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Sample records for multipass weld metal

  1. Factors affecting the strength of multipass low-alloy steel weld metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical properties of multipass high-strength steel weld metals depend upon several factors, among the most important being: (1) The interaction between the alloy composition and weld metal cooling rate which determines the as-deposited microstructure; and (2) the thermal effects of subsequent passes on each underlying pass which alter the original microstructure. The bulk properties of a multipass weld are therefore governed by both the initial microstructure of each weld pass and its subsequent thermal history. Data obtained for a high strength low alloy steel weld metal confirmed that a simple correlation exists between mechanical properties and welding conditions if the latter are in turn correlated as weld cooling rate.

  2. Effect of Ti-containing inclusions on the nucleation of acicular ferrite and mechanical properties of multipass weld metals.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Hosseini, M; Arabian, N; Rahimi, E

    2013-02-01

    In the present study, the influence of Ti-containing inclusions on the development of acicular ferrite microstructure and mechanical properties in the multipass weld metals has been studied. Shielded metal arc weld deposits were prepared by varying titanium content in the range of 0.003-0.021%. The variation in the titanium content was obtained by the addition of different amounts of titanium oxide nanoparticles to the electrode coating. The dispersion of titanium oxide nanoparticles, composition of inclusions, microstructural analysis, tensile properties and Charpy impact toughness were evaluated. As the amount of Ti-containing inclusions in the weld metal was increased, the microstructure of the weld metal was changed from the grain boundary allotriomorphic ferrite structure to acicular ferrite with the intragranular nucleation of ferrite on the Ti-containing inclusions, and the mechanical properties were improved. This improvement is attributable to the increased percentage of acicular ferrite due to the uniform dispersion of Ti-containing inclusions and the pinning force of oxide nanoparticles against the growth of allotriomorphic ferrite and Widmanstätten ferrite from the austenite grain boundaries.

  3. Stress Engineering of Multi-pass Welds of Structural Steel to Enhance Structural Integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Supriyo; Sule, Jibrin; Yakubu, Mustapha Y.

    2016-08-01

    In multi-pass welding, the weld metal and the associated heat-affected zone are subjected to repeated thermal cycling from successive deposition of filler metals. The thermal straining results into multi-mode deformation of the weld metal which causes a variably distributed residual stress field through the thickness and across the weld of a multi-pass weldment. In addition to this, the as-welded fusion zone microstructure shows dendritic formation of grains and segregation of alloying element. This may result in formation of micro-corrosion cells and the problem would aggravate in case of highly alloyed materials. Local mechanical tensioning is an effective way of elimination of the weld tensile residual stress. It has been shown that application of cold rolling is capable not only of removing the residual stress, but depending on its magnitude it may also form beneficial compressive stress state. Multi-pass structural steel welds used as structural alloy in general engineering and structural applications. Such alloys are subjected to severe in-service degradation mechanisms e.g., corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Welds and the locked-in residual stress in the welded area often initiate the defect which finally results in failure. In the present study, a multi-pass structural steel weld metal was first subjected to post-weld cold rolling which was followed by controlled heating by a fiber laser. Cold straining resulted in redistribution of the internal stress through the thickness and controlled laser processing helps in reforming of the grain structure. However, even with controlled laser, processing the residual stress is reinstated. Therefore, a strategy has been adopted to roll the metal post-laser processing so as to obtain a complete stress-free and recrystallized microstructure.

  4. Microstructure and Ductility-Dip Cracking Susceptibility of Circumferential Multipass Dissimilar Weld Between 20MND5 and Z2CND18-12NS with Ni-Base Filler Metal 52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Renyao; Duan, Zhaoling; He, Guo

    2013-10-01

    The large circumferential multipass dissimilar weld between 20MND5 steel and Z2CND18-12NS stainless steel welded with FM52 filler material was investigated in terms of the diluted composition, the grain boundary precipitation, and the ductility-dip cracking (DDC) susceptibility of the weld. The diluted composition of the weld is composed of 37 to 47 pct Ni, 21 to 24 pct Cr, and 28 to 40 pct Fe, which are inhomogeneous along the depth and over the width of the deep weld. The carbon content has a distribution in the region of the surface weld from a high level (~0.20 pct) in the zone near 20MND5 steel to a normal level (~0.03 pct) in the zone near Z2CND18-12NS stainless steel. The carbon distribution is corresponding to the grain boundary carbides. The minimum threshold strains for DDC occur in the temperature range of 1223 K to 1323 K (950 °C to 1050 °C), which are 0.5, 0.35, and 0.4 pct for the root weld, middle region, and the surface weld, respectively. The dissimilar weld has the largest susceptibility to the DDC compared to the filler metal 52 and the Inconel 690.

  5. Re-weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steels studied by multi-pass TIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, K.; Oishi, M.; Koshiishi, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Anzai, H.; Saito, Y.; Kono, W.

    2002-12-01

    Weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steel (SS) has been studied by multi-pass bead-on-plate and build-up tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, simulating the repair-welding of reactor components. Specimens were submerged arc welding (SAW) joint of Type 304 SS containing 0.5 appm helium (1.8 appm in the SAW weld metal). Sound welding could be obtained by one- to three-pass welding on the plates at weld heat inputs less than 1 MJ/m in the irradiated 304 SS base metal. In the case of the build-up welding of a groove, no visible defects appeared in the specimen at a heat input as low as 0.4 MJ/m. However, build-up welding at a high heat input of 1 MJ/m was prone to weld cracking, owing to the formation of helium bubbles on grain boundaries of the base metal or dendrite boundaries of pre-existing SAW weld metal, in the area within 0.6 mm from the fusion line.

  6. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A MULTILAYERED MULTIPASS FRICTION STIR WELD IN STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Qiao, Dongxiao; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2013-01-01

    Multilayered multipass friction stir welding (MM-FSW) makes it possible to use FSW to fabricate thick-section structures. In this work, MM-FSW was demonstrated on a high strength low alloy steel; ASTM A572 Grade 50. Three steel plates with thicknesses of 0.18", 0.18", 0.24" respectively were stacked and friction stir welded together to form a 0.6" thick welded structure. The welded plate was sectioned into rectangular bars transverse to the weld direction for tensile testing to evaluate mechanical properties. Digital image correlation (DIC) was employed to map the local strain fields during tensile testing. The initial failure was found to occur simultaneously at the bottom and middle layers away from the weld zone. The top layer failed last in the base metal. The failure locations were consistent among different samples tested. Also, Charpy V-notch impact tests were conducted for weld metal, heat affected zone, and the base metal at each layer as a function of temperature. The weld microstructures were characterized using optical and electron microscopy and micro-hardness mapping.

  7. Influence of Material Model on Prediction Accuracy of Welding Residual Stress in an Austenitic Stainless Steel Multi-pass Butt-Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Dean; Zhang, Chaohua; Pu, Xiaowei; Liang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Both experimental method and numerical simulation technology were employed to investigate welding residual stress distribution in a SUS304 steel multi-pass butt-welded joint in the current study. The main objective is to clarify the influence of strain hardening model and the yield strength of weld metal on prediction accuracy of welding residual stress. In the experiment, a SUS304 steel butt-welded joint with 17 passes was fabricated, and the welding residual stresses on both the upper and bottom surfaces of the middle cross section were measured. Meanwhile, based on ABAQUS Code, an advanced computational approach considering different plastic models as well as annealing effect was developed to simulate welding residual stress. In the simulations, the perfect plastic model, the isotropic strain hardening model, the kinematic strain hardening model and the mixed isotropic-kinematic strain hardening model were employed to calculate the welding residual stress distributions in the multi-pass butt-welded joint. In all plastic models with the consideration of strain hardening, the annealing effect was also taken into account. In addition, the influence of the yield strength of weld metal on the simulation result of residual stress was also investigated numerically. The conclusions drawn by this work will be helpful in predicting welding residual stresses of austenitic stainless steel welded structures used in nuclear power plants.

  8. Influence of Material Model on Prediction Accuracy of Welding Residual Stress in an Austenitic Stainless Steel Multi-pass Butt-Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Dean; Zhang, Chaohua; Pu, Xiaowei; Liang, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Both experimental method and numerical simulation technology were employed to investigate welding residual stress distribution in a SUS304 steel multi-pass butt-welded joint in the current study. The main objective is to clarify the influence of strain hardening model and the yield strength of weld metal on prediction accuracy of welding residual stress. In the experiment, a SUS304 steel butt-welded joint with 17 passes was fabricated, and the welding residual stresses on both the upper and bottom surfaces of the middle cross section were measured. Meanwhile, based on ABAQUS Code, an advanced computational approach considering different plastic models as well as annealing effect was developed to simulate welding residual stress. In the simulations, the perfect plastic model, the isotropic strain hardening model, the kinematic strain hardening model and the mixed isotropic-kinematic strain hardening model were employed to calculate the welding residual stress distributions in the multi-pass butt-welded joint. In all plastic models with the consideration of strain hardening, the annealing effect was also taken into account. In addition, the influence of the yield strength of weld metal on the simulation result of residual stress was also investigated numerically. The conclusions drawn by this work will be helpful in predicting welding residual stresses of austenitic stainless steel welded structures used in nuclear power plants.

  9. Procedure for Computing Residual Stresses from Neutron Diffraction Data and its Application to Multi-Pass Dissimilar Weld

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili; Crooker, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is a powerful tool for non-destructive measurement of internal residual stresses of welded structures. The conventional approach for determination of residual stresses requires the knowledge of stress-free lattice spacing a priori. For multiple-pass dissimilar metal welds common to nuclear reactor pipeline systems, the stress-free lattice parameter is a complex function of position due to the chemistry inhomogeneity in the weld region and can be challenging to determine experimentally. This paper presents a new approach to calculate the residual stress field in dissimilar welds without the use of stress-free lattice parameter. The theoretical basis takes advantage of the fact that the normal component of welding residual stresses is typically small for thin plate or pipe welds. The applicability of the new approach is examined and justified in a multi-pass dissimilar metal weld consisting of a stainless steel plate and a nickel alloy filler metal. The level of uncertainties associated with this new approach is assessed. Neutron diffraction experiment is carried out to measure the lattice spacing at various locations in the dissimilar weld. A comb-shaped specimen, electro-discharge machined from a companion weld, is used to determine the stress-free lattice spacing. The calculated results from the new approach are consistent with those from the conventional approach. The new approach is found to be a practical method for determining the two in-plane residual stress components in thin plate or pipe dissimilar metal welds.

  10. Characterization of Multilayered Multipass Friction Stir Weld on ASTM A572 G50 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Yu, Xinghua; Qiao, Dongxiao; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    A multilayered multipass friction stir weld (MM-FSW) on ASTM A572 Grade 50 steel was characterized to understand its potential application for thick-section structures. The 15-mm-thick section was fabricated by stacking up three steel plates and then friction stir welding the plates together in a total of 5 passes. The unique butt/lap joint configuration encountered in the multilayer weld was examined to understand the effect of tool rotation direction on the joint quality especially the formation of hooking defect. Charpy V-notch impact toughness tests showed generally higher impact toughness energy for the stir zone than the base metal with a ductile fracture mode. The microhardness value was measured from 195 to 220 HV in the stir zone, while the base metal showed an average value of 170 HV. The microstructure in the stir zone and the adjacent heat affected zone was quantified using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) including Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). The increased toughness and hardness were correlated with the refined microstructure in stir zone, resulting from severe plastic deformation and subsequent dynamic recrystallization during friction stir welding.

  11. Characterization of Multilayered Multipass Friction Stir Weld on ASTM A572 G50 Steel

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; ...

    2014-01-01

    A multilayered multipass friction stir weld (MM-FSW) on ASTM A572 Grade 50 steel was characterized to understand its potential application for thick-section structures. The 15-mm-thick section was fabricated by stacking up three steel plates and then friction stir welding the plates together in a total of 5 passes. The unique butt/lap joint configuration encountered in the multilayer weld was examined to understand the effect of tool rotation direction on the joint quality especially the formation of hooking defect. Charpy V-notch impact toughness tests showed generally higher impact toughness energy for the stir zone than the base metal with a ductilemore » fracture mode. The microhardness value was measured from 195 to 220 HV in the stir zone, while the base metal showed an average value of 170 HV. The microstructure in the stir zone and the adjacent heat affected zone was quantified using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) including Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). The increased toughness and hardness were correlated with the refined microstructure in stir zone, resulting from severe plastic deformation and subsequent dynamic recrystallization during friction stir welding.« less

  12. Fabrication of thick multilayered steel structure using A516 Grade 70 by multipass friction stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Y. C.; Sanderson, S.; Mahoney, M.; Wang, Y.; Chen, J.; David, S. A.; Feng, Z.

    2016-04-06

    Here, we fabricated a thick-sectioned multilayered steel structure by multipass friction stir welding on A516 Grade 70 steel. Tensile strength of the multilayered samples was comparable to that of the base metal. Failure was located in the base metal when a defect-free sample was tested. Charpy impact toughness was higher in the stir zone and heat affected zone than in the base metal. For higher microhardness values were found in the stir zone and heat affected zone than the base metal due to grain refinement and modification of the microstructures. As a result, improved mechanical properties compared to the base metal were found in the weld zones of friction stir welded A516 Grade 70 steel.

  13. Fabrication of thick multilayered steel structure using A516 Grade 70 by multipass friction stir welding

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, Y. C.; Sanderson, S.; Mahoney, M.; ...

    2016-04-06

    Here, we fabricated a thick-sectioned multilayered steel structure by multipass friction stir welding on A516 Grade 70 steel. Tensile strength of the multilayered samples was comparable to that of the base metal. Failure was located in the base metal when a defect-free sample was tested. Charpy impact toughness was higher in the stir zone and heat affected zone than in the base metal. For higher microhardness values were found in the stir zone and heat affected zone than the base metal due to grain refinement and modification of the microstructures. As a result, improved mechanical properties compared to the basemore » metal were found in the weld zones of friction stir welded A516 Grade 70 steel.« less

  14. Residual stress distribution depending on welding sequence in multi-pass welded joints with x-shaped groove

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Hayashi, Makoto; Hattori, Toshio

    2000-02-01

    Residual stress in a large-diameter multi-pass butt-welded pipe joint was calculated for various welding pass sequences by thermal elastic-plastic analysis using the finite element method. The pipe joint used had an X-shaped groove, and the sequences of welding passes were changed. The distribution of residual stress depends on the welding pass sequences. The mechanism that produces residual stress in the welded pipe joint was studied in detail by using a simple prediction model. An optimum welding sequence for preventing stress-corrosion cracking was determined from the residual stress distribution.

  15. The defects and microstructure in the fusion zone of multipass laser welded joints with Inconel 52M filler wire for nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Lu, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Xiaolei; Huang, Jian; Liu, Luwei; Wu, Yixiong

    2017-09-01

    The defects and microstructure in the fusion zone of multipass laser welded joints with Inconel 52M filler wire are investigated for nuclear power plants. Experimental results indicate that the incomplete fusion forms as the deposited metals do not completely cover the groove during multipass laser welding. The dendritic morphologies are observed on the inner surface of the porosity in the fusion zone. Many small cellular are found in the zones near the fusion boundary. With solidification preceding, cellular gradually turn into columnar dendrites and symmetrical columnar dendrites are exhibited in the weld center of the fusion zone. The fine equiaxed grains form and columnar dendrites disappear in the remelted zone of two passes. The dendrite arm spacing in the fusion zone becomes widened with increasing welding heat input. Nb-rich carbides/carbonitrides are preferentially precipitated in the fusion zone of multipass laser welded joints. In respect to high cooling rate during multipass laser welding, element segregation could be insufficient to achieve the component of Laves phase.

  16. Chemical composition variations in shielded metal arc welds

    SciTech Connect

    Bracarense, A.Q.; Liu, S. . Center for Welding and Joining Research)

    1993-12-01

    The use of shielded metal arc (SMA) welding can result in chemical composition variations along the weld length. Manganese and silicon, commonly found in low-carbon steel welds, change in composition with weld position. This research was performed to better characterize the composition variations observed in structural steel welds and to understand the controlling factors that determine the extent of these composition changes. Single bead-on-plate and multipass welds were performed and analyzed. Manganese, silicon, and oxygen contents showed significant variation along the weld length. To determine the cause of such composition variations, additional experiments were carried out with the welding arc established between the electrode and a water-cooled copper pipe. The individual metal droplets were collected in water and processed using standard particulate materials processing techniques to remove the slag covering. The droplet size distribution was determined and related to the composition variation and position along the weld length.

  17. Heat input and dilution effects in microalloyed steel weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.C. ); Kluken, A.O. . Div. of Metallurgy); Edwards, G.R. . Center for Welding and Joining Research)

    1994-01-01

    The sensitivity of weld metal microstructure and mechanical properties to variations in both heat input (i.e., cooling rate) and weld dilution in submerged arc (SA) welding of microalloyed steel was examined. Weldments were prepared with weld metal dilutions of approximately 40% and 70% at heat inputs of 2.0, 3.3, 4.6, and 5.3 kJ/mm, using two commercial welding wires and a basic commercial flux. The high dilution welds, which were ordinary bead-on-plate welds, resulted in microstructures that ranged from ferrite with aligned second phase at low heat inputs to acicular ferrite at high heat inputs. Special over-welding techniques were used to make the low dilution welds, allowing use of the same welding parameters as those for the high dilution welds. The technique involved remelting of weld metal to simulate the effect of multipass welding. The microstructure of these welds was predominantly acicular ferrite, independent of heat input. As a consequence, the low dilution welds had superior toughness compared to the high dilution welds.

  18. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Multipass TIG-Welded AA2219 Aluminum Alloy in 3.5 wt pct NaCl Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, A.; Sreekumar, K.; Raja, V. S.

    2012-09-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of the AA2219 aluminum alloy in the single-pass (SP) and multipass (MP) welded conditions was examined and compared with that of the base metal (BM) in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution using a slow-strain-rate technique (SSRT). The reduction in ductility was used as a parameter to evaluate the SCC susceptibility of both the BM and welded joints. The results showed that the ductility ratio ( ɛ NaCl/( ɛ air) was 0.97 and 0.96, respectively, for the BM and MP welded joint, and the same was marginally reduced to 0.9 for the SP welded joint. The fractographic examination of the failed samples revealed a typical ductile cracking morphology for all the base and welded joints, indicating the good environmental cracking resistance of this alloy under all welded conditions. To understand the decrease in the ductility of the SP welded joint, preexposure SSRT followed by microstructural observations were made, which showed that the decrease in ductility ratio of the SP welded joint was caused by the electrochemical pitting that assisted the nucleation of cracks in the form of corrosion induced mechanical cracking rather than true SCC failure of the alloy. The microstructural examination and polarization tests demonstrated a clear grain boundary (GB) sensitization of the PMZ, resulting in severe galvanic corrosion of the SP weld joint, which initiated the necessary conditions for the localized corrosion and cracking along the PMZ. The absence of PMZ and a refined fusion zone (FZ) structure because of the lesser heat input and postweld heating effect improved the galvanic corrosion resistance of the MP welded joint greatly, and thus, failure occurred along the FZ.

  19. Investigation of residual stresses in a multipass weld in 1 in. stainless steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, S.; Fernandezbaca, J. A.; David, S. A.; Hubbard, C. R.; Holden, T. M.; Root, J. H.

    Residual stresses and strains were measured in two welded 25-mm thick plates of type 304 stainless steel by the neutron diffraction technique. The filler metal was type 308 stainless steel and the weld zone had a two phase microstructure in which the austenitic phase lattice parameter differs from the base metal. In these circumstances strain-free samples were taken from the weld zone area for analysis of the lattice parameters and ferrite content using neutron powder diffraction. Corrections for lattice parameter variation were applied permitting the calculation of residual strains and stresses in weld zone, heat affected zone (HAZ), and base metal. One of the two welds was examined without stress relief and the other was given a stress relief treatment consisting of vibration at a frequency below the resonant condition during welding. In both plates the largest residual stress component (longitudinal) is found in the fusion zone near the boundary between the weld zone and the heat affected zone. This longitudinal component is 400 +/- 50 MPa in tension. The normal stresses are generally close to zero although large fluctuations are found in the weld zone. The transverse stresses are as high as 200 MPa in the weld zone and decrease to 50 MPa +/- 40 MPa. The lattice parameter variation was equivalent to 5 x 10(exp -4) compressive strain and the ferrite content approached 9 percent at the center of the weld zone. Variations in residual stresses with thickness through the base metal plate were small. The treated plate and untreated plate showed nearly identical patterns of stress distribution. Differences in the measured stresses between vibratory-stress-relief treated and untreated plates fall within error bars of the stress determination in these particular 25 mm thick 300-type stainless steel plates.

  20. A study of narrow gap laser welding for thick plates using the multi-layer and multi-pass method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruoyang; Wang, Tianjiao; Wang, Chunming; Yan, Fei; Shao, Xinyu; Hu, Xiyuan; Li, Jianmin

    2014-12-01

    This paper details a new method that combines laser autogenous welding, laser wire filling welding and hybrid laser-GMAW welding to weld 30 mm thick plate using a multi-layer, multi-pass process. A “Y” shaped groove was used to create the joint. Research was also performed to optimize the groove size and the processing parameters. Laser autogenous welding is first used to create the backing weld. The lower, narrowest part of the groove is then welded using laser wire filling welding. Finally, the upper part of the groove is welded using laser-GMAW hybrid welding. Additionally, the wire feeding and droplet transfer behaviors are observed by high speed photography. The two main conclusions from this work are: the wire is often biased towards the side walls, resulting in a lack of fusion at the joint and the creation of other defects for larger groove sizes. Additionally, this results in the droplet transfer behavior becoming unstable, leading to a poor weld appearance for smaller groove sizes.

  1. The Segregation and Liquation Crackings in the HAZ of Multipass Laser-Welded Joints for Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Lu, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Xiaolei; Huang, Jian; Liu, Luwei; Wu, Yixiong

    2017-07-01

    The segregation and liquation crackings in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) beside Inconel 52M overlays of multipass laser-welded joints are investigated for nuclear power plants. The results indicate that Nb-rich precipitates are distributed in chains and some aggregate together as coarse particles in the local regions at the interface. With increasing heat input, the transition width becomes widened and the fraction of the precipitates at the interface significantly increases. Closely associated to Nb segregation, liquation crackings occur along columnar dendrites in the HAZ beside Inconel 52M overlays. Due to no deformation coordination of the columnar dendrites with Nb-rich segregates in Inconel 52M overlays, liquation crackings occur in thermal cycle of multipass laser welding. The enrichment of Nb element in the interdendritic regions increases favorable factors of liquation crackings at grain boundaries.

  2. The Segregation and Liquation Crackings in the HAZ of Multipass Laser-Welded Joints for Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Lu, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Xiaolei; Huang, Jian; Liu, Luwei; Wu, Yixiong

    2017-08-01

    The segregation and liquation crackings in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) beside Inconel 52M overlays of multipass laser-welded joints are investigated for nuclear power plants. The results indicate that Nb-rich precipitates are distributed in chains and some aggregate together as coarse particles in the local regions at the interface. With increasing heat input, the transition width becomes widened and the fraction of the precipitates at the interface significantly increases. Closely associated to Nb segregation, liquation crackings occur along columnar dendrites in the HAZ beside Inconel 52M overlays. Due to no deformation coordination of the columnar dendrites with Nb-rich segregates in Inconel 52M overlays, liquation crackings occur in thermal cycle of multipass laser welding. The enrichment of Nb element in the interdendritic regions increases favorable factors of liquation crackings at grain boundaries.

  3. Precipitation behavior of σ phase in fusion zone of dissimilar stainless steel welds during multi-pass GTAW process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chih-Chun; Chang, Tao-Chih; Lin, Dong-Yih; Chen, Ming-Che; Wu, Weite

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the precipitation characteristics of σ phase in the fusion zone of stainless steel welds at various welding passes during a tungsten are welding (GTAW) process. The morphology, quantity, and chemical composition of the δ-ferrite and σ phase were analyzed using optical microscopy (OM), a ferritscope (FS), a X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), an electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA), and a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS), respectively. Massive δ-ferrite was observed in the fusion zone of the first pass welds during welding of dissimilar stainless steels. The σ phase precipitated at the inner δ-ferrite particles and decreased δ-ferrite content during the third pass welding. The σ and δ phases can be stabilized by Si element, which promoted the phase transformation of σ→ϱ+λ2 in the fusion zone of the third pass welds. It was found that the σ phase was a Fe-Cr-Si intermetallic compound found in the fusion zone of the third pass welds during multi-pass welding.

  4. Effect of Multipass TIG and Activated TIG Welding Process on the Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of 316LN Stainless Steel Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, K. C.; Balasubramanian, K. R.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.; Chandrasekhar, N.

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of this work was to develop a finite element model to predict the thermo-mechanical behavior of an activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated using 10 mm thickness of 316LN stainless steel plates in a single pass. To distinguish the merits of ATIG welding process, it was compared with manual multipass tungsten inert gas (MPTIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated with square butt edge configuration using an activating flux developed in-house. The MPTIG-welded joint was fabricated in thirteen passes with V-groove edge configuration. The finite element model was developed to predict the transient temperature, residual stress, and distortion of the welded joints. Also, microhardness, impact toughness, tensile strength, ferrite measurement, and microstructure were characterized. Since most of the recent publications of ATIG-welded joint was focused on the molten weld pool dynamics, this research work gives an insight on the thermo-mechanical behavior of ATIG-welded joint over MPTIG-welded joint.

  5. Alloying Elements Transition Into the Weld Metal When Using an Inventor Power Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamadaliev, R. A.; Kuskov, V. N.; Popova, A. A.; Valuev, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    The temperature distribution over the surface of the welded 12Kh18N10T steel plates using the inventor power source ARC-200 has been calculated. In order to imitate multipass welding when conducting the thermal analysis the initial temperature was changed from 298K up to 798K in 100K increments. It has been determined that alloying elements transition into the weld metal depends on temperature. Using an inventor power source facilitates a uniform distribution of alloying elements along the length and height of the weld seam.

  6. Studies on Creep Deformation and Rupture Behavior of 316LN SS Multi-Pass Weld Joints Fabricated with Two Different Electrode Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Kumar, J. Ganesh; Parida, P. K.; Ganesan, V.; Laha, K.

    2017-02-01

    Effect of electrode size on creep deformation and rupture behavior has been assessed by carrying out creep tests at 923 K (650 °C) over the stress range 140 to 225 MPa on 316LN stainless steel weld joints fabricated employing 2.5 and 4 mm diameter electrodes. The multi-pass welding technique not only changes the morphology of delta ferrite from vermicular to globular in the previous weld bead region near to the weld bead interface, but also subjects the region to thermo-mechanical heat treatment to generate appreciable strength gradient. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis revealed significant localized strain gradients in regions adjoining the weld pass interface for the joint fabricated with large electrode size. Larger electrode diameter joint exhibited higher creep rupture strength than the smaller diameter electrode joint. However, both the joints had lower creep rupture strength than the base metal. Failure in the joints was associated with microstructural instability in the fusion zone, and the vermicular delta ferrite zone was more prone to creep cavitation. Larger electrode diameter joint was found to be more resistant to failure caused by creep cavitation than the smaller diameter electrode joint. This has been attributed to the larger strength gradient between the beads and significant separation between the cavity prone vermicular delta ferrite zones which hindered the cavity growth. Close proximity of cavitated zones in smaller electrode joint facilitated their faster coalescence leading to more reduction in creep rupture strength. Failure location in the joints was found to depend on the electrode size and applied stress. The change in failure location has been assessed on performing finite element analysis of stress distribution across the joint on incorporating tensile and creep strengths of different constituents of joints, estimated by ball indentation and impression creep testing techniques.

  7. Influence of weld metal alloying additions to extend the heat input range for the submerged arc welding of high strength steels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.; Ramirez, J.E.

    1993-12-16

    Weld metal microstructural development for high strength steels when welded with submerged arc welding process was investigated as a function of consumable composition and thermal experience. Of specific interest is the effect of systematic variations of microalloying additions on broadening of applicable heat input range. Controlled weld metal oxygen content, particularly in the range of 300 to 400 ppm, has been found to improve HY-130 steel weld metal toughness. Molybdenum additions was found to increase the strength of the HY-130 steel weld deposits. Copper additions up to 3.5 wt.pct. were found to strengthen the high strength steel weld metals, in particular, those of higher heat input, 3.6 kJ/mm. Niobium additions alone did not provide as powerful strengthening effect in the high heat input weld metals as the copper additions. In the case of copper-enriched welds, multi-pass welding induced both the precipitation and overaging of epsilon copper precipitates in the reheated weld metal which resulted in non-uniform mechanical properties. When added together, copper and niobium produced the synergistic effect of dual precipitation (Epsilon copper and niobium carbides) which provided the needed strength and thermal stability to the reheated weld metal even at high heat inputs. With this novel approach, the applicable heat input range to produce both adequate weld metal strength and toughness in high strength steels (Sigma y > 690 MPa) can be extended significantly. The optimal additions for copper and niobium were found to be 3.3 and up to 0. 1 wt. pct., Heat input, High strength steel, Precipitation strengthening, Copper, Niobium, Single and multi-pass welding.

  8. Metal Working and Welding Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by metal workers and welders. Addressed in the six individual units of the course are the following topics: weldable metals and their alloys, arc welding, gas welding,…

  9. Cleavage fracture in high strength low alloy weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, W.W.; Bowen, P.; Strangwood, M.

    1996-12-31

    The present investigation gives an evaluation of the effect of microstructure on the cleavage fracture process of High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) multipass weld metals. With additions of alloying elements, such as Ti, Ni, Mo and Cr, the microstructure of C-Mn weld metal changes from the classical composition, i.e., allotriomorphic ferrite with acicular ferrite and Widmanstaetten ferrite, to bainite and low carbon martensite. Although the physical metallurgy of some HSLA weld metals has been studied before, more work is necessary to correlate the effect of the microstructure on the fracture behavior of such weld metals. In this work detailed microstructural analysis was carried out using optical and electron (SEM and TEM) microscopy. Single edge notched (SEN) bend testpieces were used to assess the cleavage fracture stress, {sigma}{sub F}. Inclusions beneath the notch surface were identified as the crack initiators of unstable cleavage fracture. From the size of such inclusions and the value of tensile stress predicted at the initiation site, the effective surface energy for cleavage was calculated using a modified Griffth energy balance for a penny shape crack. The results suggest that even though inclusions initiate cleavage fracture, the local microstructure may play an important role in the fracture process of these weld metals. The implications of these observations for a quantitative theory of the cleavage fracture of ferritic steels is discussed.

  10. Strain aging and toughness characteristics of ferritic weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Kocak, M.; Petrovski, B.; Evans, G.M.

    1994-12-31

    The effects of varying nitrogen, titanium, boron, and aluminum contents on the as-deposited, stress-relieved, and artificially strain-aged shielded metal arc weld (SMAW) metal properties have been studied. There are still uncertainties concerning the exact role of each element and interactions between these elements with respect to the weld metal microstructure, strain aging and fracture properties. Therefore, systematic additions of titanium (in the range of 5 ppm to 500 ppm), boron (5 ppm to 200 ppm), aluminum (5 ppm to 560 ppm) and nitrogen were made to obtain various amounts of acicular ferrite and different microstructures which lead to the varying fracture behaviors and sensitivity to the strain aging. Increasing boron content also leads to an increase of the Charpy-V transition temperature with varying sensitivity to nitrogen content. Results indicate that as toughness of the as-deposited weld metal containing 40 ppm boron s much more sensitive to nitrogen content than the weld deposits contain 160 ppm boron. A similar trend has also been seen with the addition of 160 ppm aluminum to the weld metal while a change of titanium content did not cause such a significant change. In summary, present paper rigorously reviews the results of this extensive research program to develop a mechanistic understanding of the microalloying system (Ti, B and Al) on the strain aging and fracture toughness properties (Charpy-V and CTOD) of the multipass ferritic weldments.

  11. A new technique for the strengthening of aluminum tungsten inert gas weld metals: using carbon nanotube/aluminum composite as a filler metal.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Rashidkhani, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S; Arabian, N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) on the mechanical properties of aluminum multipass weld metal prepared by the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process was investigated. High energy ball milling was used to disperse MWCNT in the aluminum powder. Carbon nanotube/aluminum composite filler metal was fabricated for the first time by hot extrusion of ball-milled powders. After welding, the tensile strength, microhardness and MWCNT distribution in the weld metal were investigated. The test results showed that the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was greatly increased when using the filler metal containing 1.5 wt.% MWCNT. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the filler metal containing MWCNT can serve as a super filler metal to improve the mechanical properties of TIG welds of Al and its alloys.

  12. Inter-pass Thermal-vibration Stress Relief on Multi-pass Welded Joints of DH 36 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shu-Qi; Fang, Hong-Yuan; Liu, Xue-Song; Wang, Ping; Ma, Ran; Cui, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Improving the efficiency and applicability of vibration stress relief (VSR) method is a hot topic today. In this study, the waste heat in the multi-pass welding procedure was used to enhance VSR. A novel stress relief method, i.e. inter-pass thermal-vibration stress relief (ITVSR), was proposed. The effects of ITVSR were compared to that of regular VSR and vibration welding (V-Welding). The results indicate that ITVSR is highly effective in decreasing the residual stress in the plates, which is very important for components to be used in offshore engineering. Further, the directional effectiveness of the three methods was revealed. The longitudinal stress in the plates was decreased while the transverse stress was increased, by all the three methods. The mechanism of this phenomenon was discussed. Comparing to the other two methods, ITVSR was more effective in relieving longitudinal stress, and raised transverse stress at a minimum amplitude. Thus, we propose a new technical route to improve the efficiency and applicability of VSR.

  13. Microstructure and mechanical properties of China low activation martensitic steel joint by TIG multi-pass welding with a new filler wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bo; Zhang, Junyu; Wu, Qingsheng

    2017-07-01

    Tungsten Inner Gas (TIG) welding is employed for joining of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel. A new filler wire was proposed, and the investigation on welding with various heat input and welding passes were conducted to lower the tendency towards the residual of δ ferrite in the joint. With the optimized welding parameters, a butt joint by multi-pass welding with the new filler wire was prepared to investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties. The microstructure of the joint was observed by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The hardness, Charpy impact and tensile tests of the joint were implemented at room temperature (25 °C). The results revealed that almost full martensite free from ferrite in the joints were obtained by multipass welding with the heat input of 2.26 kJ/mm. A certain degree of softening occurred at the heat affected zone of the joint according to the results of tensile and hardness tests. The as welded joints showed brittle fracture in the impact tests. However, the joints showed toughness fracture after tempering and relatively better comprehensive performance were achieved when the joints were tempered at 740 °C for 2 h.

  14. Assessment of delta ferrite in multipass TIG welds of 40 mm thick SS 316L: A comparative study of ferrite number (FN) prediction and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buddu, Ramesh Kumar; Raole, P. M.; Sarkar, B.

    2017-04-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in the fabrication of fusion reactor major systems like vacuum vessel, divertor, cryostat and other structural components development. Multipass welding is used for the development of thick plates for the structural components fabrication. Due to the repeated weld thermal cycles, the microstructure adversely alters owing to the presence of complex phases like austenite, ferrite and delta ferrite and subsequently influences the mechanical properties like tensile and impact toughness of joints. The present paper reports the detail analysis of delta ferrite phase in welded region of 40 mm thick SS316L plates welded by special design multipass narrow groove TIG welding process under three different heat input conditions. The correlation of delta ferrite microstructure of different type structures acicular and vermicular is observed. The chemical composition of weld samples was used to predict the Ferrite Number (FN), which is representative form of delta ferrite in welds, with Schaeffler’s, WRC-1992 diagram and DeLong techniques by calculating the Creq and Nieq ratios and compared with experimental data of FN from Feritescope measurements. The low heat input conditions (1.67 kJ/mm) have produced higher FN (7.28), medium heat input (1.72 kJ/mm) shown FN (7.04) where as high heat input (1.87 kJ/mm) conditions has shown FN (6.68) decreasing trend and FN data is compared with the prediction methods.

  15. Characteristics of Extra Narrow Gap Weld of HSLA Steel Welded by Single-Seam per Layer Pulse Current GMA Weld Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, B. P.; Ghosh, P. K.

    2017-03-01

    Butt weld joints are produced using pulse current gas metal arc welding process by employing the technique of centrally laid multi-pass single-seam per layer weld deposition in extra narrow groove of thick HSLA steel plates. The weld joints are prepared by using different combination of pulse parameters. The selection of parameter of pulse current gas metal arc welding is done considering a summarized influence of simultaneously interacting pulse parameters defined by a dimensionless hypothetical factor ϕ. The effect of diverse pulse parameters on the characteristics of weld has been studied. Weld joint is also prepared by using commonly used multi-pass multi-seam per layer weld deposition in conventional groove. The extra narrow gap weld joints have been found much superior to the weld joint prepared by multi-pass multi-seam per layer deposition in conventional groove with respect to its metallurgical characteristics and mechanical properties.

  16. Characteristics of Extra Narrow Gap Weld of HSLA Steel Welded by Single-Seam per Layer Pulse Current GMA Weld Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, B. P.; Ghosh, P. K.

    2017-02-01

    Butt weld joints are produced using pulse current gas metal arc welding process by employing the technique of centrally laid multi-pass single-seam per layer weld deposition in extra narrow groove of thick HSLA steel plates. The weld joints are prepared by using different combination of pulse parameters. The selection of parameter of pulse current gas metal arc welding is done considering a summarized influence of simultaneously interacting pulse parameters defined by a dimensionless hypothetical factor ϕ. The effect of diverse pulse parameters on the characteristics of weld has been studied. Weld joint is also prepared by using commonly used multi-pass multi-seam per layer weld deposition in conventional groove. The extra narrow gap weld joints have been found much superior to the weld joint prepared by multi-pass multi-seam per layer deposition in conventional groove with respect to its metallurgical characteristics and mechanical properties.

  17. Laser beam welding of any metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K. H.

    1998-10-01

    The effect of a metal's thermophysical properties on its weldability are examined. The thermal conductivity, melting point, absorptivity and thermal diffusivity of the metal and the laser beam focused diameter and welding speed influence the minimum beam irradiance required for melting and welding. Beam diameter, surface tension and viscosity of the molten metal affect weld pool stability and weld quality. Lower surface tension and viscosity increases weld pool instability. With larger beam diameters causing wider welds, dropout also increases. Effects of focused beam diameter and joint fitup on weldability are also examined. Small beam diameters are sensitive to beam coupling problems in relation to fitup precision in addition to beam alignment to the seam. Welding parameters for mitigating weld pool instability and increasing weld quality are derived from the above considerations. Guidelines are presented for the tailoring of welding parameters to achieve good welds. Weldability problems can also be anticipated from the properties of a metal.

  18. Metal Transfer in Gas Metal Arc Welding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-30

    detaching drops can have significant effects on the consequent weld quality and production rate. In naval ship construction a greater percentage of the...Appendix A of present report (part)) explored the effects of welding p~rameters on metal transfer phonom"a in GMkW. Droplet sizes were measured by...time scales estimates showed that viscous effects are expected to be unimportant unless Marangoni (thermocapillary) convention is significant. As shown

  19. Mechanics and mechanisms of ultrasonic metal welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Edgar

    During ultrasonic welding of sheet metal, normal and shear forces act on the parts to be welded and the weld interface. These forces are a result of the ultrasonic vibrations of the tool, pressed onto the parts to be welded. Furthermore they determine the weld quality and the power that is needed to produce the weld. The main goal in this study is to measure and calculate the tangential forces during ultrasonic metal welding that act on the parts and the weld interface and correlate them to weld quality. In this study a mechanics based model was developed which included a model for the temperature generation during welding and its effect on the mechanical material properties. This model was then used to calculate the interface forces during welding. The model results were in good agreement with the experimental results, which included the measured shear force during welding. With the knowledge of the forces that act at the interface it might be possible to control weld quality (strength) and avoid sonotrode welding (sticking of the sonotrode to the parts). Without a solution to these two problems USMW will never be applicable to large scale automated production use, despite its advantages. In the experiments the influence of part dimensions, friction coefficient, normal force and vibration amplitude on weld quality and sonotrode adhesion were examined. The presented model is capable of predicting and explaining unfavorable welding conditions, therefore making it possible to predetermine weld locations on larger parts or what surface preparation of the parts to be welded would lead to an improved welding result. Furthermore shear force at the anvil measured during welding could be correlated to changing welding conditions. This is a new approach of explaining the process of USMW, because it is based on mechanical considerations. The use of a shear force measuring anvil has the potential to be implemented into welding systems and the shear force would provide an

  20. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  1. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  2. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, H.B.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.

    1987-08-10

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, Herschel B.; Einerson, Carolyn J.; Watkins, Arthur D.

    1989-01-01

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections.

  4. Hybrid welding of dissimilar metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samigullin, A. D.; Bashmakov, D. A.; Israphilov, I. Kh; Turichin, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    The article addresses issues laser - plasma welding (LPW) dissimilar metals and the results of metallographic studies of the microstructure of welds ferrite - 40 steel and molybdenum - steel 40. Increasing potential opportunities the high-energy processing is carried out by integration the laser radiation (LR) and plasma, which allows you to create the desired spatial distribution of the energy flow for technological processes (TP) of laser-plasma heat treatment (LPT) of metals. The distribution of the thermal field is determined by the density distribution of energy flow LR and plasma exposure time, and the thermal characteristics of the treated metal. The most interesting is the treatment of details with ring flow of plasma and LR axial impact.

  5. Inclusions and Microstructure of Ce-Added Weld Metal Coarse Grain Heat-Affected Zone in Twin-Wire Submerged-Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S. F.; Yan, N.; Chen, Y.

    2016-06-01

    In high heat-input multi-pass twin-wire submerged-arc welding, weld metal of previous pass will be affected by the heat input of subsequent one and form coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ). This study focused on the effects of welding thermal cycle on the inclusions and microstructure of Ce-alloyed weld metal CGHAZ. According to the study of inclusions and microstructure of weld metal CGHAZ, it was found that the composition and type of the inclusions did not change under the effect of welding thermal cycle. Although the inclusions were coarsened slightly, the promoting ability to acicular ferrite (AF) was not deprived after thermal cycling. There are three types of AF in weld metal CGHAZ, which include oxy-sulfides of Ce inclusions-promoted AF, home-position-precipitated AF, and sympathetic AF. Results showed more than 80% of microstructure was AF, which greatly benefited the mechanical properties of weld metal CGHAZ, even though granular bainite and M-A constituents were generated.

  6. Shielded Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 4. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in shielded metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety; theory, power sources, and…

  7. Shielded Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 4. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in shielded metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety; theory, power sources, and…

  8. Welding dissimilar metal microwires by Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunagawa, Takuya; Tohmyoh, Hironori

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we report on the Joule heat welding of dissimilar metal microwires. The current required for successful welding was investigated. Various combinations of 25 µm diameter Cu, Au and Al microwires were welded together using this technique. The welded dissimilar metal wire systems were then cut by supplying a higher current, and it was found that the position at which the wires cut was not at the midpoint, i.e., the position of the weld, of the wire system. This is because the temperature distributions formed in the dissimilar metal systems were asymmetrical. The positions at which the wires cut were in good agreement with those predicted by a heat conduction model. The lower limit for successful welding of the dissimilar metal microwire system was found to be determined by the lower of the two currents required to cut microwires of the individual materials.

  9. Wiping Metal Transfer in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Much evidence suggests that as the friction stir pin-tool moves along a weld seam the displacement of metal takes place by a wiping action at the surface of a plug of metal that rotates with the tool. The wiping model is explained and some consequences for the friction stir welding process are drawn.

  10. Effect of Different Chromium Additions on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Multipass Weld Joint of Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dong Hoon; Lee, Hae Woo

    2012-12-01

    The correlation between the mechanical properties and ferrite volume fraction (approximately 40, 50, and 60 Ferrite Number [FN]) in duplex stainless steel weld metals were investigated by changing the Cr content in filler wires with a flux-cored arc-welding (FCAW) process. The interpass temperature was thoroughly maintained under a maximum of 423 K (150 °C), and the heat input was also sustained at a level under 15 KJ/cm in order to minimize defects. The microstructure examination demonstrated that the δ-ferrite volume fraction in the deposited metals increased as the Cr/Ni equivalent ratio increased, and consequently, chromium nitride (Cr2N) precipitation was prone to occur in the ferrite domains due to low solubility of nitrogen in this phase. Thus, more dislocations are pinned by the precipitates, thereby lowering the mobility of the dislocations. Not only can this lead to the strength improvement, but also it can accentuate embrittlement of the weld metal at subzero temperature. Additionally, the solid-solution strengthening by an increase of Cr and Mo content in austenite phase depending on the reduction of austenite proportion also made an impact on the increase of the tensile and yield strength. On the other hand, the impact test (at 293 K, 223 K, and 173 K [20 °C, -50 °C, and -100 °C]) showed that the specimen containing about 40 to 50 FN had the best result. The absorbed energy of about 40 to 50 J sufficiently satisfied the requirements for industrial applications at 223 K (-50 °C), while the ductile-to-brittle transition behavior exhibited in weldment containing 60 FN. As the test temperature decreased under 223 K (-50 °C), a narrow and deep dimple was transformed into a wide and shallow dimple, and a significant portion of the fracture surface was occupied by a flat cleavage facet with river patterns.

  11. Evaluation of weld metal 82 and weld metal 152 stress corrosion cracking susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Psaila-Dombrowski, M.J.; Sarver, J.M.; Doherty, P.E.; Schneider, W.G.

    1995-12-31

    Welds are often an area of concern in steam generators (SG) because of the different materials in the welds, the residual stresses which result from the welding process and subsequent operational stresses. In general a weld is composed of a base metal, weld metal and the heat affected zone (HAZ). This study investigated the corrosion performance of welds connecting the divider plate to the weld buildup in a welded-in divider plate (WIDP) design. The materials of interest were Alloy 690 plate, Weld Metals (WM) 82 and WM 152. Weld test samples were fabricated in a manner that is consistent with SG fabrication practices in which WM 152 is used to attach the Alloy 690 plate to the WM 82 weld buildup. Round tensile specimens were used to evaluate WIDP welds. Specimens were manufactured parallel to the weld fusion lines, hence, the gauge length of each specimen contained either the base metal or a metal and a HAZ. Use of specimens of this orientation permitted evaluation of all the materials contained in the specimen for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility, not just the weakest materials. Constant extension rate tests were performed in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary water chemistry and faulted primary water chemistry at 343 C and a strain rate of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} sec{sup {minus}1}. No SCC was found in any specimen in either environment.

  12. Sensors control gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Siewert, T.A.; Madigan, R.B.; Quinn, T.P.

    1997-04-01

    The response time of a trained welder from the time a weld problem is identified to the time action is taken is about one second--especially after a long, uneventful period of welding. This is acceptable for manual welding because it is close to the time it takes for the weld pool to solidify. If human response time were any slower, manual welding would not be possible. However, human response time is too slow to respond to some weld events, such as melting of the contact tube in gas metal arc welding (GMAW), and only automated intelligent control systems can react fast enough to correct or avoid these problems. Control systems incorporate welding knowledge that enables intelligent decisions to be made about weld quality and, ultimately, to keep welding parameters in the range where only high-quality welds are produced. This article discusses the correlation of electrical signals with contact-tube wear, changes in shielding gas, changes in arc length, and other weld process data.

  13. Sensing the gas metal arc welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, N.M.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.; Watkins, A.D.; Larsen, E.D.; Taylor, P.L. ); Waddoups, M.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-bypass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

  14. Sensing the gas metal arc welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, N.M.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.; Watkins, A.D.; Larsen, E.D.; Taylor, P.L.; Waddoups, M.A.

    1992-10-01

    Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-bypass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

  15. Sensing the gas metal arc welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, N. M.; Johnson, J. A.; Smartt, H. B.; Watkins, A. D.; Larsen, E. D.; Taylor, P. L.; Waddoups, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-by-pass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

  16. Effect of Heat Treatment on Low Temperature Toughness of Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Weld Metal of Type 316L Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, H.; Fujii, H.; Tamura, M.

    2006-03-31

    Austenitic stainless steels are considered to be the candidate materials for liquid hydrogen vessels and the related equipments, and those welding parts that require high toughness at cryogenic temperature. The authors have found that the weld metal of Type 316L stainless steel processed by reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding has high toughness at cryogenic temperature, which is considered to be due to the single-pass welding process without reheating effect accompanied by multi-pass welding process.In this work, the effect of heat treatment on low temperature toughness of the RPEB weld metal of Type 316L was investigated by Charpy impact test at 77K. The absorbed energy decreased with higher temperature and longer holding time of heat treatment. The remarkable drop in the absorbed energy was found with heat treatment at 1073K for 2 hours, which is as low as that of conventional multi-pass weld metal such as tungsten inert gas welding. The observations of fracture surface and microstructure revealed that the decrease in the absorbed energy with heat treatment resulted from the precipitation of intermetallic compounds near delta-ferrite phase.

  17. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  18. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  19. Femtosecond fiber laser welding of dissimilar metals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, welding of dissimilar metals was demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, by using a high-energy high-repetition-rate femtosecond fiber laser. Metallurgical and mechanical properties were investigated and analyzed under various processing parameters (pulse energy, repetition rate, and welding speed). Results showed that the formation of intermetallic brittle phases and welding defects could be effectively reduced. Strong welding quality with more than 210 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-aluminum and 175 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-magnesium has been demonstrated. A minimal heat affected zone and uniform and homogenous phase transformation in the welding region have been demonstrated. This laser-welding technique can be extended for various applications in semiconductor, automobile, aerospace, and biomedical industries.

  20. Metal Flow in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The plastic deformation field in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is compared to that in metal cutting. A shear surface around the FSW tool analogous to the metal cutting shear plane is identified and comprises the basis of the "rotating plug" flow field model and the "wiping" model of tool interaction with weld metal. Within the context of these models: The FSW shear rate is estimated to be comparable to metal cutting shear rates. The effect of tool geometry on the FSW shear surface is discussed and related to published torque measurements. Various FS W structural features are explained, including a difference in structure of bimetallic welds when alloys on the advancing and retreating sides of the weld seam are exchanged. The joining mechanism and critical parameters of the FSW process are made clear.

  1. Trends in microstructure modeling in weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Babu, S.S.; Vitek, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    Various physical processes, such as thermochemical reactions in liquid, solidification, and solid state transformations, control the microstructure development in weld metals. Some fundamental knowledge of the effects of these physical processes on weld microstructure development already exists. However, generalized and integrated models encompassing the current understanding are just evolving. Such models are needed in the design of successful welding procedures for new alloy systems and advanced materials. The principles, methodology, and future directions of modeling weld microstructure development are described in this paper, with examples in low-alloy steel, stainless steel, and Ni-base superalloys. In low alloy steels, the nucleation and growth of oxide inclusions in the melt was modeled as a function of the welding process and composition. This inclusion model has been recently coupled with solidification and numerical heat and mass transfer models. Recent advances in theoretical and physical modeling of the solidification process will be reviewed in this paper with regard to predicting the solidification modes, grain structure development, segregation effects, and nonequilibrium solidification in welds. In nickel-base superalloy welds, the effects of solidification and solid state transformations on microstructure development will be described. In these welds, the final microstructure was found to be dependent on the cooling rates and solidification modes. The weld microstructure was investigated with the help of advanced analytical techniques such as atom-probe field-ion microscopy. The result addresses the importance of advanced analytical techniques in modeling the solid state transformation.

  2. Changes in Precipitate Distributions and the Microstructural Evolution of P24/P91 Dissimilar Metal Welds During PWHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Karl E.; Tatlock, Gordon J.; Chi, Kuangnan; Barnard, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The effect of post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) on the evolution of precipitate phases in dissimilar metal welds made between 9 pct Cr P91 alloy and 2.25 pct Cr T/P24-type weld metal has been investigated. Sections of multi-pass fusion welds were analyzed in their as welded condition and after PWHTs of 2 and 8 hour duration at 1003 K (730 °C). Thin foil specimens and carbon extraction replicas have been examined in transmission electron microscopes in order to identify precipitate phases and substantiate their distributions in close proximity to the fusion line. The findings of these studies confirm that a carbon-depleted region develops in the lower alloyed weld material, adjacent to the weld interface, during thermal processing. A corresponding carbon enriched region is formed, simultaneously, in the coarse grain heat affected zone of the P91 parent alloy. It has been demonstrated that carbon depletion from the weld alloy results in the dissolution of M7C3 and M23C6 chromium carbides. However, micro-alloying additions of vanadium and niobium which are made to both the P24 and P91 alloys facilitate the precipitation of stable, nano-scale, MX carbonitride particles. This work demonstrates that these particles, which are of key importance to the strength of ferritic creep resistant alloys, are retained in carbon-depleted regions. The microstructural stability which is conferred by their retention means that the pernicious effects of recrystallization are largely avoided.

  3. The effect of welding thermal cycles on the microstructure development of energy components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praunseis, Zdravko

    2017-07-01

    The development of the microstructure in the welds and specially in heat affected zones of multi-pass weld joint is strongly influenced by welding thermal cycle and base material properties. Metallographically examined microstructures in undermatched joints with homogeneous and heterogeneous welds were especially those, having expected extremely low fracture toughness. Therefore, microstructures developed in the heat affected zones of multi-pass undermatched joint with homogeneous and heterogeneous welds metals were analysed by determination of fracture toughness of heat affected local brittle zones using standard test methods.

  4. A study of weld quality in ultrasonic spot welding of similar and dissimilar metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sarraf, Z.; Lucas, M.

    2012-08-01

    Several difficulties are faced in joining thinner sheets of similar and dissimilar materials from fusion welding processes such as resistance welding and laser welding. Ultrasonic metal welding overcomes many of these difficulties by using high frequency vibration and applied pressure to create a solid-state weld. Ultrasonic metal welding is an effective technique in joining small components, such as in wire bonding, but is also capable of joining thicker sheet, depending on the control of welding conditions. This study presents the design, characterisation and test of a lateral-drive ultrasonic metal welding device. The ultrasonic welding horn is modelled using finite element analysis and its vibration behaviour is characterised experimentally to ensure ultrasonic energy is delivered to the weld coupon. The welding stack and fixtures are then designed and mounted on a test machine to allow a series of experiments to be conducted for various welding and ultrasonic parameters. Weld strength is subsequently analysed using tensile-shear tests. Control of the vibration amplitude profile through the weld cycle is used to enhance weld strength and quality, providing an opportunity to reduce part marking. Optical microscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the weld quality. The results show how the weld quality is particularly sensitive to the combination of clamping force and vibration amplitude of the welding tip.

  5. Intraoral metal laser welding: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fornaini, Carlo; Vescovi, Paolo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Mahler, Patrick; Bertrand, Caroline; Nammour, Samir

    2010-03-01

    The possibility of laser welding of dental prostheses offers great advantages: first, the operator has the possibility of welding on the master model, which decreases the number of passages and thus the possibility of errors and damage, and secondly, the patient attends only a few sessions, and, due to the possibility of fixing the damaged prostheses, there is no need to resort to the technician's laboratory. In a previous study we described the experimental phases of intraoral welding, from the in vitro model on animal jaws with evaluations of the temperature variations during welding through thermal chamber and type K thermocouples. In this study we describe the intraoral welding in vivo on human subjects by using, as in the previous study, a fibre-delivered neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. The in vivo phase allowed a restored prosthesis to be positioned and intraorally welded in the upper central sector with optimal results both in patient's comfort and in aesthetic effects. This first in vivo test confirmed that the use of a laser technique for the intraoral welding of metal prostheses is possible, with no particular problems and risks for the biological structures close to the welding zone.

  6. Understanding metal vaporizaiton from laser welding.

    SciTech Connect

    DebRoy, Tarasankar; Fuerschbach, Phillip William; He, Xiuli; Norris, Jerome T.

    2003-09-01

    The production of metal vapor as a consequence of high intensity laser irradiation is a serious concern in laser welding. Despite the widespread use of lasers in manufacturing, little fundamental understanding of laser/material interaction in the weld pool exists. Laser welding experiments on 304 stainless steel have been completed which have advanced our fundamental understanding of the magnitude and the parameter dependence of metal vaporization in laser spot welding. Calculations using a three-dimensional, transient, numerical model were used to compare with the experimental results. Convection played a very important role in the heat transfer especially towards the end of the laser pulse. The peak temperatures and velocities increased significantly with the laser power density. The liquid flow is mainly driven by the surface tension and to a much less extent, by the buoyancy force. Heat transfer by conduction is important when the liquid velocity is small at the beginning of the pulse and during weld pool solidification. The effective temperature determined from the vapor composition was found to be close to the numerically computed peak temperature at the weld pool surface. At very high power densities, the computed temperatures at the weld pool surface were found to be higher than the boiling point of 304 stainless steel. As a result, vaporization of alloying elements resulted from both total pressure and concentration gradients. The calculations showed that the vaporization was concentrated in a small region under the laser beam where the temperature was very high.

  7. Refractory metals welded or brazed with tungsten inert gas equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisner, J. P.

    1965-01-01

    Appropriate brazing metals and temperatures facilitate the welding or brazing of base metals with tungsten inert gas equipment. The highest quality bond is obtained when TIG welding is performed in an inert atmosphere.

  8. Extended electrode technique. [gas metal arc welding of metal plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaper, V. D.; Pollack, A.

    1972-01-01

    The extended electrode technique is a unique welding process which utilizes manual gas-metal-arc (GMAW) semi-automatic equipment and close, square butt joints to effectively produce a weld. The technique takes advantage of the resistance heating of the electode extension to effect the root pass. Weldments as large as 72-X30-X2-inch have been fabricated with this technique under normal shipyard welding conditions. Mechanical properties and explosion bulge tests indicate that satisfactory results are obtained with this process. Potential savings of approximately 50 percent can be achieved in flat welding and repair of heavy structural steel members.

  9. Study on ductility dip cracking susceptibility in Filler Metal 82 during welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing-Qing; Lu, Hao; Cui, Wei

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, Ductility Dip Cracking (DDC) susceptibility in Inconel600 companion Filler Metal 82 (FM82) under different stress states is investigated. Inconel600 is a Ni-Cr-Fe alloy with excellent resistance to general corrosion, localized corrosion, and stress corrosion, which has been widely used in nuclear power plants. However, the companion FM82 has been shown to be susceptible to DDC in welding process. To resolve the problem, this work is mainly focused on evaluating DDC susceptibility in FM82 in welding process. First of all, Strain to Fracture (STF) test is used to achieve the DDC criterion under simple stress state, and the formation mechanism of DDC was explained. Real welding is a process with complex stress state. Later, to get the DDC susceptibility under complex stress state, models about multi-pass welding were built up by means of finite element method. According to numerical simulation results, relationship of deformation and temperature history is achieved. Moreover, susceptible locations and moments could be determined associated with STF results. The simulation results fairly agree with welding experiment from another research.

  10. High Strength Steel Weldment Reliability: Weld Metal Hydrogen Trapping.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    additions to welding consumables to control weld metal hydrogen and thus reduce susceptibility to cold cracking in high strength steel weldments. 14...applying weld metal hydrogen trapping to improve the resistance to hydrogen cracking in welding of high strength steels . Hydrogen cracking in high...requirements which are necessary to prevent hydrogen cracking in high strength steel welding. Common practices to prevent hydrogen cracking in steel

  11. Influences of Cr/Ni equivalent ratios of filler wires on pitting corrosion and ductility-dip cracking of AISI 316L weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. H.; Kim, D. G.; Sung, J. H.; Kim, I. S.; Ko, D. E.; Kang, N. H.; Hong, H. U.; Park, J. H.; Lee, H. W.

    2011-02-01

    To study the pitting corrosion of AISI 316L weld metals according to the chromium/nickel equivalent ratio (Creq/Nieq ratio), three filler wires were newly designed for the flux-cored arc welding process. The weld metal with delta-ferrite at less than 3 vol.%, was observed for ductility-dip cracking (DDC) in the reheated region after multi-pass welding. The tensile strength and yield strength increased with increasing Creq/Nieq ratio. The result of anodic polarization tests in a 0.1 M NaCl solution at the room temperature (25) for 45 min, revealed that the base metal and weld metals have a similar corrosion potential of -0.34 VSCE. The weld metal with the highest content of Cr had the highest pitting potential (0.39 VSCE) and the passivation range (0.64 VSCE) was higher than the base metal (0.21 VSCE and 0.46 VSCE, respectively). Adding 0.001 M Na2S to the 0.1M NaCl solution, the corrosion occurred more severely by H2S. The corrosion potentials of the base metal and three weld metals decreased to -1.0 VSCE. DDC caused the decrease of the pitting potential by inducing a locally intense corrosion attack around the crack openings.

  12. Influence of Filler Metals in Welding Wires on the Phase and Chemical Composition of Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, N. A.; Osetkovskiy, I. V.; Kozyreva, O. A.; Zernin, E. A.; Kartsev, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of filler metals used in welding wires on the phase and chemical composition of the metal, which is surfaced to mining equipment exposed to abrasive wear, has been investigated. Under a laboratory environment, samples of Mo-V-B and Cr-Mn-Mo-V wires were made. The performed experiments have revealed that fillers of the Cr-Mn-Mo-V system used in powder wire show better wear resistance of the weld metal than that of the Mn-Mo-V-B system; the absence of boron, which promotes grain refinement in the Mn-Mo-V-B system, significantly reduces wear resistance; the Mn-Mo-V-B weld metal has a finer structure than the Cr-Mn-Mo-V weld metal.

  13. Automatic laser welding of metal bellows with precision seam tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D.U.

    1996-12-31

    Metal bellows were laser edge-welded satisfactorily with the aid of a precision seam tracking system. The welding speed was five to ten times faster than conventional arc welding. The weld quality was excellent and the cost savings are expected to be substantial.

  14. Welding technologies in art processing of metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukhta, M.; Sokolov, A.; Pelevin, E.

    2014-10-01

    The article presents a comparative analysis of modern welding techniques which can be applied in the artistic machining of metals. Features of designing of art objects are defined and methods for their manufacture are offered. including stages of prototyping and full-scale modeling. Factors influencing the shaping of metal art objects are revealed. Practical application of the proposed recommendations is shown in the example of manufacturing of openwork metal mannequin.

  15. Effect of Welding Heat Input on the Corrosion Resistance of Carbon Steel Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yongxin; Jing, Hongyang; Han, Yongdian; Xu, Lianyong

    2016-02-01

    The corrosion resistance of carbon steel weld metal with three different microstructures has been systematically evaluated using electrochemical techniques with the simulated produced water containing CO2 at 90 °C. Microstructures include acicular ferrite, polygonal ferrite, and a small amount of pearlite. With welding heat input increasing, weld metal microstructure becomes more uniform. Electrochemical techniques including potentiodynamic polarization curve, linear polarization resistance, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were utilized to characterize the corrosion properties on weld joint, indicating that the best corrosion resistance corresponded to the weld metal with a polygonal ferrite microstructure, whereas the weld metal with the acicular ferrite + polygonal ferrite microstructure showed the worst corrosion resistance. The samples with high welding heat input possessed better corrosion resistance. Results were discussed in terms of crystal plane orientation, grain size, and grain boundary type found in each weld metal by electron backscatter diffraction test.

  16. Wet underwater welding trials with commercial manual metal arc electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Abson, D.J.; Cooper, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    Six commercial wet underwater welding manual metal arc electrodes were evaluated in trials which simulated repairs to structures in shallow water. Welding was carried out both vertically down and overhead, at a depth of approximately 5 meters. One of the electrodes was an austenitic stainless steel, and the remainder were ferritic steel, containing low levels of carbon and manganese. Two weld configurations were employed in 8 mm thick C-Mn steel plate. Each weld was radiographed, sectioned, and examined metallographically. Tensile, Charpy and hardness testing were carried out. The trials revealed significant differences in the handleability of the six commercial electrodes. Handleability was better when welding vertically than when welding overhead, and was also better for fillet welds than for butt welds. Worm-holes and porosity were common in the latter. Extensive cracking occurred in the panels welded with the stainless steel electrode, preventing the extraction of mechanical test specimens from them. For the weld metal of the ferritic steel butt welds, strength and hardness increased with increasing alloying. Weld metal Charpy toughness varied widely between the different deposits. HAZ toughness was higher than that of the weld metal, but followed the trend of the weld metal data. On the patch plates, failure occurred in the parent steel on cross weld tensile specimens for the ferritic consumables, and in weld metal for the panels welded with the stainless steel electrodes. Viewed overall, two of the ferritic electrodes gave the best handleability and mechanical properties. However, fine-scale cracking was observed in the vertical butt weld deposited with one of them, and thus the other ferritic electrode gave the best all-round behavior. The remaining electrodes showed poorer handleability and a higher incidence of weld defects, including the extensive cracking observed in the butt welds produced with the stainless steel electrode.

  17. Effect of Nickel Contents on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties for Low-Carbon Bainitic Weld Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Gaojun; Cao, Rui; Yang, Jun; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Shuai; Guo, Xili; Yuan, Junjun; Zhang, Xiaobo; Chen, Jianhong

    2017-05-01

    Multi-pass weld metals were deposited on Q345 base steel using metal powder-flux-cored wire with various Ni contents to investigate the effects of the Ni content on the weld microstructure and property. The types of the microstructures were identified by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and micro-hardness tests. As a focusing point, the lath bainite and lath martensite were distinguished by their compositions, morphologies, and hardness. In particular, a number of black plane facets appearing between lath bainite or lath martensite packets were characterized by laser scanning confocal microscope. The results indicated that with the increase in Ni contents in the range of 0, 2, 4, and 6%, the microstructures in the weld-deposited metal were changed from the domination of the granular bainite to the majority of the lath bainite and/or the lath martensite and the micro-hardness of the weld-deposited metal increased. Meanwhile, the average width of columnar grain displays a decreasing trend and prior austenite grain size decreases while increases with higher Ni content above 4%. Yield strength and ultimate tensile strength decrease, while the reduction in fracture area increases with the decreasing Ni mass fraction and the increasing test temperature, respectively. And poor yield strength in Ni6 specimen can be attributed to elements segregation caused by weld defect. Finally, micro-hardness distribution in correspondence with specimens presents as a style of cloud-map.

  18. Effects of alloying elements on the strength and cooling rate sensitivity of ultra-low carbon alloy steel weld metals. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilaros, M.G.

    1994-03-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of weld cooling rate on the strength of autogenous GTAW deposited weld metal. The basic weld metal composition was based on a low carbon bainite metallurgical system. The weld metal yield strength goal was 130 ksi, needed to surpass the current HY-13O weld metal requirements. Vacuum Induction Melted (VIM) heats of steel were produced and processed into 3/4` thickness plates. The autogenous gas tungsten arc welds (GTAW) on the parent steel plates were produced under two different heat input conditions. Tensile specimens were produced from the weldments; specimens from certain heats were subjected to gleeble thermal simulations of multi-pass welding conditions using the Gleeble 1500. All specimens were then evaluated for yield and ultimate tensile strength. From the data presented, it was found that the experimental compositions studied were less sensitive to cooling rate than current HY-130 welding consumables. The compositions tested approached the target yield strength of 130 ksi, but further work is necessary in this area.

  19. Effect of Activated Flux on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Residual Stresses of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduraimuthu, V.; Vasudevan, M.; Muthupandi, V.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2012-02-01

    A novel variant of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding called activated-TIG (A-TIG) welding, which uses a thin layer of activated flux coating applied on the joint area prior to welding, is known to enhance the depth of penetration during autogenous TIG welding and overcomes the limitation associated with TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steels. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a specific activated flux for enhancing the depth of penetration during autogeneous TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. In the current work, activated flux composition is optimized to achieve 6 mm depth of penetration in single-pass TIG welding at minimum heat input possible. Then square butt weld joints are made for 6-mm-thick and 10-mm-thick plates using the optimized flux. The effect of flux on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and residual stresses of the A-TIG weld joint is studied by comparing it with that of the weld joints made by conventional multipass TIG welding process using matching filler wire. Welded microstructure in the A-TIG weld joint is coarser because of the higher peak temperature in A-TIG welding process compared with that of multipass TIG weld joint made by a conventional TIG welding process. Transverse strength properties of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weld produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base materials. The average toughness values of A-TIG weld joints are lower compared with that of the base metal and multipass weld joints due to the presence of δ-ferrite and inclusions in the weld metal caused by the flux. Compressive residual stresses are observed in the fusion zone of A-TIG weld joint, whereas tensile residual stresses are observed in the multipass TIG weld joint.

  20. Welding and properties of welds of TMCP-steel

    SciTech Connect

    Brederholm, A.T.; Kotamies, J.M.N.; Haenninen, H.

    1995-12-31

    Thermomechanical control process (TMCP) of steel includes a multiplicity of processing schedules of combined thermal and mechanical working treatments that have been developed to optimize the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties of various steel grades. Weld metal properties of multipass submerged arc welded (SAW) TMCP steel joints were investigated in order to study the influences of different welding wires and heat inputs. Weld metal characterization consisted of tensile, Charpy-V Notch (CVN) and hardness testing, and microstructural examination. Cross-weld tensile specimens were tested principally to examine whether HAZ softening, which might have occurred, causes failure in this region. The tests verified that by using the right welding wire; it is possible to achieve weld joint which fulfills the strength requirements and gives satisfactory toughness at low temperatures.

  1. [Clinical analysis of laser welding on porcelain bonded metal surface].

    PubMed

    Weng, Jia-wei; Dai, Wen-an; Wu, Xue-ying

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of laser-welded crowns and bridges. Two hundred defective crowns and bridges were welded by using Heraplus laser welding machine, and then restored by porcelain. After being welded ,those defective crowns and bridges of different materials fit well and their marginal areas were also satisfactory. During the follow up period of one year, no fractured porcelain and crack were found at welding spots. The technology of laser welding has no direct effect on welding spots between metal and porcelain and could be used to deal with the usual problems of the crowns and bridges.

  2. Apparatus For Metal/Inert-Gas Welding In Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocks, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    Metal/inert-gas welding-torch assembly operates in vacuum. Plasma generated in interior chamber and focused onto workpiece in vacuum. Pinch rollers feed wire to weld puddle. Controlled flow of plasma reduces dispersal in vacuum, preventing extinction.

  3. The effect of weld metal matching on girth weld performance. Volume 2, Experimental investigation: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Denys, R.M.

    1993-01-24

    This report provides an experimental study of the failure behavior of 11.6 mm (0.457 in) pipe segments taken from 36 inch diameter pipes containing defects in the girth weld using small scale and fatigue pre-cracked curved wide plate test specimens. The focal points of the evaluations were: to study the effect of the relative difference between pipe and weld metal yield strengths on girth weld performance; to verify the assumption that the CTOD (Crack Tip Opening Displacement) test is a reliable indicator of girth weld performance; and to evaluate the usefulness of the Charpy V notch test for predicting girth weld failure behavior. The investigations have demonstrated that it would be highly desirable to require weld metal yield strength overmatching for preventing the situation where a weak weld would have to take the applied deformations and to develop a reliable testing procedure for the determination of weld metal yield strength.

  4. Thermal insulation of wet shielded metal arc welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Patrick J.

    1993-06-01

    Computational and experimental studies were performed to determine the effect of static thermal insulation on the quality of wet shielded metal arc welds (SMAW). A commercially available heat flow and fluid dynamics spectral-element computer program was used to model a wet SMAW and to determine the potential effect on the weld cooling rate of placing thermal insulation adjacent to the weld line. Experimental manual welds were made on a low carbon equivalent (0.285) mild steel and on a higher carbon equivalent (0.410) high tensile strength steel, using woven fabrics of alumina-boria-silica fibers to insulate the surface of the plate being welded. The effect of the insulation on weld quality was evaluated through the use of post-weld Rockwell Scale hardness measurements on the surface of the weld heat affected zones (HAZ's) and by visual inspection of sectioned welds at 10 X magnification. The computational simulation demonstrated a 150% increase in surface HAZ peak temperature and a significant decrease in weld cooling rate with respect to uninsulated welds, for welds in which ideal insulation had been placed on the base plate surface adjacent to the weld line. Experimental mild steel welds showed a reduction in surface HAZ hardness attributable to insulation at a 77% significance level. A visual comparison of the cross-sections of two welds made in 0.410 carbon equivalent steel-with approximately equivalent heat input-revealed underbead cracking in the uninsulated weld but not in the insulated weld.

  5. Electrode formulation to reduce weld metal hydrogen and porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.; Ibarra, S.

    1994-12-31

    Residual weld metal hydrogen is a major concern in high strength steel welding, especially when the weld is performed under high cooling rate conditions. In the case of underwater wet welding, weld metal porosity is also of importance because of the water environment. The control of both problems can be achieved by means of pyrochemical reactions in the weld pool. The hydrogen-oxygen reaction and carbon-oxygen reaction are fundamental in the control of residual hydrogen in the weld metal and the amount of gas pores entrapped. A simple model was proposed to estimate weld metal residual hydrogen content by monitoring the weld pool deoxidation reactions. Potent deoxidizers such as aluminum will first react with oxygen in the liquid weld pool, followed by other elements present such as silicon and manganese. Carbon and hydrogen will be the last ones to react with oxygen prior to the iron atoms. The Ellingham-Richardson diagram frequently applied in describing steel and iron making processes was used in the modeling. Following the sequence of deoxidation, the chemical make-up of the gas pores and the amount of each chemical species in the pores could be estimated. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen were determined to be the major components in the weld pores. To minimize the amount of weld metal porosity and residual hydrogen content, specially designed consumables that will control the oxygen potential of the weld pool must be developed.

  6. Plutonium metal and oxide container weld development and qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, R.; Horrell, D.R.; Hoth, C.W.; Pierce, S.W.; Rink, N.A.; Rivera, Y.M.; Sandoval, V.D.

    1996-01-01

    Welds were qualified for a container system to be used for long-term storage of plutonium metal and oxide. Inner and outer containers are formed of standard tubing with stamped end pieces gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welded onto both ends. The weld qualification identified GTA parameters to produce a robust weld that meets the requirements of the Department of Energy standard DOE-STD-3013-94, ``Criteria for the Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides.``

  7. Metal Transfer in Gas Metal Arc Welding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-17

    their measurements. Predictions can also be compared to integral measurements as by Halmoy [1980] for melting rate and by Ueguri, Hara and Komura ...10 No. 3. Ue-,uri, S., K. Hara and H. Komura , 1985. Welding J., 64 pp. 242s-250s. van Doormaal, J.P. and G.D. Raithby, 1985. ASME paper 85-HT-9

  8. A Study on the Welding Characteristics of Tailor Welded Blank Metal Sheets Using GTAW and Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thasanaraphan, Pornsak

    In this study, a computational and experimental effort was carried out to qualitatively understand the weld pool shape, distortion and residual stress for continuous laser welding and manual pulsed gas metal arc welding. For all the welding simulations given in this dissertation, a welding specific finite element package, SYSWELD, is used. This research focuses on the welding behavior observed in light-weight metal structures known as the tailor-welded blanks, TWBs. They are a combination of two or more metal sheets with different thickness and/or different materials that are welded together in a single plane prior to forming, e.g., stamping. They made from the low carbon steel. As laser welding experiment results show, the weld pool shape at the top and bottom surface, is strongly influenced by surface tension, giving it a characteristic hourglass shape. In order to simulate the hourglass shape, a new volumetric heat source model was developed to predict the transient temperature profile and weld pool shape, including the effect of surface tension. Tailor welded blanks with different thicknesses were examined in the laser welding process. All major physical phenomena such as thermal conduction, heat radiation and convection heat losses are taken into account in the model development as well as temperature-dependant thermal and mechanical material properties. The model is validated for the case of butt joint welding of cold rolled steel sheets. The results of the numerical simulations provide temperature distributions representing the shape of the molten pool, distortion and residual stress with varying laser beam power and welding speed. It is demonstrated that the finite element simulation results are in good agreement with the experiment results. This includes the weld pool shape and sheet metal distortion. While there is no experimental data to compare directly with residual stress results, the distorted shape provides an indirect measure of the welding

  9. Characteristics comparison of weld metal zones welded to cast and forged steels for piston crown material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-03-01

    An optimum repair welding for the piston crown which is one of the engine parts exposed to the combustion chamber is considered to be very important to prolong the engine lifetime from an economical point of view. In this study, two types of filler metals such as 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 0.5Mo were welded with SMAW method and the other two types of filler metals such as Inconel 625 and 718 were welded with GTAW method, respectively, and the used base metals were the cast and forged steels of the piston crown material. The weld metal zones welded with Inconel 625 and 718 filler metals exhibited higher corrosion resistance compared to 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 0.5Mo filler metals. In particular, the weld metal zone welded with Inconel 718 and 0.5Mo, filler metals indicated the best and worst corrosion resistance, respectively. Consequently, it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal zone surely depends on the chemical components of each filler metal and welding method irrespective of the types of piston crown material.

  10. Oxygen effect on low-alloy steel weld metal properties

    SciTech Connect

    Potapov, N.N. . Welding Dept.)

    1993-08-01

    It is shown that the weld metal oxygen content in submerged arc low-alloy steel welds, as well as in low-carbon steel welds is dependent on the concentration of oxides decomposed at low temperatures in a weld pool slag phase. The oxygen is mainly in the form of fine dispersed oxide inclusions of less than 0.03 [mu]m. Differentiated evaluation of silicon reduction effects in submerged arc welded low-alloy steels revealed that weld metal brittle fracture strength depends to a considerable degree on total weld metal oxide inclusion content than on silicon increment in the weld. Therefore, the increase of weld metal brittle fracture susceptibility with the growth of weld oxide inclusion content is important to know. Welds with lowered oxygen content [0] [<=] 0.02% also display the tendency to decrease in plasticity because (1) the ferritic-pearlitic matrix of improved purity is likely to generate unbalanced structures on cooling and, (2) when there are no oxide inclusions, the shape of sulfur and phosphor precipitation from the melt changes from globular to film-like. Optimal low-alloy steel weld metal oxygen content is defined in the range of 0.02-0.035.

  11. Welding of HSLA-100 steel using ultra low carbon bainitic weld metal to eliminate preheating

    SciTech Connect

    Devletian, J.H.; Singh, D.; Wood, W.E.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced high strength steels such as the Navy`s HSLA-100 and HSLA-80 contain sufficiently low carbon levels to be weldable without preheating. Unfortunately, commercial filler metals specifically designed to weld these steels without costly preheating have not yet been developed. The objective of this paper is to show that the Navy`s advanced steels can be welded by gas metal-arc (GMAW) and gas tungsten-arc welding (GTAW) without preheating by using filler metal compositions that produce weld metal with an ultra-low carbon bainitic (ULCB) microstructure. Filler metals were fabricated from vacuum induction melted (VIM) ingots containing ultra-low levels of C, O and N. HSLA-100 plate and plate from the VIM ingots were welded by both GMAW and GTAW with Ar-5% CO{sub 2} shielding gas using welding conditions to achieve cooling times from 800 to 500 C (t{sub 8-5}) from 35 to 14 sec. Weld metal tensile, hardness and CVN impact toughness testing as well as microstructural studies using transmission electron microscopy were conducted. The ULCB weld metal was relatively insensitive to cooling rate, resulting in good strength and toughness values over a wide range of t{sub 8-5} cooling times. Filler metal compositions which met the mechanical property requirements for HSLA-100, HSLA-80 and HSLA-65 weld metal were developed.

  12. Microstructure Improvement in Weld Metal under the Ultrasonic Application

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Yan; Xu, Cailu; Han, Qingyou

    2007-01-01

    When considering the operational performance of weldments in the engineering projects, the most important issues to be considered are weld metal mechanical properties, integrity of the welded joint, and weldability 1 . These issues are closely related to the microstructure of the weld metal. A significant amount of research has been carried out to alter the process variables and to use external devices to obtain microstructure control of the weldments. It has been reported that grain refined microstructure not only reduces cracking behavior of alloys including solidification cracking, cold cracking and reheat cracking, 2 - 5 but also improves the mechanical properties of the weld metal, such as toughness, ductility, strength, and fatigue life. 6, 7 Weld pool stirring, 8 arc oscillation, 9, 10 arc pulsation, 11 , and magnetic arc oscillator 12, 13 have been applied to fusion welding to refine the microstructures. This article describes initial experimental results on the use of power ultrasonic vibration to refine the microstructure of weld metals.

  13. Shielded Metal Arc Pipe Welding. Teacher Edition. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    This second edition of the shielded metal arc pipe welding curriculum guide presents both basic and advanced pipe welding skills. All specifications for procedure and welder qualification are presented according to national standards. The standards also include the test position for both groove and fillet pipe welding. The guide contains three…

  14. Shielded Metal Arc Pipe Welding. Teacher Edition. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    This second edition of the shielded metal arc pipe welding curriculum guide presents both basic and advanced pipe welding skills. All specifications for procedure and welder qualification are presented according to national standards. The standards also include the test position for both groove and fillet pipe welding. The guide contains three…

  15. Analysis of thermal stresses and metal movement during welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraki, T.; Pattee, F. M.; Masubuchi, K.

    1974-01-01

    Finite element computer programs were developed to determine thermal stresses and metal movement during butt welding of flat plates and bead-on-plate welding along the girth of a cylindrical shell. Circular cylindrical shells of 6061 aluminum alloy were used for the tests. Measurements were made of changes in temperature and thermal strains during the welding process.

  16. Analysis and Comparison of Aluminum Alloy Welded Joints Between Metal Inert Gas Welding and Tungsten Inert Gas Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Guan, Yingchun; Wang, Qiang; Cong, Baoqiang; Qi, Bojin

    2015-09-01

    Surface contamination usually occurs during welding processing and it affects the welds quality largely. However, the formation of such contaminants has seldom been studied. Effort was made to study the contaminants caused by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes of aluminum alloy, respectively. SEM, FTIR and XPS analysis was carried out to investigate the microstructure as well as surface chemistry. These contaminants were found to be mainly consisting of Al2O3, MgO, carbide and chromium complexes. The difference of contaminants between MIG and TIG welds was further examined. In addition, method to minimize these contaminants was proposed.

  17. Shielding gas oxygen equivalent in weld metal microstructure optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Onsoeien, M.I.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1996-07-01

    One of the compositional variables that strongly influence low-carbon structural steel weld metal microstructure and mechanical properties is the weld metal oxygen content. As the weld metal oxygen content varies, a change in microstructure occurs. At low concentrations of oxygen, ferrite with aligned or nonaligned second phases may become predominant, slightly higher oxygen levels may result in the formation of the desired acicular ferrite, and further increases in the oxygen content to promote the formation of grain boundary ferrite. The start of austenite decomposition and ferrite nucleation are very sensitive to variations in the amount of oxygen present in the weld metal. Thus, in gas metal arc welding, adjusting the shielding gas oxygen potential provides a means of controlling the weld metal oxygen content. Bead-in-groove gas metal arc welding experiments were performed on HSLA steel coupons using three different welding wires and two heat inputs. A total of 17 different argon-based oxygen and carbon dioxide shielding gas mixtures was used. Complete metallographic and chemical analyses were carried out to evaluate the weld specimens. Sub-size Charpy V-notch toughness testing was performed on selected welds.

  18. Development of a ferritic consumable for welding grain-refined Fe-12Ni-0. 25Ti to retain toughness at 4. 2K

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    Multipass gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been adapted for welding grain-refined Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti steel with a matching ferritic 14% filler metal. The weld is made as a multipass weldment using a single V-groove preparation at heat inputs from 7-17 kJ/cm (18-43 kJ/in.). The ferritic weldment has a strength roughly matching that of the base metal and exhibits excellent toughness both in the weld metal and in the heat-affected zone at temperatures as low as liquid helium temperature (4.2 K, i.e., -452/sup 0/F). The excellent toughness is attributed to two factors: the chemical cleanliness of the GTAW deposit, and the refined microstructure of the weldment and the retention of fine microstructure in the heat-affected zone. Grain refinement is accomplished by the sequential rapid thermal cycles experienced by the material during multipass GTAW welding.

  19. Effect of Pulse Parameters on Weld Quality in Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Kamal; Pal, Surjya K.

    2011-08-01

    The weld quality comprises bead geometry and its microstructure, which influence the mechanical properties of the weld. The coarse-grained weld microstructure, higher heat-affected zone, and lower penetration together with higher reinforcement reduce the weld service life in continuous mode gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Pulsed GMAW (P-GMAW) is an alternative method providing a better way for overcoming these afore mentioned problems. It uses a higher peak current to allow one molten droplet per pulse, and a lower background current to maintain the arc stability. Current pulsing refines the grains in weld fusion zone with increasing depth of penetration due to arc oscillations. Optimum weld joint characteristics can be achieved by controlling the pulse parameters. The process is versatile and easily automated. This brief review illustrates the effect of pulse parameters on weld quality.

  20. Welding, bonding, and sealing of refractory metals by vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Plating process welds, bonds, and seals refractory metals without weakening or changing the structure of the base metals. A metal halide compound in the vapor phase is decomposed to deposit filler metal on the base metal. The resulting bond is a true metal-to-metal bond.

  1. Diagnostics of metal inert gas and metal active gas welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrlandt, D.

    2016-08-01

    The paper gives a review on studies on metal inert gas (MIG) and metal active gas (MAG) welding processes with the focus on diagnostics of the arc, the material transfer, and the temporal process behaviour in welding experiments. Recent findings with respect to an improved understanding of the main mechanisms in the welding arc and the welding process are summarized. This is linked to actual developments in welding arc and welding process modelling where measurements are indispensable for validation. Challenges of forthcoming studies are illustrated by means of methods under development for welding process control as well as remaining open questions with respect to arc-surface interaction and arc power balance.

  2. Towards predicting weld metal microstructure from fundamentals of transport phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Mundra, K.; DebRoy, T.; Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; Paul, A.J.

    1995-06-01

    Heat transfer and fluid flow during manual metal arc welding Of low alloy steels were investigated by solving the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in three dimensions. Calculated cooling rates were coupled with an existing phase transformation model to predict the microstructure in low alloy steel welds. The computed results were found to be in good agreement with experimentally observed microstructures. The agreement indicates significant promise for predicting spatial distribution of weld metal microstructure from the fundamentals of transport phenomena.

  3. Effect of electrode heating on weld metal chemistry control in shielded metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Bracarense, A.Q.; Liu, S.

    1994-12-31

    During welding with the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process, the electrode experiences an increase in temperature because of Joule heating and the heat from the arc conducted though the molten droplet to the solid wire. Heating of the electrode and temperature distribution along the electrode length will depend on the welding parameters as well as the ingredients of the flux coating. Thermal properties such as heat capacity and dissociation temperature of these ingredients can affect the heat transport through the electrode. A mathematical model taking into consideration the heat transport conditions in the electrode nd carbonate decomposition in the flux coating was developed to better understand and predict the increase in temperature in the core rod and coating of the electrode. Knowing the welding parameters and the physical properties of the flux ingredients, it was possible to estimate the temperature distribution along the length of the electrode, the location along the electrode length, above the arc where ingredients such as CaCO{sub 3} will start to dissociate and the oxygen potential of the shielding gas generated. To validate the model, the temperature of the core rod and the coating were monitored during actual welding. Experimental E7018 type electrodes with varying carbonate content were used. The remarkable conclusion of this research is that the stability of the flux ingredients and the welding parameters can be used to predict the thermal history along the electrode length and the oxygen potential in the arc environment during welding. The proposed mathematical model and thermodynamic data of the flux ingredients make it possible to control the chemical composition along the weld length.

  4. Metal Flow During Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, M.; Schmidt, C.; McClure, J. C.; Murr, L. E.; Nunes, A. C.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flow of metal during Friction Stir Welding is clarified using a faying surface tracer and a nib frozen in place during welding. It is shown that material is transported by two processes. The first is a wiping of material from the advancing front side of the nib onto a plug of material that rotates and advances with the nib. The material undergoes a helical motion within the plug that both rotates and advances with the plug and descends in the wash of the threads on the nib and rises on the outer part of the plug. After one or more rotations, this material is sloughed off the plug in its wake, primarily on the advancing side. The second process is an entrainment of material from the front retreating side of the nib that fills in between the sloughed off pieces from the advancing side. These two processes produce material with different mechanical properties and the strength of a weld should depend on the relative importance of the processes.

  5. Effects of flux modifications on high strength steel weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, G.L.

    1994-12-31

    The performance of high strength steel welds is sensitive to the weld metal chemistry, and that, in turn, is dependent on the composition of the welding consumables. In the case of submerged arc welding, the flux plays an important role in determining the chemistry of the resulting weld metal. The u.S. Navy is conducting a program to gain a basic understanding of fluxes used for welding high strength steels in an effort to be able to better select the appropriate flux, or design a new flux, for a given application. The objective of the present work is to analyze the effects of a systematic chance in flux composition on weld metal chemistry and properties The dry mix of a commercial flux was modified with additions of MnO to produce a series of four experimental flux mixes with target MnO levels from 1 wt% to 4 wt%. A fifth experimental flux mix was produced with an addition of 1/2 wt% CeO{sub 2} to examine the effect of rare earth additions to the flux. Tensile and impact properties and weld metal chemistry were tested for each weldment, and correlations were made with flux composition. Weld metal Mn levels from 1.37 wt% (0.76 wt% flux MnO) to 1.75 wt% (4.26 wt% flux MnO) were achieved with the MnO-added fluxes.The small CeO{sub 2} addition appeared to improve weld metal impact performance it was concluded that a more basic knowledge of welding fluxes can be used in selecting or designing appropriate fluxes for Navy applications. Further work is required to characterize the specific effects of other flux constituents and their interactions on weld metal performance.

  6. Numerical modeling of electron-beam welding of dissimilar metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krektuleva, R. A.; Cherepanov, O. I.; Cherepanov, R. O.

    2016-11-01

    This paper is devoted to numerical modeling of heat transfer processes and estimation of thermal stresses in weld seams created by electron beam welding of heterogeneous metals. The mathematical model is based on a system of equations that includes the Lagrange's variational equation of theory of plasticity and variational equation of M. Biot's principle to simulate the heat transfer processes. The two-dimensional problems (plane strain and plane stress) are considered for estimation of thermal stresses in welds considering differences of mechanical properties of welded materials. The model is developed for simulation of temperature fields and stresses during electron beam welding.

  7. Carbide-Free Bainitic Weld Metal: A New Concept in Welding of Armor Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Murthy, N.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Murty, B. S.; Reddy, G. M.; Rao, T. J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Carbide-free bainite, a fine mixture of bainitic ferrite and austenite, is a relatively recent development in steel microstructures. Apart from being very strong and tough, the microstructure is hydrogen-tolerant. These characteristics make it well-suited for weld metals. In the current work, an armor-grade quenched and tempered steel was welded such that the fusion zone developed a carbide-free bainitic microstructure. These welds showed very high joint efficiency and ballistic performance compared to those produced, as per the current industrial practice, using austenitic stainless steel fillers. Importantly, these welds showed no vulnerability to cold cracking, as verified using oblique Y-groove tests. The concept of carbide-free bainitic weld metal thus promises many useful new developments in welding of high-strength steels.

  8. A numerical and experimental study of ultrasonic metal welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sarraf, Z.; Lucas, M.; Harkness, P.

    2012-12-01

    Ultrasonic metal welding has been the subject of ongoing research and development, most recently concentrating on metal joining in miniature devices, for example to allow solder-free wire bonding. As well as at the small scale, there are also opportunities to research the joining of thicker sheet metals and to widen the range of similar and dissimilar materials that can be successfully joined using this technology. This study presents the design, characterisation and test of a lateral-drive ultrasonic metal spot welding device. The ultrasonic metal spot welding horn is modelled using finite element analysis (FEA) and its vibration behaviour is characterised experimentally to ensure ultrasonic energy is delivered effectively to the weld coupon. The welding stack and fixtures are then designed and mounted on a test machine to allow a series of experiments to be conducted for various welding and ultrasonic parameters. Weld strength is subsequently analysed using tensile-shear tests. The results show how the weld strength is particularly sensitive to the combination of clamping force and ultrasonic vibration amplitude of the welding tip, but there are optimal combinations of these and also limits that must be clearly identified.

  9. Localized weld metal corrosion in stainless steel water tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Strum, M.J.

    1995-05-25

    The rapidly developed leaks within the TFC and TFD tanks (LLNL groundwater treatment facilities) were caused by localized corrosion within the resolidified weld metal. The corrosion was initiated by the severe oxidation of the backsides of the welds which left the exposed surfaces in a condition highly susceptible to aqueous corrosion. The propagation of surface corrosion through the thickness of the welds occurred by localized corrosive attack. This localized attack was promoted by the presence of shielded aqueous environments provided by crevices at the root of the partial penetration welds. In addition to rapid corrosion of oxidized surfaces, calcium carbonate precipitation provided an additional source of physical shielding from the bulk tank environment. Qualification testing of alternate weld procedures showed that corrosion damage can be prevented in 304L stainless steel GTA welds by welding from both sides while preventing oxidation of the tank interior through the use of an inert backing gas such as argon. Corrosion resistance was also satisfactory in GMA welds in which oxidized surfaces were postweld cleaned by wire brushing and chemically passivated in nitric acid. Further improvements in corrosion resistance are expected from a Mo-containing grade of stainless steel such as type 316L, although test results were similar for type 304L sheet welded with type 308L filler metal and type 316L sheet welded with type 316L filler metal.

  10. Effects of surface active elements on weld pool fluid flow and weld penetration in gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Tsai, H. L.

    2001-06-01

    This article presents a mathematical model simulating the effects of surface tension (Maragoni effect) on weld pool fluid flow and weld penetration in spot gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Filler droplets driven by gravity, electromagnetic force, and plasma arc drag force, carrying mass, thermal energy, and momentum, periodically impinge onto the weld pool. Complicated fluid flow in the weld pool is influenced by the droplet impinging momentum, electromagnetic force, and natural convection due to temperature and concentration gradients, and by surface tension, which is a function of both temperature and concentration of a surface active element (sulfur in the present study). Although the droplet impinging momentum creates a complex fluid flow near the weld pool surface, the momentum is damped out by an “up-and-down” fluid motion. A numerical study has shown that, depending upon the droplet’s sulfur content, which is different from that in the base metal, an inward or outward surface flow of the weld pool may be created, leading to deep or shallow weld penetration. In other words, it is primarily the Marangoni effect that contributes to weld penetration in spot GMAW.

  11. Assessment of the Biological Effects of Welding Fumes Emitted From Metal Active Gas and Manual Metal Arc Welding in Humans.

    PubMed

    Dewald, Eva; Gube, Monika; Baumann, Ralf; Bertram, Jens; Kossack, Veronika; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas; Brand, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Emissions from a particular welding process, metal inert gas brazing of zinc-coated steel, induce an increase in C-reactive protein. In this study, it was investigated whether inflammatory effects could also be observed for other welding procedures. Twelve male subjects were separately exposed to (1) manual metal arc welding fumes, (2) filtered air, and (3) metal active gas welding fumes for 6 hours. Inflammatory markers were measured in serum before, and directly, 1 and 7 days after exposure. Although C-reactive protein concentrations remained unchanged, neutrophil concentrations increased directly after exposure to manual metal arc welding fumes, and endothelin-1 concentrations increased directly and 24 hours after exposure. After exposure to metal active gas and filtered air, endothelin-1 concentrations decreased. The increase in the concentrations of neutrophils and endothelin-1 may characterize a subclinical inflammatory reaction, whereas the decrease of endothelin-1 may indicate stress reduction.

  12. Weld Metal Cooling Rate Indicator System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    rate of change of weld temperature at the predetermined weld temperature. A range of...provided so that the rate of change of weld temperatures at the predetermined weld temperature can be compared with this range. A device is then provided...which is responsive to the comparing information for indicating whether the rate of change of weld temperature is within, above, or below the range

  13. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-2, Shielded Metal Arc and Oxyacetylene Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John; Selleck, Ben

    This second in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection describes the key features of the oxyacetylene and shielded metal arc welding process. The apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspections are presented. The module follows a typical format that includes the following…

  14. Microstructural refinement through multipass GTAW process

    SciTech Connect

    Kin, H.J.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1986-04-01

    The present work was undertaken to illustrate and clarify the microstructural features of martensitic Fe-Ni weld deposits made by a multipass welding process. To simulate this, rapid thermal treatments were applied to an Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti alloy using an induction furnace and bead-on-plate welding. The rapid thermal treatment refines the microstructure significantly by destroying the previous packet structure. Hence, the term ''packet refinement'' is used to distinguish its microstructural features from the grain refinement associated with recrystallization of austenite. During multipass GTAW process with an 11% Ni ferritic filler wire, a coarse columnar grain structure is formed after solidification but this structure is refined repetitively by the rapid thermal cycles of subsequent passes. The result is a fully packet refined and extremely fine structure, in the order of several microns, throughout the weldment.

  15. Influence of Aluminum Content on Grain Refinement and Strength of AZ31 Magnesium GTA Weld Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, N. Kishore; Cross, Carl E.

    2012-06-28

    The goal is to characterize the effect of Al content on AZ31 weld metal, the grain size and strength, and examine role of Al on grain refinement. The approach is to systematically vary the aluminum content of AZ31 weld metal, Measure average grain size in weld metal, and Measure cross-weld tensile properties and hardness. Conclusions are that: (1) increased Al content in AZ31 weld metal results in grain refinement Reason: higher undercooling during solidification; (2) weld metal grain refinement resulted in increased strength & hardness Reason: grain boundary strengthening; and (3) weld metal strength can be raised to wrought base metal levels.

  16. Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    most of the commercially available metallic materials, in particular steels (including stainless steels ), super alloys, aluminum alloys, etc., can...REPORT Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel 14. ABSTRACT 16...Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel Report Title ABSTRACT A conventional gas metal

  17. Pulmonary responses to welding fumes: role of metal constituents.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Taylor, Michael D; Zimmer, Anthony T; Roberts, Jenny R

    2004-02-13

    It is estimated that more than 1 million workers worldwide perform some type of welding as part of their work duties. Epidemiology studies have shown that a large number of welders experience some type of respiratory illness. Respiratory effects seen in full-time welders have included bronchitis, siderosis, asthma, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders. Inhalation exposure to welding fumes may vary due to differences in the materials used and methods employed. The chemical properties of welding fumes can be quite complex. Most welding materials are alloy mixtures of metals characterized by different steels that may contain iron, manganese, chromium, and nickel. Animal studies have indicated that the presence and combination of different metal constituents is an important determinant in the potential pneumotoxic responses associated with welding fumes. Animal models have demonstrated that stainless steel (SS) welding fumes, which contain significant levels of nickel and chromium, induce more lung injury and inflammation, and are retained in the lungs longer than mild steel (MS) welding fumes, which contain mostly iron. In addition, SS fumes generated from welding processes using fluxes to protect the resulting weld contain elevated levels of soluble metals, which may affect respiratory health. Recent animal studies have indicated that the lung injury and inflammation induced by SS welding fumes that contain water-soluble metals are dependent on both the soluble and insoluble fractions of the fume. This article reviews the role that metals play in the pulmonary effects associated with welding fume exposure in workers and laboratory animals.

  18. Process Simulation of Gas Metal Arc Welding Software

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Paul E.

    2005-09-06

    ARCWELDER is a Windows-based application that simulates gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of steel and aluminum. The software simulates the welding process in an accurate and efficient manner, provides menu items for process parameter selection, and includes a graphical user interface with the option to animate the process. The user enters the base and electrode material, open circuit voltage, wire diameter, wire feed speed, welding speed, and standoff distance. The program computes the size and shape of a square-groove or V-groove weld in the flat position. The program also computes the current, arc voltage, arc length, electrode extension, transfer of droplets, heat input, filler metal deposition, base metal dilution, and centerline cooling rate, in English or SI units. The simulation may be used to select welding parameters that lead to desired operation conditions.

  19. The importance of spatter formed in shielded metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Molleda, F. Mora, J.; Molleda, J.R.; Mora, E.; Mellor, B.G.

    2007-10-15

    Spatter results when droplets of liquid metal that have been ejected from the weld pool by the impact of small droplets from the covered electrode solidify and weld to the surface of the base material. The present paper studies spatter and reveals why these small droplets do not oxidise during their short trajectory and accounts for why they arrive with sufficient heat to weld to the adjacent base material. Welds were thus performed on mild steel using covered electrodes (rutile type) to obtain spatter on the adjacent base material. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray mapping were used to study the above mentioned phenomena.

  20. Microstructural Development in HSLA-100 Steel Weld Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    AD-A2 3 7 931 MICROSTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT IN HSLA-100 STEEL WELD METALS A*.t - AI* Final Report Grant No. N00014-89-J-1958 -. .o, Submitted by j Paul...on pages 30-32. The microstructures that develop in the coarse-grained heat affected zone (CG- HAZ) of the welds are discussed on page 21 and figures...stringent welding procedures as well as reduce the mechanical property deterioration from welding operations. The development of the ultra low carbon

  1. Control of arc length during gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Madigan, R.B.; Quinn, T.P.

    1994-12-31

    An arc-length control system has been developed for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) under spray transfer welding conditions. The ability to monitor and control arc length during arc welding allows consistent weld characteristics to be maintained and therefore improves weld quality. Arc length control has only been implemented for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), where an automatic voltage control (AVC) unit adjusts torch-to-work distance. The system developed here compliments the voltage- and current-sensing techniques commonly used for control of GMAW. The system consists of an arc light intensity sensor (photodiode), a Hall-effect current sensor, a personal computer and software implementing a data interpretation and control algorithms. Arc length was measured using both arc light and arc current signals. Welding current was adjusted to maintain constant arc length. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller was used. Gains were automatically selected based on the desired welding conditions. In performance evaluation welds, arc length varied from 2.5 to 6.5 mm while welding up a sloped workpiece (ramp in CTWD) without the control. Arc length was maintained within 1 mm of the desired (5 mm ) with the control.

  2. The influence of oxygen on the impact toughness and microstructure of steel weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Yoshihiro; Kuwana, Takeshi; Maie, Tsuyoshi

    1995-12-31

    A steel plate was welded in a low oxygen potential welding atmosphere. The weld metal obtained is classified in two groups on the oxygen content, very low oxygen content (less than 0.002 mass %) weld metal and relatively high oxygen content (over 0.015 mass%) weld metal. The effect of oxygen in steel weld metal on the Charpy v-notch impact values and the microstructure is investigated and discussed. Very low oxygen content steel weld metal shows superior impact toughness at 273 K as well as the well-known ``optimum oxygen`` containing steel weld metal. The very low oxygen weld metal has relatively large amounts of grain boundary ferrite and side plate ferrite microstructure, instead of upper bainite compared with the relatively high oxygen content weld metal.

  3. Discontinuity Detection in the Shield Metal Arc Welding Process

    PubMed Central

    Cocota, José Alberto Naves; Garcia, Gabriel Carvalho; da Costa, Adilson Rodrigues; de Lima, Milton Sérgio Fernandes; Rocha, Filipe Augusto Santos; Freitas, Gustavo Medeiros

    2017-01-01

    This work proposes a new methodology for the detection of discontinuities in the weld bead applied in Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) processes. The detection system is based on two sensors—a microphone and piezoelectric—that acquire acoustic emissions generated during the welding. The feature vectors extracted from the sensor dataset are used to construct classifier models. The approaches based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers are able to identify with a high accuracy the three proposed weld bead classes: desirable weld bead, shrinkage cavity and burn through discontinuities. Experimental results illustrate the system’s high accuracy, greater than 90% for each class. A novel Hierarchical Support Vector Machine (HSVM) structure is proposed to make feasible the use of this system in industrial environments. This approach presented 96.6% overall accuracy. Given the simplicity of the equipment involved, this system can be applied in the metal transformation industries. PMID:28489045

  4. Discontinuity Detection in the Shield Metal Arc Welding Process.

    PubMed

    Cocota, José Alberto Naves; Garcia, Gabriel Carvalho; da Costa, Adilson Rodrigues; de Lima, Milton Sérgio Fernandes; Rocha, Filipe Augusto Santos; Freitas, Gustavo Medeiros

    2017-05-10

    This work proposes a new methodology for the detection of discontinuities in the weld bead applied in Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) processes. The detection system is based on two sensors-a microphone and piezoelectric-that acquire acoustic emissions generated during the welding. The feature vectors extracted from the sensor dataset are used to construct classifier models. The approaches based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers are able to identify with a high accuracy the three proposed weld bead classes: desirable weld bead, shrinkage cavity and burn through discontinuities. Experimental results illustrate the system's high accuracy, greater than 90% for each class. A novel Hierarchical Support Vector Machine (HSVM) structure is proposed to make feasible the use of this system in industrial environments. This approach presented 96.6% overall accuracy. Given the simplicity of the equipment involved, this system can be applied in the metal transformation industries.

  5. Application of welding science to welding engineering: A lumped parameter gas metal arc welding dynamic process model

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, P.E.; Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    We develop a model of the depth of penetration of the weld pool in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) which demonstrates interaction between the arc, filler wire and weld pool. This model is motivated by the observations of Essers and Walter which suggest a relationship between droplet momentum and penetration depth. A model of gas metal arc welding was augmented to include an improved model of mass transfer and a simple model of accelerating droplets in a plasma jet to obtain the mass and momentum of impinging droplets. The force of the droplets and depth of penetration is correlated by a dimensionless linear relation used to predict weld pool depth for a range of values of arc power and contact tip to workpiece distance. Model accuracy is examined by comparing theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of the pool depth obtained from bead on plate welds of carbon steel in an argon rich shielding gas. Moreover, theoretical predictions of pool depth are compared to the results obtained from the heat conduction model due to Christensen et al. which suggest that in some cases the momentum of impinging droplets is a better indicator of the depth of the weld pool and the presence of a deep, narrow penetration.

  6. Recommend design of filler metal to minimize carbon steel weld metal preferential corrosion in CO2-saturated oilfield produced water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yongxin; Jing, Hongyang; Han, Yongdian; Feng, Zhicao; Xu, Lianyong

    2016-12-01

    The paper proposes a recommend design for the alloying elements in the filler metal to minimize preferential weld corrosion of carbon steel. The tensile and corrosion resistance properties of the weld metal are considerably improved by using a filler metal containing alloying elements according to the recommended design. Analysis of the morphology and composition of corrosion products on weld metals showed that the common weld metal suffered severe localized corrosion, whereas the weld metal with the alloying elements exhibited uniform corrosion. Based on these results, a tentative mechanism of CO2 corrosion resistance for both weld metals has been proposed.

  7. Joining of Dissimilar Metals By Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzdor, Vahid

    The use of friction stir welding (FSW) as a new process for joining dissimilar metals has been studied frequently recently. The present study investigated dissimilar-metal FSW between Al and Mg alloys using the widely used alloys 6061 Al and AZ31B Mg. It focused on the issue of how the joint strength is affected by the welding conditions, including the positions of Al and Mg with respect to the welding tool, the tool travel speed and the tool rotation speed. In spite of studies conducted by many other investigators, understanding of this fundamental issue is still rather limited. Unlike those studies, the present study: (1) determined the heat input by torque and temperature measurements during welding and used it to explain the effect of the welding conditions on the joint strength, (2) used color metallography with Al, Mg, Al3Mg2 and Al12Mg17 shown in different colors to clearly revealed the effect of the welding conditions on the formation of intermetallic compounds and material flow, which are affected by the heat input and which in turn affect the joint strength, and (3) determined the windows for selecting the travel and rotation speeds to optimize the joint strength for various material positions. Furthermore, conventional lap FSW was modified and the joint strength and ductility of the resultant welds were both increased significantly. The modified lap FSW was applied subsequently to Al-to-Cu FSW. The intermetallic compounds in Al-Mg and Al-Cu welds were identified.

  8. Laser Indirect Shock Welding of Fine Wire to Metal Sheet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Huang, Tao; Luo, Yapeng; Liu, Huixia

    2017-09-12

    The purpose of this paper is to present an advanced method for welding fine wire to metal sheet, namely laser indirect shock welding (LISW). This process uses silica gel as driver sheet to accelerate the metal sheet toward the wire to obtain metallurgical bonding. A series of experiments were implemented to validate the welding ability of Al sheet/Cu wire and Al sheet/Ag wire. It was found that the use of a driver sheet can maintain high surface quality of the metal sheet. With the increase of laser pulse energy, the bonding area of the sheet/wire increased and the welding interfaces were nearly flat. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) results show that the intermetallic phases were absent and a short element diffusion layer which would limit the formation of the intermetallic phases emerging at the welding interface. A tensile shear test was used to measure the mechanical strength of the welding joints. The influence of laser pulse energy on the tensile failure modes was investigated, and two failure modes, including interfacial failure and failure through the wire, were observed. The nanoindentation test results indicate that as the distance to the welding interface decreased, the microhardness increased due to the plastic deformation becoming more violent.

  9. Laser Indirect Shock Welding of Fine Wire to Metal Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Huang, Tao; Luo, Yapeng; Liu, Huixia

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an advanced method for welding fine wire to metal sheet, namely laser indirect shock welding (LISW). This process uses silica gel as driver sheet to accelerate the metal sheet toward the wire to obtain metallurgical bonding. A series of experiments were implemented to validate the welding ability of Al sheet/Cu wire and Al sheet/Ag wire. It was found that the use of a driver sheet can maintain high surface quality of the metal sheet. With the increase of laser pulse energy, the bonding area of the sheet/wire increased and the welding interfaces were nearly flat. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) results show that the intermetallic phases were absent and a short element diffusion layer which would limit the formation of the intermetallic phases emerging at the welding interface. A tensile shear test was used to measure the mechanical strength of the welding joints. The influence of laser pulse energy on the tensile failure modes was investigated, and two failure modes, including interfacial failure and failure through the wire, were observed. The nanoindentation test results indicate that as the distance to the welding interface decreased, the microhardness increased due to the plastic deformation becoming more violent. PMID:28895900

  10. Effect of cooling after welding on microstructure and mechanical properties of 12 Pct Cr steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guang-Jun; Andrén, Hans-Olof; Svensson, Lars-Erik

    1997-07-01

    The microstructure of three 12 pct cr steel weld metals with different nickel and nitrogen contents was studied in as-welded condition and after postweld heat treatment with and without intercooling. Tensile strength and impact toughness of the weld metals were investigated in different postweld heat treatment conditions. In weld metals heat treated without intercooling, austenite decomposed by a eutectoid reaction that resulted in M23C6 aggregates around retained δ-ferrite. Two morphologies of M2N and MN precipitates were found in a low-dislocation α-ferrite. It was concluded that these phases were also transformed from austenite. In weld metals heat treated with intercooling, M23C6 precipitates were smaller and more homogeneously distributed. Different MN precipitates were found in the tempered martensite. The fracture mode of the weld metals at room temperature was mainly transgranular cleavage with some fibrous fracture. Intercooling treatment improved Charpy impact toughness of the 12 pct Cr steel weld metals substantially. It was found that the important microstructural factors affecting the impact toughness of the weld metals which were heat treated without intercooling were the sizes of the α-ferrite grains, nonmetallic inclusions, and M23C6 aggregates. For the weld metals heat treated with intercooling, the factors which affect the toughness of the weld metals were the sizes of martensite packets and nonmetallic inclusions.

  11. Precipitation of Niobium Boride Phases at the Base Metal/Weld Metal Interface in Dissimilar Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Výrostková, Anna; Kepič, Ján; Homolová, Viera; Falat, Ladislav

    2015-07-01

    In this work, the analysis of failure mechanism in the heat affected zone is described in dissimilar weld joints between advanced martensitic steel T92 and Ni-base weld metal. The joints were treated with two different post-weld heat treatments and tested. For the creep, tensile, and Charpy impact tests, the samples with interfacially located notch were used. Moreover long term aging at 625 °C was applied before the tensile and notch toughness tests. Decohesion fractures ran along carbides at the T92 BM/WM interfaces in case of the modified PWHT, whereas type IV cracking was the prevailing failure mechanism after the classical PWHT in the creep test. In the notch tensile and Charpy impact tests, with the notch at T92 base metal/weld metal interface, fractures ran along the interface with a hard phase on the fracture surface along with the ductile dimple and brittle quasi-cleavage fracture. The phase identified as niobium boride (either NbB and/or Nb3B2) was produced during welding at the end of the solidification process. It was found in the welds regardless of the post-weld heat treatment and long-term aging.

  12. Thermal Recovery of Plastic Deformation in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Dongxiao; Yu, Xinghua; Zhang, Wei; Crooker, Paul; David, Stan A.; Feng, Zhili

    2014-05-23

    Stainless steel has been widely used in challenging environments typical to nuclear power plant structures, due its excellent corrosion resistance. Nickel filler metals containing high chromium concentration, including Alloy 82/182, are used for joining stainless steel to carbon steel components to achieve similar high resistance to stress corrosion cracking. However, the joint usually experience weld metal stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which affects the safety and structural integrity of light water nuclear reactor systems. A primary driving force for SCC is the high tensile residual stress in these welds. Due to large dimension of pressure vessel and limitations in the field, non-destructive residual stress measurement is difficult. As a result, finite element modeling has been the de facto method to evaluate the weld residual stresses. Recent studies on this subject from researchers worldwide report different residual stress value in the weldments [5]. The discrepancy is due to the fact that most of investigations ignore or underestimate the thermal recovery in the heat-affect zone or reheated region in the weld. In this paper, the effect of heat treatment on thermal recovery and microhardness is investigated for materials used in dissimilar metal joint. It is found that high equivalent plastic strains are predominately accumulated in the buttering layer, the root pass, and the heat affected zone, which experience multiple welding thermal cycles. The final cap passes, experiencing only one or two welding thermal cycles, exhibit less plastic strain accumulation. Moreover, the experimental residual plastic strains are compared with those predicted using an existing weld thermo-mechanical model with two different strain hardening rules. The importance of considering the dynamic strain hardening recovery due to high temperature exposure in welding is discussed for the accurate simulation of weld residual stresses and plastic strains. In conclsuion, the

  13. Electrical upsetting of metal sheet forms weld edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherba, E. S.

    1966-01-01

    Electric gathering of sheet stock edges forms metal sheets in the shape of gore sections with heavier edge areas that can be welded without loss of strength. The edges are gathered by progressive resistance heating and upsetting, and are formed automatically. This process avoids disturbance of the metals internal structure.

  14. Effects of flux composition on the element transfer and mechanical properties of weld metal in submerged arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Kook-soo; Park, Chan; Jung, Hong-chul; Lee, Jong-bong

    2009-06-01

    Submerged arc welding was performed using metal-cored wires and fluxes with different compositions. The effects of wire/flux combination on the chemical composition, tensile strength, and impact toughness of the weld metal were investigated and interpreted in terms of element transfer between the slag and the weld metal, i.e., Δ quantity. Both carbon and manganese show negative Δ quantity in most combinations, indicating the transfer of the elements from the weld metal to the slag during welding. The amount of transfer, however, is different depending on the flux composition. More basic fluxes yield less negative Δ C and Δ Mn through the reduction of oxygen content in the weld metal and presumably higher Mn activity in the slag, respectively. The transfer of silicon, however, is influenced by Al2O3, TiO2 and ZrO2 contents in the flux. Δ Si becomes less negative and reaches a positive value of 0.044 as the oxides contents increase. This is because Al, Ti, and Zr could replace Si in the SiO2 network, leaving more Si free to transfer from the slag to the weld metal. Accordingly, the Pcm index of weld metals calculated from chemical compositions varies from 0.153 to 0.196 depending on the wire/flux combination, and it almost has a linear relationship with the tensile strength of the weld metal.

  15. Electrochemical transport of manganese between the flux and the weld metal in submerged arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Indacochea, J.E.; Blander, M.; Polar, A.

    1989-01-01

    Submerged arc welds were made using a SiO/sub 2/-CaO-CaF/sub 2/MnO flux containing 20 w/o MnO, 15 w/o CaF/sub 2/, and SiO/sub 2/ to CaO ratios that varied from 5.5 to 1.17; the slags formed from this flux system show good detachability and the welds produced have good bead morphology. The effect of dilution was eliminated by drawing the filler metal from the same material as the base plate. The welding parameters were the same for all welds and two polarities were used. The stability of the arc was also monitored and found to be stable, but more so for the reverse polarity welds. Chemical analyses were performed on flux, slag, and weld samples. The manganese content in the weld metal increases for all the fluxes, with the increases being larger the smaller the silica to calcium oxide ratio. This behavior can be explained by thermodynamically driven kinetic factors since, in this composition range, the activity of the manganese oxide increases with a decrease in the SiO/sub 2//CaO ratio. When the SiO/sub 2//CaO ratio is smaller than about 2.25, the manganese content in the welds made with reverse polarity is higher than those made with straight polarity. This difference in the manganese level is explained in terms of an electrochemical mechanism. 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. A theoretical model for gas metal arc welding and gas tungsten arc welding. I.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidar, J.

    1998-10-01

    A recently developed theory for predicting arc and electrode properties in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) has been generalized to include arc-electrode interfaces, variation of surface tension pressure with temperature, Marangoni forces and handling of weld pool development in stationary gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). The new theory is a unified treatment of the arc, the anode, and the cathode, and includes a detailed account of sheath effects near the electrodes. The electrodes are included as dynamic entities and the volume of fluid method is used to handle the movement of the free surface of the molten metal at one electrode. Predictions can be made of the formation and shape of the welding droplets as a function of time in GMAW and also of weld pool development in GTAW, accounting for effects of surface tension, inertia, gravity, arc pressure, viscous drag force of the plasma, Marangoni effect and magnetic forces, and also for wire feed rate in GMAW. Calculations are made of current densities, electric potential, temperatures, pressures and velocities in two dimensions, both in the arc and also within the molten metal and solid electrodes. Calculations are presented for GMAW and GTAW for an arc in argon and the results are compared with experimental temperature measurements for the plasma and the electrodes.

  17. Optimization of Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Khurana, M. K.; Yadav, Pradeep K.

    2016-09-01

    This study presents the application of Taguchi method combined with grey relational analysis to optimize the process parameters of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of AISI 1020 carbon steels for multiple quality characteristics (bead width, bead height, weld penetration and heat affected zone). An orthogonal array of L9 has been implemented to fabrication of joints. The experiments have been conducted according to the combination of voltage (V), current (A) and welding speed (Ws). The results revealed that the welding speed is most significant process parameter. By analyzing the grey relational grades, optimal parameters are obtained and significant factors are known using ANOVA analysis. The welding parameters such as speed, welding current and voltage have been optimized for material AISI 1020 using GMAW process. To fortify the robustness of experimental design, a confirmation test was performed at selected optimal process parameter setting. Observations from this method may be useful for automotive sub-assemblies, shipbuilding and vessel fabricators and operators to obtain optimal welding conditions.

  18. Influence of zirconium on microstructure and toughness of low-alloy steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade, V. B.; Mello, R. S. T.; Payão, J. C.; Paranhos, R. P. R.

    2006-06-01

    The influence of zirconium on microstructure and toughness of low-alloy steel weld metal was studied. Weld metals with different zirconium contents were obtained adding iron-zirconium alloy in the welding flux formulation. Weld metal chemical composition proved that zirconium was able to be transferred from the flux to the weld metal. The addition of zirconium refined the weld metal microstructure, increasing the acicular ferrite content. Weld metal toughness, determined by means of impact Charpy-V tests, showed that the zirconium addition is beneficial up to a content of 0.005 wt.%. Above this level, zirconium was not able to produce further microstructure refinement, although the toughness was reduced, possibly due to the formation of microconstituent such as the martensite-austenite constituent (M-A), which is considered to be deleterious to the weld metal toughness.

  19. Influence of PWHT on Toughness of High Chromium and Nickel Containing Martensitic Stainless Steel Weld Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Mahadevan, S.; Albert, S. K.; Pandian, R.; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-06-01

    Commonly used 12.5Cr-5Ni consumable specified for welding of martensitic stainless steels is compared with newly designed 14.5Cr-5Ni consumable in terms of their suitability for repair welding of 410 and 414 stainless steels by gas tungsten arc welding process. Changes in microstructure and austenite evolution were investigated using optical, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction techniques and Thermo-Calc studies. Microstructure of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed only lath martensite, whereas as-welded 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed delta-ferrite, retained austenite, and lath martensite. Toughness value of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal is found to be significantly higher (216 J) than that of the 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal (15 J). The welds were subjected to different PWHTs: one at 923 K (650 °C) for 1, 2, 4 hours (single-stage PWHT) and another one at 923 K (650 °C)/4 h followed by 873 K (600 °C)/2 h or 873 K (600 °C)/4 h (two-stage heat treatment). Hardness and impact toughness of the weld metals were measured for these weld metals and correlated with the microstructure. The study demonstrates the importance of avoiding formation of delta-ferrite in the weld metal.

  20. Slag-metal equilibrium during submerged arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, C. S.; Eagar, T. W.

    1981-09-01

    A thermodynamic model of the equilibria existing between the slag and the weld metal during submerged arc welding is presented. As formulated, the model applies only to fused neutral fluxes containing less than 20 pct CaF2, however some results indicate that the model may be useful in more general cases as well. The model is shown to be capable of predicting the gain or loss of both Mn and Si over a wide range of baseplate, electrode and flux compositions. At large deviations from the predicted equilibrium, the experimental results indicate considerable variability in the amount of Mn or Si transferred between the slag and metal phases, while closer to the calculated equilibrium, the extent of metal transfer becomes more predictable. The variability in metal transfer rate at large deviations from equilibrium may be explained by variations between the bulk and the surface concentrations of Mn and Si in both metal and slag phases.

  1. Effect of rhenium on the structure and properties of the weld metal of a molybdenum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyachenko, V. V.; Morozov, B. P.; Tylkina, M. A.; Savitskiy, Y. M.; Nikishanov, V. V.

    1984-01-01

    The structure and properties of welds made in molybdenum alloy VM-1 as a function of rhenium concentrations in the weld metal were studied. Rhenium was introduced into the weld using rhenium wire and tape or wires of Mo-47Re and Mo-52Re alloys. The properties of the weld metal were studied by means of metallographic techniques, electron microscopy, X-ray analysis, and autoradiography. The plasticity of the weld metal sharply was found to increase with increasing concentration of rhenium up to 50%. During welding, a decarburization process was observed which was more pronounced at higher concentrations of rhenium.

  2. Bonds between metals and nanocomposites created by explosion welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar', M. P.; Karpov, E. V.; Lukyanov, Ya. L.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the study of the influence of a microstructure characterized by directed or chaotic distribution of nanoinclusions and strain rate on the deformability of nanocomposites. It is revealed that, under identical loading conditions, cracks are formed in nanocomposites whose structural elements are mostly directed in the same way at lower strain rates than in nanocomposites with chaotic distribution of the reinforcer. It is shown that, as the strain rate increases, the influence of the structural order on the limiting deformation reduces due to transition from shear strain to rotational strain. No cracks are formed in the creation of bonds between metals and nanocomposites by explosion welding. The experimental results obtained in the study of transverse bending of two-layer welded beams and the structure in the vicinity of the weld reveal that the obtained metal-nanocomposite bond has a uniform structure retained in deformation, with fracture occurring in the nanocomposite.

  3. Gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of chromium-nickel steel. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-303-ASME-3 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of 300 Series Cr-Ni steels (P-8-1), in thickness range 0.25 to 2 in.; filler metals are ER3XX (F-6, A-8) (GTAW) and E3XX-15 (F-5, A-8); shielding gas for GTAW is argon.

  4. Gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of AISI 41XX steels. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-127 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of AISI 4130 and 4142 steels (ASTM A519) (P-No: None), 0.438-in. wall pipe; filler metal is AMS 6457, Class 4130 MC (F-, A-No; None) (GTAW) and E8018-B2L (F-4, A-3) (GMAW); shielding gas is argon (GTAW).

  5. Gas tungsten arc and low hydrogen shielded metal arc welding of carbon steel. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-128-ASME-1 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc and low hydrogen shielded metal arc welding of carbon steels (P-1-1), in thickness range 0.25 to 2 inch; filler metals are ER70S-3 (F-6, A-1) (GTAW) and E7018 (F-4, A-1); shielding gas is argon (GTAW).

  6. Manual gas tungsten arc and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of carbon steel. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-107-ASME-1 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Vessel Code for manual gas tungsten arc and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of carbon steel (P-1-1), in thickness range 0.237 to 2.0 inch; filler metal is ER70S-3 (F-6, A-1); shielding gas for GTAW is argon, and for GMAW is 95-5 argon-oxygen.

  7. Welding procedure specification: gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-104-ASME-2 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of carbon steels (P-1-1), in thickness range 0.25 to 1 in.; filler metals are E70S-3 (F-6, A-1) (GTAW) and E6010 (F-3, A-1) (SMAW); shielding gas is argon (GTAW).

  8. Gas metal arc welding in refurbishment of cobalt base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriary, M. S.; Miladi Gorji, Y.; Kolagar, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Refurbishments of superalloys which are used in manufacturing gas turbine hot components usually consists of removing cracks and other defects by blending and then repair welding in order to reconstruct damaged area. In this study, the effects of welding parameters on repair of FSX-414 superalloy, as the most applicable cobalt base superalloy in order to manufacture gas turbine nozzles, by use of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) technic were investigated. Results then were compared by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW). Metallographic and SEM studies of the microstructure of the weld and HAZ showed that there are no noticeable defects in the microstructure by use of GMAW. Also, chemical analysis and morphologies of carbide in both methods are similar. Hardness profile of the GM AW structure then also compared with GTAW and no noticeable difference was observed between the profiles. Also, proper tensile properties, compared with GTAW, can be achieved by use of optimum parameters that can be obtained by examining the current and welding speed. Tensile properties of optimized condition of the GMAW then were compared with GTAW. It was seen that the room and high temperature tensile properties of the GMAW structure is very similar and results confirmed that changing the technic did not have any significant influence on the properties.

  9. Career Preparation Program Curriculum Guide for: Metal Fabrication, Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria. Curriculum Development Branch.

    This curriculum outline provides secondary and postsecondary instructors with detailed information on student learning outcomes for completion of the welding/metal fabrication program requirements. A program overview discusses the aims of education; secondary school philosophy; and career preparation programs and their goals, organization, and…

  10. Analysis of thermal stresses and metal movement during welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraki, T.; Masubuchi, K.

    1973-01-01

    The research is reported concerning the development of a system of mathematical solutions and computer programs for one- and two-dimensional analyses for thermal stresses. Reports presented include: the investigation of thermal stress and buckling of tantalum and columbium sheet; and analysis of two dimensional thermal strains and metal movement during welding.

  11. The effect of weld stresses on weld quality. [stress fields and metal cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chihoski, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A narrow heat source raises the temperature of a spot on a solid piece of material like metal. The high temperature of the spot decreases with distance from the spot. This is true whether the heat source is an arc, a flame, an electron beam, a plasma jet, a laser beam, or any other source of intense, narrowly defined heat. Stress and strain fields around a moving heat source are organized into a coherent visible system. It is shown that five stresses act across the weld line in turn as an arc passes. Their proportions and positions are considerably altered by weld parameters or condition changes. These pushes and pulls affect the metallurgical character and integrity of the weld area even when there is no apparent difference between after-the-fact examples.

  12. Slag Metal Reactions during Submerged Arc Welding of Alloy Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, U.; Eagar, T. W.

    1984-01-01

    The transfer of Cr, Si, Mn, P, S, C, Ni, and Mo between the slag and the weld pool has been studied for submerged arc welds made with calcium silicate and manganese silicate fluxes. The results show a strong interaction between Cr and Si transfer but no interaction with Mn. The manganese silicate flux produces lower residual sulfur while the calcium silicate fluxes are more effective for removal of phosphorus. The effective oxygen reaction temperature lies between 1700 and 2000 °C for all elements studied. Evidence of Cr and Mn loss by metal vaporization is also presented.

  13. Shielded Metal Arc Welding Consumables for Advanced High Strength Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    100 ksi) depends on the availability of adequate welding consumables. In the case of shielded metal arc welding, the electrodes must provide...associated with the potassium silicate binder (K2 SiO3 .nH2 0). The fluxes were then crushed and sized to 14# Tyler mesh (1.7 mm screen aperture) to...determined that the hydrated potassium silicate binder (K2 SiO3 .nH20) used in this investi- gation was 50 wt. pct. potassium silicate (K 2SiO 3 ) and

  14. Stability of a pendant droplet in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, P.E.

    1998-07-01

    The authors develop a model of metal transfer in gas metal arc welding and compute the critical mass of a pendant droplet in order to ascertain the size and frequency of droplets detaching from the consumable metal electrode. These results are used to predict the mode of metal transfer for a range of voltage and current encompassing free flight transfer, and the transition between globular and spray transfer. This model includes an efficient method to compute the stability of a pendant droplet and the location of the liquid bridge connecting the primary droplet and the residual liquid remaining after detachment of the primary droplet.

  15. Control of Structure in Conventional Friction Stir Welds Through a Kinematic Theory of Metal Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    suggested a “chaotic-dynamic mixing” in the material [2]. Later tracer studies, using steel shot [3], aluminum shims [4], copper foil [5], bi-metallic...35812 Keywords: friction stir welding, AA2219, material flow Abstract In friction stir welding ( FSW ), a rotating pin is translated along a...welding, by a shoulder on the pin. In conventional FSW , the weld metal rests on an “anvil”, which supports the heavy “plunge” load on the tool. In

  16. Development of an Ultralight Pulse Gas Metal ARC Welding System for Shipyard Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-27

    out aboard ship using the shielded metal arc welding ( SMAW ) process (“stick” welding). This manual process is relatively slow, discharges...using the shielded metal arc welding ( SMAW ) process (“stick” welding). This manual process is relatively slow, discharges considerable fume...process. However, in most cases it is only necessary to bring a single cable lead with no power supply to the job area, which makes the SMAW process

  17. Multiple exposure to metals in eight types of welding.

    PubMed

    Apostoli, P; Porru, S; Brunelli, E; Alessio, L

    1997-01-01

    This article evaluates multiple exposures to metals in different types of metal welding such as manual metal arc for mild and stainless steel, continuous wire, submerged arc, laser and brazing. Environmental monitoring was carried out in eight different occupational situations and the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry technique was adopted in order to characterize exposure to several elements simultaneously and with high accuracy. The results showed that up to 23 elements could be measured. The highest concentrations were found for Al, Mn, Fr, Ni, Cr, Cu and Zn. For some elements such as In, Nd, I, Rb the concentrations were very low. A qualitative and quantitative variation in fume composition was observed at a certain distance from the welding point, which should be to taken into account when evaluating indirect exposures. It would also be possible, with this technique, to identify specific elements in the mixture which could also be measured in biological fluids.

  18. Quantitative metal magnetic memory reliability modeling for welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Haiyan; Dang, Yongbin; Wang, Ben; Leng, Jiancheng

    2016-03-01

    Metal magnetic memory(MMM) testing has been widely used to detect welded joints. However, load levels, environmental magnetic field, and measurement noises make the MMM data dispersive and bring difficulty to quantitative evaluation. In order to promote the development of quantitative MMM reliability assessment, a new MMM model is presented for welded joints. Steel Q235 welded specimens are tested along the longitudinal and horizontal lines by TSC-2M-8 instrument in the tensile fatigue experiments. The X-ray testing is carried out synchronously to verify the MMM results. It is found that MMM testing can detect the hidden crack earlier than X-ray testing. Moreover, the MMM gradient vector sum K vs is sensitive to the damage degree, especially at early and hidden damage stages. Considering the dispersion of MMM data, the K vs statistical law is investigated, which shows that K vs obeys Gaussian distribution. So K vs is the suitable MMM parameter to establish reliability model of welded joints. At last, the original quantitative MMM reliability model is first presented based on the improved stress strength interference theory. It is shown that the reliability degree R gradually decreases with the decreasing of the residual life ratio T, and the maximal error between prediction reliability degree R 1 and verification reliability degree R 2 is 9.15%. This presented method provides a novel tool of reliability testing and evaluating in practical engineering for welded joints.

  19. The effects of intermixed weld metal on mechanical properties. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana, M.A.; Johnson, M.Q.

    1999-03-01

    It is common for individual weld joints to be fabricated using a combination of electrode types and welding processes. While this situation arises most often as a result of repair welding, it also can arise due to scheduled fabrication sequencing, which requires a change from one electrode and/or process to another within the same weld joint. When weld metals deriving their properties from different metallurgical mechanisms are intermixed in the same joint, the resulting properties of the combination have caused some concern. This work is the first in a series that examines the intermixing of conventional carbon-manganese weld metals with various self-shielded flux cored arc weld metals. In this case, two different shielded metal arc weld metals are combined with various self-shielded flux cored arc weld metals. The effects of dilution from the underlying self-shielded flux cored root layers on the mechanical properties of shielded metal arc weld metal are examined. Variations in both tensile and Charpy V-notch impact properties have been documented. The effect on tensile results is limited to relatively minor changes in ductility. Reductions in Charpy V-notch impact energies were noted in all cases. The results are evaluated in terms of the chemical composition gradients and weld microstructure variations that result from dilution. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  20. Microstructure, Texture, and Mechanical Property Analysis of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Saptarshi; Mukherjee, Manidipto; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-03-01

    The present study elaborately explains the effect of welding parameters on the microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties of gas metal arc welded AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel sheet (as received) of 4 mm thickness. The welded joints were prepared by varying welding speed (WS) and current simultaneously at a fixed heat input level using a 1.2-mm-diameter austenitic filler metal (AISI 316L). The overall purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the variation of welding conditions on: (i) Microstructural constituents using optical microscope and transmission electron microscope; (ii) Micro-texture evolution, misorientation distributions, and grain boundaries at welded regions by measuring the orientation data from electron back scattered diffraction; and (iii) Mechanical properties such as hardness and tensile strength, and their correlation with the microstructure and texture. It has been observed that the higher WS along with the higher welding current (weld metal W1) can enhance weld metal mechanical properties through alternation in microstructure and texture of the weld metal. Higher δ-ferrite formation and high-angle boundaries along with the <101> + <001> grain growth direction of the weld metal W1 were responsible for dislocation pile-ups, SFs, deformation twinning, and the induced martensite with consequent strain hardening during tensile deformation. Also, fusion boundary being the weakest link in the welded structure, failure took place mainly at this region.

  1. Contribution of precipitate on migrated grain boundaries to ductility-dip cracking in Alloy 625 weld joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Jin; Kim, Youn Soo; Shin, Yong Taek; Jeon, Eon Chan; Lee, Sang Hwa; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Lee, Sung Keun; Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Hae Woo

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the crack properties in Alloy 625 weld metals and their characteristics using experimentally designed filler wires fabricated by varying the niobium and manganese contents in the flux with the shield metal arc welding (SMAW) process. The fast diffusivity of niobium on the migrated grain boundary (MGB) under strong restraint tensile stress, which was induced by the hardened matrix in weld metal containing high niobium and manganese, accelerated the growth of niobium carbide (NbC) in multipass deposits. Coalescence of microvoids along with incoherent NbC and further propagation induced ductility-dip cracking (DDC) on MGB.

  2. Microstructure and Phase Composition of a Low-Power YAG Laser-MAG Welded Stainless Steel Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R. S.; Kang, L.; Ma, X.

    2008-12-01

    This article presents multipass hybrid welding of austenitic stainless steel (ASS) structure by using the low-power Nd:YAG laser-metal active gas (MAG) arc hybrid welding method. The purpose of this work is to investigate and qualify the effects of multipass hybrid welding of ASS structure on the microstructure, phase composition, weld postheat influence, and weld bead (WB) precipitated phase. The results demonstrated that sound welded joints without any solidification and shrinkage defects could be obtained after welding. The top and the bottom portions of the workpieces were joined completely. At room temperature, the microstructures of different regions in WB were different and the WB microstructures were composed of columnar γ-austenite and δ-ferrite phases. The fraction of δ-ferrite decreased from 20% to 10%, and its morphology changed orderly from lath, skeleton, vermicular to reticular with an increase in the number of welding cycles. Because of the influence of postweld heat, the weld metal phase chemistry at 3 mm distance from the top of the WB surface underwent a notable modification that corresponded to an evolution of the partition coefficients toward the parent metal values. This indicated corrosion resistance of the microstructure is equivalent to that of the parent metal.

  3. Optimization of Laser Keyhole Welding Strategies of Dissimilar Metals by FEM Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Navas, Virginia; Leunda, Josu; Lambarri, Jon; Sanz, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    Laser keyhole welding of dissimilar metals has been simulated to study the effect of welding strategies (laser beam displacements and tilts) and combination of metals to be welded on final quality of the joints. Molten pool geometry and welding penetration have been studied but special attention has been paid to final joint material properties, such as microstructure/phases and hardness, and especially to the residual stress state because it greatly conditions the service life of laser-welded components. For a fixed strategy (laser beam perpendicular to the joint) austenitic to carbon steel laser welding leads to residual stresses at the joint area very similar to those obtained in austenitic to martensitic steel welding, but welding of steel to Inconel 718 results in steeper residual stress gradients and higher area at the joint with detrimental tensile stresses. Therefore, when the difference in thermo-mechanical properties of the metals to be welded is higher, the stress state generated is more detrimental for the service life of the component, and consequently more relevant is the optimization of welding strategy. In laser keyhole welding of austenitic to martensitic stainless steel and austenitic to carbon steel, the optimum welding strategy is displacing the laser beam 1 mm toward the austenitic steel. In the case of austenitic steel to Inconel welding, the optimum welding strategy consists in setting the heat source tilted 45 deg and moved 2 mm toward the austenitic steel.

  4. Mathematical Modeling of Optical Radiation Emission as a Function of Welding Power during Gas Shielded Metal Arc Welding.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Stefan; Janßen, Marco; Schmitz, Martin; Ott, Günter

    2017-11-01

    Arc welding is accompanied by intense optical radiation emission that can be detrimental not only for the welder himself but also for people working nearby or for passersby. Technological progress advances continuously in the field of joining, so an up-to-date radiation database is necessary. Additionally, many literature irradiance data have been measured for a few welding currents or for parts of the optical spectral region only. Within this paper, a comprehensive study of contemporary metal active gas, metal inert gas, and cold metal transfer welding is presented covering optical radiation emission from 200 up to 2,700 nm by means of (spectro-) radiometric measurements. The investigated welding currents range from 70 to 350 A, reflecting values usually applied in industry. Based upon these new irradiance data, three mathematical models were derived in order to describe optical radiation emission as a function of welding power. The linear, exponential, and sigmoidal emission models depend on the process variant (standard or pulsed) as well as on the welding material (mild and stainless steel, aluminum). In conjunction with the corresponding exposure limit values for incoherent optical radiation maximum permissible exposure durations were calculated as a function of welding power. Typical times are shorter than 1 s for the ultraviolet spectral region and range from 1 to 10 s for visible radiation. For the infrared regime, exposure durations are of the order of minutes to hours. Finally, a validation of the metal active gas emission models was carried out with manual arc welding.

  5. Influence of macrostructure on tensile properties of multipass SAW C-Mn steel deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongyuth, P.; Ghosh, P. K.; Gupta, P. C.; Patwardhan, A. K.; Prakash, Satya

    1993-06-01

    Blocks of 'all weld' metal were prepared by a multipass submerged arc process, using a C-Mn filler wire, at different welding currents and speeds by keeping the arc voltage constant. The variation in welding parameters was found to alter the macrostructure primarily by influencing its co-axial dendrite content. The chemical composition and hardness of the dendritic and the heat affected regions were affected little by the welding parameters. A dendrite content up to 37%, had no significant effect on the tensile properties. However an increase in it beyond 37% was found to enhance the UTS and YS and reduce percent elongation. The tensile strength was found to be a maximum in the L orientation and a minimum in the S direction. The use of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 873 K caused spheroidization of cementite there by somewhat reducing the hardness and strength. The treatment while not affecting the basic dendritic morphology reduced the observed difference in tensile properties along the L, T and S directions. Implications of the data vis-a-vis industrial applications have been discussed.

  6. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Shiju; Das, C. R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-12-01

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  7. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  8. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  9. Fractal Analysis of Metal Transfer in Mig/mag Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, A. P.; Vasconcelos, H. H. M.; Gonçalves, L. L.; de Miranda, H. C.

    2009-03-01

    We apply techniques of fractal analysis in order to classify metal-transfer mode in MIG/MAG (metal inert/active gas) welding, which are among the most commonly employed arc-fusion processes for industrial applications. We work with voltage and current time series obtained during welding, and evaluate statistical fluctuations present in those series by Hurst, detrended-fluctuation, and detrended-cross-correlation analyses, for each of three different metal-transfer modes: short-circuiting, globular, and spray. For a given total timespan of each series, curves of fluctuation as a funtion of the time-window size are processed by using pattern-classification techniques, such as principal-component analysis and Karhunen-Loève expansions. We obtain near 100% success rate for the classification, with timespans as small as 100 miliseconds, with a processing time of the same order. This suggests that our set of tools can be incorporated into an industrial welding apparatus in order to guarantee automatic correction of a process requiring a single metal-transfer mode.

  10. TEM Observation of Martensite Layer at the Weld Interface of an A508III to Inconel 82 Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. R.; Lu, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    A lenticular martensite layer at the weld interface in an A508III/Inconel 82 dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joint was studied by TEM. The martensite/weld metal boundary was observed as the fusion boundary. There was a K-S orientation relationship between martensite and weld metal. The formation of the martensite was mainly determined by the distribution of alloy elements. The martensite was responsible for the hardness peak in the DMW.

  11. Approximate entropy—a new statistic to quantify arc and welding process stability in short-circuiting gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Biao; Xiang, Yuan-Peng; Lü, Xiao-Qing; Zeng, Min; Huang, Shi-Sheng

    2008-03-01

    Based on the phase state reconstruction of welding current in short-circuiting gas metal arc welding using carbon dioxide as shielding gas, the approximate entropy of welding current as well as its standard deviation has been calculated and analysed to investigate their relation with the stability of electric arc and welding process. The extensive experimental and calculated results show that the approximate entropy of welding current is significantly and positively correlated with arc and welding process stability, whereas its standard deviation is correlated with them negatively. A larger approximate entropy and a smaller standard deviation imply a more stable arc and welding process, and vice versa. As a result, the approximate entropy of welding current promises well in assessing and quantifying the stability of electric arc and welding process in short-circuiting gas metal arc welding.

  12. Control of Structure in Conventional Friction Stir Welds through a Kinematic Theory of Metal Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubisoff, H.A.; Schneider, J.A.; Nunes, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating pin is translated along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. Metal is prevented from flowing up the pin, which would result in plowing/cutting instead of welding, by a shoulder on the pin. In conventional FSW, the weld metal rests on an "anvil", which supports the heavy "plunge" load on the tool. In this study, both embedded tungsten wires along and copper plating on the faying surfaces were used to trace the flow of AA2219 weld metal around the C-FSW tool. The effect of tool rotational speed, travel speed, plunge load, and pin thread pitch on the resulting weld metal flow was evaluated. Plan, longitudinal, and transverse section x-ray radiographs were examined to trace the metal flow paths. The results are interpreted in terms of a kinematic theory of metal flow in FSW.

  13. Effect of Welding Current on the Structure and Properties of Resistance Spot Welded Dissimilar (Austenitic Stainless Steel and Low Carbon Steel) Metal Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawon, M. R. A.; Gulshan, F.; Kurny, A. S. W.

    2015-04-01

    1.5 mm thick sheet metal coupons of austenitic stainless steel and plain low carbon steel were welded by resistance spot welding technique. The effects of welding current in the range 3-9 kA on the structure and mechanical properties of welded joint were investigated. The structure was studied by macroscopic, microscopic and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Mechanical properties were determined by tensile testing and microhardness measurements. Asymmetrical shape weld nugget was found to have formed in the welded joint which increased in size with an increase in welding current. The fusion zone showed cast structure with coarse columnar grain and dendritic with excess delta ferrite in austenitic matrix. Microhardness of the weld nugget was maximum because of martensite formation. An increase in welding current also increased tensile strength of the weld coupon. An attempt has also been made to relate the mode of fracture with the welding current.

  14. Monitoring and Control of the Hybrid Laser-Gas Metal-Arc Welding Process

    SciTech Connect

    Kunerth, D. C.; McJunkin, T. R.; Nichol, C. I.; Clark, D.; Todorov, E.; Couch, R. D.; Yu, F.

    2013-07-01

    Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

  15. The temporal nature of forces acting on metal drops in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.A.; Eagar, T.W.; Lang, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    At moderate and high welding currents, the most important forces in gas metal arc welding acting on the molten electrode are magnetic forces arising from the interaction between the welding current and its own magnetic field. These forces drive the dynamic evolution of the drop and also depend on the instantaneous shape of the drop. In this paper, experimentally observed manifestations of magnetic forces are shown, and a technique for approximating the temporal evolution of these forces from experimentally measured drop shapes is reported. The technique provides quantitative data illustrating the large increase in the magnetic forces as a drop detaches from the electrode.

  16. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T.; Burgardt, P.

    2011-04-15

    During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

  17. Ultrasonic metal welding with a vibration source using longitudinal and torsional vibration transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Takuya; Tamada, Yosuke; Higuchi, Yusuke; Miura, Hikaru

    2017-07-01

    Conventional ultrasonic metal welding for joining dissimilar metals uses a linear vibration locus, although this method suffers from problems such as low overall weld strength. Our previous studies have shown that ultrasonic welding with a planar vibration locus improves the weld strength. However, the vibration source in our previous studies had problems in longitudinal-torsional vibration controllability and small welding tip. Therefore, the study of the optimal shape of the vibration locus was difficult. Furthermore, improvement of weld strength cannot be expected. We have developed a new ultrasonic vibration source that can control the longitudinal-torsional vibration and can connect to a large welding tip. In this study, we clarified the longitudinal-torsional vibration controllability of the developed ultrasonic vibration source. Moreover, we clarified that using the planar locus of the developed vibration source produced a higher weld strength than our previous studies, and clarified the optimal shape of the vibration locus.

  18. Elements of arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This paper looks at the following arc welding techniques: (1) shielded metal-arc welding; (2) submerged-arc welding; (3) gas metal-arc welding; (4) flux-cored arc welding; (5) electrogas welding; (6) gas tungsten-arc welding; and (7) plasma-arc welding.

  19. Friction welded nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for electrolytic production of metals and silicon

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Stephen C.; Ray, Siba P.; Rapp, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor and a ceramic electrode body connected by a friction weld between a portion of the body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect such a friction weld and a portion of the metal conductor.

  20. Comparison of microstructure and mechanical properties of ultra-narrow gap laser and gas-metal-arc welded S960 high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Li, Lin; Dong, Shiyun; Crowther, Dave; Thompson, Alan

    2017-04-01

    The microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties, including micro-hardness, tensile properties, three-point bending properties and Charpy impact toughness at different test temperatures of 8 mm thick S960 high strength steel plates were investigated following their joining by multi-pass ultra-narrow gap laser welding (NGLW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) techniques. It was found that the microstructure in the fusion zone (FZ) for the ultra-NGLW joint was predominantly martensite mixed with some tempered martensite, while the FZ for the GMAW joint was mainly consisted of ferrite with some martensite. The strength of the ultra-NGLW specimens was comparable to that of the base material (BM), with all welded specimens failed in the BM in the tensile tests. The tensile strength of the GMAW specimens was reduced approximately by 100 MPa when compared with the base material by a broad and soft heat affected zone (HAZ) with failure located in the soft HAZ. Both the ultra-NGLW and GMAW specimens performed well in three-point bending tests. The GMAW joints exhibited better impact toughness than the ultra-NGLW joints.

  1. Effect of Mn Content on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Weld Metal During High Heat Input Welding Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, F. Y.; Shi, M. H.; Wang, P.; Zhu, F. X.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2017-05-01

    To elucidate the effect of Mn content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of weld metal, flux-cored wires with three different Mn contents were prepared to conduct high heat input welding experiments. Complex inclusions and Mn-depleted zones were observed in the weld metal with heat input of 85 kJ/cm. The study indicated that complex inclusions enabled nucleation of acicular ferrite with interlocking structure, leading to enhanced impact toughness. With decrease in Mn content, the number of complex inclusions with Mn-depleted zone and the volume fraction of acicular ferrite were both decreased. Additionally, the impact toughness of weld metal was significantly degraded with lower Mn content present in martensite-austenite (M-A) constituent and bainite.

  2. Metal flow of a tailor-welded blank in deep drawing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qi; Guo, Ruiquan

    2005-01-01

    Tailor welded blanks were used in the automotive industry to consolidate parts, reduce weight, and increase safety. In recent years, this technology was developing rapidly in China. In Chinese car models, tailor welded blanks had been applied in a lot of automobile parts such as rail, door inner, bumper, floor panel, etc. Concerns on the properties of tailor welded blanks had become more and more important for automobile industry. A lot of research had shown that the strength of the welded seam was higher than that of the base metal, such that the weld failure in the aspect of strength was not a critical issue. However, formability of tailor welded blanks in the stamping process was complex. Among them, the metal flow of tailor welded blanks in the stamping process must be investigated thoroughly in order to reduce the scrap rate during the stamping process in automobile factories. In this paper, the behavior of metal flow for tailor welded blanks made by the laser welding process with two types of different thickness combinations were studied in the deep drawing process. Simulations and experiment verification of the movement of weld line for tailor welded blanks were discussed in detail. Results showed that the control on the movement of welded seam during stamping process by taking some measures in the aspect of blank holder was effective.

  3. A comparative evaluation of low-cycle fatigue behavior of type 316LN base metal, 316 weld metal, and 316LN/316 weld joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsan, M.; Sundararaman, D.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Mannan, S. L.

    1995-05-01

    A comparative evaluation of the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of type 316LN base metal, 316 weld metal, and 316LN/316 weld joints was carried out at 773 and 873 K. Total strain-controlled LCF tests were conducted at a constant strain rate of 3 × 10-3 s-1 with strain amplitudes in the range ±0.20 to ±1.0 pct. Weld pads with single V and double V configuration were prepared by the shielded metal-arc welding (SMAW) process using 316 electrodes for weld-metal and weld-joint specimens. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the untested and tested samples were carried out to elucidate the deformation and the fracture behavior. The cyclic stress response of the base metal shows a very rapid hardening to a maximum stress followed by a saturated stress response. Weld metal undergoes a relatively short initial hardening followed by a gradual softening regime. Weld joints exhibit an initial hardening and a subsequent softening regime at all strain amplitudes, except at low strain amplitudes where a saturation regime is noticed. The initial hardening observed in base metal has been attributed to interaction between dislocations and solute atoms/complexes and cyclic saturation to saturation in the number density of slip bands. From TEM, the cyclic softening in weld metal was ascribed to the annihilation of dislocations during LCF. Type 316LN base metal exhibits better fatigue resistance than weld metal at 773 K, whereas the reverse holds true at 873 K. The weld joint shows the lowest life at both temperatures. The better fatigue resistance of weld metal is related to the brittle transformed delta ferrite structure and the high density of dislocations at the interface, which inhibits the growth rate of cracks by deflecting the crack path. The lower fatigue endurance of the weld joint was ascribed to the shortening of the crack initiation phase caused by surface intergranular crack initiation and to the poor

  4. Effect of PTA Hardfaced Interlayer Thickness on Ballistic Performance of Shielded Metal Arc Welded Armor Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, M.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2013-03-01

    Ballistic performance of armor steel welds is very poor due to the usage of low strength and low hardness austenitic stainless steel fillers, which are traditionally used to avoid hydrogen induced cracking. In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to study the effect of plasma transferred arc hardfaced interlayer thickness on ballistic performance of shielded metal arc welded armor steel weldments. The usefulness of austenitic stainless steel buttering layer on the armor grade quenched and tempered steel base metal was also considered in this study. Joints were fabricated using three different thickness (4, 5.5, and 7 mm) hardfaced middle layer by plasma transferred arc hardfacing process between the top and bottom layers of austenitic stainless steel using shielded metal arc welding process. Sandwiched joint, in addition with the buttering layer served the dual purpose of weld integrity and ballistic immunity due to the high hardness of hardfacing alloy and the energy absorbing capacity of soft backing weld deposits. This paper will provide some insight into the usefulness of austenitic stainless steel buttering layer on the weld integrity and plasma transferred arc hardfacing layer on ballistic performance enhancement of armor steel welds.

  5. Hybrid/Tandem Laser-Arc Welding of Thick Low Carbon Martensitic Stainless Steel Plates =

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh

    High efficiency and long-term life of hydraulic turbines and their assemblies are of utmost importance for the hydropower industry. Usually, hydroelectric turbine components are made of thick-walled low carbon martensitic stainless steels. The assembly of large hydroelectric turbine components has been a great challenge. The use of conventional welding processes involves typical large groove design and multi-pass welding to fill the groove which exposes the weld to a high heat input creating relatively large fusion zone and heat affected zone. The newly-developed hybrid/tandem laser-arc welding technique is believed to offer a highly competitive solution to improve the overall hydro-turbine performance by combining the high energy density and fast welding speed of the laser welding technology with the good gap bridging and feeding ability of the gas metal arc welding process to increase the productivity and reduce the consumable material. The main objective of this research work is to understand different challenges appearing during hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) of thick gauge assemblies of low carbon 13%Cr- 4%Ni martensitic stainless steel and find a practical solution by adapting and optimizing this relatively new welding process in order to reduce the number of welding passes necessary to fill the groove gap. The joint integrity was evaluated in terms of microstructure, defects and mechanical properties in both as-welded and post-welded conditions. A special focus was given to the hybrid and tandem laser-arc welding technique for the root pass. Based on the thickness of the low carbon martensitic stainless steel plates, this work is mainly focused on the following two tasks: • Single pass hybrid laser-arc welding of 10-mm thick low carbon martensitic stainless steel. • Multi-pass hybrid/tandem laser-arc welding of 25-mm thick martensitic stainless steel.

  6. A model-based approach to intelligent control of gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.; Carlson, N.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses work on a model-based intelligent process controller for gas metal arc welding. Four sensors input to a neural network, which communicates to a reference model-based adaptive controller that controls process parameters. Reference model derivation and validation are discussed. The state of an arch weld is determined by the composition of the weld and base metal and the weld's thermomechanical history. The composition of the deposited weld metal depends primarily on the amount of filler metal dilution; heat input to the weld, comprising pre-heat and process heat, is the controlling factor in the thermal cycle. Thus, control of the arc welding process should focus on rational specification and in-process control of the heat and mass input to the weld. A control model has been developed in which the governing equations are solved for the process parameters as functions of the desired heat input (in terms of heat input unit weld length) and mass input (in terms of transverse reinforcement area) to the weld. The model includes resistive and arc heating of the electrode wire, characteristics of the welding power supply, and a volumetric heat balance on the electrode material, as well as latent and superheat of the electrode material. Extension of the model to include dynamics of individual droplet transfer events, based on incorporating a nonlinear, lumped parameter droplet analysis, is discussed. A major emphasis has been placed on computational simplicity; model solutions are required at the rate of about 10 Hz during welding. Finally, a process control scheme has been developed for the gas metal arc welding process using the above nonlinear model with a proportional-integral controller with adaptive coefficients to control the weld heat input and reinforcement area independently. Performance of the resulting control method is discussed. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Structures Including Metallic Glass-Based Materials Using Ultrasonic Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Roberts, Scott N. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention fabricate objects including metallic glass-based materials using ultrasonic welding. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes a metallic glass-based material includes: ultrasonically welding at least one ribbon to a surface; where at least one ribbon that is ultrasonically welded to a surface has a thickness of less than approximately 150.mu.m; and where at least one ribbon that is ultrasonically welded to a surface includes a metallic glass-based material.

  8. Initiation and growth of microcracks in high strength steel butt welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Edward

    1993-05-01

    Early tests such as the explosion bulge test created a preference for overmatched welds (welds which are stronger than the base metal) which eventually became codified for many structural applications. While an overmatched system offers advantages such as the shedding of strain to the base plate, it requires the use of expensive fabrication procedures to avoid cracking. Undermatched welding of some high strength steels may offer reductions in welding costs with little sacrifice in weld performance or low cycle fatigue integrity. An experimental study was carried out to observe microcrack initiation and growth of overmatched and undermatched butt welded high strength steel samples using globally elastic low cycle fatigue testing. First, 1 inch thick HY-80 and HY-100 base plates were multipass, spray gas metal arc welded (GMAW) with overmatching and undermatching filler metal using a semiautomatic welding machine. Second, 1/4 inch thick MIL-A-46100 high hardness armor plates (HHA) were manually, two pass spray GMAW welded with two grades of undermatching consumables. Weld reinforcements were removed from all HY specimens and six HHA specimens. All specimens had a crack initiator slit machined in the test section. The specimens were fatigue tested by transverse tensile loading with a 12 to 13 Hz tension-tension profile. The loading range was from 10% to 85% of the tensile strength of the HY steel base plate and HHA weld metal respectively. Crack initiation and propagation was observed in situ using a confocal scanning laser microscope.

  9. Hydrogen-induced cracking along the fusion boundary of dissimilar metal welds

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.D.; Nelson, T.W.; Lippold, J.C.

    1999-02-01

    Presented here are the results from a series of experiments in which dissimilar metals welds were made using the gas tungsten arc welding process with pure argon or argon-6% hydrogen shielding gas. The objective was to determine if cracking near the fusion boundary of dissimilar metal welds could be caused by hydrogen absorbed during welding and to characterize the microstructures in which cracking occurred. Welds consisted of ER308 and ER309LSi austenitic stainless steel and ERNiCr-3-nickel-based filler metals deposited on A36 steel base metal. Cracking was observed in welds made with all three filler metals. A ferrofluid color metallography technique revealed that cracking was confined to regions in the weld metal containing martensite. Microhardness indentations indicated that martensitic regions in which cracking occurred had hardness values from 400 to 550 HV. Cracks did not extend into bulk weld metal with hardness less than 350 HV. Martensite formed near the fusion boundary in all three filler metals due to regions of locally increased base metal dilution.

  10. Metal arc welding and the risk of skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Heltoft, K N; Slagor, R M; Agner, T; Bonde, J P

    2017-08-01

    Arc welding produces the full spectrum of ultraviolet radiation and may be a contributory cause of skin cancer; however, there has been little research into this occupational hazard. The aim of this study is to explore if metal arc welding increases the risk of malignant melanoma and/or basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) on skin areas which may possibly be exposed (neck, head, and upper extremities). A Danish national company-based historic cohort of 4333 male metal arc welders was followed from 1987 through 2012 to identify the risk of skin cancer. An external reference group was established including all Danish skilled and unskilled male workers with similar age distribution. Occupational histories were gathered by questionnaires in 1986 and information about skin cancer diagnoses [BCC, SCC, cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM), and precancerous conditions, actinic keratosis (AK)] were gathered from the Danish Cancer Registry supplemented by the data from the Danish Pathology Register. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated in the follow-up period from 1987 until 2012 using Cox regression analysis and adjusted for baseline data regarding age and social group. The adjusted HR and 95% confidence interval (CI) for skin cancer (all types) were 0.99 (CI 0.94-1.04) for welders. The adjusted HR for AK and BCC located only at neck was 2.49 (CI 1.03-5.99) for welders exposed >20 years (n = 5) and 2.46 (CI 1.02-5.94), respectively, for welders exposed >30 years (n = 5). No statistically significant difference was observed for SCC. The risk of CMM at the neck was also significantly elevated after 30 years of welding, but this is based upon only one exposed case. This study indicates that long-term exposure to metal arc welding may be related to increased risk of BCC and AK located exclusively at the neck. The study provides no support for the hypothesis that welding exposure increases the risk for skin cancer at other locations.

  11. Automatic Submerged ARC Welding With Metal Power Additions to Increase Productivity and Maintain Quality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    Manager of Welding Engineering PROPOSAL WELDING OF CARBON STEEL AND HY80 UTILIZING THE BULK WELDING PROCESS May 9, 1983 PREPARED BY: NEWPORT NEwS...12 joints with carbon steel and 12 with HY80 , utilizing three The joints will requirements of Benefits 1. Deposition times that different size double...of Joint Variations and Deposition Rates Filler Metal/Base Material Chemical Analyses; Carbon Steel /HIS Filler Metal/Base Material Chemical Analyses

  12. The effect of weld metal matching on girth weld performance: Volume III - an ECA analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Denys, R.M.; Martin, J.T.

    1995-02-01

    Modern pipeline standards contain alternative methodologies for determining the acceptable defect size in pipeline welds. Through the use of fracture mechanics and plastic collapse assessments, the mechanical and toughness properties of the defective region relate to the applied stress at the defect and defect geometry. The assumptions made in these methodologies are not always representative of the situation accurring in pipeline girth welds. To determine the effect of the various input parameters on acceptable defect size, The Welding Supervisory Committee of the American Gas Association commenced in 1990, in collaboration with the Laboratorium Soete of the University Gent, Belgium, a series of small scale (Charpy V impact and CTOD) and large scale (fatigue pre-cracked wide plate) tests. All the experimental investigations were intended to evaluate the effects of weld metal mis-match, temperature, defect size, defect type, defect interaction, pipe wall thickness and yield to tensile ratio on girth weld fracture behaviour. The aim of this report was to determine how weld metal yield strength overmatching or undermatching influences girth weld defect size prediction. A further analysis was conducted using the newly revised PD6493:1991 to provide a critical analysis with the objective of explaining the behaviour of the wide plate tests.

  13. The effect of welding parameters on high-strength SMAW all-weld-metal. Part 1: AWS E11018-M

    SciTech Connect

    Vercesi, J.; Surian, E.

    1996-06-01

    Three AWS A5.5-81 all-weld-metal test assemblies were welded with an E110180-M electrode from a standard production batch, varying the welding parameters in such a way as to obtain three energy inputs: high heat input and high interpass temperature (hot), medium heat input and medium interpass temperature (medium) and low heat input and low interpass temperature (cold). Mechanical properties and metallographic studies were performed in the as-welded condition, and it was found that only the tensile properties obtained with the test specimen made with the intermediate energy input satisfied the AWS E11018-M requirements. With the cold specimen, the maximal yield strength was exceeded, and with the hot one, neither the yield nor the tensile minimum strengths were achieved. The elongation and the impact properties were high enough to fulfill the minimal requirements, but the best Charpy-V notch values were obtained with the intermediate energy input. Metallographic studies showed that as the energy input increased the percentage of the columnar zones decreased, the grain size became larger, and in the as-welded zone, there was a little increment of both acicular ferrite and ferrite with second phase, with a consequent decrease of primary ferrite. These results showed that this type of alloy is very sensitive to the welding parameters and that very precise instructions must be given to secure the desired tensile properties in the all-weld-metal test specimens and under actual working conditions.

  14. Sheet metal welding using a pulsed Nd: YAG laser-robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qi; Kullberg, Gunnar; Skoog, Hans

    This paper presents a pulsed Nd: YAG laser-robot system for spot and seam welding of mild steel sheets. The study evaluates the laser beams behaviour for welding, and then investigates pulsed Nd: YAG laser spot and seam welding processes. High pulse power intensity is needed to initiate the key-hole welding process and a threshold pulse energy to reach full penetration. In seam welding, a weld consists of successive overlapping spots. Both high pulse energy and high average power are needed to keep the key-hole welding going. A 70% overlap is used to define overlapping spot welding as seam welding and to optimize process parameters because a high tensile strength joint compatible with the strength of the base material can be obtained when the overlap is ≥ 70%; at the same time a smooth seam with full penetration is obtained. In these cases, the joints in pulsed Nd: YAG laser welding are comparable in strength to those obtained with CO 2 laser welding. Robot positioning and motion accuracies can meet the demands of Nd: YAG laser sheet metal welding, but its cornering accuracy affects the welding processes. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the YAG laser-robot system for production in the automotive industry.

  15. Diffusion welded nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for electrolytic production of metals and silicon

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Stephen C.; Vasudevan, Asuri K.

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor diffusion welded to a portion of a ceramic electrode body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect a metal bond.

  16. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) is issuing for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1279, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates the guide to remove references to outdated......

  17. Occupational asthma due to gas metal arc welding on mild steel.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenplas, O.; Dargent, F.; Auverdin, J. J.; Boulanger, J.; Bossiroy, J. M.; Roosels, D.; Vande Weyer, R.

    1995-01-01

    Occupational asthma has been documented in electric arc welders exposed to manual metal arc welding on stainless steel. A subject is described who developed late and dual asthmatic reactions after occupational-type challenge exposure to gas metal arc welding on uncoated mild steel. PMID:7597679

  18. Numerical investigation of electromagnetic pulse welded interfaces between dissimilar metals

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin

    2016-05-11

    Electromagnetic pulse welding (EMPW), an innovative high-speed joining technique, is a potential method for the automotive industry in joining and assembly of dissimilar lightweight metals with drastically different melting temperatures and other thermal physical properties, such as thermal conductivity and thermal expansion coefficients. The weld quality of EMPW is significantly affected by a variety of interacting physical phenomena including large plastic deformation, materials mixing, localized heating and rapid cooling, possible localized melting and subsequent diffusion and solidification, micro-cracking and void, etc. In the present study, a thermo-mechanically coupled dynamic model has been developed to quantitatively resolve the high-speed impact joining interface characteristics as well as the process-induced interface temperature evolution, defect formation and possible microstructural composition variation. Reasonably good agreement has been obtained between the predicted results and experimental measurements in terms of interfacial morphology characteristics. The modeling framework is expected to provide further understanding of the hierarchical interfacial features of the non-equilibrium material joining process and weld formation mechanisms involved in the EMPW operation, thus accelerating future development and deployment of this advanced joining technology.

  19. Liquid metal expulsion during laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X.; Norris, J. T.; Fuerschbach, P. W.; Roy, T. Deb

    2006-02-01

    During laser spot welding of many metals and alloys, the peak temperatures on the weld pool surface are very high and often exceed the boiling points of materials. In such situations, the equilibrium pressure on the weld pool surface is higher than the atmospheric pressure and the escaping vapour exerts a large recoil force on the weld pool surface. As a consequence, the molten metal may be expelled from the weld pool surface. The liquid metal expulsion has been examined both experimentally and theoretically for the laser spot welding of 304 stainless steel. The ejected metal droplets were collected on the inner surface of an open ended quartz tube which was mounted perpendicular to the sample surface and co-axial with the laser beam. The size range of the ejected particles was determined by examining the interior surface of the tube after the experiments. The temperature distribution, free surface profile of the weld pool and the initiation time for liquid metal expulsion were computed based on a three-dimensional transient heat transfer and fluid flow model. By comparing the vapour recoil force with the surface tension force at the periphery of the liquid pool, the model predicted whether liquid metal expulsion would take place under different welding conditions. Expulsion of the weld metal was also correlated with the depression of the liquid metal in the middle of the weld pool due to the recoil force of the vapourized material. Higher laser power density and longer pulse duration significantly increased liquid metal expulsion during spot welding.

  20. A comparative evaluation of low-cycle fatigue behavior of type 316LN base metal, 316 weld metal, and 316LN/316 weld joint

    SciTech Connect

    Valsan, M.; Sundararaman, D.; Sankara Rao, K.B.; Mannan, S.L.

    1995-05-01

    A comparative evaluation of the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of type 316LN base metal, carried out at 773 and 873 K. Total strain-controlled LCF tests were conducted at a constant strain rate of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} with strain amplitudes in the range {+-}0.20 to {+-}1.0 pct. Weld pads with single V and double V configuration were prepared by the shielded metal-arc welding (SMAW) process using 316 electrodes for weld-metal and weld-joint specimens. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the untested and tested samples were carried out to elucidate the deformation and the fracture behavior. The cyclic stress response of the base metal shows a very rapid hardening to a maximum stress followed by a saturated stress response. Weld metal undergoes a relatively short initial hardening followed by a gradual softening regime. Weld joints exhibit an initial hardening and a subsequent softening regime at all strain amplitudes, except at low strain amplitudes where a saturation regime is noticed. The initial hardening observed in base metal has been attributed to interaction between dislocations and solute atoms/complexes and cyclic saturation to saturation in the number density of slip bands. The 18-8 group of austenitic stainless steels, such as AISI type 316, 304, and their modified grades, finds applications as structural material for various components of the liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR).

  1. Metal cutting analogy for establishing Friction Stir Welding process parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Sylvester Allen

    A friction stir weld (FSW) is a solid state joining operation whose processing parameters are currently determined by lengthy trial and error methods. To implement FSWing rapidly in various applications will require an approach for predicting process parameters based on the physics of the process. Based on hot working conditions for metals, a kinematic model has been proposed for calculating the shear strain and shear strain rates during the FSW process, validation of the proposed model with direct measuring is difficult however. Since the shear strain and shear strain rates predicted for the FSW process, are similar to those predicted in metal cutting, validation of the FSW algorithms with microstructural studies of metal chips may be possible leading to the ability to predict FSW processing parameters.

  2. Effects of shielding gas compositions on arc plasma and metal transfer in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Z. H.; Liao, S. M.; Tsai, H. L.

    2010-02-15

    This article presents the effects of shielding gas compositions on the transient transport phenomena, including the distributions of temperature, flow velocity, current density, and electromagnetic force in the arc and the metal, and arc pressure in gas metal arc welding of mild steel at a constant current input. The shielding gas considered includes pure argon, 75% Ar, 50% Ar, and 25% Ar with the balance of helium. It is found that the shielding gas composition has significant influences on the arc characteristics; droplet formation, detachment, transfer, and impingement onto the workpiece; and weld pool dynamics and weld bead profile. As helium increases in the shielding gas, the droplet size increases but the droplet detachment frequency decreases. For helium-rich gases, the current converges at the workpiece with a 'ring' shape which produces non-Gaussian-like distributions of arc pressure and temperature along the workpiece surface. Detailed explanations to the physics of the very complex but interesting transport phenomena are given.

  3. Manual gas tungsten arc (dc) and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of 6XXX aluminum. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-1009 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for manual gas tungsten arc (DC) and semiautomatic gas metal arc (DC) welding of aluminum alloys 6061 and 6063 (P-23), in thickness range 0.187 to 2 in.; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23); shielding gases are helium (GTAW) and argon (GMAW).

  4. Designing shielded metal arc consumables for underwater wet welding in offshore applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Osio, A.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.; Ibarra, S.

    1995-08-01

    The use of underwater wet welding for offshore repairs has been limited mainly because of porosity and low toughness in the resulting welds. With appropriate consumable design, however, it is possible to reduce porosity and to enhance weld metal toughness through microstructural refinement. New titanium and boron-based consumables have been developed with which high toughness acicular ferrite (AF) can be produced in underwater wet welds. Titanium, by means of oxide formation, promoted an increase in the amount of acicular ferrite in the weld metal, while boron additions decreased the amount of grain boundary ferrite (GBF), further improving the microstructure. Porosity reduction was possible through the addition of calcium carbonate at approximately 13 wt percent in the electrode coating. However, weld metal decarbonization also resulted with the addition of carbonate.

  5. Fracture toughness of austenitic stainless steel weld metal at 4 K

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, G.M.

    1984-08-01

    Selection of the welding processess and weld filler metals for fabrication of a large toroidal superconducting magnet is described. Data available in the literature are collected and compared with data generated in this study for three welding processes, shielded metal arc (SMA), gas tungsten arc (GTA), and flux cored arc (FCA) welds had the highest fracture toughness as measured by K/sub Ic/ estimated from J/sub Ic/. The SMA and FCA welds had about the same toughness, below the GTA values but above the average from the literature. The fracture mode for all three processes was typified by ductile dimples. The fracture morphology of the FCA weld specimens was influenced by the solidification substructure, and small particles were found to be nucleation sites for void formation, especially for the GTA welds. All three welding processes were deemed adequate for the intended service and were used to fabricate the large magnet. A trunnion-type turning fixture eliminated the need for welding in the vertical and overhead positions. The GTA process was used for all root passes, and the horizontal welds were filled by the SMA process. Over 80% of the welds were done in the flat position with the FCA process, and its high deposition rate and ease of operation are credited with contributing greatly to the success of the effort.

  6. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 12-unit secondary course in welding. Purpose stated for the flexible entry and exit course is to help students master manipulative skills to develop successful welding techniques and to gain an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in the welding field. Units cover oxyacetylene…

  7. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 12-unit secondary course in welding. Purpose stated for the flexible entry and exit course is to help students master manipulative skills to develop successful welding techniques and to gain an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in the welding field. Units cover oxyacetylene…

  8. Reflection of illumination laser from gas metal arc weld pool surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoji; Zhang, Yu Ming

    2009-11-01

    The weld pool is the core of the welding process where complex welding phenomena originate. Skilled welders acquire their process feedback primarily from the weld pool. Observation and measurement of the three-dimensional weld pool surface thus play a fundamental role in understanding and future control of complex welding processes. To this end, a laser line is projected onto the weld pool surface in pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and an imaging plane is used to intercept its reflection from the weld pool surface. Resultant images of the reflected laser are analyzed and it is found that the weld pool surface in GMAW does specularly reflect the projected laser as in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Hence, the weld pool surface in GMAW is also specular and it is in principle possible that it may be observed and measured by projecting a laser pattern and then intercepting and imaging the reflection from it. Due to high frequencies of surface fluctuations, GMAW requires a relatively short time to image the reflected laser.

  9. Submerged arc flux welding with CaF/sub 2/-CaO-SiO/sub 2/ fluxes: Possible electrochemical effects on weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, S.; Blander, M.; Indacochea, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Compositional changes of weld metal from welds made by submerged arc flux welding of steel using CaF/sub 2/-CaO-SiO/sub 2/ fluxes are consistent with an electrochemical mechanism in which the filler wire is anodically oxidized to form oxides and fluorides, and metals are cathodically deposited at the weld pool-flux interface. This speculative mechanism, if proven by further detailed studies, could make it possible to predict fluxes which will improve the quality of welds. 10 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Effect of Boric Acid Concentration on Viscosity of Slag and Property of Weld Metal Obtained from Underwater Wet Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ning; Guo, Wei; Xu, Changsheng; Du, Yongpeng; Feng, Jicai

    2015-06-01

    Underwater wet welding is a crucial repair and maintenance technology for nuclear plant. A boric acid environment raises a new challenge for the underwater welding maintenance of nuclear plant. This paper places emphasis on studying the influence of a boric acid environment in nuclear plant on the underwater welding process. Several groups of underwater wet welding experiments have been conducted in boric acid aqueous solution with different concentration (0-35000 ppm). The viscosity of the welding slag and the mechanical properties of welds, such as the hardness, strength, and elongation, have been studied. The results show that with increasing boric acid concentration, the viscosity of the slag decreases first and then increases at a lower temperature (less than 1441 °C). However, when the temperature is above 1480 °C, the differences between the viscosity measurements become less pronounced, and the viscosity tends to a constant value. The hardness and ductility of the joints can be enhanced significantly, and the maximum strength of the weld metal can be reached at 2300 ppm.

  11. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  12. Optimization of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) Process for Maximum Ballistic Limit in MIL A46100 Steel Welded All-Metal Armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Our recently developed multi-physics computational model for the conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joining process has been upgraded with respect to its predictive capabilities regarding the process optimization for the attainment of maximum ballistic limit within the weld. The original model consists of six modules, each dedicated to handling a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e., (a) electro-dynamics of the welding gun; (b) radiation-/convection-controlled heat transfer from the electric arc to the workpiece and mass transfer from the filler metal consumable electrode to the weld; (c) prediction of the temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of thermal and mechanical fields within the weld region during the GMAW joining process; (d) the resulting temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the material microstructure throughout the weld region; (e) spatial distribution of the as-welded material mechanical properties; and (f) spatial distribution of the material ballistic limit. In the present work, the model is upgraded through the introduction of the seventh module in recognition of the fact that identification of the optimum GMAW process parameters relative to the attainment of the maximum ballistic limit within the weld region entails the use of advanced optimization and statistical sensitivity analysis methods and tools. The upgraded GMAW process model is next applied to the case of butt welding of MIL A46100 (a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel) workpieces using filler metal electrodes made of the same material. The predictions of the upgraded GMAW process model pertaining to the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and ballistic limit-controlling mechanical properties within the MIL A46100 butt weld are found to be consistent with general expectations and prior observations.

  13. Fracture mechanics characterization of welds: Fatigue life analysis of notches at welds: J(sub Ic) fracture toughness tests for weld metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, John H.

    1995-03-01

    In this report two methods of fracture analysis of welds will be emphasized, one addressing fatigue life testing and analysis of notches at welds, and the other addressing the final fracture of the welded component and the fracture toughness tests used to characterize final fracture. These fatigue and fracture methods will be described by referring to recent work from the technical literature and from the U.S. Army Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center, primarily fracture case study and fracture test method development investigations. A brief general summary will be given of fatigue and fracture methods and concepts that have application to welded structures. Specific fatigue crack initiation tests and analysis methods will be presented, using example results from a welded stainless steel box beam of a cannon carriage. Recent improvements and simplifications in J.integral fracture toughness tests will be described, particularly those related to welds. Fracture toughness measurements for various stainless steel weld metals and heat treatments will also be described.

  14. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Weld Metal and Heat-Affected Zone of Electron Beam-Welded Joints of HG785D Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Han, Jianmin; Tan, Caiwang; Yang, Zhiyong; Wang, Junqiang

    2016-12-01

    Vacuum electron beam welding (EBW) process was employed to butt weld 10-mm-thick HG785D high-strength steels. The penetration into the steel was adjusted by beam current. Microstructures at weld metal and heat-affected zone (HAZ) regions were comparatively observed. Mechanical properties of the EBWed joints including Vickers hardness, tensile and Charpy impact tests were evaluated. The results indicated that microstructures at the weld metal consisted of coarse lath martensite and a small amount of acicular martensite, while that in the HAZ was tempered sorbite and martensite. The grain size in the weld metal was found to be larger than that in the HAZ, and its proportion in weld metal was higher. The hardness in the weld metal was higher than the HAZ and base metal. The tensile strength and impact toughness in the HAZ was higher than that in the weld metal. All the behaviors were related to microstructure evolution caused by higher cooling rates and state of base metal. The fracture surfaces of tensile and impact tests on the optimized joint were characterized by uniform and ductile dimples. The results differed significantly from that obtained using arc welding process.

  15. Fusion and friction stir welding of aluminum-metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storjohann, D.; Barabash, O. M.; David, S. A.; Sklad, P. S.; Bloom, E. E.; Babu, S. S.

    2005-11-01

    Microstructure evolutions and degradations of aluminum-metal-matrix composites during fusion welding were studied and compared with thermodynamic calculations. In fusion welds of Al2O3-reinforced composites, the decomposition of Al2O3 was observed. In fusion welds of SiC whisker-reinforced composites, the decomposition of SiC to Al4C3+Si by reaction with molten aluminum occurred. These phenomena led to unacceptable fusion welds in aluminum metal-matrix composites. Successful welds were produced in the same composites by friction stir welding (FSW). Significant reorientation of SiC whiskers close to the boundary of the dynamically recrystallized and thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) was observed. The small hardening in the dynamically recrystallized region was attributed to the presence of dislocation tangles in between SiC whiskers.

  16. Interfacial microstructure and properties of copper clad steel produced using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.; Chen, Y.; Haghshenas, M.; Nguyen, T.; Galloway, J.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2015-06-15

    A preliminary study compares the feasibility and microstructures of pure copper claddings produced on a pressure vessel A516 Gr. 70 steel plate, using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the grain structures in both the copper cladding and heat affected zone in the steel near the fusion line. The friction stir welding technique produces copper cladding with a grain size of around 25 μm, and no evidence of liquid copper penetration into the steel. The gas metal arc welding of copper cladding exhibits grain sizes over 1 mm, and with surface microcracks as well as penetration of liquid copper up to 50 μm into the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that metallurgical bonding is produced in both processes. Increased diffusion of Mn and Si into the copper cladding occurs when using gas metal arc welding, although some nano-pores were detected in the FSW joint interface. - Highlights: • Cladding of steel with pure copper is possible using either FSW or GMAW. • The FSW yielded a finer grain structure in the copper, with no evidence of cracking. • The FSW joint contains some evidence of nano-pores at the interface of the steel/copper. • Copper cladding by GMAW contained surface cracks attributed to high thermal stresses. • The steel adjacent to the fusion line maintained a hardness value below 248 HV.

  17. The Concept of Electrically Assisted Friction Stir Welding (EAFSW) and Application to the Processing of Various Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    TZM) 2617 5.2 Good for Al, some success with mild steel , bronze & Ti- 6-4 Steel (SS, tool, mild) -1540 10-70 Good for aluminum alloys Tantalum 2996...lbs. This compares with forces of about 1000 lbs or so for conventional FSW welds in aluminum . With optimization of parameters, a higher weld speed...welding ( FSW ). Since 1991, friction stir welding provides an alternative to arc welding as a metal joining method in numerous applications. In FSW

  18. Characterization of Defocused Electron Beams and Welds in Stainless Steel and Refractory Metals using the Enhanced Modified Faraday Cup Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W

    2009-01-23

    As the first part of a project to compare new generation, continuous wave, laser welding technology to traditional electron beam welding technology, electron beam welds were made on commercially pure vanadium refractory metal and 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel. The electron beam welds were made while employing EB diagnostics to fully characterize the beams so that direct comparisons could be made between electron beam and laser beams and the welds that each process produces.

  19. Study of MA Effect on Yield Strength and Ductility of X80 Linepipe Steels Weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Nazmul; Lazor, Robert; Gerlich, Adrian P.

    2017-06-01

    Multipass GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) welding was used to join X80 linepipe materials using two weld metals of slightly different compositions. Welding wires with diameters of 0.984 and 0.909 mm were used while applying the same heat input in each pass. The slight difference in the wire diameters resulted in different HAZ microstructures. The microstructures in the doubly reheated HAZ of both welds were found to contain bainite-ferrite. However, etching also revealed a difference in martensite-austenite (MA) fraction in these reheated zones. The MA exhibited twice the hardness of ferrite when measured by nanoindentation. Tensile testing from the reheated zone of both welds revealed a difference in yield strength, tensile strength and elongation of the transverse weld specimens. In the reheated zone of weld A, (produced with a 0.984 mm wire) a higher fraction of MA was observed, which resulted in higher strength but lower elongation compared to weld B. The ductility of weld A was found severely impaired (to nearly half of weld B) due to formation of closely spaced voids around the MA, along with debonding of MA from the matrix, which occurs just above the yield stress.

  20. Study of MA Effect on Yield Strength and Ductility of X80 Linepipe Steels Weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Nazmul; Lazor, Robert; Gerlich, Adrian P.

    2017-09-01

    Multipass GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) welding was used to join X80 linepipe materials using two weld metals of slightly different compositions. Welding wires with diameters of 0.984 and 0.909 mm were used while applying the same heat input in each pass. The slight difference in the wire diameters resulted in different HAZ microstructures. The microstructures in the doubly reheated HAZ of both welds were found to contain bainite-ferrite. However, etching also revealed a difference in martensite-austenite (MA) fraction in these reheated zones. The MA exhibited twice the hardness of ferrite when measured by nanoindentation. Tensile testing from the reheated zone of both welds revealed a difference in yield strength, tensile strength and elongation of the transverse weld specimens. In the reheated zone of weld A, (produced with a 0.984 mm wire) a higher fraction of MA was observed, which resulted in higher strength but lower elongation compared to weld B. The ductility of weld A was found severely impaired (to nearly half of weld B) due to formation of closely spaced voids around the MA, along with debonding of MA from the matrix, which occurs just above the yield stress.

  1. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  2. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  3. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  4. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  5. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  6. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  7. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  8. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  9. Influence of Alloy and Solidification Parameters on Grain Refinement in Aluminum Weld Metal due to Inoculation

    SciTech Connect

    Schempp, Philipp; Tang, Z.; Cross, Carl E.; Seefeld, T.; Pittner, A.; Rethmeier, M.

    2012-06-28

    The goals are: (1) Establish how much Ti/B grain refiner is need to completely refine aluminum weld metal for different alloys and different welding conditions; (2) Characterize how alloy composition and solidification parameters affect weld metal grain refinement; and (3) Apply relevant theory to understand observed behavior. Conclusions are: (1) additions of Ti/B grain refiner to weld metal in Alloys 1050, 5083, and 6082 resulted in significant grain refinement; (2) grain refinement was more effective in GTAW than LBW, resulting in finer grains at lower Ti content - reason is limited time available for equiaxed grain growth in LBW (inability to occlude columnar grain growth); (3) welding travel speed did not markedly affect grain size within GTAW and LBW clusters; and (4) application of Hunt CET analysis showed experimental G to be on the order of the critical G{sub CET}; G{sub CET} was consistently higher for GTAW than for LBW.

  10. Determinants of occupational exposure to metals by gas metal arc welding and risk management measures: a biomonitoring study.

    PubMed

    Persoons, Renaud; Arnoux, Damien; Monssu, Théodora; Culié, Olivier; Roche, Gaëlle; Duffaud, Béatrice; Chalaye, Denis; Maitre, Anne

    2014-12-01

    Welding fumes contain various toxic metals including chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and manganese (Mn). An assessment of the risk to health of local and systemic exposure to welding fumes requires the assessment of both external and internal doses. The aims of this study were to test the relevance in small and medium sized enterprises of a biomonitoring strategy based on urine spot-samples, to characterize the factors influencing the internal doses of metals in gas metal arc welders and to recommend effective risk management measures. 137 welders were recruited and urinary levels of metals were measured by ICP-MS on post-shift samples collected at the end of the working week. Cr, Ni and Mn mean concentrations (respectively 0.43, 1.69 and 0.27 μg/g creatinine) were well below occupational health guidance values, but still higher than background levels observed in the general population, confirming the absorption of metals generated in welding fumes. Both welding parameters (nature of base metal, welding technique) and working conditions (confinement, welding and grinding durations, mechanical ventilation and welding experience) were predictive of occupational exposure. Our results confirm the interest of biomonitoring for assessing health risks and recommending risk management measures for welders.

  11. Effect of Welding Consumables on Fatigue Performance of Shielded Metal Arc Welded High Strength, Q&T Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magudeeswaran, G.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2009-02-01

    Quenched and Tempered (Q&T) steels are widely used in the construction of military vehicles due to their high strength-to-weight ratio and high hardness. These steels are prone to hydrogen-induced cracking in the heat affected zone (HAZ) after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel consumables to weld the above steel was the only remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. Recent studies proved that high nickel steel and low hydrogen ferritic steel consumables can be used to weld Q&T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. In this investigation an attempt has been made to study the effect of welding consumables on high cycle fatigue properties of high strength, Q&T steel joints. Three different consumables namely (i) austenitic stainless steel, (ii) low hydrogen ferritic steel, and (iii) high nickel steel have been used to fabricate the joints by shielded metal arc (SMAW) welding process. The joints fabricated using low hydrogen ferritic steel electrodes showed superior fatigue properties than other joints.

  12. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Two Dissimilar Metal Weld Overlay Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-06-30

    Two dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe-to-nozzle specimens were implanted with thermal fatigue cracks in the 13% to 90% through-wall depth range. The specimens were ultrasonically evaluated with phased-array probes having center frequencies of 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 megahertz (MHz). An Alloy 82/182 weld overlay (WOL) was applied and the specimens were ultrasonically re-evaluated for flaw detection and characterization. The Post-WOL flaw depths were approximately 10% to 56% through-wall. This study has shown the effectiveness of ultrasonic examinations of Alloy 82/182 overlaid DMW specimens. Phased-array probes with center frequency in the 0.8- to 1.0-MHz range provide a strong coherent signal but the greater ultrasonic wavelength and larger beam spot size prevent the reliable detection of small flaws. These small flaws had nominal through-wall depths of less than 15% and length in the 50-60 mm (2-2.4 in.) range. Flaws in the 19% and greater through-wall depth range were readily detected with all four probes. At the higher frequencies, the reflected signals are less coherent but still provide adequate signal for flaw detection and characterization. A single inspection at 2.0 MHz could provide adequate detection and sizing information but a supplemental inspection at 1.0 or 1.5 MHz is recommended.

  13. Mechanisms of inclusion formation in Al-Ti-Si-Mn deoxidized steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluken, A. O.; Grong, Ø.

    1989-08-01

    The present investigation is concerned with basic studies of the mechanisms of inclusion formation in submerged arc (SA), gas metal arc (GMA), and flux cored arc (FCA) steel weld metals. Theoretical models of deoxidation have been developed to establish a basis for quantitative predictions of important inclusion characteristics, such as volume fraction, size, and chemical composition from knowledge of weld metal chemistry and operating parameters. The relevance of these models has been tested against extensive inclusion data obtained from scanning electron microscope (SEM) and scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) examinations of a large number of experimental welds containing various contents of aluminum, titanium, silicon, manganese, and oxygen.

  14. Atom-probe investigation of precipitation in 12% Cr steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guang-Jun; Lundin, Lars; Andrén, Hans-Olof; Svensson, Lars-Erik

    1994-03-01

    The microstructure of two types of 12% Cr steel weld metals, one with the composition of a common 12% Cr steel and the other with a higher nitrogen content, was studied using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and APFIM (atom-probe field-ion microscopy) in post-weld heat-treated condition. The microstructure of the 12% Cr weld metals consisted of tempered martensite, retained δ-ferrite, an irregular low-dislocation α-ferrite and precipitates. Precipitates in the weld metals were dominantly M 23C 6 on different boundaries. Plate-like and fine cubic MN and M 2N were found inside the α-ferrite. APFIM analysis showed that M 23C 6 was almost a pure carbide and MN was almost a pure nitride. Carbon and nitrogen in the weld metals mainly existed in the precipitates. High nitrogen content did not change the composition of the precipitates, but increased the quantity of nitrides. Therefore, in the high nitrogen weld metal, the content of strong nitride-forming elements in the matrix decreased. These results are important in order to understand the strengthening mechanism of the high Cr steel weld metals, as well as of other high Cr heat-resistant steels.

  15. Metal ion release from silver soldering and laser welding caused by different types of mouthwash.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Ayse Tuygun; Nalbantgil, Didem; Ulkur, Feyza; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2015-07-01

    To compare metal ion release from samples welded with silver soldering and laser welding when immersed into mouthwashes with different ingredients. A total of 72 samples were prepared: 36 laser welded and 36 silver soldered. Four samples were chosen from each subgroup to study the morphologic changes on their surfaces via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Each group was further divided into four groups where the samples were submerged into mouthwash containing sodium fluoride (NaF), mouthwash containing sodium fluoride + alcohol (NaF + alcohol), mouthwash containing chlorhexidine (CHX), or artificial saliva (AS) for 24 hours and removed thereafter. Subsequently, the metal ion release from the samples was measured with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The metal ion release among the solutions and the welding methods were compared. The Kruskal-Wallis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests were used for the group comparisons, and post hoc Dunn multiple comparison test was utilized for the two group comparisons. The level of metal ion release from samples of silver soldering was higher than from samples of laser welding. Furthermore, greater amounts of nickel, chrome, and iron were released from silver soldering. With regard to the mouthwash solutions, the lowest amounts of metal ions were released in CHX, and the highest amounts of metal ions were released in NaF + alcohol. SEM images were in accord with these findings. The laser welding should be preferred over silver soldering. CHX can be recommended for patients who have welded appliances for orthodontic reasons.

  16. Comparison of joint designs for laser welding of cast metal plates and wrought wires.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yasuko; Nomoto, Rie; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare joint designs for the laser welding of cast metal plates and wrought wire, and to evaluate the welded area internally using X-ray micro-focus computerized tomography (micro-CT). Cast metal plates (Ti, Co-Cr) and wrought wires (Ti, Co-Cr) were welded using similar metals. The specimens were welded using four joint designs in which the wrought wires and the parent metals were welded directly (two designs) or the wrought wires were welded to the groove of the parent metal from one or both sides (n = 5). The porosity and gap in the welded area were evaluated by micro-CT, and the maximum tensile load of the welded specimens was measured with a universal testing machine. An element analysis was conducted using an electron probe X-ray microanalyzer. The statistical analysis of the results was performed using Bonferroni's multiple comparisons (α = 0.05). The results included that all the specimens fractured at the wrought wire when subjected to tensile testing, although there were specimens that exhibited gaps due to the joint design. The wrought wires were affected by laser irradiation and observed to melt together and onto the filler metal. Both Mo and Sn elements found in the wrought wire were detected in the filler metal of the Ti specimens, and Ni was detected in the filler metal of the Co-Cr specimens. The four joint designs simulating the designs used clinically were confirmed to have adequate joint strength provided by laser welding.

  17. Microstructure and fatigue resistance of high strength dual phase steel welded with gas metal arc welding and plasma arc welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahiale, Godwin Kwame; Oh, Yong-Jun; Choi, Won-Doo; Lee, Kwang-Bok; Jung, Jae-Gyu; Nam, Soo Woo

    2013-09-01

    This study presents the microstructure and high cycle fatigue performance of lap shear joints of dual phase steel (DP590) welded using gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and plasma arc welding (PAW) processes. High cycle fatigue tests were conducted on single and double lap joints under a load ratio of 0.1 and a frequency of 20 Hz. In order to establish a basis for comparison, both weldments were fabricated to have the same weld depth in the plate thickness. The PAW specimens exhibited a higher fatigue life, a gentle S-N slope, and a higher fatigue limit than the GMAW specimens. The improvement in the fatigue life of the PAW specimens was primarily attributed to the geometry effect that exhibited lower and wider beads resulting in a lower stress concentration at the weld toe where cracks initiate and propagate. Furthermore, the microstructural constituents in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the PAW specimens contributed to the improvement. The higher volume fraction of acicular ferrite in the HAZ beneath the weld toe enhanced the PAW specimen's resistance to fatigue crack growth. The double lap joints displayed a higher fatigue life than the single lap joints without changing the S-N slope.

  18. Simulation on friction taper plug welding of AA6063-20Gr metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Nithin, Abeyram M.

    2016-05-01

    Friction taper plug welding a variant of friction welding is useful in welding of similar and dissimilar materials. It could be used for joining of composites to metals in sophisticated aerospace applications. In the present work numerical simulation of friction taper plug welding process is carried out using finite element based software. Graphite reinforced AA6063 is modelled using the software ANSYS 15.0 and temperature distribution is predicted. Effect of friction time on temperature distribution is numerically investigated. When the friction time is increased to 30 seconds, the tapered part of plug gets detached and fills the hole in the AA6063 plate perfectly.

  19. High power x-ray welding of metal-matrix composites

    DOEpatents

    Rosenberg, Richard A.; Goeppner, George A.; Noonan, John R.; Farrell, William J.; Ma, Qing

    1999-01-01

    A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10.sup.4 watts/cm.sup.2 and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

  20. High power X-ray welding of metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Richard A.; Goeppner, George A.; Noonan, John R.; Farrell, William J.; Ma, Qing

    1997-12-01

    A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10{sup 4} watts/cm{sup 2} and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

  1. Novel concepts in weld metal science: Role of gradients and composite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

    1991-12-01

    The effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties are being investigated. Crack propagation is solidified alloy structures is being characterized as to solidification orientation and the profile of the compositional variations. The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a compositional gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Special techniques to produce laboratory samples with microstructures which simulate the composition and microstructure gradients in solidified weld metal are used, along with appropriate mathematical models, to evaluate the properties of the composite weld metals. The composite modeling techniques are being applied to describe the effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties in Ni-Cu alloys. The development of metal matrix composition weld deposits on austenitic stainless steels has been studied. The particulate metal matrix composites were produced with ceramic or refractory metal powder filled cored wire, which was gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welded.

  2. Development of welded metal bellows having minimum effective diameter change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henschel, J. K.; Stevens, J. B.; Harvey, A. C.; Howland, J. S.; Rhee, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    A program of analysis, design, and fabrication was conducted to develop welded metal bellows having a minimum change in effective diameter for cryogenic turbomachinery face seal applications. Linear analysis of the principle types of bellows provided identification of concepts capable of meeting basic operation requirements. For the 6-inch (.152 m) mean diameter, 1.5-inch free length bellows studied, nonlinear analysis showed that opposed and nested toroidal bellows plates stiffened by means of alternating stiffener rings were capable of maintaining constant effective diameter within 0.3% and 0.1% respectively under the operating conditions of interest. Changes in effective diameter were due principally to bellows axial deflection with pressure differential having a lesser influence. Fabrication problems associated with joining the thin bellows plates to the relatively heavy stiffener rings were encountered and precluded assembly and testing of a bellows core. Fabrication problems are summarized and recommended fabrication methods for future effort are presented.

  3. Modeling of Fume Formation from Shielded Metal Arc Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapirakasam, S. P.; Mohan, Sreejith; Santhosh Kumar, M. C.; Surianarayanan, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a semi-empirical model of fume formation rate (FFR) from a shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process has been developed. The model was developed for a DC electrode positive (DCEP) operation and involves the calculations of droplet temperature, surface area of the droplet, and partial vapor pressures of the constituents of the droplet to predict the FFR. The model was further extended for predicting FFR from nano-coated electrodes. The model estimates the FFR for Fe and Mn assuming constant proportion of other elements in the electrode. Fe FFR was overestimated, while Mn FFR was underestimated. The contribution of spatters and other mechanism in the arc responsible for fume formation were neglected. A good positive correlation was obtained between the predicted and experimental FFR values which highlighted the usefulness of the model.

  4. Modeling of Fume Formation from Shielded Metal Arc Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapirakasam, S. P.; Mohan, Sreejith; Santhosh Kumar, M. C.; Surianarayanan, M.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a semi-empirical model of fume formation rate (FFR) from a shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process has been developed. The model was developed for a DC electrode positive (DCEP) operation and involves the calculations of droplet temperature, surface area of the droplet, and partial vapor pressures of the constituents of the droplet to predict the FFR. The model was further extended for predicting FFR from nano-coated electrodes. The model estimates the FFR for Fe and Mn assuming constant proportion of other elements in the electrode. Fe FFR was overestimated, while Mn FFR was underestimated. The contribution of spatters and other mechanism in the arc responsible for fume formation were neglected. A good positive correlation was obtained between the predicted and experimental FFR values which highlighted the usefulness of the model.

  5. Manual gas tungsten arc and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of chromium-nickel steel. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-306-ASME-6 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for manual gas tungsten arc and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of 300 Series Cr-Ni steels (P-8-1), in thickness range 0.375 to 2 inch; filler metal is ER3XX (F-6, A-8); shielding gases are argon (GTAW) and 98-2 argon-oxygen.

  6. Machine gas tungsten arc and machine gas metal arc welding of chromium-nickel steel. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-309-ASME-0 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for machine gas tungsten arc and machine gas metal arc welding of 300 Series Cr-Ni steels (P-8-1), in thickness range 0.375 to 2 inch; filler metal is ER3XX (F-6,A-8); shielding gases are argon (GTAW) and 98-2 argon-oxygen (GMAW).

  7. Gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of carbon steel to chromium-nickel steel. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-2103-ASME-1 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of carbon steels (P-1-1) to 300 series Cr-Ni steels (P-8-1), in thickness range 0.25 to 2 in.; filler metals are ERNiCr-3 (F-43) (GTAW) and ENiCrFe-3 (F-43) (SMAW); shielding gas is argon (GTAW).

  8. Process Stability of Ultrasonic-Wave-Assisted Gas Metal Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chenglei; Xie, Weifeng; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao; Fan, Yangyang

    2017-10-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, ultrasonic-wave-assisted arc welding successfully introduced power ultrasound into the arc and weld pool, during which the ultrasonic acts on the top of the arc in the coaxial alignment direction. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by using an additional ultrasonic field. Compared with the conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW), the welding arc is compressed, the droplet size is decreased, and the droplet transfer frequency is increased significantly in ultrasonic-wave-assisted GMAW (U-GMAW). However, the stability of the metal transfer has deep influence on the welding quality equally, and the ultrasonic wave effect on the stability of the metal transfer is a phenomenon that is not completely understood. In this article, the stabilities of the short-circuiting transfer process and globular transfer process are studied systematically, and the effect of ultrasonic wave on the metal transfer is analyzed further. The transfer frequency and process stability of the U-GMAW process are much higher than those of the conventional GMAW. Analytical results show that the additional ultrasonic wave is helpful for improving welding stability.

  9. Effect of Shoulder Size on Weld Properties of Dissimilar Metal Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinlabi, E. T.

    2012-07-01

    This article reports a research study that shows the effect of shoulder diameter size on the resulting weld properties of dissimilar friction stir welds between 5754 aluminum alloy (AA) and C11000 copper (Cu). Welds were produced using three different shoulder diameter tools: 15, 18, and 25 mm by varying the rotational speed between 600 and 1200 rpm and the traverse speed between 50 and 300 mm/min to achieve the best result. Each parameter combination was chosen to represent different heat input conditions (low, intermediates and high). The welds were characterized through microstructural evaluation, tensile testing, microhardness measurements, x-ray diffraction analysis, and electrical resistivity. Microstructural evaluation of the welds revealed that the welds produced consisted of all the friction stir welding (FSW) microstructure zones with organized flow lines comprising mixture layers of aluminum (Al) and copper (Cu) at the Stir Zones. The average Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) of the welds considered ranged from 178 to 208 MPa. Higher Vickers microhardness values were measured at the joint interfaces of all the welds because of the presence of intermetallic compounds in these regions. The x-ray diffraction analysis revealed the presence of Al4Cu9 and Al2Cu intermetallics at the interfacial regions, and low electrical resistivities were obtained at the joint interfaces. An optimized parameter setting for FSW of Al and Cu was obtained at the weld produced at 950 rpm and 50 mm/min with the 18-mm shoulder diameter tool.

  10. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The safety issue has been raised with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate if molten metal could detach and come in contact with astronauts and burn through the fabric of the astronauts' Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) during electron beam welding in space. Molten metal detachments from either the weld/cut substrate or weld wire could present harm to a astronaut if the detachment was to burn through the fabric of the EMU. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The primary molten metal detachment concerns were those cases of molten metal separation from the metal surface due to metal cutting, weld pool splashing, entrainment and release of molten metal due to filler wire snap-out from the weld puddle, and molten metal accumulation and release from the end of the weld wire. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were developed for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. The surface tension represents the force opposing the liquid metal drop from detaching whereas the weight of the liquid metal droplet represents a force that is tending to detach the molten metal drop. Theoretical calculations have indicated that only a small amount of energy is required to detach a liquid metal drop; however, much of the energy of an impact is absorbed in the sample or weld plate before it reaches the metal drop on the cut edge or surface. The tendency for detachment is directly proportional to the weld pool radius and metal density and inversely proportional to the surface

  11. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The safety issue has been raised with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate if molten metal could detach and come in contact with astronauts and burn through the fabric of the astronauts' Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) during electron beam welding in space. Molten metal detachments from either the weld/cut substrate or weld wire could present harm to a astronaut if the detachment was to burn through the fabric of the EMU. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The primary molten metal detachment concerns were those cases of molten metal separation from the metal surface due to metal cutting, weld pool splashing, entrainment and release of molten metal due to filler wire snap-out from the weld puddle, and molten metal accumulation and release from the end of the weld wire. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were developed for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. The surface tension represents the force opposing the liquid metal drop from detaching whereas the weight of the liquid metal droplet represents a force that is tending to detach the molten metal drop. Theoretical calculations have indicated that only a small amount of energy is required to detach a liquid metal drop; however, much of the energy of an impact is absorbed in the sample or weld plate before it reaches the metal drop on the cut edge or surface. The tendency for detachment is directly proportional to the weld pool radius and metal density and inversely proportional to the surface

  12. Microstructural development due to long-term aging and ion irradiation behavior in weld metals of austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, K.; Ikeda, S.; Hamada, S.; Hishinuma, A.

    1996-10-01

    In a candidate austenitic stainless steel (316F) for fusion reactor structural materials, irradiation behavior of the weld metal produced by electron-beam welding (containing 7.9 vol% δ-ferrite) was investigated in terms of microstructural development. The densities of interstitial clusters in the γ-phase of the weld metal irradiated with He-ions at 673 and 773 K were about four times larger than those in 316F. Voids were formed in the δ-ferrite of the weld irradiated at 773 K. The number of clusters decreased in the weld metal (γ-phase) aged at 773 to 973 K, compared with that in the as-welded metal. The change in cluster density could be attributed to a Ni concentration increase in the γ-phase of the weld metal during aging.

  13. High cycle fatigue of weld repaired cast Ti-6AI-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, G. B.; Hodi, F. S.; Eagar, T. W.

    1982-09-01

    In order to determine the effects of weld repair on fatigue life of titanium-6Al-4V castings, a series of specimens was exposed to variations in heat treatment, weld procedure, HIP cycle, cooling rate, and surface finish. The results indicate that weld repair is not detrimental to HCF properties as fatigue cracks were located primarily in the base metal. Fine surface finish and large colony size are the primary variables improving the fatigue life. The fusion zone resisted fatigue crack initiation due to a basketweave morphology and thin grain boundary alpha. Multipass welds were shown not to affect fatigue life when compared with single pass welds. A secondary HIP treatment was not detrimental to fatigue properties, but was found to be unnecessary.

  14. 3D display and image processing system for metal bellows welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min-Chul; Son, Jung-Young

    2010-04-01

    Industrial welded metal Bellows is in shape of flexible pipeline. The most common form of bellows is as pairs of washer-shaped discs of thin sheet metal stamped from strip stock. Performing arc welding operation may cause dangerous accidents and bad smells. Furthermore, in the process of welding operation, workers have to observe the object directly through microscope adjusting the vertical and horizontal positions of welding rod tip and the bellows fixed on the jig, respectively. Welding looking through microscope makes workers feel tired. To improve working environment that workers sit in an uncomfortable position and productivity we introduced 3D display and image processing. Main purpose of the system is not only to maximize the efficiency of industrial productivity with accuracy but also to keep the safety standards with the full automation of work by distant remote controlling.

  15. Welding Stainless Steels and Refractory Metals Using Diode-Pumped Continuous Wave Nd:YAG Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Pong, R; Gauthier, M D

    2004-09-27

    This report provides an overview of a series of developmental welding studies performed on a 2.2 kW Rofin Sinar DY-022 Diode Pumped Continuous Wave (CW) Nd:YAG welder at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Several materials systems, ranging from refractory metals, such as commercially pure tantalum and vanadium, to austenitic stainless steels, including both 304L and 21-6-9 grades, are examined. Power input and travel speed are systematically varied during the welding of each materials system, and the width, depth, and cross sectional area of the resulting weld fusion zones are measured. These individual studies are undertaken in order to characterize the response of the welder to changes in these welding parameters for a range of materials and to determine the maximum depth of penetration of which this welder is capable in each materials system. The maximum weld depths, which are on the order of 5.4 mm, are observed in the 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel at the maximum laser power setting (2200 W) and a slow travel speed (6.4 mm/sec). The next highest weld depth is observed in the 304L stainless steel, followed by that observed in the vanadium and, finally, in the tantalum. Porosity, which is attributed to the collapse of the keyhole during welding, is also observed in the welds produced in tantalum, vanadium, and 304L stainless steel. Only the 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel welds displayed little or no porosity over the range of welding parameters. Comparisons with similar laser welding systems are also made for several of these same materials systems. When compared with the welds produced by these other systems, the LLNL system typically produces welds of an equivalent or slightly higher depth.

  16. Multi-pass microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Juffmann, Thomas; Klopfer, Brannon B.; Frankort, Timmo L.I.; Haslinger, Philipp; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Microscopy of biological specimens often requires low light levels to avoid damage. This yields images impaired by shot noise. An improved measurement accuracy at the Heisenberg limit can be achieved exploiting quantum correlations. If sample damage is the limiting resource, an equivalent limit can be reached by passing photons through a specimen multiple times sequentially. Here we use self-imaging cavities and employ a temporal post-selection scheme to present full-field multi-pass polarization and transmission micrographs with variance reductions of 4.4±0.8 dB (11.6±0.8 dB in a lossless setup) and 4.8±0.8 dB, respectively, compared with the single-pass shot-noise limit. If the accuracy is limited by the number of detected probe particles, our measurements show a variance reduction of 25.9±0.9 dB. The contrast enhancement capabilities in imaging and in diffraction studies are demonstrated with nanostructured samples and with embryonic kidney 293T cells. This approach to Heisenberg-limited microscopy does not rely on quantum state engineering. PMID:27670525

  17. Multi-pass microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juffmann, Thomas; Klopfer, Brannon B.; Frankort, Timmo L. I.; Haslinger, Philipp; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2016-09-01

    Microscopy of biological specimens often requires low light levels to avoid damage. This yields images impaired by shot noise. An improved measurement accuracy at the Heisenberg limit can be achieved exploiting quantum correlations. If sample damage is the limiting resource, an equivalent limit can be reached by passing photons through a specimen multiple times sequentially. Here we use self-imaging cavities and employ a temporal post-selection scheme to present full-field multi-pass polarization and transmission micrographs with variance reductions of 4.4+/-0.8 dB (11.6+/-0.8 dB in a lossless setup) and 4.8+/-0.8 dB, respectively, compared with the single-pass shot-noise limit. If the accuracy is limited by the number of detected probe particles, our measurements show a variance reduction of 25.9+/-0.9 dB. The contrast enhancement capabilities in imaging and in diffraction studies are demonstrated with nanostructured samples and with embryonic kidney 293T cells. This approach to Heisenberg-limited microscopy does not rely on quantum state engineering.

  18. Influence of M-TIG and A-TIG Welding Process on Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyarthy, R. S.; Dwivedi, D. K.; Vasudevan, M.

    2017-03-01

    The current study investigates the effects of activating flux tungsten inert gas welding (A-TIG) and multipass tungsten inert gas welding (M-TIG) on the weld morphology, angular distortion, microstructures and mechanical properties when welding 8-mm-thick 409 ferritic stainless steel (FSS). SiO2 was used as activating flux for A-TIG welding, while SUPERTIG ER309L was used as filler for M-TIG welding. Bead-on-plate weld trials were carried out to obtain the full penetration by using different combinations of flux coating density, welding speed and welding current. An optical microscope, field emission scanning microscope (FESEM), and x-ray diffractometer were used for the metallurgical characterizations. Vickers hardness, tensile test, Charpy toughness test, and creep behavior test were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties of the base and weld metals. Experimental results indicate that the A-TIG process can increase the joint penetration and tends to reduce the angular distortion of the 409 FSS weldment. The A-TIG welded joint also exhibited greater mechanical strength. However, a critically low Charpy toughness was measured for the A-TIG weld fusion zone, which was later sufficiently improved after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). It was concluded that PWHT is mandatory for A-TIG welded 409 FSS.

  19. Influence of M-TIG and A-TIG Welding Process on Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyarthy, R. S.; Dwivedi, D. K.; Vasudevan, M.

    2017-02-01

    The current study investigates the effects of activating flux tungsten inert gas welding (A-TIG) and multipass tungsten inert gas welding (M-TIG) on the weld morphology, angular distortion, microstructures and mechanical properties when welding 8-mm-thick 409 ferritic stainless steel (FSS). SiO2 was used as activating flux for A-TIG welding, while SUPERTIG ER309L was used as filler for M-TIG welding. Bead-on-plate weld trials were carried out to obtain the full penetration by using different combinations of flux coating density, welding speed and welding current. An optical microscope, field emission scanning microscope (FESEM), and x-ray diffractometer were used for the metallurgical characterizations. Vickers hardness, tensile test, Charpy toughness test, and creep behavior test were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties of the base and weld metals. Experimental results indicate that the A-TIG process can increase the joint penetration and tends to reduce the angular distortion of the 409 FSS weldment. The A-TIG welded joint also exhibited greater mechanical strength. However, a critically low Charpy toughness was measured for the A-TIG weld fusion zone, which was later sufficiently improved after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). It was concluded that PWHT is mandatory for A-TIG welded 409 FSS.

  20. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing a revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.31, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide (Revision 4) describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. It updates the guide to remove references to outdated standards and to remove an appendix......

  1. Investigation of dissimilar metal welds by energy-resolved neutron imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Ganguly, Supriyo; Meco, Sonia M.; Pardal, Goncalo R.; Shinohara, Takenao; Feller, W. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    A nondestructive study of the internal structure and compositional gradient of dissimilar metal-alloy welds through energy-resolved neutron imaging is described in this paper. The ability of neutrons to penetrate thick metal objects (up to several cm) provides a unique possibility to examine samples which are opaque to other conventional techniques. The presence of Bragg edges in the measured neutron transmission spectra can be used to characterize the internal residual strain within the samples and some microstructural features, e.g. texture within the grains, while neutron resonance absorption provides the possibility to map the degree of uniformity in mixing of the participating alloys and intermetallic formation within the welds. In addition, voids and other defects can be revealed by the variation of neutron attenuation across the samples. This paper demonstrates the potential of neutron energy-resolved imaging to measure all these characteristics simultaneously in a single experiment with sub-mm spatial resolution. Two dissimilar alloy welds are used in this study: Al autogenously laser welded to steel, and Ti gas metal arc welded (GMAW) to stainless steel using Cu as a filler alloy. The cold metal transfer variant of the GMAW process was used in joining the Ti to the stainless steel in order to minimize the heat input. The distributions of the lattice parameter and texture variation in these welds as well as the presence of voids and defects in the melt region are mapped across the welds. The depth of the thermal front in the Al–steel weld is clearly resolved and could be used to optimize the welding process. A highly textured structure is revealed in the Ti to stainless steel joint where copper was used as a filler wire. The limited diffusion of Ti into the weld region is also verified by the resonance absorption. PMID:27504075

  2. Investigation of dissimilar metal welds by energy-resolved neutron imaging.

    PubMed

    Tremsin, Anton S; Ganguly, Supriyo; Meco, Sonia M; Pardal, Goncalo R; Shinohara, Takenao; Feller, W Bruce

    2016-08-01

    A nondestructive study of the internal structure and compositional gradient of dissimilar metal-alloy welds through energy-resolved neutron imaging is described in this paper. The ability of neutrons to penetrate thick metal objects (up to several cm) provides a unique possibility to examine samples which are opaque to other conventional techniques. The presence of Bragg edges in the measured neutron transmission spectra can be used to characterize the internal residual strain within the samples and some microstructural features, e.g. texture within the grains, while neutron resonance absorption provides the possibility to map the degree of uniformity in mixing of the participating alloys and intermetallic formation within the welds. In addition, voids and other defects can be revealed by the variation of neutron attenuation across the samples. This paper demonstrates the potential of neutron energy-resolved imaging to measure all these characteristics simultaneously in a single experiment with sub-mm spatial resolution. Two dissimilar alloy welds are used in this study: Al autogenously laser welded to steel, and Ti gas metal arc welded (GMAW) to stainless steel using Cu as a filler alloy. The cold metal transfer variant of the GMAW process was used in joining the Ti to the stainless steel in order to minimize the heat input. The distributions of the lattice parameter and texture variation in these welds as well as the presence of voids and defects in the melt region are mapped across the welds. The depth of the thermal front in the Al-steel weld is clearly resolved and could be used to optimize the welding process. A highly textured structure is revealed in the Ti to stainless steel joint where copper was used as a filler wire. The limited diffusion of Ti into the weld region is also verified by the resonance absorption.

  3. Microstructure evaluation in low alloy steel weld metal from convective heat transfer calculations in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Mundra, K.; DebRoy, T.; Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    Heat transfer and fluid flow during manual metal arc welding of low alloy steels were investigated by solving the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy in three dimensions. Cooling rates were calculated at various locations in the weldment. Calculated cooling rates were coupled with an existing phase transformation model to predict percentages of acicular, allotriomorphic, and Widmanstaetten ferrites in various low alloy steel welds containing different concentration of V and Mn. Computed microstructures were in good agreement with experiment, indicating promise for predicting weld metal microstructure from the fundamentals of transport phenomena.

  4. Improvement of charpy toughness of weld metal in circumferential SMAW of pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, T.; Hara, N.; Sugino, T.; Naruse, S.; Kasai, N.

    1994-12-31

    Charpy toughness of weld metal made by low hydrogen and high cellulose electrodes for circumferential welding of API 5LX-60-X-70 grade of pipe is investigated. Improvements of charpy toughness was achieved by obtaining a fine microstructure through the adjustment of the quantity of alloying elements such as Mn and Ni and/or by the addition of an optimum range of micro-alloying elements like Ti and B for low hydrogen electrodes. It is reported that for high cellulose electrodes reducing the oxygen content in weld metal is also effective.

  5. Hydrogen Attack kinetics of 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, T. A.; Lopez, H. F.; Shewmon, P. G.

    1985-06-01

    The kinetics of Hydrogen Attack (HA) of the base metals and the weld metals of two Q&T 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments made by different techniques (SMAW and SAW) were studied in the temperature range 460 to 590°C (860 to 1094 °F) and 10 to 23 MPa of hydrogen. A sensitive dilatometer used to measure the rate of HA showed that the weld metals suffered HA at significantly higher rates than the base metals. The SMAW weld metal was inferior to the SAW weld metal and swelled nearly an order of magnitude faster than the base metal. This behavior is due to a significantly higher bubble density, and a resulting higher contribution of power law creep of the matrix. The SAW behavior was intermediate between those of the base metals and the SMAW. For the same hydrogen pressure the operating limit of the SMAW weld would be roughly 100°C lower than that of the base metals, and that of the SAW roughly 50°C lower.

  6. Welding Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Welding fabrication and welding processes were studied. The following research projects are reported: (1) welding fabrication; (2) residual stresses and distortion in structural weldments in high strength steels; (3) improvement of reliability of welding by in process sensing and control (development of smart welding machines for girth welding of pipes); (4) development of fully automated and integrated welding systems for marine applications; (5) advancement of welding technology; (6) research on metal working by high power laser (7) flux development; (8) heat and fluid flow; (9) mechanical properties developments.

  7. Real-time sensing and monitoring in robotic gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. S.; Gao, J. Q.; Hu, J. K.

    2007-01-01

    A real-time monitoring system is developed for detecting abnormal conditions in robotic gas metal arc welding. The butt-joint test pieces with simulated large gaps are used to intentionally introduce step disturbance of welding conditions. During the welding process, the welding voltage and current signals are sampled and processed on-line to extract the characteristic information reflecting the process quality. After the first statistical processing, it is found that seven statistical parameters (the mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variance and kurtosis of welding voltage; the mean, coefficient of variance and kurtosis of welding current) show variations during the step disturbance. Through the second statistical processing of the means of the welding voltage for subgroups of continuous measurement, the statistical control chart is obtained, and an SPC (statistical process control)-based on-line identifying method is developed. Ten robotic welding experiments are conducted to verify the real-time monitoring system. It is found that the correct identification rates for normal and abnormal welding conditions are 100% and 95%, respectively.

  8. Hydrogen Assisted Crack in Dissimilar Metal Welds for Subsea Service under Cathodic Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Desmond

    Dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) are routinely used in the oil and gas industries for structural joining of high strength steels in order to eliminate the need for post weld heat treatment (PWHT) after field welding. There have been reported catastrophic failures in these DMWs, particularly the AISI 8630 steel - Alloy 625 DMW combination, during subsea service while under cathodic protection (CP). This is due to local embrittlement that occurs in susceptible microstructures that are present at the weld fusion boundary region. This type of cracking is known as hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) and it is influenced by base/filler metal combination, and welding and PWHT procedures. DMWs of two material combinations (8630 steel -- Alloy 625 and F22 steel -- Alloy 625), produced with two welding procedures (BS1 and BS3) in as welded and PWHT conditions were investigated in this study. The main objectives included: 1) evaluation of the effect of materials composition, welding and PWHT procedures on the gradients of composition, microstructure, and properties in the dissimilar transition region and on the susceptibility to HAC; 2) investigation of the influence of microstructure on the HAC failure mechanism and identification of microstructural constituents acting as crack nucleation and propagation sites; 3) assessment of the applicability of two-step PWHT to improve the resistance to HAC in DMWs; 4) establishment of non-failure criterion for the delayed hydrogen cracking test (DHCT) that is applicable for qualification of DMWs for subsea service under cathodic protection (CP).

  9. Investigation of welding crack in micro laser welded NiTiNb shape memory alloy and Ti6Al4V alloy dissimilar metals joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuhua, Chen; Yuqing, Mao; Weiwei, Lu; Peng, He

    2017-06-01

    Dissimilar metals of NiTiNb shape memory alloy and Ti6Al4V alloy with a same thickness of 0.2 mm were joined by micro laser welding. The effect of laser power on crack sensitivity of the weld was investigated. The results show that full penetrated welds are obtained when the laser power of 7.2 W is used, many cracks are observed in the weld. With increasing the laser power to 12 W, the number of all cracks and cracking width first increase and then decrease. By XRD analysis, three different kinds of Ti2Ni, NbNi3 and AlNbTi2 intermetallic compounds are found in the weld. According to the formation enthalpy and binary phase diagram, brittle Ti2Ni phase with more contents is existed in the weld due to final solidification, and which is the main reason of crack formation along with large stress concentration. Moreover, the welding cracks like the weld center longitudinal solidification cracks, weld metal toe transversal liquid cracks, heat-affected-zone hot cracks and crater cracks are classified in the laser welded joints. A brittle cleavage fracture with cleavage planes and river patterns in the joints is presented from the fracture surface.

  10. The ways of reliability enhancement of welded metal structures for critical applications in the conditions of low climatic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraev, Yu. N.; Bezborodov, V. P.; Gladkovsky, S. V.; Golikov, N. I.

    2016-11-01

    The paper studies how the energy parameters of an effective welding technology based on adaptive pulse-arc welding method influence the microstructure, mechanical characteristics and fatigue strength of low carbon steel 09G2S welded joint. It is established that the application of the adaptive pulse-arc welding method with modulated current (CMW) as compared to the welding method with direct current (DCW) allows one to obtain a welded joint of this steel with high reserve impact strength, dynamic fracture toughness and fatigue strength of metallic structures at operation temperatures up to -60°C.

  11. Picosecond laser welding of optical to metal components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Richard M.; Troughton, Michael; Chen, Jinanyong; Elder, Ian; Thomson, Robert R.; Lamb, Robert A.; Esser, M. J. Daniel; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    We report on practical, industrially relevant, welding of optical components to themselves and aluminum alloy components. Weld formation is achieved through the tight focusing of a 5.9ps, 400kHz Trumpf laser operating at 1030nm. By selecting suitable surface preparation, clamping and laser parameters, the plasma can be confined, even with comparatively rough surfaces, by exploiting the melt properties of the glass. The short interaction time allows for a permanent weld to form between the two materials with heating limited to a region ~300 µm across. Practical application of these weld structures is typically limited due to the induced stress within the glass and, critically, the issues surrounding post-weld thermal expansion. We report on the measured strength of the weld, with a particular emphasis on laser parameters and surface preparation.

  12. Characterization of tool wear and weld optimization in the friction-stir welding of cast aluminum 359+20% SiC metal-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, G.J.; Murr, L.E

    2004-03-15

    Tool wear for threaded steel pin tools declines with decreasing rotation speed and increasing traverse or weld speeds for the friction-stir welding (FSW) of Al 359+20% SiC metal-matrix composite (MMC). Less than 10% tool wear occurs when the threaded tool erodes to a self-optimized shape resembling a pseudo-hour glass at weld traverse distances in excess of 3 m. There is only a 7% reduction in the SiC mean particle size in the weld zone for self-optimized pin tools with no threads as compared with a 25% variation for threaded tools wearing significantly at the start of welding. The weld zone becomes more homogeneous for efficient welding with self-optimized tools, and there is a reduction in the weld zone grain size due to dynamic recrystallization, which facilitates the solid-state flow. Transmission electron microscopy shows little difference in the dislocation density from the base material to the weld zone, but there is a propensity of dislocation loops in the weld zone. The weld zone is observed to harden by as much as 30%, in contrast to the base material, as a consequence of the recrystallized grain size reduction and the SiC particles distributed therein.

  13. The origin of acicular ferrite in gas metal arc and submerged arc welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, Daniel G.

    1994-03-01

    The nature of weld metal inclusions in relation to the formation of acicular ferrite was investigated. Gas-metal arc welds (GMAW) on High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) plate with varying amounts of oxygen and/or carbon dioxide added to the argon cover gas and submerged arc welds (SAW) on HY-100 plate with five different fluxes were analyzed. This analysis determined the effect of weld metal composition on non-metallic inclusion composition and the ultimate effects on the formation of acicular ferrite. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray analysis were used to determine inclusion size distribution, concentration and composition. This investigation revealed that the inclusions were complex MnO-Al2O3-SiO2-TiO2 oxides which contain a titanium-rich compound, Pyrophanite (MnTiO3), existing as a faceted particle in those inclusions promoting acicular ferrite formation. From these results and the research of others such as Grong/Matlock and Ramsay/Matlock/Olson it is concluded that the formation of acicular ferrite does depend on non-metallic inclusion composition demonstrating the importance of weld wire composition for achieving welds with optimum mechanical properties.

  14. Repair of pipelines by direct deposition of weld metal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, W.A.; Mishier, H.D.; Kiefner, J.F.

    1993-06-08

    A study was made of the feasibility of repairing defects, especially corrosion-caused metal loss, by direct deposition of weld metal in pressurized pipelines without removing them from service. From experiments conducted to establish limiting parameters to avoid burnthrough, it appears feasible to carry out repair by means of weld metal deposition on remaining wall thicknesses as small as 0.125-in. (3.2-mm) with internal pressure levels as high as 800 psig (54.4 bar). This confirms the work of British Gas and others. Ability to do so safely seems enhanced by small-diameter electrodes [3/32-in. (2.4-MM)-diameter or less] with heat inputs not exceeding 15 kJ/in. (0.59 kJ/mm). Most effective technique involves a perimeter weld followed by consecutive parallel fill passes. This technique results in most consistent weld profile, least amount of welder-induced discontinuities and highest amount of tempering from subsequent passes. This tempering, combined with use of low-hydrogen electrodes and low level of restraint inherent with deposited weld metal repair, minimizes the risk of hydrogen cracking. Cyclic pressure and burst testing results indicate that repairs made by deposited weld metal are resistant to pressure cycles and restore strength of the pipe. It was also shown that surface finish, pressurizing medium during welding and repair extent/electrode size have no measurable effect on either the resistance to pressure cycles or the ability to restore the strength of the pipeline. It is concluded that repairs by deposited weld metal are feasible and should be permitted by various regulations and design codes.

  15. Possibility of Underwater Explosive Welding for Making Large-Sized Thin Metal Plate Clad by Overlapping Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokamoto, Kazuyuki; Mori, Akihisa; Fujita, Masahiro

    The authors have developed a new method of explosive welding using underwater shock wave for the welding of thin plate on a substrate. Considering the size limitation of the welding area in using the technique, the possibility of overlapping thin plates to make large-sized welding area is investigated. In general, the results for the welding of Inconel 600 on 304 stainless steel show a macroscopically successful weld, but the microstructure shows some melting spots caused due to the trapping of metal jet during the welding process when the welding condition is changed. The welding process is discussed based on the experimental results in comparison with some numerically simulated results obtained by AUTODYN-2D code.

  16. Repair of pipelines by direct deposition of weld metal further studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, W.A.; Holdren, R.L.; Mohr, W.C.; Kiefner, J.F.

    1996-11-13

    The work described herein establishes the feasibility of repairing defects, especially corrosion-caused wall loss, by direct deposition of weld metal in pressurized pipelines without removing them from service. While this might seem inherently dangerous, past experience with {open_quotes}puddle welds{close_quotes} in corrosion pits and with repair and hot tap welding on relatively thin pipe materials suggests that it can be done safely. From the results of experiments conducted to establish the limiting parameters to avoid burnthrough, it appears that it is feasible to carry out repair by means of weld metal deposition on remaining wall thicknesses as small as 0.125 in. (3.2 mm) with internal pressure levels as high as 900 psig (6.2 MPa). This finding confirms the work of British Gas and others which also demonstrated that welding onto 0.125-in. (3.2-mm)-thick pipe was possible. The ability to do so safely is enhanced by the use of small-diameter electrodes (3/32-in. [2.4-mm] -diameter or less). Heat inputs limits were established as a function of remaining wall thickness and electrode diameter. The results of the previous work at EWI indicate that the most effective technique for making weld metal deposition repairs involves a series of perimeter welds followed by layers of consecutive parallel fill passes. This technique results in the most consistent weld profile, the least amount of welder-induced discontinuities and the highest amount of tempering from subsequent passes. This tempering, combined with the use of low-hydrogen electrodes and the low level of restraint inherent with deposited weld metal repair minimizes the risk of hydrogen cracking.

  17. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., cutting, or working with molten metal. 57.15007 Section 57.15007 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  18. Use of plasma arc welding process to combat hydrogen metallic disbonding of austenitic stainless steel claddings

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, O.A. ); Steklov, O.I.; Alexeev, A.V. )

    1993-11-01

    A separation type crack, metallic disbonding, occurred between austenitic stainless steel weld metal cladding and 2 1/4Cr-1Mo base metal in the hydrodesulfurizing reactor of an oil refining plant. For stainless steel cladding, the submerged arc welding (SAW) process with a strip electrode is usually applied, but the authors experimented with the plasma arc welding (PAW) process with hot wire electrode for the cladding. The metallic disbonding is considered to be attributed to hydrogen accumulation at the transition zone and has been generally studied on a laboratory scale using an autoclave. The authors used a electrolytic hydrogen charging technique for the sake of experimental simplicity and made a comparison with the results for gaseous hydrogen charging. The main conclusions obtained were follows: The PAW stainless steel weld metal cladding is more resistant to metallic disbonding with the PAW process is explained by the desirable microstructure and properties of the first layer of weld metal at the transition zone. Electrolytic hydrogen charging pretty well reproduces the results of autoclave gas phase charging.

  19. Development of an intelligent system for cooling rate and fill control in GMAW. [Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW)

    SciTech Connect

    Einerson, C.J.; Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.; Taylor, P.L. ); Moore, K.L. )

    1992-01-01

    A control strategy for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is developed in which the welding system detects certain existing conditions and adjusts the process in accordance to pre-specified rules. This strategy is used to control the reinforcement and weld bead centerline cooling rate during welding. Relationships between heat and mass transfer rates to the base metal and the required electrode speed and welding speed for specific open circuit voltages are taught to a artificial neural network. Control rules are programmed into a fuzzy logic system. TRADITOINAL CONTROL OF THE GMAW PROCESS is based on the use of explicit welding procedures detailing allowable parameter ranges on a pass by pass basis for a given weld. The present work is an exploration of a completely different approach to welding control. In this work the objectives are to produce welds having desired weld bead reinforcements while maintaining the weld bead centerline cooling rate at preselected values. The need for this specific control is related to fabrication requirements for specific types of pressure vessels. The control strategy involves measuring weld joint transverse cross-sectional area ahead of the welding torch and the weld bead centerline cooling rate behind the weld pool, both by means of video (2), calculating the required process parameters necessary to obtain the needed heat and mass transfer rates (in appropriate dimensions) by means of an artificial neural network, and controlling the heat transfer rate by means of a fuzzy logic controller (3). The result is a welding machine that senses the welding conditions and responds to those conditions on the basis of logical rules, as opposed to producing a weld based on a specific procedure.

  20. A Comparison of Weld-Repaired and Base Metal for Inconel 718 and CRES 321 at Cryogenic and Room Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Willard, Scott A.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted to characterize the performance of Inconel 718 and CRES 321 welds, weld heat-affect-zone and parent metal at room temperature laboratory air and liquid nitrogen (-196oC) environments. The results of this study were required to predict the damage tolerance behavior of proposed orbiter main engine hydrogen fuel liner weld repairs. Experimental results show that the room and cryogenic temperature fatigue crack growth characteristics of both alloys are not significantly degraded by the weld repair process. However, both Inconel 718 and CRES 321 exhibited lower apparent toughness within the weld repair region compared to the parent metal.

  1. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-3, Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Submerged Arc Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This third in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection presents the apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspection for the tungsten inert gas, metal inert gas, and submerged arc welding processes. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  2. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-3, Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Submerged Arc Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This third in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection presents the apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspection for the tungsten inert gas, metal inert gas, and submerged arc welding processes. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  3. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas metal arc welding of mild steel.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Takahashi, Jyunya; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-09-30

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema in the workplace. The degree of hazard from UVR exposure depends on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the UVR levels present under various conditions. We experimentally evaluated the UVR levels emitted in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild steel. We used both a pulsed welding current and a non-pulsed welding current. The shielding gases were 80% Ar + 20% CO2 and 100% CO2. The effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines was used to quantify the UVR hazard. The effective irradiance measured in this study was in the range of 0.51-12.9 mW/cm(2) at a distance of 500 mm from the arc. The maximum allowable exposure times at these levels are only 0.23-5.9 s/day. The following conclusions were made regarding the degree of hazard from UVR exposure during the GMAW of mild steel: (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) At higher welding currents, it is more hazardous when 80% Ar + 20% CO2 is used as a shielding gas than when 100% CO2 is used. (3) It is more hazardous for pulsed welding currents than for non-pulsed welding currents. (4) It appears to be very hazardous when metal transfer is the spray type. This study demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by the GMAW of mild steel is quite hazardous.

  4. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas metal arc welding of mild steel

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Takahashi, Jyunya; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema in the workplace. The degree of hazard from UVR exposure depends on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the UVR levels present under various conditions. Methods: We experimentally evaluated the UVR levels emitted in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild steel. We used both a pulsed welding current and a non-pulsed welding current. The shielding gases were 80% Ar + 20% CO2 and 100% CO2. The effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines was used to quantify the UVR hazard. Results: The effective irradiance measured in this study was in the range of 0.51-12.9 mW/cm2 at a distance of 500 mm from the arc. The maximum allowable exposure times at these levels are only 0.23-5.9 s/day. Conclusions: The following conclusions were made regarding the degree of hazard from UVR exposure during the GMAW of mild steel: (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) At higher welding currents, it is more hazardous when 80% Ar + 20% CO2 is used as a shielding gas than when 100% CO2 is used. (3) It is more hazardous for pulsed welding currents than for non-pulsed welding currents. (4) It appears to be very hazardous when metal transfer is the spray type. This study demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by the GMAW of mild steel is quite hazardous. PMID:27488036

  5. Toughness of 2,25Cr-1Mo steel and weld metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acarer, Mustafa; Arici, Gökhan; Acar, Filiz Kumdali; Keskinkilic, Selcuk; Kabakci, Fikret

    2017-09-01

    2,25Cr-1Mo steel is extensively used at elevated temperature structural applications in fossil fire power plants for steam pipes, nozzle chambers and petrochemical industry for hydrocracking unit due to its excellent creep resistance and good redundant to oxidation. Also they should have acceptable weldability and toughness. The steels are supplied in quenched and tempered condition and their welded components are subjected to post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). Tempering process is carried out at 690-710°C to improve toughness properties. However they are sensitive to reheat cracking and temper embrittlement. To measure temper embrittlement of the steels and their weld metal, temper embrittlement factor and formula (J factor - Watanabe and X formula- Bruscato) are used. Step cooling heat treatment is also applied to determine temper embrittlement. In this study, toughness properties of Cr Mo (W) steels were reviewed. Also transition temperature curves of 2,25Cr-1Mo steel and its weld metal were constructed before and after step cool heat treatment as experimental study. While 2,25Cr-1Mo steel as base metal was supplied, all weld metal samples were produced in Gedik Welding Company. Hardness measurements and microstructure evaluation were also carried out.

  6. Chemical composition effect on VVER-1000 RPV weld metal thermal aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B. A.; Chernobaeva, A. A.; Erak, D. Yu; Kuleshova, E. A.; Zhurko, D. A.; Papina, V. B.; Skundin, M. A.; Maltsev, D. A.

    2015-10-01

    Temperature and fast neutron flux simultaneously affect the material of welded joints of reactor pressure vessels under irradiation. Understanding thermal aging effects on the weld metal allows for an explanation of the mechanisms that govern an increase in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of the reactor pressure vessel materials under long term irradiation at operation temperature. This paper reports on new results and reassessment of the VVER-1000 weld metal surveillance specimen database performed at the National Research Center "Kurchatov Institute". The current database of VVER-1000 weld metal thermal aging at 310-320 °C includes 50 transition temperature values with the maximum holding time of 208,896 h. The updated database completed with the information on intergranular fracture shear and phosphorous content in the grain boundaries has allowed us to propose a new mechanism of VVER-1000 weld materials thermal aging at 310-320 °C and develop models of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature shift for VVER-1000 weld metal during a long-term exposure at 310-320 °C.

  7. Tensile Behaviour of Welded Wire Mesh and Hexagonal Metal Mesh for Ferrocement Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanawade, A. G.; Modhera, C. D.

    2017-08-01

    Tension tests were conducted on welded mesh and hexagonal Metal mesh. Welded Mesh is available in the market in different sizes. The two types are analysed viz. Ø 2.3 mm and Ø 2.7 mm welded mesh, having opening size 31.75 mm × 31.75 mm and 25.4 mm × 25.4 mm respectively. Tensile strength test was performed on samples of welded mesh in three different orientations namely 0°, 30° and 45° degrees with the loading axis and hexagonal Metal mesh of Ø 0.7 mm, having opening 19.05 × 19.05 mm. Experimental tests were conducted on samples of these meshes. The objective of this study was to investigate the behaviour of the welded mesh and hexagonal Metal mesh. The result shows that the tension load carrying capacity of welded mesh of Ø 2.7 mm of 0° orientation is good as compared to Ø2.3 mm mesh and ductility of hexagonal Metal mesh is good in behaviour.

  8. Fatigue crack growth properties of the base metal and weld metal of a 9% Ni steel for LNG storage tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Kyun; Shim, Kyu-Taek; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2009-07-01

    Newly developed heavy thick plates of 9% Ni steel for large capacity of LNG tank were fabricated to conduct a fatigue crack growth test. The weld metal specimens were also fabricated by taking the same weld procedures which are applied to actual LNG storage tank inner shell. The effect of changes in load ratio, R, and test temperature on the fatigue crack growth rate has been investigated. Separate fatigue crack growth experiments were performed at load ratio of 0.1 and 0.5 at -162°C and compared to the behavior at room temperature. The fatigue crack growth rates of weld metal were nearly the same as those of the base metal irrespective of load ratio change at room temperature. A decrease in temperature decreased the fatigue crack growth rates of base metal but in the case of weld metal only small scatters appeared in the fatigue crack growth rate compared with those of base metals. The fatigue crack growth rates were dominated by residual stress due to welding processes rather than temperature effects.

  9. Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    N. Jerred; L. Zirker; I. Charit; J. Cole; M. Frary; D. Butt; M. Meyer; K. L. Murty

    2010-10-01

    Pressure Resistance Welding (PRW) is a solid state joining process used for various high temperature metallic materials (Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys of MA957, MA754; martensitic alloy HT-9, tungsten etc.) for advanced nuclear reactor applications. A new PRW machine has been installed at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls for conducting joining research for nuclear applications. The key emphasis has been on understanding processing-microstructure-property relationships. Initial studies have shown that sound joints can be made between dissimilar materials such as MA957 alloy cladding tubes and HT-9 end plugs, and MA754 and HT-9 coupons. Limited burst testing of MA957/HT-9 joints carried out at various pressures up to 400oC has shown encouraging results in that the joint regions do not develop any cracking. Similar joint strength observations have also been made by performing simple bend tests. Detailed microstructural studies using SEM/EBSD tools and fatigue crack growth studies of MA754/HT-9 joints are ongoing.

  10. Achieving High Strength Joint of Pure Copper Via Laser-Cold Metal Transfer Arc Hybrid Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yulong; Chen, Cong; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-01

    Fiber laser-cold metal transfer arc hybrid welding of pure copper was studied. Weld porosity was tested by X-ray nondestructive testing. Microstructure and fracture features were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were evaluated by cross weld tensile test. Full penetrated and continuous welds were obtained by hybrid welding once the laser power reached 2 kW, while they could not be obtained by laser welding alone, even though the laser power reached 5 kW. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the yield strength (YS), and the elongation of the best hybrid weld material were up to 227, 201 MPa, and 21.5 pct, respectively. The joint efficiencies in UTS and YS of hybrid weld were up to 84 and 80 pct of the BM, respectively. The fracture location changes from the fusion zone to the heat-affected zone with the increase of laser power. Besides, the mechanisms of process stability and porosity suppression were clarified by laser-arc interaction and pool behavior. The strengthening mechanism was discussed by microstructure characteristics.

  11. Microstructure of Ti6Al4V weld metal and simulated HAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Kivineva, E.; Hannerz, N.E.; Sjoeberg, R.

    1995-12-31

    TIG and plasma arc welding were performed on 3.2 mm thick plate of Ti6Al4V (ASTM Grade 5). The welds were studied for mechanical properties in the as welded as well as in the post weld heat treated condition. Plasma arc welding was conducted with and without external copper cooling devices. It appears that TIG-welding resulted in rather large {beta} grains the mean size being 830 {micro}m depending probably on the excessive heat input involved in the process. The smallest weld metal {beta}-grain size 375 {micro}m was obtained by plasma arc with water-cooled copper blocks. The heat affected zone grain size was studied by Gleeble simulation with peak temperature 1,400 C, The cooling time {Delta}t8/5 was permutated from 10 to 300 sec. The slowest cooling time {Delta}t8/5=300 see resulted in a {beta} grain size of 515 {micro}m. At the more rapid cooling times a martensitic structure in the large {beta} grains was obtained, but a Widmanstaetten substructure is also formed at slower cooling. Moreover grain boundary {alpha} is precipitated at the slowest cooling times {Delta}t8/5=300 sec. To obtain the desired toughness properties it appears that post weld heat treatment would be necessary unless a very low heat input is employed.

  12. Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Zirker; Craig Tyler

    2010-08-01

    Engineers from the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have demonstrated an innovative method for seal or pinch welding stainless steel tubing. Sometimes a tube has fuel or contamination that must be contained, or the tube needs to be shortened or cut for handling, and the tube needs to have a guaranteed sealed weld that is both quick and easy. This technique was demonstrated in a laboratory using a resistance welding system with specially designed electrodes to ensure a tube end is seal welded or if a long tube is to be shortened, the severed ends are seal welded. The unique electrodes design is integral to achieving the sealed ends. This process could readily be adapted for robotic--remote handling or for contact handling in a glovebox or hood.

  13. Rapid detection of transition metals in welding fumes using paper-based analytical devices.

    PubMed

    Cate, David M; Nanthasurasak, Pavisara; Riwkulkajorn, Pornpak; L'Orange, Christian; Henry, Charles S; Volckens, John

    2014-05-01

    Metals in particulate matter (PM) are considered a driving factor for many pathologies. Despite the hazards associated with particulate metals, personal exposures for at-risk workers are rarely assessed due to the cost and effort associated with monitoring. As a result, routine exposure assessments are performed for only a small fraction of the exposed workforce. The objective of this research was to evaluate a relatively new technology, microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (µPADs), for measuring the metals content in welding fumes. Fumes from three common welding techniques (shielded metal arc, metal inert gas, and tungsten inert gas welding) were sampled in two welding shops. Concentrations of acid-extractable Fe, Cu, Ni, and Cr were measured and independently verified using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Results from the µPAD sensors agreed well with ICP-OES analysis; the two methods gave statistically similar results in >80% of the samples analyzed. Analytical costs for the µPAD technique were ~50 times lower than market-rate costs with ICP-OES. Further, the µPAD method was capable of providing same-day results (as opposed several weeks for ICP laboratory analysis). Results of this work suggest that µPAD sensors are a viable, yet inexpensive alternative to traditional analytic methods for transition metals in welding fume PM. These sensors have potential to enable substantially higher levels of hazard surveillance for a given resource cost, especially in resource-limited environments.

  14. Physical basis for the transition from globular to spray modes in gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowke, J. J.

    2009-07-01

    In gas metal arc welding with argon gas, there is a fairly sudden transition current above which diameters of the molten metal drops detached from the welding wire change from being greater than the wire diameter in the 'globular' mode to less than the wire diameter in the 'spray' mode. It is concluded that the primary cause of this transition is that at higher currents the magnetic pinch pressure from current within the molten metal becomes larger than the pressure induced by the surface tension of the molten metal. A formula expressing this condition is I = 2π(γD/μ0)1/2, where I is the transition current, D is the diameter of the wire, γ is the surface tension coefficient of the molten metal and μ0 = 1.26 × 10-6 N A-2 is the permeability of free space. This formula predicts transition currents in fair agreement with previously published experimental results from various authors for both steel and aluminium, for wire diameters varying from 0.4 to 3.0 mm. The formula is not valid for carbon dioxide, helium or hydrogen where, unlike argon, there is arc constriction at the base of the welding wire. Nevertheless, the formula represents a useful approximation for the change in metal transfer modes using various welding wire materials if, as is usual, argon is the principal component of the welding gas.

  15. Rapid Detection of Transition Metals in Welding Fumes Using Paper-Based Analytical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Volckens, John

    2014-01-01

    Metals in particulate matter (PM) are considered a driving factor for many pathologies. Despite the hazards associated with particulate metals, personal exposures for at-risk workers are rarely assessed due to the cost and effort associated with monitoring. As a result, routine exposure assessments are performed for only a small fraction of the exposed workforce. The objective of this research was to evaluate a relatively new technology, microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (µPADs), for measuring the metals content in welding fumes. Fumes from three common welding techniques (shielded metal arc, metal inert gas, and tungsten inert gas welding) were sampled in two welding shops. Concentrations of acid-extractable Fe, Cu, Ni, and Cr were measured and independently verified using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Results from the µPAD sensors agreed well with ICP-OES analysis; the two methods gave statistically similar results in >80% of the samples analyzed. Analytical costs for the µPAD technique were ~50 times lower than market-rate costs with ICP-OES. Further, the µPAD method was capable of providing same-day results (as opposed several weeks for ICP laboratory analysis). Results of this work suggest that µPAD sensors are a viable, yet inexpensive alternative to traditional analytic methods for transition metals in welding fume PM. These sensors have potential to enable substantially higher levels of hazard surveillance for a given resource cost, especially in resource-limited environments. PMID:24515892

  16. Microstructural Evolution of Inconel 625 and Inconel 686CPT Weld Metal for Clad Carbon Steel Linepipe Joints: A Comparator Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltin, Charles A.; Galloway, Alexander M.; Mweemba, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Microstructural evolution of Inconel 625 and Inconel 686CPT filler metals, used for the fusion welding of clad carbon steel linepipe, has been investigated and compared. The effects of iron dilution from the linepipe parent material on the elemental segregation potential of the filler metal chemistry have been considered. The results obtained provide significant evidence to support the view that, in Inconel 686CPT weld metal, the segregation of tungsten is a function of the level of iron dilution from the parent material. The data presented indicate that the incoherent phase precipitated in the Inconel 686CPT weld metal has a morphology that is dependent on tungsten enrichment and, therefore, iron dilution. Furthermore, in the same weld metal, a continuous network of finer precipitates was observed. The Charpy impact toughness of each filler metal was evaluated, and the results highlighted the superior impact toughness of the Inconel 625 weld metal over that of Inconel 686CPT.

  17. Direct welding of glass and metal by 1  kHz femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guodong; Cheng, Guanghua

    2015-10-20

    In the welding process between similar or dissimilar materials, inserting an intermediate layer and pressure assistance are usually thought to be necessary. In this paper, the direct welding between alumina-silicate glass and metal (aluminum, copper, and steel), under exposure from 1 kHz femtosecond laser pulses without any auxiliary processes, is demonstrated. The micron/nanometer-sized metal particles induced by laser ablation were considered to act as the adhesive in the welding process. The welding parameters were optimized by varying the pulse energy and the translation velocity of the sample. The shear joining strength characterized by a shear force testing equipment was as high as 2.34 MPa. This direct bonding technology has potential for applications in medical devices, sensors, and photovoltaic devices.

  18. Study on impact toughness of C-Mn multilayer weld metal at [minus]60 degrees

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.; Xia, T.D.; Yan, C. )

    1993-01-01

    A comparative study has been carried out on the toughness of specimens of the C-Mn multilayer weld steel and that of the specimens simulated with the various reheating cycles by using the weld thermal-restraint stress and strain cycle simulator. It proved that the region initiating the cleavage crack, i.e., the weakest fractured at [minus]60 C([minus]76 F), is just the region having the lowest toughness among various reheated zones. The toughness of weld metal depends upon the toughness value of this weakest region. Heat input and alloying elements, such as manganese, titanium and boron, affected the toughness of weld metal by changing the toughness of the weakest region in the multilayer weldment.

  19. Microstructure/property relationships in dissimilar welds between duplex stainless steels and carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhouse, E.J.; Lippold, J.C.

    1998-12-01

    The metallurgical characteristics, toughness and corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds between duplex stainless steel Alloy 2205 and carbon steel A36 have been evaluated. Both duplex stainless steel ER2209 and Ni-based Alloy 625 filler metals were used to join this combination using a multipass, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Defect-free welds were made with each filler metal. The toughness of both the 625 and 2209 deposits were acceptable, regardless of heat input. A narrow martensitic region with high hardness was observed along the A36/2209 fusion boundary. A similar region was not observed in welds made with the 625 filler metal. The corrosion resistance of the welds made with 2209 filler metal improved with increasing heat input, probably due to higher levels of austenite and reduced chromium nitride precipitation. Welds made with 625 exhibited severe attack in the root pass, while the bulk of the weld was resistant. This investigation has shown that both filler metals can be used to joint carbon steel to duplex stainless steels, but that special precautions may be necessary in corrosive environments.

  20. Investigation of the Pyrometallurgical, Physical and Mechanical Behavior of Weld Metal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    has been used to make homogeneous high purity ceramic chemicals. The sol gel process has also been demonstrated to achieve properties of the welding...extremely cost effective in reducing cold cracking associated with high strenght steel weldments (see publication #12). 2.4 Aluminum Weld Metal Cracking...Al-Li-Cu alloys without sufficient grain refiners have a high susceptibility of hot tearing and inferior weldability. Additions of titanium and

  1. Study of the possibility of using solar radiant energy for welding and brazing metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvernyakov, V. S.; Frantsevich, I. N.; Pasichnyy, V. V.; Shiganov, N. A.; Korunov, Y. I.; Kasich-Pilipenko, I. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The solar spectrum at the surface of the earth is analyzed. A facility for creating concentrated solar radiant energy flux is described, and data on its energetic capabilities are presented. The technology of solar welding by the fusion technique and joining by high-temperature brazing is examined. The use of concentrated solar radiant energy for welding and brazing metals and alloys is shown. The results of mechanical tests and microscopic and macroscopic studies are presented.

  2. Study of the possibility of using solar radiant energy for welding and brazing metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvernyakov, V. S.; Frantsevich, I. N.; Pasichnyy, V. V.; Shiganov, N. A.; Korunov, Y. I.; Kasich-Pilipenko, I. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The solar spectrum at the surface of the earth is analyzed. A facility for creating concentrated solar radiant energy flux is described, and data on its energetic capabilities are presented. The technology of solar welding by the fusion technique and joining by high-temperature brazing is examined. The use of concentrated solar radiant energy for welding and brazing metals and alloys is shown. The results of mechanical tests and microscopic and macroscopic studies are presented.

  3. Gas Metal Arc Weld (GMAW) Qualification of 7020-T651 Aluminum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    filler metals, Al-magnesium ( Mg ) alloys AA5087, AA5556A, and Al-Mg6- Zr fusion welded with the gas metal arc weld (GMAW) pulse (P) and spray (S) methods...high strength levels of candidate Al structural and protection materials (e.g., Al-Zn- Mg 7020) for application to land vehicles. The 7020 alloy has...of the Al- Mg 5087, 5556A, and AlMg6- Zr filler metals, which were test evaluated by GMAW-P and -S processes in this study. The alloys range in

  4. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in the Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for the International Space Welding Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1996-01-01

    In 1997, the United States [NASA] and the Paton Electric Welding Institute are scheduled to cooperate in a flight demonstration on the U.S. Space Shuttle to demonstrate the feasibility of welding in space for a possible repair option for the International Space Station Alpha. This endeavor, known as the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), will involve astronauts performing various welding exercises such as brazing, cutting, welding, and coating using an electron beam space welding system that was developed by the E.O. Paton Electric Welding Institute (PWI), Kiev Ukraine. This electron beam welding system known as the "Universal Weld System" consists of hand tools capable of brazing, cutting, autogeneous welding, and coating using an 8 kV (8000 volts) electron beam. The electron beam hand tools have also been developed by the Paton Welding Institute with greater capabilities than the original hand tool, including filler wire feeding, to be used with the Universal Weld System on the U.S. Space Shuttle Bay as part of ISWE. The hand tool(s) known as the Ukrainian Universal Hand [Electron Beam Welding] Tool (UHT) will be utilized for the ISWE Space Shuttle flight welding exercises to perform welding on various metal alloy samples. A total of 61 metal alloy samples, which include 304 stainless steel, Ti-6AI-4V, 2219 aluminum, and 5456 aluminum alloys, have been provided by NASA for the ISWE electron beam welding exercises using the UHT. These samples were chosen to replicate both the U.S. and Russian module materials. The ISWE requires extravehicular activity (EVA) of two astronauts to perform the space shuttle electron beam welding operations of the 61 alloy samples. This study was undertaken to determine if a hazard could exist with ISWE during the electron beam welding exercises in the Space Shuttle Bay using the Ukrainian Universal Weld System with the UHT. The safety issue has been raised with regard to molten metal detachments as a result of several

  5. Study of gas tungsten arc welding procedures for tantalum alloy T-111 (Ta-8 W-2Hf) plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, R. E.; Kesterson, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Methods of eliminating or reducing underbread cracking in multipass GTA welds in thick T-111 plate were studied. Single V butt welds prepared using experimental filler metal compositions and standard weld procedures resulted in only moderate success in reducing underbread cracking. Subsequent procedural changes incorporating manual welding, slower weld speeds, and three or fewer fill passes resulted in crack-free single V welds only when the filler metal was free of hafnium. The double V joint design with successive fill passes on opposite sides of the joint produced excellent welds. The quality of each weld was determined metallographically since the cracking, when present, was very slight and undetectable using standard NDT techniques. Tensile and bend tests were performed on selected weldments. The inherent filler metal strength and the joint geometry determined the strength of the weldment. Hardness and electron beam microprobe traverses were made on selected specimens with the result that significant filler metal-base metal dilution as well as hafnium segregation was detected. A tentative explanation of T-111 plate underbread cracking is presented based on the intrinsic effects of hafnium in the weldment.

  6. Metal Cutting Theory and Friction Stir Welding Tool Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payton, Lewis N.

    2003-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively new industrial process that was invented at The Weld Institute (TWI, United Kingdom) and patented in 1992 under research funded by in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Often quoted advantages of the process include good strength and ductility along with minimization of residual stress and distortion. Less well advertised are the beneficial effects of this solid state welding process in the field of occupational and environmental safety. It produces superior weld products in difficult to weld materials without producing any toxic fumes or solid waste that must be controlled as hazardous waste. In fact, it reduces noise pollution in the workspace as well. In the early days of FSW, most welding was performed on modified machine tools, in particular on milling machines with modified milling cutters. In spite of the obvious milling heritage of the process, the techniques and lessons learned from almost 250 years of successful metalworking with milling machines have not been applied in the field of modern Friction Stir Welding. The goal of the current research was to study currently successful FSW tools and parameterize the process in such a way that the design of new tools for new materials could be accelerated. Along the way, several successful new tooling designs were developed for current issues at the Marshall Space Flight Center with accompanying patent disclosures

  7. Computed Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and is carried with the macro-flow of the weld metal. By using CT images, a 3-dimensional (3D) image of the lead flow pattern can be reconstructed. CT imaging was found to be a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  8. Evolution of weld metal microstructure in shielded metal arc welding of X70 HSLA steel with cellulosic electrodes: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Ghomashchi, Reza Costin, Walter; Kurji, Rahim

    2015-09-15

    The microstructure of weld joint in X70 line pipe steel resulted from shielded metal arc welding with E6010 cellulosic electrodes is characterized using optical and electron microscopy. A range of ferritic morphologies have been identified ranging from polygonal inter- and intra-prior austenite grains allotriomorphic, idiomorphic ferrites to Widmanstätten, acicular and bainitic ferrites. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis using Image Quality (IQ) and Inverse Pole Figure (IPF) maps through superimposition of IQ and IPF maps and measurement of percentages of high and low angle grain boundaries was identified to assist in differentiation of acicular ferrite from Widmanstätten and bainitic ferrite morphologies. In addition two types of pearlitic structures were identified. There was no martensite detected in this weld structure. The morphology, size and chemistry of non-metallic inclusions are also discussed briefly. - Highlights: • Application of EBSD reveals orientation relationships in a range of phases for shielded metal arc welding of HSLA steel. • Nucleation sites of various ferrite morphologies identified • Formation of upper and lower bainite and their morphologies.

  9. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  10. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Harold; Whitney, Gregory

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as welders and preparing them for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains an overview of new and emerging welding technologies, a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography.…

  11. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Harold; Whitney, Gregory

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as welders and preparing them for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains an overview of new and emerging welding technologies, a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography.…

  12. Room-Temperature Chemical Welding and Sintering of Metallic Nanostructures by Capillary Condensation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung-Soo; Khang, Dahl-Young

    2016-06-08

    Room-temperature welding and sintering of metal nanostructures, nanoparticles and nanowires, by capillary condensation of chemical vapors have successfully been demonstrated. Nanoscale gaps or capillaries that are abundant in layers of metal nanostructures have been found to be the preferred sites for the condensation of chemically oxidizing vapor, H2O2 in this work. The partial dissolution and resolidification at such nanogaps completes the welding/sintering of metal nanostructures within ∼10 min at room-temperature, while other parts of nanostructures remain almost intact due to negligible amount of condensation on there. The welded networks of Ag nanowires have shown much improved performances, such as high electrical conductivity, mechanical flexibility, optical transparency, and chemical stability. Chemically sintered layers of metal nanoparticles, such as Ag, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Co, have also shown orders of magnitude increase in electrical conductivity and improved environmental stability, compared to nontreated ones. Pertinent mechanisms involved in the chemical welding/sintering process have been discussed. Room-temperature welding and sintering of metal nanostructures demonstrated here may find widespread application in diverse fields, such as displays, deformable electronics, wearable heaters, and so forth.

  13. Butt Welding of 2205/X65 Bimetallic Sheet and Study on the Inhomogeneity of the Properties of the Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Ning-Nian; Zhang, Jian-Xun; Wang, Jian-Long; Bi, Zong-Yue

    2017-03-01

    The explosively welded 2205 duplex stainless steel/X65 pipe steel bimetallic sheets were butt jointed by multilayer and multi-pass welding (gas tungsten arc welding for the flyer and gas metal arc welding for the transition and parent layers of the bimetallic sheets). The microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joint were investigated. The results showed that in the thickness direction, microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joint exhibited obvious inhomogeneity. The microstructures of parent filler layers consisted of acicular ferrite, widmanstatten ferrite, and a small amount of blocky ferrite. The microstructure of the transition layer and flyer layer consisted of both austenite and ferrite structures; however, the transition layer of weld had a higher volume fraction of austenite. The results of the microhardness test showed that in both weld metal (WM) and heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the parent filler layers, the average hardness decreased with the increasing (from parent filler layer 1 to parent filler layer 3) welding heat input. The results of hardness test also indicated that the hardness of the WM and the HAZ for the flyer and transition layers was equivalent. The tensile test combined with Digital Specklegram Processing Technology demonstrated that the fracturing of the welded joint started at the HAZ of the flyer, and then the fracture grew toward the base metal of the parent flyer near the parent HAZ. The stratified impact test at -5 °C showed that the WM and HAZ of the flyer exhibited lower impact toughness, and the fracture mode was ductile and brittle mixed fracture.

  14. Butt Welding of 2205/X65 Bimetallic Sheet and Study on the Inhomogeneity of the Properties of the Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Ning-Nian; Zhang, Jian-Xun; Wang, Jian-Long; Bi, Zong-Yue

    2017-04-01

    The explosively welded 2205 duplex stainless steel/X65 pipe steel bimetallic sheets were butt jointed by multilayer and multi-pass welding (gas tungsten arc welding for the flyer and gas metal arc welding for the transition and parent layers of the bimetallic sheets). The microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joint were investigated. The results showed that in the thickness direction, microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joint exhibited obvious inhomogeneity. The microstructures of parent filler layers consisted of acicular ferrite, widmanstatten ferrite, and a small amount of blocky ferrite. The microstructure of the transition layer and flyer layer consisted of both austenite and ferrite structures; however, the transition layer of weld had a higher volume fraction of austenite. The results of the microhardness test showed that in both weld metal (WM) and heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the parent filler layers, the average hardness decreased with the increasing (from parent filler layer 1 to parent filler layer 3) welding heat input. The results of hardness test also indicated that the hardness of the WM and the HAZ for the flyer and transition layers was equivalent. The tensile test combined with Digital Specklegram Processing Technology demonstrated that the fracturing of the welded joint started at the HAZ of the flyer, and then the fracture grew toward the base metal of the parent flyer near the parent HAZ. The stratified impact test at -5 °C showed that the WM and HAZ of the flyer exhibited lower impact toughness, and the fracture mode was ductile and brittle mixed fracture.

  15. Influencing the arc and the mechanical properties of the weld metal in GMA-welding processes by additive elements on the wire electrode surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesling, V.; Schram, A.; Müller, T.; Treutler, K.

    2016-03-01

    Under the premise of an increasing scarcity of raw materials and increasing demands on construction materials, the mechanical properties of steels and its joints are gaining highly important. In particular high- and highest-strength steels are getting in the focus of the research and the manufacturing industry. To the same extent, the requirements for filler metals are increasing as well. At present, these low-alloy materials are protected by a copper coating (<1μm) against corrosion. In addition, the coating realizes a good ohmic contact and good sliding properties between the welding machine and the wire during the welding process. By exchanging the copper with other elements it should be possible to change the mechanical properties of the weld metal and the arc stability during gas metal arc welding processes and keep the basic functions of the coating nearly untouched. On a laboratory scale solid wire electrodes with coatings of various elements and compounds such as titanium oxide were made and processed with a Gas Metal Arc Welding process. During the processing a different process behavior between the wire electrodes, coated and original, could be observed. The influences ranges from greater/shorter arc-length over increasing/decreasing droplets to larger/smaller arc foot point. Furthermore, the weld metal of the coated electrodes has significantly different mechanical and technological characteristics as the weld metal from the copper coated ground wire. The yield strength and tensile strength can be increased by up to 50%. In addition, the chemical composition of the weld metal was influenced by the application of coatings with layer thicknesses to 15 microns in the lower percentage range (up to about 3%). Another effect of the coating is a modified penetration. The normally occurring “argon finger” can be suppressed or enhanced by the choice of the coating. With the help of the presented studies it will be shown that Gas Metal Arc Welding processes

  16. Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, J.C.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1996-03-26

    A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld. 5 figs.

  17. Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, John C.; Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1996-01-01

    A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld.

  18. Inverse Thermal Analysis of Refractory Metal Laser Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.

    2013-09-01

    Case study inverse thermal analyses of Vanadium and Tantalum laser welds are presented. These analyses employ a methodology that is in terms of analytic basis functions for inverse thermal analysis of steady-state energy deposition in plate structures. The results of the case studies presented provide parametric representations of weld temperature histories that can be adopted as input data to various types of computational procedures, such as those for prediction of solid-state phase transformations. In addition, these temperature histories can be used to construct parametric-function representations for inverse thermal analysis of welds corresponding to other process parameters or welding processes process conditions of which fall within similar regimes. This study also discusses specific aspects the inverse-analysis methodology relevant to further development of algorithms for its application in practice.

  19. Evaluation of the AISI 904L Alloy Weld Overlays Obtained by GMAW and Electro-Slag Welding Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorge, Jorge C. F.; Meira, O. G.; Madalena, F. C. A.; de Souza, L. F. G.; Araujo, L. S.; Mendes, M. C.

    2017-05-01

    The use of superaustenitic stainless steels (SASS) as an overlay replacement for nickel-based alloys can be an interesting alternative for the oil and gas industries, due to its lower cost, when compared to superalloys. Usually, the deposition is made with several welding passes by using conventional arc welding processes, such as gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. In this respect, electro-slag welding (ESW), which promotes high heat inputs and low dilution of the welds, can also be attractive for this application, as it provides a higher productivity, once only one layer is needed for the deposition of the minimum thickness required. The present work evaluates the behavior of an AISI 904L SASS weld overlay deposited on a carbon steel ASTM A516 Grade 70 by ESW and GMAW processes. Both as-welded and heat-treated conditions were evaluated and compared. A multipass welding by GMAW process with three layers and 48 passes was performed on 12.5 × 200 × 250 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 1.0 kJ/mm. For ESW process, only one layer was deposited on 50 × 400 × 400 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 11.7 kJ/mm. After welding, a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 620 °C for 10 h was performed in half of the steel plate, in order to allow the comparison between this condition and the as-welded one. For both processes, the austenitic microstructure of the weld deposits was characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with electron backscatter diffraction. A low proportion of secondary phases were observed in all conditions, and the PWHT did not promote significant changes on the hardness profile. Martensite for GMAW process and bainite for ESW process were the microstructural constituents observed at the coarse grain heat-affected zone, due to the different cooling rates. For ESW process, no evidences of partially diluted zones were found. As a consequence of the microstructural

  20. Evaluation of the AISI 904L Alloy Weld Overlays Obtained by GMAW and Electro-Slag Welding Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorge, Jorge C. F.; Meira, O. G.; Madalena, F. C. A.; de Souza, L. F. G.; Araujo, L. S.; Mendes, M. C.

    2017-03-01

    The use of superaustenitic stainless steels (SASS) as an overlay replacement for nickel-based alloys can be an interesting alternative for the oil and gas industries, due to its lower cost, when compared to superalloys. Usually, the deposition is made with several welding passes by using conventional arc welding processes, such as gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. In this respect, electro-slag welding (ESW), which promotes high heat inputs and low dilution of the welds, can also be attractive for this application, as it provides a higher productivity, once only one layer is needed for the deposition of the minimum thickness required. The present work evaluates the behavior of an AISI 904L SASS weld overlay deposited on a carbon steel ASTM A516 Grade 70 by ESW and GMAW processes. Both as-welded and heat-treated conditions were evaluated and compared. A multipass welding by GMAW process with three layers and 48 passes was performed on 12.5 × 200 × 250 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 1.0 kJ/mm. For ESW process, only one layer was deposited on 50 × 400 × 400 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 11.7 kJ/mm. After welding, a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 620 °C for 10 h was performed in half of the steel plate, in order to allow the comparison between this condition and the as-welded one. For both processes, the austenitic microstructure of the weld deposits was characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with electron backscatter diffraction. A low proportion of secondary phases were observed in all conditions, and the PWHT did not promote significant changes on the hardness profile. Martensite for GMAW process and bainite for ESW process were the microstructural constituents observed at the coarse grain heat-affected zone, due to the different cooling rates. For ESW process, no evidences of partially diluted zones were found. As a consequence of the microstructural

  1. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming

    2012-07-15

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  2. Toenail metal concentration as a biomarker of occupational welding fume exposure

    PubMed Central

    Grashow, Rachel; Zhang, Jinming; Fang, Shona C.; Weisskopf, Marc G.; Christiani, David C.; Cavallari, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    In populations exposed to heavy metals, there are few biomarkers that capture intermediate exposure windows. We sought to determine the correlation between toenail metal concentrations and prior 12 month work activity in welders with variable, metal-rich, welding fume exposures. Forty-eight participants, recruited through a local union, provided 69 sets of toenail clippings. Union-supplied and worker verified personal work histories were used to quantify hours welded and respirator use. Toenail samples were digested and analyzed for lead (Pb), manganese (Mn), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni) and arsenic (As) using ICP-MS. Spearman correlation coefficients were used to examine the correlation between toenail metal concentrations. Using mixed models to account for multiple participation times, we divided hours welded into three-month intervals and examined how weld hours correlated with log-transformed toenail Pb, Mn, Cd, Ni and As concentrations. Highest concentrations were found for Ni, followed by Mn, Pb and As, and Cd. All of the metals were significantly correlated with one another (rho range=0.28–0.51), with the exception of Ni and As (rho=0.20, p=0.17). Using mixed models adjusted for age, respirator use, smoking status and BMI, we found that Mn was associated with weld hours 7–9 months prior to clipping (p = 0.003), Pb was associated with weld hours 10–12 months prior to clipping (p=0.03) and over the entire year (p=0.04). Cd was associated with weld hours 10–12 months prior to clipping (p=0.05), and also with the previous year’s total hours welded (p=0.02). The association between Ni and weld hours 7–9 months prior to clipping approached significance (p=0.06). Toenail metal concentrations were not associated with the long-term exposure metric, years as a welder. Results suggest Mn, Pb, and Cd may have particular windows of relevant exposure that reflect work activity. In a population with variable exposure, toenails may serve as useful biomarkers for

  3. Toenail metal concentration as a biomarker of occupational welding fume exposure.

    PubMed

    Grashow, Rachel; Zhang, Jinming; Fang, Shona C; Weisskopf, Marc G; Christiani, David C; Cavallari, Jennifer M

    2014-01-01

    In populations exposed to heavy metals, there are few biomarkers that capture intermediate exposure windows. We sought to determine the correlation between toenail metal concentrations and prior 12-month work activity in welders with variable, metal-rich, welding fume exposures. Forty-eight participants, recruited through a local union, provided 69 sets of toenail clippings. Union-supplied and worker-verified personal work histories were used to quantify hours welded and respirator use. Toenail samples were digested and analyzed for lead (Pb), manganese (Mn), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), and arsenic (As) using ICP-MS. Spearman correlation coefficients were used to examine the correlation between toenail metal concentrations. Using mixed models to account for multiple participation times, we divided hours welded into three-month intervals and examined how weld hours correlated with log-transformed toenail Pb, Mn, Cd, Ni, and As concentrations. Highest concentrations were found for Ni, followed by Mn, Pb and As, and Cd. All the metals were significantly correlated with one another (rho range = 0.28-0.51), with the exception of Ni and As (rho = 0.20, p = 0.17). Using mixed models adjusted for age, respirator use, smoking status, and BMI, we found that Mn was associated with weld hours 7-9 months prior to clipping (p = 0.003), Pb was associated with weld hours 10-12 months prior to clipping (p = 0.03) and over the entire year (p = 0.04). Cd was associated with weld hours 10-12 months prior to clipping (p = 0.05), and also with the previous year's total hours welded (p = 0.02). The association between Ni and weld hours 7-9 months prior to clipping approached significance (p = 0.06). Toenail metal concentrations were not associated with the long-term exposure metric, years as a welder. Results suggest Mn, Pb, and Cd may have particular windows of relevant exposure that reflect work activity. In a population with variable exposure, toenails may serve as useful biomarkers

  4. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding

    PubMed Central

    Ampaiboon, Anusit; Lasunon, On-Uma; Bubphachot, Bopit

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa) and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10–20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%. PMID:26491719

  5. Explosive Welding of Aluminum, Titanium and Zirconium to Copper Sheet Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegazy, A. A.; Mote, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The main material properties affecting the explosive weldability of a certain metal combination are the yield strength, the ductility, the density and the sonic velocity of the two metals. Successful welding of the metal combination depends mainly on the correct choice of the explosive welding parameters; i.e., the stand off distance, the weight of the explosive charge relative to the weight of the flyer plate and the detonation velocity of the explosive. Based on the measured and the handbook values of the properties of interest, the explosive welding parameters were calculated and the arrangements for the explosive welding of the Al alloy 6061-T6, titanium and zirconium to OFHC copper were determined. The relatively small sheet metal thickness (1/8") and the fact that the thickness of the explosive layer must exceed a certain minimum value were considered during the determination of the explosive welding conditions. The results of the metallographic investigations and the measurements of the shear strength at the interface demonstrate the usefulness of these calculations to minimize the number of experimental trials.

  6. Occupational exposure to solvents, metals and welding fumes and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    van der Mark, Marianne; Vermeulen, Roel; Nijssen, Peter C G; Mulleners, Wim M; Sas, Antonetta M G; van Laar, Teus; Huss, Anke; Kromhout, Hans

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between occupational exposure to solvents, metals and/or welding fumes and risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). Data of a hospital based case-control study including 444 PD patients and 876 age and sex matched controls was used. Occupational histories and lifestyle information of cases and controls were collected in a structured telephone interview. Exposures to aromatic solvents, chlorinated solvents and metals were estimated by linking the ALOHA+ job-exposure matrix to the occupational histories. Exposure to welding fumes was estimated using self-reported information on welding activities. No statistically significant associations with any of the studied metal and solvent exposures were found. However, for self-reported welding activities we observed non-statistically significant reduced risk estimates (third tertile cumulative exposure: OR = 0.51 (95% CI: 0.21-1.24)). The results of our study did not provide support for an increased chance on developing PD after occupational exposure to aromatic solvents, chlorinated solvents or exposure to metals. The results showed reduced risk estimates for welding, which is in line with previous research, but no clear explanation for these findings is available. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Creep crack growth properties of type 308 austenitic stainless steel weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Konosu, S.; Hashimoto, A.; Mashiba, H.; Takeshima, M.; Ohtsuka, T.

    1998-08-01

    Using Type 308 austenitic stainless steel weld metal made by the SMAW and FCAW processes, creep tests and creep crack growth tests were carried out at a temperature of 650 C. Creep crack growth rate tests were conducted using CT-type specimens and the data derived were arranged according to parameter C{sup *}. With regard to the flux cored arc weld metal, Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} (melting point 820 C) was intentionally added to the flux for easy slag peeling and enhanced welding operability. The bismuth segregated (segregation depth approximately 15 {angstrom}) at the grain boundaries and, due to the presence of this bismuth, fracturing occurred intergranularly, with marked reduction in creep ductility. Further, the creep crack growth rate of the flux cored arc weld metal, which contained large amounts of bismuth, was exceedingly rapid compared with that of SMA and FCA weld metal not containing bismuth. Bismuth that has segregated at the grain boundaries is extremely harmful with respect to creep ductility and creep crack growth properties.

  8. Addition of cerium and yttrium to ferritic steel weld metal to improve hydrogen trapping efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Jin; Ryu, Kang Mook; Oh, Min-suk

    2017-04-01

    The applicability of Ce and Y as promising candidate elements to form irreversible traps in weld metal was investigated by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) with gas chromatography (GC). The precise nature of the precipitate particles newly formed in the weld metal by the addition of Ce and Y to a certain alloy system was characterized. Moreover, the hydrogen trapping efficiency expressed as the reduction of the diffusible hydrogen in the weld metal was analyzed. The results showed that the addition of Ce and/or Y to this alloy system led to the formation of a mixed type of (Ce,Ti)-based oxide, (Y,Ni)-based carbide, or (Ce,Y,Ti)-based oxide particles. Because of the high activation energy of the mixed type of particles (≥ 150 kJ/mol), the trapping efficiency for hydrogen was considered to be sufficiently high to effectively reduce the diffusible hydrogen content.

  9. Computer Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In friction stir welding, a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. This solid-state technique has been successfully used in the joining of materials that are difficult to fusion weld such as aluminum alloys. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and thus tracks the aluminum deformation flow paths in a unique 3-dimensional manner. CT scanning is a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  10. Method of beam welding metallic parts together and apparatus for doing same

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Sommer, R.G.

    1985-11-29

    This method provides for temporarily clamping a metallic piece to one side of a metallic plate while leaving the opposite side of the plate exposed, and providing a heat conductive heat sink body configured to engage the adjacent portions of such one side of the plate and the piece at all regions proximate to but not at the interface between these components. The exposed side of such plate is then subjected to an electron welding beam, in exact registry with but opposite to the piece. The electron welding beam is supplied with adequate energy for penetrating through the plate, across the interface, and into the piece, whereby the electron welding beam produces molten material from both the plate and the piece in the region of the interface. The molten material flows into any interstices that may exist in the interface, and upon cooling solidifies to provide a welded joint between the plate and piece, where the interface was, virtually without any interstices. The heat sink material prevents the molten material from extrucing beyond what was the interface, to provide a clean welded joint. The heat sink body also mechanically holds the plate and piece together prior to the actual welding.

  11. Method of beam welding metallic parts together and apparatus for doing same

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, Edward F.; Cassidy, Dale A.; Sommer, Robert G.

    1987-01-01

    The disclosed method provides for temporarily clamping a metallic piece to one side of a metallic plate while leaving the opposite side of the plate exposed, and providing a heat conductive heat sink body configured to engage the adjacent portions of such one side of the plate and the piece at all regions proximate to but not at the interface between these components. Such exposed side of such plate is then subjected to an electron welding beam, in exact registry with but opposite to the piece. The electron welding beam is supplied with adequate energy for penetrating through the plate, across the interface, and into the piece, whereby the electron welding beam produces molten material from both the plate and the piece in the region of the interface. The molten material flows into any interstices that may exist in the interface, and upon cooling solidifies to provide a welded joint between the plate and piece, where the interface was, virtually without any interstices. The heat sink material prevents the molten material from extruding beyond what was the interface, to provide a clean welded joint. The heat sink body also mechanically holds the plate and piece together prior to the actual welding.

  12. Modelling of gas-metal arc welding taking into account metal vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnick, M.; Fuessel, U.; Hertel, M.; Haessler, M.; Spille-Kohoff, A.; Murphy, A. B.

    2010-11-01

    The most advanced numerical models of gas-metal arc welding (GMAW) neglect vaporization of metal, and assume an argon atmosphere for the arc region, as is also common practice for models of gas-tungsten arc welding (GTAW). These models predict temperatures above 20 000 K and a temperature distribution similar to GTAW arcs. However, spectroscopic temperature measurements in GMAW arcs demonstrate much lower arc temperatures. In contrast to measurements of GTAW arcs, they have shown the presence of a central local minimum of the radial temperature distribution. This paper presents a GMAW model that takes into account metal vapour and that is able to predict the local central minimum in the radial distributions of temperature and electric current density. The influence of different values for the net radiative emission coefficient of iron vapour, which vary by up to a factor of hundred, is examined. It is shown that these net emission coefficients cause differences in the magnitudes, but not in the overall trends, of the radial distribution of temperature and current density. Further, the influence of the metal vaporization rate is investigated. We present evidence that, for higher vaporization rates, the central flow velocity inside the arc is decreased and can even change direction so that it is directed from the workpiece towards the wire, although the outer plasma flow is still directed towards the workpiece. In support of this thesis, we have attempted to reproduce the measurements of Zielińska et al for spray-transfer mode GMAW numerically, and have obtained reasonable agreement.

  13. Weldability characteristics of shielded metal arc welded high strength quenched and tempered plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, R.; Mukerjee, D.; Jha, S.; Narasimhan, K.; Veeraraghavan, R.

    2002-02-01

    High strength, quench and tempered (Q&T) plates having yield strength of a minimum of 670 MPa and conforming to SA 517 Gr. F specification were successfully developed at Rourkela Steel Plant in plates up to 40 mm thickness. The plates are used extensively for the fabrication of impellers, penstocks, excavators, dumpers, and raw material handling devices, where welding is an important processing step. SA 517 Gr. F plates, characterized by a relatively high carbon equivalent (CE: ˜0.6) and alloyed with Ni, Cr, Mo, Cu, and V, are susceptible to a crack-sensitive microstructure and cold cracking during welding. In view of the above, the present study investigated the weldability properties of 20 mm thick plates using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process. Implant and elastic restraint cracking (ERC) tests were carried out to assess the cold cracking resistance of the weld joint under different welding conditions. Preheat of 100 °C, partial or full rebake, and a heat input of 14.9 to 15.4 KJ/cm resulted in static fatigue limit (SFL) values well in excess of the minimum specified yield strength (MSYS) of 670 MPa and a critical restraint intensity (K cr) value of 34,650 MPa, indicating adequate cold cracking resistance. Lamellar tear tests conducted using full thickness plates at heat input levels ranging from 9.7 to 14.4 KJ/cm and weld restraint loads (WRL) of 510 to 685 MPa showed no incidence of lamellar tear upon visual, ultrasonic, and four-section macroexamination. The weld joint, based on optimized welding parameters, exhibited adequate tensile strength (812.4 MPa) and low temperature impact toughness 88.3 and 63.4 J (9.2 and 6.6 kg-m) at -40 °C for weld metal (WM), and heat-affected zone (HAZ) properties, respectively. The crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) values of WM and HAZ (0.40 and 0.36 mm, respectively) were superior to that of the parent metal (0.29 mm), indicating adequate resistance of weld joint to brittle fracture. It was concluded that

  14. Stability evaluation of short-circuiting gas metal arc welding based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Wang, Kehong; Zhou, Zhilan; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Fang, Jimi

    2017-03-01

    The arc of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) contains abundant information about its stability and droplet transition, which can be effectively characterized by extracting the arc electrical signals. In this study, ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) was used to evaluate the stability of electrical current signals. The welding electrical signals were first decomposed by EEMD, and then transformed to a Hilbert–Huang spectrum and a marginal spectrum. The marginal spectrum is an approximate distribution of amplitude with frequency of signals, and can be described by a marginal index. Analysis of various welding process parameters showed that the marginal index of current signals increased when the welding process was more stable, and vice versa. Thus EEMD combined with the marginal index can effectively uncover the stability and droplet transition of GMAW.

  15. Metal nanoparticles and IR laser applications in medicine for biotissue ablation and welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalayan, A. A.; Israelyan, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    We report the possibility of laser welding and ablation of biotissue by using metal and hybrid metal nanoparticles (NPs) and infrared laser irradiation spectrally located far from plasmon resonances. A nanosecond YAG:Nd laser of wavelength 1064 nm has been used for synthesis of metal NPs. The Ag, Au, Cu, Ti and Ni, as well as Au-Ag and Au-Cu hybrid metal colloidal NPs were formed in a liquid medium. The diagnostic technique of second harmonic generation (SHG) has been applied to determine the biotissue ablation area after IR laser irradiation. The effectiveness of biotissue ablation was 4-5 times larger in the case of a tissue sample colored with metal NPs than for an uncolored sample. IR laser welding has been demonstrated for deep-located biotissue layers colored by metal NPs.

  16. Influence of Solute Content and Solidification Parameters on Grain Refinement of Aluminum Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schempp, Philipp; Cross, Carl Edward; Pittner, Andreas; Rethmeier, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Grain refinement provides an important possibility to enhance the mechanical properties ( e.g., strength and ductility) and the weldability (susceptibility to solidification cracking) of aluminum weld metal. In the current study, a filler metal consisting of aluminum base metal and different amounts of commercial grain refiner Al Ti5B1 was produced. The filler metal was then deposited in the base metal and fused in a GTA welding process. Additions of titanium and boron reduced the weld metal mean grain size considerably and resulted in a transition from columnar to equiaxed grain shape ( CET). In commercial pure aluminum (Alloy 1050A), the grain-refining efficiency was higher than that in the Al alloys 6082 and 5083. Different welding and solidification parameters influenced the grain size response only slightly. Furthermore, the observed grain-size reduction was analyzed by means of the undercooling parameter P and the growth restriction parameter Q, which revealed the influence of solute elements and nucleant particles on grain size.

  17. 29 CFR 1915.54 - Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and structures not covered by § 1915.12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and... STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Welding, Cutting and Heating § 1915.54 Welding, cutting and heating of... which have contained flammable substances shall, before welding, cutting, or heating is undertaken...

  18. 29 CFR 1915.54 - Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and structures not covered by § 1915.12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and... STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Welding, Cutting and Heating § 1915.54 Welding, cutting and heating of... which have contained flammable substances shall, before welding, cutting, or heating is undertaken...

  19. 29 CFR 1915.54 - Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and structures not covered by § 1915.12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and... STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Welding, Cutting and Heating § 1915.54 Welding, cutting and heating of... which have contained flammable substances shall, before welding, cutting, or heating is undertaken...

  20. 29 CFR 1915.54 - Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and structures not covered by § 1915.12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and... STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Welding, Cutting and Heating § 1915.54 Welding, cutting and heating of... which have contained flammable substances shall, before welding, cutting, or heating is undertaken...

  1. 29 CFR 1915.54 - Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and structures not covered by § 1915.12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers and... STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Welding, Cutting and Heating § 1915.54 Welding, cutting and heating of... which have contained flammable substances shall, before welding, cutting, or heating is undertaken...

  2. The Impact of Teaching Oxy-Fuel Welding on Gas Metal Arc Welding Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sgro, Sergio D.; Field, Dennis W.; Freeman, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Industrial technology programs around the country must be sensitive to the demands of manufacturing and industry as they continue to replace "vocational" curriculum with high-tech alternatives. This article examines whether or not teaching oxyacetylene welding in the industrial technology classroom is required to learn arc welding…

  3. Precipitation of sigma and chi phases in δ-ferrite of Type 316FR weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Eun Joon; Baba, Hayato; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2013-12-15

    The decomposition behavior and kinetics of δ-ferrite are examined using aging treatments between 873 and 1073 K for Type 316FR stainless steel weld metals with different solidification modes (316FR AF, 316FR FA). The dominant precipitates are sigma, chi, and secondary austenite nucleated at δ-ferrite/austenite interfaces or in the interior of the ferrite grains. These precipitates consume all the ferrite during isothermal aging in both 316FR AF and FA weld metals. Differences in the precipitation behavior (precipitation initiation time and precipitation speed) between weld metals can be explained by i) the degree of Cr and Mo microsegregation within δ-ferrite or austenite near ferrite and ii) the nucleation sites induced due to the solidification mode (AF or FA), such as the ferrite amount. For both weld materials, a Johnson–Mehl-type equation can express the precipitation behavior of the sigma + chi phases and quantitatively predict the behavior at the service-exposure temperatures of a fast breed reactor. - Highlights: • Precipitation of σ and χ phase in Type 316FR welds (two solidification modes) • Different precipitation behaviors: precipitation initiation time and growth speed • Johnson-Mehl–type equation is the most applicable to the precipitation behaviors • Precipitation behaviors are predicted under service conditions of FBRs.

  4. Cleaning Effect of Interlayer Metal on the Joining Surface during Braze Pressure Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Yohei; Suzumura, Akio; Ikeshoji, Toshi-Taka; Yamazaki, Takahisa

    Braze Pressure Welding (BPW) with high frequency induction heating is a newly developed pressure welding technique using interlayer metals for welding the general steel pipes for pipe arrangement in buildings. BPW enables to make joints by solid-state welding in air with relatively small deformation. In this method, the interlayer metal is expected to play the primary role in making high performance joints. It removes contaminations from the joining surface of the base metal and forms fillets at the gaps around the joint. It had been revealed by some experiments and/or numerical analyses in previous research that the BPW joint had higher tensile strength than the brazed joint, and that the fillet can improve the joint strength. In this study, in order to investigate the cleaning effect of interlayer metal more closely, a low carbon steel plate specimen was brazed mainly by Ni-based brazing filler using a tungsten spacer. The microscopy and EPMA analysis on the joints made by various brazing temperatures and durations confirmed that the oxide films on the joining surfaces were removed and discharged from the joining region by the interlayer metal.

  5. Heat and fluid flow in complex joints during gas metal arc welding—Part I: Numerical model of fillet welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Kim, C.-H.; DebRoy, T.

    2004-05-01

    Gas metal arc (GMA) fillet welding is one of the most important processes for metal joining because of its high productivity and amiability to automation. This welding process is characterized by the complicated V-shaped joint geometry, a deformable weld pool surface, and the additions of hot metal droplets. In the present work, a three-dimensional numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model was developed to examine the temperature profiles, velocity fields, weld pool shape and size, and the nature of the solidified weld bead geometry during GMA fillet welding. The model solved the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy using a boundary fitted curvilinear coordinate system. Apart from the direct transport of heat from the welding arc, additional heat from the metal droplets was modeled considering a volumetric heat source. The deformation of the weld pool surface was calculated by minimizing the total surface energy. Part I of this article is focused on the details of the numerical model such as coordinate transformation and calculation of volumetric heat source and free surface profile. An application of the model to GMA fillet welding of mild steel is described in an accompanying article (W. Zhang, C.-H. Kim and T. DebRoy, J. Appl Phys. 95, 5220 (2004)).

  6. Effect of Postweld Aging Treatment on Fatigue Behavior of Pulsed Current Welded AA7075 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2008-04-01

    This article reports the effect of postweld aging treatment on fatigue behavior of pulsed current welded AA 7075 aluminum alloy joints. AA7075 aluminum alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers, and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of AA7075 aluminum alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Rolled plates of 10 mm thickness have been used as the base material for preparing multipass welded joints. Single V butt joint configuration has been prepared for joining the plates. The filler metal used for joining the plates is AA 5356 (Al-5Mg (wt.%)) grade aluminum alloy. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW), and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. Argon (99.99% pure) has been used as the shielding gas. Rotary bending fatigue testing machine has been used to evaluate fatigue behavior of the welded joints. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in GTA and GMA welds. Grain refinement is accompanied by an increase in fatigue life and endurance limit. Simple postweld aging treatment applied to the joints is found to be beneficial to enhance the fatigue performance of the welded joints.

  7. Effect of alloying on microstructure and precipitate evolution in ferritic weld metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Badri Kannan

    The effect of alloying on the microstructure of ferritic weld metal produced with an self-shielded flux cored arc welding process (FCAW-S) has been studied. The welding electrode has a flux core that is intentionally alloyed with strong deoxidizers and denitriding elements such as aluminum, titanium and zirconium in addition to austenite formers such as manganese and nickel. This results in formation of microstructure consisting of carbide free bainite, retained austenite and twinned martensite. The work focuses on characterization of the microstructures and the precipitates formed during solidification and the allotropic phase transformation of the weld metal. Aluminum, manganese and nickel have significant solubility in iron while aluminum, titanium and zirconium have very strong affinity for nitrogen and oxygen. The effect of these alloying elements on the phase transformation and precipitation of oxides and nitrides have been studied with various characterization techniques. In-situ X-ray synchrotron diffraction has been used to characterize the solidification path and the effect of heating and cooling rates on microstructure evolution. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) in conjunction with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to study the effect of micro-alloying additions on inclusion evolution. The formation of core-shell structure of oxide/nitride is identified as being key to improvement in toughness of the weld metal. Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) in combination with Orientation Imaging Microscopy (OIM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been employed to study the effect of alloying on austenite to ferrite transformation modes. The prevention of twinned martensite has been identified to be key to improving ductility for achieving high strength weld metal.

  8. Laser welding aluminum without filler metal using continuous wave and pulsed Nd:YAG lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bransch, H.N.

    1994-12-31

    A problem with automotive aluminum tubing applications, particularly for air conditioning heat exchanger assemblies, is terminating the tube reliably and inexpensively. An alternative to upsetting and mchining threads to the tube end is welding a nut (made from a stronger, easily machinable alloy such as Al 5456 or Al 6061) to lengths of tubing (made from a softer alloy such as Al 3003). Laser welding was investigated in order to reduce heat input and increase process speeds copared to brazing or gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Nd:YAG lasers were selected as beam source because of better absorptivity of the wavelength compared to CO{sub 2} lasers and simplified tooling with fiber optic beam delivery. It wa determined that a pulsed Nd:YAG laser produced 1.0 mm penetration at 0.3 m/min with 400 W average power, and 1.0 mm penetration at 0.75 m/min with 1000 W average power, however, an Al 4047 filler metal was required to eliminate solidification cracking. A 1900 W CW laser could weld the Al 3003 tube to the Al 5456 nut without filler metal, however, there was insufficient penetration (0.25 mm) to meet the mechanical and hermeticity requirements. To enhance penetration, but still reduce the tendency for hot cracking, the 1900 W average power beam was sine wave modulated from 400 W to 3600 W at 250 Hz and usd to weld the Al 3003 directly to the Al 5456. These parameters produced 1.2 mm penetration at 1.2 m/min without significant cracking and without using a filler metal. In addition, the welds passed all hermeticity and tensile strength tests. This combination of materials, joint design, and laser parameters produced tube assemblies that passed a leak check (300 psi nitrogen in 60{degrees}C water for 1 min) and tensile (tube breakage 100 mm from the joint, 5.2 kN tensile strength).

  9. Ballistic-Failure Mechanisms in Gas Metal Arc Welds of MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Steel: A Computational Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-12

    distribution is unlimited. Ballistic-Failure Mechanisms in Gas Metal Arc Welds of Mil A46100 Armor- Grade Steel : A Computational Investigation The views...Welds of Mil A46100 Armor- Grade Steel : A Computational Investigation Report Title In our recent work, a multi-physics computational model for the...utility of the upgraded GMAW process model, it is next applied to the case of butt-welding of a prototypical high-hardness armor- grade martensitic steel

  10. Multiphysics Modeling and Simulations of Mil A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel Gas Metal Arc Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.; Montgomery, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    A multiphysics computational model has been developed for the conventional Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) joining process and used to analyze butt-welding of MIL A46100, a prototypical high-hardness armor martensitic steel. The model consists of five distinct modules, each covering a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e., (a) dynamics of welding-gun behavior; (b) heat transfer from the electric arc and mass transfer from the electrode to the weld; (c) development of thermal and mechanical fields during the GMAW process; (d) the associated evolution and spatial distribution of the material microstructure throughout the weld region; and (e) the final spatial distribution of the as-welded material properties. To make the newly developed GMAW process model applicable to MIL A46100, the basic physical-metallurgy concepts and principles for this material have to be investigated and properly accounted for/modeled. The newly developed GMAW process model enables establishment of the relationship between the GMAW process parameters (e.g., open circuit voltage, welding current, electrode diameter, electrode-tip/weld distance, filler-metal feed speed, and gun travel speed), workpiece material chemistry, and the spatial distribution of as-welded material microstructure and properties. The predictions of the present GMAW model pertaining to the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and properties within the MIL A46100 weld region are found to be consistent with general expectations and prior observations.

  11. Cardiovascular effects in rats after intratracheal instillation of metal welding particles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wen; Antonini, James M; Lin, Yen-Chang; Roberts, Jenny R; Kashon, Michael L; Castranova, Vincent; Kan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Studies have indicated that pulmonary exposure to welding fumes can induce a series of adverse effects in the respiratory system, including infection, bronchitis, siderosis and decreased pulmonary function. Recent clinical and epidemiological studies have found that pulmonary exposure to welding fumes is also associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular events. However, there is insufficient evidence to confirm a direct effect of welding fumes on the cardiovascular system. The present study investigated the effects of pulmonary exposure to welding fumes on the heart and the vascular system in rats. Two chemically distinct welding fumes generated from manual metal arc-hard surfacing (MMA-HS) and gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS) welding were tested. Three groups of rats were instilled intratracheally with MMA-HS (2 mg/rat), GMA-MS (2 mg/rat) or saline as control once a week for seven weeks. On days 1 and 7 after the last treatment, basal cardiovascular function and the cardiovascular response to increasing doses of adrenoreceptor agonists were assessed. MMA-HS treatment reduced the basal levels of left ventricle end-systolic pressure and dP/dt(max) at 1 day post-treatment, and decreased dP/dt(min) in response to isoproterenol (ISO) at 7 days post-treatment. Unlike MMA-HS, GMA-MS only affected left ventricular end-diastolic pressure in response to ISO at 7 days post-treatment. Treatment with MMA-HS or GMA-MS did not alter heart rate and blood pressure. Our findings suggest that exposure to different welding fumes can induce different adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, and that cardiac contractility may be a sensitive indicator of cardiovascular dysfunction.

  12. Cardiovascular effects in rats after intratracheal instillation of metal welding particles

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wen; Antonini, James M.; Lin, Yen-Chang; Roberts, Jenny R.; Kashon, Michael L.; Castranova, Vincent; Kan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Studies have indicated that pulmonary exposure to welding fumes can induce a series of adverse effects in the respiratory system, including infection, bronchitis, siderosis and decreased pulmonary function. Recent clinical and epidemiological studies have found that pulmonary exposure to welding fumes is also associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular events. However, there is insufficient evidence to confirm a direct effect of welding fumes on the cardiovascular system. The present study investigated the effects of pulmonary exposure to welding fumes on the heart and the vascular system in rats. Two chemically distinct welding fumes generated from manual metal arc-hard surfacing (MMA-HS) and gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS) welding were tested. Three groups of rats were instilled intratracheally with MMA-HS (2 mg/rat), GMA-MS (2 mg/rat) or saline as control once a week for seven weeks. On days 1 and 7 after the last treatment, basal cardiovascular function and the cardiovascular response to increasing doses of adrenoreceptor agonists were assessed. MMA-HS treatment reduced the basal levels of left ventricle end-systolic pressure and dP/dtmax at 1 day post-treatment, and decreased dP/dtmin in response to isoproterenol (ISO) at 7 days post-treatment. Unlike MMA-HS, GMA-MS only affected left ventricular end-diastolic pressure in response to ISO at 7 days post-treatment. Treatment with MMA-HS or GMA-MS did not alter heart rate and blood pressure. Our findings suggest that exposure to different welding fumes can induce different adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, and that cardiac contractility may be a sensitive indicator of cardiovascular dysfunction. PMID:25600139

  13. Mass Transfer of Nickel-Base Alloy Covered Electrode During Shielded Metal Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Renyao; He, Guo

    2013-03-01

    The mass transfer in shielded metal arc welding of a group of nickel-base alloy covered electrodes according to AWS specification A5.11-A5.11M was investigated by directly measuring their deposited metal compositions. The results indicate that the chromium mass-transfer coefficient is in the range of 86 to 94 pct, iron in the range of 82 to 89 pct, manganese in the range of 60 to 73 pct, niobium in the range of 44 to 56 pct, and silicon in the range of 41 to 47 pct. The metal mass-transfer coefficient from the core wire is markedly higher than that from the coating. The basicity of slag, the metal contents in the flux coating, and the welding current together affect the mass transfer. As the basicity of slag increases, the mass-transfer coefficients of Mn, Fe, and Cr slightly increase, but those of Nb and Si decrease significantly. As the niobium and manganese contents increase in the coating, their mass-transfer coefficients also increase. However, iron is different. The content of iron in the coating in the range of 8 to 20 wt pct results in the optimal effective mass transfer. The lower, or higher, iron content leads to lower mass-transfer coefficient. As the welding current increases, the mass-transfer coefficients of niobium and manganese decrease, but chromium and silicon increase. Iron has the lowest mass-transfer coefficient when welded under the operating current of 100 A.

  14. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Manual gas tungsten arc (DC) and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of 6XXX aluminum. [6061 and 6063

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-1009 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for manual gas tungsten arc (DC) and semiautomatic gas metal arc (DC) welding of aluminum alloys 6061 and 6063 (P-23), in thickness range 0.187 to 2,0 inch; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23); shielding gases are helium (GTAW) and argon (GMAW).

  15. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2002-01-01

    The improvement in weld quality by the friction stir welding (FSW) process invented by TWI of Cambridge, England, patented in 1991, has prompted investigation of this process for advanced structural materials including Al metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) materials. Such materials can have high specific stiffness and other potential beneficial properties for the extreme environments in space. Developments of discontinuous reinforced Al-MMCs have found potential space applications and the future for such applications is quite promising. The space industry has recognized advantages of the FSW process over conventional welding processes such as the absence of a melt zone, reduced distortion, elimination of the need for shielding gases, and ease of automation. The process has been well proven for aluminum alloys, and work is being carried out for ferrous materials, magnesium alloys and copper alloys. Development work in the FSW welding process for joining of Al-MMCs is relatively recent and some of this and related work can be found in referenced research publications. NASA engineers have undertaken to spear head this research development work for FSW process investigation of Al-MMCs. Some of the reported related work has pointed out the difficulty in fusion welding of particulate reinforced MMCs where liquid Al will react with SiC to precipitate aluminum carbide (Al4C3). Advantages of no such reaction and no need for joint preparation for the FSW process is anticipated in the welding of Al-MMCs. The FSW process has been best described as a combination of extrusion and forging of metals. This is carried out as the pin tool rotates and is slowly plunged into the bond line of the joint as the pin tool's shoulder is in intimate contact with the work piece. The material is friction-stirred into a quality weld. Al-MMCs, 4 in. x 12 in. plates of 0.25 in. (6.35mm) thickness, procured from MMCC, Inc. were butt welded using FSW process at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using

  16. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2002-01-01

    The improvement in weld quality by the friction stir welding (FSW) process invented by TWI of Cambridge, England, patented in 1991, has prompted investigation of this process for advanced structural materials including Al metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) materials. Such materials can have high specific stiffness and other potential beneficial properties for the extreme environments in space. Developments of discontinuous reinforced Al-MMCs have found potential space applications and the future for such applications is quite promising. The space industry has recognized advantages of the FSW process over conventional welding processes such as the absence of a melt zone, reduced distortion, elimination of the need for shielding gases, and ease of automation. The process has been well proven for aluminum alloys, and work is being carried out for ferrous materials, magnesium alloys and copper alloys. Development work in the FSW welding process for joining of Al-MMCs is relatively recent and some of this and related work can be found in referenced research publications. NASA engineers have undertaken to spear head this research development work for FSW process investigation of Al-MMCs. Some of the reported related work has pointed out the difficulty in fusion welding of particulate reinforced MMCs where liquid Al will react with SiC to precipitate aluminum carbide (Al4C3). Advantages of no such reaction and no need for joint preparation for the FSW process is anticipated in the welding of Al-MMCs. The FSW process has been best described as a combination of extrusion and forging of metals. This is carried out as the pin tool rotates and is slowly plunged into the bond line of the joint as the pin tool's shoulder is in intimate contact with the work piece. The material is friction-stirred into a quality weld. Al-MMCs, 4 in. x 12 in. plates of 0.25 in. (6.35mm) thickness, procured from MMCC, Inc. were butt welded using FSW process at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using

  17. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Non-Destructive Examination of Dissimilar Metal Welds and Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Deborah A.

    2002-07-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has conducted research since 1977 in the areas of environmentally assisted cracking and assessment and reliability of non-destructive examination (NDE). Recent occurrences of cracking in Alloy 82/182 welds and Alloy 600 base metal at several domestic and overseas plants have raised several issues relating to both of these areas of NRC research. The occurrences of cracking were identified by the discovery of boric acid deposits resulting from through-wall cracking in the primary system pressure boundary. Analyses indicate that the cracking has occurred due to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in Alloy 82/182 welds. This cracking has occurred in two different locations: in hot leg nozzle-to-safe end welds and in control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzle welds. The cracking associated with safe-end welds is important due to the potential for a large loss of reactor coolant inventory, and the cracking of CRDM nozzle base metal and welds, particularly circumferential cracking of CRDM nozzle base metal, is important due to the potential for a control rod to eject resulting in a loss of coolant accident. The industry response in the U.S. to this cracking is being coordinated through the Electric Power Research Institute's Materials Reliability Project (EPRI-MRP) in a comprehensive, multifaceted effort. Although the industry program is addressing many of the issues raised by these cracking occurrences, confirmatory research is necessary for the staff to evaluate the work conducted by industry groups. Several issues requiring additional consideration regarding the generic implications of these isolated events have been identified. This paper will discuss the recent events of significant cracking in domestic and foreign plants, discuss the limitations of NDE in detecting SCC, identify deficiencies in information available in this area, discuss the USNRC approach to address these issues, and discuss the

  18. Solar cell welded interconnection development program. [parallel gap and ultrasonic metal-metal bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzeff, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    Parallel gap welding and ultrasonic bonding techniques were developed for joining selected interconnect materials (silver, aluminum, copper, silver plated molybdenum and Kovar) to silver-titanium and aluminum contact cells. All process variables have been evaluated leading to establishment of optimum solar cell, interconnect, electrodes and equipment criteria for obtainment of consistent high quality welds. Applicability of nondestructive testing of solar cell welds has been studied. A pre-weld monitoring system is being built and will be utilized in the numerically controlled parallel gap weld station.

  19. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards for Electron Beam Welding in the Space Environment: Analysis and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Russell, C.; Bhat, B.; Fragomeni, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment are analyzed. A weld pool detachment parameter specifying conditions for pool detachment by impact is derived and corroborated by experimental evidence. Impact detachment for the pool is unlikely. Impact detachment for a drop of metal on the end of the weld wire may be possible under extreme conditions. Other potential causes of molten metal detachment considered, vaporization pressure forces and wire flickout from the pool, did not appear to present significant detachment threats.

  20. Friction-Stir Welding - Heavy Inclusions in Bi-metallic welds of Al 2219/2195

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietz, Ward W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy Inclusions (HI) were detected for the first time by radiographic examination in aluminum alloy 2219forging/2195plate (advancing/retreating side) Friction Sir Welds (FSW) for the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) Program. Radiographic HI indications appear as either small (approx.0.005"-0.025") individual particles or clusters of small particles. Initial work was performed to verify that the HI was not foreign material or caused by FSW pin tool debris. That and subsequent elemental analysis determined that the HI were large agglomerations of Al2Cu (theta phase), which is the strengthening precipitate in Al2219. A literature search on that subject determined that the agglomeration of phase has also been found in Al2219 bead on plate FSW [Ref. 1]. Since this was detected in ET space flight hardware, an investigative study of the effect of agglomerated theta phase particles in FSW Al2219f/2195p was performed. Numerous panels of various lengths were welded per ET weld procedures and radiographically inspected to determine if any HI was detected. Areas that had HI were sampled for room temperature and cyclic cryogenic (-423F) tensile testing and determined no significant adverse affect on mechanical properties when compared to test specimens without HI and historical data. Fracture surface examination using the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) revealed smaller phase agglomerations undetectable by radiographic inspection dispersed throughout the Al2219f/2195p FSW. This indicates that phase agglomeration is inherent to the Al2219f/2195p FSW process and only rarely creates agglomerations large enough to be detected by radiography. HI has not been observed in FSW of plate to plate material for either Al2219 or AL2195.

  1. Correlation of inclusion size and chemistry with weld metal composition and microstructure arc weldments of high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakes, Mark W.

    1994-12-01

    Non-metallic inclusions are crucial to the development of acicular ferrite, the desired microstructure for optimal strength and toughness in weld metal. This study focused on obtaining correlation between the size and chemistry of inclusions and weld metal properties, especially the amount of acicular ferrite, in Gas Metal Arc (GMA) and Submerged Arc (SA) weldments in HY-100 and HSLA-100 steel. A strong correlation was found between the amount of acicular ferrite, flux basicity and inclusion composition and volume fraction in SAW weld metal samples. An index developed to consider the effect of chemistry and volume fraction of inclusions on acicular ferrite showed good correlation. The GMA weld samples were found to contain less acicular ferrite than the SAW samples, principally because of their lower oxygen content. However, it was again found possible to correlate inclusion chemistry and volume fraction with acicular ferrite formation. Unfortunately, the large amount of data scatter precluded the development of an index in this case.

  2. Investigation into Microstructures of Maraging Steel 250 Weldments and Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, Fawad; Baloch, Rasheed Ahmed; Ahmed, Bilal; Naz, Nausheen

    2010-03-01

    This study was undertaken to gain a better understanding of microstructures obtained by multipass gas tungsten arc welding in maraging steel grade 250. Metallography and microhardness measurements were carried out on sheet and welded joints in as-welded and post-weld aged conditions. It was found that there was a significant amount of reverted austenite formed on cell boundaries of weld metal after aging at 758-823 K for 3-5 h, and was stable at room temperature. Aging at higher temperatures led to an increase in the continuous network of patchy austenite along the cell boundaries. The reason for the above, in our opinion, is the concentrational heterogeneity which characterizes the microstructure of maraging steel welds. No reverted austenite was observed in as-welded specimens. Solution annealing at 1093 K for 1 h did not completely eliminate the chemical heterogeneity associated with weld structures. However, homogenizing at 1373 K produced homogenous structure that on subsequent aging produces austenite-free lath martensitic structure.

  3. Characterization of Solid State Phase Transformation in Continuously Heated and Cooled Ferritic Weld Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, B; Mills, Michael J.; Specht, Eliot D; Santella, Michael L; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2010-12-01

    Arc welding processes involve cooling rates that vary over a wide range (1-100 K/s). The final microstructire is thus a product of the heating and cooling cycles experienced by the weld in addition to the weld composition. It has been shown that the first phase to form under weld cooling conditions may not be that predicted by equilibrium calculations. The partitioning of different interstitial/substitutional alloying elements at high temperatures can dramatically affect the subsequent phase transformations. In order to understand the effect of alloying on phase transformation temperatures and final microstructures time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique has been successfully used for characterization. The work by Jacot and Rappaz on pearlitic steels provided insight into austenitization of hypoeutectic steels using a finite volume model. However there is very little work done on the effect of heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation paths in bainitic/martensitic steels and weld metals. Previous work on a weld with higher aluminum content, deposited with a FCAW-S process indicated that even at aluminum levels where the primary phase to solidify from liquid should be delta ferrite, non-equilibrium austenite was observed. The presence of inhomogeneity in composition of the parent microstructure has been attributed to differences in transformation modes, temperatures and microstructures in dual-phase, TRIP steels and ferritic welds. The objectives of the work included the identification of the stability regions of different phases during heating and cooling, differences in the effect of weld heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation temperatures, and the variation in phase fractions of austenite and ferrite in the two phase regions as a function of temperature. The base composition used for the present work is a Fe-1%Al-2%Mn-1%Ni-0.04%C weld metal. A pseudo-binary phase diagram shows the expected solidification path under equilibrium

  4. A review of inducing compressive residual stress - shot peening; on structural metal and welded connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanchidurai, S.; Krishanan, P. A.; Baskar, K.; Saravana Raja Mohan, K.

    2017-07-01

    Shot peening treatment (SPT) is a significant mechanical method to enhance the surface of the material by inducing compressive residual stress on the layer. This study provides a review of prominent improvement in fatigue life on high strength aluminium alloy, steel and welded connection by SPT. Compressive residual stress measurement and its factors data are extracted from assorted literature, optimized peening process commented in this paper, also different types of mechanical peening methods and its effectiveness are mentioned. Fatigue life improvement is focused commented to welded structural connections. The extracted results shows significant changes in the surface layer of metals, aluminium alloy 15 - 250% of fatigue life improvement, steel plain members 6-200% of fatigue life improvement, welded connections 50-75% of fatigue life improvement and significant improvement in mechanical properties like roughness reduction, wear, hardness, tensile strength, corrosion and scuffing.

  5. Al-Si-Mn Alloy Coating on Aluminum Substrate Using Cold Metal Transfer (CMT) Welding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, G. P.; Kamaraj, M.; Bakshi, S. R.

    2014-06-01

    The cold metal transfer (CMT) process was explored as a weld overlay technique for synthesizing Al-Si-Mn alloy coating on a commercially pure Al plate. The effect of welding speed on the bead geometry, deposition rate, and the dilution were studied and the best parameter was used to synthesize the coatings. The CMT process can be used to produce thick coatings (>2.5 mm) without porosity and with low dilution levels. The Vickers hardness number of the Al substrate increased from 28 in the bulk to 57 in the coating. It is suggested that the CMT process can be an effective and energy-efficient technique for depositing thick coatings and is useful in weld repair of aluminum alloy components.

  6. Study on fundamental processes of laser welded metals observed with intense x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, T.; Daido, H.; Shobu, T.; Takase, K.; Tsukimori, K.; Kureta, M.; Segawa, M.; Nishimura, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Kawachi, T.

    With use of photon techniques including visible light, soft and hard x-rays, precise fundamental laser welding processes in the repair and maintenance of nuclear plant engineering were reviewed mechanistically. We make discussions centered on the usefulness of an intense soft x-ray beams for evaluations of spatial residual strain distribution and welded metal convection behavior including the surface morphology. Numerical results obtained with a general purpose three-dimensional code SPLICE for the simulation of the welding and solidifying phenomena. Then it is concluded that the x-ray beam would be useful as one of the powerful tools for understanding the mechanisms of various complex phenomena with higher accuracy and higher resolution.

  7. Total Fume and Metal Concentrations during Welding in Selected Factories in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Balkhyour, Mansour Ahmed; Goknil, Mohammad Khalid

    2010-01-01

    Welding is a major industrial process used for joining metals. Occupational exposure to welding fumes is a serious occupational health problem all over the world. The degree of risk to welder’s health from fumes depends on composition, concentration, and the length of exposure. The aim of this study was to investigate workers’ welding fume exposure levels in some industries in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. In each factory, the air in the breathing zone within 0.5 m from welders was sampled during 8-hour shifts. Total particulates, manganese, copper, and molybdenum concentrations of welding fumes were determined. Mean values of eight-hour average particulate concentrations measured during welding at the welders breathing zone were 6.3 mg/m3 (Factory 1), 5.3 mg/m3 (Factory 2), 11.3 mg/m3 (Factory 3), 6.8 mg/m3 (Factory 4), 4.7 mg/m3 (Factory 5), and 3.0 mg/m3 (Factory 6). Mean values of airborne manganese, copper, and molybdenum levels measured during welding were in the range of 0.010 mg/m3–0.477 mg/m3, 0.001 mg/m3–0.080 mg/m3 and 0.001 mg/m3–0.058 mg/m3 respectively. Mean values of calculated equivalent exposure values were: 1.50 (Factory 1), 1.56 (Factory 2), 5.14 (Factory 3), 2.21 (Factory 4), 2.89 (Factory 5), and 1.20 (Factory 6). The welders in factories 1, 2, 3, and 4 were exposed to welding fume concentration above the SASO limit value, which may increase the risk of respiratory health problems. PMID:20717553

  8. Total fume and metal concentrations during welding in selected factories in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Balkhyour, Mansour Ahmed; Goknil, Mohammad Khalid

    2010-07-01

    Welding is a major industrial process used for joining metals. Occupational exposure to welding fumes is a serious occupational health problem all over the world. The degree of risk to welder's health from fumes depends on composition, concentration, and the length of exposure. The aim of this study was to investigate workers' welding fume exposure levels in some industries in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. In each factory, the air in the breathing zone within 0.5 m from welders was sampled during 8-hour shifts. Total particulates, manganese, copper, and molybdenum concentrations of welding fumes were determined. Mean values of eight-hour average particulate concentrations measured during welding at the welders breathing zone were 6.3 mg/m(3) (Factory 1), 5.3 mg/m(3) (Factory 2), 11.3 mg/m(3) (Factory 3), 6.8 mg/m(3) (Factory 4), 4.7 mg/m(3) (Factory 5), and 3.0 mg/m(3) (Factory 6). Mean values of airborne manganese, copper, and molybdenum levels measured during welding were in the range of 0.010 mg/m(3)-0.477 mg/m(3), 0.001 mg/m(3)-0.080 mg/m(3) and 0.001 mg/m(3)-0.058 mg/m(3) respectively. Mean values of calculated equivalent exposure values were: 1.50 (Factory 1), 1.56 (Factory 2), 5.14 (Factory 3), 2.21 (Factory 4), 2.89 (Factory 5), and 1.20 (Factory 6). The welders in factories 1, 2, 3, and 4 were exposed to welding fume concentration above the SASO limit value, which may increase the risk of respiratory health problems.

  9. An Investigation of Mechanical Properties of Shielded Metal Arc Welding and Friction Stir Welding in 7020-T6 A1 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalal, Shawnim R.; Saeed, Mohammedtahir M.; Khider, Gawhar I.

    2014-06-01

    Two different types of welds, shielded metal arc (SMA) welding and friction stir welding (FSW) have been used to weld Aluminum alloy 7020-T6.Investigation has been carried out on mechanical properties such as (yield and tensile strength, impact, harnesses, ductility ,and microstructure) . The result shows that both method could be used to weld such alloy although FSW weld show higher mechanical properties comparison to SMA with joint efficiency equal to 97% compared to 58% in SMA .The extension of the heat affected zone is higher in SMA method in comparison to the FSW and localized grain size for FSW in the stirred zone was 15-18 micron and it was 37- 39 micron for SMA, while it was 32-35 micron for the base metal.In general decay of mechanical properties of SMA joints, was due to high temperature experienced by the material, but in FSW joint lower temperature are involved in the process due to sever plastic deformation induced by the tool motion.

  10. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin is associated with heavy metal exposure in welding workers

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Kai-Jen; Pan, Chih-Hong; Su, Chien-Ling; Lai, Ching-Huang; Lin, Wen-Yi; Ma, Chih-Ming; Ho, Shu-Chuan; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Chen, Cheng-Hsien; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Metals cause nephrotoxicity with acute and/or chronic exposure; however, few epidemiological studies have examined impacts of exposure to metal fumes on renal injury in welding workers. In total, 66 welding workers and 12 office workers were recruited from a shipyard located in southern Taiwan. Urine samples from each subject were collected at the beginning (baseline) and end of the work week (1-week exposure). Personal exposure to PM2.5 was measured. The 8-h mean PM2.5 was 50.3 μg/m3 for welding workers and 27.4 μg/m3 for office workers. iTRAQs coupled with LC-MS/MS were used to discover the pathways in response to welding PM2.5 in the urine, suggesting that extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interactions are a critical mechanism. ECM-receptor interaction-related biomarkers for renal injury, kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), were significantly elevated in welding workers post-exposure, as well as were urinary Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni levels. NGAL was more significantly associated with Al (r = 0.737, p < 0.001), Cr (r = 0.705, p < 0.001), Fe (r = 0.709, p < 0.001), and Ni (r = 0.657, p < 0.001) than was KIM-1, suggesting that NGAL may be a urinary biomarker for welding PM2.5 exposure. Nephrotoxicity (e.g., renal tubular injury) may be an emerging concern in occupational health. PMID:26673824

  11. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin is associated with heavy metal exposure in welding workers.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Kai-Jen; Pan, Chih-Hong; Su, Chien-Ling; Lai, Ching-Huang; Lin, Wen-Yi; Ma, Chih-Ming; Ho, Shu-Chuan; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Chen, Cheng-Hsien; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi

    2015-12-17

    Metals cause nephrotoxicity with acute and/or chronic exposure; however, few epidemiological studies have examined impacts of exposure to metal fumes on renal injury in welding workers. In total, 66 welding workers and 12 office workers were recruited from a shipyard located in southern Taiwan. Urine samples from each subject were collected at the beginning (baseline) and end of the work week (1-week exposure). Personal exposure to PM2.5 was measured. The 8-h mean PM2.5 was 50.3 μg/m(3) for welding workers and 27.4 μg/m(3) for office workers. iTRAQs coupled with LC-MS/MS were used to discover the pathways in response to welding PM2.5 in the urine, suggesting that extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interactions are a critical mechanism. ECM-receptor interaction-related biomarkers for renal injury, kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), were significantly elevated in welding workers post-exposure, as well as were urinary Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni levels. NGAL was more significantly associated with Al (r = 0.737, p < 0.001), Cr (r = 0.705, p < 0.001), Fe (r = 0.709, p < 0.001), and Ni (r = 0.657, p < 0.001) than was KIM-1, suggesting that NGAL may be a urinary biomarker for welding PM2.5 exposure. Nephrotoxicity (e.g., renal tubular injury) may be an emerging concern in occupational health.

  12. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin is associated with heavy metal exposure in welding workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Kai-Jen; Pan, Chih-Hong; Su, Chien-Ling; Lai, Ching-Huang; Lin, Wen-Yi; Ma, Chih-Ming; Ho, Shu-Chuan; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Chen, Cheng-Hsien; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi

    2015-12-01

    Metals cause nephrotoxicity with acute and/or chronic exposure; however, few epidemiological studies have examined impacts of exposure to metal fumes on renal injury in welding workers. In total, 66 welding workers and 12 office workers were recruited from a shipyard located in southern Taiwan. Urine samples from each subject were collected at the beginning (baseline) and end of the work week (1-week exposure). Personal exposure to PM2.5 was measured. The 8-h mean PM2.5 was 50.3 μg/m3 for welding workers and 27.4 μg/m3 for office workers. iTRAQs coupled with LC-MS/MS were used to discover the pathways in response to welding PM2.5 in the urine, suggesting that extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interactions are a critical mechanism. ECM-receptor interaction-related biomarkers for renal injury, kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), were significantly elevated in welding workers post-exposure, as well as were urinary Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni levels. NGAL was more significantly associated with Al (r = 0.737, p < 0.001), Cr (r = 0.705, p < 0.001), Fe (r = 0.709, p < 0.001), and Ni (r = 0.657, p < 0.001) than was KIM-1, suggesting that NGAL may be a urinary biomarker for welding PM2.5 exposure. Nephrotoxicity (e.g., renal tubular injury) may be an emerging concern in occupational health.

  13. Friction Stir Welding of SiC/Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    1999-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a new solid state process for joining metals by plasticizing and consolidating materials around the bond line using thermal energy producing from frictional forces. A feasibility study for FSW of Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) was investigated using aluminum 6092 alloy reinforced with 17% SiC particulates. FSW process consists of a special rotating pin tool that is positioned to plunge into the MMC surface at the bond line. As the tool rotates and move forward along the bond line, the material at the bond line is heated up and forced to flow around the rotating tip to consolidate on the tip's backside to form a solid state joint. FSW has the potential for producing sound welds with MMC because the processing temperature occurs well below the melting point of the metal matrix; thereby eliminating the reinforcement-to-matrix solidification defects, reducing the undesirable chemical reactions and porosity problems.

  14. Thomson scattering diagnostics of steady state and pulsed welding processes without and with metal vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn-Kauffeldt, M.; Marqués, J.-L.; Schein, J.

    2015-01-01

    Thomson scattering is applied to measure temperature and density of electrons in the arc plasma of the direct current gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process. This diagnostic technique allows to determine these plasma parameters independent from the gas composition and heavy particles temperature. The experimental setup is adapted to perform measurements on stationary as well as transient processes. Spatial and temporal electron temperature and density profiles of a pure argon arc in the case of the GTAW process and argon arc with the presence of aluminum metal vapor in the case of the GMAW process were obtained. Additionally the data is used to estimate the concentration of the metal vapor in the GMAW plasma.

  15. Complex Behavior of Forces Influencing Molten Weld Metal Flow based on Static Force Balance Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achebo, Joseph I.

    This study is aimed at investigating the forces responsible for the detachment of molten metal droplets formed at an electrode tip, which imminently and eventually drop into the weld pool during the welding process. The Equations used by Kim and Eagar in 1993 were applied to this study. It was found that the different detaching forces which are the gravitational force, the electromagnetic force, and the drag force, were determined to be 7.154 x 10-6N, 0.05N and 1.736N respectively. Whereas, the primary retaining force, which is the surface tension force, was calculated to be 0.0195N. From the findings, since the combination of the detaching forces taken together is greater than the retaining force, detachment of the molten metal droplet must inevitably occur. The combined effect of these forces on the behaviour of molten metal during the droplet detachment process was adequately investigated in this study.

  16. Friction Stir Welding of SiC/Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    1999-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a new solid state process for joining metals by plasticizing and consolidating materials around the bond line using thermal energy producing from frictional forces. A feasibility study for FSW of Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) was investigated using aluminum 6092 alloy reinforced with 17% SiC particulates. FSW process consists of a special rotating pin tool that is positioned to plunge into the MMC surface at the bond line. As the tool rotates and move forward along the bond line, the material at the bond line is heated up and forced to flow around the rotating tip to consolidate on the tip's backside to form a solid state joint. FSW has the potential for producing sound welds with MMC because the processing temperature occurs well below the melting point of the metal matrix; thereby eliminating the reinforcement-to-matrix solidification defects, reducing the undesirable chemical reactions and porosity problems.

  17. Effects of soldering and laser welding on bond strength of ceramic to metal.

    PubMed

    Aladağ, Akin; Cömlekoğlu, M Erhan; Dündar, Mine; Güngör, M Ali; Artunç, Celal

    2011-01-01

    Welding or soldering of metal frameworks negatively affects the overall bond strength between the veneering ceramic and metal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of soldering and laser-welding procedures on the bond strength between ceramic and metal. Thirty Ni-based metal specimens (Wiron 99) (8 × 4 × 4 mm) were fabricated and divided into 3 groups; soldered (S), laser welded (L), and control (untreated cast alloy) (n=10). In S and L specimens, a notch (1 × 1.5 mm) was prepared longitudinally on the surface of each specimen and filled with compatible alloy (Wiron soldering rods and Wiroweld NC, respectively). Vickers hardness measurements were made after polishing the surfaces with a metallographic polishing kit. A veneering ceramic (VITA VMK 95) was vibrated, condensed in a mold, and fired on the metal frameworks. The specimens were sectioned in 2 axes to obtain nontrimmed bar specimens with a bonding area of approximately 1 mm². Forty bars per block were obtained. Each bar was subjected to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The μTBS data (MPa) were recorded, and SEM was used for failure analysis of the tested bars. The measurements were statistically analyzed using a 1-way ANOVA and Tamhane tests (α=.05). The mean differences in μTBS of veneering ceramic to soldered (10.4 ±2.4 MPa) and laser-welded (11.7 ±1.3 MPa) metal surfaces were not significantly different and were significantly lower than that of the cast alloy (25.4 ±3.6 MPa) (P<.05). The mean Vickers hardness of cast alloy was significantly higher (236 ±17 HV) than soldered (114 ±9 HV) and laser-welded groups (129 ±11 HV) (P<.05). Soldering and laser welding significantly decreased the μTBS of a veneering ceramic to a base metal alloy. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Resistance Spot Welding of AA5052 Sheet Metal of Dissimilar Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat Din, N. A.; Zuhailawati, H.; Anasyida, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    Resistance spot welding of dissimilar thickness of AA5052 aluminum alloy was performed in order to investigate the effect of metal thickness on the weldment strength. Resistance spot welding was done using a spot welder machine available in Coraza Systems Sdn Bhd using a hemispherical of chromium copper electrode tip with radius of 6.00 mm under 14 kA of current and 0.02 bar of pressure for all thickness combinations. Lap joint configuration was produced between 2.0 mm thick sheet and 1.2 - 3.2 mm thick sheet, respectively. Microstructure of joint showed asymmetrical nugget shape that was larger on the thicker side indicating larger molten metal volume. Joint 2.0 mm x 3.2 mm sheets has the lowest hardness in both transverse direction and through thickness direction because less heat left in the weld nugget. The microstructure shows that this joint has coarse grains of HAZ. As thickness of sheet metal increased, the failure load of the joints increased. However, there was no linear correlation established between joint strength and metal thickness due to different shape of fusion zone in dissimilar thickness sheet metal.

  19. An investigation of the weld region on the SAE 1020 joined with metal active gas and determination of the mismatch factor

    SciTech Connect

    Meric, C.; Tokdemir, M.

    1999-10-01

    In this study, the joining process of SAE 1020 low carbon steel, generally used in the industry, has been completed using the metal active gas (MAG) weld method. The goal of this study was to examine the mismatch between base and weld metal. After the joining process, mechanical properties of the samples of the base metal (BM), the heat affected zone (HAZ), and the weld metal (WM) were investigated, and the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) test was performed.

  20. Evaluation of microstructure and electrochemical corrosion behavior of austenitic 316 stainless steel weld metals with varying chemical compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujar, M. G.; Dayal, R. K.; Gill, T. P. S.; Malhotra, S. N.

    2005-06-01

    Austenitic stainless steel weld metals have, in general, inferior corrosion resistance compared with the base metals. This is due to the fact that the weld metal has an inhomogeneous and dendritic microstructure with microsegregation of major elements (i.e., Cr, Mo, and Ni) as well as minor elements (i.e., S and P) at the δ-γ interface boundaries. The nonuniform alloying element concentration around ferrite particles plays a major role in determining the electrochemical corrosion behavior of such weld metals. Although the presence of ferrite is considered to be detrimental as far as the localized corrosion is considered, its exact role in uniform corrosion is still not clear. The uniform corrosion behavior of an alloy is determined by the fundamental electrochemical parameters of the major alloying elements. In this study, an attempt has been made to correlate the microstructure and uniform corrosion behavior of type 316 stainless steel weld metals with varying concentrations of Cr and Mo, and different ferrite contents. From the empirical equations obtained during the analysis of the electrochemical corrosion data, an attempt has been made to understand the role of Cr, Mo, and ferrite in altering the electrochemical corrosion parameters of the weld metal. Based on the extensive microstructural characterization, a dissolution model for the weld metal in the moderately oxidizing medium has been proposed.

  1. Electrically driven rapidly vaporizing foils, wires and strips used for collision welding and sheet metal forming

    SciTech Connect

    Vivek, Anupam; Daehn, Glenn S; Taber, Geoffrey A; Johnson, Jason R

    2015-05-05

    A method for forming a piece of a sheet metal is performed by positioning a consumable body, made of metal, proximate to the piece of the sheet metal. The consumable body is rapidly vaporized, and the gas pressure generated thereby is directed into the piece of the sheet metal. This results in acceleration of the piece of sheet metal, and it is collided into a stationary body at a velocity, generally in excess of 200 m/s. Depending upon the type of stationary body, the piece of sheet metal is deformed into a predetermined shape or is welded onto the stationary body. The vaporization is accomplished by passing a high current of electricity into the consumable body. The effect of the vaporized metal may be augmented by additional components in the consumable body.

  2. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of a New Type of 10% Cr Martensitic Steel Welded Joints with Ni-Based Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qunbing; Zhang, Jianxun

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, the fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of a new type of 10% Cr martensitic steel welded joints with Ni-based weld metal was comparatively studied for different regions including base metal (BM), heat-affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal (WM). FCG results indicated that the tempered lath martensite BM has a higher fatigue crack growth resistance than the tempered granular martensite HAZ that without a typical lath structure. In comparison, the austenitic WM has the highest fatigue crack growth threshold. Meanwhile, due to the microstructural and chemical compositional differences between BM and WM, a clear interface existed in the welded joints. At the region of the interface, the microstructures were physically connected and an element transition layer was formed. Although the starter notch was positioned at the region of interface, the fatigue crack gradually deviated from the interface and ultimately propagated along the inter-critically heat-affected zone. The difference in microstructure is considered as the primary factor that resulted in the different fatigue crack growth behaviors of the welded joints. In addition, the continuous microstructure connection and composition transition at the interface contributed to the good fatigue resistance at this region.

  3. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of a New Type of 10% Cr Martensitic Steel Welded Joints with Ni-Based Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qunbing; Zhang, Jianxun

    2017-08-01

    In the present work, the fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of a new type of 10% Cr martensitic steel welded joints with Ni-based weld metal was comparatively studied for different regions including base metal (BM), heat-affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal (WM). FCG results indicated that the tempered lath martensite BM has a higher fatigue crack growth resistance than the tempered granular martensite HAZ that without a typical lath structure. In comparison, the austenitic WM has the highest fatigue crack growth threshold. Meanwhile, due to the microstructural and chemical compositional differences between BM and WM, a clear interface existed in the welded joints. At the region of the interface, the microstructures were physically connected and an element transition layer was formed. Although the starter notch was positioned at the region of interface, the fatigue crack gradually deviated from the interface and ultimately propagated along the inter-critically heat-affected zone. The difference in microstructure is considered as the primary factor that resulted in the different fatigue crack growth behaviors of the welded joints. In addition, the continuous microstructure connection and composition transition at the interface contributed to the good fatigue resistance at this region.

  4. Determination of the Effect of Current and Travel Speed of Gas Metal-Arc Welding on the Mechanical Properties of A36, A516, and A514 Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    Identify by block number) steel welded joints gas metal-arc welding 70. AWTRr A ass is ,eYe slob If neoemy Md identify by block numfber) This study was...impact properties of butt joint welds produced by fully automatic gas metal-arc weld - ing (GMAW) in carbon steel (A36), pressure-vessel steel (A5 16), and...with American Society for CURRENT AND TRAVEL SPEED OF GAS Testing and Materials [ASTM] A201 mild steel up to METAL-ARC WELDING ON THE MECHAN- 2 in. (51

  5. Weld pool phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Zacharia, T.; DebRoy, T.

    1994-09-01

    During welding, the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure are affected by the interaction of the heat source with the metal. The interaction affects the fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer in the weld pool, and the solidification behavior of the weld metal. In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the importance of the weld pool transport processes and the solid state transformation reactions in determining the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure. The relation between the weld pool transport processes and the composition and structure is reviewed. Recent applications of various solidification theories to welding are examined to understand the special problems of weld metal solidification. The discussion is focussed on the important problems and issues related to weld pool transport phenomena and solidification. Resolution of these problems would be an important step towards a science based control of composition, structure and properties of the weld metal.

  6. Correlation of Flux Composition and Inclusion Characteristics With Submerged Arc Weld Metal Properties in HY-100 Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    WITH SUBMERGED ARC WELD METAL PROPERTIES IN HY- 100 STEEL by Kent William Kettell September 1993 Thesis Advisor: Alan G. Fox Approved for public... STEEL 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Kettell, Kent William ,3a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year.Month.Day) 15. PAGE COUNT Master’s...necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP HY- 100 steel , submerged arc welding, SAW, fluxes, basicity index, non-metallic inclusions

  7. Microstructural Features Controlling Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Behavior in High-Strength, Martensitic Steel Weld Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    Development Report Microstructural Features Controlling Ductile-to- Brittle Transition Behavior in High-Strength, Martensitic Steel Weld Metals C 0by...Martensitic Steel Weld Metals PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) .J. DeLoach, Jr. .TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 114 DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 1S PAGE COUNT I...if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP High strength steel , Ductile-brittle transition Martensitic Mechanical proper ties

  8. Weld-Bead Shaver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guirguis, Kamal; Price, Daniel S.

    1990-01-01

    Hand-held power tool shaves excess metal from inside circumference of welded duct. Removes excess metal deposited by penetration of tungsten/inert-gas weld or by spatter from electron-beam weld. Produces smooth transition across joint. Easier to use and not prone to overshaving. Also cuts faster, removing 35 in. (89 cm) of weld bead per hour.

  9. Effect of Thermal and Diffusion Processes on Formation of the Structure of Weld Metal in Laser Welding of Dissimilar Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, G. A.; Klimova, O. G.; Babkin, K. D.; Pevzner, Ya. B.

    2014-01-01

    The thermal and diffusion processes in laser welding of dissimilar materials are simulated. The active LaserCAD model for welding of dissimilar materials is amended. The developed model is verified for the Fe - Cu system. The microstructure of a weld of tin bronze and low-carbon steel is studied and the elements in the diffusion zone are analyzed. The computed and experimental data for laser and electron-beam welding are shown to agree well.

  10. Effect of the Metal Transport on the Mechanical Properties of Al-2Si Alloys Processed through Friction Stir Welding Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shailesh Rao, A.; Naik, Yuvaraja

    2017-06-01

    In this study, Al-2Si alloys were joined using friction stir welding with various process parameters. The process parameters considered here were rotational speeds from 600 to 1200 rpm, feed rate from 50 to 150 mm/min with three equal increments. In this study, the mushy state metal movements during the processes are discussed. The experimental observation and results indicate that the flaw formations, surface roughness of the weld, and hardness value depend on the metal movement and are explained in this study. The microstructure of the weld zone was studied finally.

  11. Effect of the Metal Transport on the Mechanical Properties of Al-2Si Alloys Processed through Friction Stir Welding Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shailesh Rao, A.; Naik, Yuvaraja

    2017-03-01

    In this study, Al-2Si alloys were joined using friction stir welding with various process parameters. The process parameters considered here were rotational speeds from 600 to 1200 rpm, feed rate from 50 to 150 mm/min with three equal increments. In this study, the mushy state metal movements during the processes are discussed. The experimental observation and results indicate that the flaw formations, surface roughness of the weld, and hardness value depend on the metal movement and are explained in this study. The microstructure of the weld zone was studied finally.

  12. Effects of thermal aging on microstructures of low alloy steel-Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Jong Jin; Lee, Bong Ho; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the advanced instrumental analysis has been performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution in the fusion boundary region between weld metal and low alloy steel in dissimilar metal welds. A representative dissimilar weld mock-up made of Alloy 690-Alloy 152-A533 Gr. B was fabricated and aged at 450 °C for 2750 h. The micro- and nano-scale characterization were conducted mainly near in a weld root region by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and three dimensional atom probe tomography. It was observed that the weld root was generally divided into several regions including dilution zone in the Ni-base alloy weld metal, fusion boundary, and heat-affected zone in the low alloy steel. A steep gradient was shown in the chemical composition profile across the interface between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152. The precipitation of carbides was also observed along and near the fusion boundary of as-welded and aged dissimilar metal joints. It was also found that the precipitation of Cr carbides was enhanced by the thermal aging near the fusion boundary.

  13. U-Groove aluminum weld strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Vaughan, R.

    1996-01-01

    Though butt-welds are among the most preferred joining methods in aerostructures, their strength dependence on inelastic mechanics is generally the least understood. This study investigated experimental strain distributions across a thick aluminum U-grooved weld and identified two weld process considerations for improving the multipass weld strength. The extreme thermal expansion and contraction gradient of the fusion heat input across the groove tab thickness produces severe peaking, which induces bending under uniaxial loading. The filler strain-hardening decreased with increasing filler pass sequence, producing the weakest welds on the last pass side. Current welding schedules unknowingly compound these effects which reduce the weld strength. A depeaking index model was developed to select filler pass thicknesses, pass numbers, and sequences to improve depeaking in the welding process. The intent is to combine the strongest weld pass side with the peaking induced bending tension to provide a more uniform stress and stronger weld under axial tensile loading.

  14. U-groove aluminum weld strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Vaughan, R.

    1995-01-01

    Though butt-welds are among the most preferred joining methods in aerostructures, their strength dependence on inelastic mechanics is generally the least understood. This study investigated experimental strain distributions across a thick aluminum U-grooved weld and identified two weld process considerations for improving the multipass weld strength. The extreme thermal expansion and contraction gradient of the fusion heat input across the groove tab thickness produces severe peaking which induces bending under uniaxial loading. The filler strain-hardening deceased with increasing filler pass sequence, producing the weakest welds on the last pass side. Current welding schedules unknowingly compound these effects which reduce the weld strength. A de-peaking index model was developed to select filler pass thicknesses, pass numbers, and sequences to improve de-peaking in the welding process. Intent is to combine the strongest weld pass side with the peaking induced bending tension to provide a more uniform stress and stronger weld under axial tensile loading.

  15. Joint tracking and adaptive robotic welding using vision sensing of the weld joint geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Agapakis, J.E.; Katz, J.M.; Koifman, M.; Epstein, G.N.; Friedman, J.M.; Eyring, D.O.; Rutishauser, H.J.

    1986-11-01

    An approach to the vision-guidance of welding robots and the in-process adjustment of welding conditions is presented. The implementation of a complete vision-guided adaptive robotic welding system is described. The vision-guided adaptive welding system described here has been used to track and weld a wide variety of test and production parts ranging in size from 1.6-mm (1/16-in.) sheet steel to 19.1-mm (3/4-in.) steel plate. Both conventional joint types, including square butt, lap, and V-groove, and special types, such as a multipass square butt submerged arc weld with pre-welded root passes or the axle joints were welded. Various welding procedures, such as GMA welding with a variety of shielding gases and submerged arc welding, have also been used.

  16. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., cutting, or working with molten metal. 56.15007 Section 56.15007 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH..., cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields, or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  17. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Gas Dynamics in the Keyhole During Laser Metal Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenner, Felix; Brock, Christian; Gürtler, Franz-Josef; Klämpfl, Florian; Schmidt, Michael

    The keyhole is the crucial factor for an appropriate weld seam in laser metal welding. The stability of the keyhole is governed by multiple hydrodynamic effects such as melt flow, evaporation on the keyhole front, gas dynamics inside the evolving vapor plume and the resulting pressures from all these phenomena. Due to their elusive nature the measurement of pressures inside the keyhole is still an unresolved task. Here we show a quantification of the density of the metal vapor and the pressure inside the keyhole through measuring the keyhole opening geometry, the evaporation rate and the flow velocity inside the vapor plume. Furthermore, a comparison to a simulation model is shown. Our results are in accordance with theoretical approaches. In the future this results can support an increase of process understanding which eventually leads to a better control of the process in industry.

  18. Effect of pressure and shielding gas on the microstructure of hyperbaric metal cored GMAW welds down to 111 bar

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge, J.C.F.; Santos, V.R. dos

    1995-12-31

    The microstructural evolution of hyperbaric C-Mn weld metals was studied by means of bead-on-plate welds deposit with GMAW process using a commercial metal cored wire. The welding was carried out in the flat position in the range of 51 bar to 111 bar with He+ CO{sub 2} as shielding gas, which CO{sub 2} content varied from 0.1% to 0.8 %. The microstructures were quantitatively analyzed by optical microscopy to evaluate the amount of constituents according to the IIW/IIS terminology. The results showed that all weld metals presented great amounts of acicular ferrite and a stronger influence of pressure on microstructure compared to the influence of the shielding gas.

  19. All-weld-metal design for AWS E10018M, E11018M and E12018M type electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Surian, E.S.; Vedia, L.A. de

    1999-06-01

    This paper presents the results of a research program conducted to design the all-weld metal deposited with AWS A5.5-81 E10018M, E11018M and E12018M SMAW-type electrodes. The role that different alloying elements such as manganese, carbon and chromium play on the tensile properties, hardness and toughness as well as on the microstructure was studied. Criteria for selecting the weld metal composition leading to optimum combination of tensile strength and toughness are suggested. The effect of the variation of heat input, within the requirements of the AWS standard, on the mentioned properties was also analyzed. It was found that the E11018M and E12018M all-weld-metal tensile properties are very sensitive to variations in heat input. For certain values of chemical composition, welding parameter ranges suitable to guarantee the fulfillment of AWS requirements were determined.

  20. Microstructural transformations in stress relieved type 316 stainless steel weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, G.F.; O'Riordan, P.

    1980-02-01

    The heat treatment of Type 316L weld metal containing small amounts of ferrite results in the transformation of the ferrite to chi or ..cap alpha.. phases after aging for only 3 hr at 850/sup 0/C. The chi-phase transformation is associated with a transitional M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ carbide, whereas the sigma-phase transforms directly from the ferrite.

  1. Ultrasonic Phased Array Technique for Accurate Flaw Sizing in Dissimilar Metal Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan D Buttram

    2005-03-11

    Described is a manual,portable non-destructive technique to determine the through wall height of cracks present in dissimilar metal welds used in the primary coolling systems of pressure water and boiler light water reactors. Current manual methods found in industry have proven not to exhibit the sizing accuracy required by ASME inspection requirement. The technique described demonstrated an accuracy approximately three times that required to ASME Section XI, Appendix 8 qualification.

  2. Thermal aging behavior of ERNiCr-3 alloy (weld and base metal)

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; King, J.F.

    1981-08-01

    The nickel-base filler metal alloy ERNiCr-3, containing nominally 67% Ni, 20% Cr, 3% Fe, 3% Mn, and 2.5% Nb, is used widely to make welds for elevated-temperature service. To determine the effect of elevated temperature on tensile and creep-rupture properties of ERNiCr-3, weld metal specimens were thermally aged to 10,000 h at 510/sup 0/C, to 15,000 h at 566/sup 0/C, and to 1000 h at 677/sup 0/C. Wrought ERNiCr-3 was also aged at 566 and 677/sup 0/C. The 0.2% yield strength of the ERNiCr-3 weld metal increased with thermal aging time at 510 and 566/sup 0/C. The ultimate tensile strength also increased continuously with aging time at 566/sup 0/C, whereas at 510/sup 0/C, it went through a maximum (the strength of the material aged 10,000 h was less than was that aged 5000 h).

  3. Influence of titanium and nitrogen on the fracture properties of weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Kocak, M.; Petrovski, B.I.; Richter, E.; Evans, G.M.

    1994-12-31

    A The effects of titanium and nitrogen contents on the C-Mn shielded metal arc weld (SMAW) metal properties have been studied. There are still uncertainties concerning the exact role of each element and interactions between these elements with respect to the weld metal microstructure and fracture toughness properties. Therefore, systematic additions of titanium (in the range of 5 to 450 ppm) and nitrogen (80, 160 and 240 ppm) were made to obtain various amounts of acicular ferrite and different microstructures which lead to varying fracture behaviors. The research program covers the determination of tensile properties, Charpy-V notch transition curves and crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) fracture toughness values of different weld deposits containing three different nitrogen contents. The results show that an optimum level of titanium (30 ppm) addition enhanced the formation of acicular ferrite and hence improved the Charpy-V impact and CTOD toughness values. An increase of nitrogen increased the strength but caused a drastic deterioration of both Charpy-V impact and CTOD toughness values at the upper shelf and transition regime.

  4. Experimental comparison of the MIG, friction stir welding, cold metal transfer and hybrid laser-MIG processes for AA 6005-T6 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Serafino; Sgambitterra, Emanuele; Rinaldi, Sergio; Gallone, Antonello; Viscido, Lucio; Filice, Luigino; Umbrello, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the mechanical properties of welded joints of AA 6005-T6 aluminum alloy obtained with hybrid laser-MIG and cold metal transfer (CMT) welding were analyzed. The performance of hybrid laser-MIG and CMT welded joints were identified using tensile, bending, shear and fatigue life tests. Taking into account the process conditions and requirements, hybrid laser-MIG and CMT welding processes were compared with friction stir welding (FSW) and conventional metal inert gas (MIG) welding processes, shown in a previous work, to understand the advantages and disadvantages of the processes for welding applications of studied Al alloy. Better tensile, bending and shear strength and fatigue life behavior were obtained with hybrid laser-MIG and FSW welded joints compared with conventional MIG processes.

  5. SCALAR MULTI-PASS ATOMIC MAGNETOMETER

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-01

    active volume including relaxation on cell walls. 4 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Fig. 6...measurements, and suppression of spin-exchange relaxation to achieve the highest sensitivity per unit volume. We developed a new multi-pass cell geometry...suppression of spin-exchange relaxation to achieve the highest sensitivity per unit volume. During the project we developed a new multi-pass cell geometry

  6. Evaluation of joint interface of friction stir welding between dissimilar metals using HTS-SQUID gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashiko, Y.; Hatsukade, Y.; Yasui, T.; Takenaka, H.; Todaka, Y.; Fukumoto, M.; Tanaka, S.

    2010-11-01

    In this study, we investigated conductive properties of joint interfaces of friction stir welding (FSW) between dissimilar metals, stainless steel SUS304 and aluminum A6063, using a SQUID nondestructive evaluation (NDE) system. With current injection method, the current maps above the FSW specimens jointed under various conditions were measured by a HTS-SQUID gradiometer. The conductivities of the joint interfaces, which were estimated from the current maps, differed between the joint conditions. By destructive tests using optical microscope, large voids were observed on the joint interfaces with low welding speed that generated excess heating. In case of one specimen, which was welded with welding speed of 500 and 200 mm/min, the conductivity of the former was higher than that of the latter, although the inside voids in the respective regions were not much different. From these results, it is suggested that the current maps were influenced not only by the conductivity of the joint interface but also by inside voids. By hardness test on the SUS boards near the interfaces, only the SUS jointed with 200 mm/min was about half softer than its matrix.

  7. Factors Affecting the Capture Efficiency of a Fume Extraction Torch for Gas Metal Arc Welding

    PubMed Central

    Bonthoux, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Welding fumes are classified as Group 2B ‘possibly carcinogenic’ and this prompts to the implementation of local exhaust ventilation (LEV). The fume extraction torch with LEV integrated into the tool is the most attractive solution but its capture efficiency is often disappointing in practice. This study assesses the main parameters affecting fume capture efficiency namely the extraction flow rate, the positioning of the suction openings on the torch, the angle of inclination of the torch to the workpiece during welding, the metal transfer modes, and the welding deposition rate. The theoretical velocity induced by suction, estimated from the extraction flow rate and the position of the suction openings, is the main parameter affecting effectiveness of the device. This is the design parameter and its value should never be <0.25 m s−1. The angle of the torch relative to the workpiece also has a great deal of influence. To improve efficiency, work station layouts need to favour positions where the torch is held with angles closer to perpendicular (<15°). Welding with high deposition rates (>1.1g s−1) and spray transfer leads to low capture efficiency if induced velocities are <0.5 m s−1. The results of the study can be used in the design of integrated on-torch extraction systems and provide information for fixing system objectives. PMID:27074798

  8. Characterization of airborne particles generated from metal active gas welding process.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, C; Gomes, J F; Carvalho, P; Santos, T J G; Miranda, R M; Albuquerque, P

    2014-05-01

    This study is focused on the characterization of particles emitted in the metal active gas welding of carbon steel using mixture of Ar + CO2, and intends to analyze which are the main process parameters that influence the emission itself. It was found that the amount of emitted particles (measured by particle number and alveolar deposited surface area) are clearly dependent on the distance to the welding front and also on the main welding parameters, namely the current intensity and heat input in the welding process. The emission of airborne fine particles seems to increase with the current intensity as fume-formation rate does. When comparing the tested gas mixtures, higher emissions are observed for more oxidant mixtures, that is, mixtures with higher CO2 content, which result in higher arc stability. These mixtures originate higher concentrations of fine particles (as measured by number of particles by cm(3) of air) and higher values of alveolar deposited surface area of particles, thus resulting in a more severe worker's exposure.

  9. Carbon migration in 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M. L.; Wang, L.

    1998-12-01

    The carbon migration between a ferritic steel and an austenitic steel was studied in submerged arc-welded 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) after aging at 500°C for various times and after long-term service in technical practice. The distribution of carbon, chromium, nickel, and iron in the areas around the weld interface was determined by electron probe microanalysis, and the microstructural aspect in the carbon-depleted/enriched zone was characterized by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the precipitation sequences and composition characteristics of the carbides were identified by diffraction pattern microanalysis and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis. It was found (1) that there exists a coherent relationship between intracrystalline M23C6 and the austenitic matrix; (2) that the composition of M23C6 in the carbon-enriched zone is independent of the duration of aging and service; (3) that the maximum carbon concentration is determined by the carbide type, the composition characteristic of precipitated carbides, and the concentration of carbide-forming Cr adjacent to the weld interface in the carbon-enriched zone; and (4) that the carbon migration in the 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni DMWs can be described by a diffusion model.

  10. Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yavari, R.; Arakere, A.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2013-05-01

    A fully coupled (two-way), transient, thermal-mechanical finite-element procedure is developed to model conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) butt-joining process. Two-way thermal-mechanical coupling is achieved by making the mechanical material model of the workpiece and the weld temperature-dependent and by allowing the potential work of plastic deformation resulting from large thermal gradients to be dissipated in the form of heat. To account for the heat losses from the weld into the surroundings, heat transfer effects associated with natural convection and radiation to the environment and thermal-heat conduction to the adjacent workpiece material are considered. The procedure is next combined with the basic physical-metallurgy concepts and principles and applied to a prototypical (plain) low-carbon steel (AISI 1005) to predict the distribution of various crystalline phases within the as-welded material microstructure in different fusion zone and heat-affected zone locations, under given GMAW-process parameters. The results obtained are compared with available open-literature experimental data to provide validation/verification for the proposed GMAW modeling effort.

  11. Factors Affecting the Capture Efficiency of a Fume Extraction Torch for Gas Metal Arc Welding.

    PubMed

    Bonthoux, Francis

    2016-07-01

    Welding fumes are classified as Group 2B 'possibly carcinogenic' and this prompts to the implementation of local exhaust ventilation (LEV). The fume extraction torch with LEV integrated into the tool is the most attractive solution but its capture efficiency is often disappointing in practice. This study assesses the main parameters affecting fume capture efficiency namely the extraction flow rate, the positioning of the suction openings on the torch, the angle of inclination of the torch to the workpiece during welding, the metal transfer modes, and the welding deposition rate. The theoretical velocity induced by suction, estimated from the extraction flow rate and the position of the suction openings, is the main parameter affecting effectiveness of the device. This is the design parameter and its value should never be <0.25 m s(-1) The angle of the torch relative to the workpiece also has a great deal of influence. To improve efficiency, work station layouts need to favour positions where the torch is held with angles closer to perpendicular (<15°). Welding with high deposition rates (>1.1g s(-1)) and spray transfer leads to low capture efficiency if induced velocities are <0.5 m s(-1) The results of the study can be used in the design of integrated on-torch extraction systems and provide information for fixing system objectives. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  12. Evaluation and monitoring of UVR in Shield Metal ARC Welding processing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chiung-yu; Liu, Hung-hsin; Chang, Cheng-ping; Shieh, Jeng-yueh; Lan, Cheng-hang

    2007-08-01

    This study established a comprehensive approach to monitoring UVR magnitude from Shield Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) processing and quantified the effective exposure based on measured data. The irradiances from welding UVR were calculated with biological effective parameter (Slambda) for human exposure assessment. The spectral weighting function for UVR measurement and evaluation followed the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) guidelines. Arc welding processing scatters bright light with UVR emission over the full UV spectrum (UVA, UVB, and UVC). The worst case of effective irradiance from a 50 cm distance arc spot with a 200 A electric current and an electrode E6011 (4 mm) is 311.0 microW cm(-2) and has the maximum allowance time (Tmax) of 9.6 s. Distance is an important factor affecting the irradiance intensity. The worst case of the effective irradiance values from arc welding at 100, 200, and 300 cm distances are 76.2, 16.6, and 12.1 microW cm(-2) with Tmax of 39.4, 180.7, and 247.9 s, respectively. Protective materials (glove and mask) were demonstrated to protect workers from hazardous UVR exposure. From this study, the methodology of UVR monitoring in SMAW processing was developed and established. It is recommended that welders should be fitted with appropriate protective materials for protection from UVR emission hazards.

  13. Electroslag and electrogas welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    These two new joining methods perform welding in the vertical position, and therein lies the secret of their impressive advantages in material handling, in weld preparation, in welding speed, in freedom from distortion, and in weld soundness. Once the work has been set in the proper vertical position for welding, no further plate handling is required. The molten filler metal is held in place by copper shoes or dams, and the weld is completed in one pass.

  14. Welding processes and practices

    SciTech Connect

    Koellhoffer, L.; Manz, A.F.; Hornberger, G.

    1987-01-01

    Each section begins with basic process theory and moves on to practical exercises that become increasingly more difficult. Among the many processes and practices covered are: the materials and mechanical factors, basic positions and joints, oxyfuel gas welding, oxyacetylene welding of carbon steel, shielded metal arc welding, flux-colored arc welding, and gas tungsten arc welding. Discusses the advantages and disadvantages of welding, and presents trouble-shooting techniques.

  15. Effect of carbon on the microstructure and mechanical properties of all weld metal from an E7024 SMAW electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Surian, E.S.; Maraniello, E.J.; Argentina, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of the carbon content on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the all weld metal deposited by an E 7024 manual electrode, and in this way to increase the knowledge about the metallurgy of deposited metals of rutile electrodes. Four E7024 electrodes, 3.25 mm diameter, were prepared with the addition of graphite to the coating, to obtain in the all weld metal nominal carbon contents of 0.03, 0.06, 0.10, and 0.13%. The mechanical properties measured were: tensile properties at room temperature and Charpy impact toughness over the temperature range from 20{degrees}C down to -70{degrees}C. Microstructure was examined and quantified on metallographic sections normal to the welding direction and obtained from the all-weld metal assemblies. As the graphite content of the electrode coating increases, it was found that: (1) In the all-weld metal, the carbon content increases, the oxygen one decreases and the manganese and silicon contents remain constant. (2) The yield and tensile strengths increase, and it is necessary to have at least 0.06% of carbon in the deposited metal to obtain the minimum values required by the AWS standard. (3) The microstructure becomes finer. The primary austenitic grain size in the columnar region of the top bead decreases as well as the fine grain size of the refined region. (4) There is an increase in the hardness, measured along the vertical centerline of the all-weld metal specimens. By fixing the chemical composition of the weld metal, of rutile electrodes, it is possible to improve the mechanical properties to be able to use them in more exigent applications, taking advantage of all the technological characteristics of this type of electrodes.

  16. Multipass modes in an open resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niziev, V. G.; Grishaev, R. V.; Panchenko, V. Ya

    2015-02-01

    The papers dealing with multipass modes in open stable resonators are reviewed. A numerical model of an axially symmetric resonator is described that permits the properties of multipass modes to be studied in wave approximation. It is shown that for Fresnel numbers larger than unity, multiple reflections of radiation from the stable resonator mirrors lead to sustained quasi-stationary field oscillations in the resonator which are indicative of the essential contribution of multipass modes. The calculations in filling the resonator with the active medium have been performed for two types of lasers: with the on-axis and off-axis gain maxima. Resonator designs are suggested, trajectory selection techniques are considered to provide high-quality radiation at large Fresnel numbers. The confocal resonator properties are analyzed in the context of competition between single-pass and multipass modes. Relying on the results of calculations for multipass mode generation, a critical analysis of the experimental works is presented suggesting a logical explanation for the peculiarities which had not been physically interpreted in the original publications. An advanced understanding of the physics of multipass mode formations allowed us to put forward a special design of stable resonators for the generation of high quality radiation in high-power lasers.

  17. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Gas tungsten arc and low hydrogen shielded metal arc welding of carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-128-ASME-1 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc and low hydrogen shielded metal arc welding of carbon steels (P-1-1), in thickness range 0.25 to 2.0 inch; filler metals are ER70S-3) (F-6, A-1) (GTAW) and E7018 (F-4, A-1); shielding gas is argon (GTAW).

  18. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of chromium-nickel steel. [300 series

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-303-ASME-3 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of 300 Series Cr-Ni steels (P-8-1), in thickness range 0.25 to 2.0 inch; filler metals are ER3XX (F-6, A-8) (GTAW) and ER3XX-15 (F-5, A-8); shielding gas for GTAW is argon.

  19. Welding procedure specification: gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of carbon steel. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-2103-ASME-1 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of carbon steels (P-1-1) to 300 series Cr-Ni steels (P-8-1), in thickness range 0.25 to 2.0 inch; filler metals are ERNiCr-3 (F-43 (GTAW) and ENiCrFe-3 (F-43) (SMAW); shielding gas is argon (GTAW).

  20. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of AISI 41XX steels. [4130 and 4142 steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-127 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of AISI 4130 and 4142 steels (ASTM A519) (P-No: None), 0.438-inch wall pipe; filler metal is AMS 6457, Class 4130 MC (F-, A-No: None) (GTAW) and E8018-B2L (F-4, A-3) (GMAW): shielding gas is argon (GTAW).

  1. Gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of carbon steel. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-104-ASME-2 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of carbon steels (P-1-1), in thickness range 0.25 to 1.0 inch; filler metals are E70S-3 (F-6, A-1) (GTAW) and E6010 (F-3, A-1) (SMAW): shielding gas is argon (GTAW).

  2. Characterization of Stainless Steel and Refractory Metal Welds Made using a Diode-Pumped, Continuous Wave Nd: Yag Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Wood, B; Elmer, J W; Westrich, C; Milewski, J O; Piltch, M; Barbe, M; Carpenter, R

    2001-10-19

    A series of laser welds have been made on several materials using a Rofin-Sinar DY-033, 3.3 kW, Diode-Pumped Continuous Wave (CW) Nd:YAG laser system, located at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Materials welded in these experiments include 21-6-9 stainless steel, 304L stainless steel, vanadium, and tantalum. The effects of changes in the power input at a constant travel speed on the depth, width, aspect ratio, and total melted area of the welds have been analyzed. Increases in the measured weld pool dimensions as a function of power input are compared for each of the base metals investigated. These results provide a basis for further examining the characteristics of diode pumped CW Nd:YAG laser systems in welding applications.

  3. Summary of Dissimilar Metal Joining Trials Conducted by Edison Welding Institute

    SciTech Connect

    MJ Lambert

    2005-11-18

    Under the direction of the NASA-Glenn Research Center, the Edison Welding Institute (EWI) in Columbus, OH performed a series of non-fusion joining experiments to determine the feasibility of joining refractory metals or refractory metal alloys to Ni-based superalloys. Results, as reported by EWI, can be found in the project report for EWI Project 48819GTH (Attachment A, at the end of this document), dated October 10, 2005. The three joining methods used in this investigation were inertia welding, magnetic pulse welding, and electro-spark deposition joining. Five materials were used in these experiments: Mo-47Re, T-111, Hastelloy X, Mar M-247 (coarse-grained, 0.5 mm to several millimeter average grain size), and Mar M-247 (fine-grained, approximately 50 {micro}m average grain size). Several iterative trials of each material combination with each joining method were performed to determine the best practice joining method. Mo-47Re was found to be joined easily to Hastelloy X via inertia welding, but inertia welding of the Mo-alloy to both Mar M-247 alloys resulted in inconsistent joint strength and large reaction layers between the two metals. T-111 was found to join well to Hastelloy X and coarse-grained Mar M-247 via inertia welding, but joining to fine-grained Mar M-247 resulted in low joint strength. Magnetic pulse welding (MPW) was only successful in joining T-111 tubing to Hastelloy X bar stock. The joint integrity and reaction layer between the metals were found to be acceptable. This single joining trial, however, caused damage to the electromagnetic concentrators used in this process. Subsequent design efforts to eliminate the problem resulted in a loss of power imparted to the accelerating work piece, and results could not be reproduced. Welding trials of Mar M-247 to T-111 resulted in catastrophic failure of the bar stock, even at lower power. Electro-spark deposition joining of Mo-47Re, in which the deposited material was Hastelloy X, did not have a

  4. Ballistic-Failure Mechanisms in Gas Metal Arc Welds of Mil A46100 Armor-Grade Steel: A Computational Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Galgalikar, R.; Ramaswami, S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    In our recent work, a multi-physics computational model for the conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joining process was introduced. The model is of a modular type and comprises five modules, each designed to handle a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e.: (i) electro-dynamics of the welding-gun; (ii) radiation-/convection-controlled heat transfer from the electric-arc to the workpiece and mass transfer from the filler-metal consumable electrode to the weld; (iii) prediction of the temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of thermal and mechanical fields within the weld region during the GMAW joining process; (iv) the resulting temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the material microstructure throughout the weld region; and (v) spatial distribution of the as-welded material mechanical properties. In the present work, the GMAW process model has been upgraded with respect to its predictive capabilities regarding the spatial distribution of the mechanical properties controlling the ballistic-limit (i.e., penetration-resistance) of the weld. The model is upgraded through the introduction of the sixth module in the present work in recognition of the fact that in thick steel GMAW weldments, the overall ballistic performance of the armor may become controlled by the (often inferior) ballistic limits of its weld (fusion and heat-affected) zones. To demonstrate the utility of the upgraded GMAW process model, it is next applied to the case of butt-welding of a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel, MIL A46100. The model predictions concerning the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and ballistic-limit-controlling mechanical properties within the MIL A46100 butt-weld are found to be consistent with prior observations and general expectations.

  5. Parametric studies on tensile strength in joining AA6061- T6 and AA7075-T6 by gas metal arc welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, M.; Noordin, N. F. M.; Shah, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Proper selection of the welding parameters can result in better joining. In this study, the effects of various welding parameters on tensile strength in joining dissimilar aluminum alloys AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 were investigated. 2 mm thick samples of both base metals were welded by semi-automatic gas metal arc welding (GMAW) using filler wire ER5356. The welding current, arc voltage and welding speed were chosen as variables parameters. The strength of each specimen after the welding operations were tested and the effects of these parameters on tensile strength were identified by using Taguchi method. The range of parameter for welding current were chosen from 100 to 115 A, arc voltage from 17 to 20 V and welding speed from 2 to 5 mm/s. L16 orthogonal array was used to obtained 16 runs of experiments. It was found that the highest tensile strength (194.34 MPa) was obtained with the combination of a welding current of 115 A, welding voltage of 18 V and welding speed of 4 mm/s. Through analysis of variance (ANOVA), the welding voltage was the most effected parameter on tensile strength with percentage of contribution at 41.30%.

  6. Fusion Welding Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    alloy for a variety of Navy systems. The fracture toughness of thick plate submerged arc welds is of particular interesc. This project is an...research S on welding processes. Studies include metal vapors in the arc , development of a high speed infrared temperature monitor, digital signal...analysis as a weld process monitor, convection in arc weld pools, droplet transfer and contact tip wear in gas metal arc welding of titanium, and fractd’re

  7. Effects of heat input on mechanical properties of metal inert gas welded 1.6 mm thick galvanized steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiqul, M. I.; Ishak, M.; Rahman, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    It is usually a lot easier and less expensive to galvanize steel before it is welded into useful products. Galvanizing afterwards is almost impossible. In this research work, Galvanized Steel was welded by using the ER 308L stainless steel filler material. This work was done to find out an alternative way of welding and investigate the effects of heat input on the mechanical properties of butt welded joints of Galvanized Steel. A 13.7 kW maximum capacity MIG welding machine was used to join 1.6 mm thick sheet of galvanized steel with V groove and no gap between mm. Heat inputs was gradually increased from 21.06 to 25.07 joules/mm in this study. The result shows almost macro defects free welding and with increasing heat input the ultimate tensile strength and welding efficiency decrease. The Vickers hardness also decreases at HAZ with increasing heat input and for each individual specimen; hardness was lowest in heat affected zone (HAZ), intermediate in base metal and maximum in welded zone. The fracture for all specimens was in the heat affected zone while testing in the universal testing machine.

  8. STRESS CORROSION CRACK GROWTH RESPONSE FOR ALLOY 152/52 DISSIMILAR METAL WELDS IN PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-08-15

    As part of ongoing research into primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of alloy 690 and its welds, SCC tests have been conducted on alloy 152/52 dissimilar metal (DM) welds with cracks positioned with the goal to assess weld dilution and fusion line effects on SCC susceptibility. No increased crack growth rate was found when evaluating a 20% Cr dilution zone in alloy 152M joined to carbon steel (CS) that had not undergone a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). However, high SCC crack growth rates were observed when the crack reached the fusion line of that material where it propagated both on the fusion line and in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the carbon steel. Crack surface and crack profile examinations of the specimen revealed that cracking in the weld region was transgranular (TG) with weld grain boundaries not aligned with the geometric crack growth plane of the specimen. The application of a typical pressure vessel PWHT on a second set of alloy 152/52 – carbon steel DM weld specimens was found to eliminate the high SCC susceptibility in the fusion line and carbon steel HAZ regions. PWSCC tests were also performed on alloy 152-304SS DM weld specimens. Constant K crack growth rates did not exceed 5x10-9 mm/s in this material with post-test examinations revealing cracking primarily on the fusion line and slightly into the 304SS HAZ.

  9. Effect of Multipasses on Microstructure and Electrochemical Behavior of Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhdoom, Muhammad Atif; Kamran, Muhammad; Awan, Gul Hameed; Mukhtar, Sehrish

    2013-12-01

    Shielded metal arc welding was applied to AISI 1045 medium carbon steel. The microstructural changes and electrochemical corrosion behavior of the heat-affected zone (HAZ), base metal (BM), and weld zone (WZ) were investigated. The effect of welding passes on microstructural changes of BM, HAZ, and WZ were elucidated using optical microscopy, potentiodynamic Tafel scan, and linear polarization resistance (LPR) methods in plain water and 3.5 pct (w/v) NaCl solution under standard temperature and pressure using corrosion kinetic parameters. From microstructural observations, the variations in ferrite morphology in the BM and WZ showed dissimilar electrochemical corrosion behavior and a corrosion rate than that of HAZ.

  10. Manganese exposures during shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) in an enclosed space.

    PubMed

    Harris, Michael K; Ewing, William M; Longo, William; DePasquale, Christopher; Mount, Michael D; Hatfield, Richard; Stapleton, Randall

    2005-08-01

    The work reported here evaluates the effectiveness of various rates of dilution ventilation in controlling welder exposures to manganese in shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) fume when working in enclosed or restricted spaces. Personal and area monitoring using total and respirable sampling techniques, along with multiple analytical techniques, was conducted during the welding operations. With 2000 cubic feet per minute (CFM) (56.63 m3/min) dilution ventilation, personal breathing zone concentrations for the welder using 1/8 inches (3.18 mm) E6010 and E7018 mild steel electrodes were within 75% of the existing threshold limit value (TLV of 0.2 mg/m3 for total manganese and were five times greater than the 2001-2003 proposed respirable manganese TLV of 0.03 mg/m3. Manganese concentrations using high manganese content electrodes were five times greater than those for E6010 and E7018 electrodes. Area samples upstream and downstream of the welder using E6010 and E7018 electrodes exceeded 0.2 mg/m3 manganese. Concentrations inside and outside the welding helmet do not indicate diversion of welding fume by the welding helmet from the welder's breathing zone. There was close agreement between respirable manganese and total manganese fume concentrations. Total fume concentrations measured by gravimetric analysis of matched-weight, mixed cellulose ester filters were comparable to those measured via preweighed PVC filter media. This study indicates that 2000 CFM general dilution ventilation per 29 CFR 1910.252 (c)(2) may not be a sufficient means of controlling respirable manganese exposures for either welders or their helpers in restricted or enclosed spaces. In the absence of site-specific monitoring data indicating otherwise, it is prudent to employ respiratory protection or source capture ventilation for SMAW with E6010, E7018, and high manganese content electrodes rather than depending solely on 2000 CFM general dilution ventilation in enclosed spaces.

  11. Assessment of the biological effects of welding fumes emitted from metal inert gas welding processes of aluminium and zinc-plated materials in humans.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, L; Bauer, M; Bertram, J; Gube, M; Lenz, K; Reisgen, U; Schettgen, T; Kraus, T; Brand, P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate biological effects and potential health risks due to two different metal-inert-gas (MIG) welding fumes (MIG welding of aluminium and MIG soldering of zinc coated steel) in healthy humans. In a threefold cross-over design study 12 male subjects were exposed to three different exposure scenarios. Exposures were performed under controlled conditions in the Aachener Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL). On three different days the subjects were either exposed to filtered ambient air, to welding fumes from MIG welding of aluminium, or to fumes from MIG soldering of zinc coated materials. Exposure was performed for 6 h and the average fume concentration was 2.5 mg m(-3). Before, directly after, 1 day after, and 7 days after exposure spirometric and impulse oscillometric measurements were performed, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was collected and blood samples were taken and analyzed for inflammatory markers. During MIG welding of aluminium high ozone concentrations (up to 250 μg m(-3)) were observed, whereas ozone was negligible for MIG soldering. For MIG soldering, concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) and factor VIII were significantly increased but remained mostly within the normal range. The concentration of neutrophils increased in tendency. For MIG welding of aluminium, the lung function showed significant decreases in Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) and Mean Expiratory Flow at 75% vital capacity (MEF 75) 7 days after exposure. The concentration of ristocetin cofactor was increased. The observed increase of hsCRP during MIG-soldering can be understood as an indicator for asymptomatic systemic inflammation probably due to zinc (zinc concentration 1.5 mg m(-3)). The change in lung function observed after MIG welding of aluminium may be attributed to ozone inhalation, although the late response (7 days after exposure) is surprising. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of modes of metal transfer on grain structure and direction of grain growth in low nickel austenitic stainless steel weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Manidipto; Saha, Saptarshi; Pal, Tapan Kumar; Kanjilal, Prasanta

    2015-04-15

    The present study elaborately discussed the effect of different modes of metal transfer (i.e., short circuit mode, spray mode and pulse mode) on grain structure and direction of grain growth in low nickel austenitic stainless steel weld metals. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis was used to study the grain growth direction and grain structure in weld metals. The changes in grain structure and grain growth direction were found to be essentially varied with the weld pool shape and acting forces induced by modes of metal transfer at a constant welding speed. Short circuit mode of metal transfer owing to higher Marangoni force (M{sub a}) and low electromagnetic force (R{sub m}) promotes the lower weld pool volume (Γ) and higher weld pool maximum radius (r{sub m}). Short circuit mode also shows curved and tapered columnar grain structures and the grain growth preferentially occurred in <001> direction. In contrast, spray mode of metal transfer increases the Γ and reduces the r{sub m} values due to very high R{sub m} and typically reveals straight and broad columnar grain structures with preferential growth direction in <111>. In the pulse mode of metal transfer relatively high M{sub a} and R{sub m} simultaneously increase the weld pool width and the primary penetration which might encourage relatively complex grain growth directions in the weld pool and cause a shift of major intensity from <001> to <111> direction. It can also be concluded that the fusion zone grain structure and direction of grain growth are solely dependent on modes of metal transfer and remain constant for a particular mode of metal transfer irrespective of filler wire used. - Highlights: • Welded joints of LNiASS were prepared by varying modes of metal transfer. • Weld pool shape, grain structure and grain growth direction were studied. • Short circuit mode shows curved and tapered grain growth in <001> direction. • Spray mode shows straight and broad columnar grain growth

  13. The dynamics of droplet formation and detachment in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.; Clark, D.E.; Carlson, N.M.; Watkins, A.D.; Lethcoe, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental measurements of gas metal arc welding are required for the development and confirmation of models of the process. This paper reports on two experiments that provide information for models of the arc physics and of the weld pool dynamics. The heat transfer efficiency of the spray transfer mode in gas metal arc welding was measured using a calorimetry technique. The efficiency varied from 75 to 85%. A special fixture was used to measure the droplet contribution, which is determined to be between 35 and 45% of the total input energy. A series of experiments was performed at a variety of conditions ranging from globular to spray to streaming transfer. The transfer was observed by taking high-speed movies at 500 to 5000 frames per second of the backlighted droplets. An automatic image analysis system was used to obtain information about the droplets including time between detachments, droplet size, and droplet acceleration. At the boundary between the globular and spray modes, the droplet size varies between small droplets that melt off faster than average, resulting in a smaller electrode extension, and large droplets that melt off slower than average, resulting in an increase in the electrode extension. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. The use of an advanced design of power supply control system for wet shielded metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, J.H.; Webb, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    The work described in this paper was carried out as a direct result of the research reported in an earlier OMAE document. That paper described a series of welding trials which investigated the handling characteristics of a series of wet shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) electrodes, and attempted to establish objective measures of welder skill by the use of parameter measurement techniques. One of the conclusions reached as a result of that work was that a skilled wet SMAW welder was capable of maintaining a much shorter arc length than a less skilled welder, resulting in higher levels of metal transfer efficiency and higher weld heat inputs. Based on this conclusion, it was decided to utilize a highly flexible welding power supply control system (PSCS) developed at Cranfield for welding process research, and to apply it to wet SMAW. Similar control techniques have been suggested by other sources. Using the consumable regarded most favorably in the earlier work, a series of welding trials were undertaken to optimize the various operating parameters which the PSCS could control. Although only a limited series of welding tests were conducted, it is felt that techniques of this type offer sufficient promise that they should be investigated in a larger scale investigation.

  15. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Mechanical and Electrochemical Properties of Gas Metal Arc-Welded 316L (X2CrNiMo 17-13-2) Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, F.; Ahmad, A.; Farooq, A.; Haider, W.

    2016-10-01

    In the present research work, corrosion behavior of post-weld heat-treated (PWHT) AISI 316L (X2CrNiMo 17-13-2) specimens joined by gas metal arc welding is compared with as-welded samples by using potentiodynamic polarization technique. Welded samples were PWHT at 1323 K for 480 s and quenched. Mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and microstructures of as-welded and PWHT specimens were investigated. Microstructural studies have shown grain size refinement after PWHT. Ultimate tensile strength and yield strength were found maximum for PWHT samples. Bend test have shown that PWHT imparted ductility in welded sample. Fractographic analysis has evidenced ductile behavior for samples. Potentiodynamic polarization test was carried out in a solution composed of 1 M H2SO4 and 1 N NaCl. Corrosion rate of weld region was 127.6 mpy, but after PWHT, it was decreased to 13.12 mpy.

  16. A Phenomenological Model for Tool Wear in Friction Stir Welding of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Tracie J.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Cook, George E.; Gibson, Brian T.; Cox, Chase D.

    2013-08-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) of metal matrix composites (MMCs) is advantageous because the solid-state nature of the process precludes formation of deleterious intermetallic phases which accompany melting. FSW of MMCs is complicated by rapid and severe wear of the welding tool, a consequence of contact between the tool and the much harder abrasive reinforcement which gives the workpiece material its enhanced strength. The current article demonstrates that Nunes's rotating plug model of material flow in FSW, which has been successfully applied in many other contexts, can also help us understand wear in FSW of MMCs. An equation for predicting the amount of wear in this application is developed and compared with experimental data. This phenomenological model explains the relationship between wear and FSW process parameters documented in previous studies.

  17. Phased array ultrasonic testing of dissimilar metal welds using geometric based referencing delay law technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Taeyoung; Schubert, Frank; Hillmann, Susanne; Meyendorf, Norbert

    2015-03-01

    Phased array ultrasonic testing (PAUT) techniques are widely used for the non-destructive testing (NDT) of austenitic welds to find defects like cracks. However, the propagation of ultrasound waves through the austenitic material is intricate due to its inhomogeneous and anisotropic nature. Such a characteristic leads beam path distorted which causes the signal to be misinterpreted. By employing a reference block which is cutout from the mockup of which the structure is a dissimilar metal weld (DMW), a new method of PAUT named as Referencing Delay Law Technique (RDLT) is introduced. With the RDLT, full matrix capture (FMC) was used for data acquisition. To reconstruct the images, total focusing method (TFM) was used. After the focal laws were calculated, PAUT was then performed. As a result, the flaws are more precisely positioned with significantly increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  18. Advanced Testing Techniques to Measure the PWSCC Resistance of Alloy 690 and its Weld Metals

    SciTech Connect

    P.Andreson

    2004-10-01

    Wrought Alloy 600 and its weld metals (Alloy 182 and Alloy 82) were originally used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) due to the material's inherent resistance to general corrosion in a number of aggressive environments and because of a coefficient of thermal expansion that is very close to that of low alloy and carbon steel. Over the last thirty years, stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water (PWSCC) has been observed in numerous Alloy 600 component items and associated welds, sometimes after relatively long incubation times. The occurrence of PWSCC has been responsible for significant downtime and replacement power costs. As part of an ongoing, comprehensive program involving utilities, reactor vendors and engineering/research organizations, this report will help to ensure that corrosion degradation of nickel-base alloys does not limit service life and that full benefit can be obtained from improved designs for both replacement components and new reactors.

  19. Friction Stir Welding of Metal Matrix Composites for use in aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Tracie

    2014-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively nascent solid state joining technique developed at The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991. The process was first used at NASA to weld the super lightweight external tank for the Space Shuttle. Today FSW is used to join structural components of the Delta IV, Atlas V, and Falcon IX rockets as well as the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle. A current focus of FSW research is to extend the process to new materials which are difficult to weld using conventional fusion techniques. Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) consist of a metal alloy reinforced with ceramics and have a very high strength to weight ratio, a property which makes them attractive for use in aerospace and defense applications. MMCs have found use in the space shuttle orbiter's structural tubing, the Hubble Space Telescope's antenna mast, control surfaces and propulsion systems for aircraft, and tank armors. The size of MMC components is severely limited by difficulties encountered in joining these materials using fusion welding. Melting of the material results in formation of an undesirable phase (formed when molten Aluminum reacts with the reinforcement) which leaves a strength depleted region along the joint line. Since FSW occurs below the melting point of the workpiece material, this deleterious phase is absent in FSW-ed MMC joints. FSW of MMCs is, however, plagued by rapid wear of the welding tool, a consequence of the large discrepancy in hardness between the steel tool and the reinforcement material. This work characterizes the effect of process parameters (spindle speed, traverse rate, and length of joint) on the wear process. Based on the results of these experiments, a phenomenological model of the wear process was constructed based on the rotating plug model for FSW. The effectiveness of harder tool materials (such as Tungsten Carbide, high speed steel, and tools with diamond coatings) to combat abrasive wear is explored. In-process force, torque, and

  20. Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  1. Introduction to Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  2. Gas Metal Arc Welding and Flux-Cored Arc Welding. Third Edition. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, John; Harper, Eddie

    This packet, containing a teacher's edition, a student edition, and a student workbook, introduces students to high deposition welding and processes for "shielding" a weld. In addition to general information, the teacher edition consists of introductory pages and teacher pages, as well as unit information that corresponds to the…

  3. Gas Metal Arc Welding and Flux-Cored Arc Welding. Third Edition. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, John; Harper, Eddie

    This packet, containing a teacher's edition, a student edition, and a student workbook, introduces students to high deposition welding and processes for "shielding" a weld. In addition to general information, the teacher edition consists of introductory pages and teacher pages, as well as unit information that corresponds to the…

  4. A self-organizing fuzzy control approach to arc sensor for weld joint tracking in gas metal arc welding of butt joints

    SciTech Connect

    Na, S.J. ); Kim, J.W.

    1993-02-01

    For the artificial intelligence (AI) approach to automatic control, the fuzzy rule-based control schemes have been successfully applied to the control of complex processes. The arc welding process is one of the processes due to the fact that it possesses complex and nonlinear characteristics such as a moving distributed heat source, a current path and metal transfer. One possible solution to the design of an effective controller suitable for such a process is to use the fuzzy control scheme. The fuzzy rule-based control can easily realize the heuristic rules obtained from human experiences that cannot be expressed in mathematical form. In this study, an arc sensor, which utilizes the electrical signal obtained from the welding arc itself, was developed for CO[sub 2] gas metal arc welding of butt joints using the fuzzy set theory. A simple fuzzy controller without any adaptation was implemented for the weld joint tracking. A set of fixed rules, which was designed based upon the experiments, and a self-organizing fuzzy controller, which could improve the control rules automatically, were examined. Through a series of experiments, the performance and learning action of the proposed self-organizing fuzzy controller were assessed.

  5. Study on laser welding of fuel clad tubes and end plugs made of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for metallic fuel of Fast Breeder Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harinath, Y. V.; Gopal, K. A.; Murugan, S.; Albert, S. K.

    2013-04-01

    A procedure for Pulsed Laser Beam Welding (PLBW) has been developed for fabrication of fuel pins made of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for metallic fuel proposed to be used in future in India's Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) programme. Initial welding trials of the samples were carried out with different average power using Nd-YAG based PLBW process. After analyzing the welds, average power for the weld was optimized for the required depth of penetration and weld quality. Subsequently, keeping the average power constant, the effect of various other welding parameters like laser peak power, pulse frequency, pulse duration and energy per pulse on weld joint integrity were studied and a procedure that would ensure welds of acceptable quality with required depth of penetration, minimum size of fusion zone and Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) were finalized. This procedure is also found to reduce the volume fraction delta-ferrite in the fusion zone.

  6. Weldability and toughness evaluation of pressure vessel quality steel using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, R.; Mukerjee, D.; Mishra, S.

    1998-12-01

    The present study was carried out to assess the weldability properties of ASTM A 537 Cl. 1 pressure-vessel quality steel using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process. Implant and elastic restraint cracking (ERC) tests were conducted under different welding conditions to determine the cold cracking susceptibility of the steel. The static fatigue limit values determined for the implant test indicate adequate resistance to cold cracking even with unbaked electrodes. The ERC test, however, established the necessity to rebake the electrodes before use. Lamellar tearing tests carried out using full-thickness plates under three welding conditions showed no incidence of lamellar tearing upon visual examination, ultrasonic inspection, and four-section macroexamination. Lamellar tearing tests were repeated using machined plates, such that the central segregated band located at the midthickness of the plate corresponded to the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the weld. Only in one (no rebake, heat input: 14.2 kj cm-1, weld restraint load: 42 kg mm-2) of the eight samples tested was lamellar tearing observed. This was probably accentuated due to the combined effects of the presence of localized pockets of a hard phase (bainite) and a high hydrogen level (unbaked electrodes) in the weld joint. Optimal welding conditions were formulated based on the above tests. The weld joint was subjected to extensive tests and found to exhibit excellent strength (tensile strength: 56.8 kg mm-2, or 557 MPa), and low temperature impact toughness (7.4 and 4.5 kg-m at-20 °C for weld metal, WM, and HAZ) properties. Crack tip opening displacement tests carried out for the WM and HAZ resulted in δm values 0.36 and 0.27 mm, respectively, which indicates adequate resistance to brittle fracture.

  7. Weldability and toughness evaluation of pressure vessel quality steel using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, R.; Mukerjee, D.; Mishra, S.

    1998-12-01

    The present study was carried out to assess the weldability properties of ASTM A537 Cl. 1 pressure-vessel quality steel using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process. Implant and elastic restraint cracking (ERC) tests were conducted under different welding conditions to determine the cold cracking susceptibility of the steel. The static fatigue limit values determined for the implant test indicate adequate resistance to cold cracking even with unbaked electrodes. The ERC test, however, established the necessity to rebake the electrodes before use. Lamellar tearing tests carried out using full-thickness plates under three welding conditions showed no incidence of lamellar tearing upon visual examination, ultrasonic inspection, and four-section macroexamination. Lamellar tearing tests were repeated using machined plates, such that the central segregated band located at the midthickness of the plate corresponded to the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the weld. Only in one (no rebake, heat input: 14.2 kJ cm{sup {minus}1}, weld restraint load: 42 kg mm{sup {minus}2}) of the eight samples tested was lamellar tearing observed. This was probably accentuated due to the combined effects of the presence of localized pockets of a hard phase (bainite) and a high hydrogen level (unbaked electrodes) in the weld joint. Optimal welding conditions were formulated based on the above tests. The weld joint was subjected to extensive tests and found to exhibit excellent strength (tensile strength:56.8 kg mm{sup {minus}2}, or 557 MPa), and low temperature impact toughness (7.4 and 4.5 kg-m at {minus}20 C for weld metal, WM, and HAZ) properties. Crack tip opening displacement tests carried out for the WM and HAZ resulted in {delta}{sub m} values 0.36 and 0.27 mm, respectively, which indicates adequate resistance to brittle fracture.

  8. Assessment of Welders Exposure to Carcinogen Metals from Manual Metal Arc Welding in Gas Transmission Pipelines, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Golbabaei, F; Seyedsomea, M; Ghahri, A; Shirkhanloo, H; Khadem, M; Hassani, H; Sadeghi, N; Dinari, B

    2012-01-01

    Background: Welding can produce dangerous fumes containing various metals especially carcinogenic ones. Occupational exposure to welding fumes is associated with lung cancer. Therefore, welders in Gas Transmission Pipelines are known as a high-risk group. This study was designed to determinate the amounts of metals Cr, Ni, and Cd in breathing zone and urine of welders and to assess the possibility of introducing urinary metals as a biomarker due to occupational exposure. Methods: In this cross sectional study, 94 individuals from Gas Transmission Pipelines welders, Iran, Borujen in 2011 were selected and classified into 3 groups including Welders, Back Welders and Assistances. The sampling procedures were performed according to NIOSH 7300 for total chromium, nickel, and cadmium and NIOSH 7600 for Cr+6. For all participants urine samples were collected during the entire work shift and metals in urine were determined according to NIOSH 8310. Results: Back Welders and Assistances groups had maximum and minimum exposure to total fume and its elements, respectively. In addition, results showed that there are significant differences (P<0.05) between Welders and Back Welders with Assistances group in exposure with total fume and elements except Ni. Urinary concentrations of three metals including Cr, Cd and Ni among all welders were about 4.5, 12 and 14-fold greater than those detected in controls, respectively. Weak correlations were found between airborne and urinary metals concentrations (R2: Cr=0.45, Cd=0.298, Ni=0.362). Conclusion: Urinary metals concentrations could not be considerate as a biomarker for welders’ exposure assessment. PMID:23113226

  9. Analysis of welding-induced residual stresses with the ADINA system

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkening, W.W,; Snow, J.L.

    1993-12-01

    Welding-induced residual stresses analysis procedure (WIRSAP), based on ADINA system of nonlinear finite element software, is described and results of several WIRSAP analyses are discussed. Several 2D axisymmetric WIRSAP analyses were performed for pipe girth welds and for several multi-pass girth-like welds attaching small nozzles to large, thick-walled pressure vessels. The analytical methodology follows closely Rybicki et al, enhanced by several specialized modeling techniques available in ADINA. The element birth option is used to simulate the addition of weld metal, and the mixed pressure/ displacement element formulation is used, in conjunction with temperature-dependent bi-linear plasticity material model. Some of the welds analyzed involve backing rings, which were subsequently `machined off` via use of the element death option. The auto-time-stepping algorithm and matrix update iteration scheme are used in structural solutions. WIRSAP involves, a pass-by-pass analysis of uncoupled thermal and structural problems, but some analyses have been performed with an ``enveloping`` technique for grouping several weld passes together. The analyses are all 2D, but most are large problems and pose challenge to software and hardware. Operations are performed on a network of Silicon Graphics workstations, and ADINA and ADINA-T are executed on a 64 MW, eight-processor CRAY YIMP. Nominally 50 solution steps are utilized for each weld pass and weld joints involving as many as 31 individual weld passes analyzed on a pass-by-pass basis. Results from several WIRSAP analyses are discussed, and potential use of WIRSAP in a hypothetic attachment weld design optimization study is illustrated.

  10. Persistence of deposited metals in the lungs after stainless steel and mild steel welding fume inhalation in rats.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Chapman, Rebecca; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G

    2011-05-01

    Welding generates complex metal fumes that vary in composition. The objectives of this study were to compare the persistence of deposited metals and the inflammatory potential of stainless and mild steel welding fumes, the two most common fumes used in US industry. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 40 mg/m(3) of stainless or mild steel welding fumes for 3 h/day for 3 days. Controls were exposed to filtered air. Generated fume was collected, and particle size and elemental composition were determined. Bronchoalveolar lavage was done on days 0, 8, 21, and 42 after the last exposure to assess lung injury/inflammation and to recover lung phagocytes. Non-lavaged lung samples were analyzed for total and specific metal content as a measure of metal persistence. Both welding fumes were similar in particle morphology and size. Following was the chemical composition of the fumes-stainless steel: 57% Fe, 20% Cr, 14% Mn, and 9% Ni; mild steel: 83% Fe and 15% Mn. There was no effect of the mild steel fume on lung injury/inflammation at any time point compared to air control. Lung injury and inflammation were significantly elevated at 8 and 21 days after exposure to the stainless steel fume compared to control. Stainless steel fume exposure was associated with greater recovery of welding fume-laden macrophages from the lungs at all time points compared with the mild steel fume. A higher concentration of total metal was observed in the lungs of the stainless steel welding fume at all time points compared with the mild steel fume. The specific metals present in the two fumes were cleared from the lungs at different rates. The potentially more toxic metals (e.g., Mn, Cr) present in the stainless steel fume were cleared from the lungs more quickly than Fe, likely increasing their translocation from the respiratory system to other organs.

  11. Nature and evolution of the fusion boundary in ferritic-austenitic dissimilar weld metals. Part 1 -- Nucleation and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T.W.; Lippold, J.C.; Mills, M.J.

    1999-10-01

    A fundamental investigation of fusion boundary microstructure evolution in dissimilar-metal welds (DMWs) between ferritic base metals and a face-centered-cubic (FCC) filler metal was conducted. The objective of the work presented here was to characterize the nature and character of the elevated-temperature fusion boundary to determine the nucleation and growth characteristics of DMWs. Type 409 ferritic stainless steel and 1080 pearlitic steel were utilized as base metal substrates, and Monel (70Ni-30Cu) was used as the filler metal. The Type 409 base metal provided a fully ferritic or body-centered-cubic (BCC) substrate at elevated temperatures and exhibited no on-cooling phase transformations to mask or disguise the original character of the fusion boundary. The 1080 pearlitic steel was selected because it is austenitic at the solidus temperature, providing an austenite substrate at the fusion boundary. The weld microstructure generated with each of the base metals in combination with Monel was fully austenitic. In the Type 409/Monel system, there was no evidence of epitaxial nucleation and growth as normally observed in homogeneous weld metal combinations. The fusion boundary in this system exhibited random grain boundary misorientations between the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal grains. In the 1080/Monel system, evidence of normal epitaxial growth was observed at the fusion boundary, where solidification and HAZ grain boundaries converged. The fusion boundary morphologies are a result of the crystal structure present along the fusion boundary during the initial stages of solidification. Based on the results of this investigation, a model for heterogeneous nucleation along the fusion boundary is proposed when the base and weld metals exhibit ferritic (BCC) and FCC crystal structures, respectively.

  12. Toenail as Non-invasive Biomarker in Metal Toxicity Measurement of Welding Fumes Exposure - A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakri, S. F. Z.; Hariri, A.; Ma'arop, N. F.; Hussin, N. S. A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Workers are exposed to a variety of heavy metal pollutants that are released into the environment as a consequence of workplace activities. This chemical pollutants are incorporated into the human by varies of routes entry and can then be stored and distributed in different tissues, consequently have a potential to lead an adverse health effects and/or diseases. As to minimize the impact, a control measures should be taken to avoid these effects and human biological marker is a very effective tool in the assessment of occupational exposure and potential related risk as the results is normally accurate and reproducible. Toenail is the ideal matrix for most common heavy metals due to its reliability and practicality compared to other biological samples as well as it is a non-invasive and this appears as a huge advantage of toenail as a biomarker. This paper reviews studies that measure the heavy metals concentration in toenail as non-invasive matrix which later may adapt in the investigation of metal fume emitted from welding process. The development of new methodology and modern analytical techniques has allowed the use of toenail as non-invasive approach. The presence of a heavy metal in this matrix reflects an exposure but the correlations between heavy metal levels in the toenail must be established to ensure that these levels are related to the total body burden. These findings suggest that further studies on interactions of these heavy metals in metal fumes utilizing toenail biomarker endpoints are highly warranted especially among welders.

  13. Potential for EMU Fabric Damage by Electron Beam and Molten Metal During Space Welding for the International Space Welding Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1998-01-01

    As a consequence of preparations concerning the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), studies were performed to better understand the effect of molten metal contact and electron beam impingement with various fabrics for space suit applications. The question arose as to what would occur if the electron beam from the Ukrainian Universal Hand Tool (UHT) designed for welding in space were to impinge upon a piece of Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1427 C. The expectation was that the electron beam would lay down a static charge pattern with no damage to the ceramic fabric. The electron beam is capable of spraying the fabric with enough negative charge to repel further electrons from the fabric before significant heating occurs. The static charge pattern would deflect any further charge accumulation except for a small initial amount of leakage to the grounded surface of the welder. However, when studies were made of the effect of the electron beam on the insulating ceramic fabric it was surprisingly found that the electron beam did indeed burn through the ceramic fabric. It was also found that the shorter electron beam standoff distances had longer burnthrough times than did some greater electron beam standoff distances. A possible explanation for the longer burnthrough times for the small electron beam standoff distance would be outgassing of the fabric which caused the electron beam hand-tool to cycle on and off to provide some protection for the cathodes. The electron beam hand tool was observed to cycle off at the short standoff distance of two inches likely due to vapors being outgassed. During the electron beam welding process there is an electron leakage, or current leakage, flow from the fabric. A static charge pattern is initially laid down by the electron beam current flow. The static charge makes up the current leakage flow which initially slightly heats up the fabric. The initially laid down surface charge leaks a

  14. Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Resistance Spot Welding and Hot Tensile Tests of Surface-refined TWIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, J.; Schram, A.; Wesling, V.

    2016-03-01

    Automotive industry strives to reduce vehicle weight and therefore fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Especially in the auto body, material light weight construction is practiced, but the occupant safety must be ensured. These requirements demand high-strength steels with good forming and crash characteristics. Such an approach is the use of high- manganese-content TWIP steels, which achieve strengths of around 1,000 MPa and fracture strains of more than 60%. Welding surface-refined TWIP steels reduces their elongation at break and produces cracks due to the contact with liquid metal and the subsequent liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The results of resistance spot welds of mixed joints of high-manganese- content steel in combination with micro-alloyed ferritic steel and hot tensile tests are presented. The influence of different welding parameters on the sensitivity to liquid metal embrittlement is investigated by means of spot welding. In a high temperature tensile testing machine, the influence of different parameters is determined regardless of the welding process. Defined strains just below or above the yield point, and at 25% of elongation at break, show the correlation between the applied strain and liquid metal crack initiation. Due to the possibility to carry out tensile tests on a wide range of temperatures, dependencies of different temperatures of the zinc coating to the steel can be identified. Furthermore, the attack time of the zinc on the base material is investigated by defined heating periods.

  15. Study of metal transfer in CO2 laser+GMAW-P hybrid welding using argon-helium mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wang; Hua, Xueming; Liao, Wei; Li, Fang; Wang, Min

    2014-03-01

    The metal transfer in CO2 Laser+GMAW-P hybrid welding by using argon-helium mixtures was investigated and the effect of the laser on the mental transfer is discussed. A 650 nm laser, in conjunction with the shadow graph technique, is used to observe the metal transfer process. In order to analyze the heat input to the droplet and the droplet internal current line distribution. An optical emission spectroscopy system was employed to estimate default parameter and optimized plasma temperature, electron number densities distribution. The results indicate that the CO2 plasma plume have a significant impact to the electrode melting, droplet formation, detachment, impingement onto the workpiece and weld morphology. Since the current distribution direction flow changes to the keyhole, to obtain a metal transfer mode of one droplet per pulse, the welding parameters should be adjusted to a higher pulse time (TP) and a lower voltage.

  16. Welding for testability: An approach aimed at improving the ultrasonic testing of thick-walled austenitic and dissimilar metal welds

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Sabine; Dugan, Sandra; Barth, Martin; Schubert, Frank; Köhler, Bernd

    2014-02-18

    Austenitic and dissimilar welds in thick walled components show a coarse grained, dendritic microstructure. Therefore, ultrasonic testing has to deal with beam refraction, scattering and mode conversion effects. As a result, the testing techniques typically applied for isotropic materials yield dissatisfying results. Most approaches for improvement of ultrasonic testing have been based on modeling and improved knowledge of the complex wave propagation phenomena. In this paper, we discuss an alternative approach: is it possible to use a modified welding technology which eliminates the cause of the UT complications, i.e. the large-grained structure of the weld seams? Various modification parameters were tested, including: TIG current pulsing, additional DC and AC magnetic fields, and also additional external vibrations during welding. For all welds produced under different conditions, the grain structure of the weld seam was characterized by optical and GIUM microstructure visualizations on cross sections, wave field propagation measurements, and ultrasonic tests of correct detectability of flaws. The mechanical properties of the welds were also tested.

  17. Welding for testability: An approach aimed at improving the ultrasonic testing of thick-walled austenitic and dissimilar metal welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sabine; Dugan, Sandra; Barth, Martin; Schubert, Frank; Köhler, Bernd

    2014-02-01

    Austenitic and dissimilar welds in thick walled components show a coarse grained, dendritic microstructure. Therefore, ultrasonic testing has to deal with beam refraction, scattering and mode conversion effects. As a result, the testing techniques typically applied for isotropic materials yield dissatisfying results. Most approaches for improvement of ultrasonic testing have been based on modeling and improved knowledge of the complex wave propagation phenomena. In this paper, we discuss an alternative approach: is it possible to use a modified welding technology which eliminates the cause of the UT complications, i.e. the large-grained structure of the weld seams? Various modification parameters were tested, including: TIG current pulsing, additional DC and AC magnetic fields, and also additional external vibrations during welding. For all welds produced under different conditions, the grain structure of the weld seam was characterized by optical and GIUM microstructure visualizations on cross sections, wave field propagation measurements, and ultrasonic tests of correct detectability of flaws. The mechanical properties of the welds were also tested.

  18. Localized Corrosion Currents from Graphite/Aluminum and Welded SiC/Al Metal Matrix Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-28

    the corrosion rate in the absence of flaws might be improved by additions of poisions to the fiber to retard the oxygen reduction reaction on graphite...weidment 8 Al4C3 + 12H 20 + 4Al(OH) 3 + 3CH 4 This reaction, along with other metallurgical variations caused by the heat of welding, leads to...efficient cathodic sites along anodic corrosion paths and can lead to exfoliation in 6061 Al when the inter- metallics are present in an appropriate

  19. Method for Assessing Grain Boundary Density in High-Strength, High-Toughness Ferritic Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xuanwei; Huang, Jihua; Chen, Shuhai; Zhao, Xingke

    2017-01-01

    A method for measuring peak values on the maxlength-area fraction curve and the perimeter-area fraction curve with morphological photos using Image Pro Plus 6.0 Soft for assessing grain boundary density in high-strength, high-toughness ferritic weld metals is developed. Results show the sizes of the peak values have a tough relationship with grain boundary densities in that a larger peak value stands for a larger grain boundary density. As ferrite transforms into a certain orientation relationship, this semi-empirical method provides handy references for judging the sizes of effective grain boundary densities.

  20. Influence of chromium on the mechanical properties and microstructure of weld metal from a high-strength SMA electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Surian, E.; Trotti, J. ); Cassanelli, A. ); Vedia, L.A. De )

    1994-03-01

    In the present work, the influence of Cr on mechanical properties and microstructure of weld metal from a high-strength SMA electrode is analyzed by considering 12 experimental low-alloy low-hydrogen iron powder AWS E10018, E11018, E12018-M type covered electrodes. These electrodes were manufactured to obtain in the weld deposits Cr contents ranging from 0 to 1.8%, with two different Mn levels for each Cr content, maintaining the amount of other elements at a fixed value. All-weld-metal specimens and production type single V-groove welds were mechanically tested in the as-welded and stress-relieved conditions, and a metallographic study was conducted. Chromium was found to be deleterious to toughness with only a minor influence due to Mn variations. A postweld heat treatment led in all cases to a reduction of toughness. Increasing Cr content in the welds produced a higher proportion of acicular ferrite and a general refinement of the microstructure.

  1. Effects of Different Filler Metals on the Mechanical Behaviors of GTA Welded AA7A52(T6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Fengyuan; Lv, Yaohui; Liu, Yuxin; Lin, Jianjun; Sun, Zhe; Xu, Binshi; He, Peng

    2014-06-01

    ER4043, ER5356, and AA7A52 on behalf of the Al-Si, Al-Mg, and Al-Zn-Mg-based welding material, respectively, were chosen as the filler metal to weld AA7A52(T6) plates by GTAW. The variance in mechanical performances of the joints caused by the various filler materials was investigated with reference to the SEM and EDS test results for the weld seam and the fracture surface. Failure was found in the seam for all the welded joints. With regard to the joint obtained with ER4043 welding wire, the total elongation was limited by the brittle intergranular compound Mg2Si of which Mg was introduced by convection mass transfer. As for the other two welds, the content ratio of Zn and Mg was found to play the dominant role in deciding the mechanical properties of the intergranular Mg-Zn compounds which were responsible for the tensile behavior of the joints. The content ratio (wt.%) of beyond 2:1 gave birth to the strengthening phase MgZn2 leading to a ductile fracture. Cr in the seam obtained with AA7A52 filler metal was found to enhance the strength of the joint through isolated particles.

  2. Design for low-cost gas metal arc weld-based aluminum 3-D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haselhuhn, Amberlee S.

    Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3-D printing, has the potential to change the state of manufacturing across the globe. Parts are made, or printed, layer by layer using only the materials required to form the part, resulting in much less waste than traditional manufacturing methods. Additive manufacturing has been implemented in a wide variety of industries including aerospace, medical, consumer products, and fashion, using metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, and even organic tissues. However, traditional 3-D printing technologies, particularly those used to print metals, can be prohibitively expensive for small enterprises and the average consumer. A low-cost open-source metal 3-D printer has been developed based upon gas metal arc weld (GMAW) technology. Using this technology, substrate release mechanisms have been developed, allowing the user to remove a printed metal part from a metal substrate by hand. The mechanical and microstructural properties of commercially available weld alloys were characterized and used to guide alloy development in 4000 series aluminum-silicon alloys. Wedge casting experiments were performed to screen magnesium, strontium, and titanium boride alloying additions in hypoeutectic aluminum-silicon alloys for their properties and the ease with which they could be printed. Finally, the top performing alloys, which were approximately 11.6% Si modified with strontium and titanium boride were cast, extruded, and drawn into wire. These wires were printed and the mechanical and microstructural properties were compared with those of commercially available alloys. This work resulted in an easier-to-print aluminum-silicon-strontium alloy that exhibited lower porosity, equivalent yield and tensile strengths, yet nearly twice the ductility compared to commercial alloys.

  3. Influence of tool speeds on dissimilar friction stir spot welding characteristics of bulk metallic glass/Mg alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyung-Seop; Jung, Yoon-Chul; Lee, Jin-Kyu

    2012-08-01

    A small-scale joining technique of dissimilar friction stir spot welding (FSSW) between bulk metallic glass and Mg alloy sheet has been tried using an apparatus which was devised with a CNC milling machine to give a precise control of tool speeds. The influence of tool speeds on the joining characteristics during FSSW was investigated. As a result, it was found that the rotation speed and plunge speed of a tool during FSSW significantly influenced the welding performance of dissimilar FSSW between bulk metallic glasses and Mg alloy.

  4. Evolution of weld metals nanostructure and properties under irradiation and recovery annealing of VVER-type reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Shtrombakh, Ya.; Fedotova, S.; Zabusov, O.; Prikhodko, K.; Zhurko, D.

    2013-03-01

    The results of VVER-440 steel Sv-10KhMFT and VVER-1000 steel SV-10KhGNMAA investigations by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger-electron spectroscopy and mechanical tests are presented in this paper. The both types of weld metals with different content of impurities and alloying elements were studied after irradiations to fast neutron (E > 0.5 MeV) fluences in the wide range below and beyond the design values, after recovery annealing procedures and after re-irradiation following the annealing. The distinctive features of embrittlement kinetics of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 RPV weld metals conditioned by their chemical composition differences were investigated. It is shown that the main contribution into radiation strengthening within the design fluence can be attributed to radiation-induced precipitates, on reaching the design or beyond design values of fast neutron fluencies the main contribution into VVER-440 welds strengthening is made by radiation-induced dislocation loops, and in case of VVER-1000 welds - radiation-induced precipitates and grain-boundary phosphorous segregations. Recovery annealing of VVER-440 welds at 475 °C during 100 h causes irradiation-induced defects disappearance, transformation of copper enriched precipitates into bigger copper-rich precipitates with lower number density and leads to almost full recovery of mechanical properties followed by comparatively slow re-embrittlement rate. The recovery annealing temperature of VVER-1000 welds was higher - 565 °C during 100 h - to avoid temper brittleness. The annealing of VVER-1000 welds leads to almost full recovery of mechanical properties due to irradiation-induced defects disappearance and decrease in precipitates number density and grain-boundary segregation of phosphorus. The re-embrittlement rate of VVER-1000 weld during subsequent re-irradiation is at least not higher than the initial rate.

  5. Relation between biomarkers in exhaled breath condensate and internal exposure to metals from gas metal arc welding.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeyer, Frank; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Weiss, Tobias; Lehnert, Martin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Kendzia, Benjamin; Harth, Volker; Henry, Jana; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Concerning possible harmful components of welding fumes, besides gases and quantitative aspects of the respirable welding fumes, particle-inherent metal toxicity has to be considered.The objective of this study was to investigate the effect markers leukotriene B4 (LTB4),prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 8-isoprostane (8-Iso PGF2α) as well as the acid–base balance(pH) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) of 43 full-time gas metal arc welders (20 smokers) in relation to welding fume exposure. We observed different patterns of iron, chromium and nickel in respirable welding fumes and EBC. Welders with undetectable chromium in EBC(group A, n = 24) presented high iron and nickel concentrations. In this group, higher 8-isoPGF2α and LTB4 concentrations could be revealed compared to welders with detectable chromium and low levels of both iron and nickel in EBC (group B): 8-iso PGF2α443.3 pg mL−1 versus 247.2 pg mL−1; p = 0.001 and LTB4 30.5 pg mL−1 versus 17.3 pgmL−1; p = 0.016. EBC-pH was more acid in samples of group B (6.52 versus 6.82; p = 0.011).Overall, effect markers in welders were associated with iron concentrations in EBC according to smoking habits--non-smokers/smokers: LTB4 (rs = 0.48; p = 0.02/rs = 0.21; p = 0.37),PGE2 (rs = 0.15; p = 0.59/rs = 0.47; p = 0.07), 8-iso PGF2α (rs = 0.18; p = 0.54/rs = 0.59;p = 0.06). Sampling of EBC in occupational research provides a matrix for the simultaneous monitoring of metal exposure and effects on target level. Our results suggest irritative effects in the airways of healthy welders. Further studies are necessary to assess whether these individual results might be used to identify welders at elevated risk for developing a respiratory disease.

  6. The Investigation of the Influence of Welding Flux on the Pyrometallurgical, Physical and Mechanical Behavior of Weld Metal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-17

    1i | I|-I I WELDING CONSUMABLE COMPOSITION _ _I I_ PHYSICAL CHEMICAL BEHAIIOR BEHAVIOR WELDING PROCESS MICROSTRUCTURE BEHAVIOR BEAD MECHANICAL...the interdendritic cellular space during solidification. Thus, the distance between the rows of inclusions is a measure of the delta ferrite cell...spacing. Using a special etch for the austenitic grains, it becomes apparent that each prior austenite grain has been made fran many delta - ferrite

  7. Corrosion Behavior of Metal Active Gas Welded Joints of a High-Strength Steel for Automotive Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Mainã Portella; Mantovani, Gerson Luiz; Vasant Kumar, R.; Antunes, Renato Altobelli

    2017-09-01

    In this work, the corrosion behavior of metal active gas-welded joints of a high-strength steel with tensile yield strength of 900 MPa was investigated. The welded joints were obtained using two different heat inputs. The corrosion behavior has been studied in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization tests. Optical microscopy images, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray revealed different microstructural features in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and the weld metal (WM). Before and after the corrosion process, the sample was evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy to measure the depth difference between HAZ and WM. The results showed that the heat input did not play an important role on corrosion behavior of HSLA steel. The anodic and cathodic areas of the welded joints could be associated with depth differences. The HAZ was found to be the anodic area, while the WM was cathodic with respect to the HAZ. The corrosion behavior was related to the amount and orientation nature of carbides in the HAZ. The microstructure of the HAZ consisted of martensite and bainite, whereas acicular ferrite was observed in the weld metal.

  8. Sensitization behaviour of modified 316N and 316L stainless steel weld metals after complex annealing and stress relieving cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvathavarthini, N.; Dayal, R. K.; Khatak, H. S.; Shankar, V.; Shanmugam, V.

    2006-09-01

    Sensitization behaviour of austenitic stainless steel weld metals prepared using indigenously developed modified 316N (C = 0.05%; N = 0.12%) and 316L (C = 0.02%; N = 0.07%) electrodes was studied. Detailed optical and scanning electron microscopic examination was carried out to understand the microstructural changes occurring in the weld metal during isothermal exposure at various temperatures ranging from 500 °C to 850 °C (773-1123 K). Based on these studies the mechanism of sensitization in the austenite-ferrite weld metal has been explained. Time-temperature-sensitization (TTS) diagrams were established using ASTM A262 Practice E test. From the TTS diagrams, critical cooling rate (CCR) above which there is no risk of sensitization was calculated for both materials. The heating/cooling rates to be followed for avoiding sensitization during heat treatment cycles consisting of solution-annealing and stress-relieving in fabrication of welded components of AISI 316LN stainless steel (SS) were estimated taking into account the soaking time and the number of times the component undergoes thermal excursions in the sensitization regime. The results were validated by performing controlled heating and cooling heat treatment trials on welded specimens.

  9. Review of Dissimilar Metal Welding for the NGNP Helical-Coil Steam Generator

    SciTech Connect

    John N. DuPont

    2010-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently funding research and development of a new high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) that is capable of providing high temperature process heat for industry. The steam generator of the HTGR will consist of an evaporator economizer section in the lower portion and a finishing superheater section in the upper portion. Alloy 800H is expected to be used for the superheater section, and 2.25Cr 1Mo steel is expected to be used for the evaporator economizer section. Dissimilar metal welds (DMW) will be needed to join these two materials. It is well known that failure of DMWs can occur well below the expected creep life of either base metal and well below the design life of the plant. The failure time depends on a wide range of factors related to service conditions, welding parameters, and alloys involved in the DMW. The overall objective of this report is to review factors associated with premature failure of DMWs operating at elevated temperatures and identify methods for extending the life of the 2.25Cr 1Mo steel to alloy 800H welds required in the new HTGR. Information is provided on a variety of topics pertinent to DMW failures, including microstructural evolution, failure mechanisms, creep rupture properties, aging behavior, remaining life estimation techniques, effect of environment on creep rupture properties, best practices, and research in progress to improve DMW performance. The microstructure of DMWs in the as welded condition consists of a sharp chemical concentration gradient across the fusion line that separates the ferritic and austenitic alloys. Upon cooling from the weld thermal cycle, a band of martensite forms within this concentration gradient due to high hardenability and the relatively rapid cooling rates associated with welding. Upon aging, during post weld heat treatment (PWHT), and/or during high temperature service, C diffuses down the chemical potential gradient from the ferritic 2.25Cr 1Mo steel

  10. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-8, Filler Metal Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This eighth in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection describes controls necessary to place the proper electrode or rod at each welding station. More specifically, the module describes use of the American Welding Society specifications, control of weld filler material after receipt from the supplier, and methods of ensuring…

  11. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-8, Filler Metal Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This eighth in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection describes controls necessary to place the proper electrode or rod at each welding station. More specifically, the module describes use of the American Welding Society specifications, control of weld filler material after receipt from the supplier, and methods of ensuring…

  12. Effect of Pin Tool Shape on Metal Flow During Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, J. C.; Coronado, E.; Aloor, S.; Nowak, B.; Murr, L. M.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown that metal moves behind the rotating Friction Stir Pin Tool in two separate currents or streams. One current, mostly on the advancing side, enters a zone of material that rotates with the pin tool for one or more revolutions and eventually is abandoned behind the pin tool in crescent-shaped pieces. The other current, largely on the retreating side of the pin tool is moved by a wiping process to the back of the pin tool and fills in between the pieces of the rotational zone that have been shed by the rotational zone. This process was studied by using a faying surface copper trace to clarify the metal flow. Welds were made with pin tools having various thread pitches. Decreasing the thread pitch causes the large scale top-to-bottorn flow to break up into multiple vortices along the pin and an unthreaded pin tool provides insufficient vertical motion for there to be a stable rotational zone and flow of material via the rotational zone is not possible leading to porosity on the advancing side of the weld.

  13. Fusion boundary precipitation in thermally aged dissimilar metal welds studied by atom probe tomography and nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Taeho; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Seunghyun; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-04-01

    In this study, microstructural and mechanical characterizations were performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the fusion boundary region between low-alloy steel and Nickel-based weld metal in dissimilar metal welds used in operating power plant systems. The effects of thermal aging treatment on the low-alloy steel side near the fusion boundary were an increase in the ratio of Cr constituents and Cr-rich precipitates and the formation and growth of Cr23C6. Cr concentrations were calculated using atom probe tomography. The accuracy of simulations of thermal aging effects of heat treatment was verified, and the activation energy for Cr diffusion in the fusion boundary region was calculated. The mechanical properties of fusion boundary region changed based on the distribution of Cr-rich precipitates, where the material initially hardened with the formation of Cr-rich precipitates and then softened because of the reduction of residual strain or coarsening of Cr-rich precipitates.

  14. The formation mechanisms of interlocked microstructures in low-carbon high-strength steel weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, X.L.; Wang, H.H.; Cheng, L.; Wu, K.M.

    2012-05-15

    Microstructural features and the formation mechanisms of interlocked microstructures of acicular ferrite in a low-carbon high-strength steel weld metal were investigated by means of computer-aided three-dimensional reconstruction technique and electron backscattered diffraction analysis. Multiple nucleation on inclusions, sympathetic nucleation or repeated nucleation, hard impingement, mutual intersection, and fixed orientation relationships of acicular ferrite grains were observed. They were all responsible for the formation of interlocked microstructures in the weld metal. During the process of isothermal transformation, the pre-formed acicular ferrite laths or plates partitioned austenite grains into many small and separate regions, and the growth of later formed acicular ferrite grains was confined in these small regions. Thus, the crystallographic grain size became smaller with the increasing holding time. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acicular ferrite is formed by multiple nucleation and sympathetic nucleation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hard impingement and intersection of ferrite grains occur at later stages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The pre-formed ferrite laths partition austenite grains into smaller regions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The growth of later formed ferrite grains is confined in the smaller regions.

  15. Effect of Hyperbaric Chamber Gas on Transformation Texture of the API-X70 Pipeline Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azar, Amin S.; Østby, Erling; Akselsen, Odd M.

    2012-09-01

    The development of the texture components in the X70 weld metal under several shielding environments was investigated using the electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) techniques. A new method for assigning the reference direction (RD), transverse direction (TD), and normal direction (ND) was introduced based on the morphological orientation of the grains. The analyses showed that different shielding gases affect the weld metal texture and microstructure. The shielding environment with pure argon shows the highest orientational pole density values and dominant acicular ferrite microstructure. It was observed that the distribution of misorientation angle and special coincidence site lattice (CSL) grain boundaries play significant roles in determining the tensile characteristics of the weld samples. Moreover, the bainite lattice orientation was found dependent on the directional heat flow unlike the other detected constituents.

  16. Welding fumes from stainless steel gas metal arc processes contain multiple manganese chemical species.

    PubMed

    Keane, Michael; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean

    2010-05-01

    Fumes from a group of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes used on stainless steel were generated using three different metal transfer modes and four different shield gases. The objective was to identify and measure manganese (Mn) species in the fumes, and identify processes that are minimal generators of Mn species. The robotic welding system was operated in short-circuit (SC) mode (Ar/CO2 and He/Ar), axial spray (AXS) mode (Ar/O2 and Ar/CO2), and pulsed axial-spray (PAXS) mode (Ar/O2). The fumes were analyzed for Mn by a sequential extraction process followed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, and by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Total elemental Mn, iron (Fe), chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) were separately measured after aqua regia digestion and ICP-AES analysis. Soluble Mn2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, and Ni2+ in a simple biological buffer (phosphate-buffered saline) were determined at pH 7.2 and 5.0 after 2 h incubation at 37 C by ion chromatography. Results indicate that Mn was present in soluble form, acid-soluble form, and acid-soluble form after reduction by hydroxylamine, which represents soluble Mn0 and Mn2+ compounds, other Mn2+ compounds, and (Mn3+ and Mn4+) compounds, respectively. The dominant fraction was the acid-soluble Mn2+ fraction, but results varied with the process and shield gas. Soluble Mn mass percent in the fume ranged from 0.2 to 0.9%, acid-soluble Mn2+ compounds ranged from 2.6 to 9.3%, and acid plus reducing agent-soluble (Mn3+ and Mn4+) compounds ranged from 0.6 to 5.1%. Total Mn composition ranged from 7 to 15%. XRD results showed fumes had a crystalline content of 90-99% Fe3O4, and showed evidence of multiple Mn oxides, but overlaps and weak signals limited identification. Small amounts of the Mn2+ in the fume (<0.01 to ≈ 1% or <0.1 to ≈ 10 microg ml(-1)) and Ni2+ (<0.01 to ≈ 0.2% or <0.1 to ≈ 2 mg ml(-1)) ions were found in biological buffer media, but amounts were highly dependent on pH and the

  17. Transverse-Weld Tensile Properties of a New Al-4Cu-2Si Alloy as Filler Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, K.

    2009-12-01

    AA2195, an Al-Cu-Li alloy in the T8P4 age-hardened condition, is a candidate aluminum armor for future combat vehicles, as this material offers higher static strength and ballistic protection than current aluminum armor alloys. However, certification of AA2195 alloy for armor applications requires initial qualification based on the ballistic performance of welded panels in the as-welded condition. Currently, combat vehicle manufacturers primarily use gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process to meet their fabrication needs. Unfortunately, a matching GMAW consumable electrode is currently not commercially available to allow effective joining of AA2195 alloy. This initial effort focused on an innovative, low-cost, low-risk approach to identify an alloy composition suitable for effective joining of AA2195 alloy, and evaluated transverse-weld tensile properties of groove butt joints produced using the identified alloy. Selected commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) aluminum alloy filler wires were twisted to form candidate twisted filler rods. Representative test weldments were produced using AA2195 alloy, candidate twisted filler rods and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Selected GTA weldments produced using Al-4wt.%Cu-2wt.%Si alloy as filler metal consistently provided transverse-weld tensile properties in excess of 275 MPa (40 ksi) UTS and 8% El (over 25 mm gage length), thereby showing potential for acceptable ballistic performance of as-welded panels. Further developmental work is required to evaluate in detail GMAW consumable wire electrodes based on the Al-Cu-Si system containing 4.2-5.0 wt.% Cu and 1.6-2.0 wt.% Si.

  18. Shielded Metal Arc Welding and Carbon Arc Cutting--Air. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Eddie; Knapp, John

    This document contains the teacher and student texts and student workbook for a secondary-level course in shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and carbon arc cutting that consists of units on the following topics: SMAW safety; SMAW equipment, applications, and techniques; hardfacing; and carbon arc cutting--air. The teacher edition includes the…

  19. Shielded Metal Arc Welding and Carbon Arc Cutting--Air. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Eddie; Knapp, John

    This document contains the teacher and student texts and student workbook for a secondary-level course in shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and carbon arc cutting that consists of units on the following topics: SMAW safety; SMAW equipment, applications, and techniques; hardfacing; and carbon arc cutting--air. The teacher edition includes the…

  20. Surface finish of metal mirrors and the laser-damage threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Roger M.

    1993-10-01

    The current interest in ever larger solid metal mirrors has highlighted several fabrication problems, amongst them the method of joining the largest available forgings. Thick section fusion welding is still predominantly carried out by multi-pass arc welding processes, but substantial development of electron beam welding (EBW) technology, particularly over the last decade, now warrants re-appraisal of this situation. The electron beam welding process offers not only a single pass welding capability for practically any thickness, but also increased joining rates, reduced distortion and in most cases elimination of consumables. Increases in beam power level have necessitated careful design of both the electron source and electron optics; in addition, to avoid problems of weld defects, special power supply developments have been required. Metal vapor and weld spatter are prevented from entering the electron gun by the introduction of a magnetic trap device and a low stored energy switch mode power source is employed to provide continuous operation, even for the most volatile workpiece materials. Reference is made to the latest in- vacuum external and in-chamber 100 kW gun column developments and, amongst the range of industrial applications, to the particular problems associated with welding large aluminum alloy components.

  1. The role of titanium in the non-metallic inclusions which nucleate acicular ferrite in the submerged arc weld (SAW) fusion zones of Navy HY-100 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, A.G.; Brothers, D.G.

    1995-04-01

    The origin of acicular ferrite in the weld metal of submerged arc weldments on high strength steels is very complex and depends upon the chemical composition for the steel base plate and filler wire, the composition of the flux used during welding and the cooling rate of the weld metal during the transformation of the undercooled metastable austenite. The strength and toughness of weld metal improves as the amount of acicular ferrite increases due its fine basket weave microstructure and so it is important to understand the mechanism of its formation so that the volume fraction of acicular ferrite can be maximized in steel weld metal. The chemical composition of the filler wire mostly determines the final composition of the weld metal although the composition of the base plate is important because of dilution effects. In high strength steels the alloying elements such as carbon, nickel, chromium, copper nd niobium are present to achieve the required strength levels and a fortuitous outcome of this is a continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram with features that mean that bainite is the major transformation product during the arc welding of these steels provided a suitable weld power and preheat/interpass temperature is chosen during multi-run welding. Once a suitable weld-metal hardenability and cooling rate has been established the amount of acicular ferrite nucleated will depend on the size, number, distribution and chemical composition of the non-metallic inclusions. Suitable inclusions appear to be in the size range 0.2--2.0 micrometers with a mean size of 0.5 micrometers being about an optimum value. These inclusions usually contain manganese, silicon, aluminum and titanium as their major constituents and do not appear to be exactly spherical but have a faceted or slightly angular appearance.

  2. Automatic welding comes of age. [Offshore

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.L. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Automatic pipe welding systems today fall into three main categories: gas metal arc welding, gas-tungsten arc welding, and flash-butt welding. The first automatic welding devices used offshore were the CRC and H.C. Price systems. Both use gas metal arc welding with a consumable steel filler wire. The recently developed McDermott flash-butt welding system is described. (DLC)

  3. A Review of Titanium Welding Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-03

    Welding ( GTAW )............................. 2 jPlasma Arc Welding (PAW) ................................... 3 Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW...earliest use of gas tungsten arc welding ( GTAW ). Submerged arc welding (SAW) was introduced in 1944 (p.149(4)). Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) was developed...discussion. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding GTAW )" The GTAW process is due to the heating from an arc between a noncon- sumable tungsten electrode and the work

  4. Influence of low nickel (0.09 wt%) content on microstructure and toughness of P91 steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arivazhagan, B.; Vasudevan, M.; Kamaraj, M.

    2015-05-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo (P91) steel is widely used as a high temperature structural material in the fabrication of power plant components. Alloying elements significantly influences the microstructure and mechanical properties of P91 steel weldments. The alloying elements manganese and nickel significantly influence the lower critical phase transformation temperature (AC1) as well as tempering response of welds. In the existing published information there was wide spread use of high Mn+Ni filler wire. In the present study, weldment preparation was completed using GTA filler wire having low Nickel content (Mn+Ni of 0.58 wt% including nickel content of 0.09 wt%). Microstructure and mechanical properties characterization was done. There is a requirement on minimum toughness of 47 Joules for P91 steel tempered welds at room temperature. Microstructural observation revealed that the GTA welds have low δ-ferrite content (<0.5%) in the martensite matrix. In the as-weld condition, the toughness was 28 Joules whereas after PWHT at 760 °C-2 h it was 115 Joules. In the present study, toughness of low nickel weld was higher due to low δ-ferrite content (<0.5%), multipass grain refinement and weld metal deposition of single pass per layer of weldment.

  5. Effect of Water Cooling on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 6N01 Aluminum Alloy P-MIG-Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Li, Haiyang; Liang, Zhimin; Wang, Dianlong

    2017-06-01

    In-process water cooling was applied to 8-mm-thick 6N01 aluminum alloy joined using the pulsed metal-inert gas (P-MIG) multi-pass welding method. The influence of the cooling conditions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joints were mainly discussed. Compared with natural cooling, under water cooling, the peak temperature decreased and the cooling rate increased substantially, leading to a decrease in the partially melted zone of the welded joint. The columnar grain sizes adjacent to the fusion boundary were much more elongated under water cooling than under natural cooling. In addition, when water cooling was performed, the width of the softened zone was approximately 6 mm smaller than that with natural cooling, and the overall microhardness of the welded joint was improved. The tensile and nominal yield strengths of the welded joint were approximately 11 and 7 MPa higher under water cooling than under natural cooling, respectively. The fracture surface morphology of the welded joints exhibited typical ductile fracture. Thus, water cooling can optimize the microstructure and improve the mechanical properties of the 6N01 alloy P-MIG-welded joint.

  6. Effect of Water Cooling on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 6N01 Aluminum Alloy P-MIG-Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Li, Haiyang; Liang, Zhimin; Wang, Dianlong

    2017-08-01

    In-process water cooling was applied to 8-mm-thick 6N01 aluminum alloy joined using the pulsed metal-inert gas (P-MIG) multi-pass welding method. The influence of the cooling conditions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joints were mainly discussed. Compared with natural cooling, under water cooling, the peak temperature decreased and the cooling rate increased substantially, leading to a decrease in the partially melted zone of the welded joint. The columnar grain sizes adjacent to the fusion boundary were much more elongated under water cooling than under natural cooling. In addition, when water cooling was performed, the width of the softened zone was approximately 6 mm smaller than that with natural cooling, and the overall microhardness of the welded joint was improved. The tensile and nominal yield strengths of the welded joint were approximately 11 and 7 MPa higher under water cooling than under natural cooling, respectively. The fracture surface morphology of the welded joints exhibited typical ductile fracture. Thus, water cooling can optimize the microstructure and improve the mechanical properties of the 6N01 alloy P-MIG-welded joint.

  7. Microstructure and creep characteristics of dissimilar T91/TP316H martensitic/austenitic welded joint with Ni-based weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Falat, Ladislav; Svoboda, Milan; Vyrostkova, Anna; Petryshynets, Ivan; Sopko, Martin

    2012-10-15

    This paper deals with characterization of microstructure and creep behavior of dissimilar weldment between the tempered martensitic steel T91 and the non-stabilized austenitic steel TP316H with Ni-based weld metal (Ni WM). Microstructure analyses were performed using light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The martensitic part of the welded joint exhibited a wide heat-affected zone (HAZ) with typical microstructural gradient from its coarse-grained to the fine-grained/intercritical region. In contrast, the HAZ of austenitic steel was limited to only a narrow region with coarsened polygonal grains. The microstructure of Ni WM was found to be very heterogeneous with respect to the size, morphology and distribution of grain boundaries and MC-type precipitates as a result of strong weld metal dilution effects and fast non-equilibrium solidification. Cross-weld creep tests were carried out in a temperature range from 600 to 650 Degree-Sign C at applied stresses from 60 to 140 MPa. The obtained values of apparent stress exponents and creep activation energies indicate thermally activated dislocation glide to be the governing creep deformation mechanism within the range of used testing conditions. The creep samples ruptured in the T91 intercritical HAZ region by the 'type IV cracking' failure mode and the creep fracture mechanism was identified to be the intergranular dimple tearing by microvoid coalescence at grain boundaries. The TEM observations revealed pronounced microstructural differences between the critical HAZ region and the T91 base material before as well as after the creep exposure. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase transformations affect the microstructures of T91 and TP316H HAZ regions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High weld metal dilution results in heterogeneous microstructure with MC carbides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Creep behavior of the studied weldment is controlled

  8. A Study of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Thick Welded Joints of a Cr - Mo Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I. Kon; Chien, Yi Cheng

    2015-07-01

    The effect of stress-relieving tempering on the mechanical properties of a welded joint of a high-strength low-alloy steel SAE 4130 (0.3% C - 1% Cr - 0.25% Mo) obtained by multipass arc welding with nonconsumable electrode is studied. The steel is quenched and tempered before the welding. An optimum tempering mode providing a good combination of the characteristics of strength, ductility and toughness of the welded joint is suggested.

  9. Nanometer-scale modification and welding of silicon and metallic nanowires with a high-intensity electron beam.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shengyong; Tian, Mingliang; Wang, Jinguo; Xu, Jian; Redwing, Joan M; Chan, Moses H W

    2005-12-01

    We demonstrate that a high-intensity electron beam can be applied to create holes, gaps, and other patterns of atomic and nanometer dimensions on a single nanowire, to weld individual nanowires to form metal-metal or metal-semiconductor junctions, and to remove the oxide shell from a crystalline nanowire. In single-crystalline Si nanowires, the beam induces instant local vaporization and local amorphization. In metallic Au, Ag, Cu, and Sn nanowires, the beam induces rapid local surface melting and enhanced surface diffusion, in addition to local vaporization. These studies open up a novel approach for patterning and connecting nanomaterials in devices and circuits at the nanometer scale.

  10. Effects of thermal aging on the microstructure of Type-II boundaries in dissimilar metal weld joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Seung Chang; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Si Hoon; Kim, Ju Young; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the effects of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution of Type-II boundary regions in the weld metal of Alloy 152, a representative dissimilar metal weld was fabricated from Alloy 690, Alloy 152, and A533 Gr.B. This mock-up was thermally aged at 450 °C to accelerate the effects of thermal aging in a nuclear power plant operation condition (320 °C). The microstructure of the Type-II boundary region of the weld root, which is parallel to and within 100 μm of the fusion boundary and known to be more susceptible to material degradation, was then characterized after different aging times using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope for micro-compositional analysis, electron backscattered diffraction detector for grain and grain boundary orientation analysis, and a nanoindenter for measurement of mechanical properties. Through this, it was found that a steep compositional gradient and high grain average misorientation is created in the narrow zone between the Type-II and fusion boundaries, while the concentration of chromium and number of low-angle grain boundaries increases with aging time. A high average hardness was also observed in the same region of the dissimilar metal welds, with hardness peaking with thermal aging simulating an operational time of 15 years.

  11. Behavior of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI titanium alloy sheet parent and weld metal in the presence of cracks at 20 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.

    1971-01-01

    Through- and surface-cracked specimens of two thicknesses were tested in uniaxial tension. Surface-cracked specimens were generally found to be stronger than through-cracked specimens with the same crack length. Apparent surface-crack fracture toughness calculated using the Anderson modified Irwin equation remained relatively constant for cracks as deep as 90 percent of the sheet thickness. Subcritical growth of surface cracks was investigated. Comparison of chamber and open air welds showed chamber welds to be slightly tougher. Both methods produced welds with toughness that compared favorably with that of the parent metal. Weld efficiencies were above 94 percent.

  12. Novel concepts in weld metal science: Role of gradients and composite structure. Annual technical progress report, January 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.

    1991-12-01

    The effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties are being investigated. Crack propagation is solidified alloy structures is being characterized as to solidification orientation and the profile of the compositional variations. The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a compositional gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Special techniques to produce laboratory samples with microstructures which simulate the composition and microstructure gradients in solidified weld metal are used, along with appropriate mathematical models, to evaluate the properties of the composite weld metals. The composite modeling techniques are being applied to describe the effects of compositional and microstructural gradients on weld metal properties in Ni-Cu alloys. The development of metal matrix composition weld deposits on austenitic stainless steels has been studied. The particulate metal matrix composites were produced with ceramic or refractory metal powder filled cored wire, which was gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welded.

  13. Metallic layered composite materials produced by explosion welding: Structure, properties, and structure of the transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'tseva, L. A.; Tyushlyaeva, D. S.; Mal'tseva, T. V.; Pastukhov, M. V.; Lozhkin, N. N.; Inyakin, D. V.; Marshuk, L. A.

    2014-10-01

    The structure, morphology, and microhardness of the transition zone in multilayer metallic composite joints are studied, and the cohesion strength of the plates to be joined, the mechanical properties of the formed composite materials, and fracture surfaces are analyzed. The materials to be joined are plates (0.1-1 mm thick) made of D16 aluminum alloy, high-strength maraging ZI90-VI (03Kh12N9K4M2YuT) steel, BrB2 beryllium bronze, and OT4-1 titanium alloy. Composite materials made of different materials are shown to be produced by explosion welding. The dependence of the interface shape (smooth or wavelike) on the physicomechanical properties of the materials to be joined is found. The formation of a wavelike interface is shown to result in the formation of intense-mixing regions in transition zones. Possible mechanisms of layer adhesion are discussed.

  14. Evaluation of Manual Ultrasonic Examinations Applied to Detect Flaws in Primary System Dissimilar Metal Welds at North Anna Power Station

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2012-06-01

    During a recent inservice inspection (ISI) of a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) in an inlet (hot leg) steam generator nozzle at North Anna Power Station Unit 1, several axially oriented flaws went undetected by the licensee's manual ultrasonic testing (UT) technique. The flaws were subsequently detected as a result of outside diameter (OD) surface machining in preparation for a full structural weld overlay. The machining operation uncovered the existence of two through-wall flaws, based on the observance of primary water leaking from the DMW. Further ultrasonic tests were then performed, and a total of five axially oriented flaws, classified as primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), were detected in varied locations around the weld circumference.

  15. Fracture toughness evaluation of a low upper-shelf weld metal from the Midland Reactor using the master curve

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D.E.; Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1997-03-01

    The primary objective of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program Tenth Irradiation Series was to develop a fracture mechanics evaluation of weld metal WF-70, which was taken from the beltline and nozzle course girth weld joints of the Midland Reactor vessel. This material became available when Consumers Power Company of Midland, Michigan, decided to abort plans to operate their nuclear power plant. WF-70 is classified as a low upper-shelf steel primarily due to the Linde 80 flux that was used in the submerged-arc welding process. The master curve concept is introduced to model the transition range fracture toughness when the toughness is quantified in terms of K{sub Jc} values. K{sub Jc} is an elastic-plastic stress intensity factor calculated by conversion from J{sub c}; i.e., J-integral at onset of cleavage instability.

  16. Control of Cr6+ emissions from gas metal arc welding using a silica precursor as a shielding gas additive.

    PubMed

    Topham, Nathan; Wang, Jun; Kalivoda, Mark; Huang, Joyce; Yu, Kuei-Min; Hsu, Yu-Mei; Wu, Chang-Yu; Oh, Sewon; Cho, Kuk; Paulson, Kathleen

    2012-03-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)) emitted from welding poses serious health risks to workers exposed to welding fumes. In this study, tetramethylsilane (TMS) was added to shielding gas to control hazardous air pollutants produced during stainless steel welding. The silica precursor acted as an oxidation inhibitor when it decomposed in the high-temperature welding arc, limiting Cr(6+) formation. Additionally, a film of amorphous SiO(2) was deposited on fume particles to insulate them from oxidation. Experiments were conducted following the American Welding Society (AWS) method for fume generation and sampling in an AWS fume hood. The results showed that total shielding gas flow rate impacted the effectiveness of the TMS process. Increasing shielding gas flow rate led to increased reductions in Cr(6+) concentration when TMS was used. When 4.2% of a 30-lpm shielding gas flow was used as TMS carrier gas, Cr(6+) concentration in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) fumes was reduced to below the 2006 Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard (5 μg m(-3)) and the efficiency was >90%. The process also increased fume particle size from a mode size of 20 nm under baseline conditions to 180-300 nm when TMS was added in all shielding gas flow rates tested. SiO(2) particles formed in the process scavenged nanosized fume particles through intercoagulation. Transmission electron microscopy imagery provided visual evidence of an amorphous film of SiO(2) on some fume particles along with the presence of amorphous SiO(2) agglomerates. These results demonstrate the ability of vapor phase silica precursors to increase welding fume particle size and minimize chromium oxidation, thereby preventing the formation of hexavalent chromium.

  17. Laser multipass system with interior cell configuration.

    PubMed

    Borysow, Jacek; Kostinski, Alexander; Fink, Manfred

    2011-10-20

    We ask whether it is possible to restore a multipass system alignment after a gas cell is inserted in the central region. Indeed, it is possible, and we report on a remarkably simple rearrangement of a laser multipass system, composed of two spherical mirrors and a gas cell with flat windows in the middle. For example, for a window of thickness d and refractive index of n, adjusting the mirror separation by ≈2d(1-1/n) is sufficient to preserve the laser beam alignment and tracing. This expression is in agreement with ray-tracing computations and our laboratory experiment. Insofar as our solution corrects for spherical aberrations, it may also find applications in microscopy. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  18. Forming Limits of Weld Metal in Aluminum Alloys and Advanced High-Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Smith, Mark T.; Grant, Glenn J.; Davies, Richard W.

    2010-10-25

    This work characterizes the mechanical properties of DP600 laser welded TWBs (1 mm-1.5 mm) near and in the weld, as well as their limits of formability. The approach uses simple uniaxial experiments to measure the variability in the forming limits of the weld region, and uses a theoretical forming limit diagram calculation to establish a probabilistic distribution of weld region imperfection using an M-K method approach

  19. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  20. Correlation of flux composition and inclusion characteristics with submerged arc weld metal properties in HY-100 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettell, Kent W.

    1993-09-01

    Submerged arc weldments of HY-100 steel prepared under standard conditions with five commercially available fluxes were analyzed to discern a basis for the variation in mechanical properties associated with different flux use. The variations in flux chemistry resulted in alloyed weldments with diverse weld metal mechanical properties as evident by Charpy impact, tensile, dynamic tear, and microhardness tests. The microstructures and macrostructures were examined using optical and electron microscopy in order to determine the basis for the variations in strength and toughness. Scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray experiments were performed to determine the size, type, distribution and volume fraction of the non-metallic inclusions in the weld metal. Inclusion characterization revealed that the role of the flux in alloying had a more significant effect on the strength and toughness than did the presence of specific inclusions.