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Sample records for multiple blood transfusions

  1. Blood Transfusion and Donation - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Blood Transfusion and Donation URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bloodtransfusionanddonation.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  2. Blood transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000431.htm Blood transfusions To use the sharing features on this ... several sources of blood which are described below. Blood From the Public (Volunteer Blood Donation) The most ...

  3. Effect of blood products transfusion on the development of postinjury multiple organ failure.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeffrey L; Moore, Ernest E; Kashuk, Jeffry L; Banerjee, Anirban; Cothren, C Clay; Biffl, Walter L; Sauaia, Angela

    2010-10-01

    Transfusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and platelets is independently associated with the development of multiple organ failure (MOF) in critically injured patients. Prospective cohort study. Academic regional level I trauma center. From 1992 to 2004, a total of 1440 critically injured patients were admitted to our surgical intensive care unit and survived at least 48 hours. Of these, 1415 had complete data on age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), and units of FFP, platelets, and packed red blood cells (PRBCs) transfused. Multiple organ failure was defined using the Denver MOF score. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to adjust transfusion of FFP, platelets, and PRBCs for known MOF risk factors. Multiple organ failure. The mean (SD) ISS was 29.3 (11.3), and the mean (SD) patient age was 37.4 (16.6) years. Among 1440 patients, 346 (24.0%) developed MOF, and 118 (8.2%) died. Multiple logistic regression analysis detected a significant interaction between units of FFP and PRBCs transfused (P < .001). Regardless of the units of PRBCs transfused, FFP transfusion was independently associated with the development of MOF. However, the deleterious effect associated with FFP transfusion was more prominent among patients receiving fewer than 6 U of PRBCs. Platelet transfusion was unassociated with MOF after adjustment for age, ISS, and FFP and PRBC transfusion. Early transfusion of FFP is associated with an increased risk of postinjury MOF, even after adjusting for age, ISS, and PRBC transfusion. Caution is warranted in developing protocols for empirical FFP transfusion. Specifically, transfusion triggers for FFP should be reexamined, as well as the practice of delivering FFP in fixed ratios to the units of PRBCs transfused.

  4. Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... even years afterward. They include the following: Allergic reaction and hives If you have an allergic reaction ... accompanied by chills and shaking. Acute immune hemolytic reaction This is a very rare but serious transfusion ...

  5. Altered /sup 67/Ga citrate distribution in patients with multiple red blood cell transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Engelstad, B.; Luk, S.S.; Hattner, R.S.

    1982-10-01

    Gallium-67 citrate studies from four patients who received multiple red blood cell transfusions were reviewed. Increased kidney, bladder, or bone localization was associated with decreased liver and colon activity. The findings suggest altered distribution due to competition with iron for receptor binding. Identification of inflammatory disease in two patients was possible. However, the effect of transfusions on detection of inflammatory or neoplastic diseases requires further evaluation.

  6. Altered /sup 67/Ga citrate distribution in patients with multiple red blood cell transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Engelstad, B.; Luk, S.S.; Hattner, R.S.

    1982-10-01

    Gallium-67 citrate studies from four patients who received multiple red blood cell transfusions were reviewed. Increased kidney, bladder or bone localization was associated with decreased liver and colon activity. The findings suggest altered distribution due to competition with iron for receptor binding. Identification of inflammatory disease in two patients was possible. However, the effect of transfusions on detection of inflammatory or neoplastic diseases requires further evaluation.

  7. Status of oxidant, antioxidantand serum enzymes in thalassaemic children receiving multiple blood transfusions.

    PubMed

    Asif, Mahmood; Manzoor, Zahid; Farooq, Muhammad Shehzad; Munawar, Shaukat Hussain; Aziz, Abdul; Khan, Imran Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    To determine the levels of oxidant, antioxidant and serum enzymes in thalassaemic children receiving multiple blood transfusions. The case-control study was done from February to August 2012, and comprised thalassaemic children receiving multiple blood transfusions at Allied Hospital, Ali Zeb Foundation, and the Thalassaemia Centre in Hilal-e-Ahmar Hospital, Faisalabad, Pakistan. Healthy subjects were also screened for any related disease condition that could prejudice the results. Blood samples were analysed for the values of total oxidant status, total antioxidant capacity, serum malondialdehyde, catalase, paraoxonase, arylesterase, glutathione peroxidase and ceruloplasmin. There were 180 children in the study; 90(50%) cases and 90(50%) controls. Of the cases, 48(53.3%) were under-weight while the weight of 42(46.7%) was in the normal range. The values of total oxidant status and total antioxidant capacity were significantly (p<0.01) higher in thalassaemic children compared to normal values. Serum malondialdehyde and catalase levels were also considerably elevated (p<0.05), suggesting the increased activity of these enzymes. However, the concentrations of serum paraoxonase, arylesterase, glutathione peroxidase were significantly (p<0.01) lower in cases than the controls, displaying diminished activities during multiple blood transfusions in these patients. Multiple blood transfusions disconcert the levels of oxidants, antioxidants and serum enzymes of thalassaemic children. Oxidative damage is seen because of the increased iron overload in these patients. Hence, regular evaluation of oxidant and antioxidant status should be monitored in thalassaemic patients during initial few years of life.

  8. Blood Transfusion and Donation

    MedlinePlus

    ... receiving the blood transfusion. To keep blood safe, blood banks carefully screen donated blood. The risk of catching ... one or more times before the surgery. A blood bank will store your blood for your use. NIH: ...

  9. Blood transfusion in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Nigam, A; Prakash, A; Saxena, P

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion of blood and blood components is a common practice in obstetric wards but it is not without risk. The incidence of transfusion reactions varies from 4 in every hundred transfusions for non-haemolytic reactions to one in every 40,000 for haemolytic transfusion reactions. The physiological basis of blood transfusion is outlined in this article. Most of the donated blood is processed into components: packed red cells (PRBCs), platelets, and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or cryoprecipitate. Various alternatives to blood transfusion exist and include autotransfusion, pre-autologous blood storage, use of oxygen carrying blood substitutes and intraoperative cell salvage. Despite the risks associated with transfusions, obstetricians are frequently too aggressive in transfusing blood and blood products to their patients. Acute blood loss in obstetrics is usually due to placenta praevia, postpartum blood loss and surgery related. An early involvement of a consultant obstetrician, anaesthetist, haematologist and the blood bank is essential. There are no established criteria for initiating red cell transfusions and the decision is purely based on clinical and haematological parameters, which have been discussed along with the general principles of blood transfusion in obstetrics and some practical guidelines.

  10. Types of Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially in the joints (knees, ankles, and elbows). Plasma Transfusions Plasma is the liquid part of your blood. It's ... or a severe infection, you may need a plasma transfusion. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: January 30, ...

  11. Blood Transfusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Goodnough, Lawrence Tim; Panigrahi, Anil K

    2017-03-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) is a balance between providing benefit for patients while avoiding risks of transfusion. Randomized, controlled trials of restrictive RBC transfusion practices have shown equivalent patient outcomes compared with liberal transfusion practices, and meta-analyses have shown improved in-hospital mortality, reduced cardiac events, and reduced bacterial infections. This body of level 1 evidence has led to substantial, improved blood utilization and reduction of inappropriate blood transfusions with implementation of clinical decision support via electronic medical records, along with accompanying educational initiatives.

  12. TT virus (TTV) genotyping in blood donors and multiple transfused patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Castro Amarante, Maria Fernanda; Kashima, Simone; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2007-12-01

    TT virus (TTV) is widely distributed in the general population. The objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and distribution of TTV genotypes among blood donor candidates and multiple transfused patients in the Southeast region of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. TTV-DNA detection by amplification of a segment of the ORF-1 region, presented a prevalence of 11.9% in 270 serum samples from blood donors, of 46.2% in 18 samples from patients with coagulopathies, and of 31.8% in 15 samples from patients with hemoglobinopathies. When specific primers for the non-coding (UTR) region of the TTV genome were used the prevalences were 50.5%, 95.0%, and 82.0% for blood donors, patients with coagulopathies and patients with hemoglobinopathies, respectively. Positive samples from 49 individuals were sequenced and partial segments of 230 base pairs referring to the ORF-1 region of the TTV genome were used for the determination of their genotypes with the aid of phylogenetic analysis. The most frequent genotype was 1 (74.0%), followed by genotype 2 (26.0%). These data indicate a high prevalence of this virus in the populations of blood donors and transfused patients, providing further evidence for the role of transfusions as an efficient pathway in the transmission chain.

  13. Alternatives to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Donat R; Goodnough, Lawrence T

    2013-05-25

    The use of alternatives to allogeneic blood continues to rest on the principles that blood transfusions have inherent risks, associated costs, and affect the blood inventory available for health-care delivery. Increasing evidence exists of a fall in the use of blood because of associated costs and adverse outcomes, and suggests that the challenge for the use of alternatives to blood components will similarly be driven by costs and patient outcomes. Additionally, the risk-benefit profiles of alternatives to blood transfusion such as autologous blood procurement, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and haemostatic agents are under investigation. Nevertheless, the inherent risks of blood, along with the continued rise in blood costs are likely to favour the continued development and use of alternatives to blood transfusion. We summarise the current roles of alternatives to blood in the management of medical and surgical anaemias.

  14. Blood Transfusion (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... two tests will be done before the transfusion: Blood typing. To confirm your child's blood type, a nurse ... blood bank lab, where technicians test it for blood type. Cross-matching. Once typing is complete, a compatible donor blood is chosen. ...

  15. [Blood transfusion practices: about transfusions at night].

    PubMed

    Roche, C; Théfenne, H; Hance, P; Garnotel, E

    2013-12-01

    Blood transfusion safety covers all stages from prescription of immuno-haematological examinations until the completion of the transfusion. According to the 05/11/2006 Afssaps' decision on good transfusion practices, transfusions should not be given at night unless the patient is actively bleeding or has some other urgent clinical need. A retrospective study was used to assess the proportion of transfusions at night. Through this professional practice evaluation, we analyze the reasons leading to perform transfusions at late hours, in order to reduce errors and improve safety for patients.

  16. Alternatives to Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... or saved by collecting it with a special machine and giving it back into the patient. Giving a person back his or her own blood is called an autologous transfusion. It cuts down on the need for transfusions from other donors. But some studies have found tumor ... Information, ...

  17. What Is a Blood Transfusion?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Blood Transfusion? A blood transfusion is a safe, common ... Very rarely, serious problems develop. Important Information About Blood The heart pumps blood through a network of ...

  18. [History of blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Izaguirre Avila, Raúl; de Micheli, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    The idea of transfusing blood of an animal to another or from an animal to a man or from one to another man, is very ancient. When the doctrine of blood circulation was diffused, in the first third of the XVII century, this idea was give fresh impetus. On began also to inject some substance into the blood, wich will permit to introduce medicaments intravenously. It is worthy to be remembered that in the same year when the Harveyan monography De motu cordis et sanguinis in animalibus was published (1628), the Paduan professor Giovanni Colle suggested a procedure for blood transfusions. Later (1645) the Tuscan physician Francesco Folli showed another procedure, in the presence of the great duke of Toscana, Ferdinando II de Medici. On his side, the surgeon Giovanni Guglielmo Riva realized blood transfusions from animals to men in 1668. Transfusions were already carried out by Richard Lower in London and by Jean-Baptiste Denis in Paris. During the XVIII century, blood transfusions were not effectuated because of some failure occurred in the formed century and of the proscription by civil and religious authorities. Nevertheless these were renewed during the first third of the XIX century in England as well as in the continental Europe. In Mexico the first blood transfusion was effectuated in 1845 by the physician Matias D. Beistegui. At the time persisted the problem of blood coagulation, which could be resolved during the XX century in North America (Crile, 1906) as well as in Latin America (Luis Agote, 1914). Moreover the blood groups were described in 1900 by the Austrian physician Karl Landsteiner, who identified later the Rh factor. It seems completely justified the inscription shining on the façade of the National Archive in Washington: "The past is only prologue".

  19. Prognostic Significance of Blood Transfusion in Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma Patients without Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Liping; Fu, Danhui; Zhang, Jinping; Wang, Qingqing; Ye, Yamei; Xie, Qianling

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether blood transfusions affect overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) patients without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A total of 181 patients were enrolled and divided into two groups: 68 patients in the transfused group and 113 patients in the nontransfused group. Statistical analyses showed that there were significant differences in ECOG scoring, Ig isotype, platelet (Plt) counts, hemoglobin (Hb) level, serum creatinine (Scr) level, and β2-microglobulin (β2-MG) level between the two groups. Univariate analyses showed that higher International Staging System staging, Plt counts < 100 × 109/L, Scr level ≥ 177 μmol/L, serum β2-MG ≥ 5.5 μmol/L, serum calcium (Ca) ≥ 2.75 mmol/L, and thalidomide use were associated with both OS and PFS in MM patients. Age ≥ 60 was associated with OS and Ig isotype was associated with PFS in MM patients. Moreover, blood transfusion was associated with PFS but not OS in MM patients. Multivariate analyses showed that blood transfusion was not an independent factor for PFS in MM patients. Our preliminary results suggested that newly diagnosed MM patients may benefit from a liberal blood transfusion strategy, since blood transfusion is not an independent impact factor for survival. PMID:28567420

  20. Multiple red blood cell transfusions and iron overload in very low birthweight infants.

    PubMed

    Treviño-Báez, J D; Briones-Lara, E; Alamillo-Velázquez, J; Martínez-Moreno, M I

    2017-07-01

    To estimate the risk of iron overload in very low birthweight (VLBW) infants who receive more than two red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, in comparison with those who receive two or less during their hospital stay. Prospective open cohort study in VLBW infants with >2 (exposed) and ≤2 (non-exposed) RBC transfusions. Ferritin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were measured at birth and after each RBC transfusion. The incidence of iron overload was determined. Risk factors were analysed using a logistic regression model. RBC transfusion volume correlations with ferritin, ALT and AST were calculated with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, as well as correlations between ferritin and aminotransferases. A total of 63 patients were enrolled, 18 of which were exposed and 45 non-exposed. Twelve patients developed severe iron overload, eight exposed (44·5%) vs. four (8·8%) non-exposed (RR: 5, 95% CI: 1·7-14·6). Multivariate analysis showed that the number of transfusions increased the risk of iron overload (OR: 2·07, 95% CI: 1·36-2·14) while a higher one-minute Apgar score was associated with a lower risk (OR: 0·56, 95% CI: 0·32-0·99). Severe iron overload mainly occurred with a transfusion volume higher than 120 ml/kg. There was a positive correlation between ferritin and transfusion (r = 0·53; P < 0·001). There was a higher risk of iron overload in exposed infants in comparison with non-exposed infants. Severe iron overload in VLBW infants may occur with a total transfusion volume >120 ml/kg. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  1. What is autologous blood transfusion?

    PubMed

    Sansom, A

    1993-07-01

    The word autologous is Greek in origin. The definition is exact 'autos' means self and 'logus' means relation. Thus, the meaning is 'related to self'. Autologous blood transfusion, which also is referred to frequently but incorrectly and imprecisely as auto transfusion, designates the reinfusion of blood or blood components to the same individual from whom they were taken. Homologous blood is blood or blood components, from another human donor, taken and stored for later transfusion as required.

  2. Hematologic Disorders: Blood Transfusion Products.

    PubMed

    Baltierra, David; Harper, Tiffany; Jones, Matthew Page; Nau, Konrad C

    2015-06-01

    Until the 1980s, liberal blood transfusion criteria with limited evidence were used regardless of the patient's clinical condition. However, blood transfusion products are associated with several risks, such as infection, acute lung injury, circulatory overload, and hemolytic transfusion reactions. More restrictive transfusion criteria and patient monitoring can decrease the need for transfusions, as well as decrease morbidity and mortality rates and costs. The national supply of blood products continues to decline with more stringent blood donor criteria. Preoperative autologous blood donation has fallen out of favor in patients without antibodies to high-incidence antigens because of increased rates of transfusion, waste of predonated units, and significant costs. Instead, preoperative erythropoietin plus iron therapy in patients who are at high risk of postoperative anemia as well as intraoperative techniques, such as use of antifibrinolytics and cell salvage, can prevent the need for allogeneic blood transfusion. Artificial blood products remain problematic and are not used in the United States.

  3. [Ethics and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Tissot, J-D; Garraud, O; Danic, B; Cabaud, J-J; Lefrère, J-J

    2013-09-01

    Blood donation is an act of solidarity. Most often, this act is done on a volunteer basis and, depending on countries and circumstances, is not remunerated. The increase in need, the always-greater number of deferral criteria, the safety issues and the changes in the structures of our societies are among the many subjects for ethical debates. Taking these into account, the actors of the transfusion must analyze certain parameters: the value of a donation, the meaning of volunteering, the appropriateness of remunerating the act of giving a part of one's self, no longer as a donation or an expression of altruism and solidarity, but as a commercial act regimented by economic laws.

  4. Massive transfusion: blood component ratios.

    PubMed

    Lal, Devika S; Shaz, Beth H

    2013-11-01

    This review will address recent developments in the transfusion management of massively transfused trauma patients, focusing on the use of fixed blood component ratios in massive transfusion protocols. The majority of trauma centers have migrated from laboratory-based transfusion protocols to massive transfusion protocols with fixed blood component ratios. These protocols with red blood cell : plasma : platelet ratio of 1 : 1 : 1 are associated with improved survival in severely injured patients. However, alternate ratios have also demonstrated improved survival. Thus, the optimal ratio has not been determined. In addition, the use of medications, such as antifibrinolytics, and point of care testing, such as thromboelastography, are increasingly being used as part of massive transfusion protocols to adjust transfusion therapy and decrease bleeding. However, their optimal integration has yet to be determined. Massive transfusion protocols with fixed ratios of red blood cells to plasma and platelets have improved survival in both civilian and military trauma patients. Continued studies of ratios as well as integration of other therapies and testing are ongoing in order to continue to improve patient outcome.

  5. Blood transfusions and Jehovah's Witnesses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, H A

    1989-04-01

    Jehovah's Witnesses believe that a human must not sustain his life with another creature's blood, and they recognize no distinction "between taking blood into the mouth and taking it into the blood vessels." It is their deep-seated religious conviction that Jehovah will turn his back on anyone who receives blood transfusions (1). Thus, Jehovah's Witnesses regularly refuse transfusions for themselves and their children because they believe the procedure creates a risk of losing eternal salvation. Legally, such refusals are based on the constitutional grounds that the transfusion is an invasion of the right of privacy and a violation of the individual's freedom of religious practice. When courts review these refusals they focus on state interests that outweigh the individual's rights. With an eye toward providing guidance to Texas physicians in dealing with such refusals, this article reviews case law on the subject of blood transfusions and Jehovah's Witnesses.

  6. The hazards of blood transfusion in historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Harvey G.

    2008-01-01

    The beginning of the modern era of blood transfusion coincided with World War II and the resultant need for massive blood replacement. Soon thereafter, the hazards of transfusion, particularly hepatitis and hemolytic transfusion reactions, became increasingly evident. The past half century has seen the near eradication of transfusion-associated hepatitis as well as the emergence of multiple new pathogens, most notably HIV. Specific donor screening assays and other interventions have minimized, but not eliminated, infectious disease transmission. Other transfusion hazards persist, including human error resulting in the inadvertent transfusion of incompatible blood, acute and delayed transfusion reactions, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), and transfusion-induced immunomodulation. These infectious and noninfectious hazards are reviewed briefly in the context of their historical evolution. PMID:18809775

  7. Blood transfusion practices in neuroanaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Zulfiqar; Hassan, Nelofar; Syed, Sumaya

    2014-01-01

    Neuroanaesthesia practice is associated with risk of significant blood loss resulting in anaemia in the intraoperative and postoperative period. The transfusion triggers in a neurologically injured brain are not clearly defined. Both a low haematocrit and a high haematocrit have not shown any improvement in the outcome. Transfusion of red blood cells may improve the cerebral oxygenation on neurophysiological monitors. However, these benefits have not been translated into clinical practice. Transfusion in subarachnoid haemorrhage leads to increased incidence of vasospasm and a poor outcome. Restrictive transfusion strategy is seen to have a lower incidence of pneumonia, urinary tract infection, bacteremia and septic shock in severe head injury. Current evidence suggests that a haemoglobin (Hb) level of <7 g/dl may be deleterious to the neurosurgical population. Target Hb of 8-9 g/dl may be desirable intraoperatively. Different transfusion triggers may hold true for different neurosurgical pathologies. PMID:25535426

  8. Outcomes and biochemical parameters following cardiac surgery: effects of transfusion of residual blood using centrifugation and multiple-pass hemoconcentration.

    PubMed

    McNair, Erick; McKay, William; Qureshi, Abdul Mohamed; Rosin, Mark; Gamble, Jon; Dalshaug, Greg; Mycyk, Taras; Prasad, Kailash

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether or not there was a significant difference between the methods of centrifugation (CF) and multiple-pass hemoconcentration (MPH) of the residual cardiopulmonary-bypass volume in relation to biochemical measurements and patient outcomes. Prospective, randomized, and controlled. Conducted at a western Canadian tertiary care hospital. Consisted of 61 consecutive male and female patients from ages 40 to 80 who were scheduled for cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Either the centrifugation or multiple-pass hemoconcentration method was used to process the residual blood from the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. The 12-hour postoperative levels of serum hemoglobin were not significantly different in the centrifugation group as compared to the multiple-pass hemoconcentration group. However, the serum levels of total protein and albumin were significantly higher in the multiple-pass hemoconcentration group as compared to the centrifugation group. Additionally, after 12-hours postoperatively, the serum fibrinogen and platelet counts were significantly higher in the multiple-pass hemoconcentration group as compared to those of the centrifugation group. The allogeneic product transfusion index and the chest-tube blood drainage indices were lower in the multiple-pass hemoconcentration group as compared to the centrifugation group. Although the CF method provided a product in a shorter turnaround time, with consistent clearance of heparin, the MPH method trended towards enhanced biochemical and clinical patient outcomes over the 12-hour postoperative period. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Economic environment and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Durand-Zaleski, I

    2015-08-01

    The increasing pressure on healthcare resources affects blood donation and transfusion. We attempted a survey of the efficiency of different strategies, actual or proposed to improve the management of blood products. We found an important disconnect between the cost effectiveness ratio of strategies and their uptake by policy makers. In other words, the least efficient strategies are those which increase transfusion safety by increasing the number of biological markers and are those preferred by health authorities in developed countries. Other more efficient strategies are more slowly implemented and included a systematic use of transfusion guidelines, reducing blood losses or increasing pre operative blood levels in elective surgeries. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  10. Detection of homologous blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Voss, S C; Thevis, M; Schinkothe, T; Schänzer, W

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to improve and validate a flow cytometric method for the detection of homologous blood transfusion in doping control analysis. A panel of eight different primary antibodies and two different phycoerythrin-conjugated secondary antibodies was used for the detection of different blood populations. The flow cytometer used in this study was the BD FACSArray instrument. Mixed red blood cell populations were prepared from phenotype known donors. Linearity, specificity, recovery, precision, robustness and interday-precision were tested for every primary antibody used in the presented assay. The technique of signal amplification was utilized for an improved separation of antigens with weak or heterozygous expression to improve the interpretation of histograms. The resulting method allowed to clearly identify mixed red blood cell populations in homologous blood transfusion samples containing 0.3 - 2.0 % of donor blood.

  11. Autologous umbilical cord blood transfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Ballin, A.; Arbel, E.; Kenet, G.; Berar, M.; Kohelet, D.; Tanay, A.; Zakut, H.; Meytes, D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine some aspects of umbilical cord blood collection for autologous transfusion in premature infants. All 120 microbacterial cultures (aerobic and anaerobic) of cord blood samples as well as 30 cultures of mycoplasma were treated. Cord prothrombin fragment (F 1 + 2) concentrations were quantified at one and 10 minutes after clamping of the cord. F 1 + 2 concentrations assessed on 25 newborn infants were similar and no linear association with time of clamping could be drawn. This means that cord blood thrombosis is not activated for at least 10 minutes following clamping of the cord. As far as is known, the first newborn infant to benefit from this method of transfusion is reported here. The premature infant received two portions of autologous blood (on days 5 and 7). No untoward effects were noted. Blood, collected from the umbilical cord, is a safe source for autotransfusion, provided that bacteriological testing has been carried out. PMID:8535878

  12. Blood Transfusions (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... re needed. Blood also collects waste products, like carbon dioxide, and takes them to the organs responsible for ... carry oxygen to the body's tissues and remove carbon dioxide. Red blood cells make up about 40%–45% ...

  13. [Blood transfusions in Jehovah's witnesses].

    PubMed

    Aguilera, P

    1993-04-01

    Jehovah Witnesses cite religious motives to refuse transfusions of whole blood or its components for themselves and their children, even when life is endangered. An ethical analysis of decision making in health problems is made, giving priority to the alternatives chosen by the patient. One of the elements that turns a therapeutic procedure into extraordinary is the moral impossibility of its use, originated in a subjective cause. The right to act with freedom in religious matters must also be considered. It is concluded that the denial of a Jehovah Witness to be transfused must be respected. However, in the case of children, the physicians should disregard the parents rejection.

  14. Immunological complications of blood transfusions.

    PubMed

    Brand, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Most adverse blood transfusion (BT) events are immune-mediated and in the majority of severe reactions antibodies can be identified as causal factors. Alloimmunization not only causes symptomatic reactions, transfused cells can also be (silently) destroyed. Immunization by BT can contribute to hemolytic disease of the newborn as well as to allograft rejection after transplantation. Reversely, pregnancy and transplantation may evoke immunity hampering transfusion therapy. Besides causing mortality and morbidity, alloimmunization has a huge economic impact. Transfusion reactions prolong hospital stay, require diagnostic tests and complex donor selection procedures and create the need for typed donor registries. In the 1970s, Opeltz and colleagues described that pre-transplantation BT impaired rejection of renal transplants. Leukocytes were essential for this immunosuppressive BT effect that raised concern about negative effects on cancer growth and resistance against infections. Studies on the mechanism were however preliminary abandoned when calcineurin inhibitors for prevention of graft rejection became available and since all blood products underwent leukoreduction in most countries as precautionary measure against transmission of variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease. Whether current leukoreduced BT are immunosuppressive and for which patients or circumstances this may contribute to worse outcome, is unknown. The last decades of the previous century, leukoreduction of cellular blood products for leukemia patients significantly reduced the incidence of immunological platelet transfusion refractoriness. The first decade of this century the avoidance of plasma- and platelet-products from females, that may contain donor-derived leukocyte antibodies, decreased transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) by more than 30%. These were major achievements. Challenge for the near future is to further reduce alloimmunization in particular against red blood cells (RBC) as a

  15. Blood Transfusions (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... part of the immune system, and its main defense against infection. White blood cells make up less ... The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  16. Analysis of complications after blood components' transfusions.

    PubMed

    Timler, Dariusz; Klepaczka, Jadwiga; Kasielska-Trojan, Anna; Bogusiak, Katarzyna

    2015-04-01

    Complications after blood components still constitute an important clinical problem and serve as limitation of liberal-transfusion strategy. The aim of the study was to present the 5-year incidence of early blood transfusions complications and to assess their relation to the type of the transfused blood components. 58,505 transfusions of blood components performed in the years 2006-2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Data concerning the amount of the transfused blood components and the numbers of adverse transfusion reactions reported to the Regional Blood Donation and Treatment Center (RBDTC) was collected. 95 adverse transfusion reactions were reportedto RBDTC 0.16% of alldonations (95/58 505) - 58 after PRBC transfusions, 28 after platelet concentrate transfusions and 9 after FFP transfusion. Febrile nonhemolytic and allergic reactions constitute respectively 36.8% and 30.5% of all complications. Nonhemolyticand allergic reactions are the most common complications of blood components transfusion and they are more common after platelet concentrate transfusions in comparison to PRBC and FFP donations.

  17. No CLL transmission through blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Landgren, Ola

    2015-10-22

    In this issue of Blood, Hjalgrim et al used the Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions (SCANDAT2) database, which includes comprehensive information on donors and recipients of >20 million blood products handled by the Danish and Swedish blood banks between 1968 and 2010, to address the clinically relevant question of whether chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is transmitted through blood transfusions.

  18. Adverse events related to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Sandeep; Hemlata; Verma, Anupam

    2014-09-01

    The acute blood transfusion reactions are responsible for causing most serious adverse events. Awareness about various clinical features of acute and delayed transfusion reactions with an ability to assess the serious reactions on time can lead to a better prognosis. Evidence-based medicine has changed today's scenario of clinical practice to decrease adverse transfusion reactions. New evidence-based algorithms of transfusion and improved haemovigilance lead to avoidance of unnecessary transfusions perioperatively. The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging. The unnecessary blood transfusions can be avoided with better blood conservation techniques during surgery and with anaesthesia techniques that reduce blood loss. Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels. With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs), selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided.

  19. Operative blood transfusion quality improvement audit.

    PubMed

    Al Sohaibani, Mazen; Al Malki, Assaf; Pogaku, Venumadhav; Al Dossary, Saad; Al Bernawi, Hanan

    2014-01-01

    To determine how current anesthesia team handless the identification of surgical anaesthetized patient (right patient). And the check of blood unit before collecting and immediately before blood administration (right blood) in operating rooms where nurses have minimal duties and responsibility to handle blood for transfusion in anaesthetized patients. To elicit the degree of anesthesia staff compliance with new policies and procedures for anaesthetized surgical patient the blood transfusion administration. A large tertiary care reference and teaching hospital. A prospective quality improvement. Elaboration on steps for administration of transfusion from policies and procedures to anaesthetized patients; and analysis of the audit forms for conducted transfusions. An audit form was used to get key performance indicators (KPIs) observed in all procedures involve blood transfusion and was ticked as item was met, partially met, not met or not applicable. Descriptive statistics as number and percentage Microsoft excel 2003. Central quality improvement committee presented the results in number percentage and graphs. The degree of compliance in performing the phases of blood transfusion by anesthesia staff reached high percentage which let us feel certain that the quality is assured that the internal policy and procedures (IPP) are followed in the great majority of all types of red cells and other blood products transfusion from the start of requesting the blood or blood product to the prescript of checking the patient in the immediate post-transfusion period. Specific problem area of giving blood transfusion to anaesthetized patient was checking KPI concerning the phases of blood transfusion was audited and assured the investigators of high quality performance in procedures of transfusion.

  20. Richard Lower: the origins of blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Fastag, Eduardo; Varon, Joseph; Sternbach, George

    2013-06-01

    Millions of blood transfusions are performed yearly worldwide. With respect to its historical origins, this practice began in the 17(th) century with an English physician. In 1666, Richard Lower reported the first successful transfusion between animals. The first transfusion in a human patient was performed the following year by Jean Baptiste Denis, a French physician. That same year, Lower transfused blood from a lamb into the bloodstream of a clergyman named Arthur Coga. However, the practice was subsequently abandoned for hundreds of years. Safe transfusion awaited the recognition of blood types and cross-matching, and did not occur until early in the 20(th) century. A number of other advances in transfusion therapy have followed, and more are in development.

  1. Highly Efficient Prion Transmission by Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Andréoletti, Olivier; Litaise, Claire; Simmons, Hugh; Corbière, Fabien; Lugan, Séverine; Costes, Pierrette; Schelcher, François; Vilette, Didier; Grassi, Jacques; Lacroux, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    It is now clearly established that the transfusion of blood from variant CJD (v-CJD) infected individuals can transmit the disease. Since the number of asymptomatic infected donors remains unresolved, inter-individual v-CJD transmission through blood and blood derived products is a major public health concern. Current risk assessments for transmission of v-CJD by blood and blood derived products by transfusion rely on infectious titers measured in rodent models of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSE) using intra-cerebral (IC) inoculation of blood components. To address the biological relevance of this approach, we compared the efficiency of TSE transmission by blood and blood components when administrated either through transfusion in sheep or by intra-cerebral inoculation (IC) in transgenic mice (tg338) over-expressing ovine PrP. Transfusion of 200 µL of blood from asymptomatic infected donor sheep transmitted prion disease with 100% efficiency thereby displaying greater virulence than the transfusion of 200 mL of normal blood spiked with brain homogenate material containing 103ID50 as measured by intracerebral inoculation of tg338 mice (ID50 IC in tg338). This was consistent with a whole blood titer greater than 103.6 ID50 IC in tg338 per mL. However, when the same blood samples were assayed by IC inoculation into tg338 the infectious titers were less than 32 ID per mL. Whereas the transfusion of crude plasma to sheep transmitted the disease with limited efficacy, White Blood Cells (WBC) displayed a similar ability to whole blood to infect recipients. Strikingly, fixation of WBC with paraformaldehyde did not affect the infectivity titer as measured in tg338 but dramatically impaired disease transmission by transfusion in sheep. These results demonstrate that TSE transmission by blood transfusion can be highly efficient and that this efficiency is more dependent on the viability of transfused cells than the level of infectivity measured by IC

  2. The team focus on improving blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    McMillan, D; Brady, P; Foot, C; Levy, R; Thomson, A

    2011-03-01

    The current literature pertaining to associated morbidity and mortality with homologous blood transfusion in the surgical patient seems to be pointing only in one direction, which is we must start reducing our patients exposure to homologous blood and products. There appears to be ever mounting evidence of increases in infraction, stroke, transfusion related lung injury, infection, and death that authors are associating with transfusion. A number of authors are reporting success in reducing their patients' requirements for homologous transfusion simply by working as a team or what is known as a multidisciplinary approach and following set transfusion protocols and algorithms. At our institution we have taken note of these reports and have taken the first steps in the formation of a Cardiac Surgical Transfusion Management Group where all specialties involved in the decision making process of transfusion in the cardiac surgical patient can have representation and be directly involved in the establishment of protocols, transfusion algorithms, and a transfusion audit system. The main goal of this group is to implement a change in transfusion practice and to assess the impact the change has had on transfusion requirements and make appropriate recommendations to the treating specialists.

  3. [Blood transfusion: the challenges for tomorrow?].

    PubMed

    Folléa, Gilles; Garraud, Olivier; Tiberghien, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    As any therapeutic means, blood transfusion requires regular evaluation, particularly for its indications, effectiveness and risks. The availability of randomized clinical trials, the evolution of the quality of blood components, and the economic constraints shared by all countries, all lead to rethink both transfusion therapy as a whole and the organization of the transfusion chain from donor to recipient. The main tools available to improve transfusion and the transfusion chain management are the following: programs of patient blood management (PBM) to optimize the use of blood products with a patient centred approach, blood supply management tools to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the transfusion chain, donor management tools to adapt donor collections to the patients' needs in compliance with safety requirements for patients and donors, and coordination of these activities. A better understanding of these tools and their implementation will certainly be major challenges for transfusion medicine in the near future. Integrating these evolutions in regulations through the revision of the European Directives on blood and blood components (the review process is expected to be launched in 2015) should enroll them in the long term, for the benefit of patients, donors and all other stakeholders involved in the transfusion chain.

  4. Red blood cell transfusion in newborn infants

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Robin K; Jefferies, Ann L

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell transfusion is an important and frequent component of neonatal intensive care. The present position statement addresses the methods and indications for red blood cell transfusion of the newborn, based on a review of the current literature. The most frequent indications for blood transfusion in the newborn are the acute treatment of perinatal hemorrhagic shock and the recurrent correction of anemia of prematurity. Perinatal hemorrhagic shock requires immediate treatment with large quantities of red blood cells; the effects of massive transfusion on other blood components must be considered. Some guidelines are now available from clinical trials investigating transfusion in anemia of prematurity; however, considerable uncertainty remains. There is weak evidence that cognitive impairment may be more severe at follow-up in extremely low birth weight infants transfused at lower hemoglobin thresholds; therefore, these thresholds should be maintained by transfusion therapy. Although the risks of transfusion have declined considerably in recent years, they can be minimized further by carefully restricting neonatal blood sampling. PMID:24855419

  5. Blood Donation and Transfusion: A Primer for Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felts, W. Michael; Glascoff, Mary A.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a primer for health educators about blood donation and transfusion, examining the nature of human blood, the background of blood transfusion, blood donation criteria, risks related to homologous blood transfusion, directed blood donation, potential alternatives to homologous transfusion, and resources for education on the subject. (SM)

  6. Blood Donation and Transfusion: A Primer for Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felts, W. Michael; Glascoff, Mary A.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a primer for health educators about blood donation and transfusion, examining the nature of human blood, the background of blood transfusion, blood donation criteria, risks related to homologous blood transfusion, directed blood donation, potential alternatives to homologous transfusion, and resources for education on the subject. (SM)

  7. [Blood components and good practices in transfusion].

    PubMed

    Andreu, Georges

    2015-02-01

    Each year, more than three millions of blood components are transfused to more than five hundred thousand patients in France. The optimal use of blood components requires that physicians prescribing blood components master the clinical indications of red blood cells concentrates, platelet concentrates and fresh frozen plasma. In addition, physicians in charge of blood component prescription should provide adequate pre- and post-transfusion information to their patients. Compliance of blood components administration in patients with safety guidelines contributes as well to their optimal use. In addition, for each blood component transfused, a proper evaluation of its safety and its efficacy should be done. Finally, a regular evaluation of transfusion practice in hospital services were blood components are used, through audits made in cooperation with their blood component provider, either blood transfusion centre or the hospital blood bank, enables to appreciate the level of compliance with safety and clinical guidelines, and more globally how the transfusion process is mastered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Lichenoid Variant of Chronic Cutaneous Graft Versus Host Reaction Post Blood Transfusion: A Rare Event Post Blood Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnaiah, Pushpa Kodipalya; Lakshman, Archana; Aradhya, Sacchidanand Sarvajnamurthy; Veerabhadrappa, Nataraja Holavanahally

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a less frequently seen disease that occurs post solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. Chronic GVHD occurring post blood transfusion is an even more uncommon disease. It can present either as a lichenoid disease or as a sclerodermatous disease involving multiple systems. In this article, we report a case of chronic graft versus host reaction occurring in skin secondary to blood transfusion.

  9. Lichenoid Variant of Chronic Cutaneous Graft Versus Host Reaction Post Blood Transfusion: A Rare Event Post Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnaiah, Pushpa Kodipalya; Lakshman, Archana; Aradhya, Sacchidanand Sarvajnamurthy; Veerabhadrappa, Nataraja Holavanahally

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a less frequently seen disease that occurs post solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. Chronic GVHD occurring post blood transfusion is an even more uncommon disease. It can present either as a lichenoid disease or as a sclerodermatous disease involving multiple systems. In this article, we report a case of chronic graft versus host reaction occurring in skin secondary to blood transfusion. PMID:26538747

  10. Pulmonary complications of transfused blood components.

    PubMed

    Benson, Alexander B

    2012-09-01

    Three transfusion complications are responsible for the majority of the morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. This article discusses the respiratory complications associated with these pathophysiologic processes, including definitions, diagnosis, mechanism, incidence, risk factors, clinical management, and strategies for prevention. It also explores how different patient populations and different blood components differentially affect the risk of these deadly transfusion complications. Lastly, the article discusses how health care providers can risk stratify individual patients or patient populations to determine whether a given transfusion is more likely to benefit or harm the patient based on the transfusion indication, risk, and expected result.

  11. Coagulopathy and blood component transfusion in trauma.

    PubMed

    Spahn, D R; Rossaint, R

    2005-08-01

    Trauma is a serious global health problem, accounting for approximately one in 10 deaths worldwide. Uncontrollable bleeding accounts for 39% of trauma-related deaths and is the leading cause of potentially preventable death in patients with major trauma. While bleeding from vascular injury can usually be repaired surgically, coagulopathy-related bleeding is often more difficult to manage and may also mask the site of vascular injury. The causes of coagulopathy in patients with severe trauma are multifactorial, including consumption and dilution of platelets and coagulation factors, as well as dysfunction of platelets and the coagulation system. The interplay between hypothermia, acidosis and progressive coagulopathy, referred to as the 'lethal triad', often results in exsanguination. Current management of coagulopathy-related bleeding is based on blood component replacement therapy. However, there is a limit on the level of haemostasis that can be restored by replacement therapy. In addition, there is evidence that transfusion of red blood cells immediately after injury increases the incidence of post-injury infection and multiple organ failure. Strategies to prevent significant coagulopathy and to control critical bleeding effectively in the presence of coagulopathy may decrease the requirement for blood transfusion, thereby improving clinical outcome of patients with major trauma.

  12. Blood transfusion practices in obstetric anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Jadon, Ashok; Bagai, Rajni

    2014-09-01

    Blood transfusion is an essential component of emergency obstetric care and appropriate blood transfusion significantly reduces maternal mortality. Obstetric haemorrhage, especially postpartum haemorrhage, remains one of the major causes of massive haemorrhage and a prime cause of maternal mortality. Blood loss and assessment of its correct requirement are difficult in pregnancy due to physiological changes and comorbid conditions. Many guidelines have been used to assess the requirement and transfusion of blood and its components. Infrastructural, economic, social and religious constraints in blood banking and donation are key issues to formulate practice guidelines. Available current guidelines for transfusion are mostly from the developed world; however, they can be used by developing countries keeping available resources in perspective.

  13. Blood transfusion practices in obstetric anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Jadon, Ashok; Bagai, Rajni

    2014-01-01

    Blood transfusion is an essential component of emergency obstetric care and appropriate blood transfusion significantly reduces maternal mortality. Obstetric haemorrhage, especially postpartum haemorrhage, remains one of the major causes of massive haemorrhage and a prime cause of maternal mortality. Blood loss and assessment of its correct requirement are difficult in pregnancy due to physiological changes and comorbid conditions. Many guidelines have been used to assess the requirement and transfusion of blood and its components. Infrastructural, economic, social and religious constraints in blood banking and donation are key issues to formulate practice guidelines. Available current guidelines for transfusion are mostly from the developed world; however, they can be used by developing countries keeping available resources in perspective. PMID:25535427

  14. [Chagas' disease in patients in chronic hemodialysis. Prevalence and risk of transmission by blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Lorca, M; Lorca, E; Atías, A; Plubins, L

    1989-06-01

    A serologic study of Chagas disease was performed in 110 patients submitted to chronic hemodialisis and blood transfusions. Immunofluorescence antibody testing (IgG and IgM) was positive in 6 out of 62 patients receiving multiple blood transfusions (9.7%), but negative in all 48 subjects without transfusions. Thus, repeated blood transfusion is a significant risk for T cruzi infection in chronic hemodialized patients.

  15. Blood platelet kinetics and platelet transfusion.

    PubMed

    Aster, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    The discovery of citrate anticoagulant in the 1920s and the development of plastic packs for blood collection in the 1960s laid the groundwork for platelet transfusion therapy on a scale not previously possible. A major limitation, however, was the finding that platelet concentrates prepared from blood anticoagulated with citrate were unsuitable for transfusion because of platelet clumping. We found that this could be prevented by simply reducing the pH of platelet-rich plasma to about 6.5 prior to centrifugation. We used this approach to characterize platelet kinetics and sites of platelet sequestration in normal and pathologic states and to define the influence of variables such as anticoagulant and ABO incompatibility on post-transfusion platelet recovery. The "acidification" approach enabled much wider use of platelet transfusion therapy until alternative means of producing concentrates suitable for transfusion became available.

  16. Blood platelet kinetics and platelet transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Aster, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of citrate anticoagulant in the 1920s and the development of plastic packs for blood collection in the 1960s laid the groundwork for platelet transfusion therapy on a scale not previously possible. A major limitation, however, was the finding that platelet concentrates prepared from blood anticoagulated with citrate were unsuitable for transfusion because of platelet clumping. We found that this could be prevented by simply reducing the pH of platelet-rich plasma to about 6.5 prior to centrifugation. We used this approach to characterize platelet kinetics and sites of platelet sequestration in normal and pathologic states and to define the influence of variables such as anticoagulant and ABO incompatibility on post-transfusion platelet recovery. The “acidification” approach enabled much wider use of platelet transfusion therapy until alternative means of producing concentrates suitable for transfusion became available. PMID:24177466

  17. Unusual results due to transfused blood.

    PubMed

    Davidson, A K; Lee, L D

    1999-01-01

    During a murder enquiry, the forensic science investigation used PGM and EAP blood grouping systems and detected a mixture of blood on the deceased's jacket. The blood groups matched those of the deceased and accused. The results of DNA analysis, however, proved that only a single source of DNA, matching the deceased, was present. Supplementary information relating to the transfusion of the individual whilst still wearing his clothing led the authors to conclude that a mixture of transfused blood and the individual's own blood had effused from his body via a stab wound, and onto his clothing.

  18. Blood transfusion and infection after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Keith A; Acker, Michael A; Chang, Helena; Bagiella, Emilia; Smith, Peter K; Iribarne, Alexander; Kron, Irving L; Lackner, Pamela; Argenziano, Michael; Ascheim, Deborah D; Gelijns, Annetine C; Michler, Robert E; Van Patten, Danielle; Puskas, John D; O'Sullivan, Karen; Kliniewski, Dorothy; Jeffries, Neal O; O'Gara, Patrick T; Moskowitz, Alan J; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac surgery is the largest consumer of blood products in medicine; although believed life saving, transfusion carries substantial adverse risks. This study characterizes the relationship between transfusion and risk of major infection after cardiac surgery. In all, 5,158 adults were prospectively enrolled to assess infections after cardiac surgery. The most common procedures were isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery (31%) and isolated valve surgery (30%); 19% were reoperations. Infections were adjudicated by independent infectious disease experts. Multivariable Cox modeling was used to assess the independent effect of blood and platelet transfusions on major infections within 60 ± 5 days of surgery. Red blood cells (RBC) and platelets were transfused in 48% and 31% of patients, respectively. Each RBC unit transfused was associated with a 29% increase in crude risk of major infection (p < 0.001). Among RBC recipients, the most common infections were pneumonia (3.6%) and bloodstream infections (2%). Risk factors for infection included postoperative RBC units transfused, longer duration of surgery, and transplant or ventricular assist device implantation, in addition to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, and elevated preoperative creatinine. Platelet transfusion decreased the risk of infection (p = 0.02). Greater attention to management practices that limit RBC use, including cell salvage, small priming volumes, vacuum-assisted venous return with rapid autologous priming, and ultrafiltration, and preoperative and intraoperative measures to elevate hematocrit could potentially reduce occurrence of major postoperative infections.

  19. Transmission of HIV through blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Okpara, R

    1992-07-01

    HIV transmission in transfused blood is a high risk in Nigeria. Although official government policy directs that all blood be screened for HIV, and that all blood donation should be voluntary, there is no legal enforcement of quality of the blood supply, and at least 85% of blood is estimated to be sold by professional donors. About 75% of blood banks are based in hospitals, mostly in major cities and teaching centers. The rest of the blood banks are unregulated small commercial operations without quality control or standard refrigerators. In small health facilities it is usual to infuse 1 unit at a time, suggesting that indications for transfusion are not emergencies, but rather anemias that could be corrected with nutritional replacement. These blood units are usually donated on request by families, but more often by professional donors managed by agents. People have misconceptions about the hazards of donating blood, such as the fear that donation will bewitch, poison them, or turn them into criminals, or that it is immoral. Blood donors who may be HIV positive are rarely traceable for counseling, since they often change their names and addresses. The Nigerian government is now deliberating in committee about forming a National Blood Transfusion Service, though the efforts of the Nigerian Society of Haematology and Blood Transfusion.

  20. Blood still kills: six strategies to further reduce allogeneic blood transfusion-related mortality.

    PubMed

    Vamvakas, Eleftherios C; Blajchman, Morris A

    2010-04-01

    After reviewing the relative frequency of the causes of allogeneic blood transfusion-related mortality in the United States today, we present 6 possible strategies for further reducing such transfusion-related mortality. These are (1) avoidance of unnecessary transfusions through the use of evidence-based transfusion guidelines, to reduce potentially fatal (infectious as well as noninfectious) transfusion complications; (2) reduction in the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury in recipients of platelet transfusions through the use of single-donor platelets collected from male donors, or female donors without a history of pregnancy or who have been shown not to have white blood cell (WBC) antibodies; (3) prevention of hemolytic transfusion reactions through the augmentation of patient identification procedures by the addition of information technologies, as well as through the prevention of additional red blood cell alloantibody formation in patients who are likely to need multiple transfusions in the future; (4) avoidance of pooled blood products (such as pooled whole blood-derived platelets) to reduce the risk of transmission of emerging transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs) and the residual risk from known TTIs (especially transfusion-associated sepsis [TAS]); (5) WBC reduction of cellular blood components administered in cardiac surgery to prevent the poorly understood increased mortality seen in cardiac surgery patients in association with the receipt of non-WBC-reduced (compared with WBC-reduced) transfusion; and (6) pathogen reduction of platelet and plasma components to prevent the transfusion transmission of most emerging, potentially fatal TTIs and the residual risk of known TTIs (especially TAS).

  1. Blood transfusion safety: a new philosophy.

    PubMed

    Franklin, I M

    2012-12-01

    Blood transfusion safety has had a chequered history, and there are current and future challenges. Internationally, there is no clear consensus for many aspects of the provision of safe blood, although pan-national legislation does provide a baseline framework in the European Union. Costs are rising, and new safety measures can appear expensive, especially when tested against some other medical interventions, such as cancer treatment and vaccination programmes. In this article, it is proposed that a comprehensive approach is taken to the issue of blood transfusion safety that considers all aspects of the process rather than considering only new measures. The need for an agreed level of safety for specified and unknown risks is also suggested. The importance of providing care and support for those inadvertently injured as a result of transfusion problems is also made. Given that the current blood safety decision process often uses a utilitarian principle for decision making--through the calculation of Quality Adjusted Life Years--an alternative philosophy is proposed. A social contract for blood safety, based on the principles of 'justice as fairness' developed by John Rawls, is recommended as a means of providing an agreed level of safety, containing costs and providing support for any adverse outcomes. © 2012 The Author. Transfusion Medicine © 2012 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  2. Transfusion and blood donation in comic strips.

    PubMed

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Danic, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    The representation of blood transfusion and donation of blood in the comic strip has never been studied. The comic strip, which is a relatively recent art, emerged in the 19th century before becoming a mass medium during the 20th century. We have sought, by calling on collectors and using the resources of Internet, comic strips devoted, wholly or in part, to the themes of transfusion and blood donation. We present some of them here in chronologic order, indicating the title, country of origin, year of publication, and names of authors. The theme of the superhero using transfusion to transmit his virtues or his powers is repeated throughout the 20th century in North American comic strips. More recently, comic strips have been conceived from the outset with a promotional aim. They perpetuate positive images and are directed toward a young readership, wielding humor to reduce the fear of venipuncture. Few comic strips denounce the abuse of the commercialization of products derived from the human body. The image of transfusion and blood donation given by the comic strips is not to be underestimated because their readership is primarily children, some of whom will become blood donors. Furthermore, if some readers are transfused during their lives, the impact of a memory more or less conscious of these childhood readings may resurface, both in hopes and in fears.

  3. For assessment of changes in intraoperative red blood cell transfusion practices over time, the pooled incidence of transfusion correlates highly with total units transfused.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H

    2017-06-01

    Multiple studies nationwide and at single hospitals have examined changes over time in the incidence of perioperative red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. However, the cost of RBC transfusions is related to the number of RBC units transfused, not to the incidence. We evaluate whether the readily available incidence of RBC transfusion can be used as a valid surrogate measure. Observational retrospective study. One tertiary, academic hospital. 394,789 cases of 1885 procedures over N=42 quarters of the year. None. Incidence and number of RBC units transfused intraoperatively. The number of RBC units transfused per case did not follow a Poisson distribution, confirming that the number of units and incidence of transfusion are not interchangeable for analyzing decisions by case. However, with all cases of each quarter combined, the Spearman correlation was 0.98±0.01 between each quarter's incidence of RBC transfusion and mean RBC units transfused per case (P<0.0001). For assessment of changes in intraoperative RBC transfusion practices over years, it is sufficient to analyze the pooled incidence of transfusion, rather than to calculate the number of units transfused. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Profiles of blood and blood component transfusion recipients in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Hassall, Oliver; Faragher, Brian E.; Kajja, Isaac; Mvere, David A.; Emmanuel, Jean C.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited published data on the characteristics of blood transfusion recipients in sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes the demographic characteristics of blood transfusion recipients and patterns of blood and blood component use in Zimbabwe. Materials and methods Data on the characteristics of the blood transfusion recipients (age, sex, blood group), blood components received (type, quantity), discharge diagnoses and outcomes following transfusion (discharge status, duration of stay in hospital), were retrospectively collected from four major hospitals for the period from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012. Diagnoses were grouped into broad categories according to the disease headings of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Surgical procedures were grouped into broad categories according to organ system using ICD-9. Results Most of the 1,793 transfusion recipients studied were female (63.2%) and in the reproductive age group, i.e. 15–49 years (65.3%). The median age of the recipients was 33 years (range, 0–93). The majority of these recipients (n=1,642; 91.6%) received a red blood cell transfusion. The majority of the patients were diagnosed with conditions related to pregnancy and childbirth (22.3%), and diseases of blood and blood-forming organs (17.7%). The median time spent in hospital was 8 days (range, 0–214) and in-hospital mortality was 15.4%. Discussion Our sample of blood transfusion recipients were fairly young and most of them received red blood cell transfusions. The majority of patients in the reproductive age group received blood transfusions for pregnancy and childbirth-related diagnoses. PMID:26192782

  5. What Are the Risks of a Blood Transfusion?

    MedlinePlus

    ... will have a reaction after the transfusion. Iron Overload Getting many blood transfusions can cause too much iron to build up in your blood (iron overload). People who have a blood disorder like thalassemia , ...

  6. Management of patients who refuse blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Chand, N Kiran; Subramanya, H Bala; Rao, G Venkateswara

    2014-09-01

    A small group of people belonging to a certain religion, called Jehovah's witness do not accept blood transfusion or blood products, based on biblical readings. When such group of people are in need of health care, their faith and belief is an obstacle for their proper treatment, and poses legal, ethical and medical challenges for attending health care provider. Due to the rapid growth in the membership of this group worldwide, physicians attending hospitals should be prepared to manage such patients. Appropriate management of such patients entails understanding of ethical and legal issues involved, providing meticulous medical management, use of prohaemostatic agents, essential interventions and techniques to reduce blood loss and hence, reduce the risk of subsequent need for blood transfusion. An extensive literature search was performed using search engines such as Google scholar, PubMed, MEDLINE, science journals and textbooks using keywords like 'Jehovah's witness', 'blood haemodilution', 'blood salvage' and 'blood substitutes'.

  7. Toward a patient-based paradigm for blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Albert; Vamvakas, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    The current “manufacturing paradigm” of transfusion practice has detached transfusion from the clinical environment. As an example, fresh whole blood in large-volume hemorrhage may be superior to whole blood reconstituted from multiple components. Multicomponent apheresis can overcome logistical difficulties in matching patient needs with fresh component availability and can deliver the benefits of fresh whole blood. Because of the different transfusion needs of patients in emerging economies and the vulnerability of these blood systems to emerging infections, fresh whole blood and multicomponent apheresis can better meet patient needs when compared with transplants of the “manufacturing paradigm”. We propose that patient blood management, along with panels of repeat, paid, accredited apheresis and fresh whole-blood donors can be used in emerging economies to support decentralized blood services. This alternative transfusion–medicine paradigm could eventually also be adopted by established economies to focus transfusion medicine on local patient needs and to alleviate the problem of the aging volunteer donor base. PMID:24520208

  8. Preoperative blood transfusions for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is one of the commonest severe monogenic disorders in the world, due to the inheritance of two abnormal haemoglobin (beta globin) genes. Sickle cell disease can cause severe pain, significant end-organ damage, pulmonary complications, and premature death. Surgical interventions are more common in people with sickle cell disease, and occur at much younger ages than in the general population. Blood transfusions are frequently used prior to surgery and several regimens are used but there is no consensus over the best method or the necessity of transfusion in specific surgical cases. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001. Objectives To determine whether there is evidence that preoperative blood transfusion in people with sickle cell disease undergoing elective or emergency surgery reduces mortality and perioperative or sickle cell-related serious adverse events. To compare the effectiveness of different transfusion regimens (aggressive or conservative) if preoperative transfusions are indicated in people with sickle cell disease. Search methods We searched for relevant trials in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980), and ongoing trial databases; all searches current to 23 March 2016. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register: 18 January 2016. Selection criteria All randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing preoperative blood transfusion regimens to different regimens or no transfusion in people with sickle cell disease undergoing elective or emergency surgery. There was no restriction by outcomes examined, language or publication status. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and the risk of bias and extracted data. Main results Three trials with 990 participants were eligible for inclusion in the review. There were no

  9. Complications and prognosis of intraoperative blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Silva, João Manoel; Cezario, Thiago Abreu; Toledo, Diogo O; Magalhães, Danielle Dourado; Pinto, Marco Aurélio Cícero; Victoria, Luiz Gustavo F

    2008-01-01

    Intraoperative blood transfusions are associated with an increase in postoperative complications and hospital costs. Thus, this study evaluated the characteristics, complications, and probable risk factors for death in surgical patients who needed intraoperative blood transfusions. This is a prospective study that spanned a one-year period, undertaken at the surgical suite of a tertiary hospital. Patients older than 18 years who needed intraoperative blood transfusions were included in this study Jehovah witnesses, patients with a history of prior blood transfusions, coronary failure, and acute brain lesions were excluded. Eighty patients with mean age of 68.4 +/- 14.1 years participated in the study. Most patients were ASA II, representing 69.6% of the study group; APACHE and POSSUM scores were 13.6 +/- 4.4 and 37.5 +/- 11.4, respectively. Mean hemoglobin at the time of transfusion was 8.2 +/-1.8 g x dL(-1) and 19% of the patients had hemoglobin levels higher than 10 g x dL(-1). Patients received an average of 2.2 +/- 0.9 IU of packed red blood cells. Hospital mortality was 26.3%. Post-transfusion complications totaled 57.5% of the cases in the postoperative period, and most of them were due to infections. In the logistic regression, independent factors for death included APACHE II (OR = 1.34; 95% CI 1.102-1.622), POSSUM (OR = 1.08; 95% CI 1.008-1.150) and the number of packed red blood cells received (OR = 2.22; 95% CI 1.100-4.463). Thus, the higher the number of transfusions, the greater the incidence of complications and mortality. Hemoglobin level, and the number of packed red blood cells used were elevated when compared with studies that suggest restrictive strategies. This sample presented a high incidence of complications, especially infections, and complications. APACHE II and POSSUM scores and the number of transfusions were independent risk factors for a worse postoperative prognosis.

  10. Blood transfusion before radiation for malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, T.K. )

    1989-10-27

    This editorial discusses the situation of administering blood to patients prior to radiotherapy in an attempt to increase tissue/tumor oxygen tension. The author believes that since the rate at which tumor cells consume oxygen is highly variable, the aim of achieving high cellular oxygen tension may be met better by maintaining a high blood perfusion rate. Blood volume can be maintained without relying on transfusion, and safer alternatives are available.

  11. Post-transplant blood transfusions and pediatric renal allograft outcomes.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Priya; Gillingham, Kristen; Matas, Arthur; Chinnakotla, Srinath; Chavers, Blanche

    2016-11-01

    The association of blood transfusions with GS after pediatric KTx is unclear. We retrospectively analyzed blood transfusions post-KTx and subsequent outcomes. Between 1984 and 2013, 482 children (<18 years of age) underwent KTx at our center. Recipient demographics, outcomes and transfusion data were collected. Cox regression with post-KTx blood transfusion as a time-dependent covariate was performed to model the impact of blood transfusion on outcomes. Of the 208 (44%) that were transfused, 39% had transfusion <1 month post-KTx; 48% >12 months. Transfused and non-transfused recipients were not significantly different. In univariate and multivariate analyses, there was no difference between transfused and non-transfused recipient patient survival, antibody-mediated and ACR, and DSA free survival. Transfusions <1 month post-KTx did not impact DCGS (P=NS). Patients transfused >12 months post-KTx had significantly lower 12 month eGFR (compared to non-transfused) and worse subsequent DCGS. Post-KTx blood transfusions have increased in pediatric KTx over time but have no negative association with rejection or DSA production. DCGS is unaffected by transfusion within first month. Transfusions after the first year occur in patients with more advanced chronic kidney disease and are associated with significantly worse DCGS. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Severe thalassaemia intermedia with multiple fractures: role of transfusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saqib Qayyum; Iqbal, Mudassar; Wahla, Madiha Saeed; Tarrar, Aimel Munir

    2011-11-01

    Thalassaemia intermedia includes thalassaemias with clinical severity intermediate between asymptomatic thalassaemia minor and transfusion dependent thalassaemia major. By definition patients of thalassaemia intermedia maintain a haemoglobin level of 7-10 g/dl and do not, or only occasionally, require blood transfusion. An eight-year-old girl who was a known case of thalassaemia intermedia and had been occasionally transfused presented with fever, pain and swelling over the wrists, ankles and above the right knee joint. Radiographs showed medullary widening, cortical thinning and; multiple, recent and old, partially healed fractures of metadiaphseal regions of long bones. Her fractures have been immobilized by means of back slabs. In view of her recurrent fractures and growth retardation we advised a regular transfusion-chelation regimen to our patient to suppress her ineffective dyserythropoiesis. The treatment is expected to prevent further bone fragility and fractures, as well as improve her life quality.

  13. Blood transfusions in critical care: improving safety through technology & process analysis.

    PubMed

    Aulbach, Rebecca K; Brient, Kathy; Clark, Marie; Custard, Kristi; Davis, Carolyn; Gecomo, Jonathan; Ho, Judy Ong

    2010-06-01

    A multidisciplinary safety initiative transformed blood transfusion practices at St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital in Houston, Texas. An intense analysis of a mistransfusion using the principles of a Just Culture and the process of Cause Mapping identified system and human performance factors that led to the transfusion error. Multiple initiatives were implemented including technology, education and human behaviour change. The wireless technology of Pyxis Transfusion Verification by CareFusion is effective with the rapid infusion module efficient for use in critical care. Improvements in blood transfusion safety were accomplished by thoroughly evaluating the process of transfusions and by implementing wireless electronic transfusion verification technology. During the 27 months following implementation of the CareFusion Transfusion Verification there have been zero cases of transfusing mismatched blood.

  14. Red blood cell transfusion in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Klein, Harvey G; Spahn, Donat R; Carson, Jeffrey L

    2007-08-04

    Every year, about 75 million units of blood are collected worldwide. Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is one of the few treatments that adequately restore tissue oxygenation when oxygen demand exceeds supply. Although the respiratory function of blood has been studied intensively, the trigger for RBC transfusion remains controversial, and doctors rely primarily on clinical experience. Laboratory assays that indicate failing tissue oxygenation would be ideal to guide the need for transfusion, but none has proved easy, reproducible, and sensitive to regional tissue hypoxia. The clinical importance of the RBCs storage lesion (ie, the time-dependent metabolic, biochemical, and molecular changes that stored blood cells undergo) is poorly understood. RBCs can be filtered, washed, frozen, or irradiated for specific indications. Donor screening and testing have dramatically reduced infectious risks in the developed world, but infection remains a major hazard in developing countries, where 13 million units of blood are not tested for HIV or hepatitis viruses. Pathogen inactivation techniques are in clinical trials for RBCs, but none is available for use. Despite serious immunological and non-immunological complications, RBC transfusion holds a therapeutic index that exceeds that of many common medications.

  15. [Blood transfusion and supply chain management safety].

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Jean-François; Caldani, Cyril; Cabaud, Jean-Jacques; Chavarin, Patricia; Rochette-Eribon, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    The level of safety attained in blood transfusion now makes this a discipline better managed care activities. This was achieved both by scientific advances and policy decisions regulating and supervising the activity, as well as by the quality system, which we recall that affects the entire organizational structure, responsibilities, procedures, processes and resources in place to achieve quality management. So, an effective quality system provides a framework within which activities are established, performed in a quality-focused way and continuously monitored to improve outcomes. This system quality has to irrigate all the actors of the transfusion, just as much the establishments of blood transfusion than the health establishments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Autologous Blood Transfusion in Sports: Emerging Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Salamin, Olivier; De Angelis, Sara; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Saugy, Martial; Leuenberger, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Despite being prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency, blood doping through erythropoietin injection or blood transfusion is frequently used by athletes to increase oxygen delivery to muscles and enhance performance. In contrast with allogeneic blood transfusion and erythropoietic stimulants, there is presently no direct method of detection for autologous blood transfusion (ABT) doping. Blood reinfusion is currently monitored with individual follow-up of hematological variables via the athlete biological passport, which requires further improvement. Microdosage is undetectable, and suspicious profiles in athletes are often attributed to exposure to altitude, heat stress, or illness. Additional indirect biomarkers may increase the sensitivity and specificity of the longitudinal approach. The emergence of "-omics" strategies provides new opportunities to discover biomarkers for the indirect detection of ABT. With the development of direct quantitative methods, transcriptomics based on microRNA or messenger RNA expression is a promising approach. Because blood donation and blood reinfusion alter iron metabolism, quantification of proteins involved in metal metabolism, such as hepcidin, may be applied in an "ironomics" strategy to improve the detection of ABT. As red blood cell (RBC) storage triggers changes in membrane proteins, proteomic methods have the potential to identify the presence of stored RBCs in blood. Alternatively, urine matrix can be used for the quantification of the plasticizer di(2-ethyhexyl)phthalate and its metabolites that originate from blood storage bags, suggesting recent blood transfusion, and have an important degree of sensitivity and specificity. This review proposes that various indirect biomarkers should be applied in combination with mathematical approaches for longitudinal monitoring aimed at improving ABT detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Perioperative Red Blood Cell Transfusion: What We Do Not Know

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Chong; Xiong, Li-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Blood transfusion saves lives but may also increase the risk of injury. The objective of this review was to evaluate the possible adverse effects related to transfusion of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates stored for prolonged periods. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from PubMed articles published in English up to February 2015. Study Selection: Clinical and basic research articles were selected according to their relevance to this topic. Results: The ex vivo changes to RBC that occur during storage are collectively called storage lesion. It is still inconclusive if transfusion of RBC with storage lesion has clinical relevance. Multiple ongoing prospective randomized controlled trials are aimed to clarify this clinical issue. It was observed that the adverse events related to stored RBC transfusion were prominent in certain patient populations, including trauma, critical care, pediatric, and cardiac surgery patients, which leads to the investigation of underlying mechanisms. It is demonstrated that free hemoglobin toxicity, decreasing of nitric oxide bioavailability, and free iron-induced increasing of inflammation may play an important role in this process. Conclusion: It is still unclear whether transfusion of older RBC has adverse effects, and if so, which factors determine such clinical effects. However, considering the magnitude of transfusion and the widespread medical significance, potential preventive strategies should be considered, especially for the susceptible recipients. PMID:26315088

  18. Perioperative blood transfusion: the role of allogenous and autologous transfusions, and pharmacological agents.

    PubMed

    Chimutengwende-Gordon, Mukai; Khan, Wasim S; Maruthainar, Nimalan

    2010-08-01

    The decision to transfuse patients perioperatively is made on an individual basis and should consider factors such as duration and severity of anaemia, symptoms, physiological parameters and comorbidities. Autologous blood transfusion has the benefit of avoiding some of the immunological and infective complications associated with allogenic blood transfusion. Pharmacological agents as well as anaesthetic and surgical techniques have a role in avoiding the need for blood transfusion.

  19. Blood doping: the flip side of transfusion and transfusion alternatives.

    PubMed

    Cacic, Daniel Limi; Hervig, Tor; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2013-08-01

    Blood doping in sports has been a hot topic of present. Longitudinal follow up of hematological parameters in different endurance sports, during the 1990s and early 2000s, has provided considerable suspicions about extensive blood manipulation, with performance enhancing effects. Recent doping revelations in the media also prove that blood doping is not an anticipated myth but it is, in fact, real. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents and autologous blood transfusions are used in synergy with substantial effect on the maximum oxygen uptake and delivery to muscles. Whilst both methods of blood manipulation represent a potential health hazard, in the context of an elevated hematocrit, nevertheless despite a number of suspicious deaths amongst athletes, this has not yet been fully documented. A reliable test for detection of recombinant human erythropoietin was implemented in 2000, but this is probably circumvented by microdose regimens. The Athlete's Biological Passport represents the progeny of the idea of an indirect approach based on long term monitoring of hematological parameters, thus making it possible to detect autologous blood doping and erythropoietin use after the substance is excreted. Nevertheless with advances in anti-doping measures it is possible that the levels of excretion of substances used can be masked. Clearly more sensitive and specific diagnostic tools and research/development in these areas of major concern are warranted, which, combined with changes in the athlete's attitude, will help in reaching the vision of fair play.

  20. Utilization management in the blood transfusion service.

    PubMed

    Peña, Jeremy Ryan Andrew; Dzik, Walter Sunny

    2014-01-01

    The scope of activity of the Blood Transfusion Service (BTS) makes it unique among the clinical laboratories. The combination of therapeutic and diagnostic roles necessitates a multi-faceted approach to utilization management in the BTS. We present our experience in utilization management in large academic medical center.

  1. Blood transfusion in trauma patients: unresolved questions.

    PubMed

    Cushing, M; Shaz, B H

    2011-03-01

    Massive transfusion is an essential part of resuscitation efforts in acute trauma patients. The goal is to quickly correct trauma-induced coagulopathy and replace red blood cell (RBC) mass with the minimal number as well as the appropriate choice of blood components to minimize the possible adverse effects of transfusions. Early trauma induced coagulopathy (ETIC) is present in about 20% of patients upon hospital admission and predicts for decreased survival. The mechanism of ETIC is still being elucidated; however, most theories of ETIC's pathophysiology justify the early use of plasma. Most massive transfusion protocol (MTP) ratios deliver blood products in a ratio of 1:1:1 for RBCs:plasma:platelets, which is supported by the majority of the literature demonstrating improved patient survival with higher ratios (>1 plasma and platelet for every 2 RBCs transfused). Indeed, formula-driven MTPs allow trauma services to react quickly to ETIC and provide coagulation factors and platelets in these ratios without having to wait for the results of coagulation assays while the patient's coagulopathy worsens. New MTPs are being created which are adjusted according to an individual's coagulation laboratory values based on point-of-care laboratory tests, such as thromboelastography. When creating an MTP, product wastage due to inappropriate activation and improper product storage should be considered and closely monitored. Another area of discussion regarding transfusion in trauma includes the potential association of prolonged storage of RBCs and adverse outcomes, which has yet to be confirmed. Significant progress has been made in the transfusion management of trauma patients, but further studies are required to optimize patient care and outcomes.

  2. Photodynamic decontamination of blood for transfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Hur, Ehud; Margolis-Nunno, H.; Gottlieb, P.; Lustigman, S.; Horowitz, Bernard

    1995-01-01

    Currently transfused cellular components of blood are not available in a sterile form and carry a small risk of transmitting viral and parasite diseases. Using phthalocyanines and red light, lipid enveloped viruses, e.g., HIV-1, can be inactivated in red blood cell concentrates (RBCC). Under conditions leading to virus sterilization the blood borne parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria) could be eliminated to undetectable levels (> 4 log10 kill). RBC damage during treatment could be avoided by increasing the light fluence rate to 80 mW/cm2, and by including the free radical scavenger glutathione and the vitamin E derivative Trolox during light exposure. Similar sterilization of platelet concentrates was achieved with the psoralen derivative AMT and UVA light. Platelet damage due to PUVA treatment was avoided by including the plant flavonoid rutin during irradiation. It is concluded that elimination of the risk of transmitting pathogens during blood transfusion is feasible with photochemical treatments.

  3. Clinical Response and Transfusion Reactions of Sheep Subjected to Single Homologous Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Rejane Santos; Minervino, Antonio Humberto Hamad; Araújo, Carolina Akiko Sato Cabral; Rodrigues, Frederico Augusto Mazzocca Lopes; Oliveira, Francisco Leonardo Costa; Zaminhan, Janaina Larissa Rodrigues; Moreira, Thiago Rocha; Sousa, Isadora Karolina Freitas; Ortolani, Enrico Lippi; Barrêto Júnior, Raimundo Alves

    2014-01-01

    Studies in relation to blood conservation and responses to transfusion are scarce for ruminants. We evaluated the clinical manifestations of sheep that received a single homologous transfusion of whole blood, focusing on transfusion reactions. Eighteen adult sheep were subjected to a single phlebotomy to withdraw 40% of the total blood volume, which was placed into CPDA-1 bags and then divided into G0, animals that received fresh blood, and G15 and G35, animals that received blood stored for 15 or 35 days, respectively. Clinical observations were recorded throughout the transfusion, whereas heart rate, respiratory rate, and rectal temperature were assessed at the following times: 24 hours after phlebotomy and before transfusion; 30 minutes, six, twelve, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours and eight and 16 days after transfusion. All groups presented transfusion reactions, among which hyperthermia was the most frequent (50% of animals). Tachycardia occurred most frequently in the G35 animals (50% of them). During transfusion G35 animals presented more clinical manifestation (P < 0.05). Transfusion of fresh or stored total blood improved the blood volume, but transfusion reactions occurred, demonstrating that a single transfusion of fresh or stored blood can cause inflammatory and febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions in sheep. PMID:25544959

  4. Neurological Complications following Blood Transfusions in Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Khawar, Nayaab; Kulpa, Jolanta; Bellin, Anne; Proteasa, Simona; Sundaram, Revathy

    2017-01-01

    In Sickle Cell Anemia (SCA) patient blood transfusions are an important part of treatment for stroke and its prevention. However, blood transfusions can also lead to complications such as Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome (RPLS). This brief report highlights two cases of SCA who developed such neurological complications after a blood transfusion. RLPS should be considered as the cause of neurologic finding in patients with SCA and hypertension following a blood transfusion. PMID:28127478

  5. [Closed-loop blood transfusion management system based on PDA].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiyi; Chen, Canda; Luo, Luo; Yin, Zhou; Zhou, Min; Xie, Qiong; Xu, Min; Zhang, Qiutao

    2013-09-01

    A closed-loop transfusion management system is constructed that covers blood preservation, transportation, transfer, distribution of blood, distribution, clinical blood specimen collection and blood transfusion process, which can monitor the implementation of doctor's advice, view the transport process of blood and blood samples, and record blood transfusion and adverse reaction information. These measurements can play a good effect in reduction of manual records and handover links in blood transfusion management, enhance the blood bank management, guarantee safely using blood, and realize the goal of real-time monitoring and closed-loop management.

  6. Blood transfusion and the World Wars.

    PubMed

    Boulton, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the remarkable development in the science and practice of blood transfusion during the 20 years either side of 1900, progressing through the challenges of surgical vascular access, the propensity of shed blood to clot and the more mysterious apparently arbitrary acute reactions (later revealed as due to blood group incompatibility), to describe in more detail, the developments at the Western Front, then giving a précis of the advances in the interwar years through to the mid-twentieth-century 'blood-banking'.

  7. [Consent to transfusion of blood and hemoderivatives].

    PubMed

    Massaro, A L; Alba, E; Ragonesi, G; Colla, F; Barbini, V; Corvetto, L; D'Addato, F

    2002-04-01

    The transfusion of blood or hemoderivatives is a medical procedure that necessarily involves the possibility of danger or damage, given that, even with maximum prudence, diligence and expertise, it is impossible to avoid severe risks of infections, transfusional reactions, alloimmunisation, undesired immunomodulating effects, etc. Article 19 of Ministerial Decree 15/01/1991 makes it obligatory to obtain informed consent , understood as the free expression of the acceptance of treatment provided after being fully informed of the nature, possibility, risks and collateral effects of the procedure. Consent to blood transfusion can only be given by a person with full mental faculties, whereas transfusion treatment can be proposed for a minor, for a prisoner or for a person who is temporarily incapacitated by their physical conditions. The authors examine a number of problems regarding the following questions: what happens if consent is withheld? What can happen if consent is not requested or if the transfusion is performed when consent has been denied? In conclusion, it is difficult to offer operating schemes that are easy to apply: much depends on the patient's conditions, his reactions, his concerns, his trust in the doctor and the latter's communication skills.

  8. [Blood transfusion and ethics: new questions].

    PubMed

    Sicard, D

    2006-09-01

    Chairman to the French Institutional Review Board, Professor Didier Sicard raises blood donation issues from an ethical standpoint. The contaminated blood scandal focused on the necessity of reducing transfusion risks and regarded blood safety as an ethical mandatory requirement, a debatable subject to deal with. The author proposes to reconsider the nature of unpaid blood donations while advising not to scorn the remunerated gift when such is the case. As for the use of blood, he questions the solutions based on a zero risk perspective, in particular an excessive auto-transfusional practice or a restrictive use of blood, lately regarded as essential. Starting from the blood donation concern this article leads us to think over both our society's fears and the precautionary principle abuses.

  9. Prolonged storage of packed red blood cells for blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Simancas-Racines, Daniel; Peña-González, Barbra S

    2015-07-14

    A blood transfusion is an acute intervention, used to address life- and health-threatening conditions on a short-term basis. Packed red blood cells are most often used for blood transfusion. Sometimes blood is transfused after prolonged storage but there is continuing debate as to whether transfusion of 'older' blood is as beneficial as transfusion of 'fresher' blood. To assess the clinical benefits and harms of prolonged storage of packed red blood cells, in comparison with fresh, on recipients of blood transfusion. We ran the search on 1st May 2014. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialized Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OvidSP), Embase (OvidSP), CINAHL (EBSCO Host) and two other databases. We also searched clinical trials registers and screened reference lists of the retrieved publications and reviews. We updated this search in June 2015 but these results have not yet been incorporated. Randomised clinical trials including participants assessed as requiring red blood cell transfusion were eligible for inclusion. Prolonged storage was defined as red blood cells stored for ≥ 21 days in a blood bank. We did not apply limits regarding the duration of follow-up, or country where the study took place. We excluded trials where patients received a combination of short- and long-stored blood products, and also trials without a clear definition of prolonged storage. We independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction by at least two review authors. The major outcomes were death from any cause, transfusion-related acute lung injury, and adverse events. We estimated relative risk for dichotomous outcomes. We measured statistical heterogeneity using I(2). We used a random-effects model to synthesise the findings. We identified three randomised clinical trials, involving a total of 120 participants, comparing packed red blood cells with ≥ 21 days storage

  10. Severe hyperkalemia following blood transfusions: Is there a link?

    PubMed Central

    Rizos, Christos V; Milionis, Haralampos J; Elisaf, Moses S

    2017-01-01

    Patients with gastrointestinal bleeding often require large volume blood transfusion. Among the various side effects of blood transfusion, the increase of potassium levels is a serious one which is often overlooked. We report a case of severe hyperkalemia in a patient with gastric bleeding after large volume transfusion of packed red blood cells. The patient had hyperkalemia at baseline associated with his receiving medication as well as acute renal failure following hypovolemia. The baseline hyperkalemia was further aggravated after massive transfusions of packed red blood cells in a short period of time. The associated pathogenetic mechanisms resulting in the increase of potassium levels are presented. A number of risk factors which increase the risk of hyperkalemia after blood transfusion are discussed. Moreover, appropriate management strategies for the prevention of blood transfusion associated hyperkalemia are also presented. Physicians should always keep in mind the possibility of hyperkalemia in cases of blood transfusion. PMID:28101452

  11. High Speed Blood and Fluid Transfusion Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    it stores energy for heating fluid when not attached to an external power source, (2) that it provides for high heating and infusion rates, up to...8217 % High Speed Blood and Fluid Transfusion Equipment Final Report Prepared by: Rocky Research 1598 Foothill Drive Boulder City, NV 89005...University of Nevada School of Medicine Trauma Institute Department of Surgery 2040 W. Charleston Blvd #302 Las Vegas, NV 89102 Principal

  12. Blood transfusion reactions; evaluation of 462 transfusions at a tertiary hospital in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Arewa, O P; Akinola, N O; Salawu, L

    2009-06-01

    The immuno-haematological safety of blood remains an important and recurring issue in blood transfusion practice. Data concerning morbidity and mortality from blood transfusion is sparse in Nigeria however and while the current efforts at reduction in the incidence of adverse consequence of blood transfusion is encapsulated in the concept of Haemovigilance, the Nigerian blood transfusion service is yet to institute the practice. A prospective study of 462 transfusions at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital was done to evaluate the incidence and pattern of transfusion reactions in the hospital. The overall incidence of transfusion reactions is 8.7% (40 cases), with febrile nonhaemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTR) constituting 65% of these. The incidence of adverse reaction is significantly related to a positive history of previous transfusion (p = 0.0039). Efforts must be sustained at evolving a system to minimize the incidence and consequences. The development of a haemovigilance system in which data regarding all transfusions carried out in Nigerian hospitals is collated and analyzed is necessary. The advent of the National Blood Transfusion Service (N.B.T.S) in Nigeria with Zonal centres in the six geopolitical zones of the country offers an opportunity for setting up a national haemovigilance programme.

  13. Management of patients who refuse blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Chand, N Kiran; Subramanya, H Bala; Rao, G Venkateswara

    2014-01-01

    A small group of people belonging to a certain religion, called Jehovah's witness do not accept blood transfusion or blood products, based on biblical readings. When such group of people are in need of health care, their faith and belief is an obstacle for their proper treatment, and poses legal, ethical and medical challenges for attending health care provider. Due to the rapid growth in the membership of this group worldwide, physicians attending hospitals should be prepared to manage such patients. Appropriate management of such patients entails understanding of ethical and legal issues involved, providing meticulous medical management, use of prohaemostatic agents, essential interventions and techniques to reduce blood loss and hence, reduce the risk of subsequent need for blood transfusion. An extensive literature search was performed using search engines such as Google scholar, PubMed, MEDLINE, science journals and textbooks using keywords like ‘Jehovah's witness’, ‘blood haemodilution’, ‘blood salvage’ and ‘blood substitutes’. PMID:25535432

  14. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    van der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Furthermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfusion of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion or irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  15. Multivariate Analysis of Blood Transfusion Rates After Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    King, Joseph J; Patrick, Matthew R; Schnetzer, Ryan E; Farmer, Kevin W; Struk, Aimee M; Garvan, Cyndi; Wright, Thomas W

    A retrospective review was performed of all shoulder arthroplasties with patients grouped on the basis of transfusion protocol time period. Group 1 had transfusions if postoperative hematocrit was <30. Group 2 had transfusions based on symptomatic anemia. Bivariate analysis of transfusion factors and multivariate analysis of significant bivariate factors were performed. Protocol change decreased transfusion rates from 16% (group 1, 153 arthroplasties) to 8% (group 2, 149 arthroplasties). Reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) transfusion rate decreased dramatically (from 24% to 5%). Transfusion rates after total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) were low (4%) and after revision arthroplasty were high (21% + 27%) in both groups. Age, gender, heart disease, preoperative hematocrit, diagnosis, and estimated blood loss (EBL) were risk factors on bivariate analysis. Failed arthroplasty and fracture diagnoses carried high transfusion rates (25% + 28%). Logistic regression showed that low preoperative hematocrit, increased EBL, revision arthroplasty, and heart disease were transfusion risk factors. Protocol based on symptomatic anemia results in low transfusion rates after primary TSA and RTSA.

  16. [Aspects of blood transfusion in Djibouti].

    PubMed

    Massenet, D; Bouh, A

    1997-01-01

    Blood transfusion in Djibouti is organized with reference to relevant French regulation and the recommendations of the World Health Organization. The system is basically family donor system operating on the principle of one tested unit of blood for every two untested units donated. Spontaneous donations mainly from the police and army personnel account for only 20% of the 2500 units collected each year. The principle blood products are adult whole blood, adult red cells, and fresh frozen plasma. Products are distributed after viral and microbial testing for infectious disease. Overall the percentage of blood products that are not released due to detection of infectious agents is 17.5%. This rate is well correlated with the incidence of hepatitis B (15.5%), HIV infection (3.4%), hepatitis C (1.5%) and syphilis (0.4%) in Djibouti. The greatest demand for whole blood comes from medical departments where indigent people are treated for anemia due to dietary deficiency. Contamination by HIV present at undetectable levels at the time of testing is a serious problem. Measures should be taken to prevent anemia due to dietary deficiency and develop the use of autologous transfusion.

  17. [Methologic contribution to blood transfusion materials surveillance].

    PubMed

    Roussel, P; Pujol-Rey, A; Arzur, C

    2001-08-01

    To reduce seriousness and frequency of iatrogenic risk implies prevention policies and efficient operational systems for vigilance. This risk management implies definition of precise organizations and procedures able to locate and to notify quickly undesirable events. This is the case about single use medical devices (SUMD) used in blood transfusion. This article is a contribution to the organisation of the implemented material vigilance in blood transfusion, collectively carried out with actors concerned (users, manufacturers, National Commission for Material Vigilance). It presents a lot of tools and methods to favour practices harmonization, as well as preventive a curative (specifications before purchase, main part of the quality contract between customer and supplier; internal control plan; index for medical device used in transfusion; illustrated glossaries for three main families of medical devices; index about symptomatic events; definitions of seriousness levels with their operational consequences; methods to manage a single use medical device judged as defective; tool for the review of incidents according to reference and batch). Then, the management of incidents about SUMD is presented within a material vigilance system integrated into the quality system of the institution, for user as for manufacturer. This is done in a chronological order with successively description of the incident, the assessment of the impact, the management of the associated risk, the periodical review of incidents and management of matters in dispute.

  18. Blood Transfusion Delay and Outcome in County Hospitals in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Julius; Ayieko, Philip; Ogero, Morris; Gachau, Susan; Makone, Boniface; Nyachiro, Wycliffe; Mbevi, George; Chepkirui, Mercy; Malla, Lucas; Oliwa, Jacquie; Irimu, Grace; English, Mike

    2017-01-01

    Severe anemia is a leading indication for blood transfusion and a major cause of hospital admission and mortality in African children. Failure to initiate blood transfusion rapidly enough contributes to anemia deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. This article examines delays in accessing blood and outcomes in transfused children in Kenyan hospitals. Children admitted with nonsurgical conditions in 10 Kenyan county hospitals participating in the Clinical Information Network who had blood transfusion ordered from September 2013 to March 2016 were studied. The delay in blood transfusion was calculated from the date when blood transfusion was prescribed to date of actual transfusion. Five percent (2,875/53,174) of admissions had blood transfusion ordered. Approximately half (45%, 1,295/2,875) of children who had blood transfusion ordered at admission had a documented hemoglobin < 5 g/dl and 36% (2,232/6,198) of all children admitted with a diagnosis of anemia were reported to have hemoglobin < 5 g/dL. Of all the ordered transfusions, 82% were administered and documented in clinical records, and three-quarters of these (75%, 1,760/2,352) were given on the same day as ordered but these proportions varied from 71% to 100% across the 10 hospitals. Children who had a transfusion ordered but did not receive the prescribed transfusion had a mortality of 20%, compared with 12% among those transfused. Malaria-associated anemia remains the leading indication for blood transfusion in acute childhood illness admissions. Delays in transfusion are common and associated with poor outcomes. Variance in delay across hospitals may be a useful indicator of health system performance. PMID:27920394

  19. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Futhermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfuson of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion of irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  20. Economic impact of blood transfusions: balancing cost and benefits.

    PubMed

    Oge, Tufan; Kilic, Cemil Hakan; Kilic, Gokhan Sami

    2014-02-01

    Blood transfusions may be lifesaving, but they inherit their own risks. Risk of transfusion to benefit is a delicate balance. In addition, blood product transfusions purchases are one of the largest line items among the hospital and laboratory charges. In this review, we aimed to discuss the transfusion strategies and share our transfusion protocol as well as the steps for hospitals to build-up a blood management program while all these factors weight in. Moreover, we evaluate the financial burden to the health care system.

  1. Prospects for the provision of genotyped blood for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Denomme, Gregory A

    2013-10-01

    Blood group genotyping is gaining widespread adoption in blood centres and transfusion services. The current interest for a blood centre is its use as a screening tool to accurately predict donor phenotypes. However, not only is blood group genotyping used to screen for uncommon and rare types on a mass-scale, it can be used to optimize the inventory of multiple antigen-negative screened units. In addition, blood group genotyping provides blood types when antisera are not available, it can predict weak and variant antigens, and can aid in the resolution of ABO discrepancies. There are quality improvement benefits in blood group genotyping because it can screen for RHD alleles in Rh-negative blood donors and can be used to confirm that donors are suitable for reagent red cell production. It is possible that blood group genotyping information may be used as a donor recruitment tool. Given that genotyping can convey much more information about the expression of some complex antigens, e.g. hrB, Uvar, and Duffy, clinical trials are probably needed to show that genotyped or 'dry matched' transfusions are superior to phenotyped blood. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Importance of extended blood group genotyping in multiply transfused patients.

    PubMed

    Osman, Nadila Haryani; Sathar, Jameela; Leong, Chooi Fun; Zulkifli, Noor Fadzilah; Raja Sabudin, Raja Zahratul Azma; Othman, Ainoon; Ahmad Asnawi, Asral Wirda

    2017-06-01

    Blood group antigen systems are not limited to the ABO blood groups. There is increasing interest in the detection of extended blood group systems on the red cell surface. The conventional method used to determine extended blood group antigens or red cell phenotype is by serological testing, which is based on the detection of visible haemagglutination or the presence of haemolysis. However, this technique has many limitations due to recent exposure to donor red cell, certain drugs or medications or other diseases that may alter the red cell membrane. We aimed to determine the red cell blood group genotype by SNP real time PCR and to compare the results with the conventional serological methods in multiply transfused patients. Sixty-three patients participated in this study whose peripheral blood was collected and blood group phenotype was determined by serological tube method while the genotype was performed using TaqMan(®) Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) RT-PCR assays for RHEe, RHCc, Kidd and Duffy blood group systems. Discrepancies were found between the phenotype and genotype results for all blood groups tested. Accurate red blood cell antigen profiling is important for patients requiring multiple transfusions. The SNP RT-PCR platform is a reliable alternative to the conventional method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A strategy to reduce inappropriate red blood cell transfusion.

    PubMed

    Brandis, K; Richards, B; Ghent, A; Weinstein, S

    1994-06-06

    To evaluate the effectiveness of policies intended to decrease unnecessary packed red cell transfusions. The transfusion records of a 550-bed acute care facility were obtained and two six-month periods, one before and one after the introduction of new transfusion policies, were compared. Meaningful reductions were seen in crossmatch requests, number of units crossmatched and units transfused. After standardising for rising patient numbers, units transfused per 1000 admissions fell by 28.8%. Units crossmatched fell by slightly more than did units transfused, resulting in lower crossmatch-to-transfusion ratios, and indicating more effective use of resources. Total requests fell while "group-and-screen" requests rose, showing a shift toward more appropriate ordering in the face of increasing workload. The transfusion policies have succeeded in curtailing unnecessary transfusion practices. They included the lowering of "transfusion-triggering" haemoglobin levels, registrar or consultant approval of transfusions and enforcement of patient consent and chart documentation of transfusion indications, verified by the laboratory. The surgical blood ordering schedule was reviewed under the overall direction of the transfusion committee. A strong institutional commitment is required to lift the profile of blood transfusion.

  4. Reducing noninfectious risks of blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Gilliss, Brian M; Looney, Mark R; Gropper, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    As screening for transfusion-associated infections has improved, noninfectious complications of transfusion now cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the United States. For example, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and hemolytic transfusion-reactions are the first, second, and third leading causes of death from transfusion, respectively. These complications and others are reviewed, and several controversial methods for prevention of noninfectious complications of transfusion are discussed, including universal leukoreduction of erythrocyte units, use of male-only plasma, and restriction of erythrocyte storage age.

  5. Economic considerations on transfusion medicine and patient blood management.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Axel; Ozawa, Sherri; Farrugia, Albert; Farmer, Shannon L; Shander, Aryeh

    2013-03-01

    In times of escalating health-care cost, it is of great importance to carefully assess the cost-effectiveness and appropriateness of the most resource-consuming health interventions. A long-standing and common clinical practice that has been underestimated in cost and overestimated in effectiveness is the transfusion of allogeneic blood products. Studies show that this intervention comes with largely underestimated service cost and unacceptably high utilisation variability for matched patients, thus adding billions of unnecessary dollars to the health-care expenditure each year. Moreover, a large and increasing body of literature points to a dose-dependent increase of morbidity and mortality and adverse long-term outcomes associated with transfusion whereas published evidence for benefit is extremely limited. This means that transfusion may be a generator for increased hospital stay and possible re-admissions, resulting in additional billions in unnecessary expenditure for the health system. In contrast to this, there are evidence-based and cost-effective treatment options available to pre-empt and reduce allogeneic transfusions. The patient-specific rather than a product-centred application of these multiple modalities is termed patient blood management (PBM). From a health-economic perspective, the expeditious implementation of PBM programmes is clearly indicated. Both patients and payers could benefit from this concept that has recently been endorsed through the World Health Assembly resolution WHA63.12. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Blood transfusions in severe burn patients: Epidemiology and predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guosheng; Zhuang, Mingzhu; Fan, Xiaoming; Hong, Xudong; Wang, Kangan; Wang, He; Chen, Zhengli; Sun, Yu; Xia, Zhaofan

    2016-12-01

    Blood is a vital resource commonly used in burn patients; however, description of blood transfusions in severe burns is limited. The purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiology of blood transfusions and determine factors associated with increased transfusion quantity. This is a retrospective study of total 133 patients with >40% total body surface area (TBSA) burns admitted to the burn center of Changhai hospital from January 2008 to December 2013. The study characterized blood transfusions in severe burn patients. Univariate and Multivariate regression analyses were used to evaluate the association of clinical variables with blood transfusions. The overall transfusion rate was 97.7% (130 of 133). The median amount of total blood (RBC and plasma), RBC and plasma transfusions was 54 units (Interquartile range (IQR), 20-84), 19 units (IQR, 4-37.8) and 28.5 units (IQR, 14.8-51.8), respectively. The number of RBC transfusion in and outside operation room was 7 (0, 14) and 11 (2, 20) units, and the number of plasma was 6 (0.5, 12) and 21 (11.5, 39.3) units. A median of one unit of blood was transfused per TBSA and an average of 4 units per operation was given in the series. The consumption of plasma is higher than that of RBC. On multivariate regression analysis, age, full-thickness TBSA and number of operations were significant independent predictors associated with the number of RBC transfusion, and coagulopathy and ICU length showed a trend toward RBC consumption. Predictors for increased plasma transfusion were female, high full-thickness TBSA burn and more operations. Severe burn patients received an ample volume of blood transfusions. Fully understanding of predictors of blood transfusions will allow physicians to better optimize burn patients during hospitalization in an effort to use blood appropriately. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. [Hepatitis E virus: Blood transfusion implications].

    PubMed

    Gallian, P; Piquet, Y; Assal, A; Djoudi, R; Chiaroni, J; Izopet, J; Tiberghien, P

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a non-enveloped RNA virus transmitted by the fecal-oral route. Autochthonous hepatitis E occurring in developed countries is caused by genotypes 3 and 4 and is a zoonotic infection. Humans are infected mostly after ingestion of undercooked meat from infected animals. Most HEV 3 and 4 infections are clinically inapparent. However, genotype 3 (HEV 3) can lead to chronic hepatitis in immuno-compromised patients such as organ-transplant recipients and patients with haematological malignancies. In Europe, HEV 3 is implicated in transfusion-transmitted HEV infection. In France, as observed in several European countries, prevalence of HEV RNA and specific IgG antibodies are high indicating that viral circulation is important. The systematic HEV NAT screening of blood donations used for preparation of solvent detergent plasma indicate that 1 to 2218 donation is infected by HEV RNA. The need or implementation's impacts of safety measures to prevent HEV transmission by blood transfusion are under reflexion by French's health authorities. The HEV NAT screening is the only available tool of prevention. Alternative strategies are under investigation including individual or mini pool NAT testing all or part of blood donations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. From blood transfusion to patient blood management: a new paradigm for patient care and cost assessment of blood transfusion practice.

    PubMed

    Leahy, M F; Mukhtar, S A

    2012-03-01

    The ageing population in developed countries, including Australia, is putting increasing demands on blood transfusion services. With a falling donor pool there is likely to be a shortage of blood and blood products in the next 20 to 30 years unless there are significant changes in medical practice. The National Health and Medical Research Council/Australasian Society of Blood Transfusion Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Use of Blood Components from 2001 are being redeveloped by the National Health and Medical Research Council/Australian and New Zealand Society of Blood Transfusion as evidence-based patient-focused Patient Blood Management guidelines with the aim of improving patient outcomes by reducing inappropriate blood and blood product use and targeting therapies for improving the management of anaemia and coagulopathies.

  9. [Management of massive transfusion - the role of the blood transfusion service].

    PubMed

    Sone, Shinji; Tsuno, Hirokazu; Okazaki, Hitoshi

    2014-12-01

    Massive transfusion (hemorrhage) is defined as blood transfusion exceeding the circulatory blood volume within 24 hours. Here, we investigated cases of massive transfusion, defined as transfusion of more than 21 units of red blood cells within 24 hours, in our institution in the period from August 2005 to March 2013. Massive transfusion accounted for approximately 1% of all blood transfusions in our institution, and the majority were cardiac surgery cases (75%), with 80% of the cases receiving blood transfusion irtfhe operating theater. Brain-dead heart and liver transplantations were started in our hospital in 2006. Due to the revision of the Organ Transplantation Law in July 2010, brain-dead organ donations increased in Japan. Massive transfusion was required in approximately 47% of heart and 41% of liver transplants, with 44% of the transplants being conducted on holidays, and 47% at night. Therefore, the implementation of a 24-hour duty system for medical technologists, including holidays, is essential for the prompt testing and supply of blood products. For improvement of the safety of blood supply, a computer network system, connecting the blood control system of the blood transfusion service, the anesthetic system of the operating theater, and the hospital general medical system, was implemented in our hospital in March 2007. In the operating theater, anesthetists can request blood products, order new blood products, cross-check the provided blood products, and register their use, using this system. At the blood transfusion service, the blood products to be provided are cross- checked against the anesthetists' requests. Through this system, the anesthetists and blood transfusion service staff can check the list of blood products available for the surgical patient as well as those already transfused, on a real-time basis. For analysis of the improvements achieved, we compared the number of non-used blood units, i.e., the number of those provided minus the

  10. The appropriateness of blood transfusion following primary total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Joy, PJ; Bennet, SJ

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A significant proportion of all red cell transfusions are given to patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery. Concern over transfusion safety and cost, coupled with evidence showing that restrictive transfusion policies benefit patients, prompted us to audit our blood prescribing practice at Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust in order to assess the appropriateness of every transfusion episode following elective primary total hip replacement. METHODS All patients undergoing a primary total hip replacement in our department over a six-month period were included in the study. Data were collected retrospectively using case note examination and transfusion service data. Standards were dictated by the British Orthopaedic Association guidelines on blood conservation in elective orthopaedic surgery. RESULTS Twenty-seven per cent of patients (39/143) were transfused. Forty-six per cent of these (18/39) were transfused inappropriately and twenty-three per cent (9/39) appropriately. Thirteen per cent (5/39) had a valid indication for transfusion but were over-transfused and in eighteen per cent (7/39) the quality of documentation did not allow an assessment to be made. Fifty-two per cent of patients who had surgical drains (29/56) were transfused. Reaudit following staff education and amendments to the local transfusion policy did not demonstrate a reduction in transfusion rates. CONCLUSIONS This audit showed that significant potential exists for reducing transfusion rates based on optimising prescribing practice alone. It also demonstrated that changing local practice based on audit data can be challenging. PMID:22507728

  11. Tetany by transfusion of small volume of blood: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Sood, Tanvi; Mittal, Kshitija; Bedi, Ravneet Kaur; Dogra, Kanchan; Dimri, Kislay

    2013-12-01

    A requisition for two units of packed red blood cells was received for a 54 year female, known case of genitourinary carcinoma. After transfusion of approximately 15-20 ml of blood, a call was received from resident in charge of radiotherapy ward stating that patient had clenching of hands along with circumoral tingling and paresthesias in her limbs. Her investigations showed decreased serum potassium and calcium levels but serum magnesium levels were not available. Multiple electrolyte disturbances probably precipitated tetany even by small volume of blood transfusion. We therefore recommend careful monitoring of electrolytes, including magnesium, before starting blood transfusion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Diabetes mellitus in the context of blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Nilotpal

    2017-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the commonest medical conditions affecting humans. However, knowledge of diabetes mellitus in the context of blood transfusion is lacking. In this article, the eligibility of people with diabetes as donors, issues faced during blood component transfusion to diabetics and impaired glucose tolerance among chronic blood recipients will be discussed, along with discussion of the present state of evidence.

  13. Total quality management in blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Smit-Sibinga, C T

    2000-01-01

    Quality management is an ongoing development resulting in consistency products and services and ever increasing customer satisfaction. The ultimum is Total Quality Management. Quality systems and quality management in transfusion medicine have gained considerable attention since the outbreak of the AIDS epidemic. Where product orientation has long been applied through quality control, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) principles were introduced, shifting the developments in the direction of process orientation. Globally, and particularly in the more industrialised world people and system orientation has come along with the introduction of the ISO9001 concept. Harmonisation and a degree of uniformity are needed to implement a universally applicable Quality System and related Quality Management. Where the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB) is the professional organisation with the most extensive experience in quality systems in blood transfusion, the European Union and the Council of Europe now are in the process to design a quality system and management applicable to a larger variety of countries, based on a hybrid of current GMP and ISO9001 principles. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies has developed a more universally to implement Quality Manual, with a pilot project in Honduras. It is recommendable to harmonise the various designs and bring the approaches under one common denominator.

  14. Blood transfusion trigger in burns: a four-year retrospective analysis of blood transfusions in eleven burn centers in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Fuzaylov, G; Anderson, R; Lee, J; Slesarenko, S; Nagaychuk, V; Grigorieva, T; Kozinec, G

    2015-09-30

    One focus of improvement of burn care in Ukraine was the management of blood loss and blood transfusions in burn patients. The aim of this project was to analyze blood transfusion triggers in burn patients and outcomes at eleven major burn centers in Ukraine. This multicenter retrospective study reviewed four years of data on blood-transfused burn patients admitted to eleven major burn centers in Ukraine. Data analyzed included: demographics, characteristics of the burns, complications of burn injury, triggers for blood transfusions and outcomes. A total of 928 burn patients who received 2,693 blood transfusions from 11 major burn centers over a four-year period, were studied. Regardless of the total body surface area (TBSA) that was burned, blood transfusions were administered with a hemoglobin (Hb) trigger value of around 9 g/dL. Roughly one third (30.5%) of all transfusions were given in patients with a TBSA ≤ 10%. We demonstrated that Ukrainian doctors were using the same Hb trigger for blood transfusions for all Ukrainian burn patients, which suggested a need to change blood transfusion policy.

  15. Fresh whole blood transfusion: a controversial military practice.

    PubMed

    Kauvar, David S; Holcomb, John B; Norris, Gary C; Hess, John R

    2006-07-01

    The transfusion of fresh whole blood (FWB) for trauma-induced coagulopathy is unusual in civilian practice. However, US military physicians have used FWB in every combat operation since the practice was introduced in World War I and continue to do so during current military operations. We discuss our review of all blood products administered to US military casualties in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) between March and December 2003. FWB transfusions were most frequent when demands for massive transfusions wiped out existing blood supplies. FWB patients had the highest blood product requirements; however, mortality did not differ significantly between FWB and non-FWB patients overall or for massively transfused patients. We review the current military practice of FWB transfusion in combat theaters and conclude that FWB transfusion is convenient, safe, and effective in certain military situations.

  16. The risks of blood transfusions and the shortage of supply leads to the quest for blood substitutes.

    PubMed

    Nouwairi, Nicole-Soraya

    2004-10-01

    A number of factors have combined to drive the interest in developing blood substitutes. These include the time-dependent decrement in stored blood biochemistry, the general shortage of the blood supply, and public awareness of the risks associated with allogeneic transfusions. Current literature on different blood substitutes was reviewed. The aim of this article is to help the reader understand the necessity of blood substitutes and to briefly describe blood substitutes that are in clinical trials. The need for oxygen-carrying blood substitutes is the driving force in multiple clinical trials. More research is needed to develop alteratives to allogeneic blood transfusion that are free of complications.

  17. [Blood transfusion safety in a limited resources setting: the elaboration of a rational National Blood Policy in Togo].

    PubMed

    Sodahlon, Yao K; Segbena, Akoeté Y; Prince-David, Mireille; Gbo, Kossivi A; Fargier, Marie-Paule; North, Marie-Louise; Malvy, Denis Jean-Marie

    2004-01-01

    The demand for blood transfusion is high in subSaharan Africa because of the high prevalence of the anemia especially due to malaria and obstetrical damage. Providing a safe and confident system of transfusion requires more and more resources when, in developing countries, these are in fact limited. With a double view to improve the coverage in blood transfusion and ensure the security of blood products, the Ministry of Health of Togo launched in 1999 a series of operations for setting up a rational National Blood Transfusion Policy. The following steps were undertaken. A two-week situation analysis of the blood transfusion sector highlighted the lack of sector regulation, the multiplicity of blood unit production centres (n = 33 for a country of 56,000 km(2)) that could endanger the security of the products especially in limited resources conditions, the inadequacy in quality management in all areas of blood transfusion (insufficiency of human resources, equipment and supply, lack of procedures, etc.) and the lack of an information system on blood transfusion for retrospective survey and planning. The draft of the National Blood Transfusion Policy was then written in a week by two national consultants in accordance with the findings of the situation analysis. It was validated during a three-day multidisciplinary workshop and an ultimate validation was made by an international consultant in order to assess the adequacy of the options considered to the country's specific setting. The options retained for developing the Togolese blood transfusion sector development and which are consigned in the National Blood Transfusion Policy are as follows: development and implementation of blood transfusion regulations; reorganisation of the National Transfusion System by reducing it to 3 blood unit production centres: one in Lomé (the capital town), one in the centre of the country (Sokodé, 480 km from Lomé), and one in the Northern part (Dapaong, 870 km from Lomé); setting

  18. Blood transfusion in burn patients: Triggers of transfusion in a referral burn center in Iran.

    PubMed

    Tavousi, S H; Ahmadabadi, A; Sedaghat, A; Khadem-Rezaiyan, M; Yaghoubi Moghaddam, Z; Behrouzian, M J; Nemati, S; Saghafi, H

    2017-08-21

    Blood and its derivatives are one of the most lifesaving products in the modern medicine practice. However, it is not an absolutely safe prescription. Many adverse effects such as infection, transfusion-related acute lung injury, immunosuppression, multi-organ dysfunction, acute respiratory syndrome, transfusion errors, transmission of infectious agents such as HIV, HBV, HCV are attributable to blood transfusion. The aim of this study was to describe how and when blood products were transfused in a referral burn center. This cross-sectional study was performed on medical records of all admitted patients in the Department of Burns and Reconstructive Surgery of Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad, Iran during September 2014 up to August 2015. Transfusion measures such as Hb, Hct and demographic data were extracted from patient records. SPSS version 11.5 was used for data analysis. During the study period, 701 acute burnt patients were admitted with the mean age of 25.5±20.5 years. Sixty-four percent were male and burnt percentage of total body surface area (TBSA) was 30.9±24.3%. About one third (240) of patients received at least one blood product. Mean of the transfused packed red blood cell was 274.1±674.6mL per patient and 8.85mL per 1% of burnt TBSA. Anemia was the most common transfusion trigger. Mortality in burnt patients who received blood products was two folds more than patients who did not receive any blood products. We prescribed less blood products compared with other reviewed burn centers. However, following a written blood transfusion protocol by all clinicians may reduce blood transfusion in unnecessary situations even more significantly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Blood transfusion indications in neurosurgical patients: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bagwe, Shefali; Chung, Lawrance K; Lagman, Carlito; Voth, Brittany L; Barnette, Natalie E; Elhajjmoussa, Lekaa; Yang, Isaac

    2017-04-01

    Neurosurgical procedures can be complicated by significant blood losses that have the potential to decrease tissue perfusion to critical brain tissue. Red blood cell transfusion is used in a variety of capacities both inside, and outside, of the operating room to prevent untoward neurologic damage. However, evidence-based guidelines concerning thresholds and indications for transfusion in neurosurgery remain limited. Consequently, transfusion practices in neurosurgical patients are highly variable and based on institutional experiences. Recently, a paradigm shift has occurred in neurocritical intensive care units, whereby restrictive transfusion is increasingly favored over liberal transfusion but the ideal strategy remains in clinical equipoise. The authors of this study perform a systematic review of the literature with the objective of capturing the changing landscape of blood transfusion indications in neurosurgical patients.

  20. [Blood is not for everyone: the usefulness of erythrocyte transfusion].

    PubMed

    Kranenburg, Floris J; Arbous, M S Sesmu; So-Osman, Cynthia; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence on the limited usefulness and the adverse consequences of erythrocyte transfusion has led to a large drop in the number of blood transfusions over the last 20 years. The results of randomised studies suggest that in most haemodynamically stable patients with acute anaemia an Hb transfusion threshold of 4.4 mmol/l for blood transfusion has the same outcomes as a higher transfusion threshold. The effect of blood transfusion in patients with anaemia is not only dependent on their Hb level, but also on other clinical factors that play a role in the balance between oxygen supply and its consumption. The Dutch '4-5-6' rule for indication for blood transfusion takes a number of important clinical factors into account, however, results of recent research suggest that the strict application of this rule will lead to unnecessary transfusions. New research in this area is focused on the quantification of the effect of blood transfusion in various combinations of relevant patient characteristics.

  1. Problems and Approaches for Blood Transfusion in the Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J; Field, Stephen; Delaney, Meghan; Bates, Imelda

    2016-04-01

    A safe supply of blood and the knowledge, skill, and resources for the appropriate use of blood are essential for medical services. Many problems are faced in the development of transfusion services in low- or medium-income countries (LMICs). Unfortunately, in many countries, providing safe blood is made more difficult by a lack of blood donors and the high frequency of transfusion-transmissible infections. The problems are compounded by the frequent need for urgent life-saving transfusions. This article examines the problems in supply, safety, and use of blood and how they are being addressed in LMICs, predominantly focusing on sub-Saharan Africa.

  2. Improving communication of inpatient blood transfusion events to GPs.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Patients who have had blood transfusions whilst in hospital must have this information communicated to their General Practitioner at discharge. Audit demonstrated that just 50% of patients (n=15) under medical specialties who had undergone a blood transfusion had this information included in their discharge letter. To improve this, a section was specifically designated on the e-discharge pro-forma for the documentation of blood transfusion events, and focused teaching was delivered to all new FY1 doctors at their induction. Post intervention, 80% of blood transfusions occurring in medical patients were documented on the e-discharge, with an improvement in how detailed this documentation was (n=40). This simple intervention is an easily reproducible, cost neutral method of ensuring that more blood transfusion events are communicated to patients' GPs; improving care and reducing risk.

  3. Reduction of exposure to blood donors in preterm infants submitted to red blood cell transfusions using pediatric satellite packs

    PubMed Central

    Uezima, Cristina Lika; Barreto, Ariane Moreira; Guinsburg, Ruth; Chiba, Akemi Kuroda; Bordin, José Orlando; Barros, Melca Maria O.; dos Santos, Amélia Miyashiro N.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In preterm newborn infants transfused with erythrocytes stored up to 28 days, to compare the reduction of blood donor exposure in two groups of infants classified according to birth weight. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted with preterm infants with birth weight <1000g (Group 1) and 1000-1499g (Group 2), born between April, 2008 and December, 2009. Neonates submitted to exchange transfusions, emergency erythrocyte transfusion, or those who died in the first 24 hours of life were excluded. Transfusions were indicated according to the local guideline using pediatric transfusion satellite bags. Demographic and clinical data, besides number of transfusions and donors were assessed. . Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors associated with multiple transfusions. RESULTS: 30 and 48 neonates were included in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. The percentage of newborns with more than one erythrocyte transfusion (90 versus 11%), the median number of transfusions (3 versus 1) and the median of blood donors (2 versus 1) were higher in Group 1 (p<0.001), compared to Group 2. Among those with multiple transfusions, 14 (82%) and one (50%) presented 50% reduction in the number of blood donors, respectively in Groups 1 and 2. Factors associated with multiple transfusions were: birth weight <1000g (OR 11.91; 95%CI 2.14-66.27) and presence of arterial umbilical catheter (OR 8.59; 95%CI 1.94-38.13), adjusted for confounders. CONCLUSIONS: The efficacy of pediatrics satellites bags on blood donor reduction was higher in preterm infants with birth weight <1000g. PMID:24142309

  4. Discolored blood and blood components: a dilemma for transfusion specialists.

    PubMed

    Sood, Tanvi; Bedi, Ravneet Kaur; Mittal, Kshitija

    2014-04-01

    It is not uncommon in transfusion practice to see blood/components with abnormal colored plasma. The present study was conducted to identify and determine the etiology of blood and/or blood components showing altered color. The present study was conducted in the Department of Transfusion Medicine, Government Medical College and Hospital, Chandigarh over a period of seven months. All the blood units/components having an abnormal appearance were segregated as: 1. Green discoloration. 2. Yellow discoloration. 3. Bright cherry red color. 4. Lipemic plasma. The donor's history was carefully evaluated and relevant investigations were done depending on discoloration. Seventeen units out of 7370 (0.23%) donations showed discoloration. In 3 units the plasma was green, 5 units were yellow, in 3 units PRBC/WB unit was bright cherry red and in the remaining 6 units the plasma was lipemic. Total bilirubin of all the 5 donors with yellowish plasma ranged from 1.6 to 2.3mg/dl. The hemoglobin and hematocrit of two out of three donors with cherry red discoloration of PRBC/WB was low. All the donors with lipemic plasma gave history of intake of fatty meal prior to donating blood. The existing rules prohibit issue of blood and blood components if the plasma is abnormal in color. Our study showed that many of the discolored units could have been safely transfused but further larger studies are required to confirm the safety of recipients receiving such units. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Lost Art of Whole Blood Transfusion in Austere Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    saving interventions must be performed quickly before hemorrhagic shock be- comes irreversible. Fresh whole blood transfusions in the field may be a...components are unavailable, fresh whole blood is a viable option (16). When red cells are lost, there is evidence that whole blood resuscitation is...benefit of fresh whole blood transfusion in settings where no other alternative exists. This represents flawed risk/benefit analysis. Prehospital mortality

  6. Assessment of blood types of Ragdoll cats for transfusion purposes.

    PubMed

    Proverbio, Daniela; Spada, Eva; Perego, Roberta; Della Pepa, Alessandra; Bagnagatti De Giorgi, Giada; Baggiani, Luciana

    2013-06-01

    Transfusion of compatible blood types ensures the vitality of transfused erythrocytes and avoids transfusion reactions. Cats with types A, B, and AB blood should receive transfusions of the same blood type. In a feline blood donor program, it is therefore essential to have blood donors of all blood types available. The objectives of this study were the identification of the 3 feline blood types in Ragdoll cats, the comparison of their frequencies with those of Domestic Shorthair (DSH) cats, and the determination of whether Ragdolls are suitable donors in a feline blood donor program. The blood type was determined by gel column agglutination from Ragdoll cats. The relationships between phenotypic traits, the origin of the cats, and the different blood types were examined. The frequencies for potential transfusion reactions and the risk for neonatal isoerythrolysis (NI) were estimated. Of 61 typed Ragdolls, 77.1% had type A, 4.9% type B, and 18% type AB blood. The frequency of blood type A in Ragdolls was lower than in DSH cats (P = .02), while the frequency of blood type AB in Ragdolls was higher than in DSH cats (P = .0002). No relationship was found between blood type and origin of the cat or phenotypic traits. The estimated frequencies of major and minor transfusion reactions following an unmatched transfusion between Ragdolls (donors and recipients), Ragdoll donors and DSH recipients, and DSH donors and Ragdoll recipients were 4.7%, 6.7%, 4.6%, and 18.5%, 20.8%, 7.6%, respectively. The frequency of kittens at risk for NI was 5%. The presence of all 3 feline blood types and a relatively high incidence of AB type cats make Ragdolls an ideal donor breed to include in feline blood transfusion programs. © 2013 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  7. [Survival after blood transfusion: a study at Rouen university hospital].

    PubMed

    Josset, V; Chamouni, P; Merle, V; Tavolacci, M P; Froment, L; Daubert, H; Ladner, J; Czernichow, P

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate short term survival rate after blood transfusion according to various criteria. Patients admitted and transfused from January, 1 until June, 30 1996 at Rouen university hospital were retrospectively included, and their status (alive or dead) was determined. The characteristics of patients admitted and transfused were compared to the overall population of inpatients. Independent factors associated with mortality six months after blood transfusion were evaluated using Cox model. During the study period, 1887 patients were transfused. These patients were older, more often admitted in surgical or in intensive care units, and had a longer duration of stay, than the overall inpatients population. The survival rate at six months in transfused patients was 76.1%. Mortality rate at six months was independently higher in patients aged 75 and older, in men, in patients admitted in intensive care units, or transfused with homologous fresh-frozen plasma or packed platelet blood cells. Mortality rate was lower in patients who underwent a surgical procedure, in children under 16, and in patients whose stay was classified in "Circulatory system disorders", "Musculoskeletal system and connective tissues disorders or trauma", or "Injuries, allergy or poisoning". In this study implemented in a teaching hospital inpatients receiving blood transfusion, the survival was mainly associated with the severity and characteristics of the diseases requiring transfusion.

  8. Preventing blood transfusion failures: FMEA, an effective assessment method.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Zhila; Hasoumi, Mojtaba; Behzadi, Faranak; Mohamadi, Efat; Jafary, Mohamadreza; Saeedi, Morteza

    2017-06-30

    Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) is a method used to assess the risk of failures and harms to patients during the medical process and to identify the associated clinical issues. The aim of this study was to conduct an assessment of blood transfusion process in a teaching general hospital, using FMEA as the method. A structured FMEA was recruited in our study performed in 2014, and corrective actions were implemented and re-evaluated after 6 months. Sixteen 2-h sessions were held to perform FMEA in the blood transfusion process, including five steps: establishing the context, selecting team members, analysis of the processes, hazard analysis, and developing a risk reduction protocol for blood transfusion. Failure modes with the highest risk priority numbers (RPNs) were identified. The overall RPN scores ranged from 5 to 100 among which, four failure modes were associated with RPNs over 75. The data analysis indicated that failures with the highest RPNs were: labelling (RPN: 100), transfusion of blood or the component (RPN: 100), patient identification (RPN: 80) and sampling (RPN: 75). The results demonstrated that mis-transfusion of blood or blood component is the most important error, which can lead to serious morbidity or mortality. Provision of training to the personnel on blood transfusion, knowledge raising on hazards and appropriate preventative measures, as well as developing standard safety guidelines are essential, and must be implemented during all steps of blood and blood component transfusion.

  9. Transmission of Chagas Disease via Blood Transfusions in 2 Immunosuppressed Pigtailed Macaques (Macaca nemestrina)

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Derek L; Torrence, Annie E; Vogel, Keith W; Stockinger, Diane E; Nelson, Veronica; Murnane, Robert D; Baldessari, Audrey; Kuller, LaRene; Agy, Michael; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Hotchkiss, Charlotte E

    2014-01-01

    A 2.25-y-old male pigtailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) was experimentally irradiated and received a bone marrow transplant. After transplantation and engraftment, the macaque had unexpected recurring pancytopenia and dependent edema of the prepuce, scrotum, and legs. The diagnostic work-up included a blood smear, which revealed a trypomastigote consistent with Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD). We initially hypothesized that the macaque had acquired the infection when it lived in Georgia. However, because the animal had received multiple blood transfusions, all blood donors were screened for CD. One male pigtailed macaque blood donor, which was previously housed in Louisiana, was positive for T. cruzi antibodies via serology. Due to the low prevalence of infection in Georgia, the blood transfusion was hypothesized to be the source of T. cruzi infection. The transfusion was confirmed as the mechanism of transmission when screening of archived serum revealed seroconversion after blood transfusion from the seropositive blood donor. The macaque made a full clinical recovery, and further follow-up including thoracic radiography, echocardiography, and gross necropsy did not show any abnormalities associated with CD. Other animals that received blood transfusions from the positive blood donor were tested, and one additional pigtailed macaque on the same research protocol was positive for T. cruzi. Although CD has been reported to occur in many nonhuman primate species, especially pigtailed macaques, the transmission of CD via blood transfusion in nonhuman primates has not been reported previously. PMID:24512963

  10. Five drivers shifting the paradigm from product-focused transfusion practice to patient blood management.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Axel; Farmer, Shannon; Shander, Aryeh

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce clinicians and health care professionals to the concept of patient blood management (PBM) and to explain the difference between PBM and the concept of "appropriate use" of blood products. The five reasons why modern health systems need to shift from product-focused transfusion practice to PBM are also presented. These are: the aging population with a leveraged demand for blood products opposed to a shrinking donor base; the growing awareness that transfusion is a complex service involving many different cost centers within a hospital and representing a multiple of the blood product cost; the continuous effort to protect blood pools from known, new, or re-emerging pathogens while facing uncertainty over their potentially long silent carrier states; the emerging evidence that transfusion is an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes; and finally, a lack of evidence for benefit of transfusion for the vast majority of recipients.

  11. Surgical outcomes and transfusion of minimal amounts of blood in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Victor A; Davenport, Daniel L; Saha, Sibu P; Austin, Peter C; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2012-01-01

    To examine outcomes in patients who receive small amounts of intraoperative blood transfusion. Longitudinal, uncontrolled observational study evaluating results of intraoperative transfusion in patients entered into the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. We made propensity-matched comparisons between patients who received and did not receive intraoperative transfusion to minimize confounding when estimating the effect of intraoperative transfusion on postoperative outcomes. We queried the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database for patients undergoing operations between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2009. A large sample of surgical patients from 173 hospitals throughout the United States. Operative mortality and serious perioperative morbidity (≥1 of 20 complications). After exclusions, 941,496 operations were analyzed in patients from 173 hospitals. Most patients (893,205 patients [94.9%]) did not receive intraoperative transfusions. Patients who received intraoperative infusion of 1 unit of packed red blood cells (15,186 patients [1.6%]) had higher unadjusted rates of mortality and more serious morbidity. These rates further increased with intraoperative transfusion of more than 1 unit of packed red blood cells in a dose-dependent manner. After propensity matching to adjust for multiple preoperative risks, transfusion of a single unit of packed red blood cells increased the multivariate risk of mortality, wound problems, pulmonary complications, postoperative renal dysfunction, systemic sepsis, composite morbidity, and postoperative length of stay compared with propensity-matched patients who did not receive intraoperative transfusion. There is a dose-dependent adverse effect of intraoperative blood transfusion. It is likely that a small, possibly discretionary amount of intraoperative transfusion leads to increased mortality, morbidity, and resource use

  12. Red Blood Cell Transfusion Practices in Acute Lung Injury: What do patient factors contribute?

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, David J.; Howard, David; Muriithi, Angela; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro; Sevransky, Jonathan; Shanholtz, Carl; Netzer, Giora; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe red blood cell (RBC) transfusion practices and evaluate the association between patient-related factors and pre-transfusion hemoglobin concentration in acute lung injury (ALI). Design Secondary analysis of prospectively collected data Setting 9 intensive care units (ICUs) in 3 teaching hospitals in Baltimore, MD Patients 249 consecutive, mechanically ventilated ALI patients Interventions None Measurements and Main Results Simple and multiple linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between the nadir hemoglobin concentration on the day of initial RBC transfusion and 20 patient-level demographic, clinical and ICU treatment factors as well as ICU type. Of 249 ALI patients, 47% received a RBC transfusion in the ICU without evidence of active hemorrhage or acute cardiac ischemia. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) nadir hemoglobin on the day of first transfusion was 7.7 (1.1) g/dL with 67%, 36%, 15%, and 5% of patients transfused at >7, >8, >9, and >10g/dL, respectively. Transfused patients received a mean (SD) of 5 (6) RBC units from ALI diagnosis to ICU discharge. Pre-hospital use of iron or erythropoietin and platelet transfusion in the ICU were independently associated with lower pre-transfusion hemoglobin concentrations. No patient factors were associated with higher hemoglobin concentrations. Admission to a surgical (vs. medical) ICU was associated with a 0.6 g/dL (95% CI: 0.1, 1.1 g/dL) higher pre-transfusion hemoglobin. Conclusions ALI patients commonly receive RBC transfusions in the ICU. The pre-transfusion hemoglobin observed in our study was lower than earlier studies, but a restrictive strategy was not universally adopted. Patient factors do not explain the gap between clinical trial evidence and routine transfusion practices. Future studies should further explore ICU- and physician-related factors as a source of variability in transfusion practice. PMID:19384204

  13. Bacteriological safety of blood collected for transfusion at university of gondar hospital blood bank, northwest ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Wondimu, Hailegebriel; Addis, Zelalem; Moges, Feleke; Shiferaw, Yitayal

    2013-01-01

    Background. Transfusion associated bacterial infection has remained more frequent with a sever risk of morbidity and mortality. This study assessed the bacteriological safety of blood collected for transfusion. Method. A cross-sectional study was conducted at University of Gondar hospital blood bank from December 2011 to June 2012. Bacterial isolation, identification, and antimicrobial susceptibility tests were done as per the standard procedure. Chi-square test and P value were used to assess associations between risk factors and the bacterial isolation rate. Results. Twenty-one (15.33%) blood units were found contaminated with bacteria, and 95.24% contamination was due to external sources. The commonly isolated bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus, Coagulase negative Staphylococci, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella species, Streptococci species, Enterobacter species, and Citrobacter species. All of the bacteria isolated were 100% sensitive to Gentamicin, Chloramphenicol, Amoxicillin, and Doxycycline. Multiple antimicrobial resistances were observed in 66.7% of the isolates. Not using glove by phlebotomist, touching disinfected phlebotomy site and double puncture at the same hand or both hands of a donor were found to be risk factors for bacterial contamination. Conclusion. Bacterial contamination of blood to be transfused is a common problem in the hospital. So attention should be given to activities performed at the blood bank for safe transfusion practices.

  14. Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease: a serious residual risk of blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Martha J; Blackall, Douglas P

    2005-11-01

    Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD) is well recognized as an uncommon, but frequently fatal, adverse effect of blood component therapy. In this disorder, viable donor lymphocytes transfused to a vulnerable patient orchestrate a devastating attack on the recipient's tissues. In contrast to the striking reduction in infectious risks of blood transfusion, a significant residual risk of TA-GVHD remains. This article reviews the pathogenesis and mechanism of TA-GVHD, which provide the foundation for a prevention strategy. A review of selected recent cases illustrates the challenges faced in the identification, prevention, and treatment of this frustrating disorder.

  15. History of blood transfusion in sub-saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Schneider, William H

    2013-01-01

    The adequacy and safety of blood transfusion in sub-Saharan Africa is the subject of much concern, yet there have been very few studies of its history. An overview of that record finds that transfusions were first reported in Africa (sub-Saharan and excluding South Africa) in the early 1920s, and organized transfusion practices were established before the Second World War. Blood transfusion grew rapidly after 1945, along with the construction of new hospitals and expanded health services in Africa. Significant differences existed between colonial powers in the organization of transfusion services, but these converged after independence as their use continued to grow and decentralized and hospital-based practices were adopted. It was only after the oil crisis in the mid-1970s that health spending declined and the collection, testing, and transfusion of blood began to level off. Thus, when the AIDS crisis hit transfusion services, they were already struggling to meet the needs of patients. At this time, foreign assistance as well as the World Health Organization and the League of Red Cross Societies helped respond to both the immediate problem of testing blood, and for some countries, support existed for the broader reorganization of transfusion. Overall, the history shows that transfusion was adopted widely and quickly, limited mainly by the availability of knowledgeable doctors and hospital facilities. There was less resistance than expected by Africans to receive transfusions, and the record shows a remarkable flexibility in obtaining blood. The dangers of disease transmission were recognized from an early date but were balanced against the potential lifesaving benefits of transfusion.

  16. Blood transfusion safety; current status and challenges in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Aneke, John C.; Okocha, Chide E.

    2017-01-01

    The attainment of blood transfusion safety in Nigeria (and probably the rest of Sub-Saharan Africa) remains an uphill task due to a number of factors, ranging from shortage of blood, poor implementation of blood transfusion guidelines, infrastructural deficits to high prevalence of transfusion-transmissible infections (TTIs), particularly hepatitis and human immune deficiency viruses. We reviewed available data on blood transfusion practices and safety in Nigeria using the PubMed, PubMed Central, Google Scholar, and African Index Medicus search engines, through a combination of word and phrases relevant to the subject. The World Health Organization has been in the forefront of efforts to establish safe, available, and affordable blood transfusion services in most parts of Africa through encouraging adequate blood donor recruitment, donor blood testing, and collection as well developing strategies for the rational use of blood. Even though modest improvement has been recorded, particularly with regards to donor blood screening for common TTIs, considerable efforts are needed in the form of robust public enlightenment campaigns (on blood donation) and continuous system improvement to drive the current transfusion practices in the country toward safety and self-sustenance. PMID:28316432

  17. Blood transfusions in athletes. Old dogmas, new tricks.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    Blood doping consists of any illicit means used to increase and optimize oxygen delivery to the muscles and includes blood transfusions, administration of erythropoiesis-stimulating substances, blood substitutes, natural or artificial altitude facilities, and innovative gene therapies. The use of blood transfusion, an extremely straightforward, practical and effective means of increasing an athlete's red blood-cell supply in advance of competition, became rather popular in the 1970s, but it has suddenly declined following the widespread use of recombinant human erythropoietin among elite endurance athletes. Most recently, following implementation of reliable tests to screen for erythropoiesis-stimulating substances, blood transfusions have made a strong resurgence, as attested by several positive doping tests. Doping by blood transfusion can be classified as homologous, where the blood is infused into someone other than the donor, and autologous, where the blood donor and transfusion recipient are the same. The former case produces more clinically relevant side effects, but is easily detectable using current antidoping protocols based on erythrocyte phenotyping by flow cytometry and, eventually, erythrocyte genotyping by DNA testing. Since the donor and recipient blood are identical in autologous blood doping, this is less risky, though much more challenging to detect. Indirect strategies, relying on significant deviations from individual hematological profiles following autologous blood donation and reinfusion, are currently being investigated. For the time being, the storage of athletes' blood samples to allow testing and sanctioning of guilty athletes once a definitive test has been introduced may represent a reliable deterrent policy.

  18. Predicting blood transfusion in patients undergoing minimally invasive oesophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Crispin; Boddy, Alex P; Fukuta, Junaid; Groom, William D; Streets, Christopher G

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate predictors of allogenic blood transfusion requirements in patients undergoing minimal invasive oesophagectomy at a tertiary high volume centre for oesophago-gastric surgery. Retrospective analysis of all patients undergoing minimal access oesophagectomy in our department between January 2010 and December 2011. Patients were divided into two groups depending on whether they required a blood transfusion at any time during their index admission. Factors that have been shown to influence perioperative blood transfusion requirements in major surgery were included in the analysis. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the impact of patient and perioperative characteristics on transfusion requirements during the index admission. A total of 80 patients underwent minimal access oesophagectomy, of which 61 patients had a laparoscopic assisted oesophagectomy and 19 patients had a minimal invasive oesophagectomy. Perioperative blood transfusion was required in 28 patients at any time during hospital admission. On binary logistic regression analysis, a lower preoperative haemoglobin concentration (p < 0.01), suffering a significant complication (p < 0.005) and laparoscopic assisted oesophagectomy (p < 0.05) were independent predictors of blood transfusion requirements. It has been reported that requirement for blood transfusion can affect long-term outcomes in oesophageal cancer resection. Two factors which could be addressed preoperatively; haemoglobin concentration and type of oesophageal resection, may be valuable in predicting blood transfusions in patients undergoing minimally invasive oesophagectomy. Our analysis revealed that preoperative haemoglobin concentration, occurrence of significant complications and type of minimal access oesophagectomy predicted blood transfusion requirements in the patient population examined. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Red blood cells transfusion in intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Volpato, Solange Emanuelle; Ferreira, Jovino Dos Santos; Ferreira, Vera Lúcia Paes Cavalcanti; Ferreira, David Cavalcanti

    2009-12-01

    The anemia is a common problem upon admission of the patients in the intensive care unit being the red blood cell transfusion a frequent therapeutic. The causes of anemia in critical patients who under go red blood cell transfusion are several: acute loss of blood after trauma, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, surgery amongst others. Currently, few studies are available regarding the use of blood components in patients at intensive care unit. Although blood transfusions are frequent in intensive care unit, the optimized criteria for handling are not clearly defined, with no available guidelines. To analyze the clinical indications of the use of the red blood cell in the intensive care unit. The clinical history of the patients admitted in the intensive care unit were analyzed, revisiting which had have red blood cell transfusion in the period between January 1st 2005 and December 31 2005. The study was accepted by the Research Ethics Committee - Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa (CEP) - of the University of South of Santa Catarina (UNISUL). The transfusion rate was 19,33, and the majority of the patients were of the male gender. Their age prevalence was of 60 years old or older. The mortality rate among patients who under went red blood cell transfusion died was of 38,22%. The transfusions criterias were low serum hemoglobin (78%) and the hemoglobin pre - transfusion was 8,11 g/dL. Politrauma and sepsis/sepsis chock were the pre diagnosis criteria. A low hemoglobin level is the main clinical criteria with average hemoglobin pre - transfusion was 8,11 g/dL.

  20. Acute HIV illness following blood transfusion in three African children.

    PubMed

    Colebunders, R; Greenberg, A E; Francis, H; Kabote, N; Izaley, L; Nguyen-Dinh, P; Quinn, T C; Van der Groen, G; Curran, J W; Piot, P

    1988-04-01

    Three children are described in whom pre-transfusion samples were HIV-seronegative and post-transfusional samples, obtained within 1 week after transfusion, were HIV-seropositive. Two of them developed a transient fever within 1 week of receiving the blood transfusion, and a transient generalized skin eruption which lasted for about 2 weeks. All three developed persistent generalized lymphadenopathy. One child developed a lumbar herpes zoster 7 months after transfusion. IgM Western blots demonstrated the presence of antibodies to protein bands p17, p24 and p55 in all three children. These three case reports suggest that children who receive a seropositive blood transfusion are at high risk for developing acute manifestations of HIV infection.

  1. Fresh whole blood transfusion capability for Special Operations Forces

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Maj Andrew; Callum, Jeannie; da Luz, Luis Teodoro; Schmid, Joanne; Funk, Christopher; Glassberg, Col Elon; Tien, Col Homer

    2015-01-01

    Summary Fresh whole blood (FWB) transfusion is an option for providing volume and oxygen carrying capacity to bleeding Special Operations soldiers who are injured in an austere environment and who are far from a regular blood bank. Retrospective data from recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan show an association between the use of FWB and survival. We reviewed the literature to document the issues surrounding FWB transfusion to Special Operations soldiers in the austere environment and surveyed the literature regarding best practice guidelines for and patient outcomes after FWB transfusions. Most literature regarding FWB transfusion is retrospective or historical. There is limited prospective evidence currently to change transfusion practice in tertiary care facilities, but FWB remains an option in the austere setting. PMID:26100776

  2. Fresh whole blood transfusion capability for Special Operations Forces.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Andrew; Callum, Jeannie; da Luz, Luis Teodoro; Schmid, Joanne; Funk, Christopher; Glassberg, Elon; Tien, Homer

    2015-06-01

    Fresh whole blood (FWB) transfusion is an option for providing volume and oxygen carrying capacity to bleeding Special Operations soldiers who are injured in an austere environment and who are far from a regular blood bank. Retrospective data from recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan show an association between the use of FWB and survival. We reviewed the literature to document the issues surrounding FWB transfusion to Special Operations soldiers in the austere environment and surveyed the literature regarding best practice guidelines for and patient outcomes after FWB transfusions. Most literature regarding FWB transfusion is retrospective or historical. There is limited prospective evidence currently to change transfusion practice in tertiary care facilities, but FWB remains an option in the austere setting.

  3. Transfusion significance of Lewis system antibodies. Success in transfusion with crossmatch-compatible blood.

    PubMed

    Waheed, A; Kennedy, M S; Gerhan, S; Senhauser, D A

    1981-09-01

    Patients with nonhemolytic Lewis antibodies in the serum were transfused on the basis of major crossmatch compatibility alone. No adverse clinical affects were noted when 33 such patients received a total of 230 transfusions. Considerable savings in technologist time and reagent cost were realized by adopting this policy. Transfusion on the basis of crossmatch compatibility alone did not necessarily result in the selection of Le(a-) and/or Le(b-) blood for patients with corresponding antibodies in the serum. Crossmatch compatibility ratio for patients with anti-Leb in the serum was much higher than expected and was profoundly affected by the ABO group of the donors.

  4. Computerized bar code-based blood identification systems and near-miss transfusion episodes and transfusion errors.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Gregory A; Abenstein, John P; Stubbs, James R; Santrach, Paula; Ereth, Mark H; Johnson, Pamela M; Douglas, Emily; Oliver, William C

    2013-04-01

    To determine whether the use of a computerized bar code-based blood identification system resulted in a reduction in transfusion errors or near-miss transfusion episodes. Our institution instituted a computerized bar code-based blood identification system in October 2006. After institutional review board approval, we performed a retrospective study of transfusion errors from January 1, 2002, through December 31, 2005, and from January 1, 2007, through December 31, 2010. A total of 388,837 U were transfused during the 2002-2005 period. There were 6 misidentification episodes of a blood product being transfused to the wrong patient during that period (incidence of 1 in 64,806 U or 1.5 per 100,000 transfusions; 95% CI, 0.6-3.3 per 100,000 transfusions). There was 1 reported near-miss transfusion episode (incidence of 0.3 per 100,000 transfusions; 95% CI, <0.1-1.4 per 100,000 transfusions). A total of 304,136 U were transfused during the 2007-2010 period. There was 1 misidentification episode of a blood product transfused to the wrong patient during that period when the blood bag and patient's armband were scanned after starting to transfuse the unit (incidence of 1 in 304,136 U or 0.3 per 100,000 transfusions; 95% CI, <0.1-1.8 per 100,000 transfusions; P=.14). There were 34 reported near-miss transfusion errors (incidence of 11.2 per 100,000 transfusions; 95% CI, 7.7-15.6 per 100,000 transfusions; P<.001). Institution of a computerized bar code-based blood identification system was associated with a large increase in discovered near-miss events. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Precautions and Adverse Reactions during Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Transfusion By Ravindra Sarode, MD, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas NOTE: This is ... hemoglobin The liquid component that consists mostly of water The component that fights infection The component that ...

  6. [Improving blood safety: errors management in transfusion medicine].

    PubMed

    Bujandrić, Nevenka; Grujić, Jasmina; Krga-Milanović, Mirjana

    2014-01-01

    The concept of blood safety includes the entire transfusion chain starting with the collection of blood from the blood donor, and ending with blood transfusion to the patient. The concept involves quality management system as the systematic monitoring of adverse reactions and incidents regarding the blood donor or patient. Monitoring of near-miss errors show the critical points in the working process and increase transfusion safety. The aim of the study was to present the analysis results of adverse and unexpected events in transfusion practice with a potential risk to the health of blood donors and patients. One-year retrospective study was based on the collection, analysis and interpretation of written reports on medical errors in the Blood Transfusion Institute of Vojvodina. Errors were distributed according to the type, frequency and part of the working process where they occurred. Possible causes and corrective actions were described for each error. The study showed that there were not errors with potential health consequences for the blood donor/patient. Errors with potentially damaging consequences for patients were detected throughout the entire transfusion chain. Most of the errors were identified in the preanalytical phase. The human factor was responsible for the largest number of errors. Error reporting system has an important role in the error management and the reduction of transfusion-related risk of adverse events and incidents. The ongoing analysis reveals the strengths and weaknesses of the entire process and indicates the necessary changes. Errors in transfusion medicine can be avoided in a large percentage and prevention is cost-effective, systematic and applicable.

  7. [TRALI is an overlooked severe complication related to blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Haunstrup, Thure Mors; Baech, John; Varming, Kim; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen; Nielsen, Kaspar René

    2014-03-31

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is recognized as the most frequent cause of transfusion-related severe morbidity and mortality. TRALI is characterized by post-transfusional respiratory distress, hypoxaemia and radiographic verified lung infiltration, in the absence of sign of circulatory overload. TRALI is predominantly triggered by human leukocyte antigen or human neutrophil antigen (HNA) antibodies from the transfused blood component. Particularly antibodies against the HNA-3a are involved in severe and fatal TRALI cases. The serological investigation is important to trace and exclude blood donors with TRALI antibodies.

  8. West Nile Virus in Europe and Safety of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Giulio; Cristiano, Karen; Pupella, Simonetta; Liumbruno, Giancarlo Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary West Nile virus (WNV) has become an increasing issue in the transfusion setting since 2002, when it was firstly shown in the USA that it can be transmitted through blood transfusion. Since then, several precautionary measures have been introduced in Europe in order to reduce the possible risk of transmission via transfusion/solid organ transplantation. In addition, the epidemiological surveillance has been tightened and the network for communication of human WNV cases strengthened. This review will focus on WNV circulation and the safety of blood in Europe. PMID:27403087

  9. The effect of resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta, partial aortic occlusion and aggressive blood transfusion on traumatic brain injury in a swine multiple injuries model.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M Austin; Williams, Timothy K; Ferencz, Sarah-Ashley E; Davidson, Anders J; Russo, Rachel M; O'Brien, William T; Galante, Joseph M; Grayson, J Kevin; Neff, Lucas P

    2017-07-01

    occurred in Control animals. Continued studies of the cerebral hemodynamics of aortic occlusion and blood transfusion are required to determine optimal resuscitation strategies for multi-injured patients.

  10. Microvascular Response to Red Blood Cell Transfusion in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Jordan A.; MacLennan, Paul A.; Vandromme–Cusick, Marianne J.; Angotti, Jonathan M.; Magnotti, Louis J.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Rue, Loring W.; Barnum, Scott R.; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trauma patients are often transfused allogeneic red blood cells (RBCs) in an effort to augment tissue oxygen delivery. However, the effect of RBC transfusion on microvascular perfusion in this patient population is not well understood. To this end, we investigated the effect of RBC transfusion on sublingual microvascular perfusion in trauma patients. Methods Sublingual microcirculation was imaged at bedside with a sidestream dark field illumination microscope before and after transfusion of one RBC unit in hemodynamically stable, anemic trauma patients. The proportion of perfused capillaries (PPC) pre- and post-transfusion was determined, and the percent change in capillary perfusion following transfusion (ΔPPC) calculated. Results Sublingual microcirculation was observed in 30 patients. Mean age was 47 (SD=21), mean ISS was 29 (SD=16), and mean pre-transfusion hemoglobin was 7.5 g/dL (SD=0.9). No patients had MAP < 65 mm Hg (mean 89 mm Hg, SD 17) or lactate > 2.5 mmol/L (mean 1.1 mmol/L, SD 0.3). Following transfusion, ΔPPC ranged from +68% to -36% and was found to inversely correlate significantly with pre-transfusion PPC (Spearman r= -0.63, p=0.0002). Conclusions Pre-transfusion PPC may be selectively deranged in otherwise stable trauma patients. Patients with relatively altered baseline PPC tend to demonstrate improvement in perfusion following transfusion, while those with relatively normal perfusion at baseline tend to demonstrate either no change or, in fact, a decline in PPC. Bedside sublingual imaging may have the potential to detect subtle perfusion defects and ultimately inform clinical decision making with respect to transfusion. PMID:22344313

  11. Acquired haemophilia A as a blood transfusion emergency

    PubMed Central

    Tagariello, Giuseppe; Sartori, Roberto; Radossi, Paolo; Risato, Renzo; Roveroni, Giovanni; Tassinari, Cristina; Giuffrida, Annachiara; Gandini, Giorgio; Franchini, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acquired haemophilia is a rare autoimmune disorder caused by autoantibodies directed in the majority of the cases against clotting factor VIII. This disorder is characterised by the sudden onset of bleeding that not rarely may be life-threatening and need transfusion support. Most reports on this condition describe the need for blood transfusions during the acute, haemorrhagic phase, but the number of transfused red cell units is often unknown. Patients and methods In the last 5 years, 14 patients with acquired haemophilia A were identified in the transfusion and haemophilia centres of Verona and Castelfranco Veneto. The transfusion support for these 14 patients was analyzed in this retrospective survey. Results The 14 patients required a total of 183 red cell units. The average transfusion requirement was 13 red cells units/patient, with a range from 0 to 38 units. Conclusions Eleven of the 14 patients studied needed strong transfusion support to enable any further management of the haemorrhages, as well as for eradication treatment of the autoantibodies to factor VIII. A relevant part of the management of haemorrhagic symptoms as well as the first choice for any further treatment (bleeding or the cure of the underlying disease) is transfusion of red blood cells. PMID:18661918

  12. [New viral risks in blood transfusion by 2016].

    PubMed

    Pozzetto, B; Garraud, O

    2016-02-01

    Viral safety remains a major concern in transfusion of blood products. Over years, the control measures applied to blood products were made more and more sophisticated; however, the number of infectious agents, and notably of viruses, that can be transmitted by transfusion is increasing continuously. The aim of this review paper is to actualize that published in the same journal by the same authors in 2011 with more details on some of actual vs virtual viral threats that were identified recently in the field of blood transfusion. The main subjects that are covered successively concern the transmission via transfusion of hepatitis E virus, the frequency of transfusion transmitted arboviruses, transfusion at the time of the Ebola epidemics in West Africa, the debated role of Marseillevirus (giant viruses infecting amoebae and suspected to infect human blood latently), and, finally, the recent report of the identification in blood donors of a new member of the Flaviviridae family. The addition of these new viral risks to those already identified-partially controlled or not-pleads for the urgent need to move forward to considering inactivation of infectious agents in blood products.

  13. [Experience of mismatched blood transfusion for an rh negative patient and reconsideration of emergency blood transfusion manual in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Aya; Hoshi, Takuo; Nishikawa, Masashi; Aya, Daisuke; Ueda, Hiroshi; Yokouchi, Takako; Tanaka, Makoto

    2013-08-01

    We report a B Rh negative patient undergoing total pelvic exenteration, who received both ABO and Rh incompatible packed red blood cells in an emergency situation. After this experience, we revised the manual of emergency blood transfusion. We defined level of severity to share information with surgeon, nurses, anesthesiologists and the member of the blood center. We changed anesthesia information management system for showing blood type including Duffy blood group system and checking out whether we can transfuse Rh positive blood to Rh negative patient in an emergency situation at the timeout of surgery.

  14. Limiting excessive postoperative blood transfusion after cardiac procedures. A review.

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, V A; Ferraris, S P

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of blood product use after cardiac operations reveals that a few patients (< or = 20%) consume the majority of blood products (> 80%). The risk factors that predispose a minority of patients to excessive blood use include patient-related factors, transfusion practices, drug-related causes, and procedure-related factors. Multivariate studies suggest that patient age and red blood cell volume are independent patient-related variables that predict excessive blood product transfusion after cardiac procedures. Other factors include preoperative aspirin ingestion, type of operation, over- or underutilization of heparin during cardiopulmonary bypass, failure to correct hypothermia after cardiopulmonary bypass, and physician overtransfusion. A survey of the currently available blood conservation techniques reveals 5 that stand out as reliable methods: 1) high-dose aprotinin therapy, 2) preoperative erythropoietin therapy when time permits adequate dosage before operation, 3) hemodilution by harvest of whole blood immediately before cardiopulmonary bypass, 4) autologous predonation of blood, and 5) salvage of oxygenator blood after cardiopulmonary bypass. Other methods, such as the use of epsilon-aminocaproic acid or desmopressin, cell saving devices, reinfusion of shed mediastinal blood, and hemofiltration have been reported to be less reliable and may even be harmful in some high-risk patients. Consideration of the available data allows formulation of a 4-pronged plan for limiting excessive blood transfusion after surgery: 1) recognize the causes of excessive transfusion, including the importance of red blood cell volume, type of procedure being performed, preoperative aspirin ingestion, etc.; 2) establish a quality management program, including a survey of transfusion practices that emphasizes physician education and availability of real-time laboratory testing to guide transfusion therapy; 3) adopt a multimodal approach using institution-proven techniques; and

  15. Increased mortality in adult patients with trauma transfused with blood components compared with whole blood.

    PubMed

    Jones, Allison R; Frazier, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Hemorrhage is a preventable cause of death among patients with trauma, and management often includes transfusion, either whole blood or a combination of blood components (packed red blood cells, platelets, fresh frozen plasma). We used the 2009 National Trauma Data Bank data set to evaluate the relationship between transfusion type and mortality in adult patients with major trauma (n = 1745). Logistic regression analysis identified 3 independent predictors of mortality: Injury Severity Score, emergency medical system transfer time, and type of blood transfusion, whole blood or components. Transfusion of whole blood was associated with reduced mortality; thus, it may provide superior survival outcomes in this population.

  16. Bartonella henselae transmission by blood transfusion in mice

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Marilene Neves; Vieira-Damiani, Gislaine; Ericson, Marna Elise; Gupta, Kalpna; Gilioli, Rovilson; de Almeida, Amanda Roberta; Drummond, Marina Rovani; Lania, Bruno Grosselli; de Almeida Lins, Karina; Soares, Tania Cristina Benetti; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bartonella spp. are neglected fastidious Gram-negative bacilli. We isolated Bartonella henselae from 1.2% of 500 studied blood donors and demonstrated that the bacteria remain viable in red blood cell units after 35 days of experimental infection. Now, we aim to evaluate the possibility of B. henselae transmission by blood transfusion in a mouse model. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Eight BALB/c mice were intraperitoneal inoculated with a 30μLof suspension with 104 CFU/mL of B. henselae and a second group of eight mice were inoculated with saline solution and used as control. After 96 hours of inoculation, the animals were euthanized. We collected blood and tissue samples from skin, liver, and spleen. Thirty microliters of blood from four Bartonella-inoculated animals were transfused into a new group (n=4). Another group received blood from the control animals. B. henselae infection was investigated by conventional and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RESULTS Blood samples from all 24 mice were negative by molecular tests though half of the tissue samples were positive by nested PCR in the intraperitoneal Bartonella-investigated animals. Tissues from two of the four mice that received blood transfusions from Bartonella-inoculated animals were also nested PCR positives. CONCLUSIONS Transmission of B. henselae by transfusion is possible in mice even when donor animals have undetectable bloodstream infection. The impact of human Bartonella sp. transmission through blood transfusion recipients must be evaluated. PMID:26968530

  17. Bartonella henselae transmission by blood transfusion in mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marilene Neves; Vieira-Damiani, Gislaine; Ericson, Marna Elise; Gupta, Kalpna; Gilioli, Rovilson; de Almeida, Amanda Roberta; Drummond, Marina Rovani; Lania, Bruno Grosselli; de Almeida Lins, Karina; Soares, Tânia Cristina Benetti; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira

    2016-06-01

    Bartonella spp. are neglected fastidious Gram-negative bacilli. We isolated Bartonella henselae from 1.2% of 500 studied blood donors and demonstrated that the bacteria remain viable in red blood cell units after 35 days of experimental infection. Now, we aim to evaluate the possibility of B. henselae transmission by blood transfusion in a mouse model. Eight BALB/c mice were intraperitoneal inoculated with a 30 µL of suspension with 10(4) CFU/mL of B. henselae and a second group of eight mice were inoculated with saline solution and used as control. After 96 hours of inoculation, the animals were euthanized. We collected blood and tissue samples from skin, liver, and spleen. Thirty microliters of blood from four Bartonella-inoculated animals were transfused into a new group (n = 4). Another group received blood from the control animals. B. henselae infection was investigated by conventional and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Blood samples from all 24 mice were negative by molecular tests though half of the tissue samples were positive by nested PCR in the intraperitoneal Bartonella-investigated animals. Tissues from two of the four mice that received blood transfusions from Bartonella-inoculated animals were also nested PCR positives. Transmission of B. henselae by transfusion is possible in mice even when donor animals have undetectable bloodstream infection. The impact of human Bartonella sp. transmission through blood transfusion recipients must be evaluated. © 2016 AABB.

  18. Detection of autologous blood transfusions in athletes: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Mørkeberg, Jakob

    2012-07-01

    Autologous blood transfusions (ABTs) has been used by athletes for approximately 4 decades to enhance their performance. Although the method was prohibited by the International Olympic Committee in the mid 1980s, no direct detection method has yet been developed and implemented by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Several indirect methods have been proposed with the majority relying on changes in erythropoiesis-sensitive blood markers. Compared with the first methods developed in 1987, the sensitivity of subsequent tests has not improved the detection of blood doping. Nevertheless, the use of sophisticated statistical algorithms has assured a higher level of specificity in subsequent detection models, which is a crucial aspect of antidoping testing particularly to avoid "false positives." Today, the testing markers with the best sensitivity/specificity ratio are the Hbmr model (an algorithm based on the total amount of circulating hemoglobin level [hemoglobin level mass] and percentage of reticulocytes, 4.51·ln(Hbmass)-√%ret) and the OFF-hr model (algorithm based on hemoglobin level concentration and percentage of reticulocytes, Hb(g/L)-60·√%ret). Only the OFF-hr model is currently approved by WADA. Recently, alternative indirect strategies for detecting blood doping have been proposed. One method is based upon a transfusion-induced immune-response resulting in specific changes in gene expression related to leukocytes such as T lymphocytes. Another method relies on detecting increased plasticizer metabolite levels in the urine caused by the leakage of plasticizers from the blood bags used during the blood storage. These methods need further development and validation across different types of transfusion regimes before they can be implemented. In addition, several research projects have been funded by WADA in recent years and are now under development including "Detection of Autologous Blood Transfusions Using Activated Red Blood Cells (the red blood cells

  19. Considerations of red blood cell molecular testing in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Annika M; Delaney, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    The field of transfusion medicine is on the threshold of a paradigm shift, as the technology for genotyping of red blood cell antigens, including US FDA-approved arrays, is now moving into standard practice. Access to cost-efficient, high-resolution genotyping has the potential to increase the quality of care by decreasing the risk for alloimmunization and incompatible transfusions in individuals on long-term blood transfusion protocols, including patient groups with hemoglobinopathies and other chronic diseases. Current and future applications of molecular methods in transfusion medicine and blood banking are discussed, with emphasis on indications for genotyping in various clinical scenarios. Furthermore, limitations of the current gold standard methodology and serology, as well as of contemporary molecular methodology, are examined.

  20. Blood transfusion in a random sample of hospitals in France.

    PubMed

    Mathoulin-Pélissier, S; Salmi, L R; Verret, C; Demoures, B

    2000-09-01

    Representative information on blood use is scarce. A large-scale study of blood recipients and blood use in France was conducted. Based on a random sampling, this study was carried out in teaching and other hospitals between March and December 1997. In each hospital, a patient was included if he or she received an allogeneic or an autologous transfusion during the observation period for that hospital. For each recipient, product and patient characteristics for 24 hours after inclusion were collected. From the 175 hospitals that had given a transfusion to at least one patient during the observation period, 3206 patients were included. Most transfusion recipients (57%) were over 65 years old; 42 percent were in teaching hospitals and 53 percent in medical wards. Among the 3044 adults, 91 percent received an allogeneic transfusion. Fifty-three percent of allogeneic units were WBC reduced. The indications most frequently reported for allogeneic transfusion were neoplasms (48%) and those for autologous transfusion were disorders of musculoskeletal (63%) or circulatory (15%) systems. The patients in nonteaching hospitals were more often transfused during surgery and were more likely to be aged and to have a musculoskeletal disorder than were patients in teaching hospitals. General collection of such data, within a system of traceability, could provide relevant denominators from which to interpret adverse-reaction data.

  1. Ensemble Learning Approaches to Predicting Complications of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Murphree, Dennis; Ngufor, Che; Upadhyaya, Sudhindra; Madde, Nagesh; Clifford, Leanne; Kor, Daryl J.; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2016-01-01

    Of the 21 million blood components transfused in the United States during 2011, approximately 1 in 414 resulted in complication [1]. Two complications in particular, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), are especially concerning. These two alone accounted for 62% of reported transfusion-related fatalities in 2013 [2]. We have previously developed a set of machine learning base models for predicting the likelihood of these adverse reactions, with a goal towards better informing the clinician prior to a transfusion decision. Here we describe recent work incorporating ensemble learning approaches to predicting TACO/TRALI. In particular we describe combining base models via majority voting, stacking of model sets with varying diversity, as well as a resampling/boosting combination algorithm called RUSBoost. We find that while the performance of many models is very good, the ensemble models do not yield significantly better performance in terms of AUC. PMID:26737958

  2. Hemoglobin Threshold for Blood Transfusion in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Chegondi, Madhuradhar; Sasaki, Jun; Raszynski, André; Totapally, Balagangadhar R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the hemoglobin threshold for red cell transfusion in children admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Methods Retrospective chart review study. Tertiary care PICU. Critically ill pediatric patients requiring blood transfusion. No intervention. Results We analyzed the charts of all children between 1 month and 21 years of age who received packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions during a 2-year period. The target patients were identified from our blood bank database. For analysis, the patients were subdivided into four groups: acute blood loss (postsurgically, trauma, or acute gastrointestinal bleeding from other causes), hematologic (hematologic malignancies, bone marrow suppression, hemolytic anemia, or sickle cell disease), unstable (FiO2 > 0.6 and/or on inotropic support), and stable groups. We also compared the pre-transfusion hemoglobin threshold in all unstable patients with that of all stable patients. A total of 571 transfusion episodes in 284 patients were analyzed. 28% (n = 160) of transfusions were administered to patients in the acute blood loss group, 36% (n = 206) to hematologic patients, 17% (n = 99) to unstable patients, and 18% (n = 106) to stable patients. The mean pre-transfusion hemoglobin (± SD) in all children as well as in the acute blood loss, hematologic, unstable and stable groups was 7.3 ± 1.20, 7.83 ± 1.32, 6.97 ± 1.31, 7.96 ± 1.37, 7.31 ± 1.09 g/dl, respectively. The transfusion threshold for acute blood loss and unstable groups was higher compared to hematologic and stable groups (p < 0.001; ANOVA with multiple comparisons). The mean pre-transfusion hemoglobin threshold for stable and unstable patients among all groups was 7.3 ± 1.3 and 7.9 ± 1.3 (p < 0.0001), respectively. The observed mortality rate was higher among children who received transfusion compared to other children admitted to PICU. Conclusion The hemoglobin threshold for transfusion varied according to clinical conditions

  3. Early autologous fresh whole blood transfusion leads to less allogeneic transfusions and is safe.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Peter; Inaba, Kenji; Pandit, Viraj; Khalil, Mazhar; Siboni, Stefano; Vercruysse, Gary; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Tang, Andrew; Asif, Anum; O'Keeffe, Terence; Joseph, Bellal

    2015-04-01

    The practice of transfusing ones' own shed whole blood has obvious benefits such as reducing the need for allogeneic transfusions and decreasing the need for other fluids that are typically used for resuscitation in trauma. It is not widely adopted in the trauma setting because of the concern of worsening coagulopathy and the inflammatory process. The aim of this study was to assess outcomes in trauma patients receiving whole blood autotransfusion (AT) from hemothorax. This is a multi-institutional retrospective study of all trauma patients who received autologous whole blood transfusion from hemothorax from two Level I trauma centers. Patients who received AT were matched to patients who did not receive AT (No-AT) using propensity score matching in a 1:1 ratio for admission age, sex, mechanism, type of injury, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, hemoglobin, international normalized ratio (INR), prothrombin time, partial prothrombin time, and lactate. AT was defined as transfusion of autologous blood from patient's hemothorax, which was collected from the chest tubes and anticoagulated with citrate phosphorous dextrose. Outcome measures were in-hospital complications, 24-hour INR, and mortality. In-hospital complications were defined as adult respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, renal insufficiency, and transfusion-related acute lung injury. A total of 272 patients (AT, 136; No-AT, 136) were included. There was no difference in admission age (p = 0.6), ISS (p = 0.56), head Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score (p = 0.42), systolic blood pressure (p = 0.88), and INR (p = 0.62) between the two groups. There was no significant difference in in-hospital complications (p = 0.61), mortality (p = 0.51), and 24-hour postadmission INR (0.31) between the AT and No-AT groups. Patients who received AT had significantly lower packed red blood cell (p = 0.01) and platelet

  4. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome secondary to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Karanbir; Gupta, Rajesh; Kamal, Haris; Silvestri, Nicholas J; Wolfe, Gil I

    2015-03-01

    The appearance of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) after blood transfusion is rare and has only been reported in three patients to our knowledge. We report a fourth patient with PRES secondary to blood transfusion. A 36-year-old woman with a history of menorrhagia presented to the emergency department with severe fatigue. She had a hemoglobin of 1.7 g/dl and received four units of red blood cells over 15 hours. On day 6 post-transfusion she returned with confusion, headache and a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. The MRI of her brain was consistent with PRES. The following day her confusion worsened, repeat MRI of the brain showed new T2-weighted lesions. Over next 10 days her mental status gradually improved close to her baseline. A repeat MRI of the brain showed resolution of the T2-weighted lesions. The clinical presentation, radiological findings and disease progression in our patient was consistent with PRES. Other than the blood transfusions, there were no apparent risk factors for PRES. The prior three patients with post-transfusion PRES have been reported in middle-aged women with uterine fibroids. It is suspected that these patients have a subacute to chronic anemic state due to ongoing menorrhagia. It is interesting to note that no cases of PRES post-transfusion have been reported in the setting of acute blood loss, such as from trauma. It is postulated that an abrupt increase in hemoglobin causes a rapid rise in blood viscosity and loss of hypoxic vasodilation. Subsequent endothelial damage and brain capillary leakage results in PRES. This constellation of changes may not occur after transfusion in patients with more acute blood loss.

  5. Bacteriological Controls at Czechoslovakia Blood Transfusion Centers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1961-07-01

    and tremor appear. 2. During the second state (30-60 minutes after the be- ginning of the transfusion) sudden chills appear, which last 10-30 minutes...by increased muscular rigidity. 4. The fourth phase is of shock, disappearance of vasomotor regulation, strong orthostatic hypotension with peripheral

  6. Recipient inflammation affects the frequency and magnitude of immunization to transfused red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Desmarets, Maxime; Deshpande, Seema S; Chadwick, Traci E; Hillyer, Christopher D; Roback, John D; Zimring, James C

    2006-09-01

    Most alloantigens on transfused red blood cells (RBCs) are weakly immunogenic, with only a 2 to 6 percent overall immunization rate even in patients receiving multiple transfusions. Although recipient genetics may contribute to responder and/or nonresponder status, in most cases HLA type does not predict humoral response to RBC antigens. In contrast, rates of alloimmunization do correspond to the underlying disease status of transfusion recipients, suggesting that acquired host factors may play an important role. In this context, it was hypothesized that the inflammatory status of a transfusion recipient would influence immunization to transfused RBCs. A novel murine model for alloimmunization to RBC antigens was developed with the mHEL mouse, which expresses hen egg lysozyme (HEL) as a model blood group antigen. Leukoreduced mHEL RBCs were transfused into wild-type recipient mice, and anti-HEL responses were monitored. To test the stated hypothesis, some recipient animals were injected with polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)), a synthetic double-stranded RNA molecule that induces viral-like inflammation. Similar to the immunogenicity of most RBC antigens in humans, transfusion of mHEL RBCs into uninflamed mice was only a weak immunogen. In contrast, poly(I:C)-treated mice had a significant increase in both the frequency and the magnitude of alloimmunization to the mHEL antigen. These findings demonstrate that recipient inflammation with poly(I:C) significantly enhances humoral immunization to transfused alloantigens in a murine model. Moreover, these data suggest that the inflammatory status of human transfusion recipients may regulate the immunogenicity of transfused RBCs.

  7. Washing older blood units before transfusion reduces plasma iron and improves outcomes in experimental canine pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Sun, Junfeng; Solomon, Steven B.; Remy, Kenneth E.; Fernandez, Melinda; Feng, Jing; Kanias, Tamir; Bellavia, Landon; Sinchar, Derek; Perlegas, Andreas; Solomon, Michael A.; Kelley, Walter E.; Popovsky, Mark A.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Klein, Harvey G.; Natanson, Charles

    2014-01-01

    In a randomized controlled blinded trial, 2-year-old purpose-bred beagles (n = 24), with Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia, were exchanged-transfused with either 7- or 42-day-old washed or unwashed canine universal donor blood (80 mL/kg in 4 divided doses). Washing red cells (RBC) before transfusion had a significantly different effect on canine survival, multiple organ injury, plasma iron, and cell-free hemoglobin (CFH) levels depending on the age of stored blood (all, P < .05 for interactions). Washing older units of blood improved survival rates, shock score, lung injury, cardiac performance and liver function, and reduced levels of non-transferrin bound iron and plasma labile iron. In contrast, washing fresh blood worsened all these same clinical parameters and increased CFH levels. Our data indicate that transfusion of fresh blood, which results in less hemolysis, CFH, and iron release, is less toxic than transfusion of older blood in critically ill infected subjects. However, washing older blood prevented elevations in plasma circulating iron and improved survival and multiple organ injury in animals with an established pulmonary infection. Our data suggest that fresh blood should not be washed routinely because, in a setting of established infection, washed RBC are prone to release CFH and result in worsened clinical outcomes. PMID:24366359

  8. Washing older blood units before transfusion reduces plasma iron and improves outcomes in experimental canine pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Puch, Irene; Wang, Dong; Sun, Junfeng; Solomon, Steven B; Remy, Kenneth E; Fernandez, Melinda; Feng, Jing; Kanias, Tamir; Bellavia, Landon; Sinchar, Derek; Perlegas, Andreas; Solomon, Michael A; Kelley, Walter E; Popovsky, Mark A; Gladwin, Mark T; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; Klein, Harvey G; Natanson, Charles

    2014-02-27

    In a randomized controlled blinded trial, 2-year-old purpose-bred beagles (n = 24), with Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia, were exchanged-transfused with either 7- or 42-day-old washed or unwashed canine universal donor blood (80 mL/kg in 4 divided doses). Washing red cells (RBC) before transfusion had a significantly different effect on canine survival, multiple organ injury, plasma iron, and cell-free hemoglobin (CFH) levels depending on the age of stored blood (all, P < .05 for interactions). Washing older units of blood improved survival rates, shock score, lung injury, cardiac performance and liver function, and reduced levels of non-transferrin bound iron and plasma labile iron. In contrast, washing fresh blood worsened all these same clinical parameters and increased CFH levels. Our data indicate that transfusion of fresh blood, which results in less hemolysis, CFH, and iron release, is less toxic than transfusion of older blood in critically ill infected subjects. However, washing older blood prevented elevations in plasma circulating iron and improved survival and multiple organ injury in animals with an established pulmonary infection. Our data suggest that fresh blood should not be washed routinely because, in a setting of established infection, washed RBC are prone to release CFH and result in worsened clinical outcomes.

  9. Cell salvage for minimising perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Carless, Paul A; Henry, David A; Moxey, Annette J; O’Connell, Dianne; Brown, Tamara; Fergusson, Dean A

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns regarding the safety of transfused blood have prompted reconsideration of the use of allogeneic (from an unrelated donor) red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and a range of techniques to minimise transfusion requirements. Objectives To examine the evidence for the efficacy of cell salvage in reducing allogeneic blood transfusion and the evidence for any effect on clinical outcomes. Search methods We identified studies by searching CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1950 to June 2009), EMBASE (1980 to June 2009), the internet (to August 2009) and bibliographies of published articles. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials with a concurrent control group in which adult patients, scheduled for non-urgent surgery, were randomised to cell salvage (autotransfusion) or to a control group who did not receive the intervention. Data collection and analysis Data were independently extracted and the risk of bias assessed. Relative risks (RR) and weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Data were pooled using a random-effects model. The primary outcomes were the number of patients exposed to allogeneic red cell transfusion and the amount of blood transfused. Other clinical outcomes are detailed in the review. Main results A total of 75 trials were included. Overall, the use of cell salvage reduced the rate of exposure to allogeneic RBC transfusion by a relative 38% (RR 0.62; 95% CI 0.55 to 0.70). The absolute reduction in risk (ARR) of receiving an allogeneic RBC transfusion was 21% (95% CI 15% to 26%). In orthopaedic procedures the RR of exposure to RBC transfusion was 0.46 (95% CI 0.37 to 0.57) compared to 0.77 (95% CI 0.69 to 0.86) for cardiac procedures. The use of cell salvage resulted in an average saving of 0.68 units of allogeneic RBC per patient (WMD −0.68; 95% CI −0.88 to −0.49). Cell salvage did not appear to impact adversely on clinical outcomes. Authors’ conclusions

  10. Development of blood transfusion service in Sultanate of Oman.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sanmukh R; Shah Al-Bulushi, Shahnaz N; Ashraf, Thamina

    2010-01-01

    Sultanate of Oman is geographically situated in south-west of Asia, having common borders on western side by the land with United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia and Yemen and with the Arabian Sea and the Gulf of Oman in the east and the north respectively. The country enjoys one of the best health care facilities including blood transfusion services in the region. Information was collected through informal personal interviews, digging out the past records, and the report presentations at various forums. A modest start by providing blood units through import, the country is now self-reliant on procuring blood units from voluntary non-remunerate blood donors within the sultanate. A steady growth of blood banks is witnessed in every aspect of blood banking including blood collection, blood processing and supply. Various modalities are adapted in promoting voluntary blood donation programme. Sultanate of Oman has created one of the best blood transfusion services in the region in providing safe blood for transfusion through voluntary donation, a use of blood components and irradiating blood products.

  11. Development of blood transfusion service in Sultanate of Oman

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sanmukh R.; Shah Al-Bulushi, Shahnaz N.; Ashraf, Thamina

    2010-01-01

    Background: Sultanate of Oman is geographically situated in south-west of Asia, having common borders on western side by the land with United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia and Yemen and with the Arabian Sea and the Gulf of Oman in the east and the north respectively. The country enjoys one of the best health care facilities including blood transfusion services in the region. Study design: Information was collected through informal personal interviews, digging out the past records, and the report presentations at various forums. Results: A modest start by providing blood units through import, the country is now self-reliant on procuring blood units from voluntary non-remunerate blood donors within the sultanate. A steady growth of blood banks is witnessed in every aspect of blood banking including blood collection, blood processing and supply. Various modalities are adapted in promoting voluntary blood donation programme. Conclusion: Sultanate of Oman has created one of the best blood transfusion services in the region in providing safe blood for transfusion through voluntary donation, a use of blood components and irradiating blood products. PMID:20376265

  12. The Deleterious Effect of Red Blood Cell Storage on Microvascular Response to Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Jordan A.; MacLennan, Paul A.; Vandromme–Cusick, Marianne J.; Magnotti, Louis J.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Rue, Loring W.; Angotti, Jonathan M.; Garrett, Cristen A.; Hendrick, Leah E.; Croce, Martin A.; Fabian, Timothy C.; Barnum, Scott R.; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The transfusion of relatively older red blood cells (RBCs) has been associated with both morbidity and mortality in trauma patients in observational studies. Although the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain unclear, alterations in the microcirculation as a result of the transfusion of relatively older blood may be a causative factor. To assess this hypothesis, we evaluated microvascular perfusion in trauma patients during RBC transfusion. Methods Anemic but otherwise stable trauma ICU patients with orders for transfusion were identified. Thenar muscle tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) was measured continuously by near infrared spectroscopy during the course of transfusion of one RBC unit. Sublingual microcirculation was observed by sidestream dark field illumination microscopy before and after transfusion of one RBC unit. Thenar muscle StO2 was recorded over the course of transfusion. Pre- and post-transfusion perfused capillary vascular density (PCD) was determined by semi-quantitative image analysis. Changes in StO2 and PCD relative to age of RBC unit were evaluated using mixed models that adjusted for baseline StO2 and Spearman's correlation, respectively. Results Overall, 93 patients were recruited for study participation, 69% were male and average Injury Severity Score was 26.4. Average pre-transfusion hemoglobin was 7.5 mg/dL and the average age of RBC unit transfused was 29.4 days. Average peri-transfusion StO2 was negatively associated with increasing RBC age (slope -0.11, p = 0.0014). Change in PCD from pre- to post-transfusion was found to correlate negatively with RBC storage age (Spearman correlation = -0.27, p = 0.037). Conclusions The transfusion of relatively older RBC units was associated with a decline in both StO2 and PCD. Collectively, these observations demonstrate that transfusions of older RBC units are associated with the inhibition of regional microvascular perfusion. In patients requiring multiple units of RBCs

  13. Blood group antibodies and their significance in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Poole, Joyce; Daniels, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of almost universally present naturally occurring antibodies in blood plasma led to the discovery of the ABO blood group system which remains, more than 100 years later, the most important and clinically significant of all blood groups. Blood group antibodies play an important role in transfusion medicine, both in relation to the practice of blood transfusion and in pregnancy, but not all are clinically significant. Clinically significant antibodies are capable of causing adverse events following transfusion, ranging from mild to severe, and of causing hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn following placental transfer from mother to fetus. Assessing the clinical significance of antibodies relies heavily on mode of reactivity and historical data relating to specificity; functional assays are sometimes employed. The principals of methodology for blood typing and antibody identification have changed little over the years, relying mainly on serological methods involving red cell agglutination. The recent advent of blood typing using DNA technology, although still in relative infancy, will surely eventually supersede serology. However, deciding on the clinical significance of an antibody when compatible blood is not immediately available is likely to remain as one of the most common dilemmas facing transfusion practitioners.

  14. Transfusion associated graft versus host disease following whole blood transfusion from an unrelated donor in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan K; Patel, Atul K; Ranjan, Rajiv R; Shah, Apurva P

    2010-09-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a well-known complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD) is much less common and nearly uniformly fatal complication of blood transfusion. The risk factors underlying the development of TA- GVHD are incompletely defined, but it is commonly seen in individuals with congenital or acquired immunodeficiency, transfusions from blood relatives, intrauterine transfusions and HLA-matched platelet transfusions. Diagnosis of TA-GVHD may be difficult at a time due to rarity in occurrence and overlapping clinical features with various infections and drug reactions. We describe a case of transfusion-associated GVHD that occurred after transfusion of whole blood from unrelated donor in an immunocompetent patient.

  15. Blood transfusion for caesarean delivery complicated by placenta praevia.

    PubMed

    Boyle, R K; Waters, B A; O'Rourke, P K

    2009-12-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if the need for red cell blood transfusion in placenta praevia could be predicted. Data from a retrospective observational study of 246 obstetric patients, with placenta praevia, from 1999 to 2005 were analysed to generate a model to predict requirement for transfusion. Seventy-one patients were transfused. Independent risk factors for transfusion were gestational age at delivery of 32-35 weeks [odds ratio (OR): 2.6; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1-6.4] and caesarean combined with hysterectomy (OR: 29.4; 95% CI: 5.9-145.9; P < 0.001). No independent risk of transfusion was associated with maternal age, race, parity, smoking status, type of anaesthesia, caesarean combined with arterial balloon occlusion, grade of placenta, accreta and previous uterine surgery. Gestational age at delivery and type of surgery required are predictors of transfusion during caesarean for placenta praevia. Arterial balloon occlusion does not appear to increase transfusion risk and may be considered as one of the techniques in management.

  16. Practical recommendations for patient blood management and the reduction of perioperative transfusion in joint replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Warwick; Campbell, David; Daly, David; Isbister, James

    2013-04-01

    Data from the Australian Better Safer Transfusion programme show that about one-third of patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty receive perioperative blood transfusions, placing them at increased risk for adverse clinical outcomes. Other concerns associated with allogeneic blood transfusion include the quality of stored red cell concentrates, the cost of provision of blood and the predicted local demographics, which mean that fewer donors will need to support a greater number of recipients. In view of the multiple challenges associated with allogeneic blood transfusion and its provision, we developed practical management recommendations for perioperative bleeding in joint replacement surgery, based on available evidence and expert consensus opinion, that aim to promote a new, responsible approach to transfusion management. Key recommendations are as follows. Patients' medical health, including haemoglobin and iron levels, needs to be evaluated and optimized preoperatively. Anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy should be stopped if possible, unless indicated for secondary cardiovascular prevention or coronary stent patency, in which case careful consideration is required. If substantial blood loss is anticipated, intraoperative management with antifibrinolytic agents is recommended for bleeding prophylaxis. Normothermia should be maintained. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures are recommended for post-operative thromboprophylaxis. A blood management programme should be instituted for haemodynamically stable patients.

  17. Red blood cell transfusion for people undergoing hip fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, Susan J; Millette, Sarah L; Shokoohi, Ali; Pulford, E C; Doree, Carolyn; Murphy, Michael F; Stanworth, Simon

    2015-04-21

    The incidence of hip fracture is increasing and it is more common with increasing age. Surgery is used for almost all hip fractures. Blood loss occurs as a consequence of both the fracture and the surgery and thus red blood cell transfusion is frequently used. However, red blood cell transfusion is not without risks. Therefore, it is important to identify the evidence for the effective and safe use of red blood cell transfusion in people with hip fracture. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of red blood cell transfusion in people undergoing surgery for hip fracture. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (31 October 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, 2014, Issue 10), MEDLINE (January 1946 to 20 November 2014), EMBASE (January 1974 to 20 November 2014), CINAHL (January 1982 to 20 November 2014), British Nursing Index Database (January 1992 to 20 November 2014), the Systematic Review Initiative's Transfusion Evidence Library, PubMed for e-publications, various other databases and ongoing trial registers. Randomised controlled trials comparing red blood cell transfusion versus no transfusion or an alternative to transfusion, different transfusion protocols or different transfusion thresholds in people undergoing surgery for hip fracture. Three review authors independently assessed each study's risk of bias and extracted data using a study-specific form. We pooled data where there was homogeneity in the trial comparisons and the timing of outcome measurement. We used GRADE criteria to assess the quality (low, moderate or high) of the evidence for each outcome. We included six trials (2722 participants): all compared two thresholds for red blood cell transfusion: a 'liberal' strategy to maintain a haemoglobin concentration of usually 10 g/dL versus a more 'restrictive' strategy based on symptoms of anaemia or a lower haemoglobin concentration, usually 8 g/dL. The exact

  18. Blood transfusion requirements in elective breast reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Al-Benna, Sammy; Rajgarhia, Prachi

    2010-12-01

    Excess-ordering of cross-matched blood in preparation for elective surgery is expensive with associated blood shortages and time-expired wastage. Although, the maximum surgical blood order schedule (MSBOS) for breast reconstruction recommends pre-operative cross-match of 2-6 units of red cell concentrate, there is no data confirming whether this guideline is observed in practice or whether compliance results in improved outcome. The aim of this study was to examine the utility of this MSBOS in clinical practice by assessing its performance in a validation set of patients. Over a three year period, 49 patients undergoing 50 consecutive elective breast reconstruction surgery were assessed for demographic data, surgical information and hematological/transfusion data to compare the number of units of blood cross-matched with those subsequently transfused for elective breast reconstruction surgery. This was in lieu of updating the current maximal surgical blood order schedule of cross-matching 2-6 units pre-operatively. Fifty elective operations were undertaken during the study period with a zero peri-operative blood transfusion requirement and a 8% post-operative blood transfusion requirement. Pre-operative cross-match to transfusion ratio was unacceptably high with a time-expired blood wastage of 8.7%. These data thus indicate that adoption of a type and screen policy is satisfactory for haemorrhage risk management of elective breast reconstruction. The MSBOS is not designed to predict post-surgery blood needs and a requirement based blood ordering protocol will optimise blood utilisation efficiency. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The use of fresh whole blood in massive transfusion.

    PubMed

    Repine, Thomas B; Perkins, Jeremy G; Kauvar, David S; Blackborne, Lorne

    2006-06-01

    Most indications for whole blood transfusion are now well managed exclusively with blood component therapy, yet the use of fresh whole blood for resuscitating combat casualties has persisted in the U.S. military. Published descriptions of whole blood use in military and civilian settings were compared with use of whole blood at the 31st Combat Support Hospital (31st CSH) stationed in Baghdad in 2004-2005. Concerns about logistics, safety, and relative efficacy of whole blood versus component therapy have argued against the use of whole blood in most settings. However, military physicians have observed some distinct advantages in fresh warm whole blood over component therapy during the massive resuscitation of acidotic, hypothermic, and coagulopathic trauma patients. In this critical role, fresh whole blood was eventually incorporated as an adjunct into a novel whole-blood-based massive transfusion protocol. Under extreme and austere circumstances, the risk:benefit ratio of whole blood transfusion favors its use. Fresh whole blood may, at times, be advantageous even when conventional component therapy is available.

  20. Syphilis screening practices in blood transfusion facilities in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Sarkodie, Francis; Hassall, Oliver; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Owusu-Ofori, Shirley; Bates, Imelda; Bygbjerg, Ib C; Ansah, Justina Kordai; Ullum, Henrik

    2016-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare laboratory practices for screening blood donors for syphilis at blood transfusion facilities in Ghana with the recommendations of the World Health Organization and the National Blood Service, Ghana (NBSG). The prevalence of syphilis antibodies in blood donors in Ghana was also estimated. Over an 11-month period, from February 2014 to January 2015, a semi-structured questionnaire was administered to 122 laboratory technical heads out of a total of 149 transfusion facilities in Ghana. The response rate was 81.9%. A total of 58 (48%) transfusion facilities tested donors for syphilis, with an estimated 3.7% seroprevalence (95% confidence interval 3.6-3.8%). A total of 62782 out of 91386 (68.7%) donations were tested with assays that are not recommended. The estimated syphilis seroprevalence in voluntary donations was 2.9%, compared to 4.0% in family donations (p=0.001). Only 6.9% of the health facilities were using standard operating procedures (SOPs). Despite international and national recommendations, more than half of the studied health facilities that provide blood transfusions in Ghana are not screening blood donations for syphilis. These data show a considerable mismatch between recommendations and practice, with serious consequences for blood safety and public health. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Microvascular response to red blood cell transfusion in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Jordan A; MacLennan, Paul A; Vandromme-Cusick, Marianne J; Angotti, Jonathan M; Magnotti, Louis J; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Rue, Loring W; Barnum, Scott R; Patel, Rakesh P

    2012-03-01

    Trauma patients are often transfused allogeneic red blood cells (RBCs) in an effort to augment tissue oxygen delivery. However, the effect of RBC transfusion on microvascular perfusion in this patient population is not well understood. To this end, we investigated the effect of RBC transfusion on sublingual microvascular perfusion in trauma patients. Sublingual microcirculation was imaged at bedside with a sidestream dark-field illumination microscope before and after transfusion of one RBC unit in hemodynamically stable, anemic trauma patients. The perfused proportion of capillaries (PPC) before and after transfusion was determined, and the percent change in capillary perfusion following transfusion (ΔPPC) calculated. Sublingual microcirculation was observed in 30 patients. Mean age was 47 (SD, 21) years, mean Injury Severity Score was 29 (SD, 16), and mean pretransfusion hemoglobin was 7.5 (SD, 0.9) g/dL. No patients had a mean arterial pressure of less than 65 mmHg (mean, 89 [SD, 17] mmHg) or lactate of greater than 2.5 mmol/L (mean, 1.1 [SD, 0.3] mmol/L). Following transfusion, ΔPPC ranged from +68% to -36% and was found to inversely correlate significantly with pretransfusion PPC (Spearman r = -0.63, P = 0.0002). Pretransfusion PPC may be selectively deranged in otherwise stable trauma patients. Patients with relatively altered baseline PPC tend to demonstrate improvement in perfusion following transfusion, whereas those with relatively normal perfusion at baseline tend to demonstrate either no change or, in fact, a decline in PPC. Bedside sublingual imaging may have the potential to detect subtle perfusion defects and ultimately inform clinical decision making with respect to transfusion.

  2. Inflammatory response, immunosuppression, and cancer recurrence after perioperative blood transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Cata, J. P.; Wang, H.; Gottumukkala, V.; Reuben, J.; Sessler, D. I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Debate on appropriate triggers for transfusion of allogeneic blood products and their effects on short- and long-term survival in surgical and critically ill patients continue with no definitive evidence or decisive resolution. Although transfusion-related immune modulation (TRIM) is well established, its influence on immune competence in the recipient and its effects on cancer recurrence after a curative resection remains controversial. An association between perioperative transfusion of allogeneic blood products and risk for recurrence has been shown in colorectal cancer in randomized trials; whether the same is true for other types of cancer remains to be determined. This article focuses on the laboratory, animal, and clinical evidence to date on the mechanistic understanding of inflammatory and immune-modulatory effects of blood products and their significance for recurrence in the cancer surgical patient. PMID:23599512

  3. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome 3 months after blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Braun, Charles N; Hughes, Richard L; Bosque, Patrick J

    2012-11-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is characterized by the prolonged but reversible constriction of cerebral arteries accompanied by a sudden onset of severe headache, and is sometimes complicated by subarachnoid hemorrhage or cerebral infarction. It is associated with various clinical conditions and treatments, although the precise pathophysiology is not understood. In particular, several cases of this syndrome have been described to occur in middle-aged women within 1 week of a blood transfusion. We encountered a patient with a reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome who became symptomatic 3 months after a blood transfusion. No other cause for the syndrome was found. This case suggests that the risk for the reversible cerebral vasoconstriction may persist for months after blood transfusion. Copyright © 2012 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Ratio of erythrocyte and plasma in massive blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Wen, Xian-Hui; Liu, Feng-Xia; Zhang, Jun-Hua; Gui, Rong

    2014-06-01

    This study was purposed to explore the suitable ratio between fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte by retrospective analysis of coagulation in patients with massive blood transfusion. The clinical data of 151 cases with massive blood transfusion from January 2011 to January 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. According to coagulation, patients were divided into coagulation normal group (138 cases) and coagulation dysfunction group (13 cases). Based on the ratio of 1:1 of fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte, the patients were divided into high plasma group(2:1), medium plasma group (1:1) and low plasma (<1:1) subgroups. Coagulation was detected before and after 24 h of massive blood transfusion. The results showed that prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and thrombin time (TT) were prolonged, fibrinogen (FIB) level decreased significantly (all P < 0.05) in the low plasma subgroup of coagulation normal group after massive blood transfusion 24 h; the high plasma and the medium plasma group of coagulation normal group had no significant changes in coagulation (P > 0.05); prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time and fibrinogen level in the medium plasma and low plasma subgroup of coagulation dysfunction group after massive transfusion was still in abnormal levels (P > 0.05), coagulation function in high plasma subgroup was improved significantly (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the ratio of plasma to erythrocyte should be adjusted according to the patient's coagulation function during massive blood transfusion, the ratio between fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte is recommended to be 2:1 in patients of coagulation dysfunction in order to improve the patient's coagulation function and to reduce the incidence of adverse event, the ratio of fresh frozen plasma to erythrocyte is recommended to be 1:1 in patients with normal coagulation so as to reduce the dilutional coagulopathy and hypervolemia of blood.

  5. [Anesthesiologists' knowledge about packed red blood cells transfusion in surgical patients].

    PubMed

    Soares, Joyce Mendes; Queiroz, Athos Gabriel Vilela; Queiroz, Vaniely Kaliny Pinheiro de; Falbo, Ana Rodrigues; Silva, Marcelo Neves; Couceiro, Tania Cursino de Menezes; Lima, Luciana Cavalcanti

    2016-10-10

    Blood is an important resource in several lifesaving interventions, such as anemia correction and improvement of oxygen transport capacity. Despite advances, packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion still involves risks. The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge of anesthesiologists about the indications, adverse effects, and alternatives to red blood cell transfusion intraoperatively. Cross-sectional study using a questionnaire containing multiple choice questions and clinical cases related to relevant factors on the decision whether to perform PRBC transfusion, its adverse effects, hemoglobin triggers, preventive measures, and blood conservation strategies. The questionnaire was filled without the presence of the investigator. Likert scale was used and the average rank of responses was calculated. The Epi Info 7 software was used for data analysis. 79% of the institution's anesthesiologists answered the questionnaire; 100% identified the main adverse effects related to blood transfusion. When asked about the factors that influence the transfusion decision, hemoglobin level had the highest agreement (MR=4.46) followed by heart disease (MR=4.26); hematocrit (MR=4.34); age (RM=4.1) and microcirculation evaluation (MR=4.22). Respondents (82.3%) identified levels of Hb=6g.dL(-1) as a trigger to transfuse healthy patient. Regarding blood conservation strategies, hypervolemic hemodilution (MR=2.81) and decided by drugs (MR=2.95) were the least reported. We identify a good understanding of anesthesiologists about PRBC transfusion; however, there is a need for refresher courses on the subject. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  6. Estimating the ratio of multivariate recurrent event rates with application to a blood transfusion study.

    PubMed

    Ning, Jing; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Choi, Sangbum; Piao, Jin; Hong, Chuan; Del Junco, Deborah J; Rahbar, Elaheh; Fox, Erin E; Holcomb, John B; Wang, Mei-Cheng

    2015-07-09

    In comparative effectiveness studies of multicomponent, sequential interventions like blood product transfusion (plasma, platelets, red blood cells) for trauma and critical care patients, the timing and dynamics of treatment relative to the fragility of a patient's condition is often overlooked and underappreciated. While many hospitals have established massive transfusion protocols to ensure that physiologically optimal combinations of blood products are rapidly available, the period of time required to achieve a specified massive transfusion standard (e.g. a 1:1 or 1:2 ratio of plasma or platelets:red blood cells) has been ignored. To account for the time-varying characteristics of transfusions, we use semiparametric rate models for multivariate recurrent events to estimate blood product ratios. We use latent variables to account for multiple sources of informative censoring (early surgical or endovascular hemorrhage control procedures or death). The major advantage is that the distributions of latent variables and the dependence structure between the multivariate recurrent events and informative censoring need not be specified. Thus, our approach is robust to complex model assumptions. We establish asymptotic properties and evaluate finite sample performance through simulations, and apply the method to data from the PRospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion study.

  7. Transfusion management using a remote-controlled, automated blood storage

    PubMed Central

    Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo; Turdo, Rosalia

    2008-01-01

    Background Generally, the safety of transfusion terapies for patients depends in part on the distribution of the blood products. The prevention of adverse events can be aided by technological means, which, besides improving the traceability of the process, make errors less likely. In this context, the latest frontier in automation and computerisation is the remote-controlled, automated refrigerator for blood storage. Materials and methods Computer cross-matching is an efficient and safe method for assigning blood components, based on Information Technology applied to typing and screening. This method can be extended to the management of an automated blood refrigerator, the programme of which is interfaced with the Transfusion Service’s information system. The connection we made in our Service between EmoNet® and Hemosafe® enables real-time, remote-controlled management of the following aspects of blood component distribution: a) release of autologous and allogeneic units already allocated to a patient, b) release of available units, which can be allocated by remote-control to known patients, in the presence of a valid computer cross-match, c) release of O-negative units of blood for emergencies. Results Our system combines an information database, which enables computer cross-matching, with an automated refrigerator for blood storage with controlled access managed remotely by the Transfusion Service. The effectiveness and safety of the system were validated during the 4 months of its routine use in the Transfusion Service’s outpatient department. Conclusions The safety and efficiency of the distribution of blood products can and must be increased by the use of technological innovations. With the EmoNet®/Hemosafe® system, the responsibility for the remote-controlled distribution of red blood cell concentrates remains with the chief of the Transfusion Services, through the use of automated computer procedures and supported by continuous training of

  8. Transfusion management using a remote-controlled, automated blood storage.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo; Turdo, Rosalia

    2008-04-01

    Generally, the safety of transfusion terapies for patients depends in part on the distribution of the blood products. The prevention of adverse events can be aided by technological means, which, besides improving the traceability of the process, make errors less likely. In this context, the latest frontier in automation and computerisation is the remote-controlled, automated refrigerator for blood storage. Computer cross-matching is an efficient and safe method for assigning blood components, based on Information Technology applied to typing and screening. This method can be extended to the management of an automated blood refrigerator, the programme of which is interfaced with the Transfusion Service's information system. The connection we made in our Service between EmoNet and Hemosafe enables real-time, remote-controlled management of the following aspects of blood component distribution: a) release of autologous and allogeneic units already allocated to a patient, b) release of available units, which can be allocated by remote-control to known patients, in the presence of a valid computer cross-match, c) release of O-negative units of blood for emergencies. Our system combines an information database, which enables computer cross-matching, with an automated refrigerator for blood storage with controlled access managed remotely by the Transfusion Service. The effectiveness and safety of the system were validated during the 4 months of its routine use in the Transfusion Service's outpatient department. The safety and efficiency of the distribution of blood products can and must be increased by the use of technological innovations. With the EmoNet/Hemosafe system, the responsibility for the remote-controlled distribution of red blood cell concentrates remains with the chief of the Transfusion Services, through the use of automated computer procedures and supported by continuous training of technicians and nursing staff.

  9. Prophylactic Plasma Transfusion Is Not Associated With Decreased Red Blood Cell Requirements in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Warner, Matthew A; Chandran, Arun; Jenkins, Gregory; Kor, Daryl J

    2017-05-01

    Critically ill patients frequently receive plasma transfusion under the assumptions that abnormal coagulation test results confer increased risk of bleeding and that plasma transfusion will decrease this risk. However, the effect of prophylactic plasma transfusion remains poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between prophylactic plasma transfusion and bleeding complications in critically ill patients. This is a retrospective cohort study of adults admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) at a single academic institution between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. Inclusion criteria included age ≥18 years and an international normalized ratio measured during ICU admission. Multivariable propensity-matched analyses were used to evaluate associations between prophylactic plasma transfusion and outcomes of interest with a primary outcome of red blood cell transfusion in the ensuing 24 hours and secondary outcomes of hospital- and ICU-free days and mortality within 30 days of ICU discharge. A total of 27,561 patients were included in the investigation with 2472 (9.0%) receiving plasma therapy and 1105 (44.7%) for which plasma transfusion was prophylactic in nature. In multivariable propensity-matched analyses, patients receiving plasma had higher rates of red blood cell transfusion (odds ratio: 4.3 [95% confidence interval: 3.3-5.7], P < .001) and fewer hospital-free days (estimated % increase: -11.0% [95% confidence interval: -11.4, -10.6%], P < .001). There were no significant differences in ICU-free days or mortality. These findings appeared robust, persisting in multiple predefined sensitivity analyses. Prophylactic administration of plasma in the critically ill was not associated with improved clinical outcomes. Further investigation examining the utility of plasma transfusion in this population is warranted.

  10. Blood Transfusion Strategies for Hemostatic Resuscitation in Massive Trauma.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Caroline

    2016-03-01

    Massive transfusion practices were transformed during the 1970s without solid evidence supporting the use of component therapy. A manual literature search was performed for all references to the lethal triad, acute or early coagulopathy of trauma, fresh whole blood, and component transfusion therapy in massive trauma, and damage control resuscitation. Data from recent wars suggest traditional component therapy causes a nonhemostatic resuscitation worsening the propagation of the lethal triad hastening death. These same studies also indicate the advantage of fresh whole blood over component therapy even when administered in a 1:1:1 replacement ratio. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in neurocritical care

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Andreas H; Zygun, David A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Anemia is one of the most common medical complications to be encountered in critically ill patients. Based on the results of clinical trials, transfusion practices across the world have generally become more restrictive. However, because reduced oxygen delivery contributes to 'secondary' cerebral injury, anemia may not be as well tolerated among neurocritical care patients. Methods The first portion of this paper is a narrative review of the physiologic implications of anemia, hemodilution, and transfusion in the setting of brain-injury and stroke. The second portion is a systematic review to identify studies assessing the association between anemia or the use of red blood cell transfusions and relevant clinical outcomes in various neurocritical care populations. Results There have been no randomized controlled trials that have adequately assessed optimal transfusion thresholds specifically among brain-injured patients. The importance of ischemia and the implications of anemia are not necessarily the same for all neurocritical care conditions. Nevertheless, there exists an extensive body of experimental work, as well as human observational and physiologic studies, which have advanced knowledge in this area and provide some guidance to clinicians. Lower hemoglobin concentrations are consistently associated with worse physiologic parameters and clinical outcomes; however, this relationship may not be altered by more aggressive use of red blood cell transfusions. Conclusions Although hemoglobin concentrations as low as 7 g/dl are well tolerated in most critical care patients, such a severe degree of anemia could be harmful in brain-injured patients. Randomized controlled trials of different transfusion thresholds, specifically in neurocritical care settings, are required. The impact of the duration of blood storage on the neurologic implications of transfusion also requires further investigation. PMID:19519893

  12. [Acute lung injury as a consequence of blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moyado, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) has been recognized as a consequence of blood transfusion (BT) since 1978; the Food and Drug Administration, has classified it as the third BT mortality issue, in 2004, and in first place related with ALI. It can be mainly detected as: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). The clinical onset is: severe dyspnea, bilateral lung infiltration and low oxygen saturation. In USA, ARDS has an incidence of three to 22.4 cases/100 000 inhabitants, with 58.3 % mortality. TACO and TRALI are less frequent; they have been reported according to the number of transfusions: one in 1275 to 6000 for TRALI and one in 356 transfusions for TACO. Mortality is reported from two to 20 % in TRALI and 20 % in TACO. Antileukocyte antibodies in blood donors plasma, caused TRALI in 89 % of cases; also it has been found antigen specificity against leukocyte blood receptor in 59 %. The UCI patients who received a BT have ALI as a complication in 40 % of cases. The capillary pulmonary endothelia is the target of leukocyte antibodies and also plasma biologic modifiers of the stored plasma, most probable like a Sanarelli-Shwar-tzman phenomenon.

  13. Hydroxyurea for reducing blood transfusion in non-transfusion dependent beta thalassaemias.

    PubMed

    Foong, Wai Cheng; Ho, Jacqueline J; Loh, C Khai; Viprakasit, Vip

    2016-10-18

    Non-transfusion dependent beta thalassaemia is a subset of inherited haemoglobin disorders characterised by reduced production of the beta globin chain of the haemoglobin molecule leading to anaemia of varying severity. Although blood transfusion is not a necessity for survival, it is required when episodes of chronic anaemia occur. This chronic anaemia can impair growth and affect quality of life. People with non-transfusion dependent beta thalassaemia suffer from iron overload due to their body's increased capability of absorbing iron from food sources. Iron overload becomes more pronounced in those requiring blood transfusion. People with a higher foetal haemoglobin level have been found to require fewer blood transfusions. Hydroxyurea has been used to increase foetal haemoglobin level; however, its efficacy in reducing transfusion, chronic anaemia complications and its safety need to be established. To assess the effectiveness, safety and appropriate dose regimen of hydroxyurea in people with non-transfusion dependent beta thalassaemia (haemoglobin E combined with beta thalassaemia and beta thalassaemia intermedia). We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of relevant journals. We also searched ongoing trials registries and the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search: 30 April 2016. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of hydroxyurea in people with non-transfusion dependent beta thalassaemia comparing hydroxyurea with placebo or standard treatment or comparing different doses of hydroxyurea. Two authors independently applied the inclusion criteria in order to select trials for inclusion. Both authors assessed the risk of bias of trials and extracted the data. A third author verified these assessments. No trials comparing hydroxyurea with placebo or standard care were found. However, we included

  14. Ensuring that blood transfusion sets administer an effective dose of functional blood components.

    PubMed

    Bashir, S; Nightingale, M J; Cardigan, R

    2013-08-01

    Proposed changes to ISO 1135-4 will require that blood transfusion administration sets are demonstrated by the manufacturers to be suitable for the range of cellular and plasma blood components for which they are designated. To design a test protocol to asses the depletion of the blood components by transfusion sets and damage and activation of blood components during their passage through the set. Transfusion giving sets (CareFusion Ref no. 60895 180311 and Fresenius Ref no. 2900032) were assessed by comparing samples of the blood component taken prior to and after passage through the transfusion set in strict accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. As well as depletion of red cells, platelets and FVIIIc, the following markers of damage/activation were assessed: red cells-supernatant haemolysis and potassium; FFP-prothrombin fragments 1 and 2 and fibrinopeptide A and platelets-pH, CD62P, CD63 and sP-selectin. The CareFusion and the Fresenius transfusion sets gave less than 5% depletion of blood components and caused negligible and clinically insignificant effects on red cells, platelet concentrates and FFP. A practical test protocol has been established to assess the depletion, damage to and activation of the key constituents of commonly requested blood components. This protocol would provide a valuable addition to ISO 1135-4 in assuring the suitability of transfusion sets. © 2013 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2013 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  15. Vital transfusion in patients with multiple antibodies against common erythrocyte antigens.

    PubMed

    Grífols, Joan-Ramon; Serrano, Alfons; Ester, Anna; Juncà, Jordi; Muñiz, Eduard

    2009-04-01

    The transfusion of blood components could be needed in certain types of surgical procedures. Blood type components and the requested number of units will depend on the estimated loss of blood, type of surgery, surgical technique to be employed and risk factors for bleeding. Problems can appear when multiple antibodies against common erythrocyte antigens are detected in blood samples and this situation worsens if blood units are requested as quickly as possible. We report a case of a patient with a non frequent erythrocytic phenotype where multiple antibodies acting against high-frequency antigens were detected and who required urgent surgery.

  16. [Immunological blood transfusion safety and selection of red blood cells issued from hospital blood banks].

    PubMed

    Py, J-Y

    2010-12-01

    Allogeneic red blood cells transfusion is always an immunological challenge and the choice of the blood products is crucial for the patient safety. But this choice may be hampered by the quality or the quantity of the available supply. In the end, the lack of transfusion may be more harmful than transfusion. The balance between patients' needs and blood centres supplying is always delicate. The conditions are not the same for all blood groups. Things are easier for the KEL1 phenotype, where the supply must ensure only 92.5% of KEL: -1 red blood cells instead of the 91% expected. More complicated is the situation for group O red blood cells with 47 versus 43%. But the major problem concerns RH: -1 red blood cells, for which the needs reach 20.1 versus 15%. These challenges require a lot of efforts from blood centres staffs to influence blood donors' recruitment and appointments. A justified and carefully selected blood products issuing may be of great help, especially for group O RH: -1 red blood cells. Therefore, hospital blood banks must have ad hoc procedures and a trained staff to put them into practice.

  17. Blood transfusion in peace and war, 1900-1918.

    PubMed

    Schneider, W H

    1997-04-01

    The practice of blood transfusion became commonplace in the first half of the twentieth century, a time that coincided with the practice of war on a hitherto unprecedented scale. A close examination of the process reveals that it was not a simple one of war acting as a stimulus to scientific and medical discovery. Most innovations had their origins in the United States before the war, whose main effect was to diffuse and perfect transfusion through greatly increased use of the technique. The result was that in less than twenty years blood transfusion changed from being a medical curiosity and procedure of last resort to a practical and relatively simple treatment that demonstrated its value in saving thousands of lives.

  18. Detecting autologous blood transfusions: a comparison of three passport approaches and four blood markers.

    PubMed

    Mørkeberg, J; Sharpe, K; Belhage, B; Damsgaard, R; Schmidt, W; Prommer, N; Gore, C J; Ashenden, M J

    2011-04-01

    Blood passport has been suggested as an indirect tool to detect various kinds of blood manipulations. Autologous blood transfusions are currently undetectable, and the objective of this study was to examine the sensitivities of different blood markers and blood passport approaches in order to determine the best approach to detect autologous blood transfusions. Twenty-nine subjects were transfused with either one (n=8) or three (n=21) bags of autologous blood. Hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]), percentage of reticulocytes (%ret) and hemoglobin mass (Hbmass) were measured 1 day before reinfusion and six times after reinfusion. The sensitivity and specificity of a novel marker, Hbmr (based on Hbmass and %ret), was evaluated together with [Hb], Hbmass and OFF-hr by different passport methods. Our novel Hbmr marker showed superior sensitivity in detecting the highest dosage of transfused blood, with OFF-hr showing equal or superior sensitivities at lower dosages. Hbmr and OFF-hr showed superior but equal sensitivities from 1 to 4 weeks after transfusion compared with [Hb] and Hbmass, with Hbmass being the only tenable prospect to detect acute transfusions. Because autologous blood transfusions can be an acute practice with blood withdrawal and reinfusion within a few days, Hbmass seems to be the only option for revealing this practice. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Severe Childhood Anaemia and Blood Transfusion in a Nigerian Secondary Level Facility.

    PubMed

    Ogunlesi, Tinuade; Fetuga, Bolanle; Olowonyo, Michael; Adekoya, Adesola; Adetola, Oluseyi; Ajetunmobi, Adebimpe

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to describe the pattern and immediate outcome of severe childhood anaemia requiring blood transfusion at a secondary level of care in Nigeria. A cross-sectional survey of children hospitalized in a secondary health facility in Ogun State, Nigeria, with packed cell volume <20% and who received blood transfusion was done. Of the 253 children admitted between March 2013 and June 2014, 79 (31.2%) had severe anaemia and were transfused with blood. Two-thirds had multiple transfusions. Higher rates of blood transfusion were obtained among underweight children. Fever (98.7%), hypoglycaemia (65.8%) and tender liver (54.4%) were the leading co-morbidities. The case fatality rate was 21.5%. Respiratory distress, convulsions and altered sensorium were significantly associated with mortality. In conclusion, severe anaemia was associated with major morbidities and mortality at the secondary level of paediatric care in Nigeria. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Transfusion Practices Committee of a public blood bank network in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Ricardo Vilas Freire; Brener, Stela; Ferreira, Angela Melgaço; do Valle, Marcele Cunha Ribeiro; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to verify the performance of blood transfusion committees in transfusion services linked to the public blood bank network of the state of Minas Gerais. Methods A cross-sectional observational study was conducted between 2007 and 2008 using questionnaires and proficiency tests to evaluate the reporting and investigation of transfusion reactions comparing transfusion services with and without transfusion committees in the public transfusion services of the state of Minas Gerais. Results Nineteen of Hemominas own transfusion services and 207 that contracted the services of the foundation located in 178 municipalities were visited between 2007 and 2008. Established transfusion committees were present in 63.4% of the services visited. Transfusion incidents were reported by 53 (36.8%) transfusion services with transfusion committees and by eight (9.6%) without transfusion committees (p < 0.001) with 543 (97.5%) and 14 (2.5%) notifications, respectively. Of the reported transfusion incidents, 40 (75.5%) transfusion services with transfusion committees and only two (25%) of those without transfusion committees investigated the causes. Conclusion The incidence of notification and investigation of the causes of transfusion reactions was higher in transfusion services where a transfusion committee was present. Despite these results, the performance of these committees was found to be incipient and a better organization and more effective operation are required. PMID:23323064

  1. Legal and ethical issues in safe blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, Shivaram; Kantharaj, Ambuja

    2014-01-01

    Legal issues play a vital role in providing a framework for the Indian blood transfusion service (BTS), while ethical issues pave the way for quality. Despite licensing of all blood banks, failure to revamp the Drugs and Cosmetic Act (D and C Act) is impeding quality. Newer techniques like chemiluminescence or nucleic acid testing (NAT) find no mention in the D and C Act. Specialised products like pooled platelet concentrates or modified whole blood, therapeutic procedures like erythropheresis, plasma exchange, stem cell collection and processing technologies like leukoreduction and irradiation are not a part of the D and C Act. A highly fragmented BTS comprising of over 2500 blood banks, coupled with a slow and tedious process of dual licensing (state and centre) is a hindrance to smooth functioning of blood banks. Small size of blood banks compromises blood safety. New blood banks are opened in India by hospitals to meet requirements of insurance providers or by medical colleges as this a Medical Council of India (MCI) requirement. Hospital based blood banks opt for replacement donation as they are barred by law from holding camps. Demand for fresh blood, lack of components, and lack of guidelines for safe transfusion leads to continued abuse of blood. Differential pricing of blood components is difficult to explain scientifically or ethically. Accreditation of blood banks along with establishment of regional testing centres could pave the way to blood safety. National Aids Control Organisation (NACO) and National Blood Transfusion Council (NBTC) deserve a more proactive role in the licensing process. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) needs to clarify that procedures or tests meant for enhancement of blood safety are not illegal. PMID:25535417

  2. [Allergic transfusion reactions in a patient with multiple food allergies].

    PubMed

    Strobel, E; Schöniger, M; Münz, M; Hiefinger-Schindlbeck, R

    2012-07-01

    A 13-year-old girl with an osteosarcoma was treated by surgery and chemotherapy. During three transfusions of apheresis platelet concentrates allergic reactions occurred, partly in spite of premedication with an antihistamine and a corticoid. As the patient declared to be allergic to some foods, in-vitro tests for allergen-specific IgE antibodies were performed and showed markedly positive results for specific IgE to carrot and celery, less so to hazelnut, peanut and a lot of other food antigens. The donor of one of the unsuitable platelet concentrates remembered when questioned, that he had eaten carrots and chocolate with hazelnuts during the evening before platelet donation. Two washed platelet concentrates were transfused without any problem. Furthermore, transfusions of nine red blood cell concentrates and one unit of virus-inactivated frozen pooled plasma were well tolerated. Patients should be asked for allergies previous to transfusions to be alert to allergic reactions in patients with a positive history of food or drug allergies. If premedication with antihistamines does not prevent severe allergic transfusion reactions, transfusion of washed platelet concentrates and of virus-inactivated frozen pooled plasma can be considered. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Perioperative blood transfusion in combat casualties: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dunne, James R; Hawksworth, Jason S; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Gage, Fred; Tadaki, Doug K; Perdue, Philip W; Forsberg, Jonathan; Davis, Tom; Denobile, John W; Brown, Trevor S; Elster, Eric A

    2009-04-01

    In recent studies, blood transfusion has been shown to increase the rate of wound healing disturbances in orthopedic patients. Furthermore, our group has determined a correlation between delayed wound healing and elevations in inflammatory mediators in combat casualties. Therefore, we sought to determine the effect of blood transfusion on wound healing and inflammatory mediator release in combat casualties. Prospective data were collected on 20 severely injured combat casualties sustaining extremity wounds. Patients were admitted to the National Naval Medical Center during a 13-month period from January 2007 to January 2008. Data variables included age, gender, Glasgow coma score (GCS), mechanism of injury, and transfusion history. Injury severity was assessed using the Injury Severity Score (ISS). Serum was collected initially and before each surgical wound debridement and analyzed using a panel of 21 cytokines and chemokines. The association between blood transfusion and wound healing, incidence of perioperative infection, intensive care unit (ICU) admission rate, and ICU and hospital length of stay was assessed. Differences were considered significant when p < 0.05. The study cohort had a mean age of 22 +/- 1, a mean ISS of 15.8 +/- 2.6, and a mean GCS 13.9 +/- 0.6; all were men and suffered penetrating injuries (90% improvised explosive device [IED] and 10% gunshot wound [GSW]). The cohort was divided into two groups. Patients receiving blood initially (group 1, n = 11) were compared with patients who received >4 units of blood initially (group 2, n = 9). There was no significant difference in age, ISS, GCS, or mortality between the two groups. However, group 2 patients had significant impairment in wound healing rate (54% vs. 9%, p < 0.05), higher ICU admission rate (78% vs. 9%, p < 0.01), perioperative infection rate (89% vs. 27%, p < 0.01), and a longer hospital length of stay (49.9 +/- 12.8 vs. 23.8 +/- 2.9, p < 0.05) compared with group 1

  4. Quality Assessment of Established and Emerging Blood Components for Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Denese C.

    2016-01-01

    Blood is donated either as whole blood, with subsequent component processing, or through the use of apheresis devices that extract one or more components and return the rest of the donation to the donor. Blood component therapy supplanted whole blood transfusion in industrialized countries in the middle of the twentieth century and remains the standard of care for the majority of patients receiving a transfusion. Traditionally, blood has been processed into three main blood products: red blood cell concentrates; platelet concentrates; and transfusable plasma. Ensuring that these products are of high quality and that they deliver their intended benefits to patients throughout their shelf-life is a complex task. Further complexity has been added with the development of products stored under nonstandard conditions or subjected to additional manufacturing steps (e.g., cryopreserved platelets, irradiated red cells, and lyophilized plasma). Here we review established and emerging methodologies for assessing blood product quality and address controversies and uncertainties in this thriving and active field of investigation. PMID:28070448

  5. Quality Assessment of Established and Emerging Blood Components for Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Acker, Jason P; Marks, Denese C; Sheffield, William P

    2016-01-01

    Blood is donated either as whole blood, with subsequent component processing, or through the use of apheresis devices that extract one or more components and return the rest of the donation to the donor. Blood component therapy supplanted whole blood transfusion in industrialized countries in the middle of the twentieth century and remains the standard of care for the majority of patients receiving a transfusion. Traditionally, blood has been processed into three main blood products: red blood cell concentrates; platelet concentrates; and transfusable plasma. Ensuring that these products are of high quality and that they deliver their intended benefits to patients throughout their shelf-life is a complex task. Further complexity has been added with the development of products stored under nonstandard conditions or subjected to additional manufacturing steps (e.g., cryopreserved platelets, irradiated red cells, and lyophilized plasma). Here we review established and emerging methodologies for assessing blood product quality and address controversies and uncertainties in this thriving and active field of investigation.

  6. Blood Transfusion Policies in Elective General Surgery: How to Optimise Cross-Match-to-Transfusion Ratios.

    PubMed

    Hall, Thomas C; Pattenden, Clare; Hollobone, Chloe; Pollard, Cristina; Dennison, Ashley R

    2013-02-01

    Preoperative over-ordering of blood is common and leads to the wastage of blood bank resources. The preoperative blood ordering and transfusion practices for common elective general surgical procedures were evaluated in our university hospital to formulate a maximum surgical blood order schedule (MSBOS) for those procedures where a cross-match appears necessary. We evaluated blood ordering practices retrospectively in all elective general surgical procedures in our institution over a 6-month period. Cross-match-to-transfusion ratios (C:T) were calculated and compared to current trust and the British Society of Haematology (BSH) guidelines. The adjusted C:T ratio was also calculated and was defined as the C:T ratio when only cross-matched blood used intraoperatively was included in the calculation. 541 patients were identified during the 6-month period. There were 314 minor and 227 major surgeries carried out. 99.6% (n = 226) of the patients who underwent major surgery and 95.5% (n = 300) of the patients having minor surgery had at least a group and save (G and S) test preoperatively. A total of 507 units of blood were cross-matched and 238 units were used. The overall C:T ratio was therefore 2.1:1, which corresponds to a 46.9% red cell usage. There was considerable variation in the C:T ratio, depending on the type of surgery performed. The adjusted C:T ratio varied between 3.75 and 37. Compliance with transfusion policies is poor and over-ordering of blood products commonplace. Implementation of the updated recommended MSBOS and introduction of G and S for eligible surgical procedures is a safe, effective and cost-effective method to prevent preoperative over-ordering of blood in elective general surgery. Savings of GBP 8,596.00 per annum are achievable with the incorporation of updated evidence-based guidelines in our university hospital.

  7. Blood Transfusion in Children With Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Elizabeth; Simone, Joseph

    1977-01-01

    Progress has been made in the separation of the various components of whole blood, methods of storage, and efficient use of blood components, permitting better management of blood quality in children undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer. (MB)

  8. Blood Transfusion in Children With Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Elizabeth; Simone, Joseph

    1977-01-01

    Progress has been made in the separation of the various components of whole blood, methods of storage, and efficient use of blood components, permitting better management of blood quality in children undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer. (MB)

  9. The evolution of perioperative transfusion testing and blood ordering.

    PubMed

    White, Marissa J; Hazard, Sprague W; Frank, Steven M; Boyd, Joan S; Wick, Elizabeth C; Ness, Paul M; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2015-06-01

    The evolution of modern anesthesia and surgical practices has been accompanied by enhanced supportive procedures in blood banking and transfusion medicine. There is increased focus on the preparation and the use of blood components including, but not limited to, preventing unnecessary type and screen/crossmatch orders, decreasing the time required to provide compatible red blood cells (RBCs), and reducing the waste of limited blood and personnel resources. The aim of this review is to help the anesthesiologist and surgical staff identify patients at highest risk for surgical bleeding. In addition, this review examines how anesthesia and transfusion medicine can efficiently and safely allocate blood components for surgical patients who require transfusions. The following databases were searched: PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane Library from January 1970 through March 2014. Subsequent reference searches of retrieved articles were also assessed. Several innovations have drastically changed the procedures by which blood is ordered, inventoried, and the speed in which blood is delivered for patient care. Before entering an operating room, patient blood management provides guidance to clinicians about when and how to treat preoperative anemia and intra- and postoperative strategies to limit the patient's exposure to blood components. Timely updates of the recommendations for blood orders (maximum surgical blood ordering schedule) have enhanced preoperative decision making regarding the appropriateness of the type and screen versus the type and crossmatch order. The updated maximum surgical blood ordering schedule reflects modern practices, such as laparoscopy, improved surgical techniques, and use of hemostatic agents resulting in a more streamlined process for ordering and obtaining RBCs. The electronic (computer) crossmatch and electronic remote blood issue have also dramatically reduced the amount of time required to obtain crossmatch-compatible RBCs

  10. [Possibility of using DST-30 thermoelastoplast in blood transfusion systems].

    PubMed

    Il'iakov, E V; El'tsefon, B S; Polezhaev, V V; Zotkina, I V; Krivonosov, A I

    1979-01-01

    Investigating possible application of the DCT-30 thermoelastoplastic shows advantages of some physico-technical properties of this product based on natural caoutchouc and latex by comparison with base-rubber onene. It justifies recommending the former for making injection tubes in the blood transfusion systems.

  11. [Blood transfusion and inflammation as of yesterday, today and tomorrow].

    PubMed

    Garraud, O; Hamzeh-Cognasse, H; Laradi, S; Pozzetto, B; Cognasse, F

    2015-08-01

    Blood transfusion is made possible principally by use of donated homologous components that - in turn - can be perceived as sources of danger by recipients. This may create an innate immune response dominated by inflammation, especially when transfusion is repeated. Residual leukocytes in blood components can source inflammatory lesions but considerably less than used to be prior to systematic, early and stringent - in process - leukoreduction. Every blood component can cause inflammation, though barely in the case of therapeutic plasma (in such a case, this is mainly restricted to allergy). Iron that may be freed by red blood cells but also processing and storage lesions such as the emission of microparticles can reveal themselves as pro-inflammatory. Platelets in platelet components represent the main source of inflammatory and/or allergic hazards in transfusion; this is linked with processing and storage lesions but also with the platelet physiology itself. It is of utmost importance to avoid inflammatory adverse events in patients that are fragile because of their primary condition and/or treatment; this stands for their safety, as inflammation can be extremely severe and even lethal, and also for their comfort; this increases efficacy of transfusion programs while reducing the overall costs.

  12. Occult hepatitis B virus infection and blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dong Hee; Whang, Dong Hee; Song, Eun Young; Han, Kyou Sup

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-transmitted infections including hepatitis B virus (HBV) have been a major concern in transfusion medicine. Implementation of HBV nucleic acid testing (NAT) has revealed occult HBV infection (OBI) in blood donors. In the mid-1980s, hepatitis B core antibody (HBc) testing was introduced to screen blood donors in HBV non-endemic countries to prevent transmission of non-A and non-B hepatitis. That test remains in use for preventing of potential transmission of HBV from hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative blood donors, even though anti-hepatitis C virus tests have been introduced. Studies of anti-HBc-positive donors have revealed an HBV DNA positivity rate of 0%-15%. As of 2012, 30 countries have implemented HBV NAT. The prevalence of OBI in blood donors was estimated to be 8.55 per 1 million donations, according to a 2008 international survey. OBI is transmissible by blood transfusion. The clinical outcome of occult HBV transmission primarily depends on recipient immune status and the number of HBV DNA copies present in the blood products. The presence of donor anti-HBs reduces the risk of HBV infection by approximately five-fold. The risk of HBV transmission may be lower in endemic areas than in non-endemic areas, because most recipients have already been exposed to HBV. Blood safety for HBV, including OBI, has substantially improved, but the possibility for OBI transmission remains. PMID:25848484

  13. Fresh Whole Blood transfusions in the austere environment.

    PubMed

    Bowling, F; Kerr, Win

    2011-01-01

    The use of Fresh Whole Blood (FWB) transfusions can be a powerful tool for the Special Operations Forces (SOF) medic to treat uncontrolled hemorrhage. In fact, it may be the only tool currently available for hemostatic resuscitation, which along with hypotensive resuscitation, forms the basis for Damage Control Resuscitation (DCR). Until now, no comprehensive protocol has existed for conducting FWB transfusions in austere environments. The United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) sponsored Curriculum Evaluation Board (CEB), which is responsible for authoring the Tactical Emergency Medical Protocols (TMEPs) has produced a protocol. This article serves as its introduction. 2011.

  14. Alternative Blood Products and Clinical Needs in Transfusion Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Carolyn; Vaglio, Stefania; Grazzini, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    The primary focus of national blood programs is the provision of a safe and adequate blood supply. This goal is dependent on regular voluntary donations and a regulatory infrastructure that establishes and enforces standards for blood safety. Progress in ex vivo expansion of blood cells from cell sources including peripheral blood, cord blood, induced pluripotent stem cells, and human embryonic stem cell lines will likely make alternative transfusion products available for clinical use in the near future. Initially, alloimmunized patients and individuals with rare blood types are most likely to benefit from alternative products. However, in developed nations voluntary blood donations are projected to be inadequate in the future as blood usage by individuals 60 years and older increases. In developing nations economic and political challenges may impede progress in attaining self-sufficiency. Under these circumstances, ex vivo generated red cells may be needed to supplement the general blood supply. PMID:22567025

  15. Red blood cell components: Meeting the quantitative and qualitative transfusion needs.

    PubMed

    Francis, Richard O; Spitalnik, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a very common therapeutic intervention. However, because of multiple recent studies improving our understanding of appropriate transfusion scenarios, the total number of RBC units transfused per year is actually decreasing in the developed world and there are no longer major shortages of RBC products for general use. Nonetheless, there are an increasing number of "special" uses, which can put strains on the blood supply for particular types of products; these may produce shortages of specific types of RBCs or require collections targeting certain types of donors. This review will focus on several broad topics, including providing some examples of "special" settings that require, or could require, special types of RBC products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Blood Transfusions and Organ/Tissue Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... supply is now among the safest in the world: All blood donors are prescreened for HIV risk factors. Blood donations are required to be tested both for presence of antibodies to HIV and for HIV ribonucleic acid (RNA). RNA testing detects HIV at an earlier stage ...

  17. The Ratio of Blood Products Transfused Affects Mortality in Patients Receiving Massive Transfusions at a Combat Support Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    products (RBC, FFP, cryoprecipitate, recombinant FVIIa [rFVIIa], apheresis platelet [aPLT], and fresh whole blood [FWB] units) administered within 24...RBC units transfused was calculated as the number of both stored RBC and FWB units transfused and plasma as FFP plus FWB units. One apheresis platelet ...calculation of apheresis platelet units transfused, though FWB has previously been shown to be as effective as 10 units of platelet concentrate.33 The

  18. Factors associated with knowledge of the nursing staff at a teaching hospital on blood transfusion 1

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Jordânia Lumênia; Barichello, Elizabeth; Mattia, Ana Lúcia De; Barbosa, Maria Helena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to determine whether there is an association between knowledge of the nursing professionals about blood transfusion and the variables related to the professional aspects. Method: this is an observational, cross-sectional and quantitative study, carried out at a large general teaching hospital. The sample consisted of 209 nursing professionals, obtained by simple random sampling. For data collection, a checklist was used. In the univariate analysis, descriptive statistics and central trend and dispersion measures were used. In the bivariate analysis, Student's t-Test, analysis of variance and Pearson's correlation were used. To determine the predictors, multiple linear regression was applied. The Institutional Review Board (Opinion number 2434) approved the study. Results: the overall average knowledge score was 52.66%; in the Pre-transfusion Step, it corresponded to 53.38%; in the Transfusion Step 51.25% and, in the Post-transfusion Step, 62.68%. The factors related to knowledge were professional category and received training and/or guidance to accomplish the transfusion process (p<0.01). Conclusion: this study showed the influence of training and guidance on the knowledge and provided a diagnosis to identify the professionals' difficulties regarding the transfusion process. PMID:26444160

  19. Costs associated with blood transfusions in Sweden--the societal cost of autologous, allogeneic and perioperative RBC transfusion.

    PubMed

    Glenngård, A H; Persson, U; Söderman, C

    2005-08-01

    Anaemia is characterised by an insufficient number of red blood cells (RBCs) and might occur for different reasons, e.g. surgical procedures are often with associated blood loss. Patients who suffer from anaemia have the option of treatment with blood transfusion or medical treatment. In this study, the societal cost, for the case of Sweden, of RBC transfusion using three different techniques, i.e. allogeneic, autologous and intraoperative transfusion, was estimated. The analysis was based on information from interviews with hospital staff at large Swedish hospitals and from published data. The average cost for a 2 units transfusion was found to be Swedish kronor (SEK) 6330 (702 Euro) for filtered allogeneic RBCs and SEK 5394 (598 Euro) for autologous RBCs for surgery patients. Transfusion reactions accounted for almost 35 per cent of the costs of allogeneic RBC transfusions. The administration cost was found to be much higher for autologous transfusions compared with allogeneic transfusions. The cost of intraoperative erythrocyte salvage was calculated to be SEK 2567 (285 Euro) per transfusion (>4 units).

  20. The Precautionary Principle and the Tolerability of Blood Transfusion Risks.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Koen; Zaaijer, Hans L; Verweij, Marcel F

    2017-03-01

    Tolerance for blood transfusion risks is very low, as evidenced by the implementation of expensive blood tests and the rejection of gay men as blood donors. Is this low risk tolerance supported by the precautionary principle, as defenders of such policies claim? We discuss three constraints on applying (any version of) the precautionary principle and show that respecting these implies tolerating certain risks. Consistency means that the precautionary principle cannot prescribe precautions that it must simultaneously forbid taking, considering the harms they might cause. Avoiding counterproductivity requires rejecting precautions that cause more harm than they prevent. Proportionality forbids taking precautions that are more harmful than adequate alternatives. When applying these constraints, we argue, attention should not be restricted to harms that are human caused or that affect human health or the environment. Tolerating transfusion risks can be justified if available precautions have serious side effects, such as high social or economic costs.

  1. The potential of viral metagenomics in blood transfusion safety.

    PubMed

    Sauvage, V; Gomez, J; Boizeau, L; Laperche, S

    2017-09-01

    Thanks to the significant advent of high throughput sequencing in the last ten years, it is now possible via metagenomics to define the spectrum of the microbial sequences present in human blood samples. Therefore, metagenomics sequencing appears as a promising approach for the identification and global surveillance of new, emerging and/or unexpected viruses that could impair blood transfusion safety. However, despite considerable advantages compared to the traditional methods of pathogen identification, this non-targeted approach presents several drawbacks including a lack of sensitivity and sequence contaminant issues. With further improvements, especially to increase sensitivity, metagenomics sequencing should become in a near future an additional diagnostic tool in infectious disease field and especially in blood transfusion safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated with blood-product transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.R.; Kuritsky, J.N.; Katzmann, J.A.; Homburger, H.A.

    1983-11-01

    A 53-year-old white man had fever, malaise, and dyspnea on exertion. His chest roentgenogram was normal, but pulmonary function tests showed impaired diffusion capacity and a gallium scan showed marked uptake in the lungs. Results of an open-lung biopsy documented Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Immunologic test results were consistent with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The patient denied having homosexual contact or using intravenous drugs. Twenty-nine months before the diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia was made, the patient had had 16 transfusions of whole blood, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma during coronary artery bypass surgery at another medical center. This patient is not a member of any currently recognized high-risk group and is believed to have contracted the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from blood and blood-product transfusions.

  3. Patient blood management: a fresh look at a fresh approach to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Liumbruno, G M; Vaglio, S; Grazzini, G; Spahn, D R; Biancofiore, G

    2015-10-01

    The overall use of allogeneic blood transfusions in clinical practice remains relatively high and still varies widely among centres and practitioners. Moreover, allogeneic blood transfusions have historically been linked with risks and complications: some of them (e.g. transfusion reactions and transmission of pathogens) have been largely mitigated through advancements in blood banking whereas some others (e.g. immunomodulation and transfusion-related acute lung injury) appear to have more subtle etiologies and are more difficult to tackle. Furthermore, blood transfusions are costly and the supply of blood is limited. Finally, evidence indicates that a great number of the critically ill patients who are being transfused today may not be having tangible benefits from the transfusion. Patient blood management is an evidence-based, multidisciplinary, multimodal, and patient-tailored approach aimed at reducing or eliminating the need for allogeneic transfusion by managing anaemia, perioperative blood conservation, surgical haemostasis, and blood as well as plasma-derivative drug use. From this point of view, the reduction of allogeneic blood usage is not an end in itself but a tool to achieve better patient clinical outcome. This article focuses on the three-pillar matrix of patient blood management where the understanding of basic physiology and pathophysiology is at the core of evidence-based approaches to optimizing erythropoiesis, minimising bleeding and tolerating anemia. Anesthesiologists and critical care physicians clearly have a key role in patient blood management programmes are and should incorporate its principles into clinical practice-based initiatives that improve patient safety and clinical outcomes.

  4. Transfusion reaction in a case with the rare Bombay blood group.

    PubMed

    Shahshahani, Hayedeh Javadzadeh; Vahidfar, Mohamad Reza; Khodaie, Seyed Ali

    2013-01-01

    Bombay phenotype is extremely rare in Caucasian with an incidence of 1 in 250,000. When individuals with the Bombay phenotype need blood transfusion, they can receive only autologous blood or blood from another Bombay blood group. Transfusing blood group O red cells to them can cause a fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction. In this study, we report a case with the rare Bombay blood group that was misdiagnosed as the O blood group and developed a hemolytic transfusion reaction. This highlights the importance of both forward and reverse typing in ABO blood grouping and standard cross-matching and performing standard pretransfusion laboratory tests in hospital blood banks.

  5. Transfusion reaction in a case with the rare Bombay blood group

    PubMed Central

    Shahshahani, Hayedeh Javadzadeh; Vahidfar, Mohamad Reza; Khodaie, Seyed Ali

    2013-01-01

    Bombay phenotype is extremely rare in Caucasian with an incidence of 1 in 250,000. When individuals with the Bombay phenotype need blood transfusion, they can receive only autologous blood or blood from another Bombay blood group. Transfusing blood group O red cells to them can cause a fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction. In this study, we report a case with the rare Bombay blood group that was misdiagnosed as the O blood group and developed a hemolytic transfusion reaction. This highlights the importance of both forward and reverse typing in ABO blood grouping and standard cross-matching and performing standard pretransfusion laboratory tests in hospital blood banks. PMID:23559776

  6. [Blood transfusion and homosexuality: Ethical considerations].

    PubMed

    Béranger, A; Bellis, R; Bracconi, M; Mouysset, A

    2016-09-01

    Since the context of the contaminated blood affair in 1983, the homosexual male were excluded from the blood donation in France. This exclusion is often called into question in several countries and is an actual lively debate. In France, reform process is ongoing for a practical change. Three issues make up the discussion: the infectious risk bound to sexual behavior, the feasibility of the powerful biological tests but having a silent window and the protection of the blood recipient. The infectious risk in the homosexual male is higher for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) than in the rest of the population. Even if every person has his/her own individual risk depending on his/her habits, everyone is confronted to the same law. The challenge is to build a consensus, along with the precautionary principle, the non-discrimination policy, and the individual and collective responsibilities.

  7. Transfusion safety: is this the business of blood centers?

    PubMed

    Slapak, Colleen; Fredrich, Nanci; Wagner, Jeffrey

    2011-12-01

    ATSO is in a unique position to break down organizational silos between hospitals and blood centers through the development of a collaborative relationship between the two entities. Use of the TSO as blood center staff centralizes the role into a consultative position thereby retaining the independence of the hospitals. The TSO position then becomes a value-added service offered by the blood center designed to supplement processes within the hospital.Whether the TSO is based in the hospital or the blood center, improvements are gained through appropriate utilization of blood components, reductions in hospital costs, ongoing education of hospital staff involved in transfusion practice, and increased availability of blood products within the community. Implementation and standardization of best practice processes for ordering and administration of blood products developed by TSOs leads to improved patient outcomes. As a liaison between hospitals and blood centers, the TSO integrates the mutual goal of transfusion safety: the provision of the safest blood product to the right patient at the right time for the right reason.

  8. Unique risks of red blood cell transfusions in very-low-birth-weight neonates: associations between early transfusion and intraventricular hemorrhage and between late transfusion and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Robert D; Baer, Vickie L; Del Vecchio, Antonio; Henry, Erick

    2013-10-01

    Red blood cell transfusions can be life-saving for neonates with severe anemia or active hemorrhage. However, risks of transfusions exist and should always be weighed against potential benefits. At least two transfusion risks are unique to very low birth weight neonates. The first is an association between transfusions given in the first days after birth and the subsequent occurrence of a grade 3 or 4 intraventricular hemorrhage. The second is an association between "late" RBC transfusions and the subsequent occurrence of necrotizing enterocolitis. Much remains to be discovered about the pathogenesis of these two outcomes. Moreover, work is needed to clearly establish whether transfusions are causatively-associated with these outcomes or are co-variables. This review will provide basic data establishing these associations and propose mechanistic explanations.

  9. The Nlrp3 Inflammasome Does Not Regulate Alloimmunization to Transfused Red Blood Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Gibb, David R; Calabro, Samuele; Liu, Dong; Tormey, Christopher A; Spitalnik, Steven L; Zimring, James C; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Hod, Eldad A; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C

    2016-07-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are essential for patients with hematological disorders and bone marrow failure syndromes. Despite ABO matching, RBC transfusions can lead to production of alloantibodies against "minor" blood group antigens. Non-ABO alloimmunization is a leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality in the U.S. Despite its clinical importance, little is known about the immunological factors that promote alloimmunization. Prior studies indicate that inflammatory conditions place patients at higher risk for alloimmunization. Additionally, co-exposure to pro-inflammatory pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) promotes alloimmunization in animal models, suggesting that RBC alloimmunization depends on innate immune cell activation. However, the specific innate immune stimuli and sensors that induce a T cell-dependent alloantibody response to transfused RBCs have not been identified. The NLRP3 inflammasome senses chemically diverse PAMPs and damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), including extracellular ATP and iron-containing heme. We hypothesized that activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by endogenous DAMPs from RBCs promotes the alloimmune response to a sterile RBC transfusion. Using genetically modified mice lacking either NLRP3 or multiple downstream inflammasome response elements, we ruled out a role for the NLRP3 inflammasome or any Caspase-1 or -11 dependent inflammasome in regulating RBC alloantibody production to a model antigen. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Concise Review: Stem Cell-Based Approaches to Red Blood Cell Production for Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Siddharth; Huang, Xiaosong

    2014-01-01

    Blood transfusion is a common procedure in modern medicine, and it is practiced throughout the world; however, many countries report a less than sufficient blood supply. Even in developed countries where the supply is currently adequate, projected demographics predict an insufficient supply as early as 2050. The blood supply is also strained during occasional widespread disasters and crises. Transfusion of blood components such as red blood cells (RBCs), platelets, or neutrophils is increasingly used from the same blood unit for multiple purposes and to reduce alloimmune responses. Even for RBCs and platelets lacking nuclei and many antigenic cell-surface molecules, alloimmunity could occur, especially in patients with chronic transfusion requirements. Once alloimmunization occurs, such patients require RBCs from donors with a different blood group antigen combination, making it a challenge to find donors after every successive episode of alloimmunization. Alternative blood substitutes such as synthetic oxygen carriers have so far proven unsuccessful. In this review, we focus on current research and technologies that permit RBC production ex vivo from hematopoietic stem cells, pluripotent stem cells, and immortalized erythroid precursors. PMID:24361925

  11. Concise review: stem cell-based approaches to red blood cell production for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Shah, Siddharth; Huang, Xiaosong; Cheng, Linzhao

    2014-03-01

    Blood transfusion is a common procedure in modern medicine, and it is practiced throughout the world; however, many countries report a less than sufficient blood supply. Even in developed countries where the supply is currently adequate, projected demographics predict an insufficient supply as early as 2050. The blood supply is also strained during occasional widespread disasters and crises. Transfusion of blood components such as red blood cells (RBCs), platelets, or neutrophils is increasingly used from the same blood unit for multiple purposes and to reduce alloimmune responses. Even for RBCs and platelets lacking nuclei and many antigenic cell-surface molecules, alloimmunity could occur, especially in patients with chronic transfusion requirements. Once alloimmunization occurs, such patients require RBCs from donors with a different blood group antigen combination, making it a challenge to find donors after every successive episode of alloimmunization. Alternative blood substitutes such as synthetic oxygen carriers have so far proven unsuccessful. In this review, we focus on current research and technologies that permit RBC production ex vivo from hematopoietic stem cells, pluripotent stem cells, and immortalized erythroid precursors.

  12. Hepcidin as a new biomarker for detecting autologous blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Leuenberger, Nicolas; Barras, Laura; Nicoli, Raul; Robinson, Neil; Baume, Norbert; Lion, Niels; Barelli, Stefano; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Saugy, Martial

    2016-05-01

    Autologous blood transfusion (ABT) is an efficient way to increase sport performance. It is also the most challenging doping method to detect. At present, individual follow-up of haematological variables via the athlete biological passport (ABP) is used to detect it. Quantification of a novel hepatic peptide called hepcidin may be a new alternative to detect ABT. In this prospective clinical trial, healthy subjects received a saline injection for the control phase, after which they donated blood that was stored and then transfused 36 days later. The impact of ABT on hepcidin as well as haematological parameters, iron metabolism, and inflammation markers was investigated. Blood transfusion had a particularly marked effect on hepcidin concentrations compared to the other biomarkers, which included haematological variables. Hepcidin concentrations increased significantly: 12 hr and 1 day after blood reinfusion, these concentrations rose by seven- and fourfold, respectively. No significant change was observed in the control phase. Hepcidin quantification is a cost-effective strategy that could be used in an "ironomics" strategy to improve the detection of ABT.

  13. Effect of Tranexamic Acid on Blood Loss and Blood Transfusion Reduction after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Seol, Young-Jun; Seon, Jong-Keun; Lee, Seung-Hun; Jin, Cheng; Prakash, Jatin; Park, Yong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) accompanies the risk of bleeding and need for transfusion. There are several methods to reduce postoperative blood loss and blood transfusion. One such method is using tranexamic acid during TKA. The purpose of this study was to confirm whether tranexamic acid reduces postoperative blood loss and blood transfusion after TKA. Materials and Methods A total of 100 TKA patients were included in the study. The tranexamic acid group consisted of 50 patients who received an intravenous injection of tranexamic acid. The control included 50 patients who received a placebo injection. The amounts of drainage, postoperative hemoglobin, and transfusion were compared between the groups. Results The mean amount of drainage was lower in the tranexamic acid group (580.6±355.0 mL) than the control group (886.0±375.5 mL). There was a reduction in the transfusion rate in the tranexamic acid group (48%) compared with the control group (64%). The hemoglobin level was higher in the tranexamic acid group than in the control group at 24 hours postoperatively. The mean units of transfusion were smaller in the tranexamic acid group (0.76 units) than in the control group (1.28 units). Conclusions Our data suggest that intravenous injection of tranexamic acid decreases the total blood loss and transfusion after TKA. PMID:27595071

  14. Prehospital blood transfusion programs: Capabilities and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Martin D; Stubbs, James R; Berns, Kathleen S; Glassberg, Elon; Murdock, Alan D; Shinar, Eilat; Sunde, Geir Arne; Williams, Steve; Yazer, Mark H; Zietlow, Scott; Jenkins, Donald H

    2017-03-22

    The Trauma and Hemostasis Oxygenation Research (THOR) network has met in Bergen, Norway every summer over the past six years in an effort to have experts in transfusion, blood banking, military medicine, and trauma surgery exchange ideas, share their experiences, and set an agenda to move the science of remote damage control resuscitation forward. In this manuscript, we supply the lessons shared from the authors/speakers to the reader. These lessons include the experiences of the Norwegian Military with freeze dried plasma and whole blood resuscitation, lessons from extreme remote damage control resuscitation situations on oceanic cruises, and remote blood product resuscitation techniques at Mayo Clinic and the University of Pittsburgh.

  15. Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria testing in blood transfusion laboratories: do they go with the flow?

    PubMed

    Whitby, L; White, J; Fletcher, M; Whitby, A; Milkins, C; Barnett, D

    2017-08-18

    Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare stem cell disorder causing, in untreated patients, symptoms that include renal damage, thrombosis and increased mortality. When correctly diagnosed and treated, patients have reduced symptoms and normal life expectancies. Historically PNH testing resided within blood transfusion laboratories using techniques that were insensitive, for example, the Ham test. However, technology has evolved and flow cytometry is now regarded as the gold standard methodology. Given the clinical importance of diagnosing PNH correctly, we undertook a study to examine PNH testing procedures in blood transfusion laboratories within the UK and Ireland to determine implementation of best practices. An online survey was issued to 386 blood transfusion laboratories in the UK and Ireland requesting details of their current PNH testing practices and procedures. There were 143 responses, representing a 37% response rate. Of these, we identified seven laboratories undertaking PNH testing using obsolete methodologies. Furthermore, multiple centres did not refer samples for confirmatory testing by national PNH reference centres and inclusion on the national PNH disease registry. Staff handling requests for PNH testing should ensure that all samples are tested in accordance with current best practices using only flow cytometry. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  16. [History of autologous blood transfusion in neurosurgical operations].

    PubMed

    Nagai, M

    1998-12-01

    The first report on predeposit autologous blood transfusion was made in 1921 by F.C. Grant, neurosurgeon in the University Hospital of Pennsylvania. The patient was a 42-year-old man with cerebellar tumor, having a rare blood type for which no donor had been listed up. 500 ml of autologous blood was obtained, kept in 0.2% sodium citrate solution in a refrigerator and retransfused following a suboccipital exploration. Clinically, no reaction was noted and there was a favorable postoperative course, and 'autotransfusion' was evaluated as a life-saving procedure. In 1925, L.E. Davis and H. Cushing reported the first case of intraoperative autotransfusion (intraoperative blood salvage). The patient was a 42-year-old man with left occipital meningioma which, due to massive bleeding, could not be removed even by two-stage operations. In a 3rd stage operation, they could remove the tumor of 120 g totally by the aid of intraoperative replacement using 600 ml autologous blood collected with a home-made suction apparatus. No adverse side-effect was noted. This procedure was performed for 23 cases and it revealed beneficial effects except in one case. In ten of the cases, the procedure was estimated as a life-saving treatment. At the present time, the appropriate use of the patients' blood for transfusion therapy is recommended due to a shortage of donors. The use of autologous blood could play a key role, not only in saving the homologous blood supply, but also in avoiding complications encountered in conventional transfusion treatments. The methods of 'Autotransfusion' originated from operations in the neurosurgical area. On that account, it is desirable that neurosurgeons should be concerned with this subject even now.

  17. Reengineering transfusion and cellular therapy processes hospitalwide: ensuring the safe utilization of blood products.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Jay P

    2005-10-01

    Efforts to make blood transfusion as safe as possible have focused on making the blood in the bag as disease-free as possible. The results have been dramatic, and the costs have been correspondingly high. Although blood services will have to continue to deal with emerging pathogens, efforts to reduce the transfusion of infectious agents presently posing a risk will require high incremental costs and result in only improvements of a small magnitude. The other aspect of safe blood transfusion, the actual transfusion process performed primarily in hospitals, has been accorded considerably less interest. We should turn our attention to enhancing overall blood safety by focusing on improving the process of blood transfusion. Errors involving patient, specimen, and blood product identification put transfused patients at risk, increasing the mortality risk for some. Solutions that could improve the transfusion process are discussed as a focus of this article.

  18. Blood transfusion in the para-Bombay phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lin-Chu, M; Broadberry, R E

    1990-08-01

    The H-deficient phenotypes found in Chinese so far, have all been secretors of soluble blood group substances in saliva. The corresponding isoagglutinin activity (e.g. anti-B in OB(Hm) persons) has been found to be weak in all cases. To determine the clinical significance of these weak isoagglutinins 51Cr red cell survival tests were performed on three OB(Hm) individuals transfused with small volumes (4 ml) of groups B and O RBC. Rapid destruction of most of the RBC occurred whether or not the isoagglutinins of the OB(Hm) individuals were indirect antiglobulin test (IAGT) reactive. When a larger volume (54 ml packed RBC) of group B cells (weakly incompatible by IAGT) was transfused to another OB(Hm) individual with IAGT active anti-HI, the survival of the transfused RBC was 93% at 24 h, with 30% of the RBC remaining in the circulation at 28 d in contrast to 76% as would be expected if the survival was normal. Therefore when whole units of blood of normal ABO blood groups, compatible by IAGT, are transfused, the survival is expected to be almost normal. These weak isoagglutinins may not be very clinically significant and we suggest that when para-Bombay blood is not available, the compatibility testing for OA(Hm) persons should be performed with group A and group O packed RBC; OB(Hm) with group B and group O packed RBC: OAB(Hm) with groups A, B, AB and O packed RBC. For cross matching, the indirect antiglobulin test by a prewarmed technique should be used.

  19. Blood transfusion and coagulopathy in geriatric trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Mador, Brett; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Hollands, Simon; Rizoli, Sandro

    2017-03-29

    Trauma resuscitation has undergone a paradigm shift with new emphasis on the early use of blood products and increased proportions of plasma and platelets. However, it is unclear how this strategy is applied or how effective it is in the elderly population. The study aim is to identify differences in transfusion practices and the coagulopathy of trauma in the elderly. Data was prospectively collected on all consecutive patients that met trauma activation criteria at a Level I trauma centre. Data fields included patient demographics, co-morbidities, injury and resuscitation data, laboratory values, thromboelastography (TEG) results, and outcome measures. Elderly patients were defined as those 55 and older. Propensity-score matched analysis was completed for patients receiving blood product transfusion. Patients were matched by gender, mechanism, injury severity score (ISS), head injury, and time from injury. Total of 628 patients were included, of which 142 (23%) were elderly. Elderly patients were more likely to be female (41% vs. 24%), suffer blunt mechanism of trauma (96% vs. 80%), have higher ISS scores (mean 25.4 vs. 21.6) and mortality (19% vs. 8%). Elderly patients were significantly more likely to receive a blood transfusion (42% vs. 30%), specifically for red cells and plasma. Propensity-matched analysis resulted in no difference in red cell transfusion or mortality. Despite the broad similarities between the matched cohorts, trauma coagulopathy as measured by TEG was less commonly observed in the elderly. Our results suggest that elderly trauma patients are more likely to receive blood products when admitted to a trauma centre, though this may be attributed to under-triage. The results also suggest an altered coagulopathic response to traumatic injury which is partially influenced by increased anticoagulant and antiplatelet medication use in the geriatric population. It is not clear whether the acute coagulopathy of trauma is equivalent in geriatric

  20. Hyperkalemia after irradiation of packed red blood cells: Possible effects with intravascular fetal transfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Thorp, J.A.; Plapp, F.V.; Cohen, G.R.; Yeast, J.D.; O'Kell, R.T.; Stephenson, S. )

    1990-08-01

    Plasma potassium, calcium, and albumin concentrations in irradiated blood, and in fetal blood before and after transfusion, were measured. Dangerously high plasma potassium levels were observed in some units of irradiated packed red blood cells (range, 13.9 to 66.5 mEq/L; mean, 44.7 mEq/L) and could be one possible explanation for the high incidence of fetal arrhythmia associated with fetal intravascular transfusion. There are many factors operative in the preparation of irradiated packed red blood cells that may predispose to high potassium levels: the age of the red blood cells, the number of procedures used to concentrate the blood, the duration of time elapsed from concentration, the duration of time elapsed from irradiation, and the hematocrit. Use of fresh blood, avoidance of multiple packing procedures, limiting the hematocrit in the donor unit to less than or equal to 80%, and minimizing the time between concentration, irradiation and transfusion may minimize the potassium levels, and therefore making an additional washing procedure unnecessary.

  1. Efficacy of fresh packed red blood transfusion in organophosphate poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Hang-xing; Tong, Pei-jian; Li, Cai-xia; Du, Jing; Chen, Bing-yu; Huang, Zhi-hui; Wang, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The mortality rate caused by organophosphate (OP) poisoning is still high, even the standard treatment such as atropine and oxime improves a lot. To search for alternative therapies, this study was aimed to investigate the effects of packed red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in acute OP poisoning, and compare the therapeutic effects of RBCs at different storage times. Patients diagnosed with OP poisoning were included in this prospective study. Fresh RBCs (packed RBCs stored less than 10 days) and longer-storage RBCs (stored more than 10 days but less than 35 days) were randomly transfused or not into OP poisoning patients. Cholinesterase (ChE) levels in blood, atropine usage and durations, pralidoxime durations were measured. We found that both fresh and longer-storage RBCs (200–400 mL) significantly increased blood ChE levels 6 hours after transfusion, shortened the duration for ChE recovery and length of hospital stay, and reduced the usage of atropine and pralidoxime. In addition, fresh RBCs demonstrated stronger therapeutic effects than longer-storage RBCs. Packed RBCs might be an alternative approach in patients with OP poisoning, especially during early stages. PMID:28296779

  2. Management of anaemia and blood transfusion in critical care - implementing national guidelines in ICU.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sethina; Kendrick, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Anaemia in intensive care is common, with approximately 50% of patients receiving a red cell transfusion. Recognised complications from transfusion include 'transfusion associated lung injury', infection, and organ failure progression. Most cohort studies show a positive relationship between red cell transfusion and adverse outcomes. In 2012, the British Committee for Standards in Haematology issued guidelines for red cell (RBC) transfusion in critical care. They recommend a haemoglobin transfusion trigger of below 70 g/dL unless the patient is bleeding, has acute sepsis, neurological injury, or an acute coronary syndrome. RBC transfusions in a single intensive care unit (ICU) were prospectively assessed for compliance with national guidance. Each transfusion was categorised with a traffic light system: red for inappropriate, green for appropriate, and amber for those that were not clearly appropriate or inappropriate. The quality improvement project began with a clinical effectiveness audit of doctors' knowledge of critical care transfusion thresholds. Two quality improvement interventions were used: 1) a local blood transfusion guideline was produced and posters were placed in the ICU 2) this guidance was attached to the transfusion prescriptions. Data was collected after each intervention. A total of 30 random adult RBC transfusions were analysed between August 2013 and February 2014. Despite good results from the effectiveness audit an assessment of RBC transfusions demonstrated room for improvement. Prior to introduction of the guideline intervention, a total of two transfusions were green, one red and seven amber. Following both interventions there were seven green transfusions and three amber. No transfusions were classed as inappropriate. According to additional trust based ICU transfusion records, there was approximately a 50% reduction (41 to 18 RBC transfusions) in overall blood transfusions following the first intervention in October 2013. Simple

  3. All Clinically-Relevant Blood Components Transmit Prion Disease following a Single Blood Transfusion: A Sheep Model of vCJD

    PubMed Central

    de Wolf, Christopher; Tan, Boon Chin; Smith, Antony; Groschup, Martin H.; Hunter, Nora; Hornsey, Valerie S.; MacGregor, Ian R.; Prowse, Christopher V.; Turner, Marc; Manson, Jean C.

    2011-01-01

    Variant CJD (vCJD) is an incurable, infectious human disease, likely arising from the consumption of BSE-contaminated meat products. Whilst the epidemic appears to be waning, there is much concern that vCJD infection may be perpetuated in humans by the transfusion of contaminated blood products. Since 2004, several cases of transfusion-associated vCJD transmission have been reported and linked to blood collected from pre-clinically affected donors. Using an animal model in which the disease manifested resembles that of humans affected with vCJD, we examined which blood components used in human medicine are likely to pose the greatest risk of transmitting vCJD via transfusion. We collected two full units of blood from BSE-infected donor animals during the pre-clinical phase of infection. Using methods employed by transfusion services we prepared red cell concentrates, plasma and platelets units (including leucoreduced equivalents). Following transfusion, we showed that all components contain sufficient levels of infectivity to cause disease following only a single transfusion and also that leucoreduction did not prevent disease transmission. These data suggest that all blood components are vectors for prion disease transmission, and highlight the importance of multiple control measures to minimise the risk of human to human transmission of vCJD by blood transfusion. PMID:21858015

  4. Low Rates of Blood Transfusion in Elective Resections of Neurofibromas in a Cohort Study: Neurofibroma Length as a Predictor of Transfusion Requirement.

    PubMed

    Hivelin, Mikael; Plaud, Benoit; Hemery, Francois; Boulat, Claire; Ortonne, Nicolas; Valleyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Lantieri, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    Neurofibromas in neurofibromatosis type 1 induce aesthetic and functional morbidity. Perioperative bleeding has been reported as an obstacle to neurofibroma resections. The authors studied the requirement for blood transfusion during surgical treatment of neurofibromatosis type 1. Six hundred twenty-two procedures performed on 390 neurofibromatosis type 1 patients at the national referral center from 1995 to 2011 were analyzed in two chronologic sets of patients: set 1 (February of 1995 to September of 2007), in which only one surgeon operated; and set 2 (October of 2007 to January of 2011), in which two additional surgeons were involved. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, reconstructive procedures, and spontaneous hemorrhages were excluded from the analysis. Age, sex, preoperative hemoglobin concentration, location, length, estimated volume and histologic features of the largest neurofibroma (cumulative values for multiple neurofibromas), and procedure duration were studied as potential predictors of blood transfusion that were measured in terms of units of packed red blood cells. Seventy reconstructive procedures, two cases of spontaneous hemorrhage, and 32 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor resections were excluded. Among 516 procedures (318 and 198 in sets 1 and 2, respectively), 17 (2.7 percent) required blood transfusions. The requirement for transfusion was associated with neurofibroma length in both sets, with an optimal cutoff value of 13 cm in both sets. Contrary to the literature, the requirement for blood transfusion was found to be low (2.7 percent of the cases) during elective resection of neurofibromas in neurofibromatosis type 1. Elective resections of benign neurofibromas less than 13 cm in length were not associated with a requirement for blood transfusion. Risk, III.

  5. [The 2013 Seville Consensus Document on alternatives to allogenic blood transfusion. An update on the Seville Document].

    PubMed

    Leal-Noval, S R; Muñoz, M; Asuero, M; Contreras, E; García-Erce, J A; Llau, J V; Moral, V; Páramo, J A; Quintana, M; Basora, M; Bautista-Paloma, F J; Bisbe, E; Bóveda, J L; Castillo-Muñoz, A; Colomina, M J; Fernández, C; Fernández-Mondéjar, E; Ferrándiz, C; García de Lorenzo, A; Gomar, C; Gómez-Luque, A; Izuel, M; Jiménez-Yuste, V; López-Briz, E; López-Fernández, M L; Martín-Conde, J A; Montoro-Ronsano, B; Paniagua, C; Romero-Garrido, J A; Ruiz, J C; Salinas-Argente, R; Sánchez, C; Torrabadella, P; Arellano, V; Candela, A; Fernández, J A; Fernández-Hinojosa, E; Puppo, A

    2013-05-01

    Since allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) is not harmless, multiple alternatives to ABT (AABT) have emerged, though there is great variability in their indications and appropriate use. This variability results from the interaction of a number of factors, including the specialty of the physician, knowledge and preferences, the degree of anemia, transfusion policy, and AABT availability. Since AABTs are not harmless and may not meet cost-effectiveness criteria, such variability is unacceptable. The Spanish Societies of Anesthesiology (SEDAR), Hematology and Hemotherapy (SEHH), Hospital Pharmacy (SEFH), Critical Care Medicine (SEMICYUC), Thrombosis and Hemostasis (SETH) and Blood Transfusion (SETS) have developed a Consensus Document for the proper use of AABTs. A panel of experts convened by these 6 Societies have conducted a systematic review of the medical literature and have developed the 2013 Seville Consensus Document on Alternatives to Allogeneic Blood Transfusion, which only considers those AABT aimed at decreasing the transfusion of packed red cells. AABTs are defined as any pharmacological or non-pharmacological measure aimed at decreasing the transfusion of red blood cell concentrates, while preserving patient safety. For each AABT, the main question formulated, positively or negatively, is: "Does this particular AABT reduce the transfusion rate or not?" All the recommendations on the use of AABTs were formulated according to the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. [The 2013 Seville Consensus Document on alternatives to allogenic blood transfusion. An update on the Seville Document].

    PubMed

    Leal-Noval, S R; Muñoz, M; Asuero, M; Contreras, E; García-Erce, J A; Llau, J V; Moral, V; Páramo, J A; Quintana, M; Basora, M; Bautista-Paloma, F J; Bisbe, E; Bóveda, J L; Castillo-Muñoz, A; Colomina, M J; Fernández, C; Fernández-Mondéjar, E; Ferrándiz, C; García de Lorenzo, A; Gomar, C; Gómez-Luque, A; Izuel, M; Jiménez-Yuste, V; López-Briz, E; López-Fernández, M L; Martín-Conde, J A; Montoro-Ronsano, B; Paniagua, C; Romero-Garrido, J A; Ruiz, J C; Salinas-Argente, R; Sánchez, C; Torrabadella, P; Arellano, V; Candela, A; Fernández, J A; Fernández-Hinojosa, E; Puppo, A

    2013-05-01

    Since allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) is not harmless, multiple alternatives to ABT (AABT) have emerged, though there is great variability in their indications and appropriate use. This variability results from the interaction of a number of factors, including the specialty of the physician, knowledge and preferences, the degree of anemia, transfusion policy, and AABT availability. Since AABTs are not harmless and may not meet cost-effectiveness criteria, such variability is unacceptable. The Spanish Societies of Anesthesiology (SEDAR), Hematology and Hemotherapy (SEHH), Hospital Pharmacy (SEFH), Critical Care Medicine (SEMICYUC), Thrombosis and Hemostasis (SETH) and Blood Transfusion (SETS) have developed a Consensus Document for the proper use of AABTs. A panel of experts convened by these 6 Societies have conducted a systematic review of the medical literature and have developed the 2013 Seville Consensus Document on Alternatives to Allogeneic Blood Transfusion, which only considers those AABT aimed at decreasing the transfusion of packed red cells. AABTs are defined as any pharmacological or non-pharmacological measure aimed at decreasing the transfusion of red blood cell concentrates, while preserving patient safety. For each AABT, the main question formulated, positively or negatively, is: « Does this particular AABT reduce the transfusion rate or not?» All the recommendations on the use of AABTs were formulated according to the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology.

  7. An audit on the current practice of red blood cell transfusion following elective primary hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ozgönenel, Bülent; Kanhere, Rujuta; O'Malley, Barbara; Balasubramaniam, Mamtha; Eisenbrey, A Bradley

    2007-08-01

    This audit encompassing a six-month period on the current practice of red blood cell transfusion following elective primary total hip arthroplasty showed that the rate of allogeneic blood avoidance was 84.8% for preoperative autologous blood donors and 47.8% for non-donors (p<0.001). Lower preoperative hemoglobin level was associated with an increased allogeneic unit transfusion (p<0.001). The intraoperative use of autologous blood collection and transfusion systems did not reduce the transfusion risk, and the use of the colloid volume expander was associated with a 1.8-fold increased risk of transfusion (p=0.022).

  8. Resistance of a subset of red blood cells to clearance by antibodies in a mouse model of incompatible transfusion.

    PubMed

    Liepkalns, Justine S; Cadwell, Chantel M; Stowell, Sean R; Hod, Eldad A; Spitalnik, Steven L; Zimring, James C

    2013-06-01

    Alloimmunization to antigens on transfused red blood cells (RBCs) represents a major barrier to chronic transfusion. In extreme cases of multiple alloimmunization, clinicians may be faced with the decision of transfusing incompatible RBCs or risking death from lack of transfusion. The disastrous results of hemolytic transfusion reactions are well understood, and major pathways of clearance have been described. However, well described but poorly understood is the survival of a subset of incompatible donor RBCs during hemolysis, despite antibody binding. We utilize a tractable murine model of incompatible transfusion in which RBCs from transgenic donor mice expressing human glycophorin A (hGPA) are transfused into recipients passively immunized with anti-hGPA. As in humans, the majority of RBCs are cleared but a subset of incompatible donor RBCs persist in circulation, despite being bound by antibodies. Data contained herein reject the hypothesis that lack of clearance is due to insufficient antibody or overwhelming of phagocytic machinery; rather, we establish that surviving RBCs represent a distinct population resistant to clearance. These studies demonstrate that surviving RBCs during incompatible transfusion can represent a population that is resistant to clearance. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  9. Repeat caesarean delivery as a risk factor for abnormal blood loss, blood transfusion and perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Saidu, R; Bolaji, B O; Olatinwo, A W O; McIntosh, C M; Alio, A P; Salihu, H M

    2011-11-01

    We reviewed 450 cases of caesarean delivery (January-December 2009) at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital in Nigeria. We analysed the association between caesarean delivery status (primary or previous) and the following outcomes: abnormal blood-loss, blood transfusion and perinatal mortality. Although significant differences were observed between primary and previous caesarean delivery groups in regards to maternal age, urgency of the caesarean delivery, booking status, and cadre of birth attendant staff, no association was noted between caesarean delivery status and any of the three outcomes. Further analyses identified parity as an important predictor for blood transfusion and abnormal blood loss. In addition, we found a dose?response relationship between parity and abnormal blood loss (< 0.05). Also, mothers with an emergency caesarean delivery of the index pregnancy were more than twice as likely to have a blood transfusion as compared with those with an elective caesarean delivery.

  10. Blood Transfusions in Dogs and Cats Receiving Hemodialysis: 230 Cases (June 1997-September 2012).

    PubMed

    Langston, C; Cook, A; Eatroff, A; Mitelberg, E; Chalhoub, S

    2017-03-01

    Multiple factors exist that contribute to anemia in dogs and cats receiving hemodialysis, can necessitate transfusion. To describe blood product usage in dogs and cats with acute and chronic kidney disease that were treated with intermittent hemodialysis to determine risk factors associated with the requirement for blood product transfusion. 83 cats and 147 dogs undergoing renal replacement therapy at the Animal Medical Center for acute or chronic kidney disease. Retrospective medical record review of all dogs and cats receiving renal replacement therapy for kidney disease, from June 1997 through September 2012. Blood products (whole blood, packed RBCs, or stromal-free hemoglobin) were administered to 87% of cats and 32% of dogs. The number of dialysis treatments was associated with the requirement for transfusion in cats (adjusted OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.13, 4.32), but not in dogs (adjusted OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.95, 1.03). Administration of a blood product was associated with a higher likelihood of death in dogs (OR 3.198, 95% CI 1.352, 7.565; P = .0098), but not in cats (OR 1.527, 95% CI 0.5404, 4.317, P = .2). Veterinary hospitals with a hemodialysis unit should have reliable and rapid access to safe blood products in order to meet the needs of dogs and cats receiving dialysis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  11. Bioethics and religious bodies: refusal of blood transfusions in Germany.

    PubMed

    Rajtar, Małgorzata

    2013-12-01

    The refusal of medical treatment is a recurrent topic in bioethical debates and Jehovah's Witnesses often constitute an exemplary case in this regard. The refusal of a potentially life-saving blood transfusion is a controversial choice that challenges the basic medical principle of acting in patients' best interests and often leads physicians to adopt paternalistic attitudes toward patients who refuse transfusion. However, neither existing bioethical nor historical and social sciences scholarship sufficiently addresses experiences of rank-and-file Witnesses in their dealings with the health care system. This article draws on results of a nine-month (2010, 2011-2012) ethnographic research on the relationship between religious, legal, ethical, and emotional issues emerging from the refusal of blood transfusions by Jehovah's Witnesses in Germany (mainly in Berlin). It shows how bioethical challenges are solved in practice by some German physicians and what they perceive to be the main goal of biomedicine: promoting the health or broadly understood well-being of patients. I argue that two different understandings of the concept of autonomy are at work here: autonomy based on reason and autonomy based on choice. The first is privileged by German physicians in line with a Kantian philosophical tradition and constitutional law; the second, paradoxically, is utilized by Jehovah's Witnesses in their version of the Anglo-Saxon Millian approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Blood transfusion and alloimmunization in patients with thalassemia: multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Azarkeivan, Azita; Ansari, Shahla; Ahmadi, Mohammad Hossein; Hajibeigy, Bashir; Maghsudlu, Mahtab; Nasizadeh, Soheila; Shaigan, Mojgan; Toolabi, Abdolmajid; Salahmand, Mitra

    2011-09-01

    One of transfusion's side effects is alloimmunization against red blood cell (RBC) antigens. Early diagnosis by antibody screening is an important step in the detection of these alloantibodies. The authors studied the frequency of alloimmunization in thalassemic patients of 4 centers (2 adult and 2 pediatric centers) and compared the rates in children (up to 15 years) and adults. Antibody screening tests were performed by gel method according to its standard pattern and respective program. In positive cases, antibody identification test by gel method was performed. Eight hundred thirty-five patients were studied; 548 (65.6%) were adults (mean age = 24.5), and 287 (34.4%) cases were pediatrics (mean age = 10.05). Of these patients, 74.1% had no history of transfusion reaction, whereas 21 (2.5%) had hemolytic complications. Seventy-eight (9.3%) exhibited allergic symptoms, and 117 (14%) cases experienced febrile reactions during transfusion. Antibody screening showed positive results in 22 pediatric cases (7.7%) and 79 adults (14.4%); 72 (71.3%), 19 (18.8%), 3 (3%), and 1 (1%) cases exhibited single, double, triple, and autoantibodies, respectively. Anti-Kell antibody was seen in 34 (33.7%) cases, anti-D was seen in 11 (10.9%) cases, and anti-E in was seen in 10 (9.9%) cases. The authors observed 8 anti-D+C (7.9%) cases, 1 anti-D+E (1%), 3 anti-Kell+E, 3 anti-Kell+Kpa (3%), and 1 anti-Kell+D double antibodies. These antibodies were also a combination of Rh subgroups or Rh and Kell subgroups. The authors observed meaningful relations between history of transfusion reactions and age with antibody screening results (P = .005). Based on alloantibodies types, more than two thirds of them were Rh subgroups and Kell groups. Phenotype determination of RBCs before beginning chronic blood transfusion and careful cross-matching with Kell and Rh subgroups in addition to ABO may help reduce alloimmunization in chronic transfusion patients.

  13. Hospital Blood Transfusion Patterns During Major Noncardiac Surgery and Surgical Mortality.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alicia; Trivedi, Amal N; Jiang, Lan; Vezeridis, Michael; Henderson, William G; Wu, Wen-Chih

    2015-08-01

    We retrospectively examined intraoperative blood transfusion patterns at US veteran's hospitals through description of national patterns of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion in the elderly; assessment of temporal trends in the use of intraoperative blood transfusion; and relationship of institutional use of intraoperative blood transfusion to hospital 30-day risk-adjusted postoperative mortality rates.Limited data exist on the pattern of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion at the hospital level, and the relationship between intraoperative transfusion rates and institutional surgical outcomes.Using the Department of Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, we assigned 424,015 major noncardiac operations among elderly patients (≥65 years) in 117 veteran's hospitals, from 1997 to 2009, into groups based on indication for intraoperative blood transfusion according to literature and clinical guidelines. We then examined institutional variations and temporal trends in surgical blood use based on these indications, and the relationship between these institutional patterns of transfusion and 30-day postoperative mortality.Intraoperative transfusion occurred in 38,056/424,015 operations (9.0%). Among the 64,390 operations with an indication for transfusion, there was wide variation (median: 49.9%, range: 8.7%-76.2%) in hospital transfusion rates, a yearly decline in transfusion rates (average 1.0%/y), and an inverse relationship between hospital intraoperative transfusion rates and hospital 30-day risk-adjusted mortality (adjusted mortality of 9.8 ± 2.8% vs 8.3 ± 2.1% for lowest and highest tertiles of hospital transfusion rates, respectively, P = 0.02). In contrast, for the 225,782 operations with no indication for transfusion, there was little variation in hospital transfusion rates (median 0.7%, range: 0%-3.4%), no meaningful temporal change in transfusion (average 0.0%/y), and

  14. Proof of homologous blood transfusion through quantification of blood group antigens.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Margaret; Popp, Hazel; Sharpe, Ken; Ashenden, Michael

    2003-11-01

    Athletes may illegally enhance endurance performance by transfusing homologous red blood cells (RBCs) and thereby increasing the oxygen carrying capacity of their blood. Detecting this dangerous practice is difficult by currently used methods. The aim of this work was to develop tests capable of detecting a mixed red cell population by flow cytometry, utilizing the likelihood of differences in minor blood group antigens. Twelve antisera directed against blood group antigens, derived from donor plasma, were used in conjunction with a secondary antibody directly conjugated with fluorescein to label IgG-coated RBCs. Optimal concentrations of RBCs and antibodies were determined on panel cells used in blood banking for the identification of specific antibodies. Blood samples from 25 patients purportedly transfused with 1-3 units of RBCs were screened for evidence of transfusion, and the percentages of antigen-positive and antigen-negative red cells were automatically calculated by the software installed in the flow cytometer after setting gates around these populations on histograms of fluorescence. Mixed RBC populations were identified in 22 of 25 patients tested. The three patients with antigenically homogeneous populations of RBCs were subsequently found not to have received their scheduled transfusions. This technique can detect small (<5%) populations of cells that are antigenically distinct from an individual's own RBCs. These results show the potential for flow cytometry to identify illicit homologous blood transfusion in athletes, and suggest the risk of false positives may be low.

  15. Retrospective evaluation of adverse transfusion reactions following blood product transfusion from a tertiary care hospital: A preliminary step towards hemovigilance

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Praveen; Thapliyal, Rakesh; Coshic, Poonam; Chatterjee, Kabita

    2013-01-01

    Background: The goal of hemovigilance is to increase the safety and quality of blood transfusion. Identification of the adverse reactions will help in taking appropriate steps to reduce their incidence and make blood transfusion process as safe as possible. Aims: To determine the frequency and type of transfusion reactions (TRs) occurring in patients, reported to the blood bank at our institute. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of all TRs reported to the blood bank at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, between December 2007 and April 2012 was done. All the TRs were evaluated in the blood bank and classified using standard definitions. Results: During the study period a total of 380,658 bloods and blood components were issued by our blood bank. Out of the total 196 adverse reactions reported under the hemovigilance system, the most common type of reaction observed was allergic 55.1% (n = 108), followed by febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR) 35.7% (n = 70). Other less frequently observed reactions were Anaphylactoid reactions 5.1% (n = 10), Acute non-immune HTRs 2.6% (n = 5), Circulatory overload 0.5% (n = 1), Transfusion related acute lung injury 0.5% (n = 1), Delayed HTRs 0.5% (n = 1). Not a single case of bacterial contamination was observed. Conclusion: The frequency of TRs in our patients was found to be 0.05% (196 out of 380,658). This can be an underestimation of the true incidence because of under reporting. It should be the responsibility of the blood transfusion consultant to create awareness amongst their clinical counterpart about safe transfusion practices so that proper hemovigilance system can be achieved to provide better patient care. PMID:24014939

  16. [Data processing and blood transfusion activities: fact and future in 2013].

    PubMed

    Py, J-Y; Daurat, G

    2013-05-01

    It is now hard to think of blood transfusion activities without data processing. Blood transfusion centers are unable to work without it since a long time. Its necessity in hospital blood banks is following the same pattern. Electronic data interchange between them is growing because of their high interdependence. A lot has already been done and works routinely. But a lot remains to be done, due to continuous evolution of computer science and blood transfusion itself.

  17. Massive blood transfusions post trauma in the elderly compared to younger patients.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Biswadev; Olaussen, Alexander; Cameron, Peter A; O'Donohoe, Tom; Fitzgerald, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Older age and blood transfusion have both been independently associated with higher mortality post trauma and the combination is expected to be associated with catastrophic outcomes. Among patients who received a massive transfusion post trauma, we aimed to investigate mortality at hospital discharge of patients ≥65 years old and explore variables associated with poor outcomes. A retrospective review of registry data on all major trauma patients presenting to a level I trauma centre between 2006 and 2011 was conducted. Mortality at hospital discharge among patients ≥65 years old was compared to the younger cohort. A multivariable logistic regression model was constructed to determine independent risk-factors for mortality among older patients. There were 51 (16.4%) patients of age ≥65 years who received a massive transfusion. There were 20 (39.2%) deaths, a proportion significantly higher than 55 (21.1%) deaths among younger patients (p<0.01). Pre-hospital GCS, the presence of acute traumatic coagulopathy and higher systolic blood pressure on presentation were independently associated with higher mortality. Age and volume of red cells transfused were not significantly associated with higher mortality. Survival to hospital discharge was demonstrated in elderly patients receiving massive transfusions post trauma, even in the presence of multiple risk factors for mortality. Restrictive resuscitation or transfusion on the basis of age alone cannot be supported. Early aggressive resuscitation of elderly trauma patients along specific guidelines directed at the geriatric population is justified and may further improve outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Transfusion of fresher versus older red blood cells for all conditions.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, Susan J; Wilkinson, Kirstin L; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Stanworth, Simon

    2015-05-12

    storage; overlap in the distribution of the age of red blood cells; and heterogeneity in measurements and reporting of outcomes of interest to this review. We tabulated and reported results by individual trial. Overall risk of bias was low or unclear, with four incidences of high risk of bias: in allocation concealment (three trials) and in incomplete outcome data (one trial).No trial measured all of the outcomes of interest in this review. Four trials comparing 'fresher' with 'older' red blood cells reported the primary outcome: mortality within seven days (one study; 74 participants) and at 30 days (three trials; 62 participants). Six trials comparing 'fresher' with 'standard practice' red blood cells reported the primary outcome: mortality within seven days (three studies; 159 participants) and at 30 days (three trials; 1018 participants). All 10 trials reported no clear differences in mortality at either time point between intervention arms.Three trials comparing 'fresher' with 'standard practice' red blood cells reported red blood cell transfusion-associated adverse events. No adverse reactions were reported in two trials, and one incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection was described in the 'standard practice' arm in one trial.Overall the trials reported no clear difference between either of the intervention comparisons in long-term mortality (three trials; 478 participants); clinically accepted measures of multiple organ dysfunction (two trials: 399 participants); incidence of in-hospital infection (two trials; 429 participants); duration of mechanical ventilation (three trials: 95 participants); and number of participants requiring respiratory organ support (five trials; 528 participants) or renal support (one trial; 57 participants). The outcome 'physiological markers of oxygen consumption or alterations in microcirculation' was reported by 11 studies, but the measures used were highly varied, and no formal statistical analysis was undertaken. Several factors

  19. Role of blood transfusion in organ system failure following major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Maetani, S; Nishikawa, T; Tobe, T; Hirakawa, A

    1986-01-01

    Using multivariate probit analysis, the data of 565 patients who underwent major abdominal surgery were retrospectively analyzed, and the etiologic role of blood transfusion in organ system failure (OSF), which includes respiratory failure, gastrointestinal stress bleeding, renal failure, nonobstructive, nonhepatitic jaundice, and coagulopathy, was studied. Apart from the amount of blood transfusion, the following factors were included in the analysis as possible contributors to OSF: age, preoperative hematocrit, organ failure risk (diffuse peritonitis, obstructive cholangitis, liver cirrhosis, terminal cancer, and hemorrhagic shock), operative time, blood loss, and postoperative highest hematocrit. The results showed that, except for preoperative hematocrit, all the factors are statistically significant contributors, blood transfusion being the most significant. There was no statistically significant interaction between blood transfusion and organ failure risk. It is concluded that blood transfusion is an important, independent factor contributing to OSF, and its contribution cannot be attributed to the underlying conditions that require blood transfusion. PMID:3485412

  20. Risk Factors for the Postoperative Transfusion of Allogeneic Blood in Orthopedics Patients With Intraoperative Blood Salvage

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jia-Hua; Lyu, Yi; Cheng, Li-Ming; Li, Ying-Chuan; Gou, Da-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to explore the risk factors affecting the postoperative transfusion of allogeneic blood in patients undergoing orthopedics surgery with intraoperative blood salvage (IBS). A retrospective study of 279 patients undergoing orthopedic surgeries with IBS from May 2013 to May 2015 was enrolled. The binary logistic regression was used to find out the risk factors associated with postoperative transfusion of allogeneic blood in orthopedics patients with IBS, and then receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn to determine the optimal threshold of the regression model. Single factor analysis showed that age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, preoperative hemoglobin, operation time, received autologous blood, the laying time of autologous blood, bleeding volume, and postoperative drainage volume had significant effects on postoperative allogeneic blood transfusion. In binary logistic regression analysis, the independent factors predicting orthopedic patients with IBS need to transfuse allogeneic blood after surgeries were age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.415, P = 0.006), ASA grade (OR = 2.393, P = 0.035), preoperative hemoglobin (OR = 0.532, P = 0.022), and postoperative drainage volume (OR = 4.279, P = 0.000). The area under ROC curve was 0.79 and the predicted accuracy rate of the model was 81.58%. After operation, the orthopedic patients with IBS still have a high allogeneic blood transfusion rate, and IBS is not a perfect blood protection method. The logistic regression model of our study provides a reliable prediction for postoperative transfusion of allogeneic blood in orthopedic patients with IBS, which have a certain reference value. PMID:26937919

  1. Reducing Non-Infectious Risks of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.; Gropper, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary As screening for transfusion-associated infections has improved, non-infectious complications of transfusion now cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the United States. For example, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and hemolytic transfusion-reactions are the first, second, and third leading causes of death from transfusion respectively. These complications and others are reviewed here and several controversial methods for prevention of non-infectious complications of transfusion are discussed; universal leukoreduction of red cell units, use of male-only plasma, and restriction of red cell storage age. PMID:21792054

  2. Blood doping: potential of blood and urine sampling to detect autologous transfusion.

    PubMed

    Segura, J; Lundby, C

    2014-05-01

    The collection of blood, its storage as red blood cell (RBC) concentrates and its reinjection is prohibited; until now, the practice cannot be reliably detected. A recent innovation-the haematological module of the athlete's biological passport-can provide authorities with indications towards autologous blood transfusion. In situations where a given athlete has been exposed to altitude, heat stress, sickness, etc, additional evidence may be needed to establish beyond any reasonable doubt that a blood transfusion may actually have occurred. Additional evidence may be obtained from at least three different approaches using parameters related to blood and urine matrices.Genomics applied to mRNA or miRNA is one of the most promising analytical tools. Proteomics of changes associated with RBC membranes may reveal the presence of cells stored for some time, as can an abnormal pattern of size distribution of aged cells. In urine, high concentrations of metabolites of plasticisers originating from the blood storing bags strongly suggest a recent blood transfusion. We emphasise the usefulness of simultaneously obtaining and then analysing blood and urine for complementary evidence of autologous blood transfusion ('blood doping').

  3. Blood transfusion practices in a tertiary care center in Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Sonam

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusion plays vital roles in the medical and surgical practice. To achieve optimum use of blood, transfusion has to be appropriate and judicious consuming minimal resources and manpower. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the pattern of blood transfusion requests and utilization with the aim of determining transfusion practice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood request forms and cross-match worksheets at the blood bank were analyzed over a 6-month period. Numbers of requisitions, blood units cross-matched, issued out, transfused, and nontransfused were calculated. Nonusage probability (NUP) and the cross-match to transfusion ratio (CTR) for each clinical unit were computed. RESULTS: Two thousand two hundred and sixty-eight units of blood were cross-matched for 1487 patient's transfusion requests, out of which only 1455 (64.2%) were transfused giving a total CTR of 1.6 for the hospital. The CTR for the various clinical units were: Obstetrics and gynecology (O and G) 2.7, surgery 2.1, orthopedics 1.9, medicine 1.1, pediatrics 1, and oncology 1. CONCLUSIONS: The overall CTR (1.6) of the hospital was within the optimal range except for the O and G and surgery department which were having very high NUP and CTR indicating their suboptimal transfusion practices. Introducing revised transfusion guidelines, maximum surgical blood ordering schedule and type, screen, save, and abbreviated cross-match method can help toward adequate requisition and utilization of blood thereby reducing wastage of resources, time, and manpower. PMID:28367018

  4. Anti-fibrinolytic use for minimising perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Henry, David A; Carless, Paul A; Moxey, Annette J; O’Connell, Dianne; Stokes, Barrie J; Fergusson, Dean A; Ker, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns regarding the safety of transfused blood have led to the development of a range of interventions to minimise blood loss during major surgery. Anti-fibrinolytic drugs are widely used, particularly in cardiac surgery, and previous reviews have found them to be effective in reducing blood loss, the need for transfusion, and the need for re-operation due to continued or recurrent bleeding. In the last few years questions have been raised regarding the comparative performance of the drugs. The safety of the most popular agent, aprotinin, has been challenged, and it was withdrawn from world markets in May 2008 because of concerns that it increased the risk of cardiovascular complications and death. Objectives To assess the comparative effects of the anti-fibrinolytic drugs aprotinin, tranexamic acid (TXA), and epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA) on blood loss during surgery, the need for red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and adverse events, particularly vascular occlusion, renal dysfunction, and death. Search methods We searched: the Cochrane Injuries Group’s Specialised Register (July 2010), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) 1950 to July 2010, EMBASE (Ovid SP) 1980 to July 2010. References in identified trials and review articles were checked and trial authors were contacted to identify any additional studies. The searches were last updated in July 2010. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of anti-fibrinolytic drugs in adults scheduled for non-urgent surgery. Eligible trials compared anti-fibrinolytic drugs with placebo (or no treatment), or with each other. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. This version of the review includes a sensitivity analysis excluding trials authored by Prof. Joachim Boldt. Main results This review summarises data from 252 RCTs that recruited over 25,000 participants. Data from

  5. An association between decreased cardiopulmonary complications (transfusion-related acute lung injury and transfusion-associated circulatory overload) and implementation of universal leukoreduction of blood transfusions.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Neil; Heal, Joanna M; Gettings, Kelly F; Phipps, Richard P; Masel, Debra; Refaai, Majed A; Kirkley, Scott A; Fialkow, L Benjamin

    2010-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary adverse events after transfusion include transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), which are potentially lethal and incompletely understood. To determine whether the incidence of TRALI and TACO was affected by leukoreduction we conducted a retrospective, before-and-after study of acute transfusion reactions for the 7years before and after introduction of universal leukoreduction in 2000, involving 778,559 blood components. Substantial decreases occurred in the rates of TRALI (-83%; from 2.8 cases per 100,000 components before to 0.48 after universal leukoreduction; p=0.01), TACO (-49%; 7.4 to 3.8 cases per 100,000; p=0.03), and febrile reactions (-35%; 11.4 to 7.4 cases per 10,000; p<0.0001). The incidence of allergic reactions remained unchanged (7.0 per 100,000 before and after universal leukoreduction). These outcomes were primarily attributable to decreased TRALI and/or TACO associated with red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) transfusions (-64%) with notably smaller decreases associated with fresh-frozen plasma or cryoprecipitate transfusions (-29%). The incidence of TRALI and/or TACO after 28,120 washed RBC and 69,325 washed transfusions was zero. These data suggest novel hypotheses for further testing in animal models, in prospective clinical trials, and via the new US hemovigilance system: 1) Is TACO or TRALI mitigated by leukoreduction? 2) Is the mechanism of TACO more complex than excessive blood volume? and 3) Does washing mitigate TRALI and TACO due to PLT and RBC transfusions? © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  6. The hospital cost (fiscal year 1991/1992) of a simple perioperative allogeneic red blood cell transfusion during elective surgery at Duke University.

    PubMed

    Lubarsky, D A; Hahn, C; Bennett, D H; Smith, L R; Bredehoeft, S J; Klein, H G; Reves, J G

    1994-10-01

    We sought to determine the actual cost to Duke University Medical Center of a perioperative red blood cell transfusion. A recent audit at Duke University Medical Center determined the base average direct and indirect hospital costs for providing a unit of red blood cells. The Transfusion Service's base cost for providing an allogeneic unit of red blood cells was $113.58. To obtain the actual hospital cost of transfusing a unit of red blood cells in the perioperative period, associated costs were calculated and added to the Transfusion Service's base cost. These associated costs included compatibility tests on multiple units per each unit transfused in the perioperative period, performing ABO and Rh typing and antibody screening on samples from patients who were not subsequently transfused, compatibility tests on units not issued, handling costs of units issued but not used, physically administering the blood, and the cost of the recipient contracting an infectious disease or developing a transfusion reaction. These associated costs increased the cost of transfusing an allogeneic unit of red blood cells in the perioperative period to $151.20. Perhaps the techniques described in the study can be used to quantify cost/benefit ratios associated with future changes in transfusion practice.

  7. Patient blood transfusion management: discharge hemoglobin level as a surrogate marker for red blood cell utilization appropriateness.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Jason; Morrison, Chris; Mohiuddin, Maleeha; Tchatalbachev, Vladislav; Patel, Charmi; Schwickerath, Vicki L; Menitove, Jay E; Singh, Gurmukh

    2012-11-01

    Blood transfusion management strategies minimize transfusion-associated risks, enhance outcomes, and reduce costs. We explored an association of discharge hemoglobin (Hb) with pretransfusion Hb, transfusion indications, and red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. We stipulate that patients with discharge Hb concentrations greater than 10.0 g/dL, or even 9.0 g/dL, received excessive RBC transfusions. We examined aggregate data from five hospitals and for one of the hospitals, the focus hospital, we reviewed patient records for a period of 6 months. Data analyses included number of RBC units transfused and Hb values before transfusion, after transfusion, and at discharge. In aggregate, 27% to 47% patients had discharge Hb levels greater than 10.0 g/dL. At the focus hospital, 27% had a discharge Hb level greater than 10 g/dL and 50.3% had a discharge Hb level greater than 9.0 g/dL. At the focus hospital, the mean Hb trigger for transfusion was a Hb level of 7.3 g/dL; the mean posttransfusion Hb level was 9.3 g/dL and mean discharge Hb level was 9.2 g/dL. Overall, 76% of the transfusions were of an even number of RBC units. In aggregate, overutilization exceeded 20%. At the focus hospital, approximately one-quarter of patients receiving transfusions had a Hb concentration greater than 10.0 g/dL at discharge. Transfused patients' discharge Hb concentration represents an effective indicator for retrospective monitoring of transfusion appropriateness. In light of the large number of patients receiving even number transfusions, reviewing Hb levels after transfusion of each RBC unit could reduce unnecessary transfusions. Retrospective review of discharge Hb data focuses providers on transfusion outcomes and affords an educational opportunity for blood utilization management. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  8. The history of blood transfusion prior to the 20th century--part 2.

    PubMed

    Learoyd, P

    2012-12-01

    Although there are a number of descriptions of 'blood infusion' in antiquity, it was the publication of the discovery of the circulation of blood in 1628 by William Harvey and the work of Christopher Wren and Robert Boyle in 1663 on the infusion of different materials into dogs that paved the way to the possible practical attempts at actual blood transfusion. Although these early experiments, principally by Richard Lower in England and Jean Denis in France provided valuable information regarding inter-species incompatibility and the problems of blood coagulation, it was not until the work of James Blundell in the early part of the 19th century that blood transfusion was used as a means of blood replacement. However, blood transfusion was not to become an accepted therapeutic possibility until the discovery of practical anticoagulation and the ABO blood groups at the start of the 20th century. © 2012 The Author. Transfusion Medicine © 2012 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  9. A Derivation and Validation Study of an Early Blood Transfusion Needs Score for Severe Trauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Umejiego, Johnbosco; Robinson, Richard D; Schrader, Chet D; Leuck, JoAnna; Barra, Michael; Buca, Stefan; Shedd, Andrew; Bui, Andrew; Zenarosa, Nestor R

    2016-08-01

    There is no existing adequate blood transfusion needs determination tool that Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel can use for prehospital blood transfusion initiation. In this study, a simple and pragmatic prehospital blood transfusion needs scoring system was derived and validated. Local trauma registry data were reviewed retrospectively from 2004 through 2013. Patients were randomly assigned to derivation and validation cohorts. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the independent approachable risks associated with early blood transfusion needs in the derivation cohort in which a scoring system was derived. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operational characteristic (AUC) were calculated and compared using both the derivation and validation data. A total of 24,303 patients were included with 12,151 patients in the derivation and 12,152 patients in the validation cohorts. Age, penetrating injury, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) were risks predictive of early blood transfusion needs. An early blood transfusion needs score was derived. A score > 5 indicated risk of early blood transfusion need with a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 80%. A sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 80% were also found in the validation study and their AUC showed no statistically significant difference (AUC of the derivation = 0.87 versus AUC of the validation = 0.86, P > 0.05). An early blood transfusion scoring system was derived and internally validated to predict severe trauma patients requiring blood transfusion during prehospital or initial emergency department resuscitation.

  10. Minimizing blood loss and the need for transfusions in very premature infants

    PubMed Central

    Lemyre, Brigitte; Sample, Megan; Lacaze-Masmonteil, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Reducing blood loss and the need for blood transfusions in extremely preterm infants is part of effective care. Delayed cord clamping is well supported by the evidence and is recommended for infants who do not immediately require resuscitation. Cord milking may be an alternative to delayed cord clamping; however, more research is needed to support its use. In view of concerns regarding the increased risk for cognitive delay, clinicians should avoid using hemoglobin transfusion thresholds lower than those tested in clinical trials. Higher transfusion volumes (15 mL/kg to 20 mL/kg) may decrease exposure to multiple donors. Erythropoietin is not recommended for routine use due to concerns about retinopathy of prematurity. Elemental iron supplementation (2 mg/kg/day to 3 mg/kg/day once full oral feeds are achieved) is recommended to prevent later iron deficiency anemia. Noninvasive monitoring (eg, for carbon dioxide, bilirubin) and point-of-care testing reduce the need for blood sampling. Clinicians should strive to order the minimal amount of blood sampling required for safe patient care, and cluster samplings to avoid unnecessary skin breaks. PMID:26744559

  11. Real-time blood cross-matching sensor for intelligent management of transfusion safety.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanian, M K; Anthony, Steven R

    2004-01-01

    Blood transfusion errors are not uncommon. In some cases the error is fatal. This is primarily due to lack of an automated system at the point of application and over-reliance on bar-coding and paperwork to catch these critical errors. In emergency situations, human errors contribute to transfusion and transplantation of incompatible blood types and organs resulting in rejection and possible fatality. We present a sensing concept that will monitor blood compatibility between the patient and the transfusion bag before allowing the valve to open for transfusion to take place. This will eliminate all transfusion errors and provide 100% safe transfusions automatically. The operating principle of the sensor is based on the light scattering characteristics of dilute blood and the effect of agglutination on scattering. The device proposed is an optical system based on spectrophotometric methods. The device configuration, and results from several tests with combinations of known blood samples will be presented.

  12. Blood transfusion in Europe: basic principles for initial and continuous training in transfusion medicine: an approach to an European harmonisation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, M M; Seifried, E

    2006-11-01

    Over the past few decades, transfusion medicine and haemotherapy have evolved into complex medical disciplines comprising a broad field of subspecialties such as immunohaematology, blood component production, haemapheresis and haemostaseology. Transfusion medicine is thus an important qualification at the interfaces of analytical laboratory medicine, pharmaceutical production and clinical disciplines such as internal medicine, anaesthesiology or surgery. Physicians specialising in transfusion medicine are valuable and competent partners for these related disciplines when it comes to safe, effective and tailored haemotherapy. Why has transfusion medicine become so complex? On the one hand, one can discern problems such as infectious diseases like the HIV disaster in the past century, resulting in guidelines, directives and laws such as the transfusion law in Germany. Thereby, we now enjoy the highest level of blood product safety ever regarding viral transmission thanks to the broad implementation of PCR testing. On the other hand, there are numerous positive reasons for the increasing complexity of transfusion medicine: Modern medical therapies like stem cell transplantation, cellular therapy, transplantation of solid organs, regenerative medicine and surgery cannot exist without a safe supply of blood products and high quality standard as well as special blood products and laboratory services provided by blood banks and transfusion medicine specialists. Good laboratory practice (GLP), good manufacturing practice (GMP), quality management systems and quality control on the pharmaceutical manufacturer's level are only few examples of the standards in today's blood banking. European directives in the field of blood products, stem cell preparations and tissue have led to higher uniform quality standards for biological preparations in a unified Europe, which is the desired outcome, but which also increases the complexity of this field. In contrast, directives 93/16/EEC

  13. Role of the blood transfusion service in tissue banking.

    PubMed

    Warwick, R M; Eastlune, T; Fehily, D

    1996-01-01

    Tissue transplantation and banking are rapidly growing services throughout the world reflecting the widening availability of transplantable cadaver tissue and the mounting clinical indications particularly in orthopaedic, plastic and cardiovascular surgery. In the US tissue banking is more established, yet continues to show a rapid growth profile. In the UK it is currently organised in a variety of different ways and by a number of different organisations. The risks of disease transmission by tissue transplantation are similar to those for blood transfusion and the majority of tissues are grafted during procedures that are not life saving. The danger of disease transmission has resulted in the introduction of legislation in the US which allows the FDA to inspect tissue banks and to recall and destroy tissues. In the UK, there is currently no regulation or inspection of tissue banks to demonstrate that donor selection, tissue processing and tracking are conducted to acceptable standards. Blood transfusion services in the UK, US, New Zealand, Australia and possibly other countries have extended their roles to include organ and tissue donation to varying degrees, with the collection, processing and distribution of bone and tendon allografts most commonly undertaken. They have readily available special capabilities and experience with an established infrastructure, compliant with Good Manufacturing Practice, placing them in an ideal position to provide this service safely and cost-effectively.

  14. [Universal implementation of pathogen inactivation in labile blood products is a major step towards transfusion safety].

    PubMed

    Cazenave, Jean-Pierre

    2010-12-01

    Transfusion of labile blood products (red cell concentrates, platelet concentrates and plasma) is vital in the absence of alternatives. Patients and doctors have always feared infections transmitted by blood, blood components and blood-derived drugs. It is potentially dangerous to delay implementation of pathogen inactivation in labile blood products pending a perfect process. Universal implementation of pathogen inactivation in labile blood products is a major step towards transfusion safety.

  15. Awareness and performance of blood transfusion standards in operating rooms of Shiraz hospitals in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Robati, R; Mirahmadi Nejad, E

    2015-01-01

    Background Assuring safety and survival of blood in vitro depends on anti-coagulation substances, blood bag characteristics, storage conditions, and transport of blood. Besides, careful selection and screening of donors as well as blood tests can minimize the transmission risk of blood-transmissible pathogens and optimize blood health. The aim of this study was to assay the level of knowledge and practices among anesthesia technicians on blood transfusion standards. Materials and Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed among 85 anesthesia technicians Shiraz, Iran throughout 2012 who were examined by census using blood transfusion questionnaires and checklists. The data were analyzed using SPSS 16 software. Results The obtained findings indicated that 32.44% of the technicians have corrected knowledge of blood transfusion standards; nevertheless, 73.84% have corrected performance. Conclusions The technicians mostly performed based on their habit and experience. However, their knowledge about blood transfusion and blood bag storage was low. PMID:26131349

  16. Can mHealth improve access to safe blood for transfusion during obstetric emergency?

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Aminur; Akhter, Sadika; Nisha, Monjura Khatun; Islam, Syed Shariful; Ashraf, Fatema; Rahman, Monjur; Begum, Nazneen; Chowdhury, Mahbub Elahi; Austin, Anne; Anwar, Iqbal

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Of the 99% maternal deaths that take place in developing countries, one-fourth is due to postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). PPH accounts for one-third of all blood transfusions in Bangladesh where the transfusion process is lengthy as most facilities do not have in-house blood bank facilities. In this context, the location where blood is obtained and the processes of obtaining blood products are not standardized, leading to preventable delays in collecting blood, when it is needed. This study evaluated the effectiveness of an online Blood Information Management Application (BIMA) system for reducing lag time in the blood transfusion process. Patients and methods The study was conducted in a public medical college hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and in two proximate, licensed blood banks between January 2014 and March 2015, using a before after design. A total of 310 women (143 before and 177 after), who needed emergency blood transfusion during their perinatal period, as determined by a medical professional, were included in the study. A median linear regression model was employed to assess the adjusted effect of BIMA on transfusion time. Results After the introduction of BIMA, the median duration between the identified need for blood and blood transfusion reduced from 152 to 122 minutes (P<0.05). For PPH specifically, the reduction was from 175 to 113 minutes (P<0.05). After introducing BIMA and after adjusting for criteria such as maternal age, education, parity, duty roster of providers, and reasons for blood transfusion, a 24 minute reduction in the time was observed between the identified need for blood and transfusion (P<0.001). Conclusion BIMA was effective in reducing delays in blood transfusion for emergency obstetric patients. This pilot study suggests that implementing BIMA is one mechanism that has the potential to streamline blood transfusion systems in Bangladesh. PMID:28461767

  17. Red blood cell transfusion, hyperkalemia, and heart failure in advanced chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gill, Karminder; Fink, Jeffrey C; Gilbertson, David T; Monda, Keri L; Muntner, Paul; Lafayette, Richard A; Petersen, Jeffrey; Chertow, Glenn M; Bradbury, Brian D

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, the use of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion for the treatment of chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related anemia has increased. We used the OptumInsight medical claims database to study the association between receiving a transfusion and hyperkalemia and heart failure events. Persons 18-64 years of age with diagnosed stage 4 or 5 CKD (not requiring dialysis) between 2006 and 2010 were followed until their first hospitalization or emergency room visit with a diagnosis of hyperkalemia or heart failure, termination of insurance coverage, or death. We used a case-only design and conditional logistic regression to estimate rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) describing associations between RBC transfusion and the risks of hyperkalemia or heart failure. We used single (1:1) and variable (1:m) self-control matching intervals, with adjustment for time-varying confounders. Seven thousand eight hundred twenty-nine individuals met our inclusion criteria; two-thirds were age 50 years or older; 43% were women and 51% had diabetes. Rates of hyperkalemia and heart failure were 7.9/100 person-years (95%CI: 7.3, 8.5) and 16.3/100 person-years (95%CI: 15.5, 17.2), respectively. RBC transfusion was associated with an increased risk of both hyperkalemia (single interval matched RR = 12.0, 95%CI: 1.3, 109; multiple interval matched RR = 6.1, 95%CI: 2.5, 15.1) and heart failure (single interval matched RR = 1.7, 95%CI: 0.3, 9.2; multiple interval matched RR = 3.8, 95%CI: 1.4, 10.3). In patients with advanced CKD, RBC transfusion appears to be associated with an elevated risk of hyperkalemia and heart failure; further investigation into these risks is warranted. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Transmission of HIV by transfusion of HIV-screened blood: the value of a national register. The 'Recipients' Study Group of the French Society of Blood Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Courtois, F; Jullien, A M; Chenais, F; Noel, L; Pinon, F

    1992-03-01

    A National Register of transfusion-transmitted infections was opened by the French Society of Blood Transfusion on 1 October, 1986. Out of 54 initially reported cases of HIV-infection, allegedly transmitted by blood components, further investigation could be completed in 33 cases. The transfusional origin of contamination was considered as established or probable in 28/33 cases, either because a potentially infectious unit was identified among those transfused to the recipient (23/28), or because the recipient was known to be seronegative before transfusion (5/28), or both (10/28). In 5/33 cases transfusion was considered as presumably responsible for contamination because no other risk factor was found in the recipient. Among the 33 documented cases of HIV-transmission by screened blood, 29 (88%) occurred between 1985 and 1987, and four (12%) during 1988. Out of 19 implicated donors later found seropositive, 16 belonged to a high-risk group for HIV-infection. The majority of HIV-infections occurred as a consequence of blood donation in the window period between contamination and the appearance of detectable antibodies in the donor's serum (11/19). In three instances, however, human and operational errors led to the release of seropositive units. We conclude that the main value of this Register is to provide a potential trend-indicator of transfusion-related infectious risks, to allow objective documentation of reported cases and to contribute to the improvement of blood transfusion practice.

  19. Consequences of Transfusing Blood Components in Patients With Trauma: A Conceptual Model.

    PubMed

    Jones, Allison R; Frazier, Susan K

    2017-04-01

    Transfusion of blood components is often required in resuscitation of patients with major trauma. Packed red blood cells and platelets break down and undergo chemical changes during storage (known as the storage lesion) that lead to an inflammatory response once the blood components are transfused to patients. Although some evidence supports a detrimental association between transfusion and a patient's outcome, the mechanisms connecting transfusion of stored components to outcomes remain unclear. The purpose of this review is to provide critical care nurses with a conceptual model to facilitate understanding of the relationship between the storage lesion and patients' outcomes after trauma; outcomes related to trauma, hemorrhage, and blood component transfusion are grouped according to those occurring in the short-term (≤30 days) and the long-term (>30 days). Complete understanding of these clinical implications is critical for practitioners in evaluating and treating patients given transfusions after traumatic injury.

  20. [Blood transfusion via the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit: the anesthesiologist point of view].

    PubMed

    Durand, M; Rossi-Blancher, M; Poquet, C

    2014-04-01

    Cardiac surgery frequently requires blood transfusion. The use of transfusion should be restricted due to side effects. Blood transfusion via the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit is easy and allows a fast transfusion. The administration of packed red cells is relatively frequent because of the CPB-induced hemodilution and of the higher rate of postoperative complications when the haematocrit during CPB decreases below 20%. This transfusion of packed red cells does not seem to be associated with complications during CPB. Platelet transfusion during bypass is illogical because of the destruction of platelets during CPB and must be avoided. Fresh frozen plasma transfusion during CPB is seldom indicated but is possible. It could reverse heparin resistance.

  1. Massive transfusion and blood product use in the pediatric trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Dehmer, Jeffrey J; Adamson, William T

    2010-11-01

    Hemorrhagic shock in the pediatric trauma patient is an uncommon but fundamental problem for the treating clinician. Current management of hemorrhagic shock involves initial resuscitation with crystalloid fluids followed by infusion of blood components as necessary. In management of the adult trauma patient, many institutions have implemented massive transfusion protocols to guide transfusion in situations requiring or anticipating the use of greater than 10 U of packed red blood cells. In the pediatric population, guidelines for massive transfusion are vague or nonexistent. Adult trauma transfusion protocols can be applied to children until a pediatric protocol is validated. Here, we attempt to identify certain principles of transfusion therapy specific to pediatric trauma and outline a sample pediatric massive transfusion protocol that may be used to guide resuscitation. Also, adjuncts to transfusion, such as colloid fluids, other plasma expanders or hemoglobin substitutes, and recombinant activated factor VII, are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Allogeneic versus autologous blood transfusion and survival after radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chalfin, Heather J.; Frank, Steven M.; Feng, Zhaoyong; Trock, Bruce J.; Drake, Charles G.; Partin, Alan W.; Humphreys, Elizabeth; Ness, Paul M.; Jeong, Byong C.; Lee, Seung B.; Han, Misop

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Potential adverse effects of blood transfusion (BT) remain controversial, especially for clinical outcomes after curative cancer surgery. Some postulate that immune modulation after allogeneic BT predisposes to recurrence and death, but autologous superiority is not established. This study assessed whether BT is associated with long-term prostate cancer recurrence and survival a large single-institutional radical prostatectomy (RP) database. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Between 1994 and 2012, a total of 11,680 patients had RP with available outcome and transfusion data. A total of 7443 (64%) had complete covariate data. Clinical variables associated with biochemical recurrence-free survival (BRFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were identified with Cox proportional hazards models for three groups: no BT (reference, 27.7%, n = 2061), autologous BT only (68.8%, n = 5124), and any allogeneic BT (with or without autologous, 3.5%, n = 258). RESULTS Median (range) follow-up was 6 (1–18) years. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed significantly decreased OS (but not BRFS or PCSS) in the allogeneic group versus autologous and no BT groups (p = 0.006). With univariate analysis, any allogeneic BT had a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.29 (range, 1.52–3.46; p < 0.0001) for OS, whereas autologous BT was not significant (HR, 1.04 [range, 0.82–1.32], p = 0.752). In multivariable models, neither autologous nor allogeneic BT was independently associated with BRFS, CSS, or OS, and a dose response was not observed for allogeneic units and BRFS. CONCLUSION Although allogeneic but not autologous BT was associated with decreased long-term OS, after adjustment for confounding clinical variables, BT was not independently associated with OS, BRFS, or CSS regardless of transfusion type. Notably, no association was observed between allogeneic BT and cancer recurrence. Observed differences in OS may reflect confounding. PMID:24601996

  3. Red blood cell transfusion in critically ill children: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Istaphanous, George K; Wheeler, Derek S; Lisco, Steven J; Shander, Aryeh

    2011-03-01

    To review the pathophysiology of anemia, as well as transfusion-related complications and indications for red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, in critically ill children. Although allogeneic blood has become increasingly safer from infectious agents, mounting evidence indicates that RBC transfusions are associated with complications and unfavorable outcomes. As a result, there has been growing interest and efforts to limit RBC transfusion, and indications are being revisited and revamped. Although a so-called restrictive RBC transfusion strategy has been shown to improve morbidity and mortality in critically ill adults, there have been relatively few studies on RBC transfusion performed in critically ill children. Published literature on transfusion medicine and outcomes of RBC transfusion. STUDY SELECTION, DATA EXTRACTION, AND SYNTHESIS: After a brief overview of physiology of oxygen transportation, anemia compensation, and current transfusion guidelines based on available literature, risks and outcomes of transfusion in general and in critically ill children are summarized in conjunction with studies investigating the safety of restrictive transfusion strategies in this patient population. The available evidence does not support the extensive use of RBC transfusions in general or critically ill patients. Transfusions are still associated with risks, and although their benefits are established in limited situations, the associated negative outcomes in many more patients must be closely addressed. Given the frequency of anemia and its proven negative outcomes, transfusion decisions in the critically ill children should be based on individual patient's characteristics rather than generalized triggers, with consideration of potential risks and benefits, and available blood conservation strategies that can reduce transfusion needs.

  4. A successful experience of the Iranian blood transfusion organization in improving accessibility and affordability of plasma derived medicine.

    PubMed

    Chegini, Azita; Torab, Seyed Ardeshir; Pourfatollah, Ali Akbar

    2017-02-01

    Plasma is the liquid part of blood. It is estimated 21.6 million liters of plasma collect from Whole blood annually. From these plasma, 4.2 million liters transfuse, 8.1 million liters fractionate, 9.3 million liters waste. Nowadays, blood products and PDM (plasma derived medicine) consider as essential medicine in modern health care and transfusion medicine. Iranian blood transfusion organization as a non-profit organization was established in 1974 in order to centralize all blood transfusion activities from donor recruitment to distribution of blood components to hospitals. Iran is the only country in EMR region with the rate of 20-29.9 blood donations per 1000 population and reached 100% voluntary non-remunerated blood donation in 2007. RBCs and platelets demand are much more than FFPs so the IBTO was faced the surplus plasma that could cause surplus plasma wastage. Simultaneously, hospitals need more plasma derived medicine especially albumin, IVIG, factor VIII, factor IX. IBTO was faced the challenges such as Fractionators selection, Plasma volume shipment, Contract duration, Product profile, Multiple External audits, Cold chain maintenance, Transporting plasma across international borders, NAT test. To overcome plasma wastage and storage of PDM. IBTO involved toll manufacturing in 2005 and not only prevents plasma wastage but also save MOH (ministry of health) budget.

  5. Timing and Location of Blood Product Transfusion and Outcomes in Massively Transfused Combat Casualties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    EVIDENCE: Therapeutic study, level III. KEY WORDS: Apheresis platelets ; resuscitation; massive transfusion; combat trauma. S ince Damage Control surgery...patient mor- tality associated with increased transfusion of apheresis pla- telets (aPLT) led the United States Army Surgeon General to mandate platelet ...4. Perkins JG, Cap AP, Spinella PC, et al. An evaluation of the impact of apheresis platelets used in the setting of massively transfused trauma

  6. Bacterial contamination of blood and blood components in three major blood transfusion centers, Accra, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Adjei, Andrew Anthony; Kuma, George Khumalo; Tettey, Yao; Ayeh-Kumi, Patrick Ferdinand; Opintan, Japheth; Apeagyei, Francis; Ankrah, Jacob Otinkorang; Adiku, Theophilus Korku; Narter-Olaga, Edwin Gbli

    2009-07-01

    Reports from studies conducted in several countries indicate a high incidence of bacterial contamination of donor blood. The prevalence of bacterial contamination of blood and its products in Ghana is not known. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of bacterial contamination of blood and its products at the three major blood transfusion centers in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana. Stored whole blood and its products were cultured on different media, and isolates were identified using standard biochemical and bacteriological methods. The susceptibility of the isolates to selected antimicrobial agents was also determined by the disc diffusion method. The overall prevalence rate was 9% (28/303; whole blood, 13% [24/192]; plasma, 3% [2/79]; platelet, 9% [2/22]). The Gram-positive bacteria isolated were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, S. aureus, and Bacillus spp., and the Gram-negative organisms were Yersinia enterocolitica, Citrobacter freundii, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The Gram-positive bacteria were sensitive to cloxacillin, erythromycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin but resistant to penicillin, ampicillin, cefuroxime, and cotrimoxazole, while the Gram-negative bacteria were sensitive to amikacin and gentamicin but resistant to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, ampicillin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime (except Y. enterocolitica), and cotrimoxazole. Our results suggest that bacterial contamination of blood and its products is prevalent in Ghana.

  7. Blood transfusion at the time of the First World War--practice and promise at the birth of transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Boulton, F; Roberts, D J

    2014-12-01

    The centenary of the start of the First World War has stirred considerable interest in the political, social, military and human factors of the time and how they interacted to produce and sustain the material and human destruction in the 4 years of the war and beyond. Medical practice may appear distant and static and perhaps seems to have been somewhat ineffectual in the face of so much trauma and in the light of the enormous advances in medicine and surgery over the last century. However, this is an illusion of time and of course medical, surgical and psychiatric knowledge and procedures were developing rapidly at the time and the war years accelerated implementation of many important advances. Transfusion practice lay at the heart of resuscitation, and although direct transfusion from donor to recipient was still used, Geoffrey Keynes from Britain, Oswald Robertson from America and his namesake Lawrence Bruce Robertson from Canada, developed methods for indirect transfusion from donor to recipient by storing blood in bottles and also blood-banking that laid the foundation of modern transfusion medicine. This review explores the historical setting behind the development of blood transfusion up to the start of the First World War and on how they progressed during the war and afterwards. A fresh look may renew interest in how a novel medical speciality responded to the needs of war and of post-war society.

  8. Improving blood transfusion practice by regular education in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Sajwani, F H

    2012-07-01

    A cross-match to transfused unit ratio of less than 2.0 is frequently used to assess performance in many hospital blood banks. This brief report was initiated to evaluate the practice at a local hospital and to emphasize the importance of regular educational sessions to improve blood transfusion practice. Retrospective data on cross-match : transfused (C : T) ratio of all departments was collected and educational sessions were given to improve practice. Thereafter, a new set of data was collected and change in practice was assessed. Initial data showed total (C : T) ratio of 1.95. After medical staff education, analysis showed clinically significant improvement in blood utilization practice with a (C : T) ratio of 1.60. This brief report indicates the importance of regular physician education, the potential role of blood transfusion committee, and the need to implement clear guidelines for blood transfusion. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  9. Is homologous blood transfusion a risk factor for infection after hip replacement?

    PubMed Central

    Steinitz, Dan; Harvey, Edward J.; Leighton, Ross K.; Petrie, David P.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To assess the risk of postoperative infection associated with blood transfusion in patients who undergo primary total hip arthroplasty. Design A retrospective cohort study. Setting Victoria General Hospital, Halifax, (a tertiary-care centre). Patients All patients who underwent primary total hip replacement between 1990 and 1995 (N = 1206). Interventions Hip replacement with or without perioperative blood transfusion. Outcome measures The rate of postoperative infection, the number of blood transfusions, patient age and sex, duration of surgery and the surgeon who performed the procedure. Victoria General Hospital medical records, the transfusion services record and the Dalhousie University Hip Study databases were integrated and analyzed using a standard statistical package. Results The incidence of infection postoperative was 9.9% overall, 8.4% in patients receiving no transfusion, and 14% in those receiving homologous transfusion (p = 0.035). There were no infections in the 11 patients who received an autologous blood transfusion. Significant predictors of postoperative infection were sex, age and duration of surgery; these were not confounding variables (χ2 multivariate analysis). Neither the operating surgeon nor the blood product transfused affected the infection rate. Conclusions These findings suggest an increased risk of postoperative infection in patients who undergo primary hip replacement and receive homologous blood transfusions perioperatively. PMID:11603748

  10. Analysis of immediate transfusion incidents reported in a regional blood bank

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa Neto, Adriana Lemos; Barbosa, Maria Helena

    2011-01-01

    Background Blood transfusion is imperative when treating certain patients; however, it is not risk free. In addition to the possible transmission of contagious infectious diseases, incidents can occur immediately after transfusion and at a later time. Aims This study aimed to examine the immediate transfusion incidents reported in a regional blood bank in the state of Minas Gerais between December 2006 and December 2009. A retrospective quantitative epidemiological study was conducted. Data were obtained from 202 transfusion incident reports of 42 health institutions served by the blood bank. Data processing and analysis were carried out using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Results The rate of immediate transfusion incidents reported in the period was 0.24%; febrile non-hemolytic reactions were the most common type of incident (56.4%). The most frequent clinical manifestations listed in transfusion incident reports were chills (26.9%) and fever (21.6%). There was a statistically significant association (p-value < 0.05) between the infusion of platelet concentrates and febrile non-hemolytic reactions and between fresh frozen plasma and febrile non-hemolytic reaction. The majority (73.3%) of transfused patients who suffered immediate transfusion incidents had already been transfused and 36.5% of the cases had previous transfusion incident reports. Conclusions Data from the present study corroborate the implementation of new professional training programs aimed at blood transfusion surveillance. These measures should emphasize prevention, identification and reporting of immediate transfusion incidents aiming to increase blood transfusion quality and safety. PMID:23049336

  11. Anaphylactic reaction after autologous blood transfusion: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shailendra; Goyal, Keshav; Dubey, Surya; Bindra, Ashish; Kedia, Shweta

    2015-01-01

    Autologous blood transfusion as a cause of intraoperative anaphylaxis is very rare. We encountered one such life-threatening event in a 72-year-old patient undergoing laminectomy and pedicle screw fixation. The probable cause identified was the floseal mixed autologous blood transfusion. Review of literature has been done, and measures to avoid such an event in the future are discussed. PMID:25972952

  12. Protocol for a national blood transfusion data warehouse from donor to recipient

    PubMed Central

    van Hoeven, Loan R; Hooftman, Babette H; Janssen, Mart P; de Bruijne, Martine C; de Vooght, Karen M K; Kemper, Peter; Koopman, Maria M W

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Blood transfusion has health-related, economical and safety implications. In order to optimise the transfusion chain, comprehensive research data are needed. The Dutch Transfusion Data warehouse (DTD) project aims to establish a data warehouse where data from donors and transfusion recipients are linked. This paper describes the design of the data warehouse, challenges and illustrative applications. Study design and methods Quantitative data on blood donors (eg, age, blood group, antibodies) and products (type of product, processing, storage time) are obtained from the national blood bank. These are linked to data on the transfusion recipients (eg, transfusions administered, patient diagnosis, surgical procedures, laboratory parameters), which are extracted from hospital electronic health records. Applications Expected scientific contributions are illustrated for 4 applications: determine risk factors, predict blood use, benchmark blood use and optimise process efficiency. For each application, examples of research questions are given and analyses planned. Conclusions The DTD project aims to build a national, continuously updated transfusion data warehouse. These data have a wide range of applications, on the donor/production side, recipient studies on blood usage and benchmarking and donor–recipient studies, which ultimately can contribute to the efficiency and safety of blood transfusion. PMID:27491665

  13. Protocol for a national blood transfusion data warehouse from donor to recipient.

    PubMed

    van Hoeven, Loan R; Hooftman, Babette H; Janssen, Mart P; de Bruijne, Martine C; de Vooght, Karen M K; Kemper, Peter; Koopman, Maria M W

    2016-08-04

    Blood transfusion has health-related, economical and safety implications. In order to optimise the transfusion chain, comprehensive research data are needed. The Dutch Transfusion Data warehouse (DTD) project aims to establish a data warehouse where data from donors and transfusion recipients are linked. This paper describes the design of the data warehouse, challenges and illustrative applications. Quantitative data on blood donors (eg, age, blood group, antibodies) and products (type of product, processing, storage time) are obtained from the national blood bank. These are linked to data on the transfusion recipients (eg, transfusions administered, patient diagnosis, surgical procedures, laboratory parameters), which are extracted from hospital electronic health records. Expected scientific contributions are illustrated for 4 applications: determine risk factors, predict blood use, benchmark blood use and optimise process efficiency. For each application, examples of research questions are given and analyses planned. The DTD project aims to build a national, continuously updated transfusion data warehouse. These data have a wide range of applications, on the donor/production side, recipient studies on blood usage and benchmarking and donor-recipient studies, which ultimately can contribute to the efficiency and safety of blood transfusion. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Red blood cell transfusion practices in very low birth weight infants in 1990s postsurfactant era.

    PubMed Central

    Beeram, M. R.; Krauss, D. R.; Riggs, M. W.

    2001-01-01

    The purposes of this study are (1) to evaluate the practice of red blood cell transfusions in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants (between 501 to 1500 g) during the postsurfactant era of the 1990s; and (2) to evaluate if there is a decreasing trend in red cell transfusions in the 1990s. Database and medical records of VLBW infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) between January 1990 and December 1995 at Scott & White Clinic, Temple, Texas, were reviewed. Five hundred twenty-seven infants were admitted to the NICU, excluding 5 infants that were transferred out for possible cardiac surgery or for other reasons. Fifty one (9.7%) of these infants died prior to discharge. Hence, data from 476 survivors were reviewed for red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. Transfusions were given at the discretion of the attending neonatologist. None of the infants received erythropoietin. Of the 476 infants, 289 (61%) received RBC transfusions during the hospital stay, with 2.7+/-3.6 transfusions per infant with a volume of 40.5+/-50.4 mL/kg. Smaller infants required significantly more transfusions compared to larger infants when divided into 250-g subgroups. No statistically significant difference was noted in the number of RBC transfusions per infant or number of infants transfused during the 6-year period from year to year. We conclude that VLBW infants in the 1990s postsurfactant era required 2.7 RBC transfusions per infant, on average, with the smallest infants requiring the most transfusions. These data will be helpful to counsel mothers in preterm labor regarding the need of transfusions for each birth weight category. Red cell transfusion practice has not changed over this 6-year period in the 1990s. Additional measures such as erythropoietin or even stricter transfusion criteria may be necessary to decrease transfusions further. However, safety of such measures should be carefully evaluated. PMID:11688921

  15. Predictive factors for red blood cell transfusion in children undergoing noncomplex cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Mulaj, Muj; Faraoni, David; Willems, Ariane; Sanchez Torres, Cristel; Van der Linden, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is frequently required in pediatric cardiac surgery and is associated with altered outcome and increased costs. Determining which factors predict transfusion in this context will enable clinicians to adopt strategies that will reduce the risk of RBC transfusion. This study aimed to assess predictive factors associated with RBC transfusion in children undergoing low-risk cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Children undergoing surgery to repair ventricular septal defect or atrioventricular septal defect from 2006 to 2011 were included in this retrospective study. Demography, preoperative laboratory testing, intraoperative data, and RBC transfusion were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to define factors that were able to predict RBC transfusion. Then, we employed receiver operating characteristic analysis to design a predictive score. Among the 334 children included, 261 (78%) were transfused. Age (<18 months), priming volume of the CPB (>43 mL/kg), type of oxygenator used, minimal temperature reached during CPB (<32°C), and preoperative hematocrit (<34%) were independently associated with RBC transfusion in the studied population. A predictive score 2 or greater was the best predictor of RBC transfusion. The present study identified several factors that were significantly associated with perioperative RBC transfusion. Based on these factors, we designed a predictive score that can be used to develop a patient-based blood management program with the aim of reducing the incidence of RBC transfusion. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Red blood cell alloimmunization among sickle cell Kuwaiti Arab patients who received red blood cell transfusion.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Reem; Al Shemmari, Salem; Al-Bashir, Abdulaziz

    2009-08-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is common in the Arabian Gulf region. Most cases require a red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, increasing the potential for RBC alloantibody development. The incidence of RBC alloimmunization among Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients is not yet known. This study retrospectively assessed the effect of using two different matching protocols on the incidence of alloimmunization among multiply transfused Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients. A total of 233 Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients were divided into two groups: Group 1 (n = 110) received RBC transfusion through standard ABO- and D-matched nonleukoreduced blood; Group 2 (n = 123) received RBCs matched for ABO, Rh, and K1 poststorage-leukoreduced blood. Multivariate analysis was performed on the factors associated with RBC alloimmunization and antibody specificity. Sixty-five percent of patients in Group 1 developed clinically significant RBC alloantibody with an increased prevalence in females; in patients in Group 2, 23.6% developed RBC alloantibodies (p = 0.01). In Group 1, 72 patients (65.5%) had alloantibodies directed against Rh and Kell systems (p = 0.01). Multivariate analysis further confirmed the results, showing that blood transfusion type and sex have significant effects on the rate of alloimmunizations. This study confirms the importance of selecting RBCs matched for Rh and Kell to reduce the risk of alloimmunizations among Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients.

  17. Prevalence of HLA antibodies in remotely transfused or alloexposed volunteer blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Kakaiya, Ram M.; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Wright, David J.; Steele, Whitney R.; Kleinman, Steven H.; Busch, Michael P.; Norris, Philip J.; Hillyer, Christopher D.; Gottschall, Jerome L.; Rios, Jorge A.; Carey, Patricia; Glynn, Simone A.

    2010-01-01

    Background HLA antibody testing of previously transfused or pregnant donors may help reduce the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). However, the prevalence of HLA antibodies in transfused donors has not been well characterized. Methods Transfusion and pregnancy history was obtained from consenting donors. HLA Class I & II antibody testing was performed by multi-antigen bead Luminex platform. Cut off values for class I & II antibodies used normalized background ratio of 10.8 and 6.9 respectively. Linear probability models were used to evaluate potential associations between HLA alloimmunization and donor characteristics. Results 7,920 donors (2,086 males and 5,834 females) were tested. HLA antibody prevalence did not significantly differ between 895 transfused (1.7%) and 1138 non-transfused males (1.0%), [odds ratio (OR) 1.75; 95% CI 0.80, 3.82]. Prevalence in 45 transfused nulliparous females (4.4%, 95% CI 0.1%, 11.8%) was not statistically different from the 1.6% prevalence in 1732 non-transfused nulliparous females (odds ratio 2.94, 95% CI 0.68, 12.74). Transfused parous females had higher prevalence than non-transfused counterparts (p=0.004), odds ratio 1.39 (95% CI 1.07, 1.80). In a linear probability model, the estimated additive risk of transfusion-induced alloimmunization was only 0.8% (95% CI -0.2%, 1.8%), (p=0.10). Donor transfusion history showed that 58% of transfusions occurred >10 years previously. Conclusion Transfused volunteer blood donors do not appear to have a significantly higher prevalence of HLA antibodies than their non-transfused counterparts. Thus, in an effort to reduce TRALI risk, ascertaining past history of transfusion and testing these donors for HLA antibodies is not necessary. PMID:20070615

  18. The lost art of whole blood transfusion in austere environments.

    PubMed

    Strandenes, Geir; Hervig, Tor A; Bjerkvig, Christopher K; Williams, Steve; Eliassen, Håkon S; Fosse, Theodor K; Torvanger, Hans; Cap, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    The optimal resuscitation fluid for uncontrolled bleeding and hemorrhagic shock in both pre- and in-hospital settings has been an ongoing controversy for decades. Hemorrhage continues to be a major cause of death in both the civilian and military trauma population, and survival depends on adequacy of hemorrhage control and resuscitation between onset of bleeding and arrival at a medical treatment facility. The terms far-forward and austere are defined, respectively, as the environment where professional health care providers normally do not operate and a setting in which basic equipment and capabilities necessary for resuscitation are often not available. The relative austerity of a treatment setting may be a function of timing rather than just location, as life-saving interventions must be performed quickly before hemorrhagic shock becomes irreversible. Fresh whole blood transfusions in the field may be a feasible life-saving procedure when facing significant hemorrhage.

  19. Red cell exchange to mitigate a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient transfused with incompatible red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Irani, Mehraboon S; Karafin, Matthew S; Ernster, Luke

    2017-02-01

    A red cell exchange was performed to prevent a potentially fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient with anti-e who was transfused with e-antigen unscreened red blood cells during liver transplant surgery. A 64-year-old woman with cirrhosis due to hepatitis C was scheduled to receive a liver transplant. She had a previously documented anti-e, an antibody to the Rh(e)-antigen that is known to cause delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions. Pre-operatively and intra-operatively, she had massive hemorrhage which required transfusion of 34 e-antigen unscreened red blood cells (RBCs) most of which were incompatible. The hemoglobin dropped from 9.1 g/dL on post-operative day (POD)1 to 6.6 g/dL on POD6, with no evidence of blood loss. The bilirubin also increased from 5.0 mg/dL on POD 1 to 11.0 mg/dL on POD 6. As she was also becoming more hemodynamically unstable, a red cell exchange with 10 units of e-negative RBCs was performed on POD 6. She improved clinically and was extubated the following day. A few residual transfused e-positive red cells were detected after the red cell exchange until POD 13. This case illustrates how a red cell exchange can mitigate the potentially harmful effects of a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction caused by red cell antibodies. With massive intraoperative blood loss it may not be possible to have antigen-negative RBCs immediately available, particularly for the e-antigen, which is present in 98% of the donor population. The ability to perform such a procedure may be life-saving in such patients. J. Clin. Apheresis 32:59-61, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Is there a "magic" hemoglobin number? Clinical decision support promoting restrictive blood transfusion practices.

    PubMed

    Goodnough, Lawrence Tim; Shah, Neil

    2015-10-01

    Blood transfusion has been identified as one of the most frequently performed therapeutic procedures, with a significant percentage of transfusions identified to be inappropriate. Recent key clinical trials in adults have provided Level 1 evidence to support restrictive red blood cell (RBC) transfusion practices. However, some advocates have attempted to identify a "correct" Hb threshold for RBC transfusion; whereas others assert that management of anemia, including transfusion decisions, must take into account clinical patient variables, rather than simply one diagnostic laboratory test. The heterogeneity of guidelines for blood transfusion by a number of medical societies reflects this controversy. Clinical decision support (CDS) uses a Hb threshold number in a smart Best Practices Alert (BPA) upon physician order, to trigger a concurrent utilization self-review for whether blood transfusion therapy is appropriate. This review summarizes Level 1 evidence in seven key clinical trials in adults that support restrictive transfusion practices, along strategies made possible by CDS that have demonstrated value in improving blood utilization by promoting restrictive transfusion practices.

  1. Blood Thinners - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Blood Thinners URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bloodthinners.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  2. Blood Sugar - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Blood Sugar URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bloodsugar.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  3. Death due to blood transfusion-induced anaphylactic shock: A case report.

    PubMed

    Nara, Akina; Aki, Toshihiko; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Uchida, Kyoko; Nakayama, Haruka; Uemura, Koichi

    2010-05-01

    In medical practice, many clinical accidents due to blood transfusion reactions have been reported, among which, nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (NHTRs) have been mainly reported in recent years. NHTRs induce reactions such as anaphylactic shock and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI); however, few forensic autopsy case reports with blood transfusion reactions including anaphylactic shock have been published. A marker for anaphylactic shock is serum tryptase, which indicates systematic mast cell activation in living patients. In forensic medicine, serum tryptase has been used in the postmortem diagnosis of anaphylactic shock. In this autopsy case report, the blood tryptase level was elevated to 49.0 ng/mL (reference standard level <13.5 ng/mL). When considered comprehensively with autopsy findings and blood typing, we concluded that this patient was suspected to have suffered from anaphylactic shock as a result of blood transfusion. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. How we manage AB plasma inventory in the blood center and transfusion service.

    PubMed

    Yazer, Mark; Eder, Anne F; Land, Kevin J

    2013-08-01

    The growing use of group AB plasma in the United States in recent years poses unique challenges to blood centers and transfusion services. Blood centers must collect sufficient plasma components from a limited pool of group AB donors while taking steps to improve transfusion safety that further restricts the available supply. Transfusion services, on the other hand, must use the finite resource in the most conscientious and medically appropriate manner. Recently, many investigations have challenged long-held beliefs about transfusion practice and appropriate indications for blood components across a variety of specialties. Balancing supply and demand of group AB plasma requires collaboration between blood suppliers and transfusion services, and opportunities for improvement exist on both sides of the equation. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  5. The Case for a Conservative Approach to Blood Transfusion Management in Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Tyler; Paone, Gaetano; Emery, Robert W; Ferraris, Victor A

    2016-01-01

    Limiting blood transfusion in cardiac operations is a well-meaning goal of perioperative care. Potential benefits include decreasing morbidity and limiting procedural costs. It is difficult to identify transfusion as the cause of adverse outcomes. The need for transfusion may identify a sicker patient population at greater risk for a worse outcome that may or may not be related to the transfusion. We reviewed the indications for and adverse effects of blood transfusion in patients undergoing cardiac procedures to provide a balanced approach to management of blood resources in this population. We reviewed current literature, including systematic reviews and practice guidelines, to synthesize a practice management plan in patients having cardiac operations. Several prospective randomized studies and large population cohort studies compared a postoperative restrictive transfusion policy to a more liberal policy and found very little difference in outcomes but decreased costs with a restrictive policy. Evidence-based practice guidelines and implementation standards provide robust intervention plans that can limit harmful effects of transfusion and provide safe and effective procedure outcomes. A restrictive transfusion policy seems to be safe and effective but does not necessarily provide better outcome in most patient cohorts. The implications of these findings suggest that many discretionary transfusions could be avoided. A subset of high-risk patients could undoubtedly benefit from a more liberal transfusion policy, but the definition of high risk is ill defined.

  6. An evidence-based approach to red blood cell transfusions in asymptomatically anaemic patients

    PubMed Central

    Chan, AW; de Gara, CJ

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgeons and physicians encounter blood transfusions on a daily basis but a robust evidence-based strategy on indications and timing of transfusion in asymptomatic anaemic patients is yet to be determined. For judicious use of blood products, the risks inherent to packed red blood cells, the patient’s co-morbidities and haemoglobin (Hb)/haematocrit levels should be considered. This review critiques and summarises the latest available evidence on the indications for transfusions in healthy and cardiac disease patients as well as the timing of transfusions relative to surgery. Methods An electronic literature search of the MEDLINE®, Google Scholar™ and Trip databases was conducted for articles published in English between January 2006 and January 2015. Studies discussing timing and indications of transfusion in medical and surgical patients were retrieved. Bibliographies of studies were checked for other pertinent articles that were missed by the initial search. Findings Six level 1 studies (randomised controlled trials or systematic reviews) and six professional society guidelines were included in this review. In healthy patients without cardiac disease, a restrictive transfusion trigger of Hb 70–80g/l is safe and appropriate whereas in cardiac patients, the trigger is Hb 80–100g/l. The literature on timing of transfusions relative to surgery is limited. For the studies available, preoperative transfusions were associated with a decreased incidence of subsequent transfusions and timing of transfusions did not affect the rates of colorectal cancer recurrence. PMID:26492900

  7. Outpatient red blood cell transfusion payments among patients on chronic dialysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Payments for red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are separate from US Medicare bundled payments for dialysis-related services and medications. Our objective was to examine the economic burden for payers when chronic dialysis patients receive outpatient RBC transfusions. Methods Using Truven Health MarketScan® data (1/1/02-10/31/10) in this retrospective micro-costing economic analysis, we analyzed data from chronic dialysis patients who underwent at least 1 outpatient RBC transfusion who had at least 6 months of continuous enrollment prior to initial dialysis claim and at least 30 days post-transfusion follow-up. A conceptual model of transfusion-associated resource use based on current literature was employed to estimate outpatient RBC transfusion payments. Total payments per RBC transfusion episode included screening/monitoring (within 3 days), blood acquisition/administration (within 2 days), and associated complications (within 3 days for acute events; up to 45 days for chronic events). Results A total of 3283 patient transfusion episodes were included; 56.4% were men and 40.9% had Medicare supplemental insurance. Mean (standard deviation [SD]) age was 60.9 (15.0) years, and mean Charlson comorbidity index was 4.3 (2.5). During a mean (SD) follow-up of 495 (474) days, patients had a mean of 2.2 (3.8) outpatient RBC transfusion episodes. Mean/median (SD) total payment per RBC transfusion episode was $854/$427 ($2,060) with 72.1% attributable to blood acquisition and administration payments. Complication payments ranged from mean (SD) $213 ($168) for delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction to $19,466 ($15,424) for congestive heart failure. Conclusions Payments for outpatient RBC transfusion episodes were driven by blood acquisition and administration payments. While infrequent, transfusion complications increased payments substantially when they occurred. PMID:23121762

  8. Blood transfusions and local tumor recurrence in colorectal cancer. Evidence of a noncausal relationship.

    PubMed Central

    Busch, O R; Hop, W C; Marquet, R L; Jeekel, J

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The authors analyzed the effect of blood transfusions on the pattern of colorectal cancer recurrence. BACKGROUND. Retrospective studies suggest that blood transfusions are associated with a poor prognosis in patients who undergo operations for colorectal malignancies. In a previously published, randomized trial, it was investigated whether autologous blood transfusions could overcome this putative detrimental effect. However, this did not appear to be the case. METHODS. In the current study, the authors analyzed the patterns of recurrence in 420 patients who underwent curative operations for colorectal cancer. RESULTS. Patients who did not require transfusions (N = 143) had significantly better disease-free survival than those who did need transfusions (N = 277); percentages at 4 years were 73% and 59%, respectively (p = 0.001). No difference was found between both groups in comparing cumulative percentages of patients having metastases; percentages at 4 years were 25% in the group that did not undergo transfusion and 27% in the transfused group. The percentage of cases having local recurrence, however, was significantly increased (p = 0.0006) in the transfused group as compared with the group that did not undergo transfusion; percentages at 4 years were 20% and 3%, respectively. The groups of patients receiving only allogeneic, only autologous, or both types of transfusions all had a significantly higher incidence of local recurrence than the patients who did not receive transfusions, but no differences were found between these three groups. CONCLUSIONS. These findings suggest that the association between blood transfusions and prognosis in colorectal cancer is a result of the circumstances that necessitate transfusions, leading to the development of local recurrences, but not of distant metastases. PMID:7986147

  9. Non-invasive spectroscopy of transfusable red blood cells stored inside sealed plastic blood-bags.

    PubMed

    Buckley, K; Atkins, C G; Chen, D; Schulze, H G; Devine, D V; Blades, M W; Turner, R F B

    2016-03-07

    After being separated from (donated) whole blood, red blood cells are suspended in specially formulated additive solutions and stored (at 4 °C) in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) blood-bags until they are needed for transfusion. With time, the prepared red cell concentrate (RCC) is known to undergo biochemical changes that lower effectiveness of the transfusion, and thus regulations are in place that limit the storage period to 42 days. At present, RCC is not subjected to analytical testing prior to transfusion. In this study, we use Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) to probe, non-invasively, the biochemistry of RCC inside sealed blood-bags. The retrieved spectra compare well with conventional Raman spectra (of sampled aliquots) and are dominated by features associated with hemoglobin. In addition to the analytical demonstration that SORS can be used to retrieve RCC spectra from standard clinical blood-bags without breaking the sterility of the system, the data reveal interesting detail about the oxygenation-state of the stored cells themselves, namely that some blood-bags unexpectedly contain measurable amounts of deoxygenated hemoglobin after weeks of storage. The demonstration that chemical information can be obtained non-invasively using spectroscopy will enable new studies of RCC degeneration, and points the way to a Raman-based instrument for quality-control in a blood-bank or hospital setting.

  10. An Analysis of and Recommendations for the Peruvian Blood Collection and Transfusion System

    PubMed Central

    George, Paul E; Vidal, Julio; Garcia, Patricia J

    2016-01-01

    Background Peru experienced a crisis in its blood collection and supply system in the mid-2000s, as contaminated blood led to several transfusion-transmitted infections (TTI), occurring in the backdrop of extremely low voluntary donation rates and a national blood supply shortage. Thus, the Peruvian Ministry of Health (MINSA) implemented a national investigation on the safety and quality of the Peruvian blood collection/transfusion network. Methods Every Peruvian blood bank was evaluated by MINSA from 2007–2008. These evaluations consisted of an update of the national registry of blood banks and visits to each blood bank from MINSA oversight teams. Information was collected on the condition of the blood bank personnel, equipment, supplies, and practices. Further, previously-collected blood at each blood bank was randomly selected and screened for TTI-causing pathogens. Results Uncovered in this investigation was a fragmented, under-equipped, and poorly-staffed blood collection and transfusion network, consisting of 241 independent blood banks and resulting in suboptimal allocation of resources. Further, blood with evidence of TTI-causing pathogens (including Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and syphilis) and set for transfusion was discovered at three separate blood banks as part of the random screening process. Conclusion Using the successful reorganizations of national blood supply systems in other Latin American countries as examples, Peru would be well-served to form large, high-volume, regional blood collection and transfusion centers, responsible for blood collection and screening for the entire country. The small, separate blood banks would then be transformed into a network of blood transfusion centers, not responsible for blood collection. This reorganization would allow Peru to better utilize its resources, standardize the blood collection and transfusion process, and increase voluntary donation, resulting in a safer, more abundant national blood product. PMID

  11. [Evaluation of non-compliance of transfusion requests of packed red blood cells].

    PubMed

    Ben Romdhane, Asma Rym; Ben Ayoub, Wided; Gouider, Emna

    2015-06-01

    Despite legislative acts develloped, many deficiencies were identified in blood requests at the National Blood TransfusionCenter impedding board and blood safety. to evaluate the conformity of the different topics of packed red blood cells requests to the legislation. Our study was prospective descriptive lasting six months (March-August 2011). It assessed all packed red blood cells requests which reached the national blood transfusion center. 16064 packed red blood cells requests from 21 public institutions and 28 private institutions were studied. There was different deficiencies in each item.The absence of birth date in 67.18% of request represented the largest non-compliance within administrative information. A predominance of shortcomings related to transfusion and obstetric history was recorded for clinical information with absence of date of the last transfusion in 91.72% cases, lack of accuracy of any previous transfusion reactions in 88.63% cases and absence of the number of previous pregnancies in 93.15% of transfusion requests prescribed to women. Non-conformities related to the prescribing physician concerned mainly the phone number which was absent in 55.82% of cases. This study revealed a significant lack of awareness of physicians in relation to the law governing transfusion. It is therefore essential to develop training for prescribers to improve transfusion safety.

  12. Determinants of costs in blood services: blood transfusion from an economic perspective.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Arturo

    2002-06-01

    Over the past decade, technology-driven inflation of blood transfusion costs has largely exceeded the medical component of the consumer price index. This tendency may speed up in the near future, despite poor cost-effectiveness projections and the low capacity of new technologies to produce clinically appreciable quality improvements or an increased productivity. Although labor is the costlier input, there has been little research and development aimed at substituting capital for labor in blood services. Substantial advances in efficiency can come only from a whole process re-engineering and adoption of a societal perspective in decision-making. There are, however, many barriers to such changes. Notably, the monopolistic nature of blood services, the perverse incentives derived from their current structure, with an increasing gap between the interests of producers and users, pressures by industry, cultural perceptions about blood and the political and judicial consequences of the transfusion AIDS epidemic.

  13. Malaysian child infected with Plasmodium vivax via blood transfusion: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Malaria may be a serious complication of blood transfusion due to the asymptomatic persistence of parasites in some donors. This case report highlights the transfusion-transmitted malaria of Plasmodium vivax in a child diagnosed with germ cell tumour. This child had received blood transfusion from three donors and a week later started developing malaria like symptoms. Nested PCR and sequencing confirmed that one of the three donors was infected with P. vivax and this was transmitted to the 12-year-old child. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported transfusion-transmitted malaria case in Malaysia. PMID:24007496

  14. Detection of malaria infection in blood transfusion: a comparative study among real-time PCR, rapid diagnostic test and microscopy: sensitivity of Malaria detection methods in blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Hassanpour, Gholamreza; Mohebali, Mehdi; Raeisi, Ahmad; Abolghasemi, Hassan; Zeraati, Hojjat; Alipour, Mohsen; Azizi, Ebrahim; Keshavarz, Hossein

    2011-06-01

    The transmission of malaria by blood transfusion was one of the first transfusion-transmitted infections recorded in the world. Transfusion-transmitted malaria may lead to serious problems because infection with Plasmodium falciparum may cause rapidly fatal death. This study aimed to compare real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) with rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and light microscopy for the detection of Plasmodium spp. in blood transfusion, both in endemic and non-endemic areas of malaria disease in Iran. Two sets of 50 blood samples were randomly collected. One set was taken from blood samples donated in blood bank of Bandar Abbas, a city located in a malarious-endemic area, and the other set from Tehran, a non-endemic one. Light microscopic examination on both thin and thick smears, RDTs, and real-time PCR were performed on the blood samples and the results were compared. Thin and thick light microscopic examinations of all samples as well as RDT results were negative for Plasmodium spp. Two blood samples from endemic area were positive only with real-time PCR. It seems that real-time PCR as a highly sensitive method can be helpful for the confirmation of malaria infection in different units of blood transfusion organization especially in malaria-endemic areas where the majority of donors may be potentially infected with malaria parasites.

  15. Clinical transfusion practice update: haemovigilance, complications, patient blood management and national standards.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Sunelle; Wood, Erica M; Cole-Sinclair, Merrole F

    2013-09-16

    Blood transfusion is not without risk. Although the risks of HIV and hepatitis transmission have diminished, haemovigilance programs highlight that other significant transfusion hazards remain. Sepsis from bacterial contamination is the most common residual infectious hazard in developed countries, and events due to clerical error are problematic. Unnecessary transfusions should be avoided. New national guidelines on patient blood management (PBM) emphasise holistic approaches, including strategies to reduce transfusion requirements. Perioperative PBM should incorporate preoperative haemoglobin and medication optimisation, intraoperative blood conservation, and consideration of restrictive postoperative transfusion and cell-salvage techniques. When massive transfusion is required, hospitals should implement massive transfusion protocols. These protocols reduce mortality, improve communication and facilitate adequate provision of blood products. They should include multidisciplinary team involvement and guidelines for use of blood components and adjunctive agents. Although fresh frozen plasma to red blood cell and platelet to red blood cell ratios of ≥ 1 : 2 appear to reduce mortality in trauma patients who receive massive transfusion, there is insufficient evidence to recommend specific ratios. Systematic reviews have found no significant benefit of recombinant activated factor VII in critical bleeding, and an increase in thromboembolic events; specialist haematology advice is therefore recommended when considering use of this agent. The National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards address use of blood and blood products, and provide important transfusion principles for adoption by all clinicians. Storage of red cells in additive solution results in changes, known as the "storage lesion", and studies to determine the clinical effect of the age of blood at transfusion are ongoing.

  16. Safety and efficacy of packed red blood cell transfusions at different doses in very low birth weight infants

    PubMed Central

    Govande, Vinayak P.; Shetty, Ashita; Beeram, Madhava R.

    2016-01-01

    This double-blinded, randomized, crossover study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of 20 mL/kg aliquots of packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions versus 15 mL/kg aliquot transfusions in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants with anemia. The study enrolled 22 hemodynamically stable VLBW infants requiring PRBC transfusions, with a mean gestational age of 25.7 ± 2.2 weeks and birth weight of 804 ± 261 g. Each infant was randomized to receive one of two treatment sequences: 15 mL/kg followed by 20 mL/kg or 20 mL/kg followed by 15 mL/kg. The infants were monitored during and after transfusions, and the efficacy and safety of the treatments were evaluated. Infants had higher posttransfusion hemoglobin (13.2 g/dL vs 11.8 g/dL, P < 0.01) and hematocrit levels (38.6 g/dL vs 34.4 g/dL, P < 0.01) following 20 mL/kg PRBC transfusions when compared to 15 mL/kg transfusions. There were no differences in the incidence of tachypnea, hepatomegaly, edema, hypoxia, necrotizing enterocolitis, or vital sign instability between groups. In conclusion, high-volume PRBC transfusions (20 mL/kg) were associated with higher posttransfusion hemoglobin and hematocrit levels but no adverse effects. Higher-volume transfusions may reduce the need for multiple transfusions and therefore the number of donors the infant is exposed to. PMID:27034542

  17. Gender disparities in red blood cell transfusion in elective surgery: a post hoc multicentre cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gombotz, Hans; Schreier, Günter; Neubauer, Sandra; Kastner, Peter; Hofmann, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A post hoc gender comparison of transfusion-related modifiable risk factors among patients undergoing elective surgery. Settings 23 Austrian centres randomly selected and stratified by region and level of care. Participants We consecutively enrolled in total 6530 patients (3465 women and 3065 men); 1491 underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, 2570 primary unilateral total hip replacement (THR) and 2469 primary unilateral total knee replacement (TKR). Main outcome measures Primary outcome measures were the number of allogeneic and autologous red blood cell (RBC) units transfused (postoperative day 5 included) and differences in intraoperative and postoperative transfusion rate between men and women. Secondary outcomes included perioperative blood loss in transfused and non-transfused patients, volume of RBCs transfused, perioperative haemoglobin values and circulating red blood volume on postoperative day 5. Results In all surgical groups, the transfusion rate was significantly higher in women than in men (CABG 81 vs 49%, THR 46 vs 24% and TKR 37 vs 23%). In transfused patients, the absolute blood loss was higher among men in all surgical categories while the relative blood loss was higher among women in the CABG group (52.8 vs 47.8%) but comparable in orthopaedic surgery. The relative RBC volume transfused was significantly higher among women in all categories (CABG 40.0 vs 22.3; TKR 25.2 vs 20.2; THR 26.4 vs 20.8%). On postoperative day 5, the relative haemoglobin values and the relative circulating RBC volume were higher in women in all surgical categories. Conclusions The higher transfusion rate and volume in women when compared with men in elective surgery can be explained by clinicians applying the same absolute transfusion thresholds irrespective of a patient's gender. This, together with the common use of a liberal transfusion strategy, leads to further overtransfusion in women. PMID:27965248

  18. Predictive factors for perioperative blood transfusion in surgeries for correction of idiopathic, neuromuscular or congenital scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Borges, Paulo Alvim; Barbosa, Angelo Roberto; Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Barros Filho, Tarcisio Eloy Pessoa de

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the association of clinical and demographic variables in patients requiring blood transfusion during elective surgery to treat scoliosis with the aim of identifying markers predictive of the need for blood transfusion. Based on the review of medical charts at a public university hospital, this retrospective study evaluated whether the following variables were associated with the need for red blood cell transfusion (measured by the number of packs used) during scoliosis surgery: scoliotic angle, extent of arthrodesis (number of fused levels), sex of the patient, surgery duration and type of scoliosis (neuromuscular, congenital or idiopathic). Of the 94 patients evaluated in a 55-month period, none required a massive blood transfusion (most patients needed less than two red blood cell packs). The number of packs was not significantly associated with sex or type of scoliosis. The extent of arthrodesis (r = 0.103), surgery duration (r = 0.144) and scoliotic angle (r = 0.004) were weakly correlated with the need for blood transfusion. Linear regression analysis showed an association between the number of spine levels submitted to arthrodesis and the volume of blood used in transfusions (p = 0.001). This study did not reveal any evidence of a significant association between the need for red blood cell transfusion and scoliotic angle, sex or surgery duration in scoliosis correction surgery. Submission of more spinal levels to arthrodesis was associated with the use of a greater number of blood packs.

  19. Predictors and complications of blood transfusion in total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Wessell, Nolan M; Charters, Michael A; Yu, Stephen; Jeffries, James J; Silverton, Craig D

    2014-09-01

    Perioperative patient optimization can minimize the need for blood transfusions in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to determine predictors and complications of transfusions. This retrospective review analyzed 1795 patients who underwent primary THA and TKA at our institution between January 2011 and December 2012. Of the 1573 patients ultimately included the rates of transfusion were 9.27% in TKA and 26.6% in THA. Significant predictors for transfusion include: preoperative hemoglobin, age, female gender, body mass index, creatinine, TKA, operating room time, operative blood loss, and intra-operative fluids. The DVT rate was comparable, but deep surgical site infection rate among transfused patients was 2.4% compared to 0.5% in non-transfused patients (P = 0.0065). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Association Among Blood Transfusion, Sepsis, and Decreased Long-term Survival After Colon Cancer Resection.

    PubMed

    Aquina, Christopher T; Blumberg, Neil; Becerra, Adan Z; Boscoe, Francis P; Schymura, Maria J; Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R T; Fleming, Fergal J

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the potential additive effects of blood transfusion and sepsis on colon cancer disease-specific survival, cardiovascular disease-specific survival, and overall survival after colon cancer surgery. Perioperative blood transfusions are associated with infectious complications and increased risk of cancer recurrence through systemic inflammatory effects. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested an association among sepsis, subsequent systemic inflammation, and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, no study has investigated the association among transfusion, sepsis, and disease-specific survival in postoperative patients. The New York State Cancer Registry and Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System were queried for stage I to III colon cancer resections from 2004 to 2011. Propensity-adjusted survival analyses assessed the association of perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion, sepsis, and 5-year colon cancer disease-specific survival, cardiovascular disease-specific survival, and overall survival. Among 24,230 patients, 29% received a transfusion and 4% developed sepsis. After risk adjustment, transfusion and sepsis were associated with worse colon cancer disease-specific survival [(+)transfusion: hazard ratio (HR) 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.30; (+)sepsis: HR 1.84, 95% CI 1.44-2.35; (+)transfusion/(+)sepsis: HR 2.27, 95% CI 1.87-2.76], cardiovascular disease-specific survival [(+)transfusion: HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.04-1.33; (+)sepsis: HR 1.63, 95% CI 1.14-2.31; (+)transfusion/(+)sepsis: HR 2.04, 95% CI 1.58-2.63], and overall survival [(+)transfusion: HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.14-1.29; (+)sepsis: HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.48-2.09; (+)transfusion/(+)sepsis: HR 2.36, 95% CI 2.07-2.68] relative to (-)transfusion/(-)sepsis. Additional analyses suggested an additive effect with those who both received a blood transfusion and developed sepsis having even worse survival. Perioperative blood transfusions are associated with shorter survival

  1. Transfusion safety in francophone African countries: an analysis of strategies for the medical selection of blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Tayou, Claude Tagny; Kouao, Maxime Diané; Touré, Hamane; Gargouri, Jalel; Fazul, Ahamada Said; Ouattara, Siaka; Anani, Ludovic; Othmani, Habiba; Feteke, Lochina; Dahourou, Honorine; Mbensa, Guy Olivier; Molé, Simplice; Nébié, Yacouba; Mbangue, Madeleine; Toukam, Michel; Boulahi, Mahommed Ould; Andriambelo, Lalatiana Valisoa; Rakoto, Olivat; Baby, Mounirou; Yahaya, Rakia; Bokilo, Amelia; Senyana, Florent; Mbanya, Dora; Shiboski, Caroline; Murphy, Edward L.; Lefrère, Jean Jacques

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The goal of selecting a healthy blood donor is to safeguard donors and reduce the risks of infections and immunologic complications for recipients. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS To evaluate the blood donor selection process, a survey was conducted in 28 blood transfusion centers located in 15 francophone African countries. Data collected included availability of blood products, risk factors for infection identified among blood donor candidates, the processing of the information collected before blood collection, the review process for the medical history of blood donor candidates, and deferral criteria for donor candidates. RESULTS During the year 2009, participating transfusion centers identified 366,924 blood donor candidates. A mean of 13% (range, 0%–36%) of the donor candidates were excluded based solely on their medical status. The main risk factors for blood-borne infections were having multiple sex partners, sexual intercourse with occasional partners, and religious scarification. Most transfusion centers collected this information verbally instead of having a written questionnaire. The topics least addressed were the possible complications relating to the donation, religious scarifications, and history of sickle cell anemia and hemorrhage. Only three centers recorded the temperature of the blood donors. The deferral criteria least reported were sickle cell anemia, piercing, scarification, and tattoo. CONCLUSIONS The medical selection process was not performed systemically and thoroughly enough, given the regional epidemiologic risks. It is essential to identify the risk factors specific to francophone African countries and modify the current medical history questionnaires to develop a more effective and relevant selection process. PMID:22014098

  2. Red Blood Cell Transfusion Risks in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tanhehco, Yvette C.; Berns, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Prior to the introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO), red blood cell (RBC) transfusions were frequently required when iron and anabolic steroids failed to improve the clinical symptoms of anemia associated with hemoglobin (Hb) levels that were commonly less than 7 g/dL. After the approval of EPO in the US in 1989, the Hb levels of patients on hemodialysis dramatically improved and the need for RBC transfusions decreased significantly. The need for RBC transfusion remains for patients who require an immediate increase in their RBC mass due to symptomatic anemia and is likely to increase due to changes in the management of anemia in dialysis patients resulting from clinical trials data, regulatory changes, and new reimbursement policies for EPO. The safety of the blood supply has greatly improved over the last few decades and the risk of transfusion-transmitted diseases has now been dramatically reduced. Non-infectious complications of transfusion currently cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the US. Transfusion also brings a risk of alloimmunization, a particular concern for dialysis patients waiting for kidney transplantation. Knowledge of the risks of RBC transfusions will help clinicians better assess the risks and benefits of transfusing patients with ESRD. This article reviews the modern day infectious and non-infectious risks of allogeneic RBC transfusions. PMID:22686519

  3. Red blood cell transfusion risks in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Tanhehco, Yvette C; Berns, Jeffrey S

    2012-01-01

    Prior to the introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO), red blood cell (RBC) transfusions were frequently required when iron and anabolic steroids failed to improve the clinical symptoms of anemia associated with hemoglobin (Hb) levels that were commonly less than 7 g/dl. After the approval of EPO in the United States in 1989, the Hb levels of patients on hemodialysis dramatically improved and the need for RBC transfusions decreased significantly. The need for RBC transfusion remains for patients who require an immediate increase in their RBC mass due to symptomatic anemia and is likely to increase due to changes in the management of anemia in dialysis patients resulting from clinical trials data, regulatory changes, and new reimbursement policies for EPO. The safety of the blood supply has greatly improved over the last few decades, and the risk of transfusion-transmitted diseases has now been dramatically reduced. Noninfectious complications of transfusion currently cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the United States. Transfusion also brings a risk of alloimmunization, a particular concern for dialysis patients waiting for kidney transplantation. Knowledge of the risks of RBC transfusions will help clinicians better assess the risks and benefits of transfusing patients with ESRD. This article reviews the modern day infectious and noninfectious risks of allogeneic RBC transfusions. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Blood Transfusion Requirements for Patients With Sarcomas Undergoing Combined Radio- and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Earl, Helena M.; Whitehead, Lynne; Jefferies, Sarah J.; Burnet, Neil G.

    2005-01-01

    Patients with bony and soft tissue sarcomas may require intensive treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which often leads to a fall in haemoglobin levels, requiring blood transfusion. There may be advantages in predicting which patients will require transfusion, partly because anaemia and hypoxia may worsen the response of tumours to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Between 1997 and 2003, a total of 26 patients who received intensive treatment with curative intent were identified. Transfusions were given to maintain the haemoglobin at 10g/dl or above during chemotherapy, and at 12 g/dl or above during radiotherapy. Eighteen (69%) required a transfusion, the majority as a result of both the chemotherapy and RT criteria. There were 78 transfusion episodes, and 181 units of blood given. In the 18 patients who required transfusion, the average number of units was 10.1, but seven patients required more blood than this. The most significant factor influencing blood transfusion was choice of intensive chemotherapy. Intensive chemotherapy and presenting Hb less than 11.6 g/dl identified 13 out of 18 patients who needed transfusion. Adding a drop in haemoglobin of greater than 1.7 g/dl after one cycle of chemotherapy identified 16 out of 18 patients who required transfusion. The seven patients who had heavy transfusion requirements were identified by age 32 or less, intensive chemotherapy and a presenting Hb of 12 g/dl or less. Erythropoietin might be a useful alternative to transfusion in selected patient groups, especially those with heavy transfusion requirements. PMID:18521418

  5. Blood Transfusion Reactions in Elderly Patients Hospitalized in a Multilevel Geriatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lubart, E.; Segal, R.; Tryhub, N.; Sigler, E.; Leibovitz, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives. Blood transfusion is a critical issue for patients with chronic diseases such as heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and malignancy. However, side effects are not rare. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the frequency of adverse blood transfusion reactions in hospitalized elderly patients during a one-year period. Design/Setting/Participants. Blood transfusion reactions such as fever, chills, dyspnea, and others following blood transfusions in hospitalized geriatric patients during one-year period were examined. Results. 382 blood units (242 patients) were administered during the study period. In 40 (11%) cases, blood transfusion reactions occurred. Fever was the most common reaction in 29 cases (72%), four (10%) had shortness of breath, and 3 (8%) had vomiting and chills each. There were no lethal cases in the 24-hour period following blood transfusions. Conclusion. A relatively low rate of adverse blood transfusion reactions occurred in our geriatric patients. We may speculate that this is related to underreporting of minor symptoms due to the high percentage of demented patients in this population. PMID:24804100

  6. Validation of multisource electronic health record data: an application to blood transfusion data.

    PubMed

    Hoeven, Loan R van; Bruijne, Martine C de; Kemper, Peter F; Koopman, Maria M W; Rondeel, Jan M M; Leyte, Anja; Koffijberg, Hendrik; Janssen, Mart P; Roes, Kit C B

    2017-07-14

    Although data from electronic health records (EHR) are often used for research purposes, systematic validation of these data prior to their use is not standard practice. Existing validation frameworks discuss validity concepts without translating these into practical implementation steps or addressing the potential influence of linking multiple sources. Therefore we developed a practical approach for validating routinely collected data from multiple sources and to apply it to a blood transfusion data warehouse to evaluate the usability in practice. The approach consists of identifying existing validation frameworks for EHR data or linked data, selecting validity concepts from these frameworks and establishing quantifiable validity outcomes for each concept. The approach distinguishes external validation concepts (e.g. concordance with external reports, previous literature and expert feedback) and internal consistency concepts which use expected associations within the dataset itself (e.g. completeness, uniformity and plausibility). In an example case, the selected concepts were applied to a transfusion dataset and specified in more detail. Application of the approach to a transfusion dataset resulted in a structured overview of data validity aspects. This allowed improvement of these aspects through further processing of the data and in some cases adjustment of the data extraction. For example, the proportion of transfused products that could not be linked to the corresponding issued products initially was 2.2% but could be improved by adjusting data extraction criteria to 0.17%. This stepwise approach for validating linked multisource data provides a basis for evaluating data quality and enhancing interpretation. When the process of data validation is adopted more broadly, this contributes to increased transparency and greater reliability of research based on routinely collected electronic health records.

  7. Accuracy of Estimated Blood Loss in Predicting Need for Transfusion after Delivery.

    PubMed

    Conner, Shayna N; Tuuli, Methodius G; Colvin, Ryan; Shanks, Anthony L; Macones, George A; Cahill, Alison G

    2015-11-01

    The definition of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) was developed more than 50 years ago. Since then, the obstetric population has changed dramatically. We sought to determine how well we estimated blood loss (EBL) and find thresholds predicting need for transfusion. We performed a prospective cohort study from 2010 to 2012, comparing those who needed transfusion postpartum and those who did not. EBL, calculated EBL (cEBL), and change in hematocrit were calculated for patients who did not receive transfusion, and EBL was calculated for those who did receive transfusion, stratified by delivery type. Receiver operator curves were created and optimal thresholds of EBL to predict transfusion were estimated. Among 4,804 patients, transfusion was required for 0.65% of vaginal and 8.7% of cesarean deliveries. Median EBL was higher in women requiring transfusion. A weak correlation was noted between EBL and cEBL for all deliveries. Thresholds of 500 mL blood loss for vaginal delivery and 1,000 mL for cesarean had the best predictive ability for transfusion. In this modern obstetric, cohort EBL is weakly correlated with cEBL, suggesting that accuracy of clinical estimates of blood loss is modest. However, EBL predicts need for transfusion, with optimal thresholds of 500 mL for a vaginal delivery and 1,000 mL in a cesarean. This validates the traditional definitions of PPH in our modern population. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Haemophilia A and the blood transfusion service: a Scottish study.

    PubMed Central

    Cash, J D; Spencely, M

    1976-01-01

    The demand for blood products containing factor VIII for treating patients with haemophilia A in south-east Scotland was reviewed. From 1961 to 1975 the demand for fresh frozen plasma (FFP), cryoprecipitate (CP), and antihaemophilic factor (AHF) increased by seven and a half times, while total donations increased by only a third. Patients with severe haemophilia A treated at the regional haemophilia centre used about 85% of the factor VIII issued in 1971-4, most of which was used on demand. A patient with severe haemophilia A on unlimited ondemand home treatment would need about 500 units of factor VII/kg body weight/year, and a regional haemophilia centre, treating moderate and mild cases as well as severe ones, would use 15000 units/patient/year. Altogether about 50 million units of factor VIII will be needed each year in the UK. Although cryoprecipitate is much harder to store and administer than AHF, its yield from plasma may be far greater and its cost far smaller. Unless the blood transfusion services receive increased amounts of money and reappraise their functions and operation, it seems likely that they will have to rely increasingly on commercial (and costly) sources for the major plasma fractions. PMID:974537

  9. Haemophilia A and the blood transfusion service: a Scottish study.

    PubMed

    Cash, J D; Spencely, M

    1976-09-18

    The demand for blood products containing factor VIII for treating patients with haemophilia A in south-east Scotland was reviewed. From 1961 to 1975 the demand for fresh frozen plasma (FFP), cryoprecipitate (CP), and antihaemophilic factor (AHF) increased by seven and a half times, while total donations increased by only a third. Patients with severe haemophilia A treated at the regional haemophilia centre used about 85% of the factor VIII issued in 1971-4, most of which was used on demand. A patient with severe haemophilia A on unlimited ondemand home treatment would need about 500 units of factor VII/kg body weight/year, and a regional haemophilia centre, treating moderate and mild cases as well as severe ones, would use 15000 units/patient/year. Altogether about 50 million units of factor VIII will be needed each year in the UK. Although cryoprecipitate is much harder to store and administer than AHF, its yield from plasma may be far greater and its cost far smaller. Unless the blood transfusion services receive increased amounts of money and reappraise their functions and operation, it seems likely that they will have to rely increasingly on commercial (and costly) sources for the major plasma fractions.

  10. A Derivation and Validation Study of an Early Blood Transfusion Needs Score for Severe Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Umejiego, Johnbosco; Robinson, Richard D.; Schrader, Chet D.; Leuck, JoAnna; Barra, Michael; Buca, Stefan; Shedd, Andrew; Bui, Andrew; Zenarosa, Nestor R.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is no existing adequate blood transfusion needs determination tool that Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel can use for prehospital blood transfusion initiation. In this study, a simple and pragmatic prehospital blood transfusion needs scoring system was derived and validated. Methods Local trauma registry data were reviewed retrospectively from 2004 through 2013. Patients were randomly assigned to derivation and validation cohorts. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the independent approachable risks associated with early blood transfusion needs in the derivation cohort in which a scoring system was derived. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operational characteristic (AUC) were calculated and compared using both the derivation and validation data. Results A total of 24,303 patients were included with 12,151 patients in the derivation and 12,152 patients in the validation cohorts. Age, penetrating injury, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) were risks predictive of early blood transfusion needs. An early blood transfusion needs score was derived. A score > 5 indicated risk of early blood transfusion need with a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 80%. A sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 80% were also found in the validation study and their AUC showed no statistically significant difference (AUC of the derivation = 0.87 versus AUC of the validation = 0.86, P > 0.05). Conclusions An early blood transfusion scoring system was derived and internally validated to predict severe trauma patients requiring blood transfusion during prehospital or initial emergency department resuscitation. PMID:27429680

  11. [Organization of safe cost-effective blood transfusion: experience APHM-EFSAM].

    PubMed

    Ferrera-Tourenc, V; Dettori, I; Chiaroni, J; Lassale, B

    2013-03-01

    Blood transfusion safety depends on strict compliance with each step of a process beginning with the order for labile blood products and related immunohematologic testing and ending with administration and follow-up of the receiver. This process is governed by stringent regulatory texts and guidelines. Despite precautions, processing errors are still reported. Analysis of incident reports shows that the most common cause involves patient identification and that most errors occur at two levels, i.e. the entry of patient information and management of multiple regulatory crosschecks and record-keeping using different systems. The purpose of this report is to describe the collaborative approach implemented by the Établissement français du Sang Alpes-Méditerranée (EFSAM) and the Assistance publique des Hôpitaux de Marseille (APHM) to secure the blood transfusion process and protect interfaces while simplifying and facilitating exchanges. Close cooperation has had a threefold impact with simplification of administration, improvement of experience feedback, and better management of test ordering. The organization implemented between the two institutions has minimized document redundancy and interfaces between immunohematologic testing and delivery. Collaboration based on experience feedback has improved the level of quality and cost control. In the domain of blood transfusion safety, the threshold of 10(-5) has been reached with regard to the risk of ABO errors in the distribution concentrated red cells (CRC). In addition, this collaborative organization has created further opportunity for improvement by deploying new methods to identify simplification measures and by controlling demand and usage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Early, Prehospital Activation of the Walking Blood Bank Based on Mechanism of Injury Improves Time to Fresh Whole Blood Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Aaron K; Auten, Jonathan D; Zieber, Tara J; Lunceford, Nicole L

    2016-01-01

    Balanced component therapy (BCT) remains the mainstay in trauma resuscitation of the critically battle injured. In austere medical environments, access to packed red blood cells, apheresis platelets, and fresh frozen plasma is often limited. Transfusion of warm, fresh whole blood (FWB) has been used to augment limited access to full BCT in these settings. The main limitation of FWB is that it is not readily available for transfusion on casualty arrival. This small case series evaluates the impact early, mechanism-of-injury (MOI)-based, preactivation of the walking blood bank has on time to transfusion. We report an average time of 18 minutes to FWB transfusion from patient arrival. Early activation of the walking blood bank based on prehospital MOI may further reduce the time to FWB transfusion. 2016.

  13. Blood transfusion in cardiac surgery--does the choice of anesthesia or type of surgery matter?

    PubMed

    Nesković, Vojislava; Milojević, Predrag; Unić-Stojanović, Dragana; Slavković, Zoran

    2013-05-01

    In spite of the evidence suggesting a significant morbidity associated with blood transfusions, the use of blood and blood products remain high in cardiac surgery. To successfully minimize the need for blood transfusion, a systematic approach is needed. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different anesthetic techniques, general vs combine epidural and general anesthesia, as well as different surgery strategies, on-pump vs off-pump, on postoperative bleeding complications and the need for blood transfusions during perioperative period. Eighty-two consecutive patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass surgery were randomized according to surgical and anesthetic techniques into 4 different groups: group 1 (patients operated on off-pump, under general anesthesia); group 2 (patients operated on off-pump, with combined general and high thoracic epidural anesthesia); group 3 (patients operated on using standard revascularization technique, with the use of extracorporeal circulation, under general anesthesia), and group 4 (patients operated on using standard revascularization technique, with the use of extracorporeal circulation, with combined general and high thoracic epidural anesthesia). Indications for transfusion were based on clinical judgment, but a restrictive policy was encouraged. Bleeding was considered significant if it required transfusion of blood or blood products, or reopening of the chest. The quantity of transfused blood or blood products was specifically noted. None of the patients was transfused blood or blood products during the surgery, and as many as 70/81 (86.4%) patients were not transfused at all during hospital stay. No difference in postoperative bleeding or blood transfusion was noted in relation to the type of surgery and anesthetic technique applied. If red blood cells were transfused, postoperative bleeding was the most influential parameter for making clinical decision. No influence of off-pump surgery or epidural

  14. Association Between Blood Transfusions and 12-Month Mortality After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Kleczynski, Pawel; Dziewierz, Artur; Bagienski, Maciej; Rzeszutko, Lukasz; Sorysz, Danuta; Trebacz, Jaroslaw; Sobczynski, Robert; Tomala, Marek; Stapor, Maciej; Dudek, Dariusz

    2017-02-07

    Blood transfusions are considered as an important predictor of adverse outcome in patients with severe aortic (AS) undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). We sought to investigate the association between blood transfusions and mortality after TAVI. We enrolled 101 consecutive patients with severe AS undergoing TAVI. Patients who required transfusion were defined as patients in whom at least one unit of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) was transfused in the perioperative period. Twelve-month outcomes were assessed based on Valve Academic Research Consortium definitions. A total of 28 (27.7%) patients required blood transfusion after TAVI. Baseline characteristics of the patients with and without a transfusion were similar. Median amount of PRBCs was 2 (interquartile range, 2-4). Twelvemonth all-cause mortality was higher in patients with than without a blood transfusion (39.3% versus 9.6%; P = 0.001). Importantly, the need for a blood transfusion after TAVI was an independent predictor of higher mortality rates after 12 months (hazard ratio (HR) 2.84 95%CI (1.06-7.63); P = 0.039; (HR for incomplete coronary revascularization 10.86, 95%CI 3.72-31.73; P < 0.001; HR for a history of stroke/TIA 3.93, 95%CI 1.39-11.07; P < 0.001). The duration of inhospital stay was longer in patients requiring transfusion (16.0 (14.0-22.0) versus 7.0 (7.0-11.5) days; P = 0.014). In conclusion, blood transfusions after TAVI were associated with higher mortality rates after 12 months, longer in-hospital stay, and were identified as an independent predictor of impaired clinical outcome.

  15. Fluid shift from intravascular compartment during fetal red blood cell transfusion.

    PubMed

    Kamping, M A; Pasman, S A; Bil-van den Brink, C P; Oepkes, D; Adama van Scheltema, P N; Vandenbussche, F P H A

    2013-05-01

    Intrauterine transfusion imposes a considerable burden on the fetal circulation by increasing volume and pressure, and a fluid shift from the fetal circulation occurs even during the procedure. The aim of this study was to quantify the intraprocedural fluid shift and to investigate the effect of procedural and fetal characteristics on this fluid shift. In 95 alloimmunized pregnancies, we calculated fluid shift at the first intrauterine transfusion by determining initial and final blood volumes. We evaluated the association of the fluid shift with the speed and volume of the transfusion, the severity of anemia and the presence of hydrops. Of the included fetuses, 11 were mildly hydropic and four were severely hydropic. A mean fluid shift of 36% of the transfused volume was found. Fluid shift related positively to transfused volume (P < 0.001). The percentage fluid shift of transfused volume was inversely related to the speed of transfusion (mL/kg/min) (P < 0.041) and was not related to the severity of anemia (P = 0.55) or to hydrops (P = 0.66). It was found that younger fetuses had been unintentionally subject to high volumes and speeds of transfusion relative to their size. Around one-third of the transfused volume is lost from the intravascular compartment during the procedure of intrauterine transfusion. There is a large variation between fetuses, partly explained by the volume and speed of the transfusion. Neither severity of anemia nor hydrops plays a clear-cut role, and thus other factors may explain the variation in fluid shift. The probability that hematocrit will still increase after transfusion, as a result of a continuing fluid shift, should be considered in transfusion policy. Advice is given on gestational age-adjusted speed of transfusion. Copyright © 2012 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. [Whole-blood transfusion for hemorrhagic shock resuscitation: two cases in Djibouti].

    PubMed

    Cordier, P Y; Eve, O; Dehan, C; Topin, F; Menguy, P; Bertani, A; Massoure, P L; Kaiser, E

    2012-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock requires early aggressive treatment, including transfusion of packed red blood cells and hemostatic resuscitation. In austere environments, when component therapy is not available, warm fresh whole-blood transfusion is a convenient treatment. It provides red blood cells, clotting factors, and functional platelets. Therefore it is commonly used in military practice to treat hemorrhagic shock in combat casualties. At Bouffard Hospital Center in Djibouti, the supply of packed red blood cells is limited, and apheresis platelets are unavailable. We used whole blood transfusion in two civilian patients with life-threatening non-traumatic hemorrhages. One had massive bleeding caused by disseminated intravascular coagulation due to septic shock; the second was a 39 year-old pregnant woman with uterine rupture. In both cases, whole blood transfusion (twelve and ten 500 mL bags respectively), combined with etiological treatment, enabled coagulopathy correction, hemorrhage control, and satisfactory recovery.

  17. BLOOD PRODUCT TRANSFUSIONS IN GREAT APES: A RETROSPECTIVE REVIEW OF 12 CASES.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Alicia; Sturgeon, Ginger; Rossi, Joseph

    2017-06-01

    Although the administration of blood and blood products can be lifesaving, transfusions in exotic species are less common because of the lack of knowledge of a species' blood groups, the availability of species-specific donors, and possible adverse effects. Recently, blood groups were elucidated in great apes; however, few reports have been published regarding actual transfusion situations in these species. This information is critical because poorly executed transfusions can compromise already weakened patients or result in the death of the recipient. In 2014, a retrospective survey of U.S. zoos housing great apes received 45 of 67 responses; from which, 12 transfusion cases in great apes were identified, including Sumatran orangutans ( Pongo pygmaeus sumatraensis, n = 4), chimpanzee ( Pan troglodytes , n = 1), and western lowland gorillas ( Gorilla gorilla gorilla, n = 7). These animals, ranging from birth to 31 yr, received intravenous transfusions of whole blood, packed red blood cells, or human albumin. Overall, animals that received transfusions for anemia because of chronic illness or blood loss survived, but those individuals with concurrent life-threatening issues did not survive. No adverse reactions related to the transfusion occurred, except in two orangutans given human albumin.

  18. Haemoglobin variants among voluntary blood donors in Jos, Nigeria: the implications on blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Damulak, O D; Bolorunduro, S A; Egesie, J O; Yakubu, K; Godit, P; Smith, O A

    2013-01-01

    The normal haemoglobin is an efficient transporter of oxygen to the tissues and carbondioxide from tissues to the lungs for elimination. Various abnormal haemoglobin variants including, the sickle cell diseases, have been described with varying sickling tendencies. This study aimed to determine the haemoglobin variants among voluntary blood donors in Jos. Records of the age, sex, Haemoglobin level, and the haemoglobin genotype of all voluntary blood donors who donated blood at the National Blood Transfusion Service Centre, Jos, Nigeria between January 2011 and April 2012; and their haemoglobin levels and protein electrophoresis determined, were reviewed. A total of 937 blood donors, 658 (70.23%) males and 279 (29.79%) females, mean age 32.4 years, donated blood voluntarily, their haemoglobin electrophoretic patterns determined by alkaline cellulose acetate electrophoresis. Donor blood haemoglobin levels were determined by automation. Haemoglobin protein electrophoretic patterns identified among our donors were 77.70% AA, 21.88% AS, 0.22% SC, 0.11% AC and 0.11% SS. Mean haemoglobin levels of the donors according to their haemoglobin proteins electrophoretic patterns were, 150.4 +/- 12.5 gms/l for AA, 151.9 +/- 13.8 gms/l for AS and 131.1 +/- 5.0 gms/l for haemoglobin SC. Determination of haemoglobin protein electrophoretic patterns of blood unit for transfusion could enhance selective blood issuing based on recipient's haemoglobin type.

  19. Platelet and red blood cell utilization and transfusion independence in umbilical cord blood and allogeneic peripheral blood hematopoietic cell transplants.

    PubMed

    Solh, Melhem; Brunstein, Claudio; Morgan, Shanna; Weisdorf, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients have substantial transfusion requirements. Factors associated with increased transfusions and the extent of blood product use in umbilical cord blood (UCB) recipients are uncertain. We reviewed blood product use in 229 consecutive adult recipients of allogeneic HCT at the University of Minnesota: 147 with leukemia, 82 lymphoma or myeloma; 58% received unrelated UCB and 43% sibling donor peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) grafts. Although neutrophil recovery was prompt (UCB median 17, range: 2-45 days, and PBSC 14, range: 3-34 days), only 135 of 229 (59% cumulative incidence) achieved red blood cell (RBC) independence and 157 (69%) achieved platelet independence by 6 months. Time to platelet independence was prolonged in UCB recipients (median UCB 41 versus PBSC 14 days) and in patients who had received a prior transplant (median 48 versus 32 days). Patients who received UCB grafts required more RBC through day 60 post-HCT (mean UCB 7.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.7-8.9) versus PBSC 5.2 (3.7-6.7) transfusions, P = .04), and more platelet transfusions (mean 25.2 (95% CI 22.1-28.2) versus 12.9 (9.4-16.4), P < .01) compared to PBSC recipients. Patients receiving myeloablative (MA) conditioning required more RBC and platelet transfusions during the first 2 months post-HCT compared to reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) (7.4 versus 6.2, P = .30 for RBC; 23.2 versus 17.5, P = .07 for platelets). Despite prompt neutrophil engraftment, UCB recipients had delayed platelet recovery as well as more prolonged and costly blood product requirements. Enhanced approaches to accelerate multilineage engraftment could limit the transfusion-associated morbidity and costs accompanying UCB allotransplantation.

  20. Massive blood transfusion during hospitalization for delivery in New York State, 1998-2007.

    PubMed

    Mhyre, Jill M; Shilkrut, Alexander; Kuklina, Elena V; Callaghan, William M; Creanga, Andreea A; Kaminsky, Sari; Bateman, Brian T

    2013-12-01

    To define the frequency, risk factors, and outcomes of massive transfusion in obstetrics. The State Inpatient Dataset for New York (1998-2007) was used to identify all delivery hospitalizations for hospitals that reported at least one delivery-related transfusion per year. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between maternal age, race, and relevant clinical variables and the risk of massive blood transfusion defined as 10 or more units of blood recorded. Massive blood transfusion complicated 6 of every 10,000 deliveries with cases observed even in the smallest facilities. Risk factors with the strongest independent associations with massive blood transfusion included abnormal placentation (1.6/10,000 deliveries, adjusted odds ratio [OR] 18.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 14.7-23.3), placental abruption (1.0/10,000, adjusted OR 14.6, 95% CI 11.2-19.0), severe preeclampsia (0.8/10,000, adjusted OR 10.4, 95% CI 7.7-14.2), and intrauterine fetal demise (0.7/10,000, adjusted OR 5.5, 95% CI 3.9-7.8). The most common etiologies of massive blood transfusion were abnormal placentation (26.6% of cases), uterine atony (21.2%), placental abruption (16.7%), and postpartum hemorrhage associated with coagulopathy (15.0%). A disproportionate number of women who received a massive blood transfusion experienced severe morbidity including renal failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis, and in-hospital death. Massive blood transfusion was infrequent, regardless of facility size. In the presence of known risk for receipt of massive blood transfusion, women should be informed of this possibility, should deliver in a well-resourced facility if possible, and should receive appropriate blood product preparation and venous access in advance of delivery. : II.

  1. Financing blood transfusion services in sub-Saharan Africa: a role for user fees?

    PubMed

    Hensher, M; Jefferys, E

    2000-09-01

    The provision of a secure and safe blood supply has taken on new importance in sub-Saharan Africa with the onset of the AIDS epidemic. Blood transfusion services capable of providing safe blood are not cheap, however, and there has been some debate on the desirability and sustainability of different financing mechanisms for blood transfusion services. This paper examines patterns of financing blood transfusion in three countries--Côte d'Ivoire, Zimbabwe and Mozambique. It goes on to consider the conceptual options for financing safe blood, and to examine in detail the possible role of user fees for blood transfusion in Africa, developing a simple model of their likely burden to patients based on data from Côte d'Ivoire. The model indicates that, at best, there can only be a limited role for user fees in the financing of safe blood transfusion services, due mainly to the relatively high cost of producing a unit of safe blood. Charging individuals for the blood they receive is likely to be administratively complex and costly, could realistically recover only a fraction of the production costs involved, and is further complicated by the fact that the main recipients of blood transfusion in sub-Saharan Africa are children and pregnant women. If cost-recovery for safe blood is to be attempted, the most viable option appears to be that of charging a collective fee, levied upon all inpatients, not just on those who receive blood. Such a mechanism is not without problems, not least in its failure to offer incentives for more appropriate blood use, and it is still likely to recover only a portion of the costs of producing safe blood. Whether or not cost-recovery is instituted, there will remain an important role for public funding of blood transfusion services, and, by implication, an important role for foreign donor support.

  2. The Effect of Treatment of Anemia with Blood Transfusion on Delirium: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    van der Zanden, Vera; Beishuizen, Sara J; Swart, Lieke M; de Rooij, Sophia E; van Munster, Barbara C

    2017-04-01

    Treating the precipitating factors of delirium is the mainstay of the prevention and treatment of delirium. We aim to investigate the role of anemia and blood transfusion within the multicomponent prevention and treatment strategy of delirium. Systematic review. We included cohort studies or Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) that considered blood transfusion as treatment for delirium or risk factor, and had delirium as outcome. Hospitalized patients above 55 years old. We searched MEDLINE from 1946 through November 2014. Quality assessment and data extraction were performed systematically. We included 23 studies (n = 29,471). The majority of the studies (n = 22) had a limited quality and for one study quality was uncertain. Two studies evaluated the association between transfusion strategy and postoperative delirium and found no association. Twenty-one studies investigated blood transfusion as a risk factor for delirium. In four of the 21 studies it could be assumed that delirium occurred after transfusion. One of these studies stated that transfusion was a significant risk factor for subsequent delirium (odds ratio (OR) = 3.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.32-10.94). The other three studies found no association between transfusion and delirium. In the remaining 17 studies, it was not clear whether delirium occurred before or after transfusion, so no conclusion could be drawn on the role of transfusion in delirium development. The majority of the included studies was not suited to answer the research question properly as the time course of the beginning of delirium as to transfusion was lacking. Our review shows that there is no good quality evidence available for blood transfusion to be a risk factor for delirium or to be a preventive or treatment option. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Factors associated with excessive postoperative blood loss and hemostatic transfusion requirements: a multivariate analysis in cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Despotis, G J; Filos, K S; Zoys, T N; Hogue, C W; Spitznagel, E; Lappas, D G

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate whether heparin and protamine doses administered using a standardized protocol based on body weight and activated clotting time values are associated with either transfusion of hemostatic blood products (HBPs) or excessive postoperative bleeding. Analysis using 10 multiple logistic or linear regression models in 487 cardiac surgical patients included perioperative variables that may have an association with either transfusion of HBP and/or excessive postoperative chest tube drainage (CTD). Prolonged duration of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), lower pre-CPB heparin dose, lower core body temperature in the intensive care unit, combined procedures, older age, repeat procedures, a larger volume of salvaged red cells reinfused intraoperatively and abnormal laboratory coagulation results (prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and platelet count) after CPB were associated with both transfusion of HBP and increased CTD. Female gender, lower total heparin dose, preoperative aspirin use and the number of HBPs administered intraoperatively were associated only with increased CTD, whereas a larger total protamine dose was associated only with perioperative transfusion of HBPs. Preoperative use of warfarin or heparin was not associated with excessive blood loss of perioperative transfusion of HBPs. In contrast to previous studies using bovine heparin, data from the present study do not support the use of reduced doses of porcine heparin during CPB.

  4. Frequency of homologous blood transfusion in patients undergoing cleft lip and palate surgery

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo, Wasiu L.; Ogunlewe, Mobolanle O.; Desalu, Ibironke; Ladeinde, Akinola L.; Adeyemo, Titilope A.; Mofikoya, Bolaji O.; Hassan, Olakunle O.; Akanmu, Alani S.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The study aims to determine the frequency of homologous blood transfusion in patientsundergoing cleft lip and palate surgery at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Setting and Design: A prospective study of transfusion rate in cleft surgery conducted at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Material and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients who required cleft lip and palate surgery were recruited into the study. Data collected included age, sex and weight of patients, type of cleft defects, type of surgery done, preoperative haematocrit, duration of surgery, amount of blood loss during surgery, the number of units of blood cross-matched and those used. Each patient was made to donate a unit of homologous blood prior to surgery. Results: There were 52 females and 48 males with a mean age of 64.4 ± 101.1 months (range, 3-420 months). The most common cleft defect was isolated cleft palate (45%) followed by unilateral cleft lip (28%). Cleft palate repair was the most common procedure (45%) followed by unilateral cleft lip repair (41%). The mean estimated blood loss was 95.8 ± 144.9 ml (range, 2-800ml). Ten (10%) patients (CL=2; CP=5, BCL=1; CLP=2) were transfused but only two of these were deemed appropriate based on percentage blood volume loss. The mean blood transfused was 131.5 ± 135.4ml (range, 35-500ml). Six (60%) of those transfused had a preoperative PCV of < 30%. Only 4.9% of patients who had unilateral cleft lip surgery were transfused as compared with 50% for CLP surgery, 11% for CP surgery, and 10% for bilateral cleft lip surgery. Conclusions: The frequency of blood transfusion in cleft lip and palate surgery was 10% with a cross-match: transfusion ratio of 10 and transfusion index of 0.1. A "type and screen" policy is advocated for cleft lip and palate surgery. PMID:20924451

  5. Platelet and Red Blood Cell Utilization and Transfusion Independence in Umbilical Cord Blood and Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Hematopoietic Cell Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Solh, Melhem; Brunstein, Claudio; Morgan, Shanna; Weisdorf, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients have substantial transfusion requirements. Factors associated with increased transfusions and the extent of blood product use in umbilical cord blood (UCB) recipients are uncertain. We reviewed blood product use in 229 consecutive adult recipients of allogeneic HCT at the University of Minnesota: 147 with leukemia, 82 lymphoma or myeloma; 58% received unrelated UCB and 43% sibling donor peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) grafts. Although neutrophil recovery was prompt (UCB median 17, range 2–45 days, and PBSC 14, range 3–34 days), only 135 of 229 (59% cumulative incidence, CI) achieved RBC independence and 157 (69%) achieved platelet independence by 6 months. Time to platelet independence was prolonged in UCB recipients (median UCB 41 vs. PBSC 14 days) and in patients who had received a prior transplant (median 48 vs. 32 days). Patients who received UCB grafts required more RBC through day 60 post HCT (mean UCB 7.8 (95% CI 6.7–8.9) vs. PBSC 5.2 (3.7–6.7) transfusions, p=0.04), and more platelet transfusions (mean 25.2 (95% CI 22.1–28.2) vs. 12.9 (9.4–16.4), p<0.01) compared to PBSC recipients. Patient receiving myeloablative (MA) conditioning required more RBC and platelet transfusions during the first 2 months post HCT compared to reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) (7.4 vs. 6.2, p=0.3 for RBC; 23.2 vs 17.5, p=0.07 for platelets). Despite prompt neutrophil engraftment, UCB recipients had delayed platelet recovery as well as more prolonged and costly blood product requirements. Enhanced approaches to accelerate multilineage engraftment could limit the transfusion-associated morbidity and costs accompanying UCB allotransplantation. PMID:20813199

  6. Rhesus Negative Woman Transfused With Rhesus Positive Blood: Subsequent Normal Pregnancy Without Anti D production.

    PubMed

    Maya, E T; Buntugu, K A; Pobee, F; Srofenyoh, E K

    2015-03-01

    Clinicians sometimes are confronted with the challenge of transfusing haemorrhaging Rhesus (Rh) D negative patients with Rh D positive blood to save their lives. There are concerns about alloimmunization and future haemolytic disease of the newborn in women of the reproductive age. Another fear is transfusion reaction if they receive another Rh D positive blood in future. We present a 32-year-old Rh D negative woman, who had postpartum haemorrhage in her first pregnancy and was transfused with Rh D positive blood because of unavailability of Rh D negative blood. She did not receive anti D immunoglobin but subsequently had a normal term pregnancy of an Rh positive fetus without any detectable anti D antibodies throughout the pregnancy. In life threatening situations from obstetric haemorrhage, transfusion of Rh D negative women with Rh D positive blood should be considered as the last resort.

  7. Additional red blood cell alloantibodies after blood transfusions in a nonhematologic alloimmunized patient cohort: is it time to take precautionary measures?

    PubMed

    Schonewille, Henk; van de Watering, Leo M G; Brand, Anneke

    2006-04-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization is common in transfused patients. Most studies report on the rate of alloimmunization in chronically transfused patients, which can be as high as 60 percent. Less is known on the incidence of clinically relevant antibodies in accidentally transfused patients. Because the probability of repeat transfusion increases with longer life expectancy, it was wondered to which extend non-chronically transfused alloimmunized patients are prone to form additional antibodies after repeat transfusion events. A 20-year retrospective multicenter study was performed analyzing additional alloantibody formation, against the RH, KEL, FY, JK, and MNS blood group systems. After additional transfusions, 21.4 percent of 653 patients produced additional antibodies, resulting in 157 new antibody specificities. At the end of the study 33.4 percent of patients had multiple antibodies. Eighty of 140 patients (57%) who formed additional antibodies did so after one transfusion episode of a median of 2 units of RBCs. Based on the antigen profile of 316 patients, 83 percent of antibodies could have been prevented by extended matching for the C, E, c, K, Fy(a), and Jk(a) antigens. Considering the current available donors in our region, 1 to 10 percent of potential donors would be available for 39 percent of patients and greater than 10 percent of potential donors for 61 percent of patients. It has been shown that nonhematooncologic alloimmunized patients are high antibody responders, with a more than 20 times increased risk to form antibodies compared to first-time alloimmunization risk. If extended matching for C, c, E, K, Fy(a), and Jk(a) antigens in the future is considered, this group should be taken into account.

  8. Blood component preferences of transfusion services supporting infant transfusions: a University HealthSystem Consortium benchmarking study.

    PubMed

    Fung, Mark K; Roseff, Susan D; Vermoch, Kathleen L

    2010-09-01

    The extent of acceptability of red blood cells (RBCs) containing additive solutions (ASs) for low-volume neonatal transfusions among hospitals is unknown. Also unknown is whether hospitals have policies that address the risk of hyperkalemia associated with prolonged storage either with or without irradiation for neonatal transfusions. A benchmarking survey of University HealthSystem Consortium members included questions regarding the acceptability of RBC units containing ASs for low-volume neonatal transfusions, policies addressing the length of RBC storage in AS, and policies regarding storage periods after irradiation. Twenty-eight of 47 respondents (60%) accept the use of at least one AS (AS-1, AS-3, or AS-5). Twenty-one (45%) accept the use of all three ASs for neonatal transfusions. Thirty-seven of 45 respondents (82%) do not have a policy requiring washing of RBCs used for low-volume transfusions beyond a specified number of days of storage or days after irradiation. Although the majority of institutions will use ASs, a significant number of institutions will not. The reasons for these policies were not elicited. Most respondents did not have a policy requiring washing beyond a specified number of days of storage or days after irradiation. Since RBCs stored for prolonged periods of time after irradiation have increased plasma potassium, it is important to develop policies to prevent clinically significant posttransfusion hyperkalemia in at-risk patients when RBCs are irradiated and not used immediately. More work still needs to be done to resolve these fundamental precepts of neonatal transfusion.

  9. Recruitment of prospective donors: what do they expect from a homepage of a blood transfusion service?

    PubMed

    Moog, R; Fourné, K

    2007-08-01

    In times of shrinking donor population, the recruitment of donors is of utmost importance. Recruitment can be done by personal communication, advertisement/information, classical mass media (newspaper, radio, TV) or new computerized media. The aim of this study was to gain information about the donors' demands of an Internet presentation of a blood transfusion service. Between October and December 2004 inclusive, prospective donors were asked to complete a survey about the impact of Internet information for blood donors. The survey contained questions measuring demographics, education and motivation for blood donation. In addition, the survey included questions that measured Internet access, duration of online time and donors' demands for an Internet presentation of a blood transfusion service. Donors were asked to tick a box with predefined answers. In cases where no options were applied, donors were requested to specify their answers. One hundred and fourteen prospective donors (71 female, 43 male) with a median age of 25 years (range 18-57 years) completed the survey. Most donors (57.9%) were 18-30 years old. Forty-two (36.8%) of the surveyed donors were repeat donors, whereas 72 (63.2%) were first-time donors. The majority of donors were informed about blood donation from relatives or friends (70.7% repeat donors and 67.7% first-time donors). Most of them had Internet access (85.7% repeat donors and 90.3% first-time donors). Exclusive use of private access was more often reported in repeat donors (77.8%), whereas both private and professional access was more frequently used in first-time donors (32.3%). Most donors used the Internet access daily, followed by weekly and monthly use. Multiple answers were given about the importance of desired information about the topic 'blood donation'. Both first-time and repeat donors wanted to be informed about organizational details of blood donation such as opening times, eligibility criteria, donation process and the kind

  10. The effect of random blood transfusions on immunoglobulin production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from uraemic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Degiannis, D; Mowat, A M; Tsakiris, D; Briggs, J D; Junor, B J; Parrott, D M

    1988-01-01

    The effect of blood transfusion on humoral immunity in chronic renal failure was studied by examining immunoglobulin production in vitro, in patients awaiting renal transplantation. Pokeweed mitogen (PWM) induced IgG plaque formation was normal in non-transfused uraemic patients while both spontaneous and Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I (SAC) induced immunoglobulin production were reduced. Five to ten units of third party blood transfusion reduced PWM-driven B cell differentiation, but had no effect on SAC-induced plaque formation, while spontaneous production of immunoglobulin was either enhanced or unaffected. As it is known that the response to SAC is less affected by suppressor T cell activity than that to PWM, these differences in the inhibitory effects of blood transfusion on B cell differentiation are further evidence that transfusion may act by increasing suppressor T cell activity. PMID:3048812

  11. Comparison of Stored Umbilical Cord Blood and Adult Donor Blood: Transfusion Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Tokan, Rola Sahyoun; Arsan, Saadet; Erdeve, Ömer; Solaz, Nuri; Avcı, Aslıhan; Ülkar, Serenay Elgün; Gülyapar, Elif; Üstünyurt, Zeynep; Bıyıklı, Zeynep; Kemahlı, Sabri

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to compare the storage properties of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates of umbilical cordblood (UCB) and adult donor blood (ADB), and to evaluate the feasibility of UCB-RBC concentrate as an autologoussource for blood transfusion in very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm neonates. Material and Methods: In all, 30 newborn (10 preterm, 20 full term) UCB and 31 ADB units were collected.RBC concentrates were stored and compared with regard to pH, potassium (K+), 2,3-biphosphoglycerate (2-3-BPG),adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), plasma Hb, and bacterial contamination on d 1, 21, and 35 of storage. Results: The K+ level increased with time and differed significantly between storage d 1 and 21, and between storaged 1 and 35 in both the UCB and ADB units. Initial and d 21 K+ levels were higher in the UCB units than in the ADBunits. The 2,3-BPG level did not differ significantly between the UCB-PRC and ADB-PRC samples. After 35 d of storageboth UCB-PRC and ADB-PRC samples exhibited significant differences from the initial free Hb, intracellular ATP, andpH values. Significant differences in intracellular ATP and pH were also observed between the UCB-PRC and ADB-PRCsamples. Conclusion: The volume of harvested and prepared UCB-PRC can be used for some of the blood transfusions requiredduring the neonatal period and thus may decrease the number of allogeneic transfusions, especially in preterm newborns.The hematological and biochemical changes that occurred in UCB during storage were comparable with those observedin ADB, and do not pose a risk to the immature metabolism of neonates. UCB-RPC prepared and stored under standardconditions can be a safe alternative RBC source for transfusions in VLBW newborns. PMID:24744666

  12. Comparison of stored umbilical cord blood and adult donor blood: transfusion feasibility.

    PubMed

    Tokan, Rola Sahyoun; Arsan, Saadet; Erdeve, Omer; Solaz, Nuri; Avcı, Aslıhan; Ulkar, Serenay Elgün; Gülyapar, Elif; Ustünyurt, Zeynep; Bıyıklı, Zeynep; Kemahlı, Sabri

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to compare the storage properties of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates of umbilical cordblood (UCB) and adult donor blood (ADB), and to evaluate the feasibility of UCB-RBC concentrate as an autologoussource for blood transfusion in very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm neonates. In all, 30 newborn (10 preterm, 20 full term) UCB and 31 ADB units were collected.RBC concentrates were stored and compared with regard to pH, potassium (K(+)), 2,3-biphosphoglycerate (2-3-BPG),adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), plasma Hb, and bacterial contamination on d 1, 21, and 35 of storage. The K(+) level increased with time and differed significantly between storage d 1 and 21, and between storaged 1 and 35 in both the UCB and ADB units. Initial and d 21 K(+) levels were higher in the UCB units than in the ADBunits. The 2,3-BPG level did not differ significantly between the UCB-PRC and ADB-PRC samples. After 35 d of storageboth UCB-PRC and ADB-PRC samples exhibited significant differences from the initial free Hb, intracellular ATP, andpH values. Significant differences in intracellular ATP and pH were also observed between the UCB-PRC and ADB-PRCsamples. The volume of harvested and prepared UCB-PRC can be used for some of the blood transfusions requiredduring the neonatal period and thus may decrease the number of allogeneic transfusions, especially in preterm newborns.The hematological and biochemical changes that occurred in UCB during storage were comparable with those observedin ADB, and do not pose a risk to the immature metabolism of neonates. UCB-RPC prepared and stored under standardconditions can be a safe alternative RBC source for transfusions in VLBW newborns.

  13. Mortality outcomes in patients transfused with fresher versus older red blood cells: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chai-Adisaksopha, C; Alexander, P E; Guyatt, G; Crowther, M A; Heddle, N M; Devereaux, P J; Ellis, M; Roxby, D; Sessler, D I; Eikelboom, J W

    2017-04-01

    Among transfused patients, the effect of the duration of red blood cell storage on mortality remains unclear. This study aims to compare the mortality of patients who were transfused with fresher versus older red blood cells. We performed an updated systematic search in the CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases, from January 2015 to October 2016. RCTs of hospitalized patients of any age comparing transfusion of fresher versus older red blood cells were eligible. We used a random-effects model to calculate pooled risk ratios (RRs) with corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI). We identified 14 randomized trials that enrolled 26 374 participants. All-cause mortality occurred in 1219 of 9531 (12·8%) patients who received a transfusion of fresher red blood cells and 1810 of 16 843 (10·7%) in those who received older red blood cells (RR: 1·04, 95% CI: 0·98-1·12, P = 0·90, I(2) = 0%, high certainty for ruling out benefit of fresh blood, moderate certainty for ruling out harm of fresh blood). In six studies, in-hospital death occurred in 691 of 7479 (9·2%) patients receiving fresher red cells and 1291 of 14 757 (8·8%) receiving older red cells (RR: 1·06, 95% CI: 0·97-1·15, P = 0·81, I(2) = 0%, high certainty for ruling out benefit of fresh blood, moderate certainty for ruling out harm of fresh blood). Transfusion of fresher red blood cells does not reduce overall or in-hospital mortality when compared with older red blood cells. Our results support the practice of transfusing patients with the oldest red blood cells available in the blood bank. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  14. Does tranexamic acid reduce blood transfusion cost for primary total hip arthroplasty? A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Harris, Ryan N; Moskal, Joseph T; Capps, Susan G

    2015-02-01

    Peri-operative tranexamic acid (TXA) significantly reduces the need for allogeneic blood transfusion in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and thus hospital costs are reduced. Before employing TXA in primary THA at our institution, facility costs were $286.90/THA for blood transfusion and required 0.45 man-hours/THA (transfusion rate 19.87%). After incorporating TXA, the cost for intravenous application was $123.38/THA for blood transfusion and TXA medication and 0.07 man-hours/THA (transfusion rate 4.39%) and the cost for topical application was $132.41/THA for blood transfusion and TXA and 0.14 man-hours/THA (transfusion rate 12.86%). TXA has the potential to reduce the facility cost per THA and the man-hours/THA from blood transfusions.

  15. Triggers and appropriateness of red blood cell transfusions in the postpartum patient--a retrospective audit.

    PubMed

    So-Osman, C; Cicilia, J; Brand, A; Schipperus, M; Berning, B; Scherjon, S

    2010-01-01

    Despite published guidelines, a proportion of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions seem unnecessary. To evaluate the indications for and the appropriateness of RBC transfusions in the postpartum patient, we performed a retrospective audit over a 1-year period in two Dutch hospitals. Observational study of transfused obstetric patients, admitted in 2006 to the Departments of Obstetrics of a university and a general hospital, was carried out. Relevant clinical and laboratory data were recorded. The appropriateness of RBC transfusions was assessed using the national and age-based transfusion guidelines for the general population; for the studied group the transfusion threshold haemoglobin (Hb) value was 6.4 g/dl for non-massive and 8.1 g/dl for massive blood loss. From these we derived target Hb levels. Ninety patients received one or more RBC units within 48 h of delivery. Mean pretransfusion Hb level was 6.9 [SD 1.2] g/dl. Median number of transfusions was 2. Mean Hb level at discharge was 9.7 [SD 1.1] g/dl. Taking threshold Hb and the derived target Hb level into account, 68% (n = 61) of the patients may have received one or more RBC units inappropriately. Of 311 RBC units transfused, 143 units (46%) were possibly inappropriate, partly due to over-transfusion. A significant proportion of postpartum RBC transfusions are possibly inappropriate, partly due to over-transfusion. If current guidelines would be more specific, in particular, with respect to the target Hb levels, the total amount of RBC transfusions may be considerably decreased.

  16. Appropriate use of red blood cell transfusion in emergency departments: a study in five emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Manuel Quintana; Borobia, Alberto M.; García Erce, José A.; Maroun-Eid, Charbel; Fabra, Sara; Carcas, Antonio; Frías, Jesus; Muñoz, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Background Transfusion of blood components continues to be an important therapeutic resource into the 21st century. Between 5 and 58% of transfusions carried out are estimated to be unnecessary. According to several studies, at least 20% of packed red blood cell transfusions (RBCT) are administered in hospital emergency departments (ED), but few data are available about the appropriateness of RBCT in this setting. This multicentre, cross-sectional observational study aims to assess the appropriateness of RBCT indications and transfused volumes in patients who attend ED. Materials and methods The study cohort is made up of consecutive consenting adult patients (≥18 years old) who received RBCT in ED over a 3-month period and for whom relevant clinical data were collected and analysed. Results Data from 908 RBCT episodes (2±1 units per transfused patient) were analysed. RBCT was considered appropriate in 21.4% (n=195), with significant differences according to RBCT indication (p<0.001), hospital level (p<0.001) and prescribing physician (p=0.002). Pre-transfusion haemoglobin level (Hb) negatively correlated with RBCT appropriateness (r=–0.616; p<0.01). Only 72.4% of appropriate RBCT had a post-transfusion Hb assessment (n=516). Of these, 45% were considered to be over-transfused (n=232), with significant differences according to RBCT indication (p=0.012) and prescribing physician (p=0.047). Overall, 584/1,433 (41%) of evaluable RBC units were unnecessarily transfused. Discussion The appropriateness of RBCT in ED is similar to other hospital departments, but the rate of over-transfusion was high. These data support the need for a reassessment after transfusion of each RBC unit before further units are prescribed. In view of these results, we recommend that physicians should be made more aware of the need to prescribe RBCT appropriately in order to reduce over-transfusion. PMID:27416566

  17. Autologous white blood cell transfusion: toward a younger immunity.

    PubMed

    Charron, Dominique

    2007-10-01

    More and more cells and tissues of human origin are considered as unique medical bio-resources and are instrumental in the ongoing development of regenerative medicine. Although a better understanding of the genetic complexity of the major histocompatibility complex has contributed to develop allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the autologous setting was viewed early on only as a means to overcome myelodepression. The contribution of the immune system for adoptive immunotherapy was recognized in the 1990s, when donor lymphocyte infusion demonstrated an antileukemic effect of the transfused T cells. This led to the foundation and development of adoptive immunotherapy in the treatment and prevention of infectious diseases and cancer. The recognition that the immune system is undergoing a progressive decline and deterioration with age introduces a new challenge. Immunosenescence results in a well-documented increase in incidence and severity of infections, impaired responses to vaccines, and development of cancer. We propose and argue that autologous white blood cells collected and cryopreserved at a young age will represent a valuable bio-resource for the restoration of immunity and the successful development of adoptive immunotherapies in treating infections and cancer, and will pave the way to anticipatory medicine.

  18. Blood transfusion and adverse surgical outcomes: The good and the bad.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Victor A; Hochstetler, Marion; Martin, Jeremiah T; Mahan, Angela; Saha, Sibu P

    2015-09-01

    Every experienced surgeon has a patient whose life was saved by a blood transfusion (the "good"). In contrast, an overwhelming amount of evidence suggests that perioperative blood transfusion can be associated with adverse surgical outcomes (the "bad"). We wondered what patient characteristics, if any, can explain this clinical dichotomy with certain patients benefiting from transfusion, whereas others are harmed by this intervention. We queried the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database containing patient information entered between 2010 and 2012 to identify differences in mortality and morbidity among patients receiving blood transfusion within 72 hours of their operative procedure compared with those who did not receive any blood. We calculated the relative risk of developing a serious complication or of operative mortality in propensity-stratified patients with equivalent predicted risk of developing a serious complication or operative mortality. There were 470,407 patients in the study group. Of these, 32,953 patients (7.0%) received at least a single blood transfusion within 72 hours of operation. The percent of transfused patients who died or developed serious morbidity was 11.3% and 55.4% compared with 1.3% and 6.1% in nontransfused patients (both P < .001). Operative mortality, rates of failure to rescue, and serious postoperative complications are increased in patients who receive a postoperative transfusion, both in unadjusted comparisons and in propensity-matched comparisons. Dividing patients into regression-stratified deciles with equal numbers of deaths in each group found that patients at the greatest risk for development of death or serious complications had nonsignificant risk of harm from blood transfusion, whereas patients in the least risk deciles had between an 8- and 12-fold increased risk of major adverse events associated with transfusion. We found that high-risk patients do not have a

  19. Pediatric blood transfusion practices at a regional referral hospital in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Fegan, Greg; Shavadia, Jay; Denje, Douglas; Mandaliya, Kishor; Bates, Imelda; Maitland, Kathryn; Hassall, Oliver W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Severe anemia in children is a major public health problem in sub‐Saharan Africa. In this study we describe clinical and operational aspects of blood transfusion in children admitted to Coast Provincial General Hospital, Kenya. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS This was an observational study where over a 2‐year period, demographic and laboratory data were collected on all children for whom the hospital blood bank received a transfusion request. Clinical data were obtained by retrospective review of case notes over the first year. RESULTS There were 2789 requests for blood for children (median age, 1.8 years; interquartile range [IQR], 0.6‐6.6 years); 70% (1950) of the samples were crossmatched with 85% (1663/1950) issued. Ninety percent (1505/1663) were presumed transfused. Median time from laboratory receipt of request to collection of blood was 3.6 hours (IQR, 1.4‐12.8 hr). Case notes of 590 children were reviewed and median pretransfusion hemoglobin level was 6.0 g/dL (IQR, 4.2‐9.1 g/dL). Ninety‐four percent (186) were transfused “appropriately” while 52% (120) were transfused “inappropriately.” There was significant disagreement between the clinical and laboratory diagnosis of severe anemia (exact McNemar's test; p < 0.0001). Antimalarials were prescribed for 65% (259) of children who received blood transfusions but only 41% (106) of these had a positive blood film. CONCLUSION In this setting, clinicians often order blood based on the clinical impression of “severe anemia.” This has implications for laboratory workload and the blood supply itself. However, the majority of children with severe anemia were appropriately transfused. The use of antimalarials with blood transfusions irrespective of blood film results is common practice. PMID:27611471

  20. Abdominopelvic hemorrhage: correlation of CT positivity with the subsequent decision to perform blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Chong, Suzanne T; Ellis, James H; Cohan, Richard H; Knoepp, Ursula S; Langley, Travis J; Lau, Darryl; Khalatbari, Shokoufeh

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the role of computed tomography (CT) on the decision to administer blood transfusions in patients with abdominopelvic hemorrhage (trauma, surgery, invasive procedure, and spontaneous) and to determine the clinical parameters most likely to influence the decision to administer blood transfusions in patients with spontaneous abdominopelvic hemorrhage. In this IRB approved and HIPPA compliant study, retrospective analysis was performed on 298 patients undergoing abdominal and pelvic CT for suspected abdominopelvic hemorrhage and the CT reports and electronic medical records were reviewed. Odds ratios and 95% CI were calculated to compare the odds of abdominopelvic hemorrhage and transfusion for categorical and continuous predictors. The presence of abdominopelvic hemorrhage by CT was significantly associated with blood transfusions for trauma patients (p-value <0.0001) only. 106 patients with suspected spontaneous abdominopelvic hemorrhage had the lowest CT positivity rate (n = 23, 21.7%) but the highest blood transfusion rate (n = 62, 58.5%) compared to the patients with abdominopelvic hemorrhage from known preceding causes. In patients with spontaneous abdominopelvic hemorrhage, low hemoglobin and hematocrit levels immediately prior to obtaining the CT study were more predictive for receiving a blood transfusion (p-value <0.0001) than the presence of hemorrhage by CT. CT positivity is strongly correlated with the decision to administer blood transfusions for patients with abdominopelvic hemorrhage from trauma, indicating that CT studies play a significant role in determining the clinical management of trauma patients. For patients with spontaneous abdominopelvic hemorrhage, the decision to transfuse depends not on the CT study but on the patient's hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. CT studies should therefore not be performed for the sole purpose of determining the need for blood transfusion in patients with spontaneous

  1. Presence of medication taken by blood donors in plasma for transfusion.

    PubMed

    van Tilborgh-de Jong, A J W; Wiersum-Osselton, J C; Touw, D J; Schipperus, M R

    2015-05-01

    The TRIP national hemovigilance and biovigilance office receives reports on side-effects and incidents associated with transfusion of labile blood products. Anaphylactic reactions accounted for the largest number of serious transfusion reactions in the period 2008-2012. In most cases, no cause is found for these reactions. TRIP data show that anaphylactic reactions occur relatively frequently with transfusion of plasma or platelet concentrates. Data from blood services show that 10% or more of plasma donors regularly use medication which is permitted under donation guidelines. It is conceivable that medication taken by the donor in plasma for transfusion could cause an anaphylactic transfusion reaction in the recipient. This exploratory study investigated the presence of drugs or drug metabolites in donor plasma. Samples (5 ml) were taken from thawed, quarantine fresh frozen plasma units (FFP) which had to be rejected for transfusion because of leaks or length of time after thawing. The samples were analysed for approximately 1000 drugs and drug metabolites using a toxicological screening method. Eighty-seven samples were analysed. Toxicological screening was positive in fourteen samples (16%). In eleven samples, one substance was found, and in three samples, the presence of two or three drugs was detected. After freezing, storage and thawing of fresh FFP, it is possible to detect medication taken by the donor. Further investigation is recommended to analyse whether donors' medication in plasma can be implicated in some cases of allergic or anaphylactic reactions in transfusion recipients. © 2014 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  2. Red blood cell storage time and transfusion: current practice, concerns and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    García-Roa, María; del Carmen Vicente-Ayuso, María; Bobes, Alejandro M.; Pedraza, Alexandra C.; González-Fernández, Ataúlfo; Martín, María Paz; Sáez, Isabel; Seghatchian, Jerard; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) units are the most requested transfusion product worldwide. Indications for transfusion include symptomatic anaemia, acute sickle cell crisis, and acute blood loss of more than 30% of the blood volume, with the aim of restoring tissue oxygen delivery. However, stored RBCs from donors are not a qualitative equal product, and, in many ways, this is a matter of concern in the transfusion practice. Besides donor-to-donor variation, the storage time influences the RBC unit at the qualitative level, as RBCs age in the storage bag and are exposed to the so-called storage lesion. Several studies have shown that the storage lesion leads to post-transfusion enhanced clearance, plasma transferrin saturation, nitric oxide scavenging and/or immunomodulation with potential unwanted transfusion-related clinical outcomes, such as acute lung injury or higher mortality rate. While, to date, several studies have claimed the risk or deleterious effects of “old” vs “young” RBC transfusion regimes, it is still a matter of debate, and consideration should be taken of the clinical context. Transfusion-dependent patients may benefit from transfusion with “young” RBC units, as it assures longer inter-transfusion periods, while transfusion with “old” RBC units is not itself harmful. Unbiased Omics approaches are being applied to the characterisation of RBC through storage, to better understand the (patho)physiological role of microparticles (MPs) that are found naturally, and also on stored RBC units. Perhaps RBC storage time is not an accurate surrogate for RBC quality and there is a need to establish which parameters do indeed reflect optimal efficacy and safety. A better Omics characterisation of components of “young” and “old” RBC units, including MPs, donor and recipient, might lead to the development of new therapies, including the use of engineered RBCs or MPs as cell-based drug delivering tools, or cost-effective personalised transfusion

  3. Intrauterine blood transfusion in immune hydrops fetalis, corrects middle cerebral artery Doppler velocimetry very quickly

    PubMed Central

    Yalinkaya, Ahmet; Evsen, Mehmet Sıddık; Celik, Yusuf; Sak, Muhammet Erdal; Soydinc, Hatice Ender; Taner, Mehmet Zeki

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the middle cerebral artery velocimetry before and after intrauterine blood transfusion in immune hydrops fetalis. The current study was conducted in a tertiary research hospital, from February 2009 to January 2011. Nineteen intrauterine blood transfusions performed during the study period. The factors recorded were age of the mothers, gestational weeks, pre-transfusion fetal hematocrit and post-transfusion fetal hematocrit, and also middle cerebral artery peak systolic velocimetry (MCA-PSV) was detected and recorded before and after intrauterine transfusion. A control group of twenty two cases for normal MCA doppler velocimetry was also included to the study. During the study, a total of eleven rhesus isoimmunized pregnancies underwent intrauterine blood transfusions at our perinatal diagnose unit. Before transfusion seventeen severe and two moderate anemias were detected and mean MoM of MCA-PSV was 1.76±0.38 MoM. Post transfusion mean MoM of MCA-PSV in the patient group and control group were 1.08±0.22 MoM and 0.96±0.21 MoM, respectively. The mean MCA-PSV values were higher in RI fetuses than post transfusion and control group. In current study, we found that MCA-PSV is a valuable parameter in detecting fetal anemia requiring intrauterine transfusion and mean MCA-PSV values is higher than 1.5 MoM in fetuses with anemia. And also decrease in MCA-PSV just after transfusion in anemic fetuses showed the quick response of the fetus to correction of anemia. PMID:22364302

  4. Mass casualty events: blood transfusion emergency preparedness across the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Heidi; Glasgow, Simon; Kristoffersen, Einar

    2016-04-01

    Transfusion support is a key enabler to the response to mass casualty events (MCEs). Transfusion demand and capability planning should be an integrated part of the medical planning process for emergency system preparedness. Historical reviews have recently supported demand planning for MCEs and mass gatherings; however, computer modeling offers greater insights for resource management. The challenge remains balancing demand and supply especially the demand for universal components such as group O red blood cells. The current prehospital and hospital capability has benefited from investment in the management of massive hemorrhage. The management of massive hemorrhage should address both hemorrhage control and hemostatic support. Labile blood components cannot be stockpiled and a large surge in demand is a challenge for transfusion providers. The use of blood components may need to be triaged and demand managed. Two contrasting models of transfusion planning for MCEs are described. Both illustrate an integrated approach to preparedness where blood transfusion services work closely with health care providers and the donor community. Preparedness includes appropriate stock management and resupply from other centers. However, the introduction of alternative transfusion products, transfusion triage, and the greater use of an emergency donor panel to provide whole blood may permit greater resilience. © 2016 AABB.

  5. Prolongation of rat heart allografts by donor-specific blood transfusion treated with ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.F.; Iga, C.; Lau, H.; Hardy, M.A.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of donor-specific blood transfusion was compared to that of UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion on heart allograft survival in inbred rats with major histocompatibility differences. In one series ACI rats received heterotopic heart grafts from Lewis rats and 1 mL transfusion of donor-type blood at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to the transplantation. Fifty percent of the grafts were permanently accepted (survival greater than 200 days). Following UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion, 55% of the grafts survived indefinitely. In a mixed lymphocyte reaction ACI lymphocytes are weak responders to Lewis lymphocytes. In another series, Lewis rats received ACI hearts. Donor-specific transfusions at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to transplantation did not significantly alter the survival of heart allografts. Lewis lymphocytes react strongly to ACI stimulator cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. However, when the donor blood was UVB-irradiated prior to transfusion, the ACI allograft survival was significantly prolonged in this ACI-to-Lewis strain combination. When Lewis rats received W/F hearts following either donor-specific or UVB-irradiated donor-specific transfusions, the hearts' survival was similarly and significantly prolonged, but did not become permanent. Mixed lymphocyte reaction reveals that the stimulation index of Lewis lymphocytes against W/F lymphocytes is greater than that of ACI versus Lewis, but is less than that between Lewis responder cells against ACI stimulators.

  6. Modeling the potential impact on the US blood supply of transfusing critically ill patients with fresher stored red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Arianna; Ezzeldin, Hussein; Menis, Mikhail; McKean, Stephen; Izurieta, Hector; Anderson, Steven A; Forshee, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    Although some studies have suggested that transfusion recipients may have better medical outcomes if transfused with red blood cell units stored for a short time, the overall body of evidence shows mixed results. It is important to understand how using fresher stored red blood cell units for certain patient groups may affect blood availability. Based on the Stock-and-Flow simulation model of the US blood supply developed by Simonetti et al. 2014, we evaluated a newly implemented allocation method of preferentially transfusing fresher stored red blood cell units to a subset of high-risk group of critically ill patients and its potential impact on supply. Simulation results showed that, depending on the scenario, the US blood total supply might be reduced between 2-42%, when compared to the standard of care in transfusion medicine practice. Among our simulated scenarios, we observed that the number of expired red blood cell units modulated the supply levels. The age threshold of the required red blood cell units was inversely correlated with both the supply levels and the number of transfused units that failed to meet that age threshold. To our knowledge, this study represents the first attempt to develop a comprehensive framework to evaluate the impact of preferentially transfusing fresher stored red blood cells to the higher-risk critically ill patients on supply. Model results show the difficulties to identify an optimal scenario.

  7. Modeling the potential impact on the US blood supply of transfusing critically ill patients with fresher stored red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Ezzeldin, Hussein; Menis, Mikhail; McKean, Stephen; Izurieta, Hector; Anderson, Steven A.; Forshee, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Although some studies have suggested that transfusion recipients may have better medical outcomes if transfused with red blood cell units stored for a short time, the overall body of evidence shows mixed results. It is important to understand how using fresher stored red blood cell units for certain patient groups may affect blood availability. Methods Based on the Stock-and-Flow simulation model of the US blood supply developed by Simonetti et al. 2014, we evaluated a newly implemented allocation method of preferentially transfusing fresher stored red blood cell units to a subset of high-risk group of critically ill patients and its potential impact on supply. Results Simulation results showed that, depending on the scenario, the US blood total supply might be reduced between 2-42%, when compared to the standard of care in transfusion medicine practice. Among our simulated scenarios, we observed that the number of expired red blood cell units modulated the supply levels. The age threshold of the required red blood cell units was inversely correlated with both the supply levels and the number of transfused units that failed to meet that age threshold. Conclusion To our knowledge, this study represents the first attempt to develop a comprehensive framework to evaluate the impact of preferentially transfusing fresher stored red blood cells to the higher-risk critically ill patients on supply. Model results show the difficulties to identify an optimal scenario. PMID:28319164

  8. Assessment of blood loss and need for transfusion during bimaxillary surgery with or without maxillary setback.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bong-Kyoon; Yang, Eun-Jung; Oh, Kap Sung; Lo, Lun-Jou

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the blood loss, transfusion needs, and operation times in subjects who underwent bimaxillary surgery with versus without maxillary setback. A retrospective chart review was completed in all patients who underwent bimaxillary surgery from March 2009 to August 2010. The inclusion criterion was the availability of a complete chart record. Patients were divided into 1 of 2 groups based on maxillary setback procedure. The predictive variable was the treatment group. The primary outcome variable was blood loss as measured by the change in hemoglobin. The secondary outcome variables were operation time and transfusion need. The other study variables were a patient's characteristics (ie, age and gender). Mann-Whitney test was performed to compare unpaired samples. Student t test was performed to compare operation time. Multiple regression analysis was used to analyze the adjusted relation among the study variables. There were 82 patients (17 male and 65 female; mean age, 28.0 ± 4.9 yr; age range, 18 to 35 yr) who underwent bimaxillary surgery in this study. The mean hemoglobin decreases were 1.72 g/dL (standard deviation, 0.67 g/dL) in the nonsetback group and 2.37 g/dL (standard deviation, 0.76 g/dL) in the setback group. The average operation times were 158.24 ± 30.36 minutes (range, 127.88 to 188.6 min) in the nonsetback group and 194.35 ± 29.20 minutes (range, 165.15 to 223.55 min) in the setback group. Transfusion was not performed in any patient. After adjusting for potential factors, the multiple regression model showed that the treatment group was associated with blood loss (P < .0001) and operation time (P < .0001). This study shows that intraoperative bleeding and operation time increased significantly in patients undergoing mandibular ramus osteotomy and Le Fort I osteotomy with maxillary setback. However, transfusion generally is not required during 2-jaw surgery, regardless of maxillary setback. Copyright © 2013

  9. Comparison of platelet transfusion as fresh whole blood versus apheresis platelets for massively transfused combat trauma patients (CME).

    PubMed

    Perkins, Jeremy G; Cap, Andrew P; Spinella, Philip C; Shorr, Andrew F; Beekley, Alec C; Grathwohl, Kurt W; Rentas, Francisco J; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B

    2011-02-01

    At major combat hospitals, the military is able to provide blood products to include apheresis platelets (aPLT), but also has extensive experience using fresh whole blood (FWB). In massively transfused trauma patients, we compared outcomes of patients receiving FWB to those receiving aPLT. This study was a retrospective review of casualties at the military hospital in Baghdad, Iraq, between January 2004 and December 2006. Patients requiring massive transfusion (≥10 units in 24 hr) were divided into two groups: those receiving FWB (n = 85) or aPLT (n = 284) during their resuscitation. Admission characteristics, resuscitation, and survival were compared between groups. Multivariate regression analyses were performed comparing survival of patients at 24 hours and at 30 days. Secondary outcomes including adverse events and causes of death were analyzed. Unadjusted survival between groups receiving aPLT and FWB was similar at 24 hours (84% vs. 81%, respectively; p = 0.52) and at 30 days (60% versus 57%, respectively; p = 0.72). Multivariate regression failed to identify differences in survival between patients receiving PLT transfusions either as FWB or as aPLT at 24 hours or at 30 days. Survival for massively transfused trauma patients receiving FWB appears to be similar to patients resuscitated with aPLT. Prospective trials will be necessary before consideration of FWB in the routine management of civilian trauma. However, in austere environments where standard blood products are unavailable, FWB is a feasible alternative. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  10. Red blood cell transfusion is not associated with necrotizing enterocolitis: a review of consecutive transfusions in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Wallenstein, Matthew B; Arain, Yassar H; Birnie, Krista L; Andrews, Jennifer; Palma, Jonathan P; Benitz, William E; Chock, Valerie Y

    2014-10-01

    To explore the association between red blood cell transfusion and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in a neonatal intensive care unit with liberal transfusion practices. A retrospective cohort study was conducted for all infants weighing <1500 g who received at least 1 packed red blood cell transfusion between January 2008 and June 2013 in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit. The primary outcome was NEC, defined as Bell stage II or greater. The temporal association of NEC and transfusion was assessed using multivariate Poisson regression. The study sample included 414 very low birth weight infants who received 2889 consecutive red blood cell transfusions. Twenty-four infants (5.8%) developed NEC. Four cases of NEC occurred within 48 hours of a previous transfusion event. Using multivariate Poisson regression, we did not find evidence of a temporal association between NEC and transfusion (P = .32). There was no association between NEC and red blood cell transfusion. Our results differ from previous studies and suggest that the association between NEC and transfusion may be contextual. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [The first 50 years of the Blood Transfusion Centre, Aarhus University Hospital].

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The first step to establish a blood transfusion centre in Aarhus was taken in 1951, when an ordinary refrigerator, to be used in a kitchen, was installed in the operation theater area (surgical department) and used for short time storage of blood from bleeding of the donor to transfusion of the patient. In order to celebrate the 60 years anniversary this paper tells the history of the Blood Transfusion Centre at Aarhus University Hospital, especially location in hospitals and scenery of laboratories. The paper is initiated with a description of some of the major milestones in transfusion medicine, which are essential for the function of a blood bank. The last part consists of photos, which shows the setting of the department during the 60 years. In order to facilitate the impression of the great technical improvement, which took place during this period, the photos are, together with a description, grouped according to the motive.

  12. Evaluation of a volumetric intravenous fluid infusion pump for transfusion of blood components containing red cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, H W; Lasky, L C; Polesky, H F

    1986-01-01

    A method was devised to evaluate the suitability of an infusion pump for transfusing components containing red cells. With simulated transfusions of units of whole blood tested before or after the expiration date there was no increase in the plasma hemoglobin level in pumped blood compared with blood that was put through a standard blood transfusion set. With outdated units of red cells there was an increased level of plasma hemoglobin after pumping. The increases were greatest at maximum pump rates, but were not statistically or clinically significant. The authors' evaluation indicates that this pump causes minimal damage to the red cells, although care should be exercised when rapidly transfusing red cells with high hematocrit values.

  13. Transfusion of type-A and type-B blood to cats.

    PubMed

    Giger, U; Bücheler, J

    1991-02-01

    Although nearly all domestic shorthair and longhair cats have type-A blood (greater than 99%), the frequency of blood type B in various feline breeds ranges from 0 to 59%. All blood-type-B cats have strong natural alloantibodies, predominantly of the IgM class, whereas blood-type-A cats have low alloantibody titers of the IgG and IgM classes. We therefore studied the efficacy and safety of transfusing 20 ml of matched and mismatched 14C-potassium cyanate-labeled blood to cats. In autologous and allogeneic matched transfusions of blood-type-A and type-B cats, the half-life of labeled erythrocytes proved to be similar (29 to 39 days). In contrast, type-B erythrocytes transfused into 5 blood-type-A cats had a mean (+/- SD) half-life of only 2.1 +/- 0.2 days and induced minor transfusion reactions. Half of the type-A blood given to 4 blood-type-B cats was destroyed within minutes to 6 hours (mean +/- SD = 1.3 +/- 2.3 hours), depending on the alloantibody titer. After 1 day, none of the labeled erythrocytes were detected. Mismatched transfusions in blood-type-B cats caused marked transient reactions including systemic anaphylactic signs (hypotension, bradycardia, apnea, urination, defecation, vomiting, and severe neurologic depression) and hemolytic signs (hemoglobinemia and pigmenturia) associated with severe reduction in plasma alloantibody titer and complement activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Linking hepatitis C virus infection to pre-1994 blood transfusions in female patients.

    PubMed

    Ramos Flores, Christian; Echeagaray, Ernesto; Castañeda, Guadalupe; Vargas, Maria de Lourdes; Montes-González, Raúl; Luna, Susana; Díaz, Laura; Torres, Oscar

    2017-03-15

    Most blood transfusions occur in female patients. The introduction of serologic screening practices by blood banks reduced the transfusion-related rate of infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV). In Mexico patients with pre-1994 transfusion history are at high risk of being detected with HCV infection. We aimed at establishing an interrelationship between two variables: pre-1994 transfusion history and rate of infection in women treated in the Guadalajara Metropolitan Area hospitals, in Mexico. Analytical observational case-control study which included both non-infected women and patients diagnosed with hepatitis C virus infection, in whom the pre-1994 transfusion history was determined. The cases were 150 women with confirmed hepatitis C virus serologic diagnosis. The controls were 150 women whose hepatitis C virus-detection serologic tests had yielded negative results. An odds ratio of 9.07 (95% CI: 5.37 – 15.3; p< 0.001) was found where the rate of infection for the case group was 0.72 while the control group had a ratio of 0.22; population attributable risk (PAR) was 0.64 (95% CI: 0.53 – 0.73), while etiologic fraction was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.81 – 0.93). Among women, having been exposed to pre-1994 blood transfusion means a risk 9.07 times higher than not being exposed to blood transfusion in the same time frame.

  15. Red blood cell age and potentiation of transfusion-related pathology in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Jordan A; Barnum, Scott R; Patel, Rakesh P

    2011-04-01

    The specific negative clinical manifestations associated with the transfusion of stored red blood cells (RBCs) and the corresponding mechanisms responsible for such phenomena remain poorly defined. Our recent studies document that leukoreduced older RBC units potentiate transfusion-related toxicity in trauma patients. It is our hypothesis that the transfusion of relatively older blood impedes microvascular perfusion. The central mechanisms proposed to mediate this microcirculatory alteration include: 1) the loss of RBC-dependent control of nitric oxide-mediated homeostasis concerning vasodilation and 2) immune cell and complement activation. In this review, we outline the background for our hypothesis and detail our current investigations toward the understanding of this pathophysiology.

  16. Current challenges and future achievements of blood transfusion service in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Cheraghali, A M; Sanei Moghaddam, E; Masoud, A; Faisal, H

    2012-10-01

    Afghanistan is a country with population of over 28 million. The long term conflicts have devastated country's qualified resources including human resources. ANBSTS was established by MoPH as the country national blood service. Currently in addition to central and regional blood centers of ANBSTS many other hospitals have their own transfusion services. Blood donation in Afghanistan mainly depends on replacement donors. Donor selection and donor interview are not very efficient. Most of the blood in Afghanistan is administered as fresh whole blood. Although blood transfusion services in Afghanistan require more efforts to be fully efficient, based on recent improvements in working procedures of ANBSTS a promising future for blood transfusion services in Afghanistan is predicted.

  17. Warm fresh whole blood transfusion for severe hemorrhage: U.S. military and potential civilian applications.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Philip C

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to review the history and current literature regarding the benefits and risks of warm fresh whole blood transfusion to include recent U.S. Army research from Afghanistan and Iraq. We also discuss current indications for its use as well as potential civilian applications for large-scale disasters. The use of warm fresh whole blood currently only persists in emergency life-threatening scenarios when tested stored blood components are not available. Recent combat operations in Afghanistan and Iraq have redirected attention on the benefits and risks of warm fresh whole blood for life-threatening injuries in casualties. Between March 2003 and July 2007, over 6000 units of warm fresh whole blood have been transfused in Afghanistan and Iraq by U.S. medical providers to patients with life-threatening traumatic injuries with hemorrhage. Preliminary results in approximately 500 patients with massive transfusion indicate that the amount of fresh warm whole blood transfused is independently associated with improved 48-hr and 30-day survival and the amount of stored red blood cells is independently associated with decreased 48-hr and 30-day survival for patients with traumatic injuries that require massive transfusion. Risks of warm fresh whole blood transfusion include the transmission of infectious agents and the potential for microchimerism. For patients with life-threatening hemorrhage at risk for massive transfusion, if complete component therapy is not available or not adequately correcting coagulopathy, the risk:benefit ratio of warm fresh whole blood transfusion favors its use. In addition, recent evidence suggests that there is potential for warm fresh whole blood to be more efficacious than stored component therapy that includes stored red blood cells in critically ill patients requiring massive transfusion. Efforts must continue to improve the safety of warm fresh whole blood transfusion for patients when it is required in emergency

  18. PLASMA EXPANDER AND BLOOD STORAGE EFFECTS ON CAPILLARY PERFUSION IN TRANSFUSION FOLLOWING HEMORRHAGE

    PubMed Central

    Hightower, C. Makena; Salazar Vázquez, Beatriz Y.; Cabrales, Pedro; Tsai, Amy G.; Acharya, Seetharama A.; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Treating hemorrhage with blood transfusions in subjects previously hemodiluted with different colloidal plasma expanders, using fresh autologous blood or 2-weeks stored blood, allows identifying the interaction between type of plasma expander and differences in blood storage. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Studies used the hamster window chamber model. Fresh autologous plasma, 130 kDa starch based plasma expander (HES), or 4% polyethylene glycol conjugated albumin (PEG-Alb) were used for 20% of blood volume hemodilution. Hemodilution was followed by a 55% by blood volume 40 min hemorrhagic shock period, treated with transfusion of fresh or 2-weeks stored blood. Outcome was evaluated one hour post blood transfusion in terms of microvascular and systemic parameters. RESULTS Results were principally dependent on the type of colloidal solution used during hemodilution, 4% PEG-Alb yielding the best microvascular recovery evaluated in terms of the functional capillary density. This result was consistent whether fresh blood or stored blood was used in treating the subsequent shock period. Fresh blood results were significantly better in systemic and microvascular terms relative to stored blood. HES and fresh plasma hemodilution yielded less favorable results, a difference that was enhanced when fresh vs. stored blood were compared in their efficacy of correcting the subsequent hemorrhage. CONCLUSION The type of plasma expander used for hemodilution influences the short term outcome of subsequent volume resuscitation using blood transfusion; 4% PEG-Alb providing the most favorable outcome by comparison to HES or fresh plasma. PMID:22554380

  19. Racial disparities in the use of blood transfusion in major surgery.

    PubMed

    Qian, Feng; Eaton, Michael P; Lustik, Stewart J; Hohmann, Samuel F; Diachun, Carol B; Pasternak, Robert; Wissler, Richard N; Glance, Laurent G

    2014-03-11

    Racial disparities in healthcare in the United States are widespread and have been well documented. However, it is unknown whether racial disparities exist in the use of blood transfusion for patients undergoing major surgery. We used the University HealthSystem Consortium database (2009-2011) to examine racial disparities in perioperative red blood cells (RBCs) transfusion in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG), total hip replacement (THR), and colectomy. We estimated multivariable logistic regressions to examine whether black patients are more likely than white patients to receive perioperative RBC transfusion, and to investigate potential sources of racial disparities. After adjusting for patient-level factors, black patients were more likely to receive RBC transfusions for CABG (AOR = 1.41, 95% CI: [1.13, 1.76], p = 0.002) and THR (AOR = 1.39, 95% CI: [1.20, 1.62], p < 0.001), but not for colectomy (AOR = 1.08, 95% CI: [0.90, 1.30], p = 0.40). Black-white disparities in blood transfusion persisted after controlling for patient insurance and hospital effects (CABG: AOR = 1.42, 95% CI: [1.30, 1.56], p < 0.001; THR: AOR = 1.43, 95% CI: [1.29, 1.58], p < 0.001). We detected racial disparities in the use of blood transfusion for CABG and THR (black patients tended to receive more transfusions compared with whites), but not for colectomy. Reporting racial disparities in contemporary transfusion practices may help reduce potentially unnecessary blood transfusions in minority patients.

  20. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation and pretransplant blood transfusion on pancreatic islet allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez-Picon, G.; McGeorge, M.

    1983-05-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) has been shown to have a strong immunosuppressive effect both experimentally and clinically. Pretransplant blood transfusions have also been shown to have a strong beneficial effect in the outcome of organ transplantation. A study was made of the effect of TLI and pretransplant blood transfusions, alone and in combination, as an immunosuppressive modality in the isolated pancreatic islet transplant in the rat model. Donor rats (Fischer RT1v1) were kept on a 50% DL-ethionine supplemented diet for 4-6 weeks prior to pancreas removal. Recipient rats (Lewis RT1) were made diabetics prior to transplantation by iv injection of streptozotocin (45 mg/kg). Transfusion protocol consisted of a biweekly transfusion of 2 ml of either donor specific or third party transfusions. Total lymphoid irradiation was carried out by daily administration of 200 rads during one week prior to transplantation. Transplantation of the isolated islets was performed by intraportal injection. Syngeneic transplant of one and a half donor pancreata in each recipient reverted the diabetic condition indefinitely (greater than 100 days). Untreated allogenic grafts had a mean survival time (MST) of 5.2 days. Total lymphoid irradiation in dosages of 800, 1000, and 1200 rads, as the only immunosuppressive regimen, prolonged the MST of allografts to 15.3, 16.5, and 21.8 days, respectively (P less than .05). Pretransplant third party blood transfusion had no effect on allograft survival (MST 6.0). When donor specific blood transfusions were given, the MST was prolonged to 25.3 days (P less than .05). When TLI was administered to recipients of donor specific transfusions, the MST of the allografts did not show any statistical significant difference when compared with untreated animals. This abrogation of the beneficial effect of specific blood transfusion was observed in all dosages of TLI employed: 800 rad (MST 3.0), 1000 rad (MST 8.0), 1200 rad (MST 5.18).

  1. 2015 proceedings of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine symposium.

    PubMed

    Spitalnik, Steven L; Triulzi, Darrell; Devine, Dana V; Dzik, Walter H; Eder, Anne F; Gernsheimer, Terry; Josephson, Cassandra D; Kor, Daryl J; Luban, Naomi L C; Roubinian, Nareg H; Mondoro, Traci; Welniak, Lisbeth A; Zou, Shimian; Glynn, Simone

    2015-09-01

    On March 25 and 26, 2015, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute sponsored a meeting on the State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) campus in Bethesda, Maryland, which was attended by a diverse group of 330 registrants. The meeting's goal was to identify important research questions that could be answered in the next 5 to 10 years and which would have the potential to transform the clinical practice of transfusion medicine. These questions could be addressed by basic, translational, and/or clinical research studies and were focused on four areas: the three "classical" transfusion products (i.e., red blood cells, platelets, and plasma) and blood donor issues. Before the meeting, four working groups, one for each area, prepared five major questions for discussion along with a list of five to 10 additional questions for consideration. At the meeting itself, all of these questions, and others, were discussed in keynote lectures, small-group breakout sessions, and large-group sessions with open discourse involving all meeting attendees. In addition to the final lists of questions, provided herein, the meeting attendees identified multiple overarching, cross-cutting themes that addressed issues common to all four areas; the latter are also provided. It is anticipated that addressing these scientific priorities, with careful attention to the overarching themes, will inform funding priorities developed by the NIH and provide a solid research platform for transforming the future practice of transfusion medicine.

  2. 2015 Proceedings of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Spitalnik, Steven L.; Triulzi, Darrell; Devine, Dana V.; Dzik, Walter H.; Eder, Anne F.; Gernsheimer, Terry; Josephson, Cassandra D.; Kor, Daryl J.; Luban, Naomi L. C.; Roubinian, Nareg H.; Mondoro, Traci; Welniak, Lisbeth A.; Zou, Shimian; Glynn, Simone

    2015-01-01

    On March 25-26, 2015, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute sponsored a meeting on the State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine on the NIH campus in Bethesda, MD, which was attended by a diverse group of 330 registrants. The meeting's goal was to identify important research questions that could be answered in the next 5-10 years, and which would have the potential to transform the clinical practice of transfusion medicine. These questions could be addressed by basic, translational, and/or clinical research studies and were focused on four areas: the three “classical” transfusion products (i.e., red blood cells, platelets, and plasma) and blood donor issues. Prior to the meeting, four Working Groups, one for each area, prepared five major questions for discussion along with a list of 5-10 additional questions for consideration. At the meeting itself, all of these questions, and others, were discussed in Keynote lectures, small group breakout sessions, and large group sessions with open discourse involving all meeting attendees. In addition to the final lists of questions, provided herein, the meeting attendees identified multiple overarching, cross-cutting themes that addressed issues common to all four areas; the latter are also provided. It is anticipated that addressing these scientific priorities, with careful attention to the overarching themes, will inform funding priorities developed by the NIH and provide a solid research platform for transforming the future practice of transfusion medicine. PMID:26260861

  3. THE IMPACT OF HIV INFECTION ON OBSTETRIC HEMORRHAGE AND BLOOD TRANSFUSION IN SOUTH AFRICA

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Evan M; Crookes, Robert; Hull, Jennifer; Fawcus, Sue; Gangaram, Rajesh; Anthony, John; Ingram, Charlotte; Ngcobo, Solomuzi; Croxford, Julie; Creel, Darryl; Murphy, Edward L

    2015-01-01

    Background Globally, as in South Africa, obstetric hemorrhage (OH) remains a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity. Although blood transfusion is critical to OH management, the incidence and predictors of transfusion as well as their relation to HIV infection are poorly described. Study Design and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted of all peripartum patients at four major hospitals in South Africa (April to July 2012). Comprehensive clinical data were collected on patients who sustained OH and/or were transfused. Logistic regression was used to model risk factors for OH and transfusion. Results A total of 15,725 peripartum women were evaluated, of whom 3,969 (25.2%) were HIV positive. Overall, 387 (2.5%) women sustained OH and 438 (2.8%) were transfused, including 213 (1.4%) women with both OH and transfusion. There was no significant difference in OH incidence between HIV positive (2.8%) and HIV negative (2.3%) patients (adjusted OR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.72–1.25). In contrast, the incidence of blood transfusion was significantly higher in HIV positive (3.7%) than in HIV negative (2.4%) patients (adjusted OR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.14–2.03). Other risk factors for transfusion included OH, low prenatal hemoglobin, the treating hospital, lack of prenatal care and gestational age ≤34 weeks. Conclusion In the South African obstetric setting, the incidence of peripartum blood transfusion is ten-fold higher than in the U.S. and other high-income countries while OH incidence is similar. While OH and prenatal anemia are major predictors of transfusion, HIV infection is a common and independent contributing factor. PMID:25773233

  4. Predicting blood transfusion using automated analysis of pulse oximetry signals and laboratory values.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, Stacy; Yang, Shiming; Hu, Peter; Miller, Catriona; Anazodo, Amechi; Galvagno, Samuel; Wang, Yulei; Hartsky, Lauren; Fang, Raymond; Mackenzie, Colin

    2015-10-01

    Identification of hemorrhaging trauma patients and prediction of blood transfusion needs in near real time will expedite care of the critically injured. We hypothesized that automated analysis of pulse oximetry signals in combination with laboratory values and vital signs obtained at the time of triage would predict the need for blood transfusion with accuracy greater than that of triage vital signs or pulse oximetry analysis alone. Continuous pulse oximetry signals were recorded for directly admitted trauma patients with abnormal prehospital shock index (heart rate [HR] / systolic blood pressure) of 0.62 or greater. Predictions of blood transfusion within 24 hours were compared using Delong's method for area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves to determine the optimal combination of triage vital signs (prehospital HR + systolic blood pressure), pulse oximetry features (40 waveform features, O2 saturation, HR), and laboratory values (hematocrit, electrolytes, bicarbonate, prothrombin time, international normalization ratio, lactate) in multivariate logistic regression models. We enrolled 1,191 patients; 339 were excluded because of incomplete data; 40 received blood within 3 hours; and 14 received massive transfusion. Triage vital signs predicted need for transfusion within 3 hours (AUROC, 0.59) and massive transfusion (AUROC, 0.70). Pulse oximetry for 15 minutes predicted transfusion more accurately than triage vital signs for both time frames (3-hour AUROC, 0.74; p = 0.004) (massive transfusion AUROC, 0.88; p < 0.001). An algorithm including triage vital signs, pulse oximetry features, and laboratory values improved accuracy of transfusion prediction (3-hour AUROC, 0.84; p < 0.001) (massive transfusion AUROC, 0.91; p < 0.001). Automated analysis of triage vital signs, 15 minutes of pulse oximetry signals, and laboratory values predicted use of blood transfusion during trauma resuscitation more accurately than triage vital signs or pulse

  5. Implementation of a two-specimen requirement for verification of ABO/Rh for blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Goodnough, Lawrence T; Viele, Maurene; Fontaine, Magali J; Jurado, Christine; Stone, Nancy; Quach, Peter; Chua, Lee; Chin, Mei-Ling; Scott, Robert; Tokareva, Irina; Tabb, Kevin; Sharek, Paul J

    2009-07-01

    This study presents our implementation of a two-specimen requirement with no prior record of ABO/Rh to verify patients' blood type before transfusion. Blood type verification was introduced, discussed, approved, and implemented over a 12-month period (May 2007 to May 2008). Potential barriers and impact on benchmark indicators were identified and tracked. Inpatient identification and/or specimen labeling for nursing and laboratory phlebotomists baseline corrected error rates were 1:467 and 1:5555, respectively. This study therefore sought and obtained approval to initiate a new policy of blood type verification before blood transfusion. Compliance in turnaround time (TAT) before and after implementation for completion of STAT type and screen/crossmatch within 60 minutes worsened marginally, from 90% to 80%. The impact on use of O-, uncrossmatched blood was found to be manageable. Seven (of 25 total) recorded electronic complaints were received after implementation. The corrected error rate for nurse phlebotomy draws after implementation was 1:630. Despite the lack of an instigating event, verification of blood type before blood transfusion was successfully implemented. An impact on resources and benchmark indicators such as TAT can be anticipated and managed. Further process improvement efforts will be needed to ensure safety (e.g., at time of blood transfusion) for patients receiving blood transfusions. ABO/Rh verification may be necessary even after future implementation of bar coding and/or RFID chips, because human errors continue to occur even with systems improvements.

  6. Transfusion-associated hepatitis before the screening of blood for hepatitis risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Ronald E.; Bukh, Jens; Alter, Harvey J.; Emerson, Suzanne U.; Trenbeath, Joni L.; Nguyen, Hanh T.; Brockington, Alicia; Mitra, Tanaji; Purcell, Robert H.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND The true incidence of transfusion-associated hepatitis (TAH) before blood screening is unknown. Our aims were to reevaluate blood recipients receiving unscreened blood and analyze hepatitis viruses circulating more than 45 years ago. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Cryopreserved serum samples from 66 patients undergoing open heart surgery in the 1960s were reevaluated with modern diagnostic tests to determine the incidence of TAH and its virologic causes. RESULTS In this heavily transfused population receiving a mean of 20 units per patient of predominantly paid-donor blood, 30 of 66 (45%) developed biochemical evidence of hepatitis; of these, 20 (67%) were infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) alone, four (13%) with hepatitis B virus (HBV) alone, and six (20%) with both viruses. Among the 36 patients who did not develop hepatitis, four (11%) were newly infected with HCV alone, nine (25%) with HBV alone, and one (3%) with both viruses. Overall, 100% of patients with hepatitis and 39% of those without hepatitis were infected with HBV and/or HCV; one patient was also infected with hepatitis E virus. The donor carrier rate for HBV and/or HCV was estimated to be more than 6%; contemporaneously prepared pooled normal human plasma was also contaminated with multiple hepatitis viruses. CONCLUSION TAH virus infections were a larger problem than perceived 50 years ago and HCV was the predominant agent transmitted. All hepatitis cases could be attributed to HCV and/or HBV and hence there was no evidence to suggest that an additional hepatitis agent existed undetected in the blood supply. PMID:24797372

  7. Bilateral cystic encephalomalacia following multiple intrauterine transfusions for anti-Kell isoimmunisation

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Hesham; Ng, Mansum; Rutherford, Mary; Gupta, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal haemolytic diseases result from maternal allo-immunisation to fetal antigens. Maternal antibodies cross the placenta causing red cell haemolysis, resulting in fetal anaemia and, in severe cases, hydrops and perinatal death. Intravascular intrauterine blood transfusion (IUT) has markedly reduced perinatal mortality and is now a standard procedure. IUT is considered to be a safe procedure with fetal loss rate reported to be less than 5% and no reported increase in the rate of neurodevelopment impairment. In this report, we are presenting a case of bilateral cystic encephalomalacia following fetal anaemia secondary to anti-Kell iso-immunisation treated with multiple IUTs. Such a significant adverse outcome following IUT for anti-Kell iso-immunisation has not been reported in the literature. This case highlights the need for appropriate parental counselling and routine postnatal head ultrasound in all babies delivered following multiple IUTs. PMID:25827913

  8. Wide Variations in Blood Product Transfusion Practices among Providers Who Care for Patients with Acute Leukemia in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Pine, Alexander B; Lee, Eun-Ju; Sekeres, Mikkael; Steensma, David P; Zelterman, Daniel; Prebet, Thomas; DeZern, Amy; Komrokji, Rami; Litzow, Mark; Luger, Selina; Stone, Richard; Erba, Harry P; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Lee, Alfred I; Podoltsev, Nikolai A; Barbarotta, Lisa; Kasberg, Stephanie; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Gore, Steven D; Zeidan, Amer M

    2017-01-01

    Background Transfusion of blood products is a key component of the supportive management in patients with acute leukemia (AL). However high-quality trial evidence and clinical outcome data to support specific transfusion goals for blood products for patients with AL remain limited leading to diverse transfusion practices. The primary objective of this study was to determine the spectrum of transfusion patterns in a variety of care settings among providers who treat AL patients. Study design and Methods A 31-question survey queried providers caring for AL patients about the existence of institutional guidelines for transfusion of blood products, transfusion triggers for hemoglobin (Hb), platelets (PLTs), and fibrinogen in various settings including inpatient, outpatient, and before procedures. Results We analyzed 130 responses and identified divergent transfusion Hb goals in hospitalized and ambulatory patients, fibrinogen goals for cryoprecipitate transfusions, and variation in practice for use of certain PLTs and red blood cell products. The least variable transfusion patterns were reported for PLT goals in thrombocytopenia and in the setting of invasive procedures such as bone marrow biopsy and lumbar punctures. Conclusions This survey confirmed wide variations in blood product transfusion practices across several clinical scenarios in patients with AL. The findings emphasized the need for large prospective randomized trials to develop standardized evidence-based guidelines for blood product transfusions in patients with AL with the goal of limiting unnecessary transfusions without compromising outcomes. PMID:27878822

  9. Ex-vivo expansion of red blood cells: how real for transfusion in humans?

    PubMed

    Migliaccio, Anna Rita; Masselli, Elena; Varricchio, Lilian; Whitsett, Carolyn

    2012-03-01

    Blood transfusion is indispensable for modern medicine. In developed countries, the blood supply is adequate and safe but blood for alloimmunized patients is often unavailable. Concerns are increasing that donations may become inadequate in the future as the population ages prompting a search for alternative transfusion products. Improvements in culture conditions and proof-of-principle studies in animal models have suggested that ex-vivo expanded red cells may represent such a product. Compared to other cell therapies transfusion poses the unique challenge of requiring great cell doses (2.5×10(12) cells vs 10(7) cells). Although production of such cell numbers is theoretically possible, current technologies generate red cells in numbers sufficient only for safety studies. It is conceived that by the time these studies will be completed, technical barriers to mass cell production will have been eliminated making transfusion with ex-vivo generated red cells a reality.

  10. "The blood fights on in other veins": Norman Bethune and the transfusion of cadaver blood in the Spanish Civil War.

    PubMed

    Lethbridge, David

    2012-01-01

    During the Spanish Civil War, Dr. Norman Bethune instituted a research laboratory to determine whether the blood from cadavers could be transfused into wounded soldiers and civilians at the front. Dr. Herman J. Muller joined him in this effort carrying out extensive experimentation into the technique and practice of such transfusions. At the same time, Bethune was in frequent contact with Dr. Reginald Saxton who later publicly advocated that the Spanish government should organize a large-scale supply of cadaver blood to the front-line hospitals. Recent evidence suggests that Saxton carried out cadaveric transfusions to an extent not previously recognized.

  11. [Blood transfusion in the Democratic Republic of Congo: efforts and challenges].

    PubMed

    Kabinda Maotela, J; Ramazani, S Y; Misingi, P; Dramaix-Wilmet, M

    2015-01-01

    The authors trace the history of blood transfusion in the Democratic Republic of Congo, as inherited through the colonial organization of the health system. The current configuration of transfusion system begins with the drafting of the national blood transfusion policy and the establishment of a national technical office within the Ministry of Health to coordinate transfusion activities and of its agents in each province. Despite countless difficulties, several positive points were noted. These involve essentially the drafting of all the necessary documents and standards and the integration of the blood safety system into the country's health system. Initially, the blood transfusion system applied a vertical approach, but with the reform of the country's health system, the performance of blood safety became transversal. In the 12 years from 2001 to 2012, it mobilized 112,882 volunteer blood donors; more than 80% of blood products were checked for safety and covered all blood needs; and 81,806 HIV infections were avoided by routine testing of blood products. During the same period, 7560 people were trained in blood transfusion. The prevalence of viral markers among donors has diminished sharply. Thus, HIV prevalence decreased from 4.7% to 2.1% between 2001 and 2012 that of hepatitis B dropped from 7.1% to 3.5% during the same period, and hepatitis C from 11.8% to 2.3% from 2004 to 2012. Despite this performance, enormous efforts are still required, for the organization of blood safety monitoring, the establishment of a safe supply of reagents and supplies, for sustaining the dynamics of voluntary associations of blood donors, and finally for providing stable funding for these blood safety activities.

  12. The use of trauma transfusion pathways for blood component transfusion in the civilian population: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Vogt, K N; Van Koughnett, J A; Dubois, L; Gray, D K; Parry, N G

    2012-06-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if, amongst civilian trauma patients requiring massive transfusion (MT), the use of a formal trauma transfusion pathway (TTP), in comparison with transfusion without a TTP, is associated with a reduction in mortality, or changes in indices of coagulation, blood product utilisation and complications. A systematic review of three bibliographic databases, reference lists and conference proceedings was conducted. Studies were included if comparisons were made between patients receiving transfusion with and without a TTP. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers on population characteristics, transfusion strategies, blood product utilisation, indices of coagulation, clinical outcomes and complications. Data were pooled using a random effects model and heterogeneity explored. Seven observational studies met all eligibility criteria. Amongst 1801 patients requiring MT, TTPs were associated with a significant reduction in mortality (RR 0·69, 95% CI 0·55, 0·87). No significant increase in the mean number of PRBC transfused between TTP and control patients was seen (MD -1·17 95% CI -2·70, 0·36). When studies assessing only trauma patients were considered, TTPs were associated with a reduction in the mean number of units of plasma transfused (MD -2·63, 95% CI -4·24, -1·01). In summary, the use of TTPs appears to be associated with a reduction in mortality amongst trauma patients requiring MT without a clinically significant increase in the number of PRBC transfused and a potential reduction in plasma transfusion. Effects of TTPs on platelet transfusion, indices of coagulation and complications remain unclear. A randomised controlled trial is warranted. © 2012 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2012 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  13. Microfluidic Flow Chambers Using Reconstituted Blood to Model Hemostasis and Platelet Transfusion In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Van Aelst, Britt; Feys, Hendrik B; Devloo, Rosalie; Vandekerckhove, Philippe; Compernolle, Veerle

    2016-03-19

    Blood platelets prepared for transfusion gradually lose hemostatic function during storage. Platelet function can be investigated using a variety of (indirect) in vitro experiments, but none of these is as comprehensive as microfluidic flow chambers. In this protocol, the reconstitution of thrombocytopenic fresh blood with stored blood bank platelets is used to simulate platelet transfusion. Next, the reconstituted sample is perfused in microfluidic flow chambers which mimic hemostasis on exposed subendothelial matrix proteins. Effects of blood donation, transport, component separation, storage and pathogen inactivation can be measured in paired experimental designs. This allows reliable comparison of the impact every manipulation in blood component preparation has on hemostasis. Our results demonstrate the impact of temperature cycling, shear rates, platelet concentration and storage duration on platelet function. In conclusion, this protocol analyzes the function of blood bank platelets and this ultimately aids in optimization of the processing chain including phlebotomy, transport, component preparation, storage and transfusion.

  14. Alloimmunization screening after transfusion of red blood cells in a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Vitor Mendonça; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano; Soares, Sheila; Araújo, Gislene; Schmidt, Luciana Cayres; Costa, Sidneia Sanches de Menezes; Langhi, Dante Mário; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2012-01-01

    Background Several irregular red blood cell alloantibodies, produced by alloimmunization of antigens in transfusions or pregnancies, have clinical importance because they cause hemolysis in the fetus and newborn and in transfused patients. Objective a prospective analysis of patients treated by the surgical and clinical emergency services of Hospital de Clínicas of the Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro (HC/UFTM), Brazil was performed to correlate alloimmunization to clinical and epidemiological data. Methods Blood samples of 143 patients with initial negative antibody screening were collected at intervals for up to 15 months after the transfusion of packed red blood cells. Samples were submitted to irregular antibody testing and, when positive, to the identification and serial titration of alloantibodies. The Fisher Exact test and Odds Ratio were employed to compare proportions. Results Fifteen (10.49%) patients produced antibodies within six months of transfusion. However, for 60% of these individuals, the titers decreased and disappeared by 15 months after transfusion. Anti-K antibodies and alloantibodies against antigens of the Rh system were the most common; the highest titer was 1:32 (anti-K). There was an evident correlation with the number of transfusions. Conclusions Given the high incidence of clinically important red blood cell alloantibodies in patients transfused in surgical and clinical emergency services, we suggest that phenotyping and pre-transfusion compatibilization for C, c, E, e (Rh system) and K (Kell system) antigens should be extended to all patients with programmed surgeries or acute clinical events that do not need emergency transfusions. PMID:23049421

  15. Utilization of blood transfusion among older adults in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Mary A.M.; Blumberg, Neil; Heal, Joanna M.; Langa, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND While there have been epidemiologic studies of blood donors, the characteristics of individuals who receive transfusions have not been well described for the US population. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Subjects were from the nationally representative Health and Retirement Study whose data were linked to Medicare files from 1991 through 2007 (n = 16,377). A cohort study was conducted to assess the frequency of transfusion in older Americans over time and to describe the characteristics of blood recipients. RESULTS Thirty-one percent (95% confidence interval [CI], 30%-33%) of older Americans received at least one transfusion within a 10-year period and 5.8% (95% CI, 5.4%-6.2%) experienced repeated transfusion-related visits within 30 days. The mean number of transfusion-related visits was 2.3 over a 10-year period (95% CI, 2.2-2.4). Older Americans who lived in the South were most likely to receive a transfusion (34%), independent of demographic and health-related factors, while those who lived in the western United States were the least likely (26%). Predictors of transfusion included smoking, low body mass index, and a history of cancer, diabetes mellitus, end-stage renal disease, and heart disease. African-Americans and Mexican-Americans had greater rates of blood utilization than other races and other Hispanics (respectively). There were also differences in transfusion utilization by education, marital status, religion, and alcohol use. CONCLUSIONS Transfusion is common in older Americans. Regional variations in blood use are not explained by patient characteristics alone. PMID:21087284

  16. Electrolyte and acid/base changes in dogs undergoing autologous blood transfusion via a cell salvage device

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Jodie L.; Thieman Mankin, Kelley M.; Levine, Gwendolyn J.; Thompson, James

    2015-01-01

    This study reports electrolyte and acid/base disturbances observed in clinical cases receiving autologous transfusion of blood processed by a cell salvage device. The records of 12 client-owned dogs that received an autologous transfusion via a cell salvage device with pre- and post-autologous transfusion blood work available were reviewed. Blood work from the 12 case dogs was compared to blood work from 12 control dogs with similar diseases. Control dogs received similar surgical treatment and were administered a similar volume per kg of packed red blood cells as case dogs, but did not undergo autologous transfusion. Case dogs that received autologous transfusion via a cell salvage device were significantly more likely to experience a decrease in ionized calcium and magnesium levels post-transfusion than were control dogs. Calcium and magnesium levels should be closely monitored during and after autologous transfusion. Calcium and/or magnesium supplementation may be required. PMID:26345136

  17. Implementing SLMTA in the Kenya National Blood Transfusion Service: lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Rombo, Charles O.; Oduor, Margaret; Kambale, Serah M.; Tilock, Kimberly; Kimani, Daniel; Makokha, Ernest; Mwamba, Peter M.

    2017-01-01

    Background The Kenya National Blood Transfusion Service (KNBTS) is mandated to provide safe and sufficient blood and blood components for the country. In 2013, the KNBTS National Testing Laboratory and the six regional blood transfusion centres were enrolled in the Strengthening Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA) programme. The process was supported by Global Communities with funding from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Methods The SLMTA implementation at KNBTS followed the standard three-workshop series, on-site mentorships and audits. Baseline, midterm and exit audits were conducted at the seven facilities, using a standard checklist to measure progress. Given that SLMTA was designed for clinical and public health laboratories, key stakeholders, guided by Global Communities, tailored SLMTA materials to address blood transfusion services, and oriented trainers, auditors and mentors on the same. Results The seven facilities moved from an average of zero stars at baseline to an average of three stars at the exit audit. The average baseline audit score was 38% (97 points), midterm 71% (183 points) and exit audit 79% (205 points). The Occurrence Management and Process Improvement quality system essential had the largest improvement (at 67 percentage points), from baseline to exit, whereas Facilities and Safety had the smallest improvement (at 31 percentage points). Conclusion SLMTA can be an effective tool for preparing a blood transfusion service for accreditation. Key success factors included customising SLMTA to blood transfusion activities; sensitising trainers, mentors and auditors on operations of blood transfusion service; creating SLMTA champions in key departments; and integrating other blood transfusion-specific accreditation standards into SLMTA. PMID:28879153

  18. Strengthening medical education in haematology and blood transfusion: postgraduate programmes in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Makani, Julie; Lyimo, Magdalena; Magesa, Pius; Roberts, David J

    2017-04-03

    Haematology and blood transfusion, as a clinical and laboratory discipline, has a far-reaching impact on healthcare both through direct patient care as well as provision of laboratory and transfusion services. Improvement of haematology and blood transfusion may therefore be significant in achieving advances in health in Africa. In 2005, Tanzania had one of the lowest distributions of doctors in the world, estimated at 2·3 doctors per 100 000 of population, with only one haematologist, a medical doctor with postgraduate medical education in haematology and blood transfusion. Here, we describe the establishment and impact of a postgraduate programme centred on Master of Medicine and Master of Science programmes to build the capacity of postgraduate training in haematology and blood transfusion. The programme was delivered through Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) with partnership from visiting medical and laboratory staff from the UK and complemented by short-term visits of trainees from Tanzania to Haematology Departments in the UK. The programme had a significant impact on the development of human resources in haematology and blood transfusion, successfully training 17 specialists with a significant influence on delivery of health services and research. This experience shows how a self-sustaining, specialist medical education programme can be developed at low cost within Lower and Middle Income Countries (LMICs) to rapidly enhance delivery of capacity to provide specialist services.

  19. Mortality increases after massive exchange transfusion with older stored blood in canines with experimental pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Steven B; Wang, Dong; Sun, Junfeng; Kanias, Tamir; Feng, Jing; Helms, Christine C; Solomon, Michael A; Alimchandani, Meghna; Quezado, Martha; Gladwin, Mark T; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; Klein, Harvey G; Natanson, Charles

    2013-02-28

    Two-year-old purpose-bred beagles (n = 24) infected with Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia were randomized in a blinded fashion for exchange transfusion with either 7- or 42-day-old canine universal donor blood (80 mL/kg in 4 divided doses). Older blood increased mortality (P = .0005), the arterial alveolar oxygen gradient (24-48 hours after infection; P ≤ .01), systemic and pulmonary pressures during transfusion (4-16 hours) and pulmonary pressures for ~ 10 hours afterward (all P ≤ .02). Further, older blood caused more severe lung damage, evidenced by increased necrosis, hemorrhage, and thrombosis (P = .03) noted at the infection site postmortem. Plasma cell–free hemoglobin and nitric oxide (NO) consumption capability were elevated and haptoglobin levels were decreased with older blood during and for 32 hours after transfusion (all P ≤ .03). The low haptoglobin (r = 0.61; P = .003) and high NO consumption levels at 24 hours (r = −0.76; P < .0001) were associated with poor survival. Plasma nontransferrin-bound and labile iron were significantly elevated only during transfusion (both P = .03) and not associated with survival (P = NS). These data from canines indicate that older blood after transfusion has a propensity to hemolyze in vivo, releases vasoconstrictive cell-free hemoglobin over days, worsens pulmonary hypertension, gas exchange, and ischemic vascular damage in the infected lung, and thereby increases the risk of death from transfusion.

  20. Strengthening medical education in haematology and blood transfusion: postgraduate programmes in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Makani, Julie; Lyimo, Magdalena; Magesa, Pius; Roberts, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Haematology and blood transfusion, as a clinical and laboratory discipline, has a far-reaching impact on healthcare both through direct patient care as well as provision of laboratory and transfusion services. Improvement of haematology and blood transfusion may therefore be significant in achieving advances in health in Africa. In 2005, Tanzania had one of the lowest distributions of doctors in the world, estimated at 2·3 doctors per 100 000 of population, with only one haematologist, a medical doctor with postgraduate medical education in haematology and blood transfusion. Here, we describe the establishment and impact of a postgraduate programme centred on Master of Medicine and Master of Science programmes to build the capacity of postgraduate training in haematology and blood transfusion. The programme was delivered through Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) with partnership from visiting medical and laboratory staff from the UK and complemented by short-term visits of trainees from Tanzania to Haematology Departments in the UK. The programme had a significant impact on the development of human resources in haematology and blood transfusion, successfully training 17 specialists with a significant influence on delivery of health services and research. This experience shows how a self-sustaining, specialist medical education programme can be developed at low cost within Lower and Middle Income Countries (LMICs) to rapidly enhance delivery of capacity to provide specialist services. PMID:28369755

  1. Clinical Decision Support Reduces Overuse of Red Blood Cell Transfusions: Interrupted Time Series Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kassakian, Steven Z; Yackel, Thomas R; Deloughery, Thomas; Dorr, David A

    2016-06-01

    Red blood cell transfusion is the most common procedure in hospitalized patients in the US. Growing evidence suggests that a sizeable percentage of these transfusions are inappropriate, putting patients at significant risk and increasing costs to the health care system. We performed a retrospective quasi-experimental study from November 2008 until November 2014 in a 576-bed tertiary care hospital. The intervention consisted of an interruptive clinical decision support alert shown to a provider when a red blood cell transfusion was ordered in a patient whose most recent hematocrit was ≥21%. We used interrupted time series analysis to determine whether our primary outcome of interest, rate of red blood cell transfusion in patients with hematocrit ≥21% per 100 patient (pt) days, was reduced by the implementation of the clinical decision support tool. The rate of platelet transfusions was used as a nonequivalent dependent control variable. A total of 143,000 hospital admissions were included in our analysis. Red blood cell transfusions decreased from 9.4 to 7.8 per 100 pt days after the clinical decision support intervention was implemented. Interrupted time series analysis showed that significant decline of 0.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03-0.07; P < .001) units of red blood cells transfused per 100 pt days per month was already underway in the preintervention period. This trend accelerated to 0.1 (95% CI, 0.09-0.12; P < .001) units of red blood cells transfused per 100 pt days per month following the implementation of the clinical decision support tool. There was no statistical change in the rate of platelet transfusion resulting from the intervention. The implementation of an evidence-based clinical decision support tool was associated with a significant decline in the overuse of red blood cell transfusion. We believe this intervention could be easily replicated in other hospitals using commercial electronic health records and a similar reduction in

  2. Reduced transfusion requirement with use of fresh whole blood in pediatric cardiac surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Jobes, David R; Sesok-Pizzini, Deborah; Friedman, David

    2015-05-01

    Pediatric patients undergoing cardiac operations are at high risk for blood loss and transfusion. A practice intended to reduce transfusion using a standard order of 2 units fresh whole blood (< 48 hours from donation) for elective cardiac operations in patients younger than 2 years of age was in place from 1995 to 2010. The objective of this study was to describe blood use in this population and to compare the results with those in published reports describing the use of blood components exclusively for transfusion. Retrospective data from a surgical registry and blood bank records for 15 consecutive years were analyzed. Transfusion requirements were identified as donor exposures for the day of operation and the next postoperative day. Transfusions were fresh whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, and cryoprecipitate. Donor exposures for subgroups according to procedure and age were compared with those in published reports. The cohort consisted of 4,111 patients with a median age of 94 days and a median weight of 4.4 kg. The median donor exposure was 2 (range, 0 to 28). Younger patients having complex procedures had the most donor exposures. Fewer donor exposures were incurred in all subgroups compared with reports of component use in the literature. The use of fresh whole blood for cardiac operations in children younger than 2 years old reduces donor exposures compared with published reports of component use. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Blood transfusion safety in Africa: a literature review of infectious disease and organizational challenges.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Evan M; Vermeulen, Marion; Murphy, Edward

    2012-04-01

    Blood safety remains an important public health concern in Africa where lack of availability or provision of unsafe blood adversely impacts morbidity and mortality in the region. In recognition of this shortfall, the World Health Organization (WHO) established a goal of regional blood safety by 2012 through improved "organization and management, blood donor recruitment and collection, testing of donor blood as well as appropriate clinical use of blood" (Tagny et al: Transfusion. 2008;48:1256-1261; Tapko et al: Status of Blood Safety in the WHO African Region: Report of the 2006 Survey http://www.afro.who.int/en/divisions-a-programmes/dsd/health-technologies-a-laboratories.html. Brazzaville, Republic of Congo: WHO Regional Office for Africa; 2006). Although there has been substantial progress toward meeting these objectives, there are continued obstacles to both development and sustainability. In a setting where transfusion oversight is still being improved, transfusion-transmitted infections are of real concern. The high prevalence of some transfusion-transmissible agents such as hepatitis B virus and HIV in the general population means that some infected blood units escape detection by even well-performed laboratory testing, resulting in potential downstream transmission to patients. The spectrum of transfusion-transmitted infection include conventional as well as exotic pathogens, many of which are endemic to the region, thereby imparting ongoing challenges to recruitment and testing strategies.

  4. Simplified enrollment for autologous transfusion: automatic referral of presurgical patients for assessment for autologous blood collections.

    PubMed

    Moore, S B; Swenke, P K; Foss, M L; Rand, J A; Cabanela, M E; Kavanagh, B; Taswell, H F

    1992-04-01

    We implemented a pilot program at our institution for automatic referral of patients for presurgical assessment for preoperative and intraoperative collection of autologous blood. Although patients and clinicians support the use of autologous transfusion, often a request for collection of autologous blood is not initiated. During 11 months, 269 patients (82%) of three orthopedic surgeons entered the program, and 218 underwent operation and were dismissed from the hospital. A total of 940 units of autologous blood (675 preoperatively and 265 intraoperatively) was collected from these 218 patients, and 84% of the units were transfused. Throughout hospitalization, 86% of the patients received only autologous blood, whereas 14% received various proportions of homologous and autologous blood. In contrast, only 26% of a concomitant control group of 220 consecutive orthopedic surgical patients not participating in the automatic-referral program received only autologous blood. Thus, the automatic-referral program increased the percentage of elective orthopedic surgical patients who received only autologous blood from 26% to 86% (P less than 0.001). This study also showed that the same amount of blood was used for autologous transfusions as was routinely used for homologous transfusions in similar cases. The automatic-referral system was convenient for physicians and patients and offered the benefits of reduction of transfusion-associated risks and amelioration of patient anxieties.

  5. Factors affecting transfusion requirement after hip fracture: Can we reduce the need for blood?

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Sagar J.; Wood, Kristi S.; Marsh, Jackie; Bryant, Dianne; Abdo, Hussein; Lawendy, Abdel-Rahman; Sanders, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hip fractures are common injuries that result in blood loss and frequently require the transfusion of blood products. We sought to identify risk factors leading to increased blood transfusion in patients presenting with hip fractures, especially those factors that are modifiable. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the cases of all patients who had fixation of their hip fractures between October 2005 and February 2010. The need for transfusion was correlated with potential risk factors, including age, sex, preoperative hemoglobin, fracture type, fixation method and more. Results A total of 835 patients had fixation of their hip fractures during the study period; 631 met the inclusion criteria and 249 of them (39.5%) were transfused. We found an association between need for blood transfusion and female sex (p = 0.018), lower preoperative hemoglobin (p < 0.001), fracture type (p < 0.001) and fixation method (p < 0.001). Compared with femoral neck fractures, there was a 2.37 times greater risk of blood transfusion in patients with intertrochanteric fractures (p < 0.001) and a 4.03 times greater risk in those with subtrochanteric fractures (p < 0.001). Dynamic hip screw (DHS) fixation decreased the risk of transfusion by about half compared with intramedullary nail or hemiarthroplasty. We found no association with age, delay to operation (p = 0.17) or duration of surgery (p = 0.30). Conclusion The only modifiable risk factor identified was fixation method. When considering blood transfusion requirements in isolation, we suggest a potential benefit in using a DHS for intertrochanteric and femoral neck fractures amenable to DHS fixation. PMID:25265109

  6. Effect of Blood Transfusions on Immune function. Part VI. Effect on Immunologic Response to Tumor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    Oberman HA. The evolution of blood transfusion. U Mich Med Dr. Mark A. Malangoni (Louisville, Ky.). You have shown Center J 1967;33:68-74. decreased...tion of donor strdin blood or blood constituents on the survival metastases rather than pulmonary metastases. Is the effect that of cardiac allografts

  7. Critical issues in hematology: anemia, thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, and blood product transfusions in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Drews, Reed E

    2003-12-01

    Systematic evaluations of anemia, thrombocytopenia, and coagulopathy are essential to identifying and managing their causes successfully. In all cases, clinicians should evaluate RBC measurements alongside WBC and platelet counts and WBC differentials. Multiple competing factors may coexist; certain factors affect RBCs independent of those that affect WBCs or platelets. Ideally, clinicians should examine the peripheral blood smear for morphologic features of RBCs, WBCs, and platelets that provide important clues to the cause of the patient's hematologic disorder. Thrombocytopenia arises from decreased platelet production, increased platelet destruction, or dilutional or distributional causes. Drug-induced thrombocytopenias present diagnostic challenges, because many medicines can cause thrombocytopenia and critically ill patients often receive multiple medications. If they suspect type II HIT, clinicians must promptly discontinue all heparin sources, including LMWHs, without awaiting laboratory confirmation, to avoid thrombotic sequelae. Because warfarin anticoagulation induces acquired protein C deficiency, thereby exacerbating the prothrombotic state of type II HIT, warfarin should be withheld until platelet counts increase to more than 100,000/microL and type II HIT is clearly resolving. The presence of a consumptive coagulopathy in the setting of thrombocytopenia supports a diagnosis of DIC, not TTP-HUS, and is demonstrated by decreasing serum fibrinogen levels, and increasing TTs, PTs, aPTTs, and fibrin degradation products. Increasing D-dimer, levels are the most specific DIC parameter and reflect fibrinolysis of cross-linked fibrin. Elevated PTs or a PTTs can result from the absence of factors or the presence of inhibitors. Clinicians should suspect factor inhibitors when the prolonged PT or aPTT does not correct or only partially corrects following an immediate assay of a 1:1 mix of patient and normal plasma. In addition to factor inhibitors

  8. Almonte's great train disaster: Shaping nurses' roles and the civilian use of blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Toman, Cynthia

    2004-01-01

    Blood transfusion was initially a small-scale, labour-intensive therapy administered by physicians. Through the first decades of the 20th century, transfusion comprised a "last resort" measure used and tested primarily in the context of war. Media accounts of the Almonte train disaster on the night of 27 December 1942 linked survival to the newly established blood bank located 42 km east in Ottawa, Ontario. This event did not constitute a "first time" occurrence or a "great discovery" in the history of blood. But it did illustrate in a very visible and public manner that blood transfusion technology was now readily available for use in general hospitals and civilian populations. Canada had an infrastructure for the collection, processing, storage, and transportation of blood products, and for the recruitment of blood donors by the mid-1940s. As the need for blood declined toward the end of World War II, transfusion became a technology in need of application. The extension of transfusion to civilian populations, however, would require a ready source of labour-increased numbers of health care workers who were available continuously with the necessary knowledge and skills to assume the responsibility. Nurses were well situated for this technological role by a convergence of scientific, economic, labour, gender, professional, and educational influences that both facilitated and constrained blood transfusion as a nursing competency. This paper examines how the expanded use of one medical technology shaped related roles for nurses. Transfusion ultimately influenced nurses' work and the composition of the workforce as the first medical act "delegated" to nurses in Ontario (1947), setting a precedent for the delegation of further technologies over the next four decades.

  9. Implementation of a transfusion algorithm to reduce blood product utilization in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Gina; Daves, Suanne; Hughes, Alex; Watkins, Scott; Woods, Marcella; Kreger, Michael; Marincola, Paula; Chocron, Isaac; Donahue, Brian

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this project is to measure the impact of standardization of transfusion practice on blood product utilization and postoperative bleeding in pediatric cardiac surgery patients. Transfusion is common following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in children and is associated with increased mortality, infection, and duration of mechanical ventilation. Transfusion in pediatric cardiac surgery is often based on clinical judgment rather than objective data. Although objective transfusion algorithms have demonstrated efficacy for reducing transfusion in adult cardiac surgery, such algorithms have not been applied in the pediatric setting. This quality improvement effort was designed to reduce blood product utilization in pediatric cardiac surgery using a blood product transfusion algorithm. We implemented an evidence-based transfusion protocol in January 2011 and monitored the impact of this algorithm on blood product utilization, chest tube output during the first 12 h of intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and predischarge mortality. When compared with the 12 months preceding implementation, blood utilization per case in the operating room odds ratio (OR) for the 11 months following implementation decreased by 66% for red cells (P = 0.001) and 86% for cryoprecipitate (P < 0.001). Blood utilization during the first 12 h of ICU did not increase during this time and actually decreased 56% for plasma (P = 0.006) and 41% for red cells (P = 0.031), indicating that the decrease in OR transfusion did not shift the transfusion burden to the ICU. Postoperative bleeding, as measured by chest tube output in the first 12 ICU hours, did not increase following implementation of the algorithm. Monthly surgical volume did not change significantly following implementation of the algorithm (P = 0.477). In a logistic regression model for predischarge mortality among the nontransplant patients, after accounting for surgical severity and duration of CPB, use of the transfusion

  10. A home blood transfusion programme for beta-thalassaemia patients.

    PubMed

    Madgwick, K V; Yardumian, A

    1999-06-01

    Although home transfusion programmes are relatively common in the USA (Anon, 1990, Home Care in the 1990s. Council on Scientific Affairs. Journal of the American Medical Association, 263, 1241-1244), this type of treatment has only recently been considered in Britain and, where it is in operation, is generally supervised by trained nursing staff or via a hospice. North Middlesex Hospital now has 3 years experience of a home transfusion programme operating for beta-thalassaemia major patients, in which relatives are trained and responsible for supervision of the red-cell transfusions at home. For families who request this service, and who are willing and able to undertake it responsibly, the scheme offers the advantages of improved patient comfort, reduced absences from education or employment and reduced hospital bed usage. Patients and their carers express improved satisfaction with the treatment delivered in this way.

  11. Raynaud's phenomenon in a child presenting as oxygen desaturation during transfusion with cold blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Coté, Charles J

    2008-12-01

    We report a case of Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) triggered by transfusion of cold blood to a pediatric burn patient under general anesthesia. The child was febrile so a decision was made to not use a blood warmer. When the blood was rapidly administered the child suddenly developed 'desaturation'. The child was placed on 100% oxygen, adequate ventilation assured, and the color of his oral mucosa assessed as 'pink'. Placement of the oximeter on the opposite hand revealed 100% saturation. To our knowledge, this is the first case of apparent RP reported in a pediatric patient triggered by transfusion of cold blood.

  12. Bridging channel dendritic cells induce immunity to transfused red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Calabro, Samuele; Gallman, Antonia; Gowthaman, Uthaman; Liu, Dong; Chen, Pei; Liu, Jingchun; Krishnaswamy, Jayendra Kumar; Nascimento, Manuela Sales L.; Xu, Lan; Patel, Seema R.; Williams, Adam; Tormey, Christopher A.; Hod, Eldad A.; Spitalnik, Steven L.; Zimring, James C.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.; Stowell, Sean R.

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a life-saving therapeutic tool. However, a major complication in transfusion recipients is the generation of antibodies against non-ABO alloantigens on donor RBCs, potentially resulting in hemolysis and renal failure. Long-lived antibody responses typically require CD4+ T cell help and, in murine transfusion models, alloimmunization requires a spleen. Yet, it is not known how RBC-derived antigens are presented to naive T cells in the spleen. We sought to answer whether splenic dendritic cells (DCs) were essential for T cell priming to RBC alloantigens. Transient deletion of conventional DCs at the time of transfusion or splenic DC preactivation before RBC transfusion abrogated T and B cell responses to allogeneic RBCs, even though transfused RBCs persisted in the circulation for weeks. Although all splenic DCs phagocytosed RBCs and activated RBC-specific CD4+ T cells in vitro, only bridging channel 33D1+ DCs were required for alloimmunization in vivo. In contrast, deletion of XCR1+CD8+ DCs did not alter the immune response to RBCs. Our work suggests that blocking the function of one DC subset during a narrow window of time during RBC transfusion could potentially prevent the detrimental immune response that occurs in patients who require lifelong RBC transfusion support. PMID:27185856

  13. Blood Transfusion Safety in Africa: A Literature Review of Infectious Disease and Organizational Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Evan M.; Vermeulen, Marion; Murphy, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Blood safety remains an important public health concern in Africa where lack of availability or provision of unsafe blood adversely impacts morbidity and mortality in the region. In recognition of this shortfall, the World Health Organization (WHO) established a goal of regional blood safety by 2012 through improved “organization and management, blood donor recruitment and collection, testing of donor blood as well as appropriate clinical use of blood” (Tagny et al: Transfusion. 2008;48:1256–1261; Tapko et al: Status of Blood Safety in the WHO African Region: Report of the 2006 Survey http://www.afro.who.int/en/divisions-a-programmes/dsd/health-technologies-a-laboratories.html. Brazzaville, Republic of Congo: WHO Regional Office for Africa; 2006). Although there has been substantial progress toward meeting these objectives, there are continued obstacles to both development and sustainability. In a setting where transfusion oversight is still being improved, transfusion-transmitted infections are of real concern. The high prevalence of some transfusion-transmissible agents such as hepatitis B virus and HIV in the general population means that some infected blood units escape detection by even well-performed laboratory testing, resulting in potential downstream transmission to patients. The spectrum of transfusion-transmitted infection include conventional as well as exotic pathogens, many of which are endemic to the region, thereby imparting ongoing challenges to recruitment and testing strategies. PMID:21872426

  14. Pulmonary Hypertension in Lambs Transfused with Stored Blood is Prevented by Breathing Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Baron, David M.; Yu, Binglan; Lei, Chong; Bagchi, Aranya; Beloiartsev, Arkadi; Stowell, Christopher P.; Steinbicker, Andrea U.; Malhotra, Rajeev; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Zapol, Warren M.

    2012-01-01

    Background During extended storage, erythrocytes undergo functional changes. These changes reduce the viability of erythrocytes leading to release of oxyhemoglobin, a potent scavenger of nitric oxide. We hypothesized that transfusion of ovine packed erythrocytes (PRBC) stored for prolonged periods would induce pulmonary vasoconstriction in lambs, and that reduced vascular nitric oxide concentrations would increase this vasoconstrictor effect. Methods We developed a model of autologous stored blood transfusion in lambs (n=36). Leukoreduced blood was stored for either 2 days (fresh PRBC) or 40 days (stored PRBC). Fresh or stored PRBC were transfused into donors instrumented for awake hemodynamic measurements. Hemodynamic effects of PRBC transfusion were also studied after infusion of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl-ester (25 mg/kg) or during inhalation of nitric oxide (80 ppm). Results Cell-free hemoglobin levels were higher in the supernatant of stored PRBC than in supernatant of fresh PRBC (Mean±SD, 148±20 versus 41±13 mg/dl, respectively, P<0.001). Pulmonary artery pressure during transfusion of stored PRBC transiently increased from 13±1 to 18±1 mmHg (P<0.001) and was associated with increased plasma hemoglobin concentrations. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl-ester potentiated the increase in pulmonary arterial pressure induced by transfusing stored PRBC, whereas inhalation of nitric oxide prevented the vasoconstrictor response. Conclusions Our results suggest that patients with reduced vascular nitric oxide levels due to endothelial dysfunction may be more susceptible to adverse effects of transfusing blood stored for prolonged periods. These patients might benefit from transfusion of fresh PRBC, when available, or inhaled nitric oxide supplementation to prevent the pulmonary hypertension associated with transfusion of stored PRBC. PMID:22293717

  15. AUDIT OF BLOOD TRANSFUSION PRACTICES IN THE PAEDIATRIC MEDICAL WARD OF A TERTIARY HOSPITAL IN SOUTHEAST NIGERIA.

    PubMed

    Ughasoro, M D; Ikefuna, A N; Emodi, I J; Ibeziako, S N; Nwose, S O

    2013-01-01

    To determine the indications, practices and outcomes of transfusion on children. A descriptive retrospective study. Paediatric wards of University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria. Children one month to 18 years that received blood transfusion. Indications for the transfusion, haemoglobin rise, vital signs, duration of transfusion and adverse events. The two hundred and thirty eight transfusions reviewed were given amongst 95 patients, at a ratio of 2.5 transfusions per patient. The indicators of the transfusion were: malignancy (31.7%), sepsis (15.1%), sickle cell anaemia (12.1%), malaria (10.0%), hyperbilirubinaemia (10.0%), HIV/AIDS (8.3%), nephrotic syndrome (7.2%) and malnutrition (5.4%). Whole blood (56.4%) and sedimented cells (36.3%) were the main types of blood transfused. About 96.4% were transfused appropriate volume of blood. The mean Haemoglobin concentration (Hb) increase was 3.1g/dl and 12.8% of the recipients recorded an Hb increase of 5g/dl. The mean duration of transfusion was 4.6 hours and 59.7% of the transfusions exceeded the recommended four hours. Pulse and respiratory rates returned to normal post transfusion in 26.1 and 21.8% of the recipients respectively. In 10% of the transfusions there were minor adverse events; chills/fever (5.1%), itching (3.4%), hypothermia (1.0%) and vomiting (0.5%). Blood transfusion in this tertiary institution is not common and mainly due to non-communicable diseases. The expected optimal rise in Hb and normalising of vitals sign are not always the case. The duration of most transfusions was unduly prolonged and transfusion-related adverse events are rare.

  16. Transfusion audit of blood products using the World Health Organization Basic Information Sheet in Qazvin, Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Sheikholeslami, H; Kani, C; Fallah-Abed, P; Lalooha, F; Mohammadi, N

    2012-12-04

    We assessed the practicality of using the transfusion Basic Information Sheet (BIS) for data collection, to determine the overall adequacy of physician documentation of blood product transfusion, and to make an audit of the appropriateness of blood product transfusion. The transfusion process and clinical indications for transfusions administered to adult hospitalized patients in 3 tertiary care teaching hospitals in Qazvin were prospectively reviewed. Adequate documentation was achieved in 62.6% of all transfusion episodes, range 41%-73%, depending on the medical specialty; 15.7% of red blood cells and whole blood requests, 40.8% of platelet requests and 34.1% of fresh frozen plasma requests were inappropriate. BIS-based information along with data collection can be used to provide feedback regarding the effectiveness of and compliance with local and national transfusion guidelines.

  17. Quantifying Blood Loss and Transfusion Risk After Primary vs Conversion Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Newman, Jared M; Webb, Matthew R; Klika, Alison K; Murray, Trevor G; Barsoum, Wael K; Higuera, Carlos A

    2017-06-01

    Primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) and conversion THA may result in substantial blood loss, sometimes necessitating transfusion. Despite the complexities of the latter, both are grouped in the same category for quality assessment and reimbursement. This study's purpose was to compare both blood loss and transfusion risk in primary and conversion THA and identify their associated predictors. A total of 1616 patients who underwent primary and conversion THA at a single hospital from 2009-2013 were reviewed (primary THA = 1575; conversion THA = 41). Demographics, comorbidities, and perioperative data were collected from electronic records. Blood loss was calculated using a validated method. Transfusion triggers were based on standardized criteria. Separate multivariable regression models for blood loss and transfusion were performed. Conversion THA patients were younger (P = .002), had lower age-adjusted Charlson scores (P = .006), longer surgeries (P < .001), higher blood loss (P < .001), and more transfusions (P < .001). Primary and conversion THA groups were different in terms of surgical approach (P < .001), anesthesia type (P = .002), and venous thromboembolism prophylaxis (P = .01). Compared to primary THA, conversion THA had an average 478.9 mL higher blood loss (P = .003) and increased adjusted odds ratio of 3.2 (P = .019) for transfusion. Conversion THA leads to higher blood loss and transfusion compared with primary THA. These differences were quantified in the present study and showed consistent results between the 2 metrics. The differences between these procedures should be addressed during quality assurance because conversion THA is associated with higher resource utilization, which is important in the allocation of resources and tiered reimbursement strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Automated prediction of early blood transfusion and mortality in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Colin F; Wang, Yulei; Hu, Peter F; Chen, Shih-Yu; Chen, Hegang H; Hagegeorge, George; Stansbury, Lynn G; Shackelford, Stacy

    2014-06-01

    Prediction of blood transfusion needs and mortality for trauma patients in near real time is an unrealized goal. We hypothesized that analysis of pulse oximeter signals could predict blood transfusion and mortality as accurately as conventional vital signs (VSs). Continuous VS data were recorded for direct admission trauma patients with abnormal prehospital shock index (SI = heart rate [HR] / systolic blood pressure) greater than 0.62. Predictions of transfusion during the first 24 hours and in-hospital mortality using logistical regression models were compared with DeLong's method for areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROCs) to determine the optimal combinations of prehospital SI and HR, continuous photoplethysmographic (PPG), oxygen saturation (SpO2), and HR-related features. We enrolled 556 patients; 37 received blood within 24 hours; 7 received more than 4 U of red blood cells in less than 4 hours or "massive transfusion" (MT); and 9 died. The first 15 minutes of VS signals, including prehospital HR plus continuous PPG, and SpO2 HR signal analysis best predicted transfusion at 1 hour to 3 hours, MT, and mortality (AUROC, 0.83; p < 0.03) and no differently (p = 0.32) from a model including blood pressure. Predictions of transfusion based on the first 15 minutes of data were no different using 30 minutes to 60 minutes of data collection. SI plus PPG and SpO2 signal analysis (AUROC, 0.82) predicted 1-hour to 3-hour transfusion, MT, and mortality no differently from pulse oximeter signals alone. Pulse oximeter features collected in the first 15 minutes of our trauma patient resuscitation cohort, without user input, predicted early MT and mortality in the critical first hours of care better than the currently used VS such as combinations of HR and systolic blood pressure or prehospital SI alone. Therapeutic/prognostic study, level II.

  19. Homologous whole blood transfusion during treatment of severe anemia in a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Debenham, John James; Atencia, Rebeca

    2014-09-01

    A 12-yr-old female chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) was presented as severely emaciated and with generalized muscle weakness. Hematology and biochemistry revealed severe anemia and hypokalemia. The chimpanzee was treated supportively and symptomatically; although initially stable, the animal deteriorated rapidly on day 5, becoming depressed and jaundiced with further deterioration of anemia. To address the decline, a prompt transfusion of compatible and cross-matched fresh whole blood from a healthy adult male chimpanzee was administered over 120 min. During transfusion, an immediate reduction in the recipient's tachycardia was noted and substantial clinical improvement continued over 24 hr posttransfusion; no adverse transfusion reactions were observed.

  20. Blood donors’ positivity for transfusion-transmissible infections: the Serbian Military Medical Academy experience

    PubMed Central

    Vučetić, Dušan; Kecman, Gorica; Ilić, Vesna; Balint, Bela

    2015-01-01

    Background Members of armed forces worldwide are considered to be very susceptible to sexually transmitted infections, thus falling into a high-risk group of blood donors regarding transfusion-transmissible infections. In the Serbian Military Medical Academy a significant number (44% for the period 2005–2013) of blood donations were from members of the Serbian Army. The aim of this study was to determine the significance of military blood donors for the safety of blood transfusion. Material and methods Between January 2005 and December 2013, a total of 155,479 blood donations were tested for hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and syphilis using serological assays (enzyme immunoassays, chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay and western blot) and molecular testing (polymerase chain reaction analysis). Results The percentage of blood donations positive for transfusion-transmissible infections in the estimated period was 0.38%, and the percentage of HBV, HCV, HIV and syphilis positive blood donations was 0.20%, 0.12%, 0.005% and 0.06%, respectively. During that period, the percentage of all transfusion-transmissible infections, and in particular of HBV and HCV, declined significantly. In contrast, the percentage of HIV and syphilis positive blood donations remained unchanged. Higher rates of positivity for transfusion-transmissible infections in blood donations from members of the Serbian Army were not found, especially after mandatory military service was abolished in 2009. Discussion The reported rate of positivity for transfusion-transmissible infections in blood donations from the Military Medical Academy was considered low. This information is of great significance for further implementation of public health measures. PMID:26057495

  1. Strengthening the service continuum between transfusion providers and suppliers: enhancing the blood services network.

    PubMed

    Sime, Stacy L

    2005-10-01

    As the cost of health care increases, the focus on cost containment grows. The pressure to reduce costs comes at the same time the public focus is on ensuring a zero-risk blood supply. The blood supply has never been safer or more expensive. With the relative vanquishing of transfusion-transmitted diseases, noninfectious risks now exceed infectious risks. This has resulted in a call to refocus blood safety efforts on interconnected processes that link a unit of blood from its volunteer blood donor to the patient. Additional costs in the blood supply chain will create new pressures on an already taxed system that gets little additional reimbursement with each new safety initiative. Opposing interests have created a tenuous relationship between the blood supplier and the transfusion provider. This adversarial relationship does not benefit the ultimate stakeholder, the patient. It is time to create a service partnership that is built on access, cost, and quality. Initiatives must be undertaken at a local, regional, and national level. Locally, blood suppliers and transfusion providers must reevaluate policies that are focused on individual gain and reinvent policies that will reward improvements in the overall system and expand cooperative services. Regionally, both blood suppliers and transfusion providers need to consolidate services to gain cost and quality benefits without compromising the competitive nature of the industry. Nationally, the creation of a strategic plan will help ensure that a mutually beneficial relationship focused on the patient is created between the blood supplier and transfusion provider at all levels. Development of such a plan would benefit the transfusing and supplying parties by identifying areas of common interest and how each may facilitate the achievement of shared benefits.

  2. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Clinical Appropriateness of Blood Transfusion in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changtai; Gao, Yulu; Li, Zhiqiang; Li, Qinyun; Gao, Zongshuai; Liao, Yanqiu; Deng, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The issue of the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion has become a focus of transfusion medicine worldwide. In China, irrational uses of blood have often been reported in recent years. However, to date there lacks a systematic review of the rational uses of blood. This study aimed to determine the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion in China. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), China Science and Technology Journal Database, WanFang Database, and Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, and the retrieval cut-off date was June 31, 2015. SPSS 17.0 and MetaAnalyst 3.13 were employed as the statistics tools in this review. A pooled rate of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion was analyzed by DerSimonian–Laird method. In this study, a total of 39 observational studies were included, which related to 75,132 cases of blood transfusion. According to the meta-analysis results, the overall incidence of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion in China was estimated to be 37.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] [32.1, 42.8]). The subgroup analyses revealed that the pooled rates of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion of plasma, red blood cells (RBCs), cryoprecipitate, and platelets were 56.3% (95% CI [45.8, 66.2]), 30.9% (95% CI [27.1, 35.0]), 25.2% (95% CI [13.2, 42.7]), and 14.1% (95% CI [8.8, 21.9]), respectively. However, the pooled incidence of inappropriateness of transfusion in operative departments was 47.5% (95% CI [36.8, 58.3]), which was significantly higher than that in nonoperative departments, 25.8% (95% CI [18.7, 34.4], P < 0.05). The overall rates of inappropriate use were 36.7% (95% CI [30.2, 43.6]) in major cities and 37.5% (95% CI [31.2, 44.3]) in other cities, respectively; there was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). In conclusion, China has suffered from a disadvantage in the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion

  3. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Clinical Appropriateness of Blood Transfusion in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changtai; Gao, Yulu; Li, Zhiqiang; Li, Qinyun; Gao, Zongshuai; Liao, Yanqiu; Deng, Zhifeng

    2015-12-01

    The issue of the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion has become a focus of transfusion medicine worldwide. In China, irrational uses of blood have often been reported in recent years. However, to date there lacks a systematic review of the rational uses of blood. This study aimed to determine the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion in China. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), China Science and Technology Journal Database, WanFang Database, and Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, and the retrieval cut-off date was June 31, 2015. SPSS 17.0 and MetaAnalyst 3.13 were employed as the statistics tools in this review. A pooled rate of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion was analyzed by DerSimonian-Laird method. In this study, a total of 39 observational studies were included, which related to 75,132 cases of blood transfusion. According to the meta-analysis results, the overall incidence of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion in China was estimated to be 37.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] [32.1, 42.8]). The subgroup analyses revealed that the pooled rates of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion of plasma, red blood cells (RBCs), cryoprecipitate, and platelets were 56.3% (95% CI [45.8, 66.2]), 30.9% (95% CI [27.1, 35.0]), 25.2% (95% CI [13.2, 42.7]), and 14.1% (95% CI [8.8, 21.9]), respectively. However, the pooled incidence of inappropriateness of transfusion in operative departments was 47.5% (95% CI [36.8, 58.3]), which was significantly higher than that in nonoperative departments, 25.8% (95% CI [18.7, 34.4], P < 0.05). The overall rates of inappropriate use were 36.7% (95% CI [30.2, 43.6]) in major cities and 37.5% (95% CI [31.2, 44.3]) in other cities, respectively; there was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). In conclusion, China has suffered from a disadvantage in the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion, especially in

  4. [Results of Training for Personnel Involved in Blood-Transfusion Testing Outside of Regular Work Hours at Saga University Hospital].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Marie; Yamada, Naotomo; Higashitani, Takanori; Ohta, Shoichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory testing prior to blood transfusion outside of regular hours in many hospitals and clinics is frequently conducted by technicians without sufficient experience in such testing work. To obtain consistent test results regardless of the degree of laboratory experience with blood transfusion testing, the number of facilities introducing automated equipment for testing prior to blood transfusion is increasing. Our hospital's blood transfusion department introduced fully automated test equipment in October of 2010 for use when blood transfusions are conducted outside of regular hours. However, excessive dependence on automated testing can lead to an inability to do manual blood typing or cross-match testing when necessitated by breakdowns in the automated test equipment, in the case of abnormal specimen reactions, or other such case. In addition, even outside of normal working hours there are more than a few instances in which transfusion must take place based on urgent communications from clinical staff, with the need for prompt and flexible timing of blood transfusion test and delivery of blood products. To address this situation, in 2010 we began training after-hours laboratory personnel in blood transfusion testing to provide practice using test tubes manually and to achieve greater understanding of blood transfusion test work (especially in cases of critical blood loss). Results of the training and difficulties in its implementation for such after-hours laboratory personnel at our hospital are presented and discussed in this paper. [Original

  5. Mononucleated Blood Cell Populations Display Different Abilities To Transmit Prion Disease by the Transfusion Route

    PubMed Central

    Douet, Jean-Yves; Lacroux, Caroline; Litaise, Claire; Lugan, Séverine; Corbière, Fabien; Arnold, Mark; Simmons, Hugh; Aron, Naima; Costes, Pierrette; Tillier, Cécile; Cassard, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous experiments carried out in a sheep scrapie model demonstrated that the transfusion of 200 μl of prion-infected whole blood has an apparent 100% efficacy for disease transmission. These experiments also indicated that, despite the apparent low infectious titer, the intravenous administration of white blood cells (WBC) resulted in efficient disease transmission. In the study presented here, using the same transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) animal model, our aim was to determine the minimal number of white blood cells and the specific abilities of mononucleated cell populations to transmit scrapie by the transfusion route. Our results confirmed that the transfusion of 100 μl, but not 10 μl, of fresh whole blood collected in asymptomatic scrapie-infected donor sheep can transmit the disease. The data also show that the intravenous administration of 105 WBCs is sufficient to cause scrapie in recipient sheep. Cell-sorted CD45R+ (predominantly B lymphocytes), CD4+/CD8+ (T lymphocytes), and CD14+ (monocytes/macrophages) blood cell subpopulations all were shown to contain prion infectivity by bioassays in ovine PrP transgenic mice. However, while the intravenous administration of 106 CD45+ or CD4+/8+ living cells was able to transmit the disease, similar numbers of CD14+ cells failed to infect the recipients. These data support the contention that mononucleated blood cell populations display different abilities to transmit TSE by the transfusion route. They also represent an important input for the risk assessment of blood-borne prion disease transmission and for refining the target performance of leukoreduction processes that currently are applied to mitigate the transmission risk in transfusion medicine. IMPORTANCE Interindividual variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) transmission through blood and blood-derived products is considered a major public health issue in transfusion medicine. Over the last decade, TSE in sheep has emerged as a

  6. Requirements for blood and blood components intended for transfusion or for further manufacturing use. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-05-22

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the regulations applicable to blood and blood components, including Source Plasma, to make the donor eligibility and testing requirements more consistent with current practices in the blood industry, to more closely align the regulations with current FDA recommendations, and to provide flexibility to accommodate advancing technology. In order to better assure the safety of the nation's blood supply and to help protect donor health, FDA is revising the requirements for blood establishments to test donors for infectious disease, and to determine that donors are eligible to donate and that donations are suitable for transfusion or further manufacture. FDA is also requiring establishments to evaluate donors for factors that may adversely affect the safety, purity, and potency of blood and blood components or the health of a donor during the donation process. Accordingly, these regulations establish requirements for donor education, donor history, and donor testing. These regulations also implement a flexible framework to help both FDA and industry to more effectively respond to new or emerging infectious agents that may affect blood product safety.

  7. Antigen Density Dictates Immune Responsiveness following Red Blood Cell Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Connie M; Patel, Seema R; Smith, Nicole H; Bennett, Ashley; Kamili, Nourine A; Mener, Amanda; Gerner-Smidt, Christian; Sullivan, Harold C; Hale, J Scott; Wieland, Andreas; Youngblood, Benjamin; Zimring, James C; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Stowell, Sean R

    2017-04-01

    Although RBC transfusion can result in the development of anti-RBC alloantibodies that increase the probability of life-threatening hemolytic transfusion reactions, not all patients generate anti-RBC alloantibodies. However, the factors that regulate immune responsiveness to RBC transfusion remain incompletely understood. One variable that may influence alloantibody formation is RBC alloantigen density. RBC alloantigens exist at different densities on the RBC surface and likewise exhibit distinct propensities to induce RBC alloantibody formation. However, although distinct alloantigens reside on the RBC surface at different levels, most alloantigens also represent completely different structures, making it difficult to separate the potential impact of differences in Ag density from other alloantigen features that may also influence RBC alloimmunization. To address this, we generated RBCs that stably express the same Ag at different levels. Although exposure to RBCs with higher Ag levels induces a robust Ab response, RBCs bearing low Ag levels fail to induce RBC alloantibodies. However, exposure to low Ag-density RBCs is not without consequence, because recipients subsequently develop Ag-specific tolerance. Low Ag-density RBC-induced tolerance protects higher Ag-density RBCs from immune-mediated clearance, is Ag specific, and occurs through the induction of B cell unresponsiveness. These results demonstrate that Ag density can potently impact immune outcomes following RBC transfusion and suggest that RBCs with altered Ag levels may provide a unique tool to induce Ag-specific tolerance.

  8. The effects of blood transfusion on renal functions in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Satoglu, Ismail Safa; Akcay, Serkan; Horoz, Levent; Kaya, Erol; Karakasli, Ahmet; Skiak, Eyad; Basci, Onur

    2015-01-01

    The effects of perioperative blood transfusion on renal functions have been studied in various studies. In this study, we investigated the effects of blood transfusion on postoperative kidney functions in patients who underwent orthopaedic surgeries. Total 136 patients who were operated for several orthopedic pathologies between June 2013 and December 2014 were evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups according to the amounts of blood transfusion. Ninety five patients (69.8%) who were transfused less than 3 units were included in Group 1 and 41 patients (30.2%) who received 3 and more units of blood were included in Group 2. There were no statistical difference between the two groups in terms of preoperative gender, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronical renal failure and smoking habbits (P > 0.05). No statistical differences between the groups were seen in terms of postoperative hospital stay, pulmonary and other complications as well as mortality (P > 0.05). When the two groups were compared for blood parameters showing postoperative renal and other system functions, no statistical differences were detected (P > 0.05). Blood transfusion does not have negative effects on postoperative BUN and creatinine levels in patients operated for orthopaedic pathologies.

  9. [Medical attitude regarding the negative of receiving blood transfusions by Jehovah's Witness patients].

    PubMed

    Tena Tamayo, Carlos; Sánchez González, Jorge M; Campos Castolo, Esther Mahuina

    2006-10-01

    Hemoderivative and blood transfusions without proper medical indication bring uncertain benefits, increase health risks and adverse effects. It is necessary to also consider the patient's values and preferences and the denial to receive transfusions. A deficient medical evaluation and an unnecessary transfusion can generate untoward effects regarding patients' health and safety. A retrospective, observational, and transverse study of 767 complaints for alleged denial of medical attention presented by Jehovah's Witness patients was undertaken, coupled with their denial to receive blood transfusions and their perception of the problem. It was established that 95.6% of cases studied involved adult patients, while 4.4% involved underage patients, with a mean of 43 years. The majority of complaints appeared at the secondary level of medical attention, 64.5% came from social security institutions and 19% from private institutions. The motive for medical consultation was surgical in 91.9% cases. 98.7% of the complaints were due to a perceived denial of medical attention, associated to religious conviction. 1.3% of complaints were filed after having received blood transfusions, without proper patient consent. The major health problems were solved in different medical units from the beginning in 500 cases (65.2%). Medical care was provided in 450 cases, in private clinics, while 50 cases were cared for in public institutions without the need for transfusion. Several studies coincide on the high number of unnecessary or unjustified blood transfusions. To improve the quality of transfusion medicine steps should be taken to install specialized hospital committees, update the use of guidelines based on the best scientific evidence, as well as to respect patient autonomy.

  10. Specific cytotoxic T cells are found in the nonrejected kidneys of blood-transfused rats

    SciTech Connect

    Dallman, M.J.; Wood, K.J.; Morris, P.J.

    1987-02-01

    Preoperative, donor-specific blood transfusion leads to indefinite survival of rat renal allografts in the strain combinations used. /sup 51/Cr-release assays have shown that the level of specific cytotoxic effector activity in the grafts of transfused (nonrejected kidney) animals is very high and may equal or exceed that seen in the grafts of untreated (rejected kidney) recipients. Such cytotoxicity demonstrates specificity for the alloantigens of the kidney, is T cell-mediated, and may persist within the transplant.

  11. [Responsibility for prescribing and monitoring an act transfusion and safety blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Piercecchi-Marti, M D; Tuchtan-Torrents, L; Lassale, B; Leonetti, G; Bartoli, C

    2014-11-01

    The act to transfuse is a prescription following basic rules similar to drug prescriptions. If harm happens, potentially linked with this prescription, the harm's responsibility is borne by the physician, the paramedics, the care organization but by the supplier laboratory too. The setting of good practice rules consistent with science data at the time when the act is performed, the respect of the patient's rights and the quality of supplied products will be assessed during the expertise. Under restorative responsibility, it is necessary to previously establish a direct and certain causation between the litigious act and the harm to enforce the vicarious liability. Nowadays, legal precedents grant a larger protection to more and more numerous victims, enhancing the field of the fault with the appeal to assumption of fault. At the same time, the lawmaker himself promulgated objective conditions of compensation for many categories of victims of medical risk from which transfused people are part. The law of March the 4th of 2002 went one step closer devoting a new foundation of compensation: national solidarity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Anaemia and blood transfusion in African children presenting to hospital with severe febrile illness.

    PubMed

    Kiguli, Sarah; Maitland, Kathryn; George, Elizabeth C; Olupot-Olupot, Peter; Opoka, Robert O; Engoru, Charles; Akech, Samuel O; Nyeko, Richard; Mtove, George; Reyburn, Hugh; Levin, Michael; Babiker, Abdel G; Gibb, Diana M; Crawley, Jane

    2015-02-02

    Severe anaemia in children is a leading cause of hospital admission and a major cause of mortality in sub-Saharan Africa, yet there are limited published data on blood transfusion in this vulnerable group. We present data from a large controlled trial of fluid resuscitation (Fluid Expansion As Supportive Therapy (FEAST) trial) on the prevalence, clinical features, and transfusion management of anaemia in children presenting to hospitals in three East African countries with serious febrile illness (predominantly malaria and/or sepsis) and impaired peripheral perfusion. Of 3,170 children in the FEAST trial, 3,082 (97%) had baseline haemoglobin (Hb) measurement, 2,346/3,082 (76%) were anaemic (Hb <10 g/dL), and 33% severely anaemic (Hb <5 g/dL). Prevalence of severe anaemia varied from 12% in Kenya to 41% in eastern Uganda. 1,387/3,082 (45%) children were transfused (81% within 8 hours). Adherence to WHO transfusion guidelines was poor. Among severely anaemic children who were not transfused, 52% (54/103) died within 8 hours, and 90% of these deaths occurred within 2.5 hours of randomisation. By 24 hours, 128/1,002 (13%) severely anaemic children had died, compared to 36/501 (7%) and 71/843 (8%) of those with moderate and mild anaemia, respectively. Among children without severe hypotension who were randomised to receive fluid boluses of 0.9% saline or albumin, mortality was increased (10.6% and 10.5%, respectively) compared to controls (7.2%), regardless of admission Hb level. Repeat transfusion varied from ≤2% in Kenya/Tanzania to 6 to 13% at the four Ugandan centres. Adverse reactions to blood were rare (0.4%). Severe anaemia complicates one third of childhood admissions with serious febrile illness to hospitals in East Africa, and is associated with increased mortality. A high proportion of deaths occurred within 2.5 hours of admission, emphasizing the need for rapid recognition and prompt blood transfusion. Adherence to current WHO transfusion guidelines was

  13. Development of blood transfusion product pathogen reduction treatments: a review of methods, current applications and demands.

    PubMed

    Salunkhe, Vishal; van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk; Seghatchian, Jerard; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Transfusion-transmitted infections (TTI) have been greatly reduced in numbers due to the strict donor selection and screening procedures, i.e. the availability of technologies to test donors for endemic infections, and routine vigilance of regulatory authorities in every step of the blood supply chain (collection, processing and storage). However, safety improvement is still a matter of concern because infection zero-risk in transfusion medicine is non-existent. Alternatives are required to assure the safety of the transfusion product and to provide a substitution to systematic blood screening tests, especially in less-developed countries or at the war-field. Furthermore, the increasing mobility of the population due to traveling poses a new challenge in the endemic screening tests routinely used, because non-endemic pathogens might emerge in a specific population. Pathogen reduction treatments sum a plethora of active approaches to eliminate or reduce potential threatening pathogen load from blood transfusion products. Despite the success of pathogen reduction treatments applied to plasma products, there is still a long way to develop and deploy pathogen reduction treatments to cellular transfusion products (such as platelets, RBCs or even to whole blood) and there is divergence on its acceptance worldwide. While the use of pathogen reduction treatments in platelets is performed routinely in a fair number of European blood banks, most of these treatments are not (or just) licensed in the USA or elsewhere in the world. The development of pathogen reduction treatments for RBC and whole blood is still in its infancy and under clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the available and emerging pathogen reduction treatments and their advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of characterizing standard transfusion products with current and emerging approaches (OMICS) and clinical outcome, and integrating this information on a database

  14. Metastatic spine tumor surgery: does perioperative blood transfusion influence postoperative complications?

    PubMed

    Zaw, Aye Sandar; Kantharajanna, Shashidhar B; Maharajan, Karthikeyan; Tan, Barry; Saparamadu, Amarasinghe A; Kumar, Naresh

    2017-09-16

    The question of independent association between allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) and postoperative complications in cancer surgeries has been controversial and remains so. In metastatic spine tumor surgery (MSTS), previous studies investigated the influence of ABT on survival, but not on postoperative complications. We aimed to evaluate the influence of perioperative ABT on postoperative complications and infections in patients undergoing MSTS. This retrospective study included 247 patients who underwent MSTS at a single tertiary institution between 2005 and 2014. The outcome measures were postoperative complications and infections within 30 days after MSTS. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess influence of blood transfusion on the outcomes after adjusting for potential confounders. Of 247 patients, 133 (54%) received ABT with overall median (range) of 2 (0-10) units. The adjusted odds of developing any postoperative complication was 2.27 times higher in patients with transfusion (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17-4.38; p = 0.01) and 1.24 times higher odds per every unit increase in blood transfusion (95% CI, 1.05-1.46; p < 0.01). Exposure to blood transfusion also increased the odds of having overall postoperative infections (odds ratio, 3.58; 95% CI, 1.15-11.11; p = 0.02) and there were 1.24 times higher odds per every unit increase in transfusion (95% CI, 1.01-1.54; p = 0.04). This study adds evidence to the literature implicating ABT to be influential on postoperative complications and infections in patients undergoing MSTS. Appropriate blood management measures should, therefore, be given a crucial place in the care of these patients so as to reduce any putative effect of blood transfusion. © 2017 AABB.

  15. Plasma and Plasma Protein Product Transfusion: A Canadian Blood Services Centre for Innovation Symposium.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Michelle P; Al-Habsi, Khalid S; Golder, Mia; Walsh, Geraldine M; Sheffield, William P

    2015-07-01

    Plasma obtained via whole blood donation processing or via apheresis technology can either be transfused directly to patients or pooled and fractionated into plasma protein products that are concentrates of 1 or more purified plasma protein. The evidence base supporting clinical efficacy in most of the indications for which plasma is transfused is weak, whereas high-quality evidence supports the efficacy of plasma protein products in at least some of the clinical settings in which they are used. Transfusable plasma utilization remains composed in part of applications that fall outside of clinical practice guidelines. Plasma contains all of the soluble coagulation factors and is frequently transfused in efforts to restore or reinforce patient hemostasis. The biochemical complexities of coagulation have in recent years been rationalized in newer cell-based models that supplement the cascade hypothesis. Efforts to normalize widely used clinical hemostasis screening test values by plasma transfusion are thought to be misplaced, but superior rapid tests have been slow to emerge. The advent of non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants has brought new challenges to clinical laboratories in plasma t