Science.gov

Sample records for multiphase system columns

  1. Multiphase fluid characterization system

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2014-09-02

    A measurement system and method for permitting multiple independent measurements of several physical parameters of multiphase fluids flowing through pipes are described. Multiple acoustic transducers are placed in acoustic communication with or attached to the outside surface of a section of existing spool (metal pipe), typically less than 3 feet in length, for noninvasive measurements. Sound speed, sound attenuation, fluid density, fluid flow, container wall resonance characteristics, and Doppler measurements for gas volume fraction may be measured simultaneously by the system. Temperature measurements are made using a temperature sensor for oil-cut correction.

  2. Column density profiles of multiphase gaseous haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Cameron J.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Agertz, Oscar

    2016-05-01

    We analyse circumgalactic medium (CGM) in a suite of high-resolution cosmological re-simulations of a Milky Way size galaxy and show that CGM properties are quite sensitive to details of star formation-feedback loop modelling. The simulation that produces a realistic late-type galaxy, fails to reproduce existing observations of the CGM. In contrast, simulation that does not produce a realistic galaxy has the predicted CGM in better agreement with observations. This illustrates that properties of galaxies and properties of their CGM provide strong complementary constraints on the processes governing galaxy formation. Our simulations predict that column density profiles of ions are well described by an exponential function of projected distance d: N ∝ e^{-d/h_s}. Simulations thus indicate that the sharp drop in absorber detections at larger distances in observations does not correspond to a `boundary' of an ion, but reflects the underlying steep exponential column density profile. Furthermore, we find that ionization energy of ions is tightly correlated with the scaleheight hs: h_s ∝ E_ion^{0.74}. At z ≈ 0, warm gas traced by low-ionization species (e.g. Mg II and C IV) has hs ≈ 0.03 - 0.07Rvir, while higher ionization species (O VI and Ne VIII) have hs ≈ 0.32 - 0.45Rvir. Finally, the scaleheights of ions in our simulations evolve slower than the virial radius for z ≤ 2, but similarly to the halo scale radius, rs. Thus, we suggest that the column density profiles of galaxies at different redshifts should be scaled by rs rather than the halo virial radius.

  3. A Course in Transport Phenomena in Multicomponent, Multiphase, Reacting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carbonell, R. G.; Whitaker, S.

    1978-01-01

    This course concentrates on a rigorous development of the multicomponent transport equations, boundary conditions at phase interfaces, and volume-averaged transport equations for multiphase reacting systems. (BB)

  4. Multiphase Flow Measurement System of Oil Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiyao; He, Chaohong; Liang, Qilin

    2007-06-01

    A new multiphase flow measurement system of oil well was developed. This measurement system was based on the combination of a separator, two level meters and three commercial flowmeters. The separator separated the crude oil into three components: gas, water and oil-water mixture. By means of the automatic control of two interface levels (the oil-water interface level and the oil-gas interface level), three components were measured by the corresponding commercial flowmeters. The developed measurement system had been tested at Shengli Oilfield in China. The test results show that the developed measurement system is effective. It is suitable for the flowrate measurement of Chinese oil well with high water fraction and its accuracy is also satisfactory.

  5. Multiphase Systems for Medical Image Region Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garamendi, J. F.; Malpica, N.; Schiavi, E.

    2009-05-01

    Variational methods for region classification have shown very promising results in medical image analysis. The Chan-Vese model is one of the most popular methods, but its numerical resolution is slow and it has serious drawbacks for most multiphase applications. In this work, we extend the link, stablished by Chambolle, between the two classes binary Chan-Vese model and the Rudin-Osher-Fatemi (ROF) model to a multiphase four classes minimal partition problem. We solve the ROF image restoration model and then we threshold the image by means of a genetic algorithm. This strategy allows for a more efficient algorithm due to the fact that only one well posed elliptic problem is solved instead of solving the coupled parabolic equations arising in the original multiphase Chan-Vese model.

  6. A single element multiphase compulsator powered railgun systems

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, S.K.; Weldon, W.F. . Center for Electromechanics)

    1994-01-01

    This paper investigates multiphase railguns (electromagnetic launchers) powered by multiphase compensated pulsed alternators (compulsators). The polyphase system offers several advantages over the single phase system. The multiphase compulsator relaxes the strong dependence between the current pulse width necessary for the railgun and the design parameters of the generator (number of poles, rotor diameter and tip speed) thus allowing the compulsator to be designed for optimum power density and electromechanical energy conversion. The paper examines in particular the two phase system. The authors explore different methods of achieving high acceleration ratios (average to peak) in multiphase railgun systems. Some of the methods analyzed are ramping up the field current of the compulsator to counter the increasing impedance of the gun, using a railgun with varying inductance per unit length (L[prime]), and using an external variable inductor in series with the compulsator. Special attention is devoted to the external series inductor method which uses a rotary flux compressor (rfc). Several concepts to integrate the rfc and the compulsator into a single element device are discussed. Comparison between the state of the art single phase compulsator powered 9 MJ railgun system, currently under fabrication at CEM-UT and a two phase compulsator driven four rail railgun system is also presented.

  7. Incorporation of Reaction Kinetics into a Multiphase, Hydrodynamic Model of a Fischer Tropsch Slurry Bubble Column Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Guillen, PhD; Anastasia Gribik; Daniel Ginosar, PhD; Steven P. Antal, PhD

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) model of the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process in a Slurry Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR). The CMFD model is fundamentally based which allows it to be applied to different industrial processes and reactor geometries. The NPHASE CMFD solver [1] is used as the robust computational platform. Results from the CMFD model include gas distribution, species concentration profiles, and local temperatures within the SBCR. This type of model can provide valuable information for process design, operations and troubleshooting of FT plants. An ensemble-averaged, turbulent, multi-fluid solution algorithm for the multiphase, reacting flow with heat transfer was employed. Mechanistic models applicable to churn turbulent flow have been developed to provide a fundamentally based closure set for the equations. In this four-field model formulation, two of the fields are used to track the gas phase (i.e., small spherical and large slug/cap bubbles), and the other two fields are used for the liquid and catalyst particles. Reaction kinetics for a cobalt catalyst is based upon values reported in the published literature. An initial, reaction kinetics model has been developed and exercised to demonstrate viability of the overall solution scheme. The model will continue to be developed with improved physics added in stages.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLOW MODEL FOR FISCHER TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Tami Grimmett; Anastasia M. Gribik; Steven P. Antal

    2010-09-01

    The Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. A central component of the HYTEST is the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) in which the gas-to-liquid reactions will be performed to synthesize transportation fuels using the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process. SBCRs are cylindrical vessels in which gaseous reactants (for example, synthesis gas or syngas) is sparged into a slurry of liquid reaction products and finely dispersed catalyst particles. The catalyst particles are suspended in the slurry by the rising gas bubbles and serve to promote the chemical reaction that converts syngas to a spectrum of longer chain hydrocarbon products, which can be upgraded to gasoline, diesel or jet fuel. These SBCRs operate in the churn-turbulent flow regime which is characterized by complex hydrodynamics, coupled with reacting flow chemistry and heat transfer, that effect reactor performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a computational multiphase fluid dynamic (CMFD) model to aid in understanding the physico-chemical processes occurring in the SBCR. Our team is developing a robust methodology to couple reaction kinetics and mass transfer into a four-field model (consisting of the bulk liquid, small bubbles, large bubbles and solid catalyst particles) that includes twelve species: (1) CO reactant, (2) H2 reactant, (3) hydrocarbon product, and (4) H2O product in small bubbles, large bubbles, and the bulk fluid. Properties of the hydrocarbon product were specified by vapor liquid equilibrium calculations. The absorption and kinetic models, specifically changes in species concentrations, have been incorporated into the mass continuity equation. The reaction rate is determined based on the macrokinetic model for a cobalt catalyst developed by Yates and Satterfield [1]. The

  9. System for measuring multiphase flow using multiple pressure differentials

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-01-01

    An improved method and system for measuring a multi-phase flow in a pressure flow meter. An extended throat venturi is used and pressure of the multi-phase flow is measured at three or more positions in the venturi, which define two or more pressure differentials in the flow conduit. The differential pressures are then used to calculate the mass flow of the gas phase, the total mass flow, and the liquid phase. The system for determining the mass flow of the high void fraction fluid flow and the gas flow includes taking into account a pressure drop experienced by the gas phase due to work performed by the gas phase in accelerating the liquid phase.

  10. New developments in the analysis of column-collapse pyroclastic density currents through numerical simulations of multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepore, S.; Scarpati, C.

    2012-06-01

    A granular multiphase model has been used to evaluate the action of differently sized particles on the dynamics of fountains and associated pyroclastic density currents. The model takes into account the overall disequilibrium conditions between a gas phase and several solid phases, each characterized by its own physical properties. The dynamics of the granular flows (fountains and pyroclastic density currents) has been simulated by adopting a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes model for describing the turbulence effects. Numerical simulations have been carried out by using different values for the eruptive column temperature at the vent, solid particle frictional concentration, turbulent kinetic energy, and dissipation. The results obtained provide evidence of the multiphase nature of the model and describe several disequilibrium effects. The low concentration (≤5 × 10-4) zones lie in the upper part of the granular flow, above the fountain, and above the tail and body of pyroclastic density current as thermal plumes. The high concentration zones, on the contrary, lie in the fountain and at the base of the current. Hence, pyroclastic density currents are assimilated to granular flows constituted by a low concentration suspension flowing above a high concentration basal layer (boundary layer), from the proximal regions to the distal ones. Interactions among the solid particles in the boundary layer of the granular flow are controlled by collisions between particles, whereas the dispersal of particles in the suspension is determined by the dragging of the gas phase. The simulations describe well the dynamics of a tractive boundary layer leading to the formation of stratified facies during Strombolian to Plinian eruptions.

  11. Multiphase patterns in periodically forced oscillatory systems

    SciTech Connect

    Elphick, C.; Hagberg, A.; Meron, E.

    1999-05-01

    Periodic forcing of an oscillatory system produces frequency locking bands within which the system frequency is rationally related to the forcing frequency. We study extended oscillatory systems that respond to uniform periodic forcing at one quarter of the forcing frequency (the 4:1 resonance). These systems possess four coexisting stable states, corresponding to uniform oscillations with successive phase shifts of {pi}/2. Using an amplitude equation approach near a Hopf bifurcation to uniform oscillations, we study front solutions connecting different phase states. These solutions divide into two groups: {pi} fronts separating states with a phase shift of {pi} and {pi}/2 fronts separating states with a phase shift of {pi}/2. We find a type of front instability where a stationary {pi} front {open_quotes}decomposes{close_quotes} into a pair of traveling {pi}/2 fronts as the forcing strength is decreased. The instability is degenerate for an amplitude equation with cubic nonlinearities. At the instability point a continuous family of pair solutions exists, consisting of {pi}/2 fronts separated by distances ranging from zero to infinity. Quintic nonlinearities lift the degeneracy at the instability point but do not change the basic nature of the instability. We conjecture the existence of similar instabilities in higher 2n:1 resonances (n=3,4,{hor_ellipsis}) where stationary {pi} fronts decompose into {ital n} traveling {pi}/n fronts. The instabilities designate transitions from stationary two-phase patterns to traveling 2n-phase patterns. As an example, we demonstrate with a numerical solution the collapse of a four-phase spiral wave into a stationary two-phase pattern as the forcing strength within the 4:1 resonance is increased. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Transient Phenomena in Multiphase and Multicomponent Systems: Research Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zur Beurteilung von Stoffen in der Landwirtschaft, Senatskommission

    2000-09-01

    Due to the reinforced risk and safety-analysis of industrial plants in chemical and energy-engineering there has been increased demand in industry for more information on thermo- and fluiddynamic effects of non-equilibria during strong transients. Therefore, the 'Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft' initiated a special research program focusing on the study of transient phenomena in multiphase systems with one or several components. This book describes macroscopic as well as microscopic transient situations. A large part of the book deals with numerical methods for describing transients in two-phase mixtures. New developments in measuring techniques are also presented.

  13. Multiphase Carbon-14 Transport in a Near-Field-Scale Unsaturated Column of Natural Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    D. T. Fox; Mitchell A. Plummer; Larry C. Hull; D. Craig Cooper

    2004-03-01

    Wastes buried at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory include activated metals that release radioactive carbon-14 (14C) as they corrode. To better understand 14C phase partitioning and transport in the SDA sediments, we conducted a series of transport experiments using 14C (radio-labeled sodium carbonate) and nonreactive gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and aqueous (bromide and tritiated water) tracers in a large (2.6-m high by 0.9-m diameter) column of sediments similar to those used as cover material at the SDA. We established steady-state unsaturated flow prior to injecting tracers into the column. Tracer migration was monitored using pore-water and pore-gas samples taken from co-located suction lysimeters and gas ports inserted at ~0.3-m intervals along the column’s length. Measurements of 14C discharged from the sediment to the atmosphere (i.e., 14CO2 flux) indicate a positive correlation between CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in the column and changes in 14CO2 flux. Though 14CO2 diffusion is expected to be independent of pCO2, changes of pCO2 affect pore water chemistry sufficiently to affect aqueous/gas phase 14C partitioning and consequently 14C2 flux. Pore-water and -gas 14C activity measurements provide an average aqueous/gas partitioning ratio, Kag, of 4.5 (±0.3). This value is consistent with that calculated using standard carbonate equilibrium expressions with measured pH, suggesting the ability to estimate Kag from carbonate equilibrium. One year after the 14C injection, the column was cored and solid-phase 14C activity was measured. The average aqueous/solid partition coefficient, Kd, (1.6 L kg-1) was consistent with those derived from small-scale and short-term batch and column experiments using SDA sediments, suggesting that bench-scale measurements are a valid means of estimating aqueous/solid partitioning at the much larger spatial scale considered in these meso-scale experiments. However

  14. Thermodynamic framework for discrete optimal control in multiphase flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieniutycz, Stanislaw

    1999-08-01

    Bellman's method of dynamic programming is used to synthesize diverse optimization approaches to active (work producing) and inactive (entropy generating) multiphase flow systems. Thermal machines, optimally controlled unit operations, nonlinear heat conduction, spontaneous relaxation processes, and self-propagating wave fronts are all shown to satisfy a discrete Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation and a corresponding discrete optimization algorithm of Pontryagin's type, with the maximum principle for a Hamiltonian. The extremal structures are always canonical. A common unifying criterion is set for all considered systems, which is the criterion of a minimum generated entropy. It is shown that constraints can modify the entropy functionals in a different way for each group of the processes considered; thus the resulting structures of these functionals may differ significantly. Practical conclusions are formulated regarding the energy savings and energy policy in optimally controlled systems.

  15. Multiphase Flow Technology Impacts on Thermal Control Systems for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John; Sankovic, John; Lekan, Jack

    2006-01-01

    The Two-Phase Flow Facility (TPHIFFy) Project focused on bridging the critical knowledge gap by developing and demonstrating critical multiphase fluid products for advanced life support, thermal management and power conversion systems that are required to enable the Vision for Space Exploration. Safety and reliability of future systems will be enhanced by addressing critical microgravity fluid physics issues associated with flow boiling, condensation, phase separation, and system stability. The project included concept development, normal gravity testing, and reduced gravity aircraft flight campaigns, in preparation for the development of a space flight experiment implementation. Data will be utilized to develop predictive models that could be used for system design and operation. A single fluid, two-phase closed thermodynamic loop test bed was designed, assembled and tested. The major components in this test bed include: a boiler, a condenser, a phase separator and a circulating pump. The test loop was instrumented with flow meters, thermocouples, pressure transducers and both high speed and normal speed video cameras. A low boiling point surrogate fluid, FC-72, was selected based on scaling analyses using preliminary designs for operational systems. Preliminary results are presented which include flow regime transitions and some observations regarding system stability.

  16. Design and Development of Integrated Compact Multiphase Separation System (CMSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ram S. Mohan; Ovadia Shoham

    2006-04-30

    The petroleum industry has relied in the past mainly on conventional vessel-type separators, which are bulky, heavy and expensive, to process wellhead production of oil-water-gas flow. Economic and operational pressures continue to force the petroleum industry to seek less expensive and more efficient separation alternatives in the form of compact separators. The compact dimensions, smaller footprint and lower weight of compact separators have a potential for cost savings to the industry, especially in offshore and subsea applications. Also, compact separators reduce the inventory of hydrocarbons significantly, which is critical for environmental This report presents a brief overview of the activities and tasks accomplished during the Budget Period II (October 09, 2004-April 30, 2006) of the DOE project titled ''Design and Development of Integrated Compact Multiphase Separation System (CMSS{copyright})''. An executive summary is presented initially followed by the tasks of the current budget period. Then, detailed description of the experimental and modeling investigations are presented. Subsequently, the technical and scientific results of the activities of this project period are presented with discussions. The findings of this investigation are summarized in the ''Conclusions'' section In this investigation, the concept of CMSS{copyright} has been developed and is proven through simulation studies and validated by experimental data. As part of the second phase of the project (Budget Period II--10/09/2004-04/30/2006) experimental investigation of the integrated CMSS{copyright} for different configurations has been conducted in order to evaluate the performance of the individual separation components, and determine how they will affect the performance of each other when integrated in the CMSS{copyright}. An intelligent control system is also developed to improve the total system efficiency of Compact Multiphase Separation System (CMSS{copyright}). In mature oil

  17. Multiphase flow modeling based on the hyperbolic thermodynamically compatible systems theory

    SciTech Connect

    Romenski, E.

    2015-03-10

    An application of the theory of thermodynamically compatible hyperbolic systems to design a multiphase compressible flow models is discussed. With the use of such approach the governing equations are derived from the first principles, formulated in a divergent form and can be transformed to a symmetric hyperbolic system in the sense of Friedrichs. A usage of the proposed approach is described for the development of multiphase compressible fluid models, including two-phase flow models.

  18. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-04-15

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  19. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF INTEGRATED COMPACT MULTIPHASE SEPARATION SYSTEM (CMSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ram S. Mohan; Ovadia Shoham

    2004-12-31

    The petroleum industry has relied in the past mainly on conventional vessel-type separators, which are bulky, heavy and expensive, to process wellhead production of oil-water-gas flow. Economic and operational pressures continue to force the petroleum industry to seek less expensive and more efficient separation alternatives in the form of compact separators. The compact dimensions, smaller footprint and lower weight of compact separators have a potential for cost savings to the industry, especially in offshore and subsea applications. Also, compact separators reduce the inventory of hydrocarbons significantly, which is critical for environmental and safety considerations. This report presents a brief overview of the activities and tasks accomplished during the part July 09, 2003--October 08, 2004, related to the Budget Period I (July 09, 2003--October 08, 2004) of the DOE project titled ''Design and Development of Integrated Compact Multiphase Separation System (CMSS{copyright})''. An executive summary is presented initially followed by the tasks of the current budget period. Then, detailed description of the experimental and modeling investigations are presented. Subsequently, the technical and scientific results of the activities of this project period are presented with discussions. The findings of this investigation are summarized in the ''Conclusions'' section followed by relevant references. The initial phase of the project (Budget Period I--07/09/2003 to 10/08/2004) focuses on the development of additional individual compact separation components, such as the horizontal pipe separator (HPS{copyright}), for obtaining clean oil stream from oil-water mixture, flow conditioning components, such as the helical pipe (HP) and slug damper (SD{copyright}), for dissipating slugs upstream of the compact separators. The project will also design and test an upstream slug generator (SG).

  20. Investigation of hydrate formation and transportability in multiphase flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Giovanny A.

    The oil and gas industry is moving towards offshore developments in more challenging environments, where evaluating hydrate plugging risks to avoid operational/safety hazards becomes more difficult (Sloan, 2005). Even though mechanistic models for hydrate plug formation have been developed, components for a full comprehensive model are still missing. Prior to this work, research efforts were focused on flowing hydrate particles with relatively little research on hydrate accumulation, leaving hydrate deposition in multiphase flow an unexplored subject. The focus of this thesis was to better understand hydrate deposition as a form of accumu- lation in pipelines. To incorporate the multiphase flow effect, hydrate formation experiments were carried out at varying water cut (WC) from 15 to 100 vol.%, liquid loading (LL) from 50 to 85 vol.%, mixture velocity (vmix) from 0.75 to 3 m/s, for three fluids systems (100 % WC, water in Conroe crude oil emulsions and King Ranch condensate + water) on the ExxonMobil flowloop (4 in. nominal size and 314 ft. long) at Friendswood, TX. For the 100 % WC flowloop tests, hydrate particle distribution transitions beyond a critical hydrate volume concentration, observed values were between 8.2 to 29.4 vol.%, causing a sudden increase in pressure drop (DP). A revised correlation of the transition as a function of Reynolds number and liquid loading was developed. For Conroe emulsions, DP starts increasing at higher hydrate concentrations than King Ranch condensate, many times at 10 vol.%. Experiments with King Ranch show higher relative DP (10 to 25) than Conroe (2 to 10) performed at the same vmix and LL. Cohesive force measurements between cyclopentane hydrate particles were reduced from a value of 3.32 mN/m to 1.26 mN/m when 6 wt.% Conroe was used and to 0.41 mN/m when 5 wt.% Caratinga crude oil was used; similar values were obtained when extracted asphaltenes were used. King Ranch condensate (11 wt.%) did not significantly change the

  1. Investigation of hydrate formation and transportability in multiphase flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Giovanny A.

    The oil and gas industry is moving towards offshore developments in more challenging environments, where evaluating hydrate plugging risks to avoid operational/safety hazards becomes more difficult (Sloan, 2005). Even though mechanistic models for hydrate plug formation have been developed, components for a full comprehensive model are still missing. Prior to this work, research efforts were focused on flowing hydrate particles with relatively little research on hydrate accumulation, leaving hydrate deposition in multiphase flow an unexplored subject. The focus of this thesis was to better understand hydrate deposition as a form of accumu- lation in pipelines. To incorporate the multiphase flow effect, hydrate formation experiments were carried out at varying water cut (WC) from 15 to 100 vol.%, liquid loading (LL) from 50 to 85 vol.%, mixture velocity (vmix) from 0.75 to 3 m/s, for three fluids systems (100 % WC, water in Conroe crude oil emulsions and King Ranch condensate + water) on the ExxonMobil flowloop (4 in. nominal size and 314 ft. long) at Friendswood, TX. For the 100 % WC flowloop tests, hydrate particle distribution transitions beyond a critical hydrate volume concentration, observed values were between 8.2 to 29.4 vol.%, causing a sudden increase in pressure drop (DP). A revised correlation of the transition as a function of Reynolds number and liquid loading was developed. For Conroe emulsions, DP starts increasing at higher hydrate concentrations than King Ranch condensate, many times at 10 vol.%. Experiments with King Ranch show higher relative DP (10 to 25) than Conroe (2 to 10) performed at the same vmix and LL. Cohesive force measurements between cyclopentane hydrate particles were reduced from a value of 3.32 mN/m to 1.26 mN/m when 6 wt.% Conroe was used and to 0.41 mN/m when 5 wt.% Caratinga crude oil was used; similar values were obtained when extracted asphaltenes were used. King Ranch condensate (11 wt.%) did not significantly change the

  2. Phase-field model for multiphase systems with different thermodynamic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundin, Julia; Siquieri, Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    A modified phase-field model for quantitative simulations of low-speed phase transitions in multiphase systems is proposed, which takes into account the difference between thermodynamic factors in all the phases. The presented model is based on the quantitative phase-field concept developed by Steinbach et al. [I. Steinbach, F. Pezolla, B. Nestler, M. Seeelberg, R. Prieler, G.J. Schmitz, J.L.L. Rezende, A phase field concept for multiphase systems, Physica D 94 (1996) 135] for multiphase systems allowing to consider the multiphase transition as a superposition of pairwise interactions between two phases. We complete this approach and develop a model, which uses parameters derived from chemical free energy functions of individual phases evaluated from experimental data by the CALPHAD method Lukas et al. (2007) [17]. Because the thermodynamic factors are different in various phases we need to evaluate a special form of total chemical free energy function of a multiphase mixture and use it in the phase-field model. It is shown, that for the developed model the thin-interface asymptotic and the anti-trapping term developed previously for the solidification of pure substances can be applied. The model is verified by an example of the Al-Ni system whose peritectic structural morphology during the directional solidification is investigated. The suggested model can be also extended to multicomponent systems.

  3. Numerical Simulation of the Multiphase Flow in the Rheinsahl-Heraeus (RH) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Dian-Qiao; Lei, Hong; He, Ji-Cheng

    2010-02-01

    Knowledge of gas-liquid multiphase flow behavior in the Rheinsahl-Heraeus (RH) system is of great significance to clarify the circulation flow rate, decarburization, and inclusion removal with a reliable description. Thus, based on the separate model of injecting gas behavior, a novel mathematical model of multiphase flow has been developed to give the distribution of gas holdup in the RH system. The numerical results show that the predicted circulation flow rates, the predicted flow velocities, and the predicted mixing times agree with the measured results in a water model and that the predicted tracer concentration curve agrees with the results obtained in an actual RH system. With a lower lifting gas flow rate, the rising gas bubbles are concentrated near the wall; with a higher lifting gas flow rate, gas bubbles can reach the center of the up-snorkel. A critical lifting gas flow rate is used to obtain the maximum circulation flow rate.

  4. Multiphase electrode microbial fuel cell system that simultaneously converts organics coexisting in water and sediment phases into electricity.

    PubMed

    An, Junyeong; Moon, Hyunsoo; Chang, In Seop

    2010-09-15

    Our challenge in this study was to harvest electricity from organics coexisting in two different phases (water and sediment) in an organics-contaminated benthic environment and to obtain increased current using a multiphase electrode microbial fuel cell (multiphase MFC). The multiphase MFC consisted of a floating electrode (FE), a midelectrode (ME), and a sediment electrode (SE) with no other components. The SE was embedded in sediment; the FE and ME were then overlaid in the water surface layer and in the middle of the water column of an aquarium, respectively. During continuous supply of organics at a COD loading rate of 94 mg of COD L(-1) day(-1) and after the cessation of organics being supplied at COD loading rates of 330 and 188 mg of COD L(-1) day(-1), the multiphase MFC showed the highest current production, as compared to the control MFCs [a floating-type MFC (FT-MFC) and two types of sediment MFCs (SMFC-A and SMFC-B)]. The total charges (in coulombs) of the multiphase MFC integrated from the currents, obtained under the three operating conditions mentioned above, were comparable to the sums of charges for the FT-MFC and SMFC. As a result, this study found that the multiphase MFC can (1) utilize organics in the sediment similarly to SMFCs, (2) use organics in the water phase similarly to FT-MFCs, and (3) obtain increased current analogous to the sum of an SMFC and a FT-MFC. Thus, it is thought that the multiphase MFC developed in this work could be suitable for use in water bodies being continuously or frequently contaminated with organic waste.

  5. Multiphase electrode microbial fuel cell system that simultaneously converts organics coexisting in water and sediment phases into electricity.

    PubMed

    An, Junyeong; Moon, Hyunsoo; Chang, In Seop

    2010-09-15

    Our challenge in this study was to harvest electricity from organics coexisting in two different phases (water and sediment) in an organics-contaminated benthic environment and to obtain increased current using a multiphase electrode microbial fuel cell (multiphase MFC). The multiphase MFC consisted of a floating electrode (FE), a midelectrode (ME), and a sediment electrode (SE) with no other components. The SE was embedded in sediment; the FE and ME were then overlaid in the water surface layer and in the middle of the water column of an aquarium, respectively. During continuous supply of organics at a COD loading rate of 94 mg of COD L(-1) day(-1) and after the cessation of organics being supplied at COD loading rates of 330 and 188 mg of COD L(-1) day(-1), the multiphase MFC showed the highest current production, as compared to the control MFCs [a floating-type MFC (FT-MFC) and two types of sediment MFCs (SMFC-A and SMFC-B)]. The total charges (in coulombs) of the multiphase MFC integrated from the currents, obtained under the three operating conditions mentioned above, were comparable to the sums of charges for the FT-MFC and SMFC. As a result, this study found that the multiphase MFC can (1) utilize organics in the sediment similarly to SMFCs, (2) use organics in the water phase similarly to FT-MFCs, and (3) obtain increased current analogous to the sum of an SMFC and a FT-MFC. Thus, it is thought that the multiphase MFC developed in this work could be suitable for use in water bodies being continuously or frequently contaminated with organic waste. PMID:20687550

  6. Computational study of the shock driven instability of a multiphase particle-gas system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    None, None

    2016-02-01

    This paper considers the interaction of a shock wave with a multiphase particle-gas system which creates an instability somewhat similar to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability but with a larger parameter space. Because this parameter space is large, we only present an introductory survey of the effects of many of these parameters. We highlight the effects of particle-gas coupling, incident shock strength, particle size, effective system density differences, and multiple particle relaxation time effects. We focus on dilute flows with mass loading up to 40% and do not attempt to cover all parametric combinations. Instead, we vary one parameter at a timemore » leaving additional parametric combinations for future work. The simulations are run with the Ares code, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which uses a multiphase particulate transport method to model two-way momentum and energy coupling. A brief validation of these models is presented and coupling effects are explored. It is shown that even for small particles, on the order of 1μm, multi-phase coupling effects are important and diminish the circulation deposition on the interface by up to 25%. These coupling effects are shown to create large temperature deviations from the dusty gas approximation, up to 20% greater, especially at higher shock strengths. It is also found that for a multiphase instability, the vortex sheet deposited at the interface separates into two sheets. In conclusion, depending on the particle and particle-gas Atwood numbers, the instability may be suppressed or enhanced by the interactions of these two vortex sheets.« less

  7. Computational study of the shock driven instability of a multiphase particle-gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Jacob A.; Black, Wolfgang J.; Dahal, Jeevan; Morgan, Brandon E.

    2016-02-01

    This paper considers the interaction of a shock wave with a multiphase particle-gas system which creates an instability similar in some ways to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability but with a larger parameter space. As this parameter space is large, we only present an introductory survey of the effects of many of these parameters. We highlight the effects of particle-gas coupling, incident shock strength, particle size, effective system density differences, and multiple particle relaxation time effects. We focus on dilute flows with mass loading up to 40% and do not attempt to cover all parametric combinations. Instead, we vary one parameter at a time leaving additional parametric combinations for future work. The simulations are run with the Ares code, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which uses a multiphase particulate transport method to model two-way momentum and energy coupling. A brief validation of these models is presented and coupling effects are explored. It is shown that even for small particles, on the order of 1 μm, multi-phase coupling effects are important and diminish the circulation deposition on the interface by up to 25%. These coupling effects are shown to create large temperature deviations from the dusty gas approximation, up to 20% greater, especially at higher shock strengths. It is also found that for a multiphase instability, the vortex sheet deposited at the interface separates into two sheets. Depending on the particle and particle-gas Atwood numbers, the instability may be suppressed or enhanced by the interactions of these two vortex sheets.

  8. Comparison of two column characterisation systems based on pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Haghedooren, Erik; Németh, Tamás; Dragovic, Sanja; Noszál, Béla; Hoogmartens, Jos; Adams, Erwin

    2008-05-01

    A useful column characterisation system should help chromatographers to select the most appropriate column to use, e.g. when a particular chromatographic column is not available or when facing the dilemma of selecting a suitable column for analysis according to an official monograph. Official monographs of the European Pharmacopoeia and the United States Pharmacopeia are not allowed to mention the brand name of the stationary phase used for the method development. Also given the overwhelming offer of several hundreds of commercially available reversed-phase liquid chromatographic columns, the choice of a suitable column could be difficult sometimes. To support rational column selection, a column characterisation study was started in our laboratory in 2000. In the same period, Euerby et al. also developed a column characterisation system, which is now released as Column Selector by ACD/Labs. The aim of this project was to compare the two existing column characterisation systems, i.e. the KUL system and the Euerby system. Other research groups active in this field will not be discussed here. Euerby et al. developed a column characterisation system based on 6 test parameters, while the KUL system is based on 4 chromatographic parameters. Comparison was done using a set of 63 columns. For 7 different pharmaceutical separations (fluoxetine, gemcitabine, erythromycin, tetracycline, tetracaine, amlodipine and bisacodyl), a ranking was built based on an F-value (KUL method) or Column Difference Factor value (Euerby method) versus a (virtual) reference column. Both methods showed a similar ranking. The KUL and Euerby methods do not perfectly match, but they yield very similar results, allowing with a relatively high certainty, the selection of similar or dissimilar columns as compared to a reference column. An analyst that uses either of the two methods, will end up with a similar ranking. From a practical point of view, it must be noted that the KUL method only includes 4

  9. Systems for column-based separations, methods of forming packed columns, and methods of purifying sample components

    DOEpatents

    Egorov, Oleg B.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Grate, Jay W.; Chandler, Darrell P.; Brockman, Fred J.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.

    2000-01-01

    The invention encompasses systems for column-based separations, methods of packing and unpacking columns and methods of separating components of samples. In one aspect, the invention includes a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber, comprising: a) packing a matrix material within a column chamber to form a packed column; and b) after the packing, unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber without moving the column chamber. In another aspect, the invention includes a system for column-based separations, comprising: a) a fluid passageway, the fluid passageway comprising a column chamber and a flow path in fluid communication with the column chamber, the flow path being obstructed by a retaining material permeable to a carrier fluid and impermeable to a column matrix material suspended in the carrier fluid, the flow path extending through the column chamber and through the retaining material, the flow path being configured to form a packed column within the column chamber when a suspension of the fluid and the column matrix material is flowed along the flow path; and b) the fluid passageway extending through a valve intermediate the column chamber and the retaining material.

  10. Systems For Column-Based Separations, Methods Of Forming Packed Columns, And Methods Of Purifying Sample Components.

    DOEpatents

    Egorov, Oleg B.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Grate, Jay W.; Chandler, Darrell P.; Brockman, Fred J.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.

    2004-08-24

    The invention encompasses systems for column-based separations, methods of packing and unpacking columns and methods of separating components of samples. In one aspect, the invention includes a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber, comprising: a) packing a matrix material within a column chamber to form a packed column; and b) after the packing, unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber without moving the column chamber. In another aspect, the invention includes a system for column-based separations, comprising: a) a fluid passageway, the fluid passageway comprising a column chamber and a flow path in fluid communication with the column chamber, the flow path being obstructed by a retaining material permeable to a carrier fluid and impermeable to a column matrix material suspended in the carrier fluid, the flow path extending through the column chamber and through the retaining material, the flow path being configured to form a packed column within the column chamber when a suspension of the fluid and the column matrix material is flowed along the flow path; and b) the fluid passageway extending through a valve intermediate the column chamber and the retaining material.

  11. Systems For Column-Based Separations, Methods Of Forming Packed Columns, And Methods Of Purifying Sample Components

    DOEpatents

    Egorov, Oleg B.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Grate, Jay W.; Chandler, Darrell P.; Brockman, Fred J.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.

    2006-02-21

    The invention encompasses systems for column-based separations, methods of packing and unpacking columns and methods of separating components of samples. In one aspect, the invention includes a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber, comprising: a) packing a matrix material within a column chamber to form a packed column; and b) after the packing, unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber without moving the column chamber. In another aspect, the invention includes a system for column-based separations, comprising: a) a fluid passageway, the fluid passageway comprising a column chamber and a flow path in fluid communication with the column chamber, the flow path being obstructed by a retaining material permeable to a carrier fluid and impermeable to a column matrix material suspended in the carrier fluid, the flow path extending through the column chamber and through the retaining material, the flow path being configured to form a packed column within the column chamber when a suspension of the fluid and the column matrix material is flowed along the flow path; and b) the fluid passageway extending through a valve intermediate the column chamber and the retaining material.

  12. MULTI-PHASE CFD MODELING OF A SOLID SORBENT CARBON CAPTURE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Emily M.; Xu, Wei; DeCroix, David; Saha, Kringan; Huckaby, E. D.; Darteville, Sebastien; Sun, Xin

    2012-05-01

    Post-combustion solid sorbent carbon capture systems are being studied via computational modeling as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI). The work focuses on computational modeling of device-scale multi-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for given carbon capture reactor configurations to predict flow properties, outlet compositions, temperature and pressure. The detailed outputs of the device-scale models provide valuable insight into the operation of new carbon capture devices and will help in the design and optimization of carbon capture systems. As a first step in this project we have focused on modeling a 1 kWe solid sorbent carbon capture system using the commercial CFD software ANSYS FLUENT®. Using the multi-phase models available in ANSYS FLUENT®, we are investigating the use of Eulerian-Eulerian and Eulerian-Lagrangian methods for modeling a fluidized bed carbon capture design. The applicability of the dense discrete phase method (DDPM) is being considered along with the more traditional Eulerian-Eulerian multi-phase model. In this paper we will discuss the design of the 1 kWe solid sorbent system and the setup of the DDPM and Eulerian-Eulerian models used to simulate the system. The results of the hydrodynamics in the system will be discussed and the predictions of the DDPM and Eulerian-Eulerian simulations will be compared. A discussion of the sensitivity of the model to boundary and initial conditions, computational meshing, granular pressure, and drag sub-models will also be presented.

  13. KINETIC MODELING OF A FISCHER-TROPSCH REACTION OVER A COBALT CATALYST IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR FOR INCORPORATION INTO A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLUID DYNAMICS MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasia Gribik; Doona Guillen, PhD; Daniel Ginosar, PhD

    2008-09-01

    Currently multi-tubular fixed bed reactors, fluidized bed reactors, and slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) are used in commercial Fischer Tropsch (FT) synthesis. There are a number of advantages of the SBCR compared to fixed and fluidized bed reactors. The main advantage of the SBCR is that temperature control and heat recovery are more easily achieved. The SBCR is a multiphase chemical reactor where a synthesis gas, comprised mainly of H2 and CO, is bubbled through a liquid hydrocarbon wax containing solid catalyst particles to produce specialty chemicals, lubricants, or fuels. The FT synthesis reaction is the polymerization of methylene groups [-(CH2)-] forming mainly linear alkanes and alkenes, ranging from methane to high molecular weight waxes. The Idaho National Laboratory is developing a computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) model of the FT process in a SBCR. This paper discusses the incorporation of absorption and reaction kinetics into the current hydrodynamic model. A phased approach for incorporation of the reaction kinetics into a CMFD model is presented here. Initially, a simple kinetic model is coupled to the hydrodynamic model, with increasing levels of complexity added in stages. The first phase of the model includes incorporation of the absorption of gas species from both large and small bubbles into the bulk liquid phase. The driving force for the gas across the gas liquid interface into the bulk liquid is dependent upon the interfacial gas concentration in both small and large bubbles. However, because it is difficult to measure the concentration at the gas-liquid interface, coefficients for convective mass transfer have been developed for the overall driving force between the bulk concentrations in the gas and liquid phases. It is assumed that there are no temperature effects from mass transfer of the gas phases to the bulk liquid phase, since there are only small amounts of dissolved gas in the liquid phase. The product from the

  14. Model of decision system for 13C Isotope Separation column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the model of a decisional system for 13C Isotope Separation column, which is used to detect mission critical situation. The start model was a model of one distributed control system of critical situations that may arise in the operation of the distillation column. The research work it is proposed a model of decision system which implement a temperature sensor inside of liquid nitrogen level in the condenser. The condenser is a part of column where take place the cryogenic process using nitrogen liquid. The work temperature is very low about -192oC, and because the temperature can grow or go down more than 2 degrees is a very critical location inside the column. In this way the column has a deeply monitor and supervised and it take a decision in a proper time when the temperature is grow up or getting down and became a critical situation. For monitor and supervised it was used MatLAB SimuLink. The model, the decision system gives a signal to one sensor when something is wrong in the condenser which is the most critical place of the isotopic column. In this way it creates an alarm that something is getting wrong in the isotopic column.

  15. Looking East at Motor Control System, Clarity Columns and Blend ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking East at Motor Control System, Clarity Columns and Blend Tank Along East Side of Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  16. ITER relevant testing of a cryogenic distillation column system

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy, D.G.; Robins, J.R.; Woodall, K.B.; Sood, S.K.; Gierszewski, P.

    1995-10-01

    A new experimental system has been constructed to test ITER relevant distillation columns and related cryogenic distillation (CD) hardware and control systems. These columns are used to purify tritium in the ITER fuel cycle. The ITER test column reported here has a diameter of about 30 mm and a packed length of approximately 150 cm. It can operate with a hydrogen isotope (Q{sub 2}) boilup of about 60 watts. Two 30 W refrigeration systems were coupled together to deliver as close as possible to 60 watts of cooling. The separation performance of the column was determined by accurately measuring the tritium concentration in the feed and product streams using a mixture of D{sub 2} and DT gas. Conditions which yield a column theoretical plate height as low as 2.05 cm. and a plate inventory of 0.118 moles are reported. The goal of this research program is to measure the performance of ITER relevant columns, packings, condensers, and reboilers in order to minimize hydrogen (Q{sub 2}) and tritium holdup and to show that ITER objectives can be met with smaller diameter and lower tritium inventory columns than have previously been considered. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Multi-phase CFD modeling of solid sorbent carbon capture system

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, E. M.; DeCroix, D.; Breault, Ronald W.; Xu, W.; Huckaby, E. David

    2013-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both Eulerian–Eulerian and Eulerian–Lagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT® and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capture reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT® Eulerian–Lagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA Eulerian–Lagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT® Eulerian–Eulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.

  18. Multi-Phase CFD Modeling of Solid Sorbent Carbon Capture System

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Emily M.; DeCroix, David; Breault, Ronald W.; Xu, Wei; Huckaby, E. D.; Saha, Kringan; Darteville, Sebastien; Sun, Xin

    2013-07-30

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both Eulerian-Eulerian and Eulerian-Lagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT® and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capture reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT® Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA Eulerian-Lagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT® Eulerian-Eulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.

  19. Improved direct and indirect systems of columns for ternary distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, R.; Fidkowski, Z.T.

    1998-04-01

    Separation of a ternary mixture into almost pure components is discussed. Systems of distillation columns, with higher thermodynamic efficiency, are developed from a direct sequence (or indirect sequence) of distillation columns by allowing for two interconnecting streams of the same composition and different enthalpy. This increases the reversibility of distillation in the second column, which results in replacing a portion of the high-temperature boiling duty with a lower-temperature heat in the direct split case. For the indirect split case, the improvement allows a portion of the low-temperature condensing duty to be replaced with a higher-temperature condensation.

  20. The impact of interfacial tension on multiphase flow in the CO2-brine-sandstone system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, C. A.; Blunt, M. J.; Krevor, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Two dominant controls on continuum scale multiphase flow properties are interfacial tension (IFT) and wetting. In hydrocarbon-brine systems, relative permeability is known to increase with decreasing IFT, while residual trapping is controlled by the wetting properties of a permeable rock and the hysteresis between drainage and imbibtion (Amaefule & Handy, 1982; Bardon & Longeron, 1980; Juanes et al., 2006). Fluid properties of the CO2-brine system, such as viscosity, density and interfacial tension, are well characterised and have known dependencies on temperature, pressure and brine salinity. Interest in this particular fluid system is motivated by CO2 storage and enhanced oil recovery. Despite increased interest in CO2 storage, the response of the CO2-brine relative permeability to varying IFT has yet to be comprehensively evaluated. Additionally the wide range of thermophysical properties (density, viscosity etc.) that exist across a relatively small range of pressures and temperatures makes it an ideal system with which to investigate the physics of multiphase flow in general. This is the first systematic study to investigate the impact of IFT on drainage and imbibition relative permeability for the CO2-brine-sandstone system. The experimental design has been adapted from a traditional steady state core flood in two ways. First, while conditions may be easily selected to obtain a range of interfacial tensions, isolating the independent impact of interfacial tension on relative permeability is less simple. Thus experimental conditions are selected so as to vary interfacial tension, while minimising the variation in viscosity ratio between CO2 and brine. Second, in order to attribute the impacts of changing conditions, it is necessary to have precise results such that small shifts in observations can be identified. Multiphase flow theory is used to both design the conditions of the test and interpret the observations, leading to a much higher precision in

  1. Computer Assisted Gamma and X-Ray Tomography: Applications to Multiphase Flow Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sailesh B.; Dudukovic, Milorad P.; Toseland, Bernard A.

    1997-03-01

    The application of X-ray and gamma ray transmission tomography to the study of process engineering systems is reviewed. The fundamental principles of tomography, the algorithms for image reconstruction, the measurement method and the possible sources of error are discussed in detail. A case study highlights the methodology involved in designing a scanning system for the study of a given process unit, e.g., reactor, separations column etc. Results obtained in the authors` laboratory for the gas holdup distribution in bubble columns are also presented. Recommendations are made for the Advanced Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, TX.

  2. [An integral chip for the multiphase pulse-duration modulation used for voltage changer in biomedical microprocessor systems].

    PubMed

    Balashov, A M; Selishchev, S V

    2004-01-01

    An integral chip (IC) was designed for controlling the step-down pulse voltage converter, which is based on the multiphase pulse-duration modulation, for use in biomedical microprocessor systems. The CMOS technology was an optimal basis for the IC designing. An additional feedback circuit diminishes the output voltage dispersion at dynamically changing loads.

  3. Mixing and Demixing Processes in Multiphase Flows With Application to Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Rand (Editor); Schafer, Charles F. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    A workshop on transport processes in multiphase flow was held at the Marshall Space Flight Center on February 25 and 26, 1988. The program, abstracts and text of the presentations at this workshop are presented. The objective of the workshop was to enhance our understanding of mass, momentum, and energy transport processes in laminar and turbulent multiphase shear flows in combustion and propulsion environments.

  4. Method and system for measuring multiphase flow using multiple pressure differentials

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2001-01-01

    An improved method and system for measuring a multiphase flow in a pressure flow meter. An extended throat venturi is used and pressure of the multiphase flow is measured at three or more positions in the venturi, which define two or more pressure differentials in the flow conduit. The differential pressures are then used to calculate the mass flow of the gas phase, the total mass flow, and the liquid phase. The method for determining the mass flow of the high void fraction fluid flow and the gas flow includes certain steps. The first step is calculating a gas density for the gas flow. The next two steps are finding a normalized gas mass flow rate through the venturi and computing a gas mass flow rate. The following step is estimating the gas velocity in the venturi tube throat. The next step is calculating the pressure drop experienced by the gas-phase due to work performed by the gas phase in accelerating the liquid phase between the upstream pressure measuring point and the pressure measuring point in the venturi throat. Another step is estimating the liquid velocity in the venturi throat using the calculated pressure drop experienced by the gas-phase due to work performed by the gas phase. Then the friction is computed between the liquid phase and a wall in the venturi tube. Finally, the total mass flow rate based on measured pressure in the venturi throat is calculated, and the mass flow rate of the liquid phase is calculated from the difference of the total mass flow rate and the gas mass flow rate.

  5. DENSE MULTIPHASE FLOW SIMULATION: CONTINUUM MODEL FOR POLY-DISPERSED SYSTEMS USING KINETIC THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    Moses Bogere

    2011-08-31

    The overall objective of the project was to verify the applicability of the FCMOM approach to the kinetic equations describing the particle flow dynamics. For monodispersed systems the fundamental equation governing the particle flow dynamics is the Boltzmann equation. During the project, the FCMOM was successfully applied to several homogeneous and in-homogeneous problems in different flow regimes, demonstrating that the FCMOM has the potential to be used to solve efficiently the Boltzmann equation. However, some relevant issues still need to be resolved, i.e. the homogeneous cooling problem (inelastic particles cases) and the transition between different regimes. In this report, the results obtained in homogeneous conditions are discussed first. Then a discussion of the validation results for in-homogeneous conditions is provided. And finally, a discussion will be provided about the transition between different regimes. Alongside the work on development of FCMOM approach studies were undertaken in order to provide insights into anisotropy or particles kinetics in riser hydrodynamics. This report includes results of studies of multiphase flow with unequal granular temperatures and analysis of momentum re-distribution in risers due to particle-particle and fluid-particle interactions. The study of multiphase flow with unequal granular temperatures entailed both simulation and experimental studies of two particles sizes in a riser and, a brief discussion of what was accomplished will be provided. And finally, a discussion of the analysis done on momentum re-distribution of gas-particles flow in risers will be provided. In particular a discussion of the remaining work needed in order to improve accuracy and predictability of riser hydrodynamics based on two-fluid models and how they can be used to model segregation in risers.

  6. Direct coupling of microbore HPLC columns to MS systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnair, H. M.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed investigation using electron microscopy was conducted which examined the conditions of materials used in the construction of stable, high performance microbore liquid chromatography (LC) columns. Small details proved to be important. The effects of temperature on the elution of several homologous series used as probe compounds was examined in reverse phase systems. They showed that accessible temperature changes provide roughly half the increase in solvent strength that would be obtained going from a 100% aqueous to a 100% organic mobile phase, which is sufficient to warrant their use in many analyses requiring the use of gradients. Air circulation temperature control systems provide the easiest means of obtaining rapid, wide range changes in column temperature. However, slow heat transfer from the gas leads to thermal nonuniformity in the column and a decrease in resolution as the temperature program progresses.

  7. Density-based separation in multiphase systems provides a simple method to identify sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok A.; Patton, Matthew R.; Hennek, Jonathan W.; Lee, Si Yi Ryan; D’Alesio-Spina, Gaetana; Yang, Xiaoxi; Kanter, Julie; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S.; Brugnara, Carlo; Whitesides, George M.

    2014-01-01

    Although effective low-cost interventions exist, child mortality attributable to sickle cell disease (SCD) remains high in low-resource areas due, in large part, to the lack of accessible diagnostic methods. The presence of dense (ρ > 1.120 g/cm3) cells is characteristic of SCD. The fluid, self-assembling step-gradients in density created by aqueous multiphase systems (AMPSs) identifies SCD by detecting dense cells. AMPSs separate different forms of red blood cells by density in a microhematocrit centrifuge and provide a visual means to distinguish individuals with SCD from those with normal hemoglobin or with nondisease, sickle-cell trait in under 12 min. Visual evaluation of a simple two-phase system identified the two main subclasses of SCD [homozygous (Hb SS) and heterozygous (Hb SC)] with a sensitivity of 90% (73–98%) and a specificity of 97% (86–100%). A three-phase system identified these two types of SCD with a sensitivity of 91% (78–98%) and a specificity of 88% (74–98%). This system could also distinguish between Hb SS and Hb SC. To the authors’ knowledge, this test demonstrates the first separation of cells by density with AMPSs, and the usefulness of AMPSs in point-of-care diagnostic hematology. PMID:25197072

  8. MULTIPHASE GAS IN GALAXY HALOS: THE O VI LYMAN-LIMIT SYSTEM TOWARD J1009+0713

    SciTech Connect

    Tumlinson, J.; Thom, C.; Okrochkov, M.; Sembach, K. R.; Werk, J. K.; Prochaska, J. X.; Meiring, J. D.; Tripp, T. M.; O'Meara, J. M.

    2011-06-01

    We have serendipitously detected a strong O VI-bearing Lyman-limit system (LLS) at z{sub abs} = 0.3558 toward the quasi-stellar object (QSO) J1009+0713 (z{sub em} = 0.456) in our survey of low-redshift galaxy halos with the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. Its total rest-frame equivalent width of W{sub r} = 835 {+-} 49 mA and column density of log N(O VI) = 15.0 are the highest for an intervening absorber yet detected in any low-redshift QSO sightline, with absorption spanning at least four major kinematic component groups over 400 km s{sup -1} in its rest frame. HST/Wide Field Camera 3 images of the galaxy field show that the absorber is associated with two galaxies lying at 14 and 46 kpc from the QSO line of sight. The absorber is kinematically complex and there are no less than nine individual Mg II components spanning 200 km s{sup -1} in our Keck/HIRES optical data. The bulk of the absorbing gas traced by H I resides in two strong, blended component groups that possess a total log N(H I) {approx_equal} 18-18.8, but most of the O VI is associated with two outlying components with log N(H I) = 14.8 and 16.5. The ion ratios and column densities of C, N, O, Mg, Si, S, and Fe, except the O VI, can be accommodated into a simple photoionization model in which diffuse, low-metallicity halo gas is exposed to a photoionizing field from stars in the nearby galaxies that propagates into the halo at 10% efficiency. In this model, the clouds have neutral fractions of {approx}1%-10% and thus total hydrogen column densities of log N(H) {approx_equal} 19.5. Direct measurement of the gas metallicity is precluded by saturation of the main components of H I, but we constrain the metallicity firmly within the range 0.1-1 Z{sub sun}, and photoionization modeling indirectly indicates a subsolar metallicity of 0.05-0.5 Z{sub sun}. This highly ionized, multiphase, possibly low-metallicity halo gas resembles gas with similar properties in the Milky Way halo

  9. Regional modelling of the tropospheric multiphase system using COSMO-MUSCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrödner, R.; Wolke, R.; Tilgner, A.

    2012-04-01

    Clouds play a major role in the atmosphere due to their influence on the Earth's radiative budget, on the hydrologic cycle and on the tropospheric chemical composition. Cloud lifetime is driven by the dynamics of the atmosphere at the synoptic scale and, in close interaction, by microphysical processes (e.g. nucleation of cloud droplets and ice crystals, condensation and evaporation, collision/coalescence processes, freezing, sedimentation of hydrometeor) on the small scale. These processes depend on the chemical composition of particles and cloud droplets. In addition, microphysical processes redistribute chemicals among the various reservoirs: gaseous, particulate, liquid and ice phases. Clouds favor the development of "multiphase chemistry": (1) clouds support very efficient photochemical processes inside droplets; (2) certain homogeneous chemical reactions within clouds can be faster than the equivalent in the gas phase, and reactions such as those involving ionic species, can be important; (3) finally, interactions between the aqueous and solid phase can contribute additionally to chemical processes in clouds (for example dissolution of soluble particulate species). The coupled model system COSMO-MUSCAT (chemical transport model MUSCAT and the forecast model of the German Weather Service (DWD) COSMO) was extended to consider cloud-chemical processes on the regional scale replacing the former aqueous phase parameterization. Based on the increasing kinetic and mechanistic knowledge on chemical aqueous phase reactions in the last two decades, advanced aqueous phase chemical mechanisms such as the Chemical Aqueous Phase Radical Mechanism (CAPRAM) are continuously developed. CAPRAM is an almost explicit mechanism which describes relevant chemical aqueous-phase conversions of both inorganic and organic compounds. With the advanced model system, 2D-sensitivity-studies have been conducted for an urban and a remote case. The comparison of two different mechanisms

  10. Multiphasic changes in systemic VEGF following intravitreal injections of ranibizumab in a child

    PubMed Central

    Shao, E H; Sivagnanavel, V; Dabbagh, A; Dave, R; Tempest-Roe, S; Tam, F W K; Taylor, S R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether intravitreal ranibizumab injections administered to a child alter systemic plasma levels of total and free VEGF 165. Methods A 9-year-old child sustained a choroidal rupture from blunt trauma. He subsequently developed a secondary choroidal neovascular membrane, which was treated with five ranibizumab injections over a period of 8 months. Peripheral venous blood samples were taken at each visit over a period of 12 months and plasma was extracted. Plasma VEGF 165 levels were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and were assayed both pre- and post-immunodepletion to remove complexed VEGF. Results Plasma VEGF 165 levels proved labile following intravitreal injection of ranibizumab. Levels increased by 30% above baseline following the first intravitreal ranibizumab injection, but then returned to baseline despite two subsequent injections. There was then a rebound increase of 67% in total plasma VEGF levels following a further injection, which remained above baseline for 12 weeks despite two further intravitreal ranibizumab injections. Baseline levels were re-attained 26 weeks after the final injection. Conclusions These results suggest intravitreal ranibizumab injections can cause significant, multiphasic changes in systemic VEGF levels. This may be of particular clinical significance in children as VEGF is known to be vital in the development of major organs, in addition to its role in the maintenance of normal organ function in adults. PMID:25657041

  11. Thermal Analysis for Ion-Exchange Column System

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Si Y.; King, William D.

    2012-12-20

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of crystalline silicotitanate ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium either in a column configuration or distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the design and operation of a waste treatment process focused on treating dissolved, high-sodium salt waste solutions for the removal of specific radionuclides. The ion exchange column will be installed inside a high level waste storage tank at the Savannah River Site. After cesium loading, the ion exchange media may be transferred to the waste tank floor for interim storage. Models were used to predict temperature profiles in these areas of the system where the cesium-loaded media is expected to lead to localized regions of elevated temperature due to radiolytic decay. Normal operating conditions and accident scenarios (including loss of solution flow, inadvertent drainage, and loss of active cooling) were evaluated for the ion exchange column using bounding conditions to establish the design safety basis. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. In-tank modeling results revealed that an idealized hemispherical mound shape leads to the highest tank floor temperatures. In contrast, even large volumes of CST distributed in a flat layer with a cylindrical shape do not result in significant floor heating.

  12. Radiotracer method for residence time distribution study in multiphase flow system.

    PubMed

    Sugiharto, S; Su'ud, Z; Kurniadi, R; Wibisono, W; Abidin, Z

    2009-01-01

    [(131)I] isotope in different chemical compounds have been injected into 24in hydrocarbon transmission pipeline containing approximately 95% water, 3% crude oil, 2% gas and negligible solid material, respectively. The system is operated at the temperature around 70 degrees C enabling fluids flow is easier in the pipeline. The segment of measurement was chosen far from the junction point of the pipeline, therefore, it was reasonably to assume that the fluids in such multiphase system were separated distinctively. Expandable tubing of injector was used to ensure that the isotopes were injected at the proper place in the sense that [(131)I]Na isotope was injected into water layer and iodo-benzene, ([131])IC(6)H(5,) was injected into crude oil regime. The radiotracer selection was based on the compatibility of radiotracer with each of fluids under investigation. [(131)I]Na was used for measuring flow of water while iodo-benzene, ([131])IC(6)H(5,) was used for measuring flow of crude oil. Two scintillation detectors were used and they are put at the distances 80 and 100m, respectively, from injection point. The residence time distribution data were utilized for calculation water and crude oil flows. Several injections were conducted in the experiments. Although the crude oil density is lighter than the density of water, the result of measurement shows that the water flow is faster than the crude oil flow. As the system is water-dominated, water may act as carrier and the movement of crude oil is slowed due to friction between crude oil with water and crude oil with gas at top layer. Above of all, this result was able to give answer on the question why crude oil always arrives behind water as it is checked at gathering station. In addition, the flow patterns of the water in the pipeline calculated by Reynolds number and predicted by simple tank-in-series model is turbulence in character.

  13. Engineered Barrier Systems Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    W.E. Lowry

    2001-12-13

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01.

  14. Novel multiphase systems based on thermoplastic chitosan: Analysis of the structure-properties relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avérous, Luc; Pollet, Eric

    2016-03-01

    In the last years, biopolymers have attracted great attention. It is for instance the case of chitosan, a linear polysaccharide. It is a deacetylated derivative of chitin, which is the second most abundant polysaccharide found in nature after cellulose. Chitosan has been found to be nontoxic, biodegradable, biofunctional, and biocompatible in addition to having antimicrobial and antifungal properties, and thus has a great potential for environmental (packaging,) or biomedical applications.For preparing chitosan-based materials, only solution casting or similar methods have been used in all the past studies. Solution casting have the disadvantage in low efficiency and difficulty in scaling-up towards industrial applications. Besides, a great amount of environmentally unfriendly chemical solvents are used and released to the environment in this method. The reason for not using a melt processing method like extrusion or kneading in the past studies is that chitosan, like many other polysaccharides such as starch, has very low thermal stability and degrade prior to melting. Therefore, even if the melt processing method is more convenient and highly preferred for industrial production, its adaptation for polysaccharide-based materials remains very difficult. However, our recently published studies has demonstrated the successful use of an innovative melt processing method (internal mixer, extrusion,) as an alternative route to solution casting, for preparing materials based on thermoplastic chitosan. These promising thermoplastic materials, obtained by melt processing, have been the main topic of recent international projects, with partners from different countries Multiphase systems based on various renewable plasticizers have been elaborated and studied. Besides, different blends, and nano-biocomposites based on nanoclays, have been elaborated and fully analyzed. The initial consortium of this vast project was based on an international consortium (Canada, Australia

  15. Numerical Modeling of Multiphase Fluid Flow in Ore-Forming Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, P.; Driesner, T.; Coumou, D.; Heinrich, C. A.

    2007-12-01

    Two coexisting fluid phases - a variably saline liquid and a vapor phase - are ubiquitous in ore-forming and other hydrothermal systems. Understanding the dynamics of phase separation and the distinct physical and chemical evolution of the two fluids probably plays a key role in generating different ore deposit types, e.g. porphyry type, high and low sulfidation Cu-Mo-Au deposits. To this end, processes within hydrothermal systems have been studied with a refined numerical model describing fluid flow in transient porous media (CSP~5.0). The model is formulated on a mass, energy and momentum conserving finite-element-finite-volume (FEFV) scheme and is capable of simulating multiphase flow of NaCl-H20 fluids. Fluid properties are computed from an improved equation of state (SOWAT~2.0). It covers conditions with temperatures of up to 1000 degrees~C, pressures of up to 500 MPa, and fluid salinities of 0~to 100%~NaCl. In particular, the new set-up allows for a more accurate description of fluid phase separation during boiling of hydrothermal fluids into a vapor and a brine phase. The geometric flexibility of the FEFV-meshes allows for investigations of a large variety of geological settings, ranging from ore-forming processes in magmatic hydrothermal system to the dynamics of black smokers at mid-ocean ridges. Simulations demonstrated that hydrothermal convection patterns above cooling plutons are primarily controlled by the system-scale permeability structure. In porphyry systems, high fluid pressures develop in a stock rising from the magma chamber which can lead to rock failure and, eventually, an increase in permeability due to hydrofracturing. Comparisons of the thermal evolution as inferred from modeling studies with data from fluid inclusion studies of the Pb-Zn deposits of Madan, Bulgaria are in a strikingly good agreement. This indicates that cross-comparisons of field observations, analytical data and numerical simulations will become a powerful tool towards a

  16. The multiphase flow system used in exploiting depleted reservoirs: water-based Micro-bubble drilling fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li-hui, Zheng; Xiao-qing, He; Li-xia, Fu; Xiang-chun, Wang

    2009-02-01

    Water-based micro-bubble drilling fluid, which is used to exploit depleted reservoirs, is a complicated multiphase flow system that is composed of gas, water, oil, polymer, surfactants and solids. The gas phase is separate from bulk water by two layers and three membranes. They are "surface tension reducing membrane", "high viscosity layer", "high viscosity fixing membrane", "compatibility enhancing membrane" and "concentration transition layer of liner high polymer (LHP) & surfactants" from every gas phase centre to the bulk water. "Surface tension reducing membrane", "high viscosity layer" and "high viscosity fixing membrane" bond closely to pack air forming "air-bag", "compatibility enhancing membrane" and "concentration transition layer of LHP & surfactants" absorb outside "air-bag" to form "incompact zone". From another point of view, "air-bag" and "incompact zone" compose micro-bubble. Dynamic changes of "incompact zone" enable micro-bubble to exist lonely or aggregate together, and lead the whole fluid, which can wet both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surface, to possess very high viscosity at an extremely low shear rate but to possess good fluidity at a higher shear rate. When the water-based micro-bubble drilling fluid encounters leakage zones, it will automatically regulate the sizes and shapes of the bubbles according to the slot width of fracture, the height of cavern as well as the aperture of openings, or seal them by making use of high viscosity of the system at a very low shear rate. Measurements of the rheological parameters indicate that water-based micro-bubble drilling fluid has very high plastic viscosity, yield point, initial gel, final gel and high ratio of yield point and plastic viscosity. All of these properties make the multiphase flow system meet the requirements of petroleum drilling industry. Research on interface between gas and bulk water of this multiphase flow system can provide us with information of synthesizing effective agents to

  17. Computer assisted gamma and X-ray tomography: Applications to multiphase flow systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.B.; Dudukovic, M.

    1998-01-01

    In process vessels, involving two or three phases it is often important not only to know the volume fraction (holdup) of each phase but also the spatial distribution of such holdups. This information is needed in control, trouble shooting and assessment of flow patterns and can be observed noninvasively by the application of Computed Tomography (CT). This report presents a complete overview of X-ray and gamma ray transmission tomography principles, equipment design to specific tasks and application in process industry. The fundamental principles of tomography, the algorithms for image reconstruction, the measurement method and the possible sources of error are discussed in detail. A case study highlights the methodology involved in designing a scanning system for the study of a given process unit, e.g., reactor, separations column etc. Results obtained in the authors` laboratory for the gas holdup distribution in bubble columns are also presented. Recommendations are made for the Advanced Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, TX.

  18. Supertoughened renewable PLA reactive multiphase blends system: phase morphology and performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kunyu; Nagarajan, Vidhya; Misra, Manjusri; Mohanty, Amar K

    2014-08-13

    Multiphase blends of poly(lactic acid) (PLA), ethylene-methyl acrylate-glycidyl methacrylate (EMA-GMA) terpolymer, and a series of renewable poly(ether-b-amide) elastomeric copolymer (PEBA) were fabricated through reactive melt blending in an effort to improve the toughness of the PLA. Supertoughened PLA blend showing impact strength of ∼500 J/m with partial break impact behavior was achieved at an optimized blending ratio of 70 wt % PLA, 20 wt % EMA-GMA, and 10 wt % PEBA. Miscibility and thermal behavior of the binary blends PLA/PEBA and PLA/EMA-GMA, and the multiphase blends were also investigated through differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Phase morphology and fracture surface morphology of the blends were studied through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to understand the strong corelation between the morphology and its significant effect on imparting tremendous improvement in toughness. A unique "multiple stacked structure" with partial encapsulation of EMA-GMA and PEBA minor phases was observed for the PLA/EMA-GMA/PEBA (70/20/10) revealing the importance of particular blend composition in enhancing the toughness. Toughening mechanism behind the supertoughened PLA blends have been established by studying the impact fractured surface morphology at different zones of fracture. Synergistic effect of good interfacial adhesion and interfacial cavitations followed by massive shear yielding of the matrix was believed to contribute to the enormous toughening effect observed in these multiphase blends.

  19. AM-DMC-AMPS Multi-Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles for Efficient Purification of Complex Multiphase Water System.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yuru; Li, Yushu; Zu, Baiyi; Zhou, Chaoyu; Dou, Xincun

    2016-12-01

    Complex multiphase waste system purification, as one of the major challenges in many industrial fields, urgently needs an efficient one-step purification method to remove several pollutants simultaneously and efficiently. Multi-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles, Fe3O4@SiO2-MPS-AM-DMC-AMPS, were facilely prepared via a one-pot in situ polymerization of three different functional monomers, AM, DMC, and AMPS, on a Fe3O4@SiO2-MPS core-shell structure. The multi-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are proven to be a highly effective purification agent for oilfield wastewater, an ideal example of industrial complex multiphase waste system containing cations, anions, and organic pollutants. Excellent overall removal efficiencies for both cations, including K(+), Ca(2+), Na(+), and Mg(2+) of 80.68 %, and anions, namely Cl(-) and SO4 (2-), of 85.18 % along with oil of 97.4 % were shown. The high removal efficiencies are attributed to the effective binding of the functional groups from the selected monomers with cations, anions, and oil emulsions. PMID:27102906

  20. AM-DMC-AMPS Multi-Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles for Efficient Purification of Complex Multiphase Water System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yuru; Li, Yushu; Zu, Baiyi; Zhou, Chaoyu; Dou, Xincun

    2016-04-01

    Complex multiphase waste system purification, as one of the major challenges in many industrial fields, urgently needs an efficient one-step purification method to remove several pollutants simultaneously and efficiently. Multi-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles, Fe3O4@SiO2-MPS-AM-DMC-AMPS, were facilely prepared via a one-pot in situ polymerization of three different functional monomers, AM, DMC, and AMPS, on a Fe3O4@SiO2-MPS core-shell structure. The multi-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are proven to be a highly effective purification agent for oilfield wastewater, an ideal example of industrial complex multiphase waste system containing cations, anions, and organic pollutants. Excellent overall removal efficiencies for both cations, including K+, Ca2+, Na+, and Mg2+ of 80.68 %, and anions, namely Cl- and SO4 2-, of 85.18 % along with oil of 97.4 % were shown. The high removal efficiencies are attributed to the effective binding of the functional groups from the selected monomers with cations, anions, and oil emulsions.

  1. Modeling multiphase migration of organic chemicals in groundwater systems--a review and assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Abriola, L M

    1989-01-01

    Over the past two decades, a number of models have been developed to describe the multiphase migration of organic chemicals in the subsurface. This paper presents the state-of-the-art with regard to such modeling efforts. The mathematical foundations of these models are explored and individual models are presented and discussed. Models are divided into three groups: a) those that assume a sharp interface between the migrating fluids; b) those that incorporate capillarity; and c) those that consider interphase transport of mass. Strengths and weaknesses of each approach are considered along with supporting data for model validation. Future research directions are also highlighted. PMID:2695322

  2. Recent Improvements in Micromodel Experimentation and Pore-scale Simulation of Multiphase Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oostrom, M.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Grate, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Recent efforts in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at PNNL have resulted in improved experimental methods to fabricate silicon micromodels with different wettability and improved numerical methods to predict multiphase fluid displacement at the pore scale. Wettability is a key parameter influencing capillary pressures, permeabilities, fingering mechanisms, and saturations in multiphase flow processes within porous media. Glass-covered silicon micromodels provide precise structures in which pore-scale displacement processes can be visualized. The wettability of silicon and glass surfaces can be modified by silanization. However, similar treatments of glass and silica surfaces using the same silane do not necessarily yield the same wettability as determined by the oil-water contact angle. Surface wettability modifications and cleaning pretreatments were investigated to determine conditions that yield oil-wet surfaces on glass with similar wettability to silica surfaces treated with the same silane. Both air-water and oil-water contact angles were determined. Displacement experiments completed in these micromodels have shown unstable and stable displacement patterns, related to capillary and viscosity ratios of the fluids. A series of high-resolution numerical experiments were conducted using the Pair-Wise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) multiphase flow model. The novel model was used to simulate experiments that showed viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement of immiscible fluids for a wide range of capillary numbers and viscosity ratios. It was demonstrated that the steady state saturation profiles and the boundaries of viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement regions compare favorably with micromodel experimental results. For displacing fluid with low viscosity, we observed that the displacement pattern changes from viscous fingering to stable displacement with increasing injection rate

  3. A novel heterogeneous algorithm to simulate multiphase flow in porous media on multicore CPU-GPU systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, J. E.; Prins, J. F.; Miller, C. T.

    2014-07-01

    Multiphase flow implementations of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) are widely applied to the study of porous medium systems. In this work, we construct a new variant of the popular “color” LBM for two-phase flow in which a three-dimensional, 19-velocity (D3Q19) lattice is used to compute the momentum transport solution while a three-dimensional, seven velocity (D3Q7) lattice is used to compute the mass transport solution. Based on this formulation, we implement a novel heterogeneous GPU-accelerated algorithm in which the mass transport solution is computed by multiple shared memory CPU cores programmed using OpenMP while a concurrent solution of the momentum transport is performed using a GPU. The heterogeneous solution is demonstrated to provide speedup of 2.6× as compared to multi-core CPU solution and 1.8× compared to GPU solution due to concurrent utilization of both CPU and GPU bandwidths. Furthermore, we verify that the proposed formulation provides an accurate physical representation of multiphase flow processes and demonstrate that the approach can be applied to perform heterogeneous simulations of two-phase flow in porous media using a typical GPU-accelerated workstation.

  4. Small Column Ion Exchange Monitor System Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    CASELLA, VITO

    2004-09-30

    A Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) system has been designed by the Oak Ridge and Savannah River National Laboratories (ORNL and SRNL) as a potential way to reduce Cs-137 concentrations in high-level radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site. SRNL was asked to develop gamma-ray monitors at six locations within the SCIX system. Gamma-ray monitors are required to verify the proper operation of the ion exchange system, detect cesium breakthrough, and confirm presence of cesium before and after used resin is transferred to a grinder module. The only observable gamma ray in the decay of Cs-137 is from its short-lived Ba-137m daughter. Chemical processes, such as the SCIX, may disrupt the secular equilibrium between this parent-daughter pair; meaning that measurement of Ba-137m will not necessarily yield information about Cs-137 content. While this is a complicating factor that can not be ignored, it is controllable by either: allowing sufficient time for equilibrium to be reestablished (about 20 minutes), or by making multiple measurements with sufficient statistical precision to determine the extent of disequilibrium. The present work provides a means of measuring the Cs-137 and Ba-137m by taking multiple measurements in a process isolation loop that contains the process solution of interest.

  5. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR ION-EXCHANGE COLUMN SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; King, W.

    2011-05-23

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed, inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature.

  6. The impact of reservoir conditions and rock heterogeneity on multiphase flow in CO2-brine-sandstone systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krevor, S. C.; Reynolds, C. A.; Al-Menhali, A.; Niu, B.

    2015-12-01

    Capillary strength and multiphase flow are key for modeling CO2 injection for CO2 storage. Past observations of multiphase flow in this system have raised important questions about the impact of reservoir conditions on flow through effects on wettability, interfacial tension and fluid-fluid mass transfer. In this work we report the results of an investigation aimed at resolving many of these outstanding questions for flow in sandstone rocks. The drainage capillary pressure, drainage and imbibition relative permeability, and residual trapping [1] characteristic curves have been characterized in Bentheimer and Berea sandstone rocks across a pressure range 5 - 20 MPa, temperatures 25 - 90 C and brine salinities 0-5M NaCl. Over 30 reservoir condition core flood tests were performed using techniques including the steady state relative permeability test, the semi-dynamic capillary pressure test, and a new test for the construction of the residual trapping initial-residual curve. Test conditions were designed to isolate effects of interfacial tension, viscosity ratio, density ratio, and salinity. The results of the tests show that, in the absence of rock heterogeneity, reservoir conditions have little impact on flow properties, consistent with continuum scale multiphase flow theory for water wet systems. The invariance of the properties is observed, including transitions of the CO2 from a gas to a liquid to a supercritical fluid, and in comparison with N2-brine systems. Variations in capillary pressure curves are well explained by corresponding changes in IFT although some variation may reflect small changes in wetting properties. The low viscosity of CO2at certain conditions results in sensitivity to rock heterogeneity. We show that (1) heterogeneity is the likely source of uncertainty around past relative permeability observations and (2) that appropriate scaling of the flow potential by a quantification of capillary heterogeneity allows for the selection of core flood

  7. Mechanical end joint system for connecting structural column elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Mikulas, Martin M., Jr. (Inventor); Wallsom, Richard E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A mechanical end joint system is presented that eliminates the possibility of free movements between the joint halves during loading or vibration. Both node joint body (NJB) and column end joint body (CEJB) have cylindrical engaging ends. Each of these ends has an integral semicircular tongue and groove. The two joint halves are engaged transversely - the tongue of the NJB mating with the groove of the CEJB and vice versa. The joint system employs a spring loaded internal latch mechanism housed in the CEJB. During mating, this mechanism is pushed away from the NJB and enters the NJB when mating is completed. In order to lock the joint and add a preload across the tongue and groove faces, an operating ring collar is rotated through 45 deg causing an internal mechanism to compress a Belleville washer preload mechanism. This causes an equal and opposite force to be exerted on the latch bolt and the latch plunger. This force presses the two joint halves tightly together. In order to prevent inadvertent disassembly, a secondary lock is also engaged when the joint is closed. Plungers are carried in the operating ring collar. When the joint is closed, the plungers fall into tracks on the CEJB, which allows the joint to be opened only when the operating ring collar and plungers are pushed directly away from the joining end. One application of this invention is the rapid assembly and disassembly of diverse skeletal framework structures which is extremely important in many projects involving the exploration of space.

  8. Noble gas and hydrocarbon tracers in multiphase unconventional hydrocarbon systems: Toward integrated advanced reservoir simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, T.; Moortgat, J.; Poreda, R. J.; Muehlenbachs, K.; Whyte, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional energy resources has increased dramatically in the last decade, total unconventional oil and gas recovery from black shales is still less than 25% and 9% of the totals in place, respectively. Further, the majority of increased hydrocarbon production results from increasing the lengths of laterals, the number of hydraulic fracturing stages, and the volume of consumptive water usage. These strategies all reduce the economic efficiency of hydrocarbon extraction. The poor recovery statistics result from an insufficient understanding of some of the key physical processes in complex, organic-rich, low porosity formations (e.g., phase behavior, fluid-rock interactions, and flow mechanisms at nano-scale confinement and the role of natural fractures and faults as conduits for flow). Noble gases and other hydrocarbon tracers are capably of recording subsurface fluid-rock interactions on a variety of geological scales (micro-, meso-, to macro-scale) and provide analogs for the movement of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. As such geochemical data enrich the input for the numerical modeling of multi-phase (e.g., oil, gas, and brine) fluid flow in highly heterogeneous, low permeability formations Herein we will present a combination of noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe abundances and isotope ratios) and molecular and isotopic hydrocarbon data from a geographically and geologically diverse set of unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs in North America. Specifically, we will include data from the Marcellus, Utica, Barnett, Eagle Ford, formations and the Illinois basin. Our presentation will include geochemical and geological interpretation and our perspective on the first steps toward building an advanced reservoir simulator for tracer transport in multicomponent multiphase compositional flow (presented separately, in Moortgat et al., 2015).

  9. Thermal analysis for ion-exchange column system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; King, W. D.

    2012-07-01

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silico-titanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed, inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. (authors)

  10. Quantitative tomographic measurements of opaque multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    GEORGE,DARIN L.; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.; SHOLLENBERGER,KIM ANN; O'HERN,TIMOTHY J.; CECCIO,STEVEN L.

    2000-03-01

    An electrical-impedance tomography (EIT) system has been developed for quantitative measurements of radial phase distribution profiles in two-phase and three-phase vertical column flows. The EIT system is described along with the computer algorithm used for reconstructing phase volume fraction profiles. EIT measurements were validated by comparison with a gamma-densitometry tomography (GDT) system. The EIT system was used to accurately measure average solid volume fractions up to 0.05 in solid-liquid flows, and radial gas volume fraction profiles in gas-liquid flows with gas volume fractions up to 0.15. In both flows, average phase volume fractions and radial volume fraction profiles from GDT and EIT were in good agreement. A minor modification to the formula used to relate conductivity data to phase volume fractions was found to improve agreement between the methods. GDT and EIT were then applied together to simultaneously measure the solid, liquid, and gas radial distributions within several vertical three-phase flows. For average solid volume fractions up to 0.30, the gas distribution for each gas flow rate was approximately independent of the amount of solids in the column. Measurements made with this EIT system demonstrate that EIT may be used successfully for noninvasive, quantitative measurements of dispersed multiphase flows.

  11. AOI 1— COMPUTATIONAL ENERGY SCIENCES:MULTIPHASE FLOW RESEARCH High-fidelity multi-phase radiation module for modern coal combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Modest, Michael

    2013-11-15

    The effects of radiation in particle-laden flows were the object of the present research. The presence of particles increases optical thickness substantially, making the use of the “optically thin” approximation in most cases a very poor assumption. However, since radiation fluxes peak at intermediate optical thicknesses, overall radiative effects may not necessarily be stronger than in gas combustion. Also, the spectral behavior of particle radiation properties is much more benign, making spectral models simpler (and making the assumption of a gray radiator halfway acceptable, at least for fluidized beds when gas radiation is not large). On the other hand, particles scatter radiation, making the radiative transfer equation (RTE) much more di fficult to solve. The research carried out in this project encompassed three general areas: (i) assessment of relevant radiation properties of particle clouds encountered in fluidized bed and pulverized coal combustors, (ii) development of proper spectral models for gas–particulate mixtures for various types of two-phase combustion flows, and (iii) development of a Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) solution module for such applications. The resulting models were validated against artificial cases since open literature experimental data were not available. The final models are in modular form tailored toward maximum portability, and were incorporated into two research codes: (i) the open-source CFD code OpenFOAM, which we have extensively used in our previous work, and (ii) the open-source multi-phase flow code MFIX, which is maintained by NETL.

  12. Phase-Field Methods for Structure Evolution in Sheared Multiphase Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badalassi, Vittorio; Ceniceros, Hector; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2002-01-01

    A homogeneous disordered phase separates into ordered structures when quenched into a broken-symmetry phase. The competition of broken-symmetry phases to select an equilibrium state may be studied in terms of coarse-grained order parameters described by a suitable Landau free-energy function. A network of equilibrium-phase domains develops on quenching and coarsens with time with a topology that may be controlled by shear. We use three-dimensional simulations, in which time-dependent models for conserved-order parameters coupled to Navier-Stokes fluid models are solved, to investigate the evolution of such domains, e.g. spinodal decompositions of polymeric materials under shear. The numerical problems are formidable because of the strong nonlinearities inherent in the coupled model, and these are amongst the first 3D calculations undertaken. In linear shear fields we find stable nanostrings, also recently seen in experiments. The affinity of the ordered phases to boundaries plays a role in the form of the structures that develop, with stacked plate-like phase distributions emerging under certain conditions. Such methods appear quite promising for design and analysis of multiphase and complex fluid formulations. The behavior of foams in such conditions is of particular interest in microgravity environments. Additional information can be found in the original extended abstract.

  13. Analysis of global components in Ganoderma using liquid chromatography system with multiple columns and detectors.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhengming; Zhao, Jing; Li, Deqiang; Hu, Dejun; Li, Shaoping

    2012-10-01

    In present study, a multiple columns and detectors liquid chromatography system for analysis of global components in traditional Chinese medicines was developed. The liquid chromatography system was consist of three columns, including size exclusion chromatography column, hydrophilic interaction chromatography column, and reversed phase chromatography column, and three detectors, such as diode array detector, evaporative light scattering detector, and mass spectrometry detector, based on column switching technique. The developed multiple columns and detectors liquid chromatography system was successfully applied to the analysis of global components, including macromolecular (polysaccharides), high (nucleosides and sugars)-, and low (triterpenes)-polarity small molecular compounds in Ganoderma, a well-known Chinese medicinal mushroom. As a result, one macromolecular chromatographic peak was found in two Ganoderma species, 19 components were identified in Ganoderma lucidum (two sugars, three nucleosides, and 14 triterpenes), and four components (two sugars and two nucleosides) were identified in Ganoderma sinense. The developed multiple columns and detectors liquid chromatography system was helpful to understand comprehensive chemical characters in TCMs.

  14. Innovative Techniques of Multiphase Flow in Pipeline System for Oil-Gas Gathering and Transportation with Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Bofeng; Guo, Liejin; Zhang, Shaojun; Zhang, Ximin; Gu, Hanyang

    2010-03-01

    Multiphase flow measurement, desanding, dehumidification and heat furnace are critical techniques for the oil and gas gathering and transportation, which influnce intensively the energy-saving and emission-reduction in the petroleum industry. Some innovative techniques were developed for the first time by the present research team, including an online recognation instrument of multiphase flow regime, a water fraction instrument for multuphase flow, a coiled tube desanding separator with low pressure loss and high efficiency, a supersonic swirling natural gas dehumifier, and a vacuum phase-change boiler. With an integration of the above techniques, a new oil gas gathering and transpotation system was proposed, which reduced the establishment of one metering station and several transfer stations compared with the tranditional system. The oil and gas mixture transpotation in single pipes was realized. The improved techniques were applied in the oilfields in China and promoted the productivity of the oilfields by low energy consumption, low emissions, high efficiency and great security.

  15. Thermodynamic approach to the stability of multi-phase systems. Application to the Y2O3–Fe system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Samolyuk, German D.; Osetskiy, Yury N.

    2015-07-07

    Oxide-metal systems (OMSs) are important in many practical applications, and therefore, are under extensive studies using a wide range of techniques. The most accurate theoretical approaches are based on density functional theory (DFT), which are limited to ~102 atoms. Multi-scale approaches, e.g., DFT+Monte Carlo, are often used to model OMSs at the atomic level. These approaches can describe qualitatively the kinetics of some processes but not the overall stability of OMSs. In this paper, we propose a thermodynamic approach to study equilibrium in multiphase systems, which can be sequentially enhanced by considering different defects and microstructures. We estimate the thermodynamicmore » equilibrium by minimization the free energy of the whole multiphase system using a limited set of defects and microstructural objects for which the properties are calculated by DFT. As an example, we consider Y2O3+bcc Fe with vacancies in both the Y2O3 and bcc Fe phases, Y substitutions and O interstitials in Fe, Fe impurities and antisite defects in Y2O3. The output of these calculations is the thermal equilibrium concentration of all the defects for a particular temperature and composition. The results obtained confirmed the high temperature stability of yttria in iron. As a result, model development towards more accurate calculations is discussed.« less

  16. Thermodynamic approach to the stability of multi-phase systems. Application to the Y2O3–Fe system

    SciTech Connect

    Samolyuk, German D.; Osetskiy, Yury N.

    2015-07-07

    Oxide-metal systems (OMSs) are important in many practical applications, and therefore, are under extensive studies using a wide range of techniques. The most accurate theoretical approaches are based on density functional theory (DFT), which are limited to ~102 atoms. Multi-scale approaches, e.g., DFT+Monte Carlo, are often used to model OMSs at the atomic level. These approaches can describe qualitatively the kinetics of some processes but not the overall stability of OMSs. In this paper, we propose a thermodynamic approach to study equilibrium in multiphase systems, which can be sequentially enhanced by considering different defects and microstructures. We estimate the thermodynamic equilibrium by minimization the free energy of the whole multiphase system using a limited set of defects and microstructural objects for which the properties are calculated by DFT. As an example, we consider Y2O3+bcc Fe with vacancies in both the Y2O3 and bcc Fe phases, Y substitutions and O interstitials in Fe, Fe impurities and antisite defects in Y2O3. The output of these calculations is the thermal equilibrium concentration of all the defects for a particular temperature and composition. The results obtained confirmed the high temperature stability of yttria in iron. As a result, model development towards more accurate calculations is discussed.

  17. Pore-scale modeling of multiphase reactive transport with phase transitions and dissolution-precipitation processes in closed systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Kang, Qinjun; Robinson, Bruce A; He, Ya-Ling; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2013-04-01

    A pore-scale model based on the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is developed for multiphase reactive transport with phase transitions and dissolution-precipitation processes. The model combines the single-component multiphase Shan-Chen LB model [X. Shan and H. Chen, Phys. Rev. E 47, 1815 (1993)], the mass transport LB model [S. P. Sullivan et al., Chem. Eng. Sci. 60, 3405 (2005)], and the dissolution-precipitation model [Q. Kang et al., J. Geophys. Res. 111, B05203 (2006)]. Care is taken to handle information on computational nodes undergoing solid-liquid or liquid-vapor phase changes to guarantee mass and momentum conservation. A general LB concentration boundary condition is proposed that can handle various concentration boundaries including reactive and moving boundaries with complex geometries. The pore-scale model can capture coupled nonlinear multiple physicochemical processes including multiphase flow with phase separations, mass transport, chemical reactions, dissolution-precipitation processes, and dynamic evolution of the pore geometries. The model is validated using several multiphase flow and reactive transport problems and then used to study the thermal migration of a brine inclusion in a salt crystal. Multiphase reactive transport phenomena with phase transitions between liquid-vapor phases and dissolution-precipitation processes of the salt in the closed inclusion are simulated and the effects of the initial inclusion size and temperature gradient on the thermal migration are investigated.

  18. A Linearized Model for Wave Propagation through Coupled Volcanic Conduit-crack Systems Filled with Multiphase Magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, C.; Dunham, E. M.; OReilly, O. J.; Karlstrom, L.

    2015-12-01

    Both the oscillation of magma in volcanic conduits and resonance of fluid-filled cracks (dikes and sills) are appealing explanations for very long period signals recorded at many active volcanoes. While these processes have been studied in isolation, real volcanic systems involve interconnected networks of conduits and cracks. The overall objective of our work is to develop a model of wave propagation and ultimately eruptive fluid dynamics through this coupled system. Here, we present a linearized model for wave propagation through a conduit with multiple cracks branching off of it. The fluid is compressible and viscous, and is comprised of a mixture of liquid melt and gas bubbles. Nonequilibrium bubble growth and resorption (BGR) is quantified by introducing a time scale for mass exchange between phases, following the treatment in Karlstrom and Dunham (2015). We start by deriving the dispersion relation for crack waves travelling along the multiphase-magma-filled crack embedded in an elastic solid. Dissipation arises from magma viscosity, nonequilibrium BGR, and radiation of seismic waves into the solid. We next introduce coupling conditions between the conduit and crack, expressing conservation of mass and the balance of forces across the junction. Waves in the conduit, like those in the crack, are influenced by nonequilibrium BGR, but the deformability of the surrounding solid is far less important than for cracks. Solution of the coupled system of equations provides the evolution of pressure and fluid velocity within the conduit-crack system. The system has various resonant modes that are sensitive to fluid properties and to the geometry of the conduit and cracks. Numerical modeling of seismic waves in the solid allows us to generate synthetic seismograms.

  19. Reactive transport modeling of stable carbon isotope fractionation in a multi-phase multi-component system during carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuo; DePaolo, Donald J.; Zheng, Liange; Mayer, Bernhard

    2014-12-31

    Carbon stable isotopes can be used in characterization and monitoring of CO2 sequestration sites to track the migration of the CO2 plume and identify leakage sources, and to evaluate the chemical reactions that take place in the CO2-water-rock system. However, there are few tools available to incorporate stable isotope information into flow and transport codes used for CO2 sequestration problems. We present a numerical tool for modeling the transport of stable carbon isotopes in multiphase reactive systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. The code is an extension of the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. The transport module of TOUGHREACT was modified to include separate isotopic species of CO2 gas and dissolved inorganic carbon (CO2, CO32-, HCO3-,…). Any process of transport or reaction influencing a given carbon species also influences its isotopic ratio. Isotopic fractionation is thus fully integrated within the dynamic system. The chemical module and database have been expanded to include isotopic exchange and fractionation between the carbon species in both gas and aqueous phases. The performance of the code is verified by modeling ideal systems and comparing with theoretical results. Efforts are also made to fit field data from the Pembina CO2 injection project in Canada. We show that the exchange of carbon isotopes between dissolved and gaseous carbon species combined with fluid flow and transport, produce isotopic effects that are significantly different from simple two-component mixing. These effects are important for understanding the isotopic variations observed in field demonstrations.

  20. Reactive transport modeling of stable carbon isotope fractionation in a multi-phase multi-component system during carbon sequestration

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Shuo; DePaolo, Donald J.; Zheng, Liange; Mayer, Bernhard

    2014-12-31

    Carbon stable isotopes can be used in characterization and monitoring of CO2 sequestration sites to track the migration of the CO2 plume and identify leakage sources, and to evaluate the chemical reactions that take place in the CO2-water-rock system. However, there are few tools available to incorporate stable isotope information into flow and transport codes used for CO2 sequestration problems. We present a numerical tool for modeling the transport of stable carbon isotopes in multiphase reactive systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. The code is an extension of the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. The transport module of TOUGHREACT was modifiedmore » to include separate isotopic species of CO2 gas and dissolved inorganic carbon (CO2, CO32-, HCO3-,…). Any process of transport or reaction influencing a given carbon species also influences its isotopic ratio. Isotopic fractionation is thus fully integrated within the dynamic system. The chemical module and database have been expanded to include isotopic exchange and fractionation between the carbon species in both gas and aqueous phases. The performance of the code is verified by modeling ideal systems and comparing with theoretical results. Efforts are also made to fit field data from the Pembina CO2 injection project in Canada. We show that the exchange of carbon isotopes between dissolved and gaseous carbon species combined with fluid flow and transport, produce isotopic effects that are significantly different from simple two-component mixing. These effects are important for understanding the isotopic variations observed in field demonstrations.« less

  1. High-resolution simulations of multi-phase flow in magmatic-hydrothermal systems with realistic fluid properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, S.; Driesner, T.; Matthai, S.; Heinrich, C.

    2002-12-01

    Realistic modelling of multi-phase fluid flow, energy and component transport in magmatic-hydrothermal systems is very challenging because hydrological properties of fluids and rocks vary over many orders of magnitude and the geometric complexities of such systems. Furthermore, density dependent component transport and transient permeability variations due to P-T changes and fluid-rock interactions introduce additional difficulties. As a result, the governing equations for the hydrodynamics, energy and component transport, and thermodynamics in magmatic hydrothermal systems are highly non-linear and strongly coupled. Essential requirements of a numerical formulation for such a system are: (1) a treatment of the hydrodynamics that can accurately resolve complex geological structures and represent the highly variable fluid velocities herein, (2) a realistic thermodynamic representation of the fluid properties including the wide P-T-X range of liquid+vapour coexistence for the highly saline fluids, and (3) an accurate handling of the highly contrasting transport properties of the two fluids. We are combining higher order finite-element (FE) methods with total variation diminishing finite volume (TVDFV) methods to model the hydrodynamics and energy and component transport of magmatic hydrothermal systems. Combined FE and TVDFV methods are mass and shock preserving, yield great geometric flexibility in 2D and 3D [2]. Furthermore, efficient matrix solvers can be employed to model fluid flow in geologically realistic structures [5]. The governing equations are linearized by operator-splitting and solved sequentially using a Picard iteration scheme. We chose the system water-NaCl as a realistic proxy for natural fluids occurring in magmatic-hydrothermal systems. An in-depth evaluation of the available experimental and theoretical data led to a consistent and accurate set of formulations for the PVTXH relations that are valid from 0 to 800 C, 0 to 500 MPa, and 0 to 1 XNa

  2. Thermodynamics and Mass Transport in Multicomponent, Multiphase H2O Systems of Planetary Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xinli; Kieffer, Susan W.

    2009-05-01

    Heat and mass transport in low-temperature, low-pressure H2O systems are important processes on Earth, and on a number of planets and moons in the Solar System. In most occurrences, these systems will contain other components, the so-called noncondensible gases, such as CO2, CO, SO2, CH4, and N2. The presence of the noncondensible components can greatly alter the thermodynamic properties of the phases and their flow properties as they move in and on the planets. We review various forms of phase diagrams that give information about pressure-temperature-volume-entropy-enthalpy-composition conditions in these complex systems. Fluid dynamic models must be coupled to the thermodynamics to accurately describe flow in gas-driven liquid and solid systems. The concepts are illustrated in detail by considering flow and flow instabilities such as geysering in modern geothermal systems on Earth, paleofluid systems on Mars, and cryogenic ice-gas systems on Mars and Enceladus. We emphasize that consideration of single-component end-member systems often leads to conclusions that exclude many qualitatively and quantitatively important phenomena.

  3. Development of an electrical impedance tomography system for an air-water vertical bubble column

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hern, T.J.; Torczynski, J.R.; Ceccio, S.L.; Tassin, A.L.; Chahine, G.L.; Duraiswami, R.; Sarkar, K.

    1995-09-01

    Because the components of a multiphase flow often exhibit different electrical properties, a variety of probes have been developed to study such flows by measuring impedance in the region of interest. Researchers are now using electric fields to reconstruct the impedance distribution within a measurement volume via Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). EIT systems employ voltage and current measurements on the boundary of a domain to create a representation of the impedance distribution within the domain. The development of the Sandia EIT system (S-EIT) is reviewed The construction of the projection acquisition system is discussed and two specific EIT inversion algorithms are detailed. The first reconstruction algorithm employs boundary element methods, and the second utilizes finite elements. The benefits and limitations of EIT systems are also discussed. Preliminary results are provided.

  4. Integrated null-flux suspension and multiphase propulsion system for magnetically-levitated vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Rote, D.M.; He, J.; Johnson, L.R.

    1994-01-04

    A propulsion and stabilization system are described comprising a series of coils mounted vertically on the walls of the guideway to provide suspension, lateral guidance, and propulsion of a magnetically levitated vehicle. This system further allows for altering the magnetic field effects by changing the relative position of the loops comprising the coils either longitudinally and/or vertically with resulting changes in the propulsion, the vertical stability, and the suspension. 8 figures.

  5. Integrated null-flux suspension and multiphase propulsion system for magnetically-levitated vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Rote, Donald M.; He, Jianliang; Johnson, Larry R.

    1994-01-01

    A propulsion and stabilization system comprising a series of FIG. 8 coils mounted vertically on the walls of the guideway to provide suspension, lateral guidance and propulsion of a magnetically levitated vehicle. This system further allows for altering the magnetic field effects by changing the relative position of the loops comprising the FIG. 8 coils either longitudinally and/or vertically with resulting changes in the propulsion, the vertical stability, and the suspension.

  6. Integrated null-flux suspension and multiphase propulsion system for magnetically-levitated vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Rote, D.M.; He, Jianliang; Johnson, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses a propulsion and stabilization system comprising a series of figure 8 coils mounted vertically on the walls of the guideway to provide suspension, lateral guidance and propulsion of a magnetically levitated vehicle. This system further allows for altering the magnetic field effects by changing the relative position of the loops comprising the figure 8 coils either longitudinally and/or vertically with resulting changes in the propulsion, the vertical stability, and the suspension.

  7. Supervising and Controlling Unmanned Systems: A Multi-Phase Study with Subject Matter Experts.

    PubMed

    Porat, Talya; Oron-Gilad, Tal; Rottem-Hovev, Michal; Silbiger, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation in the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) in civil and military operations has presented a multitude of human factors challenges; from how to bridge the gap between demand and availability of trained operators, to how to organize and present data in meaningful ways. Utilizing the Design Research Methodology (DRM), a series of closely related studies with subject matter experts (SMEs) demonstrate how the focus of research gradually shifted from "how many systems can a single operator control" to "how to distribute missions among operators and systems in an efficient way". The first set of studies aimed to explore the modal number, i.e., how many systems can a single operator supervise and control. It was found that an experienced operator can supervise up to 15 UASs efficiently using moderate levels of automation, and control (mission and payload management) up to three systems. Once this limit was reached, a single operator's performance was compared to a team controlling the same number of systems. In general, teams led to better performances. Hence, shifting design efforts toward developing tools that support teamwork environments of multiple operators with multiple UASs (MOMU). In MOMU settings, when the tasks are similar or when areas of interest overlap, one operator seems to have an advantage over a team who needs to collaborate and coordinate. However, in all other cases, a team was advantageous over a single operator. Other findings and implications, as well as future directions for research are discussed.

  8. Supervising and Controlling Unmanned Systems: A Multi-Phase Study with Subject Matter Experts.

    PubMed

    Porat, Talya; Oron-Gilad, Tal; Rottem-Hovev, Michal; Silbiger, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation in the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) in civil and military operations has presented a multitude of human factors challenges; from how to bridge the gap between demand and availability of trained operators, to how to organize and present data in meaningful ways. Utilizing the Design Research Methodology (DRM), a series of closely related studies with subject matter experts (SMEs) demonstrate how the focus of research gradually shifted from "how many systems can a single operator control" to "how to distribute missions among operators and systems in an efficient way". The first set of studies aimed to explore the modal number, i.e., how many systems can a single operator supervise and control. It was found that an experienced operator can supervise up to 15 UASs efficiently using moderate levels of automation, and control (mission and payload management) up to three systems. Once this limit was reached, a single operator's performance was compared to a team controlling the same number of systems. In general, teams led to better performances. Hence, shifting design efforts toward developing tools that support teamwork environments of multiple operators with multiple UASs (MOMU). In MOMU settings, when the tasks are similar or when areas of interest overlap, one operator seems to have an advantage over a team who needs to collaborate and coordinate. However, in all other cases, a team was advantageous over a single operator. Other findings and implications, as well as future directions for research are discussed. PMID:27252662

  9. Supervising and Controlling Unmanned Systems: A Multi-Phase Study with Subject Matter Experts

    PubMed Central

    Porat, Talya; Oron-Gilad, Tal; Rottem-Hovev, Michal; Silbiger, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation in the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) in civil and military operations has presented a multitude of human factors challenges; from how to bridge the gap between demand and availability of trained operators, to how to organize and present data in meaningful ways. Utilizing the Design Research Methodology (DRM), a series of closely related studies with subject matter experts (SMEs) demonstrate how the focus of research gradually shifted from “how many systems can a single operator control” to “how to distribute missions among operators and systems in an efficient way”. The first set of studies aimed to explore the modal number, i.e., how many systems can a single operator supervise and control. It was found that an experienced operator can supervise up to 15 UASs efficiently using moderate levels of automation, and control (mission and payload management) up to three systems. Once this limit was reached, a single operator's performance was compared to a team controlling the same number of systems. In general, teams led to better performances. Hence, shifting design efforts toward developing tools that support teamwork environments of multiple operators with multiple UASs (MOMU). In MOMU settings, when the tasks are similar or when areas of interest overlap, one operator seems to have an advantage over a team who needs to collaborate and coordinate. However, in all other cases, a team was advantageous over a single operator. Other findings and implications, as well as future directions for research are discussed. PMID:27252662

  10. Effect of concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficient on homogenization kinetics in multiphase binary alloy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.; Unnam, J.

    1978-01-01

    Diffusion calculations were performed to establish the conditions under which concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficient was important in single, two, and three phase binary alloy systems. Finite-difference solutions were obtained for each type of system using diffusion coefficient variations typical of those observed in real alloy systems. Solutions were also obtained using average diffusion coefficients determined by taking a logarithmic average of each diffusion coefficient variation considered. The constant diffusion coefficient solutions were used as reference in assessing diffusion coefficient variation effects. Calculations were performed for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries in order to compare the effect of diffusion coefficient variations with the effect of interface geometries. In most of the cases considered, the diffusion coefficient of the major-alloy phase was the key parameter that controlled the kinetics of interdiffusion.

  11. Laboratory column studies for evaluating a barrier system for providing oxygen and substrate for TCE biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Kao, C M; Chen, S C; Su, M C

    2001-08-01

    The industrial solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is among the most ubiquitous chlorinated compounds found in groundwater contamination. The objective of this study was to develop a biobarrier system containing oxygen-organic releasing material to enhance the aerobic cometabolism of TCE in situ. The oxygen-organic material, which contains calcium peroxide and peat, is able to release oxygen and primary substrates continuously upon contact with water. Batch experiments were conducted to design and identify the components of the oxygen-organic releasing material, and evaluate the oxygen and organic substrate (presented as COD equivalent) release from the designed oxygen-organic material. The observed oxygen and chemical oxygen demand (COD) release rates were approximately 0.0246 and 0.052 mg/d/g of material, respectively. A laboratory-scale column experiment was then conducted to evaluate the feasibility of this proposed system for the bioremediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater. This system was performed using a series of continuous-flow glass columns including a soil column, an oxygen-organic material column, followed by two consecutive soil columns. Aerobic acclimated sludges were inoculated in all three soil columns to provide microbial consortia for TCE biodegradation. Simulated TCE-contaminated groundwater with a flow rate of 0.25 l/day was pumped into this system. Effluent samples from each column were analyzed for TCE and other indicating parameters (e.g., pH, dissolved oxygen). Results show that the decreases in TCE concentrations were observed over a 4-month operating period. Up to 99% of TCE removal efficiency was obtained in this passive system. Results indicate that the continuously released oxygen and organic substrates from the oxygen-organic materials enhanced TCE biotransformation. Thus, the biobarrier treatment scheme has the potential to be developed into an environmentally and economically acceptable remediation technology.

  12. Laboratory column studies for evaluating a barrier system for providing oxygen and substrate for TCE biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Kao, C M; Chen, S C; Su, M C

    2001-08-01

    The industrial solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is among the most ubiquitous chlorinated compounds found in groundwater contamination. The objective of this study was to develop a biobarrier system containing oxygen-organic releasing material to enhance the aerobic cometabolism of TCE in situ. The oxygen-organic material, which contains calcium peroxide and peat, is able to release oxygen and primary substrates continuously upon contact with water. Batch experiments were conducted to design and identify the components of the oxygen-organic releasing material, and evaluate the oxygen and organic substrate (presented as COD equivalent) release from the designed oxygen-organic material. The observed oxygen and chemical oxygen demand (COD) release rates were approximately 0.0246 and 0.052 mg/d/g of material, respectively. A laboratory-scale column experiment was then conducted to evaluate the feasibility of this proposed system for the bioremediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater. This system was performed using a series of continuous-flow glass columns including a soil column, an oxygen-organic material column, followed by two consecutive soil columns. Aerobic acclimated sludges were inoculated in all three soil columns to provide microbial consortia for TCE biodegradation. Simulated TCE-contaminated groundwater with a flow rate of 0.25 l/day was pumped into this system. Effluent samples from each column were analyzed for TCE and other indicating parameters (e.g., pH, dissolved oxygen). Results show that the decreases in TCE concentrations were observed over a 4-month operating period. Up to 99% of TCE removal efficiency was obtained in this passive system. Results indicate that the continuously released oxygen and organic substrates from the oxygen-organic materials enhanced TCE biotransformation. Thus, the biobarrier treatment scheme has the potential to be developed into an environmentally and economically acceptable remediation technology. PMID:11513425

  13. Computational Modeling of Multiphase Reactors.

    PubMed

    Joshi, J B; Nandakumar, K

    2015-01-01

    Multiphase reactors are very common in chemical industry, and numerous review articles exist that are focused on types of reactors, such as bubble columns, trickle beds, fluid catalytic beds, etc. Currently, there is a high degree of empiricism in the design process of such reactors owing to the complexity of coupled flow and reaction mechanisms. Hence, we focus on synthesizing recent advances in computational and experimental techniques that will enable future designs of such reactors in a more rational manner by exploring a large design space with high-fidelity models (computational fluid dynamics and computational chemistry models) that are validated with high-fidelity measurements (tomography and other detailed spatial measurements) to provide a high degree of rigor. Understanding the spatial distributions of dispersed phases and their interaction during scale up are key challenges that were traditionally addressed through pilot scale experiments, but now can be addressed through advanced modeling.

  14. Computational Modeling of Multiphase Reactors.

    PubMed

    Joshi, J B; Nandakumar, K

    2015-01-01

    Multiphase reactors are very common in chemical industry, and numerous review articles exist that are focused on types of reactors, such as bubble columns, trickle beds, fluid catalytic beds, etc. Currently, there is a high degree of empiricism in the design process of such reactors owing to the complexity of coupled flow and reaction mechanisms. Hence, we focus on synthesizing recent advances in computational and experimental techniques that will enable future designs of such reactors in a more rational manner by exploring a large design space with high-fidelity models (computational fluid dynamics and computational chemistry models) that are validated with high-fidelity measurements (tomography and other detailed spatial measurements) to provide a high degree of rigor. Understanding the spatial distributions of dispersed phases and their interaction during scale up are key challenges that were traditionally addressed through pilot scale experiments, but now can be addressed through advanced modeling. PMID:26134737

  15. Surface control system for the 15 meter hoop-column antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James B.; Ahl, Elvin L., Jr.; Butler, David H.; Peri, Frank, Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The 15-meter hoop-column antenna fabricated by the Harris Corporation under contract to the NASA Langley Research Center is described. The antenna is a deployable and restowable structure consisting of a central telescoping column, a 15-meter-diameter folding hoop, and a mesh reflector surface. The hoop is supported and positioned by 48 quartz cords attached to the column above the hoop, and by 24 graphite cords from the base of the antenna column. The RF reflective surface is a gold plated molybdenum wire mesh supported on a graphite cord truss structure which is attached between the hoop and the column. The surface contour is controlled by 96 graphite cords from the antenna base to the rear of the truss assembly. The antenna is actually a quadaperture reflector with each quadrant of the surface mesh shaped to produce an offset parabolic reflector. Results of near-field and structural tests are given. Controls structures and electromagnetics interaction, surface control system requirements, mesh control adjustment, surface control system actuator assembly, surface control system electronics, the system interface unit, and control stations are discussed.

  16. Experience measuring performance improvement in multiphase picture archiving and communications systems implementations.

    PubMed

    Reed, G; Reed, D H

    1999-05-01

    When planning a picture archiving and communications system (PACS) implementation and determining which equipment will be implemented in earlier and later phases, collection and analysis of selected data will aid in setting implementation priorities. If baseline data are acquired relative to performance objectives, the same information used for implementation planning can be used to measure performance improvement and outcomes. The main categories of data to choose from are: (1) financial data; (2) productivity data; (3) operational parameters; (4) clinical data; and (5) information about customer satisfaction. In the authors' experience, detailed workflow data have not proved valuable in measuring PACS performance and outcomes. Reviewing only one category of data in planning will not provide adequate basis for targeting operational improvements that will lead to the most significant gains. Quality improvement takes into account all factors in production: human capacity, materials, operating capital and assets. Once we have identified key areas of focus for quality improvement in each phase, we can translate objectives into implementation requirements and finally into detailed functional and performance requirements. Here, Integration Resources reports its experience measuring PACS performance relative to phased implementation strategies for three large medical centers. Each medical center had its own objectives for overcoming image management, physical/geographical, and functional/technical barriers. The report outlines (1) principal financial and nonfinancial measures used as performance indicators; (2) implementation strategies chosen by each of the three medical centers; and (3) the results of those strategies as compared with baseline data. PMID:10342194

  17. Experience measuring performance improvement in multiphase picture archiving and communications systems implementations.

    PubMed

    Reed, G; Reed, D H

    1999-05-01

    When planning a picture archiving and communications system (PACS) implementation and determining which equipment will be implemented in earlier and later phases, collection and analysis of selected data will aid in setting implementation priorities. If baseline data are acquired relative to performance objectives, the same information used for implementation planning can be used to measure performance improvement and outcomes. The main categories of data to choose from are: (1) financial data; (2) productivity data; (3) operational parameters; (4) clinical data; and (5) information about customer satisfaction. In the authors' experience, detailed workflow data have not proved valuable in measuring PACS performance and outcomes. Reviewing only one category of data in planning will not provide adequate basis for targeting operational improvements that will lead to the most significant gains. Quality improvement takes into account all factors in production: human capacity, materials, operating capital and assets. Once we have identified key areas of focus for quality improvement in each phase, we can translate objectives into implementation requirements and finally into detailed functional and performance requirements. Here, Integration Resources reports its experience measuring PACS performance relative to phased implementation strategies for three large medical centers. Each medical center had its own objectives for overcoming image management, physical/geographical, and functional/technical barriers. The report outlines (1) principal financial and nonfinancial measures used as performance indicators; (2) implementation strategies chosen by each of the three medical centers; and (3) the results of those strategies as compared with baseline data.

  18. Advanced tomographic flow diagnostics for opaque multiphase fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Torczynski, J.R.; O`Hern, T.J.; Adkins, D.R.; Jackson, N.B.; Shollenberger, K.A.

    1997-05-01

    This report documents the work performed for the ``Advanced Tomographic Flow Diagnostics for Opaque Multiphase Fluids`` LDRD (Laboratory-Directed Research and Development) project and is presented as the fulfillment of the LDRD reporting requirement. Dispersed multiphase flows, particularly gas-liquid flows, are industrially important to the chemical and applied-energy industries, where bubble-column reactors are employed for chemical synthesis and waste treatment. Due to the large range of length scales (10{sup {minus}6}-10{sup 1}m) inherent in real systems, direct numerical simulation is not possible at present, so computational simulations are forced to use models of subgrid-scale processes, the accuracy of which strongly impacts simulation fidelity. The development and validation of such subgrid-scale models requires data sets at representative conditions. The ideal measurement techniques would provide spatially and temporally resolved full-field measurements of the distributions of all phases, their velocity fields, and additional associated quantities such as pressure and temperature. No technique or set of techniques is known that satisfies this requirement. In this study, efforts are focused on characterizing the spatial distribution of the phases in two-phase gas-liquid flow and in three-phase gas-liquid-solid flow. Due to its industrial importance, the bubble-column geometry is selected for diagnostics development and assessment. Two bubble-column testbeds are utilized: one at laboratory scale and one close to industrial scale. Several techniques for measuring the phase distributions at conditions of industrial interest are examined: level-rise measurements, differential-pressure measurements, bulk electrical impedance measurements, electrical bubble probes, x-ray tomography, gamma-densitometry tomography, and electrical impedance tomography.

  19. Water table fluctuations and soil biogeochemistry: An experimental approach using an automated soil column system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanezhad, F.; Couture, R.-M.; Kovac, R.; O'Connell, D.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2014-02-01

    Water table fluctuations significantly affect the biological and geochemical functioning of soils. Here, we introduce an automated soil column system in which the water table regime is imposed using a computer-controlled, multi-channel pump connected to a hydrostatic equilibrium reservoir and a water storage reservoir. The potential of this new system is illustrated by comparing results from two columns filled with 45 cm of the same homogenized riparian soil. In one soil column the water table remained constant at -20 cm below the soil surface, while in the other the water table oscillated between the soil surface and the bottom of the column, at a rate of 4.8 cm d-1. The experiment ran for 75 days at room temperature (25 ± 2 °C). Micro-sensors installed at -10 and -30 cm below the soil surface in the stable water table column recorded constant redox potentials on the order of 600 and -200 mV, respectively. In the fluctuating water table column, redox potentials at the same depths oscillated between oxidizing (∼700 mV) and reducing (∼-100 mV) conditions. Pore waters collected periodically and solid-phase analyses on core material obtained at the end of the experiment highlighted striking geochemical differences between the two columns, especially in the time series and depth distributions of Fe, Mn, K, P and S. Soil CO2 emissions derived from headspace gas analysis exhibited periodic variations in the fluctuating water table column, with peak values during water table drawdown. Transient redox conditions caused by the water table fluctuations enhanced microbial oxidation of soil organic matter, resulting in a pronounced depletion of particulate organic carbon in the midsection of the fluctuating water table column. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed the onset of differentiation of the bacterial communities in the upper (oxidizing) and lower (reducing) soil sections, although no systematic differences in microbial community structure

  20. Mechanical end joint system for structural column elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, H. G.; Wallsom, R. E. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical end joint system, useful for the transverse connection of strut elements to a common node, comprises a node joint half with a semicircular tongue and groove, and a strut joint half with a semicircular tongue and groove. The two joint halves are engaged transversely and the connection is made secure by the inherent physical property characteristics of locking latches and/or by a spring-actioned shaft. A quick release mechanism provides rapid disengagement of the joint halves.

  1. EDITORIAL: Measurement techniques for multiphase flows Measurement techniques for multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Koji; Murai, Yuichi

    2009-11-01

    Research on multiphase flows is very important for industrial applications, including power stations, vehicles, engines, food processing and so on. Multiphase flows originally have nonlinear features because of multiphase systems. The interaction between the phases plays a very interesting role in the flows. The nonlinear interaction causes the multiphase flows to be very complicated. Therefore techniques for measuring multiphase flows are very useful in helping to understand the nonlinear phenomena. The state-of-the-art measurement techniques were presented and discussed at the sixth International Symposium on Measurement Techniques for Multiphase Flows (ISMTMF2008) held in Okinawa, Japan, on 15-17 December 2008. This special feature of Measurement Science and Technology includes selected papers from ISMTMF2008. Okinawa has a long history as the Ryukyus Kingdom. China, Japan and many western Pacific countries have had cultural and economic exchanges through Okinawa for over 1000 years. Much technical and scientific information was exchanged at the symposium in Okinawa. The proceedings of ISMTMF2008 apart from these special featured papers were published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series vol. 147 (2009). We would like to express special thanks to all the contributors to the symposium and this special feature. This special feature will be a milestone in measurement techniques for multiphase flows.

  2. Diachronous Growth of Normal Fault Systems in Multiphase Rift Basins: Structural Evolution of the East Shetland Basin, Northern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claringbould, Johan S.; Bell, Rebecca E.; A-L. Jackson, Christopher; Gawthorpe, Robert L.; Odinsen, Tore

    2015-04-01

    Our ability to determine the structural evolution and interaction of fault systems (kinematically linked group of faults that are in the km to 10s of km scale) within a rift basin is typically limited by the spatial extent and temporal resolution of the available data and methods used. Physical and numerical models provide predictions on how fault systems nucleate, grow and interact, but these models need to be tested with natural examples. Although field studies and individual 3D seismic surveys can provide a detailed structural evolution of individual fault systems, they are often spatially limited and cannot be used examine the interaction of fault systems throughout the entire basin. In contrast, regional subsurface studies, commonly conducted on widely spaced 2D seismic surveys, are able to capture the general structural evolution of a rift basin, but lack the spatial and temporal detail. Moreover, these studies typically describe the structural evolution of rifts as comprising multiple discrete tectonic stages (i.e. pre-, syn- and post-rift). This simplified approach does not, however, consider that the timing of activity can be strongly diachronous along and between faults that form part of a kinematically linked system within a rift basin. This study focuses on the East Shetland Basin (ESB), a multiphase rift basin located on the western margin of the North Viking Graben, northern North Sea. Most previous studies suggest the basin evolved in response to two discrete phases of extension in the Permian-Triassic and Middle-Late Jurassic, with the overall geometry of the latter rift to be the result of selective reactivation of faults associated with the former rift. Gradually eastwards thickening intra-rift strata (deposited between two rift phases) that form wedges between and within fault blocks have led to two strongly contrasting tectonic interpretations: (i) Early-Middle Jurassic differential thermal subsidence after Permian-Triassic rifting; or (ii

  3. Comparison of an automated nucleic acid extraction system with the column-based procedure

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Rebecca; Hagen, Ralf Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Here, we assessed the extraction efficiency of a deployable bench-top nucleic acid extractor EZ1 in comparison to the column-based approach with complex sample matrices. A total of 48 EDTA blood samples and 81 stool samples were extracted by EZ1 automated extraction and the column-based QIAamp DNA Mini Kit. Blood sample extractions were assessed by two real-time malaria PCRs, while stool samples were analyzed by six multiplex real-time PCR assays targeting bacterial, viral, and parasitic stool pathogens. Inhibition control PCR testing was performed as well. In total, 147 concordant and 13 discordant pathogen-specific PCR results were obtained. The latter comprised 11 positive results after column-based extraction only and two positive results after EZ1 extraction only. EZ1 extraction showed a higher frequency of inhibition. This phenomenon was, however, inconsistent for the different PCR schemes. In case of concordant PCR results, relevant differences of cycle threshold numbers for the compared extraction schemes were not observed. Switches from well-established column-based extraction to extraction with the automated EZ1 system do not lead to a relevantly reduced yield of target DNA when complex sample matrices are used. If sample inhibition is observed, column-based extraction from another sample aliquot may be considered. PMID:25883797

  4. Design and Prototype of an Automated Column-Switching HPLC System for Radiometabolite Analysis.

    PubMed

    Vasdev, Neil; Collier, Thomas Lee

    2016-01-01

    Column-switching high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is extensively used for the critical analysis of radiolabeled ligands and their metabolites in plasma. However, the lack of streamlined apparatus and consequently varying protocols remain as a challenge among positron emission tomography laboratories. We report here the prototype apparatus and implementation of a fully automated and simplified column-switching procedure to allow for the easy and automated determination of radioligands and their metabolites in up to 5 mL of plasma. The system has been used with conventional UV and coincidence radiation detectors, as well as with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. PMID:27548189

  5. Design and Prototype of an Automated Column-Switching HPLC System for Radiometabolite Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vasdev, Neil; Collier, Thomas Lee

    2016-01-01

    Column-switching high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is extensively used for the critical analysis of radiolabeled ligands and their metabolites in plasma. However, the lack of streamlined apparatus and consequently varying protocols remain as a challenge among positron emission tomography laboratories. We report here the prototype apparatus and implementation of a fully automated and simplified column-switching procedure to allow for the easy and automated determination of radioligands and their metabolites in up to 5 mL of plasma. The system has been used with conventional UV and coincidence radiation detectors, as well as with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. PMID:27548189

  6. On-line subsea multiphase flow measurement

    SciTech Connect

    High, G.; Frantzen, K.H.; Marshall, M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the final detailed design, engineering, and installation phase of a Joint Industry Program to qualify a robust subsea multiphase flowmeter module for long-term installation on a North Sea manifold tie-in. Multiphase subsea production has become a common method of hydrocarbon recovery in all areas of offshore E and P. In the North Sea, many developments are subsea satellites with multiphase well-fluids being comingled prior to processing. The system described meets this challenge by offering a cost effective solution to real-time well monitoring as an alternative to the conventional test separator, removing the need for test lines and shutting in wells for testing. The multiphase instrument allows on-line well fluid analysis, and is also an important tool for reservoir management and field analysis, and provides a means of implementing field allocation metering thereby simplifying small marginal field developments. This project is one of the first subsea multiphase flowmeter installations engineered for long-term subsea service, and designed as an integrated component of the subsea production control system.

  7. Effects of enhanced denitrification on hydrodynamics and microbial community structure in a soil column system.

    PubMed

    Calderer, M; Martí, V; de Pablo, J; Guivernau, M; Prenafeta-Boldú, F X; Viñas, M

    2014-09-01

    Enhanced heterotrophic denitrification by adding glucose was investigated by means of a soil column experiment which simulated the groundwater flow. The carbon-to-nitrogen ratio was the main factor determining denitrification potential under experimental conditions. The influence of stimulated denitrification on the autochthonous microbial community was investigated by quantitative PCR (qPCR), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The qPCR detection of the nosZ genes encoding nitrous oxide reductase, and the comparison of the abundances of 16S rRNA genes revealed that the addition of glucose enhanced denitrification leading to an increase in both the total eubacteria and, in particular, in the ratio of denitrifying bacteria, which represented the 21% of the total native eubacteria on the basis of nosZ/16S rRNA gene ratio. Microbial community profiling by DGGE indicated that ribotypes closely related to the genera Acidovorax and Hydrogenophaga (Comamonadaceae family) became enriched in the soil column. The effects of biomass occurrence in the column system on soil hydrodynamics, assessed by tracer studies, revealed a reduction of porosity and a significant increase of dispersivity that could be caused by the appearance of new functional microbial biomass in the aquifer material under enhanced denitrifying conditions. The importance of investigating the microbial growth in relation to the hydrodynamic effects, during enhanced denitrification, has been revealed in the column system experiments associated with the bioremediation. Combining microbial characterisation and hydrodynamic data in a soil column system permits us to gain an insight to the limiting factors of different stimulation strategies that can be applied in the field.

  8. Biodegradation of high concentrations of tetrachloroethene in a continuous flow column system

    SciTech Connect

    Isalou, M; Sleep, B.E.; Liss, S.N.

    1998-11-15

    A long-term (2.5 years) study of the anaerobic biodegradation of high concentrations of perchloroethylene (PCE) was carried out in a continuously operated laboratory column filled with sand which was inoculated with biomass from an anaerobic digester. Concentrations of PCE fed to the column were increased from 12 {micro}M to over 600 {micro}M over 21 months, with methanol added as electron donor. Vinyl chloride (VC) was the terminal product of PCE dechlorination for the first 21 months at which point significant conversion of VC to ethylene (ETH) was detected. The onset of ETH production coincided with acetogenesis becoming the primary pathway for methanol metabolism. ETH production occurred in the column in the presence of PCE and TCE. Varying methanol:PCE molar ratios from 1.4 to 7.5 had little effect on the transformation of PCE and TCE to VC. The degradation of VC to ETH was much more sensitive, and VC accumulated when the methanol:PCE molar ratio dropped below 5.0. Withdrawal of PCE from the system for a 5 month period and maintenance of the column on methanol alone did not result in the loss of PCE degradation capability of the consortium.

  9. High throughput Sr isotope analysis using an automated column chemistry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, G. N.; Fernandez, D.

    2011-12-01

    A new method has been developed for rapidly measuring 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios using an autosampler that automates column chemistry for Sr purification. The autosampler, a SC2 DX with FAST2 valve block, produced by Elemental Scientific, Inc., utilizes a pair of six-way valves, a vacuum, and a peristaltic pump to load a sample from an autosampler tube onto the Eichrom Sr Resin in the separation column. The autosampler then elutes the sample from the column directly into the spray chamber of the mass spectrometer. Measurements are made on a Thermo-Finnigan Neptune ICP-MS. Sample-blank pairs require approximately 30 minutes for analysis. Normal throughput for the system is 24 samples and 11 standards per day. Adjustment of the pump speed allows for rapid loading of the column followed by a 3-minute data acquisition period with no fractionation of the Sr being eluted from the column. All data are blank-, interference-, and normalization-corrected online using 86Sr/88Sr = 0.1194. Analytical precision on a typical 66 ng/g analysis is ±0.00003 (2σ SE). Reproducibility of the SRM987 Sr standard (66 ng/g) over the course of a typical sequence is ±0.00004 (2σ SD, n=11). For comparison, offline column separation of the SRM987 Sr standard (66 ng/g) was conducted and measured using the same instrument method, yielding a reproducibility of ±0.00004 (2σ SD, n=7). The long-term average of the SRM987 standard (10-200 ng/g) utilizing the online column chemistry method is 0.71027 ± 0.00010 (2σ SD, n=239). A small memory effect has been measured by alternating spiked samples (87Sr/86Sr = 0.67465) with the SRM987 standard. The bias measured in this test (87Sr/86Sr +0.00006) slightly exceeds the 2σ standard reproducibility for a typical run with sample and standard concentrations near 66 ng/g, but is within the 2σ long-term reproducibility of the method. The optimal concentration range for the offline column chemistry system is 50-250 ng/g Sr. Sample concentrations above 250

  10. Simple automated liquid chromatographic system for splitless nano column gradient separations.

    PubMed

    Sesták, Jozef; Duša, Filip; Moravcová, Dana; Kahle, Vladislav

    2013-02-01

    A simple splitless gradient liquid chromatographic system for micro and nano column separations has been assembled and tested. It consists of an OEM programmable syringe pump equipped with a glass microsyringe and ten-port selector valve. Gradient of mobile phase was created in the syringe barrel due to turbulent mixing. Capability of suggested system to create various gradient profiles was verified using 50-μl, 100-μl, and 250-μl glass syringes. Acetone, thiourea, and uracil were tested as gradient markers and finally, uracil was proved to be an excellent way of water-acetonitrile gradient tracing. It was found that up to 80% of the total syringe volume is available as a linear gradient section. In context to micro and nano column chromatography, the best results were obtained using the 100-μl syringe. Separations were performed on the capillary monolithic column Chromolith CapRod RP-18e (150mm×0.1mm) and system performance was evaluated using a test mixture of six alkylphenones as well as tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin. Results proved that suggested system is able to create uniform gradients with high repeatability of retention times of test solutes (RSD<0.3%). Repeatability of injection of sample volumes in the range of 0.1-3μl was evaluated using on-column preconcentration technique which means that sample was diluted in mobile phase of low eluting strength. Repeatability of the peak areas was measured and statistically evaluated (RSD<5%).

  11. The setup of an extraction system coupled to a hydrogen isotopes distillation column

    SciTech Connect

    Zamfirache, M.; Bornea, A.; Stefanescu, I.; Bidica, N.; Balteanu, O.; Bucur, C.

    2008-07-15

    Among the most difficult problems of cryogenic distillation one stands apart: the extraction of the heavy fraction. By an optimal design of the cycle scheme, this problem could be avoided. A 'worst case scenario' is usually occurring when the extracted fraction consists of one prevalent isotope such as hydrogen and small amounts of the other two hydrogen isotopes (deuterium and/or tritium). This situation is further complicated by two parameters of the distillation column: the extraction flow rate and the hold-up. The present work proposes the conceptual design of an extraction system associated to the cryogenic distillation column used in hydrogen separation processes. During this process, the heavy fraction (DT, T{sub 2}) is separated, its concentration being the highest at the bottom of the distillation column. From this place the extraction of the gaseous phase can now begin. Being filled with adsorbent, the extraction system is used to temporarily store the heavy fraction. Also the extraction system provides samples for the gas Chromatograph. The research work is focused on the existent pilot plant for tritium and deuterium separation from our institute to validate the experiments carried out until now. (authors)

  12. Ocean thermal energy conversion gas-desorption studies. Volume 2: Deaeration in a packed column and a barometric intake system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golshani, A.; Chen, F. C.

    1981-09-01

    After a review of previous relevant studies, the design of a gas desorption test loop and a barometric intake system are described. The results of vacuum deaeration in a packed column and a barometric intake system are presented, and the savings that can be achieved when the packed column and barometric intake system are combined are discussed. Vacuum deaeration laboratory experiments using three different kinds of packings in a packed column test section and a series of barometric intake deaeration experiments are reported. A conceptual OTEC deaeration subsystem design, based on these results, and its implications on an OTEC-open cycle power system are presented.

  13. Ocean thermal energy conversion gas-desorption studies. Volume 2. Deaeration in a packed column and a barometric intake system

    SciTech Connect

    Golshani, A.; Chen, F.C.

    1981-09-01

    After a review of previous relevant studies, the design of a gas desorption test loop and a barometric intake system are described. The results of vacuum deaeration in a packed column and a barometric intake system are presented, and the savings that can be achieved when the packed column and barometric intake system are combined are discussed. Vacuum deaeration laboratory experiments using three different kinds of packings in a packed column test section and a series of barometric intake deaeration experiments are reported. A conceptual OTEC deaeration subsystem design, based on these results, and its implications on an OTEC-open cycle power system are presented. (LEW)

  14. Multiphase-flowmeter experience

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Multiphase-flowmeters (MPFM`s) are finding increasing acceptance offshore, where operators are becoming more comfortable with the technology after several years of familiarization. Meters are being used in well testing, well management, and allocation of production. Since the first deliveries of the Framo engineering A/S meter in 1993, significant experience has been gained in both topside and subsea applications of the devices. The paper describes purposes, technology, Framo`s meter, applications, performance verification, and operational problems.

  15. GE Healthcare launches multiphase advertising effort.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    GE Healthcare has launched a multi-phase marketing campaign aimed at promoting the technological breakthroughs and state-of-the-art equipment that it provides hospitals and health systems to ensure that patients are given the best care possible. The campaign boasts four new commercials and an interactive Web site designed to illustrate healthy living on a global scale.

  16. A novel automated fluctuating water table column system to study redox oscillations in saturated and unsaturated media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanezhad, F.; Couture, R.-M.; Kovac, R.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2012-04-01

    An automated, computer-controlled soil column experimental setup was developed to simulate in detail the effects of water table dynamics on the biogeochemical transformations of nutrients and other redox-sensitive chemical species at the interface between groundwater and surface waters. The experiments were conducted using two parallel soil columns, one under stable and the other under fluctuating water table conditions. The water table in the soil columns was controlled by an automated multi-channel pump connected to two equilibrium and storage columns. In the stable column, the water table was maintained at -20 cm below the soil surface while it fluctuated between the soil surface and -45 cm in the fluctuating column at a rate of 4.8 cm/d. Redox potential (Eh), pH profiles were measured continuously using high temporal resolution microsensors (10 μm glass tip) installed into the columns at different depths. The results show striking geochemical contrasts between the fluctuating and the stable columns, demonstrating that the setup is able to impose redox potential oscillations ranging from oxidizing (~+700 mv) to reducing (~-200 mv) conditions. CO2 fluxes were monitored in the headspace above the soil surface using a LICOR LI-8100 automated soil CO2 flux system. The mean CO2 emission in the stable water table column was ~20 ppm/min. In the fluctuating soil column, the CO2 flux varied between 4 and 110 ppm/min and the lowest were measured at the highest water level. Water samples obtained from micro-Rhizon samplers installed into the columns at various depths. Additionally, the physical, chemical and microbial characteristics of the media were characterized by centimetre scale slicing of the soil columns at the end of the experiment. The impacting of these oscillations on the distribution of chemical species will be discussed in term of the interactions between soils, solutes, microbial activity, and hydrology.

  17. Multiphase flow and transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1989-08-01

    Multiphase flow and transport of compositionally complex fluids in geologic media is of importance in a number of applied problems which have major social and economic effects. In petroleum reservoir engineering, efficient recovery of energy reserves is the principal goal. Unfortunately, some of these hydrocarbons and other organic chemicals often find their way unwanted into the soils and groundwater supplies. Removal in the latter case is predicated on ensuring the public health and safety. In this paper, principles of modeling fluid flow in systems containing up to three fluid phases (namely, water, air, and organic liquid) are described. Solution of the governing equations for multiphase flow requires knowledge of functional relationships between fluid pressures, saturations, and permeabilities which may be formulated on the basis of conceptual models of fluid-porous media interactions. Mechanisms of transport in multicomponent multiphase systems in which species may partition between phases are also described, and the governing equations are presented for the case in which local phase equilibrium may be assumed. A number of hypothetical numerical problems are presented to illustrate the physical behavior of systems in which multiphase flow and transport arise.

  18. Impact of water table fluctuations on water flow and solute transport in 1D column systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühle, F.; Stumpp, C.

    2012-04-01

    Although hydrological processes and mass fluxes in the unsaturated and saturated zone have been well studied separately, little is known about transition processes between these zones. Since the transition zone is dynamic and varies spatially and temporally with fluctuations of the water table, water flow and solute transport are believed to vary dynamically, too. This may influence the transport and fate of dissolved contaminants and consequently the quality of groundwater. In order to protect and maintain drinking water resources, improved understanding about hydrological processes at the dynamic interface between the unsaturated and saturated zone is needed. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of water table fluctuations on one-dimensional vertical flow and solute transport in laboratory column systems. Therefore, two flow-through columns were constantly irrigated with groundwater at an infiltration rate of 4.7 cm/d. In one column the water table was kept statically fixed in the middle, in the other column the water table was continually fluctuated by regularly raising and lowering the outflow tube. Several multi-tracer experiments were conducted and compared injecting the tracers bromide, deuterium and 18-oxygen at different water levels. Data modelling was performed with a lumped parameter model to simulate the hydrological fluxes. Our results showed that at static water table and similar water fluxes in both columns, structural heterogeneities due to packing lead to differences in solute transport, e.g. different dispersivity. Tracer breakthrough curves were well simulated with the lumped parameter model indicating that the systems were at steady state. When the water table was fluctuated small differences in solute transport were observed. Even with a fluctuating water table the lumped parameter model yielded high modelling accuracy and indicated that under certain hydrological conditions water table fluctuations lead to slightly

  19. Eruption column physics

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, G.A.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper the author focuses on the fluid dynamics of large-scale eruption columns. The dynamics of these columns are rooted in multiphase flow phenomena, so a major part of the paper sets up a foundation on that topic that allows one to quickly assess the inherent assumptions made in various theoretical and experimental approaches. The first part is centered on a set of complex differential equations that describe eruption columns, but the focus is on a general understanding of important physical processes rather than on the mathematics. The author discusses briefly the relative merits and weaknesses of different approaches, emphasizing that the largest advances in understanding are made by combining them. He then focuses on dynamics of steady eruption columns and then on transient phenomena. Finally he briefly reviews the effects of varying behavior of the ambient medium through which an eruption column moves. These final sections will emphasize concepts and a qualitative understanding of eruption dynamics. This paper relies on principles of continuum mechanics and transport processes but does not go into detail on the development of those principles. 36 refs., 36 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. In situ vertical circulation column: Containment system for small-scale DNAPL field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sorel, D.; Cherry, J.A.; Lesage, S.

    1998-12-31

    The in situ vertical circulation column (ISVCC) is a cylindrical containment system consisting of an instrumented steel cylinder used for experimental ground water studies in sandy aquifers. Vertical flow is imposed inside the ISVCC. Although vertical wells are an option, the ISVCC installed in the Borden Aquifer is instrumented with horizontal wells and monitoring ports to avoid creating vertical preferential flow paths. Pure phase DNAPL (tetrachloroethene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane) was slowly pumped into two ports in the center of the column. Following this DNAPL injection, an aqueous solution of vitamin B{sub 12} and reduced titanium was circulated through the column to promote degradation of the solvents. Processes observed in the ISVCC included DNAPL distribution, dissolution, and degradation, and geochemical evolution of the aquifer. The ISVCC provides a convenient means for testing in situ technologies in the experimental stage or for selection of proven technologies to find the most effective at a specific site. It is inexpensive, easy to install, and maximizes control over flow distribution in a heterogeneous aquifer. Its application will be restricted where low hydraulic conductivity beds are present in the aquifer.

  1. New electron optical column with large field for nanometer e-beam lithography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Hiroya; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Saitou, Norio

    1995-05-01

    An electron beam lithography system for nanometer devices has been developed. The target specifications of the system are a Gaussian beam diameter of 10 nm and a beam current of 1 nA, an acceleration voltage of 50 kV, a 500 micrometers X 500 micrometers deflection field and an overlay accuracy of 10 nm (3(sigma) ). To realize such high performance, the following two technologies have been developed for the design of the electron optical column: (1) a low aberration objective lens system with a one stage electrostatic deflector and (2) a thermal field emission (TFE) gun system with a low energy spread and a high brightness Zr/O/W cathode. The exposed results shown are a 30 nm isolated line and a 40 nm lines and spaces. An overlay accuracy of 10 nm are also obtained. This system is capable of being put into practical use in the fabrication of nanometer devices.

  2. Multiphase, multicomponent parameter estimation for liquid and vapor fluxes in deep arid systems using hydrologic data and natural environmental tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kwicklis, E.M.; Wolfsberg, A.V.; Stauffer, P.H.; Walvoord, M.A.; Sully, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Multiphase, multicomponent numerical models of long-term unsaturated-zone liquid and vapor movement were created for a thick alluvial basin at the Nevada Test Site to predict present-day liquid and vapor fluxes. The numerical models are based on recently developed conceptual models of unsaturated-zone moisture movement in thick alluvium that explain present-day water potential and tracer profiles in terms of major climate and vegetation transitions that have occurred during the past 10 000 yr or more. The numerical models were calibrated using borehole hydrologic and environmental tracer data available from a low-level radioactive waste management site located in a former nuclear weapons testing area. The environmental tracer data used in the model calibration includes tracers that migrate in both the liquid and vapor phases (??D, ??18O) and tracers that migrate solely as dissolved solutes (Cl), thus enabling the estimation of some gas-phase as well as liquid-phase transport parameters. Parameter uncertainties and correlations identified during model calibration were used to generate parameter combinations for a set of Monte Carlo simulations to more fully characterize the uncertainty in liquid and vapor fluxes. The calculated background liquid and vapor fluxes decrease as the estimated time since the transition to the present-day arid climate increases. However, on the whole, the estimated fluxes display relatively little variability because correlations among parameters tend to create parameter sets for which changes in some parameters offset the effects of others in the set. Independent estimates on the timing since the climate transition established from packrat midden data were essential for constraining the model calibration results. The study demonstrates the utility of environmental tracer data in developing numerical models of liquid- and gas-phase moisture movement and the importance of considering parameter correlations when using Monte Carlo analysis to

  3. Tissue microscopic changes and artifacts in multi-phase post-mortem computed tomography angiography in a hospital setting: a fatal case of systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Capuani, Caroline; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Mokrane, Fatima-Zohra; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Marcheix, Bertrand; Rousseau, Hervé; Telmon, Norbert; Rougé, Daniel; Dedouit, Fabrice

    2014-09-01

    A 27-year-old man suddenly died in hospital of acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to severe systemic vasculitis. Multi-phase post-mortem computed tomography angiography followed by scientific autopsy of the thoracic and abdominal cavity and histology was performed, illustrating the advantages and drawbacks of such techniques. Imaging enabled us to examine the cranium, as the family refused cerebral dissection. MPMCTA revealed absence of opacification of the left middle cerebral artery. But parenchymal findings of thoracic and abdominal organs were still difficult to interpret after both imaging and macroscopic examination during the autopsy. Microscopic examination provided the definitive diagnosis of cause of death. Analysis revealed systemic vasculitis of the lung complicated by diffuse alveolar, mediastinal, splenic and retroperitoneal lesions. We were unable to determine the type of vasculitis, whether polyarteritis nodosa or microscopic polyangiitis, because of artifactual glomerular collapse. We observed some structural changes in tissue secondary to contrast agent injection, affecting the vascular system and renal parenchyma in particular. Such artifacts must be known in order to avoid misinterpreting them as pathological findings. MPMCTA and conventional autopsy are two complementary techniques showing both their specific advantages and limits which have to be known in order to choose the appropriate technique. One limit of both techniques is the detection of microscopic findings which can only be obtained by additional histological examination. This case report underlines this fact and demonstrates that caution is required in some cases if microscopic analyses are carried out after contrast agent injection.

  4. Application of biofiltration system on AOC removal: column and field studies.

    PubMed

    Chien, C C; Kao, C M; Chen, C W; Dong, C D; Wu, C Y

    2008-04-01

    The Cheng-Ching Lake Water Treatment Plant (CCLWTP) is the main supplier of domestic water for the Greater Kaohsiung area, the second largest metropolis in Taiwan. Biological activated carbon (BAC) filtration is one of the major treatment processes in CCLWTP. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of BAC filtration on water treatment in the studied advanced water treatment plant and its capability on pollutants [e.g., AOC (assimilable organic carbon), bromide, bromate, iron] removal. In this study, water samples from each treatment process of CCLWTP were collected and analyzed periodically to assess the variations in concentrations of AOC and other water quality indicators after each treatment unit. Moreover, the efficiency of biofiltration process using granular activated carbon (GAC) and anthracite as the fillers was also evaluated through a column experiment. Results show that the removal efficiencies for AOC, bromide, bromate, and iron are 86% 100%, 17%, and 30% after the BAC filter bed, respectively. This indicates that BAC filtration plays an important role in pollutant removal. Results also show that AOC concentrations in raw water and effluent of the CCLWTP are approximately 143 and 16 microg acetate-Cl(-1), respectively. This reveals that the treatment processes applied in CCLWTP is able to remove AOC effectively. Results of column study show that the AOC removal efficiencies in the GAC and anthracite columns are 60% and 17%, respectively. Microbial colonization on GAC and anthracite were detected via the observation of scanning electron microscopic images. The observed microorganisms included bacteria (rods, cocci, and filamentous bacteria), fungi, and protozoa. Results from this study provide us insight into the mechanisms of AOC removal by advanced water treatment processes. These findings would be helpful in designing a modified water treatment system for AOC removal and water quality improvement.

  5. Implications of soil mixing for NAPL source zone remediation: Column studies and modeling of field-scale systems.

    PubMed

    Olson, Mitchell R; Sale, Tom C

    2015-01-01

    Soil remediation is often inhibited by subsurface heterogeneity, which constrains contaminant/reagent contact. Use of soil mixing techniques for reagent delivery provides a means to overcome contaminant/reagent contact limitations. Furthermore, soil mixing reduces the permeability of treated soils, thus extending the time for reactions to proceed. This paper describes research conducted to evaluate implications of soil mixing on remediation of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zones. The research consisted of column studies and subsequent modeling of field-scale systems. For column studies, clean influent water was flushed through columns containing homogenized soils, granular zero valent iron (ZVI), and trichloroethene (TCE) NAPL. Within the columns, NAPL depletion occurred due to dissolution, followed by either column-effluent discharge or ZVI-mediated degradation. Complete removal of TCE NAPL from the columns occurred in 6-8 pore volumes of flow. However, most of the TCE (>96%) was discharged in the column effluent; less than 4% of TCE was degraded. The low fraction of TCE degraded is attributed to the short hydraulic residence time (<4 days) in the columns. Subsequently, modeling was conducted to scale up column results. By scaling up to field-relevant system sizes (>10 m) and reducing permeability by one-or-more orders of magnitude, the residence time could be greatly extended, potentially for periods of years to decades. Model output indicates that the fraction of TCE degraded can be increased to >99.9%, given typical post-mixing soil permeability values. These results suggest that remediation performance can be greatly enhanced by combining contaminant degradation with an extended residence time.

  6. Implications of soil mixing for NAPL source zone remediation: Column studies and modeling of field-scale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Mitchell R.; Sale, Tom C.

    2015-06-01

    Soil remediation is often inhibited by subsurface heterogeneity, which constrains contaminant/reagent contact. Use of soil mixing techniques for reagent delivery provides a means to overcome contaminant/reagent contact limitations. Furthermore, soil mixing reduces the permeability of treated soils, thus extending the time for reactions to proceed. This paper describes research conducted to evaluate implications of soil mixing on remediation of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zones. The research consisted of column studies and subsequent modeling of field-scale systems. For column studies, clean influent water was flushed through columns containing homogenized soils, granular zero valent iron (ZVI), and trichloroethene (TCE) NAPL. Within the columns, NAPL depletion occurred due to dissolution, followed by either column-effluent discharge or ZVI-mediated degradation. Complete removal of TCE NAPL from the columns occurred in 6-8 pore volumes of flow. However, most of the TCE (> 96%) was discharged in the column effluent; less than 4% of TCE was degraded. The low fraction of TCE degraded is attributed to the short hydraulic residence time (< 4 days) in the columns. Subsequently, modeling was conducted to scale up column results. By scaling up to field-relevant system sizes (> 10 m) and reducing permeability by one-or-more orders of magnitude, the residence time could be greatly extended, potentially for periods of years to decades. Model output indicates that the fraction of TCE degraded can be increased to > 99.9%, given typical post-mixing soil permeability values. These results suggest that remediation performance can be greatly enhanced by combining contaminant degradation with an extended residence time.

  7. Implications of soil mixing for NAPL source zone remediation: Column studies and modeling of field-scale systems.

    PubMed

    Olson, Mitchell R; Sale, Tom C

    2015-01-01

    Soil remediation is often inhibited by subsurface heterogeneity, which constrains contaminant/reagent contact. Use of soil mixing techniques for reagent delivery provides a means to overcome contaminant/reagent contact limitations. Furthermore, soil mixing reduces the permeability of treated soils, thus extending the time for reactions to proceed. This paper describes research conducted to evaluate implications of soil mixing on remediation of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zones. The research consisted of column studies and subsequent modeling of field-scale systems. For column studies, clean influent water was flushed through columns containing homogenized soils, granular zero valent iron (ZVI), and trichloroethene (TCE) NAPL. Within the columns, NAPL depletion occurred due to dissolution, followed by either column-effluent discharge or ZVI-mediated degradation. Complete removal of TCE NAPL from the columns occurred in 6-8 pore volumes of flow. However, most of the TCE (>96%) was discharged in the column effluent; less than 4% of TCE was degraded. The low fraction of TCE degraded is attributed to the short hydraulic residence time (<4 days) in the columns. Subsequently, modeling was conducted to scale up column results. By scaling up to field-relevant system sizes (>10 m) and reducing permeability by one-or-more orders of magnitude, the residence time could be greatly extended, potentially for periods of years to decades. Model output indicates that the fraction of TCE degraded can be increased to >99.9%, given typical post-mixing soil permeability values. These results suggest that remediation performance can be greatly enhanced by combining contaminant degradation with an extended residence time. PMID:25981955

  8. Feasibility of aseptic processing of a low-acid multiphase food product (salsa con queso) using a continuous flow microwave system.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Coronel, P; Simunovic, J; Sandeep, K P

    2007-04-01

    Aseptic processing of a low-acid multiphase food product using a continuous flow microwave heating system can combine the advantages of an aseptic process along with those of microwave heating. Dielectric properties of 2 different brands of 1 such product (salsa con queso) were measured under continuous flow conditions at a temperature range of 20 to 130 degrees C. At 915 MHz, the dielectric constant ranged from 58.7 at 20 degrees C to 41.3 at 130 degrees C with dielectric loss factor ranging from 41.0 at 20 degrees C to 145.5 at 130 degrees C. The loss tangent at 915 MHz ranged from 0.61 at 20 degrees C to 3.52 at 130 degrees C. The temperature profiles at the outlet during processing of salsa con queso in a 5-kW microwave unit showed a narrow temperature distribution between the center and the wall of the tube. The study showed the feasibility of aseptic processing of salsa con queso using a continuous flow microwave system.

  9. Low energy gamma ray attenuation in multiphase water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Sprinkle, Danny R.; Eftekhari, Abe

    1990-01-01

    A gauging system is proposed to enable monitoring of slush density, solid-liquid interface, and slush level as well as its flow rate. It is based on the principle that the electromagnetic radiation mass attenuation coefficient of a multiphase chemical compound is constant for all relative phase concentrations. Results showing the essential constancy of mass attenuation coefficients for single-phase water vapor, liquid water, ice, and multiphase mixtures of water/ice are described.

  10. New York State Department of Environmental Conservation PAMS monitoring system using a 3-column, double identification GC

    SciTech Connect

    Sierzenga, P.M.; Boynton, G.A.; Aho, B.J.

    1996-12-31

    New York State conducted its 1995 PAMS measurements for New York City in the Bronx borough (New York Botanical Gardens) using a Perkin-Elmer ATD-400 Thermal Desorbtion Unit with an 8000 Series Gas Chromatograph. Data was collected in New York City, transferred to Albany, and processed in the central office. The system was checked on a daily basis from Albany to verify operation. Quality assurance for the system was provided by collecting a one hour collocated canister sample every day with analysis performed in Albany using a GC-MS system. The normal configuration for the Perkin-Elmer system uses only two columns, a PLOT column to separate low weight hydrocarbons (C{sub 2}-C{sub 5}) and a BP-1 column to separate higher weight hydrocarbons (C{sub 6}-C{sub 10}). New York`s custom designed system uses a third RTX-5 column to provide a second identification and quantitation of most target hydrocarbons. Analysis of the 1995 data provides insight into the usefulness of the third column in correcting both misidentified peaks and over-quantification of compound concentrations found using the standard configuration alone. The 1995 data set also allows an examination of the increased complexity versus the benefits of the system modification. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Estimation of mechanical dispersion and dispersivity in a soil-gas system by column experiments and the dusty gas model.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Kanou, Yuki; Ohira, Yuki

    2012-04-01

    In a previous study, column experiments were carried out with Toyoura sand (permeability 2.05×10(-11)m(2)) and Toyoura sand mixed with bentonite (permeability 9.96×10(-13)m(2)) to obtain the molecular diffusion coefficient, the Knudsen diffusion coefficient, the tortuosity for the molecular diffusion coefficient, and the mechanical dispersion coefficient of soil-gas systems. In this study, we conducted column experiments with field soil (permeability 2.0×10(-13)m(2)) and showed that the above parameters can be obtained for both less-permeable and more-permeable soils by using the proposed method for obtaining the parameters and performing column experiments. We then estimated dispersivity from the mechanical dispersion coefficients obtained by the column experiments. We found that the dispersivity depended on the mole fraction of the tracer gas and could be represented by a quadratic equation.

  12. Numerical simulation of multiphase flow and collision humidification in the multifluid alkaline spray generator for a novel semidry flue gas desulfurization system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.G.; Cao, W.C.; Wang, L.; Zhang, M.C.

    2008-07-15

    A hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian model was developed to simulate gas-droplet-particle multiphase flow and the collision humidification between sorbent particles and spray droplets in the confined multifluid alkaline spray generator for a novel semidry flue gas desulfurization system. In this model, the motions of discrete phases were tracked simultaneously by using a stochastic trajectory approach, and a probability model of droplets catching particles was presented to judge whether sorbent particles were caught with direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Numerical humidification efficiency of sorbent particles is validated by the experimental one deduced from the measured desulfurization efficiency. The effects of flue gas flow rate, spray droplet diameter, sorbent particle diameter, and particle injection location on the humidification efficiency were optimized. Numerical results show that the collision humidification efficiency of sorbent particles increases significantly at the axial distance of 1.67 times the generator diameter from the nozzle tip and reaches 78.5% without recirculation flow in the alkaline spray generator when the ratio of flue gas mass flow rate to spray water mass flow rate is 6.7. Moreover, there is an optimal droplet diameter ranging from 125 to 150 {mu} m and an optimal particle injection location corresponding to the maximum humidification efficiency in this paper.

  13. Evaluation of an ambient air sampling system for tritium (as tritiated water vapor) using silica gel adsorbent columns

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, G.W.; Cooper, A.T.; Tinker, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    Ambient air samples for tritium analysis (as the tritiated water vapor [HTO] content of atmospheric moisture) are collected for the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) using the solid adsorbent silica gel. The silica gel has a moisture sensitive indicator which allows for visual observation of moisture movement through a column. Despite using an established method, some silica gel columns showed a complete change in the color indicator for summertime samples suggesting that breakthrough had occurred; thus a series of tests was conducted on the sampling system in an environmental chamber. The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum practical sampling volume and overall collection efficiency for water vapor collected on silica gel columns. Another purpose was to demonstrate the use of an impinger-based system to load water vapor onto silica gel columns to provide realistic analytical spikes and blanks for the Hanford Site SESP. Breakthrough volumes (V{sub b}) were measured and the chromatographic efficiency (expressed as the number of theoretical plates [N]) was calculated for a range of environmental conditions. Tests involved visual observations of the change in the silica gel`s color indicator as a moist air stream was drawn through the column, measurement of the amount of a tritium tracer retained and then recovered from the silica gel, and gravimetric analysis for silica gel columns exposed in the environmental chamber.

  14. NMR studies of multiphase flows II

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.

    1995-12-31

    NMR techniques for measurements of spatial distribution of material phase, velocity and velocity fluctuation are being developed and refined. Versions of these techniques which provide time average liquid fraction and fluid phase velocity have been applied to several concentrated suspension systems which will not be discussed extensively here. Technical developments required to further extend the use of NMR to the multi-phase flow arena and to provide measurements of previously unobtainable parameters are the focus of this report.

  15. Laboratory analogue of a supersonic accretion column in a binary star system.

    PubMed

    Cross, J E; Gregori, G; Foster, J M; Graham, P; Bonnet-Bidaud, J-M; Busschaert, C; Charpentier, N; Danson, C N; Doyle, H W; Drake, R P; Fyrth, J; Gumbrell, E T; Koenig, M; Krauland, C; Kuranz, C C; Loupias, B; Michaut, C; Mouchet, M; Patankar, S; Skidmore, J; Spindloe, C; Tubman, E R; Woolsey, N; Yurchak, R; Falize, É

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical flows exhibit rich behaviour resulting from the interplay of different forms of energy-gravitational, thermal, magnetic and radiative. For magnetic cataclysmic variable stars, material from a late, main sequence star is pulled onto a highly magnetized (B>10 MG) white dwarf. The magnetic field is sufficiently large to direct the flow as an accretion column onto the poles of the white dwarf, a star subclass known as AM Herculis. A stationary radiative shock is expected to form 100-1,000 km above the surface of the white dwarf, far too small to be resolved with current telescopes. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment showing the evolution of a reverse shock when both ionization and radiative losses are important. We find that the stand-off position of the shock agrees with radiation hydrodynamic simulations and is consistent, when scaled to AM Herculis star systems, with theoretical predictions. PMID:27291065

  16. Laboratory analogue of a supersonic accretion column in a binary star system

    PubMed Central

    Cross, J. E.; Gregori, G.; Foster, J. M.; Graham, P.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J. -M.; Busschaert, C.; Charpentier, N.; Danson, C. N.; Doyle, H. W.; Drake, R. P.; Fyrth, J.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Koenig, M.; Krauland, C.; Kuranz, C. C.; Loupias, B.; Michaut, C.; Mouchet, M.; Patankar, S.; Skidmore, J.; Spindloe, C.; Tubman, E. R.; Woolsey, N.; Yurchak, R.

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical flows exhibit rich behaviour resulting from the interplay of different forms of energy—gravitational, thermal, magnetic and radiative. For magnetic cataclysmic variable stars, material from a late, main sequence star is pulled onto a highly magnetized (B>10 MG) white dwarf. The magnetic field is sufficiently large to direct the flow as an accretion column onto the poles of the white dwarf, a star subclass known as AM Herculis. A stationary radiative shock is expected to form 100–1,000 km above the surface of the white dwarf, far too small to be resolved with current telescopes. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment showing the evolution of a reverse shock when both ionization and radiative losses are important. We find that the stand-off position of the shock agrees with radiation hydrodynamic simulations and is consistent, when scaled to AM Herculis star systems, with theoretical predictions. PMID:27291065

  17. Laboratory analogue of a supersonic accretion column in a binary star system.

    PubMed

    Cross, J E; Gregori, G; Foster, J M; Graham, P; Bonnet-Bidaud, J-M; Busschaert, C; Charpentier, N; Danson, C N; Doyle, H W; Drake, R P; Fyrth, J; Gumbrell, E T; Koenig, M; Krauland, C; Kuranz, C C; Loupias, B; Michaut, C; Mouchet, M; Patankar, S; Skidmore, J; Spindloe, C; Tubman, E R; Woolsey, N; Yurchak, R; Falize, É

    2016-06-13

    Astrophysical flows exhibit rich behaviour resulting from the interplay of different forms of energy-gravitational, thermal, magnetic and radiative. For magnetic cataclysmic variable stars, material from a late, main sequence star is pulled onto a highly magnetized (B>10 MG) white dwarf. The magnetic field is sufficiently large to direct the flow as an accretion column onto the poles of the white dwarf, a star subclass known as AM Herculis. A stationary radiative shock is expected to form 100-1,000 km above the surface of the white dwarf, far too small to be resolved with current telescopes. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment showing the evolution of a reverse shock when both ionization and radiative losses are important. We find that the stand-off position of the shock agrees with radiation hydrodynamic simulations and is consistent, when scaled to AM Herculis star systems, with theoretical predictions.

  18. Dynamical systems model and discrete element simulations of a tapped granular column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, A. D.; Blackmore, D.; Tricoche, X. M.; Urban, K.; Zuo, L.

    2013-06-01

    We present an approximate dynamical systems model for the mass center trajectory of a tapped column of N uniform, inelastic, spheres (diameter d), in which collisional energy loss is governed by the Walton-Braun linear loading-unloading soft interaction. Rigorous analysis of the model, akin to the equations for the motion of a single bouncing ball on a vibrating plate, reveals a parameter γ≔2aω2(1+e)/g that gauges the dynamical regimes and their transitions. In particular, we find bifurcations from periodic to chaotic dynamics that depend on frequency ω, amplitude a/d of the tap. Dynamics predicted by the model are also qualitatively observed in discrete element simulations carried out over a broad range of the tap parameters.

  19. High Level Waste System Impacts from Small Column Ion Exchange Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D. J.; Hamm, L. L.; Aleman, S. E.; Peeler, D. K.; Herman, C. C.; Edwards, T. B.

    2005-08-18

    The objective of this task is to identify potential waste streams that could be treated with the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) and perform an initial assessment of the impact of doing so on the High-Level Waste (HLW) system. Design of the SCIX system has been performed as a backup technology for decontamination of High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SCIX consists of three modules which can be placed in risers inside underground HLW storage tanks. The pump and filter module and the ion exchange module are used to filter and decontaminate the aqueous tank wastes for disposition in Saltstone. The ion exchange module contains Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST in its engineered granular form is referred to as IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911), and is selective for removal of cesium ions. After the IE-911 is loaded with Cs-137, it is removed and the column is refilled with a fresh batch. The grinder module is used to size-reduce the cesium-loaded IE-911 to make it compatible with the sludge vitrification system in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). If installed at the SRS, this SCIX would need to operate within the current constraints of the larger HLW storage, retrieval, treatment, and disposal system. Although the equipment has been physically designed to comply with system requirements, there is also a need to identify which waste streams could be treated, how it could be implemented in the tank farms, and when this system could be incorporated into the HLW flowsheet and planning. This document summarizes a preliminary examination of the tentative HLW retrieval plans, facility schedules, decontamination factor targets, and vitrified waste form compatibility, with recommendations for a more detailed study later. The examination was based upon four batches of salt solution from the currently planned disposition pathway to treatment in the SCIX. Because of differences in capabilities between the SRS baseline and SCIX, these four batches were

  20. Competing Uses of Underground Systems Related to Energy Supply: Applying Single- and Multiphase Simulations for Site Characterization and Risk-Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissinger, A.; Walter, L.; Darcis, M.; Flemisch, B.; Class, H.

    2012-04-01

    Global climate change, shortage of resources and the resulting turn towards renewable sources of energy lead to a growing demand for the utilization of subsurface systems. Among these competing uses are Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS), geothermal energy, nuclear waste disposal, "renewable" methane or hydrogen storage as well as the ongoing production of fossil resources like oil, gas, and coal. Besides competing among themselves, these technologies may also create conflicts with essential public interests like water supply. For example, the injection of CO2 into the underground causes an increase in pressure reaching far beyond the actual radius of influence of the CO2 plume, potentially leading to large amounts of displaced salt water. Finding suitable sites is a demanding task for several reasons. Natural systems as opposed to technical systems are always characterized by heterogeneity. Therefore, parameter uncertainty impedes reliable predictions towards capacity and safety of a site. State of the art numerical simulations combined with stochastic approaches need to be used to obtain a more reliable assessment of the involved risks and the radii of influence of the different processes. These simulations may include the modeling of single- and multiphase non-isothermal flow, geo-chemical and geo-mechanical processes in order to describe all relevant physical processes adequately. Stochastic approaches have the aim to estimate a bandwidth of the key output parameters based on uncertain input parameters. Risks for these different underground uses can then be made comparable with each other. Along with the importance and the urgency of the competing processes this may lead to a more profound basis for a decision. Communicating risks to stake holders and a concerned public is crucial for the success of finding a suitable site for CCS (or other subsurface utilization). We present and discuss first steps towards an approach for addressing the issue of competitive

  1. Analogy between mission critical detection in distributed systems and 13C isotope separation column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, Maria L.; Secara, Mihai

    2015-02-01

    Carbon represents the fourth most abundant chemical element in the world, having two stable and one radioactive isotope. The 13 Carbon isotopes, with a natural abundance of 1.1%, plays an important role in numerous applications, such as the study of human metabolism changes, molecular structure studies, non-invasive respiratory tests, Alzheimer tests, air pollution and global warming effects on plants [2]. Distributed systems are increasingly being applied in critical real-time applications and their complexity forces programmers to use design methods which guarantee correctness and increase the maintainability of the products. Objectoriented methodologies are widely used to cope with complexity in any kind of system, but most of them lack a formal foundation to allow the analysis and verification of designs, which is one of the main requirements for dealing with concurrent and reactive systems. This research is intended to make an analogy between two tips of industrial processes, one 13C Isotope Separation Column and other one distributed systems. We try to highlight detection of "mission critical "situations for this two processes and show with one is more critical and needs deeply supervisyon [1], [3].

  2. Multiphase booster ups production from subsea well

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The Rogn South subsea well has the world`s first commercial subsea multiphase boosting system. The well produces to A/S Norske Shell`s Draugen field, in the Norwegian Sea. The Smubs (Shell multiphase underwater booster station) provides additional energy to transport a mixture of gas and liquids over long distances. This reduces the back pressure on the reservoir to potentially enhance both production and recovery. In-house Shell International Petroleum Maatschappij B.V. (SIPM) has studied estimated facility costs and performance for a multiphase boosting system for a typical small (50 million bbl) field between 20--50 km from a host facility in water depths between 150--1,000 m. The studies showed that technical costs per barrel of oil produced could be cut by up to 30% compared to conventional technology. The Smubs main features are: A single retrievable cartridge that houses all active components susceptible to wear; No orientation requirements for the pump cartridge unit; No orientation requirements for the pump cartridge unit; Hydraulically set and tested seals; and Vertical installation and retrieval with a single tool, and a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) only for a monitoring.

  3. The ARM-GCSS Intercomparison Study of Single-Column Models and Cloud System Models

    SciTech Connect

    Cederwall, R.T.; Rodriques, D.J.; Krueger, S.K.; Randall, D.A.

    1999-10-27

    The Single-Column Model (SCM) Working Group (WC) and the Cloud Working Group (CWG) in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program have begun a collaboration with the GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) WGs. The forcing data sets derived from the special ARM radiosonde measurements made during the SCM Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs), the wealth of cloud and related data sets collected by the ARM Program, and the ARM infrastructure support of the SCM WG are of great value to GCSS. In return, GCSS brings the efforts of an international group of cloud system modelers to bear on ARM data sets and ARM-related scientific questions. The first major activity of the ARM-GCSS collaboration is a model intercomparison study involving SCMs and cloud system models (CSMs), also known as cloud-resolving or cloud-ensemble models. The SCM methodologies developed in the ARM Program have matured to the point where an intercomparison will help identify the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches. CSM simulations will bring much additional information about clouds to evaluate cloud parameterizations used in the SCMs. CSMs and SCMs have been compared successfully in previous GCSS intercomparison studies for tropical conditions. The ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site offers an opportunity for GCSS to test their models in continental, mid-latitude conditions. The Summer 1997 SCM IOP has been chosen since it provides a wide range of summertime weather events that will be a challenging test of these models.

  4. Aspects regarding at 13C isotope separation column control using Petri nets system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, M. L.; Ciortea, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    This paper is intended to show that Petri nets can be also applicable in the chemical industry. It used linear programming, modeling underlying Petri nets, especially discrete event systems for isotopic separation, the purpose of considering and control events in real-time through graphical representations. In this paper it is simulate the control of 13C Isotope Separation column using Petri nets. The major problem with 13C comes from the difficulty of obtaining it and raising its natural fraction. Carbon isotopes can be obtained using many methods, one of them being the cryogenic distillation of carbon monoxide. Some few aspects regarding operating conditions and the construction of such cryogenic plants are known today, and even less information are available as far as the separation process modeling and control are concerned. In fact, the efficient control of the carbon monoxide distillation process represents a necessity for large-scale 13C production. Referring to a classic distillation process, some models for carbon isotope separation have been proposed, some based on mass, component and energy balance equations, some on the nonlinear wave theory or the Cohen equations. For modeling the system it was used Petri nets because in this case it is deal with discrete event systems. In use of the non-timed and with auxiliary times Petri model, the transport stream was divided into sections and these sections will be analyzed successively. Because of the complexity of the system and the large amount of calculations required it was not possible to analyze the system as a unitary whole. A first attempt to model the system as a unitary whole led to the blocking of the model during simulation, because of the large processing times.

  5. TRAINING TYPISTS IN THE INDUSTRIAL ENVIRONMENT--PRELIMINARY REPORT OF A PROTOTYPE SYSTEM OF SIMULTANEOUS, MULTILEVEL, MULTIPHASIC AUDIO PROGRAMMING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ADAMS, CHARLES F.

    IN 1965 TEN NEGRO AND PUERTO RICAN GIRLS BEGAN CLERICAL TRAINING IN THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MANUFACTURERS (NAM) TYPING LABORATORY I (TEELAB-I), A PILOT PROJECT TO DEVELOP A SYSTEM OF TRAINING TYPISTS WITHIN THE INDUSTRIAL ENVIRONMENT. THE INITIAL SYSTEM, AN ADAPTATION OF GREGG AUDIO MATERIALS TO A MACHINE TECHNOLOGY, TAUGHT ACCURACY, SPEED…

  6. FOREWORD: International Symposium of Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    The International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014) was held in Beijing, China during 18th-21st October, 2014, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University, Beijing, China and Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China. The co-organizer was the State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Beijing, China. Cavitation and multiphase flow is one of paramount topics of fluid mechanics with many engineering applications covering a broad range of topics, e.g. hydraulic machinery, biomedical engineering, chemical and process industry. In order to improve the performances of engineering facilities (e.g. hydraulic turbines) and to accelerate the development of techniques for medical treatment of serious diseases (e.g. tumors), it is essential to improve our understanding of cavitation and Multiphase Flow. For example, the present development towards the advanced hydrodynamic systems (e.g. space engine, propeller, hydraulic machinery system) often requires that the systems run under cavitating conditions and the risk of cavitation erosion needs to be controlled. The purpose of the ISCM 2014 was to discuss the state-of-the-art cavitation and multiphase flow research and their up-to-date applications, and to foster discussion and exchange of knowledge, and to provide an opportunity for the researchers, engineers and graduate students to report their latest outputs in these fields. Furthermore, the participants were also encouraged to present their work in progress with short lead time and discuss the encountered problems. ISCM 2014 covers all aspects of cavitation and Multiphase Flow, e.g. both fundamental and applied research with a focus on physical insights, numerical modelling and applications in engineering. Some specific topics are: Cavitating and Multiphase Flow in hydroturbines, pumps, propellers etc. Numerical simulation techniques Cavitation and multiphase flow erosion and anti-erosion techniques Measurement techniques for cavitation and

  7. Improved Design Tools for Surface Water and Standing Column Well Heat Pump Systems (DE-EE0002961)

    SciTech Connect

    Spitler, J. D.; Culling, J. R.; Conjeevaram, K.; Ramesh, M.; Selvakumar, M.

    2012-11-30

    Ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems are perhaps the most widely used “sustainable” heating and cooling systems, with an estimated 1.7 million installed units with total installed heating capacity on the order of 18 GW. They are widely used in residential, commercial, and institutional buildings. Standing column wells (SCW) are one form of ground heat exchanger that, under the right geological conditions, can provide excellent energy efficiency at a relatively low capital cost. Closed-loop surface water heat pump (SWHP) systems utilize surface water heat exchangers (SWHE) to reject or extract heat from nearby surface water bodies. For building near surface water bodies, these systems also offer a high degree of energy efficiency at a low capital cost. However, there have been few design tools available for properly sizing standing column wells or surface water heat exchangers. Nor have tools for analyzing the energy consumption and supporting economics-based design decisions been available. The main contributions of this project lie in providing new tools that support design and energy analysis. These include a design tool for sizing surface water heat exchangers, a design tool for sizing standing column wells, a new model of surface water heat pump systems implemented in EnergyPlus and a new model of standing column wells implemented in EnergyPlus. These tools will better help engineers design these systems and determine the economic and technical feasibility.

  8. Processing and Characterization of Multiphase Ceramic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Danju

    Multiphase ceramic composites structure design has advantages for many applications. It is not only an effective way of limiting grain growth which allows for fine-grain size superplasticity at elevated temperatures, but also a combination of various desirable properties can be obtained from different phases, which otherwise cannot be found in one single phase material. The goal of this research is to select, design and optimize multiphase ceramic systems for mainly two purposes: shape forming and inert matrix nuclear fuel. These ceramic composites feature the machinability of monazite (LaPO 4) due to weak interfacial bonding with other oxides, the superplasticity of 3 mol% tetragonal zirconia (3Y-TZP), and the high hardness and strength of Al2O3 and MgAl2O4. These materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Mechanical behavior at room temperature was characterized for the elastic modulus, hardness and fracture toughness. They were fabricated and demonstrated to have deformation rates in the superplastic range of at high temperatures and easy machinability at room temperature using conventional tools. An issue with conventional nuclear fuel, UO2, is its very low thermal conductivity that causes high central temperatures, which can lead to melting and cracking during reactor operation. The solution can be found in multiphase ceramic composites, by combining nuclear fuel particles in a heat conducting phase with high thermal conductivity and other phases that absorb fission byproducts while maintaining good radiation stability. In the current research, proposed multiphase ceramic composite materials were designed and radiation damage was characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Gold irradiation was used to represent the primary knock-on atoms damage caused by neutrons. Xenon irradiation was used to represent the fission product damage. Magnetoplumbite, was the most susceptible to

  9. Methods, systems and apparatus for optimization of third harmonic current injection in a multi-phase machine

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel

    2012-10-02

    Methods, system and apparatus are provided for increasing voltage utilization in a five-phase vector controlled machine drive system that employs third harmonic current injection to increase torque and power output by a five-phase machine. To do so, a fundamental current angle of a fundamental current vector is optimized for each particular torque-speed of operating point of the five-phase machine.

  10. Finite-Element Analysis of Multiphase Immiscible Flow Through Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppusamy, T.; Sheng, J.; Parker, J. C.; Lenhard, R. J.

    1987-04-01

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equations governing flow in a three-fluid phase porous medium system with constant air phase pressure. Constitutive relationships for fluid conductivities and saturations as functions of fluid pressures, which are derived in a companion paper by J. C. Parker et al. (this issue) and which may be calibrated from two-phase laboratory measurements, are employed in the finite-element program. The solution procedure uses backward time integration with iteration by a modified Picard method to handle the nonlinear properties. Laboratory experiments involving water displacement from soil columns by p cymene (a benzene-derivative hydrocarbon) under constant pressure were simulated by the finite-element program to validate the numerical model and formulation for constitutive properties. Transient water outflow predicted using independently measured saturation-capillary head data agreed with observed outflow data within the limits of precision of the predictions as estimated by a first-order Taylor series approximation considering parameter uncertainty due to experimental reproducability and constitutive model accuracy. Two-dimensional simulations are presented for a hypothetical field case involving introduction of NAPL near the soil surface due to leakage from an underground storage tank. Subsequent transport of NAPL in the variably saturated vadose and groundwater zones is analyzed.

  11. Development of High Precision Metal Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems Column for Portable Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Chromatograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaya, Takamitsu; Akao, Shingo; Sakamoto, Toshihiro; Tsuji, Toshihiro; Nakaso, Noritaka; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2012-07-01

    In the field of environmental measurement and security, a portable gas chromatograph (GC) is required for the on-site analysis of multiple hazardous gases. Although the gas separation column has been downsized using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) technology, an MEMS column made of silicon and glass still does not have sufficient robustness and a sufficiently low fabrication cost for a portable GC. In this study, we fabricated a robust and inexpensive high-precision metal MEMS column by combining diffusion-bonded etched stainless-steel plates with alignment evaluation using acoustic microscopy. The separation performance was evaluated using a desktop GC with a flame ionization detector and we achieved the high separation performance comparable to the best silicon MEMS column fabricated using a dynamic coating method. As an application, we fabricated a palm-size surface acoustic wave (SAW) GC combining this column with a ball SAW sensor and succeeded in separating and detecting a mixture of volatile organic compounds.

  12. Development of the Maypole (Hoop/Column) deployable reflector concept for large space systems applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D. C.; Sikes, L. D.

    1980-01-01

    The conceptual design, performance projections, and materials development for the maypole (hoop/column) reflector concept are summarized. Factors influencing configuration choices are discussed along with quad aperture/feed characteristics and antenna requirements based on missions.

  13. Estimations of temperature deviations in chromatographic columns using isenthalpic plots. I. Theory for isocratic systems.

    PubMed

    Tarafder, Abhijit; Iraneta, Pamela; Guiochon, Georges; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Poe, Donald P

    2014-10-31

    We propose to use constant enthalpy or isenthalpic diagrams as a tool to estimate the extent of the temperature variations caused by the mobile phase pressure drop along a chromatographic column, e.g. of its cooling in supercritical fluid and its heating in ultra-performance liquid chromatography. Temperature strongly affects chromatographic phenomena. Any of its variations inside the column, whether intended or not, can lead to significant changes in separation performance. Although instruments use column ovens in order to keep constant the column temperature, operating conditions leading to a high pressure drop may cause significant variations of the column temperature, both in the axial and the radial directions, from the set value. Different ways of measuring these temperature variations are available but they are too inconvenient to be employed in many practical situations. In contrast, the thermodynamic plot-based method that we describe here can easily be used with only a ruler and a pencil. They should be helpful in developing methods or in analyzing results in analytical laboratories. Although the most effective application area for this approach should be SFC (supercritical fluid chromatography), it can be applied to any chromatographic conditions in which temperature variations take place along the column due to the pressure drop, e.g. in ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC). The method proposed here is applicable to isocractic conditions only.

  14. Experimental Insights into Multiphase (H2O-CO2) Fluid-Rock Interactions in Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszuba, J. P.; Lo Re, C.; Martin, J.; McPherson, B. J.; Moore, J. N.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated hydrothermal experiments and geochemical modeling elucidate fluid-rock interactions and reaction pathways in both natural and anthropogenic systems, including enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) in which CO2 is introduced as a working fluid. Experiments are conducted in rocker bombs and flexible Au-Ti reaction cells. Individual experiments require one to three months to complete; intensive in-situ fluid/gas sampling gauges reaction progress. Investigation of granitic reservoirs and associated vein minerals are broadly based on the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah, USA. The granite consists of subequal amounts of quartz, perthitic K-feldspar (~25% wt% albite and 75% wt% K-feldspar), and oligoclase (An23), and 4 wt% Fe-rich biotite. Vein minerals include epidote and chlorite (clinochlore). Experiments are conducted at 250°C and 25 to 45 MPa. Each experiment uses mineral powders (75 wt% of rock mass, ground to <45 um) to increase reactivity and also mineral pieces (0.1-0.7 cm in size) to promote petrologic evaluation of mineral reactions. The water (I ≈ 0.1 molal) initially contains millimolal quantities of SiO2, Al, Ca, Mg, K, SO4, and HCO3 and is designed to be saturated with all of the minerals present at the start of each experiment. Excess CO2 is injected to saturate the water and maintain an immiscible supercritical fluid phase. The entire evolutionary path of the natural system is not replicated at laboratory scales. Instead, experiments define a segment of the reaction path and, in combination with geochemical modeling, provide clear trajectories towards equilibrium. Reaction of granite+water yields illite+zeolite; smectite subsequently precipitates in response to CO2 injection. Reaction of granite+epidote+water yields illite+zeolite+smectite; zeolite does not precipitate after CO2 is injected. Water in all experiments become saturated with chalcedony. Carbonate minerals do not precipitate but are predicted as final equilbrium products

  15. Kinetic Analysis of Batch Ethanol Acetylation in Isothermal Non-Stationary Multiphase Systems by Lyophilized Mycelium of Aspergillus Oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Palazzi, Emilio; Molinari, Francesco; Fabiano, Bruno; Pessoa, Adalberto; Converti, Attilio

    2011-01-01

    A relatively complex network of reactions has been investigated, using as a network model the isothermal batch esterification of acetic acid with ethanol in n-heptane catalyzed by lyophilized mycelium of Aspergillus oryzae. The kinetic analysis was firstly carried out on the whole system, without any simplification, by means of the well-known integral method. Owing to the poor results obtained by this way, we developed an alternative approach, combining initial rates and integral analysis and reducing the number of empirical parameters to be determined by the use of equilibrium data. All the values of the parameters calculated according to this “composite” approach to kinetic analysis well correlate with experimental data. PMID:24031645

  16. Pressure effects on bubble-column flow characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.R.; Shollenberger, K.A.; O`Hern, T.J.; Torczynski, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    Bubble-column reactors are used in the chemical processing industry for two-phase and three-phase chemical reactions. Hydrodynamic effects must be considered when attempting to scale these reactors to sizes of industrial interest, and diagnostics are needed to acquire data for the validation of multiphase scaling predictions. This paper discusses the use of differential pressure (DP) and gamma- densitometry tomography (GDT) measurements to ascertain the gas distribution in a two-phase bubble column reactor. Tests were performed on an industrial scale reactor (3-m tall, 0.48-m inside diameter) using a 5-Curie cesium-137 source with a sodium-iodide scintillation detector. GDT results provide information on the time- averaged cross-sectional distribution of gas in the liquid, and DP measurements provide information on the time and volume averaged axial distribution of gas. Close agreement was observed between the two methods of measuring the gas distribution in the bubble column. The results clearly show that, for a fixed volumetric flowrate through the reactor, increasing the system pressure leads to an increase in the gas volume fraction or ``gas holdup`` in the liquid. It is also shown from this work that GDT can provide useful diagnostic information on industrial scale bubble-column reactors.

  17. Dissolved nutrients and atrazine removal by column-scale monophasic and biphasic rain garden model systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hanbae; McCoy, Edward L; Grewal, Parwinder S; Dick, Warren A

    2010-08-01

    Rain gardens are bioretention systems that have the potential to reduce peak runoff flow and improve water quality in a natural and aesthetically pleasing manner. We compared hydraulic performance and removal efficiencies of nutrients and atrazine in a monophasic rain garden design versus a biphasic design at a column-scale using simulated runoff. The biphasic rain garden was designed to increase retention time and removal efficiency of runoff pollutants by creating a sequence of water saturated to unsaturated conditions. We also evaluated the effect of C substrate availability on pollutant removal efficiency in the biphasic rain garden. Five simulated runoff events with various concentrations of runoff pollutants (i.e. nitrate, phosphate, and atrazine) were applied to the monophasic and biphasic rain gardens once every 5d. Hydraulic performance was consistent over the five simulated runoff events. Peak flow was reduced by approximately 56% for the monophasic design and 80% for the biphasic design. Both rain garden systems showed excellent removal efficiency of phosphate (89-100%) and atrazine (84-100%). However, significantly (p<0.001) higher removal of nitrate was observed in the biphasic (42-63%) compared to the monophasic rain garden (29-39%). Addition of C substrate in the form of glucose increased removal efficiency of nitrate significantly (p<0.001), achieving up to 87% removal at a treatment C/N ratio of 2.0. This study demonstrates the importance of retention time, environmental conditions (i.e. saturated/unsaturated conditions), and availability of C substrate for bioremediation of pollutants, especially nitrates, in rain gardens.

  18. Suitability of multichannel seismic systems for imaging the internal structure of the water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallares, V.; Biescas, B.; Carbonell, R.; Danobeitia, J.; Hobbs, R.

    2007-05-01

    Seismic oceanography is slowly becoming a popular tool to investigate the internal structure of the water column. The principle of this technique is that the energy generated by seismic sources is partially reflected at the boundaries between water masses with contrasting physical properties. The reflected wavefield is recorded and processed to create continuous images of these boundaries. Since the pioneer work of Holbrook was published (Holbrook et al., 2003), numerous papers have appeared showing the potential of seismic oceanography to image the ocean's fine structure with unprecedented lateral resolution (10 m), the spatial coincidence of seismic reflectivity and temperature/salinity contrasts, and the correlation between seismic reflections and internal wave spectra. Despite the relatively large amount of recent work, little has been done concerning the existing issues to adapt seismic systems to oceanographic research. In this work we present a set of basic synthetic tests to illustrate the relative significance of different parameters for imaging the oceanic fine structure using seismic methods. The parameters considered include the frequency content and energy of the source wavelet, the ambient noise level, as well as the shooting rate, signal redundancy and fold. We show that powerful (>200 dB re 1 microPa), low-frequency (20-60 Hz) sources such as those commonly used in deep seismic soundings (DSS) are, purposelessly, well-suited to image also the oceans fine structure at all depth ranges. The reason for this is that, on one hand, the acoustic impedance (i.e., reflection coefficients) associated to intra-oceanic boundaries are two orders of magnitude smaller than those associated to geological boundaries (10-3/10-1), so it is crucial to use energetic sources to overcome ambient noise regardless of the target proximity. On the other hand, the limits between water layers, in contrast to the geological ones, do not show abrupt impedance contrasts but rather

  19. Spectrophotometric Microdetermination of Urea in a Rice Wine by Using an Immobilized Acid Urease Column·FIA System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Yasuhiro; Hara, Noriko; Matsumoto, Kunio; Satoh, Ikuo

    Determination of urea in rice wines was performed by using a spectrophotometric flow-injection analysis (FIA) system introducing an acid urease column as a recognition element. An acid urease, having specific properties of showing catalytic activity in low pH range and tolerance to ethanol in comparison to those of a urease from jack-beans, was covalently immobilized onto porous glass beads and then, packed into a small polymer column. This flow-type of the biosensing system was assembled with a sample injection valve, the immobilized enzyme column, a gas-diffusion unit, and a flow-through quartz cell attached to a UV/VIS detector. Standard urea solutions were measured through monitoring variations in absorbance resulting from pH shift due to ammonia molecules enzymatically generated. A wide, linear relationship was obtained between the concentration of urea (7.8 µM - 1.0 mM) and the change in absorbance. Followed by several investigations for application of this FIA system for measurement of urea in commercially available rice wines, the real samples were injected into the FIA system and urea in the samples were determined. These results were compared with those obtained with use of an F-kit method which was widely used for determination of urea. Comparative studies exhibited that this FIA system might be a powerful tool for urea determination in alcoholic beverages.

  20. [A simple preparation method of an electric heating apparatus for heating capillary chromatographic columns and its application in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system].

    PubMed

    Jin, Zuyao; Lü, Yayao; Zhou, Shanshan; Hao, Feiran; Fu, Bin; Ying, Wantao; Qian, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yangjun

    2015-06-01

    For deep coverage of proteome, especially in performing qualitative identification and quantitative analysis of low-abundance proteins, the most commonly used method is the application of a longer capillary chromatographic column or a capillary column packed with smaller particle sizes. However, this causes another problem, the very high back pressure which results in liquid leaks in some connection parts in a liquid chromatograph. To solve this problem, an electric heating apparatus was developed to raise the temperature of a capillary column for reducing its back pressure, which was further applied in a capillary high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry system (cHPLC-MS/MS), and evaluated in the terms of chromatographic column back pressure and chromatographic column efficiency using bovine serum albumin (BSA) tryptic digests and yeast tryptic digests, separately. The results showed that at the optimum current, our electric heating apparatus could reduce the column pressure of a capillary column packed with 3 µm packing materials by at least 50% during the separation of BSA tryptic digestion and yeast tryptic digestion, compared with that without electric heating. The column efficiency was also increased slightly. This suggested that the electric heating apparatus can significantly reduce the column pressure, which provides an efficient way to use capillary chromatographic columns packed with smaller sizes of particles at a lower pressure.

  1. Sweet and Sour: Attenuating Sulfidogenesis in an Advective Flow Column System with Perchlorate or Nitrate Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrektson, A. L.; Hubbard, C. G.; Piceno, Y.; Boussina, A.; Jin, Y.; Dubinsky, E. A.; Tom, L.; Hu, P.; Conrad, M. E.; Anderson, G. L.; Coates, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) biogenesis in oil reservoirs is a primary cause of souring and of associated costs in reservoir and pipeline maintenance. In addition to the corrosive effects of the H2S itself, abiotic and biological oxidation also generates sulfuric acid, further degrading metallic surfaces. Amending these environments with perchlorate (ClO4-) resolves these problems by inhibition of biological sulfate reduction and re-oxidation of H2S to elemental sulfur by dissimilatory (per)chlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB). Triplicate flow through columns packed with San Francisco bay sediment were flushed with bay water ([SO4=] = 25-30 mM) containing yeast extract with 50 mM inhibitor concentrations (NO3-or ClO4-) decreasing to 25 mM and finally 12.5 mM. Influent and effluent geochemistry was monitored and DNA was prepared from the sediment bed for microbial community analysis. Souring was reversed by both treatments (at 50 mM) compared to the control columns that had no ion addition. Nitrate began to re-sour when treatment concentration was decreased to 25 mM but treatment had to be decreased to 12.5 mM before the perchlorate treated columns began to re-sour. However, the treated columns re-soured to a lesser extent than the control columns. Phylochip microbial community analyses indicated microbial community shifts and phylogenetic clustering by treatment. Isotopic analysis of sulfate showed trends that broadly agreed with the geochemistry but also suggested further sulfur cycling was occurring. This study indicates that perchlorate shows great promise as an inhibitor of sulfidogenesis in natural communities and provides insight into which organisms are involved in this process.

  2. Numerical Methods and Simulations of Complex Multiphase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Peter

    Multiphase flows are an important part of many natural and technological phenomena such as ocean-air coupling (which is important for climate modeling) and the atomization of liquid fuel jets in combustion engines. The unique challenges of multiphase flow often make analytical solutions to the governing equations impossible and experimental investigations very difficult. Thus, high-fidelity numerical simulations can play a pivotal role in understanding these systems. This dissertation describes numerical methods developed for complex multiphase flows and the simulations performed using these methods. First, the issue of multiphase code verification is addressed. Code verification answers the question "Is this code solving the equations correctly?" The method of manufactured solutions (MMS) is a procedure for generating exact benchmark solutions which can test the most general capabilities of a code. The chief obstacle to applying MMS to multiphase flow lies in the discontinuous nature of the material properties at the interface. An extension of the MMS procedure to multiphase flow is presented, using an adaptive marching tetrahedron style algorithm to compute the source terms near the interface. Guidelines for the use of the MMS to help locate coding mistakes are also detailed. Three multiphase systems are then investigated: (1) the thermocapillary motion of three-dimensional and axisymmetric drops in a confined apparatus, (2) the flow of two immiscible fluids completely filling an enclosed cylinder and driven by the rotation of the bottom endwall, and (3) the atomization of a single drop subjected to a high shear turbulent flow. The systems are simulated numerically by solving the full multiphase Navier-Stokes equations coupled to the various equations of state and a level set interface tracking scheme based on the refined level set grid method. The codes have been parallelized using MPI in order to take advantage of today's very large parallel computational

  3. A filtration and column-adsorption system for onsite concentration and fractionation of organic substances from large volumes of water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Noyes, T.I.

    1984-01-01

    A portable filtration and column-adsorption system which can concentrate suspended sediment and dissolved-aqueous organic substances onsite was developed. Organic solutes also are fractionated into hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-acid, base, and neutral fractions. Subsequent isolation of organic solutes from fraction concentrates and extraction of organic constituents in suspended sediment entrained on filter tubes is performed by a variety of procedures in the laboratory. Three surface-water samples and one ground-water sample ranging in volume from 300 to 1,100 liters were processed through the filtration and column-adsorption system, yielding from about 0.8 to 3.0 grams of recovered organic carbon per sample.

  4. Phase-field modeling of multi-phase solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, Britta; Wheeler, Adam A.

    2002-08-01

    A phase-field model for a general class of multi-phase metallic alloys is now proposed which describes both multi-phase solidification phenomena as well as polycrystalline grain structures. The model serves as a computational method to simulate the motion and kinetics of multiple phase boundaries and enables the visualization of the diffusion processes and of the phase transitions in multi-phase systems. Numerical simulations are presented which illustrate the capability of the phase-field model to recover a variety of complex experimental growth structures. In particular, the phase-field model can be used to simulate microstructure evolutions in eutectic, peritectic and monotectic alloys. In addition, polycrystalline grain structures with effects such as wetting, grain growth, symmetry properties of adjacent triple junctions in thin film samples and stability criteria at multiple junctions are described by phase-field simulations.

  5. High performance mini-gas chromatography-flame ionization detector system based on micro gas chromatography column.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jianhai; Ning, Zhanwu; Zhang, Yanni; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was a very important measure for preventing environmental pollution, therefore, a mini gas chromatography (GC) flame ionization detector (FID) system integrated with a mini H2 generator and a micro GC column was developed for environmental VOC monitoring. In addition, the mini H2 generator was able to make the system explode from far away due to the abandoned use of a high pressure H2 source. The experimental result indicates that the fabricated mini GC FID system demonstrated high repeatability and very good linear response, and was able to rapidly monitor complicated environmental VOC samples.

  6. High performance mini-gas chromatography-flame ionization detector system based on micro gas chromatography column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jianhai; Ning, Zhanwu; Zhang, Yanni; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was a very important measure for preventing environmental pollution, therefore, a mini gas chromatography (GC) flame ionization detector (FID) system integrated with a mini H2 generator and a micro GC column was developed for environmental VOC monitoring. In addition, the mini H2 generator was able to make the system explode from far away due to the abandoned use of a high pressure H2 source. The experimental result indicates that the fabricated mini GC FID system demonstrated high repeatability and very good linear response, and was able to rapidly monitor complicated environmental VOC samples.

  7. Column CO2 Measurements with Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave Lidar System During the ASCENDS 2014 Summer Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Lin, B.; Harrison, F. W.; Dobler, J. T.; Kooi, S. A.; Campbell, J. F.; Obland, M. D.; Browell, E. V.; Yang, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of the ASCENDS 2014 flight campaign results of an intensity-modulated continuous-wave (IM-CW) lidar system operating at 1.57 µm for measurements of column CO2 over a wide variety of geographic regions. The 2007 National Research Council's Decadal Survey of Earth Science and Applications from Space recommended Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) as a mid-term, Tier II, space mission to address global sources, sinks, and transport of atmospheric CO2. As part of the development of a capability for the NASA ASCENDS mission, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Exelis, Inc. have been collaborating to develop, demonstrate and mature the IM-CW lidar approach for measuring atmospheric column CO2 mixing ratios from a space platform using the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar technique with preferential weighting of the CO2 measurements to the mid to lower troposphere. The Multi-Functional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL), a system developed as a technology demonstrator for the ASCENDS mission, has been used to demonstrate high precision column CO2 retrievals from various aircraft platforms. The MFLL operates using a novel IM-CW IPDA approach to make simultaneous CO2 and O2 column measurements in the 1.57-micron and 1.26-micron spectral regions, respectively, to derive the column-average CO2 dry-air mixing ratios. Measurements from the 2014 summer field experiment focused on advancing CO2 & O2 measurement technologies under day and night conditions in realistic environments, assessing CO2 emissions over large metropolitan areas, observing and evaluating CO2 drawdown and diurnal trends over large agricultural regions, obtaining reflectance data and CO2 & O2 measurements over rough ocean surfaces with high surface wind speeds (~10 m/s), and carrying out CO2 & O2 intercomparisons with OCO-2 and GOSAT over the western United States. Initial results from MFLL for the aforementioned flight campaign

  8. PULSE COLUMN

    DOEpatents

    Grimmett, E.S.

    1964-01-01

    This patent covers a continuous countercurrent liquidsolids contactor column having a number of contactor states each comprising a perforated plate, a layer of balls, and a downcomer tube; a liquid-pulsing piston; and a solids discharger formed of a conical section at the bottom of the column, and a tubular extension on the lowest downcomer terminating in the conical section. Between the conical section and the downcomer extension is formed a small annular opening, through which solids fall coming through the perforated plate of the lowest contactor stage. This annular opening is small enough that the pressure drop thereacross is greater than the pressure drop upward through the lowest contactor stage. (AEC)

  9. Development of Next Generation Multiphase Pipe Flow Prediction Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Cem Sarica; Holden Zhang

    2006-05-31

    The developments of oil and gas fields in deep waters (5000 ft and more) will become more common in the future. It is inevitable that production systems will operate under multiphase flow conditions (simultaneous flow of gas, oil and water possibly along with sand, hydrates, and waxes). Multiphase flow prediction tools are essential for every phase of hydrocarbon recovery from design to operation. Recovery from deep-waters poses special challenges and requires accurate multiphase flow predictive tools for several applications, including the design and diagnostics of the production systems, separation of phases in horizontal wells, and multiphase separation (topside, seabed or bottom-hole). It is crucial for any multiphase separation technique, either at topside, seabed or bottom-hole, to know inlet conditions such as flow rates, flow patterns, and volume fractions of gas, oil and water coming into the separation devices. Therefore, the development of a new generation of multiphase flow predictive tools is needed. The overall objective of the proposed study is to develop a unified model for gas-oil-water three-phase flow in wells, flow lines, and pipelines to predict flow characteristics such as flow patterns, phase distributions, and pressure gradient encountered during petroleum production at different flow conditions (pipe diameter and inclination, fluid properties and flow rates). In the current multiphase modeling approach, flow pattern and flow behavior (pressure gradient and phase fractions) prediction modeling are separated. Thus, different models based on different physics are employed, causing inaccuracies and discontinuities. Moreover, oil and water are treated as a pseudo single phase, ignoring the distinct characteristics of both oil and water, and often resulting in inaccurate design that leads to operational problems. In this study, a new model is being developed through a theoretical and experimental study employing a revolutionary approach. The

  10. Performance of Goddard earth observing system GCM column radiation models under heterogeneous cloud conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreopoulos, L.; Chou, M.-D.; Khairoutdinov, M.; Barker, H. W.; Cahalan, R. F.

    2004-11-01

    We test the performance of the shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) Column Radiation Models (CORAMs) of Chou and collaborators with heterogeneous cloud fields from a single-day global dataset produced by NCAR's Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) with a 2-D Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) installed in each column. The original SW version of the CORAM performs quite well compared to reference Independent Column Approximation (ICA) calculations for boundary fluxes (global error ˜4 W m -2 for reflected flux), largely due to the success of a combined overlap and cloud scaling parameterization scheme. The absolute magnitude of errors relative to ICA are even smaller (global error ˜2 W m -2 for outgoing flux) for the LW CORAM which applies similar overlap. The vertical distribution of heating and cooling within the atmosphere is also simulated quite well with daily averaged zonal errors always less than 0.3 K/day for SW and 0.6 K/day for LW heating (cooling) rates. The SW CORAM's performance improves by introducing a scheme that accounts for cloud inhomogeneity based on the Gamma Weighted Two Stream Approximation (GWTSA). These results suggest that previous studies demonstrating the inaccuracy of plane-parallel models may have unfairly focused on worst case scenarios, and that current radiative transfer algorithms in General Circulation Models (GCMs) may be more capable than previously thought in estimating realistic spatial and temporal averages of radiative fluxes, as long as they are provided with correct mean cloud profiles. However, even if the errors of our particular CORAMs are small, they seem to be systematic, and their impact can be fully assessed only with GCM climate simulations.

  11. Synaptic circuits and their variations within different columns in the visual system of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, Shin-ya; Xu, C. Shan; Lu, Zhiyuan; Rivlin, Patricia K.; Parag, Toufiq; Olbris, Donald J.; Plaza, Stephen; Zhao, Ting; Katz, William T.; Umayam, Lowell; Weaver, Charlotte; Hess, Harald F.; Horne, Jane Anne; Nunez-Iglesias, Juan; Aniceto, Roxanne; Chang, Lei-Ann; Lauchie, Shirley; Nasca, Ashley; Ogundeyi, Omotara; Sigmund, Christopher; Takemura, Satoko; Tran, Julie; Langille, Carlie; Le Lacheur, Kelsey; McLin, Sari; Shinomiya, Aya; Chklovskii, Dmitri B.; Meinertzhagen, Ian A.; Scheffer, Louis K.

    2015-01-01

    We reconstructed the synaptic circuits of seven columns in the second neuropil or medulla behind the fly’s compound eye. These neurons embody some of the most stereotyped circuits in one of the most miniaturized of animal brains. The reconstructions allow us, for the first time to our knowledge, to study variations between circuits in the medulla’s neighboring columns. This variation in the number of synapses and the types of their synaptic partners has previously been little addressed because methods that visualize multiple circuits have not resolved detailed connections, and existing connectomic studies, which can see such connections, have not so far examined multiple reconstructions of the same circuit. Here, we address the omission by comparing the circuits common to all seven columns to assess variation in their connection strengths and the resultant rates of several different and distinct types of connection error. Error rates reveal that, overall, <1% of contacts are not part of a consensus circuit, and we classify those contacts that supplement (E+) or are missing from it (E−). Autapses, in which the same cell is both presynaptic and postsynaptic at the same synapse, are occasionally seen; two cells in particular, Dm9 and Mi1, form ≥20-fold more autapses than do other neurons. These results delimit the accuracy of developmental events that establish and normally maintain synaptic circuits with such precision, and thereby address the operation of such circuits. They also establish a precedent for error rates that will be required in the new science of connectomics. PMID:26483464

  12. Chlorophyll-a thin layers in the Magellan fjord system: The role of the water column stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ríos, Francisco; Kilian, Rolf; Mutschke, Erika

    2016-08-01

    Fjord systems represent hotspots of primary productivity and organic carbon burial. However, the factors which control the primary production in mid-latitude fjords are poorly understood. In this context, results from the first fine-scale measurements of bio-oceanographic features in the water column of fjords associated with the Strait of Magellan are presented. A submersible fluorescence probe (FP) was used to measure the Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration in situ, along with conductivity, temperature, hydrostatic pressure (depth) and dissolved oxygen (CTD-O2) of the water column. The Austral spring results of 14 FP-CTD-O2 profiles were used to define the vertical and horizontal patches of the fluorescent pigment distribution and their spatial relations with respect to the observed hydrographic features. Three zones with distinct water structures were defined. In all zones, the 'brown' spectral group (diatoms and dinoflagellates) predominated accounting for >80 wt% of the phytoplankton community. Thin layers with high Chl-a concentration were detected in 50% of the profiles. These layers harbored a substantial amount (30-65 wt%) of the phytoplankton biomass. Stratification was positively correlated to the occurrence of Chl-a thin layers. In stable and highly stratified water columns the integrated Chl-a concentration was higher and frequently located within thin layers whereas well mixed water columns displayed lower values and more homogeneous vertical distribution of Chl-a. These results indicate that mixing/stability processes are important factors accounting to the vertical distribution of Chl-a in Magellan fjords.

  13. Testing and analysis of magnetorheological fluid sedimentation in a column using a vertical axis inductance monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young-Tai; Xie, Lei; Wereley, Norman M.

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the sedimentation of magnetorheological fluids (MRFs) in a vertical column using a vertical axis inductance monitoring system (VAIMS). The particle concentration (i.e., particle volume fraction) of MRF samples consisting of carbonyl iron powder in a silicone carrier fluid was monitored as a function of column height for 156 h with a measurement nominally every 12 h. In addition, the extent and concentration gradients in four distinct sedimentation zones were monitored: supernatant zone, original concentration zone, variable concentration zone, and sediment zone. In order to obtain the settling velocity of the MRF with respect to particle concentration, MRF samples with different volume fractions (i.e., 15, 19, 26, 30 and 40 vol%) were synthesized, and mudline (i.e., the boundary between clarified supernatant fluid zone and the original concentration zone below) descent of each sample was measured using both the VAIMS and visual observation. In this study, three different settling velocity models (i.e., Vesilind, Richardson and Zaki, and Dick models) were considered in order to capture settling velocity as a function of concentration. Vesilind’s settling velocity model was found to be most suitable for the MRF sample in our study, and the setting velocity distribution in the vertical column could be measured for each MRF sample. Based on Kynch’s sedimentation analysis, the mass balance equation was obtained and integrated with Vesilind’s settling velocity model to obtain the concentration propagation velocity. In addition, the solids flux within the fluid column was obtained to provide insight in sedimentation stability as a function of particle concentration.

  14. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23

    /vapor traffic that produce increased contact area and lead to substantial increases in separation efficiency – which translates to a 10% increase in energy efficiency on a BTU/bbl basis. The Flooding Predictor™ operates on the principle that between five to sixty minutes in advance of a flooding event, certain column variables experience an oscillation, a pre-flood pattern. The pattern recognition system of the Flooding Predictor™ utilizes the mathematical first derivative of certain column variables to identify the column’s pre-flood pattern(s). This pattern is a very brief, highly repeatable, simultaneous movement among the derivative values of certain column variables. While all column variables experience negligible random noise generated from the natural frequency of the process, subtle pre-flood patterns are revealed among sub-sets of the derivative values of column variables as the column approaches its hydraulic limit. The sub-set of column variables that comprise the pre-flood pattern is identified empirically through in a two-step process. First, 2ndpoint’s proprietary off-line analysis tool is used to mine historical data for pre-flood patterns. Second, the column is flood-tested to fine-tune the pattern recognition for commissioning. Then the Flooding Predictor™ is implemented as closed-loop advanced control strategy on the plant’s distributed control system (DCS), thus automating control of the column at its hydraulic limit.

  15. Subsurface Trapping of Multiphase Plumes in Stratification: Laboratory Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, B. L.; Camassa, R.; McLaughlin, R.

    2010-12-01

    Recent observations of subsurface plumes near the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill have raised many questions about the physics of multiphase plumes in deep ocean environments. Plume evolution and vertical distribution will be a complex function of chemical composition (oil, gas, water, and chemical dispersants), water column density structure, turbulent mixing, and horizontal currents. Here we present early laboratory experiments from the UNC Fluids Lab, demonstrating how a miscible turbulent plume, less dense than the entire ambient water column, can be trapped well below the free surface. We describe preliminary experiments in stratified flow tanks intended to model, with appropriate dynamical scaling, the Gulf plume. A simplified ODE closure model has been developed to model the plume trapping height and the percentage of subsurface and surface oil as a function of key non-dimensional parameters associated with deep water oil spills.

  16. Identifying layers in random multiphase structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, Kevin; Stampanoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    X-Ray microscopic methods, benefiting from the large penetration depth of X-rays in many materials, enable 3D investigation of a wide variety of samples. This allows for a wide variety of physical, chemical, and biological structures to be seen and explored, in some cases even in real time. Such measurements have lead to insights into paleontology, vulcanology, genetics, and material science. The ability to see and visualize complex systems can provide otherwise unobtainable information on structure, interactions, mechanical behavior, and evolution. The field has, however, led to a massive amount of new, heterogenous, difficult to process data. We present a general, model-free approach for characterizing multiphase 3D systems and show how the method can be applied to experimental X-ray microscopy data to better understand and quantify layer structure in two typical systems: investigation of layered fibers and clay samples.

  17. Performance of Goddard Earth Observing System GCM Column Radiation Models under Heterogeneous Cloud Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, L.; Chou, M.-D.; Khairoutdinov, M.; Barker, H. W.; Cahalan, R. F.

    2003-01-01

    We test the performance of the shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) Column Radiation Models (CORAMs) of Chou and collaborators with heterogeneous cloud fields from a global single-day dataset produced by NCAR's Community Atmospheric Model with a 2-D CRM installed in each gridbox. The original SW version of the CORAM performs quite well compared to reference Independent Column Approximation (ICA) calculations for boundary fluxes, largely due to the success of a combined overlap and cloud scaling parameterization scheme. The absolute magnitude of errors relative to ICA are even smaller for the LW CORAM which applies similar overlap. The vertical distribution of heating and cooling within the atmosphere is also simulated quite well with daily-averaged zonal errors always below 0.3 K/d for SW heating rates and 0.6 K/d for LW cooling rates. The SW CORAM's performance improves by introducing a scheme that accounts for cloud inhomogeneity. These results suggest that previous studies demonstrating the inaccuracy of plane-parallel models may have unfairly focused on worst scenario cases, and that current radiative transfer algorithms of General Circulation Models (GCMs) may be more capable than previously thought in estimating realistic spatial and temporal averages of radiative fluxes, as long as they are provided with correct mean cloud profiles. However, even if the errors of the particular CORAMs are small, they seem to be systematic, and the impact of the biases can be fully assessed only with GCM climate simulations.

  18. Feasibility study on wave energy power plant with oscillating water column system in Bawean Island Seas Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. F.; Hadi, S.

    2016-03-01

    As a huge archipelago with 17,480 islands, Indonesia still has difficulties to electrify all of its islands especially on the remote ones (areas) because of a power grid coverage limitation of National Electrical Company (PLN). This research discusses the potential calculation of sea wave power conversion by utilizing Oscillating Water Column (OWC) system in remote islands, especially on Bawean Island Seas. OWC system is chosen because of its advantages compared to other systems and also because of its suitability towards sea and coast areas in Indonesia. Kim Nielsen and David Ross Law were used for the power calculation. The research took data sampling during one month in 2015 with the result of wave height average of 2.09 meters. That obtained data resulted wave energy of within 270.19 and electrical power output of about 52.7 kW by using Oscillating Water Column system. Based on this result, Break Even Point (BEP) for one plant covering 117 houses will become zero in the period of 3 years 8 months.

  19. Applying uncertainty quantification to multiphase flow computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gel, A; Garg, R; Tong, C; Shahnam, M; Guenther, C

    2013-07-01

    Multiphase computational fluid dynamics plays a major role in design and optimization of fossil fuel based reactors. There is a growing interest in accounting for the influence of uncertainties associated with physical systems to increase the reliability of computational simulation based engineering analysis. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has recently undertaken an initiative to characterize uncertainties associated with computer simulation of reacting multiphase flows encountered in energy producing systems such as a coal gasifier. The current work presents the preliminary results in applying non-intrusive parametric uncertainty quantification and propagation techniques with NETL's open-source multiphase computational fluid dynamics software MFIX. For this purpose an open-source uncertainty quantification toolkit, PSUADE developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been interfaced with MFIX software. In this study, the sources of uncertainty associated with numerical approximation and model form have been neglected, and only the model input parametric uncertainty with forward propagation has been investigated by constructing a surrogate model based on data-fitted response surface for a multiphase flow demonstration problem. Monte Carlo simulation was employed for forward propagation of the aleatory type input uncertainties. Several insights gained based on the outcome of these simulations are presented such as how inadequate characterization of uncertainties can affect the reliability of the prediction results. Also a global sensitivity study using Sobol' indices was performed to better understand the contribution of input parameters to the variability observed in response variable.

  20. Column internals

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    In the fields of distillation, absorption, stripping and extraction, theory and technology go hand in hand. The thermodynamic principles of phase equilibrium and the concepts of mass transfer and fluid flow are of primary importance in all of these operations. The engineer must understand these phenomena to select equipment effectively. This article discusses the latest in commercial technology in column internals for gas-liquid and liquid-liquid contacting. The principles of operation are explained vis-a-vis the characteristics of the applications in which they are used. The focus is on moderate-to-large columns for refining and chemical applications. Guidelines for selecting the most appropriate type of device are presented, and examples of typical applications are described.

  1. Cr(VI) removal from aqueous systems using pyrite as the reducing agent: Batch, spectroscopic and column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantar, Cetin; Ari, Cihan; Keskin, Selda; Dogaroglu, Zeynep Gorkem; Karadeniz, Aykut; Alten, Akin

    2015-03-01

    Laboratory batch and column experiments, in conjunction with geochemical calculations and spectroscopic analysis, were performed to better understand reaction mechanisms and kinetics associated with Cr(VI) removal from aqueous systems using pyrite as the reactive material under both static and dynamic flow conditions similar to those observed in in situ permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and geochemical calculations suggest that the Cr(VI) removal by pyrite occurred due to the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), coupled with the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) and S22 - to SO42 - at the pyrite surface. Zeta potential measurements indicate that although the pyrite surface was negatively charged under a wide pH range in the absence of Cr(VI), it behaved more like a "metal oxide" surface with the surface potential shifting from positive to negative values at pH values > pH 6 in the presence of Cr(VI). Batch experiments show that increasing solution pH led to a significant decrease in Cr(VI) removal. The decrease in Cr(VI) removal at high Cr(VI) concentrations and pH values can be explained through the precipitation of sparingly soluble Cr(OH)3(s), Fe(OH)3(s) and Fe(III)-Cr(III) (oxy) hydroxides onto pyrite surface which may, then, lead to surface passivation for further Cr(VI) reduction. Batch results also suggest that the reaction kinetics follow a first order model with rate constants decreasing with increasing solution pH, indicating proton consumption during Cr(VI) reduction by pyrite. Column experiments indicate that nearly 100% of total Fe in the column effluent was in the form of Fe(II) species with a [SO42 -]/[Fe2 +] stoichiometric ratio of 2.04, indicating that the reduction of Cr(VI) by pyrite produced about 2 mol of sulfate per mole of Fe (II) release under excess surface sites relative to Cr(VI) concentration. Column experiments provide further evidence on the accumulation of oxidation products which consequently led

  2. Cr(VI) removal from aqueous systems using pyrite as the reducing agent: batch, spectroscopic and column experiments.

    PubMed

    Kantar, Cetin; Ari, Cihan; Keskin, Selda; Dogaroglu, Zeynep Gorkem; Karadeniz, Aykut; Alten, Akin

    2015-03-01

    Laboratory batch and column experiments, in conjunction with geochemical calculations and spectroscopic analysis, were performed to better understand reaction mechanisms and kinetics associated with Cr(VI) removal from aqueous systems using pyrite as the reactive material under both static and dynamic flow conditions similar to those observed in in situ permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and geochemical calculations suggest that the Cr(VI) removal by pyrite occurred due to the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), coupled with the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) and S2(2-) to SO4(2-) at the pyrite surface. Zeta potential measurements indicate that although the pyrite surface was negatively charged under a wide pH range in the absence of Cr(VI), it behaved more like a "metal oxide" surface with the surface potential shifting from positive to negative values at pH values >pH 6 in the presence of Cr(VI). Batch experiments show that increasing solution pH led to a significant decrease in Cr(VI) removal. The decrease in Cr(VI) removal at high Cr(VI) concentrations and pH values can be explained through the precipitation of sparingly soluble Cr(OH)(3(s)), Fe(OH)(3(s)) and Fe(III)-Cr(III) (oxy) hydroxides onto pyrite surface which may, then, lead to surface passivation for further Cr(VI) reduction. Batch results also suggest that the reaction kinetics follow a first order model with rate constants decreasing with increasing solution pH, indicating proton consumption during Cr(VI) reduction by pyrite. Column experiments indicate that nearly 100% of total Fe in the column effluent was in the form of Fe(II) species with a [SO4(2-)]/[Fe(2+)] stoichiometric ratio of 2.04, indicating that the reduction of Cr(VI) by pyrite produced about 2 mol of sulfate per mole of Fe (II) release under excess surface sites relative to Cr(VI) concentration. Column experiments provide further evidence on the accumulation of oxidation products which

  3. Development of the maypole (hoop/column) deployable reflector concept for large space systems application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    A review of the NASA supplied mission scenarios for the communications, radiometry and radio astronomy missions. Led to specific hoop/column antenna configurations for each mission. The mission configurations were then evaluated to identify specific technology items requiring further development. The compilation of these technology drivers resulted in a specification of an artificial or point design, the design element around which all design and performance estimates for the rest of the program were made. Mechanisms for deployment and stowing are examined including the cable driven mast and the latch pulley roller. Methods for determining the thermal expansion of candidate materials, the development of the cables, cords, and hinged joints, and surface adjustment are considered.

  4. A sensitive post-column photochemical derivatization/fluorimetric detection system for HPLC determination of bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ruiz, Tomás; Martínez-Lozano, Carmen; García-Martínez, María Dolores

    2009-02-27

    A new reversed-phase ion-pair high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method has been developed for the determination of the following bisphosphonic acids: alendronic acid (ALEN), etidronic acid (ETID), ibandronic acid (IBAN) and risedronic acid (RISE). Separation was achieved on a C(18) column using a mixture of 50 mmol L(-1) borate buffer pH 9.0 containing 0.25 mmol L(-1) tetrabutylammonium chloride and 0.5 mmol L(-1) EDTA and acetonitrile (97:3) as the mobile phase. The sensitive detection of the above bisphosphonic acids was based on their oxidation to orthophosphate by the on-line peroxydisulfate-assisted photolysis followed by post-column reaction with molybdate to yield phosphomolybdate. This subsequently reacted with thiamine to generate thiochrome and, finally, the fluorescence of thiochrome was measured at 440 nm with excitation at 375 nm. The developed method is precise with a mean relative standard deviation of 1.3%, sensitive (with a detection limit at the nmol L(-1) level), accurate, specific, rapid (analysis time approximately 13 min) and inexpensive because to the low cost of the reagents. The assay was applied to the analysis of the four bisphosphonic acids in commercial dosage formulations, in which the excipients did not interfere with the determination. The method was also applied to the determination of etidronate, risedronate and ibandronate in human urine. Sample preparation involves precipitation of the analytes from urine along with endogenous phosphates such as calcium salts by addition of calcium chloride at alkaline pH and dissolution of the precipitate in 0.05 mol L(-1) ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid. PMID:19150069

  5. Removal of copper and iron by polyurethane foam column in FIA system for the determination of nickel in pierced ring.

    PubMed

    Vongboot, Monnapat; Suesoonthon, Monrudee

    2015-01-01

    Polyurethane foam (PUF) mini-column was used to eliminate copper and iron for the determination of nickel in pierced rings. The PUF mini-column was connected to FIA system for on-line sorption of copper and iron in complexes form of CuSCN(+) and FeSCN(2+). For this season, the acid solution containing a mixture of Ni(II), Fe(III), Cu(II) and SCN(-) ions was firstly flew into the PUF column. Then, the percolated solution which Fe(III) and Cu(II) ions is separated from analysis was injected into FIA system to react with 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR) reagent in basic condition which this method is called pH gradient technique. The Ni-PAR complexes obtained were measured theirs absorbance at 500 nm by UV visible spectrophotometer. In this study, it was found that Cu(II) and Fe(III) were completely to form complexes with 400 mmol/L KSCN and entirely to eliminate in acidic condition at pH 3.0. In the optimum condition of these experiments, the method provided the linear relationship between absorbance and the concentration of Ni(II) in the range from 5.00 to 30.00 mg/L. Linear equation is y=0.0134x+0.0033 (R(2)=0.9948). Precision, assessed in the term of the relative standard deviation, RSD, and accuracy for multiple determinations obtained in values of 0.77-1.73% and 97.4%, respectively. The level of an average amount of Ni(II) in six piercing rings was evaluated to be 14.78 mg/g.

  6. Turbulent Mixing of Multiphase Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Y.-N.; Ferziger, J.; Ham, F. E.; Herrmann, M.

    2003-01-01

    Thus we conduct numerical simulations of multiphase fluids stirred by two-dimensional turbulence to assess the possibility of self-similar drop size distribution in turbulence. In our turbulence simulations, we also explore the non-diffusive limit, where molecular mobility for the interface is vanishing. Special care is needed to transport the non-diffusive interface. Numerically, we use the particle level set method to evolve the interface. Instead of using the usual methods to calculate the surface tension force from the level set function, we reconstruct the interface based on phase- field modeling, and calculate the continuum surface tension forcing from the reconstructed interface.

  7. Germanium multiphase equation of state

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Crockett, Scott D.; Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia De; Kress, Joel D.; Rudin, Sven P.

    2014-05-07

    A new SESAME multiphase germanium equation of state (EOS) has been developed using the best available experimental data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The equilibrium EOS includes the Ge I (diamond), the Ge II (β-Sn) and the liquid phases. The foundation of the EOS is based on density functional theory calculations which are used to determine the cold curve and the Debye temperature. Results are compared to Hugoniot data through the solid-solid and solid-liquid transitions. We propose some experiments to better understand the dynamics of this element

  8. Modeling of intensity-modulated continuous-wave laser absorption spectrometer systems for atmospheric CO(2) column measurements.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bing; Ismail, Syed; Wallace Harrison, F; Browell, Edward V; Nehrir, Amin R; Dobler, Jeremy; Moore, Berrien; Refaat, Tamer; Kooi, Susan A

    2013-10-10

    The focus of this study is to model and validate the performance of intensity-modulated continuous-wave (IM-CW) CO(2) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) systems and their CO(2) column measurements from airborne and satellite platforms. The model accounts for all fundamental physics of the instruments and their related CO(2) measurement environments, and the modeling results are presented statistically from simulation ensembles that include noise sources and uncertainties related to the LAS instruments and the measurement environments. The characteristics of simulated LAS systems are based on existing technologies and their implementation in existing systems. The modeled instruments are specifically assumed to be IM-CW LAS systems such as the Exelis' airborne multifunctional fiber laser lidar (MFLL) operating in the 1.57 μm CO(2) absorption band. Atmospheric effects due to variations in CO(2), solar radiation, and thin clouds, are also included in the model. Model results are shown to agree well with LAS atmospheric CO(2) measurement performance. For example, the relative bias errors of both MFLL simulated and measured CO(2) differential optical depths were found to agree to within a few tenths of a percent when compared to the in situ observations from the flight of 3 August 2011 over Railroad Valley (RRV), Nevada, during the summer 2011 flight campaign. In addition, the horizontal variations in the model CO(2) differential optical depths were also found to be consistent with those from MFLL measurements. In general, the modeled and measured signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the CO(2) column differential optical depths (τd) agreed to within about 30%. Model simulations of a spaceborne IM-CW LAS system in a 390 km dawn/dusk orbit for CO(2) column measurements showed that with a total of 42 W of transmitted power for one offline and two different sideline channels (placed at different locations on the side of the CO(2) absorption line), the accuracy of the

  9. Impact of sorption phenomena on multiphase conveying processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatesuer, Florian; Groth, Tillmann; Reichwage, Mark; Mewes, Dieter; Luke, Andrea

    2011-08-01

    Twin-screw multiphase pumps are employed increasingly to convey multiphase mixtures of crude oil, accompanying fluids, associated gas and solid particles. They are positive displacement pumps and suitable for handling products containing liquid accompanied by large amounts of gas. Experimental investigations on the conveying characteristic, namely measuring the delivered volume flow as a function of the pressure difference, provide results for selected mixtures. By means of the on hand work, the influence of sorption phenomena occurring due to pressure variations alongside the conveying process on the conveying characteristics of twin-screw pumps delivering mixtures of oil and gases is measured. The employed gases are air and carbon dioxide, which differ strongly in solubility in oil. All experiments are conducted in a closed loop test facility, where oil and gas volume flows are mixed before the inlet and separated after the outlet of the multiphase pump. In order to simulate the influence of the suction side pressure drop in the reservoir on the conveying characteristic, packed beds are employed as oil-filed model. Sorption processes inside of the oil-field model and within the multiphase pump affect the conveying behaviour significantly. The two-phase flow in the inlet and outlet pipe is visualised by means of a capacitance tomography system. Results show that the oil fraction of the total delivered volume flow is decreased due to desorption at the pump inlet. The gas fraction at the pump outlet is further decreased due to absorption. Experimental results are compared to calculated solubilities of the on-hand gases in oil and to the theoretically derived gas volume flow fraction expected at the multiphase pump.

  10. Multiphase fluid simulation tools for winning remediation solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Deschaine, L.M.

    1997-07-01

    Releases of petroleum product such as gasoline and diesel fuels from normal operating practices to aquifers are common. The costs to remediate these releases can run in the billions of dollars. Solutions to remediate these releases usually consist of some form of multiphase (air, water, oil) fluid movement, whether it be a multiphase high vacuum extraction system, bioslurping, groundwater pump and treat system, an air sparging system, a soil vapor extraction system, a free product recovery system, bioremediation or the like. The software being tested in Test Drive, Multiphase Organic Vacuum Enhanced Recovery Simulator (MOVER) is a computer simulation tool that will give the practitioner the ability to design high vacuum enhanced multiple phase recovery systems and bioslurping systems, which are often the low cost effective remediation approach. It will also allow for the comparison of various proposed remediation approaches and technologies so the best solution can be chosen for a site. This is a key competitive advantage to translate conceptual ideas into winning bids.

  11. Assessing the suitability of sediment-type bioelectrochemical systems for organic matter removal from municipal wastewater: a column study.

    PubMed

    Khalfbadam, Hassan Mohammadi; Cheng, Ka Yu; Sarukkalige, Ranjan; Kayaalp, Ahmet S; Ginige, Maneesha P

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the use of bioelectrochemical systems (BES) as an alternative to rock filters for polishing wastewater stabilisation ponds (WSPs) effluent, which often contains soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and suspended solids mainly as algal biomass. A filter type sediment BES configuration with graphite granules (as the surrogate for rocks in a rock filter) was examined. Three reactor columns were set up to examine three different treatments: (i) open-circuit without current generation; (ii) close-circuit - with current generation; and (iii) control reactor without electrode material. All columns were continuously operated for 170 days with real municipal wastewater at a hydraulic retention time of 5 days. Compared to the control reactor, the two experimental reactors showed significant improvement of SCOD removal (from approximately 25% to 66%) possibly due to retention of biomass on the graphite media. However, substantial amount of SCOD (60%) was removed via non-current generation pathways, and a very low Coulombic efficiency (6%) was recorded due to a poor cathodic oxygen reduction kinetics and a large electrode spacing. Addressing these challenges are imperative to further develop BES technology for WSP effluent treatment. PMID:27533871

  12. Use of caustic magnesia to remove cadmium, nickel, and cobalt from water in passive treatment systems: column experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias Stefan Roetting; Jordi Cama; Carlos Ayora; Jose-Luis Cortina; Joan De Pablo

    2006-10-15

    In the present study caustic magnesia obtained from calcination of magnesium carbonate was tested in column experiments as an alternative material for passive remediation systems to remove divalent metals. Caustic magnesia reacts with water to form magnesium hydroxide, which dissolves increasing the pH to values higher than 8.5. At these pH values, cadmium is precipitated as otavite and to a minor amount as a hydroxide. Cobalt and nickel are precipitated as hydroxides which form isostructural solids with brucite. Thus, metal concentrations as high as 75 mg/L in the inflowing water are depleted to values below 10 {mu}g/L. Magnesia dissolution is sufficiently fast to treat flows as high as 0.5 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2} per day. For reactive grain size of 2-4 mm, the column efficiency ends due to coating of the grains by precipitates, especially when iron and aluminum are present in the solution. 23 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Fibronectin purification from human plasma in a packed-bed column system with gelatin immobilized PHEMA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kayirhan-Denizli, F; Arica, M Y; Denizli, A

    2001-01-01

    Bioaffinity chromatography has a unique and powerful role that is used as a purification tool in the production of therapeutic plasma protein derivatives. In this study, a bioaffinity-ligand, i.e. gelatin, was covalently immobilized with PHEMA microspheres (150-200 microm in diameter). The affinity sorbent carrying 7.5 mg gelatin g(-1) polymer was then used to separate fibronectin from human plasma in a packed-bed column system. Fibronectin separation from human plasma on unmodified PHEMA microspheres was 0.45 mg g(-1), while much higher adsorption values, up to 21.8 mg g(-1), were obtained with gelatin-immobilized microspheres. The fibronectin adsorption capacity of the microspheres decreased with an increase in the recirculation rate of plasma. Fibronectin adsorption increased with decreasing temperature, and the maximum adsorption achieved at 4 degrees C (26.3 mg fibronectin g(-1)). Up to 94.7% of the adsorbed fibronectin was desorbed by using 2 M urea in the presence of 1 M sodium chloride as elution agent. The adsorption-desorption cycle was repeated ten times using the same affinity column. There was no remarkable reduction in the adsorption capacity of the gelatin-immobilized PHEMA microspheres. PMID:11469779

  14. Multi-phase back contacts for CIS solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Rockett, A.A.; Yang, L.C.

    1995-12-19

    Multi-phase, single layer, non-interdiffusing M-Mo back contact metallized films, where M is selected from Cu, Ga, or mixtures thereof, for CIS cells are deposited by a sputtering process on suitable substrates, preferably glass or alumina, to prevent delamination of the CIS from the back contact layer. Typical CIS compositions include CuXSe{sub 2} where X is In or/and Ga. The multi-phase mixture is deposited on the substrate in a manner to provide a columnar microstructure, with micro-vein Cu or/and Ga regions which partially or fully vertically penetrate the entire back contact layer. The CIS semiconductor layer is then deposited by hybrid sputtering and evaporation process. The Cu/Ga-Mo deposition is controlled to produce the single layer two-phase columnar morphology with controllable Cu or Ga vein size less than about 0.01 microns in width. During the subsequent deposition of the CIS layer, the columnar Cu/Ga regions within the molybdenum of the Cu/Ga-Mo back layer tend to partially leach out, and are replaced by columns of CIS. Narrower Cu and/or Ga regions, and those with fewer inner connections between regions, leach out more slowly during the subsequent CIS deposition. This gives a good mechanical and electrical interlock of the CIS layer into the Cu/Ga-Mo back layer. Solar cells employing In-rich CIS semiconductors bonded to the multi-phase columnar microstructure back layer of this invention exhibit vastly improved photo-electrical conversion on the order of 17% greater than Mo alone, improved uniformity of output across the face of the cell, and greater Fill Factor. 15 figs.

  15. Multi-phase back contacts for CIS solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Rockett, Angus A.; Yang, Li-Chung

    1995-01-01

    Multi-phase, single layer, non-interdiffusing M-Mo back contact metallized films, where M is selected from Cu, Ga, or mixtures thereof, for CIS cells are deposited by a sputtering process on suitable substrates, preferably glass or alumina, to prevent delamination of the CIS from the back contact layer. Typical CIS compositions include CuXSe.sub.2 where X is In or/and Ga. The multi-phase mixture is deposited on the substrate in a manner to provide a columnar microstructure, with micro-vein Cu or/and Ga regions which partially or fully vertically penetrate the entire back contact layer. The CIS semiconductor layer is then deposited by hybrid sputtering and evaporation process. The Cu/Ga-Mo deposition is controlled to produce the single layer two-phase columnar morphology with controllable Cu or Ga vein size less than about 0.01 microns in width. During the subsequent deposition of the CIS layer, the columnar Cu/Ga regions within the molybdenum of the Cu/Ga-Mo back layer tend to partially leach out, and are replaced by columns of CIS. Narrower Cu and/or Ga regions, and those with fewer inner connections between regions, leach out more slowly during the subsequent CIS deposition. This gives a good mechanical and electrical interlock of the CIS layer into the Cu/Ga-Mo back layer. Solar cells employing In-rich CIS semiconductors bonded to the multi-phase columnar microstructure back layer of this invention exhibit vastly improved photo-electrical conversion on the order of 17% greater than Mo alone, improved uniformity of output across the face of the cell, and greater Fill Factor.

  16. Multiphase groundwater flow near cooling plutons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayba, D.O.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate groundwater flow near cooling plutons with a computer program that can model multiphase flow, temperatures up to 1200??C, thermal pressurization, and temperature-dependent rock properties. A series of experiments examines the effects of host-rock permeability, size and depth of pluton emplacement, single versus multiple intrusions, the influence of a caprock, and the impact of topographically driven groundwater flow. We also reproduce and evaluate some of the pioneering numerical experiments on flow around plutons. Host-rock permeability is the principal factor influencing fluid circulation and heat transfer in hydrothermal systems. The hottest and most steam-rich systems develop where permeability is of the order of 10-15 m2. Temperatures and life spans of systems decrease with increasing permeability. Conduction-dominated systems, in which permeabilities are ???10-16m2, persist longer but exhibit relatively modest increases in near-surface temperatures relative to ambient conditions. Pluton size, emplacement depth, and initial thermal conditions have less influence on hydrothermal circulation patterns but affect the extent of boiling and duration of hydrothermal systems. Topographically driven groundwater flow can significantly alter hydrothermal circulation; however, a low-permeability caprock effectively decouples the topographically and density-driven systems and stabilizes the mixing interface between them thereby defining a likely ore-forming environment.

  17. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawai’i and Maui

    SciTech Connect

    Fercho, Steven; Owens, Lara; Walsh, Patrick; Drakos, Peter; Martini, Brigette; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Kennedy, Burton M.

    2015-08-01

    Suites of new geophysical and geochemical exploration surveys were conducted to provide evidence for geothermal resource at the Haleakala Southwest Rift Zone (HSWRZ) on Maui Island, Hawai’i. Ground-based gravity (~400 stations) coupled with heli-bourne magnetics (~1500 line kilometers) define both deep and shallow fractures/faults, while also delineating potentially widespread subsurface hydrothermal alteration on the lower flanks (below approximately 1800 feet a.s.l.). Multi-level, upward continuation calculations and 2-D gravity and magnetic modeling provide information on source depths, but lack of lithologic information leaves ambiguity in the estimates. Additionally, several well-defined gravity lows (possibly vent zones) lie coincident with magnetic highs suggesting the presence of dike intrusions at depth which may represent a potentially young source of heat. Soil CO2 fluxes were measured along transects across geophysically-defined faults and fractures as well as young cinder cones along the HSWRZ. This survey generally did not detect CO2 levels above background, with the exception of a weak anomalous flux signal over one young cinder cone. The general lack of observed CO2 flux signals on the HSWRZ is likely due to a combination of lower magmatic CO2 fluxes and relatively high biogenic surface CO2 fluxes which mix with the magmatic signal. Similar surveys at the Puna geothermal field on the Kilauea Lower East Rift Zone (KLERZ) also showed a lack of surface CO2 flux signals, however aqueous geochemistry indicated contribution of magmatic CO2 and He to shallow groundwater here. As magma has been intercepted in geothermal drilling at the Puna field, the lack of measured surface CO2 flux indicative of upflow of magmatic fluids here is likely due to effective “scrubbing” by high groundwater and a mature hydrothermal system. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations, δ13C compositions and 3He/4He values were sampled at Maui from several shallow

  18. Multiphase Flow Analysis in Hydra-TH

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, Mark A.; Bakosi, Jozsef; Francois, Marianne M.; Lowrie, Robert B.; Nourgaliev, Robert

    2012-06-20

    This talk presents an overview of the multiphase flow efforts with Hydra-TH. The presentation begins with a definition of the requirements and design principles for multiphase flow relevant to CASL-centric problems. A brief survey of existing codes and their solution algorithms is presented before turning the model formulation selected for Hydra-TH. The issues of hyperbolicity and wellposedness are outlined, and a three candidate solution algorithms are discussed. The development status of Hydra-TH for multiphase flow is then presented with a brief summary and discussion of future directions for this work.

  19. Reactive multiphase flow simulation workshop summary

    SciTech Connect

    VanderHeyden, W.B.

    1995-09-01

    A workshop on computer simulation of reactive multiphase flow was held on May 18 and 19, 1995 in the Computational Testbed for Industry at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. Approximately 35 to 40 people attended the workshop. This included 21 participants from 12 companies representing the petroleum, chemical, environmental and consumer products industries, two representatives from the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies and several from Los Alamos. The dialog at the meeting suggested that reactive multiphase flow simulation represents an excellent candidate for government/industry/academia collaborative research. A white paper on a potential consortium for reactive multiphase flow with input from workshop participants will be issued separately.

  20. Multiphase flow of miscible liquids: jets and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Travis W.; Logia, Alison N.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2015-05-01

    Drops and jets of liquids that are miscible with the surrounding bulk liquid are present in many processes from cleaning surfaces with the aid of liquid soaps to the creation of biocompatible implants for drug delivery. Although the interactions of immiscible drops and jets show similarities to miscible systems, the small, transient interfacial tension associated with miscible systems create distinct outcomes such as intricate droplet shapes and breakup resistant jets. Experiments have been conducted to understand several basic multiphase flow problems involving miscible liquids. Using high-speed imaging of the morphological evolution of the flows, we have been able to show that these processes are controlled by interfacial tensions. Further multiphase flows include investigating miscible jets, which allow the creation of fibers from inelastic materials that are otherwise difficult to process due to capillary breakup. This work shows that stabilization from the diminishing interfacial tensions of the miscible jets allows various elongated morphologies to be formed.

  1. RF characteristics of the hoop column antenna for the land mobile satellite system mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foldes, P.

    1984-01-01

    A communication system using a satellite with a 118 meter diameter quad aperture antenna to provide telephone service to mobile users remotely located from the large metropolitan areas where the telephone companies are presently implementing their cellular system is described. In this system, which is compatible with the cellular system, the mobile user communicates with the satellite at UHF frequencies. The satellite connects him at S-Band, to the existing telephone network via a base station. The results of the RF definition work for the quad aperture antenna are presented. The elements of the study requirements for the LMSS are summarized, followed by a beam topology plan which satisfies the mission requirements with a practical and realiable configuration. The geometry of the UHF antenna and its radiation characteristics are defined. The various feed alternatives, and the S-band aperture are described.

  2. Continuous countercurrent membrane column for the separation of solute/solvent and solvent/solvent systems

    DOEpatents

    Nerad, Bruce A.; Krantz, William B.

    1988-01-01

    A reverse osmosis membrane process or hybrid membrane - complementary separator process for producing enriched product or waste streams from concentrated and dilute feed streams for both solvent/solvent and solute/solvent systems is described.

  3. RF characteristics of the hoop column antenna for the land mobile satellite system mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foldes, P.

    1984-11-01

    A communication system using a satellite with a 118 meter diameter quad aperture antenna to provide telephone service to mobile users remotely located from the large metropolitan areas where the telephone companies are presently implementing their cellular system is described. In this system, which is compatible with the cellular system, the mobile user communicates with the satellite at UHF frequencies. The satellite connects him at S-Band, to the existing telephone network via a base station. The results of the RF definition work for the quad aperture antenna are presented. The elements of the study requirements for the LMSS are summarized, followed by a beam topology plan which satisfies the mission requirements with a practical and realiable configuration. The geometry of the UHF antenna and its radiation characteristics are defined. The various feed alternatives, and the S-band aperture are described.

  4. Multiphase Modeling of Water Injection on Flame Deflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Bachchan, Nili; Peroomian, Oshin; Akdag, Vedat

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the use of an Eulerian Dispersed Phase (EDP) model to simulate the water injected from the flame deflector and its interaction with supersonic rocket exhaust from a proposed Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle. The Eulerian formulation, as part of the multi-phase framework, is described. The simulations show that water cooling is only effective over the region under the liquid engines. Likewise, the water injection provides only minor effects over the surface area under the solid engines.

  5. Multi-Phase Modeling of Rainbird Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Moss, Nicholas; Sampson, Zoe

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a Volume of Fluid (VOF) multiphase model to simulate the water injected from a rainbird nozzle used in the sound suppression system during launch. The simulations help determine the projectile motion for different water flow rates employed at the pad, as it is critical to know if water will splash on the first-stage rocket engine during liftoff.

  6. Development of a passive doas system to retrieve atmospheric pollution columns in the 200 to 355 nm region

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In recent years several techniques have been developed to measure and monitor the pollution of the air. Among these techniques, remote sensing using optical methods stands out due to several advantages for air quality control applications. A Passive Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy system that uses the ultraviolet region from 200 to 355 nm of the solar radiation is presented. The developed system is portable; therefore it is practical for real time and in situ measurements. The enhanced wavelength range of the system is intended to detect the ultraviolet light penetration in the Mexican Valley considering the solar zenith angle and the altitude. The system was applied to retrieve atmospheric SO2 columns emitted either by anthropogenic (power plant) or natural sources (volcano), reaching a detection limit of about 1 ppm. The measurement of the penetrating solar radiation on the earth surface at the UVC range is presented and the possibility to measure pollution traces of some contaminants as O3, NO2 and aromatic compounds in real time and in situ in the ultraviolet region is discussed. PMID:23369629

  7. Development of a passive doas system to retrieve atmospheric pollution columns in the 200 to 355 nm region.

    PubMed

    Mejía, Rubén Galicia; Vázquez, Josémanueldelarosa; Isakina, Suren Stolik; García, Edgard Moreno; Iglesias, Gustavo Sosa

    2013-01-01

    In recent years several techniques have been developed to measure and monitor the pollution of the air. Among these techniques, remote sensing using optical methods stands out due to several advantages for air quality control applications. A Passive Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy system that uses the ultraviolet region from 200 to 355 nm of the solar radiation is presented. The developed system is portable; therefore it is practical for real time and in situ measurements. The enhanced wavelength range of the system is intended to detect the ultraviolet light penetration in the Mexican Valley considering the solar zenith angle and the altitude. The system was applied to retrieve atmospheric SO2 columns emitted either by anthropogenic (power plant) or natural sources (volcano), reaching a detection limit of about 1 ppm. The measurement of the penetrating solar radiation on the earth surface at the UVC range is presented and the possibility to measure pollution traces of some contaminants as O3, NO2 and aromatic compounds in real time and in situ in the ultraviolet region is discussed. PMID:23369629

  8. A tomography system at the thermal neutron column of the ENEA Casaccia TRIGA reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, R.; Festinesi, A.; Massari, R.; Sangiovanni, G.; Santoro, E.; Storelli, L.

    The developed system is intended for use at a collimated thermal neutron beam with a flux of about 106 n/cm2s. The system works with a cooled CCD array (192×165 pixels) and an intensifier for light from a NE426 scintillator with traditional optical coupling. A fine mechanical regulation system allows an accurate positioning of the tomographer, also ensuring the alignment of the CCD array with the rotation and translation axes. The acquisition of 200 projections is carried out in about 30min with a reconstruction time (40min max) depending on the reconstruction-matrix order. Radiography and tomography of significant objects are illustrated. The reconstruction algorithm, including spatial and temporal inhomogeneity corrections and filters, was tested with good results for projections up to 512×512 pixels.

  9. Simulation of multiphase flow in hydrocyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, P.

    2013-04-01

    Multiphase gas-liquid-solid swirling flow within hydrocyclone is simulated. Geometry and boundary conditions are based on Hsieh's 75 mm hydrocyclone. Extensive simulations point that standard mixture model with careful selection of interphase drag law is suitable for correct prediction of particle classification in case of dilute suspensions. However this approach fails for higher mass loading. It is also confirmed that Reynolds stress model is the best choice for multiphase modeling of the swirling flow on relatively coarse grids.

  10. Design of a thermally integrated bioethanol-fueled solid oxide fuel cell system integrated with a distillation column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamsak, W.; Douglas, P. L.; Croiset, E.; Suwanwarangkul, R.; Laosiripojana, N.; Charojrochkul, S.; Assabumrungrat, S.

    Solid oxide fuel cell systems integrated with a distillation column (SOFC-DIS) have been investigated in this study. The MER (maximum energy recovery) network for SOFC-DIS system under the base conditions (C EtOH = 25%, EtOH recovery = 80%, V = 0.7 V, fuel utilization = 80%, T SOFC = 1200 K) yields Q Cmin = 73.4 and Q Hmin = 0 kW. To enhance the performance of SOFC-DIS, utilization of internal useful heat sources from within the system (e.g. condenser duty and hot water from the bottom of the distillation column) and a cathode recirculation have been considered in this study. The utilization of condenser duty for preheating the incoming bioethanol and cathode recirculation for SOFC-DIS system were chosen and implemented to the SOFC-DIS (CondBio-CathRec). Different MER designs were investigated. The obtained MER network of CondBio-CathRec configuration shows the lower minimum cold utility (Q Cmin) of 55.9 kW and total cost index than that of the base case. A heat exchanger loop and utility path were also investigated. It was found that eliminate the high temperature distillate heat exchanger can lower the total cost index. The recommended network is that the hot effluent gas is heat exchanged with the anode heat exchanger, the external reformer, the air heat exchanger, the distillate heat exchanger and the reboiler, respectively. The corresponding performances of this design are 40.8%, 54.3%, 0.221 W cm -2 for overall electrical efficiency, Combine Heat and Power (CHP) efficiency and power density, respectively. The effect of operating conditions on composite curves on the design of heat exchanger network was investigated. The obtained composite curves can be divided into two groups: the threshold case and the pinch case. It was found that the pinch case which T SOFC = 1173 K yields higher total cost index than the CondBio-CathRec at the base conditions. It was also found that the pinch case can become a threshold case by adjusting split fraction or operating at

  11. Integrated system for temperature-controlled fast protein liquid chromatography. II. Optimized adsorbents and 'single column continuous operation'.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ping; Müller, Tobias K H; Ketterer, Benedikt; Ewert, Stephanie; Theodosiou, Eirini; Thomas, Owen R T; Franzreb, Matthias

    2015-07-17

    Continued advance of a new temperature-controlled chromatography system, comprising a column filled with thermoresponsive stationary phase and a travelling cooling zone reactor (TCZR), is described. Nine copolymer grafted thermoresponsive cation exchangers (thermoCEX) with different balances of thermoresponsive (N-isopropylacrylamide), hydrophobic (N-tert-butylacrylamide) and negatively charged (acrylic acid) units were fashioned from three cross-linked agarose media differing in particle size and pore dimensions. Marked differences in grafted copolymer composition on finished supports were sourced to base matrix hydrophobicity. In batch binding tests with lactoferrin, maximum binding capacity (qmax) increased strongly as a function of charge introduced, but became increasingly independent of temperature, as the ability of the tethered copolymer networks to switch between extended and collapsed states was lost. ThermoCEX formed from Sepharose CL-6B (A2), Superose 6 Prep Grade (B2) and Superose 12 Prep Grade (C1) under identical conditions displayed the best combination of thermoresponsiveness (qmax,50°C/qmax,10°C ratios of 3.3, 2.2 and 2.8 for supports 'A2', 'B2' and 'C1' respectively) and lactoferrin binding capacity (qmax,50°C∼56, 29 and 45mg/g for supports 'A2', 'B2' and 'C1' respectively), and were selected for TCZR chromatography. With the cooling zone in its parked position, thermoCEX filled columns were saturated with lactoferrin at a binding temperature of 35°C, washed with equilibration buffer, before initiating the first of 8 or 12 consecutive movements of the cooling zone along the column at 0.1mm/s. A reduction in particle diameter (A2→B2) enhanced lactoferrin desorption, while one in pore diameter (B2→C1) had the opposite effect. In subsequent TCZR experiments conducted with thermoCEX 'B2' columns continuously fed with lactoferrin or 'lactoferrin+bovine serum albumin' whilst simultaneously moving the cooling zone, lactoferrin was

  12. The effect of high column density systems on the measurement of the Lyman-α forest correlation function

    SciTech Connect

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi E-mail: miralda@icc.ub.edu

    2012-07-01

    We present a study of the effect of High Column Density (HCD) systems on the Lyα forest correlation function on large scales. We study the effect both numerically, by inserting HCD systems on mock spectra for a specific model, and analytically, in the context of two-point correlations and linear theory. We show that the presence of HCDs substantially contributes to the noise of the correlation function measurement, and systematically alters the measured redshift-space correlation function of the Lyα forest, increasing the value of the density bias factor and decreasing the redshift distortion parameter β{sub α} of the Lyα forest. We provide simple formulae for corrections on these derived parameters, as a function of the mean effective optical depth and bias factor of the host halos of the HCDs, and discuss the conditions under which these expressions should be valid. In practice, precise corrections to the measured parameters of the Lyα forest correlation for the HCD effects are more complex than the simple analytical approximations we present, owing to non-linear effects of the damped wings of the HCD systems and the presence of three-point terms. However, we conclude that an accurate correction for these HCD effects can be obtained numerically and calibrated with observations of the HCD-Lyα cross-correlation. We also discuss an analogous formalism to treat and correct for the contaminating effect of metal lines overlapping the Lyα forest spectra.

  13. Comparison of Frameworks for Next Generation Multiphase Flow Solver, MFIX: A Group Decision-Making Exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Gel, Aytekin; Pannala, Sreekanth; Syamlal, M; O'Brien, T. J.; Gel, Esma

    2007-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations have emerged as a powerful tool for understanding multiphase flows that occur in a wide range of engineering applications and natural processes. A multiphase CFD code called MFIX has been under development at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) since the 1980s for modeling multiphase flows that occur in fossil fuel reactors. CFD codes such as MFIX are equipped with a number of numerical algorithms to solve a large set of coupled partial differential equations over three-dimensional grids consisting of hundreds of thousands of cells on parallel computers. Currently, the next generation version of MFIX is under development with the goal of building a multiphase problem solving environment (PSE) that would facilitate the simple reuse of modern software components by application scientists. Several open-source frameworks were evaluated to identify the best-suited framework for the multiphase PSE. There are many requirements for the multiphase PSE, and each of these open-source frameworks offers functionalities that satisfy the requirements to varying extents. Therefore, matching the requirements and the functionalities is not a simple task and requires a systematic and quantitative decision making procedure. We present a multi-criteria decision making approach to determining a major system design decision, and demonstrate its application on the framework selection problem.

  14. Modelling biological Cr(VI) reduction in aquifer microcosm column systems.

    PubMed

    Molokwane, Pulane E; Chirwa, Evans M N

    2013-01-01

    Several chrome processing facilities in South Africa release hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) into groundwater resources. Pump-and-treat remediation processes have been implemented at some of the sites but have not been successful in reducing contamination levels. The current study is aimed at developing an environmentally friendly, cost-effective and self-sustained biological method to curb the spread of chromium at the contaminated sites. An indigenous Cr(VI)-reducing mixed culture of bacteria was demonstrated to reduce high levels of Cr(VI) in laboratory samples. The effect of Cr(VI) on the removal rate was evaluated at concentrations up to 400 mg/L. Following the detailed evaluation of fundamental processes for biological Cr(VI) reduction, a predictive model for Cr(VI) breakthrough through aquifer microcosm reactors was developed. The reaction rate in batch followed non-competitive rate kinetics with a Cr(VI) inhibition threshold concentration of approximately 99 mg/L. This study evaluates the application of the kinetic parameters determined in the batch reactors to the continuous flow process. The model developed from advection-reaction rate kinetics in a porous media fitted best the effluent Cr(VI) concentration. The model was also used to elucidate the logistic nature of biomass growth in the reactor systems.

  15. Dual excitation multiphase electrostatic drive

    SciTech Connect

    Niino, Toshiki; Higuchi, Toshiro |; Egawa, Saku

    1995-12-31

    A novel electrostatic drive technology named Dual Excitation Multiphase Electrostatic Drive (DEMED) was presented. A basic DEMED consisted of two plastic films in which 3-phase parallel electrodes were embedded and was driven by a 3-phase ac excitation to the electrodes. Static characteristics of DEMED were calculated and tested and the results agreed very well. Three prototype motors of DEMED were fabricated using commercially available technique. The first prototype consisted of a single slider and stator and generated a linear motion with a slider`s motion range of about 5mm. It weighed 7g and generated a power of 1.6W and a thrust force of 4.4N. The second prototype consisted of 50 layer stack of linear motors, summing their outputs. It weighed 3.6kg and generated a propulsive force of 310N being powered with boosted commercial 3-phase electricity. The third prototype consisted of a rotor and a stator in which electrodes were arranged radially and generated rotational motion. The maximum power of 36mW was generated by the prototype weighing only 260mg for its rotor and stator. From the results of the numerical calculation, a practical design methodology for the motor was determined. An optimal design for a motor employing currently available material and fabrication techniques is provided as an example. Analyses predict that force generation over the interfacial area between the slider and stator of this motor would be 3,900N/m{sup 2}.

  16. All-aqueous multiphase microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Sauret, Alban; Cheung Shum, Ho

    2013-01-01

    Immiscible aqueous phases, formed by dissolving incompatible solutes in water, have been used in green chemical synthesis, molecular extraction and mimicking of cellular cytoplasm. Recently, a microfluidic approach has been introduced to generate all-aqueous emulsions and jets based on these immiscible aqueous phases; due to their biocompatibility, these all-aqueous structures have shown great promises as templates for fabricating biomaterials. The physico-chemical nature of interfaces between two immiscible aqueous phases leads to unique interfacial properties, such as an ultra-low interfacial tension. Strategies to manipulate components and direct their assembly at these interfaces needs to be explored. In this paper, we review progress on the topic over the past few years, with a focus on the fabrication and stabilization of all-aqueous structures in a multiphase microfluidic platform. We also discuss future efforts needed from the perspectives of fluidic physics, materials engineering, and biology for fulfilling potential applications ranging from materials fabrication to biomedical engineering. PMID:24454609

  17. Experimental Investigations of Multiphase Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carney, Joel R.; Lightstone, James M.; McGrath, Thomas P.

    2009-12-01

    The addition of solid fuel particles to explosive formulations generally reduces the detonation velocity, but can enhance the blast performance if prompt combustion of the particles occurs in the detonation products and surrounding air early enough to support the shock. The degree to which fuel particles burn heavily depends on their dispersal throughout the explosion field and access to oxidizers. To distinguish the factors affecting the dispersal of fuel particles from those controlling their combustion, we began by analyzing the dispersal of equivalent mock inert particles. Solid glass spheres embedded in detonating small explosive charges were tracked using high-speed digital shadowgraphy. Two different particle sizes, 3 and 30 μm, and different mass fractions in the explosive compositions were considered. Shadowgraphs and pressure measurements were compared to the predictions of a newly developed multiphase numerical model. Reactive aluminum particles in the range of 1 to 120 μm in diameter were also analyzed. During the first 50 μs of the expansion, the general trend for both reactive and inert particles is for the smaller particles to expand near or beyond the leading shock wave to a greater extent than the larger particles. Expansion beyond the initial shock from the detonation is presumed to occur when particles agglomerate. The results are consistent with the predictions of the numerical models, highlighting the role of simple factors such as particle size and density in the early time expansion and mixing of fuels for enhanced blast applications.

  18. Lyman-α Spectra from Multiphase Outflows, and their Connection to Shell Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronke, M.; Dijkstra, M.

    2016-07-01

    We perform Lyman-α (Lyα) Monte-Carlo radiative transfer calculations on a suite of 2500 models of multiphase, outflowing media, which are characterized by 14 parameters. We focus on the Lyα spectra emerging from these media and investigate which properties are dominant in shaping the emerging Lyα profile. Multiphase models give rise to a wide variety of emerging spectra, including single-, double-, and triple-peaked spectra. We find that the dominant parameters in shaping the spectra include (i) the cloud covering factor, f c , which is in agreement with earlier studies, and (ii) the temperature and number density of residual H i in the hot ionized medium. We attempt to reproduce spectra emerging from multiphase models with “shell models” which are commonly used to fit observed Lyα spectra, and investigate the connection between shell-model parameters and the physical parameters of the clumpy media. In shell models, the neutral hydrogen content of the shell is one of the key parameters controlling Lyα radiative transfer. Because Lyα spectra emerging from multiphase media depend much less on the neutral hydrogen content of the clumps, the shell-model parameters such as H i column density (but also shell velocity and dust content) are generally not well matched to the associated physical parameters of the clumpy media.

  19. Modelling of fluid-structure interaction with multiphase viscous flows using an immersed-body method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, P.; Xiang, J.; Fang, F.; Pavlidis, D.; Latham, J.-P.; Pain, C. C.

    2016-09-01

    An immersed-body method is developed here to model fluid-structure interaction for multiphase viscous flows. It does this by coupling a finite element multiphase fluid model and a combined finite-discrete element solid model. A coupling term containing the fluid stresses is introduced within a thin shell mesh surrounding the solid surface. The thin shell mesh acts as a numerical delta function in order to help apply the solid-fluid boundary conditions. When used with an advanced interface capturing method, the immersed-body method has the capability to solve problems with fluid-solid interfaces in the presence of multiphase fluid-fluid interfaces. Importantly, the solid-fluid coupling terms are treated implicitly to enable larger time steps to be used. This two-way coupling method has been validated by three numerical test cases: a free falling cylinder in a fluid at rest, elastic membrane and a collapsing column of water moving an initially stationary solid square. A fourth simulation example is of a water-air interface with a floating solid square being moved around by complex hydrodynamic flows including wave breaking. The results show that the immersed-body method is an effective approach for two-way solid-fluid coupling in multiphase viscous flows.

  20. Continuous long-term observations of the carbonate system dynamics in the water column of a temperate fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atamanchuk, Dariia; Kononets, Mikhail; Thomas, Peter J.; Hovdenes, Jostein; Tengberg, Anders; Hall, Per O. J.

    2015-08-01

    A cabled underwater observatory with more than 30 sensors delivering data in real-time was used to study the dynamics of the upper pelagic carbonate system of the Koljo Fjord, western Sweden, from September to April during two consecutive years (2011-2012 and 2012-2013). In the dynamic upper ca 15 m of the water column, salinity and temperature varied by up to 10 and 20 °C throughout the recorded periods, respectively. Partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), measured with newly developed optical sensors (optodes) at three water depths (5, 9.6 and 12.6 m), varied between 210-940 μatm, while O2 varied between 80-470 μmol/L. Redfield scaled graphs (ΔO2:ΔDIC = - 1.30), in which DIC was derived from pH or pCO2 and salinity-derived alkalinity (ATsal), and oxygen was measured by the sensors, were used as a tool to assess timing and occurrence of different processes influencing the dynamics of these parameters. Distinctive short-term variations of pCO2 and O2 were induced by either tidal oscillations, wind-driven water mass transport in the mixed layer or occasional transport of deep-basin water from below the thermo/halocline to the surface layer. Intensified air-sea gas exchange during short storm events was usually followed by stabilization of gas-related parameters in the water column, such as O2 concentration and pCO2, on longer time-scales characteristic for each parameter. Biological processes including organic matter degradation in late summer/autumn and primary production in early spring were responsible for slower and gradual seasonal changes of pCO2 and O2. Net primary production (NPP) rates in the Koljo Fjord were quantified to be 1.79 and 2.10 g C m- 2 during the spring bloom periods in 2012 and 2013, respectively, and ratios of O2 production:DIC consumption during the same periods were estimated to be - 1.21 ± 0.02 (at 5 m depth in 2013), - 1.51 ± 0.02 (at 12.6 m in 2012) and - 1.95 ± 0.05 (at 9.6 m in 2013). These ratios are discussed and compared to

  1. GOME-2 total ozone columns from MetOp-A/MetOp-B and assimilation in the MACC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, N.; Koukouli, M. E.; Inness, A.; Valks, P.; Loyola, D. G.; Zimmer, W.; Balis, D. S.; Zyrichidou, I.; Van Roozendael, M.; Lerot, C.; Spurr, R. J. D.

    2014-09-01

    The two Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument (GOME-2) sensors operated in tandem are flying onboard EUMETSAT's (European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites) MetOp-A and MetOp-B satellites, launched in October 2006 and September 2012 respectively. This paper presents the operational GOME-2/MetOp-A (GOME-2A) and GOME-2/MetOp-B (GOME-2B) total ozone products provided by the EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M-SAF). These products are generated using the latest version of the GOME Data Processor (GDP version 4.7). The enhancements in GDP 4.7, including the application of Brion-Daumont-Malicet ozone absorption cross sections, are presented here. On a global scale, GOME-2B has the same high accuracy as the corresponding GOME-2A products. There is an excellent agreement between the ozone total columns from the two sensors, with GOME-2B values slightly lower with a mean difference of only 0.55±0.29%. First global validation results for 6 months of GOME-2B total ozone using ground-based measurements show that on average the GOME-2B total ozone data obtained with GDP 4.7 are slightly higher than, both, Dobson observations by about 2.0±1.0% and Brewer observations by about 1.0±0.8%. It is concluded that the total ozone columns (TOCs) provided by GOME-2A and GOME-2B are consistent and may be used simultaneously without introducing systematic effects, which has been illustrated for the Antarctic ozone hole on 18 October 2013. GOME-2A total ozone data have been used operationally in the Copernicus atmospheric service project MACC-II (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate - Interim Implementation) near-real-time (NRT) system since October 2013. The magnitude of the bias correction needed for assimilating GOME-2A ozone is reduced (to about -6 DU in the global mean) when the GOME-2 ozone retrieval algorithm changed to GDP 4.7.

  2. pH-Responsive Gas-Water-Solid Interface for Multiphase Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianping; Cheng, Fangqin; Binks, Bernard P; Yang, Hengquan

    2015-12-01

    Despite their wide utility in laboratory synthesis and industrial fabrication, gas-water-solid multiphase catalysis reactions often suffer from low reaction efficiency because of the low solubility of gases in water. Using a surface-modification protocol, interface-active silica nanoparticles were synthesized. Such nanoparticles can assemble at the gas-water interface, stabilizing micrometer-sized gas bubbles in water, and disassemble by tuning of the aqueous phase pH. The ability to stabilize gas microbubbles can be finely tuned through variation of the surface-modification protocol. As proof of this concept, Pd and Au were deposited on these silica nanoparticles, leading to interface-active catalysts for aqueous hydrogenation and oxidation, respectively. With such catalysts, conventional gas-water-solid multiphase reactions can be transformed to H2 or O2 microbubble reaction systems. The resultant microbubble reaction systems exhibit significant catalysis efficiency enhancement effects compared with conventional multiphase reactions. The significant improvement is attributed to the pronounced increase in reaction interface area that allows for the direct contact of gas, water, and solid phases. At the end of reaction, the microbubbles can be removed from the reaction systems through changing the pH, allowing product separation and catalyst recycling. Interestingly, the alcohol oxidation activation energy for the microbubble systems is much lower than that for the conventional multiphase reaction, also indicating that the developed microbubble system may be a valuable platform to design innovative multiphase catalysis reactions. PMID:26524337

  3. The separation of flavonoids from Pongamia pinnata using combination columns in high-speed counter-current chromatography with a three-phase solvent system.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hao; Zhang, Si; Long, Lijuan; Yin, Hang; Tian, Xinpeng; Luo, Xiongming; Nan, Haihan; He, Sha

    2013-11-01

    The mangrove plant Pongamia pinnata (Leguminosae) is well known as a plant pesticide. Previous studies have indicated that the flavonoids are responsible of the biological activities of the plant. A new high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) method for the separation of three flavonoids, karanjin (1), pinnatin (2), and pongaflavone (3), from P. pinnata was developed in the present study. The lower and intermediate phase (LP and IP) of a new three-phase solvent system, n-hexane-acetonitrile-dichloromethane-water, at a volume ratio of 5:5:1:5, were used as the stationary phases, while the upper phase (UP) was used as the mobile phase, and the volume ratio between the stationary phases in the CCC column could be tuned by varying the initial pumped volume ratio of the stationary phases. The CCC columns containing all three phases of the solvent system were considered combination columns. According to the theories of combination column, it is possible to optimize the retention time of the target compounds by varying the volume ratio of the stationary phases in the HSCCC combination columns, as well as the suitable volume ratios of the stationary phases for the separation of the target compounds were predicted from the partition coefficients of the compounds in the three-phase solvent system. Then, three HSCCC separations using the combination columns with initial pumped LP:IP volume ratios of 1:0, 0.9:0.1, and 0.7:0.3 were performed separately based on the prediction. Three target compounds were prepared with high purity when the initial pumped volume ratio of the stationary phases was 0.9:0.1. The baseline separation of compounds 2 and 3 was achieved on the combination column with an initial pumped volume ratio of 0.7:0.3. Furthermore, the three experiments clearly demonstrated that the retentions and resolutions of the target compounds increased with an increasing volume ratio of IP, which is consistent with the prediction for the retention times for the

  4. The separation of flavonoids from Pongamia pinnata using combination columns in high-speed counter-current chromatography with a three-phase solvent system.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hao; Zhang, Si; Long, Lijuan; Yin, Hang; Tian, Xinpeng; Luo, Xiongming; Nan, Haihan; He, Sha

    2013-11-01

    The mangrove plant Pongamia pinnata (Leguminosae) is well known as a plant pesticide. Previous studies have indicated that the flavonoids are responsible of the biological activities of the plant. A new high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) method for the separation of three flavonoids, karanjin (1), pinnatin (2), and pongaflavone (3), from P. pinnata was developed in the present study. The lower and intermediate phase (LP and IP) of a new three-phase solvent system, n-hexane-acetonitrile-dichloromethane-water, at a volume ratio of 5:5:1:5, were used as the stationary phases, while the upper phase (UP) was used as the mobile phase, and the volume ratio between the stationary phases in the CCC column could be tuned by varying the initial pumped volume ratio of the stationary phases. The CCC columns containing all three phases of the solvent system were considered combination columns. According to the theories of combination column, it is possible to optimize the retention time of the target compounds by varying the volume ratio of the stationary phases in the HSCCC combination columns, as well as the suitable volume ratios of the stationary phases for the separation of the target compounds were predicted from the partition coefficients of the compounds in the three-phase solvent system. Then, three HSCCC separations using the combination columns with initial pumped LP:IP volume ratios of 1:0, 0.9:0.1, and 0.7:0.3 were performed separately based on the prediction. Three target compounds were prepared with high purity when the initial pumped volume ratio of the stationary phases was 0.9:0.1. The baseline separation of compounds 2 and 3 was achieved on the combination column with an initial pumped volume ratio of 0.7:0.3. Furthermore, the three experiments clearly demonstrated that the retentions and resolutions of the target compounds increased with an increasing volume ratio of IP, which is consistent with the prediction for the retention times for the

  5. EOS7Cm: An improved TOUGH2 module for simulating non-isothermal multiphase and multicomponent flow in CO2-H2S-CH4-brine systems with high pressure, temperature and salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hongwu; Li, Jun; Li, Xiaochun; Jiang, Zhenjiao

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the non-isothermal multiphase and multicomponent flow in a CO2-H2S-CH4-brine system is of critical importance in projects such as CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers, natural gas extraction using CO2 as the displacement fluid, and heat extraction from hot dry rocks using CO2 as the working fluid. Numerical simulation is a necessary tool to evaluate the chemical evolution in these systems. However, an accurate thermodynamic model for CO2-H2S-CH4-brine systems appropriate for high pressure, temperature, and salinity is still lacking. This study establishes the mutual solubility model for CO2-H2S-CH4-brine systems based on the fugacity-activity method for phase equilibrium. The model can predict mutual solubilities for pressure up to 1000 bar for CO2 and CH4, and 200 bar for H2S, for temperature up to 200 °C, and for salinity up to 6 mol/kg water. We incorporated the new model into TOUGH2/EOS7C, forming a new improved module we call EOS7Cm. Compared to the original EOS7C, EOS7Cm considers the effects of H2S and covers a larger range of temperature and salinity. EOS7Cm is employed in five examples, including CO2 injection with and without impurities (CH4 and/or H2S) into deep aquifers, CH4 extraction from aquifers by CO2 injection, and heat extraction from hot dry rock. The results are compared to those from TOUGH2/ECO2N, EOS7C and CMG, agreement among which serves to verify EOS7Cm.

  6. Lagrangian coherent structures analysis of gas-liquid flow in a bubble column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qin; Wang, GuoYu; Huang, Biao; Bai, ZeYu

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to apply a new identifying method to investigating the gas-liquid two-phase flow behaviors in a bubble column with air injected into water. In the numerical simulations, the standard k- ɛ turbulence model is employed to describe the turbulence phenomenon occurring in the continuous fluid. The Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) and Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) are applied to analyze the vortex structures in multiphase flow. Reasonable agreements are obtained between the numerical and experimental data. The numerical results show that the evolution of gas-liquid in the column includes initial and periodical developing stages. During the initial stage, the bubble hose is forming and extending along the vertical direction with the vortex structures formed symmetrically. During the periodical developing stage, the bubble hose starts to oscillate periodically, and the vortexes move along the bubble hose to the bottom of column alternately. Compared to the Euler-system-based identification criterion of a vortex, the FTLE field presents the boundary of a vortex without any threshold defined and the LCS represents the divergence extent of infinite neighboring particles. During the initial stage, the interfaces between the forward and backward flows are highlighted by the LCS. As for the periodical developing stage, the LCS curls near the vortex centers, providing a method of analyzing a flow field from a dynamical system perspective.

  7. Multi-speed multi-phase resolver converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean (Inventor); Howard, David (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A multiphase converter circuit generates a plurality of sinusoidal outputs of displaced phase and given speed value from the output of an angular resolver system attachable to a motor excited by these multi-phase outputs, the resolver system having a lower speed value than that of the motor. The angular resolver system provides in parallel format sequential digital numbers indicative of the amount of rotation of the shaft of an angular position sensor associated with the angular resolver system. These numbers are used to excite simultaneously identical addresses of a plurality of addressable memory systems, each memory system having stored therein at sequential addresses sequential values of a sinusoidal wavetrain of a given number of sinusoids. The stored wavetrain values represent sinusoids displaced from each other in phase according to the number of output phases desired. A digital-to-analog converter associated with each memory system converts each accessed word to a corresponding analog value to generate attendant to rotation of the angular resolver a sinusoidal wave of proper phase at each of the plurality of outputs. By properly orienting the angular resolver system with respect to the rotor of the motor, essentially ripple-free torque is supplied to the rotor. The angular resolver system may employ an analog resolver feeding an integrated circuit resolver-to-digital converter to produce the requisite digital values serving as addresses. Alternative versions employing incremental or absolute encoders are also described.

  8. Post column derivatisation analyses review. Is post-column derivatisation incompatible with modern HPLC columns?

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew; Pravadali-Cekic, Sercan; Dennis, Gary R; Shalliker, R Andrew

    2015-08-19

    Post Column derivatisation (PCD) coupled with high performance liquid chromatography or ultra-high performance liquid chromatography is a powerful tool in the modern analytical laboratory, or at least it should be. One drawback with PCD techniques is the extra post-column dead volume due to reaction coils used to enable adequate reaction time and the mixing of reagents which causes peak broadening, hence a loss of separation power. This loss of efficiency is counter-productive to modern HPLC technologies, -such as UHPLC. We reviewed 87 PCD methods published from 2009 to 2014. We restricted our review to methods published between 2009 and 2014, because we were interested in the uptake of PCD methods in UHPLC environments. Our review focused on a range of system parameters including: column dimensions, stationary phase and particle size, as well as the geometry of the reaction loop. The most commonly used column in the methods investigated was not in fact a modern UHPLC version with sub-2-micron, (or even sub-3-micron) particles, but rather, work-house columns, such as, 250 × 4.6 mm i.d. columns packed with 5 μm C18 particles. Reaction loops were varied, even within the same type of analysis, but the majority of methods employed loop systems with volumes greater than 500 μL. A second part of this review illustrated briefly the effect of dead volume on column performance. The experiment evaluated the change in resolution and separation efficiency of some weak to moderately retained solutes on a 250 × 4.6 mm i.d. column packed with 5 μm particles. The data showed that reaction loops beyond 100 μL resulted in a very serious loss of performance. Our study concluded that practitioners of PCD methods largely avoid the use of UHPLC-type column formats, so yes, very much, PCD is incompatible with the modern HPLC column. PMID:26343427

  9. Temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-12-23

    A temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by the integration of a resistive heating element and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Additionally, means are provided to thermally isolate the heated column from their surroundings. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  10. Investigation on Online Multiphase Flow Meter in oilfield Based on Open Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, L. Y.; Wang, W. C.; Li, Y. X.; Zhang, J.; Dong, S. P.

    2010-03-01

    Flow metering of multiphase pipeline is an urgently problem needed to be solved in oilfield producing in China. Based on the principle of multiphase oil and gas flow in the open channel, four liquid metering models(Falling Model I, Falling Model II, Open Channel Model and Element Resistance Model) and one gas model were obtained to calculate the gas and liquid flow rate, in which the water cut was measured by the differential pressure. And then a new type of multiphase meter system was developed based on these models and neural networks were developed to improve the estimating results of gas and liquid flow rate with the new metering system. At last a lot of experiments of multiphase metering were finished in lab and field. According to the experiments, the results of the metering system show that the liquid flow rate error was no more than 10%, and gas flow rate error was no more than 15%, which can meet the demand of the field flow rate measurement. Furthermore the relationship between liquid and gas flow rate and characteristic signals was found out through the experiments so as to deepening the study on multiphase flow metering technology.

  11. Multiphase flow in wells and pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, M.P. ); Rohatgi, U.S. )

    1992-01-01

    This conference focuses primarily on multi-phase flow modeling and calculation methods for oil and gas although two papers focus more on the fluid mechanics of fluidized beds. Papers include theoretical, numerical modeling, experimental investigation, and state-of-the-art review aspects of multiphase flow. The theme of the symposium being general, the papers reflect generality of gas-liquid, liquid-solid, and gas solid flows. One paper deals with nuclear reactor safety as it relates to fluid flow through the reactor.

  12. Workshop on Scientific Issues in Multiphase Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    2003-01-02

    This report outlines scientific issues whose resolution will help advance and define the field of multiphase flow. It presents the findings of four study groups and of a workshop sponsored by the Program on Engineering Physics of the Department of Energy. The reason why multiphase flows are much more difficult to analyze than single phase flows is that the phases assume a large number of complicated configurations. Therefore, it should not be surprising that the understanding of why the phases configure in a certain way is the principal scientific issue. Research is needed which identifies the microphysics controlling the organization of the phases, which develops physical models for the resultant multi-scale interactions and which tests their validity in integrative experiments/theories that look at the behavior of a system. New experimental techniques and recently developed direct numerical simulations will play important roles in this endeavor. In gas-liquid flows a top priority is to develop an understanding of why the liquid phase in quasi fully-developed pipe flow changes from one configuration to another. Mixing flows offer a more complicated situation in which several patterns can exist at the same time. They introduce new physical challenges. A second priority is to provide a quantitative description of the phase distribution for selected fully-developed flows and for simple mixing flows (that could include heat transfer and phase change). Microphysical problems of interest are identified – including the coupling of molecular and macroscopic behavior that can be observed in many situations and the formation/destruction of interfaces in the coalescence/breakup of drops and bubbles. Solid-fluid flows offer a simpler system in that interfaces are not changing. However, a variety of patterns exist, that depend on the properties of the particles, their concentration and the Reynolds number characterizing the relative velocity. A top priority is the

  13. Combined column-mobile phase mixture statistical design optimization of high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of multicomponent systems.

    PubMed

    Breitkreitz, Márcia C; Jardim, Isabel C S F; Bruns, Roy E

    2009-02-27

    A statistical approach for the simultaneous optimization of the mobile and stationary phases used in reversed-phase liquid chromatography is presented. Mixture designs using aqueous mixtures of acetonitrile (ACN), methanol (MeOH) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) organic modifiers were performed simultaneously with column type optimization, according to a split-plot design, to achieve the best separation of compounds in two sample sets: one containing 10 neutral compounds with similar retention factors and another containing 11 pesticides. Combined models were obtained by multiplying a linear model for column type, C8 or C18, by quadratic or special cubic mixture models. Instead of using an objective response function, combined models were built for elementary chromatographic criteria (retention factors, resolution and relative retention) of each solute or pair of solutes and, after their validation, the global separation was accomplished by means of Derringer's desirability functions. For neutral compounds a 37:12:8:43 (v/v/v/v) percentage mixture of ACN:MeOH:THF:H2O with the C18 column and for pesticides a 15:15:70 (v/v/v) ACN:THF:H2O mixture with the C8 column provide excellent resolution of all peaks.

  14. Integrated systems with applications to the multi-phases of the ephemerides, physics and methematics of the upper atmosphere. Final report, June 1983-February 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, J.N.; Bhavnani, K.H.; Bonito, N.A.; Bryant, C.M.; McNEil, W.J.

    1987-02-27

    This contract provided research, analysis and development support for integrated systems with applications to ephemerides, physics, and mathematics of the upper atmosphere. Investigations were supported in various aspects of neutral atmospheric density, ionospheric scintillation, magnetic field models, magnetospherically trapped particles and auroral-particle precipitation. Software systems have been developed for processing and analyzing data pertaining to these research areas, and for interactive targeting of the space shuttle, ephemeris computation during double thrust, and processing of celestial aspect sensor data.

  15. Detection of a multi-phase ISM at {vec z=} 0.2212

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekar, N.; Ghosh, T.; Chengalur, J. N.

    2001-07-01

    We present sensitive Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) and high-resolution Arecibo HI 21-cm observations of the damped Lyman-alpha absorber (DLA) at z=0.2212 towards OI 363 (B2 0738+313). The GMRT and Arecibo spectra are in excellent agreement and yield a spin temperature Ts = 890 +/- 160 K, consistent with earlier lower sensitivity observations of the system. This value of Ts is far higher than spin temperatures measured for the Milky Way and local spirals but is similar to Ts values obtained in the majority of damped absorbers (Ts >~ 1000 K). The high velocity resolution of the Arecibo spectra enables us to obtain estimates of physical conditions in the absorbing clouds by fitting multiple Gaussians to the absorption profile. The spectra are well fit by a three-component model with two narrow and one wide components, with temperatures Tk_1 = 308 +/- 24 K, Tk_2 = 180 +/- 30 K and Tk_3 = 7600 +/- 1250 K, respectively. The last of these is in excellent agreement with the expected temperatures for the WNM (5000 - 8000 K). Further, the mere fact that components are seen with lower temperatures than the estimated Ts implies that the absorber must have a multi-phase medium. We use the measured 21-cm optical depth and the above estimates of the kinetic temperature to obtain the HI column density in the various components. The total column density in the narrow components is found to be NHI (CNM) <= 1.9 +/- 0.25 *E20 cm-2, while that in the wide component is NNI (WNM) >= 1.26 +/- 0.49 *E21 cm-2. Thus, the WNM contains at least 75% of the total HI in the z = 0.2212 DLA, unlike our Galaxy, in which the CNM and WNM have equitable contributions. As conjectured earlier (Chengalur & Kanekar 2000), this accounts for the difference in the spin temperatures of the z = 0.2212 system and local spirals, suggesting that the DLA is probably a dwarf or LSB type galaxy; this is also in agreement with optical studies (Turnshek et al. 2001). Finally, the total column density in the

  16. Performance evaluation of granular activated carbon system at Pantex: Rapid small-scale column tests to simulate removal of high explosives from contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Henke, J.L.; Speitel, G.E.

    1998-08-01

    A granular activated carbon (GAC) system is now in operation at Pantex to treat groundwater from the perched aquifer that is contaminated with high explosives. The main chemicals of concern are RDX and HMX. The system consists of two GAC columns in series. Each column is charged with 10,000 pounds of Northwestern LB-830 GAC. At the design flow rate of 325 gpm, the hydraulic loading is 6.47 gpm/ft{sup 2}, and the empty bed contact time is 8.2 minutes per column. Currently, the system is operating at less than 10% of its design flow rate, although flow rate increases are expected in the relatively near future. This study had several objectives: Estimate the service life of the GAC now in use at Pantex; Screen several GACs to provide a recommendation on the best GAC for use at Pantex when the current GAC is exhausted and is replaced; Determine the extent to which natural organic matter in the Pantex groundwater fouls GAC adsorption sites, thereby decreasing the adsorption capacity for high explosives; and Determine if computer simulation models could match the experimental results, thereby providing another tool to follow system performance.

  17. Americium, Cesium, and Plutonium Colloid-Facilitated Transport in a Groundwater/Bentonite/Fracture Fill Material System: Column Experiments and Model Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, T. M.; Boukhalfa, H.; Reimus, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate and quantify the effects of desorption kinetics and colloid transport on radionuclides with different sorption affinities. We focused on quantifying transport mechanisms important for upscaling in time and distance. This will help determine the long-term fate and transport of radionuclides to aid in risk assessments. We selected a fractured/weathered granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland as a model crystalline rock repository system because the system has been thoroughly studied and field experiments involving radionuclides have already been conducted. Working on this system provides a unique opportunity to compare lab experiments with field-scale observations. Weathered fracture fill material (FFM) and bentonite used as backfill at the GTS were characterized (e.g., BET, SEM/EDS, QXRD), and batch and breakthrough column experiments were conducted. Solutions were prepared in synthetic groundwaters that matched the natural water chemistry. FFM samples were crushed, rinsed, sieved (150-355 μm), and equilibrated with synthetic groundwater. Bentonite was crushed, sodium-saturated, equilibrated with synthetic groundwater, and settled to yield a stable suspension. Suspensions were equilibrated with Am, Cs, or Pu. All experiments were conducted with Teflon®materials to limit sorption to system components. After radionuclide/colloid injections reached stability, radionuclide-free solutions were injected to observe the desorption and release behavior. Aliquots of effluent were measured for pH, colloid concentration, and total and dissolved radionuclides. Unanalyzed effluent from the first column was then injected through a second column of fresh material. The process was repeated for a third column and the results of all three breakthrough curves were modeled with a multi-site/multi-rate MATLAB code to elucidate the sorption rate coefficients and binding site densities of the bentonite colloids and

  18. Ultrasonic rate measurement of multiphase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannert, David A.; Horne, Roland N.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most important tools in production logging and well testing is the downhole flowmeter. Unfortunately, existing tools are inaccurate outside of an idealized single phase flow regime. Spinner tools are inaccurate at extremely high or low flow rates and when the flow rate is variable. Radioactive tracer tools have similar inaccuracies and are extremely sensitive to the flow regime. Both tools completely fail in the presence of multiphase flow, whether for gas/oil, gas/water, or fluid/solid. Downhole flowmetering is important for locating producing zones and thief zones and monitoring production and injection rates. The effects of stimulation can also be determined. The goal of this project is the investigation of accurate downhole flowmetering techniques for all single phase flow regimes and multiphase flows. The measurement method investigated in this report is the use of ultrasound. There are two ways to use ultrasound for fluid velocity measurement. The first method, examined in Chapter 2, is the contrapropagation, or transit-time, method which compares travel times with and against fluid flow. Chapter 3 details the second method which measures the Doppler frequency shift of a reflected sound wave in the moving fluid. Both of these technologies need to be incorporated in order to build a true multiphase flowmeter. Chapter 4 describes the proposed downhole multiphase flowmeter.

  19. Multiphase Instabilities in Explosive Dispersal of Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S. ``Bala''

    2015-11-01

    Explosive dispersal of particles is a complex multiphase phenomenon that can be observed in volcanic eruptions or in engineering applications such as multiphase explosives. As the layer of particles moves outward at high speed, it undergoes complex interactions with the blast-wave structure following the reaction of the energetic material. Particularly in this work, we are interested in the multiphase flow instabilities related to Richmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RM) instabilities (in the gas phase and particulate phase), which take place as the particle layer disperses. These types of instabilities are known to depend on initial conditions for a relatively long time of their evolution. Using a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, we study the growth of these instabilities and their dependence on initial conditions related to the particulate phase - namely, (i) particle size, (ii) initial distribution, and (iii) mass ratio (particles to explosive). Additional complexities associated with compaction of the layer of particles are avoided here by limiting the simulations to modest initial volume fraction of particles. A detailed analysis of the initial conditions and its effects on multiphase RM/RT-like instabilities in the context of an explosive dispersal of particles is presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  20. Ultrasonic rate measurement of multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dannert, D.A.; Horne, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    On of the most important tools in production logging and well testing is the downhole flowmeter. Unfortunately, existing tools are inaccurate outside of an idealized single phase flow, regime. Spinner tools are inaccurate at extremely high or low, flow rates and when the flow rate is variable. Radioactive tracer tools have similar inaccuracies and are extremely sensitive to the flow regime. Both tools completely fail in the presence of multiphase flow, whether gas/ oil, gas/water or fluid/solid. Downhole flowmetering is important for locating producing zones and thief zones and monitoring production and injection rates. The effects of stimulation can also be determined. This goal of this project is the investigation of accurate downhole flowmetering techniques for all single phase flow regimes and multiphase flows. The measurement method investigated in this report is the use of ultrasound. There are two ways to use ultrasound for fluid velocity measurement. The first method, examined in Chapter 2, is the contrapropagation, or transit-time, method which compares travel times with and against fluid flow. Chapter 3 details the second method which measures the Doppler frequency shift of a reflected sound wave in the moving fluid. Both of these technologies need to be incorporated in order to build a true multiphase flowmeter. Chapter 4 describes the proposed downhole multiphase flowmeter. It has many advantages besides the ones previously mentioned and is in full in that chapter.

  1. Multi-Phase Driver Education Teaching Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst-Euless-Bedford Independent School District, Hurst, TX.

    For use in planning and conducting functional multi-phase driver education programs, this teacher's guide consists of four phases of instruction: classroom activities, simulated application, in-car range practice, and in-car public practice. Contents are divided into three instructional sections, with the first combining the classroom activities…

  2. Multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver for incompressible multiphase flows with large density ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shu, C.; Huang, H. B.; Teo, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    A multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver (MLBFS) is proposed in this paper for incompressible multiphase flows with low- and large-density-ratios. In the solver, the flow variables at cell centers are given from the solution of macroscopic governing differential equations (Navier-Stokes equations recovered by multiphase lattice Boltzmann (LB) model) by the finite volume method. At each cell interface, the viscous and inviscid fluxes are evaluated simultaneously by local reconstruction of solution for the standard lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE). The forcing terms in the governing equations are directly treated by the finite volume discretization. The phase interfaces are captured by solving the phase-field Cahn-Hilliard equation with a fifth order upwind scheme. Unlike the conventional multiphase LB models, which restrict their applications on uniform grids with fixed time step, the MLBFS has the capability and advantage to simulate multiphase flows on non-uniform grids. The proposed solver is validated by several benchmark problems, such as two-phase co-current flow, Taylor-Couette flow in an annulus, Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and droplet splashing on a thin film at density ratio of 1000 with Reynolds numbers ranging from 20 to 1000. Numerical results show the reliability of the proposed solver for multiphase flows with high density ratio and high Reynolds number.

  3. A Fully-Coupled, Fully-Implicit, Finite Element Model for Solving Multiphase Fluid Flow, Heat Transport and Rock Deformation in Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Deng, S.; Podgorney, R. K.; Huang, H.

    2011-12-01

    Reliable reservoir performance predictions of enhanced geothermal reservoir systems require accurate and robust modeling for the coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical processes. Conventionally, in order to reduce computational cost, these types of problems are solved using operator splitting method, usually by sequentially coupling a subsurface flow and heat transport simulator with a solid mechanics simulator via input files. However, such operator splitting approaches are applicable only to loosely coupled problems and usually converge slowly. As in most enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), fluid flow, heat transport, and rock deformation are typically strongly nonlinearly coupled, an alternative is to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations that govern the system simultaneously using a fully coupled solution procedure for fluid flow, heat transport, and solid mechanics. This procedure solves for all solution variables (fluid pressure, temperature and rock displacement fields) simultaneously, which leads to one large nonlinear algebraic system that needs to be solved by a strongly convergent nonlinear solver. Development over the past 10 years in the area of physics-based conditioning, strongly convergent nonlinear solvers (such as Jacobian Free Newton methods) and efficient linear solvers (such as GMRES, AMG), makes such an approach competitive. In this presentation, we will introduce a continuum-scaled parallel physics-based, fully coupled, modeling tool for predicting the dynamics of fracture initiation and propagation, fluid flow, rock deformation, and heat transport in a single integrated code named FALCON (Fracturing And Liquid-steam CONvection). FALCON is built upon a parallel computing framework developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for solving coupled systems of nonlinear equations with finite element method with unstructured and adaptively refined/coarsened grids. Currently, FALCON contains poro- and thermal- elastic models

  4. Self-regenerating column chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Park, Woo K.

    1995-05-30

    The present invention provides a process for treating both cations and anions by using a self-regenerating, multi-ionic exchange resin column system which requires no separate regeneration steps. The process involves alternating ion-exchange chromatography for cations and anions in a multi-ionic exchange column packed with a mixture of cation and anion exchange resins. The multi-ionic mixed-charge resin column works as a multi-function column, capable of independently processing either cationic or anionic exchange, or simultaneously processing both cationic and anionic exchanges. The major advantage offered by the alternating multi-function ion exchange process is the self-regeneration of the resins.

  5. Using Observations of Deep Convective Systems to Constrain Atmospheric Column Absorption of Solar Radiation in the Optically Thick Limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, Xiquan; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Xi, Baike; Hu, Yongxiang; Mace, Gerald G.; Benson, Sally; Rose, Fred; Kato, Seiji; Charlock, Thomas; Minnis, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric column absorption of solar radiation A(sub col) is a fundamental part of the Earth's energy cycle but is an extremely difficult quantity to measure directly. To investigate A(sub col), we have collocated satellite-surface observations for the optically thick Deep Convective Systems (DCS) at the Department of Energy Atmosphere Radiation Measurement (ARM) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) sites during the period of March 2000 December 2004. The surface data were averaged over a 2-h interval centered at the time of the satellite overpass, and the satellite data were averaged within a 1 deg X 1 deg area centered on the ARM sites. In the DCS, cloud particle size is important for top-of-atmosphere (TOA) albedo and A(sub col) although the surface absorption is independent of cloud particle size. In this study, we find that the A(sub col) in the tropics is approximately 0.011 more than that in the middle latitudes. This difference, however, disappears, i.e., the A(sub col) values at both regions converge to the same value (approximately 0.27 of the total incoming solar radiation) in the optically thick limit (tau greater than 80). Comparing the observations with the NASA Langley modified Fu_Liou 2-stream radiative transfer model for optically thick cases, the difference between observed and model-calculated surface absorption, on average, is less than 0.01, but the model-calculated TOA albedo and A(sub col) differ by 0.01 to 0.04, depending primarily on the cloud particle size observation used. The model versus observation discrepancies found are smaller than many previous studies and are just within the estimated error bounds. We did not find evidence for a large cloud absorption anomaly for the optically thick limit of extensive ice cloud layers. A more modest cloud absorption difference of 0.01 to 0.04 cannot yet be ruled out. The remaining uncertainty could be reduced with additional cases, and by reducing the current

  6. Experimental assessment and modeling of interphase mass transfer rates of organic compounds in multiphase subsurface systems. Final report, July 1, 1989--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Abriola, L.M.; Weber, W.J. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    Results of an experimental investigation into strady state dissolution of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLS) entrapped within water saturated porous media are presented. Influence of porous media type, NAPL characteristics, and aqueous phase flow velocity are examined for transient and steady-state dissolution of NAPL. Entrapped NAPL distributions are examined and are found to influence mass transfer between the phases. A phenomenological model for the steady state mass transfer process is developed which expresses a lumped mass transfer coefficient as a function of the hydrodynamics of the system and grain size parameters as a surrogate measure of the NAPL distribution. Transient dissolution data is used to develop two alternative phenomenological models for mass transfer. The models are incorporated into a onedimensional numerical simulator and are shown to be effective predictors of transient dissolution data in similar experimental systems. In order to further explore the effects of scale and heterogeneities on NAPL dissolution, the sphere model is incorporated into a two-dimensional simulator and is used to explore long-term dissolution of a TCE (trichloroethylene) spill in a layered system of sands. The simulation demonstrates the significance of heterogeneity, both in controlling the initial distribution of NAPL and the rate of NAPL dissolution.

  7. Multiphase studies in continental and marine atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acker, K.; Wieprecht, W.; Möller, D.

    2010-07-01

    The largest uncertainty in future climate predictions is caused by aerosols and clouds and their interaction with radiation (IPCC, 2007). Aerosol particles have multiple impacts on atmospheric properties: response to climate by optical properties, providing cloud condensation nuclei, being a heterogeneous surface for multiphase chemical reactions e.g. as a source for reactive chlorine. Therefore the chlorine partitioning in marine and continental atmospheres was studied during intensive field campaigns at two European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research: Melpitz (51°32N, 12°54 E; 87 m a.s.l., near Leipzig (D), Spindler et al., 2004) and Mace Head (53°19 N, 9°54 W; ~10 m a.s.l., near Galway (IR); O`Connor et al., 2008). Hydrochloric acid (HCl), nitric acid (HNO3) and other gaseous species as well after diffusion based separation particulate matter components (e.g., Na, Cl, nitrate, sulphate and others) were determined simultaneously by a denuder-steam chamber-IC-system with a time resolution of 30 min; limit of quantification: 10 ng m-3 (air flow 10 l min-1; Acker et al., 2005). Numerous other atmospheric components (in gas and particulate phase) as well meteorological parameters were determined. Assuming Na to be only of sea-salt origin, the (mass) Na/Cl ratio found in sea water (Rsea = 0.56) is used for calculation of the degree in chlorine loss in particulate matter: Clloss=1-Rsea/Rsample. In Mace Head to a significant extent (~ 20%), sea salt already is depleted in Cl in air masses originate exclusive from the clean marine sector, mainly caused by HCl formation during heterogeneous sulphate formation. In continental influenced air masses a higher degree in Clloss (~ 46%) was found due to additional acid replacement by nitric acid. In air masses arriving Melpitz a very high loss in chlorine has been observed in the aerosol (~ 83%), not showing a significant dependency from the air mass sector and transport percentage above continent. The high

  8. Multiphase Flow Modeling of Biofuel Production Processes

    SciTech Connect

    D. Gaston; D. P. Guillen; J. Tester

    2011-06-01

    As part of the Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Secure Energy Initiative, the INL is performing research in areas that are vital to ensuring clean, secure energy supplies for the future. The INL Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. HYTEST involves producing liquid fuels in a Hybrid Energy System (HES) by integrating carbon-based (i.e., bio-mass, oil-shale, etc.) with non-carbon based energy sources (i.e., wind energy, hydro, geothermal, nuclear, etc.). Advances in process development, control and modeling are the unifying vision for HES. This paper describes new modeling tools and methodologies to simulate advanced energy processes. Needs are emerging that require advanced computational modeling of multiphase reacting systems in the energy arena, driven by the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act, which requires production of 36 billion gal/yr of biofuels by 2022, with 21 billion gal of this as advanced biofuels. Advanced biofuels derived from microalgal biomass have the potential to help achieve the 21 billion gal mandate, as well as reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Production of biofuels from microalgae is receiving considerable interest due to their potentially high oil yields (around 600 gal/acre). Microalgae have a high lipid content (up to 50%) and grow 10 to 100 times faster than terrestrial plants. The use of environmentally friendly alternatives to solvents and reagents commonly employed in reaction and phase separation processes is being explored. This is accomplished through the use of hydrothermal technologies, which are chemical and physical transformations in high-temperature (200-600 C), high-pressure (5-40 MPa) liquid or supercritical water. Figure 1 shows a simplified diagram of the production of biofuels from algae. Hydrothermal processing has significant

  9. More Constraints on the Physical Conditions of the Kinematically Complex, Multiphase Absorption Line System at z=0.93 toward PG1206+459

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenwasser, Ben; Muzahid, Sowgat; Norris, Jackson; Charlton, Jane C.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of photo- and collisional ionization modeling of the strong MgII absorption system at redshift z~0.93 towards the quasar PG1206+459. This system has been extensively studied over the last two decades (Churchill & Charlton 1999; Ding et al. 2003; Tripp et al. 2011) using a combination of spectra from Keck/HIRES, HST/FOS, HST/STIS, and HST/COS. Here we present newconstraints using the most complete spectral coverage including more recent observations of OVI and the Lyman series from HST/COS. Numerous absorption components are seen over a large velocity spread (~1500km/s), and multiple ionization phases are required to account for the detected transitions, which include MgI, MgII, FeII, SiII, SiIII, SiIV, CII, CIII, CIV, SIII, SIV, SV, SVI, NIII, NIV, NV, OIII, OIV, OV, OVI, and NeVIII. Considering the new constraints, we revisit the question of the physical nature of the structures that produce this absorber.

  10. Starch columns: Analog model for basalt columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Gerhard

    1998-07-01

    Desiccation of starch-water mixtures produces tensile-crack patterns which appear to be interesting, but largely unknown study objects for fracture mechanics, structural geology, and volcanology. This paper concentrates on columnar jointing and on columns in starch. Starch columns have polygonal cross sections and are very similar to basalt columns. They are produced by lamp drying starch specimens with dimensions of several centimeters and have diameters in the millimeter range. The columns develop behind a crack front which propagates from the surface into the interior. The experiments, supported by X ray tomograms, show that polygonal regularity of the crack pattern is not present at the surface but develops during penetration. This transition is steered by a minimum-fracture-energy principle. The analogy between basalt cooling and starch desiccation is far reaching: water concentration in starch is analogous to temperature in basalt, both quantities obey diffusion equations, water loss is equivalent to heat loss, the resulting contraction stresses have similar dependences on depth and time, and in both cases the material strength is exceeded. The starch experiments show that column diameters are controlled by the depth gradient of water concentration at the crack front. High (low) gradients are connected with thin (thick) columns. By analogy, a similar relation with the temperature gradient exists for basalt columns. The (normalized) starch gradients are about 3 orders of magnitude larger than the (normalized) gradients in basalt. This explains why starch columns are much thinner than basalt columns. The gradients are so different, because the crack front speeds differ by a factor of about 10: after 3 days the speed is about 10 mm/d in starch but about 100 mm/d in basalt [Peck, 1978]. The speed difference, in turn, results from the difference of the diffusion constants: the hydraulic diffusivity of starch is 2 orders of magnitude lower than the thermal

  11. Development of gas chromatography-flame ionization detection system with a single column and liquid nitrogen-free for measuring atmospheric C2-C12 hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengtang; Mu, Yujing; Zhang, Chenglong; Zhang, Zhibo; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Junfeng; Sheng, Jiujiang; Quan, Jiannong

    2016-01-01

    A liquid nitrogen-free GC-FID system equipped with a single column has been developed for measuring atmospheric C2-C12 hydrocarbons. The system is consisted of a cooling unit, a sampling unit and a separation unit. The cooling unit is used to meet the temperature needs of the sampling unit and the separation unit. The sampling unit includes a dehydration tube and an enrichment tube. No breakthrough of the hydrocarbons was detected when the temperature of the enrichment tube was kept at -90 °C and sampling volume was 400 mL. The separation unit is a small round oven attached on the cooling column. A single capillary column (OV-1, 30 m × 0.32 mm I.D.) was used to separate the hydrocarbons. An optimal program temperature (-60 ∼ 170 °C) of the oven was achieved to efficiently separate C2-C12 hydrocarbons. There were good linear correlations (R(2)=0.993-0.999) between the signals of the hydrocarbons and the enrichment amount of hydrocarbons, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was less than 5%, and the method detection limits (MDLs) for the hydrocarbons were in the range of 0.02-0.10 ppbv for sampling volume of 400 mL. Field measurements were also conducted and more than 50 hydrocarbons from C2 to C12 were detected in Beijing city.

  12. Development of gas chromatography-flame ionization detection system with a single column and liquid nitrogen-free for measuring atmospheric C2-C12 hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengtang; Mu, Yujing; Zhang, Chenglong; Zhang, Zhibo; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Junfeng; Sheng, Jiujiang; Quan, Jiannong

    2016-01-01

    A liquid nitrogen-free GC-FID system equipped with a single column has been developed for measuring atmospheric C2-C12 hydrocarbons. The system is consisted of a cooling unit, a sampling unit and a separation unit. The cooling unit is used to meet the temperature needs of the sampling unit and the separation unit. The sampling unit includes a dehydration tube and an enrichment tube. No breakthrough of the hydrocarbons was detected when the temperature of the enrichment tube was kept at -90 °C and sampling volume was 400 mL. The separation unit is a small round oven attached on the cooling column. A single capillary column (OV-1, 30 m × 0.32 mm I.D.) was used to separate the hydrocarbons. An optimal program temperature (-60 ∼ 170 °C) of the oven was achieved to efficiently separate C2-C12 hydrocarbons. There were good linear correlations (R(2)=0.993-0.999) between the signals of the hydrocarbons and the enrichment amount of hydrocarbons, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was less than 5%, and the method detection limits (MDLs) for the hydrocarbons were in the range of 0.02-0.10 ppbv for sampling volume of 400 mL. Field measurements were also conducted and more than 50 hydrocarbons from C2 to C12 were detected in Beijing city. PMID:26687163

  13. Microstructure and properties of multiphase and functionally graded materials prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.Y.

    1996-05-01

    The synthesis of multiphase and functionally graded materials by chemical vapor deposition is discussed from a perspective of controlling their composition and microstructure at a nano-scale level, and ultimately, tailoring their material properties. Prior research is briefly reviewed to address the current state of this novel material concept. Recent experimental results relating to controlling the selected properties of two multiphase systems, TiN + MoS{sub 2} and NiAl + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, are described to illustrate this concept`s potential merits and challenges for use in realistic applications.

  14. Some Specific CASL Requirements for Advanced Multiphase Flow Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Berry

    2010-11-01

    Because of the diversity of physical phenomena occuring in boiling, flashing, and bubble collapse, and of the length and time scales of LWR systems, it is imperative that the models have the following features: • Both vapor and liquid phases (and noncondensible phases, if present) must be treated as compressible. • Models must be mathematically and numerically well-posed. • The models methodology must be multi-scale. A fundamental derivation of the multiphase governing equation system, that should be used as a basis for advanced multiphase modeling in LWR coolant systems, is given in the Appendix using the ensemble averaging method. The remainder of this work focuses specifically on the compressible, well-posed, and multi-scale requirements of advanced simulation methods for these LWR coolant systems, because without these are the most fundamental aspects, without which widespread advancement cannot be claimed. Because of the expense of developing multiple special-purpose codes and the inherent inability to couple information from the multiple, separate length- and time-scales, efforts within CASL should be focused toward development of a multi-scale approaches to solve those multiphase flow problems relevant to LWR design and safety analysis. Efforts should be aimed at developing well-designed unified physical/mathematical and high-resolution numerical models for compressible, all-speed multiphase flows spanning: (1) Well-posed general mixture level (true multiphase) models for fast transient situations and safety analysis, (2) DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation)-like models to resolve interface level phenmena like flashing and boiling flows, and critical heat flux determination (necessarily including conjugate heat transfer), and (3) Multi-scale methods to resolve both (1) and (2) automatically, depending upon specified mesh resolution, and to couple different flow models (single-phase, multiphase with several velocities and pressures, multiphase with single

  15. The TOUGH codes - a family of simulation tools for multiphase flowand transport processes in permeable media

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten

    2003-08-08

    Numerical simulation has become a widely practiced andaccepted technique for studying flow and transport processes in thevadose zone and other subsurface flow systems. This article discusses asuite of codes, developed primarily at Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory (LBNL), with the capability to model multiphase flows withphase change. We summarize history and goals in the development of theTOUGH codes, and present the governing equations for multiphase,multicomponent flow. Special emphasis is given to space discretization bymeans of integral finite differences (IFD). Issues of code implementationand architecture are addressed, as well as code applications,maintenance, and future developments.

  16. Preliminary flashing multiphase flow analysis with application to letdown valves in coal-conversion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L. J.; Khan, A. A.

    1982-09-01

    As part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's technical support to large coal liquefaction projects, attempts have been made to (1) develop the methodology for characterizing and predicting multicomponent, multiphase, non-Newtonian flow behavior within letdown valves and devices, and (2) analyze the fluid flow in the entire letdown region of the process. An engineering model that can be used in the analysis of multicomponent, multiphase, flashing, flowing systems has been developed. A preliminary version of a user-oriented computer code for this model has been developed and is fully described.

  17. Evaluation of a coupled model for numerical simulation of a multiphase flow system in a porous medium and a surface fluid.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among atmosphere, water, and groundwater, including saltwater intrusion along coasts. Coupled numerical simulations of such problems must consider both vertical flow between the surface fluid and the porous medium and complicated boundary conditions at their interface. In this study, a numerical simulation method coupling Navier-Stokes equations for surface fluid flow and Darcy equations for flow in a porous medium was developed. Then, the basic ability of the coupled model to reproduce (1) the drawdown of a surface fluid observed in square-pillar experiments, using pillars filled with only fluid or with fluid and a porous medium and (2) the migration of saltwater (salt concentration 0.5%) in the porous medium using the pillar filled with fluid and a porous medium was evaluated. Simulations that assumed slippery walls reproduced well the results with drawdowns of 10-30 cm when the pillars were filled with packed sand, gas, and water. Moreover, in the simulation of saltwater infiltration by the method developed in this study, velocity was precisely reproduced because the experimental salt concentration in the porous medium after saltwater infiltration was similar to that obtained in the simulation. Furthermore, conditions across the boundary between the porous medium and the surface fluid were satisfied in these numerical simulations of square-pillar experiments in which vertical flow predominated. Similarly, the velocity obtained by the simulation for a system coupling flow in surface fluid with that in a porous medium when horizontal flow predominated satisfied the conditions across the boundary. Finally, it was confirmed that the present simulation method was able to simulate a practical-scale surface fluid and porous medium system. All of these numerical simulations, however, required a great deal of

  18. Basin-Scale Study on the Multiphase Distribution, Source Apportionment and Risk Assessment of PAHs in the Hai River Water System.

    PubMed

    Li, Rufeng; Zhang, Xian'e; Liu, Yanzhen; Yin, Su; Liu, Jingling; Feng, Chenghong

    2016-10-01

    As a systematic research at basin scale, this study explored the composition and concentration characteristics of 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediments, water, and suspended particulate matter (SPM) in the water systems (rivers, lakes, and reservoirs) in the Hai River Basin through literature review. The sources and the ecosystem risks of PAHs in the sediments in the entire basin were specially discussed with diagnostic ration, PAHs composition, and an improved risk quotient method. Results showed that the total concentration of PAHs varied from 99.65 to 25,303 ng g(-1) dry weight in sediments, from 51.0 to 559.1 ng L(-1) in water, and from 4528 to 51,080 ng g(-1) dry weight in SPM, respectively. The dominant PAHs in the three examined phases were 2-3 rings in most waterbodies. PAHs in the rivers were from mixed sources (petrogenic and pyrolytic inputs), whereas those in lakes and reservoirs were mainly from biomass combustion and petroleum combustion. PAHs in the entire basin exhibited moderate to high ecological risk, and the rivers (especially Hai River, Jiyun River, Chaobai River, and Beiyun River) suffered higher ecological risk than reservoirs and lakes. Most of the rivers with higher PAHs risk flow through or around megacity Beijing and Tianjin. PMID:27421725

  19. Column Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majors, Ronald E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature covering developments of column liquid chromatography during 1982-83. Areas considered include: books and reviews; general theory; columns; instrumentation; detectors; automation and data handling; multidimensional chromatographic and column switching techniques; liquid-solid chromatography; normal bonded-phase, reversed-phase,…

  20. The Effects of Pulsating Flow on Eruption Column Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, T.; Dufek, J.; Benage, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Pulsating flow, at frequencies ranging from 10-2 to 101 Hz, has been recorded in explosive eruptions through video, thermal imagery, and infrasonic and seismic data. Such pulsating flow can be generated from instabilities in bubbly magma, and from granular instabilities in post-fragmentation conduit flow. Variable fluxes of gas and particles at the vent can alter entrainment conditions, and consequently affect eruption column stability. However, volcanic eruption models typically assume steady flow from the vent, and regime diagrams of eruption column stability are based on such steady flow assumptions. Using Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase numerical simulations of eruption columns with both steady and pulsating sources, we compared the relative behavior of steady and pulsed columns across a range of pulse frequencies and mass fluxes at the vent (mass flux is time-averaged for pulsating cases). Preliminary results suggest that pulsating flow increases air entrainment into the column relative to steady flow for otherwise constant eruption conditions, and that entrainment increases with decreasing pulse frequency. Increased entrainment at low frequency implies that low-frequency pulsed columns are more buoyant and potentially more stable than their steady counterparts, for a given mass flux. This effect disrupts the steady flow-based understanding of eruption column stability regimes and may be a factor to consider for future assessment of volcanic hazards and interpreting mass flux conditions from deposits.

  1. Artificial neural network (ANN) modeling of adsorption of methylene blue by NaOH-modified rice husk in a fixed-bed column system.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shamik; Saha, Papita Das

    2013-02-01

    In this study, rice husk was modified with NaOH and used as adsorbent for dynamic adsorption of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions. Continuous removal of MB from aqueous solutions was studied in a laboratory scale fixed-bed column packed with NaOH-modified rice husk (NMRH). Effect of different flow rates and bed heights on the column breakthrough performance was investigated. In order to determine the most suitable model for describing the adsorption kinetics of MB in the fixed-bed column system, the bed depth service time (BDST) model as well as the Thomas model was fitted to the experimental data. An artificial neural network (ANN)-based model was also developed for describing the dynamic dye adsorption process. An extensive error analysis was carried out between experimental data and data predicted by the models by using the following error functions: correlation coefficient (R(2)), average relative error, sum of the absolute error and Chi-square statistic test (χ(2)). Results show that with increasing bed height and decreasing flow rate, the breakthrough time was delayed. All the error functions yielded minimum values for the ANN model than the traditional models (BDST and Thomas), suggesting that the ANN model is the most suitable model to describe the fixed-bed adsorption of MB by NMRH. It is also more rational and reliable to interpret dynamic dye adsorption data through a process of ANN architecture.

  2. Error handling strategies in multiphase inverse modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Parameter estimation by inverse modeling involves the repeated evaluation of a function of residuals. These residuals represent both errors in the model and errors in the data. In practical applications of inverse modeling of multiphase flow and transport, the error structure of the final residuals often significantly deviates from the statistical assumptions that underlie standard maximum likelihood estimation using the least-squares method. Large random or systematic errors are likely to lead to convergence problems, biased parameter estimates, misleading uncertainty measures, or poor predictive capabilities of the calibrated model. The multiphase inverse modeling code iTOUGH2 supports strategies that identify and mitigate the impact of systematic or non-normal error structures. We discuss these approaches and provide an overview of the error handling features implemented in iTOUGH2.

  3. Pattern recognition techniques for horizontal and vertically upward multiphase flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arubi, Tesi I. M.; Yeung, Hoi

    2012-03-01

    The oil and gas industry need for high performing and low cost multiphase meters is ever more justified given the rapid depletion of conventional oil reserves that has led oil companies to develop smaller and marginal fields and reservoirs in remote locations and deep offshore, thereby placing great demands for compact and more cost effective solutions of on-line continuous multiphase flow measurement for well testing, production monitoring, production optimisation, process control and automation. The pattern recognition approach for clamp-on multiphase measurement employed in this study provides one means for meeting this need. High speed caesium-137 radioisotope-based densitometers were installed vertically at the top of a 50.8mm and 101.6mm riser as well as horizontally at the riser base in the Cranfield University multiphase flow test facility. A comprehensive experimental campaign comprising flow conditions typical of operating conditions found in the Petroleum Industry was conducted. The application of a single gamma densitometer unit, in conjunction with pattern recognition techniques to determine both the phase volume fractions and velocities to yield the individual phase flow rates of horizontal and vertically upward multiphase flows was investigated. The pattern recognition systems were trained to map the temporal fluctuations in the multiphase mixture density with the individual phase flow rates using statistical features extracted from the gamma counts signals as their inputs. Initial results yielded individual phase flow rate predictions to within ±5% relative error for the two phase airwater flows and ±10% for three phase air-oil-water flows data.

  4. A Gallium multiphase equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Scott D; Greeff, Carl

    2009-01-01

    A new SESAME multiphase Gallium equation of state (EOS) has been developed. The equation of state includes three of the solid phases (Ga I, Ga II, Ga III) and a fluid phase (liquid/gas). The EOS includes consistent latent heat between the phases. We compare the results to the liquid Hugoniol data. We also explore the possibility of re-freezing via dynamic means such as isentropic and shock compression.

  5. Modified Invasion Percolation Models for Multiphase Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Karpyn, Zuleima

    2015-01-31

    This project extends current understanding and modeling capabilities of pore-scale multiphase flow physics in porous media. High-resolution X-ray computed tomography imaging experiments are used to investigate structural and surface properties of the medium that influence immiscible displacement. Using experimental and computational tools, we investigate the impact of wetting characteristics, as well as radial and axial loading conditions, on the development of percolation pathways, residual phase trapping and fluid-fluid interfacial areas.

  6. Advances in multiphasic screening and testing.

    PubMed

    Miller, C E

    1967-11-01

    The multiphasic testing center of the future will probably be used both for periodic screening tests and for referrals by practicing physicians. Recent widespread interest of several branches of the Federal Government in multiphasic screening stems from the possibility that, through its use, the enormous cost of chronic illness to the country may be reduced.Recent advances in automation and the storage, retrieval, and analysis of data by computers make it economically feasible to obtain much more information about the patient's health than ever before. New instrument developments include both screening and diagnostic analysis of electrocardiograms by computers, analysis of heart sounds by computer, and a wide variety of other physiological and biochemical instruments. To allow for the inclusion and evaluation of these new procedures, a number of multiphasic testing centers will be needed which can do both research and routine testing. Close cooperation between the medical profession, the public health services and industry will be needed to best serve both the public and the medical profession.

  7. Practical aspects and uncertainty analysis of biological effective dose (BED) regarding its three-dimensional calculation in multiphase radiotherapy treatment plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kauweloa, Kevin I. Gutierrez, Alonso N.; Bergamo, Angelo; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Mavroidis, Panayiotis

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: There is a growing interest in the radiation oncology community to use the biological effective dose (BED) rather than the physical dose (PD) in treatment plan evaluation and optimization due to its stronger correlation with radiobiological effects. Radiotherapy patients may receive treatments involving a single only phase or multiple phases (e.g., primary and boost). Since most treatment planning systems cannot calculate the analytical BED distribution in multiphase treatments, an approximate multiphase BED expression, which is based on the total physical dose distribution, has been used. The purpose of this paper is to reveal the mathematical properties of the approximate BED formulation, relative to the true BED. Methods: The mathematical properties of the approximate multiphase BED equation are analyzed and evaluated. In order to better understand the accuracy of the approximate multiphase BED equation, the true multiphase BED equation was derived and the mathematical differences between the true and approximate multiphase BED equations were determined. The magnitude of its inaccuracies under common clinical circumstances was also studied. All calculations were performed on a voxel-by-voxel basis using the three-dimensional dose matrices. Results: Results showed that the approximate multiphase BED equation is accurate only when the dose-per-fractions (DPFs) in both the first and second phases are equal, which occur when the dose distribution does not significantly change between the phases. In the case of heterogeneous dose distributions, which significantly vary between the phases, there are fewer occurrences of equal DPFs and hence the inaccuracy of the approximate multiphase BED is greater. These characteristics are usually seen in the dose distributions being delivered to organs at risk rather than to targets. Conclusions: The finding of this study indicates that the true multiphase BED equation should be implemented in the treatment planning

  8. Multi-phase shock simulations with smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omang, M. G.; Trulsen, J. K.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we present an approach to the implementation of a multi-phase description in the numerical Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method. The work is based on previous work, but has been modified to suit the applications of interest, in this case shock propagation through dusty gases. Theoretical models for multi-phase systems rely on the introduction of a number of terms describing the interaction between the different phases; drag and heat exchange are two examples. These terms contain parameters, the value of many of which must be determined empirically. We present results on the effect of changing values of some of the important parameters and compare our results to experimental and numerical results published in the literature. Our numerical results generally agree well with published results, taking uncertainties concerning accuracy in existing experimental data and details in the choice of parameters for numerical results into consideration. In particular, we find that a reduction in dust particle size is an efficient way of increasing shock retardation for a given dust loading.

  9. Multi-phase multi-component reactive flow in Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Beñat; Afonso, Juan Carlos; Zlotnik, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Multi-phase multi-component reactive flow (MPMCRF) controls a number of important complex geodynamic/geochemical problems, such as melt generation and percolation, metasomatism, rheological weakening, magmatic differentiation, ore emplacement, and fractionation of chemical elements, to name a few. These interacting processes occur over very different spatial and temporal scales and under very different physico-chemical conditions. Therefore, there is a strong motivation in geodynamics for investigating the equations governing MPMCRF, their mathematical structure and properties, and the numerical techniques necessary to obtain reliable and accurate results. In this contribution we present results from a novel numerical framework to solve multiscale MPMCRF problems in geodynamic contexts. Our approach is based on the effective tracking of the most basic building blocks: internal energy and chemical composition. This is achieved through the combination of rigorous solutions to the conservation equations (mass, energy and momentum) for each dynamic phase (instead of the more common "mixture-type" approach) and the transport equation for the chemical species, within the context of classical irreversible thermodynamics. Interfacial processes such as phase changes, chemical diffusion+reaction, and surface tension effects are explicitly incorporated in the context of ensemble averaging. Phase assemblages, mineral and melt compositions, and all other physical parameters of multi-phase systems are obtained through dynamic free-energy minimization procedures.

  10. Interface effects on multiphase flows in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Duan Z

    2008-01-01

    Most models for multiphase flows in a porous medium are based on the straightforward extension of Darcy's law, in which each fluid phase is driven by its own pressure gradient. The pressure difference between the phases is thought to be an effect of surface tension and is called capillary pressure. Independent of Darcy's law, for liquid imbibition processes in a porous material, diffusion models are sometime used. In this paper, an ensemble phase averaging technique for continuous multi phase flows is applied to derive averaged equations and to examine the validity of the commonly used models. The closure for the averaged equations is quite complicated for general multiphase flows in a porous material. For flows with a small ratio of the characteristic length of the phase interfaces to the macroscopic length, the closure relations can be simplified significantly by an approximation with a second order error in the length ratio. The approximation reveals the information of the length scale separation obscured during the ensemble averaging process, and leads to an equation system similar to Darcy's law, but with additional terms. Based on interactions on phase interfaces, relations among closure quantities are studied.

  11. Comparison of tropospheric NO2 columns from ground based MAX-DOAS systems with satellite retrievals: A case study in the greater area of Thessaloniki.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drosoglou, Theano; Bais, Alkis; Kouremeti, Natalia; Koukouli, Mariliza; Balis, Dimitris

    2015-04-01

    Phaethon is a low-cost ground-based MAX-DOAS system that is used to acquire fast direct solar irradiance and sky radiance spectrally resolved measurements in the region 300-450 nm and deliver total and tropospheric columns of atmospheric trace gases. Phaethon, which comprises a cooled miniature CCD spectrograph (AvaSpec-ULS2048LTEC) and a 2-axes tracker, was designed for easy deployment at different sites to address specific air quality problems and to support satellite validation studies at locations of particular scientific interest. In the framework of the Optimization and expansion of ground infrastructure for the validation of satellite-derived column densities of atmospheric species, AVANTI project, three Phaethon systems have been deployed in the greater area of Thessaloniki, Greece, within an area of about 15 km by 30 km, comparable to the size of a satellite pixel, with the aim to link modeling of tropospheric trace gases with satellite products. The locations of the three systems are characterized by diverse local atmospheric pollution loadings representing urban, industrial and rural conditions. The systems have been first operated for a few days in parallel at the station in the University campus to establish their inter-comparison behaviour and possible systematic differences. Tropospheric NO2 columns derived at these different locations are presented and compared with the "area-averaged" columns derived from OMI/Aura and GOME-2/MetopA and /MetopB satellites. During days with high levels of NO2 at the urban site, the measurements at the rural site compare better with the satellite products. This finding has been attributed to the fact that the satellite products are representative of the average pollution levels in the sub-satellite pixel area which, in the case of Thessaloniki, corresponds mostly to rural conditions. This validation campaign precedes a full-scale validation to be performed within the EU FP7 Monitoring and Assessment of Regional air

  12. Development of Next Generation Multiphase Pipe Flow Prediction Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Tulsa Fluid Flow

    2008-08-31

    The developments of fields in deep waters (5000 ft and more) is a common occurrence. It is inevitable that production systems will operate under multiphase flow conditions (simultaneous flow of gas-oil-and water possibly along with sand, hydrates, and waxes). Multiphase flow prediction tools are essential for every phase of the hydrocarbon recovery from design to operation. The recovery from deep-waters poses special challenges and requires accurate multiphase flow predictive tools for several applications including the design and diagnostics of the production systems, separation of phases in horizontal wells, and multiphase separation (topside, seabed or bottom-hole). It is very crucial to any multiphase separation technique that is employed either at topside, seabed or bottom-hole to know inlet conditions such as the flow rates, flow patterns, and volume fractions of gas, oil and water coming into the separation devices. The overall objective was to develop a unified model for gas-oil-water three-phase flow in wells, flow lines, and pipelines to predict the flow characteristics such as flow patterns, phase distributions, and pressure gradient encountered during petroleum production at different flow conditions (pipe diameter and inclination, fluid properties and flow rates). The project was conducted in two periods. In Period 1 (four years), gas-oil-water flow in pipes were investigated to understand the fundamental physical mechanisms describing the interaction between the gas-oil-water phases under flowing conditions, and a unified model was developed utilizing a novel modeling approach. A gas-oil-water pipe flow database including field and laboratory data was formed in Period 2 (one year). The database was utilized in model performance demonstration. Period 1 primarily consisted of the development of a unified model and software to predict the gas-oil-water flow, and experimental studies of the gas-oil-water project, including flow behavior description and

  13. On the Grand Challenges in Physical Petrology: the Multiphase Crossroads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergantz, G. W.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid progress in experimental, micro-analytical and textural analysis at the crystal scale has produced an unprecedented record of magmatic processes. However an obstacle to further progress is the lack of understanding of how mass, energy and momentum flux associated with crystal-rich, open-system events produces identifiable outcomes. Hence developing a physically-based understanding of magmatic systems linking micro-scale petrological observations with a physical template operating at the macro-scale presents a so-called "Grand Challenge." The essence of this challenge is that magmatic systems have characteristic length and feedback scales between those accessible by classical continuum and discrete methods. It has become increasingly obvious that the old-school continuum methods have limited resolution and power of explanation for multiphase (real) magma dynamics. This is, in part, because in crystal-rich systems the deformation is non-affine, and so the concept of constitutive behavior is less applicable and likely not even relevant, especially if one is interested in the emergent character of micro-scale processes. One expression of this is the cottage industry of proposing viscosity laws for magmas, which serves as "blunt force" de facto corrections for what is intrinsically multiphase behavior. Even in more fluid-rich systems many of these laws are not suitable for use in the very transport theories they aim to support. The alternative approach is the discrete method, where multiphase interactions are explicitly resolved. This is a daunting prospect given the numbers of crystals in magmas. But perhaps all crystals don't need to be modeled. I will demonstrate how discrete methods can recover critical state behavior, resolve crystal migration, the onset of visco-elastic behavior such as melt-present shear bands which sets the large-scale mixing volumes, some of the general morpho-dynamics that underlies purported rheological models, and transient controls on

  14. Multiphase inverse modeling: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.

    1998-03-01

    Inverse modeling is a technique to derive model-related parameters from a variety of observations made on hydrogeologic systems, from small-scale laboratory experiments to field tests to long-term geothermal reservoir responses. If properly chosen, these observations contain information about the system behavior that is relevant to the performance of a geothermal field. Estimating model-related parameters and reducing their uncertainty is an important step in model development, because errors in the parameters constitute a major source of prediction errors. This paper contains an overview of inverse modeling applications using the ITOUGH2 code, demonstrating the possibilities and limitations of a formalized approach to the parameter estimation problem.

  15. Inelastic column behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duberg, John E; Wilder, Thomas W , III

    1952-01-01

    The significant findings of a theoretical study of column behavior in the plastic stress range are presented. When the behavior of a straight column is regarded as the limiting behavior of an imperfect column as the initial imperfection (lack of straightness) approaches zero, the departure from the straight configuration occurs at the tangent-modulus load. Without such a concept of the behavior of a straight column, one is led to the unrealistic conclusion that lateral deflection of the column can begin at any load between the tangent-modulus value and the Euler load, based on the original elastic modulus. A family of curves showing load against lateral deflection is presented for idealized h-section columns of various lengths and of various materials that have a systematic variation of their stress-strain curves.

  16. Inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a flow-through column system by (per)chlorate treatment

    PubMed Central

    Engelbrektson, Anna; Hubbard, Christopher G.; Tom, Lauren M.; Boussina, Aaron; Jin, Yong T.; Wong, Hayden; Piceno, Yvette M.; Carlson, Hans K.; Conrad, Mark E.; Anderson, Gary; Coates, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is a primary cause of oil reservoir souring. Here we show that amendment with chlorate or perchlorate [collectively (per)chlorate] potentially resolves this issue. Triplicate packed columns inoculated with marine sediment were flushed with coastal water amended with yeast extract and one of nitrate, chlorate, or perchlorate. Results showed that although sulfide production was dramatically reduced by all treatments, effluent sulfide was observed in the nitrate (10 mM) treatment after an initial inhibition period. In contrast, no effluent sulfide was observed with (per)chlorate (10 mM). Microbial community analyses indicated temporal community shifts and phylogenetic clustering by treatment. Nitrate addition stimulated Xanthomonadaceae and Rhizobiaceae growth, supporting their role in nitrate metabolism. (Per)chlorate showed distinct effects on microbial community structure compared with nitrate and resulted in a general suppression of the community relative to the untreated control combined with a significant decrease in sulfate reducing species abundance indicating specific toxicity. Furthermore, chlorate stimulated Pseudomonadaceae and Pseudoalteromonadaceae, members of which are known chlorate respirers, suggesting that chlorate may also control sulfidogenesis by biocompetitive exclusion of sulfate-reduction. Perchlorate addition stimulated Desulfobulbaceae and Desulfomonadaceae, which contain sulfide oxidizing and elemental sulfur-reducing species respectively, suggesting that effluent sulfide concentrations may be controlled through sulfur redox cycling in addition to toxicity and biocompetitive exclusion. Sulfur isotope analyses further support sulfur cycling in the columns, even when sulfide is not detected. This study indicates that (per)chlorate show great promise as inhibitors of sulfidogenesis in natural communities and provides insight into which organisms and respiratory processes are involved. PMID:25071731

  17. Iron buffer system in the water column and partitioning in the sediments of the naturally acidic Lake Caviahue, Neuquén, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, J. M.; Diaz, M. M.; Schultz, S.; Temporetti, P.; Pedrozo, F.

    2016-05-01

    Sedimentary iron partitioning was studied for five sediment strata (16 cm depth) at three sampling sites of the naturally-occurring acidic Lake Caviahue (Patagonia, Argentina). Additionally, water column iron was modeled based on five-year period input loadings to study a possible iron buffer system. The partition coefficient between the water column and the total iron content of the sediments was also addressed. Sedimentary iron was found to be distributed, on average, in the following forms: exchangeable (6%), iron oxides (4%), pyrite and reactive organic matter (38%) and residual (non-andesitic) materials with a high content of humic acids (52%). Furthermore, we found that the dissolved iron in the lake was nearly constant throughout the five year period we studied. This is consistent with the existence of an iron buffer system in the lake at pH between 2.0 and 3.0, which may cause differential iron precipitation at the delta of the volcanic river with respect to the deeper northern and southern arms. Sedimentary iron measurements taken at the delta further support the existence of a buffer system, where it was found that the iron content in the sub-superficial stratum (2 cm) was double that of the remainder of the vertical profile at the same site.

  18. Investigations on mobility of carbon colloid supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in a column experiment and a laboratory 2D-aquifer test system.

    PubMed

    Busch, Jan; Meißner, Tobias; Potthoff, Annegret; Oswald, Sascha E

    2014-09-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has recently gained great interest in the scientific community as in situ reagent for installation of permeable reactive barriers in aquifer systems, since nZVI is highly reactive with chlorinated compounds and may render them to harmless substances. However, nZVI has a high tendency to agglomerate and sediment; therefore it shows very limited transport ranges. One new approach to overcome the limited transport of nZVI in porous media is using a suited carrier colloid. In this study we tested mobility of a carbon colloid supported nZVI particle "Carbo-Iron Colloids" (CIC) with a mean size of 0.63 μm in a column experiment of 40 cm length and an experiment in a two-dimensional (2D) aquifer test system with dimensions of 110 × 40 × 5 cm. Results show a breakthrough maximum of 82 % of the input concentration in the column experiment and 58 % in the 2D-aquifer test system. Detected residuals in porous media suggest a strong particle deposition in the first centimeters and few depositions in the porous media in the further travel path. Overall, this suggests a high mobility in porous media which might be a significant enhancement compared to bare or polyanionic stabilized nZVI.

  19. Distillation Column Modeling Tools

    SciTech Connect

    2001-09-01

    Advanced Computational and Experimental Techniques will Optimize Distillation Column Operation. Distillation is a low thermal efficiency unit operation that currently consumes 4.8 quadrillion BTUs of energy...

  20. Airlift column photobioreactors for Porphyridium sp. culturing: part I. effects of hydrodynamics and reactor geometry.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hu-Ping; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna H

    2012-04-01

    Photosynthetic microorganisms have been attracting world attention for their great potential as renewable energy sources in recent years. Cost effective production in large scale, however, remains a major challenge to overcome. It is known to the field that turbulence could help improving the performance of photobioreactors due to the so-called flashing light effects. Better understanding of the multiphase fluid dynamics and the irradiance distribution inside the reactor that cause the flashing light effects, as well as quantifying their impacts on the reactor performance, thus, are crucial for successful design and scale-up of photobioreactors. In this study, a species of red marine microalgae, Porphyridium sp., was grown in three airlift column photobioreactors (i.e., draft tube column, bubble column, and split column). The physical properties of the culture medium, the local fluid dynamics and the photobioreactor performances were investigated and are reported in this part of the manuscript. Results indicate that the presence of microalgae considerably affected the local multiphase flow dynamics in the studied draft tube column. Results also show that the split column reactor works slightly better than the draft tube and the bubble columns due to the spiral flow pattern inside the reactor.

  1. Analysis of the Multi-Phase Copying Garbage Collection Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Podhorszki, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    The multi-phase copying garbage collection was designed to avoid the need for large amount of reserved memory usually required for the copying types of garbage collection algorithms. The collection is performed in multiple phases using the available free memory. This paper proves that the number of phases depends on the size of the reserved memory and the ratio of the garbage and accessible objects. The performance of the implemented algorithm is tested in a fine-grained parallel Prolog system. We find that reserving only 10% of memory for garbage collection is sufficient for good performance in practice. Additionally, an improvement of the generic algorithm specifically for the tested parallel Prolog system is described.

  2. Characterization of polyacrylamide based monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Plieva, Fatima M; Andersson, Jonatan; Galaev, Igor Yu; Mattiasson, Bo

    2004-07-01

    Supermacroporous monolithic polyacrylamide (pAAm)-based columns have been prepared by radical cryo-copolymerization (copolymerization in the moderately frozen system) of acrylamide with functional co-monomer, allyl glycidyl ether (AGE), and cross-linker N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide (MBAAm) directly in glass columns (ID 10 mm). The monolithic columns have uniform supermacroporous sponge-like structure with interconnected supermacropores of pore size 5-100 microm. The monoliths can be dried and stored in the dry state. High mechanical stability of the monoliths allowed sterilization by autoclaving. Column-to-column reproducibility of pAAm-monoliths was demonstrated on 5 monolithic columns from different batches prepared under the same cryostructuration conditions.

  3. Characterization of polyacrylamide based monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Plieva, Fatima M; Andersson, Jonatan; Galaev, Igor Yu; Mattiasson, Bo

    2004-07-01

    Supermacroporous monolithic polyacrylamide (pAAm)-based columns have been prepared by radical cryo-copolymerization (copolymerization in the moderately frozen system) of acrylamide with functional co-monomer, allyl glycidyl ether (AGE), and cross-linker N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide (MBAAm) directly in glass columns (ID 10 mm). The monolithic columns have uniform supermacroporous sponge-like structure with interconnected supermacropores of pore size 5-100 microm. The monoliths can be dried and stored in the dry state. High mechanical stability of the monoliths allowed sterilization by autoclaving. Column-to-column reproducibility of pAAm-monoliths was demonstrated on 5 monolithic columns from different batches prepared under the same cryostructuration conditions. PMID:15354560

  4. Electrically Conductive Multiphase Polymer Blend Carbon-Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigandi, Paul James

    The use of multiphase polymer blends provides unique morphologies and properties to reduce the percolation concentration and increase conductivity of carbon-based polymer composites. These systems offer improved conductivity, temperature stability and selective distribution of the conductive filler through unique morphologies at significantly lower conductive filler concentration. In this work, the kinetic and thermodynamic effects on a series of multiphase conductive polymer composites were investigated. The polymer blend phase morphology, filler distribution, electrical conductivity, and rheological properties of CB-filled PP/PMMA/EAA conductive polymer composites were determined. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were found to influence the morphology development and final composite properties. The morphology and CB distribution were found to be kinetically driven when annealed for a short period of time following the shear-intensive mixing process, whereas the three-phase polymer blend morphology is driven by thermodynamics when given sufficient time under high temperature annealing conditions in the melt state. At short annealing times, the CB distribution was influenced by the compounding sequence where the CB was added after being premixed with one of the polymer phases or directly added to the three phase polymer melt, but again was thermodynamically driven at longer annealing times with the CB migrating to the EAA phase. The resistivity was found to decrease by a statistically significant amount to similar levels for all of the composite systems with increasing annealing time, providing evidence of gradual phase coalescence to a tri-continuous morphology and CB migration. The addition of CB via the PP and EAA masterbatch results in significantly faster percolation and lower resistivity compared to when added direct to the system during compounding after 30 minutes annealing by a statistically significant amount. Dynamic oscillatory shear rheology using

  5. Automated design of multiphase space missions using hybrid optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilan, Christian Miguel

    A modern space mission is assembled from multiple phases or events such as impulsive maneuvers, coast arcs, thrust arcs and planetary flybys. Traditionally, a mission planner would resort to intuition and experience to develop a sequence of events for the multiphase mission and to find the space trajectory that minimizes propellant use by solving the associated continuous optimal control problem. This strategy, however, will most likely yield a sub-optimal solution, as the problem is sophisticated for several reasons. For example, the number of events in the optimal mission structure is not known a priori and the system equations of motion change depending on what event is current. In this work a framework for the automated design of multiphase space missions is presented using hybrid optimal control (HOC). The method developed uses two nested loops: an outer-loop that handles the discrete dynamics and finds the optimal mission structure in terms of the categorical variables, and an inner-loop that performs the optimization of the corresponding continuous-time dynamical system and obtains the required control history. Genetic algorithms (GA) and direct transcription with nonlinear programming (NLP) are introduced as methods of solution for the outer-loop and inner-loop problems, respectively. Automation of the inner-loop, continuous optimal control problem solver, required two new technologies. The first is a method for the automated construction of the NLP problems resulting from the use of a direct solver for systems with different structures, including different numbers of categorical events. The method assembles modules, consisting of parameters and constraints appropriate to each event, sequentially according to the given mission structure. The other new technology is for a robust initial guess generator required by the inner-loop NLP problem solver. Two new methods were developed for cases including low-thrust trajectories. The first method, based on GA

  6. Multiphase flow and phase change in microgravity: Fundamental research and strategic research for exploration of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Bhim S.

    2003-01-01

    NASA is preparing to undertake science-driven exploration missions. The NASA Exploration Team's vision is a cascade of stepping stones. The stepping-stone will build the technical capabilities needed for each step with multi-use technologies and capabilities. An Agency-wide technology investment and development program is necessary to implement the vision. The NASA Exploration Team has identified a number of areas where significant advances are needed to overcome all engineering and medical barriers to the expansion of human space exploration beyond low-Earth orbit. Closed-loop life support systems and advanced propulsion and power technologies are among the areas requiring significant advances from the current state-of-the-art. Studies conducted by the National Academy of Science's National Research Council and Workshops organized by NASA have shown that multiphase flow and phase change play a crucial role in many of these advanced technology concepts. Lack of understanding of multiphase flow, phase change, and interfacial phenomena in the microgravity environment has been a major hurdle. An understanding of multiphase flow and phase change in microgravity is, therefore, critical to advancing many technologies needed. Recognizing this, the Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) has initiated a strategic research thrust to augment the ongoing fundamental research in fluid physics and transport phenomena discipline with research especially aimed at understanding key multiphase flow related issues in propulsion, power, thermal control, and closed-loop advanced life support systems. A plan for integrated theoretical and experimental research that has the highest probability of providing data, predictive tools, and models needed by the systems developers to incorporate highly promising multiphase-based technologies is currently in preparation. This plan is being developed with inputs from scientific community, NASA mission planners and industry personnel

  7. Tomographic segmentation in multiphase flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sætre, Camilla; Tjugum, Stein-Arild; Anton Johansen, Geir

    2014-02-01

    Measurement of multiphase pipe flow of gas, oil and water is not at all trivial and in spite of considerable achievements over the past two decades, important challenges remain. These are related to reducing measurement uncertainties arising from variations in the flow regime and the fluid properties, improving long term stability and developing new means for calibration, adjustment and verification of the multiphase flow meters. In this work the pipe flow is split into temporal segments using multiple gamma-ray measurements. One 241Am source with principal emission at 59.5 keV was used because this relatively low energy enables efficient collimation and thereby shaping of the beams, as well as use of compact detectors. One detector is placed diametrically opposite the source whereas the second and eventually the third are positioned to the sides so that these beams are close to the pipe wall. The principle is then straight forward, that is to compare the measured intensities of these detectors, and through those identify the instantaneous cross sectional gas-liquid distribution, i.e. the instantaneous flow pattern. By counting the intensity in short time slots of <100 ms, experiments verify that rapid variations exist. The water salinity is one of the fluid properties which challenge most multiphase flow meters because its variations affects component volume fraction calculations based on gamma-ray, electrical conductance and other measurements methods. At the University of Bergen a dual modality method has been developed using simultaneous measurements of transmitted and scattered gamma-rays from a 241Am source. This allows the gas volume fraction to be determined independent of changes in the water salinity, provided that the fluid is fairly homogeneously mixed. Tomographic flow segmentation allows selection of low gas fraction segments where the salinity, in combination with running averaging methods, can be calculated with higher accuracy.

  8. Nonisothermal multiphase subsurface transport on parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M.J.; Hopkins, P.L.; Shadid, J.N.

    1997-10-01

    We present a numerical method for nonisothermal, multiphase subsurface transport in heterogeneous porous media. The mathematical model considers nonisothermal two-phase (liquid/gas) flow, including capillary pressure effects, binary diffusion in the gas phase, conductive, latent, and sensible heat transport. The Galerkin finite element method is used for spatial discretization, and temporal integration is accomplished via a predictor/corrector scheme. Message-passing and domain decomposition techniques are used for implementing a scalable algorithm for distributed memory parallel computers. An illustrative application is shown to demonstrate capabilities and performance.

  9. Inflatable Column Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Lightweight structural member easy to store. Billowing between circumferential loops of fiber inflated column becomes series of cells. Each fiber subjected to same tension along entire length (though tension is different in different fibers). Member is called "isotensoid" column. Serves as jack for automobiles or structures during repairs. Also used as support for temporary bleachers or swimming pools.

  10. Simulations of Multiphase Flow in a T-junction and Distributor Header

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, Jeremy; Kumar, Purushotam; Vanka, Pratap

    2012-11-01

    Multiphase flow is widely encountered in industrial applications including air conditioning and refrigeration systems. In this study, we simulate multiphase flow in complex micro-channels using two approaches: a multiphase Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) and a finite volume Volume of Fluid (VOF) method. In LBM, fluids are represented on a mesoscopic scale by particle distribution functions which evolve via a discretized Boltzmann equation. Macroscopic flow variables such as density and velocity are related to the moments of the distribution functions. In contrast, VOF calculates flow variables via three coupled equations: the continuity equation, the Navier-Stokes equation, and the volume-fraction transport equation which tracks the interface between disparate phases. An emphasis is placed on comparison of these schemes to determine their respective advantages in calculation of multiphase flow for these geometries. The principle geometries are a T-junction and multi-branch distributor header. We study bubble-laden flow and immiscible liquid-liquid flow and explore the effect of Reynolds number, buoyancy, and density ratio on the flow physics. Simulation results are compared with experiments. Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Center, The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  11. Glass-silicon column

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  12. Evenly-spaced columns in the Bishop Tuff as relicts of hydrothermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randolph-Flagg, N. G.; Breen, S. J.; Hernandez, A.; Self, S.; Manga, M.

    2015-12-01

    A few square km of the Bishop Tuff in eastern California, USA have evenly spaced erosional columns. These columns are more resistant to erosion due to the precipitation of the low-temperature zeolite (120-200 ºC), mordenite, which is not found in the surrounding tuff. Similar features observed in the Bandelier Tuff were hypothesized to form when cold water from above infiltrated into the still-hot tuff interior. This water would become gravitationally unstable and produced convection with steam upwellings and liquid water downwellings. These downwellings became cemented with mordenite while the upwellings were too dry for chemical reactions. We use two methods to quantitatively assess this hypothesis. First, scaling that ignores the effects of latent heat and mineral precipitation suggests the Rayleigh number (Ra, a measure of convective vigor) for this system is ~103 well above the critical Ra of 4π2. Second, to account for the effect of multiphase flow and latent heat, we use two-dimensional numerical models in the finite difference code HYDROTHERM. We find that the geometry of flow is consistent with field observations and confirm that geometry is sensitive to permeability and topography. These tests suggest a few things about low-pressure hydrothermal systems. 1) The geometry of at least some convection appears to be broadly captured by linear stability theory that ignores reactive transport, heterogeneity of host rock, and the effects of latent heat. 2) Topographic flow sets the wavelength of convection meaning that these columns formed somewhere without topography—probably a lake. Finally, these observations imply a wet paleoclimate in the Eastern Sierra namely that, in the aftermath of the Long Valley eruption, either rain or snow was able to pool in the caldera before the tuff cooled on the order of a hundred years after the eruption.

  13. Multiphase complete exchange: A theoretical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.

    1993-01-01

    Complete Exchange requires each of N processors to send a unique message to each of the remaining N-1 processors. For a circuit switched hypercube with N = 2(sub d) processors, the Direct and Standard algorithms for Complete Exchange are optimal for very large and very small message sizes, respectively. For intermediate sizes, a hybrid Multiphase algorithm is better. This carries out Direct exchanges on a set of subcubes whose dimensions are a partition of the integer d. The best such algorithm for a given message size m could hitherto only be found by enumerating all partitions of d. The Multiphase algorithm is analyzed assuming a high performance communication network. It is proved that only algorithms corresponding to equipartitions of d (partitions in which the maximum and minimum elements differ by at most 1) can possibly be optimal. The run times of these algorithms plotted against m form a hull of optimality. It is proved that, although there is an exponential number of partitions, (1) the number of faces on this hull is Theta(square root of d), (2) the hull can be found in theta(square root of d) time, and (3) once it has been found, the optimal algorithm for any given m can be found in Theta(log d) time. These results provide a very fast technique for minimizing communication overhead in many important applications, such as matrix transpose, Fast Fourier transform, and ADI.

  14. Multiphasic Scaffolds for Periodontal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ivanovski, S.; Vaquette, C.; Gronthos, S.; Hutmacher, D.W.; Bartold, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    For a successful clinical outcome, periodontal regeneration requires the coordinated response of multiple soft and hard tissues (periodontal ligament, gingiva, cementum, and bone) during the wound-healing process. Tissue-engineered constructs for regeneration of the periodontium must be of a complex 3-dimensional shape and adequate size and demonstrate biomechanical stability over time. A critical requirement is the ability to promote the formation of functional periodontal attachment between regenerated alveolar bone, and newly formed cementum on the root surface. This review outlines the current advances in multiphasic scaffold fabrication and how these scaffolds can be combined with cell- and growth factor–based approaches to form tissue-engineered constructs capable of recapitulating the complex temporal and spatial wound-healing events that will lead to predictable periodontal regeneration. This can be achieved through a variety of approaches, with promising strategies characterized by the use of scaffolds that can deliver and stabilize cells capable of cementogenesis onto the root surface, provide biomechanical cues that encourage perpendicular alignment of periodontal fibers to the root surface, and provide osteogenic cues and appropriate space to facilitate bone regeneration. Progress on the development of multiphasic constructs for periodontal tissue engineering is in the early stages of development, and these constructs need to be tested in large animal models and, ultimately, human clinical trials. PMID:25139362

  15. Multiphase equation of state for iron

    SciTech Connect

    Kerley, G I

    1993-02-01

    The PANDA code is used to build a multiphase equation of state (EOS) table for iron. Separate EOS tables were first constructed for each of the individual phases. The phase diagram and multiphase EOS were then determined from the Helmholtz free energies. The model includes four solid phases ([alpha],[gamma], [delta], and [var epsilon]) and a fluid phase (including the liquid, vapor, and supercritical regions). The model gives good agreement with experimental thermophysical data, static compression data, phase boundaries, and shock-wave measurements. Contributions from thermal electronic excitation, computed from a quantum-statistical-mechanical model, were found to be very important. This EOS covers a wide range of densities (0--1000 g/cm[sup 3]) and temperatures (0--1.2[times]10[sup 7] K). It is also applicable to RHA steel. The new EOS is used in hydrocode simulations of plate impact experiments, a nylon ball impact on steel, and the shaped charge perforation of an RHA plate. The new EOS table can be accessed through the SNL-SESAME library as material number 2150.

  16. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-06-15

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) quantifying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture, and (c) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress on the nature of the rock and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual descriptions of the process are shown in the report while detailed analysis of the behavior of the distribution of fracture aperture is in progress. Both extensional and shear fractures are being considered. The initial multi-phase flow tests were done in extensional fractures. Several rock samples with induced shear fracture are being studied, and some of the new results are presented in this report. These samples are being scanned in order to

  17. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-06-15

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) quantifying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture, and (c) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress on the nature of the rock and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual descriptions of the process are shown in the report while detailed analysis of the behavior of the distribution of fracture aperture is in progress. Both extensional and shear fractures are being considered. The initial multi-phase flow tests were done in extensional fractures. Several rock samples with induced shear fracture are being studies, and some of the new results are presented in this report. These samples are being scanned in order to

  18. Isothermal Multiphase Flash Calculations with the PC-SAFT Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Justo-Garcia, Daimler N.; Garcia-Sanchez, Fernando; Romero-Martinez, Ascencion

    2008-03-05

    A computational approach for isothermal multiphase flash calculations with the PC-SAFT (Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory) equation of state is presented. In the framework of the study of fluid phase equilibria of multicomponent systems, the general multiphase problem is the single most important calculation which consists of finding the correct number and types of phases and their corresponding equilibrium compositions such that the Gibbs energy of the system is a minimum. For solving this problem, the system Gibbs energy was minimized using a rigorous method for thermodynamic stability analysis to find the most stable state of the system. The efficiency and reliability of the approach to predict and calculate complex phase equilibria are illustrated by solving three typical problems encountered in the petroleum industry.

  19. Nuclear reactor control column

    DOEpatents

    Bachovchin, Dennis M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  20. A structural and thermodynamic basis for the catalytic behavior of single phase and multiphase bismuth cerium molybdate ammoxidation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Brazdil, J.F.; Glaeser, L.C.; Grasselli, R.K.; Teller, R.G.

    1983-09-01

    The vast majority of fundamental studies of metal oxide selective oxidation catalysts have been performed with single phase systems. These investigations established the basic tenents of the redox mechanism of selective oxidation and ammoxidation catalysis. By comparison, structural and kinetic investigations of multiphase oxide catalysts are less numerous because of the inherent difficulties in understanding the relative contributions of separate phases to the catalytic behavior of the composite catalyst. Some attempts have been made in the past to understand the complex chemistry of multiphase catalysts and additional important insights have been realized more recently. However, a clear understanding of the most significant catalytic interactions between individual phases of a multiphase multicomponent redox catalyst is still lacking. In an effort to provide an understanding and a physical basis for the observed synergism in multiphase oxide catalysts, the structural and chemical features which dictate the catalytic behavior of bismuth cerium molybdate catalysts were assessed. Bismuth cerium molybdates are known to be active catalysts for the selective oxidation and ammoxidation of olefins. Compositions with superior catalytic performance have been identified in both the single phase and two phase regions of the Bi/sub 2/(MoO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ - Ce/sub 2/(MoO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ phase diagram. Hence, this catalyst system serves as a useful model for determining key structural and thermodynamic aspects of the catalytic behavior of multicomponent single phase and multiphase redox catalysts.

  1. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  2. Mass transfer model liquid phase catalytic exchange column simulation applicable to any column composition profile

    SciTech Connect

    Busigin, A.

    2015-03-15

    Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) is a key technology used in water detritiation systems. Rigorous simulation of LPCE is complicated when a column may have both hydrogen and deuterium present in significant concentrations in different sections of the column. This paper presents a general mass transfer model for a homogenous packed bed LPCE column as a set of differential equations describing composition change, and equilibrium equations to define the mass transfer driving force within the column. The model is used to show the effect of deuterium buildup in the bottom of an LPCE column from non-negligible D atom fraction in the bottom feed gas to the column. These types of calculations are important in the design of CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) water detritiation systems.

  3. An origin for multiphase gas in galactic winds and haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Todd A.; Quataert, Eliot; Zhang, Dong; Weinberg, David H.

    2016-01-01

    The physical origin of high-velocity cool gas seen in galactic winds remains unknown. Following work by B. Wang, we argue that radiative cooling in initially hot thermally-driven outflows can produce fast neutral atomic and photoionized cool gas. The inevitability of adiabatic cooling from the flow's initial 107-108 K temperature and the shape of the cooling function for T ≲ 107 K imply that outflows with hot gas mass-loss rate relative to star formation rate of β =dot{M}_hot/dot{M}_star ≳ 0.5 cool radiatively on scales ranging from the size of the energy injection region to tens of kpc. We highlight the β and star formation rate surface density dependence of the column density, emission measure, radiative efficiency, and velocity. At rcool, the gas produces X-ray and then UV/optical line emission with a total power bounded by ˜10-2 L⋆ if the flow is powered by steady-state star formation with luminosity L⋆. The wind is thermally unstable at rcool, potentially leading to a multiphase medium. Cooled winds decelerate significantly in the extended gravitational potential of galaxies. The cool gas precipitated from hot outflows may explain its prevalence in galactic haloes. We forward a picture of winds whereby cool clouds are initially accelerated by the ram pressure of the hot flow, but are rapidly shredded by hydrodynamical instabilities, thereby increasing β, seeding radiative and thermal instability, and cool gas rebirth. If the cooled wind shocks as it sweeps up the circumgalactic medium, its cooling time is short, thus depositing cool gas far out into the halo. Finally, conduction can dominate energy transport in low-β hot winds, leading to flatter temperature profiles than otherwise expected, potentially consistent with X-ray observations of some starbursts.

  4. Microminiature gas chromatographic column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, R. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Techniques commonly used for fabrication of integrated circuits are utilized to produce long capillary tubes for microminiature chromatographs. Method involves bonding of flat silicon plate to top of spirally grooved silicon chip to close groove and form capillary column.

  5. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect

    2002-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop the flooding predictor, an advanced process control strategy, into a universally useable tool that will maximize the separation yield of a distillation column.

  6. Cloud-resolving and single-column simulations of a warm-frontal cloud system: Implications for the parameterization of layered clouds in GCMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, Kit K.; Lohmann, Urike

    A winter oceanic cyclonic cloud system was simulated by using both a cloud-resolving model (CRM) and two single-column models (SCMs) utilizing different approaches to parameterize layer clouds. When driven with advective forcing derived from the CRM, the SCMs can capture the general developments of the large-scale cloud field during the warm-frontal passage. However, the vertical cloud structures differed significantly among the models. Some of the differences in the model cloud structures can be attributed to the lack of, or inappropriateness of the parameterizations of some cloud microphysical processes and subgrid cloudiness in current GCM prognostic cloud schemes. The high resolution CRM results will be valuable in identifying such deficiencies in current GCM cloud schemes and in the future developments and calibrations of these schemes.

  7. A compact gas chromatograph and pre-column concentration system for enhanced in-field separation of levoglucosan and other polar organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Cropper, Paul M; Goates, Steven R; Hansen, Jaron C

    2015-10-23

    Portable and compact instruments for separating and detecting organic compounds are needed in the field for environmental studies. This is especially the case for pollution studies as in-field detection of organic compounds helps identify sources of pollution. Here we describe the development of a compact GC and simple pre-concentrator coupled to a MS detector. This simple system can easily be incorporated into portable instrumentation. Combining the pre-concentrator and compact column has the advantage of decoupling separation from manual injection and enhances separation of environmentally relevant polar organic compounds, such as levoglucosan. A detection limit of 2.2 ng was obtained for levoglucosan. This simple design has the potential to expand the use of gas chromatography as a routine in-field separation technique. PMID:26410183

  8. A compact gas chromatograph and pre-column concentration system for enhanced in-field separation of levoglucosan and other polar organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Cropper, Paul M; Goates, Steven R; Hansen, Jaron C

    2015-10-23

    Portable and compact instruments for separating and detecting organic compounds are needed in the field for environmental studies. This is especially the case for pollution studies as in-field detection of organic compounds helps identify sources of pollution. Here we describe the development of a compact GC and simple pre-concentrator coupled to a MS detector. This simple system can easily be incorporated into portable instrumentation. Combining the pre-concentrator and compact column has the advantage of decoupling separation from manual injection and enhances separation of environmentally relevant polar organic compounds, such as levoglucosan. A detection limit of 2.2 ng was obtained for levoglucosan. This simple design has the potential to expand the use of gas chromatography as a routine in-field separation technique.

  9. Sensitivity of Tropospheric Chemical Composition to Halogen-Radical Chemistry Using a Fully Coupled Size-Resolved Multiphase Chemistry-Global Climate System: Halogen Distributions, Aerosol Composition, and Sensitivity of Climate-Relevant Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Long, M.; Keene, W. C.; Easter, Richard C.; Sander, Rolf; Liu, Xiaohong; Kerkweg, A.; Erickson, D.

    2014-04-07

    Observations and model studies suggest a significant but highly non-linear role for halogens, primarily Cl and Br, in multiphase atmospheric processes relevant to tropospheric chemistry and composition, aerosol evolution, radiative transfer, weather, and climate. The sensitivity of global atmospheric chemistry to the production of marine aerosol and the associated activation and cycling of inorganic Cl and Br was tested using a size-resolved multiphase coupled chemistry/global climate model (National Center for Atmospheric Research’s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM); v3.6.33). Simulation results showed strong meridional and vertical gradients in Cl and Br species. The simulation reproduced most available observations with reasonable confidence permitting the formulation of potential mechanisms for several previously unexplained halogen phenomena including the enrichment of Br- in submicron aerosol, and the presence of a BrO maximum in the polar free troposphere. However, simulated total volatile Br mixing ratios were generally high in the troposphere. Br in the stratosphere was lower than observed due to the lack of long-lived organobromine species in the simulation. Comparing simulations using chemical mechanisms with and without reactive Cl and Br species demonstrated a significant temporal and spatial sensitivity of primary atmospheric oxidants (O3, HOx, NOx), CH4, and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC’s) to halogen cycling. Simulated O3 and NOx were globally lower (65% and 35%, respectively, less in the planetary boundary layer based on median values) in simulations that included halogens. Globally, little impact was seen in SO2 and non-sea-salt SO42- processing due to halogens. Significant regional differences were evident: The lifetime of nss-SO42- was extended downwind of large sources of SO2. The burden and lifetime of DMS (and its oxidation products) were lower by a factor of 5 in simulations that included halogens, versus those without, leading to a 20

  10. A method for incorporating equilibrium chemical reactions into multiphase flow models for CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saaltink, Maarten W.; Vilarrasa, Victor; De Gaspari, Francesca; Silva, Orlando; Carrera, Jesús; Rötting, Tobias S.

    2013-12-01

    CO2 injection and storage in deep saline aquifers involves many coupled processes, including multiphase flow, heat and mass transport, rock deformation and mineral precipitation and dissolution. Coupling is especially critical in carbonate aquifers, where minerals will tend to dissolve in response to the dissolution of CO2 into the brine. The resulting neutralization will drive further dissolution of both CO2 and calcite. This suggests that large cavities may be formed and that proper simulation may require full coupling of reactive transport and multiphase flow. We show that solving the latter may suffice whenever two requirements are met: (1) all reactions can be assumed to occur in equilibrium and (2) the chemical system can be calculated as a function of the state variables of the multiphase flow model (i.e., liquid and gas pressure, and temperature). We redefine the components of multiphase flow codes (traditionally, water and CO2), so that they are conservative for all reactions of the chemical system. This requires modifying the traditional constitutive relationships of the multiphase flow codes, but yields the concentrations of all species and all reaction rates by simply performing speciation and mass balance calculations at the end of each time step. We applied this method to the H2O-CO2-Na-Cl-CaCO3 system, so as to model CO2 injection into a carbonate aquifer containing brine. Results were very similar to those obtained with traditional formulations, which implies that full coupling of reactive transport and multi-phase flow is not really needed for this kind of systems, but the resulting simplifications may make it advisable even for cases where the above requirements are not met. Regarding the behavior of carbonate rocks, we find that porosity development near the injection well is small because of the low solubility of calcite. Moreover, dissolution concentrates at the front of the advancing CO2 plume because the brine below the plume tends to reach

  11. Towards Atomic Column-by-Column Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S.J.; Rafferty, B.

    1998-09-06

    The optical arrangement of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is ideally suited for performing analysis of individual atomic columns in materials. Using the incoherent Z-contrast image as a reference, and arranging incoherent conditions also for the spectroscopy, a precise correspondence is ensured between features in the inelastic image and elastic signals. In this way the exact probe position needed to maximise the inelastic signal from a selected column can be located and monitored during the analysis using the much higher intensity elastic signal. Although object functions for EELS are typically less than 1 {Angstrom} full width at half maximum, this is still an order of magnitude larger than the corresponding object functions for elastic (or diffuse) scattering used to form the Z-contrast image. Therefore the analysis is performed with an effective probe that is significantly broader than that used for the reference Z-contrast image. For a 2.2 {Angstrom} probe the effective probe is of the order of 2.5 {Angstrom}, while for a 1.3 {Angstrom} probe the effective probe is 1.6 {Angstrom}. Such increases in effective probe size can significantly reduce or even eliminate contrast between atomic columns that are visible in the image. However, this is only true if we consider circular collector apertures. Calculations based upon the theory of Maslen and Rossouw (Maslen and Rossouw 1984; Rossouw and Maslen 1984) show that employing an annular aperture can reduce the FWHM of the inelastic object function down to values close 0.1 {Angstrom}. With practical aperture sizes it should be possible to achieve this increased spatial resolution without loosing too much signal.

  12. A Versatile, Automatic Chromatographic Column Packing Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Eugene F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive apparatus for packing liquid and gas chromatographic columns of high efficiency. Consists of stainless steel support struts, an Automat Getriebmotor, and an associated three-pulley system capable of 10, 30, and 300 rpm. (MLH)

  13. Gasificaton Transport: A Multiphase CFD Approach & Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitri Gidaspow; Veeraya Jiradilok; Mayank Kashyap; Benjapon Chalermsinsuwan

    2009-02-14

    The objective of this project was to develop predictive theories for the dispersion and mass transfer coefficients and to measure them in the turbulent fluidization regime, using existing facilities. A second objective was to use our multiphase CFD tools to suggest optimized gasifier designs consistent with aims of Future Gen. We have shown that the kinetic theory based CFD codes correctly compute: (1) Dispersion coefficients; and (2) Mass transfer coefficients. Hence, the kinetic theory based CFD codes can be used for fluidized bed reactor design without any such inputs. We have also suggested a new energy efficient method of gasifying coal and producing electricity using a molten carbonate fuel cell. The principal product of this new scheme is carbon dioxide which can be converted into useful products such as marble, as is done very slowly in nature. We believe this scheme is a lot better than the canceled FutureGen, since the carbon dioxide is safely sequestered.

  14. Using turbine flowmeters to measure multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, J.H.; Fincke, J.R.

    1997-07-01

    Numerous ways of measuring multiphase flow are under research investigation. However, the concept of using turbine flowmeters has been largely overlooked. Testing of drag turbine mass flowmeter prototypes demonstrated that fluid flow past a turbine rotor produces a drag force that is proportional to momentum flux. Simultaneous measurements of momentum flux and velocity allow the extraction of density. Use of this type of meter to measure homogenized two-phase flow with void fractions below 90% appears feasible. Further mass turbine flowmeter research is encouraged. Drag turbine test data strongly suggests that a turbine flowmeter can be developed into a mass flowmeter by installing pressure taps across the rotor and using the differential pressure measurement to infer momentum flux. Also, using diamond film force sensing would allow the fabrication of a more compact, rugged, and faster-responding drag turbine mass flowmeter than is possible with alternative force sensing methods.

  15. Multiphase pumps and flow meters -- Status of field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Skiftesvik, P.K.; Svaeren, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    With the development and qualification of multiphase pumps and multiphase flow meters, two new tools have been made available to the oil and gas industry for enhanced production from existing installations or new field developments. This paper presents an overview of the major achievements gained from various test installations carried out the last years using equipment qualified by Framo Engineering AS. The experience from the extensive Field Verification Programmes as described shows that multiphase pumps and meters can operate in various and often harsh well environments providing significant well stream pressure boost or acceptable phase accuracy measurements of oil, water and gas.

  16. Analysis of phthalates in wine using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry combined with a hold-back column: Chromatographic strategy to avoid the influence of pre-existing phthalate contamination in a liquid chromatography system.

    PubMed

    Hayasaka, Y

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a novel method for the analysis of phthalates in wine using HPLC-MS/MS combined with a hold-back column. Phthalates are ubiquitous contaminants in the environment and can be widely found in laboratory materials and equipment. A HPLC system is no exception and can be the source of contamination affecting the accuracy and precision of analytical results. The new method successfully separates phthalates from the different sources, a wine sample and HPLC system by a simple technique using an additional HPLC column (a hold-back column) placed upstream of the injection valve. The hold-back column effectively retains the HPLC-derived contaminants during column equilibrium time and delays their elution times from an analytical column. Consequently, a phthalate from a wine sample can be baseline separated as it elutes sufficiently earlier than the same phthalate from the HPLC system. HPLC-MS/MS analysis combined with the hold-back column demonstrated virtually no influence of the HPLC contaminants on the quantification of phthalates present in wine. Together with a simple and rapid sample preparation and the use of labeled internal standards, the method was confirmed to be robust and reliable to determine concentrations of phthalates in wine. Quantification limits were within the range of 1.6-9.8μgL(-1) for dimethyl, diethyl, dibutyl, benzylbutyl, bis(2-ethylhexyl) and dioctyl phthalates, and 7.5-26.6μgL(-1) for multiple isomeric phthalates, di-iso-nonyl and di-iso-dodecyl phthalates.

  17. Column Selection for Biomedical Analysis Supported by Column Classification Based on Four Test Parameters.

    PubMed

    Plenis, Alina; Rekowska, Natalia; Bączek, Tomasz

    2016-01-21

    This article focuses on correlating the column classification obtained from the method created at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KUL), with the chromatographic resolution attained in biomedical separation. In the KUL system, each column is described with four parameters, which enables estimation of the FKUL value characterising similarity of those parameters to the selected reference stationary phase. Thus, a ranking list based on the FKUL value can be calculated for the chosen reference column, then correlated with the results of the column performance test. In this study, the column performance test was based on analysis of moclobemide and its two metabolites in human plasma by liquid chromatography (LC), using 18 columns. The comparative study was performed using traditional correlation of the FKUL values with the retention parameters of the analytes describing the column performance test. In order to deepen the comparative assessment of both data sets, factor analysis (FA) was also used. The obtained results indicated that the stationary phase classes, closely related according to the KUL method, yielded comparable separation for the target substances. Therefore, the column ranking system based on the FKUL-values could be considered supportive in the choice of the appropriate column for biomedical analysis.

  18. Column Selection for Biomedical Analysis Supported by Column Classification Based on Four Test Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Plenis, Alina; Rekowska, Natalia; Bączek, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on correlating the column classification obtained from the method created at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KUL), with the chromatographic resolution attained in biomedical separation. In the KUL system, each column is described with four parameters, which enables estimation of the FKUL value characterising similarity of those parameters to the selected reference stationary phase. Thus, a ranking list based on the FKUL value can be calculated for the chosen reference column, then correlated with the results of the column performance test. In this study, the column performance test was based on analysis of moclobemide and its two metabolites in human plasma by liquid chromatography (LC), using 18 columns. The comparative study was performed using traditional correlation of the FKUL values with the retention parameters of the analytes describing the column performance test. In order to deepen the comparative assessment of both data sets, factor analysis (FA) was also used. The obtained results indicated that the stationary phase classes, closely related according to the KUL method, yielded comparable separation for the target substances. Therefore, the column ranking system based on the FKUL-values could be considered supportive in the choice of the appropriate column for biomedical analysis. PMID:26805819

  19. Fate and transport of carbamazepine in a soil aquifer treatment (SAT) system: evaluation of a monitoring study and soil column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arye, G.; Dror, I.; Berkowitz, B.

    2009-12-01

    Carbamazepine (CBZ), an anticonvulsant and mood stabilizing drug, is found to be highly persistent in wastewater treatment plants and when subsequently released to the environment. Because of its physicochemical properties, CBZ is only weakly sorbed to mineral soils and is resistant to biodegradation. As a consequence, CBZ has been suggested as an appropriate anthropogenic marker to track the fate of wastewater in aquatic systems. We study the fate and transport of CBZ in the Dan Region Reclamation Project (Shafdan) in Israel, where about one quarter of the country’s wastewater undergoes purification. The secondary treatment of raw wastewater consists of mechanical and biological treatment by activated sludge, with an additional step of nitrification-denitrification, and subsequent recharge of treated effluent to groundwater via infiltration basins, as a complementary tertiary treatment known as soil aquifer treatment (SAT). Water produced from the SAT system is pumped from a depth of 100-200 m by means of approximately 100 recovery wells, located 300-1,500 m from the recharge basins. This water is then delivered through a single 87 km long pipeline to the southern part of the country, where it is used for irrigation. We examine the fate of CBZ before and after treatment with the SAT system. To date, our monitoring has detected up to 1300 ng/L of CBZ in the recharged effluent before SAT, and up to 700 ng/L after treatment, prior to use for irrigation. The latter may considered as an aggregate value from all recovery wells. Additional information on CBZ transport characteristics has been gained from a series of soil column experiments using soil samples taken from the SAT infiltration basin to a depth of 170 cm. For each soil layer examined, the soil column was first leached of CBZ and subsequently loaded with secondary treated wastewater containing CBZ. The CBZ breakthrough curves resemble transport of a conservative tracer in most of the soil samples. We

  20. Cross flow cyclonic flotation column for coal and minerals beneficiation

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Ralph W.; Patton, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the separation of coal from pyritic impurities using a modified froth flotation system. The froth flotation column incorporates a helical track about the inner wall of the column in a region intermediate between the top and base of the column. A standard impeller located about the central axis of the column is used to generate a centrifugal force thereby increasing the separation efficiency of coal from the pyritic particles and hydrophillic tailings.

  1. A model for multiphase flows through poroelastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, Goodarz; Mazaheri, Ali Reza; Smith, D.H

    2003-01-01

    A continuum model for multiphase fluid mixture flows through poroelastic media is presented. The basic conservation laws developed via a volume averaging technique are considered. Effects of phasic equilibrated forces are included in the model. Based on the thermodynamics of the multiphase mixture flows, appropriate constitutive equations are formulated. The entropy inequality is exploited, and the method of Lagrangian multiplier is used along with the phasic conservation laws to derive the constitutive equations for the phasic stress tensors, equilibrated stress vectors, and the interactions terms. The special cases of wave propagation in poroelastic media saturated with multiphase fluids, and multiphase flows through porous media, are studied. It is shown that the present theory leads to the extended Darcy’s law and contains, as a special case, Biot’s theory of saturated poroelastic media.

  2. Sensitivity of tropospheric chemical composition to halogen-radical chemistry using a fully coupled size-resolved multiphase chemistry-global climate system: halogen distributions, aerosol composition, and sensitivity of climate-relevant gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, M. S.; Keene, W. C.; Easter, R. C.; Sander, R.; Liu, X.; Kerkweg, A.; Erickson, D.

    2014-04-01

    Observations and model calculations indicate that highly non-linear multiphase atmospheric processes involving inorganic Cl and Br significantly impact tropospheric chemistry and composition, aerosol evolution, and radiative transfer. The sensitivity of global atmospheric chemistry to the production of marine aerosol and the associated activation and cycling of inorganic Cl and Br was investigated using a size-resolved multiphase coupled chemistry-global climate model (National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) v3.6.33). Simulated results revealed strong meridional and vertical gradients in Cl and Br species. They also point to possible physicochemical mechanisms that may account for several previously unexplained phenomena, including the enrichment of Br- in submicron aerosol and the presence of a BrO maximum in the polar free troposphere. However, simulated total volatile inorganic Br mixing ratios in the troposphere were generally higher than observed, due in part to the overly efficient net production of BrCl. In addition, the emission scheme for marine aerosol and associated Br-, which is the only source for Br in the model, overestimates emission fluxes from the high-latitude Southern Ocean. Br in the stratosphere was lower than observed due to the lack of long-lived precursor organobromine species in the simulation. Comparing simulations using chemical mechanisms with and without reactive Cl and Br species demonstrates a significant temporal and spatial sensitivity of primary atmospheric oxidants (O3, HOx, NOx), CH4, non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) to halogen cycling. Globally, halogen chemistry had relatively less impact on SO2 and non-sea-salt (nss) SO42- although significant regional differences were evident. Although variable geographically, much of this sensitivity is attributable to either over-vigorous activation of Br (primarily BrCl) via the chemical mechanism or overproduction of sea

  3. Benchmark initiative on coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical processes during CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benisch, K.; Annewandter, R.; Olden, P.; Mackay, E.; Bauer, S.; Geiger, S.

    2012-12-01

    cap rock. For the second case, a fault is introduced to investigate the risk of fault reactivation and fracturing due to CO2 injection for a single and a multiple cap rock system, respectively. A multiple injector setting exposed to different tectonic stress regimes is proposed for the third case. Hereby, a 3D model is used compartmentalized by low permeability faults, which become permeable due to injection. Injection scenarios will be evaluated for extensional and compressive stress regimes. All model set-ups are based on already published simulation results of coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical processes during CO2 injection. To end with, a real site geometry including parameterization and realistic reservoir conditions is provided. The benchmark design and cases will be presented as well as some preliminary simulation results for the first cases. Interested institutions and researchers are invited to discuss and to participate in the study.

  4. The challenge of realistic testing of multiphase flowmeters

    SciTech Connect

    Sten-Halvorsen, V.

    1995-12-31

    Multiphase flowmeters is new technology for the oil industry, and needs to be tested under realistic conditions to prove their performance. The complex nature of multiphase flow, means that test conditions in a laboratory may not necessarily represent the real flow conditions at a field installation. As a consequence, severe field testing is also required to gain experience with the meters and qualify them for field applications.

  5. PMP-22 expression in the central nervous system of the embryonic mouse defines potential transverse segments and longitudinal columns.

    PubMed

    Parmantier, E; Braun, C; Thomas, J L; Peyron, F; Martinez, S; Zalc, B

    1997-02-10

    PMP-22, a major constituent of peripheral nervous system (PNS) myelin, is also present in the central nervous system (CNS), in motoneurons of the cranial nerve motor nuclei and spinal cord (Parmantier et al. [1995] Eur. J. Neurosci. 7:1080-1088). The expression of PMP-22 in the CNS during embryonic and early postnatal development was investigated and showed a biphasic spatio-temporal pattern. The expression of PMP-22 started at embryonic day (E)11.5, in restricted longitudinal and transverse domains, in the ventricular zone of the spinal cord, rhombencephalon, mesencephalon and prosencephalon. In the mid- and forebrain, the PMP-22 signal was detectable in a longitudinal domain that followed ventrally the basal/alar boundary but could no longer be detected dorsally at some distance from the roof plate. Along the caudo-rostral axis, the territory in which PMP-22 was detected spanned the mesencephalon and the prosencephalon, extending caudally from the limit between the isthmus and the mesencephalon, and rostrally to the boundary between prosomeres 4 and 5 (p4/p5). In agreement with the prosomeric model of forebrain organization proposed by Puelles and Rubenstein ([1993] TINS 16:472-479), differences in the level of PMP-22 expression in p2, p3, and p4 clearly defined the p2/p3 and p3/p4 neuromeric boundaries. By E17.5, PMP-22 was no longer detected in the ventricular zone, but at E18.5 it began to be expressed in motoneurons of cranial nerve motor nuclei and, after birth, following a rostro-caudal gradient, in the ventral spinal cord.

  6. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic multiphase flows in the presence of thermal fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan; Baker, Nathan A.; Wu, Lei; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-08-01

    Thermal fluctuations cause perturbations of fluid-fluid interfaces and highly nonlinear hydrodynamics in multiphase flows. In this work, we develop a multiphase smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) model. This model accounts for both bulk hydrodynamics and interfacial fluctuations. Interfacial surface tension is modeled by imposing a pairwise force between SDPD particles. We show that the relationship between the model parameters and surface tension, previously derived under the assumption of zero thermal fluctuation, is accurate for fluid systems at low temperature but overestimates the surface tension for intermediate and large thermal fluctuations. To analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on surface tension, we construct a coarse-grained Euler lattice model based on the mean field theory and derive a semianalytical formula to directly relate the surface tension to model parameters for a wide range of temperatures and model resolutions. We demonstrate that the present method correctly models dynamic processes, such as bubble coalescence and capillary spectra across the interface.

  7. Pattern formation in multiphase flow through porous media: continuum models and phase diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2009-12-01

    Carbon capture and geologic storage, dissociation of methane hydrates in permafrost, infiltration of water in soil, and enhanced oil recovery, are some relevant examples of multiphase flow in porous media. While flow instabilities and pattern formation play a central role in these processes, our ability to describe them using mathematical models has been hampered by the lack of a macroscopic theory that explains the patterns observed in experimental and field conditions. We propose a new approach —phase-field modeling— to advance our fundamental understanding of multiphase porous media flow. The basic tenet, with origins in the mathematical description of solidification processes, is that the energy of the system is a function of the inhomogeneous distribution of fluid phases in the pore space, and should account for the presence of macroscopic interfaces. We present numerical simulations and compare our predictions with experimental observations. Numerical simulation of viscous fingering in a Hele-Shaw cell using the proposed phase-field modeling approach

  8. Simulating Anomalous Dispersion and Multiphase Segregation in Porous Media with the Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matin, Rastin; Misztal, Marek K.; Hernandez-Garcia, Anier; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2015-11-01

    Many hydrodynamic phenomena such as flows at micron scale in porous media, large Reynolds numbers flows, non-Newtonian and multiphase flows have been simulated numerically using the lattice Boltzmann method. By solving the Lattice Boltzmann Equation on three-dimensional unstructured meshes, we efficiently model single-phase fluid flow in real rock samples. We use the flow field to estimate the permeability and further investigate the anomalous dispersion of passive tracers in porous media. By extending our single-phase model with a free-energy based method, we are able to simulate binary systems with moderate density ratios in a thermodynamically consistent way. In this presentation we will present our recent results on both anomalous transport and multiphase segregation.

  9. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic multiphase flows in the presence of thermal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Lei, Huan; Baker, Nathan A; Wu, Lei; Schenter, Gregory K; Mundy, Christopher J; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M

    2016-08-01

    Thermal fluctuations cause perturbations of fluid-fluid interfaces and highly nonlinear hydrodynamics in multiphase flows. In this work, we develop a multiphase smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) model. This model accounts for both bulk hydrodynamics and interfacial fluctuations. Interfacial surface tension is modeled by imposing a pairwise force between SDPD particles. We show that the relationship between the model parameters and surface tension, previously derived under the assumption of zero thermal fluctuation, is accurate for fluid systems at low temperature but overestimates the surface tension for intermediate and large thermal fluctuations. To analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on surface tension, we construct a coarse-grained Euler lattice model based on the mean field theory and derive a semianalytical formula to directly relate the surface tension to model parameters for a wide range of temperatures and model resolutions. We demonstrate that the present method correctly models dynamic processes, such as bubble coalescence and capillary spectra across the interface. PMID:27627409

  10. Mixing of cryogenic fluids and predicted detonation properties for multiphase liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, C. V.; Benz, F. J.; Ullian, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The mixing and explosion of LOX and LH sub 2 is a concern for Space Transportation System operations. To understand this problem, cryogenic mixing is experimentally studied by pouring 1,2,2 trichloro 2,1,1 trifluoroethane (Freon 113) into LN sub 2, LN sub 2 into LH sub 2, and LH sub 2 into into LN sub 2 in a 1 m by 15 cm cylindrical glass vessel. Data from these experiments is compared with previous studies and a hypothesis is advanced that LOX/LH sub 2 mixing will result in a complex, heterogenous, multiphase aggregation including LOX, SOX, LH sub 2, and VH sub 2 using the multiphase hypothesis. Visual and x ray observations of the process and mass measurements are reported.

  11. Identifying Methane Sources in Groundwater; Quantifying Changes in Compositional and Stable Isotope Values during Multiphase Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, T.; Sathaye, K.

    2014-12-01

    A dramatic expansion of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling for natural gas in unconventional reserves is underway. This expansion is fueling considerable public concern, however, that extracted natural gas, reservoir brines and associated fracking fluids may infiltrate to and contaminate shallower (< 500m depth) groundwater reservoirs, thereby posing a health threat. Attributing methane found in shallow groundwater to either deep thermogenic 'fracking' operations or locally-derived shallow microbial sources utilizes geochemical methods including alkane wetness and stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of short chain (C1-C5) hydrocarbons. Compared to shallow microbial gas, thermogenic gas is wetter and falls within a different range of δ13C and δD values. What is not clear, however, is how the transport of natural gas through water saturated geological media may affect its compositional and stable isotope values. What is needed is a means to differentiate potential flow paths of natural gas including 'fast paths' along preexisting fractures and drill casings vs. 'slow paths' through low permeability rocks. In this study we attempt quantify transport-related effects using experimental 1-dimensional two-phase column experiments and analytical solutions to multi-phase gas injection equations. Two-phase experimental results for an injection of natural gas into a water saturated column packed with crushed illite show that the natural gas becomes enriched in methane compared to ethane and propane during transport. Carbon isotope measurements are ongoing. Results from the multi-phase gas injection equations that include methane isotopologue solubility and diffusion effects predict the development of a 'bank' of methane depleted in 13C relative to 12C at the front of a plume of fugitive natural gas. These results, therefore, suggest that transport of natural gas through water saturated geological media may complicate attribution methods needed to distinguish

  12. Determination of histamine in wines with an on-line pre-column flow derivatization system coupled to high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    García-Villar, Natividad; Saurina, Javier; Hernández-Cassou, Santiago

    2005-09-01

    A new rapid and sensitive high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for determining histamine in red wine samples, based on continuous flow derivatization with 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonate (NQS), is proposed. In this system, samples are derivatized on-line in a three-channel flow manifold for reagent, buffer and sample. The reaction takes place in a PTFE coil heated at 80 degrees C and with a residence time of 2.9 min. The reaction mixture is injected directly into the chromatographic system, where the histamine derivative is separated from other aminated compounds present in the wine matrix in less than ten minutes. The HPLC procedure involves a C18 column, a binary gradient of 2% acetic acid-methanol as a mobile phase, and UV detection at 305 nm. Analytical parameters of the method are evaluated using red wine samples. The linear range is up to 66.7 mg L(-1) (r = 0.9999), the precision (RSD) is 3%, the detection limit is 0.22 mg L(-1), and the average histamine recovery is 101.5% +/- 6.7%. Commercial red wines from different Spanish regions are analyzed with the proposed method.

  13. Characterization and in-vivo evaluation of potential probiotics of the bacterial flora within the water column of a healthy shrimp larviculture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Ming; Liang, Huafang; He, Yaoyao; Wen, Chongqing

    2016-05-01

    A thorough understanding of the normal bacterial flora associated with shrimp larviculture systems contributes to probiotic screening and disease control. The bacterial community of the water column over a commercial Litopenaeus vannamei larval rearing run was characterized with both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. A total of 27 phylotypes at the species level were isolated and identified based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the V3-V5 region of 16S rRNA genes showed a dynamic bacterial community with major changes occurred from stages zoea to mysis during the rearing run. The sequences retrieved were affiliated to four phyla, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes, with the family Rhodobacteraceae being the most frequently recovered one. Subsequently, 13 representative strains conferred higher larval survival than the control when evaluated in the in-vivo experiments; in particular, three candidates, assigned to Phaeobacter sp., Arthrobacter sp., and Microbacterium sp., significantly improved larval survival ( P < 0.05). Therefore, the healthy shrimp larviculture system harbored a diverse and favorable bacterial flora, which contribute to larval development and are of great importance in exploiting novel probiotics.

  14. The impact of sedimentary alkalinity release on the water column CO2 system in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, H.; Braeckman, U.; Le Guitton, M.; Meysman, F. J. R.

    2016-02-01

    It has been previously proposed that alkalinity release from sediments can play an important role in the carbonate dynamics on continental shelves, lowering the pCO2 of seawater and hence increasing the CO2 uptake from the atmosphere. To test this hypothesis, sedimentary alkalinity generation was quantified within cohesive and permeable sediments across the North Sea during two cruises in September 2011 (basin-wide) and June 2012 (Dutch coastal zone). Benthic fluxes of oxygen (O2), alkalinity (AT) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were determined using shipboard closed sediment incubations. Our results show that sediments can form an important source of alkalinity for the overlying water, particularly in the shallow southern North Sea, where high AT and DIC fluxes were recorded in near-shore sediments of the Belgian, Dutch and German coastal zone. In contrast, fluxes of AT and DIC are substantially lower in the deeper, seasonally stratified, northern part of the North Sea. Based on the data collected, we performed a model analysis to constrain the main pathways of alkalinity generation in the sediment, and to quantify how sedimentary alkalinity drives atmospheric CO2 uptake in the southern North Sea. Overall, our results show that sedimentary alkalinity generation should be regarded as a key component in the CO2 dynamics of shallow coastal systems.

  15. Computational modeling of multiphase flow and transport with Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kees, C. E.; Farthing, M. W.; Hines, A. M.; Howington, S. E.

    2008-12-01

    Computational flow and transport models play an important role in many hydrological investigations. Unfortunately, developing simulators that are efficient, widely applicable, and robust is a challenge. This is particularly true if the target applications include complications like multiple fluid phases with multiple components and material heterogeneity. To be specific, these problems often involve physical phenomena at multiple spatial and temporal scales. The appropriate formulation may evolve, and the systems of partial differential equations (PDEs) that arise from traditional formulations can be hard to solve efficiently at the desired resolution. Here, we discuss the development of a Python-based modeling framework for finite element approximation of systems of nonlinear PDEs with an emphasis on multiphase, multicomponent systems relevant for surface and subsurface hydrology. In addition to the overall approach and application, we consider the role of Python in managing code complexity, providing user interfaces, developing solution algorithms, and implementing numerical methods for execution on serial and parallel platforms. We evaluate trade-offs and design choices that follow from our use of Python versus other languages like C++ or Fortran and consider the impact on performance measured in terms of metrics like memory usage, execution time, and developer time.

  16. Columns in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  17. A Column Dispersion Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corapcioglu, M. Y.; Koroglu, F.

    1982-01-01

    Crushed glass and a Rhodamine B solution are used in a one-dimensional optically scanned column experiment to study the dispersion phenomenon in porous media. Results indicate that the described model gave satisfactory results and that the dispersion process in this experiment is basically convective. (DC)

  18. Avoid problems during distillation column startups

    SciTech Connect

    Sloley, A.W.

    1996-07-01

    The startup of a distillation column is the end product of the design process. Indeed, startup is the culmination of the theory and practice of designing the column to meet the process objectives. The author will direct most of this discussion towards column revamps due to their inherent complexity; however, the points apply equally to new columns, as well. The most important question that must be answered prior to a startup is how will the distillation system changes affect initial startup, process control of the system, and normal day-to-day operations? How will the operators run the system? Steady-state distillation-column simulations alone cannot provide an authoritative answer and, indeed, engineers` over-reliance on software too often has led them to ignore many practical aspects. Computer modeling, while an important engineering tool, is not reality. Distillation columns are real functioning pieces of equipment that require practical skills to successfully modify. They are not steady-state solutions that result from converged computer simulations. Early planning, coupled with thorough inspections and comprehensive reviews of instrumentation and procedures, can play a key role in assuring smooth startups.

  19. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; H. Yasuhara; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn

    2002-10-28

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (1) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology using high-resolution x-ray microtomography, (2) modeling of fracture permeability in the presence of asperities and confining stress, and (3) simulation of two-phase fluid flow in a fracture and a layered matrix. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. The distribution of fracture aperture is a difficult issue that we are studying and developing methods of quantification. The difficulties are both numerical and conceptual. Numerically, the three-dimensional data sets include millions, and sometimes, billions of points, and pose a computational challenge. The conceptual difficulties derive from the rough nature of the fracture surfaces, and the heterogeneous nature of the rock matrix. However, the high-resolution obtained by the imaging system provides us a much needed measuring environment on rock samples that are subjected to simultaneous fluid flow and confining stress. Pilot multi-phase experiments have been performed, proving the ability to detect two phases in certain large fractures. The absolute permeability of a fracture depends on the behavior of the asperities that keep it open. A model is being developed that predicts the permeability and average aperture of a fracture as a function of time under steady flow of water including the pressure solution at the asperity contact points. Several two-phase flow experiments in the presence of a fracture tip were performed in the past. At the

  20. Technical Report on NETL's Non Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Workshop: A path forward to understanding non-Newtonian multiphase slurry flows

    SciTech Connect

    Edited by Guenther, Chris; Garg, Rahul

    2013-08-19

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sponsored a workshop on non-Newtonian multiphase slurry at NETL’s Morgantown campus August 19 and 20, 2013. The objective of this special two-day meeting of 20-30 invited experts from industry, National Labs and academia was to identify and address technical issues associated with handling non-Newtonian multiphase slurries across various facilities managed by DOE. Particular emphasis during this workshop was placed on applications managed by the Office of Environmental Management (EM). The workshop was preceded by two webinars wherein personnel from ORP and NETL provided background information on the Hanford WTP project and discussed the critical design challenges facing this project. In non-Newtonian fluids, viscosity is not constant and exhibits a complex dependence on applied shear stress or deformation. Many applications under EM’s tank farm mission involve non-Newtonian slurries that are multiphase in nature; tank farm storage and handling, slurry transport, and mixing all involve multiphase flow dynamics, which require an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for rheological changes in non-Newtonian multiphase slurries (NNMS). To discuss the issues in predicting the behavior of NNMS, the workshop focused on two topic areas: (1) State-of-the-art in non-Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Flow, and (2) Scaling up with Confidence and Ensuring Safe and Reliable Long-Term Operation.

  1. Anisotropic distributions in a multiphase transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You; Xiao, Kai; Feng, Zhao; Liu, Feng; Snellings, Raimond

    2016-03-01

    With a multiphase transport (AMPT) model we investigate the relation between the magnitude, fluctuations, and correlations of the initial state spatial anisotropy ɛn and the final state anisotropic flow coefficients vn in Au+Au collisions at √{s NN}=200 GeV. It is found that the relative eccentricity fluctuations in AMPT account for the observed elliptic flow fluctuations, both are in agreement with the elliptic flow fluctuation measurements from the STAR collaboration. In addition, the studies based on two- and multiparticle correlations and event-by-event distributions of the anisotropies suggest that the elliptic-power function is a promising candidate of the underlying probability density function of the event-by-event distributions of ɛn as well as vn. Furthermore, the correlations between different order symmetry planes and harmonics in the initial coordinate space and final state momentum space are presented. Nonzero values of these correlations have been observed. The comparison between our calculations and data will, in the future, shed new insight into the nature of the fluctuations of the quark-gluon plasma produced in heavy ion collisions.

  2. Dan Joseph's contributions to disperse multiphase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    During his distinguished career, Dan Joseph worked on a vast array of problems. One of these, which occupied him off and on over the last two decades of his life, was that of flows with suspended finite-size particles at finite Reynolds numbers. He realized early on that progress in this field had to rely on the insight gained from numerical simulation, an area in which he was a pioneer. On the basis of the early numerical results he recognized the now famous ``drafting, kissing and tumbling'' mechanism of particle-particle interaction, the possibility of fluidization by lift and many others. With a number of colleagues and a series of gifted students he produced a significant body of work summarized in his on-line book Interrogations of Direct Numerical Simulation of Solid-Liquid Flows available from http://www.efluids.com/efluids/books/joseph.htm. This presentation will describe Joseph's contribution to the understanding of disperse multiphase flow and conclude with some examples from the author's recent work in this area. Supported by NSF.

  3. An overview of multiphase helicoaxial pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Falcimaigne, J.

    1996-02-01

    The helicoaxial concept developed by the Inst. Francais du Petrole (IFP) is one of two types of multiphase pumps extensively tested on fields and now used commercially. Helicoaxial pumps are rotodynamic turbomachines that are, in fact, hybrids between pumps and axial compressors. Helicoaxial pumps are based on special patented hydraulics designed to limit the phase separation that occurs in two-phase flow with conventional centrifugal pumps that produce a tremendous head loss. Developers have carried out extensive research and testing on actual production sites to develop helicoaxial pumping. The favorable results obtained so far confirm the soundness and versatility of the technology over a wide range of operating conditions. Helicoaxial pumps cover a larger domain of application than anticipated some years ago. They can be used with high gas volume fraction (94 to 95%) and/or low suction pressures. The pumps` inherent low weight should make them particularly attractive for large flow rates and offshore operations. Helicoaxial pumps are reliable products, technically and commercially read for field deployment.

  4. Multicomponent, multiphase flow in porous media with temperature variation

    SciTech Connect

    Wingard, J.S.; Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1990-10-01

    Recovery of hydrocarbons from porous media is an ongoing concern. Advanced techniques augment conventional recovery methods by injecting fluids that favorably interact with the oil. These fluids interact with the oil by energy transfer, in the case of steam injection, or by mass transfer, as in a miscible gas flood. Often both thermal and compositional considerations are important. An understanding of these injection methods requires knowledge of how temperature variations, phase equilibrium and multiphase flow in porous media interact. The material balance for each component and energy balance are cast as a system of non-strictly hyperbolic partial differential equations. This system of equations is solved using the method of characteristics. The model takes into account the phase behavior by using the Peng-Robinson equation of state to partition the individual components into different phases. Temperature effects are accounted for by the energy balance. Flow effects are modelled by using fractional flow curves and a Stone's three phase relative permeability model. Three problems are discussed. The first problem eliminates the phase behavior aspect of the problem by studying the flow of a single component as it undergoes an isothermal phase change. The second couples the effects of temperature and flow behavior by including a second component that is immiscible with the original component. Phase behavior is added by using a set of three partially miscible components that partition into two or three separate phases. 66 refs., 54 figs., 14 tabs.

  5. Production of Diacylglycerol-enriched Oil by Glycerolysis of Soybean Oil using a Bubble Column Reactor in a Solvent-free System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Yang, Xue; Fu, Junning; Chen, Qiong; Song, Ziliang; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, diacylglycerol-enriched soybean oil (DESO) was synthesized through Lipozyme 435-catalyzed glycerolysis of soybean oil (SO) in a solvent-free system using a modified bubble column reactor. The effects of enzyme load, mole ratio of glycerol to soybean oil, reaction temperature, gas flow and reaction time on DAG production were investigated. The selected conditions were established as being enzyme load of 4 wt% (mass of substrates), glycerol/soybean oil mole ratio of 20:1, reaction temperature of 80°C, gas flow of 10.6 cm/min, and a reaction time of 2.5 h, obtaining the DAG content of 49.4±0.5 wt%. The reusability of Lipozyme 435 was evaluated by monitoring the contents of DAG, monoacylglycerol (MAG) and triacylglycerol (TAG) in 10 consecutive runs. After purified by one-step molecular distillation, the DAG content of 63.5±0.3 wt% was achieved in DESO. The mole ratio of 1, 3-DAG to 1, 2-DAG was 2:1 and the fatty acid composition had no significant difference from that of soybean oil. However, the thermal properties of DESO and SO had considerable differences. Polymorphic form of DESO were mainly the β form and minor amounts of the β' form. Granular aggregation and round-shaped crystals were detected in DESO. PMID:26876674

  6. Simultaneous Scanning Electron Microscope Imaging of Topographical and Chemical Contrast Using In-Lens, In-Column, and Everhart-Thornley Detector Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinming; Cen, Xi; Ravichandran, Rijuta; Hughes, Lauren A; van Benthem, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    The scanning electron microscope provides a platform for subnanometer resolution characterization of material morphology with excellent topographic and chemical contrast dependent on the used detectors. For imaging applications, the predominantly utilized signals are secondary electrons (SEs) and backscattered electrons (BSEs) that are emitted from the sample surface. Recent advances in detector technology beyond the traditional Everhart-Thornley geometry have enabled the simultaneous acquisition and discrimination of SE and BSE signals. This study demonstrates the imaging capabilities of a recently introduced new detector system that consists of the combination of two in-lens (I-L) detectors and one in-column (I-C) detector. Coupled with biasing the sample stage to reduce electron-specimen interaction volumes, this trinity of detector geometry allows simultaneous acquisition of signals to distinguish chemical contrast from topographical changes of the sample, including the identification of surface contamination. The I-C detector provides 4× improved topography, whereas the I-L detector closest to the sample offers excellent simultaneous chemical contrast imaging while not limiting the minimization of working distance to obtain optimal lateral resolution. Imaging capabilities and contrast mechanisms for all three detectors are discussed quantitatively in direct comparison to each other and the conventional Everhart-Thornley detector. PMID:27142307

  7. Production of Diacylglycerol-enriched Oil by Glycerolysis of Soybean Oil using a Bubble Column Reactor in a Solvent-free System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Yang, Xue; Fu, Junning; Chen, Qiong; Song, Ziliang; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, diacylglycerol-enriched soybean oil (DESO) was synthesized through Lipozyme 435-catalyzed glycerolysis of soybean oil (SO) in a solvent-free system using a modified bubble column reactor. The effects of enzyme load, mole ratio of glycerol to soybean oil, reaction temperature, gas flow and reaction time on DAG production were investigated. The selected conditions were established as being enzyme load of 4 wt% (mass of substrates), glycerol/soybean oil mole ratio of 20:1, reaction temperature of 80°C, gas flow of 10.6 cm/min, and a reaction time of 2.5 h, obtaining the DAG content of 49.4±0.5 wt%. The reusability of Lipozyme 435 was evaluated by monitoring the contents of DAG, monoacylglycerol (MAG) and triacylglycerol (TAG) in 10 consecutive runs. After purified by one-step molecular distillation, the DAG content of 63.5±0.3 wt% was achieved in DESO. The mole ratio of 1, 3-DAG to 1, 2-DAG was 2:1 and the fatty acid composition had no significant difference from that of soybean oil. However, the thermal properties of DESO and SO had considerable differences. Polymorphic form of DESO were mainly the β form and minor amounts of the β' form. Granular aggregation and round-shaped crystals were detected in DESO.

  8. Cortical and Thalamic Excitation Mediate the Multiphasic Responses of Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons to Motivationally Salient Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Doig, Natalie M.; Magill, Peter J.; Apicella, Paul; Bolam, J. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic interneurons are key components of striatal microcircuits. In primates, tonically active neurons (putative cholinergic interneurons) exhibit multiphasic responses to motivationally salient stimuli that mirror those of midbrain dopamine neurons and together these two systems mediate reward-related learning in basal ganglia circuits. Here, we addressed the potential contribution of cortical and thalamic excitatory inputs to the characteristic multiphasic responses of cholinergic interneurons in vivo. We first recorded and labeled individual cholinergic interneurons in anesthetized rats. Electron microscopic analyses of these labeled neurons demonstrated that an individual interneuron could form synapses with cortical and, more commonly, thalamic afferents. Single-pulse electrical stimulation of ipsilateral frontal cortex led to robust short-latency (<20 ms) interneuron spiking, indicating monosynaptic connectivity, but firing probability progressively decreased during high-frequency pulse trains. In contrast, single-pulse thalamic stimulation led to weak short-latency spiking, but firing probability increased during pulse trains. After initial excitation from cortex or thalamus, interneurons displayed a “pause” in firing, followed by a “rebound” increase in firing rate. Across all stimulation protocols, the number of spikes in the initial excitation correlated positively with pause duration and negatively with rebound magnitude. The magnitude of the initial excitation, therefore, partly determined the profile of later components of multiphasic responses. Upon examining the responses of tonically active neurons in behaving primates, we found that these correlations held true for unit responses to a reward-predicting stimulus, but not to the reward alone, delivered outside of any task. We conclude that excitatory inputs determine, at least in part, the multiphasic responses of cholinergic interneurons under specific behavioral conditions. PMID

  9. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors. Seventh technical progress report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Gidaspow, D.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this investigation is to convert our ``learning gas solid-liquid`` fluidization model into a predictive design model. The IIT hydrodynamic model computes the phase velocities and the volume fractions of gas, liquid and particulate phase. Model verification involves a comparison of these computed velocities and volume fractions to experimental values. A hydrodynamic model for multiphase flows, based on the principles of mass, momentum and energy conservation for each phase, was developed and applied to model gas-liquid, gas-liquid-solid fluidization and gas-solid-solid separation. To simulate the industrial slurry bubble column reactors, a computer program based on the hydrodynamic model was written with modules for chemical reactions (e.g. the synthesis of methanol), phase changes and heat exchangers. In the simulations of gas-liquid two phases flow system, the gas hold-ups, computed with a variety of operating conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas and liquid velocities, agree well with the measurements obtained at Air Products` pilot plant. The hydrodynamic model has more flexible features than the previous empirical correlations in predicting the gas hold-up of gas-liquid two-phase flow systems. In the simulations of gas-liquid-solid bubble column reactors with and without slurry circulation, the code computes volume fractions, temperatures and velocity distributions for the gas, the liquid and the solid phases, as well as concentration distributions for the species (CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}0H, ... ), after startup from a certain initial state. A kinetic theory approach is used to compute a solid viscosity due to particle collisions. Solid motion and gas-liquid-solid mixing are observed on a color PCSHOW movie made from computed time series data. The steady state and time average catalyst concentration profiles, the slurry height and the rates of methanol production agree well with the measurements obtained at an Air Products` pilot plant.

  10. A lattice Boltzmann model for multiphase flows interacting with deformable bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosis, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a numerical model to simulate a multiphase flow interacting with deformable solid bodies is proposed. The fluid domain is modeled through the lattice Boltzmann method and the Shan-Chen model is adopted to handle the multiphase feature. The interaction of the flow with immersed solid bodies is accounted for by using the Immersed Boundary method. Corotational beam finite elements are used to model the deformable bodies and non-linear structure dynamics is predicted through the Time Discontinuous Galerkin method. A numerical campaign is carried out in order to assess the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed modeling by involving different scenarios. In particular, the model is validated by performing the bubble test and by comparing present results with the ones from a numerical commercial software. Moreover, the properties in terms of convergence are discussed. In addition, the effectiveness of the proposed methodology is evaluated by computing the error in terms of the energy that is artificially introduced in the system at the fluid-solid interface. Present findings show that the proposed approach is robust, accurate and suitable of being applied to a lot of practical applications involving the interaction between multiphase flows and deformable solid bodies.

  11. Application of multiphase modelling for vortex occurrence in vertical pump intake - a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsudin, M. L.; Munisamy, K. M.; Thangaraju, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    Vortex formation within pump intake is one of common problems faced for power plant cooling water system. This phenomenon, categorised as surface and sub-surface vortices, can lead to several operational problems and increased maintenance costs. Physical model study was recommended from published guidelines but proved to be time and resource consuming. Hence, the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is an attractive alternative in managing the problem. At the early stage, flow analysis was conducted using single phase simulation and found to find good agreement with the observation from physical model study. With the development of computers, multiphase simulation found further enhancement in obtaining accurate results for representing air entrainment and sub-surface vortices which were earlier not well predicted from the single phase simulation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the application of multiphase modelling with CFD analysis for investigating vortex formation for a vertically inverted pump intake. In applying multiphase modelling, there ought to be a balance between the acceptable usage for computational time and resources and the degree of accuracy and realism in the results as expected from the analysis.

  12. The accretion column of AE Aqr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Claudia; Costa, D. Joaquim; Luna, Gerardo; Lima, Isabel J.; Silva, Karleyne M. G.; De Araujo, Jose Carlos N.; Coelho, Jaziel

    2016-07-01

    AE Aqr is a magnetic cataclysmic variable, whose white dwarf rotates at the very fast rate of 33 s modulating the flux from high-energies to optical wavelengths. There are many studies of the origin of its emission, which consider emission from a rotating magnetic field or from an accretion column. Recently, MAGIC observations have discarded AE Aqr emission in very high energy gamma-rays discarding non-thermal emission. Furthermore, soft and hard X-ray data from Swift and NuSTAR were fitted using thermal models. Here we present the modelling of AE Aqr X-ray spectra and light curve considering the emission of a magnetic accretion column using the Cyclops code. The model takes into consideration the 3D geometry of the system, allowing to properly represent the white-dwarf auto eclipse, the pre-shock column absorption, and the varying density and temperature of a tall accretion column.

  13. Post Column Derivatization Using Reaction Flow High Performance Liquid Chromatography Columns.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew; Pravadali-Cekic, Sercan; Hua, Stanley; Kocic, Danijela; Camenzuli, Michelle; Dennis, Gary; Shalliker, Andrew

    2016-04-26

    A protocol for the use of reaction flow high performance liquid chromatography columns for methods employing post column derivatization (PCD) is presented. A major difficulty in adapting PCD to modern HPLC systems and columns is the need for large volume reaction coils that enable reagent mixing and then the derivatization reaction to take place. This large post column dead volume leads to band broadening, which results in a loss of observed separation efficiency and indeed detection in sensitivity. In reaction flow post column derivatization (RF-PCD) the derivatization reagent(s) are pumped against the flow of mobile phase into either one or two of the outer ports of the reaction flow column where it is mixed with column effluent inside a frit housed within the column end fitting. This technique allows for more efficient mixing of the column effluent and derivatization reagent(s) meaning that the volume of the reaction loops can be minimized or even eliminated altogether. It has been found that RF-PCD methods perform better than conventional PCD methods in terms of observed separation efficiency and signal to noise ratio. A further advantage of RF-PCD techniques is the ability to monitor effluent coming from the central port in its underivatized state. RF-PCD has currently been trialed on a relatively small range of post column reactions, however, there is currently no reason to suggest that RF-PCD could not be adapted to any existing one or two component (as long as both reagents are added at the same time) post column derivatization reaction.

  14. 11. TIMBER COLUMN AND CAST IRON COLUMN CAP IN FIFTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. TIMBER COLUMN AND CAST IRON COLUMN CAP IN FIFTH FLOOR WAREHOUSE SPACE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Commercial & Industrial Buildings, Becker-Hazelton Company Warehouse, 280 Iowa Street, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  15. Successfully downsize trayed columns

    SciTech Connect

    Sloley, A.W.; Fleming, B. )

    1994-03-01

    Techniques for the design and sizing of new trayed distillation columns are abundant in the literature. So, too, are the guidelines for modifying towers for operation beyond their original design range. Reducing capacity of distillation trays merits at least as much consideration. Indeed, lack of knowledge and experience in this area causes many tower failures and misdesigned columns. In this article, the authors present some practical design considerations, based on field experience, for tower trays operating at loadings dramatically lower than normal for a particular design. General considerations cover liquid and vapor hydraulics and flow behavior. Case studies are included for there typical units: a refinery vacuum crude still, a petrochemical superfractionator, and a steam stripper.

  16. Research on Configurations of Thermally Integrated Distillation Column(TIDC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lanyi; Li, Jun; Liu, Xuenuan; Li, Qingsong

    Taking a C3 distillation column as the base case, possible configurations for Thermally Integrated Distillation Columns (TIDC) are proposed and compared to a conventional column and a column with a vapor recompression system (VRC). Thermal efficiency of the TIDC appears to be strongly sensitive to column configuration and a highly efficient asymmetrical configuration with stripping section stages thermally interconnected with the same number of stages in the upper part of the rectifying section emerges as the most promising option. The relationships among pressure ratio of rectifying section to stripping section and energy consumption were also discussed.

  17. 9. Detail view of columns on first floor. This row ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail view of columns on first floor. This row of columns indicates the former location of the exterior mill wall before World War II era expansion. The unusual column and beam connection was a key part of the mill structural system patented by Providence, Rhode Island engineers Charles Praray and Charles Makepeace in 1894. Each column was originally located in the apex of triangular window bay, but not connected to the exterior wall. Modifications on the right side of each column support the beams of the addition. - Dixie Cotton Mill, 710 Greenville Street, La Grange, Troup County, GA

  18. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Paul C.K. Lam; Isaac K. Gamwo; Dimitri Gidaspow

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a predictive experimentally verified computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for gas-liquid-solid flow. A three dimensional transient computer code for the coupled Navier-Stokes equations for each phase was developed and is appended in this report. The principal input into the model is the viscosity of the particulate phase which was determined from a measurement of the random kinetic energy of the 800 micron glass beads and a Brookfield viscometer. The details are presented in the attached paper titled ''CFD Simulation of Flow and Turbulence in a Slurry Bubble Column''. This phase of the work is in press in a referred journal (AIChE Journal, 2002) and was presented at the Fourth International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF 2001) in New Orleans, May 27-June 1, 2001 (Paper No. 909). The computed time averaged particle velocities and concentrations agree with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements of velocities and concentrations, obtained using a combination of gamma-ray and X-ray densitometers, in a slurry bubble column, operated in the bubbly-coalesced fluidization regime with continuous flow of water. Both the experiment and the simulation show a down-flow of particles in the center of the column and up-flow near the walls and nearly uniform particle concentration. Normal and shear Reynolds stresses were constructed from the computed instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced similar nearly flat horizontal profiles of turbulent kinetic energy of particles. To better understand turbulence we studied fluidization in a liquid-solid bed. This work was also presented at the Fourth International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF 2001, Paper No. 910). To understand turbulence in risers, measurements were done in the IIT riser with 530 micron glass beads using a PIV technique. This report

  19. Multi-residue analytical method for the determination of endocrine disruptors and related compounds in river and waste water using dual column liquid chromatography switching system coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gorga, Marina; Petrovic, Mira; Barceló, Damià

    2013-06-21

    The present study describes a novel, fully automated method, based on column switching using EQuan™ columns for an integrated sample preconcentration and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-LC-MS/MS). The method allows the unequivocal identification and quantification of the most relevant environmental endocrine disruptors compounds (EDCs) and compounds suspected to be EDCs, such as natural and synthetic estrogens and their conjugates, antimicrobials, parabens, bisphenol A, alkylphenolic compounds, benzotriazoles, and organophosphorus flame retardants, in surface river water and wastewater samples. Applying this technique, water samples were directly injected into the chromatographic system and the target compounds were concentrated into the loading column. Thereafter, the analytes were transferred into the analytical column for subsequent detection by MS-MS (QqQ). A comparative study employing three types of columns, with different chemical modifications, was performed in order to determine the optimal column that allowed maximum retention and subsequent elution of the analytes. Using this new optimized methodology a fast and easy online methodology for the analysis of EDCs in surface river water and wastewater with low limits of quantification (LOQ) was obtained. LOQs ranged from 0.008 to 1.54 ng/L for surface river water and from 0.178/0.364 to 12.5/25.0 ng/L (except for alkylphenol monoethoxylates) for effluent/influent waste water. Moreover, employing approximately 1h, a complete analysis was performed which was significant improvement in comparison to other methods reported previously. This method was used to track the presence and fate of target compounds in the Ebro River which is the most important river in Spain whose intensive agricultural and industrial activities concentrate mainly close to the main cities in the basin, deteriorating soil and water quality.

  20. Multi-residue analytical method for the determination of endocrine disruptors and related compounds in river and waste water using dual column liquid chromatography switching system coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gorga, Marina; Petrovic, Mira; Barceló, Damià

    2013-06-21

    The present study describes a novel, fully automated method, based on column switching using EQuan™ columns for an integrated sample preconcentration and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-LC-MS/MS). The method allows the unequivocal identification and quantification of the most relevant environmental endocrine disruptors compounds (EDCs) and compounds suspected to be EDCs, such as natural and synthetic estrogens and their conjugates, antimicrobials, parabens, bisphenol A, alkylphenolic compounds, benzotriazoles, and organophosphorus flame retardants, in surface river water and wastewater samples. Applying this technique, water samples were directly injected into the chromatographic system and the target compounds were concentrated into the loading column. Thereafter, the analytes were transferred into the analytical column for subsequent detection by MS-MS (QqQ). A comparative study employing three types of columns, with different chemical modifications, was performed in order to determine the optimal column that allowed maximum retention and subsequent elution of the analytes. Using this new optimized methodology a fast and easy online methodology for the analysis of EDCs in surface river water and wastewater with low limits of quantification (LOQ) was obtained. LOQs ranged from 0.008 to 1.54 ng/L for surface river water and from 0.178/0.364 to 12.5/25.0 ng/L (except for alkylphenol monoethoxylates) for effluent/influent waste water. Moreover, employing approximately 1h, a complete analysis was performed which was significant improvement in comparison to other methods reported previously. This method was used to track the presence and fate of target compounds in the Ebro River which is the most important river in Spain whose intensive agricultural and industrial activities concentrate mainly close to the main cities in the basin, deteriorating soil and water quality. PMID:23683400

  1. New low temperature multiphase ferroelectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bescher, Eric; Xu, Yuhuan; Mackenzie, J. D.

    2001-06-01

    This article describes the low-temperature synthesis of new multiphase ferroelectrics containing an inorganic ferroelectric phase entrapped in amorphous silica or in an organically modified silicate (ormosil). Sol gel derived LiNbO3 and BaTiO3 crystals were grown in SiO2 and in RSiO1.5 glass where R contains a chromophore (TDP) insensitive to hydrolysis and condensation reactions. The LiNbO3-SiO2 and BaTiO3-SiO2 compositions as well as the TDP-LiNbO3-SiO2 and TDP-BaTiO3-SiO2 ormosils exhibit ferroelectric-like properties. This unusual characteristic is due to the presence of small, partially ordered crystallites of the ferroelectric, dispersed in the amorphous matrix. In addition to their ferroelectric properties, the ormosils also exhibit interesting optical characteristics: the TDP-BaTiO3-SiO2 materials are red, whereas the TDP-LiNbO3-SiO2 are yellow. The materials described in this article are representative of two new classes of weak ferroelectrics. In the first class, a ferroelectric is dispersed in an amorphous matrix. The second class may be called "organically-modified crystals": small ferroelectric crystals embedded in an organically modified matrix. The fabrication of such materials is possible for inorganic crystalline phases forming at temperatures below the decomposition temperature of the organic (about 250 °C). This article also contains some theoretical considerations explaining why these materials, although amorphous by x-ray diffraction, exhibit ferroelectric-like properties.

  2. MSTS - Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator theory manual

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.D.; Nichols, W.E.

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy, through the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office, has designated the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada for detailed study as the candidate US geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Site characterization will determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for the potential waste repository. If the site is determined suitable, subsequent studies and characterization will be conducted to obtain authorization from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to construct the potential waste repository. A principal component of the characterization and licensing processes involves numerically predicting the thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment of the Yucca Mountain site to the potential repository over a 10,000-year period. The thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment to the repository is anticipated to include complex processes of countercurrent vapor and liquid migration, multiple-phase heat transfer, multiple-phase transport, and geochemical reactions. Numerical simulators based on mathematical descriptions of these subsurface phenomena are required to make numerical predictions of the thermal and hydrologic response of the Yucca Mountain subsurface environment The engineering simulator called the Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator (MSTS) was developed at the request of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office to produce numerical predictions of subsurface flow and transport phenomena at the potential Yucca Mountain site. This document delineates the design architecture and describes the specific computational algorithms that compose MSTS. Details for using MSTS and sample problems are given in the {open_quotes}User`s Guide and Reference{close_quotes} companion document.

  3. PArallel Reacting Multiphase FLOw Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    2002-06-01

    PARMFLO is a parallel multiphase reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. It can perform steady or unsteady simulations in three space dimensions. It is intended for use in engineering CFD analysis of industrial flow system components. Its parallel processing capabilities allow it to be applied to problems that use at least an order of magnitude more computational cells than the number that can be used on a typical single processor workstation (about 106 cellsmore » in parallel processing mode versus about io cells in serial processing mode). Alternately, by spreading the work of a CFD problem that could be run on a single workstation over a group of computers on a network, it can bring the runtime down by an order of magnitude or more (typically from many days to less than one day). The software was implemented using the industry standard Message-Passing Interface (MPI) and domain decomposition in one spatial direction. The phases of a flow problem may include an ideal gas mixture with an arbitrary number of chemical species, and dispersed droplet and particle phases. Regions of porous media may also be included within the domain. The porous media may be packed beds, foams, or monolith catalyst supports. With these features, the code is especially suited to analysis of mixing of reactants in the inlet chamber of catalytic reactors coupled to computation of product yields that result from the flow of the mixture through the catalyst coaled support structure.« less

  4. Multiphasic strain differentiation of atypical mycobacteria from elephant trunk wash.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Loke, Mun Fai; Ong, Bee Lee; Wong, Yan Ling; Hong, Kar Wai; Tan, Kian Hin; Kaur, Sargit; Ng, Hien Fuh; Abdul Razak, Mfa; Ngeow, Yun Fong

    2015-01-01

    Background. Two non-tuberculous mycobacterial strains, UM_3 and UM_11, were isolated from the trunk wash of captive elephants in Malaysia. As they appeared to be identical phenotypes, they were investigated further by conventional and whole genome sequence-based methods of strain differentiation. Methods. Multiphasic investigations on the isolates included species identification with hsp65 PCR-sequencing, conventional biochemical tests, rapid biochemical profiling using API strips and the Biolog Phenotype Microarray analysis, protein profiling with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, repetitive sequence-based PCR typing and whole genome sequencing followed by phylogenomic analyses. Results. The isolates were shown to be possibly novel slow-growing schotochromogens with highly similar biological and genotypic characteristics. Both strains have a genome size of 5.2 Mbp, G+C content of 68.8%, one rRNA operon and 52 tRNAs each. They qualified for classification into the same species with their average nucleotide identity of 99.98% and tetranucleotide correlation coefficient of 0.99999. At the subspecies level, both strains showed 98.8% band similarity in the Diversilab automated repetitive sequence-based PCR typing system, 96.2% similarity in protein profiles obtained by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, and a genomic distance that is close to zero in the phylogenomic tree constructed with conserved orthologs. Detailed epidemiological tracking revealed that the elephants shared a common habitat eight years apart, thus, strengthening the possibility of a clonal relationship between the two strains.

  5. Study of hydrodynamic instabilities with a multiphase lattice Boltzmann model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, Ali Mauricio; Muñoz, José Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz hydrodynamic instabilities are frequent in many natural and industrial processes, but their numerical simulation is not an easy challenge. This work simulates both instabilities by using a lattice Boltzmann model on multiphase fluids at a liquid-vapour interface, instead of multicomponent systems like the oil-water one. The model, proposed by He, Chen and Zhang (1999) [1] was modified to increase the precision by computing the pressure gradients with a higher order, as proposed by McCracken and Abraham (2005) [2]. The resulting model correctly simulates both instabilities by using almost the same parameter set. It also reproduces the relation γ ∝√{ A} between the growing rate γ of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the relative density difference between the fluids (known as the Atwood number A), but including also deviations observed in experiments at low density differences. The results show that the implemented model is a useful tool for the study of hydrodynamic instabilities, drawing a sharp interface and exhibiting numerical stability for moderately high Reynolds numbers.

  6. Multiphasic strain differentiation of atypical mycobacteria from elephant trunk wash

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Loke, Mun Fai; Ong, Bee Lee; Wong, Yan Ling; Hong, Kar Wai; Tan, Kian Hin; Kaur, Sargit; Ng, Hien Fuh; Abdul Razak, MFA

    2015-01-01

    Background. Two non-tuberculous mycobacterial strains, UM_3 and UM_11, were isolated from the trunk wash of captive elephants in Malaysia. As they appeared to be identical phenotypes, they were investigated further by conventional and whole genome sequence-based methods of strain differentiation. Methods. Multiphasic investigations on the isolates included species identification with hsp65 PCR-sequencing, conventional biochemical tests, rapid biochemical profiling using API strips and the Biolog Phenotype Microarray analysis, protein profiling with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, repetitive sequence-based PCR typing and whole genome sequencing followed by phylogenomic analyses. Results. The isolates were shown to be possibly novel slow-growing schotochromogens with highly similar biological and genotypic characteristics. Both strains have a genome size of 5.2 Mbp, G+C content of 68.8%, one rRNA operon and 52 tRNAs each. They qualified for classification into the same species with their average nucleotide identity of 99.98% and tetranucleotide correlation coefficient of 0.99999. At the subspecies level, both strains showed 98.8% band similarity in the Diversilab automated repetitive sequence-based PCR typing system, 96.2% similarity in protein profiles obtained by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, and a genomic distance that is close to zero in the phylogenomic tree constructed with conserved orthologs. Detailed epidemiological tracking revealed that the elephants shared a common habitat eight years apart, thus, strengthening the possibility of a clonal relationship between the two strains. PMID:26587340

  7. Multiphasic strain differentiation of atypical mycobacteria from elephant trunk wash.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Loke, Mun Fai; Ong, Bee Lee; Wong, Yan Ling; Hong, Kar Wai; Tan, Kian Hin; Kaur, Sargit; Ng, Hien Fuh; Abdul Razak, Mfa; Ngeow, Yun Fong

    2015-01-01

    Background. Two non-tuberculous mycobacterial strains, UM_3 and UM_11, were isolated from the trunk wash of captive elephants in Malaysia. As they appeared to be identical phenotypes, they were investigated further by conventional and whole genome sequence-based methods of strain differentiation. Methods. Multiphasic investigations on the isolates included species identification with hsp65 PCR-sequencing, conventional biochemical tests, rapid biochemical profiling using API strips and the Biolog Phenotype Microarray analysis, protein profiling with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, repetitive sequence-based PCR typing and whole genome sequencing followed by phylogenomic analyses. Results. The isolates were shown to be possibly novel slow-growing schotochromogens with highly similar biological and genotypic characteristics. Both strains have a genome size of 5.2 Mbp, G+C content of 68.8%, one rRNA operon and 52 tRNAs each. They qualified for classification into the same species with their average nucleotide identity of 99.98% and tetranucleotide correlation coefficient of 0.99999. At the subspecies level, both strains showed 98.8% band similarity in the Diversilab automated repetitive sequence-based PCR typing system, 96.2% similarity in protein profiles obtained by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, and a genomic distance that is close to zero in the phylogenomic tree constructed with conserved orthologs. Detailed epidemiological tracking revealed that the elephants shared a common habitat eight years apart, thus, strengthening the possibility of a clonal relationship between the two strains. PMID:26587340

  8. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Multiphase Transport in Nanostructured PEM Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiles, Christopher D.

    As the fossil fuel crisis becomes more critical, it is imperative to develop renewable sources of power generation. Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are considered a viable option. However, the cost of the platinum catalyst has hindered their commercialization. PEM fuel cells with platinum loading of >0.4 mg cm2 are common. Efforts towards further reducing this loading are currently underway utilizing nanostructured electrodes. A consequence of increased platinum utilization per unit area and thinner nanostructured electrodes is flooding, which is detrimental to fuel cell performance. Flooding causes a two-fold impact on cell performance: a drop in cell voltage and a rise in parasitic pumping power to overcome the increased pressure drop, which together result in a significant reduction in system efficiency. Proper water management is therefore crucial for optimum performance of the fuel cell and also for enhancing membrane durability. The goal of this thesis is to simulate the multiphase fluid transport in the nanostructured PEMFC of H2O in air with realistic density ratios. In order to pursue this goal, the ability of the pseudopotential based multiphase lattice Boltzmann method to realistically model the coexistence of the gas and liquid phases of H2O at low temperatures is explored. This method is expanded to include a gas mixture of O2 and N 2 into the multiphase H2O systems. Beginning with the examination of the phase transition region described by the current implementation of the multiphase pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model. Following this, a modified form of the pressure term with the use of a scalar multiplier kappa for the Peng-Robinson equation of state is thoroughly investigated. This method proves to be very effective at enabling numerically stable simulations at low temperatures with large density ratios. It is found that for decreasing values of kappa, this model leads to an increase in multiphase interface thickness and a

  9. HEAVY OIL PROCESS MONITOR: AUTOMATED ON-COLUMN ASPHALTENE PRECIPITATION AND RE-DISSOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr; Mark Sanderson

    2006-06-01

    About 37-50% (w/w) of the heptane asphaltenes from unpyrolyzed residua dissolve in cyclohexane. As pyrolysis progresses, this number decrease to below 15% as coke and toluene insoluble pre-coke materials appear. This solubility measurement can be used after coke begins to form, unlike the flocculation titration, which cannot be applied to multi-phase systems. Currently, the procedure for the isolation of heptane asphaltenes and the determination of the amount of asphaltenes soluble in cyclohexane spans three days. A more rapid method to measure asphaltene solubility was explored using a novel on-column asphaltene precipitation and re-dissolution technique. This was automated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipment with a step gradient sequence using the solvents: heptane, cyclohexane, toluene:methanol (98:2). Results for four series of original and pyrolyzed residua were compared with data from the gravimetric method. The measurement time was reduced from three days to forty minutes. The separation was expanded further with the use of four solvents: heptane, cyclohexane, toluene, and cyclohexanone or methylene chloride. This provides a fourth peak which represents the most polar components, in the oil.

  10. Viscous and gravitational fingering in multiphase compositional and compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    Viscous and gravitational fingering refer to flow instabilities in porous media that are triggered by adverse mobility or density ratios, respectively. These instabilities have been studied extensively in the past for (1) single-phase flow (e.g., contaminant transport in groundwater, first-contact-miscible displacement of oil by gas in hydrocarbon production), and (2) multi-phase immiscible and incompressible flow (e.g., water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection in oil reservoirs). Fingering in multiphase compositional and compressible flow has received much less attention, perhaps due to its high computational complexity. However, many important subsurface processes involve multiple phases that exchange species. Examples are carbon sequestration in saline aquifers and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by gas or WAG injection below the minimum miscibility pressure. In multiphase flow, relative permeabilities affect the mobility contrast for a given viscosity ratio. Phase behavior can also change local fluid properties, which can either enhance or mitigate viscous and gravitational instabilities. This work presents a detailed study of fingering behavior in compositional multiphase flow in two and three dimensions and considers the effects of (1) Fickian diffusion, (2) mechanical dispersion, (3) flow rates, (4) domain size and geometry, (5) formation heterogeneities, (6) gravity, and (7) relative permeabilities. Results show that fingering in compositional multiphase flow is profoundly different from miscible conditions and upscaling techniques used for the latter case are unlikely to be generalizable to the former.

  11. Column test-rig facility for column scanning studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zain, Rasif M.; Roslan, Y.

    2010-03-01

    Distillation columns are considered as one of the most critical components in oil and gas plants. The plant performance depends on the ability of these columns to function as intended. Defective columns may lead to serious consequences to the plant operation, and hence the quality of product. In order to perform any inspection techniques to distillation column for NDT practitioner, the best facility was designed when the adjustable defeats of distillation column test rig has been developed. The paper discussed the development and the function of this facility.

  12. Column test-rig facility for column scanning studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zain, Rasif M.; Roslan, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Distillation columns are considered as one of the most critical components in oil and gas plants. The plant performance depends on the ability of these columns to function as intended. Defective columns may lead to serious consequences to the plant operation, and hence the quality of product. In order to perform any inspection techniques to distillation column for NDT practitioner, the best facility was designed when the adjustable defeats of distillation column test rig has been developed. The paper discussed the development and the function of this facility.

  13. Investigation on the gas pockets in a rotodynamic multiphase pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Li, Y. J.; Cai, S. J.; Zhu, H. W.; Zhang, Y. X.

    2016-05-01

    The appearance of gas pockets has an obvious impact on the performance of the rotodynamic multiphase pump. In order to study the formation of gas pockets in the pump and its effects on pump's performance, the unsteady numerical simulation and the visualization experiments were done to investigate gas pockets in a three-stage rotodynamic multiphase pump developed by authors. Meanwhile, the mixture of water and air was selected as the medium. According to the distributions of pressure, gas volume fraction and velocity vector in three compression cells in unsteady flow process, the process of the formation of gas pockets in the pump were analysed generally. The visualization experiments were used to verify the validity of the numerical simulation. The results will be benefit for the hydraulic design of the compression cell of rotodynamic multiphase pump.

  14. A Cell-Centered Multiphase ALE Scheme With Structural Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Timothy Alan

    2012-04-16

    A novel computational scheme has been developed for simulating compressible multiphase flows interacting with solid structures. The multiphase fluid is computed using a Godunov-type finite-volume method. This has been extended to allow computations on moving meshes using a direct arbitrary-Eulerian- Lagrangian (ALE) scheme. The method has been implemented within a Lagrangian hydrocode, which allows modeling the interaction with Lagrangian structural regions. Although the above scheme is general enough for use on many applications, the ultimate goal of the research is the simulation of heterogeneous energetic material, such as explosives or propellants. The method is powerful enough for application to all stages of the problem, including the initial burning of the material, the propagation of blast waves, and interaction with surrounding structures. The method has been tested on a number of canonical multiphase tests as well as fluid-structure interaction problems.

  15. Multi-phase SPH modelling of violent hydrodynamics on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokos, Athanasios; Rogers, Benedict D.; Stansby, Peter K.; Domínguez, José M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the acceleration of multi-phase smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using a graphics processing unit (GPU) enabling large numbers of particles (10-20 million) to be simulated on just a single GPU card. With novel hardware architectures such as a GPU, the optimum approach to implement a multi-phase scheme presents some new challenges. Many more particles must be included in the calculation and there are very different speeds of sound in each phase with the largest speed of sound determining the time step. This requires efficient computation. To take full advantage of the hardware acceleration provided by a single GPU for a multi-phase simulation, four different algorithms are investigated: conditional statements, binary operators, separate particle lists and an intermediate global function. Runtime results show that the optimum approach needs to employ separate cell and neighbour lists for each phase. The profiler shows that this approach leads to a reduction in both memory transactions and arithmetic operations giving significant runtime gains. The four different algorithms are compared to the efficiency of the optimised single-phase GPU code, DualSPHysics, for 2-D and 3-D simulations which indicate that the multi-phase functionality has a significant computational overhead. A comparison with an optimised CPU code shows a speed up of an order of magnitude over an OpenMP simulation with 8 threads and two orders of magnitude over a single thread simulation. A demonstration of the multi-phase SPH GPU code is provided by a 3-D dam break case impacting an obstacle. This shows better agreement with experimental results than an equivalent single-phase code. The multi-phase GPU code enables a convergence study to be undertaken on a single GPU with a large number of particles that otherwise would have required large high performance computing resources.

  16. National laboratories` capabilities summaries for the DOE Virtual Center for Multiphase Dynamics (VCMD)

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, E.L.

    1997-03-01

    The Virtual Center For Multiphase Dynamics (VCMD) integrates and develops the resources of industry, government, academia, and professional societies to enable reliable analysis in multiphase computational fluid dynamics. The primary means of the VCMD focus will be by the creation, support, and validation of a computerized simulation capability for multiphase flow and multiphase flow applications. This paper briefly describes the capabilities of the National Laboratories in this effort.

  17. Multiphasic acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with atypical rubella virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Koji; Asahara, Hideaki; Uehara, Taira; Miyoshi, Katsue; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Iwaki, Toru; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2015-02-01

    We report the first case of an occurrence of multiphasic acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) associated with atypical rubella virus infection with no rash and long-term increased titers of serum anti-rubella IgM in a 17-year-old male who had no history of rubella vaccination. He suffered from at least six clinical exacerbations with disseminated hyperintense lesions on FLAIR MR images during the course of 18 months. Repeated methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy resolved the exacerbations. In patients with multiphasic ADEM of unknown etiology, clinicians should also consider the possibility of preceding infection with rubella virus.

  18. Heat Transfer Analysis for a Fixed CST Column

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    2004-02-19

    In support of a small column ion exchange (SCIX) process for the Savannah River Site waste processing program, a transient two-dimensional heat transfer model that includes the conduction process neglecting the convection cooling mechanism inside the crystalline silicotitanate (CST) column has been constructed and heat transfer calculations made for the present design configurations. For this situation, a no process flow condition through the column was assumed as one of the reference conditions for the simulation of a loss-of-flow accident. A series of the modeling calculations has been performed using a computational heat transfer approach. Results for the baseline model indicate that transit times to reach 130 degrees Celsius maximum temperature of the CST-salt solution column are about 96 hours when the 20-in CST column with 300 Ci/liter heat generation source and 25 degrees Celsius initial column temperature is cooled by natural convection of external air as a primary heat transfer mechanism. The modeling results for the 28-in column equipped with water jacket systems on the external wall surface of the column and water coolant pipe at the center of the CST column demonstrate that the column loaded with 300 Ci/liter heat source can be maintained non-boiling indefinitely. Sensitivity calculations for several alternate column sizes, heat loads of the packed column, engineered cooling systems, and various ambient conditions at the exterior wall of the column have been performed under the reference conditions of the CST-salt solution to assess the impact of those parameters on the peak temperatures of the packed column for a given transient time. The results indicate that a water-coolant pipe at the center of the CST column filled with salt solution is the most effective one among the potential design parameters related to the thermal energy dissipation of decay heat load. It is noted that the cooling mechanism at the wall boundary of the column has significant

  19. Analysis of the impact of surface layer properties on evaporation from porous systems using column experiments and modified definition of characteristic length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, Shmuel; Narkis, Kfir; Gherabli, Rivka; Lefort, Philippe; Prat, Marc

    2014-05-01

    The hydraulic properties of the layer at the vicinity of the soil surface have significant impact on evaporation and could be harnessed to reduce water losses. The effect of the properties of the upper layer on the evolution of phase distribution during the evaporation process is first illustrated from three-dimensional pore network simulations. This effect is then studied from experiments carried out on soil columns under laboratory conditions. Comparisons between homogeneous columns packed with coarse (sand) and fine (sandy loam) materials and heterogeneous columns packed with layers of fine overlying coarse material and coarse overlying fine material of different thicknesses are performed to assess the impact of upper layer properties on evaporation. Experiments are analyzed using the classical approach based on the numerical solution of Richards equation and semianalytical theoretical predictions. The theoretical analysis is based on the clear distinction between two drying regimes, namely, the capillary regime and the gravity-capillary regime, which are the prevailing regimes in our experiments. Simple relationships enabling to estimate the duration of stage 1 evaporation (S1) for both regimes are proposed. In particular, this led to defining the characteristic length for the gravity-capillary regime from the consideration of viscous effects at low water content differently from available expressions. The duration of S1, during which most of the water losses occur, for both the homogeneous and two-layer columns is presented and discussed. Finally, the impact of liquid films and its consequences on the soil hydraulic conductivity function are briefly discussed.

  20. Relative Transport Behavior of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Pullorum in Packed Bed Column Systems: Influence of Solution Chemistry and Cell Concentration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of solution chemistry and cell concentration on bacterial pathogen transport has been examined using Salmonella pullorum and Escherichia coli O157:H7. A packed bed column was employed to determine the transport behavior and deposition kinetics on real aquifer sand particles over a ran...

  1. Effect of system variables involved in packed column SFC of nevirapine as model analyte using response surface methodology: application to retention thermodynamics, solute transfer kinetic study and binary diffusion coefficient determination.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Neerej; Agrawal, Himani; Paradkar, A R; Mahadik, K R

    2005-08-31

    A multifactor optimization technique is successfully applied to study the effect of simultaneously varying the system variables on feasibility of nevirapine analysis by packed column supercritical fluid chromatography (PC-SFC). The optimal conditions were determined with the aid of the response surface methodology using 3(3) factorial designs. The method is based on methanol-modified carbon dioxide as the mobile phase at flow rate of 3.0 ml/min with elution through a JASCO Finepak SIL-5, [C18 (5-micron, 25 cm x 4.6 mm, i.d.)] column using photodiode array detection. The method has been successfully used to analyze commercial solid dosage form to assess the chromatographic performance of SFC system. The present work briefs the thermodynamic applications of PC-SFC with an emphasis on the results of nevirapine. The foremost of such applications is the determination of solute diffusion coefficient in supercritical mobile phase by Taylor-Aris peak broadening technique.

  2. Stabilization of the Circulation Flow of the Cryogenic Distillation Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juromskiy, V. M.

    Two-circuit system of automatic stabilization of the hydrodynamics of the cryogenic distillation column is considered. Control system eliminates flooding/depletion of column in long-term mode of operation when the accuracy of stabilization of the circulation flow is better than 1%.

  3. Multiple column high-throughput e-beam inspection (EBI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, David K.; Monahan, Kevin M.; Liu, Enden D.; Tran, Cong; Prescop, Ted

    2012-03-01

    Single-column e-beam systems are used in production for the detection of electrical defects, but are too slow to be used for the detection of small physical defects, and can't meet future inspection requirements. This paper presents a multiplecolumn e-beam technology for high throughput wafer inspection. Multibeam has developed all-electrostatic columns for high-resolution imaging. The elimination of magnetic coils enables the columns to be small; e-beam deflection is faster in the absence of magnetic hysteresis. Multiple miniaturecolumns are assembled in an array. An array of 100 columns covers the entire surface of a 300mm wafer, affording simultaneous cross-wafer sampling. Column performance simulations and system architecture are presented. Also provided are examples of high throughput, more efficient, multiple-column wafer inspection.

  4. Algebraic dynamic multilevel (ADM) method for fully implicit simulations of multiphase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusini, Matteo; van Kruijsdijk, Cor; Hajibeygi, Hadi

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the development of an algebraic dynamic multilevel method (ADM) for fully implicit simulations of multiphase flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media. Built on the fine-scale fully implicit (FIM) discrete system, ADM constructs a multilevel FIM system describing the coupled process on a dynamically defined grid of hierarchical nested topology. The multilevel adaptive resolution is determined at each time step on the basis of an error criterion. Once the grid resolution is established, ADM employs sequences of restriction and prolongation operators in order to map the FIM system across the considered resolutions. Several choices can be considered for prolongation (interpolation) operators, e.g., constant, bilinear and multiscale basis functions, all of which form partition of unity. The adaptive multilevel restriction operators, on the other hand, are constructed using a finite-volume scheme. This ensures mass conservation of the ADM solutions, and as such, the stability and accuracy of the simulations with multiphase transport. For several homogeneous and heterogeneous test cases, it is shown that ADM applies only a small fraction of the full FIM fine-scale grid cells in order to provide accurate solutions. The sensitivity of the solutions with respect to the employed fraction of grid cells (determined automatically based on the threshold value of the error criterion) is investigated for all test cases. ADM is a significant step forward in the application of dynamic local grid refinement methods, in the sense that it is algebraic, allows for systematic mapping across different scales, and applicable to heterogeneous test cases without any upscaling of fine-scale high resolution quantities. It also develops a novel multilevel multiscale method for FIM multiphase flow simulations in natural subsurface formations.

  5. SPIRAL CONTACTOR FOR SOLVENT EXTRACTION COLUMN

    DOEpatents

    Cooley, C.R.

    1961-06-13

    The patented extraction apparatus includes a column, perforated plates extending across the column, liquid pulse means connected to the column, and an imperforate spiral ribbon along the length of the column.

  6. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition.

  7. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition. PMID:26550724

  8. Automated Design of Multiphase Space Missions Using Hybrid Optimal Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chilan, Christian Miguel

    2009-01-01

    A modern space mission is assembled from multiple phases or events such as impulsive maneuvers, coast arcs, thrust arcs and planetary flybys. Traditionally, a mission planner would resort to intuition and experience to develop a sequence of events for the multiphase mission and to find the space trajectory that minimizes propellant use by solving…

  9. KINEMATIC MODELING OF MULTIPHASE SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN THE VADOSE ZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this research was the development of a computationally efficient simulation model for multiphase flow of organic hazardous waste constituents in the shallow soil environment. Such a model is appropriate for investigation of fate and transport of organic chemicals intr...

  10. Final Report, Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect

    George E. Dzyacky

    2003-05-31

    The Flooding Predictor is an advanced process control strategy comprising a patented pattern-recognition methodology that identifies pre-flood patterns discovered to precede flooding events in distillation columns. The grantee holds a U.S. patent on the modeling system. The technology was validated at the Separations Research Program, The University of Texas at Austin under a grant from the U. S. Department of Energy, Inventions & Innovation Program. Distillation tower flooding occurs at abnormally high vapor and/or liquid rates. The loss in tray efficiencies is attributed to unusual behavior of liquid inventories inside the column leading to conditions of flooding of the space in between trays with liquid. Depending on the severity of the flood condition, consequences range from off spec products to equipment damage and tower shutdown. This non-intrusive pattern recognition methodology, processes signal data obtained from existing column instrumentation. Once the pattern is identified empirically, it is modeled and coded into the plant's distributed control system. The control system is programmed to briefly "unload" the tower each time the pattern appears. The unloading takes the form of a momentary reduction in column severity, e.g., decrease bottom temperature, reflux or tower throughput. Unloading the tower briefly at the pre-flood state causes long-term column operation to become significantly more stable - allowing an increase in throughput and/or product purity. The technology provides a wide range of value between optimization and flooding. When a distillation column is not running at capacity, it should be run in such a way ("pushed") that optimal product purity is achieved. Additional benefits include low implementation and maintenance costs, and a high level of console operator acceptance. The previous commercial applications experienced 98% uptime over a four-year period. Further, the technology is unique in its ability to distinguish between different

  11. Ginzburg-Landau-type multiphase field model for competing fcc and bcc nucleation.

    PubMed

    Tóth, G I; Morris, J R; Gránásy, L

    2011-01-28

    We address crystal nucleation and fcc-bcc phase selection in alloys using a multiphase field model that relies on Ginzburg-Landau free energies of the liquid-fcc, liquid-bcc, and fcc-bcc subsystems, and determine the properties of the nuclei as a function of composition, temperature, and structure. With a realistic choice for the free energy of the fcc-bcc interface, the model predicts well the fcc-bcc phase-selection boundary in the Fe-Ni system.

  12. Mathematical modeling of optimal control for the rotating cylinder in multiphase viscous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavalishchin, Dmitry

    2015-11-01

    Within the framework of studying the problem of moving a solid body in a multiphase viscous medium from the initial position to the final one at a fixed time with minimal energy consumption it is investigated the existence of analytical and numerical solutions for a system of differential equations describing the optimal trajectories. In particular movement of a rotating cylinder is considered. Control law provides given position of the cylinder at the finite time minimizing the work of the drag forces to rotation is found. In the case when the control force is applied in the direction of the cylinder axis of symmetry the problem is singular.

  13. Ginzburg-Landau-Type Multiphase Field Model for Competing fcc and bcc Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, G. I.; Morris, James R; Granasy, L.

    2011-01-01

    We address crystal nucleation and fcc-bcc phase selection in alloys using a multiphase field model that relies on Ginzburg-Landau free energies of the liquid-fcc, liquid-bcc, and fcc-bcc subsystems, and determine the properties of the nuclei as a function of composition, temperature, and structure. With a realistic choice for the free energy of the fcc-bcc interface, the model predicts well the fcc-bcc phase-selection boundary in the Fe-Ni system.

  14. Sampling device for withdrawing a representative sample from single and multi-phase flows

    DOEpatents

    Apley, Walter J.; Cliff, William C.; Creer, James M.

    1984-01-01

    A fluid stream sampling device has been developed for the purpose of obtaining a representative sample from a single or multi-phase fluid flow. This objective is carried out by means of a probe which may be inserted into the fluid stream. Individual samples are withdrawn from the fluid flow by sampling ports with particular spacings, and the sampling parts are coupled to various analytical systems for characterization of the physical, thermal, and chemical properties of the fluid flow as a whole and also individually.

  15. Buckling of a holey column.

    PubMed

    Pihler-Puzović, D; Hazel, A L; Mullin, T

    2016-09-14

    We report the results from a combined experimental and numerical investigation of buckling in a novel variant of an elastic column under axial load. We find that including a regular line of centred holes in the column can prevent conventional, global, lateral buckling. Instead, the local microstructure introduced by the holes allows the column to buckle in an entirely different, internal, mode in which the holes are compressed in alternate directions, but the column maintains the lateral reflection symmetry about its centreline. The internal buckling mode can be accommodated within a smaller external space than the global one; and it is the preferred buckling mode over an intermediate range of column lengths for sufficiently large holes. For very short or sufficiently long columns a modification of the classical, global, lateral buckling is dominant. PMID:27501288

  16. Investigating the effect of external water on magma ascent dynamics with a new multiphase flow numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Neri, A.; La Spina, G.; Clarke, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    The study of deposits produced by explosive eruptions of Campi Flegrei and Vesuvio suggests that important phases of these events have been characterized by a significant interaction of magma with external water. Despite that, the influence of external water on eruption dynamics and its potential hazard have not been studied in depth. In this work we adopted a 1D non-isothermal multi-phase flow model describing the dynamics of magma ascent inside a volcanic conduit. The new model is based on the theory of thermodynamically compatible systems that allows formulation of the governing transport equations as a hyperbolic system of partial differential equations in conservative form. The model represents a significant advance with respect to previous simplified descriptions of the magma ascent dynamics in that it: 1) is capable of treating both dilute and dense flow regimes; 2) describes flow above and below the fragmentation level in a coupled and consistent way; 3) quantifies the interaction between the two phases forming the magmatic mixture (both in the bubbly-flow and gas-particle regimes) with two distinct pressures and velocities; 4) accounts for disequilibrium crystallization and degassing; 5) treats the dissolved water as a separate phase with its own equation of state and; 6) allows for instantaneous or delayed vaporization of the external water from an aquifer. Here we investigate, through a sensitivity analysis, the role of different system parameters, in particular those related to the inflow of non-magmatic volatiles, in controlling vent conditions and eruptive style for conditions representative of Plinian (e.g. Agnano Monte Spina) eruptions at Campi Flegrei. Model results show that mass flux at the vent is primarily controlled by the quantity of engulfed external water, when this inflow occurs below the fragmentation level, whereas small changes in mass flux are produced when the interaction occurs above the fragmentation level. In particular it is worth

  17. MAMAP - a new spectrometer system for column-averaged methane and carbon dioxide observations from aircraft: instrument description and performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerilowski, K.; Tretner, A.; Krings, T.; Buchwitz, M.; Bertagnolio, P. P.; Belemezov, F.; Erzinger, J.; Burrows, J. P.; Bovensmann, H.

    2011-02-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) and Methane (CH4) are the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases. CH4 is furthermore one of the most potent present and future contributors to global warming because of its large global warming potential (GWP). Our knowledge of CH4 and CO2 source strengths is based primarily on bottom-up scaling of sparse in-situ local point measurements of emissions and up-scaling of emission factor estimates or top-down modeling incorporating data from surface networks and more recently also by incorporating data from low spatial resolution satellite observations for CH4. There is a need to measure and retrieve the dry columns of CO2 and CH4 having high spatial resolution and spatial coverage. In order to fill this gap a new passive airborne 2-channel grating spectrometer instrument for remote sensing of small scale and mesoscale column-averaged CH4 and CO2 observations has been developed. This Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) instrument measures reflected and scattered solar radiation in the short wave infrared (SWIR) and near-infrared (NIR) parts of the electro-magnetic spectrum at moderate spectral resolution. The SWIR channel yields measurements of atmospheric absorption bands of CH4 and CO2 in the spectral range between 1.59 and 1.69 μm at a spectral resolution of 0.82 nm. The NIR channel around 0.76 μm measures the atmospheric O2-A-band absorption with a resolution of 0.46 nm. MAMAP has been designed for flexible operation aboard a variety of airborne platforms. The instrument design and the performance of the SWIR channel, together with some results from on-ground and in-flight engineering tests are presented. The SWIR channel performance has been analyzed using a retrieval algorithm applied to the nadir measured spectra. Dry air column-averaged mole fractions are obtained from SWIR data only by dividing the retrieved CH4 columns by the simultaneously retrieved CO2 columns for dry air column CH4 (XCH4) and vice versa for dry air column CO2

  18. On the inclusion of the interfacial area between phases in the physical and mathematical description of subsurface multiphase flow. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.G.; Tompson, A.; Soll, W.E.

    1998-06-01

    'Improved capabilities for modeling multiphase flow in the subsurface requires that several aspects of the system which impact the flow and transport processes be more properly accounted for. A distinguishing feature of multiphase flow in comparison to single phase flow is the existence of interfaces between fluids. At the microscopic (pore) scale, these interfaces are known to influence system behavior by supporting non-zero stresses such that the pressures in adjacent phases are not equal. In problems of interphase transport at the macroscopic (core) scale, knowledge of the total amount of interfacial area in the system provides a clue to the effectiveness of the communication between phases. Although interfacial processes are central to multiphase flow physics, their treatment in traditional porous-media theories has been implicit rather than explicit; and no attempts have been made to systematically account for the evolution of the interfacial area in dynamic systems or to include the dependence of constitutive functions, such as capillary pressure, on the interfacial area. This project implements a three-pronged approach to assessing the importance of various features of multiphase flow to its description. The research contributes to the improved understanding and precise physical description of multiphase subsurface flow by combining: (1) theoretical derivation of equations, (2) lattice Boltzmann modeling of hydrodynamics to identify characteristics and parameters, and (3) solution of the field-scale equations using a discrete numerical method to assess the advantages and disadvantages of the complete theory. This approach includes both fundamental scientific inquiry and a path for inclusion of the scientific results obtained in a technical tool that will improve assessment capabilities for multiphase flow situations that have arisen due to the introduction of organic materials in the natural environment. This report summarizes work after 1.5 years of a 3

  19. Multiphase Dynamics of the Very Young Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukare, C. E.; Ricard, Y. R.; Labrosse, S.

    2015-12-01

    Early in the history of terrestrial planets, heat of accretion, radioactive decay or core-mantle segregation may have significantly melted the silicate mantle. Magma ocean evolution depends both on the physical properties of solid and liquid materials at relevant P-T conditions and on the complex dynamics of a convecting crystallizing mantle. Present deep Earth mantle structures such as ultralow-velocity zones (ULVZs) or low-shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) might be directly linked to the crystallization of a potential magma ocean. We propose a complete thermodynamic model of the solid-liquid equilibrium in the MgO-FeO-SiO2 system at HP/HT (Boukaré et al, 2015, in press). It synthesizes various data (observed and computed equations of state, melting curves, Mg/Fe partitioning). The present study confirms previous findings that, at similar compositions, melts are lighter than solids throughout the mantle. However, at thermodynamic equilibrium, the first solids that crystallize in the deep mantle are lighter than the liquid as they are more Mg-rich. This further enriches the melt in iron and this residual melt becomes much denser than the solid phase. Both the anti-freeze effect of iron and its high density suggest a mantle crystallization scenario similar to that described in Labrosse et al. [2007] where the ULVZ are iron rich and very fusible remnants of a primordial basal ocean. We also present the development of a multiphase convection code accounting for solid-liquid phase change, compaction and fractional crystallization. We discuss the effects of various temperature profiles and solid liquid density crossovers on the dynamics of a crystallizing mantle. Using this mechanical model, we also investigate the dynamics of upper mantle overturn following magma ocean crystallization. Indeed, current models of magma ocean evolution predict that fractional crystallization of the mantle leads to unstable chemical stratification of the upper mantle.

  20. Multi-phase intelligent decision model for reservoir real-time flood control during typhoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Nien-Sheng; Huang, Chien-Lin; Wei, Chih-Chiang

    2015-03-01

    This study applies an Adaptive Network-based Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) and a Real-Time Recurrent Learning Neural Network (RTRLNN) with an optimized reservoir release hydrograph using Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) from historical typhoon events to develop a multi-phase intelligent real-time reservoir operation model for flood control. The flood control process is divided into three stages: (1) before flood (Stage I); (2) before peak flow (Stage II); and (3) after peak flow (Stage III). The models are then constructed with either three phase modules (ANFIS-3P and RTRLNN-3P) or two phase (Stage I + II and Stage III) modules (ANFIS-2P and RTRLNN-2P). The multi-phase modules are developed with consideration of the difference in operational decision mechanisms, decision information, release functions, and targets between each flood control stage to solve the problem of time-consuming computation and difficult system integration of MILP. In addition, the model inputs include the coupled short lead time and total reservoir inflow forecast information that are developed using radar- and satellite-based meteorological monitoring techniques, forecasted typhoon tracks, meteorological image similarity analysis, ANFIS and RTRLNN. This study uses the Tseng-Wen Reservoir basin as the study area, and the model results showed that RTRLNN outperformed ANFIS in the simulated outcomes from the optimized hydrographs. This study also applies the models to Typhoons Kalmaegi and Morakot to compare the simulations to historical operations. From the operation results, the RTRLNN-3P model is better than RTRLNN-2P and historical operations. Further, because the RTRLNN-3P model combines the innovative multi-phase module with monitored and forecasted decision information, the operation can simultaneously, effectively and automatically achieve the dual goals of flood detention at peak flow periods and water supply at the end of a typhoon event.

  1. TOUGH2: A general-purpose numerical simulator for multiphase nonisothermal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1991-06-01

    Numerical simulators for multiphase fluid and heat flows in permeable media have been under development at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for more than 10 yr. Real geofluids contain noncondensible gases and dissolved solids in addition to water, and the desire to model such `compositional` systems led to the development of a flexible multicomponent, multiphase simulation architecture known as MULKOM. The design of MULKOM was based on the recognition that the mass-and energy-balance equations for multiphase fluid and heat flows in multicomponent systems have the same mathematical form, regardless of the number and nature of fluid components and phases present. Application of MULKOM to different fluid mixtures, such as water and air, or water, oil, and gas, is possible by means of appropriate `equation-of-state` (EOS) modules, which provide all thermophysical and transport parameters of the fluid mixture and the permeable medium as a function of a suitable set of primary thermodynamic variables. Investigations of thermal and hydrologic effects from emplacement of heat-generating nuclear wastes into partially water-saturated formations prompted the development and release of a specialized version of MULKOM for nonisothermal flow of water and air, named TOUGH. TOUGH is an acronym for `transport of unsaturated groundwater and heat` and is also an allusion to the tuff formations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The TOUGH2 code is intended to supersede TOUGH. It offers all the capabilities of TOUGH and includes a considerably more general subset of MULKOM modules with added capabilities. The paper briefly describes the simulation methodology and user features.

  2. Manual Microscale Column Chromatography Pressurization Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Bruce W.

    2003-10-01

    Pressurization of a Pasteur pipet for microscale chromatography is simplified by connecting a 20- or 30-mL syringe to the pipet using a length of Tygon tubing. This simple system allows the student to easily dry-pack a column using common chromatography packing materials. Results were uniformly good for introductory, organic, or upper-division research chemistry students.

  3. "Dry-column" chromatography of plant pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.; Lehwalt, M. F.; Oyama, V. I.

    1973-01-01

    Separation of plant pigments which can be accomplished on thin-layer silica plates with mixture of petroleum ether, halocarbon, acetone, and polar solvent can be readily translated into dry-column technique that yields reproducible chromatograms after elution in fashion of liquid chromatography with fluorimeter as detector. Best solvent system was found to be mixture of petroleum ether, dichloromethane, acetone, and ethyl acetate.

  4. Multiphase flow microfluidics for the production of single or multiple emulsions for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Xia

    2013-11-01

    Considerable effort has been directed towards developing novel drug delivery systems. Microfluidics, capable of generating monodisperse single and multiple emulsion droplets, executing precise control and operations on these droplets, is a powerful tool for fabricating complex systems (microparticles, microcapsules, microgels) with uniform size, narrow size distribution and desired properties, which have great potential in drug delivery applications. This review presents an overview of the state-of-the-art multiphase flow microfluidics for the production of single emulsions or multiple emulsions for drug delivery. The review starts with a brief introduction of the approaches for making single and multiple emulsions, followed by presentation of some potential drug delivery systems (microparticles, microcapsules and microgels) fabricated in microfluidic devices using single or multiple emulsions as templates. The design principles, manufacturing processes and properties of these drug delivery systems are also discussed and compared. Furthermore, drug encapsulation and drug release (including passive and active controlled release) are provided and compared highlighting some key findings and insights. Finally, site-targeting delivery using multiphase flow microfluidics is also briefly introduced.

  5. A liver registration method for segmented multi-phase CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shuyue; Yuan, Rong; Sun, Zhi; Xie, Qingguo

    2015-03-01

    In order to build high quality geometric models for liver containing vascular system, multi-phase CT series used in a computer-aided diagnosis and surgical planning system aims at liver diseases have to be accurately registered. In this paper we model the segmented liver containing vascular system as a complex shape and propose a two-step registration method. Without any tree modeling for vessel this method can carry out a simultaneous registration for both liver tissue and vascular system inside. Firstly a rigid aligning using vessel as feature is applied on the complex shape model while genetic algorithm is used as the optimization method. Secondly we achieve the elastic shape registration by combine the incremental free form deformation (IFFD) with a modified iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. Inspired by the concept of demons method, we propose to calculate a fastest diffusion vector (FDV) for each control point on the IFFD lattice to replace the points correspondence needed in ICP iterations. Under the iterative framework of the modified ICP, the optimal solution of control points' displacement in every IFFD level can be obtained efficiently. The method has been quantitatively evaluated on clinical multi-phase CT series.

  6. Compact electron beam focusing column

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, Arun; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani

    2001-07-13

    A novel design for an electron beam focusing column has been developed at LBNL. The design is based on a low-energy spread multicusp plasma source which is used as a cathode for electron beam production. The focusing column is 10 mm in length. The electron beam is focused by means of electrostatic fields. The column is designed for a maximum voltage of 50 kV. Simulations of the electron trajectories have been performed by using the 2-D simulation code IGUN and EGUN. The electron temperature has also been incorporated into the simulations. The electron beam simulations, column design and fabrication will be discussed in this presentation.

  7. 45. MAIN MEETING ROOM COLUMNS. Ends of gallery columns identified ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. MAIN MEETING ROOM COLUMNS. Ends of gallery columns identified at the time of removal for transfer to the George School for re-erection. The stamp reads, 'REMOVED FROM 12th ST. MTG HSE PHILA 1972'. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. Multi-Phase Fracture-Matrix Interactions Under Stress Changes

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarao; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-12-07

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multi-phase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) counter-current fluid transport between the matrix and the fracture, (c) studying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture and two-phase flow, and (d) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress, on the nature of the rock, and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual and detailed descriptions of the process are shown in the report. Both extensional and shear fractures have been considered. A series of water imbibition tests were conducted in which water was injected into a fracture and its migration into the matrix was monitored with CT and DR x-ray techniques. The objective was to understand the impact of the

  9. Rheological flow laws for multiphase magmas: An empirical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, Mattia; Cordonnier, Benoît; Ulmer, Peter; Caricchi, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The physical properties of magmas play a fundamental role in controlling the eruptive dynamics of volcanoes. Magmas are multiphase mixtures of crystals and gas bubbles suspended in a silicate melt and, to date, no flow laws describe their rheological behaviour. In this study we present a set of equations quantifying the flow of high-viscosity (> 105 Pa·s) silica-rich multiphase magmas, containing both crystals (24-65 vol.%) and gas bubbles (9-12 vol.%). Flow laws were obtained using deformation experiments performed at high temperature (673-1023 K) and pressure (200-250 MPa) over a range of strain-rates (5 · 10- 6 s- 1 to 4 · 10- 3 s- 1), conditions that are relevant for volcanic conduit processes of silica-rich systems ranging from crystal-rich lava domes to crystal-poor obsidian flows. We propose flow laws in which stress exponent, activation energy, and pre-exponential factor depend on a parameter that includes the volume fraction of weak phases (i.e. melt and gas bubbles) present in the magma. The bubble volume fraction has opposing effects depending on the relative crystal volume fraction: at low crystallinity bubble deformation generates gas connectivity and permeability pathways, whereas at high crystallinity bubbles do not connect and act as "lubricant" objects during strain localisation within shear bands. We show that such difference in the evolution of texture is mainly controlled by the strain-rate (i.e. the local stress within shear bands) at which the experiments are performed, and affect the empirical parameters used for the flow laws. At low crystallinity (< 44 vol.%) we observe an increase of viscosity with increasing strain-rate, while at high crystallinity (> 44 vol.%) the viscosity decreases with increasing strain-rate. Because these behaviours are also associated with modifications of sample textures during the experiment and, thus, are not purely the result of different deformation rates, we refer to "apparent shear-thickening" and

  10. Applicability of hydroxylamine nitrate reductant in pulse-column contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, D.J.

    1983-05-01

    Uranium and plutonium separations were made from simulated breeder reactor spent fuel dissolver solution with laboratory-sized pulse column contactors. Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) was used for reduction of plutonium (1V). An integrated extraction-partition system, simulating a breeder fuel reprocessing flowsheet, carried out a partial partition of uranium and plutonium in the second contactor. Tests have shown that acceptable coprocessing can be ontained using HAN as a plutonium reductant. Pulse column performance was stable even though gaseous HAN oxidation products were present in the column. Gas evolution rates up to 0.27 cfm/ft/sup 2/ of column cross section were tested and found acceptable.

  11. Thermal - Hydraulic Behavior of Unsaturated Bentonite and Sand-Bentonite Material as Seal for Nuclear Waste Repository: Numerical Simulation of Column Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, E.; Graupner, B.; Bauer, S.

    2015-12-01

    For deep geological repositories of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW), bentonite and sand bentonite mixtures are investigated as buffer materials to form a a sealing layer. This sealing layer surrounds the canisters and experiences an initial drying due to the heat produced by HLRW and a successive re-saturation with fluid from the host rock. These complex thermal, hydraulic and mechanical processes interact and were investigated in laboratory column experiments using MX-80 clay pellets as well as a mixture of 35% sand and 65% bentonite. The aim of this study is to both understand the individual processes taking place in the buffer materials and to identify the key physical parameters that determine the material behavior under heating and hydrating conditions. For this end, detailed and process-oriented numerical modelling was applied to the experiments, simulating heat transport, multiphase flow and mechanical effects from swelling. For both columns, the same set of parameters was assigned to the experimental set-up (i.e. insulation, heater and hydration system), while the parameters of the buffer material were adapted during model calibration. A good fit between model results and data was achieved for temperature, relative humidity, water intake and swelling pressure, thus explaining the material behavior. The key variables identified by the model are the permeability and relative permeability, the water retention curve and the thermal conductivity of the buffer material. The different hydraulic and thermal behavior of the two buffer materials observed in the laboratory observations was well reproduced by the numerical model.

  12. REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL CAPABILITIES AND HYDRODYNAMIC DATA FOR VALIDATION OF CFD-BASED PREDICTIONS FOR SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Daniel S. Wendt; Steven P. Antal; Michael Z. Podowski

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document the review of several open-literature sources of both experimental capabilities and published hydrodynamic data to aid in the validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based model of a slurry bubble column (SBC). The review included searching the Web of Science, ISI Proceedings, and Inspec databases, internet searches as well as other open literature sources. The goal of this study was to identify available experimental facilities and relevant data. Integral (i.e., pertaining to the SBC system), as well as fundamental (i.e., separate effects are considered), data are included in the scope of this effort. The fundamental data is needed to validate the individual mechanistic models or closure laws used in a Computational Multiphase Fluid Dynamics (CMFD) simulation of a SBC. The fundamental data is generally focused on simple geometries (i.e., flow between parallel plates or cylindrical pipes) or custom-designed tests to focus on selected interfacial phenomena. Integral data covers the operation of a SBC as a system with coupled effects. This work highlights selected experimental capabilities and data for the purpose of SBC model validation, and is not meant to be an exhaustive summary.

  13. REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL CAPABILITIES AND HYDRODYNAMIC DATA FOR VALIDATION OF CFD BASED PREDICTIONS FOR SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Daniel S. Wendt

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document the review of several open-literature sources of both experimental capabilities and published hydrodynamic data to aid in the validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based model of a slurry bubble column (SBC). The review included searching the Web of Science, ISI Proceedings, and Inspec databases, internet searches as well as other open literature sources. The goal of this study was to identify available experimental facilities and relevant data. Integral (i.e., pertaining to the SBC system), as well as fundamental (i.e., separate effects are considered), data are included in the scope of this effort. The fundamental data is needed to validate the individual mechanistic models or closure laws used in a Computational Multiphase Fluid Dynamics (CMFD) simulation of a SBC. The fundamental data is generally focused on simple geometries (i.e., flow between parallel plates or cylindrical pipes) or custom-designed tests to focus on selected interfacial phenomena. Integral data covers the operation of a SBC as a system with coupled effects. This work highlights selected experimental capabilities and data for the purpose of SBC model validation, and is not meant to be an exhaustive summary.

  14. Dorsal column stimulator applications

    PubMed Central

    Yampolsky, Claudio; Hem, Santiago; Bendersky, Damián

    2012-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used to treat neuropathic pain since 1967. Following that, technological progress, among other advances, helped SCS become an effective tool to reduce pain. Methods: This article is a non-systematic review of the mechanism of action, indications, results, programming parameters, complications, and cost-effectiveness of SCS. Results: In spite of the existence of several studies that try to prove the mechanism of action of SCS, it still remains unknown. The mechanism of action of SCS would be based on the antidromic activation of the dorsal column fibers, which activate the inhibitory interneurons within the dorsal horn. At present, the indications of SCS are being revised constantly, while new applications are being proposed and researched worldwide. Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is the most common indication for SCS, whereas, the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is the second one. Also, this technique is useful in patients with refractory angina and critical limb ischemia, in whom surgical or endovascular treatment cannot be performed. Further indications may be phantom limb pain, chronic intractable pain located in the head, face, neck, or upper extremities, spinal lumbar stenosis in patients who are not surgical candidates, and others. Conclusion: Spinal cord stimulation is a useful tool for neuromodulation, if an accurate patient selection is carried out prior, which should include a trial period. Undoubtedly, this proper selection and a better knowledge of its underlying mechanisms of action, will allow this cutting edge technique to be more acceptable among pain physicians. PMID:23230533

  15. Complementary Constrains on Component based Multiphase Flow Problems, Should It Be Implemented Locally or Globally?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Kolditz, O.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow problems are numerically difficult to solve, as it often contains nonlinear Phase transition phenomena A conventional technique is to introduce the complementarity constraints where fluid properties such as liquid saturations are confined within a physically reasonable range. Based on such constraints, the mathematical model can be reformulated into a system of nonlinear partial differential equations coupled with variational inequalities. They can be then numerically handled by optimization algorithms. In this work, two different approaches utilizing the complementarity constraints based on persistent primary variables formulation[4] are implemented and investigated. The first approach proposed by Marchand et.al[1] is using "local complementary constraints", i.e. coupling the constraints with the local constitutive equations. The second approach[2],[3] , namely the "global complementary constrains", applies the constraints globally with the mass conservation equation. We will discuss how these two approaches are applied to solve non-isothermal componential multiphase flow problem with the phase change phenomenon. Several benchmarks will be presented for investigating the overall numerical performance of different approaches. The advantages and disadvantages of different models will also be concluded. References[1] E.Marchand, T.Mueller and P.Knabner. Fully coupled generalized hybrid-mixed finite element approximation of two-phase two-component flow in porous media. Part I: formulation and properties of the mathematical model, Computational Geosciences 17(2): 431-442, (2013). [2] A. Lauser, C. Hager, R. Helmig, B. Wohlmuth. A new approach for phase transitions in miscible multi-phase flow in porous media. Water Resour., 34,(2011), 957-966. [3] J. Jaffré, and A. Sboui. Henry's Law and Gas Phase Disappearance. Transp. Porous Media. 82, (2010), 521-526. [4] A. Bourgeat, M. Jurak and F. Smaï. Two-phase partially miscible flow and transport modeling in

  16. An Undergraduate Column Chromatography Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danot, M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for an experiment designed to introduce undergraduate students to the theoretical and technical aspects of column chromatography. The experiment can also be shortened to serve as a demonstration of the column chromatography technique. (JN)

  17. Analyze distillation columns with thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ognisty, T.P. )

    1995-02-01

    In a distillation column, heat supplies the work for separating the components of a feed stream into products. Distillation columns consume some 95% of the total energy used in separations. This amounts to roughly 3% of the energy consumed in the US. Since distillation is so energy intensive and requires significant capital outlays, an endless quest to improve the economics has continued since the beginning of the industry. By analyzing the thermodynamics of a distillation column, an engineer can quantify the thermodynamic efficiency of the process, identify the regions where energy can be better utilized, and define the minimum targets for energy consumption. This article reviews the principles of distillation column thermodynamics and outlines the analysis of lost work profiles and column heat profiles. It then illustrates these concepts through three examples.

  18. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE HIGH COLUMN DENSITY TURNOVER IN THE H I COLUMN DENSITY DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Erkal, Denis; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2012-12-10

    We study the high column density regime of the H I column density distribution function and argue that there are two distinct features: a turnover at N{sub H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, which is present at both z = 0 and z Almost-Equal-To 3, and a lack of systems above N{sub H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} at z = 0. Using observations of the column density distribution, we argue that the H I-H{sub 2} transition does not cause the turnover at N{sub H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} but can plausibly explain the turnover at N{sub H{sub I}} {approx}> 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}. We compute the H I column density distribution of individual galaxies in the THINGS sample and show that the turnover column density depends only weakly on metallicity. Furthermore, we show that the column density distribution of galaxies, corrected for inclination, is insensitive to the resolution of the H I map or to averaging in radial shells. Our results indicate that the similarity of H I column density distributions at z = 3 and 0 is due to the similarity of the maximum H I surface densities of high-z and low-z disks, set presumably by universal processes that shape properties of the gaseous disks of galaxies. Using fully cosmological simulations, we explore other candidate physical mechanisms that could produce a turnover in the column density distribution. We show that while turbulence within giant molecular clouds cannot affect the damped Ly{alpha} column density distribution, stellar feedback can affect it significantly if the feedback is sufficiently effective in removing gas from the central 2-3 kpc of high-redshift galaxies. Finally, we argue that it is meaningful to compare column densities averaged over {approx} kpc scales with those estimated from quasar spectra that probe sub-pc scales due to the steep power spectrum of H I column density fluctuations observed in nearby galaxies.

  19. Effect of extra-column volume on practical chromatographic parameters of sub-2-μm particle-packed columns in ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Naijun; Bradley, Ashley C; Welch, Christopher J; Zhang, Li

    2012-08-01

    Effects of extra-column volume on apparent separation parameters were studied in ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography with columns and inlet connection tubings of various internal diameters (id) using 50-mm long columns packed with 1.8-μm particles under isocratic conditions. The results showed that apparent retention factors were on average 5, 11, 18, and 41% lower than those corrected with extra-column volumes for 4.6-, 3.0-, 2.1-, and 1.0-mm id columns, respectively, when the extra-column volume (11.3 μL) was kept constant. Also, apparent pressures were 31, 16, 12, and 10% higher than those corrected with pressures from extra-column volumes for 4.6-, 3.0-, 2.1-, and 1.0-mm id columns at the respective optimum flow rate for a typical ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography system. The loss in apparent efficiency increased dramatically from 4.6- to 3.0- to 2.1- to 1.0-mm id columns, less significantly as retention factors increased. The column efficiency was significantly improved as the inlet tubing id was decreased for a given column. The results suggest that maximum ratio of extra-column volume to column void volume should be approximately 1:10 for column porosity more than 0.6 and a retention factor more than 5, where 80% or higher of theoretically predicted efficiency could be achieved.

  20. Column agglutination technology: the antiglobulin test.

    PubMed

    Reis, K J; Chachowski, R; Cupido, A; Davies, D; Jakway, J; Setcavage, T M

    1993-08-01

    A new system for typing and screening blood, based on the sieving effect of glass bead microparticles, has been developed. The test is performed in a microcolumn in which the red cell agglutinates are trapped in the glass bead matrix during centrifugation, and unagglutinated cells form a pellet at the bottom of the column. Anti-human globulin reagents were incorporated in the diluent and the new test system, column agglutination technology, was compared to conventional tube tests and low-ionic-strength method. Sera and plasmas (228 samples) were screened for red cell antibodies with two anti-human globulin reagents: one containing only anti-IgG and the other containing both anti-IgG and anti-C3b, -C3d. After initial testing, there was 94-percent agreement between column agglutination technology and tube tests, and after repeat testing, there was 97-percent agreement. The column agglutination technology anti-human globulin test eliminates the need to wash red cells, which decreases the overall test time. The test is easy to perform, and the results are more objective than those with tube and microplate methods.

  1. A Stochastic Differential Equation Approach To Multiphase Flow In Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, D.; Russell, T.

    2003-12-01

    The motivation for using stochastic differential equations in multiphase flow systems stems from our work in developing an upscaling methodology for single phase flow. The long term goals of this project include: I. Extending this work to a nonlinear upscaling methodology II. Developing a macro-scale stochastic theory of multiphase flow and transport that accounts for micro-scale heterogeneities and interfaces. In this talk, we present a stochastic differential equation approach to multiphase flow, a typical example of which is flow in the unsaturated domain. Specifically, a two phase problem is studied which consists of a wetting phase and a non-wetting phase. The approach given results in a nonlinear stochastic differential equation describing the position of the non-wetting phase fluid particle. Our fundamental assumption is that the flow of fluid particles is described by a stochastic process and that the positions of the fluid particles over time are governed by the law of the process. It is this law which we seek to determine. The nonlinearity in the stochastic differential equation arises because both the drift and diffusion coefficients depend on the volumetric fraction of the phase which in turn depends on the position of the fluid particles in the experimental domain. The concept of a fluid particle is central to the development of the model described in this talk. Expressions for both saturation and volumetric fraction are developed using the fluid particle concept. Darcy's law and the continuity equation are then used to derive a Fokker-Planck equation using these expressions. The Ito calculus is then applied to derive a stochastic differential equation for the non-wetting phase. This equation has both drift and diffusion terms which depend on the volumetric fraction of the non-wetting phase. Standard stochastic theories based on the Ito calculus and the Wiener process and the equivalent Fokker-Planck PDE's are typically used to model dispersion

  2. Tropospheric NO2 and HCHO columns derived from ground-based MAX-DOAS system in Guangzhou, China and comparison with satellite observations: First results within the EU FP7 project MarcoPolo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drosoglou, Theano; Kouremeti, Natalia; Bais, Alkis; Zyrichidou, Irene; Li, Shu; Balis, Dimitris; Huang, Zhonghui

    2016-04-01

    A miniature MAX-DOAS system, Phaethon, has been developed at the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, for ground-based monitoring of column densities of atmospheric gases. Simultaneous measurements with two Phaethon systems at the city centre of Thessaloniki and at a rural location about 30 km away have shown that Phaethon provides NO2 and HCHO tropospheric column measurements of acceptable accuracy under both low and high air-pollution levels. Currently three systems have been deployed in areas with different pollution patterns to support air quality and satellite validation studies. In the framework of the EU FP7 Monitoring and Assessment of Regional air quality in China using space Observations, Project Of Long-term sino-european co-Operation, MarcoPolo project, one of the Phaethon systems has been installed since April 2015 in the Guangzhou region in China. Tropospheric NO2 and HCHO columns derived at Guangzhou during the first 10 months of operation are compared with corresponding retrievals from OMI/Aura and GOME-2/Metop-A and /Metop-B satellite sensors. The area is characterized by humid subtropical monsoon climate and cloud-free conditions are rather rare from early March to mid-October. Despite this limitation and the short period of operation of Phaethon in Guangzhou, the agreement between ground-based and satellite observations is generally good for both NO2 and HCHO. It appears that GOME-2 sensors seem to underestimate the tropospheric NO2, possibly due to their large pixel size, whereas the comparison with OMI data is better, especially when a small cloud fraction (< 0.2) is used for cloud screening.

  3. Method for producing nanocrystalline multicomponent and multiphase materials

    DOEpatents

    Eastman, Jeffrey A.; Rittner, Mindy N.; Youngdahl, Carl J.; Weertman, Julia R.

    1998-01-01

    A process for producing multi-component and multiphase nanophase materials is provided wherein a plurality of elements are vaporized in a controlled atmosphere, so as to facilitate thorough mixing, and then condensing and consolidating the elements. The invention also provides for a multicomponent and multiphase nanocrystalline material of specified elemental and phase composition having component grain sizes of between approximately 1 nm and 100 nm. This material is a single element in combination with a binary compound. In more specific embodiments, the single element in this material can be a transition metal element, a non-transition metal element, a semiconductor, or a semi-metal, and the binary compound in this material can be an intermetallic, an oxide, a nitride, a hydride, a chloride, or other compound.

  4. Multiphasic survival response of a radioresistant lepidopteran insect cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Koval, T.M.

    1984-06-01

    TN-368 lepidoteran insect cells display a multiphasic survival response in both air and nitrogen. In each case the survival curve is characterized by an initial small-shouldered region near the 0.1 survival level, and finally a shallow slope component. The oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) for the first portion of the curve is 1.6. The OER for the latter portion of the curve is 1.7. The D/sub 0/ values for each slope and the width of the plateau region all increase proportionally for the nitrogen curve over that of air, the OER being approximately the same for both curve components. A similar multiphasic response was observed at dose rates of 202, 49.6 and 9.1 Gy/min. Although cell cycle variations in radiosensitivity may contribute slightly to the response, an inducible or activated repair process would be consistent with the results.

  5. Occurrence of multiphasic anaphylaxis during a transcontinental air flight.

    PubMed

    Brady, W J; Bright, H L

    1999-11-01

    Anaphylaxis, a multisystem allergic reaction, represents a true medical emergency. Anaphylaxis is characterized by a combination of the following: urticaria, angioedema, distributive shock, and respiratory failure. Most often, the patient is rapidly treated with prompt resolution of the anaphylaxis in either the out-of-hospital or emergency department (ED) setting. Infrequently, recurrent, or multiphasic, anaphylaxis is encountered, involving a reappearance of allergic phenomena after complete resolution of the original reaction. Recurrence may involve nuisance-level issues such as urticaria; alternatively, multiphasic reactions may be characterized by cardiovascular collapse and/or respiratory compromise. Initially aggressive pharmacological therapy followed by prolonged observation in either the ED or the in-hospital setting is strongly recommended to monitor for potential recurrence.

  6. Fitting of a multiphase equation of state with swarm intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, G. A.; Christie, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Hydrocode calculations require knowledge of the variation of pressure of a material with density and temperature, which is given by the equation of state. An accurate model needs to account for discontinuities in energy, density and properties of a material across a phase boundary. When generating a multiphase equation of state the modeller attempts to balance the agreement between the available data for compression, expansion and phase boundary location. However, this can prove difficult because minor adjustments in the equation of state for a single phase can have a large impact on the overall phase diagram. This paper describes how combining statistical-mechanics-based condensed matter physics models with a stochastic analysis technique called particle swarm optimisation, yields multiphase equations of state which give good agreement with experiment over a wide range of pressure-temperature space. Aluminium and tin are used as test cases in the proof of principle described in this paper.

  7. Multiphase flow parameter estimation based on laser scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendruscolo, Tiago P.; Fischer, Robert; Martelli, Cicero; Rodrigues, Rômulo L. P.; Morales, Rigoberto E. M.; da Silva, Marco J.

    2015-07-01

    The flow of multiple constituents inside a pipe or vessel, known as multiphase flow, is commonly found in many industry branches. The measurement of the individual flow rates in such flow is still a challenge, which usually requires a combination of several sensor types. However, in many applications, especially in industrial process control, it is not necessary to know the absolute flow rate of the respective phases, but rather to continuously monitor flow conditions in order to quickly detect deviations from the desired parameters. Here we show how a simple and low-cost sensor design can achieve this, by using machine-learning techniques to distinguishing the characteristic patterns of oblique laser light scattered at the phase interfaces. The sensor is capable of estimating individual phase fluxes (as well as their changes) in multiphase flows and may be applied to safety applications due to its quick response time.

  8. The study of multiphase flow control during odor reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Dehan; Yu, Hao; Fan, Danjun; He, Meiqiu

    2014-04-01

    Odor reproduction, is the use of the chemical composition of the basic components of odor recipe, according to a certain proportion, to control the flow of the various components, which make them sufficiently blended to achieve reproduction. In this paper, reproducing method is to find the corresponding liquid flavor, and then based on chemical flavor recipes, using flowmeters to control the chemical composition of the liquid flavor ratio. In the proportional control, the liquid chemical composition is very likely to be volatile, so that the proportional control is multiphase flow control. Measurement of the flow control will directly affect the odor reproducible results. Using electronic nose to obtain reproducible odor data, and then use pattern recognition algorithm to determine reproducible results. The experimental results can be achieved on the process of odor components multiphase flow proportional control parameter adjustment.

  9. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarad; H. Yasuhara; A. Alajmi

    2002-04-20

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multi-phase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (1) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (2) modeling of fracture permeability in the presence of asperities and confining stress, and (3) simulation of two-phase fluid flow in a fracture and a layered matrix. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. The distribution of fracture aperture is a difficult issue that we are studying and developing methods of quantification. The difficulties are both numerical and conceptual. Numerically, the three-dimensional data sets include millions, and sometimes, billions of points, and pose a computational challenge. The conceptual difficulties derive from the rough nature of the fracture surfaces, and the heterogeneous nature of the rock matrix. However, the high-resolution obtained by the imaging system provides us a much needed measuring environment on rock samples that are subjected to simultaneous fluid flow and confining stress. The absolute permeability of a fracture depends on the behavior of the asperities that keep it open. A model is being developed that predicts the permeability and average aperture of a fracture as a function of time under steady flow of water including the pressure solution at the asperity contact points. Several two-phase flow experiments in the presence of a fracture tip were performed in the past. At the present time, we are developing an inverse process using a simulation model to understand the fluid flow patterns in

  10. In-situ formation of multiphase deposited thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2004-01-13

    A multiphase ceramic thermal barrier coating is provided. The coating is adapted for use in high temperature applications in excess of about 1200.degree. C., for coating superalloy components of a combustion turbine engine. The coating comprises a ceramic single or two oxide base layer disposed on the substrate surface; and a ceramic oxide reaction product material disposed on the base layer, the reaction product comprising the reaction product of the base layer with a ceramic single or two oxide overlay layer.

  11. Ensemble phase averaging equations for multiphase flows in porous media, part I: the bundle-of-tubes model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dali; Zhang, Duan; Currier, Robert

    2008-01-01

    A bundle-of-tubes construct is used as a model system to study ensemble averaged equations for multiphase flow in a porous material. Momentum equations for the fluid phases obtained from the method are similar to Darcy's law, but with additional terms. We study properties of the additional terms, and the conditions under which the averaged equations can be approximated by the diffusion model or the extended Darcy's law as often used in models for multiphase flows in porous media. Although the bundle-of-tubes model is perhaps the simplest model for a porous material, the ensemble averaged equation technique developed in this paper assumes the very same form in more general treatments described in Part 2 of the present work (Zhang 2009). Any model equation system intended for the more general cases must be understood and tested first using simple models. The concept of ensemble phase averaging is dissected here in physical terms, without involved mathematics through its application to the idealized bundle-of-tubes model for multiphase flow in porous media.

  12. Microbial activity in weathering columns.

    PubMed

    García, C; Ballester, A; González, F; Blázquez, M L

    2007-03-22

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the metabolic activity of the microbial population associated with a pyritic tailing after a column-weathering test. For this purpose, a column 150cm high and 15cm diameter was used. The solid was a tailing with 63.4% pyrite and with minor amounts of Cu, Pb and Zn sulfides (1.4, 0.5 and 0.8%, respectively). The column model was the habitual one for weathering tests: distilled water was added at the top of the column; the water flowed down through tailings and finally was collected at the bottom for chemical and microbiological analysis. Weathering was maintained for 36 weeks. The results showed a significant presence of microbial life that was distributed selectively over the column: sulfur- and iron-oxidizing aerobic bacteria were in the more oxygenated zone; anaerobic sulfur-reducing bacteria were isolated from the samples taken from the anoxic part of the column. Activity testing showed that (oxidizing and reducing) bacteria populations were active at the end of the weathering test. The quality of the water draining from the column was thus the final product of biological oxidation and reduction promoted by the bacteria consortia.

  13. Microstructure-based modelling of multiphase materials and complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Ewald; Wesenjak, Robert; Fillafer, Alexander; Meier, Felix; Krempaszky, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Micromechanical approaches are frequently employed to monitor local and global field quantities and their evolution under varying mechanical and/or thermal loading scenarios. In this contribution, an overview on important methods is given that are currently used to gain insight into the deformational and failure behaviour of multiphase materials and complex structures. First, techniques to represent material microstructures are reviewed. It is common to either digitise images of real microstructures or generate virtual 2D or 3D microstructures using automated procedures (e.g. Voronoï tessellation) for grain generation and colouring algorithms for phase assignment. While the former method allows to capture exactly all features of the microstructure at hand with respect to its morphological and topological features, the latter method opens up the possibility for parametric studies with respect to the influence of individual microstructure features on the local and global stress and strain response. Several applications of these approaches are presented, comprising low and high strain behaviour of multiphase steels, failure and fracture behaviour of multiphase materials and the evolution of surface roughening of the aluminium top metallisation of semiconductor devices.

  14. Processing, Microstructure, and Properties of Multiphase Mo Silicide Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Heatherly, L.; Liu, C.T.; Schneibel, J.H.

    1998-11-30

    Multiphase Mo silicide alloys containing T2 (Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}), Mo{sub 3}Si and Mo phases where prepared by both melting and casting (M and C) and powder metallurgical (PM) processes. Glassy phases are observed in PM materials but not in M and C materials. Microstructural studies indicate that the primary phase is Mo-rich solid solution in alloys containing {le}(9.4Si+13.8B, at. %) and T2 in alloys with {ge}(9.8Si+14.6B). An eutectic composition is estimated to be close to Mo-9.6Si-14.2B. The mechanical properties of multiphase silicide alloys were determined by hardness, tensile and bending tests at room temperature. The multiphase alloy MSB-18 (Mo-9.4Si-13.8B) possesses a flexure strength distinctly higher than that of MoSi{sub 2} and other Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} silicide alloys containing no Mo particles. Also, MSB-18 is tougher than MoSi{sub 2} by a factor of 4.

  15. Shock Initiated Reactions of Reactive Multiphase Blast Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dennis; Granier, John; Johnson, Richard; Littrell, Donald

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a new class of reactive multiphase blast explosives (RMBX) and characterization of their blast characteristics. These RMBXs are non-ideal explosive compositions of perfluoropolyether (PFPE), nano aluminum, and a micron-size high-density reactive metal - Tantalum, Zirconium, or Zinc in mass loadings of 66 to 83 percent. Unlike high explosives, these PFPE-metal compositions release energy via a fast self-oxidized combustion wave (rather than a true self-sustaining detonation) that is shock dependent, and can be overdriven to control energy release rate. The term ``reactive multiphase blast'' refers to the post-dispersion blast behavior: multiphase in that there are a gas phase that imparts pressure and a solid (particulate) phase that imparts momentum; and reactive in that the hot metal particles react with atmospheric oxygen and the explosive gas products to give an extended pressure pulse. The RMBX formulations were tested in two spherical core-shell geometries - an RMBX shell exploded by a high explosive core, and an RMBX core imploded by a high explosive shell. The fireball and blast characteristics were compared to a C-4 baseline charge.

  16. Wettability control on multiphase flow in patterned microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Benzhong; MacMinn, Christopher W; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-09-13

    Multiphase flow in porous media is important in many natural and industrial processes, including geologic CO2 sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and water infiltration into soil. Although it is well known that the wetting properties of porous media can vary drastically depending on the type of media and pore fluids, the effect of wettability on multiphase flow continues to challenge our microscopic and macroscopic descriptions. Here, we study the impact of wettability on viscously unfavorable fluid-fluid displacement in disordered media by means of high-resolution imaging in microfluidic flow cells patterned with vertical posts. By systematically varying the wettability of the flow cell over a wide range of contact angles, we find that increasing the substrate's affinity to the invading fluid results in more efficient displacement of the defending fluid up to a critical wetting transition, beyond which the trend is reversed. We identify the pore-scale mechanisms-cooperative pore filling (increasing displacement efficiency) and corner flow (decreasing displacement efficiency)-responsible for this macroscale behavior, and show that they rely on the inherent 3D nature of interfacial flows, even in quasi-2D media. Our results demonstrate the powerful control of wettability on multiphase flow in porous media, and show that the markedly different invasion protocols that emerge-from pore filling to postbridging-are determined by physical mechanisms that are missing from current pore-scale and continuum-scale descriptions. PMID:27559089

  17. Fiber-Optical Sensors: Basics and Applications in Multiphase Reactors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangyang; Yang, Chao; Yang, Shifang; Li, Guozheng

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a brief introduction on the basics of fiber-optical sensors and an overview focused on the applications to measurements in multiphase reactors. The most commonly principle utilized is laser back scattering, which is also the foundation for almost all current probes used in multiphase reactors. The fiber-optical probe techniques in two-phase reactors are more developed than those in three-phase reactors. There are many studies on the measurement of gas holdup using fiber-optical probes in three-phase fluidized beds, but negative interference of particles on probe function was less studied. The interactions between solids and probe tips were less studied because glass beads etc. were always used as the solid phase. The vision probes may be the most promising for simultaneous measurements of gas dispersion and solids suspension in three-phase reactors. Thus, the following techniques of the fiber-optical probes in multiphase reactors should be developed further: (1) online measuring techniques under nearly industrial operating conditions; (2) corresponding signal data processing techniques; (3) joint application with other measuring techniques.

  18. Common catabolic enzyme patterns in a microplankton community of the Humboldt Current System off northern and central-south Chile: Malate dehydrogenase activity as an index of water-column metabolism in an oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, R. R.; Quiñones, R. A.

    2009-07-01

    An extensive subsurface oxygen minimum zone off northern and central-south Chile, associated with the Peru-Chile undercurrent, has important effects on the metabolism of the organisms inhabiting therein. Planktonic species deal with the hypoxic and anoxic environments by relying on biochemical as well as physiological processes related to their anaerobic metabolisms. Here we characterize, for the first time, the potential enzymatic activities involved in the aerobic and anaerobic energy production pathways of microplanktonic organisms (<100 μm), their relationship, and this relationship's association with the oxygen concentration and microplanktonic biomass in the oxygen minimum zone and adjacent areas of the Humboldt Current System water column. Our results demonstrate significant potential enzymatic activity of catabolic pathways in the oxygen minimum zone. Malate dehydrogenase had the highest oxidizing activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form) in the batch of catabolic enzymatic activities assayed, including potential pyruvate oxidoreductases activity, the electron transport system, and dissimilatory nitrate reductase. Malate dehydrogenase correlated significantly with almost all the enzymes analyzed within and above the oxygen minimum zone, and also with the oxygen concentration and microplankton biomass in the water column of the Humboldt Current System, especially in the oxygen minimum zone off Iquique. These results suggest a possible specific pattern for the catabolic activity of the microplanktonic realm associated with the oxygen minimum zone spread along the Humboldt Current System off Chile. We hypothesize that malate dehydrogenase activity could be an appropriate indicator of microplankton catabolism in the oxygen minimum zone and adjacent areas.

  19. Optimal design of thermally coupled distillation columns

    SciTech Connect

    Duennebier, G.; Pantelides, C.C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper considers the optimal design of thermally coupled distillation columns and dividing wall columns using detailed column models and mathematical optimization. The column model used is capable of describing both conventional and thermally coupled columns, which allows comparisons of different structural alternatives to be made. Possible savings in both operating and capital costs of up to 30% are illustrated using two case studies.

  20. Entropic lattice Boltzmann method for multiphase flows: Fluid-solid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazloomi M., Ali; Chikatamarla, Shyam S.; Karlin, Iliya V.

    2015-08-01

    The recently introduced entropic lattice Boltzmann model (ELBM) for multiphase flows [A. Mazloomi M., S. S. Chikatamarla, and I. V. Karlin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 174502 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.174502] is extended to the simulation of dynamic fluid-solid interface problems. The thermodynamically consistent, nonlinearly stable ELBM together with a polynomial representation of the equation of state enables us to investigate the dynamics of the contact line in a wide range of applications, from capillary filling to liquid drop impact onto a flat surfaces with different wettability. The static interface behavior is tested by means of the liquid column in a channel to verify the Young-Laplace law. The numerical results of a capillary filling problem in a channel with wettability gradient show an excellent match with the existing analytical solution. Simulations of drop impact onto both wettable and nonwettable surfaces show that the ELBM reproduces the experimentally observed drop behavior in a quantitative manner. Results reported herein demonstrate that the present model is a promising alternative for studying the vapor-liquid-solid interface dynamics.

  1. Heat Integration in Batch Distillation Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Debadrita; Jana, Amiya K.; Samanta, Amar Nath

    2010-10-01

    A new heat integrated batch distillation column has been configured in this paper. Here the column and reboiler are connected in an annular arrangement and a compressor is positioned between them to maintain the pressure difference. The heat integration is between the rectifying batch column and one concentric reboiler. Ethanol-Water binary system is chosen as an example for the design and analysis of this heat integrated batch distillation column (HIBDiC). In this work, a sensitivity test for selecting the optimal value of the total number of trays and reboiler duty and a thermodynamic feasibility test for its design acceptability has been accomplished. The principal objective of this study is to investigate the influence of compression ratio (CR) on the energy consumption of distillation and to find out the optimal value of CR. Also a comparative analysis of HIBiDC on energy consumption in steady state as well as in dynamic state has been carried out on the basis of its conventional model. The proposed scheme is capable to save the energy up to 50.52% compared to its conventional one by selecting the CR of 1.4 as an optimal value.

  2. A lattice Boltzmann model for multiphase flows with large density ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H. W.; Shu, C.; Chew, Y. T.

    2006-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model for simulating multiphase flows with large density ratios is described in this paper. The method is easily implemented. It does not require solving the Poisson equation and does not involve the complex treatments of derivative terms. The interface capturing equation is recovered without any additional terms as compared to other methods [M.R. Swift, W.R. Osborn, J.M. Yeomans, Lattice Boltzmann simulation of liquid-gas and binary fluid systems, Phys. Rev. E 54 (1996) 5041-5052; T. Inamuro, T. Ogata, S. Tajima, N. Konishi, A lattice Boltzmann method for incompressible two-phase flows with large density differences, J. Comput. Phys. 198 (2004) 628-644; T. Lee, C.-L. Lin, A stable discretization of the lattice Boltzmann equation for simulation of incompressible two-phase flows at high density ratio, J. Comput. Phys. 206 (2005) 16-47]. Besides, it requires less discrete velocities. As a result, its efficiency could be greatly improved, especially in 3D applications. It is validated by several cases: a bubble in a stationary flow and the capillary wave. The numerical surface tension obtained from the Laplace law and the interface profile agrees very well with the respective analytical solution. The method is further verified by its application to capillary wave and the bubble rising under buoyancy with comparison to other methods. All the numerical experiments show that the present approach can be used to model multiphase flows with large density ratios.

  3. Electrical properties of multiphase composites based on carbon nanotubes and an optimized clay content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egiziano, Luigi; Lamberti, Patrizia; Spinelli, Giovanni; Tucci, Vincenzo; Guadagno, Liberata; Vertuccio, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    The experimental results concerning the characterization of a multiphase nanocomposite systems based on epoxy matrix, loaded with different amount of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and an optimized Hydrotalcite (HT) clay content (i.e. 0.6 wt%), duly identified by an our previous theoretical study based on Design of Experiment (DoE), are presented. Dynamic-mechanical analysis (DMA) reveal that even the introduction of higher HT loading (up to 1%wt) don't affect significantly the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites while morphological investigations show an effective synergy between clay and carbon nanotubes that leads to peculiar micro/nanostructures that favor the creation of the electrical conductive network inside the insulating resin. An electrical characterization is carried out in terms of DC electrical conductivity, percolation threshold (EPT) and frequency response in the range 10Hz-1MHz. In particular, the measurements of the DC conductivity allow to obtain the typical "percolation" curve also found for classical CNT-polymer mixtures and a value of about 2 S/m for the electrical conductivity is achieved at the highest considered CNTs concentration (i.e. 1 wt%). The results suggest that multiphase nanocomposites obtained incorporating dispersive nanofillers, in addition to the conductive one, may be a valid alternative to the polymer blends, to improve the properties of the polymeric materials thus able to meet high demands, particularly concerning their mechanical and thermal stability and electrical features required in the aircraft engineering.

  4. Multiphase flow modeling of spinodal decomposition based on the cascaded lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclaire, Sébastien; Pellerin, Nicolas; Reggio, Marcelo; Trépanier, Jean-Yves

    2014-07-01

    A new multiphase lattice Boltzmann model based on the cascaded collision operator is developed to study the spinodal decomposition of critical quenches in the inertial hydrodynamic regime. The proposed lattice Boltzmann model is able to investigate simulations of multiphase spinodal decomposition with a very high Reynolds number. The law governing the growth of the average domain size, i.e. L∝tα, is studied numerically in the late-time regime, when multiple immiscible fluids are considered in the spinodal decomposition. It is found numerically that the growth exponent, α, is inversely proportional to the number, N, of immiscible fluids in the system. In fact, α=6/(N+7) is a simple law that matches the numerical results very well, even up to N=20. As the number of immiscible fluids increases, the corresponding drop in the connectivity of the various fluid domains is believed to be the main factor that drives and slows down the growth rate. Various videos that accurately demonstrate spinodal decomposition with different transport mechanisms are provided (see Appendix A). The remarks and statement made in this research are based on the analysis of 5120 numerical simulations and the postprocessing of about 3.5 TB of data.

  5. Modeling non-isothermal multiphase multi-species reactive chemical transport in geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Tianfu Xu; Gerard, F.; Pruess, K.; Brimhall, G.

    1997-07-01

    The assessment of mineral deposits, the analysis of hydrothermal convection systems, the performance of radioactive, urban and industrial waste disposal, the study of groundwater pollution, and the understanding of natural groundwater quality patterns all require modeling tools that can consider both the transport of dissolved species as well as their interactions with solid (or other) phases in geologic media and engineered barriers. Here, a general multi-species reactive transport formulation has been developed, which is applicable to homogeneous and/or heterogeneous reactions that can proceed either subject to local equilibrium conditions or kinetic rates under non-isothermal multiphase flow conditions. Two numerical solution methods, the direct substitution approach (DSA) and sequential iteration approach (SIA) for solving the coupled complex subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes, are described. An efficient sequential iteration approach, which solves transport of solutes and chemical reactions sequentially and iteratively, is proposed for the current reactive chemical transport computer code development. The coupled flow (water, vapor, air and heat) and solute transport equations are also solved sequentially. The existing multiphase flow code TOUGH2 and geochemical code EQ3/6 are used to implement this SIA. The flow chart of the coupled code TOUGH2-EQ3/6, required modifications of the existing codes and additional subroutines needed are presented.

  6. Multiphase Model of Heat and Mass Transport during Laser Alloying of Iron with Electrodeposited Chromium Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Didenko, T.; Kusinski, J.; Kusinski, G.

    2008-02-15

    The aim of this research was to study the laser alloying process of iron with chromium. In the paper, a multiphase model of mass and heat transfer for the laser alloying is presented. Laser melting of the chromium layer and the substrate was performed using a continuous laser source operated with a TEM{sub 10} mode, with constant beam diameter ({phi}), scanning velocity (V) and varied output beam power. The partial differential equations of the conservation of mass, momentum and energy in the melted pool for multiphase system were solved. The distribution of chromium in iron after laser alloying was obtained by including the Volume of Fluid algorithm in the model. The results of the computations were compared with the experimental evaluation of the microstructure and the chromium concentration, which were based on scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis (Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) of the laser alloyed layers. The comparison of computational calculations and experimental results is presented and a good accuracy of the proposed model is shown.

  7. Multiphase permittivity imaging using absolute value electrical capacitance tomography data and a level set algorithm.

    PubMed

    Al Hosani, E; Soleimani, M

    2016-06-28

    Multiphase flow imaging is a very challenging and critical topic in industrial process tomography. In this article, simulation and experimental results of reconstructing the permittivity profile of multiphase material from data collected in electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) are presented. A multiphase narrowband level set algorithm is developed to reconstruct the interfaces between three- or four-phase permittivity values. The level set algorithm is capable of imaging multiphase permittivity by using one set of ECT measurement data, so-called absolute value ECT reconstruction, and this is tested with high-contrast and low-contrast multiphase data. Simulation and experimental results showed the superiority of this algorithm over classical pixel-based image reconstruction methods. The multiphase level set algorithm and absolute ECT reconstruction are presented for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, in this paper and critically evaluated. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'. PMID:27185966

  8. Multiphase permittivity imaging using absolute value electrical capacitance tomography data and a level set algorithm.

    PubMed

    Al Hosani, E; Soleimani, M

    2016-06-28

    Multiphase flow imaging is a very challenging and critical topic in industrial process tomography. In this article, simulation and experimental results of reconstructing the permittivity profile of multiphase material from data collected in electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) are presented. A multiphase narrowband level set algorithm is developed to reconstruct the interfaces between three- or four-phase permittivity values. The level set algorithm is capable of imaging multiphase permittivity by using one set of ECT measurement data, so-called absolute value ECT reconstruction, and this is tested with high-contrast and low-contrast multiphase data. Simulation and experimental results showed the superiority of this algorithm over classical pixel-based image reconstruction methods. The multiphase level set algorithm and absolute ECT reconstruction are presented for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, in this paper and critically evaluated. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'.

  9. High Precision, Absolute Total Column Ozone Measurements from the Pandora Spectrometer System: Comparisons with Data from a Brewer Double Monochromator and Aura OMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzortziou, Maria A.; Herman, Jay R.; Cede, Alexander; Abuhassan, Nader

    2012-01-01

    We present new, high precision, high temporal resolution measurements of total column ozone (TCO) amounts derived from ground-based direct-sun irradiance measurements using our recently deployed Pandora single-grating spectrometers. Pandora's small size and portability allow deployment at multiple sites within an urban air-shed and development of a ground-based monitoring network for studying small-scale atmospheric dynamics, spatial heterogeneities in trace gas distribution, local pollution conditions, photochemical processes and interdependencies of ozone and its major precursors. Results are shown for four mid- to high-latitude sites where different Pandora instruments were used. Comparisons with a well calibrated double-grating Brewer spectrometer over a period of more than a year in Greenbelt MD showed excellent agreement and a small bias of approximately 2 DU (or, 0.6%). This was constant with slant column ozone amount over the full range of observed solar zenith angles (15-80), indicating adequate Pandora stray light correction. A small (1-2%) seasonal difference was found, consistent with sensitivity studies showing that the Pandora spectral fitting TCO retrieval has a temperature dependence of 1% per 3K, with an underestimation in temperature (e.g., during summer) resulting in an underestimation of TCO. Pandora agreed well with Aura-OMI (Ozone Measuring Instrument) satellite data, with average residuals of <1% at the different sites when the OMI view was within 50 km from the Pandora location and OMI-measured cloud fraction was <0.2. The frequent and continuous measurements by Pandora revealed significant short-term (hourly) temporal changes in TCO, not possible to capture by sun-synchronous satellites, such as OMI, alone.

  10. High precision, absolute total column ozone measurements from the Pandora spectrometer system: Comparisons with data from a Brewer double monochromator and Aura OMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzortziou, Maria; Herman, Jay R.; Cede, Alexander; Abuhassan, Nader

    2012-08-01

    We present new, high precision, high temporal resolution measurements of total column ozone (TCO) amounts derived from ground-based direct-sun irradiance measurements using our recently deployed Pandora single-grating spectrometers. Pandora's small size and portability allow deployment at multiple sites within an urban air-shed and development of a ground-based monitoring network for studying small-scale atmospheric dynamics, spatial heterogeneities in trace gas distribution, local pollution conditions, photochemical processes and interdependencies of ozone and its major precursors. Results are shown for four mid- to high-latitude sites where different Pandora instruments were used. Comparisons with a well calibrated double-grating Brewer spectrometer over a period of more than a year in Greenbelt MD showed excellent agreement and a small bias of approximately 2 DU (or, 0.6%). This was constant with slant column ozone amount over the full range of observed solar zenith angles (15-80°), indicating adequate Pandora stray light correction. A small (1-2%) seasonal difference was found, consistent with sensitivity studies showing that the Pandora spectral fitting TCO retrieval has a temperature dependence of 1% per 3°K, with an underestimation in temperature (e.g., during summer) resulting in an underestimation of TCO. Pandora agreed well with Aura-OMI (Ozone Measuring Instrument) satellite data, with average residuals of <1% at the different sites when the OMI view was within 50 km from the Pandora location and OMI-measured cloud fraction was <0.2. The frequent and continuous measurements by Pandora revealed significant short-term (hourly) temporal changes in TCO, not possible to capture by sun-synchronous satellites, such as OMI, alone.

  11. Capital City Column.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Carl

    1994-01-01

    Provides a suggested model for SCHOOLNET, a voice, video, and data network. Proposes that library media centers should be the site of the SCHOOLNET hub; students and teachers should be able to access the INFOhio library automation system and other information systems; and digital fiber optic hubs and trunk lines should connect school buildings…

  12. Dynamics of a Tapped Granular Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, Anthony; Blackmore, Denis; Zuo, Luo; Hao, Wu; Horntrop, David

    2015-11-01

    We consider the behavior of a column of spheres subjected to a time-dependent vertical taps. Of interest are various dynamical properties, such as the motion of its mass center, its response to taps of different intensities and forms, and the effect of system size and material properties. The interplay between diverse time and length scales are the key contributors to the column's evolving dynamics. Soft sphere discrete element simulations were conducted over a very wide parameter space to obtain a portrait of column behavior as embodied by the collective dynamics of the mass center motion. Results compared favorably with a derived reduced-order paradigm of the mass center motion (surprisingly analogous to that for a single bouncing ball on an oscillating plate) with respect to dynamical regimes and their transitions. A continuum model obtained from a system of Newtonian equations, as a locally averaged limit in the transport mode along trajectories is described, and a numerical solution protocol for a one-dimensional system is outlined. Typical trajectories and density evolution profiles are shown. We conclude with a discussion of our investigations to relate predictions of the continuum and reduced dynamical systems models with discrete simulations.

  13. Use of multiphase pumps in heavy and extra heavy oil production

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, R.; Guevara, E.M.; Colmenares, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    The main results of a technical and economical feasibility study carried out to analyze the application of multiphase flow technologies in the production of heavy and extra heavy crudes from the Arecuna Field of Corpoven, S.A. in the Orinoco Belt, Venezuela, are presented. It was found that flow stations based on multiphase technologies such as multiphase pumping and metering were the most adequate both technically and economically.

  14. Pore-Scale Investigation on Stress-Dependent Characteristics of Granular Packs and Their Impact on Multiphase Fluid Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrealba, V.; Karpyn, Z.; Yoon, H.; Hart, D. B.; Klise, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    The pore-scale dynamics that govern multiphase flow under variable stress conditions are not well understood. This lack of fundamental understanding limits our ability to quantitatively predict multiphase flow and fluid distributions in natural geologic systems. In this research, we focus on pore-scale, single and multiphase flow properties that impact displacement mechanisms and residual trapping of non-wetting phase under varying stress conditions. X-ray micro-tomography is used to image pore structures and distribution of wetting and non-wetting fluids in water-wet synthetic granular packs, under dynamic load. Micro-tomography images are also used to determine structural features such as medial axis, surface area, and pore body and throat distribution; while the corresponding transport properties are determined from Lattice-Boltzmann simulations performed on lattice replicas of the imaged specimens. Results are used to investigate how inter-granular deformation mechanisms affect fluid displacement and residual trapping at the pore-scale. This will improve our understanding of the dynamic interaction of mechanical deformation and fluid flow during enhanced oil recovery and geologic CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1957-12-31

    This patent relates to liquid-liquid extraction columns having a means for pulsing the liquid in the column to give it an oscillatory up and down movement, and consists of a packed column, an inlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase located in the direct communication with the liquid in the lower part of said column, an inlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase located in direct communication with the liquid in the upper part of said column, a tube having one end communicating with liquid in the lower part of said column and having its upper end located above the level of said outlet pipe for the dispersed phase, and a piston and cylinder connected to the upper end of said tube for applying a pulsating pneumatic pressure to the surface of the liquid in said tube so that said surface rises and falls in said tube.

  16. Multiphase transport of gas and low loads of liquids in pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asante, Ben

    Multiphase flow of gas and low loads of liquids occurs frequently in natural gas gathering and transmission pipelines for both onshore and offshore operations. Literature and experimental investigations indicate that dispersed droplet and stratified flow patterns are obtained when gas and small quantities of liquids flow concurrently in a pipe. Very few correlations exist for the prediction of holdup and pressure drop for these systems and fewer still give satisfactory results. Experimental studies for air-oil and air-water systems flowing through small diameter plastic and steel horizontal pipes ranging in size from 1-inch to 3-inches were performed. The experiments were carried out at the multiphase flow laboratories of Imperial College in London and the University of Calgary in Canada. Data from actual operating gas pipeline systems transporting small amounts of hydrocarbon liquids were also evaluated. Based on the experimental results and the operating data, two approaches for modeling these systems are proposed: (1) A homogeneous approach for very low liquid loads (holdups up to 0.005), typical in gas transmission systems. A friction factor correlation based on the mixture Reynolds number and the holdup has been developed for this flow regime. (2) A mechanistic stratified two-phase approach for higher liquid loads (holdups greater than 0.005) usually found in gas gathering systems with consideration given to: (a) The reduction in the available flow area and extent of wetting of the pipe perimeter by the liquid film. The gas/liquid interface was observed to be either flat or carved. (b) The interfacial fiction factor between the liquid film and the gas. A new correlation based on the liquid and gas Reynolds numbers as well as the film thickness and hold up has been developed. This correlation has been successfully tested against both experimental and actual pipeline operating data.

  17. MAMAP - a new spectrometer system for column-averaged methane and carbon dioxide observations from aircraft: instrument description and performance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerilowski, K.; Tretner, A.; Krings, T.; Buchwitz, M.; Bertagnolio, P. P.; Belemezov, F.; Erzinger, J.; Burrows, J. P.; Bovensmann, H.

    2010-08-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) and Methane (CH4) are the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases. CH4 is furthermore one of the most potent present and future contributors to global warming because of its large global warming potential (GWP). Our knowledge of CH4 sources and sinks is based primarily on sparse in-situ local point measurements from micro sites and surface networks and more recently on low spatial resolution satellite observations. There is a need for measurements of the dry columns of CO2 and CH4 having high spatial resolution and spatial coverage. In order to fill this gap a new passive airborne 2-channel grating spectrometer instrument for remote sensing of small scale and mesoscale column-averaged CH4 and CO2 observations has been developed. This Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) instrument measures reflected and scattered solar radiation in the short wave infrared (SWIR) and near-infrared (NIR) parts of the electro-magnetic spectrum at moderate spectral resolution. The SWIR channel yields measurements of atmospheric absorption bands of CH4 and CO2 in the spectral range between 1.59 and 1.69 μm at a spectral resolution of 0.82 nm. The NIR channel around 0.76 μm measures the atmospheric O2-A-band absorption with a resolution of 0.46 nm. MAMAP has been designed for flexible operation aboard a variety of airborne platforms. The instrument design and performance, together with some results from on-ground and in-flight engineering tests are presented. The instrument performance has been analyzed using a retrieval algorithm applied to the SWIR channel nadir measured spectra. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the SWIR channel is approximately 1000 for integration times (tint) in the range of 0.6-0.8 s for scenes with surface spectral reflectances of around 0.18. At these integration times the ground scene size is about 23×33 m2 for an aircraft altitude of 1 km and a ground speed of 200 km/h. For these scenes the CH4 and CO2 column retrieval precisions

  18. Multiphase, Multicomponent Compressibility in Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Macias-Chapa, L.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

    1987-01-20

    Coefficients of compressibilities below the bubble point were computer with a thermodynamic model for single and multicomponent systems. Results showed coefficients of compressibility below the bubble point larger than the gas coefficient of compressibility at the same conditions. Two-phase compressibilities computed in the conventional way are underestimated and may lead to errors in reserve estimation and well test analysis. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  19. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR FIXED CST AND RF COLUMNS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S

    2007-10-17

    maximum temperature with either ion exchange material. Sensitivity calculations for the RF resin porosity, the ambient external column temperature, and the cooling system configuration were performed under the baseline conditions to assess the impact of these parameters on the maximum temperatures. It is noted that the cooling mechanism at the column boundary (forced versus natural convection) and the cooling system configuration significantly impact the maximum temperatures. The analysis results provide quantitative information associated with process temperature control requirements and management of the SCIX column.

  20. THERMAL MODELING OF ION EXCHANGE COLUMNS WITH SPHERICAL RF RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; King, W.

    2009-12-30

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal performance of RF columns fully loaded with radioactive cesium. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated during Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process upset conditions with a focus on implementation at Hanford. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results will provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on RF. The current full-scale design for the SCIX system includes a central cooling tube, and one objective of these calculations was to examine its elimination to simplify the design. Results confirmed that a column design without a central cooling tube is feasible for RF, allowing for the possibility of significant design simplifications if it can be assumed that the columns are always filled with liquid. With active cooling through the four outer tubes, the maximum column diameter expected to maintain the temperature below the assumed media and safety limits is 26 inches, which is comparable to the current design diameter. Additional analysis was conducted to predict the maximum column temperatures for the previously unevaluated accident scenario involving inadvertent drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, with retention of the ion exchange media and cesium in the column. As expected, much higher maximum temperatures are observed in this case due to the poor heat transfer properties of air versus liquid. For this hypothetical accident scenario involving inadvertent and complete drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, the modeling results indicate that the maximum temperature within a 28 inch diameter RF column with external cooling is expected to exceed 250 C within 2 days, while the maximum temperature of a 12 inch column is maintained below

  1. Treatment of non-ideality in the multiphase model SPACCIM - Part 1: Model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusumdar, A. J.; Wolke, R.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.

    2015-06-01

    Ambient tropospheric deliquesced particles generally comprise a complex mixture of electrolytes, organic compounds, and water. Dynamic modeling of physical and chemical processes in this complex matrix is challenging. Thus, up-to-date multiphase chemistry models do generally not consider non-ideal solution effects. Therefore, the present study was aimed at the further development of the SPACCIM model to treat both complex multiphase chemistry and phase transfer processes considering newly non-ideality properties of concentrated aerosol solutions. The present paper describes firstly, the performed model development including (i) the kinetic implementation of the non-ideality in the SPACCIM framework, (ii) the advancements in the coupling scheme of microphysics and multiphase chemistry and (iii) the required adjustments of the numerical schemes, especially in the sparse linear solver and the calculation of the Jacobian. Secondly, results of performed sensitivity investigations are outlined aiming at the evaluation of different activity coefficient modules and the examination of the contributions of different intermolecular forces to the overall activity coefficients. Finally, first results obtained with the new model framework are presented. The main product of the performed model development is the new kinetic model approach SPACCIM-SpactMod, which utilizes activities in reaction terms instead of aqueous concentrations. Based on an intercomparison of different activity coefficient models and the comparison with experimental data, AIOMFAC was selected as base model and extended by additional interaction parameters from literature for mixed organic-inorganic systems. Moreover, the performance and the capability of the applied activity coefficient module were evaluated by means of water activity measurements, literature data and results of other thermodynamic equilibrium models. Comprehensive comparison studies showed that the SpactMod (SPACCIM activity coefficient

  2. Structural, microstructural and surface properties of a specific CeO{sub 2}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} multiphase system obtained at 600 {sup o}C

    SciTech Connect

    Bourja, Lamia; Bakiz, Bahcine; Benlhachemi, Abdeljalil; Ezahri, Mohamed; Villain, Sylvie; Crosnier, Olivier; Favotto, Claude; Gavarri, Jean-Raymond

    2011-03-15

    Polycrystalline samples of (1-x) CeO{sub 2}-x/2 Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases, where x is the atom fraction of bismuth have been synthesized by the precipitation process and after the thermal treatment at 600 {sup o}C, under air. Samples are first characterized by the X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. To determine the samples specific surface areas, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses have been performed. In the composition range 0{<=}x{<=}0.20, a cubic solid solution with fluorite structure is obtained. For compositions x comprised between 0.30 and 0.90, two types of T' (or {beta}') and T (or {beta}) tetragonal phases, similar to the well-known {beta}' or {beta} Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} metastable structural varieties, are observed. However, the crystal cell volumes of these {beta}' or {beta} Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases increase with the composition x in bismuth: this might be due to the presence of defects or substitution by cerium atoms, in the tetragonal lattices. Using X-ray diffraction profile analyses, correlations between bismuth composition x and crystal sizes or lattice distortions have been established. The solid-gas interactions between these polycrystalline materials and air-CH{sub 4} and air-CO flows have been studied as a function of temperature and composition x, using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses of the conversions of CH{sub 4} and CO gases into the CO{sub 2} gas. The transformations of CH{sub 4} and CO molecules as a function of time and temperature are determined through the intensities of FTIR CO{sub 2} absorption bands. Using the specific surface areas determined from BET analyses, these FTIR intensities have been normalized and compared. For all bismuth compositions, a low catalytic reactivity is observed with air-CH{sub 4} gas flows, while, for the highest bismuth compositions, a high catalytic reactivity is observed with air-CO gas flows. -- Graphical abstract: Catalytic efficiencies of CeO{sub 2}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}system

  3. Measurement of Surface Tension of Solid Cu by Improved Multiphase Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamoto, Masashi; Liukkonen, Matti; Friman, Michael; Heikinheimo, Erkki; Hämäläinen, Marko; Holappa, Lauri

    2008-08-01

    The surface tension of solid Cu was measured with the multiphase equilibrium (MPE) method in a Pb-Cu system at 700 °C, 800 °C, and 900 °C. A special focus was on the measurement of angles involved in MPE. First, the effect of reading error in each angle measurement on the final result of surface tension of solid was simulated. It was found that the two groove measurements under atmosphere conditions are the primary sources of error in the surface tension of solid in the present system. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was applied to these angle measurements as a new method with high accuracy. The obtained surface-tension values of solid Cu in the present work were 1587, 1610, and 1521 mN/m at 700 °C, 800 °C, and 900 °C, respectively, representing reasonable temperature dependence.

  4. Quantitative analytical electron microscopy of multiphase alloys.

    PubMed

    Prybylowski, J; Ballinger, R; Elliott, C

    1989-02-01

    In this paper, we present a technique for analysis of composition gradients, using an analytical electron microscope, within the primary phase of a two-phase alloy for the case where the second-phase particle size is similar to the size of the irradiated volume. If the composition difference between the two phases is large, the detected compositional fluctuations associated with varying phase fractions may mask any underlying composition gradient of the primary phase. The analysis technique was used to determine grain boundary chromium concentration gradients in a nickel-base superalloy, alloy X-750. The technique may also be of use in other alloy systems. PMID:2709131

  5. Visualization of acceleration in multiphase fluid interactions.

    PubMed

    Sedarsky, David; Rahm, Mattias; Linne, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Probing the dynamics of structures in turbid media is important for understanding the internal forces that drive the time evolution of many fluid systems; the breakup of fuel injection sprays is a prime example. We demonstrate a three-pulse configuration for time-gated ballistic imaging, applied to a turbulent, steady spray allowing the acquisition of time-correlated image data. Coupled with targeted region-matching analysis, the detected image triplets are used to generate time-resolved velocity and acceleration vectors representing motion and forces involved in spray development. PMID:27192247

  6. Comparison of the performance of microtube column systems and solid-phase systems and the tube low-ionic-strength solution additive indirect antiglobulin test in the detection of red cell alloantibodies.

    PubMed

    Weisbach, V; Kohnhäuser, T; Zimmermann, R; Ringwald, J; Strasser, E; Zingsem, J; Eckstein, R

    2006-08-01

    To compare the performance of seven currently available test systems in the detection of erythrocyte alloantibodies (ab), we tested in parallel 446 sera samples containing red cell ab [368 sera samples with ab that are assumed to be clinically significant (cs-ab) and 78 sera samples with ab that are assumed to be of minor clinical significance (ms-ab)] using the tube spin low-ionic-strength solution (addition method) indirect antiglobulin test (tube LISS-IAT), three microtube column agglutination techniques (DiaMed-ID, Ortho BioVue and Bio-Rad Scangel), one affinity adherence test system (CLB/Mast CellBind Screen) and two solid-phase tests [Biotest Solidscreen II and Immucor Capture-R Ready-Screen (4)]. To address the specificity of the three test systems under routine conditions, results of 4566 patient samples obtained using the tube LISS-IAT, results of 5205 patient samples obtained using the Scangel and results of 3560 samples obtained using the Capture-R were evaluated. The DiaMed-ID detected 344 cs-ab and 43 ms-ab, BioVue 333 cs-ab and 48 ms-ab, Scangel 348 cs-ab and 62 ms-ab, CellBind Screen 346 cs-ab and 47 ms-ab, Solidscreen 330 cs-ab and 38 ms-ab, Capture-R 358 cs-ab and 45 ms-ab and LISS-IAT 159 cs-ab and 12 ms-ab. In routine practice, erythrocyte cs-ab could be identified in 61 (67.8%) of 90 reactive sera (specificity: 98.6%) in the tube LISS-IAT, in 169 (58.7%) of 288 (94.4%) in Bio-Rad Scangel and in 101 (51.0%) of 198 reactive sera (94.3%) in Capture-R. We conclude that the sensitivity of the microcolumn, affinity adherence and solid-phase test systems in the detection of cs-ab was similar and was markedly superior to that of the conventional tube LISS-IAT. All high-sensitive test systems produced higher rates of false positives and ms-ab compared to the tube test. An individual cost-benefit analysis, considering the recent knowledge about the clinical significance of weak-reactive cs-ab, should be performed in every institution to decide whether and

  7. Computer Simulation of Global Profiles of Carbon Dioxide Using a Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection, Column-Content DIAL System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Frehlich, Rod G.

    2009-01-01

    We present preliminary results of computer simulations of the error in measuring carbon dioxide mixing ratio profiles from earth orbit. The simulated sensor is a pulsed, 2-micron, coherent-detection lidar alternately operating on at least two wavelengths. The simulated geometry is a nadir viewing lidar measuring the column content signal. Atmospheric absorption is modeled using FASCODE3P software with the HITRAN 2004 absorption line data base. Lidar shot accumulation is employed up to the horizontal resolution limit. Horizontal resolutions of 50, 100, and 200 km are shown. Assuming a 400 km spacecraft orbit, the horizontal resolutions correspond to measurement times of about 7, 14, and 28 s. We simulate laser pulse-pair repetition frequencies from 1 Hz to 100 kHz. The range of shot accumulation is 7 to 2.8 million pulse-pairs. The resultant error is shown as a function of horizontal resolution, laser pulse-pair repetition frequency, and laser pulse energy. The effect of different on and off pulse energies is explored. The results are compared to simulation results of others and to demonstrated 2-micron operating points at NASA Langley.

  8. Enhanced adsorption of cesium on PVA-alginate encapsulated Prussian blue-graphene oxide hydrogel beads in a fixed-bed column system.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jiseon; Lee, Dae Sung

    2016-10-01

    A continuous fixed-bed column study was performed using PVA-alginate encapsulated Prussian blue-graphene oxide (PB-GO) hydrogel beads as a novel adsorbent for the removal of cesium from aqueous solutions. The effects of different operating parameters, such as initial cesium concentration, pH, bed height, flow rate, and bead size, were investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity of the PB-GO hydrogel beads was 164.5mg/g at an initial cesium concentration of 5mM, bed height of 20cm, and flow rate of 0.83mL/min at pH 7. The Thomas, Adams-Bohart, and Yoon-Nelson models were applied to the experimental data to predict the breakthrough curves using non-linear regression. Although both the Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models showed good agreement with the experimental data, the Yoon-Nelson model was found to provide the best representation for cesium adsorption on the adsorbent, based on the χ(2) analysis. PMID:27372009

  9. Liquid-based gating mechanism with tunable multiphase selectivity and antifouling behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Xu; Hu, Yuhang; Grinthal, Alison; Khan, Mughees; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2015-03-04

    Living organisms make extensive use of micro- and nanometre-sized pores as gatekeepers for controlling the movement of fluids, vapours and solids between complex environments. In addition, the ability of such pores to coordinate multiphase transport, in a highly selective and subtly triggered fashion and without clogging, has inspired interest in synthetic gated pores for applications ranging from fluid processing to 3D printing and lab-on-chip systems1-10.But although specific gating and transport behaviours have been realized by precisely tailoring pore surface chemistries and pore geometries6,11–17, a single system capable of controlling complex, selective multiphase transport has remained a distant prospect, and fouling is nearly inevitable.Here we introduce a gating mechanism that uses a capillary-stabilized liquid as a reversible, reconfigurable gate that fills and seals pores in the closed state, and creates a non-fouling, liquid-lined pore in the open state.Theoretical modelling and experiments demonstrate that for each transport substance, the gating threshold—the pressure needed to open the pores—can be rationally tuned over a wide pressure range. This enables us to realize in one system differential response profiles for a variety of liquids and gases, even letting liquids flow through the pore while preventing gas from escaping.These capabilities allow us to dynamically modulate gas–liquid sorting in a microfluidic flow and to separate a three-phase air water–oil mixture, with the liquid lining ensuring sustained antifouling behaviour. Because the liquid gating strategy enables efficient long-term operation and can be applied to a variety of pore structures and membrane materials, and to micro- as well as macroscale fluid systems, we expect it to prove useful in a wide range of applications.

  10. Liquid-based gating mechanism with tunable multiphase selectivity and antifouling behaviour

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hou, Xu; Hu, Yuhang; Grinthal, Alison; Khan, Mughees; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2015-03-04

    Living organisms make extensive use of micro- and nanometre-sized pores as gatekeepers for controlling the movement of fluids, vapours and solids between complex environments. In addition, the ability of such pores to coordinate multiphase transport, in a highly selective and subtly triggered fashion and without clogging, has inspired interest in synthetic gated pores for applications ranging from fluid processing to 3D printing and lab-on-chip systems1-10.But although specific gating and transport behaviours have been realized by precisely tailoring pore surface chemistries and pore geometries6,11–17, a single system capable of controlling complex, selective multiphase transport has remained a distant prospect, and foulingmore » is nearly inevitable.Here we introduce a gating mechanism that uses a capillary-stabilized liquid as a reversible, reconfigurable gate that fills and seals pores in the closed state, and creates a non-fouling, liquid-lined pore in the open state.Theoretical modelling and experiments demonstrate that for each transport substance, the gating threshold—the pressure needed to open the pores—can be rationally tuned over a wide pressure range. This enables us to realize in one system differential response profiles for a variety of liquids and gases, even letting liquids flow through the pore while preventing gas from escaping.These capabilities allow us to dynamically modulate gas–liquid sorting in a microfluidic flow and to separate a three-phase air water–oil mixture, with the liquid lining ensuring sustained antifouling behaviour. Because the liquid gating strategy enables efficient long-term operation and can be applied to a variety of pore structures and membrane materials, and to micro- as well as macroscale fluid systems, we expect it to prove useful in a wide range of applications.« less

  11. Liquid-based gating mechanism with tunable multiphase selectivity and antifouling behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xu; Hu, Yuhang; Grinthal, Alison; Khan, Mughees; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2015-03-01

    Living organisms make extensive use of micro- and nanometre-sized pores as gatekeepers for controlling the movement of fluids, vapours and solids between complex environments. The ability of such pores to coordinate multiphase transport, in a highly selective and subtly triggered fashion and without clogging, has inspired interest in synthetic gated pores for applications ranging from fluid processing to 3D printing and lab-on-chip systems. But although specific gating and transport behaviours have been realized by precisely tailoring pore surface chemistries and pore geometries, a single system capable of controlling complex, selective multiphase transport has remained a distant prospect, and fouling is nearly inevitable. Here we introduce a gating mechanism that uses a capillary-stabilized liquid as a reversible, reconfigurable gate that fills and seals pores in the closed state, and creates a non-fouling, liquid-lined pore in the open state. Theoretical modelling and experiments demonstrate that for each transport substance, the gating threshold--the pressure needed to open the pores--can be rationally tuned over a wide pressure range. This enables us to realize in one system differential response profiles for a variety of liquids and gases, even letting liquids flow through the pore while preventing gas from escaping. These capabilities allow us to dynamically modulate gas-liquid sorting in a microfluidic flow and to separate a three-phase air-water-oil mixture, with the liquid lining ensuring sustained antifouling behaviour. Because the liquid gating strategy enables efficient long-term operation and can be applied to a variety of pore structures and membrane materials, and to micro- as well as macroscale fluid systems, we expect it to prove useful in a wide range of applications.

  12. Liquid-based gating mechanism with tunable multiphase selectivity and antifouling behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, X; Hu, YH; Grinthal, A; Khan, M; Aizenberg, J

    2015-03-04

    Living organisms make extensive use of micro- and nanometre-sized pores as gatekeepers for controlling the movement of fluids, vapours and solids between complex environments. The ability of such pores to coordinate multiphase transport, in a highly selective and subtly triggered fashion and without clogging, has inspired interest in synthetic gated pores for applications ranging from fluid processing to 3D printing and lab-on-chip systems(1-10). But although specific gating and transport behaviours have been realized by precisely tailoring pore surface chemistries and pore geometries(6,11-17), a single system capable of controlling complex, selective multiphase transport has remained a distant prospect, and fouling is nearly inevitable(11,12). Here we introduce a gating mechanism that uses a capillary-stabilized liquid as a reversible, reconfigurable gate that fills and seals pores in the closed state, and creates a non-fouling, liquid-lined pore in the open state. Theoretical modelling and experiments demonstrate that for each transport substance, the gating threshold-the pressure needed to open the pores-can be rationally tuned over a wide pressure range. This enables us to realize in one system differential response profiles for a variety of liquids and gases, even letting liquids flow through the pore while preventing gas from escaping. These capabilities allow us to dynamically modulate gas-liquid sorting in a microfluidic flow and to separate a three-phase air-water-oil mixture, with the liquid lining ensuring sustained antifouling behaviour. Because the liquid gating strategy enables efficient long-term operation and can be applied to a variety of pore structures and membrane materials, and to micro- as well as macroscale fluid systems, we expect it to prove useful in a wide range of applications.

  13. Applying risk assessment principles to a batch distillation column

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.L.; Moosemiller, M.D.

    1996-12-31

    Some distillation columns in the chemical industry are operated in batch mode with a fairly short operating cycle. At the end of each cycle the columns are cooled and recharged. During the cooling cycle, air will be drawn into the column by the action of a vacuum relief valve. Consequently, for a finite portion of the operating cycle a flammable mixture will exist in the column. Here we evaluate the risk posed by such an operation to see if a mitigation measure is justified. We develop a fault tree and estimate the frequency of ignition by all possible ignition sources. By comparing the risk reduction attainable by installing a lightning protection system with that attainable by using an inert blanketing system the lightning protection system is found to be the preferred solution. It provides about the same risk reduction at a lower overall cost. 2 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Multi-phase Thermohaline Convection in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, S.; Driesner, T.; Matthai, S. K.; Heinrich, C. A.

    2003-12-01

    The simultaneous motion of heat and dissolved solutes by aqueous or magmatic fluids through porous or fractured media within the earth's crust is a key factor that drives many important geological processes, such as the formation of large ore deposits, cooling of new-formed oceanic crust along mid-ocean ridges, metamorphism, or the evolution of geothermal systems. The motion of such crustal fluids is usually dominated by convection due to density differences within the fluids that arise from pressure, temperature and compositional variations present in the fluids. Oxygen isotope data and fluid inclusion data indicate that fluids may percolate down to 15 km depth and experience temperatures exceeding 700 {o}C. Although crustal fluids commonly contain various dissolved chemical components and gases, the most abundant solute is salt, i.e. NaCl. Hence, changes in the concentration of NaCl influence the density variations of crustal fluids the most. The presence of NaCl in H2O has decisive effects on the thermodynamics and hydrodynamics of crustal fluids. NaCl-H2O fluids can boil and separate into a high-density brine and low-salinity vapor at much higher temperatures and pressures than the critical temperature and pressure for pure H2O. NaCl-H2O fluids may also become saturated with respect to NaCl such that a solid NaCl phase coexists with a liquid or vapor fluid phase. Because salt advects faster than heat but diffuses slower than heat, the resulting double-diffusive and double-convective motion of salt and heat may lead to non-linear flow instabilities such as periodic or chaotic behavior. While many studies have addressed the theory of convection driven by temperature and/or salinity gradients, they were limited to a Boussinesq approximation and neglected phase separation. In this study we have numerically examined the behavior of multi-phase thermohaline convection in a porous media heated and salted from below using a novel finite element - finite volume

  15. Impact of normal stress on multiphase flow through rough fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves da Silva Junior, J.; Kang, P. K.; Yang, Z.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid flow and transport through geologic fractures plays a key role in several areas such as groundwater hydrology, geothermal energy, oil and gas production, CO2 sequestration and nuclear waste disposal. High-permeability zones associated with fracture corridors often serve as fast fluid conduits for both single and multiphase flow in otherwise low-permeability media. When multiphase flow occurs, the presence of one phase interferes with the flow of the other phase, resulting in complex displacement patterns through the fracture, and macroscopic descriptors (such as fracture-scale capillary pressure and relative permeability) that depend on the phase concentration of both phases. Here, we investigate the impact of normal stress on single and multiphase flow through rough-walled fractures: (1) we generate synthetic aperture fields that honor the fractal roughness structure observed in real fractures; (2) we model the effect of normal stress on the fracture aperture geometry by solving the contact problem between fracture walls; and (3) we use invasion percolation with trapping to model immiscible fluid displacement and then compute relative permeability numerically for each stress scenario. Our results indicate that normal stress increases the amount of contact area in the fracture wall, which results in an increase of the tortuosity of the available path for fluid displacement. Increasing normal stress results in low relative permeability for the wetting phase due to a decrease of the available path for fluid flow, and therefore a small amount of non-wetting fluid has a large impact on the flow of the wetting fluid. We find that the relative permeability of the non-wetting fluid shows less variation with stress than the wetting fluid, and that both fluids exhibit strong phase interference at intermediate saturations. Finally, we show early results from our experimental work currently underway to validate the modeling results.

  16. The effect of drag reducing agent in multiphase flow pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, C.; Vancho, R.M. Jr.; Jepson, W.P.; Green, A.S.; Kerr, H.

    1998-12-31

    The effect of drag reducing agents (DRA) on pressure gradient and flow regime has been studied in horizontal and 2 degree inclination. Experiments were conducted for full pipe, stratified, slug, and annular flow in a 10 cm inside diameter, 18 m long plexiglass section and inclinable flow loops from horizontal to vertical. Superficial liquid velocity between 0.06 and 1.5 m/s and superficial gas velocity between 1 and 14 m/s were studied. The DRA effectiveness was examined for DRA concentrations between 0 and 75 ppm. The results indicate that DRA was effective in reducing the pressure gradients in single and multiphase flow. The DRA was more effective for lower superficial liquid velocities and gas velocities for both single phase and multiphase flow. The DRA was effective to reduce pressure gradients up to 42% for full pipe flow, 91% for stratified flow and up to 35% for annular flow in horizontal pipes. Kang, Wilkens and Jepson (1996) showed that the stratified flow disappears entirely and slug flow dominates the flow regime map in inclined upward flow. In 2 degree inclination, the pressure gradient reduction for slug flow with a concentration of 50 ppm DRA is 28% and 38% at superficial gas velocities of 2 and 6 m/s respectively. Flow regimes maps with DRA were determined in horizontal pipes. The transition to the slug flow with DRA was observed to occur at a higher superficial liquid due to higher liquid flow rates. There is a conspicuous absence of drag reduction work for multiphase (oil-water-gas) flow in horizontal and inclined pipes.

  17. CSIRO's multiphase reaction models and their industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Jahanshahi, S.; Sun, S.; Chen, C.; Bourke, B.; Wright, S.; Somerville, M.

    2002-11-01

    The status and ongoing work on a multiphase reaction model developed at the Commonwealth Scientific & Industrial Research Organization are outlined in this article. The package enables metallurgists to simulate reactions in pyrometallurgical processes with respect to equilibrium between various phases and to calculate slag viscosity at elevated temperatures. The models have been validated against measurements on physico-chemical properties of melts and solid phases produced in industrial processes. A number of examples of the application of the package to ferrous and non-ferrous smelting and refining processes are presented.

  18. Transient oxidation of multiphase Ni-Cr base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, G.; Meraner, M.; Farrell, P.

    1988-06-01

    Four commercially available Ni-Cr-based alloys used with porcelain enamels were studied. Major alloying elements were Al, Be, Si, B, Nb, and Mo. All alloys were multiphase. During heat treatments simulating enameling conditions, phase changes occurred in most alloys and were detected using hardness testing, differential thermal analysis (DTA), and microscopy. Oxidation of these alloys at 1000/degrees/C for 10 min produced an oxide layer consisting principally of chromium oxide, but the oxide morphology varied with each alloy depending on the alloy microstructure. Controlling alloy microstructure while keeping the overall composition unchanged may be a means of preventing wrinkled poorly adherent scales from forming.

  19. Multiphase problems related to safety studies in the process industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, R. Grollier

    Safety risk and analysis, particularly in the petrochemical industry, are discussed. Multiphase flow problems resulting from loss of confinement are described: rupture of long pipes used for transporting liquefied gas; rupture of short pipes and branch connections in an installation; rupture of a container holding liquefied gas or another liquid at a temperature higher than its normal boiling temperature; and rupture of a container holding gas in the supercritical state. Operation of valves and rupture disks during reaction runaway; and artificial dispersion of gas layers are considered.

  20. Characterizing the stretch-flangeability of hot rolled multiphase steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, N.; Butcher, C.; Worswick, M.; Gao, J.

    2013-12-16

    Hole expansion tests are commonly used to characterize the edge stretching limit of a material. Traditionally, a conical punch is used to expand a punched hole until a through-thickness crack appears. However, many automotive stretch flanging operations involve in-plane edge stretching that is best captured with a flat punch. In this paper, hole expansion tests were carried out on two different hot-rolled multiphase steels using both flat and conical punches. The fracture mechanisms for both punch types were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  1. Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    White, Mark D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Wurstner, Signe K.

    2011-04-01

    Carbonation of formation minerals converts low viscosity supercritical CO2 injected into deep saline reservoirs for geologic sequestration into an immobile form. Until recently the scientific focus of mineralization reactions with reservoir rocks has been those that follow an aqueous-mediated dissolution/precipitation mechanism, driven by the sharp reduction in pH that occurs with CO2 partitioning into the aqueous phase. For sedimentary basin formations the kinetics of aqueous-mediated dissolution/precipitation reactions are sufficiently slow to make the role of mineralization trapping insignificant over a century period. For basaltic saline formations aqueous-phase mineralization progresses at a substantially higher rate, making the role of mineralization trapping significant, if not dominant, over a century period. The overlooked mineralization reactions for both sedimentary and basaltic saline formations, however, are those that occur in liquid or supercritical CO2 phase; where, dissolved water appears to play a catalyst role in the formation of carbonate minerals. A model is proposed in this paper that describes mineral carbonation over sequestration reservoir conditions ranging from dissolved CO2 in aqueous brine to dissolved water in supercritical CO2. The model theory is based on a review of recent experiments directed at understanding the role of water in mineral carbonation reactions of interest in geologic sequestration systems occurring under low water contents.

  2. Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges

    1995-03-01

    MFIX is a general-purpose hydrodynamic model that describes chemical reactions and heat transfer in dense or dilute fluid-solids flows, flows typically occurring in energy conversion and chemical processing reactors. With such information, the engineer can visualize the conditions in the reactor, conduct parametric studies and what-if experiments, and, thereby, assist in the design process. MFIX has the following modeling capabilities: mass and momentum balance equations for gas and multiple solids phases; a gas phase andmore » two solids phase energy equation; an arbitrary number of species balance equations for each of the phases; granular stress equations based on kinetic theory and frictional flow theory; a user-defined chemistry subroutine; three-dimensional Cartesin or cylindrical coordinate systems; nonuniform mesh size; impermeable and semi-permeable internal surfaces; user-friendly input data file; multiple, single-precision, binary direct-access output files that minimize disk storage and accelerate data retrieval; extensive error reporting; post-processors for creating animations and for extracting and manipulating output data.« less

  3. Mitigation of Liquefaction in Sandy Soils Using Stone Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selcuk, Levent; Kayabalı, Kamil

    2010-05-01

    Soil liquefaction is one of the leading causes of earthquake-induced damage to structures. Soil improvement methods provide effective solutions to reduce the risk of soil liquefaction. Thus, soil ground treatments are applied using various techniques. However, except for a few ground treatment methods, they generally require a high cost and a lot of time. Especially in order to prevent the risk of soil liquefaction, stone columns conctructed by vibro-systems (vibro-compaction, vibro-replacement) are one of the traditional geotechnical methods. The construction of stone columns not only enhances the ability of clean sand to drain excess pore water during an earthquake, but also increases the relative density of the soil. Thus, this application prevents the development of the excess pore water pressure in sand during earthquakes and keeps the pore pressure ratio below a certain value. This paper presents the stone column methods used against soil liquefaction in detail. At this stage, (a) the performances of the stone columns were investigated in different spacing and diameters of columns during past earthquakes, (b) recent studies about design and field applications of stone columns were presented, and (c) a new design method considering the relative density of soil and the capacity of drenage of columns were explained in sandy soil. Furthermore, with this new method, earthquake performances of the stone columns constructed at different areas were investigated before the 1989 Loma Prieta and the 1994 Northbridge earthquakes, as case histories of field applications, and design charts were compiled for suitable spacing and diameters of stone columns with consideration to the different sandy soil parameters and earhquake conditions. Key Words: Soil improvement, stone column, excess pore water pressure

  4. Shortcut models and feasibility considerations for emerging batch distillation columns

    SciTech Connect

    Lotter, S.P.; Diwekar, U.M.

    1997-03-01

    The transient nature and flexibility of batch distillation allow for configuring the column in a number of different ways. Some of the new configurations are an inverted column, a middle vessel column, and a multivessel column. These new column configurations have also provided new ways of operation. The preliminary analysis of these emerging columns has shown promising behavior, because of the added flexibility. This added flexibility is especially interesting for a chemical industry where the quantity and lifetime of the products are uncertain, but it has also made the analysis of the system more difficult. Shortcut procedures provide an easy way of understanding the global behavior of complex systems. In this paper the authors are presenting shortcut procedures for the newly described batch distillation column configurations. The transient profiles obtained by the proposed shortcut procedures and rigorous models are compared using extensive test cases. Global qualitative properties and feasibility criteria are derived for these new designs, and a detailed analysis of these configurations is also presented.

  5. Investigation of Gas Holdup in a Vibrating Bubble Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohagheghian, Shahrouz; Elbing, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic fuels are part of the solution to the world's energy crisis and climate change. Liquefaction of coal during the Fischer-Tropsch process in a bubble column reactor (BCR) is a key step in production of synthetic fuel. It is known from the 1960's that vibration improves mass transfer in bubble column. The current study experimentally investigates the effect that vibration frequency and amplitude has on gas holdup and bubble size distribution within a bubble column. Air (disperse phase) was injected into water (continuous phase) through a needle shape injector near the bottom of the column, which was open to atmospheric pressure. The air volumetric flow rate was measured with a variable area flow meter. Vibrations were generated with a custom-made shaker table, which oscillated the entire column with independently specified amplitude and frequency (0-30 Hz). Geometric dependencies can be investigated with four cast acrylic columns with aspect ratios ranging from 4.36 to 24, and injector needle internal diameters between 0.32 and 1.59 mm. The gas holdup within the column was measured with a flow visualization system, and a PIV system was used to measure phase velocities. Preliminary results for the non-vibrating and vibrating cases will be presented.

  6. Multiphase Rayleigh Fractionation Redux and the Laramie-Kiglapait Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, S. A.; Scoates, J. S.; Lindsley, D. H.

    2006-05-01

    Three distinct paths occur in multicomponent Rayleigh fractionation, two as limits and the third as a resultant. The limiting DEPLETION effect, brought to our attention by Paul Asimow, causes a rapid evolution of a binary solution by itself in the presence of another component, as the quantity of liquid remains high when a second phase fails to crystallize. The limiting EXTENDED COTECTIC effect occurs when the crystallizing region is re- supplied from an infinite reservoir within the magma chamber. The resultant of the two is exactly equal to fractionation on the PURE BINARY. The MELTS algorithm recognizes the depletion effect and a cotectic that lies on the binary. Multiphase Rayleigh fractionation (MRF; Morse 2005, ChemGeo 226/3-4:212) recognizes the extended cotectic effect. Natural cotectic systems tend to occupy the entire region from the binary to the extended cotectic. Experimental fractionation mimics the infinite reservoir effect and closely matches the evolution of plagioclase and olivine in the Kiglapait Intrusion (KI). MRF describes the evolution of binary solutions taken one at a time in cotectic systems. It is aided by the linear partitioning principle D = KD*X2S +X1S, where D is the partition coefficient X1S/X1L, X is the mole (mass, atom) fraction, S and L are solid and liquid, and the exchange coefficient KD is the intercept of D at pure (2), from which D runs to 1.0 at pure (1); (Morse, 2000 GCA 64:2309). Stepwise fractionation calculations describe the evolution of D, X1L = C, and Co in the Rayleigh equation C=CoF(L)(D-1), where the fraction of liquid remaining, F(L), is the leading variable. The two limiting paths of fractionation are found by applying an operator, the fraction f(alpha) of the active phase, to the Rayleigh exponent (D-1). The depletion path is generated by (D-1)/f(alpha); the extended cotectic path is generated by f(alpha)(D-1), and the cotectic path is generated by both together, hence f(alpha)(D- 1)/f(alpha) = (D-1), which

  7. FRACTIONATING COLUMN PRODUCT COLLECTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Paxson, G.D. Jr.

    1964-03-10

    Means for detecting minute fluid products from a chemical separation column and for advancing a collector tube rack in order to automatically separate and collect successive fractionated products are described. A charge is imposed on the forming drops at the column orifice to create an electric field as the drop falls in the vicinity of a sensing plate. The field is detected by an electrometer tube coupled to the plate causing an output signal to actuate rotation of a collector turntable rack, thereby positioning new collectors under the orifice. The invention provides reliable automatic collection independent of drop size, rate of fall, or chemical composition. (AEC)

  8. Sample Size Requirements in Single- and Multiphase Growth Mixture Models: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Su-Young

    2012-01-01

    Just as growth mixture models are useful with single-phase longitudinal data, multiphase growth mixture models can be used with multiple-phase longitudinal data. One of the practically important issues in single- and multiphase growth mixture models is the sample size requirements for accurate estimation. In a Monte Carlo simulation study, the…

  9. Ion chromatographic separation of inorganic ions using a combination of hydrophilic interaction chromatographic column and cation-exchange resin column.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kaori; Mori, Masanobu; Hironaga, Takahiro; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2012-04-01

    A combination of hydrophilic interaction chromatographic (HILIC) column and a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin (WCX) column was used for simultaneous separation of inorganic anions and cations by ion chromatography (IC). Firstly, the capability of HILIC column for the separation of analyte ions was evaluated under acidic eluent conditions. The columns used were SeQuant ZIC-HILIC (ZIC-HILIC) with a sulfobetaine-zwitterion stationary phase (ZIC-HILIC) and Acclaim HILIC-10 with a diol stationary phase (HILIC-10). When using tartaric acid as the eluent, the HILIC columns indicated strong retentions for anions, based on ion-pair interaction. Especially, HILIC-10 could strongly retain anions compared with ZIC-HILIC. The selectivity for analyte anions of HILIC-10 with 5 mmol/L tartaric acid eluent was in the order of I(-) > NO3(-) > Br(-) > Cl(-) > H2PO4(-). However, since HILIC-10 could not separate analyte cations, a WCX column (TSKgel Super IC-A/C) was connected after the HILIC column in series. The combination column system of HILIC and WCX columns could successfully separate ten ions (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, H2PO4(-), Cl(-), Br(-), NO3(-) and I(-)) with elution of 4 mmol/L tartaric acid plus 8 mmol/L 18-crown-6. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of analyte ions by the system were in the ranges of 0.02% - 0.05% in retention times and 0.18% - 5.3% in peak areas through three-time successive injections. The limits of detection at signal-to-noise ratio of 3 were 0.24 - 0.30 micromol/L for the cations and 0.31 - 1.2 micromol/L for the anions. This system was applied for the simultaneous determination of the cations and the anions in a vegetable juice sample with satisfactory results.

  10. Systems and methods for separating a multiphase fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor); Thomas, Evan A. (Inventor); Graf, John C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for separating a fluid are provided. The apparatus can include a separator and a collector having an internal volume defined at least in part by one or more surfaces narrowing toward a bottom portion of the volume. The separator can include an exit port oriented toward the bottom portion of the volume. The internal volume can receive a fluid expelled from the separator into a flow path in the collector and the flow path can include at least two directional transitions within the collector.

  11. Multi-phase functionally graded materials for thermal barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.R.; Ritter, A.M.; Gigliotti, M.F.; Kaya, A.C.; Gallo, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    Jet engine and gas turbine hot section components can be protected from the 1,350--1,650 C combustion gases by thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Metallic candidates for functionally graded material (FGM) coatings have been evaluated for potential use in bonding zirconia to a single crystal superalloy. Properties for four materials were studied for the low-expansion layer adjacent to the ceramic. Ingots were produced for these materials, and oxidation, expansion and modulus were determined. A finite element model was used to study effects of varying the FGM layers. Elastic modulus dominated stress generation, and a 20--25% reduction in thermal stress generated within the zirconia layer may be possible.

  12. A Second Order JFNK-based IMEX Method for Single and Multi-phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Samet Kadioglu; Dana Knoll; Mark Sussman; Richard Martineau

    2010-07-01

    Abstract We present a second order time accurate IMplicit/EXplicit (IMEX) method for solving single and multi-phase flow problems. The algorithm consists of a combination of an explicit and an implicit blocks. The explicit block solves the non-stiff parts of the governing system whereas the implicit block operates on the stiff terms. In our self-conisstent IMEX implementation, the explicit part is always executed inside the implicit block as part of the nonlinear functions evaluation making use of the Jacobian-freeNewton Krylov (JFNK) method [7]. This leads to an implicitly balanced algorithm in that all non-linearities due to the coupling of different time terms are consistently converged. In this paper, we present computational results when this IMEX strategy is applied to single/multi-phase incompressible flow models. Samet

  13. A Coupled Model of Multiphase Flow, Reactive Biogeochemical Transport, Thermal Transport and Geo-Mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C. H.; Yeh, G. T.

    2015-12-01

    In this investigation, a coupled model of multiphase flow, reactive biogeochemical transport, thermal transport and geo-mechanics in subsurface media is presented. It iteratively solves the mass conservation equation for fluid flow, thermal transport equation for temperature, reactive biogeochemical transport equations for concentration distributions, and solid momentum equation for displacement with successive linearization algorithm. With species-based equations of state, density of a phase in the system is obtained by summing up concentrations of all species. This circumvents the problem of having to use empirical functions. Moreover, reaction rates of all species are incorporated in mass conservation equation for fluid flow. Formation enthalpy of all species is included in the law of energy conservation as a source-sink term. Finite element methods are used to discretize the governing equations. Numerical experiments are presented to examine the accuracy and robustness of the proposed model. The results demonstrate the feasibility and capability of present model in subsurface media.

  14. Preparation and quantification of radioactive particles for tracking hydrodynamic behavior in multiphase reactors.

    PubMed

    Yunos, Mohd Amirul Syafiq Mohd; Hussain, Siti Aslina; Yusoff, Hamdan Mohamed; Abdullah, Jaafar

    2014-09-01

    Radioactive particle tracking (RPT) has emerged as a promising and versatile technique that can provide rich information about a variety of multiphase flow systems. However, RPT is not an off-the-shelf technique, and thus, users must customize RPT for their applications. This paper presents a simple procedure for preparing radioactive tracer particles created via irradiation with neutrons from the TRIGA Mark II research reactor. The present study focuses on the performance evaluation of encapsulated gold and scandium particles for applications as individual radioactive tracer particles using qualitative and quantitative neutron activation analysis (NAA) and an X-ray microcomputed tomography (X-ray Micro-CT) scanner installed at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency.

  15. Progress in the Development of Compressible, Multiphase Flow Modeling Capability for Nuclear Reactor Flow Applications

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Berry; R. Saurel; F. Petitpas; E. Daniel; O. Le Metayer; S. Gavrilyuk; N. Dovetta

    2008-10-01

    In nuclear reactor safety and optimization there are key issues that rely on in-depth understanding of basic two-phase flow phenomena with heat and mass transfer. Within the context of multiphase flows, two bubble-dynamic phenomena – boiling (heterogeneous) and flashing or cavitation (homogeneous boiling), with bubble collapse, are technologically very important to nuclear reactor systems. The main difference between boiling and flashing is that bubble growth (and collapse) in boiling is inhibited by limitations on the heat transfer at the interface, whereas bubble growth (and collapse) in flashing is limited primarily by inertial effects in the surrounding liquid. The flashing process tends to be far more explosive (and implosive), and is more violent and damaging (at least in the near term) than the bubble dynamics of boiling. However, other problematic phenomena, such as crud deposition, appear to be intimately connecting with the boiling process. In reality, these two processes share many details.

  16. Density and Cavitating Flow Results from a Full-Scale Optical Multiphase Cryogenic Flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korman, Valentin

    2007-01-01

    Liquid propulsion systems are hampered by poor flow measurements. The measurement of flow directly impacts safe motor operations, performance parameters as well as providing feedback from ground testing and developmental work. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in an effort to improve propulsion sensor technology, has developed an all optical flow meter that directly measures the density of the fluid. The full-scale sensor was tested in a transient, multiphase liquid nitrogen fluid environment. Comparison with traditional density models shows excellent agreement with fluid density with an error of approximately 0.8%. Further evaluation shows the sensor is able to detect cavitation or bubbles in the flow stream and separate out their resulting effects in fluid density.

  17. Effect of multiphase slug flow on the stability of corrosion product layer

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, M.; Rajappa, S.

    1999-11-01

    Corrosion experiments were carried out under iron carbonate scale-forming conditions in a large diameter, multiphase flow system. Both oil/water and oil/water/gas slug flows were studied at pressures up to 0.79 MPa and temperatures of 60 C and 80 C. It was found that with increasing iron concentration, the corrosion rates were reduced to negligible values in oil/water flows. However, significant corrosion was seen in slug flow with clear evidence of damage to the corrosion product layer due to impact and possible collapse of gas bubbles and a considerable reduction in the layer thickness. Details of corrosion rates and corrosion coupon surface analysis are presented.

  18. Slip transfer and dislocation nucleation processes in multiphase ordered Ni-Fe-Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, A.; Bibala

    1999-04-01

    Directionally solidified (DS) alloys with the nominal composition Ni-30 at. pct Fe-20 at. pct Al having eutectic microstructures were used to study slip transfer across interphase boundaries and dislocation nucleation at the interfacial steps. The slip transfer from the ductile second phase, {gamma}(fcc) containing ordered {gamma}{prime}(L1{sub 2}) precipitates, to the ordered {beta}(B2) phase and the generation of dislocations at the interface steps were interpreted using the mechanisms proposed for similar processes involving grain boundaries in polycrystalline single-phase materials. The criteria for predicting the slip systems activated as a result of slip transfer across grain boundaries were found to be applicable for interphase boundaries in the multiphase ordered Ni-Fe-Al alloys. The potential of tailoring the microstructures and interfaces to promote slip transfer and thereby enhance the intrinsic ductility of dislocation-density-limited intermetallic alloys is discussed.

  19. A Two-Dimensional Multiphase Model of Biofilm Formation in Microfluidic Chambers.

    PubMed

    Whidden, Mark; Cogan, Nick; Donahue, Matt; Navarrete, Fernando; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa is the causal agent of many pathological conditions of economically important agricultural crops. There is no known cure for X. fastidiosa diseases, and management of the problem is based solely in controlling the population of insect vectors, which is somewhat effective. The bacterium causes disease by forming biofilms inside the vascular system of the plant, a process that is poorly understood. In microfluidic chambers, used as artificial xylem vessels, this bacterium has been observed to reproducibly cluster into a distinct, regular pattern of aggregates, spatially separated by channels of non-biofilm components. We develop a multiphase model in two dimensions, which recapitulates this spatial patterning, suggesting that bacterial growth and attachment/detachment processes are strongly influential modulators of these patterns. This indicates plausible strategies, such as the addition of metals and chelators, for mitigating the severity of diseases induced by this bacterial pathogen. PMID:26621357

  20. Preparation and quantification of radioactive particles for tracking hydrodynamic behavior in multiphase reactors.

    PubMed

    Yunos, Mohd Amirul Syafiq Mohd; Hussain, Siti Aslina; Yusoff, Hamdan Mohamed; Abdullah, Jaafar

    2014-09-01

    Radioactive particle tracking (RPT) has emerged as a promising and versatile technique that can provide rich information about a variety of multiphase flow systems. However, RPT is not an off-the-shelf technique, and thus, users must customize RPT for their applications. This paper presents a simple procedure for preparing radioactive tracer particles created via irradiation with neutrons from the TRIGA Mark II research reactor. The present study focuses on the performance evaluation of encapsulated gold and scandium particles for applications as individual radioactive tracer particles using qualitative and quantitative neutron activation analysis (NAA) and an X-ray microcomputed tomography (X-ray Micro-CT) scanner installed at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency. PMID:24907683