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Sample records for multiple antigen binding

  1. Polyomavirus Large T Antigen Binds Cooperatively to Its Multiple Binding Sites in the Viral Origin of DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yu-Cai; Acheson, Nicholas H.

    1998-01-01

    Polyomavirus large T antigen binds to multiple 5′-G(A/G)GGC-3′ pentanucleotide sequences in sites 1/2, A, B, and C within and adjacent to the origin of viral DNA replication on the polyomavirus genome. We asked whether the binding of large T antigen to one of these sites could influence binding to other sites. We discovered that binding to origin DNA is substantially stronger at pH 6 to 7 than at pH 7.4 to 7.8, a range often used in DNA binding assays. Large T antigen-DNA complexes formed at pH 6 to 7 were stable, but a fraction of these complexes dissociated at pH 7.6 and above upon dilution or during electrophoresis. Increased binding at low pH is therefore due at least in part to increased stability of protein-DNA complexes, and binding at higher pH values is reversible. Binding to fragments of origin DNA in which one or more sites were deleted or inactivated by point mutations was measured by nitrocellulose filter binding and DNase I footprinting. The results showed that large T antigen binds cooperatively to its four binding sites in viral DNA, suggesting that the binding of this protein to one of these sites stabilizes its binding to other sites via protein-protein contacts. Sites A, B, and C may therefore augment DNA replication by facilitating the binding of large T antigen to site 1/2 at the replication origin. ATP stabilized large T antigen-DNA complexes against dissociation in the presence, but not the absence, of site 1/2, and ATP specifically enhanced protection against DNase I digestion in the central 10 to 12 bp of site 1/2, at which hexamers are believed to form and begin unwinding DNA. We propose that large T antigen molecules bound to these multiple sites on origin DNA interact with each other to form a compact protein-DNA complex and, furthermore, that ATP stimulates their assembly into hexamers at site 1/2 by a “handover” mechanism mediated by these protein-protein contacts. PMID:9696829

  2. Multiple antigen peptide dendrimer elicits antibodies for detecting rat and mouse growth hormone binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Roberto M.; Talamantes, Frank J.; Bustamante, Juan J.; Muñoz, Jesus; Treviño, Lisa R.; Martinez, Andrew O.; Haro, Luis S.

    2009-01-01

    The membrane-bound rat growth hormone receptor (GH-R) and an alternatively spliced isoform, the soluble rat GH binding protein (GH-BP), are comprised of identical N-terminal GH binding domains, however, their C-terminal sequences differ. Immunological reagents are needed to distinguish between the two isoforms in order to understand their respective roles in mediating the actions of GH. Accordingly, a tetravalent multiple antigen peptide (MAP) dendrimer with four identical branches of a C-terminal peptide sequence of the rat GH-BP (GH-BP263-279) was synthesized and used as an immunogen in rabbits. Solid-phase peptide synthesis of four GH-BP263-279 segments onto a tetravalent Lys2-Lys-β-Ala-OH core peptide was carried out using N-(9-fluorenyl)methoxycarbonyl chemistry. The mass of the RP-HPLC purified synthetic product, 8398 Da, determined by ESI-MS, was identical to expected mass. Three anti-rat GH-BP263-279 MAP antisera, BETO-8039, BETO-8040 and BETO-8041, at dilutions of 10-3, recognized both the rat GH-BP263-279 MAP and recombinant mouse GH-BP with ED50s within a range of 5-10 fmol but did not cross-react with BSA in dot blot analyses. BETO-8041 antisera (10-3 dilution) recognized GH-BPs of rat serum and liver having Mrs ranging from 35-130 kDa but did not recognize full-length rat GH-Rs. The antisera also detected recombinant mouse GH-BPs. In summary, the tetravalent rat GH-BP263-279 MAP dendrimer served as an effective immunogenic antigen in eliciting high titer antisera specific for the C-termini of both rat and mouse GH-BPs. The antisera will facilitate studies aimed at improving our understanding of the biology of GH-BPs. PMID:19089805

  3. Calcium-dependent antigen binding as a novel modality for antibody recycling by endosomal antigen dissociation.

    PubMed

    Hironiwa, N; Ishii, S; Kadono, S; Iwayanagi, Y; Mimoto, F; Habu, K; Igawa, T; Hattori, K

    2016-01-01

    The pH-dependent antigen binding antibody, termed a recycling antibody, has recently been reported as an attractive type of second-generation engineered therapeutic antibody. A recycling antibody can dissociate antigen in the acidic endosome, and thus bind to its antigen multiple times. As a consequence, a recycling antibody can neutralize large amounts of antigen in plasma. Because this approach relies on histidine residues to achieve pH-dependent antigen binding, which could limit the epitopes that can be targeted and affect the rate of antigen dissociation in the endosome, we explored an alternative approach for generating recycling antibodies. Since calcium ion concentration is known to be lower in endosome than in plasma, we hypothesized that an antibody with antigen-binding properties that are calcium-dependent could be used as recycling antibody. Here, we report a novel anti-interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibody, identified from a phage library that binds to IL-6R only in the presence of a calcium ion. Thermal dynamics and a crystal structure study revealed that the calcium ion binds to the heavy chain CDR3 region (HCDR3), which changes and possibly stabilizes the structure of HCDR3 to make it bind to antigen calcium dependently (PDB 5AZE). In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that this calcium-dependent antigen-binding antibody can dissociate its antigen in the endosome and accelerate antigen clearance from plasma, making it a novel approach for generating recycling antibody.

  4. Human Milk IgGs Contain Various Combinations of Different Antigen-Binding Sites Resulting in Multiple Variants of their Bispecificity

    PubMed Central

    Sedykh, Sergey E.; Buneva, Valentina N.; Nevinsky, Georgy A.

    2012-01-01

    In the classic paradigm, immunoglobulins represent products of clonal B cell populations, each producing antibodies (Abs) recognizing a single antigen. There is a common belief that IgGs in mammalian biological fluids are monovalent molecules having stable structures and two identical antigen-binding sites. However, human milk IgGs to different antigens undergo extensive half-molecule exchange. In the IgGs pool, only 33±5% and 13±5% of Abs contained light chains exclusively of kappa- or lambda-type, respectively, while 54±10% of the IgGs contained both kappa- and lambda- light chains. All Ab preparations contained different amounts of IgGs of all four subclasses. Interestingly, lambda-IgGs contained an increased amount of IgG2 (87%) and only 3–6% of each of IgG1, IgG3, and IgG4, while kappa-IgGs consisted of comparable (17–32%) amounts of all IgG subtypes. Chimeric kappa-lambda-IgGs consisted of ∼74% IgG1, ∼16% IgG2, ∼5% IgG3 and ∼5% IgG4. As the result of the exchange, all IgG fractions eluted from several specific affinity sorbents under the conditions destroying strong immunocomplexes demonstrated high catalytic activities in hydrolysis of ATP, DNA, oligosaccharides, phosphorylation of proteins, lipids, and oligosaccharides. In vitro, an addition of reduced glutathione and milk plasma to two IgG fractions with different affinity for DNA-cellulose led to a transition of 25–60% of Ab of one fraction to the other fraction. Our data are indicative of the possibility of half-molecule exchange between milk IgGs of various subclasses, raised against different antigens (including abzymes), which explains the polyspecificity and cross-reactivity of these IgGs. PMID:22912765

  5. Structural Consensus among Antibodies Defines the Antigen Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Kunik, Vered; Peters, Bjoern; Ofran, Yanay

    2012-01-01

    The Complementarity Determining Regions (CDRs) of antibodies are assumed to account for the antigen recognition and binding and thus to contain also the antigen binding site. CDRs are typically discerned by searching for regions that are most different, in sequence or in structure, between different antibodies. Here, we show that ∼20% of the antibody residues that actually bind the antigen fall outside the CDRs. However, virtually all antigen binding residues lie in regions of structural consensus across antibodies. Furthermore, we show that these regions of structural consensus which cover the antigen binding site are identifiable from the sequence of the antibody. Analyzing the predicted contribution of antigen binding residues to the stability of the antibody-antigen complex, we show that residues that fall outside of the traditionally defined CDRs are at least as important to antigen binding as residues within the CDRs, and in some cases, they are even more important energetically. Furthermore, antigen binding residues that fall outside of the structural consensus regions but within traditionally defined CDRs show a marginal energetic contribution to antigen binding. These findings allow for systematic and comprehensive identification of antigen binding sites, which can improve the understanding of antigenic interactions and may be useful in antibody engineering and B-cell epitope identification. PMID:22383868

  6. An anti-human immunodeficiency virus multiple antigen peptide encompassing the cleavage region of the env precursor interferes with membrane fusion at a post-CD4 binding step.

    PubMed

    Barbouche, R; Decroly, E; Kieny, M P; Fenouillet, E

    2000-07-20

    CLIV is a multiple antigen peptide ([PTKAKRRVVQREKR](4)-K(2)-K-betaA) that encompasses the cleavage region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope precursor. It displays an antiviral activity against HIV-1 and HIV-2 and inhibits HIV-1 Env-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. This effect has previously been attributed to interference with Env processing, resulting in the expression of a nonfusogenic envelope [Virology (1998) 247, 137]. However, we show here that CLIV does not alter the status of Env cleavage at steady state. Using various aggregation/syncytium assays that allow us to discriminate between gp120/CD4 binding and binding followed by gp41-mediated fusion, we demonstrate that CLIV inhibits a step of the cell-to-cell fusion process after CD4 binding. We demonstrate also that CLIV binds at 37 degrees C to a single class of protein present at the CD4(+) cell surface (Scatchard analysis: K(d) = 8 nM; B(max) = 10(4) sites/cell) and that the fusion inhibition activity seems to correlate with binding to this proteic component. In contrast, CLIV interacts with neither membrane-inserted nor CD4-associated Env. We therefore propose that CLIV interferes after Env/CD4 binding with a step of the membrane fusion process that may involve the C-terminal domain of gp120. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  7. Class II HLA antigens in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D H; Hornabrook, R W; Dagger, J; Fong, R

    1989-01-01

    HLA typing in Wellington revealed a stronger association of multiple sclerosis with DR2 than with DQw1. The association with DQw1 appeared to be due to linkage disequilibrium of this antigen with DR2. These results, when considered in conjunction with other studies, are most easily explained by the hypothesis that susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is influenced by multiple risk factors, with DR2 being an important risk factor in Caucasoid populations. PMID:2732726

  8. Small molecule inhibitor of antigen binding and presentation by HLA-DR2b as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Niannian; Somanaboeina, Animesh; Dixit, Aakanksha; Kawamura, Kazuyuki; Hayward, Neil J; Self, Christopher; Olson, Gary L; Forsthuber, Thomas G

    2013-11-15

    The strong association of HLA-DR2b (DRB1*1501) with multiple sclerosis (MS) suggests this molecule as prime target for specific immunotherapy. Inhibition of HLA-DR2b-restricted myelin-specific T cells has the potential to selectively prevent CNS pathology mediated by these MHC molecules without undesired global immunosuppression. In this study, we report development of a highly selective small molecule inhibitor of peptide binding and presentation by HLA-DR2b. PV-267, the candidate molecule used in these studies, inhibited cytokine production and proliferation of myelin-specific HLA-DR2b-restricted T cells. PV-267 had no significant effect on T cell responses mediated by other MHC class II molecules, including HLA-DR1, -DR4, or -DR9. Importantly, PV-267 did not induce nonspecific immune activation of human PBMC. Lastly, PV-267 showed treatment efficacy both in preventing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and in treating established disease. The results suggest that blocking the MS-associated HLA-DR2b allele with small molecule inhibitors may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of MS.

  9. Does antibody binding to diverse antigens predict future infection?

    PubMed

    Owen, J P; Waite, J L; Holden, K Z; Clayton, D H

    2014-11-01

    We studied diverse antigen binding in hosts and the outcome of parasitism. We used captive-bred F1 descendants of feral rock pigeons (Columba livia) challenged with blood-feeding flies (Hippoboscidae) and a protozoan parasite (Haemoproteus). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and immunoblots were used to test (i) whether pre-infection IgY antigen binding predicts parasite fitness and (ii) whether antigen binding changes after infection. Assays used extracts from three pigeon parasites (northern fowl mite, Salmonella bacteria and avian pox virus), as well as nonparasitic molecules from cattle, chicken and keyhole limpet. Binding to hippoboscid and S. enterica extracts were predictive of hippoboscid fly fitness. Binding to extracts from hippoboscids, pox virus and nonparasitic organisms was predictive of Haemoproteus infection levels. Antigen binding to all extracts increased after parasite challenge, despite the fact that birds were only exposed to flies and Haemoproteus. Immunoblots suggested innate Ig binding to parasite-associated molecular markers and revealed that new antigens were bound in extracts after infection. These data suggest that host antibody binding to diverse antigens predicts parasite fitness even when the antigens are not related to the infecting parasite. We discuss the implications of these data for the study of host-parasite immunological interaction. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Human Milk sIgA Molecules Contain Various Combinations of Different Antigen-Binding Sites Resulting in a Multiple Binding Specificity of Antibodies and Enzymatic Activities of Abzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sedykh, Sergey E.; Buneva, Valentina N.; Nevinsky, Georgy A.

    2012-01-01

    In the classic paradigm, immunoglobulins are monospecific molecules that have stable structures and two or more identical antigen-binding sites. However, we show here for the first time that the sIgA pool of human milk contains, depending on the donor, only 35±5% λ-sIgAs, 48±7% κ-sIgAs, and 17±4% of chimeric λ-κ-sIgAs. sIgA preparations contained no traces of canonical enzymes. However, all sIgA fractions eluted from several specific affinity sorbents under the conditions destroying even strong immune complexes demonstrated high catalytic activities in hydrolysis of ATP, DNA, and oligosaccharides, and phosphorylation of proteins, lipids, and oligosaccharides. Sequential re-chromatographies of the sIgA fractions with high affinity to one affinity sorbents on the second, third and then fourth affinity sorbents bearing other immobilized antigens led to the distribution of Abs and all catalytic activities all over the profiles of these chromatographies; in all cases some fractions eluted from affinity sorbents only under the conditions destroying strong immune complexes. In vitro, only an addition of reduced glutathione and milk plasma containing no Abs to two sIgA fractions with different affinity for DNA-cellulose led to a transition of up to 11–20% of Ab from one fraction to the other. Our data are indicative of the possibility of half-molecule exchange between different IgA and sIgA molecules. In addition, it cannot be excluded that during the penetration of IgAs through the specific milk barrier, the secretory component (S) and the join chain (J) can combine molecules of dimeric H2L2 λ-IgAs and κ-IgAs against different antigens forming many different variants of H4L4SJ sIgA molecules. Therefore, some chimeric molecules of sIgA can contain from two to four HL-fragments to various antigens interacting with high affinity with different sorbents and catalyzing various chemical reactions. Our data essentially expand the ideas concerning explanation of the

  11. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies. PMID:26862167

  12. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-02-09

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies.

  13. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    DOE PAGES

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; ...

    2016-02-09

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. Thismore » “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies.« less

  14. Specific binding of antigen onto human T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Durandy, A.; Fischer, A.; Charron, D.; Griscelli, C.

    1986-05-01

    Human T lymphocytes sensitized to Candida albicans (CA) were shown to proliferate in cultures induced with mannan, a ramified polysaccharide extracted from the cell well of CA. We presently describe that, when we used strongly labeled (/sup 3/H)mannan, antigen-specific T blast cells were able to bind the labeled mannan on their membrane. The observations that irrelevant blast cells did not bind (/sup 3/H)mannan, and that mannan-specific blast cells did not bind tritiated pneumococcal polysaccharide SIII, indicate the specificity of mannan binding. Mannan binding was reversible and saturable. Mannan binding on T blast cells was inhibited by preincubation with monoclonal antibodies to T3 but not to other T cell-related molecules. The characteristics of this receptor suggest its identity with the T cell receptor for antigen. The direct binding of mannan could be either due to a cross-linking of the receptor by multivalent mannan or to a recognition of mannan in association with HLA-DQ molecules, as suggested by partial blocking of mannan binding using anti-HLA-DQ monoclonal antibodies.

  15. Binding of streptococcal antigens to muscle tissue in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, M W; Nisengard, R J; Bergey, E J

    1980-01-01

    Antigens extracted from cells of Streptococcus pyogenes T6 and Streptococcus mutans strains AHT, BHT, 10449, OMZ175, and K1R adsorbed to the sarcolemmal sheath of cardiac muscle cells in vitro. Similar preparations from S. salivarius, S. sanguis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Lactobacillus casei had weak or negligible tissue-binding activity. Tissue-bound bacterial antigens were detected with homologous rabbit antisera with both indirect immunofluorescence tests and an indirect radioimmunoassay. Serological cross-reactivity was observed between the tissue-binding factors of S. pyogenes and S. mutans cells but not between the bacteria and muscle tissue. In a comparative study of extraction procedures, the greatest yield of tissue-binding factors was obtained from group A streptococci by cell disruption in buffer at 4 degrees C. Hot aqueous phenol and hot water extracts were inactive. Antibodies specific for the tissue-binding factor(s) were readily adsorbed from rabbit anti-S. pyogenes serum by a preparation of isolated cytoplasmic membranes but not by a suspension of cell wall fragments. The heart-binding component of S. pyogenes cell extracts was inactivated by protease digestion and heat treatment and to a lesser extent by periodic acid oxidation. The capacity of heart cell components to adsorb streptococcal antigens was reduced by protease treatment but not by the action of neuraminidase, hyaluronidase, organic solvents, or detergents. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6991420

  16. Predicting MHC-II binding affinity using multiple instance regression

    PubMed Central

    EL-Manzalawy, Yasser; Dobbs, Drena; Honavar, Vasant

    2011-01-01

    Reliably predicting the ability of antigen peptides to bind to major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules is an essential step in developing new vaccines. Uncovering the amino acid sequence correlates of the binding affinity of MHC-II binding peptides is important for understanding pathogenesis and immune response. The task of predicting MHC-II binding peptides is complicated by the significant variability in their length. Most existing computational methods for predicting MHC-II binding peptides focus on identifying a nine amino acids core region in each binding peptide. We formulate the problems of qualitatively and quantitatively predicting flexible length MHC-II peptides as multiple instance learning and multiple instance regression problems, respectively. Based on this formulation, we introduce MHCMIR, a novel method for predicting MHC-II binding affinity using multiple instance regression. We present results of experiments using several benchmark datasets that show that MHCMIR is competitive with the state-of-the-art methods for predicting MHC-II binding peptides. An online web server that implements the MHCMIR method for MHC-II binding affinity prediction is freely accessible at http://ailab.cs.iastate.edu/mhcmir. PMID:20855923

  17. Factor H-binding protein, a unique meningococcal vaccine antigen.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Mariagrazia; Donnelly, John; Rappuoli, Rino

    2008-12-30

    GNA1870, also named factor H-binding protein (fHbp) or rLP-2086, is a genome-derived antigen and one of the components of a rationally designed vaccine against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B, which has entered phase III clinical trials. It has been classified into three main non-cross-protective variant groups. GNA1870 has also been termed fHbp because of its ability to bind factor H, a key regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway. fHbp is important for survival in human blood, human sera, and in presence of antimicrobial peptides, independently of its expression level. All these properties make fHbp a unique vaccine antigen.

  18. Antigen-binding site anatomy and somatic mutations in antibodies that recognize different types of antigens.

    PubMed

    Raghunathan, Gopalan; Smart, Jason; Williams, Joseph; Almagro, Juan Carlos

    2012-03-01

    The number of antibody structures co-crystallized with their respective antigens has increased rapidly in the last few years, thus offering a formidable source of information to gain insight into the structure-function relationships of this family of proteins. We have analyzed here 140 unique middle-resolution to high-resolution (<3 Å) antibody structures, including 55 in complex with proteins, 39 with peptides, and 46 with haptens. We determined (i) length variations of the hypervariable loops, (ii) number of contacts with antigen, (iii) solvent accessible area buried upon binding, (iv) location and frequency of antigen contacting residues, (v) type of residues interacting with antigens, and (vi) putative somatic mutations. Except for somatic mutations, distinctive profiles were identified for all the variables analyzed. Compared with contacts, somatic mutations occurred with less abundance at any given position and extended beyond the regions in contact, with no clear difference among antibodies that recognize different types of antigens. This observation is consistent with the fact that although antigen recognition accomplished by shape and physicochemical complementarity is selective in nature, the somatic mutation process is stochastic and selection for mutations leading to improved affinity is not directly related to contact residues. Thus, the knowledge emerging from this study enhances our understanding of the structure-function relationship in antibodies while providing valuable guidance to design libraries for antibody discovery and optimization. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Identification of mutant monoclonal antibodies with increased antigen binding.

    PubMed

    Pollock, R R; French, D L; Gefter, M L; Scharff, M D

    1988-04-01

    Sib selection and an ELISA have been used to isolate hybridoma subclones producing mutant antibodies that bind antigen better than the parental monoclonal antibody. Such mutants arise spontaneously in culture at frequencies of 2.5-5 X 10(-5). The sequences of the heavy and light chain variable regions of the mutant antibodies are identical to that of the parent and the Ka values of the mutants and the parent are the same. The increase in binding is associated with abnormalities of the constant region polypeptide and probably reflect changes in avidity of these antibodies.

  20. Cooperative binding: a multiple personality.

    PubMed

    Martini, Johannes W R; Diambra, Luis; Habeck, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Cooperative binding has been described in many publications and has been related to or defined by several different properties of the binding behavior of the ligand to the target molecule. In addition to the commonly used Hill coefficient, other characteristics such as a sigmoidal shape of the overall titration curve in a linear plot, a change of ligand affinity of the other binding sites when a site of the target molecule becomes occupied, or complex roots of the binding polynomial have been used to define or to quantify cooperative binding. In this work, we analyze how the different properties are related in the most general model for binding curves based on the grand canonical partition function and present several examples which highlight differences between the cooperativity characterizing properties which are discussed. Our results mainly show that among the presented definitions there are not two which fully coincide. Moreover, this work poses the question whether it can make sense to distinguish between positive and negative cooperativity based on the macroscopic binding isotherm only. This article shall emphasize that scientists who investigate cooperative effects in biological systems could help avoiding misunderstandings by stating clearly which kind of cooperativity they discuss.

  1. A complex water network contributes to high-affinity binding in an antibody-antigen interface.

    PubMed

    Marino, S F; Olal, D; Daumke, O

    2016-03-01

    This data article presents an analysis of structural water molecules in the high affinity interaction between a potent tumor growth inhibiting antibody (fragment), J22.9-xi, and the tumor marker antigen CD269 (B cell maturation antigen, BCMA). The 1.89 Å X-ray crystal structure shows exquisite details of the binding interface between the two molecules, which comprises relatively few, mostly hydrophobic, direct contacts but many indirect interactions over solvent waters. These are partly or wholly buried in, and therefore part of, the interface. A partial description of the structure is included in an article on the tumor inhibiting effects of the antibody: "Potent anti-tumor response by targeting B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) in a mouse model of multiple myeloma", Mol. Oncol. 9 (7) (2015) pp. 1348-58.

  2. Multiple Antigen Peptide Vaccines against Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    synthetic pep- tides. J. Oin. Microbiol. 25:91-96. VoL. 78, 2010 11. del Guercio, M. ),’., ]. Sidney, G. Hermanson, C. Perez , H. M. Grey, R. T. Kobo, and A...M. Vanegas, L. M. Salazar , and M. E. Patarroyo. 2000. Serine repeat antigen peptides which bind specifically to red blood cells. l’arasitol. Int

  3. Crystal Structure of the Simian Virus 40 Large T-Antigen Origin-Binding Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke,G.; Bullock, P.; Bohm, A.

    2006-01-01

    The origins of replication of DNA tumor viruses have a highly conserved feature, namely, multiple binding sites for their respective initiator proteins arranged as inverted repeats. In the 1.45- Angstroms crystal structure of the simian virus 40 large T-antigen (T-ag) origin-binding domain (obd) reported herein, T-ag obd monomers form a left-handed spiral with an inner channel of 30 Angstroms having six monomers per turn. The inner surface of the spiral is positively charged and includes residues known to bind DNA. Residues implicated in hexamerization of full-length T-ag are located at the interface between adjacent T-ag obd monomers. These data provide a high-resolution model of the hexamer of origin-binding domains observed in electron microscopy studies and allow the obd's to be oriented relative to the hexamer of T-ag helicase domains to which they are connected.

  4. Crystal structure of the simian virus 40 large T-antigen origin-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Gretchen; Bullock, Peter A; Bohm, Andrew

    2006-05-01

    The origins of replication of DNA tumor viruses have a highly conserved feature, namely, multiple binding sites for their respective initiator proteins arranged as inverted repeats. In the 1.45-angstroms crystal structure of the simian virus 40 large T-antigen (T-ag) origin-binding domain (obd) reported herein, T-ag obd monomers form a left-handed spiral with an inner channel of 30 angstroms having six monomers per turn. The inner surface of the spiral is positively charged and includes residues known to bind DNA. Residues implicated in hexamerization of full-length T-ag are located at the interface between adjacent T-ag obd monomers. These data provide a high-resolution model of the hexamer of origin-binding domains observed in electron microscopy studies and allow the obd's to be oriented relative to the hexamer of T-ag helicase domains to which they are connected.

  5. Goodpasture Antigen-binding Protein (GPBP) Directs Myofibril Formation

    PubMed Central

    Revert-Ros, Francisco; López-Pascual, Ernesto; Granero-Moltó, Froilán; Macías, Jesús; Breyer, Richard; Zent, Roy; Hudson, Billy G.; Saadeddin, Anas; Revert, Fernando; Blasco, Raül; Navarro, Carmen; Burks, Deborah; Saus, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Goodpasture antigen-binding protein-1 (GPBP-1) is an exportable non-conventional Ser/Thr kinase that regulates glomerular basement membrane collagen organization. Here we provide evidence that GPBP-1 accumulates in the cytoplasm of differentiating mouse myoblasts prior to myosin synthesis. Myoblasts deficient in GPBP-1 display defective myofibril formation, whereas myofibrils assemble with enhanced efficiency in those overexpressing GPBP-1. We also show that GPBP-1 targets the previously unidentified GIP130 (GPBP-interacting protein of 130 kDa), which binds to myosin and promotes its myofibrillar assembly. This report reveals that GPBP-1 directs myofibril formation, an observation that expands its reported role in supramolecular organization of structural proteins to the intracellular compartment. PMID:21832087

  6. Simian virus 40 origin DNA-binding domain on large T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Paucha, E; Kalderon, D; Harvey, R W; Smith, A E

    1986-01-01

    Fifty variant forms of simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen bearing point, multiple point, deletion, or termination mutations within a region of the protein thought to be involved in DNA binding were tested for their ability to bind to SV40 origin DNA. A number of the mutant large T species including some with point mutations were unable to bind, whereas many were wild type in this activity. The clustering of the mutations that are defective in origin DNA binding both reported here and by others suggests a DNA-binding domain on large T maps between residues 139 and approximately 220, with a particularly sensitive sequence between amino acids 147 and 166. The results indicate that the domain is involved in binding to both site I and site II on SV40 DNA, but it remains unclear whether it is responsible for binding to cellular DNA. Since all the mutants retain the ability to transform Rat-1 cells, we conclude that the ability of large T to bind to SV40 origin DNA is not a prerequisite for its transforming activity. Images PMID:3001365

  7. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-cell Therapies for Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Mikkilineni, Lekha; Kochenderfer, James N

    2017-09-19

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a nearly always incurable malignancy of plasma cells, so new approaches to treatment are needed. T-cell therapies are a promising approach for treating MM, with a mechanism of action different than those of standard MM treatments. Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are fusion proteins incorporating antigen-recognition domains and T-cell signaling domains. T-cells genetically engineered to express CARs can specifically recognize antigens. Success of CAR T-cells against leukemia and lymphoma has encouraged development of CAR T-cell therapies for MM. Target antigens for CARs must be expressed on malignant cells, but expression on normal cells must be absent or limited. B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) is expressed by normal and malignant plasma cells. CAR T-cells targeting B-cell maturation antigen have demonstrated significant anti-myeloma activity in early clinical trials. Toxicities in these trials, including cytokine-release syndrome, have been similarto toxicities observed in CAR T-cell trials for leukemia. Targeting postulated CD19(+) myeloma stem cells with anti-CD19 CAR T-cells is a novel approach to MM therapy. MM antigens including CD138, CD38, signaling lymphocyte-activating molecule 7 (SLAMF7), and kappa light chain are under investigation as CAR targets. MM is genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous, so targeting of more than one antigen might often be required for effective treatment of MM with CAR T cells. Integration of CAR T cells with other myeloma therapies is an important area of future research. CAR T cell therapies for MM are at an early stage of development but have great promise to improve MM treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Hematology.

  8. Targeting B-cell maturation antigen in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2015-01-01

    Novel effective immunotherapies are needed for patients with multiple myeloma (MM), since disease recurrence remains a major obstacle. B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), a cell surface protein universally expressed on malignant plasma cells , has emerged as a very selective antigen to be targeted in novel treatments for MM. We here first review BCMA-related biology, and then highlight the recent clinical development of a novel afucosylated anti-BCMA monoclonal antibody conjugated with monomethyl auristatin F via noncleavable linker (GSK2857916). Chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cells targeting BCMA may also induce specific and durable anti-MM responses by patients’ own effector cells. Clinical trials testing these two approaches (NCT02064387, NCT02215967) are currently ongoing in relapsed and refractory MM patients. PMID:26370838

  9. T antigen origin-binding domain of simian virus 40: determinants of specific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Sanford, David G; Luo, Xuelian; Sudmeier, James L; Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Bullock, Peter A; Bachovchin, William W

    2004-06-08

    To better understand origin recognition and initiation of DNA replication, we have examined by NMR complexes formed between the origin-binding domain of SV40 T antigen (T-ag-obd), the initiator protein of the SV40 virus, and cognate and noncognate DNA oligomers. The results reveal two structural effects associated with "origin-specific" binding that are absent in nonspecific DNA binding. The first is the formation of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) involving His 203, a residue that genetic studies have previously identified as crucial to both specific and nonspecific DNA binding in full-length T antigen. In free T-ag-obd, the side chain of His 203 has a pK(a) value of approximately 5, titrating to the N(epsilon)(1)H tautomer at neutral pH (Sudmeier, J. L., et al. (1996) J. Magn. Reson., Ser. B 113, 236-247). In complexes with origin DNA, His 203 N(delta)(1) becomes protonated and remains nontitrating as the imidazolium cation at all pH values from 4 to 8. The H-bonded N(delta1)H resonates at 15.9 ppm, an unusually large N-H proton chemical shift, of a magnitude previously observed only in the catalytic triad of serine proteases at low pH. The formation of this H-bond requires the middle G/C base pair of the recognition pentanucleotide, GAGGC. The second structural effect is a selective distortion of the A/T base pair characterized by a large (0.6 ppm) upfield chemical-shift change of its Watson-Crick proton, while nearby H-bonded protons remain relatively unaffected. The results indicate that T antigen, like many other DNA-binding proteins, may employ "catalytic" or "transition-state-like" interactions in binding its cognate DNA (Jen-Jacobson, L. (1997) Biopolymers 44, 153-180), which may be the solution to the well-known paradox between the relatively modest DNA-binding specificity exhibited by initiator proteins and the high specificity of initiation.

  10. Effects of Long-Term Immunization with Multiple Antigens.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    rheumatoid factor--Does not depend on activation of complement and detects small non- complement-fixing complexes. 4. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and other...and antibody may give rise to allergic encephalitis, orchitis, thyroiditis, or other abnormal conditions such as Arthus’ s reaction or a...booster inoculations after multiple antigens had been given over extended periods. They were evaluated periodically for specific antibody titers, delayed

  11. A morphological and functional study on antigen binding and endocytosis by immunocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Goud, B; Antoine, J C; Gonatas, N K; Stieber, A; Avrameas, S

    1980-01-01

    Immunoenzymatic techniques were used to study antigen binding and endocytosis by lymph node cells of rats immunized against horseradish peroxidase, hen ovalbumin and rabbit IgG. The number of antigen-binding cells varied and depended on the type of antigen used, the time after immunization, and was higher after a booster injection. In secondary responses (4 days after booster), about 80% of antigen-binding cells were proplasmocytes and plasmocytes; by a double staining procedure it was found that 82% of these cells bore in addition to surface antigen, specific intracytoplasmic antibody as well. About 20% of antigen-binding cells were small and medium lymphocytes which did not contain detectable intracytoplasmic antibody. For ultrastructural studies of the endocytosis, peroxidase was used as the antigen. This antigen was found in cytoplasmic compartments which consisted of vesicles, cisternae and large round bodies (lysosomes?) often located near the Golgi apparatus. However, the cisternae of the Golgi apparatus, involved in the synthesis of specific antibody were not sites of retrieval of endocytosed antigen. The effect of endocytosis of antigen on the secretion and synthesis of antibody was studied by the local haemolysis plaque assay and biosynthetic labelling. No change was detected in antibody secretion and synthesis as a result of antigen endocytosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7007216

  12. [Antigen-binding clone cells in hematopoietic spleen colonies].

    PubMed

    Khazanova, I V; Van'ko, L V; Malaĭtsev, V V; Khamitova, N S; Zhuravel', G M

    1976-05-01

    The antigen-binding cell clones and the Ig-positive cells were found and quantitatively assessed in the primary hemopoietic splenic colonies. The data ogtained were analyzed assuming that the ratio of clone of specialized B-cells should reflect the quantitative ration in the corresponding V-genes in the given lymphocyte populations at definite stages of its development. The colonies differed from one another markedly by the curves of inhibition by DNP-lysine of rosette-formation with DNP-erythrocytes, i.e. by the avidity of B-cells of the given specificity. The colonies differed significantly by the ratio of the volumes of the two clone groups (cell with anti-DNP and anti-BE Ig-receptors) between themselves and the combination of the Ig-positive cells. These quantitaive regularities were incompatible with the view that each B-cell had any conceivable set of V-genes, i.e. with the germ-line hypothesis of the antibody and receptor diversity.

  13. Uncommon Structural Motifs Dominate the Antigen Binding Site in Human Autoantibodies Reactive with Basement Membrane Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Mary H.; Buckley, Elizabeth S.; Chen, Benny J.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Clark, Amy G.

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies mediate organ destruction in multiple autoimmune diseases, yet their origins in patients remain poorly understood. To probe the genetic origins and structure of disease-associated autoantibodies, we engrafted immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and immunized with the non-collagenous-1 (NC1) domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. This antigen is expressed in lungs and kidneys and is targeted by autoantibodies in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and Goodpasture syndrome (GPS), prototypic human organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Using Epstein Barr virus transformation and cell fusion, six human anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen monoclonal autoantibodies (mAb) were recovered, including subsets reactive with human kidney and with epitopes recognized by patients’ IgG. Sequence analysis reveals a long to exceptionally long heavy chain complementarity determining region3 (HCDR3), the major site of antigen binding, in all six mAb. Mean HCDR3 length is 25.5 amino acids (range 20–36), generated from inherently long DH and JH genes and extended regions of non-templated N-nucleotides. Long HCDR3 are suited to forming noncontiguous antigen contacts and to binding recessed, immunologically silent epitopes hidden from conventional antibodies, as seen with self-antigen crossreactive broadly neutralizing anti-HIV Ig (bnAb). The anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen mAb also show preferential use of unmutated variable region genes that are enriched among human chronic lymphocytic leukemia antibodies that share features with natural polyreactive Ig. Our findings suggest unexpected relationships between pathogenic anti-collagen Ig, bnAb, and autoreactive Ig associated with malignancy, all of which arise from B cells expressing unconventional structural elements that may require transient escape from tolerance for successful expansion. PMID:27450516

  14. Herpesvirus Glycoproteins Undergo Multiple Antigenic Changes before Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Glauser, Daniel L.; Kratz, Anne-Sophie; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    Herpesvirus entry is a complicated process involving multiple virion glycoproteins and culminating in membrane fusion. Glycoprotein conformation changes are likely to play key roles. Studies of recombinant glycoproteins have revealed some structural features of the virion fusion machinery. However, how the virion glycoproteins change during infection remains unclear. Here using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies we show in situ that each component of the Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) entry machinery—gB, gH/gL and gp150—changes in antigenicity before tegument protein release begins. Further changes then occurred upon actual membrane fusion. Thus virions revealed their final fusogenic form only in late endosomes. The substantial antigenic differences between this form and that of extracellular virions suggested that antibodies have only a limited opportunity to block virion membrane fusion. PMID:22253913

  15. HLA antigens in multiple sclerosis of northern Spanish population.

    PubMed Central

    López-Larrea, C; Uría, D F; Coto, E

    1990-01-01

    HLA-A, -B, -C, -DR, -DQ antigens were studied in 43 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with clinically definite remittent sclerosis from Asturias (North Spain). The prevalence of HLA-B7, B7 and B27 were significantly increased in MS. HLA-B35 was under-represented in these patients. DR2 was increased but not significantly. No association with DQw1 was discovered. The existence of several susceptibility factors in the more common B7/DR2/DQw1 haplotype is discussed. PMID:2351974

  16. Restricted diversity of antigen binding residues of antibodies revealed by computational alanine scanning of 227 antibody-antigen complexes.

    PubMed

    Robin, Gautier; Sato, Yoshiteru; Desplancq, Dominique; Rochel, Natacha; Weiss, Etienne; Martineau, Pierre

    2014-11-11

    Antibody molecules are able to recognize any antigen with high affinity and specificity. To get insight into the molecular diversity at the source of this functional diversity, we compiled and analyzed a non-redundant aligned collection of 227 structures of antibody-antigen complexes. Free energy of binding of all the residue side chains was quantified by computational alanine scanning, allowing the first large-scale quantitative description of antibody paratopes. This demonstrated that as few as 8 residues among 30 key positions are sufficient to explain 80% of the binding free energy in most complexes. At these positions, the residue distribution is not only different from that of other surface residues but also dependent on the role played by the side chain in the interaction, residues participating in the binding energy being mainly aromatic residues, and Gly or Ser otherwise. To question the generality of these binding characteristics, we isolated an antibody fragment by phage display using a biased synthetic repertoire with only two diversified complementarity-determining regions and solved its structure in complex with its antigen. Despite this restricted diversity, the structure demonstrated that all complementarity-determining regions were involved in the interaction with the antigen and that the rules derived from the natural antibody repertoire apply to this synthetic binder, thus demonstrating the robustness and universality of our results.

  17. A Mutant Library Approach to Identify Improved Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Monica; Rossi, Raffaella; Walter, Helen; Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Factor H binding protein (FHbp) is a virulence factor used by meningococci to evade the host complement system. FHbp elicits bactericidal antibodies in humans and is part of two recently licensed vaccines. Using human complement Factor H (FH) transgenic mice, we previously showed that binding of FH decreased the protective antibody responses to FHbp vaccination. Therefore, in the present study we devised a library-based method to identify mutant FHbp antigens with very low binding of FH. Using an FHbp sequence variant in one of the two licensed vaccines, we displayed an error-prone PCR mutant FHbp library on the surface of Escherichia coli. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate FHbp mutants with very low binding of human FH and preserved binding of control anti-FHbp monoclonal antibodies. We sequenced the gene encoding FHbp from selected clones and introduced the mutations into a soluble FHbp construct. Using this approach, we identified several new mutant FHbp vaccine antigens that had very low binding of FH as measured by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. The new mutant FHbp antigens elicited protective antibody responses in human FH transgenic mice that were up to 20-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type FHbp antigen. This approach offers the potential to discover mutant antigens that might not be predictable even with protein structural information and potentially can be applied to other microbial vaccine antigens that bind host proteins. PMID:26057742

  18. Specificity and kinetics of norovirus binding to magnetic bead- conjugated histo-blood group antigens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) have been identified as candidate receptors for human norovirus (NOR). Type A, type H1, and Lewis histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) in humans have been identified as major targets for NOR binding. Pig HBGA-conjugated magnetic beads have been utilized as a means ...

  19. Age-dependent B cell Autoimmunity to a Myelin Surface Antigen in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Katherine A.; Chitnis, Tanuja; Newcombe, Jia; Franz, Bettina; Kennedy, Julia; McArdel, Shannon; Kuhle, Jens; Kappos, Ludwig; Rostasy, Kevin; Pohl, Daniela; Gagne, Donald; Ness, Jayne M.; Tenembaum, Silvia; O'Connor, Kevin C.; Viglietta, Vissia; Wong, Susan J.; Tavakoli, Norma P.; de Seze, Jerome; Khoury, Samia J.; Bar-Or, Amit; Hafler, David A.; Banwell, Brenda; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) typically manifests in early to mid adulthood, but there is increasing recognition of pediatric-onset MS, aided by improvements in imaging techniques. The immunological mechanisms of disease are largely unexplored in pediatric-onset MS, in part because studies have historically focused on adult-onset disease. We investigated autoantibodies to myelin surface antigens in a large cohort of pediatric MS cases by flow cytometric labeling of transfectants that expressed different myelin proteins. While antibodies to native myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) were uncommon among adult-onset patients, a subset of pediatric patients had serum antibodies that brightly labeled the MOG transfectant. Antibodies to two other myelin surface antigens were largely absent. Affinity purification of MOG antibodies as well as competition of binding with soluble MOG documented their binding specificity. The prevalence of such autoantibodies was highest among patients with a very early onset of MS: 38.7% of patients less than 10 years of age at disease onset had MOG antibodies, compared to 14.7% of patients in the 10–18 year age group. B cell autoimmunity to this myelin surface antigen is therefore most common in patients with a very early onset of MS. PMID:19687098

  20. From therapeutic antibodies to chimeric antigen receptors (CARs): making better CARs based on antigen-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanling; Jiang, Shibo; Ying, Tianlei

    2016-12-01

    A variety of approaches are being pursued to improve the safety and antitumor potency of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. However, most engineering efforts have thus far been focused on its intracellular signaling domain, while its extracellular antigen-binding domain has received less attention. Areas covered: Herein, the authors summarize the current knowledge of CAR T-cell therapy. Accordingly, they focus on its antigen-binding domain, discuss key considerations for selecting an optimal single-chain variable fragment (scFv) when designing a CAR, and suggest potential directions aimed at developing the next-generation CARs. Expert opinion: The extracellular region of CARs can play a decisive role in their safety and efficacy. Instead of directly translating an available therapeutic mAb to a scFv-based CAR construct, the authors suggest that various CAR-displayed scFvs with different affinity, specificity and binding epitopes against an individual target molecule should be generated and evaluated side-by-side. Incorporating new antibody formats that possess characteristics superior to those of scFvs may be one way to engineer safer and more effective CARs. The authors expect that further CAR engineering will enable us to target more antigens involved in hematological and solid malignancies with minimal side effects to serve unmet clinical needs.

  1. Effect of pH on antigen binding by clonotypic antibodies with different isoelectric points

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Y.; Miyai, K.; Hata, N.; Iijima, Y.

    1987-02-01

    Polyclonal rabbit antibodies to thyroxine, human myoglobin, human growth hormone, human thyrotropin, human alpha-fetoprotein, and human thyroglobulin were fractionated into clonotypic antibodies with different isoelectric points by agarose isoelectric focusing or chromatofocusing. The effect of pH on the binding of these antigens by their respective clonotypic antibodies was assessed by radioimmunoassay. The profiles of the pH effect differed both for different antigens and for different pI's of the antibodies used. The pH optima in the radioimmunoassays for protein antigens were found to be expressed as a function of pI and molecular weight of both antigen and antibody molecules.

  2. Multiple sclerosis: Skin-induced antigen-specific immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wildner, Paula; Selmaj, Krzysztof W

    2017-10-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a highly prevalent demyelinating disorder, presumed to be driven by an autoimmune response toward the central nervous system (CNS) components. All currently available treatments modulate the immune system globally and besides the reduction of disease activity, they may also impose considerable disturbances on the immune protective mechanisms. Thus, induction of antigen-specific immune tolerance remains the ultimate goal of MS therapy. Such approach carries promising therapeutic perspectives and, above all, a desirable safety profile. Several studies have been performed to evaluate highly selective, antigen-induced, therapies for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and MS. These trials have also indicated the importance of the antigen administration route. The continued efforts to develop efficient and safe MS therapy gave rise to the idea of incorporating the skin immune system in order to modulate autoimmunity in MS. Skin is the largest immunological organ of human body, and thus provides ample opportunities to modify immune responses. Skin dendritic cells have a significant ability to modulate the immune reactions, promoting either immunity or tolerance. Their capacity to induce tolerance has already been described in several experimental models of MS. In a one-year, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study assessing the effectiveness of transdermal myelin peptides patches, significant changes in the morphology of Langerhans cells (LCs) and shifts in the dendritic cell (DC) populations in the draining lymph nodes have been observed. In addition, patients treated with myelin patches showed a decreased brain inflammatory activity on MRI and a reduced relapse rate. In this review, we further discuss the potential to use skin-induced immune tolerance for MS treatment, with a particular focus on dermal DCs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. The Role of Antigen Presenting Cells in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, Emily M. L.; Duncan, D'Anne S.; Rodgers, Jane M.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating T cell-mediated autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Animal models of MS, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-Induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) have given light to cellular mechanisms involved in the initiation and progression of this organ-specific autoimmune disease. Within the CNS, antigen presenting cells (APC) such as microglia and astrocytes participate as first line defenders against infections or inflammation. However, during chronic inflammation they can participate in perpetuating the self-destructive environment by secretion of inflammatory factors and/or presentation of myelin epitopes to autoreactive T cells. Dendritic cells (DC) are also participants in the presentation of antigen to T cells, even within the CNS. While the APCs alone are not solely responsible for mediating the destruction to the myelin sheath, they are critical players in perpetuating the inflammatory milieu. This review will highlight relevant studies which have provided insight to the roles played by microglia, DCs and astrocytes in the context of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:20637861

  4. Assessment of Solvated Interaction Energy Function for Ranking Antibody-Antigen Binding Affinities.

    PubMed

    Sulea, Traian; Vivcharuk, Victor; Corbeil, Christopher R; Deprez, Christophe; Purisima, Enrico O

    2016-07-25

    Affinity modulation of antibodies and antibody fragments of therapeutic value is often required in order to improve their clinical efficacies. Virtual affinity maturation has the potential to quickly focus on the critical hotspot residues without the combinatorial explosion problem of conventional display and library approaches. However, this requires a binding affinity scoring function that is capable of ranking single-point mutations of a starting antibody. We focus here on assessing the solvated interaction energy (SIE) function that was originally developed for and is widely applied to scoring of protein-ligand binding affinities. To this end, we assembled a structure-function data set called Single-Point Mutant Antibody Binding (SiPMAB) comprising several antibody-antigen systems suitable for this assessment, i.e., based on high-resolution crystal structures for the parent antibodies and coupled with high-quality binding affinity measurements for sets of single-point antibody mutants in each system. Using this data set, we tested the SIE function with several mutation protocols based on the popular methods SCWRL, Rosetta, and FoldX. We found that the SIE function coupled with a protocol limited to sampling only the mutated side chain can reasonably predict relative binding affinities with a Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient of about 0.6, outperforming more aggressive sampling protocols. Importantly, this performance is maintained for each of the seven system-specific component subsets as well as for other relevant subsets including non-alanine and charge-altering mutations. The transferability and enrichment in affinity-improving mutants can be further enhanced using consensus ranking over multiple methods, including the SIE, Talaris, and FOLDEF energy functions. The knowledge gained from this study can lead to successful prospective applications of virtual affinity maturation.

  5. Clonal anergy: Persistence in tolerant mice of antigen-binding B lymphocytes incapable of responding to antigen or mitogen

    PubMed Central

    Nossal, G. J. V.; Pike, Beverley L.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to determine the degree of reduction in the number of antigen-binding B lymphocytes in the spleens of mice that had been rendered tolerant in the perinatal period. Newborn or pregnant mice were injected with fluorescein (Flu) coupled onto human gamma globulin, and the spleen cells of the neonatally injected mice, or of the offspring of the pregnant mice, were analyzed 1-6 weeks later. Tolerogen doses were chosen so as to achieve either a two-thirds reduction (low dose) in the number of anti-Flu B cells capable of yielding anti-hapten plaque-forming cell clones after in vitro stimulation, or as representing a supra-optimal tolerogenic stimulus (high dose). Antigen-binding B cells were studied by a two-cycle procedure, namely an initial cycle of binding to Flu-gelatin thin layers, followed by analysis of the binding cells in the fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) after suitable staining with Flu-protein conjugates. With the high dose of tolerogen, a modest diminution in Flu-binding cell numbers down to 56-71% of control values could be induced. When these residual Flu-specific B cells were analyzed in the FACS to quantitate their spectrum of Flu-binding avidities, profiles identical to those of controls were obtained. The reduction proved transient in nature, binding cell numbers having returned to 80% of normal by 2 weeks and to normal by 6 weeks. Nevertheless, the Flu-specific B cells were incapable of responding to antigen or mitogen by antibody formation. With the low dose of tolerogen, despite the desired degree of functional silencing of Flu-specific B cells, the numbers and avidity spectra of antigen-binding cells were entirely normal in both the neonatally injected and in utero-injected groups. The results indicate that tolerance induced amongst immature B lymphocytes is not due to a physical elimination of the relevant B cell clones or to a modulation or blockade of their surface Ig receptors. Rather, it is due to

  6. [Effect of conditions of monoclonal antibody adsorption on antigen-binding activity].

    PubMed

    Tarakanova, Iu N; Dmitriev, D A; Massino, Iu S; Smirnova, M B; Segal, O L; Fartushnaia, O V; Iakovleva, D A; Koliaskina, G I; Lavrov, V F; Dmitriev, A D

    2012-01-01

    The dependence of the antigen-binding activity of immobilized antibodies on pH of a saturating buffer has been investigated. We analyzed 28 monoclonal antibodies (MCAs) produced by various hybridomas to three virus antigens, i.e., the nuclear p23 protein of hepatitis C virus (C core protein p23), p24 protein of HIV 1, and the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg). Antibodies were adsorbed on the surfaces of immune plates in acidic (pH 2.8), neutral (pH 7.5), and alkaline (pH 9.5) buffers. The binding of labeled antigens, i.e., biotinylated or conjugated with horseradish peroxidase, with immobilized antigens was tested. It was shown that 10 out of 28 analyzed MCAs (36%) considerably better preserved their antigen-binding activity if their passive adsorption was carried out on the surface of polystyrene plates in an acidic buffer (pH 2.8). This approach allowed constructing a highly sensitive sandwich method for HBsAg assay with a minimal reliably determined antigen concentration of 0.013-0.017 ng/ml. The described approach may be recommended for the optimization of sandwich methods and solid-phase competitive methods.

  7. Identification of a peptide binding protein that plays a role in antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lakey, E.K.; Margoliash, E.; Pierce, S.K.

    1987-03-01

    The helper T-cell response to globular proteins appears, in general, to require intracellular processing of the antigen, such that a peptide fragment containing the T-cell antigenic determinant is released and transported to and held on the surface of an Ia-expressing, antigen-presenting cell. However, the molecular details underlying these phenomena are largely unknown. The means by which antigenic peptides are anchored on the antigen-presenting cell surface was investigated. A cell surface protein is identified that was isolated by it ability to bind to a 24-amino acid peptide fragment of pigeon cytochrome c, residues 81-104, containing the major antigenic determinant for B10.A mouse T cells. This peptide binding protein, purified from (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled cells, appears as two discrete bands of approx. =72 and 74 kDa after NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE. The protein can be eluted from the peptide affinity column with equivalent concentrations of either the antigenic pigeon cytochrome c peptide or the corresponding nonantigenic peptide of mouse cytochrome c. However, it does not bind to the native cytochromes c, either of pigeon or mouse, and thus the protein appears to recognize some structure available only in the free peptides. This protein plays a role in antigen presentation. Its expression is not major histocompatibility complex-restricted in that the blocking activity of the antisera can be absorbed on spleen cells from mice of different haplotypes. This peptide binding protein can be isolated from a variety of cell types, including B cells, T cells, and fibroblasts. The anchoring of processed peptides on the cell surface by such a protein may play a role in antigen presentation.

  8. Mutation of large T-antigen-binding site A, but not site B or C, eliminates stalling by RNA polymerase II in the intergenic region of polyomavirus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, J; Sunstrom, N A; Acheson, N H

    1993-01-01

    During transcription of the late strand of polyomavirus DNA, RNA polymerase II stalls and accumulates nearby the binding sites on viral DNA recognized by polyomavirus large T antigen. Stalling by RNA polymerases is eliminated when thermolabile large T antigen is inactivated by using a temperature-sensitive virus mutant (J. Bertin, N.-A. Sunstrom, P. Jain, and N. H. Acheson, Virology 189:715-724, 1992). To determine whether stalling by RNA polymerases is mediated through the interaction of large T antigen with one or more of its binding sites, viable polyomavirus mutants that contain altered large-T-antigen-binding sites were constructed. Point mutations were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis into the multiple, clustered G(A/G)GGC pentanucleotides known to be the target sequence for large T-antigen binding. Mutation of the G(A/G)GGC pentanucleotides in the first two binding sites encountered by RNA polymerases in the intergenic region (sites C and B) had no detectable effect on stalling as measured by transcriptional run-on analysis. However, mutation of the two GAGGC pentanucleotides in binding site A, which lies adjacent to the origin of viral DNA replication, eliminated stalling by RNA polymerases. We conclude that binding of large T antigen to site A blocks elongation by RNA polymerase II. Further characterization of virus containing mutated site A did not reveal any effects on early transcription levels or on virus DNA replication. However, the mutant virus gave rise to small plaques, suggesting impairment in some stage of virus growth. Stalling of RNA polymerases by large T antigen bound to the intergenic region of viral DNA may function to prevent transcription from displacing proteins whose binding is required for the normal growth of polyomavirus. Images PMID:8396655

  9. Antigenic Variation of Clade 2.1 H5N1 Virus Is Determined by a Few Amino Acid Substitutions Immediately Adjacent to the Receptor Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Koel, Björn F.; van der Vliet, Stefan; Burke, David F.; Bestebroer, Theo M.; Bharoto, Eny E.; Yasa, I. Wayan W.; Herliana, Inna; Laksono, Brigitta M.; Xu, Kemin; Skepner, Eugene; Russell, Colin A.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Perez, Daniel R.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Smith, Derek J.; Prajitno, Teguh Y.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of the H5N1 subtype are genetically highly variable and have diversified into multiple phylogenetic clades over the past decade. Antigenic drift is a well-studied phenomenon for seasonal human influenza viruses, but much less is known about the antigenic evolution of HPAI H5N1 viruses that circulate in poultry. In this study, we focused on HPAI H5N1 viruses that are enzootic to Indonesia. We selected representative viruses from genetically distinct lineages that are currently circulating and determined their antigenic properties by hemagglutination inhibition assays. At least six antigenic variants have circulated between 2003, when H5N1 clade 2.1 viruses were first detected in Indonesia, and 2011. During this period, multiple antigenic variants cocirculated in the same geographic regions. Mutant viruses were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis to represent each of the circulating antigenic variants, revealing that antigenic differences between clade 2.1 viruses were due to only one or very few amino acid substitutions immediately adjacent to the receptor binding site. Antigenic variants of H5N1 virus evaded recognition by both ferret and chicken antibodies. The molecular basis for antigenic change in clade 2.1 viruses closely resembled that of seasonal human influenza viruses, indicating that the hemagglutinin of influenza viruses from different hosts and subtypes may be similarly restricted to evade antibody recognition. PMID:24917596

  10. The constant region affects antigen binding of antibodies to DNA by altering secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yumin; Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Casadevall, Arturo; Putterman, Chaim

    2013-11-01

    We previously demonstrated an important role of the constant region in the pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies. To determine the mechanisms by which the constant region affects autoantibody binding, a panel of isotype-switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) was generated from the murine PL9-11 IgG3 autoantibody. The affinity of the PL9-11 antibody panel for histone was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine wavelength shifts of the antibody panel upon binding to DNA and histone. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure changes in secondary structure. SPR analysis revealed significant differences in histone binding affinity between members of the PL9-11 panel. The wavelength shifts of tryptophan fluorescence emission were found to be dependent on the antibody isotype, while circular dichroism analysis determined that changes in antibody secondary structure content differed between isotypes upon antigen binding. Thus, the antigen binding affinity is dependent on the particular constant region expressed. Moreover, the effects of antibody binding to antigen were also constant region dependent. Alteration of secondary structures influenced by constant regions may explain differences in fine specificity of anti-DNA antibodies between antibodies with similar variable regions, as well as cross-reactivity of anti-DNA antibodies with non-DNA antigens.

  11. Plasmodium vivax GPI-anchored micronemal antigen (PvGAMA) binds human erythrocytes independent of Duffy antigen status

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yang; Lu, Feng; Wang, Bo; Li, Jian; Han, Jin-Hee; Ito, Daisuke; Kong, Deok-Hoon; Jiang, Lubin; Wu, Jian; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Takashima, Eizo; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Cao, Jun; Nyunt, Myat Htut; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Desai, Sanjay A.; Miller, Louis H.; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Han, Eun-Taek

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax, a major agent of malaria in both temperate and tropical climates, has been thought to be unable to infect humans lacking the Duffy (Fy) blood group antigen because this receptor is critical for erythrocyte invasion. Recent surveys in various endemic regions, however, have reported P. vivax infections in Duffy-negative individuals, suggesting that the parasite may utilize alternative receptor-ligand pairs to complete the erythrocyte invasion. Here, we identified and characterized a novel parasite ligand, Plasmodium vivax GPI-anchored micronemal antigen (PvGAMA), that bound human erythrocytes regardless of Duffy antigen status. PvGAMA was localized at the microneme in the mature schizont-stage parasites. The antibodies against PvGAMA fragments inhibited PvGAMA binding to erythrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. The erythrocyte-specific binding activities of PvGAMA were significantly reduced by chymotrypsin treatment. Thus, PvGAMA may be an adhesion molecule for the invasion of Duffy-positive and -negative human erythrocytes. PMID:27759110

  12. [Hepatocellular carcinoma associated antigen HCA520, a novel Ca2+-binding protein].

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei-xiang; Han, Ke-jun; Qu, Xun; Ma, Dao-xin; Chen, Wei-feng

    2004-03-01

    To analyze the binding activity of the hepatocellular carcinoma associated antigen HCA520 to Ca2+. The HCA520 gene was gained by PCR. Then, it was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T-3. The GST-HCA520 fusion gene was induced to express in E. coli and the expressed product was purified via GST-agarose affinity resin. The fusion protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis. The Ca2+ binding capability of the fusion protein was analyzed by dot blot. The GST-HCA520 fusion gene was constructed and the protein was successfully expressed and purified, which was identified by DNA sequencing and Western blot respectively. The fusion protein could bind to Ca2+ depend on dosages. HCA520, a novel hepatocellular carcinoma associated antigen, is a novel Ca2+ binding protein.

  13. Increased immunoglobulin G, but not M, binding to endogenous retroviral antigens in HIV-1 infected persons.

    PubMed

    Lawoko, A; Johansson, B; Rabinayaran, D; Pipkorn, R; Blomberg, J

    2000-12-01

    The modes of interaction between products of human endogenous retroviral (HERV) sequences and the immune system are largely unknown. In HIV infected persons, an exogenous retrovirus adds further complexity to the situation. Therefore, 14 synthetic peptides with sequences derived from conserved regions of various endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and from related exogenous retroviruses were used to search for IgG and IgM antibodies that bind to such antigens in 15 HIV-1 seropositive and 17 seronegative immunosuppressed patients. IgG binding to three peptides, namely, the C-terminal half of murine leukemia virus (MLV) capsid protein, the conserved portion of HERV-H transmembrane protein, and the Pol region of human mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-like (HML3) sequence, was observed in both groups. Binding was, however, more frequent and more firm in HIV-1 positive samples (P<0.0001, Wilcoxon rank sum test). IgM binding to the same peptides showed no significant differentiation between the two groups of patients. Binding to both immunoglobulin isotypes was sometimes variable over time in both groups. No correlation of either IgG or IgM peptide binding with progression to AIDS in HIV-1 infected individuals was observed. Inhibition studies using analogous endogenous and exogenous retroviral peptides, including HIV-1, demonstrated specificity of the IgG antibodies for a narrow range of MLV- and MMTV-like retroviral antigens, and excluded cross-reactivity of antibodies to HIV-1 as a cause of these observations. Thus, unlike IgG, IgM binding to retroviral antigens was ubiquitous. It is suggested that anti-HERV IgM belong to a class of natural antibodies and might serve as primers in the mediation of humoral immune responses to more or less related exogenous retroviruses. Increased IgG binding in HIV-1 infected individuals could result from such priming, or reflect higher HERV antigen expression.

  14. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of multiple antigen peptides (MAP) containing P. vivax CS epitopes in Aotus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Herrera, S; De Plata, C; González, M; Perlaza, B L; Bettens, F; Corradin, G; Arévalo-Herrera, M

    1997-04-01

    Using linear synthetic peptides corresponding to the Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the common type, we have identified several T and B-cell epitopes recognized by human individuals. Three T-cell epitopes studied (p6) from the amino, (p11) from the central and (p25) from the carboxyl regions, were widely recognized by lymphocytes of immune donors. A series of six peptides, in addition to p11, representing the central repeat domain of the CS(p11-p17) protein were used in ELISA assays to map the B-cell epitopes of this region. P11 was the peptide most frequently recognized by sera containing antibodies to the homologous CS protein as determined by IFAT. The sequences corresponding to peptides p6, p11 and P25 as well as that representing a universal T-cell epitope derived from the tetanus toxin were used to assemble eight different Multiple Antigen Peptides (MAP). The immunogenicity of these MAP was analysed in Aotus monkeys. Groups of two animals were immunized with each MAP and both antibody response, T-lymphocyte proliferation and in vitro gamma-IFN production were evaluated. Two MAPs containing the same B-cell epitope and either a promiscuous CS-protein derived T-cell epitope (p25) or the tetanus toxin epitope (p-tt30) proved to be the most immunogenic and induced high levels of anti-peptide antibodies that recognized the native protein. Except for animals immunized with MAP VII, there was no correlation between antibody levels, lymphocyte proliferation or gamma-IFN production in vitro. The broad recognition of these epitopes by individuals which had been exposed to malaria, the capacity of these MAPs to induce antibodies, recognize the cognate protein, and in vitro gamma-IFN production encourages further analyses of the potential of these proteins as malaria vaccine candidates for human use.

  15. Induction of the c-myc protooncogene following antigen binding to hapten-specific B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, E.C.; Fetherston, J.; Zimmer, S.

    1986-03-01

    Considerable controversy has centered on the role that the surface immunoglobulin (sIg) receptor for antigen plays during the induction of B cell activation. Stimulation by anti-Ig reagents has been shown to activate G/sub 0/ B cells to enter the cell cycle. The binding of thymus-dependent antigens to hapten-specific B cell populations apparently does not result in the movement of the antigen-binding cells (ABC) into the G/sub 1/ stage of the cell cycle. However, the authors have recently demonstrated that antigen binding to such hapten-specific B cells does result in the initiation of the membrane phosphatidylinositol cycle. In the present experiments, hapten-specific B cells (80-90% ABC, 99% in G/sub 0/) were incubated with either the correct hapten-carrier conjugate, with the carrier protein, or only media for 2 hours at 37/sup 0/C. At that time, total cellular RNA was isolated and subsequently analyzed by either dot blots or Northern gel techniques. The blots were probed with a (/sup 32/P)-c-myc SstI-Xhol fragment. The results indicate that hapten carrier stimulation of the hapten-specific B cells induces enhanced transcription of the c-myc gene. These observations lend further support to the premise that antigen binding to the sIg receptor results in the transduction to the cell of important signals and implicates the active participation of sIg during the process of antigen-mediated B cell activation.

  16. Concentration-dependent effect of fibrinogen on IgG-specific antigen binding and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Tobias Konrad; Sojar, Hakimuddin; Denardin, Ernesto

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to characterize fibrinogen-IgG interactions, and explore how fibrinogen alters IgG-mediated phagocytosis. Using enzyme-linked binding assays, we found that fibrinogen binding to IgG is optimized for surfaces coated with high levels of IgG. Using a similar method, we have shown that for an antigen unable to specifically bind fibrinogen, fibrinogen enhances binding of antibodies towards that antigen. For binding of IgG antibodies to cells expressing Fc receptors, we found a bimodal binding response, where low levels of fibrinogen enhance binding of antibody to Fc receptors and high levels reduce it. This corresponds to a bimodal effect on phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles, which is inhibited in the presence of excess IgG during coating of the particles with antibodies and fibrinogen. We conclude that fibrinogen can modulate phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles in vitro by changing IgG binding behavior, and that high fibrinogen levels could negatively affect phagocytosis.

  17. Identification of multiple equine infectious anemia antigens by immunodiffusion reactions.

    PubMed

    Malmquist, W A; Becvar, C S

    1975-10-01

    Equine infectious anemia (EIA) cell antigens prepared from infected equine spleen, equine leukocyte cultures or a persistently infected equine dermis cell line contained at least two serologically reacting components. For convenience one component was designated as soluble antigen (SA) and the other as cell-associated antigen (CAA). The SA appeared as a single component when it was prepared from EIA virus precipitated from infectious tissue culture fluid with polyethylene glycol and ether treated but it was mixed with CAA when the source was infected cells. Cytolytic or mechanical disruption of infected cells appeared to accelerate the release of CAA. Reaction to each component could be identified in double and radial immunodiffusion tests by increasing the concentrations of SA in a two-component antigenic mixture. The CAA component does not appear to affect the value of the immunodiffusion test as a diagnostic aid.

  18. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Jr., Joseph J.

    2012-10-16

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan ({sup 5F}W). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that {sup 5F}W incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when {sup 5F}W was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. {sup 19}F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each {sup 5F}W in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody-antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody-antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques.

  19. Increased exposure to Plasmodium chabaudi antigens sustains cross-reactivity and avidity of antibodies binding Nippostrongylus brasiliensis: dissecting cross-phylum cross-reactivity in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Fairlie-Clarke, Karen J; Hansen, Christina; Allen, Judith E; Graham, Andrea L

    2015-12-01

    Mounting an antibody response capable of discriminating amongst and appropriately targeting different parasites is crucial in host defence. However, cross-reactive antibodies that recognize (bind to) multiple parasite species are well documented. We aimed to determine if a higher inoculating dose of one species, and thus exposure to larger amounts of antigen over a longer period of time, would fine-tune responses to that species and reduce cross-reactivity. Using the Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi (Pcc)-Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Nb) co-infection model in BALB/c mice, in which we previously documented cross-reactive antibodies, we manipulated the inoculating dose of Pcc across 4 orders of magnitude. We investigated antigen-specific and cross-reactive antibody responses against crude and defined recombinant antigens by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot and antibody depletion assays. Contrary to our hypothesis that increasing exposure to Pcc would reduce cross-reactivity to Nb, we found evidence for increased avidity of a subpopulation of antibodies that recognized shared antigens. Western blot indicated proteins of apparent monomer molecular mass 28 and 98 kDa in both Nb and Pcc antigen preparations and also an Nb protein of similar size to recombinant Pcc antigen, merozoite surface protein-1(19). The implications of antibodies binding antigen from such phylogenetically distinct parasites are discussed.

  20. Characterization of antibody binding to cell surface antigens using a plasma membrane-bound plate assay.

    PubMed

    Vater, C A; Reid, K; Bartle, L M; Goldmacher, V S

    1995-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for measuring antibody binding to cell surface antigens using an immobilized plasma membrane fraction. In this method, isolated plasma membranes are dried onto wells of a 96-well microtiter plate and incubated with antibodies that recognize a cell surface protein. Bound antibody is detected indirectly using an enzyme-linked or fluorescently tagged second antibody. Alternatively, the primary antibody itself can be labeled and its binding can be detected directly. The assay is simple and fast and provides several advantages over whole cell binding assays currently in widespread use.

  1. Evidence for diversifying selection on erythrocyte-binding antigens of Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Jake; Thomas, Alan W; Conway, David J

    2003-01-01

    Malaria parasite antigens involved in erythrocyte invasion are primary vaccine candidates. The erythrocyte-binding antigen 175K (EBA-175) of Plasmodium falciparum binds to glycophorin A on the human erythrocyte surface via an N-terminal cysteine-rich region (termed region II) and is a target of antibody responses. A survey of polymorphism in a malaria-endemic population shows that nucleotide alleles in eba-175 region II occur at more intermediate frequencies than expected under neutrality, but polymorphisms in the homologous domains of two closely related genes, eba-140 (encoding a second erythrocyte-binding protein) and psieba-165 (a putative pseudogene), show an opposite trend. McDonald-Kreitman tests employing interspecific comparison with the orthologous genes in P. reichenowi (a closely related parasite of chimpanzees) reveal a significant excess of nonsynonymous polymorphism in P. falciparum eba-175 but not in eba-140. An analysis of the Duffy-binding protein gene, encoding a major erythrocyte-binding antigen in the other common human malaria parasite P. vivax, also reveals a significant excess of nonsynonymous polymorphisms when compared with divergence from its ortholog in P. knowlesi (a closely related parasite of macaques). The results suggest that EBA-175 in P. falciparum and DBP in P. vivax are both under diversifying selection from acquired human immune responses. PMID:12702678

  2. Neisserial Heparin Binding Antigen (NHBA) Contributes to the Adhesion of Neisseria meningitidis to Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vacca, Irene; Del Tordello, Elena; Gasperini, Gianmarco; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Di Fede, Martina; Rossi Paccani, Silvia; Marchi, Sara; Mubaiwa, Tsisti D.; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E.; Jennings, Michael P.; Seib, Kate L.; Masignani, Vega; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Serruto, Davide; Aricò, Beatrice; Delany, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Neisserial Heparin Binding Antigen (NHBA) is a surface-exposed lipoprotein ubiquitously expressed by Neisseria meningitidis strains and an antigen of the Bexsero® vaccine. NHBA binds heparin through a conserved Arg-rich region that is the target of two proteases, the meningococcal NalP and human lactoferrin (hLf). In this work, in vitro studies showed that recombinant NHBA protein was able to bind epithelial cells and mutations of the Arg-rich tract abrogated this binding. All N-terminal and C-terminal fragments generated by NalP or hLf cleavage, regardless of the presence or absence of the Arg-rich region, did not bind to cells, indicating that a correct positioning of the Arg-rich region within the full length protein is crucial. Moreover, binding was abolished when cells were treated with heparinase III, suggesting that this interaction is mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). N. meningitidis nhba knockout strains showed a significant reduction in adhesion to epithelial cells with respect to isogenic wild-type strains and adhesion of the wild-type strain was inhibited by anti-NHBA antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, the results demonstrate that NHBA contributes to meningococcal adhesion to epithelial cells through binding to HSPGs and suggest a possible role of anti-Bexsero® antibodies in the prevention of colonization. PMID:27780200

  3. Binding of Streptococcus mutans antigens to heart and kidney basement membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, M W; Barua, P K; Bergey, E J; Nisengard, R J; Neiders, M E; Albini, B

    1984-01-01

    Using indirect immunofluorescence, alkali-extracted components of Streptococcus mutans were found to bind in vitro to capillary walls and sarcolemmal sheaths of monkey cardiac muscle and to glomerular and tubular basement membranes of monkey kidney. Adsorption of S. mutans components to tissue fragments was also detected by indirect radioimmunoassay and immunoblotting on nitrocellulose paper. Antibodies did not bind to untreated, control tissues in these experiments, proving that antigens shared by S. mutans and tissue components were not involved. Rabbit and monkey heart and kidney components bound S. mutans antigens of 24,000, 35,000, and 65,000 Mr. Monkey heart also bound molecules of 90,000 and 120,000 Mr. Rabbits immunized by intravenous injection of disrupted S. mutans cells developed severe nephritis that was characterized by the deposition of immunoglobulins, complement component C3, and S. mutans antigens in the glomeruli. Immunoglobulin G eluted from nephritic kidneys reacted in immunoblots with the 24,000, 35,000, and 65,000 Mr components of S. mutans extract, indicating that the antigens that bound to tissue in vitro also bound in vivo and reacted with antibodies in situ. Antibodies to other S. mutans antigens were not detected in the kidney eluate, although they were present in the serum of the same rabbit. Images PMID:6384042

  4. Antigen-binding site protection during radiolabeling leads to a higher immunoreactive fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Abbeele, A.D.; Aaronson, R.A.; Daher, S.; Taube, R.A.; Adelstein, S.J.; Kassis, A.I. )

    1991-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the immunointegrity of an antibody (Ab) depends on the preservation of its antigen-binding sites. Our goal was to radiolabel an antibody at several iodine:antibody molar ratios under conditions protecting its combining site and to compare its immunoreactive fraction (IRF) and electrophoretic mobility with those of the same antibody radiolabeled without protection. The data indicate that an antibody radiolabeled while its antigen-binding site is occupied by its antigen had the same IRF, regardless of the number of iodine atoms per antibody molecule. On the other hand, even at an I:Ab ratio of 1:1, the IRF of the same antibody radiolabeled without protection was lower than that of a protected one and decreased with increasing I:Ab ratios. In addition, the iodination of these Ab changes their electrophoretic mobility; however, when the Ab is labeled in the protected state, the degree of change is less. The binding of an antibody to its antigen prior to radiolabeling, therefore, enhances its immuno-integrity and prevents major conformational changes as reflected by electrophoresis.

  5. Quantitative Assessment of the Effects of Oxidants on Antigen-Antibody Binding In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuang; Wang, Guanyu; Xu, Naijin; Liu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We quantitatively assessed the influence of oxidants on antigen-antibody-binding activity. Methods. We used several immunological detection methods, including precipitation reactions, agglutination reactions, and enzyme immunoassays, to determine antibody activity. The oxidation-reduction potential was measured in order to determine total serum antioxidant capacity. Results. Certain concentrations of oxidants resulted in significant inhibition of antibody activity but had little influence on total serum antioxidant capacity. Conclusions. Oxidants had a significant influence on interactions between antigen and antibody, but minimal effect on the peptide of the antibody molecule. PMID:27313823

  6. Identification of multiple equine infectious anemia antigens by immunodiffusion reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Malmquist, W A; Becvar, C S

    1975-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia (EIA) cell antigens prepared from infected equine spleen, equine leukocyte cultures or a persistently infected equine dermis cell line contained at least two serologically reacting components. For convenience one component was designated as soluble antigen (SA) and the other as cell-associated antigen (CAA). The SA appeared as a single component when it was prepared from EIA virus precipitated from infectious tissue culture fluid with polyethylene glycol and ether treated but it was mixed with CAA when the source was infected cells. Cytolytic or mechanical disruption of infected cells appeared to accelerate the release of CAA. Reaction to each component could be identified in double and radial immunodiffusion tests by increasing the concentrations of SA in a two-component antigenic mixture. The CAA component does not appear to affect the value of the immunodiffusion test as a diagnostic aid. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4a. Fig. 4b. Fig. 4c. Fig. 5a. Fig. 5b. PMID:169969

  7. A Computational Analysis of ATP Binding of SV40 Large Tumor Antigen Helicase Motor

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yemin; Liu, Hanbin; Gai, Dahai; Ma, Jianpeng; Chen, Xiaojiang S.

    2009-01-01

    Simian Virus 40 Large Tumor Antigen (LTag) is an efficient helicase motor that unwinds and translocates DNA. The DNA unwinding and translocation of LTag is powered by ATP binding and hydrolysis at the nucleotide pocket between two adjacent subunits of an LTag hexamer. Based on the set of high-resolution hexameric structures of LTag helicase in different nucleotide binding states, we simulated a conformational transition pathway of the ATP binding process using the targeted molecular dynamics method and calculated the corresponding energy profile using the linear response approximation (LRA) version of the semi-macroscopic Protein Dipoles Langevin Dipoles method (PDLD/S). The simulation results suggest a three-step process for the ATP binding from the initial interaction to the final tight binding at the nucleotide pocket, in which ATP is eventually “locked” by three pairs of charge-charge interactions across the pocket. Such a “cross-locking” ATP binding process is similar to the binding zipper model reported for the F1-ATPase hexameric motor. The simulation also shows a transition mechanism of Mg2+ coordination to form the Mg-ATP complex during ATP binding, which is accompanied by the large conformational changes of LTag. This simulation study of the ATP binding process to an LTag and the accompanying conformational changes in the context of a hexamer leads to a refined cooperative iris model that has been proposed previously. PMID:19779548

  8. Dynamics behind affinity maturation of an anti-HCMV antibody family influencing antigen binding.

    PubMed

    Di Palma, Francesco; Tramontano, Anna

    2017-08-03

    The investigation of antibody affinity maturation and its effects on antigen binding is important with respect to understanding the regulation of the immune response. To shed light on this crucial process, we analyzed two Igs neutralizing the human cytomegalovirus: the primary germline antibody M2J1 and its related mature antibody 8F9. Both antibodies target the AD-2S1 epitope of the gB envelope protein and are considered to establish similar interactions with the cognate antigen. We used molecular dynamics simulations to understand the effect of mutations on the antibody-antigen interactions. The results provide a qualitative explanation for the increased 8F9 peptide affinity compared with that of M2J1. The emerging atomistic-detailed description of these complexes reveals the molecular effects of the somatic hypermutations occurring during affinity maturation. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. Serum B-cell maturation antigen: a novel biomarker to predict outcomes for multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Ghermezi, Michael; Li, Mingjie; Vardanyan, Suzie; Harutyunyan, Nika Manik; Gottlieb, Jillian; Berenson, Ariana; Spektor, Tanya M; Andreu-Vieyra, Claudia; Petraki, Sophia; Sanchez, Eric; Udd, Kyle; Wang, Cathy S; Swift, Regina A; Chen, Haiming; Berenson, James R

    2017-04-01

    B-cell maturation antigen is expressed on plasma cells. In this study, we have identified serum B-cell maturation antigen as a novel biomarker that can monitor and predict outcomes for multiple myeloma patients. Compared to healthy donors, patients with multiple myeloma showed elevated serum B-cell maturation antigen levels (P<0.0001). Serum B-cell maturation antigen levels correlated with the proportion of plasma cells in bone marrow biopsies (Spearman's rho = 0.710; P<0.001), clinical status (complete response vs partial response, P=0.0374; complete response vs progressive disease, P<0.0001), and tracked with changes in M-protein levels. Among patients with non-secretory disease, serum B-cell maturation antigen levels correlated with bone marrow plasma cell levels and findings from positron emission tomography scans. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that serum B-cell maturation antigen levels above the median levels were predictive of a shorter progression-free survival (P=0.0006) and overall survival (P=0.0108) among multiple myeloma patients (n=243). Specifically, patients with serum B-cell maturation antigen levels above the median level at the time of starting front-line (P=0.0043) or a new salvage therapy (P=0.0044) were found to have shorter progression-free survival. Importantly, serum B-cell maturation antigen levels did not show any dependence on renal function and maintained independent significance when tested against other known prognostic markers for multiple myeloma such as age, serum β2 microglobulin, hemoglobin, and bone disease. These data identify serum B-cell maturation antigen as a new biomarker to manage multiple myeloma patients. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  10. Voltage-induced inhibition of antigen-antibody binding at conducting optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Liron, Zvi; Tender, Leonard M; Golden, Joel P; Ligler, Frances S

    2002-06-01

    Optical waveguides coated with electrically conducting indium-tin oxide (ITO) are demonstrated here as a new class of substrate for fluorescent immunosensors. These waveguides combine electrochemical control with evanescent excitation and image-based detection. Presented here are preliminary results utilizing these waveguides that demonstrate influence of waveguide voltage on antigen binding. Specifically, waveguide surfaces were bisected into electrically addressable halves, anti-ovalbumin immobilized in patterns on their surfaces, and a 1.3 V bias applied between waveguide halves in the presence of Cy5-labeled ovalbumin in 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) containing 150 mM NaCl and 0.05% Tween-20. Fluorescence imaging indicated that binding of the antigen to positively biased waveguide halves was inhibited nearly 10-fold compared with negatively biased waveguide halves and unbiased controls. Furthermore, it is shown that ovalbumin binding to positively biased waveguide regions is regenerated after removal of applied voltage. These results suggest that electrochemical control of immunosensor substrates can be used as a possible strategy toward minimizing cross-reactive binding and/or nonspecific adsorption, immunosensor regeneration, and controlled binding.

  11. Characterization of anti-anti-idiotypic antibodies that bind antigen and an anti-idiotype

    PubMed Central

    Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Velikovsky, C. Alejandro; Dall’Acqua, William; Fossati, Carlos A.; Fields, Barry A.; Braden, Bradford C.; Poljak, Roberto J.; Mariuzza, Roy A.

    1997-01-01

    Two mouse monoclonal anti-anti-idiotopic antibodies (anti-anti-Id, Ab3), AF14 and AF52, were prepared by immunizing BALB/c mice with rabbit polyclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-Id, Ab2) raised against antibody D1.3 (Ab1) specific for the antigen hen egg lysozyme. AF14 and AF52 react with an “internal image” monoclonal mouse anti-Id antibody E5.2 (Ab2), previously raised against D1.3, with affinity constants (1.0 × 109 M−1 and 2.4 × 107 M−1, respectively) usually observed in secondary responses against protein antigens. They also react with the antigen but with lower affinity (1.8 × 106 M−1 and 3.8 × 106 M−1). This pattern of affinities for the anti-Id and for the antigen also was displayed by the sera of the immunized mice. The amino acid sequences of AF14 and AF52 are very close to that of D1.3. In particular, the amino acid side chains that contribute to contacts with both antigen and anti-Id are largely conserved in AF14 and AF52 compared with D1.3. Therapeutic immunizations against different pathogenic antigens using anti-Id antibodies have been proposed. Our experiments show that a response to an anti-Id immunogen elicits anti-anti-Id antibodies that are optimized for binding the anti-Id antibodies rather than the antigen. PMID:9238040

  12. An ELISA test for the binding of von Willebrand antigen to collagen.

    PubMed

    Brown, J E; Bosak, J O

    1986-08-01

    Collagen (soluble bovine tendon type I) coated onto microtiter plates binds von Willebrand antigen (vW:Ag) in a dose-dependent manner. An ELISA test was set up with both antibody and collagen coated microtiter plates. Test specimens assayed were: 1) normal plasmas, 2) type I vW plasmas, 3) type IIa vW plasmas, and 4) factor VIII concentrates (KoateR, Cutter; Conco-VIII, Green Cross). Normal and type I vW plasmas exhibited comparable values for vW:Ag in binding studies to both collagen and antibody-coated plates. Type IIa vW plasmas demonstrated decreased (less than 1/2) collagen to antibody-binding ratios. Ristocetin cofactor (VIII:RCO) levels in type IIa vW plasmas correlated with quantified collagen-binding levels. Factor VIII concentrates show variable results when comparing collagen and antibody-binding levels. A comparison of vW:Ag ELISA (antibody) with VIII:RCO shows ratios of 2:1 (KoatR) or 20:1 (Conco-VIII). Collagen-binding ELISA levels in concentrates show parallel decreases, reflecting presumed binding to collagen of only the high M.W. multimers. The vW:Ag collagen binding ELISA represents a possible replacement assay for the laborious and imprecise VIII:RCO method of measurement of in vitro vWf functional activity.

  13. Consensus topography in the ATP binding site of the simian virus 40 and polyomavirus large tumor antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, M.K.; Smith, T.F.; Lathrop, R.H.; Livingston, D.M.; Webster, T.A.

    1987-06-01

    The location and sequence composition of a consensus element of the nucleotide binding site in both simian virus 40 (SV40) and polyomavirus (PyV) large tumor antigens (T antigens) can be predicted with the assistance of a computer-based pattern-matching system, ARIADNE. The latter was used to optimally align elements of T antigen primary sequence and predicted secondary structure with a descriptor for a mononucleotide binding fold. Additional consensus elements of the nucleotide binding site in these two proteins were derived from comparisons of T antigen primary and predicted secondary structures with x-ray structures of the nucleotide binding sites in four otherwise unrelated proteins. Each of these elements was predicted to be encompassed within a 110-residue segment that is highly conserved between the two T antigens residues 418-528 in SV 40 T antigen and residues 565-675 in PyV. Results of biochemical and immunologic experiments on the nucleotide binding behavior of these proteins using (/sup 32/P)-Amp-labeled SV40 T antigen, were found to be consistent with these predictions. Taken together, the latter have resulted in a topological model of the ATP binding site in these two oncogene products.

  14. Polypharmacology within CXCR4: Multiple binding sites and allosteric behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planesas, Jesús M.; Pérez-Nueno, Violeta I.; Borrell, José I.; Teixidó, Jordi

    2014-10-01

    CXCR4 is a promiscuous receptor, which binds multiple diverse ligands. As usual in promiscuous proteins, CXCR4 has a large binding site, with multiple subsites, and high flexibility. Hence, it is not surprising that it is involved in the phenomenon of allosteric modulation. However, incomplete knowledge of allosteric ligand-binding sites has hampered an in-depth molecular understanding of how these inhibitors work. For example, it is known that lipidated fragments of intracellular GPCR loops, so called pepducins, such as pepducin ATI-2341, modulate CXCR4 activity using an agonist allosteric mechanism. Nevertheless, there are also examples of small organic molecules, such as AMD11070 and GSK812397, which may act as antagonist allosteric modulators. Here, we give new insights into this issue by proposing the binding interactions between the CXCR4 receptor and the above-mentioned allosteric modulators. We propose that CXCR4 has minimum two topographically different allosteric binding sites. One allosteric site would be in the intracellular loop 1 (ICL1) where pepducin ATI-2341 would bind to CXCR4, and the second one, in the extracellular side of CXCR4 in a subsite into the main orthosteric binding pocket, delimited by extracellular loops n° 1, 2, and the N-terminal end, where antagonists AMD11070 and GSK812397 would bind. Prediction of allosteric interactions between CXCR4 and pepducin ATI-2341 were studied first by rotational blind docking to determine the main binding region and a subsequent refinement of the best pose was performed using flexible docking methods and molecular dynamics. For the antagonists AMD11070 and GSK812397, the entire CXCR4 protein surface was explored by blind docking to define the binding region. A second docking analysis by subsites of the identified binding region was performed to refine the allosteric interactions. Finally, we identified the binding residues that appear to be essential for CXCR4 (agonists and antagonists) allosteric

  15. Multiple Antigenic Sites Are Involved in Blocking the Interaction of GII.4 Norovirus Capsid with ABH Histo-Blood Group Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Gabriel I.; Abente, Eugenio J.; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Bok, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Noroviruses are major etiological agents of acute viral gastroenteritis. In 2002, a GII.4 variant (Farmington Hills cluster) spread so rapidly in the human population that it predominated worldwide and displaced previous GII.4 strains. We developed and characterized a panel of six monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against the capsid protein of a Farmington Hills-like GII.4 norovirus strain that was associated with a large hospital outbreak in Maryland in 2004. The six MAbs reacted with high titers against homologous virus-like particles (VLPs) by enzyme-linked immunoassay but did not react with denatured capsid protein in immunoblots. The expression and self-assembly of newly developed genogroup I/II chimeric VLPs showed that five MAbs bound to the GII.4 protruding (P) domain of the capsid protein, while one recognized the GII.4 shell (S) domain. Cross-competition assays and mutational analyses showed evidence for at least three distinct antigenic sites in the P domain and one in the S domain. MAbs that mapped to the P domain but not the S domain were able to block the interaction of VLPs with ABH histo-blood group antigens (HBGA), suggesting that multiple antigenic sites of the P domain are involved in HBGA blocking. Further analysis showed that two MAbs mapped to regions of the capsid that had been associated with the emergence of new GII.4 variants. Taken together, our data map antibody and HBGA carbohydrate binding to proximal regions of the norovirus capsid, showing that evolutionary pressures on the norovirus capsid protein may affect both antigenic and carbohydrate recognition phenotypes. PMID:22532688

  16. Metastability of Helicobacter pylori bab adhesin genes and dynamics in Lewis b antigen binding

    PubMed Central

    Bäckström, Anna; Lundberg, Carina; Kersulyte, Dangeruta; Berg, Douglas E.; Borén, Thomas; Arnqvist, Anna

    2004-01-01

    Heterogeneity among Helicobacter pylori strains in gastric epithelial adherence is postulated to contribute to pathogen fitness in the physiologically diverse human population. H. pylori adherence to ABO and Lewis b (Leb) blood group antigens in the human stomach is mediated by the blood group antigen-binding adhesin BabA. Approximately 70% of Swedish and U.S. H. pylori clinical isolates exhibit Leb binding, but here we show that the babA gene is present in each of 10 Leb-nonbinding strains. Fluorescence microscopy identified occasional bacterial cells with a Leb-binding phenotype in populations of Leb-nonbinding strains. Thus, nonbinding seemed to be a metastable phenotype. To model metastable transition into the virulence-associated Leb-binding mode, Leb-binding clones were isolated from nonadherent strains by panning with Leb-magnetic beads and characterized. Strain 17875 has two babA genes, babA1 (silent) and babA2 (expressed). We found that a babA2-cam derivative of strain 17875 regained Leb binding by recombination of the formerly silent babA1 gene into the expressed and partially homologous babB locus. The chimeric BabB/A adhesin binds Leb with an affinity similar to that of wild-type BabA adhesin, but its expression level was lower and was subject to phase variation through slipped-strand mispairing. Equivalent results were obtained with strain NCTC11638. We propose that adhesin metastability and heterogeneity contributes to bacterial fitness and results in some clones having potential for periodic activation and deactivation of virulence appropriate for intensity of the host response to infection. PMID:15557006

  17. Structural Analysis of Determinants of Histo-Blood Group Antigen Binding Specificity in Genogroup I Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Shanker, Sreejesh; Czako, Rita; Sankaran, Banumathi; Atmar, Robert L.; Estes, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human noroviruses (NoVs) cause acute epidemic gastroenteritis. Susceptibility to the majority of NoV infections is determined by genetically controlled secretor-dependent expression of histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), which are also critical for NoV attachment to host cells. Human NoVs are classified into two major genogroups (genogroup I [GI] and GII), with each genogroup further divided into several genotypes. GII NoVs are more prevalent and exhibit periodic emergence of new variants, suggested to be driven by altered HBGA binding specificities and antigenic drift. Recent epidemiological studies show increased activity among GI NoVs, with some members showing the ability to bind nonsecretor HBGAs. NoVs bind HBGAs through the protruding (P) domain of the major capsid protein VP1. GI NoVs, similar to GII, exhibit significant sequence variations in the P domain; it is unclear how these variations affect HBGA binding specificities. To understand the determinants of possible strain-specific HBGA binding among GI NoVs, we determined the structure of the P domain of a GI.7 clinical isolate and compared it to the previously determined P domain structures of GI.1 and GI.2 strains. Our crystallographic studies revealed significant structural differences, particularly in the loop regions of the GI.7 P domain, altering its surface topography and electrostatic landscape and potentially indicating antigenic variation. The GI.7 strain bound to H- and A-type, Lewis secretor, and Lewis nonsecretor families of HBGAs, allowing us to further elucidate the structural determinants of nonsecretor HBGA binding among GI NoVs and to infer several contrasting and generalizable features of HBGA binding in the GI NoVs. IMPORTANCE Human noroviruses (NoVs) cause acute epidemic gastroenteritis. Recent epidemiological studies have shown increased prevalence of genogroup I (GI) NoVs. Although secretor-positive status is strongly correlated with NoV infection, cases of NoV infection

  18. Novel Drosophila receptor that binds multiple growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, M.R.; Thompson, K.L.; Garcia, V.; Decker, S.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have recently reported the identification of a novel growth factor receptor from Drosophila cell cultures that has dual binding specificity for both insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This 100 kDa protein is also antigenically related to the cytoplasmic region of the mammalian EGF receptor-tyrosine kinase. They now report that this protein binds to mammalian nerve growth factor and human transforming growth factor alpha as well as insulin and EGF with apparent dissociation constants ranging from 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -8/ M. The 100 kDa protein can be affinity-labeled with these /sup 125/I-labeled growth factors after immunoprecipitation with anti-EGF receptor antiserum. These four growth factors appear to share a common binding site, as evidenced by their ability to block affinity labelling by /sup 125/I-insulin. No significant binding to the 100 kDa protein was observed with platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, or glucagon. The 100 kDa Drosophila protein has a unique ligand-binding spectrum with no direct counterpart in mammalian cells and may represent an evolutionary precursor of the mammalian receptors for these growth factors.

  19. Multiple antigen-presenting system (MAPS) to induce comprehensive B- and T-cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Lu, Ying-Jie; Malley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines are among the most effective approaches to prevent and control many infectious diseases. Because of safety and reproducibility concerns, whole-cell vaccines (WCVs), made from live or killed microorganisms and including hundreds of antigenic components, have been mostly replaced by acellular or subunit vaccines composed of well-defined, purified antigen components. The efficacy of acellular vaccines is inferior to that of WCVs, however, for two major reasons: limited antigen diversity and reduced immunogenicity, especially in a lack of activation of antigen-specific T-cell immunity, which plays an important role in protection against mucosal and intracellular pathogens. Here we present the multiple antigen-presenting system (MAPS), which enables the creation of a macromolecular complex that mimics the properties of WCVs by integrating various antigen components, including polysaccharides and proteins, in the same construct and that induces multipronged immune responses, including antibody, Th1, and Th17 responses. Using antigens from various pathogens (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Salmonella typhi, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis), we demonstrate the versatility of the MAPS system and its feasibility for the design of unique defined-structure subunit vaccines to confer comprehensive protection via multiple immune mechanisms. Moreover, MAPS can serve as a tool for structure-activity analysis of cellular immunogens. PMID:23898212

  20. A fully synthetic glycopeptide antitumor vaccine based on multiple antigen presentation on a hyperbranched polymer.

    PubMed

    Glaffig, Markus; Palitzsch, Björn; Hartmann, Sebastian; Schüll, Christoph; Nuhn, Lutz; Gerlitzki, Bastian; Schmitt, Edgar; Frey, Holger; Kunz, Horst

    2014-04-07

    For antitumor vaccines both the selected tumor-associated antigen, as well as the mode of its presentation, affect the immune response. According to the principle of multiple antigen presentation, a tumor-associated MUC1 glycopeptide combined with the immunostimulating T-cell epitope P2 from tetanus toxoid was coupled to a multi-functionalized hyperbranched polyglycerol by "click chemistry". This globular polymeric carrier has a flexible dendrimer-like structure, which allows optimal antigen presentation to the immune system. The resulting fully synthetic vaccine induced strong immune responses in mice and IgG antibodies recognizing human breast-cancer cells.

  1. Antigen Binding and Site-Directed Labeling of Biosilica-Immobilized Fusion Proteins Expressed in Diatoms

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Nicole R.; Hecht, Karen A.; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Xiong, Yijia; Squier, Thomas; Rorrer, Gregory L.; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2016-01-08

    The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was genetically modified to express biosilica-targeted fusion proteins incorporating a tetracysteine tag for site-directed labeling with biarsenical affinity probes and either EGFP or single chain antibody to test colocalization of probes with the EGFP-tagged recombinant protein or binding of biosilica-immobilized antibodies to large and small molecule antigens, respectively. Site-directed labeling with the biarsenical probes demonstrated colocalization with EGFP-encoded proteins in nascent and mature biosilica, supporting their use in studying biosilica maturation. Isolated biosilica transformed with a single chain antibody against either the Bacillus anthracis surface layer protein EA1 or small molecule explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT) effectively bound the respective antigens. A marked increase in fluorescence lifetime of the TNT surrogate Alexa Fluor 555-trinitrobenzene reflected the high binding specificity of the transformed isolated biosilica. These results demonstrated the potential use of biosilica-immobilized single chain antibodies as binders for large and small molecule antigens in sensing and therapeutics.

  2. Expression of CD3-associated antigen-binding receptors on suppressor T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kuchroo, V K; Steele, J K; Billings, P R; Selvaraj, P; Dorf, M E

    1988-01-01

    Three suppressor T (Ts)-cell hybridomas specific for 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl (NP) hapten were selected for surface expression of cluster determinant 3 (CD3) by using antibody (anti-CD3) or antigen (NP-bovine serum albumin) panning procedures followed by cloning at limiting dilution. The CD3-selected Ts hybridomas showed a 1-2 logarithmic enrichment in suppressor activity when compared to the parent lines; they also specifically bound NP-coupled sheep red blood cells in rosette assays. This antigen-binding ability could be down-modulated by anti-CD3 antibody. Similarly, surface expression of CD3 was specifically down-modulated by preincubation of these hybridomas with antigen. Anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody under reducing conditions coprecipitated a broad band of 38-50 kDa associated with two CD3 (25 and 16 kDa) bands. T-cell receptor, anti-alpha-specific monoclonal antibody also immunoprecipitated a broad band in the 41 to 49-kDa region. The combined results suggest that, like helper and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, Ts cells also bear antigen-specific receptors associated with CD3 molecules. Images PMID:2973609

  3. Optimizing immobilization on two-dimensional carboxyl surface: pH dependence of antibody orientation and antigen binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhichao; Anderson, Henrik; Myrskog, Annica; Dunér, Gunnar; Ingemarsson, Björn; Aastrup, Teodor

    2010-03-15

    The performance of immunosensors is highly dependent on the amount of immobilized antibodies and their remaining antigen binding capacity. In this work, a method for immobilization of antibodies on a two-dimensional carboxyl surface has been optimized using quartz crystal microbalance biosensors. We show that successful immobilization is highly dependent on surface pK(a), antibody pI, and pH of immobilization buffer. By the use of EDC/sulfo-NHS (1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide) activation reagents, the effect of the intrinsic surface pK(a) is avoided and immobilization at very low pH is therefore possible, and this is important for immobilization of acidic proteins. Antigen binding capacity as a function of immobilization pH was studied. In most cases, the antigen binding capacity followed the immobilization response. However, the antigen-to-antibody binding ratio differed between the antibodies investigated, and for one of the antibodies the antigen binding capacity was significantly lower than expected from immobilization in a certain pH range. Tests with anti-Fc and anti-Fab(2) antibodies on different antibody surfaces indicated that the orientation of the antibodies on the surface had a profound effect on the antigen binding capacity of the immobilized antibodies. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Serine repeat antigen peptides which bind specifically to red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Puentes, A; Garcia, J; Vera, R; Lopez, Q R; Urquiza, M; Vanegas, M; Salazar, L M; Patarroyo, M E

    2000-08-01

    It has been reported that serine repeat antigen (SERA) binds directly to human erythrocyte membranes, inside-out vesicles and intact mouse erythrocytes. Similarly, mAbs specific against SERA are effective in blocking red blood cell (RBC) invasion by P. falciparum merozoites. Furthermore, the N-terminal recombinant SERA fragment inhibits the merozoite invasion of erythrocyte. In this study of 49 non-overlapping 20-residue-long peptides encompassing the whole SERA protein FCR3 strain, seven peptides having high RBC binding activity were found. Six of these peptides (three from the SERA N-terminal domain) are located in conserved regions and show affinity constants between 150 and 1100 nM, Hill coefficients between 1.5 and 3.0 and 30000-120000 binding sites per cell. Some of these peptides inhibited in vitro merozoite invasion of erythrocyte and intra-erythrocytic development. Residues which are critical in the binding to erythrocytes (in bold face), i.e. 6725 (YLKETNNAISFESNSGSLEKK), 6733 (YALGSDIPEKCDTLASNCFLS), 6737 (YDNILVKMFKTNENNDKSELI), 6746 (DQGNCDTSWIFASKYHLETI), 6754 (YKKVQNLCGDDTADHAVNIVG) and 6762 (NEVSERVHVYHILKHIKDGK), were determined by means of competition assays with high-binding peptide glycine analogues. The identification of peptides which bind to erythrocyte membrane is important in understanding the process of RBC invasion by P. falciparum merozoites.

  5. Antigen Binding and Site-Directed Labeling of Biosilica-Immobilized Fusion Proteins Expressed in Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Ford, Nicole R; Hecht, Karen A; Hu, DeHong; Orr, Galya; Xiong, Yijia; Squier, Thomas C; Rorrer, Gregory L; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2016-03-18

    The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was genetically modified to express biosilica-targeted fusion proteins comprising either enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or single chain antibodies engineered with a tetracysteine tagging sequence. Of interest were the site-specific binding of (1) the fluorescent biarsenical probe AsCy3 and AsCy3e to the tetracysteine tagged fusion proteins and (2) high and low molecular mass antigens, the Bacillus anthracis surface layer protein EA1 or small molecule explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT), to biosilica-immobilized single chain antibodies. Analysis of biarsenical probe binding using fluorescence and structured illumination microscopy indicated differential colocalization with EGFP in nascent and mature biosilica, supporting the use of either EGFP or bound AsCy3 and AsCy3e in studying biosilica maturation. Large increases in the lifetime of a fluorescent analogue of TNT upon binding single chain antibodies provided a robust signal capable of discriminating binding to immobilized antibodies in the transformed frustule from nonspecific binding to the biosilica matrix. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an ability to engineer diatoms to create antibody-functionalized mesoporous silica able to selectively bind chemical and biological agents for the development of sensing platforms.

  6. Discrepancy Between Tumor Antigen Distribution and Radiolabeled Antibody Binding in a Nude Mouse Xenograft Model of Human Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Il; Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kang, Keon Wook; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key

    2017-04-01

    Biodistribution of antibodies is vital to successful immunoscintigraphy/immunotherapy, and it is assumed to be similar to antigen distribution. We measured and compared the binding pattern of radiolabeled antibody to tissue antigen distribution in a nude mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. We transplanted 10(7) FEM-XII human melanoma cells into the right flank of five nude mice. For the control, we transplanted 5 × 10(6) LS174T human colon cancer cells into the left flank. Two weeks later, 10 μCi of (131)I-labeled melanoma-associated 96.5 monoclonal antibody (targeting p97 antigen) was intravenously injected. Three days later, we sacrificed the mice and evaluated 96.5 antibody binding and concentration in the tumors by ex vivo quantitative autoradiography (QAR). Two months later, we incubated adjacent tumor tissue slices in various concentrations of (125)I-labeled 96.5 MoAb and evaluated the distribution/concentration of p97 antigen by in vitro QAR. p97 antigen distribution was homogeneous in the tumors (total antigen concentration [Bmax] = 17.36-38.36 pmol/g). In contrast, radiolabeled 96.5 antibody binding was heterogenous between location within the tumor (estimated bound antigen concentration = 0.7-6.6 pmol/g). No quantifiable parameters were found to be related with radiolabeled antibody binding and tumor antigen distribution. Antibody-bound tumor antigen to total antigen ratios ranged between 2% and 38%. Heterogeneous features of target antibody binding were observed in contrast to relatively homogenous feature of tumor antigen. We did not identify any correlations between p97 antigen distribution and 96.5 antibody binding in melanoma tissue. Radiolabeled 96.5 antibody binding patterns within melanoma cannot be predicted based on p97 antigen distribution in the tumor, which needs to be further studied with several other methods and more subjects in the future.

  7. Human recombinant domain antibodies against multiple sclerosis antigenic peptide CSF114(Glc).

    PubMed

    Niccheri, Francesca; Real-Fernàndez, Feliciana; Ramazzotti, Matteo; Lolli, Francesco; Rossi, Giada; Rovero, Paolo; Degl'Innocenti, Donatella

    2014-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic auto-immune disease characterized by a damage to the myelin component of the central nervous system. Self-antigens created by aberrant glycosylation have been described to be a key component in the formation of auto-antibodies. CSF114(Glc) is a synthetic glucopeptide detecting in vitro MS-specific auto-antibodies, and it is actively used in diagnostics and research to monitor and quantify MS-associated Ig levels. We reasoned that antibodies raised against this probe could have been relevant for MS. We therefore screened a human Domain Antibody library against CSF114(Glc) using magnetic separation as a panning method. We obtained and described several clones, and the one with the highest signals was produced as a 6×His-tagged protein to properly study the binding properties as a soluble antibody. By surface plasmon resonance measurements, we evidenced that our clone recognized CSF114(Glc) with high affinity and specific for the glucosylated peptide. Kinetic parameters of peptide-clone interaction were calculated obtaining a value of KD in the nanomolar range. Harboring a human framework, this antibody should be very well tolerated by human immune system and may represent a valuable tool for MS diagnosis and therapy, paving the way to new research strategies.

  8. Influence of particle size and antigen binding on effectiveness of aluminum salt adjuvants in a model lysozyme vaccine.

    PubMed

    Clausi, Amber; Cummiskey, Jessica; Merkley, Scott; Carpenter, John F; Braun, Latoya Jones; Randolph, Theodore W

    2008-12-01

    It has been suggested that agglomeration of aluminum salt adjuvant particles during freezing and drying can cause loss of immunogenicity of vaccines formulated with such adjuvants. In this study, we tested this hypothesis and examined the immune response in a murine model to various liquid, freeze-thawed, and lyophilized vaccine formulations, using lysozyme as a model antigen. The various processing techniques and excipient levels resulted in a wide range of particle size distributions (PSDs) and antigen-adjuvant binding levels. Anti-lysozyme titers were independent of the PSD for vaccines adjuvanted with either aluminum hydroxide or aluminum phosphate and also were unaffected by the level of antigen binding to the adjuvant.

  9. Decoration of Outer Membrane Vesicles with Multiple Antigens by Using an Autotransporter Approach

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Tristan; Soprova, Zora; ten Hagen-Jongman, Corinne M.; Vikström, David; Majlessi, Laleh; Beskers, Joep; Follmann, Frank; de Punder, Karin; van der Wel, Nicole N.; Baumgarten, Thomas; Pham, Thang V.; Piersma, Sander R.; Jiménez, Connie R.; van Ulsen, Peter; de Gier, Jan-Willem; Leclerc, Claude; Jong, Wouter S. P.

    2014-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spherical nanoparticles that naturally shed from Gram-negative bacteria. They are rich in immunostimulatory proteins and lipopolysaccharide but do not replicate, which increases their safety profile and renders them attractive vaccine vectors. By packaging foreign polypeptides in OMVs, specific immune responses can be raised toward heterologous antigens in the context of an intrinsic adjuvant. Antigens exposed at the vesicle surface have been suggested to elicit protection superior to that from antigens concealed inside OMVs, but hitherto robust methods for targeting heterologous proteins to the OMV surface have been lacking. We have exploited our previously developed hemoglobin protease (Hbp) autotransporter platform for display of heterologous polypeptides at the OMV surface. One, two, or three of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens ESAT6, Ag85B, and Rv2660c were targeted to the surface of Escherichia coli OMVs upon fusion to Hbp. Furthermore, a hypervesiculating ΔtolR ΔtolA derivative of attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 was generated, enabling efficient release and purification of OMVs decorated with multiple heterologous antigens, exemplified by the M. tuberculosis antigens and epitopes from Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein (MOMP). Also, we showed that delivery of Salmonella OMVs displaying Ag85B to antigen-presenting cells in vitro results in processing and presentation of an epitope that is functionally recognized by Ag85B-specific T cell hybridomas. In conclusion, the Hbp platform mediates efficient display of (multiple) heterologous antigens, individually or combined within one molecule, at the surface of OMVs. Detection of antigen-specific immune responses upon vesicle-mediated delivery demonstrated the potential of our system for vaccine development. PMID:25038093

  10. Native Mass Spectrometry, Ion mobility, and Collision-Induced Unfolding Categorize Malaria Antigen/Antibody Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yining; Salinas, Nichole D.; Chen, Edwin; Tolia, Niraj H.; Gross, Michael L.

    2017-09-01

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) is a promising vaccine candidate for P. vivax malaria. Recently, we reported the epitopes on PvDBP region II (PvDBP-II) for three inhibitory monoclonal antibodies (2D10, 2H2, and 2C6). In this communication, we describe the combination of native mass spectrometry and ion mobility (IM) with collision induced unfolding (CIU) to study the conformation and stabilities of three malarial antigen-antibody complexes. These complexes, when collisionally activated, undergo conformational changes that depend on the location of the epitope. CIU patterns for PvDBP-II in complex with antibody 2D10 and 2H2 are highly similar, indicating comparable binding topology and stability. A different CIU fingerprint is observed for PvDBP-II/2C6, indicating that 2C6 binds to PvDBP-II on an epitope different from 2D10 and 2H2. This work supports the use of CIU as a means of classifying antigen-antibody complexes by their epitope maps in a high throughput screening workflow. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Characterization of the DNA-binding properties of the origin-binding domain of simian virus 40 large T antigen by fluorescence anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Titolo, S; Welchner, E; White, P W; Archambault, J

    2003-05-01

    The affinity of the origin-binding domain (OBD) of simian virus 40 large T antigen for its cognate origin was measured at equilibrium using a DNA binding assay based on fluorescence anisotropy. At a near-physiological concentration of salt, the affinities of the OBD for site II and the core origin were 31 and 50 nM, respectively. Binding to any of the four 5'-GAGGC-3' binding sites in site II was only slightly weaker, between 57 and 150 nM. Although the OBD was shown previously to assemble as a dimer on two binding sites spaced by 7 bp, we found that increasing the distance between both binding sites by 1 to 3 bp had little effect on affinity. Similar results were obtained for full-length T antigen in absence of nucleotide. Addition of ADP-Mg, which promotes hexamerization of T antigen, greatly increased the affinity of full-length T antigen for the core origin and for nonspecific DNA. The implications of these findings for the assembly of T antigen at the origin and its transition to a non-specific DNA helicase are discussed.

  12. Seasonal tracking of histo-blood group antigen expression and norovirus binding in oyster gastrointestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Peng; Engelbrektson, Anna L; Mandrell, Robert E

    2008-08-01

    Noroviruses (NORs) are the most common cause of viral gastroenteritis outbreaks. Outbreaks are often associated with the consumption of contaminated oysters and generally occur between the months of November and March, when oysters produce the highest levels of glycogen. Oyster glycogen has been proposed as playing a role in NOR accumulation. Recent research indicates that histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) function as viral receptors on human gastrointestinal cells. In this study, oyster glycogen was tested to determine whether it contains HBGA-like molecules and whether it plays a role in NOR binding. The correlation between the amount of HBGA expression and NOR binding also was measured. We also tested whether seasonal changes affected HBGA expression and binding of recombinant NORs. The results indicate that recombinant NOR binding is highly correlated with HBGA expression in Virginica (Crassostrea virginica), Pacific (Crassostrea gigas), and Kumamato (Crassostrea sikamea) oysters, but the association does not have a seasonal pattern. No obvious trend in either HBGA expression or recombinant NOR binding by month was noted. A significant increase in recombinant NOR binding was observed in Virginica and Pacific oysters in a season not generally associated with NOR gastroenteritis outbreaks. A significant increase in HBGA expression also was observed for Pacific and Virginica oysters in the same season. Paradoxically, HBGA expression and NOR binding both were higher in oysters produced in the non-NOR gastroenteritis season (April through October) than in those produced in the NOR gastroenteritis season (November through March), suggesting that seasonal NOR gastroenteritis outbreaks are not associated with high levels of HBGA expression or NOR binding.

  13. Multiple mycobacterial antigens are targets of the adaptive immune response in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease for which the association with mycobacteria continues to strengthen. It is hypothesized that a single, poorly degradable antigen is responsible for sarcoidosis pathogenesis. Several reports from independent groups support mycobacterial antigens having a role in sarcoidosis pathogenesis. To identify other microbial targets of the adaptive immune response, we tested the ability of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to recognize multiple mycobacterial antigens. Methods Fifty-four subjects were enrolled in this study: 31 sarcoidosis patients, nine non-tuberculosis mycobacterial (NTM) infection controls, and 14 PPD- controls. Using flow cytometry, we assessed for Th1 immune responses to ESAT-6, katG, Ag85A, sodA, and HSP. Results Alveolar T-cells from twenty-two of the 31 sarcoidosis patients produced a CD4+ response to at least one of ESAT-6, katG, Ag85A, sodA, or HSP, compared to two of 14 PPD- controls (p = 0.0008) and five of nine NTM controls (p = 0.44), while eighteen of the 31 sarcoidosis subjects tested produced a CD8+ response to at least one of the mycobacterial antigens compared to two of 14 PPD- controls (p = 0.009) and three of nine NTM controls (0.26). Not only did the BAL-derived T cells respond to multiple virulence factors, but also to multiple, distinct epitopes within a given protein. The detection of proliferation upon stimulation with the mycobacterial virulence factors demonstrates that these responses are initiated by antigen specific recognition. Conclusions Together these results reveal that antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells responses to multiple mycobacterial epitopes are present within sites of active sarcoidosis involvement, and that these antigen-specific responses are present at the time of diagnosis. PMID:21092305

  14. Vital transfusion in patients with multiple antibodies against common erythrocyte antigens.

    PubMed

    Grífols, Joan-Ramon; Serrano, Alfons; Ester, Anna; Juncà, Jordi; Muñiz, Eduard

    2009-04-01

    The transfusion of blood components could be needed in certain types of surgical procedures. Blood type components and the requested number of units will depend on the estimated loss of blood, type of surgery, surgical technique to be employed and risk factors for bleeding. Problems can appear when multiple antibodies against common erythrocyte antigens are detected in blood samples and this situation worsens if blood units are requested as quickly as possible. We report a case of a patient with a non frequent erythrocytic phenotype where multiple antibodies acting against high-frequency antigens were detected and who required urgent surgery.

  15. Blastomyces dermatitidis antigen detection in urine specimens from dogs with blastomycosis using a competitive binding inhibition ELISA.

    PubMed

    Shurley, J F; Legendre, A M; Scalarone, G M

    2005-09-01

    A competitive binding inhibition enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect Blastomyces dermatitidis antigens in urine specimens from dogs with blastomycosis. Sera from rabbits immunized with B. dermatitidis killed whole yeast cells were used as the primary antibody in the competitive ELISA. This initial study was performed to determine if B. dermatitidis antigen detection was possible and to test the efficacy of the rabbit sera as a primary antibody. An indirect ELISA was also performed to compare antigen detection in urine to antibody detection in the sera of the infected dogs. The results indicate 100% (36/36 specimens) detection of both antigen and antibody. Cross reactivity with Histoplasma capsulatum, as well as non-specific binding with the normal urine specimens, was observed with the competitive binding inhibition ELISA.

  16. Analysis of protective antigen peptide binding motifs using bacterial display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Dorsey, Brandi L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2015-05-01

    In today's fast-paced world, a new biological threat could emerge at any time, necessitating a prompt, reliable, inexpensive detection reagent in each case. Combined with magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), bacterial display technology makes it possible to isolate selective, high affinity peptide reagents in days to weeks. Utilizing the eCPX display scaffold is also a rapid way to screen potential peptide reagents. Peptide affinity reagents for protective antigen (PA) of the biothreat Bacillus anthracis were previously discovered using bacterial display. Bioinformatics analysis resulted in the consensus sequence WXCFTC. Additionally, we have discovered PA binding peptides with a WW motif, one of which, YGLHPWWKNAPIGQR, can pull down PA from 1% human serum. The strength of these two motifs combined, to obtain a WWCFTC consensus, is assessed here using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). While monitoring binding to PA, overall expression of the display scaffold was assessed using the YPet Mona expression control tag (YPet), and specificity was assessed by binding to Streptavidin R-Phycoerythrin (SAPE). The importance of high YPet binding is highlighted as many of the peptides in one of the three replicate experiments fell below our 80% binding threshold. We demonstrate that it is preferable to discard this experiment, due to questionable expression of the peptide itself, than to try to normalize for relative expression. The peptides containing the WWCFTC consensus were of higher affinity and greater specificity than the peptides containing the WW consensus alone, validating further investigation to optimize known PA binders.

  17. Multiple Adhesive Phenotypes Linked to Rosetting Binding of Erythrocytes in Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Victor; Treutiger, Carl Johan; Nash, Gerard B.; Wahlgren, Mats

    1998-01-01

    The cerebral form of severe malaria is associated with excessive intravascular sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (PRBC). Retention and accumulation of PRBC may lead to occlusion of brain microvessels and direct the triggering of acute pathologic changes. Here we report that by selection, cloning, and subcloning, we have identified rare P. falciparum parasites expressing a pan-adhesive phenotype linked to erythrocyte rosetting, a previously identified correlate of cerebral malaria. Rosetting PRBC not only bound uninfected erythrocytes but also formed autoagglutinates, adhered to endothelial cells, and bound to CD36, immunoglobulins, and the blood group A antigen. The linkage of rosetting, autoagglutination, and cytoadherence involved the coexpression on a single PRBC of ligands with multiple specificities and the binding to two or more receptors on erythrocytes and to at least two other cell adhesion molecules, including a new endothelial cell receptor for P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Limited proteolysis that differentially cleaved the rosetting ligand PfEMP1 from the PRBC surface abrogated all the binding phenotypes of these parasites, implicating the variant antigen PfEMP1 as a carrier of multiple ligand specificities. The results encourage the further study of pan-adhesion as a potentially important parasite phenotype in the pathogenesis of severe P. falciparum malaria. PMID:9596774

  18. Four major sequence elements of simian virus 40 large T antigen coordinate its specific and nonspecific DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, D T; Loeber, G; Tegtmeyer, P

    1990-01-01

    By mutational analysis, we have identified a motif critical to the proper recognition and binding of simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (T antigen) to virus DNA sequences at the origin of DNA replication. This motif is tripartite and consists of two elements (termed A1 and B2) that are necessary for sequence-specific binding of the origin and a central element (B1) which is required for nonspecific DNA-binding activity. Certain amino acids in elements A1 (residues 152 to 155) and B2 (203 to 207) may make direct contact with the GAGGC pentanucleotide sequences in binding sites I and II on the DNA. Alternatively, these two elements could determine the proper structure of the DNA-binding domain, although for a number of reasons we favor the first possibility. In contrast, element B1 (183 to 187) is most likely important for recognizing a general structural feature of DNA. Elements A1 and B2 are nearly identical in all known papovavirus T antigens, whereas B1 is identical only in the closely related papovaviruses simian virus 40, BK virus, and JC virus. In addition to these three elements, a fourth (B3; residues 215 to 219) is necessary for the binding of T antigen to site II but not to site I. We propose that additional contact sites on T antigen are involved in the interaction with site II to initiate the replication of the viral DNA. PMID:2157865

  19. Nuclear binding of cell cycle-related proteins: cyclin A versus proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA).

    PubMed

    Stivala, L A; Scovassi, A I; Bianchi, L; Prosperi, E

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the cell cycle-dependent nuclear binding of cyclin A and of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in asynchronously growing human fibroblasts. To this purpose, we have applied flow cytometry immunofluorescence, a powerful technique for elucidating the cell cycle phase during which the nuclear binding occurs. We have observed that, in striking contrast with the distribution of nuclear-bound PCNA which is restricted to S phase, the immunofluorescence signal of the nuclear-bound form of cyclin A is high in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle. These results suggest the involvement of nuclear-bound cyclin A in the G1/S and G2/M phase transitions.

  20. Contribution of the trifluoroacetyl group in the thermodynamics of antigen-antibody binding.

    PubMed

    Oda, Masayuki; Saito, Minoru; Tsumuraya, Takeshi; Fujii, Ikuo

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the binding of the 7C8 antibody to the chloramphenicol phosphonate antigens-one containing a trifluoroacetyl group (CP-F) and the other containing an acetyl group (CP-H)-by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The thermodynamic difference due to the substitution of F by H was evaluated using free energy calculations based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We have previously shown that another antibody, namely, 6D9, binds more weakly to CP-H than to CP-F, mainly due to the different hydration free energies of the dissociated state and not due to the unfavorable hydrophobic interactions with the antibody in the bound state. Unlike in the binding of the trifluoroacetyl group with 6D9, in its binding with 7C8, it is exposed to the solvent, as seen in the crystal structure of the complex of 7C8 with CP-F. The thermodynamic analysis performed in this study showed that the binding affinity of 7C8 for CP-H is similar to that for CP-F, but this binding to CP-H is accompanied with less favorable enthalpy and more favorable entropy changes. The free energy calculations indicated that, upon the substitution of F by H, enthalpy and entropy changes in the associated and dissociated states were decreased, but the magnitude of enthalpy and entropy changes in the dissociated state was larger than that in the associated state. The differences in binding free energy, enthalpy, and entropy changes determined by the free energy calculations for the substitution of F by H are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Quantitative analysis of the binding of simian virus 40 large T antigen to DNA.

    PubMed

    Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Vincent, Caroline; Joubert, Simon; Bullock, Peter A; Archambault, Jacques

    2007-09-01

    SV40 large T antigen (T-ag) is a multifunctional protein that successively binds to 5'-GAGGC-3' sequences in the viral origin of replication, melts the origin, unwinds DNA ahead of the replication fork, and interacts with host DNA replication factors to promote replication of the simian virus 40 genome. The transition of T-ag from a sequence-specific binding protein to a nonspecific helicase involves its assembly into a double hexamer whose formation is likely dictated by the propensity of T-ag to oligomerize and its relative affinities for the origin as well as for nonspecific double- and single-stranded DNA. In this study, we used a sensitive assay based on fluorescence anisotropy to measure the affinities of wild-type and mutant forms of the T-ag origin-binding domain (OBD), and of a larger fragment containing the N-terminal domain (N260), for different DNA substrates. We report that the N-terminal domain does not contribute to binding affinity but reduces the propensity of the OBD to self-associate. We found that the OBD binds with different affinities to its four sites in the origin and determined a consensus binding site by systematic mutagenesis of the 5'-GAGGC-3' sequence and of the residue downstream of it, which also contributes to affinity. Interestingly, the OBD also binds to single-stranded DNA with an approximately 10-fold higher affinity than to nonspecific duplex DNA and in a mutually exclusive manner. Finally, we provide evidence that the sequence specificity of full-length T-ag is lower than that of the OBD. These results provide a quantitative basis onto which to anchor our understanding of the interaction of T-ag with the origin and its assembly into a double hexamer.

  2. Understanding and predicting binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides by network analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background As the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) are one of the most polymorphic genes in humans. Patients carrying certain HLA alleles may develop adverse drug reactions (ADRs) after taking specific drugs. Peptides play an important role in HLA related ADRs as they are the necessary co-binders of HLAs with drugs. Many experimental data have been generated for understanding HLA-peptide binding. However, efficiently utilizing the data for understanding and accurately predicting HLA-peptide binding is challenging. Therefore, we developed a network analysis based method to understand and predict HLA-peptide binding. Methods Qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data were harvested and prepared from four major databases. An HLA-peptide binding network was constructed from this dataset and modules were identified by the fast greedy modularity optimization algorithm. To examine the significance of signals in the yielded models, the modularity was compared with the modularity values generated from 1,000 random networks. The peptides and HLAs in the modules were characterized by similarity analysis. The neighbor-edges based and unbiased leverage algorithm (Nebula) was developed for predicting HLA-peptide binding. Leave-one-out (LOO) validations and two-fold cross-validations were conducted to evaluate the performance of Nebula using the constructed HLA-peptide binding network. Results Nine modules were identified from analyzing the HLA-peptide binding network with a highest modularity compared to all the random networks. Peptide length and functional side chains of amino acids at certain positions of the peptides were different among the modules. HLA sequences were module dependent to some extent. Nebula archived an overall prediction accuracy of 0.816 in the LOO validations and average accuracy of 0.795 in the two-fold cross-validations and outperformed the method reported in the literature. Conclusions Network analysis is a

  3. Understanding and predicting binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides by network analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui; Shi, Leming; Tong, Weida; Mattes, William; Mendrick, Donna; Hong, Huixiao

    2015-01-01

    As the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) are one of the most polymorphic genes in humans. Patients carrying certain HLA alleles may develop adverse drug reactions (ADRs) after taking specific drugs. Peptides play an important role in HLA related ADRs as they are the necessary co-binders of HLAs with drugs. Many experimental data have been generated for understanding HLA-peptide binding. However, efficiently utilizing the data for understanding and accurately predicting HLA-peptide binding is challenging. Therefore, we developed a network analysis based method to understand and predict HLA-peptide binding. Qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data were harvested and prepared from four major databases. An HLA-peptide binding network was constructed from this dataset and modules were identified by the fast greedy modularity optimization algorithm. To examine the significance of signals in the yielded models, the modularity was compared with the modularity values generated from 1,000 random networks. The peptides and HLAs in the modules were characterized by similarity analysis. The neighbor-edges based and unbiased leverage algorithm (Nebula) was developed for predicting HLA-peptide binding. Leave-one-out (LOO) validations and two-fold cross-validations were conducted to evaluate the performance of Nebula using the constructed HLA-peptide binding network. Nine modules were identified from analyzing the HLA-peptide binding network with a highest modularity compared to all the random networks. Peptide length and functional side chains of amino acids at certain positions of the peptides were different among the modules. HLA sequences were module dependent to some extent. Nebula archived an overall prediction accuracy of 0.816 in the LOO validations and average accuracy of 0.795 in the two-fold cross-validations and outperformed the method reported in the literature. Network analysis is a useful approach for analyzing large and

  4. Structural basis of Lewisb antigen binding by the Helicobacter pylori adhesin BabA

    PubMed Central

    Hage, Naim; Howard, Tina; Phillips, Chris; Brassington, Claire; Overman, Ross; Debreczeni, Judit; Gellert, Paul; Stolnik, Snow; Winkler, G. Sebastiaan; Falcone, Franco H.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a leading cause of peptic ulceration and gastric cancer worldwide. To achieve colonization of the stomach, this Gram-negative bacterium adheres to Lewisb (Leb) antigens in the gastric mucosa using its outer membrane protein BabA. Structural information for BabA has been elusive, and thus, its molecular mechanism for recognizing Leb antigens remains unknown. We present the crystal structure of the extracellular domain of BabA, from H. pylori strain J99, in the absence and presence of Leb at 2.0- and 2.1-Å resolutions, respectively. BabA is a predominantly α-helical molecule with a markedly kinked tertiary structure containing a single, shallow Leb binding site at its tip within a β-strand motif. No conformational change occurs in BabA upon binding of Leb, which is characterized by low affinity under acidic [KD (dissociation constant) of ~227 μM] and neutral (KD of ~252 μM) conditions. Binding is mediated by a network of hydrogen bonds between Leb Fuc1, GlcNAc3, Fuc4, and Gal5 residues and a total of eight BabA amino acids (C189, G191, N194, N206, D233, S234, S244, and T246) through both carbonyl backbone and side-chain interactions. The structural model was validated through the generation of two BabA variants containing N206A and combined D233A/S244A substitutions, which result in a reduction and complete loss of binding affinity to Leb, respectively. Knowledge of the molecular basis of Leb recognition by BabA provides a platform for the development of therapeutics targeted at inhibiting H. pylori adherence to the gastric mucosa. PMID:26601230

  5. Specific Detection of Antigen-Binding Cells by Localized Growth of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rotman, Boris; Cox, David R.

    1971-01-01

    A new method for the enumeration of lymphoid cells with specific surface-receptors for antigen is described, based on the use of β-D-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23), either directly as an antigen or as a conjugated antigen. Binding of β-D-galactosidase is revealed by its activity in releasing riboflavin from a synthetic substrate, riboflavin-β-D-galactopyranoside. The riboflavin, inactive as a vitamin in the galactosidic form, becomes active when released by the enzyme, and can be detected by bioassay. Hence, lymphoid cells with receptors for β-D-galactosidase on their surface can be detected after they have been exposed to the enzyme, washed, and then plated in agar containing riboflavin-β-D-galactopyranoside, streptomycin, riboflavin-deficient medium, and a streptomycin-resistant strain of Streptococcus faecalis that requires riboflavin. Release of riboflavin is signalled by the growth of characteristic bacterial colonies over the cell that bound β-D-galactosidase. Images PMID:5002817

  6. Kinetics of antigen binding to arrays of antibodies in different sized spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapsford, K. E.; Liron, Z.; Shubin, Y. S.; Ligler, F. S.

    2001-01-01

    A fluorescence-based array biosensor has been developed which can measure the binding kinetics of an antigen to an immobilized antibody in real time. A patterned array of antibodies immobilized on the surface of a planar waveguide was used to capture a Cy5-labeled antigen present in a solution that was continuously flowed over the surface. The CCD image of the waveguide was monitored continuously for 25 min. The resulting exponential rise in fluorescence signal was determined by image analysis software and fitted to a reaction-limited kinetics model, giving a kf of 3.6 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). Different spot sizes were then patterned on the surface of the waveguide using either a PDMS flow cell or laser exposure, producing width sizes ranging from 80 to 1145 microm. It was demonstrated that under flow conditions, the reduction of spot size did not alter the association rate of the antigen with immobilized antibody; however, as the spot width decreased to < 200 nm, the signal intensity also decreased.

  7. Isolation of a peptide binding protein and its role in antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lakey, E.; Pierce, S.K.; Margoliash, E.

    1986-03-05

    A mouse T cell hybrid, TPc9.1, recognizes pigeon cytochrome c (Pc) as processed and presented by histocompatible antigen presenting cells (APC). When paraformaldehyde fixed APC are employed, only a peptide fragment of Pc, Pc 81-104, and not the native Pc, is capable of stimulating TPc9.1 cells. Pc 81-104 appears to associate tightly with the APC surface since paraformaldehyde fixed APC which have been incubated with Pc 81-104 remain stimulatory following extensive washing. When APC are surface labeled with /sup 125/I, solubilized and affinity purified on Pc 81-104-Sepharose 4B columns, two predominant polypeptides of approximately 72 and 74 kd are isolated. Little or no immunoglobulin, Class I or Class II proteins are obtained under these conditions. Antisera from rabbits immunized with the affinity purified material, but not preimmune sera, block the activation of TPc 9.1 cells by Pc as well as Pc 81-104 when presented by live APC. Furthermore, these antisera are even more effective in blocking the activation of TPc9.1 cells by either APC which had been pulsed with Pc and then paraformaldehyde fixed, or by Pc 81-104 when added to paraformaldehyde fixed APC, suggesting that these antisera were not affecting antigen processing. Thus, these peptide binding proteins may play a role in antigen presentation, and they are being further characterized.

  8. Kinetics of antigen binding to arrays of antibodies in different sized spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapsford, K. E.; Liron, Z.; Shubin, Y. S.; Ligler, F. S.

    2001-01-01

    A fluorescence-based array biosensor has been developed which can measure the binding kinetics of an antigen to an immobilized antibody in real time. A patterned array of antibodies immobilized on the surface of a planar waveguide was used to capture a Cy5-labeled antigen present in a solution that was continuously flowed over the surface. The CCD image of the waveguide was monitored continuously for 25 min. The resulting exponential rise in fluorescence signal was determined by image analysis software and fitted to a reaction-limited kinetics model, giving a kf of 3.6 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). Different spot sizes were then patterned on the surface of the waveguide using either a PDMS flow cell or laser exposure, producing width sizes ranging from 80 to 1145 microm. It was demonstrated that under flow conditions, the reduction of spot size did not alter the association rate of the antigen with immobilized antibody; however, as the spot width decreased to < 200 nm, the signal intensity also decreased.

  9. Acyl-CoA binding proteins: multiplicity and function.

    PubMed

    Gossett, R E; Frolov, A A; Roths, J B; Behnke, W D; Kier, A B; Schroeder, F

    1996-09-01

    The physiological role of long-chain fatty acyl-CoA is thought to be primarily in intermediary metabolism of fatty acids. However, recent data show that nM to microM levels of these lipophilic molecules are potent regulators of cell functions in vitro. Although long-chain fatty acyl-CoA are present at several hundred microM concentration in the cell, very little long-chain fatty acyl-CoA actually exists as free or unbound molecules, but rather is bound with high affinity to membrane lipids and/or proteins. Recently, there is growing awareness that cytosol contains nonenzymatic proteins also capable of binding long-chain fatty acyl-CoA with high affinity. Although the identity of the cytosolic long-chain fatty acyl-CoA binding protein(s) has been the subject of some controversy, there is growing evidence that several diverse nonenzymatic cytosolic proteins will bind long-chain fatty acyl-CoA. Not only does acyl-CoA binding protein specifically bind medium and long-chain fatty acyl-CoA (LCFA-CoA), but ubiquitous proteins with multiple ligand specificities such as the fatty acid binding proteins and sterol carrier protein-2 also bind LCFA-CoA with high affinity. The potential of these acyl-CoA binding proteins to influence the level of free LCFA-CoA and thereby the amount of LCFA-CoA bound to regulatory sites in proteins and enzymes is only now being examined in detail. The purpose of this article is to explore the identity, nature, function, and pathobiology of these fascinating newly discovered long-chain fatty acyl-CoA binding proteins. The relative contributions of these three different protein families to LCFA-CoA utilization and/or regulation of cellular activities are the focus of new directions in this field.

  10. The evolutionary dynamics of receptor binding avidity in influenza A: a mathematical model for a new antigenic drift hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hsiang-Yu; Koelle, Katia

    2013-01-01

    The most salient feature of influenza evolution in humans is its antigenic drift. This process is characterized by structural changes in the virus's B-cell epitopes and ultimately results in the ability of the virus to evade immune recognition and thereby reinfect previously infected hosts. Until recently, amino acid substitutions in epitope regions of the viral haemagglutinin were thought to be positively selected for their ability to reduce antibody binding and therefore were thought to be responsible for driving antigenic drift. However, a recent hypothesis put forward by Hensley and co-workers posits that cellular receptor binding avidity is the dominant phenotype under selection, with antigenic drift being a side effect of these binding avidity changes. Here, we present a mathematical formulation of this new antigenic drift model and use it to show how rates of antigenic drift depend on epidemiological parameters. We further use the model to evaluate how two different vaccination strategies can impact antigenic drift rates and ultimately disease incidence levels. Finally, we discuss the assumptions present in the model formulation, predictions of the model, and future work that needs to be done to determine the consistency of this hypothesis with known patterns of influenza's genetic and antigenic evolution. PMID:23382426

  11. Influence of macrophage activation on their capacity to bind bacterial antigens studied with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Targosz, Marta; Labuda, Aleksander; Czuba, Pawel; Biedroń, Rafal; Strus, Magdalena; Gamian, Andrzej; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Szymoński, Marek

    2006-06-01

    In this work we studied interactions between bacterial antigens and receptors on the surface of macrophages using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We used two bacterial cell wall components: lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from gram-negative Escherichia coli and exopolysaccharide (EPS) derived from gram-positive Lactobacillus rhamnosus. Interactions between these bacterial antigens and immune cell receptors were studied in peritoneal macrophages derived from two strains of mice, CBA and C3H/J, in which the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is genetically disabled. We collected 500 force-distance curves for LPS-activated cells using an EPS-covered AFM tip, and for EPS-activated cells using an LPS-covered AFM tip. Nonactivated cells were tested as reference cells. The results show that LPS-primed macrophages decrease their ability to bind EPS. Surprisingly, EPS-activated macrophages maintain or even increase their ability to bind LPS. This may suggest that in vivo commensal enteric bacteria, such as lactobacilli, will enhance the defense potential of local macrophages against pathogens expressing LPS.

  12. Characterization of the Duffy-Binding-Like Domain of Plasmodium falciparum Blood-Stage Antigen 332

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Sandra; Moll, Kirsten; Angeletti, Davide; Albrecht, Letusa; Kursula, Inari; Jiang, Ning; Sun, Xiaodong; Berzins, Klavs; Wahlgren, Mats; Chen, Qijun

    2011-01-01

    Studies on Pf332, a major Plasmodium falciparum blood-stage antigen, have largely been hampered by the cross-reactive nature of antibodies generated against the molecule due to its high content of repeats, which are present in other malaria antigens. We previously reported the identification of a conserved domain in Pf332 with a high degree of similarity to the Duffy-binding-like (DBL) domains of the erythrocyte-binding-like (EBL) family. We here describe that antibodies towards Pf332-DBL are induced after repeated exposure to P. falciparum and that they are acquired early in life in areas of intense malaria transmission. Furthermore, a homology model of Pf332-DBL was found to be similar to the structure of the EBL-DBLs. Despite their similarities, antibodies towards Pf332-DBL did not display any cross-reactivity with EBL-proteins as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy, Western blotting, and peptide microarray. Thus the DBL domain is an attractive region to use in further studies on the giant Pf332 molecule. PMID:22312570

  13. Probing the effects of surface hydrophobicity and tether orientation on antibody-antigen binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Derek B.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2017-04-01

    Antibody microarrays have the potential to revolutionize molecular detection for many applications, but their current use is limited by poor reliability, and efforts to change this have not yielded fruitful results. One difficulty which limits the rational engineering of next-generation devices is that little is known, at the molecular level, about the antibody-antigen binding process near solid surfaces. Atomic-level structural information is scant because typical experimental techniques (X-ray crystallography and NMR) cannot be used to image proteins bound to surfaces. To overcome this limitation, this study uses molecular simulation and an advanced, experimentally validated, coarse-grain, protein-surface model to compare fab-lysozyme binding in bulk solution and when the fab is tethered to hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The results show that the tether site in the fab, as well as the surface hydrophobicity, significantly impacts the binding process and suggests that the optimal design involves tethering fabs upright on a hydrophilic surface. The results offer an unprecedented, molecular-level picture of the binding process and give hope that the rational design of protein-microarrays is possible.

  14. Propofol Shares the Binding Site with Isoflurane and Sevoflurane on Leukocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1

    PubMed Central

    Yuki, Koichi; Bu, Weiming; Xi, Jin; Shimaoka, Motomu; Eckenhoff, Roderic

    2013-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that propofol interacted with the leukocyte adhesion molecule leukocyte function–associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and inhibited the production of interleukin-2 via LFA-1 in a dependent manner. However, the binding site(s) of propofol on LFA-1 remains unknown. Methods First, the inhibition of LFA-1's ligand binding by propofol was confirmed in an ELISA-type assay. The binding site of propofol on LFA-1 was probed with a photolabeling experiment using a photoactivatable propofol analog called azi-propofol-m. The adducted residues of LFA-1 by this compound were determined using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. In addition, the binding of propofol to the ligand-binding domain of LFA-1 was examined using 1-aminoanthracene (1-AMA) displacement assay. Furthermore, the binding site(s) of 1-AMA and propofol on LFA-1 was studied using the docking program GLIDE. Results We demonstrated that propofol impaired the binding of LFA-1 to its ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1. The photolabeling experiment demonstrated that the adducted residues were localized in the allosteric cavity of the ligand-binding domain of LFA-1 called “lovastatin site. ” The shift of fluorescence spectra was observed when 1-AMA was coincubated with the low-affinity conformer of LFA-1 ligand-binding domain (wild-type [WT] αL I domain), not with the high-affinity conformer, suggesting that 1-AMA bound only to WT αL I domain. In the 1-AMA displacement assay, propofol decreased 1-AMA fluorescence signal (at 520 nm), suggesting that propofol competed with 1-AMA and bound to the WT αL I domain. The docking simulation demonstrated that both 1-AMA and propofol bound to the lovastatin site, which agreed with the photolabeling experiment. Conclusions We demonstrated that propofol bound to the lovastatin site in LFA-1. Previously we showed that the volatile anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane bound to this site. Taken together, the lovastatin site is an

  15. Estrophilin immunoreactivity versus estrogen receptor binding activity in meningiomas: evidence for multiple estrogen binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lesch, K.P.; Schott, W.; Gross, S.

    1987-09-01

    The existence of estrogen receptors in human meningiomas has long been a controversial issue. This may be explained, in part, by apparent heterogeneity of estrogen binding sites in meningioma tissue. In this study, estrogen receptors were determined in 58 meningiomas with an enzyme immunoassay using monoclonal antibodies against human estrogen receptor protein (estrophilin) and with a sensitive radioligand binding assay using /sup 125/I-labeled estradiol (/sup 125/I-estradiol) as radioligand. Low levels of estrophilin immunoreactivity were found in tumors from 62% of patients, whereas radioligand binding activity was demonstrated in about 46% of the meningiomas examined. In eight (14%) tissue samples multiple binding sites for estradiol were observed. The immunoreactive binding sites correspond to the classical, high affinity estrogen receptors: the Kd for /sup 125/I-estradiol binding to the receptor was approximately 0.2 nM and the binding was specific for estrogens. The second, low affinity class of binding sites considerably influenced measurement of the classical receptor even at low ligand concentrations. The epidemiological and clinical data from patients with meningiomas, and the existence of specific estrogen receptors confirmed by immunochemical detection, may be important factors in a theory of oncogenesis.

  16. Dystrophin contains multiple independent membrane-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junling; Kodippili, Kasun; Yue, Yongping; Hakim, Chady H; Wasala, Lakmini; Pan, Xiufang; Zhang, Keqing; Yang, Nora N; Duan, Dongsheng; Lai, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Dystrophin is a large sub-sarcolemmal protein. Its absence leads to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Binding to the sarcolemma is essential for dystrophin to protect muscle from contraction-induced injury. It has long been thought that membrane binding of dystrophin depends on its cysteine-rich (CR) domain. Here, we provide in vivo evidence suggesting that dystrophin contains three additional membrane-binding domains including spectrin-like repeats (R)1-3, R10-12 and C-terminus (CT). To systematically study dystrophin membrane binding, we split full-length dystrophin into ten fragments and examined subcellular localizations of each fragment by adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer. In skeletal muscle, R1-3, CR domain and CT were exclusively localized at the sarcolemma. R10-12 showed both cytosolic and sarcolemmal localization. Importantly, the CR-independent membrane binding was conserved in murine and canine muscles. A critical function of the CR-mediated membrane interaction is the assembly of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC). While R1-3 and R10-12 did not restore the DGC, surprisingly, CT alone was sufficient to establish the DGC at the sarcolemma. Additional studies suggest that R1-3 and CT also bind to the sarcolemma in the heart, though relatively weak. Taken together, our study provides the first conclusive in vivo evidence that dystrophin contains multiple independent membrane-binding domains. These structurally and functionally distinctive membrane-binding domains provide a molecular framework for dystrophin to function as a shock absorber and signaling hub. Our results not only shed critical light on dystrophin biology and DMD pathogenesis, but also provide a foundation for rationally engineering minimized dystrophins for DMD gene therapy.

  17. Antigenic variation in Neisseria gonorrhoeae: production of multiple lipooligosaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Burch, C L; Danaher, R J; Stein, D C

    1997-01-01

    Individual cells of Neisseria gonorrhoeae may express a single lipooligosaccharide (LOS) component on their cell surfaces, or they may simultaneously express multiple LOS structures. Strain FA19 expresses LOS components that react with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2-1-L8 and 1B2. The genetic locus responsible for this phenotype in FA19 was identified by isolating a clone that is able to impart the ability to simultaneously express both LOS molecules to strain 1291, a strain expressing only the MAb 1B2-reactive LOS. This clone, pCLB1, was characterized, and the gene responsible for the expression of both LOS components was determined to be lsi2. DNA sequence analysis of lsi2(Fa19) indicates that there are several differences between the DNA sequences of lsi2(FA19) and lsi2(1291). The region responsible for the LOS-specific phenotype change in lsi2(FA19) was identified by deletion and transformation analysis, mapping to a polyguanine tract within lsi2 where lsi2(FA19) possesses a +2 frameshift relative to lsi2(1291). The polyguanine tract in lsi2(FA19) was modified by site-directed mutagenesis to change the sequence to GGGAGGTGGCGGA to prevent frameshifting during DNA replication, transcription, and/or translation. Transformants of strain 1291 containing this DNA sequence express a single MAb 2-1-L8-reactive LOS component, the same phenotype exhibited by lsi2-defective strains. These data indicate that FA19 is able to generate a small amount of functional Lsi2 protein via transcriptional and/or translational frameshifting, and this limited amount of protein allows for the expression of MAb 1B2-reactive LOS molecules. PMID:9006061

  18. Differential DNA binding of Ku antigen determines its involvement in DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Schild-Poulter, Caroline; Matheos, Diamanto; Novac, Olivia; Cui, Bo; Giffin, Ward; Ruiz, Marcia T; Price, Gerald B; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria; Haché, Robert J G

    2003-02-01

    Ku antigen (Ku70/Ku80) is a regulatory subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase, which participates in the regulation of DNA replication and gene transcription through specific DNA sequences. In this study, we have compared the mechanism of action of Ku from A3/4, a DNA sequence that appears in mammalian origins of DNA replication, and NRE1, a transcriptional regulatory element in the long terminal repeat of mouse mammary tumor virus through which Ku antigen and its associated kinase, DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK(cs)), act to repress steroid-induced transcription. Our results indicate that replication from a minimal replication origin of ors8 is independent of DNA-PK(cs) and that Ku interacts with A3/4-like sequences and NRE1 in fundamentally different ways. UV crosslinking experiments revealed differential interactions of the Ku subunits with A3/4, NRE1, and two other proposed Ku transcriptional regulatory elements. In vitro footprinting experiments showed direct contact of Ku on A3/4 and over the region of ors8 homologous to A3/4. In vitro replication assays using ors8 templates bearing mutations in the A3/4-like sequence suggested that Ku binding to this element was necessary for replication. By contrast, in vitro replication experiments revealed that NRE1 was not involved in DNA replication. Our results establish A3/4 as a new class of Ku DNA binding site. Classification of Ku DNA binding into eight categories of interaction based on recognition and DNA crosslinking experiments is discussed.

  19. A binding site for the transcription factor Grainyhead/Nuclear transcription factor-1 contributes to regulation of the Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Y; Yamagishi, M; Nishimoto, Y; Taguchi, O; Matsukage, A; Yamaguchi, M

    1999-12-03

    The Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter contains multiple transcriptional regulatory elements, including upstream regulatory element (URE), DNA replication-related element, E2F recognition sites, and three common regulatory factor for DNA replication and DNA replication-related element-binding factor genes recognition sites. In nuclear extracts of Drosophila embryos, we detected a protein factor, the URE-binding factor (UREF), that recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-AAACCAGTTGGCA located within URE. Analyses in Drosophila Kc cells and transgenic flies revealed that the UREF-binding site plays an important role in promoter activity both in cultured cells and in living flies. A yeast one-hybrid screen using URE as a bait allowed isolation of a cDNA encoding a transcription factor, Grainyhead/nuclear transcription factor-1 (GRH/NTF-1). The nucleotide sequence required for binding to GRH was indistinguishable from that for UREF detected in embryo nuclear extracts. Furthermore, a specific antibody to GRH reacted with UREF in embryo nuclear extracts. From these results we conclude that GRH is identical to UREF. Although GRH has been thought to be involved in regulation of differentiation-related genes, this study demonstrates, for the first time, involvement of a GRH-binding site in regulation of the DNA replication-related proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene.

  20. Amino Acids in Hemagglutinin Antigenic Site B Determine Antigenic and Receptor Binding Differences between A(H3N2)v and Ancestral Seasonal H3N2 Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoquan; Ilyushina, Natalia A.; Lugovtsev, Vladimir Y.; Bovin, Nicolai V.; Couzens, Laura K.; Gao, Jin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A H3N2 variant [A(H3N2)v] viruses, which have caused human infections in the United States in recent years, originated from human seasonal H3N2 viruses that were introduced into North American swine in the mid-1990s, but they are antigenically distinct from both the ancestral and current circulating H3N2 strains. A reference A(H3N2)v virus, A/Minnesota/11/2010 (MN/10), and a seasonal H3N2 strain, A/Beijing/32/1992 (BJ/92), were chosen to determine the molecular basis for the antigenic difference between A(H3N2)v and the ancestral viruses. Viruses containing wild-type and mutant MN/10 or BJ/92 hemagglutinins (HAs) were constructed and probed for reactivity with ferret antisera against MN/10 and BJ/92 in hemagglutination inhibition assays. Among the amino acids that differ between the MN/10 and BJ/92 HAs, those in antigenic site A had little impact on the antigenic phenotype. Within antigenic site B, mutations at residues 156, 158, 189, and 193 of MN/10 HA to those in BJ/92 switched the MN/10 antigenic phenotype to that of BJ/92. Mutations at residues 156, 157, 158, 189, and 193 of BJ/92 HA to amino acids present in MN/10 were necessary for BJ/92 to become antigenically similar to MN/10. The HA amino acid substitutions responsible for switching the antigenic phenotype also impacted HA binding to sialyl receptors that are usually present in the human respiratory tract. Our study demonstrates that antigenic site B residues play a critical role in determining both the unique antigenic phenotype and receptor specificity of A(H3N2)v viruses, a finding that may facilitate future surveillance and risk assessment of novel influenza viruses. IMPORTANCE Influenza A H3N2 variant [A(H3N2)v] viruses have caused hundreds of human infections in multiple states in the United States since 2009. Most cases have been children who had contact with swine in agricultural fairs. These viruses originated from human seasonal H3N2 viruses that were introduced into the U

  1. Assay Development and High-Throughput Screening for Inhibitors of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus N-Terminal Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen Binding to Nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, Chantal; Moerke, Nathan J; Faloon, Patrick; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2014-07-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has a causative role in several human malignancies, especially in immunocompromised hosts. KSHV latently infects tumor cells and persists as an extrachromosomal episome (plasmid). KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) mediates KSHV episome persistence. LANA binds specific KSHV sequence to replicate viral DNA. In addition, LANA tethers KSHV genomes to mitotic chromosomes to efficiently segregate episomes to daughter nuclei after mitosis. N-terminal LANA (N-LANA) binds histones H2A and H2B to attach to chromosomes. Currently, there are no specific inhibitors of KSHV latent infection. To enable high-throughput screening (HTS) of inhibitors of N-LANA binding to nucleosomes, here we develop, miniaturize, and validate a fluorescence polarization (FP) assay that detects fluorophore-labeled N-LANA peptide binding to nucleosomes. We also miniaturize a counterscreen to identify DNA intercalators that nonspecifically inhibit N-LANA binding to nucleosomes, and also develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to assess N-LANA binding to nucleosomes in the absence of fluorescence. HTS of libraries containing more than 350,000 compounds identified multiple compounds that inhibited N-LANA binding to nucleosomes. No compounds survived all counterscreens, however. More complex small-molecule libraries will likely be necessary to identify specific inhibitors of N-LANA binding to histones H2A and H2B; these assays should prove useful for future screens.

  2. Polysialic acid as an antigen for monoclonal antibody HIgM12 to treat multiple sclerosis and other neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Watzlawik, Jens O; Kahoud, Robert J; Ng, Shermayne; Painter, Meghan M; Papke, Louisa M; Zoecklein, Laurie; Wootla, Bharath; Warrington, Arthur E; Carey, William A; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-09-01

    CNS regeneration is a desirable goal for diseases of brain and spinal cord. Current therapeutic strategies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) aim to eliminate detrimental effects of the immune system, so far without reversing disability or affecting long-term prognosis in patients. Approachable molecular targets that stimulate CNS repair are not part of the clinical praxis or have not been identified yet. The purpose of this study was to identify the molecular target of the human monoclonal antibody HIgM12. HIgM12 reverses motor deficits in chronically demyelinated mice, a model of MS. Here, we identified polysialic acid (PSA) attached to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) as the antigen for HIgM12 by using different NCAM knockout strains and through PSA removal from the NCAM protein core. Antibody binding to CNS tissue and primary cells, antibody-mediated cell adhesion, and neurite outgrowth on HIgM12-coated nitrocellulose was detected only in the presence of PSA as assessed by western blotting, immunoprecipitation, immunocytochemistry, and histochemistry. We conclude that HIgM12 mediates its in vivo and in vitro effects through binding to PSA and has the potential to be an effective therapy for MS and neurodegenerative diseases. The human antibody HIgM12 stimulates neurite outgrowth in vitro and promotes function in chronically demyelinated mice, a model of multiple sclerosis. The cellular antigen for HIgM12 was undetermined. Here, we identified polysialic acid attached to NCAM (neural cell adhesion molecule) as the cellular target for HIgM12. This includes glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive mouse astrocytes (GFAP, red; HIgM12, green; DAPI, blue) among other cell types of the central nervous system. These findings indicate a new strategy for the treatment of neuro-motor disorders including multiple sclerosis. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  3. Creating BHb-imprinted magnetic nanoparticles with multiple binding sites.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanxia; Chen, Yiting; Huang, Lu; Lou, BenYong; Chen, Guonan

    2017-01-16

    A kind of protein imprinted over magnetic Fe3O4@Au multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) with multiple binding sites was synthesized and investigated. Magnetic Fe3O4@Au NPs as carrier materials were modified with 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid (MPBA) and mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) to introduce boronic acids and carboxyl groups. Using Bovine Hemoglobin (BHb) as a template, a polydopamine(PDA)-based molecular imprinted film was fabricated to produce a kind of magnetic molecularly imprinted nanoparticle (MMIP), possessing multiple binding sites with benzene-diol, amino groups, boronic acids and carboxyl groups. The MMIPs exhibited an excellent imprinting effect and adsorption capacity (89.65± 0.38 mg g(-1)) toward the template protein. The results show that the MMIPs reached saturated adsorption at 0.5 mg mL(-1) within 90 min. The synthesized MMIPs are suitable for the removal and enrichment of the template protein in proteomics. The strategy of multiple binding sites paves the way for the preparation of functional nanomaterials in molecular imprinting techniques.

  4. Superposition-free comparison and clustering of antibody binding sites: implications for the prediction of the nature of their antigen

    PubMed Central

    Di Rienzo, Lorenzo; Milanetti, Edoardo; Lepore, Rosalba; Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2017-01-01

    We describe here a superposition free method for comparing the surfaces of antibody binding sites based on the Zernike moments and show that they can be used to quickly compare and cluster sets of antibodies. The clusters provide information about the nature of the bound antigen that, when combined with a method for predicting the number of direct antibody antigen contacts, allows the discrimination between protein and non-protein binding antibodies with an accuracy of 76%. This is of relevance in several aspects of antibody science, for example to select the framework to be used for a combinatorial antibody library. PMID:28338016

  5. Superposition-free comparison and clustering of antibody binding sites: implications for the prediction of the nature of their antigen.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, Lorenzo; Milanetti, Edoardo; Lepore, Rosalba; Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2017-03-24

    We describe here a superposition free method for comparing the surfaces of antibody binding sites based on the Zernike moments and show that they can be used to quickly compare and cluster sets of antibodies. The clusters provide information about the nature of the bound antigen that, when combined with a method for predicting the number of direct antibody antigen contacts, allows the discrimination between protein and non-protein binding antibodies with an accuracy of 76%. This is of relevance in several aspects of antibody science, for example to select the framework to be used for a combinatorial antibody library.

  6. Antibody covalent immobilization on carbon nanotubes and assessment of antigen binding.

    PubMed

    Venturelli, Enrica; Fabbro, Chiara; Chaloin, Olivier; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Smulski, Cristian R; Da Ros, Tatiana; Kostarelos, Kostas; Prato, Maurizio; Bianco, Alberto

    2011-08-08

    Controlling the covalent bonding of antibodies onto functionalized carbon nanotubes is a key step in the design and preparation of nanotube-based conjugates for targeting cancer cells. For this purpose, an anti-MUC1 antibody (Ab) is linked to both multi-walled (MWCNTs) and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) using different synthetic strategies. The presence of the Ab attached to the nanotubes is confirmed by gel electrophoresis and thermogravimetric analysis. Most importantly, molecular recognition of the antigen by surface plasmon resonance is able to determine similar Ab binding capacities for both Ab-DWCNTs and Ab-MWCNTs. These results are very relevant for the design of future receptor-targeting strategies using chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes.

  7. The Leptospiral Antigen Lp49 is a Two-Domain Protein with Putative Protein Binding Function

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira Giuseppe,P.; Oliveira Neves, F.; Nascimento, A.; Gomes Guimaraes, B.

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a life-threatening disease that affects populations worldwide. Currently available vaccines have limited effectiveness and therapeutic interventions are complicated by the difficulty in making an early diagnosis of leptospirosis. The genome of Leptospira interrogans was recently sequenced and comparative genomic analysis contributed to the identification of surface antigens, potential candidates for development of new vaccines and serodiagnosis. Lp49 is a membrane-associated protein recognized by antibodies present in sera from early and convalescent phases of leptospirosis patients. Its crystal structure was determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction using selenomethionine-labelled crystals and refined at 2.0 Angstroms resolution. Lp49 is composed of two domains and belongs to the all-beta-proteins class. The N-terminal domain folds in an immunoglobulin-like beta-sandwich structure, whereas the C-terminal domain presents a seven-bladed beta-propeller fold. Structural analysis of Lp49 indicates putative protein-protein binding sites, suggesting a role in Leptospira-host interaction. This is the first crystal structure of a leptospiral antigen described to date.

  8. Enzymatic hydrolysis of heated whey: iron-binding ability of peptides and antigenic protein fractions.

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Seo, I S; Khan, M A; Ki, K S; Lee, W S; Lee, H J; Shin, H S; Kim, H S

    2007-09-01

    This study evaluated the influence of various enzymes on the hydrolysis of whey protein concentrate (WPC) to reduce its antigenic fractions and to quantify the peptides having iron-binding ability in its hydrolysates. Heated (for 10 min at 100 degrees C) WPC (2% protein solution) was incubated with 2% each of Alcalase, Flavourzyme, papain, and trypsin for 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, and 240 min at 50 degrees C. The highest hydrolysis of WPC was observed after 240 min of incubation with Alcalase (12.4%), followed by Flavourzyme (12.0%), trypsin (10.4%), and papain (8.53%). The nonprotein nitrogen contents of WPC hydrolysate followed the hydrolytic pattern of whey. The major antigenic fractions (beta-lactoglobulin) in WPC were degraded within 60 min of its incubation with Alcalase, Flavourzyme, or papain. Chromatograms of enzymatic hydrolysates of heated WPC also indicated complete degradation of beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin, and BSA. The highest iron solubility was noticed in hydrolysates derived with Alcalase (95%), followed by those produced with trypsin (90%), papain (87%), and Flavourzyme (81%). Eluted fraction 1 (F-1) and fraction 2 (F-2) were the respective peaks for the 0.25 and 0.5 M NaCl chromatographic step gradient for analysis of hydrolysates. Iron-binding ability was noticeably higher in F-1 than in F-2 of all hydrolysates of WPC. The highest iron contents in F-1 were observed in WPC hydrolysates derived with Alcalase (0.2 mg/kg), followed by hydrolysates derived with Flavourzyme (0.14 mg/kg), trypsin (0.14 mg/kg), and papain (0.08 mg/kg). Iron concentrations in the F-2 fraction of all enzymatic hydrolysates of WPC were low and ranged from 0.03 to 0.05 mg/kg. Fraction 1 may describe a new class of iron chelates based on the reaction of FeSO4 x 7 H2O with a mixture of peptides obtained by the enzymatic hydrolysis of WPC. The chromatogram of Alcalase F-1 indicated numerous small peaks of shorter wavelengths, which probably indicated a variety of

  9. Production of serum immunoglobulins and T cell antigen binding molecules specific for cow's milk antigens in adults intolerant to cow's milk.

    PubMed

    Little, C H; Georgiou, G M; Shelton, M J; Cone, R E

    1998-11-01

    The immune response to three cow's milk antigens, beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), alpha-lactalbumin (AL), and casein (CA) was studied in 15 milk-intolerant adult patients and 11 adult controls. IgG, IgE, and IgG subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4) and T cell-derived antigen-binding molecules (TABM) specific for each antigen were measured in both groups. In the patient group, a significant elevation of total IgG and TABM against each of the milk antigens was found as well as raised levels of IgG1 to BLG and CA, IgG4 to BLG, and IgE to CA. TABM specific for BLG were isolated by affinity for BLG and found to be Mr 28,000-46,000 polypeptides functionally and physically associated with TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta2. These results indicate a Th2-type immune response to the milk antigens in milk-intolerant individuals compared with the control group which shows a pattern typical of anergy or deletion.

  10. Presentation of antigen in immune complexes is boosted by soluble bacterial immunoglobulin binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Léonetti, M; Galon, J; Thai, R; Sautès-Fridman, C; Moine, G; Ménez, A

    1999-04-19

    Using a snake toxin as a proteic antigen (Ag), two murine toxin-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), splenocytes, and two murine Ag-specific T cell hybridomas, we showed that soluble protein A (SpA) from Staphylococcus aureus and protein G from Streptococcus subspecies, two Ig binding proteins (IBPs), not only abolish the capacity of the mAbs to decrease Ag presentation but also increase Ag presentation 20-100-fold. Five lines of evidence suggest that this phenomenon results from binding of an IBP-Ab-Ag complex to B cells possessing IBP receptors. First, we showed that SpA is likely to boost presentation of a free mAb, suggesting that the IBP-boosted presentation of an Ag in an immune complex results from the binding of IBP to the mAb. Second, FACS analyses showed that an Ag-Ab complex is preferentially targeted by SpA to a subpopulation of splenocytes mainly composed of B cells. Third, SpA-dependent boosted presentation of an Ag-Ab complex is further enhanced when splenocytes are enriched in cells containing SpA receptors. Fourth, the boosting effect largely diminishes when splenocytes are depleted of cells containing SpA receptors. Fifth, the boosting effect occurs only when IBP simultaneously contains a Fab and an Fc binding site. Altogether, our data suggest that soluble IBPs can bridge immune complexes to APCs containing IBP receptors, raising the possibility that during an infection process by bacteria secreting these IBPs, Ag-specific T cells may activate IBP receptor-containing B cells by a mechanism of intermolecular help, thus leading to a nonspecific immune response.

  11. Design and synthesis of multiple antigenic peptides and their application for dengue diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rai, Reeta; Dubey, Sameer; Santosh, K V; Biswas, Ashutosh; Mehrotra, Vinit; Rao, D N

    2017-09-01

    Major difficulty in development of dengue diagnostics is availability of suitable antigens. To overcome this, we made an attempt to develop a peptide based diagnosis which offers significant advantage over other methods. With the help of in silico methods, two epitopes were selected from envelope protein and three from NS1 protein of dengue virus. These were synthesized in combination as three multiple antigenic peptides (MAPs). We have tested 157 dengue positive sera confirmed for NS1 antigen. MAP1 showed 96.81% sera positive for IgM and 68.15% positive for IgG. MAP2 detected 94.90% IgM and 59.23% IgG positive sera. MAP3 also detected 96.17% IgM and 59.87% IgG positive sera. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study describing the use of synthetic multiple antigenic peptides for the diagnosis of dengue infection. This study describes MAPs as a promising tool for the use in serodiagnosis of dengue. Copyright © 2017 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Multiple binding sites for transcriptional repressors can produce regular bursting and enhance noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengyel, Iván M.; Morelli, Luis G.

    2017-04-01

    Cells may control fluctuations in protein levels by means of negative autoregulation, where transcription factors bind DNA sites to repress their own production. Theoretical studies have assumed a single binding site for the repressor, while in most species it is found that multiple binding sites are arranged in clusters. We study a stochastic description of negative autoregulation with multiple binding sites for the repressor. We find that increasing the number of binding sites induces regular bursting of gene products. By tuning the threshold for repression, we show that multiple binding sites can also suppress fluctuations. Our results highlight possible roles for the presence of multiple binding sites of negative autoregulators.

  13. Multiple binding sites for transcriptional repressors can produce regular bursting and enhance noise suppression.

    PubMed

    Lengyel, Iván M; Morelli, Luis G

    2017-04-01

    Cells may control fluctuations in protein levels by means of negative autoregulation, where transcription factors bind DNA sites to repress their own production. Theoretical studies have assumed a single binding site for the repressor, while in most species it is found that multiple binding sites are arranged in clusters. We study a stochastic description of negative autoregulation with multiple binding sites for the repressor. We find that increasing the number of binding sites induces regular bursting of gene products. By tuning the threshold for repression, we show that multiple binding sites can also suppress fluctuations. Our results highlight possible roles for the presence of multiple binding sites of negative autoregulators.

  14. T cells expressing an anti–B-cell maturation antigen chimeric antigen receptor cause remissions of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed Abbas; Shi, Victoria; Maric, Irina; Wang, Michael; Stroncek, David F.; Rose, Jeremy J.; Brudno, Jennifer N.; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Feldman, Steven A.; Hansen, Brenna G.; Fellowes, Vicki S.; Hakim, Frances T.; Gress, Ronald E.

    2016-01-01

    Therapies with novel mechanisms of action are needed for multiple myeloma (MM). B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) is expressed in most cases of MM. We conducted the first-in-humans clinical trial of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells targeting BCMA. T cells expressing the CAR used in this work (CAR-BCMA) specifically recognized BCMA-expressing cells. Twelve patients received CAR-BCMA T cells in this dose-escalation trial. Among the 6 patients treated on the lowest 2 dose levels, limited antimyeloma activity and mild toxicity occurred. On the third dose level, 1 patient obtained a very good partial remission. Two patients were treated on the fourth dose level of 9 × 106 CAR+ T cells/kg body weight. Before treatment, the first patient on the fourth dose level had chemotherapy-resistant MM, making up 90% of bone marrow cells. After treatment, bone marrow plasma cells became undetectable by flow cytometry, and the patient’s MM entered a stringent complete remission that lasted for 17 weeks before relapse. The second patient on the fourth dose level had chemotherapy-resistant MM making up 80% of bone marrow cells before treatment. Twenty-eight weeks after this patient received CAR-BCMA T cells, bone marrow plasma cells were undetectable by flow cytometry, and the serum monoclonal protein had decreased by >95%. This patient is in an ongoing very good partial remission. Both patients treated on the fourth dose level had toxicity consistent with cytokine-release syndrome including fever, hypotension, and dyspnea. Both patients had prolonged cytopenias. Our findings demonstrate antimyeloma activity of CAR-BCMA T cells. This trial was registered to www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT02215967. PMID:27412889

  15. [Reseach Advances on Cancer-Testis Antigens in Multiple Myeloma -Review].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Rui; Yu, Li; Zhu, Hai-Yan

    2017-02-01

    Cancer-testis antigens (CTA) are a class of tumor-associated antigens, which are mainly located in X chromosome. CTA restrictively expressed in normal testis, ovary, placenta and so on. Their expression in other normal tissues is much lower, even can not be detected. However, their expressions are aberrantly high in human cancers. Based on CTA encoding immunogenic proteins, they can be regulated by epigentics, CTA provides very attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple myeloma (MM) is incurable and has a low cureative rate and a high relapse rate. CTA have been detected in many MM cell lines and primary MM cells, they may be relaled to clinical prognosis. This reviews briefly summarized the research advances of CTA in the immune therapy of multiple myeloma, so as to provide a valuable therapeutic idea for myeloma.

  16. Lipid-Free Antigen B Subunits from Echinococcus granulosus: Oligomerization, Ligand Binding, and Membrane Interaction Properties

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Álvarez, Valeria; Franchini, Gisela R.; Pórfido, Jorge L.; Kennedy, Malcolm W.; Ferreira, Ana M.; Córsico, Betina

    2015-01-01

    Background The hydatid disease parasite Echinococcus granulosus has a restricted lipid metabolism, and needs to harvest essential lipids from the host. Antigen B (EgAgB), an abundant lipoprotein of the larval stage (hydatid cyst), is thought to be important in lipid storage and transport. It contains a wide variety of lipid classes, from highly hydrophobic compounds to phospholipids. Its protein component belongs to the cestode-specific Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein family, which includes five 8-kDa isoforms encoded by a multigene family (EgAgB1-EgAgB5). How lipid and protein components are assembled into EgAgB particles remains unknown. EgAgB apolipoproteins self-associate into large oligomers, but the functional contribution of lipids to oligomerization is uncertain. Furthermore, binding of fatty acids to some EgAgB subunits has been reported, but their ability to bind other lipids and transfer them to acceptor membranes has not been studied. Methodology/Principal Findings Lipid-free EgAgB subunits obtained by reverse-phase HPLC were used to analyse their oligomerization, ligand binding and membrane interaction properties. Size exclusion chromatography and cross-linking experiments showed that EgAgB8/2 and EgAgB8/3 can self-associate, suggesting that lipids are not required for oligomerization. Furthermore, using fluorescent probes, both subunits were found to bind fatty acids, but not cholesterol analogues. Analysis of fatty acid transfer to phospholipid vesicles demonstrated that EgAgB8/2 and EgAgB8/3 are potentially capable of transferring fatty acids to membranes, and that the efficiency of transfer is dependent on the surface charge of the vesicles. Conclusions/Significance We show that EgAgB apolipoproteins can oligomerize in the absence of lipids, and can bind and transfer fatty acids to phospholipid membranes. Since imported fatty acids are essential for Echinococcus granulosus, these findings provide a mechanism whereby EgAgB could engage in lipid

  17. Identification of Multiple Antigens Recognized by Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes From a Single Patient: Tumor Escape by Antigen Loss and Loss of MHC Expression

    PubMed Central

    Khong, Hung T.; Wang, Qiong J.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe a patient who experienced recurrence of metastatic melanoma after an initial dramatic response to immunotherapy using peptides derived from gp100, MART-1, and tyrosinase emulsified in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant, and present data to support the hypothesis that the progression of disease in this patient was due to in vivo immunoselection for immunoresistant tumor variants. The authors previously demonstrated the existence of T-cell clones in this patient’s peripheral blood and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) reactive against multiple antigens, including gp100, the tyrosinase-related protein (TRP)-2, a novel TRP-2 isoform-TRP-2-6b, SOX10, and the melanoma antigen NY-ESO-1. In addition to the multiple HLA-A2 restricted T-cell clones, the authors have now identified additional HLA-B/C-restricted as well as class II (HLA-DP)-restricted anti-melanoma antigen T-cell clones from this patient’s TIL. One recurrent tumor showed loss of expression of multiple tumor antigens but retention of HLA class I expression. The other recurrent lesion showed total loss of HLA class I expression even though the tumor cells still expressed many melanoma antigens. This paper thus provides evidence for both the effectiveness of the immune destruction of cancer as well as problems associated with antigen-loss tumor escape mechanisms. PMID:15076135

  18. Semenogelins I and II bind zinc and regulate the activity of prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Magnus; Linse, Sara; Frohm, Birgitta; Lundwall, Ake; Malm, Johan

    2005-04-15

    In semen, the gel proteins SgI and SgII (semenogelins I and II) are digested by PSA (prostate-specific antigen), resulting in liquefaction and release of motile spermatozoa. Semen contains a high concentration of Zn2+, which is known to inhibit the protease activity of PSA. We characterized the binding of Zn2+ to SgI and SgII and found evidence that these proteins are involved in regulating the activity of PSA. Intact SgI and SgII and synthetic semenogelin peptides were used in the experiments. Binding of Zn2+ was studied by radioligand blotting, titration with a zinc (II) fluorophore chelator and NMR analysis. A chromogenic substrate was used to measure the enzymatic activity of PSA. SgI and SgII bound Zn2+ with a stoichiometry of at least 10 mol (mol of protein)(-1) and with an average dissociation constant of approx. 5 microM per site. Moreover, Zn2+-inhibited PSA was activated by exposure to SgI or SgII. Since both proteins have high affinity for Zn2+ and are the dominating proteins in semen, they probably represent the major Zn2+ binders in semen, one function of which may be to regulate the activity of PSA. The system is self-regulating, and PSA is maintained in an active state by its substrate.

  19. γ Sulphate PNA (PNA S): highly selective DNA binding molecule showing promising antigene activity.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Concetta; Moggio, Loredana; Malgieri, Gaetano; Capasso, Domenica; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Saviano, Michele; Pedone, Carlo; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNAs), nucleic acid analogues showing high stability to enzyme degradation and strong affinity and specificity of binding toward DNA and RNA are widely investigated as tools to interfere in gene expression. Several studies have been focused on PNA analogues with modifications on the backbone and bases in the attempt to overcome solubility, uptake and aggregation issues. γ PNAs, PNA derivatives having a substituent in the γ position of the backbone show interesting properties in terms of secondary structure and affinity of binding toward complementary nucleic acids. In this paper we illustrate our results obtained on new analogues, bearing a sulphate in the γ position of the backbone, developed to be more DNA-like in terms of polarity and charge. The synthesis of monomers and oligomers is described. NMR studies on the conformational properties of monomers and studies on the secondary structure of single strands and triplexes are reported. Furthermore the hybrid stability and the effect of mismatches on the stability have also been investigated. Finally, the ability of the new analogue to work as antigene, interfering with the transcription of the ErbB2 gene on a human cell line overexpressing ErbB2 (SKBR3), assessed by FACS and qPCR, is described.

  20. The expression of the Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (ceramide transporter) in adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Chiara; Hammels, Caroline; Van Den Broeck, Joost; Losen, Mario; Steinbusch, Hellen; Revert, Francisco; Saus, Juan; Hopkins, David A; De Baets, Marc H; Steinbusch, Harry W; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2009-10-01

    The Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP) plays a critical role in brain development. Knockdown of GPBP leads to loss of myelinated tracts in the central nervous system and to extensive apoptosis in the brain during early embryogenesis. GPBP was initially identified as a protein associated with the autoantigen in Goodpasture autoimmune syndrome, where it was shown to be a kinase that regulates type IV collagen organization. GPBP isoforms bind and transport ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus and are therefore also known as ceramide transporters (CERT). Ceramide dysregulation is involved in autoimmunity and neurodegenerative disorders. In order to analyze the possible role of GPBP in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration we studied the basal GPBP expression in normal rat brain. High levels of immunoreactivity were detected in neurons of the cerebral cortex, hippocampal formation, the basal ganglia, the olfactory bulb and nuclei of the thalamus, the hypothalamus and the septal area. Lower expression levels of GPBP were observed widely throughout the brain, suggesting that GPBP plays an important role in central nervous system neuron function.

  1. Polyomavirus Large T Antigen Binds Symmetrical Repeats at the Viral Origin in an Asymmetrical Manner

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Celia; Jiang, Tao; Banerjee, Pubali; Meinke, Gretchen; D'Abramo, Claudia M.; Schaffhausen, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Polyomaviruses have repeating sequences at their origins of replication that bind the origin-binding domain of virus-encoded large T antigen. In murine polyomavirus, the central region of the origin contains four copies (P1 to P4) of the sequence G(A/G)GGC. They are arranged as a pair of inverted repeats with a 2-bp overlap between the repeats at the center. In contrast to simian virus 40 (SV40), where the repeats are nonoverlapping and all four repeats can be simultaneously occupied, the crystal structure of the four central murine polyomavirus sequence repeats in complex with the polyomavirus origin-binding domain reveals that only three of the four repeats (P1, P2, and P4) are occupied. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirms that the stoichiometry is the same in solution as in the crystal structure. Consistent with these results, mutation of the third repeat has little effect on DNA replication in vivo. Thus, the apparent 2-fold symmetry within the DNA repeats is not carried over to the protein-DNA complex. Flanking sequences, such as the AT-rich region, are known to be important for DNA replication. When the orientation of the central region was reversed with respect to these flanking regions, the origin was still able to replicate and the P3 sequence (now located at the P2 position with respect to the flanking regions) was again dispensable. This highlights the critical importance of the precise sequence of the region containing the pentamers in replication. PMID:24109229

  2. Polyomavirus large T antigen binds symmetrical repeats at the viral origin in an asymmetrical manner.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Celia; Jiang, Tao; Banerjee, Pubali; Meinke, Gretchen; D'Abramo, Claudia M; Schaffhausen, Brian; Bohm, Andrew

    2013-12-01

    Polyomaviruses have repeating sequences at their origins of replication that bind the origin-binding domain of virus-encoded large T antigen. In murine polyomavirus, the central region of the origin contains four copies (P1 to P4) of the sequence G(A/G)GGC. They are arranged as a pair of inverted repeats with a 2-bp overlap between the repeats at the center. In contrast to simian virus 40 (SV40), where the repeats are nonoverlapping and all four repeats can be simultaneously occupied, the crystal structure of the four central murine polyomavirus sequence repeats in complex with the polyomavirus origin-binding domain reveals that only three of the four repeats (P1, P2, and P4) are occupied. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirms that the stoichiometry is the same in solution as in the crystal structure. Consistent with these results, mutation of the third repeat has little effect on DNA replication in vivo. Thus, the apparent 2-fold symmetry within the DNA repeats is not carried over to the protein-DNA complex. Flanking sequences, such as the AT-rich region, are known to be important for DNA replication. When the orientation of the central region was reversed with respect to these flanking regions, the origin was still able to replicate and the P3 sequence (now located at the P2 position with respect to the flanking regions) was again dispensable. This highlights the critical importance of the precise sequence of the region containing the pentamers in replication.

  3. High Resolution Mapping of Bactericidal Monoclonal Antibody Binding Epitopes on Staphylococcus aureus Antigen MntC

    PubMed Central

    Gribenko, Alexey V.; Parris, Kevin; Mosyak, Lidia; Li, Sheng; Handke, Luke; Hawkins, Julio C.; Severina, Elena; Matsuka, Yury V.; Anderson, Annaliesa S.

    2016-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus manganese transporter protein MntC is under investigation as a component of a prophylactic S.aureus vaccine. Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies mAB 305-78-7 and mAB 305-101-8 produced using MntC was shown to significantly reduce S. aureus burden in an infant rat model of infection. Earlier interference mapping suggested that a total of 23 monoclonal antibodies generated against MntC could be subdivided into three interference groups, representing three independent immunogenic regions. In the current work binding epitopes for selected representatives of each of these interference groups (mAB 305-72-5 – group 1, mAB 305-78-7 – group 2, and mAB 305-101-8 – group 3) were mapped using Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (DXMS). All of the identified epitopes are discontinuous, with binding surface formed by structural elements that are separated within the primary sequence of the protein but adjacent in the context of the three-dimensional structure. The approach was validated by co-crystallizing the Fab fragment of one of the antibodies (mAB 305-78-7) with MntC and solving the three-dimensional structure of the complex. X-ray results themselves and localization of the mAB 305-78-7 epitope were further validated using antibody binding experiments with MntC variants containing substitutions of key amino acid residues. These results provided insight into the antigenic properties of MntC and how these properties may play a role in protecting the hostagainst S. aureus infection by preventing the capture and transport of Mn2+, a key element that the pathogen uses to evade host immunity. PMID:27689696

  4. High Resolution Mapping of Bactericidal Monoclonal Antibody Binding Epitopes on Staphylococcus aureus Antigen MntC.

    PubMed

    Gribenko, Alexey V; Parris, Kevin; Mosyak, Lidia; Li, Sheng; Handke, Luke; Hawkins, Julio C; Severina, Elena; Matsuka, Yury V; Anderson, Annaliesa S

    2016-09-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus manganese transporter protein MntC is under investigation as a component of a prophylactic S.aureus vaccine. Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies mAB 305-78-7 and mAB 305-101-8 produced using MntC was shown to significantly reduce S. aureus burden in an infant rat model of infection. Earlier interference mapping suggested that a total of 23 monoclonal antibodies generated against MntC could be subdivided into three interference groups, representing three independent immunogenic regions. In the current work binding epitopes for selected representatives of each of these interference groups (mAB 305-72-5 - group 1, mAB 305-78-7 - group 2, and mAB 305-101-8 - group 3) were mapped using Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (DXMS). All of the identified epitopes are discontinuous, with binding surface formed by structural elements that are separated within the primary sequence of the protein but adjacent in the context of the three-dimensional structure. The approach was validated by co-crystallizing the Fab fragment of one of the antibodies (mAB 305-78-7) with MntC and solving the three-dimensional structure of the complex. X-ray results themselves and localization of the mAB 305-78-7 epitope were further validated using antibody binding experiments with MntC variants containing substitutions of key amino acid residues. These results provided insight into the antigenic properties of MntC and how these properties may play a role in protecting the hostagainst S. aureus infection by preventing the capture and transport of Mn2+, a key element that the pathogen uses to evade host immunity.

  5. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8positive T-cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presenta...

  6. Protective efficacy of vaccination with Neospora caninum multiple recombinant antigens against experimental Neospora caninum infection

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jung-Hwa; Chung, Woo-Suk; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Kang, Seung-Won; Song, Chul-Yong

    2005-01-01

    Protective efficacy of vaccination with Neospora caninum multiple recombinant antigens against N. caninum infection was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Two major immunodominant surface antigens (NcSAG1 and NcSRS2) and two dense granule proteins (NcDG1 and NcDG2) of N. caninum tachyzoites were expressed in E. coli, respectively. An in vitro neutralization assay using polyclonal antisera raised against each recombinant antigen showed inhibitory effects on the invasion of N. caninum tachyzoites into host cells. Separate groups of gerbils were immunized with the purified recombinant proteins singly or in combinations and animals were then challenged with N.caninum. Following these experimental challenges, the protective efficacy of each vaccination was determined by assessing animal survival rate. All experimental groups showed protective effects of different degrees against experimental infection. The highest protection efficacy was observed for combined vaccination with NcSRS2 and NcDG1. Our results indicate that combined vaccination with the N. caninum recombinant antigens, NcSRS2 and NcDG1, induces the highest protective effect against N. caninum infection in vitro and in vivo. PMID:15793355

  7. Multiple antigenic peptides as vaccine platform for the induction of humoral responses against dengue-2 virus.

    PubMed

    Amexis, Georgios; Young, Neal S

    2007-12-01

    Dengue is an important agent of human disease for which no licensed vaccine is available to the public. We used multiple antigenic peptides (MAPs) as an antigen carrier for the development of subunit vaccines against dengue-2 virus (DEN-2). Commercially available software (MacVector 7.0) was used to identify potential antigenic B-cell epitopes of E-glycoprotein. A total of 60 BALB/c mice were immunized with 12 recombinant DEN-2-specific MAPs and the humoral immune response was assessed by anti-DEN-2 ELISA and PRNT50 assays. Anti-DEN-2 ELISA showed high levels of anti-DEN-2 antibodies and post-immune sera reduced viral infectivity and prevented infection of monkey kidney cells (LLC-MK2) with live DEN-2 virus. Seven neutralizing DEN-2 epitopes were identified that generated PRNT50 titers of up to 1:160. Our findings show that the MAP platform can be used as an antigen-presenting platform for dengue vaccine development.

  8. Studies of Plasmodium falciparum rhoptry-associated membrane antigen (RAMA) protein peptides specifically binding to human RBC.

    PubMed

    Pinzón, Carlos Giovanni; Curtidor, Hernando; Bermúdez, Adriana; Forero, Martha; Vanegas, Magnolia; Rodríguez, Jorge; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2008-02-06

    Plasmodium falciparum rhoptry-associated membrane antigen (RAMA) peptides used in normal red blood cell (RBC) binding assays revealed that peptides 33426 (79NINILSSVHRKGRILYDSF97) and 33460 (777HKKREKSISPHSYQKVSTKVQ797) bound with high activity, presenting nanomolar affinity constants. Such high binding activity peptides (HABPs) displayed helicoid and random coil structures as determined by circular dichroism. HABPs inhibited P. falciparumin vitro invasion of normal RBC by up to 61% (depending on concentration), suggesting that some RAMA protein regions could be involved in P. falciparum invasion of RBC. The nature and localisation of receptors on RBC surface responsible for HABP binding were studied using enzyme-treated erythrocytes and structural analysis.

  9. Very Late Antigen-4 (α4β1 Integrin) Targeted PET Imaging of Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Soodgupta, Deepti; Hurchla, Michelle A.; Jiang, Majiong; Zheleznyak, Alexander; Weilbaecher, Katherine N.; Anderson, Carolyn J.; Tomasson, Michael H.; Shokeen, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical imaging techniques such as skeletal survey and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)/Positron Emission Tomography (PET) are frequently used to diagnose and stage multiple myeloma (MM) patients. However, skeletal survey has limited sensitivity as it can detect osteolytic lesions only after 30–50% cortical bone destruction, and FDG is a marker of cell metabolism that has limited sensitivity for intramedullary lesions in MM. Targeted, and non-invasive novel probes are needed to sensitively and selectively image the unique molecular signatures and cellular processes associated with MM. Very late antigen-4 (VLA-4; also called α4β1 integrin) is over-expressed on MM cells, and is one of the key mediators of myeloma cell adhesion to the bone marrow (BM) that promotes MM cell trafficking and drug resistance. Here we describe a proof-of-principle, novel molecular imaging strategy for MM tumors using a VLA-4 targeted PET radiopharmaceutical, 64Cu-CB-TE1A1P-LLP2A. Cell uptake studies in a VLA-4-positive murine MM cell line, 5TGM1, demonstrated receptor specific uptake (P<0.0001, block vs. non-block). Tissue biodistribution at 2 h of 64Cu-CB-TE1A1P-LLP2A in 5TGM1 tumor bearing syngeneic KaLwRij mice demonstrated high radiotracer uptake in the tumor (12±4.5%ID/g), and in the VLA-4 rich organs, spleen (8.8±1.0%ID/g) and marrow (11.6±2.0%ID/g). Small animal PET/CT imaging with 64Cu-CB-TE1A1P-LLP2A demonstrated high uptake in the 5TGM1 tumors (SUV 6.6±1.1). There was a 3-fold reduction in the in vivo tumor uptake in the presence of blocking agent (2.3±0.4). Additionally, 64Cu-CB-TE1A1P-LLP2A demonstrated high binding to the human MM cell line RPMI-8226 that was significantly reduced in the presence of the cold targeting agent. These results provide pre-clinical evidence that VLA-4-targeted imaging using 64Cu-CB-TE1A1P-LLP2A is a novel approach to imaging MM tumors. PMID:23409060

  10. High-resolution structure of a new Tn antigen-binding lectin from Vatairea macrocarpa and a comparative analysis of Tn-binding legume lectins.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Bruno Lopes; Silva Filho, José Caetano; Kumar, Prashant; Pereira, Ronniery Ilário; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias; Delatorre, Plínio; Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Gruber, Karl; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2015-02-01

    Plant lectins have been studied as histological markers and promising antineoplastic molecules for a long time, and structural characterization of different lectins bound to specific cancer epitopes has been carried out successfully. The crystal structures of Vatairea macrocarpa (VML) seed lectin in complex with GalNAc-α-O-Ser (Tn antigen) and GalNAc have been determined at the resolution of 1.4Å and 1.7Å, respectively. Molecular docking analysis of this new structure and other Tn-binding legume lectins to O-mucin fragments differently decorated with this antigen provides a comparative binding profile among these proteins, stressing that subtle alterations that may not influence monosaccharide binding can, nonetheless, directly impact the ability of these lectins to recognize naturally occurring antigens. In addition to the specific biological effects of VML, the structural and binding similarities between it and other lectins commonly used as histological markers (e.g., VVLB4 and SBA) strongly suggest VML as a candidate tool for cancer research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fluorine substitutions in an antigenic peptide selectively modulate T-cell receptor binding in a minimally perturbing manner

    SciTech Connect

    Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Sommese, Ruth F.; Clemens, John; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Desmond, Clare; Do, Priscilla; Baker, Brian M.

    2010-08-17

    TCR (T-cell receptor) recognition of antigenic peptides bound and presented by MHC (major histocompatibility complex) molecules forms the basis of the cellular immune response to pathogens and cancer. TCRs bind peptide - MHC complexes weakly and with fast kinetics, features which have hindered detailed biophysical studies of these interactions. Modified peptides resulting in enhanced TCR binding could help overcome these challenges. Furthermore, there is considerable interest in using modified peptides with enhanced TCR binding as the basis for clinical vaccines. In the present study, we examined how fluorine substitutions in an antigenic peptide can selectively impact TCR recognition. Using a structure-guided design approach, we found that fluorination of the Tax peptide [HTLV (human T-cell lymphotropic virus)-1 Tax] enhanced binding by the Tax-specific TCR A6, yet weakened binding by the Tax-specific TCR B7. The changes in affinity were consistent with crystallographic structures and fluorine chemistry, and with the A6 TCR independent of other substitutions in the interface. Peptide fluorination thus provides a means to selectively modulate TCR binding affinity without significantly perturbing peptide composition or structure. Lastly, we probed the mechanism of fluorine's effect on TCR binding and we conclude that our results were most consistent with a 'polar hydrophobicity' mechanism, rather than a purely hydrophobic- or electrostatic-based mechanism. This finding should have an impact on other attempts to alter molecular recognition with fluorine.

  12. Enhanced immunogenicity of CTL antigens through mutation of the CD8 binding MHC class I invariant region.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Linda; Lissina, Anna; Vernazza, Jonathan; Gostick, Emma; Laugel, Bruno; Hutchinson, Sarah L; Mirza, Fareed; Dunbar, P Rod; Boulter, Jonathan M; Glick, Meir; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; van den Berg, Hugo A; Price, David A; Sewell, Andrew K

    2007-05-01

    CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are key determinants of immunity to intracellular pathogens and neoplastic cells. Recognition of specific antigens in the form of peptide-MHC class I complexes (pMHCI) presented on the target cell surface is mediated by T cell receptor (TCR) engagement. The CD8 coreceptor binds to invariant domains of pMHCI and facilitates antigen recognition. Here, we investigate the biological effects of a Q115E substitution in the alpha2 domain of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201 that enhances CD8 binding by approximately 50% without altering TCR/pMHCI interactions. Soluble and cell surface-expressed forms of Q115E HLA-A*0201 exhibit enhanced recognition by CTL without loss of specificity. These CD8-enhanced antigens induce greater CD3 zeta chain phosphorylation in cognate CTL leading to substantial increases in cytokine production, proliferation and priming of naive T cells. This effect provides a fundamental new mechanism with which to enhance cellular immunity to specific T cell antigens.

  13. Structural reorganization of the antigen-binding groove of human CD1b for presentation of mycobacterial sulfoglycolipids

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Alles, Luis F.; Collmann, Anthony; Versluis, Cees; Lindner, Buko; Guiard, Julie; Maveyraud, Laurent; Huc, Emilie; Im, Jin S.; Sansano, Sebastiano; Brando, Thérèse; Julien, Sylviane; Prandi, Jacques; Gilleron, Martine; Porcelli, Steven A.; de la Salle, Henri; Heck, Albert J. R.; Mori, Lucia; Puzo, Germain; Mourey, Lionel; De Libero, Gennaro

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms permitting nonpolymorphic CD1 molecules to present lipid antigens that differ considerably in polar head and aliphatic tails remain elusive. It is also unclear why hydrophobic motifs in the aliphatic tails of some antigens, which presumably embed inside CD1 pockets, contribute to determinants for T-cell recognition. The 1.9-Å crystal structure of an active complex of CD1b and a mycobacterial diacylsulfoglycolipid presented here provides some clues. Upon antigen binding, endogenous spacers of CD1b, which consist of a mixture of diradylglycerols, moved considerably within the lipid-binding groove. Spacer displacement was accompanied by F’ pocket closure and an extensive rearrangement of residues exposed to T-cell receptors. Such structural reorganization resulted in reduction of the A’ pocket capacity and led to incomplete embedding of the methyl-ramified portion of the phthioceranoyl chain of the antigen, explaining why such hydrophobic motifs are critical for T-cell receptor recognition. Mutagenesis experiments supported the functional importance of the observed structural alterations for T-cell stimulation. Overall, our data delineate a complex molecular mechanism combining spacer repositioning and ligand-induced conformational changes that, together with pocket intricacy, endows CD1b with the required molecular plasticity to present a broad range of structurally diverse antigens. PMID:22006319

  14. Epitopes of HERV-Wenv induce antigen-specific humoral immunity in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Mameli, Giuseppe; Cossu, Davide; Cocco, Eleonora; Frau, Jessica; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Niegowska, Magdalena; Sechi, Leonardo Antonio

    2015-03-15

    To verify the serological response mounted against antigenic peptides from HERV-Wenv protein, we analyzed 80 multiple sclerosis (MS) serum samples, 27 of which were re-analyzed after a 6-month follow-up IFN-β therapy, and 73 healthy controls. Indirect ELISAs were carried out to detect antibodies specific for all the synthetic peptides derived from HERV-Wenv. Two antigenic peptides, HERV-Wenv93-108 (31.25%, p<0.0001) and HERV-Wenv248-262 (15%, p=0.02), were highly recognized by MS patients' antibodies when compared to healthy subjects. Moreover, antibody titer against these two peptides slightly decreased after six months of IFN-β-based therapy.

  15. Antigen Presentation, Autoantigens, and Immune Regulation in Multiple Sclerosis and Other Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Riedhammer, Christine; Weissert, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation is in the center of the immune system, both in host defense against pathogens, but also when the system is unbalanced and autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) develop. It is not just by chance that a major histocompatibility complex gene is the major genetic susceptibility locus in MS; a feature that MS shares with other autoimmune diseases. The exact etiology of the disease, however, has not been fully understood yet. T cells are regarded as the major players in the disease, but most probably a complex interplay of altered central and peripheral tolerance mechanisms, T-cell and B-cell functions, characteristics of putative autoantigens, and a possible interference of environmental factors like microorganisms are at work. In this review, new data on all these different aspects of antigen presentation and their role in MS will be discussed, probable autoantigens will be summarized, and comparisons to other autoimmune diseases will be drawn. PMID:26136751

  16. Intramolecular trimerization, a novel strategy for making multispecific antibodies with controlled orientation of the antigen binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Compte, Marta; Cuesta, Angel M.; Blanco-Toribio, Ana; Harwood, Seandean Lykke; Villate, Maider; Merino, Nekane; Bonet, Jaume; Navarro, Rocio; Muñoz-Briones, Clara; Sørensen, Karen Marie Juul; Mølgaard, Kasper; Oliva, Baldo; Sanz, Laura; Blanco, Francisco J.; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a new strategy that allows the rapid and efficient engineering of mono and multispecific trivalent antibodies. By fusing single-domain antibodies from camelid heavy-chain-only immunoglobulins (VHHs) to the N-terminus of a human collagen XVIII trimerization domain (TIEXVIII) we produced monospecific trimerbodies that were efficiently secreted as soluble functional proteins by mammalian cells. The purified VHH-TIEXVIII trimerbodies were trimeric in solution and exhibited excellent antigen binding capacity. Furthermore, by connecting with two additional glycine-serine-based linkers three VHH-TIEXVIII modules on a single polypeptide chain, we present an approach for the rational design of multispecific tandem trimerbodies with defined stoichiometry and controlled orientation. Using this technology we report here the construction and characterization of a tandem VHH-based trimerbody capable of simultaneously binding to three different antigens: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Multispecific tandem VHH-based trimerbodies were well expressed in mammalian cells, had good biophysical properties and were capable of simultaneously binding their targeted antigens. Importantly, these antibodies were very effective in inhibiting the proliferation of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Multispecific VHH-based trimerbodies are therefore ideal candidates for future applications in various therapeutic areas. PMID:27345490

  17. Intramolecular trimerization, a novel strategy for making multispecific antibodies with controlled orientation of the antigen binding domains.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Compte, Marta; Cuesta, Angel M; Blanco-Toribio, Ana; Harwood, Seandean Lykke; Villate, Maider; Merino, Nekane; Bonet, Jaume; Navarro, Rocio; Muñoz-Briones, Clara; Sørensen, Karen Marie Juul; Mølgaard, Kasper; Oliva, Baldo; Sanz, Laura; Blanco, Francisco J; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2016-06-27

    Here, we describe a new strategy that allows the rapid and efficient engineering of mono and multispecific trivalent antibodies. By fusing single-domain antibodies from camelid heavy-chain-only immunoglobulins (VHHs) to the N-terminus of a human collagen XVIII trimerization domain (TIE(XVIII)) we produced monospecific trimerbodies that were efficiently secreted as soluble functional proteins by mammalian cells. The purified VHH-TIE(XVIII) trimerbodies were trimeric in solution and exhibited excellent antigen binding capacity. Furthermore, by connecting with two additional glycine-serine-based linkers three VHH-TIE(XVIII) modules on a single polypeptide chain, we present an approach for the rational design of multispecific tandem trimerbodies with defined stoichiometry and controlled orientation. Using this technology we report here the construction and characterization of a tandem VHH-based trimerbody capable of simultaneously binding to three different antigens: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Multispecific tandem VHH-based trimerbodies were well expressed in mammalian cells, had good biophysical properties and were capable of simultaneously binding their targeted antigens. Importantly, these antibodies were very effective in inhibiting the proliferation of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Multispecific VHH-based trimerbodies are therefore ideal candidates for future applications in various therapeutic areas.

  18. Surface plasmon resonance and NMR analyses of anti Tn-antigen MLS128 monoclonal antibody binding to two or three consecutive Tn-antigen clusters.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto-Takasaki, Ayano; Hanashima, Shinya; Aoki, Ami; Yuasa, Noriyuki; Ogawa, Haruhiko; Sato, Reiko; Kawakami, Hiroko; Mizuno, Mamoru; Nakada, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2012-03-01

    Tn-antigens are tumour-associated carbohydrate antigens that are involved in metastatic processes and are associated with a poor prognosis. MLS128 monoclonal antibody recognizes the structures of two or three consecutive Tn-antigens (Tn2 or Tn3). Since MLS128 treatment inhibits colon and breast cancer cell growth [Morita, N., Yajima, Y., Asanuma, H., Nakada, H., and Fujita-Yamaguchi, Y. (2009) Inhibition of cancer cell growth by anti-Tn monoclonal antibody MLS128. Biosci. Trends 3, 32-37.], understanding the interaction between MLS128 and Tn-clusters may allow us to the development of novel cancer therapeutics. Although MLS128 was previously reported to have specificity for Tn3 rather than Tn2, similar levels of Tn2/Tn3 binding were unexpectedly observed at 37°C. Thus, thermodynamic analyses were performed via surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using synthetic Tn2- and Tn3-peptides at 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30°C. SPR results revealed that MLS128's association constants for both antigens were highly temperature dependent. Below 25°C MLS128's association constant for Tn3-peptide was clearly higher than that for Tn2-peptide. At 30°C, however, the association constant for Tn2-peptide was higher than that for Tn3-peptide. This reversal of affinity is due to the sharp increase in K(d) for Tn3. These results were confirmed by NMR, which directly measured MLS128-Tn binding in solution. This study suggested that thermodynamic control plays a critical role in the interaction between MLS128/Tn2 and MLS128/Tn3.

  19. Human Biliverdin Reductase Suppresses Goodpasture Antigen-binding Protein (GPBP) Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Miralem, Tihomir; Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Revert, Fernando; Saus, Juan; Maines, Mahin D.

    2010-01-01

    The Ser/Thr/Tyr kinase activity of human biliverdin reductase (hBVR) and the expression of Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP), a nonconventional Ser/Thr kinase for the type IV collagen of basement membrane, are regulated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α). The pro-inflammatory cytokine stimulates kinase activity of hBVR and activates NF-κB, a transcriptional regulator of GPBP mRNA. Increased GPBP activity is associated with several autoimmune conditions, including Goodpasture syndrome. Here we show that in HEK293A cells hBVR binds to GPBP and down-regulates its TNF-α-stimulated kinase activity; this was not due to a decrease in GPBP expression. Findings with small interfering RNA to hBVR and to the p65 regulatory subunit of NF-κB show the hBVR role in the initial stimulation of GPBP expression by TNF-α-activated NF-κB; hBVR was not a factor in mediating GPBP mRNA stability. The interacting domain was mapped to the 281CX10C motif in the C-terminal 24 residues of hBVR. A 7-residue peptide, KKRILHC281, corresponding to the core of the consensus D(δ)-Box motif in the interacting domain, was as effective as the intact 296-residue hBVR polypeptide in inhibiting GPBP kinase activity. GPBP neither regulated hBVR expression nor TNF-α dependent NF-κB expression. Collectively, our data reveal that hBVR is a regulator of the TNF-α-GPBP-collagen type IV signaling cascade and uncover a novel biological interaction that may be of relevance in autoimmune pathogenesis. PMID:20177069

  20. The antigenic character of zinc-binding proteins and their localization in boar reproductive tract--a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Mogielnicka-Brzozowska, Marzena; Fraser, Leyland; Strzeżek, Jerzy; Kordan, Władysław

    2013-01-01

    In this study immunoelectrophoretic and double immunodiffusion analyses were used to investigate the antigenic character of zinc-binding proteins (ZnBPs), whereas the indirect immunofluorescence technique was used to identify their origin in boar reproductive tract. The mmunoelectrophoretic analysis of ZnBPs of the seminal plasma resulted in the appearance of three antigenic protein complexes, while specific immunoreactivity patterns of the anti-ZnBP serum were detected by double immunodiffusion analysis. Indirect immunofluorescence technique confirmed that ZnBPs were secreted by different reproductive tract tissues, suggesting their contributions to the seminal plasma.

  1. Effect of the Protein Corona on Antibody-Antigen Binding in Nanoparticle Sandwich Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    de Puig, Helena; Bosch, Irene; Carré-Camps, Marc; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2017-01-18

    We investigated the effect of the protein corona on the function of nanoparticle (NP) antibody (Ab) conjugates in dipstick sandwich immunoassays. Ab specific for Zika virus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) were conjugated to gold NPs, and another anti-NS1 Ab was immobilized onto the nitrocellulose membrane. Sandwich immunoassay formation was influenced by whether the strip was run in corona forming conditions, i.e., in human serum. Strips run in buffer or pure solutions of bovine serum albumin exhibited false positives, but those run in human serum did not. Serum pretreatment of the nitrocellulose also eliminated false positives. Corona formation around the NP-Ab in serum was faster than the immunoassay time scale. Langmuir binding analysis determined how the immobilized Ab affinity for the NP-Ab/NS1 was impacted by corona formation conditions, quantified as an effective dissociation constant, KD(eff). Results show that corona formation mediates the specificity and sensitivity of the antibody-antigen interaction of Zika biomarkers in immunoassays, and plays a critical but beneficial role.

  2. Field Effect Transistor Biosensor Using Antigen Binding Fragment for Detecting Tumor Marker in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shanshan; Hotani, Kaori; Hideshima, Sho; Kuroiwa, Shigeki; Nakanishi, Takuya; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Mori, Yasuro; Osaka, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Detection of tumor markers is important for cancer diagnosis. Field-effect transistors (FETs) are a promising method for the label-free detection of trace amounts of biomolecules. However, detection of electrically charged proteins using antibody-immobilized FETs is limited by ionic screening by the large probe molecules adsorbed to the transistor gate surface, reducing sensor responsiveness. Here, we investigated the effect of probe molecule size on the detection of a tumor marker, α-fetoprotein (AFP) using a FET biosensor. We demonstrated that the small receptor antigen binding fragment (Fab), immobilized on a sensing surface as small as 2–3 nm, offers a higher degree of sensitivity and a wider concentration range (100 pg/mL–1 μg/mL) for the FET detection of AFP in buffer solution, compared to the whole antibody. Therefore, the use of a small Fab probe molecule instead of a whole antibody is shown to be effective for improving the sensitivity of AFP detection in FET biosensors. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that a Fab-immobilized FET subjected to a blocking treatment, to avoid non-specific interactions, could sensitively and selectively detect AFP in human serum. PMID:28788579

  3. Binding of antiestrogens exposes an occult antigenic determinant in the human estrogen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, P M; Berthois, Y; Jensen, E V

    1988-01-01

    Treatment of human breast cancer cytosol with tamoxifen (Tam) or 4-monohydroxytamoxifen (MHT) enhances the immunoreactivity of the estrogen receptor toward monoclonal antibody H222 but not monoclonal antibodies D547 or D75. This effect is evident from an increase in the apparent receptor content measured by the Abbott enzyme immunoassay, which uses peroxidase-labeled H222 as the chromogenic marker, and in the rate and size of the sedimentation peak of the immune complex of the receptor with radiolabeled H222. In contrast, MHT shows no effect in reversed immunoassay systems that use peroxidase-labeled D547 or D75 as chromogenic markers, nor does it affect the sedimentation peak of the complex of D547 with the receptor. MHT can exert its action on receptor bound to immobilized antibody. These results indicate that reaction with antiestrogens causes a change, probably conformational, in the receptor protein that exposes an occult antigenic determinant recognized uniquely by H222. Since this can occur in cytosol previously treated with excess estradiol in the cold, it appears to result from an interaction of antiestrogens with a region of the receptor distinct from the estrogen-binding site, suggesting that agonist and antagonist actions may involve different parts of the receptor molecule. PMID:2451827

  4. The ceramide transporter and the Goodpasture antigen binding protein: one protein--one function?

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Chiara; Losen, Mario; Hammels, Caroline; De Vry, Jochen; Hesselink, Matthijs K C; Steinbusch, Harry W M; De Baets, Marc H; Martínez-Martínez, Pilar

    2010-06-01

    The Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP) and its splice variant the ceramide transporter (CERT) are multifunctional proteins that have been found to play important roles in brain development and biology. However, the function of GPBP and CERT is controversial because of their involvement in two apparently unrelated research fields: GPBP was initially isolated as a protein associated with collagen IV in patients with the autoimmune disease Goodpasture syndrome. Subsequently, a splice variant lacking a serine-rich domain of 26 amino acids (GPBPDelta26) was found to mediate the cytosolic transport of ceramide and was therefore (re)named CERT. The two splice forms likely carry out different functions in specific sub-cellular localizations. Selective GPBP knockdown induces extensive apoptosis and tissue loss in the brain of zebrafish. GPBP/GPBPDelta26 knock-out mice die as a result of structural and functional defects in endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Because both mitochondria and ceramide play an important role in many biological events that regulate neuronal differentiation, cellular senescence, proliferation and cell death, we propose that GPBP and CERT are pivotal in neurodegenerative processes. In this review, we discuss the current state of knowledge on GPBP and CERT, including the molecular and biochemical characterization of GPBP in the field of autoimmunity as well as the fundamental research on CERT in ceramide transport, biosynthesis, localization, metabolism and cell homeostasis.

  5. Polysialic Acid as an Antigen for Monoclonal Antibody HIgM12 to Treat Multiple Sclerosis and Other Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Watzlawik, Jens O.; Kahoud, Robert J.; Ng, Shermayne; Painter, Meghan M; Papke, Louisa M.; Zoecklein, Laurie; Wootla, Bharath; Warrington, Arthur E.; Carey, William A.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-01-01

    CNS regeneration is a desirable goal for diseases of brain and spinal cord. Current therapeutic strategies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) aim to eliminate detrimental effects of the immune system, so far without reversing disability or affecting long-term prognosis in patients. Approachable molecular targets that stimulate CNS repair are not part of the clinical praxis or have not been identified yet. The purpose of this study was to identify the molecular target of the human monoclonal antibody HIgM12. HIgM12 reverses motor deficits in chronically demyelinated mice, a model of MS. Here we identified polysialic acid (PSA) attached to the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) as the antigen for HIgM12 by using different NCAM knockout strains and through PSA removal from the NCAM protein core. Antibody binding to CNS tissue and primary cells, antibody-mediated cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth on HIgM12-coated nitrocellulose was detected only in the presence of PSA as assessed by Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, immunocytochemistry and histochemistry. We conclude that HIgM12 mediates it's in vivo and in vitro effects through binding to PSA and has the potential to be an effective therapy for MS and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25866077

  6. Structure, Receptor Binding, and Antigenicity of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinins from the 1957 H2N2 Pandemic

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Rui; McBride, Ryan; Paulson, James C.; Basler, Christopher F.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-03-04

    The hemagglutinin (HA) envelope protein of influenza viruses mediates essential viral functions, including receptor binding and membrane fusion, and is the major viral antigen for antibody neutralization. The 1957 H2N2 subtype (Asian flu) was one of the three great influenza pandemics of the last century and caused 1 million deaths globally from 1957 to 1968. Three crystal structures of 1957 H2 HAs have been determined at 1.60 to 1.75 {angstrom} resolutions to investigate the structural basis for their antigenicity and evolution from avian to human binding specificity that contributed to its introduction into the human population. These structures, which represent the highest resolutions yet recorded for a complete ectodomain of a glycosylated viral surface antigen, along with the results of glycan microarray binding analysis, suggest that a hydrophobicity switch at residue 226 and elongation of receptor-binding sites were both critical for avian H2 HA to acquire human receptor specificity. H2 influenza viruses continue to circulate in birds and pigs and, therefore, remain a substantial threat for transmission to humans. The H2 HA structure also reveals a highly conserved epitope that could be harnessed in the design of a broader and more universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  7. Intralesional Candida Antigen Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Recalcitrant and Multiple Warts in Children.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Garza, Fania Z; Roé Crespo, Esther; Torres Pradilla, Mauricio; Aguilera Peirò, Paula; Baltà Cruz, Susana; Hernández Ruiz, María Eugenia; Baselga Torres, Eulàlia

    2015-01-01

    Intralesional injection of Candida antigen appears to be an effective alternative for the treatment of warts. To determine the efficacy and safety of this treatment. We retrospectively reviewed records of all children who received intralesional injection of Candida antigen at our center from January 2008 to July 2013. From a total of 220 patients, 156 (70.9%) had a complete response, 37 (16.8%) had a partial response, and 27 (12.2%) had no improvement. An average of 2.73 treatments was needed. Forty-seven of the patients with more than one wart (21.3%) also noted at least partial resolution of untreated warts at distant sites. Twenty-seven of the 47 patients (57.4%) had complete resolution. All treated patients experienced some discomfort at the time of the injection, but no serious side effects were reported. We report our results using this approach in a large group of children. Intralesional injection of Candida antigen is an effective and safe therapy for children with multiple and recalcitrant cutaneous warts. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Developing antigen-specific therapies in multiple sclerosis: a tale of Tantalus or Ulysses?

    PubMed

    van Noort JM

    1999-10-01

    Autoreactive T-cell responses directed to myelin proteins in the central nervous system are widely believed to be crucial in the pathology of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, effective ways of selectively targeting these T-cells in order to alter the clinical course of MS in a predictable manner has yet to be demonstrated. This review discusses two recent developments of crucial importance to the rational development of antigen-specific therapy in MS. The very idea of antigen-specific therapy in MS has long faced the challenge of determinant spreading, i.e., the development of novel autoimmune responses as the consequence of tissue damage. This phenomenon has led many to expect that in ongoing MS, many different pathogenic specificities would accumulate. Obviously, this would render antigen-specific therapy very difficult. Recent data now suggest that determinant spreading is most likely to be a transient phenomenon limited only to the first stages of tissue damage. A second development has changed our perspective on the specificity of individual T-cells and, thus, on the suitability of various ways to implement antigen-specific therapy. Evidence is rapidly accumulating that T-cell receptors are much more cross-reactive than previously assumed. This notion poses unexpected challenges to therapeutic approaches in MS that are based on selective targeting of autoreactive TCR. Vaccination with TCR peptides, administration of anti-TCR antibodies and development of therapeutically altered peptide ligands all depend on a significant level of predictability of pathogenic TCR. With such predictability now turning out to be much lower than was previously hoped, selective TCR-directed strategies for intervention may therefore turn out to be much less effective than anticipated. In the development of antigen-specific therapies, the use of whole protein tolerogens now seems to be the most promising route. Oral, intranasal or iv. administration of antigen remain viable options

  9. [Effect of pH of Adsorption Buffers on the Number and Antigen-Binding Activity of Monoclonal Antibodies Immobilized on the Surface of Polystyrene Microplates].

    PubMed

    Tarakanova, Yu N; Dmitriev, A D; Massino, Yu S; Pechelulko, A A; Segal, O L; Skoblov, Yu O; Ulanova, T I; Lavrov, V F; Dmitriev, D A

    2015-01-01

    The change in the concentration and antigen-binding activity of 28 monoclonal antibodies was studied after their adsorption on the surface of polystyrene microplates in buffers with different pH values (1.0, 2.8, 7.5, 9.6, and 11.9). We used 16 clones to the HIV p24 protein and 12 clones to the surface antigen of Hepatitis B Virus. The binding efficiency of adsorbed antibodies to the labeled antigen was evaluated by the slope of the linear region of the binding curve to the concentration axis. It was shown that the antigen-binding activity of six antibodies (21.5%) statistically significantly increased after adsorption at pH 2.8 and 11.9 as compared to pH 7.5 and 9.5. The maximum amount of antibodies was found to be adsorbed on the solid surface at pH 7.5. The analysis of the binding of 125I-HBs-antigen to adsorbed antibodies made it possible to evaluate the concentration of active antibodies on the polystyrene surface. It was shown that the increase in the antigen-binding activity was due to an increase in the proportion of antibodies with retained activity after adsorption at pH 2.8 and 11.9. Under these conditions, about 20% of the antibodies retained their antigen-binding activity, and 6% did so after immobilization at pH 7.5.

  10. Direct binding of a myasthenia gravis related epitope to MHC class II molecules on living murine antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mozes, E; Dayan, M; Zisman, E; Brocke, S; Licht, A; Pecht, I

    1989-01-01

    MHC gene products present antigenic epitopes to the antigen receptor on T cells. Nevertheless, direct binding of such epitopes to MHC class II proteins on normal living antigen-presenting cells (APCs) has not yet been demonstrated. We have previously shown a significant difference in the ability of T cells of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients to proliferate in response to the synthetic peptide p195-212 of the human acetylcholine receptor (AChR) alpha-subunit in comparison to healthy controls. The observed proliferative responses correlated significantly with HLA-DR5. Moreover, lymph node cells of various mouse strains that were primed with the T cell epitope, p195-212, were found to proliferate to different extents. To investigate these observations further, we designed an assay for direct binding of p195-212 to MHC class II proteins on the surface of freshly prepared splenic adherent cells. Binding of a biotinylated p195-212 was monitored using phycoerythrin-avidin by flow cytometry. Fifteen to sixty per cent of the cells were labeled following incubation with the biotinylated peptide. Binding was observed only to splenic adherent cells derived from mouse strains of which T cells were capable of proliferating in response to p195-212. The binding specificity, in terms of epitope structure and its site of interaction on the cells, was shown by its inhibition with an excess of the unlabeled peptide or with the relevant monoclonal anti-I-A antibodies. These results constitute the first direct evidence for the specific binding of a T cell epitope to live APC. PMID:2480232

  11. Selection of Human Antibody Fragments Which Bind Novel Breast Tumor Antigens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    cell type specific scFv for tumor targeting and as tools for identifying novel tumor antigens ... tumor specific antigens ). Subsequently, the cells were washed extensively with PBS to remove unbound phage and then incubated at 37°C for 15 minutes... detection and isolation of a tumor cell surface antigen using antibody phage display. J. Immunol. Meth. 203: 11-24. 46. Watters, J.M., Telleman, P.,

  12. Mutational landscape of antibody variable domains reveals a switch modulating the interdomain conformational dynamics and antigen binding

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Patrick; Lee, Chingwei V.; Walters, Benjamin T.; Janakiraman, Vasantharajan; Stinson, Jeremy; Patapoff, Thomas W.; Fuh, Germaine

    2017-01-01

    Somatic mutations within the antibody variable domains are critical to the immense capacity of the immune repertoire. Here, via a deep mutational scan, we dissect how mutations at all positions of the variable domains of a high-affinity anti-VEGF antibody G6.31 impact its antigen-binding function. The resulting mutational landscape demonstrates that large portions of antibody variable domain positions are open to mutation, and that beneficial mutations can be found throughout the variable domains. We determine the role of one antigen-distal light chain position 83, demonstrating that mutation at this site optimizes both antigen affinity and thermostability by modulating the interdomain conformational dynamics of the antigen-binding fragment. Furthermore, by analyzing a large number of human antibody sequences and structures, we demonstrate that somatic mutations occur frequently at position 83, with corresponding domain conformations observed for G6.31. Therefore, the modulation of interdomain dynamics represents an important mechanism during antibody maturation in vivo. PMID:28057863

  13. Packaging of hepatitis delta virus RNA via the RNA-binding domain of hepatitis delta antigens: different roles for the small and large delta antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H W; Chen, P J; Lee, C Z; Wu, H L; Chen, D S

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is composed of four specific components. The first component is envelope protein which contains hepatitis B surface antigens. The second and third components are nucleocapsid proteins, referred to as small and large hepatitis delta antigens (HDAgs). The final component is a single-stranded circular RNA molecule known as the viral genome. In order to study the mechanism of HDV RNA packaging, a four-plasmid cotransfection system in which each viral component was provided by a separate plasmid was employed. Virus-like particles released from Huh-7 cells receiving such a cotransfection were found to contain HDV RNA along with three proteins. Therefore, the four-plasmid cotransfection system could lead to successful HDV RNA packaging in vitro. The system was then used to show that the large HDAg alone was able to achieve a low level of HDV RNA packaging. Analysis of a variety of large HDAg mutants revealed that the RNA-binding domain was essential for viral RNA packaging. By increasing the incorporation of small HDAg into virus-like particles, we found a three- to fourfold enhancement of HDV RNA packaging. This effect was probably through a direct binding of HDV RNA, independent from that of large HDAg, with the small HDAg. The subsequent RNA-protein complex was packaged into particles. The results provided insight into the roles and functional domains of small and large HDAgs in HDV RNA packaging. Images PMID:8083975

  14. A "liver" antigen associated with avian erythroblastosis: binding by bentonite and precipitation with sodium dodecyl sulphate.

    PubMed Central

    Darcel, C L

    1982-01-01

    The properties of a complement fixing antigen, EbAg, extracted from erythroblastosis-affected chicken livers are described. The antigen in extracts freed of structural protein is strongly bound by bentonite, but not by barium sulphate. Strongly alkaline solutions of sodium dodecyl sulphate are required to release the antigen from bentonite. Acidification of the detergent solution precipitates the active solution precipitates the active protein. Extraction of heme from the acidified detergent precipitate by methyl-ethyl ketone further purifies the antigen. This acid detergent treatment eliminates the need to use bentonite as a purification step. PMID:6280825

  15. Oriented Immobilization of Fab Fragments by Site-Specific Biotinylation at the Conserved Nucleotide Binding Site for Enhanced Antigen Detection.

    PubMed

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-09-08

    Oriented immobilization of antibodies and antibody fragments has become increasingly important as a result of the efforts to reduce the size of diagnostic and sensor devices to miniaturized dimensions for improved accessibility to the end-user. Reduced dimensions of sensor devices necessitate the immobilized antibodies to conserve their antigen binding activity for proper operation. Fab fragments are becoming more commonly used in small-scaled diagnostic devices due to their small size and ease of manufacture. In this study, we used the previously described UV-NBS(Biotin) method to functionalize Fab fragments with IBA-EG11-Biotin linker utilizing UV energy to initiate a photo-cross-linking reaction between the nucleotide binding site (NBS) on the Fab fragment and IBA-Biotin molecule. Our results demonstrate that immobilization of biotinylated Fab fragments via UV-NBS(Biotin) method generated the highest level of immobilized Fab on surfaces when compared to other typical immobilization methods while preserving antigen binding activity. UV-NBS(Biotin) method provided 432-fold, 114-fold, and 29-fold improved antigen detection sensitivity than physical adsorption, NHS-Biotin, and ε-NH3(+), methods, respectively. Additionally, the limit of detection (LOD) for PSA utilizing Fab fragments immobilized via UV-NBS(Biotin) method was significantly lower than that of the other immobilization methods, with an LOD of 0.4 pM PSA. In summary, site-specific biotinylation of Fab fragments without structural damage or loss in antigen binding activity provides a wide range of application potential for UV-NBS immobilization technique across numerous diagnostic devices and nanotechnologies.

  16. Mutagenesis of beryllium-specific T cell receptors suggests an unusual binding topology for antigen recognition1

    PubMed Central

    Bowerman, Natalie A.; Falta, Michael T.; Mack, Douglas G.; Kappler, John W.; Fontenot, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    Unconventional antigens, such as metals, stimulate T cells in a very specific manner. To delineate the binding landscape for metal-specific T cell recognition, alanine screens were performed on a set of beryllium (Be)-specific T cell receptors (TCR) derived from the lung of a chronic beryllium disease patient. These TCRs are HLA-DP2-restricted and express nearly identical TCR Vβ5.1 chains coupled with different TCR α-chains. Site-specific mutagenesis of all amino acids comprising the complementarity determining regions of the TCRA and TCRB genes showed a dominant role for Vβ5.1 residues in Be recognition, with little contribution from the TCR α-chain. Solvent-exposed residues along the α-helices of the HLA-DP2 α- and β-chains were also mutated to alanine. Two β-chain residues, located near the proposed Be binding site of HLA-DP2, played a dominant role in T cell recognition with no contribution from the HLA-DP2 α-chain. These findings suggest that Be-specific T cells recognize antigen using an unconventional binding topology, with the majority of interactions contributed by TCR Vβ5.1 residues and the HLA-DP2 β1-chain. Thus, unusual docking topologies are not exclusively used by autoreactive T cells, but also for the recognition of unconventional metal antigens, such as Be. PMID:21873524

  17. Designing binding kinetic assay on the bio-layer interferometry (BLI) biosensor to characterize antibody-antigen interactions.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Vishal; Rafique, Ashique

    2017-08-10

    The Octet biosensors provide a high-throughput alternative to the well-established surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and SPR imaging (SPRi) biosensors to characterize antibody-antigen interactions. However, the utility of the Octet biosensors for accurate and reproducible measurement of binding rate constants of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is limited due to challenges such as analyte rebinding, and mass transport limitation (MTL). This study focuses on addressing these challenges and provides experimental conditions to reliably measure kinetics of mAb-antigen interactions. The mAb capture density of less than 0.6 nm was found to be optimal to measure a wide range of binding affinities on Octet HTX biosensor. The titration kinetic and single cycle kinetic assays performed on Octet HTX generated reproducible binding kinetic parameters and correlated with the values measured on Biacore 4000 and MASS-1. Kinetic assays performed on 0.1 nm density mAb surfaces significantly reduced MTL and enabled characterization of picomolar affinity mAbs. Finally, kinetic analysis performed on 150 antibodies to 10 antigens with molecular weights ranging from 21kD to 105kD showed concordance between Octet HTX, Biacore 4000 and MASS-1 (R(2) > 0.90). The data presented in this study suggest that under optimal experimental conditions, Octet biosensor is capable of generating kinetic values comparable to SPR/SPRi biosensors. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Defective binding of the third component of complement (C3) to Streptococcus pneumoniae in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Cheson, B D; Walker, H S; Heath, M E; Gobel, R J; Janatova, J

    1984-04-01

    Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) are at an increased risk for infections with bacteria that require opsonization with complement. Because Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequently encountered pathogen in these patients, we investigated the ability of serum from patients with MM to mediate the binding of C3b, the major opsonin of the complement system, to S. pneumoniae. S. pneumoniae types 3, 14, and 25 were chosen for study, since S. pneumoniae type 3 activates primarily the classical complement pathway (CCP), type 25 primarily the alternative complement pathway (ACP), and type 14 both pathways. S. pneumoniae were treated with normal serum or serum from 17 patients with MM, and the bound C3b was quantified with fluorescein-conjugated anti-C3 in a spectrophotofluorometric assay. Despite normal or elevated serum concentrations of C3, total hemolytic complement, and C-reactive protein in all of the MM sera, factor B in 16/17 such sera, and C4 in 14/17 MM sera studied, all 17 sera demonstrated a defect in C3b binding to type 3 (32.7% +/- 6% of normal). In addition, serum from 15/17 patients bound decreased amounts of C3b to types 14 (39.6% +/- 8%) and 25 (52.2% +/- 8%). Mixing normal serum with MM serum restored MM C3b binding activity to all three S. pneumoniae types, suggesting that the defect was related to a deficiency rather than an inhibitor of C3 activation. Although MM patients are unable to produce specific antibodies to bacterial antigens, the addition of anti-S. pneumoniae antibodies to MM serum did not enhance C3b binding to any of the S. pneumoniae types. However, when S. pneumoniae were opsonized in a mixture of MM serum and C3-depleted normal serum, C3b binding was restored to all three S. pneumoniae types, demonstrating that MM C3 functions normally in the presence of other normal serum factors. In the present studies, the MM C3b binding defect appeared to correlate with the incidence of S. pneumoniae infections. Serum from patients with a

  19. Host range and cell cycle activation properties of polyomavirus large T-antigen mutants defective in pRB binding

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, R.; Bauer, P.H.; Benjamin, T.L.; Crissman, H.A.; Bradbury, E.M. |

    1994-11-01

    The authors have examined the growth properties of polyomavirus large T-antigen mutants that ar unable to bind pRB, the product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene. These mutants grow poorly on primary mouse cells yet grow well on NIH 3T3 and other established mouse cell lines. Preinfection of primary baby mouse kidney (BMK) epithelial cells with wild-type simian virus 40 renders these cells permissive to growth of pRB-binding polyomavirus mutants. Conversely, NIH 3T3 cells transfected by and expressing wild-type human pRB become nonpermissive. Primary fibroblasts for mouse embryos that carry a homozygous knockout of the RB gene are permissive, while those from normal littermates are nonpermissive. The host range of polyomavirus pRB-binding mutants is thus determined by expression or lack of expression of functional pRB by the host. These results demonstrate the importance of pRB binding by large T antigen for productive viral infection in primary cells. Failure of pRB-binding mutants to grow well in BMK cells correlates with their failure to induce progression from G{sub 0} or G{sub 1} through the S phase of the cell cycle. Time course studies show delayed synthesis and lower levels of accumulation of large T antigen, viral DNA, and VP1 in mutant compared with wild-type virus-infected BMK cells. These results support a model in which productive infection by polyomavirus in normal mouse cells is tightly coupled to the induction and progression of the cell cycle. 48 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Identification of the binding site in intercellular adhesion molecule 1 for its receptor, leukocyte function-associated antigen 1.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, K L; Lu, J; Riddle, L; Kim, K J; Presta, L G; Bodary, S C

    1997-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1, CD54) is a member of the Ig superfamily and is a counterreceptor for the beta 2 integrins: lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1, CD11a/CD18), complement receptor 1 (MAC-1, CD11b/CD18), and p150,95 (CD11c/CD18). Binding of ICAM-1 to these receptors mediates leukocyte-adhesive functions in immune and inflammatory responses. In this report, we describe a cell-free assay using purified recombinant extracellular domains of LFA-1 and a dimeric immunoadhesin of ICAM-1. The binding of recombinant secreted LFA-1 to ICAM-1 is divalent cation dependent (Mg2+ and Mn2+ promote binding) and sensitive to inhibition by antibodies that block LFA-1-mediated cell adhesion, indicating that its conformation mimics that of LFA-1 on activated lymphocytes. We describe six novel anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibodies, two of which are function blocking. Thirty-five point mutants of the ICAM-1 immunoadhesin were generated and residues important for binding of monoclonal antibodies and purified LFA-1 were identified. Nineteen of these mutants bind recombinant LFA-1 equivalently to wild type. Sixteen mutants show a 66-2500-fold decrease in LFA-1 binding yet, with few exceptions, retain binding to the monoclonal antibodies. These mutants, along with modeling studies, define the LFA-1 binding site on ICAM-1 as residues E34, K39, M64, Y66, N68, and Q73, that are predicted to lie on the CDFG beta-sheet of the Ig fold. The mutant G32A also abrogates binding to LFA-1 while retaining binding to all of the antibodies, possibly indicating a direct interaction of this residue with LFA-1. These data have allowed the generation of a highly refined model of the LFA-1 binding site of ICAM-1. Images PMID:9188101

  1. Goodpasture Antigen-binding Protein/Ceramide Transporter Binds to Human Serum Amyloid P-Component and Is Present in Brain Amyloid Plaques*

    PubMed Central

    Mencarelli, Chiara; Bode, Gerard H.; Losen, Mario; Kulharia, Mahesh; Molenaar, Peter C.; Veerhuis, Robert; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.; De Baets, Marc H.; Nicolaes, Gerry A. F.; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) is a non-fibrillar glycoprotein belonging to the pentraxin family of the innate immune system. SAP is present in plasma, basement membranes, and amyloid deposits. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that the Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP) binds to human SAP. GPBP is a nonconventional Ser/Thr kinase for basement membrane type IV collagen. Also GPBP is found in plasma and in the extracellular matrix. In the present study, we demonstrate that GPBP specifically binds SAP in its physiological conformations, pentamers and decamers. The START domain in GPBP is important for this interaction. SAP and GPBP form complexes in blood and partly colocalize in amyloid plaques from Alzheimer disease patients. These data suggest the existence of complexes of SAP and GPBP under physiological and pathological conditions. These complexes are important for understanding basement membrane, blood physiology, and plaque formation in Alzheimer disease. PMID:22396542

  2. Human lipoprotein binding to schistosomula of schistosoma mansoni. Displacement by polyanions, parasite antigen masking, and persistence in young larvae.

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, C. P.; Caulfield, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    It was previously shown by the authors that the binding of human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to the surface of schistosomula inhibits the binding of human anti-schistosomal antibodies and is inhibited by suramin. Here, three questions were considered. 1) Are LDLs bound to schistosomula displaced from the membrane by polyanions? 2) Does bound LDL mask or hide antigens recognized by human anti-schistosomal antibodies? 3) Is LDL, binding capability present when the larvae enter the blood stream? The first question was tested by measuring the percentage of the schistosomular surface membrane covered by LDL after exposure to LDL with or without dextran sulfate or suramin. The bound LDL was visualized with polyclonal goat anti-human apolipoprotein B (anti-apo B) antibodies and peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibodies. After overnight culture in 20 micrograms/300 microliters LDL, 84.0% +/- 0.3% of the parasite surface was covered by LDL reaction product. When the polyanions suramin or dextran sulfate were added to the cultures for 30 minutes, only 59.7% +/- 4.9% of the surface was covered by reaction product, demonstrating that the LDL was partially displaced from the membrane by these compounds. The second question was tested by measuring the binding of human and mouse monoclonal anti-schistosomal antibodies before and after exposure to LDL, with or without partial removal of the bound LDL by suramin. LDL partially inhibited antibody binding in a reversible fashion. The LDL clearly masked parasite antigens, most probably by steric hindrance. However, there may be competitive inhibition of antibody binding by the LDL as well, because human anti-schistosomal antibodies inhibited LDL binding to worms and both human anti-schistosomal antibody and LDL binding to schistosomula were inhibited by suramin. Finally, the third question was tested by quantitative immunofluorescence. The LDL binding capability persisted and nearly doubled by 72 hours after transformation from

  3. Role of Single-Stranded DNA Binding Activity of T Antigen in Simian Virus 40 DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunxiao; Roy, Rupa; Simmons, Daniel T.

    2001-01-01

    We have previously mapped the single-stranded DNA binding domain of large T antigen to amino acid residues 259 to 627. By using internal deletion mutants, we show that this domain most likely begins after residue 301 and that the region between residues 501 and 550 is not required. To study the function of this binding activity, a series of single-point substitutions were introduced in this domain, and the mutants were tested for their ability to support simian virus 40 (SV40) replication and to bind to single-stranded DNA. Two replication-defective mutants (429DA and 460EA) were grossly impaired in single-stranded DNA binding. These two mutants were further tested for other biochemical activities needed for viral DNA replication. They bound to origin DNA and formed double hexamers in the presence of ATP. Their ability to unwind origin DNA and a helicase substrate was severely reduced, although they still had ATPase activity. These results suggest that the single-stranded DNA binding activity is involved in DNA unwinding. The two mutants were also very defective in structural distortion of origin DNA, making it likely that single-stranded DNA binding is also required for this process. These data show that single-stranded DNA binding is needed for at least two steps during SV40 DNA replication. PMID:11222709

  4. Binding to histo-blood group antigen-expressing bacteria protects human norovirus from acute heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate if histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) expressing bacteria have any protective role on human norovirus (NoV) from acute heat stress. Eleven bacterial strains were included, belonging to Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Clostridium difficile, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, and B. longum. HBGA expression of the bacteria as well as binding of human NoV virus-like particles (VLPs, GI.1, and GII.4 strains) to the bacteria were detected by flow cytometry. NoV VLPs pre-incubated with HBGA expressing or non-HBGA expressing bacteria were heated and detected by both direct ELISA and porcine gastric mucin-binding assay. The NoV-binding abilities of the bacteria correlated well with their HBGA expression profiles. Two HBGA expressing E. coli (LMG8223 and LFMFP861, both GI.1 and GII.4 binders) and one non-HBGA expressing E. coli (ATCC8739, neither GI.1 nor GII.4 binder) were selected for the heat treatment test with NoV VLPs. Compared with the same cell numbers of non-HBGA expressing E. coli, the presence of HBGA-expressing E. coli could always maintain higher antigen integrity, as well as mucin-binding ability of NoV VLPs of both GI.1 and GII.4 after heat-treatment at 90°C for 2 min. These results indicate that HBGA-expressing bacteria may protect NoVs during the food processing treatments, thereby facilitating their transmission. PMID:26191052

  5. Exogenous antigens bind MHC class II first, and are processed by cathepsins later.

    PubMed

    Sadegh-Nasseri, Scheherazade; Kim, AeRyon

    2015-12-01

    The field of antigen processing and presentation is likely one of the most well defined areas in immunology based on decades of intense molecular and structural studies. Many molecules contributing to antigen processing and presentation have been discovered and their mechanisms of action been largely defined, yet a major question, which lies at the very core of the field has remained hard to pin down. The question is what determines immunodominance? Immunodominance is defined as a few specific epitopes being selected to represent an antigen to the immune system and provide targets for T cells. Many studies have aimed at understanding how epitopes are selected. A range of hypotheses related to the structural features of antigens, sensitivity to proteases, epitope affinity for MHC II, T cell precursor frequency, and T cell receptor affinity for peptide/MHC II have been considered. However, because of the variety of proteins and factors involved in antigen processing and enormous complexity, finding an answer has been challenging. Here we make an effort to tease out the sequence of events in antigen processing that promote selection of immunodominant epitopes for exogenous antigens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Acquisition of Functional Antibodies That Block the Binding of Erythrocyte-Binding Antigen 175 and Protection Against Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Children.

    PubMed

    Irani, Vashti; Ramsland, Paul A; Guy, Andrew J; Siba, Peter M; Mueller, Ivo; Richards, Jack S; Beeson, James G

    2015-10-15

    The targets and mechanisms of human immunity to malaria are poorly understood, which poses a major barrier to malaria vaccine development. Antibodies play a key role in human immunity and may act by inhibiting receptor-binding functions of key merozoite invasion ligands. Antibodies to the major invasion ligand and vaccine candidate, erythrocyte-binding antigen 175 (EBA-175), have been linked with protection, but how these antibodies function has not been established. We developed 2 new assays that quantify the ability of antibodies to inhibit binding of EBA-175 to its erythrocyte receptor, glycophorin A, using either native or recombinant EBA-175. Binding-inhibitory antibodies were evaluated in a longitudinal cohort study of Papua New Guinean children and related to risk of malaria, age, infection status, and markers of parasite exposure. Binding-inhibition assays (BIAs) were reproducible, and the 2 assays had a high level of agreement. Inhibitory antibodies were common among children, acquired in association with markers of increasing parasite exposure, and high in those children with active infection. Inhibitory antibodies correlated with total immunoglobulin G levels to the EBA-175 binding domain (region II). Importantly, binding-inhibitory antibodies were significantly associated with protection from symptomatic malaria when measured using either BIA. Findings suggest that naturally acquired binding-inhibitory antibodies are an important functional mechanism that contributes to protection against malaria and further supports the potential of EBA-175 as a vaccine candidate. Identifying vaccines and approaches that induce potent binding-inhibitory antibodies may be a valuable strategy in the development of highly efficacious malaria vaccines. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Preconfiguration of the antigen-binding site during affinity maturation of a broadly neutralizing influenza virus antibody.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Aaron G; Xu, Huafeng; Khan, Amir R; O'Donnell, Timothy; Khurana, Surender; King, Lisa R; Manischewitz, Jody; Golding, Hana; Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Carfi, Andrea; Settembre, Ethan C; Dormitzer, Philip R; Kepler, Thomas B; Zhang, Ruijun; Moody, M Anthony; Haynes, Barton F; Liao, Hua-Xin; Shaw, David E; Harrison, Stephen C

    2013-01-02

    Affinity maturation refines a naive B-cell response by selecting mutations in antibody variable domains that enhance antigen binding. We describe a B-cell lineage expressing broadly neutralizing influenza virus antibodies derived from a subject immunized with the 2007 trivalent vaccine. The lineage comprises three mature antibodies, the unmutated common ancestor, and a common intermediate. Their heavy-chain complementarity determining region inserts into the conserved receptor-binding pocket of influenza HA. We show by analysis of structures, binding kinetics and long time-scale molecular dynamics simulations that antibody evolution in this lineage has rigidified the initially flexible heavy-chain complementarity determining region by two nearly independent pathways and that this preconfiguration accounts for most of the affinity gain. The results advance our understanding of strategies for developing more broadly effective influenza vaccines.

  8. Identifying Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface antigen 3 (MSP3) protein peptides that bind specifically to erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Luis E.; Curtidor, Hernando; Ocampo, Marisol; Garcia, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Valbuena, John; Vera, Ricardo; López, Ramses; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2005-01-01

    Receptor–ligand interactions between synthetic peptides and normal human erythrocytes were studied to determine Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein-3 (MSP-3) FC27 strain regions that specifically bind to membrane surface receptors on human erythrocytes. Three MSP-3 protein high activity binding peptides (HABPs) were identified; their binding to erythrocytes became saturable, had nanomolar affinity constants, and became sensitive on being treated with neuraminidase and trypsin but were resistant to chymotrypsin treatment. All of them specifically recognized 45-, 55-, and 72-kDa erythrocyte membrane proteins. They all presented α-helix structural elements. All HABPs inhibited in vitro P. falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes by ~55%–85%, suggesting that MSP-3 protein’s role in the invasion process probably functions by using mechanisms similar to those described for other MSP family antigens. PMID:15987906

  9. Cancer/Testis Antigen MAGE-C1/CT7: New Target for Multiple Myeloma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Fabricio; Vettore, André L.; Colleoni, Gisele W. B.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer/Testis Antigens (CTAs) are a promising class of tumor antigens that have a limited expression in somatic tissues (testis, ovary, fetal, and placental cells). Aberrant expression of CTAs in cancer cells may lead to abnormal chromosome segregation and aneuploidy. CTAs are regulated by epigenetic mechanisms (DNA methylation and acetylation of histones) and are attractive targets for immunotherapy in cancer because the gonads are immune privileged organs and anti-CTA immune response can be tumor-specific. Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable hematological malignancy, and several CTAs have been detected in many MM cell lines and patients. Among CTAs expressed in MM we must highlight the MAGE-C1/CT7 located on the X chromosome and expressed specificity in the malignant plasma cells. MAGE-C1/CT7 seems to be related to disease progression and functional studies suggests that this CTA might play a role in cell cycle and mainly in survival of malignant plasma cells, protecting myeloma cells against spontaneous as well as drug-induced apoptosis. PMID:22481966

  10. Structure and binding studies of proliferating cell nuclear antigen from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Satya Prakash; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Sharma, Pradeep; Iqbal, Naseer; Kaur, Punit; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P

    2017-11-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) acts as a sliding clamp to support DNA replication and repair. The structure of PCNA from Leishmania donovani (LdPCNA) has been determined at 2.73Å resolution. Structure consists of six crystallographically independent molecules which form two trimeric rings. The pore diameter of the individual trimeric ring is of the order of 37Å. The two rings are stacked through their front to front faces. In order to gain a stable packing, the rings are rotated by 42° about the pore axis and shifted by 7Å and tilted by 16° along the perpendicular direction to pore axis. This form of stacking reduced the effective diameter of the pore to 32Å. The sequence of LdPCNA consists of a long segment of 41 amino acid residues (186-Gly-Val-Ser-Asp-Arg-Ser-Thr-Lys-Ser-Glu-Val-Lys-Ala-Glu-Val-Lys-Ala-Glu-Ala-Arg-Asp-Asp-Asp-Glu-Glu-Pro-Leu-Ser-Arg-Lys-Tyr-Gly-Lys-Ala-Asp-Ser-Ser-Ala-Asn-Ala-Ile-226) whereas the corresponding segments in other PCNAs contain only eight residues corresponding to 186-Gly-Val-Ser-Asp-Arg------224-Asn-Ala-Ile-226. The enhanced length of this segment in LdPCNA may influence its mode of interaction with DNA and other proteins. The dissociation constants obtained using real time binding studies with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for two peptides, Lys-Arg-Arg-Gln-Thr-Ser-Met-Thr-Asp-Phe-Tyr-His (P1) from human cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor-1(CKI-1) and Lys-Thr-Gln-Gly-Arg-Leu-Asp-Ser-Phe-Phe-Thr-Val (P2) from flap endonuclease 1 (Fen-1) as well as with two small molecule inhibitors, (S)-4-(4-(2-amino-3-hydroxypropyl)-2, 6-diiodophenoxy) phenol hydrochloride (ADPH) and N-(3-methylthiophene-2-carboxylicacid)-N'-((3-hydroxy-2-naphthalenyl) methylene) hydrazide (MCMH) are 0.29±0.09μM, 0.37±0.08μM, 0.35±0.09μM and 1.20±0.08μM respectively. The corresponding values obtained using fluorescence spectroscopic methods were 0.22±0.06μM, 0.68±0.07μM, 0.44±0.07μM and 0.75±0.05μM respectively. Copyright © 2017

  11. Antigen-antibody interactions: binding studies with fluorescence and surface plasmon resonance exemplified by acid-traseolide as antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, N. V.; Smit-Kingma, I. E.

    1999-09-01

    The interaction between the musk fragrance acid-traseolide and monoclonal antibodies (mAB) generated against this odorant has been investigated with two different techniques. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence of the antibody upon binding acid-traseolide. This spectroscopic approach is based on measurements under equilibrium conditions. The second technique exploited the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) phenomenon. The acid-traseolide was immobilized in the surface matrix and upon presenting mAB changes in SPR were recorded in real time during the association reaction. The SPR approach can be considered as a kinetic method. Although having a different origin, both methods lead to comparable equilibrium dissociation constants ( Kd). However, the results obtained with fluorescence spectroscopy were more accurate and reproducible. Not only the association of acid-traseolide with antibody was evaluated, also Fab fragment and peptide (H3-peptide) mimicking the heavy chain CDR3 of this antibody were included in this study. The Kd-values, determined by both methods, increase in the order mAB

  12. Key mutations stabilize antigen-binding conformation during affinity maturation of a broadly neutralizing influenza antibody lineage

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huafeng; Schmidt, Aaron G; O'Donnell, Timothy; Therkelsen, Matthew D; Kepler, Thomas B; Moody, M Anthony; Haynes, Barton F; Liao, Hua-Xin; Harrison, Stephen C; Shaw, David E

    2015-01-01

    Affinity maturation, the process in which somatic hypermutation and positive selection generate antibodies with increasing affinity for an antigen, is pivotal in acquired humoral immunity. We have studied the mechanism of affinity gain in a human B-cell lineage in which two main maturation pathways, diverging from a common ancestor, lead to three mature antibodies that neutralize a broad range of H1 influenza viruses. Previous work showed that increased affinity in the mature antibodies derives primarily from stabilization of the CDR H3 loop in the antigen-binding conformation. We have now used molecular dynamics simulations and existing crystal structures to identify potentially key maturation mutations, and we have characterized their effects on the CDR H3 loop and on antigen binding using further simulations and experimental affinity measurements, respectively. In the two maturation pathways, different contacts between light and heavy chains stabilize the CDR H3 loop. As few as two single-site mutations in each pathway can confer substantial loop stability, but none of them confers experimentally detectable stability on its own. Our results support models of the germinal center reaction in which two or more mutations can occur without concomitant selection and show how divergent pathways have yielded functionally equivalent antibodies. Proteins 2014; 83:771–780. © 2014 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25524709

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Reveals the Selective Binding of Human Leukocyte Antigen Alleles Associated with Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kongkaew, Sirilak; Yotmanee, Pathumwadee; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Kaiyawet, Nopporn; Meeprasert, Arthitaya; Kaburaki, Toshikatsu; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Fujio; Kungwan, Nawee; Hannongbua, Supot

    2015-01-01

    Behçet’s disease (BD), a multi-organ inflammatory disorder, is associated with the presence of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) HLA-B*51 allele in many ethnic groups. The possible antigen involvement of the major histocompatibility complex class I chain related gene A transmembrane (MICA-TM) nonapeptide (AAAAAIFVI) has been reported in BD symptomatic patients. This peptide has also been detected in HLA-A*26:01 positive patients. To investigate the link of BD with these two specific HLA alleles, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were applied on the MICA-TM nonapeptide binding to the two BD-associated HLA alleles in comparison with the two non-BD-associated HLA alleles (B*35:01 and A*11:01). The MD simulations were applied on the four HLA/MICA-TM peptide complexes in aqueous solution. As a result, stabilization for the incoming MICA-TM was found to be predominantly contributed from van der Waals interactions. The P2/P3 residue close to the N-terminal and the P9 residue at the C-terminal of the MICA-TM nonapeptide served as the anchor for the peptide accommodated at the binding groove of the BD associated HLAs. The MM/PBSA free energy calculation predicted a stronger binding of the HLA/peptide complexes for the BD-associated HLA alleles than for the non-BD-associated ones, with a ranked binding strength of B*51:01 > B*35:01 and A*26:01 > A*11:01. Thus, the HLAs associated with BD pathogenesis expose the binding efficiency with the MICA-TM nonapeptide tighter than the non-associated HLA alleles. In addition, the residues 70, 73, 99, 146, 147 and 159 of the two BD-associated HLAs provided the conserved interaction for the MICA-TM peptide binding. PMID:26331842

  14. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells against CD19 for Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Garfall, Alfred L.; Maus, Marcela V.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Lacey, Simon F.; Mahnke, Yolanda D.; Melenhorst, J. Joseph; Zheng, Zhaohui; Vogl, Dan T.; Cohen, Adam D.; Weiss, Brendan M.; Dengel, Karen; Kerr, Naseem D.S.; Bagg, Adam; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Stadtmauer, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY A patient with refractory multiple myeloma received an infusion of CTL019 cells, a cellular therapy consisting of autologous T cells transduced with an anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor, after myeloablative chemotherapy (melphalan, 140 mg per square meter of body-surface area) and autologous stem-cell transplantation. Four years earlier, autologous transplantation with a higher melphalan dose (200 mg per square meter) had induced only a partial, transient response. Autologous transplantation followed by treatment with CTL019 cells led to a complete response with no evidence of progression and no measurable serum or urine monoclonal protein at the most recent evaluation, 12 months after treatment. This response was achieved despite the absence of CD19 expression in 99.95% of the patient’s neoplastic plasma cells. (Funded by Novartis and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02135406.) PMID:26352815

  15. Effect of IVIG Formulation on IgG Binding to Self- and Exo- Antigens In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cattepoel, Susann; Gaida, Annette; Kropf, Alain; Nolte, Marc W.; Bolli, Reinhard; Miescher, Sylvia M.

    2016-01-01

    In relation to the recent trials of Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) it was demonstrated that different IgG preparations contain varying amounts of natural anti-amyloid β (Aβ) antibodies as measured by ELISA. We therefore investigated the relevance of ELISA data for measuring low-affinity antibodies, such as anti-Aβ. We analysed the binding of different commercial Immunoglobulin G (IgG) preparations to Aβ, actin and tetanus toxoid in different binding assays to further investigate the possible cause for observed differences in binding to Aβ and actin between different IgG preparations. We show that the differences of commercial IgG preparations in binding to Aβ and actin in ELISA assays are artefactual and only evident in in vitro binding assays. In functional assays and in vivo animal studies the different IVIG preparations exhibited very similar potency. ELISA data alone are not appropriate to analyse and rank the binding capacity of low-affinity antibodies to Aβ or other endogenous self-antigens contained in IgG preparations. Additional analytical methods should be adopted to complement ELISA data. PMID:27561008

  16. sNebula, a network-based algorithm to predict binding between human leukocyte antigens and peptides

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Mendrick, Donna L.; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides is important to understand the functioning of the immune system. Since it is time-consuming and costly to measure the binding between large numbers of HLAs and peptides, computational methods including machine learning models and network approaches have been developed to predict HLA-peptide binding. However, there are several limitations for the existing methods. We developed a network-based algorithm called sNebula to address these limitations. We curated qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data and demonstrated the prediction performance of sNebula on this dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation and five-fold cross-validations. This algorithm can predict not only peptides of different lengths and different types of HLAs, but also the peptides or HLAs that have no existing binding data. We believe sNebula is an effective method to predict HLA-peptide binding and thus improve our understanding of the immune system. PMID:27558848

  17. sNebula, a network-based algorithm to predict binding between human leukocyte antigens and peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Heng; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Mendrick, Donna L.; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-08-25

    Understanding the binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides is important to understand the functioning of the immune system. Since it is time-consuming and costly to measure the binding between large numbers of HLAs and peptides, computational methods including machine learning models and network approaches have been developed to predict HLA-peptide binding. However, there are several limitations for the existing methods. We developed a network-based algorithm called sNebula to address these limitations. We curated qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data and demonstrated the prediction performance of sNebula on this dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation and five-fold cross-validations. Furthermore, this algorithm can predict not only peptides of different lengths and different types of HLAs, but also the peptides or HLAs that have no existing binding data. We believe sNebula is an effective method to predict HLA-peptide binding and thus improve our understanding of the immune system.

  18. sNebula, a network-based algorithm to predict binding between human leukocyte antigens and peptides

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; ...

    2016-08-25

    Understanding the binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides is important to understand the functioning of the immune system. Since it is time-consuming and costly to measure the binding between large numbers of HLAs and peptides, computational methods including machine learning models and network approaches have been developed to predict HLA-peptide binding. However, there are several limitations for the existing methods. We developed a network-based algorithm called sNebula to address these limitations. We curated qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data and demonstrated the prediction performance of sNebula on this dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation and five-fold cross-validations. Furthermore, this algorithmmore » can predict not only peptides of different lengths and different types of HLAs, but also the peptides or HLAs that have no existing binding data. We believe sNebula is an effective method to predict HLA-peptide binding and thus improve our understanding of the immune system.« less

  19. Carcinoma-specific Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I binding glycoproteins of human colorectal carcinoma and its relation to carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Y; Yonezawa, S; Nakamura, T; Shimizu, S; Ozawa, M; Muramatsu, T; Sato, E

    1985-08-01

    Glycoproteins binding to Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) lectin, which recognizes the terminal alpha-L-fucose residue, were analyzed in 18 cases of human colorectal carcinoma by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by the Western blotting method. In the distal large bowel (descending and sigmoid colon and rectum), high-molecular-weight glycoproteins binding to UEA-I existed in carcinoma tissue but not in normal mucosa. In the proximal large bowel (ascending and transverse colon), high-molecular-weight glycoproteins binding to UEA-I were found both in normal mucosa and in carcinoma tissue, whereas those from the carcinoma tissue had an apparently lower molecular weight as compared to the weight of those from the normal mucosa. Thus there is a biochemical difference in UEA-I binding glycoproteins between the normal mucosa and the carcinoma tissue, although in our previous histochemical study no difference was observed in UEA-I binding glycoproteins of the proximal large bowel between the carcinoma tissue and the normal mucosa. Furthermore, carcinoembryonic antigen from the carcinoma tissue was found to have the same electrophoretical mobility as the UEA-I binding glycoproteins.

  20. Expression and structural characterization of anti-T-antigen single-chain antibodies (scFvs) and analysis of their binding to T-antigen by surface plasmon resonance and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Noriyuki; Koyama, Tsubasa; Subedi, Ganesh P; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Matsushita, Misao; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2013-12-01

    T-antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAcα-1-Ser/Thr), also known as Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF antigen), is an oncofetal antigen commonly found in cancerous tissues. Availability of anti-T-antigen human antibodies could lead to the development of cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Four groups of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) genes were previously isolated from a phage library (Matsumoto-Takasaki et al. (2009) Isolation and characterization of anti-T-antigen single chain antibodies from a phage library. BioSci Trends 3:87-95.). Here, four anti-T-antigen scFv genes belonging to Group 1-4 were expressed and produced in a Drosophila S2 cell expression system. ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analyses confirmed the binding activity of 1E8 scFv protein to various T-antigen presenting conjugates. NMR experiments provided evidence of the folded nature of the 1E8 scFv protein. ScFv-ligand contact was identified by STD NMR, indicating that the galactose unit of T-antigen at the non-reducing end was primarily recognized by 1E8 scFv. This thus provides direct evidence of T-antigen specificity.

  1. Elevated levels of a glycoprotein antigen (P-80) in gray and white matter of brain from victims of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cruz, T F; Quackenbush, E J; Letarte, M; Moscarello, M A

    1986-06-01

    The levels of a glycoprotein reactive with monoclonal antibody (MAb) 44D10 in white and gray matter from brains of victims of several neurological diseases, including Multiple Sclerosis, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, were compared to that of normal individuals. The concentration of antigen reactive with MAb 44D10 was elevated in both gray and white matter of all MS brains examined, but not in brains with other neurological diseases. The increase in the concentration of antigen varied amongst the MS brains, such that the levels of antigen were only slightly increased in 2 of the 6 MS brains whereas 2 to 4 fold higher levels were found in the other 4 brains. Increased levels of antigen were detected in gray matter of MS brains, whereas this antigen was either not detected or present in very low levels in gray matter homogenates prepared from age-matched normal brains. MAb Leu 1, which reacts with T lymphocytes, was not absorbed by normal and MS brain tissue suggesting the increase in antigen reactive with MAb 44D10 in MS brain homogenates was not associated with non-specific infiltration by T lymphocytes. Comparison of the purified antigen from MS gray matter and normal white matter by gel electrophoresis demonstrated that MAb 44D10 was reacting with a similar protein in both tissues with an apparent molecular weight of 80K. We have named this molecule P-80 glycoprotein.

  2. Asymmetric Assembly of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Large T-Antigen Origin Binding Domains at the Viral Origin

    SciTech Connect

    C Harrison; G Meinke; H Kwun; H Rogalin; P Phelan; P Bullock; Y Chang; P Moore; A Bohm

    2011-12-31

    The double-stranded DNA polyomavirus Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes Merkel cell carcinoma, an aggressive but rare human skin cancer that most often affects immunosuppressed and elderly persons. As in other polyomaviruses, the large T-antigen of MCV recognizes the viral origin of replication by binding repeating G(A/G)GGC pentamers. The spacing, number, orientation, and necessity of repeats for viral replication differ, however, from other family members such as SV40 and murine polyomavirus. We report here the 2.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of the MCV large T-antigen origin binding domain (OBD) in complex with a DNA fragment from the MCV origin of replication. Consistent with replication data showing that three of the G(A/G)GGC-like binding sites near the center of the origin are required for replication, the crystal structure contains three copies of the OBD. This stoichiometry was verified using isothermal titration calorimetry. The affinity for G(A/G)GGC-containing double-stranded DNA was found to be {approx} 740 nM, approximately 8-fold weaker than the equivalent domain in SV40 for the analogous region of the SV40 origin. The difference in affinity is partially attributable to DNA-binding residue Lys331 (Arg154 in SV40). In contrast to SV40, a small protein-protein interface is observed between MCV OBDs when bound to the central region of the origin. This protein-protein interface is reminiscent of that seen in bovine papilloma virus E1 protein. Mutational analysis indicates, however, that this interface contributes little to DNA binding energy.

  3. Asymmetric assembly of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T-antigen origin binding domains at the viral origin.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Celia J; Meinke, Gretchen; Kwun, Hyun Jin; Rogalin, Henry; Phelan, Paul J; Bullock, Peter A; Chang, Yuan; Moore, Patrick S; Bohm, Andrew

    2011-06-17

    The double-stranded DNA polyomavirus Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes Merkel cell carcinoma, an aggressive but rare human skin cancer that most often affects immunosuppressed and elderly persons. As in other polyomaviruses, the large T-antigen of MCV recognizes the viral origin of replication by binding repeating G(A/G)GGC pentamers. The spacing, number, orientation, and necessity of repeats for viral replication differ, however, from other family members such as SV40 and murine polyomavirus. We report here the 2.9 Å crystal structure of the MCV large T-antigen origin binding domain (OBD) in complex with a DNA fragment from the MCV origin of replication. Consistent with replication data showing that three of the G(A/G)GGC-like binding sites near the center of the origin are required for replication, the crystal structure contains three copies of the OBD. This stoichiometry was verified using isothermal titration calorimetry. The affinity for G(A/G)GGC-containing double-stranded DNA was found to be ~740 nM, approximately 8-fold weaker than the equivalent domain in SV40 for the analogous region of the SV40 origin. The difference in affinity is partially attributable to DNA-binding residue Lys331 (Arg154 in SV40). In contrast to SV40, a small protein-protein interface is observed between MCV OBDs when bound to the central region of the origin. This protein-protein interface is reminiscent of that seen in bovine papilloma virus E1 protein. Mutational analysis indicates, however, that this interface contributes little to DNA binding energy.

  4. Differential Detection of Tumor Cells Using a Combination of Cell Rolling, Multivalent Binding, and Multiple Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Effective quantification and in situ identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood are still elusive because of the extreme rarity and heterogeneity of the cells. In our previous studies, we developed a novel platform that captures tumor cells at significantly improved efficiency in vitro using a unique biomimetic combination of two physiological processes: E-selectin-induced cell rolling and poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-mediated strong multivalent binding. Herein, we have engineered a novel multifunctional surface, on the basis of the biomimetic cell capture, through optimized incorporation of multiple antibodies directed to cancer cell-specific surface markers, such as epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2), and prostate specific antigen (PSA). The surfaces were tested using a series of tumor cells, MDA-PCa-2b, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-361, both in mixture in vitro and after being spiked into human blood. Our multifunctional surface demonstrated highly efficient capture of tumor cells in human blood, achieving up to 82% capture efficiency (∼10-fold enhancement than a surface with the antibodies alone) and up to 90% purity. Furthermore, the multipatterned antibodies allowed differential capturing of the tumor cells. These results support that our multifunctional surface has great potential as an effective platform that accommodates virtually any antibodies, which will likely lead to clinically significant, differential detection of CTCs that are rare and highly heterogeneous. PMID:24892731

  5. Azide and Tween-20 reduce binding to autoantibody epitopes of islet antigen-2; implications for assay performance and reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alistair J K; Somerville, Michelle; Rokni, Saba; Bonifacio, Ezio; Yu, Liping; Eisenbarth, George; Akolkar, Beena; Steffes, Michael; Bingley, Polly J

    2009-12-31

    Autoantibodies to islet antigen 2 (IA-2A) are important markers for predicting diabetes in children and young adults. Harmonization of IA-2A assay measurement is essential if results from different laboratories are to be compared. We investigated whether sodium azide, a bacteriostatic agent added to some assays, could affect IA-2A binding and thereby contribute to differences in IA-2A measurement between laboratories. Addition of 0.1% azide to assay buffer was found to reduce median IA-2A binding of 18 selected sera from IA-2A positive patients with type 1 diabetes and their relatives by 41% (range, 78 to -33%, p<0.001). The effect on binding was epitope specific; median IA-2A binding by 14 sera with antibodies to the protein tyrosine phosphatase region of IA-2 was reduced by 48% (range, 11 to 78%, p<0.001), while binding by 4 sera with antibodies specific to only the juxtamembrane region of IA-2 showed no change (median increase 16% (range 6 to 33%, p=0.125). When the Tween-20 concentration was reduced from 1% to 0.15% the median reduction in IA-2A binding with azide by the 18 sera was only 10% (range, -12 to 41%, p<0.001). Tween-20 also exerted an independent effect, since median IA-2A binding increased by 23% (range 3% to 86%, p<0.001) when Tween-20 concentration was reduced from 1% to 0.15% in the absence of azide. We conclude that common assay reagents such as azide and Tween-20 can strongly influence IA-2A binding in an epitope-related manner, and their use may explain some of the differences between laboratories in IA-2A measurement.

  6. Histo-Blood Group Antigen Presentation Is Critical for Binding of Norovirus VLP to Glycosphingolipids in Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Waqas; Frank, Martin; Kunze, Angelika; Bally, Marta; Parra, Francisco; Nyholm, Per-Georg; Höök, Fredrik; Larson, Göran

    2017-03-27

    Virus entry depends on biomolecular recognition at the surface of cell membranes. In the case of glycolipid receptors, these events are expected to be influenced by how the glycan epitope close to the membrane is presented to the virus. This presentation of membrane-associated glycans is more restricted than that of glycans in solution, particularly because of orientational constraints imposed on the glycolipid through its lateral interactions with other membrane lipids and proteins. We have developed and employed a total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy-based binding assay and a scheme for molecular dynamics (MD) membrane simulations to investigate the consequences of various glycan presentation effects. The system studied was histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) epitopes of membrane-bound glycosphingolipids (GSLs) derived from small intestinal epithelium of humans (type 1 chain) and dogs (type 2 chain) interacting with GII.4 norovirus-like particles. Our experimental results showed strong binding to all lipid-linked type 1 chain HBGAs but no or only weak binding to the corresponding type 2 chain HBGAs. This is in contrast to results derived from STD experiments with free HBGAs in solution where binding was observed for Lewis x. The MD data suggest that the strong binding to type 1 chain glycolipids was due to the well-exposed (1,2)-linked α-l-Fucp and (1,4)-linked α-l-Fucp residues, while the weaker binding or lack of binding to type 2 chain HBGAs was due to the very restricted accessibility of the (1,3)-linked α-l-Fucp residue when the glycolipid is embedded in a phospholipid membrane. Our results not only contribute to a general understanding of protein-carbohydrate interactions on model membrane surfaces, particularly in the context of virus binding, but also suggest a possible role of human intestinal GSLs as potential receptors for norovirus uptake.

  7. Effects of humanization and gene shuffling on immunogenicity and antigen binding of anti-TAG-72 single-chain Fvs.

    PubMed

    Pavlinkova, G; Colcher, D; Booth, B J; Goel, A; Wittel, U A; Batra, S K

    2001-12-01

    One major constraint in the clinical application of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is the development of a human antimurine antibody response. The immunogenicity of MAbs can be minimized by replacing nonhuman regions with corresponding human sequences. The studies reported in our article were undertaken to analyze the immunoreactivity and the immunogenicity of the CC49 single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs): (i) an scFv construct comprised of mouse CC49 VL and VH (m/m scFv), (ii) a light chain shuffled scFv with human VL (Hum4 VL) and mouse CC49 VH (h/m scFv), and (iii) a humanized scFv assembled from Hum4 VL and CC49 VH complementary determining regions (CDRs) grafted onto a VH framework of MAb 21/28' CL (h/CDR scFv). The CC49 scFvs competed for an antigen binding site with CC49 IgG in a similar fashion in a competition radioimmunoassay and were able to inhibit the binding of CC49 IgG to the antigen completely. The immunogenicity of CC49 scFvs was tested using sera with antiidiotypic antibodies to MAb CC49 obtained from patients treated by CC49 IgG in clinical trials. All tested sera exhibited the highest reactivity to the m/m scFv. However, the sera demonstrated differential reactivities to h/CDR scFv and h/m scFv. Replacement of the mouse chain in h/m scFv and h/CDR scFv decreased or completely averted serum reactivity. Our studies compared for the first time the antigen binding and immunogenicity of different scFv constructs containing the mouse, CDR grafted or human variable chains. These results indicate that the humanized CC49 scFv is potentially an important agent for imaging and therapeutic applications with TAG-72-positive tumors.

  8. Prostate specific antigen biosensor based on long range surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy and dextran hydrogel binding matrix.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Brunsen, Annette; Jonas, Ulrich; Dostálek, Jakub; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    A new biosensor based on surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS), which employs long-range surface plasmons (LRSP) and a photo-cross-linkable carboxymethyl dextran (PCDM) hydrogel binding matrix, is reported. LRSPs are surface plasmon modes that propagate along a thin metallic film with orders of magnitude lower damping compared to regular surface plasmons. Therefore, their excitation provides strong enhancement of the intensity of the electromagnetic field and a greatly increased fluorescence signal measured upon binding of fluorophore-labeled molecules on the sensor surface. In addition, these modes exhibit highly extended evanescent fields penetrating up to micrometers in distance from the metallic sensor surface. Therefore, a PCDM hydrogel with approximately micrometer thickness was anchored on the sensor surface to serve as the binding matrix. We show that this approach provides large binding capacity and allows for the ultrasensitive detection. In a model experiment, the developed biosensor platform was applied for the detection of free prostate specific antigen (f-PSA) in buffer and human serum by using a sandwich immunoassay. The limit of detection at the low femtomolar range was achieved, which is approximately 4 orders of magnitude lower than that for direct detection of f-PSA based on the monitoring of binding-induced refractive index changes.

  9. Nucleolin is important for Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 1-mediated episome binding, maintenance, and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Lin; Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Zhao, Bo; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Shen, Chih-Long; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-wen

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for EBV episome maintenance, replication, and transcription. These effects are mediated by EBNA1 binding to cognate oriP DNA, which comprise 20 imperfect copies of a 30-bp dyad symmetry enhancer and an origin for DNA replication. To identify cell proteins essential for these EBNA1 functions, EBNA1 associated cell proteins were immune precipitated and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Nucleolin (NCL) was identified to be EBNA1 associated. EBNA1's N-terminal 100 aa and NCL's RNA-binding domains were critical for EBNA1/NCL interaction. Lentivirus shRNA-mediated NCL depletion substantially reduced EBNA1 recruitment to oriP DNA, EBNA1-dependent transcription of an EBV oriP luciferase reporter, and EBV genome maintenance in lymphoblastoid cell lines. NCL RNA-binding domain K429 was critical for ATP and EBNA1 binding. NCL overexpression increased EBNA1 binding to oriP and transcription, whereas NCL K429A was deficient. Moreover, NCL silencing impaired lymphoblastoid cell line growth. These experiments reveal a surprisingly critical role for NCL K429 in EBNA1 episome maintenance and transcription, which may be a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24344309

  10. A panel of autoantibodies against multiple tumor-associated antigens for detecting gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Isamu; Nagata, Matsuo; Takiguchi, Nobuhiro; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Atsushi; Yokoi, Sana; Kuwajima, Akiko; Tagawa, Masatoshi; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Satoshi, Yajima; Hideaki, Shimada

    2017-01-08

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the world, and effective diagnosis is extremely important for good outcome. We assessed the diagnostic potential of an autoantibody panel that may provide a novel tool for the early detection of gastric cancer. We analyzed data from patients with gastric cancer and normal controls in a test and validation cohorts. Autoantibody levels were measured against a panel of six tumor-associated antigens [TAAs; p53, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), HCC-22-5, peroxiredoxin VI (Prx VI), KM-HN-1, and p90 TAA (CYP2A)] via ELISA. We assessed serum autoantibodies in 100 participants in the test cohort. The validation cohort comprised 248 participants. Autoantibodies to at least one of the six antigens demonstrated a sensitivity/specificity of 49.0% [95% confidence interval (CI), 39.2-58.8%]/92.4% (95% CI, 87.2-97.6%) and 52.0% (95% CI, 42.2-61.8%)/90.5% (95% CI, 84.8-96.3%) in the test and validation cohorts, respectively. In the validation cohort, no significant differences were seen when patients were subdivided based on age, sex, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, peritoneal dissemination, and TNM stage. Patients who were positive for more than two antibodies in the panel tended to have a worse prognosis than those who were positive for one or no antibody. Measurement of autoantibody response to multiple TAAs in an optimized panel assay to discriminate patients with early stage gastric cancer from normal controls may aid in the early detection of gastric cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen binds specifically to double-stranded DNA but not to single-stranded DNA or DNA/RNA hybrids containing the SV40 regulatory sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Auborn, K J; Markowitz, R B; Wang, E; Yu, Y T; Prives, C

    1988-01-01

    Simian virus 40 T antigen has been shown previously to bind specifically with high affinity to sites within the regulatory region of double-stranded simian virus 40 DNA. Using competition filter binding and the DNA-binding immunoassay, we show that T antigen did not bind specifically to either early or late single-stranded DNA containing these binding sites. Moreover, T antigen did not bind these sequences present in single-stranded RNA, RNA/RNA duplexes, or RNA/DNA hybrids. T antigen did, however, bind as efficiently to single-stranded DNA-cellulose as to double-stranded DNA-cellulose. This binding was nonspecific because it was independent of the presence of T-antigen-binding sites. The implications of these observations are discussed. Images PMID:3367427

  12. Pre-clinical evaluation of CD38 chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells for the treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Drent, Esther; Groen, Richard W J; Noort, Willy A; Themeli, Maria; Lammerts van Bueren, Jeroen J; Parren, Paul W H I; Kuball, Jürgen; Sebestyen, Zsolt; Yuan, Huipin; de Bruijn, Joost; van de Donk, Niels W C J; Martens, Anton C M; Lokhorst, Henk M; Mutis, Tuna

    2016-05-01

    Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells is a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy. The CD38 molecule, with its high expression on multiple myeloma cells, appears a suitable target for antibody therapy. Prompted by this, we used three different CD38 antibody sequences to generate second-generation retroviral CD38-chimeric antigen receptor constructs with which we transduced T cells from healthy donors and multiple myeloma patients. We then evaluated the preclinical efficacy and safety of the transduced T cells. Irrespective of the donor and antibody sequence, CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells proliferated, produced inflammatory cytokines and effectively lysed malignant cell lines and primary malignant cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and multi-drug resistant multiple myeloma in a cell-dose, and CD38-dependent manner, despite becoming CD38-negative during culture. CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells also displayed significant anti-tumor effects in a xenotransplant model, in which multiple myeloma tumors were grown in a human bone marrow-like microenvironment. CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells also appeared to lyse the CD38(+) fractions of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells, monocytes, natural killer cells, and to a lesser extent T and B cells but did not inhibit the outgrowth of progenitor cells into various myeloid lineages and, furthermore, were effectively controllable with a caspase-9-based suicide gene. These results signify the potential importance of CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells as therapeutic tools for CD38(+) malignancies and warrant further efforts to diminish the undesired effects of this immunotherapy using appropriate strategies. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  13. Pre-clinical evaluation of CD38 chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells for the treatment of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Drent, Esther; Groen, Richard W.J.; Noort, Willy A.; Themeli, Maria; Lammerts van Bueren, Jeroen J.; Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Kuball, Jürgen; Sebestyen, Zsolt; Yuan, Huipin; de Bruijn, Joost; van de Donk, Niels W.C.J.; Martens, Anton C.M.; Lokhorst, Henk M.; Mutis, Tuna

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells is a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy. The CD38 molecule, with its high expression on multiple myeloma cells, appears a suitable target for antibody therapy. Prompted by this, we used three different CD38 antibody sequences to generate second-generation retroviral CD38-chimeric antigen receptor constructs with which we transduced T cells from healthy donors and multiple myeloma patients. We then evaluated the preclinical efficacy and safety of the transduced T cells. Irrespective of the donor and antibody sequence, CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells proliferated, produced inflammatory cytokines and effectively lysed malignant cell lines and primary malignant cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and multi-drug resistant multiple myeloma in a cell-dose, and CD38-dependent manner, despite becoming CD38-negative during culture. CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells also displayed significant anti-tumor effects in a xenotransplant model, in which multiple myeloma tumors were grown in a human bone marrow-like microenvironment. CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells also appeared to lyse the CD38+ fractions of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells, monocytes, natural killer cells, and to a lesser extent T and B cells but did not inhibit the outgrowth of progenitor cells into various myeloid lineages and, furthermore, were effectively controllable with a caspase-9-based suicide gene. These results signify the potential importance of CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells as therapeutic tools for CD38+ malignancies and warrant further efforts to diminish the undesired effects of this immunotherapy using appropriate strategies. PMID:26858358

  14. Identification of a Nonstructural DNA-Binding Protein (DBP) as an Antigen with Diagnostic Potential for Human Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongli; Wu, Chao; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Vernet, Guy; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei; Hung, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) have been implicated as important agents in a wide range of human illnesses. To date, 58 distinct HAdV serotypes have been identified and can be grouped into six species. For the immunological diagnosis of adenoviruses, the hexon protein, a structural protein, has been used. The potential of other HAdV proteins has not been fully addressed. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, a nonstructural antigenic protein, the DNA binding protein (DBP) of human adenovirus 5 and 35 (Ad5, Ad35) - was identified using immunoproteomic technology. The expression of Ad5 and Ad35 DBP in insect cells could be detected by rhesus monkey serum antibodies and healthy adult human serum positive for Ad5 and Ad35. Recombinant DBPs elicited high titer antibodies in mice. Their conserved domain displayed immunological cross-reactions with heterologous DBP antibodies in Western blot assays. DBP-IgM ELISA showed higher sensitivity adenovirus IgM detection than the commercial Adenovirus IgM Human ELISA Kit. A Western blot method developed based on Ad5 DBP was highly consistent with (χ2 =  44.9, P<0.01) the Western blot assay for the hexon protein in the detection of IgG, but proved even more sensitive. Conclusions/Significance The HAdV nonstructural protein DBP is an antigenic protein that could serve as an alternative common antigen for adenovirus diagnosis. PMID:23516396

  15. How To Deal with Multiple Binding Poses in Alchemical Relative Protein–Ligand Binding Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in improved force fields and sampling methods have made it possible for the accurate calculation of protein–ligand binding free energies. Alchemical free energy perturbation (FEP) using an explicit solvent model is one of the most rigorous methods to calculate relative binding free energies. However, for cases where there are high energy barriers separating the relevant conformations that are important for ligand binding, the calculated free energy may depend on the initial conformation used in the simulation due to the lack of complete sampling of all the important regions in phase space. This is particularly true for ligands with multiple possible binding modes separated by high energy barriers, making it difficult to sample all relevant binding modes even with modern enhanced sampling methods. In this paper, we apply a previously developed method that provides a corrected binding free energy for ligands with multiple binding modes by combining the free energy results from multiple alchemical FEP calculations starting from all enumerated poses, and the results are compared with Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations. From these calculations, the dominant ligand binding mode can also be predicted. We apply this method to a series of ligands that bind to c-Jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK1) and obtain improved free energy results. The dominant ligand binding modes predicted by this method agree with the available crystallography, while both Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations incorrectly predict the binding modes for some ligands. The method also helps separate the force field error from the ligand sampling error, such that deviations in the predicted binding free energy from the experimental values likely indicate possible inaccuracies in the force field. An error in the force field for a subset of the ligands studied was identified using this method, and improved free energy results were obtained by correcting the partial charges assigned to the

  16. How to deal with multiple binding poses in alchemical relative protein-ligand binding free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Kaus, Joseph W; Harder, Edward; Lin, Teng; Abel, Robert; McCammon, J Andrew; Wang, Lingle

    2015-06-09

    Recent advances in improved force fields and sampling methods have made it possible for the accurate calculation of protein–ligand binding free energies. Alchemical free energy perturbation (FEP) using an explicit solvent model is one of the most rigorous methods to calculate relative binding free energies. However, for cases where there are high energy barriers separating the relevant conformations that are important for ligand binding, the calculated free energy may depend on the initial conformation used in the simulation due to the lack of complete sampling of all the important regions in phase space. This is particularly true for ligands with multiple possible binding modes separated by high energy barriers, making it difficult to sample all relevant binding modes even with modern enhanced sampling methods. In this paper, we apply a previously developed method that provides a corrected binding free energy for ligands with multiple binding modes by combining the free energy results from multiple alchemical FEP calculations starting from all enumerated poses, and the results are compared with Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations. From these calculations, the dominant ligand binding mode can also be predicted. We apply this method to a series of ligands that bind to c-Jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK1) and obtain improved free energy results. The dominant ligand binding modes predicted by this method agree with the available crystallography, while both Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations incorrectly predict the binding modes for some ligands. The method also helps separate the force field error from the ligand sampling error, such that deviations in the predicted binding free energy from the experimental values likely indicate possible inaccuracies in the force field. An error in the force field for a subset of the ligands studied was identified using this method, and improved free energy results were obtained by correcting the partial charges assigned to the

  17. Bivalent kinetic binding model to surface plasmon resonance studies of antigen-antibody displacement reactions.

    PubMed

    Gelinsky-Wersing, Dagmar; Wersing, Wolfram; Pompe, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Molecular and functional analysis of small molecule binding to protein can provoke insights into cellular signaling and regulatory systems as well as facilitate pharmaceutical drug discovery. In label free small molecule detection the displacement assay format can be applied. This is beneficial because displacement of high molecular weight receptors is detected instead of low molecular weight ligand as in classical binding analysis. Thus, detection limit is potentially lowered. Using the influenza haemagglutinin (HA) peptide binding to mono or bivalent anti-haemagglutinin peptide antibody displacement assay formats could be established. The exact time resolved analysis of binding and dissolution of ligand HA and anti-Haemagglutinin peptide antibody was achieved with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. Mathematical models could be developed from kinetic equations of ligand binding to mono or bivalent antibodies. With this, an accurate simulation of the SPR results was reached. The simulation plot had to be exactly adjusted to the SPR results to determine all kinetic rate constants defining ligand and receptor binding kinetics. Large variations in receptor concentration gave almost identical rate constants in binding. It became obvious that rebinding is in any case not necessary to understand the binding kinetics of our model system HA/anti-HA. Maximum decline of SPR response could be used to determine ligand concentrations in analyte.

  18. A single amino acid substitution (R441A) in the receptor-binding domain of SARS coronavirus spike protein disrupts the antigenic structure and binding activity

    SciTech Connect

    He Yuxian . E-mail: yhe@nybloodcenter.org; Li Jingjing; Jiang Shibo

    2006-05-26

    The spike (S) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has two major functions: interacting with the receptor to mediate virus entry and inducing protective immunity. Coincidently, the receptor-binding domain (RBD, residues 318-510) of SAR-CoV S protein is a major antigenic site to induce neutralizing antibodies. Here, we used RBD-Fc, a fusion protein containing the RBD and human IgG1 Fc, as a model in the studies and found that a single amino acid substitution in the RBD (R441A) could abolish the immunogenicity of RBD to induce neutralizing antibodies in immunized mice and rabbits. With a panel of anti-RBD mAbs as probes, we observed that R441A substitution was able to disrupt the majority of neutralizing epitopes in the RBD, suggesting that this residue is critical for the antigenic structure responsible for inducing protective immune responses. We also demonstrated that the RBD-Fc bearing R441A mutation could not bind to soluble and cell-associated angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the functional receptor for SARS-CoV and failed to block S protein-mediated pseudovirus entry, indicating that this point mutation also disrupted the receptor-binding motif (RBM) in the RBD. Taken together, these data provide direct evidence to show that a single amino acid residue at key position in the RBD can determine the major function of SARS-CoV S protein and imply for designing SARS vaccines and therapeutics.

  19. Antigen binding of human IgG Fabs mediate ERK-associated proliferation of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yue-Jin; Mancino, Anne; Pashov, Anastas; Whitehead, Tracy; Stanley, Joseph; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2005-02-01

    Serum-circulating antibody can be linked to poor outcomes in some cancer patients. To investigate the role of human antibodies in regulating tumor cell growth, we constructed a recombinant cDNA expression library of human IgG Fab from a patient with breast cancer. Clones were screened from the library with breast tumor cell lysate. Sequence analysis of the clones showed somatic hypermutations when compared to their closest VH/VL germ-line genes. Initial characterizations focused on five clones. All tested clones displayed stronger binding to antigen derived from primary breast cancers and established breast cancer cell lines than to normal breast tissues. In vitro functional studies showed that four out of five tested clones could stimulate the growth of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines, and one out of five was able to promote MCF-7 cell growth as well. Involvement of ERK2 pathway was observed. By 1H-NMR spectra and Western blot analysis, it was evident that two tested antibody Fabs are capable of interacting with sialic acid. Our study suggests a possible role for human antibody in promoting tumor cell growth by direct binding of IgG Fab to breast tumor antigen. Such studies prompt speculation regarding the role of serum antibodies in mediating tumor growth as well as their contribution to disease progression.

  20. Exchanging Murine and Human Immunoglobulin Constant Chains Affects the Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Antigen Binding and Chimeric Antibody Autoreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Marcela; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Fiser, András; Casadevall, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    Mouse-human chimeric antibodies composed of murine variable (V) and human (C) chains are useful therapeutic reagents. Consequently, we investigated whether heterologous C-regions from mice and humans affected specificity and affinity, and determined the contribution of CH glycosylation to antigen binding. The interaction of a 12-mer peptide mimetic with monoclonal antibody (mAb) 18B7 to Cryptococcus neoformans glucuronoxylomannan, and its chimeric (ch) and deglycosylated forms were studied by surface plasmon resonance. The equilibrium and rate association constants for the chAb were higher than for mAb 18B7. V region affinity was not affected by CH region glycosylation whereas heterologous C region of the same isotype altered the Ab binding affinity and the specificity for self-antigens. Structural models displayed local differences that implied changes on the connectivity of residues. These findings suggest that V region conformational changes can be dictated by the CH domains through an allosteric effect involving networks of highly connected amino acids. PMID:18074033

  1. The Multiple Carbohydrate Binding Specificities of Helicobacter pylori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teneberg, Susann

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Adhesion of microbes to the target tissue is an important determinant for successful initiation, establishment and maintenance of infection, and a variety of different candidate carbohydrate receptors for H. pylori have been identified. Here the different the binding specifities, and their potential role in adhesion to human gastric epithelium are described. Finally, recent findings on the roles of sialic acid binding SabA adhesin in interactions with human neutrophils and erythrocytes are discussed.

  2. Structure of the origin-binding domain of simian virus 40 large T antigen bound to DNA.

    PubMed

    Bochkareva, Elena; Martynowski, Dariusz; Seitova, Almagoul; Bochkarev, Alexey

    2006-12-13

    The large T antigen (T-ag) protein binds to and activates DNA replication from the origin of DNA replication (ori) in simian virus 40 (SV40). Here, we determined the crystal structures of the T-ag origin-binding domain (OBD) in apo form, and bound to either a 17 bp palindrome (sites 1 and 3) or a 23 bp ori DNA palindrome comprising all four GAGGC binding sites for OBD. The T-ag OBDs were shown to interact with the DNA through a loop comprising Ser147-Thr155 (A1 loop), a combination of a DNA-binding helix and loop (His203-Asn210), and Asn227. The A1 loop traveled back-and-forth along the major groove and accounted for most of the sequence-determining contacts with the DNA. Unexpectedly, in both T-ag-DNA structures, the T-ag OBDs bound DNA independently and did not make direct protein-protein contacts. The T-ag OBD was also captured bound to a non-consensus site ATGGC even in the presence of its canonical site GAGGC. Our observations taken together with the known biochemical and structural features of the T-ag-origin interaction suggest a model for origin unwinding.

  3. Inducing humoral and cellular responses to multiple sporozoite and liver-stage malaria antigens using exogenous plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, B; Talbott, K T; Balakrishnan, A; Cisper, N; Morrow, M P; Hutnick, N A; Myles, D J; Shedlock, D J; Obeng-Adjei, N; Yan, J; Kayatani, A K K; Richie, N; Cabrera, W; Shiver, R; Khan, A S; Brown, A S; Yang, M; Wille-Reece, U; Birkett, A J; Sardesai, N Y; Weiner, D B

    2013-10-01

    A vaccine candidate that elicits humoral and cellular responses to multiple sporozoite and liver-stage antigens may be able to confer protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria; however, a technology for formulating and delivering such a vaccine has remained elusive. Here, we report the preclinical assessment of an optimized DNA vaccine approach that targets four P. falciparum antigens: circumsporozoite protein (CSP), liver stage antigen 1 (LSA1), thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP), and cell-traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites (CelTOS). Synthetic DNA sequences were designed for each antigen with modifications to improve expression and were delivered using in vivo electroporation (EP). Immunogenicity was evaluated in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs) and assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assay, and flow cytometry. In mice, DNA with EP delivery induced antigen-specific IFN-γ production, as measured by ELISpot assay and IgG seroconversion against all antigens. Sustained production of IFN-γ, interleukin-2, and tumor necrosis factor alpha was elicited in both the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell compartments. Furthermore, hepatic CD8(+) lymphocytes produced LSA1-specific IFN-γ. The immune responses conferred to mice by this approach translated to the NHP model, which showed cellular responses by ELISpot assay and intracellular cytokine staining. Notably, antigen-specific CD8(+) granzyme B(+) T cells were observed in NHPs. Collectively, the data demonstrate that delivery of gene sequences by DNA/EP encoding malaria parasite antigens is immunogenic in animal models and can harness both the humoral and cellular arms of the immune system.

  4. A calmodulin-binding/CGCG box DNA-binding protein family involved in multiple signaling pathways in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    We reported earlier that the tobacco early ethylene-responsive gene NtER1 encodes a calmodulin-binding protein (Yang, T., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 38467-38473). Here we demonstrate that there is one NtER1 homolog as well as five related genes in Arabidopsis. These six genes are rapidly and differentially induced by environmental signals such as temperature extremes, UVB, salt, and wounding; hormones such as ethylene and abscisic acid; and signal molecules such as methyl jasmonate, H(2)O(2), and salicylic acid. Hence, they were designated as AtSR1-6 (Arabidopsis thaliana signal-responsive genes). Ca(2+)/calmodulin binds to all AtSRs, and their calmodulin-binding regions are located on a conserved basic amphiphilic alpha-helical motif in the C terminus. AtSR1 targets the nucleus and specifically recognizes a novel 6-bp CGCG box (A/C/G)CGCG(G/T/C). The multiple CGCG cis-elements are found in promoters of genes such as those involved in ethylene signaling, abscisic acid signaling, and light signal perception. The DNA-binding domain in AtSR1 is located on the N-terminal 146 bp where all AtSR1-related proteins share high similarity but have no similarity to other known DNA-binding proteins. The calmodulin-binding nuclear proteins isolated from wounded leaves exhibit specific CGCG box DNA binding activities. These results suggest that the AtSR gene family encodes a family of calmodulin-binding/DNA-binding proteins involved in multiple signal transduction pathways in plants.

  5. A calmodulin-binding/CGCG box DNA-binding protein family involved in multiple signaling pathways in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    We reported earlier that the tobacco early ethylene-responsive gene NtER1 encodes a calmodulin-binding protein (Yang, T., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 38467-38473). Here we demonstrate that there is one NtER1 homolog as well as five related genes in Arabidopsis. These six genes are rapidly and differentially induced by environmental signals such as temperature extremes, UVB, salt, and wounding; hormones such as ethylene and abscisic acid; and signal molecules such as methyl jasmonate, H(2)O(2), and salicylic acid. Hence, they were designated as AtSR1-6 (Arabidopsis thaliana signal-responsive genes). Ca(2+)/calmodulin binds to all AtSRs, and their calmodulin-binding regions are located on a conserved basic amphiphilic alpha-helical motif in the C terminus. AtSR1 targets the nucleus and specifically recognizes a novel 6-bp CGCG box (A/C/G)CGCG(G/T/C). The multiple CGCG cis-elements are found in promoters of genes such as those involved in ethylene signaling, abscisic acid signaling, and light signal perception. The DNA-binding domain in AtSR1 is located on the N-terminal 146 bp where all AtSR1-related proteins share high similarity but have no similarity to other known DNA-binding proteins. The calmodulin-binding nuclear proteins isolated from wounded leaves exhibit specific CGCG box DNA binding activities. These results suggest that the AtSR gene family encodes a family of calmodulin-binding/DNA-binding proteins involved in multiple signal transduction pathways in plants.

  6. Multiple fatty acid binding to albumin in human blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Brodersen, R; Andersen, S; Vorum, H; Nielsen, S U; Pedersen, A O

    1990-04-30

    Binding equilibria of long-chain fatty acids to human serum albumin, in serum or plasma, were studied by a dialysis exchange rate technique. Palmitate was added to citrated plasma in vitro and it was observed that between six and ten palmitate molecules were bound to albumin with nearly equal affinity. Observations in vivo gave similar results in the following series: (a) in two volunteers with increased fatty acid concentrations after fasting, exercise, and a cold shower: (b) in three male volunteers in whom high concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids, up to 4.6 mM, were induced by intravenous administration of a preparation of lecithin/glycocholate mixed micelles, and (c) in 81 patients with diabetes mellitus, type I. The binding pattern of palmitate in serum or plasma is essentially different from that observed with palmitate added to buffered solutions of pure albumin when two molecules are tightly bound and about four additional molecules with lower affinity. The differences may partly be explained by the presence of chloride ions in blood plasma, reducing the affinity for binding of the first two fatty acid molecules, and partly by facilitated binding of several molecules of mixed fatty acids, as found in plasma.

  7. B cell antigen presentation is sufficient to drive neuro-inflammation in an animal model of multiple sclerosis1

    PubMed Central

    Parker Harp, Chelsea R.; Archambault, Angela S.; Sim, Julia; Ferris, Stephen T.; Mikesell, Robert J.; Koni, Pandelakis A.; Shimoda, Michiko; Linington, Christopher; Russell, John H.; Wu, Gregory F.

    2015-01-01

    B cells are increasingly regarded as integral to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in part due to the success of B cell depletion therapy. Multiple B cell-dependent mechanisms contributing to inflammatory demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS) have been explored using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a CD4 T cell-dependent animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). While B cell antigen presentation has been suggested to regulate CNS inflammation during EAE, direct evidence that B cells can independently support antigen-specific autoimmune responses by CD4 T cells in EAE is lacking. Using a newly developed murine model of in vivo conditional expression of MHCII, we previously reported that encephalitogenic CD4 T cells are incapable of inducing EAE when B cells are the sole antigen presenting cell. Herein we find that B cells cooperate with dendritic cells to enhance EAE severity resulting from myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) immunization. Further, increasing the precursor frequency of MOG-specific B cells, but not addition of soluble MOG-specific antibody, is sufficient to drive EAE in mice expressing MHCII by B cells alone. These data support a model in which expansion of antigen-specific B cells during CNS autoimmunity amplifies cognate interactions between B and CD4 T cells and have the capacity to independently drive neuro-inflammation at later stages of disease. PMID:25895531

  8. CD24: from a Hematopoietic Differentiation Antigen to a Genetic Risk Factor for Multiple Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yixin; Zhao, Ming; Xiang, Bo; Chang, Christopher; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-02-01

    The autoantibody is an essential characteristic of inflammatory disorders, including autoimmune diseases. Although the exact pathogenic mechanisms of these diseases remain elusive, accumulated evidence has implicated that genetic factors play important roles in autoimmune inflammation. Among these factors, CD24 was first identified as a heat-stable antigen in 1978 and first successfully cloned in 1990. Thereafter, its functional roles have been intensively investigated in various human diseases, especially autoimmune diseases and cancers. It is currently known that CD24 serves as a costimulatory factor of T cells that regulate their homeostasis and proliferation, while in B cells, CD24 is functionally involved in cell activation and differentiation. CD24 can enhance autoimmune diseases in terms of its protective role in the clonal deletion of autoreactive thymocytes. Furthermore, CD24 deficiency has been linked to mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Finally, CD24 genetic variants, including single-nucleotide polymorphisms and deletions, are etiologically relevant to autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Therefore, CD24 is a promising biomarker and novel therapeutic target for autoimmune diseases.

  9. Comprehensive functional characterization of cancer-testis antigens defines obligate participation in multiple hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Maxfield, Kimberly E; Taus, Patrick J; Corcoran, Kathleen; Wooten, Joshua; Macion, Jennifer; Zhou, Yunyun; Borromeo, Mark; Kollipara, Rahul K; Yan, Jingsheng; Xie, Yang; Xie, Xian-Jin; Whitehurst, Angelique W

    2015-11-16

    Tumours frequently activate genes whose expression is otherwise biased to the testis, collectively known as cancer-testis antigens (CTAs). The extent to which CTA expression represents epiphenomena or confers tumorigenic traits is unknown. In this study, to address this, we implemented a multidimensional functional genomics approach that incorporates 7 different phenotypic assays in 11 distinct disease settings. We identify 26 CTAs that are essential for tumor cell viability and/or are pathological drivers of HIF, WNT or TGFβ signalling. In particular, we discover that Foetal and Adult Testis Expressed 1 (FATE1) is a key survival factor in multiple oncogenic backgrounds. FATE1 prevents the accumulation of the stress-sensing BH3-only protein, BCL-2-Interacting Killer (BIK), thereby permitting viability in the presence of toxic stimuli. Furthermore, ZNF165 promotes TGFβ signalling by directly suppressing the expression of negative feedback regulatory pathways. This action is essential for the survival of triple negative breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Thus, CTAs make significant direct contributions to tumour biology.

  10. Comprehensive functional characterization of cancer–testis antigens defines obligate participation in multiple hallmarks of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maxfield, Kimberly E.; Taus, Patrick J.; Corcoran, Kathleen; Wooten, Joshua; Macion, Jennifer; Zhou, Yunyun; Borromeo, Mark; Kollipara, Rahul K.; Yan, Jingsheng; Xie, Yang; Xie, Xian-Jin; Whitehurst, Angelique W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumours frequently activate genes whose expression is otherwise biased to the testis, collectively known as cancer–testis antigens (CTAs). The extent to which CTA expression represents epiphenomena or confers tumorigenic traits is unknown. In this study, to address this, we implemented a multidimensional functional genomics approach that incorporates 7 different phenotypic assays in 11 distinct disease settings. We identify 26 CTAs that are essential for tumor cell viability and/or are pathological drivers of HIF, WNT or TGFβ signalling. In particular, we discover that Foetal and Adult Testis Expressed 1 (FATE1) is a key survival factor in multiple oncogenic backgrounds. FATE1 prevents the accumulation of the stress-sensing BH3-only protein, BCL-2-Interacting Killer (BIK), thereby permitting viability in the presence of toxic stimuli. Furthermore, ZNF165 promotes TGFβ signalling by directly suppressing the expression of negative feedback regulatory pathways. This action is essential for the survival of triple negative breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Thus, CTAs make significant direct contributions to tumour biology. PMID:26567849

  11. Analysis of the costructure of the simian virus 40 T-antigen origin binding domain with site I reveals a correlation between GAGGC spacing and spiral assembly.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul J; Harrison, Celia J; Bullock, Peter A

    2013-03-01

    Polyomavirus origins of replication contain multiple occurrences of G(A/G)GGC, the high-affinity binding element for the viral initiator T-antigen (T-ag). The site I regulatory region of simian virus 40, involved in the repression of transcription and the enhancement of DNA replication initiation, contains two GAGGC sequences arranged head to tail and separated by a 7-bp AT-rich sequence. We have solved a 3.2-Å costructure of the SV40 origin-binding domain (OBD) bound to site I. We have also established that T-ag assembly on site I is limited to the formation of a single hexamer. These observations have enabled an analysis of the role(s) of the OBDs bound to the site I pentanucleotides in hexamer formation. Of interest, they reveal a correlation between the OBDs bound to site I and a pair of OBD subunits in the previously described hexameric spiral structure. Based on these findings, we propose that spiral assembly is promoted by pentanucleotide pairs arranged in a head-to-tail manner. Finally, the possibility that spiral assembly by OBD subunits accounts for the heterogeneous distribution of pentanucleotides found in the origins of replication of polyomaviruses is discussed.

  12. Characterization of Neisseria meningitidis Isolates That Do Not Express the Virulence Factor and Vaccine Antigen Factor H Binding Protein ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lucidarme, Jay; Tan, Lionel; Exley, Rachel M.; Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray; Tang, Christoph M.

    2011-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis remains a leading cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis. Complement is a key component of natural immunity against this important human pathogen, which has evolved multiple mechanisms to evade complement-mediated lysis. One approach adopted by the meningococcus is to recruit a human negative regulator of the complement system, factor H (fH), to its surface via a lipoprotein, factor H binding protein (fHbp). Additionally, fHbp is a key antigen in vaccines currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Here we characterize strains of N. meningitidis from several distinct clonal complexes which do not express fHbp; all strains were recovered from patients with disseminated meningococcal disease. We demonstrate that these strains have either a frameshift mutation in the fHbp open reading frame or have entirely lost fHbp and some flanking sequences. No fH binding was detected to other ligands among the fHbp-negative strains. The implications of these findings for meningococcal pathogenesis and prevention are discussed. PMID:21508163

  13. Analysis of the Costructure of the Simian Virus 40 T-Antigen Origin Binding Domain with Site I Reveals a Correlation between GAGGC Spacing and Spiral Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul J.; Harrison, Celia J.

    2013-01-01

    Polyomavirus origins of replication contain multiple occurrences of G(A/G)GGC, the high-affinity binding element for the viral initiator T-antigen (T-ag). The site I regulatory region of simian virus 40, involved in the repression of transcription and the enhancement of DNA replication initiation, contains two GAGGC sequences arranged head to tail and separated by a 7-bp AT-rich sequence. We have solved a 3.2-Å costructure of the SV40 origin-binding domain (OBD) bound to site I. We have also established that T-ag assembly on site I is limited to the formation of a single hexamer. These observations have enabled an analysis of the role(s) of the OBDs bound to the site I pentanucleotides in hexamer formation. Of interest, they reveal a correlation between the OBDs bound to site I and a pair of OBD subunits in the previously described hexameric spiral structure. Based on these findings, we propose that spiral assembly is promoted by pentanucleotide pairs arranged in a head-to-tail manner. Finally, the possibility that spiral assembly by OBD subunits accounts for the heterogeneous distribution of pentanucleotides found in the origins of replication of polyomaviruses is discussed. PMID:23269808

  14. Close but Distinct Regions of Human Herpesvirus 8 Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen 1 Are Responsible for Nuclear Targeting and Binding to Human Mitotic Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Piolot, Tristan; Tramier, Marc; Coppey, Maité; Nicolas, Jean-Claude; Marechal, Vincent

    2001-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 is associated with all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, AIDS-associated body cavity-based lymphomas, and some forms of multicentric Castleman's disease. Herpesvirus 8, like other gammaherpesviruses, can establish a latent infection in which viral genomes are stably maintained as multiple episomes. The latent nuclear antigen (LANA or LNAI) may play an essential role in the stable maintenance of latent episomes, notably by interacting concomitantly with the viral genomes and the metaphase chromosomes, thus ensuring an efficient transmission of the neoduplicated episomes to the daughter cells. To identify the regions responsible for its nuclear and subnuclear localization in interphase and mitotic cells, LNAI and various truncated forms were fused to a variant of green fluorescent protein. This enabled their localization and chromosome binding activity to be studied by low-light-level fluorescence microscopy in living HeLa cells. The results demonstrate that nuclear localization of LNAI is due to a unique signal, which maps between amino acids 24 and 30. Interestingly, this nuclear localization signal closely resembles those identified in EBNA1 from Epstein-Barr virus and herpesvirus papio. A region encompassing amino acids 5 to 22 was further proved to mediate the specific interaction of LNA1 with chromatin during interphase and the chromosomes during mitosis. The presence of putative phosphorylation sites in the chromosome binding sites of LNA1 and EBNA1 suggests that their activity may be regulated by specific cellular kinases. PMID:11264383

  15. Age-dependent B cell autoimmunity to a myelin surface antigen in pediatric multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Katherine A; Chitnis, Tanuja; Newcombe, Jia; Franz, Bettina; Kennedy, Julia; McArdel, Shannon; Kuhle, Jens; Kappos, Ludwig; Rostasy, Kevin; Pohl, Daniela; Gagne, Donald; Ness, Jayne M; Tenembaum, Silvia; O'Connor, Kevin C; Viglietta, Vissia; Wong, Susan J; Tavakoli, Norma P; de Seze, Jerome; Idrissova, Zhannat; Khoury, Samia J; Bar-Or, Amit; Hafler, David A; Banwell, Brenda; Wucherpfennig, Kai W

    2009-09-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) typically manifests in early to mid adulthood, but there is increasing recognition of pediatric-onset MS, aided by improvements in imaging techniques. The immunological mechanisms of disease are largely unexplored in pediatric-onset MS, in part because studies have historically focused on adult-onset disease. We investigated autoantibodies to myelin surface Ags in a large cohort of pediatric MS cases by flow cytometric labeling of transfectants that expressed different myelin proteins. Although Abs to native myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) were uncommon among adult-onset patients, a subset of pediatric patients had serum Abs that brightly labeled the MOG transfectant. Abs to two other myelin surface Ags were largely absent. Affinity purification of MOG Abs as well as competition of binding with soluble MOG documented their binding specificity. Such affinity purified Abs labeled myelin and glial cells in human CNS white matter as well as myelinated axons in gray matter. The prevalence of such autoantibodies was highest among patients with a very early onset of MS: 38.7% of patients less than 10 years of age at disease onset had MOG Abs, compared with 14.7% of patients in the 10- to 18-year age group. B cell autoimmunity to this myelin surface Ag is therefore most common in patients with a very early onset of MS.

  16. Multiple approaches to assess pectin binding to galectin-3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Yi; Zhao, Dongyang; Yan, Jingmin; Sun, Chongliang; Zhou, Yifa; Tai, Guihua

    2016-10-01

    Although several approaches have been used to evaluate binding of carbohydrates to lectins, results are not always comparable, especially with larger polysaccharides. Here, we quantitatively assessed and compared binding of pectin-derived polysaccharides to galectin-3 (Gal-3) using five methods: surface plasmon resonance (SPR), bio-layer interferometry (BLI), fluorescence polarization (FP), competitive fluorescence-linked immunosorbance (cFLISA), and the well-known cell-based hemagglutination assay (G3H). Our studies revealed that whereas Gal-3-pectin binding parameters determined by SPR and BLI were comparable and correlated with inhibitory potencies from the G3H assay, results using FP and cFLISA assays were highly variable and depended greatly on the probe and mass of the polysaccharide. In the cFLISA assay, for example, pectins showed no inhibition when using the DTAF-labeled asialofetuin probe, but did when using a DTAF-labeled pectin probe. And the FP approach with the DTAF-lactose probe did not work on polysaccharides and large galactan chains, although it did work well with smaller galactans. Nevertheless, even though results derived from all of these methods are in general agreement, derived KD, IC50, and MIC values do differ. Our results reflect the variability using various techniques and therefore will be useful to investigators who are developing pectin-derived Gal-3 antagonists as anti-cancer agents.

  17. Expression of Ia-like antigens by human vascular endothelial cells is inducible in vitro: demonstration by monoclonal antibody binding and immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed Central

    Pober, J S; Gimbrone, M A

    1982-01-01

    The expression of Ia-like antigens by cultured human endothelial cells has been investigated by means of monoclonal antibody binding to intact cells and by immunoprecipitation of radioiodinated membrane proteins. Primary growing and confluent cultures of human umbilical vein endothelium express little, if any, detectable Ia-like antigens under standard culture conditions. However, treatment of primary cultures with the lectin phytohemagglutinin induces the expression of Ia-like antigens. This action of the lectin uniformly affects all the endothelial cells in a culture, does not depend on cell division, and is associated with a cell shape change. The data presented in this report provide unequivocal serological and biochemical demonstration of Ia-like antigens on human vascular endothelial cells. The fact that the expression of Ia-like antigens by endothelium can be induced may have important implications for organ transplantation and for regulation of the immunological response. Images PMID:6815654

  18. Assessment of sialic acid diversity in cancer- and non-cancer related CA125 antigen using sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectins (Siglecs).

    PubMed

    Mitic, N; Milutinovic, B; Jankovic, M

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed at obtaining insight into the diversity of sialic acids in cancer- and non-cancer-related CA125 antigen, tumour marker of serous ovarian cancer. Starting from available data suggesting the possible relevance of sialic acids for discriminating CA125 antigens of different origin, we have employed a new experimental approach based on the use of human sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectins, Siglecs, as tools for the investigation of sialylation. Siglec-2, belonging to the group of evolutionarily conserved Siglecs, and Siglec-3, -6, -7, -9 and -10, which are CD33-like Siglecs, were probed in solid-phase binding assays with cancer-related CA125 antigens from pleural fluid of patients with ovarian carcinoma (pfCA125), the OVCAR-3 ovarian carcinoma cell line (clCA125) and a non-cancer-related CA125 antigen, i.e. pregnancy-associated pCA125 antigen. All Siglecs used showed detectable binding to pCA125 antigen. Siglec-3, Siglec-7 and Siglec-2 exhibited moderately stronger binding to pCA125 antigen than the others. In contrast to this, Siglec-2 and Siglec-3 preferentially recognized pfCA125 with greater total binding than for pCA125, whereas Siglec-9 and Siglec-10 were highly selective for clCA125. Siglecs promise to be powerful tools for discriminating CA125 of different origin and could propagate further research on other molecular markers of biomedical and diagnostic importance.

  19. Experimental studies with homologous subtype vaccines produced with multiple antigenically different seed strains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Due to the high antigenic variability of avian influenza virus, vaccines need to be continually updated to maintain adequate protection to evolving field strains. One possible approach, to mitigating the effects of antigenic change, is to use vaccines containing more than one isolate of the same su...

  20. Heat stable antigen (mouse CD24) supports myeloid cell binding to endothelial and platelet P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Aigner, S; Ruppert, M; Hubbe, M; Sammar, M; Sthoeger, Z; Butcher, E C; Vestweber, D; Altevogt, P

    1995-10-01

    P-selectin is a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin that participates in leukocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium and platelets. Myeloid cells and a subset of T lymphocytes express carbohydrate ligands at the cell surface. Previously, we suggested that heat stable antigen (HSA/mouse CD24), an extensively glycosylated cell surface molecule on many mouse cells, is a ligand for P-selectin. Here we show that HSA mediates the binding of monocytic cells and neutrophils to P-selectin. The monocytic cell lines ESb-MP and J774, peritoneal exudate cells, and bone marrow neutrophils could bind to lipopolysaccharide-activated bend3 endothelioma cells under rotation-induced shear forces and this binding was inhibited by mAb to P-selectin and HSA. Blocking was weak at room temperature but more efficient at 4 degrees C when integrin-mediated binding was decreased. Also the adhesion of neutrophils to stimulated platelets expressing P-selectin was blocked by HSA- and P-selectin-specific mAb. Latex beads coated with purified HSA from myeloid cells bound to activated endothelioma cells or platelets, and the binding was similarly blocked by mAb to P-selectin and HSA respectively. The HSA-coated beads were stained with P-selectin-IgG, very weakly with L-selectin-IgG but not with E-selectin-IgG. The staining was dependent on divalent cations and treatment with endoglycosidase F or neuraminidase indicated that sialylated N-linked glycans were recognized. The presence of these glycans was confirmed by biosynthetic labeling studies. Our data suggest that HSA, in addition to the recently identified 160 kDa glycoprotein ligand on mouse neutrophils, belongs to a group of monospecific P-selectin ligands on myeloid cells.

  1. Bacteriophage-mediated Glucosylation Can Modify Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigens Synthesized by an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter-dependent Assembly Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mann, Evan; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; King, Jerry D; Whitfield, Chris

    2015-10-16

    Lysogenic bacteriophages may encode enzymes that modify the structures of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen glycans, altering the structure of the bacteriophage receptor and resulting in serotype conversion. This can enhance virulence and has implications for antigenic diversity and vaccine development. Side chain glucosylation is a common modification strategy found in a number of bacterial species. To date, glucosylation has only been observed in O-antigens synthesized by Wzy-dependent pathways, one of the two most prevalent O-antigen synthesis systems. Here we exploited a heterologous system to study the glucosylation potential of a model O-antigen produced in an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent system. Although O-antigen production is cryptic in Escherichia coli K-12, because of a mutation in the synthesis genes, it possesses a prophage glucosylation cluster, which modifies the GlcNAc residue in an α-l-Rha-(1→3)-d-GlcNAc motif found in the original O16 antigen. Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 produces an O-antigen possessing the same disaccharide motif, but its assembly uses an ABC transporter-dependent system. E. coli harboring the R. terrigena O-antigen biosynthesis genes produced an O-antigen displaying reduced reactivity toward antisera raised against the native R. terrigena repeat structure, indicative of an altered chemical structure. Structural determination using NMR revealed the addition of glucose side chains to the repeat units. O-antigen modification was dependent on a functional ABC transporter, consistent with modification in the periplasm, and was eliminated by deletion of the glucosylation genes from the E. coli chromosome, restoring native level antisera sensitivity and structure. There are therefore no intrinsic mechanistic barriers for bacteriophage-mediated O-antigen glucosylation in ABC transporter-dependent pathways. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Genome-wide analysis of host-chromosome binding sites for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1).

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang; Wikramasinghe, Priyankara; Norseen, Julie; Tsai, Kevin; Wang, Pu; Showe, Louise; Davuluri, Ramana V; Lieberman, Paul M

    2010-10-07

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1) protein is required for the establishment of EBV latent infection in proliferating B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein that stimulates DNA replication at the viral origin of plasmid replication (OriP), regulates transcription of viral and cellular genes, and tethers the viral episome to the cellular chromosome. EBNA1 also provides a survival function to B-lymphocytes, potentially through its ability to alter cellular gene expression. To better understand these various functions of EBNA1, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the viral and cellular DNA sites associated with EBNA1 protein in a latently infected Burkitt lymphoma B-cell line. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) combined with massively parallel deep-sequencing (ChIP-Seq) was used to identify cellular sites bound by EBNA1. Sites identified by ChIP-Seq were validated by conventional real-time PCR, and ChIP-Seq provided quantitative, high-resolution detection of the known EBNA1 binding sites on the EBV genome at OriP and Qp. We identified at least one cluster of unusually high-affinity EBNA1 binding sites on chromosome 11, between the divergent FAM55 D and FAM55B genes. A consensus for all cellular EBNA1 binding sites is distinct from those derived from the known viral binding sites, suggesting that some of these sites are indirectly bound by EBNA1. EBNA1 also bound close to the transcriptional start sites of a large number of cellular genes, including HDAC3, CDC7, and MAP3K1, which we show are positively regulated by EBNA1. EBNA1 binding sites were enriched in some repetitive elements, especially LINE 1 retrotransposons, and had weak correlations with histone modifications and ORC binding. We conclude that EBNA1 can interact with a large number of cellular genes and chromosomal loci in latently infected cells, but that these sites are likely to represent a complex ensemble of direct and indirect EBNA1 binding sites.

  3. Genome-wide analysis of host-chromosome binding sites for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1) protein is required for the establishment of EBV latent infection in proliferating B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein that stimulates DNA replication at the viral origin of plasmid replication (OriP), regulates transcription of viral and cellular genes, and tethers the viral episome to the cellular chromosome. EBNA1 also provides a survival function to B-lymphocytes, potentially through its ability to alter cellular gene expression. To better understand these various functions of EBNA1, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the viral and cellular DNA sites associated with EBNA1 protein in a latently infected Burkitt lymphoma B-cell line. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) combined with massively parallel deep-sequencing (ChIP-Seq) was used to identify cellular sites bound by EBNA1. Sites identified by ChIP-Seq were validated by conventional real-time PCR, and ChIP-Seq provided quantitative, high-resolution detection of the known EBNA1 binding sites on the EBV genome at OriP and Qp. We identified at least one cluster of unusually high-affinity EBNA1 binding sites on chromosome 11, between the divergent FAM55 D and FAM55B genes. A consensus for all cellular EBNA1 binding sites is distinct from those derived from the known viral binding sites, suggesting that some of these sites are indirectly bound by EBNA1. EBNA1 also bound close to the transcriptional start sites of a large number of cellular genes, including HDAC3, CDC7, and MAP3K1, which we show are positively regulated by EBNA1. EBNA1 binding sites were enriched in some repetitive elements, especially LINE 1 retrotransposons, and had weak correlations with histone modifications and ORC binding. We conclude that EBNA1 can interact with a large number of cellular genes and chromosomal loci in latently infected cells, but that these sites are likely to represent a complex ensemble of direct and indirect EBNA1 binding sites. PMID

  4. Amino Acids in Hemagglutinin Antigenic Site B Determine Antigenic and Receptor Binding Differences between A(H3N2)v and Ancestral Seasonal H3N2 Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoquan; Ilyushina, Natalia A; Lugovtsev, Vladimir Y; Bovin, Nicolai V; Couzens, Laura K; Gao, Jin; Donnelly, Raymond P; Eichelberger, Maryna C; Wan, Hongquan

    2017-01-15

    Influenza A H3N2 variant [A(H3N2)v] viruses, which have caused human infections in the United States in recent years, originated from human seasonal H3N2 viruses that were introduced into North American swine in the mid-1990s, but they are antigenically distinct from both the ancestral and current circulating H3N2 strains. A reference A(H3N2)v virus, A/Minnesota/11/2010 (MN/10), and a seasonal H3N2 strain, A/Beijing/32/1992 (BJ/92), were chosen to determine the molecular basis for the antigenic difference between A(H3N2)v and the ancestral viruses. Viruses containing wild-type and mutant MN/10 or BJ/92 hemagglutinins (HAs) were constructed and probed for reactivity with ferret antisera against MN/10 and BJ/92 in hemagglutination inhibition assays. Among the amino acids that differ between the MN/10 and BJ/92 HAs, those in antigenic site A had little impact on the antigenic phenotype. Within antigenic site B, mutations at residues 156, 158, 189, and 193 of MN/10 HA to those in BJ/92 switched the MN/10 antigenic phenotype to that of BJ/92. Mutations at residues 156, 157, 158, 189, and 193 of BJ/92 HA to amino acids present in MN/10 were necessary for BJ/92 to become antigenically similar to MN/10. The HA amino acid substitutions responsible for switching the antigenic phenotype also impacted HA binding to sialyl receptors that are usually present in the human respiratory tract. Our study demonstrates that antigenic site B residues play a critical role in determining both the unique antigenic phenotype and receptor specificity of A(H3N2)v viruses, a finding that may facilitate future surveillance and risk assessment of novel influenza viruses.

  5. Broadly-specific cytotoxic T cells targeting multiple HIV antigens are expanded from HIV+ patients: implications for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sharon; Sung, Julia; Cruz, Conrad; Castillo-Caro, Paul; Ngo, Minhtran; Garrido, Carolina; Kuruc, Joann; Archin, Nancie; Rooney, Cliona; Margolis, David; Bollard, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is unable to eradicate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapies for this disease to augment anti-HIV immunity. T cell therapy is appealing in this regard as T cells have the ability to proliferate, migrate, and their antigen specificity reduces the possibility of off-target effects. However, past human studies in HIV-1 infection that administered T cells with limited specificity failed to provide ART-independent, long-term viral control. In this study, we sought to expand functional, broadly-specific cytotoxic T cells (HXTCs) from HIV-infected patients on suppressive ART as a first step toward developing cellular therapies for implementation in future HIV eradication protocols. Blood samples from seven HIV+ patients on suppressive ART were used to derive HXTCs. Multiantigen specificity was achieved by coculturing T cells with antigen-presenting cells pulsed with peptides representing Gag, Pol, and Nef. All but two lines were multispecific for all three antigens. HXTCs demonstrated efficacy as shown by release of proinflammatory cytokines, specific lysis of antigen-pulsed targets, and the ability to suppress HIV replication in vitro. In conclusion, we are able to generate broadly-specific cytotoxic T cell lines that simultaneously target multiple HIV antigens and show robust antiviral function.

  6. Identifying Patient-Specific Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen-1 Genetic Variation and Potential Autoreactive Targets Relevant to Multiple Sclerosis Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tschochner, Monika; Leary, Shay; Cooper, Don; Strautins, Kaija; Chopra, Abha; Clark, Hayley; Choo, Linda; Dunn, David; James, Ian; Carroll, William M.; Kermode, Allan G.; Nolan, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection represents a major environmental risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS), with evidence of selective expansion of Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA1)-specific CD4+ T cells that cross-recognize MS-associated myelin antigens in MS patients. HLA-DRB1*15-restricted antigen presentation also appears to determine susceptibility given its role as a dominant risk allele. In this study, we have utilised standard and next-generation sequencing techniques to investigate EBNA-1 sequence variation and its relationship to HLA-DR15 binding affinity, as well as examining potential cross-reactive immune targets within the central nervous system proteome. Methods Sanger sequencing was performed on DNA isolated from peripheral blood samples from 73 Western Australian MS cases, without requirement for primary culture, with additional FLX 454 Roche sequencing in 23 samples to identify low-frequency variants. Patient-derived viral sequences were used to predict HLA-DRB1*1501 epitopes (NetMHCII, NetMHCIIpan) and candidates were evaluated for cross recognition with human brain proteins. Results EBNA-1 sequence variation was limited, with no evidence of multiple viral strains and only low levels of variation identified by FLX technology (8.3% nucleotide positions at a 1% cut-off). In silico epitope mapping revealed two known HLA-DRB1*1501-restricted epitopes (‘AEG’: aa 481–496 and ‘MVF’: aa 562–577), and two putative epitopes between positions 502–543. We identified potential cross-reactive targets involving a number of major myelin antigens including experimentally confirmed HLA-DRB1*15-restricted epitopes as well as novel candidate antigens within myelin and paranodal assembly proteins that may be relevant to MS pathogenesis. Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining autologous EBNA-1 sequences directly from buffy coat samples, and confirms divergence of these sequences from standard laboratory strains

  7. Shear-enhanced binding of intestinal colonization factor antigen I of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tchesnokova, Veronika; McVeigh, Annette L.; Kidd, Brian; Yakovenko, Olga; Thomas, Wendy E.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.; Savarino, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY In the intestine, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli works against peristaltic forces, adhering to the epithelium via the CFA/I fimbrial adhesin CfaE. The CfaE adhesin is similar in localization and tertiary (but not primary) structure to FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, which shows shear-dependent binding to epithelial receptors by an allosteric catch-bond mechanism. Thus, we speculated that CfaE is also capable of shear-enhanced binding. Indeed, bovine erythrocytes coursing over immobilized CFA/I fimbriae in flow-chambers exhibited low accumulation levels and fast rolling at low shear, but an 80-fold increase in accumulation and 3-fold decrease in rolling velocity at elevated shear. This effect was reversible and abolished by pre-incubation of fimbriae with anti-CfaE antibody. Erythrocytes bound to whole CfaE in the same shear-enhanced manner, but to CfaE adhesin domain in a shear-inhibitable fashion. Residue replacements designed to disrupt CfaE interdomain interaction decreased the shear-dependency of adhesion and increased binding under static conditions to human intestinal epithelial cells. These findings indicate that close interaction between adhesive and anchoring pilin domains of CfaE keeps the former in a low-affinity state that toggles into a high-affinity state upon separation of two domains, all consistent with an allosteric catch-bond mechanism of CfaE binding. PMID:20345656

  8. [Diagnostic Value of CD27 Antigen in Patients with Multiple Myeloma].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Lu; Liu, Fang; Chen, Li-Juan; Qu, Xiao-Yan; Li, Jian-Yong; Wu, Yu-Jie

    2017-08-01

    To explore the expression of CD27 antigen in patients with multiple myeloma(MM), and its clinical diagnostic value, as well as the correlation of CD27 with clinical features and genetic abnormalities. Using 8 color flow cytometry, the immunophenotype of 123 MM patients' marrow cells was examined, while 51 cases of normal plasma cell reactive prolieration were used as control. Antibodies are as follows:ckappa-FITC/clambda-PE/ CD38-ECD/CD45-PERCP/CD19-PC7/ CD27-APC/CD138-BV421/ CD56-BV510. For differentiation of abnormal plasma cells from normal or reactive plasma cells, FS INT /FS PEAK with CD138/CD38 gating strategy was used to measure cell markers CD138,CD38, CD56, CD19, ckappa, clambda and CD45, then the expression rate of CD27 and mean fluorescence intensity(MFI) were analyzed for its diagnostic value in MM. At the same time, the laboratory data of 107 cases of MM patients were analyzed and the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to detecte 1q21 amplification, 13q14 deletion, p53 deletion and IGH rearrangement in 34 cases, then the clinical features and genetic abnormalities were compared between CD27(-) and CD27(+) MM patients. The CD27 positive rate of abnormal plasma cells in MM patients was 48% (59/123) (percentage ≥20% as positive criterion), MFI was 31.3±35.6; while the positive rate of normal or reactive plasma cells were 100% (51/51), the MFI was 93.7±6.3. The positive rate and MFI of CD27 in MM patients were significantly lower than that in normal or reactive plasma cells (P<0.01). Laboratory examination of 58 cases of CD27 negative and 49 cases of CD27 positive MM patients indicated that no significant differences were shown on disease progress parameter, such as hemoglobin, albumin, serum calcium, serum creatinine,and no notable differences were involved in the analysis of prognostic factors between the 2 groups, such as β2-MG microglobulin and LDH levels (P<0.05). The 1q21 amplification, 13q14 deletion, p53 deletion, and IGH

  9. Western blot diagnosis of vivax malaria with multiple stage-specific antigens of the parasite

    PubMed Central

    Son, Eui-Sun; Kim, Tong Soo

    2001-01-01

    Western blot analysis was performed to diagnose vivax malaria using stage-specific recombinant antigens. Genomic DNA from the whole blood of a malaria patient was used as templates to amplify the coding regions for the antigenic domains of circumsporozoite protein (CSP-1), merozoite surface protein (MSP-1), apical merozoite antigen (AMA-1), serine repeat antigen (SERA), and exported antigen (EXP-1) of Plasmodium vivax. Each amplified DNA fragment was inserted into a pGEX-4T plasmid to induce the expression of GST fusion protein in Escherichia coli by IPTG. The bacterial cell extracts were separated on 10% SDS-PAGE followed by western blot analysis with patient sera which was confirmed by blood smear examination. When applied with patient sera, 147 (91.9%) out of 160 vivax malaria, 12 (92.3%) out of 13 falciparum malaria, and all 9 vivax/falciparum mixed malaria reacted with at least one antigen, while no reactions occurred with 20 normal uninfected sera. In the case of vivax malaria, CSP-1 reacted with 128 (80.0%) sera, MSP-1 with 102 (63.8%), AMA-1 with 128 (80.0%), SERA with 115 (71.9%), and EXP-1 with 89 (55.6%), respectively. We obtained higher detection rates when using 5 antigens (91.9%) rather than using each antigen solely (55.6-80%), a combination of 2 (76.3-87.5%), 3 (85.6-90.6%), or 4 antigens (89.4-91.3%). This method can be applied to serological diagnosis, mass screening in endemic regions, or safety test in transfusion of prevalent vivax malaria. PMID:11441504

  10. Western blot diagnosis of vivax malaria with multiple stage-specific antigens of the parasite.

    PubMed

    Son, E S; Kim, T S; Nam, H W

    2001-06-01

    Western blot analysis was performed to diagnose vivax malaria using stage-specific recombinant antigens. Genomic DNA from the whole blood of a malaria patient was used as templates to amplify the coding regions for the antigenic domains of circumsporozoite protein (CSP-1), merozoite surface protein (MSP-1), apical merozoite antigen (AMA-1), serine repeat antigen (SERA), and exported antigen (EXP-1) of Plasmodium vivax. Each amplified DNA fragment was inserted into a pGEX-4T plasmid to induce the expression of GST fusion protein in Escherichia coli by IPTG. The bacterial cell extracts were separated on 10% SDS-PAGE followed by western blot analysis with patient sera which was confirmed by blood smear examination. When applied with patient sera, 147 (91.9%) out of 160 vivax malaria, 12 (92.3%) out of 13 falciparum malaria, and all 9 vivax/falciparum mixed malaria reacted with at least one antigen, while no reactions occurred with 20 normal uninfected sera. In the case of vivax malaria, CSP-1 reacted with 128 (80.0%) sera, MSP-1 with 102 (63.8%), AMA-1 with 128 (80.0%), SERA with 115 (71.9%), and EXP-1 with 89 (55.6%), respectively. We obtained higher detection rates when using 5 antigens (91.9%) rather than using each antigen solely (55.6-80%), a combination of 2 (76.3-87.5%), 3 (85.6-90.6%), or 4 antigens (89.4-91.3%). This method can be applied to serological diagnosis, mass screening in endemic regions, or safety test in transfusion of prevalent vivax malaria.

  11. Molecular genotyping of human Ureaplasma species based on multiple-banded antigen (MBA) gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Kong, F; Ma, Z; James, G; Gordon, S; Gilbert, G L

    2000-09-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum has been divided into 14 serovars. Recently, subdivision of U. urealyticum into two species has been proposed: U. parvum (previously U. urealyticum parvo biovar), comprising four serovars (1, 3, 6, 14) and U. urealyticum (previously U. urealyticum T-960 biovar), 10 serovars (2, 4, 5, 7-13). The multiple-banded antigen (MBA) genes of these species contain both species and serovar/subtype specific sequences. Based on whole sequences of the 5'-ends of MBA genes of U. parvum serovars and partial sequences of the 5'-ends of MBA genes of U. urealyticum serovars, we previously divided each of these species into three MBA genotypes. To further elucidate the relationships between serovars, we sequenced the whole 5'-ends of MBA genes of all 10 U. urealyticum serovars and partial repetitive regions of these genes from all serovars of U. parvum and U. urealyticum. For the first time, all four serovars of U. parvum were clearly differentiated from each other. In addition, the 10 serovars of U. urealyticum were divided into five MBA genotypes, as follows: MBA genotype A comprises serovars 2, 5, 8; MBA genotype B, serovar 10 only; MBA genotype C, serovars 4, 12, 13; MBA genotype D, serovar 9 only; and MBA genotype E comprises serovars 7 and 11. There were no sequence differences between members within each MBA genotype. Further work is required to identify other genes or other regions of the MBA genes that may be used to differentiate U. urealyticum serovars within MBA genotypes A, C and E. A better understanding of the molecular basis of serotype differentiation will help to improve subtyping methods for use in studies of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of these organisms.

  12. Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II typing in Belgian multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Lysandropoulos, Andreas P; Racapé, Judith; Holovska, Vanda; Toungouz, Michel

    2017-03-01

    This is one of the first studies to compare the frequencies of different human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II alleles and haplotype HLA-DRB1*15-DQB1*06 in a cohort of 119 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and a cohort of 124 healthy controls in Belgium. An association with MS was found for the HLA-DRB1*15 (odds ratio [OR] 2.60 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.51-4.50]) and HLA-DQB1*06 (OR 1.97 [95% CI 1.18-3.29]) alleles, and for haplotype DRB1*15-DQB1*06 (OR 2.63 [95% CI 1.52-4.56]). The HLA-B*07 allele also tended to be more frequent in MS patients (OR 1.46 [95% CI 0.80-2.65]) and more frequent among MS patients with than in those without the HLA-DRB1*15 allele (26/54 [48.1%] versus 6/65 [9.2%]; p value <0.0001). Other alleles were underrepresented in MS patients, such as the HLA-DRB1*07 (OR 0.39 [95% CI 0.21-0.73]) and HLA-A*02 (OR 0.56 [95% CI 0.34-0.94]), showing a protective role against the disease. The HLA-B*44 (OR 0.58 [95% CI 0.31-1.09]) and HLA-DRB1*04 (OR 0.75 [95% CI 0.42-1.34]) alleles tended to be less frequent in MS patients. Altogether, the significant results observed in this population are in line with those from other countries and confirm that propensity to MS can be due to a complex presence of various HLA class I and class II alleles.

  13. T cells produce an antigen-binding factor with in vivo activity analogous to IgE antibody

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    T cell-dependent activation of resident tissue mast cells is required for the elicitation of delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reactions in mice. A T cell-derived antigen-binding factor that transfers the ability to elicit an immediate hypersensitivity-like skin reaction is described and compared with a hybridoma IgE antibody. Both the T cell factor and IgE mediate reactions with increased vascular permeability and both are mast cell dependent, as they are inactive in two different types of mast cell deficient mice (W/Wv and Sl/Sld). The T cell factor was distinguished from IgE by affinity chromatography using specific anti-IgE and anti-factor antibodies and by a shorter duration of passive sensitization. The T cell factor is a suitable candidate for participation in the mechanism by which T cells activate mast cells in delayed-type hypersensitivity. PMID:6187880

  14. Antibodies against Lewis antigens inhibit the binding of human norovirus GII.4 virus-like particles to saliva but not to intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Vicente, Noelia; Allen, David J; Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren; Buesa, Javier

    2016-05-21

    Human noroviruses (NoVs) are the main cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. The most commonly detected NoV strains belong to the genetically diverse GII.4 genotype, with new pandemic variants emerging periodically. Despite extensive efforts, NoV investigation has been hampered by the lack of an effective in vitro cell culture system. However, NoV-derived recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) resembling empty capsids are good surrogates for analysing NoV antigenicity and virus-ligand interactions. NoV VLPs have been reported to bind to histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). We have analysed the ability of NoV VLPs derived from GI.1 genotype and from three GII.4 genotype variants, GII.4-1999, GII.4-2004 and GII.4-2006b, to bind to porcine gastric mucin (PGM), human saliva and differentiated human intestinal Caco-2 cells (D-Caco-2 cells). Distinct patterns of saliva binding with the NoV GII.4 variant VLPs were observed, although they bound to D-Caco-2 cells independently of the expression of HBGAs. Monoclonal antibodies against Lewis antigens were able to block the binding of NoV VLPs to saliva, but not to D-Caco-2 cells. Blocking HBGAs on the surface of D-Caco-2 cells with specific monoclonal antibodies did not affect NoV VLP binding to cellular membranes. Co-localisation of Lewis y (Le(y)) and H-type 2 antigens with NoV VLPs was not observed by immunofluorescence assays. Although the binding of NoV VLPs of GII.4 genotype variants to human saliva samples occur with distinct HBGA binding patterns and can be blocked by antibodies against Lewis antigens, their attachment to D-Caco-2 cells can be mediated by other receptors, which still need further investigation.

  15. The Association of Duffy Binding Protein II Polymorphisms and its Antigenicity in Plasmodium vivax Isolates from Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Chootong, Patchanee; McHenry, Amy M.; Ntumngia, Francis B; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Adams, John H

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein II (DBPII) plays an important role in reticulocyte invasion and is a potential vaccine candidate against vivax malaria. However, polymorphisms in DBPII are a challenge for the successful design of a broadly protective vaccine. In this study, the genetic diversity of DBPII among Thai isolates was analyzed from P. vivax-infected blood samples and polymorphism characters were defined with the MEGA4 program. Sequence analysis identified 12 variant residues that are common among Thai DBPII haplotypes with variant residues L333F, L424I, W437R and I503K having the highest frequency. Variant residue D384K occurs in combination with either E385K or K386N/Q. Additionally, variant residue L424I occurs in conjunction with W437R in most Thai DBPII alleles and these variants frequently occur in combination with the I503K variant. The polymorphic patterns of Thai isolates were defined into 9 haplotypes (Thai DBL-1, -2, -3, etc…). Thai DBL-2, -5, -6 haplotypes are the most common DBPII variants in Thai residents. To study the association of these Thai DBPII polymorphisms with antigenic character, the functional inhibition of anti-DBPII monoclonal antibodies against a panel of Thai DBL variants was characterized by an in vitro erythrocyte binding inhibition assay. The functional inhibition of anti-DBPII monoclonal antibodies 3C9, 2D10 and 2C6 against Thai variants was significantly different, suggesting that polymorphisms of Thai DBPII variants alter the antigenic character of the target epitopes. In contrast, anti-DBPII monoclonal antibody 2H2 inhibited all Thai DBPII variants equally well. Our results suggest that the immune efficacy of a DBPII vaccine will depend on the specificity of the anti-DBPII antibodies induced and that it is preferable to optimize responses to conserved epitopes for broadly neutralizing protection against P. vivax. PMID:25108177

  16. Human T lymphocyte differentiation antigens: effects of blood sample storage on Leu antibody binding

    SciTech Connect

    Hensleigh, P.A.; Waters, V.B.; Herzenberg, L.A.

    1983-05-01

    Current studies of human T lymphocytes and their subsets often use quantitative immunofluorescence analysis with monoclonal antibodies against cell surface antigens. With storage of whole blood or separated mononuclear cells for more than a few hours we have found marked changes in lymphocyte analysis using a fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS). Experiments were done to determine if these lymphocyte changes were influenced by storage temperature and if lymphocytes could be made more stable by addition of culture media RPMI 1640 to whole blood. Optimal conditions found for blood storage were with with addition of 50% RPMI 1640 and with samples held at room temperature (22 degrees C). With these storage conditions, delay on FACS analysis up to 24 hours did not result in spurious results. When blood samples are collected in places remote from the laboratory or when batch analysis of serially collected samples is desirable, excessive storage times should be avoided.

  17. Identification of a Receptor-Binding Region within Domain 4 of the Protective Antigen Component of Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Varughese, Mini; Teixeira, Avelino V.; Liu, Shihui; Leppla, Stephen H.

    1999-01-01

    Anthrax toxin from Bacillus anthracis is a three-component toxin consisting of lethal factor (LF), edema factor (EF), and protective antigen (PA). LF and EF are the catalytic components of the toxin, whereas PA is the receptor-binding component. To identify residues of PA that are involved in interaction with the cellular receptor, two solvent-exposed loops of domain 4 of PA (amino acids [aa] 679 to 693 and 704 to 723) were mutagenized, and the altered proteins purified and tested for toxicity in the presence of LF. In addition to the intended substitutions, novel mutations were introduced by errors that occurred during PCR. Substitutions within the large loop (aa 704 to 723) had no effect on PA activity. A mutated protein, LST-35, with three substitutions in the small loop (aa 679 to 693), bound weakly to the receptor and was nontoxic. A mutated protein, LST-8, with changes in three separate regions did not bind to receptor and was nontoxic. Toxicity was greatly decreased by truncation of the C-terminal 3 to 5 aa, but not by their substitution with nonnative residues or the extension of the terminus with nonnative sequences. Comparison of the 28 mutant proteins described here showed that the large loop (aa 704 to 722) is not involved in receptor binding, whereas residues in and near the small loop (aa 679 to 693) play an important role in receptor interaction. Other regions of domain 4, in particular residues at the extreme C terminus, appear to play a role in stabilizing a conformation needed for receptor-binding activity. PMID:10085028

  18. The SV40 large T-antigen origin binding domain directly participates in DNA unwinding.

    PubMed

    Foster, Erin C; Simmons, Daniel T

    2010-03-16

    The origin binding domain (OBD) of SV40 large T-ag serves a critical role during initiation of DNA replication to position T-ag on the origin. After origin recognition, T-ag forms a double hexamer over the origin. Within each hexamer, the OBD adopts a lock washer structure where the origin recognizing A1 and B2 loops face toward the helicase domain and likely become unavailable for binding DNA. In this study, we investigated the role of the central channel of the OBD hexamer in DNA replication by analyzing the effects of mutations of residues lining the channel. All mutants showed binding defects with origin DNA and ssDNA especially at low protein concentrations, but only half were defective at supporting DNA replication in vitro. All mutants were normal in unwinding linear origin DNA fragments. However, replication defective mutants failed to unwind a small origin containing circular DNA whereas replication competent mutants did so normally. The presence of RPA and/or pol/prim restored circular DNA unwinding activity of compromised mutants probably by interacting with the separated DNA strands on the T-ag surface. We interpret these results to indicate a role for the OBD central channel in binding and threading ssDNA during unwinding of circular SV40 DNA. Mixing experiments suggested that only one monomer in an OBD hexamer was necessary for DNA unwinding. We present a model of DNA threading through the T-ag complex illustrating how single-stranded DNA could pass close to a trough generated by key residues in one monomer of the OBD hexamer.

  19. Comparison of human saliva and synthetic histo-blood group antigens usage as ligands in norovirus-like particle binding and blocking assays.

    PubMed

    Uusi-Kerttula, Hanni; Tamminen, Kirsi; Malm, Maria; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2014-06-01

    Blocking of norovirus-like particle binding to their cellular ligands, histo-blood group antigens with immune sera, is considered a surrogate norovirus neutralization assay. We compared human secretor positive saliva and synthetic biotinylated carbohydrates as a source of histo-blood group antigens in binding and blocking assays. Six norovirus capsid-derived virus-like particles belonging to genogroup I (GI-1-2001 and GI-3-2002) and genogroup II (GII-4-1999, GII-4-2010 New Orleans, GII-4-2012 Sydney and GII-12-1998) noroviruses were produced by a recombinant baculovirus expression system and binding profile to saliva type A, B and O and to synthetic antigens (A trimer, B trimer, H type 1, H type 3, Lewis(a) and Lewis(b)) was identified. Good correlation between virus-like particle binding to saliva type A and synthetic A trimer (r = 0.66, p < 0.05) and saliva type B and synthetic B trimer (r = 0.75, p < 0.05) was observed. Binding of each norovirus virus-like particle to the selected histo-blood group antigens was blocked by convalescent sera from NoV-infected subjects or type-specific mouse antisera. Our results support the use of either saliva or synthetic antigens in blocking assay to measure the ability of norovirus antisera to block virus-like particle binding to the carbohydrate ligands. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibody i-Patch prediction of the antibody binding site improves rigid local antibody-antigen docking.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Konrad; Baker, Terry; Shi, Jiye; Deane, Charlotte M

    2013-10-01

    Antibodies are a class of proteins indispensable for the vertebrate immune system. The general architecture of all antibodies is very similar, but they contain a hypervariable region which allows millions of antibody variants to exist, each of which can bind to different molecules. This binding malleability means that antibodies are an increasingly important category of biopharmaceuticals and biomarkers. We present Antibody i-Patch, a method that annotates the most likely antibody residues to be in contact with the antigen. We show that our predictions correlate with energetic importance and thus we argue that they may be useful in guiding mutations in the artificial affinity maturation process. Using our predictions as constraints for a rigid-body docking algorithm, we are able to obtain high-quality results in minutes. Our annotation method and re-scoring system for docking achieve their predictive power by using antibody-specific statistics. Antibody i-Patch is available from http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/research/proteins/resources.

  1. Limited proteolysis of human leukocyte interferon-. cap alpha. 2 and localization of the monoclonal antibody-binding antigenic determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Kostrov, S.V.; Chernovskaya, T.V.; Khodova, O.M.; Borukhov, S.I.; Ryzhavskaya, A.S.; Izotova, L.S.; Strongin, A.Ya.

    1986-05-20

    Large peptide fragments of human leukocyte interferon-..cap alpha..2 (INF-..cap alpha..2) were produced by limited proteolysis with trypsin, pepsin, thermolysin, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens serine proteinase, and the ability of the fragments to react with murine monoclonal antibodies NK2, directed toward INF-..cap alpha..2, was studied by the immunoblotting technique. The region of the sequence 110-149 is the most sensitive to proteinase attack and evidently is exposed on the surface of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule. The INF-..cap alpha..2 fragments 1-139, 1-147, and 1-149 react with antibodies, whereas the fragments 1-109 and 1-112 do not bind NK2 antibodies. A comparison of the primary structure of the families of human leukocyte and murine leukocyte INF in the region of the sequence 110-139 and an analysis of the ability of human INF differing in amino acid sequence to interact with NK2 antibodies suggested that the antigenic determinant that binds monoclonal antibodies NK2 is the sequence Glu/sub 114/-Asp/sub 115/-Ser/sub 116/-He/sub 117/ of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule.

  2. The major subunit, CfaB, of colonization factor antigen i from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli is a glycosphingolipid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Lena; Tobias, Joshua; Lebens, Michael; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Teneberg, Susann

    2006-06-01

    Bacterial adherence to mucosal surfaces is an important virulence trait of pathogenic bacteria. Adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) to the intestine is mediated by a number of antigenically distinct colonization factors (CFs). One of the most common CFs is CFA/I. This has a fimbrial structure composed of a major repeating subunit, CfaB, and a single tip subunit, CfaE. The potential carbohydrate recognition by CFA/I was investigated by binding CFA/I-fimbriated bacteria and purified CFA/I fimbriae to a large number of variant glycosphingolipids separated on thin-layer chromatograms. For both fimbriated bacteria and purified fimbriae, specific interactions could be identified with a number of nonacid glycosphingolipids. These included glucosylceramide, lactosylceramide with phytosphingosine and/or hydroxy fatty acids, neolactotetraosylceramide, gangliotriaosylceramide, gangliotetraosylceramide, the H5 type 2 pentaglycosylceramide, the Lea-5 glycosphingolipid, the Lex-5 glycosphingolipid, and the Ley-6 glycosphingolipid. These glycosphingolipids were also recognized by recombinant E. coli expressing CFA/I in the absence of tip protein CfaE, as well as by purified fimbriae from the same strain. This demonstrates that the glycosphingolipid-binding capacity of CFA/I resides in the major CfaB subunit.

  3. A human TATA binding protein-related protein with altered DNA binding specificity inhibits transcription from multiple promoters and activators.

    PubMed

    Moore, P A; Ozer, J; Salunek, M; Jan, G; Zerby, D; Campbell, S; Lieberman, P M

    1999-11-01

    The TATA binding protein (TBP) plays a central role in eukaryotic and archael transcription initiation. We describe the isolation of a novel 23-kDa human protein that displays 41% identity to TBP and is expressed in most human tissue. Recombinant TBP-related protein (TRP) displayed barely detectable binding to consensus TATA box sequences but bound with slightly higher affinities to nonconsensus TATA sequences. TRP did not substitute for TBP in transcription reactions in vitro. However, addition of TRP potently inhibited basal and activated transcription from multiple promoters in vitro and in vivo. General transcription factors TFIIA and TFIIB bound glutathione S-transferase-TRP in solution but failed to stimulate TRP binding to DNA. Preincubation of TRP with TFIIA inhibited TBP-TFIIA-DNA complex formation and addition of TFIIA overcame TRP-mediated transcription repression. TRP transcriptional repression activity was specifically reduced by mutations in TRP that disrupt the TFIIA binding surface but not by mutations that disrupt the TFIIB or DNA binding surface of TRP. These results suggest that TFIIA is a primary target of TRP transcription inhibition and that TRP may modulate transcription by a novel mechanism involving the partial mimicry of TBP functions.

  4. Determining the binding affinities of prostate-specific antigen to lectins: SPR and microarray approaches.

    PubMed

    Damborský, Pavel; Zámorová, Martina; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common newly diagnosed cancers among men and we focused on its traditional biomarker, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), using targeted glycomics-based strategies. The aberrant glycosylation pattern of PSA may serve as a valuable tool for improving PCa diagnosis including its early-stage. In this study, we evaluated the usability of two techniques, surface plasmon resonance and protein microarray assay, for the study and characterization of interactions of PSA (both free and complexed) with six lectins (SNA, ConA, RCA, AAL, WGA and MAA II). The information on the character of such interactions is important for the application of lectins as prospective bioreceptors for biomarker glycoprofiling in a follow-up biosensing assays. SPR as well as established bioanalytical techniques allowed determination of KD values of PSA-lectin interactions in a more reliable way than protein microarray. The protein microarray method did not allow accurate quantification of KD values. However, the features of a microarray approach, such as speed and costs, enabled the screening and estimation of the nature of lectin-glycan biomarker interaction in an effective and time-saving way. All of the tested lectins interacted with commercial PSA standard isolated from healthy persons, except MAA II which reacted only very weakly. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Multiple-antigen slide test for detection of immunoglobulin M antibodies in newborn and infant sera by immunofluorescence.

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, D; Riggs, J L; Schachter, J; Emmons, R W

    1981-01-01

    A microimmunofluorescence test was evaluated for use in measuring immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in infant sera to five of the agents implicated in congenital and neonatal disease. Pen point dots of Toxoplasma gondii, cytomegalovirus, rubella virus, herpes simplex virus, and chlamydial cell culture antigens were applied to each circle of eight-circle printed slides. These multiple-antigen slides greatly facilitated the screening of 607 sera from infants and 117 sera from mothers for the presence of IgM antibody to these agents. Forty sera could be examined microscopically in approximately 30 min. All sera reacting with one or more antigens were tested for rheumatoid factor by the latex method, absorbed with glutaraldehyde-cross-linked human IgG, and retested for the presence of IgM antibody. IgM antibody to cytomegalovirus was demonstrated in sera from four newborns, but IgM antibody to rubella virus could not be detected until 21 days after birth, although rubella virus was isolated from sera from five younger infants. This may indicate that rubella IgM levels in many congenitally infected newborns are too low to be measured by the immunofluorescence method. Five percent of the sera from infants in this study possessed demonstrable IgM antibody to one of the antigens. PMID:6262369

  6. Novel epitope evoking CD138 antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes targeting multiple myeloma and other plasma cell disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jooeun; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Munshi, Nikhil C.

    2012-01-01

    The development of an immunotherapeutic strategy targeting CD138 antigen could potentially represent a new treatment option for multiple myeloma (MM). This study evaluated the immune function of CD138 peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), generated ex vivo using an HLA-A2-specific CD138 epitope against MM cells. A novel immunogenic HLA-A2-specific CD138260-268 (GLVGLIFAV) peptide was identified from the full-length protein sequence of the CD138 antigen, which induced CTL specific to primary CD138+ MM cells. The peptide-induced CD138-CTL contained a high percentage of CD8+ activated/memory T cells with a low percentage of CD4+ T cell and naive CD8+ T cell subsets. The CTL displayed HLA-A2-restricted and CD138 antigen-specific cytotoxicity against MM cell lines. In addition, CD138-CTL demonstrated increased degranulation, proliferation and γ–interferon secretion to HLA-A2+/CD138+ myeloma cells, but not HLA-A2−/CD138+ or HLA-A2+/CD138− cells. The immune functional properties of the CD138-CTL were also demonstrated using primary HLA-A2+/CD138+ cells isolated from myeloma patients. In conclusion, a novel immunogenic CD138260-268 (GLVGLIFAV) peptide can induce antigen-specific CTL, which might be useful for the treatment of MM patients with peptide-based vaccine or cellular immunotherapy strategies. PMID:21902685

  7. The Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen-binding lectin jacalin interacts with desmoglein 1 and abrogates the pathogenicity of pemphigus foliaceus autoantibodies in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Park, Moonhee; Zhao, Minglang; Hilario-Vargas, Julio; McInnes, David M.; Prisayanh, Phillip; Liu, Zhi; Diaz, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    Pemphigus foliaceus (PF) is an autoimmune skin blistering disease mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies against the desmosomal core glycoprotein desmoglein 1 (Dsg1). This study demonstrated that the O-glycan-specific plant lectin jacalin binds Dsg1 and inhibits the interaction of Dsg1/PF IgG. N-glycosylation is not involved in the interaction of Dsg1/jacalin or Dsg1/PF IgG. Subcutaneous injection of jacalin into neonatal mice drastically reduced PF IgG deposition at the epidermal cell surface and blocked PF IgG-induced skin blisters, both clinically and histologically. Interestingly, another plant lectin peanut agglutinin (PNA), which shares the same carbohydrate specificity toward the O-linked carbohydrate structure known as Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF antigen, Galβ1-3GalNAcα-O-Ser/Thr), also bound Dsg1 and blocked the skin blistering. In contrast, the plant lectin vicia villosa-B4 (VVL-B4), which shares the carbohydrate specificity toward the O-linked monosaccharide known as Thomsennouveau antigen (Tn antigen, GalNAc-α1-O-Ser/Thr) did not bind Dsg1 and did not show a protective effect against the disease induced by the autoantibodies. Collectively, these results suggest that the binding of jacalin to O-linked TF carbohydrate motifs on Dsg1 impairs the Dsg1/PF autoantibody interactions and abrogates its pathogenicity in vivo. TF-specific binding ligands may have a potential therapeutic value for PF. PMID:20631728

  8. Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae Strain SENG-6, a Bacterium Producing Histo-Blood Group Antigen-Like Substances That Can Bind with Human Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Yang, Peiyi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacter sp. strain SENG-6, isolated from healthy human feces, produces histo-blood group antigen (HBGA)-like substances that can bind with human noroviruses. Based on the genome sequence analysis, strain SENG-6 belongs to the species Enterobacter cloacae. The genome sequence of this strain should help identify genes associated with the production of HBGA-like substances. PMID:27563051

  9. Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae Strain SENG-6, a Bacterium Producing Histo-Blood Group Antigen-Like Substances That Can Bind with Human Noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Satoshi; Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Yang, Peiyi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-08-25

    Enterobacter sp. strain SENG-6, isolated from healthy human feces, produces histo-blood group antigen (HBGA)-like substances that can bind with human noroviruses. Based on the genome sequence analysis, strain SENG-6 belongs to the species Enterobacter cloacae The genome sequence of this strain should help identify genes associated with the production of HBGA-like substances.

  10. Antigen-binding cells in the peripheral blood of sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka Walbaum, induced by immersion or intraperitoneal injection of Vibrio languilarum bacterin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1981-01-01

    We used an immunocytoadherence assay to monitor the response of antigen-binding cells (ABC) in the peripheral blood of sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka, after immersion in, or intraperitoneal injection of, Vibrio anguillarum LS 1–74 bacterin. Both methods initiated an elevated ABC response in less than one day; this response persisted one week longer in the injected than in the immersed fish.

  11. Humoral markers of active Epstein-Barr virus infection associate with anti-extractable nuclear antigen autoantibodies and plasma galectin-3 binding protein in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, N S; Nielsen, C T; Houen, G; Jacobsen, S

    2016-12-01

    We investigated if signs of active Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus infections associate with certain autoantibodies and a marker of type I interferon activity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. IgM and IgG plasma levels against Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse and cytomegalovirus pp52 were applied as humoral markers of ongoing/recently active Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus infections, respectively. Plasma galectin-3 binding protein served as a surrogate marker of type I interferon activity. The measurements were conducted in 57 systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 29 healthy controls using ELISAs. Regression analyses and univariate comparisons were performed for associative evaluation between virus serology, plasma galectin-3 binding protein and autoantibodies, along with other clinical and demographic parameters. Plasma galectin-3 binding protein concentrations were significantly higher in systemic lupus erythematosus patients (P = 0.009) and associated positively with Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse-directed antibodies and the presence of autoantibodies against extractable nuclear antigens in adjusted linear regressions (B = 2.02 and 2.02, P = 0.02 and P = 0.002, respectively). Furthermore, systemic lupus erythematosus patients with anti-extractable nuclear antigens had significantly higher antibody levels against Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse (P = 0.02). Our study supports a link between active Epstein-Barr virus infections, positivity for anti-extractable nuclear antigens and increased plasma galectin-3 binding protein concentrations/type I interferon activity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

  12. Affinity binding of antibodies to supermacroporous cryogel adsorbents with immobilized protein A for removal of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Baillie, Les W J; Zheng, Yishan; Lis, Elzbieta K; Savina, Irina N; Howell, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Sandeman, Susan R

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric cryogels are efficient carriers for the immobilization of biomolecules because of their unique macroporous structure, permeability, mechanical stability and different surface chemical functionalities. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the potential use of macroporous monolithic cryogels for biotoxin removal using anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), the central cell-binding component of the anthrax exotoxins, and covalent immobilization of monoclonal antibodies. The affinity ligand (protein A) was chemically coupled to the reactive hydroxyl and epoxy-derivatized monolithic cryogels and the binding efficiencies of protein A, monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel column were determined. Our results show differences in the binding capacity of protein A as well as monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel adsorbents caused by ligand concentrations, physical properties and morphology of surface matrices. The cytotoxicity potential of the cryogels was determined by an in vitro viability assay using V79 lung fibroblast as a model cell and the results reveal that the cryogels are non-cytotoxic. Finally, the adsorptive capacities of PA from phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were evaluated towards a non-glycosylated, plant-derived human monoclonal antibody (PANG) and a glycosylated human monoclonal antibody (Valortim(®)), both of which were covalently attached via protein A immobilization. Optimal binding capacities of 108 and 117 mg/g of antibody to the adsorbent were observed for PANG attached poly(acrylamide-allyl glycidyl ether) [poly(AAm-AGE)] and Valortim(®) attached poly(AAm-AGE) cryogels, respectively, This indicated that glycosylation status of Valortim(®) antibody could significantly increase (8%) its binding capacity relative to the PANG antibody on poly(AAm-AGE)-protien-A column (p < 0.05). The amounts of PA which remained in the solution after passing PA spiked PBS through PANG or Valortim bound poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel were significantly (p < 0

  13. Antigen-binding properties of monoclonal antibodies reactive with EBNA1 and use in immunoaffinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Duellman, Sarah J; Burgess, Richard R

    2009-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) was overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli. Mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were prepared that react with EBNA1. Eleven high affinity mAbs were recovered. Nine mAbs are isotype IgG (all subisotype IgG(1)) and two mAbs are isotype IgM. All mAbs react strongly with EBNA1 in an ELISA assay while only one mAb (designated 1EB6) fails to react in a Western blot assay. The epitopes for these mAbs were mapped to seven different regions, providing good coverage of the entire EBNA1 protein. The mAbs had differing affinity for an EBNA1/DNA complex with four mAbs able to supershift the complex completely. All mAbs can immunoprecipitate EBNA1 from E. coli overexpressing EBNA1. A modified ELISA assay, termed ELISA-elution assay, was used to screen for mAbs that release EBNA1 in the presence of a low molecular weight polyhydroxylated compound (polyol) and a nonchaotropic salt. MAbs with this property, termed polyol-responsive (PR)-mAbs, allow gentle elution of labile proteins and protein complexes. Four mAbs are polyol-responsive with two showing usefulness in gentle immunoaffinity chromatography. Purification with these PR-mAbs may be useful in purifying EBNA1 complexes and elucidating EBNA1-associated proteins. This panel of anti-EBNA1 mAbs will advance the study of EBV by providing new tools to detect and purify EBNA1.

  14. Evaluation of IL-12 serum level in patients with recalcitrant multiple common warts, treated by intralesional tuberculin antigen.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elazeim, Fian M A; Mohammed, Ghada F A; Fathy, Amal; Mohamed, Roshdy W

    2014-06-01

    No universal consensus about optimal modality for treating the recalcitrant multiple common warts (RMCW). To evaluate the immunological mechanisms and clinical therapeutic effect of using of intralesional purified protein derivative (PPD) in the treatment of RMCW. The study included 40 patients with RMCW. They were randomly assigned to 2 groups: first group (20 patients) received intralesional PPD antigen, and second group (20 patients) received intralesional saline as a control group. In both groups, injections were made into single lesions, or largest wart in case of multiple lesions, at weekly intervals, until complete clearance or for a maximum of six treatments. Blood serum was taken at pre-study and at week 6 to measure IL-12 level. A significant difference was found between the therapeutic responses of RMCW to PPD antigen and saline control group (p < 0.001). In the PPD group, complete response was achieved in 75% after 5.8 ± 0.7 sessions' patients presenting with RMCW. There was a statistically significant increase in IL-12 of PPD group versus saline group. No recurrence was observed in the PPD group. Intralesional immunotherapy by PPD antigen is an effective and a safe treatment for RMCW in previously immunized patients.

  15. GBP-5 splicing variants: New guanylate-binding proteins with tumor-associated expression and antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Fellenberg, Friederike; Hartmann, Tanja B; Dummer, Reinhard; Usener, Dirk; Schadendorf, Dirk; Eichmüller, Stefan

    2004-06-01

    We have identified a new gene, gbp-5, with high homology to the guanylate binding proteins (GBP) belonging to the GTPase superfamily including the ras gene. gbp-5 is transcribed at least into three splicing variants (gbp-5a, -5b, and -5ta) leading to two different proteins (GBP-5a/b, GBP-5ta). GBP-5ta is C-terminally truncated by 97aa and has therefore lost its isoprenylation site. Although RT-PCR results indicated expression of GBP-5 members in selected normal tissues, western blotting using two newly generated antibodies revealed that expression of both proteins is restricted to peripheral blood monocytes with GBP-5ta at lower levels. In contrast, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) tumor tissues (seven of seven) were positive solely for GBP-5ta, and four of four CTCL cell lines expressed both proteins. Eight of nine melanoma cell lines expressed GBP-5a/b and four of nine additionally low levels of GBP-5ta. SEREX retesting using CTCL sera indicated a higher immunogenicity for GBP-5ta (nine of 16) than for GBP-5a/b (two of 11). Treatment of CTCL cell lines with interferon-gamma did not alter protein expression of GBP-5ta or GBP-5a/b. The restricted expression pattern of both GBP-5ta and GBP-5a/b and the pivotal role of many known members of the GTP-binding proteins in proliferation and differentiation suggest possible cancer-related functions of gbp-5.

  16. Significant conformational changes in an antigenic carbohydrate epitope upon binding to a monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Glaudemans, C.P.J.; Lerner, L.; Daves, G.D. Jr.; Kovac, P.; Bax, A. ); Venable, R. )

    1990-12-01

    Transferred nulcear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (TRNOE) was used to observe changes in a ligand's conformation upon binding to its specific antibody. The ligands studied were methyl O-{beta}-D-galactopyranosyl(1{yields}6)-4-deoxy-4-fluoro-{beta}-D galactopyranoside (me4FGal{sub 2}) and its selectively deuteriated analogue, methyl O-{beta}-D-galactopyranosyl(1{yields}6)-4-deoxy-2-deuterio-4-fluoro-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (me4F2dGal{sub 2}). The monoclonal antibody was mouse IgA X24. The solution conformation of the free ligand me4F2dGal{sub 2} was inferred from measurements of vicinal {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H coupling constants, long-range {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C coupling constants, and NOE cross-peak intensities. For free ligand, both galactosyl residues adopt a regular chair conformation, but the NMR spectra are incompatible with a single unique conformation of the glycosidic linkage. Analysis of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C constants indicates that the major conformer has an extended conformation. TRNOE measurements on me4FGal{sub 2} and me4F2dGal{sub 2} in the presence of the specific antibody indicate that the pyranose ring pucker of each galactose ring remains unchanged, but rotations about the glycosidic linkage occur upon binding to X24. Computer calculations indicate that there are two sets of torsion angles that satisfy the observed NMR constraints. A new method, based on changes in the fluorine longitudinal relaxation rate, is used to measure the ligand-antibody dissociation rate constant.

  17. Effects of egg-adaptation on receptor-binding and antigenic properties of recent influenza A (H3N2) vaccine viruses

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Lauren; Wharton, Stephen A.; Martin, Stephen R.; Cross, Karen; Lin, Yipu; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Daniels, Rodney S.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (subtype H3N2) causes seasonal human influenza and is included as a component of influenza vaccines. The majority of vaccine viruses are isolated and propagated in eggs, which commonly results in amino acid substitutions in the haemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein. These substitutions can affect virus receptor-binding and alter virus antigenicity, thereby, obfuscating the choice of egg-propagated viruses for development into candidate vaccine viruses. To evaluate the effects of egg-adaptive substitutions seen in H3N2 vaccine viruses on sialic acid receptor-binding, we carried out quantitative measurement of virus receptor-binding using surface biolayer interferometry with haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays to correlate changes in receptor avidity with antigenic properties. Included in these studies was a panel of H3N2 viruses generated by reverse genetics containing substitutions seen in recent egg-propagated vaccine viruses and corresponding cell culture-propagated wild-type viruses. These assays provide a quantitative approach to investigating the importance of individual amino acid substitutions in influenza receptor-binding. Results show that viruses with egg-adaptive HA substitutions R156Q, S219Y, and I226N, have increased binding avidity to α2,3-linked receptor-analogues and decreased binding avidity to α2,6-linked receptor-analogues. No measurable binding was detected for the viruses with amino acid substitution combination 156Q+219Y and receptor-binding increased in viruses where egg-adaptation mutations were introduced into cell culture-propagated virus. Substitutions at positions 156 and 190 appeared to be primarily responsible for low reactivity in HI assays with post-infection ferret antisera raised against 2012–2013 season H3N2 viruses. Egg-adaptive substitutions at position 186 caused substantial differences in binding avidity with an insignificant effect on antigenicity. PMID:26974849

  18. Nanohole Arrays of Mixed Designs and Microwriting for Simultaneous and Multiple Protein Binding Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jin; Yang, Jiun-Chan; Larson, Dale N.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate using nanohole arrays of mixed designs and a microwriting process based on dip-pen nanolithography to monitor multiple, different protein binding events simultaneously in real time based on the intensity of Extraordinary Optical Transmission of nanohole arrays. The microwriting process and small footprint of the individual nanohole arrays enabled us to observe different binding events located only 16μm apart, achieving high spatial resolution. We also present a novel concept that incorporates nanohole arrays of different designs to improve confidence and accuracy of binding studies. For proof of concept, two types of nanohole arrays, designed to exhibit opposite responses to protein bindings, were fabricated on one transducer. Initial studies indicate that the mixed designs could help to screen out artifacts such as protein intrinsic signals, providing improved accuracy of binding interpretation. PMID:19297143

  19. Asymmetric Cell Division of T Cells Upon Antigen Presentation Utilizes Multiple Conserved Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Oliaro, Jane; Van Ham, Vanessa; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Pasam, Anupama; Bomzon, Ze’ev; Pham, Kim; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J.; Waterhouse, Nigel J.; Bots, Michael; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Watt, Sally V.; Cluse, Leonie A.; Clarke, Chris J.P.; Izon, David J.; Chang, John T.; Thompson, Natalie; Gu, Min; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Smyth, Mark J.; Humbert, Patrick O.; Reiner, Steven L.; Russell, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division is a potential means by which cell fate choices during an immune response are orchestrated. Defining the molecular mechanisms that underlie asymmetric division of T cells is paramount for determining the role of this process in the generation of effector and memory T cell subsets. In other cell types, asymmetric cell division is regulated by conserved polarity protein complexes that control the localization of cell fate determinants and spindle orientation during division. We have developed a tractable, in vitro model of naïve CD8+ T cells undergoing initial division while attached to dendritic cells during antigen presentation to investigate whether similar mechanisms might regulate asymmetric division of T cells. Using this system, we show that direct interactions with antigen presenting cells provide the cue for polarization of T cells. Interestingly, the immunological synapse disseminates before division even though the T cells retain contact with the antigen presenting cell. The cue from the antigen presenting cell is translated into polarization of cell fate determinants via the polarity network of the Par3 and Scribble complexes and orientation of the mitotic spindle during division is orchestrated by the Pins/G protein complex. These findings suggest that T cells have selectively adapted a number of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms to generate diversity through asymmetric cell division. PMID:20530266

  20. Multiple ligand simultaneous docking: orchestrated dancing of ligands in binding sites of protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Huameng; Li, Chenglong

    2010-07-30

    Present docking methodologies simulate only one single ligand at a time during docking process. In reality, the molecular recognition process always involves multiple molecular species. Typical protein-ligand interactions are, for example, substrate and cofactor in catalytic cycle; metal ion coordination together with ligand(s); and ligand binding with water molecules. To simulate the real molecular binding processes, we propose a novel multiple ligand simultaneous docking (MLSD) strategy, which can deal with all the above processes, vastly improving docking sampling and binding free energy scoring. The work also compares two search strategies: Lamarckian genetic algorithm and particle swarm optimization, which have respective advantages depending on the specific systems. The methodology proves robust through systematic testing against several diverse model systems: E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) complex with two substrates, SHP2NSH2 complex with two peptides and Bcl-xL complex with ABT-737 fragments. In all cases, the final correct docking poses and relative binding free energies were obtained. In PNP case, the simulations also capture the binding intermediates and reveal the binding dynamics during the recognition processes, which are consistent with the proposed enzymatic mechanism. In the other two cases, conventional single-ligand docking fails due to energetic and dynamic coupling among ligands, whereas MLSD results in the correct binding modes. These three cases also represent potential applications in the areas of exploring enzymatic mechanism, interpreting noisy X-ray crystallographic maps, and aiding fragment-based drug design, respectively.

  1. Stochastic Analysis of Antibody-antigen Binding in a Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Shauna; Zhang, Cong; Zambrano, Harvey; Conlisk, A. T.

    2012-11-01

    Over the last decade, microfluidic ``Labs on a Chip'' (LOC) have evolved from a single microchannel to micro-total analysis systems (TAS) capable of integrating thousands of reaction vessels, conduits and valves-the contents of an entire chemical laboratory-on a single chip. These systems have several advantages in biomedical applications, including lower equipment and personnel costs, reduced power requirements, faster separations, and smaller sample and reagent volume requirements. Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are cancer cells found in the blood stream indicating the presence of a tumor in the body. We consider the population of magnetically tagged antibodies to be characterized by a collection of stochastic trajectories; the probability of finding an antibody at a given position is assumed to be defined by the Fokker-Planck equation. The first objective is to determine the probability that one or more magnetically labeled antibodies will assume a trajectory that is within the neighborhood of a given cancer cell. Once this occurs the binding process can be described using a deterministic analysis and the modeling of this process is the second objective of the paper. Supported by the NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering center (NSEC) for the Affordable Nanoengineering of Polymeric Biomedical Devices EEC-0914790.

  2. Multiple chimeric antigen receptors successfully target chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 in several different cancer histologies and cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The development of immunotherapy has led to significant progress in the treatment of metastatic cancer, including the development of genetic engineering technologies that redirect lymphocytes to recognize and target a wide variety of tumor antigens. Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are hybrid proteins combining antibody recognition domains linked to T cell signaling elements. Clinical trials of CAR-transduced peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) have induced remission of both solid organ and hematologic malignancies. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) is a promising target antigen that is overexpressed in multiple cancer histologies including melanoma, triple-negative breast cancer, glioblastoma, mesothelioma and sarcoma. Methods CSPG4 expression in cancer cell lines was assayed using flow cytometry (FACS) and reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry was utilized to assay resected melanomas and normal human tissues (n = 30) for CSPG4 expression and a reverse-phase protein array comprising 94 normal tissue samples was also interrogated for CSPG4 expression. CARs were successfully constructed from multiple murine antibodies (225.28S, TP41.2, 149.53) using second generation (CD28.CD3ζ) signaling domains. CAR sequences were cloned into a gamma-retroviral vector with subsequent successful production of retroviral supernatant and PBL transduction. CAR efficacy was assayed by cytokine release and cytolysis following coculture with target cell lines. Additionally, glioblastoma stem cells were generated from resected human tumors, and CSPG4 expression was determined by RT-PCR and FACS. Results Immunohistochemistry demonstrated prominent CSPG4 expression in melanoma tumors, but failed to demonstrate expression in any of the 30 normal human tissues studied. Two of 94 normal tissue protein lysates were positive by protein array. CAR constructs demonstrated cytokine secretion and cytolytic function after co-culture with tumor cell lines

  3. Bacterial production and structure-functional validation of a recombinant antigen-binding fragment (Fab) of an anti-cancer therapeutic antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hun; Sim, Dae-Won; Park, Dongsun; Jung, Tai-Geun; Lee, Seonghwan; Oh, Taeheun; Ha, Jong-Ryul; Seok, Seung-Hyeon; Seo, Min-Duk; Kang, Ho Chul; Kim, Young Pil; Won, Hyung-Sik

    2016-12-01

    Fragment engineering of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has emerged as an excellent paradigm to develop highly efficient therapeutic and/or diagnostic agents. Engineered mAb fragments can be economically produced in bacterial systems using recombinant DNA technologies. In this work, we established recombinant production in Escherichia coli for monovalent antigen-binding fragment (Fab) adopted from a clinically used anticancer mAB drug cetuximab targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Recombinant DNA constructs were designed to express both polypeptide chains comprising Fab in a single vector and to secrete them to bacterial periplasmic space for efficient folding. Particularly, a C-terminal engineering to confer an interchain disulfide bond appeared to be able to enhance its heterodimeric integrity and EGFR-binding activity. Conformational relevance of the purified final product was validated by mass spectrometry and crystal structure at 1.9 Å resolution. Finally, our recombinant cetuximab-Fab was found to have strong binding affinity to EGFR overexpressed in human squamous carcinoma model (A431) cells. Its binding ability was comparable to that of cetuximab. Its EGFR-binding affinity was estimated at approximately 0.7 nM of Kd in vitro, which was quite stronger than the binding affinity of natural ligand EGF. Hence, the results validate that our construction could serve as an efficient platform to produce a recombinant cetuximab-Fab with a retained antigen-binding functionality.

  4. Structural Analysis of Histo-Blood Group Antigen Binding Specificity in a Norovirus GII.4 Epidemic Variant: Implications for Epochal Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Shanker, Sreejesh; Choi, Jae-Mun; Sankaran, Banumathi; Atmar, Robert L.; Estes, Mary K.; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram

    2012-03-23

    Susceptibility to norovirus (NoV), a major pathogen of epidemic gastroenteritis, is associated with histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), which are also cell attachment factors for this virus. GII.4 NoV strains are predominantly associated with worldwide NoV epidemics with a periodic emergence of new variants. The sequence variations in the surface-exposed P domain of the capsid protein resulting in differential HBGA binding patterns and antigenicity are suggested to drive GII.4 epochal evolution. To understand how temporal sequence variations affect the P domain structure and contribute to epochal evolution, we determined the P domain structure of a 2004 variant with ABH and secretor Lewis HBGAs and compared it with the previously determined structure of a 1996 variant. We show that temporal sequence variations do not affect the binding of monofucosyl ABH HBGAs but that they can modulate the binding strength of difucosyl Lewis HBGAs and thus could contribute to epochal evolution by the potentiated targeting of new variants to Lewis-positive, secretor-positive individuals. The temporal variations also result in significant differences in the electrostatic landscapes, likely reflecting antigenic variations. The proximity of some of these changes to the HBGA binding sites suggests the possibility of a coordinated interplay between antigenicity and HBGA binding in epochal evolution. From the observation that the regions involved in the formation of the HBGA binding sites can be conformationally flexible, we suggest a plausible mechanism for how norovirus disassociates from salivary mucin-linked HBGA before reassociating with HBGAs linked to intestinal epithelial cells during its passage through the gastrointestinal tract.

  5. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Mital; Rasmussen, Michael; Hansen, Andreas; Nielsen, Morten; Buus, Soren; Golde, William; Barlow, John

    2015-11-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Imolecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8+ T cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presentation, and different antigen peptide motifs are associated with specific genetic sequences of class I molecules. Understanding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA), peptide-MHC class I binding specificities may facilitate development of vaccines or reagents for quantifying the adaptive immune response to intracellular pathogens, such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Six synthetic BoLA class I (BoLA-I) molecules were produced, and the peptide binding motif was generated for five of the six molecules using a combined approach of positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries (PSCPLs) and neural network-based predictions (NetMHCpan). The updated NetMHCpan server was used to predict BoLA-I binding peptides within the P1 structural polyprotein sequence of FMDV (strain A24 Cruzeiro) for Bo-LA-1*01901, BoLA-2*00801, BoLA-2*01201, and BoLA-4*02401. Peptide binding affinity and stability were determined for these BoLA-I molecules using the luminescent oxygen channeling immunoassay (LOCI) and scintillation proximity assay (SPA). The functional diversity of known BoLA alleles was predicted using theMHCcluster tool, and functional predictions for peptide motifs were compared to observed data from this and prior studies. The results of these analyses showed that BoLA alleles cluster into three distinct groups with the potential to define BBoLA supertypes.^ This streamlined approach identifies potential T cell epitopes from pathogens, such as FMDV, and provides insight into T cell immunity following infection or vaccination.

  6. Simian Virus Large T Antigen Interacts with the N-Terminal Domain of the 70 kD Subunit of Replication Protein A in the Same Mode as Multiple DNA Damage Response Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Boting; Feldkamp, Michael D.; Cortez, David; Chazin, Walter J.; Friedman, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) serves as an important model organism for studying eukaryotic DNA replication. Its helicase, Large T-antigen (Tag), is a multi-functional protein that interacts with multiple host proteins, including the ubiquitous ssDNA binding protein Replication Protein A (RPA). Tag recruits RPA, actively loads it onto the unwound DNA, and together they promote priming of the template. Although interactions of Tag with RPA have been mapped, no interaction between Tag and the N-terminal protein interaction domain of the RPA 70kDa subunit (RPA70N) has been reported. Here we provide evidence of direct physical interaction of Tag with RPA70N and map the binding sites using a series of pull-down and mutational experiments. In addition, a monoclonal anti-Tag antibody, the epitope of which overlaps with the binding site, blocks the binding of Tag to RPA70N. We use NMR chemical shift perturbation analysis to show that Tag uses the same basic cleft in RPA70N as multiple of DNA damage response proteins. Mutations in the binding sites of both RPA70N and Tag demonstrate that specific charge reversal substitutions in either binding partner strongly diminish the interaction. These results expand the known repertoire of contacts between Tag and RPA, which mediate the many critical roles of Tag in viral replication. PMID:25706313

  7. Crystallography of a Lewis-Binding Norovirus, Elucidation of Strain-Specificity to the Polymorphic Human Histo-Blood Group Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ming; Hao, Ning; Zhang, Xuejun C.; Huang, Pengwei; Jiang, Xi; Li, Xuemei; Rao, Zihe

    2011-01-01

    Noroviruses, an important cause of acute gastroenteritis in humans, recognize the histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as host susceptible factors in a strain-specific manner. The crystal structures of the HBGA-binding interfaces of two A/B/H-binding noroviruses, the prototype Norwalk virus (GI.1) and a predominant GII.4 strain (VA387), have been elucidated. In this study we determined the crystal structures of the P domain protein of the first Lewis-binding norovirus (VA207, GII.9) that has a distinct binding property from those of Norwalk virus and VA387. Co-crystallization of the VA207 P dimer with Ley or sialyl Lex tetrasaccharides showed that VA207 interacts with these antigens through a common site found on the VA387 P protein which is highly conserved among most GII noroviruses. However, the HBGA-binding site of VA207 targeted at the Lewis antigens through the α-1, 3 fucose (the Lewis epitope) as major and the β-N-acetyl glucosamine of the precursor as minor interacting sites. This completely differs from the binding mode of VA387 and Norwalk virus that target at the secretor epitopes. Binding pocket of VA207 is formed by seven amino acids, of which five residues build up the core structure that is essential for the basic binding function, while the other two are involved in strain-specificity. Our results elucidate for the first time the genetic and structural basis of strain-specificity by a direct comparison of two genetically related noroviruses in their interaction with different HBGAs. The results provide insight into the complex interaction between the diverse noroviruses and the polymorphic HBGAs and highlight the role of human HBGA as a critical factor in norovirus evolution. PMID:21811409

  8. Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 3 (EBNA3) Proteins Regulate EBNA2 Binding to Distinct RBPJ Genomic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Anqi; Welch, Rene; Zhao, Bo; Ta, Tram; Keleş, Sündüz

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Latent infection of B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in vitro results in their immortalization into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs); this latency program is controlled by the EBNA2 viral transcriptional activator, which targets promoters via RBPJ, a DNA binding protein in the Notch signaling pathway. Three other EBNA3 proteins (EBNA3A, EBNA3B, and EBNA3C) interact with RBPJ to regulate cell gene expression. The mechanism by which EBNAs regulate different genes via RBPJ remains unclear. Our chromatin immunoprecipitation with deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis of the EBNA3 proteins analyzed in concert with prior EBNA2 and RBPJ data demonstrated that EBNA3A, EBNA3B, and EBNA3C bind to distinct, partially overlapping genomic locations. Although RBPJ interaction is critical for EBNA3A and EBNA3C growth effects, only 30 to 40% of EBNA3-bound sites colocalize with RBPJ. Using LCLs conditional for EBNA3A or EBNA3C activity, we demonstrate that EBNA2 binding at sites near EBNA3A- or EBNA3C-regulated genes is specifically regulated by the respective EBNA3. To investigate EBNA3 binding specificity, we identified sequences and transcription factors enriched at EBNA3A-, EBNA3B-, and EBNA3C-bound sites. This confirmed the prior observation that IRF4 is enriched at EBNA3A- and EBNA3C-bound sites and revealed IRF4 enrichment at EBNA3B-bound sites. Using IRF4-negative BJAB cells, we demonstrate that IRF4 is essential for EBNA3C, but not EBNA3A or EBNA3B, binding to specific sites. These results support a model in which EBNA2 and EBNA3s compete for distinct subsets of RBPJ sites to regulate cell genes and where EBNA3 subset specificity is determined by interactions with other cell transcription factors. IMPORTANCE Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent gene products cause human cancers and transform B lymphocytes into immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines in vitro. EBV nuclear antigens (EBNAs) and membrane proteins constitutively activate pathways important for

  9. Binding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebsamen, Werner

    1981-01-01

    Categorizes contemporary methods of binding printed materials in terms of physical preservation--hand binding (archival restoration), edition binding (paperback, hardcover), publication binding (magazines), textbook binding (sidesewn), single-sheet binding (loose-leaf, mechanical), and library binding (oversewn, sidesewn). Seven references are…

  10. Autoantibodies to a miRNA-binding protein Argonaute2 (Su antigen) in patients with hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Del Mercado, M; Sánchez-Orozco, L V; Pauley, B A; Chan, J Y F; Chan, E K L; Panduro, A; Maldonado González, M; Jiménez-Luévanos, M A; Martín-Márquez, B T; Palafox-Sánchez, C A; Dávalos-Rodríguez, I P; Salazar-Páramo, M; González-López, L; Gámez-Nava, J I; Satoh, M

    2010-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases caused by hepatitis B (HBV) or C virus (HCV) are common worldwide. Despite reports on autoimmunity in viral hepatitis, studies on autoantibodies associated with systemic rheumatic diseases are inconsistent. Testing of a small number of selected autoantibody specificities using ELISA appears to be one reason for inconsistency. Sera from patients with viral hepatitis were tested by immunoprecipitation that will allow unbiased screening of autoantibodies found in systemic rheumatic diseases. Ninety Mexican patients (37 male, 53 female, 26 HBV, 6 HBV+HCV, 58 HCV) with chronic viral hepatitis, confirmed by nested or RT-nested-PCR, HBsAg and anti-HCV antibodies, were studied. Autoantibodies were tested by immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation and ELISA. Specificities were verified using reference sera. Antinuclear antibodies were found in 38% HBV, 17% HBV+HCV, and 28% in HCV. Autoantibodies to Argonaute (Ago2, Su antigen), a microRNA binding protein that plays a key role in RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), was found in 5% (4/64) of HCV or HBV+HCV coinfected patients but not in HBV (0/26). Anti-Ago2/Su was found in 1/2 of I-IFN-treated case vs. 3/62 in cases without I-IFN. HCV did not have other lupus autoantibodies whereas 19% (5/26) of HBV had anti-U1RNP+Ku, Ro+La, RNA polymerase II, or possible U5snRNPs. Lupus autoantibodies were uncommon in HCV except anti-Ago2/Su. HCV and I-IFN have many ways to affect TLR signaling, miRNA and miRNA binding protein Ago2/Su. To understand the mechanism of specific targeting of Ago2 in HCV may provide a clue to understand the mechanism of specific autoantibody production.

  11. Identification of binding sites on the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A for the catalytic C subunit and for tumor antigens of simian virus 40 and polyomavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Ruediger, R; Roeckel, D; Fait, J; Bergqvist, A; Magnusson, G; Walter, G

    1992-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A is composed of three subunits: the catalytic subunit C and two regulatory subunits, A and B. The A subunit consists of 15 nonidentical repeats and has a rodlike shape. It is associated with the B and C subunits as well as with the simian virus 40 small T, polyomavirus small T, and polyomavirus medium T tumor antigens. We determined the binding sites on subunit A for subunit C and tumor antigens by site-directed mutagenesis of A. Twenty-four N- and C-terminal truncations and internal deletions of A were assayed by coimmunoprecipitation for their ability to bind C and tumor antigens. It was found that C binds to repeats 11 to 15 at the C terminus of A, whereas T antigens bind to overlapping but distinct regions of the N terminus. Simian virus 40 small T binds to repeats 3 to 6, and polyomavirus small T and medium T bind to repeats 2 to 8. The data suggest cooperativity between C and T antigens in binding to A. This is most apparent for medium T antigen, which can only bind to those A subunit molecules that provide the entire binding region for the C subunit. We infer from our results that B also binds to N-terminal repeats. A model of the small T/medium T/B-A-C complexes is presented. Images PMID:1328865

  12. Phthalocyanine tetrasulfonates bind to multiple sites on natively-folded prion protein.

    PubMed

    Dee, Derek R; Gupta, Amar Nath; Anikovskiy, Max; Sosova, Iveta; Grandi, Elena; Rivera, Laura; Vincent, Abhilash; Brigley, Angela M; Petersen, Nils O; Woodside, Michael T

    2012-06-01

    The phthalocyanine tetrasulfonates (PcTS), a class of cyclic tetrapyrroles, bind to the mammalian prion protein, PrP. Remarkably, they can act as anti-scrapie agents to prevent the formation and spread of infectious, misfolded PrP. While the effects of phthalocyanines on the diseased state have been investigated, the interaction between PcTS and PrP has not yet been extensively characterized. Here we use multiple, complementary assays (surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and tryptophan fluorescence quenching) to characterize the binding of PcTS to natively-folded hamster PrP(90-232), in order to determine binding constants, ligand stoichiometry, influence of buffer ionic strength, and the effects of chelated metal ions. We found that binding strength depends strongly on chelated metal ions, with Al(3+)-PcTS binding the weakest and free-base PcTS the strongest of the three types tested (Al(3+), Zn(2+), and free-base). Buffer ionic strength also affected the binding, with K(d) increasing along with salt concentration. The binding isotherms indicated the presence of at least two different binding sites with micromolar affinities and a total stoichiometry of ~4-5 PcTS molecules per PrP molecule.

  13. Surface Co-Expression of Two Different PfEMP1 Antigens on Single Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes Facilitates Binding to ICAM1 and PECAM1

    PubMed Central

    Joergensen, Louise; Bengtsson, Dominique C.; Bengtsson, Anja; Ronander, Elena; Berger, Sanne S.; Turner, Louise; Dalgaard, Michael B.; Cham, Gerald K. K.; Victor, Michala E.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Theander, Thor G.; Arnot, David E.; Jensen, Anja T. R.

    2010-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) antigens play a major role in cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes (IE), antigenic variation, and immunity to malaria. The current consensus on control of variant surface antigen expression is that only one PfEMP1 encoded by one var gene is expressed per cell at a time. We measured var mRNA transcript levels by real-time Q-PCR, analysed var gene transcripts by single-cell FISH and directly compared these with PfEMP1 antigen surface expression and cytoadhesion in three different antibody-selected P. falciparum 3D7 sub-lines using live confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and in vitro adhesion assays. We found that one selected parasite sub-line simultaneously expressed two different var genes as surface antigens, on single IE. Importantly, and of physiological relevance to adhesion and malaria pathogenesis, this parasite sub-line was found to bind both CD31/PECAM1 and CD54/ICAM1 and to adhere twice as efficiently to human endothelial cells, compared to infected cells having only one PfEMP1 variant on the surface. These new results on PfEMP1 antigen expression indicate that a re-evaluation of the molecular mechanisms involved in P. falciparum adhesion and of the accepted paradigm of absolutely mutually exclusive var gene transcription is required. PMID:20824088

  14. Surface co-expression of two different PfEMP1 antigens on single plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes facilitates binding to ICAM1 and PECAM1.

    PubMed

    Joergensen, Louise; Bengtsson, Dominique C; Bengtsson, Anja; Ronander, Elena; Berger, Sanne S; Turner, Louise; Dalgaard, Michael B; Cham, Gerald K K; Victor, Michala E; Lavstsen, Thomas; Theander, Thor G; Arnot, David E; Jensen, Anja T R

    2010-09-02

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) antigens play a major role in cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes (IE), antigenic variation, and immunity to malaria. The current consensus on control of variant surface antigen expression is that only one PfEMP1 encoded by one var gene is expressed per cell at a time. We measured var mRNA transcript levels by real-time Q-PCR, analysed var gene transcripts by single-cell FISH and directly compared these with PfEMP1 antigen surface expression and cytoadhesion in three different antibody-selected P. falciparum 3D7 sub-lines using live confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and in vitro adhesion assays. We found that one selected parasite sub-line simultaneously expressed two different var genes as surface antigens, on single IE. Importantly, and of physiological relevance to adhesion and malaria pathogenesis, this parasite sub-line was found to bind both CD31/PECAM1 and CD54/ICAM1 and to adhere twice as efficiently to human endothelial cells, compared to infected cells having only one PfEMP1 variant on the surface. These new results on PfEMP1 antigen expression indicate that a re-evaluation of the molecular mechanisms involved in P. falciparum adhesion and of the accepted paradigm of absolutely mutually exclusive var gene transcription is required.

  15. Temporally defined neocortical translation and polysome assembly are determined by the RNA-binding protein Hu antigen R.

    PubMed

    Kraushar, Matthew L; Thompson, Kevin; Wijeratne, H R Sagara; Viljetic, Barbara; Sakers, Kristina; Marson, Justin W; Kontoyiannis, Dimitris L; Buyske, Steven; Hart, Ronald P; Rasin, Mladen-Roko

    2014-09-09

    Precise spatiotemporal control of mRNA translation machinery is essential to the development of highly complex systems like the neocortex. However, spatiotemporal regulation of translation machinery in the developing neocortex remains poorly understood. Here, we show that an RNA-binding protein, Hu antigen R (HuR), regulates both neocorticogenesis and specificity of neocortical translation machinery in a developmental stage-dependent manner in mice. Neocortical absence of HuR alters the phosphorylation states of initiation and elongation factors in the core translation machinery. In addition, HuR regulates the temporally specific positioning of functionally related mRNAs into the active translation sites, the polysomes. HuR also determines the specificity of neocortical polysomes by defining their combinatorial composition of ribosomal proteins and initiation and elongation factors. For some HuR-dependent proteins, the association with polysomes likewise depends on the eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha kinase 4, which associates with HuR in prenatal developing neocortices. Finally, we found that deletion of HuR before embryonic day 10 disrupts both neocortical lamination and formation of the main neocortical commissure, the corpus callosum. Our study identifies a crucial role for HuR in neocortical development as a translational gatekeeper for functionally related mRNA subgroups and polysomal protein specificity.

  16. Applications of immunocolloids in light microscopy. III. Demonstration of antigenic and lectin-binding sites in semithin resin sections.

    PubMed

    Lucocq, J M; Roth, J

    1984-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that antigens or lectin-binding sites can be localized in sections from paraffin-embedded tissues with protein A or lectins bound to colloidal gold or colloidal silver (Roth J: J Histochem Cytochem 30:691, 1982 and 31:547, 1983). In the present study the protein A-gold technique and lectin-gold complexes have been applied to semithin sections (0.5-1.5 micron) of Epon- or low temperature Lowicryl K4M-embedded rat pancreas, kidney and submandibular gland. The results show that an increase in resolution and, therefore, in amount of information can be obtained. The optimal mode of imaging was determined on sections without counterstaining. Bright-field illumination gives the maximum information about the staining signal, while phase-contrast and Nomarski differential interference contrast give predominantly structural and, to a lesser extent, staining information. Polarization epi- and transillumination microscopy is inferior in all aspects. The application of a battery of lectin-gold complexes to rat submandibular gland revealed a specific staining pattern for each lectin in acinar and excretory duct cells.

  17. Effect of polyethylene glycol conjugation on conformational and colloidal stability of a monoclonal antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab').

    PubMed

    Roque, Cristopher; Sheung, Anthony; Rahman, Nausheen; Ausar, S Fernando

    2015-02-02

    We have investigated the effects of site specific "hinge" polyethylene glycol conjugation (PEGylation) on thermal, pH, and colloidal stability of a monoclonal antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab') using a variety of biophysical techniques. The results obtained by circular dichroism (CD), ultraviolet (UV) absorbance, and fluorescence spectroscopy suggested that the physical stability of the Fab' is maximized at pH 6-7 with no apparent differences due to PEGylation. Temperature-induced aggregation experiments revealed that PEGylation was able to increase the transition temperature, as well as prevent the formation of visible and subvisible aggregates. Statistical comparison of the three-index empirical phase diagram (EPD) revealed significant differences in thermal and pH stability signatures between Fab' and PEG-Fab'. Upon mechanical stress, micro-flow imaging (MFI) and measurement of the optical density at 360 nm showed that the PEG-Fab' had significantly higher resistance to surface-induced aggregation compared to the Fab'. Analysis of the interaction parameter, kD, indicated repulsive intermolecular forces for PEG-Fab' and attractive forces for Fab'. In conclusion, PEGylation appears to protect Fab' against thermal and mechanical stress-induced aggregation, likely due to a steric hindrance mechanism.

  18. Identification of the major HHV-6 antigen recognized by cerebrospinal fluid IgG in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Alenda, R; Alvarez-Lafuente, R; Costa-Frossard, L; Arroyo, R; Mirete, S; Alvarez-Cermeño, J C; Villar, L M

    2014-08-01

    Different data show an association between human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Intrathecal anti-HHV-6 immunoglobulin G (IgG) was detected in MS patients, but the antigen recognized by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) IgG has not been characterized yet. Our objective was to identify the HHV-6 antigens recognized by IgG present in the CSF of patients with MS. Cerebrospinal fluid IgG of 15 MS patients and eight patients with other neurological diseases was purified on protein G Sepharose columns. Purified IgG from every patient was linked to a CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B column. Fifty micrograms of viral extract was applied to each column. Bound proteins were eluted and analysed by SDS-PAGE and silver staining. The viral protein was characterized by mass spectrometry. A protein of 150 kD was eluted from CSF IgG columns of three of eight patients with primary progressive MS and one of seven with relapsing-remitting MS. After digestion and mass spectrometry analysis 10 peptides were found with 100% homology with the major capsid protein of the HHV-6A. These findings confirm the presence of anti-HHV-6 IgG in CSF of MS patients, particularly in progressive forms, and identify major capsid protein as the major antigen recognized by CSF IgG from MS patients. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EAN.

  19. MBSTAR: multiple instance learning for predicting specific functional binding sites in microRNA targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Ghosh, Dip; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) regulates gene expression by binding to specific sites in the 3'untranslated regions of its target genes. Machine learning based miRNA target prediction algorithms first extract a set of features from potential binding sites (PBSs) in the mRNA and then train a classifier to distinguish targets from non-targets. However, they do not consider whether the PBSs are functional or not, and consequently result in high false positive rates. This substantially affects the follow up functional validation by experiments. We present a novel machine learning based approach, MBSTAR (Multiple instance learning of Binding Sites of miRNA TARgets), for accurate prediction of true or functional miRNA binding sites. Multiple instance learning framework is adopted to handle the lack of information about the actual binding sites in the target mRNAs. Biologically validated 9531 interacting and 973 non-interacting miRNA-mRNA pairs are identified from Tarbase 6.0 and confirmed with PAR-CLIP dataset. It is found that MBSTAR achieves the highest number of binding sites overlapping with PAR-CLIP with maximum F-Score of 0.337. Compared to the other methods, MBSTAR also predicts target mRNAs with highest accuracy. The tool and genome wide predictions are available at http://www.isical.ac.in/~bioinfo_miu/MBStar30.htm.

  20. Evidence that transporters associated with antigen processing translocate a major histocompatibility complex class I-binding peptide into the endoplasmic reticulum in an ATP-dependent manner.

    PubMed Central

    Androlewicz, M J; Anderson, K S; Cresswell, P

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the putative peptide transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP) by using a permeabilized-cell system. The main objective was to determine whether these molecules, which bear homology to the ATP-binding cassette family of transporters, translocate antigenic peptides across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane for assembly with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and beta 2-microglobulin light chain. The pore-forming toxin streptolysin O was used to generate permeabilized cells, and peptide translocation was determined by measuring the amount of added radiolabeled peptide bound to endogenous class I molecules. No radiolabeled peptide was associated with MHC class I glycoproteins from unpermeabilized cells. We found that efficient peptide binding to MHC class I molecules in permeabilized cells is both transporter dependent and ATP dependent. In antigen-processing mutant cells lacking a functional transporter, uptake occurs only through a less-efficient transporter and ATP-independent pathway. In addition, short peptides (8-10 amino acids) known to bind MHC class I molecules compete efficiently with a radiolabeled peptide for TAP-dependent translocation, whereas longer peptides and a peptide derived from an endoplasmic reticulum signal sequence do not compete efficiently. This result indicates that the optimal substrates for TAP possess the characteristics of MHC-binding peptides. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8415666

  1. Promiscuous CTL recognition of viral epitopes on multiple human leukocyte antigens: biological validation of the proposed HLA A24 supertype.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Scott R; Elkington, Rebecca A; Miles, John J; Green, Katherine J; Walker, Susan; Haryana, Sofia M; Moss, Denis J; Dunckley, Heather; Burrows, Jacqueline M; Khanna, Rajiv

    2003-08-01

    Multiple HLA class I alleles can bind peptides with common sequence motifs due to structural similarities in the peptide binding cleft, and these groups of alleles have been classified into supertypes. Nine major HLA supertypes have been proposed, including an A24 supertype that includes A*2301, A*2402, and A*3001. Evidence for this A24 supertype is limited to HLA sequence homology and/or similarity in peptide binding motifs for the alleles. To investigate the immunological relevance of this proposed supertype, we have examined two viral epitopes (from EBV and CMV) initially defined as HLA-A*2301-binding peptides. The data clearly demonstrate that each peptide could be recognized by CTL clones in the context of A*2301 or A*2402; thus validating the inclusion of these three alleles within an A24 supertype. Furthermore, CTL responses to the EBV epitope were detectable in both A*2301(+) and A*2402(+) individuals who had been previously exposed to this virus. These data substantiate the biological relevance of the A24 supertype, and the identification of viral epitopes with the capacity to bind promiscuously across this supertype could aid efforts to develop CTL-based vaccines or immunotherapy. The degeneracy in HLA restriction displayed by some T cells in this study also suggests that the dogma of self-MHC restriction needs some refinement to accommodate foreign peptide recognition in the context of multiple supertype alleles.

  2. The binding sites of monoclonal antibodies to the non-reducing end of Francisella tularensis O-antigen accommodate mainly the terminal saccharide

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhaohua; Rynkiewicz, Michael J; Yang, Chiou-Ying; Madico, Guillermo; Perkins, Hillary M; Wang, Qi; Costello, Catherine E; Zaia, Joseph; Seaton, Barbara A; Sharon, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    We have previously described two types of protective B-cell epitopes in the O-antigen (OAg) of the Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis: repeating internal epitopes targeted by the vast majority of anti-OAg monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and a non-overlapping epitope at the non-reducing end targeted by the previously unique IgG2a mAb FB11. We have now generated and characterized three mAbs specific for the non-reducing end of F. tularensis OAg, partially encoded by the same variable region germline genes, indicating that they target the same epitope. Like FB11, the new mAbs, Ab63 (IgG3), N213 (IgG3) and N62 (IgG2b), had higher antigen-binding bivalent avidity than internally binding anti-OAg mAbs, and an oligosaccharide containing a single OAg repeat was sufficient for optimal inhibition of their antigen-binding. The X-ray crystal structure of N62 Fab showed that the antigen-binding site is lined mainly by aromatic amino acids that form a small cavity, which can accommodate no more than one and a third sugar residues, indicating that N62 binds mainly to the terminal Qui4NFm residue at the nonreducing end of OAg. In efficacy studies with mice infected intranasally with the highly virulent F. tularensis strain SchuS4, N62, N213 and Ab63 prolonged survival and reduced blood bacterial burden. These results yield insights into how antibodies to non-reducing ends of microbial polysaccharides can contribute to immune protection despite the smaller size of their target epitopes compared with antibodies to internal polysaccharide regions. PMID:23844703

  3. Antigen Recognition By Variable Lymphocyte Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.W.; Herrin, B.R.; Cooper, M.D.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-18

    Variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) rather than antibodies play the primary role in recognition of antigens in the adaptive immune system of jawless vertebrates. Combinatorial assembly of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene segments achieves the required repertoire for antigen recognition. We have determined a crystal structure for a VLR-antigen complex, VLR RBC36 in complex with the H-antigen trisaccharide from human blood type O erythrocytes, at 1.67 angstrom resolution. RBC36 binds the H-trisaccharide on the concave surface of the LRR modules of the solenoid structure where three key hydrophilic residues, multiple van der Waals interactions, and the highly variable insert of the carboxyl-terminal LRR module determine antigen recognition and specificity. The concave surface assembled from the most highly variable regions of the LRRs, along with diversity in the sequence and length of the highly variable insert, can account for the recognition of diverse antigens by VLRs.

  4. Zinc-induced oligomerization of zinc α2 glycoprotein reveals multiple fatty acid-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Henna; Miah, Layeque; Lau, Andy M; Brochard, Lea; Hati, Debolina; Bui, Tam T T; Drake, Alex F; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J; McDermott, Lindsay C

    2016-01-01

    Zinc α2 glycoprotein (ZAG) is an adipokine with a class I MHC protein fold and is associated with obesity and diabetes. Although its intrinsic ligand remains unknown, ZAG binds the dansylated C11 fatty acid 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA) in the groove between the α1 and α2 domains. The surface of ZAG has approximately 15 weak zinc-binding sites deemed responsible for precipitation from human plasma. In the present study the functional significance of these metal sites was investigated. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and CD showed that zinc, but not other divalent metals, causes ZAG to oligomerize in solution. Thus ZAG dimers and trimers were observed in the presence of 1 and 2 mM zinc. Molecular modelling of X-ray scattering curves and sedimentation coefficients indicated a progressive stacking of ZAG monomers, suggesting that the ZAG groove may be occluded in these. Using fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity, these ZAG-zinc oligomers were again observed in the presence of the fluorescent boron dipyrromethene fatty acid C16-BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-hexadecanoic acid). Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that ZAG binds C16-BODIPY. ZAG binding to C16-BODIPY, but not to DAUDA, was reduced by increased zinc concentrations. We conclude that the lipid-binding groove in ZAG contains at least two distinct fatty acid-binding sites for DAUDA and C16-BODIPY, similar to the multiple lipid binding seen in the structurally related immune protein CD1c. In addition, because high concentrations of zinc occur in the pancreas, the perturbation of these multiple lipid-binding sites by zinc may be significant in Type 2 diabetes where dysregulation of ZAG and zinc homoeostasis occurs.

  5. Multiple opioid receptor binding in dissociated intact guinea pig brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, S.W.; James, D.W.

    1986-03-05

    Dissociated intact guinea pig brain cells were prepared by the method of Rogers and El-Fakahany. Over 95% of these cells are viable as demonstrated by their exclusion of the dye trypan blue. Opioid receptor binding assays were performed in a modified Kreb-Ringers physiological buffer. The following radiolabeled ligands and conditions were used to selectively labeled multiple opioid receptors: mu binding, 1 nM (/sup 3/H)naloxone + 20 nM DADLE + 300 nM U50,488H; kappa binding, 4 nM (-)-(/sup 3/H)-EKC + 100 nM DAGO + 500 nM DADLE; delta binding, 2 nM (/sup 3/H)-DADLE + 100 nM DAGO + 300 nM U50,488H; sigma binding, 4 nM (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047. The intact brain cells in physiological buffer demonstrated specific binding for mu, kappa, delta, and sigma receptors. The relative binding potency of naloxone for each of the receptor types is arbitrarily set at 1.

  6. Cloning of a cuticular antigen that contains multiple tandem repeats from the filarial parasite Dirofilaria immitis.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, C B; Grandea, A G; Maina, C V; Jenkins, R E; Selkirk, M E; McReynolds, L A

    1992-01-01

    An unusual antigen composed of tandemly repeated protein units was cloned from the filarial parasite Dirofilaria immitis. The antigen was initially identified by screening a lambda gt11 cDNA library with serum from dogs immunized with irradiated D. immitis third-stage larvae. DNA sequence analysis of the cDNA clone, Di5, revealed a continuous open reading frame composed of two 399-base-pair repeats arranged in tandem. Southern blot analysis of genomic D. immitis DNA showed that the gene coding for Di5 is composed of a tandem array of 25-50 copies of this same 399-base-pair repeat. Antiserum raised against recombinant Di5 protein detected a protein "ladder," from about 14 to greater than 200 kDa with steps approximately 15 kDa apart, on immunoblots of D. immitis extract. Metabolic labeling of adult parasites with [35S]methionine showed that Di5 is synthesized as a large precursor that is subsequently cleaved to produce the ladder-like array. These results suggest that the characteristic ladder is created by proteolytic cleavage of the precursor at the same site in each monomer. The Di5 antigen was localized to the cuticle and hypodermis of adult D. immitis by immunoelectron microscopy. Both male and female parasites were found to release Di5 when cultured in vitro. DNA hybridization analysis demonstrated that Di5 is a member of a gene family present in many filarial parasites that infect both animal and human populations. Images PMID:1631084

  7. The crystal structure of avian CD1 reveals a smaller, more primordial antigen-binding pocket compared to mammalian CD1

    PubMed Central

    Zajonc, Dirk M.; Striegl, Harald; Dascher, Christopher C.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2008-01-01

    The molecular details of glycolipid presentation by CD1 antigen-presenting molecules are well studied in mammalian systems. However, little is known about how these non-classical MHC class I (MHCI) molecules diverged from the MHC locus to create a more complex, hydrophobic binding groove that binds lipids rather than peptides. To address this fundamental question, we have determined the crystal structure of an avian CD1 (chCD1–2) that shares common ancestry with mammalian CD1 from ≈310 million years ago. The chCD1–2 antigen-binding site consists of a compact, narrow, central hydrophobic groove or pore rather than the more open, 2-pocket architecture observed in mammalian CD1s. Potential antigens then would be restricted in size to single-chain lipids or glycolipids. An endogenous ligand, possibly palmitic acid, serves to illuminate the mode and mechanism of ligand interaction with chCD1–2. The palmitate alkyl chain is inserted into the relatively shallow hydrophobic pore; its carboxyl group emerges at the receptor surface and is stabilized by electrostatic and hydrogen bond interactions with an arginine residue that is conserved in all known CD1 proteins. In addition, other novel features, such as an A′ loop that interrupts and segments the normally long, continuous α1 helix, are unique to chCD1–2 and contribute to the unusually narrow binding groove, thereby limiting its size. Because birds and mammals share a common ancestor, but the rate of evolution is slower in birds than in mammals, the chCD1–2-binding groove probably represents a more primordial CD1-binding groove. PMID:19004781

  8. RNA binding of T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) C-terminal RNA recognition motif is modified by pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Aroca, Ángeles; Persson, Cecilia; Karlsson, B Göran; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2013-09-06

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a DNA/RNA-binding protein that regulates critical events in cell physiology by the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation. TIA-1 is composed of three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a glutamine-rich domain and binds to uridine-rich RNA sequences through its C-terminal RRM2 and RRM3 domains. Here, we show that RNA binding mediated by either isolated RRM3 or the RRM23 construct is controlled by slight environmental pH changes due to the protonation/deprotonation of TIA-1 RRM3 histidine residues. The auxiliary role of the C-terminal RRM3 domain in TIA-1 RNA recognition is poorly understood, and this work provides insight into its binding mechanisms.

  9. RNA Binding of T-cell Intracellular Antigen-1 (TIA-1) C-terminal RNA Recognition Motif Is Modified by pH Conditions*

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Aroca, Ángeles; Persson, Cecilia; Karlsson, B. Göran; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2013-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a DNA/RNA-binding protein that regulates critical events in cell physiology by the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation. TIA-1 is composed of three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a glutamine-rich domain and binds to uridine-rich RNA sequences through its C-terminal RRM2 and RRM3 domains. Here, we show that RNA binding mediated by either isolated RRM3 or the RRM23 construct is controlled by slight environmental pH changes due to the protonation/deprotonation of TIA-1 RRM3 histidine residues. The auxiliary role of the C-terminal RRM3 domain in TIA-1 RNA recognition is poorly understood, and this work provides insight into its binding mechanisms. PMID:23902765

  10. Multiple antigenic sites on an eicosapeptide. I. Precipitin studies in the goat.

    PubMed Central

    Lieu, T; Chapman, G; Doscher, M S; Mikoryak, C A; Brown, R K; Kong, Y M

    1975-01-01

    Purified peptide 105-124, an antigenic determinant from the carboxy terminus ribonuclease, was found to form an immune precipitate with antibody to that region prepared by affinity chromatography from goat hyperimmune antiserum to reduced carboxymethylated ribonuclease (CM-RNase). Cm-rnase also gave an immune precipitate with the antibody. Purified antibody to another region of similar size (40-61) did not form a precipitate with CM-RNase but did co-precipitate in the presence of antibody to peptide 105-124 and CM-RNase. The precipitin reaction between antibody to peptide 105-124 and CM-RNase was inhibited by two synthetic derivatives, peptides 118-124 and ala114-RNase 114-124. Stoichiometry of the precipitin reactions of antibody to 105-124 with CM-RNase or peptide 105-124 suggested an antigen valency of three or more. Consistent with this both peptides 105-124 and ala114-RNase 114-124 elicited immediate cutaneous reactions but 118-124 did not. These findings suggest that the eicosapeptide 105-124 is multivalent since at least three antibodies can react simultaneously with it. Images FIG. 2 PMID:53198

  11. Crystal structure of the CD2-binding domain of CD58 (lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3) at 1.8-Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ikemizu, Shinji; Sparks, Lisa M.; van der Merwe, P. Anton; Harlos, Karl; Stuart, David I.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Davis, Simon J.

    1999-01-01

    The binding of the cell surface molecule CD58 (formerly lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3) to its ligand, CD2, significantly increases the sensitivity of antigen recognition by T cells. This was the first heterophilic cell adhesion interaction to be discovered and is now an important paradigm for analyzing the structural basis of cell–cell recognition. The crystal structure of a CD2-binding chimeric form of CD58, solved to 1.8-Å resolution, reveals that the ligand binding domain of CD58 has the expected Ig superfamily V-set topology and shares several of the hitherto unique structural features of CD2, consistent with previous speculation that the genes encoding these molecules arose via duplication of a common precursor. Nevertheless, evidence for considerable divergence of CD2 and CD58 is also implicit in the structures. Mutations that disrupt CD2 binding map to the highly acidic surface of the AGFCC′C′′ β-sheet of CD58, which, unexpectedly, lacks marked shape complementarity to the equivalent, rather more basic CD58-binding face of human CD2. The specificity of the very weak interactions of proteins mediating cell–cell recognition may often derive largely from electrostatic complementarity, with shape matching at the protein–protein interface being less exact than for interactions that combine specificity with high affinity, such as those involving antibodies. PMID:10200255

  12. Characterization and expression of multiple alternatively spliced transcripts of the Goodpasture antigen gene region. Goodpasture antibodies recognize recombinant proteins representing the autoantigen and one of its alternative forms.

    PubMed

    Penadés, J R; Bernal, D; Revert, F; Johansson, C; Fresquet, V J; Cervera, J; Wieslander, J; Quinones, S; Saus, J

    1995-05-01

    Collagen IV, the major component of basement membranes, is composed of six distinct alpha chains (alpha 1-alpha 6). Atypically among the collagen IV genes, the exons encoding the carboxyl-terminal region of the human alpha 3(IV) chain undergo alternative splicing. This region has been designated as the Goodpasture antigen because of its reactivity in the kidney and lung with the pathogenic autoantibodies causing Goodpasture syndrome. The data presented in this report demonstrate that, in human kidney, the gene region encompassing the Goodpasture antigen generates at least six alternatively spliced transcripts predicting five distinct proteins that differ in their carboxyl-terminus and retain, except in one case, the exon that harbors the characteristic amino-terminus of the antigen. Goodpasture antibodies specifically recognize recombinant proteins representing the antigen and the alternative form that retains the amino-half of the antigen, suggesting that this moiety could be involved in the in vivo binding of the pathogenic antibodies. Furthermore, the sera of control individuals contain autoantibodies against the antigen that can be differentiated from those causing the syndrome based on their specific reactivities, suggesting that the binding of the pathogenic autoantibodies to a specific determinant likely trigger a distinct and unique cascade of events causing the disease.

  13. Host proteins that bind to or mimic SV40 large T antigen: using antibodies to look at protein interactions and their significance

    PubMed Central

    Mole, S. E.; Gannon, J. V.; Anton, I. A.; Ford, M. J.; Lane, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    The papovavirus SV40 is able to induce tumours in susceptible hosts and will transform cells in vitro. Its major early protein, large T antigen, is required for viral DNA synthesis, both in vivo and in vitro, and is also responsible for the oncogenic action of the virus. We have made use of an extensive library of anti-T monoclonal antibodies to investigate the cellular effects of T. Large T shares an antigenic determinant with a growth-regulated host protein, p68, which is a member of an expanding super-family of helicases with particular homology to the translation initiation factor elF-4A. We have also studied the binding and interaction of large T with two particular host components: the replicative enzyme DNA polymerase α and the proto-oncogene p53. These two proteins bind to similar regions of T and exert similar effects on its antigenic structure. We found that p53 can block the binding of DNA polymerase α to T as well as co-existing with DNA polymerase α in a trimeric complex with T. This suggests that these interactions may be important in the oncogenic and replicative action of large T.

  14. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins: multiple domains for multiple functions.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Thayne H; Altschuler, Sarah E; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2013-07-02

    The recognition of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is integral to myriad cellular functions. In eukaryotes, ssDNA is present stably at the ends of chromosomes and at some promoter elements. Furthermore, it is formed transiently by several cellular processes including telomere synthesis, transcription, and DNA replication, recombination, and repair. To coordinate these diverse activities, a variety of proteins have evolved to bind ssDNA in a manner specific to their function. Here, we review the recognition of ssDNA through the analysis of high-resolution structures of proteins in complex with ssDNA. This functionally diverse set of proteins arises from a limited set of structural motifs that can be modified and arranged to achieve distinct activities, including a range of ligand specificities. We also investigate the ways in which these domains interact in the context of large multidomain proteins/complexes. These comparisons reveal the structural features that define the range of functions exhibited by these proteins.

  15. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Annual Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, N. O.

    2015-04-16

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that co-localization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of recombinant subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. NLPs are are biocompatible, high-density lipoprotein mimetics that are amenable to the incorporation of multiple, chemically-disparate adjuvant and antigen molecules. We hypothesize that the ability to co-localize optimized adjuvant formulations with subunit antigens within a single particle will enhance the stimulation and activation of key immune effector cells, increasing the protective efficacy of subunit antigen-based vaccines. While Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis subunit antigens are the focus of this proposal, we anticipate that this approach is applicable to a wide range of DOD-relevant biothreat agents. The F344 rat aerosol challenge model for F. tularensis has been successfully established at Battelle under this contract, and Year 3 efficacy studies performed at Battelle demonstrated that an NLP vaccine formulation was able to enhance survival of female F344 rats relative to naïve animals. In addition, Year 3 focused on the incorporation of multiple Burkholderia antigens (both polysaccharides and proteins) onto adjuvanted NLPs, with immunological analysis poised to begin in the next quarter.

  16. On the attribution of binding energy in antigen-antibody complexes McPC 603, D1.3, and HyHEL-5.

    PubMed

    Novotny, J; Bruccoleri, R E; Saul, F A

    1989-05-30

    Using X-ray coordinates of antigen-antibody complexes McPC 603, D1.3, and HyHEL-5, we made semiquantitative estimates of Gibbs free energy changes (delta G) accompanying noncovalent complex formation of the McPC 603 Fv fragment with phosphocholine and the D1.3 or HyHEL-5 Fv fragments with hen egg white lysozyme. Our empirical delta G function, which implicitly incorporates solvent effects, has the following components: hydrophobic force, solvent-modified electrostatics, changes in side-chain conformational entropy, translational/overall rotational entropy changes, and the dilutional (cratic) entropy term. The calculated delta G ranges matched the experimentally determined delta G of McPC 603 and D1.3 complexes and overestimated it (i.e., gave a more negative value) in the case of HyHEL-5. Relative delta G contributions of selected antibody residues, calculated for HyHEL-5 complexes, agreed with those determined independently in site-directed mutagenesis experiments. Analysis of delta G attribution in all three complexes indicated that only a small number of amino acids probably contribute actively to binding energetics. These form a subset of the total antigen-antibody contact surface. In the antibodies, the bottom part of the antigen binding cavity dominated the energetics of binding whereas in lysozyme, the energetically most important residues defined small (2.5-3 nm2) "energetic" epitopes. Thus, a concept of protein antigenicity emerges that involves the active, attractive contributions mediated by the energetic antigenic epitopes and the passive surface complementarity contributed by the surrounding contact area. The D1.3 energetic epitope of lysozyme involved Gly 22, Gly 117, and Gln 121; the HyHEL-5 epitope consisted of Arg 45 and Arg 68. These are also the essential antigenic residues determined experimentally. The above positions belong to the most protruding parts of the lysozyme surface, and their backbones are not exceptionally flexible. Least

  17. Structure-based design of a disulfide-linked oligomeric form of the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen DNA-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2011-06-01

    With the aim of forming the ‘lock-washer’ conformation of the origin-binding domain of SV40 large T antigen in solution, using structure-based analysis an intermolecular disulfide bridge was engineered into the origin-binding domain to generate higher order oligomers in solution. The 1.7 Å resolution structure shows that the mutant forms a spiral in the crystal and has the de novo disulfide bond at the protein interface, although structural rearrangements at the interface are observed relative to the wild type. The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS–PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner.

  18. Development of multiple sclerosis after vaccination against hepatitis B: a study based on human leucocyte antigen haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Ozakbas, S; Idiman, E; Yulug, B; Pakoz, B; Bahar, H; Gulay, Z

    2006-09-01

    The aetiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still not fully understood. Infectious agents are believed to play a role in the development of this multifactorial disease. Cases in which this disease occurs after administration of both plasma-derived and recombinant hepatitis B vaccines have been reported. In this study, we compared a group of 11 MS patients who developed first clinical symptoms after hepatitis B vaccination (group I) with 71 MS patients who were never vaccinated against hepatitis B and were negative for hepatitis B serology (group II), and 20 healthy controls (group III). Mean age was 27.75 years (19-39) in group I, 30.16 years (18-50) in group II, and 34.4 years (18-50) in group III. Mean attack rate after 2 years was 1.5 in group I and 1.63 in group II. Mean Expanded Disability Status Scale score after 2 years was 1.31 in group I and 1.89 in group II. Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) typing and serology for hepatitis B surface antigen were performed in all groups. In groups I and II, HLA-DR2 was more frequent than in normal healthy subjects. This reflects the general role of HLA in the pathogenesis of MS but suggests that antigen presentation by different HLA is not involved in the development of MS after hepatitis B vaccination. Since there was no difference in the clinical features between vaccinated and nonvaccinated MS patients, this study supports recent reports that hepatitis B vaccination is safe in MS patients and that hepatitis B vaccination is not involved in the development of MS.

  19. Multiple myeloma: New surface antigens for the characterization of plasma cells in the era of novel agents.

    PubMed

    Muccio, Vittorio Emanuele; Saraci, Elona; Gilestro, Milena; Gattei, Valter; Zucchetto, Antonella; Astolfi, Monica; Ruggeri, Marina; Marzanati, Eleonora; Passera, Roberto; Palumbo, Antonio; Boccadoro, Mario; Omedè, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a neoplastic disorder characterized by clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells (PCs). Flow cytometry is an essential tool to confirm diagnosis and evaluate minimal residual disease (MRD). This study aims at identifying new surface PC markers suitable for targeted therapy in MM and able to improve MRD detection. The expression of 82 molecules provided by the "Ninth International Workshop on Leukocyte Antigens" was analyzed by flow cytometry in 5 MM cell lines and in 20 newly diagnosed MM (NDMM) patients. Based on the antigens expression and monoclonal antibody availability, CD150, CD48, CD229, CD352, CD319, CD272, CD86, CD200 and CD184 were subsequently tested in 24 NDMM, 8 relapsed MM (RMM), 6 plasma cell leukemia (PCL) and 13 healthy subjects. CD352 was less frequently expressed on NDMM than on healthy PCs; CD200 was more frequently expressed on NDMM than on RMM and healthy PCs. CD150, CD319, CD229, CD352 Mean Fluorescence Intensity (MFI) was lower in pathological than in healthy samples. The proportion of CD150-positive samples was lower in NDMM and RMM than in healthy subjects; CD86+ samples were less frequent in NDMM than in healthy subjects; CD200+ samples were more frequent in NDMM than in RMM and healthy subjects. CD150, CD86 and CD200 can help to identify malignant PCs; CD272, CD319, CD229, CD48 are highly expressed on all PCs and could be considered for targeted therapy. All these antigens could be added to a routine panel for PCs identification and MRD evaluation. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  20. Do antibodies to myelin basic protein isolated from multiple sclerosis cross-react with measles and other common virus antigens?

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, C C; Townsend, E; Randell, V B; Williamson, H G

    1983-01-01

    Immunological activity to various antigens, including brain components, measles and other viruses, has been associated with IgG in multiple sclerosis (MS). One possible explanation for the presence of anti-viral antibodies and antibody to myelin basic protein (MBP) in MS patients is that there are antigenic determinants common to certain viruses and MBP. To assess this possibility, IgG from individual brains and sera from patients with MS, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and controls was isolated by protein A and MBP-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Antibody to MBP was measured with a solid phase radioimmunoassay and antibody to measles and other viruses by immunofluorescence and/or complement fixation. Anti-MBP activity was detected in brain extracts and sera of all MS patients tested. In contrast to the low levels of antibody to MBP in control brains, high levels of anti-MBP antibodies were found in most of the normal sera. There was no correlation between the presence and levels of serum anti-measles antibodies and the anti-MBP activity. None of the anti-MBP antibodies affinity purified from brain and serum of MS patients reacted with any of the viruses tested, including measles. IgG purified from SSPE patients or from a rabbit hyperimmunized with measles antigen had no reactivity to MBP, despite high levels of anti-measles antibody. It is concluded that there is not direct link between the presence of antibody to MBP and antibody to measles and other viruses in MS patients. PMID:6190599

  1. A Multiple Antigenic Peptide Mimicking Peptidoglycan Induced T Cell Responses to Protect Mice from Systemic Infection with Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiang-Yu; Huang, Zhao-Xia; Chen, Yi-Guo; Lu, Xiao; Zhu, Ping; Wen, Kun; Fu, Ning; Liu, Bei-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Due to the enormous capacity of Staphylococcus aureus to acquire antibiotic resistance, it becomes imperative to develop vaccines for decreasing the risk of its life-threatening infections. Peptidoglycan (PGN) is a conserved and major component of S. aureus cell wall. However, it has not been used as a vaccine candidate since it is a thymus-independent antigen. In this study, we synthesized a multiple antigenic peptide, named MAP27, which comprised four copies of a peptide that mimics the epitope of PGN. After immunization with MAP27 five times and boosting with heat-inactivated bacterium one time, anti-MAP27 serum bound directly to S. aureus or PGN. Immunization with MAP27 decreased the bacterial burden in organs of BALB/c mice and significantly prolonged their survival time after S. aureus lethal-challenge. The percentage of IFN-γ+CD3+ T cells and IL-17+CD4+ T cells in spleen, as well as the levels of IFN-γ, IL-17A/F and CCL3 in spleen and lung, significantly increased in the MAP27-immunized mice after infection. Moreover, in vitro incubation of heat-inactivated S. aureus with splenocytes isolated from MAP27-immunized mice stimulated the production of IFN-γ and IL-17A/F. Our findings demonstrated that MAP27, as a thymus-dependent antigen, is efficient at eliciting T cell-mediated responses to protect mice from S. aureus infection. This study sheds light on a possible strategy to design vaccines against S. aureus. PMID:26317210

  2. Myelin Basic Protein and a Multiple Sclerosis-related MBP-peptide Bind to Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Rozenblum, Guido Tomás; Kaufman, Tomás; Vitullo, Alfredo Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Aptamer ligands for myelin basic protein (MBP) were obtained using the systematic evolution of ligand by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method. Two clones were isolated from a pool of oligonucleotides and tested for MBP targeting. Using purified MBP, we demonstrated the binding activity of the aptamers and we also showed the affinity of MBP for oligonucleotides of specific length. Moreover, one selected aptamer competitively inhibited the binding of an MBP-specific antibody to MBP and the aptamer was found more sensitive than a commercial antibody. In addition, we showed the ability of the aptamer to detect myelin-rich regions in paraffin-embedded mouse brain tissue. Therefore, the MBP-binding activity of the selected oligonucleotide may prove useful as a tool for life science and medical research for myelin detection and might be a good lead for testing it in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:25202925

  3. Trust-Based Service Composition and Binding for Tactical Networks with Multiple Objectives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    optimization ( MOO ) problem, minimizing the service cost, while maximizing the quality of service (QoS) and quality of information (QoI). The MOO ...consider in this paper. We formulate the problem of service composition and binding as a multi-objective optimization ( MOO ) problem for maximizing...problem for tactical networks with multiple objectives. We develop an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) solution technique to solve this MOO problem. The

  4. Peripheral VH4+ Plasmablasts Demonstrate Autoreactive B Cell Expansion Toward Brain Antigens in Early Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Jacqueline R.; Ireland, Sara J.; Chkheidze, Rati; Rounds, William H.; Lim, Joseph; Johnson, Jordan; Ramirez, Denise M.O.; Ligocki, Ann J.; Chen, Ding; Guzman, Alyssa A.; Woodhall, Mark; Wilson, Patrick C.; Meffre, Eric; White, Charles; Greenberg, Benjamin M.; Waters, Patrick; Cowell, Lindsay G.; Stowe, Ann M.

    2017-01-01

    Plasmablasts are a highly differentiated, antibody secreting B cell subset whose prevalence correlates with disease activity in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). For most patients experiencing partial transverse myelitis (PTM), plasmablasts are elevated in the blood at the first clinical presentation of disease (known as clinically isolated syndrome or CIS). In this study we found that many of these peripheral plasmablasts are autoreactive and recognize primarily gray matter targets in brain tissue. These plasmablasts express antibodies that over-utilize immunoglobulin heavy chain V-region subgroup 4 (VH4) genes, and the highly mutated VH4+ plasmablast antibodies recognize intracellular antigens of neurons and astrocytes. Most of the autoreactive, highly mutated VH4+ plasmablast antibodies recognize only a portion of cortical neurons, indicating that the response may be specific to neuronal subgroups or layers. Furthermore, CIS-PTM patients with this plasmablast response also exhibit modest reactivity toward neuroantigens in the plasma IgG antibody pool. Taken together, these data indicate that expanded VH4+ peripheral plasmablasts in early MS patients recognize brain gray matter antigens. Peripheral plasmablasts may be participating in the autoimmune response associated with MS, and provide an interesting avenue for investigating the expansion of autoreactive B cells at the time of the first documented clinical event. PMID:27730299

  5. A malaria invasion receptor, the 175-kilodalton erythrocyte binding antigen of Plasmodium falciparum recognizes the terminal Neu5Ac(alpha 2- 3)Gal- sequences of glycophorin A

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites invade human erythrocytes by means of a parasite receptor for erythrocytes, the 175-kD erythrocyte binding antigen (EBA-175). Similar to invasion efficiency, binding requires N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) on human erythrocytes, specifically the glycophorins. EBA-175 bound to erythrocytes with receptor-like specificity and was saturable. The specificity of EBA-175 binding was studied to determine if its binding is influenced either by simple electrostatic interaction with the negatively charged Neu5Ac (on the erythrocyte surface); or if Neu5Ac indirectly affected the conformation of an unknown ligand, or if Neu5Ac itself in specific linkage and carbohydrate composition was the primary ligand for EBA-175 as demonstrated for hemagglutinins of influenza viruses. Most Neu5Ac on human erythrocytes is linked to galactose by alpha 2-3 and alpha 2-6 linkages on glycophorin A. Soluble Neu5Ac by itself in solution did not competitively inhibit the binding of EBA-175 to erythrocytes, suggesting that linkage to an underlying sugar is required for binding in contrast to charge alone. Binding was competitively inhibited only by Neu5Ac(alpha 2-3)Gal-containing oligosaccharides. Similar oligosaccharides containing Neu5Ac(alpha 2-6)Gal-linkages had only slight inhibitory effects. Binding inhibition assays with modified sialic acids and other saccharides confirmed that oligosaccharide composition and linkage were primary factors for efficient binding. EBA- 175 bound tightly enough to glycophorin A that the complex could be precipitated with an anti-glycophorin A monoclonal antibody. Selective cleavage of O-linked tetrasaccharides clustered at the NH2 terminus of glycophorin A markedly reduced binding in inhibition studies. We conclude that the Neu5Ac(a2,3)-Gal- determinant on O-linked tetrasaccharides of glycophorin A appear to be the preferential erythrocyte ligand for EBA-175. PMID:1310320

  6. Multiple antigens of Yersinia pestis delivered by live recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains elicit protective immunity against plague.

    PubMed

    Sanapala, Shilpa; Rahav, Hannah; Patel, Hetal; Sun, Wei; Curtiss, Roy

    2016-05-05

    Based on our improved novel Salmonella vaccine delivery platform, we optimized the recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine (RASV) χ12094 to deliver multiple Yersinia pestis antigens. These included LcrV196 (amino acids, 131-326), Psn encoded on pYA5383 and F1 encoded in the chromosome, their synthesis did not cause adverse effects on bacterial growth. Oral immunization with χ12094(pYA5383) simultaneously stimulated high antibody titers to LcrV, Psn and F1 in mice and presented complete protection against both subcutaneous (s.c.) and intranasal (i.n.) challenges with high lethal doses of Y. pestis CO92. Moreover, no deaths or other disease symptoms were observed in SCID mice orally immunized with χ12094(pYA5383) over a 60-day period. Therefore, the trivalent S. typhimurium-based live vaccine shows promise for a next-generation plague vaccine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Generating a transgenic mouse line stably expressing human MHC surface antigen from a HAC carrying multiple genomic BACs.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Ishikura, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Takanori; Watanabe, Takashi; Suzuki, Junpei; Nakayama, Manabu; Okamura, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Tuneko; Koseki, Haruhiko; Ohara, Osamu; Ikeno, Masashi; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    The human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector is a promising tool to improve the problematic suppression and position effects of transgene expression frequently seen in transgenic cells and animals produced by conventional plasmid or viral vectors. We generated transgenic mice maintaining a single HAC vector carrying two genomic bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) from human HLA-DR loci (DRA and DRB1). Both transgenes on the HAC in transgenic mice exhibited tissue-specific expression in kidney, liver, lung, spleen, lymph node, bone marrow, and thymus cells in RT-PCR analysis. Stable functional expression of a cell surface HLA-DR marker from both transgenes, DRA and DRB1 on the HAC, was detected by flow cytometric analysis of splenocytes and maintained through at least eight filial generations. These results indicate that the de novo HAC system can allow us to manipulate multiple BAC transgenes with coordinated expression as a surface antigen through the generation of transgenic animals.

  8. Cation binding to 15-TBA quadruplex DNA is a multiple-pathway cation-dependent process

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnikov, Roman V.; Sponer, Jiri; Rassokhina, Olga I.; Kopylov, Alexei M.; Tsvetkov, Philipp O.; Makarov, Alexander A.; Golovin, Andrey V.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation (30 simulations reaching 4 µs in total), hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach and isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the atomistic picture of ion binding to 15-mer thrombin-binding quadruplex DNA (G-DNA) aptamer. Binding of ions to G-DNA is complex multiple pathway process, which is strongly affected by the type of the cation. The individual ion-binding events are substantially modulated by the connecting loops of the aptamer, which play several roles. They stabilize the molecule during time periods when the bound ions are not present, they modulate the route of the ion into the stem and they also stabilize the internal ions by closing the gates through which the ions enter the quadruplex. Using our extensive simulations, we for the first time observed full spontaneous exchange of internal cation between quadruplex molecule and bulk solvent at atomistic resolution. The simulation suggests that expulsion of the internally bound ion is correlated with initial binding of the incoming ion. The incoming ion then readily replaces the bound ion while minimizing any destabilization of the solute molecule during the exchange. PMID:21893589

  9. Cation binding to 15-TBA quadruplex DNA is a multiple-pathway cation-dependent process.

    PubMed

    Reshetnikov, Roman V; Sponer, Jiri; Rassokhina, Olga I; Kopylov, Alexei M; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Makarov, Alexander A; Golovin, Andrey V

    2011-12-01

    A combination of explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation (30 simulations reaching 4 µs in total), hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach and isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the atomistic picture of ion binding to 15-mer thrombin-binding quadruplex DNA (G-DNA) aptamer. Binding of ions to G-DNA is complex multiple pathway process, which is strongly affected by the type of the cation. The individual ion-binding events are substantially modulated by the connecting loops of the aptamer, which play several roles. They stabilize the molecule during time periods when the bound ions are not present, they modulate the route of the ion into the stem and they also stabilize the internal ions by closing the gates through which the ions enter the quadruplex. Using our extensive simulations, we for the first time observed full spontaneous exchange of internal cation between quadruplex molecule and bulk solvent at atomistic resolution. The simulation suggests that expulsion of the internally bound ion is correlated with initial binding of the incoming ion. The incoming ion then readily replaces the bound ion while minimizing any destabilization of the solute molecule during the exchange.

  10. Multiple antigen-specific processing pathways for activating naive CD8+ T cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Norbury, C C; Princiotta, M F; Bacik, I; Brutkiewicz, R R; Wood, P; Elliott, T; Bennink, J R; Yewdell, J W

    2001-04-01

    Current knowledge of the processing of viral Ags into MHC class I-associated ligands is based almost completely on in vitro studies using nonprofessional APCs (pAPCs). This is two steps removed from real immune responses to pathogens and vaccines, in which pAPCs activate naive CD8(+) T cells in vivo. Rational vaccine design requires answers to numerous questions surrounding the function of pAPCs in vivo, including their abilities to process and present peptides derived from endogenous and exogenous viral Ags. In the present study, we characterize the in vivo dependence of Ag presentation on the expression of TAP by testing the immunogenicity of model Ags synthesized by recombinant vaccinia viruses in TAP1(-/-) mice. We show that the efficiency of TAP-independent presentation in vitro correlates with TAP-independent activation of naive T cells in vivo and provide the first in vivo evidence for proteolytic processing of antigenic peptides in the secretory pathway. There was, however, a clear exception to this correlation; although the presentation of the minimal SIINFEKL determinant from chicken egg OVA in vitro was strictly TAP dependent, it was presented in a TAP-independent manner in vivo. In vivo presentation of the same peptide from a fusion protein retained its TAP dependence. These results show that determinant-specific processing pathways exist in vivo for the generation of antiviral T cell responses. We present additional findings that point to cross-priming as the likely mechanism for these protein-specific differences.

  11. Phenotypic and Functional Maturation of Tumor Antigen-Reactive CD8+ T Lymphocytes in Patients Undergoing Multiple Course Peptide Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Daniel J.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    Successful immunotherapy with peptide vaccines depends on the in vivo generation of sufficient numbers of anti-tumor T cells with appropriate phenotypic and functional characteristics to mediate tumor destruction. Herein, we report the induction of high frequencies of circulating CD8+ T cells (4.8% to 38.1%) directed against the native gp100:209-217 peptide derived from the gp100 melanoma-melanocyte tumor antigen in five HLA-A*0201 patients at high risk of recurrence of melanoma after multiple courses of immunization with modified gp100:209-217(210M) peptide in IFA. Longitudinal peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) analysis revealed a phenotypic shift of native peptide-specific CD8+ T cells from an early effector to an effector memory (CD27- CD28- CD62L- CD45RO+) phenotype with repeated immunizations and functional maturation that correlated with gp100:209-217 peptide-specific T-cell precursor frequencies. Postimmunization PBMC exhibited direct ex vivo recognition of melanoma cell lines in ELISPOT analysis, showed lytic capability against peptide-pulsed target cells, and proliferated in response to native peptide stimulation. One year after final immunization, circulating vaccine-specific CD8+ T cells persisted in patients’ PBMC with a maintained effector memory phenotype. The results herein demonstrate the efficacy of a multiple course peptide-immunization strategy for the generation of high frequencies of tumor antigen-specific T cells in vivo, and further show that continued peptide immunization results in the escalating generation of functionally mature, tumor-reactive effector memory CD8+ T lymphocytes. PMID:14676632

  12. Effects of multiple ligand binding on kinetic isotope effects in PQQ-dependent methanol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hothi, Parvinder; Basran, Jaswir; Sutcliffe, Michael J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2003-04-08

    The reaction of PQQ-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) from Methylophilus methylotrophus has been studied by steady-state and stopped-flow kinetic methods, with particular reference to multiple ligand binding and the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for PQQ reduction. Phenazine ethosulfate (PES; an artificial electron acceptor) and cyanide (a suppressant of endogenous activity), but not ammonium (an activator of MDH), compete for binding at the catalytic methanol-binding site. Cyanide does not activate turnover in M. methylotrophus MDH, as reported previously for the Paracoccus denitrificans enzyme. Activity is dependent on activation by ammonium but is inhibited at high ammonium concentrations. PES and methanol also influence the stimulatory and inhibitory effects of ammonium through competitive binding. Reaction profiles as a function of ammonium and PES concentration differ between methanol and deuterated methanol, owing to force constant effects on the binding of methanol to the stimulatory and inhibitory ammonium binding sites. Differential binding gives rise to unusual KIEs for PQQ reduction as a function of ammonium and PES concentration. The observed KIEs at different ligand concentrations are independent of temperature, consistent with their origin in differential binding affinities of protiated and deuterated substrate at the ammonium binding sites. Stopped-flow studies indicate that enzyme oxidation is not rate-limiting at low ammonium concentrations (<4 mM) during steady-state turnover. At higher ammonium concentrations (>20 mM), the low effective concentration of PES in the active site owing to the competitive binding of ammonium lowers the second-order rate constant for enzyme oxidation, and the oxidative half-reaction becomes more rate limiting. A sequential stopped-flow method is reported that has enabled, for the first time, a detailed study of the reductive half-reaction of MDH and comparison with steady-state data. The limiting rate of PQQ

  13. [mRNA-binding protein Human-antigen R regulates α-SMA expression in human bronchia smooth muscle cells].

    PubMed

    Yan, Di; Gu, Xianmin; Jiang, Shujuan; Wang, Yuhong

    2015-10-13

    To investigate the role of mRNA binding protein Human-antigen R (HuR) in the over-expression of α-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) stimulated by Platelet-derived Growth Factor (PDGF) in cultured human bronchia smooth muscle cells. Human bronchia smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro were divided into 0, 6, 12 and 24 h groups according to the time of PDGF treatment. Total HuR protein and total α-SMA protein expression were detected by Western blot. Total HuR mRNA and total α-SMA mRNA level were determined by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction. RNA interference technology was used to down-regulate HuR protein level to study the protective effect of HuR in PDGF-stimulated α-SMA protein expression. PDGF up-regulated the expression of HuR in a time-dependent manner. The relative expression levels of whole-cell HuR protein and mRNA in 0, 6, 12, 24 h groups were 0.23±0.09, 0.42±0.11, 0.93±0.21, 1.37±0.28; 1.00±0.00, 1.09±0.03, 1.16±0.03, 1.27±0.02 (all P<0.05). The relative expression levels of α-SMA protein and mRNA in 0, 6, 12, 24 h group also showed an increase trend marked in a time-dependent manner (1.03±0.08, 1.20±0.09, 1.39±0.11, 1.58±0.10; 1.00±0.00, 1.17±0.02, 1.23±0.02, 1.45±0.03; all P<0.05). Using RNA interference technology to down-regulate HuR protein level, there was a decrease in α-SMA protein expression. PDGF stimulation can increase the expression of HuR and α-SMA in the smooth muscle cells, and HuR protein is involved in the expression of α-SMA protein stimulated by PDGF.

  14. Strategic priming with multiple antigens can yield memory cell phenotypes optimized for infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A computational study

    DOE PAGES

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Gong, Chang; Kirschner, Denise E.; ...

    2016-01-06

    Lack of an effective vaccine results in 9 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) every year and 1.8 million deaths worldwide. While many infants are vaccinated at birth with BCG (an attenuated M. bovis), this does not prevent infection or development of TB after childhood. Immune responses necessary for prevention of infection or disease are still unknown, making development of effective vaccines against TB challenging. Several new vaccines are ready for human clinical trials, but these trials are difficult and expensive; especially challenging is determining the appropriate cellular response necessary for protection. The magnitude of an immune response is likelymore » key to generating a successful vaccine. Characteristics such as numbers of central memory (CM) and effector memory (EM) T cells responsive to a diverse set of epitopes are also correlated with protection. Promising vaccines against TB contain mycobacterial subunit antigens (Ag) present during both active and latent infection. We hypothesize that protection against different key immunodominant antigens could require a vaccine that produces different levels of EM and CM for each Ag-specific memory population. We created a computational model to explore EM and CM values, and their ratio, within what we term Memory Design Space. Our model captures events involved in T cell priming within lymph nodes and tracks their circulation through blood to peripheral tissues. We used the model to test whether multiple Ag-specific memory cell populations could be generated with distinct locations within Memory Design Space at a specific time point post vaccination. Boosting can further shift memory populations to memory cell ratios unreachable by initial priming events. By strategically varying antigen load, properties of cellular interactions within the LN, and delivery parameters (e.g., number of boosts) of multi-subunit vaccines, we can generate multiple Ag-specific memory populations that cover a wide range of

  15. Strategic Priming with Multiple Antigens can Yield Memory Cell Phenotypes Optimized for Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Gong, Chang; Kirschner, Denise E.; Linderman, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    Lack of an effective vaccine results in 9 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) every year and 1.8 million deaths worldwide. Although many infants are vaccinated at birth with BCG (an attenuated M. bovis), this does not prevent infection or development of TB after childhood. Immune responses necessary for prevention of infection or disease are still unknown, making development of effective vaccines against TB challenging. Several new vaccines are ready for human clinical trials, but these trials are difficult and expensive; especially challenging is determining the appropriate cellular response necessary for protection. The magnitude of an immune response is likely key to generating a successful vaccine. Characteristics such as numbers of central memory (CM) and effector memory (EM) T cells responsive to a diverse set of epitopes are also correlated with protection. Promising vaccines against TB contain mycobacterial subunit antigens (Ag) present during both active and latent infection. We hypothesize that protection against different key immunodominant antigens could require a vaccine that produces different levels of EM and CM for each Ag-specific memory population. We created a computational model to explore EM and CM values, and their ratio, within what we term Memory Design Space. Our model captures events involved in T cell priming within lymph nodes and tracks their circulation through blood to peripheral tissues. We used the model to test whether multiple Ag-specific memory cell populations could be generated with distinct locations within Memory Design Space at a specific time point post vaccination. Boosting can further shift memory populations to memory cell ratios unreachable by initial priming events. By strategically varying antigen load, properties of cellular interactions within the LN, and delivery parameters (e.g., number of boosts) of multi-subunit vaccines, we can generate multiple Ag-specific memory populations that cover a wide range of

  16. Binding kinetics of an antibody against HIV p24 core protein measured with real-time biomolecular interaction analysis suggest a slow conformational change in antigen p24.

    PubMed

    Glaser, R W; Hausdorf, G

    1996-01-16

    The interaction between HIV core protein p24 and the murine monoclonal antibody CB-4/1 or its Fab fragment showed unusual kinetics. Recombinant p24 was immobilised in a hydrophilic carboxymethyldextran matrix. At high concentration of CB-4/1 Fab the association of the antigen-antibody complex proceeds in two phases, while dissociation is mono-exponential. The antigen has a 'memory', i.e. shortly after dissociation of Fab-antigen complex the fast association phase is enhanced. Biphasic association was also found in solution. Experiments suggest a reversible change of binding properties in the epitope region with an overall time constant of about 100 s at room temperature. Intermediate steps with faster time constants must be involved. Slow conformational changes of p24 seem to be the most probable explanation. A simple model that provides a quantitative description of this process could not be found. Real-time analysis of antibody binding by surface plasmon resonance is a powerful method for studying such changes in the time domain of a few seconds to a few minutes.

  17. Determining donor-specific antibody C1q-binding ability improves the prediction of antibody-mediated rejection in human leucocyte antigen-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Malheiro, Jorge; Tafulo, Sandra; Dias, Leonídio; Martins, La Salete; Fonseca, Isabel; Beirão, Idalina; Castro-Henriques, António; Cabrita, António

    2017-04-01

    Detrimental impact of preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) against human leucocyte antigens on outcomes after kidney transplantation are well documented, however, the value of their capacity to bind complement for predicting antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and graft survival still needs to be confirmed. We aimed to study DSA characteristics (strength and C1q binding) that might distinguish harmful DSA from clinically irrelevant ones. We retrospectively studied 60 kidney-transplanted patients with preformed DSA detected by single antigen bead (SAB) assays (IgG and C1q kits), from a cohort of 517 kidney graft recipients (124 with detectable anti-HLA antibodies). Patients were divided into DSA strength (MFI < vs. ≥ 15 000) and C1q-binding ability. AMR frequency was high (30%) and it increased with DSA strength (P = 0.002) and C1q+ DSA (P < 0.001). The performance of DSA C1q-binding ability as a predictor of AMR was better than DSA strength (diagnostic odds ratio 16.3 vs. 6.4, respectively). Furthermore, a multivariable logistic regression showed that C1q+ DSA was a risk factor for AMR (OR = 16.80, P = 0.001), while high MFI DSAs were not. Graft survival was lower in high MFI C1q+ DSA in comparison with patients with C1q- high or low MFI DSA (at 6 years, 38%, 83% and 80%, respectively; P = 0.001). Both DSA strength and C1q-binding ability assessment seem valuable for improving pretransplant risk assessment. Since DSA C1q-binding ability was a better predictor of AMR and correlated with graft survival, C1q-SAB may be a particularly useful tool.

  18. Amyloid tracers detect multiple binding sites in Alzheimer's disease brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ruiqing; Gillberg, Per-Göran; Bergfors, Assar; Marutle, Amelia; Nordberg, Agneta

    2013-07-01

    -1 (Ki: 0.2 nM, 70 nM), florbetapir (1.8 nM, 53 nM) and florbetaben (1.0 nM, 65 nM). BF-227 displaced 83% of (3)H-Pittsburgh compound B binding, mainly at a low-affinity site (311 nM), whereas FDDNP only partly displaced (40%). We propose a multiple binding site model for the amyloid tracers (binding sites 1, 2 and 3), where AV-45 (florbetapir), AV-1 (florbetaben), and Pittsburgh compound B, all show nanomolar affinity for the high-affinity site (binding site 1), as visualized by positron emission tomography. BF-227 shows mainly binding to site 3 and FDDNP shows only some binding to site 2. Different amyloid tracers may provide new insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms in the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Orthogonal matrix factorization enables integrative analysis of multiple RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stražar, Martin; Žitnik, Marinka; Zupan, Blaž; Ule, Jernej; Curk, Tomaž

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: RNA binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression, including splicing, transport, polyadenylation and RNA stability. To model protein–RNA interactions by considering all available sources of information, it is necessary to integrate the rapidly growing RBP experimental data with the latest genome annotation, gene function, RNA sequence and structure. Such integration is possible by matrix factorization, where current approaches have an undesired tendency to identify only a small number of the strongest patterns with overlapping features. Because protein–RNA interactions are orchestrated by multiple factors, methods that identify discriminative patterns of varying strengths are needed. Results: We have developed an integrative orthogonality-regularized nonnegative matrix factorization (iONMF) to integrate multiple data sources and discover non-overlapping, class-specific RNA binding patterns of varying strengths. The orthogonality constraint halves the effective size of the factor model and outperforms other NMF models in predicting RBP interaction sites on RNA. We have integrated the largest data compendium to date, which includes 31 CLIP experiments on 19 RBPs involved in splicing (such as hnRNPs, U2AF2, ELAVL1, TDP-43 and FUS) and processing of 3’UTR (Ago, IGF2BP). We show that the integration of multiple data sources improves the predictive accuracy of retrieval of RNA binding sites. In our study the key predictive factors of protein–RNA interactions were the position of RNA structure and sequence motifs, RBP co-binding and gene region type. We report on a number of protein-specific patterns, many of which are consistent with experimentally determined properties of RBPs. Availability and implementation: The iONMF implementation and example datasets are available at https://github.com/mstrazar/ionmf. Contact: tomaz.curk@fri.uni-lj.si Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available

  20. Specificity of broad protein interaction surfaces for proteins with multiple binding partners.

    PubMed

    Uchikoga, Nobuyuki; Matsuzaki, Yuri; Ohue, Masahito; Akiyama, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of protein-protein interaction networks has revealed the presence of proteins with multiple interaction ligand proteins, such as hub proteins. For such proteins, multiple ligands would be predicted as interacting partners when predicting all-to-all protein-protein interactions (PPIs). In this work, to obtain a better understanding of PPI mechanisms, we focused on protein interaction surfaces, which differ between protein pairs. We then performed rigid-body docking to obtain information of interfaces of a set of decoy structures, which include many possible interaction surfaces between a certain protein pair. Then, we investigated the specificity of sets of decoy interactions between true binding partners in each case of alpha-chymotrypsin, actin, and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 as test proteins having multiple true binding partners. To observe differences in interaction surfaces of docking decoys, we introduced broad interaction profiles (BIPs), generated by assembling interaction profiles of decoys for each protein pair. After cluster analysis, the specificity of BIPs of true binding partners was observed for each receptor. We used two types of BIPs: those involved in amino acid sequences (BIP-seqs) and those involved in the compositions of interacting amino acid residue pairs (BIP-AAs). The specificity of a BIP was defined as the number of group members including all true binding partners. We found that BIP-AA cases were more specific than BIP-seq cases. These results indicated that the composition of interacting amino acid residue pairs was sufficient for determining the properties of protein interaction surfaces.

  1. Positive selection of transgenic receptor-bearing thymocytes by Kb antigen is altered by Kb mutations that involve peptide binding.

    PubMed Central

    Sha, W C; Nelson, C A; Newberry, R D; Pullen, J K; Pease, L R; Russell, J H; Loh, D Y

    1990-01-01

    A specific interaction between the class I major histocompatibility complex molecule Kb and thymocytes expressing the antigen receptor from the cytolytic T lymphocyte 2C enhances maturation of T cells of the CD8 lineage in transgenic mice. By analyzing transgenic mice backcrossed to Kbm mutant strains of mice, we have identified five bm mutations of the Kb antigen-encoding gene that alter the positive selection of thymocytes induced by Kb antigen. Compared with Kb, Kbm10 and Kbm1 did not induce significant maturation of 2C T-cell receptor-bearing thymocytes, and Kbm8 antigen positively selected for transgenic thymocytes only weakly. Altering residue 77 of Kb molecule from aspartic acid to serine made Kbm3 and Kbm11 allogeneic targets for the 2C antigen receptor and caused deletion of transgenic thymocytes. This deletion spared T cells that expressed low levels of CD8, a result differing from the total deletion of CD8-bearing T cells seen in mice that expressed the original target alloantigen Ld. This evidence indicates that (i) self-peptides bound to thymic major histocompatibility complex molecules can influence the positive selection of thymocytes and (ii) thymocytes with apparently weak interaction with self-major histocompatibility complex antigens can escape clonal deletion. PMID:2117275

  2. B cell antigen presentation is sufficient to drive neuroinflammation in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Parker Harp, Chelsea R; Archambault, Angela S; Sim, Julia; Ferris, Stephen T; Mikesell, Robert J; Koni, Pandelakis A; Shimoda, Michiko; Linington, Christopher; Russell, John H; Wu, Gregory F

    2015-06-01

    B cells are increasingly regarded as integral to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, in part as a result of the success of B cell-depletion therapy. Multiple B cell-dependent mechanisms contributing to inflammatory demyelination of the CNS have been explored using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a CD4 T cell-dependent animal model for multiple sclerosis. Although B cell Ag presentation was suggested to regulate CNS inflammation during EAE, direct evidence that B cells can independently support Ag-specific autoimmune responses by CD4 T cells in EAE is lacking. Using a newly developed murine model of in vivo conditional expression of MHC class II, we reported previously that encephalitogenic CD4 T cells are incapable of inducing EAE when B cells are the sole APC. In this study, we find that B cells cooperate with dendritic cells to enhance EAE severity resulting from myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) immunization. Further, increasing the precursor frequency of MOG-specific B cells, but not the addition of soluble MOG-specific Ab, is sufficient to drive EAE in mice expressing MHCII by B cells alone. These data support a model in which expansion of Ag-specific B cells during CNS autoimmunity amplifies cognate interactions between B and CD4 T cells and have the capacity to independently drive neuroinflammation at later stages of disease.

  3. Site-specific immobilization of recombinant antibody fragments through material-binding peptides for the sensitive detection of antigens in enzyme immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Yoichi

    2014-11-01

    The immobilization of an antibody is one of the key technologies that are used to enhance the sensitivity and efficiency of the detection of target molecules in immunodiagnosis and immunoseparation. Recombinant antibody fragments such as VHH, scFv and Fabs produced by microorganisms are the next generation of ligand antibodies as an alternative to conventional whole Abs due to a smaller size and the possibility of site-directed immobilization with uniform orientation and higher antigen-binding activity in the adsorptive state. For the achievement of site-directed immobilization, affinity peptides for a certain ligand molecule or solid support must be introduced to the recombinant antibody fragments. In this mini-review, immobilization technologies for the whole antibodies (whole Abs) and recombinant antibody fragments onto the surfaces of plastics are introduced. In particular, the focus here is on immobilization technologies of recombinant antibody fragments utilizing affinity peptide tags, which possesses strong binding affinity towards the ligand molecules. Furthermore, I introduced the material-binding peptides that are capable of direct recognition of the target materials. Preparation and immobilization strategies for recombinant antibody fragments linked to material-binding peptides (polystyrene-binding peptides (PS-tags) and poly (methyl methacrylate)-binding peptide (PMMA-tag)) are the focus here, and are based on the enhancement of sensitivity and a reduction in the production costs of ligand antibodies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent advances in molecular engineering of antibody.

  4. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen Inhibits Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression by Disrupting Enhanceosome Assembly through Binding with the Regulatory Factor X Complex

    PubMed Central

    Thakker, Suhani; Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Gupta, Namrata; Challa, Shanthan; Cai, Qiliang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules play a central role in adaptive antiviral immunity by presenting viral peptides to CD4+ T cells. Due to their key role in adaptive immunity, many viruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), have evolved multiple strategies to inhibit the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. The expression of MHC-II, which is controlled mainly at the level of transcription, is strictly dependent upon the binding of the class II transactivator (CIITA) to the highly conserved promoters of all MHC-II genes. The recruitment of CIITA to MHC-II promoters requires its direct interactions with a preassembled MHC-II enhanceosome consisting of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) complex and regulatory factor X (RFX) complex proteins. Here, we show that KSHV-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) disrupts the association of CIITA with the MHC-II enhanceosome by binding to the components of the RFX complex. Our data show that LANA is capable of binding to all three components of the RFX complex, RFX-associated protein (RFXAP), RFX5, and RFX-associated ankyrin-containing protein (RFXANK), in vivo but binds more strongly with the RFXAP component in in vitro binding assays. Levels of MHC-II proteins were significantly reduced in KSHV-infected as well as LANA-expressing B cells. Additionally, the expression of LANA in a luciferase promoter reporter assay showed reduced HLA-DRA promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that LANA binds to the MHC-II promoter along with RFX proteins and that the overexpression of LANA disrupts the association of CIITA with the MHC-II promoter. These assays led to the conclusion that the interaction of LANA with RFX proteins interferes with the recruitment of CIITA to MHC-II promoters, resulting in an inhibition of MHC-II gene expression. Thus, the data presented here identify

  5. Neisseria gonorrhoeae MutS Affects Pilin Antigenic Variation through Mismatch Correction and Not by pilE Guanine Quartet Binding

    PubMed Central

    Rotman, Ella

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many pathogens use homologous recombination to vary surface antigens to avoid immune surveillance. Neisseria gonorrhoeae achieves this in part by changing the properties of its surface pili in a process called pilin antigenic variation (AV). Pilin AV occurs by high-frequency gene conversion reactions that transfer silent pilS sequences into the expressed pilE locus and requires the formation of an upstream guanine quartet (G4) DNA structure to initiate this process. The MutS and MutL proteins of the mismatch correction (MMC) system act to correct mismatches after replication and prevent homeologous (i.e., partially homologous) recombination, but MutS orthologs can also bind to G4 structures. A previous study showed that mutation of MutS resulted in a 3-fold increase in pilin AV, which could be due to the loss of MutS antirecombination properties or loss of G4 binding. We tested two site-directed separation-of-function MutS mutants that are both predicted to bind to G4s but are not able to perform MMC. Pilus phase variation assays and DNA sequence analysis of pilE variants produced in these mutants showed that all three mutS mutants and a mutL mutant had similar increased frequencies of pilin AV. Moreover, the mutS mutants all showed similar increased levels of pilin AV-dependent synthetic lethality. These results show that antirecombination by MMC is the reason for the effect that MutS has on pilin AV and is not due to pilE G4 binding by MutS. IMPORTANCE Neisseria gonorrhoeae continually changes its outer surface proteins to avoid recognition by the immune system. N. gonorrhoeae alters the antigenicity of the pilus by directed recombination between partially homologous pilin copies in a process that requires a guanine quartet (G4) structure. The MutS protein of the mismatch correction (MMC) system prevents recombination between partially homologous sequences and can also bind to G4s. We confirmed that loss of MMC increases the frequency of pilin antigenic

  6. Post-transcriptional Regulation of Meprin α by the RNA-binding Proteins Hu Antigen R (HuR) and Tristetraprolin (TTP)*

    PubMed Central

    Roff, Alanna N.; Panganiban, Ronaldo P.; Bond, Judith S.; Ishmael, Faoud T.

    2013-01-01

    Meprins are multimeric proteases that are implicated in inflammatory bowel disease by both genetic association studies and functional studies in knock-out mice. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease show decreased colonic expression of meprin α, although regulation of expression, particularly under inflammatory stimuli, has not been studied. The studies herein demonstrate that the human meprin α transcript is bound and stabilized by Hu antigen R at baseline, and that treatment with the inflammatory stimulus phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate downregulates meprin α expression by inducing tristetraprolin. The enhanced binding of tristetraprolin to the MEP1A 3′-UTR results in destabilization of the transcript and occurs at a discrete site from Hu antigen R. This is the first report to describe a mechanism for post-transcriptional regulation of meprin α and will help clarify the role of meprins in the inflammatory response and disease. PMID:23269677

  7. Personalized ex vivo multiple peptide enrichment and detection of T cells reactive to multiple tumor-associated antigens in prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Taborska, Pavla; Stakheev, Dmitry; Strizova, Zuzana; Vavrova, Katerina; Podrazil, Michal; Bartunkova, Jirina; Smrz, Daniel

    2017-09-02

    Personalized peptide vaccination is a promising immunotherapeutic approach in prostate cancer (PCa). We therefore examined whether an approach, utilizing personalized multiple peptide-mediated ex vivo enrichment with effector T cells reactive to multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), could be employed as a basis for the development of T cell immunotherapy of PCa. In this study, we used the non-adherent fraction (lymphocytes) of cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a leukapheretic product of biochemically recurrent (BR, n = 14) and metastatic hormone-refractory (HR, n = 12) PCa patients. The lymphocytes were primed with a pool of mixed overlapping peptides derived from 6 PCa TAAs-PSA, PAP, NY-ESO-1, MAGE-A1, MAGE-A3 and MAGE-A4. After 2 weeks of culture, the cells were stimulated with the peptides and T cell reactivity determined by externalization of CD107a. No TAAs-reactive effector T cells were detected in the patient's lymphocytes after their reconstitution. However, following their priming with the TAAs-derived peptides and 2-week culturing, the lymphocytes became enriched with polyclonal TAAs-reactive effector CD8(+) T cells in 8 out of 14 BR and 5 out of 12 HR patients. No such reactive CD8(+) T cells were detected in cultured lymphocytes without the peptide priming. Stimulation of the responding cultures with peptides derived from individual TAAs revealed a unique repertoire of the reactive CD8(+) T cells. Our strategy revealed that the personalized multiple peptide-mediated ex vivo enrichment with multiple TAAs-reactive T cells in the PCa patient's lymphocytes is a viable approach for development of T cell immunotherapy of PCa.

  8. Inhibitory FcγRIIb-Mediated Soluble Antigen Clearance from Plasma by a pH-Dependent Antigen-Binding Antibody and Its Enhancement by Fc Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Iwayanagi, Yuki; Maeda, Atsuhiko; Haraya, Kenta; Wada, Naoko A.; Shibahara, Norihito; Ohmine, Ken; Nambu, Takeru; Nakamura, Genki; Mimoto, Futa; Katada, Hitoshi; Ito, Shunsuke; Tachibana, Tatsuhiko; Jishage, Kou-ichi; Hattori, Kunihiro

    2015-01-01

    Fc engineering can modulate the Fc–FcγR interaction and thus enhance the potency of Abs that target membrane-bound Ags, but it has not been applied to Abs that target soluble Ags. In this study, we revealed a previously unknown function of inhibitory FcγRII in vivo and, using an Ab that binds to Ag pH dependently, demonstrated that the function can be exploited to target soluble Ag. Because pH-dependent Ab dissociates Ag in acidic endosome, its Ag clearance from circulation reflects the cellular uptake rate of Ag/Ab complexes. In vivo studies showed that FcγR but not neonatal FcR contributes to Ag clearance by the pH-dependent Ab, and when Fc binding to mouse FcγRII and III was increased, Ag clearance was markedly accelerated in wild-type mice and FcR γ-chain knockout mice, but the effect was diminished in FcγRII knockout mice. This demonstrates that mouse FcγRII efficiently promotes Ab uptake into the cell and its subsequent recycling back to the cell surface. Furthermore, when a human IgG1 Fc variant with selectively increased binding to human FcγRIIb was tested in human FcγRIIb transgenic mice, Ag clearance was accelerated without compromising the Ab half-life. Taken together, inhibitory FcγRIIb was found to play a prominent role in the cellular uptake of monomeric Ag/Ab immune complexes in vivo, and when the Fc of a pH-dependent Ab was engineered to selectively enhance human FcγRIIb binding, the Ab could accelerate soluble Ag clearance from circulation. We assume such a function would enhance the therapeutic potency of Abs that target soluble Ags. PMID:26320252

  9. Three-Dimensional Structures Reveal Multiple ADP/ATP Binding Modes

    SciTech Connect

    C Simmons; C Magee; D Smith; L Lauman; J Chaput; J Allen

    2011-12-31

    The creation of synthetic enzymes with predefined functions represents a major challenge in future synthetic biology applications. Here, we describe six structures of de novo proteins that have been determined using protein crystallography to address how simple enzymes perform catalysis. Three structures are of a protein, DX, selected for its stability and ability to tightly bind ATP. Despite the addition of ATP to the crystallization conditions, the presence of a bound but distorted ATP was found only under excess ATP conditions, with ADP being present under equimolar conditions or when crystallized for a prolonged period of time. A bound ADP cofactor was evident when Asp was substituted for Val at residue 65, but ATP in a linear configuration is present when Phe was substituted for Tyr at residue 43. These new structures complement previously determined structures of DX and the protein with the Phe 43 to Tyr substitution [Simmons, C. R., et al. (2009) ACS Chem. Biol. 4, 649-658] and together demonstrate the multiple ADP/ATP binding modes from which a model emerges in which the DX protein binds ATP in a configuration that represents a transitional state for the catalysis of ATP to ADP through a slow, metal-free reaction capable of multiple turnovers. This unusual observation suggests that design-free methods can be used to generate novel protein scaffolds that are tailor-made for catalysis.

  10. Dynamic binding of identity and location information: a serial model of multiple identity tracking.

    PubMed

    Oksama, Lauri; Hyönä, Jukka

    2008-06-01

    Tracking of multiple moving objects is commonly assumed to be carried out by a fixed-capacity parallel mechanism. The present study proposes a serial model (MOMIT) to explain performance accuracy in the maintenance of multiple moving objects with distinct identities. A serial refresh mechanism is postulated, which makes recourse to continuous attention switching, a capacity-limited episodic buffer for identity-location bindings, indexed location information stored in the visuospatial short-term memory, and an active role of long-term memory. As identity-location bindings are refreshed serially, a location error is inherent for all other targets except the focally attended one. The magnitude of this location error is a key factor in predicting tracking accuracy. MOMIT's predictions were supported by the data of five experiments: performance accuracy decreased as a function of target set-size, speed, and familiarity. A mathematical version of MOMIT fitted nicely to the observed data with plausible parameter estimates for the binding capacity and refresh time.

  11. Characterization of invasive Neisseria meningitidis from Atlantic Canada, 2009 to 2013: With special reference to the nonpolysaccharide vaccine targets (PorA, factor H binding protein, Neisseria heparin-binding antigen and Neisseria adhesin A)

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Raymond SW; Law, Dennis KS; Gad, Rita R; Mailman, Tim; German, Gregory; Needle, Robert

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) has always been a major cause of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in Canada. With the successful implementation of a meningitis C conjugate vaccine, the majority of IMD in Canada is now caused by MenB. OBJECTIVE: To investigate IMD case isolates in Atlantic Canada from 2009 to 2013. Data were analyzed to determine the potential coverage of the newly licensed MenB vaccine. METHODS: Serogroup, serotype and serosubtype antigens were determined from IMD case isolates. Clonal analysis was performed using multilocus sequence typing. The protein-based vaccine antigen genes were sequenced and the predicted peptides were investigated. RESULTS: The majority of the IMD isolates were MenB (82.5%, 33 of 40) and, in particular, sequence type (ST)-154 B:4:P1.4 was responsible for 47.5% (19 of 40) of all IMD case isolates in Atlantic Canada. Isolates of this clone expressed the PorA antigen P1.4 and possessed the nhba genes encoding for Neisseria heparin-binding antigen peptide 2, which together matched exactly with two of the four components of the new four-component meningococcal B vaccine. Nineteen MenB isolates had two antigenic matches, another five MenB and one meningitis Y isolate had one antigenic match. This provided 75.8% (25 of 33) potential coverage for MenB, or a 62.5% (25 of 40) overall potential coverage for IMD. CONCLUSION: From 2009 to 2013, IMD in Atlantic Canada was mainly caused by MenB and, in particular, the B:4:P1.4 ST-154 clone, which accounted for 47.5% of all IMD case isolates. The new four-component meningococcal B vaccine appeared to offer adequate coverage against MenB in Atlantic Canada. PMID:26744586

  12. The ability of simian virus 40 large T antigen to immortalize primary mouse embryo fibroblasts cosegregates with its ability to bind to p53.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, J Y; Abate, M; Rice, P W; Cole, C N

    1991-01-01

    The large T antigen encoded by simian virus 40 (SV40) plays essential roles in the infection of permissive cells, leading to production of progeny virions, and in the infection of nonpermissive cells, leading to malignant transformation. Primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) are nonpermissive for SV40, and infection by wild-type SV40 leads to immortalization and transformation of a small percentage of infected cells. We examined the ability of an extensive set of mutants whose lesions affect SV40 large T antigen to immortalize MEFs. We found that immortalization activity was retained by all mutants whose lesions are located upstream of codon 346. This includes a mutant lacking amino acids 168 to 346. We previously showed (M. J. Tevethia, J. M. Pipas, T. Kierstead, and C. Cole, Virology 162:76-89, 1988) that sequences downstream of amino acid 626 are not required for immortalization of primary MEFs. Studies by Thompson et al. (D. L. Thompson, D. Kalderon, A. Smith, and M. Tevethia, Virology 178:15-34, 1990) indicate that all sequences upstream of residue 250, including the domain for binding of tumor suppressor protein Rb, are not required for transformation of MEFs. Together, these studies demonstrate that the immortalization activity of large T antigen for MEFs maps to sequences between 347 and 626. Several mutants with lesions between 347 and 626 retained the ability to immortalize at nearly the wild-type frequency, while others, with small insertions at amino acid 409 or 424 or a deletion of residues 587 to 589, failed to immortalize. The abilities of mutant T antigens to form a complex with tumor suppressor protein p53 were examined. We found that all mutants able to immortalize retained the ability to complex with p53, while all mutants which lost the ability to immortalize were no longer able to bind p53. This suggests that inactivation of the growth-suppressive properties of p53 is essential for immortalization of MEFs. Images PMID:1658380

  13. Assignment of C1q-binding HLA antibodies as unacceptable HLA antigens avoids positive CDC-crossmatches prior to transplantation of deceased donor organs.

    PubMed

    Juhl, David; Marget, Matthias; Hallensleben, Michael; Görg, Siegfried; Ziemann, Malte

    2017-01-12

    Soon, a virtual crossmatch shall replace the complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) allocation crossmatch in the Eurotransplant region. To prevent positive CDC-crossmatches in the recipient centre, careful definition of unacceptable antigens is necessary. For highly sensitized patients, this is difficult by CDC alone. Assignment of all antibodies detected by sensitive assays, however, could prevent organ allocation. To assess the usefulness of the Luminex C1q-assay to prevent positive CDC-crossmatches, all CDC-crossmatches performed prior to deceased kidney transplantation in a 16-month-period were reviewed. Sera causing positive crossmatches were investigated by the C1q-assay. 31 out of 1432 crossmatches (2.2%) were positive. Sera involved in 26 positive crossmatches were available. C1q-binding donor-specific antibodies were detected in 19 sera (73.1%). The other sera were from recipients without any HLA antibodies detectable by CDC or common solid phase assays. Three patients had known Non-HLA antibodies causing positive CDC-results. Four crossmatches were only weak positive. Therefore, avoidance of donors with HLA antigens against whom C1q-binding antibodies were detected would have prevented all positive crossmatches due to HLA antibodies. Provided that all HLA specificities against which antibodies are detected by the Luminex C1q-assay are considered as unacceptable antigens, CDC-crossmatches prior to transplantation might safely be omitted in many patients. They should be maintained in highly immunized patients, however, for whom assignment of all C1q-positive antibodies as unacceptable antigens could lead to a significant delay or even prevention of transplantation.

  14. Structure-based design of a disulfide-linked oligomeric form of the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A

    2011-06-01

    The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS-PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner.

  15. Structure-based Design of a Disulfide-lined Oligomeric Form of the Simian Virus 40 (SV40) Large T Antigen DNA-Binding Domain

    SciTech Connect

    G Meinke; P Phelan; A Fradet-Turcotte; J Archambault; P Bullock

    2011-12-31

    The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS-PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner.

  16. Use of thermodynamic coupling between antibody-antigen binding and phospholipid acyl chain phase transition energetics to predict immunoliposome targeting affinity.

    PubMed

    Klegerman, Melvin E; Zou, Yuejiao; Golunski, Eva; Peng, Tao; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D

    2014-09-01

    Thermodynamic analysis of ligand-target binding has been a useful tool for dissecting the nature of the binding mechanism and, therefore, potentially can provide valuable information regarding the utility of targeted formulations. Based on a consistent coupling of antibody-antigen binding and gel-liquid crystal transition energetics observed for antibody-phosphatidylethanolamine (Ab-PE) conjugates, we hypothesized that the thermodynamic parameters and the affinity for antigen of the Ab-PE conjugates could be effectively predicted once the corresponding information for the unconjugated antibody is determined. This hypothesis has now been tested in nine different antibody-targeted echogenic liposome (ELIP) preparations, where antibody is conjugated to dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) head groups through a thioether linkage. Predictions were satisfactory (affinity not significantly different from the population of values found) in five cases (55.6%), but the affinity of the unconjugated antibody was not significantly different from the population of values found in six cases (66.7%), indicating that the affinities of the conjugated antibody tended not to deviate appreciably from those of the free antibody. While knowledge of the affinities of free antibodies may be sufficient to judge their suitability as targeting agents, thermodynamic analysis may still provide valuable information regarding their usefulness for specific applications.

  17. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; LeHoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through 15N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6. PMID:27340016

  18. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-07-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency.

  19. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; Lehoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through 15N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6.

  20. Multiple binding sites in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: An opportunity for polypharmacolgy.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga-Vásquez, Patricio; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Bermudez, Isabel; Varas, Rodrigo; Reyes-Parada, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    For decades, the development of selective compounds has been the main goal for chemists and biologists involved in drug discovery. However, diverse lines of evidence indicate that polypharmacological agents, i.e. those that act simultaneously at various protein targets, might show better profiles than selective ligands, regarding both efficacy and side effects. On the other hand, the availability of the crystal structure of different receptors allows a detailed analysis of the main interactions between drugs and receptors in a specific binding site. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) constitute a large and diverse family of ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) that, as a product of its modulation, regulate neurotransmitter release, which in turns produce a global neuromodulation of the central nervous system. nAChRs are pentameric protein complexes in such a way that expression of compatible subunits can lead to various receptor assemblies or subtypes. The agonist binding site, located at the extracellular region, exhibits different properties depending on the subunits that conform the receptor. In the last years, it has been recognized that nAChRs could also contain one or more allosteric sites which could bind non-classical nicotinic ligands including several therapeutically useful drugs. The presence of multiple binding sites in nAChRs offers an interesting possibility for the development of novel polypharmacological agents with a wide spectrum of actions.

  1. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism.

    PubMed

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; LeHoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-06-24

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through (15)N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6.

  2. Multiple unfolding pathways of leucine binding protein (LBP) probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS).

    PubMed

    Kotamarthi, Hema Chandra; Sharma, Riddhi; Narayan, Satya; Ray, Sayoni; Ainavarapu, Sri Rama Koti

    2013-10-02

    Experimental studies on the folding and unfolding of large multi-domain proteins are challenging, given the proteins' complex energy landscapes with multiple intermediates. Here, we report a mechanical unfolding study of a 346-residue, two-domain leucine binding protein (LBP) from the bacterial periplasm. Forced unfolding of LBP is a prerequisite for its translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane into the bacterial periplasm. During the mechanical stretching of LBP, we observe that 38% of the unfolding flux followed a two-state pathway, giving rise to a single unfolding force peak at ~70 pN with an unfolding contour length of 120 nm in constant-velocity single-molecule pulling experiments. The remaining 62% of the unfolding flux followed multiple three-state pathways, with intermediates having unfolding contour lengths in the range ~20-85 nm. These results suggest that the energy landscape of LBP is complex, with multiple intermediate states, and a large fraction of molecules go through intermediate states during the unfolding process. Furthermore, the presence of the ligand leucine increased the unfolding flux through the two-state pathway from 38% to 65%, indicating the influence of ligand binding on the energy landscape. This study suggests that unfolding through parallel pathways might be a general mechanism for the large two-domain proteins that are translocated to the bacterial periplasmic space.

  3. Analysis of the binding loops configuration and surface adaptation of different crystallized single-domain antibodies in response to various antigens.

    PubMed

    Al Qaraghuli, Mohammed M; Ferro, Valerie A

    2017-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have revolutionized the biomedical field through their ubiquitous utilization in different diagnostics and therapeutic applications. Despite this widespread use, their large size and structural complexity have limited their versatility in specific applications. The antibody variable region that is responsible for binding antigen is embodied within domains that can be rescued individually as single-domain antibody (sdAb) fragments. Because of the unique characteristics of sdAbs, such as low molecular weight, high physicochemical stability, and the ability to bind antigens inaccessible to conventional antibodies, they represent a viable alternative to full-length antibodies. Consequently, 149 crystal structures of sdAbs, originating from human (VH), camelids (VHH), or sharks (VNAR), were retrieved from the Protein Data Bank, and their structures were compared. The 3 types of sdAbs displayed complementarity determining regions (CDRs) with different lengths and configurations. CDR3 of the VHH and VNAR domains were dominated by pleated and extended orientations, respectively. Although VNAR showed the smallest average molecular weight and molecular surface area compared with VHH and VH antibodies. However, the solvent accessible surface area measurements of the 3 tested sdAbs types were very similar. All the antihapten VHH antibodies showed pleated CDR3, which were sufficient to create a binding pocket to accommodate haptens (methotrexate and azo dyes) in terms of shape and electrostatic potential. The sdAbs that recognized lysozyme showed more diversity in their CDR3 orientation to enable them to recognize various topographies of lysozyme. Subsequently, the three sdAb classes were different in size and surface area and have shown distinguishable ability to optimize their CDR length and orientation to recognize different antigen classes.

  4. Selection of scFv Antibody Fragments Binding to Human Blood versus Lymphatic Endothelial Surface Antigens by Direct Cell Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Thomas; Kalt, Romana; Raab, Ingrid; Schachner, Helga; Mayrhofer, Corina; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Hantusch, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The identification of marker molecules specific for blood and lymphatic endothelium may provide new diagnostic tools and identify new targets for therapy of immune, microvascular and cancerous diseases. Here, we used a phage display library expressing human randomized single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies for direct panning against live cultures of blood (BECs) and lymphatic (LECs) endothelial cells in solution. After six panning rounds, out of 944 sequenced antibody clones, we retrieved 166 unique/diverse scFv fragments, as indicated by the V-region sequences. Specificities of these phage clone antibodies for respective compartments were individually tested by direct cell ELISA, indicating that mainly pan-endothelial cell (EC) binders had been selected, but also revealing a subset of BEC-specific scFv antibodies. The specific staining pattern was recapitulated by twelve phage-independently expressed scFv antibodies. Binding capacity to BECs and LECs and differential staining of BEC versus LEC by a subset of eight scFv antibodies was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining. As one antigen, CD146 was identified by immunoprecipitation with phage-independent scFv fragment. This antibody, B6-11, specifically bound to recombinant CD146, and to native CD146 expressed by BECs, melanoma cells and blood vessels. Further, binding capacity of B6-11 to CD146 was fully retained after fusion to a mouse Fc portion, which enabled eukaryotic cell expression. Beyond visualization and diagnosis, this antibody might be used as a functional tool. Overall, our approach provided a method to select antibodies specific for endothelial surface determinants in their native configuration. We successfully selected antibodies that bind to antigens expressed on the human endothelial cell surfaces in situ, showing that BECs and LECs share a majority of surface antigens, which is complemented by cell-type specific, unique markers. PMID:25993332

  5. GFI1B controls its own expression binding to multiple sites

    PubMed Central

    Anguita, Eduardo; Villegas, Ana; Iborra, Francisco; Hernández, Aurora

    2010-01-01

    Background Transcription factors play essential roles in both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. This is the case for the growth factor independent 1b (GFI1B) transcription factor, which is required for erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation and over-expressed in leukemic patients and cell lines. Design and Methods To investigate GFI1B regulation, we searched for multispecies conserved non-coding elements between GFI1B and neighboring genes. We used a formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE) assay and DNase1 hypersensitivity to assess the chromatin conformation of these sites. Next, we analyzed transcription factor binding and histone modifications at the GFI1B locus including the conserved non-coding elements by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Finally, we studied the interaction of the GFI1B promoter and the conserved non-coding elements with the chromatin conformation capture technique and used immunofluorescence to evaluate GFI1B levels in individual cells. Results We localized several conserved non-coding elements containing multiple erythroid specific transcription factor binding sites at the GFI1B locus. In GFI1B-expressing cells a subset of these conserved non-coding elements and the promoter adopt a close spatial conformation, localize with open chromatin sites, harbor chromatin modifications associated with gene activation and bind multiple transcription factors and co-repressors. Conclusions Our findings indicate that GFI1B regulatory elements behave as activators and repressors. Different protein levels within a cell population suggest that cells must activate and repress GFI1B continuously to control its final level. These data are consistent with a model of GFI1B regulation in which GFI1B binds to its own promoter and to the conserved non-coding elements as its levels rise. This would attract repressor complexes that progressively down-regulate the gene. GFI1B expression would decrease until a stage at which the

  6. GFI1B controls its own expression binding to multiple sites.

    PubMed

    Anguita, Eduardo; Villegas, Ana; Iborra, Francisco; Hernández, Aurora

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors play essential roles in both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. This is the case for the growth factor independent 1b (GFI1B) transcription factor, which is required for erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation and over-expressed in leukemic patients and cell lines. To investigate GFI1B regulation, we searched for multispecies conserved non-coding elements between GFI1B and neighboring genes. We used a formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE) assay and DNase1 hypersensitivity to assess the chromatin conformation of these sites. Next, we analyzed transcription factor binding and histone modifications at the GFI1B locus including the conserved non-coding elements by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Finally, we studied the interaction of the GFI1B promoter and the conserved non-coding elements with the chromatin conformation capture technique and used immunofluorescence to evaluate GFI1B levels in individual cells. We localized several conserved non-coding elements containing multiple erythroid specific transcription factor binding sites at the GFI1B locus. In GFI1B-expressing cells a subset of these conserved non-coding elements and the promoter adopt a close spatial conformation, localize with open chromatin sites, harbor chromatin modifications associated with gene activation and bind multiple transcription factors and co-repressors. Conclusions Our findings indicate that GFI1B regulatory elements behave as activators and repressors. Different protein levels within a cell population suggest that cells must activate and repress GFI1B continuously to control its final level. These data are consistent with a model of GFI1B regulation in which GFI1B binds to its own promoter and to the conserved non-coding elements as its levels rise. This would attract repressor complexes that progressively down-regulate the gene. GFI1B expression would decrease until a stage at which the activating complexes predominate and

  7. Lynx1 and Aβ1-42 bind competitively to multiple nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Morten S; Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Pinborg, Lars H; Härtig, Wolfgang; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2016-10-01

    Lynx1 regulates synaptic plasticity in the brain by regulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). It is not known to which extent Lynx1 can bind to endogenous nAChR subunits in the brain or how this interaction is affected by Alzheimer's disease pathology. We apply affinity purification to demonstrate that a water-soluble variant of human Lynx1 (Ws-Lynx1) isolates α3, α4, α5, α6, α7, β2, and β4 nAChR subunits from human and rat cortical extracts, and rat midbrain and olfactory bulb extracts, suggesting that Lynx1 forms complexes with multiple nAChR subtypes in the human and rodent brain. Incubation with Ws-Lynx1 decreases nicotine-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells and striatal neurons, indicating that binding of Ws-Lynx1 is sufficient to inhibit signaling downstream of nAChRs. The effect of nicotine in PC12 cells is independent of α7 or α4β2 nAChRs, suggesting that Lynx1 can affect the function of native non-α7, non-α4β2 nAChR subtypes. We further show that Lynx1 and oligomeric β-amyloid1-42 compete for binding to several nAChR subunits, that Ws-Lynx1 prevents β-amyloid1-42-induced cytotoxicity in cortical neurons, and that cortical Lynx1 levels are decreased in a transgenic mouse model with concomitant β-amyloid and tau pathology. Our data suggest that Lynx1 binds to multiple nAChR subtypes in the brain and that this interaction might have functional and pathophysiological implications in relation to Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Alternative splice variants of the rainbow trout leptin receptor encode multiple circulating leptin-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ningping; Einarsdottir, Ingibjörg E; Johansson, Marcus; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur

    2013-07-01

    In mammals, leptin (Lep) binding proteins (LepBPs) derived from Lep receptor (LepR) gene or protein bind most of the circulating Lep, but to date, information on LepBPs in nonmammalian vertebrate classes is lacking. This study details the characterization of multiple LepBPs in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), an early poikilothermic vertebrate, and presents the complete coding sequences for 3 of them. Size-exclusion chromatography and cross-linking assay identified plasma proteins bound to Lep ranging from 70 to 100 kDa. LepBPs were isolated from plasma by affinity chromatography, and their binding specificity was assessed by a competitive binding assay. A RIA for LepBPs indicates that plasma LepBP levels decline after fasting for 3 weeks. Immunoblotting of LepBPs using antibodies against different LepR epitopes shows that the LepBPs are indeed LepR isoforms. The alternatively spliced LepR transcripts (LepR(S1-3)) that include only the extracellular segment transcribe the 90-kDa LepBP1, the 80-kDa LepBP2, and the 70-kDa LepBP3, respectively. LepR(S1) generally has lower expression than the long-form LepR in most tissues. LepR(S2) is primarily expressed in adipose tissue, whereas LepR(S3) is expressed abundantly in brain and spleen, and moderately in liver and gills. The mRNA levels of hepatic LepR(S3) increase after 2 weeks of fasting. This study demonstrates a mechanism in fish for the generation of LepBPs that differs from that seen in mammals and indicates that the physiologic action of Lep in these poikilothermic vertebrates can be modulated, both centrally and peripherally, by the differentiated, tissue-specific expression of multiple LepBPs.

  9. The Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus Latency-associated Nuclear Antigen DNA Binding Domain Dorsal Positive Electrostatic Patch Facilitates DNA Replication and Episome Persistence.

    PubMed

    Li, Shijun; Tan, Min; Juillard, Franceline; Ponnusamy, Rajesh; Correia, Bruno; Simas, J Pedro; Carrondo, Maria A; McVey, Colin E; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2015-11-20

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has a causative role in several human malignancies. KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) mediates persistence of viral episomes in latently infected cells. LANA mediates KSHV DNA replication and segregates episomes to progeny nuclei. The structure of the LANA DNA binding domain was recently solved, revealing a positive electrostatic patch opposite the DNA binding surface, which is the site of BET protein binding. Here we investigate the functional role of the positive patch in LANA-mediated episome persistence. As expected, LANA mutants with alanine or glutamate substitutions in the central, peripheral, or lateral portions of the positive patch maintained the ability to bind DNA by EMSA. However, all of the substitution mutants were deficient for LANA DNA replication and episome maintenance. Mutation of the peripheral region generated the largest deficiencies. Despite these deficiencies, all positive patch mutants concentrated to dots along mitotic chromosomes in cells containing episomes, similar to LANA. The central and peripheral mutants, but not the lateral mutants, were reduced for BET protein interaction as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation. However, defects in BET protein binding were independent of episome maintenance function. Overall, the reductions in episome maintenance closely correlated with DNA replication deficiencies, suggesting that the replication defects account for the reduced episome persistence. Therefore, the electrostatic patch exerts a key role in LANA-mediated DNA replication and episome persistence and may act through a host cell partner(s) other than a BET protein or by inducing specific structures or complexes.

  10. Polymorphisms in the S1 spike glycoprotein of Arkansas-type infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) show differential binding to host tissues and altered antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Leyson, Christina; França, Monique; Jackwood, Mark; Jordan, Brian

    2016-11-01

    Sequencing avian infectious bronchitis virus spike genes re-isolated from vaccinated chicks revealed that many sequence changes are found on the S1 spike gene. In the ArkDPI strain, Y43H and ∆344 are the two most common changes observed. This study aims to examine the roles of Y43H and ∆344 in selection in vivo. Using recombinant ArkDPI S1 proteins, we conducted binding assays on chicken tracheas and embryonic chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Protein histochemistry showed that the Y43H change allows for enhanced binding to trachea, whereas the ArkDPI S1 spike with H43 alone was able to bind CAM. Using Western blot under denaturing conditions, ArkDPI serotype-specific sera did not bind to S1 proteins with ∆344, suggesting that ∆344 alters antigenicity of S1. These findings are important because they propose that specific changes in S1 enhances virus fitness by more effective binding to host tissues (Y43H) and by evading a vaccine-induced antibody response (∆344). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Small Molecule Inhibition of Epstein - Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen-1 DNA Binding Activity Interferes with Replication and Persistence of the Viral Genome

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Ka-Won; Joo, Eun Hye; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The replication and persistence of extra chromosomal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) episome in latently infected cells are primarily dependent on the binding of EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) to the cognate EBV oriP element. In continuation of the previous study, herein we characterized EBNA1 small molecule inhibitors (H20, H31) and their underlying inhibitory mechanisms. In silico docking analyses predicted that H20 fits into a pocket in the EBNA1 DNA binding domain (DBD). However, H20 did not significantly affect EBNA1 binding to its cognate sequence. A limited structure-relationship study of H20 identified a hydrophobic compound H31, as an EBNA1 inhibitor. An in vitro EBNA1 EMSA and in vivo EGFP-EBNA1 confocal microscopy analysis showed that H31 inhibited EBNA1-dependent oriP sequence-specific DNA binding activity, but not sequence-nonspecific chromosomal association. Consistent with this, H31 repressed the EBNA1-dependent transcription, replication, and persistence of an EBV oriP plasmid. Furthermore, H31 induced progressive loss of EBV episome. In addition, H31 selectively retarded the growth of EBV-infected LCL or Burkitt’s lymphoma cells. These data indicate that H31 inhibition of EBNA1-dependent DNA binding decreases transcription from and persistence of EBV episome in EBV-infected cells. These new compounds might be useful probes for dissecting EBNA1 functions in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24486954

  12. Age-associated changes in binding of human B lymphocytes to a VH3-restricted unconventional bacterial antigen.

    PubMed

    Silverman, G J; Sasano, M; Wormsley, S B

    1993-11-15

    We have recently demonstrated that there is a site on Staphylococcal protein A (SpA) that interacts with B cell Ig receptors in a manner comparable with known T cell superantigens, because this binding specificity is restricted to Fab with VH3 H chains and most VH3 Ig bind SpA. In the present studies, SpA was used as a phenotypic marker for VH3 expression by human lymphoid cells. As expected, this Fab-mediated binding specificity was completely inhibited by certain VH3 antibodies but not by antibodies from other VH families. In multiparameter flow cytometric analyses, this binding activity was demonstrated to be highly prevalent among B cells (14 to 54%), and was more common among IgM-bearing B cells compared with IgG-bearing B cells. In all studies, Fab-mediated binding of SpA was uniformly expressed by a greater proportion of CD5-positive B cells than CD5-negative B cells. The proportion of B lymphocytes with this VH3-restricted binding capacity was found to undergo age-associated changes, because a large proportion of the peripheral B cells of neonates (mean +/- SD, 46.0 +/- 2.9%) bind this site, but two 10-mo-old subjects and older children had significantly lower binding levels (29.0 +/- 3.5%) that were the same as binding levels by adult peripheral B lymphocytes (30.2 +/- 3.3%). In immunohistochemical studies, tonsilar B cells that bind this site on SpA were shown to be common in mantle zones and germinal centers of secondary follicles. We speculate that Fab-mediated SpA binding represents a fundamental and primitive binding capacity that is part of the human preimmune repertoire, and we discuss the implications for the observed age-dependent shift in Fab-mediated binding of SpA by peripheral blood B cells.

  13. Probing Carbohydrate Product Expulsion from a Processive Cellulase with Multiple Absolute Binding Free Energy Methods*

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Lintao; Beckham, Gregg T.; Shirts, Michael R.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Adney, William S.; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the enzymatic mechanism that cellulases employ to degrade cellulose is critical to efforts to efficiently utilize plant biomass as a sustainable energy resource. A key component of cellulase action on cellulose is product inhibition from monosaccharide and disaccharides in the product site of cellulase tunnel. The absolute binding free energy of cellobiose and glucose to the product site of the catalytic tunnel of the Family 7 cellobiohydrolase (Cel7A) of Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) was calculated using two different approaches: steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations and alchemical free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulations. For the SMD approach, three methods based on Jarzynski's equality were used to construct the potential of mean force from multiple pulling trajectories. The calculated binding free energies, −14.4 kcal/mol using SMD and −11.2 kcal/mol using FEP/MD, are in good qualitative agreement. Analysis of the SMD pulling trajectories suggests that several protein residues (Arg-251, Asp-259, Asp-262, Trp-376, and Tyr-381) play key roles in cellobiose and glucose binding to the catalytic tunnel. Five mutations (R251A, D259A, D262A, W376A, and Y381A) were made computationally to measure the changes in free energy during the product expulsion process. The absolute binding free energies of cellobiose to the catalytic tunnel of these five mutants are −13.1, −6.0, −11.5, −7.5, and −8.8 kcal/mol, respectively. The results demonstrated that all of the mutants tested can lower the binding free energy of cellobiose, which provides potential applications in engineering the enzyme to accelerate the product expulsion process and improve the efficiency of biomass conversion. PMID:21454590

  14. Isolation and characterization of the DNA-binding protein (DBP) of the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailov, Victor S. Vanarsdall, Adam L.; Rohrmann, George F.

    2008-01-20

    DNA-binding protein (DBP) of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) was expressed as an N-terminal His{sub 6}-tag fusion using a recombinant baculovirus and purified to near homogeneity. Purified DBP formed oligomers that were crosslinked by redox reagents resulting in predominantly protein dimers and tetramers. In gel retardation assays, DBP showed a high affinity for single-stranded oligonucleotides and was able to compete with another baculovirus SSB protein, LEF-3, for binding sites. DBP binding protected ssDNA against hydrolysis by a baculovirus alkaline nuclease AN/LEF-3 complex. Partial proteolysis by trypsin revealed a domain structure of DBP that is required for interaction with DNA and that can be disrupted by thermal treatment. Binding to ssDNA, but not to dsDNA, changed the pattern of proteolytic fragments of DBP indicating adjustments in protein structure upon interaction with ssDNA. DBP was capable of unwinding short DNA duplexes and also promoted the renaturation of long complementary strands of ssDNA into duplexes. The unwinding and renaturation activities of DBP, as well as the DNA binding activity, were sensitive to sulfhydryl reagents and were inhibited by oxidation of thiol groups with diamide or by alkylation with N-ethylmaleimide. A high affinity of DBP for ssDNA and its unwinding and renaturation activities confirmed identification of DBP as a member of the SSB/recombinase family. These activities and a tight association with subnuclear structures suggests that DBP is a component of the virogenic stroma that is involved in the processing of replicative intermediates.

  15. Detection of a cell surface antigen found on rat peripheral nervous system neurons and multiple glia: astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Akeson, R; Warren, S L

    1984-01-01

    A cell surface component has been identified that is found on cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons and Schwann cells and also cultured brain astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. This component was detected with a monoclonal antibody originally generated to the NG108 (N18 mouse neuroblastoma X C6 rat astrocytoma) hybrid cell line. The antibody, designated B2C11, binds to cultured peripheral nervous system cells: intact dorsal root ganglion and trigeminal neurons and cultured dorsal root ganglion and sciatic nerve Schwann cells. The binding of B2C11 to dorsal root ganglion neurons in vivo was confirmed by immunofluorescence analysis of cryostat sections. However, cultured embryonic rat central neurons showed no detectable binding of B2C11. Cultured brain cells containing glial fibrillary acidic protein (astrocytes) and also oligodendrocytes cultured from corpus collosum did bind B2C11 on their surfaces. B2C11 immunoprecipitation of detergent-solubilized membrane proteins from both lactoperoxidase iodinated C6 and PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells indicated a single band with an apparent molecular weight of 21,000-23,000. Analysis of B2C11 binding to particulate protein preparations from adult rat organs showed highest specific activity in dorsal root ganglia. Other neural tissues had substantial binding. Some nonneural tissues (lung, kidney, and small intestine) expressed significant antigen levels, whereas others (heart, liver, and skeletal muscle) had a B2C11 antigen-specific activity less than 5% of that of dorsal root ganglia. Thus the B2C11 antigen is enriched in neural tissues, where it is found on the surfaces of a unique set of neuronal and glial cells.

  16. Anthrax Toxin Protective Antigen: Inhibition of Channel Function by Chloroquine and Related Compounds and Study of Binding Kinetics Using the Current Noise Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Orlik, Frank; Schiffler, Bettina; Benz, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA) of the tripartite anthrax toxin binds to a cell surface receptor and mediates the transport of two enzymatic components, edema factor and lethal factor, into the cytosol of host cells. Here recombinant PA63 from Bacillus anthracis was reconstituted into artificial lipid bilayer membranes and formed ion permeable channels. The heptameric PA63-channel contains a binding site for 4-aminoquinolones, which block ion transport through PA in vitro. This result allowed a detailed investigation of ligand binding and the stability constants for the binding of chloroquine, fluphenazine, and quinacrine to the binding site inside the PA63-channel were determined using titration experiments. Open PA63-channels exhibit 1/f noise in the frequency range between 1 and 100 Hz, whereas the spectral density of the ligand-induced current noise was of Lorentzian type. The analysis of the power density spectra allowed the evaluation of the on- and off-rate constants (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}k_{1}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}k_{-1}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) of ligand binding. The on-rate constants of ligand binding were between 106 and 108 M−1 s−1 and were dependent on the ionic strength of the aqueous phase, sidedness of ligand addition, as well as the orientation and intensity of the applied electric field. The off-rates varied between ∼10 s−1 and 2600 s−1 and depended mainly on the structure of the ligand. PMID:15596516

  17. Effects of simian virus 40 large and small tumor antigens on mammalian target of rapamycin signaling: small tumor antigen mediates hypophosphorylation of eIF4E-binding protein 1 late in infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongjun; Kudchodkar, Sagar B; Alwine, James C

    2005-06-01

    We report that late in a simian virus 40 (SV40) infection in CV-1 cells, there are significant decreases in phosphorylations of two mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling effectors, the eIF4E-binding protein (4E-BP1) and p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K). The hypophosphorylation of 4E-BP1 results in 4E-BP1 binding to eIF4E, leading to the inhibition of cap-dependent translation. The dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 is specifically mediated by SV40 small t antigen and requires the protein phosphatase 2A binding domain but not an active DnaJ domain. Serum-starved primary African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells also showed decreased phosphorylations of mTOR, 4E-BP1, and p70S6K at late times in infection (48 h postinfection [hpi]). However, at earlier times (12 and 24 hpi), in AGMK cells, phosphorylated p70S6K was moderately increased, correlating with a significant increase in phosphorylation of the p70S6K substrate, ribosomal protein S6. Hyperphosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at early times could not be determined, since hyperphosphorylated 4E-BP1 was present in mock-infected AGMK cells. Elevated levels of phosphorylated eIF4G, a third mTOR effector, were detected in both CV-1 and AGMK cells at all times after infection, indicating that eIF4G phosphorylation was induced throughout the infection and unaffected by small t antigen. The data suggest that during SV40 lytic infection in monkey cells, the phosphorylations of p70S6K, S6, and eIF4G are increased early in the infection (12 and 24 hpi), but late in the infection (48 hpi), the phosphorylations of mTOR, p70S6K, and 4E-BP1 are dramatically decreased by a mechanism mediated, at least in part, by small t antigen.

  18. Effects of Simian Virus 40 Large and Small Tumor Antigens on Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling: Small Tumor Antigen Mediates Hypophosphorylation of eIF4E-Binding Protein 1 Late in Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yongjun; Kudchodkar, Sagar B.; Alwine, James C.

    2005-01-01

    We report that late in a simian virus 40 (SV40) infection in CV-1 cells, there are significant decreases in phosphorylations of two mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling effectors, the eIF4E-binding protein (4E-BP1) and p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K). The hypophosphorylation of 4E-BP1 results in 4E-BP1 binding to eIF4E, leading to the inhibition of cap-dependent translation. The dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 is specifically mediated by SV40 small t antigen and requires the protein phosphatase 2A binding domain but not an active DnaJ domain. Serum-starved primary African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells also showed decreased phosphorylations of mTOR, 4E-BP1, and p70S6K at late times in infection (48 h postinfection [hpi]). However, at earlier times (12 and 24 hpi), in AGMK cells, phosphorylated p70S6K was moderately increased, correlating with a significant increase in phosphorylation of the p70S6K substrate, ribosomal protein S6. Hyperphosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at early times could not be determined, since hyperphosphorylated 4E-BP1 was present in mock-infected AGMK cells. Elevated levels of phosphorylated eIF4G, a third mTOR effector, were detected in both CV-1 and AGMK cells at all times after infection, indicating that eIF4G phosphorylation was induced throughout the infection and unaffected by small t antigen. The data suggest that during SV40 lytic infection in monkey cells, the phosphorylations of p70S6K, S6, and eIF4G are increased early in the infection (12 and 24 hpi), but late in the infection (48 hpi), the phosphorylations of mTOR, p70S6K, and 4E-BP1 are dramatically decreased by a mechanism mediated, at least in part, by small t antigen. PMID:15890927

  19. Thermodynamic Switch in Binding of Adhesion/Growth Regulatory Human Galectin-3 to Tumor-Associated TF Antigen (CD176) and MUC1 Glycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A shift to short-chain glycans is an observed change in mucin-type O-glycosylation in premalignant and malignant epithelia. Given the evidence that human galectin-3 can interact with mucins and also weakly with free tumor-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) antigen (CD176), the study of its interaction with MUC1 (glyco)peptides is of biomedical relevance. Glycosylated MUC1 fragments that carry the TF antigen attached through either Thr or Ser side chains were synthesized using standard Fmoc-based automated solid-phase peptide chemistry. The dissociation constants (Kd) for interaction of galectin-3 and the glycosylated MUC1 fragments measured by isothermal titration calorimetry decreased up to 10 times in comparison to that of the free TF disaccharide. No binding was observed for the nonglycosylated control version of the MUC1 peptide. The most notable feature of the binding of MUC1 glycopeptides to galectin-3 was a shift from a favorable enthalpy to an entropy-driven binding process. The comparatively diminished enthalpy contribution to the free energy (ΔG) was compensated by a considerable gain in the entropic term. 1H–15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence spectroscopy nuclear magnetic resonance data reveal contact at the canonical site mainly by the glycan moiety of the MUC1 glycopeptide. Ligand-dependent differences in binding affinities were also confirmed by a novel assay for screening of low-affinity glycan–lectin interactions based on AlphaScreen technology. Another key finding is that the glycosylated MUC1 peptides exhibited activity in a concentration-dependent manner in cell-based assays revealing selectivity among human galectins. Thus, the presentation of this tumor-associated carbohydrate ligand by the natural peptide scaffold enhances its affinity, highlighting the significance of model studies of human lectins with synthetic glycopeptides. PMID:26129647

  20. Th1 cytokines promote T-cell binding to antigen-presenting cells via enhanced hyaluronan production and accumulation at the immune synapse

    PubMed Central

    Bollyky, Paul L; Evanko, Stephen P; Wu, Rebecca P; Potter-Perigo, Susan; Long, S Alice; Kinsella, Brian; Reijonen, Helena; Guebtner, Kelly; Teng, Brandon; Chan, Christina K; Braun, Kathy R; Gebe, John A; Nepom, Gerald T; Wight, Thomas N

    2010-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) production by dendritic cells (DCs) is known to promote antigen presentation and to augment T-cell activation and proliferation. We hypothesized that pericellular HA can function as intercellular ‘glue' directly mediating T cell–DC binding. Using primary human cells, we observed HA-dependent binding between T cells and DCs, which was abrogated upon pre-treatment of the DCs with 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), an agent which blocks HA synthesis. Furthermore, T cells regulate HA production by DCs via T cell-derived cytokines in a T helper (Th) subset-specific manner, as demonstrated by the observation that cell-culture supernatants from Th1 but not Th2 clones promote HA production. Similar effects were seen upon the addition of exogenous Th1 cytokines, IL-2, interferon γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). The critical factors which determined the extent of DC–T cell binding in this system were the nature of the pre-treatment the DCs received and their capacity to synthesize HA, as T-cell clones which were pre-treated with monensin, added to block cytokine secretion, bound equivalently irrespective of their Th subset. These data support the existence of a feedforward loop wherein T-cell cytokines influence DC production of HA, which in turn affects the extent of DC–T cell binding. We also document the presence of focal deposits of HA at the immune synapse between T-cells and APC and on dendritic processes thought to be important in antigen presentation. These data point to a pivotal role for HA in DC–T cell interactions at the IS. PMID:20228832

  1. Th1 cytokines promote T-cell binding to antigen-presenting cells via enhanced hyaluronan production and accumulation at the immune synapse.

    PubMed

    Bollyky, Paul L; Evanko, Stephen P; Wu, Rebecca P; Potter-Perigo, Susan; Long, S Alice; Kinsella, Brian; Reijonen, Helena; Guebtner, Kelly; Teng, Brandon; Chan, Christina K; Braun, Kathy R; Gebe, John A; Nepom, Gerald T; Wight, Thomas N

    2010-05-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) production by dendritic cells (DCs) is known to promote antigen presentation and to augment T-cell activation and proliferation. We hypothesized that pericellular HA can function as intercellular 'glue' directly mediating T cell-DC binding. Using primary human cells, we observed HA-dependent binding between T cells and DCs, which was abrogated upon pre-treatment of the DCs with 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), an agent which blocks HA synthesis. Furthermore, T cells regulate HA production by DCs via T cell-derived cytokines in a T helper (Th) subset-specific manner, as demonstrated by the observation that cell-culture supernatants from Th1 but not Th2 clones promote HA production. Similar effects were seen upon the addition of exogenous Th1 cytokines, IL-2, interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). The critical factors which determined the extent of DC-T cell binding in this system were the nature of the pre-treatment the DCs received and their capacity to synthesize HA, as T-cell clones which were pre-treated with monensin, added to block cytokine secretion, bound equivalently irrespective of their Th subset. These data support the existence of a feedforward loop wherein T-cell cytokines influence DC production of HA, which in turn affects the extent of DC-T cell binding. We also document the presence of focal deposits of HA at the immune synapse between T-cells and APC and on dendritic processes thought to be important in antigen presentation. These data point to a pivotal role for HA in DC-T cell interactions at the IS.

  2. Binding Properties of Streptococcus gordonii SspA and SspB (Antigen I/II Family) Polypeptides Expressed on the Cell Surface of Lactococcus lactis MG1363

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Ann R.; Gilbert, Christophe; Wells, Jeremy M.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    1998-01-01

    The oral bacterium Streptococcus gordonii expresses two cell wall-associated polypeptides, designated SspA (1,542 amino acid residues) and SspB (1,462 amino acid residues), that have 70% sequence identity. These polypeptides are members of the antigen I/II family of oral streptococcal adhesins and mediate the binding of streptococci to salivary glycoproteins, collagen, and other oral microorganisms such as Actinomyces naeslundii. To determine if SspA and SspB have differential binding properties, the coding sequences of the sspA and sspB genes were cloned into expression plasmid vector pTREX1-usp45LS to generate pTREX1-sspA and pTREX1-sspB, respectively, and the Ssp polypeptides were displayed on the cell surface of Lactococcus lactis MG1363. Lactococcal cells expressing similar levels of surface SspA or SspB polypeptide were then compared for their abilities to adhere to a range of antigen I/II polypeptide substrates. More than twice as many L. lactis cells expressing SspA bound to immobilized salivary agglutinin glycoprotein (SAG) as did L. lactis cells expressing SspB. In contrast, lactococci expressing SspB adhered twice as well as lactococci producing SspA to collagen type I and to Candida albicans. The binding of A. naeslundii to lactococci was only weakly enhanced by surface expression of Ssp polypeptides. L. lactis(pTREX1-sspB) cells bound in greater numbers to SAG than did Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2 cells expressing SspB from pAM401EB-5. The results suggest that SspA and SspB have markedly different binding affinities for their oral substrates and thus may function to promote site diversity in colonization by S. gordonii. PMID:9746559

  3. Neisseria gonorrhoeae RecQ helicase HRDC domains are essential for efficient binding and unwinding of the pilE guanine quartet structure required for pilin antigenic variation.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, Laty A; Manthei, Kelly A; Rotman, Ella; Keck, James L; Seifert, H Steven

    2013-05-01

    The strict human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae utilizes homologous recombination to antigenically vary the pilus, thus evading the host immune response. High-frequency gene conversion reactions between many silent pilin loci and the expressed pilin locus (pilE) allow for numerous pilus variants per strain to be produced from a single strain. For pilin antigenic variation (Av) to occur, a guanine quartet (G4) structure must form upstream of pilE. The RecQ helicase is one of several recombination or repair enzymes required for efficient levels of pilin Av, and RecQ family members have been shown to bind to and unwind G4 structures. Additionally, the vast majority of RecQ helicase family members encode one "helicase and RNase D C-terminal" (HRDC) domain, whereas the N. gonorrhoeae RecQ helicase gene encodes three HRDC domains, which are critical for pilin Av. Here, we confirm that deletion of RecQ HRDC domains 2 and 3 causes a decrease in the frequency of pilin Av comparable to that obtained with a functional knockout. We demonstrate that the N. gonorrhoeae RecQ helicase can bind and unwind the pilE G4 structure. Deletion of the RecQ HRDC domains 2 and 3 resulted in a decrease in G4 structure binding and unwinding. These data suggest that the decrease in pilin Av observed in the RecQ HRDC domain 2 and 3 deletion mutant is a result of the enzyme's inability to efficiently bind and unwind the pilE G4 structure.

  4. Selective binding of CD4 and CD8 T-cells to antigen presenting cells for enrichment of CMV and HIV specific T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Li Pira, Giuseppina; Ivaldi, Federico; Manca, Fabrizio

    2012-02-28

    Adherent antigen presenting cells (APC) pulsed with protein or peptide antigens were used to capture specific CD4 or CD8 T-cells derived from established T-cell lines or from PBMC of immune subjects based on physiological interaction between TCR and MHC-peptide complex. This method could be applied independently of epitope specificity, HLA restriction alleles, activation markers and secreted cytokines, parameters required by other methods for selection of specific T cells. Non specific T-cells were removed by applying a 1g force that did not affect binding of specific T-lymphocytes. Lymphocyte selection was specific and the average recovery was 36% for CD4 T-cells. CD8 T-cells proved trickier to purify, since solid phase APC were recognized as targets for cytotoxicity. Specificity was comparable to CD4 cells, but the average recovery for CD8 cells was 26%. No residual alloreactivity was detected in expanded T-cells. Frequency and recovery of specific T-cells were comparable to other current technologies, such as generation of T-cell lines and cytokine capture method. Since antigen and IL2 are the only reagents added to the cultures, this physiological procedure can be proposed for selection and expansion of pathogen specific T-cells not only for research purposes, but also for adoptive reconstitution of immunocompromised subjects if performed under GMP conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. ESCRT-0 assembles as a heterotetrameric complex on membranes and binds multiple ubiquitinylated cargoes simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Mayers, Jonathan R; Fyfe, Ian; Schuh, Amber L; Chapman, Edwin R; Edwardson, J Michael; Audhya, Anjon

    2011-03-18

    The ESCRT machinery consists of multiple protein complexes that collectively participate in the biogenesis of multivesicular endosomes (MVEs). The ESCRT-0 complex is composed of two subunits, Hrs and STAM, both of which can engage ubiquitinylated substrates destined for lysosomal degradation. Here, we conduct a comprehensive analysis of ESCRT-0:ubiquitin interactions using isothermal titration calorimetry and define the affinity of each ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) within the intact ESCRT-0 complex. Our data demonstrate that ubiquitin binding is non-cooperative between the ESCRT-0 UBDs. Additionally, our findings show that the affinity of the Hrs double ubiquitin interacting motif (DUIM) for ubiquitin is more than 2-fold greater than that of UBDs found in STAM, suggesting that Hrs functions as the major ubiquitin-binding protein in ESCRT-0. In vivo, Hrs and STAM localize to endosomal membranes. To study recombinant ESCRT-0 assembly on lipid bilayers, we used atomic force microscopy. Our data show that ESCRT-0 forms mostly heterodimers and heterotetramers of Hrs and STAM when analyzed in the presence of membranes. Consistent with these findings, hydrodynamic analysis of endogenous ESCRT-0 indicates that it exists largely as a heterotetrameric complex of its two subunits. Based on these data, we present a revised model for ESCRT-0 function in cargo recruitment and concentration at the endosome.

  6. RNA synthesis is associated with multiple TBP-chromatin binding events

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Hussain A.; Auble, David T.; Bekiranov, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Competition ChIP is an experimental method that allows transcription factor (TF) chromatin turnover dynamics to be measured across a genome. We develop and apply a physical model of TF-chromatin competitive binding using chemical reaction rate theory and are able to derive the physical half-life or residence time for TATA-binding protein (TBP) across the yeast genome from competition ChIP data. Using our physical modeling approach where we explicitly include the induction profile of the competitor in the model, we are able to estimate yeast TBP-chromatin residence times as short as 1.3 minutes, demonstrating that competition ChIP is a relatively high temporal-resolution approach. Strikingly, we find a median value of ~5 TBP-chromatin binding events associated with the synthesis of one RNA molecule across Pol II genes, suggesting multiple rounds of pre-initiation complex assembly and disassembly before productive elongation of Pol II is achieved at most genes in the yeast genome. PMID:28051102

  7. Hyperactive antifreeze protein from fish contains multiple ice-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Graham, Laurie A; Marshall, Christopher B; Lin, Feng-Hsu; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2008-02-19

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are produced to prevent freezing in many fish species that are exposed to icy seawater. There are a number of nonhomologous types of AFPs, diverse in both sequence and structure, which share the function of binding to ice and inhibiting its growth. We recently discovered a hyperactive AFP in the winter flounder and related species that is many-fold more active than other fish AFPs. Like the 3-4-kDa type I AFPs, it is alanine-rich and highly helical, but this 17-kDa protein is considerably larger and forms a dimer. We have sequenced the cDNA encoding this new AFP to gain insight into its structure and evolutionary relationship to the type I AFP family. The gene is clearly homologous to the righteye flounder type I AFP genes. Thus we have designated this protein "hyperactive type I AFP" (hyp-type I). The sequence of hyp-type I AFP supports a structural model in which two extended 195-amino acid alpha-helices form an amphipathic homodimer with a series of linked Ala- and Thr-rich patches on the surface of the dimer, each of which resembles ice-binding sites of type I AFPs. The superior activity of hyp-type I AFP may derive from the large combined surface area of the ice-binding sites, recognition of multiple planes of ice, and protection of the basal plane from ice growth.

  8. The hippocampus supports multiple cognitive processes through relational binding and comparison

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Rosanna K.; Moses, Sandra N.; Riggs, Lily; Ryan, Jennifer D.

    2012-01-01

    It has been well established that the hippocampus plays a pivotal role in explicit long-term recognition memory. However, findings from amnesia, lesion and recording studies with non-human animals, eye-movement recording studies, and functional neuroimaging have recently converged upon a similar message: the functional reach of the hippocampus extends far beyond explicit recognition memory. Damage to the hippocampus affects performance on a number of cognitive tasks including recognition memory after short and long delays and visual discrimination. Additionally, with the advent of neuroimaging techniques that have fine spatial and temporal resolution, findings have emerged that show the elicitation of hippocampal responses within the first few 100 ms of stimulus/task onset. These responses occur for novel and previously viewed information during a time when perceptual processing is traditionally thought to occur, and long before overt recognition responses are made. We propose that the hippocampus is obligatorily involved in the binding of disparate elements across both space and time, and in the comparison of such relational memory representations. Furthermore, the hippocampus supports relational binding and comparison with or without conscious awareness for the relational representations that are formed, retrieved and/or compared. It is by virtue of these basic binding and comparison functions that the reach of the hippocampus extends beyond long-term recognition memory and underlies task performance in multiple cognitive domains. PMID:22661938

  9. Nucleobindin 1 binds to multiple types of pre-fibrillar amyloid and inhibits fibrillization

    PubMed Central

    Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Barbash, Shahar; Sakmar, Thomas P.; Graham, W Vallen

    2017-01-01

    During amyloid fibril formation, amyloidogenic polypeptides misfold and self assemble into soluble pre-fibrillar aggregates, i.e., protofibrils, which elongate and mature into insoluble fibrillar aggregates. An emerging class of chaperones, chaperone-like amyloid binding proteins (CLABPs), has been shown to interfere with aggregation of particular misfolded amyloid peptides or proteins. We have discovered that the calcium-binding protein nuclebindin-1 (NUCB1) is a novel CLABP. We show that NUCB1 inhibits aggregation of islet-amyloid polypeptide associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a-synuclein associated with Parkinson’s disease, transthyretin V30M mutant associated with familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and Aβ42 associated with Alzheimer’s disease by stabilizing their respective protofibril intermediates. Kinetic studies employing the modeling software AmyloFit show that NUCB1 affects both primary nucleation and secondary nucleation. We hypothesize that NUCB1 binds to the common cross-β-sheet structure of protofibril aggregates to “cap” and stabilize soluble macromolecular complexes. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were employed to characterize the size, shape and volume distribution of multiple sources of NUCB1-capped protofibrils. Interestingly, NUCB1 prevents Aβ42 protofibril toxicity in a cellular assay. NUCB1-stabilized amyloid protofibrils could be used as immunogens to prepare conformation-specific antibodies and as novel tools to develop screens for anti-protofibril diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:28220836

  10. dCaP: detecting differential binding events in multiple conditions and proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Current ChIP-seq studies are interested in comparing multiple epigenetic profiles across several cell types and tissues simultaneously for studying constitutive and differential regulation. Simultaneous analysis of multiple epigenetic features in many samples can gain substantial power and specificity than analyzing individual features and/or samples separately. Yet there are currently few tools can perform joint inference of constitutive and differential regulation in multi-feature-multi-condition contexts with statistical testing. Existing tools either test regulatory variation for one factor in multiple samples at a time, or for multiple factors in one or two samples. Many of them only identify binary rather than quantitative variation, which are sensitive to threshold choices. Results We propose a novel and powerful method called dCaP for simultaneously detecting constitutive and differential regulation of multiple epigenetic factors in multiple samples. Using simulation, we demonstrate the superior power of dCaP compared to existing methods. We then apply dCaP to two datasets from human and mouse ENCODE projects to demonstrate its utility. We show in the human dataset that the cell-type specific regulatory loci detected by dCaP are significantly enriched near genes with cell-type specific functions and disease relevance. We further show in the mouse dataset that dCaP captures genomic regions showing significant signal variations for TAL1 occupancy between two mouse erythroid cell lines. The novel TAL1 occupancy loci detected only by dCaP are highly enriched with GATA1 occupancy and differential gene expression, while those detected only by other methods are not. Conclusions Here, we developed a novel approach to utilize the cooperative property of proteins to detect differential binding given multivariate ChIP-seq samples to provide better power, aiming for complementing existing approaches and providing new insights in the method development in

  11. dCaP: detecting differential binding events in multiple conditions and proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Bei; Hardison, Ross; Zhang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Current ChIP-seq studies are interested in comparing multiple epigenetic profiles across several cell types and tissues simultaneously for studying constitutive and differential regulation. Simultaneous analysis of multiple epigenetic features in many samples can gain substantial power and specificity than analyzing individual features and/or samples separately. Yet there are currently few tools can perform joint inference of constitutive and differential regulation in multi-feature-multi-condition contexts with statistical testing. Existing tools either test regulatory variation for one factor in multiple samples at a time, or for multiple factors in one or two samples. Many of them only identify binary rather than quantitative variation, which are sensitive to threshold choices. We propose a novel and powerful method called dCaP for simultaneously detecting constitutive and differential regulation of multiple epigenetic factors in multiple samples. Using simulation, we demonstrate the superior power of dCaP compared to existing methods. We then apply dCaP to two datasets from human and mouse ENCODE projects to demonstrate its utility. We show in the human dataset that the cell-type specific regulatory loci detected by dCaP are significantly enriched near genes with cell-type specific functions and disease relevance. We further show in the mouse dataset that dCaP captures genomic regions showing significant signal variations for TAL1 occupancy between two mouse erythroid cell lines. The novel TAL1 occupancy loci detected only by dCaP are highly enriched with GATA1 occupancy and differential gene expression, while those detected only by other methods are not. Here, we developed a novel approach to utilize the cooperative property of proteins to detect differential binding given multivariate ChIP-seq samples to provide better power, aiming for complementing existing approaches and providing new insights in the method development in this field.

  12. Multiple label-free biodetection and quantitative DNA-binding assays on a nanomechanical cantilever array.

    PubMed

    McKendry, Rachel; Zhang, Jiayun; Arntz, Youri; Strunz, Torsten; Hegner, Martin; Lang, Hans Peter; Baller, Marko K; Certa, Ulrich; Meyer, Ernst; Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim; Gerber, Christoph

    2002-07-23

    We report a microarray of cantilevers to detect multiple unlabeled biomolecules simultaneously at nanomolar concentrations within minutes. Ligand-receptor binding interactions such as DNA hybridization or protein recognition occurring on microfabricated silicon cantilevers generate nanomechanical bending, which is detected optically in situ. Differential measurements including reference cantilevers on an array of eight sensors can sequence-specifically detect unlabeled DNA targets in 80-fold excess of nonmatching DNA as a background and discriminate 3' and 5' overhangs. Our experiments suggest that the nanomechanical motion originates from predominantly steric hindrance effects and depends on the concentration of DNA molecules in solution. We show that cantilever arrays can be used to investigate the thermodynamics of biomolecular interactions mechanically, and we have found that the specificity of the reaction on a cantilever is consistent with solution data. Hence cantilever arrays permit multiple binding assays in parallel and can detect femtomoles of DNA on the cantilever at a DNA concentration in solution of 75 nM.

  13. Multiple label-free biodetection and quantitative DNA-binding assays on a nanomechanical cantilever array

    PubMed Central

    McKendry, Rachel; Zhang, Jiayun; Arntz, Youri; Strunz, Torsten; Hegner, Martin; Lang, Hans Peter; Baller, Marko K.; Certa, Ulrich; Meyer, Ernst; Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim; Gerber, Christoph

    2002-01-01

    We report a microarray of cantilevers to detect multiple unlabeled biomolecules simultaneously at nanomolar concentrations within minutes. Ligand-receptor binding interactions such as DNA hybridization or protein recognition occurring on microfabricated silicon cantilevers generate nanomechanical bending, which is detected optically in situ. Differential measurements including reference cantilevers on an array of eight sensors can sequence-specifically detect unlabeled DNA targets in 80-fold excess of nonmatching DNA as a background and discriminate 3′ and 5′ overhangs. Our experiments suggest that the nanomechanical motion originates from predominantly steric hindrance effects and depends on the concentration of DNA molecules in solution. We show that cantilever arrays can be used to investigate the thermodynamics of biomolecular interactions mechanically, and we have found that the specificity of the reaction on a cantilever is consistent with solution data. Hence cantilever arrays permit multiple binding assays in parallel and can detect femtomoles of DNA on the cantilever at a DNA concentration in solution of 75 nM. PMID:12119412

  14. The Association of HLA Class 1 and Class 2 Antigens with Multiple Myeloma in Iranian Patients.

    PubMed

    Sayad, Arezou; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; Mehdizadeh, Mahshid; Roshandel, Elham; Abedinpour, Soheila; Hajifathali, Abbas

    2014-12-05

    Amaç: Multiple myeloma (MM), malign plazma hürelerinin klonal çoğalması ile karakterize bir B hücre neoplazisidir. Çeşitli çalışmaların sonuçlarına göre, bazı sınıf 1 ve 2 HLA genlerinin hastalığa yatkınlık sağladığına dair görüşler ortaya atılmıştır. Farklı popülasyonlarda yapılan çalışmalarda, farklı HLA sınıf 1 ve 2 allellerinin MM üzerine etkisi olduğu bildirilmiştir. Bu çalışmada, İranlı MM hastalarında HLA sınıf 1 ve sınıf 2 antijenlerinin birlikteliğini değerlendirdik. Gereç ve Yöntemler: HLA-Ready Gene ABDR kitleriyle tekli spesifik primer polimeraz zincir reaksiyonu yönteminin kullanıldığı bu olgu-kontrol genetiplendirme çalışmasında, hasta grubuna Taleghani Hastanesi kemik iliği nakli bölümünden seçilen 105 İranlı MM hastası ve 150 de kontrol olgusu dahil edilmiştir.Bulgular: Çalışma sonucunda, HLA-A*03 hasta grubunda %21 ve kontrol grubunda %12 bulunurken, HLA-B*18 ise hasta grubunda %11 ve kontrol grubunda %3 olarak saptanmıştır. MM hastalarının HLA-A*03 ve HLA-B*18 allele sahip olma oranı kontrol olgularıyla karşılaştırıldığında istatistiki olarak anlamlı olacak şekilde yüksek bulunmuştur (p=0,039, OR=2,057 ve p=0,013, OR=3,567, sırasıyla). Sonuç: Bizim bulgularımız, İran toplumunda HLA-A*03 ve HLA-B*18 allel varlığının istatistiki olarak anlamlı olacak şekilde MM’ye yatkınlık yarattığını ortaya koymaktadır. Bununla birlikte, diğer toplumlara bakıldığında adı geçen allellerin aynı sonucu doğurmadıkları görülmektedir. Farklı etnik gruplar arasındaki bu birlikteliği değerlendiren fazla sayıda çalışma olmadığı için, gelecek dönemlerde MM’li hastalarda HLA genlerinin birlikteliğinin sonuçlarını izah edebilecek daha ayrıntılı çalışmalara gereksinim vardır.

  15. Cloning, expression and purification of binding domains of lethal factor and protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis in Escherichia coli and evaluation of their related murine antibody.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Mehdi; Honari, Hossein; Kooshk, Mohammad Reza Ashrafi

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax is common disease between human and animals caused by Bacillus anthracis. The cell binding domain of protective antigen (PAD4) and the binding domain of lethal factor (LFD1) have high immunogenicity potential and always were considered as a vaccine candidate against anthrax. The aims of this study are cloning and expressing of PAD4 and LFD1 in Escherichia coli, purification of the recombinant proteins and determination of their immunogenicity through evaluating of the relative produced polyclonal antibodies in mice. PAD4 and LFD1 genes were cloned in pET28a(+) vector and expressed in E. coli Bl21(DE3)PlysS. Expression and purification of the two recombinant proteins were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting techniques. The PAD4 and LFD1 were purified using Ni(+)-NTA affinity chromatography (95-98 %), yielding 37.5 and 45 mg/l of culture, respectively. The antigens were injected three times into mice and production of relative antibodies was evaluated by ELISA test. The results showed that both PAD4 and LFD1 are immunogenic, but LFD1 has higher potential to stimulate Murine immune system. With regard to the high level of LFD1 and PAD4 expression and also significant increment in produced polyclonal antibodies, these recombinant proteins can be considered as a recombinant vaccine candidate against anthrax.

  16. Insights into the initiation of JC virus DNA replication derived from the crystal structure of the T-antigen origin binding domain.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul J; Kalekar, Radha; Shin, Jong; Archambault, Jacques; Bohm, Andrew; Bullock, Peter A

    2014-02-01

    JC virus is a member of the Polyomavirus family of DNA tumor viruses and the causative agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). PML is a disease that occurs primarily in people who are immunocompromised and is usually fatal. As with other Polyomavirus family members, the replication of JC virus (JCV) DNA is dependent upon the virally encoded protein T-antigen. To further our understanding of JCV replication, we have determined the crystal structure of the origin-binding domain (OBD) of JCV T-antigen. This structure provides the first molecular understanding of JCV T-ag replication functions; for example, it suggests how the JCV T-ag OBD site-specifically binds to the major groove of GAGGC sequences in the origin. Furthermore, these studies suggest how the JCV OBDs interact during subsequent oligomerization events. We also report that the OBD contains a novel "pocket"; which sequesters the A1 & B2 loops of neighboring molecules. Mutagenesis of a residue in the pocket associated with the JCV T-ag OBD interfered with viral replication. Finally, we report that relative to the SV40 OBD, the surface of the JCV OBD contains one hemisphere that is highly conserved and one that is highly variable.

  17. Insights into the Initiation of JC Virus DNA Replication Derived from the Crystal Structure of the T-Antigen Origin Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul J.; Kalekar, Radha; Shin, Jong; Archambault, Jacques; Bohm, Andrew; Bullock, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    JC virus is a member of the Polyomavirus family of DNA tumor viruses and the causative agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). PML is a disease that occurs primarily in people who are immunocompromised and is usually fatal. As with other Polyomavirus family members, the replication of JC virus (JCV) DNA is dependent upon the virally encoded protein T-antigen. To further our understanding of JCV replication, we have determined the crystal structure of the origin-binding domain (OBD) of JCV T-antigen. This structure provides the first molecular understanding of JCV T-ag replication functions; for example, it suggests how the JCV T-ag OBD site-specifically binds to the major groove of GAGGC sequences in the origin. Furthermore, these studies suggest how the JCV OBDs interact during subsequent oligomerization events. We also report that the OBD contains a novel “pocket”; which sequesters the A1 & B2 loops of neighboring molecules. Mutagenesis of a residue in the pocket associated with the JCV T-ag OBD interfered with viral replication. Finally, we report that relative to the SV40 OBD, the surface of the JCV OBD contains one hemisphere that is highly conserved and one that is highly variable. PMID:24586168

  18. The brain antigen-specific B cell response correlates with glatiramer acetate responsiveness in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Rovituso, Damiano M.; Duffy, Cathrina E.; Schroeter, Michael; Kaiser, Claudia C.; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Bayas, Antonios; Elsner, Rebecca; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    B cells have only recently begun to attract attention in the immunopathology of multiple sclerosis (MS). Suitable markers for the prediction of treatment success with immunomodulatory drugs are still missing. Here we evaluated the B cell response to brain antigens in n = 34 relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) patients treated with glatiramer acetate (GA) using the enzyme-linked immunospot technique (ELISPOT). Our data demonstrate that patients can be subdivided into responders that show brain-specific B cell reactivity in the blood and patients without this reactivity. Only in patients that classified as B cell responders, there was a significant positive correlation between treatment duration and the time since last relapse in our study. This correlation was GA-specific because it was absent in a control group that consisted of interferon-ß (IFN-β)-treated RRMS patients (n = 23). These data suggest that GA has an effect on brain-reactive B cells in a subset of patients and that only this subset benefits from treatment. The detection of brain-reactive B cells is likely to be a suitable tool to identify drug responders. PMID:26387426

  19. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis of Pug dogs associates with dog leukocyte antigen class II and resembles acute variant forms of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Greer, K A; Wong, A K; Liu, H; Famula, T R; Pedersen, N C; Ruhe, A; Wallace, M; Neff, M W

    2010-08-01

    Necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) is a disorder of Pug Dogs that appears to have an immune etiology and high heritability based on population studies. The present study was undertaken to identify a genetic basis for the disease. A genome-wide association scan with single tandem repeat (STR) markers showed a single strong association near the dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) complex on CFA12. Fine resolution mapping with 27 STR markers on CFA12 further narrowed association to the region containing DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and, -DQB1 genes. Sequencing confirmed that affected dogs were more likely to be homozygous for specific alleles at each locus and that these alleles were linked, forming a single high risk haplotype. The strong DLA class II association of NME in Pug Dogs resembles that of human multiple sclerosis (MS). Like MS, NME appears to have an autoimmune basis, involves genetic and nongenetic factors, has a relatively low incidence, is more frequent in females than males, and is associated with a vascularly orientated nonsuppurative inflammation. However, NME of Pug Dogs is more aggressive in disease course than classical human MS, appears to be relatively earlier in onset, and involves necrosis rather than demyelination as the central pathobiologic feature. Thus, Pug Dog encephalitis (PDE) shares clinical features with the less common acute variant forms of MS. Accordingly, NME of Pug Dogs may represent a naturally occurring canine model of certain idiopathic inflammatory disorders of the human central nervous system.

  20. Multiple Ca2+ Binding Sites in the Extracellular Domain of Ca2+-Sensing Receptor Corresponding to Cooperative Ca2+ Response†

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun; Zhou, Yubin; Castiblanco, Adriana; Yang, Wei; Brown, Edward M.; Yang, Jenny J.

    2009-01-01

    A small change in the extracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]o) integrates cell signaling responses in multiple cellular and tissue networks and functions via activation of Ca2+-sensing receptors (CaSR). Mainly through binding of Ca2+ to the large extracellular domain (ECD) of the dimeric CaSR, intracellular Ca2+ responses are highly cooperative with an apparent Hill coefficient ranging from 2 to 4. We have previously reported the identification of two continuous putative Ca2+-binding sites by grafting CaSR-derived, Ca2+-binding peptides to a scaffold protein, CD2, that does not bind Ca2+. In this paper, we predict more potential non-continuous Ca2+-binding sites in the ECD. We dissect the intact CaSR into three globular subdomains, each of which contains 2 to 3 predicted Ca2+-binding sites. This approach enables us to further understand the mechanisms underlying the binding of multiple metal ions to extended polypeptides derived from within the ECD of the CaSR, which would be anticipated to more closely mimic the structure of the native CaSR ECD. Tb3+-luminescence energy transfer, ANS fluorescence, and NMR studies show biphasic metal-binding components and Ca2+-dependent conformational changes in these subdomains. Removing the predicted Ca2+-binding ligands in site 1 and site 3 abolishes the first binding step and second binding step, respectively. Studies on these subdomains suggest the existence of multiple metal-binding sites and metal-induced conformational changes that might be responsible for switching on/off the CaSR by transition between its open inactive form and closed active form. PMID:19102677

  1. Novel anti–B-cell maturation antigen antibody-drug conjugate (GSK2857916) selectively induces killing of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Patrick A.; Acharya, Chirag; Zhong, Mike Y.; Cea, Michele; Cagnetta, Antonia; Craigen, Jenny; Yates, John; Gliddon, Louise; Fieles, William; Hoang, Bao; Tunstead, James; Christie, Amanda L.; Kung, Andrew L.; Richardson, Paul; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), highly expressed on malignant plasma cells in human multiple myeloma (MM), has not been effectively targeted with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. We here show that BCMA is universally expressed on the MM cell surface and determine specific anti-MM activity of J6M0-mcMMAF (GSK2857916), a novel humanized and afucosylated antagonistic anti-BCMA antibody-drug conjugate via a noncleavable linker. J6M0-mcMMAF specifically blocks cell growth via G2/M arrest and induces caspase 3–dependent apoptosis in MM cells, alone and in coculture with bone marrow stromal cells or various effector cells. It strongly inhibits colony formation by MM cells while sparing surrounding BCMA-negative normal cells. J6M0-mcMMAF significantly induces effector cell-mediated lysis against allogeneic or autologous patient MM cells, with increased potency and efficacy compared with the wild-type J6M0 without Fc enhancement. The antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptotic activity of J6M0-mcMMAF is further enhanced by lenalidomide. Importantly, J6M0-mcMMAF rapidly eliminates myeloma cells in subcutaneous and disseminated mouse models, and mice remain tumor-free up to 3.5 months. Furthermore, J6M0-mcMMAF recruits macrophages and mediates antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis of MM cells. Together, these results demonstrate that GSK2857916 has potent and selective anti-MM activities via multiple cytotoxic mechanisms, providing a promising next-generation immunotherapeutic in this cancer. PMID:24569262

  2. Influenza H1N1 A/Solomon Island/3/06 Virus Receptor Binding Specificity Correlates with Virus Pathogenicity, Antigenicity, and Immunogenicity in Ferrets ▿

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qi; Wang, Weijia; Cheng, Xing; Zengel, James; Jin, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Influenza viruses attach to cells via a sialic acid moiety (sialic acid receptor) that is α2-3 linked or α2-6 linked to galactose (α2-3SAL or α2-6SAL); sialic acid acts as a receptor for the virus. Using lectin staining, we demonstrated that the α2-6SAL configuration is predominant in the respiratory tract of ferrets, including trachea, bronchus, and lung alveolus tissues. Recombinant wild-type (rWT) influenza A/Solomon Island/3/06 (SI06) (H1N1) viruses were constructed to assess the impact of the hemagglutinin (HA) variations (amino acids 190 or 226) identified in natural variants on virus replication in the upper and lower respiratory tract of ferrets, as well as virus antigenicity and immunogenicity. A single amino acid change at residue 226 (from Gln to Arg) in the HA of SI06 resulted in the complete loss of binding to α2-6SAL and a concomitant loss of the virus's ability to replicate in the lower respiratory tract of ferrets. In contrast, the virus with Gln226 in the HA protein has a receptor binding preference for α2-6SAL and replicates efficiently in the lungs. There was a good correlation between viral replication in the lungs of ferrets and disease symptoms. In addition, we also showed that the 190 and 226 residues affected viral antigenicity and immunogenicity. Our data emphasize the necessity of thoroughly assessing wild-type influenza viruses for their suitability as reference strains and for carefully selecting the HA antigen for vaccine production during annual influenza vaccine evaluation processes. PMID:20200248

  3. Influenza H1N1 A/Solomon Island/3/06 virus receptor binding specificity correlates with virus pathogenicity, antigenicity, and immunogenicity in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Wang, Weijia; Cheng, Xing; Zengel, James; Jin, Hong

    2010-05-01

    Influenza viruses attach to cells via a sialic acid moiety (sialic acid receptor) that is alpha2-3 linked or alpha2-6 linked to galactose (alpha2-3SAL or alpha2-6SAL); sialic acid acts as a receptor for the virus. Using lectin staining, we demonstrated that the alpha2-6SAL configuration is predominant in the respiratory tract of ferrets, including trachea, bronchus, and lung alveolus tissues. Recombinant wild-type (rWT) influenza A/Solomon Island/3/06 (SI06) (H1N1) viruses were constructed to assess the impact of the hemagglutinin (HA) variations (amino acids 190 or 226) identified in natural variants on virus replication in the upper and lower respiratory tract of ferrets, as well as virus antigenicity and immunogenicity. A single amino acid change at residue 226 (from Gln to Arg) in the HA of SI06 resulted in the complete loss of binding to alpha2-6SAL and a concomitant loss of the virus's ability to replicate in the lower respiratory tract of ferrets. In contrast, the virus with Gln226 in the HA protein has a receptor binding preference for alpha2-6SAL and replicates efficiently in the lungs. There was a good correlation between viral replication in the lungs of ferrets and disease symptoms. In addition, we also showed that the 190 and 226 residues affected viral antigenicity and immunogenicity. Our data emphasize the necessity of thoroughly assessing wild-type influenza viruses for their suitability as reference strains and for carefully selecting the HA antigen for vaccine production during annual influenza vaccine evaluation processes.

  4. A strategy to identify linker-based modules for the allosteric regulation of antibody-antigen binding affinities of different scFvs

    PubMed Central

    Thie, Holger

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibody single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) are used in a variety of applications, such as for research, diagnosis and therapy. Essential for these applications is the extraordinary specificity, selectivity and affinity of antibody paratopes, which can also be used for efficient protein purification. However, this use is hampered by the high affinity for the protein to be purified because harsh elution conditions, which may impair folding, integrity or viability of the eluted biomaterials, are typically required. In this study, we developed a strategy to obtain structural elements that provide allosteric modulation of the affinities of different antibody scFvs for their antigen. To identify suitable allosteric modules, a complete set of cyclic permutations of calmodulin variants was generated and tested for modulation of the affinity when substituting the linker between VH and VL. Modulation of affinity induced by addition of different calmodulin-binding peptides at physiologic conditions was demonstrated for 5 of 6 tested scFvs of different specificities and antigens ranging from cell surface proteins to haptens. In addition, a variety of different modulator peptides were tested. Different structural solutions were found in respect of the optimal calmodulin permutation, the optimal peptide and the allosteric effect for scFvs binding to different antigen structures. Significantly, effective linker modules were identified for scFvs with both VH-VL and VL-VH architecture. The results suggest that this approach may offer a rapid, paratope-independent strategy to provide allosteric regulation of affinity for many other antibody scFvs. PMID:28055297

  5. Structure-based analysis of the interaction between the simian virus 40 T-antigen origin binding domain and single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul J; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Bohm, Andrew; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    The origin-binding domain (OBD) of simian virus 40 (SV40) large T-antigen (T-Ag) is essential for many of T-Ag's interactions with DNA. Nevertheless, many important issues related to DNA binding, for example, how single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) transits along the T-Ag OBD, have yet to be established. Therefore, X-ray crystallography was used to determine the costructure of the T-Ag OBD bound to DNA substrates such as the single-stranded region of a forked oligonucleotide. A second structure of the T-Ag OBD crystallized in the presence of poly(dT)(12) is also reported. To test the conclusions derived from these structures, residues identified as being involved in binding to ssDNA by crystallography or by an earlier nuclear magnetic resonance study were mutated, and their binding to DNA was characterized via fluorescence anisotropy. In addition, these mutations were introduced into full-length T-Ag, and these mutants were tested for their ability to support replication. When considered in terms of additional homology-based sequence alignments, our studies refine our understanding of how the T-Ag OBDs encoded by the polyomavirus family interact with ssDNA, a critical step during the initiation of DNA replication.

  6. Structure-Based Analysis of the Interaction between the Simian Virus 40 T-Antigen Origin Binding Domain and Single-Stranded DNA

    SciTech Connect

    G Meinke; P Phelan; A Fradet-Turcotte; A Bohm; J Archambault; P Bullock

    2011-12-31

    The origin-binding domain (OBD) of simian virus 40 (SV40) large T-antigen (T-Ag) is essential for many of T-Ag's interactions with DNA. Nevertheless, many important issues related to DNA binding, for example, how single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) transits along the T-Ag OBD, have yet to be established. Therefore, X-ray crystallography was used to determine the costructure of the T-Ag OBD bound to DNA substrates such as the single-stranded region of a forked oligonucleotide. A second structure of the T-Ag OBD crystallized in the presence of poly(dT){sub 12} is also reported. To test the conclusions derived from these structures, residues identified as being involved in binding to ssDNA by crystallography or by an earlier nuclear magnetic resonance study were mutated, and their binding to DNA was characterized via fluorescence anisotropy. In addition, these mutations were introduced into full-length T-Ag, and these mutants were tested for their ability to support replication. When considered in terms of additional homology-based sequence alignments, our studies refine our understanding of how the T-Ag OBDs encoded by the polyomavirus family interact with ssDNA, a critical step during the initiation of DNA replication.

  7. Structure-Based Analysis of the Interaction between the Simian Virus 40 T-Antigen Origin Binding Domain and Single-Stranded DNA▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul J.; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Bohm, Andrew; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    The origin-binding domain (OBD) of simian virus 40 (SV40) large T-antigen (T-Ag) is essential for many of T-Ag's interactions with DNA. Nevertheless, many important issues related to DNA binding, for example, how single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) transits along the T-Ag OBD, have yet to be established. Therefore, X-ray crystallography was used to determine the costructure of the T-Ag OBD bound to DNA substrates such as the single-stranded region of a forked oligonucleotide. A second structure of the T-Ag OBD crystallized in the presence of poly(dT)12 is also reported. To test the conclusions derived from these structures, residues identified as being involved in binding to ssDNA by crystallography or by an earlier nuclear magnetic resonance study were mutated, and their binding to DNA was characterized via fluorescence anisotropy. In addition, these mutations were introduced into full-length T-Ag, and these mutants were tested for their ability to support replication. When considered in terms of additional homology-based sequence alignments, our studies refine our understanding of how the T-Ag OBDs encoded by the polyomavirus family interact with ssDNA, a critical step during the initiation of DNA replication. PMID:20980496

  8. Binding to retinoblastoma pocket domain does not alter the inter-domain flexibility of the J domain of SV40 large T antigen.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christina K; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Hammel, Michal; Pipas, James; Chazin, Walter J

    2012-02-15

    Simian Virus 40 uses the large T antigen (Tag) to bind and inactivate retinoblastoma tumor suppressor proteins (Rb), which can result in cellular transformation. Tag is a modular protein with four domains connected by flexible linkers. The N-terminal J domain of Tag is necessary for Rb inactivation. Binding of Rb is mediated by an LXCXE consensus motif immediately C-terminal to the J domain. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) were used to study the structural dynamics and interaction of Rb with the LXCXE motif, the J domain and a construct (N(260)) extending from the J domain through the origin binding domain (OBD). NMR and SAXS data revealed substantial flexibility between the domains in N(260). Binding of pRb to a construct containing the LXCXE motif and the J domain revealed weak interactions between pRb and the J domain. Analysis of the complex of pRb and N(260) indicated that the OBD is not involved and retains its dynamic independence from the remainder of Tag. These results support a 'chaperone' model in which the J domain of Tag changes its orientation as it acts upon different protein complexes.

  9. Multiple GTP-binding proteins regulate vesicular transport from the ER to Golgi membranes

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Using indirect immunofluorescence we have examined the effects of reagents which inhibit the function of ras-related rab small GTP- binding proteins and heterotrimeric G alpha beta gamma proteins in ER to Golgi transport. Export from the ER was inhibited by an antibody towards rab1B and an NH2-terminal peptide which inhibits ARF function (Balch, W. E., R. A. Kahn, and R. Schwaninger. 1992. J. Biol. Chem. 267:13053-13061), suggesting that both of these small GTP-binding proteins are essential for the transport vesicle formation. Export from the ER was also potently inhibited by mastoparan, a peptide which mimics G protein binding regions of seven transmembrane spanning receptors activating and uncoupling heterotrimeric G proteins from their cognate receptors. Consistent with this result, purified beta gamma subunits inhibited the export of VSV-G from the ER suggesting an initial event in transport vesicle assembly was regulated by a heterotrimeric G protein. In contrast, incubation in the presence of GTP gamma S or AIF(3-5) resulted in the accumulation of transported protein in different populations of punctate pre-Golgi intermediates distributed throughout the cytoplasm of the cell. Finally, a peptide which is believed to antagonize the interaction of rab proteins with putative downstream effector molecules inhibited transport at a later step preceding delivery to the cis Golgi compartment, similar to the site of accumulation of transported protein in the absence of NSF or calcium (Plutner, H., H. W. Davidson, J. Saraste, and W. E. Balch. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 119:1097-1116). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that multiple GTP-binding proteins including a heterotrimeric G protein(s), ARF and rab1 differentially regulate steps in the transport of protein between early compartments of the secretory pathway. The concept that G protein-coupled receptors gate the export of protein from the ER is discussed. PMID:1447289

  10. Yeast ribonuclease III uses a network of multiple hydrogen bonds for RNA binding and cleavage.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Mathieu; Abou Elela, Sherif

    2008-08-19

    Members of the bacterial RNase III family recognize a variety of short structured RNAs with few common features. It is not clear how this group of enzymes supports high cleavage fidelity while maintaining a broad base of substrates. Here we show that the yeast orthologue of RNase III (Rnt1p) uses a network of 2'-OH-dependent interactions to recognize substrates with different structures. We designed a series of bipartite substrates permitting the distinction between binding and cleavage defects. Each substrate was engineered to carry a single or multiple 2'- O-methyl or 2'-fluoro ribonucleotide substitutions to prevent the formation of hydrogen bonds with a specific nucleotide or group of nucleotides. Interestingly, introduction of 2'- O-methyl ribonucleotides near the cleavage site increased the rate of catalysis, indicating that 2'-OH are not required for cleavage. Substitution of nucleotides in known Rnt1p binding site with 2'- O-methyl ribonucleotides inhibited cleavage while single 2'-fluoro ribonucleotide substitutions did not. This indicates that while no single 2'-OH is essential for Rnt1p cleavage, small changes in the substrate structure are not tolerated. Strikingly, several nucleotide substitutions greatly increased the substrate dissociation constant with little or no effect on the Michaelis-Menten constant or rate of catalysis. Together, the results indicate that Rnt1p uses a network of nucleotide interactions to identify its substrate and support two distinct modes of binding. One mode is primarily mediated by the dsRNA binding domain and leads to the formation of stable RNA/protein complex, while the other requires the presence of the nuclease and N-terminal domains and leads to RNA cleavage.

  11. Coadministration of the Three Antigenic Leishmania infantum Poly (A) Binding Proteins as a DNA Vaccine Induces Protection against Leishmania major Infection in BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Soto, Manuel; Corvo, Laura; Garde, Esther; Ramírez, Laura; Iniesta, Virginia; Bonay, Pedro; Gómez-Nieto, Carlos; González, Víctor M; Martín, M Elena; Alonso, Carlos; Coelho, Eduardo A F; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Iborra, Salvador

    2015-05-01

    Highly conserved intracellular proteins from Leishmania have been described as antigens in natural and experimental infected mammals. The present study aimed to evaluate the antigenicity and prophylactic properties of the Leishmania infantum Poly (A) binding proteins (LiPABPs). Three different members of the LiPABP family have been described. Recombinant tools based on these proteins were constructed: recombinant proteins and DNA vaccines. The three recombinant proteins were employed for coating ELISA plates. Sera from human and canine patients of visceral leishmaniasis and human patients of mucosal leishmaniasis recognized the three LiPABPs. In addition, the protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine based on the combination of the three Leishmania PABPs has been tested in a model of progressive murine leishmaniasis: BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major. The induction of a Th1-like response against the LiPABP family by genetic vaccination was able to down-regulate the IL-10 predominant responses elicited by parasite LiPABPs after infection in this murine model. This modulation resulted in a partial protection against L. major infection. LiPABP vaccinated mice showed a reduction on the pathology that was accompanied by a decrease in parasite burdens, in antibody titers against Leishmania antigens and in the IL-4 and IL-10 parasite-specific mediated responses in comparison to control mice groups immunized with saline or with the non-recombinant plasmid. The results presented here demonstrate for the first time the prophylactic properties of a new family of Leishmania antigenic intracellular proteins, the LiPABPs. The redirection of the immune response elicited against the LiPABP family (from IL-10 towards IFN-γ mediated responses) by genetic vaccination was able to induce a partial protection against the development of the disease in a highly susceptible murine model of leishmaniasis.

  12. The Myxococcus xanthus rfbABC operon encodes an ATP-binding cassette transporter homolog required for O-antigen biosynthesis and multicellular development.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, D; Bowden, M G; Pershad, R; Kaplan, H B

    1996-01-01

    A wild-type sasA locus is critical for Myxococcus xanthus multicellular development. Mutations in the sasA locus cause defective fruiting body formation, reduce sporulation, and restore developmental expression of the early A-signal-dependent gene 4521 in the absence of A signal. The wild-type sasA locus has been located on a 14-kb cloned fragment of the M. xanthus chromosome. The nucleotide sequence of a 7-kb region containing the complete sasA locus was determined. Three open reading frames encoded by the genes, designated rfbA, B and C were identified. The deduced amino acid sequences of rfbA and rfbB show identity to the integral membrane domains and ATPase domains, respectively, of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. The highest identities are to a set of predicted ABC transporters required for the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen in certain gram-negative bacteria. The rfbC gene encodes a predicted protein of 1,276 amino acids. This predicted protein contains a region of 358 amino acids that is 33.8% identical to the Yersinia enterocolitica O3 rfbH gene product, which is also required for O-antigen biosynthesis. Immunoblot analysis revealed that the sasA1 mutant, which was found to encode a nonsense codon in the beginning of rfbA, produced less O-antigen than sasA+ strains. These data indicate that the sasA locus is required for the biosynthesis of O-antigen and, when mutated, results in A-signal-independent expression of 4521. PMID:8626291

  13. Coadministration of the Three Antigenic Leishmania infantum Poly (A) Binding Proteins as a DNA Vaccine Induces Protection against Leishmania major Infection in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Corvo, Laura; Garde, Esther; Ramírez, Laura; Iniesta, Virginia; Bonay, Pedro; Gómez-Nieto, Carlos; González, Víctor M.; Martín, M. Elena; Alonso, Carlos; Coelho, Eduardo A. F.; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel

    2015-01-01

    Background Highly conserved intracellular proteins from Leishmania have been described as antigens in natural and experimental infected mammals. The present study aimed to evaluate the antigenicity and prophylactic properties of the Leishmania infantum Poly (A) binding proteins (LiPABPs). Methodology/Principal Findings Three different members of the LiPABP family have been described. Recombinant tools based on these proteins were constructed: recombinant proteins and DNA vaccines. The three recombinant proteins were employed for coating ELISA plates. Sera from human and canine patients of visceral leishmaniasis and human patients of mucosal leishmaniasis recognized the three LiPABPs. In addition, the protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine based on the combination of the three Leishmania PABPs has been tested in a model of progressive murine leishmaniasis: BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major. The induction of a Th1-like response against the LiPABP family by genetic vaccination was able to down-regulate the IL-10 predominant responses elicited by parasite LiPABPs after infection in this murine model. This modulation resulted in a partial protection against L. major infection. LiPABP vaccinated mice showed a reduction on the pathology that was accompanied by a decrease in parasite burdens, in antibody titers against Leishmania antigens and in the IL-4 and IL-10 parasite-specific mediated responses in comparison to control mice groups immunized with saline or with the non-recombinant plasmid. Conclusion/Significance The results presented here demonstrate for the first time the prophylactic properties of a new family of Leishmania antigenic intracellular proteins, the LiPABPs. The redirection of the immune response elicited against the LiPABP family (from IL-10 towards IFN-γ mediated responses) by genetic vaccination was able to induce a partial protection against the development of the disease in a highly susceptible murine model of leishmaniasis. PMID:25955652

  14. EBNA1 antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Erdur, Hebun; Scholz, Veronika; Streitz, Mathias; Hammer, Markus; Meisel, Christian; Schönemann, Constanze; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Rosche, Berit

    2016-05-15

    Epidemiological data suggests that Epstein-Barr virus may be involved in the pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). We aimed to determine the frequency of CD8+ T cells specific for one EBNA1-derived epitope (HPVGEADYFEY) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood of patients with MS and other inflammatory neurological diseases (OIND). The frequency of specific CD8+ T cells was assessed by HLA-class-I-binding pentamers restricted to HLA-B35. The frequency of HPVGEADYFEY-specific CD8+ T cells did neither differ significantly in blood nor CSF in MS compared to OIND, but was consistently higher in CSF compared to blood regardless of diagnosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Alpha-amylase starch binding domains: cooperative effects of binding to starch granules of multiple tandemly arranged domains.

    PubMed

    Guillén, D; Santiago, M; Linares, L; Pérez, R; Morlon, J; Ruiz, B; Sánchez, S; Rodríguez-Sanoja, R

    2007-06-01

    The Lactobacillus amylovorus alpha-amylase starch binding domain (SBD) is a functional domain responsible for binding to insoluble starch. Structurally, this domain is dissimilar from other reported SBDs because it is composed of five identical tandem modules of 91 amino acids each. To understand adsorption phenomena specific to this SBD, the importance of their modular arrangement in relationship to binding ability was investigated. Peptides corresponding to one, two, three, four, or five modules were expressed as His-tagged proteins. Protein binding assays showed an increased capacity of adsorption as a function of the number of modules, suggesting that each unit of the SBD may act in an additive or synergic way to optimize binding to raw starch.

  16. MHC2MIL: a novel multiple instance learning based method for MHC-II peptide binding prediction by considering peptide flanking region and residue positions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Computational prediction of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) binding peptides can assist researchers in understanding the mechanism of immune systems and developing peptide based vaccines. Although many computational methods have been proposed, the performance of these methods are far from satisfactory. The difficulty of MHC-II peptide binding prediction comes mainly from the large length variation of binding peptides. Methods We develop a novel multiple instance learning based method called MHC2MIL, in order to predict MHC-II binding peptides. We deem each peptide in MHC2MIL as a bag, and some substrings of the peptide as the instances in the bag. Unlike previous multiple instance learning based methods that consider only instances of fixed length 9 (9 amino acids), MHC2MIL is able to deal with instances of both lengths of 9 and 11 (11 amino acids), simultaneously. As such, MHC2MIL incorporates important information in the peptide flanking region. For measuring the distances between different instances, furthermore, MHC2MIL explicitly highlights the amino acids in some important positions. Results Experimental results on a benchmark dataset have shown that, the performance of MHC2MIL is significantly improved by considering the instances of both 9 and 11 amino acids, as well as by emphasizing amino acids at key positions in the instance. The results are consistent with those reported in the literature on MHC-II peptide binding. In addition to five important positions (1, 4, 6, 7 and 9) for HLA(human leukocyte antigen, the name of MHC in Humans) DR peptide binding, we also find that position 2 may play some roles in the binding process. By using 5-fold cross validation on the benchmark dataset, MHC2MIL outperforms two state-of-the-art methods of MHC2SK and NN-align with being statistically significant, on 12 HLA DP and DQ molecules. In addition, it achieves comparable performance with MHC2SK and NN-align on 14 HLA DR molecules. MHC2MIL

  17. Association of p53 binding and immortalization of primary C57BL/6 mouse embryo fibroblasts by using simian virus 40 T-antigen mutants bearing internal overlapping deletion mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Kierstead, T D; Tevethia, M J

    1993-01-01

    To more precisely map the immortalization and p53 binding domains of T antigen, a large series of overlapping deletion mutations were created between codons 251 to 651 by utilizing a combination of Bal 31 deletion and oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. Immortalization assay results indicated that amino acids (aa) 252 to 350, 400, and 451 to 532 could be removed without seriously compromising immortalization, although the appearance of immortal colonies was delayed in some cases. Western immunoblotting experiments indicated that the p53 binding capacities of T antigen produced by mutants missing aa 252 to 300, 301 to 350, 400, or 451 to 532 were only slightly reduced relative to that of wild-type T antigen. Within the limits of this deletion analysis, the immortalization and p53 binding domains appear to be colinear and, in fact, may represent two aspects of the same domain. This deletion analysis eliminates the entire zinc finger domain (aa 302 to 320), a small portion of the leucine-rich region (aa 345 to 350), and a large portion of the ATP binding domain (aa 451 to 528) as participants in p53 binding or in the immortalization process. The results also show that removal of T antigen amino acids within the region 451 to 532 appears to alter the capacity of newly synthesized but not older T antigen and p53 molecules to form complexes. Images PMID:8383212

  18. A direct antigen-binding assay for detection of antibodies against native epitopes using alkaline phosphatase-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Baranov, Konstantin; Volkova, Olga; Chikaev, Nikolai; Mechetina, Ludmila; Laktionov, Pavel; Najakshin, Alexander; Taranin, Alexander

    2008-03-20

    We describe a simple and efficient method to detect antibodies against native epitopes following immunization with denatured proteins and peptides. With this method, soluble antigens genetically fused with placental alkaline phosphatase (AP) are used as probes to detect antibodies immobilized on nitrocellulose membranes. The AP-tagged proteins can be produced in sufficient amounts using transient transfection of eukaryotic cells with an appropriate cDNA fragment in a commercial AP-tag vector. The intrinsic thermo-stable phosphatase activity of a tagged protein obviates the need for its purification. To evaluate the method, three recently identified proteins of the FcR family, FCRLA, FCRL1, and FCRL4, were fused with AP and tested in a reaction with various polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies raised by immunization with bacterially produced antigens and peptide conjugates. All the three probes demonstrated high specificity in analysis of immune sera and hybridoma supernatants. Sensitivity of the assay varied depending on antibody tested and, in some cases, was in the subnanogram range. The results obtained show that AP-tagged proteins are useful tools for discrimination of antibodies against native epitopes when production of antigen in its native conformation is laborious and expensive.

  19. The Role of the Multiple Banded Antigen of Ureaplasma parvum in Intra-Amniotic Infection: Major Virulence Factor or Decoy?

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Samantha J.; Nitsos, Ilias; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Newnham, John P.; Polglase, Graeme R.; Pillow, J. Jane; Jobe, Alan H.; Timms, Peter; Knox, Christine L.

    2012-01-01

    The multiple banded antigen (MBA) is a predicted virulence factor of Ureaplasma species. Antigenic variation of the MBA is a potential mechanism by which ureaplasmas avoid immune recognition and cause chronic infections of the upper genital tract of pregnant women. We tested whether the MBA is involved in the pathogenesis of intra-amniotic infection and chorioamnionitis by injecting virulent or avirulent-derived ureaplasma clones (expressing single MBA variants) into the amniotic fluid of pregnant sheep. At 55 days of gestation pregnant ewes (n = 20) received intra-amniotic injections of virulent-derived or avirulent-derived U. parvum serovar 6 strains (2×104 CFU), or 10B medium (n = 5). Amniotic fluid was collected every two weeks post-infection and fetal tissues were collected at the time of surgical delivery of the fetus (140 days of gestation). Whilst chronic colonisation was established in the amniotic fluid of animals infected with avirulent-derived and virulent-derived ureaplasmas, the severity of chorioamnionitis and fetal inflammation was not different between these groups (p>0.05). MBA size variants (32–170 kDa) were generated in vivo in amniotic fluid samples from both the avirulent and virulent groups, whereas in vitro antibody selection experiments led to the emergence of MBA-negative escape variants in both strains. Anti-ureaplasma IgG antibodies were detected in the maternal serum of animals from the avirulent (40%) and virulent (55%) groups, and these antibodies correlated with increased IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 expression in chorioamnion tissue (p<0.05). We demonstrate that ureaplasmas are capable of MBA phase variation in vitro; however, ureaplasmas undergo MBA size variation in vivo, to potentially prevent eradication by the immune response. Size variation of the MBA did not correlate with the severity of chorioamnionitis. Nonetheless, the correlation between a maternal humoral response and the expression of chorioamnion cytokines is a

  20. Characterization of nicotine binding to the rat brain P/sub 2/ preparation: the identification of multiple binding sites which include specific up-regulatory site(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    These studies show that nicotine binds to the rat brain P/sub 2/ preparation by saturable and reversible processes. Multiple binding sites were revealed by the configuration of saturation, kinetic and Scatchard plots. A least squares best fit of Scatchard data using nonlinear curve fitting programs confirmed the presence of a very high affinity site, an up-regulatory site, a high affinity site and one or two low affinity sites. Stereospecificity was demonstrated for the up-regulatory site where (+)-nicotine was more effective and for the high affinity site where (-)-nicotine had a higher affinity. Drugs which selectively up-regulate nicotine binding site(s) have been identified. Further, separate very high and high affinity sites were identified for (-)- and (+)-(/sup 3/H)nicotine, based on evidence that the site density for the (-)-isomer is 10 times greater than that for the (+)-isomer at these sites. Enhanced nicotine binding has been shown to be a statistically significant phenomenon which appears to be a consequence of drugs binding to specific site(s) which up-regulate binding at other site(s). Although Scatchard and Hill plots indicate positive cooperatively, up-regulation more adequately describes the function of these site(s). A separate up-regulatory site is suggested by the following: (1) Drugs vary markedly in their ability to up-regulate binding. (2) Both the affinity and the degree of up-regulation can be altered by structural changes in ligands. (3) Drugs with specificity for up-regulation have been identified. (4) Some drugs enhance binding in a dose-related manner. (5) Competition studies employing cold (-)- and (+)-nicotine against (-)- and (+)-(/sup 3/H)nicotine show that the isomers bind to separate sites which up-regulate binding at the (-)- and (+)-nicotine high affinity sites and in this regard (+)-nicotine is more specific and efficacious than (-)-nicotine.

  1. On the detection of multiple-binding modes of ligands to proteins, from biological, structural, and modeling data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Paul J.; de Jonge, Marc; Daeyaert, Frits; Koymans, Luc; Vinkers, Maarten; Heeres, Jan; Janssen, Paul A. J.; Arnold, Eddy; Das, Kalyan; Clark, Art D., Jr.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Boyer, Paul L.; de Béthune, Marie-Pierre; Pauwels, Rudi; Andries, Koen; Kukla, Mike; Ludovici, Donald; De Corte, Bart; Kavash, Robert; Ho, Chih

    2003-02-01

    There are several indications that a given compound or a set of related compounds can bind in different modes to a specific binding site of a protein. This is especially evident from X-ray crystallographic structures of ligand-protein complexes. The availability of multiple binding modes of a ligand in a binding site may present an advantage in drug design when simultaneously optimizing several criteria. In the case of the design of anti-HIV compounds we observed that the more active compounds that are also resilient against mutation of the non-nucleoside binding site of HIV1-reverse transcriptase make use of more binding modes than the less active and resilient compounds.

  2. Multiple Evolutionary Origins of Ubiquitous Cu2+ and Zn2+ Binding in the S100 Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Lucas C.; Donor, Micah T.; Prell, James S.

    2016-01-01

    The S100 proteins are a large family of signaling proteins that play critical roles in biology and disease. Many S100 proteins bind Zn2+, Cu2+, and/or Mn2+ as part of their biological functions; however, the evolutionary origins of binding remain obscure. One key question is whether divalent transition metal binding is ancestral, or instead arose independently on multiple lineages. To tackle this question, we combined phylogenetics with biophysical characterization of modern S100 proteins. We demonstrate an earlier origin for established S100 subfamilies than previously believed, and reveal that transition metal binding is widely distributed across the tree. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we found that Cu2+ and Zn2+ binding are common features of the family: the full breadth of human S100 paralogs—as well as two early-branching S100 proteins found in the tunicate Oikopleura dioica—bind these metals with μM affinity and stoichiometries ranging from 1:1 to 3:1 (metal:protein). While binding is consistent across the tree, structural responses to binding are quite variable. Further, mutational analysis and structural modeling revealed that transition metal binding occurs at different sites in different S100 proteins. This is consistent with multiple origins of transition metal binding over the evolution of this protein family. Our work reveals an evolutionary pattern in which the overall phenotype of binding is a constant feature of S100 proteins, even while the site and mechanism of binding is evolutionarily labile. PMID:27764152

  3. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  4. Multiple DNA Binding Domains Mediate the Function of the ERCC1-XPF Protein in Nucleotide Excision Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yan; Orelli, Barbara; Madireddy, Advaitha; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Schärer, Orlando D.

    2012-01-01

    ERCC1-XPF is a heterodimeric, structure-specific endonuclease that cleaves single-stranded/double-stranded DNA junctions and has roles in nucleotide excision repair (NER), interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair, homologous recombination, and possibly other pathways. In NER, ERCC1-XPF is recruited to DNA lesions by interaction with XPA and incises the DNA 5′ to the lesion. We studied the role of the four C-terminal DNA binding domains in mediating NER activity and cleavage of model substrates. We found that mutations in the helix-hairpin-helix domain of ERCC1 and the nuclease domain of XPF abolished cleavage activity on model substrates. Interestingly, mutations in multiple DNA binding domains were needed to significantly diminish NER activity in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that interactions with proteins in the NER incision complex can compensate for some defects in DNA binding. Mutations in DNA binding domains of ERCC1-XPF render cells more sensitive to the crosslinking agent mitomycin C than to ultraviolet radiation, suggesting that the ICL repair function of ERCC1-XPF requires tighter substrate binding than NER. Our studies show that multiple domains of ERCC1-XPF contribute to substrate binding, and are consistent with models of NER suggesting that multiple weak protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions drive progression through the pathway. Our findings are discussed in the context of structural studies of individual domains of ERCC1-XPF and of its role in multiple DNA repair pathways. PMID:22547097

  5. Hedgehog Pathway Modulation by Multiple Lipid Binding Sites on the Smoothened Effector of Signal Response

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Benjamin R.; Sever, Navdar; Chong, Yong Chun; Kim, James; Belani, Jitendra D.; Rychnovsky, Scott; Bazan, J. Fernando; Beachy, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hedgehog (Hh) signaling during development and in postembryonic tissues requires activation of the 7TM oncoprotein Smoothened (Smo), by mechanisms that may involve endogenous lipidic modulators. Exogenous Smo ligands previously identified include the plant sterol cyclopamine (and its therapeutically useful synthetic mimics) and hydroxylated cholesterol derivatives (oxysterols); Smo is also highly sensitive to cellular sterol levels. The relationships between these effects are unclear because the relevant Smo structural determinants are unknown. We identify the conserved extracellular cysteine rich domain (CRD) as the site of action for oxysterols on Smo, involving residues structurally analogous to those contacting the Wnt lipid adduct in the homologous Frizzled CRD; this modulatory effect is distinct from that of cyclopamine mimics, from Hh-mediated regulation, and from the permissive action of cellular sterol pools. These results imply that Hh pathway activity is sensitive to lipid binding at several Smo sites, suggesting mechanisms for tuning by multiple physiological inputs. PMID:23954590

  6. Multiple Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein 1 Complexes Mediate Merozoite Binding to Human Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Clara S; Uboldi, Alessandro D; Epp, Christian; Bujard, Hermann; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Czabotar, Peter E; Cowman, Alan F

    2016-04-01

    Successful invasion of human erythrocytes byPlasmodium falciparummerozoites is required for infection of the host and parasite survival. The early stages of invasion are mediated via merozoite surface proteins that interact with human erythrocytes. The nature of these interactions are currently not well understood, but it is known that merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) is critical for successful erythrocyte invasion. Here we show that the peripheral merozoite surface proteins MSP3, MSP6, MSPDBL1, MSPDBL2, and MSP7 bind directly to MSP1, but independently of each other, to form multiple forms of the MSP1 complex on the parasite surface. These complexes have overlapping functions that interact directly with human erythrocytes. We also show that targeting the p83 fragment of MSP1 using inhibitory antibodies inhibits all forms of MSP1 complexes and disrupts parasite growthin vitro.

  7. Activation of the pp60c-src kinase by middle T antigen binding or by dephosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Courtneidge, S A

    1985-01-01

    The transforming protein of polyoma virus, middle T antigen, associates with the protein tyrosine kinase pp60c-src, and analysis of mutants of middle T suggests that this complex plays an important role in transformation by polyoma. It has recently been reported that pp60c-src from polyoma virus-transformed cells has enhanced tyrosine kinase activity in vitro. The data presented here confirm these findings and show that the enhanced kinase activity of pp60c-src is due to an increase in the Vmax of the enzyme. Sucrose density gradient analysis demonstrates that only the form of pp60c-src which is bound to middle T antigen is activated. The difference in enzyme activity between pp60c-src from normal and middle T-transformed cells is more marked when the enzyme is prepared from lysates containing the phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate. pp60c-src from middle T transformed cells is unaffected, but pp60c-src from normal cells has reduced kinase activity if dephosphorylation is prevented. The kinase activity of pp60c-src thus appears to be regulated by its degree of phosphorylation at tyrosine, and data are presented which support this hypothesis. pp60c-src is the first example of a protein tyrosine kinase whose activity is inhibited by phosphorylation at tyrosine. Middle T antigen may increase the kinase activity of pp60c-src by preventing phosphorylation at this regulatory site. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2411538

  8. Synergistic effects of multiple treatments, and both DNA and RNA direct bindings on, green tea catechins.

    PubMed

    Kuzuhara, Takashi; Tanabe, Akitoshi; Sei, Yoshihisa; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Suganuma, Masami; Fujiki, Hirota

    2007-08-01

    This article reviews two main topics: (1) the synergistic effects of multiple treatments with green tea catechin and (2) the direct binding of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to both DNA and RNA molecules. Japanese drink green tea throughout the day, so we studied whether multiple treatments of cells with EGCG would enhance the expression of apoptosis-related genes, such as growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene (GADD153) and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor gene (p21(waf1)): The results suggest that the synergistic enhancement of both GADD153 and p21(waf1) gene expressions by multiple treatments plays a significant role in human cancer prevention with green tea beverage. Our previous observation-that nucleic acids extracted from catechin-treated cells are colored-allowed us to speculate that catechins directly interact with nucleic acids. Surface plasmon resonance assay (Biacore) indicated that four catechins, EGCG, (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), (+)-gallocatechin gallate (GCG), and (+)-catechin gallate (CG), bound to DNA oligomers. Cold spray ionization mass spectrometry (CSI-MS) analysis showed that one to three EGCG molecules bound to single-stranded 18 mers of DNA and RNA. Moreover, one or two molecules of EGCG bound to double-stranded AG:CT oligomers of various nucleotide lengths. Double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) oligomers were detected only as EGCG-bound forms at high temperature, whereas at low temperature both the free and bound forms were detected, suggesting that EGCG protects double-stranded DNA oligomers from double-stranded melting into single-stranded DNA. We assume that catechins accumulate in both double-stranded DNA and RNA molecules through multiple administrations of green tea beverage in in vivo, and that the accumulated green tea catechins play a significant role for human cancer prevention.

  9. Multiple ion binding sites in Ih channels of rod photoreceptors from tiger salamanders.

    PubMed

    Wollmuth, L P

    1995-05-01

    The mechanism of ion permeation in K+/Na(+)-permeable Ih channels of tiger salamander rod photoreceptors was investigated using the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. Ih channels showed features indicative of pores with multiple ion binding sites: in mixtures of K+ and thallium (T1+), the amplitude of the time-dependent current showed an anomalous mole fraction dependence, and K+ permeation was blocked by other permeant ions (with K0.5 values: T1+, 44 microM; Rb+, 220 microM and NH4+, 1100 microM) as well as by essentially impermeant ions (Cs+, 22 microM Ba2+, 9200 microM) which apparently block Ih by binding in the pore. In contrast, Na+ had little blocking action on K+ permeation. The block by all of these ions was sensitive to external K+ with the block by Cs+ being the least sensitive. Na+ was more effective than K+ in reducing the block by T1+, Rb+ and NH4+, but was less effective for the block by Cs+ and Ba2+. The blocking action of Cs+ and Ba2+ was non-competitive, suggesting that they block Ih channels at independent sites. Based on the efficacy of block by the different ions, the degree to which K+ and Na+ antagonize this block and the noncompetitive blocking action of Cs+ and Ba2+, the permeation pathway of Ih channels appears to contain at least three ion binding sites with at least two sites having a higher affinity for K+ over Na+ and another site with a higher affinity for Na+ over K+.

  10. Binding Preference of Anti-HEV Antibodies in Sera Collected in Algeria for Antigens Derived From HEV Genotype 1‏

    PubMed Central

    Behloul, Nouredine; Zhang, Min; Meng, Jihong

    2016-01-01

    Background Two hepatitis E virus (HEV) outbreaks occurred in Algeria (1979 - 1980 and 1987 - 1988). However, to date, no study on the prevalence of anti-HEV antibodies has been conducted in Algeria, and the genotype of the circulating strains remains unclear. Objectives This study was conducted to investigate the presence of anti- HEV antibodies among outpatients and blood donors in three different hospitals in Northern Algeria and to determine the genotype of the circulating strains through the characterization of the immunoreactivity of anti-HEV antibodies. Methods A total of 590 blood samples (379 from blood donors and 211 from outpatients) were collected in three health facilities in Northern Algeria and assessed for anti-HEV antibodies using an in-house double-antigen sandwich immunoassay. HEV open reading frame 2 recombinant proteins p166 (aa 452 - 617) generated from the four HEV genotypes were used as antigens. The genotype of the strains circulating in Algeria was predicted by an indirect ELISA by assessing the anti-HEV antibodies in serially diluted positive sera using the different p166 proteins. Results Anti-HEV antibodies were detected in 20.17% of the samples. A significant correlation was found between the age of the subjects and the presence of anti-HEV antibodies (P < 0.001). Among blood donors, 83 (21.9%) were diagnosed positive for anti-HEV antibodies with two cases weakly positive for anti-HEV IgM antibodies. Moreover, 9.9% of the subjects aged less than 25 years old (born after the last HEV outbreak) were positive for anti-HEV antibodies. The indirect ELISA revealed that the anti-HEV antibodies within the positive sera reacted more strongly against the p166 antigens generated from genotype 1. Conclusions The present findings reveal a relatively high presence of anti-HEV IgGs and clearly indicate that HEV infection is still present in Northern Algeria. Further, the prediction of HEV genotype using different antigens generated from the different

  11. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jaslyn E. M. M.; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Gysel, Kira; Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Sørensen, Kasper K.; Jensen, Knud J.; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël

    2015-03-01

    The crystal and solution structures of the T. thermophilus NlpC/P60 d, l-endopeptidase as well as the co-crystal structure of its N-terminal LysM domains bound to chitohexaose allow a proposal to be made regarding how the enzyme recognizes peptidoglycan. LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers. By combining the structural information with the three-dimensional model of peptidoglycan, a model suggesting how protein dimerization enhances the recognition of peptidoglycan is proposed.

  12. Protein binding of isofluorophate in vivo after coexposure to multiple chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, John S; Keating, Garrett A; Buchholz, Bruce A

    2002-01-01

    Full toxicologic profiles of chemical mixtures, including dose-response extrapolations to realistic exposures, is a prohibitive analytical problem, even for a restricted class of chemicals. We present an approach to probing in vivo interactions of pesticide mixtures at relevant low doses using a monitor compound to report the response of biochemical pathways shared by mixture components. We use accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify [14C]-diisopropylfluorophosphate as a tracer at attomole levels with 1-5% precision after coexposures to