Science.gov

Sample records for multiparameter fluorescence imaging

  1. Acetone laser-induced fluorescence for temperature and multiparameter imaging in gaseous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Mark Clinton

    1999-10-01

    Acetone (CH3COCH3) is an excellent tracer for planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging in gaseous flows due to its low toxicity, high vapor pressure, and accessible absorption (225-320 nm) and fluorescence (350-550 nm) features. A fluorescence yield limited by rapid intersystem crossing reduces the importance of collisional effects. Since the initial work of Lozano (1992), acetone PLIF has been applied with quantitative success in studies of gas-phase mixing under isothermal, isobaric conditions. More recently, improved understanding of acetone fluorescence dependences has opened up possibilities for new diagnostics across a range of conditions. Through modeling and experimental measurement of fluorescence dependences, the current work aims to make existing diagnostics more quantitative and to allow development of new diagnostics for other parameters, in particular temperature. To this end, temperature dependences of fluorescence are measured at excitation wavelengths across the acetone absorption spectrum. Fluorescence per unit acetone mole fraction decreases significantly with increasing temperature for short wavelengths (248 and 266 nm) and weakly (308 nm) or not at all (320 nm) for longer wavelengths. These effects are related to changes in absorption cross-section and fluorescence yield with temperature. A quantitative multistep decay model of fluorescence yield explains the observed temperature and wavelength functionalities and also predicts effects of pressure and composition. Measurements of pressure and composition dependences of acetone fluorescence between 0.5 and 16 atm, with excitation at 248, 266, and 308 nm, are found to agree with model predictions. A mild fluorescence quenching effect of oxygen is observed, which the model, with slight modification, can explain as well. Temperature and multiparameter imaging diagnostics are made possible by the improved understanding of acetone photophysical behavior. Excitation at 248 or 266 nm is

  2. FluoQ: a tool for rapid analysis of multiparameter fluorescence imaging data applied to oscillatory events.

    PubMed

    Stein, Frank; Kress, Manuel; Reither, Sabine; Piljić, Alen; Schultz, Carsten

    2013-09-20

    The number of fluorescent sensors and their use in living cells has significantly increased in the past years. Yet, the analysis of data from single cells or cell populations usually remains a very time-consuming enterprise. Here, we introduce FluoQ, a new macro for the image analysis software ImageJ, which enables fast analysis of multiparameter time-lapse fluorescence microscopy data with minimal manual input. FluoQ provides statistical analysis of all measured parameters and delivers the results in multiple graphic and numeric displays. We demonstrate the power of FluoQ by applying the macro to data analysis in the development and optimization of novel FRET reporters for monitoring the performance of calcium/calmodulin-binding inositol trisphosphate kinases A and B (ITPKA and ITPKB) in HeLa cells. We find that conformational changes in the ITPKA-based sensor follow receptor-mediated calcium oscillations. This indicates that ITPKA contributes to the regulation of intracellular calcium transients by limiting inositol trisphosphate levels.

  3. Multiparameter fluorescence imaging for quantification of TH-1 and TH-2 cytokines at the single-cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekkar, Hakim; Benbernou, N.; Esnault, S.; Shin, H. C.; Guenounou, Moncef

    1998-04-01

    Immune responses are strongly influenced by the cytokines following antigenic stimulation. Distinct cytokine-producing T cell subsets are well known to play a major role in immune responses and to be differentially regulated during immunological disorders, although the characterization and quantification of the TH-1/TH-2 cytokine pattern in T cells remained not clearly defined. Expression of cytokines by T lymphocytes is a highly balanced process, involving stimulatory and inhibitory intracellular signaling pathways. The aim of this study was (1) to quantify the cytokine expression in T cells at the single cell level using optical imaging, (2) and to analyze the influence of cyclic AMP- dependent signal transduction pathway in the balance between the TH-1 and TH-2 cytokine profile. We attempted to study several cytokines (IL-2, IFN-(gamma) , IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cells were prestimulated in vitro using phytohemagglutinin and phorbol ester for 36h, and then further cultured for 8h in the presence of monensin. Cells were permeabilized and then simple-, double- or triple-labeled with the corresponding specific fluorescent monoclonal antibodies. The cell phenotype was also determined by analyzing the expression of each of CD4, CD8, CD45RO and CD45RA with the cytokine expression. Conventional images of cells were recorded with a Peltier- cooled CCD camera (B/W C5985, Hamamatsu photonics) through an inverted microscope equipped with epi-fluorescence (Diaphot 300, Nikon). Images were digitalized using an acquisition video interface (Oculus TCX Coreco) in 762 by 570 pixels coded in 8 bits (256 gray levels), and analyzed thereafter in an IBM PC computer based on an intel pentium processor with an adequate software (Visilog 4, Noesis). The first image processing step is the extraction of cell areas using an edge detection and a binary thresholding method. In order to reduce the background noise of fluorescence, we performed an opening

  4. A computational platform for robotized fluorescence microscopy (II): DNA damage, replication, checkpoint activation, and cell cycle progression by high-content high-resolution multiparameter image-cytometry.

    PubMed

    Furia, Laura; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Dissection of complex molecular-networks in rare cell populations is limited by current technologies that do not allow simultaneous quantification, high-resolution localization, and statistically robust analysis of multiple parameters. We have developed a novel computational platform (Automated Microscopy for Image CytOmetry, A.M.I.CO) for quantitative image-analysis of data from confocal or widefield robotized microscopes. We have applied this image-cytometry technology to the study of checkpoint activation in response to spontaneous DNA damage in nontransformed mammary cells. Cell-cycle profile and active DNA-replication were correlated to (i) Ki67, to monitor proliferation; (ii) phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX) and 53BP1, as markers of DNA-damage response (DDR); and (iii) p53 and p21, as checkpoint-activation markers. Our data suggest the existence of cell-cycle modulated mechanisms involving different functions of γH2AX and 53BP1 in DDR, and of p53 and p21 in checkpoint activation and quiescence regulation during the cell-cycle. Quantitative analysis, event selection, and physical relocalization have been then employed to correlate protein expression at the population level with interactions between molecules, measured with Proximity Ligation Analysis, with unprecedented statistical relevance.

  5. Multiparameter classifications of optical tomographic images.

    PubMed

    Klose, Christian D; Klose, Alexander D; Netz, Uwe; Beuthan, Juergen; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2008-01-01

    This research study explores the combined use of more than one parameter derived from optical tomographic images to increase diagnostic accuracy which is measured in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Parameters considered include, for example, smallest or largest absorption or scattering coefficients or the ratios thereof in an image region of interest. These parameters have been used individually in a previous study to determine if a finger joint is affected or not affected by rheumatoid arthritis. To combine these parameters in the analysis we employ here a vector quantization based classification method called Self-Organizing Mapping (SOM). This method allows producing multivariate ROC-curves from which sensitivity and specificities can be determined. We found that some parameter combinations can lead to higher sensitivities whereas others to higher specificities when compared to singleparameter classifications employed in previous studies. The best diagnostic accuracy, in terms of highest Youden index, was achieved by combining three absorption parameters [maximum(micro a), minimum(micro a), and the ratio of minimum(micro a) and maximum(micro a)], which result in a sensitivity of 0.78, a specificity of 0.76, a Youden index of 0.54, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.72. These values are higher than for previously reported single parameter classifications with a best sensitivity and specificity of 0.71, a Youden index of 0.41, and an AUC of 0.66.

  6. Detecting ordered small molecule drug aggregates in live macrophages: a multi-parameter microscope image data acquisition and analysis strategy

    PubMed Central

    Rzeczycki, Phillip; Yoon, Gi Sang; Keswani, Rahul K.; Sud, Sudha; Stringer, Kathleen A.; Rosania, Gus R.

    2017-01-01

    Following prolonged administration, certain orally bioavailable but poorly soluble small molecule drugs are prone to precipitate out and form crystal-like drug inclusions (CLDIs) within the cells of living organisms. In this research, we present a quantitative multi-parameter imaging platform for measuring the fluorescence and polarization diattenuation signals of cells harboring intracellular CLDIs. To validate the imaging system, the FDA-approved drug clofazimine (CFZ) was used as a model compound. Our results demonstrated that a quantitative multi-parameter microscopy image analysis platform can be used to study drug sequestering macrophages, and to detect the formation of ordered molecular aggregates formed by poorly soluble small molecule drugs in animals. PMID:28270989

  7. Multiparameter image visualization by projection pursuit (Proceedings Only)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harikumar, G.; Bresler, Yoram

    1992-09-01

    This paper addresses the display of multi-parameter medical image data, such as arises in MRI or multimodality image fusion. MRI or multi modality studies produce several different images of a given cross-section of the body, each providing different levels of contrast sensitivity between different tissues. The question then arises as to how to present this wealth of data to the diagnostician. While each of the different images may be misleading (as illustrated later by an example), in combination they may contain the correct information. Unfortunately, a human observer is not likely to be able to extract this information when presented with a parallel display of the distinct images. Given the sequential nature of detailed visual examination of a picture, a human observer is quite ineffective at integrating complex visual data from parallel sources. The development of a display technology that overcomes this difficulty by synthesizing a display method matched to the capabilities of the human observer is the subject of this paper. The ultimate goal of diagnostic imaging is the detection, localization, and quantification of abnormality. An intermediate goal, which is the one we address, is to present the diagnostician with an image that will maximize his changes to classify correctly different regions in the image as belonging to different tissue types. Our premise is that the diagnostician is able to bring to bear all his knowledge and experience, which are difficult to capture in a computer program, on the final analysis process. This is often key to the detection of subtle and otherwise elusive features in the image. We therefore rule out the generation of an automatically segmented image, which not only fails to include this knowledge, but also would deprive the diagnostician of the opportunity to exercise it, by presenting him with a hard-labeled segmentation. Instead we concentrate on the fusion of the multiple images of the same cross-section into a single

  8. Quantitative Assessment of Retinopathy Using Multi-parameter Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghanian, Zahra; Staniszewski, Kevin; Jamali, Nasim; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Wang, Shoujian; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader; Ranji, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    A multi-parameter quantification method was implemented to quantify retinal vascular injuries in microscopic images of clinically relevant eye diseases. This method was applied to wholemount retinal trypsin digest images of diabetic Akita/+, and bcl-2 knocked out mice models. Five unique features of retinal vasculature were extracted to monitor early structural changes and retinopathy, as well as quantifying the disease progression. Our approach was validated through simulations of retinal images. Results showed fewer number of cells (P = 5.1205e-05), greater population ratios of endothelial cells to pericytes (PCs) (P = 5.1772e-04; an indicator of PC loss), higher fractal dimension (P = 8.2202e-05), smaller vessel coverage (P = 1.4214e-05), and greater number of acellular capillaries (P = 7.0414e-04) for diabetic retina as compared to normal retina. Quantification using the present method would be helpful in evaluating physiological and pathological retinopathy in a high-throughput and reproducible manner. PMID:27186534

  9. Multi-parameter optical image interpretations based on self-organizing mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Christian D.; Klose, A. K.; Netz, U.; Scheel, A.; Beuthan, J.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2008-02-01

    We found that using more than one parameter derived from optical tomographic images can lead to better image classification results compared to cases when only one parameter is used.. In particular we present a multi-parameter classification approach, called self-organizing mapping (SOM), for detecting synovitis in arthritic finger joints based on sagittal laser optical tomography (SLOT). This imaging modality can be used to determine various physical parameters such as minimal absorption and scattering coefficients in an image of the proximal interphalengeal joint. Results were compared to different gold standards: magnet resonance imaging, ultra-sonography and clinical evaluation. When compared to classifications based on single-parameters, e.g., absorption minimum only, the study reveals that multi-parameter classifications lead to higher classification sensitivities and specificities and statistical significances with p-values <5 per cent. Finally, the data suggest that image analyses are more reliable and avoid ambiguous interpretations when using more than one parameter.

  10. Sensitive segmentation of low-contrast multispectral images based on multiparameter space-resonance imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmetshin, Alexander M.; Akhmetshin, Lyudmila G.

    2001-10-01

    A new method of low contrast multispectral, hyperspectral and multiparameter images segmentation is outlined. The one has significant advantage in sensitivity and space resolving power of segmentation in comparison with known methods such as principal component transformation and fuzzy C-means clustering segmentation ones. New method is based on using of two important stages: 1) application virtual long-wave holographic transformation to each separate image of analyzed multispectral sequence (it is needed for increasing sensitivity of further analysis); 2) to each pixel of analyzed multispectral image is compare a virtual nonrecursive digital filter with complex coefficients. The one is characterized by its amplitude-frequency (AFC) and phase-frequency (PFC) characteristics. Information features used for visualization and segmentation are frequencies corresponded to maximum (resonance point) or minimum (antiresonance point) of AFC and group delay function calculated on base PFC. Information possibilities of new method are demonstrated on examples of multispectral remote sensing, various physical nature geophysical fields fusion and multiparameter MRI brain tumor hidden area influence detection.

  11. Multiparameter analysis of a screen for progesterone receptor ligands: comparing fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence polarization measurements.

    PubMed

    Marks, Bryan D; Qadir, Naveeda; Eliason, Hildegard C; Shekhani, Mohammed Saleh; Doering, Klaus; Vogel, Kurt W

    2005-12-01

    Direct measurement of the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) of a fluorescent label is an emerging method for high-throughput screening. Changes in the fluorescence lifetime can be correlated to changes in the non-radiative relaxation pathway(s) for the excited state of the label. These pathways can be environmentally sensitive, such as when a labeled analyte is free in solution versus bound to a receptor. Because lifetime is an intrinsic property of a fluorophore, it is not concentration dependent, and therefore has advantages similar to those of ratiometric fluorescent techniques such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer or fluorescence polarization. We have applied the FLT measurement technique to a screen of a small compound library in order to identify compounds that bind to the progesterone receptor, and compared the results to those obtained by performing the assay in fluorescence polarization mode. Each readout modality showed excellent Z'; values, with the FLT readout performing slightly better in this respect. Interfering compounds could be rapidly identified for either assay format by comparing the results between the two formats.

  12. Multiple fluorescence microscopy and optoelectronic imaging: possibilities and limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, Heinz

    1997-12-01

    The last 20 years have seen an unexpected great renaissance and a partial revolution in light microscopy. This recent progress is due to new design in optics and instrumentation as well as improvement of optical contrast enhancement techniques. Recent progress in fluorescence microscopy is achieved by multiparameter fluorescence techniques, by improvement of conventional photomicrography as well as by optoelectronic imaging, confocal laser scanning microscopy, image processing and analysis. Due to the increase in number of fluorescence dyes, double and triple bandpass filter sets permit a rapid changeover between different fluorochromes simultaneously.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Dysli, Chantal; Wolf, Sebastian; Berezin, Mikhail Y; Sauer, Lydia; Hammer, Martin; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2017-09-01

    Imaging techniques based on retinal autofluorescence have found broad applications in ophthalmology because they are extremely sensitive and noninvasive. Conventional fundus autofluorescence imaging measures fluorescence intensity of endogenous retinal fluorophores. It mainly derives its signal from lipofuscin at the level of the retinal pigment epithelium. Fundus autofluorescence, however, can not only be characterized by the spatial distribution of the fluorescence intensity or emission spectrum, but also by a characteristic fluorescence lifetime function. The fluorescence lifetime is the average amount of time a fluorophore remains in the excited state following excitation. Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) is an emerging imaging modality for in vivo measurement of lifetimes of endogenous retinal fluorophores. Recent reports in this field have contributed to our understanding of the pathophysiology of various macular and retinal diseases. Within this review, the basic concept of fluorescence lifetime imaging is provided. It includes technical background information and correlation with in vitro measurements of individual retinal metabolites. In a second part, clinical applications of fluorescence lifetime imaging and fluorescence lifetime features of selected retinal diseases such as Stargardt disease, age-related macular degeneration, choroideremia, central serous chorioretinopathy, macular holes, diabetic retinopathy, and retinal artery occlusion are discussed. Potential areas of use for fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy will be outlined at the end of this review. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Candida, fluorescent stain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This microscopic film shows a fluorescent stain of Candida. Candida is a yeast (fungus) that causes mild disease, but in immunocompromised individuals it may cause life-threatening illness. (Image ...

  15. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, Franklin D.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  16. Fluorescence Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio, and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities, and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate fluorescent protein constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. PMID:24974023

  17. Stroboscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Holton, Mark D; Silvestre, Oscar R; Errington, Rachel J; Smith, Paul J; Matthews, Daniel R; Rees, Paul; Summers, Huw D

    2009-03-30

    We report a fluorescence lifetime imaging technique that uses the time integrated response to a periodic optical excitation, eliminating the need for time resolution in detection. A Dirac pulse train of variable period is used to probe the frequency response of the total fluorescence per pulse leading to a frequency roll-off that is dependent on the relaxation rate of the fluorophores. The technique is validated by demonstrating wide-field, realtime, lifetime imaging of the endocytosis of inorganic quantum dots by a cancer cell line. Surface charging of the dots in the intra-cellular environment produces a switch in the fluorescence lifetime from approximately 40 ns to < 10 ns. A temporal resolution of half the excitation period is possible which in this instance is 15 ns. This stroboscopic technique offers lifetime based imaging at video rates with standard CCD cameras and has application in probing millisecond cell dynamics and in high throughput imaging assays.

  18. [Multiparameter magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of cancer of the cervix uteri].

    PubMed

    Tarachkova, E V; Strel'tsova, O N; Panov, V O; Bazaeva, I Ya; Tyurin, I E

    2015-01-01

    Cancer of the cervix uteri (CCU) ranks third in the incidence of malignancies in women. The choice of CCU treatment mainly depends on the extent of the tumor process, i.e., the stage of the disease. Determining the stage of CCU is based on the clinical classification of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) (2009) and has a number of substantial limitations in evaluating parametrial invasion, tumor spread to the pelvic wall, and involvement of regional lymph nodes and in determining the true tumor sizes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now the method of choice in staging invasive CCU. Multiparameter MRI will be able to enhance the efficiency of diagnosing microinvasive CCU as well (FIGO 2009), to plan surgical and/or chemoradiation treatment, to evaluate its efficiency, and to diagnose locally recurrent CCU.

  19. Fluorescence Imaging in Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Orosco, Ryan K.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2013-01-01

    Although the modern surgical era is highlighted by multiple technological advances and innovations, one area that has remained constant is the dependence of the surgeon's vision on white-light reflectance. This renders different body tissues in a limited palette of various shades of pink and red, thereby limiting the visual contrast available to the operating surgeon. Healthy tissue, anatomic variations, and diseased states are seen as slight discolorations relative to each other and differences are inherently limited in dynamic range. In the upcoming years, surgery will undergo a paradigm shift with the use of targeted fluorescence imaging probes aimed at augmenting the surgical armamentarium by expanding the “visible” spectrum available to surgeons. Such fluorescent “smart probes” will provide real-time, intraoperative, pseudo-color, high-contrast delineation of both normal and pathologic tissues. Fluorescent surgical molecular guidance promises another major leap forward to improve patient safety and clinical outcomes, and to reduce overall healthcare costs. This review provides an overview of current and future surgical applications of fluorescence imaging in diseased and nondiseased tissues and focus on the innovative fields of image processing and instrumentation. PMID:23335674

  20. Novel image fusion method based on adaptive pulse coupled neural network and discrete multi-parameter fractional random transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Jun; Hao, Zhengchao

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we first propose the discrete multi-parameter fractional random transform (DMPFRNT), which can make the spectrum distributed randomly and uniformly. Then we introduce this new spectrum transform into the image fusion field and present a new approach for the remote sensing image fusion, which utilizes both adaptive pulse coupled neural network (PCNN) and the discrete multi-parameter fractional random transform in order to meet the requirements of both high spatial resolution and low spectral distortion. In the proposed scheme, the multi-spectral (MS) and panchromatic (Pan) images are converted into the discrete multi-parameter fractional random transform domains, respectively. In DMPFRNT spectrum domain, high amplitude spectrum (HAS) and low amplitude spectrum (LAS) components carry different informations of original images. We take full advantage of the synchronization pulse issuance characteristics of PCNN to extract the HAS and LAS components properly, and give us the PCNN ignition mapping images which can be used to determine the fusion parameters. In the fusion process, local standard deviation of the amplitude spectrum is chosen as the link strength of pulse coupled neural network. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate that the proposed method is more reliable and superior than several existing methods based on Hue Saturation Intensity representation, Principal Component Analysis, the discrete fractional random transform etc.

  1. High-Speed Multiparameter Photophysical Analyses of Fluorophore Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Kevin M.; Davis, Lloyd M.; Lubbeck, Jennifer L.; Manna, Premashis; Friis, Pia; Palmer, Amy E.; Jimenez, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    There is a critical need for high-speed multi-parameter photophysical measurements of large libraries of fluorescent probe variants for imaging and biosensor development. We present a microfluidic flow cytometer that rapidly assays 104–105 member cell-based fluorophore libraries, simultaneously measuring fluorescence lifetime and photo-bleaching. Together, these photophysical characteristics determine imaging performance. We demonstrate the ability to resolve the diverse photophysical characteristics of different library types and the ability to identify rare populations. PMID:25898152

  2. Fluorescent microthermographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    In the early days of microelectronics, design rules and feature sizes were large enough that sub-micron spatial resolution was not needed. Infrared or IR thermal techniques were available that calculated the object`s temperature from infrared emission. There is a fundamental spatial resolution limitation dependent on the wavelengths of light being used in the image formation process. As the integrated circuit feature sizes began to shrink toward the one micron level, the limitations imposed on IR thermal systems became more pronounced. Something else was needed to overcome this limitation. Liquid crystals have been used with great success, but they lack the temperature measurement capabilities of other techniques. The fluorescent microthermographic imaging technique (FMI) was developed to meet this need. This technique offers better than 0.01{degrees}C temperature resolution and is diffraction limited to 0.3 {mu}m spatial resolution. While the temperature resolution is comparable to that available on IR systems, the spatial resolution is much better. The FMI technique provides better spatial resolution by using a temperature dependent fluorescent film that emits light at 612 nm instead of the 1.5 {mu}m to 12 {mu}m range used by IR techniques. This tutorial starts with a review of blackbody radiation physics, the process by which all heated objects emit radiation to their surroundings, in order to understand the sources of information that are available to characterize an object`s surface temperature. The processes used in infrared thermal imaging are then detailed to point out the limitations of the technique but also to contrast it with the FMI process. The FMI technique is then described in detail, starting with the fluorescent film physics and ending with a series of examples of past applications of FMI.

  3. Multiparameter MR imaging in the 6-OPRI variant of inherited prion disease.

    PubMed

    De Vita, E; Ridgway, G R; Scahill, R I; Caine, D; Rudge, P; Yousry, T A; Mead, S; Collinge, J; Jäger, H R; Thornton, J S; Hyare, H

    2013-09-01

    Inherited prion diseases represent over 15% of human prion cases and are a frequent cause of early onset dementia. The purpose of this study was to define the distribution of changes in cerebral volumetric and microstructural parenchymal tissues in a specific inherited human prion disease mutation combining VBM with VBA of cerebral MTR and MD. VBM and VBA of cerebral MTR and MD were performed in 16 healthy control participants and 9 patients with the 6-OPRI mutation. An analysis of covariance consisting of diagnostic grouping with age and total intracranial volume as covariates was performed. On VBM, there was a significant reduction in gray matter volume in patients compared with control participants in the basal ganglia, perisylvian cortex, lingual gyrus, and precuneus. Significant MTR reduction and MD increases were more anatomically extensive than volume differences on VBM in the same cortical areas, but MTR and MD changes were not seen in the basal ganglia. Gray matter and WM changes were seen in brain areas associated with motor and cognitive functions known to be impaired in patients with the 6-OPRI mutation. There were some differences in the anatomic distribution of MTR-VBA and MD-VBA changes compared with VBM, likely to reflect regional variations in the type and degree of the respective pathophysiologic substrates. Combined analysis of complementary multiparameter MR imaging data furthers our understanding of prion disease pathophysiology.

  4. A Quantitative Method for Microtubule Analysis in Fluorescence Images.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiaodong; Li, Lingfei; Hu, Jiongyu; Zhang, Qiong; Dang, Yongming; Huang, Yuesheng

    2015-12-01

    Microtubule analysis is of significant value for a better understanding of normal and pathological cellular processes. Although immunofluorescence microscopic techniques have proven useful in the study of microtubules, comparative results commonly rely on a descriptive and subjective visual analysis. We developed an objective and quantitative method based on image processing and analysis of fluorescently labeled microtubular patterns in cultured cells. We used a multi-parameter approach by analyzing four quantifiable characteristics to compose our quantitative feature set. Then we interpreted specific changes in the parameters and revealed the contribution of each feature set using principal component analysis. In addition, we verified that different treatment groups could be clearly discriminated using principal components of the multi-parameter model. High predictive accuracy of four commonly used multi-classification methods confirmed our method. These results demonstrated the effectiveness and efficiency of our method in the analysis of microtubules in fluorescence images. Application of the analytical methods presented here provides information concerning the organization and modification of microtubules, and could aid in the further understanding of structural and functional aspects of microtubules under normal and pathological conditions.

  5. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  6. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  7. Imaging individual green fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Daniel W.; Hom-Booher, Nora; Vale, Ronald D.

    1997-07-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy techniques have allowed the video-time imaging of single molecules of fluorescent dyes covalently bound to proteins in aqueous environments. However, the techniques have not been exploited fully because proteins can be difficult to label, and dye modification may cause partial or complete loss of activity. These difficulties could be circumvented by fusing proteins to green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. Here we report that single S65T mutant GFP molecules can be imaged using total internal reflection microscopy, and that ATP-driven movement of an individual kinesin molecule (a microtubule motor protein) fused to GFP can be readily observed.

  8. Voxel-based clustered imaging by multiparameter diffusion tensor images for glioma grading

    PubMed Central

    Inano, Rika; Oishi, Naoya; Kunieda, Takeharu; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Yamao, Yukihiro; Shibata, Sumiya; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Miyamoto, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common intra-axial primary brain tumour; therefore, predicting glioma grade would influence therapeutic strategies. Although several methods based on single or multiple parameters from diagnostic images exist, a definitive method for pre-operatively determining glioma grade remains unknown. We aimed to develop an unsupervised method using multiple parameters from pre-operative diffusion tensor images for obtaining a clustered image that could enable visual grading of gliomas. Fourteen patients with low-grade gliomas and 19 with high-grade gliomas underwent diffusion tensor imaging and three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging before tumour resection. Seven features including diffusion-weighted imaging, fractional anisotropy, first eigenvalue, second eigenvalue, third eigenvalue, mean diffusivity and raw T2 signal with no diffusion weighting, were extracted as multiple parameters from diffusion tensor imaging. We developed a two-level clustering approach for a self-organizing map followed by the K-means algorithm to enable unsupervised clustering of a large number of input vectors with the seven features for the whole brain. The vectors were grouped by the self-organizing map as protoclusters, which were classified into the smaller number of clusters by K-means to make a voxel-based diffusion tensor-based clustered image. Furthermore, we also determined if the diffusion tensor-based clustered image was really helpful for predicting pre-operative glioma grade in a supervised manner. The ratio of each class in the diffusion tensor-based clustered images was calculated from the regions of interest manually traced on the diffusion tensor imaging space, and the common logarithmic ratio scales were calculated. We then applied support vector machine as a classifier for distinguishing between low- and high-grade gliomas. Consequently, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic

  9. Security of image encryption scheme based on multi-parameter fractional Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tieyu; Ran, Qiwen; Yuan, Lin; Chi, Yingying; Ma, Jing

    2016-10-01

    Recently, multi-parameter fractional Fourier transform (MPFRFT) has been widely applied in the optics cryptosystem, which has attracted more and more researchers' attention. However, in further study we find a serious security problem on the MPFRFT which is the multi-choice of decryption key corresponding to an encryption key. The existence of multi-decryption-key hinders the application of this algorithm. We present a new generalized fractional Fourier transform, which can overcome the problem and enlarge the key space. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has higher security and key sensitivity.

  10. Fluorescence lifetime imaging endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, G. T.; Coda, S.; Thompson, A. J.; Elson, D. S.; Neil, M. A. A.; Stamp, G. W.; Thillainayagam, A.; Viellerobe, B.; Lacombe, F.; Dunsby, C.; French, Paul M. W.

    2011-03-01

    We present two FLIM endoscopes for clinical imaging and in vivo cell biology. For subcellular confocal imaging we demonstrated the first confocal FLIM endomicroscope, implementing TCSPC with a Cellvizio®GI, which we have now developed as a self-contained wheeled instrument (1.0 × 0.7 m) incorporating a tunable excitation laser and acquiring images in < 10 s. This has been applied to image FRET in live cells and to image tissue autofluorescence, for which we are implementing "FIFO" for image montaging. For diagnostic screening/guided biopsy, we have developed a complementary wide-field FLIM endoscope employing time-gated detection with violet and UV excitation for imaging over mm-cm fields of view.

  11. Iterative Multiparameter Elastic Waveform Inversion Using Prestack Time Imaging and Kirchhoff approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaniani, Hassan

    This thesis proposes a "standard strategy" for iterative inversion of elastic properties from the seismic reflection data. The term "standard" refers to the current hands-on commercial techniques that are used for the seismic imaging and inverse problem. The method is established to reduce the computation time associated with elastic Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) methods. It makes use of AVO analysis, prestack time migration and corresponding forward modeling in an iterative scheme. The main objective is to describe the iterative inversion procedure used in seismic reflection data using simplified mathematical expression and their numerical applications. The frame work of the inversion is similar to (FWI) method but with less computational costs. The reduction of computational costs depends on the data conditioning (with or without multiple data), the level of the complexity of geological model and acquisition condition such as Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). Many processing methods consider multiple events as noise and remove it from the data. This is the motivation for reducing the computational cost associated with Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) forward modeling and Reverse Time Migration (RTM)-based techniques. Therefore, a one-way solution of the wave equation for inversion is implemented. While less computationally intensive depth imaging methods are available by iterative coupling of ray theory and the Born approximation, it is shown that we can further reduce the cost of inversion by dropping the cost of ray tracing for traveltime estimation in a way similar to standard Prestack Time Migration (PSTM) and the corresponding forward modeling. This requires the model to have smooth lateral variations in elastic properties, so that the traveltime of the scatterpoints can be approximated by a Double Square Root (DSR) equation. To represent a more realistic and stable solution of the inverse problem, while considering the phase of supercritical angles, the

  12. Simultaneous Fluorescence and Phosphorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jahn, Karolina; Buschmann, Volker; Hille, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    In living cells, there are always a plethora of processes taking place at the same time. Their precise regulation is the basis of cellular functions, since small failures can lead to severe dysfunctions. For a comprehensive understanding of intracellular homeostasis, simultaneous multiparameter detection is a versatile tool for revealing the spatial and temporal interactions of intracellular parameters. Here, a recently developed time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) board was evaluated for simultaneous fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM/PLIM). Therefore, the metabolic activity in insect salivary glands was investigated by recording ns-decaying intrinsic cellular fluorescence, mainly related to oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and the μs-decaying phosphorescence of the oxygen-sensitive ruthenium-complex Kr341. Due to dopamine stimulation, the metabolic activity of salivary glands increased, causing a higher pericellular oxygen consumption and a resulting increase in Kr341 phosphorescence decay time. Furthermore, FAD fluorescence decay time decreased, presumably due to protein binding, thus inducing a quenching of FAD fluorescence decay time. Through application of the metabolic drugs antimycin and FCCP, the recorded signals could be assigned to a mitochondrial origin. The dopamine-induced changes could be observed in sequential FLIM and PLIM recordings, as well as in simultaneous FLIM/PLIM recordings using an intermediate TCSPC timing resolution. PMID:26390855

  13. Simultaneous Fluorescence and Phosphorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy in Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Karolina; Buschmann, Volker; Hille, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    In living cells, there are always a plethora of processes taking place at the same time. Their precise regulation is the basis of cellular functions, since small failures can lead to severe dysfunctions. For a comprehensive understanding of intracellular homeostasis, simultaneous multiparameter detection is a versatile tool for revealing the spatial and temporal interactions of intracellular parameters. Here, a recently developed time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) board was evaluated for simultaneous fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM/PLIM). Therefore, the metabolic activity in insect salivary glands was investigated by recording ns-decaying intrinsic cellular fluorescence, mainly related to oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and the μs-decaying phosphorescence of the oxygen-sensitive ruthenium-complex Kr341. Due to dopamine stimulation, the metabolic activity of salivary glands increased, causing a higher pericellular oxygen consumption and a resulting increase in Kr341 phosphorescence decay time. Furthermore, FAD fluorescence decay time decreased, presumably due to protein binding, thus inducing a quenching of FAD fluorescence decay time. Through application of the metabolic drugs antimycin and FCCP, the recorded signals could be assigned to a mitochondrial origin. The dopamine-induced changes could be observed in sequential FLIM and PLIM recordings, as well as in simultaneous FLIM/PLIM recordings using an intermediate TCSPC timing resolution.

  14. Computer-controlled multi-parameter mapping of 3D compressible flowfields using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, James M.; Victor, Kenneth G.; Mcdaniel, James C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A computer-controlled technique, using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence, for measuring complex compressible flowfields is presented. A new laser permits the use of a planar two-line temperature technique so that all parameters can be measured with the laser operated narrowband. Pressure and temperature measurements in a step flowfield show agreement within 10 percent of a CFD model except in regions close to walls. Deviation of near wall temperature measurements from the model was decreased from 21 percent to 12 percent compared to broadband planar temperature measurements. Computer-control of the experiment has been implemented, except for the frequency tuning of the laser. Image data storage and processing has been improved by integrating a workstation into the experimental setup reducing the data reduction time by a factor of 50.

  15. Computer-controlled multi-parameter mapping of 3D compressible flowfields using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, James M.; Victor, Kenneth G.; Mcdaniel, James C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A computer-controlled technique, using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence, for measuring complex compressible flowfields is presented. A new laser permits the use of a planar two-line temperature technique so that all parameters can be measured with the laser operated narrowband. Pressure and temperature measurements in a step flowfield show agreement within 10 percent of a CFD model except in regions close to walls. Deviation of near wall temperature measurements from the model was decreased from 21 percent to 12 percent compared to broadband planar temperature measurements. Computer-control of the experiment has been implemented, except for the frequency tuning of the laser. Image data storage and processing has been improved by integrating a workstation into the experimental setup reducing the data reduction time by a factor of 50.

  16. Multiparameter double hole contrast detail phantom: Ability to detect image displacement due to off position anode stem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzi, Nur Farahana; Majid, Zafri Azran Abdul; Sapuan, Abdul Halim; Azemin, Mohd Zulfaezal Che; Junet, Laila Kalidah

    2015-04-01

    Contrast Detail phantom is a quality control tool to analyze the performance of imaging devices. Currently, its function is solely to evaluate the contrast detail characteristic of imaging system. It consists of drilled hole which gives effect to the penetration of x-ray beam divergence to pass through the base of each hole. This effect will lead to false appearance of image from its original location but it does not being visualized in the radiograph. In this study, a new design of Contrast Detail phantom's hole which consists of double hole construction has been developed. It can detect the image displacement which is due to off position of anode stem from its original location. The double hole differs from previous milled hole, whereby it consists of combination of different hole diameters. Small hole diameter (3 mm) is positioned on top of larger hole diameter (10 mm). The thickness of double hole acrylic blocks is 13 mm. Result revealed` that, Multiparameter Double Hole Contrast Detail phantom can visualize the shifted flaw image quality produced by x-ray machine due to improper position of the anode stem which is attached to rotor and stator. The effective focal spot of x-ray beam also has been shifted from the center of collimator as a result of off-position anode stem. As a conclusion, the new design of double hole Contrast Detail phantom able to measure those parameters in a well manner.

  17. Multiparameter double hole contrast detail phantom: Ability to detect image displacement due to off position anode stem

    SciTech Connect

    Pauzi, Nur Farahana; Majid, Zafri Azran Abdul; Sapuan, Abdul Halim; Junet, Laila Kalidah; Azemin, Mohd Zulfaezal Che

    2015-04-24

    Contrast Detail phantom is a quality control tool to analyze the performance of imaging devices. Currently, its function is solely to evaluate the contrast detail characteristic of imaging system. It consists of drilled hole which gives effect to the penetration of x-ray beam divergence to pass through the base of each hole. This effect will lead to false appearance of image from its original location but it does not being visualized in the radiograph. In this study, a new design of Contrast Detail phantom’s hole which consists of double hole construction has been developed. It can detect the image displacement which is due to off position of anode stem from its original location. The double hole differs from previous milled hole, whereby it consists of combination of different hole diameters. Small hole diameter (3 mm) is positioned on top of larger hole diameter (10 mm). The thickness of double hole acrylic blocks is 13 mm. Result revealed that Multiparameter Double Hole Contrast Detail phantom can visualize the shifted flaw image quality produced by x-ray machine due to improper position of the anode stem which is attached to rotor and stator. The effective focal spot of x-ray beam also has been shifted from the center of collimator as a result of off-position anode stem. As a conclusion, the new design of double hole Contrast Detail phantom able to measure those parameters in a well manner.

  18. Fluorescence-based multi-parameter approach to characterize dynamics of organic carbon, faecal bacteria and particles at alpine karst springs.

    PubMed

    Frank, Simon; Goeppert, Nadine; Goldscheider, Nico

    2017-09-18

    Karst springs, especially in alpine regions, are important for drinking water supply but also vulnerable to contamination, especially after rainfall events. This high variability of water quality requires rapid quantification of contamination parameters. Here, we used a fluorescence-based multi-parameter approach to characterize the dynamics of organic carbon, faecal bacteria, and particles at three alpine karst springs. We used excitation emission matrices (EEMs) to identify fluorescent dissolved organic material (FDOM). At the first system, peak A fluorescence and total organic carbon (TOC) were strongly correlated (Spearman's rs of 0.949), indicating that a large part of the organic matter is related to humic-like substances. Protein-like fluorescence and cultivation-based determination of coliform bacteria also had a significant correlation with rs=0.734, indicating that protein-like fluorescence is directly related to faecal pollution. At the second system, which has two spring outlets, the absolute values of all measured water-quality parameters were lower; there was a significant correlation between TOC and humic-like fluorescence (rs=0.588-0.689) but coliform bacteria and protein-like fluorescence at these two springs were not correlated. Additionally, there was a strong correlation (rs=0.571-0.647) between small particle fractions (1.0 and 2.0μm), a secondary turbidity peak and bacteria. At one of these springs, discharge was constant despite the reaction of all other parameters to the rainfall event. Our results demonstrated that i) all three springs showed fast and marked responses of all investigated water-quality parameters after rain events; ii) a constant discharge does not necessarily mean constant water quality; iii) at high contamination levels, protein-like fluorescence is a good indicator of bacterial contamination, while at low contamination levels no correlation between protein-like fluorescence and bacterial values was detected; and iv) a

  19. Fluorescence imaging agents in cancerology

    PubMed Central

    Paganin-Gioanni, Aurélie; Bellard, Elisabeth; Paquereau, Laurent; Ecochard, Vincent; Golzio, Muriel; Teissié, Justin

    2010-01-01

    Background One of the major challenges in cancer therapy is to improve early detection and prevention using novel targeted cancer diagnostics. Detection requests specific recognition. Tumor markers have to be ideally present on the surface of cancer cells. Their targeting with ligands coupled to imaging agents make them visible/detectable. Conclusions Fluorescence imaging is a newly emerging technology which is becoming a complementary medical method for cancer diagnosis. It allows detection with a high spatio-temporal resolution of tumor markers in small animals and in clinical studies. In this review, we focus on the recent outcome of basic studies in the design of new approaches (probes and devices) used to detect tumor cells by fluorescence imaging. PMID:22933906

  20. Multi Spectral Fluorescence Imager (MSFI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caron, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Genetic transformation with in vivo reporter genes for fluorescent proteins can be performed on a variety of organisms to address fundamental biological questions. Model organisms that may utilize an ISS imager include unicellular organisms (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), plants (Arabidopsis thaliana), and invertebrates (Caenorhabditis elegans). The multispectral fluorescence imager (MSFI) will have the capability to accommodate 10 cm x 10 cm Petri plates, various sized multi-well culture plates, and other custom culture containers. Features will include programmable temperature and light cycles, ethylene scrubbing (less than 25 ppb), CO2 control (between 400 ppm and ISS-ambient levels in units of 100 ppm) and sufficient airflow to prevent condensation that would interfere with imaging.

  1. Local region statistics combining multi-parameter intensity fitting module for medical image segmentation with intensity inhomogeneity and complex composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fan; Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Wenda; Qu, Feng; Sui, Long

    2016-08-01

    It is difficult to segment medical image with intensity inhomogeneity and complex composition, because most region-based modules relay on the intensity distributions. In this paper, we propose a novel method which uses local region statistics and multi-parameter intensity fitting as well. By replacing the original local region statistics with the novel local region statistics after bias field correction, the effect of intensity inhomogeneity can be eliminated. Then we devise a maximum likelihood energy function based on the distribution of each local region. Segmentation and bias field estimation can be jointly obtained by minimizing the proposed energy function. Furthermore, in order to characterize the features of each local region effectively, two parameters are used to fit the average intensity inside and outside of the counter, respectively. This can well handle the medical images with complex composition, such as larger gray difference even in the same region. Comparisons with several representative methods on synthetic and medical images demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method over other representative algorithms.

  2. Fluorescence imaging spectrometer optical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taiti, A.; Coppo, P.; Battistelli, E.

    2015-09-01

    The optical design of the FLuORescence Imaging Spectrometer (FLORIS) studied for the Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission is discussed. FLEX is a candidate for the ESA's 8th Earth Explorer opportunity mission. FLORIS is a pushbroom hyperspectral imager foreseen to be embarked on board of a medium size satellite, flying in tandem with Sentinel-3 in a Sun synchronous orbit at a height of about 815 km. FLORIS will observe the vegetation fluorescence and reflectance within a spectral range between 500 and 780 nm. Multi-frames acquisitions on matrix detectors during the satellite movement will allow the production of 2D Earth scene images in two different spectral channels, called HR and LR with spectral resolution of 0.3 and 2 nm respectively. A common fore optics is foreseen to enhance by design the spatial co-registration between the two spectral channels, which have the same ground spatial sampling (300 m) and swath (150 km). An overlapped spectral range between the two channels is also introduced to simplify the spectral coregistration. A compact opto-mechanical solution with all spherical and plane optical elements is proposed, and the most significant design rationales are described. The instrument optical architecture foresees a dual Babinet scrambler, a dioptric telescope and two grating spectrometers (HR and LR), each consisting of a modified Offner configuration. The developed design is robust, stable vs temperature, easy to align, showing very high optical quality along the whole field of view. The system gives also excellent correction for transverse chromatic aberration and distortions (keystone and smile).

  3. Quantitative imaging with fluorescent biosensors.

    PubMed

    Okumoto, Sakiko; Jones, Alexander; Frommer, Wolf B

    2012-01-01

    Molecular activities are highly dynamic and can occur locally in subcellular domains or compartments. Neighboring cells in the same tissue can exist in different states. Therefore, quantitative information on the cellular and subcellular dynamics of ions, signaling molecules, and metabolites is critical for functional understanding of organisms. Mass spectrometry is generally used for monitoring ions and metabolites; however, its temporal and spatial resolution are limited. Fluorescent proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology-e.g., fluorescent proteins can report on gene expression or protein localization in real time-yet promoter-based reporters are often slow to report physiologically relevant changes such as calcium oscillations. Therefore, novel tools are required that can be deployed in specific cells and targeted to subcellular compartments in order to quantify target molecule dynamics directly. We require tools that can measure enzyme activities, protein dynamics, and biophysical processes (e.g., membrane potential or molecular tension) with subcellular resolution. Today, we have an extensive suite of tools at our disposal to address these challenges, including translocation sensors, fluorescence-intensity sensors, and Förster resonance energy transfer sensors. This review summarizes sensor design principles, provides a database of sensors for more than 70 different analytes/processes, and gives examples of applications in quantitative live cell imaging.

  4. Combined fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shcheslavskiy, V. I.; Bukowiecki, R.; Dinter, F.

    2016-02-29

    We present a lifetime imaging technique that simultaneously records the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime images in confocal laser scanning systems. It is based on modulating a high-frequency pulsed laser synchronously with the pixel clock of the scanner, and recording the fluorescence and phosphorescence signals by multidimensional time-correlated single photon counting board. We demonstrate our technique on the recording of the fluorescence/phosphorescence lifetime images of human embryonic kidney cells at different environmental conditions.

  5. Lensless fluorescence imaging with height calculation.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Akshaya; Salthouse, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Lensless fluorescence imaging (LFI) is the imaging of fluorescence from cells or microspheres using an image sensor with no external lenses or filters. The simplicity of the hardware makes it well suited to replace fluorescence microscopes and flow cytometers in lab-on-a-chip applications, but the images captured by LFI are highly dependent on the distance between the sample and the sensor. This work demonstrates that not only can samples be accurately detected across a range of sample-sensor separations using LFI, but also that the separation can be accurately estimated based on the shape of fluorescence in the LFI image. First, a theoretical model that accurately predicts LFI images of microspheres is presented. Then, the experimental results are compared to the model and an image processing method for accurately predicting sample-sensor separation from LFI images is presented. Finally, LFI images of microspheres and cells passing through a microfluidic channel are presented.

  6. Multiparameter spatio-thermochemical probing of flame–wall interactions advanced with coherent Raman imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Bohlin, Gustav Alexis; Jainski, Christopher; Patterson, Brian D.; ...

    2016-08-10

    Ultrabroadband coherent anti-Stokes Ra man spectroscopy (CARS) has been developed for one -dimensional imaging of temperature and major species distributions simultaneously in the near-wall region of a methane/air flame supported on a side-wall-quenching (SWQ) burner. Automatic temporal and spatial overlap of the ~7 femtosecond pump and Stokes pulses is achieved utilizing a two-beam CARS phase-matching scheme, and the crossed ~75 picosecond probe beam provide s excellent spatial sectioning of the probed location. Concurrent detection of N2, O2, H2, CO, CO2, and CH4 is demonstrated while high-fidelity flame thermometry is assessed from the N2 pure rotational S-branch in a one-dimensional -CARSmore » imaging configuration. A methane/air premixed flame at lean, stoichiometric, and rich conditions ( Φ = 0.83, 1.0 , and 1.2) and Reynolds number = 5,000 is probed as it quenches against a cooled steel side- wall parallel to the flow providing a persistent flame-wall interaction. Here, an imaging resolution of better than 40 μm is achieved across the field -of-view, thus allowing thermochemical states (temperature and major species) of the thermal boundary layer to be resolved to within ~30 μm of the interface.« less

  7. Multiparameter spatio-thermochemical probing of flame–wall interactions advanced with coherent Raman imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, Gustav Alexis; Jainski, Christopher; Patterson, Brian D.; Dreizler, Andreas; Kliewer, Christopher Jesse

    2016-08-10

    Ultrabroadband coherent anti-Stokes Ra man spectroscopy (CARS) has been developed for one -dimensional imaging of temperature and major species distributions simultaneously in the near-wall region of a methane/air flame supported on a side-wall-quenching (SWQ) burner. Automatic temporal and spatial overlap of the ~7 femtosecond pump and Stokes pulses is achieved utilizing a two-beam CARS phase-matching scheme, and the crossed ~75 picosecond probe beam provide s excellent spatial sectioning of the probed location. Concurrent detection of N2, O2, H2, CO, CO2, and CH4 is demonstrated while high-fidelity flame thermometry is assessed from the N2 pure rotational S-branch in a one-dimensional -CARS imaging configuration. A methane/air premixed flame at lean, stoichiometric, and rich conditions ( Φ = 0.83, 1.0 , and 1.2) and Reynolds number = 5,000 is probed as it quenches against a cooled steel side- wall parallel to the flow providing a persistent flame-wall interaction. Here, an imaging resolution of better than 40 μm is achieved across the field -of-view, thus allowing thermochemical states (temperature and major species) of the thermal boundary layer to be resolved to within ~30 μm of the interface.

  8. Multiparameter spatio-thermochemical probing of flame–wall interactions advanced with coherent Raman imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, Gustav Alexis; Jainski, Christopher; Patterson, Brian D.; Dreizler, Andreas; Kliewer, Christopher Jesse

    2016-08-10

    Ultrabroadband coherent anti-Stokes Ra man spectroscopy (CARS) has been developed for one -dimensional imaging of temperature and major species distributions simultaneously in the near-wall region of a methane/air flame supported on a side-wall-quenching (SWQ) burner. Automatic temporal and spatial overlap of the ~7 femtosecond pump and Stokes pulses is achieved utilizing a two-beam CARS phase-matching scheme, and the crossed ~75 picosecond probe beam provide s excellent spatial sectioning of the probed location. Concurrent detection of N2, O2, H2, CO, CO2, and CH4 is demonstrated while high-fidelity flame thermometry is assessed from the N2 pure rotational S-branch in a one-dimensional -CARS imaging configuration. A methane/air premixed flame at lean, stoichiometric, and rich conditions ( Φ = 0.83, 1.0 , and 1.2) and Reynolds number = 5,000 is probed as it quenches against a cooled steel side- wall parallel to the flow providing a persistent flame-wall interaction. Here, an imaging resolution of better than 40 μm is achieved across the field -of-view, thus allowing thermochemical states (temperature and major species) of the thermal boundary layer to be resolved to within ~30 μm of the interface.

  9. Multi-parameter high-resolution lithospheric imaging by source-independent full-waveform inversion of teleseismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, S.; Monteiller, V.; Operto, S.; Nolet, G.

    2015-12-01

    Building broadband multi-parameter lithospheric models is one of the quest of earthquake seismology. Nowadays, deployment of dense arrays of broadband stations and advances in high-performance computing open new perspectives to achieve this goal by full waveform inversion (FWI) of teleseismic data. Compared to traveltime tomography, broadband images can be obtained by FWI when wavefields that are forward-scattered (i.e., transmission regime) and backward-scattered (reflection regime) by lithospheric heterogeneties to be imaged are involved in the inversion. In teleseismic setting, incident wavefields impinge the boundaries of the lithospheric target and propagate up to the surface where they are recorded by the stations, giving rise to the transmitted part of the recorded wavefield. The incident wavefield is also reflected back into the lithospheric target by the free surface acting as P- and S-waves secondary sources. The resulting wavefield is reflected by the lithospheric reflectors before being recorded by the stations, giving rise to the second-order reflection part of the recorded wavefield. While the transmitted part of the wavefield allows one to achieve a resolution close to that obtained by traveltime tomography, involving the reflected part of the wavefield in the FWI is amenable to the short-wavelength updates, hence broadaning the wavenumber spectrum of the lithospheric models toward high wavenumbers. Another benefit to involve the reflection regime in FWI is to increase the sensitivity of the FWI to the density parameter. In this study, we first discuss the feasibility of the density reconstruction in addition to that of the P- and S-waves velocities by FWI of teleseismic wavefields with a realistic synthetic study representative of the western Alps. The density reconstruction implies the extraction of information given by small amplitude secondary wavefields from the data that may be drastically affected by noise and trade-off between model parameter

  10. Multi-parameter acoustic imaging of uniform objects in inhomogeneous soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Güven, H Emre; Miller, Eric L; Cleveland, Robin O

    2012-08-01

    The problem studied in this paper is ultrasound image reconstruction from frequency-domain measurements of the scattered field from an object with contrast in attenuation and sound speed. The case in which the object has uniform but unknown contrast in these properties relative to the background is considered. Background clutter is taken into account in a physically realistic manner by considering an exact scattering model for randomly located small scatterers that vary in sound speed. The resulting statistical characteristics of the interference are incorporated into the imaging solution, which includes application of a total-variation minimization-based approach in which the relative effect of perturbation in sound speed to attenuation is included as a parameter. Convex optimization methods provide the basis for the reconstruction algorithm. Numerical data for inversion examples are generated by solving the discretized Lippman-Schwinger equation for the object and speckle-forming scatterers in the background. A statistical model based on the Born approximation is used for reconstruction of the object profile. Results are presented for a two-dimensional problem in terms of classification performance and compared with minimum-l2-norm reconstruction. Classification using the proposed method is shown to be robust down to a signal-to-clutter ratio of less than 1 dB.

  11. NIR fluorescent ytterbium compound for in vivo fluorescence molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Aita, Kazuki; Temma, Takashi; Kuge, Yuji; Seki, Koh-ichi; Saji, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new NIR fluorescent probe based on an ytterbium(III) (E)-1-(pyridin-2-yl-diazenyl)naphthalen-2-ol (PAN) complex. This probe emits near-infrared luminescence derived from the Yb ion through excitation of the PAN moiety with visible light (lambda(ex)= 530 nm, lambda(em)= 975 nm). The results support the possible utility of the probe for in vivo fluorescence molecular imaging.

  12. Fluorescence lifetime image of a single halobacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui-Ping; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Tsujimoto, Kazuo; Miyauchi, Seiji; Kamo, Naoki; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2007-07-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) has been reported for a single halobacterium loaded with 2',7'-bis-(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). FLIM of halobacteria exhibits two distinct fluorescence lifetimes, representing different environments from each other in different halobacteria. The observed difference in the fluorescence lifetime appears to be due to the difference in electric field inside a cell. Fluorescence intensity of BCECF in polyvinyl alcohol film is quenched by an external electric field, indicating that the fluorescence lifetime of BCECF is affected by an electric field.

  13. Boronic acids for fluorescence imaging of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaolong; Zhai, Wenlei; Fossey, John S; James, Tony D

    2016-02-28

    "Fluorescence imaging" is a particularly exciting and rapidly developing area of research; the annual number of publications in the area has increased ten-fold over the last decade. The rapid increase of interest in fluorescence imaging will necessitate the development of an increasing number of molecular receptors and binding agents in order to meet the demand in this rapidly expanding area. Carbohydrate biomarkers are particularly important targets for fluorescence imaging given their pivotal role in numerous important biological events, including the development and progression of many diseases. Therefore, the development of new fluorescent receptors and binding agents for carbohydrates is and will be increasing in demand. This review highlights the development of fluorescence imaging agents based on boronic acids a particularly promising class of receptors given their strong and selective binding with carbohydrates in aqueous media.

  14. Comprehensive phantom for interventional fluorescence molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasopoulou, Maria; Koch, Maximilian; Gorpas, Dimitris; Karlas, Angelos; Klemm, Uwe; Garcia-Allende, Pilar Beatriz; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence imaging has been considered for over a half-century as a modality that could assist surgical guidance and visualization. The administration of fluorescent molecules with sensitivity to disease biomarkers and their imaging using a fluorescence camera can outline pathophysiological parameters of tissue invisible to the human eye during operation. The advent of fluorescent agents that target specific cellular responses and molecular pathways of disease has facilitated the intraoperative identification of cancer with improved sensitivity and specificity over nonspecific fluorescent dyes that only outline the vascular system and enhanced permeability effects. With these new abilities come unique requirements for developing phantoms to calibrate imaging systems and algorithms. We briefly review herein progress with fluorescence phantoms employed to validate fluorescence imaging systems and results. We identify current limitations and discuss the level of phantom complexity that may be required for developing a universal strategy for fluorescence imaging calibration. Finally, we present a phantom design that could be used as a tool for interlaboratory system performance evaluation.

  15. Scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Daniel L.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon

    1998-01-01

    A scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI) apparatus and method is disclosed, useful for integrated circuit (IC) failure analysis, that uses a scanned and focused beam from a laser to excite a thin fluorescent film disposed over the surface of the IC. By collecting fluorescent radiation from the film, and performing point-by-point data collection with a single-point photodetector, a thermal map of the IC is formed to measure any localized heating associated with defects in the IC.

  16. Scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Barton, D.L.; Tangyunyong, P.

    1998-01-06

    A scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI) apparatus and method is disclosed, useful for integrated circuit (IC) failure analysis, that uses a scanned and focused beam from a laser to excite a thin fluorescent film disposed over the surface of the IC. By collecting fluorescent radiation from the film, and performing point-by-point data collection with a single-point photodetector, a thermal map of the IC is formed to measure any localized heating associated with defects in the IC. 1 fig.

  17. Fluorescence goggle for intraoperative breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Bauer, Adam Q.; Akers, Walter; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Charanya, Tauseef; Mondal, Suman; Culver, Joseph P.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a fluorescence goggle device for intraoperative oncologic imaging. With our system design, the surgeon can directly visualize the fluorescence information from the eyepieces in real time without any additional monitor, which can improve one's coordination and surgical accuracy. In conjunction with targeting fluorescent dyes, the goggle device can successfully detect tumor margins and small nodules that are not obvious to naked eye. This can potentially decrease the incidence of incomplete resection.

  18. Fluorescence fluctuation analysis of mixed chromophores from a line-scanning hyperspectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Ryan W.; Aaron, Jesse S.; Rempe, Susan L.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.

    2010-02-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation analysis of dilute biomolecules can provide a powerful method for fast and accurate determination of diffusion dynamics, local concentrations, and aggregation states in complex environments. However, spectral overlap among multiple exogenous and endogenous fluorescent species, photobleaching, and background inhomogeneities can compromise quantitative accuracy and constrain useful biological implementation of this analytical strategy in real systems. In order to better understand these limitations and expand the utility of fluctuation correlation methods, spatiotemporal fluorescence correlation analysis was performed on spectrally resolved line scanned images of modeled and real data from mixed fluorescent nanospheres in a synthetic gel matrix. It was found that collecting images at a pixel sampling regime optimal for spectral imaging provides a method for calibration and subsequent temporal correlation analysis which is insensitive to spectral mixing, spatial inhomogeneity, and photobleaching. In these analyses, preprocessing with multivariate curve resolution (MCR) provided the local concentrations of each spectral component in the images, thus facilitating correlation analysis of each component individually. This approach allowed quantitative removal of background signals and showed dramatically improved quantitative results compared to a hypothetical system employing idealized filters and multi-parameter fitting routines.

  19. Exogenous specific fluorescence marker location reconstruction using surface fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avital, Garashi; Gannot, Israel; Chernomordik, Victor V.; Gannot, Gallya; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.

    2003-07-01

    Diseased tissue may be specifically marked by an exogenous fluorescent marker and then, following laser activation of the marker, optically and non-invasively detected through fluorescence imaging. Interaction of a fluorophore, conjugated to an appropriate antibody, with the antigen expressed by the diseased tissue, can indicate the presence of a specific disease. Using an optical detection system and a reconstruction algorithm, we were able to determine the fluorophore"s position in the tissue. We present 3D reconstructions of the location of a fluorescent marker, FITC, in the tongues of mice. One group of BALB/c mice was injected with squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) cell line to the tongue, while another group served as the control. After tumor development, the mice"s tongues were injected with FITC conjugated to anti-CD3 and anti-CD 19 antibodies. An Argon laser excited the marker at 488 nm while a high precision fluorescent camera collected the emitted fluorescence. Measurements were performed with the fluorescent marker embedded at various simulated depths. The simulation was performed using agarose-based gel slabs applied to the tongue as tissue-like phantoms. A biopsy was taken from every mouse after the procedure and the excised tissue was histologically evaluated. We reconstruct the fluorescent marker"s location in 3D using an algorithm based on the random walk theory.

  20. Photocontrollable Fluorescent Proteins for Superresolution Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2014-01-01

    Superresolution fluorescence microscopy permits the study of biological processes at scales small enough to visualize fine subcellular structures that are unresolvable by traditional diffraction-limited light microscopy. Many superresolution techniques, including those applicable to live cell imaging, utilize genetically encoded photocontrollable fluorescent proteins. The fluorescence of these proteins can be controlled by light of specific wavelengths. In this review, we discuss the biochemical and photophysical properties of photocontrollable fluorescent proteins that are relevant to their use in superresolution microscopy. We then describe the recently developed photoactivatable, photoswitchable, and reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins, and we detail their particular usefulness in single-molecule localization–based and nonlinear ensemble–based superresolution techniques. Finally, we discuss recent applications of photocontrollable proteins in superresolution imaging, as well as how these applications help to clarify properties of intracellular structures and processes that are relevant to cell and developmental biology, neuroscience, cancer biology and biomedicine. PMID:24895855

  1. Cubosomes for in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffi, Stefania; Andolfi, Laura; Caltagirone, Claudia; Garrovo, Chiara; Falchi, Angela M.; Lippolis, Vito; Lorenzon, Andrea; Macor, Paolo; Meli, Valeria; Monduzzi, Maura; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Petrizza, Luca; Prodi, Luca; Rosa, Antonella; Schmidt, Judith; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Murgia, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    Herein we provided the first proof of principle for in vivo fluorescence optical imaging application using monoolein-based cubosomes in a healthy mouse animal model. This formulation, administered at a non-cytotoxic concentration, was capable of providing both exogenous contrast for NIR fluorescence imaging with very high efficiency and chemospecific information upon lifetime analysis. Time-resolved measurements of fluorescence after the intravenous injection of cubosomes revealed that the dye rapidly accumulated mainly in the liver, while lifetimes profiles obtained in vivo allowed for discriminating between free dye or dye embedded within the cubosome nanostructure after injection.

  2. Cubosomes for in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Stefania; Andolfi, Laura; Caltagirone, Claudia; Garrovo, Chiara; Falchi, Angela M; Lippolis, Vito; Lorenzon, Andrea; Macor, Paolo; Meli, Valeria; Monduzzi, Maura; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Petrizza, Luca; Prodi, Luca; Rosa, Antonella; Schmidt, Judith; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Murgia, Sergio

    2017-02-03

    Herein we provided the first proof of principle for in vivo fluorescence optical imaging application using monoolein-based cubosomes in a healthy mouse animal model. This formulation, administered at a non-cytotoxic concentration, was capable of providing both exogenous contrast for NIR fluorescence imaging with very high efficiency and chemospecific information upon lifetime analysis. Time-resolved measurements of fluorescence after the intravenous injection of cubosomes revealed that the dye rapidly accumulated mainly in the liver, while lifetimes profiles obtained in vivo allowed for discriminating between free dye or dye embedded within the cubosome nanostructure after injection.

  3. Reflectance and fluorescence hyperspectral elastic image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Holger; Baker, Ross; Hakansson, Johan; Gustafsson, Ulf P.

    2004-05-01

    Science and Technology International (STI) presents a novel multi-modal elastic image registration approach for a new hyperspectral medical imaging modality. STI's HyperSpectral Diagnostic Imaging (HSDI) cervical instrument is used for the early detection of uterine cervical cancer. A Computer-Aided-Diagnostic (CAD) system is being developed to aid the physician with the diagnosis of pre-cancerous and cancerous tissue regions. The CAD system uses the fusion of multiple data sources to optimize its performance. The key enabling technology for the data fusion is image registration. The difficulty lies in the image registration of fluorescence and reflectance hyperspectral data due to the occurrence of soft tissue movement and the limited resemblance of these types of imagery. The presented approach is based on embedding a reflectance image in the fluorescence hyperspectral imagery. Having a reflectance image in both data sets resolves the resemblance problem and thereby enables the use of elastic image registration algorithms required to compensate for soft tissue movements. Several methods of embedding the reflectance image in the fluorescence hyperspectral imagery are described. Initial experiments with human subject data are presented where a reflectance image is embedded in the fluorescence hyperspectral imagery.

  4. 2D multi-parameter elastic seismic imaging by frequency-domain L1-norm full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossier, Romain; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean

    2010-05-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is becoming a powerful and efficient tool to derive high-resolution quantitative models of the subsurface. In the frequency-domain, computationally efficient FWI algorithms can be designed for wide-aperture acquisition geometries by limiting inversion to few discrete frequencies. However, FWI remains an ill-posed and highly non-linear data-fitting procedure that is sensitive to noise, inaccuracies of the starting model and definition of multiparameter classes. The footprint of the noise in seismic imaging is conventionally mitigated by stacking highly redundant multifold data. However, when the data redundancy is decimated in the framework of efficient frequency-domain FWI, it is essential to assess the sensitivity of the inversion to noise. The impact of the noise in FWI, when applied to decimated data sets, has been marginally illustrated in the past and least-squares minimisation has remained the most popular approach. We investigate in this study the sensitivity of frequency-domain elastic FWI to noise for realistic onshore and offshore synthetic data sets contaminated by ambient random white noise. Four minimisation functionals are assessed in the framework of frequency domain FWI of decimated data: the classical least-square norm (L2), the least-absolute-values norm (L1), and some combinations of both (the Huber and the so-called Hybrid criteria). These functionals are implemented in a massively-parallel, 2D elastic frequency-domain FWI algorithm. A two-level hierarchical algorithm is implemented to mitigate the non-linearity of the inversion in complex environments. The first outer level consists of successive inversions of frequency groups of increasing high-frequency content. This level defines a multi-scale approach while preserving some data redundancy by means of simultaneous inversion of multiple frequencies. The second inner level used complex-valued frequencies for data preconditioning. This preconditioning controls the

  5. Fluorescent Cell Imaging in Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sapoznik, Etai; Niu, Guoguang; Zhou, Yu; Murphy, Sean V.; Soker, Shay

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent protein imaging, a promising tool in biological research, incorporates numerous applications that can be of specific use in the field of regenerative medicine. To enhance tissue regeneration efforts, scientists have been developing new ways to monitor tissue development and maturation in vitro and in vivo. To that end, new imaging tools and novel fluorescent proteins have been developed for the purpose of performing deep-tissue high-resolution imaging. These new methods, such as intra-vital microscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer, are providing new insights into cellular behavior, including cell migration, morphology, and phenotypic changes in a dynamic environment. Such applications, combined with multimodal imaging, significantly expand the utility of fluorescent protein imaging in research and clinical applications of regenerative medicine. PMID:27158228

  6. Quantification of dental fluorosis using fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Pretty, I A; Tavener, J A; Browne, D; Brettle, D S; Whelton, H; Ellwood, R P

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging hardware and software have been recently employed to assess demineralization due to early dental caries. Dental fluorosis also presents as diffuse surface hypomineralization of enamel and in principle similar measurement methods might be applicable to both. The caries analysis system requires the user to select an area of sound enamel around the lesion so that the affected surface can be reconstructed and the lesion subtracted. Whereas early caries presents as discrete isolated lesions fluorosis is characterized by diffuse opacities covering most of the tooth. Consequently it is difficult to use commercial QLF software for the assessment of fluorosis, as there is typically no sound area of enamel to use for reconstruction. This study describes a fluorescent imaging device capable of recording digital images of the anterior teeth and also software that is able to objectively measure fluorosis area and severity. A convenience sample of 26 subjects with a range of fluorosis from TF scores 0-3 took part in the study. The upper left central incisor of these subjects was scored for fluorosis using the TF index, photographed using a conventional digital camera and imaged using the fluorescence imaging device. The TF index was then used to visually score the digital photographs and the fluorescence images. The data from the fluorescence method demonstrated a strong correlation with TF scores from fluorescence images (Kendall's tau = 0.862). The fluorescence imaging method shows promise as an objective, potentially blinded system for the longitudinal assessment of enamel fluorosis in vivo. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Hyperspectral Fluorescence and Reflectance Imaging Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert E.; O'Neal, S. Duane; Lanoue, Mark; Russell, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    The system is a single hyperspectral imaging instrument that has the unique capability to acquire both fluorescence and reflectance high-spatial-resolution data that is inherently spatially and spectrally registered. Potential uses of this instrument include plant stress monitoring, counterfeit document detection, biomedical imaging, forensic imaging, and general materials identification. Until now, reflectance and fluorescence spectral imaging have been performed by separate instruments. Neither a reflectance spectral image nor a fluorescence spectral image alone yields as much information about a target surface as does a combination of the two modalities. Before this system was developed, to benefit from this combination, analysts needed to perform time-consuming post-processing efforts to co-register the reflective and fluorescence information. With this instrument, the inherent spatial and spectral registration of the reflectance and fluorescence images minimizes the need for this post-processing step. The main challenge for this technology is to detect the fluorescence signal in the presence of a much stronger reflectance signal. To meet this challenge, the instrument modulates artificial light sources from ultraviolet through the visible to the near-infrared part of the spectrum; in this way, both the reflective and fluorescence signals can be measured through differencing processes to optimize fluorescence and reflectance spectra as needed. The main functional components of the instrument are a hyperspectral imager, an illumination system, and an image-plane scanner. The hyperspectral imager is a one-dimensional (line) imaging spectrometer that includes a spectrally dispersive element and a two-dimensional focal plane detector array. The spectral range of the current imaging spectrometer is between 400 to 1,000 nm, and the wavelength resolution is approximately 3 nm. The illumination system consists of narrowband blue, ultraviolet, and other discrete

  8. Spectral band optimization for multispectral fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterhouse, Dale J.; Luthman, A. Siri; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2017-02-01

    Multispectral imaging has the potential to improve sensitivity and specificity in biomedical imaging through simultaneous acquisition of both morphological (spatial) and chemical (spectral) information. Performing multispectral imaging in real time with spectrally resolved detector arrays (SRDAs), for example in endoscopy or intraoperative imaging, requires a direct trade off between spatial and spectral resolution. We sought to quantitatively assess the impact of spectral band selection on contrast agent detection in fluorescence endoscopic imaging. As a proof of concept, we measured the `ground truth' spectra from a dilution series of a single near-infrared fluorescent contrast agent using a spectrometer incorporated into the detection path of our endoscope. We then modeled the influence of an SRDA on these spectra and calculated the theoretical endmembers associated with reflectance and fluorescence signals from the pure contrast agent. To test the accuracy of our model, we incorporated into the same endoscope an off-the-shelf SRDA with a 3x3 filter deposition pattern of 9 spectral bands. After spectral unmixing using the modeled endmembers, the amplitude of the fluorescence recorded with the SRDA compared favorably with the amplitude of fluorescence derived from the `ground truth' spectra recorded with the spectrometer. In the future, this approach could be used to minimize the number of spectral bands required in a given imaging system and hence maximize the spatial resolution of the multispectral camera.

  9. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of human hair.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Alexander; Riemann, Iris; Stark, Martin; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    In vivo and in vitro multiphoton imaging was used to perform high resolution optical sectioning of human hair by nonlinear excitation of endogenous as well as exogenous fluorophores. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) based on time-resolved single photon counting and near-infrared femtosecond laser pulse excitation was employed to analyze the various fluorescent hair components. Time-resolved multiphoton imaging of intratissue pigments has the potential (i) to identify endogenous keratin and melanin, (ii) to obtain information on intrahair dye accumulation, (iii) to study bleaching effects, and (iv) to monitor the intratissue diffusion of pharmaceutical and cosmetical components along hair shafts.

  10. Fluorescent silica nanoparticles for cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Santra, Swadeshmukul

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) received immense interest in cancer imaging. FSNPs are a new class of engineered optical probes consisting of silica NPs loaded with fluorescent dye molecules. These probes exhibit some attractive features, such as photostability and brightness, which allow sensitive imaging of cancer cells. In general, FSNPs are chemically synthesized in solution using appropriate silane-based precursors. Fluorescent dye molecules are entrapped during the synthesis process. The synthetic process involves hydrolysis and condensation reactions of silane precursors. Stöber's sol-gel and water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsion methods are two popular chemical methods that have been used for synthesizing FSNPs. Silica matrix is capable of carrying hundreds of fluorescent dye molecules in each FSNP, resulting in bright fluorescence. In FSNPs, fluorescent molecules are somewhat protected by the surrounding silica layer, resulting in good photostability. For cancer cell imaging, surface modification of FSNPs is often necessary to obtain appropriate surface functional groups to improve NP aqueous dispersibility as well as bioconjugation capability. Using conventional bioconjugate chemistry, cancer cell-specific biomolecules are then attached to the surface-modified FSNPs. For targeting cancer cells, the FSNPs are often conjugated to specific biomolecules such as antibodies, aptamers, and folic acid. In this chapter, different approaches for the FSNP design will be discussed and some representative protocols for FSNP synthesis will be provided. We will also discuss FSNP surface modification and bioconjugation techniques that are useful for cancer cell imaging.

  11. Fluorescence imaging of soybean flavonol isolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Edward H.; Mulchi, Charles L.; McMurtrey, James E., III; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Rowland, Randy A.

    1998-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to characterize the fluorescence emission of leaves from four soybean ('Harosoy') plants containing different concentrations of flavonols (kaempferol glycosides). The investigation utilized genetically mutated soybean flavonol isolines grown in a constant environment, thus limiting factors known to affect fluorescence emission characteristics other than different kaempferol glycosides concentrations. Flavonol isolines included OX922, OX941, OX942, OX944. The first two isolines contain kaempferol (K) glycosides; K3, K6, and K9, and the latter two did not have K3, K6, and K9. A fluorescence imaging system (FIS) was used to characterize steady state florescence images of the sample leaves measured at wavelengths centered at 450, 550, 680, and 740 nm with an excitation at 360 nm. Images taken with FIS greatly complement non-imaging fluorescence measurements by characterizing the spatial variation of fluorescence within leaves. We also acquired fluorescence emission spectra to characterize spectral features of the soybean flavonol isolines. The emission spectral shape of the fluorescence emission characteristics were not significantly different between the soybeans that contain kaempferol glycosides and the ones that do not contain kaempferol glycosides. Typical emission maxima of green vegetation in the blue, green, red, and far-red bands were noticed in all four soybean isolines. However, plants containing kaempferol glycosides, OX922 and OX941 had significantly lower intensities throughout the wavelength regions. These results imply that fluorescence emission intensities in the fluorescence emission bands studied are significantly affected by the presence and absence of kaempferol glycosides concentrations (UV radiation screening compounds). Pure kaempferol glycoside dissolved in solution show minimal fluorescence emission when excited with the absorption maximum radiation at 365 nm. However, a broad band emission can be seen in the green

  12. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Peter J.

    1998-12-01

    This paper outlines a method for optically detecting bacteria on various backgrounds, such as meat, by imaging their laser induced auto-fluorescence response. This method can potentially operate in real-time, which is many times faster than current bacterial detection methods, which require culturing of bacterial samples. This paper describes the imaging technique employed whereby a laser spot is scanned across an object while capturing, filtering, and digitizing the returned light. Preliminary results of the bacterial auto-fluorescence are reported and plans for future research are discussed. The results to date are encouraging with six of the eight bacterial strains investigated exhibiting auto-fluorescence when excited at 488 nm. Discrimination of these bacterial strains against red meat is shown and techniques for reducing background fluorescence discussed.

  13. Fluorescence imaging of early lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum E.; Le Riche, Jean C.; Ikeda, Norihiko; Palcic, Branko

    1995-01-01

    The performance of a fluorescence imaging device was compared with conventional white-light bronchoscopy in 100 patients with lung cancer, 46 patients with resected State I nonsmall cell lung cancer, 10 patients with head and neck cancer, and 67 volunteers who had smoked at least one pack of cigarettes per day for twenty-five years or more. Using differences in tissue autofluorescence between premalignant, malignant and normal tissues, fluorescence bronchoscopy was found to detect more than twice as many moderate-severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ sites than conventional white-light bronchoscopy. The use of fluorescence imaging to detect small peripheral lung nodules was investigated in a micro metastatic lung model of mice implanted with Lewis lung tumor cells. Fluorescence imaging was found to be able to detect small malignant lung lesions. The use of (delta) -aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to enhance fluorescence detection of CIS was investigated in a patient after oral administration of 60 mg/kg of ALA four hours prior to bronchoscopy, although ALA enhanced the tumor's visibility, multiple sites of false positive fluorescence were observed in areas of inflammation or metaplasia.

  14. Three dimensional image restoration in fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Squire, A; Bastiaens, P I

    1999-01-01

    A microscope set-up and numerical methods are described which enable the measurement and reconstruction of three-dimensional nanosecond fluorescence lifetime images in every voxel. The frequency domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (FLIM) utilizes phase detection of high-frequency modulated light by homodyne mixing on a microchannel plate image intensifier. The output signal at the image intensifier's phosphor screen is integrated on a charge coupled device camera. A scanning stage is employed to obtain a series of phase-dependent intensity images at equally separated depths in a specimen. The Fourier transform of phase-dependent data gives three-dimensional (3D) images of the Fourier coefficients. These images are deblurred using an Iterative Constrained Tikhonov-Miller (ICTM) algorithm in conjunction with a measured point spread function. The 3D reconstruction of fluorescence lifetimes are calculated from the deblurred images of the Fourier coefficients. An improved spatial and temporal resolution of fluorescence lifetimes was obtained using this approach to the reconstruction of simulated 3D FLIM data. The technique was applied to restore 3D FLIM data of a live cell specimen expressing two green fluorescent protein fusion constructs having distinct fluorescence lifetimes which localized to separate cellular compartments.

  15. Time resolved imaging microscopy. Phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, G; Clegg, R M; Arndt-Jovin, D J; Jovin, T M

    1991-01-01

    An optical microscope capable of measuring time resolved luminescence (phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence) images has been developed. The technique employs two phase-locked mechanical choppers and a slow-scan scientific CCD camera attached to a normal fluorescence microscope. The sample is illuminated by a periodic train of light pulses and the image is recorded within a defined time interval after the end of each excitation period. The time resolution discriminates completely against light scattering, reflection, autofluorescence, and extraneous prompt fluorescence, which ordinarily decrease contrast in normal fluorescence microscopy measurements. Time resolved image microscopy produces a high contrast image and particular structures can be emphasized by displaying a new parameter, the ratio of the phosphorescence to fluorescence. Objects differing in luminescence decay rates are easily resolved. The lifetime of the long lived luminescence can be measured at each pixel of the microscope image by analyzing a series of images that differ by a variable time delay. The distribution of luminescence decay rates is displayed directly as an image. Several examples demonstrate the utility of the instrument and the complementarity it offers to conventional fluorescence microscopy. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:1723311

  16. Fluorescence diagnostic imaging in patients with acne.

    PubMed

    Dobrev, Hristo

    2010-12-01

    Orange-red fluorescence in the follicle openings, induced by ultraviolet A light, originates from porphyrins, the metabolic products of Propionibacteria acnes. To investigate the relationship of orange-red follicular fluorescence with the severity of acne and the amount of sebum secretion. Twenty-five volunteers were included. The severity of acne was rated on a 4-point scale. The casual sebum level was measured using a Sebumeter and the follicular fluorescence was determined using the camera Visiopor. Casual sebum level and the intensity of fluorescence (percentage of the area and number of orange-red spots) were higher at the T zone than at the U zone in all patients regardless of their skin type. Sebum amount and area of fluorescence spots were significantly negative in correlation with the clinical grade of acne. There was a significant positive correlation between the orange-red fluorescence and the casual sebum level. The orange-red fluorescence showed stronger correlation with the presence of non-inflammatory acne lesions (comedones) and high sebum amount than the presence of inflammatory acne lesions (pustules) and low sebum amount. The fluorescence diagnostic imaging could be useful in the objective evaluation and monitoring of treatment efficacy in subjects with acne-prone skin and patients with acne. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Fluorescence imaging in the last two decades.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2013-02-01

    In commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the molecular cloning of the gene for the green fluorescent protein from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, I would like to reflect on the development of new fluorescence imaging technology in the last two decades. As this technology has become increasingly diversified, it has become more and more of a challenge to come up with a comprehensive and exhaustive review of it. Here I will focus on optogenetics and large-scale, three-dimensional reconstruction. Those two technological innovations have been achieved in the neuroscience community owing to the combined efforts of molecular biologists and light microscopists. In addition, modern fluorescence imaging has indeed improved our understanding of the spatiotemporal regulation of fundamental biological functions at cellular level. As an example, I will introduce some findings we made regarding the movement of biomolecules across the nuclear membrane. The above-mentioned imaging approaches are possible today but were impossible two decades ago.

  18. ICG fluorescence imaging and its medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Mitsuharu; Shikayama, Takahiro

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a novel optical angiography system, and introduces its medical applications. We developed the optical enhanced imaging system which can observe the blood and lymphatic vessels as the Indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence image. The imaging system consists of 760nm light emitted diode (LED) as excite light, CCD camera as a detector, a high-pass optical filter in front of the CCD and video processing system. The advantage of ICG fluorescence method is safe (radiation free), high sensitive, real time monitoring of blood and/or lymphatic flow, small size, easy to operate and cost effective compared to conventional X-ray angiography or scintigraphy. We have applied this method to several clinical applications such as breast cancer sentinel lymph node (SLN) navigation, lymph edema diagnostic and identification of liver segmentation. In each application, ICG fluorescence method shows useful result. It's indicated that this method is promising technique as optical angiography.

  19. Monomolecular multimodal fluorescence-radioisotope imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zongren; Liang, Kexian; Bloch, Sharon; Berezin, Mikhail; Achilefu, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    Diagnosis of diseases by different imaging methods can provide complementary information about the functional status of diseased tissues or organs. To overcome the current difficulties in coregistering images from different imaging modalities with a high degree of accuracy, we prepared near-infrared (NIR) monomolecular multimodal imaging agents (MOMIAs) consisting of a heptamethine carbocyanine and 111In-DOTA chelate that served as antennae for optical and scintigraphic imaging, respectively. Their spectral properties clearly show that coordination of indium to MOMIA increased the fluorescence intensity of the compounds. The MOMIAs are exceptionally stable in biological media and serum up to 24 h at 37 degrees C. Biodistribution of the compounds in mice obtained by fluorescence photon and gamma-counts demonstrated a similar distribution trend of the molecular probe in different tissues, suggesting that the detected fluorescence and gamma-emissions emanated from the same source (MOMIA). At 24 h postinjection, the MOMIAs were excreted by the renal and hepatobiliary systems and the blood level of a representative MOMIA was very low, thereby reducing background noise caused by circulating molecular probes. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of preparing single molecules with the capacity to emit discernible and diagnostic fluorescent and gamma-radiations for optical and nuclear imaging of living organisms.

  20. Supercontinuum Stimulated Emission Depletion Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lesoine, Michael; Bose, Sayantan; Petrich, Jacob; Smith, Emily

    2012-06-13

    Supercontinuum (SC) stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence lifetime imaging is demonstrated by using time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) detection. The spatial resolution of the developed STED instrument was measured by imaging monodispersed 40-nm fluorescent beads and then determining their fwhm, and was 36 ± 9 and 40 ± 10 nm in the X and Y coordinates, respectively. The same beads measured by confocal microscopy were 450 ± 50 and 430 ± 30 nm, which is larger than the diffraction limit of light due to underfilling the microscope objective. Underfilling the objective and time gating the signal were necessary to achieve the stated STED spatial resolution. The same fluorescence lifetime (2.0 ± 0.1 ns) was measured for the fluorescent beads by using confocal or STED lifetime imaging. The instrument has been applied to study Alexa Fluor 594-phalloidin labeled F-actin-rich projections with dimensions smaller than the diffraction limit of light in cultured cells. Fluorescence lifetimes of the actin-rich projections range from 2.2 to 2.9 ns as measured by STED lifetime imaging.

  1. Fluorescence Imaging Topography Scanning System for intraoperative multimodal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Quang, Tri T.; Kim, Hye-Yeong; Bao, Forrest Sheng; Papay, Francis A.; Edwards, W. Barry; Liu, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is a powerful technique with diverse applications in intraoperative settings. Visualization of three dimensional (3D) structures and depth assessment of lesions, however, are oftentimes limited in planar fluorescence imaging systems. In this study, a novel Fluorescence Imaging Topography Scanning (FITS) system has been developed, which offers color reflectance imaging, fluorescence imaging and surface topography scanning capabilities. The system is compact and portable, and thus suitable for deployment in the operating room without disturbing the surgical flow. For system performance, parameters including near infrared fluorescence detection limit, contrast transfer functions and topography depth resolution were characterized. The developed system was tested in chicken tissues ex vivo with simulated tumors for intraoperative imaging. We subsequently conducted in vivo multimodal imaging of sentinel lymph nodes in mice using FITS and PET/CT. The PET/CT/optical multimodal images were co-registered and conveniently presented to users to guide surgeries. Our results show that the developed system can facilitate multimodal intraoperative imaging. PMID:28437441

  2. Two-photon fluorescence anisotropy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Yi; Shao, Hanrong; He, Yonghong; Ma, Hui

    2006-09-01

    We have developed a novel method for imaging the fluorescence intensity and anisotropy by two-photon fluorescence microscopy and tested its capability in biological application. This method is applied to model sample including FITC and FITC-CD44 antibody solution and also FITC-CD44 stained cells. The fluorescence anisotropy (FA) of FITC-CD44ab solution is higher than the FITC solution with the same concentration. The fluorescence in cell sample has even higher FA than in solution because the rotation diffusion is restrained in membrane. The method is employed to study the effect of berberine a kind of Chinese medicine, on tumor metastasis. The results indicated that tumor cell membrane fluidity is decreasing with increasing the concentration of berberine in culture medium.

  3. Position sensitive detector for fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokazov, Y.; Turbin, E.; Weber, A.; Hartig, R.; Zuschratter, W.

    2014-12-01

    We present a detector system with a microchannel plate based photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT) and its application for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) in visible light. A capacity coupled imaging technique (charge image) combined with a charge division anode is employed for the positional readout. Using an artificial neural network's (ANN) computation model we are able to reconstruct the position of the incident photon as precise as 20 microns over the detector active area of 25 mm diameter. Thus, the resulting image quality corresponds roughly to a megapixel conventional CCD camera. Importantly, it is feasible to reach such resolution using only 9 charge acquisition channels supporting the anode structure of 14 interconnected readout electrodes. Additionally, the system features better than 50 ps temporal resolution allowing single photon counting FLIM acquisition with a regular fluorescence wide-field microscope.

  4. Fluorescein Derivatives in Intravital Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Thomas A.; Bunel, Florestan; Roberts, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Intravital fluorescence microscopy enables the direct imaging of fluorophores in vivo and advanced techniques such as fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) enable the simultaneous detection of multiple fluorophores. Consequently, it is now possible to record distribution and metabolism of a chemical in vivo and to optimise the delivery of fluorophores in vivo. Recent clinical applications with fluorescein and other intravital fluorescent stains have occurred in neurosurgery, dermatology [including photodynamic therapy (PDT)] and endomicroscopy. Potential uses have been identified in periodontal disease, skin graft and cancer surgery. Animal studies have demonstrated that diseased tissue can be specifically stained with fluorophore conjugates. This review focuses on the fluorescein derived fluorophores in common clinical use and provides examples of novel applications from studies in tissue samples. PMID:24709799

  5. Intraoperative imaging and fluorescence image guidance in oncologic surgery using a wearable fluorescence goggle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Suman B.; Gao, Shengkui; Zhu, Nan; Liu, Yang; Sudlow, Gail P.; Akers, Walter J.; Liang, Rongguang; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a wearable, fluorescence goggle based system for intraoperative imaging of tumors and image guidance in oncologic surgery. Our system can detect fluorescence from cancer selective near infra-red (NIR) contrast agent, facilitating intraoperative visualization of surgical margins and tumors otherwise not apparent to the surgeon. The fluorescence information is displayed directly to the head mounted display (HMD) of the surgeon in real time, allowing unhindered surgical procedure under image guidance. This system has the potential of improving surgical outcomes in oncologic surgery and reduce the chances of cancer recurrence.

  6. Toward Fourier interferometry fluorescence excitation/emission imaging of malignant cells combined with photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohen, Elli; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Berry, John P.; Ozkutuk, Nuri; Ornek, Ceren; Monti, Marco; Leblanc, Roger M.; Schachtschabel, Dietrich O.; Haroon, Sumaira

    2003-10-01

    Dual excitation fluorescence imaging has been used as a first step towards multi-wavelength excitation/emission fluorescence spectral imaging. Target cells are transformed keratinocytes, and other osteosarcoma, human breast and color cancer cells. Mitochondrial membrane potential probes, e.g. TMRM (tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester), Mitotracker Green (Molecular Probes, Inc., Eugene OR,USA; a recently synthesized mitochondrial oxygen probe, [PRE,P1"- pyrene butyl)-2-rhodamine ester] allow dual excitation in the UV plus in teh blue-green spectral regions. Also, using the natural endogenous probe NAD(P)H, preliminary results indicate mitochondrial responses to metabolic challenges (e.g. glucose addition), plus changes in mitochonrial distribution and morphology. In terms of application to biomedicine (for diagnostiscs, prognostsics and drug trials) three parameters have been selected in addition to the natural probe NAD(P)H, i.e. vital fluorescence probing of mitochondria, lysosomes and Golgi apparatus. It is hoped that such a multiparameter approach will allow malignant cell characterization and grading. A new area being introduced is the use of similar methodology for biotechnical applications such as the study of the hydrogen-producing alga Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii, and possible agricultural applications, such as Saccharomyces yeast for oenology. Complementation by Photoacoustic Microscopy is also contemplated, to study the internal conversion component which follows the excitation by photons.

  7. Imaging the environment of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed Central

    Suhling, Klaus; Siegel, Jan; Phillips, David; French, Paul M W; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine; Webb, Stephen E D; Davis, Daniel M

    2002-01-01

    An emerging theme in cell biology is that cell surface receptors need to be considered as part of supramolecular complexes of proteins and lipids facilitating specific receptor conformations and distinct distributions, e.g., at the immunological synapse. Thus, a new goal is to develop bioimaging that not only locates proteins in live cells but can also probe their environment. Such a technique is demonstrated here using fluorescence lifetime imaging of green fluorescent protein (GFP). We first show, by time-correlated single-photon counting, that the fluorescence decay of GFP depends on the local refractive index. This is in agreement with the Strickler Berg formula, relating the Einstein A and B coefficients for absorption and spontaneous emission in molecules. We then quantitatively image, by wide-field time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging, the refractive index of the environment of GFP. This novel approach paves the way for imaging the biophysical environment of specific GFP-tagged proteins in live cells. PMID:12496126

  8. Review of Neurosurgical Fluorescence Imaging Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Pogue, Brian W; Gibbs-Strauss, Summer; Valdés, Pablo A; Samkoe, Kimberley; Roberts, David W; Paulsen, Keith D

    2010-05-01

    Fluorescence imaging in neurosurgery has a long historical development, with several different biomarkers and biochemical agents being used, and several technological approaches. This review focuses on the different contrast agents, summarizing endogenous fluorescence, exogenously stimulated fluorescence and exogenous contrast agents, and then on tools used for imaging. It ends with a summary of key clinical trials that lead to consensus studies. The practical utility of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) as stimulated by administration of δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) has had substantial pilot clinical studies and basic science research completed. Recently multi-center clinical trials using PpIx fluorescence to guide resection have shown efficacy for improved short term survival. Exogenous agents are being developed and tested pre-clinically, and hopefully hold the potential for long term survival benefit if they provide additional capabilities for resection of micro-invasive disease or certain tumor sub-types that do not produce PpIX or help delineate low grade tumors. The range of technologies used for measurement and imaging ranges widely, with most clinical trials being carried out with either point probes or modified surgical microscopes. At this point in time, optimized probe approaches are showing efficacy in clinical trials, and fully commercialized imaging systems are emerging, which will clearly help lead to adoption into neurosurgical practice.

  9. Molecular Probes for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sarder, Pinaki; Maji, Dolonchampa; Achilefu, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of biological processes and pathologic conditions at the cellular and tissue levels largely rely on the use of fluorescence intensity signals from fluorophores or their bioconjugates. To overcome the concentration dependency of intensity measurements, evaluate subtle molecular interactions, and determine biochemical status of intracellular or extracellular microenvironments, fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging has emerged as a reliable imaging method complementary to intensity measurements. Driven by a wide variety of dyes exhibiting stable or environment-responsive FLTs, information multiplexing can be readily accomplished without the need for ratiometric spectral imaging. With knowledge of the fluorescent states of the molecules, it is entirely possible to predict the functional status of biomolecules or microevironment of cells. Whereas the use of FLT spectroscopy and microscopy in biological studies is now well established, in vivo imaging of biological processes based on FLT imaging techniques is still evolving. This review summarizes recent advances in the application of the FLT of molecular probes for imaging cells and small animal models of human diseases. It also highlights some challenges that continue to limit the full realization of the potential of using FLT molecular probes to address diverse biological problems, and outlines areas of potential high impact in the future. PMID:25961514

  10. Multiple frequency fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Squire, A; Verveer, P J; Bastiaens, P I

    2000-02-01

    The experimental configuration and the computational algorithms for performing multiple frequency fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (mfFLIM) are described. The mfFLIM experimental set-up enables the simultaneous homodyne detection of fluorescence emission modulated at a set of harmonic frequencies. This was achieved in practice by using monochromatic laser light as an excitation source modulated at a harmonic set of frequencies. A minimum of four frequencies were obtained by the use of two standing wave acousto-optic modulators placed in series. Homodyne detection at each of these frequencies was performed simultaneously by mixing with matching harmonics present in the gain characteristics of a microchannel plate (MCP) image intensifier. These harmonics arise as a natural consequence of applying a high frequency sinusoidal voltage to the photocathode of the device, which switches the flow of photoelectrons 'on' and 'off' as the sinus voltage swings from negative to positive. By changing the bias of the sinus it was possible to control the duration of the 'on' state of the intensifier relative to its 'off' state, enabling the amplitude of the higher harmonic content in the gain to be controlled. Relative modulation depths of 400% are theoretically possible from this form of square-pulse modulation. A phase-dependent integrated image is formed by the sum of the mixed frequencies on the phosphor of the MCP. Sampling this signal over a full period of the fundamental harmonic enables each harmonic to be resolved, provided that the Nyquist sampling criterion is satisfied for the highest harmonic component in the signal. At each frequency both the phase and modulation parameters can be estimated from a Fourier analysis of the data. These parameters enable the fractional populations and fluorescence lifetimes of individual components of a complex fluorescence decay to be resolved on a pixel-by-pixel basis using a non-linear fit to the dispersion relationships. The

  11. Brain tumor resection guided by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Frederic; Fontaine, Kathryn M.; Valdes, Pablo; Ji, Songbai; Pogue, Brian W.; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2009-02-01

    We present the methods that are being used in the scope of an on-going clinical trial designed to assess the usefulness of ALA-PpIX fluorescence imaging when used in conjunction with pre-operative MRI. The overall objective is to develop imaging-based neuronavigation approaches to aid in maximizing the completeness of brain tumor resection, thereby improving patient survival rate. In this paper we present the imaging methods that are used, emphasizing technical aspects relating to the fluorescence optical microscope, including initial validation approaches based on phantom and small-animal experiments. The surgical workflow is then described in detail based on a high-grade glioma resection we performed.

  12. Coherent Nonlinear Optical Imaging: Beyond Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Wei; Freudiger, Christian W.; Lu, Sijia; Xie, X. Sunney

    2012-01-01

    The quest for ultrahigh detection sensitivity with spectroscopic contrasts other than fluorescence has led to various novel approaches to optical microscopy of biological systems. Coherent nonlinear optical imaging, especially the recently developed nonlinear dissipation microscopy, including stimulated Raman scattering and two photon absorption, and pump-probe microscopy, including stimulated emission, excited state absorption and ground state depletion, provide distinct and powerful image contrasts for non-fluorescent species. Thanks to high-frequency modulation transfer scheme, they exhibit superb detection sensitivity. By directly interrogating vibrational and/or electronic energy levels of molecules, they offer high molecular specificity. Here we review the underlying principles, excitation and detection schemes, as well as exemplary biomedical applications of this emerging class of molecular imaging techniques. PMID:21453061

  13. Recent advances in activatable fluorescence imaging probes for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Jin, Guorui; Weng, Guojun; Li, Jianjun; Zhu, Jian; Zhao, Junwu

    2017-04-20

    Fluorescence imaging is superior in sensitivity and resolution compared with other imaging modalities; however, its application is hindered by high background noise. Tissue-selective strategies, such as passive, active, and activatable targeting, hold great promise in accelerating clinical translation by significantly improving the tumor:background ratio (TBR) and, in turn, the sensitivity and contrast of fluorescence imaging. Compared with the 'always on' contrast agents, activatable probes, which remain nonfluorescent until being activated by tumor-specific molecular targets, further enhance TBR and at the same time provide additional molecular information that can be related to tumor staging and therapy response. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the development of activatable fluorescence probes and provide insights into their advantages and limitations when used for tumor imaging. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Temporal resolution in fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2014-01-01

    Temporal resolution is a key factor for imaging rapidly occurring events in biology. In this feature article, I investigate an approximate estimate for determining the temporal resolution limit. The condition that led to this limit is, the time taken by the ensemble (99.9%) of excited molecules to relax to ground state, assuming all the emitted photons are detected. In a simplistic three-level system, the temporal resolution is, ≈3τp, where τp = (loge10)/(kf + knr) and, kf and knr are respectively the radiative and non-radiative emission rates. This further assumes the ideal condition that, the quantum efficiency of the detector is unity and there are no other loses. We discuss few state-of-art microscopy techniques that are capable of high temporal resolution. This includes techniques such as multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM), multifocal plane microscopy, multiple excitation spot optical microscopy (MESO), multiplane microscopy and multiple light-sheet microscopy (MLSM). PMID:25988152

  15. Developing an imaging bi-spectrometer for fluorescent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Mahnaz

    Fluorescent effects have been observed for thousands of years. Stokes, in 1852, began the science of fluorescence culminating in his law of fluorescence, which explained that fluorescence emission occurs at longer wavelengths than the excitation wavelength. This phenomenon is observed extensively in the art world. Daylight fluorescent colors known as Day-GloRTM have become an artistic medium since the 1960s. Modern artists exploit these saturated and brilliant colors to glitter their painting. Multipsectral imaging as a noninvasive technique has been used for archiving by museums and cultural-heritage institutions for about a decade. The complex fluorescence phenomenon has been often ignored in the multispectral projects. The ignored fluorescence results in errors in digital imaging of artwork containing fluorescent colors. The illuminant-dependency of the fluorescence radiance makes the fluorescence colorimetry and consequently spectral imaging more complex. In this dissertation an abridged imaging bi-spectrometer for artwork containing both fluorescent and non-fluorescent colors was developed. The method developed included two stages of reconstruction of the spectral reflected radiance factor and prediction of the fluorescent radiance factor. The estimation of the reflected radiance factor as a light source independent component was achieved by imaging with a series of short-wavelength cutoff filters placed in the illumination path. The fluorescent radiance factor, a light source dependent component, was estimated based on a proposed model, the abridged two-monochromator method. The abridged two-monochromator method was developed for reconstructing the bi-spectral matrix of a fluorescent color based on a calibrated UV-fluorescence imaging. In this way, one could predict the fluorescence radiance factor under any desired illuminant and consequently a better color evaluation and rendering could be obtained. Furthermore, this method easily fitted in a general system

  16. Photodiagnosis and fluorescence imaging in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Mark; Moghissi, Keyvan

    2004-05-01

    For cancer diagnosis clinicians rely upon histo pathological preparations in their broadest sense and the characteristic microscopic features which represent malignant changes. Standard method of in-vivo sampling (biopsy) uses white light indicating abnormal tissue. The manner in which light interacts with a specific tissue type is dictated by the wavelength dependent scattering and absorbtion properties. In the UV and visible part of the spectrum the tissue optical properties are dominated by the endogenous chromophores which is different for normal/abnormal tissue. It follows that abnormal tissue, absorbs light and fluoresces differently to normal tissue at specific light wavelengths. Autofluorescence takes advantage of this principle. Enhanced fluorescence employs exogenous markers to produce better definition. Fluorescence imaging has become an important diagnostic tool to highlight cancer at an early stage of development and/or to guide biopsy from representative samples.

  17. Fluorescence lifetime contrast in small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujan, V. Krishnan; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Sun, LuZhe; Herman, Brian A.

    2007-02-01

    Early detection of primary tumors is the key for effective therapeutic intervention and successful patient survival. Small animal models emulating human diseases are powerful tools for our comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of tumor formation and metastasis to distant sites. Our long-term goal is to develop a non-invasive, multiphoton-fluorescence lifetime imaging (MP-FLIM) modality that can precisely quantify these steps in animal tumor models at a very early stage. The specific hypothesis is that fluorescence lifetime can be employed as reliable contrast parameter for providing higher detection sensitivity as compared with conventional intensity-based tumor imaging approaches and therefore it is possible to detect smaller tumor volumes (early detection) than those achieved by other prevailing methods. We base this hypothesis on our recent observations that (1) fluorescence lifetime is "intrinsic" to the fluorophore and its measurement is not affected by concentration and/or spectral artifacts as in intensity-based methods, (2) multiphoton excitation can enable increased tissue penetrability and reduced phototoxicity and (3) MP-FLIM approach can discriminate background autofluorescence from the fluorescent proteins in thick tissues thereby achieving a ten-fold increase in signal-to-background ratio over the intensity-based approaches. We present our preliminary data to support this hypothesis in primary tumor detection in nu/nu athymic mouse models.

  18. Active Mask Segmentation of Fluorescence Microscope Images

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasa, Gowri; Fickus, Matthew C.; Guo, Yusong; Linstedt, Adam D.; Kovačević, Jelena

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new active mask algorithm for the segmentation of fluorescence microscope images of punctate patterns. It combines the (a) flexibility offered by active-contour methods, (b) speed offered by multiresolution methods, (c) smoothing offered by multiscale methods, and (d) statistical modeling offered by region-growing methods into a fast and accurate segmentation tool. The framework moves from the idea of the “contour” to that of “inside and outside”, or, masks, allowing for easy multidimensional segmentation. It adapts to the topology of the image through the use of multiple masks. The algorithm is almost invariant under initialization, allowing for random initialization, and uses a few easily tunable parameters. Experiments show that the active mask algorithm matches the ground truth well, and outperforms the algorithm widely used in fluorescence microscopy, seeded watershed, both qualitatively as well as quantitatively. PMID:19380268

  19. Radiometric calibration to consider in quantitative clinical fluorescence imaging measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litorja, M.; Urbas, A.; Zong, Y.

    2015-03-01

    The fluorescent light detected by a clinical imager is assumed to be proportional only to the amount of fluorescent substance present in the sample and the level of excitation. Unfortunately, there are many factors that can add or subtract to the light signal directly attributable to the desired fluorescence emission, especially with fluorescence from inside the body imaged remotely. The quantification of fluorescence emission is feasible by calibrating the imager using international system of units (SI)-traceable physical and material calibration artifacts such that the detector's digital numbers (DN) can be converted to radiometric units. Here we discuss three calibration methods for quantitative clinical fluorescence imaging systems.

  20. Mosaic-Detector-Based Fluorescence Spectral Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Kyung-Ah; Moon, Jeong

    2007-01-01

    A battery-powered, pen-sized, portable instrument for measuring molecular fluorescence spectra of chemical and biological samples in the field has been proposed. Molecular fluorescence spectroscopy is among the techniques used most frequently in laboratories to analyze compositions of chemical and biological samples. Heretofore, it has been possible to measure fluorescence spectra of molecular species at relative concentrations as low as parts per billion (ppb), with a few nm spectral resolution. The proposed instrument would include a planar array (mosaic) of detectors, onto which a fluorescence spectrum would be spatially mapped. Unlike in the larger laboratory-type molecular fluorescence spectrometers, mapping of wavelengths to spatial positions would be accomplished without use of relatively bulky optical parts. The proposed instrument is expected to be sensitive enough to enable measurement of spectra of chemical species at relative concentrations <1 ppb, with spectral resolution that could be tailored by design to be comparable to a laboratory molecular fluorescence spectrometer. The proposed instrument (see figure) would include a button-cell battery and a laser diode, which would generate the monochromatic ultraviolet light needed to excite fluorescence in a sample. The sample would be held in a cell bounded by far-ultraviolet-transparent quartz or optical glass. The detector array would be, more specifically, a complementary metal oxide/ semiconductor or charge-coupled- device imaging photodetector array, the photodetectors of which would be tailored to respond to light in the wavelength range of the fluorescence spectrum to be measured. The light-input face of the photodetector array would be covered with a matching checkerboard array of multilayer thin film interference filters, such that each pixel in the array would be sensitive only to light in a spectral band narrow enough so as not to overlap significantly with the band of an adjacent pixel. The

  1. Coherent nonlinear optical imaging: beyond fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Min, Wei; Freudiger, Christian W; Lu, Sijia; Xie, X Sunney

    2011-01-01

    The quest for ultrahigh detection sensitivity with spectroscopic contrasts other than fluorescence has led to various novel approaches to optical microscopy of biological systems. Coherent nonlinear optical imaging, especially the recently developed nonlinear dissipation microscopy (including stimulated Raman scattering and two-photon absorption) and pump-probe microscopy (including excited-state absorption, stimulated emission, and ground-state depletion), provides new image contrasts for nonfluorescent species. Thanks to the high-frequency modulation transfer scheme, these imaging techniques exhibit superb detection sensitivity. By directly interrogating vibrational and/or electronic energy levels of molecules, they offer high molecular specificity. Here we review the underlying principles and excitation and detection schemes, as well as exemplary biomedical applications of this emerging class of molecular imaging techniques.

  2. Fluorescence confocal endomicroscopy in biological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, Peter; Thomas, Steven; Allen, John; McLaren, Wendy; Murr, Elise; Harris, Martin

    2007-02-01

    In vivo fluorescence microscopic imaging of biological systems in human disease states and animal models is possible with high optical resolution and mega pixel point-scanning performance using optimised off-the-shelf turn-key devices. There are however various trade-offs between tissue access and instrument performance when miniaturising in vivo microscopy systems. A miniature confocal scanning technology that was developed for clinical human endoscopy has been configured into a portable device for direct hand-held interrogation of living tissue in whole animal models (Optiscan FIVE-1 system). Scanning probes of 6.3mm diameter with a distal tip diameter of 5.0mm were constructed either in a 150mm length for accessible tissue, or a 300mm probe for laparoscopic interrogation of internal tissues in larger animal models. Both devices collect fluorescence confocal images (excitation 488 nm; emission >505 or >550 nm) comprised of 1024 x 1204 sampling points/image frame, with lateral resolution 0.7um; axial resolution 7um; FOV 475 x 475um. The operator can dynamically control imaging depth from the tissue surface to approx 250um in 4um steps via an internally integrated zaxis actuator. Further miniaturisation is achieved using an imaging contact probe based on scanning the proximal end of a high-density optical fibre bundle (~30,000 fibres) of <1mm diameter to transfer the confocal imaging plane to tissue in intact small animal organs, albeit at lower resolution (30,000 sampling points/image). In rodent models, imaging was performed using various fluorescent staining protocols including fluorescently labelled receptor ligands, labelled antibodies, FITC-dextrans, vital dyes and labelled cells administered topically or intravenously. Abdominal organs of large animals were accessed laparoscopically and contrasted using i.v. fluorescein-sodium. Articular cartilage of sheep and pigs was fluorescently stained with calcein-AM or fluorescein. Surface and sub-surface cellular and

  3. Fluorescence imaging to quantify crop residue cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Chappelle, E. W.

    1994-01-01

    Crop residues, the portion of the crop left in the field after harvest, can be an important management factor in controlling soil erosion. Methods to quantify residue cover are needed that are rapid, accurate, and objective. Scenes with known amounts of crop residue were illuminated with long wave ultraviolet (UV) radiation and fluorescence images were recorded with an intensified video camera fitted with a 453 to 488 nm band pass filter. A light colored soil and a dark colored soil were used as background for the weathered soybean stems. Residue cover was determined by counting the proportion of the pixels in the image with fluorescence values greater than a threshold. Soil pixels had the lowest gray levels in the images. The values of the soybean residue pixels spanned nearly the full range of the 8-bit video data. Classification accuracies typically were within 3(absolute units) of measured cover values. Video imaging can provide an intuitive understanding of the fraction of the soil covered by residue.

  4. Imaging without fluorescence: nonlinear optical microscopy for quantitative cellular imaging.

    PubMed

    Streets, Aaron M; Li, Ang; Chen, Tao; Huang, Yanyi

    2014-09-02

    Quantitative single-cell analysis enables the characterization of cellular systems with a level of detail that cannot be achieved with ensemble measurement. In this Feature we explore quantitative cellular imaging applications with nonlinear microscopy techniques. We first offer an introductory tutorial on nonlinear optical processes and then survey a range of techniques that have proven to be useful for quantitative live cell imaging without fluorescent labels.

  5. Multiparameter liquid scintillation spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polach, Henry; Kojola, Hannu; Nurmi, Jarmo; Soini, Erkki

    1984-11-01

    Multiparameter analog to digital conversion and multichannel pulse height analyses, enabling simultaneous acquisition of four different 1024 ch energy spectra, enhance the accuracy of low-level counting of 3H and 14C. The new LS spectrometer, the QUANTULUS, is based on the concept of "total optimisation" where all known factors enabling reduction of background and data validation have been considered. These involve: special counting vials, random access — variable time base — sequential counting, electronic background reduction, and a " master spectra" library with continuous monitoring of user selected validity parameters by high resolution MCA.

  6. A novel multiwavelength fluorescence image-guided surgery imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpi, D.; Tullis, I. D. C.; Laios, A.; Pathiraja, P. N. J.; Haldar, K.; Ahmed, A. A.; Vojnovic, B.

    2014-02-01

    We describe the development and performance analysis of two clinical near-infrared fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS) devices that aim to overcome some of the limitations of current FIGS systems. The devices operate in a widefield-imaging mode and can work (1) in conjunction with a laparoscope, during minimally invasive surgery, and (2) as a hand-held, open surgery imaging system. In both cases, narrow-band excitation light, delivered at multiple wavelengths, is efficiently combined with white reflectance light. Light is delivered to ~100 cm2 surgical field at 1-2 mW/cm2 for white light and 3-7 mW/cm2 (depending on wavelength) of red - near infrared excitation, at a typical working distance of 350 mm for the hand-held device and 100 mm for the laparoscope. A single, sensitive, miniaturized color camera collects both fluorescence and white reflectance light. The use of a single imager eliminates image alignment and software overlay complexity. A novel filtering and illumination arrangement allows simultaneous detection of white reflectance and fluorescence emission from multiple dyes in real-time. We will present both fluorescence detection sensitivity modeling and practical performance data. We have demonstrated the efficiency and the advantages of the devices both pre-clinically and during live surgery on humans. Both the hand-held and the laparoscopic systems have proved to be reliable and beneficial in an ongoing clinical trial involving sentinel lymph node detection in gynecological cancers. We will show preliminary results using two clinically approved dyes, Methylene blue and indocyanine green. We anticipate that this technology can be integrated and routinely used in a larger variety of surgical procedures.

  7. Carbon Quantum Dots for Zebrafish Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yan-Fei; Li, Yu-Hao; Fang, Yang-Wu; Xu, Yang; Wei, Xiao-Mi; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) are becoming a desirable alternative to metal-based QDs and dye probes owing to their high biocompatibility, low toxicity, ease of preparation, and unique photophysical properties. Herein, we describe fluorescence bioimaging of zebrafish using C-QDs as probe in terms of the preparation of C-QDs, zebrafish husbandry, embryo harvesting, and introduction of C-QDs into embryos and larvae by soaking and microinjection. The multicolor of C-QDs was validated with their imaging for zebrafish embryo. The distribution of C-QDs in zebrafish embryos and larvae were successfully observed from their fluorescence emission. the bio-toxicity of C-QDs was tested with zebrafish as model and C-QDs do not interfere to the development of zebrafish embryo. All of the results confirmed the high biocompatibility and low toxicity of C-QDs as imaging probe. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion route (ADME) of C-QDs in zebrafish was revealed by their distribution. Our work provides the useful information for the researchers interested in studying with zebrafish as a model and the applications of C-QDs. The operations related zebrafish are suitable for the study of the toxicity, adverse effects, transport, and biocompatibility of nanomaterials as well as for drug screening with zebrafish as model. PMID:26135470

  8. Carbon Quantum Dots for Zebrafish Fluorescence Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yan-Fei; Li, Yu-Hao; Fang, Yang-Wu; Xu, Yang; Wei, Xiao-Mi; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2015-07-01

    Carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) are becoming a desirable alternative to metal-based QDs and dye probes owing to their high biocompatibility, low toxicity, ease of preparation, and unique photophysical properties. Herein, we describe fluorescence bioimaging of zebrafish using C-QDs as probe in terms of the preparation of C-QDs, zebrafish husbandry, embryo harvesting, and introduction of C-QDs into embryos and larvae by soaking and microinjection. The multicolor of C-QDs was validated with their imaging for zebrafish embryo. The distribution of C-QDs in zebrafish embryos and larvae were successfully observed from their fluorescence emission. the bio-toxicity of C-QDs was tested with zebrafish as model and C-QDs do not interfere to the development of zebrafish embryo. All of the results confirmed the high biocompatibility and low toxicity of C-QDs as imaging probe. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion route (ADME) of C-QDs in zebrafish was revealed by their distribution. Our work provides the useful information for the researchers interested in studying with zebrafish as a model and the applications of C-QDs. The operations related zebrafish are suitable for the study of the toxicity, adverse effects, transport, and biocompatibility of nanomaterials as well as for drug screening with zebrafish as model.

  9. Bayesian based fluorescence coded imaging using quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Takahiro; Kimura, Hitoshi; Ogura, Yusuke; Tanida, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Single-molecule localization techniques are effective to resolve fluorescence images with higher resolution. To increase the frame rate, high-density positions of individual fluorescence emitters should be measured. We are studying a Bayesian-based localization method for measuring high density molecular positions with fluorescence coded images. In this paper, a scheme of several color quantum dots aligned with DNA nanostructures are considered. We confirmed that the proposed method could be applied to fluorescence images of quantum dots experimentally and that the positions of the aligned fluorescence emitters at intervals of 80 nm could be measured with little errors in numerical simulations.

  10. Optimization of oncological {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging based on a multiparameter analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, Vinicius O.; D’Errico, Francesco; Namías, Mauro; Larocca, Ticiana F.; Soares, Milena B. P.

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: This paper describes a method to achieve consistent clinical image quality in {sup 18}F-FDG scans accounting for patient habitus, dose regimen, image acquisition, and processing techniques. Methods: Oncological PET/CT scan data for 58 subjects were evaluated retrospectively to derive analytical curves that predict image quality. Patient noise equivalent count rate and coefficient of variation (CV) were used as metrics in their analysis. Optimized acquisition protocols were identified and prospectively applied to 179 subjects. Results: The adoption of different schemes for three body mass ranges (<60 kg, 60–90 kg, >90 kg) allows improved image quality with both point spread function and ordered-subsets expectation maximization-3D reconstruction methods. The application of this methodology showed that CV improved significantly (p < 0.0001) in clinical practice. Conclusions: Consistent oncological PET/CT image quality on a high-performance scanner was achieved from an analysis of the relations existing between dose regimen, patient habitus, acquisition, and processing techniques. The proposed methodology may be used by PET/CT centers to develop protocols to standardize PET/CT imaging procedures and achieve better patient management and cost-effective operations.

  11. Imaging carious dental tissues with multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Po-Yen; Lyu, Hong-Chou; Hsu, Chin-Ying Stephen; Chang, Chia-Seng; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2011-01-01

    In this study, multiphoton excitation was utilized to image normal and carious dental tissues noninvasively. Unique structures in dental tissues were identified using the available multimodality (second harmonic, autofluorescence, and fluorescence lifetime analysis) without labeling. The collagen in dentin exhibits a strong second harmonic response. Both dentin and enamel emit strong autofluorescence that reveals in detail morphological features (such as dentinal tubules and enamel rods) and, despite their very similar spectral profiles, can be differentiated by lifetime analysis. Specifically, the carious dental tissue exhibits a greatly reduced autofluorescence lifetime, which result is consistent with the degree of demineralization, determined by micro-computed tomography. Our findings suggest that two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging may be a promising tool for diagnosing and monitoring dental caries. PMID:21326645

  12. Single-image molecular analysis for accelerated fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan Mei

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a new single-molecule fluorescence imaging analysis method, SIMA, to improve the temporal resolution of single-molecule localization and tracking studies to millisecond timescales without compromising the nanometer range spatial resolution [1,2]. In this method, the width of the fluorescence intensity profile of a static or mobile molecule, imaged using submillisecond to milliseconds exposure time, is used for localization and dynamics analysis. We apply this method to three single-molecule studies: (1) subdiffraction molecular separation measurements, (2) axial localization precision measurements, and (3) protein diffusion coefficient measurements in free solution. Applications of SIMA in flagella IFT particle analysis, localizations of UgtP (a cell division regulator protein) in live cells, and diffusion coefficient measurement of LacI in vitro and in vivo will be discussed.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of green fluorescent protein in a single living cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periasamy, Ammasi; Sharman, Kristin K.; Ahuja, Ramesh C.; Eto, Masumi; Brautigan, David L.

    1999-06-01

    Observing dynamic reorganization and molecular interactions of cellular components on a precise spatial and temporal scale is not possible using existing microscopic techniques. However, fluorescence lifetimes occur on a nanosecond time scale, are independent of local signal intensity and concentration of the fluorophore, and provide sensitive discrimination of the molecular environment. We designed and implemented a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (FLIM) using a picosecond-gated multi-channel plate image intensifier, providing two-dimensional time-resolved images of single cell specimen. BHK21 cells were transfected with vectors for green fluorescent protein (GFP) and placed on an infinity-corrected Olympus epi-fluorescence microscope, coupled to a Coherent tunable femtosecond ti-sapphire pulsed laser and a frequency doubler to select an appropriate excitation wave length. After synchronizing the high-speed gated image intensifier to the excitation laser pulses, time-resolved nanosecond images of fluorescent emission were acquired. These images were processed pixel-by-pixel for single exponential decay to obtain an image based on fluorescence lifetime. Although the nucleus appeared brighter than the cytoplasm by fluorescence intensity measurement, FILM showed a uniform lifetime of the GFP fluorescence in both compartments, indicating that the GFP was in similar molecular environments. This technology also has important applications in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging.

  14. Compact one-lens fluorescence microscope using CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutamulia, Suganda; Gadjali, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    A fluorescence imaging module includes a fluorescence sample, a lens, an emission filter, an image sensor, and an illuminating device disposed between the sample and the lens. The illuminating device comprises a truncated pyramid for bending light emitted by the excitation light source toward the central area of the fluorescence sample. Light from the excitation light source enters from a slanted side surface of the truncated pyramid and emerges at the top of the truncated pyramid to illuminate the sample. The fluorescence image of the sample is formed by the lens through the emission filter on the image sensor.

  15. Fluorescence imaging system: application for the assessment of vegetation stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Krizek, Donald T.; Daughtry, Craig S. T.; McMurtrey, James E., III; Sandhu, Ravinder K.; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    1997-01-01

    As a part of an ongoing laser induced fluorescence (LIF) project, out laboratories have developed a fluorescence imaging system (FIS) to acquire fluorescence images at wavelengths centered at 450 nm, 550 nm, 680 nm, and 740 nm. The system consists of ultraviolet (UV) fluorescent lamps as an exciting source, automated filter wheel, and charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The automated filter wheel and CD camera are controlled by a microcomputer via a computer interface,a nd digital images are captured. The FIS is capable of capturing steady state fluorescence and chlorophyll fluorescence induction images. Experimental studies were conducted to demonstrate the utility of the FIS. One such study included experiments to observe the effects of ethylenediurea (EDU) in soybean leaves with FIS. Five different concentrations of EDU were sued to establish a doe-response relationship. Although visual effects of EDU treatment were not apparent, the intensities of the fluorescence images of the plant leaves varied depending on the EDU concentration, the location on the leaf surface and the emission wavelength. EDU appeared mainly to affect the photosynthetic apparatus causing non-uniform increases in red and far-red fluorescence. Ratio images of red-green and blue/far-red were found to be sensitive indicators in detecting EDU effects. A ratio of fluorescence induction to steady state fluorescence had a curvilinear relationship with EDU-dosage. Such kinetic measurements can be used to assess photosynthetic activity in response to a range of chemical and environmental stresses. This study demonstrates that FIS is an excellent tool to detect stress symptoms before the onset of visible injury. It will enhance our understanding of the interactions among photosynthetic activity, vegetative stresses and fluorescence responses. Characterization of steady state fluorescence patterns in leaves is of significant value in our LIF research studies, and images taken with FIS greatly

  16. Angular domain fluorescence imaging for small animal research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasefi, Fartash; Belton, Michelle; Kaminska, Bozena; Chapman, Glenn H.; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a novel macroscopic fluorescent imaging technique called angular domain fluorescence imaging (ADFI) applicable to the detection of fluorophores embedded in biological tissues. The method exploits the collimation detection capabilities of an angular filter array (AFA). The AFA uses the principle of acceptance angle filtration to extract minimally scattered photons emitted from fluorophores deep within tissue. Our goal was to develop an ADFI system for imaging near-infrared fluorescent markers for small animal imaging. According to the experimental results, the ADFI system offered higher resolution and contrast compared to a conventional lens and lens-pinhole fluorescent detection system. Furthermore, ADFI of a hairless mouse injected with a fluorescent bone marker revealed vertebral structural and morphometric data that correlated well with data derived from volumetric x-ray computed tomography images. The results suggested that ADFI is a useful technique for submillimeter mapping of the distribution of fluorescent biomarkers in small animals.

  17. Fluorescence spectral imaging of organelle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohen, Elli; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Kohen, Cahide; Schachtschabel, Dietrich O.; Monti, Marco; Stanikunaite, Rita

    2000-04-01

    In cell biology, one of the great mysteries, which has bene only superficially 8investigate,d is the integration of cytoplasmic and nuclear organelles as part of the intracellular regulatory mechanism. The methodology used for the exploration of such intracellular processes is the pixel-by-pixel scanning by means of fluorescence spectral imaging and excitation emission fluorescence spectroscopy. While several of the steps required by this method are still in the process of implementation, the Michelson interferometer, the Sagnac interferometer and the related 'pentaferometer' are possible components of the instrumental design. One of the illustrative experimental models to begin the study of intracellular integrative processes is based on the hypothesis of a 'nuclear pump' in conjunction with cell treatment by chemotherapeutic agents such as adriamycin. Preliminary observations initiated in cultured fibroblasts, and to be pursued in Cloudman's melanoma cells, suggest that this cytotoxic agent first moves into the nucleus, form which it is subsequently ejected to be incorporated into the lysosomes and Golgi apparatus, possibly prior to exclusion via the multiple drug resistance pathway. The timetable of such a process is under investigation. This subject has obvious implications for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic studies of organelles integration.

  18. Dynamic fluorescence imaging with molecular agents for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sun Kuk

    Non-invasive dynamic optical imaging of small animals requires the development of a novel fluorescence imaging modality. Herein, fluorescence imaging is demonstrated with sub-second camera integration times using agents specifically targeted to disease markers, enabling rapid detection of cancerous regions. The continuous-wave fluorescence imaging acquires data with an intensified or an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device. The work presented in this dissertation (i) assessed dose-dependent uptake using dynamic fluorescence imaging and pharmacokinetic (PK) models, (ii) evaluated disease marker availability in two different xenograft tumors, (iii) compared the impact of autofluorescence in fluorescence imaging of near-infrared (NIR) vs. red light excitable fluorescent contrast agents, (iv) demonstrated dual-wavelength fluorescence imaging of angiogenic vessels and lymphatics associated with a xenograft tumor model, and (v) examined dynamic multi-wavelength, whole-body fluorescence imaging with two different fluorescent contrast agents. PK analysis showed that the uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) in xenograft tumor regions linearly increased with doses of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) up to 1.5 nmol/mouse. Above 1.5 nmol/mouse, the uptake did not increase with doses, suggesting receptor saturation. Target to background ratio (TBR) and PK analysis for two different tumor cell lines showed that while Kaposi's sarcoma (KS1767) exhibited early and rapid uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf), human melanoma tumors (M21) had non-significant TBR differences and early uptake rates similar to the contralateral normal tissue regions. The differences may be due to different compartment location of the target. A comparison of fluorescence imaging with NIR vs. red light excitable fluorescent dyes demonstrates that NIR dyes are associated with less background signal, enabling rapid tumor detection. In contrast, animals injected with red light excitable fluorescent dyes showed high autofluorescence. Dual

  19. High-throughput imaging of adult fluorescent zebrafish with an LED fluorescence macroscope

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Jessica S; Liu, Sali; Raimondi, Aubrey R; Ignatius, Myron S; Salthouse, Christopher D; Langenau, David M

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish are a useful vertebrate model for the study of development, behavior, disease and cancer. A major advantage of zebrafish is that large numbers of animals can be economically used for experimentation; however, high-throughput methods for imaging live adult zebrafish had not been developed. Here, we describe protocols for building a light-emitting diode (LED) fluorescence macroscope and for using it to simultaneously image up to 30 adult animals that transgenically express a fluorescent protein, are transplanted with fluorescently labeled tumor cells or are tagged with fluorescent elastomers. These protocols show that the LED fluorescence macroscope is capable of distinguishing five fluorescent proteins and can image unanesthetized swimming adult zebrafish in multiple fluorescent channels simultaneously. The macroscope can be built and used for imaging within 1 day, whereas creating fluorescently labeled adult zebrafish requires 1 hour to several months, depending on the method chosen. The LED fluorescence macroscope provides a low-cost, high-throughput method to rapidly screen adult fluorescent zebrafish and it will be useful for imaging transgenic animals, screening for tumor engraftment, and tagging individual fish for long-term analysis. PMID:21293462

  20. Video-rate optical flow corrected intraoperative functional fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Koch, Maximilian; Glatz, Jürgen; Ermolayev, Vladimir; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2014-04-01

    Intraoperative fluorescence molecular imaging based on targeted fluorescence agents is an emerging approach to improve surgical and endoscopic imaging and guidance. Short exposure times per frame and implementation at video rates are necessary to provide continuous feedback to the physician and avoid motion artifacts. However, fast imaging implementations also limit the sensitivity of fluorescence detection. To improve on detection sensitivity in video rate fluorescence imaging, we considered herein an optical flow technique applied to texture-rich color images. This allows the effective accumulation of fluorescence signals over longer, virtual exposure times. The proposed correction scheme is shown to improve signal-to-noise ratios both in phantom experiments and in vivo tissue imaging.

  1. Multiparameter breast cancer cell image analysis for objective estimation of nuclear grade: comparison with light microscopic observational data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzins, Juris; Sneiders, Uldis; Plegere, Daina; Freivalds, Talivaldis; Grigalinovica, Romalda

    2000-04-01

    We performed a multi parameter image analysis assessment of breast cancer cell population nuclear grade (NG), which is regarded as one of the main prognostic factors for treatment efficacy and survival of the patients and compared it with light microscopic estimation of NG. Cytological imprint slides from 20 ductal carcinomas were stained according to Leischmann-AzureII-eosine method, and NG was estimated by light microscopic observation according to Black in Fisher's modification. Simultaneously, using specially elaborated software, in each patient 100 cancer cells were analyzed for nuclear perimeter, diameter, area, nucleolar area, and average intensity of staining. The chromatin structure was assessed using mean diameter of chromatin grains and relatively chromatic are within the nucleus. Light microscopic estimation revealed 4/15 grade 2 and 7/15 grade 3 tumors out of 15 filtrating ductal carcinomas, with 4/15 classified as intermediate between grade 2-3. Multifactoral linear correlation coefficient r equals 0.39, p < 0.001 for ductal cancer, higher NG comes with increasing nucleolar area, nuclear roundness factor, nuclear are, and chromatin area within the cell nucleus. Image analysis may yield precise information on NG as a prognostic factor in breast cancer patients.

  2. Multicolor Conjugated Polymer Dots for Biological Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Changfeng; Bull, Barbara; Szymanski, Craig; Christensen, Kenneth; McNeill, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Highly fluorescent conjugated polymer dots were developed for demanding applications such as fluorescence imaging in live cells. These nanoparticles exhibit small particle diameters, extraordinary fluorescence brightness, and excellent photostability. Single particle fluorescence imaging and kinetic studies indicate much higher emission rates (∼108 s-1) and little or no blinking of the nanoparticles as compared to typical results for single dye molecules and quantum dots. Analysis of single particle photobleaching trajectories reveals excellent photostability — as many as 109 or more photons emitted per nanoparticle prior to irreversible photobleaching. The superior figures of merit of these new fluorescent probes, together with the demonstration of cellular imaging, indicate their enormous potential for demanding fluorescence-based imaging and sensing applications such as high speed super-resolution single molecule/particle tracking and highly sensitive assays. PMID:19206410

  3. Whole-body imaging of infection using fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ying; Akin, Ali R; Francis, Kevin P; Zhang, Ning; Troy, Tamara L; Xie, Hexin; Rao, Jianghong; Cirillo, Suat L G; Cirillo, Jeffrey D

    2011-05-01

    Optical imaging is emerging as a powerful tool to study physiological, neurological, oncological, cell biological, molecular, developmental, immunological, and infectious processes. This unit describes the use of fluorescent reporters for biological organisms, components, or events. We describe the application of fluorescence imaging to examination of infectious processes, in particular subcutaneous and pulmonary bacterial infections, but the same approaches are applicable to nearly any infectious route. The strategies described use mycobacterial infections as an example, but nearly identical systems can be used for Pseudomonas, Legionella, Salmonella, Escherichia, Borrelia, and Staphylococus, suggesting that the approaches are generally applicable to nearly any infectious agent. Two strategies for fluorescence imaging are described: the first method uses reporter enzyme fluorescence (REF), and the second uses fluorescent proteins for fluorescence imaging. Methods are described in detail to facilitate successful application of these emerging technologies to nearly any experimental system.

  4. Fluorescence Imaging Study of Impinging Underexpanded Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alderfer, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment was designed to create a simplified simulation of the flow through a hole in the surface of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle and the subsequent impingement of the flow on internal structures. In addition to planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flow visualization, pressure measurements were recorded on the surface of an impingement target. The PLIF images themselves provide quantitative spatial information about structure of the impinging jets. The images also help in the interpretation of impingement surface pressure profiles by highlighting the flow structures corresponding to distinctive features of these pressure profiles. The shape of the pressure distribution along the impingement surface was found to be double-peaked in cases with a sufficiently high jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio so as to have a Mach disk, as well as in cases where a flow feature called a recirculation bubble formed at the impingement surface. The formation of a recirculation bubble was in turn found to depend very sensitively upon the jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio. The pressure measured at the surface was typically less than half the nozzle plenum pressure at low jet pressure ratios and decreased with increasing jet pressure ratios. Angled impingement cases showed that impingement at a 60deg angle resulted in up to a factor of three increase in maximum pressure at the plate compared to normal incidence.

  5. 5-ALA induced fluorescent image analysis of actinic keratosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yong-Jin; Bae, Youngwoo; Choi, Eung-Ho; Jung, Byungjo

    2010-02-01

    In this study, we quantitatively analyzed 5-ALA induced fluorescent images of actinic keratosis using digital fluorescent color and hyperspectral imaging modalities. UV-A was utilized to induce fluorescent images and actinic keratosis (AK) lesions were demarcated from surrounding the normal region with different methods. Eight subjects with AK lesion were participated in this study. In the hyperspectral imaging modality, spectral analysis method was utilized for hyperspectral cube image and AK lesions were demarcated from the normal region. Before image acquisition, we designated biopsy position for histopathology of AK lesion and surrounding normal region. Erythema index (E.I.) values on both regions were calculated from the spectral cube data. Image analysis of subjects resulted in two different groups: the first group with the higher fluorescence signal and E.I. on AK lesion than the normal region; the second group with lower fluorescence signal and without big difference in E.I. between two regions. In fluorescent color image analysis of facial AK, E.I. images were calculated on both normal and AK lesions and compared with the results of hyperspectral imaging modality. The results might indicate that the different intensity of fluorescence and E.I. among the subjects with AK might be interpreted as different phases of morphological and metabolic changes of AK lesions.

  6. Temporal multiparameter airborne DLR E-SAR images for crop monitoring: summary of the CLEOPATRA campaign 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmullius, Christiane C.; Nithack, Juergen

    1997-01-01

    From May 11 to July 31, 1992 the Cloud Experiment OberPfaffenhofen And Transports took place as a field experimental contribution to the global energy and water cycle experiment. The DLR Institute of Radio Frequency Technology participated with its experimental SAR system E- SAR. Multitemporal X-, C- and L-band data from 8 dates and three ERS-1 images between May 20 and July 30, 1992 are analyzed in regard to the influence of changing plant backscatter constituents and to investigate the impact of increasing ground cover in the different wavelength on soil moisture mapping. Backscatter curves of four crops are shown, which indicate the possibility for crop monitoring and preferred times for crop classification. Detection of soil moisture changes is only possible with L-band and only under grain crops. Maximum likelihood and isocluster classifications were applied on several single- and multifrequency, mono- and multitemporal channel combinations. The overall classification accuracies were higher than with supervised methods. Maximum likelihood classification allowed identification of ten crop types with accuracies of up to 84 percent, when a temporal multifrequency data set was used.

  7. Two-hierarchical nonnegative matrix factorization distinguishing the fluorescent targets from autofluorescence for fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaosen; Zhao, Yong; Qin, Binjie

    2015-12-15

    Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) has been used in blind fluorescence unmixing for multispectral in-vivo fluorescence imaging, which decomposes a mixed source data into a set of constituent fluorescence spectra and corresponding concentrations. However, most classical NMF algorithms have ill convergence problems and they always fail to unmix multiple fluorescent targets from background autofluorescence for the sparse acquisition of multispectral fluorescence imaging, which introduces incomplete measurements and severe discontinuities in multispectral fluorescence emissions across the multiple spectral bands. Observing the spatial distinction between the diffusive autofluorescence and the sparse fluorescent targets, we propose to separate the mixed sparse multispectral data into equality constrained two-hierarchical updating within NMF framework by dividing the concentration matrix of entire endmembers into two hierarchies: the fluorescence targets and the background autofluorescence. Specifically, when updating concentrations of multiple fluorescent targets in the two-hierarchical NMF, we assume that the concentration of autofluorescence is fixed and known, and vice versa. Furthermore, a sparsity constraint is imposed on the concentration matrix components of fluorescence targets only. Synthetic data sets, in vivo fluorescence imaging data are employed to demonstrate and validate the performance of our approach. The proposed algorithm can achieve more satisfying results of spectral unmixing and autofluorescence removal compared to other state-of-the-art methods, especially for the sparse multispectral fluorescence imaging. The proposed algorithm can successfully tackle the sparse acquisition and ill-posed problems in the NMF-based fluorescence unmixing through equality constraint along with partial sparsity constraint during two-hierarchical NMF optimization, at which fixing sparsity constrained target fluorescence can make the update of autofluorescence as

  8. 3D fluorescence anisotropy imaging using selective plane illumination microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hedde, Per Niklas; Ranjit, Suman; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence anisotropy imaging is a popular method to visualize changes in organization and conformation of biomolecules within cells and tissues. In such an experiment, depolarization effects resulting from differences in orientation, proximity and rotational mobility of fluorescently labeled molecules are probed with high spatial resolution. Fluorescence anisotropy is typically imaged using laser scanning and epifluorescence-based approaches. Unfortunately, those techniques are limited in either axial resolution, image acquisition speed, or by photobleaching. In the last decade, however, selective plane illumination microscopy has emerged as the preferred choice for three-dimensional time lapse imaging combining axial sectioning capability with fast, camera-based image acquisition, and minimal light exposure. We demonstrate how selective plane illumination microscopy can be utilized for three-dimensional fluorescence anisotropy imaging of live cells. We further examined the formation of focal adhesions by three-dimensional time lapse anisotropy imaging of CHO-K1 cells expressing an EGFP-paxillin fusion protein. PMID:26368202

  9. Wide-Field Multi-Parameter FLIM: Long-Term Minimal Invasive Observation of Proteins in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vitali, Marco; Picazo, Fernando; Prokazov, Yury; Duci, Alessandro; Turbin, Evgeny; Götze, Christian; Llopis, Juan; Hartig, Roland; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.; Zuschratter, Werner

    2011-01-01

    Time-domain Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) is a remarkable tool to monitor the dynamics of fluorophore-tagged protein domains inside living cells. We propose a Wide-Field Multi-Parameter FLIM method (WFMP-FLIM) aimed to monitor continuously living cells under minimum light intensity at a given illumination energy dose. A powerful data analysis technique applied to the WFMP-FLIM data sets allows to optimize the estimation accuracy of physical parameters at very low fluorescence signal levels approaching the lower bound theoretical limit. We demonstrate the efficiency of WFMP-FLIM by presenting two independent and relevant long-term experiments in cell biology: 1) FRET analysis of simultaneously recorded donor and acceptor fluorescence in living HeLa cells and 2) tracking of mitochondrial transport combined with fluorescence lifetime analysis in neuronal processes. PMID:21311595

  10. Multispectral imaging fluorescence microscopy for lymphoid tissue analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monici, Monica; Agati, Giovanni; Fusi, Franco; Mazzinghi, Piero; Romano, Salvatore; Pratesi, Riccardo; Alterini, Renato; Bernabei, Pietro A.; Rigacci, Luigi

    1999-01-01

    Multispectral imaging autofluorescence microscopy (MIAM) is used here for the analysis of lymphatic tissues. Lymph node biopsies, from patients with lympthoadenopathy of different origin have been examined. Natural fluorescence (NF) images of 3 micrometers sections were obtained using three filters peaked at 450, 550 and 680 nm with 50 nm bandpass. Monochrome images were combined together in a single RGB image. NF images of lymph node tissue sections show intense blue-green fluorescence of the connective stroma. Normal tissue shows follicles with faintly fluorescent lymphocytes, as expected fro the morphologic and functional characteristics of these cells. Other more fluorescent cells (e.g., plasma cells and macrophages) are evidenced. Intense green fluorescence if localized in the inner wall of the vessels. Tissues coming from patients affected by Hodgkin's lymphoma show spread fluorescence due to connective infiltration and no evidence of follicle organization. Brightly fluorescent large cells, presumably Hodgkin cells, are also observed. These results indicate that MIAM can discriminate between normal and pathological tissues on the basis of their natural fluorescence pattern, and, therefore, represent a potentially useful technique for diagnostic applications. Analysis of the fluorescence spectra of both normal and malignant lymphoid tissues resulted much less discriminatory than MIAM.

  11. Dual PET and Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging Probes as Tools for Imaging in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    An, Fei-Fei; Chan, Mark; Kommidi, Harikrishna; Ting, Richard

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this article is to summarize advances in PET fluorescence resolution, agent design, and preclinical imaging that make a growing case for clinical PET fluorescence imaging. CONCLUSION Existing SPECT, PET, fluorescence, and MRI contrast imaging techniques are already deeply integrated into the management of cancer, from initial diagnosis to the observation and management of metastases. Combined positron-emitting fluorescent contrast agents can convey new or substantial benefits that improve on these proven clinical contrast agents. PMID:27223168

  12. Wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging of cancer

    PubMed Central

    McGinty, James; Galletly, Neil P.; Dunsby, Chris; Munro, Ian; Elson, Daniel S.; Requejo-Isidro, Jose; Cohen, Patrizia; Ahmad, Raida; Forsyth, Amanda; Thillainayagam, Andrew V.; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Stamp, Gordon W

    2010-01-01

    Optical imaging of tissue autofluorescence has the potential to provide rapid label-free screening and detection of surface tumors for clinical applications, including when combined with endoscopy. Quantitative imaging of intensity-based contrast is notoriously difficult and spectrally resolved imaging does not always provide sufficient contrast. We demonstrate that fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) applied to intrinsic tissue autofluorescence can directly contrast a range of surface tissue tumors, including in gastrointestinal tissues, using compact, clinically deployable instrumentation achieving wide-field fluorescence lifetime images of unprecedented clarity. Statistically significant contrast is observed between cancerous and healthy colon tissue for FLIM with excitation at 355 nm. To illustrate the clinical potential, wide-field fluorescence lifetime images of unstained ex vivo tissue have been acquired at near video rate, which is an important step towards real-time FLIM for diagnostic and interoperative imaging, including for screening and image-guided biopsy applications. PMID:21258496

  13. Fluorescence imaging preparation methods for tissue scaffolds implanted into a green fluorescent protein porcine model.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah E; White, Richard A; Grant, David A; Grant, Sheila A

    2015-10-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) animal models have become increasingly popular due to their potential to enhance in vivo imaging and their application to many fields of study. We have developed a technique to observe host tissue integration into scaffolds using GFP expressing swine and fluorescence imaging. Current fluorescence imaging preparation methods cannot be translated to a full GFP animal model due to several challenges and limitations that are investigated here. We have implanted tissue scaffolds into GFP expressing swine and have prepared explanted scaffolds for fluorescence imaging using four different methods including formalin fixation and paraffin embedding, vapor fixation, freshly prepared paraformaldehyde fixation, and fresh frozen tissue. Explanted scaffolds and tissue were imaged using confocal microscopy with spectral separation to evaluate the GFP animal model for visualization of host tissue integration into explanted scaffolds. All methods except fresh frozen tissue induced autofluorescence of the scaffold, preventing visualization of detail between host tissue and scaffold fibers. Fresh frozen tissue preparation allowed for the most reliable visualization of fluorescent host tissue integration into non-fluorescent scaffolds. It was concluded that fresh frozen tissue preparation is the best method for fluorescence imaging preparation when using scaffolds implanted into GFP whole animal models.

  14. Dendrimer Probes for Enhanced Photostability and Localization in Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sung Hoon; Tanyeri, Melikhan; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy have enabled high-resolution imaging and tracking of single proteins and biomolecules in cells. To achieve high spatial resolutions in the nanometer range, bright and photostable fluorescent probes are critically required. From this view, there is a strong need for development of advanced fluorescent probes with molecular-scale dimensions for fluorescence imaging. Polymer-based dendrimer nanoconjugates hold strong potential to serve as versatile fluorescent probes due to an intrinsic capacity for tailored spectral properties such as brightness and emission wavelength. In this work, we report a new, to our knowledge, class of molecular probes based on dye-conjugated dendrimers for fluorescence imaging and single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. We engineered fluorescent dendritic nanoprobes (FDNs) to contain multiple organic dyes and reactive groups for target-specific biomolecule labeling. The photophysical properties of dye-conjugated FDNs (Cy5-FDNs and Cy3-FDNs) were characterized using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, which revealed greatly enhanced photostability, increased probe brightness, and improved localization precision in high-resolution fluorescence imaging compared to single organic dyes. As proof-of-principle demonstration, Cy5-FDNs were used to assay single-molecule nucleic acid hybridization and for immunofluorescence imaging of microtubules in cytoskeletal networks. In addition, Cy5-FDNs were used as reporter probes in a single-molecule protein pull-down assay to characterize antibody binding and target protein capture. In all cases, the photophysical properties of FDNs resulted in enhanced fluorescence imaging via improved brightness and/or photostability. PMID:23561533

  15. In vivo imaging with near-infrared fluorescence lifetime contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, Walter J.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Lee, Hyeran; Achilefu, Samuel

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescence imaging is a mainstay of biomedical research, allowing detection of molecular events in both fixed and living cells, tissues and whole animals. Such high resolution fluorescence imaging is hampered by unwanted signal from intrinsic background fluorescence and scattered light. The signal to background ratio can be improved by using extrinsic contrast agents and greatly enhanced by multispectral imaging methods. Unfortunately, these methods are insufficient for deep tissue imaging where high contrast and speedy acquisition are necessary. Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is an inherent characteristic of each fluorescent species that can be independent of intensity and spectral properties. Accordingly, FLT-based detection provides an additional contrast mechanism to optical measurements. This contrast is particularly important in the near-infrared (NIR) due to relative transparency of tissue as well as the broad absorption and emission spectra of dyes that are active in this region. Here we report comparative analysis of signal distribution of several NIR fluorescent polymethine dyes in living mice and their correlations with lifetimes obtained in vitro using solution models. The FLT data obtained from dyes dissolved in serum albumin solution correlated well with FLTs measured in vivo. Thus the albumin solution model could be used as a good predictive model for in vivo FLT behavior of newly developed fluorescent reporters. Subsequent experiments in vivo, including monitoring slow release kinetics and detecting proteinuria, demonstrate the complementary nature of FLT for fluorescence intensity imaging.

  16. Application of fluorescence lifetime imaging of enhanced green fluorescent protein to intracellular pH measurements.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Wang, Hui-Ping; Kinjo, Masataka; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2008-06-01

    We have shown that the intracellular pH of a single HeLa cell expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) can be imaged using the fluorescence lifetime of EGFP, which can be interpreted in terms of the pH-dependent ionic equilibrium of the p-hydroxybenzylidene-imidazolidinone structure of the chromophore of EGFP.

  17. Synthesis of quinoline derivatives for fluorescent imaging certain bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dhanapal, Ramu; Perumal, Paramasivan T; Damodiran, Munusamy; Ramprasath, Chandrasekaran; Mathivanan, Narayanasamy

    2012-10-15

    Highly fluorescent quinoline derivatives were synthesized using Sc(OTf)(3) catalyzed imino Diels-Alder reaction. Both the aromatic and their analogous tetradehydroquinoline derivatives were explored for the detection of bacteria using fluorescent imaging studies. Surprisingly the aromatic quinoline derivatives show a remarkable fluorescent response that can be useful in the detection of both gram positive and gram negative bacteria even at a concentration in the range of 0.078 mM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fluorescent imaging of cancerous tissues for targeted surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Lihong; Shen, Baozhong; Cheng, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    To maximize tumor excision and minimize collateral damage is the primary goal of cancer surgery. Emerging molecular imaging techniques have to “image-guided surgery” developing into “molecular imaging-guided surgery”, which is termed “targeted surgery” in this review. Consequently, the precision of surgery can be advanced from tissue-scale to molecule-scale, enabling “targeted surgery” to be a component of “targeted therapy”. Evidence from numerous experimental and clinical studies has demonstrated significant benefits of fluorescent imaging in targeted surgery with preoperative molecular diagnostic screening. Fluorescent imaging can help to improve intraoperative staging and enable more radical cytoreduction, detect obscure tumor lesions in special organs, highlight tumor margins, better map lymph node metastases, and identify important normal structures intraoperatively. Though limited tissue penetration of fluorescent imaging and tumor heterogeneity are two major hurdles for current targeted surgery, multimodality imaging and multiplex imaging may provide potential solutions to overcome these issues, respectively. Moreover, though many fluorescent imaging techniques and probes have been investigated, targeted surgery remains at a proof-of-principle stage. The impact of fluorescent imaging on cancer surgery will likely be realized through persistent interdisciplinary amalgamation of research in diverse fields. PMID:25064553

  19. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis in humans by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Bernd; Dziekan, Thomas; Weissbach, Carmen; Mahler, Marianne; Schirner, Michael; Berliner, Birgitt; Bauer, Daniel; Voigt, Jan; Berliner, Michael; Bahner, Malte L.; Macdonald, Rainer

    2010-02-01

    The blood pool agent indo-cyanine green (ICG) has been investigated in a prospective clinical study for detection of rheumatoid arthritis using fluorescence imaging. Temporal behavior as well as spatial distribution of fluorescence intensity are suited to differentiate healthy and inflamed finger joints after i.v. injection of an ICG bolus.

  20. Hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation scanning for colon cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Walters, Mikayla; Lopez, Carmen; Baker, Thomas; Favreau, Peter F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Rider, Paul F.; Boudreaux, Carole W.

    2016-10-01

    Optical spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging have shown the potential to discriminate between cancerous and noncancerous tissue with high sensitivity and specificity. However, to date, these techniques have not been effectively translated to real-time endoscope platforms. Hyperspectral imaging of the fluorescence excitation spectrum represents new technology that may be well suited for endoscopic implementation. However, the feasibility of detecting differences between normal and cancerous mucosa using fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging has not been evaluated. The goal of this study was to evaluate the initial feasibility of using fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging for measuring changes in fluorescence excitation spectrum concurrent with colonic adenocarcinoma using a small pre-pilot-scale sample size. Ex vivo analysis was performed using resected pairs of colorectal adenocarcinoma and normal mucosa. Adenocarcinoma was confirmed by histologic evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) permanent sections. Specimens were imaged using a custom hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation-scanning microscope system. Results demonstrated consistent spectral differences between normal and cancerous tissues over the fluorescence excitation range of 390 to 450 nm that could be the basis for wavelength-dependent detection of colorectal cancers. Hence, excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging may offer an alternative approach for discriminating adenocarcinoma from surrounding normal colonic mucosa, but further studies will be required to evaluate the accuracy of this approach using a larger patient cohort.

  1. High speed fluorescence imaging with compressed ultrafast photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. V.; Mason, J. D.; Beier, H. T.; Bixler, J. N.

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescent lifetime imaging is an optical technique that facilitates imaging molecular interactions and cellular functions. Because the excited lifetime of a fluorophore is sensitive to its local microenvironment,1, 2 measurement of fluorescent lifetimes can be used to accurately detect regional changes in temperature, pH, and ion concentration. However, typical state of the art fluorescent lifetime methods are severely limited when it comes to acquisition time (on the order of seconds to minutes) and video rate imaging. Here we show that compressed ultrafast photography (CUP) can be used in conjunction with fluorescent lifetime imaging to overcome these acquisition rate limitations. Frame rates up to one hundred billion frames per second have been demonstrated with compressed ultrafast photography using a streak camera.3 These rates are achieved by encoding time in the spatial direction with a pseudo-random binary pattern. The time domain information is then reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm, resulting in a cube of data (x,y,t) for each readout image. Thus, application of compressed ultrafast photography will allow us to acquire an entire fluorescent lifetime image with a single laser pulse. Using a streak camera with a high-speed CMOS camera, acquisition rates of 100 frames per second can be achieved, which will significantly enhance our ability to quantitatively measure complex biological events with high spatial and temporal resolution. In particular, we will demonstrate the ability of this technique to do single-shot fluorescent lifetime imaging of cells and microspheres.

  2. FY08 Annual Report for Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.

    2009-01-06

    FY08 annual report for project the "Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging" project. Reviews accomplishments of last 3 years, including U-235 signature search, comparison of different photon sources, and examination of NRF measurements using monochromatic photon source.

  3. Soft fluorescent nanomaterials for biological and biomedical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hong-Shang; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    Soft fluorescent nanomaterials have attracted recent attention as imaging agents for biological applications, because they provide the advantages of good biocompatibility, high brightness, and easy biofunctionalization. Here, we provide a survey of recent developments in fluorescent soft nano-sized biological imaging agents. Various soft fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) (including dye-doped polymer NPs, semiconducting polymer NPs, small-molecule organic NPs, nanogels, micelles, vesicles, and biomaterial-based NPs) are summarized from the perspectives of preparation method, structure, optical property, and surface functionalization. Based on both optical and functional properties of the nano-sized imaging agents, their applications are then reviewed in terms of in vitro imaging, in vivo imaging, and cellular-process imaging, by means of specific or nonspecific targeting. PMID:25531691

  4. A computational platform for robotized fluorescence microscopy (I): high-content image-based cell-cycle analysis.

    PubMed

    Furia, Laura; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Hardware automation and software development have allowed a dramatic increase of throughput in both acquisition and analysis of images by associating an optimized statistical significance with fluorescence microscopy. Despite the numerous common points between fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry (FCM), the enormous amount of applications developed for the latter have found relatively low space among the modern high-resolution imaging techniques. With the aim to fulfill this gap, we developed a novel computational platform named A.M.I.CO. (Automated Microscopy for Image-Cytometry) for the quantitative analysis of images from widefield and confocal robotized microscopes. Thanks to the setting up of both staining protocols and analysis procedures, we were able to recapitulate many FCM assays. In particular, we focused on the measurement of DNA content and the reconstruction of cell-cycle profiles with optimal parameters. Standard automated microscopes were employed at the highest optical resolution (200 nm), and white-light sources made it possible to perform an efficient multiparameter analysis. DNA- and protein-content measurements were complemented with image-derived information on their intracellular spatial distribution. Notably, the developed tools create a direct link between image-analysis and acquisition. It is therefore possible to isolate target populations according to a definite quantitative profile, and to relocate physically them for diffraction-limited data acquisition. Thanks to its flexibility and analysis-driven acquisition, A.M.I.CO. can integrate flow, image-stream and laser-scanning cytometry analysis, providing high-resolution intracellular analysis with a previously unreached statistical relevance. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  5. Lung imaging fluorescence endoscope: development and experimental prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palcic, Branko; Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum E.; Hung, Jaclyn; Jaggi, Bruno; Radjinia, Massud; Pon, Alfred; Profio, A. E.

    1991-06-01

    A lung imaging fluorescence endoscope has been developed which can be used for detection and localization of early lung cancer. We exploited tissue autofluorescence alone or in combination with fluorescent tumor localizing drugs to create pseudo images which can clearly delineate the diseased sites from the surrounding normal tissues. With this technique it is possible to detect early lung cancer as well as pre-cancerous lesions of one to two millimeters in diameter and only a few cell layers thick.

  6. Fluorogen-based reporters for fluorescence imaging: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescence bioimaging has recently jumped into a new area of spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity thanks to synergistic advances in both optical physics and probe/biosensor design. This review focuses on the recent development of genetically encodable fluorescent reporters that bind endogenously present or exogenously applied fluorogenic chromophores (so-called fluorogens) and activate their fluorescence. We highlight the innovative engineering and design that gave rise to these new natural and synthetic fluorescent reporters, and describe some of the emerging applications in imaging and biosensing.

  7. Fluorescence Image Analyzer - FLIMA: software for quantitative analysis of fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Silva, H C M; Martins-Júnior, M M C; Ribeiro, L B; Matoso, D A

    2017-03-30

    The Fluorescence Image Analyzer (FLIMA) software was developed for the quantitative analysis of images generated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Currently, the images of FISH are examined without a coefficient that enables a comparison between them. Through GD Graphics Library, the FLIMA software calculates the amount of pixels on image and recognizes each present color. The coefficient generated by the algorithm shows the percentage of marks (probes) hybridized on the chromosomes. This software can be used for any type of image generated by a fluorescence microscope and is able to quantify digoxigenin probes exhibiting a red color, biotin probes exhibiting a green color, and double-FISH probes (digoxigenin and biotin used together), where the white color is displayed.

  8. Attenuation correction in molecular fluorescence imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence-guided surgery has demonstrated more complete tumor resections in both preclinical models and clinical applications. However, intraoperative fluorescence-based imaging can be challenging due to attenuation of the fluorescence by intrinsic tissue scattering and absorption. Removing attenuation in fluorescence imaging is critical in many applications. We have developed both a model based approach and an experimental approach to retrieve attenuation corrected fluorescence based on spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI). In the model based approach, we extended an attenuation correction model initially developed for point measurement into wide-field imaging with SFDI. To achieve attenuation correction, tissue optical properties were evaluated at both excitation and emission wavelengths, which were later applied in the model. In an in-vitro phantom study, we achieved a relative flat intensity profile over entire absorption range compared to over 80% drop at the highest absorption level before correction. Similar performance was also observed in an ex-vivo tissue study. However, lengthy image acquisition and image processing make this method ideal for static imaging instead of video-rate imaging. To achieve video-rate correction, we developed an experimental approach to reduce absorption by limiting the imaging depth using a high spatial frequency pattern. The absorption reduced fluorescence image was obtained by performing a simple demodulation. The in-vitro phantom study suggested an approximate 20% intensity drop at the highest absorption level compared to over 70% intensity drop before correction. This approach enabled video-rate attenuation corrected imaging at 19 fps, making this technique viable for clinical image guided surgery.

  9. Fluorescence-integrated transmission electron microscopy images: integrating fluorescence microscopy with transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sims, Paul A; Hardin, Jeff D

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes high-pressure freezing (HPF) techniques for correlative light and electron microscopy on the same sample. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) is exploited for its ability to collect fluorescent, as well as transmitted and back scattered light (BSL) images at the same time. Fluorescent information from a whole mount (preembedding) or from thin sections (post-embedding) can be displayed as a color overlay on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Fluorescence-integrated TEM (F-TEM) images provide a fluorescent perspective to TEM images. The pre-embedding method uses a thin two-part agarose pad to immobilize live Caenorhabditis elegans embryos for LSCM, HPF, and TEM. Pre-embedding F-TEM images display fluorescent information collected from a whole mount of live embryos onto all thin sections collected from that sample. In contrast, the postembedding method uses HPF and freeze substitution with 1% paraformaldehyde in 95% ethanol followed by low-temperature embedding in methacrylate resin. This procedure preserves the structure and function of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as determined by immunogold labeling of GFP, when compared with GFP expression, both demonstrated in the same thin section.

  10. Integrated ultrasonic particle positioning and low excitation light fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bernassau, A. L.; Al-Rawhani, M.; Beeley, J.; Cumming, D. R. S.

    2013-12-09

    A compact hybrid system has been developed to position and detect fluorescent micro-particles by combining a Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) imager with an acoustic manipulator. The detector comprises a SPAD array, light-emitting diode (LED), lenses, and optical filters. The acoustic device is formed of multiple transducers surrounding an octagonal cavity. By stimulating pairs of transducers simultaneously, an acoustic landscape is created causing fluorescent micro-particles to agglomerate into lines. The fluorescent pattern is excited by a low power LED and detected by the SPAD imager. Our technique combines particle manipulation and visualization in a compact, low power, portable setup.

  11. Optical mammography combined with fluorescence imaging: lesion detection using scatterplots

    PubMed Central

    Leproux, Anaïs; van der Voort, Marjolein; van der Mark, Martin B.; Harbers, Rik; van de Ven, Stephanie M. W. Y.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2011-01-01

    Using scatterplots of 2 or 3 parameters, diffuse optical tomography and fluorescence imaging are combined to improve detectability of breast lesions. Small or low contrast phantom-lesions that were missed in the optical and fluorescence images were detected in the scatterplots. In patient measurements, all tumors were visible and easily differentiated from artifacts and areolas in the scatterplots. The different rate of intake and wash out of the fluorescent contrast agent in the healthy versus malignant tissues was also observed in the scatterplot: this information can be used to discriminate malignant lesion from normal structures. PMID:21483622

  12. Chlorophyll Fluorescence Imaging Uncovers Photosynthetic Fingerprint of Citrus Huanglongbing.

    PubMed

    Cen, Haiyan; Weng, Haiyong; Yao, Jieni; He, Mubin; Lv, Jingwen; Hua, Shijia; Li, Hongye; He, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus, which has posed a serious threat to the global citrus production. This research was aimed to explore the use of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging combined with feature selection to characterize and detect the HLB disease. Chlorophyll fluorescence images of citrus leaf samples were measured by an in-house chlorophyll fluorescence imaging system. The commonly used chlorophyll fluorescence parameters provided the first screening of HLB disease. To further explore the photosynthetic fingerprint of HLB infected leaves, three feature selection methods combined with the supervised classifiers were employed to identify the unique fluorescence signature of HLB and perform the three-class classification (i.e., healthy, HLB infected, and nutrient deficient leaves). Unlike the commonly used fluorescence parameters, this novel data-driven approach by using the combination of the mean fluorescence parameters and image features gave the best classification performance with the accuracy of 97%, and presented a better interpretation for the spatial heterogeneity of photochemical and non-photochemical components in HLB infected citrus leaves. These results imply the potential of the proposed approach for the citrus HLB disease diagnosis, and also provide a valuable insight for the photosynthetic response to the HLB disease.

  13. Chlorophyll Fluorescence Imaging Uncovers Photosynthetic Fingerprint of Citrus Huanglongbing

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Haiyan; Weng, Haiyong; Yao, Jieni; He, Mubin; Lv, Jingwen; Hua, Shijia; Li, Hongye; He, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus, which has posed a serious threat to the global citrus production. This research was aimed to explore the use of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging combined with feature selection to characterize and detect the HLB disease. Chlorophyll fluorescence images of citrus leaf samples were measured by an in-house chlorophyll fluorescence imaging system. The commonly used chlorophyll fluorescence parameters provided the first screening of HLB disease. To further explore the photosynthetic fingerprint of HLB infected leaves, three feature selection methods combined with the supervised classifiers were employed to identify the unique fluorescence signature of HLB and perform the three-class classification (i.e., healthy, HLB infected, and nutrient deficient leaves). Unlike the commonly used fluorescence parameters, this novel data-driven approach by using the combination of the mean fluorescence parameters and image features gave the best classification performance with the accuracy of 97%, and presented a better interpretation for the spatial heterogeneity of photochemical and non-photochemical components in HLB infected citrus leaves. These results imply the potential of the proposed approach for the citrus HLB disease diagnosis, and also provide a valuable insight for the photosynthetic response to the HLB disease. PMID:28900440

  14. Image contrast in fluorescence and magnetic resonance images for glioblastoma detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gibbs-Strauss, Summer L.; Yang, Harold H.; Hekmatyar, S. Khan; Hoopes, P. Jack; O'Hara, Julia A.; Kauppinen, Risto A.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-03-01

    A diffusely infiltrative human glioma cell line (U251-GFP) has been developed and used as a model for the tumor growth outside of MR image detectable tumor boundary. The aminolevulinic acid-protoporphyrin IX (ALA-PpIX) fluorescence system has shown great strides for fluorescence guided surgical resection, but often fluorescence is observed outside of the MR image detectable tumor margin. Here we compare the use of ALA-PpIX fluorescence with that of standard gadolinium enhanced MR imaging as well as T2 and diffusion imaging to determine whether there is a correlation between fluorescence and MR imaging. We found that PpIX fluorescence, T1WCD and Absolute T2 images have the highest contrast difference from controls and are likely candidates for highly infiltrative tumor detection.

  15. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of molecular rotors in living cells.

    PubMed

    Suhling, Klaus; Levitt, James A; Chung, Pei-Hua; Kuimova, Marina K; Yahioglu, Gokhan

    2012-02-09

    Diffusion is often an important rate-determining step in chemical reactions or biological processes and plays a role in a wide range of intracellular events. Viscosity is one of the key parameters affecting the diffusion of molecules and proteins, and changes in viscosity have been linked to disease and malfunction at the cellular level. While methods to measure the bulk viscosity are well developed, imaging microviscosity remains a challenge. Viscosity maps of microscopic objects, such as single cells, have until recently been hard to obtain. Mapping viscosity with fluorescence techniques is advantageous because, similar to other optical techniques, it is minimally invasive, non-destructive and can be applied to living cells and tissues. Fluorescent molecular rotors exhibit fluorescence lifetimes and quantum yields which are a function of the viscosity of their microenvironment. Intramolecular twisting or rotation leads to non-radiative decay from the excited state back to the ground state. A viscous environment slows this rotation or twisting, restricting access to this non-radiative decay pathway. This leads to an increase in the fluorescence quantum yield and the fluorescence lifetime. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) of modified hydrophobic BODIPY dyes that act as fluorescent molecular rotors show that the fluorescence lifetime of these probes is a function of the microviscosity of their environment. A logarithmic plot of the fluorescence lifetime versus the solvent viscosity yields a straight line that obeys the Förster Hoffman equation. This plot also serves as a calibration graph to convert fluorescence lifetime into viscosity. Following incubation of living cells with the modified BODIPY fluorescent molecular rotor, a punctate dye distribution is observed in the fluorescence images. The viscosity value obtained in the puncta in live cells is around 100 times higher than that of water and of cellular cytoplasm. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy

  16. Optimizing ultrafast illumination for multiphoton-excited fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    We study the optimal conditions for high throughput two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) and three-photon excited fluorescence (3PEF) imaging using femtosecond lasers. We derive relations that allow maximization of the rate of imaging depending on the average power, pulse repetition rate, and noise characteristics of the laser, as well as on the size and structure of the sample. We perform our analysis using ~100 MHz, ~1 MHz and 1 kHz pulse rates and using both a tightly-focused illumination beam with diffraction-limited image resolution, as well loosely focused illumination with a relatively low image resolution, where the latter utilizes separate illumination and fluorescence detection beam paths. Our theoretical estimates agree with the experiments, which makes our approach especially useful for optimizing high throughput imaging of large samples with a field-of-view up to 10x10 cm2. PMID:27231620

  17. Multiplexed Spectral Imaging of 120 Different Fluorescent Labels

    PubMed Central

    Valm, Alex M.; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Borisy, Gary G.

    2016-01-01

    The number of fluorescent labels that can unambiguously be distinguished in a single image when acquired through band pass filters is severely limited by the spectral overlap of available fluorophores. The recent development of spectral microscopy and the application of linear unmixing algorithms to spectrally recorded image data have allowed simultaneous imaging of fluorophores with highly overlapping spectra. However, the number of distinguishable fluorophores is still limited by the unavoidable decrease in signal to noise ratio when fluorescence signals are fractionated over multiple wavelength bins. Here we present a spectral image analysis algorithm to greatly expand the number of distinguishable objects labeled with binary combinations of fluorophores. Our algorithm utilizes a priori knowledge about labeled specimens and imposes a binary label constraint on the unmixing solution. We have applied our labeling and analysis strategy to identify microbes labeled by fluorescence in situ hybridization and here demonstrate the ability to distinguish 120 differently labeled microbes in a single image. PMID:27391327

  18. Wide-field fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent imaging flow cytometry on a cell-phone.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-04-11

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. However these devices are in general relatively bulky and costly, making them less effective in the resource limited settings. To potentially address these limitations, we have recently demonstrated the integration of wide-field fluorescent microscopy and imaging flow cytometry tools on cell-phones using compact, light-weight, and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments. In our flow cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are flushed through a microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing cell-phone camera unit. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the side of this microfluidic chip, which effectively acts as a multi-mode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to uniformly excite the fluorescent targets. The cell-phone camera records a time lapse movie of the fluorescent cells flowing through the microfluidic channel, where the digital frames of this movie are processed to count the number of the labeled cells within the target solution of interest. Using a similar opto-fluidic design, we can also image these fluorescently labeled cells in static mode by e.g. sandwiching the fluorescent particles between two glass slides and capturing their fluorescent images using the cell-phone camera, which can achieve a spatial resolution of e.g. - 10 μm over a very large field-of-view of - 81 mm(2). This cell-phone based fluorescent imaging flow cytometry and microscopy platform might be useful especially in resource limited settings, for e.g. counting of CD4+ T cells toward monitoring of HIV+ patients or for detection of water-borne parasites in drinking water.

  19. Double-excitation fluorescence spectral imaging: eliminating tissue auto-fluorescence from in vivo PPIX measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torosean, Sason; Flynn, Brendan; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Davis, Scott C.; Gunn, Jason; Axelsson, Johan; Pogue, Brian W.

    2012-02-01

    An ultrasound coupled handheld-probe-based optical fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) system has been in development for the purpose of quantifying the production of Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in aminolevulinic acid treated (ALA), Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) in vivo. The design couples fiber-based spectral sampling of PPIX fluorescence emission with a high frequency ultrasound imaging system, allowing regionally localized fluorescence intensities to be quantified [1]. The optical data are obtained by sequential excitation of the tissue with a 633nm laser, at four source locations and five parallel detections at each of the five interspersed detection locations. This method of acquisition permits fluorescence detection for both superficial and deep locations in ultrasound field. The optical boundary data, tissue layers segmented from ultrasound image and diffusion theory are used to estimate the fluorescence in tissue layers. To improve the recovery of the fluorescence signal of PPIX, eliminating tissue autofluorescence is of great importance. Here the approach was to utilize measurements which straddled the steep Qband excitation peak of PPIX, via the integration of an additional laser source, exciting at 637 nm; a wavelength with a 2 fold lower PPIX excitation value than 633nm.The auto-fluorescence spectrum acquired from the 637 nm laser is then used to spectrally decouple the fluorescence data and produce an accurate fluorescence emission signal, because the two wavelengths have very similar auto-fluorescence but substantially different PPIX excitation levels. The accuracy of this method, using a single source detector pair setup, is verified through animal tumor model experiments, and the result is compared to different methods of fluorescence signal recovery.

  20. Fluorescence Imaging of Interscapular Brown Adipose Tissue in Living Mice†

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Douglas R.; White, Alexander G.; Leevy, W. Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a key role in energy expenditure and heat generation and is a promising target for diagnosing and treating obesity, diabetes and related metabolism disorders. While several nuclear and magnetic resonance imaging methods are established for detecting human BAT, there are no convenient protocols for high throughput imaging of BAT in small animal models. Here we disclose a simple but effective method for non-invasive optical imaging of interscapular BAT in mice using a micellar formulation of the commercially available deep-red fluorescent probe, SRFluor680. Whole-body fluorescence imaging of living mice shows extensive accumulation of the fluorescent probe in the interscapular BAT and ex vivo analysis shows 3.5-fold selectivity for interscapular BAT over interscapular WAT. Additional imaging studies indicate that SRFluor680 uptake is independent of mouse species and BAT metabolic state. The results are consistent with an unusual pharmacokinetic process that involves irreversible translocation of the lipophilic SRFluor680 from the micelle nanocarrier into the adipocytes within the BAT. Multimodal PET/CT and planar fluorescence/X-ray imaging of the same living animal shows co-localization of BAT mass signal reported by the fluorescent probe and BAT metabolism signal reported by the PET agent, 18F-FDG. The results indicate a path towards a new, dual probe molecular imaging paradigm that allows separate and independent non-invasive visualization of BAT mass and BAT metabolism in a living subject. PMID:26015867

  1. Wide field-of-view fluorescence imaging of coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Treibitz, Tali; Neal, Benjamin P; Kline, David I; Beijbom, Oscar; Roberts, Paul L D; Mitchell, B Greg; Kriegman, David

    2015-01-13

    Coral reefs globally are declining rapidly because of both local and global stressors. Improved monitoring tools are urgently needed to understand the changes that are occurring at appropriate temporal and spatial scales. Coral fluorescence imaging tools have the potential to improve both ecological and physiological assessments. Although fluorescence imaging is regularly used for laboratory studies of corals, it has not yet been used for large-scale in situ assessments. Current obstacles to effective underwater fluorescence surveying include limited field-of-view due to low camera sensitivity, the need for nighttime deployment because of ambient light contamination, and the need for custom multispectral narrow band imaging systems to separate the signal into meaningful fluorescence bands. Here we describe the Fluorescence Imaging System (FluorIS), based on a consumer camera modified for greatly increased sensitivity to chlorophyll-a fluorescence, and we show high spectral correlation between acquired images and in situ spectrometer measurements. This system greatly facilitates underwater wide field-of-view fluorophore surveying during both night and day, and potentially enables improvements in semi-automated segmentation of live corals in coral reef photographs and juvenile coral surveys.

  2. Wide Field-of-View Fluorescence Imaging of Coral Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Treibitz, Tali; Neal, Benjamin P.; Kline, David I.; Beijbom, Oscar; Roberts, Paul L. D.; Mitchell, B. Greg; Kriegman, David

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs globally are declining rapidly because of both local and global stressors. Improved monitoring tools are urgently needed to understand the changes that are occurring at appropriate temporal and spatial scales. Coral fluorescence imaging tools have the potential to improve both ecological and physiological assessments. Although fluorescence imaging is regularly used for laboratory studies of corals, it has not yet been used for large-scale in situ assessments. Current obstacles to effective underwater fluorescence surveying include limited field-of-view due to low camera sensitivity, the need for nighttime deployment because of ambient light contamination, and the need for custom multispectral narrow band imaging systems to separate the signal into meaningful fluorescence bands. Here we describe the Fluorescence Imaging System (FluorIS), based on a consumer camera modified for greatly increased sensitivity to chlorophyll-a fluorescence, and we show high spectral correlation between acquired images and in situ spectrometer measurements. This system greatly facilitates underwater wide field-of-view fluorophore surveying during both night and day, and potentially enables improvements in semi-automated segmentation of live corals in coral reef photographs and juvenile coral surveys. PMID:25582836

  3. Ultraminiature optical design for multispectral fluorescence imaging endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Tyler H.; Keenan, Molly; Black, John; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2017-03-01

    A miniature wide-field multispectral endoscopic imaging system was developed enabling reflectance and fluorescence imaging over a broad wavelength range. At 0.8-mm diameter, the endoscope can be utilized for natural orifice imaging in small lumens such as the fallopian tubes. Five lasers from 250 to 642 nm are coupled into a 125-μm diameter multimode fiber and transmitted to the endoscope distal tip for illumination. Ultraviolet and blue wavelengths excite endogenous fluorophores, which can provide differential fluorescence emission images for health and disease. Visible wavelengths provide reflectance images that can be combined for pseudo-white-light imaging and navigation. Imaging is performed by a 300-μm diameter three-element lens system connected to a 3000-element fiber. The lens system was designed for a 70-deg full field of view, working distance from 3 mm to infinity, and 40% contrast at the Nyquist cutoff of the fiber bundle. Measured performance characteristics are near design goals. The endoscope was utilized to obtain example monochromatic, pseudo-white-light, and composite fluorescence images of phantoms and porcine reproductive tract. This work shows the feasibility of packaging a highly capable multispectral fluorescence imaging system into a miniature endoscopic system that may have applications in early detection of cancer.

  4. Imaging tumor hypoxia by near-infrared fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Nrusingh C.; Pavlik, Christopher; Smith, Michael B.; Aguirre, Andres; Xu, Yan; Zanganeh, Saeid; Kuhn, Liisa T.; Claffey, Kevin P.; Zhu, Quing

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a novel nitroimidazole indocyanine dye conjugate for tumor-targeted hypoxia fluorescence tomography. The hypoxia probe has been evaluated in vitro using tumor cell lines and in vivo with tumor targeting in mice. The in vitro cell studies were performed to assess fluorescence labeling differences between hypoxia and normoxia conditions. When treated with the hypoxia probe, a fluorescence emission ratio of 2.5-fold was found between the cells incubated under hypoxia compared to the cells in normoxia condition. Hypoxia specificity was also confirmed by comparing the cells treated with indocyanine dye alone. In vivo tumor targeting in mice showed that the fluorescence signals measured at the tumor site were twice those at the normal site after 150 min post-injection of the hypoxia probe. On the other hand, the fluorescence signals measured after injection of indocyanine dye were the same at tumor and normal sites. In vivo fluorescence tomography images of mice injected with the hypoxia probe showed that the probe remained for more than 5 to 7 h in the tumors, however, the images of mice injected with indocyanine only dye confirmed that the unbound dye washed out in less than 3 h. These findings are supported with fluorescence images of histological sections of tumor samples using a Li-COR scanner and immunohistochemistry technique for tumor hypoxia.

  5. Fluorescence and Bioluminescence Imaging of Orthotopic Brain Tumors in Mice.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, Emilie; Moore, Alfred; Dixit, Suraj; Zhu, Yun; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Optical imaging strategies, such as fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging, are non-invasive, in vivo whole body imaging techniques utilized to study cancer. Optical imaging is widely used in preclinical work because of its ease of use and cost-friendliness. It also provides the opportunity to study animals and biological responses longitudinally over time. Important considerations include depth of tissue penetration, photon scattering, absorption and the choice of light emitting probe, all of which affect the resolution (image quality and data information) and the signal to noise ratio of the image. We describe how to use bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging to track a chemotherapeutic delivery nanocarrier conjugated with a fluorophore to determine its localization in vivo.

  6. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging with multi wavelength LED excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthman, A. Siri; Dumitru, Sebastian; Quirós-Gonzalez, Isabel; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) can combine morphological and molecular information, yielding potential for real-time and high throughput multiplexed fluorescent contrast agent imaging. Multiplexed readout from targets, such as cell surface receptors overexpressed in cancer cells, could improve both sensitivity and specificity of tumor identification. There remains, however, a need for compact and cost effective implementations of the technology. We have implemented a low-cost wide-field multiplexed fluorescence imaging system, which combines LED excitation at 590, 655 and 740 nm with a compact commercial solid state HSI system operating in the range 600 - 1000 nm. A key challenge for using reflectance-based HSI is the separation of contrast agent fluorescence from the reflectance of the excitation light. Here, we illustrate how it is possible to address this challenge in software, using two offline reflectance removal methods, prior to least-squares spectral unmixing. We made a quantitative comparison of the methods using data acquired from dilutions of contrast agents prepared in well-plates. We then established the capability of our HSI system for non-invasive in vivo fluorescence imaging in small animals using the optimal reflectance removal method. The HSI presented here enables quantitative unmixing of at least four fluorescent contrast agents (Alexa Fluor 610, 647, 700 and 750) simultaneously in living mice. A successful unmixing of the four fluorescent contrast agents was possible both using the pure contrast agents and with mixtures. The system could in principle also be applied to imaging of ex vivo tissue or intraoperative imaging in a clinical setting. These data suggest a promising approach for developing clinical applications of HSI based on multiplexed fluorescence contrast agent imaging.

  7. A dual oxygenation and fluorescence imaging platform for reconstructive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Nguyen, John N.; Venugopal, Vivek; Stockdale, Alan; Neacsu, Florin; Kettenring, Frank; Lee, Bernard T.; Frangioni, John V.; Gioux, Sylvain

    2013-03-01

    There is a pressing clinical need to provide image guidance during surgery. Currently, assessment of tissue that needs to be resected or avoided is performed subjectively, leading to a large number of failures, patient morbidity, and increased healthcare costs. Because near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging is safe, noncontact, inexpensive, and can provide relatively deep information (several mm), it offers unparalleled capabilities for providing image guidance during surgery. These capabilities are well illustrated through the clinical translation of fluorescence imaging during oncologic surgery. In this work, we introduce a novel imaging platform that combines two complementary NIR optical modalities: oxygenation imaging and fluorescence imaging. We validated this platform during facial reconstructive surgery on large animals approaching the size of humans. We demonstrate that NIR fluorescence imaging provides identification of perforator arteries, assesses arterial perfusion, and can detect thrombosis, while oxygenation imaging permits the passive monitoring of tissue vital status, as well as the detection and origin of vascular compromise simultaneously. Together, the two methods provide a comprehensive approach to identifying problems and intervening in real time during surgery before irreparable damage occurs. Taken together, this novel platform provides fully integrated and clinically friendly endogenous and exogenous NIR optical imaging for improved image-guided intervention during surgery.

  8. Quantitative Imaging in Laboratory: Fast Kinetics and Fluorescence Quenching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumberbatch, Tanya; Hanley, Quentin S.

    2007-01-01

    The process of quantitative imaging, which is very commonly used in laboratory, is shown to be very useful for studying the fast kinetics and fluorescence quenching of many experiments. The imaging technique is extremely cheap and hence can be used in many absorption and luminescence experiments.

  9. Quantitative Imaging in Laboratory: Fast Kinetics and Fluorescence Quenching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumberbatch, Tanya; Hanley, Quentin S.

    2007-01-01

    The process of quantitative imaging, which is very commonly used in laboratory, is shown to be very useful for studying the fast kinetics and fluorescence quenching of many experiments. The imaging technique is extremely cheap and hence can be used in many absorption and luminescence experiments.

  10. Intravital Fluorescence Excitation in Whole-Animal Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bixler, Joel N; Kong, Ying; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Maitland, Kristen C

    2016-01-01

    Whole-animal fluorescence imaging with recombinant or fluorescently-tagged pathogens or cells enables real-time analysis of disease progression and treatment response in live animals. Tissue absorption limits penetration of fluorescence excitation light, particularly in the visible wavelength range, resulting in reduced sensitivity to deep targets. Here, we demonstrate the use of an optical fiber bundle to deliver light into the mouse lung to excite fluorescent bacteria, circumventing tissue absorption of excitation light in whole-animal imaging. We present the use of this technology to improve detection of recombinant reporter strains of tdTomato-expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guerin) bacteria in the mouse lung. A microendoscope was integrated into a whole-animal fluorescence imager to enable intravital excitation in the mouse lung with whole-animal detection. Using this technique, the threshold of detection was measured as 103 colony forming units (CFU) during pulmonary infection. In comparison, the threshold of detection for whole-animal fluorescence imaging using standard epi-illumination was greater than 106 CFU.

  11. Intravital Fluorescence Excitation in Whole-Animal Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bixler, Joel N.; Kong, Ying; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-animal fluorescence imaging with recombinant or fluorescently-tagged pathogens or cells enables real-time analysis of disease progression and treatment response in live animals. Tissue absorption limits penetration of fluorescence excitation light, particularly in the visible wavelength range, resulting in reduced sensitivity to deep targets. Here, we demonstrate the use of an optical fiber bundle to deliver light into the mouse lung to excite fluorescent bacteria, circumventing tissue absorption of excitation light in whole-animal imaging. We present the use of this technology to improve detection of recombinant reporter strains of tdTomato-expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guerin) bacteria in the mouse lung. A microendoscope was integrated into a whole-animal fluorescence imager to enable intravital excitation in the mouse lung with whole-animal detection. Using this technique, the threshold of detection was measured as 103 colony forming units (CFU) during pulmonary infection. In comparison, the threshold of detection for whole-animal fluorescence imaging using standard epi-illumination was greater than 106 CFU. PMID:26901051

  12. Photoswitchable fluorescent proteins enable monochromatic multilabel imaging and dual color fluorescence nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Martin; Stiel, Andre C; Fölling, Jonas; Wenzel, Dirk; Schönle, Andreas; Egner, Alexander; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan

    2008-09-01

    Fluorescent proteins that can be reversibly photoswitched between a fluorescent and a nonfluorescent state are important for innovative microscopy schemes, such as protein tracking, fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging, sub-diffraction resolution microscopy and others. However, all available monomeric reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) have similar properties and switching characteristics, thereby limiting their use. Here, we introduce two bright green fluorescent RSFPs, bsDronpa and Padron, generated by extensive mutagenesis of the RSFP Dronpa, with unique absorption and switching characteristics. Whereas bsDronpa features a broad absorption spectrum extending into the UV, Padron displays a switching behavior that is reversed to that of all green fluorescent RSFPs known to date. These two RSFPs enable live-cell fluorescence microscopy with multiple labels using a single detection color, because they can be distinguished by photoswitching. Furthermore, we demonstrate dual-color fluorescence microscopy with sub-diffraction resolution using bsDronpa and Dronpa whose emission maxima are separated by <20 nm.

  13. Strategies for In Vivo Imaging Using Fluorescent Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-08-26

    Fluorescent proteins have enabled the color-coding of cells growing in vivo. Noninvasive imaging of cells expressing fluorescent proteins has allowed the real-time determination of the behavior on cancer cells, the progression of infection, the differentiation of stem cells, and interaction of stromal and cancer cells. Cancer cells in the nucleus and cytoplasm can visualize in vivo nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics in vivo including: mitosis, apoptosis, cell-cycle phase, and differential behavior of nucleus and cytoplasm that occurs during cancer-cell deformation. Linking spectrally-distinct fluorescent proteins with cell-cycle-specific proteins results in color-coding the phases of the cell cycle. With the use of fluorescent proteins, literally any cellular or molecular function can be imaged in vivo. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. A Time Domain Fluorescence Tomography System for Small Animal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Scott B.; Dunn, Andrew K.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Boas, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the application of a time domain diffuse fluorescence tomography system for whole body small animal imaging. The key features of the system are the use of point excitation in free space using ultrashort laser pulses and noncontact detection using a gated, intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Mouse shaped epoxy phantoms, with embedded fluorescent inclusions, were used to verify the performance of a recently developed asymptotic lifetime-based tomography algorithm. The asymptotic algorithm is based on a multiexponential analysis of the decay portion of the data. The multiexponential model is shown to enable the use of a global analysis approach for a robust recovery of the lifetime components present within the imaging medium. The surface boundaries of the imaging volume were acquired using a photogrammetric camera integrated with the imaging system, and implemented in a Monte-Carlo model of photon propagation in tissue. The tomography results show that the asymptotic approach is able to separate axially located fluorescent inclusions centered at depths of 4 and 10 mm from the surface of the mouse phantom. The fluorescent inclusions had distinct lifetimes of 0.5 and 0.95 ns. The inclusions were nearly overlapping along the measurement axis and shown to be not resolvable using continuous wave (CW) methods. These results suggest the practical feasibility and advantages of a time domain approach for whole body small animal fluorescence molecular imaging, particularly with the use of lifetime as a contrast mechanism. PMID:18672432

  15. Deep tissue fluorescence imaging and in vivo biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosignani, Viera; Dvornikov, Alexander; Aguilar, Jose S.; Stringari, Chiara; Edwards, Robert; Mantulin, William W.; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-11-01

    We describe a novel technical approach with enhanced fluorescence detection capabilities in two-photon microscopy that achieves deep tissue imaging, while maintaining micron resolution. Compared to conventional two-photon microscopy, greater imaging depth is achieved by more efficient harvesting of fluorescence photons propagating in multiple-scattering media. The system maintains the conventional two-photon microscopy scheme for excitation. However, for fluorescence collection the detection system harvests fluorescence photons directly from a wide area of the turbid sample. The detection scheme relies on a wide area detector, minimal optical components and an emission path bathed in a refractive-index-matching fluid that minimizes emission photon losses. This detection scheme proved to be very efficient, allowing us to obtain high resolution images at depths up to 3 mm. This technique was applied to in vivo imaging of the murine small intestine (SI) and colon. The challenge is to image normal and diseased tissue in the whole live animal, while maintaining high resolution imaging at millimeter depth. In Lgr5-GFP mice, we have been successful in imaging Lgr5-eGFP positive stem cells, present in SI and colon crypt bases.

  16. Green Fluorescent Protein with Anionic Tryptophan-Based Chromophore and Long Fluorescence Lifetime

    PubMed Central

    Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Goryashchenko, Alexander S.; Lidsky, Peter V.; Gorbachev, Dmitry A.; Bozhanova, Nina G.; Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Yu.; Pereverzeva, Alina R.; Ryumina, Alina P.; Zherdeva, Victoria V.; Savitsky, Alexander P.; Solntsev, Kyril M.; Bommarius, Andreas S.; Sharonov, George V.; Lindquist, Jake R.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E.; Rebane, Aleksander; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Mishin, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    Spectral diversity of fluorescent proteins, crucial for multiparameter imaging, is based mainly on chemical diversity of their chromophores. Recently we have reported, to our knowledge, a new green fluorescent protein WasCFP—the first fluorescent protein with a tryptophan-based chromophore in the anionic state. However, only a small portion of WasCFP molecules exists in the anionic state at physiological conditions. In this study we report on an improved variant of WasCFP, named NowGFP, with the anionic form dominating at 37°C and neutral pH. It is 30% brighter than enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and exhibits a fluorescence lifetime of 5.1 ns. We demonstrated that signals of NowGFP and EGFP can be clearly distinguished by fluorescence lifetime in various models, including mammalian cells, mouse tumor xenograft, and Drosophila larvae. NowGFP thus provides an additional channel for multiparameter fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of green fluorescent proteins. PMID:26200874

  17. Green fluorescent protein with anionic tryptophan-based chromophore and long fluorescence lifetime.

    PubMed

    Sarkisyan, Karen S; Goryashchenko, Alexander S; Lidsky, Peter V; Gorbachev, Dmitry A; Bozhanova, Nina G; Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Yu; Pereverzeva, Alina R; Ryumina, Alina P; Zherdeva, Victoria V; Savitsky, Alexander P; Solntsev, Kyril M; Bommarius, Andreas S; Sharonov, George V; Lindquist, Jake R; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E; Rebane, Aleksander; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Mishin, Alexander S

    2015-07-21

    Spectral diversity of fluorescent proteins, crucial for multiparameter imaging, is based mainly on chemical diversity of their chromophores. Recently we have reported, to our knowledge, a new green fluorescent protein WasCFP-the first fluorescent protein with a tryptophan-based chromophore in the anionic state. However, only a small portion of WasCFP molecules exists in the anionic state at physiological conditions. In this study we report on an improved variant of WasCFP, named NowGFP, with the anionic form dominating at 37°C and neutral pH. It is 30% brighter than enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and exhibits a fluorescence lifetime of 5.1 ns. We demonstrated that signals of NowGFP and EGFP can be clearly distinguished by fluorescence lifetime in various models, including mammalian cells, mouse tumor xenograft, and Drosophila larvae. NowGFP thus provides an additional channel for multiparameter fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of green fluorescent proteins.

  18. Multispectral imaging fluorescence microscopy for living cells.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Yasushi; Shimi, Takeshi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2002-10-01

    Multispectral imaging technologies have been widely used in fields of astronomy and remote sensing. Interdisciplinary approaches developed in, for example, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA, USA), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL, USA), or the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL, Japan) have extended the application areas of these technologies from planetary systems to cellular systems. Here we overview multispectral imaging systems that have been devised for microscope applications. We introduce these systems with particular interest in live cell imaging. Finally we demonstrate examples of spectral imaging of living cells using commercially available systems with no need for user engineering.

  19. Near-Infrared Fluorescent Nanoprobes for in Vivo Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Quek, Chai-Hoon; Leong, Kam W.

    2012-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes offer advantages of high photon penetration, reduced light scattering and minimal autofluorescence from living tissues, rendering them valuable for noninvasive mapping of molecular events, assessment of therapeutic efficacy, and monitoring of disease progression in animal models. This review provides an overview of the recent development of the design and optical property of the different classes of NIR fluorescent nanoprobes associated with in vivo imaging applications.

  20. 2-D fluorescence lifetime imaging using a time-gated image intensifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, K.; Hyde, S. C. W.; Dainty, J. C.; French, P. M. W.; Hares, J. D.

    1997-02-01

    We report a 2-D fluorescence lifetime imaging system based on a time-gated image intensifier and a Cr:LiSAF regenerative amplifier. We have demonstrated 185 ps temporal resolution. The deleterious effects of optical scattering are demonstrated.

  1. Enhanced Fluorescence Cell Imaging with Metal-Coated Slides

    PubMed Central

    Moal, E. Le; Fort, E.; Lévêque-Fort, S.; Cordelières, F. P.; Fontaine-Aupart, M.-P.; Ricolleau, C.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence labeling is the prevailing imaging technique in cell biology research. When they involve statistical investigations on a large number of cells, experimental studies require both low magnification to get a reliable statistical population and high contrast to achieve accurate diagnosis on the nature of the cells' perturbation. Because microscope objectives of low magnification generally yield low collection efficiency, such studies are limited by the fluorescence signal weakness. To overcome this technological bottleneck, we proposed a new method based on metal-coated substrates that enhance the fluorescence process and improve collection efficiency in epifluorescence observation and that can be directly used with a common microscope setup. We developed a model based on the dipole approximation with the aim of simulating the optical behavior of a fluorophore on such a substrate and revealing the different mechanisms responsible for fluorescence enhancement. The presence of a reflective surface modifies both excitation and emission processes and additionally reshapes fluorescence emission lobes. From both theoretical and experimental results, we found the fluorescence signal emitted by a molecular cyanine 3 dye layer to be amplified by a factor ∼30 when fluorophores are separated by a proper distance from the substrate. We then adapted our model to the case of homogeneously stained micrometer-sized objects and demonstrated mean signal amplification by a factor ∼4. Finally, we applied our method to fluorescence imaging of dog kidney cells and verified experimentally the simulated results. PMID:17172306

  2. Adjoint time domain method for fluorescent imaging in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Vadim Y.; D'Andrea, Cosimo; Brambilla, Marco; Valentini, Gianluca; Schulz, Ralf B.; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Arridge, Simon R.

    2008-05-01

    Application of adjoint time domain methods to the inverse problem in 3D fluorescence imaging is a novel approach. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach experimentally on the basis of a time gating technique completely in the time domain by using a small number of time windows. The evolution of the fluorescence energy density function inside a highly scattering cylinder was reconstructed together with optical parameters. Reconstructed energy density was used in localizing two fluorescent tubes. Relatively accurate reconstruction demonstrates the effectiveness and the potential of the proposed technique.

  3. Enhanced speed in fluorescence imaging using beat frequency multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Wang, Yisen; Hamad, Syed; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence imaging using radiofrequency-tagged emission (FIRE) is an emerging technique that enables higher imaging speed (namely, temporal resolution) in fluorescence microscopy compared to conventional fluorescence imaging techniques such as confocal microscopy and wide-field microscopy. It works based on the principle that it uses multiple intensity-modulated fields in an interferometric setup as excitation fields and applies frequency-division multiplexing to fluorescence signals. Unfortunately, despite its high potential, FIRE has limited imaging speed due to two practical limitations: signal bandwidth and signal detection efficiency. The signal bandwidth is limited by that of an acousto-optic deflector (AOD) employed in the setup, which is typically 100-200 MHz for the spectral range of fluorescence excitation (400-600 nm). The signal detection efficiency is limited by poor spatial mode-matching between two interfering fields to produce a modulated excitation field. Here we present a method to overcome these limitations and thus to achieve higher imaging speed than the prior version of FIRE. Our method achieves an increase in signal bandwidth by a factor of two and nearly optimal mode matching, which enables the imaging speed limited by the lifetime of the target fluorophore rather than the imaging system itself. The higher bandwidth and better signal detection efficiency work synergistically because higher bandwidth requires higher signal levels to avoid the contribution of shot noise and amplifier noise to the fluorescence signal. Due to its unprecedentedly high-speed performance, our method has a wide variety of applications in cancer detection, drug discovery, and regenerative medicine.

  4. Fluorescence Imaging and Photodynamic Therapy of Skin Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Arne; Ericsson, Marica; Grapengiesser, Sofia; Gudmundson, Fredrik; Larko, Olle; Mölne, Lena; Stenquist, Bo; Ternesten, Annika; Wennberg, Ann-Marie

    2000-03-01

    Fluorescence Imaging and Photodynamic Therapy of Skin Cancer Photodynamic therapy has become an interesting alternative to conventional therapy of skin cancer as basal cell carcinoma, BCC. Delta-aminolevulinic acid, ALA, is a precursor in the biosynthesis of protoporphyrin IX, Ph IX, which accumulates to a large extent in tumor tissue. We have compared in vivo Ph IX, fluorescence with the extent of BCC on the face, trunk and thigh etc determined by histological mapping in a number of lesions. A non-laser-based set-up (1) was used to record the fluorescence images. The time for application of ALA was varied to optimize the uptake and the contrast in fluorescence between tumor attached and healthy skin. In more than 50 correlation between the fluorescence imaging and histological pattern. The contrast in fluorescence between tumor and healthy skin seems to be highr for older patients. Work is in progress to develope routines for optimization of the contrast. 1. A-M Wennberg et al, Acta Derm Venereol(Stockh) 1999, 79:54-61.

  5. A portable fluorescence microscopic imaging system for cholecystectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jian; Yang, Chaoyu; Gan, Qi; Ma, Rong; Zhang, Zeshu; Chang, Shufang; Shao, Pengfei; Zhang, Shiwu; Liu, Chenhai; Xu, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we proposed a portable fluorescence microscopic imaging system to prevent iatrogenic biliary injuries from occurring during cholecystectomy due to misidentification of the cystic structures. The system consisted of a light source module, a CMOS camera, a Raspberry Pi computer and a 5 inch HDMI LCD. Specifically, the light source module was composed of 690 nm and 850 nm LEDs, allowing the CMOS camera to simultaneously acquire both fluorescence and background images. The system was controlled by Raspberry Pi using Python programming with the OpenCV library under Linux. We chose Indocyanine green(ICG) as a fluorescent contrast agent and then tested fluorescence intensities of the ICG aqueous solution at different concentration levels by our fluorescence microscopic system compared with the commercial Xenogen IVIS system. The spatial resolution of the proposed fluorescence microscopic imaging system was measured by a 1951 USAF resolution target and the dynamic response was evaluated quantitatively with an automatic displacement platform. Finally, we verified the technical feasibility of the proposed system in mouse models of bile duct, performing both correct and incorrect gallbladder resection. Our experiments showed that the proposed system can provide clear visualization of the confluence between the cystic duct and common bile duct or common hepatic duct, suggesting that this is a potential method for guiding cholecystectomy. The proposed portable system only cost a total of $300, potentially promoting its use in resource-limited settings.

  6. Rapid global fitting of large fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy datasets.

    PubMed

    Warren, Sean C; Margineanu, Anca; Alibhai, Dominic; Kelly, Douglas J; Talbot, Clifford; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Katan, Matilda; Dunsby, Chris; French, Paul M W

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is widely applied to obtain quantitative information from fluorescence signals, particularly using Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET) measurements to map, for example, protein-protein interactions. Extracting FRET efficiencies or population fractions typically entails fitting data to complex fluorescence decay models but such experiments are frequently photon constrained, particularly for live cell or in vivo imaging, and this leads to unacceptable errors when analysing data on a pixel-wise basis. Lifetimes and population fractions may, however, be more robustly extracted using global analysis to simultaneously fit the fluorescence decay data of all pixels in an image or dataset to a multi-exponential model under the assumption that the lifetime components are invariant across the image (dataset). This approach is often considered to be prohibitively slow and/or computationally expensive but we present here a computationally efficient global analysis algorithm for the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) or time-gated FLIM data based on variable projection. It makes efficient use of both computer processor and memory resources, requiring less than a minute to analyse time series and multiwell plate datasets with hundreds of FLIM images on standard personal computers. This lifetime analysis takes account of repetitive excitation, including fluorescence photons excited by earlier pulses contributing to the fit, and is able to accommodate time-varying backgrounds and instrument response functions. We demonstrate that this global approach allows us to readily fit time-resolved fluorescence data to complex models including a four-exponential model of a FRET system, for which the FRET efficiencies of the two species of a bi-exponential donor are linked, and polarisation-resolved lifetime data, where a fluorescence intensity and bi-exponential anisotropy decay model is applied to the analysis of live cell

  7. Metal–Dielectric Waveguides for High Efficiency Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liangfu; Zhang, Douguo; Wang, Ruxue; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai; Badugu, Ramachandram; Du, Luping; Yuan, Xiaocong; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that Metal–Dielectric Waveguide structures (MDWs) with high efficiency of fluorescence coupling can be suitable as substrates for fluorescence imaging. This hybrid MDWs consists of a continuous metal film and a dielectric top layer. The optical modes sustaining inside this structure can be excited with a high numerical aperture (N.A) objective, and then focused into a virtual optical probe with high intensity, leading to efficient excitation of fluorophores deposited on top of the MDWs. The emitted fluorophores couple with the optical modes thus enabling the directional emission, which is verified by the back focal plane (BFP) imaging. These unique properties of MDWs have been adopted in a scanning laser confocal optical microscopy, and show the merit of high efficiency fluorescence imaging. MDWs can be easily fabricated by vapor deposition and/or spin coating, the silica surface of the MDWs is suitable for biomolecule tethering, and will offer new opportunities for cell biology and biophysics research. PMID:26525494

  8. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Robert B.; Kimball, Alvin W.; Gesteland, Raymond F.; Ferguson, F. Mark; Dunn, Diane M.; Di Sera, Leonard J.; Cherry, Joshua L.

    1995-01-01

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, then an enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots.

  9. Mitigating fluorescence spectral overlap in wide-field endoscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Vivian; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The number of molecular species suitable for multispectral fluorescence imaging is limited due to the overlap of the emission spectra of indicator fluorophores, e.g., dyes and nanoparticles. To remove fluorophore emission cross-talk in wide-field multispectral fluorescence molecular imaging, we evaluate three different solutions: (1) image stitching, (2) concurrent imaging with cross-talk ratio subtraction algorithm, and (3) frame-sequential imaging. A phantom with fluorophore emission cross-talk is fabricated, and a 1.2-mm ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) is used to test and compare these approaches. Results show that fluorophore emission cross-talk could be successfully avoided or significantly reduced. Near term, the concurrent imaging method of wide-field multispectral fluorescence SFE is viable for early stage cancer detection and localization in vivo. Furthermore, a means to enhance exogenous fluorescence target-to-background ratio by the reduction of tissue autofluorescence background is demonstrated. PMID:23966226

  10. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy for the characterization of atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Jennifer; Sun, Yinghua; Saroufeem, Ramez; Hatami, Nisa; Marcu, Laura

    2009-02-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque composition has been associated with plaque instability and rupture. This study investigates the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) for mapping plaque composition and assessing features of vulnerability. Measurements were conducted in atherosclerotic human aortic samples using an endoscopic FLIM system (spatial resolution of 35 µm temporal resolution 200 ps) developed in our lab which allows mapping in one measurement the composition within a volume of 4 mm diameter x 250 µm depth. Each pixel in the image represents a corresponding fluorescence lifetime value; images are formed through a flexible 0.6 mm side-viewing imaging bundle which allows for further intravascular applications. Based on previously recorded spectra of human atherosclerotic plaque, fluorescence emission was collected through two filters: f1: 377/50 and f2: 460/60 (center wavelength/bandwidth), which together provides the greatest discrimination between intrinsic fluorophores related to plaque vulnerability. We have imaged nine aortas and lifetime images were retrieved using a Laguerre expansion deconvolution technique and correlated with histopathology. Early results demonstrate discrimination using fluorescence lifetime between early, lipid-rich, and collagen-rich lesions which are consistent with previously reported time-resolved atherosclerotic plaque measurements.

  11. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, R.B.; Kimball, A.W.; Gesteland, R.F.; Ferguson, F.M.; Dunn, D.M.; Di Sera, L.J.; Cherry, J.L.

    1995-11-28

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, the enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots. 9 figs.

  12. Snapshot imaging Fraunhofer line discriminator for detection of plant fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta Roy, S.; Kudenov, M. W.

    2015-05-01

    Non-invasive quantification of plant health is traditionally accomplished using reflectance based metrics, such as the normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI). However, measuring plant fluorescence (both active and passive) to determine photochemistry of plants has gained importance. Due to better cost efficiency, lower power requirements, and simpler scanning synchronization, detecting passive fluorescence is preferred over active fluorescence. In this paper, we propose a high speed imaging approach for measuring passive plant fluorescence, within the hydrogen alpha Fraunhofer line at ~656 nm, using a Snapshot Imaging Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (SIFOLD). For the first time, the advantage of snapshot imaging for high throughput Fraunhofer Line Discrimination (FLD) is cultivated by our system, which is based on a multiple-image Fourier transform spectrometer and a spatial heterodyne interferometer (SHI). The SHI is a Sagnac interferometer, which is dispersion compensated using blazed diffraction gratings. We present data and techniques for calibrating the SIFOLD to any particular wavelength. This technique can be applied to quantify plant fluorescence at low cost and reduced complexity of data collection.

  13. Widely accessible method for superresolution fluorescence imaging of living systems

    PubMed Central

    Dedecker, Peter; Mo, Gary C. H.; Dertinger, Thomas; Zhang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Superresolution fluorescence microscopy overcomes the diffraction resolution barrier and allows the molecular intricacies of life to be revealed with greatly enhanced detail. However, many current superresolution techniques still face limitations and their implementation is typically associated with a steep learning curve. Patterned illumination-based superresolution techniques [e.g., stimulated emission depletion (STED), reversible optically-linear fluorescence transitions (RESOLFT), and saturated structured illumination microscopy (SSIM)] require specialized equipment, whereas single-molecule–based approaches [e.g., stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), photo-activation localization microscopy (PALM), and fluorescence-PALM (F-PALM)] involve repetitive single-molecule localization, which requires its own set of expertise and is also temporally demanding. Here we present a superresolution fluorescence imaging method, photochromic stochastic optical fluctuation imaging (pcSOFI). In this method, irradiating a reversibly photoswitching fluorescent protein at an appropriate wavelength produces robust single-molecule intensity fluctuations, from which a superresolution picture can be extracted by a statistical analysis of the fluctuations in each pixel as a function of time, as previously demonstrated in SOFI. This method, which uses off-the-shelf equipment, genetically encodable labels, and simple and rapid data acquisition, is capable of providing two- to threefold-enhanced spatial resolution, significant background rejection, markedly improved contrast, and favorable temporal resolution in living cells. Furthermore, both 3D and multicolor imaging are readily achievable. Because of its ease of use and high performance, we anticipate that pcSOFI will prove an attractive approach for superresolution imaging. PMID:22711840

  14. Tumor-stem cells interactions by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meleshina, Aleksandra V.; Cherkasova, Elena I.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kiseleva, Ekaterina V.; Dashinimaev, Erdem B.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, great deal of interest is investigation the function of the stem cells (SC) in tumors. In this study, we studied «recipient-tumor- fluorescent stem cells » system using the methods of in vivo imaging and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). We used adipose-derived adult stem (ADAS) cells of human lentiviral transfected with the gene of fluorescent protein Turbo FP635. ADAS cells were administrated into nude mice with transplanted tumor HeLa Kyoto (human cervical carcinoma) at different stages of tumor growth (0-8 days) intravenously or into tumor. In vivo imaging was performed on the experimental setup for epi - luminescence bioimaging (IAP RAS, Nizhny Novgorod). The results of the imaging showed localization of fluorophore tagged stem cells in the spleen on day 5-9 after injection. The sensitivity of the technique may be improved by spectral separation autofluorescence and fluorescence of stem cells. We compared the results of in vivo imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM 510 META, Carl Zeiss, Germany). Internal organs of the animals and tumor tissue were investigated. It was shown that with i.v. injection of ADAS, bright fluorescent structures with spectral characteristics corresponding to TurboFP635 protein are locally accumulated in the marrow, lungs and tumors of animals. These findings indicate that ADAS cells integrate in the animal body with transplanted tumor and can be identified by fluorescence bioimaging techniques in vivo and ex vivo.

  15. Whole mount nuclear fluorescent imaging: convenient documentation of embryo morphology.

    PubMed

    Sandell, Lisa L; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Trainor, Paul A

    2012-11-01

    Here, we describe a relatively inexpensive and easy method to produce high quality images that reveal fine topological details of vertebrate embryonic structures. The method relies on nuclear staining of whole mount embryos in combination with confocal microscopy or conventional wide field fluorescent microscopy. In cases where confocal microscopy is used in combination with whole mount nuclear staining, the resulting embryo images can rival the clarity and resolution of images produced by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fluorescent nuclear staining may be performed with a variety of cell permeable nuclear dyes, enabling the technique to be performed with multiple standard microscope/illumination or confocal/laser systems. The method may be used to document morphology of embryos of a variety of organisms, as well as individual organs and tissues. Nuclear stain imaging imposes minimal impact on embryonic specimens, enabling imaged specimens to be utilized for additional assays.

  16. Whole mount nuclear fluorescent imaging: convenient documentation of embryo morphology

    PubMed Central

    Sandell, Lisa L.; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Trainor, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Here we describe a relatively inexpensive and easy method to produce high quality images that reveal fine topological details of vertebrate embryonic structures. The method relies on nuclear staining of whole mount embryos in combination with confocal microscopy or conventional widefield fluorescent microscopy. In cases where confocal microscopy is used in combination with whole mount nuclear staining, the resulting embryo images can rival the clarity and resolution of images of similar specimens produced by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The fluorescent nuclear staining may be performed with a variety of cell permeable nuclear dyes, enabling the technique to be performed with multiple standard microscope/illumination or confocal/laser systems. The method may be used to document morphology of embryos of a variety of organisms, as well as individual organs and tissues. Nuclear stain imaging imposes minimal impact on embryonic specimens, enabling imaged specimens to be utilized for additional assays. PMID:22930523

  17. Coded Aperture Imaging for Fluorescent X-rays-Biomedical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Haboub, Abdel; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2013-06-01

    Employing a coded aperture pattern in front of a charge couple device pixilated detector (CCD) allows for imaging of fluorescent x-rays (6-25KeV) being emitted from samples irradiated with x-rays. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays and allow for a large Numerical Aperture x- ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop the self-supported coded aperture pattern of the Non Two Holes Touching (NTHT) pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the encoded pattern recorded were developed by means of modeling and confirmed by experiments. Samples were irradiated by monochromatic synchrotron x-ray radiation, and fluorescent x-rays from several different test metal samples were imaged through the newly developed coded aperture imaging system. By choice of the exciting energy the different metals were speciated.

  18. Embedding embryos for episcopic fluorescence image capturing (EFIC).

    PubMed

    Mohun, Timothy J; Weninger, Wolfgang J

    2012-06-01

    Episcopic fluorescence image capturing (EFIC) and high-resolution episcopic microscopy (HREM) are related techniques that are used to generate digital volume data and create three-dimensional (3D) images. Both techniques require specimens that are embedded in an appropriate medium, and images are captured from successive sections before removal from the embedded tissue block. EFIC detects autofluorescence emitted from the embedded tissue, whereas HREM requires the tissue to be stained with a fluorescent dye such as eosin. Different procedures are therefore necessary for embedding tissue for EFIC or HREM imaging. This protocol describes the procedure for embedding E11.5 mouse embryos for EFIC imaging. Processing times should be adapted for the size and nature of other specimens.

  19. Coastal Benthic Optical Properties Fluorescence Imaging Laser Line Scan Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    Coral reefs are a prime example of an environment where current acoustic methods can be expected to have great difficulty. Our prototype Fluorescence Imaging Laser Line Scan (FILLS) sensor[1,2,3,4] has demonstrated that fluorescence imagery provides strong signatures which may be used to separate the coral clutter from mines. The image above demonstrates the ease with which a human observer can differentiate the mine like objects (MLOs) from the natural clutter in an environment that is difficult for sonars. Accordingly, this technology is a leading

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy in life sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willem Borst, Jan; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.

    2010-10-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and fluorescence anisotropy imaging microscopy (FAIM) are versatile tools for the investigation of the molecular environment of fluorophores in living cells. Owing to nanometre-scale interactions via Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), FLIM and FAIM are powerful microscopy methods for the detection of conformational changes and protein-protein interactions reflecting the biochemical status of live cells. This review provides an overview of recent advances in photonics techniques, quantitative data analysis methods and applications in the life sciences.

  1. Color-matched esophagus phantom for fluorescent imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenying; Hou, Vivian; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-02-01

    We developed a stable, reproducible three-dimensional optical phantom for the evaluation of a wide-field endoscopic molecular imaging system. This phantom mimicked a human esophagus structure with flexibility to demonstrate body movements. At the same time, realistic visual appearance and diffuse spectral reflectance properties of the tissue were simulated by a color matching methodology. A photostable dye-in-polymer technology was applied to represent biomarker probed "hot-spot" locations. Furthermore, fluorescent target quantification of the phantom was demonstrated using a 1.2mm ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope with concurrent fluorescence-reflectance imaging.

  2. Implantable imaging device for brain functional imaging system using flavoprotein fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunaga, Yoshinori; Yamaura, Hiroshi; Haruta, Makito; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Motoyama, Mayumi; Ohta, Yasumi; Takehara, Hiroaki; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Yoshimura, Yumiko; Ohta, Jun

    2016-03-01

    The autofluorescence of mitochondrial flavoprotein is very useful for functional brain imaging because the fluorescence intensity of flavoprotein changes as per neural activities. In this study, we developed an implantable imaging device for green fluorescence imaging and detected fluorescence changes of flavoprotein associated with visual stimulation using the device. We examined the device performance using anesthetized mice. We set the device on the visual cortex and measured fluorescence changes of flavoprotein in response to visual stimulation. A full-field sinusoidal grating with a vertical orientation was used for applying to activate the visual cortex. We successfully observed visually evoked fluorescence changes in the mouse visual cortex using our implantable device. This result suggests that we can observe the fluorescence changes of flavoprotein associated with visual stimulation in a freely moving mouse by using this technology.

  3. Optofluidic fluorescent imaging cytometry on a cell phone.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Mavandadi, Sam; Coskun, Ahmet F; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-09-01

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical sciences. Cost-effective translation of these technologies to remote and resource-limited environments could create new opportunities especially for telemedicine applications. Toward this direction, here we demonstrate the integration of imaging cytometry and fluorescent microscopy on a cell phone using a compact, lightweight, and cost-effective optofluidic attachment. In this cell-phone-based optofluidic imaging cytometry platform, fluorescently labeled particles or cells of interest are continuously delivered to our imaging volume through a disposable microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing camera unit of the cell phone. The same microfluidic device also acts as a multilayered optofluidic waveguide and efficiently guides our excitation light, which is butt-coupled from the side facets of our microfluidic channel using inexpensive light-emitting diodes. Since the excitation of the sample volume occurs through guided waves that propagate perpendicular to the detection path, our cell-phone camera can record fluorescent movies of the specimens as they are flowing through the microchannel. The digital frames of these fluorescent movies are then rapidly processed to quantify the count and the density of the labeled particles/cells within the target solution of interest. We tested the performance of our cell-phone-based imaging cytometer by measuring the density of white blood cells in human blood samples, which provided a decent match to a commercially available hematology analyzer. We further characterized the imaging quality of the same platform to demonstrate a spatial resolution of ~2 μm. This cell-phone-enabled optofluidic imaging flow cytometer could especially be useful for rapid and sensitive imaging of bodily fluids for conducting various cell counts (e.g., toward monitoring of HIV+ patients) or rare cell analysis as well as for screening of water quality in

  4. Optofluidic Fluorescent Imaging Cytometry on a Cell Phone

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongying; Mavandadi, Sam; Coskun, Ahmet F.; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical sciences. Cost-effective translation of these technologies to remote and resource-limited environments could create new opportunities especially for telemedicine applications. Toward this direction, here we demonstrate the integration of imaging cytometry and fluorescent microscopy on a cell phone using a compact, lightweight, and cost-effective optofluidic attachment. In this cell-phone-based optofluidic imaging cytometry platform, fluorescently labeled particles or cells of interest are continuously delivered to our imaging volume through a disposable microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing camera unit of the cell phone. The same microfluidic device also acts as a multilayered optofluidic waveguide and efficiently guides our excitation light, which is butt-coupled from the side facets of our microfluidic channel using inexpensive light-emitting diodes. Since the excitation of the sample volume occurs through guided waves that propagate perpendicular to the detection path, our cell-phone camera can record fluorescent movies of the specimens as they are flowing through the microchannel. The digital frames of these fluorescent movies are then rapidly processed to quantify the count and the density of the labeled particles/cells within the target solution of interest. We tested the performance of our cell-phone-based imaging cytometer by measuring the density of white blood cells in human blood samples, which provided a decent match to a commercially available hematology analyzer. We further characterized the imaging quality of the same platform to demonstrate a spatial resolution of ~2 μm. This cell-phone-enabled optofluidic imaging flow cytometer could especially be useful for rapid and sensitive imaging of bodily fluids for conducting various cell counts (e.g., toward monitoring of HIV+ patients) or rare cell analysis as well as for screening of water quality in

  5. Discriminating enumeration of subseafloor life using automated fluorescent image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morono, Y.; Terada, T.; Masui, N.; Inagaki, F.

    2008-12-01

    Enumeration of microbial cells in marine subsurface sediments has provided fundamental information for understanding the extent of life and deep-biosphere on Earth. The microbial population has been manually evaluated by direct cell count under the microscopy because the recognition of cell-derived fluorescent signals has been extremely difficult. Here, we improved the conventional method by removing the non- specific fluorescent backgrounds and enumerated the cell population in sediments using a newly developed automated microscopic imaging system. Although SYBR Green I is known to specifically bind to the double strand DNA (Lunau et al., 2005), we still observed some SYBR-stainable particulate matters (SYBR-SPAMs) in the heat-sterilized control sediments (450°C, 6h), which assumed to be silicates or mineralized organic matters. Newly developed acid-wash treatments with hydrofluoric acid (HF) followed by image analysis successfully removed these background objects and yielded artifact-free microscopic images. To obtain statistically meaningful fluorescent images, we constructed a computer-assisted automated cell counting system. Given the comparative data set of cell abundance in acid-washed marine sediments evaluated by SYBR Green I- and acridine orange (AO)-stain with and without the image analysis, our protocol could provide the statistically meaningful absolute numbers of discriminating cell-derived fluorescent signals.

  6. A multiprojection noncontact fluorescence tomography setup for imaging arbitrary geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, H.; Garofalakis, A.; Zacharakis, G.; Economou, E. N.; Mamalaki, C.; Kioussis, D.; Ntziachristos, V.; Ripoll, J.

    2005-04-01

    Optical imaging and tomography in tissues can facilitate the quantitative study of several important chromophores and fluorophores in-vivo. Due to this fact, there has been great interest in developing imaging systems offering quantitative information on the location and concentration of chromophores and fluorescent probes. However, most imaging systems currently used in research make use of fiber technology for delivery and detection, which restricts the size of the photon collecting arrays leading to insufficient spatial sampling and field of view. To enable large data sets and full 360o angular measurements, we developed a novel imaging system that enables 3D imaging of fluorescent signals in bodies of arbitrary shapes in a non-contact geometry in combination with a 3D surface reconstruction algorithm. The system consists of a rotating subject holder and a lens coupled Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera in combination with a fiber coupled laser scanning device. An Argon ion laser is used as the source and different filters are used for the detection of various fluorophores or fluorescing proteins. With this new setup a large measurements dataset can be achieved while the use of inversion models give a high capacity for quantitative 3D reconstruction of fluorochrome distributions as well as high spatial resolution. The system is currently being tested in the observation of the distribution of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) expressing T-lymphocytes in order to study the function of the immune system in a murine model.

  7. Quasi-real-time fluorescence imaging with lifetime dependent contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Pei-Chi; Grundfest, Warren S.; Stafsudd, Oscar M.

    2011-08-01

    Conventional fluorescence lifetime imaging requires complicated algorithms to extract lifetimes of fluorophores and acquisition of multiple data points at progressively longer delay times to characterize tissues. To address diminishing signal-to-noise ratios at these progressively longer time delays, we report a time-resolved fluorescence imaging method, normalized fluorescence yield imaging that does not require the extraction of lifetimes. The concept is to extract the ``contrast'' instead of the lifetime value of the fluorophores by using simple mathematical algorithms. This process converts differences in decay times directly to different intensities. The technique was verified experimentally using a gated iCCD camera and an ultraviolet light-emitting diode light source. It was shown that this method can distinguish between chemical dyes (Fluorescein and Rhodamine-B) and biomedical samples, such as powders of elastin and collagen. Good contrast was obtained between fluorophores that varied by less than 6% in lifetime. Additionally, it was shown that long gate times up to 16 ns achieve good contrast depending upon the samples to be studied. These results support the feasibility of time-resolved fluorescence imaging without lifetime extraction, which has a potential clinical role in noninvasive real-time imaging.

  8. Multilayer fluorescence imaging on a single-pixel detector

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Kaikai; Jiang, Shaowei; Zheng, Guoan

    2016-01-01

    A critical challenge for fluorescence imaging is the loss of high frequency components in the detection path. Such a loss can be related to the limited numerical aperture of the detection optics, aberrations of the lens, and tissue turbidity. In this paper, we report an imaging scheme that integrates multilayer sample modeling, ptychography-inspired recovery procedures, and lensless single-pixel detection to tackle this challenge. In the reported scheme, we directly placed a 3D sample on top of a single-pixel detector. We then used a known mask to generate speckle patterns in 3D and scanned this known mask to different positions for sample illumination. The sample was then modeled as multiple layers and the captured 1D fluorescence signals were used to recover multiple sample images along the z axis. The reported scheme may find applications in 3D fluorescence sectioning, time-resolved and spectrum-resolved imaging. It may also find applications in deep-tissue fluorescence imaging using the memory effect. PMID:27446679

  9. Multilayer fluorescence imaging on a single-pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kaikai; Jiang, Shaowei; Zheng, Guoan

    2016-07-01

    A critical challenge for fluorescence imaging is the loss of high frequency components in the detection path. Such a loss can be related to the limited numerical aperture of the detection optics, aberrations of the lens, and tissue turbidity. In this paper, we report an imaging scheme that integrates multilayer sample modeling, ptychography-inspired recovery procedures, and lensless single-pixel detection to tackle this challenge. In the reported scheme, we directly placed a 3D sample on top of a single-pixel detector. We then used a known mask to generate speckle patterns in 3D and scanned this known mask to different positions for sample illumination. The sample was then modeled as multiple layers and the captured 1D fluorescence signals were used to recover multiple sample images along the z axis. The reported scheme may find applications in 3D fluorescence sectioning, time-resolved and spectrum-resolved imaging. It may also find applications in deep-tissue fluorescence imaging using the memory effect.

  10. FluoSTIC: miniaturized fluorescence image-guided surgery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioux, Sylvain; Coutard, Jean-Guillaume; Berger, Michel; Grateau, Henri; Josserand, Véronique; Keramidas, Michelle; Righini, Christian; Coll, Jean-Luc; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2012-10-01

    Over the last few years, near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging has witnessed rapid growth and is already used in clinical trials for various procedures. However, most clinically compatible imaging systems are optimized for large, open-surgery procedures. Such systems cannot be employed during head and neck oncologic surgeries because the system is not able to image inside deep cavities or allow the surgeon access to certain tumors due to the large footprint of the system. We describe a miniaturized, low-cost, NIR fluorescence system optimized for clinical use during oral oncologic surgeries. The system, termed FluoSTIC, employs a miniature, high-quality, consumer-grade lipstick camera for collecting fluorescence light and a novel custom circular optical fiber array for illumination that combines both white light and NIR excitation. FluoSTIC maintains fluorescence imaging quality similar to that of current large-size imaging systems and is 22 mm in diameter and 200 mm in height and weighs less than 200 g.

  11. Enhanced 3D fluorescence live cell imaging on nanoplasmonic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan Gartia, Manas; Hsiao, Austin; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Chen, Yi; Logan Liu, G.

    2011-09-01

    We have created a randomly distributed nanocone substrate on silicon coated with silver for surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence detection and 3D cell imaging. Optical characterization of the nanocone substrate showed it can support several plasmonic modes (in the 300-800 nm wavelength range) that can be coupled to a fluorophore on the surface of the substrate, which gives rise to the enhanced fluorescence. Spectral analysis suggests that a nanocone substrate can create more excitons and shorter lifetime in the model fluorophore Rhodamine 6G (R6G) due to plasmon resonance energy transfer from the nanocone substrate to the nearby fluorophore. We observed three-dimensional fluorescence enhancement on our substrate shown from the confocal fluorescence imaging of chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells grown on the substrate. The fluorescence intensity from the fluorophores bound on the cell membrane was amplified more than 100-fold as compared to that on a glass substrate. We believe that strong scattering within the nanostructured area coupled with random scattering inside the cell resulted in the observed three-dimensional enhancement in fluorescence with higher photostability on the substrate surface.

  12. Inherently fluorescent polystyrene microspheres for coating, sensing and cellular imaging.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jian-Bo; Xu, Yu-Liang; Liu, Yu; Wang, Yanan; Sui, Yuanhong; Liu, Jian-Guo; Wang, Xiaojuan

    2017-04-01

    Commercially available polystyrene (PS) fluorescent microspheres are widely used in biological field for tracing, in vivo imaging and calibration of flow cytometry, among other applications. However, these particles do suffer from some drawbacks such as the leakage and photobleaching of organic dyes within them. In the present study, inherently fluorescent properties of PS based microspheres have been explored for the first time. Here we find that a simple chloromethylation reaction endows the polystyrene particles with inherent fluorescence without any subsequent conjugation of an external fluorophore. A possible mechanism for fluorescence is elucidated by synthesizing and investigating p-ethylbenzyl chloride, a compound with similar structure. Significantly, no photobleaching or leaking issues were observed owing to the stable structure of the microspheres. Chloromethylated PS (CMPS) microspheres can keep their perpetual blue fluorescence even in dry powder state making them attractive as a potential coating material. Furthermore, the chloromethyl groups on CMPS microspheres make them very convenient for further functionalization. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafted microspheres showed good biocompatibility and negligible cytotoxicity, and could be used to image intracellular Fe(3+) due to the selective fluorescence quenching effect of aqueous Fe(3+) in cytoplasm.

  13. Visualizing gene expression by whole-body fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Moossa, A. R.; Penman, Sheldon; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    Transgene expression in intact animals now can be visualized by noninvasive techniques. However, the instruments and protocols developed so far have been formidable and expensive. We describe here a system for rapidly visualizing transgene expression in major organs of intact live mice that is simple, rapid, and eminently affordable. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is expressed in the cells of brain, liver, pancreas, prostate, and bone, and its fluorescence is encoded in whole-body optical images. For low-magnification images, animals are illuminated atop a fluorescence light box and directly viewed with a thermoelectrically cooled color charge-coupled device camera. Higher-magnification images are made with the camera focused through an epi-fluorescence dissecting microscope. Both nude and normal mice were labeled by directly injecting 8 × 1010 plaque-forming units/ml of adenoviral GFP in 20–100 μl PBS and 10% glycerol into either the brain, liver, pancreas, prostate, or bone marrow. Within 5–8 h after adenoviral GFP injection, the fluorescence of the expressed GFP in brain and liver became visible, and whole-body images were recorded at video rates. The GFP fluorescence continued to increase for at least 12 h and remained detectable in liver for up to 4 months. The system's rapidity of image acquisition makes it capable of real-time recording. It requires neither exogenous contrast agents, radioactive substrates, nor long processing times. The method requires only that the expressed gene or promoter be fused or operatively linked to GFP. A comparatively modest investment allows the study of the therapeutic and diagnostic potential of suitably tagged genes in relatively opaque organisms. PMID:11050247

  14. Towards Whole-Body Fluorescence Imaging in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Sophie K.; Habermehl, Christina; Schmitz, Christoph H.; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Obrig, Hellmuth; Steinbrink, Jens; Mehnert, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic near-infrared fluorescence (DNIF) whole-body imaging of small animals has become a popular tool in experimental biomedical research. In humans, however, the field of view has been limited to body parts, such as rheumatoid hands, diabetic feet or sentinel lymph nodes. Here we present a new whole-body DNIF-system suitable for adult subjects. We explored whether this system (i) allows dynamic whole-body fluorescence imaging and (ii) can detect modulations in skin perfusion. The non-specific fluorescent probe indocyanine green (ICG) was injected intravenously into two subjects, and fluorescence images were obtained at 5 Hz. The in- and out-flow kinetics of ICG have been shown to correlate with tissue perfusion. To validate the system, skin perfusion was modulated by warming and cooling distinct areas on the chest and the abdomen. Movies of fluorescence images show a bolus passage first in the face, then in the chest, abdomen and finally in the periphery (∼10, 15, 20 and 30 seconds, respectively). When skin perfusion is augmented by warming, bolus arrives about 5 seconds earlier than when the skin is cooled and perfusion decreased. Calculating bolus arrival times and spatial fitting of basis time courses extracted from different regions of interest allowed a mapping of local differences in subcutaneous skin perfusion. This experiment is the first to demonstrate the feasibility of whole-body dynamic fluorescence imaging in humans. Since the whole-body approach demonstrates sensitivity to circumscribed alterations in skinperfusion, it may be used to target autonomous changes in polyneuropathy and to screen for peripheral vascular diseases. PMID:24391820

  15. NIR Fluorescent Small Molecules for Intraoperative Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Eric A.; Lee, Stephanie; Choi, JungMun; Henary, Maged; Choi, Hak Soo

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in bioimaging and nanomedicine have permitted the exploitation of molecular optical imaging in image-guided surgery; however, the parameters mediating optimum performance of contrast agents are not yet precisely determined. To develop ideal contrast agents for image-guided surgery, we need to consider the following criteria: 1) excitation and emission wavelengths in the NIR window, 2) optimized optical characteristics for high in vivo performance, 3) overcoming or harnessing biodistribution and clearance, and 4) reducing nonspecific uptake. The design considerations should be focused on optimizing the optical and physicochemical property criteria. Biodistribution and clearance should first be considered because they mediate the fate of a contrast agent in the body such as how long after intravenous injection a contrast agent reaches the peak signal-to-background ratio (SBR) and how long the signal lasts (retention). PMID:25645081

  16. Five-color fluorescent imaging in living tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Yang, Jie; Chu, Jun; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-12-01

    The fluorescent probes based on fluorescent proteins (FP) have been widely used to investigate the molecules of interest in living cells. It is well-known that the molecular events in the living cells are very complicate and all of the cell activities are involved by multi-molecular interaction. With the development of novel fluorescent protein mutants and imaging technology, the molecular signal in living cells could be detected accurately. In this study, with the appropriate targeting signals, the fluorescent proteins were localized to plasma membrane (Rac1-mCerulean), Golgi membrane (EYFP-go), ER membrane (RFP2-er), mitochondrial membrane (RFP1-mt). Cultured Hela cells were cotransfected with these four plasmids, and 36 h later, labeled with Hoechst33258 which located in the nucleus of a living cell. Using a confocal microscopy, with 405 nm, 458 nm and 514 nm laser lines employed respectively, a five-color fluorescent image was obtained in which five subcellular structures were clearly shown in living cells. The technique of multi-color imaging in a single cell provides a powerful tool to simultaneously study the multi-molecular events in living cells.

  17. Structure of mouse spleen investigated by 7-color fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurui, Hiromichi; Niwa, Shinichirou; Hirose, Sachiko; Okumura, Ko; Shirai, Toshikazu

    2001-07-01

    Multi-color fluorescence imaging of tissue samples has been an urgent requirement in current biology. As far as fluorescence signals should be isolated by optical bandpass filter-sets, rareness of the combination of chromophores with little spectral overlap has hampered to satisfy this demand. Additivity of signals in a fluorescence image accepts applying linear unmixing of superposed spectra based on singular value decomposition, hence complete separation of the fluorescence signals fairly overlapping each other. We have developed 7-color fluorescence imaging based on this principle and applied the method to the investigation of mouse spleen. Not only rough structural features in a spleen such as red pulp, marginal zone, and white pulp, but also fine structures of them, periarteriolar lymphocyte sheath (PALS), follicle, and germinal center were clearly pictured simultaneously. The distributions of subsets of dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages (M(phi) ) markers such as BM8, F4/80, MOMA2 and Mac3 around the marginal zone were imagined simultaneously. Their inhomogeneous expressions were clearly demonstrated. These results show the usefulness of the method in the study of the structure that consists of many kinds of cells and in the identification of cells characterized by multiple markers.

  18. Chlorophyll fluorescence analysis and imaging in plant stress and disease

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, P.F.

    1994-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence transients and quenching has evolved rapidly in the last decade. Instrumentation capable of fluorescence detection in bright actinic light has been used in conjunction with gas exchange analysis to build an empirical foundation relating quenching parameters to photosynthetic electron transport, the state of the photoapparatus, and carbon fixation. We have developed several instruments that collect video images of chlorophyll fluorescence. Digitized versions of these images can be manipulated as numerical data arrays, supporting generation of quenching maps that represent the spatial distribution of photosynthetic activity in leaves. We have applied this technology to analysis of fluorescence quenching during application of stress hormones, herbicides, physical stresses including drought and sudden changes in humidity of the atmosphere surrounding leaves, and during stomatal oscillations in high CO{sub 2}. We describe a recently completed portable fluorescence imaging system utilizing LED illumination and a consumer-grade camcorder, that will be used in long-term, non-destructive field studies of plant virus infections.

  19. Fluorescence spectral imaging of dihydroxyacetone on skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Forest, Susan E; Grothaus, Jeff T; Ertel, Keith D; Rader, Charlie; Plante, Janyl

    2003-05-01

    Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) has been proposed as a potential alternative to dansyl chloride for use as a fluorescence marker on skin to assess stratum corneum turnover time in vivo. However, the fluorescence from DHA on skin has not been adequately studied. To address this void, a noninvasive, noncontact spectral imaging system is used to characterize the fluorescence spectrum of DHA on skin in vivo and to determine the optimal wavelengths over which to collect the DHA signal that minimizes the contributions from skin autofluorescence. The DHA-skin fluorescence signal dominates the 580-680 nm region of the visible spectrum when excited with ultraviolet radiation in the 320-400 nm wavelength region (UVA). An explanation of the time-dependent spectral features is proposed in terms of DHA polymerization and binding to skin.

  20. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal based fluorescent cellular imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Palmal, Sharbari; Basiruddin, S K; Karan, Niladri Sekhar; Sarkar, Suresh; Pradhan, Narayan; Jana, Nikhil R

    2013-06-21

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals such as Mn doped ZnS, Mn doped ZnSe and Cu doped InZnS, are considered as new classes of fluorescent biological probes with low toxicity. Although the synthesis in high quality of such nanomaterials is now well established, transforming them into functional fluorescent probes remains a challenge. Here we report a fluorescent cellular imaging probe made of high quality doped semiconductor nanocrystals. We have identified two different coating approaches suitable for transforming the as synthesized hydrophobic doped semiconductor nanocrystals into water-soluble functional nanoparticles. Following these approaches we have synthesized TAT-peptide- and folate-functionalized nanoparticles of 10-80 nm hydrodynamic diameter and used them as a fluorescent cell label. The results shows that doped semiconductor nanocrystals can be an attractive alternative for conventional cadmium based quantum dots with low toxicity.

  1. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal based fluorescent cellular imaging probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Palmal, Sharbari; Basiruddin, Sk; Karan, Niladri Sekhar; Sarkar, Suresh; Pradhan, Narayan; Jana, Nikhil R.

    2013-05-01

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals such as Mn doped ZnS, Mn doped ZnSe and Cu doped InZnS, are considered as new classes of fluorescent biological probes with low toxicity. Although the synthesis in high quality of such nanomaterials is now well established, transforming them into functional fluorescent probes remains a challenge. Here we report a fluorescent cellular imaging probe made of high quality doped semiconductor nanocrystals. We have identified two different coating approaches suitable for transforming the as synthesized hydrophobic doped semiconductor nanocrystals into water-soluble functional nanoparticles. Following these approaches we have synthesized TAT-peptide- and folate-functionalized nanoparticles of 10-80 nm hydrodynamic diameter and used them as a fluorescent cell label. The results shows that doped semiconductor nanocrystals can be an attractive alternative for conventional cadmium based quantum dots with low toxicity.Doped semiconductor nanocrystals such as Mn doped ZnS, Mn doped ZnSe and Cu doped InZnS, are considered as new classes of fluorescent biological probes with low toxicity. Although the synthesis in high quality of such nanomaterials is now well established, transforming them into functional fluorescent probes remains a challenge. Here we report a fluorescent cellular imaging probe made of high quality doped semiconductor nanocrystals. We have identified two different coating approaches suitable for transforming the as synthesized hydrophobic doped semiconductor nanocrystals into water-soluble functional nanoparticles. Following these approaches we have synthesized TAT-peptide- and folate-functionalized nanoparticles of 10-80 nm hydrodynamic diameter and used them as a fluorescent cell label. The results shows that doped semiconductor nanocrystals can be an attractive alternative for conventional cadmium based quantum dots with low toxicity. Electronic supplementary information available: Characterization details of coating and

  2. Real-time absorption reduced surface fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Tunnell, James W.

    2014-09-01

    We introduce a technique that limits absorption effects in fluorescence imaging and does not require extensive imaging processing, thus allowing for video rate imaging. The absorption minimization is achieved using spatial frequency domain imaging at a single high spatial frequency with standard three-phase demodulation. At a spatial frequency f=0.5 mm-1, we demonstrated in both in-vitro phantoms and ex-vivo tissue that the absorption can be significantly reduced. In the real-time implementation, we achieved a video rate of 19 frames/s. This technique has potential in cancer visualization and tumor margin detection.

  3. Real-time absorption reduced surface fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Tunnell, James W

    2014-09-01

    We introduce a technique that limits absorption effects in fluorescence imaging and does not require extensive imaging processing, thus allowing for video rate imaging. The absorption minimization is achieved using spatial frequency domain imaging at a single high spatial frequency with standard three-phase demodulation. At a spatial frequency f ¼ 0.5 mm−1, we demonstrated in both in-vitro phantoms and ex-vivo tissue that the absorption can be significantly reduced. In the real-time implementation, we achieved a video rate of 19 frames∕s. This technique has potential in cancer visualization and tumor margin detection.

  4. Fluorescence imaging of angiogenesis in green fluorescent protein-expressing tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Jin W.; Li, Lingna; Yagi, Shigeo; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2002-05-01

    The development of therapeutics for the control of tumor angiogenesis requires a simple, reliable in vivo assay for tumor-induced vascularization. For this purpose, we have adapted the orthotopic implantation model of angiogenesis by using human and rodent tumors genetically tagged with Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) for grafting into nude mice. Genetically-fluorescent tumors can be readily imaged in vivo. The non-luminous induced capillaries are clearly visible against the bright tumor fluorescence examined either intravitally or by whole-body luminance in real time. Fluorescence shadowing replaces the laborious histological techniques for determining blood vessel density. High-level GFP-expressing tumor cell lines made it possible to acquire the high-resolution real-time fluorescent optical images of angiogenesis in both primary tumors and their metastatic lesions in various human and rodent tumor models by means of a light-based imaging system. Intravital images of angiogenesis onset and development were acquired and quantified from a GFP- expressing orthotopically-growing human prostate tumor over a 19-day period. Whole-body optical imaging visualized vessel density increasing linearly over a 20-week period in orthotopically-growing, GFP-expressing human breast tumor MDA-MB-435. Vessels in an orthotopically-growing GFP- expressing Lewis lung carcinoma tumor were visualized through the chest wall via a reversible skin flap. These clinically-relevant angiogenesis mouse models can be used for real-time in vivo evaluation of agents inhibiting or promoting tumor angiogenesis in physiological micro- environments.

  5. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of human skin and hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, A.; Riemann, I.; Anhut, T.; Kaatz, M.; Elsner, P.; König, K.

    2006-02-01

    Multiphoton imaging has developed into an important technique for in-vivo research in life sciences. With the laser System DermaInspect (JenLab, Germany) laser radiation from a Ti:Sapphire laser is used to generate multiphotonabsorption deep in the human skin in vivo. The resulting autofluorescence radiation arises from endogenous fluorophores such as NAD(P)H, flavines, collagen, elastin, porphyrins und melanin. Second harmonic generation (SHG) was used to detect collagen structures in the dermal layer. Femtosecond laser multiphoton imaging offers the possibility of high resolution optical tomography of human skin as well as fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with picosecond time resolution. In this work a photon detector with ultrashort rise time of less than 30ps was applied to FLIM measurements of human skin and hair with different pigmentation. Fluorescence lifetime images of different human hair types will be discussed.

  6. Fluorescent Pluronic nanodots for in vivo two-photon imaging.

    PubMed

    Maurin, Mathieu; Vurth, Laeticia; Vial, Jean-Claude; Baldeck, Patrice; Marder, Seth R; Van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Stephan, Olivier

    2009-06-10

    We report the synthesis of new nanosized fluorescent probes based on bio-compatible polyethylene-polypropylene glycol (Pluronic) materials. In aqueous solution, mini-emulsification of Pluronic with a high fluorescent di-stryl benzene-modified derivative, exhibiting a two-photon absorption cross section as high as 2500 Goeppert-Mayer units at 800 nm, leads to nanoparticles exhibiting a hydrodynamic radius below 100 nm. We have demonstrated that these new probes with luminescence located in the spectral region of interest for bio-imaging (the yellow part of the visible spectrum) allow deep (500 microm) bio-imaging of the mice brain vasculature. The dose injected during our experiments is ten times lower when compared to the classical commercial rhodamine-B isothicyanate-Dextran system but gives similar results to homogeneous blood plasma staining. The mean fluorescent signal intensity stayed constant during more than 1 h.

  7. Fluorescent Pluronic nanodots for in vivo two-photon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurin, Mathieu; Vurth, Laeticia; Vial, Jean-Claude; Baldeck, Patrice; Marder, Seth R.; Sanden, Boudewijn Van der; Stephan, Olivier

    2009-06-01

    We report the synthesis of new nanosized fluorescent probes based on bio-compatible polyethylene-polypropylene glycol (Pluronic) materials. In aqueous solution, mini-emulsification of Pluronic with a high fluorescent di-stryl benzene-modified derivative, exhibiting a two-photon absorption cross section as high as 2500 Goeppert-Mayer units at 800 nm, leads to nanoparticles exhibiting a hydrodynamic radius below 100 nm. We have demonstrated that these new probes with luminescence located in the spectral region of interest for bio-imaging (the yellow part of the visible spectrum) allow deep (500 µm) bio-imaging of the mice brain vasculature. The dose injected during our experiments is ten times lower when compared to the classical commercial rhodamine-B isothicyanate-Dextran system but gives similar results to homogeneous blood plasma staining. The mean fluorescent signal intensity stayed constant during more than 1 h.

  8. Image analysis for denoising full-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime images.

    PubMed

    Spring, B Q; Clegg, R M

    2009-08-01

    Video-rate fluorescence lifetime-resolved imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a quantitative imaging technique for measuring dynamic processes in biological specimens. FLIM offers valuable information in addition to simple fluorescence intensity imaging; for instance, the fluorescence lifetime is sensitive to the microenvironment of the fluorophore allowing reliable differentiation between concentration differences and dynamic quenching. Homodyne FLIM is a full-field frequency-domain technique for imaging fluorescence lifetimes at every pixel of a fluorescence image simultaneously. If a single modulation frequency is used, video-rate image acquisition is possible. Homodyne FLIM uses a gain-modulated image intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) detector, which unfortunately is a major contribution to the noise of the measurement. Here we introduce image analysis for denoising homodyne FLIM data. The denoising routine is fast, improves the extraction of the fluorescence lifetime value(s) and increases the sensitivity and fluorescence lifetime resolving power of the FLIM instrument. The spatial resolution (especially the high spatial frequencies not related to noise) of the FLIM image is preserved, because the denoising routine does not blur or smooth the image. By eliminating the random noise known to be specific to photon noise and from the intensifier amplification, the fidelity of the spatial resolution is improved. The polar plot projection, a rapid FLIM analysis method, is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the denoising routine with exemplary data from both physical and complex biological samples. We also suggest broader impacts of the image analysis for other fluorescence microscopy techniques (e.g. super-resolution imaging).

  9. Deep UV Native Fluorescence Imaging of Antarctic Cryptoendolithic Communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storrie-Lombardi, M. C.; Douglas, S.; Sun, H.; McDonald, G. D.; Bhartia, R.; Nealson, K. H.; Hug, W. F.

    2001-01-01

    An interdisciplinary team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Life Detection has embarked on a project to provide in situ chemical and morphological characterization of Antarctic cryptoendolithic microbial communities. We present here in situ deep ultraviolet (UV) native fluorescence and environmental scanning electron microscopy images transiting 8.5 mm into a sandstone sample from the Antarctic Dry Valleys. The deep ultraviolet imaging system employs 224.3, 248.6, and 325 nm lasers to elicit differential fluorescence and resonance Raman responses from biomolecules and minerals. The 224.3 and 248.6 nm lasers elicit a fluorescence response from the aromatic amino and nucleic acids. Excitation at 325 nm may elicit activity from a variety of biomolecules, but is more likely to elicit mineral fluorescence. The resultant fluorescence images provide in situ chemical and morphological maps of microorganisms and the associated organic matrix. Visible broadband reflectance images provide orientation against the mineral background. Environmental scanning electron micrographs provided detailed morphological information. The technique has made possible the construction of detailed fluorescent maps extending from the surface of an Antarctic sandstone sample to a depth of 8.5 mm. The images detect no evidence of microbial life in the superficial 0.2 mm crustal layer. The black lichen component between 0.3 and 0.5 mm deep absorbs all wavelengths of both laser and broadband illumination. Filamentous deep ultraviolet native fluorescent activity dominates in the white layer between 0.6 mm and 5.0 mm from the surface. These filamentous forms are fungi that continue into the red (iron-rich) region of the sample extending from 5.0 to 8.5 mm. Using differential image subtraction techniques it is possible to identify fungal nuclei. The ultraviolet response is markedly attenuated in this region, apparently from the absorption of ultraviolet light by iron-rich particles coating

  10. Deep UV Native Fluorescence Imaging of Antarctic Cryptoendolithic Communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storrie-Lombardi, M. C.; Douglas, S.; Sun, H.; McDonald, G. D.; Bhartia, R.; Nealson, K. H.; Hug, W. F.

    2001-01-01

    An interdisciplinary team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Life Detection has embarked on a project to provide in situ chemical and morphological characterization of Antarctic cryptoendolithic microbial communities. We present here in situ deep ultraviolet (UV) native fluorescence and environmental scanning electron microscopy images transiting 8.5 mm into a sandstone sample from the Antarctic Dry Valleys. The deep ultraviolet imaging system employs 224.3, 248.6, and 325 nm lasers to elicit differential fluorescence and resonance Raman responses from biomolecules and minerals. The 224.3 and 248.6 nm lasers elicit a fluorescence response from the aromatic amino and nucleic acids. Excitation at 325 nm may elicit activity from a variety of biomolecules, but is more likely to elicit mineral fluorescence. The resultant fluorescence images provide in situ chemical and morphological maps of microorganisms and the associated organic matrix. Visible broadband reflectance images provide orientation against the mineral background. Environmental scanning electron micrographs provided detailed morphological information. The technique has made possible the construction of detailed fluorescent maps extending from the surface of an Antarctic sandstone sample to a depth of 8.5 mm. The images detect no evidence of microbial life in the superficial 0.2 mm crustal layer. The black lichen component between 0.3 and 0.5 mm deep absorbs all wavelengths of both laser and broadband illumination. Filamentous deep ultraviolet native fluorescent activity dominates in the white layer between 0.6 mm and 5.0 mm from the surface. These filamentous forms are fungi that continue into the red (iron-rich) region of the sample extending from 5.0 to 8.5 mm. Using differential image subtraction techniques it is possible to identify fungal nuclei. The ultraviolet response is markedly attenuated in this region, apparently from the absorption of ultraviolet light by iron-rich particles coating

  11. The Cyan Fluorescent Protein (CFP) Transgenic Mouse as a Model for Imaging Pancreatic Exocrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hop S Tran; Kimura, Hiroaki; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Snyder, Cynthia S; Reynoso, Jose; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Context The use of fluorescent proteins for in vivo imaging has opened many new areas of research. Among the important advances in the field have been the development of transgenic mice expressing various fluorescent proteins. Objective To report whole-body and organ-specific fluorescence imaging to characterize the transgenic cyan fluorescent protein mouse. Design Mice were imaged using two devices. Brightfield images were obtained with the OV100 Small Animal Imaging System (Olympus Corp., Tokyo, Japan). Fluorescence imaging was performed under the cyan fluorescent protein filter using the iBox Small Animal Imaging System (UVP, Upland, CA, USA). Intervention All animals were sacrificed immediately before imaging. They were imaged before and throughout multiple steps of a complete necropsy. Harvested organs were also imaged with both devices. Selected organs were then frozen and processed for histology, fluorescence microscopy, and H&E staining. Fluorescence microscopy was performed with an Olympus IMT-2 inverted fluorescence microscope. Main outcome measure Determination of fluorescence intensity of different organs. Results Surprisingly, we found that there is differential enhancement of fluorescence among organs; most notably, the pancreas stands out from the rest of the gastrointestinal tract, displaying the strongest fluorescence of all organs in the mouse. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the cyan fluorescent protein fluorescence resided in the acinar cells of the pancreas and not the islet cells. Conclusions The cyan fluorescent protein mouse should lead to a deeper understanding of pancreatic function and pathology, including cancer. PMID:19287108

  12. The cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) transgenic mouse as a model for imaging pancreatic exocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Tran Cao, Hop S; Kimura, Hiroaki; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Snyder, Cynthia S; Reynoso, Jose; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2009-03-09

    The use of fluorescent proteins for in vivo imaging has opened many new areas of research. Among the important advances in the field have been the development of transgenic mice expressing various fluorescent proteins. To report whole-body and organ-specific fluorescence imaging to characterize the transgenic cyan fluorescent protein mouse. Mice were imaged using two devices. Brightfield images were obtained with the OV100 Small Animal Imaging System (Olympus Corp., Tokyo, Japan). Fluorescence imaging was performed under the cyan fluorescent protein filter using the iBox Small Animal Imaging System (UVP, Upland, CA, USA). All animals were sacrificed immediately before imaging. They were imaged before and throughout multiple steps of a complete necropsy. Harvested organs were also imaged with both devices. Selected organs were then frozen and processed for histology, fluorescence microscopy, and H&E staining. Fluorescence microscopy was performed with an Olympus IMT-2 inverted fluorescence microscope. Determination of fluorescence intensity of different organs. Surprisingly, we found that there is differential enhancement of fluorescence among organs; most notably, the pancreas stands out from the rest of the gastrointestinal tract, displaying the strongest fluorescence of all organs in the mouse. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the cyan fluorescent protein fluorescence resided in the acinar cells of the pancreas and not the islet cells. The cyan fluorescent protein mouse should lead to a deeper understanding of pancreatic function and pathology, including cancer.

  13. Fluorescent and Lanthanide Labeling for Ligand Screens, Assays, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Jatinder S.; De Silva, Channa R.; Yoo, Byunghee; Lynch, Ronald M.; Pagel, Mark D.; Vagner, Josef; Hruby, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent (or luminescent) and metal contrast agents in high-throughput screens, in vitro assays, and molecular imaging procedures has rapidly expanded in recent years. Here we describe the development and utility of high-affinity ligands for cancer theranostics and other in vitro screening studies. In this context, we also illustrate the syntheses and use of heteromultivalent ligands as targeted imaging agents. PMID:21318902

  14. Discovery in translation: near-infrared fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2012-01-01

    When translating new imaging modalities into the clinic, one can expect new discoveries. Owing to the high photon count rates, near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) offers exquisite sensitivity and high temporal resolution that enable new insights into human disorders. Herein, the physics of NIRF are highlighted and compared to those involved in nuclear medicine techniques. The initial application of investigational NIRF involving characterization of the lymphatics in humans and animal models of human disease yields discoveries not otherwise attainable with conventional imaging.

  15. Two-photon fluorescence and fluorescence imaging of two styryl heterocyclic dyes combined with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chao; Liu, Shu-yao; Zhang, Xian; Liu, Ying-kai; Qiao, Cong-de; Liu, Zhao-e.

    2016-03-01

    Two new styryl heterocyclic two-photon (TP) materials, 4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-imidazo [4,5-f][1,10] phenanthroline-benzene iodated salt (probe-1) and 4,4- [4-(N-methyl)styrene] -benzene iodated salt (probe-2) were successfully synthesized and studied as potential fluorescent probes of DNA detection. The linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of two compounds in different solvents were investigated. The absorption, one- and two-photon fluorescent spectra of the free dye and dye-DNA complex were also examined to evaluate their photophysical properties. The binding constants of dye-DNA were obtained according to Scatchard equation with good values. The results showed that two probes could be used as fluorescent DNA probes by two-photon excitation, and TP fluorescent properties of probe-1 are superior to that of probe-2. The fluorescent method date indicated that the mechanisms of dye-DNA complex interaction may be groove binding for probe-1 and electrostatic interaction for probe-2, respectively. The MTT assay experiments showed two probes are low toxicity. Moreover, the TP fluorescence imaging of DNA detection in living cells at 800 nm indicated that the ability to locate in cell nuclei of probe-1 is better than that of probe-2.

  16. Two-photon fluorescence and fluorescence imaging of two styryl heterocyclic dyes combined with DNA.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Liu, Shu-yao; Zhang, Xian; Liu, Ying-kai; Qiao, Cong-de; Liu, Zhao-e

    2016-03-05

    Two new styryl heterocyclic two-photon (TP) materials, 4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-imidazo [4,5-f][1,10] phenanthroline-benzene iodated salt (probe-1) and 4,4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-benzene iodated salt (probe-2) were successfully synthesized and studied as potential fluorescent probes of DNA detection. The linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of two compounds in different solvents were investigated. The absorption, one- and two-photon fluorescent spectra of the free dye and dye-DNA complex were also examined to evaluate their photophysical properties. The binding constants of dye-DNA were obtained according to Scatchard equation with good values. The results showed that two probes could be used as fluorescent DNA probes by two-photon excitation, and TP fluorescent properties of probe-1 are superior to that of probe-2. The fluorescent method date indicated that the mechanisms of dye-DNA complex interaction may be groove binding for probe-1 and electrostatic interaction for probe-2, respectively. The MTT assay experiments showed two probes are low toxicity. Moreover, the TP fluorescence imaging of DNA detection in living cells at 800 nm indicated that the ability to locate in cell nuclei of probe-1 is better than that of probe-2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Polyester Fabric's Fluorescent Dyeing in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and its Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoqing; Xu, Yanyan; Zheng, Laijiu; Yan, Jun; Zhao, Hongjuan; Zhang, Juan; Sun, Yanfeng

    2017-03-01

    As one of the most important coumarin-like dyes, disperse fluorescent Yellow 82 exhibits exceptionally large two-photon effects. Here, it was firstly introduced into the supercritical CO2 dyeing polyester fabrics in this work. Results of the present work showed that the dyeing parameters such as the dyeing time, pressure and temperature had remarkable influences on the color strength of fabrics. The optimized dyeing condition in supercritical CO2 dyeing has been proposed that the dyeing time was 60 min; the pressure was 25 MPa and the temperature was 120 °C. As a result, acceptable products were obtained with the wash and rub fastness rating at 5 or 4-5. The polyester fabrics dyed with fluorescent dyes can be satisfied for the requirement of manufacturing warning clothing. Importantly, the confocal microscopy imaging technology was successfully introduced into textile fields to observe the distribution and fluorescence intensity of disperse fluorescent Yellow 82 on polyester fabrics. As far as we know, this is the first report about supercritical CO2 dyeing polyester fabrics based on disperse fluorescent dyes. It will be very helpful for the further design of new fluorescent functional dyes suitable for supercritical CO2 dyeing technique.

  18. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system for biomedical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Matthew E.; Wabuyele, Musundi B.; Panjehpour, Masoud; Phan, Mary N.; Overholt, Bergein F.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2006-02-01

    An advanced hyper-spectral imaging (HSI) system has been developed for use in medical diagnostics. One such diagnostic, esophageal cancer is diagnosed currently through biopsy and subsequent pathology. The end goal of this research is to develop an optical-based technique to assist or replace biopsy. In this paper, we demonstrate an instrument that has the capability to optically diagnose cancer in laboratory mice. We have developed a real-time HSI system based on state-of-the-art liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF) technology coupled to an endoscope. This unique HSI technology is being developed to obtain spatially resolved images of the slight differences in luminescent properties of normal versus tumorous tissues. In this report, an in-vivo mouse study is shown. A predictive measure of cancer for the mice studied is developed and shown. It is hoped that the results of this study will lead to advances in the optical diagnosis of esophageal cancer in humans.

  19. A Review of Indocyanine Green Fluorescent Imaging in Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alander, Jarmo T.; Kaartinen, Ilkka; Laakso, Aki; Pätilä, Tommi; Spillmann, Thomas; Tuchin, Valery V.; Venermo, Maarit; Välisuo, Petri

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the recent surgical intraoperational applications of indocyanine green fluorescence imaging methods, the basics of the technology, and instrumentation used. Well over 200 papers describing this technique in clinical setting are reviewed. In addition to the surgical applications, other recent medical applications of ICG are briefly examined. PMID:22577366

  20. Photoacoustic and fluorescent imaging GAF2 photoswitchable chromoproteins (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chee, Ryan K.; Li, Yan; Paproski, Robert J.; Campbell, Robert E.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2017-03-01

    Molecular photoacoustic imaging is hindered by hemoglobin background signal. Photoswitchable chromoproteins can be used to obtain images with significantly reduced background signal. Molecular imaging of multiple biological processes via multiple chromoprotiens is difficult due to overlapping imaging spectra. Using a new rate-of-change imaging methodology, we can obtain molecular images with multiple chromoprotiens with overlapping imaging spectra. We also present a new photoswitchable chromoprotein, GAF2, which is significantly smaller than the BphP1 which has shown promise for photoswitchable photoacoustic imaging [Yao et al., Nat. Meth. 13, 67-73 (2016)]. We use BphP1 and GAF2 with photoacoustic (Vevo LAZR, Fujifilm Visualsonics Inc) and fluorescence (In vivo Xtreme, Bruker) imaging systems to show background-free multiplexed images. We image before, after, and during photoconversion to obtain background-free rate-of-change images and compare our results to difference imaging and spectral demixing. After phantom imaging, we inject mice with different chromoprotein-expressing E. coli bacteria to show multiplexed images of bacterial infections. We show distinguishable differences in the rate-of-change between GAF2 and BphP1. We obtain rate-of-change feasibility images and in vivo images in mice showing the ability to differentiate between GAF2 and BphP1 even though they are spectrally similar. We photoconvert both GAF2 and BphP1 using 550nm and 735nm light. Phantom studies suggest a 10-20dB improvement in the rate-of-change and difference images in comparison to images with background. Multiplexed background-free molecular imaging using chromoproteins could prove to be a promising new imaging methodology especially when combined with spectral demixing.

  1. SIMA: Python software for analysis of dynamic fluorescence imaging data.

    PubMed

    Kaifosh, Patrick; Zaremba, Jeffrey D; Danielson, Nathan B; Losonczy, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is a powerful method for monitoring dynamic signals in the nervous system. However, analysis of dynamic fluorescence imaging data remains burdensome, in part due to the shortage of available software tools. To address this need, we have developed SIMA, an open source Python package that facilitates common analysis tasks related to fluorescence imaging. Functionality of this package includes correction of motion artifacts occurring during in vivo imaging with laser-scanning microscopy, segmentation of imaged fields into regions of interest (ROIs), and extraction of signals from the segmented ROIs. We have also developed a graphical user interface (GUI) for manual editing of the automatically segmented ROIs and automated registration of ROIs across multiple imaging datasets. This software has been designed with flexibility in mind to allow for future extension with different analysis methods and potential integration with other packages. Software, documentation, and source code for the SIMA package and ROI Buddy GUI are freely available at http://www.losonczylab.org/sima/.

  2. Dual-color fluorescence imaging of tumor/host interaction with green and red fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Li, Lingna; Baranov, Eugene; Wang, Jin Wei; Jiang, Ping; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2004-06-01

    Dual-color fluorescence imaging using red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing tumors transplanted in green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing transgenic mice has been shown to be a powerful technology to study tumor-host interaction. Host animals include mice which express the GFP transgene in essentially all cells as well as animals in which the regulatory elements of the stem cell marker nestin drive GFP. The general GFP-transgenic mouse is available in both the normal and athymic nude (nu/nu) background. These models show with great clarity the details of the tumor-stroma interaction especially tumor induced angiogenesis, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, stromal fibroblasts and macrophages. GFP-expressing tumor vasculature could be visualized interacting with the RFP-expressing tumor cells transplanted to the nestin-driven GFP transgenic mice which expressed nestin-GFP in nascent blood vessels was shown as a marker of nascent tumor angiogenesis. Dual-color fluorescence imaging, which visualizes the tumor-host interaction by whole-body imaging and at the cellular level in fresh tissues, dramatically expanding previous studies in fixed and stained preparations (1).

  3. Fluorescence lifetime to image epidermal ionic concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behne, Martin J.; Barry, Nicholas P.; Moll, Ingrid; Gratton, Enrico; Mauro, Theodora M.

    2004-09-01

    Measurements of ionic concentrations in skin have traditionally been performed with an array of methods which either did not reveal detailed localization information, or only provided qualitative, not quantitative information. FLIM combines a number of advantages into a method ideally suited to visualize concentrations of ions such as H+ in intact, unperturbed epidermis and stratum corneum (SC). Fluorescence lifetime is dye concentration-independent, the method requires only low light intensities and is therefore not prone to photobleaching or phototoxic artifacts, and because multiphoton lasers of IR wavelength are used, light penetrates deep into intact tissue. The standard method to measure SC pH is the flat pH electrode, which provides reliable information only about surface pH changes, without further vertical or subcellular spatial resolution; i.e., specific microdomains such as the corneocyte interstices are not resolved, and the deeper SC is inaccessible without resorting to inherently disruptive stripping methods. Furthermore, the concept of a gradient of pH through the SC stems from such stripping experiments, but other confirmation for this concept is lacking. Our investigations into the SC pH distribution so far have revealed the crucial role of the Sodium/Hydrogen Antiporter NHE1 in generation of SC acidity, the colocalization of enzymatic lipid processing activity in the SC with acidic domains of the SC, and the timing and localization of emerging acidity in the SC of newborns. Together, these results have led to an improved understanding of the SC pH, its distribution, origin, and regulation. Future uses for this method include measurements of other ions important for epidermal processes, such as Ca2+, and a quantitative approach to topical drug penetration.

  4. Miniaturized side-viewing imaging probe for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM): validation with fluorescence dyes, tissue structural proteins and tissue specimens

    PubMed Central

    Elson, D S; Jo, J A

    2007-01-01

    We report a side viewing fibre-based endoscope that is compatible with intravascular imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). The instrument has been validated through testing with fluorescent dyes and collagen and elastin powders using the Laguerre expansion deconvolution technique to calculate the fluorescence lifetimes. The instrument has also been tested on freshly excised unstained animal vascular tissues. PMID:19503759

  5. Multiparameter deformation theory for quantum confined systems

    SciTech Connect

    Aleixo, A. N. F.; Balantekin, A. B.

    2009-11-15

    We introduce a generalized multiparameter deformation theory applicable to all supersymmetric and shape-invariant systems. Taking particular choices for the deformation factors used in the construction of the deformed ladder operators, we show that we can generalize the one-parameter quantum-deformed harmonic oscillator models and build alternative multiparameter deformed models that are also shape invariant like the primary undeformed system.

  6. Genetically encoded sensors and fluorescence microscopy for anticancer research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagaynova, Elena V.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Sergeeva, Tatiana F.; Klementieva, Natalia V.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Gavrina, Alena I.; Zlobovskay, Olga A.; Furman, Olga E.; Dudenkova, Varvara V.; Perelman, Gregory S.; Lukina, Maria M.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.

    2017-02-01

    Early response of cancer cells to chemical compounds and chemotherapeutic drugs were studied using novel fluorescence tools and microscopy techniques. We applied confocal microscopy, two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and super-resolution localization-based microscopy to assess structural and functional changes in cancer cells in vitro. The dynamics of energy metabolism, intracellular pH, caspase-3 activation during staurosporine-induced apoptosis as well as actin cytoskeleton rearrangements under chemotherapy were evaluated. We have showed that new genetically encoded sensors and advanced fluorescence microscopy methods provide an efficient way for multiparameter analysis of cell activities

  7. Fluorescent rhenium-naphthalimide conjugates as cellular imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Langdon-Jones, Emily E; Symonds, Nadine O; Yates, Sara E; Hayes, Anthony J; Lloyd, David; Williams, Rebecca; Coles, Simon J; Horton, Peter N; Pope, Simon J A

    2014-04-07

    A range of biologically compatible, fluorescent rhenium-naphthalimide conjugates, based upon the rhenium fac-tricarbonyl core, has been synthesized. The fluorescent ligands are based upon a N-functionalized, 4-amino-derived 1,8-naphthalimide core and incorporate a dipicolyl amine binding unit to chelate Re(I); the structural variations accord to the nature of the alkylated imide with ethyl ester glycine (L(1)), 3-propanol (L(2)), diethylene glycol (L(3)), and benzyl alcohol (L(4)) variants. The species are fluorescent in the visible region between 505 and 537 nm through a naphthalimide-localized intramolecular charge transfer, with corresponding fluorescent lifetimes of up to 9.8 ns. The ligands and complexes were investigated for their potential as imaging agents for human osteoarthritic cells and protistan fish parasite Spironucleus vortens using confocal fluorescence microscopy. The results show that the specific nature of the naphthalimide structure serves to control the uptake and intracellular localization of these imaging agents. Significant differences were noted between the free ligands and complexes, with the Re(I) complex of L(2) showing hydrogenosomal localization in S. vortens.

  8. Novel fluorescence molecular imaging of chemotherapy-induced intestinal apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Galit; Shirvan, Anat; Grimberg, Hagit; Reshef, Ayelet; Yogev-Falach, Merav; Cohen, Avi; Ziv, Ilan

    2009-09-01

    Chemotherapy-induced enteropathy (CIE) is one of the most serious complications of anticancer therapy, and tools for its early detection and monitoring are highly needed. We report on a novel fluorescence method for detection of CIE, based on molecular imaging of the related apoptotic process. The method comprises systemic intravenous administration of the ApoSense fluorescent biomarker (N,N'-didansyl-L-cystine DDC) in vivo and subsequent fluorescence imaging of the intestinal mucosa. In the reported proof-of-concept studies, mice were treated with either taxol+cyclophosphamide or doxil. DDC was administered in vivo at various time points after drug administration, and tracer uptake by ileum tissue was subsequently evaluated by ex vivo fluorescent microscopy. Chemotherapy caused marked and selective uptake of DDC in ileal epithelial cells, in correlation with other hallmarks of apoptosis (i.e., DNA fragmentation and Annexin-V binding). Induction of DDC uptake occurred early after chemotherapy, and its temporal profile was parallel to that of the apoptotic process, as assessed histologically. DDC may therefore serve as a useful tool for detection of CIE. Future potential integration of this method with fluorescent endoscopic techniques, or development of radio-labeled derivatives of DDC for emission tomography, may advance early diagnosis and monitoring of this severe adverse effect of chemotherapy.

  9. Linear and non-linear fluorescence imaging of neuronal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Jonathan A. N.

    Optical imaging of neuronal activity offers new possibilities for understanding brain physiology. The predominant methods in neuroscience for measuring electrical activity require electrodes inserted into the tissue. Such methods, however, provide limited spatial information and are invasive. Optical methods are less physically invasive and offer the possibility for simultaneously imaging the activity of many neurons. In this thesis one- and two-photon fluorescence microscopy techniques were applied to several in vivo and in vitro mammalian preparations. Using one-photon absorption fluorescence microscopy and gradient index (GRIN) lens optics, cortical electrical activity in response to electric stimulation was resolved in three-dimensions at high-speed in the primary somatosensory cortex of the mouse in vivo using voltage-sensitive dyes. Imaging at depths up to 150 mum below the cortex surface, it was possible to resolve depth-dependent patterns of neuronal activity in response to cortical and thalamic electric stimulation. The patterns of activity were consistent with known cortical cellular architecture. In a qualitatively different set of experiments, one-photon fluorescence microscopy via voltage-sensitive dyes was successfully employed to image an in vitro preparation of the perfused rat brainstem during the process of respiratory rhythmogenesis. Imaging results yielded insights into the spatial organization of the central respiratory rhythm generation region in the ventrolateral medulla. A multifocal two-photon scanning microscope was constructed, and design and operation principles are described. Utilizing the novel device, anatomical and functional two-photon imaging via potentiometric dyes and calcium dyes is described, and the results of in vivo versus in vitro imaging are compared. Anatomical imaging results used either functional probe background fluorescence or green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression. Spectroscopic experiments measuring the two

  10. Glycoproteomic probes for fluorescent imaging of fucosylated glycans in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sawa, Masaaki; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Itoh, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Hanson, Sarah R.; Vogt, Peter K.; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2006-01-01

    Glycomics is emerging as a new field for the biology of complex glycoproteins and glycoconjugates. The lack of versatile glycan-labeling methods has presented a major obstacle to visualizing at the cellular level and studying glycoconjugates. To address this issue, we developed a fluorescent labeling technique based on the Cu(I)-catalyzed [3 + 2] cycloaddition, or click chemistry, which allows rapid, versatile, and specific covalent labeling of cellular glycans bearing azide groups. The method entails generating a fluorescent probe from a nonfluorescent precursor, 4-ethynyl-N-ethyl-1,8-naphthalimide, by clicking the fluorescent trigger, the alkyne at the 4 position, with an azido-modified sugar. Using this click-activated fluorescent probe, we demonstrate incorporation of an azido-containing fucose analog into glycoproteins via the fucose salvage pathway. Distinct fluorescent signals were observed by flow cytometry when cells treated with 6-azidofucose were labeled with the click-activated fluorogenic probe or biotinylated alkyne. The intracellular localization of fucosylated glycoconjugates was visualized by using fluorescence microscopy. This technique will allow dynamic imaging of cellular fucosylation and facilitate studies of fucosylated glycoproteins and glycolipids. PMID:16895981

  11. Fluorescence imaging of cholesterol and temperature dependent cell membrane dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Petra; Wagner, Michael; Strauss, Wolfgang S. L.; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2007-07-01

    Cholesterol content is an important factor for membrane dynamics of living cells. With well defined protocols of depletion and enrichment the impact of cholesterol on membrane dynamics was examined by fluorescence microscopy. In addition, the intracellular cholesterol content was determined with biochemical methods. Changes of cholesterol amounts in cell membranes have previously been related to specific disease and may have some influence on the uptake of pharmaceutical agents. A combination of conventional and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy was applied to the fluorescence marker laurdan, a polarity-sensitive probe, whose electronic excitation energy is different in polar and non-polar environment. Once incorporated into cell membranes, the fluorescence of laurdan shows a spectral shift towards longer wavelength when its molecules get into contact with adjacent water molecules, e.g. when a phase transition from the tightly packed gel phase to the liquid crystalline phase of membrane lipids occurs. The generalized polarization (GP, characterizing this spectral shift) as well as the fluorescence lifetime (τ) of laurdan revealed to be appropriate measures for membrane stiffness and fluidity. GP generally decreased with increasing temperature and was always higher for the plasma membrane than for intracellular membranes. Enrichment of cholesterol caused a pronounced increase, whereas depletion of cholesterol caused a decrease of GP. In addition, pronounced changes of the fluorescence lifetime pattern occurred in the subnanosecond range. GP, and τ were determined as integral values of single cells or small cell collectives and were also displayed as microscopic images.

  12. Application of the stretched exponential function to fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, K C; Siegel, J; Webb, S E; Lévêque-Fort, S; Cole, M J; Jones, R; Dowling, K; Lever, M J; French, P M

    2001-09-01

    Conventional analyses of fluorescence lifetime measurements resolve the fluorescence decay profile in terms of discrete exponential components with distinct lifetimes. In complex, heterogeneous biological samples such as tissue, multi-exponential decay functions can appear to provide a better fit to fluorescence decay data than the assumption of a mono-exponential decay, but the assumption of multiple discrete components is essentially arbitrary and is often erroneous. Moreover, interactions, both between fluorophores and with their environment, can result in complex fluorescence decay profiles that represent a continuous distribution of lifetimes. Such continuous distributions have been reported for tryptophan, which is one of the main fluorophores in tissue. This situation is better represented by the stretched-exponential function (StrEF). In this work, we have applied, for the first time to our knowledge, the StrEF to time-domain whole-field fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), yielding both excellent tissue contrast and goodness of fit using data from rat tissue. We note that for many biological samples for which there is no a priori knowledge of multiple discrete exponential fluorescence decay profiles, the StrEF is likely to provide a truer representation of the underlying fluorescence dynamics. Furthermore, fitting to a StrEF significantly decreases the required processing time, compared with a multi-exponential component fit and typically provides improved contrast and signal/noise in the resulting FLIM images. In addition, the stretched-exponential decay model can provide a direct measure of the heterogeneity of the sample, and the resulting heterogeneity map can reveal subtle tissue differences that other models fail to show.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime images of green fluorescent protein in HeLa cells during TNF-alpha induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ito, Toshiyuki; Oshita, Shugo; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Sun, Fan; Kinjo, Masataka; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2009-06-01

    Fluorescence lifetime images of HeLa cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) have been measured as apoptosis is induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in combination with cycloheximide. The fluorescence lifetime of EGFP is found to decrease after the induction of apoptosis, indicating that the change in environment occurs around the chromophore of EGFP with the apoptosis process. The fluorescence lifetime imaging technique can be used to perform in vivo observation of cell death processes. Fluorescence lifetime measurements are useful to examine the induction of the apoptosis process, even when a morphological change of each cell cannot be observed because of a low spatial resolution.

  14. Fluorescent probes for super-resolution imaging in living cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, Marta; Ting, Alice Y

    2008-12-01

    In 1873, Ernst Abbe discovered that features closer than approximately 200 nm cannot be resolved by lens-based light microscopy. In recent years, however, several new far-field super-resolution imaging techniques have broken this diffraction limit, producing, for example, video-rate movies of synaptic vesicles in living neurons with 62 nm spatial resolution. Current research is focused on further improving spatial resolution in an effort to reach the goal of video-rate imaging of live cells with molecular (1-5 nm) resolution. Here, we describe the contributions of fluorescent probes to far-field super-resolution imaging, focusing on fluorescent proteins and organic small-molecule fluorophores. We describe the features of existing super-resolution fluorophores and highlight areas of importance for future research and development.

  15. Image-guided cancer surgery using near-infrared fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Hutteman, Merlijn; van der Vorst, Joost R.; van de Velde, C.J.H.; Frangioni, John V.

    2013-01-01

    Paradigm shifts in surgery arise when surgeons are empowered to perform surgery faster, better, and/or less expensively. Optical imaging that exploits invisible near-infrared fluorescent light has the potential to improve cancer surgery outcomes while minimizing anesthesia time and lowering healthcare costs. Because of this, the last few years have witnessed an explosion of proof-of-concept clinical trials in the field. In this review, we introduce the concept of near-infrared fluorescence imaging for cancer surgery, review the clinical trial literature to date, outline the key issues pertaining to imaging system and contrast agent optimization, discuss limitations and leverage, and provide a framework for making the technology available for the routine care of cancer patients in the near future. PMID:23881033

  16. Trends in Fluorescence Image-guided Surgery for Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jonathan T.C.; Meza, Daphne; Sanai, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that a more extensive surgical resection is associated with an improved life expectancy for both low-grade and high-grade glioma patients. However, radiographically complete resections are not often achieved in many cases due to the lack of sensitivity and specificity of current neurosurgical guidance techniques at the margins of diffuse infiltrative gliomas. Intraoperative fluorescence imaging offers the potential to improve the extent of resection and to investigate the possible benefits of resecting beyond the radiographic margins. Here, we provide a review of wide-field and high-resolution fluorescence-imaging strategies that are being developed for neurosurgical guidance, with a focus on emerging imaging technologies and clinically viable contrast agents. The strengths and weaknesses of these approaches will be discussed, as well as issues that are being addressed to translate these technologies into the standard of care. PMID:24618801

  17. Photon statistics, film preparation and characterization in fluorescent microthermal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Barton, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    Fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI) involves coating a sample surface with a thin inorganic-based film that, upon exposure to uv light, emits temperature-dependent fluorescence. FMI offers the ability to create thermal maps of integrated circuits with a thermal resolution theoretically limited to 1 m{degree}C and a spatial resolution diffraction-limited to 0.3 {mu}m. Even though FMI has been in use for more than a decade, many factors that can affect the thermal image quality have not been studied well. This paper presents recent results showing the limitations from photon shot noise and the improvement in signal-to-noise ratio from signal averaging. Three important factors in film preparation and characterization are presented that have a significant impact on thermal quality and sensitivity of FMI: uv bleaching, film dilution, and film curing. It is shown how proper film preparation and data collection method can dramatically improve the quality of FMI thermal images.

  18. Portable Fluorescence Imaging System for Hypersonic Flow Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, J. A.; Alderfer, D. W.; Jones, S. B.; Danehy, P. M.

    2003-01-01

    A portable fluorescence imaging system has been developed for use in NASA Langley s hypersonic wind tunnels. The system has been applied to a small-scale free jet flow. Two-dimensional images were taken of the flow out of a nozzle into a low-pressure test section using the portable planar laser-induced fluorescence system. Images were taken from the center of the jet at various test section pressures, showing the formation of a barrel shock at low pressures, transitioning to a turbulent jet at high pressures. A spanwise scan through the jet at constant pressure reveals the three-dimensional structure of the flow. Future capabilities of the system for making measurements in large-scale hypersonic wind tunnel facilities are discussed.

  19. Near infrared fluorescence imaging of rabbit thyroid and parathyroid glands.

    PubMed

    Antakia, Ramez; Gayet, Pascal; Guillermet, Stephanie; Stephenson, Tim J; Brown, Nicola J; Harrison, Barney J; Balasubramanian, Saba P

    2014-12-01

    Near infrared fluorescence imaging using intravenous methylene blue (MB) is a novel technique that has potential to aid the parathyroid gland (PG) localization during thyroid and parathyroid surgery. The aim of this study was to examine MB fluorescence in the rabbit neck and determine the influence of MB dose and time following administration on fluorescence from thyroid and PGs. Thyroid and external PGs were exposed in six New Zealand white rabbits under anesthesia. Varying doses of MB (0.025-3 mg/kg) were injected through the marginal ear vein. Near infrared fluorescence from exposed tissues was recorded at different time intervals (10-74 min) using Fluobeam 700. Specimens of identified glands were then resected for histologic assessment. Histology confirmed accurate identification of all excised thyroid and PGs; these were the only neck structures to demonstrate significant fluorescence. The parathyroid demonstrated lower fluorescence intensities and reduced washout times at all MB doses compared with the thyroid gland. A dose of 0.1 mg/kg MB was adequate to identify fluorescence; this also delineated the blood supply of the external PGs. The study demonstrates that near infrared fluorescence with intravenous MB helps differentiate between thyroid and PGs in the rabbit. This has potential to improve outcomes in thyroid and parathyroid surgery by increasing the accuracy of parathyroid identification; however, the findings require replication in human surgery. The use of low doses of MB may also avoid the side effects associated with currently used doses in humans (3-7 mg/kg). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A new fluorescent imaging of renal inflammation with RCP.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kentaro; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2010-12-20

    The objective of this study is to design a fluorescent imaging agent with R-Gel, one of the recombinant polymers (RCP), for renal inflammation. The R-Gel based on human type I collagen has multiple Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motifs which are ligands for some types of integrin receptors on the cell surface. After intravenous administration of R-Gel labeled by Cy7 of a fluorescent dye to three animal models of nephritis mousse, interstitial nephritis (by using UUO model mice), glomerulonephritis (HIGA mice), and ischemia-reperfusion injured kidney (I/R mice), the extent of fluorescent imaging at the renal inflammation was assessed. The Cy7-labeled R-Gel was accumulated in the inflammation site to a significantly greater extent than in the normal one at 24h after administration. The renal pattern of fluorescent imaging was similar to that of administration anti-Mac1 antibody. Taken together, it is conceivable that the R-Gel was targeted to macrophages infiltrated into the inflammation site of kidney. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Registering plant dysfunction in artificial biosystems through fluorescence imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, Alexandra; Krumov, Alexandar; Vassilev, Vesselin

    Humanity ambitions in space exploration and long-term men-operated space missions evoke an increasing interest to artificial ecosystem researches. Advanced studies of plant biosystems provoke development of new innovative technologies for plant cultivation in man-made environment. Closed ecosystems of different types and structure are now used for space horticulture, cultivation of genetically modified species, bio-products for pharmacies and industry etc. New technologies are required to monitor and control basic parameters of future bioregenerative life support system, especially of plants photosynthetic activity as the most fundamental biological process. Authors propose a conception for a non-invasive control of plant physiological status in closed biosystem through spatial registration of chlorophyll fluorescence. This approach allows an early detection of stress impact on plants, reveal the dynamic and direction of the negative influence and the level of plant stress. Technical requirements for obtaining plant fluorescence images are examined in close relation with plant illumination conditions. Problems related with optimised plant illumination are discussed. Examples of fluorescence images of healthy and stressed plants demonstrate the sensibility and rapidity of signal changes caused by plant dysfunction. Proposed conception could be used for developing new technical solutions in autocontrolled bio-support systems, based on real time analysis of fluorescence images.

  2. Onychomycosis diagnosis using fluorescence and infrared imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Ana Paula; Fortunato, Thereza Cury; Stringasci, Mirian D.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Inada, Natalia M.

    2015-06-01

    Onychomycosis is a common disease of the nail plate, constituting approximately half of all cases of nail infection. Onychomycosis diagnosis is challenging because it is hard to distinguish from other diseases of the nail lamina such as psoriasis, lichen ruber or eczematous nails. The existing methods of diagnostics so far consist of clinical and laboratory analysis, such as: Direct Mycological examination and culture, PCR and histopathology with PAS staining. However, they all share certain disadvantages in terms of sensitivity and specificity, time delay, or cost. This study aimed to evaluate the use of infrared and fluorescence imaging as new non-invasive diagnostic tools in patients with suspected onychomycosis, and compare them with established techniques. For fluorescence analysis, a Clinical Evince (MM Optics®) was used, which consists of an optical assembly with UV LED light source wavelength 400 nm +/- 10 nm and the maximum light intensity: 40 mW/cm2 +/- 20%. For infrared analysis, a Fluke® Camera FKL model Ti400 was used. Patients with onychomycosis and control group were analyzed for comparison. The fluorescence images were processed using MATLAB® routines, and infrared images were analyzed using the SmartView® 3.6 software analysis provided by the company Fluke®. The results demonstrated that both infrared and fluorescence could be complementary to diagnose different types of onychomycosis lesions. The simplicity of operation, quick response and non-invasive assessment of the nail patients in real time, are important factors to be consider for an implementation.

  3. Infrared imaging of LED lighting tubes and fluorescent tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siikanen, Sami; Kivi, Sini; Kauppinen, Timo; Juuti, Mikko

    2011-05-01

    The low energy efficiency of conventional light sources is mainly caused by generation of waste heat. We used infrared (IR) imaging in order to monitor the heating of both LED tube luminaires and ordinary T8 fluorescent tubes. The IR images showed clearly how the surface temperatures of the fluorescent tube ends quickly rose up to about +50...+70°C, whereas the highest surface temperatures seen on the LED tubes were only about +30...+40°C. The IR images demonstrated how the heat produced by the individual LED chips can be efficiently guided to the supporting structure in order to keep the LED emitters cool and hence maintain efficient operation. The consumed electrical power and produced illuminance were also recorded during 24 hour measurements. In order to assess the total luminous efficacy of the luminaires, separate luminous flux measurements were made in a large integrating sphere. The currently available LED tubes showed efficacies of up to 88 lm/W, whereas a standard "cool white" T8 fluorescent tube produced ca. 75 lm/W. Both lamp types gave ca. 110 - 130 lx right below the ceiling-mounted luminaire, but the LED tubes consume only 40 - 55% of the electric power compared to fluorescent tubes.

  4. Fluorescent supramolecular micelles for imaging-guided cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mengmeng; Yin, Wenyan; Dong, Xinghua; Yang, Wantai; Zhao, Yuliang; Yin, Meizhen

    2016-02-01

    A novel smart fluorescent drug delivery system composed of a perylene diimide (PDI) core and block copolymer poly(d,l-lactide)-b-poly(ethyl ethylene phosphate) is developed and named as PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8. The biodegradable PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8 is a unimolecular micelle and can self-assemble into supramolecular micelles, called as fluorescent supramolecular micelles (FSMs), in aqueous media. An insoluble drug camptothecin (CPT) can be effectively loaded into the FSMs and exhibits pH-responsive release. Moreover, the FSMs with good biocompatibility can also be employed as a remarkable fluorescent probe for cell labelling because the maximum emission of PDI is beneficial for bio-imaging. The flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrate that the micelles are easily endocytosed by cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor growth-inhibitory studies reveal a better therapeutic effect of FSMs after CPT encapsulation when compared with the free CPT drug. The multifunctional FSM nanomedicine platform as a nanovehicle has great potential for fluorescence imaging-guided cancer therapy.A novel smart fluorescent drug delivery system composed of a perylene diimide (PDI) core and block copolymer poly(d,l-lactide)-b-poly(ethyl ethylene phosphate) is developed and named as PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8. The biodegradable PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8 is a unimolecular micelle and can self-assemble into supramolecular micelles, called as fluorescent supramolecular micelles (FSMs), in aqueous media. An insoluble drug camptothecin (CPT) can be effectively loaded into the FSMs and exhibits pH-responsive release. Moreover, the FSMs with good biocompatibility can also be employed as a remarkable fluorescent probe for cell labelling because the maximum emission of PDI is beneficial for bio-imaging. The flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrate that the micelles are easily endocytosed by cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor growth

  5. Mueller matrix signature in advanced fluorescence microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, Nirmal; Qiu, Jianjun; Kao, Fu-Jen; Diaspro, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    We have demonstrated the measurement and characterization of the polarization properties of a fluorescence signal using four-channel photon counting based Stokes-Mueller polarization microscopy. Thus, Lu-Chipman decomposition was applied to extract the critical polarization properties such as depolarization, linear retardance and the optical rotation of collagen type I fiber. We observed the spatial distribution of anisotropic and helical molecules of collagen from the reconstructed 2D Mueller images based on the fluorescence signal in a pixel-by-pixel manner.

  6. Intravascular near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Thukkani, Arun K; Jaffer, Farouc A

    2013-01-01

    Novel imaging modalities are required to better identify vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques before their dire consequences of myocardial infarction, sudden death, and stroke. Moving beyond traditional diagnostic methods, the field of molecular imaging offers an innovative approach to report upon critical in vivo biological features of high-risk plaques. Molecular imaging employs engineered, targeted imaging agents in conjunction with sophisticated, high-resolution detection systems. While various modalities have been investigated for this purpose, intravascular near infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRF) strategies are uniquely poised to provide high-resolution readouts of human coronary artery plaques. To date, preclinical animal studies have demonstrated feasibility of both standalone NIRF intravascular imaging as well as dual-modality approaches detecting inflammation and fibrin deposition in coronary-sized arteries. This translatable catheter-based approach is positioned to advance the identification of biologically vulnerable coronary plaques and coronary stents at risk of thrombosis. PMID:23638334

  7. The study of blue LED to induce fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging for oral carcinoma detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Longjiang; Hu, Yuanting

    2009-07-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging diagnosis of malignant lesions provides us with a new method to diagnose diseases in precancerous stage. Early diagnosis of disease has significant importance in cancer treatment, because most cancers can be cured well in precancerous, especially when the diffusion of cancer is limited in a restricted region. In this study, Golden hamster models were applied to 5% 9, 10 dimethyl-1, 2-benzanthracene (DMBA) to induce hamster buccal cheek pouch carcinoma three times a week. Rose Bengal, which has been used in clinican for years and avoids visible side-effect to human was chosen as photosensitizer. 405 nm blue LED was used to induce the fluorescence of photosensitizer. After topical application of photosensitizer, characteristic red emission fluorescence peak was observed around 600nm. Similar, normal oral cavity has special luminescence around 480nm. Fluorescence spectroscopy technology is based on analysing emission peaks of photosensitizer in the areas of oral carcinoma, moreover, red-to-green (IR/IG) intensity ratio is also applied as a diagnostic algorithm. A CCD which is connected with a computer is used to take pictures at carcinoma areas through different filters. Fluorescence images from normal hamster buccal cheek pouch are compared with those from carcinogen-induced models of carcinoma, and morphological differences between normal and lesion tissue can be distinguished. The pictures are analyzed by Matlab and shown on the screen of computer. This paper demonstrates that Rose Bengal could be used as photosensitizer to detect oral carcinoma, and blue LED as excitation source could not only have a good effect to diagnose oral carcinoma, but also decrease cost greatly.

  8. A Pico Projector Source for Confocal Fluorescence and Ophthalmic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Muller, Matthew S

    2012-09-02

    A Pico digital light projector has been implemented as an integrated illumination source and spatial light modulator for confocal imaging. The target is illuminated with a series of rapidly projected lines or points to simulate scanning. Light returning from the target is imaged onto a 2D rolling shutter CMOS sensor. By controlling the spatio-temporal relationship between the rolling shutter and illumination pattern, light returning from the target is spatially filtered. Confocal retinal, fluorescence, and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography implementations of this novel imaging technique are presented.

  9. A Pico Projector Source for Confocal Fluorescence and Ophthalmic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Matthew S.

    2013-01-01

    A Pico digital light projector has been implemented as an integrated illumination source and spatial light modulator for confocal imaging. The target is illuminated with a series of rapidly projected lines or points to simulate scanning. Light returning from the target is imaged onto a 2D rolling shutter CMOS sensor. By controlling the spatio-temporal relationship between the rolling shutter and illumination pattern, light returning from the target is spatially filtered. Confocal retinal, fluorescence, and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography implementations of this novel imaging technique are presented. PMID:24236223

  10. Coded aperture imaging for fluorescent x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Haboub, A.; MacDowell, A. A.; Marchesini, S.; Parkinson, D. Y.

    2014-06-15

    We employ a coded aperture pattern in front of a pixilated charge couple device detector to image fluorescent x-rays (6–25 KeV) from samples irradiated with synchrotron radiation. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays, and given a known source plane, allow for a large numerical aperture x-ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop and fabricate the free standing No-Two-Holes-Touching aperture pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the recorded encoded pattern were developed by means of a ray tracing technique and confirmed by experiments on standard samples.

  11. In vivo Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis using Fluorescence Confocal Videomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fitoussi, Victor; Faye, Nathalie; Chamming's, Foucauld; Clement, Olivier; Cuenod, Charles-Andre; Fournier, Laure S.

    2013-01-01

    Fibered confocal fluorescence in vivo imaging with a fiber optic bundle uses the same principle as fluorescent confocal microscopy. It can excite fluorescent in situ elements through the optical fibers, and then record some of the emitted photons, via the same optical fibers. The light source is a laser that sends the exciting light through an element within the fiber bundle and as it scans over the sample, recreates an image pixel by pixel. As this scan is very fast, by combining it with dedicated image processing software, images in real time with a frequency of 12 frames/sec can be obtained. We developed a technique to quantitatively characterize capillary morphology and function, using a confocal fluorescence videomicroscopy device. The first step in our experiment was to record 5 sec movies in the four quadrants of the tumor to visualize the capillary network. All movies were processed using software (ImageCell, Mauna Kea Technology, Paris France) that performs an automated segmentation of vessels around a chosen diameter (10 μm in our case). Thus, we could quantify the 'functional capillary density', which is the ratio between the total vessel area and the total area of the image. This parameter was a surrogate marker for microvascular density, usually measured using pathology tools. The second step was to record movies of the tumor over 20 min to quantify leakage of the macromolecular contrast agent through the capillary wall into the interstitium. By measuring the ratio of signal intensity in the interstitium over that in the vessels, an 'index leakage' was obtained, acting as a surrogate marker for capillary permeability. PMID:24056503

  12. In vivo imaging of tumor angiogenesis using fluorescence confocal videomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fitoussi, Victor; Faye, Nathalie; Chamming's, Foucauld; Clement, Olivier; Cuenod, Charles-Andre; Fournier, Laure S

    2013-09-11

    Fibered confocal fluorescence in vivo imaging with a fiber optic bundle uses the same principle as fluorescent confocal microscopy. It can excite fluorescent in situ elements through the optical fibers, and then record some of the emitted photons, via the same optical fibers. The light source is a laser that sends the exciting light through an element within the fiber bundle and as it scans over the sample, recreates an image pixel by pixel. As this scan is very fast, by combining it with dedicated image processing software, images in real time with a frequency of 12 frames/sec can be obtained. We developed a technique to quantitatively characterize capillary morphology and function, using a confocal fluorescence videomicroscopy device. The first step in our experiment was to record 5 sec movies in the four quadrants of the tumor to visualize the capillary network. All movies were processed using software (ImageCell, Mauna Kea Technology, Paris France) that performs an automated segmentation of vessels around a chosen diameter (10 μm in our case). Thus, we could quantify the 'functional capillary density', which is the ratio between the total vessel area and the total area of the image. This parameter was a surrogate marker for microvascular density, usually measured using pathology tools. The second step was to record movies of the tumor over 20 min to quantify leakage of the macromolecular contrast agent through the capillary wall into the interstitium. By measuring the ratio of signal intensity in the interstitium over that in the vessels, an 'index leakage' was obtained, acting as a surrogate marker for capillary permeability.

  13. Wide-field in vivo background free imaging by selective magnetic modulation of nanodiamond fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Susanta K.; Bumb, Ambika; Wu, Xufeng; Sochacki, Kem A.; Kellman, Peter; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Neuman, Keir C.

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity and resolution of fluorescence-based imaging in vivo is often limited by autofluorescence and other background noise. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a wide-field background-free imaging technique based on magnetic modulation of fluorescent nanodiamond emission. Fluorescent nanodiamonds are bright, photo-stable, biocompatible nanoparticles that are promising probes for a wide range of in vitro and in vivo imaging applications. Our readily applied background-free imaging technique improves the signal-to-background ratio for in vivo imaging up to 100-fold. This technique has the potential to significantly improve and extend fluorescent nanodiamond imaging capabilities on diverse fluorescence imaging platforms. PMID:24761300

  14. In Vivo Fluorescence Imaging in the Second Near-Infrared Window Using Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Guosong; Dai, Hongjie

    2016-01-01

    In vivo fluorescence imaging in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II window, 1000-1700 nm) is a powerful imaging technique that emerged in recent years. This imaging tool allows for noninvasive, deep-tissue visualization and interrogation of anatomical features and functions with improved imaging resolution and contrast at greater tissue penetration depths than traditional fluorescence imaging. Here, we present the detailed protocol for conducting NIR-II fluorescence imaging in live animals, including the procedures for preparation of biocompatible and NIR-II fluorescent carbon nanotube solution, live animal administration and NIR-II fluorescence image acquisition.

  15. Performance validation of EMCCD and ICCD based near-infrared fluorescence imaging systems on a fluorescence solid phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Banghe; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2012-03-01

    Near infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging has been successfully applied for non-invasive assessment of both lymphatic architecture and function as well as potential disease markers of lymphatic dysfunction in clinical studies with intradermal injection of indocyanine green (ICG). For new "first-in-humans" NIR fluorescence imaging agents that need to be employed at far lower quantities, NIR fluorescence imaging devices with high measurement sensitivity are most favorable. However, the measurement sensitivity of NIR fluorescence imaging devices is limited by various parameters, including quantum efficiency of CCD chip, noise sources in the CCD camera, and the leakage of excitation light through optical filters. In this contribution, we present a quantum dot-based fluorescence solid phantom and its use for characterization of excitation light leakage and measurement sensitivity in both the intensified CCD (ICCD) and Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD) based NIR fluorescence imaging devices. The stability of the constructed quantum dot-based fluorescence solid phantom was first demonstrated and used to demonstrate higher measurement sensitivity compared of the ICCD as opposed to the EMCCD based NIR fluorescence imaging device when integration time were maintained less than 1.0 s. The phantom was used to assess the calculated transmission ratio, R, to minimize noise owing to excitation light leakage and show optimized filtering capabilities. The constructed quantum dot based solid phantom and the methodology for measuring parameters of transmission ratio and SNR can be used as a standard and quantifiable metric for installation and operational qualification of all NIR fluorescence imaging devices.

  16. mb-FLIM: model-based fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiaole; Young, Ian Ted; Schouten, Raymond; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Jalink, Kees; de Jong, Sander

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a model-based, parallel procedure to estimate fluorescence lifetimes. Multiple frequencies are present in the excitation signal. Modeling the entire fluorescence and measurement process produces an analytical ratio of polynomials in the lifetime variable τ. A non-linear model-fitting procedure is then used to estimate τ. We have analyzed this model-based approach by simulating a 10 μM fluorescein solution (τ = 4 ns) and all relevant noise sources. We have used real LED data to drive the simulation. Using 240 μs of data, we estimate τ = 3.99 ns. Preliminary experiments on real fluorescent images taken from fluorescein solutions (measured τ = 4.1 ns), green plastic test slides (measured τ = 3.0 ns), and GFP in U2OS (osteosarcoma) cells (measured τ = 2.1 ns) demonstrate that this model-based measurement technique works.

  17. Biochip Image Grid Normalization Absolute Signal Fluorescence Measurement Using

    SciTech Connect

    Alferov, Oleg

    2001-04-17

    This software was developed to measure absolute fluorescent intensities of gel pads on a microchip in units defined by a standard fluorescent slide. It can accomodate varying measurement conditions (e.g. exposure time, sensitivity of detector, resolution of detector, etc.) as well as fluorescent microscopes with non-uniform sensitivity across their field of view allowing the user to compare measurements done on different detectors with varying exposure times, sensitivities, and resolutions. The software is designed both to operate Roper Scientific, Inc. cameras and to use image files produced by the program supplied with that equipment for its calculations. the intensity of the gel pad signal is computed so as to reduce background influence.

  18. Objective identification of dental abnormalities with multispectral fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surya Pratap; Fält, Pauli; Barman, Ishan; Koistinen, Arto; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Kullaa, Arja M

    2016-12-12

    Sensitive methods that can enable early detection of dental diseases (caries and calculus) are desirable in clinical practice. Optical spectroscopic approaches have emerged as promising alternatives owing to their wealth of molecular information and lack of sample preparation requirements. In the present study, using multispectral fluorescence imaging, we have demonstrated that dental caries and calculus can be objectively identified on extracted tooth. Spectral differences among control, carious and calculus conditions were attributed to the porphyrin pigment content, which is a byproduct of bacterial metabolism. Spectral maps generated using different porphyrin bands offer important clues to the spread of bacterial infection. Statistically significant differences utilizing fluorescence intensity ratios were observed among three groups. In contrast to laser induced fluorescence, these methods can provide information about exact spread of the infection and may aid in long term dental monitoring. Successful adoption of this approach for routine clinical usage can assist dentists in implementing timely remedial measures.

  19. Fluorescent Ligand for Human Progesterone Receptor Imaging in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We employed molecular modeling to design and then synthesize fluorescent ligands for the human progesterone receptor. Boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) or tetramethylrhodamine were conjugated to the progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 (Mifepristone) through an extended hydrophilic linker. The fluorescent ligands demonstrated comparable bioactivity to the parent antagonist in live cells and triggered nuclear translocation of the receptor in a specific manner. The BODIPY labeled ligand was applied to investigate the dependency of progesterone receptor nuclear translocation on partner proteins and to show that functional heat shock protein 90 but not immunophilin FKBP52 activity is essential. A tissue distribution study indicated that the fluorescent ligand preferentially accumulates in tissues that express high levels of the receptor in vivo. The design and properties of the BODIPY-labeled RU486 make it a potential candidate for in vivo imaging of PR by positron emission tomography through incorporation of 18F into the BODIPY core. PMID:23600997

  20. Fluorescence imaging to study cancer burden on lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Alisha V.; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Gunn, Jason R.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-03-01

    Morbidity and complexity involved in lymph node staging via surgical resection and biopsy calls for staging techniques that are less invasive. While visible blue dyes are commonly used in locating sentinel lymph nodes, since they follow tumor-draining lymphatic vessels, they do not provide a metric to evaluate presence of cancer. An area of active research is to use fluorescent dyes to assess tumor burden of sentinel and secondary lymph nodes. The goal of this work was to successfully deploy and test an intra-nodal cancer-cell injection model to enable planar fluorescence imaging of a clinically relevant blue dye, specifically methylene blue along with a cancer targeting tracer, Affibody labeled with IRDYE800CW and subsequently segregate tumor-bearing from normal lymph nodes. This direct-injection based tumor model was employed in athymic rats (6 normal, 4 controls, 6 cancer-bearing), where luciferase-expressing breast cancer cells were injected into axillary lymph nodes. Tumor presence in nodes was confirmed by bioluminescence imaging before and after fluorescence imaging. Lymphatic uptake from the injection site (intradermal on forepaw) to lymph node was imaged at approximately 2 frames/minute. Large variability was observed within each cohort.

  1. Fluorescence coupling for direct imaging of electrocatalytic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Guerrette, Joshua P; Percival, Stephen J; Zhang, Bo

    2013-01-16

    Here we report the use of fluorescence microscopy and closed bipolar electrodes to reveal electrochemical and electrocatalytic activity on large electrochemical arrays. We demonstrate fluorescence-enabled electrochemical microscopy (FEEM) as a new electrochemical approach for imaging transient and heterogeneous electrochemical processes. This method uses a bipolar electrode mechanism to directly couple a conventional oxidation reaction, e.g., the oxidation of ferrocene, to a special fluorogenic reduction reaction. The generation of the fluorescent product on the cathodic pole enables one to directly monitor an electrochemical process with optical microscopy. We demonstrate the use of this method on a large electrochemical array containing thousands or more parallel bipolar microelectrodes to enable spatially and temporally resolved electrochemical imaging. We first image molecular transport of a redox analyte in solution using an array containing roughly 1000 carbon fiber ultramicroelectrodes. We then carry out a simple electrocatalysis experiment to show how FEEM can be used for electrocatalyst screening. This new method could prove useful for imaging transient electrochemical events, such as fast exocytosis events on single and networks of neurons, and for parallel, high-throughput screening of new electrocatalysts.

  2. Visualizing photosynthesis through processing of chlorophyll fluorescence images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, Paul F.; Ball, J. Timothy; Berry, Joseph A.; Patzke, Juergen; Raschke, Klaus E.

    1990-05-01

    Measurements of terrestrial plant photosynthesis frequently exploit sensing of gas exchange from leaves enclosed in gas-tight, climate controlled chambers. These methods are typically slow, and do not resolve variation in photosynthesis below the whole leaf level. A photosynthesis visualization technique is presented that uses images of leaves employing light from chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence. Images of Chl fluorescence from whole leaves undergoing steady-state photosynthesis, photosynthesis induction, or response to stress agents were digitized during light flashes that saturated photochemical reactions. Use of saturating flashes permitted deconvolution of photochemical energy use from biochemical quenching mechanisms (qN) that dissipate excess excitation energy, otherwise damaging to the light harvesting apparatus. Combination of the digital image frames of variable fluorescence with reference frames obtained from the same leaves when dark-adapted permitted derivation of frames in which grey scale represented the magnitude of qN. Simultaneous measurements with gas-exchange apparatus provided data for non-linear calibration filters for subsequent rendering of grey-scale "images" of photosynthesis. In several experiments significant non-homogeneity of photosynthetic activity was observed following treatment with growth hormones, or shifts in light or humidity, and following infection by virus. The technique provides a rapid, non-invasive probe for stress physiology and plant disease detection.

  3. Imaging cellular dynamics in vivo with multicolor fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Robert M.

    2005-04-01

    The new field of in vivo cell biology is being developed with multi-colored fluorescent proteins. With the use of fluorescent proteins, the behavior of individual cells can be visualized in the living animal. An example of the new cell biology is dual-color fluorescence imaging using red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing tumors transplanted in green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing transgenic mice. These models show with great clarity the details of the tumor-stroma cell-cell interaction especially tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, stromal fibroblasts and macrophages. Another example is the color-coding of cells with RFP or GFP such that both cell types and their interaction can be simultaneously visualized in vivo. Stem cells can also be visualized and tracked in vivo with fluorescent proteins. Mice, in which the regulatory elements of the stem-cell marker nestin drive GFP expression, can be used to visualize hair follicle stem cells including their ability to form hair follicles as well as blood vessels. Dual-color cells expressing GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm enable real-time visualization of nuclear-cytoplasm dynamics including cell cycle events and apoptosis. Dual-color cells also enable the in vivo imaging of cell and nuclear deformation as well as trafficking in capillaries in living animals. Multiple-color labeling of cells will enable multiple events to be simultaneously visualized in vivo including cell-cell interaction, gene expression, ion fluxes, protein and organelle trafficking, chromosome dynamics and numerous other processes currently still studied in vitro.

  4. Fluorescence-enhanced gadolinium-doped zinc oxide quantum dots for magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanlan; Ai, Kelong; Yuan, Qinghai; Lu, Lehui

    2011-02-01

    We report here the development of Gd-doped ZnO quantum dots (QDs) as dual modal fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging nanoprobes. They are fabricated in a simple, versatile and environmentally friendly method, not only decreasing the difficulty and complexity, but also avoiding the increase of particle's size brought about by silica coating procedure in the synthesis of nanoprobes reported previously. These nanoprobes, with exceptionally small size and enhanced fluorescence resulting from the Gd doping, can label successfully the HeLa cells in short time and present no evidence of toxicity or adverse affect on cell growth even at the concentration up to 1 mm. These results show that such nanoprobes have low toxicity, especially in comparison with the traditional PEGylated CdSe/ZnS or CdSe/CdS QDs. In MRI studies, they exert strong positive contrast effect with a large longitudinal relaxivity (r(1)) of water proton of 16 mm(-1) s(-1). Their capability of imaging HeLa cells with MRI implies that they have great potential as MRI contrast agents. Combining the high sensitivity of fluorescence imaging with high spatial resolution of MRI, We expect that the as-prepared Gd-doped Zno QDs can provide a better reliability of the collected data and find promising applications in biological, medical and other fields.

  5. [Intraoperative graft assessment using fluorescent imaging system (SPY)].

    PubMed

    Kawashima, T; Naraoka, S; Kakizaki, T

    2009-07-01

    We investigated the efficacy of intraoperative fluorescent imaging system for the assessment of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). We used SPY imaging system in 100 CABG (57 off-pump and 43 on-pump CABG), totalling 287 distal anastomoses. The total graft patency rate on postoperative angiography in this series was 96.2% (276/287). Graft revision was done in 10 cases (10.0%) and 13 anastomoses (4.5%) by SPY imaging, which all resulted in good patency at postoperative angiography. On the other hand, 7 distal anastomoses and 1 mammary graft (2.8%) appeared to be successful on intraoperative SPY imaging, but were revealed to be occluded by postoperative angiography. SPY imaging system is useful for graft validation, and may contribute to improvement of coronary bypass graft patency.

  6. Real-time fluorescence imaging in analytical chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Jonas; Johansson, Thomas; Nilsson, Stefan

    1996-01-01

    A detection system for capillary electroseparation methods based on fluorescence imaging has been developed. In capillary electrophoresis (CE) the detection unit is normally placed near the outlet part of the fused silica column where a window is opened in the coating and the fluorescence is recorded over a short distance to maintain a high resolution. Our method employs fluorescence imaging of the whole column during separation of various samples. The column is positioned in a straight holder and the outer protective coating of the column is removed to get optical access to the sample. An excimer/dye laser is used for excitation of the sample and the fluorescence is recorded with an image-intensified CCD detector and displayed in real-time. The CCD detector is read out with a rate of about 5 frames per second and the corresponding full fluorescence line profiles along the column are displayed. Thus, full electropherogram are displayed showing the propagation and gradual separation of the sample fractions. The main advantage of this method is that parameters such as sample concentrations, diffusion, wall interaction and sample-to-sample interaction can be studied in real-time over the full length of the column, which is crucial for efficient system optimization. Among several applications, isoelectric focusing, isotachophoresis and enzyme-substrate interactions can be mentioned. Methods for increasing the collection efficiency, such as fiber optic arrays, have been investigated as well as different methods for computer-assisted signal integration and filtering. A fiber array consisting of 500 optical quartz fibers has been constructed that gives a substantial improvement of the optical collection efficiency.

  7. Enhanced fluorescence cell imaging with metal-coated slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Moal, Eric; Fort, Emmanuel; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine; Janin, Anne; Murata, Hideyuki; Cordelières, Fabrice P.

    2007-07-01

    The last decade has witnessed momentous advances in fluorescence microscopy. The introduction of novel fluorescent markers, together with the development of original microscopy techniques, made it possible to study biomolecular interactions in living cells and to examine the structure and function of living tissues. The emergence of these innovative techniques had a remarkable impact on all the life sciences. However, many biological and medical applications involve the detection of minute quantities of biomolecules, and are limited by the signal weakness in common observation conditions. Here, we show that silver and gold-coated microscope slides can be used as mirror substrates to efficiently improve detection sensitivity when fluorescence microscopy is applied to micrometer-thick biological samples. We report a fourfold enhancement of the fluorescence signal and a noticeable strengthening of the image contrast, when mirror substrates are used with standard air microscope objectives. We demonstrate that metal-coated substrates provide the means to get sensitivity-enhanced fluorescence detection with dry optics, while keeping a wide field observation and a large depth of field. This is a crucial advantage for automated and high-throughput applications to cell and tissue diagnostic analysis.

  8. Red Fluorescent Carbon Nanoparticle-Based Cell Imaging Probe.

    PubMed

    Ali, Haydar; Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Dalal, Chumki; Jana, Nikhil R

    2016-04-13

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based probes with tunable visible emission are biocompatible, environment friendly and most suitable for various biomedical applications. However, synthesis of red fluorescent carbon nanoparticles and their transformation into functional nanoparticles are very challenging. Here we report red fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based nanobioconjugates of <25 nm hydrodynamic size and their application as fluorescent cell labels. Hydrophobic carbon nanoparticles are synthesized via high temperature colloid-chemical approach and transformed into water-soluble functional nanoparticles via coating with amphiphilic polymer followed by covalent linking with desired biomolecules. Following this approach, carbon nanoparticles are functionalized with polyethylene glycol, primary amine, glucose, arginine, histidine, biotin and folic acid. These functional nanoparticles can be excited with blue/green light (i.e., 400-550 nm) to capture their emission spanning from 550 to 750 nm. Arginine and folic acid functionalized nanoparticles have been demonstrated as fluorescent cell labels where blue and green excitation has been used for imaging of labeled cells. The presented method can be extended for the development of carbon nanoparticle-based other bioimaging probes.

  9. Autofluorescence removal from fluorescence tomography data using multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psycharakis, Stylianos; Zacharakis, Giannis; Garofalakis, Anikitos; Favicchio, Rosy; Ripoll, Jorge

    2007-07-01

    Autofluorescence has been a significant disadvantage when dealing with tomographic imaging of biological samples or tissue phantoms. Consequently, the accurate removal of autofluorescence signal has been a major concern in fluorescence tomography. Here we present a study on three-dimensional mapping and removal of autofluorescence from fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) data, both for phantoms and small animal in vivo. The technique is based on the recording of tomographic data in multiple spectral regions with different excitation light and on the application of a linear unmixing algorithm for targeting multiple fluorescent probes. Two types of measurements are taken, one with the excitation being in the region of the maximum absorption of the targeted fluorophore and one in a region away from the maximum. The relative strengths of the different spectra are employed to calculate the signal to be removed from the tomographic reconstruction. Autofluorescence spectra are recorded using identical reflection geometry as during the FMT acquisitions allowing for the correct mapping of the autofluorescence signal. Results from phantoms exhibiting different background autofluorescence strengths are presented and discussed. In this work we have also studied in vivo fluorescent activity in mice, involving both subcutaneously implanted fluorescent phantoms and b10 transgenic mice.

  10. In Vivo Imaging of GLP-1R with a Targeted Bimodal PET/Fluorescence Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accurate visualization and quantification of β-cell mass is critical for the improved understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of both type 1 diabetes (T1D) and insulinoma. Here, we describe the synthesis of a bimodal imaging probe (PET/fluorescence) for imaging GLP-1R expression in the pancreas and in pancreatic islet cell tumors. The conjugation of a bimodal imaging tag containing a near-infrared fluorescent dye, and the copper chelator sarcophagine to the GLP-1R targeting peptide exendin-4 provided the basis for the bimodal imaging probe. Conjugation was performed via a novel sequential one-pot synthetic procedure including 64Cu radiolabeling and copper-catalyzed click-conjugation. The bimodal imaging agent 64Cu-E4-Fl was synthesized in good radiochemical yield and specific activity (RCY = 36%, specific activity: 141 μCi/μg, >98% radiochemical purity). The agent showed good performance in vivo and ex vivo, visualizing small xenografts (<2 mm) with PET and pancreatic β-cell mass by phosphor autoradiography. Using the fluorescent properties of the probe, we were able to detect individual pancreatic islets, confirming specific binding to GLP-1R and surpassing the sensitivity of the radioactive label. The use of bimodal PET/fluorescent imaging probes is promising for preoperative imaging and fluorescence-assisted analysis of patient tissues. We believe that our procedure could become relevant as a protocol for the development of bimodal imaging agents. PMID:24856928

  11. Prostate cancer diagnosis with fluorescence lifetime imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Gandour-Edwards, Regina F.; Dall'Era, Marc; Marcu, Laura

    2017-02-01

    More than 1 million men in the United States undergo a prostate biopsy procedure annually and approximately 200,000 men receive a diagnosis of prostate cancer. 5-10% of these men have to undergo a repeat biopsy due to insufficient tissue sampling. We are studying the utility of a multi-spectral time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (MS-TRFS) technique for real-time prostate cancer diagnosis. The MS-TRFS imaging setup, which includes a fiberoptic set-up with a 355nm excitation light source coupled with a blue (450nm) aiming beam, was used to image ex-vivo prostatectomy specimen. The prostate tissue from 11 patients was sectioned at 2mm thickness and the fluorescence lifetime information was overlaid spatially for histology and thus, diagnostic co-registration. Initial results show that fluorescence lifetime in the 390±40nm channel, which measures collagen and elastin signatures, is longer for glandular regions than in the stromal regions. Additionally, lifetime in the 452±45nm channel, corresponding to NAD redox state, is longer in the cancerous glandular region in comparison with the normal glandular regions. Current work is focused on developing real-time quantitative algorithms to combine the fluorescence signatures from the two channels for performing prostate cancer diagnosis on biopsies.

  12. Fluorescent supramolecular micelles for imaging-guided cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengmeng; Yin, Wenyan; Dong, Xinghua; Yang, Wantai; Zhao, Yuliang; Yin, Meizhen

    2016-03-07

    A novel smart fluorescent drug delivery system composed of a perylene diimide (PDI) core and block copolymer poly(d,l-lactide)-b-poly(ethyl ethylene phosphate) is developed and named as PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8. The biodegradable PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8 is a unimolecular micelle and can self-assemble into supramolecular micelles, called as fluorescent supramolecular micelles (FSMs), in aqueous media. An insoluble drug camptothecin (CPT) can be effectively loaded into the FSMs and exhibits pH-responsive release. Moreover, the FSMs with good biocompatibility can also be employed as a remarkable fluorescent probe for cell labelling because the maximum emission of PDI is beneficial for bio-imaging. The flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrate that the micelles are easily endocytosed by cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor growth-inhibitory studies reveal a better therapeutic effect of FSMs after CPT encapsulation when compared with the free CPT drug. The multifunctional FSM nanomedicine platform as a nanovehicle has great potential for fluorescence imaging-guided cancer therapy.

  13. An enzymatically activated fluorescence probe for targeted tumor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Mako; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Hama, Yukihiro; Koyama, Yoshinori; Bernardo, Marcelino; Nagano, Tetsuo; Choyke, Peter L.; Urano, Yasuteru

    2008-01-01

    β-Galactosidase is a widely used reporter enzyme, but although several substrates are available for in vitro detection, its application for in vivo optical imaging remains a challenge. To obtain a probe suitable for in vivo use, we modified our previously developed activatable fluorescence probe, TG-βGal (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2005, 127, 4888-4894), on the basis of photochemical and photophysical experiments. The new probe, AM-TG-βGal, provides a dramatic fluorescence enhancement upon reaction with β-galactosidase, and further hydrolysis of the ester moiety by ubiquitous intracellular esterases affords a hydrophilic product that is well retained within the cells without loss of fluorescence. We used a mouse tumor model to assess the practical utility of AM-TG-βGal, after confirming that tumors in the model could be labeled with avidin-β-galactosidase conjugate. This conjugate was administered to the mice in vivo, followed by AM-TG-βGal, and subsequent ex vivo fluorescence imaging clearly visualized intraperitoneal tumors as small as 200 μm. This strategy has potential clinical application, for example in video-assisted laparoscopic tumor resection. PMID:17352471

  14. A portable near-infrared fluorescence image overlay device for surgical navigation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWade, Melanie A.

    2016-03-01

    A rise in the use of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dyes or intrinsic fluorescent markers for surgical guidance and tissue diagnosis has triggered the development of NIR fluorescence imaging systems. Because NIR wavelengths are invisible to the naked eye, instrumentation must allow surgeons to visualize areas of high fluorescence. Current NIR fluorescence imaging systems have limited ease-of-use because they display fluorescent information on remote display monitors that require surgeons to divert attention away from the patient to identify the location of tissue fluorescence. Furthermore, some systems lack simultaneous visible light imaging which provides valuable spatial context to fluorescence images. We have developed a novel, portable NIR fluorescence imaging approach for intraoperative surgical guidance that provides information for surgical navigation within the clinician's line of sight. The system utilizes a NIR CMOS detector to collect excited NIR fluorescence from the surgical field. Tissues with NIR fluorescence are overlaid with visible light to provide information on tissue margins directly on the surgical field. In vitro studies have shown this versatile imaging system can be applied to applications with both extrinsic NIR contrast agents such as indocyanine green and weaker sources of biological fluorescence such as parathyroid gland tissue. This non-invasive, portable NIR fluorescence imaging system overlays an image directly on tissue, potentially allowing surgical decisions to be made quicker and with greater ease-of-use than current NIR fluorescence imaging systems.

  15. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Xing, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%–5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm2 CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%–5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. Results: A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R2 > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Conclusions: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%–5% gold solutions in a small animal

  16. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Xing, Lei

    2015-02-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%-5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm(2) CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%-5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R(2) > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%-5% gold solutions in a small animal sized water phantom has been demonstrated

  17. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena Xing, Lei; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%–5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm{sup 2} CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%–5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. Results: A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R{sup 2} > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Conclusions: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%–5% gold solutions in a

  18. Imaging biological structures with fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Travis J; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Hess, Samuel T

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy (FPALM) images biological structures with subdiffraction-limited resolution. With repeated cycles of activation, readout and bleaching, large numbers of photoactivatable probes can be precisely localized to obtain a map (image) of labeled molecules with an effective resolution of tens of nanometers. FPALM has been applied to a variety of biological imaging applications, including membrane, cytoskeletal and cytosolic proteins in fixed and living cells. Molecular motions can be quantified. FPALM can also be applied to nonbiological samples, which can be labeled with photoactivatable probes. With emphasis on cellular imaging, we describe here the adaptation of a conventional widefield fluorescence microscope for FPALM and present step-by-step procedures to successfully obtain and analyze FPALM images. The fundamentals of this protocol may also be applicable to users of similar imaging techniques that apply localization of photoactivatable probes to achieve super-resolution. Once alignment of the setup has been completed, data acquisitions can be obtained in approximately 1–30 min and analyzed in approximately 0.5–4 h. PMID:19214181

  19. Imaging biological structures with fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gould, Travis J; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Hess, Samuel T

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy (FPALM) images biological structures with subdiffraction-limited resolution. With repeated cycles of activation, readout and bleaching, large numbers of photoactivatable probes can be precisely localized to obtain a map (image) of labeled molecules with an effective resolution of tens of nanometers. FPALM has been applied to a variety of biological imaging applications, including membrane, cytoskeletal and cytosolic proteins in fixed and living cells. Molecular motions can be quantified. FPALM can also be applied to nonbiological samples, which can be labeled with photoactivatable probes. With emphasis on cellular imaging, we describe here the adaptation of a conventional widefield fluorescence microscope for FPALM and present step-by-step procedures to successfully obtain and analyze FPALM images. The fundamentals of this protocol may also be applicable to users of similar imaging techniques that apply localization of photoactivatable probes to achieve super-resolution. Once alignment of the setup has been completed, data acquisitions can be obtained in approximately 1-30 min and analyzed in approximately 0.5-4 h.

  20. Increasing precision of lifetime determination in fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ching-Wei; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2010-02-01

    The interest in fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is increasing, as commercial FLIM modules become available for confocal and multi-photon microscopy. In biological FLIM applications, low fluorescence signals from samples can be a challenge, and this causes poor precision in lifetime. In this study, for the first time, we applied wavelet-based denoising methods in time-domain FLIM, and compared them with our previously developed total variation (TV) denoising methods. They were first tested using artificial FLIM images. We then applied them to lowlight live-cell images. The results demonstrated that our TV methods could improve lifetime precision multi-fold in FLIM images and preserve the overall lifetime and pre-exponential term values when improving local lifetime fitting, while wavelet-based methods were faster. The results here can enhance the precision of FLIM, especially for low-light and / or fast video-rate imaging, to improve current and rapidly emerging new applications of FLIM such as live-cell, in vivo whole-animal, or endoscopic imaging.

  1. Directional bilateral filters for smoothing fluorescence microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, Manasij; Mohan, Kavya; Seelamantula, Chandra Sekhar

    2015-08-01

    Images obtained through fluorescence microscopy at low numerical aperture (NA) are noisy and have poor resolution. Images of specimens such as F-actin filaments obtained using confocal or widefield fluorescence microscopes contain directional information and it is important that an image smoothing or filtering technique preserve the directionality. F-actin filaments are widely studied in pathology because the abnormalities in actin dynamics play a key role in diagnosis of cancer, cardiac diseases, vascular diseases, myofibrillar myopathies, neurological disorders, etc. We develop the directional bilateral filter as a means of filtering out the noise in the image without significantly altering the directionality of the F-actin filaments. The bilateral filter is anisotropic to start with, but we add an additional degree of anisotropy by employing an oriented domain kernel for smoothing. The orientation is locally adapted using a structure tensor and the parameters of the bilateral filter are optimized for within the framework of statistical risk minimization. We show that the directional bilateral filter has better denoising performance than the traditional Gaussian bilateral filter and other denoising techniques such as SURE-LET, non-local means, and guided image filtering at various noise levels in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR). We also show quantitative improvements in low NA images of F-actin filaments.

  2. Flexible peritoneal windows for quantitative fluorescence and bioluminescence preclinical imaging.

    PubMed

    Souris, Jeffrey S; Hickson, Jonathan A; Msezane, Lambda; Rinker-Schaeffer, Carrie W; Chen, Chin-Tu

    2013-01-01

    At present, there is considerable interest in the use of in vivo fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging to track the onset and progression of pathologic processes in preclinical models of human disease. Optical quantitation of such phenomena, however, is often problematic, frequently complicated by the overlying tissue's scattering and absorption of light, as well as the presence of endogenous cutaneous and subcutaneous fluorophores. To partially circumvent this information loss, we report here the development of flexible, surgically implanted, transparent windows that enhance quantitative in vivo fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging of optical reporters. These windows are metal and glass free and thus compatible with computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and single-photon emission computed tomography; they also permit visualization of much larger areas with fewer impediments to animal locomotion and grooming than those previously described. To evaluate their utility in preclinical imaging, we surgically implanted these windows in the abdominal walls of female athymic nude mice and subsequently inoculated each animal with 1 × 10(4) to 1 × 10(6) bioluminescent human ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3ip.1-luc). Longitudinal imaging studies of fenestrated animals revealed up to 48-fold gains in imaging sensitivity relative to nonfenestrated animals, with relatively few complications, allowing wide-field in vivo visualization of nascent metastatic ovarian cancer colonization.

  3. Fluorescence imaging of dendritic spines of Golgi-Cox-stained neurons using brightening background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Min; Xiong, Hanqing; Yang, Tao; Shang, Zhenhua; Chen, Muqing; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel fluorescence imaging approach to imaging nonfluorescence-labeled biological tissue samples. The method was demonstrated by imaging neurons in Golgi-Cox-stained and epoxy-resin-embedded samples through the excitation of the background fluorescence of the specimens. The dark neurons stood out clearly against background fluorescence in the images, enabling the tracing of a single dendritic spine using both confocal and wide-field fluorescence microscopy. The results suggest that the reported fluorescence imaging method would provide an effective alternative solution to image nonfluorescence-labeled samples, and it allows tracing the dendritic spine structure of neurons.

  4. Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Indicators for Organellar Calcium Imaging.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Junji; Kanemaru, Kazunori; Iino, Masamitsu

    2016-09-20

    Optical Ca(2+) indicators are powerful tools for investigating intracellular Ca(2+) signals in living cells. Although a variety of Ca(2+) indicators have been developed, deciphering the physiological functions and spatiotemporal dynamics of Ca(2+) in intracellular organelles remains challenging. Genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicators (GECIs) using fluorescent proteins are promising tools for organellar Ca(2+) imaging, and much effort has been devoted to their development. In this review, we first discuss the key points of organellar Ca(2+) imaging and summarize the requirements for optimal organellar Ca(2+) indicators. Then, we highlight some of the recent advances in the engineering of fluorescent GECIs targeted to specific organelles. Finally, we discuss the limitations of currently available GECIs and the requirements for advancing the research on intraorganellar Ca(2+) signaling. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of nanodiamonds in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yung; Hsu, Tsung-Yuan; Wu, Yi-Chun; Hsu, Jui-Hung; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2013-03-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) center in bulk diamond is a photostable fluorophore with a radiative lifetime of 11.6 ns at room temperature. The lifetime substantially increases to ~20 ns for diamond nanoparticles (size ~ 100 nm) suspended in water due to the change in refractive index of the surrounding medium of the NV- centers. This fluorescence decay time is much longer than that (typically 1 - 4 ns) of endogenous and exogenous fluorophores commonly used in biological imaging, making it possible to detect NV--containing nanodiamonds in vivo at the single particle level by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach using Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) as a model organism.

  6. Novel fluorescent carbonic nanomaterials for sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demchenko, Alexander P.; Dekaliuk, Mariia O.

    2013-12-01

    Small brightly fluorescent carbon nanoparticles have emerged as a new class of materials important for sensing and imaging applications. We analyze comparatively the properties of nanodiamonds, graphene and graphene oxide ‘dots’, of modified carbon nanotubes and of diverse carbon nanoparticles known as ‘C-dots’ obtained by different methods. The mechanisms of their light absorption and luminescence emission are still unresolved and the arguments are presented for their common origin. Regarding present and potential applications, we provide critical comparison with the other types of fluorescence reporters, such as organic dyes and semiconductor quantum dots. Their most prospective applications in sensing (based on the changes of intensity, FRET and lifetime) and in imaging technologies on the level of living cells and whole bodies are overviewed. The possibilities for design on their basis of multifunctional nanocomposites on a broader scale of theranostics are outlined.

  7. Fluorescence microscopy imaging of electroperturbation in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yinghua; Vernier, P. Thomas; Behrend, Matthew; Wang, Jingjing; Thu, Mya Mya; Gundersen, Martin A.; Marcu, Laura

    2006-03-01

    We report the design, integration, and validation of a fluorescence microscopy system for imaging of electroperturbation-the effects of nanosecond, megavolt-per-meter pulsed electric fields on biological cells and tissues. Such effects have potential applications in cancer therapy, gene regulation, and biophysical research by noninvasively disrupting intracellular compartments and inducing apoptosis in malignant cells. As the primary observing platform, an epifluorescence microscope integrating a nanosecond high-voltage pulser and a micrometer electrode chamber enable in situ imaging of the intracellular processes triggered by high electric fields. Using specific fluorescence molecular probes, the dynamic biological responses of Jurkat T lymphocytes to nanosecond electric pulses (nanoelectropulses) are studied with this system, including calcium bursts, the polarized translocation of phosphatidylserine (PS), and nuclear enlargement and chromatin/DNA structural changes.

  8. Mapping microbubble viscosity using fluorescence lifetime imaging of molecular rotors

    PubMed Central

    Hosny, Neveen A.; Mohamedi, Graciela; Rademeyer, Paul; Owen, Joshua; Wu, Yilei; Tang, Meng-Xing; Eckersley, Robert J.; Stride, Eleanor; Kuimova, Marina K.

    2013-01-01

    Encapsulated microbubbles are well established as highly effective contrast agents for ultrasound imaging. There remain, however, some significant challenges to fully realize the potential of microbubbles in advanced applications such as perfusion mapping, targeted drug delivery, and gene therapy. A key requirement is accurate characterization of the viscoelastic surface properties of the microbubbles, but methods for independent, nondestructive quantification and mapping of these properties are currently lacking. We present here a strategy for performing these measurements that uses a small fluorophore termed a “molecular rotor” embedded in the microbubble surface, whose fluorescence lifetime is directly related to the viscosity of its surroundings. We apply fluorescence lifetime imaging to show that shell viscosities vary widely across the population of the microbubbles and are influenced by the shell composition and the manufacturing process. We also demonstrate that heterogeneous viscosity distributions exist within individual microbubble shells even with a single surfactant component. PMID:23690599

  9. Evaluation of the reasons why freshly appearing citrus peel fluorescence during automatic inspection by fluorescent imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momin, Md. Abdul; Kondo, Naoshi; Kuramoto, Makoto; Ogawa, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Shiigi, Tomoo; Ninomiya, Kazunori

    2011-07-01

    Defective unshu oranges (Citrus reticulate Blanco var. unshu) were sorted based on fluorescent imaging technique in a commercial packinghouse but fresh appearing unshu were rejected due to fluorescence appearing on their peel. We studied the various visible patterns based on colour, fluorescence and microscopic images, where even areas of the peel that are not obviously damaged can have fluorescence, to provide a categorization of fluorescence reasons. The categorization corresponded to: 1) hole and flow; 2) influenced by damaged or rotten fruits that have released peel oil onto it; 3) immature or poor peel quality; 4) whitish fluorescence due to agro-chemicals and 5) variation of the growing season. The identification of such patterns of fluorescence might be useful for citrus grading industry to take some initiatives to make the entire automated system more efficient.

  10. Development and integration of Raman imaging capabilities to Sandia National Laboratories hyperspectral fluorescence imaging instrument.

    SciTech Connect

    Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Nieman, Linda T.

    2005-11-01

    Raman spectroscopic imaging is a powerful technique for visualizing chemical differences within a variety of samples based on the interaction of a substance's molecular vibrations with laser light. While Raman imaging can provide a unique view of samples such as residual stress within silicon devices, chemical degradation, material aging, and sample heterogeneity, the Raman scattering process is often weak and thus requires very sensitive collection optics and detectors. Many commercial instruments (including ones owned here at Sandia National Laboratories) generate Raman images by raster scanning a point focused laser beam across a sample--a process which can expose a sample to extreme levels of laser light and requires lengthy acquisition times. Our previous research efforts have led to the development of a state-of-the-art two-dimensional hyperspectral imager for fluorescence imaging applications such as microarray scanning. This report details the design, integration, and characterization of a line-scan Raman imaging module added to this efficient hyperspectral fluorescence microscope. The original hyperspectral fluorescence instrument serves as the framework for excitation and sample manipulation for the Raman imaging system, while a more appropriate axial transmissive Raman imaging spectrometer and detector are utilized for collection of the Raman scatter. The result is a unique and flexible dual-modality fluorescence and Raman imaging system capable of high-speed imaging at high spatial and spectral resolutions. Care was taken throughout the design and integration process not to hinder any of the fluorescence imaging capabilities. For example, an operator can switch between the fluorescence and Raman modalities without need for extensive optical realignment. The instrument performance has been characterized and sample data is presented.

  11. Resolution of a Gen-2 handheld optical imager: diffuse and fluorescence imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Roman, Manuela; Gonzalez, Jean; Carrasquilla, Jennifer; Erickson, Sarah J; Akhter, Rad; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2013-11-20

    A generation-2 (Gen-2) handheld optical imager capable of two-dimensional surface and three-dimensional tomographic imaging has recently been developed. Herein, the ability of the handheld imager to detect and resolve two targets under diffuse and fluorescence imaging conditions has been demonstrated via tissue phantom studies. Two-dimensional surface imaging studies demonstrated that two 0.96 cm diameter Indocyannine Green targets were detected and resolved ~0.5  cm apart (between edges) at a target depth of 1 cm during diffuse imaging and up to 2 cm depth during fluorescence imaging. Preliminary 3D tomographic imaging capability to resolve the two targets was also demonstrated, but requires extensive future studies.

  12. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope: all-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiaole; Schelen, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van den Oever, Rein; Leenen, René; van Kuijk, Harry; Peters, Inge; Polderdijk, Frank; Bosiers, Jan; Raspe, Marcel; Jalink, Kees; de Jong, Jan Geert Sander; van Geest, Bert; Stoop, Karel; Young, Ian Ted

    2012-12-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device design in a frequency-domain FLIM system. The first stage of evaluation for the camera has been carried out. Camera characteristics such as noise distribution, dark current influence, camera gain, sampling density, sensitivity, linearity of photometric response, and optical transfer function have been studied through experiments. We are able to do lifetime measurement using our modulated, electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (MEM-FLIM) camera for various objects, e.g., fluorescein solution, fixed green fluorescent protein (GFP) cells, and GFP-actin stained live cells. A detailed comparison of a conventional microchannel plate (MCP)-based FLIM system and the MEM-FLIM system is presented. The MEM-FLIM camera shows higher resolution and a better image quality. The MEM-FLIM camera provides a new opportunity for performing frequency-domain FLIM.

  13. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope: all-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiaole; Schelen, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van den Oever, Rein; Leenen, René; van Kuijk, Harry; Peters, Inge; Polderdijk, Frank; Bosiers, Jan; Raspe, Marcel; Jalink, Kees; Geert Sander de Jong, Jan; van Geest, Bert; Stoop, Karel; Young, Ian Ted

    2012-12-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device design in a frequency-domain FLIM system. The first stage of evaluation for the camera has been carried out. Camera characteristics such as noise distribution, dark current influence, camera gain, sampling density, sensitivity, linearity of photometric response, and optical transfer function have been studied through experiments. We are able to do lifetime measurement using our modulated, electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (MEM-FLIM) camera for various objects, e.g., fluorescein solution, fixed green fluorescent protein (GFP) cells, and GFP-actin stained live cells. A detailed comparison of a conventional microchannel plate (MCP)-based FLIM system and the MEM-FLIM system is presented. The MEM-FLIM camera shows higher resolution and a better image quality. The MEM-FLIM camera provides a new opportunity for performing frequency-domain FLIM.

  14. Neural imaging in songbirds using fiber optic fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Hearn, Gentry; Lints, Thierry; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2012-02-01

    The song control system of juvenile songbirds is an important model for studying the developmental acquisition and generation of complex learned vocal motor sequences, two processes that are fundamental to human speech and language. To understand the neural mechanisms underlying song production, it is critical to characterize the activity of identified neurons in the song control system when the bird is singing. Neural imaging in unrestrained singing birds, although technically challenging, will advance our understanding of neural ensemble coding mechanisms in this system. We are exploring the use of a fiber optic microscope for functional imaging in the brain of behaving and singing birds in order to better understand the contribution of a key brain nucleus (high vocal center nucleus; HVC) to temporal aspects of song motor control. We have constructed a fluorescence microscope with LED illumination, a fiber bundle for transmission of fluorescence excitation and emission light, a ~2x GRIN lens, and a CCD for image acquisition. The system has 2 μm resolution, 375 μm field of view, 200 μm working distance, and 1 mm outer diameter. As an initial characterization of this setup, neurons in HVC were imaged using the fiber optic microscope after injection of quantum dots or fluorescent retrograde tracers into different song nuclei. A Lucid Vivascope confocal microscope was used to confirm the imaging results. Long-term imaging of the activity of these neurons in juvenile birds during singing may lead us to a better understanding of the central motor codes for song and the central mechanism by which auditory experience modifies song motor commands to enable vocal learning and imitation.

  15. Kinetic Requirements for Spatiotemporal Chemical Imaging with Fluorescent Nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Daniel; Hagemann, Annika; Kruss, Sebastian

    2017-04-25

    Fluorescent nanosensors are powerful tools for basic research and bioanalytical applications. Individual nanosensors are able to detect single molecules, while ensembles of nanosensors can be used to measure the bulk concentration of an analyte. Collective imaging of multiple nanosensors could provide both spatial and temporal chemical information from the nano- to the microscale. This type of chemical imaging with nanosensors would be very attractive to study processes such as chemical signaling between cells (e.g., neurons). So far, it is not understood what processes are resolvable (concentration, time, space) and how optimal sensors should be designed. Here, we develop a theoretical framework to simulate the fluorescence image of arrays of nanosensors in response to a concentration gradient. For that purpose, binding and unbinding of the analyte is simulated for each single nanosensor by using a Monte Carlo simulation and varying rate constants (kon, koff). Multiple nanosensors are arranged on a surface and exposed to a concentration pattern cA(x,y,t) of an analyte. We account for the resolution limit of light microscopy (Abbe limit) and the acquisition speed and resolution of optical setups and determine the resulting response images ΔI(x,y,t). Consequently, we introduce terms for the spatial and temporal resolution and simulate phase diagrams for different rate constants that allow us to predict how a sensor should be designed to provide a desired spatial and temporal resolution. Our results show, for example, that imaging of neurotransmitter release requires rate constants of kon = 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)and koff = 10(2) s(-1) in many scenarios, which corresponds to high dissociation constants of Kd > 100 μM. This work predicts if a given fluorescent nanosensor array (rate constants, size, shape, geometry, density) is able to resolve fast concentration changes such as neurotransmitter release from cells. Additionally, we provide rational design principles to

  16. Non-invasive imaging of skin cancer with fluorescence lifetime imaging using two photon tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) using two photon microscopy as a non-invasive technique for the diagnosis of skin lesions is described. Skin contains fluorophores including elastin, keratin, collagen, FAD and NADH. This endogenous contrast allows tissue to be imaged without the addition of exogenous agents and allows the in vivo state of cells and tissues to be studied. A modified DermaInspect® multiphoton tomography system was used to excite autofluorescence at 760 nm in vivo and on freshly excised ex vivo tissue. This instrument simultaneously acquires fluorescence lifetime images in four spectral channels between 360-655 nm using time-correlated single photon counting and can also provide hyperspectral images. The multispectral fluorescence lifetime images were spatially segmented and binned to determine lifetimes for each cell by fitting to a double exponential lifetime model. A comparative analysis between the cellular lifetimes from different diagnoses demonstrates significant diagnostic potential.

  17. In Vivo Dual Fluorescence Imaging to Detect Joint Destruction.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hongsik; Bhatti, Fazal-Ur-Rehman; Lee, Sangmin; Brand, David D; Yi, Ae-Kyung; Hasty, Karen A

    2016-10-01

    Diagnosis of cartilage damage in early stages of arthritis is vital to impede the progression of disease. In this regard, considerable progress has been made in near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) optical imaging technique. Arthritis can develop due to various mechanisms but one of the main contributors is the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), enzymes that can degrade components of the extracellular matrix. Especially, MMP-1 and MMP-13 have main roles in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis because they enhance collagen degradation in the process of arthritis. We present here a novel NIRF imaging strategy that can be used to determine the activity of MMPs and cartilage damage simultaneously by detection of exposed type II collagen in cartilage tissue. In this study, retro-orbital injection of mixed fluorescent dyes, MMPSense 750 FAST (MMP750) dye and Alexa Fluor 680 conjugated monoclonal mouse antibody immune-reactive to type II collagen, was administered in the arthritic mice. Both dyes were detected with different intensity according to degree of joint destruction in the animal. Thus, our dual fluorescence imaging method can be used to detect cartilage damage as well as MMP activity simultaneously in early stage arthritis. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Fluorescence imaging of the propagation of excitability in gastrointestinal muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Publicover, Nelson G.; Smith, Terence K.; Stevens, Randel J.

    1999-07-01

    Fluorescence imaging is a useful tool to study the sequence an dynamics of the spread of excitability in biological tissues. Gastrointestinal muscles are particularly amenable to imaging using standard video rates because the frequency of events i slow and propagation velocities are slow. Calcium-sensitive fluorescent indicators such as fluo-3 provide effective markers of excitability because optically they exhibit high quantum yields and calcium plays important biological roles including regulating intracellular signaling and muscle contraction. Video sequences of gastrointestinal tissues demonstrate the existence of multiple preferred locations to indicate excitability. The spatial and temporal resolution of microscope-based imagin system allows pacing sites to be identified within single muscle bundles. Anisotropic conduction velocities result in spatially complex patterns of excitability where the range of propagation appears to be limited by 'collisions' with neighboring excitable events or recently activated regions. Although standard video rates are generally not sufficient to monitor more rapid excitable event such as nerve action potentials, fluorescence imaging can be used to investigate excitability mechanisms in tissues such as smooth muscles where event frequencies and propagation velocities are low.

  19. Validation of image processing tools for 3-D fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dieterlen, Alain; Xu, Chengqi; Gramain, Marie-Pierre; Haeberlé, Olivier; Colicchio, Bruno; Cudel, Christophe; Jacquey, Serge; Ginglinger, Emanuelle; Jung, Georges; Jeandidier, Eric

    2002-04-01

    3-D optical fluorescent microscopy becomes nowadays an efficient tool for volumic investigation of living biological samples. Using optical sectioning technique, a stack of 2-D images is obtained. However, due to the nature of the system optical transfer function and non-optimal experimental conditions, acquired raw data usually suffer from some distortions. In order to carry out biological analysis, raw data have to be restored by deconvolution. The system identification by the point-spread function is useful to obtain the knowledge of the actual system and experimental parameters, which is necessary to restore raw data. It is furthermore helpful to precise the experimental protocol. In order to facilitate the use of image processing techniques, a multi-platform-compatible software package called VIEW3D has been developed. It integrates a set of tools for the analysis of fluorescence images from 3-D wide-field or confocal microscopy. A number of regularisation parameters for data restoration are determined automatically. Common geometrical measurements and morphological descriptors of fluorescent sites are also implemented to facilitate the characterisation of biological samples. An example of this method concerning cytogenetics is presented.

  20. Optimization of multiparameter radar estimates of rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekar, V.; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Scarchilli, Gianfranco

    1993-01-01

    The estimates of rainfall rate derived from a multiparameter radar based on reflectivity factor (R sub ZH), differential reflectivity (R sub DR), and specific differential propagation phase (R sub DP) have widely varying accuracies over the dynamic range of the natural occurrence of rainfall. This paper presents a framework to optimally combine the three estimates, R sub zH, R sub DR, and R sub DP, to derive the best estimate of rainfall using coherent multiparameter radars. The optimization procedure is demonstrated for application to multiparameter radar measurements at C band.

  1. All-optically integrated multimodality imaging system: combined photoacoustic microscopy, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhongjiang; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a multimodality imaging system by optically integrating all-optical photoacoustic microscopy (AOPAM), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence microscopy (FLM) to provide complementary information including optical absorption, optical back-scattering and fluorescence contrast of biological tissue. By sharing the same low-coherence Michelson interferometer, AOPAM and OCT could be organically optically combined to obtain the absorption and scattering information of the biological tissues. Also, owing to using the same laser source and objective lens, intrinsically registered photoacoustic and fluorescence signals are obtained to present the radiative and nonradiative transition process of absorption. Simultaneously photoacoustic angiography, tissue structure and fluorescence molecular in vivo images of mouse ear were acquired to demonstrate the capabilities of the optically integrated trimodality imaging system, which can present more information to study tumor angiogenesis, vasculature, anatomical structure and microenvironments in vivo.

  2. Picosecond fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope for imaging of living glioma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qiyin; Wang, Jingjing; Sun, Yinghua; Vernier, Thomas; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Jo, Javier; Thu, Mya M.; Gundersen, Martin A.; Marcu, Laura

    2005-03-01

    In this communication, we report the imaging of living glioma cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) technique. The growing interests in developing novel techniques for diagnosis and minimally invasive therapy of brain tumor have led to microscopic studies of subcellular structures and intracellular processes in glioma cells. Fluorescence microscopy has been used with a number of exogenous molecular probes specific for certain intracellular structures such as mitochondria, peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), and calcium concentration. When probes with overlapping emission spectra being used, separate samples are required to image each probe individually under conventional fluorescence microscopy. We have developed a wide-field FLIM microscope that uses fluorescence lifetime as an additional contrast for resolving multiple markers in the same essay. The FLIM microscope consists of a violet diode laser and a nitrogen-pumped dye laser to provide tunable sub-nanosecond excitation from UV to NIR. The detection system is based on a time-gated ICCD camera with minimum 80 ps gate width. The performance of the system was evaluated using fluorescence dyes with reported lifetime values. Living rat glioma C6 cells were stained with JC-1 and Rhodamine 123. FLIM images were acquired and their lifetimes in living cells were found in good agreements with values measured in solutions by a time-domain fluorescence spectrometer. These results indicate that imaging of glioma cells using FLIM can resolve multiple spectrally-overlapping probes and provide quantitative functional information about the intracellular environment.

  3. Compact instrument for fluorescence image-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinghua; Bhaumik, Srabani; Li, Qing; Staudinger, V Paul; Yazdanfar, Siavash

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS) is an emerging technique in oncology, neurology, and cardiology. To adapt intraoperative imaging for various surgical applications, increasingly flexible and compact FIGS instruments are necessary. We present a compact, portable FIGS system and demonstrate its use in cardiovascular mapping in a preclinical model of myocardial ischemia. Our system uses fiber optic delivery of laser diode excitation, custom optics with high collection efficiency, and compact consumer-grade cameras as a low-cost and compact alternative to open surgical FIGS systems. Dramatic size and weight reduction increases flexibility and access, and allows for handheld use or unobtrusive positioning over the surgical field.

  4. Proflavine derivatives as fluorescent imaging agents of amyloid deposits.

    PubMed

    Garin, Dominique; Oukhatar, Fatima; Mahon, Andrew B; Try, Andrew C; Dubois-Dauphin, Michel; Laferla, Frank M; Demeunynck, Martine; Sallanon, Marcelle Moulin; Chierici, Sabine

    2011-04-15

    A series of proflavine derivatives for use to further image Aβ amyloid deposits were synthesized and characterized. Aged 3xTg-AD (23 months old) mice hippocampus sections incubated with these derivatives revealed preferential labeling of amyloid plaques. Furthermore an in vitro binding study showed an inhibitory effect, although moderate, of these compounds on Aβ(40) fibril formation. This study highlights the potential of proflavine as a molecular scaffold for designing new Aβ imaging agents, its native fluorescence allowing in vitro neuropathological staining in AD damaged brain sections.

  5. Time-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging applied to biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Elson, Dan; Requejo-Isidro, Jose; Munro, Ian; Reavell, Fred; Siegel, Jan; Suhling, Klaus; Tadrous, Paul; Benninger, Richard; Lanigan, Peter; McGinty, James; Talbot, Clifford; Treanor, Bebhinn; Webb, Stephen; Sandison, Ann; Wallace, Andrew; Davis, Dan; Lever, John; Neil, Mark; Phillips, David; Stamp, Gordon; French, Paul

    2004-08-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is a functional imaging methodology that can provide information, not only concerning the localisation of specific fluorophores, but also about the local fluorophore environment. It may be implemented in scanning confocal or multi-photon microscopes, or in wide-field microscopes and endoscopes. When applied to tissue autofluorescence, it reveals intrinsic excellent contrast between different types and states of tissue. This article aims to review our recent progress in developing time-domain FLIM technology for microscopy and endoscopy and applying it to biological tissue.

  6. Compact instrument for fluorescence image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinghua; Bhaumik, Srabani; Li, Qing; Staudinger, V. Paul; Yazdanfar, Siavash

    2010-03-01

    Fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS) is an emerging technique in oncology, neurology, and cardiology. To adapt intraoperative imaging for various surgical applications, increasingly flexible and compact FIGS instruments are necessary. We present a compact, portable FIGS system and demonstrate its use in cardiovascular mapping in a preclinical model of myocardial ischemia. Our system uses fiber optic delivery of laser diode excitation, custom optics with high collection efficiency, and compact consumer-grade cameras as a low-cost and compact alternative to open surgical FIGS systems. Dramatic size and weight reduction increases flexibility and access, and allows for handheld use or unobtrusive positioning over the surgical field.

  7. Refractive index sensing of green fluorescent proteins in living cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Timo K; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-04-15

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91(phox), which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase enzyme, in human myeloid PLB-985 cells and showed by high-resolution confocal fluorescence microscopy that GFP-Rac2 and GFP-gp91(phox) are targeted to the cytosol and to membranes, respectively. Frequency-domain FLIM experiments on these PLB-985 cells resulted in average fluorescence lifetimes of 2.70 ns for cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and 2.31 ns for membrane-bound GFP-gp91(phox). By comparing these lifetimes with a calibration curve obtained by measuring GFP lifetimes in PBS/glycerol mixtures of known refractive index, we found that the local refractive indices of cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and membrane-targeted GFP-gp91(phox) are approximately 1.38 and approximately 1.46, respectively, which is in good correspondence with reported values for the cytosol and plasma membrane measured by other techniques. The ability to measure the local refractive index of proteins in living cells by FLIM may be important in revealing intracellular spatial heterogeneities within organelles such as the plasma and phagosomal membrane.

  8. Two-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime imaging using a 5-kHz/110-ps gated image intensifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Keith; Hyde, Sam C. W.; Barry, Nicholas P.; Dainty, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.; Hughes, Alun J.; Lever, M. J.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, Anthony K. L.; Hares, Jonathan D.; Kellett, Paul A.

    1997-05-01

    We report the demonstration of a high temporal resolution fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) system using a time- gated image intensifier to provide whole field FLIM images. The gate width has been optimized to 110 ps, and changes in the environment of a fluorescent phantom, causing lifetime differences of 20 ps, have been detected. Environmental changes of the fluorescent indicator, Lucifer Yellow, have been sensed by measuring changes in its fluorescence lifetime when unbound and when bound to the protein albumin.

  9. Polymer-encapsulated organic nanoparticles for fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Liu, Bin

    2014-09-21

    Polymer encapsulated organic nanoparticles have recently attracted increasing attention in the biomedical field because of their unique optical properties, easy fabrication and outstanding performance as imaging and therapeutic agents. Of particular importance is the polymer encapsulated nanoparticles containing conjugated polymers (CP) or fluorogens with aggregation induced emission (AIE) characteristics as the core, which have shown significant advantages in terms of tunable brightness, superb photo- and physical stability, good biocompatibility, potential biodegradability and facile surface functionalization. In this review, we summarize the latest advances in the development of polymer encapsulated CP and AIE fluorogen nanoparticles, including preparation methods, material design and matrix selection, nanoparticle fabrication and surface functionalization for fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging. We also discuss their specific applications in cell labeling, targeted in vitro and in vivo imaging, blood vessel imaging, cell tracing, inflammation monitoring and molecular imaging. We specially focus on strategies to fine-tune the nanoparticle property (e.g. size and fluorescence quantum yield) through precise engineering of the organic cores and careful selection of polymer matrices. The review also highlights the merits and limitations of these nanoparticles as well as strategies used to overcome the limitations. The challenges and perspectives for the future development of polymer encapsulated organic nanoparticles are also discussed.

  10. Implantable CMOS imaging device with absorption filters for green fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunaga, Yoshinori; Haruta, Makito; Takehara, Hironari; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Green fluorescent materials such as Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) and fluorescein are often used for observing neural activities. Thus, it is important to observe the fluorescence in a freely moving state in order to understand neural activities corresponding to behaviors. In this work, we developed an implantable CMOS imaging device for in-vivo green fluorescence imaging with efficient excitation light rejection using a combination of absorption filters. An interference filter is usually used for a fluorescence microscope in order to achieve high fluorescence imaging sensitivity. However, in the case of the implantable device, interference filters are not suitable because their transmission spectra depend on incident angle. To solve this problem we used two kinds of absorption filters that do not have angle dependence. An absorption filter consisting of yellow dye (VARYFAST YELLOW 3150) was coated on the pixel array of an image sensor. The rejection ratio of ideal excitation light (490 nm) against green fluorescence (510 nm) was 99.66%. However, the blue LED as an excitation light source has a broad emission spectrum and its intensity at 510 nm is 2.2 x 10-2 times the emission peak intensity. By coating LEDs with the emission absorption filters, the intensity of the unwanted component of the excitation light was reduced to 1.4 x 10-4. Using the combination of absorption filters, we achieved excitation light transmittance of 10-5 onto the image sensor. It is expected that high-sensitivity green fluorescence imaging of neural activities in a freely moving mouse will be possible by using this technology.

  11. High-contrast fluorescence imaging based on the polarization dependence of the fluorescence enhancement using an optical interference mirror slide.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Mitsuru; Akimoto, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    High-contrast fluorescence imaging using an optical interference mirror (OIM) slide that enhances the fluorescence from a fluorophore located on top of the OIM surface is reported. To enhance the fluorescence and reduce the background light of the OIM, transverse-electric-polarized excitation light was used as incident light, and the transverse-magnetic-polarized fluorescence signal was detected. As a result, an approximate 100-fold improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio was achieved through a 13-fold enhancement of the fluorescence signal and an 8-fold reduction of the background light.

  12. Fluorescence Imaging Study of Transition in Underexpanded Free Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) is demonstrated to be a valuable tool for studying the onset of transition to turbulence. For this study, we have used PLIF of nitric oxide (NO) to image underexpanded axisymmetric free jets issuing into a low-pressure chamber through a smooth converging nozzle with a sonic orifice. Flows were studied over a range of Reynolds numbers and nozzle-exit-to-ambient pressure ratios with the aim of empirically determining criteria governing the onset of turbulence. We have developed an image processing technique, involving calculation of the standard deviation of the intensity in PLIF images, in order to aid in the identification of turbulence. We have used the resulting images to identify laminar, transitional and turbulent flow regimes. Jet scaling parameters were used to define a rescaled Reynolds number that incorporates the influence of a varying pressure ratio. An empirical correlation was found between transition length and this rescaled Reynolds number for highly underexpanded jets.

  13. Particle Image Velocimetry Applications Using Fluorescent Dye-Doped Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosky, Brian J.; Maisto, Pietro; Lowe, K. Todd; Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Tiemsin, Patsy I.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Polystyrene latex sphere particles are widely used to seed flows for velocimetry techniques such as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). These particles may be doped with fluorescent dyes such that signals spectrally shifted from the incident laser wavelength may be detected via Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). An attractive application of the LIF signal is achieving velocimetry in the presence of strong interference from laser scatter, opening up new research possibilities very near solid surfaces or at liquid/gas interfaces. Additionally, LIF signals can be used to tag different fluid streams to study mixing. While fluorescence-based PIV has been performed by many researchers for particles dispersed in water flows, the current work is among the first in applying the technique to micron-scale particles dispersed in a gas. A key requirement for such an application is addressing potential health hazards from fluorescent dyes; successful doping of Kiton Red 620 (KR620) has enabled the use of this relatively safe dye for fluorescence PIV for the first time. In this paper, basic applications proving the concept of PIV using the LIF signal from KR620-doped particles are exhibited for a free jet and a twophase flow apparatus. Results indicate that while the fluorescence PIV techniques are roughly 2 orders of magnitude weaker than Mie scattering, they provide a viable method for obtaining data in flow regions previously inaccessible via standard PIV. These techniques have the potential to also complement Mie scattering signals, for example in multi-stream and/or multi-phase experiments.

  14. Two photon fluorescence imaging of lipid membrane domains and potentials using advanced fluorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilin, Vasyl; Darwich, Zeinab; Richert, Ludovic; Didier, Pascal; Klymchenko, Andrey; Mély, Yves

    2013-02-01

    Biomembranes are ordered and dynamic nanoscale structures critical for cell functions. The biological functions of the membranes strongly depend on their physicochemical properties, such as electrostatics, phase state, viscosity, polarity and hydration. These properties are essential for the membrane structure and the proper folding and function of membrane proteins. To monitor these properties, fluorescence techniques and notably, two-photon microscopy appear highly suited due to their exquisite sensitivity and their capability to operate in complex biological systems, such as living cells and tissues. In this context, we have developed multiparametric environment-sensitive fluorescent probes tailored for precise location in the membrane bilayer. We notably developed probes of the 3-hydroxychromone family, characterized by an excited state intramolecular proton transfer reaction, which generates two tautomeric emissive species with well-separated emission bands. As a consequence, the response of these probes to changes in their environment could be monitored through changes in the ratios of the two bands, as well as through changes in the fluorescence lifetimes. Using two-photon ratiometric imaging and FLIM, these probes were used to monitor the surface membrane potential, and were applied to detect apoptotic cells and image membrane domains.

  15. Compatibility in multiparameter quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragy, Sammy; Jarzyna, Marcin; Demkowicz-Dobrzański, Rafał

    2016-11-01

    Simultaneous estimation of multiple parameters in quantum metrological models is complicated by factors relating to the (i) existence of a single probe state allowing for optimal sensitivity for all parameters of interest, (ii) existence of a single measurement optimally extracting information from the probe state on all the parameters, and (iii) statistical independence of the estimated parameters. We consider the situation when these concerns present no obstacle, and for every estimated parameter the variance obtained in the multiparameter scheme is equal to that of an optimal scheme for that parameter alone, assuming all other parameters are perfectly known. We call such models compatible. In establishing a rigorous theoretical framework for investigating compatibility, we clarify some ambiguities and inconsistencies present in the literature and discuss several examples to highlight interesting features of unitary and nonunitary parameter estimation, as well as deriving new bounds for physical problems of interest, such as the simultaneous estimation of phase and local dephasing.

  16. Normalized fluorescence lifetime imaging for tumor identification and margin delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Adria J.; Papour, Asael; Bhargava, Siddharth; Taylor, Zach; Grundfest, Warren S.; Stafsudd, Oscar M.

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a technique that has been proven to produce quantitative and qualitative differentiation and identification of substances with good specificity and sensitivity based on lifetime extracted information. This technique has shown the ability to also differentiate between a wide range of tissue types to identify malignant from benign tissue in vivo and ex vivo. However, the complexity, long duration and effort required to generate this information has limited the adoption of these techniques in a clinical setting. Our group has developed a time-resolved imaging system (patent pending) that does not require the extraction of lifetimes or use of complex curve fitting algorithms to display the needed information. The technique, entitled Lifetime Fluorescence Imaging (LFI, or NoFYI), converts fluorescence lifetime decay information directly into visual contrast. Initial studies using Fluorescein and Rhodamine-B demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. Subsequent studies demonstrated the ability to separate collagen and elastin powders. The technique uses nanosecond pulsed UV LEDs at 375 nm for average illumination intensities of ~4.5 μW on the tissue surface with detection by a gated CCD camera. To date, we have imaged 11 surgical head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and brain cancer biopsy specimens including 5 normal and 6 malignant samples. Images at multiple wavelengths clearly demonstrate differentiation between benign and malignant tissue, which was later confirmed by histology. Contrast was obtained between fluorophores with 35 μm spatial resolution and an SNR of ~30 dB allowing us to clearly define tumor margins in these highly invasive cancers. This method is capable of providing both anatomical and chemical information for the pathologist and the surgeon. These results suggest that this technology has a possible role in identifying tumors in tissue specimens and detecting tumor margins

  17. Intracellular temperature mapping with a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Kohki; Inada, Noriko; Gota, Chie; Harada, Yoshie; Funatsu, Takashi; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2012-02-28

    Cellular functions are fundamentally regulated by intracellular temperature, which influences biochemical reactions inside a cell. Despite the important contributions to biological and medical applications that it would offer, intracellular temperature mapping has not been achieved. Here we demonstrate the first intracellular temperature mapping based on a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The spatial and temperature resolutions of our thermometry were at the diffraction limited level (200 nm) and 0.18-0.58 °C. The intracellular temperature distribution we observed indicated that the nucleus and centrosome of a COS7 cell, both showed a significantly higher temperature than the cytoplasm and that the temperature gap between the nucleus and the cytoplasm differed depending on the cell cycle. The heat production from mitochondria was also observed as a proximal local temperature increase. These results showed that our new intracellular thermometry could determine an intrinsic relationship between the temperature and organelle function.

  18. Intracellular temperature mapping with a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Kohki; Inada, Noriko; Gota, Chie; Harada, Yoshie; Funatsu, Takashi; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2012-01-01

    Cellular functions are fundamentally regulated by intracellular temperature, which influences biochemical reactions inside a cell. Despite the important contributions to biological and medical applications that it would offer, intracellular temperature mapping has not been achieved. Here we demonstrate the first intracellular temperature mapping based on a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The spatial and temperature resolutions of our thermometry were at the diffraction limited level (200 nm) and 0.18–0.58 °C. The intracellular temperature distribution we observed indicated that the nucleus and centrosome of a COS7 cell, both showed a significantly higher temperature than the cytoplasm and that the temperature gap between the nucleus and the cytoplasm differed depending on the cell cycle. The heat production from mitochondria was also observed as a proximal local temperature increase. These results showed that our new intracellular thermometry could determine an intrinsic relationship between the temperature and organelle function. PMID:22426226

  19. Flame imaging using planar laser induced fluorescence of sulfur dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honza, Rene; Ding, Carl-Philipp; Dreizler, Andreas; Böhm, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    Laser induced fluorescence of sulfur dioxide (SO2-PLIF) has been demonstrated as a useful tool for flame imaging. Advantage was taken from the strong temperature dependence of the SO2 fluorescence signal. SO2 fluorescence intensity increases by more than one order of magnitude if the temperature changes from ambient conditions to adiabatic flame temperatures of stoichiometric methane-air flames. This results in a steep gradient of SO2-PLIF intensities at the reaction zone and therefore can be used as a reliable flame marker. SO2 can be excited electronically using the fourth-harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm. This is an attractive alternative to OH-LIF, a well-recognized flame front marker, because no frequency-doubled dye lasers are needed. This simplifies the experimental setup and is advantageous for measurements at high repetition rates where dye bleaching can become an issue. To prove the performance of this approach, SO2-PLIF measurements were performed simultaneously with OH-PLIF on laminar premixed methane-air Bunsen flames for equivalence ratios between 0.9 and 1.25. These measurements were compared to 1D laminar flamelet simulations. The SO2 fluorescence signal was found to follow the temperature rise of the flame and is located closer to the steep temperature gradient than OH. Finally, the combined SO2- and OH-PLIF setup was applied to a spark ignition IC-engine to visualize the development of the early flame kernel.

  20. Improving quantification of intravascular fluorescence imaging using structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallas, Georgios; Brooks, Dana H.; Rosenthal, Amir; Nika Nudelman, R.; Mauskapf, Adam; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2012-10-01

    Intravascular near-infrared fluorescence (iNIRF) imaging can enable the in vivo visualization of biomarkers of vascular pathology, including high-risk plaques. The technique resolves the bio-distribution of systemically administered fluorescent probes with molecular specificity in the vessel wall. However, the geometrical variations that may occur in the distance between fibre-tip and vessel wall can lead to signal intensity variations and challenge quantification. Herein we examined whether the use of anatomical information of the cross-section vessel morphology, obtained from co-registered intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), can lead to quantification improvements when fibre-tip and vessel wall distance variations are present. The algorithm developed employs a photon propagation model derived from phantom experiments that is used to calculate the relative attenuation of fluorescence signals as they are collected over 360° along the vessel wall, and utilizes it to restore accurate fluorescence readings. The findings herein point to quantification improvements when employing hybrid iNIRF, with possible implications to the clinical detection of high-risk plaques or blood vessel theranostics.

  1. Development of Fluorescence Imaging Lidar for Boat-Based Coral Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasano, Masahiko; Imasato, Motonobu; Yamano, Hiroya; Oguma, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    A fluorescence imaging lidar system installed in a boat-towable buoy has been developed for the observation of reef-building corals. Long-range fluorescent images of the sea bed can be recorded in the daytime with this system. The viability of corals is clear in these fluorescent images because of the innate fluorescent proteins. In this study, the specifications and performance of the system are shown.

  2. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of symbionts and fluorescent proteins in reef corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Guy; Salih, Anya

    2005-03-01

    Reef-building corals are dependent on dinoflagellate algal symbionts (zooxanthellae). Within the range of habitats of any one coral species there can be huge variations in light intensities, so there is a risk of photoinhibition from excess light. In extremes of light and heat, senescent algae are expelled en masse, a phenomenon known as coral bleaching. In freshly isolated tissue the chlorophyll fluorescence has a lifetime of ~1.1ns. 6 hours and 15 hours after isolation the zooxanthellae looked visually healthy, but the lifetimes had increased to 2ns after 6 hours and 2.2ns after 15 hours. Zooxanthellae which were visibly damaged or necrotic had a mean lifetime of 3ns. Lifetime of chlorophyll fluorescence is thus a sensitive indicator, revealing effects in cell metabolism before any structural changes are evident. The occurrence of FRET between fluorescent proteins in corals has already been reported and time-resolved spectra have shown the effect on fluorescent lifetime, but without any spatial resolution. Lifetime confocal microscopy offers lower time resolution but excellent spatial resolution. Lifetimes of the isolated A. millepora pigments amilFP490, amilFP504 and amilFP593 (names indicate emission peaks) were 2.8ns, 2.9ns and 2.9ns respectively. In the coral sample, imaging the entire emission spectrum from 420nm, the mean lifetime was reduced to 1.5ns, implying that FRET was occurring. Looking just at the fluorescence from FRET donors the lifetime was even shorter, at 1.3ns, supporting this interpretation.

  3. Cluster analysis applied to multiparameter geophysical dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giuseppe, M. G.; Troiano, A.; Troise, C.; De Natale, G.

    2012-04-01

    Multi-parameter acquisition is a common geophysical field practice nowadays. Regularly seismic velocity and attenuation, gravity and electromagnetic dataset are acquired in a certain area, to obtain a complete characterization of the some investigate feature of the subsoil. Such a richness of information is often underestimated, although an integration of the analysis could provide a notable improving in the imaging of the investigated structures, mostly because the handling of distinct parameters and their joint inversion still presents several and severe problems. Post-inversion statistical techniques represent a promising approach to these questions, providing a quick, simple and elegant way to obtain this advantageous but complex integration. We present an approach based on the partition of the analyzed multi parameter dataset in a number of different classes, identified as localized regions of high correlation. These classes, or 'Cluster', are structured in such a way that the observations pertaining to a certain group are more similar to each other than the observations belonging to a different one, according to an optimal logical criterion. Regions of the subsoil sharing the same physical characteristic are so identified, without a-priori or empirical relationship linking the distinct measured parameters. The retrieved imaging results highly affordable in a statistical sense, specifically due to this lack of external hypothesis that are, instead, indispensable in a full joint inversion, were works, as matter of fact, just a real constrain for the inversion process, not seldom of relative consistence. We apply our procedure to a certain number of experimental dataset, related to several structures at very different scales presents in the Campanian district (southern Italy). These structures goes from the shallows evidence of the active fault zone originating the M 7.9 Irpinia earthquake to the main feature characterizing the Campi Flegrei Caldera and the Mt

  4. Ultrafast superresolution fluorescence imaging with spinning disk confocal microscope optics.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Okada, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    Most current superresolution (SR) microscope techniques surpass the diffraction limit at the expense of temporal resolution, compromising their applications to live-cell imaging. Here we describe a new SR fluorescence microscope based on confocal microscope optics, which we name the spinning disk superresolution microscope (SDSRM). Theoretically, the SDSRM is equivalent to a structured illumination microscope (SIM) and achieves a spatial resolution of 120 nm, double that of the diffraction limit of wide-field fluorescence microscopy. However, the SDSRM is 10 times faster than a conventional SIM because SR signals are recovered by optical demodulation through the stripe pattern of the disk. Therefore a single SR image requires only a single averaged image through the rotating disk. On the basis of this theory, we modified a commercial spinning disk confocal microscope. The improved resolution around 120 nm was confirmed with biological samples. The rapid dynamics of micro-tubules, mitochondria, lysosomes, and endosomes were observed with temporal resolutions of 30-100 frames/s. Because our method requires only small optical modifications, it will enable an easy upgrade from an existing spinning disk confocal to a SR microscope for live-cell imaging.

  5. Ultrafast superresolution fluorescence imaging with spinning disk confocal microscope optics

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Okada, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Most current superresolution (SR) microscope techniques surpass the diffraction limit at the expense of temporal resolution, compromising their applications to live-cell imaging. Here we describe a new SR fluorescence microscope based on confocal microscope optics, which we name the spinning disk superresolution microscope (SDSRM). Theoretically, the SDSRM is equivalent to a structured illumination microscope (SIM) and achieves a spatial resolution of 120 nm, double that of the diffraction limit of wide-field fluorescence microscopy. However, the SDSRM is 10 times faster than a conventional SIM because SR signals are recovered by optical demodulation through the stripe pattern of the disk. Therefore a single SR image requires only a single averaged image through the rotating disk. On the basis of this theory, we modified a commercial spinning disk confocal microscope. The improved resolution around 120 nm was confirmed with biological samples. The rapid dynamics of micro­tubules, mitochondria, lysosomes, and endosomes were observed with temporal resolutions of 30–100 frames/s. Because our method requires only small optical modifications, it will enable an easy upgrade from an existing spinning disk confocal to a SR microscope for live-cell imaging. PMID:25717185

  6. Selective Detection of Neurotransmitters by Fluorescence and Chemiluminescence Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ziqiang Wang; Edward S. Yeung

    2001-08-06

    In recent years, luminescence imaging has been widely employed in neurochemical analysis. It has a number of advantages for the study of neuronal and other biological cells: (1) a particular molecular species or cellular constituent can be selectively visualized in the presence of a large excess of other species in a heterogeneous environment; (2) low concentration detection limits can be achieved because of the inherent sensitivity associated with fluorescence and chemiluminescence; (3) low excitation intensities can be used so that long-term observation can be realized while the viability of the specimen is preserved; and (4) excellent spatial resolution can be obtained with the light microscope so subcellular compartments can be identified. With good sensitivity, temporal and spatial resolution, the flux of ions and molecules and the distribution and dynamics of intracellular species can be measured in real time with specific luminescence probes, substrates, or with native fluorescence. A noninvasive detection scheme based on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymatic assay combined with microscopy was developed to measure the glutamate release in cultured cells from the central nervous system (CNS). The enzyme reaction is very specific and sensitive. The detection limit with CCD imaging is down to {micro}M levels of glutamate with reasonable response time. They also found that chemiluminescence associated with the ATP-dependent reaction between luciferase and luciferin can be used to image ATP at levels down to 10 nM in the millisecond time scale. Similar imaging experiments should be feasible in a broad spectrum of biological systems.

  7. Portable multispectral fluorescence imaging system for food safety applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefcourt, Alan M.; Kim, Moon S.; Chen, Yud-Ren

    2004-03-01

    Fluorescence can be a sensitive method for detecting food contaminants. Of particular interest is detection of fecal contamination as feces is the source of many pathogenic organisms. Feces generally contain chlorophyll a and related compounds due to ingestion of plant materials, and these compounds can readily be detected using fluorescence techniques. Described is a fluorescence-imaging system consisting primarily of a UV light source, an intensified camera with a six-position filter wheel, and software for controlling the system and automatically analyzing the resulting images. To validate the system, orchard apples artificially contaminated with dairy feces were used in a "hands-on" public demonstration. The contamination sites were easily identified using automated edge detection and threshold detection algorithms. In addition, by applying feces to apples and then washing sets of apples at hourly intervals, it was determined that five h was the minimum contact time that allowed identification of the contamination site after the apples were washed. There are many potential uses for this system, including studying the efficacy of apple washing systems.

  8. Nanoparticles and nanocomposites for fluorescence sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demchenko, Alexander P.

    2013-06-01

    The assortment of fluorescence reporters is changing dramatically. Traditionally explored intrinsic fluorescence of biological macromolecules and cellular pigments and of externally introduced organic dyes are presently in strong competition with new nanomaterials. Among them are conjugated polymers, semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots), up-converting nanocrystals, magic-size clusters of silver and gold, nanodiamonds and carbon dots. They demonstrate diverse photophysical behavior and allow one to obtain diverse information when used in analytical tools or when they form images in biological systems. Based on them, functional nanocomposites displaying a variety of useful features, thus extending dramatically the information content of output data, can be constructed. We describe their properties and compare them with those of small-molecular emitters, such as organic dyes. With their aid, one can modulate over a wide range the wavelengths of excitation and emission, the lifetimes and anisotropies and design the systems with ‘superenhancement’ and ‘superquenching’. Such unlimited possibilities are offered by combining different types of luminophores based on electronic conjugation, plasmonic effects or excited-state resonance energy transfer. This tutorial review provides a comparative analysis of the properties of new nanoscale materials and of their hybrid nanocomposites for applications in fluorescence sensing and imaging.

  9. Photostable and photoswitching fluorescent dyes for super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Minoshima, Masafumi; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2017-01-12

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is a recently developed imaging tool for biological researches. Several methods have been developed for detection of fluorescence signals from molecules in a subdiffraction-limited area, breaking the diffraction limit of the conventional optical microscopies and allowing visualization of detailed macromolecular structures in cells. As objectives are exposed to intense laser in the optical systems, fluorophores for super-resolution microscopy must be tolerated even under severe light irradiation conditions. The fluorophores must also be photoactivatable and photoswitchable for single-molecule localization-based super-resolution microscopy, because the number of active fluorophores must be controlled by light irradiation. This has led to growing interest in these properties in the development of fluorophores. In this mini-review, we focus on the development of photostable and photoswitching fluorescent dyes for super-resolution microscopy. We introduce recent efforts, including improvement of fluorophore photostability and control of photoswitching behaviors of fluorophores based on photochemical and photophysical processes. Understanding and manipulation of chemical reactions in excited fluorophores can develop highly photostable and efficiently photoswitchable fluorophores that are suitable for super-resolution imaging applications.

  10. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous biomarker of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Rupsa; Alfonso-García, Alba; Cinco, Rachel; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in excess of normal physiological level results in oxidative stress. This can lead to a range of pathological conditions including inflammation, diabetes mellitus, cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disease. Biomarkers of oxidative stress play an important role in understanding the pathogenesis and treatment of these diseases. A number of fluorescent biomarkers exist. However, a non-invasive and label-free identification technique would be advantageous for in vivo measurements. In this work we establish a spectroscopic method to identify oxidative stress in cells and tissues by fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). We identified an autofluorescent, endogenous species with a characteristic fluorescent lifetime distribution as a probe for oxidative stress. To corroborate our hypothesis that these species are products of lipid oxidation by ROS, we correlate the spectroscopic signals arising from lipid droplets by combining FLIM with THG and CARS microscopy which are established techniques for selective lipid body imaging. Further, we performed spontaneous Raman spectral analysis at single points of the sample which provided molecular vibration information characteristics of lipid droplets. PMID:25993434

  11. RNA Imaging with Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of both the copy number and spatial distribution of large fractions of the transcriptome in single-cells could revolutionize our understanding of a variety of cellular and tissue behaviors in both healthy and diseased states. Single-molecule Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (smFISH)—an approach where individual RNAs are labeled with fluorescent probes and imaged in their native cellular and tissue context—provides both the copy number and spatial context of RNAs but has been limited in the number of RNA species that can be measured simultaneously. Here we describe Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (MERFISH), a massively parallelized form of smFISH that can image and identify hundreds to thousands of different RNA species simultaneously with high accuracy in individual cells in their native spatial context. We provide detailed protocols on all aspects of MERFISH, including probe design, data collection, and data analysis to allow interested laboratories to perform MERFISH measurements themselves. PMID:27241748

  12. Localizing heat-generating defects using fluorescent microthermal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tangyunyong, P.; Liang, A.Y.; Righter, A.W.; Barton, D.L.; Soden, J.M.

    1996-10-01

    Fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI) involves coating a sample surface with a thin fluorescent film that, upon exposure to UV light source, emits temperature-dependent fluorescence. The principle behind FMI was thoroughly reviewed at the ISTFA in 1994. In two recent publications, we identified several factors in film preparation and data processing that dramatically improved the thermal resolution and sensitivity of FMI. These factors include signal averaging, the use of base mixture films, film stabilization and film curing. These findings significantly enhance the capability of FMI as a failure analysis tool. In this paper, we show several examples that use FMI to quickly localize heat-generating defects (``hot spots``). When used with other failure analysis techniques such as focused ion beam (FIB) cross sectioning and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, we demonstrate that FMI is a powerful tool to efficiently identify the root cause of failures in complex ICs. In addition to defect localization, we use a failing IC to I determine the sensitivity of FMI (i.e., the lowest power that can be detected) in an ideal situation where the defects are very localized and near the surface.

  13. Image registration and averaging of low laser power two-photon fluorescence images of mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Nathan S.; Palczewska, Grazyna; Stremplewski, Patrycjusz; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Kern, Timothy S.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPM) is now being used routinely to image live cells for extended periods deep within tissues, including the retina and other structures within the eye . However, very low laser power is a requirement to obtain TPM images of the retina safely. Unfortunately, a reduction in laser power also reduces the signal-to-noise ratio of collected images, making it difficult to visualize structural details. Here, image registration and averaging methods applied to TPM images of the eye in living animals (without the need for auxiliary hardware) demonstrate the structural information obtained with laser power down to 1 mW. Image registration provided between 1.4% and 13.0% improvement in image quality compared to averaging images without registrations when using a high-fluorescence template, and between 0.2% and 12.0% when employing the average of collected images as the template. Also, a diminishing return on image quality when more images were used to obtain the averaged image is shown. This work provides a foundation for obtaining informative TPM images with laser powers of 1 mW, compared to previous levels for imaging mice ranging between 6.3 mW [PalczewskaG., Nat Med. 20, 785 (2014)24952647 SharmaR., Biomed. Opt. Express 4, 1285 (2013)24009992]. PMID:27446697

  14. Image registration and averaging of low laser power two-photon fluorescence images of mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Nathan S; Palczewska, Grazyna; Stremplewski, Patrycjusz; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Kern, Timothy S; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-07-01

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPM) is now being used routinely to image live cells for extended periods deep within tissues, including the retina and other structures within the eye . However, very low laser power is a requirement to obtain TPM images of the retina safely. Unfortunately, a reduction in laser power also reduces the signal-to-noise ratio of collected images, making it difficult to visualize structural details. Here, image registration and averaging methods applied to TPM images of the eye in living animals (without the need for auxiliary hardware) demonstrate the structural information obtained with laser power down to 1 mW. Image registration provided between 1.4% and 13.0% improvement in image quality compared to averaging images without registrations when using a high-fluorescence template, and between 0.2% and 12.0% when employing the average of collected images as the template. Also, a diminishing return on image quality when more images were used to obtain the averaged image is shown. This work provides a foundation for obtaining informative TPM images with laser powers of 1 mW, compared to previous levels for imaging mice ranging between 6.3 mW [Palczewska G., Nat Med.20, 785 (2014) Sharma R., Biomed. Opt. Express4, 1285 (2013)].

  15. Near Infrared Fluorescent NanoGUMBOS for Biomedical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bwambok, David K.; El-Zahab, Bilal; Challa, Santhosh K.; Li, Min; Chandler, Lin; Baker, Gary A.; Warner, Isiah M.

    2009-01-01

    Herein, we report on near infrared (NIR) fluorescent nanoparticles generated from an emergent class of materials we refer to as a Group of Uniform Materials Based on Organic Salts (GUMBOS). GUMBOS are largely frozen ionic liquids, although the concept is more general and is also easily applied to solid ionic materials with melting points in excess of 100 °C. Nanoparticles based on GUMBOS (nanoGUMBOS) derived from a NIR fluorophore are prepared using a reprecipitation method and evaluated for in vivo fluorescence imaging. Due to their uniformity, single-step preparation, and composite nature, nanoGUMBOS help to resolve issues with dye leakage problems innate to alternate cellular stains and unlock a myriad of applications for these materials, highlighting exciting possibilities for multifunctional nanoGUMBOS. PMID:19928781

  16. Development of temperature imaging using two-line atomic fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Medwell, Paul R; Chan, Qing N; Kalt, Peter A M; Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Dally, Bassam B; Nathan, Graham J

    2009-02-20

    This work aims to advance understanding of the coupling between temperature and soot. The ability to image temperature using the two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) technique is demonstrated. Previous TLAF theory is extended from linear excitation into the nonlinear fluence regime. Nonlinear regime two-line atomic fluorescence (NTLAF) provides superior signal and reduces single-shot uncertainty from 250 K for conventional TLAF down to 100 K. NTLAF is shown to resolve the temperature profile across the stoichiometric envelope for hydrogen, ethylene, and natural gas flames, with deviation from thermocouple measurements not exceeding 100 K, and typically ≲30 K. Measurements in flames containing soot demonstrate good capacity of NTLAF to exclude interferences that hamper most two-dimensional thermometry techniques.

  17. Imaging atoms from resonance fluorescence spectrum beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Al-Amri, Mohammad; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2014-03-01

    We calculate the resonance fluorescence spectrum of a linear chain of two-level atoms driven by a gradient coherent laser field. The result shows that we can determine the positions of atoms from the spectrum even when the atoms locate within subwavelength range and the dipole-dipole interaction is significant. This far-field resonance fluorescence localization microscopy method does not require point-by-point scanning and it may be more time-efficient. We also give a possible scheme to extract the position information in an extended region without requiring more peak power of laser. We also briefly discuss how to do a 2D imaging based on our scheme. This work is supported by grants from the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) and the Qatar National Research Fund (QNRF) under the NPRP project.

  18. Measurement of Nanoparticle Magnetic Hyperthermia Using Fluorescent Microthermal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaowan; van Keuren, Edward

    Nanoparticle magnetic hyperthermia uses the application of an AC magnetic field to ferromagnetic nanoparticles to elevate the temperature of cancer cells. The principle of hyperthermia as a true cell-specific therapy is that tumor cells are more sensitive to high temperature, so it is of great importance to control the locality and magnitude of the temperature differences. One technique to measure temperature variations on microscopic length scales is fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI). Since it is the local temperature that is measured in FMI, effects such as heating due to nearby field coils can be accounted for. A dye, the rare earth chelate europium thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (Eu:TTA), with a strong temperature-dependent fluorescence emission has been incorporated into magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a polymer films. FMI experiments were carried out on these samples under an applied high frequency magnetic field. Preliminary results show that FMI is a promising technique for characterizing the local generation of heat in nanoparticle magnetic hyperthermia.

  19. A simple protocol for attenuating the auto-fluorescence of cyanobacteria for optimized fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Perrine; Ploux, Olivier; Méjean, Annick

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria contain pigments, which generate auto-fluorescence that interferes with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging of cyanobacteria. We describe simple chemical treatments using CuSO4 or H2O2 that significantly reduce the auto-fluorescence of Microcystis strains. These protocols were successfully applied in FISH experiments using 16S rRNA specific probes and filamentous cyanobacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fluorescence encoded super resolution imaging based on a location estimation algorithm for high-density fluorescence probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Takahiro; Kimura, Hitoshi; Ogura, Yusuke; Tanida, Jun

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a fluorescence encoded super resolution technique based on an estimation algorithm to determine locations of high-density fluorescence emitters. In our method, several types of fluorescence coded probes are employed to reduce densities of target molecules labeled with individual codes. By applying an estimation algorithm to each coded image, the locations of the high density probes can be determined. Due to multiplexed fluorescence imaging, this approach will provide fast super resolution microscopy. In experiments, we evaluated the performance of the method using probes with different fluorescence wavelengths. Numerical simulation results show that the locations of probes with the density of 200 μ m^{-2} , which is a typical membrane-receptor expression level, are determined with acquisition of 16 different coded images.

  1. Fluorescence and optical-resolution photoacoustic imaging through capillary waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasio, Nicolino; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Papadopoulos, Ioannis N.; Farahi, Salma; Simandoux, Olivier; Huignard, Jean-Pierre; Bossy, Emmanuel; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopy can be used to obtain high-resolution images at large depths in biological tissues. Usually endoscopic devices have a diameter ranging from 1 to few millimeters. Using digital phase conjugation, it is possible to adapt ultrathin multimode fibers to endoscopic purposes. Recently, we demonstrated that a 330 μm diameter, water-filled silica capillary waveguide can guide high frequency ultrasound waves through a 3 cm thick fat layer, allowing optical resolution photoacoustic imaging. Here we demonstrate that using digital phase conjugation, the same water-filled capillary waveguide (3 cm long) can be used as an endoscopic probe to obtain both fluorescence and optical resolution photoacoustic imaging, with no optical or acoustic elements at the tip of the waveguide. We study the consequences of using digital phase conjugation combined with a capillary waveguide and we conclude with possible future improvements of our endoscopic approach.

  2. Snapshot spectrally encoded fluorescence imaging through a fiber bundle.

    PubMed

    Bedard, Noah; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S

    2012-08-01

    Fiber optic endomicroscopy is a valuable tool for clinical diagnostics and animal studies because it can capture images of tissue in vivo with subcellular resolution. Current configurations for endomicroscopes have either limited spatial resolution or require a scanning mechanism at the distal end of the fiber, which can slow imaging speed and increase the probe size. We present a novel configuration that provides high contrast 350 × 350 pixel images at 7.2 frames per second, without the need for mechanical scanning at the proximal or distal end of the fiber. The proof-of-concept benchtop system is tested in fluorescence mode and can resolve 1.5 µm features of a high resolution 1951 USAF target.

  3. Another treatment of fluorescence polarization microspectroscopy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Fisz, Jacek J

    2009-04-16

    We here discuss a general (symmetry adapted) treatment for one-photon-excitation time-resolved fluorescence polarization microspectroscopy (TRFPM) at combined wide-angular excitation and detection apertures that correctly couples the principles of the optics of objective lenses with the principles of fluorescence spectroscopy with polarized light. The treatment is unified in the sense that it covers the electromagnetic description of focusing a linearly polarized beam of exciting light (diffraction theory, DT) and the description of the same problem in terms of the meridional plane properties (MPP) of the objective lenses (geometrical optics). It is shown that both approaches are quantitatively equivalent from the point of view of the polarization effects in typical TRFPM experiments on linear absorbers, despite the fact that in the MPP treatment the region of focus is treated as a pointlike object, while in the DT method the region of focus is characterized by a three-dimensional (3D) inhomogeneous electromagnetic field distribution, of generally ellipsoidal polarization at different points of the focus. This finding is essentially important from the point of view of the experimental practice because the MPP treatment is based on two very simple trigonometric expressions, in evident contrast to the DT method, in which the high-aperture focusing is described in terms of three complicated 3D integrals involving the Bessel functions of the first kind. A few words of comment are added on a similar problem in the case of nonlinear one-photon absorbers (e.g., chiral fluorophores). We discuss the synthetic fluorescence decays for the wide-field- and evanescent-wave-excitation confocal (or wide-field) detection fluorescence polarization microspectroscopy and imaging, which indicate the right experimental protocols for the kinetic and dynamic fluorescence polarization microspectroscopic studies. The manifestations of the effects resulting from the application of the wide

  4. Total variation versus wavelet-based methods for image denoising in fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Wei; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2012-05-01

    We report the first application of wavelet-based denoising (noise removal) methods to time-domain box-car fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) images and compare the results to novel total variation (TV) denoising methods. Methods were tested first on artificial images and then applied to low-light live-cell images. Relative to undenoised images, TV methods could improve lifetime precision up to 10-fold in artificial images, while preserving the overall accuracy of lifetime and amplitude values of a single-exponential decay model and improving local lifetime fitting in live-cell images. Wavelet-based methods were at least 4-fold faster than TV methods, but could introduce significant inaccuracies in recovered lifetime values. The denoising methods discussed can potentially enhance a variety of FLIM applications, including live-cell, in vivo animal, or endoscopic imaging studies, especially under challenging imaging conditions such as low-light or fast video-rate imaging.

  5. Compact wearable dual-mode imaging system for real-time fluorescence image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Nan; Huang, Chih-Yu; Mondal, Suman; Gao, Shengkui; Huang, Chongyuan; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel; Liang, Rongguang

    2015-09-01

    A wearable all-plastic imaging system for real-time fluorescence image-guided surgery is presented. The compact size of the system is especially suitable for applications in the operating room. The system consists of a dual-mode imaging system, see-through goggle, autofocusing, and auto-contrast tuning modules. The paper will discuss the system design and demonstrate the system performance.

  6. Real-time quantitative fluorescence imaging using a single snapshot optical properties technique for neurosurgical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes, Pablo A.; Angelo, Joseph; Gioux, Sylvain

    2015-03-01

    Fluorescence imaging has shown promise as an adjunct to improve the extent of resection in neurosurgery and oncologic surgery. Nevertheless, current fluorescence imaging techniques do not account for the heterogeneous attenuation effects of tissue optical properties. In this work, we present a novel imaging system that performs real time quantitative fluorescence imaging using Single Snapshot Optical Properties (SSOP) imaging. We developed the technique and performed initial phantom studies to validate the quantitative capabilities of the system for intraoperative feasibility. Overall, this work introduces a novel real-time quantitative fluorescence imaging method capable of being used intraoperatively for neurosurgical guidance.

  7. Multispectral fluorescence imaging technique for discrimination of cucumber (Cucumis Sativus) seed viability

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study, we developed a nondestructive method for discriminating viable cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seeds based on hyperspectral fluorescence imaging. The fluorescence spectra of cucumber seeds in the 420–700 nm range were extracted from hyperspectral fluorescence images obtained using 365 nm u...

  8. A CMOS In-Pixel CTIA High Sensitivity Fluorescence Imager

    PubMed Central

    Murari, Kartikeya; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Thakor, Nitish; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, charge coupled device (CCD) based image sensors have held sway over the field of biomedical imaging. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) based imagers so far lack sensitivity leading to poor low-light imaging. Certain applications including our work on animal-mountable systems for imaging in awake and unrestrained rodents require the high sensitivity and image quality of CCDs and the low power consumption, flexibility and compactness of CMOS imagers. We present a 132×124 high sensitivity imager array with a 20.1 μm pixel pitch fabricated in a standard 0.5 μ CMOS process. The chip incorporates n-well/p-sub photodiodes, capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) based in-pixel amplification, pixel scanners and delta differencing circuits. The 5-transistor all-nMOS pixel interfaces with peripheral pMOS transistors for column-parallel CTIA. At 70 fps, the array has a minimum detectable signal of 4 nW/cm2 at a wavelength of 450 nm while consuming 718 μA from a 3.3 V supply. Peak signal to noise ratio (SNR) was 44 dB at an incident intensity of 1 μW/cm2. Implementing 4×4 binning allowed the frame rate to be increased to 675 fps. Alternately, sensitivity could be increased to detect about 0.8 nW/cm2 while maintaining 70 fps. The chip was used to image single cell fluorescence at 28 fps with an average SNR of 32 dB. For comparison, a cooled CCD camera imaged the same cell at 20 fps with an average SNR of 33.2 dB under the same illumination while consuming over a watt. PMID:23136624

  9. Fluorescence and fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to characterize yeast strains by autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, H.; Goldys, E. M.; Ma, J.

    2006-02-01

    We characterised populations of wild type baking and brewing yeast cells using intrinsic fluorescence and fluorescence lifetime microscopy, in order to obtain quantitative identifiers of different strains. The cell autofluorescence was excited at 405 nm and observed within 440-540 nm range where strong cell to cell variability was observed. The images were analyzed using customised public domain software, which provided information on cell size, intensity and texture-related features. In light of significant diversity of the data, statistical methods were utilized to assess the validity of the proposed quantitative identifiers for strain differentiation. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was applied to confirm that empirical distribution functions for size, intensity and entropy for different strains were statistically different. These characteristics were followed with culture age of 24, 48 and 72 h, (the latter corresponding to a stationary growth phase) and size, and to some extent entropy, were found to be independent of age. The fluorescence intensity presented a distinctive evolution with age, different for each of the examined strains. The lifetime analysis revealed a short decay time component of 1.4 ns and a second, longer one with the average value of 3.5 ns and a broad distribution. High variability of lifetime values within cells was observed however a lifetime texture feature in the studied strains was statistically different.

  10. Luminescence and fluorescence of essential oils. Fluorescence imaging in vivo of wild chamomile oil

    PubMed Central

    Boschi, F.; Fontanella, M.; Calderan, L.; Sbarbati, A.

    2011-01-01

    Essential oils are currently of great importance to pharmaceutical companies, cosmetics producers and manufacturers of veterinary products. They are found in perfumes, creams, bath products, and household cleaning substances, and are used for flavouring food and drinks. It is well known that some of them act on the respiratory apparatus. The increasing interest in optical imaging techniques and the development of related technologies have made possible the investigation of the optical properties of several compounds. Luminescent properties of essential oils have not been extensively investigated. We evaluated the luminescent and fluorescent emissions of several essential oils, in order to detect them in living organisms by exploiting their optical properties. Some fluorescent emission data were high enough to be detected in dermal treatments. Consequently, we demonstrated how the fluorescent signal can be monitored for at least three hours on the skin of living mice treated with wild chamomile oil. The results encourage development of this technique to investigate the properties of drugs and cosmetics containing essential oils. PMID:22193298

  11. High-resolution whole field fluorescence lifetime imaging of fluorophore distribution and environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayel, Mark J.; Dowling, Keith; Hyde, Sam C. W.; Dainty, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.; Vourdas, P.; Lever, M. J.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, Anthony K. L.; Hares, Jonathan D.; Kellett, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    We report the development of a high temporal resolution fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) system suing a time- gated image intensifier to provide whole field FLIM images. The gate width has been optimized to 110 ps, and changes in the environment of a fluorescent phantom, causing lifetime differences of 20 ps, have been detected. Environmental changes of the fluorescent indicator, Lucifer Yellow, have been sensed by measuring changes in its fluorescence lifetime in the presence of the protein albumin. We also present provisional fluorescence lifetime images of tissue constituents.

  12. Noninvasive imaging of focal atherosclerotic lesions using fluorescence molecular tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Dolonchampa; Solomon, Metasebya; Nguyen, Annie; Pierce, Richard A.; Woodard, Pamela K.; Akers, Walter J.; Achilefu, Samuel; Culver, Joseph P.; Abendschein, Dana R.; Shokeen, Monica

    2014-11-01

    Insights into the etiology of stroke and myocardial infarction suggest that rupture of unstable atherosclerotic plaque is the precipitating event. Clinicians lack tools to detect lesion instability early enough to intervene, and are often left to manage patients empirically, or worse, after plaque rupture. Noninvasive imaging of the molecular events signaling prerupture plaque progression has the potential to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with myocardial infarction and stroke by allowing early intervention. Here, we demonstrate proof-of-principle in vivo molecular imaging of C-type natriuretic peptide receptor in focal atherosclerotic lesions in the femoral arteries of New Zealand white rabbits using a custom built fiber-based, fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) system. Longitudinal imaging showed changes in the fluorescence signal intensity as the plaque progressed in the air-desiccated vessel compared to the uninjured vessel, which was validated by ex vivo tissue studies. In summary, we demonstrate the potential of FMT for noninvasive detection of molecular events leading to unstable lesions heralding plaque rupture.

  13. Imaging fluorescence (cross-) correlation spectroscopy in live cells and organisms.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Jan W; Singh, Anand P; Bag, Nirmalya; Garbe, Christoph S; Saunders, Timothy E; Langowski, Jörg; Wohland, Thorsten

    2015-12-01

    Single-plane illumination (SPIM) or total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopes can be combined with fast and single-molecule-sensitive cameras to allow spatially resolved fluorescence (cross-) correlation spectroscopy (FCS or FCCS, hereafter referred to FCS/FCCS). This creates a powerful quantitative bioimaging tool that can generate spatially resolved mobility and interaction maps with hundreds to thousands of pixels per sample. These massively parallel imaging schemes also cause less photodamage than conventional single-point confocal microscopy-based FCS/FCCS. Here we provide guidelines for imaging FCS/FCCS measurements on commercial and custom-built microscopes (including sample preparation, setup calibration, data acquisition and evaluation), as well as anticipated results for a variety of in vitro and in vivo samples. For a skilled user of an available SPIM or TIRF setup, sample preparation, microscope alignment, data acquisition and data fitting, as described in this protocol, will take ∼1 d, depending on the sample and the mode of imaging.

  14. A novel method for image denoising of fluorescence molecular imaging based on fuzzy C-Means clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yu; Liu, Jie; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Yang, Xin; Jiang, Shixin; Chi, Chongwei; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    As an important molecular imaging modality, fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) has the advantages of high sensitivity, low cost and ease of use. By labeling the regions of interest with fluorophore, FMI can noninvasively obtain the distribution of fluorophore in-vivo. However, due to the fact that the spectrum of fluorescence is in the section of the visible light range, there are mass of autofluorescence on the surface of the bio-tissues, which is a major disturbing factor in FMI. Meanwhile, the high-level of dark current for charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and other influencing factor can also produce a lot of background noise. In this paper, a novel method for image denoising of FMI based on fuzzy C-Means clustering (FCM) is proposed, because the fluorescent signal is the major component of the fluorescence images, and the intensity of autofluorescence and other background signals is relatively lower than the fluorescence signal. First, the fluorescence image is smoothed by sliding-neighborhood operations to initially eliminate the noise. Then, the wavelet transform (WLT) is performed on the fluorescence images to obtain the major component of the fluorescent signals. After that, the FCM method is adopt to separate the major component and background of the fluorescence images. Finally, the proposed method was validated using the original data obtained by in vivo implanted fluorophore experiment, and the results show that our proposed method can effectively obtain the fluorescence signal while eliminate the background noise, which could increase the quality of fluorescence images.

  15. Calcium imaging using fluorescence lifetimes and long-wavelength probes.

    PubMed

    Lakowicz, J R; Szmacinski, H; Johnson, M L

    1992-03-01

    We describe imaging of calcium concentrations using the long-wavelength Ca(2+) indicators, Calcium Green, Orange, and Crimson. The lifetimes of these probes were measured using the frequency-domain method and were found to increase from 50% to severalfold in response to calcium. The two-dimensional images of the calcium concentration were obtained using a new apparatus for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). We also describe procedures to correct for the position-dependent frequency response of the gain-modulated image intensifier used in the FLIM apparatus. Importantly, the FLIM method does not require the probe to display shifts in the excitation or emission spectra. Using the FLIM method, calcium imaging is possible using probes which display changes in lifetime in response to calcium. Consequently, calcium imaging is possible with excitation wavelengths ranging from 488 to as long as 620 nm, where autofluorescence and/or photochemical damage is minimal. These probes are also suitable for calcium measurements of single cells using lifetime-based flow cytometry.

  16. Breast cancer margin delineation with fluorescence lifetime imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Jennifer E.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Darrow, Morgan; Unger, Jakob; Bold, Richard; Marcu, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The current standard of care for early stages of breast cancer is breast-conserving surgery (BCS). BCS involves a lumpectomy procedure, during which the tumor is removed with a rim of normal tissue-if cancer cells found in that rim of tissue, it is called a positive margin and means part of the tumor remains in the breast. Currently there is no method to determine if cancer cells exist at the margins of lumpectomy specimens aside from time-intensive histology methods that result in reoperations in up to 38% of cases. We used fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) to measure time-resolved autofluorescence from N=13 ex vivo human breast cancer specimens (N=10 patients undergoing lumpectomy or mastectomy) and compared our results to histology. Tumor (both invasive and ductal carcinoma in situ), fibrous tissue, fat and fat necrosis have unique fluorescence signatures. For instance, between 500-580 nm, fluorescence lifetime of tumor was shortest (4.7 +/- 0.4 ns) compared to fibrous tissue (5.5 +/- 0.7 ns) and fat (7.0 +/- 0.1 ns), P<0.05 (ANOVA). These differences are due to the biochemical properties of lipid, nicotineamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and collagen fibers in the fat, tumor and fibrous tissue, respectively. Additionally, the FLIm data is augmented to video of the breast tissue with image processing algorithms that track a blue (450 nm) aiming beam used in parallel with the 355 nm excitation beam. This allows for accurate histologic co-registration and in the future will allow for three-dimensional lumpectomy surfaces to be imaged for cancer margin delineation.

  17. FIZICS: fluorescent imaging zone identification system, a novel macro imaging system.

    PubMed

    Skwish, Stephen; Asensio, Francisco; King, Greg; Clarke, Glenn; Kath, Gary; Salvatore, Michael J; Dufresne, Claude

    2004-12-01

    Constantly improving biological assay development continues to drive technological requirements. Recently, a specification was defined for capturing white light and fluorescent images of agar plates ranging in size from the NUNC Omni tray (96-well footprint, 128 x 85 mm) to the NUNC Bio Assay Dish (245 x 245 mm). An evaluation of commercially available products failed to identify any system capable of fluorescent macroimaging with discrete wavelength selection. To address the lack of a commercially available system, a custom imaging system was designed and constructed. This system provides the same capabilities of many commercially available systems with the added ability to fluorescently image up to a 245 x 245 mm area using wavelengths in the visible light spectrum.

  18. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    DOEpatents

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2013-01-15

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  19. Sprayable enzyme-activatable fluorescent probes: kinetic mapping using dynamic fluorescence imaging can help detecting tiny cancer foci (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2017-02-01

    Optical fluorescence-guided imaging is increasingly used to guide surgery and endoscopic procedures. Sprayable enzyme-activatable probes are particularly useful because of high target-to-background ratios that increase sensitivity for tiny cancer foci. However, green fluorescent activatable probes suffers from interference from autofluorescence found in biological tissue. Dynamic imaging followed by the kinetic analysis could be detected local enzyme activity and used to differentiate specific fluorescence arising from an activated probe in a tumor from autofluorescence in background tissues especially when low concentrations of the dye are applied to detect tiny cancer foci. Serial fluorescence imaging was performed using various concentrations of γ-glutamyl hydroxymethyl rhodamine green (gGlu-HMRG) which was sprayed on the peritoneal surface with tiny implants of SHIN3-dsRed ovarian cancer tumors. Temporal differences in signal between specific green fluorescence in cancer foci and non-specific autofluorescence in background tissue was measured and processed into three kinetic maps reflecting maximum fluorescence signal (MF), wash-in rate (WIR), and area under the curve (AUC), respectively. Especially at lower concentrations, kinetic maps derived from dynamic fluorescence imaging were clearly superior to unprocessed images for detection small cancer foci.

  20. Self-interference fluorescence microscopy with three-phase detection for depth-resolved confocal epi-fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Braaf, Boy; de Boer, Johannes F

    2017-03-20

    Three-dimensional confocal fluorescence imaging of in vivo tissues is challenging due to sample motion and limited imaging speeds. In this paper a novel method is therefore presented for scanning confocal epi-fluorescence microscopy with instantaneous depth-sensing based on self-interference fluorescence microscopy (SIFM). A tabletop epi-fluorescence SIFM setup was constructed with an annular phase plate in the emission path to create a spectral self-interference signal that is phase-dependent on the axial position of a fluorescent sample. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on a 3 × 3 fiber-coupler was developed for a sensitive phase analysis of the SIFM signal with three photon-counter detectors instead of a spectrometer. The Mach-Zehnder interferometer created three intensity signals that alternately oscillated as a function of the SIFM spectral phase and therefore encoded directly for the axial sample position. Controlled axial translation of fluorescent microsphere layers showed a linear dependence of the SIFM spectral phase with sample depth over axial image ranges of 500 µm and 80 µm (3.9 × Rayleigh range) for 4 × and 10 × microscope objectives respectively. In addition, SIFM was in good agreement with optical coherence tomography depth measurements on a sample with indocyanine green dye filled capillaries placed at multiple depths. High-resolution SIFM imaging applications are demonstrated for fluorescence angiography on a dye-filled capillary blood vessel phantom and for autofluorescence imaging on an ex vivo fly eye.

  1. Biocompatible fluorescent silicon nanocrystals for single-molecule tracking and fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Hirohito; Ritchie, Ken; Kasai, Rinshi S.; Goto, Miki; Morone, Nobuhiro; Sugimura, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Koichiro; Sase, Ichiro; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Nakano, Yoshitaro; Fujiwara, Takahiro K.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is used extensively in cell-biological and biomedical research, but it is often plagued by three major problems with the presently available fluorescent probes: photobleaching, blinking, and large size. We have addressed these problems, with special attention to single-molecule imaging, by developing biocompatible, red-emitting silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) with a 4.1-nm hydrodynamic diameter. Methods for producing SiNCs by simple chemical etching, for hydrophilically coating them, and for conjugating them to biomolecules precisely at a 1:1 ratio have been developed. Single SiNCs neither blinked nor photobleached during a 300-min overall period observed at video rate. Single receptor molecules in the plasma membrane of living cells (using transferrin receptor) were imaged for ≥10 times longer than with other probes, making it possible for the first time to observe the internalization process of receptor molecules at the single-molecule level. Spatial variations of molecular diffusivity in the scale of 1–2 µm, i.e., a higher level of domain mosaicism in the plasma membrane, were revealed. PMID:24043702

  2. Modelling of microcracks image treated with fluorescent dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, Victor; Lashmanov, Oleg U.

    2015-06-01

    The main reasons of catastrophes and accidents are high level of wear of equipment and violation of the production technology. The methods of nondestructive testing are designed to find out defects timely and to prevent break down of aggregates. These methods allow determining compliance of object parameters with technical requirements without destroying it. This work will discuss dye penetrant inspection or liquid penetrant inspection (DPI or LPI) methods and computer model of microcracks image treated with fluorescent dye. Usually cracks on image look like broken extended lines with small width (about 1 to 10 pixels) and ragged edges. The used method of inspection allows to detect microcracks with depth about 10 or more micrometers. During the work the mathematical model of image of randomly located microcracks treated with fluorescent dye was created in MATLAB environment. Background noises and distortions introduced by the optical systems are considered in the model. The factors that have influence on the image are listed below: 1. Background noise. Background noise is caused by the bright light from external sources and it reduces contrast on the objects edges. 2. Noises on the image sensor. Digital noise manifests itself in the form of randomly located points that are differing in their brightness and color. 3. Distortions caused by aberrations of optical system. After passing through the real optical system the homocentricity of the bundle of rays is violated or homocentricity remains but rays intersect at the point that doesn't coincide with the point of the ideal image. The stronger the influence of the above-listed factors, the worse the image quality and therefore the analysis of the image for control of the item finds difficulty. The mathematical model is created using the following algorithm: at the beginning the number of cracks that will be modeled is entered from keyboard. Then the point with random position is choosing on the matrix whose size is

  3. Comparative studies of X-ray images and fluorescence images of the same specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majima, T.; Tomie, T.; Shimizu, H.

    2003-03-01

    A flash contact soft x-ray microscope using laser-induced plasma as a flash x-ray source is a practical instrument for observation of living organisms in water [1-4]. As previously reported we developed a tabletop flash contact soft x-ray microscope System [3]. In this System, x-ray images are given as whole projection of the specimens on the PMMA membrane. This causes us some complexity for understanding the x-ray images. It is necessary to attribute features in the x-ray images to sub-cellular structures of the specimen. For this purpose we have developed a new sample holder, where specimens are observable with a fluorescence microscope just before x-ray exposure. Fluorescence images of onion epidermal cells stained by DAPI and x-ray images of the same specimens are compared.

  4. Enhancing magnetic resonance imaging tumor detection with fluorescence intensity and lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erten, Ahmet; Hall, David; Hoh, Carl; Tran Cao, Hop S.; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Esener, Sadik; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael; Chen, James; Kesari, Santosh; Makale, Milan

    2010-11-01

    Early detection is important for many solid cancers but the images provided by ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography applied alone or together, are often not sufficient for decisive early screening/diagnosis. We demonstrate that MRI augmented with fluorescence intensity (FI) substantially improves detection. Early stage murine pancreatic tumors that could not be identified by blinded, skilled observers using MRI alone, were easily identified with MRI along with FI images acquired with photomultiplier tube detection and offset laser scanning. Moreover, we show that fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging enables positive identification of the labeling fluorophore and discriminates it from surrounding tissue autofluorescence. Our data suggest combined-modality imaging with MRI, FI, and FLT can be used to screen and diagnose early tumors.

  5. Microbial biofilm detection on food contact surfaces by macro-scale fluorescence imaging

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging methods were utilized to evaluate the potential of multispectral fluorescence methods for detection of pathogenic biofilm formations on four types of food contact surface materials: stainless steel, high density polyethylene (HDPE) commonly used for cutting boards,...

  6. Formation of near-infrared fluorescent nanoparticles for medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Larush, Liraz; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2011-02-01

    Indocyanine green (ICG) is a US FDA-approved near-infrared fluorescent, water-soluble dye used for diagnostics in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to develop insoluble nanoparticles based on a cationic polymer, ICG and a targeting molecule. The particles are intended for oral administration in the colon, having fluorescence in near-infrared, thus enabling remote detection. An aqueous dispersion of particles formed from Eudragit-RS by simple precipitation method possessing a mean size of approximately 100 nm and zeta potential of +16 mV was produced. These particles are capable of binding both ICG and fluorescein isothiocyanate-IgG via noncovalent interactions. These composite particles retain the emission characteristics of the fluorescent precursors and also exhibit potential specific recognition ability. The particles were stable in intestinal fluid and are composed only of materials that are FDA approved. The nanoparticles may be suitable for in vivo imaging and therapy by oral delivery systems.

  7. Fluorescence-Doped Particles for Simultaneous Temperature and Velocity Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Tiemsin, Pacita I.; Wohl, Chrostopher J.; Verkamp, Max; Lowe, T.; Maisto, P.; Byun, G.; Simpson, R.

    2012-01-01

    Polystyrene latex microspheres (PSLs) have been used for particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements for several decades. With advances in laser technologies, instrumentation, and data processing, the capability to collect more information about fluid flow beyond velocity is possible using new seed materials. To provide additional measurement capability, PSLs were synthesized with temperature-sensitive fluorescent dyes incorporated within the particle. These multifunctional PSLs would have the greatest impact if they could be used in large scale facilities with minimal modification to the facilities or the existing instrumentation. Consequently, several potential dyes were identified that were amenable to existing laser systems currently utilized in wind tunnels at NASA Langley Research Center as well as other wind and fluid (water) tunnels. PSLs incorporated with Rhodamine B, dichlorofluorescein (DCF, also known as fluorescein 548 or fluorescein 27) and other dyes were synthesized and characterized for morphology and spectral properties. The resulting particles were demonstrated to exhibit fluorescent emission, which would enable determination of both fluid velocity and temperature. They also would allow near-wall velocity measurements whereas laser scatter from surfaces currently prevents near-wall measurements using undoped seed materials. Preliminary results in a wind tunnel facility located at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) have verified fluorescent signal detection and temperature sensitivity of fluorophore-doped PSLs.

  8. Fluorescence lifetime imaging with near-infrared dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Shcheslavskiy, Vladislav

    2013-02-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) dyes are used as fluorescence markers in small-animal imaging and in diffuse optical tomography of the human brain. In these applications it is important to know whether the dyes bind to proteins or other tissue constituents, and whether their fluorescence lifetimes depend on the targets they are bound to. Unfortunately, neither the lasers nor the detectors of commonly used confocal and multiphoton laser scanning microscopes allow for excitation and detection of NIR fluorescence. We therefore upgraded existing confocal TCSPC FLIM systems with NIR lasers and NIR sensitive detectors. In multiphoton systems we used the Ti:Sa laser as a one-photon excitation source in combination with an NIR-sensitive detector in the confocal beam path. We tested a number of NIR dyes in biological tissue. Some of them showed clear lifetime changes depending on the tissue structures they are bound to. We therefore believe that NIR FLIM can deliver supplementary information on the tissue constitution and on local biochemical parameters.

  9. Red emitting neutral fluorescent glycoconjugates for membrane optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Redon, Sébastien; Massin, Julien; Pouvreau, Sandrine; De Meulenaere, Evelien; Clays, Koen; Queneau, Yves; Andraud, Chantal; Girard-Egrot, Agnès; Bretonnière, Yann; Chambert, Stéphane

    2014-04-16

    A family of neutral fluorescent probes was developed, mimicking the overall structure of natural glycolipids in order to optimize their membrane affinity. Nonreducing commercially available di- or trisaccharidic structures were connected to a push-pull chromophore based on dicyanoisophorone electron-accepting group, which proved to fluoresce in the red region with a very large Stokes shift. This straightforward synthetic strategy brought structural variations to a series of probes, which were studied for their optical, biophysical, and biological properties. The insertion properties of the different probes into membranes were evaluated on a model system using the Langmuir monolayer balance technique. Confocal fluorescence microscopy performed on muscle cells showed completely different localizations and loading efficiencies depending on the structure of the probes. When compared to the commercially available ANEPPS, a family of commonly used membrane imaging dyes, the most efficient probes showed a similar brightness, but a sharper pattern was observed. According to this study, compounds bearing one chromophore, a limited size of the carbohydrate moiety, and an overall rod-like shape gave the best results.

  10. Gold nanoclusters as contrast agents for fluorescent and X-ray dual-modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aili; Tu, Yu; Qin, Songbing; Li, Yan; Zhou, Juying; Chen, Na; Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Bingbo

    2012-04-15

    Multimodal imaging technique is an alternative approach to improve sensitivity of early cancer diagnosis. In this study, highly fluorescent and strong X-ray absorption coefficient gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) are synthesized as dual-modality imaging contrast agents (CAs) for fluorescent and X-ray dual-modality imaging. The experimental results show that the as-prepared Au NCs are well constructed with ultrasmall sizes, reliable fluorescent emission, high computed tomography (CT) value and fine biocompatibility. In vivo imaging results indicate that the obtained Au NCs are capable of fluorescent and X-ray enhanced imaging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Combined 3D photoacoustic and 2D fluorescence imaging of indocyanine green contrast agent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosik, Ivan; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging uses laser induced ultrasound transients to generate optical absorption maps of the illuminated volume. In this work, we used a custom built photoacoustic imaging system consisting of a 60-channel transducer array, a 50 MHz data acquisition system, and an Nd:YAG pumped OPO laser, to perform simultaneous photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging. A single 780 nm laser pulse generated both ultrasound and fluorescence, enabling reconstruction of images for both modalities with near perfect temporal co-registration. The result highlighted the ability of photoacoustic imaging to supplement fluorescence data when optical scatter reduces fluorescence resolution beyond its useful range.

  12. Detectors for single-molecule fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    MICHALET, X.; SIEGMUND, O.H.W.; VALLERGA, J.V.; JELINSKY, P.; MILLAUD, J.E.; WEISS, S.

    2010-01-01

    Single-molecule observation, characterization and manipulation techniques have recently come to the forefront of several research domains spanning chemistry, biology and physics. Due to the exquisite sensitivity, specificity, and unmasking of ensemble averaging, single-molecule fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy have become, in a short period of time, important tools in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. These methods led to new ways of thinking about biological processes such as viral infection, receptor diffusion and oligomerization, cellular signaling, protein-protein or protein-nucleic acid interactions, and molecular machines. Such achievements require a combination of several factors to be met, among which detector sensitivity and bandwidth are crucial. We examine here the needed performance of photodetectors used in these types of experiments, the current state of the art for different categories of detectors, and actual and future developments of single-photon counting detectors for single-molecule imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:20157633

  13. Fluorescent cyanine probe for DNA detection and cellular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yong-Chao; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2014-03-01

    In our study, two carbazole-based cyanines, 3,6-bis[2-(1-methylpyridinium)vinyl]-9-methyl carbazole diiodide (A) and 6,6'-bis[2-(1-methylpyridinium)vinyl]-bis(9-methyl-carbazol-3yl)methane diiodide (B) were synthesized and employed as light-up probes for DNA and cell imaging. Both of the cyanine probes possess a symmetric structure and bis-cationic center. The obvious induced circular dichroism signals in circular dichroism spectra reveal that the molecules can specifically interact with DNA. Strong fluorescence enhancement is observed when these two cyanines are bound to DNA. These cyanine probes show high binding affinity to oligonucleotides but different binding preferences to various secondary structures. Confocal microscopy images of fixed cell stained by the probes exhibit strong brightness and high contrast in nucleus with a very low cytoplasmic background.

  14. Sentinel lymph node imaging by a fluorescently labeled DNA tetrahedron.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Ran; Lee, Yong-Deok; Lee, Taemin; Kim, Byeong-Su; Kim, Sehoon; Ahn, Dae-Ro

    2013-07-01

    Sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) are the first lymph nodes which cancer cells reach after traveling through lymphatic vessels from the primary tumor. Evaluating the nodal status is crucial in accurate staging of human cancers and accordingly determines prognosis and the most appropriate treatment. The commonly used methods for SLN identification in clinics are based on employment of a colloid of radionuclide or injection of a small dye. Although these methods have certainly contributed to improve surgical practice, new imaging materials are still required to overcome drawbacks of the techniques such as inconvenience of handling radioactive materials and short retention time of small dyes in SLNs. Here, we prepare a fluorescence-labeled DNA tetrahedron and perform SLN imaging by using the DNA nanoconstruct. With a successful identification of SLNs by the DNA nanoconstruct, we suggest that DNA tetrahedron hold great promises for clinical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fluorescence imaging of chromosomal DNA using click chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, Takumi; Liu, Hong Shan; Ito, Kenichiro; Xu, Yan

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome visualization is essential for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics. Here, we developed a click chemistry approach for multicolor imaging of chromosomal DNA instead of the traditional dye method. We first demonstrated that the commercially available reagents allow for the multicolor staining of chromosomes. We then prepared two pro-fluorophore moieties that served as light-up reporters to stain chromosomal DNA based on click reaction and visualized the clear chromosomes in multicolor. We applied this strategy in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and identified, with high sensitivity and specificity, telomere DNA at the end of the chromosome. We further extended this approach to observe several basic stages of cell division. We found that the click reaction enables direct visualization of the chromosome behavior in cell division. These results suggest that the technique can be broadly used for imaging chromosomes and may serve as a new approach for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics.

  16. Fluorescence imaging of chromosomal DNA using click chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Takumi; Liu, Hong Shan; Ito, Kenichiro; Xu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome visualization is essential for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics. Here, we developed a click chemistry approach for multicolor imaging of chromosomal DNA instead of the traditional dye method. We first demonstrated that the commercially available reagents allow for the multicolor staining of chromosomes. We then prepared two pro-fluorophore moieties that served as light-up reporters to stain chromosomal DNA based on click reaction and visualized the clear chromosomes in multicolor. We applied this strategy in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and identified, with high sensitivity and specificity, telomere DNA at the end of the chromosome. We further extended this approach to observe several basic stages of cell division. We found that the click reaction enables direct visualization of the chromosome behavior in cell division. These results suggest that the technique can be broadly used for imaging chromosomes and may serve as a new approach for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics. PMID:27620982

  17. Molecular imaging needles: dual-modality optical coherence tomography and fluorescence imaging of labeled antibodies deep in tissue

    PubMed Central

    Scolaro, Loretta; Lorenser, Dirk; Madore, Wendy-Julie; Kirk, Rodney W.; Kramer, Anne S.; Yeoh, George C.; Godbout, Nicolas; Sampson, David D.; Boudoux, Caroline; McLaughlin, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging using optical techniques provides insight into disease at the cellular level. In this paper, we report on a novel dual-modality probe capable of performing molecular imaging by combining simultaneous three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (OCT) and two-dimensional fluorescence imaging in a hypodermic needle. The probe, referred to as a molecular imaging (MI) needle, may be inserted tens of millimeters into tissue. The MI needle utilizes double-clad fiber to carry both imaging modalities, and is interfaced to a 1310-nm OCT system and a fluorescence imaging subsystem using an asymmetrical double-clad fiber coupler customized to achieve high fluorescence collection efficiency. We present, to the best of our knowledge, the first dual-modality OCT and fluorescence needle probe with sufficient sensitivity to image fluorescently labeled antibodies. Such probes enable high-resolution molecular imaging deep within tissue. PMID:26137379

  18. Multiparameter Ionization and Excitation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lower, Julian

    2006-10-01

    Over recent years there has been a sustained and impressive development of technologies to aid the measurement of atomic and molecular collision processes. In particular, the application of multi-parameter coincidence techniques to atomic and molecular fragmentation processes has uncovered interesting new phenomena e.g. [1,2]. The underlying idea is to map measured arrival coordinate of particles (spatial and temporal) on to parameters of physical relevance through the action of time independent or dependent electric and/or magnetic fields [3,4]. The main challenge is in fashioning such fields to obtain greatest sensitivity for the parameters of greatest interest. In my talk I will review recent spectrometer developments discuss the potential for further improvements. The power of modern measurement techniques will be illustrated by selected examples of recent measurements by our group and others. Strengths and weaknesses of various experimental approaches will be discussed. In collaboration with: S. Bellm, AMPL, RSPHYSSE, Australian National University; D.H. Madison, Z. Stegen, University of Missouri - Rolla; K. Bartschat, Drake University; Colm T. Whelan, Old Dominion University. [1] T. Weber et al, Nature 431, 437 (2004). [2] M. Schulz et al., Nature 422, 48 (2003). [3] J. Ullrich et al, Rep. Prog. Phys. 66, 1463 (2003). [4] C. Miron et al, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 68, 3729 (1997).

  19. Fluorescence imaging as a diagnostic of M-band x-ray drive condition in hohlraum with fluorescent Si targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Hu, Zhimin; Yao, Li; Huang, Chengwu; Yuan, Zheng; Zhao, Yang; Xiong, Gang; Qing, Bo; Lv, Min; Zhu, Tuo; Deng, Bo; Li, Jin; Wei, Minxi; Zhan, Xiayu; Li, Jun; Yang, Yimeng; Su, Chunxiao; Yang, Guohong; Zhang, Jiyan; Li, Sanwei; Yang, Jiamin; Ding, Yongkun

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging of surrogate Si-doped CH targets has been used to provide a measurement for drive condition of high-energy x-ray (i.e. M-band x-ray) drive symmetry upon the capsule in hohlraum on Shenguang-II laser facility. A series of experiments dedicated to the study of photo-pumping and fluorescence effect in Si-plasma are presented. To investigate the feasibility of fluorescence imaging in Si-plasma, an silicon plasma in Si-foil target is pre-formed at ground state by the soft x-ray from a half-hohlraum, which is then photo-pumped by the K-shell lines from a spatially distinct laser-produced Si-plasma. The resonant Si photon pump is used to improve the fluorescence signal and cause visible image in the Si-foil. Preliminary fluorescence imaging of Si-ball target is performed in both Si-doped and pure Au hohlraum. The usual capsule at the center of the hohlraum is replaced with a solid Si-doped CH-ball (Si-ball). Since the fluorescence is proportional to the photon pump upon the Si-plasma, high-energy x-ray drive symmetry is equal to the fluorescence distribution of the Si-ball.

  20. New approach in prostate Gleason grading using fluorescence microscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandratou, Eleni; Yova, Dido; Gorpas, Dimitris

    2009-07-01

    Prostate cancer is a common disease among men with an increasing number of incidences during the last three decades. Histopathological grading of prostate cancer is based on tissue structural abnormalities. Gleason grading system is the gold standard and is based on the organization features of prostatic glands. However, till now there is an uncertainty assign Gleason grade to intermediate stages of the disease, Gleason 3 and Gleason 4. The aim of this study was to explore the possibility of introducing fluorescent probes in this prostate cancer Gleason grading problem. Propidium Iodide with cellular nuclei binding pattern and Alexa 488-WGA with selectivity in polysaccharides with sialic acid residues were finally chosen. Their localisation patterns were assessed using confocal microscopy. Their colocalisation degree was quantified using special developed algorithms of image processing and analysis. The introduced metrics of colocalisation were successfully used to correct classify samples in Gleason 3 and Gleason 4 grades. These metrics were found appropriate to correctly classify 93.10 % of the images into the two classes using the logistic algorithm. The integration of confocal microscopy along with fluorescent probes to pathologist routine, is an approach that cloud lead to prognostic advances.

  1. Fluorescent image tracking velocimetry of the Nimbus AxiPump.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, J P; Shaffer, F D; Maher, T R; Dennis, T J; Borovetz, H S; Antaki, J F

    1993-01-01

    High shear rates and extended residence times causing hemolysis and platelet activation can develop in an assist pump or cannula when inferior flow conditions exist. The high volume output of a miniature axial flow pump presents challenges in avoiding these adverse conditions. To assess the hemodynamics within the continuous flow Nimbus Axi-Pump, vector flow fields inside a translucent inflow cannula and a modified 12 mm AxiPump were mapped. Fluorescent image tracking velocimetry was used to track the motion of neutrally buoyant fluorescent particles (30 microns) using pulsed laser light, high resolution video cameras, and computer image analysis. An acrylic pump housing and cannula were integrated into a mock circulatory loop filled with a Newtonian, optically clear blood analog fluid. The flow parameters were controlled to yield known, physiologic loading conditions, including varying degrees of pulsatility. Cannula flow visualization results exhibited critical recirculation patterns at the bend. These results will be used to further optimize the design of the inflow. Particle impact was seen at the pump inlet in the inducer region of the rotor. Very good attachment of flow from the rotor to stator was observed when the pump operated at normal operating speeds. Intermittent regurgitant flow fields were evident in the presence of increased pulsatility and low pump speed. These results have lead to improvements in impeller design and speed control criteria to avoid potential deleterious flows.

  2. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Membrane Lipid Order with a Ratiometric Fluorescent Probe

    PubMed Central

    Kilin, Vasyl; Glushonkov, Oleksandr; Herdly, Lucas; Klymchenko, Andrey; Richert, Ludovic; Mely, Yves

    2015-01-01

    To monitor the lateral segregation of lipids into liquid-ordered (Lo) and -disordered (Ld) phases in lipid membranes, environment-sensitive dyes that partition in both phases but stain them differently have been developed. Of particular interest is the dual-color F2N12S probe, which can discriminate the two phases through the ratio of its two emission bands. These bands are associated with the normal (N∗) and tautomer (T∗) excited-state species that result from an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer. In this work, we investigated the potency of the time-resolved fluorescence parameters of F2N12S to discriminate lipid phases in model and cell membranes. Both the long and mean lifetime values of the T∗ form of F2N12S were found to differ by twofold between Ld and Lo phases as a result of the restriction in the relative motions of the two aromatic moieties of F2N12S imposed by the highly packed Lo phase. This differed from the changes in the ratio of the two emission bands between the two phases, which mainly resulted from the decreased hydration of the N∗ form in the Lo phase. Importantly, the strong difference in lifetimes between the two phases was preserved when cholesterol was added to the Ld phase. The two phases could be imaged with high contrast by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) on giant unilamellar vesicles. FLIM images of F2N12S-labeled live HeLa cells confirmed that the plasma membrane was mainly in the Lo-like phase. Furthermore, the two phases were found to be homogeneously distributed all over the plasma membrane, indicating that they are highly mixed at the spatiotemporal resolution of the FLIM setup. Finally, FLIM could also be used to sensitively monitor the change in lipid phase upon cholesterol depletion and apoptosis. PMID:25992730

  3. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of membrane lipid order with a ratiometric fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Kilin, Vasyl; Glushonkov, Oleksandr; Herdly, Lucas; Klymchenko, Andrey; Richert, Ludovic; Mely, Yves

    2015-05-19

    To monitor the lateral segregation of lipids into liquid-ordered (Lo) and -disordered (Ld) phases in lipid membranes, environment-sensitive dyes that partition in both phases but stain them differently have been developed. Of particular interest is the dual-color F2N12S probe, which can discriminate the two phases through the ratio of its two emission bands. These bands are associated with the normal (N(∗)) and tautomer (T(∗)) excited-state species that result from an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer. In this work, we investigated the potency of the time-resolved fluorescence parameters of F2N12S to discriminate lipid phases in model and cell membranes. Both the long and mean lifetime values of the T(∗) form of F2N12S were found to differ by twofold between Ld and Lo phases as a result of the restriction in the relative motions of the two aromatic moieties of F2N12S imposed by the highly packed Lo phase. This differed from the changes in the ratio of the two emission bands between the two phases, which mainly resulted from the decreased hydration of the N(∗) form in the Lo phase. Importantly, the strong difference in lifetimes between the two phases was preserved when cholesterol was added to the Ld phase. The two phases could be imaged with high contrast by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) on giant unilamellar vesicles. FLIM images of F2N12S-labeled live HeLa cells confirmed that the plasma membrane was mainly in the Lo-like phase. Furthermore, the two phases were found to be homogeneously distributed all over the plasma membrane, indicating that they are highly mixed at the spatiotemporal resolution of the FLIM setup. Finally, FLIM could also be used to sensitively monitor the change in lipid phase upon cholesterol depletion and apoptosis.

  4. Co-registered optical coherence tomography and fluorescence molecular imaging for simultaneous morphological and molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuai; Roney, Celeste A; Wierwille, Jeremiah; Chen, Chao-Wei; Xu, Biying; Griffiths, Gary; Jiang, James; Ma, Hongzhou; Cable, Alex; Summers, Ronald M; Chen, Yu

    2010-01-07

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high-resolution, cross-sectional imaging of tissue microstructure in situ and in real time, while fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) enables the visualization of basic molecular processes. There is a great deal of interest in combining these two modalities so that the tissue's structural and molecular information can be obtained simultaneously. This could greatly benefit biomedical applications such as detecting early diseases and monitoring therapeutic interventions. In this research, an optical system that combines OCT and FMI was developed. The system demonstrated that it could co-register en face OCT and FMI images with a 2.4 x 2.4 mm(2) field-of-view. The transverse resolutions of OCT and FMI of the system are both approximately 10 microm. Capillary tubes filled with fluorescent dye Cy 5.5 in different concentrations under a scattering medium are used as the phantom. En face OCT images of the phantoms were obtained and successfully co-registered with FMI images that were acquired simultaneously. A linear relationship between FMI intensity and dye concentration was observed. The relationship between FMI intensity and target fluorescence tube depth measured by OCT images was also observed and compared with theoretical modeling. This relationship could help in correcting reconstructed dye concentration. Imaging of colon polyps of the APC(min) mouse model is presented as an example of biological applications of this co-registered OCT/FMI system.

  5. Combining Optical Coherence Tomography with Fluorescence Molecular Imaging: Towards Simultaneous Morphology and Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuai; Roney, Celeste A.; Wierwille, Jerry; Chen, Chao-Wei; Xu, Biying; Jiang, James; Ma, Hongzhou; Cable, Alex; Summers, Ronald M.; Chen, Yu

    2010-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high-resolution, cross-sectional imaging of tissue microstructure in situ and in real-time, while fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) enables the visualization of basic molecular processes. There are great interests in combining these two modalities so that the tissue's structural and molecular information can be obtained simultaneously. This could greatly benefit biomedical applications such as detecting early diseases and monitoring therapeutic interventions. In this research, an optical system that combines OCT and FMI was developed. The system demonstrated that it could co-register en face OCT and FMI images with a 2.4 × 2.4 mm field of view. The transverse resolutions of OCT and FMI of the system are both ~10 μm. Capillary tubes filled with fluorescent dye Cy 5.5 in different concentrations under a scattering medium are used as the phantom. En face OCT images of the phantoms were obtained and successfully co-registered with FMI images that were acquired simultaneously. A linear relationship between FMI intensity and dye concentration was observed. The relationship between FMI intensity and target fluorescence tube depth measured by OCT images was also observed and compared with theoretical modeling. This relationship could help in correcting reconstructed dye concentration. Imaging of colon polyps of APCmin mouse model is presented as an example of biological applications of this co-registered OCT/FMI system. PMID:20009192

  6. Light-induced fluorescence endoscopy (LIFE) imaging system for early cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Haishan; MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Palcic, Branko

    1999-09-01

    This paper summarizes our experiences on the development of a Light Induced Fluorescence Endoscopy (LIFE) imaging system for early cancer detection in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. The system utilizes tissue autofluorescence to provide real time video imaging of the examined organ. No exogenous fluorescent tumor markers are needed. It is used by a physician in adjunct to conventional white-light endoscopy. Suspicious areas are identified in pseudo color to guide biopsy. A multi- center clinical trial has demonstrated that in the lung, the relative sensitivity of white-light imaging + LIFE imaging vs. white-light imaging alone was 6.3 for intraepithelial neoplastic lesion detection and 2.71 when invasive carcinomas were also included. The following issues will be discussed: (1) spectroscopy study design for imaging system development; (2) architecture of the imaging systems; (3) different imaging modalities (white-light imaging, dual channel fluorescence imaging, and combined fluorescence/reflectance imaging); and (4) clinical applications.

  7. Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy to Image Zebrafish Eye Development

    PubMed Central

    Sidhaye, Jaydeep; Tomancak, Pavel; Preibisch, Stephan; Norden, Caren

    2016-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is gaining more and more popularity as a method to image embryonic development. The main advantages of LSFM compared to confocal systems are its low phototoxicity, gentle mounting strategies, fast acquisition with high signal to noise ratio and the possibility of imaging samples from various angles (views) for long periods of time. Imaging from multiple views unleashes the full potential of LSFM, but at the same time it can create terabyte-sized datasets. Processing such datasets is the biggest challenge of using LSFM. In this protocol we outline some solutions to this problem. Until recently, LSFM was mostly performed in laboratories that had the expertise to build and operate their own light sheet microscopes. However, in the last three years several commercial implementations of LSFM became available, which are multipurpose and easy to use for any developmental biologist. This article is primarily directed to those researchers, who are not LSFM technology developers, but want to employ LSFM as a tool to answer specific developmental biology questions. Here, we use imaging of zebrafish eye development as an example to introduce the reader to LSFM technology and we demonstrate applications of LSFM across multiple spatial and temporal scales. This article describes a complete experimental protocol starting with the mounting of zebrafish embryos for LSFM. We then outline the options for imaging using the commercially available light sheet microscope. Importantly, we also explain a pipeline for subsequent registration and fusion of multiview datasets using an open source solution implemented as a Fiji plugin. While this protocol focuses on imaging the developing zebrafish eye and processing data from a particular imaging setup, most of the insights and troubleshooting suggestions presented here are of general use and the protocol can be adapted to a variety of light sheet microscopy experiments. PMID:27167079

  8. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis techniques for contaminant screening of leafy greens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everard, Colm D.; Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Hoyoung

    2014-05-01

    The production of contaminant free fresh fruit and vegetables is needed to reduce foodborne illnesses and related costs. Leafy greens grown in the field can be susceptible to fecal matter contamination from uncontrolled livestock and wild animals entering the field. Pathogenic bacteria can be transferred via fecal matter and several outbreaks of E.coli O157:H7 have been associated with the consumption of leafy greens. This study examines the use of hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis to detect fecal contamination on Spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea). Hyperspectral fluorescence images from 464 to 800 nm were captured; ultraviolet excitation was supplied by two LED-based line light sources at 370 nm. Key wavelengths and algorithms useful for a contaminant screening optical imaging device were identified and developed, respectively. A non-invasive screening device has the potential to reduce the harmful consequences of foodborne illnesses.

  9. Fluorescence imaging and chlorophyll fluorescence to evaluate the role of EDU in UV-B protection in cucumber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Ravinder K.; Kim, Moon S.; Krizek, Donald T.; Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    1997-07-01

    A fluorescence imaging system and chlorophyll fluorescence emissions were used to evaluate whether EDU, N-[2-(2-oxo-1- imidazolidinyl) ethyl]-N'-phenylurea, provided protection against ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation (290 - 320 nm) in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) leaves. Plants were grown in growth chambers illuminated for 14 h per day with 400 W high pressure sodium and metal halide lamps. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for 1 hr at the beginning and end of each cycle was provided at 270 micrometers ol m-2 s-1 PAR; during the other 12 hr of the photoperiod, the plants received 840 micrometers ol m-2 s-1 PAR. Beginning on the twelfth day, the plants were exposed to UV-B radiation (0.2 & 18.0 kJ m-2d-1) for 2 days at 8 h per day centered in the photoperiod. Rapidly acquired (less than 1 s), high spatial resolution (less than 1 mm2) images were obtained for whole adaxial leaf surfaces using a fluorescence imaging system. The steady-state fluorescence images were acquired in four spectral regions: blue (F450 nm), green (F550 nm), red (F680 nm), and far-red (F740 nm). Fluorescence emission spectra for leaf pigments extracted in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) were obtained by excitation at 280 and 380 nm (280EX 300 - 530 nm; 380EX 400 - 800 nm). Both UV-B and EDU induced stress responses in cucumber leaves that altered the fluorescence emissions obtained from extracts. In the fluorescence images only UV-B induced stress responses were observed but this damage was detected before it was visually apparent. There was no evidence that EDU afforded protection against UV-B irradiation. Use of fluorescence imaging may provide an early stress detection capability for helping to assess damage to the photosynthetic apparatus of plants.

  10. Cholesterol distribution in living cells: fluorescence imaging using dehydroergosterol as a fluorescent cholesterol analog.

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, S; Zha, X; Tabas, I; Maxfield, F R

    1998-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important constituent of most mammalian cell membranes and its concentration in various cellular membranes is tightly regulated. Although there is much information about cholesterol distribution and trafficking in cells, it is primarily derived from indirect measurements, and the results obtained using different approaches are often conflicting. A cholesterol analog that faithfully mimics the properties of cholesterol and can be followed in living cells would thus be very useful. In this study, we report the fluorescence imaging of such an analog, dehydroergosterol (DHE), in living cells. DHE differs from cholesterol in having three additional double bonds and an extra methyl group. In model systems, DHE closely mimics the behavior of native cholesterol. Using triple-labeling studies, we show that DHE colocalizes extensively with endocytosed transferrin, an endocytic recycling compartment marker, and with a marker for the trans-Golgi network, Tac-TGN38. This distribution of DHE is qualitatively similar to that observed when cells are labeled with the fluorescent cholesterol-binding polyene antibiotic, filipin, although there are differences in apparent proportions of DHE and filipin that are localized at the plasma membrane. Another cholesterol derivative, 25-NBD-cholesterol, has a structure that is compromised by the presence of a bulky NBD group and does not distribute to the same organelles as DHE or filipin. In addition, we show in this manuscript that kinetic processes can be followed in living cells by monitoring recovery of DHE fluorescence in a photobleached region over time. Our observations provide evidence for the presence of a large intracellular cholesterol pool in the endocytic recycling compartment and the trans-Golgi network that might play important roles in the trafficking of lipids, lipid-anchored proteins, and transmembrane proteins that preferentially partition into cholesterol-enriched membrane domains. In addition, this

  11. Motion corrected photoacoustic difference imaging of fluorescent contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Märk, Julia; Wagener, Asja; Pönick, Sarah; Grötzinger, Carsten; Zhang, Edward; Laufer, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In fluorophores, such as exogenous dyes and genetically expressed proteins, the excited state lifetime can be modulated using pump-probe excitation at wavelengths corresponding to the absorption and fluorescence spectra. Simultaneous pump-probe pulses induce stimulated emission (SE) which, in turn, modulates the thermalized energy, and hence the photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitude. For time-delayed pulses, by contrast, SE is suppressed. Since this is not observed in endogenous chromophores, the location of the fluorophore can be determined by subtracting images acquired using simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation. This simple experimental approach exploits a fluorophorespecific contrast mechanism, and has the potential to enable deep-tissue molecular imaging at fluences below the MPE. In this study, some of the challenges to its in vivo implementation are addressed. First, the PA signal amplitude generated in fluorophores in vivo is often much smaller than that in blood. Second, tissue motion can give rise to artifacts that correspond to endogenous chromophores in the difference image. This would not allow the unambiguous detection of fluorophores. A method to suppress motion artifacts based on fast switching between simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation was developed. This enables the acquisition of PA signals using the two excitation modes with minimal time delay (20 ms), thus minimizing the effects of tissue motion. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated by visualizing a fluorophore (Atto680) in tissue phantoms, which were moved during the image acquisition to mimic tissue motion.

  12. A novel wireless wearable fluorescence image-guided surgery system.

    PubMed

    Kunshan He; Yamin Mao; Jinzuo Ye; Yu An; Shixin Jiang; Chongwei Chi; Jie Tian

    2016-08-01

    Segmentectomy using indocyanine green (ICG) has become a primary treatment option to achieve a complete resection and preserve lung function in early-stage lung cancer. However, owing to a lack of appropriate intraoperative imaging systems, it is a huge challenge for surgeons to identify the intersegmental plane during the operation, leading to poor prognosis. Thus, we developed a novel wireless wearable fluorescence image-guided surgery system (LIGHTEN) for fast and accurate identification of intersegmental planes in human patients. The system consists of a handle, light source, Google glass and laptop. Application software is written to capture clear real-time images and Google glass is adopted to display with augmented reality. Twelve in vivo studies of pulmonary segmentectomy in swine by intravenous injection of ICG were conducted to test the performance of the system. A distinct black-and-white transition zone image was observed and displayed simultaneously on the Google glass in all swine. The results demonstrated that surgeons using LIGHTEN can effortlessly and quickly discern intersegmental planes during the operation. Our system has enormous potential in helping surgeons to precisely identify intersegmental planes with mobility and high-sensitivity.

  13. Fluorescence Imaging of the Cytoskeleton in Plant Roots.

    PubMed

    Dyachok, Julia; Paez-Garcia, Ana; Yoo, Cheol-Min; Palanichelvam, Karuppaiah; Blancaflor, Elison B

    2016-01-01

    During the past two decades the use of live cytoskeletal probes has increased dramatically due to the introduction of the green fluorescent protein. However, to make full use of these live cell reporters it is necessary to implement simple methods to maintain plant specimens in optimal growing conditions during imaging. To image the cytoskeleton in living Arabidopsis roots, we rely on a system involving coverslips coated with nutrient supplemented agar where the seeds are directly germinated. This coverslip system can be conveniently transferred to the stage of a confocal microscope with minimal disturbance to the growth of the seedling. For roots with a larger diameter such as Medicago truncatula, seeds are first germinated in moist paper, grown vertically in between plastic trays, and roots mounted on glass slides for confocal imaging. Parallel with our live cell imaging approaches, we routinely process fixed plant material via indirect immunofluorescence. For these methods we typically use non-embedded vibratome-sectioned and whole mount permeabilized root tissue. The clearly defined developmental regions of the root provide us with an elegant system to further understand the cytoskeletal basis of plant development.

  14. Fluorescence imaging of lymphatic outflow of cerebrospinal fluid in mice.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Janssen, Christopher F; Velasquez, Fred Christian; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2017-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is known to be reabsorbed by the lymphatic vessels and drain into the lymph nodes (LNs) through peripheral lymphatic vessels. In the peripheral lymphatics, the contractile pumping action of lymphangions mediates lymph drainage; yet it is unknown whether lymphatic vessels draining cranial and spinal CSF show similar function. Herein, we used non-invasive near-infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRFI) to image (i) indocyanine green (ICG) distribution along the neuraxis and (ii) routes of ICG-laden CSF outflow into the lymphatics following intrathecal lumbar administration. We demonstrate lymphatic contractile function in peripheral lymphatics draining from the nasal lymphatics to the mandibular LNs. In addition, we observed afferent sciatic lymphatic vessels, which also show contractile activity and transport spinal CSF into the sciatic LNs. This drainage pattern was also visualized by NIRFI following intrathecal thoracic injection. In situ intravital imaging following intrathecal lumbar injection of blue dye shows similar distributions to that seen in vivo with ICG. NIRFI could be used as a tool to probe CSF pathology including neurological disorders by imaging CSF outflow dynamics to lymphatics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonnegative matrix factorization: a blind spectra separation method for in vivo fluorescent optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Montcuquet, Anne-Sophie; Hervé, Lionel; Navarro, Fabrice; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Mars, Jérôme I

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging in diffusive media is an emerging imaging modality for medical applications that uses injected fluorescent markers that bind to specific targets, e.g., carcinoma. The region of interest is illuminated with near-IR light and the emitted back fluorescence is analyzed to localize the fluorescence sources. To investigate a thick medium, as the fluorescence signal decreases with the light travel distance, any disturbing signal, such as biological tissues intrinsic fluorescence (called autofluorescence) is a limiting factor. Several specific markers may also be simultaneously injected to bind to different molecules, and one may want to isolate each specific fluorescent signal from the others. To remove the unwanted fluorescence contributions or separate different specific markers, a spectroscopic approach is explored. The nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) is the blind positive source separation method we chose. We run an original regularized NMF algorithm we developed on experimental data, and successfully obtain separated in vivo fluorescence spectra.

  16. Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescent imaging during robotic operations.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Antonio Luiz de Vasconcellos; Schraibman, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The intraoperative identification of certain anatomical structures because they are small or visually occult may be challenging. The development of minimally invasive surgery brought additional difficulties to identify these structures due to the lack of complete tactile sensitivity. A number of different forms of intraoperative mapping have been tried. Recently, the near-infrared fluorescence imaging technology with indocyanine green has been added to robotic platforms. In addition, this technology has been tested in several types of operations, and has advantages such as safety, low cost and good results. Disadvantages are linked to contrast distribution in certain clinical scenarios. The intraoperative near-infrared fluorescent imaging is new and promising addition to robotic surgery. Several reports show the utility of this technology in several different procedures. The ideal dose, time and site for dye injection are not well defined. No high quality evidence-based comparative studies and long-term follow-up outcomes have been published so far. Initial results, however, are good and safe. RESUMO A identificação intraoperatória de certas estruturas anatômicas, por seu tamanho ou por elas serem ocultas à visão, pode ser desafiadora. O desenvolvimento da cirurgia minimamente invasiva trouxe dificuldades adicionais, pela falta da sensibilidade tátil completa. Diversas formas de detecção intraoperatória destas estruturas têm sido tentadas. Recentemente, a tecnologia de fluorescência infravermelha com verde de indocianina foi associada às plataformas robóticas. Além disso, essa tecnologia tem sido testada em uma variedade de cirurgias, e suas vantagens parecem estar ligadas a baixo custo, segurança e bons resultados. As desvantagens estão associadas à má distribuição do contraste em determinados cenários. A imagem intraoperatória por fluorescência infravermelha é uma nova e promissora adição à cirurgia robótica. Diversas séries mostram

  17. The Chlorophyll Fluorescence Imaging Spectrometer (CFIS): A New Airborne Instrument for Quantifying Solar-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewry, D.; Frankenberg, C.; Verma, M.; Berry, J. A.; Schimel, D.; Geier, S.; Schwochert, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent demonstrations of the retrieval of vegetation solar-induced fluorescence (SIF) emission from satellite platforms have opened up the possibility of remotely monitoring photosynthetic function, in addition to the structural and biochemical parameters that characterize the current capabilities of vegetation observing systems. These satellite retrievals, from platforms such as GOSAT, GOME-2, and most recently NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2), provide powerful evidence of the correlation between vegetation productivity and SIF at seasonal to annual timescales, and at spatial resolutions of tens to hundreds of kilometers. The Chlorophyll Fluorescence Imaging Spectrometer (CFIS) was recently developed for OCO-2 validation purposes and provides an airborne capability to help fill the spatial gap between leaf- or canopy-level observations of SIF flux and extensive satellite footprints. The flexibility of an airborne instrument likewise allows for studies of the temporal variability of SIF emission over consecutive days, or with meteorological variability throughout a day. CFIS is a high resolution (<0.1nm) spectrometer covering the 740-770nm wavelength range, optimized for SIF quantification. Here we present an overview of the instrument design and capabilities, along with the retrieval methodology. An evaluation of data collected during initial campaigns conducted during the spring and summer of 2015 are also presented, demonstrating variability within and between days for campaigns spanning multiple days in the Midwest US and Northern California. Results will be compared to OCO-2 data as well as flux-tower measurements made during the CFIS flights.

  18. Self-interference fluorescence microscopy: three dimensional fluorescence imaging without depth scanning.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Mattijs; Evans, Conor L; de Boer, Johannes F

    2012-07-02

    We present a new method for high-resolution, three-dimensional fluorescence imaging. In contrast to beam-scanning confocal microscopy, where the laser focus must be scanned both laterally and axially to collect a volume, we obtain depth information without the necessity of depth scanning. In this method, the emitted fluorescence is collected in the backward direction and is sent through a phase plate that encodes the depth information into the phase of a spectrally resolved interference pattern. We demonstrate that decoding this phase information allows for depth localization accuracy better than 4 µm over a 500 µm depth-of-field. In a high numerical aperture configuration with a much smaller depth of field, a localization accuracy of tens of nanometers can be achieved. This approach is ideally suited for miniature endoscopes, where space limitations at the endoscope tip render depth scanning difficult. We illustrate the potential for 3D visualization of complex biological samples by constructing a three-dimensional volume of the microvasculature of ex vivo murine heart tissue from a single 2D scan.

  19. Detecting fluorescence hot-spots using mosaic maps generated from multimodal endoscope imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenying; Soper, Timothy D.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence labeled biomarkers can be detected during endoscopy to guide early cancer biopsies, such as high-grade dysplasia in Barrett's Esophagus. To enhance intraoperative visualization of the fluorescence hot-spots, a mosaicking technique was developed to create full anatomical maps of the lower esophagus and associated fluorescent hot-spots. The resultant mosaic map contains overlaid reflectance and fluorescence images. It can be used to assist biopsy and document findings. The mosaicking algorithm uses reflectance images to calculate image registration between successive frames, and apply this registration to simultaneously acquired fluorescence images. During this mosaicking process, the fluorescence signal is enhanced through multi-frame averaging. Preliminary results showed that the technique promises to enhance the detectability of the hot-spots due to enhanced fluorescence signal.

  20. Adaptive optics two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy of exogenous fluorophores in mice.

    PubMed

    Feeks, James A; Hunter, Jennifer J

    2017-05-01

    In vivo cellular scale fluorescence lifetime imaging of the mouse retina has the potential to be a sensitive marker of retinal cell health. In this study, we demonstrate fluorescence lifetime imaging of extrinsic fluorophores using adaptive optics fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (AOFLIO). We recorded AOFLIO images of inner retinal cells labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and capillaries labeled with fluorescein. We demonstrate that AOFLIO can be used to differentiate spectrally overlapping fluorophores in the retina. With further refinements, AOFLIO could be used to assess retinal health in early stages of degeneration by utilizing lifetime-based sensors or even fluorophores native to the retina.

  1. Adaptive optics two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy of exogenous fluorophores in mice

    PubMed Central

    Feeks, James A.; Hunter, Jennifer J.

    2017-01-01

    In vivo cellular scale fluorescence lifetime imaging of the mouse retina has the potential to be a sensitive marker of retinal cell health. In this study, we demonstrate fluorescence lifetime imaging of extrinsic fluorophores using adaptive optics fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (AOFLIO). We recorded AOFLIO images of inner retinal cells labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and capillaries labeled with fluorescein. We demonstrate that AOFLIO can be used to differentiate spectrally overlapping fluorophores in the retina. With further refinements, AOFLIO could be used to assess retinal health in early stages of degeneration by utilizing lifetime-based sensors or even fluorophores native to the retina. PMID:28663886

  2. Multiparameter imaging of calcium and abscisic acid and high-resolution quantitative calcium measurements using R-GECO1-mTurquoise in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Waadt, Rainer; Krebs, Melanie; Kudla, Jörg; Schumacher, Karin

    2017-10-01

    Calcium signals occur in specific spatio-temporal patterns in response to various stimuli and are coordinated with, for example, hormonal signals, for physiological and developmental adaptations. Quantification of calcium together with other signalling molecules is required for correlative analyses and to decipher downstream calcium-decoding mechanisms. Simultaneous in vivo imaging of calcium and abscisic acid has been performed here to investigate the interdependence of the respective signalling processes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Advanced ratiometric genetically encoded calcium indicators have been generated and in vivo calcium calibration protocols were established to determine absolute calcium concentration changes in response to auxin and ATP. In roots, abscisic acid induced long-term basal calcium concentration increases, while auxin triggered rapid signals in the elongation zone. The advanced ratiometric calcium indicator R-GECO1-mTurquoise exhibited an increased calcium signal resolution compared to commonly used Förster resonance energy transfer-based indicators. Quantitative calcium measurements in Arabidopsis root tips using R-GECO1-mTurquoise revealed detailed maps of absolute calcium concentration changes in response to auxin and ATP. Calcium calibration protocols using R-GECO1-mTurquoise enabled high-resolution quantitative imaging of resting cytosolic calcium concentrations and their dynamic changes that revealed distinct hormonal and ATP responses in roots. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. In Vivo Follow-up of Brain Tumor Growth via Bioluminescence Imaging and Fluorescence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Genevois, Coralie; Loiseau, Hugues; Couillaud, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Reporter gene-based strategies are widely used in experimental oncology. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) using the firefly luciferase (Fluc) as a reporter gene and d-luciferin as a substrate is currently the most widely employed technique. The present paper compares the performances of BLI imaging with fluorescence imaging using the near infrared fluorescent protein (iRFP) to monitor brain tumor growth in mice. Fluorescence imaging includes fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI), fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT), and fluorescence molecular Imaging (FMT®). A U87 cell line was genetically modified for constitutive expression of both the encoding Fluc and iRFP reporter genes and assayed for cell, subcutaneous tumor and brain tumor imaging. On cultured cells, BLI was more sensitive than FRI; in vivo, tumors were first detected by BLI. Fluorescence of iRFP provided convenient tools such as flux cytometry, direct detection of the fluorescent protein on histological slices, and fluorescent tomography that allowed for 3D localization and absolute quantification of the fluorescent signal in brain tumors. PMID:27809256

  4. Fluorescent nano-PEBBLE sensors designed for intracellular glucose imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Aylott, Jonathan W; Kopelman, Raoul

    2002-11-01

    Polyacrylamide-based, ratiometric, spherical, optical nanosensors, or polyacrylamide PEBBLEs (Probes Encapsulated By Biologically Localized Embedding), have been fabricated, aimed at real-time glucose imaging in intact biological systems, i.e. living cells. These nanosensors are prepared using a microemulsion polymerization process, and their average size is about 45 nm in diameter. The sensors incorporate glucose oxidase (GOx), an oxygen sensitive fluorescent indicator (Ru[dpp(SO3Na)2]3)Cl2, and an oxygen insensitive fluorescent dye, Oregon Green 488-dextran or Texas Red-dextran, as a reference for the purpose of ratiometric intensity measurements. The enzymatic oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid results in the local depletion of oxygen, which is measured by the oxygen sensitive ruthenium dye. The small size and inert matrix of these sensors allows them to be inserted into living cells with minimal physical and chemical perturbations to their biological functions. The PEBBLE matrix protects the enzyme and fluorescent dyes from interference by proteins in cells, enabling reliable in vivo chemical analysis. Conversely, the matrix also significantly reduces the toxicity of the indicator and reference dyes to the cells, so that a larger variety of dyes can be used in optimal fashion. Furthermore, the PEBBLE matrix enables the synergistic approach in which there is a steady state of local oxygen consumption, and this cannot be achieved by separately introducing free enzyme and dyes into a cell. The work presented here describes the production and characterization of glucose sensitive PEBBLEs, and their potential for intracellular glucose measurements. The sensor response is determined in terms of the linear range, ratiometric operation, response time, sensor stability, reversibility and immunity to interferences.

  5. Enhanced live cell imaging via photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weili; Long, Kenneth D; Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Choi, Ji Sun; Harley, Brendan A; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-11-21

    We demonstrate photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence (PCEF) microscopy as a surface-specific fluorescence imaging technique to study the adhesion of live cells by visualizing variations in cell-substrate gap distance. This approach utilizes a photonic crystal surface incorporated into a standard microscope slide as the substrate for cell adhesion, and a microscope integrated with a custom illumination source as the detection instrument. When illuminated with a monochromatic light source, angle-specific optical resonances supported by the photonic crystal enable efficient excitation of surface-confined and amplified electromagnetic fields when excited at an on-resonance condition, while no field enhancement occurs when the same photonic crystal is illuminated in an off-resonance state. By mapping the fluorescence enhancement factor for fluorophore-tagged cellular components between on- and off-resonance states and comparing the results to numerical calculations, the vertical distance of labelled cellular components from the photonic crystal substrate can be estimated, providing critical and quantitative information regarding the spatial distribution of the specific components of cells attaching to a surface. As an initial demonstration of the concept, 3T3 fibroblast cells were grown on fibronectin-coated photonic crystals with fluorophore-labelled plasma membrane or nucleus. We demonstrate that PCEF microscopy is capable of providing information about the spatial distribution of cell-surface interactions at the single-cell level that is not available from other existing forms of microscopy, and that the approach is amenable to large fields of view, without the need for coupling prisms, coupling fluids, or special microscope objectives.

  6. Enhanced live cell imaging via photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence microscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weili; Long, Kenneth D.; Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Choi, Ji Sun; Harley, Brendan A.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence (PCEF) microscopy as a surface-specific fluorescence imaging technique to study the adhesion of live cells by visualizing variations in cell-substrate gap distance. This approach utilizes a photonic crystal surface incorporated into a standard microscope slide as the substrate for cell adhesion, and a microscope integrated with a custom illumination source as the detection instrument. When illuminated with a monochromatic light source, angle-specific optical resonances supported by the photonic crystal enable efficient excitation of surface-confined and amplified electromagnetic fields when excited at an on-resonance condition, while no field enhancement occurs when the same photonic crystal is illuminated in an off-resonance state. By mapping the fluorescence enhancement factor for fluorophore-tagged cellular components between on- and off-resonance states and comparing the results to numerical calculations, the vertical distance of labelled cellular components from the photonic crystal substrate can be estimated, providing critical and quantitative information regarding the spatial distribution of the specific components of cells attaching to a surface. As an initial demonstration of the concept, 3T3 fibroblast cells were grown on fibronectin-coated photonic crystals with fluorophore-labelled plasma membrane or nucleus. We demonstrate that PCEF microscopy is capable of providing information about the spatial distribution of cell-surface interactions at the single-cell level that is not available from other existing forms of microscopy, and that the approach is amenable to large fields of view, without the need for coupling prisms, coupling fluids, or special microscope objectives. PMID:25265458

  7. Two-photon fluorescent probe for cadmium imaging in cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongyou; Dong, Xiaohu; Sun, Jian; Zhong, Cheng; Li, Boheng; You, Ximeng; Liu, Bifeng; Liu, Zhihong

    2012-04-21

    A novel two-photon excited fluorescent probe for cadmium (named as TPCd) was designed and synthesized utilizing a prodan (6-acetyl-2-methoxynaphthalene) derivative as the two-photon fluorophore and an o-phenylenediamine derivative as the Cd(2+) chelator, which possessed favorable photophysical properties and good water-solubility. The probe was designed with a photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism and thus was weakly fluorescent itself. After binding with Cd(2+) which blocked the PET process, the fluorescence intensity of the probe was enhanced by up to 15-fold under one-photon excitation (OPE) and 27-fold under two-photon excitation (TPE), respectively. The two-photon action cross-section (Φδ) of the TPCd-Cd complex at 740 nm reached 109 GM compared to 3.6 GM for free TPCd, indicating the promising prospect of the probe in two-photon application. TPCd chelated Cd(2+) with 1 : 1 stoichiometry, and the apparent dissociation constant (K(d)) was 6.1 × 10(-5) M for the one-photon mode and 7.2 × 10(-5) M for the two-photon mode. The probe responded to Cd(2+) over a wide linear range from 0.1 to 30 μM with a detection limit of 0.04 μM. High selectivity of the probe towards Cd(2+) was acquired in Tris-HCl/sodium phosphate buffer. The probe was pH-independent in the biologically relevant pH range and non-toxic to living cells at reasonable concentration levels, warranting its in vivo applications. Through two-photon microscopy imaging, the probe was successfully applied to detect Cd(2+) uptake in living HepG2 cells.

  8. A widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor for image cytometry of biospecimens: Considerations for image quality optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Majid, Aneeka A.; Powless, Amy J.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2015-09-15

    Linear image sensors have been widely used in numerous research and industry applications to provide continuous imaging of moving objects. Here, we present a widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor used to image translating objects for image cytometry. First, a calibration curve was characterized for a custom microfluidic chamber over a span of volumetric pump rates. Image data were also acquired using 15 μm fluorescent polystyrene spheres on a slide with a motorized translation stage in order to match linear translation speed with line exposure periods to preserve the image aspect ratio. Aspect ratios were then calculated after imaging to ensure quality control of image data. Fluorescent beads were imaged in suspension flowing through the microfluidics chamber being pumped by a mechanical syringe pump at 16 μl min{sup −1} with a line exposure period of 150 μs. The line period was selected to acquire images of fluorescent beads with a 40 dB signal-to-background ratio. A motorized translation stage was then used to transport conventional glass slides of stained cellular biospecimens. Whole blood collected from healthy volunteers was stained with 0.02% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate was imaged to highlight leukocyte morphology with a 1.56 mm × 1.28 mm field of view (1540 ms total acquisition time). Oral squamous cells were also collected from healthy volunteers and stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate to demonstrate quantifiable subcellular features and an average nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of 0.03 (n = 75), with a resolution of 0.31 μm pixels{sup −1}.

  9. A widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor for image cytometry of biospecimens: Considerations for image quality optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Majid, Aneeka A.; Powless, Amy J.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2015-09-01

    Linear image sensors have been widely used in numerous research and industry applications to provide continuous imaging of moving objects. Here, we present a widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor used to image translating objects for image cytometry. First, a calibration curve was characterized for a custom microfluidic chamber over a span of volumetric pump rates. Image data were also acquired using 15 μm fluorescent polystyrene spheres on a slide with a motorized translation stage in order to match linear translation speed with line exposure periods to preserve the image aspect ratio. Aspect ratios were then calculated after imaging to ensure quality control of image data. Fluorescent beads were imaged in suspension flowing through the microfluidics chamber being pumped by a mechanical syringe pump at 16 μl min-1 with a line exposure period of 150 μs. The line period was selected to acquire images of fluorescent beads with a 40 dB signal-to-background ratio. A motorized translation stage was then used to transport conventional glass slides of stained cellular biospecimens. Whole blood collected from healthy volunteers was stained with 0.02% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate was imaged to highlight leukocyte morphology with a 1.56 mm × 1.28 mm field of view (1540 ms total acquisition time). Oral squamous cells were also collected from healthy volunteers and stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate to demonstrate quantifiable subcellular features and an average nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of 0.03 (n = 75), with a resolution of 0.31 μm pixels-1.

  10. A widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor for image cytometry of biospecimens: Considerations for image quality optimization.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, Joshua A; Majid, Aneeka A; Powless, Amy J; Muldoon, Timothy J

    2015-09-01

    Linear image sensors have been widely used in numerous research and industry applications to provide continuous imaging of moving objects. Here, we present a widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor used to image translating objects for image cytometry. First, a calibration curve was characterized for a custom microfluidic chamber over a span of volumetric pump rates. Image data were also acquired using 15 μm fluorescent polystyrene spheres on a slide with a motorized translation stage in order to match linear translation speed with line exposure periods to preserve the image aspect ratio. Aspect ratios were then calculated after imaging to ensure quality control of image data. Fluorescent beads were imaged in suspension flowing through the microfluidics chamber being pumped by a mechanical syringe pump at 16 μl min(-1) with a line exposure period of 150 μs. The line period was selected to acquire images of fluorescent beads with a 40 dB signal-to-background ratio. A motorized translation stage was then used to transport conventional glass slides of stained cellular biospecimens. Whole blood collected from healthy volunteers was stained with 0.02% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate was imaged to highlight leukocyte morphology with a 1.56 mm × 1.28 mm field of view (1540 ms total acquisition time). Oral squamous cells were also collected from healthy volunteers and stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate to demonstrate quantifiable subcellular features and an average nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of 0.03 (n = 75), with a resolution of 0.31 μm pixels(-1).

  11. A fluorescent reporter of caspase activity for live imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bardet, Pierre-Luc; Kolahgar, Golnar; Mynett, Anita; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene; Briscoe, James; Meier, Pascal; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the mechanisms that control the apoptosis cascade during development and adult life. To investigate the regulatory events that trigger apoptosis in whole tissues, we have devised a genetically encoded caspase sensor that can be detected in live and fixed tissue by standard confocal microscopy. The sensor comprises two fluorophores, mRFP, monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), that are linked by an efficient and specific caspase-sensitive site. Upon caspase activation, the sensor is cleaved and eGFP translocates to the nucleus, leaving mRFP at membranes. This is detected before other markers of apoptosis, including anti–cleaved caspase 3 immunoreactivity. Moreover, the sensor does not perturb normal developmental apoptosis and is specific, as cleavage does not occur in Drosophila embryos that are unable to activate the apoptotic cascade. Importantly, dying cells can be recognized in live embryos, thus opening the way for in vivo imaging. As expected from the high conservation of caspases, it is also cleaved in dying cells of chick embryos. It is therefore likely to be generally useful to track the spatiotemporal pattern of caspase activity in a variety of species. PMID:18779587

  12. Analysis of human aorta using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira-Damiani, Gislaine; Adur, J.; Ferro, D. P.; Adam, R. L.; Pelegati, V.; Thomáz, A.; Cesar, C. L.; Metze, K.

    2012-03-01

    The use of photonics has improved our understanding of biologic phenomena. For the study of the normal and pathologic architecture of the aorta the use of Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (TPEF) and Second Harmonic Generation showed interesting details of morphologic changes of the elastin-collagen architecture during aging or development of hypertension in previous studies. In this investigation we tried to apply fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for the morphologic analysis of human aortas. The aim of our study was to use FLIM in non-stained formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples of the aorta ascendants in hypertensive and normotensive patients of various ages, examining two different topographical regions. The FLIM-spectra of collagen and elastic fibers were clearly distinguishable, thus permitting an exact analysis of unstained material on the microscopic level. Moreover the FLIM spectrum of elastic fibers revealed variations between individual cases, which indicate modifications on a molecular level and might be related to FLIM age or diseases states and reflect modifications on a molecular level.

  13. Kinematics of red cell aspiration by fluorescence-imaged microdeformation.

    PubMed Central

    Discher, D E; Mohandas, N

    1996-01-01

    Maps of fluorescing red cell membrane components on a pipette-aspirated projection are quantitated in an effort to elucidate and unify the heterogeneous kinematics of deformation. Transient gradients of diffusing fluorescent lipid first demonstrate the fluidity of an otherwise uniform-density bilayer and corroborate a "universal" calibration scale for relative surface density. A steep but smooth and stable gradient in the densities of the skeleton components spectrin, actin, and protein 4.1 is used to estimate large elastic strains along the aspirated skeleton. The deformation fields are argued to be an unhindered response to loading in the surface normal direction. Density maps intermediate to those of the compressible skeleton and fluid bilayer are exhibited by particular transmembrane proteins (e.g., Band 3) and yield estimates for the skeleton-connected fractions. Such connected proteins appear to occupy a significant proportion of the undeformed membrane surface and can lead to steric exclusion of unconnected integral membrane proteins from regions of network condensation. Consistent with membrane repatterning kinematics in reversible deformation, final vesiculation of the projection tip produces a cell fragment concentrated in freely diffusing proteins but depleted of skeleton. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:8889146

  14. Application of hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime imaging to tissue autofluorescence: arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, C. B.; Benninger, R. K. P.; de Beule, P.; Requejo-Isidro, J.; Elson, D. S.; Dunsby, C.; Munro, I.; Neil, M. A.; Sandison, A.; Sofat, N.; Nagase, H.; French, P. M. W.; Lever, M. J.

    2005-08-01

    Tissue contains many natural fluorophores and therefore by exploiting autofluorescence, we can obtain information from tissue with less interference than conventional histological techniques. However, conventional intensity imaging is prone to artifacts since it is an absolute measurement. Fluorescence lifetime and spectral measurements are relative measurements and therefore allow for better measurements. We have applied FLIM and hyperspectral FLIM to the study of articular cartilage and its disease arthritis. We have analyzed normal human articular cartilage and cartilage which was in the early stages of disease. In this case, it was found that FLIM was able to detect changes in the diseased tissue that were not detectable with the conventional diagnosis. Specifically, the fluorescence lifetimes (FL) of the cells were different between the two samples. We have also applied hyperspectral FLIM to degraded cartilage through treatment with interleukin-1. In this case, it was found that there was a shift in the emission spectrum with treatment and that the lifetime had also increased. We also showed that there was greater contrast between the cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) at longer wavelengths.

  15. Fluorescence-lifetime imaging using a novel photon sensing module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLoskey, David; Suhling, Klaus; Birch, David J. S.

    1997-05-01

    We report the first read-out module for use with single- photon timing array detectors such as multi-anode MCP-PMTs. The IBH Model 5000MXR interfaces to the time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) technique using a single time-to-amplitude converter. In addition to performing established multiplexing tasks, such as simultaneous acquisition of fluorescence and excitation and anisotropy, the new module enables spectral and spatial imaging of kinetic parameters such as fluorescence lifetimes and amplitudes. The system retains the inherent advantages of TCSPC with respect to picosecond time resolution and wide dynamic range, while featuring parallel data acquisition and enhanced data acquisition rates. Unlike early TTL implementations of multiplexing which were limited to four channels, our system uses an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which can read out the data from up to sixteen detection channels with higher reliability and less time-dispersion. The Model 5000MXR can be packaged as a NIM standard module, packaged to serve more channels or be close coupled to detector arrays for specific applications such as microscopy and lifetime based sensors. The theory, design and performance of ASIC data read-out will be described. Other applications include photon migration in tissue, time- of-flight reflectometry/mass spectrometry and nucleonics.

  16. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for fluorescence-guided surgery (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Lindsay; Warram, Jason M.; de Boer, Esther; Carroll, William R.; Morlandt, Anthony; Withrow, Kirk P.; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2016-03-01

    During fluorescence-guided surgery, a cancer-specific optical probe is injected and visualized using a compatible device intraoperatively to provide visual contrast between diseased and normal tissues to maximize resection of cancer and minimize the resection of precious adjacent normal tissues. Six patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck region (oral cavity (n=4) or cutaneous (n=2)) were injected with an EGFR-targeting antibody (Cetuximab) conjugated to a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye (IRDye800) 3, 4, or 7 days prior to surgical resection of the cancer. Each patient's tumor was then imaged using a commercially available, open-field NIR fluorescence imaging device each day prior to surgery, intraoperatively, and post-operatively. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of the tumor was calculated for each specimen at each imaging time point. Adjacent normal tissue served as an internal anatomic control for each patient to establish a patient-matched "background" fluorescence. Resected tissues were also imaged using a closed-field NIR imaging device. Tumor to background ratios (TBRs) were calculated for each patient using both devices. Fluorescence histology was correlated with traditional pathology assessment to verify the specificity of antibody-dye conjugate binding. Peak TBRs using the open-field device ranged from 2.2 to 11.3, with an average TBR of 4.9. Peak TBRs were achieved between days 1 and 4. This study demonstrated that a commercially available NIR imaging device suited for intraoperative and clinical use can successfully be used with a fluorescently-labeled dye to delineate between diseased and normal tissue in this single cohort human study, illuminated the potential for its use in fluoresence-guided surgery.

  17. Optical characterization and confocal fluorescence imaging of mechanochromic acrylate polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Horn, M.; Smith, P.; Mason, B. P.; Hemmer, J. R.; Read de Alaniz, J.; Hooper, J. P.; Osswald, S.

    2015-01-01

    The development of mechanochromic molecules has opened new pathways for the study of localized stress and failure in polymers. Their application as stress or temperature diagnostics, however, requires suitable measurement techniques capable of detecting the force- and temperature-sensitive chemical species with high spatial resolution. Confocal imaging techniques offer excellent spatial resolution but the energy input during these measurements can itself affect the activation state of the mechanochromic species. Here, we present a systematic study of the effects of laser-based imaging on the activation and fluorescence behavior of mechanochromic spiropyran (SP) integrated into poly(methyl acrylate) (PMA) and poly(methyl methacrylate) matrices using a confocal Raman microspectrometer. Localized stress and temperature activation were studied by means of high-rate compressive loading and dynamic fracture. Laser illumination of SP in PMA revealed a strong excitation wavelength- and power-dependence. Suitable correction functions were established and used to account for the observed laser effects. The presented study demonstrates that confocal imaging using conventional Raman spectrometers is a powerful characterization tool for localized stress analysis in mechanochromic polymers, offering quantifiable information on the activation state with high spatial resolution. However, laser-mechanophore interactions must be well understood and effects of laser excitation and exposure times must be taken into consideration when interpreting the obtained results.

  18. A 3-D fluorescence imaging system incorporating structured illumination technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antos, L.; Emord, P.; Luquette, B.; McGee, B.; Nguyen, D.; Phipps, A.; Phillips, D.; Helguera, M.

    2010-02-01

    A currently available 2-D high-resolution, optical molecular imaging system was modified by the addition of a structured illumination source, OptigridTM, to investigate the feasibility of providing depth resolution along the optical axis. The modification involved the insertion of the OptigridTM and a lens in the path between the light source and the image plane, as well as control and signal processing software. Projection of the OptigridTM onto the imaging surface at an angle, was resolved applying the Scheimpflug principle. The illumination system implements modulation of the light source and provides a framework for capturing depth resolved mages. The system is capable of in-focus projection of the OptigridTM at different spatial frequencies, and supports the use of different lenses. A calibration process was developed for the system to achieve consistent phase shifts of the OptigridTM. Post-processing extracted depth information using depth modulation analysis using a phantom block with fluorescent sheets at different depths. An important aspect of this effort was that it was carried out by a multidisciplinary team of engineering and science students as part of a capstone senior design program. The disciplines represented are mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and imaging science. The project was sponsored by a financial grant from New York State with equipment support from two industrial concerns. The students were provided with a basic imaging concept and charged with developing, implementing, testing and validating a feasible proof-of-concept prototype system that was returned to the originator of the concept for further evaluation and characterization.

  19. Single aflatoxin contaminated corn kernel analysis with fluorescence hyperspectral image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Haibo; Hruska, Zuzana; Kincaid, Russell; Ononye, Ambrose; Brown, Robert L.; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2010-04-01

    Aflatoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of the fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, among others. Aflatoxin contaminated corn is toxic to domestic animals when ingested in feed and is a known carcinogen associated with liver and lung cancer in humans. Consequently, aflatoxin levels in food and feed are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the US, allowing 20 ppb (parts per billion) limits in food and 100 ppb in feed for interstate commerce. Currently, aflatoxin detection and quantification methods are based on analytical tests including thin-layer chromatography (TCL) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These analytical tests require the destruction of samples, and are costly and time consuming. Thus, the ability to detect aflatoxin in a rapid, nondestructive way is crucial to the grain industry, particularly to corn industry. Hyperspectral imaging technology offers a non-invasive approach toward screening for food safety inspection and quality control based on its spectral signature. The focus of this paper is to classify aflatoxin contaminated single corn kernels using fluorescence hyperspectral imagery. Field inoculated corn kernels were used in the study. Contaminated and control kernels under long wavelength ultraviolet excitation were imaged using a visible near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral camera. The imaged kernels were chemically analyzed to provide reference information for image analysis. This paper describes a procedure to process corn kernels located in different images for statistical training and classification. Two classification algorithms, Maximum Likelihood and Binary Encoding, were used to classify each corn kernel into "control" or "contaminated" through pixel classification. The Binary Encoding approach had a slightly better performance with accuracy equals to 87% or 88% when 20 ppb or 100 ppb was used as classification threshold, respectively.

  20. Aptamer-assembled nanomaterials for fluorescent sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Danqing; He, Lei; Zhang, Ge; Lv, Aiping; Wang, Ruowen; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2016-09-01

    Aptamers, which are selected in vitro by a technology known as the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), represent a crucial recognition element in molecular sensing. With advantages such as good biocompatibility, facile functionalization, and special optical and physical properties, various nanomaterials can protect aptamers from enzymatic degradation and nonspecific binding in living systems and thus provide a preeminent platform for biochemical applications. Coupling aptamers with various nanomaterials offers many opportunities for developing highly sensitive and selective sensing systems. Here, we focus on the recent applications of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials in fluorescent sensing and imaging. Different types of nanomaterials are examined along with their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, we look toward the future of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials.

  1. Aptamer-assembled nanomaterials for fluorescent sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Danqing; He, Lei; Zhang, Ge; Lv, Aiping; Wang, Ruowen; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2017-01-01

    Aptamers, which are selected in vitro by a technology known as the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), represent a crucial recognition element in molecular sensing. With advantages such as good biocompatibility, facile functionalization, and special optical and physical properties, various nanomaterials can protect aptamers from enzymatic degradation and nonspecific binding in living systems and thus provide a preeminent platform for biochemical applications. Coupling aptamers with various nanomaterials offers many opportunities for developing highly sensitive and selective sensing systems. Here, we focus on the recent applications of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials in fluorescent sensing and imaging. Different types of nanomaterials are examined along with their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, we look toward the future of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials.

  2. A novel fluorescence lifetime imaging system that optimizes photon efficiency.

    PubMed

    Colyer, Ryan A; Lee, Claudia; Gratton, Enrico

    2008-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is a powerful microscopy technique for providing contrast of biological and other systems by differences in molecular species or their environments. However, the cost of equipment and the complexity of data analysis have limited the application of FLIM. We present a mathematical model and physical implementation for a low cost digital frequency domain FLIM (DFD-FLIM) system, which can provide lifetime resolution with quality comparable to time-correlated single photon counting methods. Our implementation provides data natively in the form of phasors. On the basis of the mathematical model, we present an error analysis that shows the precise parameters for maximizing the quality of lifetime acquisition, as well as data to support this conclusion. The hardware and software of the proposed DFD-FLIM method simplifies the process of data acquisition for FLIM, presents a new interface for data display and interpretation, and optimizes the accuracy of lifetime determination. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Measuring Agarwood Formation Ratio Quantitatively by Fluorescence Spectral Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Botao; Nguyen, Duykien; Liu, Tianyi; Jiang, Kaibin; Tan, Jinfen; Liu, Chunxin; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Shaowei

    2015-01-01

    Agarwood is a kind of important and precious traditional Chinese medicine. With the decreasing of natural agarwood, artificial cultivation has become more and more important in recent years. Quantifying the formation of agarwood is an essential work which could provide information for guiding cultivation and controlling quality. But people only can judge the amount of agarwood qualitatively by experience before. Fluorescence multispectral imaging method is presented to measure the agarwood quantitatively in this paper. A spectral cube from 450 nm to 800 nm was captured under the 365 nm excitation sources. The nonagarwood, agarwood, and rotten wood in the same sample were distinguished based on analyzing the spectral cube. Then the area ratio of agarwood to the whole sample was worked out, which is the quantitative information of agarwood area percentage. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the formation of agarwood was quantified accurately and nondestructively.

  4. Measuring Agarwood Formation Ratio Quantitatively by Fluorescence Spectral Imaging Technique

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Botao; Nguyen, Duykien; Jiang, Kaibin; Tan, Jinfen; Liu, Chunxin; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Shaowei

    2015-01-01

    Agarwood is a kind of important and precious traditional Chinese medicine. With the decreasing of natural agarwood, artificial cultivation has become more and more important in recent years. Quantifying the formation of agarwood is an essential work which could provide information for guiding cultivation and controlling quality. But people only can judge the amount of agarwood qualitatively by experience before. Fluorescence multispectral imaging method is presented to measure the agarwood quantitatively in this paper. A spectral cube from 450 nm to 800 nm was captured under the 365 nm excitation sources. The nonagarwood, agarwood, and rotten wood in the same sample were distinguished based on analyzing the spectral cube. Then the area ratio of agarwood to the whole sample was worked out, which is the quantitative information of agarwood area percentage. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the formation of agarwood was quantified accurately and nondestructively. PMID:26089935

  5. Hyperspectral image reconstruction for x-ray fluorescence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gürsoy, Doǧa; Biçer, Tekin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew G.; De Carlo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A penalized maximum-likelihood estimation is proposed to perform hyperspectral (spatio-spectral) image reconstruction for X-ray fluorescence tomography. The approach minimizes a Poisson-based negative log-likelihood of the observed photon counts, and uses a penalty term that has the effect of encouraging local continuity of model parameter estimates in both spatial and spectral dimensions simultaneously. The performance of the reconstruction method is demonstrated with experimental data acquired from a seed of arabidopsis thaliana collected at the 13-ID-E microprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The resulting element distribution estimates with the proposed approach show significantly better reconstruction quality than the conventional analytical inversion approaches, and allows for a high data compression factor which can reduce data acquisition times remarkably. In particular, this technique provides the capability to tomographically reconstruct full energy dispersive spectra without compromising reconstruction artifacts that impact the interpretation of results.

  6. Hyperspectral image reconstruction for x-ray fluorescence tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Gürsoy, Doǧa; Biçer, Tekin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; ...

    2015-01-01

    A penalized maximum-likelihood estimation is proposed to perform hyperspectral (spatio-spectral) image reconstruction for X-ray fluorescence tomography. The approach minimizes a Poisson-based negative log-likelihood of the observed photon counts, and uses a penalty term that has the effect of encouraging local continuity of model parameter estimates in both spatial and spectral dimensions simultaneously. The performance of the reconstruction method is demonstrated with experimental data acquired from a seed of arabidopsis thaliana collected at the 13-ID-E microprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The resulting element distribution estimates with the proposed approach show significantly better reconstruction quality than the conventional analytical inversionmore » approaches, and allows for a high data compression factor which can reduce data acquisition times remarkably. In particular, this technique provides the capability to tomographically reconstruct full energy dispersive spectra without compromising reconstruction artifacts that impact the interpretation of results.« less

  7. Inspection of fecal contamination on strawberries using fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yung-Kun; Yang, Chun-Chieh; Kim, Moon S.; Delwiche, Stephen R.; Lo, Y. Martin; Chen, Suming; Chan, Diane E.

    2013-05-01

    Fecal contamination of produce is a food safety issue associated with pathogens such as Escherichia coli that can easily pollute agricultural products via animal and human fecal matters. Outbreaks of foodborne illnesses associated with consuming raw fruits and vegetables have occurred more frequently in recent years in the United States. Among fruits, strawberry is one high-potential vector of fecal contamination and foodborne illnesses since the fruit is often consumed raw and with minimal processing. In the present study, line-scan LED-induced fluorescence imaging techniques were applied for inspection of fecal material on strawberries, and the spectral characteristics and specific wavebands of strawberries were determined by detection algorithms. The results would improve the safety and quality of produce consumed by the public.

  8. Image reconstruction for synchronous data acquisition in fluorescence molecular tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanxuan; Liu, Fei; Zuo, Siming; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2015-01-01

    The present full-angle, free-space fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) system uses a step-by-step strategy to acquire measurements, which consumes time for both the rotation of the object and the integration of the charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Completing the integration during the rotation is a more time-efficient strategy called synchronous data acquisition. However, the positions of sources and detectors in this strategy are not stationary, which is not taken into account in the conventional reconstruction algorithm. In this paper we propose a reconstruction algorithm based on the finite element method (FEM) to overcome this problem. Phantom experiments were carried out to validate the performance of the algorithm. The results show that, compared with the conventional reconstruction algorithm used in the step-by-step data acquisition strategy, the proposed algorithm can reconstruct images with more accurate location data and lower relative errors when used with the synchronous data acquisition strategy.

  9. Hyperspectral Image Reconstruction for X-ray Fluorescence Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gürsoy, Doǧa; Bicer, Tekin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew G.; De Carlo, Francesco

    2015-04-07

    A penalized maximum-likelihood estimation is proposed to perform hyperspectral (spatio-spectral) image reconstruction for X-ray fluorescence tomography. The approach minimizes a Poisson-based negative log-likelihood of the observed photon counts, and uses a penalty term that has the effect of encouraging local continuity of model parameter estimates in both spatial and spectral dimensions simultaneously. The performance of the reconstruction method is demonstrated with experimental data acquired from a seed of arabidopsis thaliana collected at the 13-ID-E microprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The resulting element distribution estimates with the proposed approach show significantly better reconstruction quality than the conventional analytical inversion approaches, and allows for a high data compression factor which can reduce data acquisition times remarkably. In particular, this technique provides the capability to tomographically reconstruct full energy dispersive spectra without compromising reconstruction artifacts that impact the interpretation of results.

  10. Enhanced imaging resolution in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography by multispectral excitation method (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Maomao; Zhou, Yuan; Su, Han; Zhang, Dong; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (DFMT) is a promising method for the quantitative evaluation of the metabolic process of fluorescent agents in body. However, the resolution is limited due to the ill-posed nature of fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and the high absorption and scattering of the fluorescent light in biological tissues. In this paper, the resolution of DFMT is improved by multispectral excitation method. Firstly, the imaged object with varied fluorescent concentrations at different time points is excited by several excitation lights with different wavelengths, and the fluorescent images are collected. Secondly, the individual FMT images at different time points are respectively reconstructed, and independent component analysis (ICA) is employed to decompose the fluorescent targets. The independent components (ICs) and corresponding spectrum courses (SCs) which obtained from ICA represent the spatial structures and spectral variations of the fluorescent targets, respectively. Thirdly, the ICs and SCs are combined to quantitatively recover the concentrations of individual fluorescent targets. Finally, the metabolic parameters and DFMT images are obtained by fitting the FMT images of each fluorescent targets at different time points into a two compartment model. Numerical simulations are carried out to validate the feasibility of the proposed method. The results demonstrate that the resolution of DFMT is significantly improved. The metabolic curves can be correctly recovered even when the edge-edge-distance of the fluorescent targets is less than 0.1 cm.

  11. Performance comparison of different compact NIR fluorescent imaging systems with goggle display for intraoperative image-guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shengkui; Mondal, Suman; Zhu, Nan; Liang, Rongguang; Achilefu, Samuel; Gruev, Viktor

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent imaging system has been widely used for intraoperative image-guided application. In this paper, we present performance comparison from three compact NIR fluorescence imaging system prototypes with goggle display that we developed for intraoperative guidance: threshold detection based two camera system, feature matching based three cameras system and miniature beam-splitter single camera system. Their performance is evaluated according to sensitivity regarding different ICG concentrations, accuracy of image overlay between NIR-visible channels, compactness and practicability in intraoperative use. The comparison results show great potentials of using these NIR fluorescence imaging systems to improve user experience and surgical outcomes in intraoperative use.

  12. Analytical tools for single-molecule fluorescence imaging in cellulo.

    PubMed

    Leake, M C

    2014-07-07

    Recent technological advances in cutting-edge ultrasensitive fluorescence microscopy have allowed single-molecule imaging experiments in living cells across all three domains of life to become commonplace. Single-molecule live-cell data is typically obtained in a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regime sometimes only marginally in excess of 1, in which a combination of detector shot noise, sub-optimal probe photophysics, native cell autofluorescence and intrinsically underlying stochasticity of molecules result in highly noisy datasets for which underlying true molecular behaviour is non-trivial to discern. The ability to elucidate real molecular phenomena is essential in relating experimental single-molecule observations to both the biological system under study as well as offering insight into the fine details of the physical and chemical environments of the living cell. To confront this problem of faithful signal extraction and analysis in a noise-dominated regime, the 'needle in a haystack' challenge, such experiments benefit enormously from a suite of objective, automated, high-throughput analysis tools that can home in on the underlying 'molecular signature' and generate meaningful statistics across a large population of individual cells and molecules. Here, I discuss the development and application of several analytical methods applied to real case studies, including objective methods of segmenting cellular images from light microscopy data, tools to robustly localize and track single fluorescently-labelled molecules, algorithms to objectively interpret molecular mobility, analysis protocols to reliably estimate molecular stoichiometry and turnover, and methods to objectively render distributions of molecular parameters.

  13. Performance of an Automated Fluorescence Antinuclear Antibody Image Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, In Young; Oh, Jong Won; Cha, Hoon Suk; Koh, Eun Mi; Kang, Eun Suk

    2017-05-01

    The gold standard for antinuclear antibody (ANA) screening is the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assay with human epithelial cells (HEp-2). However, a number of substantial disadvantages of manual IIF assays have highlighted the need for the automation and standardization of fluorescent ANA (FANA) testing. We evaluated the performance of EUROPattern Suite (Euroimmun AG, Germany), an automated FANA image analyzer, with regard to ANA detection and pattern recognition compared with conventional manual interpretation using the fluorescence microscopic IIF assay. A total of 104 samples including 70 ANA-positive sera and 34 ANA-negative sera collected from September to October 2015 were included. The sensitivity, specificity, and pattern recognition function were evaluated to determine the performance of EUROPattern Suite compared with the manual IIF assay results. The sensitivity and specificity of EUROPattern Suite for ANA detection were 94.3% and 94.1%, respectively. The concordance rate between the two methods was 94.2%. For pattern recognition, 45.7% of the samples were assigned identical ANA patterns including simple and mixed. When major pattern matching was considered, 83.7% (41/49) and 95.2% (20/21) of the samples with simple and mixed patterns, respectively, showed concordant results between the two methods. EUROPattern Suite, an automated FANA image analyzer, provides a viable option for distinguishing between positive and negative results, although the ability to assign specific patterns is insufficient to replace manual microscopic interpretation. This automated system may increase efficiency in laboratories, in which a large number of samples need to be processed.

  14. Dual-modality, fluorescent, PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles for molecular and cellular fluorescence imaging and computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swy, Eric R.; Schwartz-Duval, Aaron S.; Shuboni, Dorela D.; Latourette, Matthew T.; Mallet, Christiane L.; Parys, Maciej; Cormode, David P.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2014-10-01

    Reports of molecular and cellular imaging using computed tomography (CT) are rapidly increasing. Many of these reports use gold nanoparticles. Bismuth has similar CT contrast properties to gold while being approximately 1000-fold less expensive. Herein we report the design, fabrication, characterization, and CT and fluorescence imaging properties of a novel, dual modality, fluorescent, polymer encapsulated bismuth nanoparticle construct for computed tomography and fluorescence imaging. We also report on cellular internalization and preliminary in vitro and in vivo toxicity effects of these constructs. 40 nm bismuth(0) nanocrystals were synthesized and encapsulated within 120 nm Poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles by oil-in-water emulsion methodologies. Coumarin-6 was co-encapsulated to impart fluorescence. High encapsulation efficiency was achieved ~70% bismuth w/w. Particles were shown to internalize within cells following incubation in culture. Bismuth nanocrystals and PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles exhibited >90% and >70% degradation, respectively, within 24 hours in acidic, lysosomal environment mimicking media and both remained nearly 100% stable in cytosolic/extracellular fluid mimicking media. μCT and clinical CT imaging was performed at multiple X-ray tube voltages to measure concentration dependent attenuation rates as well as to establish the ability to detect the nanoparticles in an ex vivo biological sample. Dual fluorescence and CT imaging is demonstrated as well. In vivo toxicity studies in rats revealed neither clinically apparent side effects nor major alterations in serum chemistry and hematology parameters. Calculations on minimal detection requirements for in vivo targeted imaging using these nanoparticles are presented. Indeed, our results indicate that these nanoparticles may serve as a platform for sensitive and specific targeted molecular CT and fluorescence imaging.Reports of molecular and cellular imaging using

  15. Self-Assembly of Fluorescent Organic Nanoparticles for Iron(III) Sensing and Cellular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyu; Cui, Qianling; Cao, Qian; Li, Lidong

    2016-03-23

    Fluorescent organic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attentions for chemical or biological sensing and imaging due to their low-toxicity, facile fabrication and surface functionalization. In this work, we report novel fluorescent organic nanoparticles via facile self-assembly method in aqueous solution. First, the designed water-soluble fluorophore shows a weak and negligible intrinsic fluorescence in water. Upon binding with adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), fluorescent nanoparticles were formed immediately with strongly enhanced fluorescence. These fluorescent nanoparticles exhibit high sensitivity and selectivity toward Fe(3+) sensing with detection limit of 0.1 nM. In addition, after incubation with HeLa cells, the fluorophore shows excellent imaging performance by interaction with entogenous ATP in cells. Finally, this fluorescent system is also demonstrated to be capable of Fe(3+) sensing via fluorescence quenching in cellular environment.

  16. Dual-modality, fluorescent, PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles for molecular and cellular fluorescence imaging and computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Swy, Eric R.; Schwartz-Duval, Aaron S.; Shuboni, Dorela D.; Latourette, Matthew T.; Mallet, Christiane L.; Parys, Maciej; Cormode, David P.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2015-01-01

    Reports of molecular and cellular imaging using computed tomography (CT) are rapidly increasing. Many of these reports use gold nanoparticles. Bismuth has similar CT contrast properties to gold while being approximately 1000-fold less expensive. Herein we report the design, fabrication, characterization, and CT and fluorescence imaging properties of a novel, dual modality, fluorescent, polymer encapsulated bismuth nanoparticle construct for computed tomography and fluorescence imaging. We also report on cellular internalization and preliminary in vitro and in vivo toxicity effects of these constructs. 40 nm bismuth(0) nanocrystals were synthesized and encapsulated within 120 nm Poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles by oil-in-water emulsion methodologies. Coumarin-6 was co-encapsulated to impart fluorescence. High encapsulation efficiency was achieved ∼ 70% bismuth w/w. Particles were shown to internalize within cells following incubation in culture. Bismuth nanocrystals and PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles exhibited >90% and >70% degradation, respectively, within 24 hours in acidic, lysosomal environment mimicking media and both remained nearly 100% stable in cytosolic/extracellular fluid mimicking media. μCT and clinical CT imaging was performed at multiple X-ray tube voltages to measure concentration dependent attenuation rates as well as to establish the ability to detect the nanoparticles in an ex vivo biological sample. Dual fluorescence and CT imaging is demonstrated as well. In vivo toxicity studies in rats revealed neither clinically apparent side effects nor major alterations in serum chemistry and hematology parameters. Calculations on minimal detection requirements for in vivo targeted imaging using these nanoparticles are presented. Indeed, our results indicate that these nanoparticles may serve as a platform for sensitive and specific targeted molecular CT and fluorescence imaging. PMID:25248645

  17. Dual-modality, fluorescent, PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles for molecular and cellular fluorescence imaging and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Swy, Eric R; Schwartz-Duval, Aaron S; Shuboni, Dorela D; Latourette, Matthew T; Mallet, Christiane L; Parys, Maciej; Cormode, David P; Shapiro, Erik M

    2014-11-07

    Reports of molecular and cellular imaging using computed tomography (CT) are rapidly increasing. Many of these reports use gold nanoparticles. Bismuth has similar CT contrast properties to gold while being approximately 1000-fold less expensive. Herein we report the design, fabrication, characterization, and CT and fluorescence imaging properties of a novel, dual modality, fluorescent, polymer encapsulated bismuth nanoparticle construct for computed tomography and fluorescence imaging. We also report on cellular internalization and preliminary in vitro and in vivo toxicity effects of these constructs. 40 nm bismuth(0) nanocrystals were synthesized and encapsulated within 120 nm Poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles by oil-in-water emulsion methodologies. Coumarin-6 was co-encapsulated to impart fluorescence. High encapsulation efficiency was achieved ∼70% bismuth w/w. Particles were shown to internalize within cells following incubation in culture. Bismuth nanocrystals and PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles exhibited >90% and >70% degradation, respectively, within 24 hours in acidic, lysosomal environment mimicking media and both remained nearly 100% stable in cytosolic/extracellular fluid mimicking media. μCT and clinical CT imaging was performed at multiple X-ray tube voltages to measure concentration dependent attenuation rates as well as to establish the ability to detect the nanoparticles in an ex vivo biological sample. Dual fluorescence and CT imaging is demonstrated as well. In vivo toxicity studies in rats revealed neither clinically apparent side effects nor major alterations in serum chemistry and hematology parameters. Calculations on minimal detection requirements for in vivo targeted imaging using these nanoparticles are presented. Indeed, our results indicate that these nanoparticles may serve as a platform for sensitive and specific targeted molecular CT and fluorescence imaging.

  18. Line-scanning microscopy for time-gated and spectrally resolved fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ryosuke; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Kajiyama, Shin'ichiro; Kobayashi, Akio; Kanematsu, Yasuo

    2008-04-01

    Laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy for efficient acquisition of time-gated and spectrally resolved fluorescence images was developed based on line illumination of the laser beam and detection of the fluorescence image through a slit. In this optical arrangement, the fluorescence image was obtained by scanning only one axis perpendicular to the excitation line, and the acquisition time was significantly reduced compared with conventional laser-scanning confocal microscopy. A multidimensional fluorescence dataset consisting of fluorescence intensities as a function of x-position, y-position, fluorescence wavelength, and delay time after photoexcitation was analyzed and decomposed based on the parallel factor analysis model. The performance of the line-scanning microscopy was examined by applying it to the analysis of one of the plant defense responses, accumulation of antimicrobial compounds of phytoalexin in oat (Avena sativa), induced by the elicitor treatment.

  19. Imaging Multimodalities for Dissecting Alzheimer's Disease: Advanced Technologies of Positron Emission Tomography and Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shimojo, Masafumi; Higuchi, Makoto; Suhara, Tetsuya; Sahara, Naruhiko

    2015-01-01

    The rapid progress in advanced imaging technologies has expanded our toolbox for monitoring a variety of biological aspects in living subjects including human. In vivo radiological imaging using small chemical tracers, such as with positron emission tomography, represents an especially vital breakthrough in the efforts to improve our understanding of the complicated cascade of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), and it has provided the most reliable visible biomarkers for enabling clinical diagnosis. At the same time, in combination with genetically modified animal model systems, the most recent innovation of fluorescence imaging is helping establish diverse applications in basic neuroscience research, from single-molecule analysis to animal behavior manipulation, suggesting the potential utility of fluorescence technology for dissecting the detailed molecular-based consequence of AD pathophysiology. In this review, our primary focus is on a current update of PET radiotracers and fluorescence indicators beneficial for understanding the AD cascade, and discussion of the utility and pitfalls of those imaging modalities for future translational research applications. We will also highlight current cutting-edge genetic approaches and discuss how to integrate individual technologies for further potential innovations. PMID:26733795

  20. Ultrabright and Multicolorful Fluorescence of Amphiphilic Polyethyleneimine Polymer Dots for Efficiently Combined Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yun; Cao, Weipeng; Li, Shengliang; Jin, Shubin; Hu, Kelei; Hu, Liming; Huang, Yuanyu; Gao, Xueyun; Wu, Yan; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Multifunctional nanoparticles as theranostic tools hold great potential for its unique and efficient way to visualize the process of disease treatment. However, the toxicity of conventional fluorescent labels and difficulty of functionalization limit their widespread use. Recently, a number of amino-rich polymers have demonstrated high luminescent fluorescence but rarely showed potential for in vivo imaging due to their blue fluorescence. Here, a general route has been found to construct polymer-based multifunctional nanoparticles for combined imaging and drug delivering. The weak fluorescent polyethyleneimine (PEI) has been conjugated with hydrophobic polylactide as the amphiphilic PEI for construction of nanoparticles which showed bright and multicolor fluorescence with high drug loading capacity. The paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles showed significant therapy effect in contrast to the free paclitaxel. Meanwhile, fluorescence imaging of the nanoparticles showed accumulation around tumor. These results demonstrate a new type of polymer-based multifunctional nanoparticles for imaging-guided drug delivery. PMID:24154493

  1. Video-Rate Confocal Microscopy for Single-Molecule Imaging in Live Cells and Superresolution Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinwoo; Miyanaga, Yukihiro; Ueda, Masahiro; Hohng, Sungchul

    2012-01-01

    There is no confocal microscope optimized for single-molecule imaging in live cells and superresolution fluorescence imaging. By combining the swiftness of the line-scanning method and the high sensitivity of wide-field detection, we have developed a, to our knowledge, novel confocal fluorescence microscope with a good optical-sectioning capability (1.0 μm), fast frame rates (<33 fps), and superior fluorescence detection efficiency. Full compatibility of the microscope with conventional cell-imaging techniques allowed us to do single-molecule imaging with a great ease at arbitrary depths of live cells. With the new microscope, we monitored diffusion motion of fluorescently labeled cAMP receptors of Dictyostelium discoideum at both the basal and apical surfaces and obtained superresolution fluorescence images of microtubules of COS-7 cells at depths in the range 0–85 μm from the surface of a coverglass. PMID:23083712

  2. Fluorescent gallium and indium bis(thiosemicarbazonates) and their radiolabelled analogues: synthesis, structures and cellular confocal fluorescence imaging investigations.

    PubMed

    Arrowsmith, Rory L; Waghorn, Philip A; Jones, Michael W; Bauman, Andreas; Brayshaw, Simon K; Hu, Zhiyuan; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Mindt, Thomas L; Tyrrell, Rex M; Botchway, Stanley W; Dilworth, Jonathan R; Pascu, Sofia I

    2011-06-21

    New fluorescent and biocompatible aromatic Ga(III)- and In(III)-bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes for dual mode optical and PET or SPECT molecular imaging have been synthesised via a synthetic method based on transmetallation reactions from Zn(II) precursors. Complexes have been fully characterised in the solid state by single crystal X-ray diffraction and in solution by spectroscopic methods (UV/Vis, fluorescence, (1)H and (13)C{(1)H} NMR). The bis(thiosemicarbazones) radiolabelled rapidly in high yields under mild conditions with (111)In (a gamma and Auger emitter for SPECT imaging and radiotherapy with t(1/2) = 2.8 d) and (68)Ga (a generator-available positron emitter for PET imaging with t(1/2) = 68 min). Cytotoxicity and biolocalisation studies using confocal fluorescence imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) techniques have been used to study their in vitro activities and stabilities in HeLa and PC-3 cells to ascertain their suitability as synthetic scaffolds for future multimodality molecular imaging in cancer diagnosis and therapy. The observation that the indium complexes show certain nuclear uptake could be of relevance towards developing (111)In therapeutic agents based on Auger electron emission to induce DNA damage.

  3. A multi-threaded mosaicking algorithm for fast image composition of fluorescence bladder images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Alexander; Bommes, Michael; Stehle, Thomas; Gross, Sebastian; Leonhardt, Steffen; Aach, Til

    2010-02-01

    The treatment of urinary bladder cancer is usually carried out using fluorescence endoscopy. A narrow-band bluish illumination activates a tumor marker resulting in a red fluorescence. Because of low illumination power the distance between endoscope and bladder wall is kept low during the whole bladder scan, which is carried out before treatment. Thus, only a small field of view (FOV) of the operation field is provided, which impedes navigation and relocating of multi-focal tumors. Although off-line calculated panorama images can assist surgery planning, the immediate display of successively growing overview images composed from single video frames in real-time during the bladder scan, is well suited to ease navigation and reduce the risk of missing tumors. Therefore we developed an image mosaicking algorithm for fluorescence endoscopy. Due to fast computation requirements a flexible multi-threaded software architecture based on our RealTimeFrame platform is developed. Different algorithm tasks, like image feature extraction, matching and stitching are separated and applied by independent processing threads. Thus, different implementation of single tasks can be easily evaluated. In an optimization step we evaluate the trade-off between feature repeatability and total processing time, consider the thread synchronization, and achieve a constant workload of each thread. Thus, a fast computation of panoramic images is performed on a standard hardware platform, preserving full input image resolution (780x576) at the same time. Displayed on a second clinical monitor, the extended FOV of the image composition promises high potential for surgery assistance.

  4. An image analysis system for near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence lymph imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingdan; Zhou, Shaohua Kevin; Xiang, Xiaoyan; Rasmussen, John C.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of lymphatic function is crucial for understanding the lymphatic system and diagnosing the associated diseases. Recently, a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging system is developed for real-time imaging lymphatic propulsion by intradermal injection of microdose of a NIR fluorophore distal to the lymphatics of interest. However, the previous analysis software3, 4 is underdeveloped, requiring extensive time and effort to analyze a NIR image sequence. In this paper, we develop a number of image processing techniques to automate the data analysis workflow, including an object tracking algorithm to stabilize the subject and remove the motion artifacts, an image representation named flow map to characterize lymphatic flow more reliably, and an automatic algorithm to compute lymph velocity and frequency of propulsion. By integrating all these techniques to a system, the analysis workflow significantly reduces the amount of required user interaction and improves the reliability of the measurement.

  5. Digital aberration correction of fluorescent images with coherent holographic image reconstruction by phase transfer (CHIRPT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-03-01

    Coherent holographic image reconstruction by phase transfer (CHIRPT) is an imaging method that permits digital holographic propagation of fluorescent light. The image formation process in CHIRPT is based on illuminating the specimen with a precisely controlled spatio-temporally varying intensity pattern. This pattern is formed by focusing a spatially coherent illumination beam to a line focus on a spinning modulation mask, and image relaying the mask plane to the focal plane of an objective lens. Deviations from the designed spatio-temporal illumination pattern due to imperfect mounting of the circular modulation mask onto the rotation motor induce aberrations in the recovered image. Here we show that these aberrations can be measured and removed non-iteratively by measuring the disk aberration phase externally. We also demonstrate measurement and correction of systematic optical aberrations in the CHIRPT microscope.

  6. Cell nuclear features for classification from fluorescence images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heynen, Susanne; Hunter, Edward; Price, Jeffrey H.

    2000-04-01

    In clinical cytology, nuclear features play an important role in cell and tissue classification. To increase efficiency and decrease subjectivity of cytological results, automation of the analytic process has been proposed and discussed by many authors. This automation can be achieved by estimating the probability of occurrence of a certain class given particular features of a microscope specimen. In this paper, feature sets that might be used as inputs for mathematical cytological classification algorithms are reviewer. The primary goal was to determine the important properties of these features sets, i.e., are there mathematically efficient features that provide a more or less compete description of the cell. Under what conditions will these feature then result in optimal classification of the cells using quantitative fluorescence staining. And how would these mathematical features relate to conventional features that a human observer understands. Example human observer features are size, shape, and chromaticity o the cell nucleus while example mathematical features are image moments. If the cell image can be completely reconstructed from the feature set, then it should be possible to derive the conventional features used by human observers from the mathematical feature set for presentation to clinicians. Finally, the suitability of different mathematical decision making algorithms like probabilistic reasoning, clustering or neural networks are also briefly evaluated in the context of a mathematically complete feature set.

  7. Segmentation of fluorescence microscopy cell images using unsupervised mining.

    PubMed

    Du, Xian; Dua, Sumeet

    2010-05-28

    The accurate measurement of cell and nuclei contours are critical for the sensitive and specific detection of changes in normal cells in several medical informatics disciplines. Within microscopy, this task is facilitated using fluorescence cell stains, and segmentation is often the first step in such approaches. Due to the complex nature of cell issues and problems inherent to microscopy, unsupervised mining approaches of clustering can be incorporated in the segmentation of cells. In this study, we have developed and evaluated the performance of multiple unsupervised data mining techniques in cell image segmentation. We adapt four distinctive, yet complementary, methods for unsupervised learning, including those based on k-means clustering, EM, Otsu's threshold, and GMAC. Validation measures are defined, and the performance of the techniques is evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively using synthetic and recently published real data. Experimental results demonstrate that k-means, Otsu's threshold, and GMAC perform similarly, and have more precise segmentation results than EM. We report that EM has higher recall values and lower precision results from under-segmentation due to its Gaussian model assumption. We also demonstrate that these methods need spatial information to segment complex real cell images with a high degree of efficacy, as expected in many medical informatics applications.

  8. Probing peroxisome dynamics and biogenesis by fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Miluska; Kim, Peter K

    2014-03-03

    Peroxisomes are the most recently discovered classical organelles, and only lately have their diverse functions been truly recognized. Peroxisomes are highly dynamic structures, changing both morphologically and in number in response to both extracellular and intracellular signals. This metabolic organelle came to prominence due to the many genetic disorders caused by defects in its biogenesis or enzymatic functions. There is now growing evidence that suggests peroxisomes are involved in lipid biosynthesis, innate immunity, redox homeostasis, and metabolite scavenging, among other functions. Therefore, it is important to have available suitable methods and techniques to visualize and quantify peroxisomes in response to various cellular signals. This unit includes a number of protocols that will enable researchers to image, qualify, and quantify peroxisome numbers and morphology-with both steady-state and time-lapse imaging using mammalian cells. The use of photoactivatable fluorescent proteins to detect and measure peroxisome biogenesis is also described. Altogether, the protocols described here will facilitate understanding of the dynamic changes that peroxisomes undergo in response to various cellular signals.

  9. Imaging peptidoglycan biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis with fluorescent antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Tiyanont, Kittichoat; Doan, Thierry; Lazarus, Michael B.; Fang, Xiao; Rudner, David Z.; Walker, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    The peptidoglycan (PG) layers surrounding bacterial cells play an important role in determining cell shape. The machinery controlling when and where new PG is made is not understood, but is proposed to involve interactions between bacterial actin homologs such as Mbl, which forms helical cables within cells, and extracellular multiprotein complexes that include penicillin-binding proteins. It has been suggested that labeled antibiotics that bind to PG precursors may be useful for imaging PG to help determine the genes that control the biosynthesis of this polymer. Here, we compare the staining patterns observed in Bacillus subtilis using fluorescent derivatives of two PG-binding antibiotics, vancomycin and ramoplanin. The staining patterns for both probes exhibit a strong dependence on probe concentration, suggesting antibiotic-induced perturbations in PG synthesis. Ramoplanin probes may be better imaging agents than vancomycin probes because they yield clear staining patterns at concentrations well below their minimum inhibitory concentrations. Under some conditions, both ramoplanin and vancomycin probes produce helicoid staining patterns along the cylindrical walls of B. subtilis cells. This sidewall staining is observed in the absence of the cytoskeletal protein Mbl. Although Mbl plays an important role in cell shape determination, our data indicate that other proteins control the spatial localization of the biosynthetic complexes responsible for new PG synthesis along the walls of B. subtilis cells. PMID:16832063

  10. In vivo fluorescence imaging of β-amyloid plaques with push-pull dimethylaminothiophene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2015-12-14

    In vivo fluorescence imaging of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in the brain is expected to be used as a new method for detecting Alzheimer's disease (AD). We synthesized novel push-pull dimethylaminothiophenyl (DTM) derivatives and evaluated their utility as in vivo fluorescence imaging probes targeting Aβ plaques. As a result, we found that DTM-2 is a promising fluorescent probe for Aβ plaques in the AD brains.

  11. Fluorescence behavioral imaging (FBI) tracks identity in heterogeneous groups of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ramdya, Pavan; Schaffter, Thomas; Floreano, Dario; Benton, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Distinguishing subpopulations in group behavioral experiments can reveal the impact of differences in genetic, pharmacological and life-histories on social interactions and decision-making. Here we describe Fluorescence Behavioral Imaging (FBI), a toolkit that uses transgenic fluorescence to discriminate subpopulations, imaging hardware that simultaneously records behavior and fluorescence expression, and open-source software for automated, high-accuracy determination of genetic identity. Using FBI, we measure courtship partner choice in genetically mixed groups of Drosophila.</