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Sample records for multiple blunt trauma

  1. Blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Weyant, Michael J; Fullerton, David A

    2008-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma represents a significant portion of trauma admissions to hospitals in the United States. These injuries are encountered by physicians in many specialities such as emergency medicine, pediatrics, general surgery and thoracic surgery. Accurate diagnosis and treatment improves the chances of favorable outcomes and it is desirable for all treating physicians to have current knowledge of all aspects of blunt thoracic trauma. Cardiothoracic surgeons often treat the most severe forms of blunt thoracic injuries and we review the aspects of blunt thoracic trauma that are pertinent to the practicing cardiothoracic surgeon. PMID:18420123

  2. Paediatric Blunt Torso Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Khalid M.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Harthy, Ahmed Z. S.; Hamid, Rana S.; Al-Balushi, Zainab N.; Sankhla, Dilip K.; Al-Qadhi, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Trauma is the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric/adolescent populations worldwide. This study aimed to describe trauma mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) in Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective single-centre study involved all children ≤12 years old with blunt torso trauma admitted for paediatric surgical care at SQUH between January 2009 and December 2013. Medical records were analysed to collect demographic and clinical data. Results: A total of 70 children were admitted with blunt torso trauma during the study period, including 39 (55.7%) male patients. The mean age was 5.19 ± 2.66 years. Of the cohort, 35 children (50.0%) received their injuries after having been hit by cars as pedestrians, while 19 (27.1%) were injured by falls, 12 (17.1%) during car accidents as passengers and four (5.7%) by falling heavy objects. According to computed tomography scans, thoracic injuries were most common (65.7%), followed by abdominal injuries (42.9%). The most commonly involved solid organs were the liver (15.7%) and spleen (11.4%). The majority of the patients were managed conservatively (92.9%) with a good outcome (74.3%). The mortality rate was 7.1%. Most deaths were due to multisystem involvement. Conclusion: Among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to SQUH, the main mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. As a result, parental education and enforcement of infant car seat/child seat belt laws are recommended. Conservative management was the most successful approach. PMID:27226913

  3. Imbalance between macrophage migration inhibitory factor and cortisol induces multiple organ dysfunction in patients with blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Mineji; Katabami, Kenichi; Wada, Takeshi; Minami, Yousuke; Sugano, Masahiro; Shimojima, Hidekazu; Kubota, Nobuhiko; Uegaki, Shinji; Sawamura, Atsushi; Gando, Satoshi

    2011-06-01

    Migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is associated with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Our purposes were to determine the serum MIF, cortisol, and tumor narcosis factor-α (TNF-α) and to investigate the influences of the balance between the levels of MIF and cortisol in patients with blunt trauma. The cortisol levels were identical between the patients with and without MODS. However, the MIF and TNF-α levels in the patients with MODS were statistically higher than those of the patients without MODS. The cortisol/MIF ratios in the patients with MODS were statistically higher than those of the patients without MODS. The results show that MIF and TNF-α play an important role together in posttraumatic inflammatory response. An excessive serum MIF elevation overrides the anti-inflammatory effects of cortisol and leads to persistent SIRS followed by MODS in blunt trauma patients. PMID:20499270

  4. Blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Tepas, J J

    1993-06-01

    The growing popularity of nonoperative treatment of children with splenic injuries has seduced some physicians into a false sense of security regarding care of the injured child. Although it has been established that hemodynamically stable children with splenic, hepatic, and even renal injuries can safely be treated "expectantly," this concept cannot be applied indiscriminately. Accurate diagnosis and effective care of the child with blunt abdominal trauma is an exercise of clinical precision that demands attention to detail and thorough evaluation. This review addresses this process in light of recent advances in diagnostic imaging and in consideration of recent reports analyzing different protocols for therapeutic decision making. PMID:8374651

  5. Multidetector CT of blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Soto, Jorge A; Anderson, Stephan W

    2012-12-01

    The morbidity, mortality, and economic costs resulting from trauma in general, and blunt abdominal trauma in particular, are substantial. The "panscan" (computed tomographic [CT] examination of the head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis) has become an essential element in the early evaluation and decision-making algorithm for hemodynamically stable patients who sustained abdominal trauma. CT has virtually replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage for the detection of important injuries. Over the past decade, substantial hardware and software developments in CT technology, especially the introduction and refinement of multidetector scanners, have expanded the versatility of CT for examination of the polytrauma patient in multiple facets: higher spatial resolution, faster image acquisition and reconstruction, and improved patient safety (optimization of radiation delivery methods). In this article, the authors review the elements of multidetector CT technique that are currently relevant for evaluating blunt abdominal trauma and describe the most important CT signs of trauma in the various organs. Because conservative nonsurgical therapy is preferred for all but the most severe injuries affecting the solid viscera, the authors emphasize the CT findings that are indications for direct therapeutic intervention. PMID:23175542

  6. Management of blunt hepatic trauma.

    PubMed

    Letoublon, C; Amariutei, A; Taton, N; Lacaze, L; Abba, J; Risse, O; Arvieux, C

    2016-08-01

    For the last 20 years, nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt hepatic trauma (BHT) has been the initial policy whenever this is possible (80% of cases), i.e., in all cases where the hemodynamic status does not demand emergency laparotomy. NOM relies upon the coexistence of three highly effective treatment modalities: radiology with contrast-enhanced computerized tomography (CT) and hepatic arterial embolization, intensive care surveillance, and finally delayed surgery (DS). DS is not a failure of NOM management but rather an integral part of the surgical strategy. When imposed by hemodynamic instability, the immediate surgical option has seen its effectiveness transformed by development of the concept of abbreviated (damage control) laparotomy and wide application of the method of perihepatic packing (PHP). The effectiveness of these two conservative and cautious strategies for initial management is evidenced by current experience, but the management of secondary events that may arise with the most severe grades of injury must be both rapid and effective. PMID:27519150

  7. [Relation between cytokine IL-6 levels and the occurrence of systemic complications in patients with multiple injuries and blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Gregorić, Pavle D; Bajec, Djordje D; Sijacki, Ana D; Karadzić, Borivoje A

    2003-01-01

    Severe trauma is the third cause of death and the first one in the most vital and young population. In USA more children die of trauma then of all other causes. Blunt abdominal trauma takes 56% cases of multiple traumas of all etiologies. Among multiple injured patients, near to 50% have some system-complications, more of 60% in the group of critically injured (ISS > 35). Cytokines play the main role in the inflammatory reaction during the early phase response on trauma. Their secretion predicts system-complications as ARDS, SIRS, even MODS. Hypothetically, level of concentration of Interleukin-6 (IL 6) can improve methods of early diagnostic procedures for detecting SIRS and MODS, when scores are still low (preclinical level), at which stages therapy is more powerful and also cheaper. This prospective study includes 35 multiple injured persons with blunt abdominal trauma (75 > ISS > 18). We have used standard diagnostic procedures. Concentration of IL 6 was detected with ELISA-test. Levels of IL 6 were significantly higher in correlation with SIRS score groups. Correlation with MODS score was not significant for the lowest scores, but IL 6 showed significant higher levels in the second and the third MODS score group. PMID:14608873

  8. The development of pneumobilia after blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    Okan, İsmail; Tali, Servet; Özsoy, Zeki; Deniz, Çağlar; Acu, Berat; Yenidoğan, Erdinç; Kayaoğlu, Hüseyin Ayhan; Şahin, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Pneumobilia is the detection of gas within the biliary system. It usually develops after bilioenteric anastomosis, percutaneous or endoscopic biliary interventions, infections and abscesses. The treatment is surgical, especially in cases with no prior interventions to the biliary system. The development of pneumobilia is quite rare after blunt trauma. Therefore, both the diagnosis and management are challenging for surgeons. Herein, we present the diagnosis and conservative management of a patient with pneumobilia after blunt trauma. PMID:27528818

  9. Blunt Force Trauma in Veterinary Forensic Pathology.

    PubMed

    Ressel, L; Hetzel, U; Ricci, E

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary pathologists commonly encounter lesions of blunt trauma. The development of lesions is affected by the object's mass, velocity, size, shape, and angle of impact and by the plasticity and mobility of the impacted organ. Scrape, impact, and pattern abrasions cause localized epidermal loss and sometimes broken hairs and implanted foreign material. Contusions are best identified after reflecting the skin, and must be differentiated from coagulopathies and livor mortis. Lacerations-traumatic tissue tears-may have irregular margins, bridging by more resilient tissue, deviation of the wound tail, crushed hairs, and unilateral abrasion. Hanging or choking can cause circumferential cervical abrasions, contusions and rupture of hairs, hyoid bone fractures, and congestion of the head. Other special forms of blunt trauma include fractured nails, pressure sores, and dog bites. Ocular blunt trauma causes extraocular and intraocular hemorrhages, proptosis, or retinal detachment. The thoracic viscera are relatively protected from blunt trauma but may develop hemorrhages in intercostal muscles, rib fractures, pulmonary or cardiac contusions or lacerations with subsequent hemothorax, pneumothorax, or cardiac arrhythmia. The abdominal wall is resilient and moveable, yet the liver and spleen are susceptible to traumatic laceration or rupture. Whereas extravasation of blood can occur after death, evidence of vital injury includes leukocyte infiltration, erythrophagocytosis, hemosiderin, reparative lesions of fibroblast proliferation, myocyte regeneration in muscle, and callus formation in bone. Understanding these processes aids in the diagnosis of blunt force trauma including estimation of the age of resulting injuries. PMID:27381403

  10. Coronary Thrombosis without Dissection following Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Sibel, Michael; Thomas, Peter; Burt, Francis; Cipolla, James; Puleo, Peter; Baker, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the chest resulting in coronary thrombosis and ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is a rare but well-described occurrence in adults. Angiography in such cases has generally disclosed complete epicardial coronary occlusion with thrombus, indistinguishable from the findings commonly found in spontaneous plaque rupture due to atherosclerotic disease. In all previously reported cases in which coronary interrogation with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was performed in association with acute revascularization, coronary artery dissection was implicated as the etiology of coronary thrombosis. We present the first case report of blunt trauma-associated coronary thrombosis without underlying atherosclerosis or coronary dissection, as documented by IVUS imaging. PMID:27006836

  11. Contemporary management of blunt aortic trauma.

    PubMed

    Dubose, J J; Azizzadeh, A; Estrera, A L; Safi, H J

    2015-10-01

    Blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI) remains a common cause of death following blunt mechanisms of trauma. Among patients who survive to reach hospital care, significant advances in diagnosis and treatment afford previously unattainable survival. The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) guidelines provide current best-evidence suggestions for treatment of BTAI. However, several key areas of controversy regarding optimal BTAI care remain. These include the refinement of selection criteria, timing for treatment and the need for long-term follow-up data. In addition, the advent of the Aortic Trauma Foundation (ATF) represents an important development in collaborative research in this field. PMID:25868973

  12. Tetanus after blunt lawn mower trauma

    PubMed Central

    Normand, Camilla; Fostervold, Aasmund; Haarr, Elin; Skontorp, Marie; Berg, Åse

    2015-01-01

    A patient presented with tetanus ten days after blunt trauma with a lawn mower. Our case describes the diagnosis and treatment of this patient with an infectious disease commonly seen in the developing world but rarely seen in the developed world. PMID:26793459

  13. Suicide by blunt head trauma - Two cases with striking similarities.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyejin; Lee, Bongwoo; Yoon, Connie

    2015-10-01

    There have been several forensic pathological studies on the distinction between falls from height and homicidal blows in blunt head trauma, but few studies have focused on suicidal blows. Self-inflicted blunt head trauma is usually a part of a complex suicide with more than one suicidal method applied. Actually, no reports on suicide indicate blunt head trauma to be the singular cause of death in recent publications. Cases with self-inflicted blunt trauma are often challenging for those involved in the investigation because they are confronted with findings that are also found in homicides. A refined guideline to differentiate suicidal blows from homicidal blows in blunt head trauma allows for a more accurate representation of the events surrounding death. This paper presents two cases of suicide by self-inflicted blunt head trauma in which blunt head trauma from repeatedly hitting the decedent's head with a hammer was considered to be the only cause of death. PMID:26304757

  14. Myocardial contusion following nonfatal blunt chest trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.A.; Puri, V.K.; Mittal, V.K.; Cortez, J.

    1983-04-01

    Currently available diagnostic techniques for myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma were evaluated. We investigated 30 patients prospectively over a period of 1 year for the presence of myocardial contusion. Among the 30 patients, eight were found to have myocardial contusion on the basis of abnormal electrocardiograms, elevated creatine phosphokinase MB fraction (CPK-MB), and positive myocardial scan. Myocardial scan was positive in seven of eight patients (87.5%). CPK-MB fraction was elevated in four of eight patients (50%). Definitive electrocardiographic changes were seen in only two of eight patients (25%). It appears that myocardial scan using technetium pyrophosphate and CPK-MB fraction determinations are the most reliable aids in diagnosis of myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma.

  15. Blunt pancreatic trauma: A persistent diagnostic conundrum?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Atin; Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury but has high morbidity and mortality. In modern era of trauma care, pancreatic trauma remains a persistent challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Early detection of pancreatic trauma is essential to prevent subsequent complications. However early pancreatic injury is often subtle on computed tomography (CT) and can be missed unless specifically looked for. Signs of pancreatic injury on CT include laceration, transection, bulky pancreas, heterogeneous enhancement, peripancreatic fluid and signs of pancreatitis. Pan-creatic ductal injury is a vital decision-making parameter as ductal injury is an indication for laparotomy. While lacerations involving more than half of pancreatic parenchyma are suggestive of ductal injury on CT, ductal injuries can be directly assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or encoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Pancreatic trauma also shows temporal evolution with increase in extent of injury with time. Hence early CT scans may underestimate the extent of injures and sequential imaging with CT or MRI is important in pancreatic trauma. Sequential imaging is also needed for successful non-operative management of pancreatic injury. Accurate early detection on initial CT and adopting a multimodality and sequential imaging strategy can improve outcome in pancreatic trauma. PMID:26981225

  16. Blunt pancreatic trauma: A persistent diagnostic conundrum?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Atin; Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-02-28

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury but has high morbidity and mortality. In modern era of trauma care, pancreatic trauma remains a persistent challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Early detection of pancreatic trauma is essential to prevent subsequent complications. However early pancreatic injury is often subtle on computed tomography (CT) and can be missed unless specifically looked for. Signs of pancreatic injury on CT include laceration, transection, bulky pancreas, heterogeneous enhancement, peripancreatic fluid and signs of pancreatitis. Pan-creatic ductal injury is a vital decision-making parameter as ductal injury is an indication for laparotomy. While lacerations involving more than half of pancreatic parenchyma are suggestive of ductal injury on CT, ductal injuries can be directly assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or encoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Pancreatic trauma also shows temporal evolution with increase in extent of injury with time. Hence early CT scans may underestimate the extent of injures and sequential imaging with CT or MRI is important in pancreatic trauma. Sequential imaging is also needed for successful non-operative management of pancreatic injury. Accurate early detection on initial CT and adopting a multimodality and sequential imaging strategy can improve outcome in pancreatic trauma. PMID:26981225

  17. Segmental Renal Infarction due to Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Alevizopoulos, Aristeidis; Hamilton, Lauren; Stratu, Natalia; Rix, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Segmental renal infarction is a rare situation which has been reported so far in the form of case reports. It's caused usually by cardiac conditions, such as atrial fibrillation, and systemic diseases (e.g. systemic lupus erythematous). We are presenting a case of a 31 year old healthy male, who sustained a left segmental renal infarction, following a motorbike accident. We report his presentation, management and outcome. We also review the literature in search of the optimal diagnostic and treatment pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first report of segmental renal infarction due to blunt trauma. PMID:27175338

  18. Supporting the early use of echocardiography in blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This case reports a very unusual mechanism of cardiac rupture following an episode of multiple blunt chest trauma. The patient, a professional jockey, was trampled by horses, and although shocked on hospital admission, he did not present with signs and symptoms that were consistent with cardiogenic shock. This case highlights the difficult and subjective nature of clinical examination in emergency situations when dealing with cases of acute cardiac tamponade. It further emphasises the lack of sensitivity of traditional trauma imaging and investigative approaches such as the standard anteroposterior chest X-ray and electrocardiogram. The diagnosis of acute cardiac tamponade was not made until tertiary-care-centre arrival, when ultrasound technology in the form of bedside echocardiography was used, facilitating emergency surgery to repair a ruptured left ventricle. It is hoped that the sharing of this case will alert fellow clinicians to this uncommon but possible mechanism of cardiac rupture and subsequent tamponade, encourage the early use of echocardiography at the bedside in hypotensive blunt chest trauma cases and reinforce the principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support course in treating trauma victims. PMID:22870886

  19. [Right atrium rupture due to blunt trauma].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Thuboi, H; Okada, H

    2008-03-01

    We report 2 cases of surgical treatment of blunt cardiac trauma. The postoperative course was uneventful in either case. Pericardial drainage in patients with cardiac rupture should be performed with preparation for thoracotomy. Case 1: A 34-year-old male, hit in the chest by a collapsing 700-kg steel rod, was transported to our hospital via ambulance. The patient was diagnosed as having a cardiac rupture by echocardiography and underwent emergency thoracotomy. The right atrium near the inferior vena cava (IVC) was damaged, though bleeding from the wound had already ceased. No suture hemostusis was needed. Case 2: A 63-year-old female was hit by a car and transported to our hospital due to blunt trauma to the chest. Low blood pressure and chest computed tomography demonstrated cardiac tamponade, and subxiphoid pericardial drainage was performed. Blood pressure was recovered, but persistent hemorrhage necessitated emergency thoracotomy, which revealed a laceration at the right atrium near IVC. The injury was sutured to achieve complete hemostasis. PMID:18323181

  20. Bone beveling caused by blunt trauma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Quatrehomme, Gérald; Piercecchi-Marti, Marie-Dominique; Buchet, Luc; Alunni, Véronique

    2016-05-01

    The authors report a fatal case of blunt trauma to the skull caused by a rib of a beach umbrella. The skull displayed a round hole in the right temporal bone with typical internal beveling. Blunt trauma mimicking a gunshot wound (round perforation of the skull with internal beveling) is very rarely reported in the forensic literature. PMID:26585737

  1. Tracheobronchial injury due to blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Mahmodlou, Rahim; Sepehrvand, Nariman

    2015-01-01

    Tracheobronchial avulsion resulting from blunt trauma is a very rare and serious condition, mostly due to high-speed traffic crashes. In this article, we briefly report the case of an 18-year-old man who was injured in a car accident and because of massive persistent air leakage (despite appropriate chest tube drainage), deemed to have a deep tracheobronchial injury. Due to a rapid drop in the patient's O2 saturation, he underwent an anterolateral thoracotomy. Endotracheal intubation was performed under direct visualization. The right mainstem bronchus was disrupted from the carina with a 1.5-cm stump remaining on the carina, and the remainder was crushed to the origin of the right superior lobe bronchus. Hence, a right superior lobectomy was performed and the postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:26157657

  2. Partial tearing of the interventricular septum after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    López-Ruiz, Nilson; Ramírez Gil, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac trauma after blunt chest trauma is a rare complication of patients arriving alive to an emergency department. We here present the case of patient who had a partial rupture of the interventricular septum after having had a blunt chest trauma in a traffic accident. As there was no ventricular septal defect, conservative management was deemed appropriate. At 3-year follow-up, the patient was free of right heart failure symptoms suggestive of the septal defect progression. PMID:26031362

  3. Management of blunt pancreatic trauma: what's new?

    PubMed

    Potoka, D A; Gaines, B A; Leppäniemi, A; Peitzman, A B

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic injuries are relatively uncommon but present a major challenge to the surgeon in terms of both diagnosis and management. Pancreatic injuries are associated with significant mortality, primarily due to associated injuries, and pancreas-specific morbidity, especially in cases of delayed diagnosis. Early diagnosis of pancreatic trauma is a key for optimal management, but remains a challenge even with more advanced imaging modalities. For both penetrating and blunt pancreatic injuries, the presence of main pancreatic ductal injury is the major determinant of morbidity and the major factor guiding management decisions. For main pancreatic ductal injury, surgery remains the preferred approach with distal pancreatectomy for most injuries and more conservative surgical management for proximal ductal injuries involving the head of the pancreas. More recently, nonoperative management has been utilized, especially in the pediatric population, with the potential for increased rates of pseudocyst and pancreatic fistulae and the potential for the need for further intervention and increased hospital stay. This review presents recent data focusing on the diagnosis, management, and outcomes of blunt pancreatic injury. PMID:26038029

  4. Duodenal perforation as result of blunt abdominal trauma in childhood.

    PubMed

    Hartholt, Klaas Albert; Dekker, Jan Willem T

    2015-01-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma may cause severe intra-abdominal injuries, while clinical findings could be mild or absent directly after the trauma. The absence of clinical findings could mislead physicians into underestimating the severity of the injury at the primary survey, and inevitably leads to a delay in the diagnosis. The Blunt Abdominal Trauma in Children (BATiC) score may help to identify children who are at a high risk for intra-abdominal injuries in an early stage and requires additional tests directly. A case of a 10-year-old girl with a duodenal perforation after a blunt abdominal trauma is presented. A delay in diagnosis may lead to an increased morbidity and mortality rate. A low admission threshold for children with abdominal pain after a blunt trauma is recommended. PMID:26698210

  5. Blunt force trauma as a rare mechanism for chyluria.

    PubMed

    Rycyna, Kevin J; Casella, Daniel; D'Agostino, Louis

    2016-06-01

    Chyluria is an uncommon clinical entity outside of the tropics. We present a rare case of blunt force trauma leading to the formation of a lymphorenal fistula. This was successfully managed via conservative endoscopic and dietary treatment. PMID:27347629

  6. Right-sided diaphragmatic rupture after blunt trauma. An unusual entity.

    PubMed

    Vilallonga, Ramon; Pastor, Vicente; Alvarez, Laura; Charco, Ramon; Armengol, Manel; Navarro, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic injuries of the diaphragm remain an entity of difficult diagnosis despite having been recognised early in the history of surgery, especially when it comes to blunt trauma and injuries of the right diaphragm. We report the case of a patient with blunt trauma with right diaphragmatic rupture that required urgent surgical treatment for hepatothorax and iatrogenic severe liver injury. Blunt trauma can cause substantial diaphragmatic rupture. It must have a high index of suspicion for diaphragmatic injury in patients, victims of vehicle collisions, mainly if they have suffered frontal impacts and/or side precipitates in patients with severe thoracoabdominal trauma. The diagnosis can be performed clinically and confirmation should be radiological. The general measures for the management of multiple trauma patients must be applied. Surgery at the time of diagnosis should restore continuity. PMID:21244704

  7. Prehospital advanced trauma life support for critical blunt trauma victims.

    PubMed

    Cwinn, A A; Pons, P T; Moore, E E; Marx, J A; Honigman, B; Dinerman, N

    1987-04-01

    The ability of paramedics to deliver advanced trauma life support (ATLS) in an expedient fashion for victims of trauma has been strongly challenged. In this study, the records of 114 consecutive victims of blunt trauma who underwent laparotomy or thoracotomy were reviewed. Prehospital care was rendered by paramedics operating under strict protocols. The mean response time (minutes +/- SEM) to the scene was 5.6 +/- 0.27. On-scene time was 13.9 +/- 0.62. The time to return to the hospital was 8.0 +/- 0.4. On-scene time included assessing hazards at the scene, patient extrication, spine immobilization (n = 98), application of oxygen (n = 94), measurement of vital signs (n = 114), splinting of 59 limbs, and the following ATLS procedures: endotracheal intubation (n = 31), IV access (n = 106), ECG monitoring (n = 69), procurement of blood for tests including type and cross (n = 58), and application of a pneumatic antishock garment (PASG) (n = 31). On-scene times were analyzed according to the number of ATLS procedures performed: insertion of one IV line (n = 46), 14.8 +/- 1.03 minutes; two IV lines (n = 28), 13.4 +/- 0.92; one IV line plus intubation (n = 7), 14.0 +/- 2.94; two IV lines plus intubation (n = 9), 17.0 +/- 2.38; and two IV lines plus intubation plus PASG (n = 13), 12.4 +/- 1.36. Of the 161 IV attempts, 94% were completed successfully. Of 36 attempts at endotracheal intubation, 89% were successful.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3826807

  8. Macular optical coherence tomography findings following blunt ocular trauma

    PubMed Central

    Oladiwura, Dilys; Lim, Lik Thai; Ah-kee, Elliott Yann; Scott, James Angus

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the optical coherence tomography (OCT) results of Berlin’s edema in a male subject following blunt ocular trauma from a soccer ball. A 27-year-old male presented with blurred vision in his left eye following blunt trauma. On admission, he underwent a complete eye examination and an OCT of the macula. Fundoscopy revealed commotio retinae, observed as an abnormal cream-colored discoloration of the fovea. The OCT showed outer photoreceptor segment disruption, retinal pigment epithelium inter-digitation, and intra-retinal edema of the outer nuclear layer. Following initial management, a repeat OCT after 3 months showed near complete resolution. OCT can be a useful adjunct for monitoring the progress of Berlin’s edema secondary to blunt ocular trauma because Berlin’s edema may present similarly clinically to other ocular trauma, but can affect different layers of the retina depending on the type of injury to the eye. PMID:24899795

  9. Blunt force trauma to skull with various instruments.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Nur Amirah; Osman, Khairul; Hamzah, Noor Hazfalinda; Amir, Sri Pawita Albakri

    2014-04-01

    Deaths due to blunt force trauma to the head as a result of assault are some of the most common cases encountered by the practicing forensic pathologist. Previous studies have shown inflicting injury to the head region is one of the most effective methods of murder. The important factors that determine severity of trauma include the type of weapon used, type and site of skull fracture, intracranial haemorrhage and severity of brain injury. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of blunt force trauma to the skull produced by different instruments. Nine adult monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) skulls were used as models. Commonly found blunt objects comprising of Warrington hammer, hockey stick and open face helmet were used in this study. A machine calibrated force generator was used to hold the blunt object in place and to hit the skulls at forces of 12.5N and 25N. Resultant traumatic effects and fractures (linear, depressed, basilar, comminuted, and distastic) were analyzed according to type of blunt object used; surface area of contact and absolute force (N/cm(2)) delivered. Results showed that all investigated instruments were capable of producing similar injuries. The severity of trauma was not related to the surface area of contact with the blunt objects. However, only high absolute forces produced comminuted fractures. These findings were observational, as the samples were too small for statistical conclusions. PMID:24763233

  10. Isolated gallbladder injury in a case of blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Birn, Jeffrey; Jung, Melissa; Dearing, Mark

    2012-04-01

    The diagnosis of blunt injury to the gallbladder may constitute a significant challenge to the diagnostician. There is often a delay in presentation with non-specific clinical symptoms. In the absence of reliable clinical symptoms, diagnostic imaging becomes an invaluable tool in the rapid identification of gallbladder injury. We present a case of isolated gallbladder injury following blunt abdominal trauma which was diagnosed by computed tomography and subsequently confirmed by cholecystectomy. PMID:22690293

  11. Isolated Gallbladder Injury in a Case of Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Birn, Jeffrey; Jung, Melissa; Dearing, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of blunt injury to the gallbladder may constitute a significant challenge to the diagnostician. There is often a delay in presentation with non-specific clinical symptoms. In the absence of reliable clinical symptoms, diagnostic imaging becomes an invaluable tool in the rapid identification of gallbladder injury. We present a case of isolated gallbladder injury following blunt abdominal trauma which was diagnosed by computed tomography and subsequently confirmed by cholecystectomy. PMID:22690293

  12. Duodenal Transection without Pancreatic Injury following Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bankar, Sanket Subhash; Gosavi, Vikas S.; Hamid, Mohd.

    2014-01-01

    With the inventions of faster cars and even more faster motorbikes there is a worldwide increase in road traffic accidents, which has increased the incidence of blunt abdominal trauma but still duodenal injury following a blunt abdominal trauma is uncommon and can pose a formidable challenge to the surgeon and failure to manage it properly can result in devastating results. It may typically occur in isolation or with pancreatic injury. Here, we report a case of an isolated transection of the third part of the duodenum with normal pancreas following a blunt abdominal trauma. The initial clinical changes in isolated duodenal injury may be extremely subtle before life-threatening, peritonitis develops. Hence, a high index of suspicion, on the basis of mechanism of injury and physical examination is the key in early detection of duodenal injury especially in a rural hospital like ours where the facilities for computed tomography scan are not available. PMID:25598947

  13. Duodenal Transection without Pancreatic Injury following Blunt Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Bankar, Sanket Subhash; Gosavi, Vikas S; Hamid, Mohd

    2014-01-01

    With the inventions of faster cars and even more faster motorbikes there is a worldwide increase in road traffic accidents, which has increased the incidence of blunt abdominal trauma but still duodenal injury following a blunt abdominal trauma is uncommon and can pose a formidable challenge to the surgeon and failure to manage it properly can result in devastating results. It may typically occur in isolation or with pancreatic injury. Here, we report a case of an isolated transection of the third part of the duodenum with normal pancreas following a blunt abdominal trauma. The initial clinical changes in isolated duodenal injury may be extremely subtle before life-threatening, peritonitis develops. Hence, a high index of suspicion, on the basis of mechanism of injury and physical examination is the key in early detection of duodenal injury especially in a rural hospital like ours where the facilities for computed tomography scan are not available. PMID:25598947

  14. Isolated common femoral artery injury caused by blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Avaro, J P; Biance, N; Savoie, P H; Peycru, T; Bonnet, P M; Balandraud, P

    2008-01-01

    The authors report an isolated common femoral artery injury caused by blunt trauma with dissection and secondary ischaemia. A 21-year-old man was admitted to hospital after being stabbed during acute alcoholic intoxication. He presented with a stab wound on the left leg and blunt trauma in the right groin. The surgical exploration of the left-sided wound did not disclose any vascular injury. After a 12-hour period of observation, the patient was discharged. Six hours later, he came back with severe ischaemia on the right leg caused by a femoral artery dissection. The patient underwent surgical revascularization, and fully recovered. Isolated artery blunt trauma is a rare event. In this observation, the absence of early symptoms resulted in delayed diagnosis. PMID:19241930

  15. Laparotomy for blunt abdominal trauma-some uncommon indications.

    PubMed

    Dharap, Satish B; Noronha, Jarin; Kumar, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Trauma laparotomy after blunt abdominal trauma is conventionally indicated for patients with features of hemodynamic instability and peritonitis to achieve control of hemorrhage and control of spillage. In addition, surgery is clearly indicated for the repair of posttraumatic diaphragmatic injury with herniation. Some other indications for laparotomy have been presented and discussed. Five patients with blunt abdominal injury who underwent laparotomy for nonroutine indications have been presented. These patients were hemodynamically stable and had no overt signs of peritonitis. Three patients had solid organ (spleen, kidney) infarction due to posttraumatic occlusion of the blood supply. One patient had mesenteric tear with internal herniation of bowel loops causing intestinal obstruction. One patient underwent surgery for traumatic abdominal wall hernia. In addition to standard indications for surgery in blunt abdominal trauma, laparotomy may be needed for vascular thrombosis of end arteries supplying solid organs, internal or external herniation through a mesenteric tear or anterior abdominal wall musculature, respectively. PMID:26957824

  16. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Matos, António P.; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  17. Multidetector computer tomography: evaluation of blunt chest trauma in adults.

    PubMed

    Palas, João; Matos, António P; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco; Ramalho, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  18. An uncommon cause of pneumobilia: blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, Fahrettin; Coban, Sacit; Terzi, Alpaslan; Cece, Hasan; Uzunkoy, Ali

    2011-07-01

    Pneumobilia is described as occurrence of free air in the gallbladder or biliary tree. There are a number of causes of pneumobilia, including surgically created biliary enteric fistula, instrumentation of the bile duct on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, emphysematous cholecystitis, and pyogenic cholangitis. Pneumobilia has also occurred following blunt abdominal trauma, but to date, no more than five cases of such injury have been reported in the literature. In this report, we present a patient struck by a motor vehicle with traumatic pneumobilia following blunt trauma to the abdomen, which was managed conservatively. PMID:21935838

  19. Macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy following blunt ocular trauma.

    PubMed

    Goel, Neha; Rajput, Metu; Sawhney, Amrita; Sardana, Tushar

    2016-01-01

    Macular infarction is a visually disabling condition caused by a variety of reasons. It has rarely been described in association with blunt ocular trauma. We describe the case of a young healthy male who sustained injury with a bull's leg and presented with severe visual loss owing to macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy. This report of an angiographically documented macular infarct secondary to ocular contusion highlights an additional feature in the spectrum of ocular findings following blunt trauma that might lead to a severe and permanent affliction of vision. PMID:26949360

  20. Macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy following blunt ocular trauma

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Neha; Rajput, Metu; Sawhney, Amrita; Sardana, Tushar

    2015-01-01

    Macular infarction is a visually disabling condition caused by a variety of reasons. It has rarely been described in association with blunt ocular trauma. We describe the case of a young healthy male who sustained injury with a bull’s leg and presented with severe visual loss owing to macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy. This report of an angiographically documented macular infarct secondary to ocular contusion highlights an additional feature in the spectrum of ocular findings following blunt trauma that might lead to a severe and permanent affliction of vision. PMID:26949360

  1. Severe Pulmonary Valve Regurgitation 40 Years After Blunt Chest Trauma.

    PubMed

    Fuglsang, Simon; Heiberg, Johan; Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    Severe pulmonary valve regurgitation caused by a pulmonary valve tear is a rare complication to a blunt chest trauma. In this case report, we present a patient with pulmonary regurgitation originating from a chest trauma 40 years ago. Possible mechanisms are osseous pinch of the pulmonary valve between the anterior chest wall and the vertebral column, and retrograde blowout from severe compression of the lungs. PMID:26434447

  2. Pancreatic atrophy and diabetes mellitus following blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Mary J; Crudo, David F; Carlson, Terri L; Pedersen, Anita M; Keller, Laura

    2013-02-01

    Following pancreatic trauma, loss of uninjured parenchyma as a result of surgical management is expected, and atrophy of parenchyma following nonoperative management has been described. While endocrine insufficiency as a sequela of pancreatic trauma has been reported in adults, it is not a described entity in children. We report a case of pancreatic atrophy following blunt injury in an 8 year old boy who presented 3 years later with diabetes mellitus. Further analysis revealed significant genetic predisposition to diabetes. PMID:23414880

  3. Diagnostic imaging of blunt abdominal trauma in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Miele, Vittorio; Piccolo, Claudia Lucia; Trinci, Margherita; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Brunese, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood, and blunt trauma accounts for 80-90 % of abdominal injuries. The mechanism of trauma is quite similar to that of the adults, but there are important physiologic differences between children and adults in this field, such as the smaller blood vessels and the high vasoconstrictive response, leading to the spreading of a non-operative management. The early imaging of children undergoing a low-energy trauma can be performed by CEUS, a valuable diagnostic tool to demonstrate solid organ injuries with almost the same sensitivity of CT scans; nevertheless, as for as urinary tract injuries, MDCT remains still the technique of choice, because of its high sensitivity and accuracy, helping to discriminate between an intra-peritoneal form a retroperitoneal urinary leakage, requiring two different managements. The liver is the most common organ injured in blunt abdominal trauma followed by the spleen. Renal, pancreatic, and bowel injuries are quite rare. In this review we present various imaging findings of blunt abdominal trauma in children. PMID:27075018

  4. Transcatheter Embolization for Delayed Hemorrhage Caused by Blunt Splenic Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Krohmer, Steven J. Hoffer, Eric K.; Burchard, Kenneth W.

    2010-08-15

    Although the exact benefit of adjunctive splenic artery embolization (SAE) in the nonoperative management (NOM) of patients with blunt splenic trauma has been debated, the role of transcatheter embolization in delayed splenic hemorrhage is rarely addressed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of SAE in the management of patients who presented at least 3 days after initial splenic trauma with delayed hemorrhage. During a 24-month period 4 patients (all male; ages 19-49 years) presented with acute onset of pain 5-70 days after blunt trauma to the left upper quadrant. Two had known splenic injuries that had been managed nonoperatively. All had computed axial tomography evidence of active splenic hemorrhage or false aneurysm on representation. All underwent successful SAE. Follow-up ranged from 28 to 370 days. These cases and a review of the literature indicate that SAE is safe and effective for NOM failure caused by delayed manifestations of splenic arterial injury.

  5. Cardio-embolic stroke following remote blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sonali; Atreya, Auras R; Penumetsa, Srikanth C; Hiser, William L

    2013-03-01

    A cardio-embolic stroke as a sequela of remote blunt chest trauma is a rare clinical presentation. Blunt chest trauma can cause various acute cardiac complications like arrhythmias, cardiac contusion etc. However, delayed consequences such as left ventricular thrombus resulting in thromboembolic phenomena are reported infrequently. A 30-year-old healthy man presented to an outside facility with transient neurological deficits. An MRI brain showed lesions suggestive of embolic etiology. A trans-thoracic echocardiogram (TTE) showed a 1.5 × 1.5 cm mass present in the left ventricular (LV) apex. Patient was transferred to our institution for cardiac surgery evaluation. On detailed questioning, he reported an incident of blunt chest trauma during a martial arts exhibition fight that took place 2 years back. Given this history, a cardiac catheterization was done, which showed 30% stenosis in mid-left anterior descending artery (LAD) without any other significant obstructive lesion. A trans-esophageal echocardiogram (TEE) showed akinesis of the LV apex and confirmed TTE finding of a mass, consistent with an apical thrombus. Surgery was deferred and patient was started on anticoagulation. A cardiac MRI done 2 weeks later showed evidence of apical infarction in the LAD territory. LAD is the most commonly affected coronary vessel by blunt traumatic injuries, likely due to its vulnerable anatomical position on the anterior aspect of the heart. A variety of mechanisms including intimal tear, rupture and spasm have been implicated in the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction after blunt chest trauma. PMID:24023477

  6. Right coronary artery dissection following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Ander; Alvarez-Contreras, Luis; Martín-Yuste, Victoria; Kasa, Gizem; Sabaté, Manel

    2012-04-01

    Chest trauma is a major health problem with a high mortality. Myocardial infarction secondary to coronary dissection following blunt chest trauma is a rare entity. We describe the case of an inferior MI following blunt chest trauma. A 61-year-old male without any relevant medical history was transported to a hospital after a low-velocity motorcycle accident. The patient was asymptomatic before the accident. The patient developed severe chest pain and an ECG revealed inferior ST segment elevation. After ruling out aortic dissection with angio-CT, a coronary angiograph depicted a proximal occlusion of the right coronary artery. After thrombectomy, a typical image of coronary artery dissection was observed; the image persisted after several runs of thrombectomy and for that reason a bare metal stent was implanted with a good final angiographic result. Five days after admission the patient was discharged home. Cardiac contusion is not uncommon; however acute myocardial infarction is a rare complication of blunt chest trauma. Thorough evaluation with clinical suspicion can lead to optimal medical care. PMID:24062888

  7. Massive rectal bleeding distant from a blunt car trauma.

    PubMed

    Gruden, E; Ragot, E; Arienzo, R; Revaux, A; Magri, M; Grossin, M; Leroy, C; Msika, S; Kianmanesh, R

    2010-09-01

    Mesenteric trauma is one of the possible injuries caused by the use of seat belts in case of motor vehicle crash. We report here a rare case of rectal bleeding by rupture of a mesosigmoid haematoma. An emergent laparotomy revealed a mesosigmoid haematoma with a centimetric rectal perforation. The wearing of safety belts added some specific blunt abdominal trauma, which directly depends on lap-and-sash belts. Mesenteric injuries are found out up to 5% of blunt abdominal traumas. "Seat belt mark" leads the surgical team to strongly suspect an intra-abdominal trauma. When "seat belt mark" sign is found, in patients with mild to severe blunt car injuries, CT-scan has to be realised to eliminate intra-abdominal complications, including mesenteric and mesosigmoid ones. In case of proved mesenteric haematoma associated to intestinal bleeding, a surgical treatment must be considered as first choice. Conservative approach remains possible in stable patients but surgical exploration remains necessary in unstable patients with active bleeding. PMID:20638207

  8. 2. Newer aids in the diagnosis of blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, B.

    1977-01-01

    The assessment of a case of blunt abdominal trauma can be complicated by many factors, and the resultant inaccurate or delayed diagnoses have contributed to the unacceptable mortality for this type of injury. Recently several useful diagnostic techniques have been developed that, if applied intelligently, may be instrumental in decreasing the high mortality among patients who present with ambiguous abdominal signs after sustaining blunt trauma. Although hematologic investigation and routine radiography have facilitated detection of intraperitoneal injury, peritoneal lavage has become the single most helpful aid. Scanning procedures are sometimes useful in recognizing splenic and hepatic defects especially; these may be confirmed or clarified by angiography. Although ultrasonography may be no more valuable than scintigraphy in outlining splenic and hepatic abnormalities, it is an important technique, especially in the diagnosis of retroperitoneal masses of traumatic origin. Laparoscopy also may be helpful in investigation if surgeons become more familiar with the procedure. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:608158

  9. Isolated posterior capsular rupture following blunt head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Jaroudi, Mahmoud O; Hamam, Rola N; Maalouf, Fadi C

    2014-01-01

    Closed-globe traumatic cataract is not uncommon in males in the pediatric age group. However, there is a relative paucity of literature on isolated posterior lens capsule rupture associated with closed-globe traumatic cataract. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with white cataract 1 day after blunt trauma to the forehead associated with posterior capsular rupture that was detected by B-scan ultrasonography preoperatively. No stigmata of trauma outside the posterior capsule could be detected by slit-lamp exam, funduscopy, and optical coherence tomography. Phacoemulsification with posterior chamber intraocular lens implant was performed 24 hours after trauma, with the patient achieving 6/6 visual acuity 1 week and 6 months after surgery. Our case is unique, being the youngest (amblyogenic age) to be reported, with prompt surgical intervention, and with no signs of trauma outside the posterior capsule. PMID:25506201

  10. Acute Myocardial Infarction Following Blunt Chest Trauma and Coronary Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Abdolrahimi, Safar Ali; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Heris, Saeed Oni; Maadani, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    Blunt chest traumatic coronary artery dissection is an uncommon cause of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Injuries of the coronary artery after blunt chest trauma are caused by different mechanisms such as vascular spasm, dissection and intimal tear or rupture of an existing thrombus formation. Chest pain might be masked by other injuries in patients with multiple traumas in car accident. Present case report is on a 37-year-old male without any specific past medical history who reported to the emergency department of a hospital with chest discomfort and was discharged with the impression of chest wall pain. After three days he experienced severe chest pain and he was admitted with the impression of acute coronary syndrome and underwent coronary angiography which showed Left Anterior Descending (LAD) artery dissection. The possibility of injury of the coronary artery should be kept in mind after blunt trauma to the chest. This condition is sometimes underdiagnosed. Its diagnosis may be difficult because chest pain can be interpreted as being secondary to chest wall contusion or it may be overshadowed by other injuries. Coronary dissection diagnosis after chest trauma requires clinical suspicion and systematic evaluation. Electrocardiography (ECG) should be done for every patient with thoracic trauma as the clinical findings may be misleading. PMID:27504338

  11. Acute Myocardial Infarction Following Blunt Chest Trauma and Coronary Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Abdolrahimi, Safar Ali; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Heris, Saeed Oni

    2016-01-01

    Blunt chest traumatic coronary artery dissection is an uncommon cause of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Injuries of the coronary artery after blunt chest trauma are caused by different mechanisms such as vascular spasm, dissection and intimal tear or rupture of an existing thrombus formation. Chest pain might be masked by other injuries in patients with multiple traumas in car accident. Present case report is on a 37-year-old male without any specific past medical history who reported to the emergency department of a hospital with chest discomfort and was discharged with the impression of chest wall pain. After three days he experienced severe chest pain and he was admitted with the impression of acute coronary syndrome and underwent coronary angiography which showed Left Anterior Descending (LAD) artery dissection. The possibility of injury of the coronary artery should be kept in mind after blunt trauma to the chest. This condition is sometimes underdiagnosed. Its diagnosis may be difficult because chest pain can be interpreted as being secondary to chest wall contusion or it may be overshadowed by other injuries. Coronary dissection diagnosis after chest trauma requires clinical suspicion and systematic evaluation. Electrocardiography (ECG) should be done for every patient with thoracic trauma as the clinical findings may be misleading. PMID:27504338

  12. Blunt trauma to large vessels: a mathematical study

    PubMed Central

    Ismailov, Rovshan M; Shevchuk, Nikolai A; Schwerha, Joseph; Keller, Lawrence; Khusanov, Higmat

    2004-01-01

    Background Blunt trauma causes short-term compression of some or all parts of the chest, abdomen or pelvis and changes hemodynamics of the blood. Short-term compression caused by trauma also results in a short-term decrease in the diameter of blood vessels. It has been shown that with a sudden change in the diameter of a tube or in the direction of the flow, the slower-moving fluid near the wall stops or reverses direction, which is known as boundary layer separation (BLS). We hypothesized that a sudden change in the diameter of elastic vessel that results from compression may lead not only to BLS but also to other hemodynamic changes that can damage endothelium. Methods We applied Navier-Stokes, multiphase and boundary layer equations to examine such stress. The method of approximation to solve the BL equations was used. Experiments were conducted in an aerodynamic tube, where incident flow velocity and weight of carriage with particles before and after blowing were measured. Results We found that sudden compression resulting from trauma leads to (1) BLS on the curved surface of the vessel wall; (2) transfer of laminar boundary layer into turbulent boundary layer. Damage to the endothelium can occur if compression is at least 25% and velocity is greater than 2.4 m/s or if compression is at least 10% and velocity is greater than 2.9 m/s. Conclusion Our research may point up new ways of reducing the damage from blunt trauma to large vessels. It has the potential for improvement of safety features of motor vehicles. This work will better our understanding of the precise mechanics and critical variables involved in diagnosis and prevention of blunt trauma to large vessels. PMID:15153246

  13. [Bronchial rupture in blunt thoracic trauma].

    PubMed

    López Espadas, F; Zabalo, M; Encinas, M; Díaz Regañón, G; Pagola, M A; González Fernández, C

    2000-12-01

    In closed chest trauma, bronchial rupture is an unusual but potentially serious complication, with an associated mortality rate of 30%. Recent decades have seen an increase in incidence parallel to greater use of transport. Eighty percent of injuries are located 2.5 cm from the carina. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs, imaging and bronchoscopy. Subcutaneous emphysema and respiratory insufficiency are the most common findings. Images show the presence of pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum or both. Bronchoscopy is the diagnostic method of choice and must be performed early. Treatment consists of reestablishing anatomical continuity of the tracheobronchial tree by surgical repair if the lesion affects more than a third of the circumference and/or pneumothorax is not resolved after two chest drainages. This type of injury should be recognized and treated early, both to restore lung function and to prevent associated complications caused by delay. However, initial findings are seldom specific, requiring the physician to display a high degree of suspicion and explaining why diagnosis often comes late. PMID:11171438

  14. Ventricular tachycardia from intracardiac hematoma in the setting of blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Solhpour, Amirreza; Ananaba-Ekeruo, Ijeoma; Memon, Nada B; Kantharia, Bharat K

    2014-01-01

    In the victims of motor vehicle accidents, unrecognized myocardial injuries may pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Herein, we present a case of a 17-year-old man who developed multiple ventricular premature complexes and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the setting of blunt chest trauma from a motor vehicle accident. We discuss significance of the electrocardiographic abnormalities in making an accurate diagnosis of cardiac hematoma and its management. PMID:24581106

  15. [Coronary artery dissection following blunt chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Seven, Ekim; Henningsen, Kristoffer; Abildgaard, Ulrik

    2015-03-16

    A previously healthy 38-year-old man was admitted to hospital with chest pain. The day before the patient had been to a karate session and had received multiple punches and kicks to the chest region. An ECG showed Q-waves in V1 and V2 and flattening of the T-waves in V1-V6. Levels of cardiac enzyme markers were elevated. The patient subsequently underwent coronary angiography with supplemental optical coherence tomography that revealed a bifurcate dissection involving the proximal parts of left ramus interventricularis anterior and circumflex coronary artery. Two drug-eluting stents were implanted with good angiographic result. PMID:25786846

  16. Morbidity and mortality rates in major blunt trauma to the upper chest.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, G V; Myers, R T

    1981-01-01

    It is widely believed that fractures of the first rib are associated with more severe injuries than fractures of other ribs. To confirm or refute that belief, we conducted a retrospective review of 168 patients with major blunt trauma resulting in fractures of the upper ribs treated at the North Carolina Baptist Hospital. A comparison of morbidity and mortality rates in relation to highest rib fractured showed essentially no correlation. We concluded that all patients with deceleration or crushing injuries involving upper-rib fractures must be suspected of having significant multiple organ system trauma and evaluated accordingly. PMID:7458452

  17. Blunt pancreatic trauma: experience at a rural referral center.

    PubMed

    Timberlake, G A

    1997-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare mechanism of injury, treatment methods, and outcome of blunt pancreas trauma patients transferred from another hospital to those of patients brought directly from the scene. A retrospective review was conducted of 6078 patients treated at a Level I trauma center from 1/1/90 to 12/31/94. Blunt pancreas injury was found in 39 (0.64%) patients (mean age, 33.2 years). Mechanism of injury included 34 (87%) motor vehicle crashes, 3 (8%) motorcycle crashes, and 2 (5%) other injuries. There were 11 transfer patients (28%), and 28 (72%) admitted directly from the scene. Eighty-two per cent of the motor vehicle crash patients were unrestrained, and 35 per cent had ethanol intoxication. Exploratory laparotomy was performed on 32 (82%); eight (25%) required repair or resection; 22 (69%) had trivial injuries, at most requiring drainage; and two (6.3%) exsanguinated. No patients required Whipple resection or pancreatiocojejunostomy. At operation, an average of 2.5 associated intra-abdominal injuries were found. Overall survival was 35 of 39 (90%). Among the patients brought directly to the trauma center, 93 per cent survived, whereas survival among transferred patients was 82 per cent (chi2 = 0.19; P = 0.66). Blunt pancreatic injuries vary in severity, but radical resection is rarely required. Lack of safety restraint and ethanol use are major risk factors. Despite the high likelihood of associated injuries, survivability is high. No difference in outcome was seen between directly admitted and transferred patients. PMID:9036900

  18. Behind armour blunt trauma--an emerging problem.

    PubMed

    Cannon, L

    2001-02-01

    Behind Armour Blunt Trauma (BABT) is the non-penetrating injury resulting from the rapid deformation of armours covering the body. The deformation of the surface of an armour in contact with the body wall arises from the impact of a bullet or other projectile on its front face. The deformation is part of the retardation and energy absorbing process that captures the projectile. In extreme circumstances, the BABT may result in death, even though the projectile has not perforated the armour. An escalation of the available energy of bullets and the desire of armour designers to minimise the weight and bulk of personal armour systems will increase the risk of BABT in military and security forces personnel. In order to develop materials that can be interposed between the armour and the body wall to attenuate the transfer of energy into the body, it is essential that the mechanism of BABT is known. There is a great deal of activity within UK and NATO to unravel the interactions; the mechanism is likely to be a combination of stress (pressure) waves generated by the rapid initial motion of the rear of the armour, and shear deformation to viscera produced by gross deflection of the body wall. Physical and computer model systems are under development to characterise the biophysical processes and provide performance targets for materials to be placed between armours and the body wall in order to attenuate the injuries (trauma attenuating backings-TABs). The patho-physiological consequences of BABT are being clarified by research, but the injuries will have some of the features of blunt chest trauma observed in road traffic accidents and other forms of civilian blunt impact injury. The injuries also have characteristics of primary blast injury. An overview diagnosis and treatment is described. PMID:11307682

  19. Periorbital non-Hodgkin's lymphoma after blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Kriwalsky, Marcus Stephan; Schroers, Roland; Stricker, Ingo; Hollstein, Stefan; Kunkel, Martin

    2010-06-01

    The head and neck region is the second most common site for the development of extranodal lymphomas. Richter's syndrome (RS) involves the transformation of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) to an aggressive lymphoma, most commonly, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We report the case of a 62-year-old man who developed DLBCL in the periorbital region 2 months after blunt trauma to the site. The patient lacked other physical symptoms at the time of presentation. Bone marrow biopsy and immunophenotypic analysis revealed a Richter transformation of unknown B-CLL. RS frequently arises in lymph nodes or bone marrow and rarely presents with extranodal involvement. Chemotherapy resulted in total remission of the lymphoma and no relapse was observed in the 6-month follow-up period. This case demonstrates that the clinician must recognize that unresolved soft tissue swelling after a trauma may be caused by NHL. PMID:20451833

  20. Management of Abdominal Solid Organ Injury After Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Jonathan E; Chokshi, Nikunj K

    2016-07-01

    Injury to the solid abdominal organs-liver, spleen, kidney, and pancreas-is one of the most common injury patterns in pediatric blunt trauma. Pediatric trauma centers are becoming increasingly successful in managing these injuries without operative intervention. Well-validated guidelines have been established for liver and spleen injury management, and operative intervention is reserved for patients who show evidence of active bleeding after resuscitation. No such guidelines yet exist for the management of traumatic injury of the kidney or pancreas. Exploratory laparotomy remains the treatment of choice in patients suffering hemodynamic collapse, but interventional radiologic or endoscopic procedures are increasingly used to manage all but the most devastating solid organ injuries. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(7):e241-e246.]. PMID:27403671

  1. Pneumoscrotum as Complication of Blunt Thoracic Trauma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gkagkalidis, Konstantinos; Varsamis, Nikolaos; Salveridis, Nikolaos; Karageorgiou, Georgios; Kampantais, Spyridon; Pouggouras, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Pneumoscrotum is a rare clinical entity. It presents with swollen scrotal sac and sometimes with palpable crepitus. It has many etiologies. One of them is due to blunt trauma of the thoracic cage, causing pneumothorax and/or pneumomediastinum. Case Presentation. We report the case of an 82-year-old male who was transferred to the Emergency Department with signs of respiratory distress after a blunt chest trauma. A CT scan was obtained, and bilateral pneumothoraces with four broken ribs were disclosed. Subcutaneous emphysema expanding from the eyelids to the scrotum was observed, and a chest tube was inserted on the right side with immediate improvement of the vital signs of the patient. Discussion. Pneumoscrotum has three major etiologies: (a) local introduction of air or infection from gas-producing bacteria, (b) pneumoperitoneum, and (c) air accumulation from lungs, mediastinum, or retroperitoneum. These sources account for most of the cases described in the literature. Treatment should be individualized, and surgical consultation should be obtained in all cases. Conclusion. Although pneumoscrotum itself is a benign entity, the process by which air accumulates in the scrotum must be clarified, and treatment must target the primary cause. PMID:23401836

  2. Left anterior descending coronary artery dissection after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Sadr-Ameli, Mohammad Ali; Amiri, Elaheh; Pouraliakbar, Hamidreza; Heidarali, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery dissection is a well-known albeit unusual complication of blunt chest trauma. It is also an uncommon cause of myocardial infarction. Only a few such cases have been reported, probably due to the high rate of sudden death. We report a case of left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery dissection in a healthy 38-year-old female caused by blunt chest trauma. The patient was referred to our hospital with a complaint of chest pain. Electrocardiography showed T-wave inversion, echocardiography a revealed circumferential pericardial effusion, and the coronary angiogram demonstrated a thrombotic dissection of the LAD.  Troponin I was the only biomarker with elevated level. CT coronary angiography was performed using the subtotal occlusion of the LAD and illustrated a relatively good LAD run-off, and thallium scintigraphy displayed viable myocardium in this territory. Despite the total occlusion of the LAD in our case, myocardial injury was not significant due to the relatively good LAD run-off. She underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery with an excellent result. PMID:24444069

  3. Outer Retinal Structure Following Closed Globe Blunt Ocular Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Flatter, John A.; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubow, Michael J.; Pinhas, Alexander; Singh, Ravi S.; Kapur, Rashmi; Shah, Nishit; Walsh, Ryan D.; Hong, Sang H.; Weinberg, David V.; Stepien, Kimberly E.; Wirostko, William J.; Robison, Scott; Dubra, Alfredo; Rosen, Richard B.; Connor, Thomas B.; Carroll, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate outer retinal structural abnormalities in patients with visual deficits following closed globe blunt ocular trauma (cgBOT). Methods Nine subjects with visual complaints following cgBOT were examined between 1 month post-trauma and 6 years post-trauma. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was used to assess outer retinal architecture, while adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) was used to analyze photoreceptor mosaic integrity. Results Visual deficits ranged from central scotomas to decreased visual acuity. SD-OCT defects included focal foveal photoreceptor lesions, variable attenuation of the interdigitation zone, and mottling of the outer segment band, with one subject having normal outer retinal structure. AOSLO revealed disruption of the photoreceptor mosaic in all subjects, variably manifesting as foveal focal discontinuities, perifoveal hyporeflective cones, and paracentral regions of selective cone loss. Conclusions We observe persistent outer retinal disruption in subjects with visual complaints following cgBOT, albeit to a variable degree. AOSLO imaging allows assessment of photoreceptor structure at a level of detail not resolvable using SD-OCT or other current clinical imaging tools. Multimodal imaging appears useful for revealing the cause of visual complaints in patients following cgBOT. Future studies are needed to better understand how photoreceptor structure changes longitudinally in response to various trauma. PMID:24752010

  4. Clinical review: Initial management of blunt pelvic trauma patients with haemodynamic instability

    PubMed Central

    Geeraerts, Thomas; Chhor, Vibol; Cheisson, Gaëlle; Martin, Laurent; Bessoud, Bertrand; Ozanne, Augustin; Duranteau, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Pelvic trauma can lead to severe, uncontrollable haemorrhage and death related to prolonged shock and multiple organ failure. Massive retroperitoneal haematoma should be assumed to be present in cases of post-traumatic haemodynamic instability associated with pelvic fracture in the absence of extrapelvic haemorrhagic lesions. This review describes the pathophysiology of retroperitoneal haematoma in trauma patient with blunt pelvic fracture, considering the roles of venous and arterial bleeding. Efficacy and safety of haemostatic procedures are also discussed, and particular attention is given to the efficacy of pelvic angiographic embolization and external pelvic fixation. A decision making algorithm is proposed for the treatment of trauma patients with pelvic fracture that takes haemodynamic status and associated lesions into account. PMID:17300738

  5. Computed tomography for pancreatic injuries in pediatric blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Almaramhy, Hamdi Hameed; Guraya, Salman Yousuf

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of computed tomography scan in diagnosing and grading the pattern of pancreatic injuries in children. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study to review medical files of children admitted with blunt pancreatic injuries to the Maternity and Children Hospital Al-Madina Al-Munawwarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The demographic details and mechanisms of injury were recorded. From the database of the Picture Archiving and Communication System of the radiology department, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) images of the pancreatic injuries, severity, type of injuries and grading of pancreatic injuries were established. RESULTS: Seven patients were recruited in this study over a period of 5 years; 5 males and 2 females with a mean age of 7 years (age range 5-12 years). Fall from height was the most frequent mechanism of injury, reported in 5 (71%), followed by road traffic accident (1 patient, 14%) and cycle handlebar (1 patient, 14%) injuries. According to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma grading system, 1 (14%) patient sustained Grade I, 1 (14%) Grade II, 3 (42%) Grade III and 2 (28%) patients were found to have Grade V pancreatic injuries. This indicated a higher incidence of severe pancreatic injuries; 5 (71.4%) patients were reported to have Grade III and higher on the injury scale. Three (42%) patients had associated abdominal organ injuries. CONCLUSION: Pediatric pancreatic injuries due to blunt abdominal trauma are rare. The majority of the patients sustained extensive pancreatic injuries. MDCT findings are helpful and reliable in diagnosing and grading the pancreatic injuries. PMID:22905284

  6. Is there any role for resuscitative emergency department thoracotomy in blunt trauma?

    PubMed Central

    Khorsandi, Maziar; Skouras, Christos; Shah, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether there is any role for resuscitative emergency department thoracotomy in severe blunt trauma. Emergency thoracotomy is an accepted intervention for patients with penetrating cardiothoracic trauma. However, its role in blunt trauma has been challenged and has been a subject of considerable debate. Altogether, 186 relevant papers were identified, of which 14 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The author, journal, date, country of publication and relevant outcomes are tabulated. The 14 studies comprised 2 systematic reviews and 12 retrospective studies. The systematic review performed by the Trauma Committee of the American College of Surgeons included 42 studies and a cumulative total of 2193 blunt trauma patients who underwent an emergency department thoracotomy, reporting a survival rate of 1.6%. According to this review, 15% of the survivors suffered from neurological sequelae, but survivors from both penetrating and blunt trauma were included. A systematic review comprising 24 studies reported a survival rate of 1.4% among 1047 blunt trauma patients. Of the retrospective studies, 11 report poor survival rates, ranging from 0 to 6%. Only one study reports a higher survival rate (12.2%). Five of the studies reported on the neurological outcome of survivors. The majority of the studies suffered from limitations due to the small number of included cases. The reported survival after an emergency department thoracotomy for blunt trauma is very low in the vast majority of available studies. Furthermore, the neurological sequelae in the few survivors are frequent and severe. Interestingly, some author groups recommend that emergency department thoracotomy should be contraindicated in cases of blunt trauma with no signs of life at the scene of trauma or on arrival at the emergency department. Larger, well-designed series will

  7. Surgical Management of Undiagnosed Laceration of Superior Vena Cava Caused by Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Bouabdallaoui, Nadia; Debbagh, Hassan; Schoell, Thibaut; Lebreton, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    Intrapericardial rupture of the superior vena cava resulting from blunt thoracic trauma is a rare and life-threatening condition that has to be ruled out in the presence of signs of cardiac tamponade and a history of blunt thoracic trauma. We report the case of undiagnosed superior vena cava laceration caused by a high-speed road traffic accident in a 25 year-old patient revealed by cardiac tamponade. We highlight the need of urgent surgical exploration in all patients whose condition is unstable in the setting of blunt thoracic trauma regardless of imaging conclusions. PMID:27106431

  8. Hepatic Enzyme Decline after Pediatric Blunt Trauma: A Tool for Timing Child Abuse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Amy L.; Lindberg, Daniel M.; Burke, Bonnie L.; Shults, Justine; Holmes, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Previous research in adult patients with blunt hepatic injuries has suggested a pattern of serum hepatic transaminase concentration decline. Evaluating this decline after pediatric blunt hepatic trauma could establish parameters for estimating the time of inflicted injuries. Deviation from a consistent transaminase resolution pattern…

  9. The Houdini effect--an unusual case of blunt abdominal trauma resulting in perforative appendicitis.

    PubMed

    O'Kelly, F; Lim, K T; Hayes, B; Shields, W; Ravi, N; Reynolds, J V

    2012-03-01

    We present a unique case of perforative appendicitis that occurred in an adult following blunt abdominal trauma. This case represents the first such reported case from Ireland. It also represents a modern practical example of Laplace's theory of the effect of increased pressure on colonic wall tension leading to localized perforation, and serves to highlight not only the importance in preoperative imaging for blunt abdominal trauma, but also the importance of considering appendiceal perforation. PMID:22558817

  10. Temporal bone fracture following blunt trauma caused by a flying fish.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, D; Karam, M; Danino, J; Flax-Goldenberg, R; Joachims, H Z

    1998-10-01

    Blunt trauma to the temporal region can cause fracture of the skull base, loss of hearing, vestibular symptoms and otorrhoea. The most common causes of blunt trauma to the ear and surrounding area are motor vehicle accidents, violent encounters, and sports-related accidents. We present an obscure case of a man who was struck in the ear by a flying fish while wading in the sea with resulting temporal bone fracture, sudden deafness, vertigo, cerebrospinal fluid otorrhoea, and pneumocephalus. PMID:10211221

  11. Pediatric blunt trauma resulting in major arterial injuries.

    PubMed

    Milas, Zvonimir L; Dodson, Thomas F; Ricketts, Richard R

    2004-05-01

    Ten children, aged 4 to 14 years, sustaining blunt arterial trauma from motor vehicle collisions (6), bicycle accidents (2), and falls (2) were identified over a 10-year period. The arteries injured included the common iliac (3), abdominal aorta (2), carotid (2), brachial (2), and the subclavian, renal, and femoral artery (1 each). One patient had three arterial injuries. Six patients had associated injuries including a pelvic and lumbar spine fracture, Horner's syndrome, liver laceration, skull fracture, open humerus fracture, small bowel serosal tear, and a brachial plexus injury. Definitive diagnosis was made using arteriography (6), computed tomography (CT) scan (2), and physical examination (2). The types of arterial injuries found included incomplete transection, complete transection with pseudo-aneurysm formation, traumatic arteriovenous (AV) fistulas, complete occlusion, and dissection. Repair was accomplished by hypogastric artery interposition or bypass grafting, synthetic grafting with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), reverse saphenous vein grafting, or primary repair, depending on the circumstances. An AV fistula between the carotid artery and cavernous sinus was embolized. All grafts remained patent with exception of the aorto-renal bypass graft at follow-up ranging from 1 month to 3 years. The principles for repairing vascular injuries in children are slightly different than those in adults. Every effort should be made to use autogenous tissue such as the hypogastric artery or saphenous vein for repair if possible. If not, PTFE grafts can be used, although the long-term patency of these grafts in growing children is not known. PMID:15156954

  12. Impact of Injury Severity on Dynamic Inflammation Networks Following Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Almahmoud, Khalid; Namas, Rami A.; Abdul-Malak, Othman; Zaaqoq, Akram M.; Zamora, Ruben; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Sperry, Jason; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Clinical outcomes following trauma depend on the extent of injury and the host’s response to injury, along with medical care. We hypothesized that dynamic networks of systemic inflammation manifest differently as a function of injury severity in human blunt trauma. Study Design From a cohort of 472 blunt trauma survivors studied following IRB approval, three Injury Severity Score (ISS) sub-cohorts were derived after matching for age and gender: Mild ISS (49 patients [33 males, 16 females; age 42±1.9; ISS 9.5±0.4]); Moderate ISS: (49 patients [33 males, 16 females; age 42±1.9; ISS 19.9±0.4]) and Severe ISS: (49 patients [33 males, 16 females; age 42±2.5; ISS 33±1.1]). Multiple inflammatory mediators were assessed in serial blood samples. Dynamic Bayesian Network (DyBN) inference was utilized to infer causal relationships based on probabilistic measures. Results ICU length of stay [LOS], total LOS, days on mechanical ventilation, Marshall Multiple Organ Dysfunction Score, prevalence of pre-hospital hypotension and nosocomial infection, as well admission lactate and base deficit were elevated as a function of ISS. Multiple circulating inflammatory mediators were significantly elevated in Severe ISS vs. Moderate or Mild ISS over both the first 24 h and out to 7 days post-injury. Moderate and Mild ISS. DyBN suggested that IL-6 production in Severe ISS was affected by MCP-1/CCL2, MIG/CXCL9, and IP-10/CXCL10; by MCP-1/CCL2 and MIG/CXCL9 in Moderate ISS; and by MIG/CXCL9 alone in Mild ISS over 7 d post-injury. Conclusion ISS correlates linearly with morbidity, prevalence of infection, and early systemic inflammatory connectivity of chemokines to IL-6. PMID:26009819

  13. Computed tomography (CT) of bowel and mesenteric injury in blunt abdominal trauma: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Radhiana; Abd Aziz, Azian; Mohamed, Siti Kamariah Che

    2012-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is currently the diagnostic modality of choice in the evaluation of clinically stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma, including the assessment of blunt bowel and mesenteric injuries. CT signs of bowel and/or mesenteric injuries are bowel wall defect, free air, oral contrast material extravasation, extravasation of contrast material from mesenteric vessels, mesenteric vascular beading, abrupt termination of mesenteric vessels, focal bowel wall thickening, mesenteric fat stranding, mesenteric haematoma and intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal fluid. This pictorial essay illustrates CT features of bowel and/or mesenteric injuries in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Pitfalls in interpretation of images are emphasized in proven cases. PMID:23082464

  14. [Isolated left ventricular--right atrial shunt after blunt chest trauma (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, E; Beyer, J

    1978-12-01

    A case of left-ventricular-right-atrial septal defect secundary to blunt chest trauma is described. The etiology of this type of septal defect, e. g. congenital, following aortic and mitral valve replacement, endocarditis and trauma, is discussed. Early defect closure is recommended in the presence of significant shunt volume. PMID:751280

  15. Coronary artery dissection: an unusual cause of hypoxia in blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Burns, Brian J; Healy, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    A 41-year-old motocross rider sustained blunt trauma to the chest following a collision with another rider. He was initially hypoxic and was given oxygen with a non-rebreather mask. He complained of chest pain. A prehospital extended focused assessment with sonography in trauma (eFAST) scan was negative for pneumothorax, but demonstrated a hypokinetic left ventricle. An electrocardiogram (ECG) in the emergency department confirmed anterior myocardial infarction, found to be due to a traumatic left anterior descending coronary artery dissection. This case highlights a rare but life-threatening cause of hypoxia in blunt chest trauma. PMID:21495831

  16. Computed tomography arterial portography for assessment of portal vein injury after blunt hepatic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chen-Ju; Wong, Yon-Cheong; Tsang, Yuk-Ming; Wang, Li-Jen; Chen, Huan-Wu; Ku, Yi-Kang; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Huan-Wen; Kang, Shih-Ching

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Intrahepatic portal vein injuries secondary to blunt abdominal trauma are difficult to diagnose and can result in insidious bleeding. We aimed to compare computed tomography arterial portography (CTAP), reperfusion CTAP (rCTAP), and conventional computed tomography (CT) for diagnosing portal vein injuries after blunt hepatic trauma. METHODS Patients with blunt hepatic trauma, who were eligible for nonoperative management, underwent CTAP, rCTAP, and CT. The number and size of perfusion defects observed using the three methods were compared. RESULTS A total of 13 patients (seven males/six females) with a mean age of 34.5±14.1 years were included in the study. A total of 36 hepatic segments had perfusion defects on rCTAP and CT, while there were 47 hepatic segments with perfusion defects on CTAP. The size of perfusion defects on CT (239 cm3; interquartile range [IQR]: 129.5, 309.5) and rCTAP (238 cm3; IQR: 129.5, 310.5) were significantly smaller compared with CTAP (291 cm3; IQR: 136, 371) (both, P = 0.002). CONCLUSION Perfusion defects measured by CTAP were significantly greater than those determined by either rCTAP or CT in cases of blunt hepatic trauma. This finding suggests that CTAP is superior to rCTAP and CT in evaluating portal vein injuries after blunt liver trauma. PMID:26268303

  17. Prospective evaluation of hand-held focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) in blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Sirois, Marco; Laupland, Kevin B.; Goldstein, Leanelle; Brown, David Ross; Simons, Richard K.; Dulchavsky, Scott; Boulanger, Bernard R.

    2005-01-01

    Background Ultrasonography (US) has become indispensable in assessing the status of the injured patient. Although hand-held US equipment is now commercially available and may expand the availability and speed of US in assessing the trauma patient, it has not been subjected to controlled evaluation in early trauma care. Methods A 2.4-kg hand-held (HH) US device was used to perform focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) on blunt trauma victims at 2 centres. Results were compared with the “truth” as determined through formal FAST examinations (FFAST), CT, operative findings and serial examination. The ability of HHFAST to detect free fluid, intra-abdominal injuries and injuries requiring therapeutic interventions was assessed. Results HHFAST was positive in 80% of 313 patients who needed surgery or angiography. HHFAST test performances (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios of positive and negative test results) were 77%, 99%, 96%, 94%, 95%, 95 and 0.2, respectively, for free fluid, and 64%, 99%, 96%, 89%, 90%, 74 and 0.4, respectively, for documented injuries. HHFAST missed or gave an indeterminate result in 8 (3%) of 270 patients with injuries who required therapeutic intervention and 25 (9%) of 270 patients who did not require intervention. FFAST performance was comparable. Conclusions HHFAST performed by clinicians detects intraperitoneal fluid with a high degree of accuracy. All FAST examinations are valuable tests when positive. They will miss some injuries, but the majority of the injuries missed do not require therapy. HHFAST provides an early extension of the physical examination but should be complemented by the selective use of CT, rather than formal repeat US. PMID:16417051

  18. Acute myocardial infarction due to blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, R K; Singh, Arun; Kumar, Rajiv; Kumar, Sanjeev; Sinha, Ajay; Saurabh; Kumar, Amit

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of blunt chest injury following a road accident leading to damage of the left main and left anterior descending coronary arteries causing acute myocardial infarction in a young person. PMID:12674188

  19. [Blunt abdominal trauma.--analysis of 201 cases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Pannenborg, G; Wolf, O; Voigtsberger, P

    1978-01-01

    201 blunt abdominal traumata treated clinically at the surgical department of the Medical Academy in Erfurt from 1967 to 1976 are reported: No increase of blunt abdominal traumata within the period of the report in spite of considerable growth of trafficdensity and industrialization could be observed.--The percentage of severe secundary injuries remained approximately constant, too.--Intestinal lesions, combined hepatolienal ruptures caused the highest mortality especially in combination with severe craniocerebral lesions. PMID:685552

  20. [Right Atrial Rupture due to Blunt Trauma;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Nishi, Toshihiko; Tamenishi, Akinori; Niimi, Takao; Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    The survival rate of cardiac rupture due to blunt trauma is generally low. We report a case of surgical treatment of blunt cardiac trauma. A 55-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for blunt trauma due to a car accident. His hemodynamics was compromised due to cardiac tamponade. The patient underwent pericardial drainage by small subxiphoid incision. Although about 400 ml of blood was evacuated, hemorrhage was still continuing. After full sternotomy, we found a 3 mm tear in the right atrial appendage and sutured it easily without cardiopulmonary bypass. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged on the 10th postoperative day. He is now leading a normal life. PMID:26197827

  1. Thyroid gland rupture: a rare finding after a blunt neck trauma.

    PubMed

    Zawawi, Faisal; Varshney, Rickul; Payne, Richard J; Manoukian, John J

    2013-05-01

    This is a case report of a 13 years old boy with a thyroid rupture secondary to a hockey stick blunt trauma to his neck and a literature review focused on diagnosis and management. There are 14 other cases in the literature, 7 of which required surgical intervention mainly to evacuate a hematoma. The case in this review did not develop any complications. This is the first reported case in the literature of thyroid gland rupture due to a blunt trauma in a child. Patients with thyroid gland rupture should be monitored closely for developing a hematoma or thyroid storm. PMID:23522054

  2. Ocular blunt trauma: loss of sight from an ice hockey injury

    PubMed Central

    Morris, D S

    2006-01-01

    A case of ocular blunt trauma is described in which a 17 year old male ice hockey player collided with an opponent during a game. The opponent's stick travelled under the patient's half face visor and struck his left eye causing hyphema, angle recession, lens subluxation, and choroidal rupture over the macula, permanently reducing his vision to counting fingers. Sequelae of ocular blunt trauma are discussed along with methods of injury prevention by addressing players' behaviour and safety equipment. This injury is unlikely to have occurred with properly used full face protection. PMID:16505067

  3. Small bowel intussusception with the Meckel's diverticulum after blunt abdominal trauma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Benjelloun, El Bachir; Ousadden, Abdelmalek; Ibnmajdoub, Karim; Mazaz, Khalid; Taleb, Khalid Ait

    2009-01-01

    Intussusception with the Meckel's diverticulum is a rare but well-known cause of small bowel obstruction in the adult. After blunt abdominal trauma, intussusception is exceedingly rare and has been reported previously only in few cases. We present a case of a previously healthy 28-year-old man developing four days after blunt abdominal trauma signs of small bowel obstruction. Ileo-ileal intussusception was suggested by computed tomography. Exploration revealed ileo-ileal intussusception with Meckel's diverticulum. A diverticulectomy with small bowel resection was performed. PMID:19419572

  4. Systematic review of blunt abdominal trauma as a cause of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Toumi, Zaher; Chan, Anthony; Hadfield, Matthew B; Hulton, Neil R

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acute appendicitis commonly presents as an acute abdomen. Cases of acute appendicitis caused by blunt abdominal trauma are rare. We present a systematic review of appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma. The aim of this review was to collate and report the clinical presentations and experience of such cases. SUBJECTS AND METHODS A literature review was performed using PubMed, Embase and Medline and the keywords ‘appendicitis’, ‘abdominal’ and ‘trauma’. RESULTS The initial search returned 381 papers, of which 17 articles were included. We found 28 cases of acute appendicitis secondary to blunt abdominal trauma reported in the literature between 1991 and 2009. Mechanisms of injury included road-traffic accidents, falls, assaults and accidents. Presenting symptoms invariably included abdominal pain, but also nausea, vomiting and anorexia. Only 12 patients had computed tomography scans and 10 patients had ultrasonography. All reported treatment was surgical and positive for appendicitis. CONCLUSIONS Although rare, the diagnosis of acute appendicitis must be considered following direct abdominal trauma especially if the patient complains of abdominal right lower quadrant pain, nausea and anorexia. Haemodynamically stable patients who present shortly after blunt abdominal trauma with right lower quadrant pain and tenderness should undergo urgent imaging with a plan to proceed to appendicectomy if the imaging suggested an inflammatory process within the right iliac fossa. PMID:20513274

  5. Evaluation of leadership skills during the simulation education course for the initial management of blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Schott, Eric; Brautigam, Robert T; Smola, Jacqueline; Burns, Karyl J

    2012-04-01

    Leadership skills of senior residents, trauma fellows, and a nurse practitioner were assessed during simulation training for the initial management of blunt trauma. This was a pilot, observational study, that in addition to skill development and assessment also sought to determine the need for a dedicated leadership training course for surgical residents. The study evaluated the leadership skills and adherence to Advance Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines of the team leaders during simulation training. The team leaders' performances on criteria regarding prearrival planning, critical actions based on ATLS, injury identification, patient management, and communication were evaluated for each of five blunt-trauma scenarios. Although there was a statistically significant increase in leadership skills for performing ATLS critical actions, P < 0.05, there were 10 adverse events. A structured simulation program dedicated to developing skills for team leadership willbe a worthwhile endeavor at our institution. PMID:22611722

  6. Lower Urinary Tract Injuries Following Blunt Trauma: A Review of Contemporary Management

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jennifer P. L; Bultitude, Matthew F; Royce, Peter; Gruen, Russell L; Cato, Alex; Corcoran, Niall M

    2011-01-01

    Lower urinary tract trauma, although relatively uncommon in blunt trauma, can lead to significant morbidity when diagnosed late or left untreated; urologists may only encounter a handful of these injuries in their career. This article reviews the literature and reports on the management of these injuries, highlighting the issues facing clinicians in this subspecialty. Also presented is a structured review detailing the mechanisms, classification, diagnosis, management, and complications of blunt trauma to the bladder and urethra. The prognosis for bladder rupture is excellent when treated. Significant intraperitoneal rupture or involvement of the bladder neck mandates surgical repair, whereas smaller extraperitoneal lacerations may be managed with catheterization alone. With the push for management of trauma patients in larger centers, urologists in these hospitals are seeing increasing numbers of lower urinary tract injuries. Prospective analysis may be achieved in these centers to address the current lack of Level 1 evidence. PMID:22114545

  7. The role of elevated liver transaminase levels in children with blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Karaduman, Dolunay; Sarioglu-Buke, Akile; Kilic, Ilknur; Gurses, Ercan

    2003-05-01

    The role of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) levels on intra-abdominal injury in children has not been adequately studied. In this report, the accuracy of these tests in predicting the degree and extend of intra-abdominal and hepatic injury in children with blunt abdominal trauma was investigated.Eighty-seven haemodynamically stable children with multiple trauma were prospectively evaluated. The SGOT and SGPT of patients with and without abdominal trauma (Groups I and II) were compared. Patients with and without radiologically verified intra-abdominal injury were further compared (Groups Ib and Ia). There was significant difference in SGOT and SGPT levels of Groups I and II. SGOT and SGPT levels were 333.6+/-283.8 and, 197.5+/-192.5 U/l, respectively in Group Ib; but 84.2+/-55.9, 43+/-29.8 U/l in Group Ia (P<0.001). In all patients with radiologically detected intra-abdominal pathology SGOT and SGPT levels were above 110.5 and 63.5 U/l, respectively. In patients with hepatic injury SGOT level was above 500 U/l and, SGPT level was above 300 U/l. Statistically significant positive correlation was found between radiologically detected intra-abdominal pathology and increased SGOT (above 110.5 U/l) and SGPT (above 63.5 U/l) levels (P<0.05). These data indicated that the SGOT and SGPT levels were significantly higher in patients with intra-abdominal injury even in the absence of hepatic injury. We suggest that liver function tests may be used as screening tests in children with blunt abdominal trauma in addition to physical abdominal examination. A sudden rise up to 110.5 U/l in SGOT and 63.5 U/l in SGPT indicate an intra-abdominal injury and severe hepatic injury should be suspected with higher levels of SGOT and SGPT. PMID:12667774

  8. Incomplete ventricular septal rupture following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Tsikaderis, D; Dardas, P; Hristoforidis, H

    2000-02-01

    Nonpenetrating cardiac trauma should be considered in the diagnosis of electrocardiographic changes after road traffic accidents. Transesophageal echocardiography is the most useful noninvasive technique for the diagnosis of cardiac trauma. This paper reports the case of a patient with traumatic contusion of the ventricular septum following a fall from a 20 m height onto the roof of a car. PMID:10676607

  9. CT Chest with IV Contrast Compared with CT Angiography after Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Zaw, Andrea A; Stewart, Donovan; Murry, Jason S; Hoang, David M; Sun, Beatrice; Ashrafian, Sogol; Hotz, Heidi; Chung, Rex; Margulies, Daniel R; Ley, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Blunt aortic injury (BAI) after chest trauma is a potentially lethal condition. Rapid diagnosis is important to appropriately treat patients. The purpose of this study was to compare CT with intravenous contrast (CTI) to CT with angiography (CTA) in the initial evaluation of blunt chest trauma patients. This was a retrospective review of all blunt trauma patients who received a CTI or CTA during the initial evaluation at an urban Level I trauma center from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2013. Two-hundred and eighty-one trauma patients met inclusion criteria. Most, 167/281 (59%) received CTI and 114/281 (41%) received CTA. There were no differences between cohorts in age, gender, initial heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and Glasgow Coma Scale in emergency department. Mortality rates were similar for CTI and CTA (4% vs 8%, P = 0.20). CTI identified an injury in 54 per cent compared with 46 per cent in CTA (P = 0.05). Overall, 2 per cent of patients had BAI with similar rates in CTI and CTA (2% vs 2%, P = 0.80). BAI was not missed using either CTI or CTA. Trauma patients studied with CTI had similar diagnostic findings as CTA. CTI may be preferable to CTA during the initial assessment for possible BAI because of a single contrast injection for whole body CT. PMID:26802856

  10. Blunt Trauma Performance of Fabric Systems Utilizing Natural Rubber Coated High Strength Fabrics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, M. R.; Ahmad, W. Y. W.; Samsuri, A.; Salleh, J.; Abidin, M. H.

    2010-03-11

    The blunt trauma performance of fabric systems against 9 mm bullets is reported. Three shots were fired at each fabric system with impact velocity of 367+-9 m/s and the depth of indentation on the modeling clay backing was measured. The results showed that 18-layer and 21-layer all-neat fabric systems failed the blunt trauma test. However, fabric systems with natural rubber (NR) latex coated fabric layers gave lower blunt trauma of between 25-32 mm indentation depths. Deformations on the neat fabrics upon impact were identified as broken yarns, yarn stretching and yarn pull-out. Deflections of the neat fabrics were more localised. For the NR latex coated fabric layers, no significant deformation can be observed except for peeled-off regions of the NR latex film at the back surface of the last layer. From the study, it can be said that the NR latex coated fabric layers were effective in reducing the blunt trauma of fabric systems.

  11. Right main bronchus rupture from blunt chest trauma in a child.

    PubMed

    Alimi, Faouzi; Alijla, Hazem; Neily, Asma; Ghannouchi, Chams; El Hadj Sidi, Chighali; Jerbi, Sofian

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of a 6-year-old boy with right main bronchus avulsion after blunt chest trauma. Reimplantation of the right main bronchus at the carina was performed via a right posterolateral thoracotomy, with satisfactory long-term morphological and functional results. PMID:27298476

  12. Delayed Presentation of Renocolic Fistula at 4 Months after Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Don; Kim, Tae Nam; Ha, Hong Koo

    2011-01-01

    Causes of previously reported reno-colic fistulas included primary renal and colonic pathologic states involving infectious, malignant or other inflammatory processes. However, reno-colic fistula after renal injury is extremely uncommon. We report an unusual delayed presentation of reno-colic fistula that occurred at 4 months later after blunt abdominal trauma. PMID:21423539

  13. A Cost-effectiveness Analysis Comparing a Clinical Decision Rule Versus Usual Care to Risk Stratify Children for Intraabdominal Injury After Blunt Torso Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Daniel K.; Yang, Zhuo; Clark, John A.; Kuppermann, Nathan; Holmes, James F.; Melnikow, Joy

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recently a clinical decision rule (CDR) to identify children at very low risk for intraabdominal injury needing acute intervention (IAI) following blunt torso trauma was developed. Potential benefits of a CDR include more appropriate abdominal computed tomography (CT) use and decreased hospital costs. The objective of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of implementing the CDR compared to usual care for the evaluation of children with blunt torso trauma. The hypothesis was that compared to usual care, implementation of the CDR would result in lower CT use and hospital costs. Methods A cost-effectiveness decision analytic model was constructed comparing the costs and outcomes of implementation of the CDR to usual care in the evaluation of children with blunt torso trauma. Probabilities from a multicenter cohort study of children with blunt torso trauma were derived; estimated costs were based on those at the study coordinating site. Outcome measures included missed IAI, number of abdominal CT scans, total costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Sensitivity analyses varying imputed probabilities, costs, and scenarios were conducted. Results Using a hypothetical cohort of 1,000 children with blunt torso trauma, the base case model projected that the implementation of the CDR would result in 0.50 additional missed IAIs, a total cost savings of $54,527, and 104 fewer abdominal CT scans compared to usual care. The usual care strategy would cost $108,110 to prevent missing one additional IAI. Findings were robust under multiple sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Compared to usual care, implementation of the CDR in the evaluation of children with blunt torso trauma would reduce hospital costs and abdominal CT imaging, with a slight increase in the risk of missed intraabdominal IAI. PMID:24238315

  14. Extracorporeal life support in a severe blunt chest trauma with cardiac rupture.

    PubMed

    Yoann, Launey; Erwan, Flecher; Nicolas, Nesseler; Yannick, Malledant; Philippe, Seguin

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a case of severe blunt chest trauma secondary to a horse riding accident with resultant free-wall rupture of the left ventricle in association with severe lung contusion. We describe the initial surgical and medical management of the cardiac rupture which was associated with a massive haemoptysis due to severe lung trauma. Extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support was initiated and allowed both the acute heart and lung failure to recover. We discuss the successful use and pitfalls of ECMO techniques which are sparsely described in such severe combined cardiac and thoracic trauma. PMID:24829813

  15. Pericardio-diaphragmatic rupture following blunt abdominal trauma: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Abou Hussein, Bassem; Khammas, Ali; Kaiyasah, Hadiel; Swaleh, Abeer; Al Rifai, Nazim; Al-Mazrouei, Alya; Badri, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic diaphragmatic rupture (TDR) occurs in 0–5% of patients with major blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma, in most of them on the left side, and an early correct diagnosis is made in less than half of the cases (Meyers and McCabe, 1993; Ball et al., 1982). Presentation of the case We report a case of a forty-eight years old man who had a pericardio-diaphragmatic rupture after a high-velocity blunt abdominal trauma that was diagnosed and treated successfully. Discussion Pericardio-diaphragmatic rupture (PDR) is an uncommon problem that poses a diagnostic challenge to surgeons. The incidence of PDR is between 0.2% and 3.3% of cases with TDR (Sharma, 1999 [3]). Conclusion PDR should be suspected in any patient with high velocity thoraco-abdominal trauma. Early diagnosis is essential and needs a high index of suspicion. Early Management is important in decreasing morbidity and mortality. PMID:26773877

  16. Myocardial contusion in patients with blunt chest trauma as evaluated by thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, L.; Rouby, J.J.; Viars, P.

    1988-07-01

    Fifty five patients suffering from blunt chest trauma were studied to assess the diagnosis of myocardial contusion using thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy. Thirty-eight patients had consistent scintigraphic defects and were considered to have a myocardial contusion. All patients with scintigraphic defects had paroxysmal arrhythmias and/or ECG abnormalities. Of 38 patients, 32 had localized ST-T segment abnormalities; 29, ST-T segment abnormalities suggesting involvement of the same cardiac area as scintigraphic defects; 21, echocardiographic abnormalities. Sixteen patients had segmental hypokinesia involving the same cardiac area as the scintigraphic defects. Fifteen patients had clinical signs suggestive of myocardial contusion and scintigraphic defects. Almost 70 percent of patients with blunt chest trauma had scintigraphic defects related to areas of myocardial contusion. When thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy directly showed myocardial lesion, two-dimensional echocardiography and standard ECG detected related functional consequences of cardiac trauma.

  17. Postoperative blunt trauma to 7.5 mm scleral pocket wounds.

    PubMed

    Stevens, J D; Claoué, C M; Steele, A D

    1994-05-01

    Two patients received blunt trauma to the operated eye after phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Both patients had a three-step 7.5 mm chord width, 3.0 mm long, curving incision, extending from sclera into clear cornea. One patient had rupture of the scleral tunnel and horizontal suture 20 days after surgery. The intraocular lens was dislocated into and along the scleral tunnel. The second patient had direct trauma four days after surgery, resulting in cheese-wiring of the horizontal nylon 10-0 suture and wound leakage but no other sequelae. Blunt trauma after scleral pocket phacoemulsification cataract surgery may result in clinical wound dehiscence if sufficient force is sustained. PMID:8064613

  18. Acute myocardial infarction due to left anterior descending coronary artery dissection after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Oghlakian, Gerard; Maldjian, Pierre; Kaluski, Edo; Saric, Muhamed

    2010-03-01

    Cardiac complications of chest trauma range from arrhythmias to valvular avulsions to myocardial contusion, rupture, and rarely myocardial infarction. We describe a case of a young patient with blunt chest trauma after a motor vehicle accident in whom the diagnosis of myocardial infarction was established a week later because no electrocardiogram or cardiac biomarkers were obtained on presentation. Retrospective review of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the chest done on presentation demonstrated a perfusion defect in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Subsequent coronary angiography demonstrated dissection in the proximal LAD. Our case illustrates the importance of electrocardiography and contrast-enhanced chest CT in initial evaluation of patients with blunt chest trauma and suspected injury to the coronary arteries. PMID:19214607

  19. Endovascular Stent Grafts in Urgent Blunt and Penetrating Thoracic Aortic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kolbeck, Kenneth J.; Kaufman, John A.

    2011-01-01

    A traumatic thoracic aortic injury is fatal in the majority of cases. Surviving the aortic injury in addition to the myriad of associated trauma requires comprehensive medical management from many medical services. Balancing these services and coordinating the medical care requires free and open communication between services. Although one might assume a thoracic aortic injury takes precedence over other injuries, an organized plan of care in which the morbidity of the injury as well as the consequences of treatment of each injury helps provide an appropriate “rank order” in the treatment process. A patient with a thoracic aortic injury can be observed for several days while additional injuries are treated, as long as appropriate blood pressure controls are observed. The treatment order for multiple injuries must be reevaluated on a regular basis to adjust for changes in the overall clinical condition. This rank order to treatment and scheduled treatment plan allows for appropriate imaging, evaluation, and coordination of services in preparation for the placement of a thoracic aortic stent graft. The goal of treatment is to reduce the risk of aortic rupture and subsequent fatal hemorrhage. Choosing an open surgical repair versus an endovascular stent graft depends upon physician expertise and clinical status of the patient. In the appropriate clinical setting, endovascular repair of the thoracic aortic injury has become the treatment of choice at the authors' institution in patients with significant operative risks and extensive comorbid injuries. Specific characteristics of the injured aorta also dictate the type of endovascular device required for repair. Case reviews of a patient with blunt trauma and a patient with penetrating trauma used to demonstrate clinical parameters, imaging options, and details of stent graft choice and placement, are presented followed by a review of the literature. PMID:22379280

  20. Death from undetected acute myocardial infarction secondary to coronary artery dissection after blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Puanglumyai, Supot; Thamtakerngkit, Somboon; Lekawanvijit, Suree

    2016-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma is a common occurrence in automobile accidents. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) caused by coronary dissection following blunt thoracic trauma is rare. We report a case of healthy 24-year-old man with a history of blunt thoracic injury with subsequent undetected AMI who died of acute decompensated heart failure 4 days after the insult. The autopsy findings showed a 90% luminal narrowing of the left anterior descending coronary artery by dissecting hematoma, 3 cm in length. The myocardium revealed transmural myocardial infarction affecting apex, most part of left ventricular free wall, and interventricular septum. Both lungs were heavy, wet, and noncrepitant. Histological findings of the infarcted myocardium were consistent with 3-5 days post-AMI. Sections from both lungs revealed massive pulmonary edema, reflecting acute decompensated heart failure following a large AMI secondary to coronary dissection. Blunt thoracic trauma may obscure typical chest pain associated with cardiac ischemia especially in cases with a high tolerance for pain. PMID:26454807

  1. Spontaneous closure of macular hole following blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    Freitas-Neto, Clovis Arcoverde; Pigosso, Douglas; Pacheco, Katia Delalíbera; Pereira, Viviane Oliveira; Patel, Pranav; Freitas, Luiz Guilherme; Ávila, Marcos Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Ocular trauma can result in macular hole and it can lead to complete loss of central vision. We are reporting a case of traumatic macular hole associated with retinal hemorrhages and choroidal ruptures with spontaneous resolution and total vision recovery. PMID:27433039

  2. Mothers' unresolved trauma blunts amygdala response to infant distress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the neurobiology of post-traumatic stress disorder has been extensively researched, much less attention has been paid to the neural mechanisms underlying more covert but pervasive types of trauma (e.g., those involving disrupted relationships and insecure attachment). Here, we report on a neur...

  3. Intra-abdominal injury following blunt trauma becomes clinically apparent within 9 hours

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Edward L.; Stovall, Robert T.; Jones, Teresa S.; Bensard, Denis D.; Burlew, Clay Cothren; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Jurkovich, Gregory Jerry; Barnett, Carlton C.; Pieracci, Frederic M.; Biffl, Walter L.; Moore, Ernest E.

    2014-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of blunt abdominal trauma can be challenging and resource intensive. Observation with serial clinical assessments plays a major role in the evaluation of these patients, but the time required for intra-abdominal injury to become clinically apparent is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of time required for an intra-abdominal injury to become clinically apparent after blunt abdominal trauma via physical examination or commonly followed clinical values. Methods A retrospective review of patients who sustained blunt trauma resulting in intra-abdominal injury between June 2010 and June 2012 at a Level 1 academic trauma center was performed. Patient demographics, injuries, and the amount of time from emergency department admission to sign or symptom development and subsequent diagnosis were recorded. All diagnoses were made by computed tomography or at the time of surgery. Patient transfers from other hospitals were excluded. Results Of 3,574 blunt trauma patients admitted to the hospital, 285 (8%) experienced intra-abdominal injuries. The mean (SD) age was 36(17) years, the majority were male (194 patients, 68%) and the mean (SD) Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 21 (14). The mean (SD) time from admission to diagnosis via computed tomography or surgery was 74 (55) minutes. Eighty patients (28%) required either surgery (78 patients, 17%) or radiographic embolization (2 patients, 0.7%) for their injury. All patients who required intervention demonstrated a sign or symptom of their intra-abdominal injury within 60 minutes of arrival, although two patients were intervened upon in a delayed fashion. All patients with a blunt intra-abdominal injury manifested a clinical sign or symptom of their intra-abdominal injury, resulting in their diagnosis within 8 hours 25 minutes of arrival to the hospital. Conclusion All diagnosed intra-abdominal injuries from blunt trauma manifested clinical signs or symptoms that could prompt

  4. Urgent pulmonary lobectomy for blunt chest trauma: report of three cases without mortality

    PubMed Central

    Chiarelli, Marco; Gerosa, Martino; Guttadauro, Angelo; Gabrielli, Francesco; Vertemati, Giuseppe; Cazzaniga, Massimo; Fumagalli, Luca; De Simone, Matilde

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of patients with severe blunt chest trauma is successfully treated with supportive measures and thoracostomy tube; only few cases need urgent thoracotomy. Lung-sparing techniques are treatments of choice but major pulmonary resections are necessary in case of injuries involving hilar vessels or bronchi. Currently the mortality associated with pulmonary lobectomy performed for chest trauma is 40%. Methods Over a 2-year period [2013–2014], 210 patients with chest trauma were hospitalized at our Institution. Mechanism of injury was blunt in 204 (97.1%) patients and penetrating in 6 (2.9%). In 48 (22.8%) patients was necessary a ventilatory support and 37 (17.6%) patients were treated with thoracostomy tube. Nineteen (9%) patients needed urgent thoracotomy: 4 (1.9%) cases for penetrating injury and 15 (7.1%) cases for blunt trauma. Three (1.4%) patients treated with urgent thoracotomy required concomitant laparotomy for intra-abdominal injuries. The overall mortality rate was 1.4%. Results We report three cases of urgent lobectomies for chest trauma without mortality and with postoperative complete restoration of respiratory function. The anatomical lobectomies were performed for: massive hemothorax with bronchial disruption, expanding pulmonary hematoma with hypovolemic shock, and massive hemothorax in deep parenchymal laceration. Conclusions Mortality rate after major pulmonary resections for trauma is very high and increases with the presence of multivisceral injuries, the severity of hypovolemic shock and extent of lung resection. Anterolateral thoracotomy was the approach employed in case of cardiac arrest. In hypovolemic patients a posterolateral incision with a double lumen intubation was performed. The absence of mortality in this series may be related to the prompt diagnosis, short operative time and absence of associated severe neurological or abdominal injuries. PMID:27499975

  5. Cervical Spinal Injury In Pediatric Blunt Trauma Patients: Management In The Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Spinal injuries from blunt trauma are uncommon in pediatric patients, representing only about 1.5% of all blunt trauma patients. However, the potentially fatal consequences of spinal injuries make them of great concern to emergency clinicians. Clinical goals in the emergency department are to identify all injuries using selective imaging and to minimize further harm from spinal cord injury. Achieving these goals requires an understanding of the age-related physiologic differences that affect patterns of injury and radiologic interpretation in children, as well as an appreciation of high-risk clinical clues and mechanisms. This issue reviews current approaches to prehospital immobilization, identification of low-risk patients who may be clinically cleared from immobilization, a rational approach to the use of radiologic imaging, and the existing evidence for medical management of spinal cord injuries. PMID:26894868

  6. An isolated hyoid bone fracture caused by blunt trauma to the neck.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Baris; Erdogan, Mehmet Ozgur; Colak, Sahin; Kibici, Ozge; Bozan, Korkut; Alper, Baris

    2015-11-01

    Hyoid bone fractures due to blunt trauma are exceedingly rare. Here, we present an isolated hyoid bone fracture caused by blunt trauma as well as a detailed discussion of the injury and treatment options. A 32-year-old male was admitted to emergency department with odynophagia and severe neck pain. He had been hit in the neck with a metal rod during a fight. Computed tomography scan revealed a fracture on hyoid bone and local swelling of adjacent soft tissues. The patient\\'s head was elevated, and ice packs were used to reduce the swelling. Diclofenac sodium and prednisolone were administered. Patient was discharged with a recommendation of out-patient control. Odynophagia, dysphagia and dyspnoea should alert the physician to possible hyoid or laryngeal damage. Fibre optic laryngoscopy and neck CT are important diagnostic steps to reveal a possible life-threatening injury. Conservative treatment is usually adequate, and patients rarely require surgical intervention. PMID:26564301

  7. Delayed presentation of a sigmoid colon injury following blunt abdominal trauma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The low incidence of colon injury due to blunt abdominal trauma and the lack of a definitive diagnostic method for the same can lead to delays in diagnosis and treatment, subsequently resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Case presentation A 66-year-old woman with sigmoid colon injury was admitted to our emergency department after sustaining blunt abdominal trauma. Her physical examination findings and laboratory results led to a decision to perform a laparotomy; exploration revealed a sigmoid colon injury that was treated by sigmoid loop colostomy. Conclusions Surgical abdominal exploration revealed gross fecal contamination and a perforation site. Intra-abdominal irrigation and a sigmoid loop colostomy were performed. Our patient was discharged on post-operative day six without any problems. Closure of the sigmoid loop colostomy was performed three months after the initial surgery. PMID:22905731

  8. Ruptured intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm in a patient with blunt thoracic trauma: diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez Romero, Diego Felipe; Barrufet, Marta; Lopez-Rueda, Antonio; Burrel, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm is an extremely unusual condition, with less than 10 reported cases to our knowledge. Most of them have been associated with surgical interventions or blunt thoracic trauma. The bleeding risk in this kind of lesions is considerable, the majority of them presenting as haemothorax. We present a case of an intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm detected after a blunt thoracic trauma in a patient with signs of acute bleeding. The identification of a small artery pseudoaneurysm as the cause of haemothorax requires knowledge of this possible aetiology as well as detailed attention to the CT technique. Embolisation is considered to be the first therapeutic method in the management of a ruptured pseudoaneurysm. To reduce the risk of failure, the anatomic features and adjacent vessels providing collateral branches must be studied and embolised if needed, with important attention to collateral blood supply arising from the musculophrenic and anterior intercostal arteries. PMID:24966257

  9. Mechanisms and Clinical Management of Ventricular Arrhythmias following Blunt Chest Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wolbrom, Daniel H.; Rahman, Aleef; Tschabrunn, Cory M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonpenetrating, blunt chest trauma is a serious medical condition with varied clinical presentations and implications. This can be the result of a dense projectile during competitive and recreational sports but may also include other etiologies such as motor vehicle accidents or traumatic falls. In this setting, the manifestation of ventricular arrhythmias has been observed both acutely and chronically. This is based on two entirely separate mechanisms and etiologies requiring different treatments. Ventricular fibrillation can occur immediately after chest wall injury (commotio cordis) and requires rapid defibrillation. Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia can develop in the chronic stage due to underlying structural heart disease long after blunt chest injury. The associated arrhythmogenic tissue may be complex and provides the necessary substrate to form a reentrant VT circuit. Ventricular tachycardia in the absence of overt structural heart disease appears to be focal in nature with rapid termination during ablation. Regardless of the VT mechanism, patients with recurrent episodes, despite antiarrhythmic medication in the chronic stage following blunt chest injury, are likely to require ablation to achieve VT control. This review article will describe the mechanisms, pathophysiology, and treatment of ventricular arrhythmias that occur in both the acute and chronic stages following blunt chest trauma. PMID:26981308

  10. Laparoscopic treatment of gastric and duodenal perforation in children after blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, S H A J; Zwaveling, S; Kramer, W L M; van der Zee, D C

    2012-09-01

    Minimal invasive surgery has not yet gained wide acceptation for the care of patients that sustained an abdominal trauma. We describe the complete laparoscopic surgical treatment of two patients after a single blunt abdominal trauma. One patient sustained a handle bar injury and presented with a gastric perforation. The other sustained a duodenal rupture by falling on a sharp edge of a table. The patients were assessed and treated laparoscopically. The perforations were identified and closed. Both patients had an uneventful postoperative recovery. Therapeutic laparoscopic treatment of patients with upper gastrointestinal perforation is feasible. We would recommend this approach to experienced laparoscopic surgeons in hemodynamically stable patients. PMID:21129741

  11. [Enzymatic markers in peritoneal lavage fluid for diagnosis of blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Kopiszka, K; Lipiński, J; Lasek, J; Białko, M

    1997-01-01

    Value of Diagnostic Peritoneal Lavage (DPL) in blunt abdominal trauma has been analysed in the studies. The material included 84 patients who were subjected to DPL since 1990 till 1994, and who were treated in the Department of Trauma Surgery Medical University of Gdańsk. The enzymatic examination of the lavage perfusate performed in this study revealed that the level of the activity of the aspartic transaminase and the alanine transaminase over 10 IU/L indicate hepatic injury, and the level of the alkaline phosphatase over 3 IU/L point at the injury of the large intestine, small intestine and mesentery. PMID:9424871

  12. Histologic evidence of repetitive blunt force abdominal trauma in four pediatric fatalities.

    PubMed

    Dye, Daniel W; Peretti, Frank J; Kokes, Charles P

    2008-11-01

    In cases of acute fatal child abuse, certain injuries, including cutaneous blunt force trauma, skull fractures, subdural hematomas, intra-abdominal hemorrhage, and retinal hemorrhages are common and well described in the pediatric and forensic literature. These gross findings at autopsy, when taken into consideration with scene investigation and interviews with caregivers, may indicate both a clear manner and cause of death. In such cases, the discovery of additional pathologic changes attributable to older abusive injuries helps support a conclusion of death due to inflicted trauma. We discuss four cases of fatal child abuse in which acute blunt force abdominal trauma was the cause of death. In each of these cases, careful examination with proper sectioning and microscopy of select abdominal tissues revealed that the acute tissue trauma was superimposed on a background of older, healing injury. This older trauma was characterized by classic histologic elements of tissue repair, including fibroblast proliferation, early scar formation, increased vascularity, and hemosiderin-laden macrophages. Iron and trichrome stains were used to confirm the presence of hemosiderin and fibrosis in all four cases, but the recognition of fibroblast proliferation and a reactive vascular pattern was best seen on routine hematoxylin and eosin stains. The gross and microscopic autopsy findings, along with available investigative information, established the diagnosis of chronic physical abuse. PMID:18808370

  13. The Accuracy of Urinalysis in Predicting Intra-Abdominal Injury Following Blunt Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Sabzghabaei, Anita; Shojaee, Majid; Safari, Saeed; Hatamabadi, Hamid Reza; Shirvani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In cases of blunt abdominal traumas, predicting the possible intra-abdominal injuries is still a challenge for the physicians involved with these patients. Therefore, this study was designed, to evaluate the accuracy of urinalysis in predicting intra-abdominal injuries. Methods: Patients aged 15 to 65 years with blunt abdominal trauma who were admitted to emergency departments were enrolled. Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan with intravenous contrast and urinalysis were requested for all the included patients. Demographic data, trauma mechanism, the results of urinalysis, and the results of abdominopelvic CT scan were gathered. Finally, the correlation between the results of abdominopelvic CT scan, and urinalysis was determined. Urinalysis was considered positive in case of at least one positive value in gross appearance, blood in dipstick, or red blood cell count. Results: 325 patients with blunt abdominal trauma were admitted to the emergency departments (83% male with the mean age of 32.63±17.48 years). Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios of urinalysis, were 77.9% (95% CI: 69.6-84.4), 58.5% (95% CI: 51.2-65.5), 56% (95% CI: 48.5-63.3), 79.6% (95% CI: 71.8-85.7), 1.27% (95% CI: 1.30-1.57), and 0.25% (95% CI: 0.18-0.36), respectively. Conclusion: The diagnostic value of urinalysis in prediction of blunt traumatic intra-abdominal injuries is low and it seems that it should be considered as an adjuvant diagnostic tool, in conjunction with other sources such as clinical findings and imaging. PMID:26862543

  14. Transient trifascicular block complicating myocardial contusion after blunt chest trauma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bortnik, Miriam; Occhetta, Eraldo; Ruggeri, Chiara; Marino, Paolo

    2008-09-01

    Cardiac contusion may be frequently found in patients with blunt chest trauma, and it presents clinically as a spectrum of injuries of varying severity, including transient disorders of impulse formation and propagation. A rare observation of transient trifascicular block in a previously fit 32-year-old man involved in a car accident is reported. The importance of ECG monitoring and biochemical assessment of markers to unmask myocardial contusion is discussed. PMID:18695435

  15. Blunt carotid artery injury after minor facial trauma

    PubMed Central

    Murabit, Amera; Tredget, Edward E

    2012-01-01

    A healthy young man presented three days after suffering a punch to the face resulting in minimally displaced mandibular fractures. History revealed an episode of anterograde amnesia and a delayed episode of dysphonia. Apart from the fractured mandible, the physical examination was otherwise noncontributory. Imaging revealed severe luminal narrowing of the left cervical internal carotid artery distal to the carotid bifurcation, consistent with carotid dissection; and two focal hypodensities in the left frontal and parietal cortices, highly suggestive of acute secondary embolic infarcts. The patient was treated with systemic anticoagulation for three months and experienced no further neurological symptoms. His mandibular fractures, treated conservatively, healed without any complications. Blunt carotid artery injuries are uncommon and diverse. Neurological symptoms may develop in a delayed fashion, thus, a high index of suspicion based on knowledge of the injury mechanisms and patterns of associated injuries may enable earlier diagnosis and treatment. Angiographic imaging is essential for the diagnosis and classification of injury characteristics (eg, type, location, etc). Treatment must be considered on an individual patient basis depending on the presentation, grade and morphology of the lesion. Although no level I clinical trials exist on the topic, anticoagulation seems to be the treatment of choice in most cases and surgical intervention is not commonly indicated. Carotid artery dissection without complete thrombosis may be effectively treated with systemic anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy in the majority of cases. PMID:23997588

  16. Blunt carotid artery injury after minor facial trauma.

    PubMed

    Murabit, Amera; Tredget, Edward E

    2012-01-01

    A healthy young man presented three days after suffering a punch to the face resulting in minimally displaced mandibular fractures. History revealed an episode of anterograde amnesia and a delayed episode of dysphonia. Apart from the fractured mandible, the physical examination was otherwise noncontributory. Imaging revealed severe luminal narrowing of the left cervical internal carotid artery distal to the carotid bifurcation, consistent with carotid dissection; and two focal hypodensities in the left frontal and parietal cortices, highly suggestive of acute secondary embolic infarcts. The patient was treated with systemic anticoagulation for three months and experienced no further neurological symptoms. His mandibular fractures, treated conservatively, healed without any complications. Blunt carotid artery injuries are uncommon and diverse. Neurological symptoms may develop in a delayed fashion, thus, a high index of suspicion based on knowledge of the injury mechanisms and patterns of associated injuries may enable earlier diagnosis and treatment. Angiographic imaging is essential for the diagnosis and classification of injury characteristics (eg, type, location, etc). Treatment must be considered on an individual patient basis depending on the presentation, grade and morphology of the lesion. Although no level I clinical trials exist on the topic, anticoagulation seems to be the treatment of choice in most cases and surgical intervention is not commonly indicated. Carotid artery dissection without complete thrombosis may be effectively treated with systemic anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy in the majority of cases. PMID:23997588

  17. Rare electrocution due to powerline contact in a hot-air balloon: comparison with fatalities from blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    McConnell, T S; Zumwalt, R E; Wahe, J; Haikal, N A; McFeeley, P J

    1992-09-01

    Powerline contact by hot-air balloons is one of the most frequent concurrences in balloon accidents resulting in injury or death. Injuries and deaths are usually a result of blunt trauma from falls. In this report, we describe the aircraft, the circumstances of the accidents and the autopsy data in two powerline contact accidents involving three deaths, one from electrocution and two, from blunt trauma sustained in falls. Appropriate pilot behavior is briefly discussed. PMID:1402763

  18. Intrathoracic esophageal rupture distal to the carina after blunt chest trauma: Case-report

    PubMed Central

    Cedeño, Alex; Echeverría, Karla; Vázquez, Jan; Delgado, Aura; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal rupture caused by blunt chest trauma is a very rare entity, with an incidence of 0.001%. Eighty two percent of the esophageal perforation secondary to blunt chest trauma occur above the level of the carina, with the lowest reported incidence in the intrathoracic region distal to the carina. Presentation of case We report on the case of a 48-year-old Hispanic male with intrathoracic esophageal rupture. Exploration revealed a right lateral, mid esophageal, longitudinal 1.5 cm perforation. The defect was repaired using a double-layered primary closure reinforced with an intercostal muscle flap. The patient tolerated the procedure and the recovery was complicated by a pneumonic process which was treated accordingly. No leakage was found. Discussion A five-year retrospective review (2009–2013) at our institution identified 5586 trauma cases with only one case with esophageal rupture. This represents a 0.0002% of incidence of blunt esophageal rupture. This estimate is consistent with what has been previously reported in the medical literature. Our case represents a uniquely rare presentation of traumatic esophageal rupture due to the underline mechanism of injury and its anatomical location. A high index of suspicion and early intervention are critical in assuring a favorable outcome. Conclusion Diagnosis and surgical intervention with primary repair completed in the first twenty-four hours after presentation is fundamental to achieve a good outcome after esophageal rupture. PMID:26492358

  19. Negative predictive value of cardiac troponin for predicting adverse cardiac events following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Guild, Cameron S; deShazo, Matthew; Geraci, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac-specific troponins (Tns) are sensitive and specific markers of myocardial injury that have been shown to be predictive of outcomes in many cardiac and noncardiac conditions. We sought to determine whether normal cardiac Tn concentrations obtained during the first 24 hours following blunt chest trauma would predict good cardiac outcomes. A PubMed/MEDLINE search was performed to identify prospective studies in patients with blunt chest trauma in which serial cardiac TnT or TnI values were measured within 24 hours of admission and clinical outcomes assessed. Ten studies qualified for review. Studies that used the lower reference limit of Tn as the cutoff for cardiac injury showed 100% negative predictive value (NPV) for developing cardiac complications, whereas studies using higher Tn cutoffs showed wider variation in NPV (50%-98%). Cardiac Tn measured within 24 hours using the lower reference limit (LRL) as the cutoff appears to have excellent NPV for clinically significant adverse cardiac events. This could allow for early discharge after a 24-hour observation period in otherwise uncomplicated blunt chest trauma patients and avoid the need for more expensive cardiac imaging and additional resource utilization. PMID:24389788

  20. Isolated inferior rectus muscle rupture after blunt orbital trauma

    PubMed Central

    Tomasetti, Patrick; Metzler, Philipp; Jacobsen, Christine

    2013-01-01

    A 44-year-old man was referred to our department with diplopia, periorbital swelling and haematoma of the left eye after orbital trauma due to a punch. During the examination, mild enophthalmos, hypertropia and a total absence of infraduction were observed. An orbital computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated a left orbital floor blow-out fracture, with caudal herniation of periorbital fat and rectus inferior muscle. Repair was performed under total anaesthesia with placement of a Titan mesh. The following days were marked by the persistence of diplopia without improvement of infraduction. A postoperative, 0.5 mm CT scan highlighted a complete rupture of the inferior rectus muscle, not seen before operation, by a 1.0 mm-sliced CT. In this case, orthoptic therapy was undertaken with good results after 6 months and without need of a second repair. PMID:24963904

  1. Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the assessment of polytrauma patient, an accurate diagnostic study protocol with high sensitivity and specificity is necessary. Computed Tomography (CT) is the standard reference in the emergency for evaluating the patients with abdominal trauma. Ultrasonography (US) has a high sensitivity in detecting free fluid in the peritoneum, but it does not show as much sensitivity for traumatic parenchymal lesions. The use of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) improves the accuracy of the method in the diagnosis and assessment of the extent of parenchymal lesions. Although the CEUS is not feasible as a method of first level in the diagnosis and management of the polytrauma patient, it can be used in the follow-up of traumatic injuries of abdominal parenchymal organs (liver, spleen and kidneys), especially in young people or children. PMID:23902930

  2. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Miele, Vittorio; Piccolo, Claudia Lucia; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Sessa, Barbara; Trinci, Margherita

    2016-01-01

    Baseline ultrasound is essential in the early assessment of patients with a huge haemoperitoneum undergoing an immediate abdominal surgery; nevertheless, even with a highly experienced operator, it is not sufficient to exclude parenchymal injuries. More recently, a new ultrasound technique using second generation contrast agents, named contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been developed. This technique allows all the vascular phase to be performed in real time, increasing ultrasound capability to detect parenchymal injuries, enhancing some qualitative findings, such as lesion extension, margins and its relationship with capsule and vessels. CEUS has been demonstrated to be almost as sensitive as contrast-enhanced CT in the detection of traumatic injuries in patients with low-energy isolated abdominal trauma, with levels of sensitivity and specificity up to 95%. Several studies demonstrated its ability to detect lesions occurring in the liver, spleen, pancreas and kidneys and also to recognize active bleeding as hyperechoic bands appearing as round or oval spots of variable size. Its role seems to be really relevant in paediatric patients, thus avoiding a routine exposure to ionizing radiation. Nevertheless, CEUS is strongly operator dependent, and it has some limitations, such as the cost of contrast media, lack of panoramicity, the difficulty to explore some deep regions and the poor ability to detect injuries to the urinary tract. On the other hand, it is timesaving, and it has several advantages, such as its portability, the safety of contrast agent, the lack to ionizing radiation exposure and therefore its repeatability, which allows follow-up of those traumas managed conservatively, especially in cases of fertile females and paediatric patients. PMID:26607647

  3. When backyard fun turns to trauma: risk assessment of blunt ballistic impact trauma due to potato cannons.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias; Jobski, Oliver; Bockholdt, Britta; Grossjohann, Rico; Stengel, Dirk; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Hinz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Although potato cannons are an area of great interest among internet users, they are almost completely unknown in the medical community. These simple ballistic devices are made from plastic plumbing pipes and are powered with propellant gas from aerosol cans. By combustion of the gas-oxygen mixture, a high pressure is produced which propels the potato chunks through the barrel. It is the aim of this study to investigate the hazardous potential of these shooting devices. Test shots were performed using three illegally manufactured potato cannons that were confiscated by police authorities. Velocity, impulse, kinetic energy, and energy density were calculated. The risk of head and chest injuries was investigated by using Sturdivan's Blunt Criterion (BC), an energy based five parametric trauma model assessing the vulnerability to blunt weapons, projectile impacts, and behind-body-armor exposures. The probability of lethality due to blunt impact trauma to the chest was assessed using Sturdivan's lethality model. For potential head impacts, all test shots far exceeded the critical BC (head) value which corresponds to a 50% risk of skull fracture. The risk of injury with regard to chest impacts was similar. All but two test shots far exceeded the critical BC (chest) value corresponding to a 50% risk of sustaining a thoracic skeletal injury of Abbreviated Injury Scale 2 or 3. The probability of a lethal injury due to blunt chest impact was as high as 20%. To conclude, this work demonstrates that potato cannons should be considered dangerous weapons rather than as toys used by adventurous adolescents. PMID:21279374

  4. Radiolucent hair accessories causing depressed skull fracture following blunt cranial trauma.

    PubMed

    Syed, Omar N; Hankinson, Todd C; Mack, William J; Feldstein, Neil A; Anderson, Richard C E

    2008-12-01

    Pediatric neurosurgeons frequently care for children with traumatic scalp and skull injury. Foreign objects are often observed on imaging and may influence the clinician's decision-making process. The authors report on 2 cases of poorly visualized hair beads that had become embedded into the skull during blunt trauma. In both cases, skull radiography and CT scanning demonstrated depressed, comminuted fractures with poorly demonstrated spherical radiolucencies in the overlying scalp. The nature of these objects was initially unclear, and they could have represented air that entered the scalp during trauma. In one case, scalp inspection demonstrated no evidence of the bead. In the other case, a second bead was observed at the site of scalp laceration. In both cases, the beads were surgically removed, the fractures were elevated, and the patients recovered uneventfully. Radiolucent fashion accessories, such as hair beads, may be difficult to appreciate on clinical examination and may masquerade as clinically insignificant air following cranial trauma. If they are not removed, these foreign bodies may pose the risk of an infection. Pediatric neurosurgeons should consider hair accessories in the differential diagnosis of foreign bodies that may produce skull fracture following blunt trauma. PMID:19035690

  5. Outcome of Blunt Abdominal Traumas with Stable Hemodynamic and Positive FAST Findings

    PubMed Central

    Behboodi, Firooz; Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra; Masjedi, Navid; Shojaie, Reza; Sadri, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) is a highly effective first screening tool for initial classification of abdominal trauma patients. The present study was designed to evaluate the outcome of patients with blunt abdominal trauma and positive FAST findings. Methods: The present prospective cross-sectional study was done on patients over 7 years old with normal abdominal examination, positive FAST findings, and available abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan findings. The frequency of need for laparotomy as well as its probable risk factors were calculated. Results: 180 patients were enrolled (mean age: 28.0 ± 11.5 years; 76.7% male). FAST findings were confirmed by abdominopelvic CT scan in only 124 (68.9%) cases. Finally, 12 (6.6%) patients needed laparotomy. Mean age of those in need of laparotomy was significantly higher than others (36.75 ± 11.37 versus 27.34 ± 11.37, p = 0.006). Higher grading of spleen (p = 0.001) and hepatic (p = 0.038) ruptures increased the probability of need for laparotomy. Conclusion: 68.9% of the positive FAST findings in patients with blunt abdominal trauma and stable hemodynamics was confirmed by abdominopelvic CT scan and only 6.6% needed laparotomy. Simultaneous presence of free fluid and air in the abdominal area, old age, and higher grading o solid organ injuries were factors that had a significant correlation with need for laparotomy. PMID:27299142

  6. Benefits of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for major blunt tracheobronchial trauma in the paediatric age group.

    PubMed

    Ballouhey, Quentin; Fesseau, Rose; Benouaich, Vincent; Léobon, Bertrand

    2013-04-01

    Tracheobronchial rupture due to blunt chest trauma is a rare but life-threatening injury among children. The severity of this condition ranges from death before hospital admission to clinical stability resulting in delayed management. Diagnosis is difficult because there is sometimes no evidence of external trauma, in spite of severe chest crush injury and consecutive rupture of airways. Here, we report the case of a 32-month-old girl whose torso was crushed by a van, resulting in bilateral bronchi disconnection. She was admitted to our hospital with cardiac and respiratory arrest. After prompt resuscitation, flexible bronchoscopy permitted the accurate visualization of the rupture and its extent. The life-saving procedure consisted of surgical repair using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as ventilatory support. This provided rapid relief from the injury, which was previously expected to result in death. These data suggest that ECMO could be beneficial as supportive therapy for selected paediatric patients with major tracheobronchial traumas. PMID:23178817

  7. Blunt Trauma in Paediatric Patients – Experience from a Small Centre

    PubMed Central

    Djordjevic, I; Slavkovic, A; Marjanovic, Z; Zivanovic, D

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Despite great prevention efforts, blunt abdominal trauma still remains a leading cause of injury, especially in the paediatric population. Abdominal trauma is the main culprit of serious children's injury and the most common area of initially missed diagnosis with a fatal outcome. Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence, aetiology, grades of abdominal organ injuries, diagnosis, management and outcome of blunt abdominal trauma in a paediatric population. Method: This is a retrospective study of 31 patients with isolated parenchymatous abdominal organs, treated in a single centre. Stable patients with no signs of peritonitis and insignificant changes in laboratory findings were managed conservatively. Unstable patients received surgery. Results: The leading cause of injuries were traffic accidents (64.5%), followed by fall from a height (22.5%), bicycle handlebar injuries (6.45%), contact sport and child abuse (3.22% each). The majority of injured children (90.32%) were managed conservatively. Only three patients (9.68%) were operated on due to complete avulsion and organ smash, or devascularization of the injured organs. Diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scan examination was performed on 93.5% of patients. Few patients had grade I and grade V injuries, while the largest proportion of patients had grade III and IV injuries. The most frequently injured organs were the spleen and kidney. There was no mortality. Conclusion: The results emphasize that conservative treatment was appropriate for all stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma regardless of organ injury grade. The success of non-operative management depends upon proper patient selection. The choice of non-operative treatment should be based predominantly on physiological response, rather than grade injury on CT scan. PMID:26360685

  8. Unenhanced Computed Tomography to Visualize Hollow Viscera and/or Mesenteric Injury After Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xu-Yang; Wei, Ming-Tian; Jin, Cheng-Wu; Wang, Meng; Wang, Zi-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To identify and describe the major features of unenhanced computed tomography (CT) images of blunt hollow viscera and/or mesenteric injury (BHVI/MI) and to determine the value of unenhanced CT in the diagnosis of BHVI/MI. This retrospective study included 151 patients who underwent unenhanced CT before laparotomy for blunt abdominal trauma between January 2011 and December 2013. According to surgical observations, patients were classified as having BHVI/MI (n = 73) or not (n = 78). Sensitivity, specificity, P values, and likelihood ratios were calculated by comparing CT findings between the 2 groups. Six significant CT findings (P < 0.05) for BHVI/MI were identified and their sensitivity and specificity values determined, as follows: bowel wall thickening (39.7%, 96.2%), mesentery thickening (46.6%, 88.5%), mesenteric fat infiltration (12.3%, 98.7%), peritoneal fat infiltration (31.5%, 87.1%), parietal peritoneum thickening (30.1%, 85.9%), and intra- or retro-peritoneal air (34.2%, 96.2%). Unenhanced CT scan was useful as an initial assessment tool for BHVI/MI after blunt abdominal trauma. Six key features on CT were correlated with BHVI/MI. PMID:26945375

  9. Nonoperative management of blunt renal trauma: Is routine early follow-up imaging necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, John B; Derweesh, Ithaar H; Mehrazin, Reza; DiBlasio, Christopher J; Vance, David D; Joshi, Salil; Wake, Robert W; Gold, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Background There is no consensus on the role of routine follow-up imaging during nonoperative management of blunt renal trauma. We reviewed our experience with nonoperative management of blunt renal injuries in order to evaluate the utility of routine early follow-up imaging. Methods We reviewed all cases of blunt renal injury admitted for nonoperative management at our institution between 1/2002 and 1/2006. Data were compiled from chart review, and clinical outcomes were correlated with CT imaging results. Results 207 patients were identified (210 renal units). American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) grades I, II, III, IV, and V were assigned to 35 (16%), 66 (31%), 81 (39%), 26 (13%), and 2 (1%) renal units, respectively. 177 (84%) renal units underwent routine follow-up imaging 24–48 hours after admission. In three cases of grade IV renal injury, a ureteral stent was placed after serial imaging demonstrated persistent extravasation. In no other cases did follow-up imaging independently alter clinical management. There were no urologic complications among cases for which follow-up imaging was not obtained. Conclusion Routine follow-up imaging is unnecessary for blunt renal injuries of grades I-III. Grade IV renovascular injuries can be followed clinically without routine early follow-up imaging, but urine extravasation necessitates serial imaging to guide management decisions. The volume of grade V renal injuries in this study is not sufficient to support or contest the need for routine follow-up imaging. PMID:18768088

  10. Pseudopancreatitis on computed tomography in a patient with isolated blunt head trauma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Computed tomography is commonly used to exclude occult injuries in patients with trauma, but imaging can reveal findings that are of uncertain etiology or clinical significance. We present a case of unsuspected pancreatic abnormality in a female patient with trauma who sustained an isolated blunt head injury. Case presentation A 25-year-old female Caucasian patient sustained massive blunt and penetrating head trauma, secondary to a large object penetrating through the vehicle windshield. Based on the mechanism of injury and clinical evaluation, it was felt to be an isolated head injury. However, computed tomography of her abdomen revealed an occult, intra-abdominal finding of significant pancreatic enlargement and peripancreatic fluid. There was no computed tomography evidence of parenchymal pancreatic laceration. The appearance of her pancreas on computed tomography was identical to that of acute pancreatitis or low-grade pancreatic injury, but her clinical history and laboratory values were not consistent with this, hence the term ‘pseudopancreatitis’. Later surgery for organ donation confirmed diffuse pancreatic and peripancreatic edema, but no hematoma, contusion or other evidence for direct traumatic injury. This was an isolated intra-abdominal abnormality. Conclusion The routine use of computed tomography in patients who have sustained trauma has led to increasing detection of unexpected findings. Clinical information such as mechanism of injury and blood work, along with careful evaluation of ancillary imaging findings (or lack of), is important for the provision of an appropriate differential diagnosis. We discuss the possible mechanism and differential diagnosis of an isolated pancreatic abnormality in the setting of non-abdominal trauma, which includes shock pancreas, overhydration, traumatic pancreatic injury and pancreatitis secondary to other etiologies. PMID:24529327

  11. Enteral versus parenteral feeding. Effects on septic morbidity after blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Kudsk, K A; Croce, M A; Fabian, T C; Minard, G; Tolley, E A; Poret, H A; Kuhl, M R; Brown, R O

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the importance of route of nutrient administration on septic complications after blunt and penetrating trauma, 98 patients with an abdominal trauma index of at least 15 were randomized to either enteral or parenteral feeding within 24 hours of injury. Septic morbidity was defined as pneumonia, intra-abdominal abscess, empyema, line sepsis, or fasciitis with wound dehiscence. Patients were fed formulas with almost identical amounts of fat, carbohydrate, and protein. Two patients died early in the study. The enteral group sustained significantly fewer pneumonias (11.8% versus total parenteral nutrition 31.%, p less than 0.02), intra-abdominal abscess (1.9% versus total parenteral nutrition 13.3%, p less than 0.04), and line sepsis (1.9% versus total parenteral nutrition 13.3%, p less than 0.04), and sustained significantly fewer infections per patient (p less than 0.03), as well as significantly fewer infections per infected patient (p less than 0.05). Although there were no differences in infection rates in patients with injury severity score less than 20 or abdominal trauma index less than or equal to 24, there were significantly fewer infections in patients with an injury severity score greater than 20 (p less than 0.002) and abdominal trauma index greater than 24 (p less than 0.005). Enteral feeding produced significantly fewer infections in the penetrating group (p less than 0.05) and barely missed the statistical significance in the blunt-injured patients (p = 0.08). In the subpopulation of patients requiring more than 20 units of blood, sustaining an abdominal trauma index greater than 40 or requiring reoperation within 72 hours, there were significantly fewer infections per patient (p = 0.03) and significantly fewer infections per infected patient (p less than 0.01). There is a significantly lower incidence of septic morbidity in patients fed enterally after blunt and penetrating trauma, with most of the significant changes occurring in the

  12. Neuroprotective effects of tetracyclines on blunt head trauma: An experimental study on rats

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, Ozhan Merzuk; Alagoz, Fatih; Secer, Mehmet; Karakoyun, Oguz; Ocakcioglu, Ayhan; Yildirim, Ali Erdem; Yımaz, Fevzi; Sahinoglu, Mert; Divanlioglu, Denizhan; Dalgic, Ali; Daglioglu, Ergun; Belen, Ahmet Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prevention of primary damage caused by head trauma may be avoided with protective measures and techniques which is a public health concern. Experimental and clinical studies about treatment of head trauma were all centered to prevent secondary damage caused by physiopathological changes following primary injury. Neuroprotective features of tetracyclines were the focus of several experimental studies in the last decade. In the present study we aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of tetracycline in an experimental model of blunt brain injury in rats. Materials and Methods: 32 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four experimental groups (n = 8). Head trauma was not performed in control group (group 1, craniectomy only). In the second group, head trauma and craniectomy were performed. Intraperitoneal saline was used in addition to trauma and craniectomy for treatment in group 3 whereas intraperitoneal tetracycline and saline were used for treatment in group 4. Results: When histological examinations performed by transmission electron microscopy were evaluated, injury at ultrastructural level was demonstrated to be less pronounced in tetracycline group with decreased lipid peroxidation levels. Conclusion: In accordance with these findings, we conclude that systemic tetracycline administration is effective in reduction of secondary brain damage and brain edema and thus it may be considered as a therapeutic option. PMID:25552848

  13. Traumatic rupture of a Meckel’s diverticulum due to blunt abdominal trauma in a soccer game: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tummers, W.S.; van der Vorst, J.R.; Swank, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction a Meckel’s diverticulum is one of the most common congenital anomalies of the digestive tract. The reported lifetime complication rate is 4%, mostly due to hemorrhage, obstruction, perforation or inflammation. A symptomatic Meckel’s diverticulum due to rupture after blunt abdominal trauma is very rare. We believe this case report is the first reporting a rupture of a Meckel’s diverticulum after a low velocity blunt abdominal trauma and outlining the importance of a thorough and complete examination of the patient after blunt abdominal trauma. Presentation of case a 17-year-old male presented with abdominal pain after blunt abdominal trauma during a soccer game. Physical examination showed signs of peritonitis in all quadrants of the abdomen. During admission the patient deteriorated with decreasing blood pressure and raising pulse rate. A CT-scan showed free abdominal fluid. Our patient was scheduled for an emergent laparotomy where a perforated Meckel’s diverticulum with fecal spill was found. A segmental ileal resection was performed. Post-operative, patient developed a pneumonia and also intra-abdominal abscesses treated with percutaneous drainage. After an admission period of 17-days the patient was discharged. Conclusion perforation of a Meckel’s diverticulum is rarely suspected as a cause of acute deterioration following blunt abdominal trauma. This case shows the importance of awareness of this kind of injury especially in male patients. PMID:26701844

  14. Traumatic rupture of the ascending aorta and aortic valve following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Charles, K P; Davidson, K G; Miller, H; Caves, P K

    1977-02-01

    Traumatic rupture of the aorta at the level of the isthmus is a well-recognized injury following blunt chest trauma. By contrast, rupture of the ascending aorta and of the aortic valve in a road traffic accident is rare and does not appear to have been previously reported. The occurrence of such an injury in a 56-year-old man involved in a road traffic accident is reported. The diagnosis was made preoperatively following aortography and successful surgical correction involved aortic valve replacement with resection and grafting of the damaged area of the ascending aorta. The probable mechanisms involved in the production of this unusual injury are discussed. PMID:834060

  15. Delayed rupture of the middle colic artery secondary to blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Ferrella, T J

    1992-04-01

    The case of a 46-year-old man complaining of acute abdominal discomfort is presented. The patient fell 3 ft and injured his abdomen in the right upper quadrant four days before his emergency department visit. The complete workup revealed an acutely ruptured middle colic artery. The presenting symptoms, laboratory work, differential diagnosis, computed tomography scan, treatment, and follow-up are reviewed. This case is unusual in that delayed rupture of the middle colic artery secondary to blunt abdominal trauma had not been described previously. PMID:1554184

  16. Emergency department evaluation and management of blunt chest and lung trauma (Trauma CME).

    PubMed

    Morley, Eric J; Johnson, Scott; Leibner, Evan; Shahid, Jawad

    2016-06-01

    The majority of blunt chest injuries are minor contusions or abrasions; however, life-threatening injuries, including tension pneumothorax, hemothorax, and aortic rupture can occur and must be recognized early. This review focuses on the diagnosis, management, and disposition of patients with blunt injuries to the ribs and lung. Utilization of decision rules for chest x-ray and computed tomography are discussed, along with the emerging role of bedside lung ultrasonography. Management controversies presented include the limitations of needle thoracostomy us¬ing standard needle, chest tube placement, and chest tube size. Finally, a discussion is provided related to airway and ventilation management to assist in the timing and type of interventions needed to maintain oxygenation. PMID:27177417

  17. Occult Congenital Ureteropelvic Junction Obstruction in Two Adults Presenting with Collecting System Rupture After Blunt Renal Trauma: A Case Report Series

    PubMed Central

    Hoffner, Haley E.; Dagrosa, Lawrence M.; Pais, Vernon M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report two adult cases of congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction detected incidentally in the setting of blunt abdominal trauma. CT images are provided to describe the presentation, while review of the literature and management of renal trauma are discussed.

  18. Simultaneous “traumatic Gerbode” and aortic rupture due to blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Anninos, Hector; Baikoussis, Nikolaos G.; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Argiriou, Michalis; Politis, Panagiotis; Gounopoulos, Pantelis; Koroneos, Apostolos; Charitos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The Gerbode defect is characterized by a perimembranous ventricular septal defect between the left ventricle and the right atrium. This intracardiac shunt is a congenital defect but may be iatrogenic after valve surgery or atrioventricular node ablation, may be the result of endocarditis or may be traumatic. It is really rarely encountered as sequelae of non-penetrating heart trauma, and their clinical manifestations may often be unrecognized in the multi-injured patient. However, they are serious complications, and their diagnostic approach is not always feasible. We hereby present a case of a young man with the left ventricle to the right atrium communication after blunt thoracic trauma due to a car accident and concomitant rupture of the thoracic aorta. We present also the case and the ways of treatment according to the international bibliography. PMID:26750699

  19. Severe Blunt Muscle Trauma in Rats: Only Marginal Hypoxia in the Injured Area

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Kristina; Scheerer, Nina; Verhaegh, Rabea; Pütter, Carolin; Fandrey, Joachim; de Groot, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Background After severe muscle trauma, hypoxia due to microvascular perfusion failure is generally believed to further increase local injury and to impair healing. However, detailed analysis of hypoxia at the cellular level is missing. Therefore, in the present work, spectroscopic measurements of microvascular blood flow and O2 supply were combined with immunological detection of hypoxic cells to estimate O2 conditions within the injured muscle area. Materials and Methods Severe blunt muscle trauma was induced in the right Musculus gastrocnemius of male Wistar rats by a standardized “weight-drop” device. Microvascular blood flow, relative hemoglobin amount, and hemoglobin O2 saturation were determined by laser Doppler and white-light spectroscopy. Hypoxic cells were detected by histologic evaluation of covalent binding of pimonidazole and expression of HIF-1α. Results Directly after trauma and until the end of experiment (480 minutes), microvascular blood flow and relative hemoglobin amount were clearly increased. In contrast to blood flow and relative hemoglobin amount, there was no immediate but a delayed increase of microvascular hemoglobin O2 saturation. Pimonidazole immunostaining revealed a hypoxic fraction (percentage area of pimonidazole-labelled muscle cells within the injured area) between 8 to 3%. There was almost no HIF-1α expression detectable in the muscle cells under each condition studied. Conclusions In the early phase (up to 8 hours) after severe blunt muscle trauma, the overall microvascular perfusion of the injured area and thus its O2 supply is clearly increased. This increased O2 supply is obviously sufficient to ensure normoxic (or even hyperoxic) conditions in the vast majority of the cells. PMID:25360779

  20. Primary chest wall abscess mimicking a breast tumor that occurred after blunt chest trauma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yusuke; Yamamura, Jun; Masuda, Norikazu; Yasojima, Hiroyuki; Mizutani, Makiko; Nakamori, Shoji; Kanazawa, Toru; Kuriyama, Keiko; Mano, Masayuki; Sekimoto, Mitsugu

    2014-01-01

    Primary chest wall abscess occurring after blunt chest trauma is rare. We present the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with a swelling in her left breast. The patient had experienced blunt chest trauma 2 months back. Needle aspiration revealed pus formation in the patient's chest. Computed tomography revealed a mass in the lower region of the left mammary gland, with thickening of the parietal pleura and skin and fracture of the fifth rib under the abscess. Following antibiotic administration and irrigation of the affected region, surgical debridement was performed. During surgery, we found that the pectoralis major muscle at the level of the fifth rib was markedly damaged, although the necrotic tissue did not contact the mammary gland. We diagnosed the lesion as a chest wall abscess that occurred in response to blunt chest trauma. Her postoperative course was uneventful. There has been no recurrence for six months after surgery. PMID:24660001

  1. Surgical Repair of Right Atrial Wall Rupture after Blunt Chest Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Telich-Tarriba, Jose E.; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E.; Reardon, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Right atrial wall rupture after blunt chest trauma is a catastrophic event associated with high mortality rates. We report the case of a 24-year-old woman who was ejected 40 feet during a motor vehicle accident. Upon presentation, she was awake and alert, with a systolic blood pressure of 100 mmHg. Chest computed tomography disclosed a large pericardial effusion; transthoracic echocardiography confirmed this finding and also found right ventricular diastolic collapse. A diagnosis of cardiac tamponade with probable cardiac injury was made; the patient was taken to the operating room, where median sternotomy revealed a 1-cm laceration of the right atrial appendage. This lesion was directly repaired with 4-0 polypropylene suture. Her postoperative course was uneventful, and she continued to recover from injuries to the musculoskeletal system. This case highlights the need for a high degree of suspicion of cardiac injuries after blunt chest trauma. An algorithm is proposed for rapid recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of these lesions. PMID:22949784

  2. Dynamic Response Due to Behind Helmet Blunt Trauma Measured with a Human Head Surrogate

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Christopher J.; Mathis, James T.; Scott, Nikki; Bigger, Rory P.; MacKiewicz, James

    2014-01-01

    A Human Head Surrogate has been developed for use in behind helmet blunt trauma experiments. This human head surrogate fills the void between Post-Mortem Human Subject testing (with biofidelity but handling restrictions) and commercial ballistic head forms (with no biofidelity but ease of use). This unique human head surrogate is based on refreshed human craniums and surrogate materials representing human head soft tissues such as the skin, dura, and brain. A methodology for refreshing the craniums is developed and verified through material testing. A test methodology utilizing these unique human head surrogates is also developed and then demonstrated in a series of experiments in which non-perforating ballistic impact of combat helmets is performed with and without supplemental ceramic appliques for protecting against larger caliber threats. Sensors embedded in the human head surrogates allow for direct measurement of intracranial pressure, cranial strain, and head and helmet acceleration. Over seventy (70) fully instrumented experiments have been executed using this unique surrogate. Examples of the data collected are presented. Based on these series of tests, the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Human Head Surrogate has demonstrated great potential for providing insights in to injury mechanics resulting from non-perforating ballistic impact on combat helmets, and directly supports behind helmet blunt trauma studies. PMID:24688303

  3. Fatal right coronary artery rupture following blunt chest trauma: detection by postmortem selective coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Go; Makino, Yohsuke; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Torimitsu, Suguru; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-05-01

    Coronary artery injury is a rare complication following blunt chest trauma (BCT), and can be fatal. Here we report findings on postmortem selective coronary angiography of right coronary artery rupture after an assault involving blunt trauma to the chest. A woman in her 60s died after her son stomped on her chest. There were no appreciable signs of injury on external examination, and cause of death could not be determined by postmortem computed tomography (PMCT). Internal findings indicated that an external force had been applied to the anterior chest, as evidenced by subcutaneous hemorrhage and pericardial and cardiac contusions. Postmortem coronary angiography revealed irregularity of the intima and of the fat tissue surrounding the proximal part of the right coronary artery associated with a local filling defect. Histopathological examination suggested coronary rupture with dissection of the tunica media and compression of the lumen cavity. The key points in the present case are that no fatal injuries could be determined on external examination, and the heart and coronary artery injuries were not evident on PMCT. Criminality might be overlooked in such cases, as external investigation at the crime scene would be inadequate and could result in a facile diagnosis of cause of death. This is the first report of coronary artery rupture with dissection that was detected by CT coronary angiography, and provides helpful findings for reaching an appropriate decision both forensically and clinically. PMID:26126482

  4. Frequency of myocardial injury after blunt chest trauma as evaluated by radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.; Driedger, A.A.; Holliday, R.L.; Cheung, H.W.; Sibbald, W.J.

    1983-11-01

    Seventy-seven patients who had sustained multisystem trauma, including severe blunt chest injury, were prospectively evaluated to assess the frequency of associated traumatic myocardial injury. Traumatic injury to either the right or left ventricle was defined by the presence of discrete abnormalities of wall motion on electrocardiographically gated cardiac scintigraphy in patients without a clinical history of heart disease. Forty-two patients (55%) (Group 1) had focal abnormalities of wall motion; 27 involved the right ventricle, 7 the left ventricle, 7 were biventricular, and 1 involved only the septum. Both the right and left ventricular ejection fractions were significantly lower (31 +/- 11% and 47 +/- 14%, respectively) than those in the 35 traumatized patients without wall motion abnormalities on scintigraphy (Group 2) (49 +/- 8% and 58 +/- 11%, respectively). Repeat scintigraphic examination in 32 Group 1 patients at a time remote from initial injury showed improvement or resolution of previously defined focal wall motion abnormalities in 27 of 32 patients (84%). The electrocardiogram and serum enzyme tests were insensitive indexes of traumatic myocardial injury when defined by the scintigraphic abnormalities. Thus, severe blunt chest trauma results in a higher frequency of traumatic myocardial injury than heretofore recognized, and frequently involves the anteriorly situated right ventricle.

  5. An unusual complication of blunt ocular trauma: A horseshoe-shaped macular tear with spontaneous closure

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Umut; Durukan, Hakan A; Mumcuoglu, Tarkan; Erdurman, Cuneyt; Hurmeric, Volkan

    2014-01-01

    A case of horseshoe-shaped macular tear after blunt trauma with the course of the tear and the relevant findings obtained by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is described. A 21-year-old man who had suffered blunt trauma 5 days previously visited our clinic complaining of vision loss in his left eye. Ophthalmic examination and SD-OCT images revealed a horseshoe-shaped macular tear. A month later at the second visit, the macular tear was found to have spontaneously closed. There have been many cases reported previously of the spontaneous closure of traumatic macular holes. A horseshoe-shaped macular tear is an atypical clinical presentation. However, the mechanism of spontaneous closure is hypothetically as same as that for a macular hole. High-resolution images and three-dimensional maps taken with SD-OCT can provide more details on macular diseases and are more useful than time-domain OCT images. PMID:24817754

  6. Using autologous peritoneal graft for portal vein injury due to blunt thoracoabdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Sabuncuoglu, M Z; Dandin, O; Teomete, U; Cakir, T; Kayaalp, C

    2015-01-01

    Background Autologous vein or prosthetic materials are used as patch or tube graft for portal or caval vein reconstruction after trauma or tumor resection. Preparation of autologous veins requires extra incisions and is time consuming that is crucial especially in trauma patients. This condition adversely affects postoperative morbidity and mortality, particularly in trauma cases. Prosthetic materials may not be available in some centers, and their use is associated with an increased risk of infection. Description of case A 28-year-old hemodynamically unstable man presented to the emergency room with complete transection of main portal vein, right hepatic artery and common bile duct with tissue defect on hepatoduodenal ligament due to blunt thoracoabdominal trauma. Reconstructing of the portal vein was performed using an autologous peritoneal tube graft. Conclusion Autologous peritoneal graft is a very good option in the treatment of major vascular injuries which can not be repaired with primary suturing. It is also easy to prepare and use, safe, without a need of additional incision, as an alternative to autologous veins and prosthetic materials especially under emergency conditions. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (3): 260-262. PMID:27418787

  7. Reduced Mortality by Physician-Staffed HEMS Dispatch for Adult Blunt Trauma Patients in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyoungwon; Huh, Yo; Lee, John Cj; Kim, Younghwan; Moon, Jonghwan; Youn, Seok Hwa; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Tea Youn; Kim, Juryang; Kim, Hyoju

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of domestic physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) for the transport of patients with severe trauma to a hospital. The study included patients with blunt trauma who were transported to our hospital by physician-staffed HEMS (Group P; n = 100) or nonphysician-staffed HEMS (Group NP; n = 80). Basic patient characteristics, transport time, treatment procedures, and medical treatment outcomes assessed using the Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) were compared between groups. We also assessed patients who were transported to the hospital within 3 h of injury in Groups P (Group P3; n = 50) and NP (Group NP3; n = 74). The severity of injury was higher, transport time was longer, and time from hospital arrival to operation room transfer was shorter for Group P than for Group NP (P < 0.001). Although Group P patients exhibited better medical treatment outcomes compared with Group NP, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.134 vs. 0.730). However, the difference in outcomes was statistically significant between Groups P3 and NP3 (P = 0.035 vs. 0.546). Under the current domestic trauma patient transport system in South Korea, physician-staffed HEMS are expected to increase the survival of patients with severe trauma. In particular, better treatment outcomes are expected if dedicated trauma resuscitation teams actively intervene in the medical treatment process from the transport stage and if patients are transported to a hospital to receive definitive care within 3 hours of injury. PMID:27550497

  8. Assessing Incidence and Risk Factors of Cervical Spine Injury in Blunt Trauma Patients Using the National Trauma Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Young, Andrew J; Wolfe, Luke; Tinkoff, Glenn; Duane, Therese M

    2015-09-01

    Despite the potentially devastating impact of missed cervical spine injuries (CI), there continues to be a large disparity in how institutions attempt to make the diagnosis. To better streamline the approach among institutions, understanding incidence and risk factors across the country is paramount. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors of CI using the National Trauma Databank for 2008 and 2009. We performed a retrospective review of the National Trauma Databank for 2008 and 2009 comparing patients with and without CI. We then performed subset analysis separating injury by patients with and without fracture and ligamentous injury. There were a total of 591,138 patients included with a 6.2 per cent incidence of CI. Regression found that age, Injury Severity Score, alcohol intoxication, and specific mechanisms of motor vehicle crash (MVC), motorcycle crash (MCC), fall, pedestrian stuck, and bicycle were independent risk factors for overall injury (P < 0.0001). Patients with CI had longer intensive care unit (8.5 12.5 vs 5.1 7.7) and hospital lengths of stay (days) (9.6 14.2 vs 5.3 8.1) and higher mortality (1.2 per cent vs 0.3%), compared with those without injury (P < 0.0001). There were 33,276 patient with only fractures for an incidence of 5.6 per cent and 1875 patients with ligamentous injury. Just over 6 per cent of patients suffer some form of CI after blunt trauma with the majority being fractures. Higher Injury Severity Score and MVC were consistent risk factors in both groups. This information will assist in devising an algorithm for clearance that can be used nationally allowing for more consistency among trauma providers. PMID:26350665

  9. Invading of intrauterine contraceptive device into the sigmoid colon through uterine perforation caused by a blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Davoodabadi, Abdoulhossein; Mohammadzadeh, Mahdi; Amirbeigi, Mahdieh; Jazayeri, Hoda

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) is relatively safe but still with some serious risks. Uterus perforation is rare and would be fatal. A case of Cu-7 IUCD invading into the sigmoid colon through uterine perforation caused by a pelvic blunt trauma was presented. Our case showed that uterus perforation by an IUCD could induce utero-sigmoid fistula which is likely to be missed. Imaging is required when the patients with IUCD present abdominal pain, particularly with a history of trauma. PMID:26764547

  10. CT Chest with IV Contrast Compared with CT Angiography after Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Zaw, Andrea A; Stewart, Donovan; Murry, Jason S; Hoang, David M; Sun, Beatrice; Ashrafian, Sogol; Hotz, Heidi; Chung, Rex; Margulies, Daniel R; Ley, Eric J

    2015-10-01

    Blunt aortic injury (BAI) after chest trauma is a potentially lethal condition that requires rapid diagnosis for appropriate treatment. We compared CT with IV contrast (CTI) with CT with angiography (CTA) during the initial phase of care at an urban Level I trauma center from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2013. Overall, 281 patients met inclusion criteria with 167 (59%) CTI and 114 (41%) CTA. There were no differences between cohorts in age, gender, initial heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and Glasgow Coma Scale. Mortality rates were similar for CTI and CTA (4% vs 8%, P = 0.20). CTI identified any chest injury in 54 per cent of patients compared with 46 per cent with CTA (P = 0.05). The rate of BAI was similar with CTI and CTA (2% vs 2%, P = 0.80), and neither modality was falsely negative. We conclude that CTI and CTA are similar at evaluating trauma patients for BAI, although CTI may be preferable during the initial assessment phase because the contrast injection may be combined with abdominal scanning and image time is reduced when whole-body CT is required. PMID:26463312

  11. Trends in blunt abdominal trauma among hospital in-patients. Developments in a Swedish rural district over 30 years.

    PubMed

    Bergqvist, D; Hedelin, H

    1979-01-01

    To analyse changes in background factors, injury pattern, and prognosis regarding blunt abdominal trauma in Sweden, the 30-year postwar (1946--75) development was investigated in a rural district. 396 patients were treated, showing a great increase during the last 5 years. The highest frequency was seen in patients aged 11--30 years. Abdominal trauma occurred most commonly during July and August. The growing aetiological importance of road accidents is shown. Equestrian accidents were common early in the period and again towards the end. The incidence of cerebrally confused patients increased. The organs most commonly traumatized were kidney, liver, and spleen. The frequency of multiple intra-abdominal injuries and also associated extra-abdominal injuries increased with time. There was a tendency towards shorter hospital stays. Mortality rates did not change during the period, even though injuries have become increasingly severe (judged by the Injury Severity Score). It is concluded that the improved care of patients compensated precisely for the increased severity of injuries, as reflected in mortality. PMID:432565

  12. Late Intrathoracic Tracheal Stricture After Blunt Chest Trauma: A Rare Life-Threatening Condition.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Ikram; Aldulaijan, Fozan W; Alhajji, Zahra; Cheema, Ahsan; Mutairi, Hadi

    2016-02-01

    Tracheal injury after blunt chest trauma is a rare but life-threatening condition. If diagnosed and treated early, the outcome is excellent. We report a case of an 18-year-old man who sustained a fracture of the right femur in a traffic accident. He underwent operation under spinal anesthesia and was discharged home after 2 weeks. Six weeks later, he was readmitted with acute respiratory distress, stridor, and drowsiness. Arterial blood gas analysis showed hypercarbia (PCO2 of 80 mm Hg; PO2 of 60 mm Hg). He was intubated with difficulty and ventilated. A computed tomographic (CT) scan of the chest showed a very tight supracarinal tracheal stricture. Emergency surgical resection of the tracheal stricture was performed, and an end-to-end anastomosis was fashioned. The patient had an excellent recovery. PMID:26777938

  13. A case of ocular cardiac reflex in a child with blunt ocular trauma.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Soma Sekhara; Landry, Jonathan P; Douglass, Kate; Venugopalan, Poovathum Parambil

    2014-01-01

    An 11-year-old boy re-presented with refractory vomiting 18 h after blunt facial and head trauma. Initial CT of the brain performed at his first visit was normal. He was found to have a heart rate of 56 bpm (age appropriate 65-100 bpm) with a blood pressure 90/60 mm Hg. Physical examination revealed an injected sclera and limited vertical movement of the left eye. Neurological examination revealed no focal deficits, but a Glasgow Coma Scale of 14, with mild confusion, depressed mental status and diplopia on upward gaze. Performing upward gaze extra ocular movements exacerbated the patient's bradycardia and confirmed the presence of the oculocardiac reflex. High-resolution CT of orbits demonstrated a left orbital floor fracture with entrapment of the left inferior rectus muscle. Surgical correction resolved his bradycardia. PMID:25422334

  14. Inhaled hydrogen sulfide induces suspended animation, but does not alter the inflammatory response after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Daniel H; Fröba, Janine S; Niesler, Ulrike; Palmer, Annette; Veltkamp, Heinrich A; Braumüller, Sonja T; Wagner, Florian; Wagner, Katja; Bäder, Stefan; Wachter, Ulrich; Calzia, Enrico; Radermacher, Peter; Huber-Lang, Markus S; Zhou, Shaoxia; Gebhard, Florian; Knöferl, Markus W

    2012-02-01

    The treatment of acute lung injury and septic complications after blunt chest trauma remains a challenge. Inhaled hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) may cause a hibernation-like metabolic state, which refers to an attenuated systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that inhaled H₂S-induced suspended animation may attenuate the inflammation after pulmonary contusion. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to blunt chest trauma (blast wave) or sham procedure and subsequently exposed to a continuous flow of H₂S (100 ppm) or control gas for 6 h. Body temperature and activity were measured by an implanted transmitter. At 6, 24, or 48 h after trauma, animals were killed, and the cellular contents of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) as well as cytokine concentrations in BAL, plasma, and culture supernatants of blood mononuclear cells, Kupffer cells, splenic macrophages, and splenocytes were determined. Hydrogen sulfide inhalation caused a significant reduction in body temperature and activity. The trauma-induced increase in alveolar macrophage counts was abrogated 48 h after trauma when animals received H₂S, whereas the trauma-induced increase in neutrophil counts was unaltered. Furthermore, H₂S inhalation partially attenuated the mediator release in BAL and culture supernatants of Kupffer cells as well as splenic cells; it altered plasma cytokine concentrations but did not affect the trauma-induced changes in mononuclear cell culture supernatants. These findings indicate that inhaled H₂S induced a reduced metabolic expenditure and partially attenuated inflammation after trauma. Nevertheless, in contrast to hypoxic- or pathogen-induced lung injury, H₂S treatment appears to have no protective effect after blunt chest trauma. PMID:22089191

  15. Effects of methylene blue in acute lung injury induced by blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Ayvaz, S; Aksu, B; Karaca, T; Cemek, M; Tarladacalisir, Y-T; Ayaz, A; Metin, M-S; Basaran, UN; Ayvaz, A-T; Aksu, F; Pul, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: We studied whether methylene blue (MB) treatment blunts chest trauma-induced lung injury in rats. Material and Methods: Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats, 200-300g, were used. The rats were divided into five groups (n=8): control, early contusion (EC), early contusion + methylene blue (2 mg/kg, EC+MB), late contusion (LC), and late contusion + methylene blue (2 mg/kg, LC+MB). Results: Histopathological analysis showed increased hemorrhage, alveolar wall thickness, edema, and inflammatory cell infiltrates in the EC and LC rats, which decreased upon MB treatment. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that MB reduced activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the number of active terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells. A significant increase was observed in the malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) levels in the EC group compared to the control group (p<0.05). In addition, a significant decrease was reported in the glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels (p<0.01), but no significant difference was observed in the catalase (CAT) levels among the groups. The MDA level was significantly higher in the LC group compared to the control group, whereas the GSH level was significantly lower compared to the control group. The NO level in the EC+MB group was significantly lower when compared to the NO level in the EC group (p<0.05). Conclusion: The present study provides evidence that MB might serve as a therapeutic treatment for blunt chest trauma. PMID:25125953

  16. Intractable epilepsy and craniocerebral trauma: analysis of 163 patients with blunt and penetrating head injuries sustained in war.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Hadi; Hashemi-Fesharaki, Sohrab; Razaghi, Soodeh; Najafi, Masomeh; Kolivand, Peir Hossein; Kovac, Stjepana; Gorji, Ali

    2012-12-01

    Post-traumatic epileptic seizure is a common complication of brain trauma including military injuries. We present clinical characteristics and correlates of post-traumatic epilepsy in 163 head-injured veterans suffering from intractable epilepsy due to blunt or penetrating head injuries sustained during the Iraq-Iran war. The medical records of 163 war veterans who were admitted by the Epilepsy Department of the Shefa Neuroscience Center between 2005 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. The mean follow-up period after developing epilepsy was 17.2 years. The time interval between the trauma and the first seizure was shorter and the seizure frequency was higher in epileptic patients suffering from penetrating head trauma. There was no difference in seizure type between epileptic patients traumatised by blunt or penetrating injury. Patients with seizure frequency of more than 30 per month mostly had simple partial seizure. Frontal and parietal semiologies were observed more frequently in patients with penetrating trauma, whereas patients with blunt trauma showed a higher temporal semiology. The most common brain lesion observed by CT scan was encephalomalacia followed by porencephaly and focal atrophy. There was no association between intracerebral retained fragments and different characteristic features of epilepsy. Patients with military brain injury carry a high risk of intractable post-traumatic epilepsy decades after their injury, and thus require a long-term medical follow-up. PMID:22763317

  17. Commentary: sonography in the evaluation of children following blunt trauma: is it to be or not to be?

    PubMed

    Sivit, C J; Kaufman, R A

    1995-01-01

    Over the past decade CT scanning has become generally accepted in North America as the diagnostic modality of choice for the evaluation of abdominal injury in children following blunt trauma [1-5]. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the use of sonography as the primary screening examination in this area. Initial studies utilizing sonography in the evaluation of trauma patients focused primarily on identifying hemoperitoneum in adults [6-8]. More recent studies have also attempted to evaluate the accuracy of sonography for the diagnosis of solid viscus injury [9-14]. Filiatraut and colleagues recently reported a long and successful experience using sonography for the investigation of blunt abdominal trauma in children [12]. Their work in this area should be applauded. However, whether widespread application of this modality can be successful remains uncertain. In the space below a critical evaluation of sonography and CT in the assessment of injured children is presented. PMID:7567254

  18. Blunt urogenital trauma in prepubescent female patients: more than meets the eye!

    PubMed

    Lynch, J M; Gardner, M J; Albanese, C T

    1995-12-01

    Blunt traumatic injury to the urogenital region in the prepubescent girl is commonly evaluated in pediatric emergency departments (ED). The purpose of this study is: 1) to establish recommendations for an accurate, painless (both physically and psychologically), and timely diagnosis, and 2) to determine whether the ED examination can accurately determine the extent of the injury. Over a 24-month period (January 1991 through December 1992), 22 girls with blunt trauma to the urogenital region (mean age 5.7 years, range 2-9 years) were retrospectively evaluated. Initial ED evaluations were by both an emergency physician and a pediatric surgeon. All 22 patients underwent an examination under anesthesia (EUA) in the operating room to evaluate the extent of the injury and to repair the injury as needed. Follow-up was obtained in all patients and averaged 18 months. The findings at EUA demonstrated a significant disagreement with the preoperative ED evaluation. In only five patients was there agreement between the preoperative ED assessment and the findings during the EUA (24% concurrence). Thus, 16 patients (76%) had injuries of greater extent than was appreciated during the preoperative examination in the ED. Partial or complete disruption of the perianal sphincters occurred in six patients (27%) and was unrecognized preoperatively in each. Twenty-one of the 22 patients required suture repair of lacerations, the remaining patient did not require surgical therapy. Three patients had contusions or lacerations to the urethral area requiring repair and/or prolonged bladder catheter drainage for two to 14 days (average seven days). The average hospital stay was 19.3 hours. There were three minor wound complications following surgery: two required repeat EUA with suturing or cauterization, and one required no further therapy. This study clearly demonstrates that the ED examination, by both emergency physicians and pediatric surgeons, of young girls who have suffered blunt

  19. Role of Complement C5 in Experimental Blunt Chest Trauma-Induced Septic Acute Lung Injury (ALI)

    PubMed Central

    Karbach, Michael; Braumueller, Sonja; Kellermann, Philipp; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus; Perl, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe blunt chest trauma is associated with high mortality. Sepsis represents a serious risk factor for mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In septic patients with ARDS complement activation products were found to be elevated in the plasma. In single models like LPS or trauma complement has been studied to some degree, however in clinically highly relevant double hit models such as the one used here little data is available. Here, we hypothesized that absence of C5 is correlated with a decreased inflammatory response in trauma induced septic acute lung injury. Methods 12 hrs after DH in mice the local and systemic cytokines and chemokines were quantified by multiplex bead array or ELISA, activated caspase-3 by western blot. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Sidak’s multiple comparison test (significance, p≤ 0.05). Results In lung tissue interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was elevated in both C5-/- mice and wildtype littermates (wt), whereas caspase-3 was reduced in lungs after DH in C5-/- mice. Systemically, reduced keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) levels were observed after DH in C5-/- compared to wt mice. Locally, lung myeloperoxidase (MPO), protein, IL-6, MCP-1 and G-CSF in brochoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were elevated after DH in C5-/- compared to wt. Conclusions In the complex but clinically relevant DH model the local and systemic inflammatory immune response features both, C5-dependent and C5-independent characteristics. Activation of caspase-3 in lung tissue after DH was C5-dependent whereas local inflammation in lung tissue was C5-independent. PMID:27437704

  20. Physiological and immune-biological characterization of a long-term murine model of blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Sebastian; Wagner, Katja; Wepler, Martin; Matallo, José; Gröger, Michael; McCook, Oscar; Scheuerle, Angelika; Huber-Lang, Markus; Frick, Manfred; Weber, Sandra; Stahl, Bettina; Jung, Birgit; Calzia, Enrico; Georgieff, Michael; Möller, Peter; Dietl, Paul; Radermacher, Peter; Wagner, Florian

    2015-02-01

    Blunt chest trauma causes pulmonary and systemic inflammation. It is still a matter of debate whether the long-term course of this inflammatory response is associated with persistent impairment of lung function. We hypothesized that an increase of inflammatory biomarkers may still be present at later time points after blunt chest trauma, eventually, despite normalized lung mechanics and gas exchange. Anesthetized spontaneously breathing male C57BL/6J mice underwent a blast wave-induced blunt chest trauma or sham procedure. Twelve and 24 h later, blood gases and lung mechanics were measured, together with blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and tissue cytokine concentrations (multiplex cytokine kit); heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), activated caspase-3, Bcl-xL, and Bax expression (Western blotting); nuclear factor-κB activation (electrophoretic mobility shift assay); nitrotyrosine formation; and purinergic (P2XR4 and P2XR7) receptor expression (immunohistochemistry). Histological damage was assessed by hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid-Schiff staining. High-resolution respirometry allowed assessing mitochondrial respiration in diaphragm biopsies. Chest trauma significantly increased tissue and BAL cytokine levels, associated with a significant increase in HO-1, purinergic receptor expression, and tissue nitrotyrosine formation. In contrast, lung mechanics, gas exchange, and histological damage did not show any significant difference between sham and trauma groups. Activation of the immune response remains present at later time points after murine blunt chest trauma. Discordance of the increased local inflammatory response and preserved pulmonary function may be explained by a dissociation of the immune response and lung function, such as previously suggested after experimental sepsis. PMID:25526372

  1. Aniridia after blunt trauma and presumed wound dehiscence in a pseudophakic eye.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong Hwan; Kim, Wan Soo

    2016-02-01

    This was a report about a pseudophakic patient who experienced isolated total aniridia without damage to other intraocular structures following blunt trauma to the eye. This patient had a history of uneventful cataract surgery using a small clear corneal incision (CCI). This 71-year-old male presented at our clinic with glare in his left eye. He reported that he had fallen down while drunk and struck his left eye against a stone on the road 15 days earlier. He had undergone cataract surgery on his left eye nine months before the accident at another eye clinic. Slit-lamp examination showed total aniridia in his left eye, but there was no hyphema or cells in the anterior chamber. The intraocular lens in his left eye was stable, without decentration, dislocation, or zonular dehiscence and remained in an intact capsular bag. Review of the medical records from the surgical clinic at which he had undergone cataract surgery indicated no specific findings for any intraocular structure including the iris. He had previously undergone an uneventful phacoemulsification for his left eye through a 2.2 mm CCI, followed by the implantation of a single piece acrylic intraocular lens inside an intact capsular bag. This report showed that small-sized CCIs can be opened postoperatively by trauma and that this can result in isolated total aniridia without damage to other intraocular structures. PMID:26840167

  2. [Characteristics of duodenal ruptures depending on topographical and anatomical properties of this organ and circumstances of blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Pigolkin, Iu I; Dubrovin, I A; Chirkov, R N; Dubrovina, I A; Khachaturian, B S; Mosoian, A S; Dallakian, V F

    2013-01-01

    We have studied specific morphological properties of duodenal rupture depending on the topographic and anatomical features of this organ and circumstances of blunt abdominal trauma suffered in a car crash (with the victim found in the passenger compartment or involved in an automobile-pedestrian accident) and a railway crash (a train-pedestrian accident) or resulting from a blunt-force trauma, a fall from height, a fall on the stomach, and traumatic compression of the body. We took into consideration the anatomical peculiarities of the duodenal rupture, such as its circular, horseshoe, and loop-like shape. The study has demonstrated that the frequency of duodenal injury associated with a blunt abdominal trauma shows a stronger dependence on the topographical and anatomical peculiarities of duodenum than on the circumstances of the case. Specifically, the circular duodenum and especially its descending portion are more readily subjected to the damage than the organs of a different shape. The position of the break with respect to the duodenal axis is an important diagnostic signs allowing to clarify circumstances of the blunt injury. Transverse ruptures are typical of strong impacts associated with the short-term interaction between the damaging object and the affected part of the body whereas longitudinal ruptures more commonly occur as a result the long-term traumatic impact. Bile imbibition of paraduodenal and peripancreatic retroperitoneal adipose tissue may be used as an additional diagnostic sign of duodenal rupture. PMID:24428049

  3. How do clinical features help identify paediatric patients with fractures following blunt wrist trauma?

    PubMed Central

    Webster, A P; Goodacre, S; Walker, D; Burke, D

    2006-01-01

    Objective Wrist injuries are a common presentation to the emergency department (ED). There are no validated decision rules to help clinicians evaluate paediatric wrist trauma. This study aimed to identify which clinical features are diagnostically useful in deciding the need for a wrist radiograph, and then to develop a clinical decision rule. Methods This prospective cohort study was carried out in the ED of Sheffield Children's Hospital. Eligible patients were recruited if presenting within 72 hours following blunt wrist trauma. A standardised data collection form was completed for all patients. The outcome measure was the presence or absence of a fracture. Univariate analysis was performed with the χ2 test. Associated variables (p<0.2) were entered into a multivariate model. Classification and regression tree (CART) analysis was used to derive the clinical decision rule. Results In total, 227 patients were recruited and 106 children were diagnosed with fractures (47%). Of 10 clinical features analysed, six were found by univariate analysis to be associated with a fracture. CART analysis identified the presence of radial tenderness, focal swelling, or an abnormal supination/pronation as the best discriminatory features. Cross fold validation of this decision rule had a sensitivity of 99.1% (95% confidence interval 94.8% to 100%) and a specificity of 24.0% (17.2% to 32.3%). The radiography rate would be 87%. Conclusions Radial tenderness, focal swelling, and abnormal supination/pronation are associated with wrist fractures in children. The clinical decision rule derived from these features had a high sensitivity, but low specificity, and would not substantially alter our current radiography rate. The potential for a clinical decision rule for paediatric wrist trauma appears limited. PMID:16627835

  4. C5aR-antagonist significantly reduces the deleterious effect of a blunt chest trauma on fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Recknagel, Stefan; Bindl, Ronny; Kurz, Julian; Wehner, Tim; Schoengraf, Philipp; Ehrnthaller, Christian; Qu, Hongchang; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus; Lambris, John D; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita

    2012-04-01

    Confirming clinical evidence, we recently demonstrated that a blunt chest trauma considerably impaired fracture healing in rats, possibly via the interaction of posttraumatic systemic inflammation with local healing processes, the underlying mechanisms being unknown. An important trigger of systemic inflammation is the complement system, with the potent anaphylatoxin C5a. Therefore, we investigated whether the impairment of fracture healing by a severe trauma resulted from systemically activated complement. Rats received a blunt chest trauma and a femur osteotomy stabilized with an external fixator. To inhibit the C5a-dependent posttraumatic systemic inflammation, half of the rats received a C5aR-antagonist intravenously immediately and 12 h after the thoracic trauma. Compared to the controls (control peptide), the treatment with the C5aR-antagonist led to a significantly increased flexural rigidity (three-point-bending test), an improved bony bridging of the fracture gap, and a slightly larger and qualitatively improved callus (µCT, histomorphometry) after 35 days. In conclusion, immunomodulation by a C5aR-antagonist could abolish the deleterious effects of a thoracic trauma on fracture healing, possibly by influencing the function of inflammatory and bone cells locally at the fracture site. C5a could possibly represent a target to prevent delayed bone healing in patients with severe trauma. PMID:21922535

  5. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide as a marker of blunt cardiac contusion in trauma.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Halil; Sarikaya, Sezgin; Neijmann, Sebnem Tekin; Uysal, Emin; Yucel, Neslihan; Ozucelik, Dogac Niyazi; Okuturlar, Yıldız; Solak, Suleyman; Sever, Nurten; Ayan, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac contusion is usually caused by blunt chest trauma and, although it is potentially a life-threatening condition, the diagnosis of a myocardial contusion is difficult because of non-specific symptoms and the lack of an ideal test to detect myocardial damage. Cardiac enzymes, such as creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase MB fraction (CK-MB), cardiac troponin I (cTn-I), and cardiac troponin T (cTn-T) were used in previous studies to demonstrate the blunt cardiac contusion (BCC). Each of these diagnostic tests alone is not effective for diagnosis of BCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the serum heart-type fatty acid binding protein (h-FABP), N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), CK, CK-MB, and cTn-I levels as a marker of BCC in blunt chest trauma in rats. The eighteen Wistar albino rats were randomly allocated to two groups; group I (control) (n=8) and group II (blunt chest trauma) (n=10). Isolated BCC was induced by the method described by Raghavendran et al. (2005). All rats were observed in their cages and blood samples were collected after five hours of trauma for the analysis of serum h-FABP, NT-pro BNP, CK, CK-MB, and cTn-I levels. The mean serum NT-pro BNP was significantly different between group I and II (10.3 ± 2.10 ng/L versus 15.4 ± 3.68 ng/L, respectively; P=0.0001). NT-pro BNP level >13 ng/ml had a sensitivity of 87.5%, a specificity of 70%, a positive predictive value of 70%, and a negative predictive value of 87.5% for predicting blunt chest trauma (area under curve was 0.794 and P=0.037). There was no significant difference between two groups in serum h-FABP, CK, CK-MB and c Tn-I levels. A relation between NT-Pro BNP and BCC was shown in this study. Serum NT-proBNP levels significantly increased with BCC after 5 hours of the blunt chest trauma. The use of NT-proBNP as an adjunct to other diagnostic tests, such as troponins, electrocardiography (ECG), chest x-ray and echocardiogram may be beneficial for diagnosis of

  6. The Changing Pattern and Implications of Multiple Organ Failure (MOF) After Blunt Injury With Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Sperry, Jason; Moore, Ernest E.; West, Michael A.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Cohen, Mitchell J.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Maier, Ronald V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe the incidence of post-injury multiple organ failure (MOF) and its relationship to nosocomial infection and mortality in trauma centers employing evidence-based standard operating procedures (SOPs). Design Prospective cohort study wherein SOPs were developed and implemented to optimize post-injury care. Setting Seven U.S. Level I trauma centers. Patients Severely injured patients (> 16 years old) with a blunt mechanism, systolic hypotension (< 90 mmHg) and/or base deficit (> 6 meq/L), need for blood transfusion within the first 12 hrs, and an abbreviated injury score (AIS) ≥ two excluding brain injury were eligible for inclusion. Measurements and Main Results 1,002 patients were enrolled and 916 met inclusion criteria. Daily markers of organ dysfunction were prospectively recorded for all patients while receiving intensive care. Overall, 29% of patients developed MOF. Development of MOF was early (median time of two days), short - lived, and predicted an increased incidence of NI, whereas, persistence of MOF predicted mortality. However, surprisingly, NI did not increase subsequent MOF and there was no evidence of a “second-hit” induced late onset MOF. Conclusions MOF remains common after severe injury. Contrary to current paradigms, the onset is only early, and not bimodal, nor is it associated with a “second-hit” induced late onset. MOF is associated with subsequent NI and increased mortality. SOP-driven interventions may be associated with a decrease in late MOF and morbidity. PMID:22020243

  7. Diaphragmatic rupture precipitated by intercostal chest tube drainage in a patient of blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Ashok Kumar; Feroz, Asif; Dawar, Sachet; Kumar, Prem; Singh, Anupam; Khublani, Trilok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma in collision injuries in road traffic accident (RTA) occasionally results in diaphragmatic injury and rupture besides other serious multisystem injuries. These diaphragmatic injuries (DI) frequently go undetected specially when occur on the right side. DI associated with hemothorax need insertion of intercostal tube drainage (ICTD). ICTD has never been reported to precipitate diaphragmatic rupture and hernia. We are reporting such a rare case for the first time in medical literature. PMID:26933316

  8. Rupture of Cervical Esophagus From Blunt Trauma With Concomitant Fracture Dislocation of C4-C5 Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Makoyo, P. Ziki

    1979-01-01

    A patient is presented who had sustained a high posterior cervical esophageal laceration (secondary to an automobile accident) with concomitant fracture of the C4 - C5 spine. It was treated by Gulbrandson conversional method. To the author's knowledge, this represents the first recorded rupture of the cervical esophagus associated with high cord lesions as a result of blunt trauma to the neck. PMID:448756

  9. Bleeding small bowel cavernous haemangioma following blunt trauma to the abdomen presenting as subacute intestinal obstruction in a child

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Dayang Anita Abdul; Khandasamy, Yugasaravanan; Tamba, Riana Pauline; Zaki, Faizah Mohd

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 6-year-old girl who developed subacute intestinal obstruction after a trivial blunt trauma to her abdomen. Her normal vital signs masked the presence of intestinal bleeding. An incidental finding at surgery of a haematomatous polypoid vascular growth of the ileum was subsequently confirmed to be cavernous haemangioma of the small bowel. Surgical resection was curative in this patient. PMID:22679168

  10. Best evidence topic report. Use of troponin for the diagnosis of myocardial contusion after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Lorna; Stewart, Alison

    2005-03-01

    A short cut review was carried out to establish the utility of troponin levels in diagnosing myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma. Using the reported search, 75 papers were found, of which six presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, date, and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results, and study weaknesses of these best papers are tabulated. A clinical bottom line is stated. PMID:15735270

  11. Delayed Presentation of Isolated Complete Pancreatic Transection as a Result of Sport-Related Blunt Trauma to the Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Andrew J.; Dimarikis, Iannis; Pai, Madhava; Jiao, Long R.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Blunt abdominal trauma is a rare but well-recognized cause of pancreatic transection. A delayed presentation of pancreatic fracture following sport-related blunt trauma with the coexisting diagnostic pitfalls is presented. Case Report A 17-year-old rugby player was referred to our specialist unit after having been diagnosed with traumatic pancreatic transection, having presented 24 h after a sporting injury. Despite haemodynamic stability, at laparotomy he was found to have a diffuse mesenteric hematoma involving the large and small bowel mesentery, extending down to the sigmoid colon from the splenic flexure, and a large retroperitoneal hematoma arising from the pancreas. The pancreas was completely severed with the superior border of the distal segment remaining attached to the splenic vein that was intact. A distal pancreatectomy with spleen preservation and evacuation of the retroperitoneal hematoma was performed. Discussion/Conclusion Blunt pancreatic trauma is a serious condition. Diagnosis and treatment may often be delayed, which in turn may drastically increase morbidity and mortality. Diagnostic difficulties apply to both paraclinical and radiological diagnostic methods. A high index of suspicion should be maintained in such cases, with a multi-modality diagnostic approach and prompt surgical intervention as required. PMID:21490833

  12. Impending rupture of a blunt trauma-induced left ventricular aneurysm: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Asai, Yasufumi; Kurimoto, Yoshihiko

    2007-01-01

    Most left ventricular true aneurysms that occur secondary to blunt trauma gradually become symptomatic as they enlarge, which validates conservative management as a reasonable initial course of action. We report a case of impending rupture of a left ventricular true aneurysm that showed rapid expansion within a few weeks. A 17-year-old youth was involved in a head-on collision into a car while riding a motorcycle. He underwent repair of a ruptured jejunum and internal fixation of a fractured femur; 28 days after the accident, he was transferred to another hospital for rehabilitation. His chest X-ray just before the transfer was normal. He was re-admitted to our hospital 58 days after the accident complaining of anterior chest pain and dyspnea. Echocardiography showed impending rupture of a left ventricular aneurysm. We performed emergency open repair of a left ventricular true aneurysm with a very thin wall. We report this case to show that even a true aneurysm of the left ventricle should be carefully monitored from the early stage, considering the possibility of rupture. PMID:17952528

  13. Successful Kidney and Lung Transplantation From a Deceased Donor With Blunt Abdominal Trauma and Intestinal Perforation

    PubMed Central

    van Smaalen, Tim C.; Krikke, Christina; Haveman, Jan Willem; van Heurn, L.W. Ernest

    2016-01-01

    The number of organ donors is limited by many contraindications for donation and poor quality of potential organ donors. Abdominal infection is a generally accepted contraindication for donation of abdominal organs. We present a 43-year-old man with lethal brain injury, blunt abdominal trauma, and intestinal perforation. After withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment and circulatory arrest, a minilaparotomy confirmed abdominal contamination with intestinal content. After closure of the abdomen, organs were preserved with in situ preservation with an aortic cannula inserted via the femoral artery. Thereafter, the kidneys were procured via bilateral lumbotomy to reduce the risk of direct bacterial contamination; lungs were retrieved following a standard practice. There was no bacterial or fungal growth in the machine preservation fluid of both kidneys. All organs were successfully transplanted, without postoperative infection, and functioned well after 6 months. We hereby show that direct contamination of organs can be avoided with the use of in situ preservation and retroperitoneal procurement. Intestinal perforation is not an absolute contraindication for donation, although the risk of bacterial or fungal transmission has to be evaluated per case.

  14. Place of Arterial Embolization in Severe Blunt Hepatic Trauma: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Monnin, Valerie Sengel, Christian; Thony, Frederic; Bricault, Ivan; Voirin, David; Letoublon, Christian; Broux, Christophe; Ferretti, Gilbert

    2008-09-15

    This study evaluates the efficacy of arterial embolization (AE) for blunt hepatic traumas (BHT) as part of a combined management strategy based on the hemodynamic status of patients and CT findings. From 2000 to 2005, 84 patients were admitted to our hospital for BHT. Of these, 14 patients who had high-grade injuries (grade III [n = 2], grade IV [n = 9], grade V [n = 3]) underwent AE because of arterial bleeding and were included in the study. They were classified into three groups according to their hemodynamic status: (1) unresponsive shock, (2) shock improved with resuscitation, and (3) hemodynamic stability. Four patients (group 1) underwent, first, laparotomy with packing and, then, AE for persistent bleeding. Ten patients who were hemodynamically stable (group 1) or even unstable (group 2) underwent AE first, based on CT findings. AE was successful in all cases. The mortality rate was 7% (1/14). Only two angiography-related complications (gallbladder infarction) were reported. Liver-related complications (abdominal compartment syndrome and biliary complications) were frequent and often required secondary interventions. Our multidisciplinary approach for the management of BHT gives a main role to embolization, even for hemodynamically unstable patients. In this strategy AE is very efficient and has a low complication rate.

  15. Successful Kidney and Lung Transplantation From a Deceased Donor With Blunt Abdominal Trauma and Intestinal Perforation.

    PubMed

    van Smaalen, Tim C; Krikke, Christina; Haveman, Jan Willem; van Heurn, L W Ernest

    2016-01-01

    The number of organ donors is limited by many contraindications for donation and poor quality of potential organ donors. Abdominal infection is a generally accepted contraindication for donation of abdominal organs. We present a 43-year-old man with lethal brain injury, blunt abdominal trauma, and intestinal perforation. After withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment and circulatory arrest, a minilaparotomy confirmed abdominal contamination with intestinal content. After closure of the abdomen, organs were preserved with in situ preservation with an aortic cannula inserted via the femoral artery. Thereafter, the kidneys were procured via bilateral lumbotomy to reduce the risk of direct bacterial contamination; lungs were retrieved following a standard practice. There was no bacterial or fungal growth in the machine preservation fluid of both kidneys. All organs were successfully transplanted, without postoperative infection, and functioned well after 6 months. We hereby show that direct contamination of organs can be avoided with the use of in situ preservation and retroperitoneal procurement. Intestinal perforation is not an absolute contraindication for donation, although the risk of bacterial or fungal transmission has to be evaluated per case. PMID:27500248

  16. [Multiple trauma and the management structure].

    PubMed

    Sturm, J

    1999-01-01

    The implementation of Quality Management Procedures is necessary in evaluating the treatment of multiple trauma-patients. The development of standards in structures of the trauma management system is the first step to insure quality (appraisal of structure). But the amount of investment in the trauma system structure is limited by 1. The resources available, 2. The efficacy of the applied resources, i.e. the principle of diminishing returns of investment. Centralization of care in Level I Trauma Centers is not realistic in every situation. Transport time can be too long and exceed the critical "golden hour". Review of current data indicates that in approximately 50% of the time, helicopter transport is not possible due to weather, geography, or other limiting factors. This leads to a fragmented transport system, often necessitating extensive transport times, resulting in less than optimal patient outcomes. In order to optimize quality, the following needs to be done: Assessment of process: 1. Realistic algorithms or protocols for primary transport must be developed. 2. Agreements must be reached between designated regional hospitals. 3. Treatment algorithms or protocols which address the different care levels, must be developed by a committee of clinical experts. 4. Quality management procedures must be implemented to monitor the quality of care delivered. Assessments of outcomes: 1. Outcome data must be reviewed on an ongoing basis to determine if changes must be made in the system design or the transportation & clinical algorithms/protocols. 2. Such outcome data should be gathered by means of a Trauma Registry. PMID:10612209

  17. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for imaging blunt abdominal trauma - indications, description of the technique and imaging review.

    PubMed

    Cokkinos, D; Antypa, E; Stefanidis, K; Tserotas, P; Kostaras, V; Parlamenti, A; Tavernaraki, K; Piperopoulos, P N

    2012-02-01

    Patients with blunt abdominal trauma are initially imaged with ultrasound (US) for the evaluation of free abdominal fluid. However, lacerations of solid organs can be overlooked. Although computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard technique for abdominal trauma imaging, overutilization, ionizing radiation, need to transport the patient and potential artifacts are well known disadvantages. Contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) can be used as an imaging tool between the two methods. It can easily and reliably reveal solid abdominal organ injuries in patients with low-energy localized trauma and decrease the number of CT scans performed. It can be rapidly performed at the patient's bedside with no need for transportation. There are only very few contraindications and anaphylactoid reactions are extremely rare. Altogether, CEUS has proved to be very helpful for the initial imaging of traumatic lesions of the liver, kidney and spleen, as well as for patient follow-up. PMID:22274907

  18. Detection of necrosis of the gastric fundus after blunt abdominal trauma by PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Hofer, A; Kratochwill, H; Pentsch, A; Gabriel, M

    2015-02-01

    Positron emission tomography with [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose provides functional and anatomic information by visualising the uptake of radiolabelled glucose in tumour and inflammatory cells. We report delayed diagnosis of necrosis of the gastric fundus after blunt abdominal trauma in a 73-year-old man. After a car accident with head-on collision, the patient was stabilised in our emergency room. His femur was treated by internal fixation, his ellbow was stabilised by a fixateur externe. During surgery his status deteriorated. The patient was in need of high dosage of inotrops during the following days. He had a biventricular pacemaker implanted because of ischemic myocardiopathy, and he suffered from renal insufficiency. Over the next days, his haemodynamics improved. A central venous line had to be removed because of ensuing septic fever. The patient complained of upper abdominal pain and nausea. A sonography and computer tomography without contrast medium were performed with negative result. Because of contamination of the central venous line with Staphylococcus epidermidis the pacemaker was evaluated for infection by transoesophageal echocardiography, again without any findings. Because of ongoing fever and positive inflammatory markers a positron emission tomography was indicated, as a contrast examination and a magnetic resonance examination were not feasible because of the renal insufficiency and the pacemaker, respectively. Prophylactic removal of the pacemaker would have been a substantial risk for the patient due to his underlying myocardiopathy. Positron emission tomography showed an increased tracer uptake in the gastric fundus, which turned out to be necrotic by endoscopy. A laparoscopic resection followed, and drainage of an abscess, which had evolved subsequently between stomach and spleen stopped the inflammatory process. This case report demonstrates that positron emission tomography may be an alternative to computer tomography with contrast medium

  19. Trauma scores and neuron-specific enolase, cytokine and C-reactive protein levels as predictors of mortality in patients with blunt head trauma.

    PubMed

    Sogut, O; Guloglu, C; Orak, M; Sayhan, M B; Gokdemir, M T; Ustundag, M; Akkus, Z

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE), cytokine and high-sensitivity C-reactive-protein (hs-CRP) levels, along with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and Revised Trauma Score (RTS), as predictors of mortality in the early posttraumatic period, in 100 Turkish patients with blunt head trauma. Overall patient mortality was 27%. There was a significant association between age and mortality, and mortality was negatively correlated with GCS and RTS. Head injury severity (GCS) was significantly related to NSE, hs-CRP, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels. Mortality correlated positively with IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha and hs-CRP levels. NSE, hs-CRP, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha levels were significantly higher in non-survivors compared with survivors. GCS score < or =8, younger age and NSE levels were significant independent predictors of mortality. During the early post-traumatic period, NSE may be an objective alternative criterion to the GCS, in the management of patients with blunt head trauma. PMID:21309485

  20. Traumatic Pulmonary Herniation at the Diaphragmatic Junction in a Pediatric Patient: A Rare Complication of Blunt Chest Trauma.

    PubMed

    Orlik, Kseniya; Simon, Erin Leslie; Hemmer, Carrie; Ramundo, Maria

    2016-07-01

    We present a case of traumatic intercostal pulmonary herniation in an 11-year-old boy after blunt trauma to the chest, without associated chest wall disruption or pneumothorax. This condition is especially uncommon in children, with only 5 previously reported cases and most occurring after penetrating chest trauma. To date, there are no reports in literature describing traumatic intercostal lung herniation at the diaphragmatic junction with a closed chest cavity in a child. The number of traumatic lung herniation diagnoses may be expanded by a more liberal use of computed tomography when serious injury is suspected. Computed tomography and advanced imaging should be considered in pediatric trauma patients presenting with concern for intrathoracic injury that may not be seen on plain film. Traumatic blunt intrathoracic and intra-abdominal injuries in the pediatric population that are within proximity of diaphragmatic insertion should be thoroughly evaluated to rule out diaphragmatic injury. As in our case, invasive surgical intervention such as thoracoscopy may be necessary. PMID:27380604

  1. Jujitsu kick to the abdomen: a case of blunt abdominal trauma resulting in hematochezia and transient ischemic colitis.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Hans; Beck, Jeremy

    2011-08-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma is a common presentation to the emergency department. Ischemic colitis is a rare complication of this and its possible sequelae are important for an emergency physician to recognize. A 21-year-old man presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and hourly episodes of bright red blood per rectum shortly after being kicked in the stomach at his jujitsu class. He had no significant medical history, and results of his systems review were otherwise unremarkable. On examination, he appeared well, with normal vital signs. He had mild lower abdominal tenderness, but there were no peritoneal signs present. There was blood on the digital rectal examination. His hemoglobin, platelet, and international normalized ratio levels were normal and his abdominal radiograph was unremarkable. The gastroenterology service was contacted because of the hematochezia and a flexible sigmoidoscopy was performed. The sigmoidoscopy showed erythema, ulceration, and edema of a segment in the left colon, consistent with ischemic colitis. This was later confirmed on biopsy. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen was conducted, which revealed left colonic inflammation consistent with colonic ischemia. There was no mesenteric vascular thrombosis or mesenteric hematoma found on CT. His hematochezia and abdominal pain subsided spontaneously, and he was discharged home. This case illustrates transient ischemic colitis as a potential presentation of blunt abdominal trauma, and emergency physicians should consider this uncommon diagnosis in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting after abdominal trauma. PMID:21392850

  2. Impact of emergency medical helicopter transport directly to a university hospital trauma center on mortality of severe blunt trauma patients until discharge

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The benefits of transporting severely injured patients by helicopter remain controversial. This study aimed to analyze the impact on mortality of helicopter compared to ground transport directly from the scene to a University hospital trauma center. Methods The French Intensive Care Research for Severe Trauma cohort study enrolled 2,703 patients with severe blunt trauma requiring admission to University hospital intensive care units within 72 hours. Pre-hospital and hospital clinical data, including the mode of transport, (helicopter (HMICU) versus ground (GMICU), both with medical teams), were recorded. The analysis was restricted to patients admitted directly from the scene to a University hospital trauma center. The main endpoint was mortality until ICU discharge. Results Of the 1,958 patients analyzed, 74% were transported by GMICU, 26% by HMICU. Median injury severity score (ISS) was 26 (interquartile range (IQR) 19 to 34) for HMICU patients and 25 (IQR 18 to 34) for GMICU patients. Compared to GMICU, HMICU patients had a higher median time frame before hospital admission and were more intensively treated in the pre-hospital phase. Crude mortality until hospital discharge was the same regardless of pre-hospital mode of transport. After adjustment for initial status, the risk of death was significantly lower (odds ratio (OR): 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 0.98, P = 0.035) for HMICU compared with GMICU. This result did not change after further adjustment for ISS and overall surgical procedures. Conclusions This study suggests a beneficial impact of helicopter transport on mortality in severe blunt trauma. Whether this association could be due to better management in the pre-hospital phase needs to be more thoroughly assessed. PMID:23131068

  3. Usefulness of transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography in recognition and management of cardiovascular injuries after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Chirillo, F.; Totis, O.; Cavarzerani, A.; Bruni, A.; Farnia, A.; Sarpellon, M.; Ius, P.; Valfrè, C.; Stritoni, P.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the diagnostic potential of transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography for the detection of traumatic cardiovascular injuries in patients suffering from severe blunt chest trauma. DESIGN: Prospective study over a three year period. SETTING: A regional cardiothoracic centre. PATIENTS: 134 consecutive patients (94 M/40 F; mean age 38 (SD 14) years) suffering from severe blunt chest trauma (injury severity score 33.5 (18.2)). Most patients (89%) were victims of motor vehicle accidents. EVALUATION: All patients underwent transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography within 8 h of admission. Aortography was performed in the first 20 patients and in a further five equivocal cases. RESULTS: Transthoracic echocardiography provided suboptimal images in 83 patients, detecting three aortic ruptures, 28 pericardial effusions (one cardiac tamponade), 35 left pleural effusions, and 15 myocardial contusions. Transoesophageal echocardiography was feasible in 131 patients and detected 14 aortic ruptures (13 at the isthmus), 40 pericardial effusions, 51 left pleural effusions, 34 periaortic haematomas, 45 myocardial contusions, right atrial laceration in one patient with cardiac tamponade, one tricuspid valve rupture, and one severe mitral regurgitation caused by annular disruption. For the detection of aortic rupture transoesophageal echocardiography showed 93% sensitivity, 98% specificity, and 98% accuracy. Time to surgery was significantly shorter (30 (12) v 71 (21) min; P < 0.05) for patients operated on only on the basis of transoesophageal echocardiographic findings. CONCLUSIONS: Transthoracic echocardiography has low diagnostic yield in severe blunt chest trauma, while transoesophageal echocardiography provides accurate diagnosis in a short time at the bedside, is inexpensive, minimally invasive, and does not interfere with other diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Images PMID:8800997

  4. Venous air embolism in homicidal blunt impact head trauma. Case reports.

    PubMed

    Adams, V; Guidi, C

    2001-09-01

    From 1992 through 1997, there were 41 deaths by homicidal blunt impact head trauma in Hillsborough County, Florida. Twenty-one cases were excluded from the study because of putrefaction or survival beyond the emergency department doors, leaving 20 cases for the study. One of the 15 nonputrefied victims found dead at the scene and 1 of the 5 victims pronounced dead in the emergency department had definite venous air embolism. Victim 1 was found dead, bludgeoned with a concrete block, and had open vault and comminuted basilar skull fractures. The dura forming the right sigmoid sinus at the jugular foramen was lacerated. A preautopsy chest radiograph and examination under water documented gas in the pulmonary artery and right ventricle. Victim 2 was bludgeoned with a steel stake and was pronounced dead on arrival in the emergency department. He had open comminuted vault fractures, a transverse basilar skull fracture, and lacerations of the brain. Direct examination and preautopsy chest radiography revealed air in the right side of the heart. A third victim, with basilar fractures, had a small gas bubble in the pulmonary artery not detected by the case pathologist. A fourth victim, with a basilar skull fracture, had an unusual radiographic finding that was thought to be air in the posteromedial aspect of the lower lobe of the left lung but could not be excluded as an air embolus. Optimal postmortem documentation of venous air embolism includes the demonstration of the embolus and the site of air ingress. This study demonstrates that venous air embolism occurs in some victims of homicidal bludgeoning and suggests that when significant, it is easily demonstrated in the absence of putrefactive gas formation. The presence of venous air embolism can serve as evidence that a victim was alive and breathing at the time of the infliction of head wounds. In the belief that venous air embolism might be underdiagnosed in many medical examiner offices, the authors have sought to

  5. Management of high-risk popliteal vascular blunt trauma: clinical experience with 62 cases

    PubMed Central

    Pourzand, Ali; Fakhri, Bassir A; Azhough, Ramin; Hassanzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Hashemzadeh, Shahryar; Bayat, Amrollah M

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to report the clinical and functional outcomes of patients, treated between 2004 and 2009, with high-risk popliteal vascular injuries due to compound fractures about the knee. Patients and methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted of prospectively collected data from Tabriz Medical Trauma Center. Our aim was to perform surgical revascularization as soon as the arterial injury was recognized. The mechanism of injury was blunt in the entire cohort of patients, and all of them had bone fractures about the knee. The treatment of arterial injury included vein graft interposition in 39 (63%), primary anastomosis in 20 (32.3%), and lateral repair in 3 (4.8%) patients. The patients were divided into 2 study groups: limb salvage group (group 1) and amputation group (group 2). Subgroup analysis consisted of univariate analysis comparing the 2 groups and multivariate analysis examining the factors associated negatively and positively with the primary endpoint, limb salvage. Results: In the entire cohort of patients, 60 patients (97%) were male and 2 were female (3%); the mean age was 34.1 years (16–49 years). The overall amputation rate in this study was 37.1% (23 amputations). Significant (P < 0.05) independent factors associated negatively with limb salvage were combined tibia and fibula fracture, concomitant artery and vein injury, ligation of venous injury, and lack of backflow after Fogarty catheter thrombectomy, while repair of popliteal artery and vein injury, when present, was associated with improved early limb salvage. For 40 patients, we adopt a liberal attitude toward open 4-compartment fasciotomy through both medially and laterally placed incisions. Conclusion: Expeditious recognition of vascular injury, transport to repair, and repair of associated venous injury when possible are necessary to optimize limb salvage. The importance of a high level of suspicion and low threshold for timely amputation has been emphasized

  6. Immunonutrition in patients after multiple trauma.

    PubMed

    Bastian, L; Weimann, A

    2002-01-01

    Severe trauma threatens the life of the victim, both directly and indirectly via immunological dysregulation during the subsequent clinical course. Inflammatory or infectious episodes may complicate the clinical course and ultimately result in sepsis and multiple organ failure, which have mortality rates of up to 80%. Immunomodulatory intervention aims to ameliorate the early hyperinflammatory phase (systemic inflammatory response syndrome, SIRS) to avoid the development of sepsis. One of the immunomodulation strategies is enteral feeding supplemented with specific nutrients, such as glutamine, n-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids, and nucleotides ('immunonutrition'), because changes in the GALT (gut-associated lymphoid tissue) immune response may contribute to intestinal dysfunction and increase susceptibility to post injury gut-derived sepsis. In a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled study in twenty-nine patients suffering severe trauma we were able to show that immunonutrition (arginine, n-3-fatty acids, and nucleotides) significantly reduces the number of SIRS days per patient, and also lowers the multiple organ failure (MOF) score on day 3 and days 8-11 (P<0.05). Other studies have reported a reduction in septic complications and MOF rates, shortened hospital stay, and reduction in the use of antibiotics in patients randomized to the immune-enhancing diet. This improved clinical outcome was reflected in a reduction in hospital costs. In the recovery period after trauma (1-72 h after injury) a limitation of the inflammatory response of immunocompetent cells must be achieved as quickly as possible (<72 h). The only strategy available to clinicians caring for trauma patients is immunonutrition, and this should be strongly considered as a rational approach improving immune function and reducing septic complications in critically ill or injured patients. PMID:11895149

  7. Acute myocardial infarction due to coronary thrombosis caused by blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Treuth, Gregory M; Baibars, Motaz; Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Alraies, M Chadi

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old man presented to the emergency department following an anterior chest trauma. He had significant chest pain and chest X-ray was significant for revealed multiple rib fractures and negative. CT scan of the chest ruled out pulmonary embolism or aortic dissection. However, few hours later he developed hypotension requiring admission to medical intensive care unit and intravenous vasopressors. Further workup showed ST elevation myocardial infarction involving the anterior ECG leads. Emergent coronary angiography was performed with intervention to the mid-left anterior descending occlusion. Cardiogenic shock resolved and patient was discharged few days later. One-year follow-up with echocardiogram showed stable ischaemic cardiomyopathy with improved left ventricular ejection fraction to 50%. PMID:24769662

  8. Evaluation of the safety of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) therapy in blunt thoracic trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Casandra A; Palmer, Cassandra A; Ney, Arthur L; Becker, Brian; Schaffel, Steven D; Quickel, Robert R

    2008-01-01

    Background Airway clearance is frequently needed by patients suffering from blunt chest wall trauma. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO) has been shown to be effective in helping to clear secretions from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, asthma, primary ciliary dyskinesia, emphysema, COPD, and many others. Chest wall trauma patients are at increased risk for development of pulmonary complications related to airway clearance. These patients frequently have chest tubes, drains, catheters, etc. which could become dislodged during HFCWO. This prospective observational study was conducted to determine if HFCWO treatment, as provided by The Vest™ Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Saint Paul, MN), was safe and well tolerated by these patients. Methods Twenty-five blunt thoracic trauma patients were entered into the study. These patients were consented. Each patient was prescribed 2, 15 minute HFCWO treatments per day using The Vest® Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Inc., St Paul, MN). The Vest® system was set to a frequency of 10–12 Hz and a pressure of 2–3 (arbitrary unit). Physiological parameters were measured before, during, and after treatment. Patients were free to refuse or terminate a treatment early for any reason. Results No chest tubes, lines, drains or catheters were dislodged as a result of treatment. One patient with flail chest had a chest tube placed after one treatment due to increasing serous effusion. No treatments were missed and continued without further incident. Post treatment survey showed 76% experienced mild or no pain and more productive cough. Thirty days after discharge there were no deaths or hospital re-admissions. Conclusion This study suggests that HFCWO treatment is safe for trauma patients with lung and chest wall injuries. These findings support further work to demonstrate the airway clearance benefits of HFCWO treatment. PMID:18837992

  9. Experience of endovascular repair of thoracic aortic dissection after blunt trauma injury in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Hsien; Huang, Jau-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Background Traumatic thoracic aortic dissection is uncommon in clinical practice; however, it is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thoracic aortic dissection is usually caused by sudden deceleration resulting from a traffic accident or fall. Aortic injury after blunt trauma is a critical condition. This study reported the outcomes of endovascular repair of acute traumatic aortic dissection in patients at a district general hospital. Methods In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical data of eight patients with acute traumatic aortic dissection after a blunt trauma who had undergone thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) between January 2012 and December 2015 at a district general hospital in Taiwan. Results The median age of the patients was 49±22 years (range, 20–77 years), and 6 of the 8 (75%) patients were men. Five patients were involved in traffic accidents, and 3 patients had fallen from heights. The injury severity score (ISS) of the patients ranged from 17 to 66. In all patients, the aortic injury was located near the origin of the left subclavian artery (LSA). Four patients had seal ostium of subclavian artery, left. None of the patients developed paraplegia or lower extremity ischemia. Moreover, all patients had concomitant injuries, and no patients died postoperatively. Conclusions Endovascular repair is a rapid and minimally invasive therapy for patients with traumatic aortic injury and is associated with favorable technical results. PMID:27293831

  10. The Applicability of Trauma and Injury Severity Score for a Blunt Trauma Population in Korea and a Proposal of New Models Using Score Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Yo; Lee, John Cook-Jong; Kim, Younghwan; Moon, Jonghwan; Youn, Seok Hwa; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Juryang; Kim, Hyoju

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to verify the utility of existing Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) coefficients and to propose a new prediction model with a new set of TRISS coefficients or predictors. Materials and Methods Of the blunt adult trauma patients who were admitted to our hospital in 2014, those eligible for Korea Trauma Data Bank entry were selected to collect the TRISS predictors. The study data were input into the TRISS formula to obtain "probability of survival" values, which were examined for consistency with actual patient survival status. For TRISS coefficients, Major Trauma Outcome Study-derived values revised in 1995 and National Trauma Data Bank-derived and National Sample Project-derived coefficients revised in 2009 were used. Additionally, using a logistic regression method, a new set of coefficients was derived from our medical center's database. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) for each prediction ability were obtained, and a pairwise comparison of ROC curves was performed. Results In the statistical analysis, the AUCs (0.879–0.899) for predicting outcomes were lower than those of other countries. However, by adjusting the TRISS score using a continuous variable rather than a code for age, we were able to achieve higher AUCs [0.913 (95% confidence interval, 0.899 to 0.926)]. Conclusion These results support further studies that will allow a more accurate prediction of prognosis for trauma patients. Furthermore, Korean TRISS coefficients or a new prediction model suited for Korea needs to be developed using a sufficiently sized sample. PMID:26996574

  11. Altered expression of Fas receptor on alveolar macrophages and inflammatory effects of soluble Fas ligand following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Daniel H; Palmer, Annette; Niesler, Ulrike; Braumüller, Sonja T; Bauknecht, Simon; Gebhard, Florian; Knöferl, Markus W

    2011-06-01

    Blunt chest trauma impairs the outcome of multiply-injured patients. Lung contusion induces inflammatory alterations and Fas-dependent apoptosis of alveolar type 2 epithelial (AT2) cells has been described. The Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) system seems to exhibit a proinflammatory potential. We aimed to elucidate the involvement of the Fas/FasL system in the inflammatory response after lung contusion. Chest trauma was induced in male rats by a pressure wave. Soluble FasL concentrations were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and alveolar macrophage (AMΦ) supernatants. Alveolar macrophages and AT2 cells were isolated to determine the surface expression (FACS) of Fas/FasL, the mRNA expression (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) of Fas, FasL, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 and to measure the release of IL-6 and IL-10 after culture with or without stimulation with FasL. After chest trauma, FasL concentration was increased in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and AMΦ supernatants and Fas and FasL protein were downregulated on AMΦs and unchanged on AT2 cells. The mRNA expression of Fas was increased in AMΦs and AT2 cells and that of FasL only in AMΦs isolated after lung contusion. Fas ligand stimulation further enhanced IL-6 and suppressed IL-10 release in AMΦs after trauma.The results indicate that the Fas/FasL system is activated after chest trauma, and FasL is associated with the inflammatory response after lung contusion. The proinflammatory response of AMΦs is enhanced by FasL stimulation. Both AMΦs and AT2 cells seem to contribute to the mediator release after lung contusion. These results confirm the importance of the Fas/FasL system in the inflammatory response after chest trauma. PMID:21330946

  12. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in the management of penetrating and blunt thoracic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Milanchi, S; Makey, I; McKenna, R; Margulies, D R

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) is still being defined in the management of thoracic trauma. We report our trauma cases managed by VATS and review the role of VATS in the management of thoracic trauma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All the trauma patients who underwent VATS from 2000 to 2007 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center were retrospectively studied. RESULTS: Twenty-three trauma patients underwent 25 cases of VATS. The most common indication for VATS was retained haemothorax. Thoracotomy was avoided in 21 patients. VATS failed in two cases. On an average VATS was performed on trauma day seven (range 1-26) and the length of hospital stay was 20 days (range 3-58). There was no mortality. VATS was performed in an emergency (day 1-2), or in the early (day 2-7) or late (after day 7) phases of trauma. CONCLUSION: VATS can be performed safely for the management of thoracic traumas. VATS can be performed before or after thoracotomy and at any stage of trauma. The use of VATS in trauma has a trimodal distribution (emergent, early, late), each with different indications. PMID:20040799

  13. N-Acetylcysteine counteracts oxidative stress and protects alveolar epithelial cells from lung contusion-induced apoptosis in rats with blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Topcu-Tarladacalisir, Yeter; Tarladacalisir, Taner; Sapmaz-Metin, Melike; Karamustafaoglu, Altemur; Uz, Yesim Hulya; Akpolat, Meryem; Cerkezkayabekir, Aysegul; Turan, Fatma Nesrin

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on peroxidative and apoptotic changes in the contused lungs of rats following blunt chest trauma. The rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, contusion, and contusion + NAC. All the rats, apart from those in the control group, performed moderate lung contusion. A daily intramuscular NAC injection (150 mg/kg) was given immediately following the blunt chest trauma and was continued for two additional days following cessation of the trauma. Samples of lung tissue were taken in order to evaluate the tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) level, histopathology, and epithelial cell apoptosis using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay and active caspase-3 immunostaining. In addition, we immunohistochemically evaluated the expression of surfactant protein D (SP-D) in the lung tissue. The blunt chest trauma-induced lung contusion resulted in severe histopathological injury, as well as an increase in the MDA level and in the number of cells identified on TUNEL assay together with active caspase-3 positive epithelial cells, but a decrease in the number of SP-D positive alveolar type 2 (AT-2) cells. NAC treatment effectively attenuated histopathologic, peroxidative, and apoptotic changes, as well as reducing alterations in SP-D expression in the lung tissue. These findings indicate that the beneficial effects of NAC administrated following blunt chest trauma is related to the regulation of oxidative stress and apoptosis. PMID:24442604

  14. Neurodegeneration and Vision Loss after Mild Blunt Trauma in the C57Bl/6 and DBA/2J Mouse.

    PubMed

    Bricker-Anthony, Courtney; Rex, Tonia S

    2015-01-01

    Damage to the eye from blast exposure can occur as a result of the overpressure air-wave (primary injury), flying debris (secondary injury), blunt force trauma (tertiary injury), and/or chemical/thermal burns (quaternary injury). In this study, we investigated damage in the contralateral eye after a blast directed at the ipsilateral eye in the C57Bl/6J and DBA/2J mouse. Assessments of ocular health (gross pathology, electroretinogram recordings, optokinetic tracking, optical coherence tomography and histology) were performed at 3, 7, 14 and 28 days post-trauma. Olfactory epithelium and optic nerves were also examined. Anterior pathologies were more common in the DBA/2J than in the C57Bl/6 and could be prevented with non-medicated viscous eye drops. Visual acuity decreased over time in both strains, but was more rapid and severe in the DBA/2J. Retinal cell death was present in approximately 10% of the retina at 7 and 28 days post-blast in both strains. Approximately 60% of the cell death occurred in photoreceptors. Increased oxidative stress and microglial reactivity was detected in both strains, beginning at 3 days post-injury. However, there was no sign of injury to the olfactory epithelium or optic nerve in either strain. Although our model directs an overpressure air-wave at the left eye in a restrained and otherwise protected mouse, retinal damage was detected in the contralateral eye. The lack of damage to the olfactory epithelium and optic nerve, as well as the different timing of cell death as compared to the blast-exposed eye, suggests that the injuries were due to physical contact between the contralateral eye and the housing chamber of the blast device and not propagation of the blast wave through the head. Thus we describe a model of mild blunt eye trauma. PMID:26148200

  15. Neurodegeneration and Vision Loss after Mild Blunt Trauma in the C57Bl/6 and DBA/2J Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bricker-Anthony, Courtney; Rex, Tonia S.

    2015-01-01

    Damage to the eye from blast exposure can occur as a result of the overpressure air-wave (primary injury), flying debris (secondary injury), blunt force trauma (tertiary injury), and/or chemical/thermal burns (quaternary injury). In this study, we investigated damage in the contralateral eye after a blast directed at the ipsilateral eye in the C57Bl/6J and DBA/2J mouse. Assessments of ocular health (gross pathology, electroretinogram recordings, optokinetic tracking, optical coherence tomography and histology) were performed at 3, 7, 14 and 28 days post-trauma. Olfactory epithelium and optic nerves were also examined. Anterior pathologies were more common in the DBA/2J than in the C57Bl/6 and could be prevented with non-medicated viscous eye drops. Visual acuity decreased over time in both strains, but was more rapid and severe in the DBA/2J. Retinal cell death was present in approximately 10% of the retina at 7 and 28 days post-blast in both strains. Approximately 60% of the cell death occurred in photoreceptors. Increased oxidative stress and microglial reactivity was detected in both strains, beginning at 3 days post-injury. However, there was no sign of injury to the olfactory epithelium or optic nerve in either strain. Although our model directs an overpressure air-wave at the left eye in a restrained and otherwise protected mouse, retinal damage was detected in the contralateral eye. The lack of damage to the olfactory epithelium and optic nerve, as well as the different timing of cell death as compared to the blast-exposed eye, suggests that the injuries were due to physical contact between the contralateral eye and the housing chamber of the blast device and not propagation of the blast wave through the head. Thus we describe a model of mild blunt eye trauma. PMID:26148200

  16. Animal-related fatalities--part I: characteristic autopsy findings and variable causes of death associated with blunt and sharp trauma.

    PubMed

    Bury, Danielle; Langlois, Neil; Byard, Roger W

    2012-03-01

    Animals may be responsible for an array of potentially lethal injuries. Blunt force injuries characteristically involve larger animals such as cattle or horses that may kick, crush, or trample a victim causing head and facial injuries. Farm workers in particular are at high risk of lethal injuries involving the head and torso. Significant blunt trauma may be found in vehicle occupants after collisions with large animals such as camels or moose. Rarely, zookeepers may be crushed by particularly massive animals such as elephants. Sharp force injuries usually involve carnivore bites, most often from dogs with a "hole and tear" pattern of wounding. Injuries from animals such as alligators and sharks may have a significant component of crushing. Incised wounds may result in death from exsanguination and air embolism. On occasion, blunt or sharp trauma from animal activity may be confused with postmortem damage or with inflicted injury from an assault. PMID:21981339

  17. Late outcome of very severe blunt head trauma: a 10-15 year second follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, I V

    1984-01-01

    Forty patients with very severe blunt head trauma (post-traumatic amnesia greater than or equal to 1 month) were initially examined at an average of 4.5 months after the injury. The patients were visited in their homes 2.5 years and 10-15 years after the accident and questionnaires were presented to patients, relatives and/or staff. Though physical impairment, dysarthria and defects of memory remained severe in many cases, the psychosocial sequelae presented the most serious problems. Permanent changes in personality and emotion were reported in two thirds and were especially frequent among the youngest patients. The worse overall outcome was seen in cases with severe brainstem involvement or anterior lesions or both. In spite of the great frequency of deficits long-term improvement of functional state was common and several regained at least some work capacity. PMID:6707671

  18. Blunt Chest Trauma in Mice after Cigarette Smoke-Exposure: Effects of Mechanical Ventilation with 100% O2.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Katja; Gröger, Michael; McCook, Oscar; Scheuerle, Angelika; Asfar, Pierre; Stahl, Bettina; Huber-Lang, Markus; Ignatius, Anita; Jung, Birgit; Duechs, Matthias; Möller, Peter; Georgieff, Michael; Calzia, Enrico; Radermacher, Peter; Wagner, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking (CS) aggravates post-traumatic acute lung injury and increases ventilator-induced lung injury due to more severe tissue inflammation and apoptosis. Hyper-inflammation after chest trauma is due to the physical damage, the drop in alveolar PO2, and the consecutive hypoxemia and tissue hypoxia. Therefore, we tested the hypotheses that 1) CS exposure prior to blunt chest trauma causes more severe post-traumatic inflammation and thereby aggravates lung injury, and that 2) hyperoxia may attenuate this effect. Immediately after blast wave-induced blunt chest trauma, mice (n=32) with or without 3-4 weeks of CS exposure underwent 4 hours of pressure-controlled, thoraco-pulmonary compliance-titrated, lung-protective mechanical ventilation with air or 100% O2. Hemodynamics, lung mechanics, gas exchange, and acid-base status were measured together with blood and tissue cytokine and chemokine concentrations, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), activated caspase-3, and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α) expression, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, nitrotyrosine formation, purinergic receptor 2X4 (P2XR4) and 2X7 (P2XR7) expression, and histological scoring. CS exposure prior to chest trauma lead to higher pulmonary compliance and lower PaO2 and Horovitz-index, associated with increased tissue IL-18 and blood MCP-1 concentrations, a 2-4-fold higher inflammatory cell infiltration, and more pronounced alveolar membrane thickening. This effect coincided with increased activated caspase-3, nitrotyrosine, P2XR4, and P2XR7 expression, NF-κB activation, and reduced HIF-1α expression. Hyperoxia did not further affect lung mechanics, gas exchange, pulmonary and systemic cytokine and chemokine concentrations, or histological scoring, except for some patchy alveolar edema in CS exposed mice. However, hyperoxia attenuated tissue HIF-1α, nitrotyrosine, P2XR7, and P2XR4 expression, while it increased HO-1 formation in CS exposed mice. Overall, CS exposure aggravated post

  19. Blunt Chest Trauma in Mice after Cigarette Smoke-Exposure: Effects of Mechanical Ventilation with 100 % O2

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Katja; Gröger, Michael; McCook, Oscar; Scheuerle, Angelika; Asfar, Pierre; Stahl, Bettina; Huber-Lang, Markus; Ignatius, Anita; Jung, Birgit; Duechs, Matthias; Möller, Peter; Georgieff, Michael; Calzia, Enrico; Radermacher, Peter; Wagner, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking (CS) aggravates post-traumatic acute lung injury and increases ventilator-induced lung injury due to more severe tissue inflammation and apoptosis. Hyper-inflammation after chest trauma is due to the physical damage, the drop in alveolar PO2, and the consecutive hypoxemia and tissue hypoxia. Therefore, we tested the hypotheses that 1) CS exposure prior to blunt chest trauma causes more severe post-traumatic inflammation and thereby aggravates lung injury, and that 2) hyperoxia may attenuate this effect. Immediately after blast wave-induced blunt chest trauma, mice (n=32) with or without 3-4 weeks of CS exposure underwent 4 hours of pressure-controlled, thoraco-pulmonary compliance-titrated, lung-protective mechanical ventilation with air or 100 % O2. Hemodynamics, lung mechanics, gas exchange, and acid-base status were measured together with blood and tissue cytokine and chemokine concentrations, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), activated caspase-3, and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α) expression, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, nitrotyrosine formation, purinergic receptor 2X4 (P2XR4) and 2X7 (P2XR7) expression, and histological scoring. CS exposure prior to chest trauma lead to higher pulmonary compliance and lower PaO2 and Horovitz-index, associated with increased tissue IL-18 and blood MCP-1 concentrations, a 2-4-fold higher inflammatory cell infiltration, and more pronounced alveolar membrane thickening. This effect coincided with increased activated caspase-3, nitrotyrosine, P2XR4, and P2XR7 expression, NF-κB activation, and reduced HIF-1α expression. Hyperoxia did not further affect lung mechanics, gas exchange, pulmonary and systemic cytokine and chemokine concentrations, or histological scoring, except for some patchy alveolar edema in CS exposed mice. However, hyperoxia attenuated tissue HIF-1α, nitrotyrosine, P2XR7, and P2XR4 expression, while it increased HO-1 formation in CS exposed mice. Overall, CS exposure aggravated post

  20. Occult Mediastinal Great Vessel Trauma: The Value of Aortography Performed During Angiographic Screening for Blunt Cervical Vascular Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Charles E. Bauer, Jason R.; Cothren, C. Clay; Turner, James H.; Moore, Ernest E.

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To determine the value of aortography in the assessment of occult aortic and great vessel injuries when routinely performed during screening angiography for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI). Methods. One hundred and one consecutive patients who received both aortography and screening four-vessel angiography over 4 years were identified retrospectively. Angiograms for these patients were evaluated, and the incidence of occult mediastinal vascular injury was determined. Results. Of the 101 patients, 6 (6%) had angiographically documented traumatic aortic injuries. Of these 6 patients, one injury (17%) was unsuspected prior to angiography. Four of the 6 (67%) also had BCVI. One additional patient also had an injury to a branch of the subclavian artery. Conclusion. Routine aortography during screening angiography for BCVI is not warranted due to the low incidence (1%) of occult mediastinal arterial injury. However, in the setting of a BCVI screening study and no CT scan of the chest, aortography may be advantageous.

  1. A Patient With Blunt Trauma and Cardiac Arrest Arriving Pulseless at the Emergency Department; is that Enough Reason to Stop Resuscitation? Review of Literature and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hamidian Jahromi, Alireza; Northcutt, Ashley; Youssef, Asser M

    2013-01-01

    The decision to stop or continue resuscitation in a patient with blunt trauma and cardiac arrest arriving pulseless to the hospital has always been controversial. While many authors still believe that it is a futile effort, with no chance of success for complete neurological recovery, some recent reports have challenged the idea. Here we report complete recovery of a severely injured patient following a motor vehicle accident who lost vital signs completely before arrival at our trauma center. No cardiac motion was detected on ultrasound examination on arrival. Emergency department thoracotomy, open cardiac massage, massive blood transfusion, damage control laparotomy with abdominal and pelvic packing, followed by angio-embolization of pelvic bleeding, and staged abdominal exploration were performed. This case is an example showing that resuscitation of patients with blunt trauma and cardiac arrest arriving pulseless to the hospital is not always futile. PMID:24693385

  2. Early enteral feeding of patients with multiple trauma.

    PubMed

    Cheever, K H

    1999-12-01

    The case study illustrates the recovery of a patient with multiple trauma who was fed a peptide-based formula via the enteral route soon after the trauma. Although the clinical course might have been worse if D.H. had not received this treatment, his generally excellent recovery might be partly attributable to this therapy. Although stress hypermetabolism occurs in most patients with multiple trauma within 48 hours after injury, no known treatment can arrest or reverse this problem. However, the lethal catabolic and septic effects of stress hypermetabolism can be at least partly thwarted through delivery of enteral nutrients within 72 hours after trauma. PMID:10889604

  3. Blunt aortic trauma in a patient with the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome type VI

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Marco Yat Hang; Murray, Jennifer; Thompson, Errington C.

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old male with the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VI (ocular scoliotic) who was kicked in the abdomen presented to the emergency room (ER) with abdominal pain. He was found to have a blunt traumatic aortic injury. The patient was treated nonoperatively. He was stable and discharged home on the eighth day. The patient returned to the ER several days later hypotensive and tachycardic. The patient was taken immediately to the operating room, but vascular repair was not possible. The patient expired. We discuss the challenges of taking care of a patient with EDS and offer suggestions that might improve future patient's outcome. PMID:26956239

  4. Blunt aortic trauma in a patient with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI.

    PubMed

    Yung, Marco Yat Hang; Murray, Jennifer; Thompson, Errington C

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old male with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VI (ocular scoliotic) who was kicked in the abdomen presented to the emergency room (ER) with abdominal pain. He was found to have a blunt traumatic aortic injury. The patient was treated nonoperatively. He was stable and discharged home on the eighth day. The patient returned to the ER several days later hypotensive and tachycardic. The patient was taken immediately to the operating room, but vascular repair was not possible. The patient expired. We discuss the challenges of taking care of a patient with EDS and offer suggestions that might improve future patient's outcome. PMID:26956239

  5. Homicidal blunt abdominal trauma with isolated laceration of the small bowel mesentery.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, A

    1984-01-01

    Nonpenetrating abdominal trauma rarely causes isolated mesenteric lacerations with fatal hemorrhages. When this does happen, it is often the result of compression by a lap seal belt or a steering wheel, only extremely rarely is it the result of a homicidal act. In the present paper, two homicide victims with resulting mesenteric tears and fatal bleeding due to sagittal compression are described. A high blood alcohol concentration may in both cases have contributed to the fatal outcome. The cases support the assumption that direct rather than indirect trauma causes this kind of lesion. PMID:6516601

  6. Paediatric case of a large gastric rupture after a blunt abdominal trauma: Report of a case in a District General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pafitanis, Georgios; Koulas, Spiros; Bikos, Stavros; Tsimoyiannis, Evangelos

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Isolated gastric rupture after blunt abdominal trauma is rare. In current literature gastric rupture from blunt abdominal trauma ranges between 0.02% and 1.7%. This document reports the first non-motor-vehicle case of an isolated gastric rapture after blunt abdominal injury, which repaired after early diagnosis and aggressive surgical treatment. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 14-year-old boy attended our emergency surgical department after sustained a blunt abdominal trauma following a fall from his bicycle. He presented with pain and left para-umbilical abdominal ecchymoses. Examination revealed subcutaneous emphysema and a palpable abdominal wall dimple. DISCUSSION Radiological examination with CT scan determined the need for exploratory laparotomy. Operation revealed, extensive rupture of the left lateral border of the rectus abdominus muscle, free intra-peritoneal position of the nasogastric tube with gross spillage of gastric contents and pneumo-peritoneum observed with 7-8cm full thickness rupture of anterior stomach wall, from the lesser towards the greater curvature. Primary, two-layer closure was performed. On the 5th post-operative day he developed gastrorrhagia. He was discharged on the 15th postoperative day. CONCLUSION We present this case report focusing on the paediatric patient to illustrate isolated gastric injury in terms of mechanism of injury, clinical presentation, and immediate surgical management. PMID:23295382

  7. Pretrauma Center Red Blood Cell Transfusion Is Associated With Reduced Mortality and Coagulopathy in Severely Injured Patients With Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joshua B.; Cohen, Mitchell J.; Minei, Joseph P.; Maier, Ronald V.; West, Michaela A.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Moore, Ernest E.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Sperry, Jason L.; Inflammation, The

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of pretrauma center (PTC) red blood cell (RBC) transfusion with outcomes in severely injured patients. Background Hemorrhage remains a major driver of mortality. Little evidence exists supporting PTC interventions to mitigate this. Methods Blunt injured patients in shock arriving at a trauma center within 2 hours of injury were included from the Glue Grant database. Subjects were dichotomized by PTC RBC transfusion. Outcomes included 24-hour mortality, 30-day mortality, and trauma-induced coagulopathy [(TIC), admission international normalized ratio >1.5]. Cox regression and logistic regression determined the association of PTC RBC transfusion with outcomes. To address baseline differences, propensity score matching was used. Results Of 1415 subjects, 50 received PTC RBC transfusion. Demographics and injury severity score were similar. The PTC RBC group received 1.3 units of RBCs (median), and 52% were scene transports. PTC RBC transfusion was associated with a 95% reduction in odds of 24-hour mortality [odds ratio (OR) = 0.05; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.01–0.48; P < 0.01], 64% reduction in the risk of 30-day mortality [hazard ratio = 0.36; 95% CI, 0.15–0.83; P = 0.02], and 88% reduction in odds of TIC (OR = 0.12; 95% CI, 0.02–0.79; P = 0.03). The matched cohort included 113 subjects (31% PTC RBC group). Baseline characteristics were similar. PTC RBC transfusion was associated with a 98% reduction in odds of 24-hour mortality (OR = 0.02; 95% CI, 0.01–0.69; P = 0.04), 88% reduction in the risk of 30-day mortality (hazard ratio = 0.12; 95% CI, 0.03–0.61; P = 0.01), and 99% reduction in odds of TIC (OR = 0.01; 95% CI, 0.01–0.95; P = 0.05). Conclusions PTC RBC administration was associated with a lower risk of 24-hour mortality, 30-day mortality, and TIC in severely injured patients with blunt trauma, warranting further prospective study. PMID:24670858

  8. [Preclinical treatment of multiple trauma : what is important?].

    PubMed

    Schweigkofler, U; Hoffmann, R

    2013-09-01

    Multiple trauma is still the most common cause of death in the age group below 40 years but rarely occurs in prehospital emergencies in Germany. Therefore, personal experience of emergency physicians in prehospital treatment of multiple trauma is often limited. Priority-based therapy according to standardized algorithms and advances in clinical and intensive care have reduced hospital mortality down to 13 %. Time factors, treatment and transport by Helicopter Emergency Medical Services seem to have had a significant impact on the outcome. The current German multiple trauma S3 guidelines provide algorithms for preclinical treatment. The underlying scientific evidence in this respect is, however, low. PMID:23942888

  9. Delayed recurrent pericarditis complicated by pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade in a blunt trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Khidir, Hazar H.; Bloom, Jordan P.; Hawkins, Alexander T.

    2015-01-01

    A 19-year-old male suffered orthopedic fractures, blunt solid organ injury and pneumopericardium after a fall from 40 feet. With the exception of an external fixation device, he was managed non-operatively and discharged to a rehabilitation unit after 8 days. He was readmitted 4 days later with chest pain and clinical evidence of pericardititis that resolved with the initiation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine. He returned to the rehabilitation hospital, but was readmitted once again for chest pain and hypotension. Echocardiogram revealed cardiac tamponade that required emergent drainage. He tolerated the procedure well and was discharged home from the hospital to continue treatment for his pericarditis. He is doing well at 3 months of follow-up. PMID:25709254

  10. Clinical Predictors of Recovery after Blunt Spinal Cord Trauma: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Al-Habib, Amro F.; Attabib, Najmedden; Ball, Jonathon; Bajammal, Sohail; Casha, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Several clinical, imaging, and therapeutic factors affecting recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) have been described. A systematic review of the topic is still lacking. Our primary aim was to systematically review clinical factors that may predict neurological and functional recovery following blunt traumatic SCI in adults. Such work would help guide clinical care and direct future research. Both Medline and Embase (to April 2008) were searched using index terms for various forms of SCI, paraplegia, or quadri/tetraplegia, and functional and neurological recovery. The search was limited to published articles that were in English and included human subjects. Article selection included class I and II evidence, blunt traumatic SCI, injury level above L1-2, baseline assessment within 72 h of injury, use of American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scoring system for clinical assessment, and functional and neurological outcome. A total of 1526 and 1912 citations were located from Medline and Embase, respectively. Two surgeons reviewed the titles, abstracts, and full text articles for each database. Ten articles were identified, only one of which was level 1 evidence. Age and gender were identified as two patient-related predictors. While motor and functional recovery decreased with advancing age for complete SCI, there was no correlation considering incomplete ones. Therefore, treatment should not be restructured based on age in incomplete SCI. Among injury-related predictors, severity of SCI was the most significant. Complete injuries correlated with increased mortality and worse neurological and functional outcomes. Other predictors included SCI level, energy transmitted by the injury, and baseline electrophysiological testing. PMID:19831845

  11. Mechanical small bowel obstruction following a blunt abdominal trauma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zirak-Schmidt, Samira; El-Hussuna, Alaa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal obstruction following abdominal trauma has previously been described. However, in most reported cases pathological finding was intestinal stenosis. Presentation of the case A 51-year-old male was admitted after a motor vehicle accident. Initial focused abdominal sonogram for trauma and enhanced computerized tomography were normal, however there was a fracture of the tibia. Three days later, he complained of abdominal pain, constipation, and vomiting. An exploratory laparotomy showed bleeding from the omentum and mechanical small bowel obstruction due to a fibrous band. Discussion The patient had prior abdominal surgery, but clinical and radiological findings indicate that the impact of the motor vehicle accident initiated his condition either by causing rotation of a bowel segment around the fibrous band, or by formation of a fibrous band secondary to minimal bleeding from the omentum. Conclusion High index of suspicion of intestinal obstruction is mandatory in trauma patients presenting with complaints of abdominal pain, vomiting, and constipation despite uneventful CT scan. PMID:26566436

  12. Complex rectal and anal canal injuries secondary to unusual blunt perineal trauma.

    PubMed

    El Lakis, Mustapha A; Rida, Khaled; Nakhle, Ram; Abi Saad, George

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old woman sustained a trauma to her perineal area when she was ejected from a jet ski while riding on water at high speed. The patient presented to the emergency department with blood streaking from her anal canal. Imaging revealed pneumoperitoneum. Surgical intervention showed complex anal canal and rectal injuries. Primary repair of the injuries was performed. Postoperatively the patient did well and was followed up with no evidence of residual symptoms and with a continent anal sphincter. PMID:25352384

  13. A combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin is effective for the treatment of cardiac contusion following blunt chest trauma in rats

    PubMed Central

    Demir, F.; Güzel, A.; Katı, C.; Karadeniz, C.; Akdemir, U.; Okuyucu, A.; Gacar, A.; Özdemir, S.; Güvenç, T.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac contusion is a potentially fatal complication of blunt chest trauma. The effects of a combination of quercetin and methylprednisolone against trauma-induced cardiac contusion were studied. Thirty-five female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups (n=7) as follows: sham, cardiac contusion with no therapy, treated with methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg on the first day, and 3 mg/kg on the following days), treated with quercetin (50 mg·kg−1·day−1), and treated with a combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin. Serum troponin I (Tn-I) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels and cardiac histopathological findings were evaluated. Tn-I and TNF-α levels were elevated after contusion (P=0.001 and P=0.001). Seven days later, Tn-I and TNF-α levels decreased in the rats treated with methylprednisolone, quercetin, and the combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin compared to the rats without therapy, but a statistical significance was found only with the combination therapy (P=0.001 and P=0.011, respectively). Histopathological degeneration and necrosis scores were statistically lower in the methylprednisolone and quercetin combination group compared to the group treated only with methylprednisolone (P=0.017 and P=0.007, respectively). However, only degeneration scores were lower in the combination therapy group compared to the group treated only with quercetin (P=0.017). Inducible nitric oxide synthase positivity scores were decreased in all treatment groups compared to the untreated groups (P=0.097, P=0.026, and P=0.004, respectively). We conclude that a combination of quercetin and methylprednisolone can be used for the specific treatment of cardiac contusion. PMID:25098616

  14. [Rupture of the interventricular septum after the blunt trauma of thorax].

    PubMed

    Smejkal, K; Parízková, R; Harrer, J; Lukes, A; Koudelka, J; Zvák, I

    2008-02-01

    Authors present the case of little patient with the dissection, pseudoaneurysm and finally a rupture of the interventricular septum after the blunt thracic injury. The patient was smitten as a pedestrian by a car and during the whole period of her stay in the hospital she was showing signs of circulatory instability. Due to the current intraabdominal injuries this circulatory decompensation was first assigned to hemoperitoneum, for which the girl was operated on about 3 hours after admission. Nevertheless, even after the abdminal cavity check, after the treatment of supreficial liver lacerations and intensive volume resuscitation the patient showed signs of insufficiency. Diagnosis was finally determined on the base of the transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), which proved the traumatic rupture of interventricular septum. The operation followed correcting the defect, which was performed with a good result according to the TTE postoperatively. Nevertheless, 27 hours after the admission the patient died due to the electromechanical dissociation. In the discussion the authors then evoke a number of papers concerning the same topic. PMID:18380159

  15. [Chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. PMID:21640287

  16. Diagnostic Value of Clinical Findings in Evaluation of Thoracolumbar Blunt Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Shahrami, Ali; Shojaee, Majid; Tabatabaee, Seyed Mohammadreza; Mianehsaz, Elaheh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Necessity of imaging for symptom-free conscious patients presented to emergency department (ED) following traumatic thoracolumbar spine injuries has been a matter of debate. The present study was aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of clinical findings in prediction of traumatic thoracolumbar injuries compared tocomputed tomography (CT) scan. Methods: The present diagnostic value study was carried out using non-random convenience sampling during the time between October 2013 and March 2014. All trauma patients > 15 years old underwent thoracolumbar CT scan were included. Correlation between clinical and CT findings was measured using SPSS 21.0 and screening performance characteristics of clinical findings in prediction of thoracolumbar fracture were calculated. Results: 169 patients with mean age of 37.8 ± 17.3 years (rage: 15-86) were evaluated (69.8% male). All fracture patients had at least 1 positive finding in history and physical examination. The fracture was confirmed in only 24.6% of the patients with positive findings in history or physical examination. In 37.5% of patients the location of fracture, matched the area of positive physical examinations. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, PLR, and NLR of clinical findings in comparison to thoracolumbar CT scan were 100 (95% CI: 89 - 100), 1.5 (95% CI: 0.2-6), 24.5 (95% CI: 18.3-31.9), 100 (95% CI: 19.7-100), 32.5 (95% CI: 24.6-43.03), and infinite, respectively. Conclusion: The results of the present study, show the excellent screening performance characteristics of clinical findings in prediction of traumatic thoracolumbar fracture (100% sensitivity). It could be concluded that in conscious patients with stable hemodynamic, who have no distracting pain and are not intoxicated, probability of thoracolumbar fracture is very low and near to zero in case of no positive clinical finding. PMID:27299140

  17. Can Early Aggressive Administration of Fresh Frozen Plasma Improve Outcomes in Patients with Severe Blunt Trauma?—a Report by the Japanese Association for the Surgery of Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Akiyoshi; Kushimoto, Shigeki; Kato, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Junichi; Ogura, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Tetsuya; Uejima, Toshifumi; Hayakawa, Mineji; Takeda, Munekazu; Kaneko, Naoyuki; Saitoh, Daizoh; Otomo, Yasuhiro; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Teruo; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Shiraishi, Atsushi; Morimura, Naoto; Ishikura, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: This study investigated the effect of a high ratio of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) to red blood cells (RBCs) within the first 6 and 24 h after admission on mortality in patients with severe, blunt trauma. Methods: This retrospective observational study included 189 blunt trauma patients with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≥16 requiring RBC transfusions within the first 24 h. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to calculate cut-off values of the FFP/RBC ratio for outcome. The patients were then divided into two groups according to the cut-off value. Patient survival was compared between groups using propensity score matching (PSM). Results: The area under the ROC curve was 0.57, and the FFP/RBC ratio was 1.0 at maximum sensitivity (0.57) and specificity (0.67). All patients were then divided into two groups (FFP/RBC ratio ≥1 or <1) and analyzed using PSM and inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW). The unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) was 0.44, and the adjusted HR was 0.29. The HR was 0.38 by PSM and 0.41 by IPTW. The survival rate was significantly higher in patients with an FFP/RBC ratio ≥1 within the first 6 h. Conclusions: Severe blunt trauma patients transfused with an FFP/RBC ratio ≥1 within the first 6 h had an HR of about 0.4. The transfusion of an FFP/RBC ratio ≥1 within the first 6 h was associated with the outcomes of blunt trauma patients with ISS ≥16 who need a transfusion within 24 h. PMID:26863127

  18. Surgical management for the first 48 h following blunt chest trauma: state of the art (excluding vascular injuries).

    PubMed

    de Lesquen, Henri; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Gust, Lucile; Ford, Robert Michael; Beranger, Fabien; Natale, Claudia; Bonnet, Pierre-Mathieu; D'Journo, Xavier-Benoît

    2015-03-01

    This review aims to answer the most common questions in routine surgical practice during the first 48 h of blunt chest trauma (BCT) management. Two authors identified relevant manuscripts published since January 1994 to January 2014. Using preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses statement, they focused on the surgical management of BCT, excluded both child and vascular injuries and selected 80 studies. Tension pneumothorax should be promptly diagnosed and treated by needle decompression closely followed with chest tube insertion (Grade D). All traumatic pneumothoraces are considered for chest tube insertion. However, observation is possible for selected patients with small unilateral pneumothoraces without respiratory disease or need for positive pressure ventilation (Grade C). Symptomatic traumatic haemothoraces or haemothoraces >500 ml should be treated by chest tube insertion (Grade D). Occult pneumothoraces and occult haemothoraces are managed by observation with daily chest X-rays (Grades B and C). Periprocedural antibiotics are used to prevent chest-tube-related infectious complications (Grade B). No sign of life at the initial assessment and cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration >10 min are considered as contraindications of Emergency Department Thoracotomy (Grade C). Damage Control Thoracotomy is performed for either massive air leakage or refractive shock or ongoing bleeding enhanced by chest tube output >1500 ml initially or >200 ml/h for 3 h (Grade D). In the case of haemodynamically stable patients, early video-assisted thoracic surgery is performed for retained haemothoraces (Grade B). Fixation of flail chest can be considered if mechanical ventilation for 48 h is probably required (Grade B). Fixation of sternal fractures is performed for displaced fractures with overlap or comminution, intractable pain or respiratory insufficiency (Grade D). Lung herniation, traumatic diaphragmatic rupture and pericardial rupture are life

  19. Prehospital care for multiple trauma patients in Germany.

    PubMed

    Maegele, Marc

    2015-01-01

    For the German speaking countries, Tscherne's definition of "polytrauma" which represents an injury of at least two body regions with one or a combination being life-threatening is still valid. The timely and adequate management including quick referral of the trauma patient into a designated trauma center may limit secondary injury and may thus improve outcomes already during the prehospital phase of care. The professional treatment of multiple injured trauma patients begins at the scene in the context of a well structured prehospital emergency medical system. The "Primary Survey" is performed by the emergency physician at the scene according to the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS)-concept. The overall aim is to rapidly assess and treat life-threatening conditions even in the absence of patient history and diagnosis ("treat-first-what-kills-first"). If no immediate treatment is necessary, a "Secondary Sur- vey" follows with careful and structured body examination and detailed assessment of the trauma mechanism. Massive and life-threatening states of hemorrhage should be addressed immediately even disregarding the ABCDE-scheme. Critical trauma patients should be referred without any delay ("work and go")toTR-DGU® certified trauma centers of the local trauma networks. Due to the difficult pre- hospital environment the number of quality studies in the field is low and, as consequence, the level of evidence for most recommendations is also low. Much information has been obtained from different care systems and the interchangeability of results is limited. The present article provides a synopsis of rec- ommendations for early prehospital care for the severely injured based upon the 2011 updated multi- disciplinary S3-Guideline "Polytrauma/Schwerstverletzten Behandlung", the most recently updated European Trauma guideline and the current PHTLS-algorithms including grades of recommendation whenever possible. PMID:26643236

  20. [Patient with massive hemothorax due to blunt trauma saved by transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE)].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Itaru; Oura, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Toru; Shiga, Kojiro; Sakatsume, Ko; Sasaki, Yasuo; Sekizawa, Takuro; Handa, Masashi

    2013-06-01

    A 78-year-old man who fell from a step ladder was transported to our hospital by ambulance under the diagnosis of multiple rib fractures and right hemothorax. Since he was in shock on arrival, endotracheal intubation and tube thoracotomy were immediately performed. Though 2 liters of blood was evacuated, persistent hemorrhage was observed, requiring continuous rapid infusion and blood transfusion. Emergency thoracic arteriography revealed active bleeding from a branch of the right internal thoracic artery. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) was performed using vascular embolization coils and porous gelatin particles. These procedures successfully controlled active hemorrhage from the chest. Intrathoracic hematoma was evacuated through the 2nd large chest tube. Chest tubes were removed on the 7th day. He was discharged on the 17th day without any complications. PMID:23917046

  1. The Antimicrobial Peptide Lysozyme Is Induced after Multiple Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Klüter, Tim; Fitschen-Oestern, Stefanie; Lippross, Sebastian; Weuster, Matthias; Pufe, Thomas; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Beyer, Andreas; Seekamp, Andreas; Varoga, Deike

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide lysozyme is an important factor of innate immunity and exerts high potential of antibacterial activity. In the present study we evaluated the lysozyme expression in serum of multiple injured patients and subsequently analyzed their possible sources and signaling pathways. Expression of lysozyme was examined in blood samples of multiple trauma patients from the day of trauma until 14 days after trauma by ELISA. To investigate major sources of lysozyme, its expression and regulation in serum samples, different blood cells, and tissue samples were analysed by ELISA and real-time PCR. Neutrophils and hepatocytes were stimulated with cytokines and supernatant of Staphylococcus aureus. The present study demonstrates the induction and release of lysozyme in serum of multiple injured patients. The highest lysozyme expression of all tested cells and tissues was detected in neutrophils. Stimulation with trauma-related factors such as interleukin-6 and S. aureus induced lysozyme expression. Liver tissue samples of patients without trauma show little lysozyme expression compared to neutrophils. After stimulation with bacterial fragments, lysozyme expression of hepatocytes is upregulated significantly. Toll-like receptor 2, a classic receptor of Gram-positive bacterial protein, was detected as a possible target for lysozyme induction. PMID:25258475

  2. The antimicrobial peptide lysozyme is induced after multiple trauma.

    PubMed

    Klüter, Tim; Fitschen-Oestern, Stefanie; Lippross, Sebastian; Weuster, Matthias; Mentlein, Rolf; Steubesand, Nadine; Neunaber, Claudia; Hildebrand, Frank; Pufe, Thomas; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Beyer, Andreas; Seekamp, Andreas; Varoga, Deike

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide lysozyme is an important factor of innate immunity and exerts high potential of antibacterial activity. In the present study we evaluated the lysozyme expression in serum of multiple injured patients and subsequently analyzed their possible sources and signaling pathways. Expression of lysozyme was examined in blood samples of multiple trauma patients from the day of trauma until 14 days after trauma by ELISA. To investigate major sources of lysozyme, its expression and regulation in serum samples, different blood cells, and tissue samples were analysed by ELISA and real-time PCR. Neutrophils and hepatocytes were stimulated with cytokines and supernatant of Staphylococcus aureus. The present study demonstrates the induction and release of lysozyme in serum of multiple injured patients. The highest lysozyme expression of all tested cells and tissues was detected in neutrophils. Stimulation with trauma-related factors such as interleukin-6 and S. aureus induced lysozyme expression. Liver tissue samples of patients without trauma show little lysozyme expression compared to neutrophils. After stimulation with bacterial fragments, lysozyme expression of hepatocytes is upregulated significantly. Toll-like receptor 2, a classic receptor of Gram-positive bacterial protein, was detected as a possible target for lysozyme induction. PMID:25258475

  3. Risks associated with magnetic resonance imaging and cervical collar in comatose, blunt trauma patients with negative comprehensive cervical spine computed tomography and no apparent spinal deficit

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, C Michael; Brocker, Brian P; Collier, B David; Gemmel, David J

    2008-01-01

    Introduction In blunt trauma, comatose patients (Glasgow Coma Scale score 3 to 8) with a negative comprehensive cervical spine (CS) computed tomography assessment and no apparent spinal deficit, CS clearance strategies (magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] and prolonged cervical collar use) are controversial. Methods We conducted a literature review to delineate risks for coma, CS instability, prolonged cervical collar use, and CS MRI. Results Based on our search of the literature, the numbers of functional survivor patients among those who had sustained blunt trauma were as follows: 350 per 1,000 comatose unstable patients (increased intracranial pressure [ICP], hypotension, hypoxia, or early ventilator-associated pneumonia); 150 per 1,000 comatose high-risk patients (age > 45 years or Glasgow Coma Scale score 3 to 5); and 600 per 1,000 comatose stable patients (not unstable or high risk). Risk probabilities for adverse events among unstable, high-risk, and stable patients were as follows: 2.5% for CS instability; 26.2% for increased intensive care unit complications with prolonged cervical collar use; 9.3% to 14.6% for secondary brain injury with MRI transportation; and 20.6% for aspiration during MRI scanning (supine position). Additional risk probabilities for adverse events among unstable patients were as follows: 35.8% for increased ICP with cervical collar; and 72.1% for increased ICP during MRI scan (supine position). Conclusion Blunt trauma coma functional survivor (independent living) rates are alarming. When a comprehensive CS computed tomography evaluation is negative and there is no apparent spinal deficit, CS instability is unlikely (2.5%). Secondary brain injury from the cervical collar or MRI is more probable than CS instability and jeopardizes cerebral recovery. Brain injury severity, probability of CS instability, cervical collar risk, and MRI risk assessments are essential when deciding whether CS MRI is appropriate and for determining the timing of

  4. Blunt Cardiac Injury in the Severely Injured – A Retrospective Multicentre Study

    PubMed Central

    Hanschen, Marc; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Khalil, Philipe N.; Wierer, Matthias; van Griensven, Martijn; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Biberthaler, Peter; Lefering, Rolf; Huber-Wagner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Blunt cardiac injury is a rare trauma entity. Here, we sought to evaluate the relevance and prognostic significance of blunt cardiac injury in severely injured patients. Methods In a retrospective multicentre study, using data collected from 47,580 patients enrolled to TraumaRegister DGU (1993-2009), characteristics of trauma, prehospital / hospital trauma management, and outcome analysis were correlated to the severity of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of cardiac injury was assessed according to the abbreviated injury score (AIS score 1-6), the revised injury severity score (RISC) allowed comparison of expected outcome with injury severity-dependent outcome. N = 1.090 had blunt cardiac trauma (AIS 1-6) (2.3% of patients). Results Predictors of blunt cardiac injury could be identified. Sternal fractures indicate a high risk of the presence of blunt cardiac injury (AIS 0 [control]: 3.0%; AIS 1: 19.3%; AIS 2-6: 19.1%). The overall mortality rate was 13.9%, minor cardiac injury (AIS 1) and severe cardiac injury (AIS 2-6) are associated with higher rates. Severe blunt cardiac injury (AIS 4 and AIS 5-6) is associated with a higher mortality (OR 2.79 and 4.89, respectively) as compared to the predicted average mortality (OR 2.49) of the study collective. Conclusion Multiple injured patients with blunt cardiac trauma are at high risk to be underestimated. Careful evaluation of trauma patients is able to predict the presence of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of blunt cardiac injury needs to be stratified according to the AIS score, as the patients’ outcome is dependent on the severity of cardiac injury. PMID:26136126

  5. Comparative Effectiveness of Emergency Resuscitative Thoracotomy versus Closed Chest Compressions among Patients with Critical Blunt Trauma: A Nationwide Cohort Study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kodai; Inoue, Shigeaki; Morita, Seiji; Watanabe, Nobuo; Shintani, Ayumi; Inokuchi, Sadaki; Ogura, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Background Although emergency resuscitative thoracotomy is performed as a salvage maneuver for critical blunt trauma patients, evidence supporting superior effectiveness of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy compared to conventional closed-chest compressions remains insufficient. The objective of this study was to investigate whether emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at the emergency department or in the operating room was associated with favourable outcomes after blunt trauma and to compare its effectiveness with that of closed-chest compressions. Methods This was a retrospective nationwide cohort study. Data were obtained from the Japan Trauma Data Bank for the period between 2004 and 2012. The primary and secondary outcomes were patient survival rates 24 h and 28 d after emergency department arrival. Statistical analyses were performed using multivariable generalized mixed-effects regression analysis. We adjusted for the effects of different hospitals by introducing random intercepts in regression analysis to account for the differential quality of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at hospitals where patients in cardiac arrest were treated. Sensitivity analyses were performed using propensity score matching. Results In total, 1,377 consecutive, critical blunt trauma patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency department or operating room were included in the study. Of these patients, 484 (35.1%) underwent emergency resuscitative thoracotomy and 893 (64.9%) received closed-chest compressions. Compared to closed-chest compressions, emergency resuscitative thoracotomy was associated with lower survival rate 24 h after emergency department arrival (4.5% vs. 17.5%, respectively, P < 0.001) and 28 d after arrival (1.2% vs. 6.0%, respectively, P < 0.001). Multivariable generalized mixed-effects regression analysis with and without a propensity score-matched dataset revealed that the odds ratio for an unfavorable survival rate after 24 h

  6. Potential Risk Factors of Death in Multiple Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jelodar, Sina; Jafari, Peyman; Yadollahi, Mahnaz; Sabetian Jahromi, Golnar; Khalili, Hoseynali; Abbasi, Hamidreza; Bolandparvaz, Shahram; Paydar, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: rauma has been recognized as one of the leading causes of death in many countries for decades. Reduction in mortality and morbidity rate of trauma cases is one of the most important attitudes in this field. Evaluation of different risk factors have been considered as the main goal of some studies. The purpose of this study was determining potential risk factors of death in trauma patients. Method: In a retrograde study, data of 740 patients admitted during three years (2009-2011) were studied. Demographic data (sex and age), clinical factors (blood pressure, pulse rate, respiratory rate, Glasgow coma scale (GCS)), trauma characteristics (location, type of injury, etc.), as well as outcome of patients were evaluated. Data analyses was done using SPSS 18.0. Stepwise multivariate regression analysis was used for recognition of independent predictive factors of death in multiple trauma patients. Results: Of those admitted, majority of patients were male (81.4%), 68% between 18 to 60 years, and 11.2% of them died during the course of treatment. Age; type of trauma; abnormal respiration rate, pulse rate, blood pressure; total GCS ≤8; abnormal pupil size; and head and neck; vertebral, and extremities fractures were obtained as significant predictive factor of death. GCS≤8, head and neck fracture, and abnormal pulse rate were independent death predictors. Conclusion: We identified GCS≤8, head and neck fracture, and abnormal pulse rate as predictive factors of mortality after trauma, which remained independent in the presence of all other factors and potentially treatable. PMID:26495375

  7. A Retrospective Observational Study Examining the Effect of Thoracic Epidural and Patient Controlled Analgesia on Short-term Outcomes in Blunt Thoracic Trauma Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Edward James; Lee, Geraldine Ann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Effective analgesia in the early stages after any major traumatic event remains pivotal to optimal trauma management. For patients with significant thoracic injuries, this is paramount to ensure ongoing efficient respiratory function. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of analgesic modes in the management of patients with a primary thoracic injury and blunt mechanism of injury. By understanding variables that influence the use of varying analgesic modes and influence the development of pulmonary complications, there should be more uniform evidence-based prescription in the future. This retrospective study considered analgesic use in patients admitted after blunt thoracic injuries at one major trauma center over a 2-year period. Pulmonary complications measured included both infective and ventilator-associated failure. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify patient and injury severity characteristics and their association with respiratory complications. A total of 401 cases were reviewed and analyzed: 159 received Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA), 32 received PCA and epidural analgesia (EA), 6 received EA alone, and 204 received interval-administered analgesia. There were no significant differences in the rates of complication when compared between analgesic modes. Patients who developed pneumonia had significantly increased number of thoracic fractures and underlying organ injury (P < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis highlighted duration of intercostal drain insertion (OR 1.377, P = 0.001) and premorbid cardiac disease (OR 2.624, P = 0.042) and ICU length of stay (OR: 1.146, P < 0.001) as significant predictors of developing pneumonia in this patient group. Examining the different analgesic modes, this study failed to identify a particular analgesic mode that was more effective in preventing pulmonary complications in blunt thoracic injuries. However, variables that may influence usage of different

  8. Femorofemoral bypass allowed limb preservation after late diagnosis of left common iliac artery thrombosis due to blunt trauma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Huang, Jing-Yong; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Acute common iliac artery occlusion which results from blunt abdominal trauma is rare and potentially leads to a late diagnosis. Methods: We report a case of a 58-year-old patient who suffered a late diagnosed acute left common iliac artery occlusion secondary to abdominal trauma. An emergency exploratory laparotomy was performed to stop intra-abdominal bleeding, while his left limb ischemia was not noticed until 32 h later and femorofemoral bypass was then successfully performed for revascularization. Compartment syndrome was observed postoperatively, and fasciotomy was performed promptly. The wound was temporarily covered with Vaccum Sealing Drainage due to high skin tension. Patient underwent skin-grafting after leg swelling subsided. Results: The follow-up turned out that these managements were valid in the preservation of the limb viability. Conclusions: This case highlights the prudent recognition of the acute lower extremity ischemia in the abdominal trauma and immediate remedy for acute iliac artery occlusion after a late diagnosis.

  9. Derivation and Validation of Two Decision Instruments for Selective Chest CT in Blunt Trauma: A Multicenter Prospective Observational Study (NEXUS Chest CT)

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Robert M.; Langdorf, Mark I.; Nishijima, Daniel; Baumann, Brigitte M.; Hendey, Gregory W.; Medak, Anthony J.; Raja, Ali S.; Allen, Isabel E.; Mower, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Unnecessary diagnostic imaging leads to higher costs, longer emergency department stays, and increased patient exposure to ionizing radiation. We sought to prospectively derive and validate two decision instruments (DIs) for selective chest computed tomography (CT) in adult blunt trauma patients. Methods and Findings From September 2011 to May 2014, we prospectively enrolled blunt trauma patients over 14 y of age presenting to eight US, urban level 1 trauma centers in this observational study. During the derivation phase, physicians recorded the presence or absence of 14 clinical criteria before viewing chest imaging results. We determined injury outcomes by CT radiology readings and categorized injuries as major or minor according to an expert-panel-derived clinical classification scheme. We then employed recursive partitioning to derive two DIs: Chest CT-All maximized sensitivity for all injuries, and Chest CT-Major maximized sensitivity for only major thoracic injuries (while increasing specificity). In the validation phase, we employed similar methodology to prospectively test the performance of both DIs. We enrolled 11,477 patients—6,002 patients in the derivation phase and 5,475 patients in the validation phase. The derived Chest CT-All DI consisted of (1) abnormal chest X-ray, (2) rapid deceleration mechanism, (3) distracting injury, (4) chest wall tenderness, (5) sternal tenderness, (6) thoracic spine tenderness, and (7) scapular tenderness. The Chest CT-Major DI had the same criteria without rapid deceleration mechanism. In the validation phase, Chest CT-All had a sensitivity of 99.2% (95% CI 95.4%–100%), a specificity of 20.8% (95% CI 19.2%–22.4%), and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 99.8% (95% CI 98.9%–100%) for major injury, and a sensitivity of 95.4% (95% CI 93.6%–96.9%), a specificity of 25.5% (95% CI 23.5%–27.5%), and a NPV of 93.9% (95% CI 91.5%–95.8%) for either major or minor injury. Chest CT-Major had a sensitivity

  10. Effects of Copper, Zinc, and Vitamin Complex (Cernevit®) on Hepatic Healing in Rats Experimentally Subjected to Blunt Hepatic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Ayten, Refik; Aygen, Erhan; Cerrahoglu, Yusuf Ziya; Camci, Cemalettin; Ilhan, Yavuz Selim; Girgin, Mustafa; Ilhan, Necip; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanefi

    2015-12-01

    Solid organ injuries following blunt trauma are frequently encountered. The use of non-operative approach is gradually increasing. Thus, research on the methods that could enhance healing in solid organ injuries is in progress. Agents known to have antioxidant property were used after an experimentally induced blunt hepatic trauma. Thirty-two Wistar albino rats weighing 200 g were dropped from a height of 40 cm on to the right upper abdominal quadrant to produce a grade II-III hepatic injury. Rats were divided into control, Zn-administered, Cu-administered, and vitamin complex-administered groups, with eight rats in each. Aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels were measured in the blood samples. The percentage of cells displaying Ki-67 nuclear staining was estimated. The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and the degree of inflammation in the samples was semi-quantitatively assessed. Treatment with zinc, copper, and Cernevit® caused varying levels of decrease in AST, ALT, and LDH levels compared to the control group. Ki-67 positivity was significantly lower in group I compared with groups II and III (p = 0.002). Ki-67 positivity was significantly higher in group II compared to the other groups (p < 0.05). A marked improvement was observed in inflammation in group II. Copper and zinc treatment decreased inflammation as well as blood levels of AST and ALT, and enhanced the healing of traumatized hepatic tissue. However, Cernevit® reduced only the degree of inflammation. PMID:27011508

  11. Trichomonal sinusitis in an adolescent patient with multiple trauma.

    PubMed

    Oud, Lavi

    2009-03-01

    Trichomonal disease typically involves the genital and occasionally respiratory tracts. Although exposure of the upper respiratory tract to infected genital secretions is not uncommon with contemporary sexual practices, trichomonal sinus disease has been rarely described. The present report describes the case of a healthy 17-year-old male admitted to an intensive care unit following multiple trauma, who developed purulent sinusitis on the 4th day of hospitalization. Numerous trichomonads were noted on microscopic examination of sinus aspirate. Further investigation revealed orofacial sexual exposure of the patient to a partner with trichomoniasis. The patient's sinusitis resolved following a course of parenteral metronidazole-containing antibiotics. PMID:19204647

  12. Characterization and Comparison of Injuries Caused by Accidental and Non-accidental Blunt Force Trauma in Dogs and Cats.

    PubMed

    Intarapanich, Nida P; McCobb, Emily C; Reisman, Robert W; Rozanski, Elizabeth A; Intarapanich, Pichai P

    2016-07-01

    Motor vehicle accidents (MVA) are often difficult to distinguish from non-accidental injury (NAI). This retrospective case-control study compared animals with known MVA trauma against those with known NAI. Medical records of 426 dogs and cats treated after MVA and 50 after NAI were evaluated. Injuries significantly associated with MVA were pelvic fractures, pneumothorax, pulmonary contusion, abrasions, and degloving wounds. Injuries associated with NAI were fractures of the skull, teeth, vertebrae, and ribs, scleral hemorrhage, damage to claws, and evidence of older fractures. Odds ratios are reported for these injuries. MVA rib fractures were found to occur in clusters on one side of the body, with cranial ribs more likely to fracture, while NAI rib fractures were found to occur bilaterally with no cranial-caudal pattern. Establishing evidence-based patterns of injury may help clinicians differentiate causes of trauma and may aid in the documentation and prosecution of animal abuse. PMID:27364279

  13. Guideline validation in multiple trauma care through business process modeling.

    PubMed

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Bilir, Hüseyin; Waydhas, Christian; Ruchholtz, Steffen

    2003-07-01

    Clinical guidelines can improve the quality of care in multiple trauma. In our Department of Trauma Surgery a specific guideline is available paper-based as a set of flowcharts. This format is appropriate for the use by experienced physicians but insufficient for electronic support of learning, workflow and process optimization. A formal and logically consistent version represented with a standardized meta-model is necessary for automatic processing. In our project we transferred the paper-based into an electronic format and analyzed the structure with respect to formal errors. Several errors were detected in seven error categories. The errors were corrected to reach a formally and logically consistent process model. In a second step the clinical content of the guideline was revised interactively using a process-modeling tool. Our study reveals that guideline development should be assisted by process modeling tools, which check the content in comparison to a meta-model. The meta-model itself could support the domain experts in formulating their knowledge systematically. To assure sustainability of guideline development a representation independent of specific applications or specific provider is necessary. Then, clinical guidelines could be used for eLearning, process optimization and workflow management additionally. PMID:12909182

  14. Scoring systems of severity in patients with multiple trauma.

    PubMed

    Rapsang, Amy Grace; Shyam, Devajit Chowlek

    2015-04-01

    Trauma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; hence severity scales are important adjuncts to trauma care in order to characterize the nature and extent of injury. Trauma scoring models can assist with triage and help in evaluation and prediction of prognosis in order to organise and improve trauma systems. Given the wide variety of scoring instruments available to assess the injured patient, it is imperative that the choice of the severity score accurately match the application. Even though trauma scores are not the key elements of trauma treatment, they are however, an essential part of improvement in triage decisions and in identifying patients with unexpected outcomes. This article provides the reader with a compendium of trauma severity scales along with their predicted death rate calculation, which can be adopted in order to improve decision making, trauma care, research and in comparative analyses in quality assessment. PMID:25015031

  15. The Use of CT Scan in Hemodynamically Stable Children with Blunt Abdominal Trauma: Look before You Leap.

    PubMed

    Nellensteijn, David R; Greuter, Marcel J; El Moumni, Moustafa; Hulscher, Jan B

    2016-08-01

    We set out to determine the diagnostic value of computed tomographic (CT) scans in relation to the radiation dose, tumor incidence, and tumor mortality by radiation for hemodynamically stable pediatric patients with blunt abdominal injury. We focused on the changes in management because of new information obtained by CT. CT scans for suspected pediatric abdominal injury performed in our accident and emergency department were retrieved from the radiology registry and analyzed for: injury and hemodynamic parameters, changes in therapy, and radiological interventions. The dose length product (DLP) was used to calculate the effective dose (ED) and with the BEIR VII report we calculated the estimated induced lifetime tumor and mortality risk. Seventy-two patients underwent abdominal CT scanning for suspicion of abdominal injury and eight patients were excluded for hemodynamic instability, leaving 64 hemodynamically stable patients. Four patients died (6%). On the remaining 60 patients, only one laparotomy was performed for suspicion of duodenal perforation. Only in three out of the 64 hemodynamically stable cases (5%), a CT scan brought forward an indication for intervention or change in management. One patient was suspected of a duodenal perforation and underwent a laparotomy. A grade II hepatic laceration, but no duodenal, injury was found. Two patients underwent embolization of the splenic artery. One for an arterial blush caused by splenic laceration as was observed on the contrast enhanced-CT. Patient remained stable and during the angiogram the blush had disappeared. The second patient underwent (prophylactic) selective arterial embolization for having sustained a grade V splenic injury. The median radiation dosage was 11.43 mSv (range 1.19-23.76 mSv) in our patients. The use of the BEIR VII methodology results in an estimated increase in the lifetime tumor incidence of 0.17% (range, 0.05-0.67%) and an estimated increase in lifetime tumor incidence of 0.08% (0

  16. Accuracy of single-pass whole-body computed tomography for detection of injuries in patients with major blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Dirk; Ottersbach, Caspar; Matthes, Gerrit; Weigeldt, Moritz; Grundei, Simon; Rademacher, Grit; Tittel, Anja; Mutze, Sven; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Frank, Matthias; Schmucker, Uli; Seifert, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Background: Contrast-enhanced whole-body computed tomography (also called “pan-scanning”) is considered to be a conclusive diagnostic tool for major trauma. We sought to determine the accuracy of this method, focusing on the reliability of negative results. Methods: Between July 2006 and December 2008, a total of 982 patients with suspected severe injuries underwent single-pass pan-scanning at a metropolitan trauma centre. The findings of the scan were independently evaluated by two reviewers who analyzed the injuries to five body regions and compared the results to a synopsis of hospital charts, subsequent imaging and interventional procedures. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity of the pan-scan for each body region, and we assessed the residual risk of missed injuries that required surgery or critical care. Results: A total of 1756 injuries were detected in the 982 patients scanned. Of these, 360 patients had an Injury Severity Score greater than 15. The median length of follow-up was 39 (interquartile range 7–490) days, and 474 patients underwent a definitive reference test. The sensitivity of the initial pan-scan was 84.6% for head and neck injuries, 79.6% for facial injuries, 86.7% for thoracic injuries, 85.7% for abdominal injuries and 86.2% for pelvic injuries. Specificity was 98.9% for head and neck injuries, 99.1% for facial injuries, 98.9% for thoracic injuries, 97.5% for abdominal injuries and 99.8% for pelvic injuries. In total, 62 patients had 70 missed injuries, indicating a residual risk of 6.3% (95% confidence interval 4.9%–8.0%). Interpretation: We found that the positive results of trauma pan-scans are conclusive but negative results require subsequent confirmation. The pan-scan algorithms reduce, but do not eliminate, the risk of missed injuries, and they should not replace close monitoring and clinical follow-up of patients with major trauma. PMID:22392949

  17. Proximal Versus Distal Splenic Artery Embolisation for Blunt Splenic Trauma: What is the Impact on Splenic Immune Function?

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, P. T.; Kavnoudias, H.; Cameron, P. U.; Czarnecki, C.; Paul, E.; Lyon, S. M.

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo compare the impact of proximal or distal splenic artery embolisation versus that of splenectomy on splenic immune function as measured by IgM memory B cell levels.Materials and MethodsPatients with splenic trauma who were treated by splenic artery embolisation (SAE) were enrolled. After 6 months splenic volume was assessed by CT, and IgM memory B cells in peripheral blood were measured and compared to a local normal reference population and to a post-splenectomy population.ResultsOf the 71 patients who underwent embolisation, 38 underwent proximal embolisation, 11 underwent distal embolisation, 22 patients were excluded, 1 had both proximal and distal embolisation, 5 did not survive and 16 did not return for evaluation. There was a significant difference between splenectomy and proximal or distal embolisation and a trend towards greater preservation of IgM memory B cell number in those with distal embolisation—a difference that could not be attributed to differences in age, grade of injury or residual splenic volume.ConclusionIgM memory B cell levels are significantly higher in those treated with SAE compared to splenectomy. Our data provide evidence that splenic embolisation should reduce immunological complications of spleen trauma and suggest that distal embolisation may maintain better function.

  18. Vascular injuries after minor blunt upper extremity trauma: pitfalls in the recognition and diagnosis of potential "near miss" injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bravman, Jonathan T; Ipaktchi, Kyros; Biffl, Walter L; Stahel, Philip F

    2008-01-01

    Background Low energy trauma to the upper extremity is rarely associated with a significant vascular injury. Due to the low incidence, a high level of suspicion combined with appropriate diagnostic algorithms are mandatory for early recognition and timely management of these potentially detrimental injuries. Methods Review of the pertinent literature, supported by the presentation of two representative "near miss" case examples. Results A major diagnostic pitfall is represented by the insidious presentation of significant upper extremity arterial injuries with intact pulses and normal capillary refill distal to the injury site, due to collateral perfusion. Thus, severe vascular injuries may easily be missed or neglected at the upper extremity, leading to a long-term adverse outcome with the potential need for a surgical amputation. Conclusion The present review article provides an outline of the diagnostic challenges related to these rare vascular injuries and emphasizes the necessity for a high level of suspicion, even in the absence of a significant penetrating or high-velocity trauma mechanism. PMID:19032757

  19. Informing the design of clinical decision support services for evaluation of children with minor blunt head trauma in the emergency department: a sociotechnical analysis.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Barbara; Nigrovic, Lise E; Dayan, Peter S; Kuppermann, Nathan; Ballard, Dustin W; Alessandrini, Evaline; Bajaj, Lalit; Goldberg, Howard; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Offerman, Steven R; Mark, Dustin G; Swietlik, Marguerite; Tham, Eric; Tzimenatos, Leah; Vinson, David R; Jones, Grant S; Bakken, Suzanne

    2013-10-01

    Integration of clinical decision support services (CDSS) into electronic health records (EHRs) may be integral to widespread dissemination and use of clinical prediction rules in the emergency department (ED). However, the best way to design such services to maximize their usefulness in such a complex setting is poorly understood. We conducted a multi-site cross-sectional qualitative study whose aim was to describe the sociotechnical environment in the ED to inform the design of a CDSS intervention to implement the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) clinical prediction rules for children with minor blunt head trauma. Informed by a sociotechnical model consisting of eight dimensions, we conducted focus groups, individual interviews and workflow observations in 11 EDs, of which 5 were located in academic medical centers and 6 were in community hospitals. A total of 126 ED clinicians, information technology specialists, and administrators participated. We clustered data into 19 categories of sociotechnical factors through a process of thematic analysis and subsequently organized the categories into a sociotechnical matrix consisting of three high-level sociotechnical dimensions (workflow and communication, organizational factors, human factors) and three themes (interdisciplinary assessment processes, clinical practices related to prediction rules, EHR as a decision support tool). Design challenges that emerged from the analysis included the need to use structured data fields to support data capture and re-use while maintaining efficient care processes, supporting interdisciplinary communication, and facilitating family-clinician interaction for decision-making. PMID:23892207

  20. Dual-phase CT for the assessment of acute vascular injuries in high-energy blunt trauma: the imaging findings and management implications.

    PubMed

    Iacobellis, Francesca; Ierardi, Anna M; Mazzei, Maria A; Magenta Biasina, Alberto; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Nicola, Refky; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    Acute vascular injuries are the second most common cause of fatalities in patients with multiple traumatic injuries; thus, prompt identification and management is essential for patient survival. Over the past few years, multidetector CT (MDCT) using dual-phase scanning protocol has become the imaging modality of choice in high-energy deceleration traumas. The objective of this article was to review the role of dual-phase MDCT in the identification and management of acute vascular injuries, particularly in the chest and abdomen following multiple traumatic injuries. In addition, this article will provide examples of MDCT features of acute vascular injuries with correlative surgical and interventional findings. PMID:26882960

  1. Infected Subgaleal Hematoma Following Blunt Head Trauma in a Child: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Barry, James; Fridley, Jared; Sayama, Christina; Lam, Sandi

    2015-01-01

    Subgaleal hematoma (SGH), an uncommon but potentially dangerous complication, has been reported to occur with delivery in newborns, as well as in young patients following head trauma. Infection of a SGH is extremely rare, especially in cases where no disruption of the skin barrier occurs. We report a case of an infected SGH in an 8-month-old following closed skull fracture. The patient presented with scalp swelling 1 day after falling 3 feet. Initial evaluation found a nondisplaced skull fracture on computed tomography. She was discharged following an uneventful 23-hour observation. Three days later, she developed symptoms concerning for a viral upper respiratory tract infection and received symptomatic treatment. Nine days after injury, she returned with continued fevers, irritability, and significant increase in scalp swelling. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a subgaleal abscess with osteomyelitis. Needle aspiration revealed an infected hematoma with cultures positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae, treated with intravenous ampicillin. Purulent drainage from an enlarging necrotic needle aspiration site required subsequent surgical debridement of the subgaleal abscess with drain placement. She recovered well following surgery and intravenous antibiotics. Physicians should be aware that SGH carries a risk of serious morbidity and mortality. SGH can serve as a nidus for infection, typically from skin barrier breakdown or, as in this case, hematogenous spread. Early recognition, appropriate antibiotic therapy, and surgical debridement are critical in treating infected SGH. PMID:26088299

  2. Sequential changes in the metabolic response in critically injured patients during the first 25 days after blunt trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Monk, D N; Plank, L D; Franch-Arcas, G; Finn, P J; Streat, S J; Hill, G L

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Understanding the changes in energy expenditure and body composition is essential for the optimal management of the critically injured, yet these changes have not been quantified within the current context of trauma care. METHODS: Ten critically injured patients (median Injury Severity Score = 35) had measurements of energy expenditure and body composition as soon as they were hemodynamically stable and then every 5 days for 21 days. RESULTS: Resting energy expenditure rose to 55% above predicted and remained elevated throughout the study period. Total energy expenditure was 1.32 X resting energy expenditure. Body fat was oxidized when energy intake was insufficient (r=-0.830, p<0.02). Body water changes closely paralleled body weight changes and were largely accounted for by changes in extracellular water. Over the 21-day study period, there was a loss of 1.62 kg (16%) of total body protein (p<0.0002), of which 1.09 kg (67%) came from skeletal muscle. Intracellular potassium was low (133 +/- 3 mmol/L, p<0.02) but did not deteriorate further after hemodynamic stability had been reached. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that the period of hypermetabolism lasts longer and the protein loss is greater in critically injured patients than previously thought. Most, but not all, the protein is lost from muscle. Fat loss can be prevented and cell composition preserved once hemodynamic stability is achieved. Images Figure 1. PMID:8633918

  3. Emergency nursing management of the multiple trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Kosmos, C A

    1989-01-01

    This case study reinforces key principles in caring for multiply injured trauma victims. The Primary Survey is a tool developed to allow those caring for trauma patients to prioritize injuries. Those injuries identified in the Primary Survey will be the most life threatening. PMID:2601995

  4. Association of Prehospital Shock Index and Trauma Bay Uncrossmatched Red Blood Cell Transfusion With Multiple Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Day, Darcy L; Anzelon, Kathleen M; Conde, Franscisco A

    2016-01-01

    Early resuscitation of bleeding trauma patients with multiple blood products improves outcome, yet transfusion initiation is not standardized. Shock index (heart rate/systolic blood pressure) and trauma bay uncrossmatched red blood cell (RBC) transfusion were evaluated for association with multiple transfusions, defined as 6 or more RBCs during the first 6 hrs of hospital presentation. A prehospital shock index of 1 was significantly associated with multiple transfusions (p = .02). Subjects receiving uncrossmatched RBCs required more RBCs during the first 6 hrs (10.3 units, p < .01). Consideration of these simple variables may help trauma nurses anticipate the potentially bleeding patient. PMID:26953537

  5. Current theories on the pathophysiology of multiple organ failure after trauma.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Takeshi; Chanthaphavong, R Savanh; Pape, Hans-Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Despite the enormous efforts to elucidate the mechanisms of the development of multiple organ failure (MOF) following trauma, MOF following trauma is still a leading cause of late post-injury death and morbidity. Now, it has been proven that excessive systemic inflammation following trauma participates in the development of MOF. Fundamentally, the inflammatory response is a host-defence response; however, on occasion, this response turns around to cause deterioration to host depending on exo- and endogenic factors. Through this review we aim to describe the pathophysiological approach for MOF after trauma studied so far and also introduce the prospects of this issue for the future. PMID:19729158

  6. Anti-Platelet Therapy is Associated With Decreased Transfusion-Associated Risk of Lung Dysfunction, Multiple Organ Failure, and Mortality in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Harr, Jeffrey N.; Moore, Ernest E.; Johnson, Jeffrey; Chin, Theresa L.; Wohlauer, Max V.; Maier, Ronald; Cuschieri, Joseph; Sperry, Jason; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C.; Sauaia, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether pre-hospital anti-platelet therapy (APT) was associated with reduced incidence of acute lung dysfunction, multiple organ failure (MOF), and mortality in blunt trauma patients. Design Secondary analysis of a cohort enrolled in the NIGMS Trauma Glue Grant database. Setting Multicenter study including 9 US level-1 trauma centers. Patients A total of 839 severely injured blunt trauma patients at risk for MOF (age >45 years, base deficit > 6 mEq/L or systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg, who received a blood transfusion). Severe/isolated head injuries were excluded. Measurements and Main Results Primary outcomes were lung dysfunction (defined as grades 2–3 by the Denver MOF score), MOF (Denver MOF score>3), and mortality. Patients were documented as on APT if taking acetylsalicylic acid, clopidogrel, and/or ticlopidine. Fifteen percent were taking APT prior to injury. Median injury severity score (ISS) was 30 (interquartile range, IQR: 22–51), mean age 61 ± 0.4 years and median red blood cells (RBC) volume transfused was 1700 ml (IQR: 800–3150ml). Overall, 63% developed lung dysfunction, 19% had MOF, and 21% died. After adjustment for age, gender, comorbidities, blood products, crystalloid/12hrs, presence of any head injury, ISS, and 12hrs base deficit >8 mEq/L, 12 hrs RBC transfusion was associated with a significantly smaller risk of lung dysfunction and MOF among the group receiving APT compared to those not receiving it (lung dysfunction p=0.0116, MOF p=0.0291). In addition, APT had a smaller risk (albeit not significant, p=0.06) of death for patients receiving RBC compared to those not on APT after adjustment for confounders, Conclusions Pre-injury APT therapy is associated with a decreased risk of lung dysfunction, MOF, and possibly mortality in high-risk blunt trauma patients who received blood transfusions. These findings suggest platelets have a role in organ dysfunction development and have potential therapeutic implications

  7. Oxidative stress in severe pulmonary trauma in critical ill patients. Antioxidant therapy in patients with multiple trauma--a review.

    PubMed

    Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Alina Carmen; Papurica, Marius; Dumbuleu, Maria Corina; Chira, Alexandru Mihai; Rosu, Oana Maria; Sandesc, Dorel

    2015-01-01

    Multiple trauma patients require extremely good management and thus, the trauma team needs to be prepared and to be up to date with the new standards of intensive therapy. Oxidative stress and free radicals represent an extremely aggressive factor to cells, having a direct consequence upon the severity of lung inflammation. Pulmonary tissue is damaged by oxidative stress, leading to biosynthesis of mediators that exacerbate inflammation modulators. The subsequent inflammation spreads throughout the body, leading most of the time to multiple organ dysfunction and death. In this paper, we briefly present an update of biochemical effects of oxidative stress and free radical damage to the pulmonary tissue in patients in critical condition in the intensive care unit. Also, we would like to present a series of active substances that substantially reduce the aggressiveness of free radicals, increasing the chances of survival. PMID:26037258

  8. Critical Care for the Patient With Multiple Trauma.

    PubMed

    Radomski, Michal; Zettervall, Sara; Schroeder, Mary Elizabeth; Messing, Jonathan; Dunne, James; Sarani, Babak

    2016-06-01

    Trauma remains the leading cause of death worldwide and the leading cause of death in those less than 44 years old in the United States. Admission to a verified trauma center has been shown to decrease mortality following a major injury. This decrease in mortality has been a direct result of improvements in the initial evaluation and resuscitation from injury as well as continued advances in critical care. As such, it is vital that intensive care practitioners be familiar with various types of injuries and their associated treatment strategies as well as their potential complications in order to minimize the morbidity and mortality frequently seen in this patient population. PMID:25673631

  9. Concentration kinetics of serum MMP-9 and TIMP-1 after blunt multiple injuries in the early posttraumatic period.

    PubMed

    Brumann, M; Kusmenkov, T; Ney, L; Kanz, K-G; Leidel, B A; Biberthaler, P; Mutschler, W; Bogner, V

    2012-01-01

    Metalloproteinases are secreted in response to a variety of inflammatory mediators and inhibited by tissue inhibitors of matrixmetalloproteinases (TIMPs). Two members of these families, MMP-9 and TIMP-1, were differentially expressed depending on clinical parameters in a previous genomewide mRNA analysis. The aim of this paper was now to evaluate the posttraumatic serum levels and the time course of both proteins depending on distinct clinical parameters. 60 multiple traumatized patients (ISS > 16) were included. Blood samples were drawn on admission and 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h after trauma. Serum levels were quantified by ELISA. MMP-9 levels significantly decreased in the early posttraumatic period (P < 0.05) whereas TIMP-1 levels significantly increased in all patients (P < 0.05). MMP-9 and TIMP-1 serum concentration kinetics became manifest in an inversely proportional balance. Furthermore, MMP-9 presented a stronger decrease in patients with severe trauma and non-survivors in contrast to minor traumatized patients (ISS ≤ 33) and survivors, initially after trauma. PMID:22547904

  10. Concentration Kinetics of Serum MMP-9 and TIMP-1 after Blunt Multiple Injuries in the Early Posttraumatic Period

    PubMed Central

    Brumann, M.; Kusmenkov, T.; Ney, L.; Kanz, K.-G.; Leidel, B. A.; Biberthaler, P.; Mutschler, W.; Bogner, V.

    2012-01-01

    Metalloproteinases are secreted in response to a variety of inflammatory mediators and inhibited by tissue inhibitors of matrixmetalloproteinases (TIMPs). Two members of these families, MMP-9 and TIMP-1, were differentially expressed depending on clinical parameters in a previous genomewide mRNA analysis. The aim of this paper was now to evaluate the posttraumatic serum levels and the time course of both proteins depending on distinct clinical parameters. 60 multiple traumatized patients (ISS > 16) were included. Blood samples were drawn on admission and 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h after trauma. Serum levels were quantified by ELISA. MMP-9 levels significantly decreased in the early posttraumatic period (P < 0.05) whereas TIMP-1 levels significantly increased in all patients (P < 0.05). MMP-9 and TIMP-1 serum concentration kinetics became manifest in an inversely proportional balance. Furthermore, MMP-9 presented a stronger decrease in patients with severe trauma and non-survivors in contrast to minor traumatized patients (ISS ≤ 33) and survivors, initially after trauma. PMID:22547904

  11. The effects of multiple interpersonal traumas on psychological maladjustment of sexually abused children in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Young; Oh, Kyung Ja

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the effects of multiple interpersonal traumas on psychiatric diagnosis and behavior problems of sexually abused children in Korea. With 495 children (ages 4-13 years) referred to a public counseling center for sexual abuse in Korea, we found significant differences in the rate of psychiatric diagnoses (r = .23) and severity of behavioral problems (internalizing d = 0.49, externalizing d = 0.40, total d = 0.52) between children who were victims of sexual abuse only (n = 362) and youth who were victims of interpersonal trauma experiences in addition to sexual abuse (n = 133). The effects of multiple interpersonal trauma experiences on single versus multiple diagnoses remained significant in the logistic regression analysis where demographic variables, family environmental factors, sexual abuse characteristics, and postincident factors were considered together, odds ratio (OR) = 0.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) = [0.25, 0.77], p < .01. Similarly, multiple regression analyses revealed a significant effect of multiple interpersonal trauma experiences on severity of behavioral problems above and beyond all aforementioned variables (internalizing β =.12, p = .019, externalizing β = .11, p = .036, total β = .14, p =.008). The results suggested that children with multiple interpersonal traumas are clearly at a greater risk for negative consequences following sexual abuse. PMID:23417881

  12. Blunt cardiac rupture.

    PubMed

    Martin, T D; Flynn, T C; Rowlands, B J; Ward, R E; Fischer, R P

    1984-04-01

    Blunt injury to the heart ranges from contusion to disruption. This report comprises 14 patients seen during a 6-year period with cardiac rupture secondary to blunt trauma. Eight patients were injured in automobile accidents, two patients were injured in auto-pedestrian accidents, two were kicked in the chest by ungulates, and two sustained falls. Cardiac tamponade was suspected in ten patients. Five patients presented with prehospital cardiac arrest or arrested shortly after arrival. All underwent emergency department thoracotomy without survival. Two patients expired in the operating room during attempted cardiac repair; both had significant extracardiac injury. Seven patients survived, three had right atrial injuries, three had right ventricular injuries, and one had a left atrial injury. Cardiopulmonary bypass was not required for repair of the surviving patients. There were no significant complications from the cardiac repair. The history of significant force dispersed over a relatively small area of the precordium as in a kicking injury from an animal or steering wheel impact should alert the physician to possible cardiac rupture. Cardiac rupture should be considered in patients who present with signs of cardiac tamponade or persistent thoracic bleeding after blunt trauma. PMID:6708151

  13. Trauma.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain and spine injury (TBI/TSI) is a leading cause of death and lifelong disability in children. The biomechanical properties of the child's brain, skull, and spine, the size of the child, the age-specific activity pattern, and variance in trauma mechanisms result in a wide range of age-specific traumas and patterns of brain and spine injuries. A detailed knowledge about the various types of primary and secondary pediatric head and spine injuries is essential to better identify and understand pediatric TBI/TSI, which enhances sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, will guide therapy, and may give important information about the prognosis. The purposes of this chapter are to: (1) discuss the unique epidemiology, mechanisms, and characteristics of TBI/TSI in children; (2) review the anatomic and functional imaging techniques that can be used to study common and rare pediatric TBI/TSI and their complications; (3) comprehensively review frequent primary and secondary brain injuries; and (4) to give a short overview of two special types of pediatric TBI/TSI: birth-related and nonaccidental injuries. PMID:27430465

  14. Association of low non-invasive near-infrared spectroscopic measurements during initial trauma resuscitation with future development of multiple organ dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Nicks, Bret A.; Campos, Kevin M.; Bozeman, William P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) non-invasively monitors muscle tissue oxygen saturation (StO2). It may provide a continuous noninvasive measurement to identify occult hypoperfusion, guide resuscitation, and predict the development of multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) after severe trauma. We evaluated the correlation between initial StO2 and the development of MOD in multi-trauma patients. METHODS: Patients presenting to our urban, academic, Level I Trauma Center/Emergency Department and meeting standardized trauma-team activation criteria were enrolled in this prospective trial. NIRS monitoring was initiated immediately on arrival with collection of StO2 at the thenar eminence and continued up to 24 hours for those admitted to the Trauma Intensive Care Unit (TICU). Standardized resuscitation laboratory measures and clinical evaluation tools were collected. The primary outcome was the association between initial StO2 and the development of MOD within the first 24 hours based on a MOD score of 6 or greater. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed; numeric means, multivariate regression and rank sum comparisons were utilized. Clinicians were blinded from the StO2 values. RESULTS: Over a 14 month period, 78 patients were enrolled. Mean age was 40.9 years (SD 18.2), 84.4% were male, 76.9% had a blunt trauma mechanism and mean injury severity score (ISS) was 18.5 (SD 12.9). Of the 78 patients, 26 (33.3%) developed MOD within the first 24 hours. The MOD patients had mean initial StO2 values of 53.3 (SD 10.3), significantly lower than those of non-MOD patients 61.1 (SD 10.0); P=0.002. The mean ISS among MOD patients was 29.9 (SD 11.5), significantly higher than that of non-MODS patients, 12.1 (SD 9.1) (P<0.0001). The mean shock index (SI) among MOD patients was 0.92 (SD 0.28), also significantly higher than that of non-MODS patients, 0.73 (SD 0.19) (P=0.0007). Lactate values were not significantly different between groups. CONCLUSION: Non

  15. EMDR in Competition with Fate: A Case Study in a Chinese Woman with Multiple Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Maggie Wai-Ling

    2012-01-01

    This paper described the application of eye movement desensitization reprocessing (EMDR) for addressing the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a Chinese woman who had experienced multiple traumas in her childhood. EMDR is an integrative therapeutic intervention that uses a standardized eight-phase approach to treatment. It is also a proven, effective, and efficient treatment for trauma. In this client with multiple traumas, the etiological event that lay the foundation of her dysfunctional responses was reprocessed first. The successful resolution of this event allowed the positive treatment effects to transfer to other traumatic events of a similar theme. This case also illustrates the importance of identifying a culturally appropriate positive cognition (PC) in contributing to the success of the treatment. PMID:22937416

  16. Multiple laparotomies are a predictor of fascial dehiscence in the setting of severe trauma.

    PubMed

    Swaroop, Mamta; Williams, Michael; Greene, Wendy Ricketts; Sava, Jack; Park, Kenneth; Wang, Dennis

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of wound dehiscence after repeat trauma laparotomy. We performed a retrospective analysis of adult trauma patients who underwent laparotomy at an urban level 1 trauma center during the past 5 years. Patients were divided into single (SL) and multiple laparotomy (ML) groups. Demographic, clinical, and outcome data were collected. Data were analyzed using chi2, t testing, and ANOVA. Overall dehiscence rate was 0.7 per cent. Multiple laparotomy patients had damage control, staged management of their injuries, or abdominal compartment syndrome as the reason for reexploration. SL and ML patients had similar age and sex. ML patients had a higher rate of intra-abdominal abscess than SL patients (13.7% vs 1.2% P < 0.0001), but intra-abdominal abscess did not predict wound dehiscence in the ML group (P = 0.24). This was true in spite of the fact that ML patients had a significantly higher Injury Severity Score (ISS) than SL patients (21.68 vs 14.35, P < 0.0001). Interestingly, wound infection did not predict dehiscence. Patients undergoing repeat laparotomy after trauma are at increased risk for wound dehiscence. This risk appears to be associated with intraabdominal abscess and ISS, but not wound infection. Surgeons should leave the skin open in the setting of repeat trauma laparotomy, which will allow serial assessment of the integrity of the fascial closure. PMID:15986970

  17. Multiplicity and Self-Identity: Trauma and Integration in Shirley Mason's Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    This viewpoint appeared in its original form as the catalogue essay that accompanied the exhibition "Multiplicity and Self-Identity: Trauma and Integration in Shirley Mason's Art," curated by the author for Gallery 2110, Sacramento, CA, and the 2010 Annual Conference of the American Art Therapy Association. The exhibition featured 17 artworks by…

  18. Animal attack: an unusual case of multiple trauma in childhood.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, E; Doyle, M; Fitzgerald, C W R; Mortell, A; Murray, D

    2014-01-01

    A 2½ year old girl attended our facility following attack by a tapir at a city zoo. She sustained multiple injuries including a forearm laceration and multiple perforating wounds to her abdominal wall. She had several procedures, including bowel resection, performed under the care of the General Paediatric Surgery and Plastic Surgery teams and was treated with a course of IV antibiotics. She recovered well and to date has suffered no long-term adverse outcome. PMID:25551902

  19. No Significant Acute and Subacute Differences between Blast and Blunt Concussions across Multiple Neurocognitive Measures and Symptoms in Deployed Soldiers.

    PubMed

    Dretsch, Michael N; Kelly, Mark P; Coldren, Rodney L; Parish, Robert V; Russell, Michael L

    2015-08-15

    Seventy-one deployed U.S. Army soldiers who presented for concussion care due to either blast or blunt mechanisms within 72 h of injury were assessed using the Military Acute Concussion Evaluation, the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM), traditional neuropsychological tests, and health status questionnaires. Follow-up ANAM testing was performed 10 d after initial testing (±5 d). Twenty-one soldiers were excluded: two for poor effort and 19 who had combined blast/blunt injuries. Of the remaining 50 male participants, 34 had blast injuries and 16 had blunt injuries. There were no statistically significant differences between blast injury and blunt injury participants in demographic, physical, or psychological health factors, concussive symptoms, or automated and traditional neurocognitive testing scores within 72 h post-injury. In addition, follow-up ANAM scores up to 15 d post-injury were not significantly different (available on 21 blast-injured and 13 blunt-injured subjects). Pre-injury baseline ANAM scores were compared where available, and revealed no statistically significant differences between 22 blast injury and eight blunt injury participants. These findings suggest there are no significant differences between mechanisms of injury during both the acute and subacute periods in neurobehavioral concussion sequelae while deployed in a combat environment. The current study supports the use of sports/mechanical concussion models for early concussion management in the deployed setting and exploration of variability in potential long-term outcomes. PMID:25367048

  20. Pitfalls in penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, A B

    2003-08-01

    In Western Europe the most frequent cause of multiple injuries is blunt trauma. Only few of us have experience with penetrating trauma, without exception far less than in the USA or South-Africa. In Rotterdam, the Erasmus Medical Centre is a level I trauma centre, situated directly in the town centre. All penetrating traumas are directly presented to our emergency department by a well organized ambulance service supported by a mobile medical team if necessary. The delay with scoop and run principles is very short for these cases, resulting in severely injured reaching the hospital alive in increasing frequency. Although the basic principles of trauma care according to the guidelines of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) (1-2) are the same for blunt and penetrating trauma with regard to priorities, diagnostics and primary therapy, there are some pitfalls in the strategy of management in penetrating trauma one should be aware of. Simple algorithms can be helpful, especially in case of limited experience (3). In case of life-saving procedures, the principles of Damage Control Surgery (DCS) must be followed (4-5). This approach is somewhat different from "traditional" surgical treatment. In the Ist phase prompt interventions by emergency thoracotomy and laparotomy are carried out, with only two goals to achieve: surgical control of haemorrhage and contamination. After temporary life-saving procedures, the 2nd phase is characterized by intensive care treatment, dealing with hypothermia, metabolic acidosis and clotting disturbances. Finally in the 3rd phase, within 6-24 hours, definitive surgical care takes place. In this overview, penetrating injuries of neck, thorax, abdomen and extremities will be outlined. Penetrating cranial injuries, as a neurosurgical emergency with poor prognosis, are not discussed. History and physical examination remain the corner stones of good medical praxis. In a work-up according to ATLS principles airway, breathing and circulation

  1. Redox Changes Induced by General Anesthesia in Critically Ill Patients with Multiple Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Papurica, Marius; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Sandesc, Dorel; Dumache, Raluca; Nartita, Radu; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Alina Carmen; Luca, Loredana; Vernic, Corina; Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea

    2015-01-01

    The critically ill polytrauma patient is a constant challenge for the trauma team due to the complexity of the complications presented. Intense inflammatory response and infections, as well as multiple organ dysfunctions, significantly increase the rate of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Moreover, due to the physiological and biochemical imbalances present in this type of patients, the bioproduction of free radicals is significantly accelerated, thus installing the oxidative stress. In the therapeutic management of such patients, multiple surgical interventions are required and therefore they are being subjected to repeated general anesthesia. In this paper, we want to present the pathophysiological implications of oxidative stress in critically ill patients with multiple traumas and the implications of general anesthesia on the redox mechanisms of the cell. We also want to summarize the antioxidant treatments able to reduce the intensity of oxidative stress by modulating the biochemical activity of some cellular mechanisms. PMID:26693352

  2. Generating penetration path hypotheses for decision support in multiple trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Ogunyemi, O.; Kaye, J.; Webber, B.; Clarke, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    We present a 3D graphical system that allows users to visualize different penetration path hypotheses for (multiple) gunshot or stab wounds, using a 3D graphical model of a human body with appropriate anatomical structures. The system also identifies the anatomical structures associated with each hypothesis. The various penetration path hypotheses follow from a combinatorial analysis of the set of surface wounds. The affected structures are determined by performing a detailed interpenetration analysis between 3D models of a penetration path and each anatomical structure within the body. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8563315

  3. The efficacy of sequential compression devices in multiple trauma patients with severe head injury.

    PubMed

    Gersin, K; Grindlinger, G A; Lee, V; Dennis, R C; Wedel, S K; Cachecho, R

    1994-08-01

    Thirty-two multiple trauma patients with severe head injury and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 8 or less were prospectively studied to assess the occurrence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). All patients required mechanical ventilation. A sequential compression device (SCD) was used in 14 patients and 18 patients received no prophylaxis for thromboembolism. Bilateral lower extremity technetium venoscans and ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) lung scans were performed within 6 days of admission and every week for 1 month or until the patient developed DVT or PE or was discharged from the SICU. Deep venous thrombosis occurred in two patients (6%) at 16 and 28 days following trauma. Twenty-five patients had normal or low probability V/Q scans. Six had high probability V/Q scans confirmed by pulmonary arteriograms (PAGs) at 12.5 +/- 4 days. Clinical signs of PE were absent in all patients with a positive PAG. There were no differences in age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), GCS Score, APACHE II Score, or Trauma Score between the patients who developed DVT or PE and those who did not. A SCD was used in four of the eight patients with DVT or PE. All but one patient with DVT or PE underwent placement of a vena caval filter. Multiple trauma patients with severe head injury (GCS score < or = 8) are at high risk for thromboembolism. The available means of prevention and diagnosis of DVT or PE in multiple trauma patients with severe head injury are not entirely effective. PMID:8064917

  4. Understanding traumatic blunt cardiac injury.

    PubMed

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Al Thani, Hassan; Zarour, Ahmad; Latifi, Rifat

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac injuries are classified as blunt and penetrating injuries. In both the injuries, the major issue is missing the diagnosis and high mortality. Blunt cardiac injuries (BCI) are much more common than penetrating injuries. Aiming at a better understanding of BCI, we searched the literature from January 1847 to January 2012 by using MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. Using the key word "Blunt Cardiac Injury," we found 1814 articles; out of which 716 articles were relevant. Herein, we review the causes, diagnosis, and management of BCI. In conclusion, traumatic cardiac injury is a major challenge in critical trauma care, but the guidelines are lacking. A high index of suspicion, application of current diagnostic protocols, and prompt and appropriate management is mandatory. PMID:23041686

  5. [Severe craniocerebral trauma in multiple trauma. An assessment of the interaction of local and systemic mediator responses].

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, E; Hensler, T; Rose, S; Maier, B; Holanda, M; Raum, M; Rixen, D; Marzi, I

    2000-02-01

    Isolated severe head trauma (SHT) or SHT in combination with multiple injuries are important factors for the prognosis of morbidity and mortality in patients suffering from the consequences of accidents. The prognosis mainly depends on the presence of primary mechanic brain injury and the development of secondary brain damage. Causes for the development of secondary brain damage are the intracranial space demand after traumatic injury and edema formation which may result in iscemia, as well as inflammatory processes. Both isolated SHT and polytrauma with or without brain damage may result in a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) due to the synthesis of cytokines and other inflammatory mediators which may cause a single or multiple organ failure (MOF). Often the organism is able to survive isolated traumatic injuries and functional disturbances, but in combination or cumulation they may be lethal. The hypermetabolism after SHT is often regarded as an interaction between the central nervous system and the whole organism by the activation of the neuroendocrine axis. In contrast to the consequences of SHT for the whole organism, multiple injuries after polytrauma may affect brain functions, such as the shock dependent disturbance of the brain perfusion accompanied by brain hypoxia which may lead to an aggravated prognosis. Moreover, coagulation, metabolism and fracture healing are influenced by the onset of SIRS as well. Our knowledge about the bidirectional inflammatory interaction between brain and whole organism is still limited. In this context, the effects of secondary surgical interventions which may additionally, stress a traumatized body have to be considered and are the subject for actual clinical discussions and experimental studies. This article tries to summarize some important aspects on this topic. PMID:10763364

  6. Epidemiology of Patients With Multiple Trauma and the Quality of Their Prehospital Respiration Management in Kashan, Iran: Six Months Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Maghaminejad, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Respiration management is an important and critical issue in prehospital transportation phase of multiple trauma patients. However, the quality of this important care has not been assessed in Iran Emergency Medical Services’ (EMS). Objectives: This study was conducted to investigate the quality of prehospital respiration management in patients with multiple trauma, referred to the Shahid Beheshti Trauma Center, Kashan, Iran. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the first six months of 2013. All the 400 patients with multiple trauma, transferred by EMS to the Shahid Beheshti Medical Center, were recruited. The study instrument was a checklist, which was completed through observation. Descriptive statistics were presented. Results: Out of all included individuals, 301 were males (75.2%) and 99 were females (24.8%). The most common mechanism of trauma was traffic accident (87.25%). Furthermore, 71.7% of the patients were injured in head and neck and chest areas. The quality of consciousness monitoring and airway management was desirable in 95% of the cases. However, the quality of monitoring patients’ respiration was only desirable in 42% of the cases. Only 18.6% of the patients received oxygen therapy during prehospital transportation. Conclusions: The quality of monitoring patients’ respiration and oxygen therapy was undesirable in most patients with multiple trauma. Therefore, the EMS workers should be retrained to apply proper respiration management in patients with multiple trauma. PMID:25147774

  7. Open Repair Versus Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair in Multiple-Injured Patients: Observations From a Level-1 Trauma Center

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Stephan; Breitenbach, Ingo; Bolzen, Philipp; Petri, Maximilian; Krettek, Christian; Teebken, Omke

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blunt trauma of the thoracic aorta is a rare but potentially life-threatening entity. Intimal tears are a domain of non-operative management, whereas all other types of lesions should be repaired urgently. There is now a clear trend favoring minimally invasive stent grafting over open surgical repair. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the mortality and morbidity with either treatment option. Therefore, a retrospective observational study was performed to compare two different treatment methods at two different time periods at one trauma center. Patients and Methods: Between 1977 and 2012, all severely injured patients referred to our level 1 trauma center were screened for blunt aortic injuries. We compared baseline characteristics, 30-day and overall mortality, morbidity, duration of intensive care treatment, procedure time, and transfusion of packed red blood between patients who underwent open surgical or stent repair. Results: During the observation period, 45 blunt aortic injuries were recorded. The average Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 41.8 (range 29 - 68). Twenty-five patients underwent Open Repair (OR), and another 20 patients were scheduled to emergency stent grafting. The 30-day mortality in the surgical and stent groups were 5/25 (20%) and 2/20 (10%), respectively. The average time for open surgery was 151 minutes; the mean time for stent grafting was 67 minutes (P = 0.001). Postoperative stay on the intensive care unit was between one and 59 days (median 10) in group one and between four and 50 days in group two (median 26)(P = 0.03). Patients undergoing OR required transfusion of 6.0 units of packed red cells in median; patients undergoing stent grafting required a median of 2.0 units of packed red cells (P < 0.001). In the stent grafting group, 30-day mortality was 10% (2/20). Conclusions: Due to more sophisticated diagnostic tools and surgical approaches, mortality and morbidity of blunt aortic

  8. Vascular trauma in civilian practice.

    PubMed Central

    Golledge, J.; Scriven, M. W.; Fligelstone, L. J.; Lane, I. F.

    1995-01-01

    Vascular trauma is associated with major morbidity and mortality, but little is known about its incidence or nature in Britain. A retrospective study of 36 patients requiring operative intervention for vascular trauma under one vascular surgeon over a 6-year period was undertaken. Twenty-four patients suffered iatrogenic trauma (median age 61 years); including cardiological intervention (19), radiological intervention (2), varicose vein surgery (1), umbilical vein catherisation (1) and isolated hyperthermic limb perfusion (1). There were 23 arterial and three venous injuries. Twelve patients had accidental trauma (median age 23 years). Three of the ten patients with blunt trauma were referred for vascular assessment before orthopaedic intervention, two after an on-table angiogram and five only after an initial orthopaedic procedure (range of delay 6 h to 10 days). Injuries were arterial in nine, venous in two and combined in one. Angiography was obtained in six patients, and in two patients with multiple upper limb fractures identified the site of injury when clinical localisation was difficult. A variety of vascular techniques were used to treat the injuries. Two patients died postoperatively and one underwent major limb amputation. Thirty-two (89%) remain free of vascular sequelae after a median follow-up of 48 months (range 3-72 months). Vascular trauma is uncommon in the United Kingdom. To repair the injuries a limited repertoire of vascular surgery techniques is needed. Therefore, vascular surgical assessment should be sought at an early stage to prevent major limb loss. PMID:8540659

  9. A Complex Facial Trauma Case with Multiple Mandibular Fractures and Dentoalveolar Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Guven, Yeliz; Zorlu, Sevgi; Cankaya, Abdulkadir Burak; Aktoren, Oya; Gencay, Koray

    2015-01-01

    The principles of management of mandibular fractures differ in children when compared to adults and depend on the specific age-related status of the growing mandible and the developing dentition. This paper presents a case report with a complex facial trauma affecting the mandibular body and condyle region and dentoalveolar complex. Clinical examination revealed soft tissue injuries, limited mouth opening, lateral deviation of the mandible, an avulsed incisor, a subluxated incisor, and a fractured crown. CBCT examination revealed a nondisplaced fracture and an oblique greenstick fracture of the mandibular body and unilateral fracture of the condyle. Closed reduction technique was chosen to manage fractures of the mandible. Favorable healing outcomes on multiple fractures of the mandible throughout the 6-year follow-up period proved the success of the conservative treatment. This case report is important since it presents a variety of pathological sequelae to trauma within one case. PMID:26339511

  10. [Coagulation therapy in multiple trauma without point-of-care testing].

    PubMed

    Lier, H; Hinkelbein, J

    2014-02-01

    Analysis of blood coagulation with thrombelastometry (ROTEM™) and thrombelastography (TEG™) and analysis of thrombocyte function by a Multiplate™ assay is possible in only a few hospitals in Germany. Recently, the grade of recommendation (GoR) for point-of-care (POC) testing in official guidelines was increased and is now classified as GoR 1C. If a POC-based option is not available alternatives must be used. Besides blood products (RBC, FFP, TC), coagulation factor concentrates are used to treat trauma-induced coagulopathy. The benefits of therapy with factor concentrates are fewer immunological and infection side effects as well as faster effects after administration of specific coagulation factors. A good outcome in patients with multiple trauma is only possible by an adequate transfusion regime and administration of coagulation factors. PMID:24482058

  11. Spinal Cord Lesion by Minor Trauma as an Early Sign of Multiple System Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Brum, Marisa; Reimão, Sofia; Sousa, Djalma; de Carvalho, Rui; Ferreira, Joaquim J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is characterized clinically by parkinsonism, cerebellar, autonomic, and corticospinal features of variable severity. When the presentation is only parkinsonism, the disease might be difficult to differentiate from Parkinson's disease (PD). We present a case of an 80-year-old man with previous diagnosis of PD. One year after the diagnosis, he had a whiplash cervical trauma due to a tricycle accident caused by a hole in the road. This low-energy trauma caused an unstable C4-C5 cervical fracture with spinal cord injury, which required surgical decompression and stabilization. Neurological examination showed marked postural instability, no rest and postural tremor, finger tapping slowed on the right, spastic tetraparesis (ASIA D) - predominantly on the left side, brisk deep tendon reflexes in the upper and lower extremities, and bilateral extensor plantar response. He also presented with vertical gaze restriction, mild hypometria in horizontal saccades, moderate dysphagia, and dysphonia. As atypical parkinsonism was suspected, he underwent an MRI that revealed conjunction of findings suggestive of parkinsonian-type MSA. In our case, we hypothesize that the loss of postural reflexes, as an early manifestation of MSA, did not allow the patient to have an effective reaction response to a low-energy trauma, resulting in a more severe injury. With this case report, we speculate that the severe spinal lesions caused by minor accidents can be an early sign of postural instability, which may lead to clinical suspicion of neurodegenerative disorder manifested by postural reflexes impairment. PMID:27014185

  12. Mortality Factors in Geriatric Blunt Trauma Patients: Creation of a Highly Predictive Statistical Model for Mortality Using 50,765 Consecutive Elderly Trauma Admissions from the National Sample Project

    PubMed Central

    HRANJEC, TJASA; SAWYER, ROBERT G.; YOUNG, JEFFREY S.; SWENSON, BRIAN R.; CALLAND, JAMES F.

    2013-01-01

    Elderly patients are at high risk for mortality after injury. We hypothesized that trauma benchmarking efforts would benefit from development of a geriatric-specific model for risk-adjusted analyses of trauma center outcomes. A total of 57,973 records of elderly patients (age older than 65 years), which met our selection criteria, were submitted to the National Trauma Database and included within the National Sample Project between 2003 and 2006. These cases were used to construct a multivariable logistic regression model, which was compared with the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma’s Trauma Quality Improvement Project’s (TQIP) existing model. Additional spline regression analyses were performed to further objectively quantify the physiologic differences between geriatric patients and their younger counterparts. The geriatric-specific and TQIP mortality models shared several covariates: age, Injury Severity Score, motor component of the Glasgow Coma Scale, and systolic blood pressure. Our model additionally used temperature and the presence of mechanical ventilation. Our geriatric-specific regression mode generated a superior c-statistic as compared with the TQIP approximation (0.85 vs 0.77; P = 0.048). Spline analyses demonstrated that elderly patients appear to be less likely to tolerate relative hypotension with higher observed mortality at initial systolic blood pressures of 90 to 130 mmHg. Although the TQIP model includes a single age component, these data suggest that each variable needs to be adjusted for age to more accurately predict mortality in the elderly. Clearly, a separate geriatric model for predicting outcomes is not only warranted, but necessary. PMID:23265126

  13. Computed tomography in trauma: An atlas approach

    SciTech Connect

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.

    1986-01-01

    This book discussed computed tomography in trauma. The text is organized according to mechanism of injury and site of injury. In addition to CT, some correlation with other imaging modalities is included. Blunt trauma, penetrating trauma, complications and sequelae of trauma, and use of other modalities are covered.

  14. Frequency and Severity of Trauma in Fishes Subjected to Multiple-pass Depletion Electrofishing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panek, Frank; Densmore, Christine L.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence and severity of trauma associated with multiple-pass electrofishing and the effects on short-term (30-d) survival and growth of Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis, and five representative co-inhabiting nontarget or bycatch species were examined. Fish were held in four rectangular fiberglass tanks (190 × 66 cm) equipped with electrodes, a gravel–cobble stream substrate, and continuous water flow. Fish were exposed to one, two, or three electroshocks (100-V, 60-Hz pulsed DC) spaced 1 h apart or were held as a control. The heterogeneous field produced a mean (±SD) voltage gradient of 0.23 ± 0.024 V/cm (range = 0.20–0.30 V/cm) with a duty cycle of 30% and a 5-s exposure. Radiographs of 355 fish were examined for evidence of spinal injuries, and necropsies were performed on 303 fish to assess hemorrhagic trauma in soft tissue. Using linear regression, we demonstrated significant relationships between the number of electrical shocks and the frequency and severity of hemorrhagic and spinal trauma in each of the nontarget species (Potomac Sculpin Cottus girardi, Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus, Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas, Green Sunfish Lepomis cyanellus, and Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides). Most of the injuries in these species were either minor or moderate. Rainbow Trout and Brook Trout generally sustained the highest incidence and severity of injuries, but those injuries were generally independent of the number of treatments. The 30-d postshock survival for the trout species was greater than 94%; survival for the bycatch species ranged from 80% (Fathead Minnow) to 100% (Green Sunfish and Channel Catfish). There were no significant differences in 30-d postshock condition factors despite observations of altered feeding behavior lasting several days to 1 week posttreatment in several of the study species.

  15. Introduction of a Simple Technique for Partial Splenectomy in Multiple Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Eskandarlou, Mehdi; Derakhshanfar, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Background: The spleen is the most commonly injured intraperitoneal organ in multiple trauma patients. Total splenectomy results in immunodeficiency and predisposes patients to certain infections. Objectives: Performing partial splenectomy with a safe, simple, and definite technique in trauma patients with hemodynamic instability and accompanying intra-abdominal injury could play an important role in the preservation of immune function and reducing morbidity. Patients and Methods: From 2006 to 2009, a total of 20 patients underwent partial splenectomy, at Mobasher and Be’sat hospitals. Patients with splenic injuries of up to stage IV and grade 3 shocks underwent partial splenectomy. The operations were performed without vascular isolation and by wedge resection of the injured splenic tissue and repair with chromic 2/0 sutures in two rows. Three months later, patients were evaluated by a Tc99 liver-spleen scan, complete blood count, and blood smear. Results: There were 16 male and four female patients with an age range of 4 to 54 years old. Ten patients had additional intra and extra abdominal injuries. The salvaged spleen tissue was approximately 30% in nine patients, 40 to 50% in two, and more than 50% in another nine patients. The operation time was less than three hours and hospital stay was 3 to 15 days for 90% of the patients. No complications occurred after the surgery or during the follow up. For all patients, the complete blood count, peripheral smear, and liver-spleen scan were normal after six months. Conclusions: Partial splenectomy with preserving at least 30% of the splenic tissue can be performed for trauma patients using wedge resection of the injured splenic tissue and repair by chromic 2/0 sutures in two rows. Using this technique, there is no need for vascular isolation or hemostatic materials. Splenic function is presented and associated intra and extra abdominal injuries are not contraindications for partial splenectomy. PMID:24693413

  16. Spinal Cord Lesion by Minor Trauma as an Early Sign of Multiple System Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Brum, Marisa; Reimão, Sofia; Sousa, Djalma; de Carvalho, Rui; Ferreira, Joaquim J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is characterized clinically by parkinsonism, cerebellar, autonomic, and corticospinal features of variable severity. When the presentation is only parkinsonism, the disease might be difficult to differentiate from Parkinson’s disease (PD). We present a case of an 80-year-old man with previous diagnosis of PD. One year after the diagnosis, he had a whiplash cervical trauma due to a tricycle accident caused by a hole in the road. This low-energy trauma caused an unstable C4–C5 cervical fracture with spinal cord injury, which required surgical decompression and stabilization. Neurological examination showed marked postural instability, no rest and postural tremor, finger tapping slowed on the right, spastic tetraparesis (ASIA D) – predominantly on the left side, brisk deep tendon reflexes in the upper and lower extremities, and bilateral extensor plantar response. He also presented with vertical gaze restriction, mild hypometria in horizontal saccades, moderate dysphagia, and dysphonia. As atypical parkinsonism was suspected, he underwent an MRI that revealed conjunction of findings suggestive of parkinsonian-type MSA. In our case, we hypothesize that the loss of postural reflexes, as an early manifestation of MSA, did not allow the patient to have an effective reaction response to a low-energy trauma, resulting in a more severe injury. With this case report, we speculate that the severe spinal lesions caused by minor accidents can be an early sign of postural instability, which may lead to clinical suspicion of neurodegenerative disorder manifested by postural reflexes impairment. PMID:27014185

  17. Mortality Patterns in Patients with Multiple Trauma: A Systematic Review of Autopsy Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Roman; Teuben, Michel; Andruszkow, Hagen; Barkatali, Bilal M.; Pape, Hans-Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A high percentage (50%-60%) of trauma patients die due to their injuries prior to arrival at the hospital. Studies on preclinical mortality including post-mortem examinations are rare. In this review, we summarized the literature focusing on clinical and preclinical mortality and studies included post-mortem examinations. Methods A literature search was conducted using PubMed/Medline database for relevant medical literature in English or German language published within the last four decades (1980–2015). The following MeSH search terms were used in different combinations: “multiple trauma”, “epidemiology”, “mortality “, “cause of death”, and “autopsy”. References from available studies were searched as well. Results Marked differences in demographic parameters and injury severity between studies were identified. Moreover, the incidence of penetrating injuries has shown a wide range (between 4% and 38%). Both unimodal and bimodal concepts of trauma mortality have been favored. Studies have shown a wide variation in time intervals used to analyze the distribution of death. Thus, it is difficult to say which distribution is correct. Conclusions We have identified variable results indicating bimodal or unimodal death distribution. Further more stundardized studies in this field are needed. We would like to encourage investigators to choose the inclusion criteria more critically and to consider factors affecting the pattern of mortality. PMID:26871937

  18. The Quality of Pre-hospital Circulatory Management in Patients With Multiple Trauma Referred to the Trauma Center of Shahid Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, Iran, in the First Six Months of 2013

    PubMed Central

    Maghaminejad, Farzaneh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulatory management is a critical issue in pre-hospital transportation phase of multiple trauma patients. However, the quality of this important care did not receive enough attention. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of pre-hospital circulatory management in patients with multiple trauma. Patients and Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted in 2013. The study population consisted of all patients with multiple trauma who had been transferred by emergency medical services (EMS) to the central trauma department in Kashan Shahid Beheshti medical center, Kashan, Iran. We recruited a convenience sample of 400 patients with multiple trauma. Data were collected using the circulatory assessment questionnaire and controlling hemorrhage (CAQCH) that were designed by the researchers and were described by using frequency tabulations, central tendency measures, and variability indices. The chi-square test was used to analyze the data. Results The study sample consisted of 263 males (75.2%); 57.75% had lower levels of education and 28.75% were workers. The most common mechanism of trauma was traffic accident (85.4%). We found that the quality of circulatory management was unfavorable in 61% of the cases. A significant relationship was observed between the quality of circulatory management and type of trauma and staff’s employment status. Conclusions The quality of pre-hospital circulatory management provided to patients with multiple trauma was unfavorable. Therefore, establishment of in-service training programs on circulatory management is recommended. PMID:27556056

  19. Severe ocular trauma without corneal rupture after radial keratotomy: case reports.

    PubMed

    Casebeer, J C; Shapiro, D R; Phillips, S

    1994-01-01

    The vulnerability of the ocular coat to trauma following radial keratotomy is an issue of concern to both patients and physicians. Herein, we report two cases of eyes which were exposed to severe trauma after previously undergoing radial keratotomy procedures. In the first case, a woman sustained multiple facial bone fractures in a fatal airplane crash. In the second case, a man was involved in a case of blunt ocular trauma involving a high velocity racquetball. Rupture of the ocular coat did not occur in either case. PMID:7517777

  20. The Quality of Pre-Hospital Oxygen Therapy in Patients With Multiple Trauma: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Maghaminejad, Farzaneh; Paravar, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a major healthcare challenge worldwide. In developing countries, most road deaths happen during the pre-hospital phase; consequently, pre-hospital trauma care has received considerable attention during the past decades. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of pre-hospital oxygen therapy in patients with multiple trauma. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the year 2013. The study population consisted of all patients with multiple trauma who had been transferred by emergency medical services to the central trauma department in Shahid Beheshti Medical Center, Kashan, Iran. The data collection instrument had three parts including demographic, a trauma assessment, and an oxygen therapy quality assessment questionnaires that were designed by the researchers. In total, 350 patients with multiple trauma were recruited from March through July 2013. Data were described by using frequency tables, central tendency measures, and variability indices. Moreover, we analyzed data by using the Chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U test, and the logistic regression analysis. Results: The study sample consisted of 263 (75.1%) male and 87 (24.9%) female patients. Overall, 211 patients needed oxygen therapy during the pre-hospital phase; however, only 35 (16.60%) patients had received oxygen. The quality of oxygen therapy was undesirable in 92.42% of cases. In addition, 83.4% of patients, whose pre-hospital records indicated the administration of oxygen, reported that they had not received oxygen therapy. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the place of accident and the level of patients' education were significant predictors for administration of oxygen during the pre-hospital phase (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The quality of pre-hospital oxygen therapy had been provided for the patients with multiple trauma was poor while these patients, particularly patients with chest traumas and head injuries, were in

  1. Whole-body CT-based imaging algorithm for multiple trauma patients: radiation dose and time to diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gordic, S; Hodel, S; Simmen, H-P; Brueesch, M; Frauenfelder, T; Wanner, G; Sprengel, K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the number of imaging examinations, radiation dose and the time to complete trauma-related imaging in multiple trauma patients before and after introduction of whole-body CT (WBCT) into early trauma care. Methods: 120 consecutive patients before and 120 patients after introduction of WBCT into the trauma algorithm of the University Hospital Zurich were compared regarding the number and type of CT, radiography, focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST), additional CT examinations (defined as CT of the same body regions after radiography and/or FAST) and the time to complete trauma-related imaging. Results: In the WBCT cohort, significantly more patients underwent CT of the head, neck, chest and abdomen (p < 0.001) than in the non-WBCT cohort, whereas the number of radiographic examinations of the cervical spine, chest and pelvis and of FAST examinations were significantly lower (p < 0.001). There were no significant differences between cohorts regarding the number of radiographic examinations of the upper (p = 0.56) and lower extremities (p = 0.30). We found significantly higher effective doses in the WBCT (29.5 mSv) than in the non-WBCT cohort (15.9 mSv; p < 0.001), but fewer additional CT examinations for completing the work-up were needed in the WBCT cohort (p < 0.001). The time to complete trauma-related imaging was significantly shorter in the WBCT (12 min) than in the non-WBCT cohort (75 min; p < 0.001). Conclusion: Including WBCT in the initial work-up of trauma patients results in higher radiation doses, but fewer additional CT examinations are needed, and the time for completing trauma-related imaging is shorter. Advances in knowledge: WBCT in trauma patients is associated with a high radiation dose of 29.5 mSv. PMID:25594105

  2. Liver trauma grading and biochemistry tests.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Gozde; Gemici, Aysegul Akdogan; Yirgin, Inci Kizildag; Gulsen, Esma; Inci, Ercan

    2013-10-01

    Among solid organ blunt traumas, the liver and spleen are mostly subject to injury. In addition, the liver is also commonly injured in penetrating traumas because of its size, location, and the ease of injury to the "Glisson Capsule". Several enzymes are known to be elevated following trauma. In our study, we evaluated the correlation between the levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase in 57 patients with blunt trauma to the liver and compared these values to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma trauma grading system. Additionally, we compared the enzyme level elevations in these patients to the enzyme levels of 29 healthy subjects. As expected, we found significant elevations in enzyme levels of trauma patients compared to the control group. The calculated point estimates were not significantly different between grades 1 and 2 trauma. However, grade 3 trauma group showed a significant increase in enzyme levels. PMID:23793528

  3. Impact of the Body Mass on Complications and Outcome in Multiple Trauma Patients: What Does the Weight Weigh?

    PubMed Central

    Andruszkow, Hagen; Mommsen, Philipp; Zeckey, Christian; Frink, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is known as an independent risk factor for various morbidities. The influence of an increased body mass index (BMI) on morbidity and mortality in critically injured patients has been investigated with conflicting results. To verify the impact of weight disorders in multiple traumatized patients, 586 patients with an injury severity score >16 points treated at a level I trauma center between 2005 and 2011 were differentiated according to the BMI and analyzed regarding morbidity and outcome. Plasma levels of interleukin- (IL-) 6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured during clinical course to evaluate the inflammatory response to the “double hit” of weight disorders and multiple trauma. In brief, obesity was the highest risk factor for development of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) (OR 4.209, 95%-CI 1.515–11.692) besides injury severity (OR 1.054, 95%-CI 1.020–1.089) and APACHE II score (OR 1.059, 95%-CI 1.001–1.121). In obese patients as compared to those with overweight, normal weight, and underweight, the highest levels of CRP were continuously present while increased systemic IL-6 levels were found until day 4. In conclusion, an altered posttraumatic inflammatory response in obese patients seems to determine the risk for multiple organ failure after severe trauma. PMID:24023413

  4. Dissection of the right coronary artery following blunt cardiac injury

    PubMed Central

    Vogiatzis, I; Dapcevic, I

    2015-01-01

    Background Coronary artery dissection is a rare complication of blunt thoracic trauma which can become rapidly lethal necessitating prompt diagnosis and treatment. Most reported cases of coronary artery injury, including dissection, involve the left anterior descending coronary artery, given its anatomical location in relation to the impact. Description of case A 72-year-old male, who was involved in a vehicular accident, sustained blunt thoracic trauma which resulted in isolated right coronary artery dissection and acute myocardial infarction. The culprit lesion was found in coronary angiography in the proximal right coronary artery and was successfully repaired with percutaneous coronary intervention and one drug-eluting stent placement. Conclusion Traumatic dissection of coronary arteries must be suspected in blunt thoracic trauma. It can be treated with interventional management and results in a fairly good prognosis. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (3): 278-280. PMID:27418793

  5. [Acute myocardial infarction after blunt polytrauma -- successful coronary intervention].

    PubMed

    Mauser, M; Schwenk, M; Schmelzeisen, H; Fleischmann, D; Fösel, T

    2003-02-01

    Acute myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma is a well reported but rare finding. Especially in severely injured patients the optimal therapy of the myocardial infarction is not well established, since anticoagulants, platelet aggregation inhibitors or thrombolytics are frequently contraindicated under these conditions. We report a case of a 41-year-old man, who presented with an acute myocardial infarction in combination with a severe polytrauma (multiple rib fractures, hematothorax, pelvic bone fractures, multiple injuries of intestinal organs) after a motorcycle accident with a blunt chest and abdominal trauma. After surgical treatment of the injuries of the bones and the intestinal organs a coronary angiography was immediately performed. The left anterior descending and the circumflex coronary artery were occluded in the mid-portion of the vessels. Coronary recanalization by PTCA and the implantation of coronary stents were successful in both vessels. Despite of a non-optimal blood flow after recanalization and stenting in one vessel (LAD TIMI II flow after recanalization), and a non-optimal accompanying medical therapy, during and after intervention (intravenous heparin starting 8 hours after the coronary intervention and platelet inhibitors starting 4 days after the intervention) the coronary angiogram after 2 months documented both vessels patent without a reocclusion or a restenosis. The case report documents, that in traumatic myocardial infarctions the treating of both, the attending injuries and the myocardial ischemia, is feasible. Early coronary angiography and coronary interventions, with or without stent-implantation, are indicated, even in cases in which an adequate accompanying medical therapy with heparin and platelet inhibitors is contraindicated. PMID:12557122

  6. Altered Levels of Zinc and N-methyl-D-aspartic Acid Receptor Underlying Multiple Organ Dysfunctions After Severe Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guanghuan; Yu, Xiaojun; Wang, Dian; Xu, Xiaohu; Chen, Guang; Jiang, Xuewu

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe trauma can cause secondary multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and death. Oxidative stress and/or excitatory neurotoxicity are considered as the final common pathway in nerve cell injuries. Zinc is the cofactor of the redox enzyme, and the effect of the excitatory neurotoxicity is related to N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR). Material/Methods We investigated the levels of zinc and brainstem NMDAR in a rabbit model of severe trauma. Zinc and serum biochemical profiles were determined. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect brainstem N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 1 (NR1), N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 2A (NR2A), and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 2B (NR2B) expression. Results Brain and brainstem Zn levels increased at 12 h, but serum Zn decreased dramatically after the trauma. NR1 in the brainstem dorsal regions increased at 6 h after injury and then decreased. NR2A in the dorsal regions decreased to a plateau at 12 h after trauma. The levels of NR2B were lowest in the death group in the brainstem. Serum zinc was positively correlated with NR2A and 2B and negatively correlated with zinc in the brain. Correlations were also found between the brainstem NR2A and that of the dorsal brainstem, as well as between brainstem NR2A and changes in NR2B. There was a negative correlation between zinc and NR2A. Conclusions Severe trauma led to an acute reduction of zinc enhancing oxidative stress and the changes of NMDAR causing the neurotoxicity of the nerve cells. This may be a mechanism for the occurrence of MODS or death after trauma. PMID:26335029

  7. Multiple trauma in children: predicting outcome and long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Letts, Mervyn; Davidson, Darin; Lapner, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Objective To analyze the management of pediatric trauma and the efficacy of the Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS) in classifying injury severity and predicting prognosis. Design A retrospective case series. Setting The Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, a major pediatric trauma centre. Patients One hundred and forty-nine traumatized children with 2 or more injuries to 1 body system or a single injury to 2 or more body systems. Interventions Use of the PTS and Glasgow Coma Scale score in trauma management. Main outcome measures Types of injuries sustained, complications, missed injuries, psychosocial effects and residual deficiencies. Results The average PTS was 8.5 (range from −3 to 11). The total number of injuries sustained was 494, most commonly closed head injury (86). Forty-two percent of children with an average trauma score of 8.5 were treated surgically. There were 13 missed injuries, and complications were encountered in 57 children, the most common being secondary to fractures. Forty-eight (32%) children had residual long-term deficiency, most commonly neurologic deficiency secondary to head injury. Conclusions Fractures should be stabilized early to decrease long-term complications. A deficiency of the PTS is the weighting of open fractures of a minor bone. For example, metacarpal fracture is given the same weight as an open fracture of the femur. Neuropsychologic difficulties secondary to trauma are a major sequela of trauma in children. PMID:11939656

  8. Trauma in silico: Individual-specific mathematical models and virtual clinical populations.

    PubMed

    Brown, David; Namas, Rami A; Almahmoud, Khalid; Zaaqoq, Akram; Sarkar, Joydeep; Barclay, Derek A; Yin, Jinling; Ghuma, Ali; Abboud, Andrew; Constantine, Gregory; Nieman, Gary; Zamora, Ruben; Chang, Steven C; Billiar, Timothy R; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-04-29

    Trauma-induced critical illness is driven by acute inflammation, and elevated systemic interleukin-6 (IL-6) after trauma is a biomarker of adverse outcomes. We constructed a multicompartment, ordinary differential equation model that represents a virtual trauma patient. Individual-specific variants of this model reproduced both systemic inflammation and outcomes of 33 blunt trauma survivors, from which a cohort of 10,000 virtual trauma patients was generated. Model-predicted length of stay in the intensive care unit, degree of multiple organ dysfunction, and IL-6 area under the curve as a function of injury severity were in concordance with the results from a validation cohort of 147 blunt trauma patients. In a subcohort of 98 trauma patients, those with high-IL-6 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) exhibited higher plasma IL-6 levels than those with low IL-6 SNPs, matching model predictions. Although IL-6 could drive mortality in individual virtual patients, simulated outcomes in the overall cohort were independent of the propensity to produce IL-6, a prediction verified in the 98-patient subcohort. In silico randomized clinical trials suggested a small survival benefit of IL-6 inhibition, little benefit of IL-1β inhibition, and worse survival after tumor necrosis factor-α inhibition. This study demonstrates the limitations of extrapolating from reductionist mechanisms to outcomes in individuals and populations and demonstrates the use of mechanistic simulation in complex diseases. PMID:25925680

  9. Prognostic value of HMGB1 and oxidative stress markers in multiple trauma patients: A single-centre prospective study.

    PubMed

    Polito, Francesca; Cicciu', Marco; Aguennouz, Mohammed; Cucinotta, Maria; Cristani, Mariateresa; Lauritano, Floriana; Sindoni, Alessandro; Gioffre'-Florio, Maria; Fama, Fausto

    2016-09-01

    Serious multiple traumatic injuries may rapidly become fatal or be complicated by a life-threatening sequelae leading to a significant increase of the mortality rate. Trauma scoring systems are used to evaluate the critical status of the patient and recently many different biomarkers have been taken into account to better estimate the potential clinical outcome. The aim of the present study is to analyse the expression pattern of high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), oxidative stress markers and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related (Nrf2) in critically ill traumatic patients (at hospital admittance and after 6 and 24 h), in order to find out their potential role as early post-traumatic predictors markers. Forty-seven patients admitted for multiple trauma and 15 healthy participants were prospectively recruited. Eight patients (17%) died within 92 h of admission; this subgroup of patients presented the highest severity scores and their HMGB1 expression levels were significantly correlated with ISS, whereas patients with higher ISS exhibited higher levels of HMGB1 (P <0.001). Our study suggests the role of HMGB1 as a predictive biomarker of outcome in injured patients and hypothesizes the protective role of Nrf2 in bringing down the oxidative stress and HMGB1 release; measuring HMGB1 in combination with Nrf2 might represent a potentially useful tool in the early detection of post-trauma complications. PMID:27343243

  10. Management of Carotid Artery Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Thomas S.; Ducic, Yadranko; Gordin, Eli; Stroman, David

    2014-01-01

    With increased awareness and liberal screening of trauma patients with identified risk factors, recent case series demonstrate improved early diagnosis of carotid artery trauma before they become problematio. There remains a need for unified screening criteria for both intracranial and extracranial carotid trauma. In the absence of contraindications, antithrombotic agents should be considered in blunt carotid artery injuries, as there is a significant risk of progression of vessel injury with observation alone. Despite CTA being used as a common screening modality, it appears to lack sufficient sensitivity. DSA remains to be the gold standard in screening. Endovascular techniques are becoming more widely accepted as the primary surgical modality in the treatment of blunt extracranial carotid injuries and penetrating/blunt intracranial carotid lessions. Nonetheless, open surgical approaches are still needed for the treatment of penetrating extracranial carotid injuries and in patients with unfavorable lesions for endovascular intervention. PMID:25136406

  11. Aversive Imagery in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Trauma Recurrence, Comorbidity, and Physiological Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    McTeague, Lisa M.; Lang, Peter J.; Laplante, Marie-Claude; Cuthbert, Bruce N.; Shumen, Joshua R.; Bradley, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized as a disorder of exaggerated defensive physiological arousal. The novel aim of the present research was to investigate within PTSD a potential dose-response relationship between past trauma recurrence and current comorbidity and intensity of physiological reactions to imagery of trauma and other aversive scenarios. Methods A community sample of principal PTSD (n = 49; 22 single-trauma exposed, 27 multiple-trauma exposed) and control (n = 76; 46 never-trauma exposed, 30 trauma exposed) participants imagined threatening and neutral events while acoustic startle probes were presented and the eye-blink response (orbicularis occuli) was recorded. Changes in heart rate, skin conductance level, and facial expressivity were also indexed. Results Overall, PTSD patients exceeded control participants in startle reflex, autonomic responding, and facial expressivity during idiographic trauma imagery and, though less pronounced, showed heightened reactivity to standard anger, panic, and physical danger imagery. Concerning subgroups, control participants with and without trauma exposure showed isomorphic patterns. Within PTSD, only the single-trauma patients evinced robust startle and autonomic responses, exceeding both control participants and multiple-trauma PTSD. Despite greater reported arousal, the multiple-trauma relative to single-trauma PTSD group showed blunted defensive reactivity associated with more chronic and severe PTSD, greater mood and anxiety disorder comorbidity, and more pervasive dimensional dysphoria (e.g., depression, trait anxiety). Conclusions Whereas PTSD patients generally show marked physiological arousal during aversive imagery, concordant with self-reported distress, the most symptomatic patients with histories of severe, cumulative traumatization show discordant physiological hyporeactivity, perhaps attributable to sustained high stress and an egregious, persistent negative affectivity

  12. Outcome analysis of management of liver trauma: A 10-year experience at a trauma center

    PubMed Central

    She, Wong Hoi; Cheung, Tan To; Dai, Wing Chiu; Tsang, Simon H Y; Chan, Albert C Y; Tong, Daniel K H; Leung, Gilberto K K; Lo, Chung Mau

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review the outcomes of liver trauma in patients with hepatic injuries only and in patients with associated injuries outside the liver. METHODS: Data of liver trauma patients presented to our center from January 2003 to October 2013 were reviewed. The patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of patients who had hepatic injuries only. Group 2 consisted of patients who also had associated injuries outside the liver. RESULTS: Seven (30.4%) patients in group 1 and 10 (28.6%) patients in group 2 received non-operative management; the rest underwent operation. Blunt trauma occurred in 82.8% (48/58) of the patients and penetrative trauma in 17.2% (10/58). A higher injury severity score (ISS) was observed in group 2 (median 45 vs 25, P < 0.0001). More patients in group 1 were hemodynamically stable (65.2% vs 37.1%, P = 0.036). Other parameters were comparable between groups. Group 1 had better 30-d survival (91.3% vs 71.4%, P = 0.045). On multivariate analysis using the logistic regression model, ISS was found to be associated with mortality (P = 0.004, hazard ratio = 1.035, 95%CI: 1.011-1.060). CONCLUSION: Liver trauma patients with multiple injuries are relatively unstable on presentation. Despite a higher ISS in group 2, non-operative management was possible for selected patients. Associated injuries outside the liver usually account for morbidity and mortality. PMID:27239257

  13. A New Injury Severity Score for Predicting the Length of Hospital Stay in Multiple Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Oveis; Tabibzadeh Dezfuli, Seyed Ashkan; Namazi, Seyed Shojaeddin; Dehghan Khalili, Maryam; Saeedi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals under 40 and is the third main cause for death throughout the world. Objectives: This study was designed to compare our modified injury scoring systems with the current injury severity score (ISS) from the viewpoint of its predictive value to estimate the duration of hospitalization in trauma patients. Patients and Methods: This analytical cross-sectional study was performed at the general referral trauma center of Bandar-Abbas in southern Iran from March 2009 to March 2010. The study population consisted of all the trauma patients referred to the emergency department (ED). Demographic data, type and severity of injury, duration of admission, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), and revised trauma score (RTS) were recorded. The injury severity score (ISS) and NISS were calculated. The length of hospital stay was recorded during the patients follow-up and compared with ISS, NISS and modified injury scoring systems. Results: Five hundred eleven patients (446 males (87.3%) and 65 females (12.7%)) were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 22 ± 4.2 for males and 29.15 ± 3.8 for females. The modified NISS had a relatively strong correlation with the length of hospitalization (r = 0.79). The formula below explains the length of hospitalization according to MNISS score. Duration of hospitalization was 0.415 + (2.991) MNISS. Duration of hospitalization had a strong correlation with MISS (r = 0.805, R2: 0.65). Duration of hospitalization was 0.113 + (7.915) MISS. Conclusions: This new suggested scale shows a better value to predict patients’ length of hospital stay compared to ISS and NISS. However, future studies with larger sample sizes and more confounding factors such as prehospital procedures, intubation and other procedures during admission, should be designed to examine these scoring systems and confirm the results of our study. PMID:27218048

  14. MAIN CONTROVERSIES IN THE NONOPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF BLUNT SPLENIC INJURIES

    PubMed Central

    CARLOTTO, Jorge Roberto Marcante; LOPES-FILHO, Gaspar de Jesus; COLLEONI-NETO, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : The nonoperative management of traumatic spleen injuries is the modality of choice in patients with blunt abdominal trauma and hemodynamic stability. However, there are still questions about the treatment indication in some groups of patients, as well as its follow-up. Aim: Update knowledge about the spleen injury. Method : Was performed review of the literature on the nonoperative management of blunt injuries of the spleen in databases: Cochrane Library, Medline and SciELO. Were evaluated articles in English and Portuguese, between 1955 and 2014, using the headings "splenic injury, nonoperative management and blunt abdominal trauma". Results : Were selected 35 articles. Most of them were recommendation grade B and C. Conclusion : The spleen traumatic injuries are frequent and its nonoperative management is a worldwide trend. The available literature does not explain all aspects on treatment. The authors developed a systematization of care based on the best available scientific evidence to better treat this condition. PMID:27120744

  15. Imaging of Abusive Trauma.

    PubMed

    Shekdar, Karuna

    2016-06-01

    "Shaken baby syndrome" is a term often used by the physicians and public to describe abusive trauma inflicted on infants and young children. Advances in the understanding of the mechanisms and the associated clinical spectrum of injury has lead us to modify our terminology and address it as "abusive trauma" (AT). Pediatric abusive head trauma is defined as an injury to the skull or intracranial contents of an infant or a young child (< 5 y age) due to inflicted blunt impact and/or violent shaking. This chapter focuses on the imaging aspects of childhood abusive trauma along with a brief description of the mechanism and pathophysiology of abusive injury. The diagnosis of AT is not always obvious, and abusive injuries in many infants may remain unrecognized. Pediatricians should be cognizant of AT since pediatricians play a crucial role in the diagnosis, management and prevention of AT. PMID:26882906

  16. Prospective Screening for Blunt Cerebrovascular Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Preston R.; Fabian, Timothy C.; Croce, Martin A.; Cagiannos, Catherine; Williams, J. Scott; Vang, Meng; Qaisi, Waleed G.; Felker, Richard E.; Timmons, Shelly D.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To prospectively examine outcomes associated with an aggressive screening protocol for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI), and to compare the accuracy of computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) versus conventional angiography with respect to BCVI diagnosis. Summary Background Data In the past 5 years, BCVI (carotid and vertebral arteries) has been recognized with increasing frequency. Initial studies described blunt carotid injuries and their associated morbidity, while more recent reports have established the devastating potential of blunt vertebral injuries. It has been suggested that early diagnosis and anticoagulation will improve outcomes and that less-invasive diagnostic techniques than conventional angiography are desirable for screening. However, there are neither established screening criteria nor studies comparing optimal diagnostic modalities. Methods The screened population included all patients with cervical spine fractures, LeFort II or III facial fractures, Horner’s syndrome, skull base fractures involving the foramen lacerum, neck soft tissue injury, or neurological abnormalities unexplained by intracranial injuries. Patients underwent screening with four-vessel cerebral angiography. During the first half of the study, patients also underwent helical CTA. Selected patients during this same period underwent MRA. At the time of diagnosis, anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy was instituted unless clinically contraindicated. Results of this screening protocol were compared to a previously published cohort with cerebrovascular injuries (1995–1999) from the authors’ institution. Results Two hundred sixteen patients were screened over a 2-year period (3.5% of all blunt trauma admissions). Angiography identified 24 patients with carotid artery injuries (CAI) and 43 patients with vertebral artery injuries (VAI) for an overall screening yield of 29%. While the incidence of CAI remained similar between

  17. Orbital emphysema following remote skull trauma.

    PubMed

    Brown, S M; Lissner, G

    1995-06-01

    In an unusual case of orbital emphysema following nose blowing, a reliable patient history and examination demonstrated no direct trauma to the orbit. Blunt posterior skull trauma was sustained several hours before the development of the orbital emphysema. A "seismic" transmittal of force to the orbital walls is postulated. PMID:7654620

  18. Less is more? Assessing the validity of the ICD-11 model of PTSD across multiple trauma samples

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Maj; Hyland, Philip; Armour, Cherie; Shevlin, Mark; Elklit, Ask

    2015-01-01

    Background In the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), the symptom profile of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was expanded to include 20 symptoms. An alternative model of PTSD is outlined in the proposed 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) that includes just six symptoms. Objectives and method The objectives of the current study are: 1) to independently investigate the fit of the ICD-11 model of PTSD, and three DSM-5-based models of PTSD, across seven different trauma samples (N=3,746) using confirmatory factor analysis; 2) to assess the concurrent validity of the ICD-11 model of PTSD; and 3) to determine if there are significant differences in diagnostic rates between the ICD-11 guidelines and the DSM-5 criteria. Results The ICD-11 model of PTSD was found to provide excellent model fit in six of the seven trauma samples, and tests of factorial invariance showed that the model performs equally well for males and females. DSM-5 models provided poor fit of the data. Concurrent validity was established as the ICD-11 PTSD factors were all moderately to strongly correlated with scores of depression, anxiety, dissociation, and aggression. Levels of association were similar for ICD-11 and DSM-5 suggesting that explanatory power is not affected due to the limited number of items included in the ICD-11 model. Diagnostic rates were significantly lower according to ICD-11 guidelines compared to the DSM-5 criteria. Conclusions The proposed factor structure of the ICD-11 model of PTSD appears valid across multiple trauma types, possesses good concurrent validity, and is more stringent in terms of diagnosis compared to the DSM-5 criteria. PMID:26450830

  19. Déjà-vu from the nineties: is there a perspective for anti-endotoxin strategies to improve the outcome of multiple trauma patients?

    PubMed Central

    Menger, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    A recent cohort study of Charbonney et al. indicates that multiple trauma patients develop endotoxemia also in the absence of Gram-negative infection. This is most probably due to an increase of gut permeability. Non-survivors as well as patients with cardiovascular dysfunction and multiple organ failure (MOF) show significantly higher endotoxin levels at 24 h after injury compared to survivors and patients without MOF. These results are like a déjà-vu from the nineties of the last century, where several studies reported endotoxemia during the initial 24 h after multiple trauma with development of MOF and death at endotoxin levels >10 and >12 pg/mL, respectively. Of interest, other multiple trauma patient studies in the nineties have shown endogenous anti-endotoxin antibody production in survivors and reduced antibody production in non-survivors, which died from MOF. Although all these studies have pointed towards a mechanistic role of endotoxin in the fatal outcome after multiple injuries, clinical anti-endotoxin studies are still lacking. Thus, the future perspective must be prospective randomized multicenter trials, which have to elucidate the capability of anti-endotoxin treatment strategies to improve outcome in multiple trauma patients. PMID:27620806

  20. Swords with Blunt Edges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    2004-01-01

    Many U.S. educators now wonder whether they're teachers or targets. This mentality stems from the specter of their school being sanctioned for failing the state accountability tests mandated under No Child Left Behind (NCLB). According to this author, most of those tests are like blunt-edged swords: They function badly in two directions. While…

  1. Implementation and Evaluation of a Wiki Involving Multiple Stakeholders Including Patients in the Promotion of Best Practices in Trauma Care: The WikiTrauma Interrupted Time Series Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Alexis F; Witteman, Holly O; Lauzier, François; Moore, Lynne; Lamontagne, François; Horsley, Tanya; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Droit, Arnaud; Weiss, Matthew; Tremblay, Sébastien; Lachaine, Jean; Le Sage, Natalie; Émond, Marcel; Berthelot, Simon; Plaisance, Ariane; Lapointe, Jean; Razek, Tarek; van de Belt, Tom H; Brand, Kevin; Bérubé, Mélanie; Clément, Julien; Grajales III, Francisco Jose; Eysenbach, Gunther; Kuziemsky, Craig; Friedman, Debbie; Lang, Eddy; Muscedere, John; Rizoli, Sandro; Roberts, Derek J; Scales, Damon C; Sinuff, Tasnim; Stelfox, Henry T; Gagnon, Isabelle; Chabot, Christian; Grenier, Richard; Légaré, France

    2015-01-01

    Background Trauma is the most common cause of mortality among people between the ages of 1 and 45 years, costing Canadians 19.8 billion dollars a year (2004 data), yet half of all patients with major traumatic injuries do not receive evidence-based care, and significant regional variation in the quality of care across Canada exists. Accordingly, our goal is to lead a research project in which stakeholders themselves will adapt evidence-based trauma care knowledge tools to their own varied institutional contexts and cultures. We will do this by developing and assessing the combined impact of WikiTrauma, a free collaborative database of clinical decision support tools, and Wiki101, a training course teaching participants how to use WikiTrauma. WikiTrauma has the potential to ensure that all stakeholders (eg, patients, clinicians, and decision makers) can all contribute to, and benefit from, evidence-based clinical knowledge about trauma care that is tailored to their own needs and clinical setting. Objective Our main objective will be to study the combined effect of WikiTrauma and Wiki101 on the quality of care in four trauma centers in Quebec. Methods First, we will pilot-test the wiki with potential users to create a version ready to test in practice. A rapid, iterative prototyping process with 15 health professionals from nonparticipating centers will allow us to identify and resolve usability issues prior to finalizing the definitive version for the interrupted time series. Second, we will conduct an interrupted time series to measure the impact of our combined intervention on the quality of care in four trauma centers that will be selected—one level I, one level II, and two level III centers. Participants will be health care professionals working in the selected trauma centers. Also, five patient representatives will be recruited to participate in the creation of knowledge tools destined for their use (eg, handouts). All participants will be invited to

  2. Non-operative management of renal trauma in very young children: experiences from a dedicated South African paediatric trauma unit.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Alex; Lazarus, John; Sebastian van As, A B

    2012-09-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma results in renal injury in 10% of paediatric cases. Over the last twenty years, the management of paediatric renal trauma has shifted towards a primarily non-operative approach that is now well-established for children up to 18 years old. This retrospective study reviews our experiences of non-operatively managing blunt renal trauma in a very young cohort of patients up to 11 years old. Between June 2006 and June 2010, 118 children presented to the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in Cape Town with blunt abdominal trauma. 16 patients shown to have sustained renal injury on abdominal computed tomography (CT) scanning were included in this study. Medical records were reviewed for the mechanism of injury, severity of renal injury, clinical presentation, associated injuries, management method and clinical outcomes. All renal injuries were graded (I-V) according to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Organ Injury Severity Scale. All renal trauma patients included in this study were aged between 1 and 11 years (mean of 6.5 years). 1 patient sustained grade V injuries; 2 grade IV, 6 grade III and 7 grade I injuries. The majority of injuries (9/16) were caused by motor vehicle crashes, whilst 5 children fell from height, 1 was struck by a falling tree and 1 hit by a moving train. 1 of 16 patients was haemodynamically unstable on presentation as a result of multiple splenic and hepatic lacerations. He was resuscitated and underwent immediate laparotomy. However, his renal injuries were not indications for surgical management. 15 haemodynamically stable patients were non-operatively managed for their renal injuries. Following lengths of admissions ranging from 4 to 132 days, all 16 patients were successfully discharged with no mortalities. No significant complications of renal trauma, such as new-onset hypertension, were detected during their first follow up outpatient appointments. Our findings successfully extend non

  3. Trauma Induced Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lolay, Georges A.; Abdel-Latef, Ahmed K.

    2016-01-01

    Chest Trauma in athletes is a common health problem. However, myocardial infarction secondary to coronary dissection in the setting of blunt chest trauma is extremely rare. We report a case of acute inferior wall myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma. A 32-year-old male with no relevant medical problems was transferred to our medical center for retrosternal chest pain after being elbowed in the chest during a soccer game. Few seconds later, he started experiencing sharp retrosternal chest pain that was severe to that point where he called the emergency medical service. Upon arrival to the Trauma department patient was still complaining of chest pain. ECG demonstrated ST segment elevation in the inferior leads with reciprocal changes in the lateral leads all consistent with active ischemia. After rolling out Aortic dissection, patient was loaded with ASA, ticagerlor, heparin and was emergently taken to the cardiac catheterization lab. Coronary angiography demonstrated 100% thrombotic occlusion in the distal right coronary artery with TIMI 0 flow distally. After thrombus aspiration, a focal dissection was noted on the angiogram that was successfully stented. Two days after admission patient was discharged home. Echocardiography prior to discharge showed inferior wall akinesis, normal right ventricular systolic function and normal overall ejection fraction. PMID:26490501

  4. Multiple traumas, postelection violence, and posttraumatic stress among impoverished Kenyan youth.

    PubMed

    Harder, Valerie S; Mutiso, Victoria N; Khasakhala, Lincoln I; Burke, Heather M; Ndetei, David M

    2012-02-01

    Research on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among youth has focused on specific subgroups from developed countries. Most of the world's youth and war-like violence, however, is concentrated in developing countries, yet there is limited mental health data within affected countries. This study focused on a random community-based sample of 552 impoverished youth ages 6-18 within an informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya, which experienced war-like violence for a month following the contested presidential election of 2007. Six months after the violence ended, 99 (18%) had PTSD according to the UCLA PTSD Reaction Index (Steinberg, Brymer, Decker, & Pynoos, 2004), and an additional 18 (3%) were found to have partial PTSD due to high overall scores. Kenyan psychologists conducted diagnostic interviews and found the positive predictive value of the assessment tool to be 72% in this sample; the confirmed prevalence was 12%. Similar to other studies worldwide, Criterion C (avoidance) was the limiting factor for diagnosing PTSD according to the DSM-IV-TR, and parent-child agreement was at best fair. The number of traumatic experiences was strongly associated with PTSD outcomes. Differences due to age or sex were not found. The findings indicate the need for universal mental health services for trauma-exposed youth and their families in the impoverished informal settlements of Nairobi, Kenya. PMID:22354509

  5. What's new in resuscitation strategies for the patient with multiple trauma?

    PubMed

    Curry, N; Davis, P W

    2012-07-01

    The last decade has seen a sea change in the management of major haemorrhage following traumatic injury. Damage control resuscitation (DCR), a strategy combining the techniques of permissive hypotension, haemostatic resuscitation and damage control surgery has been widely adopted as the preferred method of resuscitation in patients with haemorrhagic shock. The over-riding goals of DCR are to mitigate metabolic acidosis, hypothermia and coagulopathy and stabilise the patient as early as possible in a critical care setting. This narrative review examines the background to these changes in resuscitation practice, discusses the central importance of traumatic coagulopathy in driving these changes particularly in relation to the use of high FFP:RBC ratio and explores methods of predicting, diagnosing and treating the coagulopathy with massive transfusion protocols as well as newer coagulation factor concentrates. We discuss other areas of trauma haemorrhage management including the role of hypertonic saline and interventional radiology. Throughout this review we specifically examine whether the available evidence supports these newer practices. PMID:22487163

  6. Protocol for a randomized controlled trial on risk adapted damage control orthopedic surgery of femur shaft fractures in multiple trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Rixen, Dieter; Steinhausen, Eva; Sauerland, Stefan; Lefering, Rolf; Meier, Matthias; Maegele, Marc G; Bouillon, Bertil; Neugebauer, Edmund AM

    2009-01-01

    Background Fractures of the long bones and femur fractures in particular are common in multiple trauma patients, but the optimal management of femur fractures in these patients is not yet resolved. Although there is a trend towards the concept of "Damage Control Orthopedics" (DCO) in the management of multiple trauma patients with long bone fractures as reflected by a significant increase in primary external fixation of femur fractures, current literature is insufficient. Thus, in the era of "evidence-based medicine", there is the need for a more specific, clarifying trial. Methods/Design The trial is designed as a randomized controlled open-label multicenter study. Multiple trauma patients with femur shaft fractures and a calculated probability of death between 20 and 60% will be randomized to either temporary fracture fixation with fixateur externe and defined secondary definitive treatment (DCO) or primary reamed nailing (early total care). The primary objective is to reduce the extent of organ failure as measured by the maximum sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA) score. Discussion The Damage Control Study is the first to evaluate the risk adapted damage control orthopedic surgery concept of femur shaft fractures in multiple trauma patients in a randomized controlled design. The trial investigates the differences in clinical outcome of two currently accepted different ways of treating multiple trauma patients with femoral shaft fractures. This study will help to answer the question whether the "early total care" or the „damage control” concept is associated with better outcome. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN10321620 PMID:19691847

  7. The possible role of cranio-cervical trauma and abnormal CSF hydrodynamics in the genesis of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Damadian, Raymond V; Chu, David

    2011-01-01

    UPRIGHT Multi-Position MR scanning has uncovered a key set of new observations regarding Multiple Sclerosis (MS), which observations are likely to provide a new understanding of the origin of MS. The new findings may also lead to new forms of treatment for MS. The UPRIGHT MRI has demonstrated pronounced anatomic pathology of the cervical spine in five of the MS patients studied and definitive cervical pathology in the other three. The pathology was the result of prior head and neck trauma. All eight MS patients entered the study on a first come first serve basis without priority, and all but one were found to have a history of serious prior cervical trauma which resulted in significant cervical pathology. The cervical pathology was visualized by UPRIGHT MRI. Upright cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cinematography and quantitative measurements of CSF velocity, CSF flow and CSF pressure gradients in the upright patient revealed that significant obstructions to CSF flow were present in all MS patients. The obstructions are believed to be responsible for CSF "leakages" of CSF from the ventricles into the surrounding brain parenchyma which "leakages" can be the source of the MS lesions in the brain that give rise to MS symptomatology. The CSF flow obstructions are believed to result in increases in intracranial pressure (ICP) that generate "leakages" of the CSF into the surrounding brain parenchyma. In all but one MS patient, anatomic pathologies were found to be more severe in the upright position than in the recumbent position. Similarly, CSF flow abnormalities were found to be more severe in the upright position than in the recumbent position in all but one MS patient. Images of the MS patient anatomic pathologies and CSF flow abnormalities are provided with comparison images from normal examinees in Figures 1-15. PMID:21970155

  8. Towards evidence-based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. BET: Is CT thorax necessary to exclude significant injury in paediatric patients with blunt chest trauma?

    PubMed

    de la Morandiere, Katherine

    2015-08-01

    A shortcut review was carried out to establish if CXR had sufficient sensitivity to rule out significant thoracic injury in haemodynamically stable, paediatric patients with a significant mechanism of trauma. No studies were found that directly answered the three-part question, but 13 studies were found which were considered relevant. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these papers are tabulated. The clinical bottom line is that important thoracic injuries may not be clinically apparent and that CT scans have a significantly higher sensitivity than CXR in detecting such injuries. PMID:26195475

  9. [Clinical study of multiple traumas with severe facial injury undergoing emergency endovascular treatment: significance of emergency embolization of the external carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Naoto; Hirohata, Masaru; Miyagi, Tomoya; Fujimura, Naoko; Karukaya, Takashi; Tokutomi, Takashi; Shigemori, Minoru

    2005-07-01

    The outcome of multiple injures freqently depends on the priority of treatments, and the decision as to the procedures and timing of primary care is extremely important. We studied the patients with multiple trauma whounderwent emergency endovascular treatment for facial hemorrhage related to external carotid arterial injury. The subjects are 5 patients who underwent embolization of the external carotid artery by an endovascular approach among patients with multiple traumas who were brought to our hospital by ambulance. In these patients, the vital signs on arrival, interval between injury and intravascular surgery, type of brain injury, type and grade of concurrent injury and outcome were studied. Three patients showed hemorrhagic shock on arrival, and 1 patient showed hemorrhagic shock immediately after arrival. The mean interval between injury and endovascular surgery was 3.9 hours. All patients had skull base fracture, and abnormal intracranial lesions on initial CT including 4 focal injuries and 1 diffuse injury. Moderate to severe thoracic/abdominal injuries were noted in 3 patients. In the remaining 2 patients, there was no trauma in the thoracic or abdominal regions. Intraperitoneal hemorrhage with splenic injury was observed in 3 patients. In 3 of 4 patients died by hemorrhagic shock because of the delay of endvascular treatments. In trauma patients with persistent hemorrhage, emergency endovascular treatment should be considered as a primary survey for initial treatment without delay under intensive conservative treatment. PMID:16001808

  10. Simultaneous multisystem surgery: An important capability for the civilian trauma hospital.

    PubMed

    Moore, Justin M; Thomas, Piers A W; Gruen, Russell L; Chan, Patrick; Rosenfled, Jeffrey V

    2016-09-01

    Head injury commonly presents in association with torso or limb injuries, especially in blunt trauma mechanisms. Stopping life-threatening thoraco-abdominal hemorrhage and preventing secondary brain injury are time critical priorities. Although simultaneous operative management by multiple teams has been common practice in the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, simultaneous surgery is rare in most civilian settings. Nevertheless, situations arise whereby simultaneous craniotomy and chest or abdominal surgery is necessary to prevent mortality or reduce severe morbidity. We discuss two recent cases at our level one trauma centre, the challenges that surgeons and the operating room staff face and propose that with appropriate planning this surgical capability can be integrated into the systems of contemporary advanced trauma units. PMID:27359088

  11. Blunt cardiac injury: case report of salvaged traumatic right atrial rupture.

    PubMed

    Al Ayyan, Muna; Aziz, Tanim; El Sherif, Amgad; Bekdache, Omar

    2016-11-01

    The incidence of cardiac rupture following blunt trauma is rare, occurring in 0.3%-0.5% of all blunt trauma patients. It can be fatal at the trauma scene, and is frequently missed in the emergency room setting. The severity of a cardiac trauma is based on the mechanism and degree of the force applied. The objective of this study was to report the case of a 32-year-old male patient who was involved in a motor vehicle collision and presented to the emergency room with signs of hypovolemic shock. The patient was found to have severe chest trauma associated with massive hemothorax requiring immediate intervention. The patient had an emergent thoracotomy revealing a right atrial injury. Repair of the atrial injury reversed the state of shock. The patient was discharged after 35 days of hospitalization in good condition. PMID:27054650

  12. An alternative option in the management of blunt splenic injury

    PubMed Central

    Bodansky, David; Jones, Robert; Tucker, Olga N.

    2013-01-01

    Splenic injury is a preventable cause of mortality following blunt trauma. The majority of splenic injuries can be managed conservatively. Laparotomy is indicated in the haemodynamically unstable patient, or those with other intra-abdominal injuries requiring surgery. Angio-embolization can be used to achieve haemostasis and preserve splenic parenchyma. The expertise and experience of the multidisciplinary trauma team and resources of the receiving facility are critical in determining the optimal management approach. We present a patient with a successful outcome following selective angio-embolization for ongoing bleeding from a Grade 4 splenic injury. PMID:24964468

  13. Assessing the Ignored Associated Injuries of the Ear, Nose and Throat in Patients with Multiple Trauma in Shahid Rahnamun Hospital of Yazd in 2012 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Sarafraz, Zahra; Mirshamsi, Mohammad Hossein; Musavi, Seyyed Ali; Azaraein, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many trauma patients in the Emergency Department are unconscious, and this causes many other problems to go undiagnosed, resulting in the loss of valuable time in initiating the appropriate treatments. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and types of injuries to the ears, nose, and throat that are ignored in patients with multiple traumas in an Emergency Department. Methods: This study was conducted by assessing patients with multiple traumas who were admitted to the Emergency Department at Shahid Rahnamun Hospital in Yazd, Iran, in 2012 and 2013, and who were advised to acquire diagnostic workups and treatment in the Ear, Nose, and Throat Department. The patients’ data were gathered by studying their records and by careful examinations, and the data were analyzed using the chi-squared test by SPSS version 18. Results: Among the 230 patients who were counseled, 170 patients had multiple traumas that were caused by accidents, falls, conflicts between individuals, and natural disasters. Fifty-four patients with low Glassco Coma Scale (GCS) values who were admitted to the ICU were counseled after they regained consciousness. Among the 54 cases, 12 cases (22%) had nasal fractures and four cases had septal hematomas that resulted in infections and severe deformities. Twenty-four cases (44%) had lacerations of posterior auricular components, one case required extended debridement, and two cases had extensive necrosis that required a local flap. Two cases (3%) had paralyzed facial nerves, 8 cases (14%) had fractured mandibles, and 10 cases (18%) had laceration of the oral mucosa (lingual - buccal) that require extended debridement in the operating room. Conclusions: It is recommended that complete physical examinations be done in patients with multiple trauma after they are stabilized; such examinations would require careful training of the medical staff and also careful and timely counseling. PMID:26388978

  14. Cystic artery bleeding due to blunt gallbladder injury: computed tomography findings and treatment with transcatheter arterial embolization.

    PubMed

    Osada, Hisato; Ohno, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Wataru; Okada, Takemichi; Nakada, Kei; Honda, Norinari

    2010-02-01

    Blunt gallbladder injury is rare, and bleeding from the cystic artery due to blunt trauma is even rarer. We report herein a case of extraluminal bleeding of the gallbladder in a patient following blunt abdominal trauma. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed pericholecystic fluid and extravasation of contrast material in the subcapsular liver space adjacent to the gallbladder. Abdominal digital subtraction angiography revealed pseudoaneurysm originating from a branch of the cystic artery. Successful treatment was achieved using selective transcatheter embolization, and cholecystectomy was not required. PMID:20182852

  15. Circulating Histones Are Mediators of Trauma-associated Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Simon T.; Zhang, Nan; Manson, Joanna; Liu, Tingting; Dart, Caroline; Baluwa, Florence; Wang, Susan Siyu; Brohi, Karim; Kipar, Anja; Yu, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Acute lung injury is a common complication after severe trauma, which predisposes patients to multiple organ failure. This syndrome largely accounts for the late mortality that arises and despite many theories, the pathological mechanism is not fully understood. Discovery of histone-induced toxicity in mice presents a new dimension for elucidating the underlying pathophysiology. Objectives: To investigate the pathological roles of circulating histones in trauma-induced lung injury. Methods: Circulating histone levels in patients with severe trauma were determined and correlated with respiratory failure and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores. Their cause–effect relationship was studied using cells and mouse models. Measurements and Main Results: In a cohort of 52 patients with severe nonthoracic blunt trauma, circulating histones surged immediately after trauma to levels that were toxic to cultured endothelial cells. The high levels were significantly associated with the incidence of acute lung injury and SOFA scores, as well as markers of endothelial damage and coagulation activation. In in vitro systems, histones damaged endothelial cells, stimulated cytokine release, and induced neutrophil extracellular trap formation and myeloperoxidase release. Cellular toxicity resulted from their direct membrane interaction and resultant calcium influx. In mouse models, cytokines and markers for endothelial damage and coagulation activation significantly increased immediately after trauma or histone infusion. Pathological examinations showed that lungs were the predominantly affected organ with edema, hemorrhage, microvascular thrombosis, and neutrophil congestion. An anti-histone antibody could reduce these changes and protect mice from histone-induced lethality. Conclusions: This study elucidates a new mechanism for acute lung injury after severe trauma and proposes that circulating histones are viable therapeutic targets for improving survival

  16. Imaging in spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Johan W M; Maes, Menno; Ozsarlak, Ozkan; van den Hauwe, Luc; Parizel, Paul M

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  17. Classification of Liver Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rizoli, Sandro B.; Brenneman, Frederick D.; Hanna, Sherif S.; Kahnamoui, Kamyar

    1996-01-01

    The classification of liver injuries is important for clinical practice, clinical research and quality assurance activities. The Organ Injury Scaling (OIS) Committee of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma proposed the OIS for liver trauma in 1989. The purpose ofthe present study was to apply this scale to a cohort ofliver trauma patients managed at a single Canadian trauma centre from January 1987 to June 1992.170 study patients were identified and reviewed. The mean age was 30, with 69% male and a mean ISS of 33.90% had a blunt mechanism ofinjury. The 170 patients were categorized into the 60IS grades ofliver injury. The number of units of blood transfused, the magnitude of the operative treatment required, the liver-related complications and the liver-related mortality correlated well with the OIS grade. The OIS grade was unable to predict the need for laparotomy or the length of stay in hospital. We conclude that the OIS is a useful, practical and important tool for the categorization of liver injuries, and it may prove to be the universally accepted classification scheme in liver trauma. PMID:8809585

  18. Endovascular Repair of Blunt Popliteal Arterial Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shan; Chen, Zhong; Dong, Peng; Sun, Yequan; Zhu, Wei; Pan, Xiaolin; Qi, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of endovascular repair for blunt popliteal arterial injuries. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis of seven patients with clinical suspicion of popliteal arterial injuries that were confirmed by arteriography was performed from September 2009 to July 2014. Clinical data included demographics, mechanism of injury, type of injury, location of injury, concomitant injuries, time of endovascular procedures, time interval from trauma to blood flow restoration, instrument utilized, and follow-up. All patients were male (mean age of 35.9 ± 10.3 years). The type of lesion involved intimal injury (n = 1), partial transection (n = 2), complete transection (n = 2), arteriovenous fistula (n = 1), and pseudoaneurysm (n = 1). All patients underwent endovascular repair of blunt popliteal arterial injuries. Results Technical success rate was 100%. Intimal injury was treated with a bare-metal stent. Pseudoaneurysm and popliteal artery transections were treated with bare-metal stents. Arteriovenous fistula was treated with bare-metal stent and coils. No perioperative death and procedure-related complication occurred. The average follow-up was 20.9 ± 2.3 months (range 18–24 months). One patient underwent intra-arterial thrombolysis due to stent thrombosis at 18 months after the procedure. All limbs were salvaged. Stent migration, deformation, or fracture was not found during the follow-up. Conclusion Endovascular repair seems to be a viable approach for patients with blunt popliteal arterial injuries, especially on an emergency basis. Endovascular repair may be effective in the short-term. Further studies are required to evaluate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair. PMID:27587969

  19. [Cardiac arrest following blunt chest injury. Emergency thoracotomy without ifs or buts?].

    PubMed

    Leidel, B A; Kanz, K G; Kirchhoff, C; Bürklein, D; Wismüller, A; Mutschler, W

    2007-10-01

    In German-speaking countries, most serious thoracic injuries are attributable to the impact of blunt force; they are the second most frequent result of injury after head injury in polytrauma patients with multiple injuries. Almost one in every three polytraumatized patients with significant chest injury develops acute lung failure, and one in every four, acute circulatory failure. The acute circulatory arrest following serious chest injury involves a high mortality rate, and in most cases it reflects a tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, or hemorrhagic shock resulting from injury to the heart or one of the large vessels close to it. Brisk drainage of tension pneumothorax and adequate volume restoration are therefore particularly important in resuscitation of multiply traumatized patients, as are rapid resuscitative thoracotomy to allow direct heart massage, drainage of pericardial tamponade, and control of hemorrhage. However the probability of survival described in the literature is very low for patients sustaining severe chest trauma with acute cardiac arrest. The case report presented here describes a female polytrauma patient who suffered an acute cardiac arrest following cardiac tamponade after admission in the emergency department and who survived without neurological deficits after an emergency thoracotomy. Selections from the topical literature can help the treating physician in the emergency department in making decisions on whether an emergency thoracotomy is indicated after a blunt chest injury and on the procedure itself. PMID:17909734

  20. [New observations on gut trauma].

    PubMed

    Staib, L; Henne-Bruns, D

    2005-10-01

    Abdominal trauma from blunt objects remains a challenge in clinical practice. The primary aims are quick recognition and reversal of life-threatening situations, rational use of the available diagnostic methods, and avoidance of unnecessary laparotomy. The majority of these injuries can now be treated conservatively, whereby interventional methods such as drainage inserts and embolisation are becoming increasingly favoured. Observation of the treatment course by an experienced surgeon is a must. In patients with complicated injuries, special attention must be paid to so-called missed injuries: traumata that may be overlooked such as small intestine and diaphragm ruptures. Aside from retaining organs and their function, the most important concern is damage control (for complex injuries) and laparotomy in the abdominal compartment, with the application of temporary laparotomy as needed. These methods are aimed at reducing mortality pre- and post-admittance. However, we still lack valid prognostic parameters to allow realistic estimation of survival following severe, blunt abdominal trauma. PMID:15843910

  1. Trauma imaging in the thorax and abdomen

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberger, A.; Adler, O.

    1987-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers the radiologic diagnosis of traumatic injuries of the thorax and abdomen with special consideration given to the physical principles governing blunt, blast, and penetrating trauma and to the pathophysiology which they cause. The clinical experience forming the major data base for this book is drawn from the Ramban Medical Center in Haifa, Israel, the major trauma center for the Middle East wars.

  2. Vertebral Artery Transection in Nonpenetrating Trauma: A Series of 4 Patients.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Ezekiel; Lehnert, Bruce; McNeeley, Michael F

    2015-10-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injury is a common and potentially devastating consequence of nonpenetrating trauma to the head and neck. The degree of injury ranges from minimal intimal disruption to complete transection with free extravasation. Although blunt carotid transection has been well characterized in clinical reports and radiologic studies, the computed tomographic angiography (CTA) features of blunt vertebral artery transection have not been well described. We report a series of 4 patients presenting to our level I trauma center with blunt vertebral artery transection, with an emphasis on their CTA imaging findings at presentation and their respective clinical courses. A brief review of the pertinent literature is provided. PMID:26122415

  3. Blunt Hepatic Injury: A Paradigm Shift From Operative to Nonoperative Management in the 1990s

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Ajai K.; Fabian, Timothy C.; Croce, Martin A.; Gavin, Timothy J.; Kudsk, Kenneth A.; Minard, Gayle; Pritchard, F. Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    Objective To analyze the outcome of hemodynamically stable patients with blunt hepatic injury managed nonoperatively, and to examine the impact of this approach on the outcome of all patients with blunt hepatic injury. Summary Background Data Until recently, operative management has been the standard for liver injury. A prospective trial from the authors’ institution had shown that nonoperative management could safely be applied to hemodynamically stable patients with blunt hepatic injury. The present study reviewed the authors’ institutional experience with blunt hepatic trauma since that trial and compared the results with prior institutional experience. Methods Six hundred sixty-one patients with blunt hepatic trauma during the 5-year period ending December 1998 were reviewed (NONOP2). The outcomes were compared with two previous studies from this institution: operative 1985 to 1990 (OP) and nonoperative 1993 to 1994 (NONOP1). Results All 168 OP patients were managed operatively. Twenty-four (18%) of 136 NONOP1 patients and 101 (15%) of the 661 NONOP2 patients required immediate exploration for hemodynamic instability. Forty-two (7%) patients failed nonoperative management; 20 were liver-related. Liver-related failures of nonoperative management were associated with higher-grade injuries and with larger amounts of hemoperitoneum on computed tomography scanning. Twenty-four-hour transfusions, abdominal infections, and hospital length of stay were all significantly lower in the NONOP1 and NONOP2 groups versus the OP cohort. The liver-related death rate was constant at 4% in the three cohorts over the three time periods. Conclusions Although urgent surgery continues to be the standard for hemodynamically compromised patients with blunt hepatic trauma, there has been a paradigm shift in the management of hemodynamically stable patients. Approximately 85% of all patients with blunt hepatic trauma are stable. In this group, nonoperative management significantly

  4. Aerobic and anaerobic microbiology of infections after trauma in children.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, I

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the recovery of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria from infections after trauma in children over a 20 year period. METHODS: Only specimens that were studied for both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were included in the analysis. They were collected from seven separate centres in which the microbiology laboratories only accepted specimens that were properly collected without contamination and were submitted in appropriate transport media. Anaerobes and aerobic bacteria were cultured and identified using standard techniques. Clinical records were reviewed to identify post-trauma patients. RESULTS: From 1974 to 1994, 175 specimens obtained from 166 children with trauma showed bacterial growth. The trauma included blunt trauma (71), lacerations (48), bites (42), and open fractures (5). Anaerobic bacteria only were isolated in 38 specimens (22%), aerobic bacteria only in 51 (29%), and mixed aerobic-anaerobic flora in 86 (49%); 363 anaerobic (2.1/specimen) and 158 aerobic or facultative isolates (0.9/specimen) were recovered. The predominant anaerobic bacteria included Peptostreptococcus spp (115 isolates), Prevotella spp (68), Fusobacterium spp (52), B fragilis group (42), and Clostridium spp (21). The predominant aerobic bacteria included Staph aureus (51), E coli (13), Ps aeruginosa (12), Str pyogenes (11) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (9). Principal infections were: abscesses (52), bacteraemia (3), pulmonary infections (30, including aspiration pneumonia, tracheostomy associated pneumonia, empyema, and ventilator associated pneumonia), wounds (36, including cellulitis, post-traumatic wounds, decubitus ulcers, myositis, gastrostomy and tracheostomy site wounds, and fasciitis), bites (42, including 23 animal and 19 human), peritonitis (4), osteomyelitis (5), and sinusitis (3). Staph aureus and Str pyogenes were isolated at all sites. However, organisms of the oropharyngeal flora predominated in infections that originated from head and neck wounds and

  5. Thyroid crisis in the maxillofacial trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Robert J; Lewis, Tashorn; Miller, Jared; Clarkson, Earl I

    2014-11-01

    Thyroid crisis, also known as thyroid storm, is a rare complication of thyrotoxicosis that results in a hypermetabolic and hyperadrenergic state. This condition requires prompt recognition and treatment because the mortality from thyroid crisis approaches 30%. Thyrotoxicosis alone will usually not progress to thyroid crisis. Thyroid crisis will typically be precipitated by some concomitant event such as infection, iodine-containing contrast agents, medications such as amiodarone, pregnancy, or surgery. Trauma is a rare precipitator of thyroid crisis. Several published studies have reported thyroid crisis resulting from blunt or penetrating neck trauma. Significant systemic trauma, such as motor vehicle accidents, has also been reported to precipitate thyroid crisis. It is very unusual for minor trauma to precipitate thyroid crisis. In the present study, we report the case of a patient who had incurred relatively minor maxillofacial trauma and developed thyroid crisis 2 weeks after the initial trauma. PMID:25085805

  6. Primary and secondary skeletal blast trauma.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Angi M; Smith, Victoria A; Ramos, Vanessa; Shegogue, Candie; Whitworth, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This study examines primary (resulting from blast wave) and secondary (resulting from disintegrated, penetrating fragments) blast trauma to the skeleton. Eleven pigs were exposed to semi-controlled blast events of varying explosive type, charge size, and distance, including some cases with shrapnel. Skeletal trauma was found to be extensive, presenting as complex, comminuted fractures with numerous small, displaced bone splinters and fragments. Traumatic amputation of the limbs and cranium was also observed. Fractures were concentrated in areas nearer the blast, but there was generally no identifiable point of impact. Fractures were more random in appearance and widespread than those typically associated with gunshot or blunt force injury events. These patterns appear to be uniquely associated with blast trauma and may therefore assist forensic anthropologists and other forensic examiners in the interpretation of skeletal trauma by enabling them to differentiate between blast trauma and trauma resulting from some other cause. PMID:21981586

  7. Penetrating Trauma to the Ureter, Bladder, and Urethra

    PubMed Central

    Zaid, Uwais B.; Bayne, David B.; Harris, Catherine R.; Alwaal, Amjad; McAninch, Jack W.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of adult civilian penetrating trauma to the ureter, bladder, and urethra. Trauma is a significant source of death and morbidity. Genitourinary injuries are present in 10% of penetrating trauma cases. Prompt recognition and appropriate management of genitourinary injuries, which are often masked or overlooked due to concomitant injuries, is essential to minimize morbidity. Penetrating trauma most commonly results from gunshot wounds or stab wounds. Compared to blunt trauma, these typically require surgical exploration. An understanding of anatomy and a high index of suspicion are necessary for prompt recognition of genitourinary injuries. PMID:26623247

  8. Blunt traumatic superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm presenting as gluteal hematoma without bony injury: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Babu, Annu; Gupta, Amit; Sharma, Pawan; Ranjan, Piyush; Kumar, Atin

    2016-08-01

    Blunt traumatic injuries to the superior gluteal artery are rare in clinic. A majority of injuries present as aneurysms following penetrating trauma, fracture pelvis or posterior dislocation of the hip joint. We reported a rare case of superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm following blunt trauma presenting as large expanding right gluteal hematoma without any bony injury. The gluteal hematoma was suspected clinically, confirmed by ultrasound and the arterial injury was diagnosed by CT angiography that revealed a large right gluteal hematoma with a focal contrast leakage forming a pseudoaneurysm within the hematoma. Pseudoaneurysm arose from the superior gluteal branch of right internal iliac artery, which was successfully angioembolized. The patient was discharged on day 4 of hospitalization with resolving gluteal hematoma. This report highlighted the importance of considering an arterial injury following blunt trauma to the buttocks with subsequent painful swelling. Acknowledgment of this rare injury pattern was necessary to facilitate rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:27578385

  9. Facial trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Maxillofacial injury; Midface trauma; Facial injury; LeFort injuries ... Kellman RM. Maxillofacial trauma. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  10. Facial trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Kellman RM. Maxillofacial trauma. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 23. Mayersak RJ. Facial trauma. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, ...

  11. Vascular Injury in Orthopedic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Panagopoulos, George N; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Koulouvaris, Panayiotis; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Mantas, George; Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Sfyroeras, George S; Lazaris, Andreas; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2016-07-01

    Vascular injury in orthopedic trauma is challenging. The risk to life and limb can be high, and clinical signs initially can be subtle. Recognition and management should be a critical skill for every orthopedic surgeon. There are 5 types of vascular injury: intimal injury (flaps, disruptions, or subintimal/intramural hematomas), complete wall defects with pseudoaneurysms or hemorrhage, complete transections with hemorrhage or occlusion, arteriovenous fistulas, and spasm. Intimal defects and subintimal hematomas with possible secondary occlusion are most commonly associated with blunt trauma, whereas wall defects, complete transections, and arteriovenous fistulas usually occur with penetrating trauma. Spasm can occur after either blunt or penetrating trauma to an extremity and is more common in young patients. Clinical presentation of vascular injury may not be straightforward. Physical examination can be misleading or initially unimpressive; a normal pulse examination may be present in 5% to 15% of patients with vascular injury. Detection and treatment of vascular injuries should take place within the context of the overall resuscitation of the patient according to the established principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. Advances in the field, made mostly during times of war, have made limb salvage the rule rather than the exception. Teamwork, familiarity with the often subtle signs of vascular injuries, a high index of suspicion, effective communication, appropriate use of imaging modalities, sound knowledge of relevant technique, and sequence of surgical repairs are among the essential factors that will lead to a successful outcome. This article provides a comprehensive literature review on a subject that generates significant controversy and confusion among clinicians involved in the care of trauma patients. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):249-259.]. PMID:27322172

  12. Penetrating extremity trauma.

    PubMed

    Ivatury, Rao R; Anand, Rahul; Ordonez, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    Penetrating extremity trauma (PET) usually becomes less important when present along with multiple truncal injuries. The middle eastern wars documented the terrible mortality and morbidity resulting from PET. Even in civilian trauma, PET can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. There are now well-established principles in the evaluation and management of vascular, bony, soft tissue, and neurologic lesions that will lead to a reduction of the poor outcomes. This review will summarize some of these recent concepts. PMID:25413177

  13. A Comparative Analysis of Diagnostic Accuracy of Focused Assessment With Sonography for Trauma Performed by Emergency Medicine and Radiology Residents

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Majid; Masoumi, Babak; Esmailian, Mehrdad; Habibi, Amin; Khazaei, Mehdi; Mohammadi Esfahani, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST) is a method for prompt detection of the abdominal free fluid in patients with abdominal trauma. Objectives: This study was conducted to compare the diagnostic accuracy of FAST performed by emergency medicine residents (EMR) and radiology residents (RRs) in detecting peritoneal free fluids. Patients and Methods: Patients triaged in the emergency department with blunt abdominal trauma, high energy trauma, and multiple traumas underwent a FAST examination by EMRs and RRs with the same techniques to obtain the standard views. Ultrasound findings for free fluid in peritoneal cavity for each patient (positive/negative) were compared with the results of computed tomography, operative exploration, or observation as the final outcome. Results: A total of 138 patients were included in the final analysis. Good diagnostic agreement was noted between the results of FAST scans performed by EMRs and RRs (κ = 0.701, P < 0.001), also between the results of EMRs-performed FAST and the final outcome (κ = 0.830, P < 0.0010), and finally between the results of RRs-performed FAST and final outcome (κ = 0.795, P < 0.001). No significant differences were noted between EMRs- and RRs-performed FASTs regarding sensitivity (84.6% vs 84.6%), specificity (98.4% vs 97.6%), positive predictive value (84.6% vs 84.6%), and negative predictive value (98.4% vs 98.4%). Conclusions: Trained EMRs like their fellow RRs have the ability to perform FAST scan with high diagnostic value in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. PMID:26756009

  14. Head and neck neurovascular trauma: Clinical and angiographic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Ssenyonga, Peter Kato; Le Feuvre, David

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective review of all angiograms done for craniocervical trauma, over an eight-year period at Groote Schuur Hospital identified 61 patients out of 823 angiographically studied who had extradural vascular injury and required endovascular treatment. Multiple lesions were identified in nine (14,8%) patients and associated injuries were found in 23 patients (37%). The mechanism of injury was blunt in nine (14.8%) patients and penetrating in 52 (85.2%). There was a statistically significant correlation between the presenting clinical feature and the underlying angiographic lesion. Patients with active bleeding were more likely to have a vessel laceration, an expanding hematoma was associated with false aneurysm and a pulsatile mass with arteriovenous fistula. Endovascular treatment with emphasis on vessel occlusion rather than preservation was successful in all cases except one which required surgical vessel ligation. PMID:25934784

  15. The incidence, spectrum and outcome of paediatric trauma managed by the Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service

    PubMed Central

    Manchev, V; Bruce, JL; Oosthuizen, GV; Laing, GL

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service (PMTS) has run a systematic quality improvement programme since 2006. A key component included the development and implementation of an effective surveillance system in the form of an electronic surgical registry (ESR). This study used data from the ESR to review the incidence, spectrum and outcome of paediatric trauma in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. Methods The ESR was reviewed, and all cases of paediatric trauma managed between 1 January 2012 and 30 July 2014 were retrieved for analysis. Results During the study period, 1,041 paediatric trauma patients (724 male, 69.5%) were managed by the PMTS, averaging a monthly admission of 36. The mean age was 10.9 years (standard deviation: 5.4 years). The mechanism of injury (MOI) was blunt trauma in 753 patients (72.3%) and penetrating trauma in 170 (16.3%). Pedestrian vehicle collisions accounted for 21% of cases and motor vehicle collisions for a further 11%. Intentional trauma accounted for 282 patients (27.1%) and self-inflicted trauma for 14 cases (1.3%). Ninety patients admitted to the intensive care unit and fifty-one required high dependency unit admission. There were 17 deaths, equating to an in-hospital mortality rate of 1.7%. A total of 172 children died on the scene of an incident. There were 35 road traffic related deaths, 26 suicides by hanging, 27 deaths from blunt assault and 23 deaths from penetrating assault. The overall mortality rate for paediatric trauma was 18.2%. Conclusions The ESR has proved to be an effective surveillance system and has enabled the accurate quantification of the burden of paediatric trauma in Pietermaritzburg. This has improved our understanding of the mechanisms and patterns of injury, and has identified a high incidence of intentional and penetrating trauma as well as road traffic collisions. These data can be used to guide strategies to reduce the burden of paediatric trauma in our environment. PMID:26263934

  16. Influence of prehospital fluid resuscitation on patients with multiple injuries in hemorrhagic shock in patients from the DGU trauma registry

    PubMed Central

    Huβmann, Björn; Lefering, Rolf; Taeger, Georg; Waydhas, Christian; Ruchholtz, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Severe bleeding as a result of trauma frequently leads to poor outcome by means of direct or delayed mechanisms. Prehospital fluid therapy is still regarded as the main option of primary treatment in many rescue situations. Our study aimed to assess the influence of prehospital fluid replacement on the posttraumatic course of severely injured patients in a retrospective analysis of matched pairs. Materials and Methods: We reviewed data from 35,664 patients recorded in the Trauma Registry of the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU). The following patients were selected: patients having an Injury Severity Score >16 points, who were ≥16 years of age, with trauma, excluding those with craniocerebral injuries, who were admitted directly to the participating hospitals from the accident site. All patients had recorded values for replaced volume and blood pressure, hemoglobin concentration, and units of packed red blood cells given. The patients were matched based on similar blood pressure characteristics, age groups, and type of accident to create pairs. Pairs were subdivided into two groups based on the volumes infused prior to hospitalization: group 1: 0-1500 (low), group 2: ≥2000 mL (high) volume. Results: We identified 1351 pairs consistent with the inclusion criteria. Patients in group 2 received significantly more packed red blood cells (group 1: 6.9 units, group 2: 9.2 units; P=0.001), they had a significantly reduced capacity of blood coagulation (prothrombin ratio: group 1: 72%, group 2: 61.4%; P≤0.001), and a lower hemoglobin value on arrival at hospital (group 1: 10.6 mg/dL, group 2: 9.1 mg/dL; P≤0.001). The number of ICU-free days concerning the first 30 days after trauma was significantly higher in group 1 (group 1: 11.5 d, group 2: 10.1 d; P≤0.001). By comparison, the rate of sepsis was significantly lower in the first group (group 1: 13.8%, group 2: 18.6%; P=0.002); the same applies to organ failure (group 1: 36.0%, group 2: 39

  17. Subtle Radiological Features of Splenic Avulsion following Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rehim, S. A.; Dagash, H.; Godbole, P. P.; Raghavan, A.; Murthi, G. V.

    2010-01-01

    Splenic trauma in children following blunt abdominal injury is usually treated by nonoperative management (NOM). Splenectomy following abdominal trauma is rare in children. NOM is successful as in the majority of instances the injury to the spleen is contained within its capsule or a localised haematoma. Rarely, the spleen may suffer from an avulsion injury that causes severe uncontrollable bleeding and necessitates an emergency laparotomy and splenectomy. We report two cases of children requiring splenectomy following severe blunt abdominal injury. In both instances emergency laparotomy was undertaken for uncontrollable bleeding despite resuscitation. The operating team was unaware of the precise source of bleeding preoperatively. Retrospective review of the computed tomography (CT) scans revealed subtle radiological features that indicate splenic avulsion. We wish to highlight these radiological features of splenic avulsion as they can help to focus management decisions regarding the need/timing for a laparotomy following blunt abdominal trauma in children. PMID:21209813

  18. Delayed Presentation of Porta Hepatis Injury Following Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lau, L. L.

    1997-01-01

    A 73 year old lady developed abdominal pain, anaemia and obstructive jaundice 18 days after a road traffic accident. The jaundice was due to compression of the biliary confluence by a haematoma which was caused by a laceration of the left portal vein. The portal vein was repaired (lateral venorrhaphy) and post-operative recovery was uncomplicated. Porta hepatis injuries are difficult to diagnose and delayed presentation is not uncommon. Significant morbidity and mortality may ensue if aggressive management is not adopted. PMID:9184880

  19. Systemic trauma.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Rachel E; Martin, Christina Gamache; Smith, Carly Parnitzke

    2014-01-01

    Substantial theoretical, empirical, and clinical work examines trauma as it relates to individual victims and perpetrators. As trauma professionals, it is necessary to acknowledge facets of institutions, cultures, and communities that contribute to trauma and subsequent outcomes. Systemic trauma-contextual features of environments and institutions that give rise to trauma, maintain it, and impact posttraumatic responses-provides a framework for considering the full range of traumatic phenomena. The current issue of the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation is composed of articles that incorporate systemic approaches to trauma. This perspective extends conceptualizations of trauma to consider the influence of environments such as schools and universities, churches and other religious institutions, the military, workplace settings, hospitals, jails, and prisons; agencies and systems such as police, foster care, immigration, federal assistance, disaster management, and the media; conflicts involving war, torture, terrorism, and refugees; dynamics of racism, sexism, discrimination, bullying, and homophobia; and issues pertaining to conceptualizations, measurement, methodology, teaching, and intervention. Although it may be challenging to expand psychological and psychiatric paradigms of trauma, a systemic trauma perspective is necessary on both scientific and ethical grounds. Furthermore, a systemic trauma perspective reflects current approaches in the fields of global health, nursing, social work, and human rights. Empirical investigations and intervention science informed by this paradigm have the potential to advance scientific inquiry, lower the incidence of a broader range of traumatic experiences, and help to alleviate personal and societal suffering. PMID:24617751

  20. Understanding the Relationships between Gender Inequitable Behaviours, Childhood Trauma and Socio-Economic Status in Single and Multiple Perpetrator Rape in Rural South Africa: Structural Equation Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Jewkes, Rachel; Nduna, Mzikazi; Jama-Shai, Nwabisa; Chirwa, Esnat; Dunkle, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Background Interventions to prevent rape perpetration must be designed to address its drivers. This paper seeks to extend understanding of drivers of single and multiple perpetrator rape (referred to here as SPR and MPR respectively) and the relationships between socio-economic status, childhood trauma, peer pressure, other masculine behaviours and rape. Method 1370 young men aged 15 to 26 were interviewed as part of the randomised controlled trial evaluation of Stepping Stones in the rural Eastern Cape. We used multinomial to compare the characteristics of men who reported rape perpetration at baseline. We used structural equation modelling (SEM) to examine pathways to rape perpetration. Results 76.1% of young men had never raped, 10.0% had perpetrated SPR and 13.9% MPR. The factors associated with both MPR and SPR (compared to never having raped) were indicators of socio-economic status (SES), childhood trauma, sexual coercion by a woman, drug and alcohol use, peer pressure susceptibility, having had transactional sex, multiple sexual partners and being physically violent towards a partner. The SEM showed the relationship between SES and rape perpetration to be mediated by gender inequitable masculinity. It was complex as there was a direct path indicating that SES correlated with the masculinity variable directly such that men of higher SES had more gender inequitable masculinities, and indirect path mediated by peer pressure resistance indicated that the former pertained so long as men lacked peer pressure resistance. Having a higher SES conveyed greater resistance for some men. There was also a path mediated through childhood trauma, such that men of lower SES were more likely to have a higher childhood trauma exposure and this correlated with a higher likelihood of having the gender inequitable masculinity (with or without the mediating effect of peer pressure resistance). Discussion Both higher and lower socio-economic status were associated with raping

  1. Trauma systems, shock, and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Fallon, W F

    1993-01-01

    This review of early care covers issues pertaining to the analysis of system function, prehospital intravascular volume replacement, diagnosis of proximity vascular injury, the role of emergency thoracotomy, and the value of transesophageal echocardiography. The first six articles deal with various aspects of system function, from triage to analysis of outcome. The next series of articles reviews work in progress evaluating optimal fluid for resuscitation. Hypertonic saline and dextran combinations have been shown to restore vital signs better than isotonic solutions; they are safe, require smaller volumes, and may improve head injury outcome. Danger lies in the restoration of perfusion without hemorrhage control. Two articles on emergency thoracotomy review the indications and outcome in blunt and penetrating trauma. Survival in blunt trauma is virtually zero. An article and two editorials summarize state of the art for diagnosis and treatment of proximity vascular injury. Two articles describe the potential use of the new technique of transesophageal echocardiography. This new modality has not formed a solid indication at present and can be considered investigational in trauma care. PMID:7584006

  2. Evaluating initial spine trauma response: injury time to trauma center in PA, USA.

    PubMed

    Harrop, James S; Ghobrial, George M; Chitale, Rohan; Krespan, Kelly; Odorizzi, Laura; Fried, Tristan; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Cohen, Murray; Vaccaro, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Historical perceptions regarding the severity of traumatic spinal cord injury has led to considerable disparity in triage to tertiary care centers. This article retrospectively reviews a large regional trauma database to analyze whether the diagnosis of spinal trauma affected patient transfer timing and patterns. The Pennsylvania Trauma database was retrospectively reviewed. All acute trauma patient entries for level I and II centers were categorized for diagnosis, mechanism, and location of injury, analyzing transportation modality and its influence on time of arrival. A total of 1162 trauma patients were identified (1014 blunt injuries, 135 penetrating injuries and 12 other) with a mean transport time of 3.9 hours and a majority of patients arriving within 7 hours (>75%). Spine trauma patients had the longest mean arrival time (5.2 hours) compared to blunt trauma (4.2 hours), cranial neurologic injuries (4.35 hours), and penetrating injuries (2.13 hours, p<0.0001). There was a statistically significant correlation between earlier arrivals and both cranial trauma (p=0.0085) and penetrating trauma (p<0.0001). The fastest modality was a fire rescue (0.93 hours) or police (0.63 hours) vehicle with Philadelphia County (1.1 hour) having the quickest arrival times. Most trauma patients arrived to a specialty center within 7 hours of injury. However subsets analysis revealed that spine trauma patients had the greatest transit times. Present research trials for spinal cord injuries suggest earlier intervention may lead to improved recovery. Therefore, it is important to focus on improvement of the transportation triage system for traumatic spinal patients. PMID:24932590

  3. Nursing Workload in Intensive Care Unit Trauma Patients: Analysis of Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Lilia de Souza; Domingues, Cristiane de Alencar; Poggetti, Renato Sérgio; de Sousa, Regina Marcia Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    Background From the perspective of nurses, trauma patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) demand a high degree of nursing workload due to hemodynamic instability and the severity of trauma injuries. This study aims to identify the factors related to the high nursing workload required for trauma victims admitted to the ICU. Methods This is a prospective, cross-sectional study using descriptive and correlation analyses, conducted with 200 trauma patients admitted to an ICU in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The nursing workload was measured using the Nursing Activities Score (NAS). The distribution of the NAS values into tertiles led to the identification of two research groups: medium/low workload and high workload. The Chi-square, Fisher's exact, Mann-Whitney and multiple logistic regression tests were utilized for the analyses. Findings The majority of patients were male (82.0%) and suffered blunt trauma (94.5%), with traffic accidents (57.5%) and falls (31.0%) being prevalent. The mean age was 40.7 years (±18.6) and the mean NAS was 71.3% (±16.9). Patient gender, the presence of pulmonary failure, the number of injured body regions and the risk of death according to the Simplified Acute Physiology Score II were factors associated with a high degree of nursing workload in the first 24 hours following admission to the ICU. Conclusion Workload demand was higher in male patients with physiological instability and multiple severe trauma injuries who developed pulmonary failure. PMID:25375369

  4. 'Not just little adults' - a pediatric trauma primer.

    PubMed

    Overly, Frank L; Wills, Hale; Valente, Jonathan H

    2014-01-01

    This article describes pediatric trauma care and specifically how a pediatric trauma center, like Hasbro Children's Hospital, provides specialized care to this patient population. The authors review unique aspects of pediatric trauma patients broken down into anatomy and physiology, including Airway and Respiratory, Cardiovascular Response to Hemorrhage, Spine Injuries, Traumatic Brain Injuries, Thoracic Injuries and Blunt Abdominal Trauma. They review certain current recommendations for evaluation and management of these pediatric patients. The authors also briefly review the topic of Child Abuse/Non-accidental Trauma in pediatric patients. Although Pediatric Trauma is a very broad topic, the goal of this article is to act as a primer and describe certain characteristics and management recommendations unique to the pediatric trauma patient. PMID:24400309

  5. Evolution in the Management of Hepatic Trauma: A 25-Year Perspective

    PubMed Central

    David Richardson, J.; Franklin, Glen A.; Lukan, James K.; Carrillo, Eddy H.; Spain, David A.; Miller, Frank B.; Wilson, Mark A.; Polk, Hiram C.; Flint, Lewis M.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To define the changes in demographics of liver injury during the past 25 years and to document the impact of treatment changes on death rates. Summary Background Data No study has presented a long-term review of a large series of hepatic injuries, documenting the effect of treatment changes on outcome. A 25-year review from a concurrently collected database of liver injuries documented changes in treatment and outcome. Methods A database of hepatic injuries from 1975 to 1999 was studied for changes in demographics, treatment patterns, and outcome. Factors potentially responsible for outcome differences were examined. Results A total of 1,842 liver injuries were treated. Blunt injuries have dramatically increased; the proportion of major injuries is approximately 16% annually. Nonsurgical therapy is now used in more than 80% of blunt injuries. The death rates from both blunt and penetrating trauma have improved significantly through each successive decade of the study. The improved death rates are due to decreased death from hemorrhage. Factors responsible include fewer major venous injuries requiring surgery, improved outcome with vein injuries, better results with packing, and effective arterial hemorrhage control with arteriographic embolization. Conclusions The treatment and outcome of liver injuries have changed dramatically in 25 years. Multiple modes of therapy are available for hemorrhage control, which has improved outcome. PMID:10973382

  6. Geriatric Trauma.

    PubMed

    Reske-Nielsen, Casper; Medzon, Ron

    2016-08-01

    Within the next 15 years, 1 in 5 Americans will be over age 65. $34 billion will be spent yearly on trauma care of this age group. This section covers situations in trauma unique to the geriatric population, who are often under-triaged and have significant injuries underestimated. Topics covered include age-related pathophysiological changes, underlying existing medical conditions and certain daily medications that increase the risk of serious injury in elderly trauma patients. Diagnostic evaluation of this group requires liberal testing, imaging, and a multidisciplinary team approach. Topics germane to geriatric trauma including hypothermia, elder abuse, and depression and suicide are also covered. PMID:27475011

  7. Association Between Helicopter vs Ground Emergency Medical Services and Survival for Adults With Major Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Galvagno, Samuel M.; Haut, Elliott R.; Zafar, S. Nabeel; Millin, Michael G.; Efron, David T.; Koenig, George J.; Baker, Susan P.; Bowman, Stephen M.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Haider, Adil H.

    2012-01-01

    Context Helicopter emergency medical services and their possible effect on outcomes for traumatically injured patients remain a subject of debate. Because helicopter services are a limited and expensive resource, a methodologically rigorous investigation of its effectiveness compared with ground emergency medical services is warranted. Objective To assess the association between the use of helicopter vs ground services and survival among adults with serious traumatic injuries. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective cohort study involving 223 475 patients older than 15 years, having an injury severity score higher than 15, and sustaining blunt or penetrating trauma that required transport to US level I or II trauma centers and whose data were recorded in the 2007–2009 versions of the American College of Surgeons National Trauma Data Bank. Interventions Transport by helicopter or ground emergency services to level I or level II trauma centers. Main Outcome Measures Survival to hospital discharge and discharge disposition. Results A total of 61 909 patients were transported by helicopter and 161 566 patients were transported by ground. Overall, 7813 patients (12.6%) transported by helicopter died compared with 17 775 patients (11%) transported by ground services. Before propensity score matching, patients transported by helicopter to level I and level II trauma centers had higher Injury Severity Scores. In the propensity score–matched multivariable regression model, for patients transported to level I trauma centers, helicopter transport was associated with an improved odds of survival compared with ground transport (odds ratio [OR], 1.16; 95% CI, 1.14–1.17; P<.001; absolute risk reduction [ARR], 1.5%). For patients transported to level II trauma centers, helicopter transport was associated with an improved odds of survival (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.13–1.17; P < .001; ARR, 1.4%). A greater proportion (18.2%) of those transported to level I trauma centers

  8. Role of external cardiac compression in truncal trauma.

    PubMed

    Mattox, K L; Feliciano, D V

    1982-11-01

    External cardiac compression (ECC) was originally developed for patients with nontraumatic cardiac conditions, but it is now used for a wide variety of emergency conditions. As an integral part of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), ECC coupled with forced pulmonary ventilation may NOT be applicable to cases of cardiac arrest following penetrating and blunt thoracic and abdominal trauma. Review of 100 patients with penetrating or blunt truncal trauma who received CPR and ECC more than 3 minutes prehospital revealed NO survivors despite continued aggressive resuscitative efforts in 49 of the patients upon arrival at a trauma center. Major cardiovascular disruption was found at thoracotomy or autopsy in all patients. In another 12 patients receiving forced ventilation and prehospital ECC, air embolism to the coronary arteries was the cause of death. CPR by paramedics, physicians, nurses, or lay persons does not appear to be of value in patients who have sustained cardiac arrest from truncal trauma. PMID:7143499

  9. A Genomic Score Prognostic of Outcome in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Warren, H Shaw; Elson, Constance M; Hayden, Douglas L; Schoenfeld, David A; Cobb, J Perren; Maier, Ronald V; Moldawer, Lyle L; Moore, Ernest E; Harbrecht, Brian G; Pelak, Kimberly; Cuschieri, Joseph; Herndon, David N; Jeschke, Marc G; Finnerty, Celeste C; Brownstein, Bernard H; Hennessy, Laura; Mason, Philip H; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injuries frequently lead to infection, organ failure, and death. Health care providers rely on several injury scoring systems to quantify the extent of injury and to help predict clinical outcome. Physiological, anatomical, and clinical laboratory analytic scoring systems (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation [APACHE], Injury Severity Score [ISS]) are utilized, with limited success, to predict outcome following injury. The recent development of techniques for measuring the expression level of all of a person’s genes simultaneously may make it possible to develop an injury scoring system based on the degree of gene activation. We hypothesized that a peripheral blood leukocyte gene expression score could predict outcome, including multiple organ failure, following severe blunt trauma. To test such a scoring system, we measured gene expression of peripheral blood leukocytes from patients within 12 h of traumatic injury. cRNA derived from whole blood leukocytes obtained within 12 h of injury provided gene expression data for the entire genome that were used to create a composite gene expression score for each patient. Total blood leukocytes were chosen because they are active during inflammation, which is reflective of poor outcome. The gene expression score combines the activation levels of all the genes into a single number which compares the patient’s gene expression to the average gene expression in uninjured volunteers. Expression profiles from healthy volunteers were averaged to create a reference gene expression profile which was used to compute a difference from reference (DFR) score for each patient. This score described the overall genomic response of patients within the first 12 h following severe blunt trauma. Regression models were used to compare the association of the DFR, APACHE, and ISS scores with outcome. We hypothesized that patients with a total gene response more different from uninjured volunteers would tend to have poorer

  10. Triad of death: the importance of temperature monitoring in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Keane, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Multiple organ failure is a significant complication in traumatic injury, and can be exacerbated by a failure to adequately monitor and control trauma patients' core body temperature in emergency departments (EDs). Nearly half of trauma patients are hypothermic on arrival at emergency departments, often due to factors beyond the control of emergency service responders and during on-scene resuscitation attempts. This article examines the physiology of the 'triad of death' -hypothermia, metabolic acidosis and coagulopathy - to highlight the importance of monitoring and maintaining normothermia, or normal body temperature, which is between 36°C and 37.2°C, in trauma patients to improve outcomes. It also describes some rewarming interventions that can help to save the lives of patients with multiple injuries. Major traumatic injury is the leading cause of death in people under 40 years of age in the UK. Among major trauma patients, 75% are male and 98% of injuries are caused by blunt force such as falls or road traffic incidents ( National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) 2015 ). The cost in terms of lost economic output is variously estimated to be between £3.3 billion ( National Audit Office 2010 ) and £3.7 billion a year ( Scott 2016 ). Multiple organ failure is a significant complication of traumatic injury, and is exacerbated by failure to adequately monitor and control the patient's core body temperature in ED. On arrival at ED, 43% of trauma patients are hypothermic ( Allen et al 2010 ), often due to factors beyond the control of emergency service responders, such as complicated extrications in adverse environmental conditions. Initial resuscitative attempts on-scene can further reduce core body temperature, because of prolonged exposure to the environment and administration of cold intravenous (IV) fluids ( Duchesne et al 2010 ). PMID:27615346

  11. Popliteal vasculature injuries in paediatric trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Jones, S A; Roberts, D C; Clarke, N M P

    2012-10-01

    Popliteal-artery injuries in the paediatric-trauma patient are uncommon, difficult to diagnose and with prolonged ischaemia lead to substantial complications. We report three cases of popliteal-vasculature injury in paediatric-trauma patients with diverse mechanisms of injury: blunt trauma, penetrating injury and a Salter-Harris I fracture. We present a range of the significant sequelae that can result from paediatric popliteal-artery injury, both physically and psychologically. It is imperative that clinicians have a high index of suspicion when confronted with paediatric patients with trauma around the knee and that popliteal-vasculature injuries are diagnosed early. If insufficiencies are detected, further imaging should be considered, but surgical exploration should not be delayed in the presence of ischaemia. PMID:22776610

  12. Hypotensive Resuscitation among Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Matthew M.; Leonard, Jan; Slone, Denetta S.; Mains, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a principal cause of death among trauma patients within the first 24 hours after injury. Optimal fluid resuscitation strategies have been examined for nearly a century, more recently with several randomized controlled trials. Hypotensive resuscitation, also called permissive hypotension, is a resuscitation strategy that uses limited fluids and blood products during the early stages of treatment for hemorrhagic shock. A lower-than-normal blood pressure is maintained until operative control of the bleeding can occur. The randomized controlled trials examining restricted fluid resuscitation have demonstrated that aggressive fluid resuscitation in the prehospital and hospital setting leads to more complications than hypotensive resuscitation, with disparate findings on the survival benefit. Since the populations studied in each randomized controlled trial are slightly different, as is the timing of intervention and targeted vitals, there is still a need for a large, multicenter trial that can examine the benefit of hypotensive resuscitation in both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. PMID:27595109

  13. Hypotensive Resuscitation among Trauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Carrick, Matthew M; Leonard, Jan; Slone, Denetta S; Mains, Charles W; Bar-Or, David

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a principal cause of death among trauma patients within the first 24 hours after injury. Optimal fluid resuscitation strategies have been examined for nearly a century, more recently with several randomized controlled trials. Hypotensive resuscitation, also called permissive hypotension, is a resuscitation strategy that uses limited fluids and blood products during the early stages of treatment for hemorrhagic shock. A lower-than-normal blood pressure is maintained until operative control of the bleeding can occur. The randomized controlled trials examining restricted fluid resuscitation have demonstrated that aggressive fluid resuscitation in the prehospital and hospital setting leads to more complications than hypotensive resuscitation, with disparate findings on the survival benefit. Since the populations studied in each randomized controlled trial are slightly different, as is the timing of intervention and targeted vitals, there is still a need for a large, multicenter trial that can examine the benefit of hypotensive resuscitation in both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. PMID:27595109

  14. [Severe hepatic trauma. Initial non-operative treatment. A case report].

    PubMed

    Christophe, M; Le Treut, Y P; Thomas, P; Pol, B; Escoffier, J M; Ottomani, A; Bricot, R

    1990-05-26

    The emergency surgical treatment of severe hepatic traumas still carries a high mortality risk. We report a case of severe blunt trauma of the liver managed without surgery under CT guidance. This attitude--which does not exclude surgery as a later resort--requires haemodynamic stability of the patient, close monitoring in a surgical intensive care unit and repeated CT scans. PMID:2141153

  15. Should blunt segmental vascular renal injuries be considered an AAST grade 4 renal injury?

    PubMed Central

    Malaeb, Bahaa; Figler, Brad; Wessells, Hunter; Voelzke, Bryan B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Renal segmental vascular injury (SVI) following blunt abdominal trauma is not part of the original AAST renal injury grading system. Recent recommendations support classifying SVI as an AAST grade 4 injury. Our primary aim was to compare outcomes following blunt renal SVI and blunt renal collecting system lacerations (CSL). We hypothesize that renal SVI fare well with conservative management alone and should be relegated a less severe renal AAST grade. Methods We retrospectively identified patients with SVI and G4 CSL admitted to a Level 1 trauma center between 2003–2010. Penetrating trauma was excluded. Need for surgical intervention, length of stay, kidney salvage (>25% renal preservation on renography 6–12 weeks after injury), and delayed complication rates were compared between the SVI and CSL injuries. Statistical analysis utilized chi squared, Fisher exact, and t-test. Results 56 patients with SVI and 88 patients with G4 CSL sustained blunt trauma. Age, injury severity score, and length of stay were similar for the two groups. Five patients in each group died of concomitant, non-renal injuries. In the G4 CSL group, 15 patients underwent major interventions and 32 patients underwent minor interventions. Only one patient in the SVI group underwent a major intervention. The renal salvage rate was 85.7% following SVI versus 62.5% following CSL (p=0.107). Conclusions Overall surgical interventions are significantly lower among the SVI cohort than G4 CSL cohort. Further analysis using a larger cohort of patients is recommended before revising the current renal grading system. Adding SVI as a grade 4 injury could potentially increase the heterogeneity of grade 4 injuries and decrease the ability of the AAST renal injury grading system to predict outcomes, such as nephrectomy rate. Level of Evidence IV (retrospective, cohort study) PMID:24458054

  16. Tailbone trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Choi SB, Cwinn AA. Pelvic trauma. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 55. Vora ...

  17. Geriatric Trauma: A Radiologist's Guide to Imaging Trauma Patients Aged 65 Years and Older.

    PubMed

    Sadro, Claudia T; Sandstrom, Claire K; Verma, Nupur; Gunn, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    Radiologists play an important role in evaluation of geriatric trauma patients. Geriatric patients have injury patterns that differ markedly from those seen in younger adults and are susceptible to serious injury from minor trauma. The spectrum of trauma in geriatric patients includes head and spine injury, chest and rib trauma, blunt abdominal injury, pelvic fractures, and extremity fractures. Clinical evaluation of geriatric trauma patients is difficult because of overall frailty, comorbid illness, and medication effects. Specific attention should be focused on the effects of medications in this population, including anticoagulants, steroids, and bisphosphonates. Radiologists should use age-appropriate algorithms for radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging of geriatric trauma patients and follow guidelines for intravenous contrast agent administration in elderly patients with impaired renal function. Because there is less concern about risk for cancer with use of ionizing radiation in this age group, CT is the primary imaging modality used in the setting of geriatric trauma. Clinical examples are provided from the authors' experience at a trauma center where geriatric patients who have sustained major and minor injuries are treated daily. PMID:26065932

  18. [Mesenteric trauma: management in austere environments].

    PubMed

    Peycru, T; Biance, N; Avaro, J P; Savoie, P H; Tardat, E; Balandraud, P

    2006-04-01

    Mesenteric trauma, i.e., injuries located in the bowel or organs supplied by the superior mesenteric artery, can be life-threatening. The incidence of these lesions is low. Most occur as result of blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma due mainly to gunshot wounds or road accidents. Management of these serious injuries can be challenging in the military field hospitals. The major problem in austere environment is the unavailabiity of computerized axial and other tools gene rally used for diagnosis. As an alternative to tomography diagnostic peritoneal lavage can be used with a high sensitivity for the detection of mesenteric trauma. The second difficulty is technical. General surgeons without vasular training or supplies must prepared to suspect and reonstuct lesions of the superior mesenteric available resources. PMID:16775948

  19. Elderly trauma.

    PubMed

    Holleran, Renee Semonin

    2015-01-01

    Across the world, the population is aging. Adults 65 years and older make up one of the fastest growing segments of the US population. Trauma is a disease process that affects all age groups. The mortality and morbidity that result from an injury can be influenced by many factors including age, physical condition, and comorbidities. The management of the elderly trauma patient can present some unique challenges. This paper addresses the differences that occur in the management of elderly patient who has been injured. This paper also includes a discussion of how to prevent injury in the elderly. PMID:26039652

  20. The unrecognized epidemic of blunt carotid arterial injuries: early diagnosis improves neurologic outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Biffl, W L; Moore, E E; Ryu, R K; Offner, P J; Novak, Z; Coldwell, D M; Franciose, R J; Burch, J M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the benefit of screening for blunt carotid arterial injuries (BCI) in patients who are asymptomatic. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Blunt carotid arterial injuries have the potential for devastating complications. Published studies report 23% to 28% mortality rates, with 48% to 58% of survivors having permanent severe neurologic deficits. Most patients have neurologic deficits when the injury is diagnosed. The authors hypothesized that screening patients who are asymptomatic and instituting early therapy would improve neurologic outcome. METHODS: The Trauma Registry of the author's Level I Trauma Center identified patients with BCI from 1990 through 1997. Beginning in August 1996, the authors implemented a screening for BCI. Arteriography was used for diagnosis. Patients without specific contraindications were anticoagulated. Endovascular stents were deployed in the setting of pseudoaneurysms. RESULTS: Thirty-seven patients with BCI were identified among 15,331 blunt-trauma victims (0.24%). During the screening period, 25 patients were diagnosed with BCI among 2902 admissions (0.86%); 13 (52%) were asymptomatic. Overall, eight patients died, and seven of the survivors had permanent severe neurologic deficits. Excluding those dying of massive brain injury and patients admitted with coma and brain injury, mortality associated with BCI was 15%, with severe neurologic morbidity in 16% of survivors. The patients who were asymptomatic at diagnosis had a better neurologic outcome than those who were symptomatic. Symptomatic patients who were anticoagulated showed a trend toward greater neurologic improvement at the time of discharge than those who were not anticoagulated. CONCLUSIONS: Screening allows the identification of asymptomatic BCI and thereby facilitates early systemic anticoagulation, which is associated with improved neurologic outcome. The role of endovascular stents in the treatment of blunt traumatic pseudoaneurysms remains to be defined

  1. Benchmarking Outcomes in the Critically Injured Trauma Patient and the Effect of Implementing Standard Operating Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Cuschieri, Joseph; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; West, Michael A.; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Bankey, Paul E.; Nathens, Avery B.; Cuenca, Alex G.; Efron, Philip A.; Hennessy, Laura; Xiao, Wenzhong; Mindrinos, Michael N.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Mason, Philip H.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Warren, H. Shaw; Cobb, J. Perren; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Maier, Ronald V.; Tompkins, Ronald G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine and compare outcomes with accepted benchmarks in trauma care at seven academic Level I trauma centers in which patients were treated based on a series of standard operating procedures (SOPs). Background Injury remains the leading cause of death for those under 45 years of age. We describe the baseline patient characteristics and well-defined outcomes of persons hospitalized in the United States for severe blunt trauma. Methods We followed 1,637 trauma patients from 2003–2009 up to 28 hospital days using SOPs developed at the onset of the study. An extensive database on patient and injury characteristics, clinical treatment, and outcomes was created. These data were compared with existing trauma benchmarks. Results The study patients were critically injured and in shock. SOP compliance improved 10–40% during the study period. Multiple organ failure and mortality rates were 34.8% and 16.7% respectively. Time to recovery, defined as the time until the patient was free of organ failure for at least two consecutive days, was developed as a new outcome measure. There was a reduction in mortality rate in the cohort during the study that cannot be explained by changes in the patient population. Conclusions This study provides the current benchmark and the overall positive effect of implementing SOPs for severely injured patients. Over the course of the study, there were improvements in morbidity and mortality and increasing compliance with SOPs. Mortality was surprisingly low, given the degree of injury, and improved over the duration of the study, which correlated with improved SOP compliance. PMID:22470077

  2. Clinical review is essential to evaluate 30-day mortality after trauma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Securing high-quality mortality statistics requires systematic evaluation of all trauma deaths. We examined the proportion of trauma patients dying within 30 days from causes not related to the injury and the impact of exclusion of patients dead on arrival on 30-day trauma mortality. We also defined the demographics, injury characteristics, cause of death and time to death in patients admitted to our trauma center who died within 30 days, between 2007-2011. Methods Demographics, injury characteristics, status alive/dead on arrival, cause of death and time to death of all patients were reviewed. Deaths were analyzed based on injury mechanism (penetrating, blunt trauma and low energy blunt trauma) and cause of death (traumatic brain injury (TBI), hemorrhage, organ dysfunction and other/unknown). Results Of the 7422 admissions, 343 deaths were identified of which 36 (10.5%) involved causes not related to the injury. The overall age was 71 years, Injury Severity Score (ISS) 29 and time to death 24 hours (all medians). Fifty-four patients (17.6%) were dead on arrival. Exclusion of patients dead on arrival reduced the overall mortality rate (P < 0.05) and median ISS (P < 0.05) and increased median age (P < 0.01) and time to death (P < 0.001). Injury mechanism was penetrating trauma in 7.5%, blunt trauma in 56.0%, and low energy blunt trauma in 36.5%. TBI accounted for 58.6%; hemorrhage 16.3%, organ dysfunction 15.0%, and other/unknown for 10.1% of the deaths. Patients who died after low energy blunt trauma were older, had lower ISS and longer time to death compared to those who died after penetrating and blunt trauma (all P < 0.01). Conclusions Clinical review of all trauma deaths was essential to interpret mortality. Thirty-day trauma mortality included 10.5% deaths not directly related to the injury and the exclusion of patients dead on arrival significantly affected the unadjusted mortality rate, ISS, median age and time to death

  3. Thoracic spinal trauma and associated injuries: should early spinal decompression be considered?

    PubMed

    Petitjean, M E; Mousselard, H; Pointillart, V; Lassie, P; Senegas, J; Dabadie, P

    1995-08-01

    The relative benefits of conservative or surgical treatment in thoracic spinal trauma are still controversial. Owing to its anatomic relations, thoracic spinal trauma is specific regarding neurologic prognosis, the high incidence of associated injuries, and surgical management. Over a 30-month period, 49 patients sustained thoracic spinal trauma with neurologic impairment. The authors review population characteristics, associated injuries, and surgical management, and underline the high incidence of associated injuries, in particular, blunt chest trauma. In their opinion, early spinal decompression has no indication in complete paraplegia. Concerning partial paraplegia, early surgery may enhance neurologic recovery. Nevertheless, they suggest three main criteria in deciding whether or not to perform surgery early: the existence of residual spinal compression, the degree of neurologic impairment, and the presence of potential hemorrhagic lesions or blunt chest trauma, especially pulmonary contusion. PMID:7674409

  4. The neonatal nurse's role in preventing abusive head trauma.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kimberly A

    2014-10-01

    Abusive head trauma in infants occurs in 24.6 to 39.8 per 100,000 infants in developed countries. Abusive head trauma refers to any type of intentional head trauma an infant sustains, as a result of an injury to the skull or intracranial contents from a blunt force and/or violent shaking. The clinical question was: what evidence-based interventions have been implemented by neonatal nurses to prevent abusive head trauma in infants? PubMed was searched to obtain English language publications from 2005 to May 2014 for interventions focused on preventing abusive head trauma using the key term "shaken baby syndrome." A total of 10 studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. All of the interventions targeted prevention of abusive head trauma with information about abusive head trauma/shaken baby syndrome and the "normal" infant crying behaviors. Interventions taught parents why infants cried, how to calm the infants, ways to cope with inconsolable infants, and how to develop a plan for what to do if they could not cope anymore. Parents who participated in the interventions were consistently able to explain the information and tell others about the dangers of shaking infants compared to the control parents. Only 2 studies calculated the preintervention abusive head trauma rate and the postintervention frequency of abusive head trauma. Each found significant differences in abusive head trauma. PMID:25137601

  5. [Major respiratory tract traumas].

    PubMed

    Petrov, D; Obretenov, E; Kalaĭdzhiev, G; Plochev, M; Kostadinov, D

    2002-01-01

    Between 1988 and 2000 a total of 33 patients with traumatic tracheobronchial lesions were diagnosed and treated. The trauma was penetrating in 7 (stab and gun-shot), blunt in 10 (car accidents, compression and falling from heights) and iatrogenic in 16 of them (postintubational--15, after foreign body extraction--1). The main clinical and radiological features were subcutaneous emphysema, hemoptysis, respiratory insufficiency, pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax. The diagnosis was confirmed in all patients by early fiberoptic bronchoscopy. "Watch and see" tactics with massive antibiotics therapy was followed in 4 (12%) patients. A surgical treatment was carried out in 29 (88%) patients as follows: simple repair--19 (58%), left pneumonectomy--2 (6%), tracheal resection and anastomosis "end to end"--2 (6%), tracheostomy--1 (3%), thoracocenthesis and drainage--3 (9%) and cervical mediastinotomy--2 (6%). The operative mortality was 9%. The cause of death in these 3 patients were associated brain and spinal cord injuries. In the rest of patients the early and long-term postoperative results were considered very good. PMID:12515032

  6. Abdominal trauma by ostrich

    PubMed Central

    Usurelu, Sergiu; Bettencourt, Vanessa; Melo, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ostriches typically avoid humans in the wild, since they correctly assess humans as potential predators, and, if approached, often run away. However, ostriches may turn aggressive rather than run when threatened, especially when cornered, and may also attack when they feel the need to defend their offspring or territories. Presentation of case A 71-year-old male patient presented with intra abdominal injury sustained from being kicked in the abdominal wall by an ostrich. During laparotomy, were found free peritoneal effusion and perforation of the small intestine. Discussion The clinical history and physical examination are extremely important for diagnostic and therapeutic decision making. CT-scan is the most accurate exam for making diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice, and is always indicated when there is injury to the hollow viscera. In general it is possible to suture the defect. Conclusion In cases of blunt abdominal trauma by animals is necessary to have a low threshold of suspicion for acute abdomen. PMID:25685344

  7. External iliac artery occlusion in a paediatric patient following handlebar trauma.

    PubMed

    Singla, Animesh A; McPherson, Danielle; Singla, Apresh A; Cross, Jane; Leslie, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Arterial occlusion following blunt trauma is an uncommon occurrence. We report an unusual case of delayed external iliac artery occlusion in a young male following blunt abdominal injury. He was successfully treated with thromboendarterectomy and saphenous vein patch repair. There have only been a handful of documented cases occurring in the paediatric population. All patients presenting with groin injury from this mechanism should be carefully investigated and monitored for risk of vascular injury. PMID:25733671

  8. External iliac artery occlusion in a paediatric patient following handlebar trauma

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Animesh A.; McPherson, Danielle; Singla, Apresh A; Cross, Jane; Leslie, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Arterial occlusion following blunt trauma is an uncommon occurrence. We report an unusual case of delayed external iliac artery occlusion in a young male following blunt abdominal injury. He was successfully treated with thromboendarterectomy and saphenous vein patch repair. There have only been a handful of documented cases occurring in the paediatric population. All patients presenting with groin injury from this mechanism should be carefully investigated and monitored for risk of vascular injury. PMID:25733671

  9. Shock trauma.

    PubMed

    Trunkey, D D

    1984-09-01

    Trauma - accidental or intentional injury - is a major health and social problem. It is still the chief cause of death in people between the ages of 1 and 38 years. In the United States, the mortality due to trauma between the ages of 15 and 24 years increased by 13% from 1960 to 1978. During the same period, the mortality for people aged 25 to 64 years declined by 16%. Murders have increased from 8464 in 1960, to 26 000 in 1982. The overall death rate of American teenagers and young adults is 50% higher than that of their counterparts in Britain, Sweden and Japan. Trauma affects young, productive citizens, and the estimated costs for death, disability and loss of productivity exceed $230 million a day. The most tragic statistic is that at least 40% of the deaths are needless and preventable if better treatment and prevention programs were available. Trauma deaths that might be prevented are those due to motor vehicle accidents, homicide, burns, and alcohol and drug abuse. In this paper suggestions for prevention are made. They include improved crash worthiness of motor vehicles, revocation of drunk drivers' licences, use of devices that limit drunk drivers, increased tax on alcohol and random breathalyser tests, and the use of seat belts and motorcycle helmets. Control of hand-guns and burn characteristics of cigarettes could also reduce deaths. The problems and issues in trauma care can be divided into two broad categories: system and professional. System problems include prehospital care, in-hospital care, rehabilitation and prevention. Professional problems include education, research, economics, and quality.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6478325

  10. An animal model of emotional blunting in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pietersen, Charmaine Y; Bosker, Fokko J; Doorduin, Janine; Jongsma, Minke E; Postema, Folkert; Haas, Joseph V; Johnson, Michael P; Koch, Tineke; Vladusich, Tony; den Boer, Johan A

    2007-01-01

    Schizophrenia is often associated with emotional blunting--the diminished ability to respond to emotionally salient stimuli--particularly those stimuli representative of negative emotional states, such as fear. This disturbance may stem from dysfunction of the amygdala, a brain region involved in fear processing. The present article describes a novel animal model of emotional blunting in schizophrenia. This model involves interfering with normal fear processing (classical conditioning) in rats by means of acute ketamine administration. We confirm, in a series of experiments comprised of cFos staining, behavioral analysis and neurochemical determinations, that ketamine interferes with the behavioral expression of fear and with normal fear processing in the amygdala and related brain regions. We further show that the atypical antipsychotic drug clozapine, but not the typical antipsychotic haloperidol nor an experimental glutamate receptor 2/3 agonist, inhibits ketamine's effects and retains normal fear processing in the amygdala at a neurochemical level, despite the observation that fear-related behavior is still inhibited due to ketamine administration. Our results suggest that the relative resistance of emotional blunting to drug treatment may be partially due to an inability of conventional therapies to target the multiple anatomical and functional brain systems involved in emotional processing. A conceptual model reconciling our findings in terms of neurochemistry and behavior is postulated and discussed. PMID:18159243

  11. Chronic Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Presenting 29 Years following Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sarah; Kumar, Prashant; Van den Bosch, Rene; Khanafer, Adib

    2015-01-01

    Blunt, nonpenetrating injuries of the thoracic aorta are uncommon and associated with a high mortality rate within the first hour. Aortic injury is missed in 1-2% of patients that survive to hospital, and a chronic thoracic aortic aneurysm may subsequently form. We present a case in which a chronic thoracic aortic aneurysm was diagnosed 29 years following a significant motor vehicle accident. We discuss the epidemiology, presentation, and management of this uncommon consequence of blunt, nonpenetrating aortic injury. Our case illustrates an important clinical lesson; a past medical history of trauma should not be overlooked at any patient assessment. PMID:26351610

  12. Blunt splenic injury in Sikkimese children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Mohanta, Pradip Kumar; Ghosh, Amrita; Pal, Ranabir; Pal, Shrayan

    2011-01-01

    Background: The contemplation for the salvage operations and the nonoperative treatment for the pediatric splenic injuries had increasingly been suggested as the standard case management. Objectives: The study was carried out to identify the risk factors, the presentations, the severities and outcome of the interventions of blunt splenic injuries in the children and adolescents. Materials and Methods: This retrospective review was carried out in a tertiary care hospital in Sikkim on the children and adolescents admitted with splenic injury from January 2005 to December 2009. Splenic injuries were graded with the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Splenic Injury Scale followed by the operative and nonoperative managements (NOM). Results: Overall 147 cases with the abdominal trauma were diagnosed with splenic injury. Of them, males reported in higher numbers; three-fourths were adolescents with preponderance above 16 years of age. Majority of the cases [n=91(61.90%)] were due to fall from heights and others from road traffic accidents. Immediate surgical interventions was instituted in the hemodynamically unstable cases (n=87) NOM failed in 27 patients; of them eight cases underwent splenectomy, and 19 underwent surgical salvage; 33 were closely followed up by conservative approach with both clinical and CT criteria. Total number of cases in grade III and above was significantly higher than with lower grades of injury. Conclusions: In total 95(64.63%) of the cases were managed with total splenectomy; 19 cases in the initial nonsurgical group underwent salvage operation and 33 cases received NOM. PMID:21769209

  13. Fatal case of cervical blunt vascular injury with cervical vertebral fracture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Imagama, Shiro; Okura, Toshiaki; Yoshihara, Hisatake; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Ukai, Junichi; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Muramoto, Akio; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) is usually caused by neck trauma that predominantly occurs in high-impact injuries. BCVI may occur due to damage to both the vertebral and carotid arteries, and may be fatal in the absence of appropriate treatment and early diagnosis. Here, we describe a case of cerebral infarction caused by a combination of a lower cervical spinal fracture and traumatic injury to the carotid artery by a direct blunt external force in a 52-year-old man. Initially, there was no effect on consciousness, but 6 hours later loss of consciousness occurred due to traumatic dissection of the carotid artery that resulted in a cerebral infarction. Brain edema was so extensive that decompression by emergency craniectomy and internal decompression were performed by a neurosurgeon, but with no effect, and the patient died on day 7. This is a rare case of cerebral infarction caused by a combination of a lower cervical spinal fracture and traumatic injury to the carotid artery. The case suggests that cervical vascular injury should be considered in a patient with a blunt neck trauma and that additional imaging should be performed. PMID:26412898

  14. Aging May Blunt Some of Exercise's Benefits

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159438.html Aging May Blunt Some of Exercise's Benefits But, that's no excuse for seniors to ... News) -- Aging may dampen some beneficial effects of exercise, a new study suggests. But, that's no reason ...

  15. Antibiotics May Blunt Breast-Feeding's Benefits

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159339.html Antibiotics May Blunt Breast-Feeding's Benefits Infants given the drugs were prone to infections ... use of antibiotics may dampen some of the benefits of breast-feeding, a new study suggests. Researchers ...

  16. [Alleged assault in a forest: An unusual case of self-inflicted blunt injury].

    PubMed

    Kunz, Sebastian Niko; Tutsch-Bauer, Edith

    2014-01-01

    The medico-legal assessment of potentially self-inflicted injuries is an important field of clinical forensic medicine. Compared with sharp force injuries, it is much more difficult to distinguish blunt injuries caused by another party from self-inflicted lesions. We present a case of a young female doctor, who was allegedly attacked by an unknown stranger during her evening walk in the woods. She claimed to have been hit repeatedly on the head and arms with a stone. During the forensic investigation, blunt injuries could be confirmed on her head and forearms. Based on the arrangement and intensity of the injuries, together with the result of a bloodstain pattern analysis of the weapon, the victim's statement could be disproved. After being confronted with the results of the investigation, the woman admitted to have inflicted the injuries herself. This case is an unusual and rare example of self-inflicted blunt injury. It shows that the criteria of self-inflicted injuries can also be applied to blunt trauma. However, due to the small number of cases, a high degree of caution is required from the forensic expert. PMID:26548021

  17. Spleen volume on CT and the effect of abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Romero, Cinthia; Agarwal, Sheela; Abujudeh, Hani H; Thrall, James; Hahn, Peter F

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the magnitude of change in spleen volume on CT in subjects sustaining blunt abdominal trauma without hemorrhage relative to patients without disease and how the spleen volumes are distributed. Sixty-seven subjects with blunt abdominal trauma and 101 control subjects were included in this retrospective single-center, IRB-approved, and HIPAA-compliant study. Patients with an injured spleen were excluded. Using a semiautomatic segmentation program, two readers computed spleen volumes from CT. Spleen volume distribution in male and female trauma and control cohorts were compared nonparametrically. Spleen volume plotted against height, weight, and age were analyzed by linear regression. The number of females and males are, respectively, 35 and 32 in trauma subjects and 69 and 32 among controls. Female trauma patients (49.6 years) were older than males (39.8 years) (p = 0.02). Distributions of spleen volume were not normal, skewed above their means, requiring a nonparametric comparison. Spleen volumes in trauma patients were smaller than those in controls with medians of 230 vs 294 mL in males(p < 0.006) and 163 vs 191 mL in females(p < 0.04). Spleen volume correlated positively with weight in females and with height in male controls, and negatively with age in male controls (p < 0.01). Variation in reproducibility and repeatability was acceptable at 1.5 and 4.9 %, respectively. Reader variation was 1.7 and 4.6 % for readers 1 and 2, respectively. The mean spleen volume in controls was 245 mL, the largest ever reported. Spleen volume decreases in response to blunt abdominal trauma. Spleen volumes are not normally distributed. Our population has the largest spleen volume reported in the literature, perhaps a consequence of the obesity epidemic. PMID:27166964

  18. Acute ethanol intoxication and the trauma patient: hemodynamic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bilello, John; McCray, Victor; Davis, James; Jackson, Lascienya; Danos, Leigh Ann

    2011-09-01

    Many trauma patients are acutely intoxicated with alcohol. Animal studies have demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication inhibits the normal release of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and vasopressin in response to acute hemorrhage. Ethanol also increases nitric oxide release and inhibits antidiuretic hormone secretion. This article studies the effects of alcohol intoxication (measured by blood alcohol level, BAL) on the presentation and resuscitation of trauma patients with blunt hepatic injuries. A retrospective registry and chart review was conducted of all patients who presented with blunt liver injuries at an ACS-verified, level I trauma center. Data collected included admission BAL, systolic blood pressure, hematocrit, International Normalized Ratio (INR), liver injury grade, Injury Severity Score (ISS), intravenous fluid and blood product requirements, base deficit, and mortality. From September 2002 to May 2008, 723 patients were admitted with blunt hepatic injuries. Admission BAL was obtained in 569 patients, with 149 having levels >0.08%. Intoxicated patients were more likely to be hypotensive on admission (p = 0.01) despite a lower liver injury grade and no significant difference in ISS. There was no significant difference in the percent of intoxicated patients requiring blood transfusion. However, when blood was given, intoxicated patients required significantly more units of packed red blood cells (PRBC) than their nonintoxicated counterparts (p = 0.01). Intoxicated patients also required more intravenous fluid during their resuscitation (p = 0.002). Alcohol intoxication may impair the ability of blunt trauma patients to compensate for acute blood loss, making them more likely to be hypotensive on admission and increasing their PRBC and intravenous fluid requirements. All trauma patients should have BAL drawn upon admission and their resuscitation should be performed with an understanding of the physiologic alterations associated with acute alcohol

  19. Penetrating trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Dervelegas, Konstantinos; Porpodis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax occurs when air enters the pleural space. Currently there is increasing incidence of road traffic accidents, increasing awareness of healthcare leading to more advanced diagnostic procedures, and increasing number of admissions in intensive care units are responsible for traumatic (non iatrogenic and iatrogenic) pneumothorax. Pneumothorax has a clinical spectrum from asymptomatic patient to life-threatening situations. Diagnosis is usually made by clinical examination and imaging techniques. In our current work we focus on the treatment of penetrating trauma. PMID:25337403

  20. Penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Dervelegas, Konstantinos; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Pneumothorax occurs when air enters the pleural space. Currently there is increasing incidence of road traffic accidents, increasing awareness of healthcare leading to more advanced diagnostic procedures, and increasing number of admissions in intensive care units are responsible for traumatic (non iatrogenic and iatrogenic) pneumothorax. Pneumothorax has a clinical spectrum from asymptomatic patient to life-threatening situations. Diagnosis is usually made by clinical examination and imaging techniques. In our current work we focus on the treatment of penetrating trauma. PMID:25337403

  1. Trauma management incorporating focused assessment with computed tomography in trauma (FACTT) - potential effect on survival

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Immediate recognition of life-threatening conditions and injuries is the key to trauma management. To date, the impact of focused assessment with computed tomography in trauma (FACTT) has not been formally assessed. We aimed to find out whether the concept of using FACTT during primary trauma survey has a negative or positive effect on survival. Methods In a retrospective, multicentre study, we compared our time management and probability of survival (Ps) in major trauma patients who received FACTT during trauma resuscitation with the trauma registry of the German Trauma Society (DGU). FACTT is defined as whole-body computed tomography (WBCT) during primary trauma survey. We determined the probability of survival according to the Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS), the Revised Injury Severity Classification score (RISC) and the standardized mortality ratio (SMR). Results We analysed 4.817 patients from the DGU database from 2002 until 2004, 160 (3.3%) were from our trauma centre at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University (LMU) and 4.657 (96.7%) from the DGU group. 73.2% were male with a mean age of 42.5 years, a mean ISS of 29.8. 96.2% had suffered from blunt trauma. Time from admission to FAST (focused assessment with sonography for trauma)(4.3 vs. 8.7 min), chest x-ray (8.1 vs. 16.0 min) and whole-body CT (20.7 vs. 36.6 min) was shorter at the LMU compared to the other trauma centres (p < 0.001). SMR calculated by TRISS was 0.74 (CI95% 0.40-1.08) for the LMU (p = 0.24) and 0.92 (CI95% 0.84-1.01) for the DGU group (p = 0.10). RISC methodology revealed a SMR of 0.69 (95%CI 0.47-0.92) for the LMU (p = 0.043) and 1.00 (95%CI 0.94-1.06) for the DGU group (p = 0.88). Conclusion Trauma management incorporating FACTT enhances a rapid response to life-threatening problems and enables a comprehensive assessment of the severity of each relevant injury. Due to its speed and accuracy, FACTT during primary trauma survey supports rapid decision-making and may

  2. Blunt traumatic injury in the Arab Middle Eastern populations

    PubMed Central

    Asim, Mohammad; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Thani, Hassan; Abdelrahman, Husham; Zarour, Ahmad; Latifi, Rifat

    2014-01-01

    Background: Trauma represents a global public health concern with an estimated 5 million deaths annually. Moreover, the incidence of blunt traumatic injuries (BTI) particularly road traffic accidents (RTAs) and workplace-related injuries are rising throughout the world-wide. Objectives: We aimed to review the epidemiology and prevention of BTI, in the Arab Middle East. Materials and Methods: A traditional narrative literature review was carried out using PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. We used the keywords “traumatic injuries”, “blunt” “epidemiology”, “Arab Middle East” between December 1972 and March 2013. Results: The most common mechanisms of BTI in our region are RTAs, falls from height, struck by heavy objects and pedestrian motor vehicle trauma crashes. The rate of RTA and occupational injuries are markedly increased in the region due to rapid industrial development, extreme climatic conditions and unfamiliar working environment. However, lack of reliable information on these unintentional injuries is mainly responsible for the underestimation of this trauma burden. This knowledge deficit shields the extent of the problem from policy makers, leading to continued fatalities. These preventable injuries in turn add to the overall financial burden on the society through loss of productivity and greater need of medical and welfare services. Conclusion: In the Arab Middle East, population-based studies on the incidence, mechanism of injury, prevention and outcome of BTI are not well-documented. Therefore, region-specific BTI studies would strengthen surveillance to better understand the burden of these injuries in the region. PMID:24812453

  3. Shock Waves Mitigation at Blunt Bodies Using Needles and Shells Against a Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilinsky, M.; Blankson, I. M.; Sakharov, V. I.; Shvets, A. I.

    2004-01-01

    The paper contains some experimental and numerical simulation test results on cylindrical blunt body drag reduction using thin spikes or shell mounted in front of a body against a supersonic flow. Experimental tests were conducted using the Aeromechanics and Gas Dynamics Laboratory facilities at the Institute of Mechanics of Moscow State University (IMMSU). Numerical simulations utilizing NASA and IM/MSU codes were conducted at the Hampton University Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory. The main purpose of this research is to examine the efficiency of application of multiple spikes for drag reduction and flow stability at the front of a blunt body in different flight conditions, i.e. Mach number, angle of attack, etc. The principal conclusions of these test results are: multiple spike/needle application leads to decrease of drag reduction benefits by comparison with the case of one central mounted needle at the front of a blunt body, but increase lift benefits.

  4. Renal Trauma from Recreational Accidents Manifests Different Injury Patterns than Urban Renal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Granville L.; Slack, Sean; McWilliams, Kelly L.; Black, Aaron; Nicholson, Tristan M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The majority of blunt renal trauma is a consequence of motor vehicle collisions and falls. Prior publications based on urban series have shown that significant renal injuries are almost always accompanied by gross hematuria alone or microscopic hematuria with concomitant hypotension. We present a series of blunt renal trauma sustained during recreational pursuits, and describe the mechanisms, injury patterns and management. Materials and Methods Database review from 1996 to 2009 identified 145 renal injuries. Children younger than age 16 years, and trauma involving licensable motor vehicles, penetrating injuries and work related injuries were excluded from analysis. Grade, hematuria, hypotension, age, gender, laterality, mechanism, management, injury severity score and associated injuries were recorded. Results We identified 106 patients meeting the criteria and 85% of the injuries were snow sport related. Age range was 16 to 76 years and 92.5% of patients were male. There were 39 grade 1 injuries, 30 grade 2, 22 grade 3, 12 grade 4 and 3 grade 5 injuries. Gross hematuria was present in 56.7%, 77.2% and 83.3% of grade 2, grade 3 and grade 4 injuries, respectively. None of the patients with grade 2 or greater injuries and microscopic hematuria had hypotension except 1 grade 5 pedicle injury. The nephrectomy and renorrhaphy rate for grade 1 to grade 4 injuries was 0%. Conclusions Compared to urban series of blunt renal trauma, recreationally acquired injuries appear to follow different patterns, including a paucity of associated injuries or hypotension. If imaging were limited to the presence of gross hematuria, or microscopic hematuria with hypotension, 23% of grade 2 to grade 4 injuries would be missed. Men are at higher risk than women. However, operative intervention is rarely helpful. PMID:22591969

  5. Reconstruction after pancreatic trauma by pancreaticogastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Gonzalo Martín; Morillas, Patricia Jiménez; Pino, José C. Rodríguez; Canis, José M. Morón; Argenté, Francesc X. González

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic lesions are very infrequent after closed abdominal trauma (5% of cases) with a complication rate that affects 30–40% of patients, and a mortality rate that can reach 39%. In our experience, closed abdominal traumatisms occurring at typical popular horse-riding festivals in our region constitute a high risk of pancreatic trauma. The purpose of the present paper is to raise awareness about our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic lesions secondary to closed abdominal traumatism. Presentation of case We present the clinical cases of two young patients who, after suffering blunt abdominal trauma secondary to the impact of a horse during the celebration of typical horse-riding festival, were diagnosed with pancreatic trauma type III. The treatment was surgical in both cases and consisted in performing a pancreaticogastric anastomosis with preservation of the distal pancreas and spleen. The postoperative period was uneventful and, at present, both patients are asymptomatic. Discussion Signs and symptoms caused by pancreatic lesion are unspecific and difficult to objectify. With some limitations CT is the imaging test of choice for diagnosis and staging in the acute phase. The Wirsung section is indication for surgical treatment. The most extended surgical procedure in these cases is the resection of pancreatic body, tail, and spleen. Conclusion The identification of a pancreatic injury after closed abdominal trauma requires a high suspicion based on the injury mechanism. A safer option may be the distal pancreatic preservation with pancreaticogastric anastomosis in grade III lesions with healthy pancreatic tissue. PMID:25744560

  6. Grade IV blunt splenic injury – the role of proximal angioembolization. A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Gheju, I; Venter, MD; Beuran, M; Gulie, L; Racoveanu, I; Carstea, P; Iftimie Nastase, I; Venter, DP

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The authors present a case of grade IV traumatic spleen rupture (AAST-OIS) and an Injury Severity Score of 21 and a Revised Trauma Score RTS=7.841, which was managed without surgery, but with proximal splenic angioembolization (SAE), with a positive outcome. Indications, types and side-effects of SAE are also discussed with regard to blunt spleen trauma and the benefits of SAE as non-operative treatment approach. It is the first case of a grade IV splenic laceration non-operatively managed to be published in Romania. PMID:24701254

  7. Blunt splenic injury and severe brain injury: a decision analysis and implications for care

    PubMed Central

    Alabbasi, Thamer; Nathens, Avery B.; Tien, Col Homer

    2015-01-01

    Background The initial nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt splenic injuries in hemodynamically stable patients is common. In soldiers who experience blunt splenic injuries with concomitant severe brain injury while on deployment, however, NOM may put the injured soldier at risk for secondary brain injury from prolonged hypotension. Methods We conducted a decision analysis using a Markov process to evaluate 2 strategies for managing hemodynamically stable patients with blunt splenic injuries and severe brain injury — immediate splenectomy and NOM — in the setting of a field hospital with surgical capability but no angiography capabilities. We considered the base case of a 40-year-old man with a life expectancy of 78 years who experienced blunt trauma resulting in a severe traumatic brain injury and an isolated splenic injury with an estimated failure rate of NOM of 19.6%. The primary outcome measured was life expectancy. We assumed that failure of NOM would occur in the setting of a prolonged casualty evacuation, where surgical capability was not present. Results Immediate splenectomy was the slightly more effective strategy, resulting in a very modest increase in overall survival compared with NOM. Immediate splenectomy yielded a survival benefit of only 0.4 years over NOM. Conclusion In terms of overall survival, we would not recommend splenectomy unless the estimated failure rate of NOM exceeded 20%, which corresponds to an American Association for the Surgery of Trauma grade III splenic injury. For military patients for whom angiography may not be available at the field hospital and who require prolonged evacuation, immediate splenectomy should be considered for grade III–V injuries in the presence of severe brain injury. PMID:26100770

  8. Very early initiation of chemical venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after blunt solid organ injury is safe

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Patrick B.; Sothilingam, Niroshan; Stewart, Tanya Charyk; Batey, Brandon; Moffat, Brad; Gray, Daryl K.; Parry, Neil G.; Vogt, Kelly N.

    2016-01-01

    Background The optimal timing of initiating low–molecular weight heparin (LMWH) in patients who have undergone nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt solid organ injuries (SOIs) remains controversial. We describe the safety of early initiation of chemical venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis among patients undergoing NOM of blunt SOIs. Methods We retrospectively studied severely injured adults who sustained blunt SOI without significant intracranial hemorrhage and underwent an initial NOM at a Canadian lead trauma hospital between 2010 and 2014. Safety was assessed based on failure of NOM, defined as the need for operative intervention, in patients who received early (< 48 h) or late LMWH (≥48 h, or early discharge [< 72 h] without LMWH). Results We included 162 patients in our analysis. Most were men (69%), and the average age was 42 ± 18 years. The median injury severity score was 17, and splenic injuries were most common (97 [60%], median grade 2), followed by liver (57 [35%], median grade 2) and kidney injuries (31 [19%], median grade 1). Combined injuries were present in 14% of patients. A total of 78 (48%) patients received early LMWH, while 84 (52%) received late LMWH. The groups differed only in percent of high-grade splenic injury (14% v. 32%). Overall 2% of patients failed NOM, none after receiving LMWH. Semielective angiography was performed in 23 (14%) patients. The overall rate of confirmed VTE on imaging was 1.9%. Conclusion Early initiation of medical thromboembolic prophylaxis appears safe in select patients with isolated SOI following blunt trauma. A prospective multicentre study is warranted. PMID:26820318

  9. [Isolated chest trauma in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Yersin, Bertrand; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Pasquier, Mathieu; Zingg, Tobias

    2015-08-12

    In elderly patients, a blunt trauma of the chest is associated with a significant risk of complications and mortality. The number of ribs fractures (≥ 4), the presence of bilateral rib fractures, of a pulmonary contusion, of existent comorbidities or acute extra-thoracic traumatic lesions, and lastly the severity of thoracic pain, are indeed important risk factors of complications and mortality. Their presence may require hospitalization of the patient. When complications do occur, they are represented by alveolar hypoventilation, pulmonary atelectasia and broncho-pulmonary infections. When hospitalization is required, it may allow for the specific treatment of thoracic pain, including locoregional anesthesia techniques. PMID:26449103

  10. Impact of Splenic Artery Embolization on the Success Rate of Nonoperative Management for Blunt Splenic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Vlies, C. H. van der Hoekstra, J.; Ponsen, K. J.; Reekers, J. A.; Delden, O. M. van; Goslings, J. C.

    2012-02-15

    Introduction: Nonoperative management (NOM) has become the treatment of choice for hemodynamically stable patients with blunt splenic injury. Results of outcome after NOM are predominantly based on large-volume studies from level 1 trauma centers in the United States. This study was designed to assess the results of NOM in a relatively low-volume Dutch level 1 trauma center. Methods: An analysis of a prospective trauma registry was performed for a 6-year period before (period 1) and after the introduction and implementation of splenic artery embolization (SAE) (period 2). Primary outcome was the failure rate of initial treatment. Results: A total of 151 patients were reviewed. An increased use of SAE and a reduction of splenic operations during the second period was observed. Compared with period 1, the failure rate after observation in period 2 decreased from 25% to 10%. The failure rate after SAE in period 2 was 18%. The splenic salvage rate (SSR) after observation increased from 79% in the first period to 100% in the second period. During the second period, all patients with failure after observation were successfully treated with SAE. The SSR after SAE in periods 1 and 2 was respectively 100% and 86%. Conclusions: SAE of patients with blunt splenic injuries is associated with a reduction in splenic operations. The failure and splenic salvage rates in this current study were comparable with the results from large-volume studies of level 1 trauma centers. Nonoperative management also is feasible in a relatively low-volume level 1 trauma center outside the United States.

  11. National Trauma Database (NTrD)--improving trauma care: first year report.

    PubMed

    Sabariah, F J; Ramesh, N; Mahathar, A W

    2008-09-01

    The first Malaysian National Trauma Database was launched in May 2006 with five tertiary referral centres to determine the fundamental data on major trauma, subsequently to evaluate the major trauma management and to come up with guidelines for improved trauma care. A prospective study, using standardized and validated questionnaires, was carried out from May 2006 till April 2007 for all cases admitted and referred to the participating hospitals. During the one year period, 123,916 trauma patients were registered, of which 933 (0.75%) were classified as major trauma. Patients with blunt injury made up for 83.9% of cases and RTA accounted for 72.6% of injuries with 64.9% involving motorcyclist and pillion rider. 42.8% had severe head injury with an admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of 3-8 and the Revised Trauma Score (RTS) of 5-6 were recorded in 28.8% of patients. The distribution of Injury Severity Score (ISS) showed that 42.9% of cases were in the range of 16-24. Only 1.9% and 6.3% of the patients were reviewed by the Emergency Physician and Surgeon respectively. Patients with admission systolic blood pressure of less than 90 mmHg had a death rate of 54.6%. Patients with severe head injury (GCS < 9), 45.1% died while 79% patients with moderate head injury survived. There were more survivors within the higher RTS range compared to the lower RTS. Patients with direct admission accounted for 52.3% of survivors and there were 61.7% survivors for referred cases. In conclusion, NTrD first report has successfully demonstrated its significance in giving essential data on major trauma in Malaysia, however further expansion of the study may reflect more comprehensive trauma database in this country. PMID:19227673

  12. Epidemiology of in-hospital trauma deaths in a Brazilian university hospital

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The analysis of patterns of trauma deaths may improve the evaluation of a trauma system and identify areas that may benefit from more resources. The objective of this study was to analyze the epidemiology of trauma deaths in a Brazilian university hospital in order to assess the profile of these fatalities over a 16-year period. Method Retrospective study of time series using database records. The research subjects were in-hospital deaths from external causes during the years 1995, 2000, 2005 and 2010. The following variables were analyzed: cause of injury, trauma scores, time and cause of death. Results 467 cases were studied, being 325 patients (69.6%) admitted with signs of life and 142 (30.4%) considered dead on arrival. The mean age was 35.35 ± 18.03 years. 85.4% were males. Blunt trauma occurred in 73.0% of cases and penetrating mechanism in 27.0%. There was a significant increase (p < 0.001) in deaths from motorcycle crashes over the years, which went from 7.3% in 1995 to 31.5% in 2010. In contrast, there was a significant decrease (p = 0.030) in firearm-injury victims; from 21.0% in 1995 to 9.6% in 2010. About 60% of deaths occurred less than 24 hours after admission. The main causes of death were lesions of the central nervous system (56.3% of the total), followed by hemorrhagic shock (18.1%) and sepsis/multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (17.1%). The mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) of patients with signs of life was 26.41 ± 9.00, 71.3% of whom had ISS >25. The mean Revised Trauma Score (RTS) was 5.24 ± 2.05. Only 25.8% of the deaths had TRISS <0.50. Conclusion There was a shift in the profile of causes of death from trauma in this university teaching hospital, with a large decrease in penetrating injuries and a higher incidence of deaths of motorcycle riders. PMID:25361609

  13. Can ultrasound help to manage patients with scrotal trauma?

    PubMed Central

    Adlan, T

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic injuries to the scrotum are uncommon but, when they do occur, frequently lead to serious complications. Early complications include testicular infarction, necrosis and abscess formation; in the longer-term trauma may result in testicular atrophy and subfertility. Early surgical intervention in patients with testicular rupture can significantly improve the clinical outcome and reduce the need for delayed orchidectomy. However, clinical examination of the scrotum following trauma is difficult and frequently inaccurate; this may result in incorrect triage of patients for surgical exploration. Scrotal ultrasound can reliably assess scrotal injuries and diagnose testicular rupture with a high level of accuracy. Additionally, ultrasound can provide important information regarding testicular perfusion, which can further inform decisions on surgical management. This article reviews the sonographic findings that may be encountered in patients with scrotal trauma, with an emphasis on blunt trauma. It describes the pivotal role that ultrasound can play in the accurate triage of these patients to surgical or conservative management.

  14. Risk Factors for Vertebral Artery Injuries in Cervical Spine Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Dabke, Harshad V.

    2014-01-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (i.e. involvement of carotid and vertebral arteries) are increasingly being recognized in setting of cervical spine trauma/fractures and are associated with high incidence of stroke/morbidity and mortality. The incidence of vertebral artery injuries (VAI) is more common than previously thought and regular screening is seldom performed. However there exists no screening criteria and conflicting reports exists between spine and trauma literature. Many clinicians do not routinely screen/evaluate patients presenting with cervical spine trauma for potential VAI. This article provides a brief summary of existing evidence regarding the incidence of VAI in the background of cervical trauma/fractures. The type and fracture pattern that is associated with a high risk of VAI warranting mandatory screening/further work-up is discussed. A brief overview of diagnostic modalities and their respective sensitivity/specificity along with available treatment options is also summarized. PMID:25317310

  15. Management of temporal bone trauma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Alpen; Groppo, Eli

    2010-06-01

    The temporal bones are paired structures located on the lateral aspects of the skull and contribute to the skull base. Trauma is usually the result of blunt head injury and can result in damage to the brain and meninges, the middle and internal ear, and the facial nerve. Complications can include intracranial hemorrhage, cerebral contusion, CSF leak and meningitis, hearing loss, vertigo, and facial paralysis. To prevent these complications, diagnosis followed by appropriate medical and surgical management is critical. Diagnosis relies primarily on physical signs and symptoms as well as radiographic imaging. Emergent intervention is required in situations involving herniation of the brain into the middle ear cavity or hemorrhage of the intratemporal carotid artery. Patients with declining facial nerve function are candidates for early surgical intervention. Conductive hearing loss can be corrected surgically as an elective procedure, while sensorineural hearing loss carries a poor prognosis, regardless of management approach. Children generally recover from temporal bone trauma with fewer complications than adults and experience a markedly lower incidence of facial nerve paralysis. PMID:22110824

  16. Imaging patients with cardiac trauma.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Carlos S; Gutierrez, Fernando R; Marmol-Velez, Juan A; Ocazionez, Daniel; Martinez-Jimenez, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, trauma is the leading cause of death among those who are 1-44 years old, with cardiovascular injuries representing the second most common cause of traumatic death after central nervous system injuries. Evaluation of trauma patients with suspected cardiac injury may be complex and include electrocardiography, measurement of cardiac biomarkers, and imaging examinations. Contrast material-enhanced computed tomography (CT) has become one of the most valuable imaging tools available for evaluating hemodynamically stable patients with suspected cardiac injury. The presence of hemopericardium, with or without cardiac tamponade, is one of the most significant findings of cardiac injury. Other complications that result from blunt cardiac injury, such as pericardial rupture and cardiac herniation, may be readily depicted at multidetector CT. Assessment of patients with cardiac injuries, particularly those with penetrating injuries, is a challenging and time-critical matter, with clinical and imaging findings having complementary roles in the formation of an accurate diagnosis. Patients who are hemodynamically stable, particularly those with penetrating cardiac injuries, also may benefit from a timely imaging examination. In addition to chest radiography, other available modalities such as transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, nuclear medicine, and magnetic resonance imaging may play a role in selected cases. PMID:22582351

  17. Endovascular Treatment of Blunt Traumatic Abdominal Aortic Occlusion With Kissing Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Idoguchi, Koji Yamaguchi, Masato; Okada, Takuya; Nomura, Yoshikatsu; Sugimura, Kazuro; Okita, Yutaka; Sugimoto, Koji

    2012-10-15

    Blunt traumatic abdominal aortic dissection is extremely rare and potentially deadly. We present the case of a 62-year-old man involved in a frontal car crash. After emergency undergoing laparotomy for bowel injuries, he was referred to our hospital due to acute ischemia of bilateral lower extremities on day 3 after the trauma. Computed tomography and aortography showed an aortobiiliac dissection with complete occlusion. This injury was successfully treated by endovascular treatment with 'kissing'-technique stent placement, which appears to be a safe, effective, and minimally invasive treatment.

  18. Laparoscopy in trauma: An overview of complications and related topics

    PubMed Central

    Kindel, Tammy; Latchana, Nicholas; Swaroop, Mamta; Chaudhry, Umer I; Noria, Sabrena F; Choron, Rachel L; Seamon, Mark J; Lin, Maggie J; Mao, Melissa; Cipolla, James; El Chaar, Maher; Scantling, Dane; Martin, Niels D; Evans, David C; Papadimos, Thomas J; Stawicki, Stanislaw P

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of laparoscopy has provided trauma surgeons with a valuable diagnostic and, at times, therapeutic option. The minimally invasive nature of laparoscopic surgery, combined with potentially quicker postoperative recovery, simplified wound care, as well as a growing number of viable intraoperative therapeutic modalities, presents an attractive alternative for many traumatologists when managing hemodynamically stable patients with selected penetrating and blunt traumatic abdominal injuries. At the same time, laparoscopy has its own unique complication profile. This article provides an overview of potential complications associated with diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy in trauma, focusing on practical aspects of identification and management of laparoscopy-related adverse events. PMID:26557490

  19. Toxic trauma.

    PubMed

    Moles, T M; Baker, D J

    2001-01-01

    Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) carry many inherent dangers. Such materials are distributed widely in industrial and military sites. Toxic trauma (TT) denotes the complex of systemic and organ injury caused by toxic agents. Often, TT is associated with other injuries that also require the application of life-support techniques. Rapid onset of acute respiratory failure and consequent cardiovascular failure are of primary concern. Management of TT casualties is dependent upon the characteristics of the toxic agents involved and on the demographics surrounding the HAZMAT incident. Agents that can produce TT possess two pairs of salient characteristics: (1) causality (toxicity and latency), and (2) EMS system (persistency and transmissibility). Two characteristics of presentations are important: (1) incident presentation, and (2) casualty presentation. In addition, many of these agents complicate the processes associated with anaesthesia and must be dealt with. Failure of recognition of these factors may result in the development of respiratory distress syndromes and multiorgan system failure, or even death. PMID:11513285

  20. Epidemiology of Trauma Patients and Analysis of 268 Mortality Cases: Trends of a Single Center in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Chun Sung; Oh, Joong Hwan; Bae, Keum Seok; Lee, Kang Hyun; Lee, Eunbi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose There is an increasing incidence of mortality among trauma patients; therefore, it is important to analyze the trauma epidemiology in order to prevent trauma death. The authors reviewed the trauma epidemiology retrospectively at a regional emergency center of Korea and evaluated the main factors that led to trauma-related deaths. Materials and Methods A total of 17007 trauma patients were registered to the trauma registry of the regional emergency center at Wonju Severance Christian Hospital in Korea from January 2010 to December 2012. Results The mean age of patients was 35.2 years old. The most frequent trauma mechanism was blunt injury (90.8%), as well as slip-and-fall down injury, motor vehicle accidents, and others. Aside from 142 early trauma deaths, a total of 4673 patients were admitted for further treatment. The most common major trauma sites of admitted patients were on the extremities (38.4%), followed by craniocerebral, abdominopelvis, and thorax. With deaths of 126 patients during in-hospital treatment, the overall mortality (142 early and 126 late deaths) was 5.6% for admitted patients. Ages ≥55, injury severity score ≥16, major craniocerebral injury, cardiopulmonary resuscitation at arrival, probability of survival <25% calculated from the trauma and injury severity score were independent predictors of trauma mortality in multivariate analysis. Conclusion The epidemiology of the trauma patients studied was found to be mainly blunt trauma. This finding is similar to previous papers in terms of demographics and mechanism. Trauma patients who have risk factors of mortality require careful management in order to prevent trauma-related deaths. PMID:25510768

  1. A report of three cases and review of the literature on rectal disruption following abdominal seatbelt trauma.

    PubMed

    El Kafsi, J; Kraus, R; Guy, R

    2016-02-01

    Seatbelt associated blunt trauma to the rectum is a rare but well recognised injury. The exact mechanism of hollow visceral injury in blunt trauma is unclear. Stress and shear waves generated by abdominal compression may in part account for injury to gas containing structures. A 'seatbelt sign' (linear ecchymosis across the abdomen in the distribution of the lap belt) should raise the suspicion of hollow visceral injuries and can be more severe with disruption of the abdominal wall musculature. Three consecutive cases of rectal injury following blunt abdominal trauma, requiring emergency laparotomy and resection, are described. Lumbar spine injury occurred in one case and in the other two cases, there was injury to the iliac wing of the pelvis; all three cases sustained significant abdominal wall contusion or muscle disruption. Abdominal wall reconstruction and closure posed a particular challenge, requiring a multidisciplinary approach. The literature on this topic is reviewed and potential mechanisms of injury are discussed. PMID:26741660

  2. [Non-surgical management after blunt traumatic liver injuries: A review article].

    PubMed

    Noyola-Villalobos, Héctor Faustino; Loera-Torres, Marco Antonio; Jiménez-Chavarría, Enrique; Núñez-Cantú, Olliver; García-Núñez, Luis Manuel; Arcaute-Velázquez, Fernando Federico

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic trauma is a common cause for admissions in the Emergency Room. Currently, non-surgical management is the standard treatment in haemodynamically stable patients with a success rate of around 85 to 98%. This haemodynamic stability is the most important factor in selecting the appropriate patient. Adjuncts in non-surgical management are angioembolisation, image-guided drainage and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Failure in non-surgical management is relatively rare but potentially fatal, and needs to be recognised and aggressively treated as early as possible. The main cause of failure in non-surgical management is persistent haemorrhage. The aim of this paper is to describe current evidence and guidelines that support non-surgical management of liver injuries in blunt trauma. PMID:27036671

  3. Blunt traumatic cardiac rupture. A 5-year experience.

    PubMed

    Brathwaite, C E; Rodriguez, A; Turney, S Z; Dunham, C M; Cowley, R

    1990-12-01

    Blunt traumatic cardiac rupture is associated with a high rate of mortality. A review of the computerized trauma registry (1983 to 1988) identified 32 patients with this injury (ages 19 to 65 years; mean age, 39.5 years; 21 men and 11 women). Twenty-one patients (65.6%) were injured in vehicular crashes, 3 (9.4%) in pedestrian accidents, 3 (9.4%) in motorcycle accidents; 3 (9.4%) sustained crush injury; 1 (3.1%) was injured by a fall; and 1 (3.1%) was kicked in the chest by a horse. Anatomic injuries included right atrial rupture (13[40.6%]), left atrial rupture (8 [25%]), right ventricular rupture (10[31.3%]), left ventricular rupture (4[12.5%]), and rupture of two cardiac chambers (3 [9.4%]). Diagnosis was made by thoracotomy in all 20 patients presenting in cardiac arrest. In the remaining 12 patients, the diagnosis was established in seven by emergency left anterolateral thoracotomy and in five by subxyphoid pericardial window. Seven of these 12 patients (58.3%) had clinical cardiac tamponade and significant upper torso cyanosis. The mean Injury Severity Score (ISS), Trauma Score (TS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score were 33.8, 13.2, and 14.3, respectively, among survivors and 51.5, 8.3, and 7.0 for nonsurvivors. The overall mortality rate was 81.3% (26 of 32 patients), the only survivors being those presenting with vital signs (6 of 12 patients [50%]). All patients with rupture of two cardiac chambers or with ventricular rupture died. The mortality rate from myocardial rupture is very high. Rapid prehospital transportation, a high index of suspicion, and prompt surgical intervention contribute to survival in these patients. PMID:2256761

  4. Transpiration Cooling Of Hypersonic Blunt Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henline, William D.

    1991-01-01

    Results on analytical approximation and numerical simulation compared. Report presents theoretical study of degree to which transpiration blocks heating of blunt, axisymmetric body by use of injected air. Transpiration cooling proposed to reduce operating temperatures on nose cones of proposed hypersonic aerospace vehicles. Analyses important in design of thermal protection for such vehicles.

  5. Changes of color coordinates of biological tissue with superficial skin damage due to mechanical trauma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pteruk, Vail; Mokanyuk, Olexander; Kvaternuk, Olena; Yakenina, Lesya; Kotyra, Andrzej; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Dussembayeva, Shynar

    2015-12-01

    Change of color coordinates of normal and pathological biological tissues is based on calculated spectral diffuse reflection. The proposed color coordinates of normal and pathological biological tissues of skin provided using standard light sources, allowing accurately diagnose skin damage due to mechanical trauma with a blunt object for forensic problems.

  6. Utility of cardiac troponins in patients with suspected cardiac trauma or after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Adams, J E

    1997-12-01

    Detection of cardiac injury after blunt chest wall trauma or cardiac surgery is problematic. Previously available biomarkers have been hindered largely by limitations of specifity for myocardial damage. Both cardiac troponin I and T have been evaluated in these patient subgroups. While many questions remain unanswered, it appears that measurement of troponin proteins will facilitate patient care in these difficult situations. PMID:9439875

  7. Immunonutrition – the influence of early postoperative glutamine supplementation in enteral/parenteral nutrition on immune response, wound healing and length of hospital stay in multiple trauma patients and patients after extensive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Kai J.; Schallert, Reiner; Daniel, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the postoperative phase, the prognosis of multiple trauma patients with severe brain injuries as well as of patients with extensive head and neck surgery mainly depends on protein metabolism and the prevention of septic complications. Wound healing problems can also result in markedly longer stays in the intensive care unit and general wards. As a result, the immunostimulation of patients in the postoperative phase is expected to improve their immunological and overall health. Patients and methods: A study involving 15 patients with extensive ENT tumour surgery and 7 multiple-trauma patients investigated the effect of enteral glutamine supplementation on immune induction, wound healing and length of hospital stay. Half of the patients received a glutamine-supplemented diet. The control group received an isocaloric, isonitrogenous diet. Results: In summary, we found that total lymphocyte counts, the percentage of activated CD4+DR+ T helper lymphocytes, the in-vitro response of lymphocytes to mitogens, as well as IL-2 plasma levels normalised faster in patients who received glutamine-supplemented diets than in patients who received isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets and that these parameters were even above normal by the end of the second postoperative week. Summary: We believe that providing critically ill patients with a demand-oriented immunostimulating diet is fully justified as it reduces septic complications, accelerates wound healing, and shortens the length of ICU (intensive care unit) and general ward stays. PMID:26734536

  8. Endovascular treatment of blunt traumatic thoracic aortic injury.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Georghios

    2009-06-01

    Blunt traumatic thoracic aortic injury (BTTAI) is a lethal injury associated with a prehospital mortality of 80% to 90%. Patients arriving in the emergency room and considered appropriate to undergo emergency open surgical repair still have a mortality rate of 15% to 30% because of severe associated injuries. Conventional open surgical repair requires a left thoracotomy, single lung ventilation, aortic-cross clamping and unclamping, with or without the adjunct use of partial or full cardiopulmonary bypass and systemic heparinization. All this leads to significant physiological stress and surgical trauma resulting in perioperative complications such as major blood loss, coagulopathy, myocardial infarction, stroke, respiratory failure, renal failure, bowel infarction, and paraplegia. Despite advances in anesthesia, critical care medicine, and surgical techniques, a recent meta-analysis showed no definite improvement in operative mortality over the past decade, following open surgical repair in patients with BTTAI. Endovascular repair of BTTAI does not require a thoracotomy, single lung ventilation, aorticcross clamping and unclamping, or systemic heparinization. As a result, endovascular repair of BTTAI has emerged as an effective, minimally invasive treatment alternative, especially in patients with severe concomitant injuries, which may be prohibitive to open surgical repair. Recent published studies have shown that endovascular repair of BTTAI is associated with lower morbidity, mortality, stroke, and paraplegia/paraparesis rates, when compared with open surgical repair of BTTAI. PMID:19617250

  9. Trauma Focused CBT for Children with Co-Occurring Trauma and Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Berliner, Lucy; Mannarino, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Childhood trauma impacts multiple domains of functioning including behavior. Traumatized children commonly have behavioral problems that therapists must effectively evaluate and manage in the context of providing trauma-focused treatment. This manuscript describes practical strategies for managing behavior problems in the context of…

  10. Detection of metal residues on bone using SEM-EDS. Part I: Blunt force injury.

    PubMed

    Pechníková, Markéta; Porta, Davide; Mazzarelli, Debora; Rizzi, Agostino; Drozdová, Eva; Gibelli, Daniele; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2012-11-30

    Previous studies have indicated that metal particles remain on bone after sharp force injury or gunshot and that their detection by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS) could greatly help in tool identification. However, the presence of metal particles on bone surfaces in the context of blunt force trauma has never been assessed experimentally. For this reason the present paper represents an experimental study of the behaviour of metal residues on bone following blunt force injury. Ten fresh sub-adult bovine metatarsal bones were manually cleaned of soft tissues. They were then struck by metal bars (copper, iron or aluminium) on the external surface of the mid-diaphysis. All blunt metal instruments used in this study left a sign in the form of single particles, a smear or a powder-like deposit on the bone surface. The residues of all three metal implements were detected on the bone surface, 0.3-10 mm from the fracture border. The presence of metal particles was confirmed in all samples struck with iron and copper and in two of six aluminium samples; no particles were detected on the negative control. Chemical composition of residues highly corresponded with the composition of applied bars. PMID:22989600

  11. An Animal Model of Emotional Blunting in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Pietersen, Charmaine Y.; Bosker, Fokko J.; Doorduin, Janine; Jongsma, Minke E.; Postema, Folkert; Haas, Joseph V.; Johnson, Michael P.; Koch, Tineke; Vladusich, Tony; den Boer, Johan A.

    2007-01-01

    Schizophrenia is often associated with emotional blunting—the diminished ability to respond to emotionally salient stimuli—particularly those stimuli representative of negative emotional states, such as fear. This disturbance may stem from dysfunction of the amygdala, a brain region involved in fear processing. The present article describes a novel animal model of emotional blunting in schizophrenia. This model involves interfering with normal fear processing (classical conditioning) in rats by means of acute ketamine administration. We confirm, in a series of experiments comprised of cFos staining, behavioral analysis and neurochemical determinations, that ketamine interferes with the behavioral expression of fear and with normal fear processing in the amygdala and related brain regions. We further show that the atypical antipsychotic drug clozapine, but not the typical antipsychotic haloperidol nor an experimental glutamate receptor 2/3 agonist, inhibits ketamine's effects and retains normal fear processing in the amygdala at a neurochemical level, despite the observation that fear-related behavior is still inhibited due to ketamine administration. Our results suggest that the relative resistance of emotional blunting to drug treatment may be partially due to an inability of conventional therapies to target the multiple anatomical and functional brain systems involved in emotional processing. A conceptual model reconciling our findings in terms of neurochemistry and behavior is postulated and discussed. PMID:18159243

  12. Childhood Trauma and Its Relation to Chronic Depression in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Negele, Alexa; Kaufhold, Johannes; Kallenbach, Lisa; Leuzinger-Bohleber, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    There is a large consensus indicating that childhood trauma is significantly involved in the development of depression. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of retrospectively recalled childhood trauma in chronically depressed patients and to investigate a more specific relationship between trauma type and depression. We further asked for the influence of multiple experiences of childhood trauma on the vulnerability to a chronic course of depression in adulthood. 349 chronically depressed patients of the German LAC Depression Study completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, a self-report measure of traumatic experiences in childhood. 75.6% of the chronically depressed patients reported clinically significant histories of childhood trauma. 37% of the chronically depressed patients reported multiple childhood traumatization. Experiences of multiple trauma also led to significantly more severe depressive symptoms. Stepwise multiple regression analysis suggested that childhood emotional abuse and sexual abuse were significantly associated with a higher symptom severity in chronically depressed adults. Yet, expanding the regression model for multiple exposures showed that multiplicity was the only remaining significant predictor for symptom severity in chronically depressed patients. Clinical implications suggest a precise assessment of childhood trauma in chronically depressed patients with a focus on emotional abuse, sexual abuse, and multiple exposures to childhood trauma. This trial is registered with registration number ISRCTN91956346. PMID:26693349

  13. The impact of self-efficacy, alexithymia and multiple traumas on posttraumatic stress disorder and psychiatric co-morbidity following epileptic seizures: a moderated mediation analysis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Man Cheung; Allen, Rachel D; Dennis, Ian

    2013-12-30

    This study investigated the incidence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and psychiatric co-morbidity following epileptic seizure, whether alexithymia mediated the relationship between self-efficacy and psychiatric outcomes, and whether the mediational effect was moderated by the severity of PTSD from other traumas. Seventy-one (M=31, F=40) people with a diagnosis of epilepsy recruited from support groups in the United Kingdom completed the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 and the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale. They were compared with 71 people (M=29, F=42) without epilepsy. For people with epilepsy, 51% and 22% met the diagnostic criteria for post-epileptic seizure PTSD and for PTSD following one other traumatic life event respectively. For the control group, 24% met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD following other traumatic life events. The epilepsy group reported significantly more anxiety and depression than the control. Partial least squares (PLS) analysis showed that self-efficacy was significantly correlated with alexithymia, post-epileptic seizure PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity. Alexithymia was also significantly correlated with post-epileptic seizure PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity. Mediation analyses confirmed that alexithymia mediated the path between self-efficacy and post-epileptic seizure PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity. Moderated mediation also confirmed that self-efficacy and PTSD from one other trauma moderated the effect of alexithymia on outcomes. To conclude, people can develop posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and psychiatric co-morbidity following epileptic seizure. These psychiatric outcomes are closely linked with their belief in personal competence to deal with stressful situations and regulate their own functioning, to process rather than defend against distressing emotions, and with the degree of PTSD from other traumas. PMID:23978734

  14. The sequential trauma score - a new instrument for the sequential mortality prediction in major trauma*

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    available at: http://www.sequential-trauma-score.com Conclusions This score is the first sequential, dynamic score to provide a prognosis for patients with blunt major trauma at several points in time. With every additional piece of information the precision increases. The medical team has a simple, useful tool to identify patients at high risk and to predict the prognosis of an individual patient with major trauma very early, quickly and precisely. PMID:20562057

  15. Blunt Liver Injury with Intact Ribs under Impacts on the Abdomen: A Biomechanical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengdong; Wan, Lei; Qin, Zhiqiang; Liu, Ningguo; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhong, Liangwei; Huang, Ping; Chen, Yijiu

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal trauma accounts for nearly 20% of all severe traffic injuries and can often result from intentional physical violence, from which blunt liver injury is regarded as the most common result and is associated with a high mortality rate. Liver injury may be caused by a direct impact with a certain velocity and energy on the abdomen, which may result in a lacerated liver by penetration of fractured ribs. However, liver ruptures without rib cage fractures were found in autopsies in a series of cases. All the victims sustained punches on the abdomen by fist. Many studies have been dedicated to determining the mechanism underlying hepatic injury following abdominal trauma, but most have been empirical. The actual process and biomechanism of liver injury induced by blunt impact on the abdomen, especially with intact ribs remained, are still inexhaustive. In order to investigate this, finite element methods and numerical simulation technology were used. A finite element human torso model was developed from high resolution CT data. The model consists of geometrically-detailed liver and rib cage models and simplified models of soft tissues, thoracic and abdominal organs. Then, the torso model was used in simulations in which the right hypochondrium was punched by a fist from the frontal, lateral, and rear directions, and in each direction with several impact velocities. Overall, the results showed that liver rupture was primarily caused by a direct strike of the ribs induced by blunt impact to the abdomen. Among three impact directions, a lateral impact was most likely to cause liver injury with a minimum punch speed of 5 m/s (the momentum was about 2.447 kg.m/s). Liver injuries could occur in isolation and were not accompanied by rib fractures due to different material characteristics and injury tolerance. PMID:23308111

  16. Strategy for the use of biliary scintigraphy in non-iatrogenic biliary trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, R.K.; Lee, C.H.; Stahl, R.; Viscomi, G.N.; Baker, C.; Cahow, C.E.; Dobbins, J.; Neumann, R.; Burrell, M.I.

    1984-06-01

    Biliary scintigraphy was used to examine 21 patients who had suspected non-iatrogenic biliary trauma. Seven patients (33%) had scintigraphic evidence of biliary leakage. Ultimately, surgical biliary repair was required for only three of these patients. Visualization of the gallbladder did not occur in eight trauma patients, but only one patient was shown to have cholecystitis. In this series, 16 patients had Tc-99m sulfur colloid scans that offered no significant advantage over cholescintigraphy in the detection of hepatic parenchymal defects. Biliary scintigraphy provides clinically useful information in cases both of blunt and penetrating trauma.

  17. Strategy for use of biliary scintigraphy in non-iatrogenic biliary trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, R.K.; Lee, C.H.; Stahl, R.; Viscomi, G.N.; Baker, C.; Cahow, C.E.; Dobbins, J.; Neumann, R.; Burrell, M.I.

    1984-06-01

    Biliary scintigraphy was used to examine 21 patients who had suspected non-iatrogenic biliary trauma. Seven patients (33%) had scintigraphic evidence of biliary leakage. Ultimately, surgical biliary repair was required for only three of these patients. Visualization of the gallbladder did not occur in eight trauma patients, but only one patient was shown to have cholecystitis. In this series, 16 patients had Tc-99m sulfur colloid scans that offered no significant advantage over cholescintigraphy in the detection of hepatic parenchymal defects. Biliary scintigraphy provides clinically useful information in cases both of blunt and penetrating trauma.

  18. Rural trauma management.

    PubMed

    Wayne, R

    1989-05-01

    Rural trauma is a major problem in the United States. Up to 70 percent of trauma fatalities occur in rural areas, even though 70 percent of the population live in urban areas. Over the past 3 decades, numerous studies have defined the concept of preventable trauma death in both rural and urban populations. With the development of a regional trauma care system in Oregon, preventable trauma mortality should decrease. An effort was made to improve the quality of trauma care in Clatsop County, Oregon, a community of 30,000 people with 2 small rural hospitals. To obtain this goal, four steps were taken: (1) physician and nurse education was improved, (2) trauma protocols promoting prompt resuscitation and stabilization of patients were established, (3) regular trauma case reviews were conducted, and (4) emergency medical technician and prehospital management were coordinated. This study reviews the trail from sporadic, uncoordinated rural trauma care to the designation process. PMID:2712202

  19. Review of Pancreaticoduodenal Trauma with a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Poyrazoglu, Yavuz; Duman, Kazim; Harlak, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Complex anatomical relation of the duodenum, pancreas, biliary tract, and major vessels plays to obscure pancreaticoduodenal injuries. Causes of pancreaticoduodenal injuries are blunt trauma (traffic accidents, sport injuries) in 25 % of cases and penetrating abdominal injuries (stab wounds and firearm injuries) in 75 % of cases. Duodenal injuries are reported to occur in 0.5 to 5 % of all abdominal trauma cases and are observed in 11 % of abdominal firearm wounds, 1.6 % of abdominal stab wounds, and 6 % of blunt trauma. Retroperitoneal and deep abdominal localization of duodenum as an organ contribute to the difficulty in diagnosis and treatment. There are three important major points regarding treatment of duodenal injuries: (1) operation timing and decision, (2) Intraoperative detection, and (3) post-operative care. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose and treat duodenal trauma. We would like to present a 21-year-old male patient with pancreaticoduodenal injury who presented to our emergency service after firearm injury to his abdomen and discuss his treatment with a short review of related literature. PMID:27358516

  20. Relationship between trauma narratives and trauma pathology.

    PubMed

    Amir, N; Stafford, J; Freshman, M S; Foa, E B

    1998-04-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between posttrauma pathology and the level of articulation (complexity) in rape narratives recounted by victims shortly after the assault. Degree of articulation was operationalized as the reading level of the narrative as determined by a computer program. Shortly after the trauma, reading level was correlated with severity of anxiety but not with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Degree of the narrative articulation shortly after the trauma, however, was related to severity of later PTSD. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the less developed trauma narratives hinder recovery from trauma. PMID:9565923

  1. The Blunt Plate In Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baradell, Donald L.; Bertram, Mitchel H.

    1960-01-01

    The sonic-wedge characteristics method has been used to obtain the shock shapes and surface pressure distributions on several blunt two-dimensional shapes in a hypersonic stream for several values of the ratio of specific heats. These shapes include the blunt slab at angle of attack and power profiles of the form yb = a)P, where 0 les than m less than 1, Yb and x are coordinates of the body surface, and a is a constant. These numerical results have been compared with the results of blast-wave theory, and methods of predicting the pressure distributions and shock shapes are proposed in each case. The effects of a free-stream conical-flow gradient on the pressure distribution on a blunt slab in hypersonic flow were investigated by the sonic-wedge characteristics method and were found to be sizable in many cases. Procedures which are satisfactory for reducing pressure data obtained in conical flows with small gradients are presented.

  2. Acute refractory hypoxemia after chest trauma reversed by high-frequency oscillatory ventilation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Polytrauma often results in significant hypoxemia secondary to direct lung contusion or indirectly through atelectasis, systemic inflammatory response, large volume fluid resuscitation and blood product transfusion. In addition to causing hypoxemia, atelectasis and acute lung injury can lead to right ventricular failure through an acute increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. Mechanical ventilation is often applied, accompanied with recruitment maneuvers and positive end-expiratory pressure in order to recruit alveoli and reverse atelectasis, while preventing excessive alveolar damage. This strategy should lead to the reversal of the hypoxemic condition and the detrimental heart–lung interaction that may occur. However, as described in this case report, hemodynamic instability and intractable alveolar atelectasis sometimes do not respond to conventional ventilation strategies. Case presentation We describe the case of a 21-year-old Caucasian man with severe chest trauma requiring surgical interventions, who developed refractory hypoxemia and overt right ventricular failure. After multiple failed attempts of recruitment using conventional ventilation, the patient was ventilated with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. This mode of ventilation allowed the reversal of the hemodynamic effects of severe hypoxemia and of the acute cor pulmonale. We use this case report to describe the physiological advantages of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in patients with chest trauma, and formulate the arguments to explain the positive effect observed in our patient. Conclusions High-frequency oscillatory ventilation can be used in the context of a blunt chest trauma accompanied by severe hypoxemia due to atelectasis. The positive effect is due to its capacity to recruit the collapsed alveoli and, as a result, the relief of increased pulmonary vascular resistance and subsequently the reversal of acute cor pulmonale. This approach may represent an

  3. Multidetector CT for Penetrating Torso Trauma: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Dreizin, David; Munera, Felipe

    2015-11-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) for hemodynamically stable victims of penetrating torso trauma continues to increase but remains less singular to the work-up than in blunt trauma. Research in this area has focused on the incremental benefits of CT within the context of evolving diagnostic algorithms and in conjunction with techniques such as laparoscopy, endoscopy, and angiographic intervention. This review centers on the current state of multidetector CT as a triage tool for penetrating torso trauma and the primacy of trajectory evaluation in diagnosis, while emphasizing diagnostic challenges that have lingered despite tremendous technological advances since CT was first used in this setting 3 decades ago. As treatment strategies have also changed considerably over the years in parallel with advances in CT, current management implications of organ-specific injuries depicted at multidetector CT are also discussed. PMID:26492022

  4. Effects of nose bluntness and shock-shock interactions on blunt bodies in viscous hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, D. J.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical study was conducted to investigate the effects of blunt leading edges on the viscous flow field around a hypersonic vehicle such as the proposed National Aero-Space Plane. Attention is focused on two specific regions of the flow field. In the first region, effects of nose bluntness on the forebody flow field are investigated. The second region of the flow considered is around the leading edges of the scramjet inlet. In this region, the interaction of the forebody shock with the shock produced by the blunt leading edges of the inlet compression surfaces is analyzed. Analysis of these flow regions is required to accurately predict the overall flow field as well as to get necessary information on localized zones of high pressure and intense heating. The results for the forebody flow field are discussed first, followed by the results for the shock interaction in the inlet leading edge region.

  5. Helping Youth Overcome Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jamie C.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of trauma can roll on unchecked like a spirit of death. In its path are strewn its once vibrant victims. Human bonds are rent asunder by the disgrace of trauma. These are the youngsters who have been verbally bashed, physically battered, sexually assaulted, and spiritually exploited. Other traumas of childhood neglect include: (1)…

  6. Microscopic Pattern of Bone Fractures as an Indicator of Blast Trauma: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Pechníková, Marketa; Mazzarelli, Debora; Poppa, Pasquale; Gibelli, Daniele; Scossa Baggi, Emilio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The assessment of fractures is a key issue in forensic anthropology; however, very few studies deal with the features of fractures due to explosion in comparison with other traumatic injuries. This study focuses on fractures resulting from blast trauma and two types of blunt force trauma (manual compression and running over), applied to corpses of pigs; 163 osteons were examined within forty fractures by the transmission light microscopy. Blast lesions showed a higher percentage of fracture lines through the Haversian canal, whereas in other types of trauma, the fractures went across the inner lamellae. Significant differences between samples hit by blast energy and those runover or manually compressed were observed (p<0.05). The frequency of pattern A is significantly higher in exploded bones than in runover and compressed. Microscopic analysis of the fracture line may provide information about the type of trauma, especially for what concerns blast trauma. PMID:26259072

  7. A National Study of Trauma Level Designation and Renal Trauma Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hotaling, James M.; Wang, Jin; Sorensen, Mathew D.; Rivara, Frederick P.; Gore, John L.; Jurkovich, Jerry; McClung, Christopher D.; Wessells, Hunter; Voelzke, Bryan B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We examined the initial management of renal trauma and assessed patterns of management based on hospital trauma level designation. Materials and Methods The National Trauma Data Bank is a comprehensive trauma registry with records from hospitals in the United States and Puerto Rico. Renal injuries treated at a member hospital from 2002 to 2007 were identified. We classified initial management as expectant, minimally invasive (angiography, embolization, ureteral stent or nephrostomy) or open surgical management based on ICD-9 procedure codes. The primary outcome was use of secondary therapies. Results Of 3,247,955 trauma injuries in the National Trauma Data Bank 9,002 were renal injuries (0.3%). High grade injuries demonstrated significantly higher rates of definitive success with the first urological intervention at level I trauma centers vs other trauma centers (minimally invasive 52% vs 26%, p <0.001), and were more likely treated successfully with conservative management (89% vs 82%, p <0.001). When adjusting for other known indices of injury severity, and examining low and high grade injuries, level I trauma centers were 90% more likely to offer an initial trial of conservative management (OR 1.90; 95% CI 1.19, 3.05) and had a 30% lower chance of patients requiring multiple procedures (OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.52, 0.95). Conclusions Following multivariate analysis conservative therapy was more common at level I trauma centers despite the patient population being more severely injured. Initial intervention strategies were also more definitive at level I trauma centers, providing additional support for tiered delivery of trauma care. PMID:22177171

  8. Computed tomography in trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book begins with a chapter dealing with the epidemiology and mechanisms of trauma. Trauma accounts for more lives lost in the United States than cancer and heart disease. The fact that 30%-40% of trauma-related deaths are caused by improper or delayed diagnoses or treatment emphasizes the importance of rapid and accurate methods to establish a diagnosis. Acute thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic trauma and their complications are discussed. A chapter on high-resolution CT of spinal and facial trauma and the role of three-dimensional reconstruction images is presented.

  9. Trauma system development.

    PubMed

    Lendrum, R A; Lockey, D J

    2013-01-01

    The word 'trauma' describes the disease entity resulting from physical injury. Trauma is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and deaths due to injury look set to increase. As early as the 1970s, it became evident that centralisation of resources and expertise could reduce the mortality rate from serious injury and that organisation of trauma care delivery into formal systems could improve outcome further. Internationally, trauma systems have evolved in various forms, with widespread reports of mortality and functional outcome benefits when major trauma management is delivered in this way. The management of major trauma in England is currently undergoing significant change. The London Trauma System began operating in April 2010 and others throughout England became operational this year. Similar systems exist internationally and continue to be developed. Anaesthetists have been and continue to be involved with all levels of trauma care delivery, from the provision of pre-hospital trauma and retrieval teams, through to chronic pain management and rehabilitation of patients back into society. This review examines the international development of major trauma care delivery and the components of a modern trauma system. PMID:23210554

  10. Association Between the Pancreatic Enzyme Level and Organ Failure in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Arulselvi; Albert, Venencia; Mishra, Biplab; Sanoria, Shilpi; Pandey, Ravindra Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Background The literature suggests an association of pancreatic enzymes with systemic inflammation resulting in secondary organ injury and dysfunction following trauma. Elevation in serum enzymes may not always be predictive of pancreatic disease, and can reflect extra pancreatic production. Objectives This study was conducted to evaluate the rise in serum pancreatic enzyme levels with the incidence of organ failure following trauma. Patients and Methods A retrospective review was performed on critically injured patients from December 2009 to March 2010. Patient’s clinical demographics, routine laboratory investigations along with amylase and lipase levels were also extracted from the patients' records. Patients with pancreatic or duodenal injuries were excluded from the study. Results From a total of 296 patients (mean age, 31 years), 85% were males. Blunt injury was seen in 91.6% of the cases and 8.4% had penetrating injury. One hundred and fifty-three patients had single organ failure, 96 had multiple organ failure and 47 had no organ failure. There was a significant difference in lipase levels (P = 0.04), potassium levels (P = 0.05) and hemoglobin levels (P = -0.004), among the three patient groups. There was no significant difference in amylase levels among the three patient groups. The observed independent predictors of mortality included coagulopathy (OR = 1.7), Glasgow coma scale (OR = 1.1, 4.7), pulmonary failure (OR = 0.0004), hepatic failure (OR = 0.048), renal failure (OR = 5.5), organ failure (OR =149.8), lipase levels (OR = 1.3), and infection (OR = 3.0). Conclusions There was a significant correlation between elevated lipase levels and the incidence of multiple organ failure. Moreover, No significant association was found between the elevated amylase levels and organ failure. However, on admission, measurement of these enzymes coupled with routine laboratory investigations can be a powerful tool in the early detection of patients progressing

  11. Non-operative management of splenic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Beuran, M; Gheju, I; Venter, MD; Marian, RC; Smarandache, R

    2012-01-01

    The risk of overwhelming postsplenectomy infection (OPSI) prompted the evolution toward preservation of the injured spleen. Nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt injury to the spleen in adults has become the standard of care in hemodynamically stable patients. This modality of treatment began in the 1970’s in paediatric patients. It is highly successful with overall failures rates from 2% to 31% (average 10.8%) - with the majority of failures occurring in the first 24 hours. Current, NOM of splenic trauma includes splenic artery embolization. However, the criteria for NOM are controversial. In this study we present the current criteria, the evolution and failure rates of this type of management viewed through the general knowledge and, particularly, our experience. PMID:22574087

  12. H. Julian Allen with Blunt Body Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    H. Julian Allen is best known for his 'Blunt Body Theory' of aerodynamics, a design technique for alleviating the severe re-entry heating problem which was then delaying the development of ballistic missiles. His findings revolutionized the fundamental design of ballistic missle re-entry shapes. Subsequently, applied research led to applications of the 'blunt' shape to ballistic missles and spacecraft which were intended to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere. This application led to the design of ablative heat shields that protected the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts as their space capsules re- entered the Earth's atmosphere. 'Harvey' Allen as he was called by most, was not only a brilliant scientist and aeronautical engineer but was also admired for his kindness, thoughtfulness and sense of humor. Among his many other accomplishments, Harvey Allen served as Center Director of the NASA Ames Research Center from 1965 to 1969. He died of a heart attack on January 29, 1977 at the age of 66.

  13. Management of splenic injuries in a Canadian trauma centre

    PubMed Central

    Garber, Bryan G.; Yelle, Jean-Denis; Fairfull-Smith, Robin; Lorimer, John W.; Carson, Cathy

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To document the current practice pattern for the treatment of splenic injuries in one Canadian trauma centre and to identify factors that determined which method was employed. Design A cohort study. Setting A Canadian lead trauma centre. Patients A cohort of 100 patients with splenic injury treated at one trauma hospital over 5 years was identified from a prospective trauma database. Main Outcome Measures The success rate and failure rate for splenic salvage by splenectomy, splenorrhaphy or observation. Volume of blood transfused, injury severity score (ISS) and method of diagnosis. Results The median ISS for the cohort was 34 (36 for splenectomy, 38 for splenorrhaphy and 35 for observation). A blunt mechanism of injury was present in 96%. The diagnosis was made by computed tomography (CT) in 55%. Splenic salvage was accomplished in 51 patients; of these, 44 (86%) were in the observation group, and the success rate was 90% (within the range reported in the literature). Only seven patients underwent splenorrhaphy. CT was performed more frequently in the observation group than in the splenectomy group (82% v. 25%, p < 0.0001). The splenectomy group had more blood tranfused than the successful observation group (mean units 15 v. 3, p = 0.0001) and had a higher median ISS (36 v. 29, p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis revealed that the method of diagnosis (CT v. diagnostic peritoneal lavage) was the strongest factor associated with how the splenic injury was treated. Conclusions The finding in this report of an increase in observational treatment of splenic injuries represents a shift in practice from a previous Canadian report and is in keeping with recent published trends from the United States. Future studies are needed to assess whether any strong regional practice pattern variations in the management of blunt splenic injuries exists in other trauma centres across Canada. PMID:8956813

  14. Pancreatic and gastrointestinal trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Grosfeld, J L; Cooney, D R

    1975-05-01

    Injuries to the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract following blunt abdominal trauma continue to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the pediatric age group. Optimal treatment of these injuries is frequently hampered by considerable delays in diagnosis. Factors contributing to these delays include the location of much of the duodenum and the pancreas in the retroperitoneum resulting in an absence of initial symptoms and signs, the often trivial nature of some of the responsible blunt traumatic accidents, inappropriate child-parent or child-physician communication, failure to achieve a meaningful physical examination in uncooperative or unconscious patients, and false negative paracentesis. Eighty per cent of these injuries occurred in boys. Eleven of 16 patients with pancreatic trauma had pseudocysts. A persistently elevated serum amylase level was invariably noted and epigastric mass was palpable in eight patients. Significant delays in diagnosis were prevalent and pseudocysts was misdiagnosed as appendicitis in three cases. Internal drainage by cystgastrostomy or cystjejunostomy was effective operative treatment. In instances of acute pancreatic injuries, sump drains, gastrostomy, cholecystostomy, and total parenteral hyperalimentation were useful therapeutic adjuncts. There was one death for a 6.2 per cent mortality rate. Forty patients had gastrointestinal injuries involving the duodenum in 17, jejunum in 14, ileum in seven, and stomach in two. Perforations occured in 65 per cent of cases, obstructing hematomas in 30 per cent, and mesenteric avulsions in 5 per cent. Associated injuries were observed in 15 patients (37.5 per cent). Pain and tenderness were the only consistent findings. Upper gastrointestinal contrast studies were diagnostic of duodenal hematomas. Eighty per cent of perforations were managed by simple closures and 20 per cent by resection and anastomosis. Obstructing hematomas unassociated with other injuries may be expected to

  15. Identification and Interpretation of Longitudinal Gene Expression Changes in Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rajicic, Natasa; Cuschieri, Joseph; Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Miller-Graziano, Carol L.; Hayden, Douglas; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Moore, Ernest; O'Keefe, Grant; Pelik, Kimberly; Warren, H. Shaw; Schoenfeld, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The relationship between leukocyte gene expression and recovery of respiratory function after injury may provide information on the etiology of multiple organ dysfunction. Objectives To find a list of genes for which expression after injury predicts respiratory recovery, and to identify which networks and pathways characterize these genes. Methods Blood was sampled at 12 hours and at 1, 4, 7, 21 and 28 days from 147 patients who had been admitted to the hospital after blunt trauma. Leukocyte gene expression was measured using Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays. A linear model, fit to each probe-set expression value, was used to impute the gene expression trajectory over the entire follow-up period. The proportional hazards model score test was used to calculate the statistical significance of each probe-set trajectory in predicting respiratory recovery. A list of genes was determined such that the expected proportion of false positive results was less than 10%. These genes were compared to the Gene Ontology for ‘response to stimulus’ and, using Ingenuity software, were mapped into networks and pathways. Measurements and Main Results The median time to respiratory recovery was 6 days. There were 170 probe-sets representing 135 genes that were found to be related to respiratory recovery. These genes could be mapped to nine networks. Two known pathways that were activated were antigen processing and presentation and JAK- signaling. Conclusions The examination of the relationship of gene expression over time with a patient's clinical course can provide information which may be useful in determining the mechanism of recovery or lack of recovery after severe injury. PMID:21187951

  16. Planned reoperation for severe trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Hirshberg, A; Mattox, K L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors review the physiologic basis, indications, techniques, and results of the planned reoperation approach to severe trauma. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Multivisceral trauma and exsanguinating hemorrhage lead to hypothermia, coagulopathy, and acidosis. Formal resections and reconstructions in these unstable patients often result in irreversible physiologic insult. A new surgical strategy addresses these physiologic concerns by staged control and repair of the injuries. METHOD: The authors review the literature. RESULTS: Indications for planned reoperation include avoidance of irreversible physiologic insult and inability to obtain direct hemostasis or formal abdominal closure. The three phases of the strategy include initial control, stabilization, and delayed reconstruction. Various techniques are used to obtain rapid temporary control of bleeding and hollow visceral spillage. Hypothermia, coagulopathy, and the abdominal compartment syndrome are major postoperative concerns. Definitive repair of the injuries is undertaken after stabilization. CONCLUSION: Planned reoperation offers a simple and effective alternative to the traditional surgical management of complex or multiple injuries in critically wounded patients. PMID:7618965

  17. A novel experimental model of orthopedic trauma with acute kidney injury in obese Zucker rats

    PubMed Central

    Mittwede, Peter N; Xiang, Lusha; Lu, Silu; Clemmer, John S; Hester, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) after blunt traumatic injury in humans. Because limitations exist in studying trauma in human patients, animal models are necessary to elucidate mechanisms of remote organ injury after trauma. We developed a model of severe orthopedic trauma in lean (LZ) and obese (OZ) Zucker rats, in which OZ develop greater kidney dysfunction after trauma than LZ. Orthopedic trauma was inflicted via bilateral hindlimb soft tissue injury, fibula fracture, and injection of homogenized bone components. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were measured for 6 h after trauma, and again at 24 h after trauma. Urine was collected for 24 h before and after trauma to measure urine albumin excretion. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal plasma flow (RPF), plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6), and renal macrophage infiltration (ED-1 [CD68 Antibody] immunostaining) were measured in animals with and without trauma. MAP and HR were similar between LZ and OZ throughout the study, with the exception that OZ had a 18 mmHg lower pressure 24 h posttrauma. GFR and RPF were decreased significantly (∼50%), while urine albumin excretion, plasma IL-6, and renal ED-1-positive cells were increased in OZ 24 h after trauma compared to both OZ without trauma and LZ after trauma. In conclusion, these data are consistent with studies in humans that show that AKI develops more frequently in obese than in lean individuals. This model will be an important experimental tool to better understand the underlying mechanisms of poor outcomes after trauma in obese patients. PMID:24303169

  18. The Impact of Specific and Complex Trauma on the Mental Health of Homeless Youth.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carolyn F; Clark, Leslie F; Marlotte, Lauren

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the relative impact of trauma experiences that occurred prior to and since becoming homeless on depressive symptoms, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and self-injurious behaviors among a sample of homeless youth (N = 389). Youth (aged 13 to 25) who had been homeless or precariously housed in the past year completed a survey about housing history, experiences of violence and victimization, mental health, and service utilization. In addition to examining the impact associated with specific trauma types, we also considered the effect of "early-on" poly-victimization (i.e., cumulative number of reported traumas prior to homelessness) and the influence of a compound sexual trauma variable created to represent earlier complex trauma. This created-variable has values ranging from no reported trauma, single trauma, multiple non-sexual traumas, and multiple traumas that co-occurred with sexual abuse. Multivariate analyses revealed that specific traumatic experiences prior to homelessness, including sexual abuse, emotional abuse/neglect, and adverse home environment, predicted greater mental health symptoms. Poly-victimization did not add to the prediction of mental health symptoms after the inclusion of specific traumas. Results with early compound sexual trauma revealed significant differences between lower-order trauma exposures and multiple-trauma exposures. Specifically, experience of multiple traumas that co-occurred with sexual trauma was significantly more detrimental in predicting PTSD symptoms than multiple traumas of non-sexual nature. Findings support the utility of an alternate/novel conceptualization of complex trauma, and support the need to carefully evaluate complex traumatic experiences that occurred prior to homelessness, which can impact the design and implementation of mental health care and services for homeless youth. PMID:25392379

  19. Trauma patterns in patients attending the Emergency Department of Jazan General Hospital, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Hokkam, Emad; Gonna, Abdelaziz; Zakaria, Ossama; El-shemally, Amany

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Modern civilization and the sharp rise in living standards have led to dramatic changes in trauma pattern in Saudi Arabia. This study aimed to describe the different patterns of injuries of patients attending the Emergency Department of Jazan General Hospital (JGH) in the southwest corner of Saudi Arabia. METHODS: A total number of 1 050 patients were enrolled in the study. A pre-organized data sheet was prepared for each patient attended the Emergency Department of JGH from February 2012 to January 2013. It contains data about socio-demographics, trauma data, clinical evaluation results, investigations as well as treatment strategies. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 25.3±16.8 years. Most (45.1%) of the patients were at age of 18–30 years. Males (64.3%) were affected by trauma more common than females. More than half (60.6%) of the patients were from urban areas. The commonest kind of injury was minor injury (60%), followed by blunt trauma (30.9%) and then penetrating trauma (9.1%). The mean time from the incident to arrival at hospital was 41.3±79.8 minutes. The majority (48.2%) of the patients were discharged after management of trivial trauma, whereas 2.3% were admitted to ICU, 7.7% transferred to inpatient wards, and 17.7% observed and subsequently discharged. The mortality rate of the patients was 2.6%. CONCLUSION: Trauma is a major health problem, especially in the young population in Saudi Arabia. Blunt trauma is more frequent than penetrating trauma, with road traffic accidents accounting for the majority. PMID:25802567

  20. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Michael; Lewis, Jaime; Guitron, Julian; Reed, Michael; Pritts, Timothy; Starnes, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13%) following blunt injury and 20 (87%) after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury. PMID:23723618

  1. A review of ureteral injuries after external trauma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Ureteral trauma is rare, accounting for less than 1% of all urologic traumas. However, a missed ureteral injury can result in significant morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this article is to review the literature since 1961 with the primary objective to present the largest medical literature review, to date, regarding ureteral trauma. Several anatomic and physiologic considerations are paramount regarding ureteral injuries management. Literature review Eighty-one articles pertaining to traumatic ureteral injuries were reviewed. Data from these studies were compiled and analyzed. The majority of the study population was young males. The proximal ureter was the most frequently injured portion. Associated injuries were present in 90.4% of patients. Admission urinalysis demonstrated hematuria in only 44.4% patients. Intravenous ureterogram (IVU) failed to diagnose ureteral injuries either upon admission or in the operating room in 42.8% of cases. Ureteroureterostomy, with or without indwelling stent, was the surgical procedure of choice for both trauma surgeons and urologists (59%). Complications occurred in 36.2% of cases. The mortality rate was 17%. Conclusion The mechanism for ureteral injuries in adults is more commonly penetrating than blunt. The upper third of the ureter is more often injured than the middle and lower thirds. Associated injuries are frequently present. CT scan and retrograde pyelography accurately identify ureteral injuries when performed together. Ureteroureterostomy, with or without indwelling stent, is the surgical procedure of choice of both trauma surgeons and urologists alike. Delay in diagnosis is correlated with a poor prognosis. PMID:20128905

  2. Blunt cardiac rupture with prehospital pulseless electrical activity: a rare successful experience.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li-Hua; Choi, Wai-Mau; Wu, Hsueh-Ru; Liu, Hung-Chang; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Tsai, Shin-Han

    2005-12-01

    Blunt cardiac rupture is highly associated with mortality. In the recent literature, the reported mortality rates of cardiac rupture ranged from 59.7% to 100%. The probability of survival for those with prehospital pulseless electrical activity was extremely low. This case report describes a rare example of survival of a female patient with life-threatening cardiac rupture and cardiac tamponade after a major car accident. The victim developed pulseless electrical activity at admission. She recovered from the accident, however, without developing any signs of neurologic deficits. This case study emphasizes the value of the primary survey of patients and prompt and accurate interventions, including focused abdominal sonography for trauma, pericardiocentesis, and an urgent thoracotomy in the operating room for primary repair of cardiac rupture without applying a cardiopulmonary bypass system. The study showed that early diagnosis and aggressive interventions are crucial factors to the successful outcome of patient's survival. PMID:16394928

  3. Detection of blunt, sharp force and gunshot lesions on burnt remains: a cautionary note.

    PubMed

    Poppa, Pasquale; Porta, Davide; Gibelli, Daniele; Mazzucchi, Alessandra; Brandone, Alberto; Grandi, Marco; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2011-09-01

    The study of skin and bone lesions may give information concerning type and manner of production, but in burnt material modification of tissues by the high temperatures may considerably change the morphological characteristics of the lesions. This study aims at pointing out the effects of burning head of pigs with several types of lesions (blunt trauma, sharp force, and gunshot lesions) on soft tissues and bones, both from a morphological and chemical point of view. Results show that the charring process does not completely destroy signs of lesions on bones, which can often be recovered by cleaning bone surface from charred soft-tissue residues. Furthermore, neutron activation analysis test proved that antimony may be detectable also on gunshot entry wounds at the final stages of charring process. PMID:21799393

  4. Caring for Trauma Survivors.

    PubMed

    Antai-Otong, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Although trauma exposure is common, few people develop acute and chronic psychiatric disorders. Those who develop posttraumatic stress disorder likely have coexisting psychiatric and physical disorders. Psychiatric nurses must be knowledgeable about trauma responses, implement evidence-based approaches to conduct assessments, and create safe environments for patients. Most researchers assert that trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral approaches demonstrate the most efficacious treatment outcomes. Integrated approaches, offer promising treatment options. This article provides an overview of clinical factors necessary to help the trauma survivor begin the process of healing and recovery and attain an optimal level of functioning. PMID:27229285

  5. Thoracic response to high-rate blunt impacts using an advanced testing platform.

    PubMed

    Wickwire, Alexis C; Merkle, Andrew C; Carneal, Catherine M; Pauson, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    ehind Armor Blunt Trauma (BABT) is a persistent concern for both the military and civil law enforcement. Although personal protective equipment (PPE), including soft and hard body armor, mitigates penetrating injuries from ballistic threats, the impact generates a backface deformation which creates a high-rate blunt impact to the body and potential internal injury (i.e., BABT). A critical need exists to understand the mechanics of the human response and subsequently evaluate the efficacy of current and proposed PPE in mitigating BABT injury risk. Current human surrogate test platforms lack anatomical fidelity or instrumentation for capturing the dynamic transfer of energy during the event. Therefore, we have developed and tested a Human Surrogate Torso Model (HSTM) composed of biosimulants representing soft tissues and skeleton of the human torso. A matrix of pressure transducers were embedded in the soft tissue and a custom displacement sensor was mounted to the skeletal structure to measure sternum displacement. A series of non-penetrating, high energy ballistic tests were performed with the HSTM. Results indicate that both sternum displacement and internal localized pressure are sensitive to impact energy and location. These data provide a spatial and temporal comparison to the current standard (static clay measurements) and a method for evaluating the applicability of thoracic injury metrics, including the Viscous Criterion, for BABT. The HSTM provides an advanced, biomechanically relevant test platform for determining the thoracic response to dynamic loading events due to non-penetrating ballistic impacts. PMID:22846323

  6. Blunt traumatic aortic rupture of the proximal ascending aorta repaired by resection and direct anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Harmouche, Majid; Slimani, Eric Karim; Heraudeau, Adeline; Verhoye, Jean-Philippe

    2013-10-01

    Traumatic aortic injury represents 15% of motor vehicle related deaths with death occurring at the scene in 85% of the cases. Aortic disruptions usually occur at the isthmus in a transverse fashion with all three of the aortic layers being involved. Herein, we report the case of a 68-year old man with no prior medical history who was struck by a vehicle while riding his bicycle. The ruptured segment of aorta was resected circumferentially and interrupted horizontal mattress pledgeted prolene sutures were used to ensure full thickness aortic integrity of the proximal and distal aortic segments. The aorta was closed with a single-layer technique using 4/0 prolene suture. There were no postoperative complications and patient was discharged on Day 44. The case here discussed demonstrates a rare presentation of blunt aortic injury. The proximal ascending aorta is an unusual site of transection following blunt trauma with few reports in the literature. We were able to repair the aorta with direct suture, thus avoiding the use of artificial material. PMID:23838337

  7. Trauma and Substance Use Disorders in Rural and Urban Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, David L.; Wilkinson, Jamie; Paradis, Bryce; Kelley, Stephanie; Naseem, Ahsan; Grant, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Disparities in the prevalence, morbidity, and mortality of multiple mental health conditions have been described between rural and urban populations. However, there is limited information regarding differences in exposure to trauma and trauma-related mental health conditions in these populations. Given the number of veterans who are…

  8. Aerothermodynamic shape optimization of hypersonic blunt bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyi, Sinan; Yumuşak, Mine

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a reliable and efficient design tool that can be used in hypersonic flows. The flow analysis is based on the axisymmetric Euler/Navier-Stokes and finite-rate chemical reaction equations. The equations are coupled simultaneously and solved implicitly using Newton's method. The Jacobian matrix is evaluated analytically. A gradient-based numerical optimization is used. The adjoint method is utilized for sensitivity calculations. The objective of the design is to generate a hypersonic blunt geometry that produces the minimum drag with low aerodynamic heating. Bezier curves are used for geometry parameterization. The performances of the design optimization method are demonstrated for different hypersonic flow conditions.

  9. Contemporary Trends in the Immediate Surgical Management of Renal Trauma Using A National Database

    PubMed Central

    McClung, Christopher; Hotaling, James M.; Wang, Jin; Wessells, Hunter; Voelzke, Bryan B.

    2013-01-01

    Background The National Trauma Data Bank was utilized to analyze open surgical management of renal trauma during the first 24 hours of hospital admission, excluding those who were treated with conservative measures. A descriptive analysis of initial management trends following renal trauma was also performed as a secondary analysis. Methods Using the NTDB, patients with renal injuries were identified, and AIS codes were stratified to a corresponding AAST renal injury grade. Trends in initial management were assessed using the following initial treatment categories: observation, minimally invasive surgery, and open renal surgery. Analysis of initial open surgery was further examined according to etiology of injury (blunt vs. penetrating), type of open renal surgery, concomitant abdominal surgery, patient demographics, and time to surgery. Results 9,002 renal injuries (0.3%) mapped to an AAST renal grade. Of these, 1,183 patients underwent open surgery for their renal injury in the first 24 hours. There were 773 penetrating and 410 blunt injuries within this cohort. The majority of surgical patients sustained a high-grade renal injury (AAST 4–5: 64%). The overall nephrectomy rate in the first 24 hours was 54% and 83% for the penetrating and blunt groups, respectively. While the overall nephrectomy rate for AAST 1–3 renal injuries in the first 24 hours was low (1.8%), the nephrectomy rate was higher in the setting of an exploratory laparotomy (30%). Of those undergoing renal surgery in the first 24 hours, 86% had concomitant surgery performed for other abdominal injuries. Mean time from ED presentation to surgery was less for penetrating trauma. Conclusions Of patients requiring open surgery for renal trauma within 24 hours of admission, nephrectomy is the most common surgery. Continued effort to reduce nephrectomy rates following abdominal trauma are necessary. Level of Evidence III (exploratory cohort analysis, nonrandomized) PMID:24064872

  10. Non-iatrogenic trauma of the coronary arteries and myocardium: Contribution of angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspard, P.; Clermont, A.; Villard, J.; Amiel, M.

    1983-04-01

    Six patients with coronary and myocardial trauma had selective coronary arteriography and left ventriculography. Of these, three patients with penetrating cardiac trauma presented with an occlusion of one coronary artery, including one fistula. Of three patients with blunt chest trauma, normal coronary arteries were observed in one patient, and obstruction of one artery in another; repeat coronary arteriography showed resolution of the previous obstruction in one patient. A review of the last 15 years of experience summarizes 38 angiography reports after coronary artery trauma. An analysis of the angiographic aspect of coronary artery damage is considered as an aid to understanding the traumatic lesion, its causes and its manifestations under the conditions of total or partial parietal damage of the artery, or parietal integrity.

  11. Trauma care systems in Spain.

    PubMed

    Queipo de Llano, E; Mantero Ruiz, A; Sanchez Vicioso, P; Bosca Crespo, A; Carpintero Avellaneda, J L; de la Torre Prado, M V

    2003-09-01

    Trauma care systems in Spain are provided by the Nacional Health Service in a decentralized way by the seventeen autonomous communities whose process of decentralization was completed in January 2002. Its organisation is similar in all of them. Public sector companies of sanitary emergencies look after the health of citizens in relation to medical and trauma emergencies with a wide range of up to date resources both technical and human. In the following piece there is a description of the emergency response teams divided into ground and air that are responsible for the on site care of the patients in coordination with other public services. They also elaborate the prehospital clinical history that is going to be a valuable piece of information for the teams that receive the patient in the Emergency Hospital Unit (EHU). From 1980 to 1996 the mortality rate per 10.000 vehicles and the deaths per 1.000 accidents dropped significantly: in 1980 6.4 and 96.19% and in 1996, 2.8 and 64.06% respectively. In the intrahospital organisation there are two differentiated areas to receive trauma patients the casualty department and the EHU. In the EHU the severe and multiple injured patients are treated by the emergency hospital doctors; first in the triage or resuscitation areas and after when stabilised they are passed too the observation area or to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and from there the EHU or ICU doctors call the appropriate specialists. There is a close collaboration and coordination between the orthopaedic surgeon the EHU doctors and the other specialists surgeons in order to comply with treatment prioritization protocols. Once the patient has been transferred an entire process of assistance continuity is developed based on interdisciplinary teams formed in the hospital from the services areas involved in trauma assistance and usually coordinated by the ICU doctors. There is also mentioned the assistance registry of trauma patients, the ICU professional training

  12. Demystifying damage control in musculoskeletal trauma.

    PubMed

    Bates, P; Parker, P; McFadyen, I; Pallister, I

    2016-05-01

    Trauma care has evolved rapidly over the past decade. The benefits of operative fracture management in major trauma patients are well recognised. Concerns over early total care arose when applied broadly. The burden of additional surgical trauma could constitute a second hit, fuelling the inflammatory response and precipitating a decline into acute respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Temporary external fixation aimed to deliver the benefits of fracture stabilisation without the risk of major surgery. This damage control orthopaedics approach was advocated for those in extremis and a poorly defined borderline group. An increasing understanding of the physiological response to major trauma means there is now a need to refine our treatment options. A number of large scale retrospective reviews indicate that early definitive fracture fixation is beneficial in the majority of major trauma patients. It is recommended that patients are selected appropriately on the basis of their response to resuscitation. The hope is that this approach (dubbed 'safe definitive fracture surgery' or 'early appropriate care') will herald an era when care is individualised for each patient and their circumstances. The novel Damage Control in Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery course at The Royal College of Surgeons of England aims to equip senior surgeons with the insights and mindset necessary to contribute to this key decision making process as well as also the technical skills to provide damage control interventions when needed, relying on the improved techniques of damage control resuscitation and advances in the understanding of early appropriate care. PMID:27023640

  13. Complexity Science and Adult Education: The Role of Trauma in Nurses' Embodied Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Ann L.

    2009-01-01

    Every day nurses work in environments that expose them to trauma and they move through their professional space as embodied creatures with their own histories of trauma. Because trauma changes our bodies in multiple ways, these diverse, changed and changing embodied selves are the people who come to class when nurses engage in higher education.…

  14. Antemortem trauma and survival in the late Middle Pleistocene human cranium from Maba, South China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiu-Jie; Schepartz, Lynne A.; Liu, Wu; Trinkaus, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Paleopathological assessment of the late Middle Pleistocene archaic human cranium from Maba, South China, has documented a right frontal squamous exocranially concave and ridged lesion with endocranial protrusion. Differential diagnosis indicates that it resulted from localized blunt force trauma, due to an accident or, more probably, interhuman aggression. As such it joins a small sample of pre-last glacial maximum Pleistocene human remains with probable evidence of humanly induced trauma. Its remodeled condition also indicates survival of a serious pathological condition, a circumstance that is increasingly documented for archaic and modern Homo through the Pleistocene. PMID:22106311

  15. Hemostasis of solid viscus trauma by intraparenchymal injection of fibrin glue.

    PubMed

    Hauser, C J

    1989-03-01

    Fibrin glue (FG) is an effective hemostatic agent applied topically to the spleen. In this study, FG was found to be an effective hemostatic agent when applied topically in standardized wounds of the canine liver, spleen, and pancreas. It was markedly more effective, however, when injected intraparenchymally. In a case of severe blunt trauma in a patient with acute alcoholic hepatitis, intraparenchymal FG was lifesaving. Fibrin glue is a useful adjunct in the management of trauma to all the abdominal solid viscera. Intraparenchymal injection is the preferred mode of FG application. PMID:2465750

  16. [Trauma scores: reproducibility and reliability].

    PubMed

    Waydhas, C; Nast-Kolb, D; Trupka, A; Kerim-Sade, C; Kanz, G; Zoller, J; Schweiberer, L

    1992-02-01

    The inter-rater reliability of the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the Polytraumaschlüssel (PTS) [multiple trauma code] was studied using diagnosis sheets filled in for 107 multiple injured patients. The scoring was performed by eight physicians with different levels of qualification. The scores for individual patients varied widely depending on the scorer, with extremes differing from the mean by about 80% and 70% for the ISS and PTS, respectively. The mean ISS and PTS for the whole study population also varied significantly between the scorers (P less than 0.0001, one-way analysis of variance). Raters with experience in trauma scoring calculated significantly higher scores (P less than 0.01, t-test) Neither the ISS nor the PTS seem reliable enough to describe injury severity in an individual patient. Treatment decisions must not be based on such grounds. Even for larger groups, caution must be exercised in comparison of different populations of multiple traumatized patients. PMID:1570531

  17. Efficiency Analysis of Direct Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery in Elderly Patients with Blunt Traumatic Hemothorax without an Initial Thoracostomy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Lu, I-Yin; Yang, Chyan; Chou, Yi-Pin; Lin, Hsing-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Hemothorax is common in elderly patients following blunt chest trauma. Traditionally, tube thoracostomy is the first choice for managing this complication. The goal of this study was to determine the benefits of this approach in elderly patients with and without an initial tube thoracostomy. Seventy-eight patients aged >65 years with blunt chest trauma and stable vital signs were included. All of them had more than 300 mL of hemothorax, indicating that a tube thoracostomy was necessary. The basic demographic data and clinical outcomes of patients with hemothorax who underwent direct video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery without a tube thoracostomy were compared with those who received an initial tube thoracostomy. Patients who did not receive a thoracostomy had lower posttrauma infection rates (28.6% versus 56.3%, P = 0.061) and a significantly shorter length of stay in the intensive care unit (3.13 versus 8.27, P = 0.029) and in the hospital (15.93 versus 23.17, P = 0.01) compared with those who received a thoracostomy. The clinical outcomes in the patients who received direct VATS were more favorable compared with those of the patients who did not receive direct VATS. PMID:27190987

  18. Efficiency Analysis of Direct Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery in Elderly Patients with Blunt Traumatic Hemothorax without an Initial Thoracostomy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Lu, I-Yin; Yang, Chyan; Chou, Yi-Pin; Lin, Hsing-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Hemothorax is common in elderly patients following blunt chest trauma. Traditionally, tube thoracostomy is the first choice for managing this complication. The goal of this study was to determine the benefits of this approach in elderly patients with and without an initial tube thoracostomy. Seventy-eight patients aged >65 years with blunt chest trauma and stable vital signs were included. All of them had more than 300 mL of hemothorax, indicating that a tube thoracostomy was necessary. The basic demographic data and clinical outcomes of patients with hemothorax who underwent direct video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery without a tube thoracostomy were compared with those who received an initial tube thoracostomy. Patients who did not receive a thoracostomy had lower posttrauma infection rates (28.6% versus 56.3%, P = 0.061) and a significantly shorter length of stay in the intensive care unit (3.13 versus 8.27, P = 0.029) and in the hospital (15.93 versus 23.17, P = 0.01) compared with those who received a thoracostomy. The clinical outcomes in the patients who received direct VATS were more favorable compared with those of the patients who did not receive direct VATS. PMID:27190987

  19. Experimental Trauma Models: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Frink, Michael; Andruszkow, Hagen; Zeckey, Christian; Krettek, Christian; Hildebrand, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of polytrauma patients remains a medical as well as socioeconomic challenge. Although diagnostics and therapy improved during the last decades, multiple injuries are still the major cause of fatalities in patients below 45 years of age. Organ dysfunction and organ failure are major complications in patients with major injuries and contribute to mortality during the clinical course. Profound understanding of the systemic pathophysiological response is crucial for innovative therapeutic approaches. Therefore, experimental studies in various animal models are necessary. This review is aimed at providing detailed information of common trauma models in small as well as in large animals. PMID:21331361

  20. Management outcomes in splenic injury: a statewide trauma center review.

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, T V; Ramshaw, D G; Maxwell, J G; Covington, D L; Churchill, M P; Rutledge, R; Oller, D W; Cunningham, P R; Meredith, J W; Thomason, M H; Baker, C C

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Clinical pathways now highlight both observation and operation as acceptable initial therapeutic options for the management of patients with splenic injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment trends for splenic injury in all North Carolina trauma centers over a 6-year period. METHODS: Splenic injuries in adults over a 6-year period (January 1988-December 1993) were identified in the North Carolina Trauma Registry using ICD-9-CM codes. Patients were divided into four groups by method of management: 1) no spleen operation, 2) splenectomy, 3) definitive splenorrhaphy, and 4) splenorrhaphy failure followed by splenectomy. The authors examined age, mechanism of injury, admitting blood pressure, and severity of injury by trauma score and injury severity score. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Comparisons were made between adult (17-64 years of age) and geriatric (older than 65 years of age) patients and between patients with blunt and penetrating injury. Resource utilization (length of stay, hospital charges) and outcome (mortality) were compared. RESULTS: One thousand two hundred fifty-five patients were identified with splenic injury. Rate of splenic preservation increased over time and was achieved in more than 50% of patients through nonoperative management (40%) and splenorrhaphy (12%). Splenorrhaphy was not used commonly in either blunt or penetrating injury. Overall mortality was 13%. Geriatric patients had a higher mortality and resource utilization regardless of their mechanism of injury or method of management.CONCLUSIONS: Nonoperative management represents the prevailing method of splenic preservation in both the adult and geriatric population in North Carolina trauma center hospitals. Satisfactory outcomes and economic advantages accompany nonoperative management in this adult population. PMID:9242333

  1. Tracheobronchial Injury caused by Blunt Trauma: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Dharam S; Choraria, Swati; Guria, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial injuries are rare cases requiring skillful airway management. We report a challenging case of tracheobronchial injury in a young adult who was run over by a tractor and was referred to us from a peripheral hospital with endotracheal tube in situ. He was severely hypoxaemic on initial presentation. Diagnostic work up showed high suspicion for right bronchial transection along with left lung upper lobe contusion. Due to deteriorating clinical condition of the patient and despite immediate unavailability of fibreoptic bronchoscope, patient was immediately taken up for right posterolateral thoracotomy and double lumen tube was inserted. The position of the tube was confirmed clinically. As soon as the fibreoptic bronchoscope arrived, it was again used to confirm the position of double lumen tube. Patient’s clinical condition improved after repair of the injured right bronchus and he was later extubated the next day.

  2. Successful Operative Repair of Delayed Left Ventricle Rupture From Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Greene, Christina L; Boyd, Jack H

    2016-08-01

    A 21-year-old female was found to have an enlarging pericardial effusion 10 days after a 40-foot fall. Initial cardiac evaluation was negative. Ten days after presentation she developed hemodynamic compromise and chest computed tomography was concerning for cardiac rupture. The patient was taken to the operating room where the ruptured posterior ventricle was repaired, perforation in the P1 leaflet was identified and the mitral valve was replaced. The patient survived. To our knowledge, this is the first report of survival after delayed presentation of atrioventricular rupture at the level of the mitral valve. PMID:27449439

  3. An Arteriovenous Fistula Between the Internal Mammary Artery and the Pulmonary Vein Following Blunt Chest Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, T. Sakamoto, Toshihisa; Norio, Hirofumi; Kaji, Tatsumi; Okada, Yoshiaki

    2005-01-15

    A 67-year-old man suffered a traffic accident and was transferred to an emergency hospital close to the scene. He was diagnosed to have bilateral pneumohemothorax with a lung contusion, an anterior fracture dislocation of the C6-vertebra and a cervical cord injury at the level of C7. On the 48th day, massive hemoptysis was suddenly recognized. He was transferred in a state of shock to our hospital to undergo hemostasis for the bleeding. On the day of admission, a selective arteriogram showed extravasation from the left bronchial artery, for which embolization was carried out using Gelfoam. In spite of this treatment, his hemoptysis continued. On the next day, a selective left internal mammary arteriogram showed an arteriovenous fistula between the left internal mammary artery and the left pulmonary vein without any apparent extravasation. The arteriovenous fistula was successfully embolized using platinum fiber coils. The patient no longer demonstrated any hemoptysis after embolization.

  4. Blunt trauma resulting in pneumothorax with progression to pneumoperitoneum: a unique diagnosis with predicament in management

    PubMed Central

    Curfman, Karleigh R.; Robitsek, R. Jonathan; Sammett, David; Schubl, Sebastian D.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a case of pneumoperitoneum caused by traumatic pneumothorax after a fall. The patient is an 82-year-old male who was brought into the emergency department after being found at the bottom of a flight of stairs with a bleeding scalp laceration. Upon presentation, the patient underwent emergent intubation followed by tube thoracostomy placement, had necessary imaging and was transferred to the surgical intensive care unit (SICU). Imaging revealed signs of pneumomediastinum and pneumoperitoneum in addition to the partially resolved pneumothorax. In the SICU, the patient became hemodynamically unstable requiring vasopressor support, which in the face of documented pneumoperitoneum without a clear cause mandated exploration. He was taken to the operating room for suspected viscus perforation, though none was found after extensively searching during an exploratory laparotomy. We suspect the patient developed pneumomediastinum and pneumoperitoneum as a result of traumatic pneumothorax, hastened by his subsequent intubation and mechanical ventilation. PMID:26628715

  5. Co-incidence of acute appendicitis and appendiceal transection after blunt abdominal trauma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moslemi, Sam; Forootan, Hamid Reza; Tahamtan, Maryam

    2013-12-01

    A 13-year-old boy with a history of bicycle handlebar injury to the left side of his abdomen was brought to the Emergency Department of our center. On admission, his vital signs were stable and abdominal examination revealed ecchymosis and tenderness of the injured areas. Mild to moderate free fluid and two small foci of free air in the anterior aspect of the abdomen, in favor of pneumoperitoneum, were detected in abdominopelvic sonography and CT-scan, respectively. In less than 6 hours, the patient developed generalized peritonitis. Therefore, exploratory laparotomy was promptly performed, which revealed appendiceal transection and rupture of the small bowel mesentery. Appendectomy and small bowel mesoplasty were done, with pathological diagnosis of acute appendicitis and periappendicitis. After surgery, the patient had a non-complicated hospital course. This rare case highlights the significance of the early management of appendiceal traumatic injuries in order to prevent further complicated events, especially in patients who are much more exposed to this risk due to their traumatic background. PMID:24293790

  6. High flow priapism after blunt perineal trauma: resolution with bucrylate embolization.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Gonzalez, E; Pamplona, M; Rodriguez, A; Garcia-Hidalgo, E; Nunez, V; Leiva, O

    1994-02-01

    We report on 2 patients (ages 21 and 33 years) with high flow priapism secondary to arteriocavernous fistula produced by perineal injury. Both cases were satisfactorily resolved by super-selective embolization of the fistula with bucrylate. Diagnosis was based on the results of gasometry in cavernous blood, color Doppler ultrasound and arteriography. Erectile function after 24 and 30 months of treatment, respectively, was normal in both patients. Review of the literature revealed that only 13 patients have been managed with arterial embolization. To our knowledge our report represents the first in which intracavernous bucrylate embolization produced detumescence with preservation of erectile function. PMID:8283545

  7. Blunt trauma resulting in pneumothorax with progression to pneumoperitoneum: a unique diagnosis with predicament in management.

    PubMed

    Curfman, Karleigh R; Robitsek, R Jonathan; Sammett, David; Schubl, Sebastian D

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a case of pneumoperitoneum caused by traumatic pneumothorax after a fall. The patient is an 82-year-old male who was brought into the emergency department after being found at the bottom of a flight of stairs with a bleeding scalp laceration. Upon presentation, the patient underwent emergent intubation followed by tube thoracostomy placement, had necessary imaging and was transferred to the surgical intensive care unit (SICU). Imaging revealed signs of pneumomediastinum and pneumoperitoneum in addition to the partially resolved pneumothorax. In the SICU, the patient became hemodynamically unstable requiring vasopressor support, which in the face of documented pneumoperitoneum without a clear cause mandated exploration. He was taken to the operating room for suspected viscus perforation, though none was found after extensively searching during an exploratory laparotomy. We suspect the patient developed pneumomediastinum and pneumoperitoneum as a result of traumatic pneumothorax, hastened by his subsequent intubation and mechanical ventilation. PMID:26628715

  8. Imaging of head trauma.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Sandra; Gupta, Rajiv; Ptak, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is an indispensable part of the initial assessment and subsequent management of patients with head trauma. Initially, it is important for diagnosing the extent of injury and the prompt recognition of treatable injuries to reduce mortality. Subsequently, imaging is useful in following the sequelae of trauma. In this chapter, we review indications for neuroimaging and typical computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols used in the evaluation of a patient with head trauma. We review the role of CT), the imaging modality of choice in the acute setting, and the role of MRI in the evaluation of patients with head trauma. We describe an organized and consistent approach to the interpretation of imaging of these patients. Important topics in head trauma, including fundamental concepts related to skull fractures, intracranial hemorrhage, parenchymal injury, penetrating trauma, cerebrovascular injuries, and secondary effects of trauma, are reviewed. The chapter concludes with advanced neuroimaging techniques for the evaluation of traumatic brain injury, including use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS), techniques which are still under development. PMID:27432678

  9. Blunt cerebrovascular injury in rugby and other contact sports: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Trajan A; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Moore, Frederick A

    2014-01-01

    Contact sports have long been a part of human existence. The two earliest recorded organized contact games, both of which still exist, include Royal Shrovetide Football played since the 12(th) century in England and Caid played since 1308 AD in Ireland. Rugby is the premier contact sport played throughout the world with the very popular derivative American football being the premier contact sport of the North American continent. American football in the USA has on average 1,205,037 players at the high school and collegiate level per year while rugby in the USA boasts a playing enrollment of 457,983 at all levels. Recent media have highlighted injury in the context of competitive contact sports including their long-term sequelae such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) that had previously been underappreciated. Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) has become a recognized injury pattern for trauma; however, a paucity of data regarding this injury can be found in the sports trauma literature. We present a case of an international level scrum-half playing Rugby Union at club level for a local non-professional team, in which a player sustained a fatal BCVI followed by a discussion of the literature surrounding sport related BCVI. PMID:24872841

  10. Blunt cerebrovascular injury in rugby and other contact sports: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Contact sports have long been a part of human existence. The two earliest recorded organized contact games, both of which still exist, include Royal Shrovetide Football played since the 12th century in England and Caid played since 1308 AD in Ireland. Rugby is the premier contact sport played throughout the world with the very popular derivative American football being the premier contact sport of the North American continent. American football in the USA has on average 1,205,037 players at the high school and collegiate level per year while rugby in the USA boasts a playing enrollment of 457,983 at all levels. Recent media have highlighted injury in the context of competitive contact sports including their long-term sequelae such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) that had previously been underappreciated. Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) has become a recognized injury pattern for trauma; however, a paucity of data regarding this injury can be found in the sports trauma literature. We present a case of an international level scrum-half playing Rugby Union at club level for a local non-professional team, in which a player sustained a fatal BCVI followed by a discussion of the literature surrounding sport related BCVI. PMID:24872841

  11. Monitoring of hemostasis in combat trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Carr, Marcus E

    2004-12-01

    prevents medical personnel from quickly reaching the wounded. Furthermore, whereas civilian blunt trauma victims may have a "golden hour," casualties with penetrating battlefield trauma often have only a "platinum 5 minutes." Because of the challenges of treating hemorrhage during combat, it is important for military medical personnel to understand their options for treating hemorrhage quickly and efficiently. These articles discuss the causes of posttraumatic microvascular bleeding and the potential treatment options for controlling catastrophic hemorrhage in combat areas. PMID:15651434

  12. The coagulopathy of trauma.

    PubMed

    Maegele, M

    2014-04-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death, with uncontrolled hemorrhage and exsanguination being the primary causes of preventable deaths during the first 24 h following trauma. Death usually occurs quickly, typically within the first 6 h after injury. One out of four patients arriving at the Emergency Department after trauma is already in hemodynamic and hemostatic depletion. This early manifestation of hemostatic depletion is referred to as the coagulopathy of trauma, which may distinguished as: (i) acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) and (ii) iatrogenic coagulopathy (IC). The principle drivers of ATC have been characterized by tissue trauma, inflammation, hypoperfusion/shock, and the acute activation of the neurohumoral system. Hypoperfusion leads to an activation of protein C with cleavage of activated factors V and VIII and the inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), with subsequent fibrinolysis. Endothelial damage and activation results in Weibel-Palade body degradation and glycocalyx shedding associated with autoheparinization. In contrast, there is an IC which occurs secondary to uncritical volume therapy, leading to acidosis, hypothermia, and hemodilution. This coagulopathy may, then, be an integral part of the "vicious cycle" when combined with acidosis and hypothermia. The awareness of the specific pathophysiology and of the principle drivers underlying the coagulopathy of trauma by the treating physician is paramount. It has been shown that early recognition prompted by appropriate and aggressive management can correct coagulopathy, control bleeding, reduce blood product use, and improve outcome in severely injured patients. This paper summarizes: (i) the current concepts of the pathogenesis of the coagulopathy of trauma, including ATC and IC, (ii) the current strategies available for the early identification of patients at risk for coagulopathy and ongoing life-threatening hemorrhage after trauma, and (iii) the current and updated European

  13. Trauma and Mobile Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Drafke, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    Trauma and Mobile Radiography focuses on the radiography of trauma patients and of patients confined to bed. This book offers students a foundation in the skills they need to produce quality radiograms without causing additional injury or pain to the patient. Features of this new book include: coverage of the basics of radiography and patient care, including monitoring of heavily sedated, immobile, and accident patients. Information on the injuries associated with certain types of accidents, and methods for dealing with these problems. Detailed explanation of the positioning of each anatomical area. A Quick Reference Card with information on evaluating, monitoring and radiographing trauma patients.

  14. Operative treatment of hepatic trauma in Vachira Phuket Hospital.

    PubMed

    Vatanaprasan, Thanong

    2005-03-01

    Descriptive study of an 8-year period, 211 patients with hepatic trauma were studied retrospectively. Most of the patients were male (81.5%). Patients mainly affected were in the third decade of life (46.9%) with an age range of 2 to 65 years old (Mean 26.1 +/- 9.8). Fifty four percent resulted from blunt and 46.4% from penetrating injuries. The most common cause of injuries was motorcycle accidents (41.2%). The injuries were graded by the hepatic injury scale (grades I to VI). There were 22 (10.4%), 62 (29.4%), 70 (33.2%), 27 (12.8%), 28 (13.3%) and 2 (0.9%) patients with grade I, II, III, IV, V and VI hepatic injuries, respectively. Forty seven percent of patients were in shock when they first arrived at the emergency room. One hundred and sixty five patients (78.2%) had 375 associated injuries. Seventy three percent of patients had low grade hepatic injuries (grades I to III), the remainder (27%) had high grade hepatic injuries (grades IV to VI). Operative treatment of hepatic injuries varied according to degree of injury. Low grade hepatic injuries amenable to relatively simple operative treatment. Nineteen deaths (12.3%) occurring in this group were attributed to the commonly encountered associated injuries inside and outside the abdomen, which were more frequently seen after blunt trauma (89.5%). High-grade hepatic injuries required major techniques. Thirty four of these patients died (59.6%), death was related to the injury itself (91.2%), which were more frequently seen after blunt trauma (85%). During operation, suture ligature of the bleeding point, or hepatorrhaphy stopped the bleeding in most circumstances. Perihepatic packing was a useful procedure when termination of the operation was considered necessary in order to prevent the development of hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy. Perihepatic packing was used for treatment of 73% of high grade hepatic injuries and yielded 65.5% survival rate. The results were 59 patients had complication (morbidity

  15. Trauma and the full moon: a waning theory.

    PubMed

    Coates, W; Jehle, D; Cottington, E

    1989-07-01

    There exists a popular belief in the causal relationship between the moon's phase and the incidence of major trauma. In this retrospective study we reviewed 1,444 trauma victims admitted to the hospital during one calendar year. Full moons were defined as three-day periods in the 29.531-day lunar cycle, with the middle day being described in the world almanac as the full moon. Victims of violence included those patients sustaining blunt assault, gunshot wounds, and stabbings. There was no statistical difference in number of trauma admissions between the full moon, 129 patients per 36 days (mean, 3.58), and nonfull moon days, 1,315 patients per 330 days (mean, 3.98). Mortality rate, 5.4% versus 10.3%; mean Injury Severity Score, 13 versus 15; and mean length of stay, ten versus 12 days, were not significantly different during the full moon and nonfull moon days. Victims of violence were admitted at a similar frequency on full moon, 16 patients per 36 days (mean, 0.444), and nonfull moon days, 183 patients per 330 days (mean, 0.555). We conclude that the belief in the deleterious effects of the full moon on major trauma is statistically unfounded. PMID:2735596

  16. Trauma program development.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L

    2014-07-01

    The development of a strong trauma program is clearly one of the most important facets of successful business development. Several recent publications have demonstrated that well run trauma services can generate significant profits for both the hospital and the surgeons involved. There are many aspects to this task that require constant attention and insight. Top notch patient care, efficiency, and cost-effective resource utilization are all important components that must be addressed while providing adequate physician compensation within the bounds of hospital financial constraints and the encompassing legal issues. Each situation is different but many of the components are universal. This chapter addresses all aspects of trauma program development to provide the graduating fellow with the tools to create a new trauma program or improve an existing program in order to provide the best patient care while optimizing financial reward and improving care efficiency. PMID:24918830

  17. Basic trauma life support.

    PubMed

    Werman, H A; Nelson, R N; Campbell, J E; Fowler, R L; Gandy, P

    1987-11-01

    The impact of traumatic injuries on modern society in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic cost is enormous. Studies have shown that both advanced life support skills and rapid stabilization and transport of the trauma victim have a beneficial effect on the patient's ultimate outcome. The Basic Trauma Life Support (BTLS) course was designed to provide pre-hospital care providers with the skills necessary to provide a thorough assessment, initial resuscitation, and rapid transportation of the trauma victim. Early studies suggest that the material is easily learned by prehospital care providers and that the on-scene time for trauma cases is reduced following training in BTLS. More widespread training in BTLS may have a significant effect on the mortality and morbidity associated with traumatic injuries. PMID:3662184

  18. Imaging in orbital trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ken Y.; Ngai, Philip; Echegoyen, Julio C.; Tao, Jeremiah P.

    2012-01-01

    Orbital trauma is one of the most common reasons for ophthalmology specialty consultation in the emergency department setting. We survey the literature from 1990 to present to describe the role of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their associated angiography in some of the most commonly encountered orbital trauma conditions. CT orbit can often detect certain types of foreign bodies, lens dislocation, ruptured globe, choroidal or retinal detachments, or cavernous sinus thrombosis and thus complement a bedside ophthalmic exam that can sometimes be limited in the setting of trauma. CT remains the workhorse for acute orbital trauma owing to its rapidity and ability to delineate bony abnormalities; however MRI remains an important modality in special circumstances such as soft tissue assessment or with organic foreign bodies. PMID:23961028

  19. Advanced trauma life support training: How useful it is?

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2016-01-01

    We have tried in a recently published systematic review (World J of Surg 2014; 38: 322-329) to study the educational value of advanced trauma life support (ATLS) courses and whether they improve survival of multiple trauma patients. This Frontier article summarizes what we have learned and reflects on future perspectives in this important area. Our recently published systematic review has shown that ATLS training is very useful from an educational point view. It significantly increased knowledge, and improved practical skills and the critical decision making process in managing multiple trauma patients. These positive changes were evident in a wide range of learners including undergraduate medical students and postgraduate residents from different subspecialties. In contrast, clear evidence that ATLS training reduces trauma death is lacking. It is obvious that it is almost impossible to perform randomized controlled trials to study the effect of ATLS courses on trauma mortality. Studying factors predicting trauma mortality is a very complex issue. Accordingly, trauma mortality does not depend solely on ATLS training but on other important factors, like presence of well-developed trauma systems including advanced pre-hospital care. We think that the way to answer whether ATLS training improves survival is to perform large prospective cohort studies of high quality data and use advanced statistical modelling. PMID:26855889

  20. Advanced trauma life support training: How useful it is?

    PubMed

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2016-02-01

    We have tried in a recently published systematic review (World J of Surg 2014; 38: 322-329) to study the educational value of advanced trauma life support (ATLS) courses and whether they improve survival of multiple trauma patients. This Frontier article summarizes what we have learned and reflects on future perspectives in this important area. Our recently published systematic review has shown that ATLS training is very useful from an educational point view. It significantly increased knowledge, and improved practical skills and the critical decision making process in managing multiple trauma patients. These positive changes were evident in a wide range of learners including undergraduate medical students and postgraduate residents from different subspecialties. In contrast, clear evidence that ATLS training reduces trauma death is lacking. It is obvious that it is almost impossible to perform randomized controlled trials to study the effect of ATLS courses on trauma mortality. Studying factors predicting trauma mortality is a very complex issue. Accordingly, trauma mortality does not depend solely on ATLS training but on other important factors, like presence of well-developed trauma systems including advanced pre-hospital care. We think that the way to answer whether ATLS training improves survival is to perform large prospective cohort studies of high quality data and use advanced statistical modelling. PMID:26855889

  1. Trauma registry reengineered.

    PubMed

    Wargo, Christina; Bolig, Nicole; Hixson, Heather; McWilliams, Nate; Rummerfield, Heather; Stratton, Elaine; Woodruff, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    A successful trauma registry balances accuracy of abstraction and timeliness of case submissions to achieve quality performance. Staffing to achieve quality performance is a challenge at times based on competitive institutional need. The aim of this performance improvement timing study was to identify trauma registry job responsibilities and redesign the responsibilities to create increased abstraction time and maintain accuracy of data abstraction. The outcome is measured by case submission rates with existing staffing and interrater reliability outcomes. PMID:25397337

  2. Effects of Nose Bluntness on Stability of Hypersonic Boundary Layers over Blunt Cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kara, K.; Balakumar, P.; Kandil, O. A.

    2007-01-01

    Receptivity and stability of hypersonic boundary layers are numerically investigated for boundary layer flows over a 5-degree straight cone at a free-stream Mach number of 6.0. To compute the shock and the interaction of shock with the instability waves, we solve the Navier-Stokes equations in axisymmetric coordinates. The governing equations are solved using the 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. After the mean flow field is computed, disturbances are introduced at the upstream end of the computational domain. Generation of instability waves from leading edge region and receptivity of boundary layer to slow acoustic waves are investigated. Computations are performed for a cone with nose radii of 0.001, 0.05 and 0.10 inches that give Reynolds numbers based on the nose radii ranging from 650 to 130,000. The linear stability results showed that the bluntness has a strong stabilizing effect on the stability of axisymmetric boundary layers. The transition Reynolds number for a cone with the nose Reynolds number of 65,000 is increased by a factor of 1.82 compared to that for a sharp cone. The receptivity coefficient for a sharp cone is about 4.23 and it is very small, approx.10(exp -3), for large bluntness.

  3. Noninvasive ventilation in trauma.

    PubMed

    Karcz, Marcin K; Papadakos, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Trauma patients are a diverse population with heterogeneous needs for ventilatory support. This requirement depends mainly on the severity of their ventilatory dysfunction, degree of deterioration in gaseous exchange, any associated injuries, and the individual feasibility of potentially using a noninvasive ventilation approach. Noninvasive ventilation may reduce the need to intubate patients with trauma-related hypoxemia. It is well-known that these patients are at increased risk to develop hypoxemic respiratory failure which may or may not be associated with hypercapnia. Hypoxemia in these patients is due to ventilation perfusion mismatching and right to left shunt because of lung contusion, atelectasis, an inability to clear secretions as well as pneumothorax and/or hemothorax, all of which are common in trauma patients. Noninvasive ventilation has been tried in these patients in order to avoid the complications related to endotracheal intubation, mainly ventilator-associated pneumonia. The potential usefulness of noninvasive ventilation in the ventilatory management of trauma patients, though reported in various studies, has not been sufficiently investigated on a large scale. According to the British Thoracic Society guidelines, the indications and efficacy of noninvasive ventilation treatment in respiratory distress induced by trauma have thus far been inconsistent and merely received a low grade recommendation. In this review paper, we analyse and compare the results of various studies in which noninvasive ventilation was applied and discuss the role and efficacy of this ventilator modality in trauma. PMID:25685722

  4. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  5. Trauma in elderly patients evaluated in a hospital emergency department in Konya, Turkey: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Hasan; Bayir, Aysegul; Ak, Ahmet; Akinci, Murat; Tufekci, Necmettin; Degirmenci, Selim; Azap, Melih

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Trauma is a common cause of admission to the hospital emergency department. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cause of admission, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of patients aged ≥65 years admitted to an emergency department in Turkey because of blunt trauma. Materials and methods Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for 568 patients (314 women and 254 men) aged ≥65 years who were admitted to an emergency department of a tertiary care hospital. Results Trauma was caused by low-energy fall in 379 patients (67%), traffic accident in 79 patients (14%), high-energy fall in 69 patients (12%), and other causes in 41 patients (7%). The most frequent sites of injury were the lower extremity, thorax, upper extremity, and head. The femur was the most frequent fracture site. After evaluation in the emergency department, 377 patients (66%) were hospitalized. There were 31 patients (5%) who died. Risk of hospitalization after trauma was significantly associated with trauma to the lower extremity, thorax, and spine; fractures of the femur and rib; and intracranial injury. Conclusion Emergency department admission after trauma in patients aged ≥65 years is common after low-energy falls, and most injuries occur to the extremities. It is important to focus on prevention of falls to decrease the frequency of trauma in the elderly. PMID:24376346

  6. CT imaging signs of surgically proven bowel trauma.

    PubMed

    LeBedis, Christina A; Anderson, Stephan W; Bates, David D B; Khalil, Ramy; Matherly, David; Wing, Heidi; Burke, Peter A; Soto, Jorge A

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and interobserver agreement of individual CT findings as well as the bowel injury prediction score (BIPS) in surgically proven bowel injury after blunt abdominal trauma. This HIPAA-compliant retrospective study was IRB approved and consent was waived. All patients 14 years or older who sustained surgically proven bowel injury after blunt abdominal trauma between 1/1/2004 and 6/30/2015 were included. Admission trauma MDCT scans were independently interpreted by two abdominal fellowship-trained radiologists who recorded the following CT findings: intraperitoneal fluid, mesenteric hematoma/fat stranding, bowel wall thickening/hematoma, active intravenous contrast extravasation, free intraperitoneal air, bowel wall discontinuity, and focal bowel hypoenhancement. Subsequently, the electronic medical records of the included patients, admission abdominal physical exam results, admission white blood cell count, and findings at exploratory laparotomy of the included patients were recorded. Thirty-three patients met the inclusion criteria. The incidence and interobserver agreement of the CT findings were as follows: intraperitoneal fluid 93.9 %, kappa = 0.784 (good); mesenteric hematoma/fat stranding 84.8 %, kappa = 0.718 (good); bowel wall thickening/hematoma 42.4 %, kappa = 0.491 (moderate); active IV contrast extravasation 36.3 %, kappa = 1.00 (perfect); free intraperitoneal air 21.2 %, kappa = 0.904 (very good), bowel wall discontinuity 6.1 %, kappa = 1.00 (perfect); and focal bowel hypoenhancement 6.1 %, kappa = 0.468 (moderate). An absence of the specified CT findings was encountered in 9.1 % with surgically proven bowel injuries (kappa = 1.00, perfect). In our study, 9/16 patients or 56.3 % had a bowel injury prediction score (BIPS) of 2 or more as defined by McNutt et al. (J Trauma Acute Care Surg 78(1):105-111, 2014). The presence of intraperitoneal fluid and

  7. Survival probability in patients with liver trauma.

    PubMed

    Buci, Skender; Kukeli, Agim

    2016-08-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to assess the survival probability among patients with liver trauma injury using the anatomical and psychological scores of conditions, characteristics and treatment modes. Design/methodology/approach - A logistic model is used to estimate 173 patients' survival probability. Data are taken from patient records. Only emergency room patients admitted to University Hospital of Trauma (former Military Hospital) in Tirana are included. Data are recorded anonymously, preserving the patients' privacy. Findings - When correctly predicted, the logistic models show that survival probability varies from 70.5 percent up to 95.4 percent. The degree of trauma injury, trauma with liver and other organs, total days the patient was hospitalized, and treatment method (conservative vs intervention) are statistically important in explaining survival probability. Practical implications - The study gives patients, their relatives and physicians ample and sound information they can use to predict survival chances, the best treatment and resource management. Originality/value - This study, which has not been done previously, explores survival probability, success probability for conservative and non-conservative treatment, and success probability for single vs multiple injuries from liver trauma. PMID:27477933

  8. Nonoperative treatment of blunt splenic injury.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Pfeifer, J

    2001-11-01

    A spleen-preserving program was implemented at the author's institution during the mid-1980s using a five-part injury-grading scale that is similar and comparable to the AAST classification. Since that time, all patients with splenic injuries admitted to the Department of Surgery at the Karl-Franzens University Hospital in Graz, a level I trauma center, have been prospectively evaluated with respect to splenic preservation. Analysis of the relation of the severity of organ injury to the use of nonoperative management showed that degree I or II injuries were treated nonoperatively, whereas degree III and IV injuries were usually treated with adhesives, partial resection, or mesh splenorrhaphy; only degree V injuries almost always required splenectomy. With increasing experience in nonoperative management of splenic injuries the initial criteria have become less rigid, and there is now a tendency to attempt it in patients who formerly would have undergone surgery. PMID:11760743

  9. Multiple mandibular fractures. Treatment outlines.

    PubMed

    Elia, Giovanni; Franco, Elena; Clauser, Luigi C

    2016-02-01

    Multiple mandibular comminuted fractures usually occur in high energy traumas. The authors describe the management and treatment of multiple mandibular fractures in a young patient after a suicide attempt. PMID:26862697

  10. Pretransfer computed tomography delays arrival to definitive care without affecting pediatric trauma outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fahy, Aodhnait S.; Antiel, Ryan M.; Polites, Stephanie F.; Ishitani, Michael B.; Moir, Christopher R.; Zielinski, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Children with thoracic or abdominal trauma, presenting to referring hospitals, may undergo CT imaging prior to transfer to a pediatric trauma center (PTC). We sought to determine if children who undergo pretransfer imaging experience a delay in definitive care and worse clinical outcomes. Methods Pediatric blunt trauma patients transferred to our level I PTC were identified in this IRB approved study. Those transferred with CT imaging of the chest or abdomen/pelvis prior to transfer were compared to those transferred without imaging. Results Of 246 patients with a mean age of 12.4 ± 5.3 years (64% male), 128 patients (52%) underwent chest (n = 85) and/or abdominal (n = 115) CT studies prior to transfer. Among those patients with pretransfer CT, 14% of CT scans were repeated. On multivariate analysis accounting for distance, time from injury to arrival at our PTC was significantly greater in children who underwent pretransfer CT (320 ± 216 vs. 208 ± 149 minutes, p < 0.001). Median length of stay (3 vs. 3 days) and mortality (3% vs. 3%) were similar between groups (all p > 0.05). Conclusions A substantial number of pediatric blunt trauma patients underwent CT scans prior to transfer, which is associated with a delay in transfer but not worse outcomes. PMID:26778842

  11. Lactate in trauma: a poor predictor of mortality in the setting of alcohol ingestion.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Hadley K; Dechert, Tracey A; Wolfe, Luke; Aboutanos, Michel B; Malhotra, Ajai K; Ivatury, Rao R; Duane, Therese M

    2011-12-01

    Resuscitation end point markers such as lactate and base deficit (BD) are used in trauma to identify and treat a state of compensated shock. Lactate and BD levels are also elevated by alcohol. In blunt trauma patients with positive blood alcohol levels, lactate may be a poor indicator of injury. Retrospective data were collected on 1083 blunt trauma patients with positive blood alcohol levels admitted a Level I trauma center between 2003 and 2006. Patients were stratified by Injury Severity Score, age, gender, and Glasgow Coma Score. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess lactate and BD as independent risk factors for mortality. Seventy-four per cent of patients had an abnormal lactate level compared with 28 per cent with abnormal BD levels. In patients with mild injury, lactate levels were abnormal in more than 70 per cent of patients compared with less than 20 per cent of patients with abnormal BD levels. Linear regression showed lactate is not a significant predictor of mortality. Regardless of Injury Severity Score, lactate appeared to be more often abnormal than BD in the setting of alcohol ingestion. Additionally, because BD, and not lactate, was shown to be an independent predictor of mortality, lactate may not be a reliable marker of end point resuscitation in this patient population. PMID:22273211

  12. Epidemiology of severe trauma.

    PubMed

    Alberdi, F; García, I; Atutxa, L; Zabarte, M

    2014-12-01

    Major injury is the sixth leading cause of death worldwide. Among those under 35 years of age, it is the leading cause of death and disability. Traffic accidents alone are the main cause, fundamentally in low- and middle-income countries. Patients over 65 years of age are an increasingly affected group. For similar levels of injury, these patients have twice the mortality rate of young individuals, due to the existence of important comorbidities and associated treatments, and are more likely to die of medical complications late during hospital admission. No worldwide, standardized definitions exist for documenting, reporting and comparing data on severely injured trauma patients. The most common trauma scores are the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the Trauma and Injury severity Score (TRISS). Documenting the burden of injury also requires evaluation of the impact of post-trauma impairments, disabilities and handicaps. Trauma epidemiology helps define health service and research priorities, contributes to identify disadvantaged groups, and also facilitates the elaboration of comparable measures for outcome predictions. PMID:25241267

  13. Male genital trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, G.H.; Gilbert, D.A.

    1988-07-01

    We have attempted to discuss genital trauma in relatively broad terms. In most cases, patients present with relatively minimal trauma. However, because of the complexity of the structures involved, minimal trauma can lead to significant disability later on. The process of erection requires correct functioning of the arterial, neurologic, and venous systems coupled with intact erectile bodies. The penis is composed of structures that are compliant and distensible to the limits of their compliance. These structures therefore tumesce in equal proportion to each other, allowing for straight erection. Relatively minimal trauma can upset this balance of elasticity, leading to disabling chordee. Likewise, relatively minimal injuries to the vascular erectile structures can lead to significantly disabling spongiofibrosis. The urethra is a conduit of paramount importance. Whereas the development of stricture is generally related to the nature of the trauma, the extent of stricture and of attendant complications is clearly a function of the immediate management. Overzealous debridement can greatly complicate subsequent reconstruction. A delicate balance between aggressive initial management and maximal preservation of viable structures must be achieved. 38 references.

  14. Recombinant Factor VIIa Reduces Bleeding after Blunt Liver Injury in a Pig Model of Dilutional Coagulopathy under Severe Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Spronk, Henri M. H.; Braunschweig, Till; Rossaint, Rolf; Wüst, Dirk C.; van Oerle, Rene; Lauritzen, Brian; Tolba, Rene; Grottke, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Background Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is registered for use in haemophilia with inhibitors and other rare bleeding disorders, but has also been used in various other clinical conditions to terminate life-threatening bleeding. Underlying conditions (e.g. coagulopathy) and dosing may affect treatment efficacy. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of increasing doses of rFVIIa on blood loss and coagulation assays in haemodiluted and hypothermic pigs undergoing blunt liver injury. Methods A grade III blunt liver injury was induced in 28 pigs after 70% haemodilution and cooling to 32.6–33.4°C. Ten minutes after trauma, animals randomly received placebo or 90, 180 or 360 μg/kg rFVIIa. Global coagulation parameters, thromboelastometry (TEM) and plasma thrombin generation (TG) were determined at different time points during the observation period of 120 minutes. Results Total blood loss was significantly lower following 90 μg/kg rFVIIa (1206 [1138–1470] mL) relative to placebo (2677 [2337–3068] mL; p<0.05), with no increased effect with higher dose levels of rFVIIa. Following trauma and haemodilution, coagulation was impaired relative to baseline in both TEM and TG analysis. At 60 and 120 minutes after trauma, TEM variables improved in the rFVIIa-treated animals compared with the placebo group. Similarly, rFVIIa improved coagulation kinetics in TG. As was observed with blood loss, no significant effect between different rFVIIa dose levels was found in TEM or TG. Macro- and microscopic post-mortem examination did not reveal any signs of thromboembolic events. Conclusion Early administration of 90 μg/kg rFVIIa reduced blood loss in pigs undergoing blunt liver injury even after severe haemodilution and hypothermia, with no further effect of higher dose levels. Coagulation assays showed impaired coagulation in coagulopathic animals, with a dose-independent improvement in animals treated with rFVIIa. PMID:26098426

  15. The Role of Stent-Grafts in the Management of Aortic Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, Herve Elaassar, Omar; Marcheix, Bertrand; Cron, Christophe; Chabbert, Valerie; Combelles, Sophie; Dambrin, Camille; Leobon, Bertrand; Moreno, Ramiro; Otal, Philippe; Auriol, Julien

    2012-02-15

    Stent graft has resulted in major advances in the treatment of trauma patients with blunt traumatic aortic injury (TAI) and has become the preferred method of treatment at many trauma centers. In this review, we provide an overview of the place of stent grafts for the management of this disease. As a whole, TEVAR repair of TAIs offers a survival advantage and reduction in major morbidity, including paraplegia, compared with open surgery. However, endovascular procedures in trauma require a sophisticated multidisciplinary and experienced team approach. More research and development of TAI-specific endograft devices is needed and large, multicenter studies will help to clarify the role of TEVAR compared with open repair of TAI.

  16. Subsonic Static and Dynamic Aerodynamics of Blunt Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Fremaux, Charles M.; Yates, Leslie A.

    1999-01-01

    The incompressible subsonic aerodynamics of four entry-vehicle shapes with variable c.g. locations are examined in the Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel. The shapes examined are spherically-blunted cones with half-cone angles of 30, 45, and 60 deg. The nose bluntness varies between 0.25 and 0.5 times the base diameter. The Reynolds number based on model diameter for these tests is near 500,000. Quantitative data on attitude and location are collected using a video-based data acquisition system and reduced with a six deg-of-freedom inverse method. All of the shapes examined suffered from strong dynamic instabilities which could produced limit cycles with sufficient amplitudes to overcome static stability of the configuration. Increasing cone half-angle or nose bluntness increases drag but decreases static and dynamic stability.

  17. Effect of blunt trailing edge on rotor broadband noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, S.-T.; George, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    The production of high-frequency broadband noise by turbulent vortex shedding from rotor blades with blunt trailing edges is investigated analytically. The derivation of the governing equations, analogous to that of Kim and George (1982) for boundary-layer/trailing-edge noise, is explained, and numerical results are compared with the experimental data of Hubbard et al. (1981) and Lowson et al. (1972) in graphs. It is shown that vortex-shedding noise is a significant component of blunt-trailing-edge rotor broadband noise and that the analytical method employed gives reasonable predictions. The need for a better empirical expression for the normalized spectrum and for more measurements of surface pressure fluctuations near blunt trailing edges is indicated.

  18. Right coronary artery dissection and aneurysm presented as acute inferior myocardial infarction from an automobile airbag trauma.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chunlai; Hu, Wuming; Zhu, Ning; Zhao, Xuyong; Xu, Jian; Ye, Shiyong; Xiang, Yijia; Lv, Linchun

    2015-10-01

    Coronary artery dissection and aneurysm culminating in acute myocardial infarction are rare after blunt chest trauma. We are reporting a case of a previously healthy 52-year-old man who presented with right inferior lobe contusion, pleural effusion, right interlobar fissure effusion, bone fracture of right fourth rib, and acute inferior wall myocardial infarction and who experienced blunt trauma in his right chest wall by an airbag deployment in a car accident. Coronary angiography showed an aneurysm in the middle of right coronary artery with 70% afferent narrowing just distal to the aneurysm with no visible atherosclerotic lesion. A 4.0×20 mm TEXUS Liberté stent in the lesion was deployed, and a good coronary flow was obtained without residual stenosis and the aneurysm vanished. PMID:26319191

  19. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will this in some way impair their responding to current or ongoing trauma? The paper addresses practical strategies for implementing one evidence-based treatment, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for youth with ongoing traumas. Collaboration with local therapists and families participating in TF-CBT community and international programs elucidated effective strategies for applying TF-CBT with these youth. These strategies included: 1) enhancing safety early in treatment; 2) effectively engaging parents who experience personal ongoing trauma; and 3) during the trauma narrative and processing component focusing on a) increasing parental awareness and acceptance of the extent of the youths’ ongoing trauma experiences; b) addressing youths’ maladaptive cognitions about ongoing traumas; and c) helping youth differentiate between real danger and generalized trauma reminders. Case examples illustrate how to use these strategies in diverse clinical situations. Through these strategies TF-CBT clinicians can effectively improve outcomes for youth experiencing ongoing traumas. PMID:21855140

  20. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth Who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will…