliver; Björklund, Mikael; Taipale, Minna; Helleday, Thomas; Taipale, Jussi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT To identify cell cycle regulators that enable cancer cells to replicate DNA and divide in an unrestricted manner, we performed a parallel genome-wide RNAi screen in normal and cancer cell lines. In addition to many shared regulators, we found that tumor and normal cells are differentially sensitive to loss of the histone genes transcriptional regulator CASP8AP2. In cancer cells, loss of CASP8AP2 leads to a failure to synthesize sufficient amount of histones in the S-phase of the cell cycle, resulting in slowing of individual replication forks. Despite this, DNA replication fails to arrest, and tumor cells progress in an elongated S-phase that lasts several days, finally resulting in death of most of the affected cells. In contrast, depletion of CASP8AP2 in normal cells triggers a response that arrests viable cells in S-phase. The arrest is dependent on p53, and preceded by accumulation of markers of DNA damage, indicating that nucleosome depletion is sensed in normal cells via a DNA-damage -like response that is defective in tumor cells. PMID:27929715

  9. Identification of striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) as a novel calmodulin target by a newly developed genome-wide screen.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Yusui; Denda, Miwako; Sakane, Kyohei; Ogusu, Tomoko; Takahashi, Sumio; Magari, Masaki; Kanayama, Naoki; Morishita, Ryo; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    To search for novel target(s) of the Ca(2+)-signaling transducer, calmodulin (CaM), we performed a newly developed genome-wide CaM interaction screening of 19,676 GST-fused proteins expressed in human. We identified striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) as a novel CaM target and characterized its CaM binding ability and found that the Ca(2+)/CaM complex interacted stoichiometrically with the N-terminal region (Ala13-Gln35) of STARS in vitro as well as in living cells. Mutagenesis studies identified Ile20 and Trp33 as the essential hydrophobic residues in CaM anchoring. Furthermore, the CaM binding deficient mutant (Ile20Ala, Trp33Ala) of STARS further enhanced its stimulatory effect on SRF-dependent transcriptional activation. These results suggest a connection between Ca(2+)-signaling via excitation-contraction coupling and the regulation of STARS-mediated gene expression in muscles.

  10. Identification of a novel polymorphism involving a CGG repeat in the PTCH gene and a genome-wide screening of CGG-containing genes.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Kazuaki; Fujii, Katsunori; Yamada, Masao; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in the human homologue of the Drosophila patched gene (PTCH) are responsible for the hereditary disorder called nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). PTCH has a CGG triplet repeat located 4 bp upstream of the first methionine codon. Here we report a novel polymorphism involving the number of the CGG-repeat. The major allele (86.3%) contained a repeat size of seven, whereas the minor allele contained eight. No significant difference in the distributions of genotypes was observed between normal and NBCCS individuals. However, when the repeat was inserted between a heterologous promoter and the luciferase gene, the longer repeats tended to induce higher luciferase activities, suggesting that the repeat length potentially affects the levels of gene expression. A genome-wide screening revealed that 68 and 146 genes contained a CGG/CCG repeat in the coding region and in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR), respectively. None of the genes had this repeat in 3'-UTR. Interestingly, the number of genes with a CGG repeat in the 5'-UTR was significantly higher than that with a CCG repeat in the 5'-UTR. The localization of a CGG/CCG repeat in PTCH is quite unique in that only four other genes have been found in which the repeat is localized up to 4 bp upstream of the first methionine.

  11. A genome-wide RNAi screen reveals a Trio-regulated Rho GTPase circuitry transducing mitogenic signals initiated by G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Vaqué, Jose P; Dorsam, Robert T; Feng, Xiaodong; Iglesias-Bartolome, Ramiro; Forsthoefel, David J; Chen, Qianming; Debant, Anne; Seeger, Mark A; Ksander, Bruce R; Teramoto, Hidemi; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2013-01-10

    Activating mutations in GNAQ and GNA11, encoding members of the Gα(q) family of G protein α subunits, are the driver oncogenes in uveal melanoma, and mutations in Gq-linked G protein-coupled receptors have been identified recently in numerous human malignancies. How Gα(q) and its coupled receptors transduce mitogenic signals is still unclear because of the complexity of signaling events perturbed upon Gq activation. Using a synthetic-biology approach and a genome-wide RNAi screen, we found that a highly conserved guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Trio, is essential for activating Rho- and Rac-regulated signaling pathways acting on JNK and p38, and thereby transducing proliferative signals from Gα(q) to the nucleus independently of phospholipase C-β. Indeed, whereas many biological responses elicited by Gq depend on the transient activation of second-messenger systems, Gq utilizes a hard-wired protein-protein-interaction-based signaling circuitry to achieve the sustained stimulation of proliferative pathways, thereby controlling normal and aberrant cell growth.

  12. Formation of Hydrogen Sulfide from Cysteine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4742: Genome Wide Screen Reveals a Central Role of the Vacuole

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Gal; Cordente, Antonio G.; Curtin, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Discoveries on the toxic effects of cysteine accumulation and, particularly, recent findings on the many physiological roles of one of the products of cysteine catabolism, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), are highlighting the importance of this amino acid and sulfur metabolism in a range of cellular activities. It is also highlighting how little we know about this critical part of cellular metabolism. In the work described here, a genome-wide screen using a deletion collection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed a surprising set of genes associated with this process. In addition, the yeast vacuole, not previously associated with cysteine catabolism, emerged as an important compartment for cysteine degradation. Most prominent among the vacuole-related mutants were those involved in vacuole acidification; we identified each of the eight subunits of a vacuole acidification sub-complex (V1 of the yeast V-ATPase) as essential for cysteine degradation. Other functions identified included translation, RNA processing, folate-derived one-carbon metabolism, and mitochondrial iron-sulfur homeostasis. This work identified for the first time cellular factors affecting the fundamental process of cysteine catabolism. Results obtained significantly contribute to the understanding of this process and may provide insight into the underlying cause of cysteine accumulation and H2S generation in eukaryotes. PMID:25517415

  13. A genome-wide IR-induced RAD51 foci RNAi screen identifies CDC73 involved in chromatin remodeling for DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Patrick; Lundin, Cecilia; Evers, Bastiaan; Ebner, Daniel; Bauerschmidt, Christina; Kingham, Guy; Palmai-Pallag, Timea; Mortusewicz, Oliver; Frings, Oliver; Sonnhammer, Erik; Helleday, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To identify new regulators of homologous recombination repair, we carried out a genome-wide short-interfering RNA screen combined with ionizing irradiation using RAD51 foci formation as readout. All candidates were confirmed by independent short-interfering RNAs and validated in secondary assays like recombination repair activity and RPA foci formation. Network analysis of the top modifiers identified gene clusters involved in recombination repair as well as components of the ribosome, the proteasome and the spliceosome, which are known to be required for effective DNA repair. We identified and characterized the RNA polymerase II-associated protein CDC73/Parafibromin as a new player in recombination repair and show that it is critical for genomic stability. CDC73 interacts with components of the SCF/Cullin and INO80/NuA4 chromatin-remodeling complexes to promote Histone ubiquitination. Our findings indicate that CDC73 is involved in local chromatin decondensation at sites of DNA damage to promote DNA repair. This function of CDC73 is related to but independent of its role in transcriptional elongation. PMID:27462432

  14. A genome-wide RNAi screen reveals that mRNA decapping restricts bunyaviral replication by limiting the pools of Dcp2-accessible targets for cap-snatching

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Kaycie C.; McLane, Laura M.; Maqbool, Tariq; Panda, Debasis; Gordesky-Gold, Beth; Cherry, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Bunyaviruses are an emerging group of medically important viruses, many of which are transmitted from insects to mammals. To identify host factors that impact infection, we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila and identified 131 genes that impacted infection of the mosquito-transmitted bunyavirus Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). Dcp2, the catalytic component of the mRNA decapping machinery, and two decapping activators, DDX6 and LSM7, were antiviral against disparate bunyaviruses in both insect cells and adult flies. Bunyaviruses 5′ cap their mRNAs by “cap-snatching” the 5′ ends of poorly defined host mRNAs. We found that RVFV cap-snatches the 5′ ends of Dcp2 targeted mRNAs, including cell cycle-related genes. Loss of Dcp2 allows increased viral transcription without impacting viral mRNA stability, while ectopic expression of Dcp2 impedes viral transcription. Furthermore, arresting cells in late S/early G2 led to increased Dcp2 mRNA targets and increased RVFV replication. Therefore, RVFV competes for the Dcp2-accessible mRNA pool, which is dynamically regulated and can present a bottleneck for viral replication. PMID:23824541

  15. Genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 Screens Reveal Loss of Redundancy between PKMYT1 and WEE1 in Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Chad M; Ding, Yu; Hoellerbauer, Pia; Davis, Ryan J; Basom, Ryan; Girard, Emily J; Lee, Eunjee; Corrin, Philip; Hart, Traver; Bolouri, Hamid; Davison, Jerry; Zhang, Qing; Hardcastle, Justin; Aronow, Bruce J; Plaisier, Christopher L; Baliga, Nitin S; Moffat, Jason; Lin, Qi; Li, Xiao-Nan; Nam, Do-Hyun; Lee, Jeongwu; Pollard, Steven M; Zhu, Jun; Delrow, Jeffery J; Clurman, Bruce E; Olson, James M; Paddison, Patrick J

    2015-12-22

    To identify therapeutic targets for glioblastoma (GBM), we performed genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 knockout (KO) screens in patient-derived GBM stem-like cells (GSCs) and human neural stem/progenitors (NSCs), non-neoplastic stem cell controls, for genes required for their in vitro growth. Surprisingly, the vast majority GSC-lethal hits were found outside of molecular networks commonly altered in GBM and GSCs (e.g., oncogenic drivers). In vitro and in vivo validation of GSC-specific targets revealed several strong hits, including the wee1-like kinase, PKMYT1/Myt1. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that PKMYT1 acts redundantly with WEE1 to inhibit cyclin B-CDK1 activity via CDK1-Y15 phosphorylation and to promote timely completion of mitosis in NSCs. However, in GSCs, this redundancy is lost, most likely as a result of oncogenic signaling, causing GBM-specific lethality. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Genome-wide genetic screen identified the link between dG9a and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shimaji, Kouhei; Konishi, Takahiro; Yoshida, Hideki; Kimura, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2016-08-01

    G9a is one of the histone H3 Lys 9 (H3K9) specific methyltransferases first identified in mammals. Drosophila G9a (dG9a) has been reported to induce H3K9 dimethylation in vivo, and the target genes of dG9a were identified during embryonic and larval stages. Although dG9a is important for a variety of developmental processes, the link between dG9a and signaling pathways are not addressed yet. Here, by genome-wide genetic screen, taking advantage of the rough eye phenotype of flies that over-express dG9a in eye discs, we identified 16 genes that enhanced the rough eye phenotype induced by dG9a over-expression. These 16 genes included Star, anterior open, bereft and F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 6 which are components of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway. When dG9a over-expression was combined with mutation of Star, differentiation of R7 photoreceptors in eye imaginal discs as well as cone cells and pigment cells in pupal retinae was severely inhibited. Furthermore, the dG9a over-expression reduced the activated ERK signals in eye discs. These data demonstrate a strong genetic link between dG9a and the EGFR signaling pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Genome-wide screen of cell-cycle regulators in normal and tumor cells identifies a differential response to nucleosome depletion.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Maria; Turunen, Mikko; Mortusewicz, Oliver; Kivioja, Teemu; Herr, Patrick; Vähärautio, Anna; Björklund, Mikael; Taipale, Minna; Helleday, Thomas; Taipale, Jussi

    2017-01-17

    To identify cell cycle regulators that enable cancer cells to replicate DNA and divide in an unrestricted manner, we performed a parallel genome-wide RNAi screen in normal and cancer cell lines. In addition to many shared regulators, we found that tumor and normal cells are differentially sensitive to loss of the histone genes transcriptional regulator CASP8AP2. In cancer cells, loss of CASP8AP2 leads to a failure to synthesize sufficient amount of histones in the S-phase of the cell cycle, resulting in slowing of individual replication forks. Despite this, DNA replication fails to arrest, and tumor cells progress in an elongated S-phase that lasts several days, finally resulting in death of most of the affected cells. In contrast, depletion of CASP8AP2 in normal cells triggers a response that arrests viable cells in S-phase. The arrest is dependent on p53, and preceded by accumulation of markers of DNA damage, indicating that nucleosome depletion is sensed in normal cells via a DNA-damage -like response that is defective in tumor cells.

  18. A genome wide shRNA screen identifies α/β hydrolase domain containing 4 (ABHD4) as a novel regulator of anoikis resistance.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Craig D; Hurren, Rose; Kasimer, Dahlia; MacLean, Neil; Eberhard, Yanina; Ketela, Troy; Moffat, Jason; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2012-07-01

    Acquisition of resistance to anchorage dependant cell death, a process termed anoikis, is a requirement for cancer cell metastasis. However, the molecular determinants of anoikis resistance and sensitivity are poorly understood. To better understand resistance to anoikis we conducted a genome wide lentiviral shRNA screen to identify genes whose knockdown render anoikis-sensitive RWPE-1 prostate cells resistant to anoikis. RWPE-1 cells were infected with a pooled lentiviral shRNA library with 54,021 shRNA targeting 11,255 genes. After infection, an anoikis-resistant cell population was selected and shRNA sequences were amplified and sequenced. Thirty-four shRNA sequences reproducibly protected RWPE-1 cells from anoikis after culture under suspension conditions including the top validated hit, α/β hydrolase domain containing 4 (ABHD4). In validation studies, ABHD4 knockdown inhibited anoikis in RWPE-1 cells as well as anoikis sensitive NP69 nasopharyngeal and OVCAR3 ovarian cancer cells, while over-expression of the gene increased sensitivity. Induction of anoikis after ABHD4 knockdown was associated with cleavage of PARP and activation of caspases-3, but was independent in changes of FLIP, FAK and Src expression. Interestingly, induction of anoikis after ABHD4 knockdown was independent of the known role of ABHD4 in the anandamide synthesis pathway and the generation of glycerophospho-N-acyl ethanolamines. Thus, ABHD4 is a novel genetic regulator of anoikis sensitivity.

  19. A genome-wide siRNA screen reveals multiple mTORC1 independent signaling pathways regulating autophagy under normal nutritional conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Marta M.; Hoffman, Greg; Ng, Aylwin; Zhou, Wen; Py, Bénédicte F.; Hsu, Emily; Liu, Xuxin; Eisenberg, Jason; Liu, Jun; Blenis, John; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Yuan, Junying

    2010-01-01

    Summary Autophagy is a cellular catabolic mechanism that plays an essential function in protecting multicellular eukaryotes from neurodegeneration, cancer and other diseases. However, we still know very little about mechanisms regulating autophagy under normal homeostatic conditions when nutrients are not limiting. In a genome-wide human siRNA screen, we demonstrate that under normal nutrient conditions up regulation of autophagy requires the type III PI3 kinase, but not inhibition of mTORC1, the essential negative regulator of starvation-induced autophagy. We show that a group of growth factors and cytokines inhibit the type III PI3 kinase through multiple pathways, including the MAPK-ERK1/2, Stat3, Akt/Foxo3 and CXCR4/GPCR, which are all known to positively regulate cell growth and proliferation. Our study suggests that the type III PI3 kinase integrates diverse signals to regulate cellular levels of autophagy, and that autophagy and cell proliferation may represent two alternative cell fates that are regulated in a mutually exclusive manner. PMID:20627085

  20. A genome-wide RNAi screen draws a genetic framework for transposon control and primary piRNA biogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Muerdter, Felix; Guzzardo, Paloma M.; Gillis, Jesse; Luo, Yicheng; Yu, Yang; Chen, Caifu; Fekete, Richard; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A large fraction of our genome consists of mobile genetic elements. Governing transposons in germ cells is critically important, and failure to do so compromises genome integrity, leading to sterility. In animals, the piRNA pathway is the key to transposon constraint, yet the precise molecular details of how piRNAs are formed and how the pathway represses mobile elements remain poorly understood. In an effort to identify general requirements for transposon control and novel components of the piRNA pathway, we carried out a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila ovarian somatic sheet cells. We identified and validated 87 genes necessary for transposon silencing. Among these were several novel piRNA biogenesis factors. We also found CG3893 (asterix) to be essential for transposon silencing, most likely by contributing to the effector step of transcriptional repression. Asterix loss leads to decreases in H3K9me3 marks on certain transposons but has no effect on piRNA levels. PMID:23665228

  1. Possible roles of vacuolar H+-ATPase and mitochondrial function in tolerance to air-drying stress revealed by genome-wide screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion strains.

    PubMed

    Shima, Jun; Ando, Akira; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    Yeasts used in bread making are exposed to air-drying stress during dried yeast production processes. To clarify the genes required for air-drying tolerance, we performed genome-wide screening using the complete deletion strain collection of diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screening identified 278 gene deletions responsible for air-drying sensitivity. These genes were classified based on their cellular function and on the localization of their gene products. The results showed that the genes required for air-drying tolerance were frequently involved in mitochondrial functions and in connection with vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, which plays a role in vacuolar acidification. To determine the role of vacuolar acidification in air-drying stress tolerance, we monitored intracellular pH. The results showed that intracellular acidification was induced during air-drying and that this acidification was amplified in a deletion mutant of the VMA2 gene encoding a component of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, suggesting that vacuolar H(+)-ATPase helps maintain intracellular pH homeostasis, which is affected by air-drying stress. To determine the effects of air-drying stress on mitochondria, we analysed the mitochondrial membrane potential under air-drying stress conditions using MitoTracker. The results showed that mitochondria were extremely sensitive to air-drying stress, suggesting that a mitochondrial function is required for tolerance to air-drying stress. We also analysed the correlation between oxidative-stress sensitivity and air-drying-stress sensitivity. The results suggested that oxidative stress is a critical determinant of sensitivity to air-drying stress, although ROS-scavenging systems are not necessary for air-drying stress tolerance. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. A genome-wide RNA interference screen identifies a role for Wnt/β-catenin signaling during Rift Valley Fever Virus infection

    DOE PAGES

    Harmon, Brooke; Bird, Sara W.; Schudel, Benjamin R.; ...

    2016-05-25

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arbovirus within the Bunyaviridae family capable of causing serious morbidity and mortality in humans and livestock. To identify host factors involved in bunyavirus replication, we employed genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screening and identified 381 genes whose knockdown reduced infection. The Wnt pathway was the most represented pathway when gene hits were functionally clustered. With further investigation, we found that RVFV infection activated Wnt signaling, was enhanced when Wnt signaling was preactivated, was reduced with knockdown of β-catenin, and was blocked using Wnt signaling inhibitors. Similar results were found using distantly related bunyaviruses Lamore » Crosse virus and California encephalitis virus, suggesting a conserved role for Wnt signaling in bunyaviral infection. We propose a model where bunyaviruses activate Wnt-responsive genes to regulate optimal cell cycle conditions needed to promote efficient viral replication. The findings in this study should aid in the design of efficacious host-directed antiviral therapeutics. IMPORTANCE RVFV is a mosquito-borne bunyavirus that is endemic to Africa but has demonstrated a capacity for emergence in new territories (e.g., the Arabian Peninsula). As a zoonotic pathogen that primarily affects livestock, RVFV can also cause lethal hemorrhagic fever and encephalitis in humans. Currently, there are no treatments or fully licensed vaccines for this virus. Using high-throughput RNAi screening, we identified canonical Wnt signaling as an important host pathway regulating RVFV infection. The beneficial role of Wnt signaling was observed for RVFV, along with other disparate bunyaviruses, indicating a conserved bunyaviral replication mechanism involving Wnt signaling. Lastly, these studies supplement our knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms of bunyavirus infection and provide new avenues for countermeasure development against pathogenic bunyaviruses.« less

  3. Genome-wide functional genetic screen with the anticancer agent AMPI-109 identifies PRL-3 as an oncogenic driver in triple-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Gari, Hamid H; Gearheart, Christy M; Fosmire, Susan; DeGala, Gregory D; Fan, Zeying; Torkko, Kathleen C; Edgerton, Susan M; Lucia, M Scott; Ray, Rahul; Thor, Ann D; Porter, Christopher C; Lambert, James R

    2016-03-29

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are among the most aggressive and heterogeneous cancers with a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. Here, we demonstrate that the anticancer compound, AMPI-109, is selectively efficacious in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of multiple TNBC subtype cell lines as assessed by activation of pro-apoptotic caspases-3 and 7, PARP cleavage and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. AMPI-109 had little to no effect on growth in the majority of non-TNBC cell lines examined. We therefore utilized AMPI-109 in a genome-wide shRNA screen in the TNBC cell line, BT-20, to investigate the utility of AMPI-109 as a tool in helping to identify molecular alterations unique to TNBC. Our screen identified the oncogenic phosphatase, PRL-3, as a potentially important driver of TNBC growth, migration and invasion. Through stable lentiviral knock downs and transfection with catalytically impaired PRL-3 in TNBC cells, loss of PRL-3 expression, or functionality, led to substantial growth inhibition. Moreover, AMPI-109 treatment, downregulation of PRL-3 expression or impairment of PRL-3 activity reduced TNBC cell migration and invasion. Histological evaluation of human breast cancers revealed PRL-3 was significantly, though not exclusively, associated with the TNBC subtype and correlated positively with regional and distant metastases, as well as 1 and 3 year relapse free survival. Collectively, our study is proof-of-concept that AMPI-109, a selectively active agent against TNBC cell lines, can be used as a molecular tool to uncover unique drivers of disease progression, such as PRL-3, which we show promotes oncogenic phenotypes in TNBC cells.

  4. A genome-wide RNA interference screen identifies a role for Wnt/β-catenin signaling during Rift Valley Fever Virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, Brooke; Bird, Sara W.; Schudel, Benjamin R.; Hatch, Anson V.; Rasley, Amy; Negrete, Oscar A.

    2016-05-25

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arbovirus within the Bunyaviridae family capable of causing serious morbidity and mortality in humans and livestock. To identify host factors involved in bunyavirus replication, we employed genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screening and identified 381 genes whose knockdown reduced infection. The Wnt pathway was the most represented pathway when gene hits were functionally clustered. With further investigation, we found that RVFV infection activated Wnt signaling, was enhanced when Wnt signaling was preactivated, was reduced with knockdown of β-catenin, and was blocked using Wnt signaling inhibitors. Similar results were found using distantly related bunyaviruses La Crosse virus and California encephalitis virus, suggesting a conserved role for Wnt signaling in bunyaviral infection. We propose a model where bunyaviruses activate Wnt-responsive genes to regulate optimal cell cycle conditions needed to promote efficient viral replication. The findings in this study should aid in the design of efficacious host-directed antiviral therapeutics.

    IMPORTANCE RVFV is a mosquito-borne bunyavirus that is endemic to Africa but has demonstrated a capacity for emergence in new territories (e.g., the Arabian Peninsula). As a zoonotic pathogen that primarily affects livestock, RVFV can also cause lethal hemorrhagic fever and encephalitis in humans. Currently, there are no treatments or fully licensed vaccines for this virus. Using high-throughput RNAi screening, we identified canonical Wnt signaling as an important host pathway regulating RVFV infection. The beneficial role of Wnt signaling was observed for RVFV, along with other disparate bunyaviruses, indicating a conserved bunyaviral replication mechanism involving Wnt signaling. Lastly, these studies supplement our knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms of bunyavirus infection and provide new avenues for

  5. A Genome-Wide RNA Interference Screen Identifies a Role for Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling during Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Brooke; Bird, Sara W.; Schudel, Benjamin R.; Hatch, Anson V.; Rasley, Amy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arbovirus within the Bunyaviridae family capable of causing serious morbidity and mortality in humans and livestock. To identify host factors involved in bunyavirus replication, we employed genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screening and identified 381 genes whose knockdown reduced infection. The Wnt pathway was the most represented pathway when gene hits were functionally clustered. With further investigation, we found that RVFV infection activated Wnt signaling, was enhanced when Wnt signaling was preactivated, was reduced with knockdown of β-catenin, and was blocked using Wnt signaling inhibitors. Similar results were found using distantly related bunyaviruses La Crosse virus and California encephalitis virus, suggesting a conserved role for Wnt signaling in bunyaviral infection. We propose a model where bunyaviruses activate Wnt-responsive genes to regulate optimal cell cycle conditions needed to promote efficient viral replication. The findings in this study should aid in the design of efficacious host-directed antiviral therapeutics. IMPORTANCE RVFV is a mosquito-borne bunyavirus that is endemic to Africa but has demonstrated a capacity for emergence in new territories (e.g., the Arabian Peninsula). As a zoonotic pathogen that primarily affects livestock, RVFV can also cause lethal hemorrhagic fever and encephalitis in humans. Currently, there are no treatments or fully licensed vaccines for this virus. Using high-throughput RNAi screening, we identified canonical Wnt signaling as an important host pathway regulating RVFV infection. The beneficial role of Wnt signaling was observed for RVFV, along with other disparate bunyaviruses, indicating a conserved bunyaviral replication mechanism involving Wnt signaling. These studies supplement our knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms of bunyavirus infection and provide new avenues for countermeasure development against pathogenic bunyaviruses. PMID:27226375

  6. Genome-wide functional genetic screen with the anticancer agent AMPI-109 identifies PRL-3 as an oncogenic driver in triple-negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Gari, Hamid H.; Gearheart, Christy M.; Fosmire, Susan; DeGala, Gregory D.; Fan, Zeying; Torkko, Kathleen C.; Edgerton, Susan M.; Lucia, M. Scott; Ray, Rahul; Thor, Ann D.; Porter, Christopher C.; Lambert, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are among the most aggressive and heterogeneous cancers with a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. Here, we demonstrate that the anticancer compound, AMPI-109, is selectively efficacious in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of multiple TNBC subtype cell lines as assessed by activation of pro-apoptotic caspases-3 and 7, PARP cleavage and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. AMPI-109 had little to no effect on growth in the majority of non-TNBC cell lines examined. We therefore utilized AMPI-109 in a genome-wide shRNA screen in the TNBC cell line, BT-20, to investigate the utility of AMPI-109 as a tool in helping to identify molecular alterations unique to TNBC. Our screen identified the oncogenic phosphatase, PRL-3, as a potentially important driver of TNBC growth, migration and invasion. Through stable lentiviral knock downs and transfection with catalytically impaired PRL-3 in TNBC cells, loss of PRL-3 expression, or functionality, led to substantial growth inhibition. Moreover, AMPI-109 treatment, downregulation of PRL-3 expression or impairment of PRL-3 activity reduced TNBC cell migration and invasion. Histological evaluation of human breast cancers revealed PRL-3 was significantly, though not exclusively, associated with the TNBC subtype and correlated positively with regional and distant metastases, as well as 1 and 3 year relapse free survival. Collectively, our study is proof-of-concept that AMPI-109, a selectively active agent against TNBC cell lines, can be used as a molecular tool to uncover unique drivers of disease progression, such as PRL-3, which we show promotes oncogenic phenotypes in TNBC cells. PMID:26909599

  7. A Genome-Wide Screen in Yeast Identifies Specific Oxidative Stress Genes Required for the Maintenance of Sub-Cellular Redox Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ayer, Anita; Fellermeier, Sina; Fife, Christopher; Li, Simone S.; Smits, Gertien; Meyer, Andreas J.; Dawes, Ian W.; Perrone, Gabriel G.

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance of an optimal redox environment is critical for appropriate functioning of cellular processes and cell survival. Despite the importance of maintaining redox homeostasis, it is not clear how the optimal redox potential is sensed and set, and the processes that impact redox on a cellular/organellar level are poorly understood. The genetic bases of cellular redox homeostasis were investigated using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) based redox probe, roGFP2 and a pH sensitive GFP-based probe, pHluorin. The use of roGFP2, in conjunction with pHluorin, enabled determination of pH-adjusted sub-cellular redox potential in a non-invasive and real-time manner. A genome-wide screen using both the non-essential and essential gene collections was carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using cytosolic-roGFP2 to identify factors essential for maintenance of cytosolic redox state under steady-state conditions. 102 genes of diverse function were identified that are required for maintenance of cytosolic redox state. Mutations in these genes led to shifts in the half-cell glutathione redox potential by 75-10 mV. Interestingly, some specific oxidative stress-response processes were identified as over-represented in the data set. Further investigation of the role of oxidative stress-responsive systems in sub-cellular redox homeostasis was conducted using roGFP2 constructs targeted to the mitochondrial matrix and peroxisome and EGSH was measured in cells in exponential and stationary phase. Analyses allowed for the identification of key redox systems on a sub-cellular level and the identification of novel genes involved in the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis. PMID:22970195

  8. A genome-wide screen in yeast identifies specific oxidative stress genes required for the maintenance of sub-cellular redox homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ayer, Anita; Fellermeier, Sina; Fife, Christopher; Li, Simone S; Smits, Gertien; Meyer, Andreas J; Dawes, Ian W; Perrone, Gabriel G

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance of an optimal redox environment is critical for appropriate functioning of cellular processes and cell survival. Despite the importance of maintaining redox homeostasis, it is not clear how the optimal redox potential is sensed and set, and the processes that impact redox on a cellular/organellar level are poorly understood. The genetic bases of cellular redox homeostasis were investigated using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) based redox probe, roGFP2 and a pH sensitive GFP-based probe, pHluorin. The use of roGFP2, in conjunction with pHluorin, enabled determination of pH-adjusted sub-cellular redox potential in a non-invasive and real-time manner. A genome-wide screen using both the non-essential and essential gene collections was carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using cytosolic-roGFP2 to identify factors essential for maintenance of cytosolic redox state under steady-state conditions. 102 genes of diverse function were identified that are required for maintenance of cytosolic redox state. Mutations in these genes led to shifts in the half-cell glutathione redox potential by 75-10 mV. Interestingly, some specific oxidative stress-response processes were identified as over-represented in the data set. Further investigation of the role of oxidative stress-responsive systems in sub-cellular redox homeostasis was conducted using roGFP2 constructs targeted to the mitochondrial matrix and peroxisome and E(GSH) was measured in cells in exponential and stationary phase. Analyses allowed for the identification of key redox systems on a sub-cellular level and the identification of novel genes involved in the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis.

  9. A genome-wide screen identifies genes required for formation of the wobble nucleoside 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Lu, Jian; Byström, Anders S.

    2008-01-01

    We recently showed that the γ-subunit of Kluyveromyces lactis killer toxin (γ-toxin) is a tRNA endonuclease that cleaves , , and 3′ of the wobble nucleoside 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm5s2U). The 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl (mcm5) side chain was important for efficient cleavage by γ-toxin, and defects in mcm5 side-chain synthesis correlated with resistance to γ-toxin. Based on this correlation, a genome-wide screen was performed to identify gene products involved in the formation of the mcm5 side chain. From a collection of 4826 homozygous diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, each with one nonessential gene deleted, 63 mutants resistant to Kluyveromyces lactis killer toxin were identified. Among these, eight were earlier identified to have a defect in formation of the mcm5 side chain. Analysis of the remaining mutants and other known γ-toxin resistant mutants revealed that sit4, kti14, and KTI5 mutants also have a defect in the formation of mcm5. A mutant lacking two of the Sit4-associated proteins, Sap185 and Sap190, displays the same modification defect as a sit4-null mutant. Interestingly, several mutants were found to be defective in the synthesis of the 2-thio (s2) group of the mcm5s2U nucleoside. In addition to earlier described mutants, formation of the s2 group was also abolished in urm1, uba4, and ncs2 mutants and decreased in the yor251c mutant. Like the absence of the mcm5 side chain, the lack of the s2 group renders less sensitive to γ-toxin, reinforcing the importance of the wobble nucleoside mcm5s2U for tRNA cleavage by γ-toxin. PMID:18755837

  10. A genome-wide miRNA screen revealed miR-603 as a MGMT-regulating miRNA in glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kimberly; Steed, Tyler; Nguyen, Thien; Futalan, Diahnn; Akers, Johnny C.; Sarkaria, Jann; Jiang, Tao; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Carter, Bob S.; Chen, Clark C.

    2014-01-01

    MGMT expression is a critical determinant for therapeutic resistance to DNA alkylating agents. We previously demonstrated that MGMT expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-181d and other miRNAs. Here, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Candidate miRNAs were further tested for inverse correlation with MGMT expression in clinical specimens. We identified 15 candidate miRNAs and characterized the top candidate, miR-603. Transfection of miR-603 suppressed MGMT mRNA/protein expression in vitro and in vivo; this effect was reversed by transfection with antimiR-603. miR-603 affinity-precipitated with MGMT mRNA and suppressed luciferase activity in an MGMT-3'UTR-luciferase assay, suggesting direct interaction between miR-603 and MGMT 3'UTR. miR-603 transfection enhanced the temozolomide (TMZ) sensitivity of MGMT-expressing glioblastoma cell lines. Importantly, miR-603 mediated MGMT suppression and TMZ resistance were reversed by expression of an MGMT cDNA. In a collection of 74 clinical glioblastoma specimens, both miR-603 and miR-181d levels inversely correlated with MGMT expression. Moreover, a combined index of the two miRNAs better reflected MGMT expression than each individually. These results suggest that MGMT is co-regulated by independent miRNAs. Characterization of these miRNAs should contribute toward strategies for enhancing the efficacy of DNA alkylating agents. PMID:24994119

  11. Genome-Wide Screening Uncovers the Significance of N-sulfation of Heparan Sulfate as a Host Cell Factor for Chikungunya Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Tumkosit, Uranan; Nakamura, Shota; Motooka, Daisuke; Kishishita, Natsuko; Priengprom, Thongkoon; Sa-Ngasang, Areerat; Kinoshita, Taroh; Takeda, Naokazu; Maeda, Yusuke

    2017-04-12

    The molecular mechanisms underlying chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection are poorly characterized. In this study, we analyzed the host factors involved in CHIKV infection using genome-wide screening. Human haploid HAP1 cells, into which an exon-trapping vector was introduced, were challenged with a vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotype bearing the CHIKV E3-E1 envelope proteins. Analysis of genes enriched in the cells resistant to the pseudotyped virus infection unveiled a critical role of N-sulfation of heparan sulfate (HS) for the infectivity of a clinically isolated CHIKV Thai #16856 strain to HAP1 cells. Knockout of NDST1 that catalyzes N-sulfation of HS greatly decreased the binding and infectivity of CHIKV Thai#16856 strain but not infectivity of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and yellow fever virus (YFV). Whereas glycosaminoglycans were commonly required for efficient infectivity of CHIKV, JEV and YFV as shown by using B3GAT3 knockout cells, the tropism for N-sulfate was specific to CHIKV. Expression of chondroitin sulfate (CS) in NDST1-knockout HAP1 cells did not restore the binding of CHIKV Thai#16856 strain and the infectivity of its pseudotype but restored the infectivity of authentic CHIKV Thai#16856, suggesting that CS functions at the later steps after the CHIKV binding. Among the genes enriched in this screening, we found that TM9SF2 is critical for N-sulfation of HS and therefore for CHIKV infection, because it is involved in proper localization and stability of NDST1. Determination of the significance of and the relevant proteins to N-sulfation of HS may contribute to understanding mechanisms of CHIKV propagation, cell tropism and pathogenesis.IMPORTANCE Recent outbreaks of chikungunya fever have increased its clinical importance. Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) utilizes host glycosaminoglycans to bind efficiently to its target cells. However, the substructure in glycosaminoglycans required for CHIKV infection have not been characterized. Here, we

  12. Identification of seven genes essential for male fertility through a genome-wide association study of non-obstructive azoospermia and RNA interference-mediated large-scale functional screening in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Wu, Hao; Wen, Yang; Liu, Yujuan; Zhou, Tao; Ni, Bixian; Lin, Yuan; Dong, Jing; Zhou, Zuomin; Hu, Zhibin; Guo, Xuejiang; Sha, Jiahao; Tong, Chao

    2015-03-01

    Non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is a complex and severe condition whose etiology remains largely unknown. In a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of NOA in Chinese men, few loci reached genome-wide significance, although this might be a result of genetic heterogeneity. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) without genome-wide significance may also indicate genes that are essential for fertility, and multiple stage validation can lead to false-negative results. To perform large-scale functional screening of the genes surrounding these SNPs, we used in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) in Drosophila, which has a short maturation cycle and is suitable for high-throughput analysis. The analysis found that 7 (31.8%) of the 22 analyzed orthologous Drosophila genes were essential for male fertility. These genes corresponded to nine loci. Of these genes, leukocyte-antigen-related-like (Lar) is primarily required in germ cells to sustain spermatogenesis, whereas CG12404, doublesex-Mab-related 11E (dmrt11E), CG6769, estrogen-related receptor (ERR) and sulfateless (sfl) function in somatic cells. Interestingly, ERR and sfl are also required for testis morphogenesis. Our study thus demonstrates that SNPs without genome-wide significance in GWAS may also provide clues to disease-related genes and therefore warrant functional analysis.

  13. Assessing the Role of Copy Number Variants in Prostate Cancer Risk and Progression Using a Novel Genome-Wide Screening Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Chromosomal region 8q24 is of interest due to its consistent implication in GWA studies for prostate cancer. A rare non-recurrent 8486 base pair...indicates that some common CNVs have already been indirectly assessed for association with traits in SNP-based genome-wide association studies ( GWAS ...However, recurrent variants and risk-bearing alleles with low minor allele frequencies (MAF) may not be well tagged by SNPs in GWAS , and these variants

  14. Identification of putative insulin-like peptides and components of insulin signaling pathways in parasitic platyhelminths by the use of genome-wide screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Luo, Xuenong; Zhang, Shaohua; Yin, Cai; Dou, Yongxi; Cai, Xuepeng

    2014-02-01

    No endogenous insulin-like peptides in parasitic flatworms have been reported. Insulin receptors from flukes and tapeworms have been shown to interact directly with the host-derived insulin molecule, which suggests the exploitation of host-derived insulin. In this study, a strategy of genome-wide searches followed by comprehensive analyses of strictly conserved features of the insulin family was used to demonstrate the presence of putative insulin-like peptides in the genomes of six tapeworms and two flukes. In addition, whole insulin signaling pathways were annotated on a genome-wide scale. Two putative insulin-like peptide genes in each genome of tapeworms and one insulin-like peptide gene in each genome of flukes were identified. The comprehensive analyses revealed that all of these peptides showed the common features shared by other members of the insulin family, and the phylogenetic analysis implied a putative gene duplication event in the Cestoda during the evolution of insulin-like peptide genes. The quantitative expression analysis and immunolocalization results suggested a putative role of these peptides in reproduction. Entire sets of major components of the classic insulin signaling pathway were successfully identified, suggesting that this pathway in parasitic flatworms might also regulate many other important biological activities. We believe that the identification of the insulin-like peptides gives us a better understanding of the insulin signaling pathway in these parasites, as well as host-parasite interactions. © 2013 FEBS.

  15. A genome-wide screening and SNPs-to-genes approach to identify novel genetic risk factors associated with frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Grassi, Mario; Salvi, Erika; Borroni, Barbara; Palluzzi, Fernando; Pepe, Daniele; D'Avila, Francesca; Padovani, Alessandro; Archetti, Silvana; Rainero, Innocenzo; Rubino, Elisa; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luisa; Binetti, Giuliano; Ghidoni, Roberta; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Serpente, Maria; Rossi, Giacomina; Giaccone, Giorgio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Nacmias, Benedetta; Piaceri, Irene; Bagnoli, Silvia; Bruni, Amalia C.; Maletta, Raffaele G.; Bernardi, Livia; Postiglione, Alfredo; Milan, Graziella; Franceschi, Massimo; Puca, Annibale A.; Novelli, Valeria; Barlassina, Cristina; Glorioso, Nicola; Manunta, Paolo; Singleton, Andrew; Cusi, Daniele; Hardy, John; Momeni, Parastoo

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most prevalent form of early onset dementia after Alzheimer's disease (AD). We performed a case-control association study in an Italian FTD cohort (n = 530) followed by the novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)-to-genes approach and functional annotation analysis. We identified 2 novel potential loci for FTD. Suggestive SNPs reached p-values ∼10−7 and odds ratio > 2.5 (2p16.3) and 1.5 (17q25.3). Suggestive alleles at 17q25.3 identified a disease-associated haplotype causing decreased expression of –cis genes such as RFNG and AATK involved in neuronal genesis and differentiation and axon outgrowth, respectively. We replicated this locus through the SNPs-to-genes approach. Our functional annotation analysis indicated significant enrichment for functions of the brain (neuronal genesis, differentiation, and maturation), the synapse (neurotransmission and synapse plasticity), and elements of the immune system, the latter supporting our recent international FTD–genome-wide association study. This is the largest genome-wide study in Italian FTD to date. Although our results are not conclusive, we set the basis for future replication studies and identification of susceptible molecular mechanisms involved in FTD pathogenesis. PMID:26154020

  16. Genome-wide Mechanosensitive MicroRNA (MechanomiR) Screen Uncovers Dysregulation of Their Regulatory Networks in the mdm Mouse Model of Muscular Dystrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Junaith S.; Hajira, Ameena; Lopez, Michael A.; Boriek, Aladin M.

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a heterogeneous group of genetic and neuromuscular disorders, which result in severe loss of motor ability and skeletal muscle mass and function. Aberrant mechanotransduction and dysregulated-microRNA pathways are often associated with the progression of MD. Here, we hypothesized that dysregulation of mechanosensitive microRNAs (mechanomiRs) in dystrophic skeletal muscle plays a major role in the progression of MD. To test our hypothesis, we performed a genome-wide expression profile of anisotropically regulated mechanomiRs and bioinformatically analyzed their target gene networks. We assessed their functional roles in the advancement of MD using diaphragm muscles from mdm (MD with myositis) mice, an animal model of human tibial MD (titinopathy), and their wild-type littermates. We were able to show that ex vivo anisotropic mechanical stretch significantly alters the miRNA expression profile in diaphragm muscles from WT and mdm mice; as a result, some of the genes associated with MDs are dysregulated in mdm mice due to differential regulation of a distinct set of mechanomiRs. Interestingly, we found a contrasting expression pattern of the highly expressed let-7 family mechanomiRs, let-7e-5p and miR-98–5p, and their target genes associated with the extracellular matrix and TGF-β pathways, respectively, between WT and mdm mice. Gain- and loss-of-function analysis of let-7e-5p in myocytes isolated from the diaphragms of WT and mdm mice confirmed Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, Col24a1, Col27a1, Itga1, Itga4, Scd1, and Thbs1 as target genes of let-7e-5p. Furthermore, we found that miR-98 negatively regulates myoblast differentiation. Our study therefore introduces additional biological players in the regulation of skeletal muscle structure and myogenesis that may contribute to unexplained disorders of MD. PMID:26272747

  17. Genome-wide screen for metabolic syndrome susceptibility Loci reveals strong lipid gene contribution but no evidence for common genetic basis for clustering of metabolic syndrome traits.

    PubMed

    Kristiansson, Kati; Perola, Markus; Tikkanen, Emmi; Kettunen, Johannes; Surakka, Ida; Havulinna, Aki S; Stancáková, Alena; Barnes, Chris; Widen, Elisabeth; Kajantie, Eero; Eriksson, Johan G; Viikari, Jorma; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli T; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Ruokonen, Aimo; Pouta, Anneli; Jula, Antti; Kangas, Antti J; Soininen, Pasi; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Männistö, Satu; Jousilahti, Pekka; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kuusisto, Johanna; Collins, Francis S; Laakso, Markku; Hurles, Matthew E; Palotie, Aarno; Peltonen, Leena; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko

    2012-04-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified several susceptibility loci for metabolic syndrome (MetS) component traits, but have had variable success in identifying susceptibility loci to the syndrome as an entity. We conducted a GWA study on MetS and its component traits in 4 Finnish cohorts consisting of 2637 MetS cases and 7927 controls, both free of diabetes, and followed the top loci in an independent sample with transcriptome and nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics data. Furthermore, we tested for loci associated with multiple MetS component traits using factor analysis, and built a genetic risk score for MetS. A previously known lipid locus, APOA1/C3/A4/A5 gene cluster region (SNP rs964184), was associated with MetS in all 4 study samples (P=7.23×10(-9) in meta-analysis). The association was further supported by serum metabolite analysis, where rs964184 was associated with various very low density lipoprotein, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein metabolites (P=0.024-1.88×10(-5)). Twenty-two previously identified susceptibility loci for individual MetS component traits were replicated in our GWA and factor analysis. Most of these were associated with lipid phenotypes, and none with 2 or more uncorrelated MetS components. A genetic risk score, calculated as the number of risk alleles in loci associated with individual MetS traits, was strongly associated with MetS status. Our findings suggest that genes from lipid metabolism pathways have the key role in the genetic background of MetS. We found little evidence for pleiotropy linking dyslipidemia and obesity to the other MetS component traits, such as hypertension and glucose intolerance.

  18. A Genome-Wide siRNA Screen Implicates Spire1/2 in SipA-Driven Salmonella Typhimurium Host Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Andritschke, Daniel; Dilling, Sabrina; Emmenlauer, Mario; Welz, Tobias; Schmich, Fabian; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Rämö, Pauli; Rottner, Klemens; Kerkhoff, Eugen; Wada, Teiji; Penninger, Josef M.; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Horvath, Peter; Dehio, Christoph; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Tm) is a leading cause of diarrhea. The disease is triggered by pathogen invasion into the gut epithelium. Invasion is attributed to the SPI-1 type 3 secretion system (T1). T1 injects effector proteins into epithelial cells and thereby elicits rearrangements of the host cellular actin cytoskeleton and pathogen invasion. The T1 effector proteins SopE, SopB, SopE2 and SipA are contributing to this. However, the host cell factors contributing to invasion are still not completely understood. To address this question comprehensively, we used Hela tissue culture cells, a genome-wide siRNA library, a modified gentamicin protection assay and S. TmSipA, a sopBsopE2sopE mutant which strongly relies on the T1 effector protein SipA to invade host cells. We found that S. TmSipA invasion does not elicit membrane ruffles, nor promote the entry of non-invasive bacteria "in trans". However, SipA-mediated infection involved the SPIRE family of actin nucleators, besides well-established host cell factors (WRC, ARP2/3, RhoGTPases, COPI). Stage-specific follow-up assays and knockout fibroblasts indicated that SPIRE1 and SPIRE2 are involved in different steps of the S. Tm infection process. Whereas SPIRE1 interferes with bacterial binding, SPIRE2 influences intracellular replication of S. Tm. Hence, these two proteins might fulfill non-redundant functions in the pathogen-host interaction. The lack of co-localization hints to a short, direct interaction between S. Tm and SPIRE proteins or to an indirect effect. PMID:27627128

  19. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Genome-wide shRNA Screens with DEMETER Inferred Gene Effects | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    In this study RNA interference (RNAi) screens were performed on 285 cell lines and combined with 216 lines previously screened, which were then analyzed together with DEMETER to discover genetic dependencies across the entire pool of cell lines. Read the abstract

  20. Genome-wide Mechanosensitive MicroRNA (MechanomiR) Screen Uncovers Dysregulation of Their Regulatory Networks in the mdm Mouse Model of Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Junaith S; Hajira, Ameena; Lopez, Michael A; Boriek, Aladin M

    2015-10-09

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a heterogeneous group of genetic and neuromuscular disorders, which result in severe loss of motor ability and skeletal muscle mass and function. Aberrant mechanotransduction and dysregulated-microRNA pathways are often associated with the progression of MD. Here, we hypothesized that dysregulation of mechanosensitive microRNAs (mechanomiRs) in dystrophic skeletal muscle plays a major role in the progression of MD. To test our hypothesis, we performed a genome-wide expression profile of anisotropically regulated mechanomiRs and bioinformatically analyzed their target gene networks. We assessed their functional roles in the advancement of MD using diaphragm muscles from mdm (MD with myositis) mice, an animal model of human tibial MD (titinopathy), and their wild-type littermates. We were able to show that ex vivo anisotropic mechanical stretch significantly alters the miRNA expression profile in diaphragm muscles from WT and mdm mice; as a result, some of the genes associated with MDs are dysregulated in mdm mice due to differential regulation of a distinct set of mechanomiRs. Interestingly, we found a contrasting expression pattern of the highly expressed let-7 family mechanomiRs, let-7e-5p and miR-98-5p, and their target genes associated with the extracellular matrix and TGF-β pathways, respectively, between WT and mdm mice. Gain- and loss-of-function analysis of let-7e-5p in myocytes isolated from the diaphragms of WT and mdm mice confirmed Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, Col24a1, Col27a1, Itga1, Itga4, Scd1, and Thbs1 as target genes of let-7e-5p. Furthermore, we found that miR-98 negatively regulates myoblast differentiation. Our study therefore introduces additional biological players in the regulation of skeletal muscle structure and myogenesis that may contribute to unexplained disorders of MD. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Genome-wide RNA-mediated interference screen identifies miR-19 targets in Notch-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Mavrakis, Konstantinos J; Wolfe, Andrew L; Oricchio, Elisa; Palomero, Teresa; de Keersmaecker, Kim; McJunkin, Katherine; Zuber, Johannes; James, Taneisha; Khan, Aly A; Leslie, Christina S; Parker, Joel S; Paddison, Patrick J; Tam, Wayne; Ferrando, Adolfo; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2010-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as novel cancer genes. In particular, the miR-17-92 cluster, containing six individual miRNAs, is highly expressed in haematopoietic cancers and promotes lymphomagenesis in vivo. Clinical use of these findings hinges on isolating the oncogenic activity within the 17-92 cluster and defining its relevant target genes. Here we show that miR-19 is sufficient to promote leukaemogenesis in Notch1-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) in vivo. In concord with the pathogenic importance of this interaction in T-ALL, we report a novel translocation that targets the 17-92 cluster and coincides with a second rearrangement that activates Notch1. To identify the miR-19 targets responsible for its oncogenic action, we conducted a large-scale short hairpin RNA screen for genes whose knockdown can phenocopy miR-19. Strikingly, the results of this screen were enriched for miR-19 target genes, and include Bim (Bcl2L11), AMP-activated kinase (Prkaa1) and the phosphatases Pten and PP2A (Ppp2r5e). Hence, an unbiased, functional genomics approach reveals a coordinate clampdown on several regulators of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase-related survival signals by the leukaemogenic miR-19.

  2. Human Genome-Wide RNAi Screen for Host Factors That Facilitate Salmonella Invasion Reveals a Role for Potassium Secretion in Promoting Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Thornbrough, Joshua M.; Gopinath, Adarsh; Hundley, Tom; Worley, Micah J.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica can actively invade the gastro-intestinal epithelium. This frequently leads to diarrheal disease, and also gives the pathogen access to phagocytes that can serve as vehicles for dissemination into deeper tissue. The ability to invade host cells is also important in maintaining the carrier state. While much is known about the bacterial factors that promote invasion, relatively little is known about the host factors involved. To gain insight into how Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is able to invade normally non-phagocytic cells, we undertook a global RNAi screen with S. Typhimurium-infected human epithelial cells. In all, we identified 633 genes as contributing to bacterial internalization. These genes fall into a diverse group of functional categories revealing that cytoskeletal regulators are not the only factors that modulate invasion. In fact, potassium ion transport was the most enriched molecular function category in our screen, reinforcing a link between potassium and internalization. In addition to providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the ability of pathogens to invade host cells, all 633 host factors identified are candidates for new anti-microbial targets for treating Salmonella infections, and may be useful in curtailing infections with other pathogens as well. PMID:27880807

  3. Genome-Wide Screening and Identification of Factors Affecting the Biosynthesis of Prodigiosin by Hahella chejuensis, Using Escherichia coli as a Surrogate Host ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Park, Yon-Kyoung; Kim, Jihyun F.

    2010-01-01

    A marine bacterium, Hahella chejuensis, recently has attracted attention due to its lytic activity against a red-tide dinoflagellate. The algicidal function originates from its red pigment, prodigiosin, which also exhibits immunosuppressive or anticancer activity. Genome sequencing and functional analysis revealed a gene set contained in the hap gene cluster that is responsible for the biosynthesis of prodigiosin. To screen for the factors affecting the prodigiosin biosynthesis, we constructed a plasmid library of the H. chejuensis genomic DNA, introduced it into Escherichia coli strains harboring the hap cluster, and observed changes in production of the red pigment. Among the screened clones, hapXY genes whose products constitute a two-component signal transduction system were elucidated as positive regulators of the pigment production. In addition, an Hfq-dependent, noncoding region located at one end of the hap cluster was confirmed to play roles in regulation. Identification of factors involved in the regulation of prodigiosin biosynthesis should help in understanding how the prodigiosin-biosynthetic pathway is organized and controlled and also aid in modulating the overexpression of prodigiosin in a heterologous host, such as E. coli, or in the natural producer, H. chejuensis. PMID:20038694

  4. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M.

    PubMed

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50%) to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3). A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the glycerol structural analogs from the PubChem database. We identified five best inhibitors with strong affinities, stable interactions, and also with reliable drug-like properties. Hence, these leads might be used as the most effective inhibitors of modeled protein. The outcome of the present work of virtual screening of putative gene targets might facilitate design of potential drugs for better treatment against brucellosis.

  5. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50%) to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3). A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the glycerol structural analogs from the PubChem database. We identified five best inhibitors with strong affinities, stable interactions, and also with reliable drug-like properties. Hence, these leads might be used as the most effective inhibitors of modeled protein. The outcome of the present work of virtual screening of putative gene targets might facilitate design of potential drugs for better treatment against brucellosis. PMID:25834405

  6. A high-coverage artificial chromosome library for the genome-wide screening of drug-resistance genes in malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Shiroh; Kaneko, Izumi; Yuda, Masao

    2012-05-01

    The global spread of drug-resistant parasites is a serious problem for the treatment of malaria. Although identifying drug-resistance genes is crucial for the efforts against resistant parasites, an effective approach has not yet been developed. Here, we report a robust method for identifying resistance genes from parasites by using a Plasmodium artificial chromosome (PAC). Large genomic DNA fragments (10-50 kb) from the drug-resistant rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei were ligated into the PAC and directly introduced into the drug-sensitive (i.e., wild-type) parasite by electroporation, resulting in a PAC library that encompassed the whole genomic sequence of the parasite. Subsequently, the transformed parasites that acquired resistance were selected by screening with the drug, and the resistance gene in the PAC was successfully identified. Furthermore, the drug-resistance gene was identified from a PAC library that was made from the pyrimethamine-resistant parasite Plasmodium chabaudi, further demonstrating the utility of our method. This method will promote the identification of resistance genes and contribute to the global fight against drug-resistant parasites.

  7. Genome-wide Screening of Regulators of Catalase Expression: ROLE OF A TRANSCRIPTION COMPLEX AND HISTONE AND tRNA MODIFICATION COMPLEXES ON ADAPTATION TO STRESS.

    PubMed

    García, Patricia; Encinar Del Dedo, Javier; Ayté, José; Hidalgo, Elena

    2016-01-08

    In response to environmental cues, the mitogen-activated protein kinase Sty1-driven signaling cascade activates hundreds of genes to induce a robust anti-stress cellular response in fission yeast. Thus, upon stress imposition Sty1 transiently accumulates in the nucleus where it up-regulates transcription through the Atf1 transcription factor. Several regulators of transcription and translation have been identified as important to mount an integral response to oxidative stress, such as the Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyl transferase or Elongator complexes, respectively. With the aim of identifying new regulators of this massive gene expression program, we have used a GFP-based protein reporter and screened a fission yeast deletion collection using flow cytometry. We find that the levels of catalase fused to GFP, both before and after a threat of peroxides, are altered in hundreds of strains lacking components of chromatin modifiers, transcription complexes, and modulators of translation. Thus, the transcription elongation complex Paf1, the histone methylase Set1-COMPASS, and the translation-related Trm112 dimers are all involved in full expression of Ctt1-GFP and in wild-type tolerance to peroxides.

  8. Genome-wide single-cell-level screen for protein abundance and localization changes in response to DNA damage in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Aprotim; Pesudo, Laia Quiros; McRee, Siobhan; Bathe, Mark; Samson, Leona D.

    2013-01-01

    An effective response to DNA damaging agents involves modulating numerous facets of cellular homeostasis in addition to DNA repair and cell-cycle checkpoint pathways. Fluorescence microscopy-based imaging offers the opportunity to simultaneously interrogate changes in both protein level and subcellular localization in response to DNA damaging agents at the single-cell level. We report here results from screening the yeast Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-fusion library to investigate global cellular protein reorganization on exposure to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Broad groups of induced, repressed, nucleus- and cytoplasm-enriched proteins were identified. Gene Ontology and interactome analyses revealed the underlying cellular processes. Transcription factor (TF) analysis identified principal regulators of the response, and targets of all major stress-responsive TFs were enriched amongst the induced proteins. An unexpected partitioning of biological function according to the number of TFs targeting individual genes was revealed. Finally, differential modulation of ribosomal proteins depending on methyl methanesulfonate dose was shown to correlate with cell growth and with the translocation of the Sfp1 TF. We conclude that cellular responses can navigate different routes according to the extent of damage, relying on both expression and localization changes of specific proteins. PMID:23935119

  9. A Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Identifies FOXO4 as a Metastasis-Suppressor through Counteracting PI3K/AKT Signal Pathway in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Bing; Gao, Lingqiu; Baranowski, Catherine; Gillard, Bryan; Wang, Jianmin; Ransom, Ryan; Ko, Hyun-Kyung; Gelman, Irwin H.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the PI3K/AKT signal pathway is a known driving force for the progression to castration-recurrent prostate cancer (CR-CaP), which constitutes the major lethal phenotype of CaP. Here, we identify using a genomic shRNA screen the PI3K/AKT-inactivating downstream target, FOXO4, as a potential CaP metastasis suppressor. FOXO4 protein levels inversely correlate with the invasive potential of a panel of human CaP cell lines, with decreased mRNA levels correlating with increased incidence of clinical metastasis. Knockdown (KD) of FOXO4 in human LNCaP cells causes increased invasion in vitro and lymph node (LN) metastasis in vivo without affecting indices of proliferation or apoptosis. Increased Matrigel invasiveness was found by KD of FOXO1 but not FOXO3. Comparison of differentially expressed genes affected by FOXO4-KD in LNCaP cells in culture, in primary tumors and in LN metastases identified a panel of upregulated genes, including PIP, CAMK2N1, PLA2G16 and PGC, which, if knocked down by siRNA, could decrease the increased invasiveness associated with FOXO4 deficiency. Although only some of these genes encode FOXO promoter binding sites, they are all RUNX2-inducible, and RUNX2 binding to the PIP promoter is increased in FOXO4-KD cells. Indeed, the forced expression of FOXO4 reversed the increased invasiveness of LNCaP/shFOXO4 cells; the forced expression of FOXO4 did not alter RUNX2 protein levels, yet it decreased RUNX2 binding to the PIP promoter, resulting in PIP downregulation. Finally, there was a correlation between FOXO4, but not FOXO1 or FOXO3, downregulation and decreased metastasis-free survival in human CaP patients. Our data strongly suggest that increased PI3K/AKT-mediated metastatic invasiveness in CaP is associated with FOXO4 loss, and that mechanisms to induce FOXO4 re-expression might suppress CaP metastatic aggressiveness. PMID:24983969

  10. Genome-Wide Deletion Screening with the Array CGH Method in Mouse Offspring Derived from Irradiated Spermatogonia Indicates that Mutagenic Responses are Highly Variable among Genes.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Jun-Ichi; Kodaira, Mieko; Miura, Akiko; Tsuji, Takahiro; Nakamoto, Yoshiko; Imanaka, Masaaki; Kitamura, Jun; Cullings, Harry; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya; Nakamura, Nori

    2016-12-01

    Until the end of the 20th century, mouse germ cell data on induced mutation rates, which were collected using classical genetic methods at preselected specific loci, provided the principal basis for estimates of genetic risks from radiation in humans. The work reported on here is an extension of earlier efforts in this area using molecular methods. It focuses on validating the use of array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) methods for identifying radiation-induced copy number variants (CNVs) and specifically for DNA deletions. The emphasis on deletions stems from the view that it constitutes the predominant type of radiation-induced genetic damage, which is relevant for estimating genetic risks in humans. In the current study, deletion mutations were screened in the genomes of F1 mice born to unirradiated or 4 Gy irradiated sires at the spermatogonia stage (100 offspring each). The array CGH analysis was performed using a "2M array" with over 2 million probes with a mean interprobe distance of approximately 1 kb. The results provide evidence of five molecularly-confirmed paternally-derived deletions in the irradiated group (5/100) and one in the controls (1/100). These data support a calculation, which estimates that the mutation rate is 1 × 10(-2)/Gy per genome for induced deletions; this is much lower than would be expected if one assumes that the specific locus rate of 1 × 10(-5)/locus per Gy (at 34 loci) is applicable to other genes in the genome. The low observed rate of induced deletions suggests that the effective number of genes/genomic regions at which recoverable deletions could be induced would be only approximately 1,000. This estimate is far lower than expected from the size of the mouse genome (>20,000 genes). Such a discrepancy between observation and expectation can occur if the genome contains numerous genes that are far less sensitive to radiation-induced deletions, if many deletion-bearing offspring are not viable or if the current

  11. Multi-modality image registration for effective thermographic fever screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwith, C. Y. N.; Ghassemi, Pejhman; Pfefer, Joshua; Casamento, Jon; Wang, Quanzeng

    2017-02-01

    Fever screening based on infrared thermographs (IRTs) is a viable mass screening approach during infectious disease pandemics, such as Ebola and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), for temperature monitoring in public places like hospitals and airports. IRTs have been found to be powerful, quick and non-invasive methods for detecting elevated temperatures. Moreover, regions medially adjacent to the inner canthi (called the canthi regions in this paper) are preferred sites for fever screening. Accurate localization of the canthi regions can be achieved through multi-modality registration of infrared (IR) and white-light images. Here we propose a registration method through a coarse-fine registration strategy using different registration models based on landmarks and edge detection on eye contours. We have evaluated the registration accuracy to be within +/- 2.7 mm, which enables accurate localization of the canthi regions.

  12. Patterns of Genome-Wide VDR Locations

    PubMed Central

    Tuoresmäki, Pauli; Väisänen, Sami; Neme, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The genome-wide analysis of the binding sites of the transcription factor vitamin D receptor (VDR) is essential for a global appreciation the physiological impact of the nuclear hormone 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3). Genome-wide analysis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-polarized THP-1 human monocytic leukemia cells via chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) resulted in 1,318 high-confidence VDR binding sites, of which 789 and 364 occurred uniquely with and without 1,25(OH)2D3 stimulation, while only 165 were common. We re-analyzed five public VDR ChIP-seq datasets with identical peak calling settings (MACS, version 2) and found, using a novel consensus summit identification strategy, in total 23,409 non-overlapping VDR binding sites, 75% of which are unique within the six analyzed cellular models. LPS-differentiated THP-1 cells have 22% more genomic VDR locations than undifferentiated cells and both cell types display more overlap in their VDR locations than the other investigated cell types. In general, the intersection of VDR binding profiles of ligand-stimulated cells is higher than those of unstimulated cells. De novo binding site searches and HOMER screening for binding motifs formed by direct repeats spaced by three nucleotides (DR3) suggest for all six VDR ChIP-seq datasets that these sequences are found preferentially at highly ligand responsive VDR loci. Importantly, all VDR ChIP-seq datasets display the same relationship between the VDR occupancy and the percentage of DR3-type sequences below the peak summits. The comparative analysis of six VDR ChIP-seq datasets demonstrated that the mechanistic basis for the action of the VDR is independent of the cell type. Only the minority of genome-wide VDR binding sites contains a DR3-type sequence. Moreover, the total number of identified VDR binding sites in each ligand-stimulated cell line inversely correlates with the percentage of peak summits with DR3 sites. PMID:24787735

  13. Identification of Restriction Factors by Human Genome-Wide RNA Interference Screening of Viral Host Range Mutants Exemplified by Discovery of SAMD9 and WDR6 as Inhibitors of the Vaccinia Virus K1L−C7L− Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Sivan, Gilad; Ormanoglu, Pinar; Buehler, Eugen C.; Martin, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA interference (RNAi) screens intended to identify host factors that restrict virus replication may fail if the virus already counteracts host defense mechanisms. To overcome this limitation, we are investigating the use of viral host range mutants that exhibit impaired replication in nonpermissive cells. A vaccinia virus (VACV) mutant with a deletion of both the C7L and K1L genes, K1L−C7L−, which abrogates replication in human cells at a step prior to late gene expression, was chosen for this strategy. We carried out a human genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen in HeLa cells infected with a VACV K1L−C7L− mutant that expresses the green fluorescent protein regulated by a late promoter. This positive-selection screen had remarkably low background levels and resulted in the identification of a few cellular genes, notably SAMD9 and WDR6, from approximately 20,000 tested that dramatically enhanced green fluorescent protein expression. Replication of the mutant virus was enabled by multiple siRNAs to SAMD9 or WDR6. Moreover, SAMD9 and WDR6 clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 knockout HeLa cell lines were permissive for replication of the K1L−C7L− mutant, in agreement with the siRNA data. Expression of exogenous SAMD9 or interferon regulatory factor 1 restricted replication of the K1L−C7L− mutant in the SAMD9−/− cells. Independent interactions of SAMD9 with the K1 and C7 proteins were suggested by immunoprecipitation. Knockout of WDR6 did not reduce the levels of SAMD9 and interactions of WDR6 with SAMD9, C7, and K1 proteins were not detected, suggesting that these restriction factors act independently but possibly in the same innate defense pathway. PMID:26242627

  14. Genome-Wide siRNA Screen Identifies Complementary Signaling Pathways Involved in Listeria Infection and Reveals Different Actin Nucleation Mechanisms during Listeria Cell Invasion and Actin Comet Tail Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kühbacher, Andreas; Emmenlauer, Mario; Rämo, Pauli; Kafai, Natasha; Dehio, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes enters nonphagocytic cells by a receptor-mediated mechanism that is dependent on a clathrin-based molecular machinery and actin rearrangements. Bacterial intra- and intercellular movements are also actin dependent and rely on the actin nucleating Arp2/3 complex, which is activated by host-derived nucleation-promoting factors downstream of the cell receptor Met during entry and by the bacterial nucleation-promoting factor ActA during comet tail formation. By genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening for host factors involved in bacterial infection, we identified diverse cellular signaling networks and protein complexes that support or limit these processes. In addition, we could precise previously described molecular pathways involved in Listeria invasion. In particular our results show that the requirements for actin nucleators during Listeria entry and actin comet tail formation are different. Knockdown of several actin nucleators, including SPIRE2, reduced bacterial invasion while not affecting the generation of comet tails. Most interestingly, we observed that in contrast to our expectations, not all of the seven subunits of the Arp2/3 complex are required for Listeria entry into cells or actin tail formation and that the subunit requirements for each of these processes differ, highlighting a previously unsuspected versatility in Arp2/3 complex composition and function. PMID:25991686

  15. Genome-wide screen identifies Escherichia coli TCA cycle-related mutants with extended chronological lifespan dependent on acetate metabolism and the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ArcA

    PubMed Central

    Gonidakis, Stavros; Finkel, Steven E.; Longo, Valter D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Single-gene mutants with extended lifespan have been described in several model organisms. We performed a genome-wide screen for long-lived mutants in Escherichia coli which revealed strains lacking TCA cycle-related genes that exhibit longer stationary phase survival and increased resistance to heat stress compared to wild-type. Extended lifespan in the sdhA mutant, lacking subunit A of succinate dehydrogenase, is associated with reduced production of superoxide and increased stress resistance. On the other hand, the longer lifespan of the lipoic acid synthase mutant (lipA) is associated with reduced oxygen consumption and requires the acetate-producing enzyme pyruvate oxidase, as well as acetyl-CoA synthetase, the enzyme that converts extracellular acetate to acetyl-CoA. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ArcA, acting independently of acetate metabolism, is also required for maximum lifespan extension in the lipA and lpdA mutants, indicating that these mutations promote entry into a mode normally associated with a low-oxygen environment. Since analogous changes from respiration to fermentation have been observed in long-lived Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans strains, such metabolic alterations may represent an evolutionarily conserved strategy to extend lifespan. PMID:20707865

  16. Identification of Restriction Factors by Human Genome-Wide RNA Interference Screening of Viral Host Range Mutants Exemplified by Discovery of SAMD9 and WDR6 as Inhibitors of the Vaccinia Virus K1L-C7L- Mutant.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Gilad; Ormanoglu, Pinar; Buehler, Eugen C; Martin, Scott E; Moss, Bernard

    2015-08-04

    RNA interference (RNAi) screens intended to identify host factors that restrict virus replication may fail if the virus already counteracts host defense mechanisms. To overcome this limitation, we are investigating the use of viral host range mutants that exhibit impaired replication in nonpermissive cells. A vaccinia virus (VACV) mutant with a deletion of both the C7L and K1L genes, K1L(-)C7L(-), which abrogates replication in human cells at a step prior to late gene expression, was chosen for this strategy. We carried out a human genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen in HeLa cells infected with a VACV K1L(-)C7L(-) mutant that expresses the green fluorescent protein regulated by a late promoter. This positive-selection screen had remarkably low background levels and resulted in the identification of a few cellular genes, notably SAMD9 and WDR6, from approximately 20,000 tested that dramatically enhanced green fluorescent protein expression. Replication of the mutant virus was enabled by multiple siRNAs to SAMD9 or WDR6. Moreover, SAMD9 and WDR6 clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 knockout HeLa cell lines were permissive for replication of the K1L(-)C7L(-) mutant, in agreement with the siRNA data. Expression of exogenous SAMD9 or interferon regulatory factor 1 restricted replication of the K1L(-)C7L(-) mutant in the SAMD9(-/-) cells. Independent interactions of SAMD9 with the K1 and C7 proteins were suggested by immunoprecipitation. Knockout of WDR6 did not reduce the levels of SAMD9 and interactions of WDR6 with SAMD9, C7, and K1 proteins were not detected, suggesting that these restriction factors act independently but possibly in the same innate defense pathway. The coevolution of microbial pathogens with cells has led to an arms race in which the invader and host continuously struggle to gain the advantage. For this reason, traditional siRNA screens may fail to uncover important immune mechanisms if the pathogens

  17. A genome-wide siRNA screen for regulators of tumor suppressor p53 activity in human non-small lung cancer cells identifies components of the RNA splicing machinery as targets for anticancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Siebring-van Olst, Ellen; Blijlevens, Maxime; de Menezes, Renee X; van der Meulen-Muileman, Ida H; Smit, Egbert F; van Beusechem, Victor W

    2017-03-13

    Reinstating wild-type tumor suppressor p53 activity could be a valuable option for the treatment of cancer. To contribute to development of new treatment options for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we performed genome-wide siRNA screens for determinants of p53 activity in NSCLC cells. We identified many genes not previously known to be involved in regulating p53 activity. Silencing p53 pathway inhibitor genes was associated with loss of cell viability. The largest functional gene cluster influencing p53 activity was mRNA splicing. Prominent p53 activation was observed upon silencing of specific spliceosome components, rather than by general inhibition of the spliceosome. Ten genes were validated as inhibitors of p53 activity in multiple NSCLC cell lines: genes encoding the Ras-pathway activator SOS1, the zinc finger protein TSHZ3, the mitochondrial membrane protein COX16 and the spliceosome components SNRPD3, SF3A3, SF3B1, SF3B6, XAB2, CWC22 and HNRNPL. Silencing these genes generally increased p53 levels, with distinct effects on CDKN1A expression, induction of cell cycle arrest and cell death. Silencing spliceosome components was associated with alternative splicing of MDM4 mRNA, which could contribute to activation of p53. In addition, silencing splice factors was particularly effective in killing NSCLC cells, albeit in a p53-independent manner. Interestingly, silencing SNRPD3 and SF3A3 exerted much stronger cytotoxicity to NSCLC cells than to lung fibroblasts, suggesting that these genes could represent useful therapeutic targets. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Genome-Wide Linkage Screen for Systolic Blood Pressure in the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES) of Mexican-Americans and Confirmation of a Major Susceptibility Locus on Chromosome 6q14.1

    PubMed Central

    Puppala, Sobha; Coletta, Dawn K.; Schneider, Jennifer; Hu, Shirley L.; Farook, Vidya S.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Arya, Rector; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Jenkinson, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Hypertension or high blood pressure is a strong correlate of diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. We conducted a genome-wide linkage screen to identify susceptibility genes influencing systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Mexican-Americans from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES). Methods Using data from 1,089 individuals distributed across 266 families, we performed a multipoint linkage analysis to localize susceptibility loci for SBP and DBP by applying two models. In model 1, we added a sensible constant to the observed BP values in treated subjects [Tobin et al.; Stat Med 2005;24:2911–2935] to account for antihypertensive use (i.e. 15 and 10 mm Hg to SBP and DBP values, respectively). In model 2, we fixed values of 140 mm Hg for SBP and 90 mm Hg for DBP, if the treated values were less than the standard referenced treatment thresholds of 140/90 mm Hg for hypertensive status. However, if the observed treated BP values were found to be above these standard treatment thresholds, the actual observed treated BP values were retained in order not to reduce them by substitution of the treatment threshold values. Results The multipoint linkage analysis revealed strong linkage signals for SBP compared with DBP. The strongest evidence for linkage of SBP (model 1, LOD = 5.0; model 2, LOD = 3.6) was found on chromosome 6q14.1 near the marker D6S1031 (89 cM) in both models. In addition, some evidence for SBP linkage occurred on chromosomes 1q, 4p, and 16p. Most importantly, our major SBP linkage finding on chromosome 6q near marker D6S1031 was independently confirmed in a Caucasian population (LOD = 3.3). In summary, our study found evidence for a major locus on chromosome 6q influencing SBP levels in Mexican-Americans. PMID:21293138

  19. Genome-wide analysis correlates Ayurveda Prakriti

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Nizamuddin, Sheikh; Sharath, Anugula; Jyothi, Vuskamalla; Rotti, Harish; Raval, Ritu; Nayak, Jayakrishna; Bhat, Balakrishna K.; Prasanna, B. V.; Shintre, Pooja; Sule, Mayura; Joshi, Kalpana S.; Dedge, Amrish P.; Bharadwaj, Ramachandra; Gangadharan, G. G.; Nair, Sreekumaran; Gopinath, Puthiya M.; Patwardhan, Bhushan; Kondaiah, Paturu; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Valiathan, Marthanda Varma Sankaran; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2015-01-01

    The practice of Ayurveda, the traditional medicine of India, is based on the concept of three major constitutional types (Vata, Pitta and Kapha) defined as “Prakriti”. To the best of our knowledge, no study has convincingly correlated genomic variations with the classification of Prakriti. In the present study, we performed genome-wide SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) analysis (Affymetrix, 6.0) of 262 well-classified male individuals (after screening 3416 subjects) belonging to three Prakritis. We found 52 SNPs (p ≤ 1 × 10−5) were significantly different between Prakritis, without any confounding effect of stratification, after 106 permutations. Principal component analysis (PCA) of these SNPs classified 262 individuals into their respective groups (Vata, Pitta and Kapha) irrespective of their ancestry, which represent its power in categorization. We further validated our finding with 297 Indian population samples with known ancestry. Subsequently, we found that PGM1 correlates with phenotype of Pitta as described in the ancient text of Caraka Samhita, suggesting that the phenotypic classification of India’s traditional medicine has a genetic basis; and its Prakriti-based practice in vogue for many centuries resonates with personalized medicine. PMID:26511157

  20. Genome-wide association mapping in plants.

    PubMed

    George, Andrew W; Cavanagh, Colin

    2015-06-01

    We present new association mapping methods which address the unique challenges of analyzing genome-wide data from multi-environment plant studies. Association studies on a genome-wide scale are being performed in plants. Unlike human studies, plant studies contain replicates whose data may be recorded across different environments. Plant studies also often employ elaborate experimental designs for controlling extraneous phenotypic variation. As a result, the genome-wide analysis of data from plant studies can be challenging. In this paper, we present QK-based association mapping for the analysis of data from plant association studies. In doing so, we have developed: (a) a general multivariate QK framework for association mapping in plant studies of arbitrary complexity; (b) a new weighted two-stage analysis approach for QK-based association mapping; (c) a heuristic procedure for determining when two-stage analysis is appropriate; and (d) a Monte Carlo sampling procedure for controlling the genome-wide type I error rate. We conduct a simulation study to evaluate the performance of our genome-wide mapping technique. We also analyze data from a multi-environment association study in wheat.

  1. TeraSCREEN: multi-frequency multi-mode Terahertz screening for border checks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Naomi E.; Alderman, Byron; Allona, Fernando; Frijlink, Peter; Gonzalo, Ramón; Hägelen, Manfred; Ibáñez, Asier; Krozer, Viktor; Langford, Marian L.; Limiti, Ernesto; Platt, Duncan; Schikora, Marek; Wang, Hui; Weber, Marc Andree

    2014-06-01

    The challenge for any security screening system is to identify potentially harmful objects such as weapons and explosives concealed under clothing. Classical border and security checkpoints are no longer capable of fulfilling the demands of today's ever growing security requirements, especially with respect to the high throughput generally required which entails a high detection rate of threat material and a low false alarm rate. TeraSCREEN proposes to develop an innovative concept of multi-frequency multi-mode Terahertz and millimeter-wave detection with new automatic detection and classification functionalities. The system developed will demonstrate, at a live control point, the safe automatic detection and classification of objects concealed under clothing, whilst respecting privacy and increasing current throughput rates. This innovative screening system will combine multi-frequency, multi-mode images taken by passive and active subsystems which will scan the subjects and obtain complementary spatial and spectral information, thus allowing for automatic threat recognition. The TeraSCREEN project, which will run from 2013 to 2016, has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme under the Security Call. This paper will describe the project objectives and approach.

  2. Genome-wide association studies of cancer.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, Eric; Witte, John S

    2007-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies provide a new and powerful approach to investigate the effect of inherited genetic variation on the risk of human disease. These studies rely on high throughput DNA microarray technology to genotype hundreds of thousands of genetic variants across the human genome. The first genome-wide association studies have identified previously unknown genetic risk factors that influence a range of diseases, including prostate cancer, breast cancer, myocardial infarction, age-related macular degeneration, diabetes, Crohn's disease and obesity. Many more studies are currently underway, including a number that will focus on other cancers (e.g., colorectal). Here we discuss the major issues involved in conducting genome-wide association studies and how these studies can be used to examine cancer phenotypes.

  3. Genome-wide functional analysis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Motaung, Thabiso E; Ells, Ruan; Pohl, Carolina H; Albertyn, Jacobus; Tsilo, Toi J

    2017-02-08

    Candida albicans is an important etiological agent of superficial and life-threatening infections in individuals with compromised immune systems. To date, we know of several overlapping genetic networks that govern virulence attributes in this fungal pathogen. Classical use of deletion mutants has led to the discovery of numerous virulence factors over the years, and genome-wide functional analysis has propelled gene discovery at an even faster pace. Indeed, a number of recent studies using large-scale genetic screens followed by genome-wide functional analysis has allowed for the unbiased discovery of many new genes involved in C. albicans biology. Here we share our perspectives on the role of these studies in analyzing fundamental aspects of C. albicans virulence properties.

  4. Genome-wide epigenomic profiling for biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Dirks, René A M; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Marks, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    A myriad of diseases is caused or characterized by alteration of epigenetic patterns, including changes in DNA methylation, post-translational histone modifications, or chromatin structure. These changes of the epigenome represent a highly interesting layer of information for disease stratification and for personalized medicine. Traditionally, epigenomic profiling required large amounts of cells, which are rarely available with clinical samples. Also, the cellular heterogeneity complicates analysis when profiling clinical samples for unbiased genome-wide biomarker discovery. Recent years saw great progress in miniaturization of genome-wide epigenomic profiling, enabling large-scale epigenetic biomarker screens for disease diagnosis, prognosis, and stratification on patient-derived samples. All main genome-wide profiling technologies have now been scaled down and/or are compatible with single-cell readout, including: (i) Bisulfite sequencing to determine DNA methylation at base-pair resolution, (ii) ChIP-Seq to identify protein binding sites on the genome, (iii) DNaseI-Seq/ATAC-Seq to profile open chromatin, and (iv) 4C-Seq and HiC-Seq to determine the spatial organization of chromosomes. In this review we provide an overview of current genome-wide epigenomic profiling technologies and main technological advances that allowed miniaturization of these assays down to single-cell level. For each of these technologies we evaluate their application for future biomarker discovery. We will focus on (i) compatibility of these technologies with methods used for clinical sample preservation, including methods used by biobanks that store large numbers of patient samples, and (ii) automation of these technologies for robust sample preparation and increased throughput.

  5. Genome-wide association interaction analysis for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gusareva, Elena S.; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Bellenguez, Céline; Cuyvers, Elise; Colon, Samuel; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Mahachie Johna, Jestinah M.; Bessonov, Kyrylo; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Williams, Julie; Amouyel, Philippe; Sleegers, Kristel; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Van Steen, Kristel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a minimal protocol for exhaustive genome-wide association interaction analysis that involves screening for epistasis over large-scale genomic data combining strengths of different methods and statistical tools. The different steps of this protocol are illustrated on a real-life data application for Alzheimer's disease (AD) (2259 patients and 6017 controls from France). Particularly, in the exhaustive genome-wide epistasis screening we identified AD-associated interacting SNPs-pair from chromosome 6q11.1 (rs6455128, the KHDRBS2 gene) and 13q12.11 (rs7989332, the CRYL1 gene) (p = 0.006, corrected for multiple testing). A replication analysis in the independent AD cohort from Germany (555 patients and 824 controls) confirmed the discovered epistasis signal (p = 0.036). This signal was also supported by a meta-analysis approach in 5 independent AD cohorts that was applied in the context of epistasis for the first time. Transcriptome analysis revealed negative correlation between expression levels of KHDRBS2 and CRYL1 in both the temporal cortex (β = −0.19, p = 0.0006) and cerebellum (β = −0.23, p < 0.0001) brain regions. This is the first time a replicable epistasis associated with AD was identified using a hypothesis free screening approach. PMID:24958192

  6. Genome-Wide Approaches to Drosophila Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Frasch, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The development of the dorsal vessel in Drosophila is one of the first systems in which key mechanisms regulating cardiogenesis have been defined in great detail at the genetic and molecular level. Due to evolutionary conservation, these findings have also provided major inputs into studies of cardiogenesis in vertebrates. Many of the major components that control Drosophila cardiogenesis were discovered based on candidate gene approaches and their functions were defined by employing the outstanding genetic tools and molecular techniques available in this system. More recently, approaches have been taken that aim to interrogate the entire genome in order to identify novel components and describe genomic features that are pertinent to the regulation of heart development. Apart from classical forward genetic screens, the availability of the thoroughly annotated Drosophila genome sequence made new genome-wide approaches possible, which include the generation of massive numbers of RNA interference (RNAi) reagents that were used in forward genetic screens, as well as studies of the transcriptomes and proteomes of the developing heart under normal and experimentally manipulated conditions. Moreover, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments have been performed with the aim to define the full set of genomic binding sites of the major cardiogenic transcription factors, their relevant target genes, and a more complete picture of the regulatory network that drives cardiogenesis. This review will give an overview on these genome-wide approaches to Drosophila heart development and on computational analyses of the obtained information that ultimately aim to provide a description of this process at the systems level. PMID:27294102

  7. Profiling genome-wide DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Yong, Wai-Shin; Hsu, Fei-Man; Chen, Pao-Yang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays an important role in regulating gene expression and therefore a broad range of biological processes and diseases. DNA methylation is tissue-specific, dynamic, sequence-context-dependent and trans-generationally heritable, and these complex patterns of methylation highlight the significance of profiling DNA methylation to answer biological questions. In this review, we surveyed major methylation assays, along with comparisons and biological examples, to provide an overview of DNA methylation profiling techniques. The advances in microarray and sequencing technologies make genome-wide profiling possible at a single-nucleotide or even a single-cell resolution. These profiling approaches vary in many aspects, such as DNA input, resolution, genomic region coverage, and bioinformatics analysis, and selecting a feasible method requires knowledge of these methods. We first introduce the biological background of DNA methylation and its pattern in plants, animals and fungi. We present an overview of major experimental approaches to profiling genome-wide DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation and then extend to the single-cell methylome. To evaluate these methods, we outline their strengths and weaknesses and perform comparisons across the different platforms. Due to the increasing need to compute high-throughput epigenomic data, we interrogate the computational pipeline for bisulfite sequencing data and also discuss the concept of identifying differentially methylated regions (DMRs). This review summarizes the experimental and computational concepts for profiling genome-wide DNA methylation, followed by biological examples. Overall, this review provides researchers useful guidance for the selection of a profiling method suited to specific research questions.

  8. Genome-Wide Approaches to Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jubao; Sanders, Alan R.; Gejman, Pablo V.

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a common and severe psychiatric disorder with both environmental and genetic risk factors, and a high heritability. After over 20 years of molecular genetics research, new molecular strategies, primarily genome-wide association studies (GWAS), have generated major tangible progress. This new data provides evidence for: 1) A number of chromosomal regions with common polymorphisms showing genome-wide association with SZ (the major histocompatibility complex, MHC, region at 6p22-p21; 18q21.2; and 2q32.1). The associated alleles present small odds ratios (the odds of a risk variant being present in cases versus controls) and suggest causative involvement of gene regulatory mechanisms in SZ. 2) Polygenic inheritance. 3) Involvement of rare (<1%) and large (>100kb) copy number variants (CNVs). 4) A genetic overlap of SZ with autism and with bipolar disorder (BP) challenging the classical clinical classifications. Most new SZ findings (chromosomal regions and genes) have generated new biological leads. These new findings, however, still need to be translated into a better understanding of the underlying biology and into causal mechanisms. Furthermore, a considerable amount of heritability still remains unexplained (missing heritability). Deep resequencing for rare variants and system biology approaches (e.g., integrating DNA sequence and functional data) are expected to further improve our understanding of the genetic architecture of SZ and its underlying biology. PMID:20433910

  9. Genome-wide SNP detection, validation, and development of an 8K SNP array for apple

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As high-throughput genetic marker screening systems are essential for a range of genetics studies and plant breeding applications, the International RosBREED SNP Consortium (IRSC) has utilized the Illumina Infinium® II system to develop a medium- to high-throughput SNP screening tool for genome-wide...

  10. Genome-wide mapping of DNA strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Frédéric; Faucher, David; Bikond Nkoma, Geneviève; Grégoire, Marie-Chantal; Arguin, Mélina; Wellinger, Raymund J; Boissonneault, Guylain

    2011-02-25

    Determination of cellular DNA damage has so far been limited to global assessment of genome integrity whereas nucleotide-level mapping has been restricted to specific loci by the use of specific primers. Therefore, only limited DNA sequences can be studied and novel regions of genomic instability can hardly be discovered. Using a well-characterized yeast model, we describe a straightforward strategy to map genome-wide DNA strand breaks without compromising nucleotide-level resolution. This technique, termed "damaged DNA immunoprecipitation" (dDIP), uses immunoprecipitation and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin end-labeling (TUNEL) to capture DNA at break sites. When used in combination with microarray or next-generation sequencing technologies, dDIP will allow researchers to map genome-wide DNA strand breaks as well as other types of DNA damage and to establish a clear profiling of altered genes and/or intergenic sequences in various experimental conditions. This mapping technique could find several applications for instance in the study of aging, genotoxic drug screening, cancer, meiosis, radiation and oxidative DNA damage.

  11. Genome-wide determination of drug localization

    PubMed Central

    Anders, Lars; Guenther, Matthew G.; Qi, Jun; Fan, Zi Peng; Marineau, Jason J.; Rahl, Peter B.; Lovén, Jakob; Sigova, Alla A.; Smith, William B.; Lee, Tong Ihn; Bradner, James E.; Young, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    A vast number of small-molecule ligands, including therapeutic drugs under development and in clinical use, elicit their effects by binding specific proteins associated with the genome. An ability to map the direct interactions of a chemical entity with chromatin genome-wide could provide new and important insights into chemical perturbation of cellular function. Here we describe a method that couples ligand-affinity capture and massively parallel DNA sequencing (Chem-seq) to identify the sites bound by small chemical molecules throughout the human genome. We show how Chem-seq can be combined with ChIP-seq to gain unique insights into the interaction of drugs with their target proteins throughout the genome of tumor cells. These methods provide a powerful approach to enhance understanding of therapeutic action and characterize the specificity of chemical entities that interact with DNA or genome-associated proteins. PMID:24336317

  12. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Zsofia K.; Thom, Peter; Robson, Mark E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Kauff, Noah D.; Hurley, Karen E.; Devlin, Vincent; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the inherited risk for cancer is an important component of preventive oncology. In addition to well-established syndromes of cancer predisposition, much remains to be discovered about the genetic variation underlying susceptibility to common malignancies. Increased knowledge about the human genome and advances in genotyping technology have made possible genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of human diseases. These studies have identified many important regions of genetic variation associated with an increased risk for human traits and diseases including cancer. Understanding the principles, major findings, and limitations of GWAS is becoming increasingly important for oncologists as dissemination of genomic risk tests directly to consumers is already occurring through commercial companies. GWAS have contributed to our understanding of the genetic basis of cancer and will shed light on biologic pathways and possible new strategies for targeted prevention. To date, however, the clinical utility of GWAS-derived risk markers remains limited. PMID:20585100

  13. Replication in genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Peter; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Ioannidis, John P. A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Replication helps ensure that a genotype-phenotype association observed in a genome-wide association (GWA) study represents a credible association and is not a chance finding or an artifact due to uncontrolled biases. We discuss prerequisites for exact replication; issues of heterogeneity; advantages and disadvantages of different methods of data synthesis across multiple studies; frequentist vs. Bayesian inferences for replication; and challenges that arise from multi-team collaborations. While consistent replication can greatly improve the credibility of a genotype-phenotype association, it may not eliminate spurious associations due to biases shared by many studies. Conversely, lack of replication in well-powered follow-up studies usually invalidates the initially proposed association, although occasionally it may point to differences in linkage disequilibrium or effect modifiers across studies. PMID:20454541

  14. RNAi screening in primary human hepatocytes of genes implicated in genome-wide association studies for roles in type 2 diabetes identifies roles for CAMK1D and CDKAL1, among others, in hepatic glucose regulation.

    PubMed

    Haney, Steven; Zhao, Juan; Tiwari, Shiwani; Eng, Kurt; Guey, Lin T; Tien, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have described a large number of new candidate genes that contribute to of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D). In some cases, small clusters of genes are implicated, rather than a single gene, and in all cases, the genetic contribution is not defined through the effects on a specific organ, such as the pancreas or liver. There is a significant need to develop and use human cell-based models to examine the effects these genes may have on glucose regulation. We describe the development of a primary human hepatocyte model that adjusts glucose disposition according to hormonal signals. This model was used to determine whether candidate genes identified in GWA studies regulate hepatic glucose disposition through siRNAs corresponding to the list of identified genes. We find that several genes affect the storage of glucose as glycogen (glycolytic response) and/or affect the utilization of pyruvate, the critical step in gluconeogenesis. Of the genes that affect both of these processes, CAMK1D, TSPAN8 and KIF11 affect the localization of a mediator of both gluconeogenesis and glycolysis regulation, CRTC2, to the nucleus in response to glucagon. In addition, the gene CDKAL1 was observed to affect glycogen storage, and molecular experiments using mutant forms of CDK5, a putative target of CDKAL1, in HepG2 cells show that this is mediated by coordinate regulation of CDK5 and PKA on MEK, which ultimately regulates the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, a critical step in the insulin signaling pathway.

  15. Rapid Screening of Cancer Margins in Tissue with Multimodal Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gareau, Daniel S.; Jeon, Hana; Nehal, Kishwer S.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2012-01-01

    Background Complete and accurate excision of cancer is guided by the examination of histopathology. However, preparation of histopathology is labor intensive and slow, leading to insufficient sampling of tissue and incomplete and/or inaccurate excision of margins. We demonstrate the potential utility of multimodal confocal mosaicing microscopy for rapid screening of cancer margins, directly in fresh surgical excisions, without the need for conventional embedding, sectioning or processing. Materials/Methods A multimodal confocal mosaicing microscope was developed to image basal cell carcinoma margins in surgical skin excisions, with resolution that shows nuclear detail. Multimodal contrast is with fluorescence for imaging nuclei and reflectance for cellular cytoplasm and dermal collagen. Thirtyfive excisions of basal cell carcinomas from Mohs surgery were imaged, and the mosaics analyzed by comparison to the corresponding frozen pathology. Results Confocal mosaics are produced in about 9 minutes, displaying tissue in fields-of-view of 12 mm with 2X magnification. A digital staining algorithm transforms black and white contrast to purple and pink, which simulates the appearance of standard histopathology. Mosaicing enables rapid digital screening, which mimics the examination of histopathology. Conclusions Multimodal confocal mosaicing microscopy offers a technology platform to potentially enable real-time pathology at the bedside. The imaging may serve as an adjunct to conventional histopathology, to expedite screening of margins and guide surgery toward more complete and accurate excision of cancer. PMID:22721570

  16. Genome-wide studies of telomere biology in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Harari, Yaniv; Kupiec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres are specialized DNA-protein structures at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomeres are essential for chromosomal stability and integrity, as they prevent chromosome ends from being recognized as double strand breaks. In rapidly proliferating cells, telomeric DNA is synthesized by the enzyme telomerase, which copies a short template sequence within its own RNA moiety, thus helping to solve the “end-replication problem”, in which information is lost at the ends of chromosomes with each DNA replication cycle. The basic mechanisms of telomere length, structure and function maintenance are conserved among eukaryotes. Studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been instrumental in deciphering the basic aspects of telomere biology. In the last decade, technical advances, such as the availability of mutant collections, have allowed carrying out systematic genome-wide screens for mutants affecting various aspects of telomere biology. In this review we summarize these efforts, and the insights that this Systems Biology approach has produced so far.

  17. A Genome-Wide Perspective on Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Alexander; Mandrup, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Mammals have at least 210 histologically diverse cell types (Alberts, Molecular biology of the cell. Garland Science, New York, 2008) and the number would be even higher if functional differences are taken into account. The genome in each of these cell types is differentially programmed to express the specific set of genes needed to fulfill the phenotypical requirements of the cell. Furthermore, in each of these cell types, the gene program can be differentially modulated by exposure to external signals such as hormones or nutrients. The basis for the distinct gene programs relies on cell type-selective activation of transcriptional enhancers, which in turn are particularly sensitive to modulation. Until recently we had only fragmented insight into the regulation of a few of these enhancers; however, the recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have enabled the development of a large number of technologies that can be used to obtain genome-wide insight into how genomes are reprogrammed during development and in response to specific external signals. By applying such technologies, we have begun to reveal the cross-talk between metabolism and the genome, i.e., how genomes are reprogrammed in response to metabolites, and how the regulation of metabolic networks is coordinated at the genomic level.

  18. Genome wide selection in Citrus breeding.

    PubMed

    Gois, I B; Borém, A; Cristofani-Yaly, M; de Resende, M D V; Azevedo, C F; Bastianel, M; Novelli, V M; Machado, M A

    2016-10-17

    Genome wide selection (GWS) is essential for the genetic improvement of perennial species such as Citrus because of its ability to increase gain per unit time and to enable the efficient selection of characteristics with low heritability. This study assessed GWS efficiency in a population of Citrus and compared it with selection based on phenotypic data. A total of 180 individual trees from a cross between Pera sweet orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) and Murcott tangor (Citrus sinensis Osbeck x Citrus reticulata Blanco) were evaluated for 10 characteristics related to fruit quality. The hybrids were genotyped using 5287 DArT_seq(TM) (diversity arrays technology) molecular markers and their effects on phenotypes were predicted using the random regression - best linear unbiased predictor (rr-BLUP) method. The predictive ability, prediction bias, and accuracy of GWS were estimated to verify its effectiveness for phenotype prediction. The proportion of genetic variance explained by the markers was also computed. The heritability of the traits, as determined by markers, was 16-28%. The predictive ability of these markers ranged from 0.53 to 0.64, and the regression coefficients between predicted and observed phenotypes were close to unity. Over 35% of the genetic variance was accounted for by the markers. Accuracy estimates with GWS were lower than those obtained by phenotypic analysis; however, GWS was superior in terms of genetic gain per unit time. Thus, GWS may be useful for Citrus breeding as it can predict phenotypes early and accurately, and reduce the length of the selection cycle. This study demonstrates the feasibility of genomic selection in Citrus.

  19. Genome-wide positioning of bivalent mononucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Sen, Subhojit; Block, Kirsten F; Pasini, Alice; Baylin, Stephen B; Easwaran, Hariharan

    2016-09-15

    Bivalent chromatin refers to overlapping regions containing activating histone H3 Lys4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) and inactivating H3K27me3 marks. Existence of such bivalent marks on the same nucleosome has only recently been suggested. Previous genome-wide efforts to characterize bivalent chromatin have focused primarily on individual marks to define overlapping zones of bivalency rather than mapping positions of truly bivalent mononucleosomes. Here, we developed an efficacious sequential ChIP technique for examining global positioning of individual bivalent nucleosomes. Using next generation sequencing approaches we show that although individual H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 marks overlap in broad zones, bivalent nucleosomes are focally enriched in the vicinity of the transcription start site (TSS). These seem to occupy the H2A.Z nucleosome positions previously described as salt-labile nucleosomes, and are correlated with low gene expression. Although the enrichment profiles of bivalent nucleosomes show a clear dependency on CpG island content, they demonstrate a stark anti-correlation with methylation status. We show that regional overlap of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 chromatin tend to be upstream to the TSS, while bivalent nucleosomes with both marks are mainly promoter proximal near the TSS of CpG island-containing genes with poised/low expression. We discuss the implications of the focal enrichment of bivalent nucleosomes around the TSS on the poised chromatin state of promoters in stem cells.

  20. Genome Wide Methylome Alterations in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mullapudi, Nandita; Ye, Bin; Suzuki, Masako; Fazzari, Melissa; Han, Weiguo; Shi, Miao K; Marquardt, Gaby; Lin, Juan; Wang, Tao; Keller, Steven; Zhu, Changcheng; Locker, Joseph D; Spivack, Simon D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant cytosine 5-methylation underlies many deregulated elements of cancer. Among paired non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), we sought to profile DNA 5-methyl-cytosine features which may underlie genome-wide deregulation. In one of the more dense interrogations of the methylome, we sampled 1.2 million CpG sites from twenty-four NSCLC tumor (T)-non-tumor (NT) pairs using a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme- based HELP-microarray assay. We found 225,350 differentially methylated (DM) sites in adenocarcinomas versus adjacent non-tumor tissue that vary in frequency across genomic compartment, particularly notable in gene bodies (GB; p<2.2E-16). Further, when DM was coupled to differential transcriptome (DE) in the same samples, 37,056 differential loci in adenocarcinoma emerged. Approximately 90% of the DM-DE relationships were non-canonical; for example, promoter DM associated with DE in the same direction. Of the canonical changes noted, promoter (PR) DM loci with reciprocal changes in expression in adenocarcinomas included HBEGF, AGER, PTPRM, DPT, CST1, MELK; DM GB loci with concordant changes in expression included FOXM1, FERMT1, SLC7A5, and FAP genes. IPA analyses showed adenocarcinoma-specific promoter DMxDE overlay identified familiar lung cancer nodes [tP53, Akt] as well as less familiar nodes [HBEGF, NQO1, GRK5, VWF, HPGD, CDH5, CTNNAL1, PTPN13, DACH1, SMAD6, LAMA3, AR]. The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate methylation sites in both PR and GB regions not previously identified in NSCLC, and many non-canonical relationships to gene expression. These DNA methylation features could potentially be developed as risk or diagnostic biomarkers, or as candidate targets for newer methylation locus-targeted preventive or therapeutic agents.

  1. Genome Wide Methylome Alterations in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masako; Fazzari, Melissa; Han, Weiguo; Shi, Miao K.; Marquardt, Gaby; Lin, Juan; Wang, Tao; Keller, Steven; Zhu, Changcheng; Locker, Joseph D.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant cytosine 5-methylation underlies many deregulated elements of cancer. Among paired non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), we sought to profile DNA 5-methyl-cytosine features which may underlie genome-wide deregulation. In one of the more dense interrogations of the methylome, we sampled 1.2 million CpG sites from twenty-four NSCLC tumor (T)–non-tumor (NT) pairs using a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme- based HELP-microarray assay. We found 225,350 differentially methylated (DM) sites in adenocarcinomas versus adjacent non-tumor tissue that vary in frequency across genomic compartment, particularly notable in gene bodies (GB; p<2.2E-16). Further, when DM was coupled to differential transcriptome (DE) in the same samples, 37,056 differential loci in adenocarcinoma emerged. Approximately 90% of the DM-DE relationships were non-canonical; for example, promoter DM associated with DE in the same direction. Of the canonical changes noted, promoter (PR) DM loci with reciprocal changes in expression in adenocarcinomas included HBEGF, AGER, PTPRM, DPT, CST1, MELK; DM GB loci with concordant changes in expression included FOXM1, FERMT1, SLC7A5, and FAP genes. IPA analyses showed adenocarcinoma-specific promoter DMxDE overlay identified familiar lung cancer nodes [tP53, Akt] as well as less familiar nodes [HBEGF, NQO1, GRK5, VWF, HPGD, CDH5, CTNNAL1, PTPN13, DACH1, SMAD6, LAMA3, AR]. The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate methylation sites in both PR and GB regions not previously identified in NSCLC, and many non-canonical relationships to gene expression. These DNA methylation features could potentially be developed as risk or diagnostic biomarkers, or as candidate targets for newer methylation locus-targeted preventive or therapeutic agents. PMID:26683690

  2. Genome-wide linkage in Utah autism pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Allen-Brady, K; Robison, R; Cannon, D; Varvil, T; Villalobos, M; Pingree, C; Leppert, MF; Miller, J; McMahon, WM; Coon, H

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies of autism over the past decade suggest a complex landscape of multiple genes. In the face of this heterogeneity, studies that include large extended pedigrees may offer valuable insight, as the relatively few susceptibility genes within single large families may be more easily discerned. This genome-wide screen of 70 families includes 20 large extended pedigrees of 6–9 generations, 6 moderate-sized families of 4–5 generations, and 44 smaller families of 2–3 generations. The Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR) provided genotyping using the Illumina Linkage Panel 12, a 6K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) platform. Results from 192 subjects with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and 461 of their relatives revealed genome-wide significance on chromosome 15q, with three possibly distinct peaks: 15q13.1-q14 (HLOD=4.09 at 29,459,872bp); 15q14-q21.1 (HLOD=3.59 at 36,837,208bp); and 15q21.1-q22.2 (HLOD=5.31 at 55,629,733bp). Two of these peaks replicate previous findings. There were additional suggestive results on chromosomes 2p25.3-p24.1 (HLOD=1.87), 7q31.31-q32.3 (HLOD=1.97), and 13q12.11-q12.3 (HLOD=1.93). Affected subjects in families supporting the linkage peaks found in this study did not reveal strong evidence for distinct phenotypic subgroups. PMID:19455147

  3. Genome-Wide Association Studies for Comb Traits in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Meng; Dou, Taocun; Lu, Jian; Guo, Jun; Hu, Yuping; Yi, Guoqiang; Yuan, Jingwei; Sun, Congjiao; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The comb, as a secondary sexual character, is an important trait in chicken. Indicators of comb length (CL), comb height (CH), and comb weight (CW) are often selected in production. DNA-based marker-assisted selection could help chicken breeders to accelerate genetic improvement for comb or related economic characters by early selection. Although a number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and candidate genes have been identified with advances in molecular genetics, candidate genes underlying comb traits are limited. The aim of the study was to use genome-wide association (GWA) studies by 600 K Affymetrix chicken SNP arrays to detect genes that are related to comb, using an F2 resource population. For all comb characters, comb exhibited high SNP-based heritability estimates (0.61–0.69). Chromosome 1 explained 20.80% genetic variance, while chromosome 4 explained 6.89%. Independent univariate genome-wide screens for each character identified 127, 197, and 268 novel significant SNPs with CL, CH, and CW, respectively. Three candidate genes, VPS36, AR, and WNT11B, were determined to have a plausible function in all comb characters. These genes are important to the initiation of follicle development, gonadal growth, and dermal development, respectively. The current study provides the first GWA analysis for comb traits. Identification of the genetic basis as well as promising candidate genes will help us understand the underlying genetic architecture of comb development and has practical significance in breeding programs for the selection of comb as an index for sexual maturity or reproduction. PMID:27427764

  4. Genome-wide identification of molecular mimicry candidates in parasites.

    PubMed

    Ludin, Philipp; Nilsson, Daniel; Mäser, Pascal

    2011-03-08

    Among the many strategies employed by parasites for immune evasion and host manipulation, one of the most fascinating is molecular mimicry. With genome sequences available for host and parasite, mimicry of linear amino acid epitopes can be investigated by comparative genomics. Here we developed an in silico pipeline for genome-wide identification of molecular mimicry candidate proteins or epitopes. The predicted proteome of a given parasite was broken down into overlapping fragments, each of which was screened for close hits in the human proteome. Control searches were carried out against unrelated, free-living eukaryotes to eliminate the generally conserved proteins, and with randomized versions of the parasite proteins to get an estimate of statistical significance. This simple but computation-intensive approach yielded interesting candidates from human-pathogenic parasites. From Plasmodium falciparum, it returned a 14 amino acid motif in several of the PfEMP1 variants identical to part of the heparin-binding domain in the immunosuppressive serum protein vitronectin. And in Brugia malayi, fragments were detected that matched to periphilin-1, a protein of cell-cell junctions involved in barrier formation. All the results are publicly available by means of mimicDB, a searchable online database for molecular mimicry candidates from pathogens. To our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide survey for molecular mimicry proteins in parasites. The strategy can be adopted to any pair of host and pathogen, once appropriate negative control organisms are chosen. MimicDB provides a host of new starting points to gain insights into the molecular nature of host-pathogen interactions.

  5. Genome-Wide Identification of Molecular Mimicry Candidates in Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Ludin, Philipp; Nilsson, Daniel; Mäser, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Among the many strategies employed by parasites for immune evasion and host manipulation, one of the most fascinating is molecular mimicry. With genome sequences available for host and parasite, mimicry of linear amino acid epitopes can be investigated by comparative genomics. Here we developed an in silico pipeline for genome-wide identification of molecular mimicry candidate proteins or epitopes. The predicted proteome of a given parasite was broken down into overlapping fragments, each of which was screened for close hits in the human proteome. Control searches were carried out against unrelated, free-living eukaryotes to eliminate the generally conserved proteins, and with randomized versions of the parasite proteins to get an estimate of statistical significance. This simple but computation-intensive approach yielded interesting candidates from human-pathogenic parasites. From Plasmodium falciparum, it returned a 14 amino acid motif in several of the PfEMP1 variants identical to part of the heparin-binding domain in the immunosuppressive serum protein vitronectin. And in Brugia malayi, fragments were detected that matched to periphilin-1, a protein of cell-cell junctions involved in barrier formation. All the results are publicly available by means of mimicDB, a searchable online database for molecular mimicry candidates from pathogens. To our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide survey for molecular mimicry proteins in parasites. The strategy can be adopted to any pair of host and pathogen, once appropriate negative control organisms are chosen. MimicDB provides a host of new starting points to gain insights into the molecular nature of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:21408160

  6. A Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) for Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; St. Julien, Krystal R.; Stevenson, David K.; Hoffmann, Thomas J.; Witte, John S.; Lazzeroni, Laura C.; Krasnow, Mark A.; Quaintance, Cecele C.; Oehlert, John W.; Jelliffe-Pawlowski, Laura L.; Gould, Jeffrey B.; Shaw, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Twin studies suggest that heritability of moderate-severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is 53% to 79%, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify genetic variants associated with the risk for BPD. METHODS: The discovery GWAS was completed on 1726 very low birth weight infants (gestational age = 250–296/7 weeks) who had a minimum of 3 days of intermittent positive pressure ventilation and were in the hospital at 36 weeks’ postmenstrual age. At 36 weeks’ postmenstrual age, moderate-severe BPD cases (n = 899) were defined as requiring continuous supplemental oxygen, whereas controls (n = 827) inhaled room air. An additional 795 comparable infants (371 cases, 424 controls) were a replication population. Genomic DNA from case and control newborn screening bloodspots was used for the GWAS. The replication study interrogated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in the discovery GWAS and those within the HumanExome beadchip. RESULTS: Genotyping using genomic DNA was successful. We did not identify SNPs associated with BPD at the genome-wide significance level (5 × 10−8) and no SNP identified in previous studies reached statistical significance (Bonferroni-corrected P value threshold .0018). Pathway analyses were not informative. CONCLUSIONS: We did not identify genomic loci or pathways that account for the previously described heritability for BPD. Potential explanations include causal mutations that are genetic variants and were not assayed or are mapped to many distributed loci, inadequate sample size, race ethnicity of our study population, or case-control differences investigated are not attributable to underlying common genetic variation. PMID:23897914

  7. Peptide signal molecules and bacteriocins in Gram-negative bacteria: a genome-wide in silico screening for peptides containing a double-glycine leader sequence and their cognate transporters.

    PubMed

    Dirix, G; Monsieurs, P; Dombrecht, B; Daniels, R; Marchal, K; Vanderleyden, J; Michiels, J

    2004-09-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) in Gram-negative bacteria is generally assumed to be mediated by N-acyl-homoserine lactone molecules while Gram-positive bacteria make use of signaling peptides. We analyzed the occurrence in Gram-negative bacteria of peptides and transporters that are involved in quorum sensing in Gram-positive bacteria. Many class II bacteriocins and inducing factors produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and competence stimulating peptides (CSPs) synthesized by streptococci are processed by their cognate ABC-transporters during their secretion. During transport, a conserved leader sequence, termed the double-glycine motif (GG-motif), is cleaved off by the N-terminal domain of the transporter, which belongs to the Peptidase C39 protein family. Several peptides containing a GG-motif were recently described in Gram-negative bacteria (Trends Microbiol 2001;9:164-8). To screen for additional putative GG-motif containing peptides, an in silico strategy based on MEME, HMMER2.2 and Wise2 was designed. Using a curated training set, a motif model of the leader peptide was built and used to screen over 120 fully sequenced bacterial genomes. The screening methodology was applied at the nucleotide level as probably many small peptide genes have not been annotated and may be absent from the non-redundant databases. It was found that 33% of the screened genomes of Gram-negative bacteria contained one or more transporters carrying a Peptidase C39 domain, compared to 44% of the genomes of Gram-positive bacteria. The transporters can be subdivided into four classes on the basis of their domain organization. Genes coding for putative peptides containing 23-142 amino acids and a GG-motif were found in close association with genes coding for Peptidase C39 domain containing proteins. These peptides show structural similarity to bacteriocins and peptide pheromones of Gram-positive bacteria. The possibility of signal transduction based on peptide signaling in Gram-negative bacteria

  8. High quality genome-wide genotyping from archived dried blood spots without DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    St Julien, Krystal R; Jelliffe-Pawlowski, Laura L; Shaw, Gary M; Stevenson, David K; O'Brodovich, Hugh M; Krasnow, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Spots of blood are routinely collected from newborn babies onto filter paper called Guthrie cards and used to screen for metabolic and genetic disorders. The archived dried blood spots are an important and precious resource for genomic research. Whole genome amplification of dried blood spot DNA has been used to provide DNA for genome-wide SNP genotyping. Here we describe a 96 well format procedure to extract DNA from a portion of a dried blood spot that provides sufficient unamplified genomic DNA for genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. We show that SNP genotyping of the unamplified DNA is more robust than genotyping amplified dried blood spot DNA, is comparable in cost, and can be done with thousands of samples. This procedure can be used for genome-wide association studies and other large-scale genomic analyses that require robust, high-accuracy genotyping of dried blood spot DNA.

  9. A genome-wide screen identifies Salmonella Enteritidis lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the HtrA heat shock protein as crucial factors involved in egg white persistence at chicken body temperature.

    PubMed

    Raspoet, R; Shearer, N; Appia-Ayme, C; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Thompson, A; Van Immerseel, F

    2014-05-01

    Eggs contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis are an important source of human foodborne Salmonella infections. Salmonella Enteritidis is able to contaminate egg white during formation of the egg within the chicken oviduct, and it has developed strategies to withstand the antimicrobial properties of egg white to survive in this hostile environment. The mechanisms involved in the persistence of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg white are likely to be complex. To address this issue, a microarray-based transposon library screen was performed to identify genes necessary for survival of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg white at chicken body temperature. The majority of identified genes belonged to the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis pathway. Additionally, we provide evidence that the serine protease/heat shock protein (HtrA) appears essential for the survival of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg white at chicken body temperature.

  10. A Discovery Genome-Wide Association Study of Entrepreneurship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quaye, Lydia; Nicolaou, Nicos; Shane, Scott; Mangino, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    To identify specific genetic variants influencing the phenotype of entrepreneurship, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with 3,933 Caucasian females from the TwinsUK Adult Twin Registry. Following stringent genotype quality control, GWAF (genome-wide association analyses for family data) software was used to assess the association…

  11. Genome-Wide Screening of Salt Tolerant Genes by Activation-Tagging Using Dedifferentiated Calli of Arabidopsis and Its Application to Finding Gene for Myo-Inositol-1-P-Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Aftab; Niwa, Yasuo; Goto, Shingo; Kobayashi, Kyoko; Shimizu, Masanori; Ito, Sohei; Usui, Yumiko; Nakayama, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    Salinity represents a major abiotic stress factor that can adversely limit the production, quality and geographical distribution of crops. In this study we focused on dedifferentiated calli with fundamental cell functions, the salt tolerance of which had not been previously examined. The experimental approach was based on activation tagging without regeneration of plants for the identification of salt-tolerant mutants of Arabidopsis. Among 62,000 transformed calli that were screened, 18 potential mutants resistant to 150 mM NaCl were obtained. Thermal asymmetric interlaced (TAIL)-PCR was performed to determine the location of T-DNA integration in the genome. In one line, referred to as salt tolerant callus 1 (stc1), expression of a gene [At4g39800: myo-inositol-1-P-synthase 1 (MIPS1)] was considerably enhanced in calli. Plants regenerated from calli showed tolerance to salt in germination and subsequent growth. Retransformation of wild-type Arabidopsis with MIPS1 conferred salt tolerance, indicating that MIPS1 is the causal gene. The over-expression of MIPS1 increased the content of total inositol. The involvement of MIPS1 in salt tolerance through the fundamental cell growth has been proved in Arabidopsis. PMID:25978457

  12. Genome-Wide RNAi High-Throughput Screen Identifies Proteins Necessary for the AHR-Dependent Induction of CYP1A1 by 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    PubMed Central

    Hankinson, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) has a plethora of physiological roles, and upon dysregulation, carcinogenesis can occur. One target gene of AHR encodes the xenobiotic and drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP1A1, which is inducible by the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) via the AHR. An siRNA library targeted against over 5600 gene candidates in the druggable genome was used to transfect mouse Hepa-1 cells, which were then treated with TCDD, and subsequently assayed for CYP1A1-dependent ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) activity. Following redundant siRNA activity (RSA) statistical analysis, we identified 93 hits that reduced EROD activity with a p value ≤ .005 and substantiated 39 of these as positive hits in a secondary screening using endoribonuclease-prepared siRNAs (esiRNAs). Twelve of the corresponding gene products were subsequently confirmed to be necessary for the induction of CYP1A1 messenger RNA by TCDD. None of the candidates were deficient in aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator expression. However 6 gene products including UBE2i, RAB40C, CRYGD, DCTN4, RBM5, and RAD50 are required for the expression of AHR as well as for induction of CYP1A1. We also found 2 gene products, ARMC8 and TCF20, to be required for the induction of CYP1A1, but our data are ambiguous as to whether they are required for the expression of AHR. In contrast, SIN3A, PDC, TMEM5, and CD9 are not required for AHR expression but are required for the induction of CYP1A1, implicating a direct role in Cyp1a1 transcription. Our methods, although applied to Cyp1a1, could be modified for identifying proteins that regulate other inducible genes. PMID:23997114

  13. Adjusted P values for genome-wide scans.

    PubMed Central

    Lystig, Theodore C

    2003-01-01

    Genome-wide scans for quantitative trait loci (QTL) have traditionally been summarized with plots of logarithm of odds (LOD) scores. A valuable modification is to supplement such plots with an additional vertical axis displaying quantiles of adjusted P values and labeling local maxima of the LOD scores with location-specific adjusted P values. This provides a visible gradation of genome-wide significance for the LOD score curve, instead of the stark dichotomy that a single threshold yields. Adjusted P values give genome-wide significance of individual LOD scores and are obtained through a straightforward modification of the familiar algorithm for generating permutation-based thresholds. PMID:12930772

  14. Genome-wide association study of circulating retinol levels.

    PubMed

    Mondul, Alison M; Yu, Kai; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Hong; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Major, Jacqueline M; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Männistö, Satu; Hazra, Aditi; Hsing, Ann W; Jacobs, Kevin B; Eliassen, Heather; Tanaka, Toshiko; Reding, Douglas J; Hendrickson, Sara; Ferrucci, Luigi; Virtamo, Jarmo; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Kraft, Peter; Albanes, Demetrius

    2011-12-01

    Retinol is one of the most biologically active forms of vitamin A and is hypothesized to influence a wide range of human diseases including asthma, cardiovascular disease, infectious diseases and cancer. We conducted a genome-wide association study of 5006 Caucasian individuals drawn from two cohorts of men: the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. We identified two independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with circulating retinol levels, which are located near the transthyretin (TTR) and retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) genes which encode major carrier proteins of retinol: rs1667255 (P =2.30× 10(-17)) and rs10882272 (P =6.04× 10(-12)). We replicated the association with rs10882272 in RBP4 in independent samples from the Nurses' Health Study and the Invecchiare in Chianti Study (InCHIANTI) that included 3792 women and 504 men (P =9.49× 10(-5)), but found no association for retinol with rs1667255 in TTR among women, thus suggesting evidence for gender dimorphism (P-interaction=1.31× 10(-5)). Discovery of common genetic variants associated with serum retinol levels may provide further insight into the contribution of retinol and other vitamin A compounds to the development of cancer and other complex diseases.

  15. Genome-wide association study and premature ovarian failure.

    PubMed

    Christin-Maitre, S; Tachdjian, G

    2010-05-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is defined as an amenorrhea for more than 4months, associated with elevated gonadotropins, usually higher than 20mIU/ml, occurring in a woman before the age of 40. Some candidate genes have been identified in the past 15years, such as FOXL2, FSHR, BMP15, GDF9, Xfra premutation. However, POF etiology remains unknown in more than 90% of cases. The first strategy to identify candidate gene, apart from studying genes involved in ovarian failure in animal models, relies on the study of X chromosome deletions and X;autosome translocations in patients. The second strategy is based on linkage analysis, the third one on Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) array. The latest strategy relies on Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). This technique consists in screening single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients and controls. So far, three studies have been performed and have identified different loci potentially linked to POF, such as PTHB1 and ADAMTS19. However, replications in independent cohorts need to be performed. GWAS studies on large cohorts of women with POF should find new candidate genes in the near future. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Multimodal lung cancer screening using the ITALUNG biomarker panel and low dose computed tomography. Results of the ITALUNG biomarker study.

    PubMed

    Carozzi, Francesca Maria; Bisanzi, Simonetta; Carrozzi, Laura; Falaschi, Fabio; Lopes Pegna, Andrea; Mascalchi, Mario; Picozzi, Giulia; Peluso, Marco; Sani, Cristina; Greco, Luana; Ocello, Cristina; Paci, Eugenio

    2017-07-01

    Asymptomatic high-risk subjects, randomized in the intervention arm of the ITALUNG trial (1,406 screened for lung cancer), were enrolled for the ITALUNG biomarker study (n = 1,356), in which samples of blood and sputum were analyzed for plasma DNA quantification (cut off 5 ng/ml), loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability. The ITALUNG biomarker panel (IBP) was considered positive if at least one of the two biomarkers included in the panel was positive. Subjects with and without lung cancer diagnosis at the end of the screening cycle with LDCT (n = 517) were evaluated. Out of 18 baseline screen detected lung cancer cases, 17 were IBP positive (94%). Repeat screen-detected lung cancer cases were 18 and 12 of them positive at baseline IBP test (66%). Interval cancer cases (2-years) and biomarker tests after a suspect Non Calcific Nodule follow-up were investigated. The single test versus multimodal screening measures of accuracy were compared in a simulation within the screened ITALUNG intervention arm, considering screen-detected and interval cancer cases. Sensitivity was 90% at baseline screening. Specificity was 71 and 61% for LDCT and IBP as baseline single test, and improved at 89% with multimodal, combined screening. The positive predictive value was 4.3% for LDCT at baseline and 10.6% for multimodal screening. Multimodal screening could improve the screening efficiency at baseline and strategies for future implementation are discussed. If IBP was used as primary screening test, the LDCT burden might decrease of about 60%. © 2017 UICC.

  17. The First Pilot Genome-Wide Gene-Environment Study of Depression in the Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Otowa, Takeshi; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Kawakami, Norito; Kan, Chiemi; Shimada, Takafumi; Umekage, Tadashi; Kasai, Kiyoto; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Sasaki, Tsukasa

    2016-01-01

    Stressful events have been identified as a risk factor for depression. Although gene–environment (G × E) interaction in a limited number of candidate genes has been explored, no genome-wide search has been reported. The aim of the present study is to identify genes that influence the association of stressful events with depression. Therefore, we performed a genome-wide G × E interaction analysis in the Japanese population. A genome-wide screen with 320 subjects was performed using the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human Array 6.0. Stressful life events were assessed using the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS) and depression symptoms were assessed with self-rating questionnaires using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale. The p values for interactions between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and stressful events were calculated using the linear regression model adjusted for sex and age. After quality control of genotype data, a total of 534,848 SNPs on autosomal chromosomes were further analyzed. Although none surpassed the level of the genome-wide significance, a marginal significant association of interaction between SRRS and rs10510057 with depression were found (p = 4.5 × 10−8). The SNP is located on 10q26 near Regulators of G-protein signaling 10 (RGS10), which encodes a regulatory molecule involved in stress response. When we investigated a similar G × E interaction between depression (K6 scale) and work-related stress in an independent sample (n = 439), a significant G × E effect on depression was observed (p = 0.015). Our findings suggest that rs10510057, interacting with stressors, may be involved in depression risk. Incorporating G × E interaction into GWAS can contribute to find susceptibility locus that are potentially missed by conventional GWAS. PMID:27529621

  18. Genome-wide examination of myoblast cell cycle withdrawal duringdifferentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xun; Collier, John Michael; Hlaing, Myint; Zhang, Leanne; Delshad, Elizabeth H.; Bristow, James; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2002-12-02

    Skeletal and cardiac myocytes cease division within weeks of birth. Although skeletal muscle retains limited capacity for regeneration through recruitment of satellite cells, resident populations of adult myocardial stem cells have not been identified. Because cell cycle withdrawal accompanies myocyte differentiation, we hypothesized that C2C12 cells, a mouse myoblast cell line previously used to characterize myocyte differentiation, also would provide a model for studying cell cycle withdrawal during differentiation. C2C12 cells were differentiated in culture medium containing horse serum and harvested at various time points to characterize the expression profiles of known cell cycle and myogenic regulatory factors by immunoblot analysis. BrdU incorporation decreased dramatically in confluent cultures 48 hr after addition of horse serum, as cells started to form myotubes. This finding was preceded by up-regulation of MyoD, followed by myogenin, and activation of Bcl-2. Cyclin D1 was expressed in proliferating cultures and became undetectable in cultures containing 40 percent fused myotubes, as levels of p21(WAF1/Cip1) increased and alpha-actin became detectable. Because C2C12 myoblasts withdraw from the cell cycle during myocyte differentiation following a course that recapitulates this process in vivo, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify other gene products involved in this process. Using microarrays containing approximately 10,000 minimally redundant mouse sequences that map to the UniGene database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, we compared gene expression profiles between proliferating, differentiating, and differentiated C2C12 cells and verified candidate genes demonstrating differential expression by RT-PCR. Cluster analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed groups of gene products involved in cell cycle withdrawal, muscle differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition, we identified several genes, including DDAH2 and Ly

  19. Machine learning in genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Silke; Biernacka, Joanna M; Cordell, Heather J; González-Recio, Oscar; König, Inke R; Zhang, Heping; Sun, Yan V

    2009-01-01

    Recently, genome-wide association studies have substantially expanded our knowledge about genetic variants that influence the susceptibility to complex diseases. Although standard statistical tests for each single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) separately are able to capture main genetic effects, different approaches are necessary to identify SNPs that influence disease risk jointly or in complex interactions. Experimental and simulated genome-wide SNP data provided by the Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 afforded an opportunity to analyze the applicability and benefit of several machine learning methods. Penalized regression, ensemble methods, and network analyses resulted in several new findings while known and simulated genetic risk variants were also identified. In conclusion, machine learning approaches are promising complements to standard single-and multi-SNP analysis methods for understanding the overall genetic architecture of complex human diseases. However, because they are not optimized for genome-wide SNP data, improved implementations and new variable selection procedures are required. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. A novel statistic for genome-wide interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuesen; Dong, Hua; Luo, Li; Zhu, Yun; Peng, Gang; Reveille, John D; Xiong, Momiao

    2010-09-23

    Although great progress in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has been made, the significant SNP associations identified by GWAS account for only a few percent of the genetic variance, leading many to question where and how we can find the missing heritability. There is increasing interest in genome-wide interaction analysis as a possible source of finding heritability unexplained by current GWAS. However, the existing statistics for testing interaction have low power for genome-wide interaction analysis. To meet challenges raised by genome-wide interactional analysis, we have developed a novel statistic for testing interaction between two loci (either linked or unlinked). The null distribution and the type I error rates of the new statistic for testing interaction are validated using simulations. Extensive power studies show that the developed statistic has much higher power to detect interaction than classical logistic regression. The results identified 44 and 211 pairs of SNPs showing significant evidence of interactions with FDR<0.001 and 0.001genome-wide interaction analysis is a valuable tool for finding remaining missing heritability unexplained by the current GWAS, and the developed novel statistic is able to search significant interaction between SNPs across the genome. Real data analysis showed that the results of genome-wide interaction analysis can be replicated in two independent studies.

  1. Host cell factors in HIV replication: meta-analysis of genome-wide studies.

    PubMed

    Bushman, Frederic D; Malani, Nirav; Fernandes, Jason; D'Orso, Iván; Cagney, Gerard; Diamond, Tracy L; Zhou, Honglin; Hazuda, Daria J; Espeseth, Amy S; König, Renate; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Ideker, Trey; Goff, Stephen P; Krogan, Nevan J; Frankel, Alan D; Young, John A T; Chanda, Sumit K

    2009-05-01

    We have analyzed host cell genes linked to HIV replication that were identified in nine genome-wide studies, including three independent siRNA screens. Overlaps among the siRNA screens were very modest (<7% for any pairwise combination), and similarly, only modest overlaps were seen in pairwise comparisons with other types of genome-wide studies. Combining all genes from the genome-wide studies together with genes reported in the literature to affect HIV yields 2,410 protein-coding genes, or fully 9.5% of all human genes (though of course some of these are false positive calls). Here we report an "encyclopedia" of all overlaps between studies (available at http://www.hostpathogen.org), which yielded a more extensively corroborated set of host factors assisting HIV replication. We used these genes to calculate refined networks that specify cellular subsystems recruited by HIV to assist in replication, and present additional analysis specifying host cell genes that are attractive as potential therapeutic targets.

  2. A Genome-Wide Map of AAV-Mediated Human Gene Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Deyle, David R.; Hansen, R. Scott; Cornea, Anda M.; Li, Li B.; Burt, Amber A.; Alexander, Ian E.; Sandstrom, Richard S.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Wei, Chia-Lin; Russell, David W.

    2014-01-01

    To determine which genomic features promote homologous recombination, we created a genome-wide map of gene targeting sites. An adeno-associated virus vector was used to target identical loci introduced as transcriptionally active retroviral vector proviruses. A comparison of ~2,000 targeted and untargeted sites showed that targeting occurred throughout the human genome and was not influenced by the presence of nearby CpG islands, sequence repeats, or DNase I hypersensitive sites. Targeted sites were preferentially found within transcription units, especially when the target loci were transcribed in the opposite orientation to their surrounding chromosomal genes. The impact of DNA replication was determined by mapping replication forks, which revealed a preference for recombination at target loci transcribed towards an incoming fork. Our results constitute the first genome-wide screen of gene targeting in mammalian cells, and they demonstrate a strong recombinogenic effect of colliding polymerases. PMID:25282150

  3. Multi-modal ECG Holter system for sleep-disordered breathing screening: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Poupard, Laurent; Mathieu, Marc; Goldman, Michael; Chouchou, Florian; Roche, Frédéric

    2012-09-01

    The high prevalence of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) among heart diseases patients becomes increasingly recognized. A reliable exploring tool of SDB well adapted to cardiologists practice would be very useful for the management of these patients. We assessed a novel multi-modal electrocardiogram (ECG) Holter which incorporated both thoracic impedance and pulse oximetry signals. We compared in a home setting, a standard condition for Holter recordings, results from the novel device to a classical ambulatory polygraph in subjects with suspected SDB. The analysis of cardiac arrhythmias in relationship with SDB is also presented. A total of 118 patients clinically suspected of having SDB were evaluated (mean age 57 ± 14 years, mean body mass index [BMI] 32 ± 6 kg/m(2)). The new device allows calculating a new index called thoracic impedance (TI) disturbance index (TIDI+) evaluated from TI and SpO(2) signals recorded from a Holter monitor. In the population under study, 93% had more than 70% of usable TI signal and 95% had more than 90% for SpO(2) during sleep time recording. Screening performance results based on automatic analysis is accurate: TIDI + demonstrates a high level of sensitivity (96.8%), specificity (72.3%) as well as positive (82.4%) and negative (94.4%) predictive value for the detection of SDB. Moreover, detection of SDB periods permits us to observe a possible respiratory association of several nocturnal arrhythmias. The multi-modal Holter should be considered as a valuable evaluating tool for SDB screening and as a case selection technique for facilitating access to a full polysomnography for severe cases. Moreover, it offers a unique opportunity to study arrhythmia consequences with both respiratory and hypoxia disturbances.

  4. Genome-wide association mapping of soybean aphid resistance traits

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean aphid is the most damaging insect pest of soybean in the Upper Midwest and is primarily controlled by insecticides. Soybean aphid resistance (i.e., Rag genes) has been documented in some soybean lines at chromosomes 6, 7, 13, and 16, but more sources of resistance are needed. Genome-wide ass...

  5. A super powerful method for genome wide association study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genome-Wide Association Studies shed light on the identification of genes underlying human diseases and agriculturally important traits. This potential has been shadowed by false positive findings. The Mixed Linear Model (MLM) method is flexible enough to simultaneously incorporate population struct...

  6. Genome-wide characterization of maize miRNA genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that play essential roles in plant growth and development. We conducted a genome-wide survey of maize miRNA genes, characterizing their structure, expression, and evolution. Computational approaches based on homology and secondary structure modeling ident...

  7. Genome-wide association studies in maize: praise and stargaze

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genome-wide association study (GWAS) has appeared as a widespread strategy in decoding genotype-phenotype associations in many species thanks to technical advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) applications. Maize is an ideal crop for GWAS and significant progress has been made in the last dec...

  8. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia for seven loci, five of which are new (1p21.3, 2q32.3, 8p23.2, 8q21.3 and 10q24.32-q24.33) and two of which have been previously implicated (6p21.32-p22.1 and 18q21.2). The strongest new finding (P = 1.6 × 10−11) was with rs1625579 within an intron of a putative primary transcript for MIR137 (microRNA 137), a known regulator of neuronal development. Four other schizophrenia loci achieving genome-wide significance contain predicted targets of MIR137, suggesting MIR137-mediated dysregulation as a previously unknown etiologic mechanism in schizophrenia. In a joint analysis with a bipolar disorder sample (16,374 affected individuals and 14,044 controls), three loci reached genome-wide significance: CACNA1C (rs4765905, P = 7.0 × 10−9), ANK3 (rs10994359, P = 2.5 × 10−8) and the ITIH3-ITIH4 region (rs2239547, P = 7.8 × 10−9). PMID:21926974

  9. High-resolution genome-wide scan of genes, gene-networks and cellular systems impacting the yeast ionome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To balance the demand for uptake of essential elements with their potential toxicity living cells have complex regulatory mechanisms. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen to identify genes that impact the elemental composition (‘ionome’) of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using inductively coupled...

  10. Anxiety genetics – findings from cross-species genome-wide approaches

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are complex diseases, which often occur in combination with major depression, alcohol use disorder, or general medical conditions. Anxiety disorders were the most common mental disorders within the EU states in 2010 with 14% prevalence. Anxiety disorders are triggered by environmental factors in genetically susceptible individuals, and therefore genetic research offers a great route to unravel molecular basis of these diseases. As anxiety is an evolutionarily conserved response, mouse models can be used to carry out genome-wide searches for specific genes in a setting that controls for the environmental factors. In this review, we discuss translational approaches that aim to bridge results from unbiased genome-wide screens using mouse models to anxiety disorders in humans. Several methods, such as quantitative trait locus mapping, gene expression profiling, and proteomics, have been used in various mouse models of anxiety to identify genes that regulate anxiety or play a role in maintaining pathological anxiety. We first discuss briefly the evolutionary background of anxiety, which justifies cross-species approaches. We then describe how several genes have been identified through genome-wide methods in mouse models and subsequently investigated in human anxiety disorder samples as candidate genes. These studies have led to the identification of completely novel biological pathways that regulate anxiety in mice and humans, and that can be further investigated as targets for therapy. PMID:23659354

  11. A GENOME-WIDE LINKAGE AND ASSOCIATION SCAN REVEALS NOVEL LOCI FOR AUTISM

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Lauren A.; Arking, Dan E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Although autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, attempts to identify specific susceptibility genes have thus far met with limited success 1. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using half a million or more markers, particularly those with very large sample sizes achieved through meta-analysis, have shown great success in mapping genes for other complex genetic traits (http://www.genome.gov/26525384). Consequently, we initiated a linkage and association mapping study using half a million genome-wide SNPs in a common set of 1,031 multiplex autism families (1,553 affected offspring). We identified regions of suggestive and significant linkage on chromosomes 6q27 and 20p13, respectively. Initial analysis did not yield genome-wide significant associations; however, genotyping of top hits in additional families revealed a SNP on chromosome 5p15 (between SEMA5A and TAS2R1) that was significantly associated with autism (P = 2 × 10−7). We also demonstrated that expression of SEMA5A is reduced in brains from autistic patients, further implicating SEMA5A as an autism susceptibility gene. The linkage regions reported here provide targets for rare variation screening while the discovery of a single novel association demonstrates the action of common variants. PMID:19812673

  12. A genome-wide linkage and association scan reveals novel loci for autism.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Lauren A; Arking, Dan E; Daly, Mark J; Chakravarti, Aravinda

    2009-10-08

    Although autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, attempts to identify specific susceptibility genes have thus far met with limited success. Genome-wide association studies using half a million or more markers, particularly those with very large sample sizes achieved through meta-analysis, have shown great success in mapping genes for other complex genetic traits. Consequently, we initiated a linkage and association mapping study using half a million genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a common set of 1,031 multiplex autism families (1,553 affected offspring). We identified regions of suggestive and significant linkage on chromosomes 6q27 and 20p13, respectively. Initial analysis did not yield genome-wide significant associations; however, genotyping of top hits in additional families revealed an SNP on chromosome 5p15 (between SEMA5A and TAS2R1) that was significantly associated with autism (P = 2 x 10(-7)). We also demonstrated that expression of SEMA5A is reduced in brains from autistic patients, further implicating SEMA5A as an autism susceptibility gene. The linkage regions reported here provide targets for rare variation screening whereas the discovery of a single novel association demonstrates the action of common variants.

  13. Case-only genome-wide interaction study of disease risk, prognosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brandon L; Ahsan, Habibul

    2010-01-01

    Case-control genome-wide association (GWA) studies have facilitated the identification of susceptibility loci for many complex diseases; however, these studies are often not adequately powered to detect gene-environment (G x E) and gene-gene (G x G) interactions. Case-only studies are more efficient than case-control studies for detecting interactions and require no data on control subjects. In this article, we discuss the concept and utility of the case-only genome-wide interaction (COGWI) study, in which common genetic variants, measured genome-wide, are screened for association with environmental exposures or genetic variants of interest. An observed G-E (or G-G) association, as measured by the case-only odds ratio (OR), suggests interaction, but only if the interacting factors are unassociated in the population from which the cases were drawn. The case-only OR is equivalent to the interaction risk ratio. In addition to risk-related interactions, we discuss how the COGWI design can be used to efficiently detect G x G, G x E and pharmacogenetic interactions related to disease outcomes in the context of observational clinical studies or randomized clinical trials. Such studies can be conducted using only data on individuals experiencing an outcome of interest or individuals not experiencing the outcome of interest. Sharing data among GWA and COGWI studies of disease risk and outcome can further enhance efficiency. Sample size requirements for COGWI studies, as compared to case-control GWA studies, are provided. In the current era of genome-wide analyses, the COGWI design is an efficient and straightforward method for detecting G x G, G x E and pharmacogenetic interactions related to disease risk, prognosis and treatment response.

  14. Identification of genetic causes of congenital neurodevelopmental disorders using genome wide molecular technologies

    PubMed Central

    Eglė, Preikšaitienė; Laima, Ambrozaitytė; Živilė, Maldžienė; Aušra, Morkūnienė,; Loreta, Cimbalistienė; Tautvydas, Rančelis; Algirdas, Utkus; Vaidutis, Kučinskas

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intellectual disability affects about 1–2% of the general population worldwide, and this is the leading socio-economic problem of health care. The evaluation of the genetic causes of intellectual disability is challenging because these conditions are genetically heterogeneous with many different genetic alterations resulting in clinically indistinguishable phenotypes. Genome wide molecular technologies are effective in a research setting for establishing the new genetic basis of a disease. We describe the first Lithuanian experience in genome-wide CNV detection and whole exome sequencing, presenting the results obtained in the research project UNIGENE. Materials and methods. The patients with developmental delay/intellectual disability have been investigated (n = 66). Diagnostic screening was performed using array-CGH technology. FISH and real time-PCR were used for the confirmation of gene-dose imbalances and investigation of parental samples. Whole exome sequencing using the next generation high throughput NGS technique was used to sequence the samples of 12 selected families. Results. 14 out of 66 patients had pathogenic copy number variants, and one patient had novel likely pathogenic aberration (microdeletion at 4p15.2). Twelve families have been processed for whole exome sequencing. Two identified sequence variants could be classified as pathogenic (in MECP2, CREBBP genes). The other families had several candidate intellectual disability gene variants that are of unclear clinical significance and must be further investigated for possible effect on the molecular pathways of intellectual disability. Conclusions. The genetic heterogeneity of intellectual disability requires genome wide approaches, including detection of chromosomal aberrations by chromosomal microarrays and whole exome sequencing capable of uncovering single gene mutations. This study demonstrates the benefits and challenges that accompany the use of genome wide molecular

  15. Automated genome-wide visual profiling of cellular proteins involved in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Genovesio, Auguste; Kwon, Yong-Jun; Windisch, Marc P; Kim, Nam Youl; Choi, Seo Yeon; Kim, Hi Chul; Jung, Sungyong; Mammano, Fabrizio; Perrin, Virginie; Boese, Annette S; Casartelli, Nicoletta; Schwartz, Olivier; Nehrbass, Ulf; Emans, Neil

    2011-10-01

    Recent genome-wide RNAi screens have identified >842 human genes that affect the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cycle. The list of genes implicated in infection differs between screens, and there is minimal overlap. A reason for this variance is the interdependence of HIV infection and host cell function, producing a multitude of indirect or pleiotropic cellular effects affecting the viral infection during RNAi screening. To overcome this, the authors devised a 15-dimensional phenotypic profile to define the viral infection block induced by CD4 silencing in HeLa cells. They demonstrate that this phenotypic profile excludes nonspecific, RNAi-based side effects and viral replication defects mediated by silencing of housekeeping genes. To achieve statistical robustness, the authors used automatically annotated RNAi arrays for seven independent genome-wide RNAi screens. This identified 56 host genes, which reliably reproduced CD4-like phenotypes upon HIV infection. The factors include 11 known HIV interactors and 45 factors previously not associated with HIV infection. As proof of concept, the authors confirmed that silencing of PAK1, Ku70, and RNAseH2A impaired HIV replication in Jurkat cells. In summary, multidimensional, visual profiling can identify genes required for HIV infection.

  16. Genome-Wide Screen of miRNAs and Targeting mRNAs Reveals the Negatively Regulatory Effect of miR-130b-3p on PTEN by PI3K and Integrin β1 Signaling Pathways in Bladder Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Mengxin; Zhong, Zhenyu; Chi, Hong; Huang, Mengge; Jiang, Rong; Chen, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    miRNAs have emerged as promising markers for tumors. However, the underlying mechanism of specific miRNAs in bladder cancer (BC) remains largely unknown. Here, a comprehensive miRNA/mRNA expression profile was executed by microarray assay for four pairs of bladder carcinoma and para-carcinoma tissues from patients with grade 2 (G2) T2. A total of 99 miRNAs and 4416 mRNAs were discovered to be significantly differentially expressed in BC tissues compared with controls. Five microRNAs and two mRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR in 30 pairs of samples, including G1–G3/T1–T4. Subsequently, we constructed a network with the five miRNAs-target mRNAs; gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enrichment analyses were utilized to recognize the functions and associated pathways. Moreover, we further found that miR-130b-3p was significantly up-regulated and negatively correlated with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression in bladder cancer tissues. Next, we demonstrated that miR-130b-3p might target PTEN through bioinformatics and dual-luciferase reporter assay. Finally, we showed that miR-130b-3p could down-regulate PTEN expression, which promoted proliferation, migration, invasion and rearranged cytoskeleton through the activation of the PI3K and integrin β1 signaling pathway in bladder cancer cells. Inversely, miR-130b-3p inhibitors induced apoptosis. Taken together, this research investigated, for the first time, miR-130b-3p by an incorporated analysis of microRNA/mRNA expressions of a genome-wide screen in BC. Our findings suggest that the miR-130b-3p/PTEN/integrin β1 axis could play a critical role in the progression and development of BC and that miR-130b-3p might be a valuable clinical marker and therapeutical target for BC patients. PMID:28042869

  17. Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, Iain; Lazaridis, Iosif; Rohland, Nadin; Mallick, Swapan; Patterson, Nick; Roodenberg, Songül Alpaslan; Harney, Eadaoin; Stewardson, Kristin; Fernandes, Daniel; Novak, Mario; Sirak, Kendra; Gamba, Cristina; Jones, Eppie R; Llamas, Bastien; Dryomov, Stanislav; Pickrell, Joseph; Arsuaga, Juan Luís; de Castro, José María Bermúdez; Carbonell, Eudald; Gerritsen, Fokke; Khokhlov, Aleksandr; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Lozano, Marina; Meller, Harald; Mochalov, Oleg; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Guerra, Manuel A Rojo; Roodenberg, Jacob; Vergès, Josep Maria; Krause, Johannes; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W; Brown, Dorcas; Anthony, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Haak, Wolfgang; Pinhasi, Ron; Reich, David

    2015-12-24

    Ancient DNA makes it possible to observe natural selection directly by analysing samples from populations before, during and after adaptation events. Here we report a genome-wide scan for selection using ancient DNA, capitalizing on the largest ancient DNA data set yet assembled: 230 West Eurasians who lived between 6500 and 300 bc, including 163 with newly reported data. The new samples include, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide ancient DNA from Anatolian Neolithic farmers, whose genetic material we obtained by extracting from petrous bones, and who we show were members of the population that was the source of Europe's first farmers. We also report a transect of the steppe region in Samara between 5600 and 300 bc, which allows us to identify admixture into the steppe from at least two external sources. We detect selection at loci associated with diet, pigmentation and immunity, and two independent episodes of selection on height.

  18. Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, Iain; Lazaridis, Iosif; Rohland, Nadin; Mallick, Swapan; Patterson, Nick; Roodenberg, Songül Alpaslan; Harney, Eadaoin; Stewardson, Kristin; Fernandes, Daniel; Novak, Mario; Sirak, Kendra; Gamba, Cristina; Jones, Eppie R.; Llamas, Bastien; Dryomov, Stanislav; Pickrel, Joseph; Arsuaga, Juan Luís; de Castro, José María Bermúdez; Carbonell, Eudald; Gerritsen, Fokke; Khokhlov, Aleksandr; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Lozano, Marina; Meller, Harald; Mochalov, Oleg; Moiseyev, Vayacheslav; Rojo Guerra, Manuel A.; Roodenberg, Jacob; Vergès, Josep Maria; Krause, Johannes; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W.; Brown, Dorcas; Anthony, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Haak, Wolfgang; Pinhasi, Ron; Reich, David

    2016-01-01

    Ancient DNA makes it possible to directly witness natural selection by analyzing samples from populations before, during and after adaptation events. Here we report the first scan for selection using ancient DNA, capitalizing on the largest genome-wide dataset yet assembled: 230 West Eurasians dating to between 6500 and 1000 BCE, including 163 with newly reported data. The new samples include the first genome-wide data from the Anatolian Neolithic culture whose genetic material we extracted from the DNA-rich petrous bone and who we show were members of the population that was the source of Europe’s first farmers. We also report a complete transect of the steppe region in Samara between 5500 and 1200 BCE that allows us to recognize admixture from at least two external sources into steppe populations during this period. We detect selection at loci associated with diet, pigmentation and immunity, and two independent episodes of selection on height. PMID:26595274

  19. Genome-wide association studies of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fall, Tove; Ingelsson, Erik

    2014-01-25

    Until just a few years ago, the genetic determinants of obesity and metabolic syndrome were largely unknown, with the exception of a few forms of monogenic extreme obesity. Since genome-wide association studies (GWAS) became available, large advances have been made. The first single nucleotide polymorphism robustly associated with increased body mass index (BMI) was in 2007 mapped to a gene with for the time unknown function. This gene, now known as fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) has been repeatedly replicated in several ethnicities and is affecting obesity by regulating appetite. Since the first report from a GWAS of obesity, an increasing number of markers have been shown to be associated with BMI, other measures of obesity or fat distribution and metabolic syndrome. This systematic review of obesity GWAS will summarize genome-wide significant findings for obesity and metabolic syndrome and briefly give a few suggestions of what is to be expected in the next few years.

  20. Genome wide copy number analysis of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Baslan, Timour; Kendall, Jude; Rodgers, Linda; Cox, Hilary; Riggs, Mike; Stepansky, Asya; Troge, Jennifer; Ravi, Kandasamy; Esposito, Diane; Lakshmi, B.; Wigler, Michael; Navin, Nicholas; Hicks, James

    2016-01-01

    Summary Copy number variation (CNV) is increasingly recognized as an important contributor to phenotypic variation in health and disease. Most methods for determining CNV rely on admixtures of cells, where information regarding genetic heterogeneity is lost. Here, we present a protocol that allows for the genome wide copy number analysis of single nuclei isolated from mixed populations of cells. Single nucleus sequencing (SNS), combines flow sorting of single nuclei based on DNA content, whole genome amplification (WGA), followed by next generation sequencing to quantize genomic intervals in a genome wide manner. Multiplexing of single cells is discussed. Additionally, we outline informatic approaches that correct for biases inherent in the WGA procedure and allow for accurate determination of copy number profiles. All together, the protocol takes ~3 days from flow cytometry to sequence-ready DNA libraries. PMID:22555242

  1. Genome-wide scans for loci under selection in humans.

    PubMed

    Ronald, James; Akey, Joshua M

    2005-06-01

    Natural selection, which can be defined as the differential contribution of genetic variants to future generations, is the driving force of Darwinian evolution. Identifying regions of the human genome that have been targets of natural selection is an important step in clarifying human evolutionary history and understanding how genetic variation results in phenotypic diversity, it may also facilitate the search for complex disease genes. Technological advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping have enabled several genome-wide scans of natural selection to be undertaken. Here, some of the observations that are beginning to emerge from these studies will be reviewed, including evidence for geographically restricted selective pressures (ie local adaptation) and a relationship between genes subject to natural selection and human disease. In addition, the paper will highlight several important problems that need to be addressed in future genome-wide studies of natural selection.

  2. Genome-wide RNA Tomography in the zebrafish embryo.

    PubMed

    Junker, Jan Philipp; Noël, Emily S; Guryev, Victor; Peterson, Kevin A; Shah, Gopi; Huisken, Jan; McMahon, Andrew P; Berezikov, Eugene; Bakkers, Jeroen; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2014-10-23

    Advancing our understanding of embryonic development is heavily dependent on identification of novel pathways or regulators. Although genome-wide techniques such as RNA sequencing are ideally suited for discovering novel candidate genes, they are unable to yield spatially resolved information in embryos or tissues. Microscopy-based approaches, using in situ hybridization, for example, can provide spatial information about gene expression, but are limited to analyzing one or a few genes at a time. Here, we present a method where we combine traditional histological techniques with low-input RNA sequencing and mathematical image reconstruction to generate a high-resolution genome-wide 3D atlas of gene expression in the zebrafish embryo at three developmental stages. Importantly, our technique enables searching for genes that are expressed in specific spatial patterns without manual image annotation. We envision broad applicability of RNA tomography as an accurate and sensitive approach for spatially resolved transcriptomics in whole embryos and dissected organs.

  3. Analysis of Heritability Using Genome-Wide Data.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jacob B; Bush, William S

    2016-10-11

    Most analyses of genome-wide association data consider each variant independently without considering or adjusting for the genetic background present in the rest of the genome. New approaches to genome analysis use representations of genomic sharing to better account for confounding factors like population stratification or to directly approximate heritability through the estimated sharing of individuals in a dataset. These approaches use mixed linear models, which relate genotypic sharing to phenotypic sharing, and rely on the efficient computation of genetic sharing among individuals in a dataset. This unit describes the principles and practical application of mixed models for the analysis of genome-wide association study data. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Genome-Wide Significant Loci: How Important Are They?

    PubMed Central

    Björkegren, Johan L.M.; Kovacic, Jason C.; Dudley, Joel T.; Schadt, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been extensively used to study common complex diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD), revealing 153 suggestive CAD loci, of which at least 46 have been validated as having genome-wide significance. However, these loci collectively explain <10% of the genetic variance in CAD. Thus, we must address the key question of what factors constitute the remaining 90% of CAD heritability. We review possible limitations of GWAS, and contextually consider some candidate CAD loci identified by this method. Looking ahead, we propose systems genetics as a complementary approach to unlocking the CAD heritability and etiology. Systems genetics builds network models of relevant molecular processes by combining genetic and genomic datasets to ultimately identify key “drivers” of disease. By leveraging systems-based genetic approaches, we can help reveal the full genetic basis of common complex disorders, enabling novel diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. PMID:25720628

  5. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  6. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity.

    PubMed

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P; Nir, Talia M; Toga, Arthur W; Jack, Clifford R; Saykin, Andrew J; Green, Robert C; Weiner, Michael W; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Hansell, Narelle K; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-03-19

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain's connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain's wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer's disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases.

  7. Genome-Wide Association Studies and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of the human genome has opened up many opportunities to learn about our own genetic susceptibilities to disease. In this Foreword to this issue of Seminars in Liver Disease, I provide some required background to understanding genome-wide association analyses in general, including a list of terms (Table 1) often used in such studies. Five areas of particular significance are then reviewed in detail in the articles that follow. PMID:26676811

  8. Genome-wide association study of schizophrenia in Ashkenazi Jews.

    PubMed

    Goes, Fernando S; McGrath, John; Avramopoulos, Dimitrios; Wolyniec, Paula; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Ruczinski, Ingo; Nestadt, Gerald; Kenny, Eimear E; Vacic, Vladimir; Peters, Inga; Lencz, Todd; Darvasi, Ariel; Mulle, Jennifer G; Warren, Stephen T; Pulver, Ann E

    2015-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a common, clinically heterogeneous disorder associated with lifelong morbidity and early mortality. Several genetic variants associated with schizophrenia have been identified, but the majority of the heritability remains unknown. In this study, we report on a case-control sample of Ashkenazi Jews (AJ), a founder population that may provide additional insights into genetic etiology of schizophrenia. We performed a genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) of 592 cases and 505 controls of AJ ancestry ascertained in the US. Subsequently, we performed a meta-analysis with an Israeli AJ sample of 913 cases and 1640 controls, followed by a meta-analysis and polygenic risk scoring using summary results from Psychiatric GWAS Consortium 2 schizophrenia study. The U.S. AJ sample showed strong evidence of polygenic inheritance (pseudo-R(2) ∼9.7%) and a SNP-heritability estimate of 0.39 (P = 0.00046). We found no genome-wide significant associations in the U.S. sample or in the combined US/Israeli AJ meta-analysis of 1505 cases and 2145 controls. The strongest AJ specific associations (P-values in 10(-6) -10(-7) range) were in the 22q 11.2 deletion region and included the genes TBX1, GLN1, and COMT. Supportive evidence (meta P < 1 × 10(-4) ) was also found for several previously identified genome-wide significant findings, including the HLA region, CNTN4, IMMP2L, and GRIN2A. The meta-analysis of the U.S. sample with the PGC2 results provided initial genome-wide significant evidence for six new loci. Among the novel potential susceptibility genes is PEPD, a gene involved in proline metabolism, which is associated with a Mendelian disorder characterized by developmental delay and cognitive deficits. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Genome-Wide Profiling of Alternative Translation Initiation Sites.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiangwei; Wan, Ji; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of translation initiation is a central control point in protein synthesis. Variations of start codon selection contribute to protein diversity and complexity. Systemic mapping of start codon positions and precise measurement of the corresponding initiation rate would transform our understanding of translational control. Here we describe a ribosome profiling approach that enables identification of translation initiation sites on a genome-wide scale. By capturing initiating ribosomes using lactimidomycin, this approach permits qualitative and quantitative analysis of alternative translation initiation.

  10. Genome-wide association study of paliperidone efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Wineinger, Nathan E.; Fu, Dong-Jing; Libiger, Ondrej; Alphs, Larry; Savitz, Adam; Gopal, Srihari; Cohen, Nadine; Schork, Nicholas J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Clinical response to the atypical antipsychotic paliperidone is known to vary among schizophrenic patients. We carried out a genome-wide association study to identify common genetic variants predictive of paliperidone efficacy. Methods We leveraged a collection of 1390 samples from individuals of European ancestry enrolled in 12 clinical studies investigating the efficacy of the extended-release tablet paliperidone ER (n1=490) and the once-monthly injection paliperidone palmitate (n2=550 and n3=350). We carried out a genome-wide association study using a general linear model (GLM) analysis on three separate cohorts, followed by meta-analysis and using a mixed linear model analysis on all samples. The variations in response explained by each single nucleotide polymorphism (h2SNP) were estimated. Results No SNP passed genome-wide significance in the GLM-based analyses with suggestive signals from rs56240334 [P=7.97×10−8 for change in the Clinical Global Impression Scale-Severity (CGI-S); P=8.72×10−7 for change in the total Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS)] in the intron of ADCK1. The mixed linear model-based association P-values for rs56240334 were consistent with the results from GLM-based analyses and the association with change in CGI-S (P=4.26×10−8) reached genome-wide significance (i.e. P<5×10−8). We also found suggestive evidence for a polygenic contribution toward paliperidone treatment response with estimates of heritability, h2SNP, ranging from 0.31 to 0.43 for change in the total PANSS score, the PANSS positive Marder factor score, and CGI-S. Conclusion Genetic variations in the ADCK1 gene may differentially predict paliperidone efficacy in schizophrenic patients. However, this finding should be replicated in additional samples. PMID:27846195

  11. Significance of genome-wide association studies in molecular anthropology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipin; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Sachdeva, Mohinder Pal

    2009-12-01

    The successful advent of a genome-wide approach in association studies raises the hopes of human geneticists for solving a genetic maze of complex traits especially the disorders. This approach, which is replete with the application of cutting-edge technology and supported by big science projects (like Human Genome Project; and even more importantly the International HapMap Project) and various important databases (SNP database, CNV database, etc.), has had unprecedented success in rapidly uncovering many of the genetic determinants of complex disorders. The magnitude of this approach in the genetics of classical anthropological variables like height, skin color, eye color, and other genome diversity projects has certainly expanded the horizons of molecular anthropology. Therefore, in this article we have proposed a genome-wide association approach in molecular anthropological studies by providing lessons from the exemplary study of the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. We have also highlighted the importance and uniqueness of Indian population groups in facilitating the design and finding optimum solutions for other genome-wide association-related challenges.

  12. Voxelwise genome-wide association study (vGWAS).

    PubMed

    Stein, Jason L; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Ho, April J; Leow, Alex D; Toga, Arthur W; Saykin, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Gerber, Jill D; Allen, April N; Corneveaux, Jason J; Dechairo, Bryan M; Potkin, Steven G; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul

    2010-11-15

    The structure of the human brain is highly heritable, and is thought to be influenced by many common genetic variants, many of which are currently unknown. Recent advances in neuroimaging and genetics have allowed collection of both highly detailed structural brain scans and genome-wide genotype information. This wealth of information presents a new opportunity to find the genes influencing brain structure. Here we explore the relation between 448,293 single nucleotide polymorphisms in each of 31,622 voxels of the entire brain across 740 elderly subjects (mean age+/-s.d.: 75.52+/-6.82 years; 438 male) including subjects with Alzheimer's disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and healthy elderly controls from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). We used tensor-based morphometry to measure individual differences in brain structure at the voxel level relative to a study-specific template based on healthy elderly subjects. We then conducted a genome-wide association at each voxel to identify genetic variants of interest. By studying only the most associated variant at each voxel, we developed a novel method to address the multiple comparisons problem and computational burden associated with the unprecedented amount of data. No variant survived the strict significance criterion, but several genes worthy of further exploration were identified, including CSMD2 and CADPS2. These genes have high relevance to brain structure. This is the first voxelwise genome wide association study to our knowledge, and offers a novel method to discover genetic influences on brain structure.

  13. Genome-wide DNA polymorphism analyses using VariScan

    PubMed Central

    Hutter, Stephan; Vilella, Albert J; Rozas, Julio

    2006-01-01

    Background DNA sequence polymorphisms analysis can provide valuable information on the evolutionary forces shaping nucleotide variation, and provides an insight into the functional significance of genomic regions. The recent ongoing genome projects will radically improve our capabilities to detect specific genomic regions shaped by natural selection. Current available methods and software, however, are unsatisfactory for such genome-wide analysis. Results We have developed methods for the analysis of DNA sequence polymorphisms at the genome-wide scale. These methods, which have been tested on a coalescent-simulated and actual data files from mouse and human, have been implemented in the VariScan software package version 2.0. Additionally, we have also incorporated a graphical-user interface. The main features of this software are: i) exhaustive population-genetic analyses including those based on the coalescent theory; ii) analysis adapted to the shallow data generated by the high-throughput genome projects; iii) use of genome annotations to conduct a comprehensive analyses separately for different functional regions; iv) identification of relevant genomic regions by the sliding-window and wavelet-multiresolution approaches; v) visualization of the results integrated with current genome annotations in commonly available genome browsers. Conclusion VariScan is a powerful and flexible suite of software for the analysis of DNA polymorphisms. The current version implements new algorithms, methods, and capabilities, providing an important tool for an exhaustive exploratory analysis of genome-wide DNA polymorphism data. PMID:16968531

  14. Genome-Wide Detection and Analysis of Multifunctional Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pritykin, Yuri; Ghersi, Dario; Singh, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Many genes can play a role in multiple biological processes or molecular functions. Identifying multifunctional genes at the genome-wide level and studying their properties can shed light upon the complexity of molecular events that underpin cellular functioning, thereby leading to a better understanding of the functional landscape of the cell. However, to date, genome-wide analysis of multifunctional genes (and the proteins they encode) has been limited. Here we introduce a computational approach that uses known functional annotations to extract genes playing a role in at least two distinct biological processes. We leverage functional genomics data sets for three organisms—H. sapiens, D. melanogaster, and S. cerevisiae—and show that, as compared to other annotated genes, genes involved in multiple biological processes possess distinct physicochemical properties, are more broadly expressed, tend to be more central in protein interaction networks, tend to be more evolutionarily conserved, and are more likely to be essential. We also find that multifunctional genes are significantly more likely to be involved in human disorders. These same features also hold when multifunctionality is defined with respect to molecular functions instead of biological processes. Our analysis uncovers key features about multifunctional genes, and is a step towards a better genome-wide understanding of gene multifunctionality. PMID:26436655

  15. Genome-Wide Association Study of Polymorphisms Predisposing to Bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Pasanen, Anu; Karjalainen, Minna K.; Bont, Louis; Piippo-Savolainen, Eija; Ruotsalainen, Marja; Goksör, Emma; Kumawat, Kuldeep; Hodemaekers, Hennie; Nuolivirta, Kirsi; Jartti, Tuomas; Wennergren, Göran; Hallman, Mikko; Rämet, Mika; Korppi, Matti

    2017-01-01

    Bronchiolitis is a major cause of hospitalization among infants. Severe bronchiolitis is associated with later asthma, suggesting a common genetic predisposition. Genetic background of bronchiolitis is not well characterized. To identify polymorphisms associated with bronchiolitis, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in which 5,300,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for association in a Finnish–Swedish population of 217 children hospitalized for bronchiolitis and 778 controls. The most promising SNPs (n = 77) were genotyped in a Dutch replication population of 416 cases and 432 controls. Finally, we used a set of 202 Finnish bronchiolitis cases to further investigate candidate SNPs. We did not detect genome-wide significant associations, but several suggestive association signals (p < 10−5) were observed in the GWAS. In the replication population, three SNPs were nominally associated (p < 0.05). Of them, rs269094 was an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) for KCND3, previously shown to be associated with occupational asthma. In the additional set of Finnish cases, the association for another SNP (rs9591920) within a noncoding RNA locus was further strengthened. Our results provide a first genome-wide examination of the genetics underlying bronchiolitis. These preliminary findings require further validation in a larger sample size. PMID:28139761

  16. Genome-Wide Estimates of Heritability for Social Demographic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Domingue, Benjamin W.; Wedow, Robbee; Conley, Dalton; McQueen, Matt; Hoffmann, Thomas J.; Boardman, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of studies that are widely used in the demographic research community have collected genome-wide data from their respondents. It is therefore important that demographers have a proper understanding of some of the methodological tools needed to analyze such data. Our paper details the underlying methodology behind one of the most common techniques for analyzing genome-wide data, Genome-Wide Complex Trait Analysis (GCTA). GCTA models provide heritability estimates for health, health behaviors, or indicators of attainment using data from unrelated persons.. Our goal is to describe this model, to highlight the utility of the model for biodemographic research, and to demonstrate the performance of this approach under modifications of the underlying assumptions. The first set of modifications involves changing the nature of the genetic data used to compute genetic similarities between individuals (the genetic relationship matrix). We then explore the sensitivity of the model to heteroscedastic errors. In general, GCTA estimates are robust to the modifications proposed here but we also highlight potential limitations of GCTA estimates. PMID:27050030

  17. Genome-wide meta-analyses identify three loci associated with primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiangdong; Invernizzi, Pietro; Lu, Yue; Kosoy, Roman; Lu, Yan; Bianchi, Ilaria; Podda, Mauro; Xu, Chun; Xie, Gang; Macciardi, Fabio; Selmi, Carlo; Lupoli, Sara; Shigeta, Russell; Ransom, Michael; Lleo, Ana; Lee, Annette T; Mason, Andrew L; Myers, Robert P; Peltekian, Kevork M; Ghent, Cameron N; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Zuin, Massimo; Rosina, Floriano; Borghesio, Elisabetta; Floreani, Annarosa; Lazzari, Roberta; Niro, Grazia; Andriulli, Angelo; Muratori, Luigi; Muratori, Paolo; Almasio, Piero L; Andreone, Pietro; Margotti, Marzia; Brunetto, Maurizia; Coco, Barbara; Alvaro, Domenico; Bragazzi, Maria C; Marra, Fabio; Pisano, Alessandro; Rigamonti, Cristina; Colombo, Massimo; Marzioni, Marco; Benedetti, Antonio; Fabris, Luca; Strazzabosco, Mario; Portincasa, Piero; Palmieri, Vincenzo O; Tiribelli, Claudio; Croce, Lory; Bruno, Savino; Rossi, Sonia; Vinci, Maria; Prisco, Cleofe; Mattalia, Alberto; Toniutto, Pierluigi; Picciotto, Antonio; Galli, Andrea; Ferrari, Carlo; Colombo, Silvia; Casella, Giovanni; Morini, Lorenzo; Caporaso, Nicola; Colli, Agostino; Spinzi, Giancarlo; Montanari, Renzo; Gregersen, Peter K; Heathcote, E Jenny; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Amos, Christopher I; Gershwin, M Eric; Seldin, Michael F

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide association screen for primary biliary cirrhosis risk alleles was performed in an Italian cohort. The results from the Italian cohort replicated IL12A and IL12RB associations, and a combined meta-analysis using a Canadian dataset identified newly associated loci at SPIB (P = 7.9 × 10–11, odds ratio (OR) = 1.46), IRF5-TNPO3 (P = 2.8 × 10–10, OR = 1.63) and 17q12-21 (P = 1.7 × 10–10, OR = 1.38). PMID:20639880

  18. Genome-wide meta-analyses identify three loci associated with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangdong; Invernizzi, Pietro; Lu, Yue; Kosoy, Roman; Lu, Yan; Bianchi, Ilaria; Podda, Mauro; Xu, Chun; Xie, Gang; Macciardi, Fabio; Selmi, Carlo; Lupoli, Sara; Shigeta, Russell; Ransom, Michael; Lleo, Ana; Lee, Annette T; Mason, Andrew L; Myers, Robert P; Peltekian, Kevork M; Ghent, Cameron N; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Zuin, Massimo; Rosina, Floriano; Borghesio, Elisabetta; Floreani, Annarosa; Lazzari, Roberta; Niro, Grazia; Andriulli, Angelo; Muratori, Luigi; Muratori, Paolo; Almasio, Piero L; Andreone, Pietro; Margotti, Marzia; Brunetto, Maurizia; Coco, Barbara; Alvaro, Domenico; Bragazzi, Maria C; Marra, Fabio; Pisano, Alessandro; Rigamonti, Cristina; Colombo, Massimo; Marzioni, Marco; Benedetti, Antonio; Fabris, Luca; Strazzabosco, Mario; Portincasa, Piero; Palmieri, Vincenzo O; Tiribelli, Claudio; Croce, Lory; Bruno, Savino; Rossi, Sonia; Vinci, Maria; Prisco, Cleofe; Mattalia, Alberto; Toniutto, Pierluigi; Picciotto, Antonio; Galli, Andrea; Ferrari, Carlo; Colombo, Silvia; Casella, Giovanni; Morini, Lorenzo; Caporaso, Nicola; Colli, Agostino; Spinzi, Giancarlo; Montanari, Renzo; Gregersen, Peter K; Heathcote, E Jenny; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Amos, Christopher I; Gershwin, M Eric; Seldin, Michael F

    2010-08-01

    A genome-wide association screen for primary biliary cirrhosis risk alleles was performed in an Italian cohort. The results from the Italian cohort replicated IL12A and IL12RB associations, and a combined meta-analysis using a Canadian dataset identified newly associated loci at SPIB (P = 7.9 x 10(-11), odds ratio (OR) = 1.46), IRF5-TNPO3 (P = 2.8 x 10(-10), OR = 1.63) and 17q12-21 (P = 1.7 x 10(-10), OR = 1.38).

  19. Cellular RNA helicases and HIV-1: insights from genome-wide, proteomic, and molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yen; Liu, Xiang; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen; Sharma, Amit; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2013-02-01

    RNA helicases are ubiquitous in plants and animals and function in many cellular processes. Retroviruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), encode no RNA helicases in their genomes and utilize host cellular RNA helicases at various stages of their life cycle. Here, we briefly summarize the roles RNA helicases play in HIV-1 replication that have been identified recently, in part, through genome-wide screenings, proteomics, and molecular studies. Some of these helicases augment virus propagation while others apparently participate in antiviral defenses against viral replication.

  20. Genome-wide bisulfite sensitivity profiling of yeast suggests bisulfite inhibits transcription.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Romulo; Mathew, Veena; Tam, Annie S; Stirling, Peter C

    2017-09-01

    Bisulfite, in the form of sodium bisulfite or metabisulfite, is used commercially as a food preservative. Bisulfite is used in the laboratory as a single-stranded DNA mutagen in epigenomic analyses of DNA methylation. Recently it has also been used on whole yeast cells to induce mutations in exposed single-stranded regions in vivo. To understand the effects of bisulfite on live cells we conducted a genome-wide screen for bisulfite sensitive mutants in yeast. Screening the deletion mutant array, and collections of essential gene mutants we define a genetic network of bisulfite sensitive mutants. Validation of screen hits revealed hyper-sensitivity of transcription and RNA processing mutants, rather than DNA repair pathways and follow-up analyses support a role in perturbation of RNA transactions. We propose a model in which bisulfite-modified nucleotides may interfere with transcription or RNA metabolism when used in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Genome Wide assessment of Parkinson’s disease in a Southern Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    Bandrés-Ciga, S; Price, TR; Barrero, FJ; Escamilla-Sevilla, F; Pelegrina, J; Arepalli, S; Hernández, D; Gutiérrez, B; Cervilla, J; Rivera, M; Rivera, AM; Ding, J; Vives, F; Nalls, MA; Singleton, AB; Durán, R

    2016-01-01

    Here, we set out to study the genetic architecture of Parkinson’s disease (PD) through a Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) in a Southern Spanish population. 240 PD cases and 192 controls were genotyped on the NeuroX array. We estimated genetic variation associated with PD risk and age at onset (AAO). Risk profile analyses for PD and AAO were performed using a weighted genetic risk score (GRS). Total heritability was estimated by genome-wide complex trait analysis. Rare variants were screened with single-variant and burden tests. We also screened for variation in known PD genes. Finally, we explored runs of homozygosity and structural genomic variations. We replicate PD association (uncorrected p-value < 0.05) at the following loci: ACMSD/TMEM163, MAPT, STK39, MIR4697 and SREBF/RAI1. Subjects in the highest GRS quintile showed significantly increased risk of PD versus the lowest quintile (OR=3.6, p-value < 4e−7), but no significant difference in AAO. We found evidence of runs of homozygosity in two PD-associated regions: one intersecting the HLA-DQB1 gene in six patients and one control; and another intersecting the GBA-SYT11 gene in one PD case. The GBA N370S and the LRRK2 G2019S variants were found in 8 and 7 cases respectively, replicating previous work. A structural variant was found in one case in the PARK2 gene locus. This current work represents a comprehensive assessment at a genome-wide level characterizing a novel population in PD genetics. PMID:27393345

  2. Improved Heritability Estimation from Genome-wide SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Speed, Doug; Hemani, Gibran; Johnson, Michael R.; Balding, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Estimation of narrow-sense heritability, h2, from genome-wide SNPs genotyped in unrelated individuals has recently attracted interest and offers several advantages over traditional pedigree-based methods. With the use of this approach, it has been estimated that over half the heritability of human height can be attributed to the ∼300,000 SNPs on a genome-wide genotyping array. In comparison, only 5%–10% can be explained by SNPs reaching genome-wide significance. We investigated via simulation the validity of several key assumptions underpinning the mixed-model analysis used in SNP-based h2 estimation. Although we found that the method is reasonably robust to violations of four key assumptions, it can be highly sensitive to uneven linkage disequilibrium (LD) between SNPs: contributions to h2 are overestimated from causal variants in regions of high LD and are underestimated in regions of low LD. The overall direction of the bias can be up or down depending on the genetic architecture of the trait, but it can be substantial in realistic scenarios. We propose a modified kinship matrix in which SNPs are weighted according to local LD. We show that this correction greatly reduces the bias and increases the precision of h2 estimates. We demonstrate the impact of our method on the first seven diseases studied by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Our LD adjustment revises downward the h2 estimate for immune-related diseases, as expected because of high LD in the major-histocompatibility region, but increases it for some nonimmune diseases. To calculate our revised kinship matrix, we developed LDAK, software for computing LD-adjusted kinships. PMID:23217325

  3. Genome-wide Association Study of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, S Evelyn; Yu, Dongmei; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Neale, Benjamin M; Fagerness, Jesen A; Mathews, Carol A; Arnold, Paul D; Evans, Patrick D; Gamazon, Eric R; Osiecki, Lisa; McGrath, Lauren; Haddad, Stephen; Crane, Jacquelyn; Hezel, Dianne; Illman, Cornelia; Mayerfeld, Catherine; Konkashbaev, Anuar; Liu, Chunyu; Pluzhnikov, Anna; Tikhomirov, Anna; Edlund, Christopher K; Rauch, Scott L; Moessner, Rainald; Falkai, Peter; Maier, Wolfgang; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Lennertz, Leonard; Wagner, Michael; Bellodi, Laura; Cavallini, Maria Cristina; Richter, Margaret A; Cook, Edwin H; Kennedy, James L; Rosenberg, David; Stein, Dan J; Hemmings, Sian MJ; Lochner, Christine; Azzam, Amin; Chavira, Denise A; Fournier, Eduardo; Garrido, Helena; Sheppard, Brooke; Umaña, Paul; Murphy, Dennis L; Wendland, Jens R; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Denys, Damiaan; Blom, Rianne; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Westenberg, Herman GM; Walitza, Susanne; Egberts, Karin; Renner, Tobias; Miguel, Euripedes Constantino; Cappi, Carolina; Hounie, Ana G; Conceição do Rosário, Maria; Sampaio, Aline S; Vallada, Homero; Nicolini, Humberto; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Camarena, Beatriz; Delorme, Richard; Leboyer, Marion; Pato, Carlos N; Pato, Michele T; Voyiaziakis, Emanuel; Heutink, Peter; Cath, Danielle C; Posthuma, Danielle; Smit, Jan H; Samuels, Jack; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Cullen, Bernadette; Fyer, Abby J; Grados, Marco A; Greenberg, Benjamin D; McCracken, James T; Riddle, Mark A; Wang, Ying; Coric, Vladimir; Leckman, James F; Bloch, Michael; Pittenger, Christopher; Eapen, Valsamma; Black, Donald W; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; Cusi, Daniele; Turiel, Maurizio; Frau, Francesca; Macciardi, Fabio; Gibbs, J Raphael; Cookson, Mark R; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Crenshaw, Andrew T; Parkin, Melissa A; Mirel, Daniel B; Conti, David V; Purcell, Shaun; Nestadt, Gerald; Hanna, Gregory L; Jenike, Michael A; Knowles, James A; Cox, Nancy; Pauls, David L

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common, debilitating neuropsychiatric illness with complex genetic etiology. The International OCD Foundation Genetics Collaborative (IOCDF-GC) is a multi-national collaboration established to discover the genetic variation predisposing to OCD. A set of individuals affected with DSM-IV OCD, a subset of their parents, and unselected controls, were genotyped with several different Illumina SNP microarrays. After extensive data cleaning, 1,465 cases, 5,557 ancestry-matched controls and 400 complete trios remained, with a common set of 469,410 autosomal and 9,657 X-chromosome SNPs. Ancestry-stratified case-control association analyses were conducted for three genetically-defined subpopulations and combined in two meta-analyses, with and without the trio-based analysis. In the case-control analysis, the lowest two p-values were located within DLGAP1 (p=2.49×10-6 and p=3.44×10-6), a member of the neuronal postsynaptic density complex. In the trio analysis, rs6131295, near BTBD3, exceeded the genome-wide significance threshold with a p-value=3.84 × 10-8. However, when trios were meta-analyzed with the combined case-control samples, the p-value for this variant was 3.62×10-5, losing genome-wide significance. Although no SNPs were identified to be associated with OCD at a genome-wide significant level in the combined trio-case-control sample, a significant enrichment of methylation-QTLs (p<0.001) and frontal lobe eQTLs (p=0.001) was observed within the top-ranked SNPs (p<0.01) from the trio-case-control analysis, suggesting these top signals may have a broad role in gene expression in the brain, and possibly in the etiology of OCD. PMID:22889921

  4. Genome Wide Association Study of Sepsis in Extremely Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Page, Grier; Kirpalani, Haresh; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Bell, Edward F.; Goldberg, Ronald N.; Schibler, Kurt; Sood, Beena G.; Stevenson, David K.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Johnson, Karen J.; Levy, Joshua; McDonald, Scott A.; Zaterka-Baxter, Kristin M.; Kennedy, Kathleen A.; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Duara, Shahnaz; Walsh, Michele C.; Shankaran, Seetha; Wynn, James L.; Cotten, C. Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objective To identify genetic variants associated with sepsis (early and late-onset) using a genome wide association (GWA) analysis in a cohort of extremely premature infants. Study Design Previously generated GWA data from the Neonatal Research Network’s anonymized genomic database biorepository of extremely premature infants were used for this study. Sepsis was defined as culture-positive early-onset or late-onset sepsis or culture-proven meningitis. Genomic and whole genome amplified DNA was genotyped for 1.2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); 91% of SNPs were successfully genotyped. We imputed 7.2 million additional SNPs. P values and false discovery rates were calculated from multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusting for gender, gestational age and ancestry. Target statistical value was p<10−5. Secondary analyses assessed associations of SNPs with pathogen type. Pathway analyses were also run on primary and secondary end points. Results Data from 757 extremely premature infants were included: 351 infants with sepsis and 406 infants without sepsis. No SNPs reached genome-wide significance levels (5×10−8); two SNPs in proximity to FOXC2 and FOXL1 genes achieved target levels of significance. In secondary analyses, SNPs for ELMO1, IRAK2 (Gram positive sepsis), RALA, IMMP2L (Gram negative sepsis) and PIEZO2 (fungal sepsis) met target significance levels. Pathways associated with sepsis and Gram negative sepsis included gap junctions, fibroblast growth factor receptors, regulators of cell division and Interleukin-1 associated receptor kinase 2 (p values<0.001 and FDR<20%). Conclusions No SNPs met genome-wide significance in this cohort of ELBW infants; however, areas of potential association and pathways meriting further study were identified. PMID:28283553

  5. Genome-Wide Association Study of Metabolic Syndrome in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seok Won; Chung, Myungguen; Park, Soo-Jung; Cho, Seong Beom

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (METS) is a disorder of energy utilization and storage and increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. To identify the genetic risk factors of METS, we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for 2,657 cases and 5,917 controls in Korean populations. As a result, we could identify 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with genome-wide significance level p-values (<5 × 10-8), 8 SNPs with genome-wide suggestive p-values (5 × 10-8 ≤ p < 1 × 10-5), and 2 SNPs of more functional variants with borderline p-values (5 × 10-5 ≤ p < 1 × 10-4). On the other hand, the multiple correction criteria of conventional GWASs exclude false-positive loci, but simultaneously, they discard many true-positive loci. To reconsider the discarded true-positive loci, we attempted to include the functional variants (nonsynonymous SNPs [nsSNPs] and expression quantitative trait loci [eQTL]) among the top 5,000 SNPs based on the proportion of phenotypic variance explained by genotypic variance. In total, 159 eQTLs and 18 nsSNPs were presented in the top 5,000 SNPs. Although they should be replicated in other independent populations, 6 eQTLs and 2 nsSNP loci were located in the molecular pathways of LPL, APOA5, and CHRM2, which were the significant or suggestive loci in the METS GWAS. Conclusively, our approach using the conventional GWAS, reconsidering functional variants and pathway-based interpretation, suggests a useful method to understand the GWAS results of complex traits and can be expanded in other genomewide association studies. PMID:25705157

  6. Voxelwise genome-wide association study (vGWAS)

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jason L.; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Ho, April J.; Leow, Alex D.; Toga, Arthur W.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Craig, David W.; Gerber, Jill D.; Allen, April N.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; DeChairo, Bryan M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of the human brain is highly heritable, and is thought to be influenced by many common genetic variants, many of which are currently unknown. Recent advances in neuroimaging and genetics have allowed collection of both highly detailed structural brain scans and genome-wide genotype information. This wealth of information presents a new opportunity to find the genes influencing brain structure. Here we explore the relation between 448,293 single nucleotide polymorphisms in each of 31,622 voxels of the entire brain across 740 elderly subjects (mean age±s.d.: 75.52±6.82 years; 438 male) including subjects with Alzheimer's disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and healthy elderly controls from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). We used tensor-based morphometry to measure individual differences in brain structure at the voxel level relative to a study-specific template based on healthy elderly subjects. We then conducted a genome-wide association at each voxel to identify genetic variants of interest. By studying only the most associated variant at each voxel, we developed a novel method to address the multiple comparisons problem and computational burden associated with the unprecedented amount of data. No variant survived the strict significance criterion, but several genes worthy of further exploration were identified, including CSMD2 and CADPS2. These genes have high relevance to brain structure. This is the first voxelwise genome wide association study to our knowledge, and offers a novel method to discover genetic influences on brain structure. PMID:20171287

  7. Genome-Wide Association of Heroin Dependence in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Gursharan; Euesden, Jack; Coleman, Jonathan R I; Ducci, Francesca; Aliev, Fazil; Newhouse, Stephen J; Liu, Xiehe; Ma, Xiaohong; Wang, Yingcheng; Collier, David A; Asherson, Philip; Li, Tao; Breen, Gerome

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction is a costly and recurring healthcare problem, necessitating a need to understand risk factors and mechanisms of addiction, and to identify new biomarkers. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for heroin addiction have been limited; moreover they have been restricted to examining samples of European and African-American origin due to difficulty of recruiting samples from other populations. This is the first study to test a Han Chinese population; we performed a GWAS on a homogeneous sample of 370 Han Chinese subjects diagnosed with heroin dependence using the DSM-IV criteria and 134 ethnically matched controls. Analysis using the diagnostic criteria of heroin dependence yielded suggestive evidence for association between variants in the genes CCDC42 (coiled coil domain 42; p = 2.8x10-7) and BRSK2 (BR serine/threonine 2; p = 4.110-6). In addition, we found evidence for risk variants within the ARHGEF10 (Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 10) gene on chromosome 8 and variants in a region on chromosome 20q13, which is gene-poor but has a concentration of mRNAs and predicted miRNAs. Gene-based association analysis identified genome-wide significant association between variants in CCDC42 and heroin addiction. Additionally, when we investigated shared risk variants between heroin addiction and risk of other addiction-related and psychiatric phenotypes using polygenic risk scores, we found a suggestive relationship with variants predicting tobacco addiction, and a significant relationship with variants predicting schizophrenia. Our genome wide association study of heroin dependence provides data in a novel sample, with functionally plausible results and evidence of genetic data of value to the field.

  8. Genome-Wide Association of Heroin Dependence in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Jonathan R. I.; Ducci, Francesca; Aliev, Fazil; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Liu, Xiehe; Ma, Xiaohong; Wang, Yingcheng; Collier, David A.; Asherson, Philip; Li, Tao; Breen, Gerome

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction is a costly and recurring healthcare problem, necessitating a need to understand risk factors and mechanisms of addiction, and to identify new biomarkers. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for heroin addiction have been limited; moreover they have been restricted to examining samples of European and African-American origin due to difficulty of recruiting samples from other populations. This is the first study to test a Han Chinese population; we performed a GWAS on a homogeneous sample of 370 Han Chinese subjects diagnosed with heroin dependence using the DSM-IV criteria and 134 ethnically matched controls. Analysis using the diagnostic criteria of heroin dependence yielded suggestive evidence for association between variants in the genes CCDC42 (coiled coil domain 42; p = 2.8x10-7) and BRSK2 (BR serine/threonine 2; p = 4.110−6). In addition, we found evidence for risk variants within the ARHGEF10 (Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 10) gene on chromosome 8 and variants in a region on chromosome 20q13, which is gene-poor but has a concentration of mRNAs and predicted miRNAs. Gene-based association analysis identified genome-wide significant association between variants in CCDC42 and heroin addiction. Additionally, when we investigated shared risk variants between heroin addiction and risk of other addiction-related and psychiatric phenotypes using polygenic risk scores, we found a suggestive relationship with variants predicting tobacco addiction, and a significant relationship with variants predicting schizophrenia. Our genome wide association study of heroin dependence provides data in a novel sample, with functionally plausible results and evidence of genetic data of value to the field. PMID:27936112

  9. Genome-wide association study of parity in Bangladeshi women.

    PubMed

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Argos, Maria; Pierce, Brandon L; Tong, Lin; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Ahsan, Habibul

    2015-01-01

    Human fertility is a complex trait determined by gene-environment interactions in which genetic factors represent a significant component. To better understand inter-individual variability in fertility, we performed one of the first genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of common fertility phenotypes, lifetime number of pregnancies and number of children in a developing country population. The fertility phenotype data and DNA samples were obtained at baseline recruitment from individuals participating in a large prospective cohort study in Bangladesh. GWAS analyses of fertility phenotypes were conducted among 1,686 married women. One SNP on chromosome 4 was non-significantly associated with number of children at P <10(-7) and number of pregnancies at P <10(-6). This SNP is located in a region without a gene within 1 Mb. One SNP on chromosome 6 was non-significantly associated with extreme number of children at P <10(-6). The closest gene to this SNP is HDGFL1, a hepatoma-derived growth factor. When we excluded hormonal contraceptive users, a SNP on chromosome 5 was non-significantly associated at P <10(-5) for number of children and number of pregnancies. This SNP is located near C5orf64, an open reading frame, and ZSWIM6, a zinc ion binding gene. We also estimated the heritability of these phenotypes from our genotype data using GCTA (Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis) for number of children (hg2 = 0.149, SE = 0.24, p-value = 0.265) and number of pregnancies (hg2 = 0.007, SE = 0.22, p-value = 0.487). Our genome-wide association study and heritability estimates of number of pregnancies and number of children in Bangladesh did not confer strong evidence of common variants for parity variation. However, our results suggest that future studies may want to consider the role of 3 notable SNPs in their analysis.

  10. Genome-wide association study of conduct disorder symptomatology

    PubMed Central

    Dick, DM; Aliev, F; Krueger, RF; Edwards, A; Agrawal, A; Lynskey, M; Lin, P; Schuckit, M; Hesselbrock, V; Nurnberger, J; Almasy, L; Porjesz, B; Edenberg, HJ; Bucholz, K; Kramer, J; Kuperman, S; Bierut, L

    2013-01-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is one of the most prevalent childhood psychiatric conditions, and is associated with a number of serious concomitant and future problems. CD symptomatology is known to have a considerable genetic component, with heritability estimates in the range of 50%. Despite this, there is a relative paucity of studies aimed at identifying genes involved in the susceptibility to CD. In this study, we report results from a genome-wide association study of CD symptoms. CD symptoms were retrospectively reported by a psychiatric interview among a sample of cases and controls, in which cases met the criteria for alcohol dependence. Our primary phenotype was the natural log transformation of the number of CD symptoms that were endorsed, with data available for 3963 individuals who were genotyped on the Illumina Human 1M beadchip array. Secondary analyses are presented for case versus control status, in which caseness was established as endorsing three or more CD symptoms (N= 872 with CD and N= 3091 without CD). We find four markers that meet the criteria for genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) with the CD symptom count, two of which are located in the gene C1QTNF7 (C1q and tumor necrosis factor-related protein 7). There were six additional SNPs in the gene that yielded converging evidence of association. These data provide the first evidence of a specific gene that is associated with CD symptomatology. None of the top signals resided in traditional candidate genes, underscoring the importance of a genome-wide approach for identifying novel variants involved in this serious childhood disorder. PMID:20585324

  11. Arabidopsis transcription factors: genome-wide comparative analysis among eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Riechmann, J L; Heard, J; Martin, G; Reuber, L; Jiang, C; Keddie, J; Adam, L; Pineda, O; Ratcliffe, O J; Samaha, R R; Creelman, R; Pilgrim, M; Broun, P; Zhang, J Z; Ghandehari, D; Sherman, B K; Yu, G

    2000-12-15

    The completion of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence allows a comparative analysis of transcriptional regulators across the three eukaryotic kingdoms. Arabidopsis dedicates over 5% of its genome to code for more than 1500 transcription factors, about 45% of which are from families specific to plants. Arabidopsis transcription factors that belong to families common to all eukaryotes do not share significant similarity with those of the other kingdoms beyond the conserved DNA binding domains, many of which have been arranged in combinations specific to each lineage. The genome-wide comparison reveals the evolutionary generation of diversity in the regulation of transcription.

  12. Genome-wide approaches to defining macrophage identity and function

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Gregory J; Seidman, Jason S; Glass, Christopher K

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play essential roles in the response to injury and infection and contribute to the development and/or homeostasis of the various tissues they reside in. Conversely, macrophages also influence the pathogenesis of metabolic, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic diseases. Mechanisms that contribute to the phenotypic diversity of macrophages in health and disease remain poorly understood. Here we review the recent application of genome-wide approaches to characterize the transcriptomes and epigenetic landscapes of tissue-resident macrophages. These studies are beginning to provide insights into how distinct tissue environments are interpreted by transcriptional regulatory elements to drive specialized programs of gene expression. PMID:28087927

  13. Genome-wide approaches to understanding behaviour in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Neville, Megan; Goodwin, Stephen F

    2012-09-01

    Understanding how an organism exhibits specific behaviours remains a major and important biological question. Studying behaviour in a simple model organism like the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has the advantages of advanced molecular genetics approaches along with well-defined anatomy and physiology. With advancements in functional genomic technologies, researchers are now attempting to uncover genes and pathways involved in complex behaviours on a genome-wide scale. A systems-level network approach, which will include genomic approaches, to study behaviour will be key to understanding the regulation and modulation of behaviours and the importance of context in regulating them.

  14. Validating, augmenting and refining genome-wide association signals.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, John P A; Thomas, Gilles; Daly, Mark J

    2009-05-01

    Studies using genome-wide platforms have yielded an unprecedented number of promising signals of association between genomic variants and human traits. This Review addresses the steps required to validate, augment and refine such signals to identify underlying causal variants for well-defined phenotypes. These steps include: large-scale exact replication across both similar and diverse populations; fine mapping and resequencing; determination of the most informative markers and multiple independent informative loci; incorporation of functional information; and improved phenotype mapping of the implicated genetic effects. Even in cases for which replication proves that an effect exists, confident localization of the causal variant often remains elusive.

  15. Genome-wide association studies and contribution to cardiovascular physiology

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Patricia B.

    2015-01-01

    The study of family pedigrees with rare monogenic cardiovascular disorders has revealed new molecular players in physiological processes. Genome-wide association studies of complex traits with a heritable component may afford a similar and potentially intellectually richer opportunity. In this review we focus on the interpretation of genetic associations and the issue of causality in relation to known and potentially new physiology. We mainly discuss cardiometabolic traits as it reflects our personal interests, but the issues pertain broadly in many other disciplines. We also describe some of the resources that are now available that may expedite follow up of genetic association signals into observations on causal mechanisms and pathophysiology. PMID:26106147

  16. [Genome-wide association study for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yoji; Kou, Ikuyo; Scoliosis, Japan; Matsumoto, Morio; Watanabe, Kota; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-04-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis(AIS)is a polygenic disease. Genome-wide association studies(GWASs)have been performed for a lot of polygenic diseases. For AIS, we conducted GWAS and identified the first AIS locus near LBX1. After the discovery, we have extended our study by increasing the numbers of subjects and SNPs. In total, our Japanese GWAS has identified four susceptibility genes. GWASs for AIS have also been performed in the USA and China, which identified one and three susceptibility genes, respectively. Here we review GWASs in Japan and abroad and functional analysis to clarify the pathomechanism of AIS.

  17. [New insight of genome-wide association study (GWAS)].

    PubMed

    Hotta, Kikuko

    2013-02-01

    The number of obese patients is increasing in Japan, due to the westernization of lifestyle. Obesity, especially visceral fat obesity, is important for the development of metabolic syndrome. Genetic factors are important for the development of obesity as well as environmental factors. Importance of genetic factors of fat distribution is also reported. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed the obesity and fat distribution-related polymorphisms. GWAS will highlight a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms in the regulation of obesity and distribution of body fat.

  18. Genome-wide association study of Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Yu, Dongmei; Mathews, Carol A.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Stewart, S. Evelyn; Fagerness, Jesen A; Evans, Patrick; Gamazon, Eric; Edlund, Christopher K.; Service, Susan; Tikhomirov, Anna; Osiecki, Lisa; Illmann, Cornelia; Pluzhnikov, Anna; Konkashbaev, Anuar; Davis, Lea K; Han, Buhm; Crane, Jacquelyn; Moorjani, Priya; Crenshaw, Andrew T.; Parkin, Melissa A.; Reus, Victor I.; Lowe, Thomas L.; Rangel-Lugo, Martha; Chouinard, Sylvain; Dion, Yves; Girard, Simon; Cath, Danielle C; Smit, Jan H; King, Robert A.; Fernandez, Thomas; Leckman, James F.; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Kidd, Judith R.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; State, Matthew; Herrera, Luis Diego; Romero, Roxana; Fournier, Eduardo; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy L; Phan, Nam; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Benarroch, Fortu; Pollak, Yehuda; Budman, Cathy L.; Bruun, Ruth D.; Erenberg, Gerald; Naarden, Allan L; Lee, Paul C; Weiss, Nicholas; Kremeyer, Barbara; Berrío, Gabriel Bedoya; Campbell, Desmond; Silgado, Julio C. Cardona; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Restrepo, Sandra C. Mesa; Muller, Heike; Duarte, Ana V. Valencia; Lyon, Gholson J; Leppert, Mark; Morgan, Jubel; Weiss, Robert; Grados, Marco A.; Anderson, Kelley; Davarya, Sarah; Singer, Harvey; Walkup, John; Jankovic, Joseph; Tischfield, Jay A.; Heiman, Gary A.; Gilbert, Donald L.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Robertson, Mary M.; Kurlan, Roger; Liu, Chunyu; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Strengman, Eric; Ophoff, Roel; Wagner, Michael; Moessner, Rainald; Mirel, Daniel B.; Posthuma, Danielle; Sabatti, Chiara; Eskin, Eleazar; Conti, David V.; Knowles, James A.; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Rouleau, Guy A.; Purcell, Shaun; Heutink, Peter; Oostra, Ben A.; McMahon, William; Freimer, Nelson; Cox, Nancy J.; Pauls, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder that has one of the highest familial recurrence rates among neuropsychiatric diseases with complex inheritance. However, the identification of definitive TS susceptibility genes remains elusive. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TS in 1285 cases and 4964 ancestry-matched controls of European ancestry, including two European-derived population isolates, Ashkenazi Jews from North America and Israel, and French Canadians from Quebec, Canada. In a primary meta-analysis of GWAS data from these European ancestry samples, no markers achieved a genome-wide threshold of significance (p<5 × 10−8); the top signal was found in rs7868992 on chromosome 9q32 within COL27A1 (p=1.85 × 10−6). A secondary analysis including an additional 211 cases and 285 controls from two closely-related Latin-American population isolates from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and Antioquia, Colombia also identified rs7868992 as the top signal (p=3.6 × 10−7 for the combined sample of 1496 cases and 5249 controls following imputation with 1000 Genomes data). This study lays the groundwork for the eventual identification of common TS susceptibility variants in larger cohorts and helps to provide a more complete understanding of the full genetic architecture of this disorder. PMID:22889924

  19. Genome-wide identification of hypoxia-induced enhancer regions

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Jessica L.; Randel, Melissa A.; Johnson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a genome-wide method for de novo identification of enhancer regions. This approach enables massively parallel empirical investigation of DNA sequences that mediate transcriptional activation and provides a platform for discovery of regulatory modules capable of driving context-specific gene expression. The method links fragmented genomic DNA to the transcription of randomer molecule identifiers and measures the functional enhancer activity of the library by massively parallel sequencing. We transfected a Drosophila melanogaster library into S2 cells in normoxia and hypoxia, and assayed 4,599,881 genomic DNA fragments in parallel. The locations of the enhancer regions strongly correlate with genes up-regulated after hypoxia and previously described enhancers. Novel enhancer regions were identified and integrated with RNAseq data and transcription factor motifs to describe the hypoxic response on a genome-wide basis as a complex regulatory network involving multiple stress-response pathways. This work provides a novel method for high-throughput assay of enhancer activity and the genome-scale identification of 31 hypoxia-activated enhancers in Drosophila. PMID:26713262

  20. A genome-wide association study for malignant mesothelioma risk.

    PubMed

    Cadby, Gemma; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Musk, A W Bill; Reid, Alison; Garlepp, Mike; Dick, Ian; Robinson, Cleo; Hui, Jennie; Fiorito, Giovanni; Guarrera, Simonetta; Beilby, John; Melton, Phillip E; Moses, Eric K; Ugolini, Donatella; Mirabelli, Dario; Bonassi, Stefano; Magnani, Corrado; Dianzani, Irma; Matullo, Giuseppe; Robinson, Bruce; Creaney, Jenette; Palmer, Lyle J

    2013-10-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a uniformly fatal tumour of mesothelial cells. MM is caused by exposure to asbestos however most individuals with documented asbestos exposure do not develop MM. Although MM appears to aggregate within families, the genetics of MM susceptibility is a relatively unexplored area. The aim of the current study was to identify genetic factors that contribute to MM risk. A genome-wide association analysis of 2,508,203 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 428 MM cases and 1269 controls from Western Australia was performed. Additional genotyping was performed on a sample of 778 asbestos-exposed Western Australian controls. Replication of the most strongly associated SNPs was undertaken in an independent case-control study of 392 asbestos-exposed cases and 367 asbestos-exposed controls from Italy. No SNPs achieved formal genome-wide statistical significance in the Western Australian study. However, suggestive results for MM risk were identified in the SDK1, CRTAM and RASGRF2 genes, and in the 2p12 chromosomal region. These findings were not replicated in the Italian study, although there was some evidence of replication in the region of SDK1. These suggestive associations will be further investigated in sequencing and functional studies. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Stefan; Atzmon, Gil; Demerath, Ellen W.; Garcia, Melissa E.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kumari, Meena; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tranah, Gregory J.; Völker, Uwe; Yu, Lei; Arnold, Alice; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Biffar, Reiner; Buchman, Aron S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Couper, David; De Jager, Philip L.; Evans, Denis A.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P.; Kocher, Thomas; Kuningas, Maris; Launer, Lenore J.; Lohman, Kurt K.; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Mackenbach, Johan; Marciante, Kristin; Psaty, Bruce M.; Reiman, Eric M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seshadri, Sudha; Shardell, Michelle D.; Smith, Albert V.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Walston, Jeremy; Zillikens, M. Carola; Bandinelli, Stefania; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Bennett, David A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Liu, Yongmei; Murabito, Joanne M.; Newman, Anne B.; Tiemeier, Henning; Franceschini, Nora

    2011-01-01

    Human longevity and healthy aging show moderate heritability (20–50%). We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from nine studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium for two outcomes: a) all-cause mortality and b) survival free of major disease or death. No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was a genome-wide significant predictor of either outcome (p < 5 × 10−8). We found fourteen independent SNPs that predicted risk of death, and eight SNPs that predicted event-free survival (p < 10−5). These SNPs are in or near genes that are highly expressed in the brain (HECW2, HIP1, BIN2, GRIA1), genes involved in neural development and function (KCNQ4, LMO4, GRIA1, NETO1) and autophagy (ATG4C), and genes that are associated with risk of various diseases including cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition to considerable overlap between the traits, pathway and network analysis corroborated these findings. These findings indicate that variation in genes involved in neurological processes may be an important factor in regulating aging free of major disease and achieving longevity. PMID:21782286

  2. Genome-wide patterns of Arabidopsis gene expression in nature.

    PubMed

    Richards, Christina L; Rosas, Ulises; Banta, Joshua; Bhambhra, Naeha; Purugganan, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Organisms in the wild are subject to multiple, fluctuating environmental factors, and it is in complex natural environments that genetic regulatory networks actually function and evolve. We assessed genome-wide gene expression patterns in the wild in two natural accessions of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and examined the nature of transcriptional variation throughout its life cycle and gene expression correlations with natural environmental fluctuations. We grew plants in a natural field environment and measured genome-wide time-series gene expression from the plant shoot every three days, spanning the seedling to reproductive stages. We find that 15,352 genes were expressed in the A. thaliana shoot in the field, and accession and flowering status (vegetative versus flowering) were strong components of transcriptional variation in this plant. We identified between ∼110 and 190 time-varying gene expression clusters in the field, many of which were significantly overrepresented by genes regulated by abiotic and biotic environmental stresses. The two main principal components of vegetative shoot gene expression (PC(veg)) correlate to temperature and precipitation occurrence in the field. The largest PC(veg) axes included thermoregulatory genes while the second major PC(veg) was associated with precipitation and contained drought-responsive genes. By exposing A. thaliana to natural environments in an open field, we provide a framework for further understanding the genetic networks that are deployed in natural environments, and we connect plant molecular genetics in the laboratory to plant organismal ecology in the wild.

  3. Measuring genome-wide nucleosome turnover using CATCH-IT.

    PubMed

    Teves, Sheila S; Deal, Roger B; Henikoff, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic interplay between DNA-binding proteins and nucleosomes underlies essential nuclear processes such as transcription, replication, and DNA repair. Manifestations of this interplay include the assembly, eviction, and replacement of nucleosomes. Hence, measurements of nucleosome turnover kinetics can lead to insights into the regulation of dynamic chromatin processes. In this chapter, we describe a genome-wide method for measuring nucleosome turnover that uses metabolic labeling followed by capture of newly synthesized histones, which we have termed Covalent Attachment of Tagged Histones to Capture and Identify Turnover (CATCH-IT). Although CATCH-IT can be used with any genome-wide mapping procedure, high-resolution profiling is attainable using paired-end sequencing of native chromatin. Our protocol also includes an efficient Solexa DNA sequencing library preparation protocol that can be used for single base-pair resolution mapping of both nucleosome and subnucleosomal particles. We not only describe the use of these protocols in the context of a Drosophila cell line but also provide the necessary changes for adaptation to other model systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Genome-wide analysis of differential RNA editing in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Prashant Kumar; Bagnati, Marta; Delahaye-Duriez, Andree; Ko, Jeong-Hun; Rotival, Maxime; Langley, Sarah R; Shkura, Kirill; Mazzuferi, Manuela; Danis, Bénédicte; van Eyll, Jonathan; Foerch, Patrik; Behmoaras, Jacques; Kaminski, Rafal M; Petretto, Enrico; Johnson, Michael R

    2017-03-01

    The recoding of genetic information through RNA editing contributes to proteomic diversity, but the extent and significance of RNA editing in disease is poorly understood. In particular, few studies have investigated the relationship between RNA editing and disease at a genome-wide level. Here, we developed a framework for the genome-wide detection of RNA sites that are differentially edited in disease. Using RNA-sequencing data from 100 hippocampi from mice with epilepsy (pilocarpine-temporal lobe epilepsy model) and 100 healthy control hippocampi, we identified 256 RNA sites (overlapping with 87 genes) that were significantly differentially edited between epileptic cases and controls. The degree of differential RNA editing in epileptic mice correlated with frequency of seizures, and the set of genes differentially RNA-edited between case and control mice were enriched for functional terms highly relevant to epilepsy, including "neuron projection" and "seizures." Genes with differential RNA editing were preferentially enriched for genes with a genetic association to epilepsy. Indeed, we found that they are significantly enriched for genes that harbor nonsynonymous de novo mutations in patients with epileptic encephalopathy and for common susceptibility variants associated with generalized epilepsy. These analyses reveal a functional convergence between genes that are differentially RNA-edited in acquired symptomatic epilepsy and those that contribute risk for genetic epilepsy. Taken together, our results suggest a potential role for RNA editing in the epileptic hippocampus in the occurrence and severity of epileptic seizures.

  5. A genome-wide association study of aging.

    PubMed

    Walter, Stefan; Atzmon, Gil; Demerath, Ellen W; Garcia, Melissa E; Kaplan, Robert C; Kumari, Meena; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Milaneschi, Yuri; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tranah, Gregory J; Völker, Uwe; Yu, Lei; Arnold, Alice; Benjamin, Emelia J; Biffar, Reiner; Buchman, Aron S; Boerwinkle, Eric; Couper, David; De Jager, Philip L; Evans, Denis A; Harris, Tamara B; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Kocher, Thomas; Kuningas, Maris; Launer, Lenore J; Lohman, Kurt K; Lutsey, Pamela L; Mackenbach, Johan; Marciante, Kristin; Psaty, Bruce M; Reiman, Eric M; Rotter, Jerome I; Seshadri, Sudha; Shardell, Michelle D; Smith, Albert V; van Duijn, Cornelia; Walston, Jeremy; Zillikens, M Carola; Bandinelli, Stefania; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Bennett, David A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Liu, Yongmei; Murabito, Joanne M; Newman, Anne B; Tiemeier, Henning; Franceschini, Nora

    2011-11-01

    Human longevity and healthy aging show moderate heritability (20%-50%). We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from 9 studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium for 2 outcomes: (1) all-cause mortality, and (2) survival free of major disease or death. No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was a genome-wide significant predictor of either outcome (p < 5 × 10(-8)). We found 14 independent SNPs that predicted risk of death, and 8 SNPs that predicted event-free survival (p < 10(-5)). These SNPs are in or near genes that are highly expressed in the brain (HECW2, HIP1, BIN2, GRIA1), genes involved in neural development and function (KCNQ4, LMO4, GRIA1, NETO1) and autophagy (ATG4C), and genes that are associated with risk of various diseases including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. In addition to considerable overlap between the traits, pathway and network analysis corroborated these findings. These findings indicate that variation in genes involved in neurological processes may be an important factor in regulating aging free of major disease and achieving longevity.

  6. Genome-wide scans for footprints of natural selection

    PubMed Central

    Oleksyk, Taras K.; Smith, Michael W.; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Detecting recent selected ‘genomic footprints’ applies directly to the discovery of disease genes and in the imputation of the formative events that molded modern population genetic structure. The imprints of historic selection/adaptation episodes left in human and animal genomes allow one to interpret modern and ancestral gene origins and modifications. Current approaches to reveal selected regions applied in genome-wide selection scans (GWSSs) fall into eight principal categories: (I) phylogenetic footprinting, (II) detecting increased rates of functional mutations, (III) evaluating divergence versus polymorphism, (IV) detecting extended segments of linkage disequilibrium, (V) evaluating local reduction in genetic variation, (VI) detecting changes in the shape of the frequency distribution (spectrum) of genetic variation, (VII) assessing differentiating between populations (FST), and (VIII) detecting excess or decrease in admixture contribution from one population. Here, we review and compare these approaches using available human genome-wide datasets to provide independent verification (or not) of regions found by different methods and using different populations. The lessons learned from GWSSs will be applied to identify genome signatures of historic selective pressures on genes and gene regions in other species with emerging genome sequences. This would offer considerable potential for genome annotation in functional, developmental and evolutionary contexts. PMID:20008396

  7. Genome-Wide Mapping of DNA Methylation in Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoxiang; Li, Jinxiu; Du, Zhuo; Chen, Li; Yin, Guangliang; Duan, Jinjie; Zhang, Haichao; Zhao, Yaofeng; Wang, Jun; Li, Ning

    2011-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification termed as the fifth base that functions in diverse processes. Till now, the genome-wide DNA methylation maps of many organisms has been reported, such as human, Arabidopsis, rice and silkworm, but the methylation pattern of bird remains rarely studied. Here we show the genome-wide DNA methylation map of bird, using the chicken as a model organism and an immunocapturing approach followed by high-throughput sequencing. In both of the red jungle fowl and the avian broiler, DNA methylation was described separately for the liver and muscle tissue. Generally, chicken displays analogous methylation pattern with that of animals and plants. DNA methylation is enriched in the gene body regions and the repetitive sequences, and depleted in the transcription start site (TSS) and the transcription termination site (TTS). Most of the CpG islands in the chicken genome are kept in unmethylated state. Promoter methylation is negatively correlated with the gene expression level, indicating its suppressive role in regulating gene transcription. This work contributes to our understanding of epigenetics in birds. PMID:21573164

  8. A Pooled Genome-Wide Association Study of Asperger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Varun; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Murphy, Laura; Chan, Allen; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Peltonen, Leena; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, alongside the presence of unusually repetitive, restricted interests and stereotyped behaviour. Individuals with AS have no delay in cognitive and language development. It is a subset of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), which are highly heritable and has a population prevalence of approximately 1%. Few studies have investigated the genetic basis of AS. To address this gap in the literature, we performed a genome-wide pooled DNA association study to identify candidate loci in 612 individuals (294 cases and 318 controls) of Caucasian ancestry, using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. We identified 11 SNPs that had a p-value below 1x10-5. These SNPs were independently genotyped in the same sample. Three of the SNPs (rs1268055, rs7785891 and rs2782448) were nominally significant, though none remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Two of our top three SNPs (rs7785891 and rs2782448) lie in loci previously implicated in ASC. However, investigation of the three SNPs in the ASC genome-wide association dataset from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium indicated that these three SNPs were not significantly associated with ASC. The effect sizes of the variants were modest, indicating that our study was not sufficiently powered to identify causal variants with precision.

  9. Genome-wide nucleotide-level mammalian ancestor reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Paten, Benedict; Herrero, Javier; Fitzgerald, Stephen; Beal, Kathryn; Flicek, Paul; Holmes, Ian; Birney, Ewan

    2008-11-01

    Recently attention has been turned to the problem of reconstructing complete ancestral sequences from large multiple alignments. Successful generation of these genome-wide reconstructions will facilitate a greater knowledge of the events that have driven evolution. We present a new evolutionary alignment modeler, called "Ortheus," for inferring the evolutionary history of a multiple alignment, in terms of both substitutions and, importantly, insertions and deletions. Based on a multiple sequence probabilistic transducer model of the type proposed by Holmes, Ortheus uses efficient stochastic graph-based dynamic programming methods. Unlike other methods, Ortheus does not rely on a single fixed alignment from which to work. Ortheus is also more scaleable than previous methods while being fast, stable, and open source. Large-scale simulations show that Ortheus performs close to optimally on a deep mammalian phylogeny. Simulations also indicate that significant proportions of errors due to insertions and deletions can be avoided by not assuming a fixed alignment. We additionally use a challenging hold-out cross-validation procedure to test the method; using the reconstructions to predict extant sequence bases, we demonstrate significant improvements over using closest extant neighbor sequences. Accompanying this paper, a new, public, and genome-wide set of Ortheus ancestor alignments provide an intriguing new resource for evolutionary studies in mammals. As a first piece of analysis, we attempt to recover "fossilized" ancestral pseudogenes. We confidently find 31 cases in which the ancestral sequence had a more complete sequence than any of the extant sequences.

  10. Genome-wide analysis of differential RNA editing in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Prashant Kumar; Bagnati, Marta; Delahaye-Duriez, Andree; Ko, Jeong-Hun; Rotival, Maxime; Langley, Sarah R.; Shkura, Kirill; Mazzuferi, Manuela; Danis, Bénédicte; van Eyll, Jonathan; Foerch, Patrik; Behmoaras, Jacques; Kaminski, Rafal M.; Petretto, Enrico; Johnson, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    The recoding of genetic information through RNA editing contributes to proteomic diversity, but the extent and significance of RNA editing in disease is poorly understood. In particular, few studies have investigated the relationship between RNA editing and disease at a genome-wide level. Here, we developed a framework for the genome-wide detection of RNA sites that are differentially edited in disease. Using RNA-sequencing data from 100 hippocampi from mice with epilepsy (pilocarpine–temporal lobe epilepsy model) and 100 healthy control hippocampi, we identified 256 RNA sites (overlapping with 87 genes) that were significantly differentially edited between epileptic cases and controls. The degree of differential RNA editing in epileptic mice correlated with frequency of seizures, and the set of genes differentially RNA-edited between case and control mice were enriched for functional terms highly relevant to epilepsy, including “neuron projection” and “seizures.” Genes with differential RNA editing were preferentially enriched for genes with a genetic association to epilepsy. Indeed, we found that they are significantly enriched for genes that harbor nonsynonymous de novo mutations in patients with epileptic encephalopathy and for common susceptibility variants associated with generalized epilepsy. These analyses reveal a functional convergence between genes that are differentially RNA-edited in acquired symptomatic epilepsy and those that contribute risk for genetic epilepsy. Taken together, our results suggest a potential role for RNA editing in the epileptic hippocampus in the occurrence and severity of epileptic seizures. PMID:28250018

  11. A Pooled Genome-Wide Association Study of Asperger Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, Varun; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Murphy, Laura; Chan, Allen; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E.; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, alongside the presence of unusually repetitive, restricted interests and stereotyped behaviour. Individuals with AS have no delay in cognitive and language development. It is a subset of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), which are highly heritable and has a population prevalence of approximately 1%. Few studies have investigated the genetic basis of AS. To address this gap in the literature, we performed a genome-wide pooled DNA association study to identify candidate loci in 612 individuals (294 cases and 318 controls) of Caucasian ancestry, using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. We identified 11 SNPs that had a p-value below 1x10-5. These SNPs were independently genotyped in the same sample. Three of the SNPs (rs1268055, rs7785891 and rs2782448) were nominally significant, though none remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Two of our top three SNPs (rs7785891 and rs2782448) lie in loci previously implicated in ASC. However, investigation of the three SNPs in the ASC genome-wide association dataset from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium indicated that these three SNPs were not significantly associated with ASC. The effect sizes of the variants were modest, indicating that our study was not sufficiently powered to identify causal variants with precision. PMID:26176695

  12. FVGWAS: Fast Voxelwise Genome Wide Association Analysis of Large-scale Imaging Genetic Data 1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Meiyan; Nichols, Thomas; Huang, Chao; Yang, Yu; Lu, Zhaohua; Feng, Qianjing; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C; Zhu, Hongtu

    2015-01-01

    More and more large-scale imaging genetic studies are being widely conducted to collect a rich set of imaging, genetic, and clinical data to detect putative genes for complexly inherited neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Several major big-data challenges arise from testing genome-wide (NC > 12 million known variants) associations with signals at millions of locations (NV ~ 106) in the brain from thousands of subjects (n ~ 103). The aim of this paper is to develop a Fast Voxelwise Genome Wide Association analysiS (FVGWAS) framework to e ciently carry out whole-genome analyses of whole-brain data. FVGWAS consists of three components including a heteroscedastic linear model, a global sure independence screening (G-SIS) procedure, and a detection procedure based on wild bootstrap methods. Specifically, for standard linear association, the computational complexity is O(nNV NC) for voxelwise genome wide association analysis (VGWAS) method compared with O((NC + NV)n2) for FVGWAS. Simulation studies show that FVGWAS is an effcient method of searching sparse signals in an extremely large search space, while controlling for the family-wise error rate. Finally, we have successfully applied FVGWAS to a large-scale imaging genetic data analysis of ADNI data with 708 subjects, 193,275 voxels in RAVENS maps, and 501,584 SNPs, and the total processing time was 203,645 seconds for a single CPU. Our FVG-WAS may be a valuable statistical toolbox for large-scale imaging genetic analysis as the field is rapidly advancing with ultra-high-resolution imaging and whole-genome sequencing. PMID:26025292

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study in Immunocompetent Patients with Delayed Hypersensitivity to Sulfonamide Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Dickey, Allison; Yale, Steven; Trepanier, Lauren A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypersensitivity (HS) reactions to sulfonamide antibiotics occur uncommonly, but with potentially severe clinical manifestations. A familial predisposition to sulfonamide HS is suspected, but robust predictive genetic risk factors have yet to be identified. Strongly linked genetic polymorphisms have been used clinically as screening tests for other HS reactions prior to administration of high-risk drugs. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate for genetic risk of sulfonamide HS in the immunocompetent population using genome-wide association. Methods Ninety-one patients with symptoms after trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) attributable to “probable” drug HS based on medical record review and the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale, and 184 age- and sex-matched patients who tolerated a therapeutic course of TMP-SMX, were included in a genome-wide association study using both common and rare variant techniques. Additionally, two subgroups of HS patients with a more refined clinical phenotype (fever and rash; or fever, rash and eosinophilia) were evaluated separately. Results For the full dataset, no single nucleotide polymorphisms were suggestive of or reached genome-wide significance in the common variant analysis, nor was any genetic locus significant in the rare variant analysis. A single, possible gene locus association (COL12A1) was identified in the rare variant analysis for patients with both fever and rash, but the sample size was very small in this subgroup (n = 16), and this may be a false positive finding. No other significant associations were found for the subgroups. Conclusions No convincing genetic risk factors for sulfonamide HS were identified in this population. These negative findings may be due to challenges in accurately confirming the phenotype in exanthematous drug eruptions, or to unidentified gene-environment interactions influencing sulfonamide HS. PMID:27272151

  14. Longitudinal Genome-Wide Association of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in the Bogalusa Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Erin N.; Chen, Wei; Kähönen, Mika; Kettunen, Johannes; Lehtimäki, Terho; Peltonen, Leena; Raitakari, Olli T.; Salem, Rany M.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Shaw, Marian; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Topol, Eric J.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies have pinpointed many loci associated with CVD risk factors in adults. It is unclear, however, if these loci predict trait levels at all ages, if they are associated with how a trait develops over time, or if they could be used to screen individuals who are pre-symptomatic to provide the opportunity for preventive measures before disease onset. We completed a genome-wide association study on participants in the longitudinal Bogalusa Heart Study (BHS) and have characterized the association between genetic factors and the development of CVD risk factors from childhood to adulthood. We report 7 genome-wide significant associations involving CVD risk factors, two of which have been previously reported. Top regions were tested for replication in the Young Finns Study (YF) and two associations strongly replicated: rs247616 in CETP with HDL levels (combined P = 9.7×10−24), and rs445925 at APOE with LDL levels (combined P = 8.7×10−19). We show that SNPs previously identified in adult cross-sectional studies tend to show age-independent effects in the BHS with effect sizes consistent with previous reports. Previously identified variants were associated with adult trait levels above and beyond those seen in childhood; however, variants with time-dependent effects were also promising predictors. This is the first GWA study to evaluate the role of common genetic variants in the development of CVD risk factors in children as they advance through adulthood and highlights the utility of using longitudinal studies to identify genetic predictors of adult traits in children. PMID:20838585

  15. Genome-wide Pleiotropy Between Parkinson Disease and Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Witoelar, Aree; Jansen, Iris E; Wang, Yunpeng; Desikan, Rahul S; Gibbs, J Raphael; Blauwendraat, Cornelis; Thompson, Wesley K; Hernandez, Dena G; Djurovic, Srdjan; Schork, Andrew J; Bettella, Francesco; Ellinghaus, David; Franke, Andre; Lie, Benedicte A; McEvoy, Linda K; Karlsen, Tom H; Lesage, Suzanne; Morris, Huw R; Brice, Alexis; Wood, Nicholas W; Heutink, Peter; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew B; Dale, Anders M; Gasser, Thomas; Andreassen, Ole A; Sharma, Manu

    2017-07-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and pathway analyses supported long-standing observations of an association between immune-mediated diseases and Parkinson disease (PD). The post-GWAS era provides an opportunity for cross-phenotype analyses between different complex phenotypes. To test the hypothesis that there are common genetic risk variants conveying risk of both PD and autoimmune diseases (ie, pleiotropy) and to identify new shared genetic variants and their pathways by applying a novel statistical framework in a genome-wide approach. Using the conjunction false discovery rate method, this study analyzed GWAS data from a selection of archetypal autoimmune diseases among 138 511 individuals of European ancestry and systemically investigated pleiotropy between PD and type 1 diabetes, Crohn disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, psoriasis, and multiple sclerosis. NeuroX data (6927 PD cases and 6108 controls) were used for replication. The study investigated the biological correlation between the top loci through protein-protein interaction and changes in the gene expression and methylation levels. The dates of the analysis were June 10, 2015, to March 4, 2017. The primary outcome was a list of novel loci and their pathways involved in PD and autoimmune diseases. Genome-wide conjunctional analysis identified 17 novel loci at false discovery rate less than 0.05 with overlap between PD and autoimmune diseases, including known PD loci adjacent to GAK, HLA-DRB5, LRRK2, and MAPT for rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease. Replication confirmed the involvement of HLA, LRRK2, MAPT, TRIM10, and SETD1A in PD. Among the novel genes discovered, WNT3, KANSL1, CRHR1, BOLA2, and GUCY1A3 are within a protein-protein interaction network with known PD genes. A subset of novel loci was significantly associated with changes in methylation or expression levels of adjacent genes. The study findings provide novel mechanistic

  16. Genome-wide association study of antisocial personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rautiainen, M-R; Paunio, T; Repo-Tiihonen, E; Virkkunen, M; Ollila, H M; Sulkava, S; Jolanki, O; Palotie, A; Tiihonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) remains unclear. Although the most consistent biological finding is reduced grey matter volume in the frontal cortex, about 50% of the total liability to developing ASPD has been attributed to genetic factors. The contributing genes remain largely unknown. Therefore, we sought to study the genetic background of ASPD. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a replication analysis of Finnish criminal offenders fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for ASPD (N=370, N=5850 for controls, GWAS; N=173, N=3766 for controls and replication sample). The GWAS resulted in suggestive associations of two clusters of single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 6p21.2 and at 6p21.32 at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Imputation of HLA alleles revealed an independent association with DRB1*01:01 (odds ratio (OR)=2.19 (1.53–3.14), P=1.9 × 10-5). Two polymorphisms at 6p21.2 LINC00951–LRFN2 gene region were replicated in a separate data set, and rs4714329 reached genome-wide significance (OR=1.59 (1.37–1.85), P=1.6 × 10−9) in the meta-analysis. The risk allele also associated with antisocial features in the general population conditioned for severe problems in childhood family (β=0.68, P=0.012). Functional analysis in brain tissue in open access GTEx and Braineac databases revealed eQTL associations of rs4714329 with LINC00951 and LRFN2 in cerebellum. In humans, LINC00951 and LRFN2 are both expressed in the brain, especially in the frontal cortex, which is intriguing considering the role of the frontal cortex in behavior and the neuroanatomical findings of reduced gray matter volume in ASPD. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing genome-wide significant and replicable findings on genetic variants associated with any personality disorder. PMID:27598967

  17. Susceptibility to Childhood Pneumonia: A Genome-Wide Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Lystra P; Cho, Michael H; McDonald, Merry-Lynn N; Crapo, James D; Beaty, Terri H; Silverman, Edwin K; Hersh, Craig P

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that in adult smokers, a history of childhood pneumonia is associated with reduced lung function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. There have been few previous investigations using genome-wide association studies to investigate genetic predisposition to pneumonia. This study aims to identify the genetic variants associated with the development of pneumonia during childhood and over the course of the lifetime. Study subjects included current and former smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease participating in the COPDGene Study. Pneumonia was defined by subject self-report, with childhood pneumonia categorized as having the first episode at <16 years. Genome-wide association studies for childhood pneumonia (843 cases, 9,091 control subjects) and lifetime pneumonia (3,766 cases, 5,659 control subjects) were performed separately in non-Hispanic whites and African Americans. Non-Hispanic white and African American populations were combined in the meta-analysis. Top genetic variants from childhood pneumonia were assessed in network analysis. No single-nucleotide polymorphisms reached genome-wide significance, although we identified potential regions of interest. In the childhood pneumonia analysis, this included variants in NGR1 (P = 6.3 × 10(-8)), PAK6 (P = 3.3 × 10(-7)), and near MATN1 (P = 2.8 × 10(-7)). In the lifetime pneumonia analysis, this included variants in LOC339862 (P = 8.7 × 10(-7)), RAPGEF2 (P = 8.4 × 10(-7)), PHACTR1 (P = 6.1 × 10(-7)), near PRR27 (P = 4.3 × 10(-7)), and near MCPH1 (P = 2.7 × 10(-7)). Network analysis of the genes associated with childhood pneumonia included top networks related to development, blood vessel morphogenesis, muscle contraction, WNT signaling, DNA damage, apoptosis, inflammation, and immune response (P ≤ 0.05). We have identified genes potentially associated with the risk of pneumonia

  18. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation in Mixed Ancestry Individuals with Diabetes and Prediabetes from South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pheiffer, Carmen; Humphries, Stephen E.; Gamieldien, Junaid; Erasmus, Rajiv T.

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To conduct a genome-wide DNA methylation in individuals with type 2 diabetes, individuals with prediabetes, and control mixed ancestry individuals from South Africa. Methods. We used peripheral blood to perform genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in 3 individuals with screen detected diabetes, 3 individuals with prediabetes, and 3 individuals with normoglycaemia from the Bellville South Community, Cape Town, South Africa, who were age-, gender-, body mass index-, and duration of residency-matched. Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) was performed by Arraystar Inc. (Rockville, MD, USA). Results. Hypermethylated DMRs were 1160 (81.97%) and 124 (43.20%), respectively, in individuals with diabetes and prediabetes when both were compared to subjects with normoglycaemia. Our data shows that genes related to the immune system, signal transduction, glucose transport, and pancreas development have altered DNA methylation in subjects with prediabetes and diabetes. Pathway analysis based on the functional analysis mapping of genes to KEGG pathways suggested that the linoleic acid metabolism and arachidonic acid metabolism pathways are hypomethylated in prediabetes and diabetes. Conclusions. Our study suggests that epigenetic changes are likely to be an early process that occurs before the onset of overt diabetes. Detailed analysis of DMRs that shows gradual methylation differences from control versus prediabetes to prediabetes versus diabetes in a larger sample size is required to confirm these findings. PMID:27555869

  19. Natural CMT2 Variation Is Associated With Genome-Wide Methylation Changes and Temperature Seasonality

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xia; De Jonge, Jennifer; Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Pettersson, Mats E.; Sheng, Zheya; Hennig, Lars; Carlborg, Örjan

    2014-01-01

    As Arabidopsis thaliana has colonized a wide range of habitats across the world it is an attractive model for studying the genetic mechanisms underlying environmental adaptation. Here, we used public data from two collections of A. thaliana accessions to associate genetic variability at individual loci with differences in climates at the sampling sites. We use a novel method to screen the genome for plastic alleles that tolerate a broader climate range than the major allele. This approach reduces confounding with population structure and increases power compared to standard genome-wide association methods. Sixteen novel loci were found, including an association between Chromomethylase 2 (CMT2) and temperature seasonality where the genome-wide CHH methylation was different for the group of accessions carrying the plastic allele. Cmt2 mutants were shown to be more tolerant to heat-stress, suggesting genetic regulation of epigenetic modifications as a likely mechanism underlying natural adaptation to variable temperatures, potentially through differential allelic plasticity to temperature-stress. PMID:25503602

  20. Case-Control Genome-Wide Association of Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah; Ripke, Stephan; Anney, Richard J.L.; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Gill, Michael; Kent, Lindsey; Holmans, Peter; Middleton, Frank; Thapar, Anita; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Daly, Mark; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schäfer, Helmut; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Freitag, Christine; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Rothenberger, Aribert; Hawi, Ziarih; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective Although twin and family studies have shown attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. Thus, additional genomewide association studies (GWAS) are needed. Method We used case-control analyses of 896 cases with DSM-IV ADHD genotyped using the Affymetrix 5.0 array and 2,455 repository controls screened for psychotic and bipolar symptoms genotyped using Affymetrix 6.0 arrays. A consensus SNP set was imputed using BEAGLE 3.0, resulting in an analysis dataset of 1,033,244 SNPs. The data were analyzed using a generalized linear model. Results No genome-wide significant associations were found. The most significant results implicated the following genes: PRKG1, FLNC, TCERG1L, PPM1H, NXPH1, PPM1H, CDH13, HK1 and HKDC1. Conclusions The current analyses are a useful addition to the present literature and will make a valuable contribution to future meta-analyses. The candidate gene findings are consistent with a prior meta-analysis in suggesting that the effects of ADHD risk variants must, individually, be very small and/or include multiple rare alleles. PMID:20732627

  1. Case-control genome-wide association study of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Neale, Benjamin M; Medland, Sarah; Ripke, Stephan; Anney, Richard J L; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Gill, Michael; Kent, Lindsey; Holmans, Peter; Middleton, Frank; Thapar, Anita; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V; Daly, Mark; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schäfer, Helmut; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Freitag, Christine; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Rothenberger, Aribert; Hawi, Ziarih; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-09-01

    Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. Thus additional genomewide association studies (GWAS) are needed. We used case-control analyses of 896 cases with DSM-IV ADHD genotyped using the Affymetrix 5.0 array and 2,455 repository controls screened for psychotic and bipolar symptoms genotyped using Affymetrix 6.0 arrays. A consensus SNP set was imputed using BEAGLE 3.0, resulting in an analysis dataset of 1,033,244 SNPs. Data were analyzed using a generalized linear model. No genome-wide significant associations were found. The most significant results implicated the following genes: PRKG1, FLNC, TCERG1L, PPM1H, NXPH1, PPM1H, CDH13, HK1, and HKDC1. The current analyses are a useful addition to the present literature and will make a valuable contribution to future meta-analyses. The candidate gene findings are consistent with a prior meta-analysis in suggesting that the effects of ADHD risk variants must, individually, be very small and/or include multiple rare alleles. 2010 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genome-wide interaction analysis reveals replicated epistatic effects on brain structure

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Jahanshad, Neda; Kohannim, Omid; Hua, Xue; Toga, Arthur W.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of several genes that affect risk for Alzheimer's disease ignited a worldwide search for Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), common genetic variants that affect the brain. Genome-wide search of all possible SNP-SNP interactions is challenging and rarely attempted, due to the complexity of conducting ∼1011 pairwise statistical tests. However, recent advances in machine learning, e.g., iterative sure independence screening (SIS), make it possible to analyze datasets with vastly more predictors than observations. Using an implementation of the SIS algorithm (called EPISIS), we performed a genome-wide interaction analysis testing all possible SNP-SNP interactions affecting regional brain volumes measured on MRI and mapped using tensor-based morphometry. We identified a significant SNP-SNP interaction between rs1345203 and rs1213205 that explains 1.9% of the variance in temporal lobe volume. We mapped the whole-brain, voxelwise effects of the interaction in the ADNI dataset and separately in an independent replication dataset of healthy twins (QTIM). Each additional loading in the interaction effect was associated with ∼5% greater brain regional brain volume (a protective effect) in both ADNI and QTIM samples. PMID:25264344

  3. Genome-wide characterization of microsatellites in Triticeae species: abundance, distribution and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Pingchuan; Wang, Meng; Feng, Kewei; Cui, Licao; Tong, Wei; Song, Weining; Nie, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites are an important constituent of plant genome and distributed across entire genome. In this study, genome-wide analysis of microsatellites in 8 Triticeae species and 9 model plants revealed that microsatellite characteristics were similar among the Triticeae species. Furthermore, genome-wide microsatellite markers were designed in wheat and then used to analyze the evolutionary relationship of wheat and other Triticeae species. Results displayed that Aegilops tauschii was found to be the closest species to Triticum aestivum, followed by Triticum urartu, Triticum turgidum and Aegilops speltoides, while Triticum monococcum, Aegilops sharonensis and Hordeum vulgare showed a relatively lower PCR amplification effectivity. Additionally, a significantly higher PCR amplification effectivity was found in chromosomes at the same subgenome than its homoeologous when these markers were subjected to search against different chromosomes in wheat. After a rigorous screening process, a total of 20,666 markers showed high amplification and polymorphic potential in wheat and its relatives, which were integrated with the public available wheat markers and then anchored to the genome of wheat (CS). This study not only provided the useful resource for SSR markers development in Triticeae species, but also shed light on the evolution of polyploid wheat from the perspective of microsatellites. PMID:27561724

  4. Progress of genome wide association study in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zhipeng; Wang, Shouzhi; Li, Hui

    2012-08-22

    Domestic animals are invaluable resources for study of the molecular architecture of complex traits. Although the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for economically important traits in domestic animals has achieved remarkable results in recent decades, not all of the genetic variation in the complex traits has been captured because of the low density of markers used in QTL mapping studies. The genome wide association study (GWAS), which utilizes high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), provides a new way to tackle this issue. Encouraging achievements in dissection of the genetic mechanisms of complex diseases in humans have resulted from the use of GWAS. At present, GWAS has been applied to the field of domestic animal breeding and genetics, and some advances have been made. Many genes or markers that affect economic traits of interest in domestic animals have been identified. In this review, advances in the use of GWAS in domestic animals are described.

  5. Microfluidics for genome-wide studies involving next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Travis W.; Lu, Chang

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized how molecular biology studies are conducted. Its decreasing cost and increasing throughput permit profiling of genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic features for a wide range of applications. Microfluidics has been proven to be highly complementary to NGS technology with its unique capabilities for handling small volumes of samples and providing platforms for automation, integration, and multiplexing. In this article, we review recent progress on applying microfluidics to facilitate genome-wide studies. We emphasize on several technical aspects of NGS and how they benefit from coupling with microfluidic technology. We also summarize recent efforts on developing microfluidic technology for genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic studies, with emphasis on single cell analysis. We envision rapid growth in these directions, driven by the needs for testing scarce primary cell samples from patients in the context of precision medicine. PMID:28396707

  6. Implications of genome-wide association studies in cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jai N; McLeod, Howard L; Innocenti, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) provide an agnostic approach to identifying potential genetic variants associated with disease susceptibility, prognosis of survival and/or predictive of drug response. Although these techniques are costly and interpretation of study results is challenging, they do allow for a more unbiased interrogation of the entire genome, resulting in the discovery of novel genes and understanding of novel biological associations. This review will focus on the implications of GWAS in cancer therapy, in particular germ-line mutations, including findings from major GWAS which have identified predictive genetic loci for clinical outcome and/or toxicity. Lessons and challenges in cancer GWAS are also discussed, including the need for functional analysis and replication, as well as future perspectives for biological and clinical utility. Given the large heterogeneity in response to cancer therapeutics, novel methods of identifying mechanisms and biology of variable drug response and ultimately treatment individualization will be indispensable. PMID:23701381

  7. High-resolution genome-wide mapping of histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Roh, Tae-young; Ngau, Wing Chi; Cui, Kairong; Landsman, David; Zhao, Keji

    2004-08-01

    The expression patterns of eukaryotic genomes are controlled by their chromatin structure, consisting of nucleosome subunits in which DNA of approximately 146 bp is wrapped around a core of 8 histone molecules. Post-translational histone modifications play an essential role in modifying chromatin structure. Here we apply a combination of SAGE and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocols to determine the distribution of hyperacetylated histones H3 and H4 in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. We call this approach genome-wide mapping technique (GMAT). Using GMAT, we find that the highest acetylation levels are detected in the 5' end of a gene's coding region, but not in the promoter. Furthermore, we show that the histone acetyltransferase, GCN5p, regulates H3 acetylation in the promoter and 5' end of the coding regions. These findings indicate that GMAT should find valuable applications in mapping target sites of chromatin-modifying enzymes.

  8. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Drug-Resistance Determinants.

    PubMed

    Volkman, Sarah K; Herman, Jonathan; Lukens, Amanda K; Hartl, Daniel L

    2017-03-01

    Population genetic strategies that leverage association, selection, and linkage have identified drug-resistant loci. However, challenges and limitations persist in identifying drug-resistance loci in malaria. In this review we discuss the genetic basis of drug resistance and the use of genome-wide association studies, complemented by selection and linkage studies, to identify and understand mechanisms of drug resistance and response. We also discuss the implications of nongenetic mechanisms of drug resistance recently reported in the literature, and present models of the interplay between nongenetic and genetic processes that contribute to the emergence of drug resistance. Throughout, we examine artemisinin resistance as an example to emphasize challenges in identifying phenotypes suitable for population genetic studies as well as complications due to multiple-factor drug resistance. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Genome-wide measurement of RNA folding energies.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yue; Qu, Kun; Ouyang, Zhengqing; Kertesz, Michael; Li, Jun; Tibshirani, Robert; Makino, Debora L; Nutter, Robert C; Segal, Eran; Chang, Howard Y

    2012-10-26

    RNA structural transitions are important in the function and regulation of RNAs. Here, we reveal a layer of transcriptome organization in the form of RNA folding energies. By probing yeast RNA structures at different temperatures, we obtained relative melting temperatures (Tm) for RNA structures in over 4000 transcripts. Specific signatures of RNA Tm demarcated the polarity of mRNA open reading frames and highlighted numerous candidate regulatory RNA motifs in 3' untranslated regions. RNA Tm distinguished noncoding versus coding RNAs and identified mRNAs with distinct cellular functions. We identified thousands of putative RNA thermometers, and their presence is predictive of the pattern of RNA decay in vivo during heat shock. The exosome complex recognizes unpaired bases during heat shock to degrade these RNAs, coupling intrinsic structural stabilities to gene regulation. Thus, genome-wide structural dynamics of RNA can parse functional elements of the transcriptome and reveal diverse biological insights.

  10. [Genome-wide associations for cigarette smoking behavior].

    PubMed

    Strauss, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Diseases related to tobacco smoking are the second leading cause of death in the world. Despite increasing evidence of genetic determination, the susceptibility genes and loci underlying various aspects of smoking behavior are largely unknown. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) provided a new conceptual framework in the search for variants underlying common traits/disorders. A massive scan of the genome and a "hypothesis-free" approach enable discovery of new aspects of genetics of complex traits. In this paper the results of GWASs and GWAS meta-analyzes of cigarette smoking behavior and nicotine dependence are reviewed with the particular attention to smoking cessation success and the replacement therapy. The results of these studies are discussed in the context of the results of the candidate gene association studies. Studies on the role of the genomic regions, identified in GWASs, in the development of smoking-related diseases are also discussed.

  11. The utility of genome-wide association studies in hepatology.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Tom H; Melum, Espen; Franke, Andre

    2010-05-01

    Over the last 4 years, more than 450 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successfully performed in a variety of human traits, of which approximately 2% relates to the field of hepatology. Whereas the many robust susceptibility gene findings have provided insight into fundamental physiological aspects of the phenotypes that have been studied, the widespread application has also revealed important limitations of the GWAS design. This review aims to systematically summarize both the strengths and the weaknesses of GWAS, as well as underscore important experiences made in model diseases outside the field of hepatology. By reviewing the GWAS performed in hepatology so far on this broader background, extensions and guidelines for the rational application of the study design in hepatology are proposed.

  12. Implications of genome-wide association studies in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jai N; McLeod, Howard L; Innocenti, Federico

    2013-09-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) provide an agnostic approach to identifying potential genetic variants associated with disease susceptibility, prognosis of survival and/or predictive of drug response. Although these techniques are costly and interpretation of study results is challenging, they do allow for a more unbiased interrogation of the entire genome, resulting in the discovery of novel genes and understanding of novel biological associations. This review will focus on the implications of GWAS in cancer therapy, in particular germ-line mutations, including findings from major GWAS which have identified predictive genetic loci for clinical outcome and/or toxicity. Lessons and challenges in cancer GWAS are also discussed, including the need for functional analysis and replication, as well as future perspectives for biological and clinical utility. Given the large heterogeneity in response to cancer therapeutics, novel methods of identifying mechanisms and biology of variable drug response and ultimately treatment individualization will be indispensable. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Bioinformatics challenges in genome-wide association studies (GWAS).

    PubMed

    De, Rishika; Bush, William S; Moore, Jason H

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a powerful tool for investigators to examine the human genome to detect genetic risk factors, reveal the genetic architecture of diseases and open up new opportunities for treatment and prevention. However, despite its successes, GWAS have not been able to identify genetic loci that are effective classifiers of disease, limiting their value for genetic testing. This chapter highlights the challenges that lie ahead for GWAS in better identifying disease risk predictors, and how we may address them. In this regard, we review basic concepts regarding GWAS, the technologies used for capturing genetic variation, the missing heritability problem, the need for efficient study design especially for replication efforts, reducing the bias introduced into a dataset, and how to utilize new resources available, such as electronic medical records. We also look to what lies ahead for the field, and the approaches that can be taken to realize the full potential of GWAS.

  14. Quality control for genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Gondro, Cedric; Lee, Seung Hwan; Lee, Hak Kyo; Porto-Neto, Laercio R

    2013-01-01

    This chapter overviews the quality control (QC) issues for SNP-based genotyping methods used in genome-wide association studies. The main metrics for evaluating the quality of the genotypes are discussed followed by a worked out example of QC pipeline starting with raw data and finishing with a fully filtered dataset ready for downstream analysis. The emphasis is on automation of data storage, filtering, and manipulation to ensure data integrity throughput the process and on how to extract a global summary from these high dimensional datasets to allow better-informed downstream analytical decisions. All examples will be run using the R statistical programming language followed by a practical example using a fully automated QC pipeline for the Illumina platform.

  15. Genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenomics of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Eugene; Lane, Hsien-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorders worldwide. Doctors must prescribe antidepressants based on educated guesses due to the fact that it is unmanageable to predict the effectiveness of any particular antidepressant in an individual patient. With the recent advent of scientific research, the genome-wide association study (GWAS) is extensively employed to analyze hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms by high-throughput genotyping technologies. In addition to the candidate-gene approach, the GWAS approach has recently been utilized to investigate the determinants of antidepressant response to therapy. In this study, we reviewed GWAS studies, their limitations and future directions with respect to the pharmacogenomics of antidepressants in MDD.

  16. Genome-wide discovery of loci influencing chemotherapy cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Watters, James W; Kraja, Aldi; Meucci, Melissa A; Province, Michael A; McLeod, Howard L

    2004-08-10

    Little is known about the heritability of chemotherapy activity or the identity of genes that may enable the individualization of cancer chemotherapy. Although numerous genes are likely to influence chemotherapy response, current candidate gene-based pharmacogenetics approaches require a priori knowledge and the selection of a small number of candidate genes for hypothesis testing. In this study, an ex vivo familial genetics strategy using lymphoblastoid cells derived from Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain reference pedigrees was used to discover genetic determinants of chemotherapy cytotoxicity. Cytotoxicity to the mechanistically distinct chemotherapy agents 5-fluorouracil and docetaxel were shown to be heritable traits, with heritability values ranging from 0.26 to 0.65 for 5-fluorouracil and 0.21 to 0.70 for docetaxel, varying with dose. Genome-wide linkage analysis was also used to map a quantitative trait locus influencing the cellular effects of 5-fluorouracil to chromosome 9q13-q22 [logarithm of odds (LOD) = 3.44], and two quantitative trait loci influencing the cellular effects of docetaxel to chromosomes 5q11-21 (LOD = 2.21) and 9q13-q22 (LOD = 2.73). Finally, 5-fluorouracil and docetaxel were shown to cause apoptotic cell death involving caspase-3 cleavage in Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain lymphoblastoid cells. This study identifies genomic regions likely to harbor genes important for chemotherapy cytotoxicity using genome-wide linkage analysis in human pedigrees and provides a widely applicable strategy for pharmacogenomic discovery without the requirement for a priori candidate gene selection.

  17. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Landt, Margarita CT Slof-Op t; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O'Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10-7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10-6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10-6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10-6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4×10-6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:24514567

  18. Genome-wide significant loci for addiction and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, K.; Almasy, L.; Knowles, E.E.M.; Kent, J.W.; Curran, J.E.; Dyer, T.D.; Göring, H.H.H.; Olvera, R.L.; Fox, P.T.; Pearlson, G.D.; Krystal, J.H.; Duggirala, R.; Blangero, J.; Glahn, D.C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Psychiatric comorbidity is common among individuals with addictive disorders, with patients frequently suffering from anxiety disorders. While the genetic architecture of comorbid addictive and anxiety disorders remains unclear, elucidating the genes involved could provide important insights into the underlying etiology. Methods Here we examine a sample of 1284 Mexican-Americans from randomly selected extended pedigrees. Variance decomposition methods were used to examine the role of genetics in addiction phenotypes (lifetime history of alcohol dependence, drug dependence or chronic smoking) and various forms of clinically relevant anxiety. Genome-wide univariate and bivariate linkage scans were conducted to localize the chromosomal regions influencing these traits. Results Addiction phenotypes and anxiety were shown to be heritable and univariate genome-wide linkage scans revealed significant quantitative trait loci for drug dependence (14q13.2–q21.2, LOD = 3.322) and a broad anxiety phenotype (12q24.32–q24.33, LOD = 2.918). Significant positive genetic correlations were observed between anxiety and each of the addiction subtypes (ρg = 0.550–0.655) and further investigation with bivariate linkage analyses identified significant pleiotropic signals for alcohol dependence-anxiety (9q33.1–q33.2, LOD = 3.054) and drug dependence-anxiety (18p11.23–p11.22, LOD = 3.425). Conclusions This study confirms the shared genetic underpinnings of addiction and anxiety and identifies genomic loci involved in the etiology of these comorbid disorders. The linkage signal for anxiety on 12q24 spans the location of TMEM132D, an emerging gene of interest from previous GWAS of anxiety traits, whilst the bivariate linkage signal identified for anxiety-alcohol on 9q33 peak coincides with a region where rare CNVs have been associated with psychiatric disorders. Other signals identified implicate novel regions of the genome in addiction genetics. PMID:27318301

  19. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Eun-Heui; Zhang, Enji; Ko, Youngkwon; Sim, Woo Seog; Moon, Dong Eon; Yoon, Keon Jung; Hong, Jang Hee; Lee, Won Hyung

    2013-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic, progressive, and devastating pain syndrome characterized by spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia, allodynia, altered skin temperature, and motor dysfunction. Although previous gene expression profiling studies have been conducted in animal pain models, there genome-wide expression profiling in the whole blood of CRPS patients has not been reported yet. Here, we successfully identified certain pain-related genes through genome-wide expression profiling in the blood from CRPS patients. We found that 80 genes were differentially expressed between 4 CRPS patients (2 CRPS I and 2 CRPS II) and 5 controls (cut-off value: 1.5-fold change and p<0.05). Most of those genes were associated with signal transduction, developmental processes, cell structure and motility, and immunity and defense. The expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class I A subtype (HLA-A29.1), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), alanine aminopeptidase N (ANPEP), l-histidine decarboxylase (HDC), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 3 receptor (G-CSF3R), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) genes selected from the microarray were confirmed in 24 CRPS patients and 18 controls by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). We focused on the MMP9 gene that, by qRT-PCR, showed a statistically significant difference in expression in CRPS patients compared to controls with the highest relative fold change (4.0±1.23 times and p = 1.4×10−4). The up-regulation of MMP9 gene in the blood may be related to the pain progression in CRPS patients. Our findings, which offer a valuable contribution to the understanding of the differential gene expression in CRPS may help in the understanding of the pathophysiology of CRPS pain progression. PMID:24244504

  20. Genome-wide association and genomic selection in animal breeding.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Ben; Goddard, Mike

    2010-11-01

    Results from genome-wide association studies in livestock, and humans, has lead to the conclusion that the effect of individual quantitative trait loci (QTL) on complex traits, such as yield, are likely to be small; therefore, a large number of QTL are necessary to explain genetic variation in these traits. Given this genetic architecture, gains from marker-assisted selection (MAS) programs using only a small number of DNA markers to trace a limited number of QTL is likely to be small. This has lead to the development of alternative technology for using the available dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) information, called genomic selection. Genomic selection uses a genome-wide panel of dense markers so that all QTL are likely to be in linkage disequilibrium with at least one SNP. The genomic breeding values are predicted to be the sum of the effect of these SNPs across the entire genome. In dairy cattle breeding, the accuracy of genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) that can be achieved and the fact that these are available early in life have lead to rapid adoption of the technology. Here, we discuss the design of experiments necessary to achieve accurate prediction of GEBV in future generations in terms of the number of markers necessary and the size of the reference population where marker effects are estimated. We also present a simple method for implementing genomic selection using a genomic relationship matrix. Future challenges discussed include using whole genome sequence data to improve the accuracy of genomic selection and management of inbreeding through genomic relationships.

  1. Genome-Wide Association Study of Meiotic Recombination Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Ferdouse; Chowdhury, Reshmi; Cheung, Vivian G.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Feingold, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is an essential step in gametogenesis, and is one that also generates genetic diversity. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and molecular studies have identified genes that influence of human meiotic recombination. RNF212 is associated with total or average number of recombination events, and PRDM9 is associated with the locations of hotspots, or sequences where crossing over appears to cluster. In addition, a common inversion on chromosome 17 is strongly associated with recombination. Other genes have been identified by GWAS, but those results have not been replicated. In this study, using new datasets, we characterized additional recombination phenotypes to uncover novel candidates and further dissect the role of already known loci. We used three datasets totaling 1562 two-generation families, including 3108 parents with 4304 children. We estimated five different recombination phenotypes including two novel phenotypes (average recombination counts within recombination hotspots and outside of hotspots) using dense SNP array genotype data. We then performed gender-specific and combined-sex genome-wide association studies (GWAS) meta-analyses. We replicated associations for several previously reported recombination genes, including RNF212 and PRDM9. By looking specifically at recombination events outside of hotspots, we showed for the first time that PRDM9 has different effects in males and females. We identified several new candidate loci, particularly for recombination events outside of hotspots. These include regions near the genes SPINK6, EVC2, ARHGAP25, and DLGAP2. This study expands our understanding of human meiotic recombination by characterizing additional features that vary across individuals, and identifying regulatory variants influencing the numbers and locations of recombination events. PMID:27733454

  2. Genome-Wide Association Study of Meiotic Recombination Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Begum, Ferdouse; Chowdhury, Reshmi; Cheung, Vivian G; Sherman, Stephanie L; Feingold, Eleanor

    2016-12-07

    Meiotic recombination is an essential step in gametogenesis, and is one that also generates genetic diversity. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and molecular studies have identified genes that influence of human meiotic recombination. RNF212 is associated with total or average number of recombination events, and PRDM9 is associated with the locations of hotspots, or sequences where crossing over appears to cluster. In addition, a common inversion on chromosome 17 is strongly associated with recombination. Other genes have been identified by GWAS, but those results have not been replicated. In this study, using new datasets, we characterized additional recombination phenotypes to uncover novel candidates and further dissect the role of already known loci. We used three datasets totaling 1562 two-generation families, including 3108 parents with 4304 children. We estimated five different recombination phenotypes including two novel phenotypes (average recombination counts within recombination hotspots and outside of hotspots) using dense SNP array genotype data. We then performed gender-specific and combined-sex genome-wide association studies (GWAS) meta-analyses. We replicated associations for several previously reported recombination genes, including RNF212 and PRDM9 By looking specifically at recombination events outside of hotspots, we showed for the first time that PRDM9 has different effects in males and females. We identified several new candidate loci, particularly for recombination events outside of hotspots. These include regions near the genes SPINK6, EVC2, ARHGAP25, and DLGAP2 This study expands our understanding of human meiotic recombination by characterizing additional features that vary across individuals, and identifying regulatory variants influencing the numbers and locations of recombination events.

  3. A genome-wide association study of attempted suicide

    PubMed Central

    Willour, Virginia L.; Seifuddin, Fayaz; Mahon, Pamela B.; Jancic, Dubravka; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Steele, Jo; Schweizer, Barbara; Goes, Fernando S.; Mondimore, Francis M.; MacKinnon, Dean F.; Perlis, Roy H.; Lee, Phil Hyoun; Huang, Jie; Kelsoe, John R.; Shilling, Paul D.; Rietschel, Marcella; Nöthen, Markus; Cichon, Sven; Gurling, Hugh; Purcell, Shaun; Smoller, Jordan W.; Craddock, Nicholas; DePaulo, J. Raymond; Schulze, Thomas G.; McMahon, Francis J.; Zandi, Peter P.; Potash, James B.

    2011-01-01

    The heritable component to attempted and completed suicide is partly related to psychiatric disorders and also partly independent of them. While attempted suicide linkage regions have been identified on 2p11–12 and 6q25–26, there are likely many more such loci, the discovery of which will require a much higher resolution approach, such as the genome-wide association study (GWAS). With this in mind, we conducted an attempted suicide GWAS that compared the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes of 1,201 bipolar (BP) subjects with a history of suicide attempts to the genotypes of 1,497 BP subjects without a history of suicide attempts. 2,507 SNPs with evidence for association at p<0.001 were identified. These associated SNPs were subsequently tested for association in a large and independent BP sample set. None of these SNPs were significantly associated in the replication sample after correcting for multiple testing, but the combined analysis of the two sample sets produced an association signal on 2p25 (rs300774) at the threshold of genome-wide significance (p= 5.07 × 10−8). The associated SNPs on 2p25 fall in a large linkage disequilibrium block containing the ACP1 gene, a gene whose expression is significantly elevated in BP subjects who have completed suicide. Furthermore, the ACP1 protein is a tyrosine phosphatase that influences Wnt signaling, a pathway regulated by lithium, making ACP1 a functional candidate for involvement in the phenotype. Larger GWAS sample sets will be required to confirm the signal on 2p25 and to identify additional genetic risk factors increasing susceptibility for attempted suicide. PMID:21423239

  4. A genome-wide methylation study on obesity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojing; Su, Shaoyong; Barnes, Vernon A.; De Miguel, Carmen; Pollock, Jennifer; Ownby, Dennis; Shi, Huidong; Zhu, Haidong; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    Besides differential methylation, DNA methylation variation has recently been proposed and demonstrated to be a potential contributing factor to cancer risk. Here we aim to examine whether differential variability in methylation is also an important feature of obesity, a typical non-malignant common complex disease. We analyzed genome-wide methylation profiles of over 470,000 CpGs in peripheral blood samples from 48 obese and 48 lean African-American youth aged 14–20 y old. A substantial number of differentially variable CpG sites (DVCs), using statistics based on variances, as well as a substantial number of differentially methylated CpG sites (DMCs), using statistics based on means, were identified. Similar to the findings in cancers, DVCs generally exhibited an outlier structure and were more variable in cases than in controls. By randomly splitting the current sample into a discovery and validation set, we observed that both the DVCs and DMCs identified from the first set could independently predict obesity status in the second set. Furthermore, both the genes harboring DMCs and the genes harboring DVCs showed significant enrichment of genes identified by genome-wide association studies on obesity and related diseases, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancers, supporting their roles in the etiology and pathogenesis of obesity. We generalized the recent finding on methylation variability in cancer research to obesity and demonstrated that differential variability is also an important feature of obesity-related methylation changes. Future studies on the epigenetics of obesity will benefit from both statistics based on means and statistics based on variances. PMID:23644594

  5. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Slof-Op t Landt, Margarita CT; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O’Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10−7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10−6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10−6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10−6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P= 4×10−6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:21079607

  6. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Boraska, V; Franklin, C S; Floyd, J A B; Thornton, L M; Huckins, L M; Southam, L; Rayner, N W; Tachmazidou, I; Klump, K L; Treasure, J; Lewis, C M; Schmidt, U; Tozzi, F; Kiezebrink, K; Hebebrand, J; Gorwood, P; Adan, R A H; Kas, M J H; Favaro, A; Santonastaso, P; Fernández-Aranda, F; Gratacos, M; Rybakowski, F; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, M; Kaprio, J; Keski-Rahkonen, A; Raevuori, A; Van Furth, E F; Slof-Op 't Landt, M C T; Hudson, J I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T; Knudsen, G P S; Monteleone, P; Kaplan, A S; Karwautz, A; Hakonarson, H; Berrettini, W H; Guo, Y; Li, D; Schork, N J; Komaki, G; Ando, T; Inoko, H; Esko, T; Fischer, K; Männik, K; Metspalu, A; Baker, J H; Cone, R D; Dackor, J; DeSocio, J E; Hilliard, C E; O'Toole, J K; Pantel, J; Szatkiewicz, J P; Taico, C; Zerwas, S; Trace, S E; Davis, O S P; Helder, S; Bühren, K; Burghardt, R; de Zwaan, M; Egberts, K; Ehrlich, S; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Herzog, W; Imgart, H; Scherag, A; Scherag, S; Zipfel, S; Boni, C; Ramoz, N; Versini, A; Brandys, M K; Danner, U N; de Kovel, C; Hendriks, J; Koeleman, B P C; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; van Elburg, A A; Bruson, A; Clementi, M; Degortes, D; Forzan, M; Tenconi, E; Docampo, E; Escaramís, G; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Lissowska, J; Rajewski, A; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Slopien, A; Hauser, J; Karhunen, L; Meulenbelt, I; Slagboom, P E; Tortorella, A; Maj, M; Dedoussis, G; Dikeos, D; Gonidakis, F; Tziouvas, K; Tsitsika, A; Papezova, H; Slachtova, L; Martaskova, D; Kennedy, J L; Levitan, R D; Yilmaz, Z; Huemer, J; Koubek, D; Merl, E; Wagner, G; Lichtenstein, P; Breen, G; Cohen-Woods, S; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Cichon, S; Giegling, I; Herms, S; Rujescu, D; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H-E; Dina, C; Sladek, R; Gambaro, G; Soranzo, N; Julia, A; Marsal, S; Rabionet, R; Gaborieau, V; Dick, D M; Palotie, A; Ripatti, S; Widén, E; Andreassen, O A; Espeseth, T; Lundervold, A; Reinvang, I; Steen, V M; Le Hellard, S; Mattingsdal, M; Ntalla, I; Bencko, V; Foretova, L; Janout, V; Navratilova, M; Gallinger, S; Pinto, D; Scherer, S W; Aschauer, H; Carlberg, L; Schosser, A; Alfredsson, L; Ding, B; Klareskog, L; Padyukov, L; Courtet, P; Guillaume, S; Jaussent, I; Finan, C; Kalsi, G; Roberts, M; Logan, D W; Peltonen, L; Ritchie, G R S; Barrett, J C; Estivill, X; Hinney, A; Sullivan, P F; Collier, D A; Zeggini, E; Bulik, C M

    2014-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14 860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery data sets. Seventy-six (72 independent) single nucleotide polymorphisms were taken forward for in silico (two data sets) or de novo (13 data sets) replication genotyping in 2677 independent AN cases and 8629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication data sets comprised 5551 AN cases and 21 080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1606 AN restricting; 1445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01 × 10(-7)) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84 × 10(-6)) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76 × 10(-)(6)) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05 × 10(-)(6)) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery with replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4 × 10(-6)), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field.

  7. Systems-Level Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Data

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have emerged as the method of choice for identifying common variants affecting complex disease. In a GWAS, particular attention is placed, for obvious reasons, on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that exceed stringent genome-wide significance thresholds. However, it is expected that many SNPs with only nominal evidence of association (e.g., P < 0.05) truly influence disease. Efforts to extract additional biological information from entire GWAS datasets have primarily focused on pathway-enrichment analyses. However, these methods suffer from a number of limitations and typically fail to lead to testable hypotheses. To evaluate alternative approaches, we performed a systems-level analysis of GWAS data using weighted gene coexpression network analysis. A weighted gene coexpression network was generated for 1918 genes harboring SNPs that displayed nominal evidence of association (P ≤ 0.05) from a GWAS of bone mineral density (BMD) using microarray data on circulating monocytes isolated from individuals with extremely low or high BMD. Thirteen distinct gene modules were identified, each comprising coexpressed and highly interconnected GWAS genes. Through the characterization of module content and topology, we illustrate how network analysis can be used to discover disease-associated subnetworks and characterize novel interactions for genes with a known role in the regulation of BMD. In addition, we provide evidence that network metrics can be used as a prioritizing tool when selecting genes and SNPs for replication studies. Our results highlight the advantages of using systems-level strategies to add value to and inform GWAS. PMID:23316444

  8. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Scan in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Irizarry, Rafael A.; Rongione, Michael; Webster, Maree J.; Kaufman, Walter E.; Murakami, Peter; Lessard, Andree; Yolken, Robert H.; Feinberg, Andrew P.; Potash, James B.; Consortium, GenRED

    2012-01-01

    While genome-wide association studies are ongoing to identify sequence variation influencing susceptibility to major depressive disorder (MDD), epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, which can be influenced by environment, might also play a role. Here we present the first genome-wide DNA methylation (DNAm) scan in MDD. We compared 39 postmortem frontal cortex MDD samples to 26 controls. DNA was hybridized to our Comprehensive High-throughput Arrays for Relative Methylation (CHARM) platform, covering 3.5 million CpGs. CHARM identified 224 candidate regions with DNAm differences >10%. These regions are highly enriched for neuronal growth and development genes. Ten of 17 regions for which validation was attempted showed true DNAm differences; the greatest were in PRIMA1, with 12–15% increased DNAm in MDD (p = 0.0002–0.0003), and a concomitant decrease in gene expression. These results must be considered pilot data, however, as we could only test replication in a small number of additional brain samples (n = 16), which showed no significant difference in PRIMA1. Because PRIMA1 anchors acetylcholinesterase in neuronal membranes, decreased expression could result in decreased enzyme function and increased cholinergic transmission, consistent with a role in MDD. We observed decreased immunoreactivity for acetylcholinesterase in MDD brain with increased PRIMA1 DNAm, non-significant at p = 0.08. While we cannot draw firm conclusions about PRIMA1 DNAm in MDD, the involvement of neuronal development genes across the set showing differential methylation suggests a role for epigenetics in the illness. Further studies using limbic system brain regions might shed additional light on this role. PMID:22511943

  9. Genome-wide association study of working memory brain activation.

    PubMed

    Blokland, Gabriëlla A M; Wallace, Angus K; Hansell, Narelle K; Thompson, Paul M; Hickie, Ian B; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Wright, Margaret J

    2017-05-01

    In a population-based genome-wide association (GWA) study of n-back working memory task-related brain activation, we extracted the average percent BOLD signal change (2-back minus 0-back) from 46 regions-of-interest (ROIs) in functional MRI scans from 863 healthy twins and siblings. ROIs were obtained by creating spheres around group random effects analysis local maxima, and by thresholding a voxel-based heritability map of working memory brain activation at 50%. Quality control for test-retest reliability and heritability of ROI measures yielded 20 reliable (r>0.7) and heritable (h(2)>20%) ROIs. For GWA analysis, the cohort was divided into a discovery (n=679) and replication (n=97) sample. No variants survived the stringent multiple-testing-corrected genome-wide significance threshold (p<4.5×10(-9)), or were replicated (p<0.0016), but several genes were identified that are worthy of further investigation. A search of 529,379 genomic markers resulted in discovery of 31 independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BOLD signal change at a discovery level of p<1×10(-5). Two SNPs (rs7917410 and rs7672408) were associated at a significance level of p<1×10(-7). Only one, most strongly affecting BOLD signal change in the left supramarginal gyrus (R(2)=5.5%), had multiple SNPs associated at p<1×10(-5) in linkage disequilibrium with it, all located in and around the BANK1 gene. BANK1 encodes a B-cell-specific scaffold protein and has been shown to negatively regulate CD40-mediated AKT activation. AKT is part of the dopamine-signaling pathway, suggesting a mechanism for the involvement of BANK1 in the BOLD response to working memory. Variants identified here may be relevant to (the susceptibility to) common disorders affecting brain function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Genome-wide association study of atypical psychosis.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Tetsufumi; Ikeda, Masashi; Glatt, Stephen J; Tsutsumi, Atsushi; Kikuyama, Hiroki; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Nishida, Nao; Miyagawa, Taku; Hashimoto, Ryota; Takeda, Masatoshi; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Koh, Jun; Iwata, Nakao; Yoneda, Hiroshi

    2013-10-01

    Atypical psychosis with a periodic course of exacerbation and features of major psychiatric disorders [schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD)] has a long history in clinical psychiatry in Japan. Based upon the new criteria of atypical psychosis, a Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) was conducted to identify the risk gene or variants. The relationships between atypical psychosis, SZ and BD were then assessed using independent GWAS data. Forty-seven patients with solid criteria of atypical psychosis and 882 normal controls (NCs) were scanned using an Affymetrics 6.0 chip. GWAS SZ data (560 SZ cases and 548 NCs) and GWAS BD (107 cases with BD type 1 and 107 NCs) were compared using gene-based analysis. The most significant SNPs were detected around the CHN2/CPVL genes (rs245914, P = 1.6 × 10(-7)) , COL21A1 gene (rs12196860, P = 2.45 × 10(-7) ), and PYGL/TRIM9 genes (rs1959536, P = 7.73 × 10(-7) ), although none of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms exhibited genome-wide significance (P = 5 × 10(-8) ). One of the highest peaks was detected on the major histocompatibility complex region, where large SZ GWASs have previously disclosed an association. The gene-based analysis suggested significant enrichment between SZ and atypical psychosis (P = 0.01), but not BD. This study provides clues about the types of patient whose diagnosis lies between SZ and BD. Studies with larger samples are required to determine the causal variant.

  11. Genome-Wide Binding Patterns of Thyroid Hormone Receptor Beta

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Stephen; Switnicki, Michal Piotr; Angajala, Anusha; Lammel, Jan; Arumanayagam, Anithachristy S.; Webb, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) receptors (TRs) play central roles in metabolism and are major targets for pharmaceutical intervention. Presently, however, there is limited information about genome wide localizations of TR binding sites. Thus, complexities of TR genomic distribution and links between TRβ binding events and gene regulation are not fully appreciated. Here, we employ a BioChIP approach to capture TR genome-wide binding events in a liver cell line (HepG2). Like other NRs, TRβ appears widely distributed throughout the genome. Nevertheless, there is striking enrichment of TRβ binding sites immediately 5′ and 3′ of transcribed genes and TRβ can be detected near 50% of T3 induced genes. In contrast, no significant enrichment of TRβ is seen at negatively regulated genes or genes that respond to unliganded TRs in this system. Canonical TRE half-sites are present in more than 90% of TRβ peaks and classical TREs are also greatly enriched, but individual TRE organization appears highly variable with diverse half-site orientation and spacing. There is also significant enrichment of binding sites for TR associated transcription factors, including AP-1 and CTCF, near TR peaks. We conclude that T3-dependent gene induction commonly involves proximal TRβ binding events but that far-distant binding events are needed for T3 induction of some genes and that distinct, indirect, mechanisms are often at play in negative regulation and unliganded TR actions. Better understanding of genomic context of TR binding sites will help us determine why TR regulates genes in different ways and determine possibilities for selective modulation of TR action. PMID:24558356

  12. Comparative analysis of genome-wide divergence, domestication footprints and genome-wide association study of root traits for Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium barbadense

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Use of 10,129 singleton SNPs of known genomic location in tetraploid cotton provided unique opportunities to characterize genome-wide diversity among 440 Gossypium hirsutum and 219 G. barbadense cultivars and landrace accessions of widespread origin. Using genome-wide distributed SNPs, we examined ...

  13. Infection and inflammation in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: a genome wide study for interactions with genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Avramopoulos, Dimitrios; Pearce, Brad D; McGrath, John; Wolyniec, Paula; Wang, Ruihua; Eckart, Nicole; Hatzimanolis, Alexandros; Goes, Fernando S; Nestadt, Gerald; Mulle, Jennifer; Coneely, Karen; Hopkins, Myfanwy; Ruczinski, Ingo; Yolken, Robert; Pulver, Ann E

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and maternal or fetal infections have been suggested as risk factors for schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP). It is likely that such environmental effects are contingent on genetic background. Here, in a genome-wide approach, we test the hypothesis that such exposures increase the risk for SZ and BP and that the increase is dependent on genetic variants. We use genome-wide genotype data, plasma IgG antibody measurements against Toxoplasma gondii, Herpes simplex virus type 1, Cytomegalovirus, Human Herpes Virus 6 and the food antigen gliadin as well as measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP), a peripheral marker of inflammation. The subjects are SZ cases, BP cases, parents of cases and screened controls. We look for higher levels of our immunity/infection variables and interactions between them and common genetic variation genome-wide. We find many of the antibody measurements higher in both disorders. While individual tests do not withstand correction for multiple comparisons, the number of nominally significant tests and the comparisons showing the expected direction are in significant excess (permutation p=0.019 and 0.004 respectively). We also find CRP levels highly elevated in SZ, BP and the mothers of BP cases, in agreement with existing literature, but possibly confounded by our inability to correct for smoking or body mass index. In our genome-wide interaction analysis no signal reached genome-wide significance, yet many plausible candidate genes emerged. In a hypothesis driven test, we found multiple interactions among SZ-associated SNPs in the HLA region on chromosome 6 and replicated an interaction between CMV infection and genotypes near the CTNNA3 gene reported by a recent GWAS. Our results support that inflammatory processes and infection may modify the risk for psychosis and suggest that the genotype at SZ-associated HLA loci modifies the effect of these variables on the risk to develop SZ.

  14. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of cell-free serum DNA in esophageal adenocarcinoma and Barrett esophagus.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Rihong; Zhao, Yang; Su, Li; Cassidy, Lauren; Liu, Geoffrey; Christiani, David C

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation (DNAm) is a feature of most types of cancers. Genome-wide DNAm profiling has been performed successfully on tumor tissue DNA samples. However, the invasive procedure limits the utility of tumor tissue for epidemiological studies. While recent data indicate that cell-free circulating DNAm (cfDNAm) profiles reflect DNAm status in corresponding tumor tissues, no studies have examined the association of cfDNAm with cancer or precursors on a genome-wide scale. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the putative significance of genome-wide cfDNAm profiles in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) and Barrett esophagus (BE, EA precursor). We performed genome-wide DNAm profiling in EA tissue DNA (n = 8) and matched serum DNA (n = 8), in serum DNA of BE (n = 10), and in healthy controls (n = 10) using the Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip that covers 27,578 CpG loci in 14,495 genes. We found that cfDNAm profiles were highly correlated to DNAm profiles in matched tumor tissue DNA (r = 0.92) in patients with EA. We selected the most differentially methylated loci to perform hierarchical clustering analysis. We found that 911 loci can discriminate perfectly between EA and control samples, 554 loci can separate EA from BE samples, and 46 loci can distinguish BE from control samples. These results suggest that genome-wide cfDNAm profiles are highly consistent with DNAm profiles detected in corresponding tumor tissues. Differential cfDNAm profiling may be a useful approach for the noninvasive screening of EA and EA premalignant lesions.

  15. Genome-wide search for genes affecting the risk for alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Reich, T; Edenberg, H J; Goate, A; Williams, J T; Rice, J P; Van Eerdewegh, P; Foroud, T; Hesselbrock, V; Schuckit, M A; Bucholz, K; Porjesz, B; Li, T K; Conneally, P M; Nurnberger, J I; Tischfield, J A; Crowe, R R; Cloninger, C R; Wu, W; Shears, S; Carr, K; Crose, C; Willig, C; Begleiter, H

    1998-05-08

    Alcohol dependence is a leading cause of morbidity and premature death. Several lines of evidence suggest a substantial genetic component to the risk for alcoholism: sibs of alcoholic probands have a 3-8 fold increased risk of also developing alcoholism, and twin heritability estimates of 50-60% are reported by contemporary studies of twins. We report on the results of a six-center collaborative study to identify susceptibility loci for alcohol dependence. A genome-wide screen examined 291 markers in 987 individuals from 105 families. Two-point and multipoint nonparametric linkage analyses were performed to detect susceptibility loci for alcohol dependence. Multipoint methods provided the strongest suggestions of linkage with susceptibility loci for alcohol dependence on chromosomes 1 and 7, and more modest evidence for a locus on chromosome 2. In addition, there was suggestive evidence for a protective locus on chromosome 4 near the alcohol dehydrogenase genes, for which protective effects have been reported in Asian populations.

  16. Genome-wide association studies and epigenome-wide association studies go together in cancer control

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Completion of the human genome a decade ago laid the foundation for: using genetic information in assessing risk to identify individuals and populations that are likely to develop cancer, and designing treatments based on a person's genetic profiling (precision medicine). Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) completed during the past few years have identified risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms that can be used as screening tools in epidemiologic studies of a variety of tumor types. This led to the conduct of epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS). This article discusses the current status, challenges and research opportunities in GWAS and EWAS. Information gained from GWAS and EWAS has potential applications in cancer control and treatment. PMID:27079684

  17. Prediction of a time-to-event trait using genome wide SNP data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A popular objective of many high-throughput genome projects is to discover various genomic markers associated with traits and develop statistical models to predict traits of future patients based on marker values. Results In this paper, we present a prediction method for time-to-event traits using genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We also propose a MaxTest associating between a time-to-event trait and a SNP accounting for its possible genetic models. The proposed MaxTest can help screen out nonprognostic SNPs and identify genetic models of prognostic SNPs. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated through simulations. Conclusions In conjunction with the MaxTest, the proposed method provides more parsimonious prediction models but includes more prognostic SNPs than some naive prediction methods. The proposed method is demonstrated with real GWAS data. PMID:23418752

  18. Breast cancer prediction using genome wide single nucleotide polymorphism data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper introduces and applies a genome wide predictive study to learn a model that predicts whether a new subject will develop breast cancer or not, based on her SNP profile. Results We first genotyped 696 female subjects (348 breast cancer cases and 348 apparently healthy controls), predominantly of Caucasian origin from Alberta, Canada using Affymetrix Human SNP 6.0 arrays. Then, we applied EIGENSTRAT population stratification correction method to remove 73 subjects not belonging to the Caucasian population. Then, we filtered any SNP that had any missing calls, whose genotype frequency was deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, or whose minor allele frequency was less than 5%. Finally, we applied a combination of MeanDiff feature selection method and KNN learning method to this filtered dataset to produce a breast cancer prediction model. LOOCV accuracy of this classifier is 59.55%. Random permutation tests show that this result is significantly better than the baseline accuracy of 51.52%. Sensitivity analysis shows that the classifier is fairly robust to the number of MeanDiff-selected SNPs. External validation on the CGEMS breast cancer dataset, the only other publicly available breast cancer dataset, shows that this combination of MeanDiff and KNN leads to a LOOCV accuracy of 60.25%, which is significantly better than its baseline of 50.06%. We then considered a dozen different combinations of feature selection and learning method, but found that none of these combinations produces a better predictive model than our model. We also considered various biological feature selection methods like selecting SNPs reported in recent genome wide association studies to be associated with breast cancer, selecting SNPs in genes associated with KEGG cancer pathways, or selecting SNPs associated with breast cancer in the F-SNP database to produce predictive models, but again found that none of these models achieved accuracy better than baseline. Conclusions

  19. Genome-wide association study of circulating vitamin D levels.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Yu, Kai; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Simon, K Claire; McCullough, Marjorie L; Gallicchio, Lisa; Jacobs, Eric J; Ascherio, Alberto; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Jacobs, Kevin B; Li, Qizhai; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Purdue, Mark; Virtamo, Jarmo; Horst, Ronald; Wheeler, William; Chanock, Stephen; Hunter, David J; Hayes, Richard B; Kraft, Peter; Albanes, Demetrius

    2010-07-01

    The primary circulating form of vitamin D, 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D], is associated with multiple medical outcomes, including rickets, osteoporosis, multiple sclerosis and cancer. In a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 4501 persons of European ancestry drawn from five cohorts, we identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene encoding group-specific component (vitamin D binding) protein, GC, on chromosome 4q12-13 that were associated with 25(OH)D concentrations: rs2282679 (P=2.0x10(-30)), in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with rs7041, a non-synonymous SNP (D432E; P=4.1x10(-22)) and rs1155563 (P=3.8x10(-25)). Suggestive signals for association with 25(OH)D were also observed for SNPs in or near three other genes involved in vitamin D synthesis or activation: rs3829251 on chromosome 11q13.4 in NADSYN1 [encoding nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthetase; P=8.8x10(-7)], which was in high LD with rs1790349, located in DHCR7, the gene encoding 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase that synthesizes cholesterol from 7-dehydrocholesterol; rs6599638 in the region harboring the open-reading frame 88 (C10orf88) on chromosome 10q26.13 in the vicinity of ACADSB (acyl-Coenzyme A dehydrogenase), involved in cholesterol and vitamin D synthesis (P=3.3x10(-7)); and rs2060793 on chromosome 11p15.2 in CYP2R1 (cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily R, polypeptide 1, encoding a key C-25 hydroxylase that converts vitamin D3 to an active vitamin D receptor ligand; P=1.4x10(-5)). We genotyped SNPs in these four regions in 2221 additional samples and confirmed strong genome-wide significant associations with 25(OH)D through meta-analysis with the GWAS data for GC (P=1.8x10(-49)), NADSYN1/DHCR7 (P=3.4x10(-9)) and CYP2R1 (P=2.9x10(-17)), but not C10orf88 (P=2.4x10(-5)).

  20. Genome-Wide SNP Detection, Validation, and Development of an 8K SNP Array for Apple

    PubMed Central

    Chagné, David; Crowhurst, Ross N.; Troggio, Michela; Davey, Mark W.; Gilmore, Barbara; Lawley, Cindy; Vanderzande, Stijn; Hellens, Roger P.; Kumar, Satish; Cestaro, Alessandro; Velasco, Riccardo; Main, Dorrie; Rees, Jasper D.; Iezzoni, Amy; Mockler, Todd; Wilhelm, Larry; Van de Weg, Eric; Gardiner, Susan E.; Bassil, Nahla; Peace, Cameron

    2012-01-01

    As high-throughput genetic marker screening systems are essential for a range of genetics studies and plant breeding applications, the International RosBREED SNP Consortium (IRSC) has utilized the Illumina Infinium® II system to develop a medium- to high-throughput SNP screening tool for genome-wide evaluation of allelic variation in apple (Malus×domestica) breeding germplasm. For genome-wide SNP discovery, 27 apple cultivars were chosen to represent worldwide breeding germplasm and re-sequenced at low coverage with the Illumina Genome Analyzer II. Following alignment of these sequences to the whole genome sequence of ‘Golden Delicious’, SNPs were identified using SoapSNP. A total of 2,113,120 SNPs were detected, corresponding to one SNP to every 288 bp of the genome. The Illumina GoldenGate® assay was then used to validate a subset of 144 SNPs with a range of characteristics, using a set of 160 apple accessions. This validation assay enabled fine-tuning of the final subset of SNPs for the Illumina Infinium® II system. The set of stringent filtering criteria developed allowed choice of a set of SNPs that not only exhibited an even distribution across the apple genome and a range of minor allele frequencies to ensure utility across germplasm, but also were located in putative exonic regions to maximize genotyping success rate. A total of 7867 apple SNPs was established for the IRSC apple 8K SNP array v1, of which 5554 were polymorphic after evaluation in segregating families and a germplasm collection. This publicly available genomics resource will provide an unprecedented resolution of SNP haplotypes, which will enable marker-locus-trait association discovery, description of the genetic architecture of quantitative traits, investigation of genetic variation (neutral and functional), and genomic selection in apple. PMID:22363718

  1. Composing on the Screen: Student Perceptions of Traditional and Multimodal Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker Beard, Jeannie

    2012-01-01

    When college composition teachers carefully consider the role and function of multimodal composition in their classrooms, they can enhance the teaching of writing and communication, engage and empower students, and better prepare students for the challenges and possibilities of life in our rapidly changing digital age. To meet this teaching…

  2. Composing on the Screen: Student Perceptions of Traditional and Multimodal Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker Beard, Jeannie

    2012-01-01

    When college composition teachers carefully consider the role and function of multimodal composition in their classrooms, they can enhance the teaching of writing and communication, engage and empower students, and better prepare students for the challenges and possibilities of life in our rapidly changing digital age. To meet this teaching…

  3. Pharmacogenomics in colorectal cancer: a genome-wide association study to predict toxicity after 5-fluorouracil or FOLFOX administration.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rozadilla, C; Cazier, J B; Moreno, V; Crous-Bou, M; Guinó, E; Durán, G; Lamas, M J; López, R; Candamio, S; Gallardo, E; Paré, L; Baiget, M; Páez, D; López-Fernández, L A; Cortejoso, L; García, M I; Bujanda, L; González, D; Gonzalo, V; Rodrigo, L; Reñé, J M; Jover, R; Brea-Fernández, A; Andreu, M; Bessa, X; Llor, X; Xicola, R; Palles, C; Tomlinson, I; Castellví-Bel, S; Castells, A; Ruiz-Ponte, C; Carracedo, A

    2013-06-01

    The development of genotyping technologies has allowed for wider screening for inherited causes of variable outcomes following drug administration. We have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on 221 colorectal cancer (CRC) patients that had been treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), either alone or in combination with oxaliplatin (FOLFOX). A validation set of 791 patients was also studied. Seven SNPs (rs16857540, rs2465403, rs10876844, rs10784749, rs17626122, rs7325568 and rs4243761) showed evidence of association (pooled P-values 0.020, 9.426E-03, 0.010, 0.017, 0.042, 2.302E-04, 2.803E-03) with adverse drug reactions (ADRs). This is the first study to explore the genetic basis of inter-individual variation in toxicity responses to the administration of 5-FU or FOLFOX in CRC patients on a genome-wide scale.

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis of Human Metapneumovirus Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Il; Park, Sehee; Lee, Ilseob; Park, Kwang Sook; Kwak, Eun Jung; Moon, Kwang Mee; Lee, Chang Kyu; Bae, Joon-Yong; Park, Man-Seong; Song, Ki-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) has been described as an important etiologic agent of upper and lower respiratory tract infections, especially in young children and the elderly. Most of school-aged children might be introduced to HMPVs, and exacerbation with other viral or bacterial super-infection is common. However, our understanding of the molecular evolution of HMPVs remains limited. To address the comprehensive evolutionary dynamics of HMPVs, we report a genome-wide analysis of the eight genes (N, P, M, F, M2, SH, G, and L) using 103 complete genome sequences. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that the eight genes from one HMPV strain grouped into the same genetic group among the five distinct lineages (A1, A2a, A2b, B1, and B2). A few exceptions of phylogenetic incongruence might suggest past recombination events, and we detected possible recombination breakpoints in the F, SH, and G coding regions. The five genetic lineages of HMPVs shared quite remote common ancestors ranging more than 220 to 470 years of age with the most recent origins for the A2b sublineage. Purifying selection was common, but most protein genes except the F and M2-2 coding regions also appeared to experience episodic diversifying selection. Taken together, these suggest that the five lineages of HMPVs maintain their individual evolutionary dynamics and that recombination and selection forces might work on shaping the genetic diversity of HMPVs. PMID:27046055

  5. A synergistic DNA logic predicts genome-wide chromatin accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Sherwood, Richard I.; Kang, Daniel D.; Rajagopal, Nisha; Barkal, Amira A.; Zeng, Haoyang; Emons, Bart J.M.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Jaakkola, Tommi; Gifford, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Enhancers and promoters commonly occur in accessible chromatin characterized by depleted nucleosome contact; however, it is unclear how chromatin accessibility is governed. We show that log-additive cis-acting DNA sequence features can predict chromatin accessibility at high spatial resolution. We develop a new type of high-dimensional machine learning model, the Synergistic Chromatin Model (SCM), which when trained with DNase-seq data for a cell type is capable of predicting expected read counts of genome-wide chromatin accessibility at every base from DNA sequence alone, with the highest accuracy at hypersensitive sites shared across cell types. We confirm that a SCM accurately predicts chromatin accessibility for thousands of synthetic DNA sequences using a novel CRISPR-based method of highly efficient site-specific DNA library integration. SCMs are directly interpretable and reveal that a logic based on local, nonspecific synergistic effects, largely among pioneer TFs, is sufficient to predict a large fraction of cellular chromatin accessibility in a wide variety of cell types. PMID:27456004

  6. A genome-wide association study in multiple system atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sailer, Anna; Nalls, Michael A.; Schulte, Claudia; Federoff, Monica; Price, T. Ryan; Lees, Andrew; Ross, Owen A.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Mok, Kin; Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Schottlaender, Lucia; Chelban, Viorica; Ling, Helen; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Federoff, Howard J.; Mhyre, Timothy R.; Morris, Huw R.; Deuschl, Günther; Quinn, Niall; Widner, Hakan; Albanese, Alberto; Infante, Jon; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Poewe, Werner; Oertel, Wolfgang; Höglinger, Günter U.; Wüllner, Ullrich; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Ferreira, Joaquim; Tolosa, Eduardo; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Rascol, Olivier; Meissner, Wassilios G.; Hardy, John A.; Revesz, Tamas; Holton, Janice L.; Gasser, Thomas; Wenning, Gregor K.; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify genetic variants that play a role in the pathogenesis of multiple system atrophy (MSA), we undertook a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Methods: We performed a GWAS with >5 million genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 918 patients with MSA of European ancestry and 3,864 controls. MSA cases were collected from North American and European centers, one third of which were neuropathologically confirmed. Results: We found no significant loci after stringent multiple testing correction. A number of regions emerged as potentially interesting for follow-up at p < 1 × 10−6, including SNPs in the genes FBXO47, ELOVL7, EDN1, and MAPT. Contrary to previous reports, we found no association of the genes SNCA and COQ2 with MSA. Conclusions: We present a GWAS in MSA. We have identified several potentially interesting gene loci, including the MAPT locus, whose significance will have to be evaluated in a larger sample set. Common genetic variation in SNCA and COQ2 does not seem to be associated with MSA. In the future, additional samples of well-characterized patients with MSA will need to be collected to perform a larger MSA GWAS, but this initial study forms the basis for these next steps. PMID:27629089

  7. Genome-wide profiling of forum domains in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Tchurikov, Nickolai A; Kretova, Olga V; Sosin, Dmitri V; Zykov, Ivan A; Zhimulev, Igor F; Kravatsky, Yuri V

    2011-05-01

    Forum domains are stretches of chromosomal DNA that are excised from eukaryotic chromosomes during their spontaneous non-random fragmentation. Most forum domains are 50-200 kb in length. We mapped forum domain termini using FISH on polytene chromosomes and we performed genome-wide mapping using a Drosophila melanogaster genomic tiling microarray consisting of overlapping 3 kb fragments. We found that forum termini very often correspond to regions of intercalary heterochromatin and regions of late replication in polytene chromosomes. We found that forum domains contain clusters of several or many genes. The largest forum domains correspond to the main clusters of homeotic genes inside BX-C and ANTP-C, cluster of histone genes and clusters of piRNAs. PRE/TRE and transcription factor binding sites often reside inside domains and do not overlap with forum domain termini. We also found that about 20% of forum domain termini correspond to small chromosomal regions where Ago1, Ago2, small RNAs and repressive chromatin structures are detected. Our results indicate that forum domains correspond to big multi-gene chromosomal units, some of which could be coordinately expressed. The data on the global mapping of forum domains revealed a strong correlation between fragmentation sites in chromosomes, particular sets of mobile elements and regions of intercalary heterochromatin.

  8. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    PubMed

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human epidermal melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Haltaufderhyde, Kirk D.; Oancea, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Because human epidermal melanocytes (HEMs) provide critical protection against skin cancer, sunburn, and photoaging, a genome-wide perspective of gene expression in these cells is vital to understanding human skin physiology. In this study we performed high throughput sequencing of HEMs to obtain a complete data set of transcript sizes, abundances, and splicing. As expected, we found that melanocyte specific genes that function in pigmentation were among the highest expressed genes. We analyzed receptor, ion channel and transcription factor gene families to get a better understanding of the cell signalling pathways used by melanocytes. We also performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of lightly versus darkly pigmented HEMs and found 16 genes differentially expressed in the two pigmentation phenotypes; of those, only one putative melanosomal transporter (SLC45A2) has known function in pigmentation. In addition, we found 166 genes with splice isoforms expressed exclusively in one pigmentation phenotype, 17 of which are genes involved in signal transduction. Our melanocyte transcriptome study provides a comprehensive view and may help identify novel pigmentation genes and potential pharmacological targets. PMID:25451175

  10. A genome-wide association study of global gene expression.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Anna L; Liang, Liming; Moffatt, Miriam F; Chen, Wei; Heath, Simon; Wong, Kenny C C; Taylor, Jenny; Burnett, Edward; Gut, Ivo; Farrall, Martin; Lathrop, G Mark; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Cookson, William O C

    2007-10-01

    We have created a global map of the effects of polymorphism on gene expression in 400 children from families recruited through a proband with asthma. We genotyped 408,273 SNPs and identified expression quantitative trait loci from measurements of 54,675 transcripts representing 20,599 genes in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. We found that 15,084 transcripts (28%) representing 6,660 genes had narrow-sense heritabilities (H2) > 0.3. We executed genome-wide association scans for these traits and found peak lod scores between 3.68 and 59.1. The most highly heritable traits were markedly enriched in Gene Ontology descriptors for response to unfolded protein (chaperonins and heat shock proteins), regulation of progression through the cell cycle, RNA processing, DNA repair, immune responses and apoptosis. SNPs that regulate expression of these genes are candidates in the study of degenerative diseases, malignancy, infection and inflammation. We have created a downloadable database to facilitate use of our findings in the mapping of complex disease loci.

  11. Reconstructing Roma History from Genome-Wide Data

    PubMed Central

    Moorjani, Priya; Patterson, Nick; Loh, Po-Ru; Lipson, Mark; Kisfali, Péter; Melegh, Bela I.; Bonin, Michael; Kádaši, Ľudevít; Rieß, Olaf; Berger, Bonnie; Reich, David; Melegh, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The Roma people, living throughout Europe and West Asia, are a diverse population linked by the Romani language and culture. Previous linguistic and genetic studies have suggested that the Roma migrated into Europe from South Asia about 1,000–1,500 years ago. Genetic inferences about Roma history have mostly focused on the Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA. To explore what additional information can be learned from genome-wide data, we analyzed data from six Roma groups that we genotyped at hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We estimate that the Roma harbor about 80% West Eurasian ancestry–derived from a combination of European and South Asian sources–and that the date of admixture of South Asian and European ancestry was about 850 years before present. We provide evidence for Eastern Europe being a major source of European ancestry, and North-west India being a major source of the South Asian ancestry in the Roma. By computing allele sharing as a measure of linkage disequilibrium, we estimate that the migration of Roma out of the Indian subcontinent was accompanied by a severe founder event, which appears to have been followed by a major demographic expansion after the arrival in Europe. PMID:23516520

  12. Genome-wide nucleosome specificity and directionality of chromatin remodelers

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Kuangyu; Vinayachandran, Vinesh; Batta, Kiran; Koerber, R. Thomas; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2012-01-01

    How chromatin remodelers cooperate to organize nucleosomes around the start and end of genes is not known. We determined the genome-wide binding of remodeler complexes SWI/SNF, RSC, ISW1a, ISW1b, ISW2, and INO80 to individual nucleosomes in Saccharomyces, and determined their functional contributions to nucleosome positioning through deletion analysis. We applied ultra-high resolution ChIP-exo mapping to Isw2 to determine its sub-nucleosomal orientation and organization on a genomic scale. Remodelers interacted with selected nucleosome positions relative to the start and end of genes, and produced net directionality in moving nucleosomes either away or towards nucleosome-free regions at the 5′ and 3′ ends of genes. Isw2 possessed a sub-nucleosomal organization in accord with biochemical and crystallographic-based models that place its linker binding region within promoters and abutted against Reb1-bound locations. Together these findings reveal a coordinated position-specific approach taken by remodelers to organize genic nucleosomes into arrays. PMID:22726434

  13. Genome-wide profiling of forum domains in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Tchurikov, Nickolai A.; Kretova, Olga V.; Sosin, Dmitri V.; Zykov, Ivan A.; Zhimulev, Igor F.; Kravatsky, Yuri V.

    2011-01-01

    Forum domains are stretches of chromosomal DNA that are excised from eukaryotic chromosomes during their spontaneous non-random fragmentation. Most forum domains are 50–200 kb in length. We mapped forum domain termini using FISH on polytene chromosomes and we performed genome-wide mapping using a Drosophila melanogaster genomic tiling microarray consisting of overlapping 3 kb fragments. We found that forum termini very often correspond to regions of intercalary heterochromatin and regions of late replication in polytene chromosomes. We found that forum domains contain clusters of several or many genes. The largest forum domains correspond to the main clusters of homeotic genes inside BX-C and ANTP-C, cluster of histone genes and clusters of piRNAs. PRE/TRE and transcription factor binding sites often reside inside domains and do not overlap with forum domain termini. We also found that about 20% of forum domain termini correspond to small chromosomal regions where Ago1, Ago2, small RNAs and repressive chromatin structures are detected. Our results indicate that forum domains correspond to big multi-gene chromosomal units, some of which could be coordinately expressed. The data on the global mapping of forum domains revealed a strong correlation between fragmentation sites in chromosomes, particular sets of mobile elements and regions of intercalary heterochromatin. PMID:21247882

  14. Genome-Wide Discriminatory Information Patterns of Cytosine DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Robersy; Mackenzie, Sally A.

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM) is a highly abundant, heritable but reversible chemical modification to the genome. Herein, a machine learning approach was applied to analyze the accumulation of epigenetic marks in methylomes of 152 ecotypes and 85 silencing mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. In an information-thermodynamics framework, two measurements were used: (1) the amount of information gained/lost with the CDM changes IR and (2) the uncertainty of not observing a SNP LCR. We hypothesize that epigenetic marks are chromosomal footprints accounting for different ontogenetic and phylogenetic histories of individual populations. A machine learning approach is proposed to verify this hypothesis. Results support the hypothesis by the existence of discriminatory information (DI) patterns of CDM able to discriminate between individuals and between individual subpopulations. The statistical analyses revealed a strong association between the topologies of the structured population of Arabidopsis ecotypes based on IR and on LCR, respectively. A statistical-physical relationship between IR and LCR was also found. Results to date imply that the genome-wide distribution of CDM changes is not only part of the biological signal created by the methylation regulatory machinery, but ensures the stability of the DNA molecule, preserving the integrity of the genetic message under continuous stress from thermal fluctuations in the cell environment. PMID:27322251

  15. Genome-Wide Identification of KANADI1 Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Felix; Weigel, Detlef; Bowman, John L.; Heisler, Marcus G.; Wenkel, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Plant organ development and polarity establishment is mediated by the action of several transcription factors. Among these, the KANADI (KAN) subclade of the GARP protein family plays important roles in polarity-associated processes during embryo, shoot and root patterning. In this study, we have identified a set of potential direct target genes of KAN1 through a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation/DNA sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and genome-wide transcriptional profiling using tiling arrays. Target genes are over-represented for genes involved in the regulation of organ development as well as in the response to auxin. KAN1 affects directly the expression of several genes previously shown to be important in the establishment of polarity during lateral organ and vascular tissue development. We also show that KAN1 controls through its target genes auxin effects on organ development at different levels: transport and its regulation, and signaling. In addition, KAN1 regulates genes involved in the response to abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, brassinosteroids, ethylene, cytokinins and gibberellins. The role of KAN1 in organ polarity is antagonized by HD-ZIPIII transcription factors, including REVOLUTA (REV). A comparison of their target genes reveals that the REV/KAN1 module acts in organ patterning through opposite regulation of shared targets. Evidence of mutual repression between closely related family members is also shown. PMID:24155946

  16. Fine mapping by composite genome-wide association analysis.

    PubMed

    Casellas, Joaquim; Cañas-Álvarez, Jhon Jacobo; Fina, Marta; Piedrafita, Jesús; Cecchinato, Alessio

    2017-06-06

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies play a key role in current genetics research, unravelling genomic regions linked to phenotypic traits of interest in multiple species. Nevertheless, the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) may provide confounding results when significant genetic markers span along several contiguous cM. In this study, we have adapted the composite interval mapping approach to the GWA framework (composite GWA), in order to evaluate the impact of including competing (possibly linked) genetic markers when testing for the additive allelic effect inherent to a given genetic marker. We tested model performance on simulated data sets under different scenarios (i.e., qualitative trait loci effects, LD between genetic markers and width of the genomic region involved in the analysis). Our results showed that the genomic region had a small impact on the number of competing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as well as on the precision of the composite GWA analysis. A similar conclusion was derived from the preferable range of LD between the tested SNP and competing SNPs, although moderate-to-high LD seemed to attenuate the loss of statistical power. The composite GWA improved specificity and reduced the number of significant genetic markers. The composite GWA model contributes a novel point of view for GWA analyses where testing circumscribed to the genomic region flanking each SNP (delimited by the nearest competing SNPs) and conditioning on linked markers increases the precision to locate causal mutations, but possibly at the expense of power.

  17. Genome-wide significant risk associations for mucinous ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Linda E.; Lawrenson, Kate; Tyrer, Jonathan; Li, Qiyuan; M. Lee, Janet; Seo, Ji-Heui; Phelan, Catherine M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqin; Spindler, Tassja J.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Baker, Helen; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Y. Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T.; Edwards, Robert P.; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B.; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Grownwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wlodzimierz, Sawicki; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Sellers, Thomas A.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.; Gayther, Simon A.; Berchuck, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas (OC) but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOC). Genotypes from OC cases and controls were imputed into the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel. Analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls identified three novel risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10−8), rs711830 at 2q31.1 (P = 7.5 × 10−12) and rs688187 at 19q13.2 (P = 6.8 × 10−13). Expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL) analysis in ovarian and colorectal tumors (which are histologically similar to MOC) identified significant eQTL associations for HOXD9 at 2q31.1 in ovarian (P = 4.95 × 10−4, FDR = 0.003) and colorectal (P = 0.01, FDR = 0.09) tumors, and for PAX8 at 2q13 in colorectal tumors (P = 0.03, FDR = 0.09). Chromosome conformation capture analysis identified interactions between the HOXD9 promoter and risk SNPs at 2q31.1. Overexpressing HOXD9 in MOC cells augmented the neoplastic phenotype. These findings provide the first evidence for MOC susceptibility variants and insights into the underlying biology of the disease. PMID:26075790

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of Polyadenylation Events in Schmidtea mediterranea

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Vairavan; Bansal, Dhiru; Kulkarni, Jahnavi; Poduval, Deepak; Krishna, Srikar; Sasidharan, Vidyanand; Anand, Praveen; Seshasayee, Aswin; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) play important roles in regulating posttranscriptional gene expression. The 3′UTR is defined by regulated cleavage/polyadenylation of the pre-mRNA. The advent of next-generation sequencing technology has now enabled us to identify these events on a genome-wide scale. In this study, we used poly(A)-position profiling by sequencing (3P-Seq) to capture all poly(A) sites across the genome of the freshwater planarian, Schmidtea mediterranea, an ideal model system for exploring the process of regeneration and stem cell function. We identified the 3′UTRs for ∼14,000 transcripts and thus improved the existing gene annotations. We found 97 transcripts, which are polyadenylated within an internal exon, resulting in the shrinking of the ORF and loss of a predicted protein domain. Around 40% of the transcripts in planaria were alternatively polyadenylated (ApA), resulting either in an altered 3′UTR or a change in coding sequence. We identified specific ApA transcript isoforms that were subjected to miRNA mediated gene regulation using degradome sequencing. In this study, we also confirmed a tissue-specific expression pattern for alternate polyadenylated transcripts. The insights from this study highlight the potential role of ApA in regulating the gene expression essential for planarian regeneration. PMID:27489207

  19. Genome-wide approaches to studying yeast chromatin modifications.

    PubMed

    Schones, Dustin E; Cui, Kairong; Cuddapah, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    The genomes of eukaryotic organisms are packaged into nuclei by wrapping DNA around proteins in a structure known as chromatin. The most basic unit of chromatin, the nucleosome, consists of approximately 146 bp of DNA wrapped around an octamer of histone proteins. The placement of nucleosomes relative to a gene can influence the regulation of the transcription of this gene. Furthermore, the N-terminal tails of histone proteins are subjected to numerous post-translational modifications that are also known to influence gene regulation. In recent years, a number of genome-scale approaches to identify modifications to chromatin have been developed. Techniques combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with microarrays (ChIP-chip) and second-generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) have led to great advances in our understanding of how chromatin modifications contribute to gene regulation. Many excellent protocols related to ChIP-chip have been published recently (Lieb, J. D. (2003) Genome-wide mapping of protein-DNA interactions by chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA microarray hybridization. Methods Mol. Biol. 224, 99-109.). For this reason, we will focus our attention here on the application of second-generation sequencing platforms to the study of chromatin modifications in yeast. As these genome-scale experiments require both wet-lab and bioinformatic components to reach their full potential, we will detail both the wet-lab protocols and bioinformatic steps necessary to fully conduct genome-scale studies of chromatin modifications.

  20. Genome-wide significant risk associations for mucinous ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Linda E; Lawrenson, Kate; Tyrer, Jonathan; Li, Qiyuan; Lee, Janet M; Seo, Ji-Heui; Phelan, Catherine M; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Spindler, Tassja J; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia

    2015-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOCs). Our analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls with imputation identified 3 new risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10(-8)), rs711830 at 2q31.1 (P = 7.5 × 10(-12)) and rs688187 at 19q13.2 (P = 6.8 × 10(-13)). We identified significant expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) associations for HOXD9 at 2q31.1 in ovarian (P = 4.95 × 10(-4), false discovery rate (FDR) = 0.003) and colorectal (P = 0.01, FDR = 0.09) tumors and for PAX8 at 2q13 in colorectal tumors (P = 0.03, FDR = 0.09). Chromosome conformation capture analysis identified interactions between the HOXD9 promoter and risk-associated SNPs at 2q31.1. Overexpressing HOXD9 in MOC cells augmented the neoplastic phenotype. These findings provide the first evidence for MOC susceptibility variants and insights into the underlying biology of the disease.

  1. Genome-Wide Association Mapping for Phenotypic Plasticity in Rice.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Shinji; Bheemanahalli, Raju; Jagadish, Krishna S V; Kumagai, Etsushi; Masuya, Yusuke; Kuroda, Eiki; Raghavan, Chitra; Dingkuhn, Michael; Abe, Akira; Shimono, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-31

    Phenotypic plasticity of plants in response to environmental changes is important for adapting to changing climate. Less attention has been paid to exploring the advantages of phenotypic plasticity in resource-rich environments to enhance the productivity of agricultural crops. Here, we examined genetic variation in phenotypic plasticity in indica rice (Oryza sativa L.) across two diverse panels: (i) a Phenomics of Rice Adaptation and Yield (PRAY) population comprising 301 accessions and (ii) a Multi-parent-Advanced-Generation-Inter-Cross (MAGIC) indica population comprising 151 accessions. Altered planting density was used as a proxy for elevated atmospheric CO2 response. Low planting density significantly increased panicle weight per plant compared with normal density, and the magnitude of the increase ranged from 1.10 to 2.78 times among accessions for the PRAY population and from 1.05 to 2.45 times for the MAGIC population. Genome-wide-association studies revealed three Environmental Responsiveness (ER) candidate alleles (qER1-3) that were associated with relative response of panicle weight to low density. Two of these alleles were tested in 13 genotypes to clarify their biomass responses during vegetative growth under elevated CO2 in Japan. Our study provides evidence for polymorphisms that control rice phenotypic plasticity in environments that are rich in resources such as light and CO2 .

  2. Weighted SNP set analysis in genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hui; Zhao, Yang; Qian, Cheng; Cai, Min; Zhang, Ruyang; Chu, Minjie; Dai, Juncheng; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are popular for identifying genetic variants which are associated with disease risk. Many approaches have been proposed to test multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a region simultaneously which considering disadvantages of methods in single locus association analysis. Kernel machine based SNP set analysis is more powerful than single locus analysis, which borrows information from SNPs correlated with causal or tag SNPs. Four types of kernel machine functions and principal component based approach (PCA) were also compared. However, given the loss of power caused by low minor allele frequencies (MAF), we conducted an extension work on PCA and used a new method called weighted PCA (wPCA). Comparative analysis was performed for weighted principal component analysis (wPCA), logistic kernel machine based test (LKM) and principal component analysis (PCA) based on SNP set in the case of different minor allele frequencies (MAF) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) structures. We also applied the three methods to analyze two SNP sets extracted from a real GWAS dataset of non-small cell lung cancer in Han Chinese population. Simulation results show that when the MAF of the causal SNP is low, weighted principal component and weighted IBS are more powerful than PCA and other kernel machine functions at different LD structures and different numbers of causal SNPs. Application of the three methods to a real GWAS dataset indicates that wPCA and wIBS have better performance than the linear kernel, IBS kernel and PCA.

  3. Genome-wide characterization of fission yeast DNA replication origins

    PubMed Central

    Heichinger, Christian; Penkett, Christopher J; Bähler, Jürg; Nurse, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication is initiated from multiple origins of replication, but little is known about the global regulation of origins throughout the genome or in different types of cell cycles. Here, we identify 401 strong origins and 503 putative weaker origins spaced in total every 14 kb throughout the genome of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The same origins are used during premeiotic and mitotic S-phases. We found that few origins fire late in mitotic S-phase and that activating the Rad3 dependent S-phase checkpoint by inhibiting DNA replication had little effect on which origins were fired. A genome-wide analysis of eukaryotic origin efficiencies showed that efficiency was variable, with large chromosomal domains enriched for efficient or inefficient origins. Average efficiency is twice as high during mitosis compared with meiosis, which can account for their different S-phase lengths. We conclude that there is a continuum of origin efficiency and that there is differential origin activity in the mitotic and meiotic cell cycles. PMID:17053780

  4. Genome-wide DNA methylation profile in mungbean

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yang Jae; Bae, Ahra; Shim, Sangrea; Lee, Taeyoung; Lee, Jayern; Satyawan, Dani; Kim, Moon Young; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation on cytosine residues is known to affect gene expression and is potentially responsible for the phenotypic variations among different crop cultivars. Here, we present the whole-genome DNA methylation profiles and assess the potential effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for two mungbean cultivars, Sunhwanogdu (VC1973A) and Kyunggijaerae#5 (V2984). By measuring the DNA methylation levels in leaf tissue with the bisulfite sequencing (BSseq) approach, we show both the frequencies of the various types of DNA methylation and the distribution of weighted gene methylation levels. SNPs that cause nucleotide changes from/to CHH – where C is cytosine and H is any other nucleotide – were found to affect DNA methylation status in VC1973A and V2984. In order to better understand the correlation between gene expression and DNA methylation levels, we surveyed gene expression in leaf tissues of VC1973A and V2984 using RNAseq. Transcript expressions of paralogous genes were controlled by DNA methylation within the VC1973A genome. Moreover, genes that were differentially expressed between the two cultivars showed distinct DNA methylation patterns. Our mungbean genome-wide methylation profiles will be valuable resources for understanding the phenotypic variations between different cultivars, as well as for molecular breeding. PMID:28084412

  5. Genome-wide association study of aggressive behaviour in chicken

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhui; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Zhenqiang; Ye, Qiao; Xu, Haiping; Luo, Wei; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    In the poultry industry, aggressive behaviour is a large animal welfare issue all over the world. To date, little is known about the underlying genetics of the aggressive behaviour. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to explore the genetic mechanism associated with aggressive behaviour in chickens. The GWAS results showed that a total of 33 SNPs were associated with aggressive behaviour traits (P < 4.6E-6). rs312463697 on chromosome 4 was significantly associated with aggression (P = 2.10905E-07), and it was in the intron region of the sortilin-related VPS10 domain containing receptor 2 (SORCS2) gene. In addition, biological function analysis of the nearest 26 genes around the significant SNPs was performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. An interaction network contained 17 genes was obtained and SORCS2 was involved in this network, interacted with nerve growth factor (NGF), nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), dopa decarboxylase (L-dopa) and dopamine. After knockdown of SORCS2, the mRNA levels of NGF, L-dopa and dopamine receptor genes DRD1, DRD2, DRD3 and DRD4 were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). In summary, our data indicated that SORCS2 might play an important role in chicken aggressive behaviour through the regulation of dopaminergic pathways and NGF. PMID:27485826

  6. Evolution of mate choice for genome-wide heterozygosity.

    PubMed

    Fromhage, Lutz; Kokko, Hanna; Reid, Jane M

    2009-03-01

    The extent to which indirect genetic benefits can drive the evolution of directional mating preferences for more ornamented mates, and the mechanisms that maintain such preferences without depleting genetic variance, remain key questions in evolutionary ecology. We used an individual-based genetic model to examine whether a directional preference for mates with higher genome-wide heterozygosity (H), and consequently greater ornamentation, could evolve and be maintained in the absence of direct fitness benefits of mate choice. We specifically considered finite populations of varying size and spatial genetic structure, in which parent-offspring resemblance in heterozygosity could provide an indirect benefit of mate choice. A directional preference for heterozygous mates evolved under broad conditions, even given a substantial direct cost of mate choice, low mutation rate, and stochastic variation in the link between individual heterozygosity and ornamentation. Furthermore, genetic variance was retained under directional sexual selection. Preference evolution was strongest in smaller populations, but weaker in populations with greater internal genetic structure in which restricted dispersal increased local inbreeding among offspring of neighboring females that all preferentially mated with the same male. These results suggest that directional preferences for heterozygous or outbred mates could evolve and be maintained in finite populations in the absence of direct fitness benefits, suggesting a novel resolution to the lek paradox.

  7. Identification of differential translation in genome wide studies.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Ola; Sonenberg, Nahum; Nadon, Robert

    2010-12-14

    Regulation of gene expression through translational control is a fundamental mechanism implicated in many biological processes ranging from memory formation to innate immunity and whose dysregulation contributes to human diseases. Genome wide analyses of translational control strive to identify differential translation independent of cytosolic mRNA levels. For this reason, most studies measure genes' translation levels as log ratios (translation levels divided by corresponding cytosolic mRNA levels obtained in parallel). Counterintuitively, arising from a mathematical necessity, these log ratios tend to be highly correlated with the cytosolic mRNA levels. Accordingly, they do not effectively correct for cytosolic mRNA level and generate substantial numbers of biological false positives and false negatives. We show that analysis of partial variance, which produces estimates of translational activity that are independent of cytosolic mRNA levels, is a superior alternative. When combined with a variance shrinkage method for estimating error variance, analysis of partial variance has the additional benefit of having greater statistical power and identifying fewer genes as translationally regulated resulting merely from unrealistically low variance estimates rather than from large changes in translational activity. In contrast to log ratios, this formal analytical approach estimates translation effects in a statistically rigorous manner, eliminates the need for inefficient and error-prone heuristics, and produces results that agree with biological function. The method is applicable to datasets obtained from both the commonly used polysome microarray method and the sequencing-based ribosome profiling method.

  8. Genome-wide analysis links NFATC2 with asparaginase hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Christian A.; Smith, Colton; Yang, Wenjian; Mullighan, Charles G.; Qu, Chunxu; Larsen, Eric; Bowman, W. Paul; Liu, Chengcheng; Ramsey, Laura B.; Chang, Tamara; Karol, Seth E.; Loh, Mignon L.; Raetz, Elizabeth A.; Winick, Naomi J.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Carroll, William L.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Devidas, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Asparaginase is used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL); however, hypersensitivity reactions can lead to suboptimal asparaginase exposure. Our objective was to use a genome-wide approach to identify loci associated with asparaginase hypersensitivity in children with ALL enrolled on St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital (SJCRH) protocols Total XIIIA (n = 154), Total XV (n = 498), and Total XVI (n = 271), or Children’s Oncology Group protocols POG 9906 (n = 222) and AALL0232 (n = 2163). Germline DNA was genotyped using the Affymetrix 500K, Affymetrix 6.0, or the Illumina Exome BeadChip array. In multivariate logistic regression, the intronic rs6021191 variant in nuclear factor of activated T cells 2 (NFATC2) had the strongest association with hypersensitivity (P = 4.1 × 10−8; odds ratio [OR] = 3.11). RNA-seq data available from 65 SJCRH ALL tumor samples and 52 Yoruba HapMap samples showed that samples carrying the rs6021191 variant had higher NFATC2 expression compared with noncarriers (P = 1.1 × 10−3 and 0.03, respectively). The top ranked nonsynonymous polymorphism was rs17885382 in HLA-DRB1 (P = 3.2 × 10−6; OR = 1.63), which is in near complete linkage disequilibrium with the HLA-DRB1*07:01 allele we previously observed in a candidate gene study. The strongest risk factors for asparaginase allergy are variants within genes regulating the immune response. PMID:25987655

  9. Natural selection on functional modules, a genome-wide analysis.

    PubMed

    Serra, François; Arbiza, Leonardo; Dopazo, Joaquín; Dopazo, Hernán

    2011-03-01

    Classically, the functional consequences of natural selection over genomes have been analyzed as the compound effects of individual genes. The current paradigm for large-scale analysis of adaptation is based on the observed significant deviations of rates of individual genes from neutral evolutionary expectation. This approach, which assumed independence among genes, has not been able to identify biological functions significantly enriched in positively selected genes in individual species. Alternatively, pooling related species has enhanced the search for signatures of selection. However, grouping signatures does not allow testing for adaptive differences between species. Here we introduce the Gene-Set Selection Analysis (GSSA), a new genome-wide approach to test for evidences of natural selection on functional modules. GSSA is able to detect lineage specific evolutionary rate changes in a notable number of functional modules. For example, in nine mammal and Drosophilae genomes GSSA identifies hundreds of functional modules with significant associations to high and low rates of evolution. Many of the detected functional modules with high evolutionary rates have been previously identified as biological functions under positive selection. Notably, GSSA identifies conserved functional modules with many positively selected genes, which questions whether they are exclusively selected for fitting genomes to environmental changes. Our results agree with previous studies suggesting that adaptation requires positive selection, but not every mutation under positive selection contributes to the adaptive dynamical process of the evolution of species.

  10. Genome wide association scan for chronic periodontitis implicates novel locus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is evidence for a genetic contribution to chronic periodontitis. In this study, we conducted a genome wide association study among 866 participants of the University of Pittsburgh Dental Registry and DNA Repository, whose periodontal diagnosis ranged from healthy (N = 767) to severe chronic periodontitis (N = 99). Methods Genotypingi of over half-million single nucleotide polymorphisms was determined. Analyses were done twice, first in the complete dataset of all ethnicities, and second including only samples defined as self-reported Whites. From the top 100 results, twenty single nucleotide polymorphisms had consistent results in both analyses (borderline p-values ranging from 1E-05 to 1E-6) and were selected to be tested in two independent datasets derived from 1,460 individuals from Porto Alegre, and 359 from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Meta-analyses of the Single nucleotide polymorphisms showing a trend for association in the independent dataset were performed. Results The rs1477403 marker located on 16q22.3 showed suggestive association in the discovery phase and in the Porto Alegre dataset (p = 0.05). The meta-analysis suggested the less common allele decreases the risk of chronic periodontitis. Conclusions Our data offer a clear hypothesis to be independently tested regarding the contribution of the 16q22.3 locus to chronic periodontitis. PMID:25008200

  11. Genome-wide Association Studies for Osteoporosis: A 2013 Update

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Lei; Papasian, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, the bone field has witnessed great advances in genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of osteoporosis, with a number of promising genes identified. In particular, meta-analysis of GWASs, aimed at increasing the power of studies by combining the results from different study populations, have led to the identification of novel associations that would not otherwise have been identified in individual GWASs. Recently, the first whole genome sequencing study for osteoporosis and fractures was published, reporting a novel rare nonsense mutation. This review summarizes the important and representative findings published by December 2013. Comments are made on the notable findings and representative studies for their potential influence and implications on our present understanding of the genetics of osteoporosis. Potential limitations of GWASs and their meta-analyses are evaluated, with an emphasis on understanding the reasons for inconsistent results between different studies and clarification of misinterpretation of GWAS meta-analysis results. Implications and challenges of GWAS are also discussed, including the need for multi- and inter-disciplinary studies. PMID:25006567

  12. Genome-Wide Association Studies of the Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Emily R.; Cusanovich, Darren A.; Michelini, Katelyn; Barreiro, Luis B.; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial composition of the human fecal microbiome is influenced by many lifestyle factors, notably diet. It is less clear, however, what role host genetics plays in dictating the composition of bacteria living in the gut. In this study, we examined the association of ~200K host genotypes with the relative abundance of fecal bacterial taxa in a founder population, the Hutterites, during two seasons (n = 91 summer, n = 93 winter, n = 57 individuals collected in both). These individuals live and eat communally, minimizing variation due to environmental exposures, including diet, which could potentially mask small genetic effects. Using a GWAS approach that takes into account the relatedness between subjects, we identified at least 8 bacterial taxa whose abundances were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the host genome in each season (at genome-wide FDR of 20%). For example, we identified an association between a taxon known to affect obesity (genus Akkermansia) and a variant near PLD1, a gene previously associated with body mass index. Moreover, we replicate a previously reported association from a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping study of fecal microbiome abundance in mice (genus Lactococcus, rs3747113, P = 3.13 x 10−7). Finally, based on the significance distribution of the associated microbiome QTLs in our study with respect to chromatin accessibility profiles, we identified tissues in which host genetic variation may be acting to influence bacterial abundance in the gut. PMID:26528553

  13. Genome-Wide Specific Selection in Three Domestic Sheep Breeds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huihua; Zhang, Li; Cao, Jiaxve; Wu, Mingming; Ma, Xiaomeng; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Ruizao; Zhao, Fuping; Wei, Caihong; Du, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Commercial sheep raised for mutton grow faster than traditional Chinese sheep breeds. Here, we aimed to evaluate genetic selection among three different types of sheep breed: two well-known commercial mutton breeds and one indigenous Chinese breed. We first combined locus-specific branch lengths and di statistical methods to detect candidate regions targeted by selection in the three different populations. The results showed that the genetic distances reached at least medium divergence for each pairwise combination. We found these two methods were highly correlated, and identified many growth-related candidate genes undergoing artificial selection. For production traits, APOBR and FTO are associated with body mass index. For meat traits, ALDOA, STK32B and FAM190A are related to marbling. For reproduction traits, CCNB2 and SLC8A3 affect oocyte development. We also found two well-known genes, GHR (which affects meat production and quality) and EDAR (associated with hair thickness) were associated with German mutton merino sheep. Furthermore, four genes (POL, RPL7, MSL1 and SHISA9) were associated with pre-weaning gain in our previous genome-wide association study. Our results indicated that combine locus-specific branch lengths and di statistical approaches can reduce the searching ranges for specific selection. And we got many credible candidate genes which not only confirm the results of previous reports, but also provide a suite of novel candidate genes in defined breeds to guide hybridization breeding.

  14. A genome-wide investigation of food addiction.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Marilyn C; Flint, Alan; Field, Alison E; Kraft, Peter; Han, Jiali; Rimm, Eric B; van Dam, Rob M

    2016-06-01

    Evidence of parallels between drug addiction and eating behavior continues to accumulate. Genetic studies of addictive substances have yielded a number of susceptibility loci that point to common higher order genetic pathways underlying addiction. It was hypothesized that a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of food addiction would yield significant enrichment in genes and pathways linked to addiction. A GWAS of food addiction, determined by the modified Yale Food Addiction Scale (mYFAS), was conducted among 9,314 women of European ancestry, and results for enrichment of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (n = 44), genes (n = 238), and pathways (n = 11) implicated in drug addiction were examined. Two loci met GW-significance (P < 2.5 × 10(-8) ) mapping to 17q21.31 and 11q13.4 that harbor genes with no obvious roles in eating behavior. GW results were significantly enriched for gene members of the MAPK signaling pathway (P = 0.02). No candidate SNP or gene for drug addiction was significantly associated with food addiction after correction for multiple testing. In the first GWAS of mYFAS, suggestive loci worthy of further follow-up were identified, but limited support was provided for shared genetic underpinnings of food addiction and drug addiction. The latter might be due to limited study power and knowledge of the genetics of drug addiction. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  15. A genome wide dosage suppressor network reveals genomic robustness

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Biranchi; Kon, Yoshiko; Yadav, Gitanjali; Sevold, Anthony W.; Frumkin, Jesse P.; Vallabhajosyula, Ravishankar R.; Hintze, Arend; Østman, Bjørn; Schossau, Jory; Bhan, Ashish; Marzolf, Bruz; Tamashiro, Jenna K.; Kaur, Amardeep; Baliga, Nitin S.; Grayhack, Elizabeth J.; Adami, Christoph; Galas, David J.; Raval, Alpan; Phizicky, Eric M.; Ray, Animesh

    2017-01-01

    Genomic robustness is the extent to which an organism has evolved to withstand the effects of deleterious mutations. We explored the extent of genomic robustness in budding yeast by genome wide dosage suppressor analysis of 53 conditional lethal mutations in cell division cycle and RNA synthesis related genes, revealing 660 suppressor interactions of which 642 are novel. This collection has several distinctive features, including high co-occurrence of mutant-suppressor pairs within protein modules, highly correlated functions between the pairs and higher diversity of functions among the co-suppressors than previously observed. Dosage suppression of essential genes encoding RNA polymerase subunits and chromosome cohesion complex suggests a surprising degree of functional plasticity of macromolecular complexes, and the existence of numerous degenerate pathways for circumventing the effects of potentially lethal mutations. These results imply that organisms and cancer are likely able to exploit the genomic robustness properties, due the persistence of cryptic gene and pathway functions, to generate variation and adapt to selective pressures. PMID:27899637

  16. Biostatistical aspects of genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Andreas; König, Inke R; Thompson, John R

    2008-02-01

    To search the entire human genome for association is a novel and promising approach to unravelling the genetic basis of complex genetic diseases. In these genome-wide association studies (GWAs), several hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are analyzed at the same time, posing substantial biostatistical and computational challenges. In this paper, we discuss a number of biostatistical aspects of GWAs in detail. We specifically consider quality control issues and show that signal intensity plots are a sine qua condition non in today's GWAs. Approaches to detect and adjust for population stratification are briefly examined. We discuss different strategies aimed at tackling the problem of multiple testing, including adjustment of p -values, the false positive report probability and the false discovery rate. Another aspect of GWAs requiring special attention is the search for gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. We finally describe multistage approaches to GWAs. (c) 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  17. Genome-Wide Analysis of Human MicroRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Li, Zhixin; Zhou, Shixin; Wen, Jinhua; Geng, Bin; Yang, Jichun; Cui, Qinghua

    2013-01-01

    Increasing studies have shown that microRNA (miRNA) stability plays important roles in physiology. However, the global picture of miRNA stability remains largely unknown. Here, we had analyzed genome-wide miRNA stability across 10 diverse cell types using miRNA arrays. We found that miRNA stability shows high dynamics and diversity both within individual cells and across cell types. Strikingly, we observed a negative correlation between miRNA stability and miRNA expression level, which is different from current findings on other biological molecules such as proteins and mRNAs that show positive and not negative correlations between stability and expression level. This finding indicates that miRNA has a distinct action mode, which we called “rapid production, rapid turnover; slow production, slow turnover.” This mode further suggests that high expression miRNAs normally degrade fast and may endow the cell with special properties that facilitate cellular status-transition. Moreover, we revealed that the stability of miRNAs is affected by cohorts of factors that include miRNA targets, transcription factors, nucleotide content, evolution, associated disease, and environmental factors. Together, our results provided an extensive description of the global landscape, dynamics, and distinct mode of human miRNA stability, which provide help in investigating their functions in physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:24187663

  18. Genome-wide methylation profiles in coronary artery ectasia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tzu-Pin; Chuang, Nai-Chen; Cheng, Chin-Yu; Hsu, Cheng-An; Wang, Yi-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hong; Lee, Jen-Kuang; Wu, Cho-Kai; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Lin, Lian-Yu; Yeh, Shih-Fan Sherri; Chien, Kuo-Liang; Juang, Jyh-Ming Jimmy

    2017-04-01

    Coronary artery ectasia (CAE) is a disease characterized by abnormally dilated coronary arteries. The mechanism of CAE remains unclear, and its treatment is limited. Previous studies have shown that risk factors for CAE were related to changes in DNA methylation. However, no systematic investigation of methylation profiles has been performed. Therefore, we compared methylation profiles between 12 CAE patients and 12 propensity-matched individuals with normal coronary arteries using microarrays. Wilcoxon's rank sum tests revealed 89 genes with significantly different methylation levels (P<0.05 and Δβ > |0.1|). Functional characterization using the DAVID database and gene set enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were involved in immune and inflammatory responses. Of these genes 6 were validated in 29 CAE patients and 87 matched individuals with CAE, using pyro-sequencing. TLR6 and NOTCH4 showed significant differences in methylation between the two groups, and lower protein levels of toll-like receptor 6 (TLR6) were detected in CAE patients. In conclusion, this genome-wide analysis of methylation profiles in CAE patients showed that significant changes in both methylation and expression of TLR6 deserve further study to elucidate their roles in CAE. © 2017 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  19. Genome-Wide Specific Selection in Three Domestic Sheep Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jiaxve; Wu, Mingming; Ma, Xiaomeng; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Ruizao; Zhao, Fuping; Wei, Caihong; Du, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Background Commercial sheep raised for mutton grow faster than traditional Chinese sheep breeds. Here, we aimed to evaluate genetic selection among three different types of sheep breed: two well-known commercial mutton breeds and one indigenous Chinese breed. Results We first combined locus-specific branch lengths and di statistical methods to detect candidate regions targeted by selection in the three different populations. The results showed that the genetic distances reached at least medium divergence for each pairwise combination. We found these two methods were highly correlated, and identified many growth-related candidate genes undergoing artificial selection. For production traits, APOBR and FTO are associated with body mass index. For meat traits, ALDOA, STK32B and FAM190A are related to marbling. For reproduction traits, CCNB2 and SLC8A3 affect oocyte development. We also found two well-known genes, GHR (which affects meat production and quality) and EDAR (associated with hair thickness) were associated with German mutton merino sheep. Furthermore, four genes (POL, RPL7, MSL1 and SHISA9) were associated with pre-weaning gain in our previous genome-wide association study. Conclusions Our results indicated that combine locus-specific branch lengths and di statistical approaches can reduce the searching ranges for specific selection. And we got many credible candidate genes which not only confirm the results of previous reports, but also provide a suite of novel candidate genes in defined breeds to guide hybridization breeding. PMID:26083354

  20. Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation in Human Amnion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinsil; Pitlick, Mitchell M.; Christine, Paul J.; Schaefer, Amanda R.; Saleme, Cesar; Comas, Belén; Cosentino, Viviana; Gadow, Enrique; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    The amnion is a specialized tissue in contact with the amniotic fluid, which is in a constantly changing state. To investigate the importance of epigenetic events in this tissue in the physiology and pathophysiology of pregnancy, we performed genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of human amnion from term (with and without labor) and preterm deliveries. Using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, we identified genes exhibiting differential methylation associated with normal labor and preterm birth. Functional analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed biologically relevant enriched gene sets. Bisulfite sequencing analysis of the promoter region of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene detected two CpG dinucleotides showing significant methylation differences among the three groups of samples. Hypermethylation of the CpG island of the solute carrier family 30 member 3 (SLC30A3) gene in preterm amnion was confirmed by methylation-specific PCR. This work provides preliminary evidence that DNA methylation changes in the amnion may be at least partially involved in the physiological process of labor and the etiology of preterm birth and suggests that DNA methylation profiles, in combination with other biological data, may provide valuable insight into the mechanisms underlying normal and pathological pregnancies. PMID:23533356

  1. A Genome-wide Association Study of Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Alan E.; Pliner, Hannah A.; Provenzano, Carlo; Evoli, Amelia; Ricciardi, Roberta; Nalls, Michael A.; Marangi, Giuseppe; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Arepalli, Sampath; Chong, Sean; Hernandez, Dena G.; Johnson, Janel O.; Bartoccioni, Emanuela; Scuderi, Flavia; Maestri, Michelangelo; Raphael Gibbs, J.; Errichiello, Edoardo; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Sabatelli, Mario; Macek, Mark; Scholz, Sonja W.; Corse, Andrea; Chaudhry, Vinay; Benatar, Michael; Barohn, Richard J.; McVey, April; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Rowin, Julie; Kissel, John; Freimer, Miriam; Kaminski, Henry J.; Sanders, Donald B.; Lipscomb, Bernadette; Massey, Janice M.; Chopra, Manisha; Howard, James F.; Koopman, Wilma J.; Nicolle, Michael W.; Pascuzzi, Robert M.; Pestronk, Alan; Wulf, Charlie; Florence, Julaine; Blackmore, Derrick; Soloway, Aimee; Siddiqi, Zaeem; Muppidi, Srikanth; Wolfe, Gil; Richman, David; Mezei, Michelle M.; Jiwa, Theresa; Oger, Joel; Drachman, Daniel B.; Traynor, Bryan J.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Myasthenia gravis is a chronic, autoimmune, neuromuscular disease characterized by fluctuating weakness of voluntary muscle groups. Although genetic factors are known to play a role in this neuroimmunological condition, the genetic etiology underlying myasthenia gravis is not well understood. OBJECTIVE To identify genetic variants that alter susceptibility to myasthenia gravis, we performed a genome-wide association study. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS DNA was obtained from 1032 white individuals from North America diagnosed as having acetylcholine receptor antibody–positive myasthenia gravis and 1998 race/ethnicity-matched control individuals from January 2010 to January 2011. These samples were genotyped on Illumina OmniExpress single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays. An independent cohort of 423 Italian cases and 467 Italian control individuals were used for replication. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We calculated P values for association between 8114394 genotyped and imputed variants across the genome and risk for developing myasthenia gravis using logistic regression modeling. A threshold P value of 5.0 × 10−8 was set for genome-wide significance after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. RESULTS In the over all case-control cohort, we identified association signals at CTLA4 (rs231770; P = 3.98 × 10−8; odds ratio, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.25–1.49), HLA-DQA1 (rs9271871; P = 1.08 × 10−8; odds ratio, 2.31; 95% CI, 2.02 – 2.60), and TNFRSF11A (rs4263037; P = 1.60 × 10−9; odds ratio, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.29–1.53). These findings replicated for CTLA4 and HLA-DQA1 in an independent cohort of Italian cases and control individuals. Further analysis revealed distinct, but overlapping, disease-associated loci for early- and late-onset forms of myasthenia gravis. In the late-onset cases, we identified 2 association peaks: one was located in TNFRSF11A (rs4263037; P = 1.32 × 10−12; odds ratio, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.44–1.68) and the other was detected

  2. A genome-wide association study of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Renton, Alan E; Pliner, Hannah A; Provenzano, Carlo; Evoli, Amelia; Ricciardi, Roberta; Nalls, Michael A; Marangi, Giuseppe; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Arepalli, Sampath; Chong, Sean; Hernandez, Dena G; Johnson, Janel O; Bartoccioni, Emanuela; Scuderi, Flavia; Maestri, Michelangelo; Gibbs, J Raphael; Errichiello, Edoardo; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Sabatelli, Mario; Macek, Mark; Scholz, Sonja W; Corse, Andrea; Chaudhry, Vinay; Benatar, Michael; Barohn, Richard J; McVey, April; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Rowin, Julie; Kissel, John; Freimer, Miriam; Kaminski, Henry J; Sanders, Donald B; Lipscomb, Bernadette; Massey, Janice M; Chopra, Manisha; Howard, James F; Koopman, Wilma J; Nicolle, Michael W; Pascuzzi, Robert M; Pestronk, Alan; Wulf, Charlie; Florence, Julaine; Blackmore, Derrick; Soloway, Aimee; Siddiqi, Zaeem; Muppidi, Srikanth; Wolfe, Gil; Richman, David; Mezei, Michelle M; Jiwa, Theresa; Oger, Joel; Drachman, Daniel B; Traynor, Bryan J

    2015-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a chronic, autoimmune, neuromuscular disease characterized by fluctuating weakness of voluntary muscle groups. Although genetic factors are known to play a role in this neuroimmunological condition, the genetic etiology underlying myasthenia gravis is not well understood. To identify genetic variants that alter susceptibility to myasthenia gravis, we performed a genome-wide association study. DNA was obtained from 1032 white individuals from North America diagnosed as having acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive myasthenia gravis and 1998 race/ethnicity-matched control individuals from January 2010 to January 2011. These samples were genotyped on Illumina OmniExpress single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays. An independent cohort of 423 Italian cases and 467 Italian control individuals were used for replication. We calculated P values for association between 8,114,394 genotyped and imputed variants across the genome and risk for developing myasthenia gravis using logistic regression modeling. A threshold P value of 5.0×10(-8) was set for genome-wide significance after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. In the overall case-control cohort, we identified association signals at CTLA4 (rs231770; P=3.98×10(-8); odds ratio, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.25-1.49), HLA-DQA1 (rs9271871; P=1.08×10(-8); odds ratio, 2.31; 95% CI, 2.02-2.60), and TNFRSF11A (rs4263037; P=1.60×10(-9); odds ratio, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.29-1.53). These findings replicated for CTLA4 and HLA-DQA1 in an independent cohort of Italian cases and control individuals. Further analysis revealed distinct, but overlapping, disease-associated loci for early- and late-onset forms of myasthenia gravis. In the late-onset cases, we identified 2 association peaks: one was located in TNFRSF11A (rs4263037; P=1.32×10(-12); odds ratio, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.44-1.68) and the other was detected in the major histocompatibility complex on chromosome 6p21 (HLA-DQA1; rs9271871; P=7.02×10(-18); odds ratio, 4.27; 95

  3. Genome-Wide Architecture of Disease Resistance Genes in Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Christopoulou, Marilena; Wo, Sebastian Reyes-Chin; Kozik, Alex; McHale, Leah K; Truco, Maria-Jose; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W

    2015-10-08

    Genome-wide motif searches identified 1134 genes in the lettuce reference genome of cv. Salinas that are potentially involved in pathogen recognition, of which 385 were predicted to encode nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR) proteins. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we grouped the NLRs into 25 multigene families and 17 singletons. Forty-one percent of these NLR-encoding genes belong to three families, the largest being RGC16 with 62 genes in cv. Salinas. The majority of NLR-encoding genes are located in five major resistance clusters (MRCs) on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 and cosegregate with multiple disease resistance phenotypes. Most MRCs contain primarily members of a single NLR gene family but a few are more complex. MRC2 spans 73 Mb and contains 61 NLRs of six different gene families that cosegregate with nine disease resistance phenotypes. MRC3, which is 25 Mb, contains 22 RGC21 genes and colocates with Dm13. A library of 33 transgenic RNA interference tester stocks was generated for functional analysis of NLR-encoding genes that cosegregated with disease resistance phenotypes in each of the MRCs. Members of four NLR-encoding families, RGC1, RGC2, RGC21, and RGC12 were shown to be required for 16 disease resistance phenotypes in lettuce. The general composition of MRCs is conserved across different genotypes; however, the specific repertoire of NLR-encoding genes varied particularly of the rapidly evolving Type I genes. These tester stocks are valuable resources for future analyses of additional resistance phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Christopoulou et al.

  4. Genome-wide metabolic (re-) annotation of Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Even before having its genome sequence published in 2004, Kluyveromyces lactis had long been considered a model organism for studies in genetics and physiology. Research on Kluyveromyces lactis is quite advanced and this yeast species is one of the few with which it is possible to perform formal genetic analysis. Nevertheless, until now, no complete metabolic functional annotation has been performed to the proteins encoded in the Kluyveromyces lactis genome. Results In this work, a new metabolic genome-wide functional re-annotation of the proteins encoded in the Kluyveromyces lactis genome was performed, resulting in the annotation of 1759 genes with metabolic functions, and the development of a methodology supported by merlin (software developed in-house). The new annotation includes novelties, such as the assignment of transporter superfamily numbers to genes identified as transporter proteins. Thus, the genes annotated with metabolic functions could be exclusively enzymatic (1410 genes), transporter proteins encoding genes (301 genes) or have both metabolic activities (48 genes). The new annotation produced by this work largely surpassed the Kluyveromyces lactis currently available annotations. A comparison with KEGG’s annotation revealed a match with 844 (~90%) of the genes annotated by KEGG, while adding 850 new gene annotations. Moreover, there are 32 genes with annotations different from KEGG. Conclusions The methodology developed throughout this work can be used to re-annotate any yeast or, with a little tweak of the reference organism, the proteins encoded in any sequenced genome. The new annotation provided by this study offers basic knowledge which might be useful for the scientific community working on this model yeast, because new functions have been identified for the so-called metabolic genes. Furthermore, it served as the basis for the reconstruction of a compartmentalized, genome-scale metabolic model of Kluyveromyces lactis, which is

  5. Genome-wide signatures of convergent evolution in echolocating mammals.

    PubMed

    Parker, Joe; Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Cotton, James A; Liu, Yuan; Provero, Paolo; Stupka, Elia; Rossiter, Stephen J

    2013-10-10

    Evolution is typically thought to proceed through divergence of genes, proteins and ultimately phenotypes. However, similar traits might also evolve convergently in unrelated taxa owing to similar selection pressures. Adaptive phenotypic convergence is widespread in nature, and recent results from several genes have suggested that this phenomenon is powerful enough to also drive recurrent evolution at the sequence level. Where homoplasious substitutions do occur these have long been considered the result of neutral processes. However, recent studies have demonstrated that adaptive convergent sequence evolution can be detected in vertebrates using statistical methods that model parallel evolution, although the extent to which sequence convergence between genera occurs across genomes is unknown. Here we analyse genomic sequence data in mammals that have independently evolved echolocation and show that convergence is not a rare process restricted to several loci but is instead widespread, continuously distributed and commonly driven by natural selection acting on a small number of sites per locus. Systematic analyses of convergent sequence evolution in 805,053 amino acids within 2,326 orthologous coding gene sequences compared across 22 mammals (including four newly sequenced bat genomes) revealed signatures consistent with convergence in nearly 200 loci. Strong and significant support for convergence among bats and the bottlenose dolphin was seen in numerous genes linked to hearing or deafness, consistent with an involvement in echolocation. Unexpectedly, we also found convergence in many genes linked to vision: the convergent signal of many sensory genes was robustly correlated with the strength of natural selection. This first attempt to detect genome-wide convergent sequence evolution across divergent taxa reveals the phenomenon to be much more pervasive than previously recognized.

  6. Genome-wide association study on differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Aleksandra; Chen, Bowang; Gemignani, Federica; Elisei, Rossella; Romei, Cristina; Figlioli, Gisella; Cipollini, Monica; Cristaudo, Alfonso; Bambi, Franco; Hoffmann, Per; Herms, Stefan; Kalemba, Michal; Kula, Dorota; Harris, Shelley; Broderick, Peter; Houlston, Richard; Pastor, Susana; Marcos, Ricard; Velázquez, Antonia; Jarzab, Barbara; Hemminki, Kari; Landi, Stefano; Försti, Asta

    2013-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) have identified associations with polymorphisms at 2q35 (DIRC3), 8p12 (NRG1), 9q22.33 (FOXE1), and 14q13.2 (NKX2-1). However, most of the inherited genetic risk factors of DTC remain to be discovered. Our objective was to identify additional common DTC susceptibility loci. We conducted a GWAS in a high-incidence Italian population of 690 cases and 497 controls and followed up the most significant polymorphisms in 2 additional Italian series and in 3 low-incidence populations totaling 2958 cases and 3727 controls. After excluding the most robust previously identified locus (9q22.33), the strongest association was shown by rs6759952, confirming the recently published association in DIRC3 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.21, P = 6.4 × 10(-10), GWAS and all replications combined). Additionally, in the combined analysis of the Italian series, suggestive associations were attained with rs10238549 and rs7800391 in IMMP2L (OR = 1.27, P = 4.1 × 10(-6); and OR = 1.25, P = 5.7 × 10(-6)), rs7617304 in RARRES1 (OR = 1.25, P = 4.6 × 10(-5)) and rs10781500 in SNAPC4/CARD9 (OR = 1.23, P = 3.5 × 10(-5)). Our findings provide additional insights into the genetic and biological basis of inherited genetic susceptibility to DTC. Additional studies are needed to determine the role of the identified polymorphisms in the development of DTC and their possible use in the clinical practice.

  7. Genome wide analysis of protein production load in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Pakula, Tiina M; Nygren, Heli; Barth, Dorothee; Heinonen, Markus; Castillo, Sandra; Penttilä, Merja; Arvas, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina) is a widely used industrial host organism for protein production. In industrial cultivations, it can produce over 100 g/l of extracellular protein, mostly constituting of cellulases and hemicellulases. In order to improve protein production of T. reesei the transcriptional regulation of cellulases and secretory pathway factors have been extensively studied. However, the metabolism of T. reesei under protein production conditions has not received much attention. To understand the physiology and metabolism of T. reesei under protein production conditions we carried out a well-controlled bioreactor experiment with extensive analysis. We used minimal media to make the data amenable for modelling and three strain pairs to cover different protein production levels. With RNA-sequencing transcriptomics we detected the concentration of the carbon source as the most important determinant of the transcriptome. As the major transcriptional response concomitant to protein production we detected the induction of selected genes that were putatively regulated by xyr1 and were related to protein transport, amino acid metabolism and transcriptional regulation. We found novel metabolic responses such as production of glycerol and a cellotriose-like compound. We then used this cultivation data for flux balance analysis of T. reesei metabolism and demonstrate for the first time the use of genome wide stoichiometric metabolic modelling for T. reesei. We show that our model can predict protein production rate and provides novel insight into the metabolism of protein production. We also provide this unprecedented cultivation and transcriptomics data set for future modelling efforts. The use of stoichiometric modelling can open a novel path for the improvement of protein production in T. reesei. Based on this we propose sulphur assimilation as a major limiting factor of protein production. As an organism with

  8. Mosaic paternal genome-wide uniparental isodisomy with down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Darcy, Diana; Atwal, Paldeep Singh; Angell, Cathy; Gadi, Inder; Wallerstein, Robert

    2015-10-01

    We report on a 6-month-old girl with two apparent cell lines; one with trisomy 21, and the other with paternal genome-wide uniparental isodisomy (GWUPiD), identified using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based microarray and microsatellite analysis of polymorphic loci. The patient has Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) due to paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) at chromosome location 11p15 (UPD 11p15), which was confirmed through methylation analysis. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia is present, which is associated with paternal UPD 11p15.5; and she likely has medullary nephrocalcinosis, which is associated with paternal UPD 20, although this was not biochemically confirmed. Angelman syndrome (AS) analysis was negative but this testing is not completely informative; she has no specific features of AS. Clinical features of this patient include: dysmorphic features consistent with trisomy 21, tetralogy of Fallot, hemihypertrophy, swirled skin hyperpigmentation, hepatoblastoma, and Wilms tumor. Her karyotype is 47,XX,+21[19]/46,XX[4], and microarray results suggest that the cell line with trisomy 21 is biparentally inherited and represents 40-50% of the genomic material in the tested specimen. The difference in the level of cytogenetically detected mosaicism versus the level of mosaicism observed via microarray analysis is likely caused by differences in the test methodologies. While a handful of cases of mosaic paternal GWUPiD have been reported, this patient is the only reported case that also involves trisomy 21. Other GWUPiD patients have presented with features associated with multiple imprinted regions, as does our patient. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Genome-wide signatures of convergent evolution in echolocating mammals

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Joe; Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Cotton, James A.; Liu, Yuan; Provero, Paolo; Stupka, Elia; Rossiter, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Evolution is typically thought to proceed through divergence of genes, proteins, and ultimately phenotypes1-3. However, similar traits might also evolve convergently in unrelated taxa due to similar selection pressures4,5. Adaptive phenotypic convergence is widespread in nature, and recent results from a handful of genes have suggested that this phenomenon is powerful enough to also drive recurrent evolution at the sequence level6-9. Where homoplasious substitutions do occur these have long been considered the result of neutral processes. However, recent studies have demonstrated that adaptive convergent sequence evolution can be detected in vertebrates using statistical methods that model parallel evolution9,10 although the extent to which sequence convergence between genera occurs across genomes is unknown. Here we analyse genomic sequence data in mammals that have independently evolved echolocation and show for the first time that convergence is not a rare process restricted to a handful of loci but is instead widespread, continuously distributed and commonly driven by natural selection acting on a small number of sites per locus. Systematic analyses of convergent sequence evolution in 805,053 amino acids within 2,326 orthologous coding gene sequences compared across 22 mammals (including four new bat genomes) revealed signatures consistent with convergence in nearly 200 loci. Strong and significant support for convergence among bats and the dolphin was seen in numerous genes linked to hearing or deafness, consistent with an involvement in echolocation. Surprisingly we also found convergence in many genes linked to vision: the convergent signal of many sensory genes was robustly correlated with the strength of natural selection. This first attempt to detect genome-wide convergent sequence evolution across divergent taxa reveals the phenomenon to be much more pervasive than previously recognised. PMID:24005325

  10. Assessing statistical significance in multivariable genome wide association analysis

    PubMed Central

    Buzdugan, Laura; Kalisch, Markus; Navarro, Arcadi; Schunk, Daniel; Fehr, Ernst; Bühlmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Although Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) genotype a very large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the data are often analyzed one SNP at a time. The low predictive power of single SNPs, coupled with the high significance threshold needed to correct for multiple testing, greatly decreases the power of GWAS. Results: We propose a procedure in which all the SNPs are analyzed in a multiple generalized linear model, and we show its use for extremely high-dimensional datasets. Our method yields P-values for assessing significance of single SNPs or groups of SNPs while controlling for all other SNPs and the family wise error rate (FWER). Thus, our method tests whether or not a SNP carries any additional information about the phenotype beyond that available by all the other SNPs. This rules out spurious correlations between phenotypes and SNPs that can arise from marginal methods because the ‘spuriously correlated’ SNP merely happens to be correlated with the ‘truly causal’ SNP. In addition, the method offers a data driven approach to identifying and refining groups of SNPs that jointly contain informative signals about the phenotype. We demonstrate the value of our method by applying it to the seven diseases analyzed by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC). We show, in particular, that our method is also capable of finding significant SNPs that were not identified in the original WTCCC study, but were replicated in other independent studies. Availability and implementation: Reproducibility of our research is supported by the open-source Bioconductor package hierGWAS. Contact: peter.buehlmann@stat.math.ethz.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153677

  11. Genome-wide characteristics of de novo mutations in autism

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Ryan K C; Merico, Daniele; Cao, Hongzhi; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Alipanahi, Babak; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Tong, Xin; Sun, Yuhui; Cao, Dandan; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Xueli; Jin, Xin; Zhou, Ze; Liu, Xiaomin; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Walker, Susan; Howe, Jennifer L.; Wang, Zhuozhi; MacDonald, Jeffrey R.; Chan, Ada; D’Abate, Lia; Deneault, Eric; Siu, Michelle T.; Tammimies, Kristiina; Uddin, Mohammed; Zarrei, Mehdi; Wang, Mingbang; Li, Yingrui; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Bookman, Matt; Bingham, Jonathan; Gross, Samuel S.; Loy, Dion; Pletcher, Mathew; Marshall, Christian R.; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Weksberg, Rosanna; Fernandez, Bridget A; Roberts, Wendy; Szatmari, Peter; Glazer, David; Frey, Brendan J.; Ring, Robert H.; Xu, Xun; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    De novo mutations (DNMs) are important in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), but so far analyses have mainly been on the ~1.5% of the genome encoding genes. Here, we performed whole genome sequencing (WGS) of 200 ASD parent-child trios and characterized germline and somatic DNMs. We confirmed that the majority of germline DNMs (75.6%) originated from the father, and these increased significantly with paternal age only (p=4.2×10−10). However, when clustered DNMs (those within 20kb) were found in ASD, not only did they mostly originate from the mother (p=7.7×10−13), but they could also be found adjacent to de novo copy number variations (CNVs) where the mutation rate was significantly elevated (p=2.4×10−24). By comparing DNMs detected in controls, we found a significant enrichment of predicted damaging DNMs in ASD cases (p=8.0×10−9; OR=1.84), of which 15.6% (p=4.3×10−3) and 22.5% (p=7.0×10−5) were in the non-coding or genic non-coding, respectively. The non-coding elements most enriched for DNM were untranslated regions of genes, boundaries involved in exon-skipping and DNase I hypersensitive regions. Using microarrays and a novel outlier detection test, we also found aberrant methylation profiles in 2/185 (1.1%) of ASD cases. These same individuals carried independently identified DNMs in the ASD risk- and epigenetic- genes DNMT3A and ADNP. Our data begins to characterize different genome-wide DNMs, and highlight the contribution of non-coding variants, to the etiology of ASD. PMID:27525107

  12. Genome-wide association study of sleep in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sleep is a highly conserved behavior, yet its duration and pattern vary extensively among species and between individuals within species. The genetic basis of natural variation in sleep remains unknown. Results We used the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) to perform a genome-wide association (GWA) study of sleep in D. melanogaster. We identified candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with differences in the mean as well as the environmental sensitivity of sleep traits; these SNPs typically had sex-specific or sex-biased effects, and were generally located in non-coding regions. The majority of SNPs (80.3%) affecting sleep were at low frequency and had moderately large effects. Additive models incorporating multiple SNPs explained as much as 55% of the genetic variance for sleep in males and females. Many of these loci are known to interact physically and/or genetically, enabling us to place them in candidate genetic networks. We confirmed the role of seven novel loci on sleep using insertional mutagenesis and RNA interference. Conclusions We identified many SNPs in novel loci that are potentially associated with natural variation in sleep, as well as SNPs within genes previously known to affect Drosophila sleep. Several of the candidate genes have human homologues that were identified in studies of human sleep, suggesting that genes affecting variation in sleep are conserved across species. Our discovery of genetic variants that influence environmental sensitivity to sleep may have a wider application to all GWA studies, because individuals with highly plastic genotypes will not have consistent phenotypes. PMID:23617951

  13. Multicentric Genome-Wide Association Study for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Abrantes, Patrícia; Francisco, Vânia; Teixeira, Gilberto; Monteiro, Marta; Neves, João; Norte, Ana; Robalo Cordeiro, Carlos; Moura e Sá, João; Reis, Ernestina; Santos, Patrícia; Oliveira, Manuela; Sousa, Susana; Fradinho, Marta; Malheiro, Filipa; Negrão, Luís

    2016-01-01

    Despite elevated incidence and recurrence rates for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax (PSP), little is known about its etiology, and the genetics of idiopathic PSP remains unexplored. To identify genetic variants contributing to sporadic PSP risk, we conducted the first PSP genome-wide association study. Two replicate pools of 92 Portuguese PSP cases and of 129 age- and sex-matched controls were allelotyped in triplicate on the Affymetrix Human SNP Array 6.0 arrays. Markers passing quality control were ranked by relative allele score difference between cases and controls (|RASdiff|), by a novel cluster method and by a combined Z-test. 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected using these three approaches for technical validation by individual genotyping in the discovery dataset. 87 out of 94 successfully tested SNPs were nominally associated in the discovery dataset. Replication of the 87 technically validated SNPs was then carried out in an independent replication dataset of 100 Portuguese cases and 425 controls. The intergenic rs4733649 SNP in chromosome 8 (between LINC00824 and LINC00977) was associated with PSP in the discovery (P = 4.07E-03, ORC[95% CI] = 1.88[1.22–2.89]), replication (P = 1.50E-02, ORC[95% CI] = 1.50[1.08–2.09]) and combined datasets (P = 8.61E-05, ORC[95% CI] = 1.65[1.29–2.13]). This study identified for the first time one genetic risk factor for sporadic PSP, but future studies are warranted to further confirm this finding in other populations and uncover its functional role in PSP pathogenesis. PMID:27203581

  14. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Multiple Keratinocyte Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Verkouteren, Joris A. C.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Kraft, Peter; Turman, Constance; Han, Jiali; Cho, Eunyoung; Murabito, Joanne M.; Levy, Daniel; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Nijsten, Tamar

    2017-01-01

    There is strong evidence for a role of environmental risk factors involved in susceptibility to develop multiple keratinocyte cancers (mKCs), but whether genes are also involved in mKCs susceptibility has not been thoroughly investigated. We investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with susceptibility for mKCs. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 1,666 cases with mKCs and 1,950 cases with single KC (sKCs; controls) from Harvard cohorts (the Nurses' Health Study [NHS], NHS II, and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study) and the Framingham Heart Study was carried-out using over 8 million SNPs (stage-1). We sought to replicate the most significant statistical associations (p-value≤ 5.5x10-6) in an independent cohort of 574 mKCs and 872 sKCs from the Rotterdam Study. In the discovery stage, 40 SNPs with suggestive associations (p-value ≤5.5x10-6) were identified, with eight independent SNPs tagging all 40 SNPs. The most significant SNP was located at chromosome 9 (rs7468390; p-value = 3.92x10-7). In stage-2, none of these SNPs replicated and only two of them were associated with mKCs in the same direction in the combined meta-analysis. We tested the associations for 19 previously reported basal cell carcinoma-related SNPs (candidate gene association analysis), and found that rs1805007 (MC1R locus) was significantly associated with risk of mKCs (p-value = 2.80x10-4). Although the suggestive SNPs with susceptibility for mKCs were not replicated, we found that previously identified BCC variants may also be associated with mKC, which the most significant association (rs1805007) located at the MC1R gene. PMID:28081215

  15. Heritability and genome-wide linkage scan of subjective happiness.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Meike; Saviouk, Viatcheslav; de Moor, Marleen H M; Willemsen, Gonneke; van Beijsterveldt, Toos C E M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Geus, Eco J C; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2010-04-01

    Causes of individual differences in happiness, as assessed with the Subjective Happiness Scale, are investigated in a large of sample twins and siblings from the Netherlands Twin Register. Over 12,000 twins and siblings, average age 24.7 years (range 12 to 88), took part in the study. A genetic model with an age by sex design was fitted to the data with structural equation modeling in Mx. The heritability of happiness was estimated at 22% for males and 41% in females. No effect of age was observed. To identify the genomic regions contributing to this heritability, a genome-wide linkage study for happiness was conducted in sibling pairs. A subsample of 1157 offspring from 441 families was genotyped with an average of 371 micro-satellite markers per individual. Phenotype and genotype data were analyzed in MERLIN with multipoint variance component linkage analysis and age and sex as covariates. A linkage signal (logarithm of odds score 2.73, empirical p value 0.095) was obtained at the end of the long arm of chromosome 19 for marker D19S254 at 110 cM. A second suggestive linkage peak was found at the short arm of chromosome 1 (LOD of 2.37) at 153 cM, marker D1S534 (empirical p value of .209). These two regions of interest are not overlapping with the regions found for contrasting phenotypes (such as depression, which is negatively associated with happiness). Further linkage and future association studies are warranted.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of intraspecific transposon diversity in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transposable elements (TEs) consist of LTR (Long Terminal Repeat) retrotransposons called Ty elements belonging to five families, Ty1 to Ty5. They take the form of either full-length coding elements or non-coding solo-LTRs corresponding to remnants of former transposition events. Although the biological features of Ty elements have been studied in detail in S. cerevisiae and the Ty content of the reference strain (S288c) was accurately annotated, the Ty-related intra-specific diversity has not been closely investigated so far. Results In this study, we investigated the Ty contents of 41 available genomes of isolated S. cerevisiae strains of diverse geographical and ecological origins. The strains were compared in terms of the number of Ty copies, the content of the potential transpositionally active elements and the genomic insertion maps. The strain repertoires were also investigated in the closely related Ty1 and Ty2 families and subfamilies. Conclusions This is the first genome-wide analysis of the diversity associated to the Ty elements, carried out for a large set of S. cerevisiae strains. The results of the present analyses suggest that the current Ty-related polymorphism has resulted from multiple causes such as differences between strains, between Ty families and over time, in the recent transpositional activity of Ty elements. Some new Ty1 variants were also identified, and we have established that Ty1 variants have different patterns of distribution among strains, which further contributes to the strain diversity. PMID:23768249

  17. Genome-wide analysis highlights genetic dilution in Algerian sheep.

    PubMed

    Gaouar, S B S; Lafri, M; Djaout, A; El-Bouyahiaoui, R; Bouri, A; Bouchatal, A; Maftah, A; Ciani, E; Da Silva, A B

    2017-03-01

    Algeria represents a reservoir of genetic diversity with local sheep breeds adapted to a large range of environments and showing specific features necessary to deal with harsh conditions. This remarkable diversity results from the traditional management of dryland by pastoralists over centuries. Most of these breeds are poorly productive, and the economic pressure leads farmers to realize anarchic cross-breeding (that is, not carried out in the framework of selection plans) with the hope to increase animal's conformation. In this study, eight of the nine local Algerian sheep breeds (D'men, Hamra, Ouled-Djellal, Rembi, Sidaoun, Tazegzawt, Berber and Barbarine) were investigated for the first time by genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. At an international scale, Algerian sheep occupied an original position shaped by relations with African and European (particularly Italian) breeds. The strong genetic proximity with Caribbean and Brazilian breeds confirmed that the genetic make-up of these American breeds was largely influenced by the Atlantic slave trade. At a national scale, an alarming genetic dilution of the Berber (a primitive breed) and the Rembi was observed, as a consequence of uncontrolled mating practices with Ouled-Djellal. A similar, though less pronounced, phenomenon was also detected for the Barbarine, another ancestral breed. Genetic originality appeared to be better preserved in Tazegzawt, Hamra, D'men and Sidaoun. These breeds should be given high priority in the establishment of conservation plans to halt their progressive loss. For Berber and Barbarine that also occur in the bordering neighbor countries, urgent concerted transnational actions are needed.

  18. Technical note: Computing strategies in genome-wide selection.

    PubMed

    Legarra, A; Misztal, I

    2008-01-01

    Genome-wide genetic evaluation might involve the computation of BLUP-like estimations, potentially including thousands of covariates (i.e., single-nucleotide polymorphism markers) for each record. This implies dense Henderson's mixed-model equations and considerable computing resources in time and storage, even for a few thousand records. Possible computing options include the type of storage and the solving algorithm. This work evaluated several computing options, including half-stored Cholesky decomposition, Gauss-Seidel, and 3 matrix-free strategies: Gauss-Seidel, Gauss-Seidel with residuals update, and preconditioned conjugate gradients. Matrix-free Gauss-Seidel with residuals update adjusts the residuals after computing the solution for each effect. This avoids adjusting the left-hand side of the equations by all other effects at every step of the algorithm and saves considerable computing time. Any Gauss-Seidel algorithm can easily be extended for variance component estimation by Markov chain-Monte Carlo. Let m and n be the number of records and markers, respectively. Computing time for Cholesky decomposition is proportional to n3. Computing times per round are proportional to mn2 in matrix-free Gauss-Seidel, to n2 for half-stored Gauss-Seidel, and to n and m for the rest of the algorithms. Algorithms were tested on a real mouse data set, which included 1,928 records and 10,946 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers. Computing times were in the order of a few minutes for Gauss-Seidel with residuals update and preconditioned conjugate gradients, more than 1 h for half-stored Gauss-Seidel, 2 h for Cholesky decomposition, and 4 d for matrix-free Gauss-Seidel. Preconditioned conjugate gradients was the fastest. Gauss-Seidel with residuals update would be the method of choice for variance component estimation as well as solving.

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study of Schizophrenia in Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazuo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Hattori, Eiji; Iwamoto, Kazuya; Toyota, Tomoko; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Ohba, Hisako; Maekawa, Motoko; Kato, Tadafumi; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating neuropsychiatric disorder with genetically complex traits. Genetic variants should explain a considerable portion of the risk for schizophrenia, and genome-wide association study (GWAS) is a potentially powerful tool for identifying the risk variants that underlie the disease. Here, we report the results of a three-stage analysis of three independent cohorts consisting of a total of 2,535 samples from Japanese and Chinese populations for searching schizophrenia susceptibility genes using a GWAS approach. Firstly, we examined 115,770 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 120 patient-parents trio samples from Japanese schizophrenia pedigrees. In stage II, we evaluated 1,632 SNPs (1,159 SNPs of p<0.01 and 473 SNPs of p<0.05 that located in previously reported linkage regions). The second sample consisted of 1,012 case-control samples of Japanese origin. The most significant p value was obtained for the SNP in the ELAVL2 [(embryonic lethal, abnormal vision, Drosophila)-like 2] gene located on 9p21.3 (p = 0.00087). In stage III, we scrutinized the ELAVL2 gene by genotyping gene-centric tagSNPs in the third sample set of 293 family samples (1,163 individuals) of Chinese descent and the SNP in the gene showed a nominal association with schizophrenia in Chinese population (p = 0.026). The current data in Asian population would be helpful for deciphering ethnic diversity of schizophrenia etiology. PMID:21674006

  20. Multicentric Genome-Wide Association Study for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Inês; Abrantes, Patrícia; Francisco, Vânia; Teixeira, Gilberto; Monteiro, Marta; Neves, João; Norte, Ana; Robalo Cordeiro, Carlos; Moura E Sá, João; Reis, Ernestina; Santos, Patrícia; Oliveira, Manuela; Sousa, Susana; Fradinho, Marta; Malheiro, Filipa; Negrão, Luís; Feijó, Salvato; Oliveira, Sofia A

    2016-01-01

    Despite elevated incidence and recurrence rates for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax (PSP), little is known about its etiology, and the genetics of idiopathic PSP remains unexplored. To identify genetic variants contributing to sporadic PSP risk, we conducted the first PSP genome-wide association study. Two replicate pools of 92 Portuguese PSP cases and of 129 age- and sex-matched controls were allelotyped in triplicate on the Affymetrix Human SNP Array 6.0 arrays. Markers passing quality control were ranked by relative allele score difference between cases and controls (|RASdiff|), by a novel cluster method and by a combined Z-test. 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected using these three approaches for technical validation by individual genotyping in the discovery dataset. 87 out of 94 successfully tested SNPs were nominally associated in the discovery dataset. Replication of the 87 technically validated SNPs was then carried out in an independent replication dataset of 100 Portuguese cases and 425 controls. The intergenic rs4733649 SNP in chromosome 8 (between LINC00824 and LINC00977) was associated with PSP in the discovery (P = 4.07E-03, ORC[95% CI] = 1.88[1.22-2.89]), replication (P = 1.50E-02, ORC[95% CI] = 1.50[1.08-2.09]) and combined datasets (P = 8.61E-05, ORC[95% CI] = 1.65[1.29-2.13]). This study identified for the first time one genetic risk factor for sporadic PSP, but future studies are warranted to further confirm this finding in other populations and uncover its functional role in PSP pathogenesis.

  1. Genome-Wide Methylation Analyses in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Rose K.; Chen, Yanwen; Guan, Xiaowei; Nousome, Darryl; Sharma, Charu; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey; Sloan, Andrew E.; Cortes, Etty; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Su, Tao; Delgado-Cruzata, Lissette; Gurvich, Irina; Santella, Regina M.; Ostrom, Quinn; Lee, Annette; Gregersen, Peter; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Few studies had investi