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Sample records for multiple antigen binding

  1. Atomic force microscopy measurements reveal multiple bonds between Helicobacter pylori blood group antigen binding adhesin and Lewis b ligand.

    PubMed

    Parreira, P; Shi, Q; Magalhaes, A; Reis, C A; Bugaytsova, J; Borén, T; Leckband, D; Martins, M C L

    2014-12-01

    The strength of binding between the Helicobacter pylori blood group antigen-binding adhesin (BabA) and its cognate glycan receptor, the Lewis b blood group antigen (Le(b)), was measured by means of atomic force microscopy. High-resolution measurements of rupture forces between single receptor-ligand pairs were performed between the purified BabA and immobilized Le(b) structures on self-assembled monolayers. Dynamic force spectroscopy revealed two similar but statistically different bond populations. These findings suggest that the BabA may form different adhesive attachments to the gastric mucosa in ways that enhance the efficiency and stability of bacterial adhesion.

  2. BINDING OF ANTIGEN BY IMMUNOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Bystryn, Jean-Claude; Siskind, Gregory W.; Uhr, Jonathan W.

    1973-01-01

    The binding of antigen to cells with antibody on their surface has been studied in a model system consisting of murine myeloma cells (MOPC 315) and DNP conjugates. Specific binding occurred between the DNP groups of DNP conjugates and cell surface immunoglobulin. Using this model, the binding affinities of multivalent and univalent DNP conjugates were measured directly by equilibrium-binding techniques and indirectly by displacement of bound conjugate with univalent hapten. With both approaches the multivalent conjugate was shown to bind to cells with an avidity 100–300 fold greater than the univalent hapten. Nonspecific binding of unrelated protein and repeated washing of cells was found to markedly dedecrease the specific binding of univalent conjugates, presumably because the relatively weak bonds dissociate readily. PMID:4734402

  3. Calcium-dependent antigen binding as a novel modality for antibody recycling by endosomal antigen dissociation.

    PubMed

    Hironiwa, N; Ishii, S; Kadono, S; Iwayanagi, Y; Mimoto, F; Habu, K; Igawa, T; Hattori, K

    2016-01-01

    The pH-dependent antigen binding antibody, termed a recycling antibody, has recently been reported as an attractive type of second-generation engineered therapeutic antibody. A recycling antibody can dissociate antigen in the acidic endosome, and thus bind to its antigen multiple times. As a consequence, a recycling antibody can neutralize large amounts of antigen in plasma. Because this approach relies on histidine residues to achieve pH-dependent antigen binding, which could limit the epitopes that can be targeted and affect the rate of antigen dissociation in the endosome, we explored an alternative approach for generating recycling antibodies. Since calcium ion concentration is known to be lower in endosome than in plasma, we hypothesized that an antibody with antigen-binding properties that are calcium-dependent could be used as recycling antibody. Here, we report a novel anti-interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibody, identified from a phage library that binds to IL-6R only in the presence of a calcium ion. Thermal dynamics and a crystal structure study revealed that the calcium ion binds to the heavy chain CDR3 region (HCDR3), which changes and possibly stabilizes the structure of HCDR3 to make it bind to antigen calcium dependently (PDB 5AZE). In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that this calcium-dependent antigen-binding antibody can dissociate its antigen in the endosome and accelerate antigen clearance from plasma, making it a novel approach for generating recycling antibody.

  4. Ku antigen binds to Alu family DNA.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, T; Saëgusa, Y; Taira, T; Mimori, T; Iguchi-Ariga, S M; Ariga, H

    1998-01-01

    The GC-rich segment containing GGAGGC (Alu core) is conserved within the RNA polymerase III (pol III) promoters of Alu family sequences. We have shown that the GGAGGC motif functions as a modulator of DNA replication as well as of transcription, and identified the proteins binding to the motif in human HeLa cells. In this study, the Alu core binding proteins were partially purified from human Raji cells by using an Alu core DNA affinity column. Both the proteins thus purified were implied to be subunits of Ku antigen based on the following criteria: The molecular weights of the proteins estimated on gel electrophoreses were 70 and 85 kDa, respectively, under denaturing conditions, while under non-denaturing conditions only one band was observed for the same sample at 150 kDa, probably representing hetero-dimer formed between the 70 and 85 kDa proteins. The sizes and the hetero-dimer formation are reminiscent of the 70 and 80 kDa subunits of Ku antigen (Ku-p70 and Ku-p80). Moreover, the purified proteins were immunoreactive with anti-Ku antibodies, and the specific DNA-protein complex on the Alu core element was cancelled by the anti-Ku antibodies. The nucleoprotein complex showed the same clipping patterns as those of the complex between the Alu core element and an authentically purified Ku antigen after proteolytic cleavage with trypsin and chymotrypsin.

  5. Class II HLA antigens in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D H; Hornabrook, R W; Dagger, J; Fong, R

    1989-01-01

    HLA typing in Wellington revealed a stronger association of multiple sclerosis with DR2 than with DQw1. The association with DQw1 appeared to be due to linkage disequilibrium of this antigen with DR2. These results, when considered in conjunction with other studies, are most easily explained by the hypothesis that susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is influenced by multiple risk factors, with DR2 being an important risk factor in Caucasoid populations. PMID:2732726

  6. Binding studies of SV40 T-antigen to SV40 binding site II.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, P; Nasoff, M S; Fisher, E F; Walsh, A M; Caruthers, M H

    1985-09-25

    SV40 T-Antigen binding site II was synthesized, cloned and analyzed for its ability to bind purified SV40 T-antigen. We report the binding constant of T-antigen for isolated site II. Using a filter binding assay the calculated binding constant was 6-8 fold less efficient than site I previously reported. Binding constants were calculated using two methods. The first was a direct calculation using a protein titration curve (KD). The second was by the ratio of measured association and dissociation rates. Both methods gave similar constants. Protection studies with SV40 T-antigen on the T-antigen binding sites in the wild-type array demonstrated that the binding constants of site I and site II are similar to those calculated for the individual sites. These results demonstrate that SV40 T-antigen does not bind cooperatively to sites one and two as earlier believed and are in agreement with recent observations emanating from several laboratories.

  7. Acoustic micromixing increases antibody-antigen binding in immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Tran, Phong; Petkovic-Duran, Karolina; Swallow, Tony; Zhu, Yonggang

    2015-08-01

    Sound wave-assisted acoustic micromixing has been shown to increase the binding of molecules in small volumes (10-100 μL) where effective mixing is difficult to achieve through conventional techniques. The aim of this work is to study whether acoustic micromixing can increase the binding efficiency of antibodies to their antigens, a reaction that forms the basis of immunoassays, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Using a procedure from a general ELISA and immobilizing an antigen on wells of 96-well plates, it was found that acoustic micromixing at 125-150 Hz increased the initial rate of antibody-antigen binding by over 80 % and the total binding at the end point (i.e., 45 min) by over 50 %. As a result, acoustic micromixing achieved a binding level in 9 min that would otherwise take 45 min on a standard platform rocking mixer. Therefore acoustic micromixing has the potential to increase the detection sensitivity of ELISA as well as shorten the antigen-antibody binding times from typically 45-60 min to 15 min.

  8. Factor H-binding protein, a unique meningococcal vaccine antigen.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Mariagrazia; Donnelly, John; Rappuoli, Rino

    2008-12-30

    GNA1870, also named factor H-binding protein (fHbp) or rLP-2086, is a genome-derived antigen and one of the components of a rationally designed vaccine against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B, which has entered phase III clinical trials. It has been classified into three main non-cross-protective variant groups. GNA1870 has also been termed fHbp because of its ability to bind factor H, a key regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway. fHbp is important for survival in human blood, human sera, and in presence of antimicrobial peptides, independently of its expression level. All these properties make fHbp a unique vaccine antigen.

  9. Cooperative binding: a multiple personality.

    PubMed

    Martini, Johannes W R; Diambra, Luis; Habeck, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Cooperative binding has been described in many publications and has been related to or defined by several different properties of the binding behavior of the ligand to the target molecule. In addition to the commonly used Hill coefficient, other characteristics such as a sigmoidal shape of the overall titration curve in a linear plot, a change of ligand affinity of the other binding sites when a site of the target molecule becomes occupied, or complex roots of the binding polynomial have been used to define or to quantify cooperative binding. In this work, we analyze how the different properties are related in the most general model for binding curves based on the grand canonical partition function and present several examples which highlight differences between the cooperativity characterizing properties which are discussed. Our results mainly show that among the presented definitions there are not two which fully coincide. Moreover, this work poses the question whether it can make sense to distinguish between positive and negative cooperativity based on the macroscopic binding isotherm only. This article shall emphasize that scientists who investigate cooperative effects in biological systems could help avoiding misunderstandings by stating clearly which kind of cooperativity they discuss.

  10. Goodpasture Antigen-binding Protein (GPBP) Directs Myofibril Formation

    PubMed Central

    Revert-Ros, Francisco; López-Pascual, Ernesto; Granero-Moltó, Froilán; Macías, Jesús; Breyer, Richard; Zent, Roy; Hudson, Billy G.; Saadeddin, Anas; Revert, Fernando; Blasco, Raül; Navarro, Carmen; Burks, Deborah; Saus, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Goodpasture antigen-binding protein-1 (GPBP-1) is an exportable non-conventional Ser/Thr kinase that regulates glomerular basement membrane collagen organization. Here we provide evidence that GPBP-1 accumulates in the cytoplasm of differentiating mouse myoblasts prior to myosin synthesis. Myoblasts deficient in GPBP-1 display defective myofibril formation, whereas myofibrils assemble with enhanced efficiency in those overexpressing GPBP-1. We also show that GPBP-1 targets the previously unidentified GIP130 (GPBP-interacting protein of 130 kDa), which binds to myosin and promotes its myofibrillar assembly. This report reveals that GPBP-1 directs myofibril formation, an observation that expands its reported role in supramolecular organization of structural proteins to the intracellular compartment. PMID:21832087

  11. Computational Reprogramming of T Cell Antigen Receptor Binding Properties.

    PubMed

    Riley, Timothy P; Singh, Nishant K; Pierce, Brian G; Baker, Brian M; Weng, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) binding to peptide/MHC is key to antigen-specific cellular immunity, and there has been considerable interest in modulating TCR affinity and specificity for the development of therapeutics and imaging reagents. While in vitro engineering efforts using molecular evolution have yielded remarkable improvements in TCR affinity, such approaches do not offer structural control and can adversely affect receptor specificity, particularly if the attraction towards the MHC is enhanced independently of the peptide. Here we describe an approach to computational design that begins with structural information and offers the potential for more controlled manipulation of binding properties. Our design process models point mutations in selected regions of the TCR and ranks the resulting change in binding energy. Consideration is given to designing optimized scoring functions tuned to particular TCR-peptide/MHC interfaces. Validation of highly ranked predictions can be used to refine the modeling methodology and scoring functions, improving the design process. Our approach results in a strong correlation between predicted and measured changes in binding energy, as well as good agreement between modeled and experimental structures. PMID:27094299

  12. PK/PD analysis of a novel pH-dependent antigen-binding antibody using a dynamic antibody-antigen binding model.

    PubMed

    Haraya, Kenta; Tachibana, Tatsuhiko; Iwayanagi, Yuki; Maeda, Atsuhiko; Ozeki, Kazuhisa; Nezu, Junichi; Ishigai, Masaki; Igawa, Tomoyuki

    2016-04-01

    Previously, we have reported novel engineered antibody with pH-dependent antigen-binding (recycling antibody), and with both pH-dependent antigen-binding and increased FcRn-binding at neutral pH (sweeping antibody). The purpose of this study is to perform PK/PD predictions to better understand the potential applications of the antibodies as therapeutics. To demonstrate the applicability of recycling and sweeping antibodies over conventional antibodies, PK/PD analyses were performed. PK/PD parameters for antibody and antigen dynamics were estimated from the results of a pharmacokinetic study in human FcRn transgenic mice. A simulation study was performed using the estimated PK/PD parameters with various target antigen profiles. In comparison to conventional antibody, recycling antibody enhanced antibody-antigen complex clearance by 3 folds, while sweeping antibody accelerated antigen clearance by 10 folds in a pharmacokinetic study. Simulation results showed that recycling and sweeping antibodies can improve dosage frequency and reduce the required dose for target antigens with various clearances, plasma concentrations or binding kinetics. Moreover, importance of the association rate constant to enhance the beneficial effect of antibodies was shown. These results support the conclusion that recycling and sweeping antibodies can be applied to various target antigens with different profiles, and expand the number of antigens that antibodies can target. PMID:26944099

  13. Multiple overlapping homologies between two rheumatoid antigens and immunosuppressive viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Douvas, A; Sobelman, S

    1991-01-01

    Amino acid (aa) sequence homologies between viruses and autoimmune nuclear antigens are suggestive of viral involvement in disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and scleroderma. We analyzed the frequency of exact homologies of greater than or equal to 5 aa between 61 viral proteins (19,827 aa), 8 nuclear antigens (3813 aa), and 41 control proteins (11,743 aa). Both pentamer and hexamer homologies between control proteins and viruses are unexpectedly abundant, with hexamer matches occurring in 1 of 3 control proteins (or once every 769 aa). However, 2 nuclear antigens, the SLE-associated 70-kDa antigen and the scleroderma-associated CENP-B protein, are highly unusual in containing multiple homologies to a group of synergizing immunosuppressive viruses. Two viruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1), contain sequences exactly duplicated at 15 sites in the 70-kDa antigen and at 10 sites in CENP-B protein. The immediate-early (IE) protein of HSV-1, which activates HIV-1 regulatory functions, contains three homologies to the 70-kDa antigen (two hexamers and a pentamer) and two to CENP-B (a hexamer and pentamer). There are four homologies (including a hexamer) common to the 70-kDa antigen and Epstein-Barr virus, and three homologies (including two hexamers) common to CENP-B and cytomegalovirus. The majority of homologies in both nuclear antigens are clustered in highly charged C-terminal domains containing epitopes for human autoantibodies. Furthermore, most homologies have a contiguous or overlapping distribution, thereby creating a high density of potential epitopes. In addition to the exact homologies tabulated, motifs of matching sequences are repeated frequently in these domains. Our analysis suggests that coexpression of heterologous viruses having common immunosuppressive functions may generate autoantibodies cross-reacting with certain nuclear proteins. PMID:1712488

  14. Uncommon structural motifs dominate the antigen binding site in human autoantibodies reactive with basement membrane collagen.

    PubMed

    Foster, Mary H; Buckley, Elizabeth S; Chen, Benny J; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Clark, Amy G

    2016-08-01

    Autoantibodies mediate organ destruction in multiple autoimmune diseases, yet their origins in patients remain poorly understood. To probe the genetic origins and structure of disease-associated autoantibodies, we engrafted immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and immunized with the non-collagenous-1 (NC1) domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. This antigen is expressed in lungs and kidneys and is targeted by autoantibodies in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and Goodpasture syndrome (GPS), prototypic human organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Using Epstein Barr virus transformation and cell fusion, six human anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen monoclonal autoantibodies (mAb) were recovered, including subsets reactive with human kidney and with epitopes recognized by patients' IgG. Sequence analysis reveals a long to exceptionally long heavy chain complementarity determining region3 (HCDR3), the major site of antigen binding, in all six mAb. Mean HCDR3 length is 25.5 amino acids (range 20-36), generated from inherently long DH and JH genes and extended regions of non-templated N-nucleotides. Long HCDR3 are suited to forming noncontiguous antigen contacts and to binding recessed, immunologically silent epitopes hidden from conventional antibodies, as seen with self-antigen crossreactive broadly neutralizing anti-HIV Ig (bnAb). The anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen mAb also show preferential use of unmutated variable region genes that are enriched among human chronic lymphocytic leukemia antibodies that share features with natural polyreactive Ig. Our findings suggest unexpected relationships between pathogenic anti-collagen Ig, bnAb, and autoreactive Ig associated with malignancy, all of which arise from B cells expressing unconventional structural elements that may require transient escape from tolerance for successful expansion. PMID:27450516

  15. Restricted diversity of antigen binding residues of antibodies revealed by computational alanine scanning of 227 antibody-antigen complexes.

    PubMed

    Robin, Gautier; Sato, Yoshiteru; Desplancq, Dominique; Rochel, Natacha; Weiss, Etienne; Martineau, Pierre

    2014-11-11

    Antibody molecules are able to recognize any antigen with high affinity and specificity. To get insight into the molecular diversity at the source of this functional diversity, we compiled and analyzed a non-redundant aligned collection of 227 structures of antibody-antigen complexes. Free energy of binding of all the residue side chains was quantified by computational alanine scanning, allowing the first large-scale quantitative description of antibody paratopes. This demonstrated that as few as 8 residues among 30 key positions are sufficient to explain 80% of the binding free energy in most complexes. At these positions, the residue distribution is not only different from that of other surface residues but also dependent on the role played by the side chain in the interaction, residues participating in the binding energy being mainly aromatic residues, and Gly or Ser otherwise. To question the generality of these binding characteristics, we isolated an antibody fragment by phage display using a biased synthetic repertoire with only two diversified complementarity-determining regions and solved its structure in complex with its antigen. Despite this restricted diversity, the structure demonstrated that all complementarity-determining regions were involved in the interaction with the antigen and that the rules derived from the natural antibody repertoire apply to this synthetic binder, thus demonstrating the robustness and universality of our results.

  16. A Mutant Library Approach to Identify Improved Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Monica; Rossi, Raffaella; Walter, Helen; Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Factor H binding protein (FHbp) is a virulence factor used by meningococci to evade the host complement system. FHbp elicits bactericidal antibodies in humans and is part of two recently licensed vaccines. Using human complement Factor H (FH) transgenic mice, we previously showed that binding of FH decreased the protective antibody responses to FHbp vaccination. Therefore, in the present study we devised a library-based method to identify mutant FHbp antigens with very low binding of FH. Using an FHbp sequence variant in one of the two licensed vaccines, we displayed an error-prone PCR mutant FHbp library on the surface of Escherichia coli. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate FHbp mutants with very low binding of human FH and preserved binding of control anti-FHbp monoclonal antibodies. We sequenced the gene encoding FHbp from selected clones and introduced the mutations into a soluble FHbp construct. Using this approach, we identified several new mutant FHbp vaccine antigens that had very low binding of FH as measured by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. The new mutant FHbp antigens elicited protective antibody responses in human FH transgenic mice that were up to 20-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type FHbp antigen. This approach offers the potential to discover mutant antigens that might not be predictable even with protein structural information and potentially can be applied to other microbial vaccine antigens that bind host proteins. PMID:26057742

  17. Age-dependent B cell Autoimmunity to a Myelin Surface Antigen in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Katherine A.; Chitnis, Tanuja; Newcombe, Jia; Franz, Bettina; Kennedy, Julia; McArdel, Shannon; Kuhle, Jens; Kappos, Ludwig; Rostasy, Kevin; Pohl, Daniela; Gagne, Donald; Ness, Jayne M.; Tenembaum, Silvia; O'Connor, Kevin C.; Viglietta, Vissia; Wong, Susan J.; Tavakoli, Norma P.; de Seze, Jerome; Khoury, Samia J.; Bar-Or, Amit; Hafler, David A.; Banwell, Brenda; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) typically manifests in early to mid adulthood, but there is increasing recognition of pediatric-onset MS, aided by improvements in imaging techniques. The immunological mechanisms of disease are largely unexplored in pediatric-onset MS, in part because studies have historically focused on adult-onset disease. We investigated autoantibodies to myelin surface antigens in a large cohort of pediatric MS cases by flow cytometric labeling of transfectants that expressed different myelin proteins. While antibodies to native myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) were uncommon among adult-onset patients, a subset of pediatric patients had serum antibodies that brightly labeled the MOG transfectant. Antibodies to two other myelin surface antigens were largely absent. Affinity purification of MOG antibodies as well as competition of binding with soluble MOG documented their binding specificity. The prevalence of such autoantibodies was highest among patients with a very early onset of MS: 38.7% of patients less than 10 years of age at disease onset had MOG antibodies, compared to 14.7% of patients in the 10–18 year age group. B cell autoimmunity to this myelin surface antigen is therefore most common in patients with a very early onset of MS. PMID:19687098

  18. Specificity and kinetics of norovirus binding to magnetic bead- conjugated histo-blood group antigens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) have been identified as candidate receptors for human norovirus (NOR). Type A, type H1, and Lewis histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) in humans have been identified as major targets for NOR binding. Pig HBGA-conjugated magnetic beads have been utilized as a means ...

  19. Control of antibody-antigen binding or dissociation by electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Philip B.; Asanov, Alexander N.

    1999-04-01

    The development of a biosensor with adequate sensitivity generally requires a biospecific interaction with high binding affinity. The affinity constants for most antibody- antigen interactions are determined largely by the dissociation constants, kd, with little variation observed in rates of associated. additionally, surface immobilization typically results in a reduced kd. In this case, the sensor binds analyte kinetically irreversibly preventing response to changes in analytic concentration or reuse. Regeneration of the sensor surface is difficult, at best. On the other hand, a higher dissociation rate which would lend itself to a linear and reusable sensor, results in lower affinity and poor sensitivity. Consequently, most biosensors are disposable devices and quantitation is obtained using multiple single-use sensors. In this work, a new reusable biosensor platform which provides simultaneous fluorescence detection and electrochemical control of biospecific binding has been developed. Biotin was covalently attached to a transparent indium tin oxide electrode, which also served as an integral part of a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) flow cell. TIRF was used to monitor biospecific interactions while electrochemical polarization was employed to control the interactions. Two possible mechanisms of the electric field effect involving interactions with induced and permanent dipoles of proteins will be discussed.

  20. Assessment of Solvated Interaction Energy Function for Ranking Antibody-Antigen Binding Affinities.

    PubMed

    Sulea, Traian; Vivcharuk, Victor; Corbeil, Christopher R; Deprez, Christophe; Purisima, Enrico O

    2016-07-25

    Affinity modulation of antibodies and antibody fragments of therapeutic value is often required in order to improve their clinical efficacies. Virtual affinity maturation has the potential to quickly focus on the critical hotspot residues without the combinatorial explosion problem of conventional display and library approaches. However, this requires a binding affinity scoring function that is capable of ranking single-point mutations of a starting antibody. We focus here on assessing the solvated interaction energy (SIE) function that was originally developed for and is widely applied to scoring of protein-ligand binding affinities. To this end, we assembled a structure-function data set called Single-Point Mutant Antibody Binding (SiPMAB) comprising several antibody-antigen systems suitable for this assessment, i.e., based on high-resolution crystal structures for the parent antibodies and coupled with high-quality binding affinity measurements for sets of single-point antibody mutants in each system. Using this data set, we tested the SIE function with several mutation protocols based on the popular methods SCWRL, Rosetta, and FoldX. We found that the SIE function coupled with a protocol limited to sampling only the mutated side chain can reasonably predict relative binding affinities with a Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient of about 0.6, outperforming more aggressive sampling protocols. Importantly, this performance is maintained for each of the seven system-specific component subsets as well as for other relevant subsets including non-alanine and charge-altering mutations. The transferability and enrichment in affinity-improving mutants can be further enhanced using consensus ranking over multiple methods, including the SIE, Talaris, and FOLDEF energy functions. The knowledge gained from this study can lead to successful prospective applications of virtual affinity maturation. PMID:27367467

  1. Assessment of Solvated Interaction Energy Function for Ranking Antibody-Antigen Binding Affinities.

    PubMed

    Sulea, Traian; Vivcharuk, Victor; Corbeil, Christopher R; Deprez, Christophe; Purisima, Enrico O

    2016-07-25

    Affinity modulation of antibodies and antibody fragments of therapeutic value is often required in order to improve their clinical efficacies. Virtual affinity maturation has the potential to quickly focus on the critical hotspot residues without the combinatorial explosion problem of conventional display and library approaches. However, this requires a binding affinity scoring function that is capable of ranking single-point mutations of a starting antibody. We focus here on assessing the solvated interaction energy (SIE) function that was originally developed for and is widely applied to scoring of protein-ligand binding affinities. To this end, we assembled a structure-function data set called Single-Point Mutant Antibody Binding (SiPMAB) comprising several antibody-antigen systems suitable for this assessment, i.e., based on high-resolution crystal structures for the parent antibodies and coupled with high-quality binding affinity measurements for sets of single-point antibody mutants in each system. Using this data set, we tested the SIE function with several mutation protocols based on the popular methods SCWRL, Rosetta, and FoldX. We found that the SIE function coupled with a protocol limited to sampling only the mutated side chain can reasonably predict relative binding affinities with a Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient of about 0.6, outperforming more aggressive sampling protocols. Importantly, this performance is maintained for each of the seven system-specific component subsets as well as for other relevant subsets including non-alanine and charge-altering mutations. The transferability and enrichment in affinity-improving mutants can be further enhanced using consensus ranking over multiple methods, including the SIE, Talaris, and FOLDEF energy functions. The knowledge gained from this study can lead to successful prospective applications of virtual affinity maturation.

  2. Effect of multiple genetic polymorphisms on antigen presentation and susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Chang, Stewart T; Linderman, Jennifer J; Kirschner, Denise E

    2008-07-01

    Several molecules related to antigen presentation, including gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), are encoded by polymorphic genes. Some polymorphisms were found to affect susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) when they were considered singly in epidemiological studies, but how multiple polymorphisms interact to determine susceptibility to TB in an individual remains an open question. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in some genes may counteract or intensify the effects of polymorphisms in other genes. For example, an increase in IFN-gamma expression may counteract the weak binding that a particular MHC variant displays for a peptide from Mycobacterium tuberculosis to establish the same T-cell response as another, more strongly binding MHC variant. To test this hypothesis, we developed a mathematical model of antigen presentation based on experimental data for the known effects of genetic polymorphisms and simulated time courses when multiple polymorphisms were present. We found that polymorphisms in different genes could affect antigen presentation to the same extent and therefore compensate for each other. Furthermore, we defined the conditions under which such relationships could exist. For example, increased IFN-gamma expression compensated for decreased peptide-MHC affinity in the model only above a certain threshold of expression. Below this threshold, changes in IFN-gamma expression were ineffectual compared to changes in peptide-MHC affinity. The finding that polymorphisms exhibit such relationships could explain discrepancies in the epidemiological literature, where some polymorphisms have been inconsistently associated with susceptibility to TB. Furthermore, the model allows polymorphisms to be ranked by effect, providing a new tool for designing association studies.

  3. Identification of a peptide binding protein that plays a role in antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lakey, E.K.; Margoliash, E.; Pierce, S.K.

    1987-03-01

    The helper T-cell response to globular proteins appears, in general, to require intracellular processing of the antigen, such that a peptide fragment containing the T-cell antigenic determinant is released and transported to and held on the surface of an Ia-expressing, antigen-presenting cell. However, the molecular details underlying these phenomena are largely unknown. The means by which antigenic peptides are anchored on the antigen-presenting cell surface was investigated. A cell surface protein is identified that was isolated by it ability to bind to a 24-amino acid peptide fragment of pigeon cytochrome c, residues 81-104, containing the major antigenic determinant for B10.A mouse T cells. This peptide binding protein, purified from (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled cells, appears as two discrete bands of approx. =72 and 74 kDa after NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE. The protein can be eluted from the peptide affinity column with equivalent concentrations of either the antigenic pigeon cytochrome c peptide or the corresponding nonantigenic peptide of mouse cytochrome c. However, it does not bind to the native cytochromes c, either of pigeon or mouse, and thus the protein appears to recognize some structure available only in the free peptides. This protein plays a role in antigen presentation. Its expression is not major histocompatibility complex-restricted in that the blocking activity of the antisera can be absorbed on spleen cells from mice of different haplotypes. This peptide binding protein can be isolated from a variety of cell types, including B cells, T cells, and fibroblasts. The anchoring of processed peptides on the cell surface by such a protein may play a role in antigen presentation.

  4. The constant region affects antigen binding of antibodies to DNA by altering secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yumin; Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Casadevall, Arturo; Putterman, Chaim

    2013-11-01

    We previously demonstrated an important role of the constant region in the pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies. To determine the mechanisms by which the constant region affects autoantibody binding, a panel of isotype-switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) was generated from the murine PL9-11 IgG3 autoantibody. The affinity of the PL9-11 antibody panel for histone was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine wavelength shifts of the antibody panel upon binding to DNA and histone. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure changes in secondary structure. SPR analysis revealed significant differences in histone binding affinity between members of the PL9-11 panel. The wavelength shifts of tryptophan fluorescence emission were found to be dependent on the antibody isotype, while circular dichroism analysis determined that changes in antibody secondary structure content differed between isotypes upon antigen binding. Thus, the antigen binding affinity is dependent on the particular constant region expressed. Moreover, the effects of antibody binding to antigen were also constant region dependent. Alteration of secondary structures influenced by constant regions may explain differences in fine specificity of anti-DNA antibodies between antibodies with similar variable regions, as well as cross-reactivity of anti-DNA antibodies with non-DNA antigens.

  5. Directed evolution of antibody fragments with monovalent femtomolar antigen-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Boder, E T; Midelfort, K S; Wittrup, K D

    2000-09-26

    Single-chain antibody mutants have been evolved in vitro with antigen-binding equilibrium dissociation constant K(d) = 48 fM and slower dissociation kinetics (half-time > 5 days) than those for the streptavidin-biotin complex. These mutants possess the highest monovalent ligand-binding affinity yet reported for an engineered protein by over two orders of magnitude. Optimal kinetic screening of randomly mutagenized libraries of 10(5)-10(7) yeast surface-displayed antibodies enabled a >1,000-fold decrease in the rate of dissociation after four cycles of affinity mutagenesis and screening. The consensus mutations are generally nonconservative by comparison with naturally occurring mouse Fv sequences and with residues that do not contact the fluorescein antigen in the wild-type complex. The existence of these mutants demonstrates that the antibody Fv architecture is not intrinsically responsible for an antigen-binding affinity ceiling during in vivo affinity maturation.

  6. Plasmodium vivax GPI-anchored micronemal antigen (PvGAMA) binds human erythrocytes independent of Duffy antigen status

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yang; Lu, Feng; Wang, Bo; Li, Jian; Han, Jin-Hee; Ito, Daisuke; Kong, Deok-Hoon; Jiang, Lubin; Wu, Jian; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Takashima, Eizo; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Cao, Jun; Nyunt, Myat Htut; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Desai, Sanjay A.; Miller, Louis H.; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Han, Eun-Taek

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax, a major agent of malaria in both temperate and tropical climates, has been thought to be unable to infect humans lacking the Duffy (Fy) blood group antigen because this receptor is critical for erythrocyte invasion. Recent surveys in various endemic regions, however, have reported P. vivax infections in Duffy-negative individuals, suggesting that the parasite may utilize alternative receptor-ligand pairs to complete the erythrocyte invasion. Here, we identified and characterized a novel parasite ligand, Plasmodium vivax GPI-anchored micronemal antigen (PvGAMA), that bound human erythrocytes regardless of Duffy antigen status. PvGAMA was localized at the microneme in the mature schizont-stage parasites. The antibodies against PvGAMA fragments inhibited PvGAMA binding to erythrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. The erythrocyte-specific binding activities of PvGAMA were significantly reduced by chymotrypsin treatment. Thus, PvGAMA may be an adhesion molecule for the invasion of Duffy-positive and -negative human erythrocytes. PMID:27759110

  7. Simian virus 40 T antigen can regulate p53-mediated transcription independent of binding p53.

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, J J; Jiang, D; Srinivasan, A; Pipas, J M; Robbins, P D

    1997-01-01

    A simian virus 40 (SV40) T-antigen mutant containing only the N-terminal 136 amino acids, able to bind to Rb and p300 but not p53, partially inhibited p53-mediated transcription without affecting the ability of p53 to bind DNA. These results suggest that SV40 T antigen can regulate p53-mediated transcription either directly through protein-protein association or indirectly through interaction with factors which may function to confer p53-mediated transcription. PMID:9188637

  8. Multiple instance learning of Calmodulin binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Minhas, Fayyaz ul Amir Afsar; Ben-Hur, Asa

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitously conserved protein that acts as a calcium sensor, and interacts with a large number of proteins. Detection of CaM binding proteins and their interaction sites experimentally requires a significant effort, so accurate methods for their prediction are important. Results: We present a novel algorithm (MI-1 SVM) for binding site prediction and evaluate its performance on a set of CaM-binding proteins extracted from the Calmodulin Target Database. Our approach directly models the problem of binding site prediction as a large-margin classification problem, and is able to take into account uncertainty in binding site location. We show that the proposed algorithm performs better than the standard SVM formulation, and illustrate its ability to recover known CaM binding motifs. A highly accurate cascaded classification approach using the proposed binding site prediction method to predict CaM binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana is also presented. Availability: Matlab code for training MI-1 SVM and the cascaded classification approach is available on request. Contact: fayyazafsar@gmail.com or asa@cs.colostate.edu PMID:22962461

  9. Structural Basis for Distinct Binding Properties of the Human Galectins to Thomsen-Friedenreich Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Cheng-Feng; Zhang, Ying; Sun, Hui; Li, De-Feng; Wang, Da-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    The Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF or T) antigen, Galβ1-3GalNAcα1-O-Ser/Thr, is the core 1 structure of O-linked mucin type glycans appearing in tumor-associated glycosylation. The TF antigen occurs in about 90% of human cancer cells and is a potential ligand for the human endogenous galectins. It has been reported that human galectin-1 (Gal-1) and galectin-3 (Gal-3) can perform their cancer-related functions via specifically recognizing TF antigen. However, the detailed binding properties have not been clarified and structurally characterized. In this work, first we identified the distinct TF-binding abilities of Gal-1 and Gal-3. The affinity to TF antigen for Gal-3 is two orders of magnitude higher than that for Gal-1. The structures of Gal-3 carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) complexed with TF antigen and derivatives, TFN and GM1, were then determined. These structures show a unique Glu-water-Arg-water motif-based mode as previously observed in the mushroom galectin AAL. The observation demonstrates that this recognition mode is commonly adopted by TF-binding galectins, either as endogenous or exogenous ones. The detailed structural comparisons between Gal-1 and Gal-3 CRD and mutagenesis experiments reveal that a pentad residue motif (51AHGDA55) at the loop (g1-L4) connecting β-strands 4 and 5 of Gal-1 produces a serious steric hindrance for TF binding. This motif is the main structural basis for Gal-1 with the low affinity to TF antigen. These findings provide the intrinsic structural elements for regulating the TF-binding activity of Gal-1 in some special conditions and also show certain target and approach for mediating some tumor-related bioactivities of human galectins. PMID:21949831

  10. Increased exposure to Plasmodium chabaudi antigens sustains cross-reactivity and avidity of antibodies binding Nippostrongylus brasiliensis: dissecting cross-phylum cross-reactivity in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Fairlie-Clarke, Karen J; Hansen, Christina; Allen, Judith E; Graham, Andrea L

    2015-12-01

    Mounting an antibody response capable of discriminating amongst and appropriately targeting different parasites is crucial in host defence. However, cross-reactive antibodies that recognize (bind to) multiple parasite species are well documented. We aimed to determine if a higher inoculating dose of one species, and thus exposure to larger amounts of antigen over a longer period of time, would fine-tune responses to that species and reduce cross-reactivity. Using the Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi (Pcc)-Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Nb) co-infection model in BALB/c mice, in which we previously documented cross-reactive antibodies, we manipulated the inoculating dose of Pcc across 4 orders of magnitude. We investigated antigen-specific and cross-reactive antibody responses against crude and defined recombinant antigens by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot and antibody depletion assays. Contrary to our hypothesis that increasing exposure to Pcc would reduce cross-reactivity to Nb, we found evidence for increased avidity of a subpopulation of antibodies that recognized shared antigens. Western blot indicated proteins of apparent monomer molecular mass 28 and 98 kDa in both Nb and Pcc antigen preparations and also an Nb protein of similar size to recombinant Pcc antigen, merozoite surface protein-1(19). The implications of antibodies binding antigen from such phylogenetically distinct parasites are discussed.

  11. An impedance biosensor array for label-free detection of multiple antigen-antibody reactions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaobo; Xu, Dawei; Xu, Danke; Lv, Renjie; Liu, Zhihong

    2006-01-01

    An electrochemical impedance biosensor array with protein-modified electrodes was designed and fabricated in this report. To demonstrate its feasibility of the detection of multiple antigen-antibody binding reactions based on a label-free approach, human IgG (hIgG), rat IgG (rIgG), human globin and bovine serum albumin were immobilized, respectively, on the gold electrodes and then the resultant array was incubated with goat anti-hIgG, goat anti-rIgG, anti-human globin antibody and the mixture of three antibodies, respectively. The results indicated that the electron transfer resistance of the electrodes was significantly changed due to formation of the antigen-antibody conjugated layer. In addition, experimental conditions such as the protein concentration for the immobilization and screen were studied and optimized. Furthermore, the surface of various protein-modified electrodes was imaged with atomic force microscopy and the height distribution of protein particles was obtained with the Particle Analysis Software. The relative results were fully in accordance with the ones from the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  12. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Jr., Joseph J.

    2012-10-16

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan ({sup 5F}W). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that {sup 5F}W incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when {sup 5F}W was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. {sup 19}F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each {sup 5F}W in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody-antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody-antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques.

  13. Comparison of biosensor platforms in the evaluation of high affinity antibody-antigen binding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Danlin; Singh, Ajit; Wu, Helen; Kroe-Barrett, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    The acquisition of reliable kinetic parameters for the characterization of biomolecular interactions is an important component of the drug discovery and development process. While several benchmark studies have explored the variability of kinetic rate constants obtained from multiple laboratories and biosensors, a direct comparison of these instruments' performance has not been undertaken, and systematic factors contributing to data variability from these systems have not been discussed. To address these questions, a panel of ten high-affinity monoclonal antibodies was simultaneously evaluated for their binding kinetics against the same antigen on four biosensor platforms: GE Healthcare's Biacore T100, Bio-Rad's ProteOn XPR36, ForteBio's Octet RED384, and Wasatch Microfluidics's IBIS MX96. We compared the strengths and weaknesses of these systems and found that despite certain inherent systematic limitations in instrumentation, the rank orders of both the association and dissociation rate constants were highly correlated between these instruments. Our results also revealed a trade-off between data reliability and sample throughput. Biacore T100, followed by ProteOn XPR36, exhibited excellent data quality and consistency, whereas Octet RED384 and IBIS MX96 demonstrated high flexibility and throughput with compromises in data accuracy and reproducibility. Our results support the need for a "fit-for-purpose" approach in instrument selection for biosensor studies. PMID:27365220

  14. Sporozoite and liver stage antigen Plasmodium falciparum peptides bind specifically to human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Alvaro; García, Javier; Vera, Ricardo; López, Ramsés; Suarez, Jorge; Rodríguez, Luis; Curtidor, Hernando; Ocampo, Marisol; Tovar, Diana; Forero, Martha; Bermudez, Adriana; Cortes, Jimena; Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2004-03-12

    Sporozoite and Liver Stage Antigen (SALSA) sequence synthetic peptides were used in HepG2 cell binding assays to identify regions involved in parasite invasion. SALSA 20608 ( 21IWASEKKDEKEASEQGEESHY40) and 20611 ( 64KKDDGTDKVQEKVLEKSPKY83) peptides were determined as having high binding activity in HepG2 cell assays, some of them were located in immunogenic regions. Immune-fluorescence antibody test with 24276 (20608 peptide analogue, CGIWSSMKMDEKMAAMQGEESHCG) showed sporozoite and merozoite reactivity. This data suggests SALSA high activity binding peptides' (HABPs) possible role in hepatic cell invasion and merozoite invasion of erythrocytes.

  15. Neisserial Heparin Binding Antigen (NHBA) Contributes to the Adhesion of Neisseria meningitidis to Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vacca, Irene; Del Tordello, Elena; Gasperini, Gianmarco; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Di Fede, Martina; Rossi Paccani, Silvia; Marchi, Sara; Mubaiwa, Tsisti D.; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E.; Jennings, Michael P.; Seib, Kate L.; Masignani, Vega; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Serruto, Davide; Aricò, Beatrice; Delany, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Neisserial Heparin Binding Antigen (NHBA) is a surface-exposed lipoprotein ubiquitously expressed by Neisseria meningitidis strains and an antigen of the Bexsero® vaccine. NHBA binds heparin through a conserved Arg-rich region that is the target of two proteases, the meningococcal NalP and human lactoferrin (hLf). In this work, in vitro studies showed that recombinant NHBA protein was able to bind epithelial cells and mutations of the Arg-rich tract abrogated this binding. All N-terminal and C-terminal fragments generated by NalP or hLf cleavage, regardless of the presence or absence of the Arg-rich region, did not bind to cells, indicating that a correct positioning of the Arg-rich region within the full length protein is crucial. Moreover, binding was abolished when cells were treated with heparinase III, suggesting that this interaction is mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). N. meningitidis nhba knockout strains showed a significant reduction in adhesion to epithelial cells with respect to isogenic wild-type strains and adhesion of the wild-type strain was inhibited by anti-NHBA antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, the results demonstrate that NHBA contributes to meningococcal adhesion to epithelial cells through binding to HSPGs and suggest a possible role of anti-Bexsero® antibodies in the prevention of colonization. PMID:27780200

  16. Quantitative Assessment of the Effects of Oxidants on Antigen-Antibody Binding In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuang; Wang, Guanyu; Xu, Naijin; Liu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We quantitatively assessed the influence of oxidants on antigen-antibody-binding activity. Methods. We used several immunological detection methods, including precipitation reactions, agglutination reactions, and enzyme immunoassays, to determine antibody activity. The oxidation-reduction potential was measured in order to determine total serum antioxidant capacity. Results. Certain concentrations of oxidants resulted in significant inhibition of antibody activity but had little influence on total serum antioxidant capacity. Conclusions. Oxidants had a significant influence on interactions between antigen and antibody, but minimal effect on the peptide of the antibody molecule. PMID:27313823

  17. Binding of T-antigen disaccharides to Artocarpus hirsuta lectin and jacalin are energetically different.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Sushama M; Khan, M Islam

    2006-01-01

    The thermodynamics of binding of Me-alpha(-GalNAc, Gal-beta-1-3GalNAc-alpha-O-Me (T-antigen-alpha), Gal-beta-1-3GalNAc and Gal-alpha-1-6Glc (mellibiose) to Artocarpus hirsuta lectin was studied using fluorescence spectroscopy. The binding affinities of the saccharides are in the order Gal-beta-1-3GalNAc-alpha-O-Me > Me-alpha-GalNAc > Me-alpha-Gal > Gal-beta-1-3GalNAc > Gal-alpha-1-6Glc. The binding affinities were comparable to those for jacalin. However, binding of the saccharides to the A. hirsuta lectin was not affected as strongly by temperature as observed in jacalin and the trend was found to be reversed. Values for AH and AS were found to be positive in A. hirsuta lectin-disaccharide binding despite similar binding affinities. Thus, with 99% structural and 96% sequence homology, with similar sugar specificity and affinity, the energetics of the disaccharide binding of the two lectins seem to be different. Me-alpha-GalNAc binding to A. hirsuta lectin is enthalpically driven, because the association constant decreases with increasing temperature. However, the binding of the T-antigen disaccharides and mellibiose disaccharides to the lectin is entropically driven. The difference in the molecular associations in the packing and variation of the C-terminal length of the beta chain of the A. hirsuta lectin could be reflected in the different disaccharide binding energetics.

  18. Current status of multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems: Application of organic and inorganic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Many studies are currently investigating the development of safe and effective vaccines to prevent various infectious diseases. Multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems have been developed to avoid the adverse effects associated with conventional vaccines (i.e., live-attenuated, killed or inactivated pathogens), carrier proteins and cytotoxic adjuvants. Recently, two main approaches have been used to develop multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems: (1) the addition of functional components, e.g., T-cell epitopes, cell-penetrating peptides, and lipophilic moieties; and (2) synthetic approaches using size-defined nanomaterials, e.g., self-assembling peptides, non-peptidic dendrimers, and gold nanoparticles, as antigen-displaying platforms. This review summarizes the recent experimental studies directed to the development of multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems. PMID:21861904

  19. Hierarchy among multiple H-2b-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes within simian virus 40 T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Mylin, L M; Bonneau, R H; Lippolis, J D; Tevethia, S S

    1995-01-01

    Simian virus 40 large tumor (T) antigen contains three H-2Db-restricted (I, II/III, and V) and one H-2Kb-restricted (IV) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes. We demonstrate that a hierarchy exists among these CTL epitopes, since vigorous CTL responses against epitopes I, II/III, and IV are detected following immunization of H-2b mice with syngeneic, T-antigen-expressing cells. By contrast, a weak CTL response against the H-2Db-restricted epitope V was detected only following immunization of H-2b mice with epitope loss variant B6/K-3,1,4 cells, which have lost expression of CTL epitopes I, II/III, and IV. Limiting-dilution analysis confirmed that the lack of epitope V-specific CTL activity in bulk culture splenocytes correlated with inefficient expansion and priming of epitope V-specific CTL precursors in vivo. We examined whether defined genetic alterations of T antigen might improve processing and presentation of epitope V to the epitope V-specific CTL clone Y-5 in vitro and/or overcome the recessive nature of epitope V in vivo. Deletion of the H-2Db-restricted epitopes I and II/III from T antigen did not increase target cell lysis by epitope V-specific CTL clones in vitro. The amino acid sequence SMIKNLEYM, which species an optimized H-2Db binding motif and was found to induce CTL in H-2b mice, did not further reduce epitope V presentation in vitro when inserted within T antigen. Epitope V-containing T-antigen derivatives which retained epitopes I and II/III or epitope IV did not induce epitope V-specific CTL in vivo: T-antigen derivatives in which epitope V replaced epitope I failed to induce epitope V-specific CTL. Recognition of epitope V-H-2Db complexes by multiple independently derived epitope V-specific CTL clones was rapidly and dramatically reduced by incubation of target cells in the presence of brefeldin A compared with the recognition of the other T-antigen CTL epitopes by epitope specific CTL, suggesting that the epitope V-H-2Db complexes either are

  20. The overall architecture and receptor binding of pneumococcal carbohydrate-antigen-hydrolyzing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Melanie A; Ficko-Blean, Elizabeth; Meloncelli, Peter J; Lowary, Todd L; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2011-09-01

    The TIGR4 and SP3-BS71 strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae each produce family 98 glycoside hydrolases, called Sp4GH98 and Sp3GH98, respectively, which have different modular architectures and substrate specificities. Sp4GH98 degrades the Lewis(Y) antigen and possesses three C-terminal family 47 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) that bind to this substrate. Sp3GH98 degrades the blood group A/B antigens and has two N-terminal family 51 CBMs that are of unknown function. Here, we examine the complex carbohydrate-binding specificity of the family 51 CBMs from Sp3GH98 (referred to as CBM51-1 and CBM51-2), the structural basis of this interaction, and the overall solution conformations of both Sp3GH98 and Sp4GH98, which are shown to be fully secreted proteins. Through glycan microarray binding analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry, CBM51-1 is found to bind specifically to the blood group A/B antigens. However, due to a series of relatively small structural rearrangements that were revealed in structures determined by X-ray crystallography, CBM51-2 appears to be incapable of binding carbohydrates. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data in combination with the available high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of the Sp3GH98 and Sp4GH98 catalytic modules and their CBMs yielded models of the biological solution structures of the full-length enzymes. These studies reveal the complex architectures of the two enzymes and suggest that carbohydrate recognition by the CBMs and the activity of the catalytic modules are not directly coupled. PMID:21767550

  1. Simulation and Theory of Antibody Binding to Crowded Antigen-Covered Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    De Michele, Cristiano; De Los Rios, Paolo; Foffi, Giuseppe; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a fully flexible coarse-grained model of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies parametrized directly on cryo-EM data and simulate the binding dynamics of many IgGs to antigens adsorbed on a surface at increasing densities. Moreover, we work out a theoretical model that allows to explain all the features observed in the simulations. Our combined computational and theoretical framework is in excellent agreement with surface-plasmon resonance data and allows us to establish a number of important results. (i) Internal flexibility is key to maximize bivalent binding, flexible IgGs being able to explore the surface with their second arm in search for an available hapten. This is made clear by the strongly reduced ability to bind with both arms displayed by artificial IgGs designed to rigidly keep a prescribed shape. (ii) The large size of IgGs is instrumental to keep neighboring molecules at a certain distance (surface repulsion), which essentially makes antigens within reach of the second Fab always unoccupied on average. (iii) One needs to account independently for the thermodynamic and geometric factors that regulate the binding equilibrium. The key geometrical parameters, besides excluded-volume repulsion, describe the screening of free haptens by neighboring bound antibodies. We prove that the thermodynamic parameters govern the low-antigen-concentration regime, while the surface screening and repulsion only affect the binding at high hapten densities. Importantly, we prove that screening effects are concealed in relative measures, such as the fraction of bivalently bound antibodies. Overall, our model provides a valuable, accurate theoretical paradigm beyond existing frameworks to interpret experimental profiles of antibodies binding to multi-valent surfaces of different sorts in many contexts. PMID:26967624

  2. Binding of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus to Antigens of the ABH Histo-Blood Group Family

    PubMed Central

    Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Ganière, Jean Pierre; André-Fontaine, Geneviève; Blanchard, Dominique; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    The ability of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus to agglutinate human erythrocytes and to attach to rabbit epithelial cells of the upper respiratory and digestive tracts was shown to depend on the presence of ABH blood group antigens. Indeed, agglutination was inhibited by saliva from secretor individuals but not from nonsecretors, the latter being devoid of H antigen. In addition, erythrocytes of the rare Bombay phenotype, which completely lack ABH antigens, were not agglutinated. Native viral particles from extracts of infected rabbit liver as well as virus-like particles from the recombinant virus capsid protein specifically bound to synthetic A and H type 2 blood group oligosaccharides. Both types of particles could attach to adult rabbit epithelial cells of the upper respiratory and digestive tracts. This binding paralleled that of anti-H type 2 blood group reagents and was inhibited by the H type 2-specific lectin UEA-I and polyacrylamide-conjugated H type 2 trisaccharide. Young rabbit tissues were almost devoid of A and H type 2 antigens, and only very weak binding of virus particles could be obtained on these tissues. PMID:11090195

  3. Structural Constraints on Human Norovirus Binding to Histo-Blood Group Antigens.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bishal K; Leuthold, Mila M; Hansman, Grant S

    2016-01-01

    Human norovirus interacts with the polymorphic human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), and this interaction is thought to be important for infection. The genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) noroviruses are the dominant cluster, evolve every other year, and are thought to modify their binding interactions with different HBGA types. Most human noroviruses bind HBGAs, while some strains were found to have minimal or no HBGA interactions. Here, we explain some possible structural constraints for several noroviruses that were found to bind poorly to HBGAs by using X-ray crystallography. We showed that one aspartic acid was flexible or positioned away from the fucose moiety of the HBGAs and this likely hindered binding, although other fucose-interacting residues were perfectly oriented. Interestingly, a neighboring loop also appeared to influence the loop hosting the aspartic acid. These new findings might explain why some human noroviruses bound HBGAs poorly, although further studies are required. PMID:27303720

  4. [Expression of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) and selection of its specific binding peptide].

    PubMed

    Hou, Li-Hua; Du, Yong; Zhang, Xiao-Peng; An, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Wei

    2004-09-01

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a homologue of the Ly-6/Thy-1 family of cell surface antigen, is expressed by a majority of human prostate cancers and is a promising target for prostate cancer immunotherapy. To obtain the specific peptide binding with PSCA for targeted immunotherapy, PSCA gene was obtained by RT-PCR from human prostate cancer cell line DU145 and the transcated PSCA (tPSCA) gene was cloned into vector pQE30 for soluble expression in E. coli. The identity of recombinant tPSCA was confirmed through ELISA and western blot by use of anti-PSCA monoclonal antibody. Then the 12-peptide phage display library was screened with the purified tPSCA protein for its specific binding peptide through 3 rounds panning. For identifying the peptide's specificity, the peptide was coupled with EGFP (enhanced green fluorecent protein) by recombinant DNA technology and the recombinant coupled protein was termed 11-EGFP. The binding specificity with tPSCA of 11-EGFP was further confirmed by ELISA and competitive inhibition experiment. Flow cytometry demonstrated its binding specificity with cell line DU145. In conclusion, a 12-amino-acid peptide which could bind with PSCA specifically was found and it may be a potential tool for targeted immunotherapy of prostate carcinoma. PMID:15973992

  5. Characterization of anti-anti-idiotypic antibodies that bind antigen and an anti-idiotype

    PubMed Central

    Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Velikovsky, C. Alejandro; Dall’Acqua, William; Fossati, Carlos A.; Fields, Barry A.; Braden, Bradford C.; Poljak, Roberto J.; Mariuzza, Roy A.

    1997-01-01

    Two mouse monoclonal anti-anti-idiotopic antibodies (anti-anti-Id, Ab3), AF14 and AF52, were prepared by immunizing BALB/c mice with rabbit polyclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-Id, Ab2) raised against antibody D1.3 (Ab1) specific for the antigen hen egg lysozyme. AF14 and AF52 react with an “internal image” monoclonal mouse anti-Id antibody E5.2 (Ab2), previously raised against D1.3, with affinity constants (1.0 × 109 M−1 and 2.4 × 107 M−1, respectively) usually observed in secondary responses against protein antigens. They also react with the antigen but with lower affinity (1.8 × 106 M−1 and 3.8 × 106 M−1). This pattern of affinities for the anti-Id and for the antigen also was displayed by the sera of the immunized mice. The amino acid sequences of AF14 and AF52 are very close to that of D1.3. In particular, the amino acid side chains that contribute to contacts with both antigen and anti-Id are largely conserved in AF14 and AF52 compared with D1.3. Therapeutic immunizations against different pathogenic antigens using anti-Id antibodies have been proposed. Our experiments show that a response to an anti-Id immunogen elicits anti-anti-Id antibodies that are optimized for binding the anti-Id antibodies rather than the antigen. PMID:9238040

  6. Binding sequence-dependent regulation of the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter by p53

    SciTech Connect

    Shan Bin . E-mail: gmorris2@tulane.edu

    2005-04-15

    Exposure of a lung epithelial cell line to ionizing radiation (IR) arrests cell cycle progression through 48 h post-exposure. Coincidentally, IR differentially activates expression of the cell cycle inhibitor, p21/WAF1, and the DNA replication protein, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). p21/WAF1 mRNA levels remain elevated through 48 h post-exposure to IR, while PCNA mRNA levels increase transiently at early times. Since p21/WAF1 inhibits DNA replication by directly binding PCNA, the relative levels of the two proteins can determine cell cycle progression. The PCNA p53-binding site displayed reduced p53 binding affinity in vitro relative to the distal p21/WAF1 p53-binding site. Substitution of the p21/WAF1 site for the resident p53-binding site in the PCNA promoter altered the responses to increasing amounts of p53 or IR in transient expression assays. The p21/WAF1 p53-binding site sustained activation of the chimeric PCNA promoter under conditions (high p53 levels or high dose IR) that the PCNA p53-binding site did not. Binding site-specific regulation by wild-type p53 was not observed with mutant p53 harboring a serine to alanine change at amino acid 46. Limited activation of the PCNA promoter by p53 and its modified forms would restrict the amount of PCNA made available for DNA repair.

  7. Polypharmacology within CXCR4: Multiple binding sites and allosteric behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planesas, Jesús M.; Pérez-Nueno, Violeta I.; Borrell, José I.; Teixidó, Jordi

    2014-10-01

    CXCR4 is a promiscuous receptor, which binds multiple diverse ligands. As usual in promiscuous proteins, CXCR4 has a large binding site, with multiple subsites, and high flexibility. Hence, it is not surprising that it is involved in the phenomenon of allosteric modulation. However, incomplete knowledge of allosteric ligand-binding sites has hampered an in-depth molecular understanding of how these inhibitors work. For example, it is known that lipidated fragments of intracellular GPCR loops, so called pepducins, such as pepducin ATI-2341, modulate CXCR4 activity using an agonist allosteric mechanism. Nevertheless, there are also examples of small organic molecules, such as AMD11070 and GSK812397, which may act as antagonist allosteric modulators. Here, we give new insights into this issue by proposing the binding interactions between the CXCR4 receptor and the above-mentioned allosteric modulators. We propose that CXCR4 has minimum two topographically different allosteric binding sites. One allosteric site would be in the intracellular loop 1 (ICL1) where pepducin ATI-2341 would bind to CXCR4, and the second one, in the extracellular side of CXCR4 in a subsite into the main orthosteric binding pocket, delimited by extracellular loops n° 1, 2, and the N-terminal end, where antagonists AMD11070 and GSK812397 would bind. Prediction of allosteric interactions between CXCR4 and pepducin ATI-2341 were studied first by rotational blind docking to determine the main binding region and a subsequent refinement of the best pose was performed using flexible docking methods and molecular dynamics. For the antagonists AMD11070 and GSK812397, the entire CXCR4 protein surface was explored by blind docking to define the binding region. A second docking analysis by subsites of the identified binding region was performed to refine the allosteric interactions. Finally, we identified the binding residues that appear to be essential for CXCR4 (agonists and antagonists) allosteric

  8. Probabilistic Inference of Transcription Factor Binding from Multiple Data Sources

    PubMed Central

    Lähdesmäki, Harri; Rust, Alistair G.; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2008-01-01

    An important problem in molecular biology is to build a complete understanding of transcriptional regulatory processes in the cell. We have developed a flexible, probabilistic framework to predict TF binding from multiple data sources that differs from the standard hypothesis testing (scanning) methods in several ways. Our probabilistic modeling framework estimates the probability of binding and, thus, naturally reflects our degree of belief in binding. Probabilistic modeling also allows for easy and systematic integration of our binding predictions into other probabilistic modeling methods, such as expression-based gene network inference. The method answers the question of whether the whole analyzed promoter has a binding site, but can also be extended to estimate the binding probability at each nucleotide position. Further, we introduce an extension to model combinatorial regulation by several TFs. Most importantly, the proposed methods can make principled probabilistic inference from multiple evidence sources, such as, multiple statistical models (motifs) of the TFs, evolutionary conservation, regulatory potential, CpG islands, nucleosome positioning, DNase hypersensitive sites, ChIP-chip binding segments and other (prior) sequence-based biological knowledge. We developed both a likelihood and a Bayesian method, where the latter is implemented with a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Results on a carefully constructed test set from the mouse genome demonstrate that principled data fusion can significantly improve the performance of TF binding prediction methods. We also applied the probabilistic modeling framework to all promoters in the mouse genome and the results indicate a sparse connectivity between transcriptional regulators and their target promoters. To facilitate analysis of other sequences and additional data, we have developed an on-line web tool, ProbTF, which implements our probabilistic TF binding prediction method using multiple data sources

  9. A new approach for evaluating antigen-specific T cell responses to myelin antigens during the course of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Arbour, Nathalie; Holz, Andreas; Sipe, Jack C.; Naniche, Denise; Romine, John S.; Zyroff, Jack; Oldstone, Michael B.A.

    2016-01-01

    We used a flow cytometry assay to measure proliferation and cytokine production of self-antigen-specific T cells in individual patients during the clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS). Myelin-associated oligodendrocytic basic protein (MOBP) was selected for proof of principles in the assay, along with myelin basic protein (MBP) to assess specific activated T cells in 10 MS patients over an 18-month period, in parallel with brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and clinical rating scale. A positive correlation occurred between antigen-specific T cell proliferation and interferon-γ production with clinical relapses and MRI lesion activity that was absent when the same patients were in remission. PMID:12667664

  10. Defining the erythrocyte binding domains of Plasmodium vivax tryptophan rich antigen 33.5.

    PubMed

    Bora, Hema; Tyagi, Rupesh Kumar; Sharma, Yagya Dutta

    2013-01-01

    Tryptophan-rich antigens play important role in host-parasite interaction. One of the Plasmodium vivax tryptophan-rich antigens called PvTRAg33.5 had earlier been shown to be predominantly of alpha helical in nature with multidomain structure, induced immune responses in humans, binds to host erythrocytes, and its sequence is highly conserved in the parasite population. In the present study, we divided this protein into three different parts i.e. N-terminal (amino acid position 24-106), middle (amino acid position 107-192), and C-terminal region (amino acid position 185-275) and determined the erythrocyte binding activity of these fragments. This binding activity was retained by the middle and C-terminal fragments covering 107 to 275 amino acid region of the PvTRAg33.5 protein. Eight non-overlapping peptides covering this 107 to 275 amino acid region were then synthesized and tested for their erythrocyte binding activity to further define the binding domains. Only two peptides, peptide P4 (at 171-191 amino acid position) and peptide P8 (at 255-275 amino acid position), were found to contain the erythrocyte binding activity. Competition assay revealed that each peptide recognizes its own erythrocyte receptor. These two peptides were found to be located on two parallel helices at one end of the protein in the modelled structure and could be exposed on its surface to form a suitable site for protein-protein interaction. Natural antibodies present in the sera of the P. vivax exposed individuals or the polyclonal rabbit antibodies against this protein were able to inhibit the erythrocyte binding activity of PvTRAg33.5, its fragments, and these two synthetic peptides P4 and P8. Further studies on receptor-ligand interaction might lead to the development of the therapeutic reagent. PMID:23638151

  11. A fully synthetic glycopeptide antitumor vaccine based on multiple antigen presentation on a hyperbranched polymer.

    PubMed

    Glaffig, Markus; Palitzsch, Björn; Hartmann, Sebastian; Schüll, Christoph; Nuhn, Lutz; Gerlitzki, Bastian; Schmitt, Edgar; Frey, Holger; Kunz, Horst

    2014-04-01

    For antitumor vaccines both the selected tumor-associated antigen, as well as the mode of its presentation, affect the immune response. According to the principle of multiple antigen presentation, a tumor-associated MUC1 glycopeptide combined with the immunostimulating T-cell epitope P2 from tetanus toxoid was coupled to a multi-functionalized hyperbranched polyglycerol by "click chemistry". This globular polymeric carrier has a flexible dendrimer-like structure, which allows optimal antigen presentation to the immune system. The resulting fully synthetic vaccine induced strong immune responses in mice and IgG antibodies recognizing human breast-cancer cells.

  12. Receptor Binding Sites and Antigenic Epitopes on the Fiber Knob of Human Adenovirus Serotype 3

    PubMed Central

    Liebermann, Herbert; Mentel, Renate; Bauer, Ulrike; Pring-Åkerblom, Patricia; Dölling, Rudolf; Modrow, Susanne; Seidel, Werner

    1998-01-01

    The adenovirus fiber knob causes the first step in the interaction of adenovirus with cell membrane receptors. To obtain information on the receptor binding site(s), the interaction of labeled cell membrane proteins to synthetic peptides covering the adenovirus type 3 (Ad3) fiber knob was studied. Peptide P6 (amino acids [aa] 187 to 200), to a lesser extent P14 (aa 281 to 294), and probably P11 (aa 244 to 256) interacted specifically with cell membrane proteins, indicating that these peptides present cell receptor binding sites. Peptides P6, P11, and P14 span the D, G, and I β-strands of the R-sheet, respectively. The other reactive peptides, P2 (aa 142 to 156), P3 (aa 153 to 167), and P16 (aa 300 to 319), probably do not present real receptor binding sites. The binding to these six peptides was inhibited by Ad3 virion and was independent of divalent cations. We have also screened the antigenic epitopes on the knob with recombinant Ad3 fiber, recombinant Ad3 fiber knob, and Ad3 virion-specific antisera by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The main antigenic epitopes were presented by P3, P6, P12 (aa 254 to 269), P14, and especially the C-terminal P16. Peptides P14 and P16 of the Ad3 fiber knob were able to inhibit Ad3 infection of cells. PMID:9765458

  13. Structural Analysis of Determinants of Histo-Blood Group Antigen Binding Specificity in Genogroup I Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Shanker, Sreejesh; Czako, Rita; Sankaran, Banumathi; Atmar, Robert L.; Estes, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human noroviruses (NoVs) cause acute epidemic gastroenteritis. Susceptibility to the majority of NoV infections is determined by genetically controlled secretor-dependent expression of histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), which are also critical for NoV attachment to host cells. Human NoVs are classified into two major genogroups (genogroup I [GI] and GII), with each genogroup further divided into several genotypes. GII NoVs are more prevalent and exhibit periodic emergence of new variants, suggested to be driven by altered HBGA binding specificities and antigenic drift. Recent epidemiological studies show increased activity among GI NoVs, with some members showing the ability to bind nonsecretor HBGAs. NoVs bind HBGAs through the protruding (P) domain of the major capsid protein VP1. GI NoVs, similar to GII, exhibit significant sequence variations in the P domain; it is unclear how these variations affect HBGA binding specificities. To understand the determinants of possible strain-specific HBGA binding among GI NoVs, we determined the structure of the P domain of a GI.7 clinical isolate and compared it to the previously determined P domain structures of GI.1 and GI.2 strains. Our crystallographic studies revealed significant structural differences, particularly in the loop regions of the GI.7 P domain, altering its surface topography and electrostatic landscape and potentially indicating antigenic variation. The GI.7 strain bound to H- and A-type, Lewis secretor, and Lewis nonsecretor families of HBGAs, allowing us to further elucidate the structural determinants of nonsecretor HBGA binding among GI NoVs and to infer several contrasting and generalizable features of HBGA binding in the GI NoVs. IMPORTANCE Human noroviruses (NoVs) cause acute epidemic gastroenteritis. Recent epidemiological studies have shown increased prevalence of genogroup I (GI) NoVs. Although secretor-positive status is strongly correlated with NoV infection, cases of NoV infection

  14. Norwalk Virus-Like Particle Hemagglutination by Binding to H Histo-Blood Group Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, Anne M.; Atmar, Robert L.; Marcus, Donald M.; Estes, Mary K.

    2003-01-01

    Noroviruses are a major cause of epidemic acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Here we report our discovery that recombinant Norwalk virus virus-like particles (rNV VLPs) agglutinate red blood cells (RBCs). Since histo-blood group antigens are expressed on gut mucosa as well as RBCs, we used rNV VLP hemagglutination (HA) as a model system for studying NV attachment to cells in order to help identify a potential NV receptor(s). rNV VLP HA is dependent on low temperature (4°C) and acidic pH. Of the 13 species of RBCs tested, rNV VLPs hemagglutinated only chimpanzee and human RBCs. The rNV VLPs hemagglutinated all human type O (11 of 11), A (9 of 9), and AB (4 of 4) RBCs; however, few human type B RBC samples (4 of 14) were hemagglutinated. HA with periodate- and neuraminidase-treated RBCs indicated that rNV VLP binding was carbohydrate dependent and did not require sialic acid. The rNV VLPs did not hemagglutinate Bombay RBCs (zero of seven) that lack H type 2 antigen, and an anti-H type 2 antibody inhibited rNV VLP HA of human type O RBCs. These data indicated that the H type 2 antigen functions as the rNV VLP HA receptor on human type O RBCs. The rNV VLP HA was also inhibited by rNV VLP-specific monoclonal antibody 8812, an antibody that inhibits VLP binding to Caco-2 cells. Convalescent-phase sera from NV-infected individuals showed increased rNV VLP HA inhibition titers compared to prechallenge sera. In carbohydrate binding assays, the rNV VLPs bound to synthetic Lewis d (Led), Leb, H type 2, and Ley antigens, and these antigens also inhibited rNV VLP HA of human type O RBCs. Overall, our results indicate that carbohydrate antigens in the gut are a previously unrecognized factor in NV pathogenesis. PMID:12477845

  15. Novel Drosophila receptor that binds multiple growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, M.R.; Thompson, K.L.; Garcia, V.; Decker, S.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have recently reported the identification of a novel growth factor receptor from Drosophila cell cultures that has dual binding specificity for both insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This 100 kDa protein is also antigenically related to the cytoplasmic region of the mammalian EGF receptor-tyrosine kinase. They now report that this protein binds to mammalian nerve growth factor and human transforming growth factor alpha as well as insulin and EGF with apparent dissociation constants ranging from 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -8/ M. The 100 kDa protein can be affinity-labeled with these /sup 125/I-labeled growth factors after immunoprecipitation with anti-EGF receptor antiserum. These four growth factors appear to share a common binding site, as evidenced by their ability to block affinity labelling by /sup 125/I-insulin. No significant binding to the 100 kDa protein was observed with platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, or glucagon. The 100 kDa Drosophila protein has a unique ligand-binding spectrum with no direct counterpart in mammalian cells and may represent an evolutionary precursor of the mammalian receptors for these growth factors.

  16. Tau Binds to Multiple Tubulin Dimers with Helical Structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Han; Culver, Jacob A; Rhoades, Elizabeth

    2015-07-29

    Understanding the mechanism by which tau binds to and promotes microtubule (MT) assembly as part of its native function may also provide insight into its loss of function that occurs in neurodegenerative disease. Both mechanistic and structural studies of tau have been hindered by its intrinsic disorder and highly dynamic nature. Here, we combine fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and acrylodan fluorescence screening to study the stoichiometry and structural features of tau-tubulin assemblies. Our results show that tau binds to multiple tubulin dimers, even when MT assembly is inhibited. Moreover, we observe helical structure in the repeat regions of the MT binding domain of tau in the tau-tubulin complex, reflecting partial folding upon binding. Our findings support a role for tau's intrinsic disorder in providing a flexible scaffold for binding tubulin and MTs and a disorder-to-order transition in mediating this important interaction.

  17. Echinococcus granulosus antigen B: a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein at the host-parasite interface.

    PubMed

    Silva-Álvarez, Valeria; Folle, Ana Maite; Ramos, Ana Lía; Zamarreño, Fernando; Costabel, Marcelo D; García-Zepeda, Eduardo; Salinas, Gustavo; Córsico, Betina; Ferreira, Ana María

    2015-02-01

    Lipids are mainly solubilized by various families of lipid binding proteins which participate in their transport between tissues as well as cell compartments. Among these families, Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Proteins (HLBPs) deserve special consideration since they comprise intracellular and extracellular members, are able to bind a variety of fatty acids, retinoids and some sterols, and are present exclusively in cestodes. Since these parasites have lost catabolic and biosynthetic pathways for fatty acids and cholesterol, HLBPs are likely relevant for lipid uptake and transportation between parasite and host cells. Echinococcus granulosus antigen B (EgAgB) is a lipoprotein belonging to the HLBP family, which is very abundant in the larval stage of this parasite. Herein, we review the literature on EgAgB composition, structural organization and biological properties, and propose an integrated scenario in which this parasite HLBP contributes to adaptation to mammalian hosts by meeting both metabolic and immunomodulatory parasite demands.

  18. Mycobacterial antigen 85 complex (Ag85) as a target for ficolins and mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Świerzko, Anna S; Bartłomiejczyk, Marcin A; Brzostek, Anna; Łukasiewicz, Jolanta; Michalski, Mateusz; Dziadek, Jarosław; Cedzyński, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    The pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) able to activate complement via the lectin pathway are suspected to be involved in the interaction between pathogenic Mycobacteria and the host immune response. Recently, we have found strong interactions between 25 and 35kDa mycobacterial cell fractions and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins. Here we demonstrate that two biologically important mycobacterial structures, mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and the antigen 85 (Ag85) complex, induce activation of the lectin pathway of complement. The strong interaction of recombinant MBL with purified ManLAM was confirmed, but no binding of recombinant ficolins (ficolin-1, -2, -3) with this structure was observed. Interestingly, all PRMs tested reacted with the mycobacterial antigen 85 (Ag85) complex. Based on the use of specific inhibitors (mannan for MBL, acetylated bovine serum albumin for ficolin-1 and -2, Hafnia alvei PCM 1200 lipopolysaccharide for ficolin-3), we concluded that carbohydrate-recognition (MBL) and fibrinogen-like domains (ficolins) were involved in these interactions. Our results indicate that the mycobacterial antigen 85 complex is a target for ficolins and MBL. Furthermore, those PRMs also bound to fibronectin and therefore might influence the Ag85 complex-dependent interaction of Mycobacterium with the extracellular matrix. PMID:27141819

  19. Expression of CD3-associated antigen-binding receptors on suppressor T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kuchroo, V K; Steele, J K; Billings, P R; Selvaraj, P; Dorf, M E

    1988-01-01

    Three suppressor T (Ts)-cell hybridomas specific for 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl (NP) hapten were selected for surface expression of cluster determinant 3 (CD3) by using antibody (anti-CD3) or antigen (NP-bovine serum albumin) panning procedures followed by cloning at limiting dilution. The CD3-selected Ts hybridomas showed a 1-2 logarithmic enrichment in suppressor activity when compared to the parent lines; they also specifically bound NP-coupled sheep red blood cells in rosette assays. This antigen-binding ability could be down-modulated by anti-CD3 antibody. Similarly, surface expression of CD3 was specifically down-modulated by preincubation of these hybridomas with antigen. Anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody under reducing conditions coprecipitated a broad band of 38-50 kDa associated with two CD3 (25 and 16 kDa) bands. T-cell receptor, anti-alpha-specific monoclonal antibody also immunoprecipitated a broad band in the 41 to 49-kDa region. The combined results suggest that, like helper and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, Ts cells also bear antigen-specific receptors associated with CD3 molecules. Images PMID:2973609

  20. Decoration of outer membrane vesicles with multiple antigens by using an autotransporter approach.

    PubMed

    Daleke-Schermerhorn, Maria H; Felix, Tristan; Soprova, Zora; Ten Hagen-Jongman, Corinne M; Vikström, David; Majlessi, Laleh; Beskers, Joep; Follmann, Frank; de Punder, Karin; van der Wel, Nicole N; Baumgarten, Thomas; Pham, Thang V; Piersma, Sander R; Jiménez, Connie R; van Ulsen, Peter; de Gier, Jan-Willem; Leclerc, Claude; Jong, Wouter S P; Luirink, Joen

    2014-09-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spherical nanoparticles that naturally shed from Gram-negative bacteria. They are rich in immunostimulatory proteins and lipopolysaccharide but do not replicate, which increases their safety profile and renders them attractive vaccine vectors. By packaging foreign polypeptides in OMVs, specific immune responses can be raised toward heterologous antigens in the context of an intrinsic adjuvant. Antigens exposed at the vesicle surface have been suggested to elicit protection superior to that from antigens concealed inside OMVs, but hitherto robust methods for targeting heterologous proteins to the OMV surface have been lacking. We have exploited our previously developed hemoglobin protease (Hbp) autotransporter platform for display of heterologous polypeptides at the OMV surface. One, two, or three of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens ESAT6, Ag85B, and Rv2660c were targeted to the surface of Escherichia coli OMVs upon fusion to Hbp. Furthermore, a hypervesiculating ΔtolR ΔtolA derivative of attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 was generated, enabling efficient release and purification of OMVs decorated with multiple heterologous antigens, exemplified by the M. tuberculosis antigens and epitopes from Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein (MOMP). Also, we showed that delivery of Salmonella OMVs displaying Ag85B to antigen-presenting cells in vitro results in processing and presentation of an epitope that is functionally recognized by Ag85B-specific T cell hybridomas. In conclusion, the Hbp platform mediates efficient display of (multiple) heterologous antigens, individually or combined within one molecule, at the surface of OMVs. Detection of antigen-specific immune responses upon vesicle-mediated delivery demonstrated the potential of our system for vaccine development. PMID:25038093

  1. Antigen Binding and Site-Directed Labeling of Biosilica-Immobilized Fusion Proteins Expressed in Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Ford, Nicole R; Hecht, Karen A; Hu, DeHong; Orr, Galya; Xiong, Yijia; Squier, Thomas C; Rorrer, Gregory L; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2016-03-18

    The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was genetically modified to express biosilica-targeted fusion proteins comprising either enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or single chain antibodies engineered with a tetracysteine tagging sequence. Of interest were the site-specific binding of (1) the fluorescent biarsenical probe AsCy3 and AsCy3e to the tetracysteine tagged fusion proteins and (2) high and low molecular mass antigens, the Bacillus anthracis surface layer protein EA1 or small molecule explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT), to biosilica-immobilized single chain antibodies. Analysis of biarsenical probe binding using fluorescence and structured illumination microscopy indicated differential colocalization with EGFP in nascent and mature biosilica, supporting the use of either EGFP or bound AsCy3 and AsCy3e in studying biosilica maturation. Large increases in the lifetime of a fluorescent analogue of TNT upon binding single chain antibodies provided a robust signal capable of discriminating binding to immobilized antibodies in the transformed frustule from nonspecific binding to the biosilica matrix. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an ability to engineer diatoms to create antibody-functionalized mesoporous silica able to selectively bind chemical and biological agents for the development of sensing platforms.

  2. Long-Range Stabilization of Anthrax Protective Antigen upon Binding to CMG2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA) mediates entry of edema factor (EF) and lethal factor (LF) into the cytoplasmic space of the cells through the formation of a membrane-spanning pore. To do this, PA must initially bind to a host cellular receptor. Recent mass spectrometry analysis of PA using histidine hydrogen–deuterium exchange (His-HDX) has shown that binding of the von Willebrand factor A (vWA) domain of the receptor capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2) lowers the exchange rates of the imidazole C2 hydrogen of several histidines, suggesting that receptor binding decreases the structural flexibility of PA. Here, using His-HDX and fluorescence as a function of denaturant, and protease susceptibility, we show that binding of the vWA domain of CMG2 largely increases the stability of PA and the effect reaches up to 70 Å from the receptor binding interface. We also show that the pKa values and HDX rates of histidines located in separate domains change upon receptor binding. These results indicate that when one end of the protein is anchored, the structure of PA is tightened, noncovalent interactions are strengthened, and the global stability of the protein increases. These findings suggest that CMG2 may be used to stabilize PA in future anthrax vaccines. PMID:25186975

  3. T-cell hybridoma specific for a cytochrome c peptide: specific antigen binding and interleukin 2 production.

    PubMed Central

    Carel, S; Bron, C; Corradin, G

    1983-01-01

    T-cell hybridomas were obtained after fusion of BW 5147 thymoma and long-term cultured T cells specific for cytochrome c peptide 66-80 derivatized with a 2,4-dinitroaminophenyl (DNAP) group. The resulting hybridomas were selected for their capacity to specifically bind to soluble radiolabeled peptide antigen. One T-cell hybrid was positive for antigen binding. This hybrid T cell exhibits surface phenotypic markers of the parent antigen-specific T cells. The binding could be inhibited either by an excess of unlabeled homologous antigen or by cytochrome c peptide 11-25 derivatized with a 2-nitrophenylsulfenyl group. Several other peptide antigens tested failed to inhibit binding of the radioactive peptide. This suggests that a specific amino acid sequence, modified by a DNAP group, is the antigenic structure recognized by the putative T-cell receptor. In addition, direct interaction of DNAP-66-80 peptide with the hybridoma cell line induced production of the T-cell growth factor interleukin 2. Furthermore, supernatants derived from syngeneic macrophages pulsed with the relevant peptide also induced the antigen-specific hybridoma to produce interleukin 2. Images PMID:6192442

  4. Analysis of protective antigen peptide binding motifs using bacterial display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Dorsey, Brandi L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2015-05-01

    In today's fast-paced world, a new biological threat could emerge at any time, necessitating a prompt, reliable, inexpensive detection reagent in each case. Combined with magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), bacterial display technology makes it possible to isolate selective, high affinity peptide reagents in days to weeks. Utilizing the eCPX display scaffold is also a rapid way to screen potential peptide reagents. Peptide affinity reagents for protective antigen (PA) of the biothreat Bacillus anthracis were previously discovered using bacterial display. Bioinformatics analysis resulted in the consensus sequence WXCFTC. Additionally, we have discovered PA binding peptides with a WW motif, one of which, YGLHPWWKNAPIGQR, can pull down PA from 1% human serum. The strength of these two motifs combined, to obtain a WWCFTC consensus, is assessed here using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). While monitoring binding to PA, overall expression of the display scaffold was assessed using the YPet Mona expression control tag (YPet), and specificity was assessed by binding to Streptavidin R-Phycoerythrin (SAPE). The importance of high YPet binding is highlighted as many of the peptides in one of the three replicate experiments fell below our 80% binding threshold. We demonstrate that it is preferable to discard this experiment, due to questionable expression of the peptide itself, than to try to normalize for relative expression. The peptides containing the WWCFTC consensus were of higher affinity and greater specificity than the peptides containing the WW consensus alone, validating further investigation to optimize known PA binders.

  5. Structural basis of Lewisb antigen binding by the Helicobacter pylori adhesin BabA

    PubMed Central

    Hage, Naim; Howard, Tina; Phillips, Chris; Brassington, Claire; Overman, Ross; Debreczeni, Judit; Gellert, Paul; Stolnik, Snow; Winkler, G. Sebastiaan; Falcone, Franco H.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a leading cause of peptic ulceration and gastric cancer worldwide. To achieve colonization of the stomach, this Gram-negative bacterium adheres to Lewisb (Leb) antigens in the gastric mucosa using its outer membrane protein BabA. Structural information for BabA has been elusive, and thus, its molecular mechanism for recognizing Leb antigens remains unknown. We present the crystal structure of the extracellular domain of BabA, from H. pylori strain J99, in the absence and presence of Leb at 2.0- and 2.1-Å resolutions, respectively. BabA is a predominantly α-helical molecule with a markedly kinked tertiary structure containing a single, shallow Leb binding site at its tip within a β-strand motif. No conformational change occurs in BabA upon binding of Leb, which is characterized by low affinity under acidic [KD (dissociation constant) of ~227 μM] and neutral (KD of ~252 μM) conditions. Binding is mediated by a network of hydrogen bonds between Leb Fuc1, GlcNAc3, Fuc4, and Gal5 residues and a total of eight BabA amino acids (C189, G191, N194, N206, D233, S234, S244, and T246) through both carbonyl backbone and side-chain interactions. The structural model was validated through the generation of two BabA variants containing N206A and combined D233A/S244A substitutions, which result in a reduction and complete loss of binding affinity to Leb, respectively. Knowledge of the molecular basis of Leb recognition by BabA provides a platform for the development of therapeutics targeted at inhibiting H. pylori adherence to the gastric mucosa. PMID:26601230

  6. Kinetics of antigen binding to arrays of antibodies in different sized spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapsford, K. E.; Liron, Z.; Shubin, Y. S.; Ligler, F. S.

    2001-01-01

    A fluorescence-based array biosensor has been developed which can measure the binding kinetics of an antigen to an immobilized antibody in real time. A patterned array of antibodies immobilized on the surface of a planar waveguide was used to capture a Cy5-labeled antigen present in a solution that was continuously flowed over the surface. The CCD image of the waveguide was monitored continuously for 25 min. The resulting exponential rise in fluorescence signal was determined by image analysis software and fitted to a reaction-limited kinetics model, giving a kf of 3.6 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). Different spot sizes were then patterned on the surface of the waveguide using either a PDMS flow cell or laser exposure, producing width sizes ranging from 80 to 1145 microm. It was demonstrated that under flow conditions, the reduction of spot size did not alter the association rate of the antigen with immobilized antibody; however, as the spot width decreased to < 200 nm, the signal intensity also decreased.

  7. Isolation of a peptide binding protein and its role in antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lakey, E.; Pierce, S.K.; Margoliash, E.

    1986-03-05

    A mouse T cell hybrid, TPc9.1, recognizes pigeon cytochrome c (Pc) as processed and presented by histocompatible antigen presenting cells (APC). When paraformaldehyde fixed APC are employed, only a peptide fragment of Pc, Pc 81-104, and not the native Pc, is capable of stimulating TPc9.1 cells. Pc 81-104 appears to associate tightly with the APC surface since paraformaldehyde fixed APC which have been incubated with Pc 81-104 remain stimulatory following extensive washing. When APC are surface labeled with /sup 125/I, solubilized and affinity purified on Pc 81-104-Sepharose 4B columns, two predominant polypeptides of approximately 72 and 74 kd are isolated. Little or no immunoglobulin, Class I or Class II proteins are obtained under these conditions. Antisera from rabbits immunized with the affinity purified material, but not preimmune sera, block the activation of TPc 9.1 cells by Pc as well as Pc 81-104 when presented by live APC. Furthermore, these antisera are even more effective in blocking the activation of TPc9.1 cells by either APC which had been pulsed with Pc and then paraformaldehyde fixed, or by Pc 81-104 when added to paraformaldehyde fixed APC, suggesting that these antisera were not affecting antigen processing. Thus, these peptide binding proteins may play a role in antigen presentation, and they are being further characterized.

  8. Identification and characterization of an antigen binding receptor on an inducible suppressor T cell hybridoma specific for GAT

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, C.M.; Pierce, C.W.

    1986-03-05

    C57BL/10 spleen cells were incubated for 18 hrs with monoclonal GAT-TsF1 and soluble GAT, and fused with BW5147. Hybridomas that did not produce GAT-TsF2 constitutively but could be induced by GAT-TsF1 to do so were cloned. One such clone (1556A2.1) was shown to bind GAT via a cell surface structure having the properties of a classical receptor. Binding of /sup 125/I-GAT was saturable and maximal by 4 hrs at 4/sup 0/C. Scatchard analysis indicated 5.8 x 10/sup 4/ binding sites per cell with an avidity of 8 x 10/sup -14/M. Binding of /sup 125/I-GAT was specific because cold GAT, GT, and GLT competed for binding, whereas BSA and GA did not. Furthermore, monoclonal antibody against a shared anti-GAT idiotype also blocked binding of /sup 125/I-GAT. Finally, the antigen-binding receptor isolated from uninduced 1556A2.1 hybridoma failed to complement independently isolated I-J/sup +/ chain from TsF2 obtained from induced 1556A2.1. These data suggest the presence of a molecule on the Ts/sub 2/ cell capable of binding antigen which is related to, but functionally different from, the TsF2 antigen-binding chain.

  9. Antigenic modulation of the cytophilic binding of guinea-pig IgG and IgM antibodies to homologous macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, R O; Lawrence, D A

    1979-01-01

    The cytophilic binding of immune complexes by peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) from adjuvant-stimulated guinea-pigs was studied using 125I-labelled guinea-pig IgG1, IgG2 and IgM antibodies to the dinitrophenyl (DNP) group. The influence of hapten density upon cytophilic activity was studied by the addition of DNP-conjugated antigens to antibody in 2-200 molar ratios of DNP:antibody. Only IgG2 binding was enhanced by immune complex formation, and the increased binding of IgG2 anti-DNP was dependent on the number of DNP determinants per antigen molecule. Cytophilic activity with epsilon-DNP-L-lysine (DNP-LYS), alpha,epsilon-di-DNP-L-lysine (DNP-LYS-DNP), or DNP1-8-BSA was no greater than that seen in the absence of hapten. Increased cytophilic binding was noted only with DNP20-41-BSA. The binding of IgG2 and IgG2 anti-DNP:DNP-bovine serum albumin (BSA) complexes was inhibited by monomeric IgG2. The relative cytophilic capacities of guinea-pig immunoglobulins appeared as follows: IgG greater than IgG1 greater than IgM. IgG1 and IgM binding of DNP conjugates did not enhance their cytophilic activity; therefore, IgG1 and IgM cytophilic binding to PEC was considered biologically insignificant. This investigation provides further evidence that cytophilic binding of immune complexes to macrophages is due to the co-operative action of multiple Fc sites rather than a conformational change in the IgG2 antibodies, and serum proteins, notably complement components, can alter the binding and/or phagocytosis of IgG2 anti-DNP:DNP-BSA complexes. PMID:86509

  10. Antibody Binding Selectivity: Alternative Sets of Antigen Residues Entail High-Affinity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Nominé, Yves; Choulier, Laurence; Travé, Gilles; Vernet, Thierry; Altschuh, Danièle

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between protein sequence and molecular recognition selectivity remains a major challenge. The antibody fragment scFv1F4 recognizes with sub nM affinity a decapeptide (sequence 6TAMFQDPQER15) derived from the N-terminal end of human papilloma virus E6 oncoprotein. Using this decapeptide as antigen, we had previously shown that only the wild type amino-acid or conservative replacements were allowed at positions 9 to 12 and 15 of the peptide, indicating a strong binding selectivity. Nevertheless phenylalanine (F) was equally well tolerated as the wild type glutamine (Q) at position 13, while all other amino acids led to weaker scFv binding. The interfaces of complexes involving either Q or F are expected to diverge, due to the different physico-chemistry of these residues. This would imply that high-affinity binding can be achieved through distinct interfacial geometries. In order to investigate this point, we disrupted the scFv–peptide interface by modifying one or several peptide positions. We then analyzed the effect on binding of amino acid changes at the remaining positions, an altered susceptibility being indicative of an altered role in complex formation. The 23 starting variants analyzed contained replacements whose effects on scFv1F4 binding ranged from minor to drastic. A permutation analysis (effect of replacing each peptide position by all other amino acids except cysteine) was carried out on the 23 variants using the PEPperCHIP® Platform technology. A comparison of their permutation patterns with that of the wild type peptide indicated that starting replacements at position 11, 12 or 13 modified the tolerance to amino-acid changes at the other two positions. The interdependence between the three positions was confirmed by SPR (Biacore® technology). Our data demonstrate that binding selectivity does not preclude the existence of alternative high-affinity recognition modes. PMID:26629896

  11. Crystal structure of the anti-(carcinoembryonic antigen) single-chain Fv antibody MFE-23 and a model for antigen binding based on intermolecular contacts.

    PubMed

    Boehm, M K; Corper, A L; Wan, T; Sohi, M K; Sutton, B J; Thornton, J D; Keep, P A; Chester, K A; Begent, R H; Perkins, S J

    2000-03-01

    MFE-23 is the first single-chain Fv antibody molecule to be used in patients and is used to target colorectal cancer through its high affinity for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a cell-surface member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. MFE-23 contains an N-terminal variable heavy-chain domain joined by a (Gly(4)Ser)(3) linker to a variable light-chain (V(L)) domain (kappa chain) with an 11-residue C-terminal Myc-tag. Its crystal structure was determined at 2.4 A resolution by molecular replacement with an R(cryst) of 19.0%. Five of the six antigen-binding loops, L1, L2, L3, H1 and H2, conformed to known canonical structures. The sixth loop, H3, displayed a unique structure, with a beta-hairpin loop and a bifurcated apex characterized by a buried Thr residue. In the crystal lattice, two MFE-23 molecules were associated back-to-back in a manner not seen before. The antigen-binding site displayed a large acidic region located mainly within the H2 loop and a large hydrophobic region within the H3 loop. Even though this structure is unliganded within the crystal, there is an unusually large region of contact between the H1, H2 and H3 loops and the beta-sheet of the V(L) domain of an adjacent molecule (strands DEBA) as a result of intermolecular packing. These interactions exhibited remarkably high surface and electrostatic complementarity. Of seven MFE-23 residues predicted to make contact with antigen, five participated in these lattice contacts, and this model for antigen binding is consistent with previously reported site-specific mutagenesis of MFE-23 and its effect on CEA binding.

  12. An adhesin-like protein, Lam29, from Lactobacillus mucosae ME-340 binds to histone H3 and blood group antigens in human colonic mucus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masamichi; Kinoshita, Hideki; Huang, I-Nung; Eguchi, Kei; Tsurumi, Takuya; Kawai, Yasushi; Kitazawa, Haruki; Kimura, Katsunori; Taketomo, Naoki; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Sase, Tomohiko; Miura, Koh; Ogawa, Hitoshi; Shibata, Chikashi; Horii, Akira; Saito, Tadao

    2012-01-01

    A cell-surface 29-kDa protein (Lam29, cysteine-binding protein of the ABC transporter) from Lactobacillus mucosae ME-340 showed an adhesin-like property for human ABO blood group antigens expressed on the gastrointestinal mucosa. In addition, here we report that Lam29 also bound to an 18-kDa protein on human colonic mucus. By ligand blot assay and N-terminal amino acid sequence of the protein, it was identified as human histone H3. By ligand blot and microplate binding assays with recombinant histone H3, binding between Lam29 and histone H3 was confirmed. The adhesion of ME-340 cells to histone H3 was significantly inhibited by 26% after the addition of 2.5 mg/mL Lam29 as compared to the absence of Lam29 (p<0.01). By GHCl extraction and transcription attenuation of ME-340 cells, binding reduction of ME340 cells against histone H3 was detected at 12% and 13% respectively, as compared to control cells by the BIACORE assay (p<0.01). These data indicate that Lam29 shows multiple binding activities to blood group antigens and histone H3 in human colonic mucus. This is the first report to indicate that lactobacilli expressing Lam29 adhere to histone H3 on gastrointestinal mucosa.

  13. Erythrocyte-binding antigen 175 mediates invasion in Plasmodium falciparum utilizing sialic acid-dependent and -independent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Duraisingh, Manoj T.; Maier, Alexander G.; Triglia, Tony; Cowman, Alan F.

    2003-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte-binding antigen 175 (EBA-175) is a ligand for merozoite invasion into human erythrocytes that binds to glycophorin A in a sialic acid-dependent manner. P. falciparum strain W2mef depends on sialic acid for invasion of erythrocytes, whereas 3D7 is sialic acid-independent. We generated parasites that lack expression or express truncated forms of EBA-175 in W2mef and 3D7. Lack of EBA-175 expression in W2mef parasites was associated with a switch to sialic acid-independent invasion. 3D7 parasites lacking expression of EBA-175 showed no alteration in their ability to utilize sialic acid-independent pathways. Strikingly, both W2mef and 3D7 parasites lacking EBA-175 expression invaded chymotrypsin-treated erythrocytes inefficiently compared with the parental lines. This loss of function suggests that the EBA-175/glycophorin A ligand–receptor interaction is the major chymotrypsin-resistant invasion pathway. Parasite lines with truncated EBA-175 had invasion phenotypes equivalent to parasites lacking expression of EBA-175. The EBA-175 ligand is functional in erythrocyte invasion by merozoites that utilize either sialic acid-dependent or -independent invasion pathways. This finding suggests a model where a minimal affinity supplied by multiple ligand–receptor interactions is required for successful invasion and has implications for EBA-175 as a malaria vaccine candidate. PMID:12672957

  14. Binding Patterns of Rotavirus Genotypes P[4], P[6], and P[8] in China with Histo-Blood Group Antigens.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Li, Dan-di; Sun, Xiao-Man; Guo, Yan-Qing; Xiang, Jing-Yao; Wang, Wei-Huan; Zhang, Li-Xia; Gu, Qing-Jiu; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are an important cause of severe gastroenteritis in children. It has been found that RV may recognize the histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as ligands or receptors and bind HBGAs in a type-dependent manner. In this study, we investigated the binding specificity of VP8* proteins from human rotaviruses (RV) that are prevalent in China including genotypes P[4], P[6], and P[8]. Through the saliva- and oligosaccharide-based binding assays, we found that the VP8* proteins of P[4] and P[8] RV showed similar reactivity with the Leb and H type 1 antigens, while P[6] RV weakly bound the Leb antigen. These findings may facilitate further research into RV host specificity and vaccine development. PMID:26274396

  15. Binding Patterns of Rotavirus Genotypes P[4], P[6], and P[8] in China with Histo-Blood Group Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Li, Dan-di; Sun, Xiao-man; Guo, Yan-qing; Xiang, Jing-yao; Wang, Wei-huan; Zhang, Li-xia; Gu, Qing-jiu; Duan, Zhao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are an important cause of severe gastroenteritis in children. It has been found that RV may recognize the histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as ligands or receptors and bind HBGAs in a type-dependent manner. In this study, we investigated the binding specificity of VP8* proteins from human rotaviruses (RV) that are prevalent in China including genotypes P[4], P[6], and P[8]. Through the saliva- and oligosaccharide-based binding assays, we found that the VP8* proteins of P[4] and P[8] RV showed similar reactivity with the Leb and H type 1 antigens, while P[6] RV weakly bound the Leb antigen. These findings may facilitate further research into RV host specificity and vaccine development. PMID:26274396

  16. Receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells induces apoptosis via ectodomain shedding.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Kenzo; Miyamoto, Shingo; Nakashima, Manabu; Wake, Norio

    2010-07-01

    Receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells (RCAS1) is a secreted antigen that induces apoptosis in putative receptor-expressing cells, including peripheral lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells. RCAS1 expression is associated with aggressive characteristics and poor overall survival for 15 different human malignancies. The putative RCAS1 receptor has not been isolated and the mechanism of RCAS1 apoptosis induction remains unclear. This study explores how RCAS1 is involved in apoptosis initiation. The cell lines SiSo and MCF-7, human uterine carcinoma and breast adenocarcinoma, respectively, both express RCAS1, but RCAS1 secretion is undetectable in MCF-7 cells. SiSo and MCF-7 cells were stimulated to induce RCAS1 ectodomain shedding followed by assessment of RCAS1 expression and secretion. Additionally, the RCAS1 putative receptor-expressing human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562 was co-cultured with SiSo, MCF-7, or soluble RCAS1 to follow RCAS1 secretion in apoptosis initiation. RCAS1 secretion was strongly suppressed by inhibitors of metalloproteases, protein kinase C (PKC)-delta, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). K562 apoptosis could be induced only by co-culturing with SiSo or soluble RCAS1. RCAS1 is thus secreted by ectodomain shedding, which may represent a pivotal step in RCAS1-induced apoptosis initiation.

  17. The Leptospiral Antigen Lp49 is a Two-Domain Protein with Putative Protein Binding Function

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira Giuseppe,P.; Oliveira Neves, F.; Nascimento, A.; Gomes Guimaraes, B.

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a life-threatening disease that affects populations worldwide. Currently available vaccines have limited effectiveness and therapeutic interventions are complicated by the difficulty in making an early diagnosis of leptospirosis. The genome of Leptospira interrogans was recently sequenced and comparative genomic analysis contributed to the identification of surface antigens, potential candidates for development of new vaccines and serodiagnosis. Lp49 is a membrane-associated protein recognized by antibodies present in sera from early and convalescent phases of leptospirosis patients. Its crystal structure was determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction using selenomethionine-labelled crystals and refined at 2.0 Angstroms resolution. Lp49 is composed of two domains and belongs to the all-beta-proteins class. The N-terminal domain folds in an immunoglobulin-like beta-sandwich structure, whereas the C-terminal domain presents a seven-bladed beta-propeller fold. Structural analysis of Lp49 indicates putative protein-protein binding sites, suggesting a role in Leptospira-host interaction. This is the first crystal structure of a leptospiral antigen described to date.

  18. Lipid-Free Antigen B Subunits from Echinococcus granulosus: Oligomerization, Ligand Binding, and Membrane Interaction Properties

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Álvarez, Valeria; Franchini, Gisela R.; Pórfido, Jorge L.; Kennedy, Malcolm W.; Ferreira, Ana M.; Córsico, Betina

    2015-01-01

    Background The hydatid disease parasite Echinococcus granulosus has a restricted lipid metabolism, and needs to harvest essential lipids from the host. Antigen B (EgAgB), an abundant lipoprotein of the larval stage (hydatid cyst), is thought to be important in lipid storage and transport. It contains a wide variety of lipid classes, from highly hydrophobic compounds to phospholipids. Its protein component belongs to the cestode-specific Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein family, which includes five 8-kDa isoforms encoded by a multigene family (EgAgB1-EgAgB5). How lipid and protein components are assembled into EgAgB particles remains unknown. EgAgB apolipoproteins self-associate into large oligomers, but the functional contribution of lipids to oligomerization is uncertain. Furthermore, binding of fatty acids to some EgAgB subunits has been reported, but their ability to bind other lipids and transfer them to acceptor membranes has not been studied. Methodology/Principal Findings Lipid-free EgAgB subunits obtained by reverse-phase HPLC were used to analyse their oligomerization, ligand binding and membrane interaction properties. Size exclusion chromatography and cross-linking experiments showed that EgAgB8/2 and EgAgB8/3 can self-associate, suggesting that lipids are not required for oligomerization. Furthermore, using fluorescent probes, both subunits were found to bind fatty acids, but not cholesterol analogues. Analysis of fatty acid transfer to phospholipid vesicles demonstrated that EgAgB8/2 and EgAgB8/3 are potentially capable of transferring fatty acids to membranes, and that the efficiency of transfer is dependent on the surface charge of the vesicles. Conclusions/Significance We show that EgAgB apolipoproteins can oligomerize in the absence of lipids, and can bind and transfer fatty acids to phospholipid membranes. Since imported fatty acids are essential for Echinococcus granulosus, these findings provide a mechanism whereby EgAgB could engage in lipid

  19. Characterization of multiple nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-binding proteins and phospholipases A2 from the venom of the coral snake Micrurus nigrocinctus.

    PubMed

    Alape-Girón, A; Stiles, B; Schmidt, J; Girón-Cortes, M; Thelestam, M; Jörnvall, H; Bergman, T

    1996-02-12

    The presence of multiple nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AchR)-binding proteins and phospholipases A2 was detected in the venom of a member of the Elapinae subfamily, Micrurus nigrocinctus nigrocinctus. Multi-step chromatographies were used to isolate four AchR-binding proteins (Mnn-9, Mnn-4, Mnn-3C and Mnn-1A) and five basic PLA2s (nigroxins A, B, C1, C2 and C3). The Micrurus AchR-binding proteins are antigenically and structurally related to short- and long-chain alpha-neurotoxins from Naja. The nigroxins are antigenically similar and constitute a new antigenic subclass of PLA(2)s. Nigroxins A and B are class I PLA(2)s, structurally more related to enzymes from Bungarinae than to those from Hydrophinae/Laticaudinae. These data contribute to clarify the relationships between Micrurus venom proteins and other elapid toxins and may be useful to improve the neutralizing efficiency of antivenoms.

  20. Transcriptional activation by simian virus 40 large T antigen: interactions with multiple components of the transcription complex.

    PubMed Central

    Gruda, M C; Zabolotny, J M; Xiao, J H; Davidson, I; Alwine, J C

    1993-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen is a potent transcriptional activator of both viral and cellular promoters. Within the SV40 late promoter, a specific upstream element necessary for T-antigen transcriptional activation is the binding site for transcription-enhancing factor 1 (TEF-1). The promoter structure necessary for T-antigen-mediated transcriptional activation appears to be simple. For example, a promoter consisting of upstream TEF-1 binding sites (or other factor-binding sites) and a downstream TATA or initiator element is efficiently activated. It has been demonstrated that transcriptional activation by T antigen does not require direct binding to the DNA; thus, the most direct effect that T antigen could have on these simple promoters would be through protein-protein interactions with either upstream-bound transcription factors, the basal transcription complex, or both. To determine whether such interactions occur, full-length T antigen or segments of it was fused to the glutathione-binding site (GST fusions) or to the Gal4 DNA-binding domain (amino acids 1 to 147) (Gal4 fusions). With the GST fusions, it was found that TEF-1 and the TATA-binding protein (TBP) bound different regions of T antigen. A GST fusion containing amino acids 5 to 172 (region T1) efficiently bound TBP. TEF-1 bound neither region T1 nor a region between amino acids 168 and 373 (region T2); however, it bound efficiently to the combined region (T5) containing amino acids 5 to 383.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8423815

  1. A computational method for identification of vaccine targets from protein regions of conserved human leukocyte antigen binding

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational methods for T cell-based vaccine target discovery focus on selection of highly conserved peptides identified across pathogen variants, followed by prediction of their binding of human leukocyte antigen molecules. However, experimental studies have shown that T cells often target diverse regions in highly variable viral pathogens and this diversity may need to be addressed through redefinition of suitable peptide targets. Methods We have developed a method for antigen assessment and target selection for polyvalent vaccines, with which we identified immune epitopes from variable regions, where all variants bind HLA. These regions, although variable, can thus be considered stable in terms of HLA binding and represent valuable vaccine targets. Results We applied this method to predict CD8+ T-cell targets in influenza A H7N9 hemagglutinin and significantly increased the number of potential vaccine targets compared to the number of targets discovered using the traditional approach where low-frequency peptides are excluded. Conclusions We developed a webserver with an intuitive visualization scheme for summarizing the T cell-based antigenic potential of any given protein or proteome using human leukocyte antigen binding predictions and made a web-accessible software implementation freely available at http://met-hilab.cbs.dtu.dk/blockcons/. PMID:26679766

  2. Antibodies for Growth Hormone and Prolactin Using Multiple Antigen Peptide Immunogens.

    PubMed

    González-Villaseñor; Chen

    1999-05-01

    : Antibodies elicited by novel synthetic peptide antigens derived from a highly conserved domain of the growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) of vertebrates were developed using the multiple antigen peptide approach. The sequence of the antigens is located near the carboxy-terminus in the D domain of the GH and PRL in a cluster of 11 and 10 conserved amino acids, respectively, within a sequence of 18 residues. The synthetic peptides were manually synthesized, purified by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the corresponding antibodies, elicited in rabbits, were cross-reacted with the GH and PRL of a variety of mammalian (human, bovine, ovine, pig, and equine) and nonmammalian (chicken, coho salmon, chum salmon, rainbow trout, catfish and striped bass) vertebrates. The cross-reactivity between the immunogen and its corresponding antigen was tested by immunobloting using either GH or PRL. The GH and PRL of the organisms tested cross-reacted specifically with the corresponding antibody. Chicken and fish GH and PRL showed stronger antibody cross-reactivity than that observed in mammalian sources. These results demonstrate the utility of peptide-derived polyclonal antibodies in the detection of native and recombinant GH and PRL of a variety of vertebrates.

  3. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8positive T-cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presenta...

  4. Further probes into quantitative aspects of competitive binding assays: allowance for effects of antigen multivalency in immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Hogg, P J; Winzor, D J

    1987-04-01

    Effects of antigen multivalency on procedures for the analysis of immunoassays are examined on the basis of a theoretical expression developed in the context of quantitative affinity chromatography [Nichol, L. W., Ward, L. D., and Winzor, D. J. (1981) Biochemistry 20, 4856-4860] but which is also pertinent to antigen-antibody interactions that may be described in terms of a single intrinsic association constant. Quantitative relationships are generated which provide the basis for more rigorous logit-log analyses of radioimmunoassays in which the antigen is multivalent, and an additional, theoretically superior, linear transform of the basic expression is developed. Simulated binding data for a tetravalent antigen system are then used to demonstrate the curvilinearity of the conventional Scatchard plot for such a system despite the homogeneity of binding sites, and the application of the various linear transforms involving logarithmic functions. Of particular interest in that regard is the observation that the traditional logit-log analyses yield linear plots with the predicted slope of unity even though antigen univalence is an implicit assumption in their application. Results obtained in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay of triiodothyronine are then presented to provide, for that system at least, experimental justification of the above-mentioned assumption that the antibody-antigen interactions may be described in terms of a single intrinsic association constant. Finally, an enzyme-linked immunoassay of ferritin is used to illustrate the possibility that a linear Scatchard plot may be obtained with a multivalent antigen under conditions where steric factors restrict participation of an antigen molecule to a single interaction with immobilized antibody. PMID:3579309

  5. High Resolution Mapping of Bactericidal Monoclonal Antibody Binding Epitopes on Staphylococcus aureus Antigen MntC

    PubMed Central

    Gribenko, Alexey V.; Parris, Kevin; Mosyak, Lidia; Li, Sheng; Handke, Luke; Hawkins, Julio C.; Severina, Elena; Matsuka, Yury V.; Anderson, Annaliesa S.

    2016-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus manganese transporter protein MntC is under investigation as a component of a prophylactic S.aureus vaccine. Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies mAB 305-78-7 and mAB 305-101-8 produced using MntC was shown to significantly reduce S. aureus burden in an infant rat model of infection. Earlier interference mapping suggested that a total of 23 monoclonal antibodies generated against MntC could be subdivided into three interference groups, representing three independent immunogenic regions. In the current work binding epitopes for selected representatives of each of these interference groups (mAB 305-72-5 – group 1, mAB 305-78-7 – group 2, and mAB 305-101-8 – group 3) were mapped using Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (DXMS). All of the identified epitopes are discontinuous, with binding surface formed by structural elements that are separated within the primary sequence of the protein but adjacent in the context of the three-dimensional structure. The approach was validated by co-crystallizing the Fab fragment of one of the antibodies (mAB 305-78-7) with MntC and solving the three-dimensional structure of the complex. X-ray results themselves and localization of the mAB 305-78-7 epitope were further validated using antibody binding experiments with MntC variants containing substitutions of key amino acid residues. These results provided insight into the antigenic properties of MntC and how these properties may play a role in protecting the hostagainst S. aureus infection by preventing the capture and transport of Mn2+, a key element that the pathogen uses to evade host immunity. PMID:27689696

  6. Polyomavirus large T antigen binds symmetrical repeats at the viral origin in an asymmetrical manner.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Celia; Jiang, Tao; Banerjee, Pubali; Meinke, Gretchen; D'Abramo, Claudia M; Schaffhausen, Brian; Bohm, Andrew

    2013-12-01

    Polyomaviruses have repeating sequences at their origins of replication that bind the origin-binding domain of virus-encoded large T antigen. In murine polyomavirus, the central region of the origin contains four copies (P1 to P4) of the sequence G(A/G)GGC. They are arranged as a pair of inverted repeats with a 2-bp overlap between the repeats at the center. In contrast to simian virus 40 (SV40), where the repeats are nonoverlapping and all four repeats can be simultaneously occupied, the crystal structure of the four central murine polyomavirus sequence repeats in complex with the polyomavirus origin-binding domain reveals that only three of the four repeats (P1, P2, and P4) are occupied. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirms that the stoichiometry is the same in solution as in the crystal structure. Consistent with these results, mutation of the third repeat has little effect on DNA replication in vivo. Thus, the apparent 2-fold symmetry within the DNA repeats is not carried over to the protein-DNA complex. Flanking sequences, such as the AT-rich region, are known to be important for DNA replication. When the orientation of the central region was reversed with respect to these flanking regions, the origin was still able to replicate and the P3 sequence (now located at the P2 position with respect to the flanking regions) was again dispensable. This highlights the critical importance of the precise sequence of the region containing the pentamers in replication.

  7. Preliminary selection and evaluation of the binding of aptamers against a Hantavirus antigen using fluorescence spectroscopy and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missailidis, Sotiris; de Oliveira, Renata Carvalho; Silva, Dilson; Cortez, Célia Martins; Guterres, Alexandro; Vicente, Luciana Helena Bassan; de Godoy, Daniela Tupy; Lemos, Elba

    2015-12-01

    In this study we have aimed to develop novel aptamers against the Hantavirus nucleoprotein N, a valid antigen already used in the Hantavirus reference laboratory of the Institute Oswaldo Cruz in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Such aptamers, if they are found to bind with high affinity and specificity for the selected hantavirus antigen, they could be translated into novel diagnostic assays with the ability to provide early detection for hantaviroses and their related disease syndromes. In a preliminary screening, we have managed to identify three aptamer species. We have analyzed a short and a long version of these aptamer using fluorescence spectroscopy and modelled their binding. We have identified Stern-Volmer constants for the selected aptamers, which have shown affinity for their target, with a different binding between the short and the long versions of them. Short aptamers have shown to have a higher Stern-Volmer constant and the ability to potentially bind to more than one binding site on the antigen. The information provided by the spectroscopic screening has been invaluable in allowing us to define candidates for further development into diagnostic assays.

  8. Antigen Presentation, Autoantigens, and Immune Regulation in Multiple Sclerosis and Other Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Riedhammer, Christine; Weissert, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation is in the center of the immune system, both in host defense against pathogens, but also when the system is unbalanced and autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) develop. It is not just by chance that a major histocompatibility complex gene is the major genetic susceptibility locus in MS; a feature that MS shares with other autoimmune diseases. The exact etiology of the disease, however, has not been fully understood yet. T cells are regarded as the major players in the disease, but most probably a complex interplay of altered central and peripheral tolerance mechanisms, T-cell and B-cell functions, characteristics of putative autoantigens, and a possible interference of environmental factors like microorganisms are at work. In this review, new data on all these different aspects of antigen presentation and their role in MS will be discussed, probable autoantigens will be summarized, and comparisons to other autoimmune diseases will be drawn. PMID:26136751

  9. Interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein is a potent tolerogen in Lewis rat: suppression of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis is retinal antigen specific

    PubMed Central

    Laliotou, B.; Liversidge, J.; Forrester, J.; Dick, A.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—Administration of unfractionated retinal antigen(s) (retinal extract, RE) suppresses RE induced experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) and offers a potential therapeutic alternative to non-specific immunosuppressive therapies for posterior uveitis and autoimmune diseases. S-Ag and interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP) are two major autoantigens within soluble RE. It was aimed to assess, firstly, as has previously been shown with S-Ag, if IRBP can induce intranasal tolerance and, secondly, the contribution of both these major autoantigens to tolerance induction by whole RE.
METHODS—Animals were tolerised by intranasal administration with S-Ag or IRBP, either alone or in combination, or RE before immunisation with either IRBP or RE. Control animals were administered nasally either PBS or MBP. Daily clinical responses were recorded biomicroscopically and histological grades were obtained using a semiquantitative scoring system. Weekly serum antibody levels to retinal antigens were measured by ELISA and delayed hypersensitivity responses (DTH) were assessed by skin reactivity to intradermal inoculation with retinal or non-specific antigens.
RESULTS—Microgram doses of IRBP successfully suppressed both clinically and histologically IRBP induced EAU. This suppression was accompanied by reduced antigen specific DTH reactivity but maintained T cell dependent (IgG2a) antibody responses. Furthermore, combined S-Ag and IRBP administration afforded equal suppression of RE induced EAU when compared with RE therapy alone. Suppression of RE induced EAU was not achieved with administration of a non-retinal specific autoantigen, MBP. Although individually, both S-Ag and IRBP suppressed RE induced EAU, whole RE was unable to protect against IRBP induced disease.
CONCLUSIONS—Intranasal administration of IRBP suppressed IRBP induced EAU in the Lewis rat. S-Ag and IRBP are the major contributors to the tolerogenicity within RE, despite the known

  10. Enhanced immunogenicity of CTL antigens through mutation of the CD8 binding MHC class I invariant region.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Linda; Lissina, Anna; Vernazza, Jonathan; Gostick, Emma; Laugel, Bruno; Hutchinson, Sarah L; Mirza, Fareed; Dunbar, P Rod; Boulter, Jonathan M; Glick, Meir; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; van den Berg, Hugo A; Price, David A; Sewell, Andrew K

    2007-05-01

    CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are key determinants of immunity to intracellular pathogens and neoplastic cells. Recognition of specific antigens in the form of peptide-MHC class I complexes (pMHCI) presented on the target cell surface is mediated by T cell receptor (TCR) engagement. The CD8 coreceptor binds to invariant domains of pMHCI and facilitates antigen recognition. Here, we investigate the biological effects of a Q115E substitution in the alpha2 domain of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201 that enhances CD8 binding by approximately 50% without altering TCR/pMHCI interactions. Soluble and cell surface-expressed forms of Q115E HLA-A*0201 exhibit enhanced recognition by CTL without loss of specificity. These CD8-enhanced antigens induce greater CD3 zeta chain phosphorylation in cognate CTL leading to substantial increases in cytokine production, proliferation and priming of naive T cells. This effect provides a fundamental new mechanism with which to enhance cellular immunity to specific T cell antigens.

  11. Fluorine substitutions in an antigenic peptide selectively modulate T-cell receptor binding in a minimally perturbing manner

    SciTech Connect

    Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Sommese, Ruth F.; Clemens, John; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Desmond, Clare; Do, Priscilla; Baker, Brian M.

    2010-08-17

    TCR (T-cell receptor) recognition of antigenic peptides bound and presented by MHC (major histocompatibility complex) molecules forms the basis of the cellular immune response to pathogens and cancer. TCRs bind peptide - MHC complexes weakly and with fast kinetics, features which have hindered detailed biophysical studies of these interactions. Modified peptides resulting in enhanced TCR binding could help overcome these challenges. Furthermore, there is considerable interest in using modified peptides with enhanced TCR binding as the basis for clinical vaccines. In the present study, we examined how fluorine substitutions in an antigenic peptide can selectively impact TCR recognition. Using a structure-guided design approach, we found that fluorination of the Tax peptide [HTLV (human T-cell lymphotropic virus)-1 Tax] enhanced binding by the Tax-specific TCR A6, yet weakened binding by the Tax-specific TCR B7. The changes in affinity were consistent with crystallographic structures and fluorine chemistry, and with the A6 TCR independent of other substitutions in the interface. Peptide fluorination thus provides a means to selectively modulate TCR binding affinity without significantly perturbing peptide composition or structure. Lastly, we probed the mechanism of fluorine's effect on TCR binding and we conclude that our results were most consistent with a 'polar hydrophobicity' mechanism, rather than a purely hydrophobic- or electrostatic-based mechanism. This finding should have an impact on other attempts to alter molecular recognition with fluorine.

  12. Intramolecular trimerization, a novel strategy for making multispecific antibodies with controlled orientation of the antigen binding domains.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Compte, Marta; Cuesta, Angel M; Blanco-Toribio, Ana; Harwood, Seandean Lykke; Villate, Maider; Merino, Nekane; Bonet, Jaume; Navarro, Rocio; Muñoz-Briones, Clara; Sørensen, Karen Marie Juul; Mølgaard, Kasper; Oliva, Baldo; Sanz, Laura; Blanco, Francisco J; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a new strategy that allows the rapid and efficient engineering of mono and multispecific trivalent antibodies. By fusing single-domain antibodies from camelid heavy-chain-only immunoglobulins (VHHs) to the N-terminus of a human collagen XVIII trimerization domain (TIE(XVIII)) we produced monospecific trimerbodies that were efficiently secreted as soluble functional proteins by mammalian cells. The purified VHH-TIE(XVIII) trimerbodies were trimeric in solution and exhibited excellent antigen binding capacity. Furthermore, by connecting with two additional glycine-serine-based linkers three VHH-TIE(XVIII) modules on a single polypeptide chain, we present an approach for the rational design of multispecific tandem trimerbodies with defined stoichiometry and controlled orientation. Using this technology we report here the construction and characterization of a tandem VHH-based trimerbody capable of simultaneously binding to three different antigens: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Multispecific tandem VHH-based trimerbodies were well expressed in mammalian cells, had good biophysical properties and were capable of simultaneously binding their targeted antigens. Importantly, these antibodies were very effective in inhibiting the proliferation of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Multispecific VHH-based trimerbodies are therefore ideal candidates for future applications in various therapeutic areas. PMID:27345490

  13. Intramolecular trimerization, a novel strategy for making multispecific antibodies with controlled orientation of the antigen binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Compte, Marta; Cuesta, Angel M.; Blanco-Toribio, Ana; Harwood, Seandean Lykke; Villate, Maider; Merino, Nekane; Bonet, Jaume; Navarro, Rocio; Muñoz-Briones, Clara; Sørensen, Karen Marie Juul; Mølgaard, Kasper; Oliva, Baldo; Sanz, Laura; Blanco, Francisco J.; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a new strategy that allows the rapid and efficient engineering of mono and multispecific trivalent antibodies. By fusing single-domain antibodies from camelid heavy-chain-only immunoglobulins (VHHs) to the N-terminus of a human collagen XVIII trimerization domain (TIEXVIII) we produced monospecific trimerbodies that were efficiently secreted as soluble functional proteins by mammalian cells. The purified VHH-TIEXVIII trimerbodies were trimeric in solution and exhibited excellent antigen binding capacity. Furthermore, by connecting with two additional glycine-serine-based linkers three VHH-TIEXVIII modules on a single polypeptide chain, we present an approach for the rational design of multispecific tandem trimerbodies with defined stoichiometry and controlled orientation. Using this technology we report here the construction and characterization of a tandem VHH-based trimerbody capable of simultaneously binding to three different antigens: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Multispecific tandem VHH-based trimerbodies were well expressed in mammalian cells, had good biophysical properties and were capable of simultaneously binding their targeted antigens. Importantly, these antibodies were very effective in inhibiting the proliferation of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Multispecific VHH-based trimerbodies are therefore ideal candidates for future applications in various therapeutic areas. PMID:27345490

  14. Sequences flanking the pentanucleotide T-antigen binding sites in the polyomavirus core origin help determine selectivity of DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Li, B L; Hock, M; Wang, E; Folk, W R

    1995-01-01

    Replication of the genomes of the polyomaviruses requires two virus-specified elements, the cis-acting origin of DNA replication, with its auxiliary DNA elements, and the trans-acting viral large tumor antigen (T antigen). Appropriate interactions between them initiate the assembly of a replication complex which, together with cellular proteins, is responsible for primer synthesis and DNA chain elongation. The organization of cis-acting elements within the origins of the polyomaviruses which replicate in mammalian cells is conserved; however, these origins are sufficiently distinct that the T antigen of one virus may function inefficiently or not at all to initiate replication at the origin of another virus. We have studied the basis for such replication selectivity between the murine polyomavirus T antigen and the primate lymphotropic polyomavirus origin. The murine polyomavirus T antigen is capable of carrying out the early steps of the assembly of an initiation complex at the lymphotropic papovavirus origin, including binding to and deformation of origin sequences in vitro. However, the T antigen inefficiently unwinds the origin, and unwinding is influenced by sequences flanking the T antigen pentanucleotide binding sites on the late side of the viral core origin. These same sequences contribute to the replication selectivity observed in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that the inefficient unwinding is the cause of the replication defect. These observations suggest a mechanism by which origins of DNA replication can evolve replication selectivity and by which the function of diverse cellular origins might be temporally activated during the S phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. PMID:7494263

  15. Structures of Two Melanoma-Associated Antigens Suggest Allosteric Regulation of Effector Binding

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Anette K.; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Oppermann, Udo C. T.; Cho, Hearn J.; Osman, Roman; Gileadi, Opher

    2016-01-01

    The MAGE (melanoma associated antigen) protein family are tumour-associated proteins normally present only in reproductive tissues such as germ cells of the testis. The human genome encodes over 60 MAGE genes of which one class (containing MAGE-A3 and MAGE-A4) are exclusively expressed in tumours, making them an attractive target for the development of targeted and immunotherapeutic cancer treatments. Some MAGE proteins are thought to play an active role in driving cancer, modulating the activity of E3 ubiquitin ligases on targets related to apoptosis. Here we determined the crystal structures of MAGE-A3 and MAGE-A4. Both proteins crystallized with a terminal peptide bound in a deep cleft between two tandem-arranged winged helix domains. MAGE-A3 (but not MAGE-A4), is predominantly dimeric in solution. Comparison of MAGE-A3 and MAGE-A3 with a structure of an effector-bound MAGE-G1 suggests that a major conformational rearrangement is required for binding, and that this conformational plasticity may be targeted by allosteric binders. PMID:26910052

  16. The role of monogamous bivalency and Fc interactions in the binding of anti-DNA antibodies to DNA antigen.

    PubMed

    Stearns, Nancy A; Pisetsky, David S

    2016-05-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus. These antibodies can bind DNA avidly by monogamous bivalency, a mechanism which requires the interaction of both Fab combining regions with antigenic determinants on the same polynucleotide. To explore further this mechanism, we tested Fab and F(ab')2 fragments prepared from IgG from patient plasmas in an ELISA with native DNA antigen, detecting antibody with a peroxidase conjugated anti-Fab reagent. These studies showed that Fab fragments, which can only bind monovalently, had negligible activity. Although bivalent F(ab')2 fragments would be predicted to bind DNA, these fragments also showed poor anti-DNA activity. Control studies showed that the fragments retained antibody activity to tetanus toxoid and an EBV antigen preparation. Together, these findings suggest that anti-DNA avidity depends on monogamous bivalency, with the antibody Fc portion also influencing DNA binding, in a mechanism which can be termed Fc-dependent monogamous bivalency.

  17. The role of monogamous bivalency and Fc interactions in the binding of anti-DNA antibodies to DNA antigen.

    PubMed

    Stearns, Nancy A; Pisetsky, David S

    2016-05-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus. These antibodies can bind DNA avidly by monogamous bivalency, a mechanism which requires the interaction of both Fab combining regions with antigenic determinants on the same polynucleotide. To explore further this mechanism, we tested Fab and F(ab')2 fragments prepared from IgG from patient plasmas in an ELISA with native DNA antigen, detecting antibody with a peroxidase conjugated anti-Fab reagent. These studies showed that Fab fragments, which can only bind monovalently, had negligible activity. Although bivalent F(ab')2 fragments would be predicted to bind DNA, these fragments also showed poor anti-DNA activity. Control studies showed that the fragments retained antibody activity to tetanus toxoid and an EBV antigen preparation. Together, these findings suggest that anti-DNA avidity depends on monogamous bivalency, with the antibody Fc portion also influencing DNA binding, in a mechanism which can be termed Fc-dependent monogamous bivalency. PMID:27083935

  18. Structure, Receptor Binding, and Antigenicity of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinins from the 1957 H2N2 Pandemic

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Rui; McBride, Ryan; Paulson, James C.; Basler, Christopher F.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-03-04

    The hemagglutinin (HA) envelope protein of influenza viruses mediates essential viral functions, including receptor binding and membrane fusion, and is the major viral antigen for antibody neutralization. The 1957 H2N2 subtype (Asian flu) was one of the three great influenza pandemics of the last century and caused 1 million deaths globally from 1957 to 1968. Three crystal structures of 1957 H2 HAs have been determined at 1.60 to 1.75 {angstrom} resolutions to investigate the structural basis for their antigenicity and evolution from avian to human binding specificity that contributed to its introduction into the human population. These structures, which represent the highest resolutions yet recorded for a complete ectodomain of a glycosylated viral surface antigen, along with the results of glycan microarray binding analysis, suggest that a hydrophobicity switch at residue 226 and elongation of receptor-binding sites were both critical for avian H2 HA to acquire human receptor specificity. H2 influenza viruses continue to circulate in birds and pigs and, therefore, remain a substantial threat for transmission to humans. The H2 HA structure also reveals a highly conserved epitope that could be harnessed in the design of a broader and more universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  19. Targeting Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen and Its Protein Interactions Induces Apoptosis in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Rebekka; Bachke, Siri; Gilljam, Karin M.; Våtsveen, Thea K.; Rø, Torstein B.; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Sundan, Anders; Otterlei, Marit

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological cancer that is considered incurable despite advances in treatment strategy during the last decade. Therapies targeting single pathways are unlikely to succeed due to the heterogeneous nature of the malignancy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a multifunctional protein essential for DNA replication and repair that is often overexpressed in cancer cells. Many proteins involved in the cellular stress response interact with PCNA through the five amino acid sequence AlkB homologue 2 PCNA-interacting motif (APIM). Thus inhibiting PCNA’s protein interactions may be a good strategy to target multiple pathways simultaneously. We initially found that overexpression of peptides containing the APIM sequence increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to contemporary therapeutics. Here we have designed a cell-penetrating APIM-containing peptide, ATX-101, that targets PCNA and show that it has anti-myeloma activity. We found that ATX-101 induced apoptosis in multiple myeloma cell lines and primary cancer cells, while bone marrow stromal cells and primary healthy lymphocytes were much less sensitive. ATX-101-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent and cell cycle phase-independent. ATX-101 also increased multiple myeloma cells’ sensitivity against melphalan, a DNA damaging agent commonly used for treatment of multiple myeloma. In a xenograft mouse model, ATX-101 was well tolerated and increased the anti-tumor activity of melphalan. Therefore, targeting PCNA by ATX-101 may be a novel strategy in multiple myeloma treatment. PMID:23936203

  20. Developing antigen-specific therapies in multiple sclerosis: a tale of Tantalus or Ulysses?

    PubMed

    van Noort JM

    1999-10-01

    Autoreactive T-cell responses directed to myelin proteins in the central nervous system are widely believed to be crucial in the pathology of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, effective ways of selectively targeting these T-cells in order to alter the clinical course of MS in a predictable manner has yet to be demonstrated. This review discusses two recent developments of crucial importance to the rational development of antigen-specific therapy in MS. The very idea of antigen-specific therapy in MS has long faced the challenge of determinant spreading, i.e., the development of novel autoimmune responses as the consequence of tissue damage. This phenomenon has led many to expect that in ongoing MS, many different pathogenic specificities would accumulate. Obviously, this would render antigen-specific therapy very difficult. Recent data now suggest that determinant spreading is most likely to be a transient phenomenon limited only to the first stages of tissue damage. A second development has changed our perspective on the specificity of individual T-cells and, thus, on the suitability of various ways to implement antigen-specific therapy. Evidence is rapidly accumulating that T-cell receptors are much more cross-reactive than previously assumed. This notion poses unexpected challenges to therapeutic approaches in MS that are based on selective targeting of autoreactive TCR. Vaccination with TCR peptides, administration of anti-TCR antibodies and development of therapeutically altered peptide ligands all depend on a significant level of predictability of pathogenic TCR. With such predictability now turning out to be much lower than was previously hoped, selective TCR-directed strategies for intervention may therefore turn out to be much less effective than anticipated. In the development of antigen-specific therapies, the use of whole protein tolerogens now seems to be the most promising route. Oral, intranasal or iv. administration of antigen remain viable options

  1. Characterization of the DNA-binding protein antigen Ku recognized by autoantibodies from patients with rheumatic disorders.

    PubMed

    Mimori, T; Hardin, J A; Steitz, J A

    1986-02-15

    We have characterized the biochemical nature of the Ku protein, the antigen recognized by autoantibodies from certain patients with scleroderma-polymyositis overlap syndrome. From extracts of HeLa cells labeled with [32P]orthophosphate, anti-Ku antibodies precipitated a high molecular weight nucleic acid identified as DNA because of sensitivity to DNase I and resistance to RNase. From extracts of cells labeled with [35S] methionine, these antibodies precipitated two polypeptides of 70,000 and 80,000 Da. These proteins were purified using immunoaffinity column chromatography. In immunoblots most sera containing anti-Ku antibodies recognized both Ku proteins but one serum bound only to the 70,000-Da subunit. When nucleosomal segments of chromatin were used as antigen, anti-Ku antibodies precipitated dinucleosomes and larger forms of chromatin but not mononucleosomes. Thus, the Ku antigen is a novel DNA-binding protein that is at least partially exposed on nucleosomal segments of chromatin.

  2. Antigenicity of Recombinant Maltose Binding Protein-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Fusion Proteins with and without Factor Xa Cleaving

    PubMed Central

    Begg, Douglas J.; Purdie, Auriol C.; Bannantine, John P.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease (JD) in ruminants. Proteomic studies have shown that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis expresses certain proteins when exposed to in vitro physiological stress conditions similar to the conditions experienced within a host during natural infection. Such proteins are hypothesized to be expressed in vivo, are recognized by the host immune system, and may be of potential use in the diagnosis of JD. In this study, 50 recombinant maltose binding protein (MBP)-M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis fusion proteins were evaluated using serum samples from sheep infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and 29 (58%) were found to be antigenic. Among 50 fusion proteins, 10 were evaluated in MBP fusion and factor Xa-cleaved forms. A total of 31 proteins (62%) were found to be antigenic in either MBP fusion or factor Xa-cleaved forms. Antigenicity after cleavage and removal of the MBP tag was marginally enhanced. PMID:24132604

  3. Oriented Immobilization of Fab Fragments by Site-Specific Biotinylation at the Conserved Nucleotide Binding Site for Enhanced Antigen Detection.

    PubMed

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-09-01

    Oriented immobilization of antibodies and antibody fragments has become increasingly important as a result of the efforts to reduce the size of diagnostic and sensor devices to miniaturized dimensions for improved accessibility to the end-user. Reduced dimensions of sensor devices necessitate the immobilized antibodies to conserve their antigen binding activity for proper operation. Fab fragments are becoming more commonly used in small-scaled diagnostic devices due to their small size and ease of manufacture. In this study, we used the previously described UV-NBS(Biotin) method to functionalize Fab fragments with IBA-EG11-Biotin linker utilizing UV energy to initiate a photo-cross-linking reaction between the nucleotide binding site (NBS) on the Fab fragment and IBA-Biotin molecule. Our results demonstrate that immobilization of biotinylated Fab fragments via UV-NBS(Biotin) method generated the highest level of immobilized Fab on surfaces when compared to other typical immobilization methods while preserving antigen binding activity. UV-NBS(Biotin) method provided 432-fold, 114-fold, and 29-fold improved antigen detection sensitivity than physical adsorption, NHS-Biotin, and ε-NH3(+), methods, respectively. Additionally, the limit of detection (LOD) for PSA utilizing Fab fragments immobilized via UV-NBS(Biotin) method was significantly lower than that of the other immobilization methods, with an LOD of 0.4 pM PSA. In summary, site-specific biotinylation of Fab fragments without structural damage or loss in antigen binding activity provides a wide range of application potential for UV-NBS immobilization technique across numerous diagnostic devices and nanotechnologies.

  4. Validation of BKV Large T-antigen ATP-Binding Site as a Target for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Gang; Bueno, Marta; Camachos, Carlos J; Randhawa, Parmjeet

    2009-01-01

    Summary BK virus large T antigen (LTA) is a hexameric protein with a helicase activity that is powered by ATP hydrolysis. A mutant virus with Lys420Ala, Arg421Ala, and Asp504Ala mutations at the ATP binding sites showed marked reduction in viral fitness. This observation indicates that high throughput screening for ATPase inhibitors will be valid strategy to discover anti-BKV drugs. PMID:19084558

  5. Kinetic analysis of a high-affinity antibody/antigen interaction performed by multiple Biacore users.

    PubMed

    Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Navratilova, Iva; Calderon-Cacia, Maria; Fan, Linsey; Thornton, Kevin; Zhu, Mingde; Bos, Tim Vanden; Forte, Carla; Friend, Della; Laird-Offringa, Ite; Tavares, Gisele; Whatley, John; Shi, Ergang; Widom, Angela; Lindquist, Kevin C; Klakamp, Scott; Drake, Andrew; Bohmann, David; Roell, Marina; Rose, Larry; Dorocke, Jill; Roth, Bruce; Luginbühl, Béatrice; Myszka, David G

    2006-05-15

    To explore the reliability of Biacore-based assays, 22 study participants measured the binding of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) to a monoclonal antibody (mAb). Each participant was provided with the same reagents and a detailed experimental protocol. The mAb was immobilized on the sensor chip at three different densities and a two-step assay was used to determine the kinetic and affinity parameters of the PSA/mAb complex. First, PSA was tested over a concentration range of 2.5-600 nM to obtain k(a) information. Second, to define the k(d) of this stable antigen/antibody complex accurately, the highest PSA concentration was retested with the dissociation phase of each binding cycle monitored for 1h. All participants collected data that could be analyzed to obtain kinetic parameters for the interaction. The association and the extended-dissociation data derived from the three antibody surfaces were globally fit using a simple 1:1 interaction model. The average k(a) and k(d) for the PSA/mAb interaction as calculated from the 22 analyses were (4.1+/-0.6) x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and (4.5+/-0.6) x 10(-5) s(-1), respectively. Overall, the experimental standard errors in the rate constants were only approximately 14%. Based on the kinetic rate constants, the affinity (K(D)) of the PSA/mAb interaction was 1.1+/-0.2 nM.

  6. Variable domain-linked oligosaccharides of a human monoclonal IgG: structure and influence on antigen binding.

    PubMed Central

    Leibiger, H; Wüstner, D; Stigler, R D; Marx, U

    1999-01-01

    The variable-domain-attached oligosaccharide side chains of a human IgG produced by a human-human-mouse heterohybridoma were analysed. In addition to the conserved N-glycosylation site at Asn-297, an N-glycosylation consensus sequence (Asn-Asn-Ser) is located at position 75 in the variable region of its heavy chain. The antibody was cleaved into its antigen-binding (Fab) and crystallizing fragments. The oligosaccharides of the Fab fragment were released by digestion with various endo- and exoglycosidases and analysed by anion-exchange chromatography and fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis. The predominant components were disialyl- bi-antennary and tetra-sialyl tetra-antennary complex carbohydrates. Of note is the presence in this human IgG of oligosaccharides containing N-glycolylneuraminic acid and N-acetylneuraminic acid in the ratio of 94:6. Furthermore, we determined N-acetylgalactosamine in the Fab fragment of this antibody, suggesting the presence of O-linked carbohydrates. A three-dimensional structure of the glycosylated variable (Fv) fragment was suggested using computer-assisted modelling. In addition, the influence of the Fv-associated oligosaccharides of the CBGA1 antibody on antigen binding was tested in several ELISA systems. Deglycosylation resulted in a decreased antigen-binding activity. PMID:10024532

  7. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 binding residues in intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2) and the integrin binding surface in the ICAM subfamily

    PubMed Central

    Casasnovas, José M.; Pieroni, Cristiana; Springer, Timothy A.

    1999-01-01

    The crystal structure of intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2) revealed significant differences in the presentation of the critical acidic residue important for integrin binding between I and non-I-domain integrin ligands. Based on this crystal structure, we mutagenized ICAM-2 to localize the binding site for the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1). The integrin binding site runs diagonally across the GFC β-sheet and includes residues on the CD edge of the β-sandwich. The site is oblong and runs along a flat ridge on the upper half of domain 1, which is proposed to dock to a groove in the I domain of LFA-1, with the critical Glu-37 residue ligating the Mg2+ in the I domain. Previous mutagenesis of ICAM-1 and ICAM-3, interpreted in light of the recently determined ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 structures, suggests similar binding sites. By contrast, major differences are seen with vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), which binds α4 integrins that lack an I domain. The binding site on VCAM-1 includes the lower portion of domain 1 and the upper part of domain 2, whereas the LFA-1 binding site on ICAM is confined to the upper part of domain 1. PMID:10077629

  8. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 binding residues in intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2) and the integrin binding surface in the ICAM subfamily.

    PubMed

    Casasnovas, J M; Pieroni, C; Springer, T A

    1999-03-16

    The crystal structure of intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2) revealed significant differences in the presentation of the critical acidic residue important for integrin binding between I and non-I-domain integrin ligands. Based on this crystal structure, we mutagenized ICAM-2 to localize the binding site for the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1). The integrin binding site runs diagonally across the GFC beta-sheet and includes residues on the CD edge of the beta-sandwich. The site is oblong and runs along a flat ridge on the upper half of domain 1, which is proposed to dock to a groove in the I domain of LFA-1, with the critical Glu-37 residue ligating the Mg2+ in the I domain. Previous mutagenesis of ICAM-1 and ICAM-3, interpreted in light of the recently determined ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 structures, suggests similar binding sites. By contrast, major differences are seen with vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), which binds alpha4 integrins that lack an I domain. The binding site on VCAM-1 includes the lower portion of domain 1 and the upper part of domain 2, whereas the LFA-1 binding site on ICAM is confined to the upper part of domain 1. PMID:10077629

  9. The antigenic landscape of multiple myeloma: mass spectrometry (re)defines targets for T-cell–based immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Walz, Simon; Kowalewski, Daniel Johannes; Schuster, Heiko; Weisel, Katja; Backert, Linus; Kahn, Stefan; Nelde, Annika; Stroh, Tatjana; Handel, Martin; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Kanz, Lothar; Salih, Helmut Rainer; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Direct analysis of HLA-presented antigens by mass spectrometry provides a comprehensive view on the antigenic landscape of different tissues/malignancies and enables the identification of novel, pathophysiologically relevant T-cell epitopes. Here, we present a systematic and comparative study of the HLA class I and II presented, nonmutant antigenome of multiple myeloma (MM). Quantification of HLA surface expression revealed elevated HLA molecule counts on malignant plasma cells compared with normal B cells, excluding relevant HLA downregulation in MM. Analyzing the presentation of established myeloma-associated T-cell antigens on the HLA ligandome level, we found a substantial proportion of antigens to be only infrequently presented on primary myelomas or to display suboptimal degrees of myeloma specificity. However, unsupervised analysis of our extensive HLA ligand data set delineated a panel of 58 highly specific myeloma-associated antigens (including multiple myeloma SET domain containing protein) which are characterized by frequent and exclusive presentation on myeloma samples. Functional characterization of these target antigens revealed peptide-specific, preexisting CD8+ T-cell responses exclusively in myeloma patients, which is indicative of pathophysiological relevance. Furthermore, in vitro priming experiments revealed that peptide-specific T-cell responses can be induced in response-naive myeloma patients. Together, our results serve to guide antigen selection for T-cell–based immunotherapy of MM. PMID:26138685

  10. Host range and cell cycle activation properties of polyomavirus large T-antigen mutants defective in pRB binding

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, R.; Bauer, P.H.; Benjamin, T.L.; Crissman, H.A.; Bradbury, E.M. |

    1994-11-01

    The authors have examined the growth properties of polyomavirus large T-antigen mutants that ar unable to bind pRB, the product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene. These mutants grow poorly on primary mouse cells yet grow well on NIH 3T3 and other established mouse cell lines. Preinfection of primary baby mouse kidney (BMK) epithelial cells with wild-type simian virus 40 renders these cells permissive to growth of pRB-binding polyomavirus mutants. Conversely, NIH 3T3 cells transfected by and expressing wild-type human pRB become nonpermissive. Primary fibroblasts for mouse embryos that carry a homozygous knockout of the RB gene are permissive, while those from normal littermates are nonpermissive. The host range of polyomavirus pRB-binding mutants is thus determined by expression or lack of expression of functional pRB by the host. These results demonstrate the importance of pRB binding by large T antigen for productive viral infection in primary cells. Failure of pRB-binding mutants to grow well in BMK cells correlates with their failure to induce progression from G{sub 0} or G{sub 1} through the S phase of the cell cycle. Time course studies show delayed synthesis and lower levels of accumulation of large T antigen, viral DNA, and VP1 in mutant compared with wild-type virus-infected BMK cells. These results support a model in which productive infection by polyomavirus in normal mouse cells is tightly coupled to the induction and progression of the cell cycle. 48 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Opposite effects on human colon cancer cell proliferation of two dietary Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen-binding lectins.

    PubMed

    Yu, L G; Milton, J D; Fernig, D G; Rhodes, J M

    2001-02-01

    Increased cell surface expression of the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF antigen, Galbeta1-3GalNAcalpha-) is a common feature in malignant and pre-malignant epithelia. Our previous studies have shown that dietary TF-binding lectins from peanut (Arachis hypogea) and edible mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) produce marked but different effects on human intestinal epithelial cell proliferation. This study investigates the proliferative effects of the other two known dietary TF-binding lectins: jacalin (Artocarpus integrifolia, JAC) and amaranth lectin (Amaranthus caudatus, ACA). JAC produced dose-dependent and non-cytotoxic inhibition of proliferation in HT29 human colon cancer cells with maximal effects of 46 +/- 4% at 20 microg/ml, whereas ACA produced dose-dependent stimulation of proliferation with maximal effects of 22 +/- 3% at 20 microg/ml when assessed both by incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA and by cell counting. The lectin-mediated effects were inhibitable by the presence of appropriate Galbeta1-3GalNAc-expressing glycoproteins but differences existed between JAC and ACA in their patterns of inhibition by such substances. Ligand binding equilibrium studies using iodinated lectins revealed different Kd of the two lectins for HT29 cell surface glycoproteins. Lectin blots of cell membrane extracts showed different binding patterns in all the four TF-binding lectins. These results provide further evidence that dietary TF-binding lectins can have marked effects on the proliferation of human malignant gastro-intestinal epithelial cells and hence may play a role in intestinal cancer development, and also show that the biological effects of dietary lectins cannot be predicted solely from their carbohydrate binding properties.

  12. Binding to histo-blood group antigen-expressing bacteria protects human norovirus from acute heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate if histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) expressing bacteria have any protective role on human norovirus (NoV) from acute heat stress. Eleven bacterial strains were included, belonging to Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Clostridium difficile, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, and B. longum. HBGA expression of the bacteria as well as binding of human NoV virus-like particles (VLPs, GI.1, and GII.4 strains) to the bacteria were detected by flow cytometry. NoV VLPs pre-incubated with HBGA expressing or non-HBGA expressing bacteria were heated and detected by both direct ELISA and porcine gastric mucin-binding assay. The NoV-binding abilities of the bacteria correlated well with their HBGA expression profiles. Two HBGA expressing E. coli (LMG8223 and LFMFP861, both GI.1 and GII.4 binders) and one non-HBGA expressing E. coli (ATCC8739, neither GI.1 nor GII.4 binder) were selected for the heat treatment test with NoV VLPs. Compared with the same cell numbers of non-HBGA expressing E. coli, the presence of HBGA-expressing E. coli could always maintain higher antigen integrity, as well as mucin-binding ability of NoV VLPs of both GI.1 and GII.4 after heat-treatment at 90°C for 2 min. These results indicate that HBGA-expressing bacteria may protect NoVs during the food processing treatments, thereby facilitating their transmission. PMID:26191052

  13. Acquisition of Functional Antibodies That Block the Binding of Erythrocyte-Binding Antigen 175 and Protection Against Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Children

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Vashti; Ramsland, Paul A.; Guy, Andrew J.; Siba, Peter M.; Mueller, Ivo; Richards, Jack S.; Beeson, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The targets and mechanisms of human immunity to malaria are poorly understood, which poses a major barrier to malaria vaccine development. Antibodies play a key role in human immunity and may act by inhibiting receptor-binding functions of key merozoite invasion ligands. Antibodies to the major invasion ligand and vaccine candidate, erythrocyte-binding antigen 175 (EBA-175), have been linked with protection, but how these antibodies function has not been established. Methods. We developed 2 new assays that quantify the ability of antibodies to inhibit binding of EBA-175 to its erythrocyte receptor, glycophorin A, using either native or recombinant EBA-175. Binding-inhibitory antibodies were evaluated in a longitudinal cohort study of Papua New Guinean children and related to risk of malaria, age, infection status, and markers of parasite exposure. Results. Binding-inhibition assays (BIAs) were reproducible, and the 2 assays had a high level of agreement. Inhibitory antibodies were common among children, acquired in association with markers of increasing parasite exposure, and high in those children with active infection. Inhibitory antibodies correlated with total immunoglobulin G levels to the EBA-175 binding domain (region II). Importantly, binding-inhibitory antibodies were significantly associated with protection from symptomatic malaria when measured using either BIA. Conclusions. Findings suggest that naturally acquired binding-inhibitory antibodies are an important functional mechanism that contributes to protection against malaria and further supports the potential of EBA-175 as a vaccine candidate. Identifying vaccines and approaches that induce potent binding-inhibitory antibodies may be a valuable strategy in the development of highly efficacious malaria vaccines. PMID:26136391

  14. Multiple binding modes for dicationic Hoechst 33258 to DNA.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yuan; Shi, Ruina; Li, Xiaomin; Zhao, Meiping; Li, Yuanzong

    2007-06-28

    The binding of dicationic Hoechst 33258 (ligand) to DNA was characterized by means of the fluorescence spectra, fluorescence intensity titration, time-resolved fluorescence decay, light scattering, circular dichroism, and fluorescence thermal denaturation measurements, and two binding modes were distinguished by the experimental results. Type 1 binding has the stoichiometry of one ligand to more than 12 base pairs, and it is defined as quasi-minor groove binding which has the typical prolonged fluorescence lifetime of about 4.4 ns. In type 1 binding, planar conformation of the ligand is favorable. Type 2 binding with phosphate to ligand ratio (P/L) < 2.5 has the stoichiometry of one ligand to two phosphates. It is defined as a highly dense and orderly stacked binding with DNA backbone as the template. Electrostatic interactions between doubly protonated ligands and negatively charged DNA backbone play a predominant role in the type 2 binding mode. The characteristics of this type of binding result in a twisted conformation of the ligand that has a fluorescence lifetime of less than 1 ns. The results also indicate that the binding is in a cooperative manner primarily by stacking of the aromatic rings of the neighboring ligands. Type 1 binding is only observed for double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with affinity constant of 1.83 x 10(7) M-1. In the type 2 binding mode, the binding affinity constants are 4.9 x 10(6) and 4.3 x 10(6) M-1 for dsDNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), respectively. The type 2 binding is base pair independent while the type 1 binding is base pair related. The experiments described in this paper revealed that the dication bindings are different from the monocation bindings reported by previous study. The dication binding leads to stronger aggregation at low ligand concentration and results in orderly arrangements of the ligands along DNA chains. Furthermore the dication binding is demonstrated to be beneficial for enhancing the DNA's stability.

  15. Epitope Mapping of a Monoclonal Antibody Directed against Neisserial Heparin Binding Antigen Using Next Generation Sequencing of Antigen-Specific Libraries.

    PubMed

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Donnarumma, Danilo; Bartolini, Erika; Borgogni, Erica; Bruttini, Marco; Santini, Laura; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Patanè, Francesco; Biondo, Carmelo; Norais, Nathalie; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    We explore here the potential of a newly described technology, which is named PROFILER and is based on next generation sequencing of gene-specific lambda phage-displayed libraries, to rapidly and accurately map monoclonal antibody (mAb) epitopes. For this purpose, we used a novel mAb (designated 31E10/E7) directed against Neisserial Heparin-Binding Antigen (NHBA), a component of the anti-group B meningococcus Bexsero® vaccine. An NHBA phage-displayed library was affinity-selected with mAb 31E10/E7, followed by massive sequencing of the inserts present in antibody-selected phage pools. Insert analysis identified an amino acid stretch (D91-A128) in the N-terminal domain, which was shared by all of the mAb-enriched fragments. Moreover, a recombinant fragment encompassing this sequence could recapitulate the immunoreactivity of the entire NHBA molecule against mAb 31E10/E7. These results were confirmed using a panel of overlapping recombinant fragments derived from the NHBA vaccine variant and a set of chemically synthetized peptides covering the 10 most frequent antigenic variants. Furthermore, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass-spectrometry analysis of the NHBA-mAb 31E10/E7 complex was also compatible with mapping of the epitope to the D91-A128 region. Collectively, these results indicate that the PROFILER technology can reliably identify epitope-containing antigenic fragments and requires considerably less work, time and reagents than other epitope mapping methods. PMID:27508302

  16. Epitope Mapping of a Monoclonal Antibody Directed against Neisserial Heparin Binding Antigen Using Next Generation Sequencing of Antigen-Specific Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Donnarumma, Danilo; Bartolini, Erika; Borgogni, Erica; Bruttini, Marco; Santini, Laura; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Patanè, Francesco; Biondo, Carmelo; Norais, Nathalie; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    We explore here the potential of a newly described technology, which is named PROFILER and is based on next generation sequencing of gene-specific lambda phage-displayed libraries, to rapidly and accurately map monoclonal antibody (mAb) epitopes. For this purpose, we used a novel mAb (designated 31E10/E7) directed against Neisserial Heparin-Binding Antigen (NHBA), a component of the anti-group B meningococcus Bexsero® vaccine. An NHBA phage-displayed library was affinity-selected with mAb 31E10/E7, followed by massive sequencing of the inserts present in antibody-selected phage pools. Insert analysis identified an amino acid stretch (D91-A128) in the N-terminal domain, which was shared by all of the mAb-enriched fragments. Moreover, a recombinant fragment encompassing this sequence could recapitulate the immunoreactivity of the entire NHBA molecule against mAb 31E10/E7. These results were confirmed using a panel of overlapping recombinant fragments derived from the NHBA vaccine variant and a set of chemically synthetized peptides covering the 10 most frequent antigenic variants. Furthermore, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass-spectrometry analysis of the NHBA-mAb 31E10/E7 complex was also compatible with mapping of the epitope to the D91-A128 region. Collectively, these results indicate that the PROFILER technology can reliably identify epitope-containing antigenic fragments and requires considerably less work, time and reagents than other epitope mapping methods. PMID:27508302

  17. Evidence that verotoxins (Shiga-like toxins) from Escherichia coli bind to P blood group antigens of human erythrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bitzan, M; Richardson, S; Huang, C; Boyd, B; Petric, M; Karmali, M A

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of verotoxins (VTs) with human erythrocytes (RBCs) in vitro was investigated, with particular reference to the role of P blood group glycolipids that are structurally related to the known VT receptors. RBC binding of purified VT1, VT2, VT2c, and VT2e was detected by direct and indirect immunofluorescence. Glycolipids were extracted from defined RBCs, separated by thin-layer chromatography, and assessed for VT binding in an overlay assay by adding toxin and specific antibodies. All VTs bound to P1 phenotype (Pk, P, and P1 antigens) and P2 phenotype (Pk and P antigens) RBCs but not to p phenotype (lacking the Pk, P, and P1 antigens) RBCs. Binding of VT1 and VT2 was approximately 10-fold greater to P1 and the rare Pk2 (Pk antigen but no P1 or P antigen) phenotype cells than to P2 phenotype RBCs, whereas VT2e bound equally well to P1 and P2 phenotype cells. The VT1 and VT2 immunofluorescence results correlated with the detection of P1 and/or increased amounts of Pk (globotriaosylceramide) antigen; VT2e immunofluorescence correlated with the detection of P (globotetraosylceramide) antigen. The Pk band pattern and VT binding observed in the thin-layer chromatogram of human P1 and P phenotype RBC extracts varied from that of human kidney and Pk1 phenotype (Pk and P1 antigens) RBCs. We conclude that each VT binds to human RBCs in vitro by utilizing specific P blood group glycolipids as receptors. On P1 and P phenotype RBCs, the accessibility of the Pk antigen for VTs appeared to be restricted. The occurrence of VT-RBC binding in natural VT-producing Escherichia coli disease and its relevance for the pathophysiology of hemolytic uremic syndrome remain to be established. Images PMID:8039905

  18. Effect of IVIG Formulation on IgG Binding to Self- and Exo- Antigens In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Cattepoel, Susann; Gaida, Annette; Kropf, Alain; Nolte, Marc W; Bolli, Reinhard; Miescher, Sylvia M

    2016-01-01

    In relation to the recent trials of Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) it was demonstrated that different IgG preparations contain varying amounts of natural anti-amyloid β (Aβ) antibodies as measured by ELISA. We therefore investigated the relevance of ELISA data for measuring low-affinity antibodies, such as anti-Aβ. We analysed the binding of different commercial Immunoglobulin G (IgG) preparations to Aβ, actin and tetanus toxoid in different binding assays to further investigate the possible cause for observed differences in binding to Aβ and actin between different IgG preparations. We show that the differences of commercial IgG preparations in binding to Aβ and actin in ELISA assays are artefactual and only evident in in vitro binding assays. In functional assays and in vivo animal studies the different IVIG preparations exhibited very similar potency. ELISA data alone are not appropriate to analyse and rank the binding capacity of low-affinity antibodies to Aβ or other endogenous self-antigens contained in IgG preparations. Additional analytical methods should be adopted to complement ELISA data. PMID:27561008

  19. Effect of IVIG Formulation on IgG Binding to Self- and Exo- Antigens In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cattepoel, Susann; Gaida, Annette; Kropf, Alain; Nolte, Marc W.; Bolli, Reinhard; Miescher, Sylvia M.

    2016-01-01

    In relation to the recent trials of Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) it was demonstrated that different IgG preparations contain varying amounts of natural anti-amyloid β (Aβ) antibodies as measured by ELISA. We therefore investigated the relevance of ELISA data for measuring low-affinity antibodies, such as anti-Aβ. We analysed the binding of different commercial Immunoglobulin G (IgG) preparations to Aβ, actin and tetanus toxoid in different binding assays to further investigate the possible cause for observed differences in binding to Aβ and actin between different IgG preparations. We show that the differences of commercial IgG preparations in binding to Aβ and actin in ELISA assays are artefactual and only evident in in vitro binding assays. In functional assays and in vivo animal studies the different IVIG preparations exhibited very similar potency. ELISA data alone are not appropriate to analyse and rank the binding capacity of low-affinity antibodies to Aβ or other endogenous self-antigens contained in IgG preparations. Additional analytical methods should be adopted to complement ELISA data. PMID:27561008

  20. sNebula, a network-based algorithm to predict binding between human leukocyte antigens and peptides

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Mendrick, Donna L.; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides is important to understand the functioning of the immune system. Since it is time-consuming and costly to measure the binding between large numbers of HLAs and peptides, computational methods including machine learning models and network approaches have been developed to predict HLA-peptide binding. However, there are several limitations for the existing methods. We developed a network-based algorithm called sNebula to address these limitations. We curated qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data and demonstrated the prediction performance of sNebula on this dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation and five-fold cross-validations. This algorithm can predict not only peptides of different lengths and different types of HLAs, but also the peptides or HLAs that have no existing binding data. We believe sNebula is an effective method to predict HLA-peptide binding and thus improve our understanding of the immune system. PMID:27558848

  1. sNebula, a network-based algorithm to predict binding between human leukocyte antigens and peptides.

    PubMed

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Mendrick, Donna L; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides is important to understand the functioning of the immune system. Since it is time-consuming and costly to measure the binding between large numbers of HLAs and peptides, computational methods including machine learning models and network approaches have been developed to predict HLA-peptide binding. However, there are several limitations for the existing methods. We developed a network-based algorithm called sNebula to address these limitations. We curated qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data and demonstrated the prediction performance of sNebula on this dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation and five-fold cross-validations. This algorithm can predict not only peptides of different lengths and different types of HLAs, but also the peptides or HLAs that have no existing binding data. We believe sNebula is an effective method to predict HLA-peptide binding and thus improve our understanding of the immune system. PMID:27558848

  2. Studies on Immunogenicity and Antigenicity of Baculovirus-Expressed Binding Region of Plasmodium falciparum EBA-140 Merozoite Ligand.

    PubMed

    Zerka, Agata; Rydzak, Joanna; Lass, Anna; Szostakowska, Beata; Nahorski, Wacław; Wroczyńska, Agnieszka; Myjak, Przemyslaw; Krotkiewski, Hubert; Jaskiewicz, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    The erythrocyte binding ligand 140 (EBA-140) is a member of the Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte binding antigens (EBA) family, which are considered as prospective candidates for malaria vaccine development. EBA proteins were identified as important targets for naturally acquired inhibitory antibodies. Natural antibody response against EBA-140 ligand was found in individuals living in malaria-endemic areas. The EBA-140 ligand is a paralogue of the well-characterized P. falciparum EBA-175 protein. They both share homology of domain structure, including the binding region (Region II), which consists of two homologous F1 and F2 domains and is responsible for ligand-erythrocyte receptor interaction during merozoite invasion. It was shown that the erythrocyte receptor for EBA-140 ligand is glycophorin C-a minor human erythrocyte sialoglycoprotein. In studies on the immunogenicity of P. falciparum EBA ligands, the recombinant proteins are of great importance. In this report, we have demonstrated that the recombinant baculovirus-obtained EBA-140 Region II is immunogenic and antigenic. It can raise specific antibodies in rabbits, and it is recognized by natural antibodies present in sera of patients with malaria, and thus, it may be considered for inclusion in multicomponent blood-stage vaccines. PMID:26439848

  3. Asymmetric Assembly of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Large T-Antigen Origin Binding Domains at the Viral Origin

    SciTech Connect

    C Harrison; G Meinke; H Kwun; H Rogalin; P Phelan; P Bullock; Y Chang; P Moore; A Bohm

    2011-12-31

    The double-stranded DNA polyomavirus Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes Merkel cell carcinoma, an aggressive but rare human skin cancer that most often affects immunosuppressed and elderly persons. As in other polyomaviruses, the large T-antigen of MCV recognizes the viral origin of replication by binding repeating G(A/G)GGC pentamers. The spacing, number, orientation, and necessity of repeats for viral replication differ, however, from other family members such as SV40 and murine polyomavirus. We report here the 2.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of the MCV large T-antigen origin binding domain (OBD) in complex with a DNA fragment from the MCV origin of replication. Consistent with replication data showing that three of the G(A/G)GGC-like binding sites near the center of the origin are required for replication, the crystal structure contains three copies of the OBD. This stoichiometry was verified using isothermal titration calorimetry. The affinity for G(A/G)GGC-containing double-stranded DNA was found to be {approx} 740 nM, approximately 8-fold weaker than the equivalent domain in SV40 for the analogous region of the SV40 origin. The difference in affinity is partially attributable to DNA-binding residue Lys331 (Arg154 in SV40). In contrast to SV40, a small protein-protein interface is observed between MCV OBDs when bound to the central region of the origin. This protein-protein interface is reminiscent of that seen in bovine papilloma virus E1 protein. Mutational analysis indicates, however, that this interface contributes little to DNA binding energy.

  4. Asymmetric assembly of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T-antigen origin binding domains at the viral origin.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Celia J; Meinke, Gretchen; Kwun, Hyun Jin; Rogalin, Henry; Phelan, Paul J; Bullock, Peter A; Chang, Yuan; Moore, Patrick S; Bohm, Andrew

    2011-06-17

    The double-stranded DNA polyomavirus Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes Merkel cell carcinoma, an aggressive but rare human skin cancer that most often affects immunosuppressed and elderly persons. As in other polyomaviruses, the large T-antigen of MCV recognizes the viral origin of replication by binding repeating G(A/G)GGC pentamers. The spacing, number, orientation, and necessity of repeats for viral replication differ, however, from other family members such as SV40 and murine polyomavirus. We report here the 2.9 Å crystal structure of the MCV large T-antigen origin binding domain (OBD) in complex with a DNA fragment from the MCV origin of replication. Consistent with replication data showing that three of the G(A/G)GGC-like binding sites near the center of the origin are required for replication, the crystal structure contains three copies of the OBD. This stoichiometry was verified using isothermal titration calorimetry. The affinity for G(A/G)GGC-containing double-stranded DNA was found to be ~740 nM, approximately 8-fold weaker than the equivalent domain in SV40 for the analogous region of the SV40 origin. The difference in affinity is partially attributable to DNA-binding residue Lys331 (Arg154 in SV40). In contrast to SV40, a small protein-protein interface is observed between MCV OBDs when bound to the central region of the origin. This protein-protein interface is reminiscent of that seen in bovine papilloma virus E1 protein. Mutational analysis indicates, however, that this interface contributes little to DNA binding energy.

  5. A role for multiple chimeric antigen receptor-expressing leukocytes in antigen-specific responses to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Carmen S.M.; John, Liza B.; Devaud, Christel; Prince, Miles H.; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Trapani, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    While adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells can induce remission of some tumors, the role of other CAR-modified leukocytes is not well characterized. In this study, we characterize the function of leukocytes including natural killer (NK) cells, macrophages and CAR T cells from transgenic mice expressing a CAR under the control of the pan-hematopoietic promoter, vav, and determine the ability of these mice to respond to ERB expressing tumors. We demonstrate the anti-tumor functions of leukocytes, including antigen specific cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion. The adoptive transfer of CAR T cells provided a greater survival advantage in the E0771ERB tumor model than their wildtype (WT) counterparts. In addition, CAR NK cells and CAR T cells also mediated increased survival in the RMAERB tumor model. When challenged with Her2 expressing tumors, F38 mice were shown to mount an effective immune response, resulting in tumor rejection and long-term survival. This was shown to be predominantly dependent on both CD8+ T cells and NK cells. However, macrophages and CD4+ T cells were also shown to contribute to this response. Overall, this study highlights the use of the vav-CAR mouse model as a unique tool to determine the anti-tumor function of various immune subsets, either alone or when acting alongside CAR T cells in adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27153556

  6. Pre-clinical evaluation of CD38 chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells for the treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Drent, Esther; Groen, Richard W J; Noort, Willy A; Themeli, Maria; Lammerts van Bueren, Jeroen J; Parren, Paul W H I; Kuball, Jürgen; Sebestyen, Zsolt; Yuan, Huipin; de Bruijn, Joost; van de Donk, Niels W C J; Martens, Anton C M; Lokhorst, Henk M; Mutis, Tuna

    2016-05-01

    Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells is a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy. The CD38 molecule, with its high expression on multiple myeloma cells, appears a suitable target for antibody therapy. Prompted by this, we used three different CD38 antibody sequences to generate second-generation retroviral CD38-chimeric antigen receptor constructs with which we transduced T cells from healthy donors and multiple myeloma patients. We then evaluated the preclinical efficacy and safety of the transduced T cells. Irrespective of the donor and antibody sequence, CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells proliferated, produced inflammatory cytokines and effectively lysed malignant cell lines and primary malignant cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and multi-drug resistant multiple myeloma in a cell-dose, and CD38-dependent manner, despite becoming CD38-negative during culture. CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells also displayed significant anti-tumor effects in a xenotransplant model, in which multiple myeloma tumors were grown in a human bone marrow-like microenvironment. CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells also appeared to lyse the CD38(+) fractions of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells, monocytes, natural killer cells, and to a lesser extent T and B cells but did not inhibit the outgrowth of progenitor cells into various myeloid lineages and, furthermore, were effectively controllable with a caspase-9-based suicide gene. These results signify the potential importance of CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells as therapeutic tools for CD38(+) malignancies and warrant further efforts to diminish the undesired effects of this immunotherapy using appropriate strategies. PMID:26858358

  7. Pre-clinical evaluation of CD38 chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells for the treatment of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Drent, Esther; Groen, Richard W.J.; Noort, Willy A.; Themeli, Maria; Lammerts van Bueren, Jeroen J.; Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Kuball, Jürgen; Sebestyen, Zsolt; Yuan, Huipin; de Bruijn, Joost; van de Donk, Niels W.C.J.; Martens, Anton C.M.; Lokhorst, Henk M.; Mutis, Tuna

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells is a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy. The CD38 molecule, with its high expression on multiple myeloma cells, appears a suitable target for antibody therapy. Prompted by this, we used three different CD38 antibody sequences to generate second-generation retroviral CD38-chimeric antigen receptor constructs with which we transduced T cells from healthy donors and multiple myeloma patients. We then evaluated the preclinical efficacy and safety of the transduced T cells. Irrespective of the donor and antibody sequence, CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells proliferated, produced inflammatory cytokines and effectively lysed malignant cell lines and primary malignant cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and multi-drug resistant multiple myeloma in a cell-dose, and CD38-dependent manner, despite becoming CD38-negative during culture. CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells also displayed significant anti-tumor effects in a xenotransplant model, in which multiple myeloma tumors were grown in a human bone marrow-like microenvironment. CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells also appeared to lyse the CD38+ fractions of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells, monocytes, natural killer cells, and to a lesser extent T and B cells but did not inhibit the outgrowth of progenitor cells into various myeloid lineages and, furthermore, were effectively controllable with a caspase-9-based suicide gene. These results signify the potential importance of CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells as therapeutic tools for CD38+ malignancies and warrant further efforts to diminish the undesired effects of this immunotherapy using appropriate strategies. PMID:26858358

  8. A novel M2e-multiple antigenic peptide providing heterologous protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Wen, Feng; Ma, Ji-Hong; Yu, Hai; Yang, Fu-Ru; Huang, Meng; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Li, Ze-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Hui; Li, Guo-Xin; Jiang, Yi-Feng; Tong, Wu; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2016-03-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SwIVs) cause considerable morbidity and mortality in domestic pigs, resulting in a significant economic burden. Moreover, pigs have been considered to be a possible mixing vessel in which novel strains loom. Here, we developed and evaluated a novel M2e-multiple antigenic peptide (M2e-MAP) as a supplemental antigen for inactivated H3N2 vaccine to provide cross-protection against two main subtypes of SwIVs, H1N1 and H3N2. The novel tetra-branched MAP was constructed by fusing four copies of M2e to one copy of foreign T helper cell epitopes. A high-yield reassortant H3N2 virus was generated by plasmid based reverse genetics. The efficacy of the novel H3N2 inactivated vaccines with or without M2e-MAP supplementation was evaluated in a mouse model. M2e-MAP conjugated vaccine induced strong antibody responses in mice. Complete protection against the heterologous swine H1N1 virus was observed in mice vaccinated with M2e-MAP combined vaccine. Moreover, this novel peptide confers protection against lethal challenge of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1). Taken together, our results suggest the combined immunization of reassortant inactivated H3N2 vaccine and the novel M2e-MAP provided cross-protection against swine and human viruses and may serve as a promising approach for influenza vaccine development. PMID:27051342

  9. A novel M2e-multiple antigenic peptide providing heterologous protection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Feng; Ma, Ji-Hong; Yang, Fu-Ru; Huang, Meng; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Li, Ze-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Hui; Li, Guo-Xin; Jiang, Yi-Feng; Tong, Wu

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SwIVs) cause considerable morbidity and mortality in domestic pigs, resulting in a significant economic burden. Moreover, pigs have been considered to be a possible mixing vessel in which novel strains loom. Here, we developed and evaluated a novel M2e-multiple antigenic peptide (M2e-MAP) as a supplemental antigen for inactivated H3N2 vaccine to provide cross-protection against two main subtypes of SwIVs, H1N1 and H3N2. The novel tetra-branched MAP was constructed by fusing four copies of M2e to one copy of foreign T helper cell epitopes. A high-yield reassortant H3N2 virus was generated by plasmid based reverse genetics. The efficacy of the novel H3N2 inactivated vaccines with or without M2e-MAP supplementation was evaluated in a mouse model. M2e-MAP conjugated vaccine induced strong antibody responses in mice. Complete protection against the heterologous swine H1N1 virus was observed in mice vaccinated with M2e-MAP combined vaccine. Moreover, this novel peptide confers protection against lethal challenge of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1). Taken together, our results suggest the combined immunization of reassortant inactivated H3N2 vaccine and the novel M2e-MAP provided cross-protection against swine and human viruses and may serve as a promising approach for influenza vaccine development. PMID:27051342

  10. Nucleolin is important for Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 1-mediated episome binding, maintenance, and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Lin; Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Zhao, Bo; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Shen, Chih-Long; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-wen

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for EBV episome maintenance, replication, and transcription. These effects are mediated by EBNA1 binding to cognate oriP DNA, which comprise 20 imperfect copies of a 30-bp dyad symmetry enhancer and an origin for DNA replication. To identify cell proteins essential for these EBNA1 functions, EBNA1 associated cell proteins were immune precipitated and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Nucleolin (NCL) was identified to be EBNA1 associated. EBNA1's N-terminal 100 aa and NCL's RNA-binding domains were critical for EBNA1/NCL interaction. Lentivirus shRNA-mediated NCL depletion substantially reduced EBNA1 recruitment to oriP DNA, EBNA1-dependent transcription of an EBV oriP luciferase reporter, and EBV genome maintenance in lymphoblastoid cell lines. NCL RNA-binding domain K429 was critical for ATP and EBNA1 binding. NCL overexpression increased EBNA1 binding to oriP and transcription, whereas NCL K429A was deficient. Moreover, NCL silencing impaired lymphoblastoid cell line growth. These experiments reveal a surprisingly critical role for NCL K429 in EBNA1 episome maintenance and transcription, which may be a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24344309

  11. Influenza virus binds its host cell using multiple dynamic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sieben, Christian; Kappel, Christian; Zhu, Rong; Wozniak, Anna; Rankl, Christian; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Grubmüller, Helmut; Herrmann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus belongs to a wide range of enveloped viruses. The major spike protein hemagglutinin binds sialic acid residues of glycoproteins and glycolipids with dissociation constants in the millimolar range [Sauter NK, et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31:9609–9621], indicating a multivalent binding mode. Here, we characterized the attachment of influenza virus to host cell receptors using three independent approaches. Optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy revealed very low interaction forces. Further, the observation of sequential unbinding events strongly suggests a multivalent binding mode between virus and cell membrane. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal a variety of unbinding pathways that indicate a highly dynamic interaction between HA and its receptor, allowing rationalization of influenza virus–cell binding quantitatively at the molecular level. PMID:22869709

  12. The TRPV5/6 calcium channels contain multiple calmodulin binding sites with differential binding properties.

    PubMed

    Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; Bokhovchuk, Fedir M; Vuister, Geerten W

    2012-06-01

    The epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV5/6 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 5/6) are thoroughly regulated in order to fine-tune the amount of Ca(2+) reabsorption. Calmodulin has been shown to be involved into calcium-dependent inactivation of TRPV5/6 channels by binding directly to the distal C-terminal fragment of the channels (de Groot et al. in Mol Cell Biol 31:2845-2853, 12). Here, we investigate this binding in detail and find significant differences between TRPV5 and TRPV6. We also identify and characterize in vitro four other CaM binding fragments of TRPV5/6, which likely are also involved in TRPV5/6 channel regulation. The five CaM binding sites display diversity in binding modes, binding stoichiometries and binding affinities, which may fine-tune the response of the channels to varying Ca(2+)-concentrations. PMID:22354706

  13. CREB Binds to Multiple Loci on Human Chromosome 22

    PubMed Central

    Euskirchen, Ghia; Royce, Thomas E.; Bertone, Paul; Martone, Rebecca; Rinn, John L.; Nelson, F. Kenneth; Sayward, Fred; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Miller, Perry; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Snyder, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) is an important transcription factor that can be activated by hormonal stimulation and regulates neuronal function and development. An unbiased, global analysis of where CREB binds has not been performed. We have mapped for the first time the binding distribution of CREB along an entire human chromosome. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of CREB-associated DNA and subsequent hybridization of the associated DNA to a genomic DNA microarray containing all of the nonrepetitive DNA of human chromosome 22 revealed 215 binding sites corresponding to 192 different loci and 100 annotated potential gene targets. We found binding near or within many genes involved in signal transduction and neuronal function. We also found that only a small fraction of CREB binding sites lay near well-defined 5′ ends of genes; the majority of sites were found elsewhere, including introns and unannotated regions. Several of the latter lay near novel unannotated transcriptionally active regions. Few CREB targets were found near full-length cyclic AMP response element sites; the majority contained shorter versions or close matches to this sequence. Several of the CREB targets were altered in their expression by treatment with forskolin; interestingly, both induced and repressed genes were found. Our results provide novel molecular insights into how CREB mediates its functions in humans. PMID:15082775

  14. Antigen-antibody binding in reverse micelles: interaction of monoclonal antibodies with a myelin basic protein peptide.

    PubMed

    Groome, N P; Vacher, M; Nicot, C; Waks, M

    1990-01-01

    Reverse micelles can be used to mimic biological processes occurring at interfaces. To investigate antigen-antibody binding in a membrane-like environment, we first obtained Fab fragments from monoclonal antibodies against bovine myelin basic protein (MBP), an encephalitogenic protein. The binding of the fragments to a dansylated synthetic human MBP peptide gly(119)-gly(131), presenting sequence homologies with a viral protein, was measured in buffer and for the first time in reverse micelles of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate, in isooctane. Analysis of the fluorescence polarisation titration curves discloses that the Fab fragments in reverse micelles have retained the high affinity for the peptide found in buffer, and similar to that for intact MBP.

  15. TLR and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor signals differentially regulate exogenous antigen-presentation

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Claudia S.; Cresswell, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The effect of dendritic cell (DC) maturation on MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation is well studied, but less is known about the effects of DC maturation on MHC class I-restricted cross-presentation. We investigated the ability of mature DCs to present antigens from cells infected with Herpes simplex virus-1. Pre-treatment with pure LPS increased cross-presentation, in a manner dependent on both MyD88 and TRIF, while a similar dose of a less pure LPS preparation inhibited cross-presentation. The difference could not be attributed to differences in uptake or phenotypic maturation. The likely contaminant responsible for shutting down cross-presentation is peptidoglycan. Addition of peptidoglycan to pure LPS abrogated its ability to enhance cross-presentation. Direct activation of DCs with peptidoglycan inhibited cross-presentation through nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (Nod)-like receptor signaling. These results demonstrate that different maturation stimuli can have opposite impacts on the ability of DCs to cross-present viral antigens. PMID:22156493

  16. How to deal with multiple binding poses in alchemical relative protein-ligand binding free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Kaus, Joseph W; Harder, Edward; Lin, Teng; Abel, Robert; McCammon, J Andrew; Wang, Lingle

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in improved force fields and sampling methods have made it possible for the accurate calculation of protein–ligand binding free energies. Alchemical free energy perturbation (FEP) using an explicit solvent model is one of the most rigorous methods to calculate relative binding free energies. However, for cases where there are high energy barriers separating the relevant conformations that are important for ligand binding, the calculated free energy may depend on the initial conformation used in the simulation due to the lack of complete sampling of all the important regions in phase space. This is particularly true for ligands with multiple possible binding modes separated by high energy barriers, making it difficult to sample all relevant binding modes even with modern enhanced sampling methods. In this paper, we apply a previously developed method that provides a corrected binding free energy for ligands with multiple binding modes by combining the free energy results from multiple alchemical FEP calculations starting from all enumerated poses, and the results are compared with Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations. From these calculations, the dominant ligand binding mode can also be predicted. We apply this method to a series of ligands that bind to c-Jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK1) and obtain improved free energy results. The dominant ligand binding modes predicted by this method agree with the available crystallography, while both Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations incorrectly predict the binding modes for some ligands. The method also helps separate the force field error from the ligand sampling error, such that deviations in the predicted binding free energy from the experimental values likely indicate possible inaccuracies in the force field. An error in the force field for a subset of the ligands studied was identified using this method, and improved free energy results were obtained by correcting the partial charges assigned to the

  17. A single amino acid substitution (R441A) in the receptor-binding domain of SARS coronavirus spike protein disrupts the antigenic structure and binding activity

    SciTech Connect

    He Yuxian . E-mail: yhe@nybloodcenter.org; Li Jingjing; Jiang Shibo

    2006-05-26

    The spike (S) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has two major functions: interacting with the receptor to mediate virus entry and inducing protective immunity. Coincidently, the receptor-binding domain (RBD, residues 318-510) of SAR-CoV S protein is a major antigenic site to induce neutralizing antibodies. Here, we used RBD-Fc, a fusion protein containing the RBD and human IgG1 Fc, as a model in the studies and found that a single amino acid substitution in the RBD (R441A) could abolish the immunogenicity of RBD to induce neutralizing antibodies in immunized mice and rabbits. With a panel of anti-RBD mAbs as probes, we observed that R441A substitution was able to disrupt the majority of neutralizing epitopes in the RBD, suggesting that this residue is critical for the antigenic structure responsible for inducing protective immune responses. We also demonstrated that the RBD-Fc bearing R441A mutation could not bind to soluble and cell-associated angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the functional receptor for SARS-CoV and failed to block S protein-mediated pseudovirus entry, indicating that this point mutation also disrupted the receptor-binding motif (RBM) in the RBD. Taken together, these data provide direct evidence to show that a single amino acid residue at key position in the RBD can determine the major function of SARS-CoV S protein and imply for designing SARS vaccines and therapeutics.

  18. Evidence for a conformational change in a class II major histocompatibility complex molecule occurring in the same pH range where antigen binding is enhanced

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Many class II histocompatibility complex molecules bind antigenic peptides optimally at low pH, consistent with their exposure to antigen in acidic endosomal compartments. While it has been suggested that a partially unfolded state serves as an intermediate involved in peptide binding, very little evidence for such a state has been obtained. In this report, we show that the murine class II molecule IE becomes increasingly less stable to sodium dodecyl sulfate-induced dissociation since the pH is decreased in the same range that enhances antigenic peptide binding. Furthermore, at mildly acidic pH levels, IEk binds the fluorescent dye 1-anilino-naphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS), a probe for exposed nonpolar sites in proteins, suggesting that protonation produces a molten globule-like state. The association of IEk with a single high-affinity peptide had only a small effect in these two assays, indicating that the changes that occur are distal to the peptide-binding groove. Circular dichroism analysis shows that a pH shift from neutral to mildly acidic pH causes subtle changes in the environment of aromatic residues but does not grossly disrupt the secondary structure of IEk. We propose a model in which perturbations in interdomain contacts outside the peptide-binding domain of IEk occur at acidic pH, producing a partially unfolded state that facilitates optimal antigen binding. PMID:8551214

  19. B cell antigen presentation is sufficient to drive neuro-inflammation in an animal model of multiple sclerosis1

    PubMed Central

    Parker Harp, Chelsea R.; Archambault, Angela S.; Sim, Julia; Ferris, Stephen T.; Mikesell, Robert J.; Koni, Pandelakis A.; Shimoda, Michiko; Linington, Christopher; Russell, John H.; Wu, Gregory F.

    2015-01-01

    B cells are increasingly regarded as integral to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in part due to the success of B cell depletion therapy. Multiple B cell-dependent mechanisms contributing to inflammatory demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS) have been explored using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a CD4 T cell-dependent animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). While B cell antigen presentation has been suggested to regulate CNS inflammation during EAE, direct evidence that B cells can independently support antigen-specific autoimmune responses by CD4 T cells in EAE is lacking. Using a newly developed murine model of in vivo conditional expression of MHCII, we previously reported that encephalitogenic CD4 T cells are incapable of inducing EAE when B cells are the sole antigen presenting cell. Herein we find that B cells cooperate with dendritic cells to enhance EAE severity resulting from myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) immunization. Further, increasing the precursor frequency of MOG-specific B cells, but not addition of soluble MOG-specific antibody, is sufficient to drive EAE in mice expressing MHCII by B cells alone. These data support a model in which expansion of antigen-specific B cells during CNS autoimmunity amplifies cognate interactions between B and CD4 T cells and have the capacity to independently drive neuro-inflammation at later stages of disease. PMID:25895531

  20. The role of antigen specificity in the binding of murine monoclonal anti-DNA antibodies to microparticles from apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Ullal, Anirudh J; Marion, Tony N; Pisetsky, David S

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus and markers of underlying immune system disturbances. These antibodies bind to both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA, mediating pathogenesis by forming immune complexes. As shown recently, DNA in blood exists in both free and particulate forms, with DNA representing an important component of microparticles. Microparticles are membrane-bound vesicles containing nuclear molecules, released by membrane blebbing during cell death and activation. A panel of monoclonal NZB/NZW F1 anti-DNA antibodies was tested for binding to microparticles generated from apoptotic THP-1 and Jurkat cells. These studies showed that only certain anti-DNA antibodies in the panel, specific for double-stranded DNA, bound to microparticles. Binding to particles was reduced by soluble DNA or DNase treatment. Together, these results indicate that particle binding is a feature of only certain anti-DNA antibodies, reflecting immunochemical properties of the antibodies and the nature of the exposed DNA antigens.

  1. Tumor cells in multiple myeloma patients inhibit myeloma-reactive T cells through carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-6.

    PubMed

    Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Hose, Dirk; Jünger, Simone; Pfirschke, Christina; Khandelwal, Nisit; Umansky, Ludmila; Seckinger, Anja; Conrad, Heinke; Brackertz, Bettina; Rème, Thierry; Gueckel, Brigitte; Meißner, Tobias; Hundemer, Michael; Ho, Anthony D; Rossi, Jean-Francois; Neben, Kai; Bernhard, Helga; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Klein, Bernard; Beckhove, Philipp

    2013-05-30

    Although functionally competent cytotoxic, T cells are frequently observed in malignant diseases, they possess little ability to react against tumor cells. This phenomenon is particularly apparent in multiple myeloma. We here demonstrate that cytotoxic T cells reacted against myeloma antigens when presented by autologous dendritic cells, but not by myeloma cells. We further show by gene expression profiling and flow cytometry that, similar to many other malignant tumors, freshly isolated myeloma cells expressed several carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) at varying proportions. Binding and crosslinking of CEACAM-6 by cytotoxic T cells inhibited their activation and resulted in T-cell unresponsiveness. Blocking of CEACAM-6 on the surface of myeloma cells by specific monoclonal antibodies or CEACAM-6 gene knock down by short interfering RNA restored T-cell reactivity against malignant plasma cells. These findings suggest that CEACAM-6 plays an important role in the regulation of CD8+ T-cell responses against multiple myeloma; therefore, therapeutic targeting of CEACAM-6 may be a promising strategy to improve myeloma immunotherapy.

  2. The Multiple Carbohydrate Binding Specificities of Helicobacter pylori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teneberg, Susann

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Adhesion of microbes to the target tissue is an important determinant for successful initiation, establishment and maintenance of infection, and a variety of different candidate carbohydrate receptors for H. pylori have been identified. Here the different the binding specifities, and their potential role in adhesion to human gastric epithelium are described. Finally, recent findings on the roles of sialic acid binding SabA adhesin in interactions with human neutrophils and erythrocytes are discussed.

  3. Comprehensive functional characterization of cancer–testis antigens defines obligate participation in multiple hallmarks of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maxfield, Kimberly E.; Taus, Patrick J.; Corcoran, Kathleen; Wooten, Joshua; Macion, Jennifer; Zhou, Yunyun; Borromeo, Mark; Kollipara, Rahul K.; Yan, Jingsheng; Xie, Yang; Xie, Xian-Jin; Whitehurst, Angelique W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumours frequently activate genes whose expression is otherwise biased to the testis, collectively known as cancer–testis antigens (CTAs). The extent to which CTA expression represents epiphenomena or confers tumorigenic traits is unknown. In this study, to address this, we implemented a multidimensional functional genomics approach that incorporates 7 different phenotypic assays in 11 distinct disease settings. We identify 26 CTAs that are essential for tumor cell viability and/or are pathological drivers of HIF, WNT or TGFβ signalling. In particular, we discover that Foetal and Adult Testis Expressed 1 (FATE1) is a key survival factor in multiple oncogenic backgrounds. FATE1 prevents the accumulation of the stress-sensing BH3-only protein, BCL-2-Interacting Killer (BIK), thereby permitting viability in the presence of toxic stimuli. Furthermore, ZNF165 promotes TGFβ signalling by directly suppressing the expression of negative feedback regulatory pathways. This action is essential for the survival of triple negative breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Thus, CTAs make significant direct contributions to tumour biology. PMID:26567849

  4. A calmodulin-binding/CGCG box DNA-binding protein family involved in multiple signaling pathways in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    We reported earlier that the tobacco early ethylene-responsive gene NtER1 encodes a calmodulin-binding protein (Yang, T., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 38467-38473). Here we demonstrate that there is one NtER1 homolog as well as five related genes in Arabidopsis. These six genes are rapidly and differentially induced by environmental signals such as temperature extremes, UVB, salt, and wounding; hormones such as ethylene and abscisic acid; and signal molecules such as methyl jasmonate, H(2)O(2), and salicylic acid. Hence, they were designated as AtSR1-6 (Arabidopsis thaliana signal-responsive genes). Ca(2+)/calmodulin binds to all AtSRs, and their calmodulin-binding regions are located on a conserved basic amphiphilic alpha-helical motif in the C terminus. AtSR1 targets the nucleus and specifically recognizes a novel 6-bp CGCG box (A/C/G)CGCG(G/T/C). The multiple CGCG cis-elements are found in promoters of genes such as those involved in ethylene signaling, abscisic acid signaling, and light signal perception. The DNA-binding domain in AtSR1 is located on the N-terminal 146 bp where all AtSR1-related proteins share high similarity but have no similarity to other known DNA-binding proteins. The calmodulin-binding nuclear proteins isolated from wounded leaves exhibit specific CGCG box DNA binding activities. These results suggest that the AtSR gene family encodes a family of calmodulin-binding/DNA-binding proteins involved in multiple signal transduction pathways in plants.

  5. Fibronectin and asialoglyprotein receptor mediate hepatitis B surface antigen binding to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Feng; Tian, Linlin; Su, Jing; Zhu, Xiangqian; Lin, Li; Ding, Xiaoran; Wang, Xuejun; Wang, Shengqi

    2010-06-01

    Both fibronectin and the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) have been identified by some investigators as partners for hepatitis B virus (HBV) envelope proteins. Because fibronectin is a natural ligand for ASGPR, we speculated that HBV might attach to ASGPR expressed on the hepatocyte surface via fibronectin. To test this hypothesis, we first confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation that ASGPR, fibronectin and HBsAg bind to each other in HepG2.2.15 cells, and possible binding domains were identified by GST pull-down. In addition, by measuring binding of HBsAg to cells, we found that ASGPR and fibronectin enhanced the binding capability of HBsAg to HepG2 cells, and even to 293T and CHO cells, which normally do not bind HBV. In conclusion, our findings suggest that both fibronectin and ASGPR mediate HBsAg binding to the cell surface, which provides further evidence for the potential roles of these two proteins in mediating HBV binding to liver cells. PMID:20364278

  6. Enhanced antigen-antibody binding affinity mediated by an anti-idiotypic antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Sawutz, D.G.; Koury, R.; Homcy, C.J.

    1987-08-25

    The authors previously described the production of four monoclonal antibodies to the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor antagonist alprenolol. One of these antibodies, 5B7 (IgG/sub 2a/, kappa), was used to raise anti-idiotypic antisera in rabbits. In contrast to the expected results, one of the anti-idiotypic antisera (R9) promotes (/sup 125/I)iodocyanopinodolol (ICYP) binding to antibody 5B7. In the presence of R9, the dissociation constant decreases 100-fold from 20 to 0.3 nM. This increase in binding affinity of antibody 5B7 for ICYP is not observed in the presence of preimmune, rabbit anti-mouse or anti-idiotypic antisera generated to a monoclonal antibody of a different specificity. Furthermore, R9 in the absence of 5B7 does not bind ICYP. The F(ab) fragments of 5B7 and T9 behaved in a similar manner, and the soluble complex responsible for the high-affinity interaction with ICYP can be identified by gel filtration chromatography. The elution position of the complex is consistent with a 5B7 F(ab)-R9 F(ab) dimer, indicating that polyvalency is not responsible for the enhanced ligand binding. Kinetic analysis of ICYP-5B7 binding revealed that the rate of ICYP dissociation from 5B7 in the presence of R9 is approximately 100 times slower than in the absence of R9, consistent with the 100-fold change in binding affinity of 5B7 for ICYP. The available data best fit a model in which an anti-idiotypic antibody binds at or near the binding site of the idiotype participating in the formation of a hybrid ligand binding site. This would allow increased contact of the ligand with the idiotype-anti-idiotype complex and result in an enhanced affinity of the ligand interaction.

  7. A fully human monoclonal antibody with novel binding epitope and excellent neutralizing activity to multiple human IFN-α subtypes: A candidate therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Du, Peng; Xu, Lei; Qiu, Weiyi; Zeng, Dadi; Yue, Junjie; Wang, Shuang; Huang, Peitang; Sun, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, heterogeneous autoimmune disease short of effective therapeutic agents. A multitude of studies of SLE in the last decade have accentuated a central role of the interferon alpha (IFN-α) pathway in SLE pathogenesis. We report here a candidate therapeutic neutralizing antibody, AIA22, with a different binding epitope and discrepant neutralizing profile from the anti-multiple IFN-α subtype antibodies currently in clinical trials. AIA22 specifically interacts with multiple IFN-α subtypes, binds to the type I IFN receptor 2 (IFNAR2) recognition region of IFN-α (considered a novel antigen epitope), and effectively neutralizes the activity of almost all of the IFN-α subtypes (with the exception of IFN-α7) both in vitro and in vivo. Concurrently, structural modeling and computational design yielded a mutational antibody of AIA22, AIAmut, which exhibited substantially improved neutralizing activity to multiple IFN-α subtypes.

  8. Decomposition of the factors that govern binding site preference in a multiple rotaxane.

    PubMed

    Angelo, Joseph P; Sohlberg, Karl

    2009-06-18

    A particularly interesting class of multiple rotaxanes consists of complexes where one long shaft threads two rings. If the shaft contains three or more potential binding sites for the rings, multiple co-conformations are possible. Such a complex is a molecular topological analogue to an abacus. Here we address the question, how does strength of ring binding to the shaft vary with respect to position on the shaft? Previous studies have found that a shaft with three binding sites exhibits strongest ring binding at the center site. Here a five-binding-site shaft is studied. We employ a novel method to partition the total energy of the system into contributions from intercomponent binding and intracomponent distortion. The method uses the output of quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations to determine fitting parameters in a set of coupled equations. The solution of the equations yields the energy partitioning and reveals the influence of long-range intercomponent interactions.

  9. Identifying Patient-Specific Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen-1 Genetic Variation and Potential Autoreactive Targets Relevant to Multiple Sclerosis Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tschochner, Monika; Leary, Shay; Cooper, Don; Strautins, Kaija; Chopra, Abha; Clark, Hayley; Choo, Linda; Dunn, David; James, Ian; Carroll, William M.; Kermode, Allan G.; Nolan, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection represents a major environmental risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS), with evidence of selective expansion of Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA1)-specific CD4+ T cells that cross-recognize MS-associated myelin antigens in MS patients. HLA-DRB1*15-restricted antigen presentation also appears to determine susceptibility given its role as a dominant risk allele. In this study, we have utilised standard and next-generation sequencing techniques to investigate EBNA-1 sequence variation and its relationship to HLA-DR15 binding affinity, as well as examining potential cross-reactive immune targets within the central nervous system proteome. Methods Sanger sequencing was performed on DNA isolated from peripheral blood samples from 73 Western Australian MS cases, without requirement for primary culture, with additional FLX 454 Roche sequencing in 23 samples to identify low-frequency variants. Patient-derived viral sequences were used to predict HLA-DRB1*1501 epitopes (NetMHCII, NetMHCIIpan) and candidates were evaluated for cross recognition with human brain proteins. Results EBNA-1 sequence variation was limited, with no evidence of multiple viral strains and only low levels of variation identified by FLX technology (8.3% nucleotide positions at a 1% cut-off). In silico epitope mapping revealed two known HLA-DRB1*1501-restricted epitopes (‘AEG’: aa 481–496 and ‘MVF’: aa 562–577), and two putative epitopes between positions 502–543. We identified potential cross-reactive targets involving a number of major myelin antigens including experimentally confirmed HLA-DRB1*15-restricted epitopes as well as novel candidate antigens within myelin and paranodal assembly proteins that may be relevant to MS pathogenesis. Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining autologous EBNA-1 sequences directly from buffy coat samples, and confirms divergence of these sequences from standard laboratory strains

  10. Bacteriophage-mediated Glucosylation Can Modify Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigens Synthesized by an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter-dependent Assembly Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Evan; Ovchinnikova, Olga G.; King, Jerry D.; Whitfield, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Lysogenic bacteriophages may encode enzymes that modify the structures of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen glycans, altering the structure of the bacteriophage receptor and resulting in serotype conversion. This can enhance virulence and has implications for antigenic diversity and vaccine development. Side chain glucosylation is a common modification strategy found in a number of bacterial species. To date, glucosylation has only been observed in O-antigens synthesized by Wzy-dependent pathways, one of the two most prevalent O-antigen synthesis systems. Here we exploited a heterologous system to study the glucosylation potential of a model O-antigen produced in an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent system. Although O-antigen production is cryptic in Escherichia coli K-12, because of a mutation in the synthesis genes, it possesses a prophage glucosylation cluster, which modifies the GlcNAc residue in an α-l-Rha-(1→3)-d-GlcNAc motif found in the original O16 antigen. Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 produces an O-antigen possessing the same disaccharide motif, but its assembly uses an ABC transporter-dependent system. E. coli harboring the R. terrigena O-antigen biosynthesis genes produced an O-antigen displaying reduced reactivity toward antisera raised against the native R. terrigena repeat structure, indicative of an altered chemical structure. Structural determination using NMR revealed the addition of glucose side chains to the repeat units. O-antigen modification was dependent on a functional ABC transporter, consistent with modification in the periplasm, and was eliminated by deletion of the glucosylation genes from the E. coli chromosome, restoring native level antisera sensitivity and structure. There are therefore no intrinsic mechanistic barriers for bacteriophage-mediated O-antigen glucosylation in ABC transporter-dependent pathways. PMID:26330553

  11. Bacteriophage-mediated Glucosylation Can Modify Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigens Synthesized by an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter-dependent Assembly Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mann, Evan; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; King, Jerry D; Whitfield, Chris

    2015-10-16

    Lysogenic bacteriophages may encode enzymes that modify the structures of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen glycans, altering the structure of the bacteriophage receptor and resulting in serotype conversion. This can enhance virulence and has implications for antigenic diversity and vaccine development. Side chain glucosylation is a common modification strategy found in a number of bacterial species. To date, glucosylation has only been observed in O-antigens synthesized by Wzy-dependent pathways, one of the two most prevalent O-antigen synthesis systems. Here we exploited a heterologous system to study the glucosylation potential of a model O-antigen produced in an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent system. Although O-antigen production is cryptic in Escherichia coli K-12, because of a mutation in the synthesis genes, it possesses a prophage glucosylation cluster, which modifies the GlcNAc residue in an α-l-Rha-(1→3)-d-GlcNAc motif found in the original O16 antigen. Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 produces an O-antigen possessing the same disaccharide motif, but its assembly uses an ABC transporter-dependent system. E. coli harboring the R. terrigena O-antigen biosynthesis genes produced an O-antigen displaying reduced reactivity toward antisera raised against the native R. terrigena repeat structure, indicative of an altered chemical structure. Structural determination using NMR revealed the addition of glucose side chains to the repeat units. O-antigen modification was dependent on a functional ABC transporter, consistent with modification in the periplasm, and was eliminated by deletion of the glucosylation genes from the E. coli chromosome, restoring native level antisera sensitivity and structure. There are therefore no intrinsic mechanistic barriers for bacteriophage-mediated O-antigen glucosylation in ABC transporter-dependent pathways. PMID:26330553

  12. Bacteriophage-mediated Glucosylation Can Modify Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigens Synthesized by an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter-dependent Assembly Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mann, Evan; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; King, Jerry D; Whitfield, Chris

    2015-10-16

    Lysogenic bacteriophages may encode enzymes that modify the structures of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen glycans, altering the structure of the bacteriophage receptor and resulting in serotype conversion. This can enhance virulence and has implications for antigenic diversity and vaccine development. Side chain glucosylation is a common modification strategy found in a number of bacterial species. To date, glucosylation has only been observed in O-antigens synthesized by Wzy-dependent pathways, one of the two most prevalent O-antigen synthesis systems. Here we exploited a heterologous system to study the glucosylation potential of a model O-antigen produced in an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent system. Although O-antigen production is cryptic in Escherichia coli K-12, because of a mutation in the synthesis genes, it possesses a prophage glucosylation cluster, which modifies the GlcNAc residue in an α-l-Rha-(1→3)-d-GlcNAc motif found in the original O16 antigen. Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 produces an O-antigen possessing the same disaccharide motif, but its assembly uses an ABC transporter-dependent system. E. coli harboring the R. terrigena O-antigen biosynthesis genes produced an O-antigen displaying reduced reactivity toward antisera raised against the native R. terrigena repeat structure, indicative of an altered chemical structure. Structural determination using NMR revealed the addition of glucose side chains to the repeat units. O-antigen modification was dependent on a functional ABC transporter, consistent with modification in the periplasm, and was eliminated by deletion of the glucosylation genes from the E. coli chromosome, restoring native level antisera sensitivity and structure. There are therefore no intrinsic mechanistic barriers for bacteriophage-mediated O-antigen glucosylation in ABC transporter-dependent pathways.

  13. Multiple approaches to assess pectin binding to galectin-3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Yi; Zhao, Dongyang; Yan, Jingmin; Sun, Chongliang; Zhou, Yifa; Tai, Guihua

    2016-10-01

    Although several approaches have been used to evaluate binding of carbohydrates to lectins, results are not always comparable, especially with larger polysaccharides. Here, we quantitatively assessed and compared binding of pectin-derived polysaccharides to galectin-3 (Gal-3) using five methods: surface plasmon resonance (SPR), bio-layer interferometry (BLI), fluorescence polarization (FP), competitive fluorescence-linked immunosorbance (cFLISA), and the well-known cell-based hemagglutination assay (G3H). Our studies revealed that whereas Gal-3-pectin binding parameters determined by SPR and BLI were comparable and correlated with inhibitory potencies from the G3H assay, results using FP and cFLISA assays were highly variable and depended greatly on the probe and mass of the polysaccharide. In the cFLISA assay, for example, pectins showed no inhibition when using the DTAF-labeled asialofetuin probe, but did when using a DTAF-labeled pectin probe. And the FP approach with the DTAF-lactose probe did not work on polysaccharides and large galactan chains, although it did work well with smaller galactans. Nevertheless, even though results derived from all of these methods are in general agreement, derived KD, IC50, and MIC values do differ. Our results reflect the variability using various techniques and therefore will be useful to investigators who are developing pectin-derived Gal-3 antagonists as anti-cancer agents. PMID:27328612

  14. Heat stable antigen (mouse CD24) supports myeloid cell binding to endothelial and platelet P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Aigner, S; Ruppert, M; Hubbe, M; Sammar, M; Sthoeger, Z; Butcher, E C; Vestweber, D; Altevogt, P

    1995-10-01

    P-selectin is a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin that participates in leukocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium and platelets. Myeloid cells and a subset of T lymphocytes express carbohydrate ligands at the cell surface. Previously, we suggested that heat stable antigen (HSA/mouse CD24), an extensively glycosylated cell surface molecule on many mouse cells, is a ligand for P-selectin. Here we show that HSA mediates the binding of monocytic cells and neutrophils to P-selectin. The monocytic cell lines ESb-MP and J774, peritoneal exudate cells, and bone marrow neutrophils could bind to lipopolysaccharide-activated bend3 endothelioma cells under rotation-induced shear forces and this binding was inhibited by mAb to P-selectin and HSA. Blocking was weak at room temperature but more efficient at 4 degrees C when integrin-mediated binding was decreased. Also the adhesion of neutrophils to stimulated platelets expressing P-selectin was blocked by HSA- and P-selectin-specific mAb. Latex beads coated with purified HSA from myeloid cells bound to activated endothelioma cells or platelets, and the binding was similarly blocked by mAb to P-selectin and HSA respectively. The HSA-coated beads were stained with P-selectin-IgG, very weakly with L-selectin-IgG but not with E-selectin-IgG. The staining was dependent on divalent cations and treatment with endoglycosidase F or neuraminidase indicated that sialylated N-linked glycans were recognized. The presence of these glycans was confirmed by biosynthetic labeling studies. Our data suggest that HSA, in addition to the recently identified 160 kDa glycoprotein ligand on mouse neutrophils, belongs to a group of monospecific P-selectin ligands on myeloid cells.

  15. pH effects on binding between the anthrax protective antigen and the host cellular receptor CMG2

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksha, Maheshinie; Lovell, Scott; Janowiak, Blythe E; Andra, Kiran K; Battaile, Kevin P; Bann, James G

    2012-01-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) binds to the host cellular receptor capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2) with high affinity. To gain a better understanding of how pH may affect binding to the receptor, we have investigated the kinetics of binding as a function of pH to the full-length monomeric PA and to two variants: a 2-fluorohistidine-labeled PA (2-FHisPA), which is ∼1 pH unit more stable to variations in pH than WT, and an ∼1 pH unit less stable variant in which Trp346 in the domain 2β3-2β4 loop is substituted with a Phe (W346F). We show using stopped-flow fluorescence that the binding rate increases as the pH is lowered for all proteins, with little influence on the rate of dissociation. In addition, we have crystallized PA and the two variants and examine the influence of pH on structure. In contrast to previous X-ray studies, the domain 2β3-2β4 loop undergoes little change in structure from pH ∼8 to 5.5 for the WT protein, but for the 2-FHis labeled and W346F mutant there are changes in structure consistent with previous X-ray studies. In accord with pH stability studies, we find that the average B-factor values increase by ∼20–30% for all three proteins at low pH. Our results suggest that for the full-length PA, low pH increases the binding affinity, likely through a change in structure that favors a more “bound-like” conformation. PMID:22855243

  16. Heat stable antigen (mouse CD24) supports myeloid cell binding to endothelial and platelet P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Aigner, S; Ruppert, M; Hubbe, M; Sammar, M; Sthoeger, Z; Butcher, E C; Vestweber, D; Altevogt, P

    1995-10-01

    P-selectin is a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin that participates in leukocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium and platelets. Myeloid cells and a subset of T lymphocytes express carbohydrate ligands at the cell surface. Previously, we suggested that heat stable antigen (HSA/mouse CD24), an extensively glycosylated cell surface molecule on many mouse cells, is a ligand for P-selectin. Here we show that HSA mediates the binding of monocytic cells and neutrophils to P-selectin. The monocytic cell lines ESb-MP and J774, peritoneal exudate cells, and bone marrow neutrophils could bind to lipopolysaccharide-activated bend3 endothelioma cells under rotation-induced shear forces and this binding was inhibited by mAb to P-selectin and HSA. Blocking was weak at room temperature but more efficient at 4 degrees C when integrin-mediated binding was decreased. Also the adhesion of neutrophils to stimulated platelets expressing P-selectin was blocked by HSA- and P-selectin-specific mAb. Latex beads coated with purified HSA from myeloid cells bound to activated endothelioma cells or platelets, and the binding was similarly blocked by mAb to P-selectin and HSA respectively. The HSA-coated beads were stained with P-selectin-IgG, very weakly with L-selectin-IgG but not with E-selectin-IgG. The staining was dependent on divalent cations and treatment with endoglycosidase F or neuraminidase indicated that sialylated N-linked glycans were recognized. The presence of these glycans was confirmed by biosynthetic labeling studies. Our data suggest that HSA, in addition to the recently identified 160 kDa glycoprotein ligand on mouse neutrophils, belongs to a group of monospecific P-selectin ligands on myeloid cells. PMID:8562500

  17. Genome-wide analysis of host-chromosome binding sites for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1) protein is required for the establishment of EBV latent infection in proliferating B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein that stimulates DNA replication at the viral origin of plasmid replication (OriP), regulates transcription of viral and cellular genes, and tethers the viral episome to the cellular chromosome. EBNA1 also provides a survival function to B-lymphocytes, potentially through its ability to alter cellular gene expression. To better understand these various functions of EBNA1, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the viral and cellular DNA sites associated with EBNA1 protein in a latently infected Burkitt lymphoma B-cell line. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) combined with massively parallel deep-sequencing (ChIP-Seq) was used to identify cellular sites bound by EBNA1. Sites identified by ChIP-Seq were validated by conventional real-time PCR, and ChIP-Seq provided quantitative, high-resolution detection of the known EBNA1 binding sites on the EBV genome at OriP and Qp. We identified at least one cluster of unusually high-affinity EBNA1 binding sites on chromosome 11, between the divergent FAM55 D and FAM55B genes. A consensus for all cellular EBNA1 binding sites is distinct from those derived from the known viral binding sites, suggesting that some of these sites are indirectly bound by EBNA1. EBNA1 also bound close to the transcriptional start sites of a large number of cellular genes, including HDAC3, CDC7, and MAP3K1, which we show are positively regulated by EBNA1. EBNA1 binding sites were enriched in some repetitive elements, especially LINE 1 retrotransposons, and had weak correlations with histone modifications and ORC binding. We conclude that EBNA1 can interact with a large number of cellular genes and chromosomal loci in latently infected cells, but that these sites are likely to represent a complex ensemble of direct and indirect EBNA1 binding sites. PMID

  18. Transporter associated with antigen processing preselection of peptides binding to the MHC: a bioinformatic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini; Hemsley, Shelley; Flower, Darren R

    2004-12-01

    TAP is responsible for the transit of peptides from the cytosol to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. In an immunological context, this event is followed by the binding of peptides to MHC molecules before export to the cell surface and recognition by T cells. Because TAP transport precedes MHC binding, TAP preferences may make a significant contribution to epitope selection. To assess the impact of this preselection, we have developed a scoring function for TAP affinity prediction using the additive method, have used it to analyze and extend the TAP binding motif, and have evaluated how well this model acts as a preselection step in predicting MHC binding peptides. To distinguish between MHC alleles that are exclusively dependent on TAP and those exhibiting only a partial dependence on TAP, two sets of MHC binding peptides were examined: HLA-A*0201 was selected as a representative of partially TAP-dependent HLA alleles, and HLA-A*0301 represented fully TAP-dependent HLA alleles. TAP preselection has a greater impact on TAP-dependent alleles than on TAP-independent alleles. The reduction in the number of nonbinders varied from 10% (TAP-independent) to 33% (TAP-dependent), suggesting that TAP preselection is an important component in the successful in silico prediction of T cell epitopes. PMID:15557175

  19. A Remote Arene-Binding Site on Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen Revealed by Antibody-Recruiting Small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Andrew X.; Murelli, Ryan P.; Barinka, Cyril; Michel, Julien; Cocleaza, Alexandra; Jorgensen, William L.; Lubkowski, Jacek; Spiegel, David A.

    2010-09-27

    Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a membrane-bound glutamate carboxypeptidase overexpressed in many forms of prostate cancer. Our laboratory has recently disclosed a class of small molecules, called ARM-Ps (antibody-recruiting molecule targeting prostate cancer) that are capable of enhancing antibody-mediated immune recognition of prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, during the course of these studies, we found ARM-Ps to exhibit extraordinarily high potencies toward PSMA, compared to previously reported inhibitors. Here, we report in-depth biochemical, crystallographic, and computational investigations which elucidate the origin of the observed affinity enhancement. These studies reveal a previously unreported arene-binding site on PSMA, which we believe participates in an aromatic stacking interaction with ARMs. Although this site is composed of only a few amino acid residues, it drastically enhances small molecule binding affinity. These results provide critical insights into the design of PSMA-targeted small molecules for prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment; more broadly, the presence of similar arene-binding sites throughout the proteome could prove widely enabling in the optimization of small molecule-protein interactions.

  20. Substrate Binding Protein SBP2 of a Putative ABC Transporter as a Novel Vaccine Antigen of Moraxella catarrhalis

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Taketo; Kirkham, Charmaine; Johnson, Antoinette; Jones, Megan M.

    2014-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a common respiratory tract pathogen that causes otitis media in children and infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Since the introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines with/without protein D of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, M. catarrhalis has become a high-priority pathogen in otitis media. For the development of antibacterial vaccines and therapies, substrate binding proteins of ATP-binding cassette transporters are important targets. In this study, we identified and characterized a substrate binding protein, SBP2, of M. catarrhalis. Among 30 clinical isolates tested, the sbp2 gene sequence was highly conserved. In 2 different analyses (whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and flow cytometry), polyclonal antibodies raised to recombinant SBP2 demonstrated that SBP2 expresses epitopes on the bacterial surface of the wild type but not the sbp2 mutant. Mice immunized with recombinant SBP2 showed significantly enhanced clearance of M. catarrhalis from the lung compared to that in the control group at both 25-μg and 50-μg doses (P < 0.001). We conclude that SBP2 is a novel, attractive candidate as a vaccine antigen against M. catarrhalis. PMID:24914218

  1. Molecular genotyping of human Ureaplasma species based on multiple-banded antigen (MBA) gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Kong, F; Ma, Z; James, G; Gordon, S; Gilbert, G L

    2000-09-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum has been divided into 14 serovars. Recently, subdivision of U. urealyticum into two species has been proposed: U. parvum (previously U. urealyticum parvo biovar), comprising four serovars (1, 3, 6, 14) and U. urealyticum (previously U. urealyticum T-960 biovar), 10 serovars (2, 4, 5, 7-13). The multiple-banded antigen (MBA) genes of these species contain both species and serovar/subtype specific sequences. Based on whole sequences of the 5'-ends of MBA genes of U. parvum serovars and partial sequences of the 5'-ends of MBA genes of U. urealyticum serovars, we previously divided each of these species into three MBA genotypes. To further elucidate the relationships between serovars, we sequenced the whole 5'-ends of MBA genes of all 10 U. urealyticum serovars and partial repetitive regions of these genes from all serovars of U. parvum and U. urealyticum. For the first time, all four serovars of U. parvum were clearly differentiated from each other. In addition, the 10 serovars of U. urealyticum were divided into five MBA genotypes, as follows: MBA genotype A comprises serovars 2, 5, 8; MBA genotype B, serovar 10 only; MBA genotype C, serovars 4, 12, 13; MBA genotype D, serovar 9 only; and MBA genotype E comprises serovars 7 and 11. There were no sequence differences between members within each MBA genotype. Further work is required to identify other genes or other regions of the MBA genes that may be used to differentiate U. urealyticum serovars within MBA genotypes A, C and E. A better understanding of the molecular basis of serotype differentiation will help to improve subtyping methods for use in studies of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of these organisms.

  2. Direct detection of antibody-antigen binding using an on-chip artificial pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Omar A.; Sohn, Lydia L.

    2003-02-01

    We demonstrate a rapid and highly sensitive all-electronic technique based on the resistive pulse method of particle sizing with a pore to detect the binding of unlabeled antibodies to the surface of latex colloids. Here, we use an on-chip pore to sense colloids derivatized with streptavidin and measure accurately their diameter increase on specific binding to several different types of antibodies. We show the sensitivity of this technique to the concentration of free antibody and that it can be used to perform immunoassays in both inhibition and sandwich configurations. Overall, our technique does not require labeling of the reactants and is performed rapidly by using very little solution, and the pore itself is fabricated quickly and inexpensively by using soft lithography. Finally, because this method relies only on the volume of bound ligand, it can be generally applied to detecting a wide range of ligand-receptor binding reactions.

  3. Defining a protective epitope on factor H binding protein, a key meningococcal virulence factor and vaccine antigen.

    PubMed

    Malito, Enrico; Faleri, Agnese; Lo Surdo, Paola; Veggi, Daniele; Maruggi, Giulietta; Grassi, Eva; Cartocci, Elena; Bertoldi, Isabella; Genovese, Alessia; Santini, Laura; Romagnoli, Giacomo; Borgogni, Erica; Brier, Sébastien; Lo Passo, Carla; Domina, Maria; Castellino, Flora; Felici, Franco; van der Veen, Stijn; Johnson, Steven; Lea, Susan M; Tang, Christoph M; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Savino, Silvana; Norais, Nathalie; Rappuoli, Rino; Bottomley, Matthew J; Masignani, Vega

    2013-02-26

    Mapping of epitopes recognized by functional monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is essential for understanding the nature of immune responses and designing improved vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics. In recent years, identification of B-cell epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies has facilitated the design of peptide-based vaccines against highly variable pathogens like HIV, respiratory syncytial virus, and Helicobacter pylori; however, none of these products has yet progressed into clinical stages. Linear epitopes identified by conventional mapping techniques only partially reflect the immunogenic properties of the epitope in its natural conformation, thus limiting the success of this approach. To investigate antigen-antibody interactions and assess the potential of the most common epitope mapping techniques, we generated a series of mAbs against factor H binding protein (fHbp), a key virulence factor and vaccine antigen of Neisseria meningitidis. The interaction of fHbp with the bactericidal mAb 12C1 was studied by various epitope mapping methods. Although a 12-residue epitope in the C terminus of fHbp was identified by both Peptide Scanning and Phage Display Library screening, other approaches, such as hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (MS) and X-ray crystallography, showed that mAb 12C1 occupies an area of ∼1,000 Å(2) on fHbp, including >20 fHbp residues distributed on both N- and C-terminal domains. Collectively, these data show that linear epitope mapping techniques provide useful but incomplete descriptions of B-cell epitopes, indicating that increased efforts to fully characterize antigen-antibody interfaces are required to understand and design effective immunogens.

  4. Coinvasion of dentinal tubules by Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus gordonii depends upon binding specificity of streptococcal antigen I/II adhesin.

    PubMed

    Love, R M; McMillan, M D; Park, Y; Jenkinson, H F

    2000-03-01

    Cell wall-anchored polypeptides of the antigen I/II family are produced by many species of oral streptococci. These proteins mediate adhesion of streptococci to salivary glycoproteins and to other oral microorganisms and promote binding of cells to collagen type I and invasion of dentinal tubules. Since infections of the root canal system have a mixed anaerobic bacterial etiology, we investigated the hypothesis that coadhesion of anaerobic bacteria with streptococci may facilitate invasive endodontic disease. Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 cells were able to invade dentinal tubules when cocultured with Streptococcus gordonii DL1 (Challis) but not when cocultured with Streptococcus mutans NG8. An isogenic noninvasive mutant of S. gordonii, with production of SspA and SspB (antigen I/II family) polypeptides abrogated, was deficient in binding to collagen and had a 40% reduced ability to support adhesion of P. gingivalis. Heterologous expression of the S. mutans SpaP (antigen I/II) protein in this mutant restored collagen binding and tubule invasion but not adhesion to P. gingivalis or the ability to promote P. gingivalis coinvasion of dentin. An isogenic afimbrial mutant of P. gingivalis had 50% reduced binding to S. gordonii cells but was unaffected in the ability to coinvade dentinal tubules with S. gordonii wild-type cells. Expression of the S. gordonii SspA or SspB polypeptide on the surface of Lactococcus lactis cells endowed these bacteria with the abilities to bind P. gingivalis, penetrate dentinal tubules, and promote P. gingivalis coinvasion of dentin. The results demonstrate that collagen-binding and P. gingivalis-binding properties of antigen I/II polypeptides are discrete functions. Specificity of antigen I/II polypeptide recognition accounts for the ability of P. gingivalis to coinvade dentinal tubules with S. gordonii but not with S. mutans. This provides evidence that the specificity of interbacterial coadhesion may influence directly the etiology

  5. Carbon-13 NMR study of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies: Antigen binding and domain-domain interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Koichi; Matsunaga, Chigusa; Odaka, Asano; Yamato, Sumie; Takaha, Wakana; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji )

    1991-07-02

    A {sup 13}C NMR study is reported of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies, which possess the identical V{sub H}, V{sub L}, and C{sub L} domains in conjunction with highly homologous but not identical heavy-chain constant regions. Each of the antibodies has been selectively labeled with {sup 13}C at the carbonyl carbon of Trp, Tyr, His, or Cys residue by growing hybridoma cells in serum-free medium. Spectral assignments have been made by folowing the procedure described previously for the switch variant antibodies labeled with (1-{sup 13}C)Met. On the basis of the spectral data collected for the antibodies and their proteolytic fragments, the authors discuss how {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy can be used for the structural analyses of antigen binding and also of domain-domain interactions in the antibody molecule.

  6. Homologous recombination enhancement conferred by the Z-DNA motif d(TG)30 is abrogated by simian virus 40 T antigen binding to adjacent DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Wahls, W P; Moore, P D

    1990-02-01

    The Z-DNA motif polydeoxythymidylic-guanylic [d(TG)].polydeoxyadenylic-cytidylic acid [d(AC)], present throughout eucaryotic genomes, is capable of readily forming left-handed Z-DNA in vitro and has been shown to promote homologous recombination. The effects of simian virus 40 T-antigen-dependent substrate replication upon the stimulation of recombination conferred by the Z-DNA motif d(TG)30 were analyzed. Presence of d(TG)30 adjacent to a T-antigen-binding site I can stimulate homologous recombination between nonreplicating plasmids, providing that T antigen is absent, in both simian CV-1 cells and human EJ cells (W. P. Wahls, L. J. Wallace, and P. D. Moore, Mol. Cell. Biol. 10:785-793). It has also been shown elsewhere that the presence of d(TG)n not adjacent to the T-antigen-binding site can stimulate homologous recombination in simian virus 40 molecules replicating in the presence of T antigen (P. Bullock, J. Miller, and M. Botchan, Mol. Cell. Biol. 6:3948-3953, 1986). However, it is demonstrated here that d(TG)30 nine base pairs distant from a T-antigen-binding site bound with T antigen does not stimulate recombination between either replicating or nonreplicating substrates in somatic cells. The bound T antigen either prevents the d(TG)30 sequence from acquiring a recombinogenic configuration (such as left-handed Z-DNA), or it prevents the interaction of recombinase proteins with the sequence by stearic hindrance. PMID:2153923

  7. Lipid Nanoparticles with Accessible Nickel as a Vaccine Delivery System for Single and Multiple His-tagged HIV Antigens.

    PubMed

    Yan, Weili; Jain, Anekant; O'Carra, Ronan; Woodward, Jerold G; Li, Wenxue; Li, Guanhan; Nath, Avindra; Mumper, Russell J

    2009-07-01

    Lipid-based nanoparticles (NPs) with a small amount of surface-chelated nickel (Ni-NPs) were developed to easily formulate the HIV his-tagged Tat protein, as well as to formulate and co-deliver two HIV antigens (his-p24 and his-Nef) on one particle. Female BALB/c mice were immunized by s.c. injection with his-Tat/Ni-NP formulation (1.5 μg Tat-his/mouse) and control formulations on day 0 and 14. The day 28 anti-Tat specific IgG titer with his-Tat/Ni-NP was significantly greater than that with Alum/his-Tat. Furthermore, splenocytes from his-Tat/Ni-NP immunized mice secreted significantly higher IFN-γ than those from mice immunized with Alum/his-Tat. Although Ni-NPs did not show better adjuvant activity than Tat-coated anionic NPs made with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS/NPs), they were less toxic than SDS/NPs. The initial results indicated that co-immunization of mice using his-p24/his-Nef/Ni-NP induced greater antibody response compared to using Alum/his-p24/his-Nef. Co-delivery of two antigens using Ni-NPs also increased the immunogenicity of individual antigens compared to delivery of a single antigen by Ni-NPs. In conclusion, Ni-NPs are an efficient delivery system for HIV vaccines including both single antigen delivery and multiple antigen co-delivery. PMID:21966230

  8. Lipid nanoparticles with accessible nickel as a vaccine delivery system for single and multiple his-tagged HIV antigens

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Weili; Jain, Anekant; O’Carra, Ronan; Woodward, Jerold G; Li, Wenxue; Li, Guanhan; Nath, Avindra; Mumper, Russell J

    2009-01-01

    Lipid-based nanoparticles (NPs) with a small amount of surface-chelated nickel (Ni-NPs) were developed to easily formulate the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) his-tagged Tat (his-Tat) protein, as well as to formulate and co-deliver two HIV antigens (his-p24 and his-Nef) on one particle. Female BALB/c mice were immunized by subcutaneous injection with his-Tat/Ni-NP formulation (1.5 μg his-Tat/mouse) and control formulations on day 0 and 14. The day 28 anti-Tat specific immunoglobulin G titer with his-Tat/Ni-NPs was significantly greater than that with Alum/his-Tat. Furthermore, splenocytes from his-Tat/Ni-NP-immunized mice secreted significantly higher IFN-γ than those from mice immunized with Alum/his-Tat. Although Ni-NPs did not show better adjuvant activity than Tat-coated anionic NPs made with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS/NPs), they were less toxic than SDS/NPs. The initial results indicated that co-immunization of mice using his-p24/his-Nef/Ni-NP induced greater antibody response compared to using Alum/his-p24/his-Nef. Co-delivery of two antigens using Ni-NPs also increased the immunogenicity of individual antigens compared to delivery of a single antigen by Ni-NPs. In conclusion, Ni-NPs are an efficient delivery system for HIV vaccines including both single antigen delivery and multiple antigen co-delivery. PMID:21966230

  9. Human natural immunoglobulin M antibodies induce apoptosis of human neuroblastoma cells by binding to a Mr 260,000 antigen.

    PubMed

    David, K; Ollert, M W; Vollmert, C; Heiligtag, S; Eickhoff, B; Erttmann, R; Bredehorst, R; Vogel, C W

    1999-08-01

    Sera of healthy humans contain natural cytotoxic IgM antibodies that specifically recognize a Mr 260,000 antigen (NB-p260) on the surface of human neuroblastoma (NB) cells. Here we demonstrate that anti-NB IgM antibodies prepared from different healthy individuals induce, in all human NB cell lines analyzed thus far, typical morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis including nuclear fragmentation, chromatin condensation, and DNA fragmentation. Both the binding of human anti-NB IgM to NB cells and the induction of apoptosis could be inhibited by preincubation of NB cells with murine IgG raised against purified NB-p260. Furthermore, preincubation of human anti-NB IgM with purified NB-p260 immobilized onto a solid support abolished its ability to induce apoptosis in NB cells. Natural human anti-NB IgM failed to bind to and induce apoptosis in control tumor cell lines that lack expression of NB-p260. The anti-NB IgM-induced apoptotic response was also observed in vivo in xenografted human NB tumors. After a single i.v. injection of anti-NB IgM into nude rats bearing solid NB xenografts, many areas of pyknotic cells with fragmented nuclei were observed that stained positive using the terminal dUTP nick end labeling method. In conclusion, the data demonstrate that natural anti-NB IgM antibodies in the sera of healthy individuals are potent mediators of apoptotic cell death of NB cells both in vitro and in vivo. The NB-p260 antigen was identified as the apoptosis-inducing receptor for anti-NB IgM. Whereas natural anti-NB IgM and NB-p260 may be useful tools for immunotherapy of NB, their biological significance remains to be determined.

  10. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I restricted epitope discovery in yellow fewer and dengue viruses: importance of HLA binding strength.

    PubMed

    Lund, Ole; Nascimento, Eduardo J M; Maciel, Milton; Nielsen, Morten; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Lundegaard, Claus; Harndahl, Mikkel; Lamberth, Kasper; Buus, Søren; Salmon, Jérôme; August, Thomas J; Marques, Ernesto T A

    2011-01-01

    Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue fever virus (DENV) restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I) alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV epitopes were selected using the EpiSelect algorithm to allow for optimal coverage of viral strains. The selected predicted epitopes were synthesized and approximately 75% were found to bind the predicted restricting HLA molecule with an affinity, K(D), stronger than 500 nM. The immunogenicity of 25 HLA-A*02:01, 28 HLA-A*24:02 and 28 HLA-B*07:02 binding peptides was tested in three HLA-transgenic mice models and led to the identification of 17 HLA-A*02:01, 4 HLA-A*2402 and 4 HLA-B*07:02 immunogenic peptides. The immunogenic peptides bound HLA significantly stronger than the non-immunogenic peptides. All except one of the immunogenic peptides had K(D) below 100 nM and the peptides with K(D) below 5 nM were more likely to be immunogenic. In addition, all the immunogenic peptides that were identified as having a high functional avidity had K(D) below 20 nM. A*02:01 transgenic mice were also inoculated twice with the 17DD YFV vaccine strain. Three of the YFV A*02:01 restricted peptides activated T-cells from the infected mice in vitro. All three peptides that elicited responses had an HLA binding affinity of 2 nM or less. The results indicate the importance of the strength of HLA binding in shaping the immune response.

  11. Multiple Binding Poses in the Hydrophobic Cavity of Bee Odorant Binding Protein AmelOBP14

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the first step of olfaction, odorants are bound and solubilized by small globular odorant binding proteins (OBPs) which shuttle them to the membrane of a sensory neuron. Low ligand affinity and selectivity at this step enable the recognition of a wide range of chemicals. Honey bee Apis mellifera’s OBP14 (AmelOBP14) binds different plant odorants in a largely hydrophobic cavity. In long molecular dynamics simulations in the presence and absence of ligand eugenol, we observe a highly dynamic C-terminal region which forms one side of the ligand-binding cavity, and the ligand drifts away from its crystallized orientation. Hamiltonian replica exchange simulations, allowing exchanges of conformations sampled by the real ligand with those sampled by a noninteracting dummy molecule and several intermediates, suggest an alternative, quite different ligand pose which is adopted immediately and which is stable in long simulations. Thermodynamic integration yields binding free energies which are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. PMID:26633245

  12. Multiple lineages of antigenically and genetically diverse influenza A virus co-circulate in the United States swine population.

    PubMed

    Webby, R J; Rossow, K; Erickson, G; Sims, Y; Webster, R

    2004-07-01

    Before the isolation of H3N2 viruses in 1998, swine influenza in the United States was an endemic disease caused exclusively by classical-swine H1N1 viruses. In this study we determined the antigenic and phylogenetic composition of a selection of currently circulating strains and revealed that, in contrast to the situation pre-1998, the swine population in the United States is now a dynamic viral reservoir containing multiple viral lineages. H3N2 viruses still circulate and representatives of each of two previously identified phylogenetic groups were isolated. H1N1 and H1N2 viruses were also identified. In addition to the genotypic diversity present, there was also considerable antigenic diversity seen. At least three antigenic profiles of H1 viruses were noted and all of the recent H3N2 viruses reacted poorly, if at all, to the index A/swine/Texas/4199-2/98 H3N2 antiserum in hemagglutination inhibition assays. The influenza reservoir in the United States swine population has thus gone from a stable single viral lineage to one where genetically and antigenically heterogenic viruses co-circulate. The growing complexity of influenza at this animal-human interface and the presence of viruses with a seemingly high affinity for reassortment makes the United States swine population an increasingly important reservoir of viruses with human pandemic potential.

  13. Novel epitope evoking CD138 antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes targeting multiple myeloma and other plasma cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jooeun; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2011-11-01

    The development of an immunotherapeutic strategy targeting CD138 antigen could potentially represent a new treatment option for multiple myeloma (MM). This study evaluated the immune function of CD138 peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), generated ex vivo using an HLA-A2-specific CD138 epitope against MM cells. A novel immunogenic HLA-A2-specific CD138(260-268) (GLVGLIFAV) peptide was identified from the full-length protein sequence of the CD138 antigen, which induced CTL specific to primary CD138(+) MM cells. The peptide-induced CD138-CTL contained a high percentage of CD8(+) activated/memory T cells with a low percentage of CD4(+) T cell and naive CD8(+) T cell subsets. The CTL displayed HLA-A2-restricted and CD138 antigen-specific cytotoxicity against MM cell lines. In addition, CD138-CTL demonstrated increased degranulation, proliferation and γ-interferon secretion to HLA-A2(+) /CD138(+) myeloma cells, but not HLA-A2(-) /CD138(+) or HLA-A2(+) /CD138(-) cells. The immune functional properties of the CD138-CTL were also demonstrated using primary HLA-A2(+) /CD138(+) cells isolated from myeloma patients. In conclusion, a novel immunogenic CD138(260-268) (GLVGLIFAV) peptide can induce antigen-specific CTL, which might be useful for the treatment of MM patients with peptide-based vaccine or cellular immunotherapy strategies. PMID:21902685

  14. Novel epitope evoking CD138 antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes targeting multiple myeloma and other plasma cell disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jooeun; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Munshi, Nikhil C.

    2012-01-01

    The development of an immunotherapeutic strategy targeting CD138 antigen could potentially represent a new treatment option for multiple myeloma (MM). This study evaluated the immune function of CD138 peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), generated ex vivo using an HLA-A2-specific CD138 epitope against MM cells. A novel immunogenic HLA-A2-specific CD138260-268 (GLVGLIFAV) peptide was identified from the full-length protein sequence of the CD138 antigen, which induced CTL specific to primary CD138+ MM cells. The peptide-induced CD138-CTL contained a high percentage of CD8+ activated/memory T cells with a low percentage of CD4+ T cell and naive CD8+ T cell subsets. The CTL displayed HLA-A2-restricted and CD138 antigen-specific cytotoxicity against MM cell lines. In addition, CD138-CTL demonstrated increased degranulation, proliferation and γ–interferon secretion to HLA-A2+/CD138+ myeloma cells, but not HLA-A2−/CD138+ or HLA-A2+/CD138− cells. The immune functional properties of the CD138-CTL were also demonstrated using primary HLA-A2+/CD138+ cells isolated from myeloma patients. In conclusion, a novel immunogenic CD138260-268 (GLVGLIFAV) peptide can induce antigen-specific CTL, which might be useful for the treatment of MM patients with peptide-based vaccine or cellular immunotherapy strategies. PMID:21902685

  15. Multiple lectin detection by cell membrane affinity binding.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana; Catarino, Sofia; Ferreira, Ricardo Boavida

    2012-05-01

    Assuming that lectins evolved to recognise relatively complex and branched oligosaccharides or parts of them, rather than simple sugars, a procedure based on lectin affinity binding to isolated erythrocyte (or any other cell type) membranes is proposed. This methodology was validated using six pure commercial lectins, as well as lectins from total protein extracts of Arbutus unedo leaves. All commercial lectins, as well as five polypeptides from A. unedo leaves bound to the glycosylated membrane receptors and were eluted by the corresponding sugars. When compared to the standard affinity chromatography procedure involving an individual sugar bound to a solid matrix, the new method provides a single-step, effective detection method for lectins and allows the rapid screening of their profile present in any unknown protein solution, indicates their biological carbohydrate affinities as well as their sugar specificities (if any), enables the simultaneous analysis of a large number of samples, does not require any pre-purification steps, permits detection of additional lectins and provides data which are more relevant from the physiological point of view. PMID:22381939

  16. An essential serotype recognition pocket on phage P22 tailspike protein forces Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A O-antigen fragments to bind as nonsolution conformers.

    PubMed

    Andres, Dorothee; Gohlke, Ulrich; Broeker, Nina K; Schulze, Stefan; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Heinemann, Udo; Barbirz, Stefanie; Seckler, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Bacteriophage P22 recognizes O-antigen polysaccharides of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica (S.) with its tailspike protein (TSP). In the serovars S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis, and S. Paratyphi A, the tetrasaccharide repeat units of the respective O-antigens consist of an identical main chain trisaccharide but different 3,6-dideoxyhexose substituents. Here, the epimers abequose, tyvelose and paratose determine the specific serotype. P22 TSP recognizes O-antigen octasaccharides in an extended binding site with a single 3,6-dideoxyhexose binding pocket. We have isolated S. Paratyphi A octasaccharides which were not available previously and determined the crystal structure of their complex with P22 TSP. We discuss our data together with crystal structures of complexes with S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis octasaccharides determined earlier. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that S. Paratyphi A octasaccharide binds P22 TSP less tightly, with a difference in binding free energy of ∼7 kJ mol(-1) at 20°C compared with S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis octasaccharides. Individual protein-carbohydrate contacts were probed by amino acid replacements showing that the dideoxyhexose pocket contributes to binding of all three serotypes. However, S. Paratyphi A octasaccharides bind in a conformation with an energetically unfavorable ϕ/ψ glycosidic bond angle combination. In contrast, octasaccharides from the other serotypes bind as solution-like conformers. Two water molecules are conserved in all P22 TSP complexes with octasaccharides of different serotypes. They line the dideoxyhexose binding pocket and force the S. Paratyphi A octasaccharides to bind as nonsolution conformers. This emphasizes the role of solvent as part of carbohydrate binding sites.

  17. The structure of the antigen-binding groove of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules determines specific selection of self-peptides.

    PubMed Central

    van Bleek, G M; Nathenson, S G

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the effect of diversity in the antigen-binding groove of the Kb, Db, Kbm1, and Kbm8 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules on the set of self-peptides they present on the cell surface, by using a procedure we recently developed in our laboratory to isolate endogenously processed peptides bound to MHC class I molecules. We found that such naturally processed peptides are 7-10 amino acids long. A major motif of tyrosine and phenylalanine residues at positions three and five was found for peptides binding to Kb. The availability of Kb mutant molecules Kbm1 and Kbm8, each with localized clustered changes in the antigen-binding cleft, allowed us to probe the effect of such small alterations on peptide selection. We found that such changes in different regions in the antigen-binding groove exert an absolute effect by changing subsets of self-peptides bound to these MHC molecules. In the Kbm1 mutant, the binding of the characteristic major set of Kb-associated peptides with tyrosine at position three or both positions three and five is abrogated, although this MHC molecule still binds peptides with tyrosine at position seven; the latter peptides also bind to Kb. Kbm8 shares the major Tyr-3, Tyr-5 peptide set that binds to Kb but does not bind the peptides with tyrosine at position seven. Thus differences in binding selectivity in Kbm1 and Kbm8 appear to be the major determinant for the observed alterations in in vivo immune responses. PMID:1763019

  18. Limited proteolysis of human leukocyte interferon-. cap alpha. 2 and localization of the monoclonal antibody-binding antigenic determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Kostrov, S.V.; Chernovskaya, T.V.; Khodova, O.M.; Borukhov, S.I.; Ryzhavskaya, A.S.; Izotova, L.S.; Strongin, A.Ya.

    1986-05-20

    Large peptide fragments of human leukocyte interferon-..cap alpha..2 (INF-..cap alpha..2) were produced by limited proteolysis with trypsin, pepsin, thermolysin, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens serine proteinase, and the ability of the fragments to react with murine monoclonal antibodies NK2, directed toward INF-..cap alpha..2, was studied by the immunoblotting technique. The region of the sequence 110-149 is the most sensitive to proteinase attack and evidently is exposed on the surface of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule. The INF-..cap alpha..2 fragments 1-139, 1-147, and 1-149 react with antibodies, whereas the fragments 1-109 and 1-112 do not bind NK2 antibodies. A comparison of the primary structure of the families of human leukocyte and murine leukocyte INF in the region of the sequence 110-139 and an analysis of the ability of human INF differing in amino acid sequence to interact with NK2 antibodies suggested that the antigenic determinant that binds monoclonal antibodies NK2 is the sequence Glu/sub 114/-Asp/sub 115/-Ser/sub 116/-He/sub 117/ of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule.

  19. Surface antigens on cat leukemic cells induced by feline leukemia virus: area density and antibody-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Boone, C W; Gordin, F; Kawakami, T G

    1973-04-01

    The binding of autologous bovine antibody to feline leukemia virus-induced cell surface antigens (FeCSA) on cat leukemia cells was studied by performing certain titration procedures with a mixture of immune and normal sera labeled with different iodine radioisotopes (paired-label technique). By using plots of titration data which conformed to linear equations derived from the mass action law, we determined the following constants. (i) The density of FeCSA was 2.03 x 10(6) sites per cell, or 5,230 sites per mum(2). (ii) The equilibrium constant of the FeCSA-antibody reaction was 2.67 x 10(7), from which the antibody binding affinity or standard free energy of the FeCSA-antibody bond was determined to be - 10.48 kcal (-43,869.28 J) per mol. The use of the techniques described to measure the concentration of antibody in antiserum, in micrograms per milliliter, is discussed.

  20. Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae Strain SENG-6, a Bacterium Producing Histo-Blood Group Antigen-Like Substances That Can Bind with Human Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Yang, Peiyi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacter sp. strain SENG-6, isolated from healthy human feces, produces histo-blood group antigen (HBGA)-like substances that can bind with human noroviruses. Based on the genome sequence analysis, strain SENG-6 belongs to the species Enterobacter cloacae. The genome sequence of this strain should help identify genes associated with the production of HBGA-like substances. PMID:27563051

  1. Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae Strain SENG-6, a Bacterium Producing Histo-Blood Group Antigen-Like Substances That Can Bind with Human Noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Satoshi; Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Yang, Peiyi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacter sp. strain SENG-6, isolated from healthy human feces, produces histo-blood group antigen (HBGA)-like substances that can bind with human noroviruses. Based on the genome sequence analysis, strain SENG-6 belongs to the species Enterobacter cloacae The genome sequence of this strain should help identify genes associated with the production of HBGA-like substances. PMID:27563051

  2. Antigen-binding cells in the peripheral blood of sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka Walbaum, induced by immersion or intraperitoneal injection of Vibrio languilarum bacterin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1981-01-01

    We used an immunocytoadherence assay to monitor the response of antigen-binding cells (ABC) in the peripheral blood of sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka, after immersion in, or intraperitoneal injection of, Vibrio anguillarum LS 1–74 bacterin. Both methods initiated an elevated ABC response in less than one day; this response persisted one week longer in the injected than in the immersed fish.

  3. Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae Strain SENG-6, a Bacterium Producing Histo-Blood Group Antigen-Like Substances That Can Bind with Human Noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Satoshi; Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Yang, Peiyi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacter sp. strain SENG-6, isolated from healthy human feces, produces histo-blood group antigen (HBGA)-like substances that can bind with human noroviruses. Based on the genome sequence analysis, strain SENG-6 belongs to the species Enterobacter cloacae The genome sequence of this strain should help identify genes associated with the production of HBGA-like substances.

  4. Inverse relation between prostate-specific antigen and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 in bone metastases and serum of patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, G L; Doherty, A P; Mitchell, H; Hanham, I W; Christmas, T J; Epstein, R J

    1999-12-11

    The usual osteoblastic phenotype of metastatic prostate cancer is unexplained. Here we show that tissue and serum concentrations of prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-vary inversely with a substrate protein that binds a growth factor known to activate osteoblasts. These findings suggest that PSA may contribute to the osteoblastic phenotype, and could thus represent a new drug target devoid of antiandrogenic toxicity.

  5. Identification of a purified complement-fixing antigen as the Epstein-Barr-virus determined nuclear antigen (EBNA) by its binding to metaphase chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ohno, S; Luka, J; Lindahl, T; Klein, G

    1977-04-01

    A soluble complement-fixing antigen carried by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed human cells has been previously extracted from cell nuclei and purified by DNA-cellulose chromatography [Luka, J., Siegert, W. & Klein, G. (1977) J. Virol., in press]. On addition of this antigen to methanol/acetic acid-fixed metaphase chrmosomes, followed by exposure to human sera containing antibodies against the EBV-determined nuclear antigen (EBNA), brilliant positive staining was obtained by anti-complement immunofluorescence. There was no staining after exposure to EBV-negative sera. Moreover, a nuclear protein fraction, prepared from an EBV-negative cell line in an analogous fashion, failed to induce the staining reaction. These data identify the soluble purified antigen as the EBV-determined nuclear antigen. The purified antigen has a molecular weight of 174,000 +/- 15,000, as determined by sucrose gradient centrifugation and gel filtration experiments. In neutral buffers containing 0.5-1.0 M NaCl, the antigen dissociates into a form of approximately one-half the original molecular weight with retained complement-fixing activity. This "monomer" has a molecular weight of 98,000 +/- 8,000. PMID:67603

  6. Cancer/testis antigens and obligate participation in multiple hallmarks of cancer: an update

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Steven M; Rajagopalan, Krithika; Rangarajan, Govindan; Kulkarni, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer/Testis Antigens (CTAs) are a group of so-called tumor antigens that exhibit provocative expression patterns in most types of cancer. However, because most CTAs appear to be intrinsically disordered, they are recalcitrant to classical structural studies. Thus, the functions of most, if not all, CTAs have remained elusive and their potential as pharmacological targets in cancer has remained largely unexplored. In this viewpoint, we suggest that perhaps, an integrative approach applying dynamical systems theory and a system-level perspective rather a merely reductionist view, may shine new light on these enigmatic molecules. PMID:26908068

  7. Mathematical analysis of a multiple strain, multi-locus-allele system for antigenically variable infectious diseases revisited.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Alhaji

    2015-09-01

    Many important pathogens such as HIV/AIDS, influenza, malaria, dengue and meningitis generally exist in phenotypically distinct serotypes that compete for hosts. Models used to study these diseases appear as meta-population systems. Herein, we revisit one of the multiple strain models that have been used to investigate the dynamics of infectious diseases with co-circulating serotypes or strains, and provide analytical results underlying the numerical investigations. In particular, we establish the necessary conditions for the local asymptotic stability of the steady states and for the existence of oscillatory behaviors via Hopf bifurcation. In addition, we show that the existence of discrete antigenic forms among pathogens can either fully or partially self-organize, where (i) strains exhibit no strain structures and coexist or (ii) antigenic variants sort into non-overlapping or minimally overlapping clusters that either undergo the principle of competitive exclusion exhibiting discrete strain structures, or co-exist cyclically.

  8. Expression and characterization of an enantioselective antigen-binding fragment directed against α-amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Eleniste, Pierre P.; Hofstetter, Heike; Hofstetter, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the design and expression of a stereoselective Fab that possesses binding properties comparable to those displayed by the parent monoclonal antibody. Utilizing mRNA from hybridoma clones that secrete a stereoselective anti-L-amino acid antibody, a corresponding biotechnologically produced Fab was generated. For that, appropriate primers were designed based on extensive literature and databank searches. Using these primers in PCR resulted in successful amplification of the VH, VL, CL and CH1 gene fragments. Overlap PCR was utilized to combine the VH and CH1 sequences and the VL and CL sequences, respectively, to obtain the genes encoding the HC and LC fragments. These sequences were separately cloned into the pEXP5-CT/TOPO expression vector and used for transfection of BL21(DE3) cells. Separate expression of the two chains, followed by assembly in a refolding buffer, yielded an Fab that was demonstrated to bind to L-amino acids but not to recognize the corresponding D-enantiomers. PMID:23827208

  9. Affinity binding of antibodies to supermacroporous cryogel adsorbents with immobilized protein A for removal of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Baillie, Les W J; Zheng, Yishan; Lis, Elzbieta K; Savina, Irina N; Howell, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Sandeman, Susan R

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric cryogels are efficient carriers for the immobilization of biomolecules because of their unique macroporous structure, permeability, mechanical stability and different surface chemical functionalities. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the potential use of macroporous monolithic cryogels for biotoxin removal using anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), the central cell-binding component of the anthrax exotoxins, and covalent immobilization of monoclonal antibodies. The affinity ligand (protein A) was chemically coupled to the reactive hydroxyl and epoxy-derivatized monolithic cryogels and the binding efficiencies of protein A, monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel column were determined. Our results show differences in the binding capacity of protein A as well as monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel adsorbents caused by ligand concentrations, physical properties and morphology of surface matrices. The cytotoxicity potential of the cryogels was determined by an in vitro viability assay using V79 lung fibroblast as a model cell and the results reveal that the cryogels are non-cytotoxic. Finally, the adsorptive capacities of PA from phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were evaluated towards a non-glycosylated, plant-derived human monoclonal antibody (PANG) and a glycosylated human monoclonal antibody (Valortim(®)), both of which were covalently attached via protein A immobilization. Optimal binding capacities of 108 and 117 mg/g of antibody to the adsorbent were observed for PANG attached poly(acrylamide-allyl glycidyl ether) [poly(AAm-AGE)] and Valortim(®) attached poly(AAm-AGE) cryogels, respectively, This indicated that glycosylation status of Valortim(®) antibody could significantly increase (8%) its binding capacity relative to the PANG antibody on poly(AAm-AGE)-protien-A column (p < 0.05). The amounts of PA which remained in the solution after passing PA spiked PBS through PANG or Valortim bound poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel were significantly (p < 0

  10. Affinity binding of antibodies to supermacroporous cryogel adsorbents with immobilized protein A for removal of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Baillie, Les W J; Zheng, Yishan; Lis, Elzbieta K; Savina, Irina N; Howell, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Sandeman, Susan R

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric cryogels are efficient carriers for the immobilization of biomolecules because of their unique macroporous structure, permeability, mechanical stability and different surface chemical functionalities. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the potential use of macroporous monolithic cryogels for biotoxin removal using anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), the central cell-binding component of the anthrax exotoxins, and covalent immobilization of monoclonal antibodies. The affinity ligand (protein A) was chemically coupled to the reactive hydroxyl and epoxy-derivatized monolithic cryogels and the binding efficiencies of protein A, monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel column were determined. Our results show differences in the binding capacity of protein A as well as monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel adsorbents caused by ligand concentrations, physical properties and morphology of surface matrices. The cytotoxicity potential of the cryogels was determined by an in vitro viability assay using V79 lung fibroblast as a model cell and the results reveal that the cryogels are non-cytotoxic. Finally, the adsorptive capacities of PA from phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were evaluated towards a non-glycosylated, plant-derived human monoclonal antibody (PANG) and a glycosylated human monoclonal antibody (Valortim(®)), both of which were covalently attached via protein A immobilization. Optimal binding capacities of 108 and 117 mg/g of antibody to the adsorbent were observed for PANG attached poly(acrylamide-allyl glycidyl ether) [poly(AAm-AGE)] and Valortim(®) attached poly(AAm-AGE) cryogels, respectively, This indicated that glycosylation status of Valortim(®) antibody could significantly increase (8%) its binding capacity relative to the PANG antibody on poly(AAm-AGE)-protien-A column (p < 0.05). The amounts of PA which remained in the solution after passing PA spiked PBS through PANG or Valortim bound poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel were significantly (p < 0

  11. Antigenic peptide molecular recognition by the DRB1-DQB1 haplotype modulates multiple sclerosis susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Melis, Paola; Genna, Vito; Cocco, Eleonora; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Pieroni, Enrico

    2014-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that has a notably high incidence in Sardinia. Our study focuses on two HLA class II haplotypes associated with the disease in Sardinia, the rare predisposing DRB1*15:01-DQB1*06:02 and the widespread protective DRB1*16:01-DQB1*05:02. This framework enabled the highlighting of HLA binding pocket specificity and peptide recognition mechanisms by employing molecular dynamics simulations of the whole DRB1-DQB1 haplotype interacting with MBP- and EBV-derived peptides. We analyzed peptide-protein interaction networks and temporal evolution of the original complexes and after key amino acid mutations. The mutation G86V of the protective DRB1 allele exerted its effect mainly in the presence of the EBV viral peptide, with local and long range outcomes. However, the V38A mutation of the protective DQB1 showed a long range effect only in the case of the MBP myelin peptide. Our findings also demonstrate a DRB1/DQB1 complementary molecular recognition of peptides. This mechanism could provide a robust synergistic action and a differential role of DRB1 and DQB1 in tissues and in the time-steps towards autoimmunity. In addition, we demonstrate that negatively charged residues in pockets 4 and 9 play a role in MS susceptibility. Our findings are supported by recent experiments using a closely related MS animal model. Overall, our analysis confirms the role of the DRB1-DQB1 haplotype in conferring disease predisposition and could provide a valuable aid in designing optimal therapeutic peptides for MS therapy.

  12. The low incidence of multiple sclerosis in areas near the equator may be due to ultraviolet light induced suppressor cells to melanocyte antigens.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, R J

    1986-04-01

    It has been shown by Elmets et al. (1) that ultraviolet irradiation of the skin followed by the application of a normally sensitizing antigen results in tolerance induction to the antigen. This tolerance is due to the induction of suppressor T-cells specific for the antigen. Multiple sclerosis is more common in certain climates distant from the equator where there is less ultraviolet light (sunlight). I postulate that people near the equator are exposed to more sunlight and that the ultraviolet light from the sunlight aids in the induction of suppressor cells specific for melanocyte associated antigens. Since melanocytes are of neural crest origin and share antigenic determinants with neural tissues these suppressor cells may act to protect against multiple sclerosis which is probably an autoimmune disease directed against neural tissues.

  13. Significant conformational changes in an antigenic carbohydrate epitope upon binding to a monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Glaudemans, C.P.J.; Lerner, L.; Daves, G.D. Jr.; Kovac, P.; Bax, A. ); Venable, R. )

    1990-12-01

    Transferred nulcear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (TRNOE) was used to observe changes in a ligand's conformation upon binding to its specific antibody. The ligands studied were methyl O-{beta}-D-galactopyranosyl(1{yields}6)-4-deoxy-4-fluoro-{beta}-D galactopyranoside (me4FGal{sub 2}) and its selectively deuteriated analogue, methyl O-{beta}-D-galactopyranosyl(1{yields}6)-4-deoxy-2-deuterio-4-fluoro-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (me4F2dGal{sub 2}). The monoclonal antibody was mouse IgA X24. The solution conformation of the free ligand me4F2dGal{sub 2} was inferred from measurements of vicinal {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H coupling constants, long-range {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C coupling constants, and NOE cross-peak intensities. For free ligand, both galactosyl residues adopt a regular chair conformation, but the NMR spectra are incompatible with a single unique conformation of the glycosidic linkage. Analysis of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C constants indicates that the major conformer has an extended conformation. TRNOE measurements on me4FGal{sub 2} and me4F2dGal{sub 2} in the presence of the specific antibody indicate that the pyranose ring pucker of each galactose ring remains unchanged, but rotations about the glycosidic linkage occur upon binding to X24. Computer calculations indicate that there are two sets of torsion angles that satisfy the observed NMR constraints. A new method, based on changes in the fluorine longitudinal relaxation rate, is used to measure the ligand-antibody dissociation rate constant.

  14. Structural Analysis of Histo-Blood Group Antigen Binding Specificity in a Norovirus GII.4 Epidemic Variant: Implications for Epochal Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Shanker, Sreejesh; Choi, Jae-Mun; Sankaran, Banumathi; Atmar, Robert L.; Estes, Mary K.; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram

    2012-03-23

    Susceptibility to norovirus (NoV), a major pathogen of epidemic gastroenteritis, is associated with histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), which are also cell attachment factors for this virus. GII.4 NoV strains are predominantly associated with worldwide NoV epidemics with a periodic emergence of new variants. The sequence variations in the surface-exposed P domain of the capsid protein resulting in differential HBGA binding patterns and antigenicity are suggested to drive GII.4 epochal evolution. To understand how temporal sequence variations affect the P domain structure and contribute to epochal evolution, we determined the P domain structure of a 2004 variant with ABH and secretor Lewis HBGAs and compared it with the previously determined structure of a 1996 variant. We show that temporal sequence variations do not affect the binding of monofucosyl ABH HBGAs but that they can modulate the binding strength of difucosyl Lewis HBGAs and thus could contribute to epochal evolution by the potentiated targeting of new variants to Lewis-positive, secretor-positive individuals. The temporal variations also result in significant differences in the electrostatic landscapes, likely reflecting antigenic variations. The proximity of some of these changes to the HBGA binding sites suggests the possibility of a coordinated interplay between antigenicity and HBGA binding in epochal evolution. From the observation that the regions involved in the formation of the HBGA binding sites can be conformationally flexible, we suggest a plausible mechanism for how norovirus disassociates from salivary mucin-linked HBGA before reassociating with HBGAs linked to intestinal epithelial cells during its passage through the gastrointestinal tract.

  15. A Rapid Method to Characterize Mouse IgG Antibodies and Isolate Native Antigen Binding IgG B Cell Hybridomas

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haolin; White, Janice; Crawford, Frances; Jin, Niyun; Ju, Xiangwu; Liu, Kangtai; Jiang, Chengyu; Marrack, Philippa; Zhang, Gongyi; Kappler, John W.

    2015-01-01

    B cell hybridomas are an important source of monoclonal antibodies. In this paper, we developed a high-throughput method to characterize mouse IgG antibodies using surface plasmon resonance technology. This assay rapidly determines their sub-isotypes, whether they bind native antigen and their approximate affinities for the antigen using only 50 μl of hybridoma cell culture supernatant. Moreover, we found that mouse hybridomas secreting IgG antibodies also have membrane form IgG expression without Igα. Based on this surface IgG, we used flow cytometry to isolate rare γ2a isotype switched variants from a γ2b antibody secreting hybridoma cell line. Also, we used fluorescent antigen to single cell sort antigen binding hybridoma cells from bulk mixture of fused hybridoma cells instead of the traditional multi-microwell plate screening and limiting dilution sub-cloning thus saving time and labor. The IgG monoclonal antibodies specific for the native antigen identified with these methods are suitable for in vivo therapeutic uses, but also for sandwich ELISA assays, histology, flow cytometry, immune precipitation and x-ray crystallography. PMID:26317987

  16. Stochastic Analysis of Antibody-antigen Binding in a Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Shauna; Zhang, Cong; Zambrano, Harvey; Conlisk, A. T.

    2012-11-01

    Over the last decade, microfluidic ``Labs on a Chip'' (LOC) have evolved from a single microchannel to micro-total analysis systems (TAS) capable of integrating thousands of reaction vessels, conduits and valves-the contents of an entire chemical laboratory-on a single chip. These systems have several advantages in biomedical applications, including lower equipment and personnel costs, reduced power requirements, faster separations, and smaller sample and reagent volume requirements. Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are cancer cells found in the blood stream indicating the presence of a tumor in the body. We consider the population of magnetically tagged antibodies to be characterized by a collection of stochastic trajectories; the probability of finding an antibody at a given position is assumed to be defined by the Fokker-Planck equation. The first objective is to determine the probability that one or more magnetically labeled antibodies will assume a trajectory that is within the neighborhood of a given cancer cell. Once this occurs the binding process can be described using a deterministic analysis and the modeling of this process is the second objective of the paper. Supported by the NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering center (NSEC) for the Affordable Nanoengineering of Polymeric Biomedical Devices EEC-0914790.

  17. Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 3 (EBNA3) Proteins Regulate EBNA2 Binding to Distinct RBPJ Genomic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Anqi; Welch, Rene; Zhao, Bo; Ta, Tram; Keleş, Sündüz

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Latent infection of B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in vitro results in their immortalization into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs); this latency program is controlled by the EBNA2 viral transcriptional activator, which targets promoters via RBPJ, a DNA binding protein in the Notch signaling pathway. Three other EBNA3 proteins (EBNA3A, EBNA3B, and EBNA3C) interact with RBPJ to regulate cell gene expression. The mechanism by which EBNAs regulate different genes via RBPJ remains unclear. Our chromatin immunoprecipitation with deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis of the EBNA3 proteins analyzed in concert with prior EBNA2 and RBPJ data demonstrated that EBNA3A, EBNA3B, and EBNA3C bind to distinct, partially overlapping genomic locations. Although RBPJ interaction is critical for EBNA3A and EBNA3C growth effects, only 30 to 40% of EBNA3-bound sites colocalize with RBPJ. Using LCLs conditional for EBNA3A or EBNA3C activity, we demonstrate that EBNA2 binding at sites near EBNA3A- or EBNA3C-regulated genes is specifically regulated by the respective EBNA3. To investigate EBNA3 binding specificity, we identified sequences and transcription factors enriched at EBNA3A-, EBNA3B-, and EBNA3C-bound sites. This confirmed the prior observation that IRF4 is enriched at EBNA3A- and EBNA3C-bound sites and revealed IRF4 enrichment at EBNA3B-bound sites. Using IRF4-negative BJAB cells, we demonstrate that IRF4 is essential for EBNA3C, but not EBNA3A or EBNA3B, binding to specific sites. These results support a model in which EBNA2 and EBNA3s compete for distinct subsets of RBPJ sites to regulate cell genes and where EBNA3 subset specificity is determined by interactions with other cell transcription factors. IMPORTANCE Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent gene products cause human cancers and transform B lymphocytes into immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines in vitro. EBV nuclear antigens (EBNAs) and membrane proteins constitutively activate pathways important for

  18. Evaluation of B cell maturation antigen as a target for antibody drug conjugate mediated cytotoxicity in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lydia; Bounds, Danton; Paterson, Jennifer; Herledan, Gaelle; Sully, Katherine; Seestaller-Wehr, Laura M; Fieles, William E; Tunstead, James; McCahon, Lee; Germaschewski, Fiona M; Mayes, Patrick A; Craigen, Jenny L; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Yong, Kwee L

    2016-09-01

    B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA, also termed TNFRSF17) is an attractive therapeutic target due to its restricted expression on normal and malignant plasma cells (PC). GSK2857916 (or J6M0-MMAF) is a BCMA-specific antibody conjugated to the microtubule-disrupting agent monomethyl auristatin F (MMAF) via a protease-resistant linker. To evaluate the clinical potential of this agent, tumour cells from seventy multiple myeloma (MM) patients were assessed for BCMA expression by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. All patients tested expressed BCMA, at varying levels, and both surface and intracellular expression were observed. BCMA expression is maintained through relapse, extramedullary spread and in residual disease post therapy. BCMA levels may also be prognostically useful as higher levels of BCMA were associated with poorer outcomes, even taking into account genetic risk. We observed rapid internalization of surface BCMA and newly expressed protein by 1 h, suggesting a mechanism for J6M0-MMAF activity even with low surface antigen. J6M0-MMAF mediated cytotoxicity of MM cells varied with dose and antigen levels, with clonogenic progenitors killed at lower doses than mature cells. In comparison, J6M0-MMAF killing of primary CD138(+) myeloma cells occurred with slower kinetics. Our observations support BCMA to be a promising therapeutic target in MM for novel therapies such as J6M0-MMAF. PMID:27313079

  19. An Immunoglobulin Binding Protein (Antigen 5) of the Stable Fly (Diptera: Muscidae) Salivary Gland Stimulates Bovine Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    AMERI, M.; WANG, X.; WILKERSON, M. J.; KANOST, M. R.; BROCE, A. B.

    2008-01-01

    The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans, is an economically important pest of livestock. Prior studies demonstrated lymphocyte suppression by crude salivary gland extract (SGE) of the stable fly. A dominant 27 kDa protein identified in the SGE was reported to stimulate immunodominant antibody responses in exposed cattle. The purpose of this study was to determine if this protein, now identified as a homolog of insect proteins named antigen 5 (Ag5), was responsible for the lymphocyte suppression and if naïve calves can mount an immune response to it. Calves raised in the winter months were immunized with recombinant Ag5 (rAg5) expressed in Drosophila S2 cells or with “natural” Ag5 protein isolated by preparative gel electrophoresis of SGE. Control calves were immunized with adjuvant alone. Rising antibody concentrations to rAg5 were detected in two of three calves immunized with rAg5 and one of three calves immunized with natural Ag5. Recall lymphocyte responses to rAg5 were detected at 21 and 28 DPI in calves immunized with rAg5 but not in calves immunized with the natural Ag5 or those exposed to adjuvant alone. Mitogen-stimulated bovine lymphocyte responses were not suppressed by rAg5. Further investigation using immunoblotting revealed that rAg5 binds to the Fc and F(ab’)2 portions of bovine IgG, but not to an Fab fragment. These findings suggest that Ag5 of the stable fly salivary gland is not immunosuppressive, but has immunoglobulin binding properties and can invoke specific antibody and memory lymphocyte responses in immunized calves. PMID:18283948

  20. A novel immunogenic CS1-specific peptide inducing antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes targeting multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jooeun; Song, Weihua; Smith, Robert; Daley, John; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Munshi, Nikhil C.

    2013-01-01

    The CS1 antigen provides a unique target for the development of an immunotherapeutic strategy to treat patients with multiple myeloma (MM). This study aimed to identify HLA-A2+ immunogenic peptides from the CS1 antigen, which induce peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against HLA-A2+ MM cells. We identified a novel immunogenic HLA-A2-specific CS1239–247 (SLFVLGLFL) peptide, which induced CS1-specific CTL (CS1-CTL) to MM cells. The CS1-CTL showed a distinct phenotype, with an increased percentage of effector memory and activated CTL and a decreased percentage of naive CTL. CS1239–247 peptide-specific CD8+ T cells were detected by DimerX analyses and demonstrated functional activities specific to the peptide. The CTL displayed HLA-A2-restricted and antigen-specific cytotoxicity, proliferation, degranulation and γ-interferon (IFN-γ)production against both primary MM cells and MM cell lines. In addition, the effector memory cells subset (CD45RO−CCR7−/CD3+CD8+) within CS1-CTL showed a higher level of CD107a degranulation and IFN-γproduction as compared to effector cells (CD45RO−CCR7−/CD3+CD8+) against HLA-A2+ primary MM cells or MM cell lines. In conclusion, this study introduced a novel immunogenic HLA-A2-specific CS1239–247 peptide capable of inducing antigen-specific CTL against MM cells that will provide a framework for its application as a novel MM immunotherapy. PMID:22533610

  1. A novel immunogenic CS1-specific peptide inducing antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes targeting multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jooeun; Song, Weihua; Smith, Robert; Daley, John; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2012-06-01

    The CS1 antigen provides a unique target for the development of an immunotherapeutic strategy to treat patients with multiple myeloma (MM). This study aimed to identify HLA-A2(+) immunogenic peptides from the CS1 antigen, which induce peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against HLA-A2(+) MM cells. We identified a novel immunogenic HLA-A2-specific CS1(239-247) (SLFVLGLFL) peptide, which induced CS1-specific CTL (CS1-CTL) to MM cells. The CS1-CTL showed a distinct phenotype, with an increased percentage of effector memory and activated CTL and a decreased percentage of naïve CTL. CS1(239-247) peptide-specific CD8(+) T cells were detected by DimerX analyses and demonstrated functional activities specific to the peptide. The CTL displayed HLA-A2-restricted and antigen-specific cytotoxicity, proliferation, degranulation and γ-interferon (IFN-γ) production against both primary MM cells and MM cell lines. In addition, the effector memory cells subset (CD45RO(+) CCR7(-) /CD3(+) CD8(+) ) within CS1-CTL showed a higher level of CD107a degranulation and IFN-γ production as compared to effector cells (CD45RO(-) CCR7(-) /CD3(+) CD8(+) ) against HLA-A2(+) primary MM cells or MM cell lines. In conclusion, this study introduced a novel immunogenic HLA-A2-specific CS1(239-247) peptide capable of inducing antigen-specific CTL against MM cells that will provide a framework for its application as a novel MM immunotherapy. PMID:22533610

  2. Temporally defined neocortical translation and polysome assembly are determined by the RNA-binding protein Hu antigen R.

    PubMed

    Kraushar, Matthew L; Thompson, Kevin; Wijeratne, H R Sagara; Viljetic, Barbara; Sakers, Kristina; Marson, Justin W; Kontoyiannis, Dimitris L; Buyske, Steven; Hart, Ronald P; Rasin, Mladen-Roko

    2014-09-01

    Precise spatiotemporal control of mRNA translation machinery is essential to the development of highly complex systems like the neocortex. However, spatiotemporal regulation of translation machinery in the developing neocortex remains poorly understood. Here, we show that an RNA-binding protein, Hu antigen R (HuR), regulates both neocorticogenesis and specificity of neocortical translation machinery in a developmental stage-dependent manner in mice. Neocortical absence of HuR alters the phosphorylation states of initiation and elongation factors in the core translation machinery. In addition, HuR regulates the temporally specific positioning of functionally related mRNAs into the active translation sites, the polysomes. HuR also determines the specificity of neocortical polysomes by defining their combinatorial composition of ribosomal proteins and initiation and elongation factors. For some HuR-dependent proteins, the association with polysomes likewise depends on the eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha kinase 4, which associates with HuR in prenatal developing neocortices. Finally, we found that deletion of HuR before embryonic day 10 disrupts both neocortical lamination and formation of the main neocortical commissure, the corpus callosum. Our study identifies a crucial role for HuR in neocortical development as a translational gatekeeper for functionally related mRNA subgroups and polysomal protein specificity.

  3. Effect of polyethylene glycol conjugation on conformational and colloidal stability of a monoclonal antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab').

    PubMed

    Roque, Cristopher; Sheung, Anthony; Rahman, Nausheen; Ausar, S Fernando

    2015-02-01

    We have investigated the effects of site specific "hinge" polyethylene glycol conjugation (PEGylation) on thermal, pH, and colloidal stability of a monoclonal antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab') using a variety of biophysical techniques. The results obtained by circular dichroism (CD), ultraviolet (UV) absorbance, and fluorescence spectroscopy suggested that the physical stability of the Fab' is maximized at pH 6-7 with no apparent differences due to PEGylation. Temperature-induced aggregation experiments revealed that PEGylation was able to increase the transition temperature, as well as prevent the formation of visible and subvisible aggregates. Statistical comparison of the three-index empirical phase diagram (EPD) revealed significant differences in thermal and pH stability signatures between Fab' and PEG-Fab'. Upon mechanical stress, micro-flow imaging (MFI) and measurement of the optical density at 360 nm showed that the PEG-Fab' had significantly higher resistance to surface-induced aggregation compared to the Fab'. Analysis of the interaction parameter, kD, indicated repulsive intermolecular forces for PEG-Fab' and attractive forces for Fab'. In conclusion, PEGylation appears to protect Fab' against thermal and mechanical stress-induced aggregation, likely due to a steric hindrance mechanism.

  4. Diverse monoclonal antibodies against the CA 19-9 antigen show variation in binding specificity with consequences for clinical interpretation.

    PubMed

    Partyka, Katie; Maupin, Kevin A; Brand, Randall E; Haab, Brian B

    2012-07-01

    The CA 19-9 antigen is currently the best individual marker for the detection of pancreatic cancer. In order to optimize the CA 19-9 assay and to develop approaches to further improve cancer detection, it is important to understand the specificity differences between CA 19-9 antibodies and the consequential affect on biomarker performance. Antibody arrays enabled multiplexed comparisons between five different CA 19-9 antibodies used in the analysis of plasma samples from pancreatic cancer patients and controls. Major differences were observed between antibodies in their detection of particular patient samples. Glycan array analysis revealed that certain antibodies were highly specific for the canonical CA 19-9 epitope, sialyl-Lewis A, while others bound sialyl-Lewis A in addition to a related structure called sialyl-Lewis C and modification with Nue5Gc. In a much larger patient cohort, we confirmed the binding of sialyl-Lewis C glycan by one of the antibodies and showed that the broader specificity led to the detection of an increased number of cancer patients without increasing detection of pancreatitis patient samples. This work demonstrates that variation between antibody specificity for cancer-associated glycans can have significant implications for biomarker performance and highlights the value of characterizing and detecting the range of glycan structures that are elevated in cancer.

  5. Hepatitis C Virus Subtype 3a Envelope Protein 1 Binding with Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Types of Pakistani Population: Candidate Epitopes for Synthetic Peptide Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nawaz-Tipu, Hamid

    2015-10-01

    The object of this cross sectional study was to determine the HCV subtype 3a envelope protein binding affinity with Human Leukocyte Antigen. Envelope 1 (E1) protein is one of the structural proteins responsible for entering the cells through the receptors. The binding affinity of E1 protein epitopes to the selected Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I alleles was investigated using the computer-based tools. These prediction tools were also used to design the synthetic vaccine's candidate epitopes and to identify the individuals/populations who are likely to be responder to those vaccines.The mean frequency of HLA I antigens in Pakistani population was calculated. Three alleles each from HLA A and B were selected. E1 protein sequence extracted from HCV 3a isolates was retrieved and twenty-four sequences of it were selected. NetMHCcons 1.0 server was used to determine the binding affinities of HLA alleles to the epitope sequences of 10 amino acids in length.A02, A03, A11, A24, A33, B08, B13, B15, B35 and B40 were the first five antigens more prevalent in Pakistan each from HLA A and HLA B.. We did not find any binding affinity between HLA A*201, B*1501 and B*4001 and epitopes from E1 sequences in a threshold of 50 nM. Totally five various epitopes derived from different isolates were characterized.The prediction of HLA-E1 epitope specific bindings and the forthcoming response can be a useful bioinformatics tool to uncover the right synthetic peptides for vaccine design purposes.

  6. The binding sites of monoclonal antibodies to the non-reducing end of Francisella tularensis O-antigen accommodate mainly the terminal saccharide

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhaohua; Rynkiewicz, Michael J; Yang, Chiou-Ying; Madico, Guillermo; Perkins, Hillary M; Wang, Qi; Costello, Catherine E; Zaia, Joseph; Seaton, Barbara A; Sharon, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    We have previously described two types of protective B-cell epitopes in the O-antigen (OAg) of the Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis: repeating internal epitopes targeted by the vast majority of anti-OAg monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and a non-overlapping epitope at the non-reducing end targeted by the previously unique IgG2a mAb FB11. We have now generated and characterized three mAbs specific for the non-reducing end of F. tularensis OAg, partially encoded by the same variable region germline genes, indicating that they target the same epitope. Like FB11, the new mAbs, Ab63 (IgG3), N213 (IgG3) and N62 (IgG2b), had higher antigen-binding bivalent avidity than internally binding anti-OAg mAbs, and an oligosaccharide containing a single OAg repeat was sufficient for optimal inhibition of their antigen-binding. The X-ray crystal structure of N62 Fab showed that the antigen-binding site is lined mainly by aromatic amino acids that form a small cavity, which can accommodate no more than one and a third sugar residues, indicating that N62 binds mainly to the terminal Qui4NFm residue at the nonreducing end of OAg. In efficacy studies with mice infected intranasally with the highly virulent F. tularensis strain SchuS4, N62, N213 and Ab63 prolonged survival and reduced blood bacterial burden. These results yield insights into how antibodies to non-reducing ends of microbial polysaccharides can contribute to immune protection despite the smaller size of their target epitopes compared with antibodies to internal polysaccharide regions. PMID:23844703

  7. The binding sites of monoclonal antibodies to the non-reducing end of Francisella tularensis O-antigen accommodate mainly the terminal saccharide.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhaohua; Rynkiewicz, Michael J; Yang, Chiou-Ying; Madico, Guillermo; Perkins, Hillary M; Wang, Qi; Costello, Catherine E; Zaia, Joseph; Seaton, Barbara A; Sharon, Jacqueline

    2013-11-01

    We have previously described two types of protective B-cell epitopes in the O-antigen (OAg) of the Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis: repeating internal epitopes targeted by the vast majority of anti-OAg monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and a non-overlapping epitope at the non-reducing end targeted by the previously unique IgG2a mAb FB11. We have now generated and characterized three mAbs specific for the non-reducing end of F. tularensis OAg, partially encoded by the same variable region germline genes, indicating that they target the same epitope. Like FB11, the new mAbs, Ab63 (IgG3), N213 (IgG3) and N62 (IgG2b), had higher antigen-binding bivalent avidity than internally binding anti-OAg mAbs, and an oligosaccharide containing a single OAg repeat was sufficient for optimal inhibition of their antigen-binding. The X-ray crystal structure of N62 Fab showed that the antigen-binding site is lined mainly by aromatic amino acids that form a small cavity, which can accommodate no more than one and a third sugar residues, indicating that N62 binds mainly to the terminal Qui4NFm residue at the nonreducing end of OAg. In efficacy studies with mice infected intranasally with the highly virulent F. tularensis strain SchuS4, N62, N213 and Ab63 prolonged survival and reduced blood bacterial burden. These results yield insights into how antibodies to non-reducing ends of microbial polysaccharides can contribute to immune protection despite the smaller size of their target epitopes compared with antibodies to internal polysaccharide regions. PMID:23844703

  8. The kinetics of antibody binding to Plasmodium falciparum VAR2CSA PfEMP1 antigen and modelling of PfEMP1 antigen packing on the membrane knobs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Infected humans make protective antibody responses to the PfEMP1 adhesion antigens exported by Plasmodium falciparum parasites to the erythrocyte membrane, but little is known about the kinetics of this antibody-receptor binding reaction or how the topology of PfEMP1 on the parasitized erythrocyte membrane influences antibody association with, and dissociation from, its antigenic target. Methods A Quartz Crystal Microbalance biosensor was used to measure the association and dissociation kinetics of VAR2CSA PfEMP1 binding to human monoclonal antibodies. Immuno-fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize antibody-mediated adhesion between the surfaces of live infected erythrocytes and atomic force microscopy was used to obtain higher resolution images of the membrane knobs on the infected erythrocyte to estimate knob surface areas and model VAR2CSA packing density on the knob. Results Kinetic analysis indicates that antibody dissociation from the VAR2CSA PfEMP1 antigen is extremely slow when there is a high avidity interaction. High avidity binding to PfEMP1 antigens on the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes in turn requires bivalent cross-linking of epitopes positioned within the distance that can be bridged by antibody. Calculations of the surface area of the knobs and the possible densities of PfEMP1 packing on the knobs indicate that high-avidity cross-linking antibody reactions are constrained by the architecture of the knobs and the large size of PfEMP1 molecules. Conclusions High avidity is required to achieve the strongest binding to VAR2CSA PfEMP1, but the structures that display PfEMP1 also tend to inhibit cross-linking between PfEMP1 antigens, by holding many binding epitopes at distances beyond the 15-18 nm sweep radius of an antibody. The large size of PfEMP1 will also constrain intra-knob cross-linking interactions. This analysis indicates that effective vaccines targeting the parasite's vulnerable adhesion receptors should

  9. Zinc-induced oligomerization of zinc α2 glycoprotein reveals multiple fatty acid-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Henna; Miah, Layeque; Lau, Andy M; Brochard, Lea; Hati, Debolina; Bui, Tam T T; Drake, Alex F; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J; McDermott, Lindsay C

    2016-01-01

    Zinc α2 glycoprotein (ZAG) is an adipokine with a class I MHC protein fold and is associated with obesity and diabetes. Although its intrinsic ligand remains unknown, ZAG binds the dansylated C11 fatty acid 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA) in the groove between the α1 and α2 domains. The surface of ZAG has approximately 15 weak zinc-binding sites deemed responsible for precipitation from human plasma. In the present study the functional significance of these metal sites was investigated. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and CD showed that zinc, but not other divalent metals, causes ZAG to oligomerize in solution. Thus ZAG dimers and trimers were observed in the presence of 1 and 2 mM zinc. Molecular modelling of X-ray scattering curves and sedimentation coefficients indicated a progressive stacking of ZAG monomers, suggesting that the ZAG groove may be occluded in these. Using fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity, these ZAG-zinc oligomers were again observed in the presence of the fluorescent boron dipyrromethene fatty acid C16-BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-hexadecanoic acid). Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that ZAG binds C16-BODIPY. ZAG binding to C16-BODIPY, but not to DAUDA, was reduced by increased zinc concentrations. We conclude that the lipid-binding groove in ZAG contains at least two distinct fatty acid-binding sites for DAUDA and C16-BODIPY, similar to the multiple lipid binding seen in the structurally related immune protein CD1c. In addition, because high concentrations of zinc occur in the pancreas, the perturbation of these multiple lipid-binding sites by zinc may be significant in Type 2 diabetes where dysregulation of ZAG and zinc homoeostasis occurs.

  10. Cloning of a cuticular antigen that contains multiple tandem repeats from the filarial parasite Dirofilaria immitis.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, C B; Grandea, A G; Maina, C V; Jenkins, R E; Selkirk, M E; McReynolds, L A

    1992-01-01

    An unusual antigen composed of tandemly repeated protein units was cloned from the filarial parasite Dirofilaria immitis. The antigen was initially identified by screening a lambda gt11 cDNA library with serum from dogs immunized with irradiated D. immitis third-stage larvae. DNA sequence analysis of the cDNA clone, Di5, revealed a continuous open reading frame composed of two 399-base-pair repeats arranged in tandem. Southern blot analysis of genomic D. immitis DNA showed that the gene coding for Di5 is composed of a tandem array of 25-50 copies of this same 399-base-pair repeat. Antiserum raised against recombinant Di5 protein detected a protein "ladder," from about 14 to greater than 200 kDa with steps approximately 15 kDa apart, on immunoblots of D. immitis extract. Metabolic labeling of adult parasites with [35S]methionine showed that Di5 is synthesized as a large precursor that is subsequently cleaved to produce the ladder-like array. These results suggest that the characteristic ladder is created by proteolytic cleavage of the precursor at the same site in each monomer. The Di5 antigen was localized to the cuticle and hypodermis of adult D. immitis by immunoelectron microscopy. Both male and female parasites were found to release Di5 when cultured in vitro. DNA hybridization analysis demonstrated that Di5 is a member of a gene family present in many filarial parasites that infect both animal and human populations. Images PMID:1631084

  11. Multiple opioid receptor binding in dissociated intact guinea pig brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, S.W.; James, D.W.

    1986-03-05

    Dissociated intact guinea pig brain cells were prepared by the method of Rogers and El-Fakahany. Over 95% of these cells are viable as demonstrated by their exclusion of the dye trypan blue. Opioid receptor binding assays were performed in a modified Kreb-Ringers physiological buffer. The following radiolabeled ligands and conditions were used to selectively labeled multiple opioid receptors: mu binding, 1 nM (/sup 3/H)naloxone + 20 nM DADLE + 300 nM U50,488H; kappa binding, 4 nM (-)-(/sup 3/H)-EKC + 100 nM DAGO + 500 nM DADLE; delta binding, 2 nM (/sup 3/H)-DADLE + 100 nM DAGO + 300 nM U50,488H; sigma binding, 4 nM (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047. The intact brain cells in physiological buffer demonstrated specific binding for mu, kappa, delta, and sigma receptors. The relative binding potency of naloxone for each of the receptor types is arbitrarily set at 1.

  12. RNA Binding of T-cell Intracellular Antigen-1 (TIA-1) C-terminal RNA Recognition Motif Is Modified by pH Conditions*

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Aroca, Ángeles; Persson, Cecilia; Karlsson, B. Göran; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2013-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a DNA/RNA-binding protein that regulates critical events in cell physiology by the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation. TIA-1 is composed of three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a glutamine-rich domain and binds to uridine-rich RNA sequences through its C-terminal RRM2 and RRM3 domains. Here, we show that RNA binding mediated by either isolated RRM3 or the RRM23 construct is controlled by slight environmental pH changes due to the protonation/deprotonation of TIA-1 RRM3 histidine residues. The auxiliary role of the C-terminal RRM3 domain in TIA-1 RNA recognition is poorly understood, and this work provides insight into its binding mechanisms. PMID:23902765

  13. The TF-antigen binding lectin from Sclerotium rolfsii inhibits growth of human colon cancer cells by inducing apoptosis in vitro and suppresses tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Shashikala R; Savanur, Mohammed Azharuddin; Eligar, Sachin M; Chachadi, Vishwanath B; Nagre, Nagaraja N; Chen, Chen; Barclays, Monica; Ingle, Aravind; Mahajan, Praveen; Borges, Anita; Shastry, Padma; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Swamy, Bale M; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Yu, Lu-Gang

    2012-09-01

    Glycan array analysis of Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) revealed its exquisite binding specificity to the oncofetal Thomsen-Friedenreich (Galβ1-3GalNAcα-O-Ser/Thr, T or TF) antigen and its derivatives. This study shows that SRL strongly inhibits the growth of human colon cancer HT29 and DLD-1 cells by binding to cell surface glycans and induction of apoptosis through both the caspase-8 and -9 mediated signaling. SRL showed no or very weak binding to normal human colon tissues but strong binding to cancerous and metastatic tissues. Intratumor injection of SRL at subtoxic concentrations in NOD-SCID mice bearing HT29 xenografts resulted in total tumor regression in 9 days and no subsequent tumor recurrence. As the increased expression of TF-associated glycans is commonly seen in human cancers, SRL has the potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent for cancer. PMID:22653662

  14. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Annual Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, N. O.

    2015-04-16

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that co-localization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of recombinant subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. NLPs are are biocompatible, high-density lipoprotein mimetics that are amenable to the incorporation of multiple, chemically-disparate adjuvant and antigen molecules. We hypothesize that the ability to co-localize optimized adjuvant formulations with subunit antigens within a single particle will enhance the stimulation and activation of key immune effector cells, increasing the protective efficacy of subunit antigen-based vaccines. While Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis subunit antigens are the focus of this proposal, we anticipate that this approach is applicable to a wide range of DOD-relevant biothreat agents. The F344 rat aerosol challenge model for F. tularensis has been successfully established at Battelle under this contract, and Year 3 efficacy studies performed at Battelle demonstrated that an NLP vaccine formulation was able to enhance survival of female F344 rats relative to naïve animals. In addition, Year 3 focused on the incorporation of multiple Burkholderia antigens (both polysaccharides and proteins) onto adjuvanted NLPs, with immunological analysis poised to begin in the next quarter.

  15. Humoral Responses to Diverse Autoimmune Disease-Associated Antigens in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Malyavantham, Kishore; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Suresh, Lakshmanan; Zivadinov, Robert; Shanahan, Thomas; Badgett, Darlene; Ramanathan, Murali

    2015-01-01

    To compare frequencies of autoreactive antibody responses to endogenous disease-associated antigens in healthy controls (HC), relapsing and progressive MS and to assess their associations with clinical and MRI measures of MS disease progression. Methods The study analyzed 969 serum samples from 315 HC, 411 relapsing remitting MS (RR-MS), 128 secondary progressive MS (SP-MS), 33 primary progressive MS (PP-MS) and 82 patients with other neurological diseases for autoantibodies against two putative MS antigens CSF114(Glc) and KIR4.1a and KIR4.1b and against 24 key endogenous antigens linked to diseases such as vasculitis, systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, polymyositis, scleroderma, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease and primary biliary cirrhosis. Associations with disability and MRI measures of lesional injury and neurodegeneration were assessed. Results The frequencies of anti-KIR4.1a and anti-KIR4.1b peptide IgG positivity were 9.8% and 11.4% in HC compared to 4.9% and 7.5% in RR-MS, 8.6% for both peptides in SP-MS and 6.1% for both peptides in PP-MS (p = 0.13 for KIR4.1a and p = 0.34 for KIR4.1b), respectively. Antibodies against CSF114(Glc), KIR4.1a and KIR4.1b peptides were not associated with MS compared to HC, or with MS disease progression. HLA DRB1*15:01 positivity and anti-Epstein Barr virus antibodies, which are MS risk factors, were not associated with these putative MS antibodies. Conclusions Antibody responses to KIR4.1a and KIR4.1b peptides are not increased in MS compared to HC nor associated with MS disease progression. The frequencies of the diverse autoreactive antibodies investigated are similar in MS and HC. PMID:26065913

  16. Thermodynamic signatures of the antigen binding site of mAb 447-52D targeting the third variable region of HIV-1 gp120.

    PubMed

    Killikelly, April; Zhang, Hui-Tang; Spurrier, Brett; Williams, Constance; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Kong, Xiang-Peng

    2013-09-10

    The third variable region (V3) of HIV-1 gp120 plays a key role in viral entry into host cells; thus, it is a potential target for vaccine design. Human monoclonal antibody (mAb) 447-52D is one of the most broadly and potently neutralizing anti-V3 mAbs. We further characterized the 447-52D epitope by determining a high-resolution crystal structure of the Fab fragment in complex with a cyclic V3 and interrogated the antigen-antibody interaction by a combination of site-specific mutagenesis, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and neutralization assays. We found that 447-52D's neutralization capability is correlated with its binding affinity and at 25 °C the Gibbs free binding energy is composed of a large enthalpic component and a small favorable entropic component. The large enthalpic contribution is due to (i) an extensive hydrogen bond network, (ii) a π-cation sandwiching the V3 crown apex residue Arg(315), and (iii) a salt bridge between the 447-52D heavy chain residue Asp(H95) and Arg(315). Arg(315) is often harbored by clade B viruses; thus, our data explained why 447-52D preferentially neutralizes clade B viruses. Interrogation of the thermodynamic signatures of residues at the antigen binding interface gives key insights into their contributions in the antigen-antibody interaction.

  17. A recombinant hepatitis B core antigen polypeptide with the protamine-like domain deleted self-assembles into capsid particles but fails to bind nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Gallina, A; Bonelli, F; Zentilin, L; Rindi, G; Muttini, M; Milanesi, G

    1989-01-01

    We have cloned in Escherichia coli both the complete core gene of hepatitis B virus and a truncated version of it, leading to the synthesis of high levels of a core-antigen-equivalent polypeptide (r-p22) and of an e-antigen-equivalent polypeptide (r-p16), respectively. We then compared the structural and antigenic properties of the two polypeptides, as well as their ability to bind viral nucleic acids. r-p16 was found to self-assemble into capsid-like particles that appeared similar, when observed under the electron microscope, to those formed by r-p22. In r-p16 particles, disulfide bonds linked the truncated polypeptides in dimers, assembled in the particle by noncovalent interactions. In r-p22 capsids, further disulfide bonds, conceivably involving the carboxy-terminal cysteines of r-p22 polypeptides, joined the dimers together, converting the structure into a covalently closed lattice. The protamine-like domain was at least partly exposed on the surface of r-p22 particles, since it was accessible to selective proteolysis. Finally, r-p22, but not r-p16, was shown to bind native and denatured DNA as well as RNA. Taken together, these results suggest that the protamine-like domain in core polypeptides is a nucleic acid-binding domain and is dispensable for the correct folding and assembly of amino-terminal and central regions. Images PMID:2677399

  18. Patterns of selection on Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte-binding antigens after the colonization of the New World.

    PubMed

    Yalcindag, Erhan; Rougeron, Virginie; Elguero, Eric; Arnathau, Céline; Durand, Patrick; Brisse, Sylvain; Diancourt, Laure; Aubouy, Agnes; Becquart, Pierre; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Fontenille, Didier; Gamboa, Dionicia; Maestre, Amanda; Ménard, Didier; Musset, Lise; Noya, Oscar; Veron, Vincent; Wide, Albina; Carme, Bernard; Legrand, Eric; Chevillon, Christine; Ayala, Francisco J; Renaud, François; Prugnolle, Franck

    2014-04-01

    Pathogens, which have recently colonized a new host species or new populations of the same host, are interesting models for understanding how populations may evolve in response to novel environments. During its colonization of South America from Africa, Plasmodium falciparum, the main agent of malaria, has been exposed to new conditions in distinctive new human populations (Amerindian and populations of mixed origins) that likely exerted new selective pressures on the parasite's genome. Among the genes that might have experienced strong selective pressures in response to these environmental changes, the eba genes (erythrocyte-binding antigens genes), which are involved in the invasion of the human red blood cells, constitute good candidates. In this study, we analysed, in South America, the polymorphism of three eba genes (eba-140, eba-175, eba-181) and compared it to the polymorphism observed in African populations. The aim was to determine whether these genes faced selective pressures in South America distinct from what they experienced in Africa. Patterns of genetic variability of these genes were compared to the patterns observed at two housekeeping genes (adsl and serca) and 272 SNPs to separate adaptive effects from demographic effects. We show that, conversely to Africa, eba-140 seemed to be under stronger diversifying selection in South America than eba-175. In contrast, eba-181 did not show any sign of departure from neutrality. These changes in the patterns of selection on the eba genes could be the consequence of changes in the host immune response, the host receptor polymorphisms and/or the ability of the parasite to silence or express differentially its invasion proteins. PMID:24834503

  19. Defining a protective epitope on factor H binding protein, a key meningococcal virulence factor and vaccine antigen

    PubMed Central

    Malito, Enrico; Faleri, Agnese; Lo Surdo, Paola; Veggi, Daniele; Maruggi, Giulietta; Grassi, Eva; Cartocci, Elena; Bertoldi, Isabella; Genovese, Alessia; Santini, Laura; Romagnoli, Giacomo; Borgogni, Erica; Brier, Sébastien; Lo Passo, Carla; Domina, Maria; Castellino, Flora; Felici, Franco; van der Veen, Stijn; Johnson, Steven; Lea, Susan M.; Tang, Christoph M.; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Savino, Silvana; Norais, Nathalie; Rappuoli, Rino; Bottomley, Matthew J.; Masignani, Vega

    2013-01-01

    Mapping of epitopes recognized by functional monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is essential for understanding the nature of immune responses and designing improved vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics. In recent years, identification of B-cell epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies has facilitated the design of peptide-based vaccines against highly variable pathogens like HIV, respiratory syncytial virus, and Helicobacter pylori; however, none of these products has yet progressed into clinical stages. Linear epitopes identified by conventional mapping techniques only partially reflect the immunogenic properties of the epitope in its natural conformation, thus limiting the success of this approach. To investigate antigen–antibody interactions and assess the potential of the most common epitope mapping techniques, we generated a series of mAbs against factor H binding protein (fHbp), a key virulence factor and vaccine antigen of Neisseria meningitidis. The interaction of fHbp with the bactericidal mAb 12C1 was studied by various epitope mapping methods. Although a 12-residue epitope in the C terminus of fHbp was identified by both Peptide Scanning and Phage Display Library screening, other approaches, such as hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (MS) and X-ray crystallography, showed that mAb 12C1 occupies an area of ∼1,000 Å2 on fHbp, including >20 fHbp residues distributed on both N- and C-terminal domains. Collectively, these data show that linear epitope mapping techniques provide useful but incomplete descriptions of B-cell epitopes, indicating that increased efforts to fully characterize antigen–antibody interfaces are required to understand and design effective immunogens. PMID:23396847

  20. Hydroxychloroquine protects melanocytes from autoantibody-induced injury by reducing the binding of antigen-antibody complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Guang; Hu, Wen-Zhi; Ma, Hui-Jun; Liu, Wen; Yang, Qing-Qi; Zhao, Guang

    2016-08-01

    Vitiligo is a polygenic autoimmune disorder characterized by loss of pigmentation due to melanocyte destruction. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is an effective immunosuppressant widely used in the treatment of autoimmune disorders. As generalized vitiligo (GV) is commonly considered to be a T cell and autoantibody-induced immune disorder, the present study aimed to determine whether HCQ protects melanocytes from autoantibody‑induced disruption. Anti‑melanocyte antibodies were obtained from the serum of patients with progressive GV and the effects of HCQ on prevent the autoantibody‑induced disruption of melanocytes was observed. Cell‑based ELISA, indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting were used to analyze the autoantibody content of sera samples obtained from 32 patients with progressive GV. The cytotoxicity of HCQ was detected by MTT assay, and 1 µg/ml HCQ was applied to human primary melanocytes (HMCs) to examine whether it could exert protective effects against autoantibody‑induced immune injury. Flow cytometry was used to measure autoantibody binding to the surface of HMCs. Complement‑dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody‑dependent cell‑mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) were monitored by MTT and lactate dehydrogenase‑releasing assays. The concentration of autoantibodies in sera samples taken from GV patients was significantly higher than in controls, particularly in patients who had >10% of their body surface affected by vitiligo. The majority of the autoantibodies presented in the HMCs and human keratinocytes (HKCs) and were predominantly localized to the cell surface and cytoplasm. The molecular weights of the autoantigens were identified as 30, 37‑39, 42, 53, 60‑75, 90, 100, 110, and 126 kDa; the 30 kDa protein was observed only in HMCs. The addition of HCQ at a concentration of 1 µg/ml produced no significant cytotoxicity in HMCs and was demonstrated to reduce the binding of GV immunoglobulin G (IgG) to the surface of HMCs

  1. Characterizing multiple metal ion binding sites within a ribozyme by cadmium-induced EPR silencing

    PubMed Central

    Kisseleva, Natalia; Kraut, Stefanie; Jäschke, Andres; Schiemann, Olav

    2007-01-01

    In ribozyme catalysis, metal ions are generally known to make structural and∕or mechanistic contributions. The catalytic activity of a previously described Diels-Alderase ribozyme was found to depend on the concentration of divalent metal ions, and crystallographic data revealed multiple binding sites. Here, we elucidate the interactions of this ribozyme with divalent metal ions in solution using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Manganese ion titrations revealed five high-affinity Mn2+ binding sites with an upper Kd of 0.6±0.2 μM. In order to characterize each binding site individually, EPR-silent Cd2+ ions were used to saturate the other binding sites. This cadmium-induced EPR silencing showed that the Mn2+ binding sites possess different affinities. In addition, these binding sites could be assigned to three different types, including innersphere, outersphere, and a Mn2+ dimer. Based on simulations, the Mn2+-Mn2+ distance within the dimer was found to be ∼6 Å, which is in good agreement with crystallographic data. The EPR-spectroscopic characterization reveals no structural changes upon addition of a Diels-Alder product, supporting the concept of a preorganized catalytic pocket in the Diels-Alder ribozyme and the structural role of these ions. PMID:19404418

  2. A rigorous multiple independent binding site model for determining cell-based equilibrium dissociation constants.

    PubMed

    Drake, Andrew W; Klakamp, Scott L

    2007-01-10

    A new 4-parameter nonlinear equation based on the standard multiple independent binding site model (MIBS) is presented for fitting cell-based ligand titration data in order to calculate the ligand/cell receptor equilibrium dissociation constant and the number of receptors/cell. The most commonly used linear (Scatchard Plot) or nonlinear 2-parameter model (a single binding site model found in commercial programs like Prism(R)) used for analysis of ligand/receptor binding data assumes only the K(D) influences the shape of the titration curve. We demonstrate using simulated data sets that, depending upon the cell surface receptor expression level, the number of cells titrated, and the magnitude of the K(D) being measured, this assumption of always being under K(D)-controlled conditions can be erroneous and can lead to unreliable estimates for the binding parameters. We also compare and contrast the fitting of simulated data sets to the commonly used cell-based binding equation versus our more rigorous 4-parameter nonlinear MIBS model. It is shown through these simulations that the new 4-parameter MIBS model, when used for cell-based titrations under optimal conditions, yields highly accurate estimates of all binding parameters and hence should be the preferred model to fit cell-based experimental nonlinear titration data. PMID:17141800

  3. Expression of a Chimeric Antigen Receptor in Multiple Leukocyte Lineages in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Carmen S. M.; Westwood, Jennifer A.; Schröder, Jan; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; von Scheidt, Bianca; Moeller, Maria; Devaud, Christel

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified CD8+ T lymphocytes have shown significant anti-tumor effects in the adoptive immunotherapy of cancer, with recent studies highlighting a potential role for a combination of other immune subsets to enhance these results. However, limitations in present genetic modification techniques impose difficulties in our ability to fully explore the potential of various T cell subsets and assess the potential of other leukocytes armed with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). To address this issue, we generated a transgenic mouse model using a pan-hematopoietic promoter (vav) to drive the expression of a CAR specific for a tumor antigen. Here we present a characterization of the immune cell compartment in two unique vav-CAR transgenic mice models, Founder 9 (F9) and Founder 38 (F38). We demonstrate the vav promoter is indeed capable of driving the expression of a CAR in cells from both myeloid and lymphoid lineage, however the highest level of expression was observed in T lymphocytes from F38 mice. Lymphoid organs in vav-CAR mice were smaller and had reduced cell numbers compared to the wild type (WT) controls. Furthermore, the immune composition of F9 mice differed greatly with a significant reduction in lymphocytes found in the thymus, lymph node and spleen of these mice. To gain insight into the altered immune phenotype of F9 mice, we determined the chromosomal integration site of the transgene in both mouse strains using whole genome sequencing (WGS). We demonstrated that compared to the 7 copies found in F38 mice, F9 mice harbored almost 270 copies. These novel vav-CAR models provide a ready source of CAR expressing myeloid and lymphoid cells and will aid in facilitating future experiments to delineate the role for other leukocytes for adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:26505904

  4. Do antibodies to myelin basic protein isolated from multiple sclerosis cross-react with measles and other common virus antigens?

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, C C; Townsend, E; Randell, V B; Williamson, H G

    1983-01-01

    Immunological activity to various antigens, including brain components, measles and other viruses, has been associated with IgG in multiple sclerosis (MS). One possible explanation for the presence of anti-viral antibodies and antibody to myelin basic protein (MBP) in MS patients is that there are antigenic determinants common to certain viruses and MBP. To assess this possibility, IgG from individual brains and sera from patients with MS, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and controls was isolated by protein A and MBP-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Antibody to MBP was measured with a solid phase radioimmunoassay and antibody to measles and other viruses by immunofluorescence and/or complement fixation. Anti-MBP activity was detected in brain extracts and sera of all MS patients tested. In contrast to the low levels of antibody to MBP in control brains, high levels of anti-MBP antibodies were found in most of the normal sera. There was no correlation between the presence and levels of serum anti-measles antibodies and the anti-MBP activity. None of the anti-MBP antibodies affinity purified from brain and serum of MS patients reacted with any of the viruses tested, including measles. IgG purified from SSPE patients or from a rabbit hyperimmunized with measles antigen had no reactivity to MBP, despite high levels of anti-measles antibody. It is concluded that there is not direct link between the presence of antibody to MBP and antibody to measles and other viruses in MS patients. PMID:6190599

  5. B-cell Maturation Antigen is a Promising Target for Adoptive T-cell Therapy of Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Robert O.; Evbuomwan, Moses O.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Rose, Jeremy J.; Raffeld, Mark; Yang, Shicheng; Gress, Ronald E.; Hakim, Frances T.; Kochenderfer, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Multiple myeloma (MM) is a usually incurable malignancy of plasma cells. New therapies are urgently needed for MM. Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T cells is a promising new therapy for hematologic malignancies, but an ideal target antigen for CAR-expressing T cell therapies of MM has not been identified. B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) is a protein that has been reported to be selectively expressed by B-lineage cells including MM cells. Our goal was to determine if BCMA is a suitable target for CAR-expressing T cells. Experimental Design We conducted an assessment of BCMA expression in normal human tissues and MM cells by flow cytometry, quantitative PCR, and immunohistochemistry. We designed and tested novel anti-BCMA CARs. Results BCMA had a restricted RNA expression pattern. Except for expression on plasma cells, BCMA protein was not detected in normal human tissues. BCMA was not detected on primary human CD34+ hematopoietic cells. We detected uniform BCMA cell-surface expression on primary MM cells from 5 of 5 patients. We designed the first anti-BCMA CARs to be reported, and we transduced T cells with lentiviral vectors encoding these CARs. The CARs gave T cells the ability to specifically recognize BCMA. The anti-BCMA-CAR-transduced T cells exhibited BCMA-specific functions including cytokine production, proliferation, cytotoxicity, and in vivo tumor eradication. Importantly, anti-BCMA-CAR-transduced T cells recognized and killed primary MM cells. Conclusions BCMA is a suitable target for CAR-expressing T cells, and adoptive transfer of anti-BCMA-CAR-expressing T cells is a promising new strategy for treating MM. PMID:23344265

  6. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins: multiple domains for multiple functions.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Thayne H; Altschuler, Sarah E; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2013-07-01

    The recognition of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is integral to myriad cellular functions. In eukaryotes, ssDNA is present stably at the ends of chromosomes and at some promoter elements. Furthermore, it is formed transiently by several cellular processes including telomere synthesis, transcription, and DNA replication, recombination, and repair. To coordinate these diverse activities, a variety of proteins have evolved to bind ssDNA in a manner specific to their function. Here, we review the recognition of ssDNA through the analysis of high-resolution structures of proteins in complex with ssDNA. This functionally diverse set of proteins arises from a limited set of structural motifs that can be modified and arranged to achieve distinct activities, including a range of ligand specificities. We also investigate the ways in which these domains interact in the context of large multidomain proteins/complexes. These comparisons reveal the structural features that define the range of functions exhibited by these proteins.

  7. Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Proteins: Multiple Domains for Multiple Functions

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Thayne H.; Altschuler, Sarah E.; Wuttke, Deborah S.

    2013-01-01

    The recognition of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is integral to myriad cellular functions. In eukaryotes, ssDNA is present stably at the ends of chromosomes and at some promoter elements. Furthermore, it is formed transiently by several cellular processes including telomere synthesis, transcription, and DNA replication, recombination, and repair. To coordinate these diverse activities, a variety of proteins have evolved to bind ssDNA in a manner specific to their function. Here, we review the recognition of ssDNA through the analysis of high-resolution structures of proteins in complex with ssDNA. This functionally diverse set of proteins arises from a limited set of structural motifs that can be modified and arranged to achieve distinct activities, including a range of ligand specificities. We also investigate the ways in which these domains interact in the context of large multidomain proteins/complexes. These comparisons reveal the structural features that define the range of functions exhibited by these proteins. PMID:23823326

  8. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 15 (Siglec-15) mediates periarticular bone loss, but not joint destruction, in murine antigen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Tomohiro; Takahata, Masahiko; Kameda, Yusuke; Endo, Tsutomu; Hamano, Hiroki; Hiratsuka, Shigeto; Ota, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2015-10-01

    Osteoclastogenesis requires immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling. Multiple immunoreceptors associated with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif adaptor proteins, including DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) and Fc receptor common γ (FcRγ), have been identified in osteoclast lineage cells, and some are involved in arthritis-induced bone destruction. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 15 (Siglec-15) is an immunoreceptor that regulates osteoclast development and bone resorption in association with DAP12. Whether Siglec-15 is involved in arthritis-induced bone lesions, however, remains unknown. Here we used a murine antigen-induced arthritis model to examine the role of Siglec-15 in the development of bone lesions induced by joint inflammation. Arthritis was unilaterally induced in the knee joints of 8-week-old female wild-type (WT) and Siglec-15(-/-) mice, and the contralateral knees were used as a control. The degree of joint inflammation, and cartilage and subchondral bone destruction in Siglec-15(-/-) mice was comparable to that in WT mice, indicating that Siglec-15 is not involved in the development of arthritis and concomitant cartilage and subchondral bone destruction. On the other hand, the degree of periarticular bone loss in the proximal tibia of the arthritic knee was significantly lower in Siglec-15(-/-) mice compared to WT mice. Although osteoclast formation in the metaphysis was enhanced in both WT and Siglec-15(-/-) mice after arthritis induction, mature multinucleated osteoclast formation was impaired in Siglec-15(-/-) mice, indicating impaired osteoclast bone resorptive function in the periarticular regions of the arthritic joint in Siglec-15(-/-) mice. Confirming this result, Siglec-15(-/-) primary unfractionated bone marrow cells harvested from arthritic femurs and tibiae failed to develop into mature multinuclear osteoclasts. Our findings suggest that Siglec-15 is a therapeutic target for periarticular

  9. Structure-based design of a disulfide-linked oligomeric form of the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen DNA-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2011-06-01

    With the aim of forming the ‘lock-washer’ conformation of the origin-binding domain of SV40 large T antigen in solution, using structure-based analysis an intermolecular disulfide bridge was engineered into the origin-binding domain to generate higher order oligomers in solution. The 1.7 Å resolution structure shows that the mutant forms a spiral in the crystal and has the de novo disulfide bond at the protein interface, although structural rearrangements at the interface are observed relative to the wild type. The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS–PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner.

  10. Analysis of saccharide binding to Artocarpus integrifolia lectin reveals specific recognition of T-antigen (beta-D-Gal(1----3)D-GalNAc).

    PubMed

    Sastry, M V; Banarjee, P; Patanjali, S R; Swamy, M J; Swarnalatha, G V; Surolia, A

    1986-09-01

    The binding of Artocarpus integrifolia lectin to N-dansylgalactosamine (where dansyl is 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl) leads to a 100% increase in dansyl fluorescence with a concomitant blue shift in the emission maximum by 10 nm. This binding is carbohydrate-specific and has an association constant of 1.74 X 10(4) M-1 at 20 degrees C. The lectin has two binding sites for N-dansylgalactosamine. The values of -delta H and -delta S for the binding of N-dansylgalactosamine are in the range of values reported for several lectin-monosaccharide interactions, indicating an absence of nonpolar interaction of the dansyl moiety of the sugar with the combining region of the protein. Dissociation of the bound N-dansylgalactosamine from its complex with the lectin and the consequent change in its fluorescence on addition of nonfluorescent sugars allowed evaluation of the association constant for competing ligands. The thermodynamic parameters for the binding of monosaccharides suggest that the OH groups at C-2, C-3, C-4, and C-6 in the D-galactose configuration are important loci for interaction with the lectin. The acetamido group at C-2 of 2-acetamido-2-deoxygalactopyranose and a methoxyl group at C-1 of methyl-alpha-D-galactopyranoside are presumably also involved in binding through nonpolar and van der Waals' interactions. The T-antigenic disaccharide Gal beta 1----3GalNAc binds very strongly to the lectin when compared with methyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside, the beta(1----3)-linked disaccharides such as Gal beta 1----3GlcNAc, and the beta(1----4)-linked disaccharides, N-acetyllactosamine and lactose. The major stabilizing force for the avid binding of T-antigenic disaccharide appears to be a favorable enthalpic contribution. The combining site of the lectin is, therefore, extended. These data taken together suggest that the Artocarpus lectin is specific toward the Thomsen-Friedenreich (T) antigen. There are subtle differences in the overall topography of its

  11. Myelin Basic Protein and a Multiple Sclerosis-related MBP-peptide Bind to Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Rozenblum, Guido Tomás; Kaufman, Tomás; Vitullo, Alfredo Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Aptamer ligands for myelin basic protein (MBP) were obtained using the systematic evolution of ligand by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method. Two clones were isolated from a pool of oligonucleotides and tested for MBP targeting. Using purified MBP, we demonstrated the binding activity of the aptamers and we also showed the affinity of MBP for oligonucleotides of specific length. Moreover, one selected aptamer competitively inhibited the binding of an MBP-specific antibody to MBP and the aptamer was found more sensitive than a commercial antibody. In addition, we showed the ability of the aptamer to detect myelin-rich regions in paraffin-embedded mouse brain tissue. Therefore, the MBP-binding activity of the selected oligonucleotide may prove useful as a tool for life science and medical research for myelin detection and might be a good lead for testing it in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:25202925

  12. Multiple antigens of Yersinia pestis delivered by live recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains elicit protective immunity against plague.

    PubMed

    Sanapala, Shilpa; Rahav, Hannah; Patel, Hetal; Sun, Wei; Curtiss, Roy

    2016-05-01

    Based on our improved novel Salmonella vaccine delivery platform, we optimized the recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine (RASV) χ12094 to deliver multiple Yersinia pestis antigens. These included LcrV196 (amino acids, 131-326), Psn encoded on pYA5383 and F1 encoded in the chromosome, their synthesis did not cause adverse effects on bacterial growth. Oral immunization with χ12094(pYA5383) simultaneously stimulated high antibody titers to LcrV, Psn and F1 in mice and presented complete protection against both subcutaneous (s.c.) and intranasal (i.n.) challenges with high lethal doses of Y. pestis CO92. Moreover, no deaths or other disease symptoms were observed in SCID mice orally immunized with χ12094(pYA5383) over a 60-day period. Therefore, the trivalent S. typhimurium-based live vaccine shows promise for a next-generation plague vaccine. PMID:27060051

  13. DNA binding proteins explore multiple local configurations during docking via rapid rebinding

    PubMed Central

    Ganji, Mahipal; Docter, Margreet; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.; Abbondanzieri, Elio A.

    2016-01-01

    Finding the target site and associating in a specific orientation are essential tasks for DNA-binding proteins. In order to make the target search process as efficient as possible, proteins should not only rapidly diffuse to the target site but also dynamically explore multiple local configurations before diffusing away. Protein flipping is an example of this second process that has been observed previously, but the underlying mechanism of flipping remains unclear. Here, we probed the mechanism of protein flipping at the single molecule level, using HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) as a model system. In order to test the effects of long-range attractive forces on flipping efficiency, we varied the salt concentration and macromolecular crowding conditions. As expected, increased salt concentrations weaken the binding of RT to DNA while increased crowding strengthens the binding. Moreover, when we analyzed the flipping kinetics, i.e. the rate and probability of flipping, at each condition we found that flipping was more efficient when RT bound more strongly. Our data are consistent with a view that DNA bound proteins undergo multiple rapid re-binding events, or short hops, that allow the protein to explore other configurations without completely dissociating from the DNA. PMID:27471033

  14. Strategic Priming with Multiple Antigens can Yield Memory Cell Phenotypes Optimized for Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Gong, Chang; Kirschner, Denise E.; Linderman, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    Lack of an effective vaccine results in 9 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) every year and 1.8 million deaths worldwide. Although many infants are vaccinated at birth with BCG (an attenuated M. bovis), this does not prevent infection or development of TB after childhood. Immune responses necessary for prevention of infection or disease are still unknown, making development of effective vaccines against TB challenging. Several new vaccines are ready for human clinical trials, but these trials are difficult and expensive; especially challenging is determining the appropriate cellular response necessary for protection. The magnitude of an immune response is likely key to generating a successful vaccine. Characteristics such as numbers of central memory (CM) and effector memory (EM) T cells responsive to a diverse set of epitopes are also correlated with protection. Promising vaccines against TB contain mycobacterial subunit antigens (Ag) present during both active and latent infection. We hypothesize that protection against different key immunodominant antigens could require a vaccine that produces different levels of EM and CM for each Ag-specific memory population. We created a computational model to explore EM and CM values, and their ratio, within what we term Memory Design Space. Our model captures events involved in T cell priming within lymph nodes and tracks their circulation through blood to peripheral tissues. We used the model to test whether multiple Ag-specific memory cell populations could be generated with distinct locations within Memory Design Space at a specific time point post vaccination. Boosting can further shift memory populations to memory cell ratios unreachable by initial priming events. By strategically varying antigen load, properties of cellular interactions within the LN, and delivery parameters (e.g., number of boosts) of multi-subunit vaccines, we can generate multiple Ag-specific memory populations that cover a wide range of

  15. Strategic priming with multiple antigens can yield memory cell phenotypes optimized for infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A computational study

    DOE PAGES

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Gong, Chang; Kirschner, Denise E.; Linderman, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-06

    Lack of an effective vaccine results in 9 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) every year and 1.8 million deaths worldwide. While many infants are vaccinated at birth with BCG (an attenuated M. bovis), this does not prevent infection or development of TB after childhood. Immune responses necessary for prevention of infection or disease are still unknown, making development of effective vaccines against TB challenging. Several new vaccines are ready for human clinical trials, but these trials are difficult and expensive; especially challenging is determining the appropriate cellular response necessary for protection. The magnitude of an immune response is likelymore » key to generating a successful vaccine. Characteristics such as numbers of central memory (CM) and effector memory (EM) T cells responsive to a diverse set of epitopes are also correlated with protection. Promising vaccines against TB contain mycobacterial subunit antigens (Ag) present during both active and latent infection. We hypothesize that protection against different key immunodominant antigens could require a vaccine that produces different levels of EM and CM for each Ag-specific memory population. We created a computational model to explore EM and CM values, and their ratio, within what we term Memory Design Space. Our model captures events involved in T cell priming within lymph nodes and tracks their circulation through blood to peripheral tissues. We used the model to test whether multiple Ag-specific memory cell populations could be generated with distinct locations within Memory Design Space at a specific time point post vaccination. Boosting can further shift memory populations to memory cell ratios unreachable by initial priming events. By strategically varying antigen load, properties of cellular interactions within the LN, and delivery parameters (e.g., number of boosts) of multi-subunit vaccines, we can generate multiple Ag-specific memory populations that cover a wide range of

  16. Multiple factors dictate target selection by Hfq-binding small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Beisel, Chase L; Updegrove, Taylor B; Janson, Ben J; Storz, Gisela

    2012-01-01

    Hfq-binding small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria modulate the stability and translational efficiency of target mRNAs through limited base-pairing interactions. While these sRNAs are known to regulate numerous mRNAs as part of stress responses, what distinguishes targets and non-targets among the mRNAs predicted to base pair with Hfq-binding sRNAs is poorly understood. Using the Hfq-binding sRNA Spot 42 of Escherichia coli as a model, we found that predictions using only the three unstructured regions of Spot 42 substantially improved the identification of previously known and novel Spot 42 targets. Furthermore, increasing the extent of base-pairing in single or multiple base-pairing regions improved the strength of regulation, but only for the unstructured regions of Spot 42. We also found that non-targets predicted to base pair with Spot 42 lacked an Hfq-binding site, folded into a secondary structure that occluded the Spot 42 targeting site, or had overlapping Hfq-binding and targeting sites. By modifying these features, we could impart Spot 42 regulation on non-target mRNAs. Our results thus provide valuable insights into the requirements for target selection by sRNAs. PMID:22388518

  17. Using multiple linear regression and physicochemical changes of amino acid mutations to predict antigenic variants of influenza A/H3N2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Cui, Haibo; Wei, Xiaomei; Huang, Yu; Hu, Bin; Fang, Yaping; Wang, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Among human influenza viruses, strain A/H3N2 accounts for over a quarter of a million deaths annually. Antigenic variants of these viruses often render current vaccinations ineffective and lead to repeated infections. In this study, a computational model was developed to predict antigenic variants of the A/H3N2 strain. First, 18 critical antigenic amino acids in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein were recognized using a scoring method combining phi (ϕ) coefficient and information entropy. Next, a prediction model was developed by integrating multiple linear regression method with eight types of physicochemical changes in critical amino acid positions. When compared to other three known models, our prediction model achieved the best performance not only on the training dataset but also on the commonly-used testing dataset composed of 31878 antigenic relationships of the H3N2 influenza virus.

  18. Epitope mapping of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibodies in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis: microwave-assisted synthesis of the peptide antigens and ELISA screening.

    PubMed

    Pacini, Giulia; Ieronymaki, Matthaia; Nuti, Francesca; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Larregola, Maud; Aharoni, Rina; Papini, Anna Maria; Rovero, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The role of pathologic auto-antibodies against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) in multiple sclerosis is a highly controversial matter. As the use of animal models may enable to unravel the molecular mechanisms of the human disorder, numerous studies on multiple sclerosis are carried out using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In particular, the most extensively used EAE model is obtained by immunizing C57BL/6 mice with the immunodominant peptide MOG(35-55). In this scenario, we analyzed the anti-MOG antibody response in this model using the recombinant refolded extracellular domain of the protein, MOG(1-117). To assess the presence of a B-cell intramolecular epitope spreading mechanism, we tested also five synthetic peptides mapping the 1-117 sequence of MOG, including MOG(35-55). For this purpose, we cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and on-column refolded MOG(1-117), and we applied an optimized microwave-assisted solid-phase synthetic strategy to obtain the designed peptide sequences. Subsequently, we set up a solid-phase immunoenzymatic assay testing both naïve and EAE mice sera and using MOG protein and peptides as antigenic probes. The results obtained disclose an intense IgG antibody response against both the recombinant protein and the immunizing peptide, while no response was observed against the other synthetic fragments, thus excluding the presence of an intramolecular epitope spreading mechanism. Furthermore, as the properly refolded recombinant probe is able to bind antibodies with greater efficiency compared with MOG(35-55), we hypothesize the presence of both linear and conformational epitopes on MOG(35-55) sequence. PMID:26663200

  19. B cell antigen presentation is sufficient to drive neuroinflammation in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Parker Harp, Chelsea R; Archambault, Angela S; Sim, Julia; Ferris, Stephen T; Mikesell, Robert J; Koni, Pandelakis A; Shimoda, Michiko; Linington, Christopher; Russell, John H; Wu, Gregory F

    2015-06-01

    B cells are increasingly regarded as integral to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, in part as a result of the success of B cell-depletion therapy. Multiple B cell-dependent mechanisms contributing to inflammatory demyelination of the CNS have been explored using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a CD4 T cell-dependent animal model for multiple sclerosis. Although B cell Ag presentation was suggested to regulate CNS inflammation during EAE, direct evidence that B cells can independently support Ag-specific autoimmune responses by CD4 T cells in EAE is lacking. Using a newly developed murine model of in vivo conditional expression of MHC class II, we reported previously that encephalitogenic CD4 T cells are incapable of inducing EAE when B cells are the sole APC. In this study, we find that B cells cooperate with dendritic cells to enhance EAE severity resulting from myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) immunization. Further, increasing the precursor frequency of MOG-specific B cells, but not the addition of soluble MOG-specific Ab, is sufficient to drive EAE in mice expressing MHCII by B cells alone. These data support a model in which expansion of Ag-specific B cells during CNS autoimmunity amplifies cognate interactions between B and CD4 T cells and have the capacity to independently drive neuroinflammation at later stages of disease.

  20. Amyloid tracers detect multiple binding sites in Alzheimer's disease brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ruiqing; Gillberg, Per-Göran; Bergfors, Assar; Marutle, Amelia; Nordberg, Agneta

    2013-07-01

    -1 (Ki: 0.2 nM, 70 nM), florbetapir (1.8 nM, 53 nM) and florbetaben (1.0 nM, 65 nM). BF-227 displaced 83% of (3)H-Pittsburgh compound B binding, mainly at a low-affinity site (311 nM), whereas FDDNP only partly displaced (40%). We propose a multiple binding site model for the amyloid tracers (binding sites 1, 2 and 3), where AV-45 (florbetapir), AV-1 (florbetaben), and Pittsburgh compound B, all show nanomolar affinity for the high-affinity site (binding site 1), as visualized by positron emission tomography. BF-227 shows mainly binding to site 3 and FDDNP shows only some binding to site 2. Different amyloid tracers may provide new insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms in the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Orthogonal matrix factorization enables integrative analysis of multiple RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stražar, Martin; Žitnik, Marinka; Zupan, Blaž; Ule, Jernej; Curk, Tomaž

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: RNA binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression, including splicing, transport, polyadenylation and RNA stability. To model protein–RNA interactions by considering all available sources of information, it is necessary to integrate the rapidly growing RBP experimental data with the latest genome annotation, gene function, RNA sequence and structure. Such integration is possible by matrix factorization, where current approaches have an undesired tendency to identify only a small number of the strongest patterns with overlapping features. Because protein–RNA interactions are orchestrated by multiple factors, methods that identify discriminative patterns of varying strengths are needed. Results: We have developed an integrative orthogonality-regularized nonnegative matrix factorization (iONMF) to integrate multiple data sources and discover non-overlapping, class-specific RNA binding patterns of varying strengths. The orthogonality constraint halves the effective size of the factor model and outperforms other NMF models in predicting RBP interaction sites on RNA. We have integrated the largest data compendium to date, which includes 31 CLIP experiments on 19 RBPs involved in splicing (such as hnRNPs, U2AF2, ELAVL1, TDP-43 and FUS) and processing of 3’UTR (Ago, IGF2BP). We show that the integration of multiple data sources improves the predictive accuracy of retrieval of RNA binding sites. In our study the key predictive factors of protein–RNA interactions were the position of RNA structure and sequence motifs, RBP co-binding and gene region type. We report on a number of protein-specific patterns, many of which are consistent with experimentally determined properties of RBPs. Availability and implementation: The iONMF implementation and example datasets are available at https://github.com/mstrazar/ionmf. Contact: tomaz.curk@fri.uni-lj.si Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available

  2. Logic nanoparticle beacon triggered by the binding-induced effect of multiple inputs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Dong, Chen; Dong, Yafei; Liu, Shi; Pan, Linqiang; Zhang, Cheng

    2014-08-27

    Recently, the toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement reaction has been widely used in detecting molecular signals. However, traditional strand displacement, without cooperative signaling among DNA inputs, is insufficient for the design of more complicated nanodevices. In this work, a logic computing system is established using the cooperative "binding-induced" mechanism, based on the AuNP-based beacons, in which five kinds of multiple-input logic gates have been constructed. This system can recognize DNA and protein streptavidin simultaneously. Finally, the manipulations of the logic system are also demonstrated by controlling programmed conjugate DNA/AuNP clusters. This study provides the possibility of detecting multiple input signals and designing complex nanodevices that can be potentially applied to the detection of multiple molecular targets and the construction of large-scale DNA-based computation.

  3. Post-transcriptional Regulation of Meprin α by the RNA-binding Proteins Hu Antigen R (HuR) and Tristetraprolin (TTP)*

    PubMed Central

    Roff, Alanna N.; Panganiban, Ronaldo P.; Bond, Judith S.; Ishmael, Faoud T.

    2013-01-01

    Meprins are multimeric proteases that are implicated in inflammatory bowel disease by both genetic association studies and functional studies in knock-out mice. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease show decreased colonic expression of meprin α, although regulation of expression, particularly under inflammatory stimuli, has not been studied. The studies herein demonstrate that the human meprin α transcript is bound and stabilized by Hu antigen R at baseline, and that treatment with the inflammatory stimulus phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate downregulates meprin α expression by inducing tristetraprolin. The enhanced binding of tristetraprolin to the MEP1A 3′-UTR results in destabilization of the transcript and occurs at a discrete site from Hu antigen R. This is the first report to describe a mechanism for post-transcriptional regulation of meprin α and will help clarify the role of meprins in the inflammatory response and disease. PMID:23269677

  4. Binding of antibodies against birch pollen antigens/allergens to various parts of apples as studied by immuno-gold electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Grote, M

    1988-02-01

    The clinically and biochemically observed correlation between birch pollen allergy and hypersensitivity to apples was investigated by immunocytochemical techniques. For this purpose, apple tissue was fixed in p-formaldehyde and embedded in Lowicryl K4M resin at -35 degrees C. Ultrathin sections were cut and successively incubated with rabbit antibodies against birch pollen antigens/allergens and protein A/gold. Specific antibody binding sites were detected throughout the apple fruit (peel, fruit flesh, seed). Control sections incubated with normal rabbit IgG antibodies and protein A/gold showed minimal background staining. It was concluded from the results of immunocytochemical labelling that apple tissue and birch pollen contain similar molecular structures which lead to the observed cross-reactions. The present immunocytochemical results confirm biochemical investigations reporting partial structural identity of antigens/allergens in birch and apple.

  5. FF domains of CA150 bind transcription and splicing factors through multiple weak interactions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew J; Kulkarni, Sarang; Pawson, Tony

    2004-11-01

    The human transcription factor CA150 modulates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gene transcription and contains numerous signaling elements, including six FF domains. Repeated FF domains are present in several transcription and splicing factors and can recognize phosphoserine motifs in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Using mass spectrometry, we identify a number of nuclear binding partners for the CA150 FF domains and demonstrate a direct interaction between CA150 and Tat-SF1, a protein involved in the coupling of splicing and transcription. CA150 FF domains recognize multiple sites within the Tat-SF1 protein conforming to the consensus motif (D/E)(2/5)-F/W/Y-(D/E)(2/5). Individual FF domains are capable of interacting with Tat-SF1 peptide ligands in an equivalent and noncooperative manner, with affinities ranging from 150 to 500 microM. Repeated FF domains therefore appear to bind their targets through multiple weak interactions with motifs comprised of negatively charged residues flanking aromatic amino acids. The RNAPII CTD represents a consensus FF domain-binding site, contingent on generation of the requisite negative charges by phosphorylation of serines 2 and 5. We propose that CA150, through the dual recognition of acidic motifs in proteins such as Tat-SF1 and the phosphorylated CTD, could mediate the recruitment of transcription and splicing factors to actively transcribing RNAPII.

  6. Three-Dimensional Structures Reveal Multiple ADP/ATP Binding Modes

    SciTech Connect

    C Simmons; C Magee; D Smith; L Lauman; J Chaput; J Allen

    2011-12-31

    The creation of synthetic enzymes with predefined functions represents a major challenge in future synthetic biology applications. Here, we describe six structures of de novo proteins that have been determined using protein crystallography to address how simple enzymes perform catalysis. Three structures are of a protein, DX, selected for its stability and ability to tightly bind ATP. Despite the addition of ATP to the crystallization conditions, the presence of a bound but distorted ATP was found only under excess ATP conditions, with ADP being present under equimolar conditions or when crystallized for a prolonged period of time. A bound ADP cofactor was evident when Asp was substituted for Val at residue 65, but ATP in a linear configuration is present when Phe was substituted for Tyr at residue 43. These new structures complement previously determined structures of DX and the protein with the Phe 43 to Tyr substitution [Simmons, C. R., et al. (2009) ACS Chem. Biol. 4, 649-658] and together demonstrate the multiple ADP/ATP binding modes from which a model emerges in which the DX protein binds ATP in a configuration that represents a transitional state for the catalysis of ATP to ADP through a slow, metal-free reaction capable of multiple turnovers. This unusual observation suggests that design-free methods can be used to generate novel protein scaffolds that are tailor-made for catalysis.

  7. Effect of antigen-dependent clearance on pharmacokinetics of anti-heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Noriyuki; Yoshikawa, Yukitaka; Enokizono, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a member of the EGF family and is an important therapeutic target in some types of human cancers. KM3566 is a mouse anti-HB-EGF monoclonal antibody that neutralizes HB-EGF activity by inhibiting the binding of HB-EGF to its receptors. Based on the results of our pharmacokinetics study, a humanized derivative antibody, KHK2866, is rapidly cleared from serum and shows nonlinear pharmacokinetics in cynomolgus monkeys. In this study, we examined the antigen-dependent clearance of an anti-HB-EGF monoclonal antibody in vivo and in vitro in order to pharmacokinetically explain the rapid elimination of KHK2866. We revealed tumor size-dependent clearance of KM3566 in in vivo studies and obtained good fits between the observed and simulated concentrations of KM3566 based on the two-compartment with a saturable route of clearance model. Furthermore, in vivo imaging analyses demonstrated tumor-specific distribution of KM3566. We then confirmed rapid internalization and distribution to lysosome of KM3566 at a cellular level. Moreover, we revealed that the amounts of HB-EGF on cell surface membrane were maintained even while HB-EGF was internalized with KM3566. Recycled or newly synthesized HB-EGF, therefore, may contribute to a consecutive clearance of KM3566, which could explain a rapid clearance from serum. These data suggested that the rapid elimination in pharmacokinetics of KM3566 is due to antigen-dependent clearance. Given that its antigen is expressed in a wide range of normal tissue, it is estimated that the rapid elimination of KHK2866 from cynomolgus monkey serum is caused by antigen-dependent clearance. PMID:25517307

  8. Predicting promiscuous antigenic T cell epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mymA operon proteins binding to MHC Class I and Class II molecules.

    PubMed

    Saraav, Iti; Pandey, Kirti; Sharma, Monika; Singh, Swati; Dutta, Prasun; Bhardwaj, Anshu; Sharma, Sadhna

    2016-10-01

    Limited efficacy of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine has raised the need to explore other immunogenic candidates to develop an effective vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells play a critical role in host immunity to Mtb. Infection of macrophages with Mtb results in upregulation of mymA operon genes thereby suggesting their importance as immune targets. In the present study, after exclusion of self-peptides mymA operon proteins of Mtb were analyzed in silico for the presence of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I and Class II binding peptides using Bioinformatics and molecular analysis section, NetMHC 3.4, ProPred and Immune epitope database software. Out of 56 promiscuous epitopes obtained, 41 epitopes were predicted to be antigenic for MHC Class I. In MHC Class II, out of 336 promiscuous epitopes obtained, 142 epitopes were predicted to be antigenic. The comparative bioinformatics analysis of mymA operon proteins found Rv3083 to be the best vaccine candidate. Molecular docking was performed with the most antigenic peptides of Rv3083 (LASGAASVV with alleles HLA-B51:01, HAATSGTLI with HLA-A02, IVTATGLNI and EKIHYGLKVNTA with HLA-DRB1_01:01) to study the structural basis for recognition of peptides by various HLA molecules. The software binding prediction was validated by the obtained molecular docking score of peptide-HLA complex. These peptides can be further investigated for their immunological relevance in patients of tuberculosis using major histocompatibility complex tetramer approach. PMID:27389362

  9. Mucosal immunogenicity of polysaccharides conjugated to a peptide or multiple-antigen peptide containing T- and B-cell epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Lett, E; Klopfenstein, C; Klein, J P; Schöller, M; Wachsmann, D

    1995-01-01

    In this study we investigated the mucosal and systemic responses to two T-cell-independent polysaccharides, a serogroup f polysaccharide (formed of rhamnose glucose polymers [RGPs]) from Streptococcus mutans OMZ 175 and a mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, covalently conjugated either to a linear peptide (peptide 3) or to a multiple-antigen peptide (MAP), both derived from S. mutans protein SR, an adhesin of the I/II protein antigen family of oral streptococci. Peptide 3 and MAP, which contained at least one B- and one T-cell epitope, were tested as carriers for the polysaccharides and as protective immunogens. Intragastric intubation of rats with the conjugates (RGPs-peptide 3, RGPs-MAP, mannan-peptide 3, and mannan-MAP) associated with liposomes produced salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies which reacted with RGPs or mannan, peptide 3 or MAP, protein SR, and S. mutans or S. cerevisiae cells. Administration of conjugate boosters to the animals showed that both carriers conjugated to the polysaccharides were able to induce, in immunized animals, a salivary antipolysaccharide IgA memory. In contrast, animals primed and challenged with unconjugated polysaccharide showed no anamnestic response. Rats orally immunized with the conjugates also developed systemic primary antipolysaccharide and antipeptide IgM antibody responses which were characterized by a switch from IgM to IgG during the course of the secondary response. Data presented here demonstrated that both peptide 3 and the MAP construct can act as good carriers for orally administered polysaccharides. Unexpectedly, the use of a MAP did not further improve the immunogenicity of polysaccharides at the mucosal level; nevertheless, such a construct should be of great interest in overcoming the problem of genetic restriction induced by linear peptides. PMID:7790080

  10. Differential recognition of the multiple banded antigen isoforms across Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum species by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Aboklaish, Ali F; Ahmed, Shatha; McAllister, Douglas; Cassell, Gail; Zheng, Xiaotian T; Spiller, Owen B

    2016-08-01

    Two separate species of Ureaplasma have been identified that infect humans: Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum. Most notably, these bacteria lack a cell wall and are the leading infectious organism associated with infection-related induction of preterm birth. Fourteen separate representative prototype bacterial strains, called serovars, are largely differentiated by the sequence of repeating units in the C-terminus of the major surface protein: multiple-banded antigen (MBA). Monoclonal antibodies that recognise single or small groups of serovars have been previously reported, but these reagents remain sequestered in individual research laboratories. Here we characterise a panel of commercially available monoclonal antibodies raised against the MBA and describe the first monoclonal antibody that cross-reacts by immunoblot with all serovars of U. parvum and U. urealyticum species. We also describe a recombinant MBA expressed by Escherichia coli which facilitated further characterisation by immunoblot and demonstrate immunohistochemistry of paraffin-embedded antigens. Immunoblot reactivity was validated against well characterised previously published monoclonal antibodies and individual commercial antibodies were found to recognise all U. parvum strains, only serovars 3 and 14 or only serovars 1 and 6, or all strains belonging to U. parvum and U. urealyticum. MBA mass was highly variable between strains, consistent with variation in the number of C-terminal repeats between strains. Antibody characterisation will enable future investigations to correlate severity of pathogenicity to MBA isoform number or mass, in addition to development of antibody-based diagnostics that will detect infection by all Ureaplasma species or alternately be able to differentiate between U. parvum, U. urealyticum or mixed infections. PMID:27208664

  11. Inhibitory FcγRIIb-Mediated Soluble Antigen Clearance from Plasma by a pH-Dependent Antigen-Binding Antibody and Its Enhancement by Fc Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Iwayanagi, Yuki; Maeda, Atsuhiko; Haraya, Kenta; Wada, Naoko A.; Shibahara, Norihito; Ohmine, Ken; Nambu, Takeru; Nakamura, Genki; Mimoto, Futa; Katada, Hitoshi; Ito, Shunsuke; Tachibana, Tatsuhiko; Jishage, Kou-ichi; Hattori, Kunihiro

    2015-01-01

    Fc engineering can modulate the Fc–FcγR interaction and thus enhance the potency of Abs that target membrane-bound Ags, but it has not been applied to Abs that target soluble Ags. In this study, we revealed a previously unknown function of inhibitory FcγRII in vivo and, using an Ab that binds to Ag pH dependently, demonstrated that the function can be exploited to target soluble Ag. Because pH-dependent Ab dissociates Ag in acidic endosome, its Ag clearance from circulation reflects the cellular uptake rate of Ag/Ab complexes. In vivo studies showed that FcγR but not neonatal FcR contributes to Ag clearance by the pH-dependent Ab, and when Fc binding to mouse FcγRII and III was increased, Ag clearance was markedly accelerated in wild-type mice and FcR γ-chain knockout mice, but the effect was diminished in FcγRII knockout mice. This demonstrates that mouse FcγRII efficiently promotes Ab uptake into the cell and its subsequent recycling back to the cell surface. Furthermore, when a human IgG1 Fc variant with selectively increased binding to human FcγRIIb was tested in human FcγRIIb transgenic mice, Ag clearance was accelerated without compromising the Ab half-life. Taken together, inhibitory FcγRIIb was found to play a prominent role in the cellular uptake of monomeric Ag/Ab immune complexes in vivo, and when the Fc of a pH-dependent Ab was engineered to selectively enhance human FcγRIIb binding, the Ab could accelerate soluble Ag clearance from circulation. We assume such a function would enhance the therapeutic potency of Abs that target soluble Ags. PMID:26320252

  12. Humanization of the anti-CD18 antibody 6.7: an unexpected effect of a framework residue in binding to antigen.

    PubMed

    Caldas, Cristina; Coelho, Verônica; Kalil, Jorge; Moro, Ana Maria; Maranhão, Andrea Q; Brígido, Marcelo M

    2003-05-01

    Humanization of monoclonal antibodies by complementary determinant region (CDR)-grafting has become a standard procedure to improve the clinical usage of animal antibodies. However, antibody humanization may result in loss of activity that has been attributed to structural constraints in the framework structure. In this paper, we report the complete humanization of the 6.7 anti-human CD18 monoclonal antibody in a scFv form. We used a germline-based approach to design a humanized VL gene fragment and expressed it together with a previously described humanized VH. The designed humanized VL has only 14 mutations compared to the closest human germline sequence. The resulting humanized scFv maintained the binding capacity and specificity to human CD18 expressed on the cell surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and showed the same pattern of staining T-lymphocytes sub-populations, in comparison to the original monoclonal antibody. We observed an unexpected effect of a conserved mouse-human framework position (L37) that hinders the binding of the humanized scFv to antigen. This paper reveals a new framework residue that interferes with paratope and antigen binding and also reinforces the germline approach as a successful strategy to humanize antibodies.

  13. PI3Kδ promotes CD4+ T-cell interactions with antigen-presenting cells by increasing LFA-1 binding to ICAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Garçon, Fabien; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Activation of T lymphocytes by peptide/major histocompatibility complex on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) involves dynamic contacts between the two cells, during which T cells undergo marked morphological changes. These interactions are facilitated by integrins. Activation of the T cells increases the binding of the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) expressed by T cells to intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and ICAM-2 expressed by APCs. The signalling pathways that control integrin affinities are incompletely defined. The phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) generate second-messenger signalling molecules that control cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and trafficking. Here we show that in T cells, PI3Kδ attenuates the activation of Rac1, but sustains the activation of Rap1. Consequently, PI3Kδ increases LFA-1-dependent adhesion to form stable conjugates with APCs. Increased Rap1 activity and LFA-1 adhesion were only in part mediated by the downstream kinase Akt, suggesting the involvement of additional phosphatidylinositol(3,4,5)P3-binding proteins. These results establish a link between PI3K activity, cytoskeletal changes and integrin binding and help explain the impaired T-cell-dependent immune responses in PI3Kδ-deficient mice. PMID:26740009

  14. Structure-based Design of a Disulfide-lined Oligomeric Form of the Simian Virus 40 (SV40) Large T Antigen DNA-Binding Domain

    SciTech Connect

    G Meinke; P Phelan; A Fradet-Turcotte; J Archambault; P Bullock

    2011-12-31

    The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS-PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner.

  15. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency. PMID:27432161

  16. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; LeHoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through 15N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6. PMID:27340016

  17. Multiple binding sites in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: An opportunity for polypharmacolgy.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga-Vásquez, Patricio; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Bermudez, Isabel; Varas, Rodrigo; Reyes-Parada, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    For decades, the development of selective compounds has been the main goal for chemists and biologists involved in drug discovery. However, diverse lines of evidence indicate that polypharmacological agents, i.e. those that act simultaneously at various protein targets, might show better profiles than selective ligands, regarding both efficacy and side effects. On the other hand, the availability of the crystal structure of different receptors allows a detailed analysis of the main interactions between drugs and receptors in a specific binding site. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) constitute a large and diverse family of ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) that, as a product of its modulation, regulate neurotransmitter release, which in turns produce a global neuromodulation of the central nervous system. nAChRs are pentameric protein complexes in such a way that expression of compatible subunits can lead to various receptor assemblies or subtypes. The agonist binding site, located at the extracellular region, exhibits different properties depending on the subunits that conform the receptor. In the last years, it has been recognized that nAChRs could also contain one or more allosteric sites which could bind non-classical nicotinic ligands including several therapeutically useful drugs. The presence of multiple binding sites in nAChRs offers an interesting possibility for the development of novel polypharmacological agents with a wide spectrum of actions. PMID:26318763

  18. Selection of scFv Antibody Fragments Binding to Human Blood versus Lymphatic Endothelial Surface Antigens by Direct Cell Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Thomas; Kalt, Romana; Raab, Ingrid; Schachner, Helga; Mayrhofer, Corina; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Hantusch, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The identification of marker molecules specific for blood and lymphatic endothelium may provide new diagnostic tools and identify new targets for therapy of immune, microvascular and cancerous diseases. Here, we used a phage display library expressing human randomized single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies for direct panning against live cultures of blood (BECs) and lymphatic (LECs) endothelial cells in solution. After six panning rounds, out of 944 sequenced antibody clones, we retrieved 166 unique/diverse scFv fragments, as indicated by the V-region sequences. Specificities of these phage clone antibodies for respective compartments were individually tested by direct cell ELISA, indicating that mainly pan-endothelial cell (EC) binders had been selected, but also revealing a subset of BEC-specific scFv antibodies. The specific staining pattern was recapitulated by twelve phage-independently expressed scFv antibodies. Binding capacity to BECs and LECs and differential staining of BEC versus LEC by a subset of eight scFv antibodies was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining. As one antigen, CD146 was identified by immunoprecipitation with phage-independent scFv fragment. This antibody, B6-11, specifically bound to recombinant CD146, and to native CD146 expressed by BECs, melanoma cells and blood vessels. Further, binding capacity of B6-11 to CD146 was fully retained after fusion to a mouse Fc portion, which enabled eukaryotic cell expression. Beyond visualization and diagnosis, this antibody might be used as a functional tool. Overall, our approach provided a method to select antibodies specific for endothelial surface determinants in their native configuration. We successfully selected antibodies that bind to antigens expressed on the human endothelial cell surfaces in situ, showing that BECs and LECs share a majority of surface antigens, which is complemented by cell-type specific, unique markers. PMID:25993332

  19. Structure-function analysis of the extracellular domains of the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines: characterization of antibody and chemokine binding sites.

    PubMed

    Tournamille, Christophe; Filipe, Anne; Wasniowska, Kazimiera; Gane, Pierre; Lisowska, Elwira; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2003-09-01

    The Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC), a seven-transmembrane glycoprotein carrying the Duffy (Fy) blood group, acts as a widely expressed promiscuous chemokine receptor. In a structure-function study, we analysed the binding of chemokines and anti-Fy monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to K562 cells expressing 39 mutant forms of DARC with alanine substitutions spread out on the four extracellular domains (ECDs). Using synthetic peptides, we defined previously the Fy6 epitope (22-FEDVW-26), and we characterized the Fya epitope as the linear sequence 41-YGANLE-46. In agreement with these results, mutations of F22-E23, V25 and Y41, G42, N44, L45 on ECD1 abolished the binding of anti-Fy6 and anti-Fya mAbs to K562 cells respectively, Anti-Fy3 binding was abolished by D58-D59 (ECD1), R124 (ECD2), D263 and D283 (ECD4) substitutions. Mutations of C51 (ECD1), C129 (ECD2), C195 (ECD3) and C276 (ECD4 severely reduced anti-Fy3 and CXC-chemokine ligand 8 (CXCL-8) binding. CXCL-8 binding was also abrogated by mutations of F22-E23, P50 (ECD1) and D263, R267, D283 (ECD4). These results defined the Fya epitope and suggested that (1) two disulphide bridges are involved in the creation of an active chemokine binding pocket; (2) a limited number of amino acids in ECDs 1-4 participate in CXCL-8 binding; and (3) Fy3 is a conformation-dependent epitope involving all ECDs. We also showed that N-glycosylation of DARC occurred on N16SS and did not influence antibody and chemokine binding.

  20. Multiple CaMKII Binding Modes to the Actin Cytoskeleton Revealed by Single-Molecule Imaging.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahid; Conte, Ianina; Carter, Tom; Bayer, K Ulrich; Molloy, Justin E

    2016-07-26

    Localization of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) to dendritic spine synapses is determined in part by the actin cytoskeleton. We determined binding of GFP-tagged CaMKII to tag-RFP-labeled actin cytoskeleton within live cells using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking. Stepwise photobleaching showed that CaMKII formed oligomeric complexes. Photoactivation experiments demonstrated that diffusion out of the evanescent field determined the track lifetimes. Latrunculin treatment triggered a coupled loss of actin stress fibers and the colocalized, long-lived CaMKII tracks. The CaMKIIα (α) isoform, which was previously thought to lack F-actin interactions, also showed binding, but this was threefold weaker than that observed for CaMKIIβ (β). The βE' splice variant bound more weakly than α, showing that binding by β depends critically on the interdomain linker. The mutations βT287D and αT286D, which mimic autophosphorylation states, also abolished F-actin binding. Autophosphorylation triggers autonomous CaMKII activity, but does not impair GluN2B binding, another important synaptic protein interaction of CaMKII. The CaMKII inhibitor tatCN21 or CaMKII mutations that inhibit GluN2B association by blocking binding of ATP (βK43R and αK42M) or Ca(2+)/calmodulin (βA303R) had no effect on the interaction with F-actin. These results provide the first rationale for the reduced synaptic spine localization of the αT286D mutant, indicating that transient F-actin binding contributes to the synaptic localization of the CaMKIIα isoform. The track lifetime distributions had a stretched exponential form consistent with a heterogeneously diffusing population. This heterogeneity suggests that CaMKII adopts different F-actin binding modes, which is most easily rationalized by multiple subunit contacts between the CaMKII dodecamer and the F-actin cytoskeleton that stabilize the initial weak (micromolar

  1. Lynx1 and Aβ1-42 bind competitively to multiple nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Morten S; Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Pinborg, Lars H; Härtig, Wolfgang; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2016-10-01

    Lynx1 regulates synaptic plasticity in the brain by regulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). It is not known to which extent Lynx1 can bind to endogenous nAChR subunits in the brain or how this interaction is affected by Alzheimer's disease pathology. We apply affinity purification to demonstrate that a water-soluble variant of human Lynx1 (Ws-Lynx1) isolates α3, α4, α5, α6, α7, β2, and β4 nAChR subunits from human and rat cortical extracts, and rat midbrain and olfactory bulb extracts, suggesting that Lynx1 forms complexes with multiple nAChR subtypes in the human and rodent brain. Incubation with Ws-Lynx1 decreases nicotine-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells and striatal neurons, indicating that binding of Ws-Lynx1 is sufficient to inhibit signaling downstream of nAChRs. The effect of nicotine in PC12 cells is independent of α7 or α4β2 nAChRs, suggesting that Lynx1 can affect the function of native non-α7, non-α4β2 nAChR subtypes. We further show that Lynx1 and oligomeric β-amyloid1-42 compete for binding to several nAChR subunits, that Ws-Lynx1 prevents β-amyloid1-42-induced cytotoxicity in cortical neurons, and that cortical Lynx1 levels are decreased in a transgenic mouse model with concomitant β-amyloid and tau pathology. Our data suggest that Lynx1 binds to multiple nAChR subtypes in the brain and that this interaction might have functional and pathophysiological implications in relation to Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27460145

  2. The search for the target antigens of multiple sclerosis, part 2: CD8+ T cells, B cells, and antibodies in the focus of reverse-translational research.

    PubMed

    Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Dornmair, Klaus; Meinl, Edgar; Wekerle, Hartmut

    2016-03-01

    Interest in CD8+ T cells and B cells was initially inspired by observations in multiple sclerosis rather than in animal models: CD8+ T cells predominate in multiple sclerosis lesions, oligoclonal immunoglobulin bands in CSF have long been recognised as diagnostic and prognostic markers, and anti-B-cell therapies showed considerable efficacy in multiple sclerosis. Taking a reverse-translational approach, findings from human T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire studies provided strong evidence for antigen-driven clonal expansion in the brain and CSF. New methods allow the reconstruction of human TCRs and antibodies from tissue-infiltrating immune cells, which can be used for the unbiased screening of antigen libraries. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) has received renewed attention as an antibody target in childhood multiple sclerosis and in a small subgroup of adult patients with multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that a separate condition in adults exists, tentatively called MOG-antibody-associated encephalomyelitis, which has clinical features that overlap with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder and multiple sclerosis. Although CD8+ T cells and B cells are thought to have a pathogenic role in some subgroups of patients, their target antigens have yet to be identified.

  3. Polymorphisms in the S1 spike glycoprotein of Arkansas-type infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) show differential binding to host tissues and altered antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Leyson, Christina; França, Monique; Jackwood, Mark; Jordan, Brian

    2016-11-01

    Sequencing avian infectious bronchitis virus spike genes re-isolated from vaccinated chicks revealed that many sequence changes are found on the S1 spike gene. In the ArkDPI strain, Y43H and ∆344 are the two most common changes observed. This study aims to examine the roles of Y43H and ∆344 in selection in vivo. Using recombinant ArkDPI S1 proteins, we conducted binding assays on chicken tracheas and embryonic chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Protein histochemistry showed that the Y43H change allows for enhanced binding to trachea, whereas the ArkDPI S1 spike with H43 alone was able to bind CAM. Using Western blot under denaturing conditions, ArkDPI serotype-specific sera did not bind to S1 proteins with ∆344, suggesting that ∆344 alters antigenicity of S1. These findings are important because they propose that specific changes in S1 enhances virus fitness by more effective binding to host tissues (Y43H) and by evading a vaccine-induced antibody response (∆344). PMID:27619927

  4. Polymorphisms in the S1 spike glycoprotein of Arkansas-type infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) show differential binding to host tissues and altered antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Leyson, Christina; França, Monique; Jackwood, Mark; Jordan, Brian

    2016-11-01

    Sequencing avian infectious bronchitis virus spike genes re-isolated from vaccinated chicks revealed that many sequence changes are found on the S1 spike gene. In the ArkDPI strain, Y43H and ∆344 are the two most common changes observed. This study aims to examine the roles of Y43H and ∆344 in selection in vivo. Using recombinant ArkDPI S1 proteins, we conducted binding assays on chicken tracheas and embryonic chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Protein histochemistry showed that the Y43H change allows for enhanced binding to trachea, whereas the ArkDPI S1 spike with H43 alone was able to bind CAM. Using Western blot under denaturing conditions, ArkDPI serotype-specific sera did not bind to S1 proteins with ∆344, suggesting that ∆344 alters antigenicity of S1. These findings are important because they propose that specific changes in S1 enhances virus fitness by more effective binding to host tissues (Y43H) and by evading a vaccine-induced antibody response (∆344).

  5. CD4 binding to major histocompatibility complex class II antigens induces LFA-1-dependent and -independent homotypic adhesion of B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kansas, G S; Cambier, J C; Tedder, T F

    1992-01-01

    T helper cells recognize processed antigen (Ag) in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens present on the surface of B cells and other Ag-presenting cells. This interaction is mediated through the T cell receptor complex with associate recognition of class II molecules by the CD4 molecule. In this study, the binding of a soluble recombinant CD4/Ig heavy chain fusion protein (CD4-gamma 3) or monoclonal antibody (mAb) to class II antigens on human B cells was shown to induce rapid and specific homotypic adhesion of B cells and most B lymphoblastoid cell lines. mAb reactive with CD4 inhibited CD4-gamma 3-induced adhesion and a mutant B lymphoblastoid cell line deficient in class II antigens failed to respond. Induction of homotypic adhesion was dependent on energy metabolism and a functional cytoskeleton, and class II+ pre-B cells did not exhibit adhesion in response to these stimuli, suggesting that cross-linking of class II molecules generated a transmembrane signal and did not simply aggregate cells. In addition, MHC class II-induced adhesion was Fc receptor independent, as 15 mAb of different Ig isotypes reactive with HLA-D or HLA-DQ gene products induced adhesion. Anti-class II mAb and CD4-gamma 3 were able to induce adhesion at concentrations as low as 10 ng/ml and 100 ng/ml, respectively. Suboptimal stimulation of B cell lines through HLA-D antigens induced homotypic adhesion that was dependent on the activation of LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18), and which could be blocked by specific mAb. However, at greater signal strengths, adhesion was not blocked by mAb against the known adhesion receptors, suggesting the induction of a novel adhesion pathway. Consistent with this, homotypic adhesion induced by engagement of MHC class II antigens was observed with LFA-1-deficient B cell lines, and was independent of CD49d or CD18 expression. Thus, the direct engagement of B cell class II antigens by CD4 is likely to generate transmembrane signals which

  6. Binding studies of alpha-GalNAc-specific lectins to the alpha-GalNAc (Tn-antigen) form of porcine submaxillary mucin and its smaller fragments.

    PubMed

    Dam, Tarun K; Gerken, Thomas A; Cavada, Benildo S; Nascimento, Kyria S; Moura, Tales R; Brewer, C Fred

    2007-09-21

    Isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) and hemagglutination inhibition measurements demonstrate that a chemically and enzymatically prepared form of porcine submaxillary mucin that possesses a molecular mass of approximately 10(6) daltons and approximately 2300 alpha-GalNAc residues (Tn-PSM) binds to the soybean agglutinin (SBA) with a K(d) of 0.2 nm, which is approximately 10(6)-fold enhanced affinity relative to GalNAcalpha1-O-Ser (Tn), the pancarcinoma carbohydrate antigen. The enzymatically derived 81 amino acid tandem repeat domain of Tn-PSM containing approximately 23 alpha-GalNAc residues binds with approximately 10(3)-fold enhanced affinity, while the enzymatically derived 38/40 amino acid cleavage product(s) of Tn-PSM containing approximately 11-12 alpha-GalNAc residues shows approximately 10(2)-fold enhanced affinity. A natural carbohydrate decorated form of PSM (Fd-PSM) containing 40% of the core 1 blood group type A tetrasaccharide, and 58% peptide-linked GalNAcalpha1-O-Ser/Thr residues, with 45% of the peptide-linked alpha-GalNAc residues linked alpha-(2,6) to N-glycolylneuraminic acid, shows approximately 10(4) enhanced affinity for SBA. Vatairea macrocarpa lectin (VML), which is also a GalNAc binding lectin, displays a similar pattern of binding to the four forms of PSM, although there are quantitative differences in its affinities as compared with SBA. The higher affinities of SBA and VML for Tn-PSM relative to Fd-PSM indicate the importance of carbohydrate composition and epitope density of mucins on their affinities for lectins. The higher affinities of SBA and VML for Tn-PSM relative to its two shorter chain analogs demonstrate that the length of a mucin polypeptide and hence total carbohydrate valence determines the affinities of the three Tn-PSM analogs. The results suggest a binding model in which lectin molecules "bind and jump" from alpha-GalNAc residue to alpha-GalNAc residue along the polypeptide chain of Tn-PSM before dissociating

  7. Probing carbohydrate product expulsion from a processive cellulase with multiple absolute binding free energy methods.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lintao; Beckham, Gregg T; Shirts, Michael R; Nimlos, Mark R; Adney, William S; Himmel, Michael E; Crowley, Michael F

    2011-05-20

    Understanding the enzymatic mechanism that cellulases employ to degrade cellulose is critical to efforts to efficiently utilize plant biomass as a sustainable energy resource. A key component of cellulase action on cellulose is product inhibition from monosaccharide and disaccharides in the product site of cellulase tunnel. The absolute binding free energy of cellobiose and glucose to the product site of the catalytic tunnel of the Family 7 cellobiohydrolase (Cel7A) of Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) was calculated using two different approaches: steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations and alchemical free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulations. For the SMD approach, three methods based on Jarzynski's equality were used to construct the potential of mean force from multiple pulling trajectories. The calculated binding free energies, -14.4 kcal/mol using SMD and -11.2 kcal/mol using FEP/MD, are in good qualitative agreement. Analysis of the SMD pulling trajectories suggests that several protein residues (Arg-251, Asp-259, Asp-262, Trp-376, and Tyr-381) play key roles in cellobiose and glucose binding to the catalytic tunnel. Five mutations (R251A, D259A, D262A, W376A, and Y381A) were made computationally to measure the changes in free energy during the product expulsion process. The absolute binding free energies of cellobiose to the catalytic tunnel of these five mutants are -13.1, -6.0, -11.5, -7.5, and -8.8 kcal/mol, respectively. The results demonstrated that all of the mutants tested can lower the binding free energy of cellobiose, which provides potential applications in engineering the enzyme to accelerate the product expulsion process and improve the efficiency of biomass conversion. PMID:21454590

  8. Probing Carbohydrate Product Expulsion from a Processive Cellulase with Multiple Absolute Binding Free Energy Methods*

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Lintao; Beckham, Gregg T.; Shirts, Michael R.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Adney, William S.; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the enzymatic mechanism that cellulases employ to degrade cellulose is critical to efforts to efficiently utilize plant biomass as a sustainable energy resource. A key component of cellulase action on cellulose is product inhibition from monosaccharide and disaccharides in the product site of cellulase tunnel. The absolute binding free energy of cellobiose and glucose to the product site of the catalytic tunnel of the Family 7 cellobiohydrolase (Cel7A) of Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) was calculated using two different approaches: steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations and alchemical free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulations. For the SMD approach, three methods based on Jarzynski's equality were used to construct the potential of mean force from multiple pulling trajectories. The calculated binding free energies, −14.4 kcal/mol using SMD and −11.2 kcal/mol using FEP/MD, are in good qualitative agreement. Analysis of the SMD pulling trajectories suggests that several protein residues (Arg-251, Asp-259, Asp-262, Trp-376, and Tyr-381) play key roles in cellobiose and glucose binding to the catalytic tunnel. Five mutations (R251A, D259A, D262A, W376A, and Y381A) were made computationally to measure the changes in free energy during the product expulsion process. The absolute binding free energies of cellobiose to the catalytic tunnel of these five mutants are −13.1, −6.0, −11.5, −7.5, and −8.8 kcal/mol, respectively. The results demonstrated that all of the mutants tested can lower the binding free energy of cellobiose, which provides potential applications in engineering the enzyme to accelerate the product expulsion process and improve the efficiency of biomass conversion. PMID:21454590

  9. Monoclonal antibody GOM-2 binds to blood group B-Le(y) active glycolipid antigens on human gastric cancer cells, KATO-III.

    PubMed

    Sueyoshi, S; Nagakura, H; Kato, A; Uetsuki, S; Nakayama, Y; Adachi, M

    1992-04-01

    The antigen structure of a mouse monoclonal antibody, GOM-2, established by immunization with KATO-III human gastric cancer cells, was examined. GOM-2 reactive glycolipids were prepared from KATO-III cells and treated with endoglycoceramidase. Structural studies of ten GOM-2 reactive oligosaccharides by a combination of glycosidase digestions, methylation, and affinity chromatography on an Ulex europeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) column revealed that nine of them had a Y-related B-active difucosylated determinant (B-Le(y)) and one had a B-active determinant. Affinity chromatography of the purified and modified oligosaccharides on an immobilized GOM-2 column demonstrated that GOM-2 has a novel binding specificity: it binds tightly to the biantennary structure carrying the B-Le(y) determinant at the termini or the branched structure carrying the B-Le(y) structure at two nonreducing termini. PMID:1344715

  10. Binding of simian virus 40 large T antigen from virus-infected monkey cells to wild-type and mutant viral replication origins.

    PubMed

    Tenen, D G; Taylor, T S; Haines, L L; Bradley, M K; Martin, R G; Livingston, D M

    1983-08-25

    The binding of purified simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (T) from monkey cells infected with wild-type SV40 virus to viral replication origin-containing DNA fragments was studied by DNase footprinting and restriction endonuclease protection methods. A strong affinity binding site (site 1) of 30 base-pairs and a second, adjacent 40 base-pair lower affinity binding site (site 2), which includes the origin of replication, were detected in these assays. These sites appear identical to those previously noted in similar assays performed with the Ad2 + D2 (D2) T protein. Heating T prior to incubation with DNA significantly increased the binding to these two sites, and the order of binding did not change. Moreover, protection of sequences was observed on both strands in these two sites suggesting that both strands can participate in binding of T to these two sites. Studies with DNAs from two internal site 2 deletion mutants as well as with a DNA fragment lacking the distal 13 base-pairs of site 2 revealed that sequences in the "early" portion of site 2 are sufficient for T binding to the intact site. Furthermore, use of a new assay that measures protection of DNA sequences from specific restriction enzyme cleavage revealed that site 2 can be subdivided into two subsites, 2A and 2B, where 2A corresponds to the above-noted early segment of this locus. In titration experiments, the affinity of 2A for T was greater than that of 2B. Hence, binding to a major portion of the replication initiation sequence (i.e. site 2) is the product of at least two interactions. Finally, analyses performed with DNA from a site 1 deletion mutant, cs1085, revealed that prior binding of T to this locus did not facilitate its binding to site 2. The opposite effect was observed when D2T was employed in these assays. Thus, although similar in many respects, these proteins display a detectable difference in their DNA binding mechanisms.

  11. Thermodynamic Switch in Binding of Adhesion/Growth Regulatory Human Galectin-3 to Tumor-Associated TF Antigen (CD176) and MUC1 Glycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A shift to short-chain glycans is an observed change in mucin-type O-glycosylation in premalignant and malignant epithelia. Given the evidence that human galectin-3 can interact with mucins and also weakly with free tumor-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) antigen (CD176), the study of its interaction with MUC1 (glyco)peptides is of biomedical relevance. Glycosylated MUC1 fragments that carry the TF antigen attached through either Thr or Ser side chains were synthesized using standard Fmoc-based automated solid-phase peptide chemistry. The dissociation constants (Kd) for interaction of galectin-3 and the glycosylated MUC1 fragments measured by isothermal titration calorimetry decreased up to 10 times in comparison to that of the free TF disaccharide. No binding was observed for the nonglycosylated control version of the MUC1 peptide. The most notable feature of the binding of MUC1 glycopeptides to galectin-3 was a shift from a favorable enthalpy to an entropy-driven binding process. The comparatively diminished enthalpy contribution to the free energy (ΔG) was compensated by a considerable gain in the entropic term. 1H–15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence spectroscopy nuclear magnetic resonance data reveal contact at the canonical site mainly by the glycan moiety of the MUC1 glycopeptide. Ligand-dependent differences in binding affinities were also confirmed by a novel assay for screening of low-affinity glycan–lectin interactions based on AlphaScreen technology. Another key finding is that the glycosylated MUC1 peptides exhibited activity in a concentration-dependent manner in cell-based assays revealing selectivity among human galectins. Thus, the presentation of this tumor-associated carbohydrate ligand by the natural peptide scaffold enhances its affinity, highlighting the significance of model studies of human lectins with synthetic glycopeptides. PMID:26129647

  12. Structures of Coxsackievirus A16 Capsids with Native Antigenicity: Implications for Particle Expansion, Receptor Binding, and Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jingshan; Wang, Xiangxi; Zhu, Ling; Hu, Zhongyu; Gao, Qiang; Yang, Pan; Li, Xuemei; Wang, Junzhi; Shen, Xinliang; Fry, Elizabeth E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) are the primary causes of the epidemics of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) that affect more than a million children in China each year and lead to hundreds of deaths. Although there has been progress with vaccines for EV71, the development of a CVA16 vaccine has proved more challenging, and the EV71 vaccine does not give useful cross-protection, despite the capsid proteins of the two viruses sharing about 80% sequence identity. The structural details of the expanded forms of the capsids, which possess nonnative antigenicity, are now well understood, but high resolution information for the native antigenic form of CVA16 has been missing. Here, we remedy this with high resolution X-ray structures of both mature and natural empty CVA16 particles and also of empty recombinant viruslike particles of CVA16 produced in insect cells, a potential vaccine antigen. All three structures are unexpanded native particles and antigenically identical. The recombinant particles have recruited a lipid moiety to stabilize the native antigenic state that is different from the one used in a natural virus infection. As expected, the mature CVA16 virus is similar to EV71; however, structural and immunogenic comparisons highlight differences that may have implications for vaccine production. IMPORTANCE Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is a serious public health threat to children in Asian-Pacific countries, resulting in millions of cases. EV71 and CVA16 are the two dominant causative agents of the disease that, while usually mild, can cause severe neurological complications, leading to hundreds of deaths. EV71 vaccines do not provide protection against CVA16. A CVA16 vaccine or bivalent EV71/CVA16 vaccine is therefore urgently needed. We report atomic structures for the mature CVA16 virus, a natural empty particle, and a recombinant CVA16 virus-like particle that does not contain the viral genome. All three particles have similar

  13. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis of Pug dogs associates with dog leukocyte antigen class II and resembles acute variant forms of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Greer, K A; Wong, A K; Liu, H; Famula, T R; Pedersen, N C; Ruhe, A; Wallace, M; Neff, M W

    2010-08-01

    Necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) is a disorder of Pug Dogs that appears to have an immune etiology and high heritability based on population studies. The present study was undertaken to identify a genetic basis for the disease. A genome-wide association scan with single tandem repeat (STR) markers showed a single strong association near the dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) complex on CFA12. Fine resolution mapping with 27 STR markers on CFA12 further narrowed association to the region containing DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and, -DQB1 genes. Sequencing confirmed that affected dogs were more likely to be homozygous for specific alleles at each locus and that these alleles were linked, forming a single high risk haplotype. The strong DLA class II association of NME in Pug Dogs resembles that of human multiple sclerosis (MS). Like MS, NME appears to have an autoimmune basis, involves genetic and nongenetic factors, has a relatively low incidence, is more frequent in females than males, and is associated with a vascularly orientated nonsuppurative inflammation. However, NME of Pug Dogs is more aggressive in disease course than classical human MS, appears to be relatively earlier in onset, and involves necrosis rather than demyelination as the central pathobiologic feature. Thus, Pug Dog encephalitis (PDE) shares clinical features with the less common acute variant forms of MS. Accordingly, NME of Pug Dogs may represent a naturally occurring canine model of certain idiopathic inflammatory disorders of the human central nervous system.

  14. Mini-Array of Multiple Tumor-Associated Antigens to Enhance Autoantibody Detection for Immunodiagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2009-01-01

    Liver cancer, especially hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is particularly prevalent in Africa and Asia. HCC affects the Hispanic population of the United States at a rate double that of the white population. The majority of people with HCC will die within 1 year of its detection. This high case-fatality rate can in part be attributed to lack of diagnostic methods that allow early detection. How to establish a methodology to identify the high-risk individuals for HCC remains to be investigated. The multi-factorial and multi-step nature in the molecular pathogenesis of human cancers must be taken into account in both the design and interpretation of studies to identify markers which will be useful for early detection of cancer. Our recent studies demonstrated that a mini-array of multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) might enhance autoantibody detection for diagnosis of HCC, especially for the alpha fetoprotein (AFP)-negative cases. It also suggested that different types of cancer might require different panels of TAAs to achieve the sensitivity and specificity required to make immunodiagnosis a feasible adjunct to tumor diagnosis. PMID:17289549

  15. Novel anti–B-cell maturation antigen antibody-drug conjugate (GSK2857916) selectively induces killing of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Patrick A.; Acharya, Chirag; Zhong, Mike Y.; Cea, Michele; Cagnetta, Antonia; Craigen, Jenny; Yates, John; Gliddon, Louise; Fieles, William; Hoang, Bao; Tunstead, James; Christie, Amanda L.; Kung, Andrew L.; Richardson, Paul; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), highly expressed on malignant plasma cells in human multiple myeloma (MM), has not been effectively targeted with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. We here show that BCMA is universally expressed on the MM cell surface and determine specific anti-MM activity of J6M0-mcMMAF (GSK2857916), a novel humanized and afucosylated antagonistic anti-BCMA antibody-drug conjugate via a noncleavable linker. J6M0-mcMMAF specifically blocks cell growth via G2/M arrest and induces caspase 3–dependent apoptosis in MM cells, alone and in coculture with bone marrow stromal cells or various effector cells. It strongly inhibits colony formation by MM cells while sparing surrounding BCMA-negative normal cells. J6M0-mcMMAF significantly induces effector cell-mediated lysis against allogeneic or autologous patient MM cells, with increased potency and efficacy compared with the wild-type J6M0 without Fc enhancement. The antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptotic activity of J6M0-mcMMAF is further enhanced by lenalidomide. Importantly, J6M0-mcMMAF rapidly eliminates myeloma cells in subcutaneous and disseminated mouse models, and mice remain tumor-free up to 3.5 months. Furthermore, J6M0-mcMMAF recruits macrophages and mediates antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis of MM cells. Together, these results demonstrate that GSK2857916 has potent and selective anti-MM activities via multiple cytotoxic mechanisms, providing a promising next-generation immunotherapeutic in this cancer. PMID:24569262

  16. ESCRT-0 Assembles as a Heterotetrameric Complex on Membranes and Binds Multiple Ubiquitinylated Cargoes Simultaneously*

    PubMed Central

    Mayers, Jonathan R.; Fyfe, Ian; Schuh, Amber L.; Chapman, Edwin R.; Edwardson, J. Michael; Audhya, Anjon

    2011-01-01

    The ESCRT machinery consists of multiple protein complexes that collectively participate in the biogenesis of multivesicular endosomes (MVEs). The ESCRT-0 complex is composed of two subunits, Hrs and STAM, both of which can engage ubiquitinylated substrates destined for lysosomal degradation. Here, we conduct a comprehensive analysis of ESCRT-0:ubiquitin interactions using isothermal titration calorimetry and define the affinity of each ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) within the intact ESCRT-0 complex. Our data demonstrate that ubiquitin binding is non-cooperative between the ESCRT-0 UBDs. Additionally, our findings show that the affinity of the Hrs double ubiquitin interacting motif (DUIM) for ubiquitin is more than 2-fold greater than that of UBDs found in STAM, suggesting that Hrs functions as the major ubiquitin-binding protein in ESCRT-0. In vivo, Hrs and STAM localize to endosomal membranes. To study recombinant ESCRT-0 assembly on lipid bilayers, we used atomic force microscopy. Our data show that ESCRT-0 forms mostly heterodimers and heterotetramers of Hrs and STAM when analyzed in the presence of membranes. Consistent with these findings, hydrodynamic analysis of endogenous ESCRT-0 indicates that it exists largely as a heterotetrameric complex of its two subunits. Based on these data, we present a revised model for ESCRT-0 function in cargo recruitment and concentration at the endosome. PMID:21193406

  17. The hippocampus supports multiple cognitive processes through relational binding and comparison

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Rosanna K.; Moses, Sandra N.; Riggs, Lily; Ryan, Jennifer D.

    2012-01-01

    It has been well established that the hippocampus plays a pivotal role in explicit long-term recognition memory. However, findings from amnesia, lesion and recording studies with non-human animals, eye-movement recording studies, and functional neuroimaging have recently converged upon a similar message: the functional reach of the hippocampus extends far beyond explicit recognition memory. Damage to the hippocampus affects performance on a number of cognitive tasks including recognition memory after short and long delays and visual discrimination. Additionally, with the advent of neuroimaging techniques that have fine spatial and temporal resolution, findings have emerged that show the elicitation of hippocampal responses within the first few 100 ms of stimulus/task onset. These responses occur for novel and previously viewed information during a time when perceptual processing is traditionally thought to occur, and long before overt recognition responses are made. We propose that the hippocampus is obligatorily involved in the binding of disparate elements across both space and time, and in the comparison of such relational memory representations. Furthermore, the hippocampus supports relational binding and comparison with or without conscious awareness for the relational representations that are formed, retrieved and/or compared. It is by virtue of these basic binding and comparison functions that the reach of the hippocampus extends beyond long-term recognition memory and underlies task performance in multiple cognitive domains. PMID:22661938

  18. Somitogenesis clock-wave initiation requires differential decay and multiple binding sites for clock protein.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Mark; Gedeon, Tomás

    2010-04-01

    Somitogenesis is a process common to all vertebrate embryos in which repeated blocks of cells arise from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM) to lay a foundational pattern for trunk and tail development. Somites form in the wake of passing waves of periodic gene expression that originate in the tailbud and sweep posteriorly across the PSM. Previous work has suggested that the waves result from a spatiotemporally graded control protein that affects the oscillation rate of clock-gene expression. With a minimally constructed mathematical model, we study the contribution of two control mechanisms to the initial formation of this gene-expression wave. We test four biologically motivated model scenarios with either one or two clock protein transcription binding sites, and with or without differential decay rates for clock protein monomers and dimers. We examine the sensitivity of wave formation with respect to multiple model parameters and robustness to heterogeneity in cell population. We find that only a model with both multiple binding sites and differential decay rates is able to reproduce experimentally observed waveforms. Our results show that the experimentally observed characteristics of somitogenesis wave initiation constrain the underlying genetic control mechanisms.

  19. RecA-binding pilE G4 sequence essential for pilin antigenic variation forms monomeric and 5' end-stacked dimeric parallel G-quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Kuryavyi, Vitaly; Cahoon, Laty A; Seifert, H Steven; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2012-12-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an obligate human pathogen that can escape immune surveillance through antigenic variation of surface structures such as pili. A G-quadruplex-forming (G4) sequence (5'-G(3)TG(3)TTG(3)TG(3)) located upstream of the N. gonorrhoeae pilin expression locus (pilE) is necessary for initiation of pilin antigenic variation, a recombination-based, high-frequency, diversity-generation system. We have determined NMR-based structures of the all parallel-stranded monomeric and 5' end-stacked dimeric pilE G-quadruplexes in monovalent cation-containing solutions. We demonstrate that the three-layered all parallel-stranded monomeric pilE G-quadruplex containing single-residue double-chain reversal loops, which can be modeled without steric clashes into the 3 nt DNA-binding site of RecA, binds and promotes E. coli RecA-mediated strand exchange in vitro. We discuss how interactions between RecA and monomeric pilE G-quadruplex could facilitate the specialized recombination reactions leading to pilin diversification.

  20. The role of the multiple banded antigen of Ureaplasma parvum in intra-amniotic infection: major virulence factor or decoy?

    PubMed

    Dando, Samantha J; Nitsos, Ilias; Kallapur, Suhas G; Newnham, John P; Polglase, Graeme R; Pillow, J Jane; Jobe, Alan H; Timms, Peter; Knox, Christine L

    2012-01-01

    The multiple banded antigen (MBA) is a predicted virulence factor of Ureaplasma species. Antigenic variation of the MBA is a potential mechanism by which ureaplasmas avoid immune recognition and cause chronic infections of the upper genital tract of pregnant women. We tested whether the MBA is involved in the pathogenesis of intra-amniotic infection and chorioamnionitis by injecting virulent or avirulent-derived ureaplasma clones (expressing single MBA variants) into the amniotic fluid of pregnant sheep. At 55 days of gestation pregnant ewes (n = 20) received intra-amniotic injections of virulent-derived or avirulent-derived U. parvum serovar 6 strains (2×10⁴ CFU), or 10B medium (n = 5). Amniotic fluid was collected every two weeks post-infection and fetal tissues were collected at the time of surgical delivery of the fetus (140 days of gestation). Whilst chronic colonisation was established in the amniotic fluid of animals infected with avirulent-derived and virulent-derived ureaplasmas, the severity of chorioamnionitis and fetal inflammation was not different between these groups (p>0.05). MBA size variants (32-170 kDa) were generated in vivo in amniotic fluid samples from both the avirulent and virulent groups, whereas in vitro antibody selection experiments led to the emergence of MBA-negative escape variants in both strains. Anti-ureaplasma IgG antibodies were detected in the maternal serum of animals from the avirulent (40%) and virulent (55%) groups, and these antibodies correlated with increased IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 expression in chorioamnion tissue (p<0.05). We demonstrate that ureaplasmas are capable of MBA phase variation in vitro; however, ureaplasmas undergo MBA size variation in vivo, to potentially prevent eradication by the immune response. Size variation of the MBA did not correlate with the severity of chorioamnionitis. Nonetheless, the correlation between a maternal humoral response and the expression of chorioamnion cytokines is a

  1. The Role of the Multiple Banded Antigen of Ureaplasma parvum in Intra-Amniotic Infection: Major Virulence Factor or Decoy?

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Samantha J.; Nitsos, Ilias; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Newnham, John P.; Polglase, Graeme R.; Pillow, J. Jane; Jobe, Alan H.; Timms, Peter; Knox, Christine L.

    2012-01-01

    The multiple banded antigen (MBA) is a predicted virulence factor of Ureaplasma species. Antigenic variation of the MBA is a potential mechanism by which ureaplasmas avoid immune recognition and cause chronic infections of the upper genital tract of pregnant women. We tested whether the MBA is involved in the pathogenesis of intra-amniotic infection and chorioamnionitis by injecting virulent or avirulent-derived ureaplasma clones (expressing single MBA variants) into the amniotic fluid of pregnant sheep. At 55 days of gestation pregnant ewes (n = 20) received intra-amniotic injections of virulent-derived or avirulent-derived U. parvum serovar 6 strains (2×104 CFU), or 10B medium (n = 5). Amniotic fluid was collected every two weeks post-infection and fetal tissues were collected at the time of surgical delivery of the fetus (140 days of gestation). Whilst chronic colonisation was established in the amniotic fluid of animals infected with avirulent-derived and virulent-derived ureaplasmas, the severity of chorioamnionitis and fetal inflammation was not different between these groups (p>0.05). MBA size variants (32–170 kDa) were generated in vivo in amniotic fluid samples from both the avirulent and virulent groups, whereas in vitro antibody selection experiments led to the emergence of MBA-negative escape variants in both strains. Anti-ureaplasma IgG antibodies were detected in the maternal serum of animals from the avirulent (40%) and virulent (55%) groups, and these antibodies correlated with increased IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 expression in chorioamnion tissue (p<0.05). We demonstrate that ureaplasmas are capable of MBA phase variation in vitro; however, ureaplasmas undergo MBA size variation in vivo, to potentially prevent eradication by the immune response. Size variation of the MBA did not correlate with the severity of chorioamnionitis. Nonetheless, the correlation between a maternal humoral response and the expression of chorioamnion cytokines is a

  2. Vitamin D receptor binding, chromatin states and association with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Disanto, Giulio; Sandve, Geir Kjetil; Berlanga-Taylor, Antonio J.; Ragnedda, Giammario; Morahan, Julia M.; Watson, Corey T.; Giovannoni, Gavin; Ebers, George C.; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V.

    2012-01-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the aetiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). More than 50 genomic regions have been associated with MS susceptibility and vitamin D status also influences the risk of this complex disease. However, how these factors interact in disease causation is unclear. We aimed to investigate the relationship between vitamin D receptor (VDR) binding in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), chromatin states in LCLs and MS-associated genomic regions. Using the Genomic Hyperbrowser, we found that VDR-binding regions overlapped with active regulatory regions [active promoter (AP) and strong enhancer (SE)] in LCLs more than expected by chance [45.3-fold enrichment for SE (P < 2.0e−05) and 63.41-fold enrichment for AP (P < 2.0e−05)]. Approximately 77% of VDR regions were covered by either AP or SE elements. The overlap between VDR binding and regulatory elements was significantly greater in LCLs than in non-immune cells (P < 2.0e−05). VDR binding also occurred within MS regions more than expected by chance (3.7-fold enrichment, P < 2.0e−05). Furthermore, regions of joint overlap SE-VDR and AP-VDR were even more enriched within MS regions and near to several disease-associated genes. These findings provide relevant insights into how vitamin D influences the immune system and the risk of MS through VDR interactions with the chromatin state inside MS regions. Furthermore, the data provide additional evidence for an important role played by B cells in MS. Further analyses in other immune cell types and functional studies are warranted to fully elucidate the role of vitamin D in the immune system. PMID:22595971

  3. Multiple GTP-binding proteins regulate vesicular transport from the ER to Golgi membranes

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Using indirect immunofluorescence we have examined the effects of reagents which inhibit the function of ras-related rab small GTP- binding proteins and heterotrimeric G alpha beta gamma proteins in ER to Golgi transport. Export from the ER was inhibited by an antibody towards rab1B and an NH2-terminal peptide which inhibits ARF function (Balch, W. E., R. A. Kahn, and R. Schwaninger. 1992. J. Biol. Chem. 267:13053-13061), suggesting that both of these small GTP-binding proteins are essential for the transport vesicle formation. Export from the ER was also potently inhibited by mastoparan, a peptide which mimics G protein binding regions of seven transmembrane spanning receptors activating and uncoupling heterotrimeric G proteins from their cognate receptors. Consistent with this result, purified beta gamma subunits inhibited the export of VSV-G from the ER suggesting an initial event in transport vesicle assembly was regulated by a heterotrimeric G protein. In contrast, incubation in the presence of GTP gamma S or AIF(3-5) resulted in the accumulation of transported protein in different populations of punctate pre-Golgi intermediates distributed throughout the cytoplasm of the cell. Finally, a peptide which is believed to antagonize the interaction of rab proteins with putative downstream effector molecules inhibited transport at a later step preceding delivery to the cis Golgi compartment, similar to the site of accumulation of transported protein in the absence of NSF or calcium (Plutner, H., H. W. Davidson, J. Saraste, and W. E. Balch. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 119:1097-1116). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that multiple GTP-binding proteins including a heterotrimeric G protein(s), ARF and rab1 differentially regulate steps in the transport of protein between early compartments of the secretory pathway. The concept that G protein-coupled receptors gate the export of protein from the ER is discussed. PMID:1447289

  4. Structure-Based Analysis of the Interaction between the Simian Virus 40 T-Antigen Origin Binding Domain and Single-Stranded DNA

    SciTech Connect

    G Meinke; P Phelan; A Fradet-Turcotte; A Bohm; J Archambault; P Bullock

    2011-12-31

    The origin-binding domain (OBD) of simian virus 40 (SV40) large T-antigen (T-Ag) is essential for many of T-Ag's interactions with DNA. Nevertheless, many important issues related to DNA binding, for example, how single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) transits along the T-Ag OBD, have yet to be established. Therefore, X-ray crystallography was used to determine the costructure of the T-Ag OBD bound to DNA substrates such as the single-stranded region of a forked oligonucleotide. A second structure of the T-Ag OBD crystallized in the presence of poly(dT){sub 12} is also reported. To test the conclusions derived from these structures, residues identified as being involved in binding to ssDNA by crystallography or by an earlier nuclear magnetic resonance study were mutated, and their binding to DNA was characterized via fluorescence anisotropy. In addition, these mutations were introduced into full-length T-Ag, and these mutants were tested for their ability to support replication. When considered in terms of additional homology-based sequence alignments, our studies refine our understanding of how the T-Ag OBDs encoded by the polyomavirus family interact with ssDNA, a critical step during the initiation of DNA replication.

  5. Coadministration of the Three Antigenic Leishmania infantum Poly (A) Binding Proteins as a DNA Vaccine Induces Protection against Leishmania major Infection in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Corvo, Laura; Garde, Esther; Ramírez, Laura; Iniesta, Virginia; Bonay, Pedro; Gómez-Nieto, Carlos; González, Víctor M.; Martín, M. Elena; Alonso, Carlos; Coelho, Eduardo A. F.; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel

    2015-01-01

    Background Highly conserved intracellular proteins from Leishmania have been described as antigens in natural and experimental infected mammals. The present study aimed to evaluate the antigenicity and prophylactic properties of the Leishmania infantum Poly (A) binding proteins (LiPABPs). Methodology/Principal Findings Three different members of the LiPABP family have been described. Recombinant tools based on these proteins were constructed: recombinant proteins and DNA vaccines. The three recombinant proteins were employed for coating ELISA plates. Sera from human and canine patients of visceral leishmaniasis and human patients of mucosal leishmaniasis recognized the three LiPABPs. In addition, the protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine based on the combination of the three Leishmania PABPs has been tested in a model of progressive murine leishmaniasis: BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major. The induction of a Th1-like response against the LiPABP family by genetic vaccination was able to down-regulate the IL-10 predominant responses elicited by parasite LiPABPs after infection in this murine model. This modulation resulted in a partial protection against L. major infection. LiPABP vaccinated mice showed a reduction on the pathology that was accompanied by a decrease in parasite burdens, in antibody titers against Leishmania antigens and in the IL-4 and IL-10 parasite-specific mediated responses in comparison to control mice groups immunized with saline or with the non-recombinant plasmid. Conclusion/Significance The results presented here demonstrate for the first time the prophylactic properties of a new family of Leishmania antigenic intracellular proteins, the LiPABPs. The redirection of the immune response elicited against the LiPABP family (from IL-10 towards IFN-γ mediated responses) by genetic vaccination was able to induce a partial protection against the development of the disease in a highly susceptible murine model of leishmaniasis. PMID:25955652

  6. Association of p53 binding and immortalization of primary C57BL/6 mouse embryo fibroblasts by using simian virus 40 T-antigen mutants bearing internal overlapping deletion mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Kierstead, T D; Tevethia, M J

    1993-01-01

    To more precisely map the immortalization and p53 binding domains of T antigen, a large series of overlapping deletion mutations were created between codons 251 to 651 by utilizing a combination of Bal 31 deletion and oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. Immortalization assay results indicated that amino acids (aa) 252 to 350, 400, and 451 to 532 could be removed without seriously compromising immortalization, although the appearance of immortal colonies was delayed in some cases. Western immunoblotting experiments indicated that the p53 binding capacities of T antigen produced by mutants missing aa 252 to 300, 301 to 350, 400, or 451 to 532 were only slightly reduced relative to that of wild-type T antigen. Within the limits of this deletion analysis, the immortalization and p53 binding domains appear to be colinear and, in fact, may represent two aspects of the same domain. This deletion analysis eliminates the entire zinc finger domain (aa 302 to 320), a small portion of the leucine-rich region (aa 345 to 350), and a large portion of the ATP binding domain (aa 451 to 528) as participants in p53 binding or in the immortalization process. The results also show that removal of T antigen amino acids within the region 451 to 532 appears to alter the capacity of newly synthesized but not older T antigen and p53 molecules to form complexes. Images PMID:8383212

  7. Extractable low mass proteins <30kDa from peanut display elevated antigenicity (IgG-binding) and allergenicity (IgE-binding) in vitro and are attenuated by thermal reactivity with non-peanut food ingredients.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Louise; Lee, Alvin

    2016-03-01

    Human allergic reactions to peanut proteins and the associated risk of life-threatening anaphylaxis requires vigilant management of peanuts in food processing. Processed forms of peanuts with attenuated antigenicity and less severe immunogenic responses may lower the risk. Molecular subfractions of raw (UP), blanched (BP) and roasted (RP) peanuts were prepared including water-insoluble (P1), water-soluble high mass (>30kDa, P2) and water-soluble low mass (<30kDa, P3) fractions. Products were screened by measuring binding to IgG (polyclonal antibody against peanut allergen) and IgE (sera from peanut-allergic donors, RAST>3). The results showed that IgE titres were highest for total extracts of RP, particularly for P3 fractions of UP and RP, and were affected by further heating. Antigenicity was also modulated by heating in the presence of either peanut oil or non-peanut food ingredients (lactose, coconut oil). Results support several alternative methods for regulating peanut antigenicity using food processing approaches but require further substantiation in larger numbers of allergic and control donor sera.

  8. Extractable low mass proteins <30kDa from peanut display elevated antigenicity (IgG-binding) and allergenicity (IgE-binding) in vitro and are attenuated by thermal reactivity with non-peanut food ingredients.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Louise; Lee, Alvin

    2016-03-01

    Human allergic reactions to peanut proteins and the associated risk of life-threatening anaphylaxis requires vigilant management of peanuts in food processing. Processed forms of peanuts with attenuated antigenicity and less severe immunogenic responses may lower the risk. Molecular subfractions of raw (UP), blanched (BP) and roasted (RP) peanuts were prepared including water-insoluble (P1), water-soluble high mass (>30kDa, P2) and water-soluble low mass (<30kDa, P3) fractions. Products were screened by measuring binding to IgG (polyclonal antibody against peanut allergen) and IgE (sera from peanut-allergic donors, RAST>3). The results showed that IgE titres were highest for total extracts of RP, particularly for P3 fractions of UP and RP, and were affected by further heating. Antigenicity was also modulated by heating in the presence of either peanut oil or non-peanut food ingredients (lactose, coconut oil). Results support several alternative methods for regulating peanut antigenicity using food processing approaches but require further substantiation in larger numbers of allergic and control donor sera. PMID:26471622

  9. Observation of multiple, identical binding sites in the exchange of carboxylic acid ligands with CdS nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Nichols, Valerie M; Zhou, Dapeng; Lim, Cynthia; Pau, George Shu Heng; Bardeen, Christopher J; Tang, Ming L

    2014-06-11

    We study ligand exchange between the carboxylic acid group and 5.0 nm oleic-acid capped CdS nanocrystals (NCs) using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). This is the first measurement of the initial binding events between cadmium chalcogenide NCs and carboxylic acid groups. The binding behavior can be described as an interaction between a ligand with single binding group and a substrate with multiple, identical binding sites. Assuming Poissonian binding statistics, our model fits both steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (SSPL and TRPL, respectively) data well. A modified Langmuir isotherm reveals that a CdS nanoparticle has an average of 3.0 new carboxylic acid ligands and binding constant, Ka, of 3.4 × 10(5) M(-1).

  10. Characterization of nicotine binding to the rat brain P/sub 2/ preparation: the identification of multiple binding sites which include specific up-regulatory site(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    These studies show that nicotine binds to the rat brain P/sub 2/ preparation by saturable and reversible processes. Multiple binding sites were revealed by the configuration of saturation, kinetic and Scatchard plots. A least squares best fit of Scatchard data using nonlinear curve fitting programs confirmed the presence of a very high affinity site, an up-regulatory site, a high affinity site and one or two low affinity sites. Stereospecificity was demonstrated for the up-regulatory site where (+)-nicotine was more effective and for the high affinity site where (-)-nicotine had a higher affinity. Drugs which selectively up-regulate nicotine binding site(s) have been identified. Further, separate very high and high affinity sites were identified for (-)- and (+)-(/sup 3/H)nicotine, based on evidence that the site density for the (-)-isomer is 10 times greater than that for the (+)-isomer at these sites. Enhanced nicotine binding has been shown to be a statistically significant phenomenon which appears to be a consequence of drugs binding to specific site(s) which up-regulate binding at other site(s). Although Scatchard and Hill plots indicate positive cooperatively, up-regulation more adequately describes the function of these site(s). A separate up-regulatory site is suggested by the following: (1) Drugs vary markedly in their ability to up-regulate binding. (2) Both the affinity and the degree of up-regulation can be altered by structural changes in ligands. (3) Drugs with specificity for up-regulation have been identified. (4) Some drugs enhance binding in a dose-related manner. (5) Competition studies employing cold (-)- and (+)-nicotine against (-)- and (+)-(/sup 3/H)nicotine show that the isomers bind to separate sites which up-regulate binding at the (-)- and (+)-nicotine high affinity sites and in this regard (+)-nicotine is more specific and efficacious than (-)-nicotine.

  11. Multiple Evolutionary Origins of Ubiquitous Cu2+ and Zn2+ Binding in the S100 Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Lucas C.; Donor, Micah T.; Prell, James S.

    2016-01-01

    The S100 proteins are a large family of signaling proteins that play critical roles in biology and disease. Many S100 proteins bind Zn2+, Cu2+, and/or Mn2+ as part of their biological functions; however, the evolutionary origins of binding remain obscure. One key question is whether divalent transition metal binding is ancestral, or instead arose independently on multiple lineages. To tackle this question, we combined phylogenetics with biophysical characterization of modern S100 proteins. We demonstrate an earlier origin for established S100 subfamilies than previously believed, and reveal that transition metal binding is widely distributed across the tree. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we found that Cu2+ and Zn2+ binding are common features of the family: the full breadth of human S100 paralogs—as well as two early-branching S100 proteins found in the tunicate Oikopleura dioica—bind these metals with μM affinity and stoichiometries ranging from 1:1 to 3:1 (metal:protein). While binding is consistent across the tree, structural responses to binding are quite variable. Further, mutational analysis and structural modeling revealed that transition metal binding occurs at different sites in different S100 proteins. This is consistent with multiple origins of transition metal binding over the evolution of this protein family. Our work reveals an evolutionary pattern in which the overall phenotype of binding is a constant feature of S100 proteins, even while the site and mechanism of binding is evolutionarily labile. PMID:27764152

  12. Antibody recognition in multiple sclerosis and Rett syndrome using a collection of linear and cyclic N-glucosylated antigenic probes.

    PubMed

    Real Fernández, Feliciana; Di Pisa, Margherita; Rossi, Giada; Auberger, Nicolas; Lequin, Olivier; Larregola, Maud; Benchohra, Amina; Mansuy, Christelle; Chassaing, Gerard; Lolli, Francesco; Hayek, Joussef; Lavielle, Solange; Rovero, Paolo; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Papini, Anna Maria

    2015-09-01

    Antibody detection in autoimmune disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and Rett syndrome (RTT) can be achieved more efficiently using synthetic peptides. The previously developed synthetic antigenic probe CSF114(Glc), a type I' β-turn N-glucosylated peptide structure, is able to recognize antibodies in MS and RTT patients' sera as a sign of immune system derangement. We report herein the design, synthesis, conformational analysis, and immunological evaluation of a collection of glycopeptide analogs of CSF114(Glc) to characterize the specific role of secondary structures in MS and RTT antibody recognition. Therefore, we synthesized a series of linear and cyclic short glucosylated sequences, mimicking different β-turn conformations, which were evaluated in inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Calculated IC50 ranking analysis allowed the selection of the candidate octapeptide containing two (S)-2-amino-4-pentynoic acid (L-Pra) residues Ac-Pra-RRN(Glc)GHT-Pra-NH2 , with an IC50 in the nanomolar range. This peptide was adequately modified for solid-phase ELISA (SP-ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) experiments. Pra-RRN(Glc)GHT-Pra-NH2 peptide was modified with an alkyl chain linked to the N-terminus, favoring immobilization on solid phase in SP-ELISA and differentiating IgG antibody recognition between patients and healthy blood donors with a high specificity. However, this peptide displayed a loss in IgM specificity and sensitivity. Moreover, an analog was obtained after modification of the octapeptide candidate Ac-Pra-RRN(Glc)GHT-Pra-NH2 to favor immobilization on SPR sensor chips. SPR technology allowed us to determine its affinity (KD  = 16.4 nM), 2.3 times lower than the affinity of the original glucopeptide CSF114(Glc) (KD  = 7.1 nM). PMID:25973844

  13. Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3 multiple banded antigen size variation after chronic intra-amniotic infection/colonization.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James W; Dando, Samantha J; Nitsos, Ilias; Newnham, John; Polglase, Graeme R; Kallapur, Suhas G; Pillow, J Jane; Kramer, Boris W; Jobe, Alan H; Payton, Diane; Knox, Christine L

    2013-01-01

    Ureaplasma species are the microorganisms most frequently associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The multiple banded antigen (MBA), a surface-exposed lipoprotein, is a key virulence factor of ureaplasmas. The MBA demonstrates size variation, which we have shown previously to be correlated with the severity of chorioamnion inflammation. We aimed to investigate U. parvum serovar 3 pathogenesis in vivo, using a sheep model, by investigating: MBA variation after long term (chronic) and short term (acute) durations of in utero ureaplasma infections, and the severity of chorioamnionitis and inflammation in other fetal tissues. Inocula of 2 × 10(7) colony-forming-units (CFU) of U. parvum serovar 3 (Up) or media controls (C) were injected intra-amniotically into pregnant ewes at one of three time points: day 55 (69d Up, n = 8; C69, n = 4); day 117 (7d Up, n = 8; C7, n = 2); and day 121 (3d Up, n = 8; C3, n = 2) of gestation (term = 145-150d). At day 124, preterm fetuses were delivered surgically. Samples of chorioamnion, fetal lung, and umbilical cord were: (i) snap frozen for subsequent ureaplasma culture, and (ii) fixed, embedded, sectioned and stained by haematoxylin and eosin stain for histological analysis. Selected fetal lung clinical ureaplasma isolates were cloned and filtered to obtain cultures from a single CFU. Passage 1 and clone 2 ureaplasma cultures were tested by western blot to demonstrate MBA variation. In acute durations of ureaplasma infection no MBA variants (3d Up) or very few MBA variants (7d Up) were present when compared to the original inoculum. However, numerous MBA size variants were generated in vivo (alike within contiguous tissues, amniotic fluid and fetal lung, but different variants were present within chorioamnion), during chronic, 69d exposure to ureaplasma infection. For the first time we have shown that the degree of ureaplasma MBA variation in vivo increased with the duration of gestation.

  14. Peptides identify multiple hotspots within the ligand binding domain of the TNF receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Ku-chuan; Brissette, Renee E; Wang, Pinger; Fletcher, Paul W; Rodriguez, Vanessa; Lennick, Michael; Blume, Arthur J; Goldstein, Neil I

    2003-01-01

    Background Hotspots are defined as the minimal functional domains involved in protein:protein interactions and sufficient to induce a biological response. Results Here we describe the use of complex and high diversity phage display libraries to isolate peptides (called Hotspot Ligands or HSPLs) which sub-divide the ligand binding domain of the tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2; p75) into multiple hotspots. We have shown that these libraries could generate HSPLs which not only subdivide hotspots on protein and non-protein targets but act as agonists or antagonists. Using this approach, we generated peptides which were specific for human TNFR2, could be competed by the natural ligands, TNFα and TNFβ and induced an unexpected biological response in a TNFR2-specific manner. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the dissection of the TNFR2 into biologically active hotspots with the concomitant identification of a novel and unexpected biological activity. PMID:12646066

  15. Multiple Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein 1 Complexes Mediate Merozoite Binding to Human Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Clara S; Uboldi, Alessandro D; Epp, Christian; Bujard, Hermann; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Czabotar, Peter E; Cowman, Alan F

    2016-04-01

    Successful invasion of human erythrocytes byPlasmodium falciparummerozoites is required for infection of the host and parasite survival. The early stages of invasion are mediated via merozoite surface proteins that interact with human erythrocytes. The nature of these interactions are currently not well understood, but it is known that merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) is critical for successful erythrocyte invasion. Here we show that the peripheral merozoite surface proteins MSP3, MSP6, MSPDBL1, MSPDBL2, and MSP7 bind directly to MSP1, but independently of each other, to form multiple forms of the MSP1 complex on the parasite surface. These complexes have overlapping functions that interact directly with human erythrocytes. We also show that targeting the p83 fragment of MSP1 using inhibitory antibodies inhibits all forms of MSP1 complexes and disrupts parasite growthin vitro.

  16. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  17. Probabilistic Inference on Multiple Normalized Signal Profiles from Next Generation Sequencing: Transcription Factor Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    With the prevalence of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with sequencing (ChIP-Seq) technology, massive ChIP-Seq data has been accumulated. The ChIP-Seq technology measures the genome-wide occupancy of DNA-binding proteins in vivo. It is well-known that different DNA-binding protein occupancies may result in a gene being regulated in different conditions (e.g. different cell types). To fully understand a gene's function, it is essential to develop probabilistic models on multiple ChIP-Seq profiles for deciphering the gene transcription causalities. In this work, we propose and describe two probabilistic models. Assuming the conditional independence of different DNA-binding proteins' occupancies, the first method (SignalRanker) is developed as an intuitive method for ChIP-Seq genome-wide signal profile inference. Unfortunately, such an assumption may not always hold in some gene regulation cases. Thus, we propose and describe another method (FullSignalRanker) which does not make the conditional independence assumption. The proposed methods are compared with other existing methods on ENCODE ChIP-Seq datasets, demonstrating its regression and classification ability. The results suggest that FullSignalRanker is the best-performing method for recovering the signal ranks on the promoter and enhancer regions. In addition, FullSignalRanker is also the best-performing method for peak sequence classification. We envision that SignalRanker and FullSignalRanker will become important in the era of next generation sequencing. FullSignalRanker program is available on the following website: http://www.cs.toronto.edu/~wkc/FullSignalRanker/.

  18. Probabilistic Inference on Multiple Normalized Signal Profiles from Next Generation Sequencing: Transcription Factor Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    With the prevalence of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with sequencing (ChIP-Seq) technology, massive ChIP-Seq data has been accumulated. The ChIP-Seq technology measures the genome-wide occupancy of DNA-binding proteins in vivo. It is well-known that different DNA-binding protein occupancies may result in a gene being regulated in different conditions (e.g. different cell types). To fully understand a gene's function, it is essential to develop probabilistic models on multiple ChIP-Seq profiles for deciphering the gene transcription causalities. In this work, we propose and describe two probabilistic models. Assuming the conditional independence of different DNA-binding proteins' occupancies, the first method (SignalRanker) is developed as an intuitive method for ChIP-Seq genome-wide signal profile inference. Unfortunately, such an assumption may not always hold in some gene regulation cases. Thus, we propose and describe another method (FullSignalRanker) which does not make the conditional independence assumption. The proposed methods are compared with other existing methods on ENCODE ChIP-Seq datasets, demonstrating its regression and classification ability. The results suggest that FullSignalRanker is the best-performing method for recovering the signal ranks on the promoter and enhancer regions. In addition, FullSignalRanker is also the best-performing method for peak sequence classification. We envision that SignalRanker and FullSignalRanker will become important in the era of next generation sequencing. FullSignalRanker program is available on the following website: http://www.cs.toronto.edu/~wkc/FullSignalRanker/. PMID:26671811

  19. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jaslyn E. M. M.; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Gysel, Kira; Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Sørensen, Kasper K.; Jensen, Knud J.; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël

    2015-03-01

    The crystal and solution structures of the T. thermophilus NlpC/P60 d, l-endopeptidase as well as the co-crystal structure of its N-terminal LysM domains bound to chitohexaose allow a proposal to be made regarding how the enzyme recognizes peptidoglycan. LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers. By combining the structural information with the three-dimensional model of peptidoglycan, a model suggesting how protein dimerization enhances the recognition of peptidoglycan is proposed.

  20. A frameshift mutation in the pre-S region of the human hepatitis B virus genome allows production of surface antigen particles but eliminates binding to polymerized albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Persing, D H; Varmus, H E; Ganem, D

    1985-01-01

    The coding region for the major polypeptide (p24S) of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is preceded by an in-phase open reading frame termed pre-S. The coding potential of the pre-S region was examined in mouse L cells transformed with cloned hepatitis B virus DNA. Such cells produce three HBsAg-related polypeptides of Mr 24,000, 27,000, and 35,000 organized into complex particles of 22 nm diameter. These HBsAg particles bind to polymerized human albumin, but not to polyalbumins of several other species. In contrast, cells transformed with hepatitis B virus DNA bearing a frameshift mutation near the 3' end of the pre-S region secrete immunoreactive HBsAg particles containing only the 24,000 and 27,000 Mr species. These mutant particles, which lack the 35,000 Mr species, are unable to bind polymerized human albumin. These studies indicate that the pre-S region encodes the 35,000 Mr species, that this product accounts for the known polyalbumin-binding activity of HBsAg but is not required for assembly and secretion of HBsAg 22-nm particles, and that the major polypeptide of HBsAg is not derived primarily by cleavage of larger precursors encoded by the pre-S region. Images PMID:3858831

  1. The Tim8-Tim13 complex has multiple substrate binding sites and binds cooperatively to Tim23.

    PubMed

    Beverly, Kristen N; Sawaya, Michael R; Schmid, Einhard; Koehler, Carla M

    2008-10-24

    The Tim8-Tim13 complex, located in the mitochondrial intermembrane space, functions in the TIM22 import pathway that mediates the import of the mitochondrial carriers Tim23, Tim22, and Tim17 into the mitochondrial inner membrane. The Tim8-Tim13 complex assembles as a hexamer and binds to the substrate Tim23 to chaperone the hydrophobic Tim23 across the aqueous intermembrane space. However, both structural features of the Tim8-Tim13 complex and the binding interaction to Tim23 remain poorly defined. The crystal structure of the yeast Tim8-Tim13 complex, reported here at 2.6 A resolution, reveals that the architecture of the Tim8-Tim13 complex is similar to those of other chaperones such as Tim9-Tim10, prefoldin, and Skp, in which long helices extend from a central body like tentacles from a jellyfish. Surface plasmon resonance was applied to investigate interactions between the Tim8-Tim13 complex and Tim23. The Tim8-Tim13 complex contained approximately six binding sites and showed a complex binding interaction indicative of positive cooperativity rather than a simple bimolecular interaction. By combining results from the structural and binding studies, we provide a molecular model of the Tim8-Tim13 complex binding to Tim23. The regions where the tentacle helices attach to the body of the Tim8-Tim13 complex contain six hydrophobic pockets that likely interact with specific sequences of Tim23 and possibly other substrates. Smaller hydrophobic patches on the tentacles themselves likely interact nonspecifically with the substrate's transmembrane helices, shielding it from the aqueous intermembrane space. The central region of Tim23, which enters the intermembrane space first, may serve to nucleate the binding of the Tim8-Tim13 complex, thereby initiating the chaperoned translocation of Tim23 to the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:18706423

  2. An integrated top-down and bottom-up proteomic approach to characterize the antigen binding fragment of antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Dekker, Leendert J.; Wu, Si; vanDuijn, Martijn M.; Tolic, Nikola; Stingl, Christoph; Zhao, Rui; Luider, Theo N.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2014-05-31

    We have previously shown that different individuals exposed to the same antigen produce antibodies with identical mutations in their complementarity determining regions (CDR), suggesting that CDR tryptic peptides can serve as biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis. Complete Fabs derived from disease specific antibodies have even higher potential; they could potentially be used for disease treatment and are required to identify the antigens towards which the antibodies are directed. However, complete Fab sequence characterization via LC-MS analysis of tryptic peptides (i.e. bottom-up) has proven to be impractical for mixtures of antibodies. To tackle this challenge, we have developed an integrated bottom-up and top-down MS approach, employing 2D chromatography coupled with Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS), and applied this approach for full characterization of the variable parts of two pharmaceutical monoclonal antibodies with sensitivity comparable to the bottom-up standard. These efforts represent an essential step towards the identification of disease specific antibodies in patient samples with potentially significant clinical impact.

  3. A region of the N-terminal domain of meningococcal factor H-binding protein that elicits bactericidal antibody across antigenic variant groups.

    PubMed

    Beernink, Peter T; LoPasso, Carla; Angiolillo, Antonella; Felici, Franco; Granoff, Dan

    2009-05-01

    Meningococcal factor H-binding protein (fHbp) is a promising vaccine antigen. Previous studies described three fHbp antigenic variant groups and identified amino acid residues between 100 and 255 as important targets of variant-specific bactericidal antibodies. We investigated residues affecting expression of an epitope recognized by a murine IgG2a anti-fHbp mAb, designated JAR 4, which cross-reacted with fHbps in variant group 1 or 2 (95% of strains), and elicited human complement-mediated, cooperative bactericidal activity with other non-bactericidal anti-fHbp mAbs with epitopes involving residues between 121 and 216. From filamentous bacteriophage libraries containing random peptides that were recognized by JAR 4, we identified a consensus tripeptide, DHK that matched residues 25-27 in the N-terminal domain of fHbp. Since DHK was present in both JAR 4-reactive and non-reactive fHbps, the tripeptide was necessary but not sufficient for reactivity. Based on site-directed mutagenesis studies, the JAR 4 epitope could either be knocked out of a reactive variant 1 fHbp, or introduced into a non-reactive variant 3 protein. Collectively, the data indicated that the JAR 4 epitope was discontinuous and involved DHK residues beginning at position 25; YGN residues beginning at position 57; and a KDN tripeptide that was present in variant 3 proteins beginning at position 67 that negatively affected expression of the epitope. Thus, the region of fHbp encompassing residues 25-59 in the N-terminal domain is important for eliciting antibodies that can cooperate with other anti-fHbp antibodies for cross-reactive bactericidal activity against strains expressing fHbp from different antigenic variant groups.

  4. Aberrant Glycosylation of Anchor-Optimized MUC1 Peptides Can Enhance Antigen Binding Affinity and Reverse Tolerance to Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pathangey, Latha B.; Lakshminarayanan, Vani; Suman, Vera J.; Pockaj, Barbara A.; Mukherjee, Pinku; Gendler, Sandra J.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer vaccines have often failed to live up to their promise, although recent results with checkpoint inhibitors are reviving hopes that they will soon fulfill their promise. Although mutation-specific vaccines are under development, there is still high interest in an off-the-shelf vaccine to a ubiquitous antigen, such as MUC1, which is aberrantly expressed on most solid and many hematological tumors, including more than 90% of breast carcinomas. Clinical trials for MUC1 have shown variable success, likely because of immunological tolerance to a self-antigen and to poor immunogenicity of tandem repeat peptides. We hypothesized that MUC1 peptides could be optimized, relying on heteroclitic optimizations of potential anchor amino acids with and without tumor-specific glycosylation of the peptides. We have identified novel MUC1 class I peptides that bind to HLA-A*0201 molecules with significantly higher affinity and function than the native MUC1 peptides. These peptides elicited CTLs from normal donors, as well as breast cancer patients, which were highly effective in killing MUC1-expressing MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Each peptide elicited lytic responses in greater than 6/8 of normal individuals and 3/3 breast cancer patients. The CTLs generated against the glycosylated-anchor modified peptides cross reacted with the native MUC1 peptide, STAPPVHNV, suggesting these analog peptides may offer substantial improvement in the design of epitope-based vaccines. PMID:27367740

  5. Nonreducing terminal modifications determine the chain length of polymannose O antigens of Escherichia coli and couple chain termination to polymer export via an ATP-binding cassette transporter.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Bradley R; Cuthbertson, Leslie; Whitfield, Chris

    2004-08-20

    The chain length of bacterial lipopolysaccharide O antigens is regulated to give a modal distribution that is critical for pathogenesis. This paper describes the process of chain length determination in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent pathway, a pathway that is widespread among Gram-negative bacteria. Escherichia coli O8 and O9/O9a polymannans are synthesized in the cytoplasm, and an ABC transporter exports the nascent polymer across the inner membrane prior to completion of the LPS molecule. The polymannan O antigens have nonreducing terminal methyl groups. The 3-O-methyl group in serotype O8 is transferred from S-adenosylmethionine by the WbdD(O8) enzyme, and this modification terminates polymerization. Methyl groups are added to the O9a polymannan in a reaction dependent on preceding phosphorylation. The bifunctional WbdD(O9a) catalyzes both reactions, but only the kinase activity controls chain length. Chain termination occurs in a mutant lacking the ABC transporter, indicating that it precedes export. An E. coli wbdD(O9a) mutant accumulated O9a polymannan in the cytoplasm, indicating that WbdD activity coordinates polymannan chain termination with export across the inner membrane.

  6. Electrostatic Modifications of the Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR P9 Peptide-Binding Pocket and Susceptibility to Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Hov, Johannes R; Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilis; Traherne, James A; Olsson, Marita; Boberg, Kirsten M; Bergquist, Annika; Schrumpf, Erik; Bradley, J Andrew; Taylor, Craig J; Lie, Benedicte A; Trowsdale, John; Karlsen, Tom H

    2011-01-01

    The strongest genetic risk factors for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are found in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex at chromosome 6p21. Genes in the HLA class II region encode molecules that present antigen to T lymphocytes. Polymorphisms in these genes are associated with most autoimmune diseases, most likely because they contribute to the specificity of immune responses. The aim of this study was to analyze the structure and electrostatic properties of the peptide-binding groove of HLA-DR in relation to PSC. Thus, four-digit resolution HLA-DRB1 genotyping was performed in 356 PSC patients and 366 healthy controls. Sequence information was used to assign which amino acids were encoded at all polymorphic positions. In stepwise logistic regressions, variations at residues 37 and 86 were independently associated with PSC (P = 1.2 × 10−32 and P = 1.8 × 10−22 in single-residue models, respectively). Three-dimensional modeling was performed to explore the effect of these key residues on the HLA-DR molecule. This analysis indicated that residue 37 was a major determinant of the electrostatic properties of pocket P9 of the peptide-binding groove. Asparagine at residue 37, which was associated with PSC, induced a positive charge in pocket P9. Tyrosine, which protected against PSC, induced a negative charge in this pocket. Consistent with the statistical observations, variation at residue 86 also indirectly influenced the electrostatic properties of this pocket. DRB1*13:01, which was PSC-associated, had a positive P9 pocket and DRB1*13:02, protective against PSC, had a negative P9 pocket. Conclusion: The results suggest that in patients with PSC, residues 37 and 86 of the HLA-DRβ chain critically influence the electrostatic properties of pocket P9 and thereby the range of peptides presented. (Hepatology 2011;53:1967-1976) PMID:21413052

  7. Host cell-mediated selection of influenza A (H3N2) virus variant subpopulations: lack of association between antigenic and receptor-binding properties.

    PubMed Central

    Pyhälä, R.; Pyhälä, L.; Pekkala, P.

    1988-01-01

    During the outbreak of influenza due to A (H3N3) viruses in Finland in 1985/6 virus pairs were isolated from the same clinical specimens in embryonated hens' eggs (CE) and in canine kidney cell cultures (MDCK). Some of these isolates, the E and M pairs, were distinguished by their reactions in haemagglutination inhibition (HI) tests carried out using polyclonal antisera, and by receptor-binding properties, as evidenced by differences in their elution activity from erythrocytes. Passage of the E- and M-virus isolates in the foreign host affected their serological characteristics, but the E virus did not convert to an M-like virus and the M virus did not convert to an E-like virus. Returning the viruses to grow in the host used for their isolation changed the serological reactions so that they were once more close to the reactions of the original isolates. This contrasts with the changes in receptor-binding properties. Rapid elution from hen erythrocytes, which has been described as a property of viruses binding to the SA alpha 2,3Gal sequence in preference to SA alpha 2,6Gal, characterized the virus passages grown solely in MDCK cell cultures. Cultivation of the M virus in CE, at any stage of its passage history, made the virus irreversibly incapable of elution. The M virus was more sensitive than the E virus to HI antibodies against heterologous viruses of the H3N2 subtype, and, when used as an antigen in HI serology, it more frequently (90% vs. 69%; P less than 0.01) detected diagnostic antibody responses in patients infected with viruses of this subtype in 1985/6. Use of antigens with a different passage history in HI serology provided evidence that this superiority, which may be due to the ability of the virus to pick out anamnestic antibody responses, is unrelated to the receptor-binding peculiarity of the M virus under consideration. The results support the concept that the host cell can select a diversity of virus variant subpopulations from a single clinical

  8. Coexpression of class I major histocompatibility antigen and viral RNA in central nervous system of mice infected with Theiler's virus: a model for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lindsley, M D; Patick, A K; Prayoonwiwat, N; Rodriguez, M

    1992-09-01

    Chronic infection of susceptible strains of mice with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) results in central nervous system (CNS) demyelination similar to multiple sclerosis. Demyelination induced by TMEV is mediated, in part, by class I-restricted CD8+ T lymphocytes. For these T cells to function, they must recognize virus-infected CNS targets in the presence of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigen. Therefore, we studied in vivo expression of class I MHC antigen and viral antigen-RNA in prototypic mouse strains that are susceptible (SJL/J) or resistant (C57BL/10SNJ) to TMEV-induced demyelination. In brains of resistant mice, viral antigen-RNA expression peaked on day 3 after infection and was effectively diminished by day 5 such that few virus-infected cells were ever detected in the spinal cord. In contrast, susceptible mice demonstrated delay in clearance of TMEV from the brain and a subsequent increase and persistence of viral antigen-RNA in the spinal cord for as long as 277 days. Viral infection resulted in "upregulation" of class I MHC expression in the CNS. Class I MHC antigens were expressed as early as 1 day after infection in the choroid plexus of both strains of mice before detection of viral antigen or inflammation. In resistant mice, class I MHC expression predominated in the gray matter of the brain and spinal cord on day 7 after infection but returned to undetectable levels by day 28. In susceptible mice, class I MHC expression in the CNS persisted and was intense in the white matter of the spinal cord throughout chronic infection and demyelination. No class I MHC expression was detected in the CNS of uninfected mice. Coexpression of viral RNA and class I MHC antigen was demonstrated in CNS cells by using simultaneous in situ hybridization and immunoperoxidase technique. These results support the hypothesis that a class I-restricted immune response directed against virus-infected cells may be important in the mechanism

  9. Multiple ligand simultaneous docking (MLSD): A novel approach to study the effect of inhibitors on substrate binding to PPO.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, S; Aditya Rao, S J; Kumar, Vadlapudi; Ramesh, C K

    2015-12-01

    Multiple ligand simultaneous docking, a computational approach is used to study the concurrent interactions between substrate and the macromolecule binding together in the presence of an inhibitor. The present investigation deals with the study of the effect of different inhibitors on binding of substrate to the protein Polyphenoloxidase (PPO). The protein was isolated from Mucuna pruriens and confirmed as tyrosinases involved in L-DOPA production. The activity was measured using different inhibitors at different concentrations taking catechol as substrate. A high-throughput binding study was conducted to compare the binding orientations of individual ligands and multiple ligands employing Autodock 4.2. The results of single substrate docking showed a better binding of urea with the binding energy of -3.48 kJ mol(-1) and inter molecular energy of -3.48 kJ mol(-1) while the results of MLSD revealed that ascorbic acid combined with the substrate showed better inhibition with a decreased binding energy of -2.37 kJ mol(-1).

  10. Multiple ligand simultaneous docking (MLSD): A novel approach to study the effect of inhibitors on substrate binding to PPO.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, S; Aditya Rao, S J; Kumar, Vadlapudi; Ramesh, C K

    2015-12-01

    Multiple ligand simultaneous docking, a computational approach is used to study the concurrent interactions between substrate and the macromolecule binding together in the presence of an inhibitor. The present investigation deals with the study of the effect of different inhibitors on binding of substrate to the protein Polyphenoloxidase (PPO). The protein was isolated from Mucuna pruriens and confirmed as tyrosinases involved in L-DOPA production. The activity was measured using different inhibitors at different concentrations taking catechol as substrate. A high-throughput binding study was conducted to compare the binding orientations of individual ligands and multiple ligands employing Autodock 4.2. The results of single substrate docking showed a better binding of urea with the binding energy of -3.48 kJ mol(-1) and inter molecular energy of -3.48 kJ mol(-1) while the results of MLSD revealed that ascorbic acid combined with the substrate showed better inhibition with a decreased binding energy of -2.37 kJ mol(-1). PMID:26414950

  11. The novel panel assay to define tumor-associated antigen-binding antibodies in patients with metastatic melanomas may have diagnostic value.

    PubMed

    Kotlan, Beatrix; Liszkay, Gabriella; Blank, Miri; Csuka, Orsolya; Balatoni, Timea; Toth, Laszlo; Eles, Klara; Horvath, Szabolcs; Naszados, Gyorgy; Olasz, Judit; Banky, Balazs; Toth, Jozsef; Godeny, Maria; Marincola, Francesco M; Kasler, Miklos; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-02-01

    We aim to harness the natural humoral immune response by various technologies to get novel biomarkers. A complex antibody analysis in sera and in the tumor microenvironment leads to reveal tumor-specific antibodies. More strategies were introduced to select the most effective one to identify potential tumor antigen-binding capacity of the host. Epstein-Barr virus transformation and cloning with limiting dilution assay, magnetic cell sorting and antibody phage display with further methodological improvements were used in epithelial and neuroectodermal cancers. Column-purified sera of patient with melanoma were tested by immunofluorescence assay, while sera of further melanoma patients were processed for membrane-binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Some supernatants of selected B cell clones and purified antibodies showed considerable cancer cell binding capacity by immunofluorescence FACS analysis and confocal laser microscopy. Our native tumor cell membrane preparations helped to test soluble scFv and patients' sera for tumor binder antibodies. A complex tumor immunological study was introduced for patients with melanoma (ethical permission: ETT TUKEB 16462-02/2010); peripheral blood (n = 57) and surgically removed primary or metastatic tumors (n = 44) were gathered and processed at cellular immunological level. The technological developments proved to be important steps forward to the next antibody profile analyses at DNA sequence level. Cancer cell binding of patient-derived antibodies and natural immunoglobulin preparations of pooled plasma product intravenous immunoglobulins support the importance of natural human antibodies. Important cancer diagnostics and novel anticancer strategies are going to be built on these tools.

  12. Differences in electrostatic properties at antibody-antigen binding sites: implications for specificity and cross-reactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Neeti; Mohan, Srinivasan; Lipschultz, Claudia A; Smith-Gill, Sandra J

    2002-01-01

    Antibodies HyHEL8, HyHEL10, and HyHEL26 (HH8, HH10, and HH26, respectively) recognize highly overlapping epitopes on hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) with similar affinities, but with different specificities. HH8 binding to HEL is least sensitive toward mutations in the epitope and thus is most cross-reactive, HH26 is most sensitive, whereas the sensitivity of HH10 lies in between HH8 and HH26. Here we have investigated intra- and intermolecular interactions in three antibody-protein complexes: theoretical models of HH8-HEL and HH26-HEL complexes, and the x-ray crystal structure of HH10-HEL complex. Our results show that HH8-HEL has the lowest number and HH26-HEL has the highest number of intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The number of salt bridges is lowest in HH8-HEL and highest in HH26-HEL. The binding site salt bridges in HH8-HEL are not networked, and are weak, whereas, in HH26-HEL, an intramolecular salt-bridge triad at the binding site is networked to an intermolecular triad to form a pentad. The pentad and each salt bridge of this pentad are exceptionally stabilizing. The number of binding-site salt bridges and their strengths are intermediate in HH10-HEL, with an intramolecular triad. Our further calculations show that the electrostatic component contributes the most to binding energy of HH26-HEL, whereas the hydrophobic component contributes the most in the case of HH8-HEL. A "hot-spot" epitope residue Lys-97 forms an intermolecular salt bridge in HH8-HEL, and participates in the intermolecular pentad in the HH26-HEL complex. Mutant modeling and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies show that this hot-spot epitope residue contributes significantly more to the binding than an adjacent epitope residue, Lys-96, which does not form a salt bridge in any of the three HH-HEL complexes. Furthermore, the effect of mutating Lys-97 is most severe in HH26-HEL. Lys-96, being a charged residue, also contributes the most in HH26-HEL among the three complexes. The

  13. Ureaplasma parvum Serovar 3 Multiple Banded Antigen Size Variation after Chronic Intra-Amniotic Infection/Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James W.; Dando, Samantha J.; Nitsos, Ilias; Newnham, John; Polglase, Graeme R.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Pillow, J. Jane; Kramer, Boris W.; Jobe, Alan H.; Payton, Diane; Knox, Christine L.

    2013-01-01

    Ureaplasma species are the microorganisms most frequently associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The multiple banded antigen (MBA), a surface-exposed lipoprotein, is a key virulence factor of ureaplasmas. The MBA demonstrates size variation, which we have shown previously to be correlated with the severity of chorioamnion inflammation. We aimed to investigate U. parvum serovar 3 pathogenesis in vivo, using a sheep model, by investigating: MBA variation after long term (chronic) and short term (acute) durations of in utero ureaplasma infections, and the severity of chorioamnionitis and inflammation in other fetal tissues. Inocula of 2×107 colony-forming-units (CFU) of U. parvum serovar 3 (Up) or media controls (C) were injected intra-amniotically into pregnant ewes at one of three time points: day 55 (69d Up, n = 8; C69, n = 4); day 117 (7d Up, n = 8; C7, n = 2); and day 121 (3d Up, n = 8; C3, n = 2) of gestation (term = 145–150d). At day 124, preterm fetuses were delivered surgically. Samples of chorioamnion, fetal lung, and umbilical cord were: (i) snap frozen for subsequent ureaplasma culture, and (ii) fixed, embedded, sectioned and stained by haematoxylin and eosin stain for histological analysis. Selected fetal lung clinical ureaplasma isolates were cloned and filtered to obtain cultures from a single CFU. Passage 1 and clone 2 ureaplasma cultures were tested by western blot to demonstrate MBA variation. In acute durations of ureaplasma infection no MBA variants (3d Up) or very few MBA variants (7d Up) were present when compared to the original inoculum. However, numerous MBA size variants were generated in vivo (alike within contiguous tissues, amniotic fluid and fetal lung, but different variants were present within chorioamnion), during chronic, 69d exposure to ureaplasma infection. For the first time we have shown that the degree of ureaplasma MBA variation in vivo increased with the duration of gestation. PMID:23638142

  14. Antibodies That Efficiently Form Hexamers upon Antigen Binding Can Induce Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity under Complement-Limiting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Erika M.; Lindorfer, Margaret A.; van der Horst, Hilma; Oostindie, Simone; Beurskens, Frank J.; Schuurman, Janine; Zent, Clive S.; Burack, Richard; Parren, Paul W. H. I.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that IgG Abs can organize into ordered hexamers after binding their cognate Ags expressed on cell surfaces. This process is dependent on Fc:Fc interactions, which promote C1q binding, the first step in classical pathway complement activation. We went on to engineer point mutations that stimulated IgG hexamer formation and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). The hexamer formation–enhanced (HexaBody) CD20 and CD38 mAbs support faster, more robust CDC than their wild-type counterparts. To further investigate the CDC potential of these mAbs, we used flow cytometry, high-resolution digital imaging, and four-color confocal microscopy to examine their activity against B cell lines and primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in sera depleted of single complement components. We also examined the CDC activity of alemtuzumab (anti-CD52) and mAb W6/32 (anti-HLA), which bind at high density to cells and promote substantial complement activation. Although we observed little CDC for mAb-opsonized cells reacted with sera depleted of early complement components, we were surprised to discover that the Hexabody mAbs, as well as ALM and W6/32, were all quite effective at promoting CDC in sera depleted of individual complement components C6 to C9. However, neutralization studies conducted with an anti-C9 mAb verified that C9 is required for CDC activity against cell lines. These highly effective complement-activating mAbs efficiently focus activated complement components on the cell, including C3b and C9, and promote CDC with a very low threshold of MAC binding, thus providing additional insight into their enhanced efficacy in promoting CDC. PMID:27474078

  15. Binding and segmentation of multiple objects through neural oscillators inhibited by contour information.

    PubMed

    Ursino, Mauro; La Cara, Giuseppe-Emiliano; Sarti, Alessandro

    2003-07-01

    Temporal correlation of neuronal activity has been suggested as a criterion for multiple object recognition. In this work, a two-dimensional network of simplified Wilson-Cowan oscillators is used to manage the binding and segmentation problem of a visual scene according to the connectedness Gestalt criterion. Binding is achieved via original coupling terms that link excitatory units to both excitatory and inhibitory units of adjacent neurons. These local coupling terms are time independent, i.e., they do not require Hebbian learning during the simulations. Segmentation is realized by a two-layer processing of the visual image. The first layer extracts all object contours from the image by means of "retinal cells" with an "on-center" receptive field. Information on contour is used to selectively inhibit Wilson-Cowan oscillators in the second layer, thus realizing a strong separation among neurons in different objects. Accidental synchronism between oscillations in different objects is prevented with the use of a global inhibitor, i.e., a global neuron that computes the overall activity in the Wilson-Cowan network and sends back an inhibitory signal. Simulations performed in a 50 x 50 neural grid with 21 different visual scenes (containing up to eight objects + background) with random initial conditions demonstrate that the network can correctly segment objects in almost 100% of cases using a single set of parameters, i.e., without the need to adjust parameters from one visual scene to the next. The network is robust with reference to dynamical noise superimposed on oscillatory neurons. Moreover, the network can segment both black objects on white background and vice versa and is able to deal with the problem of "fragmentation."The main limitation of the network is its sensitivity to static noise superimposed on the objects. Overcoming this problem requires implementation of more robust mechanisms for contour enhancement in the first layer in agreement with

  16. Polyphosphates form antigenic complexes with platelet factor 4 (PF4) and enhance PF4-binding to bacteria.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Sven; Krauel, Krystin; Jaax, Miriam; Renné, Thomas; Helm, Christiane A; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Delcea, Mihaela; Greinacher, Andreas

    2015-11-25

    Short chain polyphosphates (polyP) are pro-coagulant and pro-inflammatory platelet released inorganic polymers. The platelet chemokine platelet factor 4 (PF4) binds to lipid A on bacteria, inducing an antibody mediated host defense mechanism, which can be misdirected against PF4/heparin complexes leading to the adverse drug reaction heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Here, we demonstrate that PF4 complex formation with soluble short chain polyP contributes to host defense mechanisms. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that PF4 changed its structure upon binding to polyP in a similar way as seen in PF4/heparin complexes. Consequently, PF4/polyP complexes exposed neoepitopes to which human anti-PF4/heparin antibodies bound. PolyP enhanced binding of PF4 to Escherichia coli, hereby facilitating bacterial opsonisation and, in the presence of human anti-PF4/polyanion antibodies, phagocytosis. Our study indicates a role of polyP in enhancing PF4-mediated defense mechanisms of innate immunity.

  17. Post-transcriptional regulation of programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) mRNA by the RNA-binding proteins human antigen R (HuR) and T-cell intracellular antigen 1 (TIA1).

    PubMed

    Wigington, Callie P; Jung, Jeenah; Rye, Emily A; Belauret, Sara L; Philpot, Akahne M; Feng, Yue; Santangelo, Philip J; Corbett, Anita H

    2015-02-01

    Post-transcriptional processing of mRNA transcripts plays a critical role in establishing the gene expression profile of a cell. Such processing events are mediated by a host of factors, including RNA-binding proteins and microRNAs. A number of critical cellular pathways are subject to regulation at multiple levels that allow fine-tuning of key biological responses. Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) is a tumor suppressor and an important modulator of mRNA translation that is regulated by a number of mechanisms, most notably as a target of the oncomiR, miR-21. Here, we provide evidence for post-transcriptional regulation of PDCD4 by the RNA-binding proteins, HuR and TIA1. Complementary approaches reveal binding of both HuR and TIA1 to the PDCD4 transcript. Consistent with a model where RNA-binding proteins modulate the PDCD4 transcript, knockdown of HuR and/or TIA1 results in a significant decrease in steady-state PDCD4 mRNA and protein levels. However, fractionation experiments suggest that the mode of regulation of the PDCD4 transcript likely differs in the cytoplasm and the nucleus as the pool of PDCD4 mRNA present in the cytoplasm is more stable than the nuclear pool of PDCD4 transcript. We observe a competitive mode of binding between HuR and TIA1 on the PDCD4 transcript in the cytoplasm, suggesting that these two factors dynamically interact with one another as well as the PDCD4 transcript to maintain tight control of PDCD4 levels. Overall, this study reveals an additional set of regulatory interactions that modulate the expression of PDCD4, a key pro-apoptotic factor, and also reveals new insights into how HuR and TIA1 functions are integrated to achieve such regulation.

  18. Thermoregulation of Meningococcal fHbp, an Important Virulence Factor and Vaccine Antigen, Is Mediated by Anti-ribosomal Binding Site Sequences in the Open Reading Frame

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Edmund; Lavender, Hayley; Tan, Felicia; Tracy, Alexander; Tang, Christoph M.

    2016-01-01

    During colonisation of the upper respiratory tract, bacteria are exposed to gradients of temperatures. Neisseria meningitidis is often present in the nasopharynx of healthy individuals, yet can occasionally cause severe disseminated disease. The meningococcus can evade the human complement system using a range of strategies that include recruitment of the negative complement regulator, factor H (CFH) via factor H binding protein (fHbp). We have shown previously that fHbp levels are influenced by the ambient temperature, with more fHbp produced at higher temperatures (i.e. at 37°C compared with 30°C). Here we further characterise the mechanisms underlying thermoregulation of fHbp, which occurs gradually over a physiologically relevant range of temperatures. We show that fHbp thermoregulation is not dependent on the promoters governing transcription of the bi- or mono-cistronic fHbp mRNA, or on meningococcal specific transcription factors. Instead, fHbp thermoregulation requires sequences located in the translated region of the mono-cistronic fHbp mRNA. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that two anti-ribosomal binding sequences within the coding region of the fHbp transcript are involved in fHbp thermoregulation. Our results shed further light on mechanisms underlying the control of the production of this important virulence factor and vaccine antigen. PMID:27560142

  19. Isolation of a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the origin binding domain of JCV, but not SV40, large T-antigen.

    PubMed

    Grubman, Shelley A; Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J; Gong, Aaron; Can, Hande; Dilworth, Ryan; Kini, Sandeep Kuntadi; Gagnon, David; Archambault, Jacques; Meinke, Gretchen; Bohm, Andrew; Jefferson, Douglas M; Bullock, Peter A

    2016-10-01

    Within immunocompromised populations, the JC polyomavirus is the cause of the often-fatal disease Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML). JC virus encodes a protein, termed T-antigen (T-ag), which is essential for its replication and pathogenicity. Previous studies of JCV T-ag have, in general, used antibodies raised against SV40 T-ag. Unfortunately, SV40 T-ag is also detected in humans and therefore there have been concerns about cross-reactivity. To address this issue, we have isolated a monoclonal antibody that binds to the JCV, but not the SV40, T-ag origin-binding domain (OBD). Furthermore, the region on the surface of the JCV T-ag OBD that is recognized by the "anti-JCV OBD mAb" has been mapped. We also demonstrate that the "anti-JCV OBD mAb" will be a useful reagent for standard techniques (e.g., Westerns blots and ELISAs). Finally, we note that additional monoclonal Abs that are specific for the T-ags encoded by the other human polyomaviruses could be generated by adopting the approach described herein. PMID:27433780

  20. Increased Goodpasture Antigen-Binding Protein Expression Induces Type IV Collagen Disorganization and Deposit of Immunoglobulin A in Glomerular Basement Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Revert, Fernando; Merino, Ramón; Monteagudo, Carlos; Macias, Jesús; Peydró, Amando; Alcácer, Javier; Muniesa, Pedro; Marquina, Regina; Blanco, Mario; Iglesias, Marcos; Revert-Ros, Francisco; Merino, Jesús; Saus, Juan

    2007-01-01

    Increased expression of Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP), a protein that binds and phosphorylates basement membrane collagen, has been associated with immune complex-mediated pathogenesis. However, recent reports have questioned this biological function and proposed that GPBP serves as a cytosolic ceramide transporter (CERTL). Thus, the role of GPBP in vivo remains unknown. New Zealand White (NZW) mice are considered healthy animals although they convey a genetic predisposition for immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. Here we show that NZW mice developed age-dependent lupus-prone autoimmune response and immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis characterized by elevated GPBP, glomerular basement membrane (GBM) collagen disorganization and expansion, and deposits of IgA on disrupted GBM. Transgenic overexpression of human GPBP (hGPBP) in non-lupus-prone mice triggered similar glomerular abnormalities including deposits of IgA on a capillary GBM that underwent dissociation, in the absence of an evident autoimmune response. We provide in vivo evidence that GPBP regulates GBM collagen organization and its elevated expression causes dissociation and subsequent accumulation of IgA on the GBM. Finally, we describe a previously unrecognized pathogenic mechanism that may be relevant in human primary immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. PMID:17916599

  1. Crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment of a monoclonal antibody specific for the multidrug-resistance-linked ABC transporter human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Esser, Lothar; Shukla, Suneet; Zhou, Fei; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Xia, Di

    2016-08-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a polyspecific ATP-dependent transporter linked to multidrug resistance in cancers that plays important roles in the pharmacokinetics of a large number of drugs. The drug-resistance phenotype of P-gp can be modulated by the monoclonal antibody UIC2, which specifically recognizes human P-gp in a conformation-dependent manner. Here, the purification, sequence determination and high-resolution structure of the Fab fragment of UIC2 (UIC2/Fab) are reported. Purified UIC2/Fab binds human P-gp with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Crystals of UIC2/Fab are triclinic (space group P1), with unit-cell parameters a = 40.67, b = 44.91, c = 58.09 Å, α = 97.62, β = 99.10, γ = 94.09°, and diffracted X-rays to 1.6 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement and refined to 1.65 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of UIC2/Fab, which exhibits a positively charged antigen-binding surface, suggesting that it might recognize an oppositely charged extracellular epitope of P-gp.

  2. Thermoregulation of Meningococcal fHbp, an Important Virulence Factor and Vaccine Antigen, Is Mediated by Anti-ribosomal Binding Site Sequences in the Open Reading Frame.

    PubMed

    Loh, Edmund; Lavender, Hayley; Tan, Felicia; Tracy, Alexander; Tang, Christoph M

    2016-08-01

    During colonisation of the upper respiratory tract, bacteria are exposed to gradients of temperatures. Neisseria meningitidis is often present in the nasopharynx of healthy individuals, yet can occasionally cause severe disseminated disease. The meningococcus can evade the human complement system using a range of strategies that include recruitment of the negative complement regulator, factor H (CFH) via factor H binding protein (fHbp). We have shown previously that fHbp levels are influenced by the ambient temperature, with more fHbp produced at higher temperatures (i.e. at 37°C compared with 30°C). Here we further characterise the mechanisms underlying thermoregulation of fHbp, which occurs gradually over a physiologically relevant range of temperatures. We show that fHbp thermoregulation is not dependent on the promoters governing transcription of the bi- or mono-cistronic fHbp mRNA, or on meningococcal specific transcription factors. Instead, fHbp thermoregulation requires sequences located in the translated region of the mono-cistronic fHbp mRNA. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that two anti-ribosomal binding sequences within the coding region of the fHbp transcript are involved in fHbp thermoregulation. Our results shed further light on mechanisms underlying the control of the production of this important virulence factor and vaccine antigen. PMID:27560142

  3. High-resolution, three-dimensional modeling of human leukocyte antigen class I structure and surface electrostatic potential reveals the molecular basis for alloantibody binding epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilis; Dafforn, Timothy R; Chaudhry, Afzal N; Halsall, David J; Bradley, J Andrew; Taylor, Craig J

    2011-11-01

    The potential of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) to stimulate humoral alloimmunity depends on the orientation, accessibility and physiochemical properties of polymorphic amino acids. We have generated high-resolution structural and physiochemical models of all common HLA class I alleles and analyzed the impact of amino acid polymorphisms on surface electrostatic potential. Atomic resolution three-dimensional structural models of HLA class I molecules were generated using the MODELLER computer algorithm. The molecular surface electrostatic potential was calculated using the DelPhi program. To confirm that electrostatic surface topography reflects known HLA B cell epitopes, we examined Bw4 and Bw6 and ascertained the impact of amino acid polymorphisms on their tertiary and physiochemical composition. The HLA protein structures generated performed well when subjected to stereochemical and energy-based testing for structural integrity. The electrostatic pattern and conformation of Bw4 and Bw6 epitopes are maintained among HLA molecules even when expressed in a different structural context. Importantly, variation in epitope amino acid composition does not always translate into a different electrostatic motif, providing an explanation for serologic cross-reactivity. Mutations of critical amino acids that abrogate antibody binding also induce distinct changes in epitope electrostatic properties. In conclusion, high-resolution structural modeling provides a physiochemical explanation for serologic patterns of antibody binding and provides novel insights into HLA immunogenicity. PMID:21840357

  4. Correlation of CD2 binding and functional properties of multimeric and monomeric lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3.

    PubMed

    Dustin, M L; Olive, D; Springer, T A

    1989-02-01

    LFA-3 was purified with an intact (mLFA-3) or an enzymatically removed membrane-anchoring domain (sLFA-3). Gel filtration and sucrose gradient sedimentation showed sLFA-3 to be a single highly glycosylated polypeptide chain in solution, while mLFA-3 formed micelles of 8 LFA-3 monomers. 125I-mLFA-3 bound to Jurkat T leukemic cell surface CD2 with much higher avidity than sLFA-3. mLFA-3 binding had characteristics of a multivalent interaction with cell surface CD2 and had an avidity of 1.5 nM for Jurkat cells and 12 nM for resting T cells. Two CD2 mAbs tested did not block mLFA-3 binding: 9-1 and CD2.1. These mAbs were tested in combination with LFA-3 for their ability to activate T cells. The combination of mLFA-3 and CD2.1 mAbs induced a rapid increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ in Jurkat cells which was proportional to mLFA-3 occupation of CD2 sites. sLFA-3 showed no activity in the Ca2+ flux assay. The combination of mLFA-3 and the CD2.1 mAbs significantly stimulated proliferation of PBMC. The combination of mLFA-3 and 9-1 mAbs was weakly or not mitogenic for the same cells. The combination of CD2.1 and sLFA-3 at concentrations up to 480 nM was not consistently mitogenic. Therefore, monomeric LFA-3/CD2 interaction appears to have a relatively low affinity, while multimeric LFA-3 binds with high avidity. T cell activation by binding of LFA-3 to CD2 appears to require occupation of 10(4) to 10(5) CD2 sites, which is likely to occur during adhesion, but is rare in receptor systems with soluble ligands. PMID:2463330

  5. Biological bottom-up assembly of antibody nanotubes on patterned antigen arrays.

    PubMed

    Nuraje, Nurxat; Banerjee, Ipsita A; MacCuspie, Robert I; Yu, Lingtao; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2004-07-01

    Application of biotechnology in nanofabrication has an advantage to produce functional building-block materials that may not have synthetic counterparts. Here we introduced a new type of building block, antibody nanotubes, and demonstrated anchoring them on complementary antigen arrays via antibody-antigen recognition. Biological recognition between the antibody nanotubes and the antigen arrays permitted recognition-driven assembly of ordered nanotube arrays. The array of antigens was written by using the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) on alkylthiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-coated Au substrates via nanografting. After antigens were immobilized onto the shaved regions of the alkylthiol SAMs with the AFM tip, antibody nanotubes, produced by incubating antibodies in template nanotube solutions, were selectively attached onto the antigen regions. This technique is very useful when multiple building blocks are necessary to address specific locations on substrates because simultaneous immobilization of multiple antibody nanotubes at specific complementary binding positions can be achieved in a single process.

  6. Structural relaxation and nonexponential kinetics of CO-binding to horse myoglobin. Multiple flash photolysis experiments.

    PubMed

    Post, F; Doster, W; Karvounis, G; Settles, M

    1993-06-01

    The geminate recombination kinetics of CO-myoglobin strongly deviates from single exponential behavior in contrast to what is expected for unimolecular reactions (1). At low temperatures, this result was attributed to slowly exchanging conformational states which differ substantially in barrier height for ligand binding. Above 160 K the kinetics apparently slow down with temperature increase. Agmon and Hopfield (2) explain this result in terms of structural relaxation perpendicular to the reaction coordinate, which enhances the activation energy. In their model, structural relaxation homogenizes the kinetic response. Recently, Steinbach et al. (3) proposed a relaxation model which conserves the kinetic inhomogeneity. Below we test these conjectures by single and multiple excitation experiments. This method allows for discrimination between parallel (inhomogeneous) and sequential (homogeneous) kinetic schemes. The kinetic anomaly above 160 K is shown to result from a homogeneous, structurally relaxed intermediate. However a second anomaly is found above 210 K concerning the inhomogeneous phase which may indicate either a shift in activation energy or entropy.

  7. Abnormal IGF-Binding Protein Profile in the Bone Marrow of Multiple Myeloma Patients.

    PubMed

    Bieghs, Liesbeth; Brohus, Malene; Kristensen, Ida B; Abildgaard, Niels; Bøgsted, Martin; Johnsen, Hans E; Conover, Cheryl A; De Bruyne, Elke; Vanderkerken, Karin; Overgaard, Michael T; Nyegaard, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signalling plays a key role in homing, progression, and treatment resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). In the extracellular environment, the majority of IGF molecules are bound to one of six IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP1-6), leaving a minor fraction of total IGF free and accessible for receptor activation. In MM, high IGF-receptor type 1 expression levels correlate with a poor prognosis, but the status and role of IGF and IGFBPs in the pathobiology of MM is unknown. Here we measured total IGF1, IGF2, and intact IGFBP levels in blood and bone marrow samples from MM (n = 17), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) (n = 37), and control individuals (n = 15), using ELISA (IGFs) and 125I-IGF1 Western Ligand Blotting (IGFBPs). MGUS and MM patients displayed a significant increase in intact IGFBP-2 (2.5-3.8 fold) and decrease in intact IGFBP-3 (0.6-0.5 fold) in the circulation compared to control individuals. Further, IGFBP-2 as well as total IGFBP levels were significantly lower in bone marrow compared to circulation in MM and MGUS only, whereas IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP-3 were equally distributed between the two compartments. In conclusion, the profound change in IGFBP profile strongly suggests an increased IGF bioavailability in the bone marrow microenvironment in MGUS and MM, despite no change in growth factor concentration. PMID:27111220

  8. Abnormal IGF-Binding Protein Profile in the Bone Marrow of Multiple Myeloma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bieghs, Liesbeth; Brohus, Malene; Kristensen, Ida B.; Abildgaard, Niels; Bøgsted, Martin; Johnsen, Hans E.; Conover, Cheryl A.; De Bruyne, Elke; Vanderkerken, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signalling plays a key role in homing, progression, and treatment resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). In the extracellular environment, the majority of IGF molecules are bound to one of six IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP1-6), leaving a minor fraction of total IGF free and accessible for receptor activation. In MM, high IGF-receptor type 1 expression levels correlate with a poor prognosis, but the status and role of IGF and IGFBPs in the pathobiology of MM is unknown. Here we measured total IGF1, IGF2, and intact IGFBP levels in blood and bone marrow samples from MM (n = 17), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) (n = 37), and control individuals (n = 15), using ELISA (IGFs) and 125I-IGF1 Western Ligand Blotting (IGFBPs). MGUS and MM patients displayed a significant increase in intact IGFBP-2 (2.5–3.8 fold) and decrease in intact IGFBP-3 (0.6–0.5 fold) in the circulation compared to control individuals. Further, IGFBP-2 as well as total IGFBP levels were significantly lower in bone marrow compared to circulation in MM and MGUS only, whereas IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP-3 were equally distributed between the two compartments. In conclusion, the profound change in IGFBP profile strongly suggests an increased IGF bioavailability in the bone marrow microenvironment in MGUS and MM, despite no change in growth factor concentration. PMID:27111220

  9. Saturated fatty acids induce post-transcriptional regulation of HAMP mRNA via AU-rich element-binding protein, human antigen R (HuR).

    PubMed

    Lu, Sizhao; Mott, Justin L; Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee

    2015-10-01

    Iron is implicated in fatty liver disease pathogenesis. The human hepcidin gene, HAMP, is the master switch of iron metabolism. The aim of this study is to investigate the regulation of HAMP expression by fatty acids in HepG2 cells. For these studies, both saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid (PA) and stearic acid (SA)) and unsaturated fatty acid (oleic acid (OA)) were used. PA and, to a lesser extent, SA, but not OA, up-regulated HAMP mRNA levels, as determined by real-time PCR. To understand whether PA regulates HAMP mRNA at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level, the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D was employed. PA-mediated induction of HAMP mRNA expression was not blocked by actinomycin D. Furthermore, PA activated HAMP 3'-UTR, but not promoter, activity, as shown by reporter assays. HAMP 3'-UTR harbors a single AU-rich element (ARE). Mutation of this ARE abolished the effect of PA, suggesting the involvement of ARE-binding proteins. The ARE-binding protein human antigen R (HuR) stabilizes mRNA through direct interaction with AREs on 3'-UTR. HuR is regulated by phosphorylation-mediated nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling. PA activated this process. The binding of HuR to HAMP mRNA was also induced by PA in HepG2 cells. Silencing of HuR by siRNA abolished PA-mediated up-regulation of HAMP mRNA levels. PKC is known to phosphorylate HuR. Staurosporine, a broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor, inhibited both PA-mediated translocation of HuR and induction of HAMP expression. Similarly, rottlerin, a novel class PKC inhibitor, abrogated PA-mediated up-regulation of HAMP expression. In conclusion, lipids mediate post-transcriptional regulation of HAMP throughPKC- and HuR-dependent mechanisms. PMID:26304124

  10. Saturated fatty acids induce post-transcriptional regulation of HAMP mRNA via AU-rich element-binding protein, human antigen R (HuR).

    PubMed

    Lu, Sizhao; Mott, Justin L; Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee

    2015-10-01

    Iron is implicated in fatty liver disease pathogenesis. The human hepcidin gene, HAMP, is the master switch of iron metabolism. The aim of this study is to investigate the regulation of HAMP expression by fatty acids in HepG2 cells. For these studies, both saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid (PA) and stearic acid (SA)) and unsaturated fatty acid (oleic acid (OA)) were used. PA and, to a lesser extent, SA, but not OA, up-regulated HAMP mRNA levels, as determined by real-time PCR. To understand whether PA regulates HAMP mRNA at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level, the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D was employed. PA-mediated induction of HAMP mRNA expression was not blocked by actinomycin D. Furthermore, PA activated HAMP 3'-UTR, but not promoter, activity, as shown by reporter assays. HAMP 3'-UTR harbors a single AU-rich element (ARE). Mutation of this ARE abolished the effect of PA, suggesting the involvement of ARE-binding proteins. The ARE-binding protein human antigen R (HuR) stabilizes mRNA through direct interaction with AREs on 3'-UTR. HuR is regulated by phosphorylation-mediated nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling. PA activated this process. The binding of HuR to HAMP mRNA was also induced by PA in HepG2 cells. Silencing of HuR by siRNA abolished PA-mediated up-regulation of HAMP mRNA levels. PKC is known to phosphorylate HuR. Staurosporine, a broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor, inhibited both PA-mediated translocation of HuR and induction of HAMP expression. Similarly, rottlerin, a novel class PKC inhibitor, abrogated PA-mediated up-regulation of HAMP expression. In conclusion, lipids mediate post-transcriptional regulation of HAMP throughPKC- and HuR-dependent mechanisms.

  11. The PD-1/PD-L1 complex resembles the antigen-binding Fv domains of antibodies and T cell receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, David Yin-wei; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Iwasaki, Masashi; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Su, Hua-Poo; Mikami, Bunzo; Okazaki, Taku; Honjo, Tasuku; Minato, Nagahiro; Garboczi, David N.

    2008-07-29

    Signaling through the programmed death 1 (PD-1) inhibitory receptor upon binding its ligand, PD-L1, suppresses immune responses against autoantigens and tumors and plays an important role in the maintenance of peripheral immune tolerance. Release from PD-1 inhibitory signaling revives 'exhausted' virus-specific T cells in chronic viral infections. Here we present the crystal structure of murine PD-1 in complex with human PD-L1. PD-1 and PD-L1 interact through the conserved front and side of their Ig variable (IgV) domains, as do the IgV domains of antibodies and T cell receptors. This places the loops at the ends of the IgV domains on the same side of the PD-1/PD-L1 complex, forming a surface that is similar to the antigen-binding surface of antibodies and T cell receptors. Mapping conserved residues allowed the identification of residues that are important in forming the PD-1/PD-L1 interface. Based on the structure, we show that some reported loss-of-binding mutations involve the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction but that others compromise protein folding. The PD-1/PD-L1 interaction described here may be blocked by antibodies or by designed small-molecule drugs to lower inhibitory signaling that results in a stronger immune response. The immune receptor-like loops offer a new surface for further study and potentially the design of molecules that would affect PD-1/PD-L1 complex formation and thereby modulate the immune response.

  12. EGCG debilitates the persistence of EBV latency by reducing the DNA binding potency of nuclear antigen 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ya-Lin; Tsai, Hsing-Lyn; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two cell-based reporter platforms were established for screening of EBNA1 inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG acts as an inhibitor to block EBNA1 binding with the cognate oriP sequence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG debilitates EBNA1-dependent transcription enhancement and episome maintenance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG impairs persistence of EBV latency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG is a potent anti-EBV agent for targeting the latent cascade of EBV. -- Abstract: Because the expression of EBNA1 is prevalent in all EBV-associated tumors, it has become one of the most attractive drug targets for the discovery of anti-EBV compounds. In a cell-based reporter system, EBNA1 consistently upregulated the transcription of an oriP-Luc mini-EBV episome by 6- to 8-fold. The treatment of cells with 50 {mu}M EGCG effectively blocked the binding of EBNA1 to oriP-DNA both in vivo and in vitro, which led to the abrogation of EBNA1-dependent episome maintenance and transcriptional enhancement. Importantly, the anti-EBNA1 effects caused by EGCG ultimately impaired the persistence of EBV latent infection. Our data suggest that the inhibition of EBNA1 activity by EGCG could be a promising starting point for the development of new protocols for anti-EBV therapy.

  13. The MF6p/FhHDM-1 Major Antigen Secreted by the Trematode Parasite Fasciola hepatica Is a Heme-binding Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sernández, Victoria; Mezo, Mercedes; González-Warleta, Marta; Perteguer, María J.; Muiño, Laura; Guitián, Esteban; Gárate, Teresa; Ubeira, Florencio M.

    2014-01-01

    Blood-feeding parasites have developed biochemical mechanisms to control heme intake and detoxification. Here we show that a major antigen secreted by Fasciola hepatica, previously reported as MF6p, of unknown function (gb|CCA61804.1), and as FhHDM-1, considered to be a helminth defense molecule belonging to the family of cathelicidin-like proteins (gb|ADZ24001.1), is in fact a heme-binding protein. The heme-binding nature of the MF6p/FhHDM-1 protein was revealed in two independent experiments: (i) immunopurification of the secreted protein·heme complexes with mAb MF6 and subsequent analysis by C8 reversed-phase HPLC and MS/MS spectrometry and (ii) analysis of the binding ability of the synthetic protein to hemin in vitro. By immunohistochemistry analysis, we have observed that MF6p/FhHDM-1 is produced by parenchymal cells and transported to other tissues (e.g. vitellaria and testis). Interestingly, MF6p/FhHDM-1 is absent both in the intestinal cells and in the lumen of cecum, but it can be released through the tegumental surface to the external medium, where it binds to free heme molecules regurgitated by the parasite after hemoglobin digestion. Proteins that are close analogs of the Fasciola MF6p/FhHDM-1 are present in other trematodes, including Clonorchis, Opistorchis, Paragonimus, Schistosoma, and Dicrocoelium. Using UV-visible spectroscopy and immunoprecipitation techniques, we observed that synthetic MF6p/FhHDM-1 binds to hemin with 1:1 stoichiometry and an apparent Kd of 1.14 × 10−6 m−1. We also demonstrated that formation of synthetic MF6p/FhHDM-1·hemin complexes inhibited hemin degradation by hydrogen peroxide and hemin peroxidase-like activity in vitro. Our results suggest that MF6p/FhHDM-1 may be involved in heme homeostasis in trematodes. PMID:24280214

  14. Nonspecific recognition is achieved in Pot1pC through the use of multiple binding modes.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Thayne H; McKercher, Marissa A; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2013-01-01

    Pot1 is the protein responsible for binding to and protecting the 3' single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) overhang at most eukaryotic telomeres. Here, we present the crystal structure of one of the two oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding folds (Pot1pC) that make up the ssDNA-binding domain in S. pombe Pot1. Comparison with the homologous human domain reveals unexpected structural divergence in the mode of ligand binding that explains the differing ligand requirements between species. Despite the presence of apparently base-specific hydrogen bonds, Pot1pC is able to bind a wide range of ssDNA sequences with thermodynamic equivalence. To address how Pot1pC binds ssDNA with little to no specificity, multiple structures of Pot1pC bound to noncognate ssDNA ligands were solved. These structures reveal that this promiscuity is implemented through new binding modes that thermodynamically compensate for base-substitutions through alternate stacking interactions and new H-bonding networks.

  15. Multiple sup 3 H-oxytocin binding sites in rat myometrial plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Crankshaw, D.; Gaspar, V.; Pliska, V. )

    1990-01-01

    The affinity spectrum method has been used to analyse binding isotherms for {sup 3}H-oxytocin to rat myometrial plasma membranes. Three populations of binding sites with dissociation constants (Kd) of 0.6-1.5 x 10(-9), 0.4-1.0 x 10(-7) and 7 x 10(-6) mol/l were identified and their existence verified by cluster analysis based on similarities between Kd, binding capacity and Hill coefficient. When experimental values were compared to theoretical curves constructed using the estimated binding parameters, good fits were obtained. Binding parameters obtained by this method were not influenced by the presence of GTP gamma S (guanosine-5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate) in the incubation medium. The binding parameters agree reasonably well with those found in uterine cells, they support the existence of a medium affinity site and may allow for an explanation of some of the discrepancies between binding and response in this system.

  16. Prediction of altered 3'- UTR miRNA-binding sites from RNA-Seq data: the swine leukocyte antigen complex (SLA) as a model region.

    PubMed

    Endale Ahanda, Marie-Laure; Fritz, Eric R; Estellé, Jordi; Hu, Zhi-Liang; Madsen, Ole; Groenen, Martien A M; Beraldi, Dario; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Hume, David A; Rowland, Robert R R; Lunney, Joan K; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire; Reecy, James M; Giuffra, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    THE SLA (swine leukocyte antigen, MHC: SLA) genes are the most important determinants of immune, infectious disease and vaccine response in pigs; several genetic associations with immunity and swine production traits have been reported. However, most of the current knowledge on SLA is limited to gene coding regions. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small molecules that post-transcriptionally regulate the expression of a large number of protein-coding genes in metazoans, and are suggested to play important roles in fine-tuning immune mechanisms and disease responses. Polymorphisms in either miRNAs or their gene targets may have a significant impact on gene expression by abolishing, weakening or creating miRNA target sites, possibly leading to phenotypic variation. We explored the impact of variants in the 3'-UTR miRNA target sites of genes within the whole SLA region. The combined predictions by TargetScan, PACMIT and TargetSpy, based on different biological parameters, empowered the identification of miRNA target sites and the discovery of polymorphic miRNA target sites (poly-miRTSs). Predictions for three SLA genes characterized by a different range of sequence variation provided proof of principle for the analysis of poly-miRTSs from a total of 144 M RNA-Seq reads collected from different porcine tissues. Twenty-four novel SNPs were predicted to affect miRNA-binding sites in 19 genes of the SLA region. Seven of these genes (SLA-1, SLA-6, SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1, SLA-DOA, SLA-DOB and TAP1) are linked to antigen processing and presentation functions, which is reminiscent of associations with disease traits reported for altered miRNA binding to MHC genes in humans. An inverse correlation in expression levels was demonstrated between miRNAs and co-expressed SLA targets by exploiting a published dataset (RNA-Seq and small RNA-Seq) of three porcine tissues. Our results support the resource value of RNA-Seq collections to identify SNPs that may lead to altered miRNA regulation patterns.

  17. Waves of Retrotransposon Expansion Remodel Genome Organization and CTCF Binding in Multiple Mammalian Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Dominic; Schwalie, Petra C.; Wilson, Michael D.; Ballester, Benoit; Gonçalves, Ângela; Kutter, Claudia; Brown, Gordon D.; Marshall, Aileen; Flicek, Paul; Odom, Duncan T.

    2012-01-01

    Summary CTCF-binding locations represent regulatory sequences that are highly constrained over the course of evolution. To gain insight into how these DNA elements are conserved and spread through the genome, we defined the full spectrum of CTCF-binding sites, including a 33/34-mer motif, and identified over five thousand highly conserved, robust, and tissue-independent CTCF-binding locations by comparing ChIP-seq data from six mammals. Our data indicate that activation of retroelements has produced species-specific expansions of CTCF binding in rodents, dogs, and opossum, which often functionally serve as chromatin and transcriptional insulators. We discovered fossilized repeat elements flanking deeply conserved CTCF-binding regions, indicating that similar retrotransposon expansions occurred hundreds of millions of years ago. Repeat-driven dispersal of CTCF binding is a fundamental, ancient, and still highly active mechanism of genome evolution in mammalian lineages. PaperClip PMID:22244452

  18. Non-specific recognition is achieved in Pot1pC through the use of multiple binding modes

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Thayne H.; McKercher, Marissa A.; Wuttke, Deborah S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pot1 is the protein responsible for binding to and protecting the 3’ single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) overhang at most eukaryotic telomeres. Here we present the crystal structure of one of the two OB-folds (Pot1pC) that make up the ssDNA-binding domain in S. pombe Pot1. Comparison with the homologous human domain reveals unexpected structural divergence in the mode of ligand binding that explains the differing ligand requirements between species. Despite the presence of apparently base-specific hydrogen bonds, Pot1pC is able to bind a wide range of ssDNA sequences with thermodynamic equivalence. To address how Pot1pC binds ssDNA with little to no specificity, multiple structures of Pot1pC bound to non-cognate ssDNA ligands were solved. These structures reveal that this promiscuity is implemented through new binding modes that thermodynamically compensate for base-substitutions through alternate stacking interactions and new H-bonding networks. PMID:23201273

  19. Binding site multiplicity with fatty acid ligands: implications for the regulation of PKR kinase autophosphorylation with palmitate.

    PubMed

    Fang, Liang; Cho, Hyun Ju; Chan, Christina; Feig, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Saturated long chain-free fatty acids (FFAs), especially palmitate, have been implicated in apoptosis by inhibiting the activity of PKR (double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase). We recently found evidence that palmitate interacts directly with the kinase domain of PKR, subsequently inhibiting the autophosphorylation of PKR. To investigate the interactions of palmitate with PKR and its effects on PKR autophosphorylation, we performed extensive unbiased MD simulations combined with biochemical and biophysical experiments. The simulations predict multiple putative binding sites of palmitate on both the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated PKR with similar binding affinities. Ligand-protein interactions involving a large variety of different binding modes challenge the conventional view of highly specific, single binding sites. Key interactions of palmitate involve the αC-helix of PKR, especially near residue R307. Experimental mutation of R307 was found to affect palmitate binding and reduce its inhibitory effect. Based on this study a new allosteric mechanism is proposed where palmitate binding to the αC-helix prevents the inactive-to-active transition of PKR and subsequently reduces its ability to autophosphorylate.

  20. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells and type 1 interferon promote peripheral expansion of forkhead box protein 3(+) regulatory T cells specific for the ubiquitous RNA-binding nuclear antigen La/Sjögren's syndrome (SS)-B.

    PubMed

    Pan, Z-J; Horton, C G; Lawrence, C; Farris, A D

    2016-10-01

    RNA-binding nuclear antigens are a major class of self-antigen to which immune tolerance is lost in rheumatic diseases. Serological tolerance to one such antigen, La/Sjögren's syndrome (SS)-B (La), is controlled by CD4(+) T cells. This study investigated peripheral tolerance to human La (hLa) by tracking the fate of hLa-specific CD4(+) T cells expressing the transgenic (Tg) 3B5.8 T cell receptor (TCR) after adoptive transfer into lymphocyte-replete recipient mice expressing hLa as a neo-self-antigen. After initial antigen-specific cell division, hLa-specific donor CD4(+) T cells expressed forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3). Donor cells retrieved from hLa Tg recipients displayed impaired proliferation and secreted interleukin (IL)-10 in vitro in response to antigenic stimulation. Transfer of highly purified FoxP3-negative donor cells demonstrated that accumulation of hLa-specific regulatory T cells (Treg ) was due primarily to expansion of small numbers of donor Treg . Depletion of recipient plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), but not B cells, severely hampered the accumulation of FoxP3(+) donor Treg in hLa Tg recipients. Recipient pDC expressed tolerogenic markers and higher levels of co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory molecules than B cells. Adoptive transfer of hLa peptide-loaded pDC into mice lacking expression of hLa recapitulated the accumulation of hLa-specific Treg . Blockade of the type 1 interferon (IFN) receptor in hLa Tg recipients of hLa-specific T cells impaired FoxP3(+) donor T cell accumulation. Therefore, peripheral expansion of Treg specific for an RNA-binding nuclear antigen is mediated by antigen-presenting pDC in a type 1 IFN-dependent manner. These results reveal a regulatory function of pDC in controlling autoreactivity to RNA-binding nuclear antigens.

  1. RALP1 Is a Rhoptry Neck Erythrocyte-Binding Protein of Plasmodium falciparum Merozoites and a Potential Blood-Stage Vaccine Candidate Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Tomoyuki; Miura, Kazutoyo; Yamasaki, Tsutomu; Arumugam, Thangavelu U.; Thongkukiatkul, Amporn; Takeo, Satoru; Takashima, Eizo; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Han, Eun-Taek; Long, Carole A.; Torii, Motomi

    2013-01-01

    Erythrocyte invasion by merozoites is an obligatory stage of Plasmodium infection and is essential to disease progression. Proteins in the apical organelles of merozoites mediate the invasion of erythrocytes and are potential malaria vaccine candidates. Rhoptry-associated, leucine zipper-like protein 1 (RALP1) of Plasmodium falciparum was previously found to be specifically expressed in schizont stages and localized to the rhoptries of merozoites by immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Also, RALP1 has been refractory to gene knockout attempts, suggesting that it is essential for blood-stage parasite survival. These characteristics suggest that RALP1 can be a potential blood-stage vaccine candidate antigen, and here we assessed its potential in this regard. Antibodies were raised against recombinant RALP1 proteins synthesized by using the wheat germ cell-free system. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated for the first time that RALP1 is a rhoptry neck protein of merozoites. Moreover, our IFA data showed that RALP1 translocates from the rhoptry neck to the moving junction during merozoite invasion. Growth and invasion inhibition assays revealed that anti-RALP1 antibodies inhibit the invasion of erythrocytes by merozoites. The findings that RALP1 possesses an erythrocyte-binding epitope in the C-terminal region and that anti-RALP1 antibodies disrupt tight-junction formation, are evidence that RALP1 plays an important role during merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. In addition, human sera collected from areas in Thailand and Mali where malaria is endemic recognized this protein. Overall, our findings indicate that RALP1 is a rhoptry neck erythrocyte-binding protein and that it qualifies as a potential blood-stage vaccine candidate. PMID:24002067

  2. The Severity of Chorioamnionitis in Pregnant Sheep Is Associated with In Vivo Variation of the Surface-Exposed Multiple-Banded Antigen/Gene of Ureaplasma parvum1

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Christine L.; Dando, Samantha J.; Nitsos, Ilias; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Jobe, Alan H.; Payton, Diane; Moss, Timothy J.M.; Newnham, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Ureaplasma species are the bacteria most frequently isolated from human amniotic fluid in asymptomatic pregnancies and placental infections. Ureaplasma parvum serovars 3 and 6 are the most prevalent serovars isolated from men and women. We hypothesized that the effects on the fetus and chorioamnion of chronic ureaplasma infection in amniotic fluid are dependent on the serovar, dose, and variation of the ureaplasma multiple-banded antigen (MBA) and mba gene. We injected high- or low-dose U. parvum serovar 3, serovar 6, or vehicle intra-amniotically into pregnant ewes at 55 days of gestation (term = 150 days) and examined the chorioamnion, amniotic fluid, and fetal lung tissue of animals delivered by cesarean section at 125 days of gestation. Variation of the multiple banded antigen/mba generated by serovar 3 and serovar 6 ureaplasmas in vivo were compared by PCR assay and Western blot. Ureaplasma inoculums demonstrated only one (serovar 3) or two (serovar 6) MBA variants in vitro, but numerous antigenic variants were generated in vivo: serovar 6 passage 1 amniotic fluid cultures contained more MBA size variants than serovar 3 (P = 0.005), and ureaplasma titers were inversely related to the number of variants (P = 0.025). The severity of chorioamnionitis varied between animals. Low numbers of mba size variants (five or fewer) within amniotic fluid were associated with severe inflammation, whereas the chorioamnion from animals with nine or more mba variants showed little or no inflammation. These differences in chorioamnion inflammation may explain why not all women with in utero Ureaplasma spp. experience adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:20519696

  3. The severity of chorioamnionitis in pregnant sheep is associated with in vivo variation of the surface-exposed multiple-banded antigen/gene of Ureaplasma parvum.

    PubMed

    Knox, Christine L; Dando, Samantha J; Nitsos, Ilias; Kallapur, Suhas G; Jobe, Alan H; Payton, Diane; Moss, Timothy J M; Newnham, John P

    2010-09-01

    Ureaplasma species are the bacteria most frequently isolated from human amniotic fluid in asymptomatic pregnancies and placental infections. Ureaplasma parvum serovars 3 and 6 are the most prevalent serovars isolated from men and women. We hypothesized that the effects on the fetus and chorioamnion of chronic ureaplasma infection in amniotic fluid are dependent on the serovar, dose, and variation of the ureaplasma multiple-banded antigen (MBA) and mba gene. We injected high- or low-dose U. parvum serovar 3, serovar 6, or vehicle intra-amniotically into pregnant ewes at 55 days of gestation (term = 150 days) and examined the chorioamnion, amniotic fluid, and fetal lung tissue of animals delivered by cesarean section at 125 days of gestation. Variation of the multiple banded antigen/mba generated by serovar 3 and serovar 6 ureaplasmas in vivo were compared by PCR assay and Western blot. Ureaplasma inoculums demonstrated only one (serovar 3) or two (serovar 6) MBA variants in vitro, but numerous antigenic variants were generated in vivo: serovar 6 passage 1 amniotic fluid cultures contained more MBA size variants than serovar 3 (P = 0.005), and ureaplasma titers were inversely related to the number of variants (P = 0.025). The severity of chorioamnionitis varied between animals. Low numbers of mba size variants (five or fewer) within amniotic fluid were associated with severe inflammation, whereas the chorioamnion from animals with nine or more mba variants showed little or no inflammation. These differences in chorioamnion inflammation may explain why not all women with in utero Ureaplasma spp. experience adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  4. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 9 is involved in ectodomain shedding of receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Kenzo; Kato, Kiyoko

    2014-01-01

    In several human malignancies, the expression of receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells (RCAS1) is associated with aggressive characteristics and poor overall survival. RCAS1 alters the tumor microenvironment by inducing peripheral lymphocyte apoptosis and angiogenesis, while reducing the vimentin-positive cell population. Although proteolytic processing, referred to as "ectodomain shedding," is pivotal for induction of apoptosis by RCAS1, the proteases involved in RCAS1-dependent shedding remain unclear. Here we investigated proteases involved in RCAS1 shedding and the association between tumor protease expression and serum RCAS1 concentration in uterine cancer patients. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) 9 was shown to be involved in the ectodomain shedding of RCAS1. Given the significant correlation between tumor ADAM9 expression and serum RCAS1 concentration in both cervical and endometrial cancer as well as the role for ADAM9 in RCAS1 shedding, further exploration of the regulatory mechanisms by which ADAM9 converts membrane-anchored RCAS1 into its soluble form should aid the development of novel RCAS1-targeting therapeutic strategies to treat human malignancies.

  5. A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 9 Is Involved in Ectodomain Shedding of Receptor-Binding Cancer Antigen Expressed on SiSo Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kiyoko

    2014-01-01

    In several human malignancies, the expression of receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells (RCAS1) is associated with aggressive characteristics and poor overall survival. RCAS1 alters the tumor microenvironment by inducing peripheral lymphocyte apoptosis and angiogenesis, while reducing the vimentin-positive cell population. Although proteolytic processing, referred to as “ectodomain shedding,” is pivotal for induction of apoptosis by RCAS1, the proteases involved in RCAS1-dependent shedding remain unclear. Here we investigated proteases involved in RCAS1 shedding and the association between tumor protease expression and serum RCAS1 concentration in uterine cancer patients. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) 9 was shown to be involved in the ectodomain shedding of RCAS1. Given the significant correlation between tumor ADAM9 expression and serum RCAS1 concentration in both cervical and endometrial cancer as well as the role for ADAM9 in RCAS1 shedding, further exploration of the regulatory mechanisms by which ADAM9 converts membrane-anchored RCAS1 into its soluble form should aid the development of novel RCAS1-targeting therapeutic strategies to treat human malignancies. PMID:25177692

  6. Exogenous heat shock protein 70 binds macrophage lipid raft microdomain and stimulates phagocytosis, processing, and MHC-II presentation of antigens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruibo; Kovalchin, Joseph T; Muhlenkamp, Peggy; Chandawarkar, Rajiv Y

    2006-02-15

    The extracellular presence of endotoxin-free heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) enhances the rate and capacity of macrophage-mediated phagocytosis at 6 times the basal rate. It is protein-specific, dose- and time-dependent and involves the internalization of inert microspheres, Gram-positive and -negative bacteria and fungi. Structurally, exogenous HSP70 binds the macrophage plasma membrane, specifically on its lipid raft-microdomain. Disruption of lipid rafts, HSP70-LR interaction, or denaturing HSP70 abrogates the HSP-mediated increase in phagocytosis. Further, HSP70-mediated phagocytosis directly enhances the processing and presentation of internalized antigens via the endocytic MHC class-II pathway to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Modulating the HSP70-LR interaction presents an opportunity to intervene at the level of host-pathogen interface: a therapeutic tool for emerging infections, especially when conventional treatment with antibiotics is ineffective (antibiotic resistance) or unavailable (rapidly spreading, endemic). These results identify a new role for HSP70, a highly conserved molecule in stimulating phagocytosis: a primordial macrophage function, thereby influencing both innate and adaptive immune responses.

  7. Multiple octamer binding sites in the promoter region of the bovine alpha s2-casein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Groenen, M A; Dijkhof, R J; van der Poel, J J; van Diggelen, R; Verstege, E

    1992-01-01

    Using a set of overlapping oligonucleotides from the promoter region of the bovine alpha s2-casein gene we have identified two nuclear factors which probably are involved in expression of this gene and the related calcium sensitive alpha s1- and beta-casein genes. One of these factors which was present in extracts of all tissues that have been tested including Hela cells turned out to be the octamer binding protein OCT-1. Oct-1 binds with different affinity to 4 sites at positions centred around -480, -260, -210 and -50. The strongest of these 4 binding sites, the one around position -50, is highly conserved in all calcium sensitive caseins of mouse, rat, rabbit and cattle. The other nuclear factor (MGF, mammary gland factor) which is specifically expressed in the mammary gland, binds to a site around position -90. This binding site is also highly conserved in all calcium sensitive caseins of mouse, rat, rabbit and cattle. Images PMID:1508722

  8. Characterization and autoradiographic localization of multiple tachykinin binding sites in gastrointestinal tract and bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Burcher, E.; Buck, S.H.; Lovenberg, W.; O'Donohue, T.L.

    1986-03-01

    Binding sites for the (125I)Bolton-Hunter-labeled tachykinins substance K (BHSK), eledoisin (BHE) and substance P (BHSP) were investigated using crude membrane suspensions and autoradiography. In smooth muscle membranes from guinea-pig small intestine and rat duodenum, specific binding of BHSK was saturable and reversible, showing a single class of sites with a KD of 1 to 3 nM and maximum number of specific binding sites of 1 to 2 fmol/mg of wet weight tissue. Pharmacological characterization of this binding revealed a novel receptor site (K) with affinity for substance K greater than kassinin greater than or equal to eledoisin greater than neuromedin K greater than substance P greater than physalaemin. Inhibition of the binding of BHSK in membranes from mouse urinary bladder exhibited a similar K-type pattern. In rat duodenum and mouse bladder membranes, the binding of BHE was inhibited by substance K greater than kassinin greater than eledoisin greater than neuromedin K greater than substance P greater than physalaemin indicating the same receptor site as for BHSK. In rat cerebral cortex membranes BHE binding was inhibited by neuromedin K = kassinin = eledoisin greater than physalaemin greater than substance K greater than substance P indicating a definitive tachykinin E receptor site. The same displacement pattern of BHE binding was also detected in longitudinal muscle membranes from the guinea-pig small intestine. In mouse bladder membranes and in rat and guinea-pig intestine, the binding of BHSP was inhibited by substance P greater than physalaemin greater than substance K greater than or equal to eledoisin = kassinin greater than neuromedin K indicating a definitive tachykinin P receptor site. Autoradiographic binding sites for both BHSK and BHSP were seen in circular muscle of the rat stomach, small intestine and colon and in circular and longitudinal muscle of the guinea-pig small intestine and colon.

  9. The prediction of novel multiple lipid-binding regions in protein translocation motor proteins: a possible general feature.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rob C A

    2011-03-01

    Protein translocation is an important cellular process. SecA is an essential protein component in the Sec system, as it contains the molecular motor that facilitates protein translocation. In this study, a bioinformatics approach was applied in the search for possible lipid-binding helix regions in protein translocation motor proteins. Novel lipid-binding regions in Escherichia coli SecA were identified. Remarkably, multiple lipid-binding sites were also identified in other motor proteins such as BiP, which is involved in ER protein translocation. The prokaryotic signal recognition particle receptor FtsY, though not a motor protein, is in many ways related to SecA, and was therefore included in this study. The results demonstrate a possible general feature for motor proteins involved in protein translocation. PMID:20957445

  10. Separation, characterization and sexual heterogeneity of multiple putative odorant-binding proteins in the honeybee Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidea).

    PubMed

    Danty, E; Arnold, G; Huet, J C; Huet, D; Masson, C; Pernollet, J C

    1998-02-01

    According to precise molar mass determined by mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequence, some 25 odorant-binding-like proteins were characterized from the antennae and legs of worker and drone honeybees. Antennal specific proteins, composed of six different molecules, were classified into three subclasses according to N-terminal sequence homology. The major sexual difference was shown to lie in the relative abundance of these antennal specific proteins and in the occurrence of a drone-specific isoform. At least 19 other related proteins were found to occur in antennae and legs, forming another class showing homology with insect OBP. Genotype comparison of two honeybee races revealed a variability limited to this second class. Provided that these odorant-binding-like proteins are indeed able to bind odorants or pheromones, the question of whether their peculiar multiplicity contributes to the remarkable capacity of the honeybee to discriminate among a wide range of odor molecules is raised.

  11. Identification of an Arabidopsis thaliana protein that binds to tomato mosaic virus genomic RNA and inhibits its multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisaki, Koki; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2008-10-25

    The genomic RNAs of positive-strand RNA viruses carry RNA elements that play positive, or in some cases, negative roles in virus multiplication by interacting with viral and cellular proteins. In this study, we purified Arabidopsis thaliana proteins that specifically bind to 5' or 3' terminal regions of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) genomic RNA, which contain important regulatory elements for translation and RNA replication, and identified these proteins by mass spectrometry analyses. One of these host proteins, named BTR1, harbored three heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K-homology RNA-binding domains and preferentially bound to RNA fragments that contained a sequence around the initiation codon of the 130K and 180K replication protein genes. The knockout and overexpression of BTR1 specifically enhanced and inhibited, respectively, ToMV multiplication in inoculated A. thaliana leaves, while such effect was hardly detectable in protoplasts. These results suggest that BTR1 negatively regulates the local spread of ToMV.

  12. Unraveling multiple binding modes of acridine orange to DNA using a multispectroscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Mhejabeen; Krishnamurthy, Bhavana; Pal, Haridas

    2016-09-21

    The interaction of acridine orange (AOH(+)) with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) under different dye-DNA conditions has been investigated in detail using multispectroscopic techniques, unraveling a number of hitherto unexplored intricacies of dye-DNA binding. The observed results intriguingly show contrasting binding features when low (2.4 μM) and significantly high (23 μM) dye concentrations are used. It is conclusively inferred from absorption, steady-state fluorescence, circular dichroism, fluorescence decay and anisotropy decay studies that at low [DNA] to [dye] ratio, especially with higher dye concentration, dimeric AOH(+) predominantly binds externally to DNA surfaces through electrostatic interactions. At sufficiently high [DNA] to [dye] ratios, however, the interaction intriguingly changes to monomeric AOH(+) bound to DNA, predominantly in the intercalative mode between DNA base pairs, with partly an electrostatic binding on DNA surfaces. With very low initial dye concentration, monomeric (AOH(+)) mostly binds to DNA through intercalative and electrostatic modes for most DNA to dye ratios. The present study demonstrates a systematic correlation of the striking changes in the photophysical properties of the dye upon multimode binding with DNA. The observed results are of great significance in understanding the fundamental insights of dye/drug binding to DNA hosts, of use in the design of effective therapeutic agents. PMID:27545984

  13. Screening Mixtures of Small Molecules for Binding to Multiple Sites on the Surface Tetanus Toxin C Fragment by Bioaffinity NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Cosman, M; Zeller, L; Lightstone, F C; Krishnan, V V; Balhorn, R

    2002-01-01

    also contains 3-sialyllactose (another predicted site 1 binder) and bisbenzimide 33342 (non-binder). A series of five predicted Site-2 binders were then screened sequentially in the presence of the Site-1 binder doxorubicin. These experiments showed that the compounds lavendustin A and naphthofluorescein-di-({beta}-D-galactopyranoside) binds along with doxorubicin to TetC. Further experiments indicate that doxorubicin and lavendustin are potential candidates to use in preparing a bidendate inhibitor specific for TetC. The simultaneous binding of two different predicted Site-2 ligands to TetC suggests that they may bind multiple sites. Another possibility is that the conformations of the binding sites are dynamic and can bind multiple diverse ligands at a single site depending on the pre-existing conformation of the protein, especially when doxorubicin is already bound.

  14. Identification of multiple binding sites for the THAP domain of the Galileo transposase in the long terminal inverted-repeats.

    PubMed

    Marzo, Mar; Liu, Danxu; Ruiz, Alfredo; Chalmers, Ronald

    2013-08-01

    Galileo is a DNA transposon responsible for the generation of several chromosomal inversions in Drosophila. In contrast to other members of the P-element superfamily, it has unusually long terminal inverted-repeats (TIRs) that resemble those of Foldback elements. To investigate the function of the long TIRs we derived consensus and ancestral sequences for the Galileo transposase in three species of Drosophilids. Following gene synthesis, we expressed and purified their constituent THAP domains and tested their binding activity towards the respective Galileo TIRs. DNase I footprinting located the most proximal DNA binding site about 70 bp from the transposon end. Using this sequence we identified further binding sites in the tandem repeats that are found within the long TIRs. This suggests that the synaptic complex between Galileo ends may be a complicated structure containing higher-order multimers of the transposase. We also attempted to reconstitute Galileo transposition in Drosophila embryos but no events were detected. Thus, although the limited numbers of Galileo copies in each genome were sufficient to provide functional consensus sequences for the THAP domains, they do not specify a fully active transposase. Since the THAP recognition sequence is short, and will occur many times in a large genome, it seems likely that the multiple binding sites within the long, internally repetitive, TIRs of Galileo and other Foldback-like elements may provide the transposase with its binding specificity.

  15. Site-directed alkylation of multiple opioid receptors. I. Binding selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    James, I.F.; Goldstein, A.

    1984-05-01

    A method for measuring and expressing the binding selectivity of ligands for mu, delta, and kappa opioid binding sites is reported. Radioligands are used that are partially selective for these sites in combination with membrane preparations enriched in each site. Enrichment was obtained by treatment of membranes with the alkylating agent beta-chlornaltrexamine in the presence of appropriate protecting ligands. After enrichment for mu receptors, (/sup 3/H) dihydromorphine bound to a single type of site as judged by the slope of competition binding curves. After enrichment for delta or kappa receptors, binding sites for (/sup 3/H) (D-Ala2, D-Leu5)enkephalin and (3H)ethylketocyclazocine, respectively, were still not homogeneous. There were residual mu sites in delta-enriched membranes but no evidence for residual mu or delta sites in kappa-enriched membranes were found. This method was used to identify ligands that are highly selective for each of the three types of sites.

  16. Interplay of Multiple Interaction Forces: Binding of Norfloxacin to Human Serum Albumin.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bijan K; Ghosh, Narayani; Mukherjee, Saptarshi

    2015-10-15

    Herein, the binding interaction of a potential chemotherapeutic antibacterial drug norfloxacin (NOF) with a serum transport protein, human serum albumin (HSA), is investigated. The prototropic transformation of the drug (NOF) is found to be remarkably modified following interaction with the protein as manifested through significant modulations of the photophysics of the drug. The predominant zwitterionic form of NOF in aqueous buffer phase undergoes transformation to the cationic form within the protein-encapsulated state. This implies the possible role of electrostatic interaction force in NOF-HSA binding. This postulate is further substantiated from the effect of ionic strength on the interaction process. To this end, the detailed study of the thermodynamics of the drug-protein interaction process from isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) experiments is found to unfold the signature of electrostatic as well as hydrophobic interaction forces underlying the binding process. Thus, interplay of more than one interaction forces is argued to be responsible for the overall drug-protein binding. The ITC results reveal an important finding in terms of enthalpy-entropy compensation (EEC) characterizing the NOF-HSA binding. The effect of drug-binding on the native protein conformation has also been evaluated from circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy which unveils partial rupture of the protein secondary structure. In conjunction to this, the functionality of the native protein (in terms of esterase-like activity) is found to be lowered as a result of binding with NOF. The AutoDock-based docking simulation unravels the probable binding location of NOF within the hydrophilic subdomain IA of HSA. The present program also focuses on exploring the dynamical aspects of the drug-protein interaction scenario. The rotational-relaxation dynamics of the protein-bound drug reveals the not-so-common "dip-and-rise" pattern.

  17. A two-constant equation for multiple albumin-binding isotherms.

    PubMed

    Larsen, C G; Larsen, F G; Brodersen, R

    1986-07-01

    It has been found that binding of low molecular weight ligands to human serum albumin is generally nonsaturating. Equations commonly used for describing the binding equilibria, i.e., the Scatchard and Klotz (Adair) equations, are saturation functions. We have accordingly tried to establish an equation which would fit the observed data, i.e., not reach a saturation plateau. An empirical equation, in which the bound ligand is expressed as a function of the free ligand [R(C) = b1 in (b2C + 1)], is shown to give reasonably good fits to observed binding equilibrium data for the binding of several organic ligands to human serum albumin, when the two parameters, b1 and b2, are given suitable values. The curve of bound versus free ligand, as plotted from this equation, has the same slope and curvature as that obtained from the Klotz stepwise binding equation at C = 0, if b1 = K1/[2(K1 - 2K2)] and b2 = 2(K1 - 2K2), where K1 and K2 are the first and second stoichiometric binding constants.

  18. Cell-type specific regulation of gene expression by simian virus 40 T antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Cantalupo, Paul G.; Saenz-Robles, Maria Teresa; Rathi, Abhilasha V.; Beerman, Rebecca W.; Patterson, William H.; Whitehead, Robert H.; Pipas, James M.

    2009-03-30

    SV40 transforms cells through the action of two oncoproteins, large T antigen and small t antigen. Small t antigen targets phosphatase PP2A, while large T antigen stimulates cell proliferation and survival by action on multiple proteins, including the tumor suppressors Rb and p53. Large T antigen also binds components of the transcription initiation complex and several transcription factors. We examined global gene expression in SV40-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts, and in enterocytes obtained from transgenic mice. SV40 transformation alters the expression of approximately 800 cellular genes in both systems. Much of this regulation is observed in both MEFs and enterocytes and is consistent with T antigen action on the Rb-E2F pathway. However, the regulation of many genes is cell-type specific, suggesting that unique signaling pathways are activated in different cell types upon transformation, and that the consequences of SV40 transformation depends on the type of cell targeted.

  19. Multiple actin binding domains of Ena/VASP proteins determine actin network stiffening.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Brian S; van der Meulen, Stef; Noguera, Philippe; Alonso-Latorre, Baldomero; Plastino, Julie; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2012-11-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (Ena/VASP) is an actin binding protein, important for actin dynamics in motile cells and developing organisms. Though VASP's main activity is the promotion of barbed end growth, it has an F-actin binding site and can form tetramers, and so could additionally play a role in actin crosslinking and bundling in the cell. To test this activity, we performed rheology of reconstituted actin networks in the presence of wild-type VASP or mutants lacking the ability to tetramerize or to bind G-actin and/or F-actin. We show that increasing amounts of wild-type VASP increase network stiffness up to a certain point, beyond which stiffness actually decreases with increasing VASP concentration. The maximum stiffness is 10-fold higher than for pure actin networks. Confocal microscopy shows that VASP forms clustered actin filament bundles, explaining the reduction in network elasticity at high VASP concentration. Removal of the tetramerization site results in significantly reduced bundling and bundle clustering, indicating that VASP's flexible tetrameric structure causes clustering. Removing either the F-actin or the G-actin binding site diminishes VASP's effect on elasticity, but does not eliminate it. Mutating the F-actin and G-actin binding site together, or mutating the F-actin binding site and saturating the G-actin binding site with monomeric actin, eliminates VASP's ability to increase network stiffness. We propose that, in the cell, VASP crosslinking confers only moderate increases in linear network elasticity, and unlike other crosslinkers, VASP's network stiffening activity may be tuned by the local concentration of monomeric actin.

  20. In vitro binding of anthrax protective antigen on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface through Hoc-capsid interactions: A strategy for efficient display of large full-length proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shivachandra, Sathish B.; Rao, Mangala; Janosi, Laszlo; Sathaliyawala, Taheri; Matyas, Gary R.; Alving, Carl R.; Leppla, Stephen H.; Rao, Venigalla B. . E-mail: rao@cua.edu

    2006-02-05

    An in vitro binding system is described to display large full-length proteins on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface at high density. The phage T4 icosahedral capsid features 155 copies of a nonessential highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc, at the center of each major capsid protein hexon. Gene fusions were engineered to express the 83-kDa protective antigen (PA) from Bacillus anthracis fused to the N-terminus of Hoc and the 130-kDa PA-Hoc protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The purified PA-Hoc was assembled in vitro on hoc {sup -} phage particles. Binding was specific, stable, and of high affinity. This defined in vitro system allowed manipulation of the copy number of displayed PA and imposed no significant limitation on the size of the displayed antigen. In contrast to in vivo display systems, the in vitro approach allows all the capsid binding sites to be occupied by the 130-kDa PA-Hoc fusion protein. The PA-T4 particles were immunogenic in mice in the absence of an adjuvant, eliciting strong PA-specific antibodies and anthrax lethal toxin neutralizing antibodies. The in vitro display on phage T4 offers a novel platform for potential construction of customized vaccines against anthrax and other infectious diseases.

  1. Structural details of HIV-1 recognition by the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody 2F5: epitope conformation, antigen-recognition loop mobility, and anion-binding site.

    PubMed

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Bryson, Steve; Nieva, Jose L; Pai, Emil F

    2008-12-12

    2F5 is a monoclonal antibody with potent and broadly neutralizing activity against HIV-1. It targets the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the gp41 subunit of the envelope glycoprotein and interferes with the process of fusion between viral and host cell membranes. This study presents eight 2F5 F(ab)' crystal structures in complex with various gp41 peptide epitopes. These structures reveal several key features of this antibody-antigen interaction. (1) Whenever free of contacts caused by crystal artifacts, the extended complementarity-determining region H3 loop is mobile; this is true for ligand-free and epitope-bound forms. (2) The interaction between the antibody and the gp41 ELDKWA epitope core is absolutely critical, and there are also close and specific contacts with residues located N-terminal to the epitope core. (3) Residues located at the C-terminus of the gp41 ELDKWA core do not interact as tightly with the antibody. However, in the presence of a larger peptide containing the gp41 fusion peptide segment, these residues adopt a conformation consistent with the start of an alpha-helix. (4) At high sulfate concentrations, the electron density maps of 2F5 F(ab)'-peptide complexes contain a peak that may mark a binding site for phosphate groups of negatively charged lipid headgroups. The refined atomic-level details of 2F5 paratope-epitope interactions revealed here should contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism of 2F5-based virus neutralization, in general, and prove important for the design of potential vaccine candidates intended to elicit 2F5-like antibody production.

  2. HPLC-purified 2-(/sup 125/I)iodomelatonin labels multiple binding sites in hamster brain

    SciTech Connect

    Niles, L.P.; Pickering, D.S.; Sayer, B.G.

    1987-09-30

    Binding of 2-(/sup 125/I)iodomelatonin in hamster brain synaptosomal membranes at 0 degrees C is rapid, saturable, reversible and sensitive to heat and trypsin treatment. Computer resolution of curvilinear Scatchard plots yielded high- and low-affinity components as follows: Kd1 = 0.32 +/- 0.14 nM, Bmax1 = 5.6 +/- 1.7 fmol/mg protein and Kd2 = 10.5 +/- 3.2 nM, Bmax2 = 123 +/- 33 fmol/mg protein (n = 3). Competition experiments indicated that 2-iodomelatonin and prazosin are the most potent inhibitors of high-affinity binding. Unlike prazosin, several alpha-adrenergic agents and various neurotransmitters were ineffective. These findings suggest that prazosin may be a potent antagonist at a unique, non-alpha-adrenergic, high-affinity binding site for melatonin.

  3. The poly(C)-binding proteins: a multiplicity of functions and a search for mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Makeyev, Aleksandr V; Liebhaber, Stephen A

    2002-01-01

    The poly(C) binding proteins (PCBPs) are encoded at five dispersed loci in the mouse and human genomes. These proteins, which can be divided into two groups, hnRNPs K/J and the alphaCPs (alphaCP1-4), are linked by a common evolutionary history, a shared triple KH domain configuration, and by their poly(C) binding specificity. Given these conserved characteristics it is remarkable to find a substantial diversity in PCBP functions. The roles of these proteins in mRNA stabilization, translational activation, and translational silencing suggest a complex and diverse set of post-transcriptional control pathways. Their additional putative functions in transcriptional control and as structural components of important DNA-protein complexes further support their remarkable structural and functional versatility. Clearly the identification of additional binding targets and delineation of corresponding control mechanisms and effector pathways will establish highly informative models for further exploration. PMID:12003487

  4. Inactivation of Multiple Bacterial Histidine Kinases by Targeting the ATP-Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial agents that exploit new targets will be required to combat the perpetual rise of bacterial resistance to current antibiotics. We are exploring the inhibition of histidine kinases, constituents of two-component systems. Two-component systems are the primary signaling pathways that bacteria utilize to respond to their environment. They are ubiquitous in bacteria and trigger various pathogenic mechanisms. To attenuate these signaling pathways, we sought to broadly target the histidine kinase family by focusing on their highly conserved ATP-binding domain. Development of a fluorescence polarization displacement assay facilitated high-throughput screening of ∼53 000 diverse small molecules for binding to the ATP-binding pocket. Of these compounds, nine inhibited the catalytic activity of two or more histidine kinases. These scaffolds could provide valuable starting points for the design of broadly effective HK inhibitors, global reduction of bacterial signaling, and ultimately, a class of antibiotics that function by a new mechanism of action. PMID:25531939

  5. Multiple Scattering X-Ray Absorption Studies of Zn2+ Binding Sites in Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers

    PubMed Central

    Giachini, Lisa; Francia, Francesco; Mallardi, Antonia; Palazzo, Gerardo; Carpenè, Emilio; Boscherini, Federico; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Binding of transition metal ions to the reaction center (RC) protein of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been previously shown to slow light-induced electron and proton transfer to the secondary quinone acceptor molecule, QB. On the basis of x-ray diffraction at 2.5 Å resolution a site, formed by AspH124, HisH126, and HisH128, has been identified at the protein surface which binds Cd2+ or Zn2+. Using Zn K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy we report here on the local structure of Zn2+ ions bound to purified RC complexes embedded into polyvinyl alcohol films. X-ray absorption fine structure data were analyzed by combining ab initio simulations and multiparameter fitting; structural contributions up to the fourth coordination shell and multiple scattering paths (involving three atoms) have been included. Results for complexes characterized by a Zn to RC stoichiometry close to one indicate that Zn2+ binds two O and two N atoms in the first coordination shell. Higher shell contributions are consistent with a binding cluster formed by two His, one Asp residue, and a water molecule. Analysis of complexes characterized by ∼2 Zn ions per RC reveals a second structurally distinct binding site, involving one O and three N atoms, not belonging to a His residue. The local structure obtained for the higher affinity site nicely fits the coordination geometry proposed on the basis of x-ray diffraction data, but detects a significant contraction of the first shell. Two possible locations of the second new binding site at the cytoplasmic surface of the RC are proposed. PMID:15613631

  6. Multiple Src Homology 3 Binding to the Ubiquitin Ligase Itch Conserved Proline-Rich Region.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, Guillaume; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Omichinski, James G; Angers, Annie

    2015-12-22

    Itch is a member of the C2-WW-HECT (CWH) family of ubiquitin ligases involved in the control of inflammatory signaling pathways, several transcription factors, and sorting of surface receptors to the degradative pathway. In addition to these common domains, Itch also contains a conserved proline-rich region (PRR) allowing its interaction with Src homology 3 (SH3) domain-containing proteins. This region is composed of 20 amino acids and contains one consensus class I and three class II SH3-binding motifs. Several SH3 domain-containing partners have been shown to recognize the Itch PRR, but their binding properties have been poorly defined. Here we compare a subset of endocytic SH3 domain-containing proteins using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, isothermal titration calorimetry, and pull-down assays. Results indicate that Endophilin is a high-affinity binding partner of Itch both in vivo and in vitro, with a calculated KD placing this complex among the highest-affinity SH3 domain-mediated interactions reported to date. All of the SH3 domains tested here bind to Itch with a 1:1 stoichiometry, except for β-PIX that binds with a 2:1 stoichiometry. Together, these results indicate that Itch PRR is a versatile binding module that can accommodate several different SH3 domain-containing proteins but has a preference for Endophilin. Interestingly, the catalytic activity of Itch toward different SH3 domain-containing proteins was similar, except for β-PIX that was not readily ubiquitylated even though it could interact with an affinity comparable to those of other substrates tested. PMID:26613292

  7. Hu Antigen R (HuR) Is a Positive Regulator of the RNA-binding Proteins TDP-43 and FUS/TLS

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Liang; Zheng, Lei; Si, Ying; Luo, Wenyi; Dujardin, Gwendal; Kwan, Thaddaeus; Potochick, Nicholas R.; Thompson, Sunnie R.; Schneider, David A.; King, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Posttranscriptional gene regulation is governed by a network of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that interact with regulatory elements in the mRNA to modulate multiple molecular processes, including splicing, RNA transport, RNA stability, and translation. Mounting evidence indicates that there is a hierarchy within this network whereby certain RBPs cross-regulate other RBPs to coordinate gene expression. HuR, an RNA-binding protein we linked previously to aberrant VEGF mRNA metabolism in models of SOD1-associated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, has been identified as being high up in this hierarchy, serving as a regulator of RNA regulators. Here we investigated the role of HuR in regulating two RBPs, TDP-43 and FUS/TLS, that have been linked genetically to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We found that HuR promotes the expression of both RBPs in primary astrocytes and U251 cells under normal and stressed (hypoxic) conditions. For TDP-43, we found that HuR binds to the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) and regulates its expression through translational efficiency rather than RNA stability. With HuR knockdown, there was a shift of TDP-43 and FUS mRNAs away from polysomes, consistent with translational silencing. The TDP-43 splicing function was attenuated upon HuR knockdown and could be rescued by ectopic TDP-43 lacking the 3′ UTR regulatory elements. Finally, conditioned medium from astrocytes in which HuR or TDP-43 was knocked down produced significant motor neuron and cortical neuron toxicity in vitro. These findings indicate that HuR regulates TDP-43 and FUS/TLS expression and that loss of HuR-mediated RNA processing in astrocytes can alter the molecular and cellular landscape to produce a toxic phenotype. PMID:25239623

  8. Hu antigen R (HuR) is a positive regulator of the RNA-binding proteins TDP-43 and FUS/TLS: implications for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liang; Zheng, Lei; Si, Ying; Luo, Wenyi; Dujardin, Gwendal; Kwan, Thaddaeus; Potochick, Nicholas R; Thompson, Sunnie R; Schneider, David A; King, Peter H

    2014-11-14

    Posttranscriptional gene regulation is governed by a network of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that interact with regulatory elements in the mRNA to modulate multiple molecular processes, including splicing, RNA transport, RNA stability, and translation. Mounting evidence indicates that there is a hierarchy within this network whereby certain RBPs cross-regulate other RBPs to coordinate gene expression. HuR, an RNA-binding protein we linked previously to aberrant VEGF mRNA metabolism in models of SOD1-associated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, has been identified as being high up in this hierarchy, serving as a regulator of RNA regulators. Here we investigated the role of HuR in regulating two RBPs, TDP-43 and FUS/TLS, that have been linked genetically to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We found that HuR promotes the expression of both RBPs in primary astrocytes and U251 cells under normal and stressed (hypoxic) conditions. For TDP-43, we found that HuR binds to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) and regulates its expression through translational efficiency rather than RNA stability. With HuR knockdown, there was a shift of TDP-43 and FUS mRNAs away from polysomes, consistent with translational silencing. The TDP-43 splicing function was attenuated upon HuR knockdown and could be rescued by ectopic TDP-43 lacking the 3' UTR regulatory elements. Finally, conditioned medium from astrocytes in which HuR or TDP-43 was knocked down produced significant motor neuron and cortical neuron toxicity in vitro. These findings indicate that HuR regulates TDP-43 and FUS/TLS expression and that loss of HuR-mediated RNA processing in astrocytes can alter the molecular and cellular landscape to produce a toxic phenotype.

  9. Self-assembled nanospheres with multiple endohedral binding sites pre-organize catalysts and substrates for highly efficient reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi-Qiang; Gonell, Sergio; Leenders, Stefan H. A. M.; Dürr, Maximilian; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana; Reek, Joost N. H.

    2016-03-01

    Tuning reagent and catalyst concentrations is crucial in the development of efficient catalytic transformations. In enzyme-catalysed reactions the substrate is bound—often by multiple non-covalent interactions—in a well-defined pocket close to the active site of the enzyme; this pre-organization facilitates highly efficient transformations. Here we report an artificial system that co-encapsulates multiple catalysts and substrates within the confined space defined by an M12L24 nanosphere that contains 24 endohedral guanidinium-binding sites. Cooperative binding means that sulfonate guests are bound much more strongly than carboxylates. This difference has been used to fix gold-based catalysts firmly, with the remaining binding sites left to pre-organize substrates. This strategy was applied to a Au(I)-catalysed cyclization of acetylenic acid to enol lactone in which the pre-organization resulted in much higher reaction rates. We also found that the encapsulated sulfonate-containing Au(I) catalysts did not convert neutral (acid) substrates, and so could have potential in the development of substrate-selective catalysis and base-triggered on/off switching of catalysis.

  10. Self-assembled nanospheres with multiple endohedral binding sites pre-organize catalysts and substrates for highly efficient reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi-Qiang; Gonell, Sergio; Leenders, Stefan H A M; Dürr, Maximilian; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana; Reek, Joost N H

    2016-03-01

    Tuning reagent and catalyst concentrations is crucial in the development of efficient catalytic transformations. In enzyme-catalysed reactions the substrate is bound-often by multiple non-covalent interactions-in a well-defined pocket close to the active site of the enzyme; this pre-organization facilitates highly efficient transformations. Here we report an artificial system that co-encapsulates multiple catalysts and substrates within the confined space defined by an M12L24 nanosphere that contains 24 endohedral guanidinium-binding sites. Cooperative binding means that sulfonate guests are bound much more strongly than carboxylates. This difference has been used to fix gold-based catalysts firmly, with the remaining binding sites left to pre-organize substrates. This strategy was applied to a Au(I)-catalysed cyclization of acetylenic acid to enol lactone in which the pre-organization resulted in much higher reaction rates. We also found that the encapsulated sulfonate-containing Au(I) catalysts did not convert neutral (acid) substrates, and so could have potential in the development of substrate-selective catalysis and base-triggered on/off switching of catalysis. PMID:26892553

  11. Neural networks for determining protein specificity and multiple alignment of binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Heumann, J.M.; Lapedes, A.S.; Stormo, G.D.

    1994-12-31

    We use a quantitative definition of specificity to develop a neural network for the identification of common protein binding sites in a collection of unaligned DNA fragments. We demonstrate the equivalence of the method to maximizing Information Content of the aligned sites when simple models of the binding energy and the genome are employed. The network method subsumes those simple models and is capable of working with more complicated ones. This is demonstrated using a Markov model of the E. coli genome and a sampling method to approximate the partition function. A variation of Gibbs sampling aids in avoiding local minima.

  12. Role of a Novel Human Leukocyte Antigen-DQA1*01:02;DRB1*15:01 Mixed Isotype Heterodimer in the Pathogenesis of “Humanized” Multiple Sclerosis-like Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Kaushansky, Nathali; Eisenstein, Miriam; Boura-Halfon, Sigalit; Hansen, Bjarke Endel; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Milo, Ron; Zeilig, Gabriel; Lassmann, Hans; Altmann, Daniel M.; Ben-Nun, Avraham

    2015-01-01

    Gene-wide association and candidate gene studies indicate that the greatest effect on multiple sclerosis (MS) risk is driven by the HLA-DRB1*15:01 allele within the HLA-DR15 haplotype (HLA-DRB1*15:01-DQA1*01:02-DQB1*0602-DRB5*01:01). Nevertheless, linkage disequilibrium makes it difficult to define, without functional studies, whether the functionally relevant effect derives from DRB1*15:01 only, from its neighboring DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 or DRB5*01:01 genes of HLA-DR15 haplotype, or from their combinations or epistatic interactions. Here, we analyzed the impact of the different HLA-DR15 haplotype alleles on disease susceptibility in a new “humanized” model of MS induced in HLA-transgenic (Tg) mice by human oligodendrocyte-specific protein (OSP)/claudin-11 (hOSP), one of the bona fide potential primary target antigens in MS. We show that the hOSP-associated MS-like disease is dominated by the DRB1*15:01 allele not only as the DRA1*01:01;DRB1*15:01 isotypic heterodimer but also, unexpectedly, as a functional DQA1*01:02;DRB1*15:01 mixed isotype heterodimer. The contribution of HLA-DQA1/DRB1 mixed isotype heterodimer to OSP pathogenesis was revealed in (DRB1*1501xDQB1*0602)F1 double-Tg mice immunized with hOSP(142–161) peptide, where the encephalitogenic potential of prevalent DRB1*1501/hOSP(142–161)-reactive Th1/Th17 cells is hindered due to a single amino acid difference in the OSP(142–161) region between humans and mice; this impedes binding of DRB1*1501 to the mouse OSP(142–161) epitope in the mouse CNS while exposing functional binding of mouse OSP(142–161) to DQA1*01:02;DRB1*15:01 mixed isotype heterodimer. This study, which shows for the first time a functional HLA-DQA1/DRB1 mixed isotype heterodimer and its potential association with disease susceptibility, provides a rationale for a potential effect on MS risk from DQA1*01:02 through functional DQA1*01:02;DRB1*15:01 antigen presentation. Furthermore, it highlights a potential contribution to MS

  13. Antibody levels to multiple malaria vaccine candidate antigens in relation to clinical malaria episodes in children in the Kasena-Nankana district of Northern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Considering the natural history of malaria of continued susceptibility to infection and episodes of illness that decline in frequency and severity over time, studies which attempt to relate immune response to protection must be longitudinal and have clearly specified definitions of immune status. Putative vaccines are expected to protect against infection, mild or severe disease or reduce transmission, but so far it has not been easy to clearly establish what constitutes protective immunity or how this develops naturally, especially among the affected target groups. The present study was done in under six year old children to identify malaria antigens which induce antibodies that correlate with protection from Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Methods In this longitudinal study, the multiplex assay was used to measure IgG antibody levels to 10 malaria antigens (GLURP R0, GLURP R2, MSP3 FVO, AMA1 FVO, AMA1 LR32, AMA1 3D7, MSP1 3D7, MSP1 FVO, LSA-1and EBA175RII) in 325 children aged 1 to 6 years in the Kassena Nankana district of northern Ghana. The antigen specific antibody levels were then related to the risk of clinical malaria over the ensuing year using a negative binomial regression model. Results IgG levels generally increased with age. The risk of clinical malaria decreased with increasing antibody levels. Except for FMPOII-LSA, (p = 0.05), higher IgG levels were associated with reduced risk of clinical malaria (defined as axillary temperature ≥37.5°C and parasitaemia of ≥5000 parasites/ul blood) in a univariate analysis, upon correcting for the confounding effect of age. However, in a combined multiple regression analysis, only IgG levels to MSP1-3D7 (Incidence rate ratio = 0.84, [95% C.I.= 0.73, 0.97, P = 0.02]) and AMA1 3D7 (IRR = 0.84 [95% C.I.= 0.74, 0.96, P = 0.01]) were associated with a reduced risk of clinical malaria over one year of morbidity surveillance. Conclusion The data from this study support the view that a multivalent vaccine

  14. Dynamic Binding of Identity and Location Information: A Serial Model of Multiple Identity Tracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oksama, Lauri; Hyona, Jukka

    2008-01-01

    Tracking of multiple moving objects is commonly assumed to be carried out by a fixed-capacity parallel mechanism. The present study proposes a serial model (MOMIT) to explain performance accuracy in the maintenance of multiple moving objects with distinct identities. A serial refresh mechanism is postulated, which makes recourse to continuous…

  15. Allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppress NF-κB and Ets-1 DNA binding activity, and inhibit phosphorylated NF-κB p65 nuclear localization in CD4+ T-cells.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Ryuichi; Kawakami, Fumitaka; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Obata, Fumiya; Kubo, Makoto

    2014-08-01

    CD8+ T-cells of asymptomatic HIV-1 carriers (AC) suppress human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I)-restricted and -unrestricted manner. In order to investigate the mechanism of MHC-I-unrestricted CD8+ T-cell-mediated HIV-1 suppression, we previously established allo-antigen stimulated CD8+T-cells from HIV-1-uninfected donors. These allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppressed HIV-1 replication in acutely infected autologous CD4+ T-cells when directly co-cultured. To elucidate the mechanism of HIV-1 replication suppression, we analyzed DNA-binding activity and phosphorylation of transcriptional factors associated with HIV-1 replication by electrophoresis mobility shift assay and Western blotting. When CD4+ T-cells were cultured with allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells, the reduction of NF-κB and Ets-1 DNA-binding activity was observed. Nuclear localization of NF-κB p65 and Ets-1 was suppressed in CD4+ T-cells. Although NF-κB p65 and Ets-1 are known to be regulated by protein kinase A (PKA), no difference was observed in the expression and phosphorylation of the PKA catalytic subunit in CD4+ T-cells cultured with PHA-treated CD8+ T-cells or allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells. Cyclic AMP is also known to enter through gap junctions, but the suppression of HIV-1 replication mediated by allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells was not affected by the gap junction inhibitor. The nuclear transport of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (Ser276) was inhibited only in CD4+ T-cells cultured with allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells. Our results indicate that allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppress the transcriptional activity of NF-κB p65 or Ets-1 in an antigen-nonspecific manner, and inhibit the nuclear transport of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (Ser276).

  16. Antigen-specific T-cell immunity in multiple myeloma patients is restored following high-dose therapy: implications for timing of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Svane, I M; Nikolajsen, K; Johnsen, H E

    2007-10-01

    The present study analyses the influence of high-dose chemotherapy (HD) and autologous stem cell transplantation on natural and vaccine induced specific immunity in multiple myeloma patients. Peripheral blood was collected from six multiple myeloma (MM) patients at serial time points in connection with treatment and during a follow-up period of 3 months. T-cell response to cytomegalovirus (CMV), varicella zoster virus (VZV) and tetanus toxoid (TT) was determined by flow cytometry analysis for CD69, TNFalpha, IFNgamma, IL-4 expression and cell proliferation. At diagnosis and prior to induction chemotherapy TNFalpha expressing T cells in 5/6 patients were found specific for CMV, 3/6 for VZV and 4/6 for TT. Serial analyses during treatment conclude impaired immune response, however, 3 months post-transplantation all but one patient had regained cytokine expressing CD8(+) T cells specific for CMV, VZV and TT. The highest percentages of cytokine responding T cells were observed after stimulation with CMV antigen. A striking observation was the low cytokine reactivity (close to zero) measured in G-CSF mobilized blood at the time of leukapheresis. In spite of a general reduction of the CD4/CD8 ratio following transplantation, recovery of antigen specific CD4(+) T cells reactivity generally occurred prior to CD8(+) recovery and often to a higher level. In conclusion, the study demonstrates that natural as well as vaccine induced specific immunity present prior to HD was regained after stem cell transplantation, hence identifying a possible window for future vaccination trials.

  17. Mapping the Structural and Dynamical Features of Multiple p53 DNA Binding Domains: Insights into Loop 1 Intrinsic Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lukman, Suryani; Lane, David P.; Verma, Chandra S.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor p53 regulates cellular integrity in response to stress. p53 is mutated in more than half of cancerous cells, with a majority of the mutations localized to the DNA binding domain (DBD). In order to map the structural and dynamical features of the DBD, we carried out multiple copy molecular dynamics simulations (totaling 0.8 μs). Simulations show the loop 1 to be the most dynamic element among the DNA-contacting loops (loops 1-3). Loop 1 occupies two major conformational states: extended and recessed; the former but not the latter displays correlations in atomic fluctuations with those of loop 2 (~24 Å apart). Since loop 1 binds to the major groove whereas loop 2 binds to the minor groove of DNA, our results begin to provide some insight into the possible mechanism underpinning the cooperative nature of DBD binding to DNA. We propose (1) a novel mechanism underlying the dynamics of loop 1 and the possible tread-milling of p53 on DNA and (2) possible mutations on loop 1 residues to restore the transcriptional activity of an oncogenic mutation at a distant site. PMID:24324553

  18. Binding of antibodies to the extractable nuclear antigens SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La is induced on the surface of human keratinocytes by ultraviolet light (UVL): Implications for the pathogenesis of photosensitive cutaneous lupus

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, F.; Kashihara-Sawami, M.; Lyons, M.B.; Norris, D.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the non-histone nucleoprotein antigens SS-A/Ro, SS-B/La, and RNP are highly associated with photosensitive cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). In order to better understand the potential mechanisms of ultraviolet (UV) light on photosensitivity in patients with cutaneous LE, we designed immunopathologic in vitro and in vivo experiments to evaluate the effects of UV on the binding of such autoantibodies to the surface of human keratinocytes, one major target of immunologic damage in photosensitive LE. Short-term 2% paraformaldehyde fixation of suspensions of cultured human keratinocytes previously incubated with monospecific antiserum probes enabled the detection of ENA expression on the cell surface by flow-cytometry analysis. UVB light (280-320 nm) induced the binding of monospecific antibody probes for SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La on keratinocytes in a dose-dependent pattern with maximal induction observed at the dose of 200 mJ/cm2 UVB. Binding of SS-A/Ro, SS-B/La, and RNP antibody was augmented strongly, but binding of anti-Sm was very weak. In contrast, UVA (320-400 nm) light had no effect on the induction of binding of these antibody probes. Identical results were seen by standard immunofluorescence techniques. Hydroxyurea-treated keratinocytes showed similar induction of those antigens by UVB irradiation, which suggested that ENA expression on cultured keratinocytes by UVB were cell-cycle independent. Tunicamycin, an inhibitor of glycosylation of proteins, reduced UVB light effect on the SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La antigen's expression. These in vitro FACS analyses revealed that ENA augmentation on the keratinocyte cell surface was dose dependent, UVB dependent, glycosylation dependent, and cell-cycle independent. In vivo ENA augmentation on the keratinocyte surface was examined in suction blister epidermal roofs.

  19. Development of a Competitive Binding Assay System with Recombinant Estrogen Receptors from Multiple Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT In the current study, we developed a new system using full-length recombinant baculovirus-expressed estrogen receptors which allows for direct comparison of binding across species. Estrogen receptors representing five vertebrate classes were compared: human (hERα), quai...

  20. Binding of Multiple Features in Memory by High-Functioning Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowler, Dermot M.; Gaigg, Sebastian B.; Gardiner, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Diminished episodic memory and diminished use of semantic information to aid recall by individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are both thought to result from diminished relational binding of elements of complex stimuli. To test this hypothesis, we asked high-functioning adults with ASD and typical comparison participants to study grids in…

  1. Self-Amplifying mRNA Vaccines Expressing Multiple Conserved Influenza Antigens Confer Protection against Homologous and Heterosubtypic Viral Challenge.

    PubMed

    Magini, Diletta; Giovani, Cinzia; Mangiavacchi, Simona; Maccari, Silvia; Cecchi, Raffaella; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; De Gregorio, Ennio; Geall, Andrew J; Brazzoli, Michela; Bertholet, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Current hemagglutinin (HA)-based seasonal influenza vaccines induce vaccine strain-specific neutralizing antibodies that usually fail to provide protection against mismatched circulating viruses. Inclusion in the vaccine of highly conserved internal proteins such as the nucleoprotein (NP) and the matrix protein 1 (M1) was shown previously to increase vaccine efficacy by eliciting cross-reactive T-cells. However, appropriate delivery systems are required for efficient priming of T-cell responses. In this study, we demonstrated that administration of novel self-amplifying mRNA (SAM®) vectors expressing influenza NP (SAM(NP)), M1 (SAM(M1)), and NP and M1 (SAM(M1-NP)) delivered with lipid nanoparticles (LNP) induced robust polyfunctional CD4 T helper 1 cells, while NP-containing SAM also induced cytotoxic CD8 T cells. Robust expansions of central memory (TCM) and effector memory (TEM) CD4 and CD8 T cells were also measured. An enhanced recruitment of NP-specific cytotoxic CD8 T cells was observed in the lungs of SAM(NP)-immunized mice after influenza infection that paralleled with reduced lung viral titers and pathology, and increased survival after homologous and heterosubtypic influenza challenge. Finally, we demonstrated for the first time that the co-administration of RNA (SAM(M1-NP)) and protein (monovalent inactivated influenza vaccine (MIIV)) was feasible, induced simultaneously NP-, M1- and HA-specific T cells and HA-specific neutralizing antibodies, and enhanced MIIV efficacy against a heterologous challenge. In conclusion, systemic administration of SAM vectors expressing conserved internal influenza antigens induced protective immune responses in mice, supporting the SAM® platform as another promising strategy for the development of broad-spectrum universal influenza vaccines. PMID:27525409

  2. The 15 SCR flexible extracellular domains of human complement receptor type 2 can mediate multiple ligand and antigen interactions.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Hannah E; Asokan, Rengasamy; Holers, V Michael; Perkins, Stephen J

    2006-10-01

    Complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) is a cell surface protein that links the innate and adaptive immune response during the activation of B cells. The extracellular portion of CR2 comprises 15 or 16 short complement regulator (SCR) domains, for which the overall arrangement in solution is unknown. This was determined by constrained scattering and ultracentrifugation modelling. The radius of gyration of CR2 SCR 1-15 was determined to be 11.5 nm by both X-ray and neutron scattering, and that of its cross-section was 1.8 nm. The distance distribution function P(r) showed that the overall length of CR2 SCR 1-15 was 38 nm. Sedimentation equilibrium curve fits gave a mean molecular weight of 135,000 (+/- 13,000) Da, in agreement with a fully glycosylated structure. Velocity experiments using the g*(s) derivative method gave a sedimentation coefficient of 4.2 (+/- 0.1) S. In order to construct a model of CR2 SCR 1-15 for constrained fitting, homology models for the 15 SCR domains were combined with randomised linker peptides generated by molecular dynamics simulations. Using an automated procedure, the analysis of 15,000 possible CR2 SCR 1-15 models showed that only those models in which the 15 SCR domains were flexible but partially folded back accounted for the scattering and sedimentation data. The best-fit CR2 models provided a visual explanation for the versatile interaction of CR2 with four ligands C3d, CD23, gp350 and IFN-alpha. The flexible location of CR2 SCR 1-2 is likely to facilitate interactions of C3d-antigen complexes with the B cell receptor.

  3. Self-Amplifying mRNA Vaccines Expressing Multiple Conserved Influenza Antigens Confer Protection against Homologous and Heterosubtypic Viral Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Magini, Diletta; Giovani, Cinzia; Mangiavacchi, Simona; Maccari, Silvia; Cecchi, Raffaella; Ulmer, Jeffrey B.; De Gregorio, Ennio; Geall, Andrew J.; Brazzoli, Michela; Bertholet, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Current hemagglutinin (HA)-based seasonal influenza vaccines induce vaccine strain-specific neutralizing antibodies that usually fail to provide protection against mismatched circulating viruses. Inclusion in the vaccine of highly conserved internal proteins such as the nucleoprotein (NP) and the matrix protein 1 (M1) was shown previously to increase vaccine efficacy by eliciting cross-reactive T-cells. However, appropriate delivery systems are required for efficient priming of T-cell responses. In this study, we demonstrated that administration of novel self-amplifying mRNA (SAM®) vectors expressing influenza NP (SAM(NP)), M1 (SAM(M1)), and NP and M1 (SAM(M1-NP)) delivered with lipid nanoparticles (LNP) induced robust polyfunctional CD4 T helper 1 cells, while NP-containing SAM also induced cytotoxic CD8 T cells. Robust expansions of central memory (TCM) and effector memory (TEM) CD4 and CD8 T cells were also measured. An enhanced recruitment of NP-specific cytotoxic CD8 T cells was observed in the lungs of SAM(NP)-immunized mice after influenza infection that paralleled with reduced lung viral titers and pathology, and increased survival after homologous and heterosubtypic influenza challenge. Finally, we demonstrated for the first time that the co-administration of RNA (SAM(M1-NP)) and protein (monovalent inactivated influenza vaccine (MIIV)) was feasible, induced simultaneously NP-, M1- and HA-specific T cells and HA-specific neutralizing antibodies, and enhanced MIIV efficacy against a heterologous challenge. In conclusion, systemic administration of SAM vectors expressing conserved internal influenza antigens induced protective immune responses in mice, supporting the SAM® platform as another promising strategy for the development of broad-spectrum universal influenza vaccines. PMID:27525409

  4. A synthetic random basic copolymer with promiscuous binding to class II major histocompatibility complex molecules inhibits T-cell proliferative responses to major and minor histocompatibility antigens in vitro and confers the capacity to prevent murine graft-versus-host disease in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, P G; Aharoni, R; Chen, Y; Chen, J; Teitelbaum, D; Arnon, R; Sela, M; Chao, N J

    1996-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a T-cell-mediated disease of transplanted donor T cells recognizing host alloantigens. Data presented in this report show, to our knowledge, for the first time that a synthetic copolymer of the amino acids L-Glu, L-Lys, L-Ala, and L-Tyr (molecular ratio, 1.9:6.0:4.7:1.0; Mr, 6000-8500) [corrected], termed GLAT, with promiscuous binding to multiple major histocompatibility complex class II alleles is capable of preventing lethal GVHD in the B10.D2 --> BALB/c model (both H-2d) across minor histocompatibility barriers. Administration of GLAT over a limited time after transplant significantly reduced the incidence, onset, and severity of disease. GLAT also improved long-term survival from lethal GVHD: 14/25 (56%) of experimental mice survived > 140 days after transplant compared to 2/26 of saline-treated or to 1/10 of hen egg lysozyme-treated control mice (P < 0.01). Long-term survivors were documented to be fully chimeric by PCR analysis of a polymorphic microsatellite region in the interleukin 1beta gene. In vitro, GLAT inhibited the mixed lymphocyte culture in a dose-dependent fashion across a variety of major barriers tested. Furthermore, GLAT inhibited the response of nylon wool-enriched T cells to syngeneic antigen-presenting cells presenting minor histocompatibility antigens. Prepulsing of the antigen-presenting cells with GLAT reduced the proliferative response, suggesting that GLAT inhibits antigen presentation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8643529

  5. Osteopontin binds multiple calcium ions with high affinity and independently of phosphorylation status.

    PubMed

    Kläning, Eva; Christensen, Brian; Sørensen, Esben S; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Jensen, Jan K

    2014-09-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is an acidic, intrinsically disordered extracellular matrix protein with a capacity to modulate biomineralization in vitro and in vivo. The role of posttranslational modification of osteopontin has been intensively studied. Phosphorylation of OPN has been demonstrated to play a role in inhibition of biomineral formation and growth in vitro. Here, we used isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to investigate the ability of OPN to bind the divalent cations Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), both essential components of inorganic minerals in vivo. We found, that bovine OPN binds ~10 Ca(2+) ions with an apparent affinity ~50-fold tighter than Mg(2+), both regardless of OPN phosphorylation, and with affinities significantly stronger than previously reported. These results were confirmed using human derived OPN. This implies that a majority of the acidic residues within OPN must be engaged in calcium interaction under physiological conditions.

  6. Identification of multiple salicylic acid-binding proteins using two high throughput screens

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Murli; Tian, Miaoying; Moreau, Magali; Park, Sang-Wook; Choi, Hyong Woo; Fei, Zhangjun; Friso, Giulia; Asif, Muhammed; Manosalva, Patricia; von Dahl, Caroline C.; Shi, Kai; Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P.; O'Doherty, Inish; Schroeder, Frank C.; van Wijk, Klass J.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important hormone involved in many diverse plant processes, including floral induction, stomatal closure, seed germination, adventitious root initiation, and thermogenesis. It also plays critical functions during responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. The role(s) of SA in signaling disease resistance is by far the best studied process, although it is still only partially understood. To obtain insights into how SA carries out its varied functions, particularly in activating disease resistance, two new high throughput screens were developed to identify novel SA-binding proteins (SABPs). The first utilized crosslinking of the photo-reactive SA analog 4-AzidoSA (4AzSA) to proteins in an Arabidopsis leaf extract, followed by immuno-selection with anti-SA antibodies and then mass spectroscopy-based identification. The second utilized photo-affinity crosslinking of 4AzSA to proteins on a protein microarray (PMA) followed by detection with anti-SA antibodies. To determine whether the candidate SABPs (cSABPs) obtained from these screens were true SABPs, recombinantly-produced proteins were generated and tested for SA-inhibitable crosslinking to 4AzSA, which was monitored by immuno-blot analysis, SA-inhibitable binding of the SA derivative 3-aminoethylSA (3AESA), which was detected by a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay, or SA-inhibitable binding of [3H]SA, which was detected by size exclusion chromatography. Based on our criteria that true SABPs must exhibit SA-binding activity in at least two of these assays, nine new SABPs are identified here; nine others were previously reported. Approximately 80 cSABPs await further assessment. In addition, the conflicting reports on whether NPR1 is an SABP were addressed by showing that it bound SA in all three of the above assays. PMID:25628632

  7. Role of receptor-binding activity of the viral hemagglutinin molecule in the presentation of influenza virus antigens to helper T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenlohr, L C; Gerhard, W; Hackett, C J

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of antigen required to stimulate influenza virus-specific helper T cells was observed to be dependent upon the antigenic form bearing the relevant determinant: intact, nonreplicative virus was needed only in picomolar amounts, while denatured proteins, protein fragments, or synthetic peptides were required in micromolar concentrations for a threshold level of stimulation. Antigenic efficiency of intact virus was found to result from the attachment of virus to sialic acid residues on the surface of the antigen-presenting cell since spikeless viral particles lacking the hemagglutinin molecule were much less efficient antigens for helper T cells and continuous presence of hemagglutination-inhibiting antihemagglutinin antibodies reduced efficiency of stimulation by intact virus approximately 100-fold for both hemagglutinin and internal virion proteins. Influenza virus associated rapidly with antigen-presenting cells; less than 10 min at 20 degrees C was sufficient to introduce virus for a maximal level of T-cell stimulation. This rapid attachment was blocked by antibodies to the hemagglutinin or by pretreatment of the antigen-presenting cells with neuraminidase to remove the cellular virus receptor. Following viral adsorption by antigen-presenting cells, a lag period of 30 min at 37 degrees C was required for the expression of helper T-cell determinants. One early event identified was the movement of the virus to a neuraminidase-insensitive compartment, which can occur at 10 degrees C, but which was not equivalent to expression of helper T-cell determinants. Preincubation of cells with virus at 10 degrees C for 4 h reduced the lag period of helper T-cell determinant expression to 15 min when these cells were shifted to 37 degrees C, suggesting that transition of the virus to a neuraminidase-resistant state is a required step in presentation of T-cell antigenic determinants. PMID:2952806

  8. Possible multiple binding sites for o-aminophenol on uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Howland, R D; Bohm, L D

    1977-01-01

    1. Hepatic microsomal UDP-glucuronyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.17) derived from either weanling or adult rats exhibits three pH optima, at pH 5.4, 7.2 and 9.2, when o-aminophenol is the acceptor substrate, whereas p-nitrophenol is the acceptor substrate only on pH optimum is observed, at pH 5.4.2. Prior treatment of rats of either age with 3-methylcholanthrene results in a 2-3-fold increase in o-aminophenol conjugation at pH 5.4 and a 6-9-fold increase at pH 9.2. At pH 7.2, the induced enzyme is 2 to 3 times more active towards o-aminophenol than the control enzyme, but no pH optimum is demonstrable. 3. o-Aminophenol conjugation at pH 5.4 and 9.2 is inhibited competitively by both p-nitrophenol and p-nitrophenyl glucuronide, suggesting that the two phenolic aglycones share the same binding site. At pH 7.2, however, p-nitrophenyl glucuronide does not inhibit o-aminophenol conjugation, suggesting that the binding site at this pH is not shared by the two phenols. These data are consistent with the existence of more than one binding site for o-aminophenol on UDP-glucuronyltransferase. PMID:17389

  9. High throughput quantitative reverse transcription PCR assays revealing over-expression of cancer testis antigen genes in multiple myeloma stem cell-like side population cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jianguo; Li, Hangwen; Tao, Wenjing; Savoldo, Barbara; Foglesong, Jessica A; King, Lauren C; Zu, Youli; Chang, Chung-Che

    2014-09-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) stem cells, proposed to be responsible for the tumourigenesis, drug resistance and recurrence of this disease, are enriched in the cancer stem cell-like side population (SP). Cancer testis antigens (CTA) are attractive targets for immunotherapy because they are widely expressed in cancers but only in limited types of normal tissues. We designed a high throughput assay, which allowed simultaneous relative quantifying expression of 90 CTA genes associated with MM. In the three MM cell lines tested, six CTA genes were over-expressed in two and LUZP4 and ODF1 were universally up-regulated in all three cell lines. Subsequent study of primary bone marrow (BM) from eight MM patients and four healthy donors revealed that 19 CTA genes were up-regulated in SP of MM compared with mature plasma cells. In contrast, only two CTA genes showed a moderate increase in SP cells of healthy BM. Furthermore, knockdown using small interfering RNA (siRNA) revealed that LUZP4 expression is required for colony-forming ability and drug resistance in MM cells. Our findings indicate that multiple CTA have unique expression profiles in MM SP, suggesting that CTA may serve as targets for immunotherapy that it specific for MM stem cells and which may lead to the long-term cure of MM.

  10. From defining antigens to new therapies in multiple sclerosis: honoring the contributions of Ruth Arnon and Michael Sela.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Lawrence; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-11-01

    Ruth Arnon and Michael Sela profoundly influenced the development of a model system to test new therapies in multiple sclerosis (MS). Their application of the animal model, known as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), for the discovery of Copaxone, opened a new path for testing of drug candidates in MS. By measuring clinical, pathologic, and immunologic outcomes, the biological implications of new drugs could be elucidated. Using EAE they established the efficacy of Copaxone as a therapy for preventing and reducing paralysis and inflammation in the central nervous system without massive immune suppression. This had a huge impact on the field of drug discovery for MS. Much like the use of parabiosis to discover soluble factors associated with obesity, or the replica plating system to probe antibiotic resistance in bacteria, the pioneering research on Copaxone using the EAE model, paved the way for the discovery of other therapeutics in MS, including Natalizumab and Fingolimod. Future applications of this approach may well elucidate novel therapies for the neurodegenerative phase of multiple sclerosis associated with disease progression.

  11. Rational design of a meningococcal antigen inducing broad protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Scarselli, Maria; Aricò, Beatrice; Brunelli, Brunella; Savino, Silvana; Di Marcello, Federica; Palumbo, Emmanuelle; Veggi, Daniele; Ciucchi, Laura; Cartocci, Elena; Bottomley, Matthew James; Malito, Enrico; Lo Surdo, Paola; Comanducci, Maurizio; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Cantini, Francesca; Dragonetti, Sara; Colaprico, Annalisa; Doro, Francesco; Giannetti, Patrizia; Pallaoro, Michele; Brogioni, Barbara; Tontini, Marta; Hilleringmann, Markus; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Banci, Lucia; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino

    2011-07-13

    The sequence variability of protective antigens is a major challenge to the development of vaccines. For Neisseria meningitidis, the bacterial pathogen that causes meningitis, the amino acid sequence of the protective antigen factor H binding protein (fHBP) has more than 300 variations. These sequence differences can be classified into three distinct groups of antigenic variants that do not induce cross-protective immunity. Our goal was to generate a single antigen that would induce immunity against all known sequence variants of N. meningitidis. To achieve this, we rationally designed, expressed, and purified 54 different mutants of fHBP and tested them in mice for the induction of protective immunity. We identified and determined the crystal structure of a lead chimeric antigen that was able to induce high levels of cross-protective antibodies in mice against all variant strains tested. The new fHBP antigen had a conserved backbone that carried an engineered surface containing specificities for all three variant groups. We demonstrate that the structure-based design of multiple immunodominant antigenic surfaces on a single protein scaffold is possible and represents an effective way to create broadly protective vaccines.

  12. Generation of a phage-display library of single-domain camelid VH H antibodies directed against Chlamydomonas reinhardtii antigens, and characterization of VH Hs binding cell-surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenzhi; Rosenberg, Julian N; Wauchope, Akelia D; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Shoemaker, Charles B; Weeks, Donald P; Oyler, George A

    2013-11-01

    Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) are powerful tools for the detection, quantification, purification and subcellular localization of proteins of interest in biological research. We have generated camelid (Lama pacos) heavy chain-only variable VH domain (VH H) libraries against antigens in total cell lysates from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The sdAbs in the sera from immunized animals and VH H antibody domains isolated from the library show specificity to C. reinhardtii and lack of reactivity to antigens from four other algae: Chlorella variabilis, Coccomyxa subellipsoidea, Nannochloropsis oceanica and Thalassiosira pseudonana. Antibodies were produced against a diverse representation of antigens as evidenced by sera ELISA and protein-blot analyses. A phage-display library consisting of the VH H region contained at least 10(6) individual transformants, and thus should represent a wide range of C. reinhardtii antigens. The utility of the phage library was demonstrated by using live C. reinhardtii cells to pan for VH H clones with specific recognition of cell-surface epitopes. The lead candidate VH H clones (designated B11 and H10) bound to C. reinhardtii with EC50 values ≤ 0.5 nm. Treatment of cells with VH H B11 fused to the mCherry or green fluorescent proteins allowed brilliant and specific staining of the C. reinhardtii cell wall and analysis of cell-wall genesis during cell division. Such high-complexity VH H antibody libraries for algae will be valuable tools for algal researchers and biotechnologists.

  13. The Critical Role of Antigen-Presentation-Induced Cytokine Crosstalk in the Central Nervous System in Multiple Sclerosis and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Rebecca A.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that has been extensively studied using the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). It is believed that CD4+ T lymphocytes play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease by mediating the demyelination of neuronal axons via secretion of proinflammatory cytokines resulting in the clinical manifestations. Although a great deal of information has been gained in the last several decades about the cells involved in the inflammatory and disease mediating process, important questions have remained unanswered. It has long been held that initial neuroantigen presentation and T cell activation events occur in the immune periphery and then translocate to the CNS. However, an increasing body of evidence suggests that antigen (Ag) presentation might initiate within the CNS itself. Importantly, it has remained unresolved which antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the CNS are the first to acquire and present neuroantigens during EAE/MS to T cells, and what the conditions are under which this takes place, ie, whether this occurs in the healthy CNS or only during inflammatory conditions and what the related cytokine microenvironment is comprised of. In particular, the central role of interferon-γ as a primary mediator of CNS pathology during EAE has been challenged by the emergence of Th17 cells producing interleukin-17. This review describes our current understanding of potential APCs in the CNS and the contribution of these and other CNS-resident cells to disease pathology. Additionally, we discuss the question of where Ag presentation is initiated and under what conditions neuroantigens are made available to APCs with special emphasis on which cytokines may be important in this process. PMID:21919736

  14. Structural and Functional Characterization of CRM1-Nup214 Interactions Reveals Multiple FG-Binding Sites Involved in Nuclear Export.

    PubMed

    Port, Sarah A; Monecke, Thomas; Dickmanns, Achim; Spillner, Christiane; Hofele, Romina; Urlaub, Henning; Ficner, Ralf; Kehlenbach, Ralph H

    2015-10-27

    CRM1 is the major nuclear export receptor. During translocation through the nuclear pore, transport complexes transiently interact with phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats of multiple nucleoporins. On the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore, CRM1 tightly interacts with the nucleoporin Nup214. Here, we present the crystal structure of a 117-amino-acid FG-repeat-containing fragment of Nup214, in complex with CRM1, Snurportin 1, and RanGTP at 2.85 Å resolution. The structure reveals eight binding sites for Nup214 FG motifs on CRM1, with intervening stretches that are loosely attached to the transport receptor. Nup214 binds to N- and C-terminal regions of CRM1, thereby clamping CRM1 in a closed conformation and stabilizing the export complex. The role of conserved hydrophobic pockets for the recognition of FG motifs was analyzed in biochemical and cell-based assays. Comparative studies with RanBP3 and Nup62 shed light on specificities of CRM1-nucleoporin binding, which serves as a paradigm for transport receptor-nucleoporin interactions.

  15. Cross-class metallo-β-lactamase inhibition by bisthiazolidines reveals multiple binding modes.

    PubMed

    Hinchliffe, Philip; González, Mariano M; Mojica, Maria F; González, Javier M; Castillo, Valerie; Saiz, Cecilia; Kosmopoulou, Magda; Tooke, Catherine L; Llarrull, Leticia I; Mahler, Graciela; Bonomo, Robert A; Vila, Alejandro J; Spencer, James

    2016-06-28

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) hydrolyze almost all β-lactam antibiotics and are unaffected by clinically available β-lactamase inhibitors (βLIs). Active-site architecture divides MBLs into three classes (B1, B2, and B3), complicating development of βLIs effective against all enzymes. Bisthiazolidines (BTZs) are carboxylate-containing, bicyclic compounds, considered as penicillin analogs with an additional free thiol. Here, we show both l- and d-BTZ enantiomers are micromolar competitive βLIs of all MBL classes in vitro, with Kis of 6-15 µM or 36-84 µM for subclass B1 MBLs (IMP-1 and BcII, respectively), and 10-12 µM for the B3 enzyme L1. Against the B2 MBL Sfh-I, the l-BTZ enantiomers exhibit 100-fold lower Kis (0.26-0.36 µM) than d-BTZs (26-29 µM). Importantly, cell-based time-kill assays show BTZs restore β-lactam susceptibility of Escherichia coli-producing MBLs (IMP-1, Sfh-1, BcII, and GOB-18) and, significantly, an extensively drug-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia clinical isolate expressing L1. BTZs therefore inhibit the full range of MBLs and potentiate β-lactam activity against producer pathogens. X-ray crystal structures reveal insights into diverse BTZ binding modes, varying with orientation of the carboxylate and thiol moieties. BTZs bind the di-zinc centers of B1 (IMP-1; BcII) and B3 (L1) MBLs via the free thiol, but orient differently depending upon stereochemistry. In contrast, the l-BTZ carboxylate dominates interactions with the monozinc B2 MBL Sfh-I, with the thiol uninvolved. d-BTZ complexes most closely resemble β-lactam binding to B1 MBLs, but feature an unprecedented disruption of the D120-zinc interaction. Cross-class MBL inhibition therefore arises from the unexpected versatility of BTZ binding. PMID:27303030

  16. Multiple Binding Modes between HNF4[alpha] and the LXXLL Motifs of PGC-1[alpha] Lead to Full Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Rha, Geun Bae; Wu, Guangteng; Shoelson, Steven E.; Chi, Young-In

    2010-04-15

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF4{alpha}) is a novel nuclear receptor that participates in a hierarchical network of transcription factors regulating the development and physiology of such vital organs as the liver, pancreas, and kidney. Among the various transcriptional coregulators with which HNF4{alpha} interacts, peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator 1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) represents a novel coactivator whose activation is unusually robust and whose binding mode appears to be distinct from that of canonical coactivators such as NCoA/SRC/p160 family members. To elucidate the potentially unique molecular mechanism of PGC-1{alpha} recruitment, we have determined the crystal structure of HNF4{alpha} in complex with a fragment of PGC-1{alpha} containing all three of its LXXLL motifs. Despite the presence of all three LXXLL motifs available for interactions, only one is bound at the canonical binding site, with no additional contacts observed between the two proteins. However, a close inspection of the electron density map indicates that the bound LXXLL motif is not a selected one but an averaged structure of more than one LXXLL motif. Further biochemical and functional studies show that the individual LXXLL motifs can bind but drive only minimal transactivation. Only when more than one LXXLL motif is involved can significant transcriptional activity be measured, and full activation requires all three LXXLL motifs. These findings led us to propose a model wherein each LXXLL motif has an additive effect, and the multiple binding modes by HNF4{alpha} toward the LXXLL motifs of PGC-1{alpha} could account for the apparent robust activation by providing a flexible mechanism for combinatorial recruitment of additional coactivators and mediators.

  17. Tetramerization and interdomain flexibility of the replication initiation controller YabA enables simultaneous binding to multiple partners

    PubMed Central

    Felicori, Liza; Jameson, Katie H.; Roblin, Pierre; Fogg, Mark J.; Garcia-Garcia, Transito; Ventroux, Magali; Cherrier, Mickaël V.; Bazin, Alexandre; Noirot, Philippe; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Molina, Franck; Terradot, Laurent; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Françoise

    2016-01-01

    YabA negatively regulates initiation of DNA replication in low-GC Gram-positive bacteria. The protein exerts its control through interactions with the initiator protein DnaA and the sliding clamp DnaN. Here, we combined X-ray crystallography, X-ray scattering (SAXS), modeling and biophysical approaches, with in vivo experimental data to gain insight into YabA function. The crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of YabA solved at 2.7 Å resolution reveals an extended α-helix that contributes to an intermolecular four-helix bundle. Homology modeling and biochemical analysis indicates that the C-terminal domain (CTD) of YabA is a small Zn-binding domain. Multi-angle light scattering and SAXS demonstrate that YabA is a tetramer in which the CTDs are independent and connected to the N-terminal four-helix bundle via flexible linkers. While YabA can simultaneously interact with both DnaA and DnaN, we found that an isolated CTD can bind to either DnaA or DnaN, individually. Site-directed mutagenesis and yeast-two hybrid assays identified DnaA and DnaN binding sites on the YabA CTD that partially overlap and point to a mutually exclusive mode of interaction. Our study defines YabA as a novel structural hub and explains how the protein tetramer uses independent CTDs to bind multiple partners to orchestrate replication initiation in the bacterial cell. PMID:26615189

  18. Increased IgG4 responses to multiple food and animal antigens indicate a polyclonal expansion and differentiation of pre-existing B cells in IgG4-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Culver, Emma L; Vermeulen, Ellen; Makuch, Mateusz; van Leeuwen, Astrid; Sadler, Ross; Cargill, Tamsin; Klenerman, Paul; Aalberse, Rob C; van Ham, S Marieke; Barnes, Eleanor; Rispens, Theo

    2015-01-01

    Background IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic fibroinflammatory condition, characterised by an elevated serum IgG4 concentration and abundant IgG4-positive plasma cells in the involved organs. An important question is whether the elevated IgG4 response is causal or a reflection of immune-regulatory mechanisms of the disease. Objectives To investigate if the IgG4 response in IgG4-RD represents a generalised polyclonal amplification by examining the response to common environmental antigens. Methods Serum from 24 patients with IgG4-RD (14 treatment-naive, 10 treatment-experienced), 9 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and an elevated serum IgG4 (PSC-high IgG4), and 18 healthy controls were tested against egg white and yolk, milk, banana, cat, peanut, rice and wheat antigens by radioimmunoassay. Results We demonstrated an elevated polyclonal IgG4 response to multiple antigens in patients with IgG4-RD and in PSC-high IgG4, compared with healthy controls. There was a strong correlation between serum IgG4 and antigen-specific responses. Responses to antigens were higher in treatment-naive compared with treatment-experienced patients with IgG4-RD. Serum electrophoresis and immunofixation demonstrated polyclonality. Conclusions This is the first study to show enhanced levels of polyclonal IgG4 to multiple antigens in IgG4-RD. This supports that elevated IgG4 levels reflect an aberrant immunological regulation of the overall IgG4 response, but does not exclude that causality of disease could be antigen-driven. PMID:25646372

  19. Presumptive diagnosis of subclinical infections utilizing computer-assisted analysis of sequential enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays against multiple antigens.

    PubMed

    Mallinson, E T; Snyder, D B; Marquardt, W W; Russek-Cohen, E; Savage, P K; Allen, D C; Yancey, F S

    1985-09-01

    One-hundred-seventy-two serum samples, collected sequentially from four flocks of egg- and meat-type chickens, were evaluated for antibodies to multiple infectious agents by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MELISA). The MELISA system used provided simultaneous measurement of antibody titers against avian infectious bronchitis (IB), infectious bursal disease (BD), Newcastle disease, avian encephalomyelitis and reovirus infections, and Mycoplasma gallisepticum. The use of computer-generated graphic print outs of relative MELISA titers provided immediate visulization of over 740 data points and convenient detection of any temporal changes in median titer class (MTC). The temporally changing MTC, or flock profiles obtained, indicated that negligible or waning IB immunity may be a common occurrence in previously vaccinated commercial chickens. These profiles further suggested that, despite no IB revaccination, these same flocks experienced episodes of reexposure to IB which otherwise may have been difficult to detect by conventional clinical or diagnostic laboratory protocols. MELISA profiles and sequential histologic examinations of bursas of Fabricius also provided evidence of a possible BD vaccination problem in young chickens that also experienced excessive losses from coccidiosis, ulcerative enteritis, and Marek's disease. Short sampling intervals were found to foster the detection and definition of fluctuations in MTC which otherwise may have been missed. PMID:4048057

  20. The heterodimeric sweet taste receptor has multiple potential ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Maillet, Emeline; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of two G protein coupled receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. This discovery has increased our understanding at the molecular level of the mechanisms underlying sweet taste. Previous experimental studies using sweet receptor chimeras and mutants show that there are at least three potential binding sites in this heterodimeric receptor. Receptor activity toward the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame depends on residues in the amino terminal domain of human T1R2. In contrast, receptor activity toward the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole depends on residues within the transmembrane domain of human T1R3. Furthermore, receptor activity toward the sweet protein brazzein depends on the cysteine rich domain of human T1R3. Although crystal structures are not available for the sweet taste receptor, useful homology models can be developed based on appropriate templates. The amino terminal domain, cysteine rich domain and transmembrane helix domain of T1R2 and T1R3 have been modeled based on the crystal structures of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1, tumor necrosis factor receptor, and bovine rhodopsin, respectively. We have used homology models of the sweet taste receptors, molecular docking of sweet ligands to the receptors, and site-directed mutagenesis of the receptors to identify potential ligand binding sites of the sweet taste receptor. These studies have led to a better understanding of the structure and function of this heterodimeric receptor, and can act as a guide for rational structure-based design of novel non-caloric sweeteners, which can be used in the fighting against obesity and diabetes. PMID:17168764

  1. Endothelial microparticles (EMP) bind and activate monocytes: elevated EMP-monocyte conjugates in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jy, Wenche; Minagar, Alireza; Jimenez, Joaquin J; Sheremata, William A; Mauro, Lucia M; Horstman, Lawrence L; Bidot, Carlos; Ahn, Yeon S

    2004-09-01

    Elevated plasma endothelial microparticles (EMP) have been documented in MS during exacerbation. However, the role of EMP in pathogenesis of MS remains unclear. We investigated the formation of EMP-monocyte conjugates (EMP-MoC) and their potential role in transendothelial migration of inflammatory cells in MS. EMP-MoC were assayed in 30 MS patients in exacerbation, 20 in remission and in 35 controls. EMP-leukocyte conjugation was investigated flowcytometrically by employing alpha-CD54 or alpha-CD62E for EMP, and alpha-CD45 for leukocytes. EMP-MoC were characterized by identifying adhesion molecules involved and their effect on monocyte function. In vivo (clinical): EMP-MoC were markedly elevated in exacerbation vs. remission and controls, correlating with presence of GD+ MRI lesions. Free CD54+ EMP were not elevated but free CD62E+ EMP were. In vitro: EMP bound preferentially to monocytes, less to neutrophils, but little to lymphocytes. Bound EMP activated monocytes: CD11b expression increased 50% and migration through cerebral endothelial cell layer increased 2.6-fold. Blockade of CD54 reduced binding by 80%. Most CD54+ EMP bound to monocytes, leaving little free EMP, while CD62+ EMP were found both free and bound. These results demonstrated that phenotypic subsets of EMP interacted differently with monocytes. Based on our observations, EMP may enhance inflammation and increase transendothelial migration of monocytes in MS by binding to and activating monocytes through CD54. EMP-MoC were markedly increased in MS patients in exacerbation compared to remission and may serve as a sensitive marker of MS disease activity.

  2. The heterodimeric sweet taste receptor has multiple potential ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Maillet, Emeline; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of two G protein coupled receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. This discovery has increased our understanding at the molecular level of the mechanisms underlying sweet taste. Previous experimental studies using sweet receptor chimeras and mutants show that there are at least three potential binding sites in this heterodimeric receptor. Receptor activity toward the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame depends on residues in the amino terminal domain of human T1R2. In contrast, receptor activity toward the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole depends on residues within the transmembrane domain of human T1R3. Furthermore, receptor activity toward the sweet protein brazzein depends on the cysteine rich domain of human T1R3. Although crystal structures are not available for the sweet taste receptor, useful homology models can be developed based on appropriate templates. The amino terminal domain, cysteine rich domain and transmembrane helix domain of T1R2 and T1R3 have been modeled based on the crystal structures of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1, tumor necrosis factor receptor, and bovine rhodopsin, respectively. We have used homology models of the sweet taste receptors, molecular docking of sweet ligands to the receptors, and site-directed mutagenesis of the receptors to identify potential ligand binding sites of the sweet taste receptor. These studies have led to a better understanding of the structure and function of this heterodimeric receptor, and can act as a guide for rational structure-based design of novel non-caloric sweeteners, which can be used in the fighting against obesity and diabetes.

  3. Substitutions near the Hemagglutinin Receptor-Binding Site Determine the Antigenic Evolution of Influenza A H3N2 Viruses in U.S. Swine

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Nicola S.; Anderson, Tavis K.; Kitikoon, Pravina; Skepner, Eugene; Burke, David F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Swine influenza A virus is an endemic and economically important pathogen in pigs, with the potential to infect other host species. The hemagglutinin (HA) protein is the primary target of protective immune responses and the major component in swine influenza A vaccines. However, as a result of antigenic drift, vaccine strains must be regularly updated to reflect currently circulating strains. Characterizing the cross-reactivity between strains in pigs and seasonal influenza virus strains in humans is also important in assessing the relative risk of interspecies transmission of viruses from one host population to the other. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay data for swine and human H3N2 viruses were used with antigenic cartography to quantify the antigenic differences among H3N2 viruses isolated from pigs in the United States from 1998 to 2013 and the relative cross-reactivity between these viruses and current human seasonal influenza A virus strains. Two primary antigenic clusters were found circulating in the pig population, but with enough diversity within and between the clusters to suggest updates in vaccine strains are needed. We identified single amino acid substitutions that are likely responsible for antigenic differences between the two primary antigenic clusters and between each antigenic cluster and outliers. The antigenic distance between current seasonal influenza virus H3 strains in humans and those endemic in swine suggests that population immunity may not prevent the introduction of human viruses into pigs, and possibly vice versa, reinforcing the need to monitor and prepare for potential incursions. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus (IAV) is an important pathogen in pigs and humans. The hemagglutinin (HA) protein is the primary target of protective immune responses and the major target of vaccines. However, vaccine strains must be updated to reflect current strains. Characterizing the differences between seasonal IAV in humans and swine

  4. Residues in the distal heme pocket of neuroglobin. Implications for the multiple ligand binding steps.

    PubMed

    Uno, Tadayuki; Ryu, Daisuke; Tsutsumi, Hiroko; Tomisugi, Yoshikazu; Ishikawa, Yoshinobu; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Sato, Hideaki; Hayashi, Takashi

    2004-02-13

    Amino acid residues in the ligand binding pocket of human neuroglobin have been identified by site-directed mutagenesis and their properties investigated by resonance Raman and flash photolysis methods. Wild-type neuroglobin has been shown to have six-coordinate heme in both ferric and ferrous states. Substitution of His96 by alanine leads to complete loss of heme, indicating that His96 is the proximal ligand. The resonance Raman spectra of M69L and K67T mutants were similar to those of wild-type (WT) neuroglobin in both ferric and ferrous states. By contrast, H64V was six-coordinate high-spin and five-coordinate high-spin in the ferric and ferrous states, respectively, at acidic pH. The spectra were pH-dependent and six-coordinate with the low-spin component dominating at alkaline pH. In a double mutant H64V/K67T, the high-spin component alone was detected in the both ferric and the ferrous states. This implies that His64 is the endogenous ligand and that Lys67 is situated nearby in the distal pocket. In the ferrous H64V and H64V/K67T mutants, the nu(Fe-His) stretching frequency appears at 221 cm(-1), which is similar to that of deoxymyoglobin. In the ferrous CO-bound state, the nu(Fe-CO) stretching frequency was detected at 521 and 494 cm(-1) in WT, M69L, and K67T, while only the 494 cm(-1) component was detected in the H64V and H64V/K67T mutants. Thus, the 521 cm(-1) component is attributed to the presence of polar His64. The CO binding kinetics were biphasic for WT, H64V, and K67T and monophasic for H64V/K67T. Thus, His64 and Lys67 comprise a unique distal heme pocket in neuroglobin. PMID:14645216

  5. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies. PMID:27775006

  6. The transcriptional repressor ICER binds to multiple loci throughout the genome.

    PubMed

    Muñiz, Luis C; Molina, Carlos A

    2016-09-23

    The events culminating in ovulation are controlled by the cyclical actions of hormones such as Follical Stimulating Hormone (FSH) and Luteinizing Hormone (LH). The secondary messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP) conveys the intracellular activity of these hormones. It is well established that a family of transcription factors facilitate cAMP mediated gene expression, yet it remains unknown how these factors directly affect ovulation. One of these factors, Inducible cAMP Early Repressor (ICER) has been implicated in the transcriptional regulation of cAMP inducible genes during folliculogenesis and ovulation. In order to better determine the role of ICER in ovarian function we have identified novel targets using a genome-wide approach. Using a modification of the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay we directly cloned and sequenced the immunoprecipitated ICER-associated DNAs from an immortalized mouse granulose cell line (GRMO2). The analysis of the immunoprecipitated DNA fragments has revealed that ICER's binding to DNA has the following distribution; 16% within the promoter region, 31% within an intron, 14% were not within a gene, 6% were within 20 kb of a promoter and 3% were within the 3' end of genes.

  7. Coexistence of multiple minor states of fatty acid binding protein and their functional relevance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Binhan; Yang, Daiwen

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are dynamic over a wide range of timescales, but determining the number of distinct dynamic processes and identifying functionally relevant dynamics are still challenging. Here we present the study on human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (hIFABP) using a novel analysis of 15N relaxation dispersion (RD) and chemical shift saturation transfer (CEST) experiments. Through combined analysis of the two types of experiments, we found that hIFABP exists in a four-state equilibrium in which three minor states interconvert directly with the major state. According to conversion rates from the major “closed” state to minor states, these minor states are irrelevant to the function of fatty acid transport. Based on chemical shifts of the minor states which could not be determined from RD data alone but were extracted from a combined analysis of RD and CEST data, we found that all the minor states are native-like. This conclusion is further supported by hydrogen-deuterium exchange experiments. Direct conversions between the native state and native-like intermediate states may suggest parallel multitrack unfolding/folding pathways of hIFABP. Moreover, hydrogen-deuterium exchange data indicate the existence of another locally unfolded minor state that is relevant to the fatty acid entry process. PMID:27677899

  8. Rrp5 Binding at Multiple Sites Coordinates Pre-rRNA Processing and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Lebaron, Simon; Segerstolpe, Åsa; French, Sarah L.; Dudnakova, Tatiana; de lima Alves, Flavia; Granneman, Sander; Rappsilber, Juri; Beyer, Ann L.; Wieslander, Lars; Tollervey, David

    2013-01-01

    Summary In vivo UV crosslinking identified numerous preribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) binding sites for the large, highly conserved ribosome synthesis factor Rrp5. Intramolecular complementation has shown that the C-terminal domain (CTD) of Rrp5 is required for pre-rRNA cleavage at sites A0–A2 on the pathway of 18S rRNA synthesis, whereas the N-terminal domain (NTD) is required for A3 cleavage on the pathway of 5.8S/25S rRNA synthesis. The CTD was crosslinked to sequences flanking A2 and to the snoRNAs U3, U14, snR30, and snR10, which are required for cleavage at A0–A2. The NTD was crosslinked to sequences flanking A3 and to the RNA component of ribonuclease MRP, which cleaves site A3. Rrp5 could also be directly crosslinked to several large structural proteins and nucleoside triphosphatases. A key role in coordinating preribosomal assembly and processing was confirmed by chromatin spreads. Following depletion of Rrp5, cotranscriptional cleavage was lost and preribosome compaction greatly reduced. PMID:24239293

  9. Multiple stepwise pattern for potential of mean force in unfolding the thrombin binding aptamer in complex with Sr2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changwon; Jang, Soonmin; Pak, Youngshang

    2011-12-01

    Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulation in conjunction with umbrella sampling, we obtained the unfolding free energy and the force extension profiles of the thrombin binding DNA aptamer (15-TBA) in complex with Sr2+ (Protein Data Bank code: 1RDE). The resulting potential of mean force (PMF) displays a multiple stepwise pattern with distinct plateau regions. The detailed analysis of the simulation result indicated that each plateau was created by the interplay of the metal ion interacting with self-arranging guanine bases and the successive uptakes of water molecules. The current PMF simulation provides a quantitative description of the unfolding process of 15-TBA DNA driven by stretching and gives molecular insight on its detailed changes of base pair interactions in the presence of the metal cation.

  10. Phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein 4 (PEBP4) is a secreted protein and has multiple functions.

    PubMed

    He, Huan; Liu, Dan; Lin, Hui; Jiang, Shanshan; Ying, Ying; Chun, Shao; Deng, Haiteng; Zaia, Joseph; Wen, Rong; Luo, Zhijun

    2016-07-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine binding proteins (PEBP) represent a superfamily of proteins that are conserved from bacteria to humans. In mammals, four members have been identified, PEBP1-4. To determine the functional differences among PEBP1-4 and the underlying mechanism for their actions, we performed a sequence alignment and found that PEBP4 contains a signal peptide and potential glycosylation sites, whereas PEBP1-3 are intracellular proteins. To test if PEBP4 is secreted, we made constructs with Myc epitope at the amino (N) terminus or carboxyl (C) terminus to mask the signal sequence or keep it free, respectively. Our data revealed that both mouse and human PEBP4 were secreted when the epitope was tagged at their C-terminus. To our surprise, secretion was dependent upon the C-terminal conserved domain in addition to the N-terminal signal sequence. When the epitope was placed to the N-terminus, the recombinant protein failed to secrete and instead, was retained in the cytoplasm. Mass spectrometry detected asparagine (N)-glycosylation on the secreted PEBP4. Although overexpression of N-terminal tagged PEBP4 resulted in an inhibition of ERK activation by EGF, that with a C-terminal epitope tag did not have such an effect. Likewise, transfection of PEBP4 shRNA did not appear to affect ERK activation, suggesting that PEBP4 does not participate in the regulation of this pathway. In contrast, PEBP4 siRNA suppressed phosphorylation of Act at S473. Therefore, our results suggest that PEBP4 is a multifunctional protein and can be secreted. It will be important to investigate the mechanism by which PEBP4 is secreted and regulates cellular events.

  11. A multiplex method for the detection of serum antibodies against in silico-predicted tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; Dörre, Jonathan; Waterboer, Tim; Kopitz, Jürgen; Schneider, Martin; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jäger, Elke; Kloor, Matthias; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2014-12-01

    Humoral immune responses against tumor antigens are studied as indirect markers of antigen exposure and in cancer vaccine studies. An increasing number of tumor antigens potentially translated from mutant genes is identified by advances in genomic sequencing. They represent an interesting source for yet unknown immunogenic epitopes. We here describe a multiplex method using the Luminex technology allowing for the detection of antibodies against multiple in silico-predicted linear neo-antigens in large sets of sera. The approach included 32 synthetic biotinylated peptides comprising a predicted set of frameshift mutation-induced neo-antigens. The antigens were fused to a FLAG epitope to ensure monitoring antigen binding to avidin-linked microspheres in the absence of monoclonal antibodies. Analytical specificity of measured serum antibody reactivity was proven by the detection of immune responses in immunized rabbits and a colorectal cancer patient vaccinated with peptides included in the assay. The measured antibody responses were comparable to peptide ELISA, and inter-assay reproducibility of the multiplex approach was excellent (R (2) > 0.98) for 20 sera tested against all antigens. Our methodic approach represents a valuable platform to monitor antibody responses against predicted antigens. It may be used in individualized cancer vaccine studies, thereby extending the relevance beyond the model system in the presented approach.

  12. Accurate identification of paraprotein antigen targets by epitope reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sompuram, Seshi R.; Bastas, Gerassimos; Vani, Kodela

    2008-01-01

    We describe the first successful clinical application of a new discovery technology, epitope-mediated antigen prediction (E-MAP), to the investigation of multiple myeloma. Until now, there has been no reliable, systematic method to identify the cognate antigens of paraproteins. E-MAP is a variation of previous efforts to reconstruct the epitopes of paraproteins, with the significant difference that it provides enough epitope sequence data so as to enable successful protein database searches. We first reconstruct the paraprotein's epitope by analyzing the peptides that strongly bind. Then, we compile the data and interrogate the nonredundant protein database, searching for a close match. As a clinical proof-of-concept, we apply this technology to uncovering the protein targets of para-proteins in multiple myeloma (MM). E-MAP analysis of 2 MM paraproteins identified human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) as a target in both. E-MAP sequence analysis determined that one para-protein binds to the AD-2S1 epitope of HCMV glycoprotein B. The other binds to the amino terminus of the HCMV UL-48 gene product. We confirmed these predictions using immunoassays and immunoblot analyses. E-MAP represents a new investigative tool for analyzing the role of chronic antigenic stimulation in B-lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:17878398

  13. Nck Binds to the T Cell Antigen Receptor Using Its SH3.1 and SH2 Domains in a Cooperative Manner, Promoting TCR Functioning.

    PubMed

    Paensuwan, Pussadee; Hartl, Frederike A; Yousefi, O Sascha; Ngoenkam, Jatuporn; Wipa, Piyamaporn; Beck-Garcia, Esmeralda; Dopfer, Elaine P; Khamsri, Boonruang; Sanguansermsri, Donruedee; Minguet, Susana; Schamel, Wolfgang W; Pongcharoen, Sutatip

    2016-01-01

    Ligand binding to the TCR causes a conformational change at the CD3 subunits to expose the CD3ε cytoplasmic proline-rich sequence (PRS). It was suggested that the PRS is important for TCR signaling and T cell activation. It has been shown that the purified, recombinant SH3.1 domain of the adaptor molecule noncatalytic region of tyrosine kinase (Nck) can bind to the exposed PRS of CD3ε, but the molecular mechanism of how full-length Nck binds to the TCR in cells has not been investigated so far. Using the in situ proximity ligation assay and copurifications, we show that the binding of Nck to the TCR requires partial phosphorylation of CD3ε, as it is based on two cooperating interactions. First, the SH3.1(Nck) domain has to bind to the nonphosphorylated and exposed PRS, that is, the first ITAM tyrosine has to be in the unphosphorylated state. Second, the SH2(Nck) domain has to bind to the second ITAM tyrosine in the phosphorylated state. Likewise, mutations of the SH3.1 and SH2 domains in Nck1 resulted in the loss of Nck1 binding to the TCR. Furthermore, expression of an SH3.1-mutated Nck impaired TCR signaling and T cell activation. Our data suggest that the exact pattern of CD3ε phosphorylation is critical for TCR functioning. PMID:26590318

  14. Activation of human monocytes by streptococcal rhamnose glucose polymers is mediated by CD14 antigen, and mannan binding protein inhibits TNF-alpha release.

    PubMed

    Soell, M; Lett, E; Holveck, F; Schöller, M; Wachsmann, D; Klein, J P

    1995-01-15

    The present work was initiated to define mechanisms that account for the binding on human monocytes of streptococcal cell wall polysaccharides formed by rhamnose glucose polymers (RGPs), and subsequent stimulatory activities. We show here that RGPs bind to and stimulate human monocytes to produce TNF-alpha in a dose-dependent manner. To detect cell surface RGPs binding proteins, intact monocytes were biotinylated before lysis with Nonidet P-40 and solubilized proteins were incubated with RGPs Affi-Prep beads. One major membrane protein of 55 kDa was specifically detected and identified as CD14 because it reacted with anti-CD14 mAbs. Furthermore, anti-CD14 mAbs were able to perform a dose-dependent inhibition of RGPs binding, and suppressed TNF-alpha release from RGPs-stimulated monocytes. Moreover, we demonstrated that RGPs also bind to CD11b; however, this binding is not implicated in synthesis of TNF-alpha. Interestingly, RGPs binding to monocytes was enhanced by human normal serum (HNS) whereas HNS inhibits the TNF-alpha-stimulating activity of RGPs. Western blotting analysis of HNS proteins purified on RGPs Affi-prep beads revealed three specific bands of 75, 55, and 32 kDa reactive with anti-C3 Abs, anti-CD14 mAbs (TUK4), and anti-human mannan binding protein (hMBP)-derived peptide IgG, respectively. These results suggest that C3, soluble CD14, and hMBP form complexes that are probably active in enhancing the binding of RGPs to monocytes. Additional studies have shown that hMBP that recognizes RGPs prevents, unlike the LPS binding protein, TNF-alpha release by inhibiting the binding of RGPs to CD14 Ag. By incubating cells with a constant amount of RGPs-hMBP complexes in the presence or absence of increasing concentrations of C1q, we also demonstrated that C1q receptor mediates the binding and probably the uptake of RGPs-hMBP complexes by human monocytes. PMID:7529289

  15. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Lysophosphatidic Acid Binding by a Humanized Monoclonal Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    J Fleming; J Wojciak; M Campbell; T Huxford

    2011-12-31

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a common product of glycerophospholipid metabolism and an important mediator of signal transduction. Aberrantly high LPA concentrations accompany multiple disease states. One potential approach for treatment of these diseases, therefore, is the therapeutic application of antibodies that recognize and bind LPA as their antigen. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of an anti-LPA antibody (LT3015) Fab fragment in its antigen-free form to 2.15 {angstrom} resolution and in complex with two LPA isotypes (14:0 and 18:2) to resolutions of 1.98 and 2.51 {angstrom}, respectively. The variable CDR (complementarity-determining region) loops at the antigen binding site adopt nearly identical conformations in the free and antigen-bound crystal structures. The crystallographic models reveal that the LT3015 antibody employs both heavy- and light-chain CDR loops to create a network of eight hydrogen bonds with the glycerophosphate head group of its LPA antigen. The head group is almost completely excluded from contact with solvent, while the hydrocarbon tail is partially solvent-exposed. In general, mutation of amino acid residues at the antigen binding site disrupts LPA binding. However, the introduction of particular mutations chosen strategically on the basis of the structures can positively influence LPA binding affinity. Finally, these structures elucidate the exquisite specificity demonstrated by an anti-lipid antibody for binding a structurally simple and seemingly unconstrained target molecule.

  16. Keys to Lipid Selection in Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Catalysis: Structural Flexibility, Gating Residues and Multiple Binding Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Giulia; Bauer, Inga; Campomanes, Pablo; Cavalli, Andrea; Armirotti, Andrea; Girotto, Stefania; Rothlisberger, Ursula; De Vivo, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) regulates the endocannabinoid system cleaving primarily the lipid messenger anandamide. FAAH has been well characterized over the years and, importantly, it represents a promising drug target to treat several diseases, including inflammatory-related diseases and cancer. But its enzymatic mechanism for lipid selection to specifically hydrolyze anandamide, rather than similar bioactive lipids, remains elusive. Here, we clarify this mechanism in FAAH, examining the role of the dynamic paddle, which is formed by the gating residues Phe432 and Trp531 at the boundary between two cavities that form the FAAH catalytic site (the “membrane-access” and the “acyl chain-binding” pockets). We integrate microsecond-long MD simulations of wild type and double mutant model systems (Phe432Ala and Trp531Ala) of FAAH, embedded in a realistic membrane/water environment, with mutagenesis and kinetic experiments. We comparatively analyze three fatty acid substrates with different hydrolysis rates (anandamide > oleamide > palmitoylethanolamide). Our findings identify FAAH’s mechanism to selectively accommodate anandamide into a multi-pocket binding site, and to properly orient the substrate in pre-reactive conformations for efficient hydrolysis that is interceded by the dynamic paddle. Our findings therefore endorse a structural framework for a lipid selection mechanism mediated by structural flexibility and gating residues between multiple binding cavities, as found in FAAH. Based on the available structural data, this exquisite catalytic strategy for substrate specificity seems to be shared by other lipid-degrading enzymes with similar enzymatic architecture. The mechanistic insights for lipid selection might assist de-novo enzyme design or drug discovery efforts. PMID:26111155

  17. Multiple length peptide-pheromone variants produced by Streptococcus pyogenes directly bind Rgg proteins to confer transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Chaitanya; Jimenez, Juan Cristobal; Nanavati, Dhaval; Federle, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, a human-restricted pathogen, accounts for substantial mortality related to infections worldwide. Recent studies indicate that streptococci produce and respond to several secreted peptide signaling molecules (pheromones), including those known as short hydrophobic peptides (SHPs), to regulate gene expression by a quorum-sensing mechanism. Upon transport into the bacterial cell, pheromones bind to and modulate activity of receptor proteins belonging to the Rgg family of transcription factors. Previously, we reported biofilm regulation by the Rgg2/3 quorum-sensing circuit in S. pyogenes. The aim of this study was to identify the composition of mature pheromones from cell-free culture supernatants that facilitate biofilm formation. Bioluminescent reporters were employed to detect active pheromones in culture supernatants fractionated by reverse-phase chromatography, and mass spectrometry was used to characterize their properties. Surprisingly, multiple SHPs that varied by length were detected. Synthetic peptides of each variant were tested individually using bioluminescence reporters and biofilm growth assays, and although activities differed widely among the group, peptides comprising the C-terminal eight amino acids of the full-length native peptide were most active. Direct Rgg/SHP interactions were determined using a fluorescence polarization assay that utilized FITC-labeled peptide ligands. Peptide receptor affinities were seen to be as low as 500 nm and their binding affinities directly correlated with observed bioactivity. Revelation of naturally produced pheromones along with determination of their affinity for cognate receptors are important steps forward in designing compounds whose purpose is positioned for future therapeutics aimed at treating infections through the interference of bacterial communication.

  18. The combined use of photoaffinity labeling and surface plasmon resonance-based technology identifies multiple salicylic acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miaoying; von Dahl, Caroline C; Liu, Po-Pu; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J; Klessig, Daniel F

    2012-12-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a small phenolic molecule that not only is the active ingredient in the multi-functional drug aspirin, but also serves as a plant hormone that affects diverse processes during growth, development, responses to abiotic stresses and disease resistance. Although a number of SA-binding proteins (SABPs) have been identified, the underlying mechanisms of action of SA remain largely unknown. Efforts to identify additional SA targets, and thereby elucidate the complex SA signaling network in plants, have been hindered by the lack of effective approaches. Here, we report two sensitive approaches that utilize SA analogs in conjunction with either a photoaffinity labeling technique or surface plasmon resonance-based technology to identify and evaluate candidate SABPs from Arabidopsis. Using these approaches, multiple proteins, including the E2 subunit of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and the glutathione S-transferases GSTF2, GSTF8, GSTF10 and GSTF11, were identified as SABPs. Their association with SA was further substantiated by the ability of SA to inhibit their enzymatic activity. The photoaffinity labeling and surface plasmon resonance-based approaches appear to be more sensitive than the traditional approach for identifying plant SABPs using size-exclusion chromatography with radiolabeled SA, as these proteins exhibited little to no SA-binding activity in such an assay. The development of these approaches therefore complements conventional techniques and helps dissect the SA signaling network in plants, and may also help elucidate the mechanisms through which SA acts as a multi-functional drug in mammalian systems.

  19. Targeting glutamine metabolism in multiple myeloma enhances BIM binding to BCL-2 eliciting synthetic lethality to venetoclax

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, R; Matulis, SM; Wei, C; Nooka, AK; Von Hollen, HE; Lonial, S; Boise, LH; Shanmugam, M

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy that is largely incurable due to development of resistance to therapy-elicited cell death. Nutrients are intricately connected to maintenance of cellular viability in part by inhibition of apoptosis. We were interested to determine if examination of metabolic regulation of BCL-2 proteins may provide insight on alternative routes to engage apoptosis. MM cells are reliant on glucose and glutamine and withdrawal of either nutrient is associated with varying levels of apoptosis. We and others have demonstrated that glucose maintains levels of key resistance-promoting BCL-2 family member, myeloid cell leukemic factor 1 (MCL-1). Cells continuing to survive in the absence of glucose or glutamine were found to maintain expression of MCL-1 but importantly induce pro-apoptotic BIM expression. One potential mechanism for continued survival despite induction of BIM could be due to binding and sequestration of BIM to alternate pro-survival BCL-2 members. Our investigation revealed that cells surviving glutamine withdrawal in particular, enhance expression and binding of BIM to BCL-2, consequently sensitizing these cells to the BH3 mimetic venetoclax. Glutamine deprivation-driven sensitization to venetoclax can be reversed by metabolic supplementation with TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate. Inhibition of glucose metabolism with the GLUT4 inhibitor ritonavir elicits variable cytotoxicity in MM that is marginally enhanced with venetoclax treatment, however, targeting glutamine metabolism with 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine uniformly sensitized MM cell lines and relapse/refractory patient samples to venetoclax. Our studies reveal a potent therapeutic strategy of metabolically driven synthetic lethality involving targeting glutamine metabolism for sensitization to venetoclax in MM. PMID:26640142

  20. Targeting glutamine metabolism in multiple myeloma enhances BIM binding to BCL-2 eliciting synthetic lethality to venetoclax.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, R; Matulis, S M; Wei, C; Nooka, A K; Von Hollen, H E; Lonial, S; Boise, L H; Shanmugam, M

    2016-07-28

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy that is largely incurable due to development of resistance to therapy-elicited cell death. Nutrients are intricately connected to maintenance of cellular viability in part by inhibition of apoptosis. We were interested to determine if examination of metabolic regulation of BCL-2 proteins may provide insight on alternative routes to engage apoptosis. MM cells are reliant on glucose and glutamine and withdrawal of either nutrient is associated with varying levels of apoptosis. We and others have demonstrated that glucose maintains levels of key resistance-promoting BCL-2 family member, myeloid cell leukemic factor 1 (MCL-1). Cells continuing to survive in the absence of glucose or glutamine were found to maintain expression of MCL-1 but importantly induce pro-apoptotic BIM expression. One potential mechanism for continued survival despite induction of BIM could be due to binding and sequestration of BIM to alternate pro-survival BCL-2 members. Our investigation revealed that cells surviving glutamine withdrawal in particular, enhance expression and binding of BIM to BCL-2, consequently sensitizing these cells to the BH3 mimetic venetoclax. Glutamine deprivation-driven sensitization to venetoclax can be reversed by metabolic supplementation with TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate. Inhibition of glucose metabolism with the GLUT4 inhibitor ritonavir elicits variable cytotoxicity in MM that is marginally enhanced with venetoclax treatment, however, targeting glutamine metabolism with 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine uniformly sensitized MM cell lines and relapse/refractory patient samples to venetoclax. Our studies reveal a potent therapeutic strategy of metabolically driven synthetic lethality involving targeting glutamine metabolism for sensitization to venetoclax in MM.

  1. A Crystallin Fold in the Interleukin-4-inducing Principle of Schistosoma mansoni Eggs (IPSE/α-1) Mediates IgE Binding for Antigen-independent Basophil Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, N. Helge; Mayerhofer, Hubert; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Blindow, Silke; Barths, Daniela; Mewes, Astrid; Weimar, Thomas; Köhli, Thies; Bade, Steffen; Madl, Tobias; Frey, Andreas; Haas, Helmut; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen; Sattler, Michael; Schramm, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The IL-4-inducing principle from Schistosoma mansoni eggs (IPSE/α-1), the major secretory product of eggs from the parasitic worm S. mansoni, efficiently triggers basophils to release the immunomodulatory key cytokine interleukin-4. Activation by IPSE/α-1 requires the presence of IgE on the basophils, but the detailed molecular mechanism underlying activation is unknown. NMR and crystallographic analysis of IPSEΔNLS, a monomeric IPSE/α-1 mutant, revealed that IPSE/α-1 is a new member of the βγ-crystallin superfamily. We demonstrate that this molecule is a general immunoglobulin-binding factor with highest affinity for IgE. NMR binding studies of IPSEΔNLS with the 180-kDa molecule IgE identified a large positively charged binding surface that includes a flexible loop, which is unique to the IPSE/α-1 crystallin fold. Mutational analysis of amino acids in the binding interface showed that residues contributing to IgE binding are important for IgE-dependent activation of basophils. As IPSE/α-1 is unable to cross-link IgE, we propose that this molecule, by taking advantage of its unique IgE-binding crystallin fold, activates basophils by a novel, cross-linking-independent mechanism. PMID:26163514

  2. The Transcription Factor AmrZ Utilizes Multiple DNA Binding Modes to Recognize Activator and Repressor Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, Edward E.; Waligora, Elizabeth A.; Xu, Binjie; Dellos-Nolan, Sheri; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Hollis, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    AmrZ, a member of the Ribbon-Helix-Helix family of DNA binding proteins, functions as both a transcriptional activator and repressor of multiple genes encoding Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors. The expression of these virulence factors leads to chronic and sustained infections associated with worsening prognosis. In this study, we present the X-ray crystal structure of AmrZ in complex with DNA containing the repressor site, amrZ1. Binding of AmrZ to this site leads to auto-repression. AmrZ binds this DNA sequence as a dimer-of-dimers, and makes specific base contacts to two half sites, separated by a five base pair linker region. Analysis of the linker region shows a narrowing of the minor groove, causing significant distortions. AmrZ binding assays utilizing sequences containing variations in this linker region reveals that secondary structure of the DNA, conferred by the sequence of this region, is an important determinant in binding affinity. The results from these experiments allow for the creation of a model where both intrinsic structure of the DNA and specific nucleotide recognition are absolutely necessary for binding of the protein. We also examined AmrZ binding to the algD promoter, which results in activation of the alginate exopolysaccharide biosynthetic operon, and found the protein utilizes different interactions with this site. Finally, we tested the in vivo effects of this differential binding by switching the AmrZ binding site at algD, where it acts as an activator, for a repressor binding sequence and show that differences in binding alone do not affect transcriptional regulation. PMID:22511872

  3. (S)-2-Amino-6-nitrohexanoic Acid Binds to Human Arginase I through Multiple Nitro−Metal Coordination Interactions in the Binuclear Manganese Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharian, T.; Di Costanzo, L; Christianson, D

    2008-01-01

    The binding affinity of (S)-2-amino-6-nitrohexanoic acid to human arginase I was studied using surface plasmon resonance (K{sub d} = 60 {mu}M), and the X-ray crystal structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complex was determined at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution to reveal multiple nitro-metal coordination interactions.

  4. Vitamin D Binding Protein Isoforms and Apolipoprotein E in Cerebrospinal Fluid as Prognostic Biomarkers of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Katarzyna; Minari, Nicoletta; Falvo, Sara; Marnetto, Fabiana; Caldano, Marzia; Reviglione, Raffaella; Berchialla, Paola; Capobianco, Marco A.; Malentacchi, Maria; Corpillo, Davide; Bertolotto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease of the central nervous system with a heterogeneous and unpredictable course. To date there are no prognostic biomarkers even if they would be extremely useful for early patient intervention with personalized therapies. In this context, the analysis of inter-individual differences in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome may lead to the discovery of biological markers that are able to distinguish the various clinical forms at diagnosis. Methods To this aim, a two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) study was carried out on individual CSF samples from 24 untreated women who underwent lumbar puncture (LP) for suspected MS. The patients were clinically monitored for 5 years and then classified according to the degree of disease aggressiveness and the disease-modifying therapies prescribed during follow up. Results The hierarchical cluster analysis of 2-DE dataset revealed three protein spots which were identified by means of mass spectrometry as Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) and two isoforms of vitamin D binding protein (DBP). These three protein spots enabled us to subdivide the patients into subgroups correlated with clinical classification (MS aggressive forms identification: 80%). In particular, we observed an opposite trend of values for the two protein spots corresponding to different DBP isoforms suggesting a role of a post-translational modification rather than the total protein content in patient categorization. Conclusions These findings proved to be very interesting and innovative and may be developed as new candidate prognostic biomarkers of MS aggressiveness, if confirmed. PMID:26046356

  5. The anthrax protective antigen (PA63) bound conformation of a peptide inhibitor of the binding of lethal factor to PA63: as determined by trNOESY NMR and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Rickey P; Bhattacharjee, Apurba K; Koser, Brandon W; Traficante, Daniel D

    2004-10-21

    Anthrax protective antigen (PA) is one of the three proteins produced by the gram positive bacteria Bacillus anthracis collectively known as the "anthrax toxin" (Ascenzi, P.; Visca, P.; Ippolito, G.; Spallarossa, A.; Bolognesi, M.; et al. Anthrax toxin: a tripartite lethal combination. FEBS Lett. 2002, 531, 384-388). The role played by PA in anthrax intoxication is to transport the two enzymes lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF) into the cell. Collier and co-workers (Mourez, M.; Kane, R. S.; Mogridge, J.; Metallo, S.; Deschatelets, P.; et al. Designing a polyvalent inhibitor of anthrax toxin. Nat. Biotechnol. 2001, 958). reported the isolation of two peptides via phage display that bind to the PA63 heptamer and inhibit its interaction with LF and EF, and thereby prevent the transport of LF and EF into the cell. One of these peptides, His-Thr-Ser-Thr-Try-Trp-Trp-Leu-Asp-Gly-Ala-Pro (P1), was selected for structural investigation on the basis of its ability to prevent the binding of LF to the PA63 heptamer bundle. Two-dimensional trNOESY experiments coupled with NOE restrained simulated annealing calculations were used to determine the PA63-bound conformation of P1. On binding to PA63, P1 adopts a helical conformation involving residues 3-9 while the C- and N-terminal residues exhibit dynamic fraying.

  6. Generation of Two-color Antigen Microarrays for the Simultaneous Detection of IgG and IgM Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Chruscinski, Andrzej; Huang, Flora Y Y; Ulndreaj, Antigona; Chua, Conan; Fehlings, Michael; Rao, Vivek; Ross, Heather J; Levy, Gary A

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies, which are antibodies against self-antigens, are present in many disease states and can serve as markers for disease activity. The levels of autoantibodies to specific antigens are typically detected with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. However, screening for multiple autoantibodies with ELISA can be time-consuming and requires a large quantity of patient sample. The antigen microarray technique is an alternative method that can be used to screen for autoantibodies in a multiplex fashion. In this technique, antigens are arrayed onto specially coated microscope slides with a robotic microarrayer. The slides are probed with patient serum samples and subsequently fluorescent-labeled secondary antibodies are added to detect binding of serum autoantibodies to the antigens. The autoantibody reactivities are revealed and quantified by scanning the slides with a scanner that can detect fluorescent signals. Here we describe methods to generate custom antigen microarrays. Our current arrays are printed with 9 solid pins and can include up to 162 antigens spotted in duplicate. The arrays can be easily customized by changing the antigens in the source plate that is used by the microarrayer. We have developed a two-color secondary antibody detection scheme that can distinguish IgG and IgM reactivities on the same slide surface. The detection system has been optimized to study binding of human and murine autoantibodies. PMID:27685156

  7. Ropizine concurrently enhances and inhibits ( sup 3 H) dextromethorpan binding to different structures of the guinea pig brain: Autoradiographic evidence for multiple binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Canoll, P.D.; Smith, P.R.; and Musacchio, J.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Ropizine produces a simultaneous enhancement and inhibition of ({sup 3}H) dextromethorphan (DM) high-affinity binding to different areas of the guinea pig brain. These results imply that there are two distinct types of high-affinity ({sup 3}H)DM binding sites, which are present in variable proportions in different brain structures. The ropizine-enhances ({sup 3}H)DM binding type was preferentially inhibited by (+)-pentazocine. This is consistent with the presumption that the (+)-pentazocine-sensitive site is identical with the common site for DM and 3-(-3-Hydroxphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine ((+)-3-PPP). The second binding type, which is inhibited by ropizine and is not so sensitive to (+){minus} pentazocine, has not been fully characterized. This study demonstrates that the biphasic effects to ropizine are due, at least in part, to the effects of ropizine on two different types of ({sup 3}H)DM binding sites. However, this study does not rule out that the common DM/(+)-3-PPP site also might be inhibited by higher concentrations of ropizine.

  8. Upregulation of capsule enables Streptococcus pyogenes to evade immune recognition by antigen-specific antibodies directed to the G-related alpha2-macroglobulin-binding protein GRAB located on the bacterial surface.

    PubMed

    Dinkla, Katrin; Sastalla, Inka; Godehardt, Antonia W; Janze, Nina; Chhatwal, Gursharan S; Rohde, Manfred; Medina, Eva

    2007-07-01

    One of the major problems associated with the development of a vaccine against Streptococcus pyogenes is the ability of this pathogen to escape recognition by antibodies directed against conserved surface-associated determinants and to establish infection in the setting of an acquired immune response. Identification of the mechanism(s) used by S. pyogenes to avoid recognition by antigen-specific antibodies and escape killing in blood was the focus of this study. We showed here that S. pyogenes was capable of surviving in human blood containing high levels of antibodies directed against the G-related alpha2-macroglobulin-binding protein GRAB, a highly conserved bacterial surface protein. S. pyogenes upregulated the hyaluronic acid capsule production during incubation with human blood, suggesting that the capsule may structurally minimize antibody access to protein GRAB. This hypothesis was confirmed by the ability of anti-GRAB antibodies to promote opsonophagocytosis of a capsule-deficient mutant of S. pyogenes but not of the encapsulated wild-type strain. Capsule upregulation and protection of S. pyogenes from opsonophagocytosis in the presence of anti-GRAB antibodies was also observed in a murine model of streptococcal infection. Thus, masking of surface immunogenic determinants by the hyaluronic acid capsule may constitute a novel mechanism of S. pyogenes for evasion of antigen-specific antibodies.

  9. The Neck Region of the C-type Lectin DC-SIGN Regulates Its Surface Spatiotemporal Organization and Virus-binding Capacity on Antigen-presenting Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Carlo; Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Joosten, Ben; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Gualda, Emilio J.; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Figdor, Carl G.; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.; Cambi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The C-type lectin DC-SIGN expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) facilitates capture and internalization of a plethora of different pathogens. Although it is known that DC-SIGN organizes in nanoclusters at the surface of DCs, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this well defined nanopatterning and role in viral binding remain enigmatic. By combining biochemical and advanced biophysical techniques, including optical superresolution and single particle tracking, we demonstrate that DC-SIGN intrinsic nanoclustering strictly depends on its molecular structure. DC-SIGN nanoclusters exhibited free, Brownian diffusion on the cell membrane. Truncation of the extracellular neck region, known to abrogate tetramerization, significantly reduced nanoclustering and concomitantly increased lateral diffusion. Importantly, DC-SIGN nanocluster dissolution exclusively compromised binding to nanoscale size pathogens. Monte Carlo simulations revealed that heterogeneity on nanocluster density and spatial distribution confers broader binding capabilities to DC-SIGN. As such, our results underscore a direct relationship between spatial nanopatterning, driven by intermolecular interactions between the neck regions, and receptor diffusion to provide DC-SIGN with the exquisite ability to dock pathogens at the virus length scale. Insight into how virus receptors are organized prior to virus binding and how they assemble into functional platforms for virus docking is helpful to develop novel strategies to prevent virus entry and infection. PMID:23019323

  10. Presentation of hepatocellular antigens

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, Arash; Crispe, Ian Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The liver is an organ in which antigen-specific T-cell responses manifest a bias toward immune tolerance. This is clearly seen in the rejection of allogeneic liver transplants, and multiple other phenomena suggest that this effect is more general. These include tolerance toward antigens introduced via the portal vein, immune failure to several hepatotropic viruses, the lack of natural liver-stage immunity to malaria parasites, and the frequent metastasis of cancers to the liver. Here we review the mechanisms by which T cells engage with hepatocellular antigens, the context in which such encounters occur, and the mechanisms that act to suppress a full T-cell response. While many mechanisms play a role, we will argue that two important processes are the constraints on the cross-presentation of hepatocellular antigens, and the induction of negative feedback inhibition driven by interferons. The constant exposure of the liver to microbial products from the intestine may drive innate immunity, rendering the local environment unfavorable for specific T-cell responses through this mechanism. Nevertheless, tolerance toward hepatocellular antigens is not monolithic and under specific circumstances allows both effective immunity and immunopathology. PMID:26924525

  11. Substitution of Heavy Complementarity Determining Region 3 (CDR-H3) Residues Can Synergistically Enhance Functional Activity of Antibody and Its Binding Affinity to HER2 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Seung Kee; Park, So Ra; Park, Ami; Oh, Hyun Mi; Shin, Hyun Jung; Jeon, Eun Ju; Kim, Seiwhan; Park, Hyun June; Yeon, Young Joo; Yoo, Young Je

    2016-01-01

    To generate a biobetter that has improved therapeutic activity, we constructed scFv libraries via random mutagenesis of several residues of CDR-H3 and -L3 of hu4D5. The scFv clones were isolated from the phage display libraries by stringent panning, and their anti-proliferative activity against HER2-positive cancer cells was evaluated as a primary selection criterion. Consequently, we selected AH06 as a biobetter antibody that had a 7.2-fold increase in anti-proliferative activity (IC50: 0.81 nM) against the gastric cancer cell line NCI-N87 and a 7.4-fold increase in binding affinity (KD: 60 pM) to HER2 compared to hu4D5. The binding energy calculation and molecular modeling suggest that the substitution of residues of CDR-H3 to W98, F100c, A101 and L102 could stabilize binding of the antibody to HER2 and there could be direct hydrophobic interactions between the aromatic ring of W98 and the aliphatic group of I613 within HER2 domain IV as well as the heavy and light chain hydrophobic interactions by residues F100c, A101 and L102 of CDR-H3. Therefore, we speculate that two such interactions were exerted by the residues W98 and F100c. A101 and L102 may have a synergistic effect on the increase in the binding affinity to HER2. AH06 specifically binds to domain IV of HER2, and it decreased the phosphorylation level of HER2 and AKT. Above all, it highly increased the overall level of p27 compared to hu4D5 in the gastric cancer cell line NCI-N82, suggesting that AH06 could potentially be a more efficient therapeutic agent than hu4D5. PMID:26743905

  12. Substitution of Heavy Complementarity Determining Region 3 (CDR-H3) Residues Can Synergistically Enhance Functional Activity of Antibody and Its Binding Affinity to HER2 Antigen.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seung Kee; Park, So Ra; Park, Ami; Oh, Hyun Mi; Shin, Hyun Jung; Jeon, Eun Ju; Kim, Seiwhan; Park, Hyun June; Yeon, Young Joo; Yoo, Young Je

    2016-03-01

    To generate a biobetter that has improved therapeutic activity, we constructed scFv libraries via random mutagenesis of several residues of CDR-H3 and -L3 of hu4D5. The scFv clones were isolated from the phage display libraries by stringent panning, and their anti-proliferative activity against HER2-positive cancer cells was evaluated as a primary selection criterion. Consequently, we selected AH06 as a biobetter antibody that had a 7.2-fold increase in anti-proliferative activity (IC50: 0.81 nM) against the gastric cancer cell line NCI-N87 and a 7.4-fold increase in binding affinity (KD: 60 pM) to HER2 compared to hu4D5. The binding energy calculation and molecular modeling suggest that the substitution of residues of CDR-H3 to W98, F100c, A101 and L102 could stabilize binding of the antibody to HER2 and there could be direct hydrophobic interactions between the aromatic ring of W98 and the aliphatic group of I613 within HER2 domain IV as well as the heavy and light chain hydrophobic interactions by residues F100c, A101 and L102 of CDR-H3. Therefore, we speculate that two such interactions were exerted by the residues W98 and F100c. A101 and L102 may have a synergistic effect on the increase in the binding affinity to HER2. AH06 specifically binds to domain IV of HER2, and it decreased the phosphorylation level of HER2 and AKT. Above all, it highly increased the overall level of p27 compared to hu4D5 in the gastric cancer cell line NCI-N82, suggesting that AH06 could potentially be a more efficient therapeutic agent than hu4D5.

  13. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, N. O.

    2015-01-13

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that colocalization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. In the third quarter of the third year, F344 rats vaccinated with adjuvanted NLP formulations were challenged with F. tularensis SCHU S4 at Battelle. Preliminary data indicate that up to 65% of females vaccinated intranasally with an NLP-based formulation survived this challenge, compared to only 20% survival of naïve animals. In addition, NLPs were successfully formulated with Burkholderia protein antigens. IACUC approval for immunological assessments in BALB/c mice was received and we anticipate that these assessments will begin by March 2015, pending ACURO approval.

  14. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, N. O.

    2015-01-06

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that colocalization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. In the second quarter of the third year, LLNL finalized all immunological assessments of NLP vaccine formulations in the F344 model. Battelle has immunized rats with three unique NLP formulations by either intramuscular or intranasal administration. All inoculations have been completed, and protective efficacy against an aerosolized challenge will begin at the end of October, 2014.

  15. LANA Binds to Multiple Active Viral and Cellular Promoters and Associates with the H3K4Methyltransferase hSET1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianhong; Yang, Yajie; Turner, Peter C.; Jain, Vaibhav; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Renne, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a γ-herpesvirus associated with KS and two lymphoproliferative diseases. Recent studies characterized epigenetic modification of KSHV episomes during latency and determined that latency-associated genes are associated with H3K4me3 while most lytic genes are associated with the silencing mark H3K27me3. Since the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) (i) is expressed very early after de novo infection, (ii) interacts with transcriptional regulators and chromatin remodelers, and (iii) regulates the LANA and RTA promoters, we hypothesized that LANA may contribute to the establishment of latency through epigenetic control. We performed a detailed ChIP-seq analysis in cells of lymphoid and endothelial origin and compared H3K4me3, H3K27me3, polII, and LANA occupancy. On viral episomes LANA binding was detected at numerous lytic and latent promoters, which were transactivated by LANA using reporter assays. LANA binding was highly enriched at H3K4me3 peaks and this co-occupancy was also detected on many host gene promoters. Bioinformatic analysis of enriched LANA binding sites in combination with biochemical binding studies revealed three distinct binding patterns. A small subset of LANA binding sites showed sequence homology to the characterized LBS1/2 sequence in the viral terminal repeat. A large number of sites contained a novel LANA binding motif (TCCAT)3 which was confirmed by gel shift analysis. Third, some viral and cellular promoters did not contain LANA binding sites and are likely enriched through protein/protein interaction. LANA was associated with H3K4me3 marks and in PEL cells 86% of all LANA bound promoters were transcriptionally active, leading to the hypothesis that LANA interacts with the machinery that methylates H3K4. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated LANA association with endogenous hSET1 complexes in both lymphoid and endothelial cells suggesting that LANA may contribute to the epigenetic

  16. LANA binds to multiple active viral and cellular promoters and associates with the H3K4methyltransferase hSET1 complex.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianhong; Yang, Yajie; Turner, Peter C; Jain, Vaibhav; McIntyre, Lauren M; Renne, Rolf

    2014-07-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a γ-herpesvirus associated with KS and two lymphoproliferative diseases. Recent studies characterized epigenetic modification of KSHV episomes during latency and determined that latency-associated genes are associated with H3K4me3 while most lytic genes are associated with the silencing mark H3K27me3. Since the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) (i) is expressed very early after de novo infection, (ii) interacts with transcriptional regulators and chromatin remodelers, and (iii) regulates the LANA and RTA promoters, we hypothesized that LANA may contribute to the establishment of latency through epigenetic control. We performed a detailed ChIP-seq analysis in cells of lymphoid and endothelial origin and compared H3K4me3, H3K27me3, polII, and LANA occupancy. On viral episomes LANA binding was detected at numerous lytic and latent promoters, which were transactivated by LANA using reporter assays. LANA binding was highly enriched at H3K4me3 peaks and this co-occupancy was also detected on many host gene promoters. Bioinformatic analysis of enriched LANA binding sites in combination with biochemical binding studies revealed three distinct binding patterns. A small subset of LANA binding sites showed sequence homology to the characterized LBS1/2 sequence in the viral terminal repeat. A large number of sites contained a novel LANA binding motif (TCCAT)3 which was confirmed by gel shift analysis. Third, some viral and cellular promoters did not contain LANA binding sites and are likely enriched through protein/protein interaction. LANA was associated with H3K4me3 marks and in PEL cells 86% of all LANA bound promoters were transcriptionally active, leading to the hypothesis that LANA interacts with the machinery that methylates H3K4. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated LANA association with endogenous hSET1 complexes in both lymphoid and endothelial cells suggesting that LANA may contribute to the epigenetic

  17. The binding of monoclonal antibodies to cell-surface molecules. A quantitative analysis with immunoglobulin G against two alloantigenic determinants of the human transplantation antigen HLA-A2.

    PubMed Central

    Ways, J P; Parham, P

    1983-01-01

    Monoclonal IgG1 (immunoglobulin G1) PA2.1 and MA2.1 antibodies recognize polymorphic sites of the human transplantation antigen HLA-A2. They are distinguishable because MA2.1 binds HLA-A2 and HLA-B17, whereas PA2.1 binds HLA-A2 and HLA-A28. The affinities of PA2.1-Fab for HLA-A2, three HLA-A2 variants and HLA-A28 are similar and relatively low (1.9 X 10(7) M-1). The affinities of MA2.1-Fab for HLA-A2, three HLA-A2 variants and HLA-B17 are similar and high (1.2 X 10(9) M-1). The difference in affinity is due to the rates of dissociation, which give half-times of dissociation of 290 min for MA2.1-Fab and 4 min for PA2.1-Fab. For both Fab, equilibrium measurements and kinetic determinations gave consistent estimates for affinity. When PA2.1-F(ab)2 or IgG is incubated with cells it reaches equilibrium within 3 h, with most molecules bound bivalently to the cell. Under similar conditions, MA2.1-F(ab)2 does not reach equilibrium and a significant proportion of molecules bound with one and two sites are found. For the lower-affinity antibody (PA2.1), estimates of the binding constants for one- and two-site interactions could be made. By simple Scatchard analysis the avidity of F(ab)2 or IgG is 1.3 X 10(9) M-1, giving an enhancement factor of 68 between bivalent and univalent binding. This is a measure of the equilibrium constant for the interchange between bivalent and univalent binding. Analysis of the results with more realistic models indicates that the actual value is larger (10(3)-10(4) M-1) than 68 M-1. The avidities of F(ab)2 and IgG for HLA-A2 are identical, showing the Fc does not interfere with bivalent binding to cells. PMID:6197968

  18. Methylation and downregulated expression of mac25/insulin-like growth factor binding protein-7 is associated with liver tumorigenesis in SV40T/t antigen transgenic mice, screened by restriction landmark genomic scanning for methylation (RLGS-M).

    PubMed

    Komatsu, S; Okazaki, Y; Tateno, M; Kawai, J; Konno, H; Kusakabe, M; Yoshiki, A; Muramatsu, M; Held, W A; Hayashizaki, Y

    2000-01-01

    Restriction landmark genomic scanning for methylation (RLGS-M) was used to detect alterations in DNA methylation associated with murine SV40 T/t antigen-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. An altered locus/spot (S130) was cloned and found to correspond to sequences in the 5' flanking region and 5' portion of the cDNA for the murine mac25/insulin-like growth factor binding protein-7 (Igfbp-7) gene. IGFBPs are believed to be capable of binding insulin, Igf1, and Igf2 and modulating mitogenic effects. Previous studies have shown that Igf2 has an important role in promoting liver tumorigenesis. Quantitative PCR was used to access the methylation status of the NotI site just 5' to the coding region and the expression level of the mac25/igfbp-7 gene. The results indicated that the degree of methylation was inversely related to the expression level and is consistent with a role for DNA methylation in silencing mac25/Igfbp-7 gene expression and function for mac25/Igfbp-7 as a tumor suppressor gene. PMID:10623583

  19. Multiple Glycosaminoglycan-binding Epitopes of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-3/CCL7 Enable It to Function as a Non-oligomerizing Chemokine*

    PubMed Central

    Salanga, Catherina L.; Dyer, Douglas P.; Kiselar, Janna G.; Gupta, Sayan; Chance, Mark R.; Handel, Tracy M.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of chemokines with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) facilitates the formation of localized chemokine gradients that provide directional signals for migrating cells. In this study, we set out to understand the structural basis and impact of the differing oligomerization propensities of the chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1/CCL2 and MCP-3/CCL7 on their ability to bind GAGs. These chemokines provide a unique comparison set because CCL2 oligomerizes and oligomerization is required for its full in vivo activity, whereas CCL7 functions as a monomer. To identify the GAG-binding determinants of CCL7, an unbiased hydroxyl radical footprinting approach was employed, followed by a focused mutagenesis study. Compared with the size of the previously defined GAG-binding epitope of CCL2, CCL7 has a larger binding site, consisting of multiple epitopes distributed along its surface. Furthermore, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies indicate that CCL7 is able to bind GAGs with an affinity similar to CCL2 but higher than the non-oligomerizing variant, CCL2(P8A), suggesting that, in contrast to CCL2, the large cluster of GAG-binding residues in CCL7 renders oligomerization unnecessary for high affinity binding. However, the affinity of CCL7 is more sensitive than CCL2 to the density of heparan sulfate on the SPR surfaces; this is likely due to the inability of CCL7 to oligomerize because CCL2(P8A) also binds significantly less tightly to low than high density heparan sulfate surfaces compared with CCL2. Together, the data suggest that CCL7 and CCL2 are non-redundant chemokines and that GAG chain density may provide a mechanism for regulating the accumulation of chemokines on cell surfaces. PMID:24727473

  20. Actin-Binding Protein 1 Regulates B Cell Receptor-Mediated Antigen Processing and Presentation in Response to B Cell Receptor Activation1

    PubMed Central

    Onabajo, Olusegun O.; Seeley, Margaret K.; Kale, Amruta; Qualmann, Britta; Kessels, Michael; Han, Jin; Tan, Tse-Hua; Song, Wenxia

    2010-01-01

    The BCR serves as both signal transducer and Ag transporter. Binding of Ags to the BCR induces signaling cascades and Ag processing and presentation, two essential cellular events for B cell activation. BCR-initiated signaling increases BCR-mediated Ag-processing efficiency by increasing the rate and specificity of Ag transport. Previous studies showed a critical role for the actin cytoskeleton in these two processes. In this study, we found that actin-binding protein 1 (Abp1/HIP-55/SH3P7) functioned as an actin-binding adaptor protein, coupling BCR signaling and Ag-processing pathways with the actin cytoskeleton. Gene knockout of Abp1 and overexpression of the Src homology 3 domain of Abp1 inhibited BCR-mediated Ag internalization, consequently reducing the rate of Ag transport to processing compartments and the efficiency of BCR-mediated Ag processing and presentation. BCR activation induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Abp1 and translocation of both Abp1 and dynamin 2 from the cytoplasm to plasma membrane, where they colocalized with the BCR and cortical F-actin. Mutations of the two tyrosine phosphorylation sites of Abp1 and depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton interfered with BCR-induced Abp1 recruitment to the plasma membrane. The inhibitory effect of a dynamin proline-rich domain deletion mutant on the recruitment of Abp1 to the plasma membrane, coimmunoprecipitation of dynamin with Abp1, and coprecipitation of Abp1 with GST fusion of the dyanmin proline-rich domain demonstrate the interaction of Abp1 with dynamin 2. These results demonstrate that the BCR regulates the function of Abp1 by inducing Abp1 phosphorylation and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, and that Abp1 facilitates BCR-mediated Ag processing by simultaneously interacting with dynamin and the actin cytoskeleton. The Journal of Immunology, 2008, 180: 6685–6695. PMID:18453588

  1. Antigen Processing and Presentation Mechanisms in Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Roche, Paul A; Cresswell, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Unlike B cells, CD8-positive and CD4-positive T cells of the adaptive immune system do not recognize intact foreign proteins but instead recognize polypeptide fragments of potential antigens. These antigenic peptides are expressed on the surface of antigen presenting cells bound to MHC class I and MHC class II proteins. Here, we review the basics of antigen acquisition by antigen presenting cells, antigen proteolysis into polypeptide fragments, antigenic peptide binding to MHC proteins, and surface display of both MHC class I-peptide and MHC class II-peptide complexes.

  2. Iris Pigment Epithelium Expressing CD86 (B7-2) Directly Suppresses T Cell Activation In Vitro via Binding to Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte–associated Antigen 4

    PubMed Central

    Sugita, Sunao; Streilein, J. Wayne

    2003-01-01

    A monolayer of pigment epithelium (PE) lines the iris PE (IPE), ciliary body PE, and retina PE of the inner eye, an immune-privileged site. These neural crest-derived epithelial cells participate in ocular immune privilege through poorly defined molecular mechanisms. Murine PE cells cultured from different ocular tissues suppress T cell activation by differing mechanisms. In particular, IPE cells suppress primarily via direct cell to cell contact. By examining surface expression of numerous candidate molecules (tumor necrosis factor receptor [TNFR]1, TNFR2, CD36, CD40, CD47, CD80, CD86, PD-L1, CD95 ligand, and type I interferon receptor), we report that IPE cells uniquely express on their surface the costimulatory molecule CD86. When IPE were blocked with anti-CD86 or were derived from CD80/CD86 (but not CD80) knockout (KO) mice, the cells displayed reduced capacity to suppress T cell activation. IPE also failed to suppress activation of T cells in the presence of cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) immunoglobulin or if the T cells were obtained from CTLA-4 (but not CD28) KO mice. We conclude that iris pigment epithelial cells constitutively express cell surface CD86, which enables the cells to contact inhibit T cells via direct interaction with CTLA-4. Thus, ocular immune privilege is achieved in part by subversion of molecules that are usually used for conventional immune costimulation. PMID:12835481

  3. Multiple, conserved iron-responsive elements in the 3'-untranslated region of transferrin receptor mRNA enhance binding of iron regulatory protein 2.

    PubMed

    Erlitzki, Ronit; Long, Joanne C; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2002-11-01

    Synthesis of proteins for iron homeostasis is regulated by specific, combinatorial mRNA/protein interactions between RNA stem-loop structures (iron-responsive elements, IREs) and iron-regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2), controlling either mRNA translation or stability. The transferrin receptor 3'-untranslated region (TfR-3'-UTR) mRNA is unique in having five IREs, linked by AU-rich elements. A C-bulge in the stem of each TfR-IRE folds into an IRE that has low IRP2 binding, whereas a loop/bulge in the stem of the ferritin-IRE allows equivalent IRP1 and IRP2 binding. Effects of multiple IRE interactions with IRP1 and IRP2 were compared between the native TfR-3'-UTR sequence (5xIRE) and RNA with only 3 or 2 IREs. We show 1) equivalent IRP1 and IRP2 binding to multiple TfR-IRE RNAs; 2) increased IRP-dependent nuclease resistance of 5xIRE compared with lower IRE copy-number RNAs; 3) distorted TfR-IRE helix structure within the context of 5xIRE, detected by Cu-(phen)(2) binding/cleavage, that coincides with ferritin-IRE conformation and enhanced IRP2 binding; and 4) variable IRP1 and IRP2 expression in human cells and during development (IRP2-mRNA predominated). Changes in TfR-IRE structure conferred by the full length TfR-3'-UTR mRNA explain in part evolutionary conservation of multiple IRE-RNA, which allows TfR mRNA stabilization and receptor synthesis when IRP activity varies, and ensures iron uptake for cell growth.

  4. Antigenic Characterization of the HCMV gH/gL/gO and Pentamer Cell Entry Complexes Reveals Binding Sites for Potently Neutralizing Human Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ciferri, Claudio; Chandramouli, Sumana; Leitner, Alexander; Donnarumma, Danilo; Cianfrocco, Michael A.; Gerrein, Rachel; Friedrich, Kristian; Aggarwal, Yukti; Palladino, Giuseppe; Aebersold, Ruedi; Norais, Nathalie; Settembre, Ethan C.; Carfi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in transplant patients and in fetuses following congenital infection. The glycoprotein complexes gH/gL/gO and gH/gL/UL128/UL130/UL131A (Pentamer) are required for HCMV entry in fibroblasts and endothelial/epithelial cells, respectively, and are targeted by potently neutralizing antibodies in the infected host. Using purified soluble forms of gH/gL/gO and Pentamer as well as a panel of naturally elicited human monoclonal antibodies, we determined the location of key neutralizing epitopes on the gH/gL/gO and Pentamer surfaces. Mass Spectrometry (MS) coupled to Chemical Crosslinking or to Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange was used to define residues that are either in proximity or part of neutralizing epitopes on the glycoprotein complexes. We also determined the molecular architecture of the gH/gL/gO- and Pentamer-antibody complexes by Electron Microscopy (EM) and 3D reconstructions. The EM analysis revealed that the Pentamer specific neutralizing antibodies bind to two opposite surfaces of the complex, suggesting that they may neutralize infection by different mechanisms. Together, our data identify the location of neutralizing antibodies binding sites on the gH/gL/gO and Pentamer complexes and provide a framework for the development of antibodies and vaccines against HCMV. PMID:26485028

  5. Antigenic Characterization of the HCMV gH/gL/gO and Pentamer Cell Entry Complexes Reveals Binding Sites for Potently Neutralizing Human Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ciferri, Claudio; Chandramouli, Sumana; Leitner, Alexander; Donnarumma, Danilo; Cianfrocco, Michael A; Gerrein, Rachel; Friedrich, Kristian; Aggarwal, Yukti; Palladino, Giuseppe; Aebersold, Ruedi; Norais, Nathalie; Settembre, Ethan C; Carfi, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in transplant patients and in fetuses following congenital infection. The glycoprotein complexes gH/gL/gO and gH/gL/UL128/UL130/UL131A (Pentamer) are required for HCMV entry in fibroblasts and endothelial/epithelial cells, respectively, and are targeted by potently neutralizing antibodies in the infected host. Using purified soluble forms of gH/gL/gO and Pentamer as well as a panel of naturally elicited human monoclonal antibodies, we determined the location of key neutralizing epitopes on the gH/gL/gO and Pentamer surfaces. Mass Spectrometry (MS) coupled to Chemical Crosslinking or to Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange was used to define residues that are either in proximity or part of neutralizing epitopes on the glycoprotein complexes. We also determined the molecular architecture of the gH/gL/gO- and Pentamer-antibody complexes by Electron Microscopy (EM) and 3D reconstructions. The EM analysis revealed that the Pentamer specific neutralizing antibodies bind to two opposite surfaces of the complex, suggesting that they may neutralize infection by different mechanisms. Together, our data identify the location of neutralizing antibodies binding sites on the gH/gL/gO and Pentamer complexes and provide a framework for the development of antibodies and vaccines against HCMV. PMID:26485028

  6. T-helper cell-response to MHC class II-binding peptides of the renal cell carcinoma-associated antigen RAGE-1.

    PubMed

    Stassar, M J; Raddrizzani, L; Hammer, J; Zöller, M

    2001-08-01

    Recently, epitope prediction software for HLA-DR binding sequences has become available. In view of the importance of T helper (T