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Sample records for multiple drug resistant

  1. Management of multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, D C S; Drobniewski, F A; Milburn, H J

    2003-01-01

    There has been a worldwide increase in multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) which has in the past been associated with a poor prognosis. In the U.K., about half of the cases live in the London area and we have set out to obtain further information on their treatment and outcome. We examined the risk factors, drug resistance, drug treatment, sputum conversion, and outcome in patients with MDR-TB at three hospitals in South London and diagnosed during the period June 1995-January 1999. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-positive patients were excluded. There were 760 patients resident in Lambeth, Southwark and Lewisham Health Authority (LSLHA) who were notified as tuberculosis (TB) during the time period and who were of negative or unknown HIV status. (The population of LSLHA is approx.750,000.) There was a total of 13 patients with MDR-TB, known or presumed to be HlV negative. Their median age was 28 years (range 15-53); nine (69%) were born outside the U.K. and 11 had pulmonary disease; they had organisms resistant to a median of two first-line drugs (range 2-4) and to a median of four of all drugs tested (range 2-10). They received treatment with a median of six drugs (range 3-9). Eight were followed up for at least 3 years (range 3-6) after the completion of treatment; at their last assessment none had features of active TB and all were sputum negative (smear and culture). Two returned to their countries of origin during treatment; they were sputum negative at that time. Two patients are well and continue on treatment in the U.K. One patient (known HIV negative) died following treatment failure. In conclusion, we obtained disease-free survival in eight cases of MDR-TB, known or presumed to be HIV negative and followed up for 3 years or more. The prognosis for patients treated at specialised centres is good (and better than is generally believed). We describe a new protocol for the detection and management of MDR-TB.

  2. Microenvironment drug resistance in multiple myeloma: emerging new players

    PubMed Central

    Solimando, Antonio Giovanni; Ruggieri, Simona; Annese, Tiziana; Nico, Beatrice; Fumarulo, Ruggiero; Vacca, Angelo; Frassanito, Maria Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) drug resistance (DR) is a multistep transformation process based on a powerful interplay between bone marrow stromal cells and MM cells that allows the latter to escape anti-myeloma therapies. Here we present an overview of the role of the bone marrow microenvironment in both soluble factors-mediated drug resistance (SFM-DR) and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR), focusing on the role of new players, namely miRNAs, exosomes and cancer-associated fibroblasts. PMID:27474171

  3. Epigenetic strategies to reverse drug resistance in heterogeneous multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Issa, Mark E; Takhsha, Farnaz Sedigheh; Chirumamilla, Chandra Sekhar; Perez-Novo, Claudina; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Cuendet, Muriel

    2017-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy, which remains incurable because most patients eventually relapse or become refractory to current treatments. Due to heterogeneity within the cancer cell microenvironment, cancer cell populations employ a dynamic survival strategy to chemotherapeutic treatments, which frequently results in a rapid acquisition of therapy resistance. Besides resistance-conferring genetic alterations within a tumor cell population selected during drug treatment, recent findings also reveal non-mutational mechanisms of drug resistance, involving a small population of "cancer stem cells" (CSCs) which are intrinsically more refractory to the effects of a variety of anticancer drugs. Other studies have implicated epigenetic mechanisms in reversible drug tolerance to protect the population from eradication by potentially lethal exposures, suggesting that acquired drug resistance does not necessarily require a stable heritable genetic alteration. Clonal evolution of MM cells and the bone marrow microenvironment changes contribute to drug resistance. MM-CSCs may not be a static population and survive as phenotypically and functionally different cell types via the transition between stem-like and non-stem-like states in local microenvironments, as observed in other types of cancers. Targeting MM-CSCs is clinically relevant, and different approaches have been suggested to target molecular, metabolic and epigenetic signatures, and the self-renewal signaling characteristic of MM CSC-like cells. Here, we summarize epigenetic strategies to reverse drug resistance in heterogeneous multiple myeloma.

  4. Multiple-Drug-Resistant Salmonella Typhi

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    sensitive to norfloxacin . ciprofloxacin. and ceftriaxone soipe.U’iually HII 16-81. (Bauer-Kirbv method) [ I J_ Five of the I5 patients whose sam- Until...11 4 These findings and those of other insestigators [3-51 support vears) reported taking antibiotics before presentation, and the the proposition that...S, i iphi strain% resistant to all of- the first- mean durations of illness before presentation were 13.8 days line antibiotics used in treatment

  5. [Response to therapy in multiple drug resistant tuberculosis patients].

    PubMed

    García de la Osa, Mercedes de la Paz; García Silvera, Eberto; Solano Leal, Mercedes; Milanés Virelles, María Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Multiple drug resistant tuberculosis is an increasingly significant medical problem, because it means the spread of microorganisms for which "second line" drugs are required to eliminate them; therapeutic effectiveness is lower, it takes longer to treat it, leading to more adverse effects in addition to being more expensive than the conventional treatment. To identify the response to individualized treatment in multiple drug resistant tuberculosis patients, who are non-HIV seropositive. A descriptive study was conducted in a sample of multiple drug resistant patients, who were treated for a year under individualized courses of treatment from 2000 to 2010 in Hospital Neumológico "Benéfico Jurídico". Data were collected from their medical histories and from bacteriological records. Out of 42 patients, 85.7% were males and the average age was 48.8 years. The most common category on admission was chronically-ill patient (40.5%). The average time for negative results in direct exam was 4.6 months and in culturing was 6 months; this indicator was lower in patients regarded as failures and higher in those classified as relapses. The highest healing percentage was found in chronic patients and in those classified as failures, accounting for 23.8 and 21.4% respectively. The compliance with individualized treatment under direct observation in multiple drug resistant tuberculosis proved to be effective in over half of the cases.

  6. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in Relapse and Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Fung

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy that remains incurable because most patients eventually relapse or become refractory to current treatments. Although the treatments have improved, the major problem in MM is resistance to therapy. Clonal evolution of MM cells and bone marrow microenvironment changes contribute to drug resistance. Some mechanisms affect both MM cells and microenvironment, including the up- and downregulation of microRNAs and programmed death factor 1 (PD-1)/PD-L1 interaction. Here, we review the pathogenesis of MM cells and bone marrow microenvironment and highlight possible drug resistance mechanisms. We also review a potential molecular targeting treatment and immunotherapy for patients with refractory or relapse MM. PMID:26649299

  7. A Hybrid Drug Limits Resistance by Evading the Action of the Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kathy K.; Stone, Laura K.; Lieberman, Tami D.; Shavit, Michal; Baasov, Timor; Kishony, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid drugs are a promising strategy to address the growing problem of drug resistance, but the mechanism by which they modulate the evolution of resistance is poorly understood. Integrating high-throughput resistance measurements and genomic sequencing, we compared Escherichia coli populations evolved in a hybrid antibiotic that links ciprofloxacin and neomycin B with populations evolved in combinations of the component drugs. We find that populations evolved in the hybrid gain less resistance than those evolved in an equimolar mixture of the hybrid’s components, in part because the hybrid evades resistance mediated by the multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) operon. Furthermore, we find that the ciprofloxacin moiety of the hybrid inhibits bacterial growth whereas the neomycin B moiety diminishes the effectiveness of mar activation. More generally, comparing the phenotypic and genotypic paths to resistance across different drug treatments can pinpoint unique properties of new compounds that limit the emergence of resistance. PMID:26538141

  8. Rapid evolution of drug resistance of multiple myeloma in the microenvironment with drug gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Amy; Zhang, Qiucen; Lambert, Guillaume; Khin, Zayar; Silva, Ariosto; Gatenby, Robert; Kim, John; Pourmand, Nader; Austin, Robert; Sturm, James

    2013-03-01

    Drug resistance in cancer is usually caused by the spatial drug gradients in tumor environment. Here, we culture multiple myeloma in a gradient from 0 to 20 nM of doxorubicin (genotoxic drug) across 2 mm wide region for 12 days. The myeloma cells grew rapidly and formed 3D colonies in the regions with less drug concentration. However, we have seen emergent colonies forming in regions with drug concentration above the minimal inhibitory concentration in less than one week. Once the cells have occupied the regions with less drug concentration, they tend to migrate toward the regions with higher drug concentration in a collective behavior. To characterize their resistance, we collect them from this microfluidic system, for further analysis of the dose response. We find that the IC50 (drug concentration that inhibits 50% of controlled population) of the cells, undergone a drug gradient, increase 16-fold of the wildtype cells. We further discover that these resistant cells express more Multidrug Resistance (mdr) protein, which pumps out the drugs and causes drug resistance, than the wildtype. Our current works on RNA-sequencing analysis may discover other biomolecular mechanisms that may confer the drug resistance.

  9. Bedaquiline: A novel drug to combat multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Goel, Divya

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is among the most common infectious diseases and continues as a major global health problem. The scenario is worsened by the emergence and spread of multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensive drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB). Cure rates are high for drug sensitive strains of Myobacterium tuberculosis if treatment protocols are adhered to, but treatment of MDR-TB and extensive drug drug-resistant strains is virtually impossible. The treatment of MDR-TB and XDR-TB relies on the drugs, which are less potent, more toxic and more costly and have to be administered for the longer duration. No new drug had come in to market for last 40 years, but the emergence of MDR-TB and XDR-TB has spurred interest in the development of novel drugs. For the effective treatment outcome, there is a dire need of new drugs with a different mechanism of action that can tackle both drug sensitive as well as drug-resistant strains. Bedaquiline is one such new drug with unique mechanism of action. Food and Drug Administration has approved bedaquiline for MDR-TB in December 2012. This article reviews the available evidence of efficacy and safety of bedaquiline.

  10. Specificity and mechanism of tetracycline resistance in a multiple drug resistant strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Izaki, K; Kiuchi, K; Arima, K

    1966-02-01

    Izaki, Kazuo (University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan), Kan Kiuchi, and Kei Arima. Specificity and mechanism of tetracycline resistance in a multiple drug resistant strain of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 91:628-633. 1966.-A decrease in the uptake of tetracycline occurred concurrently with a rise in the level of resistance of a multiple drug resistant strain of Escherichia coli grown in the presence of tetracycline. Although the strain was also resistant to streptomycin and chloramphenicol, growth in the presence of these two antibiotics did not influence the uptake of tetracycline. The induction of resistance, or decreased uptake of tetracycline, was dependent on growth of the organism in the presence of the drug. Decreased uptake of tetracycline could not be induced in a sensitive strain of the same organism under conditions suitable for induction of the resistant strain. The decrease in accumulating power of the resistant organism cultured in the presence of tetracycline does not appear to be due to selection of a resistant strain from cultures containing both resistant and sensitive strains.

  11. Co-delivery of multiple drug resistance inhibitors by polymer/inorganic hybrid nanoparticles to effectively reverse cancer drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cong; Gong, Meng-Qing; Liu, Bo-Ya; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Cheng, Si-Xue

    2017-01-01

    To effectively reverse multiple drug resistance (MDR) in tumor treatments, a functional nano-sized drug delivery system with active targeting function and pH sensitivity was prepared for the co-delivery of multiple drug resistance inhibitors. Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) to inhibit GSH synthesis and celecoxib (CXB) to down-regulate P-gp expression were co-loaded in polymer/inorganic hybrid nanoparticles to form buthionine sulfoximine/celecoxib@biotin-heparin/heparin/calcium carbonate/calcium phosphate nanoparticles (BSO/CXB@BNP). To investigate the reversal of MDR, the drug resistant cells (MCF-7/ADR) were pretreated by the dual-inhibitor loaded nanoparticles (BSO/CXB@BNP) followed by the treatment of doxorubicin (DOX) loaded nanoparticles (DOX@BNP). The dual-inhibitor loaded nanoparticles (BSO/CXB@BNP) exhibited greatly enhanced efficiency in down-regulation of GSH and P-gp since BSO and CXB had combined effects on the reduction of GSH and P-gp in drug resistant tumor cells. As a result, BSO/CXB@BNP exhibited a significantly improved capability in reversal of MDR compared with mono-inhibitor loaded nanoparticles (CXB@BNP and BSO@BNP). As compared with free drug resistance inhibitors, delivery of drug resistance inhibitors by functional nanocarriers could obviously improve the therapeutic efficiency due to enhanced cellular uptake and increased intracellular drug accumulation. The study on immunostimulatory effects of different treatments showed that BSO/CXB@BNP treatment resulted in the lowest concentration of interleukin 10, a cytokine related to tumor development. These results suggest the nanoparticulate drug delivery platform developed in this study has promising applications in multiple drug delivery to overcome drug resistance in tumor treatments.

  12. A Hybrid Drug Limits Resistance by Evading the Action of the Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kathy K; Stone, Laura K; Lieberman, Tami D; Shavit, Michal; Baasov, Timor; Kishony, Roy

    2016-02-01

    Hybrid drugs are a promising strategy to address the growing problem of drug resistance, but the mechanism by which they modulate the evolution of resistance is poorly understood. Integrating high-throughput resistance measurements and genomic sequencing, we compared Escherichia coli populations evolved in a hybrid antibiotic that links ciprofloxacin and neomycin B with populations evolved in combinations of the component drugs. We find that populations evolved in the hybrid gain less resistance than those evolved in an equimolar mixture of the hybrid's components, in part because the hybrid evades resistance mediated by the multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) operon. Furthermore, we find that the ciprofloxacin moiety of the hybrid inhibits bacterial growth whereas the neomycin B moiety diminishes the effectiveness of mar activation. More generally, comparing the phenotypic and genotypic paths to resistance across different drug treatments can pinpoint unique properties of new compounds that limit the emergence of resistance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Emergence of tetracycline resistance due to a multiple drug resistance plasmid in Vibrio cholerae O139.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Nair, G B; Takeda, Y

    1995-04-01

    Of the 173 clinical strains of Vibrio cholerae O139 isolated from India, Bangladesh, and Thailand tested, six strains from India were resistant to tetracycline, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, and gentamicin. These six strains harbored a self-transmissible plasmid that mediated resistance to tetracycline, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, gentamicin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, and O/129. The multiple drug resistance plasmids were 200 kb in size and belonged to the incompatibility group C. Although a majority of the O139 strains (94.8%) were highly resistant to streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, and O/129, the tetracycline-susceptible strains so far tested were plasmid-negative. The data suggest the existence of two distinct multiple antimicrobial agent resistance (MAR) patterns in V. cholerae O139.

  14. Multiple drug resistance genes in malaria -- from epistasis to epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Duraisingh, Manoj T; Refour, Philippe

    2005-08-01

    A decline in our ability to successfully treat patients with malaria infections of the parasitic protozoan Plasmodium falciparum with cheap quinoline drugs has led to a huge escalation in morbidity and mortality in recent years. Many approaches have been taken, including classical genetics, reverse genetics and molecular epidemiology, to identify the molecular determinants underlying this resistance. The contribution of the P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene, pfmdr1, to antimalarial resistance has been a source of controversy for over a decade since it was first identified. In the current issue of Molecular Microbiology, Sidhu and colleagues use powerful reverse genetics to demonstrate the importance of commonly occurring alleles of pfmdr1 in conferring resistance to the second-line drugs quinine and sensitivity to the new alternatives mefloquine and artemisinin. They also elegantly highlight the importance of genetic background and epistasis between pfmdr1 and other potential modulators of drug resistance. Such molecular knowledge will facilitate surveillance/monitoring and aid the development of strategies for the reversal of resistance.

  15. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  16. Drug resistance in multiple myeloma: latest findings and new concepts on molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Jahangir; Chen, Guoan; Chang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    In the era of new and mostly effective therapeutic protocols, multiple myeloma still tends to be a hard-to-treat hematologic cancer. This hallmark of the disease is in fact a sequel to drug resistant phenotypes persisting initially or emerging in the course of treatment. Furthermore, the heterogeneous nature of multiple myeloma makes treating patients with the same drug challenging because finding a drugable oncogenic process common to all patients is not yet feasible, while our current knowledge of genetic/epigenetic basis of multiple myeloma pathogenesis is outstanding. Nonetheless, bone marrow microenvironment components are well known as playing critical roles in myeloma tumor cell survival and environment-mediated drug resistance happening most possibly in all myeloma patients. Generally speaking, however; real mechanisms underlying drug resistance in multiple myeloma are not completely understood. The present review will discuss the latest findings and concepts in this regard. It reviews the association of important chromosomal translocations, oncogenes (e.g. TP53) mutations and deranged signaling pathways (e.g. NFκB) with drug response in clinical and experimental investigations. It will also highlight how bone marrow microenvironment signals (Wnt, Notch) and myeloma cancer stem cells could contribute to drug resistance in multiple myeloma. PMID:24327604

  17. Role of micro-RNAs in drug resistance of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Jahangir; Jian, Hou; Chang, Hong

    2016-09-13

    While novel therapeutic approaches have profoundly improved survival of multiple myeloma (MM) patients, drug resistance and treatment refractoriness still persists. This obstacle highly demands thorough investigation into the root and underlying molecular mechanisms to develop more effective strategies. The advent of micro-RNAs (miRNAs) in the study of cancer biology and pathogenesis in recent years has revolutionized therapy in this field and particularly opened new windows to further understanding of tumor drug resistance. However; in spite of the fact that miRNAs involvement in MM pathogenesis and progression has been substantially evidenced, miRNA investigation in MM drug resistance is still in its infancy. Our knowledge of the potential role of miRNAs in MM drug resistance comes from few recent reports confirming that some miRNAs including miR-137/197, miR-21 and miR-221/222 could negatively modulate drug sensitivity of MM cells. Further continuous researches are required to exploit miRNAs to elucidate the critical mechanisms controlling drug resistance in MM. In this review, we will highlight the most recent observations on the role of miRNAs in MM drug resistance. Moreover, approaches and insights into clinical application of miRNAs to overcome MM drug resistance will be discussed.

  18. Role of micro-RNAs in drug resistance of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Jahangir; Jian, Hou; Chang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    While novel therapeutic approaches have profoundly improved survival of multiple myeloma (MM) patients, drug resistance and treatment refractoriness still persists. This obstacle highly demands thorough investigation into the root and underlying molecular mechanisms to develop more effective strategies. The advent of micro-RNAs (miRNAs) in the study of cancer biology and pathogenesis in recent years has revolutionized therapy in this field and particularly opened new windows to further understanding of tumor drug resistance. However; in spite of the fact that miRNAs involvement in MM pathogenesis and progression has been substantially evidenced, miRNA investigation in MM drug resistance is still in its infancy. Our knowledge of the potential role of miRNAs in MM drug resistance comes from few recent reports confirming that some miRNAs including miR-137/197, miR-21 and miR-221/222 could negatively modulate drug sensitivity of MM cells. Further continuous researches are required to exploit miRNAs to elucidate the critical mechanisms controlling drug resistance in MM. In this review, we will highlight the most recent observations on the role of miRNAs in MM drug resistance. Moreover, approaches and insights into clinical application of miRNAs to overcome MM drug resistance will be discussed. PMID:27494872

  19. Development of novel antibacterial drugs to combat multiple resistant organisms.

    PubMed

    Bassetti, Matteo; Righi, Elda

    2015-02-01

    Infections due to multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria are increasing both in hospitals and in the community and are characterized by high mortality rates. New molecules are in development to face the need of active compounds toward resistant gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens. In particular, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) has supported the initiative to develop ten new antibacterials within 2020. Principal targets are the so-called ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacteriaceae). To review the characteristics and the status of development of new antimicrobials including new cephalosporins, carbapenems, beta-lactamase inhibitors, aminoglycosides, quinolones, oxazolidones, glycopeptides, and tetracyclines. While numerous new compounds target resistant gram-positive pathogens and have been approved for clinical use, very few new molecules are active against MDR gram-negative pathogens, especially carbapenemase producers. New glycopeptides and oxazolidinones are highly efficient against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and new cephalosporins and carbapenems also display activity toward MDR gram-positive bacteria. Although new cephalosporins and carbapenems have acquired activity against MRSA, they offer few advantages against difficult-to-treat gram-negatives. Among agents that are potentially active against MDR gram-negatives are ceftozolane/tazobactam, new carbapenems, the combination of avibactam with ceftazidime, and plazomicin. Since a relevant number of promising antibiotics is currently in development, regulatory approvals over the next 5 years are crucial to face the growing threat of multidrug resistance.

  20. Tris DBA palladium overcomes hypoxia-mediated drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Azab, Feda; Muz, Barbara; Luderer, Micah; Arbiser, Jack; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2016-07-01

    Despite recent progress in novel and targeted therapies, multiple myeloma (MM) remains a therapeutically challenging incurable disease. The regulation of important cellular processes and its link to cancer presented Src as an attractive target for MM. We suggest a novel strategy to improve the treatment of MM and overcome the drug resistance for the current therapeutic agents by specific inhibition of Src in MM cells by Tris (Dibenzylideneacetone) dipalladium (Tris DBA). Tris DBA reduces proliferation, induces G1 arrest and apoptosis in MM cells. Tris DBA showed additive effect with proteasome inhibitors reducing proliferation, cell cycle signaling, and increasing apoptosis more than each drug alone. Tris DBA overcame hypoxia-induced effects such as enhanced chemotaxis or drug resistance to proteasome inhibitors by inhibition of HIF1α expression. Moreover, we found that Tris DBA is an effective anti-myeloma agent alone or in combination with other targeted drugs and that it reverses hypoxia-induced drug resistance in myeloma.

  1. Monitoring a Nuclear Factor-κB Signature of Drug Resistance in Multiple Myeloma*

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yun; Remily-Wood, Elizabeth R.; Oliveira, Vasco; Yarde, Danielle; He, Lili; Cheng, Jin Q.; Mathews, Linda; Boucher, Kelly; Cubitt, Christopher; Perez, Lia; Gauthier, Ted J.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Shain, Kenneth H.; Dalton, William S.; Hazlehurst, Lori; Koomen, John M.

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of acquired drug resistance results from multiple compensatory mechanisms acting to prevent cell death. Simultaneous monitoring of proteins involved in drug resistance is a major challenge for both elucidation of the underlying biology and development of candidate biomarkers for assessment of personalized cancer therapy. Here, we have utilized an integrated analytical platform based on SDS-PAGE protein fractionation prior to liquid chromatography coupled to multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry, a versatile and powerful tool for targeted quantification of proteins in complex matrices, to evaluate a well-characterized model system of melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). Quantitative assays were developed to measure protein expression related to signaling events and biological processes relevant to melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma, specifically: nuclear factor-κB subunits, members of the Bcl-2 family of apoptosis-regulating proteins, and Fanconi Anemia DNA repair components. SDS-PAGE protein fractionation prior to liquid chromatography coupled to multiple reaction monitoring methods were developed for quantification of these selected target proteins in amounts of material compatible with direct translation to clinical specimens (i.e. less than 50,000 cells). As proof of principle, both relative and absolute quantification were performed on cell line models of MM to compare protein expression before and after drug treatment in naïve cells and in drug resistant cells; these liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring results are compared with existing literature and Western blots. The initial stage of a systems biology platform for examining drug resistance in MM has been implemented in cell line models and has been translated to MM cells isolated from a patient. The ultimate application of this platform could assist in clinical decision-making for individualized patient treatment. Although these specific assays have

  2. Drug-Resistant Epilepsy: Multiple Hypotheses, Few Answers

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fei; Hartz, Anika M. S.; Bauer, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that affects over 70 million people worldwide. Despite the recent introduction of new antiseizure drugs (ASDs), about one-third of patients with epilepsy have seizures refractory to pharmacotherapy. Early identification of patients who will become refractory to ASDs could help direct such patients to appropriate non-pharmacological treatment, but the complexity in the temporal patterns of epilepsy could make such identification difficult. The target hypothesis and transporter hypothesis are the most cited theories trying to explain refractory epilepsy, but neither theory alone fully explains the neurobiological basis of pharmacoresistance. This review summarizes evidence for and against several major theories, including the pharmacokinetic hypothesis, neural network hypothesis, intrinsic severity hypothesis, gene variant hypothesis, target hypothesis, and transporter hypothesis. The discussion is mainly focused on the transporter hypothesis, where clinical and experimental data are discussed on multidrug transporter overexpression, substrate profiles of ASDs, mechanism of transporter upregulation, polymorphisms of transporters, and the use of transporter inhibitors. Finally, future perspectives are presented for the improvement of current hypotheses and the development of treatment strategies as guided by the current understanding of refractory epilepsy. PMID:28729850

  3. Low MITF/AXL ratio predicts early resistance to multiple targeted drugs in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Judith; Krijgsman, Oscar; Tsoi, Jennifer; Robert, Lidia; Hugo, Willy; Song, Chunying; Kong, Xiangju; Possik, Patricia A.; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien D.M.; Foppen, Marnix H. Geukes; Kemper, Kristel; Goding, Colin R.; McDermott, Ultan; Blank, Christian; Haanen, John; Graeber, Thomas G.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.; Peeper, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Increased expression of the Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) contributes to melanoma progression and resistance to BRAF pathway inhibition. Here we show that the lack of MITF is associated with more severe resistance to a range of inhibitors, while its presence is required for robust drug responses. Both in primary and acquired resistance, MITF levels inversely correlate with the expression of several activated receptor tyrosine kinases, most frequently AXL. The MITF-low/AXL-high/drug-resistance phenotype is common among mutant BRAF and NRAS melanoma cell lines. The dichotomous behaviour of MITF in drug response is corroborated in vemurafenib-resistant biopsies, including MITF-high and -low clones in a relapsed patient. Furthermore, drug cocktails containing AXL inhibitor enhance melanoma cell elimination by BRAF or ERK inhibition. Our results demonstrate that a low MITF/AXL ratio predicts early resistance to multiple targeted drugs, and warrant clinical validation of AXL inhibitors to combat resistance of BRAF and NRAS mutant MITF-low melanomas. PMID:25502142

  4. Targeting the Fanconi anemia/BRCA pathway circumvents drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Yarde, Danielle N; Oliveira, Vasco; Mathews, Linda; Wang, Xingyu; Villagra, Alejandro; Boulware, David; Shain, Kenneth H; Hazlehurst, Lori A; Alsina, Melissa; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Beg, Amer A; Dalton, William S

    2009-12-15

    The Fanconi anemia/BRCA (FA/BRCA) DNA damage repair pathway plays a pivotal role in the cellular response to replicative stress induced by DNA alkylating agents and greatly influences drug response in cancer treatment. We recently reported that FA/BRCA genes are overexpressed and causative for drug resistance in human melphalan-resistant multiple myeloma cell lines. However, the transcriptional regulation of the FA/BRCA pathway is not understood. In this report, we describe for the first time a novel function of the NF-kappaB subunits, RelB/p50, as transcriptional activators of the FA/BRCA pathway. Specifically, our findings point to constitutive phosphorylation of IkappaB kinase alpha and subsequent alterations in FANCD2 expression and function as underlying events leading to melphalan resistance in repeatedly exposed multiple myeloma cells. Inhibiting NF-kappaB by small interfering RNA, blocking the IkappaB kinase complex with BMS-345541, or using the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib drastically reduced FA/BRCA gene expression and FANCD2 protein expression in myeloma cells, resulting in diminished DNA damage repair and enhanced melphalan sensitivity. Importantly, we also found that bortezomib decreases FA/BRCA gene expression in multiple myeloma patients. These results show for the first time that NF-kappaB transcriptionally regulates the FA/BRCA pathway and provide evidence for targeting Fanconi anemia-mediated DNA repair to enhance chemotherapeutic response and circumvent drug resistance in myeloma patients.

  5. Public Health Risks of Multiple-Drug-Resistant Enterococcus spp. in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sui Mae; Rahman, Sadequr

    2015-01-01

    Enterococci rank as one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections, such as urinary tract infections, surgical wound infections, and endocarditis, in humans. These infections can be hard to treat because of the rising incidence of antibiotic resistance. Enterococci inhabiting nonhuman reservoirs appear to play a critical role in the acquisition and dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants. The spread of antibiotic resistance has become a major concern in both human and veterinary medicine, especially in Southeast Asia, where many developing countries have poor legislation and regulations to control the supply and excessive use of antimicrobials. This review addresses the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant enterococci in Association of Southeast Asian Nations countries and proposes infection control measures that should be applied to limit the spread of multiple-drug-resistant enterococci. PMID:26150452

  6. Withanolide D Exhibits Similar Cytostatic Effect in Drug-Resistant and Drug-Sensitive Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Issa, Mark E; Wijeratne, E M K; Gunatilaka, A A L; Cuendet, Muriel

    2017-01-01

    In spite of recent therapeutic advances, multiple myeloma (MM) remains a malignancy with very low curability. This has been partly attributed to the existence of a drug-resistant subpopulation known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). MM-CSCs are equipped with the necessary tools that render them highly resistant to virtually all conventional therapies. In this study, the growth inhibitory effects of withanolide D (WND), a steroidal lactone isolated from Withania somnifera, on drug-sensitive tumoral plasma cells and drug-resistant MM cells have been investigated. In MTT/XTT assays, WND exhibited similar cytostatic effects between drug-resistant and drug-sensitive cell lines in the nM range. WND also induced cell death and apoptosis in MM-CSCs and RPMI 8226 cells, as examined by the calcein/ethidium homodimer and annexin V/propidium iodide stainings, respectively. To determine whether P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux affected the cytostatic activity of WND, P-gp was inhibited with verapamil and results indicated that the WND cytostatic effect in MM-CSCs was independent of P-gp efflux. Furthermore, WND did not increase the accumulation of the fluorescent P-gp substrate rhodamine 123 in MM-CSCs, suggesting that WND may not inhibit P-gp at the tested relevant doses. Therefore, the WND-induced cytostatic effect may be independent of P-gp efflux. These findings warrant further investigation of WND in MM-CSC animal models.

  7. Targeting the Fanconi Anemia/BRCA Pathway Circumvents Drug Resistance in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Yarde, Danielle N.; Oliveira, Vasco; Mathews, Linda; Wang, Xingyu; Villagra, Alejandro; Boulware, David; Shain, Kenneth H.; Hazlehurst, Lori A.; Alsina, Melissa; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Beg, Amer A.; Dalton, William S.

    2015-01-01

    The Fanconi Anemia (FA)/BRCA DNA damage repair pathway plays a pivotal role in the cellular response to replicative stress induced by DNA alkylating agents and greatly influences drug response in cancer treatment. We recently reported that FA/BRCA genes are overexpressed and causative for drug resistance in human melphalan-resistant multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines. However, the transcriptional regulation of the FA/BRCA pathway is not understood. In this report, we describe for the first time a novel function of the NF-κB subunits, RelB/p50, as transcriptional activators of the FA/BRCA pathway. Specifically, our findings point to constitutive phosphorylation of IκB Kinase IKKα and subsequent alterations in FANCD2 expression and function as underlying events leading to melphalan resistance in repeatedly exposed MM cells. Inhibiting NF-κB by siRNA, blocking the IKK complex with BMS-345541, or using the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib drastically reduced FA/BRCA gene expression and FANCD2 protein expression in myeloma cells, resulting in diminished DNA damage repair and enhanced melphalan sensitivity. Importantly, we also found that bortezomib decreases FA/BRCA gene expression in multiple myeloma patients. These results show for the first time that NF-κB transcriptionally regulates the FA/BRCA pathway, and provide evidence for targeting FA-mediated DNA repair to enhance chemotherapeutic response and circumvent drug resistance in myeloma patients. PMID:19934314

  8. Evidence for cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance of multiple myeloma cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schmidmaier, R; Mörsdorf, K; Baumann, P; Emmerich, B; Meinhardt, G

    2006-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable disease and patients eventually die of disease progression due to drug resistance. VLA-4 (very late antigen 4), VCAM (vascular adhesion molecule), LFA-1 (leukocyte function-associated antigen 1), and ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1)-mediated adhesion of myeloma cells to bone marrow stromal cells induces primary multidrug resistance in vitro. Based on these preclinical data we hypothesized that myeloma cells with strong adhesion - due to strong expression of adhesion molecules on the cell surface - are selected by chemotherapy in patients. To prove this hypothesis we determined the expression levels of adhesion molecules in 31 multiple myeloma patients by flow cytometry. A 3-color stain with CD38, CD138 and antibodies against VLA-4, ICAM-1, LFA-1, and VCAM was performed. The patients were either at diagnosis (chemo-naive; n=17) or at relapse (pre-treated; n=15). Furthermore, the response to the next chemotherapy of chemo-naive patients was correlated with the expression levels of adhesion molecules. ICAM-1, VLA-4, and VCAM expression was higher in pre-treated patients than in chemo-naive patients and the expression levels increased with the number of chemotherapy regimens. Primarily multidrug-resistant patients had significantly higher expression levels of VLA-4 and ICAM-1 than responders. This study suggests that multiple myeloma cells expressing high levels of VLA-4 and ICAM-1 are drug resistant and that such a subpopulation of cells is selected by chemotherapy.

  9. Multiple-drug resistant enterococci: the nature of the problem and an agenda for the future.

    PubMed Central

    Huycke, M. M.; Sahm, D. F.; Gilmore, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Enterococci, leading causes of nosocomial bacteremia, surgical wound infection, and urinary tract infection, are becoming resistant to many and sometimes all standard therapies. New rapid surveillance methods are highlighting the importance of examining enterococcal isolates at the species level. Most enterococcal infections are caused by Enterococcus faecalis, which are more likely to express traits related to overt virulence but--for the moment--also more likely to retain sensitivity to at least one effective antibiotic. The remaining infections are mostly caused by E. faecium, a species virtually devoid of known overt pathogenic traits but more likely to be resistant to even antibiotics of last resort. Effective control of multiple-drug resistant enterococci will require 1) better understanding of the interaction between enterococci, the hospital environment, and humans, 2) prudent antibiotic use, 3) better contact isolation in hospitals and other patient care environments, and 4) improved surveillance. Equally important is renewed vigor in the search for additional drugs, accompanied by the evolution of new therapeutic paradigms less vulnerable to the cycle of drug introduction and drug resistance. PMID:9621194

  10. Multiple drug resistance due to resistance to stem cells and stem cell treatment progress in cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    DI, CHONG; ZHAO, YAODONG

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory has provided a new angle in the research of cancer, and has gradually gained significance. According to this theory, the multiple drug resistance (MDR) of cancer is most likely due to the resistance of CSCs, and a significant quantity of research has been carried out into the MDR mechanisms of CSC. Over time, some of these mechanisms have been gradually accepted, including ATP-binding cassette transporters, aldehyde dehydrogenase, the CSC microenvironment and epithelial to mesenchymal transition. In the present review, we summarize these mechanisms in detail and review possible appropriate therapy plans against CSCs based on CSC theory. PMID:25574188

  11. Therapeutic re-appraisal of multiple drug resistant Salmonella typhi (MDRST) in Pakistani children.

    PubMed

    Hazir, T; Qazi, S A; Abbas, K A; Khan, M A

    2002-03-01

    The emergence of multi drug-resistant Salmonella typhi (MDRST) in many developing countries including Pakistan, has led to a search for suitable alternatives to conventional therapy. Quinolones have been found to be an effective alternative for the treatment of MDRST, in adults as well as in children. The efficacy of various therapeutic regimens currently used for the treatment of Typhoid was analysed. Children 1 month to 12 years of age admitted to the Children's Hospital from 1990 to 1993 with fever and Salmonella typhi isolated from blood cultures were included in this retrospective analysis. The cumulative prevalence of Multiple Drug Resistant Salmonella typhi (MDRST) was 67.2%. Only 32.8% of isolated Salmonella typhi were susceptible to chloramphenicol and amoxicillin. The cumulative cure rate with conventional therapy (chloramphenicol or amoxicillin) was 47.4% and 53.6% children needed a change of therapy. The average hospital stay for the non-responders to conventional therapy was 9.2 days as compared to 7.7 days for the responders. The average hospital stay of the patients treated with a third generation cephalosporin was 12.7 days. Patients treated with ofloxacin, a flouroquinolone drug, did not need a change of therapy. The average hospital stay of the patients treated with flouroquinolones was 6.2 days. There was a high prevalence of multiple drug resistant typhoid fever in hospitalized children, leading to a high failure rate with conventional therapy. This resulted in frequent change of therapy, delayed defervesence and prolonged hospital stay. The flouroquinolones were found to be the most effective drug against MDRST.

  12. Analysis on the infections change and measures for the multiple drug-resistant bacteria of neurology.

    PubMed

    Zang, Wenju

    2016-05-01

    To analyze the bacterial infection situations and the separation situations of multiple drug-resistant bacteria of the neurology of Zhengzhou People's hospital from Feb. 2012 to Dec. 2014. The patients data of neurology were retrieved by means of the doctor workstation system. The infection sites, the classification and drug-resistant feature of bacteria were classified and summarized in Excel. Finally, Compared with the infection sites, the classification and drug-resistant feature of bacteria at different year. The data obtained use SPSS 19.0 software to do statistical analysis. The infection rate of bacteria in neurology from Year 2012 to 2014 declined from 4.99% to 3.41%. But the constitution of the infection sites of bacteria had no significant changes. Staphylococcus aureus still was the majority in the infections of gram-positive bacteria, and Escherichia coli was the majority in the infections of gram-negative bacteria, and there were no significant changes in the ranking of the past three years. The separation rate of Acihetobacter baumanii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in gram-negative bacteria gradually escalated. There were definite efficiencies in the prevention and control of the bacterial infections in neurology in the past three years. But the situation of prevention and control was still severe at the same time.

  13. Drug Resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drug resistance refers to both intrinsic and acquired abilities of cells or organisms to become insensitive or refractory to chemotherapeutic intervention. The advent of antibiotics is considered one of the most important medicinal developments in human history, which has led to significantly reduce...

  14. Multiple drug resistant mechanisms against darunavir, amprenavir, and nelfinavir of HIV-1 PR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Dai, Qi; Xiu, Zhilong

    2013-02-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which is infecting more humans and is expanding faster in the world. The illness interferes with the immune system, making people with AIDS much more likely to get infections, including opportunistic infections and tumors that do not affect people with working immune systems. HIV-1 PR is one of the major targets of anti-AIDS drug discovery. It is, therefore, necessary to develop some inhibitors against HIV-1 PR. In this work, we executed molecular dynamics (MDs) simulation of HIV-1 PR with drugs darunavir (DRV), amprenavir (APV), nelfinavir (NFV), and examined the resistant mechanism of L10I, G48V, I54V, and L90M mutations of this PR, aiming at designing promising drugs. The comparative analysis suggests that the existences of dodecahydroisoquinoline ring at P1' subsite, 4-aminophenylsulfonamide at P2' subsite, and bis-tetrahydrofuranylurethane at P2 subsite are helpful for maintaining the high affinity of the inhibitor for the protease and exhibiting high potency against multiple drug resistance (MDR) mutant protease.

  15. Monotherapy with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate for multiple drug-resistant chronic hepatitis B: 3-year trial.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young-Suk; Lee, Yung Sang; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Byun, Kwan Soo; Kim, Yoon Jun; Choi, Jonggi; An, Jihyun; Lee, Han Chu; Yoo, Byung Chul; Kwon, So Young

    2017-09-01

    Combination therapy has been recommended for the treatment of patients harboring multiple drug-resistant hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, we recently demonstrated that monotherapy with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) for 48 weeks displayed noninferior efficacy to TDF plus entecavir (ETV) combination therapy in patients with HBV resistant to multiple drugs, including ETV and adefovir. Nonetheless, whether prolonged TDF monotherapy would be safe and increase the virologic response rate in these patients was unclear. Among 192 patients with HBV-resistance mutations to ETV and/or adefovir, who were randomized to receive TDF monotherapy (n = 95) or TDF/ETV combination therapy (n = 97) for 48 weeks, 189 agreed to continue TDF monotherapy (TDF-TDF group) or to switch to TDF monotherapy (TDF/ETV-TDF group) and 180 (93.8%) completed the 144-week study. Serum HBV DNA <15 IU/mL at week 48, the primary efficacy endpoint, was achieved in 66.3% in the TDF-TDF group and 68.0% in the TDF/ETV-TDF group (P = 0.80). At week 144, the proportion with HBV DNA <15 IU/mL increased to 74.5%, which was significantly higher compared with that at week 48 (P = 0.03), without a significant difference between groups (P = 0.46). By on-treatment analysis, a total of 79.4% had HBV DNA <15 IU/mL at week 144. Transient virologic breakthrough occurred in 6 patients, which was due to poor drug adherence. At week 144, 19 patients who had HBV DNA levels >60 IU/mL qualified for genotypic resistance analysis, and 6 retained some of their baseline resistance mutations of HBV. No patients developed additional resistance mutations throughout the study period. TDF monotherapy was efficacious and safe for up to 144 weeks, providing an increasing rate of virologic response in heavily pretreated patients with multidrug-resistant HBV. (Hepatology 2017;66:772-783). © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  16. Cancer stem cells are the cause of drug resistance in multiple myeloma: fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Janz, Siegfried; Zhan, Fenghuang; Tricot, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains a largely incurable, genetically heterogeneous plasma-cell malignancy that contains – just like many other cancers – a small fraction of clonogenic stem cell-like cells that exhibit pronounced self-renewal and differentiation capacities, but also pronounced drug resistance. These MM stem cells (MMSCs) are a controversial but highly significant issue in myeloma research because, in our opinion, they are at the root of the failure of anti-neoplastic chemotherapies to transform myeloma to a manageable chronic disease. Several markers including CD138−, ALDH1+ and SP have been used to identify MMSCs; however, no single marker is reliable for the isolation of MMSC. Nonetheless, it is now known that MMSCs depend on self-renewal and pro-survival pathways, such as AKT, Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and Hedgehog, which can be targeted with novel drugs that have shown promise in pre-clinical and clinical trials. Here, we review the pathways of myeloma “stemness”, the interactions with the bone marrow microenvironment that promote drug resistance, and the obstacles that must be overcome to eradicate MMSCs and make myeloma a curable disease. PMID:26415231

  17. Molecular Epidemiology and Characterization of Multiple-Drug Resistant (MDR) Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    El-Shazly, Sherief; Dashti, Ali; Vali, Leila; Bolaris, Michael; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to identify the genetic relatedness of multiple-drug resistance (MDR) in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates recovered from a hospital in Los Angeles. Methods Twenty one MDR A. baumannii isolates were collected and their antibiotic susceptibility were determined according to the CLSI guidelines. Genes coding for antibiotic resistance were identified by PCR and their identities were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Clonal relationships were studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Results MDR consistently correlated with the presence of oxacillinases, mostly in the form of plasmid-mediated OXA-23 enzyme which were detected in 12 (57.1%) isolates. GES-type carbapenemases were found in 20 (95.2%) strains, AAC in all 21 (100%) strains, PER in 7 (33.3%) strains and ISAba1 has been detected in 16 (76.2%) isolates. The association between ISAba1 and resistant genes confirms insertion elements as a source of β-lactamase production. Of the 21 clinical isolates, 5 were found to be related to sequence type-1 (ST1) and 16 to ST2 as analyzed by MLST. PFGE demonstrated that the majority of clinical isolates are highly related (>85%). Conclusions This study supports a more complete understanding of genotyping of antibiotic resistance for better assessment of MDR strains transmission. PMID:26518066

  18. Multiple drug resistance in Mycobacterium avium: is the wall architecture responsible for exclusion of antimicrobial agents?

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, N; Frehel, C; Ryter, A; Ohayon, H; Lesourd, M; David, H L

    1981-01-01

    Whole cells of Mycobacterium avium, characterized by their negative response in the nine biochemical tests used for mycobacterial identification in our laboratory, turned positive for nitrate reductase, Tween-80 hydrolysis, beta-glucosidase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, penicillinase, and trehalase after their wall portion was removed to yield spheroplasts. This suggested that the negative results in most of the biochemical procedures were caused by the exclusion mechanism at the wall level. Preliminary transmission and scanning electron microscopic studies showed differences at wall level between laboratory-maintained opaque, dome-shaped (SmD) and host-recycled smooth, transparent (SmT) colony type variants of M. avium and suggested the presence of an outer regularly structured layer in SmT variants. Comparative ultrastructural studies utilizing different polysaccharide coloration methods confirmed the presence of an outer polysaccharide layer in SmT variants which was probably related to their enhanced pathogenicity for experimental animals and drug resistance as compared to that of SmD variants. These findings are discussed with respect to multiple drug resistance, virulence, and gene expression of M. avium. Images PMID:6798925

  19. Studies of acid resistance characteristics in multiple drug resistant Salmonella species isolated from tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Z; Mishra, S H; Musaddiq, M; Ali, Y A

    2013-04-01

    Salmonella species found to have a great potential of causing a variety of diseases ranging from gastroenteritis to enteric fever. Salmonella have been isolated from all food, animals and also found in the vegetables such as tomatoes, spinach etc. Several out breaks of Salmonellosis have been associated with the consumption of raw tomatoes. This is because of the fact that Salmonella attaches to the surface of tomatoes and also present in the interior part due to geotropic transmission via contaminated soil irrigated with contaminated water. .During the life cycle, Salmonella encounters the various environments such as acidic environment (low pH). To overcome such factors, Salmonella has certain adaptable mechanisms. In present 'study total 200 samples of tomatoes were analyzed out of which 10 samples were found to contain Salmonella. All the 10 isolates were then subjected to the antibiotic susceptibility testing and were found to be resistant against several antibiotics. These were subjected to acid resistant tolerance study.

  20. Isolation of multiple drug-resistant enteric bacteria from feces of wild Western Lowland Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Mbehang Nguema, Pierre Philippe; Okubo, Torahiko; Tsuchida, Sayaka; Fujita, Shiho; Yamagiwa, Juichi; Tamura, Yutaka; Ushida, Kazunari

    2015-05-01

    Prevalence of drug-resistant bacteria in wildlife can reveal the actual level of anthropological burden on the wildlife. In this study, we isolated two multiple drug-resistant strains, GG6-2 and GG6-1-1, from 27 fresh feces of wild western lowland gorillas in Moukalaba-Doudou National Park, Gabon. Isolates were identified as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Providencia sp., respectively. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of the following 12 drugs-ampicillin (ABPC), cefazolin (CEZ), cefotaxime (CTX), streptomycin (SM), gentamicin (GM), kanamycin (KM), tetracycline (TC), nalidixic acid (NA), ciprofloxacin (CPFX), colistin (CL), chloramphenicol (CP) and trimethoprim (TMP)-were determined. Isolate GG6-2 was resistant to all antimicrobials tested and highly resistant to CTX, SM, TC, NA and TMP. Isolate GG6-1-1 was resistant to ABPC, CEZ, TC, CL, CP and TMP.

  1. Exploring multiple drug and herbicide resistance in plants--spotlight on transporter proteins.

    PubMed

    Conte, Sarah S; Lloyd, Alan M

    2011-02-01

    Multiple drug resistance (MDR) has been extensively studied in bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells due to the great clinical significance of this problem. MDR is not well studied in plant systems, although plant genomes contain large numbers of genes encoding putative MDR transporters (MDRTs). Biochemical pathways in the chloroplast are the targets of many herbicides and antibiotics, yet very little data is available regarding mechanisms of drug transport across the chloroplast membrane. MDRTs typically have broad substrate specificities, and may transport essential compounds and metabolites in addition to toxins. Indeed, plant transporters belonging to MDR families have also been implicated in the transport of a wide variety of compounds including auxins, flavonoids, glutathione conjugates, metal chelators, herbicides and antibiotics, although definitive evidence that a single transporter is capable of moving both toxins and metabolites has not yet been provided. Current understanding of plant MDR can be expanded via the characterization of candidate genes, especially MDRTs predicted to localize to the chloroplast, and also via traditional forward genetic approaches. Novel plant MDRTs have the potential to become endogenous selectable markers, aid in phytoremediation strategies, and help us to understand how plants have evolved to cope with toxins in their environment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Anthracycline Nano-Delivery Systems to Overcome Multiple Drug Resistance: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ping; Mumper, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    Anthracyclines (doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and idarubicin) are very effective chemotherapeutic drugs to treat many cancers; however, the development of multiple drug resistance (MDR) is one of the major limitations for their clinical applications. Nano-delivery systems have emerged as the novel cancer therapeutics to overcome MDR. Up until now, many anthracycline nano-delivery systems have been developed and reported to effectively circumvent MDR both in-vitro and in-vivo, and some of these systems have even advanced to clinical trials, such as the HPMA-doxorubicin (HPMA-DOX) conjugate. Doxil, a DOX PEGylated liposome formulation, was developed and approved by FDA in 1995. Unfortunately, this formulation does not address the MDR problem. In this comprehensive review, more than ten types of developed anthracycline nano-delivery systems to overcome MDR and their proposed mechanisms are covered and discussed, including liposomes; polymeric micelles, conjugate and nanoparticles; peptide/protein conjugates; solid-lipid, magnetic, gold, silica, and cyclodextrin nanoparticles; and carbon nanotubes. PMID:23888183

  3. Probabilistic orthology analysis of the ATP-binding cassette transporters: implications for the development of multiple drug resistance phenotype.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Ciaran; Coleman, Tanya; Plant, Nick

    2012-07-01

    Drug transporters are rapidly becoming recognized as central to determining a chemical's fate within the body. This action is a double-edged sword, protecting the body from toxicants, but also potentially leading to reduced clinical efficacy of drugs through multiple drug resistance phenotype. To examine the interrelationship of this superfamily, we have constructed phylogenetic trees over an extended evolutionary distance representing each of the seven subfamilies. In addition, using protein sequences from species important in the design and evaluation of novel chemicals, namely human, macaque, rat, mouse, and dog, we have undertaken probabilistic orthology analysis to examine speciation probabilities within this phylogeny. These data allow us to accurately predict orthologous sequences across these species, an important confirmatory step with implications for cross-species extrapolation of data during drug safety testing. Finally, we present the first complete phylogeny for subfamilies within humans constructed using the entire coding sequences, at both the DNA and protein levels. We demonstrate for the first time that genes associated with the multiple drug resistance phenotype cluster separately from other genes within the same subfamily, suggestive of a conserved, fundamental, difference in these proteins. Such work may help guide future studies on the mechanisms underlying multiple drug resistance as well as the development of novel therapeutic approaches to mitigate against its development.

  4. FIGHTING MULTIPLE DRUG RESISTANCE: EFFECTS OF UV-ACTIVATED CHLORPROMAZINE ON RABBIT'S EYE PSEUDOTUMOURS.

    PubMed

    Pirvulescu, Ruxandra Angela; Cherecheanu, Alina Popa; Romanitan, Mihaela Oana; Dascalu, Ana Maria; Alexandrescu, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Multiple drug resistance requires a flexible approach to find medicines able to overcome it. One method could be the exposure of existing medicines to UV laser beams to generate active photoproducts against bacteria and/or malignant tumors. The interaction of Chlorpromazine (CPZ) (irradiated with 266 nm pulsed laser beams) was studied at concentrations of 10 mg/ml and 20 mg/ ml in ultrapure water, with pseudotumors of rabbits eyes. The use of CPZ water solution exposed to 266 nm in the treatment of pseudotumor tissues produced on rabbit eyes showed that treatment results depend on initial (before irradiation) CPZ concentration and exposure time. At this stage, one could not specify which out of the generated photoproducts, individual or as a group, was/were efficient in pseudotumor cure but overall effects were observable. Application of CPZ irradiated solutions on rabbit eyes pseudotumors seemed to produce a faster recovery of tissues with respect to control, untreated eyes. Histologic findings in the treated tissues showed a good anti-inflammatory response. The results obtained open perspectives to fight MDR and/or development of pseudotumoral processes with substances that were not initially made for this purpose (non-antibiotics, for instance).

  5. Measurement of multiple drug resistance transporter activity in putative cancer stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Donnenberg, Vera S; Meyer, E Michael; Donnenberg, Albert D

    2009-01-01

    Multiple drug resistance, mediated by the expression and activity of ABC-transporters, is a major obstacle to antineoplastic therapy. Normal tissue stem cells and their malignant counterparts share MDR transporter activity as a major mechanism of self-protection. Although MDR activity is upregulated in response to substrate chemotherapeutic agents, it is also constitutively expressed on both normal tissue stem cells and a subset of tumor cells prior to the initiation of therapy, representing a built-in obstacle to therapeutic ratio. Constitutive and induced MDR activity can be detected in cellular subsets of disaggregated tissues, using the fluorescent substrates Rhodamine 123 and Hoechst 33342 for ABCB1 (also known as P-gp and MDR1) and ABCG2 (BCRP1). In this chapter, we will describe the complete procedure for the detection of MDR activity, including: (1) Preparing single-cell suspensions from tumor and normal tissue specimens; (2) An efficient method to perform cell surface marker staining on large numbers of cells; (3) Flow cytometer setup and controls; (4) Simultaneous measurement of Hoechst 33342 and Rhodamine123 transport; and (5) Data acquisition and analysis.

  6. Loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 induces resistance to multiple drugs in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Göllner, Stefanie; Oellerich, Thomas; Agrawal-Singh, Shuchi; Schenk, Tino; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Rohde, Christian; Pabst, Caroline; Sauer, Tim; Lerdrup, Mads; Tavor, Sigal; Stölzel, Friedrich; Herold, Sylvia; Ehninger, Gerhard; Köhler, Gabriele; Pan, Kuan-Ting; Urlaub, Henning; Serve, Hubert; Dugas, Martin; Spiekermann, Karsten; Vick, Binje; Jeremias, Irmela; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Hansen, Klaus; Zelent, Arthur; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Müller, Lutz P; Thiede, Christian; Müller-Tidow, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), therapy resistance frequently occurs, leading to high mortality among patients. However, the mechanisms that render leukemic cells drug resistant remain largely undefined. Here, we identified loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 and subsequent reduction of histone H3K27 trimethylation as a novel pathway of acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and cytotoxic drugs in AML. Low EZH2 protein levels correlated with poor prognosis in AML patients. Suppression of EZH2 protein expression induced chemoresistance of AML cell lines and primary cells in vitro and in vivo. Low EZH2 levels resulted in derepression of HOX genes, and knockdown of HOXB7 and HOXA9 in the resistant cells was sufficient to improve sensitivity to TKIs and cytotoxic drugs. The endogenous loss of EZH2 expression in resistant cells and primary blasts from a subset of relapsed AML patients resulted from enhanced CDK1-dependent phosphorylation of EZH2 at Thr487. This interaction was stabilized by heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and followed by proteasomal degradation of EZH2 in drug-resistant cells. Accordingly, inhibitors of HSP90, CDK1 and the proteasome prevented EZH2 degradation, decreased HOX gene expression and restored drug sensitivity. Finally, patients with reduced EZH2 levels at progression to standard therapy responded to the combination of bortezomib and cytarabine, concomitant with the re-establishment of EZH2 expression and blast clearance. These data suggest restoration of EZH2 protein as a viable approach to overcome treatment resistance in this AML patient population.

  7. Steps toward discovering the function and expression of multiple drug resistance genes in "Arabidopsis thaliana"

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily is the largest protein family identified in all organisms. It is a highly conserved domain responsible for the ATP-dependent transport of substances including ions, carbohydrates, xenobiotics, drugs, and peptides. Also, the subfamily, multidrug resistance...

  8. Occurrence of multiple drug resistance in Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense isolated from sleeping sickness patients.

    PubMed

    Kagira, J M; Maina, N

    2007-03-01

    The occurrence of cross-resistance among melarsoprol-resistant Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense isolates was investigated in this study. The isolates, T. b. rhodesiense KETRI 237, 2538, 1992, 2709, 2694 and 3530, had been obtained from sleeping sickness patients in Kenya and Uganda between 1960 and 1985. Five groups consisting of six mice each were inoculated intraperitoneally with 10(5) parasites of each isolate, and 24 h later treated with either melarsoprol, homidium chloride, diminazene aceturate or isometamidium chloride. The control group comprised infected but untreated mice. The mice were monitored for cure for a period of 60 days post-treatment. The mean prepatent period in the control mice was 5 days while the mean survival period was 22 days. Five of the stabilates, KETRI 237, 2538, 2709, 2694, and 3530, were confirmed to be melarsoprol resistant. Cross-resistance was observed, with the majority of the isolates being resistant to homidium chloride (5/6) and diminazene aceturate (5/6), but all were sensitive to isometamidium chloride (6/6). However T. b. rhodesiense KETRI 1992, which was previously considered as melarsoprol resistant, was sensitive to all the drugs tested. In conclusion, our study has revealed the existence of cross-resistance among the melarsoprol resistant isolates which could only be cured by isometamidium.

  9. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. [Multiple Drug Resistance (MDR)

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1990-10-15

    The overall objective of this work was to promote nuclear medicine applications in oncology. This is being done by improving the scientific basis of diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up with cyclotron-produced tracers. For diagnostic use, positron-emitting isotopes such as Ga-66 and I-124 are being used. Initial studies on the characterization of He-4 particle energies required for Ga-66 production have been completed. Parameters for I-124 radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies have been determined; the labelled antibodies have been used in animal studies using positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify antibody concentration within tumors in vivo. Imaging physics studies have demonstrated that I-124 can be quantitatively imaged by PET, even in the presence of 100-told greater concentrations of I-131. Measurement of concentrations of label in vivo has been accomplished in nuclei mice bearing neuroblastoma tumors and nude rats bearing human ovarian cancer cells. These studies have major implications for both the quantification of dosimetry and quantification kinetic assessment of anti-tumor antibody localization in vivo. For treatment of tumors, F-18 has been incorporated in 2-fluoro-2-deoxy glucose and 5-fluoro uridine, and O-15 labelled water has been produced. Reagents incorporating C-11 and N-13 are under development. In a related area, C-14 labelled colchicine is being studied as a means of assaying cells for multiple drug resistance (MDR). Cells expressing MDR are shown to retain significantly less C-14 colchiene. This suggest that colchiene retention may be of useful probe in modelling and studying MDR development in human tumors. The precursor required for producing C-11 colchicine has also been synthesized. 11 refs. (MHB)

  10. Prevalence of multiple drug-resistant Helicobacter pylori strains among patients with different gastric disorders in Iran.

    PubMed

    Shokrzadeh, Leila; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Mirzaei, Tabassom; Farzi, Nastaran; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-02-01

    Emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of Helicobacter pylori is a global health concern. This study was aimed to determine the frequency of MDR H. pylori strains in Iran. H. pylori isolates were obtained from cultured gastric biopsy samples on selective culture media after their characterization by PCR and conventional biochemical methods. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of rifampicin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, ampicillin, clarithromycin, erythromycin, metronidazole, and tetracycline were determined for 111 strains that were isolated from 197 dyspeptic patients by the agar dilution method. The primary resistance rates were 61.3% (68/111) for metronidazole, 15.3% (17/111) for ampicillin, and 14.4% (16/111) for rifampicin. Resistance rates for other antimicrobials were as follows: macrolides (erythromycin or clarithromycin) 32.4% (36/111) and quinolones (levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin) 30.6% (34/111). Among the resistant strains, the rates of double and multiple drug resistance phenotypes were 22.6% (19/84) and 34.5% (29/84), respectively. The quadruple drug resistance phenotype encompasses 37.9% of the MDR strains, of which 90% of them was resistant to metronidazole. In conclusion, these results showed a high frequency of MDR phenotypes among the studied H. pylori strains in Iran. The eradication of the H. pylori strains presenting high resistance rates to macrolides, fluoroquinolones, or metronidazole could be achieved by approved tetracycline- or amoxicillin-containing regimens as alternative regimens to standard triple therapy.

  11. Characterization of the Vibrio cholerae vceCAB Multiple-Drug Resistance Efflux Operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, Robin C.; Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Anderson, Matthew; Lackey, Melinda; Ramasubramanian, Bhagavathi; Jiangping, Bai; Borisova, Tatyana; Colmer, Jane A.; Hamood, Abdul N.; McVay, Catherine S.; Fralick, Joe A.

    2005-01-01

    Herein, we identify vceC as a component of a vceCAB operon, which codes for the Vibrio cholerae VceAB multiple-drug resistance (MDR) efflux pump, and vceR, which codes for a transcriptional autoregulatory protein that negatively regulates the expression of the vceCAB operon and is modulated by some of the substrates of this MDR efflux pump. PMID:16030246

  12. Instability of multiple drug resistance plasmids in Salmonella typhimurium isolated from poultry.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. J.; Threlfall, E. J.; Rowe, B.

    1991-01-01

    Plasmids in five strains of Salmonella typhimurium resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, neomycin/kanamycin, streptomycin, sulphonamides, tetracyclines and trimethoprim (ACGKSSuTTm), CGKSSuTTm, ACSSuT or CSSuT which had been isolated from poultry in the first 3 months of 1989 have been characterized and compared with plasmids in two strains of R-types ACGKSSuTTm and ASSuTTm isolated from two patients later in the year. With the exception of the human isolate of R-type ASSuTTm, all strains carried two non-conjugative plasmids, one coding for SSu and belonging to incompatibility group Q, and a second coding for multiple resistance and belonging to the FIme incompatibility group. The human isolate of R-type ASSuTTm did not carry the IncQ SSu plasmid but like the poultry isolates, carried a non-conjugative FIme plasmid. Restriction endonuclease digestion with the enzymes EcoR I, Pst I and Hind III demonstrated that the FIme plasmids from strains of different R-types showed a high degree of homology but exhibited numerous fragment size polymorphisms. The restriction digest fingerprint of plasmids in the human isolate of R-type ACGKSSuTTm was indistinguishable from a poultry isolate of the same R-type. Analysis of segregants of one of the poultry isolates of R-type ACGKSSuTTm demonstrated that resistance determinants could be rapidly lost from the FIme plasmid to give rise to a number of R-types and fingerprint patterns. Loss of tetracycline resistance from this plasmid appeared to be correlated with the integration of other plasmid-mediated resistances into the bacterial chromosome. Evidence is presented for the rapid loss of antimicrobial resistance determinants from a multiple resistance plasmid of the FIme incompatibility group in response to withdrawal of antibiotic selective pressure. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2019296

  13. Instability of multiple drug resistance plasmids in Salmonella typhimurium isolated from poultry.

    PubMed

    Brown, D J; Threlfall, E J; Rowe, B

    1991-04-01

    Plasmids in five strains of Salmonella typhimurium resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, neomycin/kanamycin, streptomycin, sulphonamides, tetracyclines and trimethoprim (ACGKSSuTTm), CGKSSuTTm, ACSSuT or CSSuT which had been isolated from poultry in the first 3 months of 1989 have been characterized and compared with plasmids in two strains of R-types ACGKSSuTTm and ASSuTTm isolated from two patients later in the year. With the exception of the human isolate of R-type ASSuTTm, all strains carried two non-conjugative plasmids, one coding for SSu and belonging to incompatibility group Q, and a second coding for multiple resistance and belonging to the FIme incompatibility group. The human isolate of R-type ASSuTTm did not carry the IncQ SSu plasmid but like the poultry isolates, carried a non-conjugative FIme plasmid. Restriction endonuclease digestion with the enzymes EcoR I, Pst I and Hind III demonstrated that the FIme plasmids from strains of different R-types showed a high degree of homology but exhibited numerous fragment size polymorphisms. The restriction digest fingerprint of plasmids in the human isolate of R-type ACGKSSuTTm was indistinguishable from a poultry isolate of the same R-type. Analysis of segregants of one of the poultry isolates of R-type ACGKSSuTTm demonstrated that resistance determinants could be rapidly lost from the FIme plasmid to give rise to a number of R-types and fingerprint patterns. Loss of tetracycline resistance from this plasmid appeared to be correlated with the integration of other plasmid-mediated resistances into the bacterial chromosome. Evidence is presented for the rapid loss of antimicrobial resistance determinants from a multiple resistance plasmid of the FIme incompatibility group in response to withdrawal of antibiotic selective pressure.

  14. Bitter melon extracts enhance the activity of chemotherapeutic agents through the modulation of multiple drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kwatra, Deep; Venugopal, Anand; Standing, David; Ponnurangam, Sivapriya; Dhar, Animesh; Mitra, Ashim; Anant, Shrikant

    2014-01-01

    Recently we demonstrated that extracts of bitter melon (BME) can be used as a preventive/therapeutic agent in colon cancers. Here, we determined BME effects on anticancer activity and bioavailability of doxorubicin (DOX) in colon cancer cells. BME enhanced the effect of DOX on cell proliferation and sensitized the cells towards DOX upon pretreatment. Furthermore, there was both increased drug uptake and reduced drug efflux. We also observed a reduction in the expression of Multidrug resistance conferring proteins (MDRCP) P-glycoprotein, MRP-2 and BCRP. Further BME suppressed DOX efflux in MDCK cells overexpressing the three efflux proteins individually, suggesting that BME is a potent inhibitor of MDR function. Next, we determined the effect of BME on PXR, a xenobiotic sensing nuclear receptor and a transcription factor that controls the expression of the three MDR genes. BME suppressed PXR promoter activity thereby suppressing its expression. Finally, we determined the effect of AMPK pathway on drug efflux because we have previously demonstrated that BME affects the pathway. However, inhibiting AMPK did not affect drug resistance, suggesting that BME may use different pathways for the anticancer and MDR modulating activities. Together, these results suggest that BME can enhance the bioavailability and efficacy of conventional chemotherapy. PMID:24129966

  15. 3D tissue-engineered bone marrow as a novel model to study pathophysiology and drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Muz, Barbara; Gilson, Rebecca C; Azab, Feda; Luderer, Micah; King, Justin; Achilefu, Samuel; Vij, Ravi; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2015-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most prevalent hematological malignancy and it remains incurable despite the introduction of several novel drugs. The discrepancy between preclinical and clinical outcomes can be attributed to the failure of classic two-dimensional (2D) culture models to accurately recapitulate the complex biology of MM and drug responses observed in patients. We developed 3D tissue engineered bone marrow (3DTEBM) cultures derived from the BM supernatant of MM patients to incorporate different BM components including MM cells, stromal cells, and endothelial cells. Distribution and growth were analyzed by confocal imaging, and cell proliferation of cell lines and primary MM cells was tested by flow cytometry. Oxygen and drug gradients were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, and drug resistance was studied by flow cytometry. 3DTEBM cultures allowed proliferation of MM cells, recapitulated their interaction with the microenvironment, recreated 3D aspects observed in the bone marrow niche (such as oxygen and drug gradients), and induced drug resistance in MM cells more than 2D or commercial 3D tissue culture systems. 3DTEBM cultures not only provide a better model for investigating the pathophysiology of MM, but also serve as a tool for drug development and screening in MM. In the future, we will use the 3DTEBM cultures for developing personalized therapeutic strategies for individual MM patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of DTX3L on the cell proliferation, adhesion, and drug resistance of multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yaodong; Sun, Yuxiang; Zhang, Linlin; Liu, Hong

    2017-06-01

    Cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance is an important factor that influences the effects of chemotherapy in multiple myeloma. DTX3L, a ubiquitin ligase, plays a key role in cell-cycle-related process. Here, we found that the expression of DTX3L gradually increased during the proliferation of myeloma cells, which resulted in arrest of the cell cycle in the G1 phase and promoted the adherence of myeloma cells to fibronectin or bone marrow stromal cells. In addition, silencing of DTX3L improved sensitivity to chemotherapy drugs in multiple myeloma cell lines adherent to bone marrow stromal cells and increased the expression of caspase-3 and poly-adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase, two markers of apoptosis. Finally, we also found that DTX3L expression was regulated by focal adhesion kinase. Taken together, the results of this study show that DTX3L plays an important role in the proliferation and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance of multiple myeloma cells and as such may play a key role in the development of multiple myeloma.

  17. The effect of S1P receptor signaling pathway on the survival and drug resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Di; Li, Yingchun; Li, Jia; Shi, Xiaoyan; Yang, Ronghui; Zhong, Yuan; Wang, Huihan; Liao, Aijun

    2017-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable by conventional chemotherapy. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor-mediated signaling has been recently demonstrated to have critical roles in cell survival and drug resistance in a number of hematological malignancies. To dissect the roles of S1P receptor pathway in MM, we systematically examined cell viability and protein expression associated with cell survival and drug resistance in MM cell lines upon treatment with either pathway activator (S1P) or inhibitor (FTY720). Our results reveal that FTY720 inhibits cell proliferation by downregulating expression of target genes, while S1P has an opposite effect. Knocking down of S1P receptor S1P5R results in a reduction of cell survival-related gene expression; however, it does not have impacts on expression of drug resistance genes. These results suggest that S1P signaling plays a role in cell proliferation and drug resistance in MM, and targeting this pathway will provide a new therapeutic direction for MM management.

  18. Multiple Drugs Compete for Transport via the Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance Transporter at Distinct but Interdependent Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Bellanca, Sebastiano; Summers, Robert L.; Meyrath, Max; Dave, Anurag; Nash, Megan N.; Dittmer, Martin; Sanchez, Cecilia P.; Stein, Wilfred D.; Martin, Rowena E.; Lanzer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the “chloroquine resistance transporter” (PfCRT) are a major determinant of drug resistance in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We have previously shown that mutant PfCRT transports the antimalarial drug chloroquine away from its target, whereas the wild-type form of PfCRT does not. However, little is understood about the transport of other drugs via PfCRT or the mechanism by which PfCRT recognizes different substrates. Here we show that mutant PfCRT also transports quinine, quinidine, and verapamil, indicating that the protein behaves as a multidrug resistance carrier. Detailed kinetic analyses revealed that chloroquine and quinine compete for transport via PfCRT in a manner that is consistent with mixed-type inhibition. Moreover, our analyses suggest that PfCRT accepts chloroquine and quinine at distinct but antagonistically interacting sites. We also found verapamil to be a partial mixed-type inhibitor of chloroquine transport via PfCRT, further supporting the idea that PfCRT possesses multiple substrate-binding sites. Our findings provide new mechanistic insights into the workings of PfCRT, which could be exploited to design potent inhibitors of this key mediator of drug resistance. PMID:25378409

  19. Existence of multiple-stable equilibria for a multi-drug-resistant model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gumel, Abba B; Song, Baojun

    2008-07-01

    The resurgence of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis in some parts of Europe and North America calls for a mathematical study to assess the impact of the emergence and spread of such strain on the global effort to effectively control the burden of tuberculosis. This paper presents a deterministic compartmental model for the transmission dynamics of two strains of tuberculosis, a drug-sensitive (wild) one and a multi-drug-resistant strain. The model allows for the assessment of the treatment of people infected with the wild strain. The qualitative analysis of the model reveals the following. The model has a disease-free equilibrium, which is locally asymptotically stable if a certain threshold, known as the effective reproduction number, is less than unity. Further, the model undergoes a backward bifurcation, where the disease-free equilibrium coexists with a stable endemic equilibrium. One of the main novelties of this study is the numerical illustration of tri-stable equilibria, where the disease-free equilibrium coexists with two stable endemic equilibrium when the aforementioned threshold is less than unity, and a bi-stable setup, involving two stable endemic equilibria, when the effective reproduction number is greater than one. This, to our knowledge, is the first time such dynamical features have been observed in TB dynamics. Finally, it is shown that the backward bifurcation phenomenon in this model arises due to the exogenous re-infection property of tuberculosis.

  20. NANOMEDICINE: will it offer possibilities to overcome multiple drug resistance in cancer?

    PubMed

    Friberg, Sten; Nyström, Andreas M

    2016-03-09

    This review is written with the purpose to review the current nanomedicine literature and provide an outlook on the developments in utilizing nanoscale drug constructs in treatment of solid cancers as well as in the potential treatment of multi-drug resistant cancers. No specific design principles for this review have been utilized apart from our active choice to avoid results only based on in vitro studies. Few drugs based on nanotechnology have progressed to clinical trials, since most are based only on in vitro experiments which do not give the necessary data for the research to progress towards pre-clinical studies. The area of nanomedicine has indeed spark much attention and holds promise for improved future therapeutics in the treatment of solid cancers. However, despite much investment few targeted therapeutics have successfully progressed to early clinical trials, indicating yet again that the human body is complicated and that much more understanding of the fundamentals of receptor interactions, physics of nanomedical constructs and their circulation in the body is indeed needed. We believe that nanomedical therapeutics can allow for more efficient treatments of resistant cancers, and may well be a cornerstone for RNA based therapeutics in the future given their general need for shielding from the harsh environment in the blood stream.

  1. Origin and Proliferation of Multiple-Drug Resistance in Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsiao-Han; Cohen, Ted; Grad, Yonatan H.; Hanage, William P.; O'Brien, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Many studies report the high prevalence of multiply drug-resistant (MDR) strains. Because MDR infections are often significantly harder and more expensive to treat, they represent a growing public health threat. However, for different pathogens, different underlying mechanisms are traditionally used to explain these observations, and it is unclear whether each bacterial taxon has its own mechanism(s) for multidrug resistance or whether there are common mechanisms between distantly related pathogens. In this review, we provide a systematic overview of the causes of the excess of MDR infections and define testable predictions made by each hypothetical mechanism, including experimental, epidemiological, population genomic, and other tests of these hypotheses. Better understanding the cause(s) of the excess of MDR is the first step to rational design of more effective interventions to prevent the origin and/or proliferation of MDR. PMID:25652543

  2. Development, Maintenance, and Reversal of Multiple Drug Resistance: At the Crossroads of TFPI1, ABC Transporters, and HIF1α

    PubMed Central

    Arnason, Terra; Harkness, Troy

    2015-01-01

    Early detection and improved therapies for many cancers are enhancing survival rates. Although many cytotoxic therapies are approved for aggressive or metastatic cancer; response rates are low and acquisition of de novo resistance is virtually universal. For decades; chemotherapeutic treatments for cancer have included anthracyclines such as Doxorubicin (DOX); and its use in aggressive tumors appears to remain a viable option; but drug resistance arises against DOX; as for all other classes of compounds. Our recent work suggests the anticoagulant protein Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor 1α (TFPI1α) plays a role in driving the development of multiple drug resistance (MDR); but not maintenance; of the MDR state. Other factors; such as the ABC transporter drug efflux pumps MDR-1/P-gp (ABCB1) and BCRP (ABCG2); are required for MDR maintenance; as well as development. The patient population struggling with therapeutic resistance specifically requires novel treatment options to resensitize these tumor cells to therapy. In this review we discuss the development, maintenance, and reversal of MDR as three distinct phases of cancer biology. Possible means to exploit these stages to reverse MDR will be explored. Early molecular detection of MDR cancers before clinical failure has the potential to offer new approaches to fighting MDR cancer. PMID:26501324

  3. Development, Maintenance, and Reversal of Multiple Drug Resistance: At the Crossroads of TFPI1, ABC Transporters, and HIF1.

    PubMed

    Arnason, Terra; Harkness, Troy

    2015-10-16

    Early detection and improved therapies for many cancers are enhancing survival rates. Although many cytotoxic therapies are approved for aggressive or metastatic cancer; response rates are low and acquisition of de novo resistance is virtually universal. For decades; chemotherapeutic treatments for cancer have included anthracyclines such as Doxorubicin (DOX); and its use in aggressive tumors appears to remain a viable option; but drug resistance arises against DOX; as for all other classes of compounds. Our recent work suggests the anticoagulant protein Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor 1α (TFPI1α) plays a role in driving the development of multiple drug resistance (MDR); but not maintenance; of the MDR state. Other factors; such as the ABC transporter drug efflux pumps MDR-1/P-gp (ABCB1) and BCRP (ABCG2); are required for MDR maintenance; as well as development. The patient population struggling with therapeutic resistance specifically requires novel treatment options to resensitize these tumor cells to therapy. In this review we discuss the development, maintenance, and reversal of MDR as three distinct phases of cancer biology. Possible means to exploit these stages to reverse MDR will be explored. Early molecular detection of MDRcancers before clinical failure has the potential to offer new approaches to fightingMDRcancer.

  4. Tariquidar sensitizes multiple myeloma cells to proteasome inhibitors via reduction of hypoxia-induced P-gp-mediated drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Muz, Barbara; Kusdono, Hubert D; Azab, Feda; de la Puente, Pilar; Federico, Cinzia; Fiala, Mark; Vij, Ravi; Salama, Noha N; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2017-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) presents a poor prognosis and high lethality of patients due to development of drug resistance. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a drug-efflux transporter, is upregulated in MM patients post-chemotherapy and is involved in the development of drug resistance since many anti-myeloma drugs (including proteasome inhibitors) are P-gp substrates. Hypoxia develops in the bone marrow niche during MM progression and has long been linked to chemoresistance. Additionally, hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF-1α) was demonstrated to directly regulate P-gp expression. We found that in MM patients P-gp expression positively correlated with the hypoxic marker, HIF-1α. Hypoxia increased P-gp protein expression and its efflux capabilities in MM cells in vitro using flow cytometry. We reported herein that hypoxia-mediated resistance to carfilzomib and bortezomib in MM cells is due to P-gp activity and was reversed by tariquidar, a P-gp inhibitor. These results suggest combining proteasome inhibitors with P-gp inhibition for future clinical studies.

  5. Coupling of radiofrequency with magnetic nanoparticles treatment as an alternative physical antibacterial strategy against multiple drug resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasia, Akhilesh K.; Thorat, Nanasaheb D.; Tandon, Anshula; Kim, Jin-Hahn; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria not only affect human health and but also threatens the safety in hospitals and among communities. However, the emergence of drug resistant bacteria is inevitable due to evolutionary selection as a consequence of indiscriminate antibiotic usage. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a novel strategy by which pathogenic bacteria can be eliminated without triggering resistance. We propose a novel magnetic nanoparticle-based physical treatment against pathogenic bacteria, which blocks biofilm formation and kills bacteria. In this approach, multiple drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and uropathogenic Escherichia coli CFT073 are trapped to the positively charged magnetic core-shell nanoparticles (MCSNPs) by electrostatic interaction. All the trapped bacteria can be completely killed within 30 min owing to the loss of membrane potential and dysfunction of membrane-associated complexes when exposed to the radiofrequency current. These results indicate that MCSNP-based physical treatment can be an alternative antibacterial strategy without leading to antibiotic resistance, and can be used for many purposes including environmental and therapeutic applications. PMID:27670157

  6. Coupling of radiofrequency with magnetic nanoparticles treatment as an alternative physical antibacterial strategy against multiple drug resistant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasia, Akhilesh K.; Thorat, Nanasaheb D.; Tandon, Anshula; Kim, Jin-Hahn; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria not only affect human health and but also threatens the safety in hospitals and among communities. However, the emergence of drug resistant bacteria is inevitable due to evolutionary selection as a consequence of indiscriminate antibiotic usage. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a novel strategy by which pathogenic bacteria can be eliminated without triggering resistance. We propose a novel magnetic nanoparticle-based physical treatment against pathogenic bacteria, which blocks biofilm formation and kills bacteria. In this approach, multiple drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and uropathogenic Escherichia coli CFT073 are trapped to the positively charged magnetic core-shell nanoparticles (MCSNPs) by electrostatic interaction. All the trapped bacteria can be completely killed within 30 min owing to the loss of membrane potential and dysfunction of membrane-associated complexes when exposed to the radiofrequency current. These results indicate that MCSNP-based physical treatment can be an alternative antibacterial strategy without leading to antibiotic resistance, and can be used for many purposes including environmental and therapeutic applications.

  7. The diagnosis and management of multiple-drug-resistant-tuberculosis at the beginning of the new millenium.

    PubMed

    Drobniewski, F A; Balabanova, Yanina M

    2002-03-01

    Multiple-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) is more difficult to treat and the treatment is less likely to produce favourable results compared to treatment of drug-sensitive disease. Success requires close co-operation between the laboratory, which defines a case as MDRTB, and the clinical team, who will treat it as well as the public health staff who will address aspects of contact tracing and institutional cross-infection. National surveys have indicated that MDRTB occurs at a higher rate in some countries such as Estonia and Latvia (14.1% and 9% respectively, in 1998) and Russia (although there are only limited validated data). In contrast, in Western Europe and in some countries of Eastern Europe, such as the Czech Republic, Slovenia, Slovakia and Poland with good tuberculosis (TB) prevention and treatment programmes, the combined MDRTB prevalence was 1% or less. The early diagnosis of MDRTB and case management by experienced teams from the outset remains the best hope clinically for these patients. Adequately supervised and prolonged combination chemotherapy is essential, with drug choice governed mainly by quality-controlled in vitro drug susceptibility data. There is a more limited role for surgery, and immunomodulating therapy, such as the use of gamma-interferon, may have a useful adjunct role. Clearly the most important therapeutic modality for MDRTB is to treat drug-sensitive TB correctly in the first instance and prevent the emergence of resistant TB.

  8. Emergence of Staphylococcus aureus Carrying Multiple Drug Resistance Genes on a Plasmid Encoding Exfoliative Toxin B

    PubMed Central

    Hisatsune, Junzo; Hirakawa, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Fudaba, Yasuyuki; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Kato, Fuminori; Kayama, Shizuo

    2013-01-01

    We report the complete nucleotide sequence and analysis of pETBTY825, a Staphylococcus aureus TY825 plasmid encoding exfoliative toxin B (ETB). S. aureus TY825 is a clinical isolate obtained from an impetigo patient in 2002. The size of pETBTY825, 60.6 kbp, was unexpectedly larger than that of the archetype pETBTY4 (∼30 kbp). Genomic comparison of the plasmids shows that pETBTY825 has the archetype pETBTY4 as the backbone and has a single large extra DNA region of 22.4 kbp. The extra DNA region contains genes for resistance to aminoglycoside [aac(6′)/aph(2″)], macrolide (msrA), and penicillin (blaZ). A plasmid deletion experiment indicated that these three resistance elements were functionally active. We retrospectively examined the resistance profile of the clinical ETB-producing S. aureus strains isolated in 1977 to 2007 using a MIC determination with gentamicin (GM), arbekacin (ABK), and erythromycin (EM) and by PCR analyses for aac(6′)/aph(2″) and msrA using purified plasmid preparations. The ETB-producing S. aureus strains began to display high resistance to GM, which was parallel with the detection of aac(6′)/aph(2″) and mecA, after 1990. Conversely, there was no significant change in the ABK MIC during the testing period, although it had a tendency to slightly increase. After 2001, isolates resistant to EM significantly increased; however, msrA was hardly detected in ETB-producing S. aureus strains, and only five isolates were positive for both aac(6′)/aph(2″) and msrA. In this study, we report the emergence of a fusion plasmid carrying the toxin gene etb and drug resistance genes. Prevalence of the pETBTY825 carrier may further increase the clinical threat, since ETB-producing S. aureus is closely related to more severe impetigo or staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome (SSSS), which requires a general antimicrobial treatment. PMID:24080652

  9. Drugs and drug resistance in African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Delespaux, Vincent; de Koning, Harry P

    2007-01-01

    Despite the many decades of use of most of the current trypanocides, we know little of their mode of action. This may in part be because most of these will act on multiple targets once inside the cell, and they derive their selective action on the parasite from selective accumulation by the pathogen. Loss of this capacity for drug uptake by the trypanosome would thus be a major cause for drug resistance. We here discuss the use of current drugs against human and veterinary African trypanosomiasis, the prevalence, causes and mechanisms of drug resistance and new developments in trypanosomiasis therapy such as the introduction of nifurtimox and DB289.

  10. Antibacterial activity of natural spices on multiple drug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from drinking water, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Shahedur; Parvez, Anowar Khasru; Islam, Rezuanul; Khan, Mahboob Hossain

    2011-03-15

    Spices traditionally have been used as coloring agents, flavoring agents, preservatives, food additives and medicine in Bangladesh. The present work aimed to find out the antimicrobial activity of natural spices on multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli isolates. Anti-bacterial potentials of six crude plant extracts (Allium sativum, Zingiber officinale, Allium cepa, Coriandrum sativum, Piper nigrum and Citrus aurantifolia) were tested against five Escherichia coli isolated from potable water sources at kushtia, Bangladesh. All the bacterial isolates were susceptible to undiluted lime-juice. None of them were found to be susceptible against the aqueous extracts of garlic, onion, coriander, pepper and ginger alone. However, all the isolates were susceptible when subjected to 1:1:1 aqueous extract of lime, garlic and ginger. The highest inhibition zone was observed with lime (11 mm). Natural spices might have anti-bacterial activity against enteric pathogens and could be used for prevention of diarrheal diseases. Further evaluation is necessary.

  11. A Novel Hypoxia-Selective Epigenetic Agent RRx-001 Triggers Apoptosis and Overcomes Drug Resistance in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Deepika Sharma; Ray, Arghya; Das, Abhishek; Song, Yan; Oronsky, Bryan; Richardson, Paul; Scicinski, Jan; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    The hypoxic bone-marrow (BM) microenvironment confers growth/survival and drug-resistance in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Novel therapies targeting the MM cell in its hypoxic-BM milieu may overcome drug resistance. Recent studies led to the development of a novel molecule RRx-001 with hypoxia-selective epigenetic and Nitric Oxide-donating properties. Here we demonstrate that RRx-001 decreases the viability of MM cell lines and primary patient cells, as well as overcomes drug-resistance. RRx-001 inhibits MM cell growth in the presence of BM stromal cells. RRx-001 induced apoptosis is associated with: 1) activation of caspases; 2) release of ROS and nitrogen-species; 3) induction of DNA damage via ATM/γ-H2AX; and 4) decrease in DNA methytransferase (DNMT) and global methylation. RNA interference study shows a predominant role of DNMT1 in MM cell survival versus DNMT3a or DNMT3b. Deubiquitylating enzyme USP7 stimulates DNMT1 activity; and conversely, USP7-siRNA reduced DNMT1 activity and decreased MM cell viability. RRx-001 plus USP7 inhibitor P5091 triggered synergistic anti-MM activity. MM xenograft studies show that RRx-001 is well tolerated, inhibits tumor growth, and enhances survival. Combining RRx-001 with pomalidomide, bortezomib or SAHA induces synergistic anti-MM activity. Our results provide the rationale for translation of RRx-001, either alone or in combination, to clinical evaluation in MM. PMID:27118403

  12. A novel hypoxia-selective epigenetic agent RRx-001 triggers apoptosis and overcomes drug resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Das, D Sharma; Ray, A; Das, A; Song, Y; Tian, Z; Oronsky, B; Richardson, P; Scicinski, J; Chauhan, D; Anderson, K C

    2016-11-01

    The hypoxic bone marrow (BM) microenvironment confers growth/survival and drug resistance in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Novel therapies targeting the MM cell in its hypoxic BM milieu may overcome drug resistance. Recent studies led to the development of a novel molecule RRx-001 with hypoxia-selective epigenetic and nitric oxide-donating properties. Here, we demonstrate that RRx-001 decreases the viability of MM cell lines and primary patient cells, as well as overcomes drug resistance. RRx-001 inhibits MM cell growth in the presence of BM stromal cells. RRx-001-induced apoptosis is associated with: (i) activation of caspases; (ii) release of ROS and nitrogen species; (iii) induction of DNA damage via ATM/γ-H2AX; and (iv) decrease in DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) and global methylation. RNA interference study shows a predominant role of DNMT1 in MM cell survival versus DNMT3a or DNMT3b. The deubiquitylating enzyme USP7 stimulates DNMT1 activity, and conversely, USP7-siRNA reduced DNMT1 activity and decreased MM cell viability. RRx-001 plus USP7 inhibitor P5091 triggered synergistic anti-MM activity. MM xenograft studies show that RRx-001 is well tolerated, inhibits tumor growth and enhances survival. Combining RRx-001 with pomalidomide, bortezomib or SAHA induces synergistic anti-MM activity. Our results provide the rationale for translation of RRx-001, either alone or in combination, to clinical evaluation in MM.

  13. Induction and expression of mutations at multiple drug-resistance marker loci in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, G.M.; Carver, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    We observed quantitative and qualitative differences in the mutability and mutagen-specificity of various drug-resistance marker loci in Chinese hamster ovary (THO) cells, which suggest that mammalian gene loci may differ in their relative mutability by a given mutagenic agent. We have used the CHO-AT3-2 multiple-marker mutagenesis assay system to examine the dose-dependent induction and kinetics of expression of mutations at four well-characterized, drug-resistance marker loci, after treatment with chemical agents which produce various types of DNA damage. The CHO-AT3-2 subline allows simultaneous quantitation and direct comparison of induced mutation frequencies at the hgprt, oua (Na/sup +//K/sup +/ ATPase), aprt, and tk loci. The agents tested in this study included ethyl methanesulfonate, methyl methanesulfonate, mitomycin C, ICR-191, benzo(a)pyrene, and dimethylnitrosamine. The expression kinetics and optimal expression times for each drug-resistance marker were determined in dose-response experiments in which cells from mutagen-treated populations were plated at 1-2-day intervals over a period of 10 days following mutagenesis. Comparison of induced mutation frequencies for each drug-resistance marker after mutagen treatments yielding equivalent cell survivals (equitoxic doses resulting in relative cell survivals of 0.37) revealed locus-specific differences in the relative mutagenicities of the agents tested. These results indicate that the apparent mutagenicity of a particular agent at a single genetic locus may not necessarily be an accurate indicator of that agent's mutagenic potential for the genome as a whole.

  14. Antibacterial activity of natural spices on multiple drug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from drinking water, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Spices traditionally have been used as coloring agents, flavoring agents, preservatives, food additives and medicine in Bangladesh. The present work aimed to find out the antimicrobial activity of natural spices on multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli isolates. Methods Anti-bacterial potentials of six crude plant extracts (Allium sativum, Zingiber officinale, Allium cepa, Coriandrum sativum, Piper nigrum and Citrus aurantifolia) were tested against five Escherichia coli isolated from potable water sources at kushtia, Bangladesh. Results All the bacterial isolates were susceptible to undiluted lime-juice. None of them were found to be susceptible against the aqueous extracts of garlic, onion, coriander, pepper and ginger alone. However, all the isolates were susceptible when subjected to 1:1:1 aqueous extract of lime, garlic and ginger. The highest inhibition zone was observed with lime (11 mm). Conclusion Natural spices might have anti-bacterial activity against enteric pathogens and could be used for prevention of diarrheal diseases. Further evaluation is necessary. PMID:21406097

  15. Multiple Drug Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Pichler, Werner J.; Srinoulprasert, Yuttana; Yun, James; Hausmann, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Multiple drug hypersensitivity (MDH) is a syndrome that develops as a consequence of massive T-cell stimulations and is characterized by long-lasting drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) to different drugs. The initial symptoms are mostly severe exanthems or drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). Subsequent symptoms due to another drug often appear in the following weeks, overlapping with the first DHR, or months to years later after resolution of the initial presentation. The second DHR includes exanthema, erythroderma, DRESS, Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), hepatitis, and agranulocytosis. The eliciting drugs can be identified by positive skin or in vitro tests. The drugs involved in starting the MDH are the same as for DRESS, and they are usually given in rather high doses. Fixed drug combination therapies like sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim or piperacillin/tazobactam are frequently involved in MDH, and 30–40% of patients with severe DHR to combination therapy show T-cell reactions to both components. The drug-induced T-cell stimulation appears to be due to the p-i mechanism. Importantly, a permanent T-cell activation characterized by PD-1+/CD38+ expression on CD4+/CD25low T cells can be found in the circulation of patients with MDH for many years. In conclusion, MDH is a drug-elicited syndrome characterized by a long-lasting hyperresponsiveness to multiple, structurally unrelated drugs with clinically diverse symptoms. PMID:28315874

  16. Detection of multiple drug-resistant Trypanosoma congolense populations in village cattle of south-east Mali

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    responded positively to DIM treatment. Conclusions The overreliance on trypanocides in the control of trypanosomosis will ultimately lead to multiple drug-resistant trypanosome populations as detected in villages in south-east Mali rendering the use of drugs doubtful. Effective alternative methods for trypanosomosis control ought to substitute chemotherapy to ensure sustainable cattle production in these villages. Since there is no single strategy for containing trypanocidal drug resistance, promotion of an integrated approach combining proven trypanosomosis control approaches in high trypanosomosis risk areas is most desirous. The best-bet strategy this study recommended for areas with multiple drug resistance included area-wide community tsetse control, control of co-infections to exploit self-cure against resistant trypanosome populations and the rational use of trypanocidal drugs which should be urgently promoted at all levels as a way of containing or reversing resistance. PMID:22852796

  17. Detection of multiple drug-resistant Trypanosoma congolense populations in village cattle of south-east Mali.

    PubMed

    Mungube, Erick O; Vitouley, Hervé S; Allegye-Cudjoe, Emmanuel; Diall, Oumar; Boucoum, Zakaria; Diarra, Boucader; Sanogo, Yousouf; Randolph, Thomas; Bauer, Burkhard; Zessin, Karl-Hans; Clausen, Peter-Henning

    2012-08-01

    treatment. The overreliance on trypanocides in the control of trypanosomosis will ultimately lead to multiple drug-resistant trypanosome populations as detected in villages in south-east Mali rendering the use of drugs doubtful. Effective alternative methods for trypanosomosis control ought to substitute chemotherapy to ensure sustainable cattle production in these villages. Since there is no single strategy for containing trypanocidal drug resistance, promotion of an integrated approach combining proven trypanosomosis control approaches in high trypanosomosis risk areas is most desirous. The best-bet strategy this study recommended for areas with multiple drug resistance included area-wide community tsetse control, control of co-infections to exploit self-cure against resistant trypanosome populations and the rational use of trypanocidal drugs which should be urgently promoted at all levels as a way of containing or reversing resistance.

  18. Molecular diagnostics of a single drug-resistant multiple myeloma case using targeted next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Ishiguro, Kazuya; Igarashi, Tetsuyuki; Aoki, Yuka; Hayashi, Toshiaki; Ishida, Tadao; Sasaki, Yasushi; Tokino, Takashi; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old man was diagnosed with IgG λ-type multiple myeloma (MM), Stage II in October 2010. He was treated with one cycle of high-dose dexamethasone. After three cycles of bortezomib, the patient exhibited slow elevations in the free light-chain levels and developed a significant new increase of serum M protein. Bone marrow cytogenetic analysis revealed a complex karyotype characteristic of malignant plasma cells. To better understand the molecular pathogenesis of this patient, we sequenced for mutations in the entire coding regions of 409 cancer-related genes using a semiconductor-based sequencing platform. Sequencing analysis revealed eight nonsynonymous somatic mutations in addition to several copy number variants, including CCND1 and RB1. These alterations may play roles in the pathobiology of this disease. This targeted next-generation sequencing can allow for the prediction of drug resistance and facilitate improvements in the treatment of MM patients. PMID:26491355

  19. The Transmission and Antibiotic Resistance Variation in a Multiple Drug Resistance Clade of Vibrio cholerae Circulating in Multiple Countries in Asia.

    PubMed

    Pang, Bo; Du, Pengcheng; Zhou, Zhemin; Diao, Baowei; Cui, Zhigang; Zhou, Haijian; Kan, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae has caused massive outbreaks and even trans-continental epidemics. In 2008 and 2010, at least 3 remarkable cholera outbreaks occurred in Hainan, Anhui and Jiangsu provinces of China. To address the possible transmissions and the relationships to the 7th pandemic strains of those 3 outbreaks, we sequenced the whole genomes of the outbreak isolates and compared with the global isolates from the 7th pandemic. The three outbreaks in this study were caused by a cluster of V. cholerae in clade 3.B which is parallel to the clade 3.C that was transmitted from Nepal to Haiti and caused an outbreak in 2010. Pan-genome analysis provided additional evolution information on the mobile element and acquired multiple antibiotic resistance genes. We suggested that clade 3.B should be monitored because the multiple antibiotic resistant characteristics of this clade and the 'amplifier' function of China in the global transmission of current Cholera pandemic. We also show that dedicated whole genome sequencing analysis provided more information than the previous techniques and should be applied in the disease surveillance networks.

  20. The Transmission and Antibiotic Resistance Variation in a Multiple Drug Resistance Clade of Vibrio cholerae Circulating in Multiple Countries in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhemin; Diao, Baowei; Cui, Zhigang; Zhou, Haijian; Kan, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae has caused massive outbreaks and even trans-continental epidemics. In 2008 and 2010, at least 3 remarkable cholera outbreaks occurred in Hainan, Anhui and Jiangsu provinces of China. To address the possible transmissions and the relationships to the 7th pandemic strains of those 3 outbreaks, we sequenced the whole genomes of the outbreak isolates and compared with the global isolates from the 7th pandemic. The three outbreaks in this study were caused by a cluster of V. cholerae in clade 3.B which is parallel to the clade 3.C that was transmitted from Nepal to Haiti and caused an outbreak in 2010. Pan-genome analysis provided additional evolution information on the mobile element and acquired multiple antibiotic resistance genes. We suggested that clade 3.B should be monitored because the multiple antibiotic resistant characteristics of this clade and the ‘amplifier’ function of China in the global transmission of current Cholera pandemic. We also show that dedicated whole genome sequencing analysis provided more information than the previous techniques and should be applied in the disease surveillance networks. PMID:26930352

  1. Etiologic diagnosis and clinical treatment of multiple drug-resistant bacteria infection in elderly patients with stroke-associated pneumonia after neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liu; Qing, Ye; Xingyi, Jin; Hongbo, Qiao

    2015-03-01

    Our objective is to analyze the etiology and antibiotics resistance rate of multiple drug-resistant bacteria infection in elderly patients with stroke-associated pneumonia from Neurosurgery Department, providing a reference for clinical treatment. Sputum of 372 elderly patients with stroke-associated pneumonia (SAP) from Neurosurgery Department was collected for sputum culture and drug sensitivity test, and pathogenic bacteria distribution and drug resistance rate of antibiotics were discussed. Among 372 pathogenic bacteria, there were 95 cases with Gram-positive cocci, the percentage was 15.32 %; there were 277 cases with Gram-negative bacilli, the percentage was 59.95 %; there were 54 cases with fungus, the percentage was 14.51 %; the common Gram-positive cocci included Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, with percentages of 15.32 %, 2.96 % and 4.30 % respectively; the common Gram-negative bacilli included Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, with percentages of 23.92 %, 14.25 % and 9.95 % respectively; the highest drug resistance rates of Staphylococcus aureus were 100.00 % to penicillin, erythrocin and oxacillin, the highest drug resistance rate of Staphylococcus epidermidis was 87.50 % to erythrocin, the highest drug resistance rate of Staphylococcus haemolyticus was 100.00 % to penicillin and erythrocin, the lowest drug resistance rates of three Gram-negative bacilli were 0 % to teicoplanin and vancomycin; the highest drug resistance rates of Escherichia coli were 100.00 % to ceftriaxone and ticarcillin, and the lowest drug resistance rate was 11.32 % to ciprofloxacin; the highest drug resistance rate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was 100.00 % to ceftriaxone, and the lowest drug resistance rate was 22.47 % to imipenem; the highest drug resistance rate of Klebsiella pneumoniae was 81.08 % to aztreonam, and the lowest drug resistance rate was 0.00 % to imipenem. Stroke

  2. EphA4 promotes cell proliferation and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance via the AKT pathway in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Ding, Linlin; Shen, Yaodong; Ni, Jing; Ou, Yiqing; Ou, Yangyu; Liu, Hong

    2017-03-01

    Eph receptor A4 (EphA4), a member of the erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular (Eph) family, has been reported to upregulate in several tumors. However, the role of EphA4 in multiple myeloma has not been clarified yet. In this study, we found that EphA4 promoted proliferation of multiple myeloma cells via the regulation of cell cycle. Besides, EphA4 was closely related to cell adhesion of multiple myeloma cells and promoted cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance by enhancing the phosphorylation levels of Akt (p-AKT) expression in multiple myeloma. More interestingly, we discovered that EphA4 can interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and regulate its expression in multiple myeloma. CDK5 has been reported to be overexpressed in multiple myeloma which mediated bortezomib resistance and also participated in AKT pathway. And we have also proved the fact. So, we supposed that EphA4 interacted with CDK5 and promoted its expression which in turn enhanced p-AKT expression and promoted cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance in multiple myeloma. Therefore, this study clarifies the molecular mechanism of cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance and may be useful in identifying potential target for treatment of multiple myeloma.

  3. New drugs in resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rao, Nisar Ahmed

    2007-05-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that up to 50 million persons worldwide may be infected with drug resistant strains of TB. The fatality rate of MDR-TB is 20-80%. Drug resistant tuberculosis cases are on the rise in Pakistan. The reasons for this menace are multiple including improper prescription, compliance and over the counter sale of anti-TB drugs. The treatment cost of drug-resistant TB is high, both to the individual patient and society. This article is written to create awareness about the available second line drugs and those in the pipeline. Considering the fact that resistant tuberculosis is difficult to manage, it is suggested that these drugs should only be used after consultation with a physician experienced in the treatment of drug resistant TB. The most frequent mistake made by treating physicians is addition of one drug in the failing regimen. At present, 27 potential anti-TB drugs are at various stages of development. The aim is that by 2010 at least one of these molecules completes the journey and should come in the market.

  4. [Attempt at eliminating the multiple drug resistance of E. coli in pigs with enteritis using Rimactin].

    PubMed

    Karaivanov, L; Koleva, P; Bonovska, M; Mateev, M; Kozarev, A

    1980-01-01

    The eliminating effect of rimactan was studied in vivo on resistance markers of E. coli, isolated from 18 new-born pigs with a clinic of enteritis. Rimactan is given per os in 15 mg/kg, liver weight, once a day in the course of 6 days. The sensitivity of the strains eliminated was checked in vitro in respect of 16 medicinal preparations (Pe, Sm, Km, Neo, Chl, Novo, Te, Er, Ty, Sp, Le, Am, Ox, Oxte, Ge-penicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, neomycin, chlornitromycin, novobiocin, tetracycline, erythromycin, tylan, spectam, lentamycin, ampicillin, oxacillin, oxytetracycline, gentamicin and borgal). To 11 of them E. coli were resistant. After a treatment with rimactan an elimination of resistance markers was observed right on the first day, namely, with regard to Sm, Chl, Novo, Te, Er, Sp, Oxte. On the second day was eliminated the Pe-marker, on the third--the Ty-marker, and it was not until on the fifth day that Am and Ox-markers were eliminated. The elimination frequency was the highest between the third and the fifth days. The experiments studied also the sensitivity of the investigated coli strains with regard to different rimactan concentrations (2-256 mg/cm3) in vitro. It was most pronounced for a concentration of 16-32 mg/cm3. It was proved that rimactan can be used as a preparation for eliminating resistance markers (R-factors) of E. coli in pigs suffering from enteritis.

  5. Ethics and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Selgelid, Michael J

    2007-05-01

    This paper reviews the dynamics behind, and ethical issues associated with, the phenomenon of drug resistance. Drug resistance is an important ethical issue partly because of the severe consequences likely to result from the increase in drug resistant pathogens if more is not done to control them. Drug resistance is also an ethical issue because, rather than being a mere quirk of nature, the problem is largely a product of drug distribution. Drug resistance results from the over-consumption of antibiotics by the wealthy; and it, ironically, results from the under-consumption of antibiotics, usually by the poor or otherwise marginalized. In both kinds of cases the phenomenon of drug resistance illustrates why health (care)--at least in the context of infectious disease--should be treated as a (global) public good. The point is that drug resistance involves 'externalities' affecting third parties. When one patient develops a resistant strain of disease because of her over- or under-consumption of medication, this more dangerous malady poses increased risk to others. The propriety of free-market distribution of goods subject to externalities is famously dubious--given that the 'efficiency' rationale behind markets assumes an absence of externalities. Market failure in the context of drug resistance is partly revealed by the fact that no new classes of antibiotics have been developed since 1970. I conclude by arguing that the case of drug resistance reveals additional reasons--to those traditionally appealed to by bioethicists--for treating health care as something special when making policy decisions about its distribution.

  6. Prevalence of multiple drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria cases in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jitendra; Khan, Siraj Ahmed; Soni, Monika; Dutta, Prafulla

    2017-01-01

    Two numbers of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from Gossingpara, Runikhata area in Chirang district of Assam had shown multiple mutations in Pfcrt-dhfr-dhps gene (up to seven mutations: One mutation in Pfcrt gene, three mutations in Pfdhfr gene and three mutations in Pfdhps gene). Similarly, two cases in Bat camp, Miao area under Changlang district of Arunachal Pradesh had shown a total of eight mutations, of which one mutation in Pfcrt gene, three mutations in Pfdhfr gene, three mutations in Pfdhps gene and one mutation in PfATPase6 gene. One case in 3 Miles, Miao area of Changlang district has shown mutations in Pfcrt(one mutation), Pfdhfr(four mutations) and Pfdhps(three mutations) gene. These results indicated that there is an existence of multiple mutant P. falciparum malaria cases in northeastern region of India.

  7. Bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors: attractive alternatives for control of infectious pathogens showing multiple drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Ashima K; Vinothkumar, Kittappa; Rajpara, Neha

    2013-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial communication process that depends on the bacterial population density. It involves small diffusible signaling molecules which activate the expression of myriad genes that control diverse array of functions like bioluminescence, virulence, biofilm formation, sporulation, to name a few. Since QS is responsible for virulence in the clinically relevant bacteria, inhibition of QS appears to be a promising strategy to control these pathogenic bacteria. With indiscriminate use of antibiotics, there has been an alarming increase in the number of antibiotic resistant pathogens. Antibiotics are no longer the magic bullets they were once thought to be and therefore there is a need for development of new antibiotics and/or other novel strategies to combat the infections caused by multidrug resistant organisms. Quorum sensing inhibition or quorum quenching has been pursued as one of such novel strategies. While antibiotics kill or slow down the growth of bacteria, quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) or quorum quenchers (QQs) attenuate bacterial virulence. A large body of work on QS has been carried out in deadly pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio fischeri, V. harveyi, Escherichia coli and V. cholerae etc to unravel the mechanisms of QS as well as identify and study QSIs. This review describes various aspects of QS, QSI, different model systems to study these phenomena and recent patents on various QSIs. It suggests QSIs as attractive alternatives for controlling human, animal and plant pathogens and their utility in agriculture and other industries.

  8. Antifungal drug resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pemán, Javier; Cantón, Emilia; Espinel-Ingroff, Ana

    2009-05-01

    Antifungal resistance is a prominent feature in the management of invasive mycoses, with important implications for morbidity and mortality. Microbiological resistance, the most common cause of refractory infection, is associated with a fungal pathogen for which an antifungal MIC is higher than average or within the range designated as the resistant breakpoint. Four major mechanisms of resistance to azoles have been described in Candida spp.: decreased intracellular drug concentration by activation of efflux systems or reduction of drug penetration, modification of the target site, upregulation of the target enzyme and development of bypass pathways. Conversely, echinocandins are a poor substrate for multidrug efflux transporters, and their mechanisms of resistance are associated with point mutations and/or overexpression of FKS1 and FKS2 genes. Acquired resistance to flucytosine results from defects in its metabolism through enzymatic mutations, whereas resistance to amphotericin B may be mediated by increased catalase activity or defects in ergosterol biosynthesis.

  9. RECQ1 helicase is involved in replication stress survival and drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Viziteu, E; Klein, B; Basbous, J; Lin, Y-L; Hirtz, C; Gourzones, C; Tiers, L; Bruyer, A; Vincent, L; Grandmougin, C; Seckinger, A; Goldschmidt, H; Constantinou, A; Pasero, P; Hose, D; Moreaux, J

    2017-03-10

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell cancer with poor survival, characterized by the expansion of multiple myeloma cells (MMCs) in the bone marrow. Using a microarray-based genome-wide screen for genes responding to DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) inhibition in MM cells, we identified RECQ1 among the most downregulated genes. RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding enzymes involved in the maintenance of chromosome stability. Here we show that RECQ1 is significantly overexpressed in MMCs compared to normal plasma cells and that increased RECQ1 expression is associated with poor prognosis in three independent cohorts of patients. Interestingly, RECQ1 knockdown inhibits cells growth and induces apoptosis in MMCs. Moreover, RECQ1 depletion promotes the development of DNA double-strand breaks, as evidenced by the formation of 53BP1 foci and the phosphorylation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and histone variant H2A.X (H2AX). In contrast, RECQ1 overexpression protects MMCs from melphalan and bortezomib cytotoxicity. RECQ1 interacts with PARP1 in MMCs exposed to treatment and RECQ1 depletion sensitizes MMCs to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor. DNMT inhibitor treatment results in RECQ1 downregulation through miR-203 deregulation in MMC. Altogether, these data suggest that association of DNA damaging agents and/or PARP inhibitors with DNMT inhibitors may represent a therapeutic approach in patients with high RECQ1 expression associated with a poor prognosis.Leukemia advance online publication, 10 March 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.54.

  10. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIAID invests in basic research to understand the biology of microbes, their behavior, and how drug resistance ... Nucleotide Polymorphism Phylogenetics & Ontology Proteomics & Protein Analysis Systems Biology Data Portals Software Applications BCBB Mobyle Interface Designer ( ...

  11. Multiple drug hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chiriac, Anca M; Demoly, Pascal

    2013-08-01

    The multiple drug hypersensitivity syndrome (MDH) is a distinct clinical entity, different from cross-reactivity and flare-up reactions. Following its initial description in 1989 by Sullivan et al., several authors have addressed the issues surrounding this peculiar form of drug hypersensitivity. Whether this syndrome is single or can be further classified in several entities is still a matter of debate. Case reports, case series or studies involving large populations on MDH are few. The use of this term in the literature is heterogeneous, and the definitions variable. Given the major advances in the study of drug hypersensitivities in general, and ongoing research regarding severe cutaneous adverse reactions in particular, careful study of the subgroup of patients with demonstrated immunological basis of MDH has enabled the generation of possible pathogenetic hypotheses. Together with the studies (despite their limitations) to estimate the prevalence of this syndrome in adult and paediatric patients these emerging data need confirmation through larger studies with well defined populations. Bringing together the experience of groups involved in the field of drug allergy should help to move knowledge regarding this peculiar form of drug hypersensitivity forward.

  12. Antibiotic Resistance, RAPD- PCR Typing of Multiple Drug Resistant Strains of Escherichia Coli From Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

    PubMed Central

    Marialouis, Xavier Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Global spreading of multidrug resistant strains of Escherichia coli is responsible for Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) which is a major health problem in of concern. Among the gram negative bacteria, the major contributors for UTI belongs to the family Enterobacteriaceae, which includes E. coli, Klebsiella, Citrobacter and Proteus. However, E. coli accounts for the major cause of Urinary tract infections (UTIs) and accounts for 75% to 90% of UTI isolates. Aim The main aim of this study is to analyse the phylogenetic grouping of clinical isolates of UTI E. coli. Materials and Methods In this study nearly 58 E. coli strains were isolated and confirmed through microbiological, biochemical characterization. The urine samples were collected from outpatients having symptoms of UTI, irrespective of age and sex in Tamil Nadu, India. The isolates were subjected to analyse for ESBL and AmpC β-lactamase production. To understand its genetic correlation, molecular typing was carried out using RAPD-PCR method. Results Here we noted phenotypically twenty seven isolates were positive for ESBL and seven for AmpC β-lactamase production. However, among the ESBL isolates higher sensitivity was noted for Nitrofurantoin and Cefoxitin. It is worth to note that the prevalence of UTIs was more common among female and elderly male. Phylogenetic grouping revealed the presence of 24 isolates belonged to B2 group followed by 19 isolates to group A, eight isolates to group B1 and Seven isolates to group D. Conclusion Phenotypically most of the strains were positive for ESBL and showed high sensitivity for Nitrofurantoin and cefoxitin. PMID:27134870

  13. Antibiotic Resistance, RAPD- PCR Typing of Multiple Drug Resistant Strains of Escherichia Coli From Urinary Tract Infection (UTI).

    PubMed

    Marialouis, Xavier Alexander; Santhanam, Amutha

    2016-03-01

    Global spreading of multidrug resistant strains of Escherichia coli is responsible for Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) which is a major health problem in of concern. Among the gram negative bacteria, the major contributors for UTI belongs to the family Enterobacteriaceae, which includes E. coli, Klebsiella, Citrobacter and Proteus. However, E. coli accounts for the major cause of Urinary tract infections (UTIs) and accounts for 75% to 90% of UTI isolates. The main aim of this study is to analyse the phylogenetic grouping of clinical isolates of UTI E. coli. In this study nearly 58 E. coli strains were isolated and confirmed through microbiological, biochemical characterization. The urine samples were collected from outpatients having symptoms of UTI, irrespective of age and sex in Tamil Nadu, India. The isolates were subjected to analyse for ESBL and AmpC β-lactamase production. To understand its genetic correlation, molecular typing was carried out using RAPD-PCR method. Here we noted phenotypically twenty seven isolates were positive for ESBL and seven for AmpC β-lactamase production. However, among the ESBL isolates higher sensitivity was noted for Nitrofurantoin and Cefoxitin. It is worth to note that the prevalence of UTIs was more common among female and elderly male. Phylogenetic grouping revealed the presence of 24 isolates belonged to B2 group followed by 19 isolates to group A, eight isolates to group B1 and Seven isolates to group D. Phenotypically most of the strains were positive for ESBL and showed high sensitivity for Nitrofurantoin and cefoxitin.

  14. Kinetically Controlled Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xin E.; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2011-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium brevicompactum produces the immunosuppressive drug mycophenolic acid (MPA), which is a potent inhibitor of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases (IMPDHs). IMPDH catalyzes the conversion of IMP to XMP via a covalent enzyme intermediate, E-XMP*; MPA inhibits by trapping E-XMP*. P. brevicompactum (Pb) contains two MPA-resistant IMPDHs, PbIMPDH-A and PbIMPDH-B, which are 17- and 103-fold more resistant to MPA than typically observed. Surprisingly, the active sites of these resistant enzymes are essentially identical to those of MPA-sensitive enzymes, so the mechanistic basis of resistance is not apparent. Here, we show that, unlike MPA-sensitive IMPDHs, formation of E-XMP* is rate-limiting for both PbIMPDH-A and PbIMPDH-B. Therefore, MPA resistance derives from the failure to accumulate the drug-sensitive intermediate. PMID:21979957

  15. Capillary electrophoresis-single strand conformation polymorphism for the detection of multiple mutations leading to tuberculosis drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Krothapalli, Sowmya; May, Michael K; Hestekin, Christa N

    2012-10-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) is a major health problem in both developed and developing countries. Mutations in the Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis bacterial genome, such as those to the rpoB gene and mabA-inhA promoter region, have been linked to TB drug resistance in against rifampicin and isoniazid, respectively. The rapid, accurate, and inexpensive identification of these and other mutations leading to TB drug resistance is an essential tool for improving human health. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) can be a highly sensitive technique for the detection of genetic mutation that has not been previously explored for drug resistance mutations in M. tuberculosis. This work explores the potential of CE-SSCP through the optimization of variables such as polymer separation matrix concentration, capillary wall coating, electric field strength, and temperature on resolution of mutation detection. The successful detection of an rpoB gene mutation and two mabA-inhA promoter region mutations while simultaneously differentiating a TB-causing mycobacteria from a non-TB bacteria was accomplished using the optimum conditions of 4.5% (w/v) PDMA in a PDMA coated capillary at 20°C using a separation voltage of 278 V/cm. This multiplexed analysis that can be completed in a few hours demonstrates the potential of CE-SSCP to be an inexpensive and rapid analysis method.

  16. Capillary Electrophoresis – Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism for the Detection of Multiple Mutations Leading to Tuberculosis Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Krothapalli, Sowmya; May, Michael K.; Hestekin, Christa N.

    2013-01-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) is a major health problem in both developed and developing countries. Mutations in the Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis bacterial genome, such as those to the rpoB gene and mabA-inhA promoter region, have been linked to TB drug resistance in against rifampicin and isoniazid, respectively. The rapid, accurate, and inexpensive identification of these and other mutations leading to TB drug resistance is an essential tool for improving human health. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) can be a highly sensitive technique for the detection of genetic mutation that has not been previously explored for drug resistance mutations in M. tuberculosis. This work explores the potential of CE-SSCP through the optimization of variables such as polymer separation matrix concentration, capillary wall coating, electric field strength, and temperature on resolution of mutation detection. The successful detection of an rpoB gene mutation and two mabA-inhA promoter region mutations while simultaneously differentiating a TB-causing mycobacteria from a non-TB bacteria was accomplished using the optimum conditions of 4.5% (w/v) PDMA in a PDMA coated capillary at 20°C using a separation voltage of 278 V/cm. This multiplexed analysis that can be completed in a few hours demonstrates the potential of CE-SSCP to be an inexpensive and rapid analysis method. PMID:22884688

  17. Multiple mechanisms of N-(phosphonoacetyl)-L-aspartate drug resistance in SV40-infected precrisis human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, D I; Livanos, E M; White, A E; Tlsty, T D

    1993-10-15

    Normal and SV40-infected human fibroblasts were grown in the presence of the drug N-(phosphonoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) and examined for evidence of genetic instability. Both cell populations were precrisis and showed a normal, diploid karyotype at early passage. In contrast to the normal IMR-90 cells, which showed growth arrest and did not form colonies in PALA, the SV40-infected IMR-90 cells formed colonies at a very high frequency and continued to cycle in the drug. The drug-resistant colonies senesced after continued growth in culture, indicating that this change in ability to amplify preceded immortalization. This is the first observation of mortal human cells overcoming the drug-induced growth arrest. Although all previously isolated PALA-resistant colonies demonstrated CAD gene amplification as the mechanism of the drug-resistant phenotype, these SV40-infected human cells also showed alternative mechanisms, including increases in gene copy number by aneuploidy and formation of an isochromosome 2p.

  18. [Viral drug resistance].

    PubMed

    Dudman, Susanne Gjeruldsen; Stene-Johansen, Kathrine; Vik, Inger Sofie Samdal

    2008-11-20

    More and more viral infections are treated with antiviral drugs, and resistance against these drugs is steadily increasing. Our aim is to give a general understanding of viral resistance and its clinical significance. This article is based on review of published literature on the subject, international recommendations and our own experience as a national reference laboratory for hepatitis viruses. Development of viral resistance is an increasing problem with long-term treatment of both latent and chronic viral infections and may be one of the reasons for clinical treatment failure. Susceptibility testing is therefore an important diagnostic tool in cases of suspected failure during antiviral treatment, and is also necessary for customising of treatment to each individual patient. In Norway, susceptibility testing is offered for HIV, HBV, CMV and influenza, whereas systematic surveillance for the time being is only performed on HIV and influenza resistance. Surveillance on viral resistance is necessary in order to choose the adequate empirical therapy and to monitor the spread of resistant virus in the population. Prevalence of resistance can be limited with infection control measures and appropriate antiviral treatment, especially used in combinations of effective drugs directed at different enzymes and proteins within the virus.

  19. Drug Preferences of Multiple Drug Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harford, Robert J.

    1978-01-01

    Examined drug preferences of a group of active multiple drug abusers referred for treatment. Nearly half the respondents preferred drugs other than type they most frequently used. Preferences were related to method of administration. Results suggest preference is one among several determinants of drug use. (Author/BEF)

  20. Antimicrobial drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marilyn; Silley, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of our current understanding of the mechanisms associated with the development of antimicrobial drug resistance, international differences in definitions of resistance, ongoing efforts to track shifts in drug susceptibility, and factors that can influence the selection of therapeutic intervention. The latter presents a matrix of complex variables that includes the mechanism of drug action, the pharmacokinetics (PK) of the antimicrobial agent in the targeted patient population, the pharmacodynamics (PD) of the bacterial response to the antimicrobial agent, the PK/PD relationship that will influence dose selection, and the integrity of the host immune system. Finally, the differences between bacterial tolerance and bacterial resistance are considered, and the potential for non-traditional anti-infective therapies is discussed.

  1. Control of hospital endemicity of multiple-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii ST457 with directly observed hand hygiene.

    PubMed

    Cheng, V C C; Chen, J H K; Poon, R W S; Lee, W M; So, S Y C; Wong, S C Y; Chau, P H; Yip, C C Y; Wong, S S Y; Chan, J F W; Hung, I F N; Ho, P L; Yuen, K Y

    2015-04-01

    An increasing endemicity of multiple-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MRAB) ST457 was noted in Hong Kong. The epidemiology, risk factors, and infection control measures to prevent nosocomial transmission of this epidemic clone were analyzed. A total of 5,058 patients cultured positive with A. baumannii between 1 January 2004 and 30 June 2014 were included, of which 297 (5.9 %) had bacteremia. The first case of MRAB bacteremia emerged in 2009, with an incidence that increased from 0.27 (one case) in 2009 to 1.86 (14 cases) per 100,000 patient-days in 2013 (p < 0.001). With the implementation of strict contact precautions and directly observed hand hygiene in conscious patients immediately before receiving meals and medications in July 2013, the incidence of MRAB bacteremia reduced from its peak to 0.77 (one case) per 100,000 patient-days in the first 6 months of 2014 (p < 0.001). Patients from long-term care facilities for the elderly [odds ratio (OR) 18.6, confidence interval (CI) 2.1-162.4, p = 0.008] and history of carbapenem (OR 7.0, CI 1.7-28.0, p = 0.006) and beta-lactam/beta-lactamase use (OR 5.6, CI 1.1-28.7, p = 0.038) 90 days prior to admission were independent risk factors for MRAB bacteremia by logistic regression when compared with carbapenem-susceptible A. baumannii bacteremia.

  2. CXCL12 and CXCR7 are relevant targets to reverse cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Waldschmidt, Johannes M; Simon, Anna; Wider, Dagmar; Müller, Stefan J; Follo, Marie; Ihorst, Gabriele; Decker, Sarah; Lorenz, Joschka; Chatterjee, Manik; Azab, Abdel K; Duyster, Justus; Wäsch, Ralph; Engelhardt, Monika

    2017-10-01

    Cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) by the bone marrow (BM) is fundamental to multiple myeloma (MM) propagation and survival. Targeting BM protection to increase the efficacy of current anti-myeloma treatment has not been extensively pursued. To extend the understanding of CAM-DR, we hypothesized that the cytotoxic effects of novel anti-myeloma agents may be abrogated by the presence of BM stroma cells (BMSCs) and restored by addition of the CXCL12 antagonist NOX-A12 or the CXCR4 inhibitor plerixafor. Following this hypothesis, we evaluated different anti-myeloma agents alone, with BMSCs and when combined with plerixafor or NOX-A12. We verified CXCR4, CD49d (also termed ITGA4) and CD44 as essential mediators of BM adhesion on MM cells. Additionally, we show that CXCR7, the second receptor of stromal-derived-factor-1 (CXCL12), is highly expressed in active MM. Co-culture proved that co-treatment with plerixafor or NOX-A12, the latter inhibiting CXCR4 and CXCR7, functionally interfered with MM chemotaxis to the BM. This led to the resensitization of MM cells to the anti-myeloma agents vorinostat and pomalidomide and both proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and carfilzomib. Within a multicentre phase I/II study, NOX-A12 was tested in combination with bortezomib-dexamethasone, underlining the feasibility of NOX-A12 as an active add-on agent to antagonize myeloma CAM-DR. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Antibacterial effect of Allium sativum cloves and Zingiber officinale rhizomes against multiple-drug resistant clinical pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Karuppiah, Ponmurugan; Rajaram, Shyamkumar

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antibacterial properties of Allium sativum (garlic) cloves and Zingiber officinale (ginger) rhizomes against multi-drug resistant clinical pathogens causing nosocomial infection. Methods The cloves of garlic and rhizomes of ginger were extracted with 95% (v/v) ethanol. The ethanolic extracts were subjected to antibacterial sensitivity test against clinical pathogens. Results Anti-bacterial potentials of the extracts of two crude garlic cloves and ginger rhizomes were tested against five gram negative and two gram positive multi-drug resistant bacteria isolates. All the bacterial isolates were susceptible to crude extracts of both plants extracts. Except Enterobacter sp. and Klebsiella sp., all other isolates were susceptible when subjected to ethanolic extracts of garlic and ginger. The highest inhibition zone was observed with garlic (19.45 mm) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). The minimal inhibitory concentration was as low as 67.00 µg/mL against P. aeruginosa. Conclusions Natural spices of garlic and ginger possess effective anti-bacterial activity against multi-drug clinical pathogens and can be used for prevention of drug resistant microbial diseases and further evaluation is necessary. PMID:23569978

  4. Drugs Approved for Multiple Myeloma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for multiple myeloma and other plasma cell neoplasms. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. Prevalence of decreased susceptibility to triclosan in Salmonella enterica isolates from animals and humans and association with multiple drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Copitch, Justin L; Whitehead, Rebekah N; Webber, Mark A

    2010-09-01

    Previous laboratory studies have implicated triclosan as a possible selective force driving resistance to multiple antibiotics and have identified a number of triclosan resistance mechanisms in Salmonella enterica. The aim of this work was to determine the prevalence of decreased susceptibility to triclosan in a panel of human and animal isolates of S. enterica and to identify the mechanisms of triclosan resistance in these strains. Over 400 animal and human isolates of non-typhoidal Salmonella were screened for decreased susceptibility to triclosan and a panel of antibiotics. The prevalence of decreased susceptibility to triclosan was ca. 4%. Of the isolates with decreased triclosan susceptibility, 56% were multidrug-resistant (MDR) compared with 12% of triclosan-sensitive isolates. MDR and triclosan-resistant strains showed increased efflux activity compared with strains with reduced susceptibility to triclosan alone. No high-level triclosan resistance was seen in this panel of isolates. A reservoir of strains with low-level decreased triclosan susceptibility is present in animals and humans. These isolates are MDR as a result of generic mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance and do not carry specific mutations within fabI. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  6. A treatment plant receiving waste water from multiple bulk drug manufacturers is a reservoir for highly multi-drug resistant integron-bearing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Nachiket P; Regina, Viduthalai R; Walujkar, Sandeep A; Charan, Shakti Singh; Moore, Edward R B; Larsson, D G Joakim; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2013-01-01

    The arenas and detailed mechanisms for transfer of antibiotic resistance genes between environmental bacteria and pathogens are largely unclear. Selection pressures from antibiotics in situations where environmental bacteria and human pathogens meet are expected to increase the risks for such gene transfer events. We hypothesize that waste-water treatment plants (WWTPs) serving antibiotic manufacturing industries may provide such spawning grounds, given the high bacterial densities present there together with exceptionally strong and persistent selection pressures from the antibiotic-contaminated waste. Previous analyses of effluent from an Indian industrial WWTP that processes waste from bulk drug production revealed the presence of a range of drugs, including broad spectrum antibiotics at extremely high concentrations (mg/L range). In this study, we have characterized the antibiotic resistance profiles of 93 bacterial strains sampled at different stages of the treatment process from the WWTP against 39 antibiotics belonging to 12 different classes. A large majority (86%) of the strains were resistant to 20 or more antibiotics. Although there were no classically-recognized human pathogens among the 93 isolated strains, opportunistic pathogens such as Ochrobactrum intermedium, Providencia rettgeri, vancomycin resistant Enterococci (VRE), Aerococcus sp. and Citrobacter freundii were found to be highly resistant. One of the O. intermedium strains (ER1) was resistant to 36 antibiotics, while P. rettgeri (OSR3) was resistant to 35 antibiotics. Class 1 and 2 integrons were detected in 74/93 (80%) strains each, and 88/93 (95%) strains harbored at least one type of integron. The qPCR analysis of community DNA also showed an unprecedented high prevalence of integrons, suggesting that the bacteria living under such high selective pressure have an appreciable potential for genetic exchange of resistance genes via mobile gene cassettes. The present study provides insight into

  7. A Treatment Plant Receiving Waste Water from Multiple Bulk Drug Manufacturers Is a Reservoir for Highly Multi-Drug Resistant Integron-Bearing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Walujkar, Sandeep A.; Charan, Shakti Singh; Moore, Edward R. B.; Larsson, D. G. Joakim; Shouche, Yogesh S.

    2013-01-01

    The arenas and detailed mechanisms for transfer of antibiotic resistance genes between environmental bacteria and pathogens are largely unclear. Selection pressures from antibiotics in situations where environmental bacteria and human pathogens meet are expected to increase the risks for such gene transfer events. We hypothesize that waste-water treatment plants (WWTPs) serving antibiotic manufacturing industries may provide such spawning grounds, given the high bacterial densities present there together with exceptionally strong and persistent selection pressures from the antibiotic-contaminated waste. Previous analyses of effluent from an Indian industrial WWTP that processes waste from bulk drug production revealed the presence of a range of drugs, including broad spectrum antibiotics at extremely high concentrations (mg/L range). In this study, we have characterized the antibiotic resistance profiles of 93 bacterial strains sampled at different stages of the treatment process from the WWTP against 39 antibiotics belonging to 12 different classes. A large majority (86%) of the strains were resistant to 20 or more antibiotics. Although there were no classically-recognized human pathogens among the 93 isolated strains, opportunistic pathogens such as Ochrobactrum intermedium, Providencia rettgeri, vancomycin resistant Enterococci (VRE), Aerococcus sp. and Citrobacter freundii were found to be highly resistant. One of the O. intermedium strains (ER1) was resistant to 36 antibiotics, while P. rettgeri (OSR3) was resistant to 35 antibiotics. Class 1 and 2 integrons were detected in 74/93 (80%) strains each, and 88/93 (95%) strains harbored at least one type of integron. The qPCR analysis of community DNA also showed an unprecedented high prevalence of integrons, suggesting that the bacteria living under such high selective pressure have an appreciable potential for genetic exchange of resistance genes via mobile gene cassettes. The present study provides insight into

  8. Novel Conjugative Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance Plasmid pAQU1 from Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae Isolated from Marine Aquaculture Environment

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Lisa; Maruyama, Fumito; Miyamoto, Manabu; Miyakoshi, Masatoshi; Kurokawa, Ken; Masuda, Michiaki

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant bacteria is a severe problem in aquaculture. The ability of drug resistance genes to transfer from a bacterial cell to another is thought to be responsible for the wide dissemination of these genes in the aquaculture environment; however, little is known about the gene transfer mechanisms in marine bacteria. In this study, we show that a tetracycline-resistant strain of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, isolated from seawater at a coastal aquaculture site in Japan, harbors a novel multiple drug resistance plasmid. This plasmid named pAQU1 can be transferred to Escherichia coli by conjugation. Nucleotide sequencing showed that the plasmid was 204,052 base pairs and contained 235 predicted coding sequences. Annotation showed that pAQU1 did not have known repA, suggesting a new replicon, and contained seven drug resistance genes: blaCARB-9-like, floR, mph(A)-like, mef(A)-like, sul2, tet(M) and tet(B). The plasmid has a complete set of genes encoding the apparatus for the type IV secretion system with a unique duplication of traA. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of relaxase encoded by traI in pAQU1 demonstrated that the conjugative transfer system of the plasmid belongs to MOBH12, a sub-group of the MOBH plasmid family, closely related to the IncA/C type of plasmids and SXT/R391 widely distributed among species of Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae. Our data suggest that conjugative transfer is involved in horizontal gene transfer among marine bacteria and provide useful insights into the molecular basis for the dissemination of drug resistance genes among bacteria in the aquaculture environment. PMID:22446310

  9. Isolation and characterization of multiple drug resistance bacterial pathogens from waste water in hospital and non-hospital environments, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The importance of bacterial isolates from waste water environment as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance and a potential source of novel resistance genes to clinical pathogens is underestimated. This study is aimed at to isolate and characterize public health important bacteria from waste water in hospital and non- hospital environments and evaluate the distribution of multiple drug resistance bacteria in the study area. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at Gondar from January-June 2012. The hospital waste water was taken from different sections of the Gondar University Teaching Hospital. Non- hospital environment samples were taken at different sites of the university campuses, Gondar College of Teachers education, and soft drink factory in Gondar. Samples were aseptically collected, transported and processed with in two hours following standard procedure. Identified organisms were assessed for different antibiotics following Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. All data was registered and entered in to SPSS version 16 computer program. P-values less than 0.05 were taken as statistically significant. Result A total of 60 waste water samples were processed for the presence of drug resistance pathogens. Among the total samples 113 bacterial isolates were recovered and of these 65 (57.5%) were from hospital environment and 48 (42.5%) were from non-hospital environment. The most frequently identified bacterium was Klebsiella spp. 30 (26.6%) followed by Pseudomonas spp. 19(16.8%), E. coli (11.5%) and Citrobacter spp (11.5%), and Staphylococcus aureus (8.2%). The over all prevalence of multiple drug resistance (MDR) in this study was 79/113 (69.9%). MDR in hospital environment was found to be 53/68 (81.5%) while in non hospital environment was found to be 26/48 (54.2%). Conclusions Multiple drug resistance to the commonly used antibiotics is high in the study area. The contamination of waste water by antibiotics or other pollutants lead to the rise

  10. Isolation and characterization of multiple drug resistance bacterial pathogens from waste water in hospital and non-hospital environments, Northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Moges, Feleke; Endris, Mengistu; Belyhun, Yeshambel; Worku, Walelegn

    2014-04-05

    The importance of bacterial isolates from waste water environment as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance and a potential source of novel resistance genes to clinical pathogens is underestimated. This study is aimed at to isolate and characterize public health important bacteria from waste water in hospital and non- hospital environments and evaluate the distribution of multiple drug resistance bacteria in the study area. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Gondar from January-June 2012. The hospital waste water was taken from different sections of the Gondar University Teaching Hospital. Non- hospital environment samples were taken at different sites of the university campuses, Gondar College of Teachers education, and soft drink factory in Gondar. Samples were aseptically collected, transported and processed with in two hours following standard procedure. Identified organisms were assessed for different antibiotics following Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. All data was registered and entered in to SPSS version 16 computer program. P-values less than 0.05 were taken as statistically significant. A total of 60 waste water samples were processed for the presence of drug resistance pathogens. Among the total samples 113 bacterial isolates were recovered and of these 65 (57.5%) were from hospital environment and 48 (42.5%) were from non-hospital environment. The most frequently identified bacterium was Klebsiella spp. 30 (26.6%) followed by Pseudomonas spp. 19(16.8%), E. coli (11.5%) and Citrobacter spp (11.5%), and Staphylococcus aureus (8.2%). The over all prevalence of multiple drug resistance (MDR) in this study was 79/113 (69.9%). MDR in hospital environment was found to be 53/68 (81.5%) while in non hospital environment was found to be 26/48 (54.2%). Multiple drug resistance to the commonly used antibiotics is high in the study area. The contamination of waste water by antibiotics or other pollutants lead to the rise of resistance due to selection

  11. Reelin promotes the adhesion and drug resistance of multiple myeloma cells via integrin β1 signaling and STAT3.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liang; Yan, Fan; Zhao, Dandan; Lv, Meng; Liang, Xiaodong; Dai, Hui; Qin, Xiaodan; Zhang, Yan; Hao, Jie; Sun, Xiuyuan; Yin, Yanhui; Huang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jun; Lu, Jin; Ge, Qing

    2016-03-01

    Reelin is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that is essential for neuron migration and positioning. The expression of reelin in multiple myeloma (MM) cells and its association with cell adhesion and survival were investigated. Overexpression, siRNA knockdown, and the addition of recombinant protein of reelin were used to examine the function of reelin in MM cells. Clinically, high expression of reelin was negatively associated with progression-free survival and overall survival. Functionally, reelin promoted the adhesion of MM cells to fibronectin via activation of α5β1 integrin. The resulting phosphorylation of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) led to the activation of Src/Syk/STAT3 and Akt, crucial signaling molecules involved in enhancing cell adhesion and protecting cells from drug-induced cell apoptosis. These findings indicate reelin's important role in the activation of integrin-β1 and STAT3/Akt pathways in multiple myeloma and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting reelin/integrin/FAK axis.

  12. Identifying representative drug resistant mutants of HIV

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug resistance is one of the most important causes for failure of anti-AIDS treatment. During therapy, multiple mutations accumulate in the HIV genome, eventually rendering the drugs ineffective in blocking replication of the mutant virus. The huge number of possible mutants precludes experimental analysis to explore the molecular mechanisms of resistance and develop improved antiviral drugs. Results In order to solve this problem, we have developed a new algorithm to reveal the most representative mutants from the whole drug resistant mutant database based on our newly proposed unified protein sequence and 3D structure encoding method. Mean shift clustering and multiple regression analysis were applied on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. This approach successfully chooses less than 100 mutants with the highest resistance to each drug out of about 10K in the whole database. When considering high level resistance to multiple drugs, the numbers reduce to one or two representative mutants. Conclusion This approach for predicting the most representative mutants for each drug has major importance for experimental verification since the results provide a small number of representative sequences, which will be amenable for in vitro testing and characterization of the expressed mutant proteins. PMID:26678327

  13. Virulence Characteristics and Genetic Affinities of Multiple Drug Resistant Uropathogenic Escherichia coli from a Semi Urban Locality in India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Parveen, Sana; Gandham, Nageshwari; Wieler, Lothar H.; Ewers, Christa; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2011-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) are of significant health concern. The emergence of drug resistant E. coli with high virulence potential is alarming. Lack of sufficient data on transmission dynamics, virulence spectrum and antimicrobial resistance of certain pathogens such as the uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) from countries with high infection burden, such as India, hinders the infection control and management efforts. In this study, we extensively genotyped and phenotyped a collection of 150 UPEC obtained from patients belonging to a semi-urban, industrialized setting near Pune, India. The isolates representing different clinical categories were analyzed in comparison with 50 commensal E. coli isolates from India as well as 50 ExPEC strains from Germany. Virulent strains were identified based on hemolysis, haemagglutination, cell surface hydrophobicity, serum bactericidal activity as well as with the help of O serotyping. We generated antimicrobial resistance profiles for all the clinical isolates and carried out phylogenetic analysis based on repetitive extragenic palindromic (rep)-PCR. E. coli from urinary tract infection cases expressed higher percentages of type I (45%) and P fimbriae (40%) when compared to fecal isolates (25% and 8% respectively). Hemolytic group comprised of 60% of UPEC and only 2% of E. coli from feces. Additionally, we found that serum resistance and cell surface hydrophobicity were not significantly (p = 0.16/p = 0.51) associated with UPEC from clinical cases. Moreover, clinical isolates exhibited highest resistance against amoxicillin (67.3%) and least against nitrofurantoin (57.3%). We also observed that 31.3% of UPEC were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers belonging to serotype O25, of which four were also positive for O25b subgroup that is linked to B2-O25b-ST131-CTX-M-15 virulent/multiresistant type. Furthermore, isolates from India and Germany (as well as global sources) were found to be

  14. SDX-101, the R-enantiomer of etodolac, induces cytotoxicity, overcomes drug resistance, and enhances the activity of dexamethasone in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Hiroshi; Hideshima, Teru; Hamasaki, Makoto; Roccaro, Aldo M.; Shiraishi, Norihiko; Kumar, Shaji; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Ishitsuka, Kenji; Raje, Noopur; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Podar, Klaus; Chauhan, Dharminder; Leoni, Lorenzo M.; Kanekal, Sarath; Elliott, Gary; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2005-01-01

    In this study we report that R-etodolac (SDX-101), at clinically relevant concentrations, induces potent cytotoxicity in drug-sensitive multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines, as well as in dexamethasone (MM.1R)-, doxorubicin (Dox40/RPMI8226)-, and bortezomib (DHL4)-resistant cell lines. Immunoblot analysis demonstrates that R-etodolac induces apoptosis characterized by caspase-8, -9, and -3 and PARP (poly-ADP [adenosine diphosphate]-ribose polymerase) cleavage and down-regulation of cyclin D1 expression. Subcytotoxic doses of R-etodolac up-regulate myeloid cell leukemia-1 proapoptotic variant (Mcl-1S), while enhancing dexamethasone (Dex)-induced caspase activation and apoptosis. The combination of R-etodolac with Dex results in a highly synergistic cytotoxic effect. R-etodolac also induces apoptosis against primary cells isolated from patients with MM refractory to chemotherapy. Although interleukin 6 (IL-6) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) abrogate Dex-induced MM cell cytotoxicity, neither IL-6 nor IGF-1 protects against R-etodolac-induced cytotoxicity in MM cells. R-etodolac also inhibits viability of MM cells adherent to bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), thereby overcoming a mechanism of drug resistance commonly observed with other conventional chemotherapeutic agents. Our data, therefore, indicate that R-etodolac circumvents drug resistance in MM cells at clinically relevant concentrations, targets Mcl-1, and can be synergistically combined with Dex. (Blood. 2005;106:706-712) PMID:15802527

  15. The role of ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (USP14) in cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) of multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohong; Liu, Jing; Shen, Chaoyan; Ding, Linlin; Zhong, Fei; Ouyang, Yu; Wang, Yuchan; He, Song

    2017-01-01

    Cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) is one of the mechanisms underlying the drug resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). Ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (USP14) is downregulated in the apoptotic model and upregulated in the adhesive model of MM. This study was undertaken to determine the role of USP14 in CAM-DR of MM cells. We examined the expression of USP14 in the apoptotic model of MM. The mechanism of USP14 in the process of apoptosis was further explored by flow cytometry assay and co-immunoprecipitation. We then performed the cell co-culture and adhesion assay and cell viability assay to investigate the effect of USP14 on adhesive rate and drug resistance in MM. We discovered that USP14 played a negative role in cell apoptosis, which is correlated with Bcl-xl. Moreover, overexpression of USP14 in MM cell adhesion model could enhance the ability of cell adhesion by regulating Wnt-signaling pathways, thereby promoting the CAM-DR in MM. USP14 participates in CAM-DR of MM through acting as a bridge between Bcl-xl apoptotic pathway and Wnt-signaling pathways and may be represented as a good candidate for pursuing clinical trials in MM. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Efficacy of commonly used anthelmintics: first report of multiple drug resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    George, N; Persad, K; Sagam, R; Offiah, V N; Adesiyun, A A; Harewood, W; Lambie, N; Basu, A K

    2011-12-29

    In Trinidad, small ruminant farms are semi-intensively managed under tropical conditions which support the development and survival of the infective stages of the helminths. Local farmers use anthelmintics to control gastrointestinal nematodes frequently. Frequent use of anthelmintics has the potential to select for populations of nematodes resistance to those chemicals. Hence, an attempt was made to study the efficacy of commonly used drugs on gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep. Three farms situated in different counties in Trinidad were selected. Sheep aged 6-15 months and not treated with anthelmintics for a minimum of six months previous and with faecal egg count (FEC)>150 eggs per gram were selected for study. They were allocated into 5 groups, each consisting 10 animals. The Group TA animals were treated once with albendazole (5mg/kg. b.wt.), group TF with fenbendazole (5mg/kg.b.wt.), group TI animals with ivermectin (200 μg/kg b.wt.), group TL with levamisol (7.5mg/kg b.wt.). The group NTC animals were not given any drug and served as control. The number of nematode eggs per gram of faeces from each animal was determined before treatment and at 14 days after treatment. The anthelmintic susceptibility to different drugs was detected by FECRT (in vivo) with EPG recorded at 14 day post-treatment. The data analysis using FECRT revealed that efficacy of albendazole (46-62%), fenbendazole (44-61%) and levamisol (53-81%) were reduced compared to ivermectin (95-97%). An attempt has also been made to find a suitable method for calculation of FECR (%).

  17. Epigenetic Drugs for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Peedicayil, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that abnormalities in epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression contribute to the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). Advances in epigenetics have given rise to a new class of drugs, epigenetic drugs. Although many classes of epigenetic drugs are being investigated, at present most attention is being paid to two classes of epigenetic drugs: drugs that inhibit DNA methyltransferase (DNMTi) and drugs that inhibit histone deacetylase (HDACi). This paper discusses the potential use of epigenetic drugs in the treatment of MS, focusing on DNMTi and HDACi. Preclinical drug trials of DNMTi and HDACi for the treatment of MS are showing promising results. Epigenetic drugs could improve the clinical management of patients with MS.

  18. Multiple Introduction and Naturally Occuring Drug Resistance of HCV among HIV-Infected Intravenous Drug Users in Yunnan: An Origin of China’s HIV/HCV Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Ma, Yanling; Chen, Huichao; Luo, Hongbing; Dai, Jie; Song, Lijun; Yang, Chaojun; Mei, Jingyuan; Yang, Li; Dong, Lijuan; Jia, Manhong; Lu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) epidemic in China historically stemmed from intravenous drug users (IDUs) in Yunnan. Due to a shared transmission route, hepatitis C virus (HCV)/HIV-1 co-infection is common. Here, we investigated HCV genetic characteristics and baseline drug resistance among HIV-infected IDUs in Yunnan. Methods Blood samples of 432 HIV-1/HCV co-infected IDUs were collected from January to June 2014 in six prefectures of Yunnan Province. Partial E1E2 and NS5B genes were sequenced. Phylogenetic, evolutionary and genotypic drug resistance analyses were performed. Results Among the 293 specimens successfully genotyped, seven subtypes were identified, including subtypes 3b (37.9%, 111/293), 3a (21.8%, 64/293), 6n (14.0%, 41/293), 1b (10.6%, 31/293), 1a (8.2%, 24/293), 6a (5.1%, 15/293) and 6u (2.4%, 7/293). The distribution of HCV subtypes was mostly related to geographic location. Subtypes 3b, 3a, and 6n were detected in all six prefectures, however, the other four subtypes were detected only in parts of the six prefectures. Phylogeographic analyses indicated that 6n, 1a and 6u originated in the western prefecture (Dehong) and spread eastward and showed genetic relatedness with those detected in Burmese. However, 6a originated in the southeast prefectures (Honghe and Wenshan) bordering Vietnam and was transmitted westward. These subtypes exhibited different evolutionary rates (between 4.35×10−4 and 2.38×10−3 substitutions site-1 year-1) and times of most recent common ancestor (tMRCA, between 1790.3 and 1994.6), suggesting that HCV was multiply introduced into Yunnan. Naturally occurring resistance-associated mutations (C316N, A421V, C445F, I482L, V494A, and V499A) to NS5B polymerase inhibitors were detected in direct-acting antivirals (DAAs)-naïve IDUs. Conclusion This work reveals the temporal-spatial distribution of HCV subtypes and baseline HCV drug resistance among HIV-infected IDUs in Yunnan. The findings enhance our

  19. Induction of multiple pleiotropic drug resistance genes in yeast engineered to produce an increased level of anti-malarial drug precursor, artemisinic acid

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Dae-Kyun; Ouellet, Mario; Paradise, Eric M; Burd, Helcio; Eng, Diana; Paddon, Chris J; Newman, Jack D; Keasling, Jay D

    2008-01-01

    Background Due to the global occurrence of multi-drug-resistant malarial parasites (Plasmodium falciparum), the anti-malarial drug most effective against malaria is artemisinin, a natural product (sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide) extracted from sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua). However, artemisinin is in short supply and unaffordable to most malaria patients. Artemisinin can be semi-synthesized from its precursor artemisinic acid, which can be synthesized from simple sugars using microorganisms genetically engineered with genes from A. annua. In order to develop an industrially competent yeast strain, detailed analyses of microbial physiology and development of gene expression strategies are required. Results Three plant genes coding for amorphadiene synthase, amorphadiene oxidase (AMO or CYP71AV1), and cytochrome P450 reductase, which in concert divert carbon flux from farnesyl diphosphate to artemisinic acid, were expressed from a single plasmid. The artemisinic acid production in the engineered yeast reached 250 μg mL-1 in shake-flask cultures and 1 g L-1 in bio-reactors with the use of Leu2d selection marker and appropriate medium formulation. When plasmid stability was measured, the yeast strain synthesizing amorphadiene alone maintained the plasmid in 84% of the cells, whereas the yeast strain synthesizing artemisinic acid showed poor plasmid stability. Inactivation of AMO by a point-mutation restored the high plasmid stability, indicating that the low plasmid stability is not caused by production of the AMO protein but by artemisinic acid synthesis or accumulation. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and quantitative real time-PCR consistently showed that pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) genes, belonging to the family of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter, were massively induced in the yeast strain producing artemisinic acid, relative to the yeast strain producing the hydrocarbon amorphadiene alone. Global transcriptional analysis by

  20. Drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra K; Jain, Amita; Malhotra, Hardeep S; Agrawal, Avinash; Garg, Rajiv

    2013-06-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis, including drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis, is an emerging health problem in many countries. An association with Beijing strains and drug resistance-related mutations, such as mutations in katG and rpoB genes, has been found. The pathology, clinical features and neuroimaging characteristics of drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis are similar to drug-responsive tuberculous meningitis. Detection of mycobacteria in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by conventional methods (smear examination or culture) is often difficult. Nucleic acid amplification assays are better methods owing to their rapidity and high sensitivity. The Xpert MTB/RIF assay (Cepheid, CA, USA) is a fully-automated test that has also been found to be effective for CSF samples. Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculous meningitis depends on the drug susceptibility pattern of the isolate and/or the previous treatment history of the patient. Second-line drugs with good penetration of the CSF should be preferred. Isoniazid monoresistant disease requires addition of another drug with better CSF penetration. Drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis is associated with a high mortality. HIV infected patients with drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis have severe clinical manifestations with exceptionally high mortality. Prevention of tuberculosis is the key to reduce drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis.

  1. A new system for parallel drug screening against multiple-resistant HIV mutants based on lentiviral self-inactivating (SIN) vectors and multi-colour analyses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite progress in the development of combined antiretroviral therapies (cART), HIV infection remains a significant challenge for human health. Current problems of cART include multi-drug-resistant virus variants, long-term toxicity and enormous treatment costs. Therefore, the identification of novel effective drugs is urgently needed. Methods We developed a straightforward screening approach for simultaneously evaluating the sensitivity of multiple HIV gag-pol mutants to antiviral drugs in one assay. Our technique is based on multi-colour lentiviral self-inactivating (SIN) LeGO vector technology. Results We demonstrated the successful use of this approach for screening compounds against up to four HIV gag-pol variants (wild-type and three mutants) simultaneously. Importantly, the technique was adapted to Biosafety Level 1 conditions by utilising ecotropic pseudotypes. This allowed upscaling to a large-scale screening protocol exploited by pharmaceutical companies in a successful proof-of-concept experiment. Conclusions The technology developed here facilitates fast screening for anti-HIV activity of individual agents from large compound libraries. Although drugs targeting gag-pol variants were used here, our approach permits screening compounds that target several different, key cellular and viral functions of the HIV life-cycle. The modular principle of the method also allows the easy exchange of various mutations in HIV sequences. In conclusion, the methodology presented here provides a valuable new approach for the identification of novel anti-HIV drugs. PMID:23286882

  2. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, David C.; Jacoby, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  3. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large.

  4. Evaluation of direct microplate nitrate reductase assay as a rapid method for the detection of multiple and extensively tuberculosis drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Abilleira, Fernanda; Brum, Clarice; von Groll, Andrea; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Reports of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to multiple drugs are increasing globally and laboratories are becoming increasingly aware of the need for drug susceptibility testing. In recent years, due to the long time required by conventional drug susceptibility testing, new approaches have been proposed for faster detection of drug resistance, such as the nitrate reductase assay, considered fast and inexpensive, making it a good diagnostic tool for low resource countries. The present study proposed a fast direct colorimetric drug susceptibility testing method in a microplate format using solid medium. The diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by comparing the proportion method with the direct nitrate reductase assay in plates. Frozen sputum samples, known to be positive, were decontaminated and processed by Petroff method. The decontaminated suspension was used to perform direct nitrate reductase assay in 7H11 medium using 1 µ g/ml rifampicin (RIF), 0.2 µg/ml isoniazid (INH), 2 µg/ml ofloxacin (OFX), 6 µg/ml kanamycin (KAN), 2 µg/ml amikacin (AMK) and 10 µg/ml capreomycin (CAP). Eighty-four samples were tested and the results for 69% of them were available within 21 days. The sensitivity and specificity compared to the proportion method, was 98.5% and 100% for INH, 98.3% and 96.2% for RIF, 91.7% and 100% for KAN, 78.8% and 97.3% for OFX, 100% and 100% for AMK and CAP, respectively. The results lead to the conclusion that direct nitrate reductase assay, in this new format, is an accurate, quick and inexpensive method to determine the susceptibility profile of M. tuberculosis and may become an alternative for countries with limited resources.

  5. Atomic modelling and systematic mutagenesis identify residues in multiple drug binding sites that are essential for drug resistance in the major Candida transporter Cdr1.

    PubMed

    Nim, Shweta; Lobato, Lucia Gonzalez; Moreno, Alexis; Chaptal, Vincent; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Falson, Pierre; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-11-01

    The ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) transporter Cdr1 (Candida drug resistance 1) protein (Cdr1p) of Candida albicans, shows promiscuity towards the substrate it exports and plays a major role in antifungal resistance. It has two transmembrane domains (TMDs) comprising of six transmembrane helices (TMH) that envisage and confer the substrate specificity and two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), interconnected by extracellular loops (ECLs) and intracellular loops (ICLs) Cdr1p. This study explores the diverse substrate specificity spectrum to get a deeper insight into the structural and functional features of Cdr1p. By screening with the variety of compounds towards an in-house TMH 252 mutant library of Cdr1p, we establish new substrates of Cdr1p. The localization of substrate-susceptible mutants in an ABCG5/G8 homology model highlights the common and specific binding pockets inside the membrane domain, where rhodamines and tetrazoliums mainly engage the N-moiety of Cdr1p, binding between TMH 2, 11 and surrounded by TMH 1, 5. Whereas, tin chlorides involve both N and C moieties located at the interface of TMH 2, 11, 1 and 5. Further, screening of the in house TMH mutant library of Cdr1p displays the TMH12 interaction with tetrazolium chloride, trimethyltin chloride and a Ca(2+) ionophore, A23187. In silico localization reveals a binding site at the TMH 12, 9 and 10 interface, which is widely exposed to the lipid interface. Together, for the first time, our study shows the molecular localization of Cdr1p substrates-binding sites and demonstrates the participation of TMH12 in a peripheral drug binding site.

  6. Multiple recognition of various amphiphilic molecules by the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein: molecular mechanisms and pharmacological consequences coming from functional interactions between various drugs.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, S; Garrigos, M

    1999-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an active, ATP-dependent plasma membrane transporter which is responsible for the expulsion of various cytotoxic drugs with different chemical structures out of resistant (MDR) cells. It is also capable of transporting a number of other amphiphilic molecules, the so-called MDR-reversing agents, which belong to a very broad variety of chemical families. Moreover, P-gp can also play a role in steroid secretion and cellular detoxification by transporting various other substrates. In this review, we address the problem of the multiple recognition by P-gp of such a large number of amphiphilic molecules. This is both (i) from a basic viewpoint in order to discuss the underlying molecular mechanisms explaining how the general rule of substrate-enzyme specificity can be violated, and (ii) from a more applied pharmacological viewpoint to show in detail how the interaction of various drugs with P-gp leads to important consequences in terms of the relative effects of these drugs in the anticancer chemotherapy context, as well as for their pharmacokinetic distributions in the whole organism, rationalizing possible adverse drug reactions. In particular, we will present evidence that, independently of the technique used, the mutual interactions between P-gp transport substrates cannot always be reduced to simple competitive effects.

  7. Relationship between multiple drug resistance and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from medical and non-medical personnel in Yaounde, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Eyoh, Agnes Bedie; Toukam, Michel; Atashili, Julius; Fokunang, Charles; Gonsu, Hortense; Lyonga, Emilia Enjema; Mandi, Henshaw; Ikomey, George; Mukwele, Bertha; Mesembe, Martha; Assoumou, Marie Claire Okomo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Monitoring the prevalence of nasal carriage of multiple drug resistance (MDR) Staphylococcus aureus (SA) strains in hospital personnel is essential. These strains when transmitted from hospital personnel to patients with already weakened immune states or in-built medical devices, may limit the latter's treatment options. This study aimed at assessing the potential exposure of patients to these MDR SA in a resource-limited hospital setting by assessing the prevalence and relationship between antimicrobial susceptibility and biofilm forming capacity of SA isolates from hospital personnel. Methods A total of 59 bacteria isolates phenotypically identified as Staphylococcus aureus obtained from medical (39) and non-medical personnel (20) in Yaounde were used in the study. Multiple drug resistance defined as resistance to four or more of twelve locally used antibiotics were determined by Kirby Bauer disc diffusion technique whereas quantification of biofilm production was by the microtitre plate method. Results Among the 59 SA isolates, the prevalence of MDR was 50.9%. Among medical personnel 48.7% had MDR as against 55.9% for non-medical personnel (p-value=0.648). The overall percentage of weak biofilm producers was 35.6%. Although the prevalence of weak biofilm formers was higher in isolates from non-medical personnel (40%) than medical personnel (33.3%) the difference was not statistically significant (p-value= 0.246). Slightly less than half (42.9%) of the weak biofilm producers were MDR. Conclusion Considering the high rates of MDR and that slightly less than half of biofilm formers were MDR, these trends need to be monitored regularly among hospital personnel in Yaounde. PMID:25396012

  8. Fosfomycin, interesting alternative drug for treatment of urinary tract infections created by multiple drug resistant and extended spectrum β-lactamase producing strains

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh-Sefidan, Fatemeh; Ghotaslou, Reza; Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Mohammadzadeh-Asl, Yalda; Bannazadeh Baghi, Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The emergence and spread of multidrug resistant (MDR) and extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing strains reduces the number of effective drugs that can be used for treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility profile of Enterobacteriaceae isolated from UTIs, specifically MDR and ESBL producing strains, to fosfomycin and other antibiotics. Materials and Methods: The study was performed during a 6 month period (February 2014 to August 2015). A total of 219 non-duplicate urinary isolates of Enterobacteriaceae were collected. Identification and susceptibility testing was done according to standard microbiological procedures and the Kirby-Bauer test, respectively. Based on the results obtained from susceptibility testing, MDR bacteria were recovered and identification of ESBL production was done according to CLSI recommendation. Results: Isolates of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. were responsible for 80.8% and 12.8% of patients with UTIs respectively. The rates of resistance to ampicillin, cefazolin, nalidixic acid, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were 86.3%, 79.4%, 68.5% and 63.9% respectively. In contrast, high sensitivity rates were detected to fosfomycin, amikacin and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid with 97.3%, 91.8% and 80.8%, respectively. Of all isolates, 167 (76.3%) were detected as MDR and 75 (34.2%) as ESBL producing strains. Conclusion: The rate of antibiotic resistance among uropathogens Enterobacteriaceae is remarkably high. The most effective antibiotic was fosfomycin. Moreover, susceptibility to fosfomycin is over 90% for MDR and ESBL producer isolates. Therefore, fosfomycin can be a good option for treating UTIs. PMID:27307978

  9. Cx43 expressed on bone marrow stromal cells plays an essential role in multiple myeloma cell survival and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Connexin-43 (Cx43), a connexin constituent of gap junctions (GJs) is mainly expressed in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and played a important role on hematopoiesis. In this study, we explored the role of gap junctions (GJs) formed by Cx43 between BMSCs and multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Material and methods qPCR and western blot assays were employed to assay Cx43 expression in three MM cell lines (RPMI 8266, U266, and XG7), freshly isolated MM cells, and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Cx43 mRNA and proteins were detected in all three MM cell lines and six out of seven freshly isolated MM cells. Resuths The BMSCs from MM patients expressed Cx43 at higher levels than of normal donor (ND-BMSCs). Dye transfer assays demonstrated that gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) occurring via Cx43 situated between MM and BMSCs is functional. Cytometry beads array (CBA) assays showed that cytokines production changed when the ND-BMSCs were co-cultured with MM cells, especially the levels of IL-6, SDF-1α and IL-10 were higher than those the cells cultured alone and decreased significantly in the presence of GJ inhibitor heptanol. Our results demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of BTZ to MM cells decreased significantly in the presence of BMSCs, an effect that was partially recovered in the presence of GJ inhibitor. Conclusions Our data suggest that GJIC between MM and BMSCs is a critical factor in tumor cell proliferation and drug sensitivity, and is implicated in MM pathogenesis. PMID:28144277

  10. HIV-1 drug resistance and resistance testing.

    PubMed

    Clutter, Dana S; Jordan, Michael R; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Shafer, Robert W

    2016-12-01

    The global scale-up of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy (ART) has led to dramatic reductions in HIV-1 mortality and incidence. However, HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) poses a potential threat to the long-term success of ART and is emerging as a threat to the elimination of AIDS as a public health problem by 2030. In this review we describe the genetic mechanisms, epidemiology, and management of HIVDR at both individual and population levels across diverse economic and geographic settings. To describe the genetic mechanisms of HIVDR, we review the genetic barriers to resistance for the most commonly used ARVs and describe the extent of cross-resistance between them. To describe the epidemiology of HIVDR, we summarize the prevalence and patterns of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and acquired drug resistance (ADR) in both high-income and low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We also review to two categories of HIVDR with important public health relevance: (i) pre-treatment drug resistance (PDR), a World Health Organization-recommended HIVDR surveillance metric and (ii) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)-related drug resistance, a type of ADR that can impact clinical outcomes if present at the time of treatment initiation. To summarize the implications of HIVDR for patient management, we review the role of genotypic resistance testing and treatment practices in both high-income and LMIC settings. In high-income countries where drug resistance testing is part of routine care, such an understanding can help clinicians prevent virological failure and accumulation of further HIVDR on an individual level by selecting the most efficacious regimens for their patients. Although there is reduced access to diagnostic testing and to many ARVs in LMIC, understanding the scientific basis and clinical implications of HIVDR is useful in all regions in order to shape appropriate surveillance, inform treatment algorithms, and manage difficult cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  11. Cbl-b inhibits P-gp transporter function by preventing its translocation into caveolae in multiple drug-resistant gastric and breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Qu, Xiujuan; Teng, Yuee; Li, Zhi; Xu, Ling; Liu, Jing; Ma, Yanju; Fan, Yibo; Li, Ce; Liu, Shizhou; Wang, Zhenning; Hu, Xuejun; Zhang, Jingdong; Liu, Yunpeng

    2015-03-30

    The transport function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) requires its efficient localization to caveolae, a subset of lipid rafts, and disruption of caveolae suppresses P-gp transport function. However, the regulatory molecules involved in the translocation of P-gp into caveolae remain unknown. In the present study, we showed that c-Src dependent Caveolin-1 phosphorylation promoted the translocation of P-gp into caveolae, resulting in multidrug resistance in adriamycin resistant gastric cancer SGC7901/Adr and breast cancer MCF-7/Adr cells. In a negative feedback loop, the translocation of Cbl-b from the nucleus to the cytoplasm prevented the localization of P-gp to caveolae resulting in the reversal of MDR through the ubiquitination and degradation of c-Src. Clinical data showed a significant positive relationship between Cbl-b expression and survival in P-gp positive breast cancer patients who received anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Our findings identified a new regulatory mechanism of P-gp transport function in multiple drug-resistant gastric and breast cancers.

  12. Dissemination of Multiple Drug Resistance Genes by Class 1 Integrons in Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates from Four Countries: a Comparative Study ▿

    PubMed Central

    Roy Chowdhury, Piklu; Ingold, Ana; Vanegas, Natasha; Martínez, Elena; Merlino, John; Merkier, Andrea Karina; Castro, Mercedes; González Rocha, Gerardo; Borthagaray, Graciela; Centrón, Daniela; Bello Toledo, Helia; Márquez, Carolina M.; Stokes, H. W.

    2011-01-01

    A comparative genetic analysis of 42 clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates, resistant to two or more antibiotics belonging to the broad-spectrum β-lactam group, sourced from Sydney, Australia, and three South American countries is presented. The study focuses on the genetic contexts of class 1 integrons, mobilizable genetic elements best known for their role in the rapid evolution of antibiotic resistance among Gram-negative pathogens. It was found that the class 1 integrons in this cohort were located in a number of different genetic contexts with clear regional differences. In Sydney, IS26-associated Tn21-like transposons on IncL/M plasmids contribute greatly to the dispersal of integron-associated multiple-drug-resistant (MDR) loci. In contrast, in the South American countries, Tn1696-like transposons on an IncA/C plasmid(s) appeared to be disseminating a characteristic MDR region. A range of mobile genetic elements is clearly being recruited by clinically important mobile class 1 integrons, and these elements appear to be becoming more common with time. This in turn is driving the evolution of complex and laterally mobile MDR units and may further complicate antibiotic therapy. PMID:21518841

  13. Mechanisms of Antifungal Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cowen, Leah E.; Sanglard, Dominique; Howard, Susan J.; Rogers, P. David; Perlin, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Antifungal therapy is a central component of patient management for acute and chronic mycoses. Yet, treatment choices are restricted because of the sparse number of antifungal drug classes. Clinical management of fungal diseases is further compromised by the emergence of antifungal drug resistance, which eliminates available drug classes as treatment options. Once considered a rare occurrence, antifungal drug resistance is on the rise in many high-risk medical centers. Most concerning is the evolution of multidrug- resistant organisms refractory to several different classes of antifungal agents, especially among common Candida species. The mechanisms responsible are mostly shared by both resistant strains displaying inherently reduced susceptibility and those acquiring resistance during therapy. The molecular mechanisms include altered drug affinity and target abundance, reduced intracellular drug levels caused by efflux pumps, and formation of biofilms. New insights into genetic factors regulating these mechanisms, as well as cellular factors important for stress adaptation, provide a foundation to better understand the emergence of antifungal drug resistance. PMID:25384768

  14. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Multiple Drug-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Mastitis-Infected Goats: An Alternative Approach for Antimicrobial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yu-Guo; Peng, Qiu-Ling; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2017-01-01

    Recently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely used in various applications as antimicrobial agents, anticancer, diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labels, and drug delivery systems for the treatment of various diseases. Microorganisms generally acquire resistance to antibiotics through the course of antibacterial therapy. Multi-drug resistance (MDR) has become a growing problem in the treatment of infectious diseases, and the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance by numerous human and animal bacterial pathogens. As a result, an increasing number of microorganisms are resistant to multiple antibiotics causing continuing economic losses in dairy farming. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative, cost-effective, and efficient antimicrobial agents that overcome antimicrobial resistance. Here, AgNPs synthesized using the bio-molecule quercetin were characterized using various analytical techniques. The synthesized AgNPs were highly spherical in shape and had an average size of 11 nm. We evaluated the efficacy of synthesized AgNPs against two MDR pathogenic bacteria, namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which were isolated from milk samples produced by mastitis-infected goats. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of AgNPs against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were found to be 1 and 2 μg/mL, respectively. Our findings suggest that AgNPs exert antibacterial effects in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Results from the present study demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of AgNPs is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), and leakage of proteins and sugars in bacterial cells. Results of the present study showed that AgNP-treated bacteria had significantly lower lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH) and lower adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels compared to the control. Furthermore, AgNP-treated bacteria

  15. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Multiple Drug-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Mastitis-Infected Goats: An Alternative Approach for Antimicrobial Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yu-Guo; Peng, Qiu-Ling; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2017-03-06

    Recently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely used in various applications as antimicrobial agents, anticancer, diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labels, and drug delivery systems for the treatment of various diseases. Microorganisms generally acquire resistance to antibiotics through the course of antibacterial therapy. Multi-drug resistance (MDR) has become a growing problem in the treatment of infectious diseases, and the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance by numerous human and animal bacterial pathogens. As a result, an increasing number of microorganisms are resistant to multiple antibiotics causing continuing economic losses in dairy farming. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative, cost-effective, and efficient antimicrobial agents that overcome antimicrobial resistance. Here, AgNPs synthesized using the bio-molecule quercetin were characterized using various analytical techniques. The synthesized AgNPs were highly spherical in shape and had an average size of 11 nm. We evaluated the efficacy of synthesized AgNPs against two MDR pathogenic bacteria, namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which were isolated from milk samples produced by mastitis-infected goats. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of AgNPs against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were found to be 1 and 2 μg/mL, respectively. Our findings suggest that AgNPs exert antibacterial effects in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Results from the present study demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of AgNPs is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), and leakage of proteins and sugars in bacterial cells. Results of the present study showed that AgNP-treated bacteria had significantly lower lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH) and lower adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels compared to the control. Furthermore, AgNP-treated bacteria

  16. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Drug-Resistance Determinants.

    PubMed

    Volkman, Sarah K; Herman, Jonathan; Lukens, Amanda K; Hartl, Daniel L

    2017-03-01

    Population genetic strategies that leverage association, selection, and linkage have identified drug-resistant loci. However, challenges and limitations persist in identifying drug-resistance loci in malaria. In this review we discuss the genetic basis of drug resistance and the use of genome-wide association studies, complemented by selection and linkage studies, to identify and understand mechanisms of drug resistance and response. We also discuss the implications of nongenetic mechanisms of drug resistance recently reported in the literature, and present models of the interplay between nongenetic and genetic processes that contribute to the emergence of drug resistance. Throughout, we examine artemisinin resistance as an example to emphasize challenges in identifying phenotypes suitable for population genetic studies as well as complications due to multiple-factor drug resistance. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Why does drug resistance readily evolve but vaccine resistance does not?

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David A; Read, Andrew F

    2017-03-29

    Why is drug resistance common and vaccine resistance rare? Drugs and vaccines both impose substantial pressure on pathogen populations to evolve resistance and indeed, drug resistance typically emerges soon after the introduction of a drug. But vaccine resistance has only rarely emerged. Using well-established principles of population genetics and evolutionary ecology, we argue that two key differences between vaccines and drugs explain why vaccines have so far proved more robust against evolution than drugs. First, vaccines tend to work prophylactically while drugs tend to work therapeutically. Second, vaccines tend to induce immune responses against multiple targets on a pathogen while drugs tend to target very few. Consequently, pathogen populations generate less variation for vaccine resistance than they do for drug resistance, and selection has fewer opportunities to act on that variation. When vaccine resistance has evolved, these generalities have been violated. With careful forethought, it may be possible to identify vaccines at risk of failure even before they are introduced.

  18. [Drug resistant epilepsy. Clinical and neurobiological concepts].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jovel, Camilo A; Sobrino-Mejía, Fidel E

    2015-08-16

    Drug-resistant epilepsy, is a condition defined by the International League Against Epilepsy as persistent seizures despite having used at least two appropriate and adequate antiepileptic drug treatments. Approximately 20-30% of patients with epilepsy are going to be resistant to antiepileptic drugs, with different patterns of clinical presentation, which are related to the biological basis of this disease (de novo resistance, relapsing-remitting and progressive). Drug resistant epilepsy, impacts negatively the quality of life and significantly increases the risk of premature death. From the neurobiological point of view, this medical condition is the result of the interaction of multiple variables related to the underlying disease, drug interactions and proper genetic aspects of each patient. Thanks to advances in pharmacogenetics and molecular biology research, currently some hypotheses may explain the cause of this condition and promote the study of new therapeutic options. Currently, overexpression of membrane transporters such as P-glycoprotein, appears to be one of the most important mechanisms in the development of drug resistant epilepsy. The objective of this review is to deepen the general aspects of this clinical condition, addressing the definition, epidemiology, differential diagnosis and the pathophysiological bases.

  19. Targeted inhibition of the immunoproteasome is a potent strategy against models of multiple myeloma that overcomes resistance to conventional drugs and nonspecific proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Deborah J.; Hunsucker, Sally A.; Chen, Qing; Voorhees, Peter M.; Orlowski, Marian

    2009-01-01

    Proteasome inhibition is a validated strategy for therapy of multiple myeloma, but this disease remains challenging as relapses are common, and often associated with increasing chemoresistance. Moreover, nonspecific proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib can induce peripheral neuropathy and other toxicities that may compromise the ability to deliver therapy at full doses, thereby decreasing efficacy. One novel approach may be to target the immunoproteasome, a proteasomal variant found predominantly in cells of hematopoietic origin that differs from the constitutive proteasome found in most other cell types. Using purified preparations of constitutive and immunoproteasomes, we screened a rationally designed series of peptidyl-aldehydes and identified several with relative specificity for the immunoproteasome. The most potent immunoproteasome-specific inhibitor, IPSI-001, preferentially targeted the β1i subunit of the immunoproteasome in vitro and in cellulo in a dose-dependent manner. This agent induced accumulation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates, proapoptotic proteins, and activated caspase-mediated apoptosis. IPSI-001 potently inhibited proliferation in myeloma patient samples and other hematologic malignancies. Importantly, IPSI-001 was able to overcome conventional and novel drug resistance, including resistance to bortezomib. These findings provide a rationale for the translation of IPSIs to the clinic, where they may provide antimyeloma activity with greater specificity and less toxicity than current inhibitors. PMID:19050304

  20. Communicating trends in resistance using a drug resistance index.

    PubMed

    Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Klugman, Keith P

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem worldwide, but communicating this challenge to policymakers and non-experts is complicated by the multiplicity of bacterial pathogens and the distinct classes of antibiotics used to treat them. It is difficult, even for experts aware of the pharmacodynamics of antibiotics, to infer the seriousness of resistance without information on how commonly the antibiotic is being used and whether alternative antibiotics are available. Difficulty in aggregating resistance to multiple drugs to assess trends poses a further challenge to quantifying and communicating changes in resistance over time and across locations. Methods We developed a method for aggregating bacterial resistance to multiple antibiotics, creating an index comparable to the composite economic indices that measure consumer prices and stock market values. The resulting drug resistance index (DRI) and various subindices show antibiotic resistance and consumption trends in the USA but can be applied at any geographical level. Findings The DRI based on use patterns in 1999 for Escherichia coli rose from 0.25 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.26) to 0.30 (95% CI 0.29 to 0.32) between 1999 and 2006. However, the adaptive DRI, which includes treatment of baseline resistant strains with alternative agents, climbed from 0.25 to 0.27 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.28) during that period. In contrast, both the static-use and the adaptive DRIs for Acinetobacter spp. rose from 0.41 (95% CI 0.4 to 0.42) to 0.48 (95% CI 0.46 to 0.49) between 1999 and 2006. Interpretation Divergence between the static-use and the adaptive-use DRIs for E coli reflects the ability of physicians to adapt to increasing resistance. However, antibiotic use patterns did not change much in response to growing resistance to Acinetobacter spp. because physicians were unable to adapt; new drugs for Acinetobacter spp. are therefore needed. Composite indices that aggregate resistance to various drugs can be useful for assessing

  1. Communicating trends in resistance using a drug resistance index

    PubMed Central

    Klugman, Keith P

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem worldwide, but communicating this challenge to policymakers and non-experts is complicated by the multiplicity of bacterial pathogens and the distinct classes of antibiotics used to treat them. It is difficult, even for experts aware of the pharmacodynamics of antibiotics, to infer the seriousness of resistance without information on how commonly the antibiotic is being used and whether alternative antibiotics are available. Difficulty in aggregating resistance to multiple drugs to assess trends poses a further challenge to quantifying and communicating changes in resistance over time and across locations. Methods We developed a method for aggregating bacterial resistance to multiple antibiotics, creating an index comparable to the composite economic indices that measure consumer prices and stock market values. The resulting drug resistance index (DRI) and various subindices show antibiotic resistance and consumption trends in the USA but can be applied at any geographical level. Findings The DRI based on use patterns in 1999 for Escherichia coli rose from 0.25 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.26) to 0.30 (95% CI 0.29 to 0.32) between 1999 and 2006. However, the adaptive DRI, which includes treatment of baseline resistant strains with alternative agents, climbed from 0.25 to 0.27 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.28) during that period. In contrast, both the static-use and the adaptive DRIs for Acinetobacter spp. rose from 0.41 (95% CI 0.4 to 0.42) to 0.48 (95% CI 0.46 to 0.49) between 1999 and 2006. Interpretation Divergence between the static-use and the adaptive-use DRIs for E coli reflects the ability of physicians to adapt to increasing resistance. However, antibiotic use patterns did not change much in response to growing resistance to Acinetobacter spp. because physicians were unable to adapt; new drugs for Acinetobacter spp. are therefore needed. Composite indices that aggregate resistance to various drugs can be useful for assessing

  2. Drug resistance in eukaryotic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Fairlamb, Alan H; Gow, Neil A R; Matthews, Keith R; Waters, Andrew P

    2016-06-24

    Eukaryotic microbial pathogens are major contributors to illness and death globally. Although much of their impact can be controlled by drug therapy as with prokaryotic microorganisms, the emergence of drug resistance has threatened these treatment efforts. Here, we discuss the challenges posed by eukaryotic microbial pathogens and how these are similar to, or differ from, the challenges of prokaryotic antibiotic resistance. The therapies used for several major eukaryotic microorganisms are then detailed, and the mechanisms that they have evolved to overcome these therapies are described. The rapid emergence of resistance and the restricted pipeline of new drug therapies pose considerable risks to global health and are particularly acute in the developing world. Nonetheless, we detail how the integration of new technology, biological understanding, epidemiology and evolutionary analysis can help sustain existing therapies, anticipate the emergence of resistance or optimize the deployment of new therapies.

  3. Drug resistance in eukaryotic microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Fairlamb, Alan H.; Gow, Neil A. R.; Matthews, Keith R.; Waters, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic microbial pathogens are major contributors to illness and death globally. Although much of their impact can be controlled by drug therapy as with prokaryotic microorganisms, the emergence of drug resistance has threatened these treatment efforts. Here, we discuss the challenges posed by eukaryotic microbial pathogens and how these are similar to, or differ from, the challenges of prokaryotic antibiotic resistance. The therapies used for several major eukaryotic microorganisms are then detailed, and the mechanisms that they have evolved to overcome these therapies are described. The rapid emergence of resistance and the restricted pipeline of new drug therapies pose considerable risks to global health and are particularly acute in the developing world. Nonetheless, we detail how the integration of new technology, biological understanding, epidemiology and evolutionary analysis can help sustain existing therapies, anticipate the emergence of resistance or optimize the deployment of new therapies. PMID:27572976

  4. Update on Antifungal Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shor, Erika; Zhao, Yanan

    2015-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections remain a major source of global morbidity and mortality, especially among patients with underlying immune suppression. Successful patient management requires antifungal therapy. Yet, treatment choices are restricted due to limited classes of antifungal agents and the emergence of antifungal drug resistance. In some settings, the evolution of multidrug-resistant strains insensitive to several classes of antifungal agents is a major concern. The resistance mechanisms responsible for acquired resistance are well characterized and include changes in drug target affinity and abundance, and reduction in the intracellular level of drug by biofilms and efflux pumps. The development of high-level and multidrug resistance occurs through a stepwise evolution of diverse mechanisms. The genetic factors that influence these mechanisms are emerging and they form a complex symphony of cellular interactions that enable the cell to adapt and/or overcome drug-induced stress. Drivers of resistance involve a complex blend of host and microbial factors. Understanding these mechanisms will facilitate development of better diagnostics and therapeutic strategies to overcome and prevent antifungal resistance. PMID:26120512

  5. Ribavirin: a drug active against many viruses with multiple effects on virus replication and propagation. Molecular basis of ribavirin resistance.

    PubMed

    Beaucourt, Stéphanie; Vignuzzi, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Ribavirin has proven to be effective against several viruses in the clinical setting and a multitude of viruses in vitro. With up to five different proposed mechanisms of action, recent advances have begun to discern the hierarchy of antiviral effects at play depending on the virus and the host conditions under scrutiny. Studies reveal that for many viruses, antiviral mechanisms may differ depending on cell type in vitro and in vivo. Further analyses are thus required to accurately identify mechanisms to more optimally determine clinical treatments. In recent years, a growing number of ribavirin resistant and sensitive variants have been identified. These variants not only inform on the specific mechanisms by which ribavirin enfeebles the virus, but also can themselves be tools to identify new antiviral compounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Multiple-drug resistant Trypanosoma congolense populations in village cattle of Metekel district, north-west Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Afewerk, Y; Clausen, P H; Abebe, G; Tilahun, G; Mehlitz, D

    2000-10-02

    Investigations were carried out to determine the prophylactic activity of isometamidium chloride in village populations of cattle naturally infected with trypanosomes in Metekel district, northwest Ethiopia. In a cross-sectional study in March 1997, 484 randomly selected cattle from four villages were examined for trypanosome infections by the dark ground/phase contrast buffy coat technique (BCT). The trypanosome prevalence was 17.2%. Trypanosoma congolense was the dominant species accounting for 47.6% of the overall infections. Fifty parasitaemic cattle from two villages were treated with isometainidium chloride (Trypamidium(R)) at a prophylactic dose of 1.0 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) and thereafter monitored on a monthly basis for parasitaemia. Trypanosomes were detected in six cattle within 1 month and in 18 cattle within 2 months of treatment. Twenty three percent (6/26) of cattle infected with T. congolense at the time of treatment were detected parasitaemic with this trypanosome species 1 month after treatment. Mice were infected with three T. congolense isolates obtained from cattle which were detected parasitaemic within one or 2 months after isometamidium treatment. The mice were subsequently treated with ranges of doses of isometamidium chloride or diminazene aceturate (Berenil(R)) and thereafter monitored for parasitaemia for a period of 60 days. Isometamidium chloride at doses of 0.5-4.0 mg/kg b.w. and diminazene aceturate at doses of 3.5-28.0 mg/kg b.w. failed to cure T. congolense infections in any of the animals. Three clones were derived from one of the isolates; each clone expressed high levels of resistance to both trypanocides when tested in mice. Based on these results it is concluded that the prophylactic activity of isometamidium is greatly reduced for some of the T. congolense populations present in the area, and in addition there is resistance to diminazene aceturate in this trypanosome species.

  7. [Polymorphisms of the multiple drug resistance gene (MDR1) in Mapuche, Mestizo and Maori populations in Chile].

    PubMed

    Wielandt, Ana María; Vollrath, Valeska; Chianale, José

    2004-09-01

    There are significant differences in drug responses among different ethnic groups. The multidrug transporter P-gp, encoded by the MDR1 gene, plays a key role in determining drug bioavailability, and an association between a polymorphism in exon 26 (C3435T) and lower P-gp expression has been found. The co-segregation of this polymorphism with the polymorphism in exon 12 (C1236T) and in exon 21 (G2677T/A) determines several MDR1 haplotypes in humans. To characterize the polymorphisms of exons 26, 21 and 12 of the MDR1 gene in different Chilean populations. Using a polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism technique, we studied the allelic frequencies and the distribution of MDR1 haplotypes in 3 Chilean populations: Mestizo (n=104), Mapuche (n=96, living in the National Reservation of the Huapi Island, Ranico Lake) and Maori (n=52, living in Eastern Island). The frequency of the normal MDR1*1 haplotype, without mutations, was lower in Mapuches than in Mestizos or Maoris (p<0.005) but similar to that reported in Asian population (p=0.739), probably due to the Asian origin of the Amerindian populations. In addition, the MDR1*l haplotype fequency hin Mestizos was similar to the frequency reported in Caucasians (p=0.49), in agreement with the origin of our population, with a strong influence of Caucasian genes from the Spanish conquerors. The MDR1*2 haplotype distribution, with the three polymoyphisms and probably lower multidrug transporter expression, was similar in the three Chilean populations studied (p>0.0.5), but lower than the frequencies reported in Caucasians or Asians (p<0.05). We found significant differences in the frequencies of genetic polymorphisms of the MDR1 gene in Chilean populations, related to the ethnic origins of our ancestors.

  8. Exploiting Nanotechnology to Overcome Tumor Drug Resistance: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Kirtane, Ameya; Kalscheuer, Stephen; Panyam, Jayanth

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells develop resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs through multiple mechanisms. Overexpression of efflux transporters is an important source of drug resistance. Efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein reduce intracellular drug accumulation and compromise drug efficacy. Various nanoparticle-based approaches have been investigated to overcome efflux-mediated resistance. These include the use of formulation excipients that inhibit transporter activity and co-delivery of the anticancer drug with a specific inhibitor of transporter function or expression. However, the effectiveness of nanoparticles can be diminished by poor transport in the tumor tissue. Hence, adjunct therapies that improve the intratumoral distribution of nanoparticles may be vital to the successful application of nanotechnology to overcome tumor drug resistance. This review discusses the mechanisms of tumor drug resistance and highlights the opportunities and challenges in the use of nanoparticles to improve the efficacy of anticancer drugs against resistant tumors. PMID:24036273

  9. Macroalgal activity against multiple drug resistant Aeromonas hydrophila: A novel treatment study towards enhancement of fish growth performance.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sameh S; Shaaban, Mohamed T; Abomohra, Abd El-Fatah; El-Safity, Khairy

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of macroalgal extracts as antibacterial agent against multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria isolated from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) as well as to enhance the fish growth performance by macroalgae diet application. A total of 50 swabs were collected from the diseased organs of tilapia fish including gills, skin, spleen, intestine, liver, kidney and muscle. The isolated bacteria were identified and then confirmed by using VITEK 2. Eight macroalgal species were collected from Abu-Qir, Alexandria coast, Egypt. After determination of their biomass, three solvents were used to prepare algal extracts. The antibacterial activities of different macroalgal extracts were measured against MDR Aeromonas hydrophila 6 (MDRAH6) using well-diffusion method. The mechanism by which macroalgal extract affects MDR bacteria was conducted by using transmission electron microscope (TEM). To evaluate the safety of the promising algal extract, GC-MS was performed to detect the composition of S. vulgare extract. In addition, growth performance was measured as an application of algal extracts into fish feed. Between eight collected macroalgal species, Sargassum vulgare showed the highest biomass production (53.4 g m(-2)). In addition, its ethanolic extract showed the highest significant antibacterial activity with MIC value of 250 μg ml(-1). TEM examination showed distinctive changes in the treated MDRAH6 cells including rupture of the cell wall, leakage of cytoplasmic contents, alterations in the cytoplasm density in addition to totally cell deformation. In addition, GC-MS analysis revealed eleven identified components in S. vulgare ethanolic extract, in which 9,12-octadecadienoyl chloride and hexadecanoic acid methyl ester were dominant (46.6 and 19.7 %, respectively). Furthermore, dietary replacement of fish meal with S. vulgare ethanolic extract significantly enhanced the growth performance and survival of Nile tilapia

  10. Platelet resistance to antiplatelet drugs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashwani; Kao, John

    2009-06-01

    In patients with cardiovascular diseases, platelet aggregation plays an important role in development of cardiovascular events and hence its inhibition is important in prevention and treatment of these events. Antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with acute coronary syndrome and in those who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention. Currently dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel is the standard of care in such patients and has been associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes. However, a significant number of patients experience recurrent cardiovascular events despite being on dual antiplatelet therapy. At present there is growing evidence that these events may be associated with poor response to these antiplatelet drugs and has been commonly called as antiplatelet drug resistance. The exact mechanisms leading to antiplatelet drug resistance are not very well understood but are likely multifactorial. Although the precise definition of antiplatelet drug resistance is lacking, but there is sufficient evidence to support that persistence of enhanced platelet reactivity persists despite use of aspirin and clopidogrel and is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. In this paper, we will review the mechanisms, clinical relevance, methods to evaluate, controversies surrounding the definition along with some recent patents and current and future directions for management of antiplatelet drug resistance.

  11. Resistant multiple sparse canonical correlation.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jacob; Replogle, Joseph; Chandler, Gabriel; Hardin, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is a multivariate technique that takes two datasets and forms the most highly correlated possible pairs of linear combinations between them. Each subsequent pair of linear combinations is orthogonal to the preceding pair, meaning that new information is gleaned from each pair. By looking at the magnitude of coefficient values, we can find out which variables can be grouped together, thus better understanding multiple interactions that are otherwise difficult to compute or grasp intuitively. CCA appears to have quite powerful applications to high-throughput data, as we can use it to discover, for example, relationships between gene expression and gene copy number variation. One of the biggest problems of CCA is that the number of variables (often upwards of 10,000) makes biological interpretation of linear combinations nearly impossible. To limit variable output, we have employed a method known as sparse canonical correlation analysis (SCCA), while adding estimation which is resistant to extreme observations or other types of deviant data. In this paper, we have demonstrated the success of resistant estimation in variable selection using SCCA. Additionally, we have used SCCA to find multiple canonical pairs for extended knowledge about the datasets at hand. Again, using resistant estimators provided more accurate estimates than standard estimators in the multiple canonical correlation setting. R code is available and documented at https://github.com/hardin47/rmscca.

  12. Lysosomes as mediators of drug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhitomirsky, Benny; Assaraf, Yehuda G

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance remains a leading cause of chemotherapeutic treatment failure and cancer-related mortality. While some mechanisms of anticancer drug resistance have been well characterized, multiple mechanisms remain elusive. In this respect, passive ion trapping-based lysosomal sequestration of multiple hydrophobic weak-base chemotherapeutic agents was found to reduce the accessibility of these drugs to their target sites, resulting in a markedly reduced cytotoxic effect and drug resistance. Recently we have demonstrated that lysosomal sequestration of hydrophobic weak base drugs triggers TFEB-mediated lysosomal biogenesis resulting in an enlarged lysosomal compartment, capable of enhanced drug sequestration. This study further showed that cancer cells with an increased number of drug-accumulating lysosomes are more resistant to lysosome-sequestered drugs, suggesting a model of drug-induced lysosome-mediated chemoresistance. In addition to passive drug sequestration of hydrophobic weak base chemotherapeutics, other mechanisms of lysosome-mediated drug resistance have also been reported; these include active lysosomal drug sequestration mediated by ATP-driven transporters from the ABC superfamily, and a role for lysosomal copper transporters in cancer resistance to platinum-based chemotherapeutics. Furthermore, lysosomal exocytosis was suggested as a mechanism to facilitate the clearance of chemotherapeutics which highly accumulated in lysosomes, thus providing an additional line of resistance, supplementing the organelle entrapment of chemotherapeutics away from their target sites. Along with these mechanisms of lysosome-mediated drug resistance, several approaches were recently developed for the overcoming of drug resistance or exploiting lysosomal drug sequestration, including lysosomal photodestruction and drug-induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization. In this review we explore the current literature addressing the role of lysosomes in mediating cancer drug

  13. Extensive drug resistance in malaria and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda; Varma, Jay K; Juliano, Jonathan J; Kimerling, Michael E; MacArthur, John R

    2010-07-01

    Drug resistance in malaria and in tuberculosis (TB) are major global health problems. Although the terms multidrug-resistant TB and extensively drug-resistant TB are precisely defined, the term multidrug resistance is often loosely used when discussing malaria. Recent declines in the clinical effectiveness of antimalarial drugs, including artemisinin-based combination therapy, have prompted the need to revise the definitions of and/or to recategorize antimalarial drug resistance to include extensively drug-resistant malaria. Applying precise case definitions to different levels of drug resistance in malaria and TB is useful for individual patient care and for public health.

  14. Feedback control of multiple hemodynamic variables with multiple cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Sugimachi, Masaru; Uemura, Kazunori; Kamiya, Atsunori; Shimizu, Shuji; Inagaki, Masashi; Shishido, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate goal of disease treatment is to control the biological system beyond the native regulation to combat pathological process. To maximize the advantage of drugs, we attempted to pharmacologically control the biological system at will, e.g., control multiple hemodynamic variables with multiple cardiovascular drugs. A comprehensive physiological cardiovascular model enabled us to evaluate cardiovascular properties (pump function, vascular resistance, and blood volume) and the feedback control of these properties. In 12 dogs, with dobutamine (5+/-3 mug.kg(-1).min(-1)), nitroprusside (4+/-2 mug.kg(-1).min(-1)), dextran (2+/-2 ml.kg(-1)), and furosemide (10 mg in one, 20 mg in one), rapid, sufficient and stable control of pump function, vascular resistance and blood volume resulted in similarly quick and stable control of blood pressure, cardiac output and left atrial pressure in 5+/-7, 7+/-5, and 12+/-10 minutes, respectively. These variables remained stable for 60 minutes (RMS 4+/-3 mmHg, 5+/-2 ml.min(-1).kg(-1), 0.8+/-0.6 mmHg, respectively).

  15. Overcoming drug resistance in multi-drug resistant cancers and microorganisms: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Avner, Benjamin S; Fialho, Arsenio M; Chakrabarty, Ananda M

    2012-01-01

    Resistance development against multiple drugs is a common feature among many pathogens--including bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, viruses, and parasites--and also among cancers. The reasons are two-fold. Most commonly-used rationally-designed small molecule drugs or monoclonal antibodies, as well as antibiotics, strongly inhibit a key single step in the growth and proliferation of the pathogen or cancer cells. The disease agents quickly change or switch off this single target, or activate the efflux mechanisms to pump out the drug, thereby becoming resistant to the drug. A second problem is the way drugs are designed. The pharmaceutical industry chooses to use, by high-throughput screening, compounds that are maximally inhibitory to the key single step in the growth of the pathogen or cancer, thereby promoting selective pressure. An ideal drug would be one that inhibits multiple steps in the disease progression pathways with less stringency in these steps. Low levels of inhibition at multiple steps provide cumulative strong inhibitory effect, but little incentives or ability on the part of the pathogen/cancer to develop resistance. Such intelligent drug design involving multiple less stringent inhibitory steps is beyond the scope of the drug industry and requires evolutionary wisdom commonly possessed by bacteria. This review surveys assessments of the current clinical situation with regard to drug resistance in P. aeruginosa, and examines tools currently employed to limit this trend. We then provide a conceptual framework in which we explore the similarities between multi-drug resistance in pathogens and in cancers. We summarize promising work on anti-cancer drugs derived from the evolutionary wisdom of bacteria such as P. aeruginosa, and how such strategies can be the basis for how to look for candidate protein/peptide antibiotic drugs from bioengineered bugs. Such multi-domain proteins, unlike diffusible antibiotics, are not diffusible because of their

  16. Mechanisms of Candida biofilm drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Taff, Heather T; Mitchell, Kaitlin F; Edward, Jessica A; Andes, David R

    2013-01-01

    Candida commonly adheres to implanted medical devices, growing as a resilient biofilm capable of withstanding extraordinarily high antifungal concentrations. As currently available antifungals have minimal activity against biofilms, new drugs to treat these recalcitrant infections are urgently needed. Recent investigations have begun to shed light on the mechanisms behind the profound resistance associated with the biofilm mode of growth. This resistance appears to be multifactorial, involving both mechanisms similar to conventional, planktonic antifungal resistance, such as increased efflux pump activity, as well as mechanisms specific to the biofilm lifestyle. A unique biofilm property is the production of an extracellular matrix. Two components of this material, β-glucan and extracellular DNA, promote biofilm resistance to multiple antifungals. Biofilm formation also engages several stress response pathways that impair the activity of azole drugs. Resistance within a biofilm is often heterogeneous, with the development of a subpopulation of resistant persister cells. In this article we review the molecular mechanisms underlying Candida biofilm antifungal resistance and their relative contributions during various growth phases. PMID:24059922

  17. Increasing Drug Resistance in Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Jessica; Moodley, Prashini; Moodley, Salona; Babaria, Palav; Ramtahal, Melissa; Heysell, Scott K.; Li, Xuan; Moll, Anthony P.; Friedland, Gerald; Sturm, A. Willem; Gandhi, Neel R.

    2011-01-01

    We expanded second-line tuberculosis (TB) drug susceptibility testing for extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from South Africa. Of 19 patients with extensively drug-resistant TB identified during February 2008–April 2009, 13 (68%) had isolates resistant to all 8 drugs tested. This resistance leaves no effective treatment with available drugs in South Africa. PMID:21392446

  18. Cytotoxicity of the bisphenolic honokiol from Magnolia officinalis against multiple drug-resistant tumor cells as determined by pharmacogenomics and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mohamed; Kuete, Victor; Kadioglu, Onat; Börtzler, Jonas; Khalid, Hassan; Greten, Henry Johannes; Efferth, Thomas

    2014-10-15

    A main problem in oncology is the development of drug-resistance. Some plant-derived lignans are established in cancer therapy, e.g. the semisynthetic epipodophyllotoxins etoposide and teniposide. Their activity is, unfortunately, hampered by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein. Here, we investigated the bisphenolic honokiol derived from Magnolia officinalis. P-glycoprotein-overexpressing CEM/ADR5000 cells were not cross-resistant to honokiol, but MDA-MB-231 BRCP cells transfected with another ABC-transporter, BCRP, revealed 3-fold resistance. Further drug resistance mechanisms analyzed study was the tumor suppressor TP53 and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). HCT116 p53(-/-) did not reveal resistance to honokiol, and EGFR-transfected U87.MG EGFR cells were collateral sensitive compared to wild-type cells (degree of resistance: 0.34). To gain insight into possible modes of collateral sensitivity, we performed in silico molecular docking studies of honokiol to EGFR and EGFR-related downstream signal proteins. Honokiol bound with comparable binding energies to EGFR (-7.30 ± 0.01 kcal/mol) as the control drugs erlotinib (-7.50 ± 0.30 kcal/mol) and gefitinib (-8.30 ± 0.10 kcal/mol). Similar binding affinities of AKT, MEK1, MEK2, STAT3 and mTOR were calculated for honokiol (range from -9.0 ± 0.01 to 7.40 ± 0.01 kcal/mol) compared to corresponding control inhibitor compounds for these signal transducers. This indicates that collateral sensitivity of EGFR-transfectant cells towards honokiol may be due to binding to EGFR and downstream signal transducers. COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of microarray-based transcriptomic mRNA expression data of 59 tumor cell lines revealed a specific gene expression profile predicting sensitivity or resistance towards honokiol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Drug resistance in Giardia duodenalis.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Brendan R E; McConville, Malcolm J; Ma'ayeh, Showgy Y; Dagley, Michael J; Gasser, Robin B; Svärd, Staffan G; Jex, Aaron R

    2015-11-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a microaerophilic parasite of the human gastrointestinal tract and a major contributor to diarrheal and post-infectious chronic gastrointestinal disease world-wide. Treatment of G. duodenalis infection currently relies on a small number of drug classes. Nitroheterocyclics, in particular metronidazole, have represented the front line treatment for the last 40 years. Nitroheterocyclic-resistant G. duodenalis have been isolated from patients and created in vitro, prompting considerable research into the biomolecular mechanisms of resistance. These compounds are redox-active and are believed to damage proteins and DNA after being activated by oxidoreductase enzymes in metabolically active cells. In this review, we explore the molecular phenotypes of nitroheterocyclic-resistant G. duodenalis described to date in the context of the protist's unusual glycolytic and antioxidant systems. We propose that resistance mechanisms are likely to extend well beyond currently described resistance-associated enzymes (i.e., pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductases and nitroreductases), to include NAD(P)H- and flavin-generating pathways, and possibly redox-sensitive epigenetic regulation. Mechanisms that allow G. duodenalis to tolerate oxidative stress may lead to resistance against both oxygen and nitroheterocyclics, with implications for clinical control. The present review highlights the potential for systems biology tools and advanced bioinformatics to further investigate the multifaceted mechanisms of nitroheterocyclic resistance in this important pathogen.

  20. Tumor Targeting Synergistic Drug Delivery by Self-Assembled Hybrid Nanovesicles to Overcome Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Gong, Meng-Qing; Wu, Cong; He, Xiao-Yan; Zong, Jing-Yi; Wu, Jin-Long; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Cheng, Si-Xue

    2017-01-01

    To overcome multi-drug resistance (MDR) in tumor chemotherapy, a polymer/inorganic hybrid drug delivery platform with tumor targeting property and enhanced cell uptake efficiency was developed. To evaluate the applicability of our delivery platform for the delivery of different drug resistance inhibitors, two kinds of dual-drug pairs (doxorubicin/buthionine sulfoximine and doxorubicin/tariquidar, respectively) were loaded in heparin-biotin/heparin/protamine sulfate/calcium carbonate nanovesicles to realize simultaneous delivery of an anticancer drug and a drug resistance inhibitor into drug-resistant tumor cells. Prepared by self-assembly, the drug loaded hybrid nanovesicles with a mean size less than 210 nm and a negative zeta potential exhibit good stability in serum contained aqueous media. The in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation indicates that hybrid nanovesicles with tumor targeting biotin moieties have an enhanced tumor cell inhibitory effect. In addition, dual-drug loaded hybrid nanovesicles exhibit significantly stronger cell growth inhibition as compared with doxorubicin (DOX) mono-drug loaded nanovesicles due to the reduced intracellular glutathione (GSH) content by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) or the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibition by tariquidar (TQR). The tumor targeting nanovesicles prepared in this study, which can simultaneously deliver multiple drugs and effectively reverse drug resistance, have promising applications in drug delivery for tumor treatments. The polymer/inorganic hybrid drug delivery platform developed in this study has good applicability for the co-delivery of different anti-tumor drug/drug resistance inhibitor pairs to overcome MDR. Graphical Abstract A polymer/inorganic hybrid drug delivery platform with enhanced cell uptake was developed for tumor targeting synergistic drug delivery. The heparin-biotin/heparin/protamine sulfate/calcium carbonate nanovesicles prepared in this study can deliver an anticancer drug and a drug

  1. Mutational Pathway Determines Whether Drug Gradients Accelerate Evolution of Drug-Resistant Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greulich, Philip; Waclaw, Bartłomiej; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2012-08-01

    Drug gradients are believed to play an important role in the evolution of bacteria resistant to antibiotics and tumors resistant to anticancer drugs. We use a statistical physics model to study the evolution of a population of malignant cells exposed to drug gradients, where drug resistance emerges via a mutational pathway involving multiple mutations. We show that a nonuniform drug distribution has the potential to accelerate the emergence of resistance when the mutational pathway involves a long sequence of mutants with increasing resistance, but if the pathway is short or crosses a fitness valley, the evolution of resistance may actually be slowed down by drug gradients. These predictions can be verified experimentally, and may help to improve strategies for combating the emergence of resistance.

  2. Comprehensive treatment of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mitnick, Carole D; Shin, Sonya S; Seung, Kwonjune J; Rich, Michael L; Atwood, Sidney S; Furin, Jennifer J; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Alcantara Viru, Felix A; Appleton, Sasha C; Bayona, Jaime N; Bonilla, Cesar A; Chalco, Katiuska; Choi, Sharon; Franke, Molly F; Fraser, Hamish S F; Guerra, Dalia; Hurtado, Rocio M; Jazayeri, Darius; Joseph, Keith; Llaro, Karim; Mestanza, Lorena; Mukherjee, Joia S; Muñoz, Maribel; Palacios, Eda; Sanchez, Epifanio; Sloutsky, Alexander; Becerra, Mercedes C

    2008-08-07

    Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis has been reported in 45 countries, including countries with limited resources and a high burden of tuberculosis. We describe the management of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and treatment outcomes among patients who were referred for individualized outpatient therapy in Peru. A total of 810 patients were referred for free individualized therapy, including drug treatment, resective surgery, adverse-event management, and nutritional and psychosocial support. We tested isolates from 651 patients for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and developed regimens that included five or more drugs to which the infecting isolate was not resistant. Of the 651 patients tested, 48 (7.4%) had extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis; the remaining 603 patients had multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis had undergone more treatment than the other patients (mean [+/-SD] number of regimens, 4.2+/-1.9 vs. 3.2+/-1.6; P<0.001) and had isolates that were resistant to more drugs (number of drugs, 8.4+/-1.1 vs. 5.3+/-1.5; P<0.001). None of the patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis were coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis received daily, supervised therapy with an average of 5.3+/-1.3 drugs, including cycloserine, an injectable drug, and a fluoroquinolone. Twenty-nine of these patients (60.4%) completed treatment or were cured, as compared with 400 patients (66.3%) with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (P=0.36). Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis can be cured in HIV-negative patients through outpatient treatment, even in those who have received multiple prior courses of therapy for tuberculosis. 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society

  3. Comprehensive Treatment of Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitnick, Carole D.; Shin, Sonya S.; Seung, Kwonjune J.; Rich, Michael L.; Atwood, Sidney S.; Furin, Jennifer J.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Alcantara Viru, Felix A.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Bayona, Jaime N.; Bonilla, Cesar A.; Chalco, Katiuska; Choi, Sharon; Franke, Molly F.; Fraser, Hamish S.F.; Guerra, Dalia; Hurtado, Rocio M.; Jazayeri, Darius; Joseph, Keith; Llaro, Karim; Mestanza, Lorena; Mukherjee, Joia S.; Muñoz, Maribel; Palacios, Eda; Sanchez, Epifanio; Sloutsky, Alexander; Becerra, Mercedes C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis has been reported in 45 countries, including countries with limited resources and a high burden of tuberculosis. We describe the management of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and treatment outcomes among patients who were referred for individualized outpatient therapy in Peru. METHODS A total of 810 patients were referred for free individualized therapy, including drug treatment, resective surgery, adverse-event management, and nutritional and psychosocial support. We tested isolates from 651 patients for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and developed regimens that included five or more drugs to which the infecting isolate was not resistant. RESULTS Of the 651 patients tested, 48 (7.4%) had extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis; the remaining 603 patients had multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis had undergone more treatment than the other patients (mean [±SD] number of regimens, 4.2±1.9 vs. 3.2±1.6; P<0.001) and had isolates that were resistant to more drugs (number of drugs, 8.4±1.1 vs. 5.3±1.5; P<0.001). None of the patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis were coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis received daily, supervised therapy with an average of 5.3±1.3 drugs, including cycloserine, an injectable drug, and a fluoroquinolone. Twenty-nine of these patients (60.4%) completed treatment or were cured, as compared with 400 patients (66.3%) with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (P=0.36). CONCLUSIONS Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis can be cured in HIV-negative patients through outpatient treatment, even in those who have received multiple prior courses of therapy for tuberculosis. PMID:18687637

  4. Targeted cancer therapy; nanotechnology approaches for overcoming drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Shen, Jacson K; Milane, Lara; Hornicek, Francis J; Amiji, Mansoor M; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer molecular biology have resulted in parallel and unprecedented progress in the development of targeted cancer therapy. Targeted therapy can provide higher efficacy and lower toxicity than conventional chemotherapy for cancer. However, like traditional chemotherapy, molecularly targeted cancer therapy also faces the challenge of drug resistance. Multiple mechanisms are responsible for chemotherapy resistance in tumors, including over-expression of efflux transporters, somatic alterations of drug targets, deregulation of apoptosis, and numerous pharmacokinetic issues. Nanotechnology based approaches are proving to be efficacious in overcoming drug resistance in cancer. Combination of targeted therapies with nanotechnology approaches is a promising strategy to overcome targeted therapy drug resistance in cancer treatment. This review discusses the mechanisms of targeted drug resistance in cancer and discusses nanotechnology approaches to circumvent this resistance.

  5. Drug resistance in Leishmania: similarities and differences to other organisms.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, B; Kündig, C; Singh, A; Ouellette, M

    1998-01-01

    The main line of defense available against parasitic protozoa is chemotherapy. Drug resistance has emerged however, as a primary obstacle to the successful treatment and control of parasitic diseases. Leishmania spp., the causative agents of leishmaniasis, have served as a useful model for studying mechanisms of drug resistance in vitro. Antimonials and amphotericin B are the first line drugs to treat Leishmania followed by pentamidine and a number of other drugs. Parasites resistant against all these classes of drugs have been selected under laboratory conditions. A multiplicity of resistance mechanisms has been detected, the most prevalent being gene amplification and transport mutations. With the tools now available, it should be possible to elucidate the mechanisms that govern drug resistance in field isolates and develop more effective chemotherapeutic agents.

  6. The plant alkaloid and anti-leukemia drug homoharringtonine sensitizes resistant human colorectal carcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Beranova, Lenka; Pombinho, Antonio R; Spegarova, Jarmila; Koc, Michal; Klanova, Magdalena; Molinsky, Jan; Klener, Pavel; Bartunek, Petr; Andera, Ladislav

    2013-06-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a pro-apoptotic ligand from the TNF-alpha family that is under consideration, along with agonistic anti-TRAIL receptor antibodies, as a potential anti-tumor agent. However, most primary human tumors are resistant to monotherapy with TRAIL apoptogens, and thus the potential applicability of TRAIL in anti-tumor therapy ultimately depends on its rational combination with drugs targeting these resistances. In our high-throughput screening for novel agents/drugs that could sensitize TRAIL-resistant colorectal cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, we found homoharringtonine (HHT), a cephalotaxus alkaloid and tested anti-leukemia drug, to be a very effective, low nanomolar enhancer of TRAIL-mediated apoptosis/growth suppression of these resistant cells. Co-treatment of TRAIL-resistant RKO or HT-29 cells with HHT and TRAIL led to the effective induction of apoptosis and the complete elimination of the treated cells. HHT suppressed the expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and cFLIP and enhanced the TRAIL-triggered activation of JNK and p38 kinases. The shRNA-mediated down-regulation of cFLIP or Mcl-1 in HT-29 or RKO cells variably enhanced their TRAIL-induced apoptosis but it did not markedly sensitize them to TRAIL-mediated growth suppression. However, with the notable exception of RKO/sh cFLIP cells, the downregulation of cFLIP or Mcl-1 significantly lowered the effective concentration of HHT in HHT + TRAIL co-treatment. Combined HHT + TRAIL therapy also led to the strong suppression of HT-29 tumors implanted into immunodeficient mice. Thus, HHT represents a very efficient enhancer of TRAIL-induced apoptosis with potential application in TRAIL-based, anti-cancer combination therapy.

  7. Potential of berberine to enhance antimicrobial activity of commonly used antibiotics for dairy cow mastitis caused by multiple drug-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis infection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Yang, C; Li, Y; Liu, X; Wang, Y

    2015-08-19

    Berberine is a plant alkaloid with antimicrobial activity against a variety of microorganisms. In this study, the antimicrobial properties of berberine against multi-drug resistant field isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis were investigated using berberine alone or in combination with a commonly used antibiotics in veterinary clinics, including penicillin, lincomycin, and amoxicillin. The results indicated that the minimum inhibitory concentrations of berberine, penicillin, lincomycin, and amoxicillin against field S. epidermidis isolates were 2-512, 0.8-213, 0.4-1024, and 0.4-256 mg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, the synergistic effects of antimicrobial activity against these multi-drug resistant isolates were observed when the berberine was combined with penicillin, lincomycin, or amoxicillin; no antagonistic effect of the combination was detected in any of the clinical isolates. These observations were further confirmed using a time-killing assay, in which a combination of 2 agents yielded a greater than 2.03-2.44 log10 decrease in colony-forming unit/mL compared with each agent alone. These findings suggest that berberine is a promising compound for preventing and treating multi-drug resistant S. epidermidis infected mastitis in dairy cows either alone or in combination with other commonly used antibiotics, such as penicillin, lincomycin, and amoxicillin.

  8. Drug resistance mechanisms and novel drug targets for tuberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Mahmudul; Hameed, H M Adnan; Mugweru, Julius; Chhotaray, Chiranjibi; Wang, Changwei; Tan, Yaoju; Liu, Jianxiong; Li, Xinjie; Tan, Shouyong; Ojima, Iwao; Yew, Wing Wai; Nuermberger, Eric; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Zhang, Tianyu

    2017-01-20

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) poses a significant challenge to the successful treatment and control of TB worldwide. Resistance to anti-TB drugs has existed since the beginning of the chemotherapy era. New insights into the resistant mechanisms of anti-TB drugs have been provided. Better understanding of drug resistance mechanisms helps in the development of new tools for the rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant TB. There is also a pressing need in the development of new drugs with novel targets to improve the current treatment of TB and to prevent the emergence of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review summarizes the anti-TB drug resistance mechanisms, furnishes some possible novel drug targets in the development of new agents for TB therapy and discusses the usefulness using known targets to develop new anti-TB drugs. Whole genome sequencing is currently an advanced technology to uncover drug resistance mechanisms in M. tuberculosis. However, further research is required to unravel the significance of some newly discovered gene mutations in their contribution to drug resistance. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Quorum sensing and microbial drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yufan, Chen; Shiyin, Liu; Zhibin, Liang; Mingfa, Lv; Jianuan, Zhou; Lianhui, Zhang

    2016-10-20

    Microbial drug resistance has become a serious problem of global concern, and the evolution and regulatory mechanisms of microbial drug resistance has become a hotspot of research in recent years. Recent studies showed that certain microbial resistance mechanisms are regulated by quorum sensing system. Quorum sensing is a ubiquitous cell-cell communication system in the microbial world, which associates with cell density. High-density microbial cells produce sufficient amount of small signal molecules, activating a range of downstream cellular processes including virulence and drug resistance mechanisms, which increases bacterial drug tolerance and causes infections on host organisms. In this review, the general mechanisms of microbial drug resistance and quorum-sensing systems are summarized with a focus on the association of quorum sensing and chemical signaling systems with microbial drug resistance mechanisms, including biofilm formation and drug efflux pump. The potential use of quorum quenching as a new strategy to control microbial resistance is also discussed.

  10. Occurrence of extended-spectrum and AmpC β-lactamases in multiple drug resistant Salmonella isolates from clinical samples in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Akinyemi, KO; Iwalokun, Bamidele Abiodun; Oyefolu, Akeeb O Bola; Fakorede, CO

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Salmonella spp. are important foodborne pathogens exhibiting increasing resistance to antimicrobial drugs. Resistance to broad-spectrum β-lactams, mediated by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and AmpC β-lactamase enzymes is fast spreading and has had negative impacts on the clinical outcomes, particularly on third-generation cephalosporins. This study investigated the carriage of AmpC gene among multidrug-resistant Salmonella spp. from Lagos, Nigeria. Methods Forty Salmonella spp. from clinical samples (S. typhi = 13; S. typhimurium = 10; S. enteritidis = 8; S. choleraesuis = 5; S. paratyphi = 4) were subjected to in vitro susceptibility test by disk diffusion methods. Isolates that were resistant to cefoxitin and third-generation cephalosporins were screened for ESBL (Double Disk Synergy Test Method) and AmpC enzyme (AmpC disk test) production. Detection of AmpC fox gene was carried out by polymerase chain reaction. Results Thirty-two (80%) of the Salmonella isolates were cefoxitin resistant. Plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamase and ESBL enzymes were recorded in 10/40 (25%) and 16/40 (40%) of the Salmonella isolates, respectively. Specifically, 16/40 (40%) of the Salmonella isolates possessed 380 bp AmpC fox gene, with the highest occurrence found in S. typhi strains (43.8%) followed by S. typhimurium (25%). There was no AmpC fox gene detected in S. paratyphi strains. Interestingly, coproduction of enzymes occurred in some of the isolates, raising fears of resistance to a multitude of antibiotics in the treatment of bacterial infections. Conclusion Emergence of AmpC β-lactamase–producing Salmonella isolates in our environment was recorded for the first time, raising concern on increased antibiotic resistance among strains of Salmonella serovars in Lagos. Further genotypic study of the isolates could answer the questions on strain sources, clonal relatedness, and mechanism of spread. PMID:28144154

  11. A pleiotropic drug resistance transporter is involved in reduced sensitivity to multiple fungicide classes in Sclerotinia homoeocarpa (F.T. Bennett).

    PubMed

    Sang, Hyunkyu; Hulvey, Jon; Popko, James T; Lopes, John; Swaminathan, Aishwarya; Chang, Taehyun; Jung, Geunhwa

    2015-04-01

    Dollar spot, caused by Sclerotinia homoeocarpa, is a prevalent turfgrass disease, and the fungus exhibits widespread fungicide resistance in North America. In a previous study, an ABC-G transporter, ShatrD, was associated with practical field resistance to demethylation inhibitor (DMI) fungicides. Mining of ABC-G transporters, also known as pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) transporters, from RNA-Seq data gave an assortment of transcripts, several with high sequence similarity to functionally characterized transporters from Botrytis cinerea, and others with closest blastx hits from Aspergillus and Monilinia. In addition to ShatrD, another PDR transporter showed significant over-expression in replicated RNA-Seq data, and in a collection of field-resistant isolates, as measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. These isolates also showed reduced sensitivity to unrelated fungicide classes. Using a yeast complementation system, we sought to test the hypothesis that this PDR transporter effluxes DMI as well as chemically unrelated fungicides. The transporter (ShPDR1) was cloned into the Gal1 expression vector and transformed into a yeast PDR transporter deletion mutant, AD12345678. Complementation assays indicated that ShPDR1 complemented the mutant in the presence of propiconazole (DMI), iprodione (dicarboximide) and boscalid (SDHI, succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor). Our results indicate that the over-expression of ShPDR1 is correlated with practical field resistance to DMI fungicides and reduced sensitivity to dicarboximide and SDHI fungicides. These findings highlight the potential for the eventual development of a multidrug resistance phenotype in this pathogen. In addition, this study presents a pipeline for the discovery and validation of fungicide resistance genes using de novo next-generation sequencing and molecular biology techniques in an unsequenced plant pathogenic fungus. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  12. Three-dimensional (3D) plasmonic hot spots for label-free sensing and effective photothermal killing of multiple drug resistant superbugs.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stacy; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Pramanik, Avijit; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2016-11-03

    Drug resistant superbug infection is one of the foremost threats to human health. Plasmonic nanoparticles can be used for ultrasensitive bio-imaging and photothermal killing by amplification of electromagnetic fields at nanoscale "hot spots". One of the main challenges to plasmonic imaging and photothermal killing is design of a plasmonic substrate with a large number of "hot spots". Driven by this need, this article reports design of a three-dimensional (3D) plasmonic "hot spot"-based substrate using gold nanoparticle attached hybrid graphene oxide (GO), free from the traditional 2D limitations. Experimental results show that the 3D substrate has capability for highly sensitive label-free sensing and generates high photothermal heat. Reported data using p-aminothiophenol conjugated 3D substrate show that the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) enhancement factor for the 3D "hot spot"-based substrate is more than two orders of magnitude greater than that for the two-dimensional (2D) substrate and five orders of magnitude greater than that for the zero-dimensional (0D) p-aminothiophenol conjugated gold nanoparticle. 3D-Finite-Difference Time-Domain (3D-FDTD) simulation calculations indicate that the SERS enhancement factor can be greater than 10(4) because of the bent assembly structure in the 3D substrate. Results demonstrate that the 3D-substrate-based SERS can be used for fingerprint identification of several multi-drug resistant superbugs with detection limits of 5 colony forming units per mL. Experimental data show that 785 nm near infrared (NIR) light generates around two times more photothermal heat for the 3D substrate with respect to the 2D substrate, and allows rapid and effective killing of 100% of the multi-drug resistant superbugs within 5 minutes.

  13. Baseline resistance and Cross resistance among fluoroquinolones in Multi Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates at a national reference laboratory.

    PubMed

    H G, Mamatha; Shanthi, V

    2017-09-05

    Pre-existing fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance in Multiple Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR TB) patients is a major threat in treating MDR TB. This study was conducted to assess the percentage of FQ resistance among MDR TB patients and to determine whether there is complete cross-resistance between FQs (ofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin) used as second line drugs in TB treatment. Among 879 MDR TB suspects tested, 68 were confirmed to be MDRTB and mono rifampicin resistant. They were further analyzed for FQ drug resistance by DST using MGIT. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were also determined for ofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin. Out of 879 MDR TB suspects, rifampicin resistance was observed in 70 patients (8%). Among which pre-existing FQ resistance was detected in 32% of patients. 88% of isolates exhibited a similar DST pattern for all three FQs tested. Cross resistance among FQs was not complete in 8 isolates. MIC of moxifloxacin was found to be much lower than MICs of ofloxacin and levofloxacin. A huge proportion of MDR TB strains (32%) exhibiting ofloxacin resistance prior treatment with second line anti TB drugs raises major concern. Baseline drug resistance detection in TB patients helps in cutting down transmission of drug resistant TB. The MIC for Ofloxacin was higher than its critical concentration indicating the prevalence of baseline resistance to FQs due to irrational use of the drug. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Structure-based methods for predicting target mutation-induced drug resistance and rational drug design to overcome the problem.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Yang, Guang-Fu; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2012-10-01

    Drug resistance has become one of the biggest challenges in drug discovery and/or development and has attracted great research interests worldwide. During the past decade, computational strategies have been developed to predict target mutation-induced drug resistance. Meanwhile, various molecular design strategies, including targeting protein backbone, targeting highly conserved residues and dual/multiple targeting, have been used to design novel inhibitors for combating the drug resistance. In this article we review recent advances in development of computational methods for target mutation-induced drug resistance prediction and strategies for rational design of novel inhibitors that could be effective against the possible drug-resistant mutants of the target.

  15. Overcoming drug resistance through in silico prediction.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Pablo; Trosset, Jean-Yves

    2014-03-01

    Prediction tools are commonly used in pre-clinical research to assist target selection, to optimize drug potency or to predict the pharmacological profile of drug candidates. In silico prediction and overcoming drug resistance is a new opportunity that creates a high interest in pharmaceutical research. This review presents two main in silico strategies to meet this challenge: a structure-based approach to study the influence of mutations on the drug-target interaction and a system-biology approach to identify resistance pathways for a given drug. In silico screening of synergies between therapeutic and resistant pathways through biological network analysis is an example of technique to escape drug resistance. Structure-based drug design and in silico system biology are complementary approaches to reach few objectives at once: increase efficiency, reduce toxicity and overcoming drug resistance.

  16. Superinfection and the evolution of resistance to antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Klein, Eili Y; Smith, David L; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Levin, Simon

    2012-09-22

    A major issue in the control of malaria is the evolution of drug resistance. Ecological theory has demonstrated that pathogen superinfection and the resulting within-host competition influences the evolution of specific traits. Individuals infected with Plasmodium falciparum are consistently infected by multiple parasites; however, while this probably alters the dynamics of resistance evolution, there are few robust mathematical models examining this issue. We developed a general theory for modelling the evolution of resistance with host superinfection and examine: (i) the effect of transmission intensity on the rate of resistance evolution; (ii) the importance of different biological costs of resistance; and (iii) the best measure of the frequency of resistance. We find that within-host competition retards the ability and slows the rate at which drug-resistant parasites invade, particularly as the transmission rate increases. We also find that biological costs of resistance that reduce transmission are less important than reductions in the duration of drug-resistant infections. Lastly, we find that random sampling of the population for resistant parasites is likely to significantly underestimate the frequency of resistance. Considering superinfection in mathematical models of antimalarial drug resistance may thus be important for generating accurate predictions of interventions to contain resistance.

  17. Superinfection and the evolution of resistance to antimalarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Eili Y.; Smith, David L.; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Levin, Simon

    2012-01-01

    A major issue in the control of malaria is the evolution of drug resistance. Ecological theory has demonstrated that pathogen superinfection and the resulting within-host competition influences the evolution of specific traits. Individuals infected with Plasmodium falciparum are consistently infected by multiple parasites; however, while this probably alters the dynamics of resistance evolution, there are few robust mathematical models examining this issue. We developed a general theory for modelling the evolution of resistance with host superinfection and examine: (i) the effect of transmission intensity on the rate of resistance evolution; (ii) the importance of different biological costs of resistance; and (iii) the best measure of the frequency of resistance. We find that within-host competition retards the ability and slows the rate at which drug-resistant parasites invade, particularly as the transmission rate increases. We also find that biological costs of resistance that reduce transmission are less important than reductions in the duration of drug-resistant infections. Lastly, we find that random sampling of the population for resistant parasites is likely to significantly underestimate the frequency of resistance. Considering superinfection in mathematical models of antimalarial drug resistance may thus be important for generating accurate predictions of interventions to contain resistance. PMID:22787024

  18. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Valle, Demetrio L; Cabrera, Esperanza C; Puzon, Juliana Janet M; Rivera, Windell L

    2016-01-01

    Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml) of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn). Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant bacteria.

  19. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Demetrio L.; Cabrera, Esperanza C.; Puzon, Juliana Janet M.; Rivera, Windell L.

    2016-01-01

    Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml) of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn). Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant bacteria. PMID

  20. Amplification of a Gene Related to Mammalian mdr Genes in Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Craig M.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Wasley, Annemarie; Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    1989-06-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains at least two genes related to the mammalian multiple drug resistance genes, and at least one of the P. falciparum genes is expressed at a higher level and is present in higher copy number in a strain that is resistant to multiple drugs than in a strain that is sensitive to the drugs.

  1. Understanding drug resistance in human intestinal protozoa.

    PubMed

    El-Taweel, Hend Aly

    2015-05-01

    Infections with intestinal protozoa continue to be a major health problem in many areas of the world. The widespread use of a limited number of therapeutic agents for their management and control raises concerns about development of drug resistance. Generally, the use of any antimicrobial agent should be accompanied by meticulous monitoring of its efficacy and measures to minimize resistance formation. Evidence for the occurrence of drug resistance in different intestinal protozoa comes from case studies and clinical trials, sometimes with a limited number of patients. Large-scale field-based assessment of drug resistance and drug sensitivity testing of clinical isolates are needed. Furthermore, the association of drug resistance with certain geographic isolates or genotypes deserves consideration. Drug resistance has been triggered in vitro and has been linked to modification of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, nitroreductases, antioxidant defense, or cytoskeletal system. Further mechanistic studies will have important implications in the development of second generation therapeutic agents.

  2. Dominant drug targets suppress the emergence of antiviral resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Elizabeth J; Liu, Hong-mei; Oberste, M Steven; Pallansch, Mark; Collett, Marc S; Kirkegaard, Karla

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance can defeat the successful treatment of pathogens that display high mutation rates, as exemplified by RNA viruses. Here we detail a new paradigm in which a single compound directed against a ‘dominant drug target’ suppresses the emergence of naturally occurring drug-resistant variants in mice and cultured cells. All new drug-resistant viruses arise during intracellular replication and initially express their phenotypes in the presence of drug-susceptible genomes. For the targets of most anti-viral compounds, the presence of these drug-susceptible viral genomes does not prevent the selection of drug resistance. Here we show that, for an inhibitor of the function of oligomeric capsid proteins of poliovirus, the expression of drug-susceptible genomes causes chimeric oligomers to form, thus rendering the drug-susceptible genomes dominant. The use of dominant drug targets should suppress drug resistance whenever multiple genomes arise in the same cell and express products in a common milieu. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03830.001 PMID:25365453

  3. Emergence of therapy resistance in multiple myeloma in heterogeneous microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Amy; Zhang, Qiucen; Lambert, Guillaume; Khin, Zayar; Silva, Ariosto; Gatenby, Robert; Kim, Hyungsung; Pourmand, Nader; Austin, Robert; Sturm, James

    2014-03-01

    Cancer chemotherapy resistance is always a problem that is not clear considering spatial heterogeneity in the tumor microenvironment. We culture multiple myeloma in a gradient from 0 to 20 nM of doxorubicin (genotoxic drug) across 2 mm wide region in a microfluidic device which mimics the tumor microenvironment with a chemotherapy drug gradient and microhabitats. Resistance of the multiple myeloma cells to doxorubicin emerged within two weeks. For the resistant cells evolved from the devices, the doxorubicin concentration that inhibits 50% of the controlled population increased by 16-fold than the parental cells. Whole transcriptome sequencing revealed that 39% of newly acquired mutational hotspots (the genes with more than 3 non-synonymous point mutation) of the resistant cells are involved in apoptosis and DNA repair. On the other hand, 40% of the non-mutated genes that are abnormally regulated in the resistant cells, are involved in metabolism, biosynthesis, and biomolecular transport. Among them, metabolic drug efflux pumps and oxidative stress scavengers are up-regulated to reduce the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and further result in the resistance. The roles of the spatial drug gradients and microhabitats in rapid emergence of cancer resistance will be discussed. The project described was supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Cancer Institute.

  4. Clinical Management of HIV Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Karoll J.; Maldarelli, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection has resulted in profound reductions in viremia and is associated with marked improvements in morbidity and mortality. Therapy is not curative, however, and prolonged therapy is complicated by drug toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance. Management of clinical drug resistance requires in depth evaluation, and includes extensive history, physical examination and laboratory studies. Appropriate use of resistance testing provides valuable information useful in constructing regimens for treatment-experienced individuals with viremia during therapy. This review outlines the emergence of drug resistance in vivo, and describes clinical evaluation and therapeutic options of the individual with rebound viremia during therapy. PMID:21994737

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs in Mozambique*, **

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Germano Manuel; Folgosa, Elena; Nquobile, Ndlovu; Gitta, Sheba; Cadir, Nureisha

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the drug resistance profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mozambique. METHODS: We analyzed secondary data from the National Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Maputo, Mozambique, and from the Beira Regional Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Beira, Mozambique. The data were based on culture-positive samples submitted to first-line drug susceptibility testing (DST) between January and December of 2011. We attempted to determine whether the frequency of DST positivity was associated with patient type or provenance. RESULTS: During the study period, 641 strains were isolated in culture and submitted to DST. We found that 374 (58.3%) were resistant to at least one antituberculosis drug and 280 (43.7%) were resistant to multiple antituberculosis drugs. Of the 280 multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases, 184 (65.7%) were in previously treated patients, most of whom were from southern Mozambique. Two (0.71%) of the cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis were confirmed to be cases of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis was most common in males, particularly those in the 21-40 year age bracket. CONCLUSIONS: M. tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs is high in Mozambique, especially in previously treated patients. The frequency of M. tuberculosis strains that were resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin in combination was found to be high, particularly in samples from previously treated patients. PMID:24831398

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Pires, Germano Manuel; Folgosa, Elena; Nquobile, Ndlovu; Gitta, Sheba; Cadir, Nureisha

    2014-01-01

    To determine the drug resistance profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mozambique. We analyzed secondary data from the National Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Maputo, Mozambique, and from the Beira Regional Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Beira, Mozambique. The data were based on culture-positive samples submitted to first-line drug susceptibility testing (DST) between January and December of 2011. We attempted to determine whether the frequency of DST positivity was associated with patient type or provenance. During the study period, 641 strains were isolated in culture and submitted to DST. We found that 374 (58.3%) were resistant to at least one antituberculosis drug and 280 (43.7%) were resistant to multiple antituberculosis drugs. Of the 280 multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases, 184 (65.7%) were in previously treated patients, most of whom were from southern Mozambique. Two (0.71%) of the cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis were confirmed to be cases of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis was most common in males, particularly those in the 21-40 year age bracket. M. tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs is high in Mozambique, especially in previously treated patients. The frequency of M. tuberculosis strains that were resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin in combination was found to be high, particularly in samples from previously treated patients.

  7. Efflux-Mediated Drug Resistance in Bacteria: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian-Zhi; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Drug efflux pumps play a key role in drug resistance and also serve other functions in bacteria. There has been a growing list of multidrug and drug-specific efflux pumps characterized from bacteria of human, animal, plant and environmental origins. These pumps are mostly encoded on the chromosome although they can also be plasmid-encoded. A previous article (Li X-Z and Nikaido H, Drugs, 2004; 64[2]: 159–204) had provided a comprehensive review regarding efflux-mediated drug resistance in bacteria. In the past five years, significant progress has been achieved in further understanding of drug resistance-related efflux transporters and this review focuses on the latest studies in this field since 2003. This has been demonstrated in multiple aspects that include but are not limited to: further molecular and biochemical characterization of the known drug efflux pumps and identification of novel drug efflux pumps; structural elucidation of the transport mechanisms of drug transporters; regulatory mechanisms of drug efflux pumps; determining the role of the drug efflux pumps in other functions such as stress responses, virulence and cell communication; and development of efflux pump inhibitors. Overall, the multifaceted implications of drug efflux transporters warrant novel strategies to combat multidrug resistance in bacteria. PMID:19678712

  8. Structure-based drug design to overcome drug resistance: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rafaela S; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is a common concern for the development of novel antiviral, antimicrobial and anticancer therapies. To overcome this problem, several strategies have been developed, many of which involving the theme of this review, the use of structure-based drug design (SBDD) approaches. These include the successful design of new compounds that target resistant mutant proteins, as well as the development of drugs that target multiple proteins involved in specific biochemical pathways. Finally, drug resistance can also be considered in the early stages of drug discovery, through the use of strategies to delay the development of resistance. The purpose of this brief review is to underline the usefulness of SBDD approaches based on case studies, highlighting present challenges and opportunities in drug design.

  9. Why does drug resistance readily evolve but vaccine resistance does not?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Why is drug resistance common and vaccine resistance rare? Drugs and vaccines both impose substantial pressure on pathogen populations to evolve resistance and indeed, drug resistance typically emerges soon after the introduction of a drug. But vaccine resistance has only rarely emerged. Using well-established principles of population genetics and evolutionary ecology, we argue that two key differences between vaccines and drugs explain why vaccines have so far proved more robust against evolution than drugs. First, vaccines tend to work prophylactically while drugs tend to work therapeutically. Second, vaccines tend to induce immune responses against multiple targets on a pathogen while drugs tend to target very few. Consequently, pathogen populations generate less variation for vaccine resistance than they do for drug resistance, and selection has fewer opportunities to act on that variation. When vaccine resistance has evolved, these generalities have been violated. With careful forethought, it may be possible to identify vaccines at risk of failure even before they are introduced. PMID:28356449

  10. Drug Resistance Among Pathogenic Bacteria from Animals in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, H.; Barnum, D. A.; Mitchell, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    Prevalence of antimicrobial drug resistance among over 3000 clinical isolates of animal pathogens in Ontario during 1971-72 has been studied. A high number of multiple resistance patterns is prevalent among members of Enterobacteriaceae, especially Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. The most common resistance pattern among bovine strains was against not less than six drugs in common use. Among different animal species the bovine population was found to be the source of a high percentage of chloramphenicol resistant E. coli and S. typhimurium organisms. All the isolates resistant to this drug were in addition resistant to three or more other antibiotics of established therapeutic value. All the multiple resistant isolates of S. typhimurium tested had R factors and they transferred most of the resistance determinants including that for chloramphenicol to a recipient E. coli in vitro. Penicillin resistance among Staphylococcus aureus of bovine mammary origin did not appear to be high. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns of staphylococci, streptococci and Corynebacterium sp indicate effective in vitro activity with many antimicrobial agents. PMID:4277443

  11. Medical Management of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Doosoo

    2015-07-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is still a major threat worldwide. However, recent scientific advances in diagnostic and therapeutic tools have improved the management of drug-resistant TB. The development of rapid molecular testing methods allows for the early detection of drug resistance and prompt initiation of an appropriate treatment. In addition, there has been growing supportive evidence for shorter treatment regimens in multidrug-resistant TB; and for the first time in over 50 years, new anti-TB drugs have been developed. The World Health Organization has recently revised their guidelines, primarily based on evidence from a meta-analysis of individual patient data (n=9,153) derived from 32 observational studies, and outlined the recommended combination and correct use of available anti-TB drugs. This review summarizes the updated guidelines with a focus on the medical management of drug-resistant TB.

  12. [New drugs in the treatment of multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Oriol, Albert; Motlló, Cristina

    2014-09-15

    Progress in the treatment of multiple myeloma in the last decade has been able to delay, but ultimately not to prevent, the development of resistances and most patients still die of the disease or its related complications. New drugs have been developed including new alkylating agents, proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulators but also monoclonal antibodies and drugs with new mechanisms of action. Hopefully, this new generation of targeted agents will improve the results of the initial therapy, avoid relapses and development of resistances and provide better and less toxic options for the relapsed and refractory patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. New Drugs and Drug Resistance in Malaria: Molecular Genetic Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-26

    heterologous expressions system in yeast for potential drug target enzymes. The yeast expression system should allow rapid screening of new drugs , greatly...medication yet the world faces a crisis-drug resistance is emerging and spreading faster than drugs are being developed and the flow in the pipeline of new ... drugs has all but stopped. This represents a particular threat to the US Military. In a short time there may be parts of the world where no effective

  14. New Drugs and Drug Resistance in Malaria: Molecular Genetic Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-06-20

    heterologous expressions system in yeast for potential drug target enzymes. The yeast expression system should allow rapid screening of new drugs , greatly...medication yet the world faces a crisis-drug resistance is emerging and spreading faster than drugs are being developed and the flow in the pipeline of new ... drugs has all but stopped. This represents a particular threat to the US Military. In a short time there may be parts of the world where no effective

  15. Preventing drug resistance in severe influenza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolny, Hana; Deecke, Lucas

    2015-03-01

    Severe, long-lasting influenza infections are often caused by new strains of influenza. The long duration of these infections leads to an increased opportunity for the emergence of drug resistant mutants. This is particularly problematic for new strains of influenza since there is often no vaccine, so drug treatment is the first line of defense. One strategy for trying to minimize drug resistance is to apply periodic treatment. During treatment the wild-type virus decreases, but resistant virus might increase; when there is no treatment, wild-type virus will hopefully out-compete the resistant virus, driving down the number of resistant virus. We combine a mathematical model of severe influenza with a model of drug resistance to study emergence of drug resistance during a long-lasting infection. We apply periodic treatment with two types of antivirals: neuraminidase inhibitors, which block release of virions; and adamantanes, which block replication of virions. We compare the efficacy of the two drugs in reducing emergence of drug resistant mutants and examine the effect of treatment frequency on the emergence of drug resistant mutants.

  16. [Change in drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Liu, Yan; Luo, Yan-Ping; Liu, Chang-Ting

    2013-11-01

    To analyze the change in drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus (SAU) in the PLA general hospital from January 2008 to December 2012, and to provide solid evidence to support the rational use of antibiotics for clinical applications. The SAU strains isolated from clinical samples in the hospital were collected and subjected to the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion test. The results were assessed based on the 2002 American National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) guidelines. SAU strains were mainly isolated from sputum, urine, blood and wound excreta and distributed in penology, neurology wards, orthopedics and surgery ICU wards. Except for glycopeptide drugs, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) had a higher drug resistance rate than those of the other drugs and had significantly more resistance than methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (P < 0.05). In the dynamic observation of drug resistance, we discovered a gradual increase in drug resistance to fourteen test drugs during the last five years. Drug resistance rate of SAU stayed at a higher level over the last five years; moreover, the detection ratio of MRSA keeps rising year by year. It is crucial for physicians to use antibiotics rationally and monitor the change in drug resistance in a dynamic way.

  17. Drug concentration heterogeneity facilitates the evolution of drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kepler, Thomas B.; Perelson, Alan S.

    1998-01-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms use Darwinian processes to circumvent attempts at their control through chemotherapy. In the case of HIV-1 infection, in which drug resistance is a continuing problem, we show that in one-compartment systems, there is a relatively narrow window of drug concentrations that allows evolution of resistant variants. When the system is enlarged to two spatially distinct compartments held at different drug concentrations with transport of virus between them, the range of average drug concentrations that allow evolution of resistance is significantly increased. For high average drug concentrations, resistance is very unlikely to arise without spatial heterogeneity. We argue that a quantitative understanding of the role played by heterogeneity in drug levels and pathogen transport is crucial for attempts to control re-emergent infectious disease. PMID:9751697

  18. EPISOME-MEDIATED TRANSFER OF DRUG RESISTANCE IN ENTEROBACTERIACEAE VIII.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tsutomu; Ogata, Chizuko; Sato, Sachiko

    1964-01-01

    Watanabe, Tsutomu (Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan), Chizuko Ogata, and Sachiko Sato. Episome-mediated transfer of drug resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. VIII. Six-drug-resistance R factor. J. Bacteriol. 88:922–928. 1964.—The multiple-drug-resistant Escherichia coli strain isolated by Lebek in 1963 was found to transfer resistance to sulfonamide, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, kanamycin, and neomycin together by conjugation, as well as by transduction with phage P1kc, suggesting that these drug-resistance markers are carried by a single R factor (R6). The results of transductional and spontaneous segregations of the drug-resistance markers of R6 have shown that R6 has independent genetic determinants for sulfonamide, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and kanamycin-neomycin resistance. Resistance to kanamycin and neomycin is probably controlled by a single gene, because no segregation was observed between these two. The resistance transfer factor of R6 was found to be of the fi+ type. PMID:14219055

  19. Role of ABC-cassette transporters (MDR1, MRP1, BCRP) in the development of primary and acquired multiple drug resistance in patients with early and metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kovalev, A A; Tsvetaeva, D A; Grudinskaja, T V

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the research was to study the influence of multiple drug resistance (MDR1), multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) proteins expression on the effectiveness of chemotherapy in breast cancer (BC) patients. The retrospective analysis of the results of treatment of 77 women with invasive BC with different molecular subtypes at the age of 54.1±12.5, who received treatment in Zaporizhzhya Regional Clinical Oncological Dispensary during 2011-2013, has been carried out. 23 (29.8%) patients were in II stage of disease, 32 (41.5%) - in III stage, 22 patients (28.5%) - IV stage. Neoadjuvant therapy has been given to 34 (44.2%) patients, palliative therapy in connection with presence of hematogenous visceral and bone metastases - to 43 (55.8%) patients. Transport proteins BCRP, MRP and PGP have been studied in tissues of primary BC tumor, in tissues of visceral metastases, in metastatically altered regional lymph nodes, as well as in circulating in blood tumor cells (CTC). In every case, 1000 of tumor cells has been calculated. The intensity of staining (0, 1+, 2+, 3+), percentage of stained cells (threshold has constituted 10%) and homogeneity of tumor cells staining (homogeneous was considered 80% staining of cytoplasm or membrane of studied cells) has been taken in consideration. Retrospective analysis has determined the dependence of results of polychemotherapy (PCT) on level and pattern of expression of BCRP, MRP and PGP proteins. In 1(st) group, in the absence thereof expression of transport proteins in BC cells, the objective response (CR + PR) from the tumor has been observed in 17 out of 18 patients (94.4%). In 2nd group (only cytoplasmic staining) the objective response has been observed in 36 patients (85.7%). Ineffectiveness of therapy and tumor progression in this group has been observed in 6 (14.2%) patients. In 3(rd)group (high membrane BCRP, MRP and PGP expression), in 14 out of 17 patients (82.3%), during

  20. Mesenchymal change and drug resistance in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Naiditch, Jessica A; Jie, Chunfa; Lautz, Timothy B; Yu, Songtao; Clark, Sandra; Voronov, Dimitry; Chu, Fei; Madonna, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic initiation has many phenotypic similarities to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, including loss of cell-cell adhesion, increased invasiveness, and increased cell mobility. We have previously demonstrated that drug resistance is associated with a metastatic phenotype in neuroblastoma (NB). The purpose of this project was to determine if the development of doxorubicin resistance is associated with characteristics of mesenchymal change in human NB cells. Total RNA was isolated from wild type (WT) and doxorubicin-resistant (DoxR) human NB cell lines (SK-N-SH and SK-N-BE(2)C) and analyzed using the Illumina Human HT-12 version 4 Expression BeadChip. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified. Volcano plots and heat maps were generated. Genes of interest with a fold change in expression >1.5 and an adjusted P < 0.1 were analyzed. Immunofluorescence (IF) and Western blot analysis confirmed microarray results of interest. Matrigel invasion assay and migration wounding assays were performed. Volcano plots and heat maps visually demonstrated a similar pattern of DEGs in the SK-N-SH and SK-N-BE(2)C DoxR cell lines relative to their parental WT lines. Venn diagramming revealed 1594 DEGs common to both DoxR cell lines relative to their parental cell lines. Network analysis pointed to several significantly upregulated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition pathways, through TGF-beta pathways via RhoA, PI3K, and ILK and via SMADs, as well as via notch signaling pathways. DoxR cell lines displayed a more invasive phenotype than respective WT cell lines. Human SK-N-SH and SK-N-BE(2)C NB cells display characteristics of mesenchymal change via multiple pathways in the transition to a drug-resistant state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Environment-Mediated Drug Resistance in Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0572 TITLE: Environment-Mediated Drug Resistance in Neuroblastoma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yu...Resistance in Neuroblastoma 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0572 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Yu, Hua E 5d. PROJECT...collaborative experiments have demonstrated that monocytes collaborate with MSC in inducing STAT3-dependent drug resistance in neuroblastoma (Task 1), that S1P

  2. Antiproliferative effect of pheophorbide a-mediated photodynamic therapy and its synergistic effect with doxorubicin on multiple drug-resistant uterine sarcoma cell MES-SA/Dx5.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Karen Ka-Yan; Chan, Judy Yuet-Wa; Fung, Kwok-Pui

    2013-10-01

    Prolonged cancer chemotherapy is associated with the development of multidrug resistance (MDR), which is a major cause of treatment failure. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been applied as anticancer therapy and a means of circumventing MDR. The antiproliferative effect of pheophorbide a-mediated photodynamic therapy (Pa-PDT) has been demonstrated in several human cancer cell lines, including the uterine sarcoma cell line, MES-SA. This study set out to evaluate, first, the therapeutic potential of Pa-PDT on MES-SA/Dx5 uterine sarcoma cells and, subsequently, the effectiveness of combination therapy using Pa-PDT with doxorubicin (Dox). Our results showed that Pa-PDT was able to circumvent MDR in the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpressing human uterine sarcoma cell line, MES-SA/Dx5. Intracellular accumulation of Pa and Pa-PDT-induced cell death was not abrogated by MDR phenotype, when compared to the parental cell line, MES-SA. Combined therapy using Pa-PDT and Dox, a common chemotherapeutic drug, was found to be synergistic in the cell line, MES-SA/Dx5. Both activity and expression of MDR1 and P-gp were reduced by Pa-PDT treatment and such reductions were attenuated by α-tocopherol, the scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS), suggesting that the effect of Pa-PDT was mediated by the generation of intracellular ROS. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated the therapeutic potential of Pa-PDT alone or in combination with Dox in combating multidrug-resistant malignancies.

  3. A novel asymmetric-loop molecular beacon-based two-phase hybridization assay for accurate and high-throughput detection of multiple drug resistance-conferring point mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qinghai; Wu, Nan; Xie, Meng; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Ming; Li, Jianjun; Zhuo, Lisha; Kuang, Hong; Fu, Weiling

    2012-04-01

    The accurate and high-throughput detection of drug resistance-related multiple point mutations remains a challenge. Although the combination of molecular beacons with bio-immobilization technology, such as microarray, is promising, its application is difficult due to the ineffective immobilization of molecular beacons on the chip surface. Here, we propose a novel asymmetric-loop molecular beacon in which the loop consists of 2 parts. One is complementary to a target, while the other is complementary to an oligonucleotide probe immobilized on the chip surface. With this novel probe, a two-phase hybridization assay can be used for simultaneously detecting multiple point mutations. This assay will have advantages, such as easy probe availability, multiplex detection, low background, and high-efficiency hybridization, and may provide a new avenue for the immobilization of molecular beacons and high-throughput detection of point mutations.

  4. The role of glucuronidation in drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Mazerska, Zofia; Mróz, Anna; Pawłowska, Monika; Augustin, Ewa

    2016-03-01

    The final therapeutic effect of a drug candidate, which is directed to a specific molecular target strongly depends on its absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME). The disruption of at least one element of ADME may result in serious drug resistance. In this work we described the role of one element of this resistance: phase II metabolism with UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). UGT function is the transformation of their substrates into more polar metabolites, which are better substrates for the ABC transporters, MDR1, MRP and BCRP, than the native drug. UGT-mediated drug resistance can be associated with (i) inherent overexpression of the enzyme, named intrinsic drug resistance or (ii) induced expression of the enzyme, named acquired drug resistance observed when enzyme expression is induced by the drug or other factors, as food-derived compounds. Very often this induction occurs via ligand binding receptors including AhR (aryl hydrocarbon receptor) PXR (pregnane X receptor), or other transcription factors. The effect of UGT dependent resistance is strengthened by coordinate action and also a coordinate regulation of the expression of UGTs and ABC transporters. This coupling of UGT and multidrug resistance proteins has been intensively studied, particularly in the case of antitumor treatment, when this resistance is "improved" by differences in UGT expression between tumor and healthy tissue. Multidrug resistance coordinated with glucuronidation has also been described here for drugs used in the management of epilepsy, psychiatric diseases, HIV infections, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. Proposals to reverse UGT-mediated drug resistance should consider the endogenous functions of UGT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Total hip prosthesis complication, periprosthetic infection with external fistulizing due to Enterobacter cloacae complex multiple drugs resistance: A clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Amorese, V; Corda, M; Donadu, M; Usai, D; Pisanu, F; Milia, F; Marras, F; Sanna, A; Delogu, D; Mazzarello, V; Manzoni, G; Conti, M; Meloni, G B; Zanetti, S; Doria, C

    2017-01-01

    The Enterobacter cloacae is a microorganism found in the intestinal flora of the majority of animals, including humans. Primary infections caused by E. cloacae are rare in immunocompetent patients, but are very common in hospital settings in newborns and immunocompromised patients, and can be aggravated by the insurgence of antibiotic resistance. The incidence of periprosthetic hip infections is just below 2%. A 76year old woman with multiple comorbidities underwent surgical implantation of intermediary total hip prosthesis of the left hip, in a different health facility, in February 2014, after the basicervical fracture of the upper femur extremity due to trauma. After an episode of dislocation of the prosthetic implant, in September 2014, she underwent a surgical operation to implant the acetabular component. A month later not in our facility, following a re-hospitalization for the dislocation of the arthroprosthesis, an infection from E. cloacae complex was discovered. After 2 years of chronic infection she came to our attention; the clinical picture featured coxalgia and secreting fistula in the surgical wound. Following a specific antibiotic therapy, carried out intravenously over the course of a month, we decided to intervene removing the left hip arthroprosthesis and placing an antibiotic spacer following the direction deduced from the antibiogram study of August 2016. The patient was hospitalized in our facility and 2 months later she underwent another operation to remove the antibiotic spacer and to place a new total hip arthroprosthesis. Multiple swabs showed the complete healing from the infection, which was confirmed a couple of months later. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance: Daptomycin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Truc T.; Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2016-01-01

    Daptomycin (DAP) is a cyclic lipopeptide with in vitro activity against a variety of Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug-resistant organisms. Since its introduction in clinical practice in 2003, DAP has become an important key front-line antibiotic for severe or deep-seated infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. Unfortunately, DAP-resistance (R) has been extensively documented in clinically important organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp, and Streptococcus spp. Studies on the mechanisms of DAP-R in Bacillus subtilis and other Gram-positive bacteria indicate that the genetic pathways of DAP resistance are diverse and complex. However, a common phenomenon emerging from these mechanistic studies is that DAP-R is associated with important adaptive changes in cell wall and cell membrane homeostasis with critical changes in cell physiology. Findings related to these adaptive changes have offered novel insights into the genetics and molecular mechanisms of bacterial cell envelope stress response and the manner in which Gram-positive bacteria cope with the antimicrobial peptide attack and protect vital structures of the cell envelope such as the cell membrane. In this review, we will examine the most recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms of resistance to DAP in relevant Gram-positive pathogens and discuss the clinical implications for therapy against these important bacteria. PMID:26495887

  7. Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Angola.

    PubMed

    Fançony, Cláudia; Brito, Miguel; Gil, Jose Pedro

    2016-02-09

    Facing chloroquine drug resistance, Angola promptly adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy as the first-line to treat malaria. Currently, the country aims to consolidate malaria control, while preparing for the elimination of the disease, along with others African countries in the region. However, the remarkable capacity of Plasmodium to develop drug resistance represents an alarming threat for those achievements. Herein, the available, but relatively scarce and dispersed, information on malaria drug resistance in Angola, is reviewed and discussed. The review aims to inform but also to encourage future research studies that monitor and update the information on anti-malarial drug efficacy and prevalence of molecular markers of drug resistance, key fields in the context and objectives of elimination.

  8. Preventing and managing antiretroviral drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2004-05-01

    Development of resistance to antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) is a major impediment to optimum treatment of HIV-1 infection. Although resistance testing can help to select subsequent regimens when virologic failure occurs, cross-resistance, which affects all classes of ARVs, may make it more difficult to achieve optimum control of HIV. We have known for some time that our first choice of antiretroviral therapy offers the best chance to control HIV replication and that initial therapy should be selected with an eye on future options. Potency is the first line of defense against the development of resistance. Other factors that affect resistance development include: tolerability, potential for optimum adherence, and genetic and pharmacologic barriers to development of resistance. If resistance emerges, only a single drug may be affected initially, and a rapid change in ARVs may preserve the efficacy of other components. One cautionary note is that we can no longer assume that a patient's HIV is fully susceptible to all ARVs even in the initial regimen. Transmission of drug-resistant HIV means that the genetic composition may be that of an "experienced" virus with reduced susceptibility to ARVs. Resistance testing at the time of transmission is most likely to reveal this resistance, but over time the dominant genetic pattern may revert to wild-type, and be missed by resistance testing. Because "archived" resistant HIV may emerge quickly once treatment is initiated, we need to keep this in mind when selecting initial therapy.

  9. Mechanisms of drug resistance: daptomycin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tran, Truc T; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-09-01

    Daptomycin (DAP) is a cyclic lipopeptide with in vitro activity against a variety of Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug-resistant organisms. Since its introduction into clinical practice in 2003, DAP has become an important key frontline antibiotic for severe or deep-seated infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. Unfortunately, DAP resistance (DAP-R) has been extensively documented in clinically important organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. Studies on the mechanisms of DAP-R in Bacillus subtilis and other Gram-positive bacteria indicate that the genetic pathways of DAP-R are diverse and complex. However, a common phenomenon emerging from these mechanistic studies is that DAP-R is associated with important adaptive changes in cell wall and cell membrane homeostasis with critical changes in cell physiology. Findings related to these adaptive changes have provided novel insights into the genetics and molecular mechanisms of bacterial cell envelope stress response and the manner in which Gram-positive bacteria cope with the antimicrobial peptide attack and protect vital structures of the cell envelope, such as the cell membrane. In this review, we will examine the most recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms of resistance to DAP in relevant Gram-positive pathogens and discuss the clinical implications for therapy against these important bacteria.

  10. Delivery of miR-375 and doxorubicin hydrochloride by lipid-coated hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles to overcome multiple drug resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Huiying; Yu, Zhaoyang; Liu, Yong; Yuan, Weigang; Yang, Tan; You, Jia; He, Xingxing; Lee, Robert J; Li, Lei; Xu, Chuanrui

    2017-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) due to overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a major obstacle that hinders the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It has been shown that miR-375 inhibits P-gp expression via inhibition of astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) expression in HCC, and induces apoptosis in HCC cells by targeting AEG-1 and YAP1. In this study, we prepared lipid-coated hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (LH) containing doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) and miR-375 (LHD/miR-375) to deliver the two agents into MDR HCC cells in vitro and in vivo. We found that LHD/miR-375 overcame drug efflux and delivered miR-375 and DOX into MDR HepG2/ADR cells or HCC tissues. MiR-375 delivered by LHD/miR-375 was taken up through phagocytosis and clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Following release from late endosomes, it repressed the expression of P-gp in HepG2/ADR cells. The synergistic effects of miR-375 and hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSN) resulted in a profound increase in the uptake of DOX by the HCC cells and prevented HCC cell growth. Enhanced antitumor effects of LHD/miR-375 were also validated in HCC xenografts and primary tumors; however, no significant toxicity was observed. Mechanistic studies also revealed that miR-375 and DOX exerted a synergistic antitumor effect by promoting apoptosis. Our study illustrates that delivery of miR-375 using HMSN is a feasible approach to circumvent MDR in the management of HCC. It, therefore, merits further development for potential clinical application. PMID:28769563

  11. Giardiasis, drug resistance, and new target discovery.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hai-Feng; Chen, Bing; Wen, Jian-Fan

    2010-08-01

    Giardiasis is a worldwide parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Giardia lamblia in humans and other animals, especially live stocks. Here, we briefly review the current state of therapeutic availability for giardiasis, including chemical drugs and vaccines, and the dilemma in the prevention and treatment of this disease, including the emergence of drug resistance and the shortage of vaccine (especially for humans). Future efforts and progress in controlling giardiasis are expected in three aspects: clarification of the drug resistance mechanisms, development of efficient vaccines, and identification of more targets for new drugs and vaccines.

  12. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  13. Mechanisms of echinocandin antifungal drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections due to Candida and Aspergillus species cause extensive morbidity and mortality, especially among immunosuppressed patients, and antifungal therapy is critical to patient management. Yet only a few drug classes are available to treat invasive fungal diseases, and this problem is compounded by the emergence of antifungal resistance. Echinocandin drugs are the preferred choice to treat candidiasis. They are the first cell wall–active agents and target the fungal-specific enzyme glucan synthase, which catalyzes the biosynthesis of β-1,3-glucan, a key cell wall polymer. Therapeutic failures occur rarely among common Candida species, with the exception of Candida glabrata, which are frequently multidrug resistant. Echinocandin resistance in susceptible species is always acquired during therapy. The mechanism of resistance involves amino acid changes in hot-spot regions of Fks subunits of glucan synthase, which decrease the sensitivity of the enzyme to drug. Cellular stress response pathways lead to drug adaptation, which promote the formation of resistant fks strains. Clinical factors promoting echinocandin resistance include empiric therapy, prophylaxis, gastrointestinal reservoirs, and intra-abdominal infections. A better understanding of the echinocandin resistance mechanism, along with cellular and clinical factors promoting resistance, will promote more effective strategies to overcome and prevent echinocandin resistance. PMID:26190298

  14. Noncoding RNA in drug resistant sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyang; Shen, Jacson K.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Xiao, Tao; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2017-01-01

    Sarcomas are a group of malignant tumors that arise from mesenchymal origin. Despite significant development of multidisciplinary treatments for sarcoma, survival rates have reached a plateau. Chemotherapy has been extensively used for sarcoma treatment; however, the development of drug resistance is a major obstacle limiting the success of many anticancer agents. Sarcoma biology has traditionally focused on genomic and epigenomic deregulation of protein-coding genes to identify the therapeutic potential for reversing drug resistance. New and more creative approaches have found the involvement of noncoding RNAs, including microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs in drug resistant sarcoma. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of noncoding RNAs characteristics and the regulated genes involved in drug resistant sarcoma, and focus on their therapeutic potential in the future.

  15. MICROBIAL DRUG RESISTANCE (EPIDEMIOLOGY, GENETICS).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    resistance. Antibacterial and inducer activities of LM and its derivatives were examined. Mechanisms of Mac-resistance after induction was investigated...combination of ribosomes from S.aureus and supernatant of E.coli. The ribosomes decrease their binding to spiramycin (SP) in parallel with the increase

  16. Impact of treatment heterogeneity on drug resistance and supply chain costs☆

    PubMed Central

    Spiliotopoulou, Eirini; Boni, Maciej F.; Yadav, Prashant

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of scarce drugs for many infectious diseases is threatened by the emergence and spread of resistance. Multiple studies show that available drugs should be used in a socially optimal way to contain drug resistance. This paper studies the tradeoff between risk of drug resistance and operational costs when using multiple drugs for a specific disease. Using a model for disease transmission and resistance spread, we show that treatment with multiple drugs, on a population level, results in better resistance-related health outcomes, but more interestingly, the marginal benefit decreases as the number of drugs used increases. We compare this benefit with the corresponding change in procurement and safety stock holding costs that result from higher drug variety in the supply chain. Using a large-scale simulation based on malaria transmission dynamics, we show that disease prevalence seems to be a less important factor when deciding the optimal width of drug assortment, compared to the duration of one episode of the disease and the price of the drug(s) used. Our analysis shows that under a wide variety of scenarios for disease prevalence and drug cost, it is optimal to simultaneously deploy multiple drugs in the population. If the drug price is high, large volume purchasing discounts are available, and disease prevalence is high, it may be optimal to use only one drug. Our model lends insights to policy makers into the socially optimal size of drug assortment for a given context. PMID:25843982

  17. Overcoming Drug Resistance in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jiang; Zhang, Yuqing; Yu, Xianjun; Yang, Jingxuan; LeBrun, Drake; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Li, Min

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic cancer has the worst survival rate of all cancers. The current standard care for metastatic pancreatic cancer is gemcitabine, however, the success of this treatment is poor and overall survival has not improved for decades. Drug resistance (both intrinsic and acquired) is thought to be a major reason for the limited benefit of most pancreatic cancer therapies. Areas covered Previous studies have indicated various mechanisms of drug resistance in pancreatic cancer, including changes in individual genes or signaling pathways, the influence of the tumor microenvironment, and the presence of highly resistant stem cells. This review summarizes recent advances in the mechanisms of drug resistance in pancreatic cancer, and potential strategies to overcome this. Expert Opinion Increasing drug delivery efficiency and decreasing drug resistance is the current aim in pancreatic cancer treatment, and will also benefit the treatment of other cancers. Understanding the molecular and cellular basis of drug resistance in pancreatic cancer will lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies with the potential to sensitize pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy, and to increase the efficacy of current treatments in a wide variety of human cancers. PMID:21391891

  18. Evolution of Drug Resistance in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Waclaw, B

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is an important and timely problem of contemporary medicine. Rapid evolution of resistant bacteria calls for new preventive measures to slow down this process, and a longer-term progress cannot be achieved without a good understanding of the mechanisms through which drug resistance is acquired and spreads in microbial populations. Here, we discuss recent experimental and theoretical advances in our knowledge how the dynamics of microbial populations affects the evolution of antibiotic resistance . We focus on the role of spatial and temporal drug gradients and show that in certain situations bacteria can evolve de novo resistance within hours. We identify factors that lead to such rapid onset of resistance and discuss their relevance for bacterial infections.

  19. Inflammatory cytokine production in tumor cells upon chemotherapy drug exposure or upon selection for drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Edwardson, Derek W; Boudreau, Justin; Mapletoft, Jonathan; Lanner, Carita; Kovala, A Thomas; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2017-01-01

    Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α) has been shown to be released by tumor cells in response to docetaxel, and lipopolysaccharides (LPS), the latter through activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). However, it is unclear whether the former involves TLR4 receptor activation through direct binding of the drug to TLR4 at the cell surface. The current study was intended to better understand drug-induced TNF-α production in tumor cells, whether from short-term drug exposure or in cells selected for drug resistance. ELISAs were employed to measure cytokine release from breast and ovarian tumor cells in response to several structurally distinct chemotherapy agents and/or TLR4 agonists or antagonists. Drug uptake and drug sensitivity studies were also performed. We observed that several drugs induced TNF-αrelease from multiple tumor cell lines. Docetaxel-induced cytokine production was distinct from that of LPS in both MyD88-positive (MCF-7) and MyD88-deficient (A2780) cells. The acquisition of docetaxel resistance was accompanied by increased constitutive production of TNF-αand CXCL1, which waned at higher levels of resistance. In docetaxel-resistant MCF-7 and A2780 cell lines, the production of TNF-α could not be significantly augmented by docetaxel without the inhibition of P-gp, a transporter protein that promotes drug efflux from tumor cells. Pretreatment of tumor cells with LPS sensitized MyD88-positive cells (but not MyD88-deficient) to docetaxel cytotoxicity in both drug-naive and drug-resistant cells. Our findings suggest that taxane-induced inflammatory cytokine production from tumor cells depends on the duration of exposure, requires cellular drug-accumulation, and is distinct from the LPS response seen in breast tumor cells. Also, stimulation of the LPS-induced pathway may be an attractive target for treatment of drug-resistant disease.

  20. Learning the ABC of oral fungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Cannon, R D; Holmes, A R

    2015-12-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins are ubiquitous in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. They are involved in energy-dependent transport of molecules across membranes. ABC proteins are often promiscuous transporters that can translocate a variety of substrates. In oral fungi, especially in Candida species, they have been implicated as major contributors to the high-level azole resistance of clinical isolates from infections that do not respond to drug therapy. Although this is predominantly due to efflux of azoles from the cells, ABC proteins can contribute to fungal drug resistance in other ways as well. Cells in biofilms are notoriously resistant to antifungal agents. ABC proteins can contribute to this resistance through the efflux of drugs. Biofilms are complex communities of myriad microorganisms which, to survive in such a milieu, need to communicate with, and respond to, other microorganisms and their products. ABC proteins are involved in the secretion of fungal mating factors and quorum sensing molecules. These molecules affect biofilm structure and behavior that can result in increased drug resistance. Hence, ABC proteins make multiple contributions to oral fungal drug resistance through a variety of responses to environmental signals.

  1. Malaria epidemic and drug resistance, Djibouti.

    PubMed

    Rogier, Christophe; Pradines, Bruno; Bogreau, H; Koeck, Jean-Louis; Kamil, Mohamed-Ali; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2005-02-01

    Analysis of Plasmodium falciparum isolates collected before, during, and after a 1999 malaria epidemic in Djibouti shows that, despite a high prevalence of resistance to chloroquine, the epidemic cannot be attributed to a sudden increase in drug resistance of local parasite populations.

  2. First Report of blaIMP-14 on a Plasmid Harboring Multiple Drug Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131.

    PubMed

    Stoesser, Nicole; Sheppard, Anna E; Peirano, Gisele; Sebra, Robert P; Lynch, Tarah; Anson, Luke W; Kasarskis, Andrew; Motyl, Mary R; Crook, Derrick W; Pitout, Johann D

    2016-08-01

    The blaIMP-14 carbapenem resistance gene has largely previously been observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. As part of global surveillance and sequencing of carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, we identified a sequence type 131 strain harboring blaIMP-14 within a class 1 integron, itself nested within an ∼54-kb multidrug resistance region on an epidemic IncA/C2 plasmid. The emergence of blaIMP-14 in this context in the ST131 lineage is of potential clinical concern. Copyright © 2016 Stoesser et al.

  3. First Report of blaIMP-14 on a Plasmid Harboring Multiple Drug Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Anna E.; Peirano, Gisele; Sebra, Robert P.; Lynch, Tarah; Anson, Luke W.; Kasarskis, Andrew; Motyl, Mary R.; Crook, Derrick W.; Pitout, Johann D.

    2016-01-01

    The blaIMP-14 carbapenem resistance gene has largely previously been observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. As part of global surveillance and sequencing of carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, we identified a sequence type 131 strain harboring blaIMP-14 within a class 1 integron, itself nested within an ∼54-kb multidrug resistance region on an epidemic IncA/C2 plasmid. The emergence of blaIMP-14 in this context in the ST131 lineage is of potential clinical concern. PMID:27246777

  4. Drug Resistance in Glioblastoma: A Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    Haar, Catherine P.; Hebbar, Preetha; Wallace, Gerald C.; Das, Arabinda; Vandergrift, William A.; Smith, Joshua A.; Giglio, Pierre; Patel, Sunil J.; Ray, Swapan K.; Banik, Naren L.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is recognized as the most common and lethal form of central nervous system cancer. Currently used surgical techniques, chemotherapeutic agents, and radiotherapy strategies have done very little in extending the life expectancies of patients diagnosed with GBM. The difficulty in treating this malignant disease lies both in its inherent complexity and numerous mechanisms of drug resistance. In this review, we summarize several of the primary mechanisms of drug resistance. We reviewed available published literature in the English language regarding drug resistance in glioblastoma. The reasons for drug resistance in glioblastoma include drug efflux, hypoxic areas of tumor cells, cancer stem cells, DNA damage repair, and miRNAs. Many potential therapies target these mechanisms, including a series of investigated alternative and plant-derived agents. Future research and clinical trials in glioblastoma patients should pursue combination of therapies to help combat drug resistance. The emerging new data on the potential of plant-derived therapeutics should also be closely considered and further investigated. PMID:22228201

  5. Drug resistance in glioblastoma: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Haar, Catherine P; Hebbar, Preetha; Wallace, Gerald C; Das, Arabinda; Vandergrift, William A; Smith, Joshua A; Giglio, Pierre; Patel, Sunil J; Ray, Swapan K; Banik, Naren L

    2012-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is recognized as the most common and lethal form of central nervous system cancer. Currently used surgical techniques, chemotherapeutic agents, and radiotherapy strategies have done very little in extending the life expectancies of patients diagnosed with GBM. The difficulty in treating this malignant disease lies both in its inherent complexity and numerous mechanisms of drug resistance. In this review, we summarize several of the primary mechanisms of drug resistance. We reviewed available published literature in the English language regarding drug resistance in glioblastoma. The reasons for drug resistance in glioblastoma include drug efflux, hypoxic areas of tumor cells, cancer stem cells, DNA damage repair, and miRNAs. Many potential therapies target these mechanisms, including a series of investigated alternative and plant-derived agents. Future research and clinical trials in glioblastoma patients should pursue combination of therapies to help combat drug resistance. The emerging new data on the potential of plant-derived therapeutics should also be closely considered and further investigated.

  6. Hsp90 Governs Dispersion and Drug Resistance of Fungal Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Nett, Jeniel; Rajendran, Ranjith; Ramage, Gordon; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.; Andes, David; Cowen, Leah E.

    2011-01-01

    Fungal biofilms are a major cause of human mortality and are recalcitrant to most treatments due to intrinsic drug resistance. These complex communities of multiple cell types form on indwelling medical devices and their eradication often requires surgical removal of infected devices. Here we implicate the molecular chaperone Hsp90 as a key regulator of biofilm dispersion and drug resistance. We previously established that in the leading human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, Hsp90 enables the emergence and maintenance of drug resistance in planktonic conditions by stabilizing the protein phosphatase calcineurin and MAPK Mkc1. Hsp90 also regulates temperature-dependent C. albicans morphogenesis through repression of cAMP-PKA signalling. Here we demonstrate that genetic depletion of Hsp90 reduced C. albicans biofilm growth and maturation in vitro and impaired dispersal of biofilm cells. Further, compromising Hsp90 function in vitro abrogated resistance of C. albicans biofilms to the most widely deployed class of antifungal drugs, the azoles. Depletion of Hsp90 led to reduction of calcineurin and Mkc1 in planktonic but not biofilm conditions, suggesting that Hsp90 regulates drug resistance through different mechanisms in these distinct cellular states. Reduction of Hsp90 levels led to a marked decrease in matrix glucan levels, providing a compelling mechanism through which Hsp90 might regulate biofilm azole resistance. Impairment of Hsp90 function genetically or pharmacologically transformed fluconazole from ineffectual to highly effective in eradicating biofilms in a rat venous catheter infection model. Finally, inhibition of Hsp90 reduced resistance of biofilms of the most lethal mould, Aspergillus fumigatus, to the newest class of antifungals to reach the clinic, the echinocandins. Thus, we establish a novel mechanism regulating biofilm drug resistance and dispersion and that targeting Hsp90 provides a much-needed strategy for improving clinical outcome in the

  7. Drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae: latest developments.

    PubMed

    Suay-García, B; Pérez-Gracia, M T

    2017-07-01

    Gonorrhea is the second most frequently reported notifiable disease in the United States and is becoming increasingly common in Europe. The purpose of this review was to assess the current state of drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in order to evaluate future prospects for its treatment. An exhaustive literature search was conducted to include the latest research regarding drug resistance and treatment guidelines for gonorrhea. Gonococci have acquired all known resistance mechanisms to all antimicrobials used for treatment. Currently, the European Union, the United States, and the United Kingdom have established surveillance programs to assess, on a yearly basis, the development of gonococcal resistance. Current treatment guidelines are being threatened by the increasing number of ceftriaxone-, cefixime-, and azithromycin-resistant N. gonorrhoeae strains being detected worldwide. This has led the scientific community to develop new treatment options with new molecules in order to persevere in the battle against this "superbug".

  8. Antimicrobial Drugs in Fighting against Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Ahmed, Saeed; Hao, Haihong; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The outbreak of antimicrobial resistance, together with the lack of newly developed antimicrobial drugs, represents an alarming signal for both human and animal healthcare worldwide. Selection of rational dosage regimens for traditional antimicrobial drugs based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles as well as development of novel antimicrobials targeting new bacterial targets or resistance mechanisms are key approaches in tackling AMR. In addition to the cellular level resistance (i.e., mutation and horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants), the community level resistance (i.e., bilofilms and persisters) is also an issue causing antimicrobial therapy difficulties. Therefore, anti-resistance and antibiofilm strategies have currently become research hotspot to combat antimicrobial resistance. Although metallic nanoparticles can both kill bacteria and inhibit biofilm formation, the toxicity is still a big challenge for their clinical applications. In conclusion, rational use of the existing antimicrobials and combinational use of new strategies fighting against antimicrobial resistance are powerful warranties to preserve potent antimicrobial drugs for both humans and animals. PMID:27092125

  9. CancerDR: cancer drug resistance database.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gupta, Sudheer; Singh, Harinder; Kumar, Shailesh; Gautam, Ankur; Kapoor, Pallavi; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2013-01-01

    Cancer therapies are limited by the development of drug resistance, and mutations in drug targets is one of the main reasons for developing acquired resistance. The adequate knowledge of these mutations in drug targets would help to design effective personalized therapies. Keeping this in mind, we have developed a database "CancerDR", which provides information of 148 anti-cancer drugs, and their pharmacological profiling across 952 cancer cell lines. CancerDR provides comprehensive information about each drug target that includes; (i) sequence of natural variants, (ii) mutations, (iii) tertiary structure, and (iv) alignment profile of mutants/variants. A number of web-based tools have been integrated in CancerDR. This database will be very useful for identification of genetic alterations in genes encoding drug targets, and in turn the residues responsible for drug resistance. CancerDR allows user to identify promiscuous drug molecules that can kill wide range of cancer cells. CancerDR is freely accessible at http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/cancerdr/

  10. Cross-resistance to fluoroquinolones in multiple-antibiotic-resistant (Mar) Escherichia coli selected by tetracycline or chloramphenicol: decreased drug accumulation associated with membrane changes in addition to OmpF reduction.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, S P; McMurry, L M; Hooper, D C; Wolfson, J S; Levy, S B

    1989-01-01

    Chromosomal multiple-antibiotic-resistant (Mar) mutants of Escherichia coli, selected on agar containing low concentrations of tetracycline or chloramphenicol, were 6- to 18-fold less susceptible to the fluoroquinolones than were their wild-type E. coli K-12 or E. coli C parental strains. The frequency of emergence of such mutants was at least 1,000-fold higher than that of those selected by the fluoroquinolone norfloxacin directly. When Mar mutants, but not wild-type cells, were plated on norfloxacin, mutants resistant to high levels of norfloxacin (2 micrograms/ml) appeared at a relatively high (approximately 10(-7] frequency. In addition to decreased amounts of OmpF, Mar mutants had other outer membrane protein changes and were four- to eightfold less susceptible to fluoroquinolones than was an ompF::Tn5 mutant lacking only OmpF. Accumulation of [3H]norfloxacin was more than threefold lower in the Mar mutants than in wild-type cells and twofold lower than in the OmpF-deficient derivative. These differences were not attributable to a change in the endogenous active efflux system for norfloxacin in E. coli. Norfloxacin-induced inhibition of DNA synthesis was threefold lower in intact cells of a Mar mutant than in susceptible cells, but this difference was not seen in toluene-permeabilized cells. Insertion of Tn5 into marA (min 34.05 on the chromosome) led to a return of the wild-type patterns of norfloxacin accumulation, fluoroquinolone and other antimicrobial agent susceptibilities, and outer membrane protein profile, including partial restoration of OmpF. These findings together suggest that marA-dependent fluoroquinolone resistance is linked to decreased cell permeability, only part of which can be accounted for by the reduction in OmpF. Once mutated to marA, cells can achieve high levels of quinolone resistance at a relatively high frequency. Images PMID:2679373

  11. Drug targeting of leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Anna; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Meli, Rosaria

    2015-11-01

    Leptin regulates glucose, lipid and energy homeostasis as well as feeding behavior, serving as a bridge between peripheral metabolically active tissues and the central nervous system (CNS). Indeed, this adipocyte-derived hormone, whose circulating levels mirror fat mass, not only exerts its anti-obesity effects mainly modulating the activity of specific hypothalamic neurons expressing the long form of the leptin receptor (Ob-Rb), but it also shows pleiotropic functions due to the activation of Ob-Rb in peripheral tissues. Nevertheless, several mechanisms have been suggested to mediate leptin resistance, including obesity-associated hyperleptinemia, impairment of leptin access to CNS and the reduction in Ob-Rb signal transduction effectiveness, among others. During the onset and progression of obesity, the dampening of leptin sensitivity often occurs, preventing the efficacy of leptin replacement therapy from overcoming obesity and/or its comorbidities. This review focuses on obesity-associated leptin resistance and the mechanisms underpinning this condition, to highlight the relevance of leptin sensitivity restoration as a useful therapeutic strategy to treat common obesity and its complications. Interestingly, although promising strategies to counteract leptin resistance have been proposed, these pharmacological approaches have shown limited efficacy or even relevant adverse effects in preclinical and clinical studies. Therefore, the numerous findings from this review clearly indicate a lack of a single and efficacious treatment for leptin resistance, highlighting the necessity to find new therapeutic tools to improve leptin sensitivity, especially in patients with most severe disease profiles.

  12. Antibacterial drug discovery in the resistance era.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric D; Wright, Gerard D

    2016-01-21

    The looming antibiotic-resistance crisis has penetrated the consciousness of clinicians, researchers, policymakers, politicians and the public at large. The evolution and widespread distribution of antibiotic-resistance elements in bacterial pathogens has made diseases that were once easily treatable deadly again. Unfortunately, accompanying the rise in global resistance is a failure in antibacterial drug discovery. Lessons from the history of antibiotic discovery and fresh understanding of antibiotic action and the cell biology of microorganisms have the potential to deliver twenty-first century medicines that are able to control infection in the resistance era.

  13. Detection of Low Frequency Multi-Drug Resistance and Novel Putative Maribavir Resistance in Immunocompromised Pediatric Patients with Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J; Bryant, Josephine M; Depledge, Daniel P; Margetts, Ben K; Simmonds, Jacob; Nicolaou, Stephanos; Tutill, Helena J; Williams, Rachel; Worth, Austen J J; Marks, Stephen D; Veys, Paul; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Breuer, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a significant pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, with the potential to cause fatal pneumonitis and colitis, as well as increasing the risk of organ rejection in transplant patients. With the advent of new anti-HCMV drugs there is therefore considerable interest in using virus sequence data to monitor emerging resistance to antiviral drugs in HCMV viraemia and disease, including the identification of putative new mutations. We used target-enrichment to deep sequence HCMV DNA from 11 immunosuppressed pediatric patients receiving single or combination anti-HCMV treatment, serially sampled over 1-27 weeks. Changes in consensus sequence and resistance mutations were analyzed for three ORFs targeted by anti-HCMV drugs and the frequencies of drug resistance mutations monitored. Targeted-enriched sequencing of clinical material detected mutations occurring at frequencies of 2%. Seven patients showed no evidence of drug resistance mutations. Four patients developed drug resistance mutations a mean of 16 weeks after starting treatment. In two patients, multiple resistance mutations accumulated at frequencies of 20% or less, including putative maribavir and ganciclovir resistance mutations P522Q (UL54) and C480F (UL97). In one patient, resistance was detected 14 days earlier than by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis suggested recombination or superinfection in one patient. Deep sequencing of HCMV enriched from clinical samples excluded resistance in 7 of 11 subjects and identified resistance mutations earlier than conventional PCR-based resistance testing in 2 patients. Detection of multiple low level resistance mutations was associated with poor outcome.

  14. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: an insurmountable epidemic?

    PubMed

    Chakroborty, Amitabha

    2011-06-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis has brought back the spectre of pre-antibiotic days. WHO surveillance data from 2007 showed multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB)-tubercle bacillus resistant to both isoniazid and rifampicin accounting for 4.8% of all new and subsequent cases of tuberculosis. India and China-the two most populated countries of the world, house the maximum number of drug-resistant tuberculosis cases. In eastern European and central Asian countries, more than 6% of new TB cases are MDR-TB, whereas the number is <3% in the countries of the western world. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) has emerged with the prospect of tuberculosis becoming an incurable disease. A surveillance spreading over the six continents showed 10% of MDR-TB cases were also XDR-TB. The fact that tuberculosis is the most common opportunistic infection among HIV-infected patients in developing countries makes the challenge almost insurmountable. The mortality of HIV and MDR-TB co-infected patients is exceedingly high. The absence of guidelines for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis and of infrastructure for delivery of DOT program and rapid laboratory diagnostic facilities, including drug susceptibility testing for both first and second-line drugs, and lack of trained human resource in most of the developing world account for the emergence and perpetuation of this menacing problem. WHO along with partnership with Green Light Committee and individual national governments has started DOT plus program to control this global epidemic.

  15. Chemotherapy of drug-resistant malaria

    PubMed Central

    Kain, Kevin C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the impact of drug-resistant malaria on current management of plasmodial infections. DATA SOURCES: A MEDLINE search of the English-language medical literature from 1985 to 1995; bibliographies of selected papers; international malaria advisory experts. DATA SYNTHESIS: Combinations of artemisinin derivatives and mefloquine or atovaquone plus proguanil appear to be the most active drug regimens against multidrug-resistant falciparum malaria from Southeast Asia. The optimal therapy for chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax is unknown, but recent data indicate that halofantrine or chloroquine plus high doses of primaquine are efficacious. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of drug-resistant malaria continues to increase at a rate that exceeds new drug development. Ultimately the control of malaria will require more creative approaches than just the development of additional inhibitory drugs. These might include the identification of biochemical pathways unique to the parasite (such as drug efflux and heme polymerization), making it possible to design new classes of antimalarial agents that are selectively toxic to the parasite; methods to block parasite development in the mosquito vector; and multistage vaccines against asexual and sexual stages to block both the pathophysiology and the transmission of disease. PMID:22514413

  16. Prevalence of multiple drug resistance and screening of enterotoxin (stn) gene in Salmonella enterica serovars from water sources in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akinyemi, K O; Iwalokun, B A; Foli, F; Oshodi, K; Coker, A O

    2011-02-01

    To determine the prevalence, antibiotic resistance and carriage of enterotoxin (stn) gene among strains of Salmonella isolated from water sources in Lagos. A total of 200 samples (60 well water, 60 pipe-borne water and 80 different brands of sachet water) were collected at random from various locations in Lagos. The samples were evaluated bacteriologically using standard methods. The identified isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility tests and were further screened for the presence of stn gene using standard procedures. Thirty-seven of the samples analysed were positive for Salmonella isolates. Seven serotypes were found -Salmonella typhi (n = 3, 8.1%), Salmonella typhimurium (n = 8, 21.6%), Salmonella choleraesuis (n = 5, 13.5%), Salmonella enteritidis (n = 9, 24.3%), Salmonella paratyphi (n = 8, 21.6%) and Salmonella arizonae (n = 4, 10.8%) - with at least one serotype present in all water sources. Over 60% of Salmonella isolates carried stn gene and the risk was higher in pipe-borne water. There was no relationship (P > 0.05) between enterotoxin-producing gene and antibiotic resistance in Salmonella isolates. Thirteen resistance patterns were exhibited by the isolates, with Str. Amp.Tet.Chl.Amo.Gen, Str. Amp.Tet.Amo.Chl.Amo.Nal.Nit, Str.Tet and Str. Amp.Tet.Chl.Amo being the most notable resistance patterns observed. Isolates that carried stn gene developed resistance to more antibiotics. Although reduced susceptibility to ciproflocacin was observed in two strains, none of the isolates developed resistance to ofloxacin. Emerging multidrug-resistant Salmonella serotypes with stn gene were found in the water samples, which may pose a threat to public health. Constant monitoring of pipe leakages, the quality of various wells and the quality of sachet water is advocated to avoid possible future outbreaks of salmonellosis due to consumption of contaminated water. Copyright © 2010 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by

  17. Antifungal drug resistance to azoles and polyenes.

    PubMed

    Masiá Canuto, Mar; Gutiérrez Rodero, Félix

    2002-09-01

    There is an increased awareness of the morbidity and mortality associated with fungal infections caused by resistant fungi in various groups of patients. Epidemiological studies have identified risk factors associated with antifungal drug resistance. Selection pressure due to the continuous exposure to azoles seems to have an essential role in developing resistance to fluconazole in Candida species. Haematological malignancies, especially acute leukaemia with severe and prolonged neutropenia, seem to be the main risk factors for acquiring deep-seated mycosis caused by resistant filamentous fungi, such us Fusarium species, Scedosporium prolificans, and Aspergillus terreus. The still unacceptably high mortality rate associated with some resistant mycosis indicates that alternatives to existing therapeutic options are needed. Potential measures to overcome antifungal resistance ranges from the development of new drugs with better antifungal activity to improving current therapeutic strategies with the present antifungal agents. Among the new antifungal drugs, inhibitors of beta glucan synthesis and second-generation azole and triazole derivatives have characteristics that render them potentially suitable agents against some resistant fungi. Other strategies including the use of high doses of lipid formulations of amphotericin B, combination therapy, and adjunctive immune therapy with cytokines are under investigation. In addition, antifungal control programmes to prevent extensive and inappropriate use of antifungals may be needed.

  18. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Adhvaryu, Meghna; Vakharia, Bhasker

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug–drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drugsusceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and markers for adequacy of treatment and an integrative approach to fulfill WHO goals. However, regulatory control over the drug market, as well as public-private partnership to use health program facilities to track patients and ensure

  19. HIV resistance testing and detected drug resistance in Europe.

    PubMed

    Schultze, Anna; Phillips, Andrew N; Paredes, Roger; Battegay, Manuel; Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Machala, Ladislav; Tomazic, Janez; Girard, Pierre M; Januskevica, Inga; Gronborg-Laut, Kamilla; Lundgren, Jens D; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro

    2015-07-17

    To describe regional differences and trends in resistance testing among individuals experiencing virological failure and the prevalence of detected resistance among those individuals who had a genotypic resistance test done following virological failure. Multinational cohort study. Individuals in EuroSIDA with virological failure (>1 RNA measurement >500 on ART after >6 months on ART) after 1997 were included. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) for resistance testing following virological failure and aORs for the detection of resistance among those who had a test were calculated using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations. Compared to 74.2% of ART-experienced individuals in 1997, only 5.1% showed evidence of virological failure in 2012. The odds of resistance testing declined after 2004 (global P < 0.001). Resistance was detected in 77.9% of the tests, NRTI resistance being most common (70.3%), followed by NNRTI (51.6%) and protease inhibitor (46.1%) resistance. The odds of detecting resistance were lower in tests done in 1997-1998, 1999-2000 and 2009-2010, compared to those carried out in 2003-2004 (global P < 0.001). Resistance testing was less common in Eastern Europe [aOR 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.55-0.94] compared to Southern Europe, whereas the detection of resistance given that a test was done was less common in Northern (aOR 0.29, 95% CI 0.21-0.39) and Central Eastern (aOR 0.47, 95% CI 0.29-0.76) Europe, compared to Southern Europe. Despite a concurrent decline in virological failure and testing, drug resistance was commonly detected. This suggests a selective approach to resistance testing. The regional differences identified indicate that policy aiming to minimize the emergence of resistance is of particular relevance in some European regions, notably in the countries in Eastern Europe.

  20. Analysis of MDR genes expression and cross-resistance in eight drug resistant ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Januchowski, Radosław; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Zaorska, Katarzyna; Sosińska, Patrycja; Klejewski, Andrzej; Brązert, Maciej; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2016-10-18

    Multiple drug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells is the main reason of intrinsic or acquired insensitivity to chemotherapy in many cancers. In this study we used ovarian cancer model of acquired drug resistance to study development of MDR. We have developed eight drug resistant cell lines from A2780 ovarian cancer cell line: two cell lines resistant to each drug commonly used in ovarian cancer chemotherapy: cisplatin (CIS), paclitaxel (PAC), doxorubicin (DOX) and topotecan (TOP). A chemosensitivity assay - MTT was performed to assess drug cross-resistance. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence were also performed to determine mRNA and protein expression of genes/proteins involved in drug resistance (P-gp, BCRP, MRP1, MRP2, MVP). Flow cytometry was used to determine the activity of drug transporters. We could observe cross-resistance between PAC- and DOX-resistant cell lines. Additionally, both PAC-resistant cell lines were cross-resistant to TOP and both TOP-resistant cell lines were cross-resistant to DOX. We observed two different mechanisms of resistance to TOP related to P-gp and BCRP expression and activity. P-gp and BCRP were also involved in DOX resistance. Expression of MRP2 was increased in CIS-resistant cell lines and increased MVP expression was observed in CIS-, PAC- and TOP-, but not in DOX-resistant cell lines. Effectiveness of TOP and DOX in second line of chemotherapy in ovarian cancer can be limited because of their cross-resistance to PAC. Moreover, cross-resistance of PAC-resistant cell line to CIS suggests that such interaction between those drugs might also be probable in clinic.

  1. Suspect aggression and victim resistance in multiple perpetrator rapes.

    PubMed

    Woodhams, Jessica; Cooke, Claire

    2013-11-01

    Several research studies have reported an elevated level of aggression in rapes committed by multiple perpetrators compared to rapes committed by lone suspects. Several factors that have been linked to elevated aggression in generic samples of rape were examined for the first time with a sample of multiple perpetrator rapes. Factors that might be associated with victim resistance were also investigated. Victim and offender characteristics, as well as the behaviors displayed by victims and offenders, were extracted from the police files of 89 multiple perpetrator stranger rapes perpetrated against female victims in the United Kingdom. These behaviors were rated for their level of suspect (non-sexual) aggression and victim resistance, respectively. Degree of victim resistance was significantly and positively associated with suspect aggression. Older victims were the recipients of significantly higher levels of suspect aggression. Victims who were incapacitated from drugs and/or alcohol were less likely to be the recipients of suspect aggression. Group leaders displayed more aggression towards the victim than the followers in the groups. The number of perpetrators was significantly related to the degree of resistance displayed by the victim with offences perpetrated by fewer suspects being characterized by more victim resistance. Research regarding cognitive appraisal during criminal interactions and the respective roles of offenders is referred to in considering these relationships.

  2. Drug resistance confounding prion therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Berry, David B.; Lu, Duo; Geva, Michal; Watts, Joel C.; Bhardwaj, Sumita; Oehler, Abby; Renslo, Adam R.; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Giles, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    There is not a single pharmaceutical that halts or even slows any neurodegenerative disease. Mounting evidence shows that prions cause many neurodegenerative diseases, and arguably, scrapie and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease prions represent the best therapeutic targets. We report here that the previously identified 2-aminothiazoles IND24 and IND81 doubled the survival times of scrapie-infected, wild-type mice. However, mice infected with Rocky Mountain Laboratory (RML) prions, a scrapie-derived strain, and treated with IND24 eventually exhibited neurological dysfunction and died. We serially passaged their brain homogenates in mice and cultured cells. We found that the prion strain isolated from IND24-treated mice, designated RML[IND24], emerged during a single passage in treated mice. Although RML prions infect both the N2a and CAD5 cell lines, RML[IND24] prions could only infect CAD5 cells. When passaged in CAD5 cells, the prions remained resistant to high concentrations of IND24. However, one passage of RML[IND24] prions in untreated mice restored susceptibility to IND24 in CAD5 cells. Although IND24 treatment extended the lives of mice propagating different prion strains, including RML, another scrapie-derived prion strain ME7, and chronic wasting disease, it was ineffective in slowing propagation of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease prions in transgenic mice. Our studies demonstrate that prion strains can acquire resistance upon exposure to IND24 that is lost upon passage in mice in the absence of IND24. These data suggest that monotherapy can select for resistance, thus intermittent therapy with mixtures of antiprion compounds may be required to slow or stop neurodegeneration. PMID:24128760

  3. Drug Resistance Patterns of Multidrug- and Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Korea: Amplification of Resistance to Oral Second-line Drugs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Ki; Shin, So Youn; Kim, Hee Jin; Lee, Kyungwon

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to analyze the drug resistance patterns of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) and the difference of drug resistance among various settings for health care in Korea. The data of drug susceptibility testing in 2009 was analyzed in order to secure sufficient number of patients from various settings in Korea. Patients were categorized by types of institutions into four groups, which comprised new and previously treated patients from public health care centers (PHC), the private sector, and Double-barred Cross clinics (DBC). The resistance rates to first-line drugs were uniformly high in every group. While the resistance rates to second-line drugs were not as high as first-line drugs, there was a pattern that drug resistance rates were lowest for PHC and highest for DBC. The differences of the resistance rates were more prominent for oral second-line drugs. Our findings implied that drug resistance to oral second-line drugs was significantly amplified during multidrug-resistant-TB treatment in Korea. Therefore, an individualized approach is recommended for treating drug-resistant-TB based on susceptibility testing results to prevent acquisition or amplification of drug resistance. © The Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine.

  4. Oncolytic Virotherapy Targeting Lung Cancer Drug Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) can exert a dual antitumor effect by triggering direct tumor lysis and eliciting tumor specific immunity. VSV can also...tumors, and the levels of infiltrating leukocytes were similar across the VSV-treated tumors. Altogether the data indicate that VSV-based therapy is...effective against a cisplatin-resistant lung tumor model. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Drug resistance, oncolytic virotherapy, vesicular stomatitis virus, lung

  5. Environment-Mediated Drug Resistance in Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Neuroblastoma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yves A. DeClerck, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA...3. DATES COVERED 30September2012 – 29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Environment-Mediated Drug Resistance in Neuroblastoma 5a. CONTRACT...demonstrating that interleukin-6 protects neuroblastoma cells from drug-induced apoptosis via activation of signal transduction and activator of

  6. The slippery difficulty of ever containing drug resistance with current practices.

    PubMed

    Fullybright, R

    2017-04-01

    It has previously been shown that the rate of drug resistance emergence in medicine is exponential, while we have been producing drugs at a much lower rate. Our ability to successfully contain resistance at any one time is function of how many drugs we have at our disposal to counter new resistances from pathogens. Here, we assess our level of preparedness through a mathematical comparison of the drug manufacture rate by the pharmaceutical industry with the resistance emergence rate in pathogens. To that effect, changes in the rates of growth of the drugs production and resistance emergence processes are computed over multiple time segments and compared. It is found that new resistance emergence rate in infectious diseases medicine remains mathematically and permanently ahead of the drugs production rate by the pharmaceutical industry. Consequently, we are not in a position to ever contain current or future strengths of resistance from pathogens. A review of current practices is called for.

  7. Virologic Tools for HCV Drug Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Fourati, Slim; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology have led to the development of new antiviral drugs that target specific steps of the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) lifecycle. These drugs, collectively termed direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), include non-structural (NS) HCV protein inhibitors, NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors (nucleotide analogues and non-nucleoside inhibitors), and NS5A inhibitors. Due to the high genetic variability of HCV, the outcome of DAA-based therapies may be altered by the selection of amino-acid substitutions located within the targeted proteins, which affect viral susceptibility to the administered compounds. At the drug developmental stage, preclinical and clinical characterization of HCV resistance to new drugs in development is mandatory. In the clinical setting, accurate diagnostic tools have become available to monitor drug resistance in patients who receive treatment with DAAs. In this review, we describe tools available to investigate drug resistance in preclinical studies, clinical trials and clinical practice. PMID:26690198

  8. Childhood abdominal tuberculosis: Disease patterns, diagnosis, and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Malik, Rohan; Srivastava, Anshu; Yachha, Surender K; Poddar, Ujjal; Lal, Richa

    2015-11-01

    Childhood abdominal tuberculosis may be difficult to diagnose with certainty. Drug resistance adds to the challenge. We present our experience in children with this condition. The case records of all children <18 years of age and diagnosed as abdominal tuberculosis from January 2000 to April 2012 were reviewed. The clinical details; investigative profile (imaging, ascitic fluid analysis, upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, colonoscopy, and laparotomy); histopathology; microbiology; and response to antitubercular therapy was noted. Thirty-eight children (median age 11, range 4-16 years) were diagnosed. Multiple intraabdominal sites were involved in 12 (32 %), peritoneal alone in 9 (24 %); isolated intestinal and isolated lymph nodal in 6 (16 %) each. Three children had atypical presentations with gastric outlet obstruction, acute lower GI bleeding, and duodenal perforation, respectively. Overall, definitive bacteriological diagnosis was possible in 47 % (18/38). In others, diagnosis was supported by histopathology (19 %) or other supportive investigations (34 %) along with a response to treatment without relapse. Drug-resistant disease was diagnosed in three (8 %, two multidrug resistant, one extended drug resistant) all of whom presented with a similar clinical picture of large abdominal lymph node masses. Abdominal tuberculosis is still a challenging diagnosis with microbiological confirmation possible only in half of the cases. Atypical presentations and emergence of drug resistance should be kept in mind while managing these patients.

  9. Conjugation to polymeric chains of influenza drugs targeting M2 ion channels partially restores inhibition of drug-resistant mutants

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Alyssa M.; Chen, Jianzhu; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    2013-01-01

    By attaching multiple copies of the influenza M2 ion channel inhibitors amantadine (1) and rimantadine (2) to polymeric chains we endeavored to recover their potency in inhibiting drug-resistant influenza viruses. Depending on loading densities, as well as the nature of the drug, the polymer, and the spacer arm, polymer-conjugated drugs were up to 30-fold more potent inhibitors of drug-resistant strains than their monomeric parents. In particular, a 20% loading density and a short linker group on the negatively charged poly-L-glutamate resulted in some of the most potent inhibitors for 2′s conjugates against drug-resistant influenza strains. Although full recovery of the inhibitory action against drug-resistant strains was not achieved, this study may be a step toward salvaging anti-influenza drugs that are no longer effective. PMID:23832466

  10. Economic implications of resistance to antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M; Phillips-Howard, P A

    1996-09-01

    The widespread evolution of drug resistance in malarial parasites has seriously hampered efforts to control this debilitating disease. Chloroquine, the mainstay of malaria treatment for many decades, is now proving largely ineffective in many parts of the world, particularly against the most severe form of malaria--falciparum. Alternative drugs have been developed, but they are frequently less safe and are all between 50 and 700% more expensive than chloroquine. Choice of drug clearly has important budgetary implications and national malaria control programmes need to weigh up the costs and benefits in deciding whether to change to more effective but more expensive drugs. The growth in drug resistance also has implications for the choice of diagnostic tool. Clinical diagnosis of malaria is relatively cheap, but less specific than some technological approaches. As more expensive drugs are employed, the cost of wasted treatment on suspected cases who do not in fact have malaria rises and the more worthwhile it becomes to invest in more specific diagnostic techniques. This paper presents an economic framework for analysing the various malaria drug and diagnostic tool options available. It discusses the nature of the key factors that need to be considered when making choices of malaria treatment (including treatment costs, drug resistance, the costs of treatment failure and compliance) and diagnosis (including diagnosis cost and accuracy, and the often overlooked costs associated with delayed treatment), and uses some simple equations to illustrate the impact of these on the relative cost effectiveness of the alternatives being considered. On the basis of some simplifying assumptions and illustrative calculations, it appears that in many countries more effective drugs and more specific and rapid diagnostic approaches will be worth adopting even although they imply additional expense.

  11. Drug resistance in human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Michael P; Vincent, Isabel M; Burchmore, Richard J S; Kazibwe, Anne J N; Matovu, Enock

    2011-09-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis or 'sleeping sickness' is a neglected tropical disease caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. A decade of intense international cooperation has brought the incidence to fewer than 10,000 reported cases per annum with anti-trypanosomal drugs, particularly against stage 2 disease where the CNS is involved, being central to control. Treatment failures with melarsoprol started to appear in the 1990s and their incidence has risen sharply in many foci. Loss of plasma membrane transporters involved in drug uptake, particularly the P2 aminopurine transporter and also a transporter termed the high affinity pentamidine transporter, relate to melarsoprol resistance selected in the laboratory. The same two transporters are also responsible for the uptake of the stage 1 drug pentamidine and, to varying extents, other diamidines. However, reports of treatment failures with pentamidine have been rare from the field. Eflornithine (difluoromethylornithine) has replaced melarsoprol as first-line treatment in many regions. However, a need for protracted and complicated drug dosing regimens slowed widespread implementation of eflornithine monotherapy. A combination of eflornithine with nifurtimox substantially decreases the required dose and duration of eflornithine administration and this nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy has enjoyed rapid implementation. Unfortunately, selection of resistance to eflornithine in the laboratory is relatively easy (through loss of an amino acid transporter believed to be involved in its uptake), as is selection of resistance to nifurtimox. The first anecdotal reports of treatment failures with eflornithine monotherapy are emerging from some foci. The possibility that parasites resistant to melarsoprol on the one hand, and eflornithine on the other, are present in the field indicates that genes capable of conferring drug resistance to both drugs are in circulation. If new drugs, that act in ways that will not

  12. Psychosocial Correlates of Empirical Types of Multiple Drug Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braucht, G. Nicholas; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Examined subgroups of people in relation to specific types of drugs. Multiple drug clusters identified here yielded six basic drug clusters. Typology of drug abusers was developed by proximity cluster analysis. Set of psychosocial measures was differentially related to use of types of drugs and drug abusers. (Author/BEF)

  13. Repurposing Salicylanilide Anthelmintic Drugs to Combat Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Conery, Annie L.; Kim, Wooseong; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kwon, Bumsup; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that has become the leading cause of hospital acquired infections in the US. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs for antimicrobial therapy involves lower risks and costs compared to de novo development of novel antimicrobial agents. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available anthelmintic drugs. The FDA approved drug niclosamide and the veterinary drug oxyclozanide displayed strong in vivo and in vitro activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC): 0.125 and 0.5 μg/ml respectively; minimum effective concentration: ≤ 0.78 μg/ml for both drugs). The two drugs were also effective against another Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecium (MIC 0.25 and 2 μg/ml respectively), but not against the Gram-negative species Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of niclosamide and oxyclozanide were determined against methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid or daptomycin resistant S. aureus clinical isolates, with MICs at 0.0625-0.5 and 0.125-2 μg/ml for niclosamide and oxyclozanide respectively. A time-kill study demonstrated that niclosamide is bacteriostatic, whereas oxyclozanide is bactericidal. Interestingly, oxyclozanide permeabilized the bacterial membrane but neither of the anthelmintic drugs exhibited demonstrable toxicity to sheep erythrocytes. Oxyclozanide was non-toxic to HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells within the range of its in vitro MICs but niclosamide displayed toxicity even at low concentrations. These data show that the salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs niclosamide and oxyclozanide are suitable candidates for mechanism of action studies and further clinical evaluation for treatment of staphylococcal infections. PMID:25897961

  14. Antibiotic Restriction Might Facilitate the Emergence of Multi-drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Obolski, Uri; Stein, Gideon Y; Hadany, Lilach

    2015-06-01

    High antibiotic resistance frequencies have become a major public health issue. The decrease in new antibiotics' production, combined with increasing frequencies of multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria, cause substantial limitations in treatment options for some bacterial infections. To diminish overall resistance, and especially the occurrence of bacteria that are resistant to all antibiotics, certain drugs are deliberately scarcely used--mainly when other options are exhausted. We use a mathematical model to explore the efficiency of such antibiotic restrictions. We assume two commonly used drugs and one restricted drug. The model is examined for the mixing strategy of antibiotic prescription, in which one of the drugs is randomly assigned to each incoming patient. Data obtained from Rabin medical center, Israel, is used to estimate realistic single and double antibiotic resistance frequencies in incoming patients. We find that broad usage of the hitherto restricted drug can reduce the number of incorrectly treated patients, and reduce the spread of bacteria resistant to both common antibiotics. Such double resistant infections are often eventually treated with the restricted drug, and therefore are prone to become resistant to all three antibiotics. Thus, counterintuitively, a broader usage of a formerly restricted drug can sometimes lead to a decrease in the emergence of bacteria resistant to all drugs. We recommend re-examining restriction of specific drugs, when multiple resistance to the relevant alternative drugs already exists.

  15. Antibiotic Restriction Might Facilitate the Emergence of Multi-drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Obolski, Uri; Stein, Gideon Y.; Hadany, Lilach

    2015-01-01

    High antibiotic resistance frequencies have become a major public health issue. The decrease in new antibiotics' production, combined with increasing frequencies of multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria, cause substantial limitations in treatment options for some bacterial infections. To diminish overall resistance, and especially the occurrence of bacteria that are resistant to all antibiotics, certain drugs are deliberately scarcely used—mainly when other options are exhausted. We use a mathematical model to explore the efficiency of such antibiotic restrictions. We assume two commonly used drugs and one restricted drug. The model is examined for the mixing strategy of antibiotic prescription, in which one of the drugs is randomly assigned to each incoming patient. Data obtained from Rabin medical center, Israel, is used to estimate realistic single and double antibiotic resistance frequencies in incoming patients. We find that broad usage of the hitherto restricted drug can reduce the number of incorrectly treated patients, and reduce the spread of bacteria resistant to both common antibiotics. Such double resistant infections are often eventually treated with the restricted drug, and therefore are prone to become resistant to all three antibiotics. Thus, counterintuitively, a broader usage of a formerly restricted drug can sometimes lead to a decrease in the emergence of bacteria resistant to all drugs. We recommend re-examining restriction of specific drugs, when multiple resistance to the relevant alternative drugs already exists. PMID:26110266

  16. Environment-Mediated Drug Resistance in Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Neuroblastoma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yves A. DeClerck CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION... Neuroblastoma 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0571 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) DE CLERCK, YVES 5d. PROJECT...experiments have demonstrated that monocytes collaborate with MSC in inducing STAT3-dependent drug resistance in neuroblastoma . Further

  17. Malaria drug resistance: new observations and developments

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Juliana M.; Chong, Jason L.; Wellems, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Drug-resistant micro-organisms became widespread in the 20th Century, often with devastating consequences, in response to widespread use of natural and synthetic drugs against infectious diseases. Antimalarial resistance provides one of the earliest examples, following the introduction of new medicines that filled important needs for prophylaxis and treatment around the globe. In the present chapter, we offer a brief synopsis of major antimalarial developments from two natural remedies, the qinghaosu and cinchona bark infusions, and of synthetic drugs inspired by the active components of these remedies. We review some contributions that early efficacy studies of antimalarial treatment brought to clinical pharmacology, including convincing documentation of atebrine-resistant malaria in the 1940s, prior to the launching of what soon became first-choice antimalarials, chloroquine and amodiaquine. Finally, we discuss some new observations on the molecular genetics of drug resistance, including delayed parasite clearances that have been increasingly observed in response to artemisinin derivatives in regions of South-East Asia. PMID:22023447

  18. [Travellers and multi-drug resistance bacteria].

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Nozomi

    2012-02-01

    The number of international travellers has increased. There is enormous diversity in medical backgrounds, purposes of travel, and travelling styles among travellers. Travellers are hospitalized abroad because of exotic and common diseases via medical tourism. This is one way of transporting and importing human bacteria between countries, including multi-drug resistant organisms. In developing countries, the antimicrobial resistance in Shigella sp. and Salmonella sp. have been a problem, because of this trend, the first choice of antibiotics has changed in some countries. Community acquired infections as well as hospital acquired infections with MRSA, multi-drug resistance (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ESBL have been a problem. This review will discuss the risk of MDR bacterial infectious diseases for travellers.

  19. Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis to overcome drug resistance to MAPK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gao; Frederick, Dennie T.; Wu, Lawrence; Wei, Zhi; Krepler, Clemens; Srinivasan, Satish; Chae, Young Chan; Xu, Xiaowei; Choi, Harry; Dimwamwa, Elaida; Shannan, Batool; Basu, Devraj; Zhang, Dongmei; Guha, Manti; Xiao, Min; Randell, Sergio; Sproesser, Katrin; Xu, Wei; Liu, Jephrey; Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Gangadhar, Tara C.; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Gu, Mengnan; Xu, Caiyue; Ghosh, Abheek; Xu, Weiting; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Jie; Zha, Shijie; Brafford, Patricia; Weeraratna, Ashani; Davies, Michael A.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Avadhani, Narayan G.; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Altieri, Dario C.; Flaherty, Keith T.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting multiple components of the MAPK pathway can prolong the survival of patients with BRAFV600E melanoma. This approach is not curative, as some BRAF-mutated melanoma cells are intrinsically resistant to MAPK inhibitors (MAPKi). At the systemic level, our knowledge of how signaling pathways underlie drug resistance needs to be further expanded. Here, we have shown that intrinsically resistant BRAF-mutated melanoma cells with a low basal level of mitochondrial biogenesis depend on this process to survive MAPKi. Intrinsically resistant cells exploited an integrated stress response, exhibited an increase in mitochondrial DNA content, and required oxidative phosphorylation to meet their bioenergetic needs. We determined that intrinsically resistant cells rely on the genes encoding TFAM, which controls mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, and TRAP1, which regulates mitochondrial protein folding. Therefore, we targeted mitochondrial biogenesis with a mitochondrium-targeted, small-molecule HSP90 inhibitor (Gamitrinib), which eradicated intrinsically resistant cells and augmented the efficacy of MAPKi by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting tumor bioenergetics. A subset of tumor biopsies from patients with disease progression despite MAPKi treatment showed increased mitochondrial biogenesis and tumor bioenergetics. A subset of acquired drug-resistant melanoma cell lines was sensitive to Gamitrinib. Our study establishes mitochondrial biogenesis, coupled with aberrant tumor bioenergetics, as a potential therapy escape mechanism and paves the way for a rationale-based combinatorial strategy to improve the efficacy of MAPKi. PMID:27043285

  20. Mechanisms of acquired resistance to androgen receptor targeting drugs in castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chism, David D.; De Silva, Dinuka; Whang, Young E.

    2014-01-01

    After initial response to androgen receptor targeting drugs abiraterone or enzalutamide, most patients develop progressive disease and therefore, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains a terminal disease. Multiple mechanisms underlying acquired resistance have been postulated. Intratumoral androgen synthesis may resume after abiraterone treatment. A point mutation in the ligand binding domain of androgen receptor may confer resistance to enzalutamide. Emergence of androgen receptor splice variants lacking the ligand binding domain may mediate resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide. Steroid receptors such as glucocorticoid receptor may substitute for androgen receptor. Drugs with novel mechanisms of action or combination therapy, along with biomarkers for patient selection, may be needed to improve the therapy of CRPC. PMID:24927631

  1. Intrinsic and induced drug resistance mechanisms: in silico investigations at the cellular and tissue scales.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Krishnan, J; Xu, Xiao Yun

    2015-09-01

    Multiple cellular drug resistance mechanisms are present in a broad range of tumour types and act to counteract the effects of drugs. There are independent mechanisms by which drug resistance occurs; these include (i) the multi-drug resistance mechanism involving upregulation of ABC transporter proteins and (ii) intracellular mechanisms which sequester/degrade/detoxify drugs. In addition, drug resistance mechanisms could be either intrinsic, or directly induced by the drug. In this paper we focus on the behaviour of intrinsic and induced variants of these resistance mechanisms in solid tumours, by systematically elucidating their cellular and tissue level effects with an aim to bridge the gap between cell and tissue levels. This is achieved in a controlled in silico setting, which allows for an investigation of the interplay between transport, resistance pathways, and tissue level effects. Overall the paper (i) provides insights into the tissue level functioning of widespread classes of intracellular resistance mechanisms, showing important differences, (ii) systematically elucidates the difference between intrinsic and induced drug resistance mechanisms at the cell and tissue levels, (iii) demonstrates how spatial heterogeneity in intrinsic resistance in cells can significantly affect the response of solid tumours to drugs, and (iv) examines how different independent resistance mechanisms work in concert, to counteract drug dosages in tumours.

  2. Challenges of drug-resistant malaria.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Shweta; Medhi, Bikash; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Over the past six decades, the drug resistance of Plasmodium falciparum has become an issue of utmost concern. Despite the remarkable progress that has been made in recent years in reducing the mortality rate to about 30% with the scaling-up of vector control, introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapies and other malaria control strategies, the confirmation of artemisinin resistance on the Cambodia-Thailand border threatened all the previous success. This review addresses the global scenario of antimalarial resistance and factors associated with it, with the main emphasis on futuristic approaches like nanotechnology and stem cell therapy that may impede resistant malaria, along with novel medications which are preparing to enter the global antimalarial market. These novel studies are likely to escalate over the coming years and will hopefully help to reduce the burden of malaria. © S. Sinha et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2014.

  3. Resistance of Candida parapsilosis to drugs.

    PubMed

    Camougrand, N; Velours, G; Guerin, M

    1986-01-01

    Several strains of Candida parapsilosis, isolated independently in our laboratory, had their resistance compared to a series of inhibitors which act either at the level of mitochondrial ribosomes (chloramphenicol, erythromycin, paromomycin) or at the level of mitochondrial respiration and oxidative phosphorylation (oligomycin, antimycin A, diuron, carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone). Cells were grown on glycerol media supplemented with one of these inhibitors, and it was demonstrated that the resistance of these yeasts to a large spectrum of antibiotics was due to several features: a resistance to oligomycin was found at the permeation level; the resistance to the other drugs was correlated to the relative insensitivity of cytochrome biosynthesis to the drugs; the cells developed, at the same time, two types of alternative pathways: the one branched at the ubiquinone level which drove electrons from Krebs cycle substrates to oxygen, and the other, antimycin A-insensitive but inhibited by amytal, salicylhydroxamic acid and high cyanide concentrations. This secondary mitochondrial pathway, driving reducing equivalents from cytoplasmic NADH to cytochrome c and then to cytochrome aa3 or to alternate oxidase, allowed the growth of Candida parapsilosis on a non fermentescible medium, supplemented with these drugs.

  4. In vitro assessment of antifungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, K

    1986-01-01

    Several studies have documented the variability in the susceptibility pattern of fungi to antifungal drugs, and fungi possess resistance determinants to negate the effects of antifungal agents. In vitro assessment of both resistance and susceptibility are measured by suitable concentration endpoints of the antifungal drug, the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). MICs serve as the main parameter to define the fungistatic action on fungi growing in culture. For the antifungals used for treatment of local mycoses, the limit between a MIC value indicating susceptibility and one indicating resistance is usually determined empirically on the basis of the correlation between MIC values, and either positive or negative response to chemotherapy. The principles of susceptibility testing of fungi are essentially the same as those for bacteria. However, testing with fungi must deal with the fact that interpretation of the results is complicated by inherent differences in fungal morphology, growth rate, and optimal culture conditions. Several factors could adversely affect the test results and must be considered in the design of susceptibility testing of fungi. It is obvious when the present data on fungal susceptibility testing are reviewed that much more work on standardization of techniques and interpretation of results is necessary. This presentation will focus on the in vitro susceptibility testing for determining primary and secondary drug resistance of griseofulvin and azole antifungal agents, and the correlation between the activities of these antifungals in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Strategies to manage antifungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hsiang-Kuang; Perfect, John R

    2011-02-01

    Invasive fungal infections continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts. From more than half a million deaths from cryptococcosis in sub-Saharan Africa to an unchanging death rate from invasive candidiasis, despite three antifungal classes of drugs, insights into better strategies to reduce therapeutic failures or resistance are needed. This review examines the issues around antifungal drug resistance from both a basic description of the failures and how they are detected to the variety of issues that need to be addressed to help prevent failures for successful management. The reader will gain an understanding of the clinical complexities in this patient population for management of invasive fungal infections. Throughout the review, principles of management are given along with some specific clinical examples to illustrate the issues and frame the knowledge base. From this discussion it is hoped that the clinician can use the insights provided to manage individual patients and find links to the evidence-based material that support its conclusions. Also, this review specifically identifies the limitations of present management and directs clinicians to gather additional information and provide even better treatment strategies. Invasive fungal infections are life-threatening complications of serious underlying diseases. Their management can be complicated by both direct and clinical drug resistance and by understanding these possibilities and correcting them; most patients can be successfully managed with present antifungal drugs if the underlying diseases can be controlled.

  6. Ceftaroline desensitization procedure in a pregnant patient with multiple drug allergies.

    PubMed

    Kuhlen, James L; Blumenthal, Kimberly G; Sokol, Caroline L; Balekian, Diana S; Weil, Ana A; Varughese, Christy A; Shenoy, Erica S; Banerji, Aleena

    2015-01-01

    Validated skin testing is lacking for many drugs, including ceftaroline. The cross-reactivity between ceftaroline and other β-lactam antibiotics is unknown. We report a case of a pregnant patient with cystic fibrosis and multiple drug allergies who required ceftaroline for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia and underwent an uncomplicated empiric desensitization procedure.

  7. Primary trastuzumab resistance: new tricks for an old drug.

    PubMed

    Wilken, Jason A; Maihle, Nita J

    2010-10-01

    Trastuzumab is the first Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved therapeutic targeting a HER-family receptor tyrosine kinase (HER2/ErbB2/neu). Although trastuzumab is effective in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer, a substantial proportion of patients will not respond to trastuzumab-based regimens (primary resistance), and those who do respond will often lose clinical benefits (i.e., secondary resistance). Although multiple mechanisms underlying the development of secondary trastuzumab resistance have been identified, few studies have specifically examined the basis of primary trastuzumab resistance. Here, we review these studies, which together demonstrate that trastuzumab induces phenotypic changes in tumor cells, even when they are not growth inhibited by trastuzumab, including changes in gene expression. These changes have important clinical implications, including the sensitization of malignant cells to other therapeutic drugs. In light of these observations, we propose that the conventional definition of resistance as it pertains to trastuzumab and, perhaps, to other targeted therapeutics, may require revision. The results of these studies will be useful in informing the direction of future basic and clinical research focused on overcoming primary trastuzumab resistance. © 2010 New York Academy of Sciences.

  8. Drugs in development for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rehiana; Nicholas, Richard St John; Muraro, Paolo Antonio

    2013-05-01

    Drug development for multiple sclerosis (MS), as with any other neurological disease, faces numerous challenges, with many drugs failing at various stages of development. The disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) first introduced for MS are only moderately effective, but given the lack of competition, they have been widely accepted in clinical practice. Although safety and efficacy continue to be the two main metrics by which drugs will be judged, the newer agents in the market also face challenges of a more comparative nature-are they more efficacious than the currently available drugs on the market? Are they safer or better tolerated? Do they offer any practical advantages over current treatments? Fingolimod represented a milestone following its approval as an oral drug for MS in 2010, offering patients a far more convenient administration route. However, association with cardiovascular complications has led to a more cautious approach in its initial prescribing, now requiring cardiac monitoring for the first 6 h as well as subsequent monitoring of blood pressure and for macular oedema. Natalizumab, amongst licensed drugs, represents the current benchmark for efficacy. The risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy during natalizumab treatment is now more quantifiable. Other monoclonal antibodies are in various phases of development. Marketing authorisation for alemtuzumab has been filed, and whilst trial data suggest that its efficacy outperforms both licensed drugs and others in development, there is a significant risk of secondary autoimmunity. Its once-yearly administration, however, seems particularly advantageous. Rituximab is unlikely to be developed further as its license will expire, but ocrelizumab, another monoclonal antibody directly targeting B cells, is currently in phase 2 development and looks promising. Daclizumab is also moderately efficacious but may struggle to establish itself given its monthly subcutaneous dosing. There are new oral

  9. Evaluation of the potential antimicrobial resistance transfer from a multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli to Salmonella in dairy calves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous research conducted by our laboratory investigated the incidence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) Salmonella in dairy cattle and reported that individual cattle, and most often calves, shed multiple Salmonella serotypes that vary in the degree of antibiotic resistance. More recently, we invest...

  10. Fungal Biofilms, Drug Resistance, and Recurrent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Jigar V.; Mitchell, Aaron P.; Andes, David R.

    2014-01-01

    A biofilm is a surface-associated microbial community. Diverse fungi are capable of biofilm growth. The significance of this growth form for infection biology is that biofilm formation on implanted devices is a major cause of recurrent infection. Biofilms also have limited drug susceptibility, making device-associated infection extremely difficult to treat. Biofilm-like growth can occur during many kinds of infection, even when an implanted device is not present. Here we summarize the current understanding of fungal biofilm formation, its genetic control, and the basis for biofilm drug resistance. PMID:25274758

  11. An insight into the drug resistance profile & mechanism of drug resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Achchhe Lal; Chaudhry, Uma; Sachdev, Divya; Sachdeva, Poonam Nagpal; Bala, Manju; Saluja, Daman

    2011-01-01

    Among the aetiological agents of treatable sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), Neissseria gonorrhoeae is considered to be most important because of emerging antibiotic resistant strains that compromise the effectiveness of treatment of the disease - gonorrhoea. In most of the developing countries, treatment of gonorrhoea relies mainly on syndromic management rather than the aetiological based therapy. Gonococcal infections are usually treated with single-dose therapy with an agent found to cure > 95 per cent of cases. Unfortunately during the last few decades, N. gonorrhoeae has developed resistance not only to less expensive antimicrobials such as sulphonamides, penicillin and tetracyclines but also to fluoroquinolones. The resistance trend of N. gonorrhoeae towards these antimicrobials can be categorised into pre-quinolone, quinolone and post-quinolone era. Among the antimicrobials available so far, only the third-generation cephalosporins could be safely recommended as first-line therapy for gonorrhoea globally. However, resistance to oral third-generation cephalosporins has also started emerging in some countries. Therefore, it has become imperative to initiate sustained national and international efforts to reduce infection and misuse of antibiotics so as to prevent further emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance. It is necessary not only to monitor drug resistance and optimise treatment regimens, but also to gain insight into how gonococcus develops drug resistance. Knowledge of mechanism of resistance would help us to devise methods to prevent the occurrence of drug resistance against existing and new drugs. Such studies could also help in finding out new drug targets in N. gonorrhoeae and also a possibility of identification of new drugs for treating gonorrhoea. PMID:22089602

  12. An insight into the drug resistance profile & mechanism of drug resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Patel, Achchhe Lal; Chaudhry, Uma; Sachdev, Divya; Sachdeva, Poonam Nagpal; Bala, Manju; Saluja, Daman

    2011-10-01

    Among the aetiological agents of treatable sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), Neissseria gonorrhoeae is considered to be most important because of emerging antibiotic resistant strains that compromise the effectiveness of treatment of the disease - gonorrhoea. In most of the developing countries, treatment of gonorrhoea relies mainly on syndromic management rather than the aetiological based therapy. Gonococcal infections are usually treated with single-dose therapy with an agent found to cure > 95 per cent of cases. Unfortunately during the last few decades, N. gonorrhoeae has developed resistance not only to less expensive antimicrobials such as sulphonamides, penicillin and tetracyclines but also to fluoroquinolones. The resistance trend of N. gonorrhoeae towards these antimicrobials can be categorised into pre-quinolone, quinolone and post-quinolone era. Among the antimicrobials available so far, only the third-generation cephalosporins could be safely recommended as first-line therapy for gonorrhoea globally. However, resistance to oral third-generation cephalosporins has also started emerging in some countries. Therefore, it has become imperative to initiate sustained national and international efforts to reduce infection and misuse of antibiotics so as to prevent further emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance. It is necessary not only to monitor drug resistance and optimise treatment regimens, but also to gain insight into how gonococcus develops drug resistance. Knowledge of mechanism of resistance would help us to devise methods to prevent the occurrence of drug resistance against existing and new drugs. Such studies could also help in finding out new drug targets in N. gonorrhoeae and also a possibility of identification of new drugs for treating gonorrhoea.

  13. European recommendations on surveillance of antituberculosis drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Schwoebel, V; Lambregts, C.S.B.; Moro, M.L.; Drobniewski, F; Hoffner, S.E.; Raviglione, M.C.; Rieder, H.L.

    2000-10-01

    Antituberculosis drug resistance, whose extent in Europe is not well documented, is a serious threat to tuberculosis control. The aim of the recent European recommendations on antituberculosis drug resistance surveillance, issued by a working group compos

  14. Spatial Heterogeneity in Drug Concentrations Can Facilitate the Emergence of Resistance to Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Feng; Nowak, Martin A.; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Acquired resistance is one of the major barriers to successful cancer therapy. The development of resistance is commonly attributed to genetic heterogeneity. However, heterogeneity of drug penetration of the tumor microenvironment both on the microscopic level within solid tumors as well as on the macroscopic level across metastases may also contribute to acquired drug resistance. Here we use mathematical models to investigate the effect of drug heterogeneity on the probability of escape from treatment and the time to resistance. Specifically we address scenarios with sufficiently potent therapies that suppress growth of all preexisting genetic variants in the compartment with the highest possible drug concentration. To study the joint effect of drug heterogeneity, growth rate, and evolution of resistance, we analyze a multi-type stochastic branching process describing growth of cancer cells in multiple compartments with different drug concentrations and limited migration between compartments. We show that resistance is likely to arise first in the sanctuary compartment with poor drug penetrations and from there populate non-sanctuary compartments with high drug concentrations. Moreover, we show that only below a threshold rate of cell migration does spatial heterogeneity accelerate resistance evolution, otherwise deterring drug resistance with excessively high migration rates. Our results provide new insights into understanding why cancers tend to quickly become resistant, and that cell migration and the presence of sanctuary sites with little drug exposure are essential to this end. PMID:25789469

  15. Emerging Technologies for Monitoring Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis at the Point-of-Care

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Vigneshwaran; Wang, ShuQi; Inci, Fatih; De Libero, Gennaro; Singhal, Amit; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Among them, tuberculosis (TB) remains a major threat to public health, exacerbated by the emergence of multiple drug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). MDR-Mtb strains are resistant to first-line anti-TB drugs such as isoniazid and rifampicin; whereas XDR-Mtb strains are resistant to additional drugs including at least to any fluoroquinolone and at least one of the second-line anti-TB injectable drugs such as kanamycin, capreomycin, or amikacin. Clinically, these strains have significantly impacted the management of TB in high-incidence developing countries, where systemic surveillance of TB drug resistance is lacking. For effective management of TB on-site, early detection of drug resistance is critical to initiate treatment, to reduce mortality, and to thwart drug-resistant TB transmission. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic challenges to detect drug-resistant TB at the point-of-care (POC). Moreover, we present the latest advances in nano/microscale technologies that can potentially detect TB drug resistance to improve on-site patient care. PMID:24882226

  16. Spatial heterogeneity in drug concentrations can facilitate the emergence of resistance to cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Feng; Nowak, Martin A; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2015-03-01

    Acquired resistance is one of the major barriers to successful cancer therapy. The development of resistance is commonly attributed to genetic heterogeneity. However, heterogeneity of drug penetration of the tumor microenvironment both on the microscopic level within solid tumors as well as on the macroscopic level across metastases may also contribute to acquired drug resistance. Here we use mathematical models to investigate the effect of drug heterogeneity on the probability of escape from treatment and the time to resistance. Specifically we address scenarios with sufficiently potent therapies that suppress growth of all preexisting genetic variants in the compartment with the highest possible drug concentration. To study the joint effect of drug heterogeneity, growth rate, and evolution of resistance, we analyze a multi-type stochastic branching process describing growth of cancer cells in multiple compartments with different drug concentrations and limited migration between compartments. We show that resistance is likely to arise first in the sanctuary compartment with poor drug penetrations and from there populate non-sanctuary compartments with high drug concentrations. Moreover, we show that only below a threshold rate of cell migration does spatial heterogeneity accelerate resistance evolution, otherwise deterring drug resistance with excessively high migration rates. Our results provide new insights into understanding why cancers tend to quickly become resistant, and that cell migration and the presence of sanctuary sites with little drug exposure are essential to this end.

  17. DDTRP: Database of Drug Targets for Resistant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramurthi, Jagadish Chandrabose; Ramanandan, Prabhakaran; Brindha, Sridharan; Subhasree, Chelladurai Ramarathnam; Prasad, Abhimanyu; Kumaraswami, Vasanthapuram; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Emergence of drug resistance is a major threat to public health. Many pathogens have developed resistance to most of the existing antibiotics, and multidrug-resistant and extensively drug resistant strains are extremely difficult to treat. This has resulted in an urgent need for novel drugs. We describe a database called ‘Database of Drug Targets for Resistant Pathogens’ (DDTRP). The database contains information on drugs with reported resistance, their respective targets, metabolic pathways involving these targets, and a list of potential alternate targets for seven pathogens. The database can be accessed freely at http://bmi.icmr.org.in/DDTRP. PMID:21938213

  18. Current Perspectives on HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Iyidogan, Pinar; Anderson, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    Current advancements in antiretroviral therapy (ART) have turned HIV-1 infection into a chronic and manageable disease. However, treatment is only effective until HIV-1 develops resistance against the administered drugs. The most recent antiretroviral drugs have become superior at delaying the evolution of acquired drug resistance. In this review, the viral fitness and its correlation to HIV-1 mutation rates and drug resistance are discussed while emphasizing the concept of lethal mutagenesis as an alternative therapy. The development of resistance to the different classes of approved drugs and the importance of monitoring antiretroviral drug resistance are also summarized briefly. PMID:25341668

  19. Antibacterial Cleaning Products and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Bonnie; Levy, Stuart B.; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Lin, Susan X.; Larson, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    We examined whether household use of antibacterial cleaning and hygiene products is an emerging risk factor for carriage of antimicrobial drug–resistant bacteria on hands of household members. Households (N = 224) were randomized to use of antibacterial or nonantibacterial cleaning and hygiene products for 1 year. Logistic regression was used to assess the influence of antibacterial product use in homes. Antibacterial product use did not lead to a significant increase in antimicrobial drug resistance after 1 year (odds ratio 1.33, 95% confidence interval 0.74–2.41), nor did it have an effect on bacterial susceptibility to triclosan. However, more extensive and longer term use of triclosan might provide a suitable environment for emergence of resistant species. Further research on this issue is needed. PMID:16318697

  20. Recent trends in HIV-1 drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Siliciano, Janet D; Siliciano, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    Once considered an inevitable consequence of HIV treatment, drug resistance is declining. This decline supports the hypothesis that antiretroviral therapy can arrest replication and prevent the evolution of resistance. Further support comes from excellent clinical outcomes, the failure of treatment intensification to reduce residual viremia, the lack of viral evolution in patients on optimal therapy, pharmacodynamics studies explaining the extraordinarily high antiviral activity of modern regimens, and recent reports of potential cures. Evidence supporting ongoing replication includes higher rates of certain complications in treated patients and an increase in circular forms of the viral genome after intensification with integrase inhibitors. Recent studies also provide an explanation for the observation that some patients fail protease-inhibitor based regimens without evidence for resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Recent Trends in HIV-1 Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Siliciano, Janet D.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Once considered an inevitable consequence of HIV treatment, drug resistance is declining. This decline supports the hypothesis that antiretroviral therapy can arrest replication and prevent the evolution of resistance. Further support comes from excellent clinical outcomes, the failure of treatment intensification to reduce residual viremia, the lack of viral evolution in patients on optimal therapy, pharmacodynamics studies explaining the extraordinarily high antiviral activity of modern regimens, and recent reports of potential cures. Evidence supporting ongoing replication includes higher rates of certain complications in treated patients and an increase in circular forms of the viral genome after intensification with integrase inhibitors. Recent studies also provide an explanation for the observation that some patients fail protease-inhibitor based regimens without evidence for resistance. PMID:24021560

  2. Infectious Multiple Drug Resistance in the Enterobacteriaceae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-30

    plasmids of E. coli to Vibrio cholerae one finds that the plasmid per se is unstable. Yet, we now know that stable inheritance is not so much the...However, the degree of mismatch is still quite low. 9. C. The Mode of Replication of RSF1010 If one grows RSP1010 to the mid-logarithmic phase of growth...left hand end of the molecule, it was possible.. to unequivocally map the origin and mode of replication for RSF1010, relative to one end of EcoRI

  3. Infectious Multiple Drug Resistance in the Enterobacteriaceae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic E . coli were identified with the Y-1 adrenal and suckling mouse assays. All were homologous and thus identifiable with radiolabled...technique detected DNA homologous with the three probes in bacterial growth of all stools from patients with diarrhea from whom enterotoxigenic E . coli were...isolated and in enterotoxigenic E . coli -inoculated water containing other species of bacteria. The DNA hybridization assay is a useful technique for

  4. Infectious Multiple Drug Resistance in the Enterobacteriaceae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    or secretion in suckling al mice by E coli ST. Ten microliters of 3.5 the appropriate dilution of ST partial- 0.065" ly purified from Ecoli strain C14...characterization of heat-stable enterotoxin produced by 26. Rao MC, Guandolini S. Smith PL, Field M. Mode ofa strain of Ecoli pathogenic for man. J

  5. Infectious Multiple Drug Resistance in the Enterobacteriaceae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    typing, serological typing, colicin typing or other conventional epidemiological tools. Yet, for species such as Citrobacter freundii for which no...The C16tro and Kleb spots which are clearly niegative were performed on clones of Citrobacter freundii and K. pneumoniae received from Dr. R

  6. Malaria medicines to address drug resistance and support malaria elimination efforts.

    PubMed

    Achan, Jane; Mwesigwa, Julia; Edwin, Chinagozi Precious; D'Alessandro, Umberto

    2017-10-02

    Antimalarial drugs are essential weapons to fight malaria and have been used effectively since the 17(th) century. However, P.falciparum resistance has been reported to almost all available antimalarial drugs, including artemisinin derivatives, raising concerns that this could jeopardize malaria elimination. Areas covered: In this article, we present a historical perspective of antimalarial drug resistance, review current evidence of resistance to available antimalarial drugs and discuss possible mitigating strategies to address this challenge. Expert commentary: The historical approach to drug resistance has been to change the national treatment policy to an alternative treatment. However, alternatives to artemisinin-based combination treatment are currently extremely limited. Innovative approaches utilizing available schizonticidal drugs such as triple combination therapies or multiple first line treatments could delay the emergence and spread of drug resistance. Transmission blocking drugs like primaquine may play a key role if given to a substantial proportion of malaria infected persons. Deploying antimalarial medicines in mass drug administration or mass screening and treatment campaigns could also contribute to containment efforts by eliminating resistant parasites in some settings. Ultimately, response to drug resistance should also include further investment in the development of new antimalarial drugs.

  7. Biophysics of cell membrane lipids in cancer drug resistance: Implications for drug transport and drug delivery with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-11-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcome drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance.

  8. Biophysics of Cell Membrane Lipids in Cancer Drug Resistance: Implications for Drug Transport and Drug Delivery with Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcoming drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance. PMID:24055719

  9. Stochastic expression of a multiple antibiotic resistance activator confers transient resistance in single cells.

    PubMed

    El Meouche, Imane; Siu, Yik; Dunlop, Mary J

    2016-01-13

    Transient resistance can allow microorganisms to temporarily survive lethal concentrations of antibiotics. This can be accomplished through stochastic mechanisms, where individual cells within a population display diverse phenotypes to hedge against the appearance of an antibiotic. To date, research on transient stochastic resistance has focused primarily on mechanisms where a subpopulation of cells enters a dormant, drug-tolerant state. However, a fundamental question is whether stochastic gene expression can also generate variable resistance levels among growing cells in a population. We hypothesized that stochastic expression of antibiotic-inducible resistance mechanisms might play such a role. To investigate this, we focused on a prototypical example of such a system: the multiple antibiotic resistance activator MarA. Previous studies have shown that induction of MarA can lead to a multidrug resistant phenotype at the population level. We asked whether MarA expression also has a stochastic component, even when uninduced. Time lapse microscopy showed that isogenic cells express heterogeneous, dynamic levels of MarA, which were correlated with transient antibiotic survival. This finding has important clinical implications, as stochastic expression of resistance genes may be widespread, allowing populations to hedge against the sudden appearance of an antibiotic.

  10. Sociodemographic correlates of HIV drug resistance and access to drug resistance testing in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Rocheleau, Genevieve; Franco-Villalobos, Conrado; Oliveira, Natalia; Brumme, Zabrina L; Rusch, Melanie; Shoveller, Jeannie; Brumme, Chanson J; Harrigan, P Richard

    2017-01-01

    Sociodemographic correlates of engagement in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care are well studied, however the association with accessing drug resistance testing (DRT) and the development of drug resistance have not been characterized. Between 1996-2014, 11 801 HIV patients accessing therapy in British Columbia were observed longitudinally. A subset of 9456 patients had testable viral load; of these 8398 were linked to census data. Sociodemographic (census tract-level) and clinical (individual-level) correlates of DRT were assessed using multivariable General Estimating Equation logistic regression adjusted odds ratios (aOR). The mean number of tests per patient was 2.1 (Q1-Q3; 0-3). Separately, any drug resistance was determined using IAS-USA (2013) list for 5703 initially treatment naïve patients without baseline resistance; 5175 were census-linked (mean of 1.5 protease-reverse transcriptase sequences/patient, Q1-Q3; 0-2). Correlates of detecting drug resistance in this subset were analyzed using Cox PH regression adjusted hazard ratios (aHR). Our results indicate baseline CD4 <200 cells/μL (aOR: 1.5, 1.3-1.6), nRTI-only baseline regimens (aOR: 1.4, 1.3-1.6), and unknown (therapy initiation before routine pVL in BC) baseline pVL (aOR: 1.8, 1.5-2.1) were among individual-level clinical covariates strongly associated with having accessed DRT; while imperfect adherence (aHR: 2.2, 1.9-2.5), low baseline CD4 count (aHR: 1.9, 1.6-2.3), and high baseline pVL (aHR: 2.0, 1.6-2.6) were associated with a higher likelihood of developing drug resistance. A higher median income (aOR: 0.83, 0.77-0.89) and higher percentage of those with aboriginal ancestry (aOR: 0.85, 0.76-0.95) were census tract-level sociodemographic covariates associated with decreased access to DRT. Similarly, aboriginal ancestry (aHR: 1.2, 1.1-1.5) was associated with development of drug resistance. In conclusion, clinical covariates continue to be the strongest correlates of development of drug

  11. The association between multiple drug misuse and crime.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Trevor; Holloway, Katy

    2005-02-01

    Research that has investigated the association between specific drug types and crime has tended to focus on the specific drug type in isolation from other drugs. The main problem with this is that it cannot be assumed that the association between specific drug use and crime will be the same regardless of the additional drugs consumed. The research aimed to investigate whether there was a correlation between number and type of drugs used and involvement in crime. The analysis of multiple drug use was based on data collected as part of the New English and Welsh Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring program in the United Kingdom. The results showed that both the number of drug types consumed and the particular drug type combinations used explained offending rate. The research concluded that the investigation of links between multiple drug use and crime might help inform antidrugs strategies and treatment services.

  12. The challenge of developing robust drugs to overcome resistance

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Amy C.; Schiffer, Celia; Pollastri, Michael; Peet, Norton P.

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance is problematic in microbial disease, viral disease and cancer. Understanding at the outset that resistance will impact the effectiveness of any new drug that is developed for these disease categories is imperative. In this Feature, we detail approaches that have been taken with selected drug targets to reduce the susceptibility of new drugs to resistance mechanisms. We will also define the concepts of robust drugs and resilient targets, and discuss how the design of robust drugs and the selection of resilient targets can lead to successful strategies for combating resistance. PMID:21784168

  13. Neurostimulation for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    DeGiorgio, Christopher M.; Krahl, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review: The purpose of this review is to provide an evidence-based update on the neurostimulation options available for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy in the United States and in European countries. Recent Findings: The field of neurostimulation for epilepsy has grown dramatically since 1997, when vagus nerve stimulation became the first device to be approved for epilepsy by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). New data from recently completed randomized controlled trials are available for deep brain stimulation of the anterior thalamus, responsive neurostimulation, and trigeminal nerve stimulation. Although vagus nerve stimulation is the only device currently approved in the United States, deep brain stimulation and responsive neurostimulation devices are awaiting FDA approval. Deep brain stimulation, trigeminal nerve stimulation, and transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation are now approved for epilepsy in the European Union. In this article, the mechanisms of action, safety, and efficacy of new neurostimulation devices are reviewed, and the key advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. Summary: The exponential growth of the field of neuromodulation for epilepsy is an exciting development; these new devices provide physicians with new options for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:23739108

  14. Gene expression analysis of two extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis isolates show that two-component response systems enhance drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guohua; Cui, Zhenling; Sun, Xian; Peng, Jinfu; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Wei; Huang, Wenhua; Chu, Kaili; Zhang, Lu; Ge, Baoxue; Li, Yao

    2015-05-01

    Global analysis of expression profiles using DNA microarrays was performed between a reference strain H37Rv and two clinical extensively drug-resistant isolates in response to three anti-tuberculosis drug exposures (isoniazid, capreomycin, and rifampicin). A deep analysis was then conducted using a combination of genome sequences of the resistant isolates, resistance information, and related public microarray data. Certain known resistance-associated gene sets were significantly overrepresented in upregulated genes in the resistant isolates relative to that observed in H37Rv, which suggested a link between resistance and expression levels of particular genes. In addition, isoniazid and capreomycin response genes, but not rifampicin, either obtained from published works or our data, were highly consistent with the differentially expressed genes of resistant isolates compared to those of H37Rv, indicating a strong association between drug resistance of the isolates and genes differentially regulated by isoniazid and capreomycin exposures. Based on these results, 92 genes of the studied isolates were identified as candidate resistance genes, 10 of which are known resistance-related genes. Regulatory network analysis of candidate resistance genes using published networks and literature mining showed that three two-component regulatory systems and regulator CRP play significant roles in the resistance of the isolates by mediating the production of essential envelope components. Finally, drug sensitivity testing indicated strong correlations between expression levels of these regulatory genes and sensitivity to multiple anti-tuberculosis drugs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These findings may provide novel insights into the mechanism underlying the emergence and development of drug resistance in resistant tuberculosis isolates and useful clues for further studies on this issue.

  15. Detection of Low Frequency Multi-Drug Resistance and Novel Putative Maribavir Resistance in Immunocompromised Pediatric Patients with Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J.; Bryant, Josephine M.; Depledge, Daniel P.; Margetts, Ben K.; Simmonds, Jacob; Nicolaou, Stephanos; Tutill, Helena J.; Williams, Rachel; Worth, Austen J. J.; Marks, Stephen D.; Veys, Paul; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Breuer, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a significant pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, with the potential to cause fatal pneumonitis and colitis, as well as increasing the risk of organ rejection in transplant patients. With the advent of new anti-HCMV drugs there is therefore considerable interest in using virus sequence data to monitor emerging resistance to antiviral drugs in HCMV viraemia and disease, including the identification of putative new mutations. We used target-enrichment to deep sequence HCMV DNA from 11 immunosuppressed pediatric patients receiving single or combination anti-HCMV treatment, serially sampled over 1–27 weeks. Changes in consensus sequence and resistance mutations were analyzed for three ORFs targeted by anti-HCMV drugs and the frequencies of drug resistance mutations monitored. Targeted-enriched sequencing of clinical material detected mutations occurring at frequencies of 2%. Seven patients showed no evidence of drug resistance mutations. Four patients developed drug resistance mutations a mean of 16 weeks after starting treatment. In two patients, multiple resistance mutations accumulated at frequencies of 20% or less, including putative maribavir and ganciclovir resistance mutations P522Q (UL54) and C480F (UL97). In one patient, resistance was detected 14 days earlier than by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis suggested recombination or superinfection in one patient. Deep sequencing of HCMV enriched from clinical samples excluded resistance in 7 of 11 subjects and identified resistance mutations earlier than conventional PCR-based resistance testing in 2 patients. Detection of multiple low level resistance mutations was associated with poor outcome. PMID:27667983

  16. Multiple drug use and polydrug use amongst homeless traveling youth.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Bill; Lankenau, Stephen E; Jackson-Bloom, Jennifer; Hathazi, Dodi

    2008-01-01

    Diverse forms of drug use are an emerging theme within research on young people and substance use. This manuscript, based on a three city study of health risks amongst young injection drug users, explores multiple drug use and polydrug use amongst a subset of homeless youth referred to as "travelers." In particular, we outline characteristics of homeless traveler youths and the various ways in which they practiced multiple drug use and polydrug use. From here, we discuss some theoretical and public health implications of multiple drug use and polydrug use amongst this particular population.

  17. Frequency of Natural Resistance within NS5a Replication Complex Domain in Hepatitis C Genotypes 1a, 1b: Possible Implication of Subtype-Specific Resistance Selection in Multiple Direct Acting Antivirals Drugs Combination Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bagaglio, Sabrina; Andolina, Andrea; Merli, Marco; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Morsica, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Different HCV subtypes may naturally harbor different resistance selection to anti-NS5a inhibitors. 2761 sequences retrieved from the Los Alamos HCV database were analyzed in the NS5a domain 1, the target of NS5a inhibitors. The NS5a resistance-associated polymorphisms (RAPs) were more frequently detected in HCV G1b compared to G1a. The prevalence of polymorphisms associated with cross-resistance to compounds in clinical use (daclatasvir, DCV, ledipasvir, LDV, ombitasvir, and OMV) or scheduled to come into clinical use in the near future (IDX719, elbasvir, and ELV) was higher in G1b compared to G1a (37/1552 (2.4%) in 1b sequences and 15/1209 (1.2%) in 1a isolates, p = 0.040). Interestingly, on the basis of the genotype-specific resistance pattern, 95 (6.1%) G1b sequences had L31M RAP to DCV/IDX719, while 6 sequences of G1a (0.5%) harbored L31M RAP, conferring resistance to DCV/LDV/IDX719/ELV (p < 0.0001). Finally, 28 (2.3%) G1a and none of G1b isolates harbored M28V RAP to OMV (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, the pattern of subtype-specific resistance selection in the naturally occurring strains may guide the treatment option in association with direct acting antivirals (DAAs) targeting different regions, particularly in patients that are difficult to cure, such as those with advanced liver disease or individuals who have failed previous DAAs. PMID:27023593

  18. Tumor-Specific Multiple Stimuli-Activated Dendrimeric Nanoassemblies with Metabolic Blockade Surmount Chemotherapy Resistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Yachao; Xu, Xianghui; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Yunkun; Zhang, Zhijun; Gu, Zhongwei

    2017-01-24

    Chemotherapy resistance remains a serious impediment to successful antitumor therapy around the world. However, existing chemotherapeutic approaches are difficult to cope with the notorious multidrug resistance in clinical treatment. Herein, we developed tumor-specific multiple stimuli-activated dendrimeric nanoassemblies with a metabolic blockade to completely combat both physiological barriers and cellular factors of multidrug resistance. With a sophisticated molecular and supramolecular engineering, this type of tumor-specific multiple stimuli-activated nanoassembly based on dendrimeric prodrugs can hierarchically break through the sequential physiological barriers of drug resistance, including stealthy dendritic PEGylated corona to optimize blood transportation, robust nanostructures for efficient tumor passive targeting and accumulation, enzyme-activated tumor microenvironment targeted to deepen tumor penetration and facilitate cellular uptake, cytoplasmic redox-sensitive disintegration for sufficient release of encapsulated agents, and lysosome acid-triggered nucleus delivery of antitumor drugs. In the meantime, we proposed a versatile tactic of a tumor-specific metabolism blockade for provoking several pathways (ATP restriction, apoptotic activation, and anti-apoptotic inhibition) to restrain multiple cellular factors of drug resistance. The highly efficient antitumor activity to drug-resistant MCF-7R tumor in vitro and in vivo supports this design and strongly defeats both physiological barriers and cellular factors of chemotherapy resistance. This work sets up an innovative dendrimeric nanosystem to surmount multidrug resistance, contributing to the development of a comprehensive nanoparticulate strategy for future clinical applications.

  19. Genetic and Genomic Architecture of the Evolution of Resistance to Antifungal Drug Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Jessica A.; Ammar, Ron; Torti, Dax; Nislow, Corey; Cowen, Leah E.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of drug resistance in fungal pathogens compromises the efficacy of the limited number of antifungal drugs. Drug combinations have emerged as a powerful strategy to enhance antifungal efficacy and abrogate drug resistance, but the impact on the evolution of drug resistance remains largely unexplored. Targeting the molecular chaperone Hsp90 or its downstream effector, the protein phosphatase calcineurin, abrogates resistance to the most widely deployed antifungals, the azoles, which inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis. Here, we evolved experimental populations of the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the leading human fungal pathogen Candida albicans with azole and an inhibitor of Hsp90, geldanamycin, or calcineurin, FK506. To recapitulate a clinical context where Hsp90 or calcineurin inhibitors could be utilized in combination with azoles to render resistant pathogens responsive to treatment, the evolution experiment was initiated with strains that are resistant to azoles in a manner that depends on Hsp90 and calcineurin. Of the 290 lineages initiated, most went extinct, yet 14 evolved resistance to the drug combination. Drug target mutations that conferred resistance to geldanamycin or FK506 were identified and validated in five evolved lineages. Whole-genome sequencing identified mutations in a gene encoding a transcriptional activator of drug efflux pumps, PDR1, and a gene encoding a transcriptional repressor of ergosterol biosynthesis genes, MOT3, that transformed azole resistance of two lineages from dependent on calcineurin to independent of this regulator. Resistance also arose by mutation that truncated the catalytic subunit of calcineurin, and by mutation in LCB1, encoding a sphingolipid biosynthetic enzyme. Genome analysis revealed extensive aneuploidy in four of the C. albicans lineages. Thus, we identify molecular determinants of the transition of azole resistance from calcineurin dependence to independence and establish multiple

  20. Signalling to drug resistance in CLL.

    PubMed

    Hertlein, Erin; Byrd, John C

    2010-03-01

    The nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kappaB) signalling pathway is constitutively active in a variety of cancers, including chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). The importance of this signalling pathway identifies it as a prime therapeutic target; however, the complexity and potential side effects of inhibiting NF-kappaB have thus far made the clinical use of NF-kappaB inhibitors a relatively unexplored resource in this disease. This article discusses the role of NF-kappaB in CLL as a common crossroad for pathways promoting drug resistance in CLL. We provide the background on how this pathway contributes to both spontaneous and drug-induced apoptosis. Potential new avenues to regulate this pathway in CLL are also discussed.

  1. Drug Resistance in Salmonella Typhimurium and its Implications*

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, E. S.

    1968-01-01

    A rise in Salmonella typhimurium infection was observed in calves in Britain during 1964–6, follwing the adoption of the intensive farming method. A single phage type of S. typhimurium, type 29, was incriminated as the major pathogen. Attempts to treat and control the disease with a range of antibiotics were ineffective, but resulted in the acquisition of transferable multiple drug resistance by type 29. The transmission of drug-resistant type 29, directly or indirectly, from bovines to man resulted in many human infections. Transferable drug resistance reaching man from enterobacteria of animal origin may ultimately enter specifically human pathogens. Infections such as that caused by type 29 can be eliminated, not by the massive use of antibiotics but by improvement in conditions of animal husbandry and reduction in the opportunities for the initiation and spread of the disease. A reappraisal is needed of the methods of using antibiotics to determine how these methods can be improved, in order to conserve the long-term efficacy of the antibiotics. PMID:4874171

  2. New drugs in multiple myeloma - role of carfilzomib and pomalidomide.

    PubMed

    Jurczyszyn, Artur; Legieć, Wojciech; Helbig, Grzegorz; Hus, Marek; Kyrcz-Krzemień, Sławomira; Skotnicki, Aleksander B

    2014-01-01

    Carfilzomib (CFZ), an epoxyketone with specific chymotrypsin-like activity, is a second-generation proteasome inhibitor with significant activity in patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma. On July 20, 2012, the US Food and Drug Administration approved CFZ to treat patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least two prior therapies including bortezomib (BORT) and an immunomodulatory agent and have demonstrated disease progression on or within 60 days of completion of the last therapy. Cytogenetic abnormalities did not appear to have a significant impact on the CFZ activity. Carfilzomib was well tolerated and demonstrated promising efficacy in patients with renal insufficiency. Pomalidomide (POM) (CC-4047) is a novel immunomodulatory derivative (IMID) with a stronger in vitro anti-myeloma effect compared with "older" IMIDs - thalidomide and lenalidomide (LEN). On February 8, 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration approved POM (Pomalyst, Celgene) for the treatment of MM patients who have received at least two prior therapies including LEN and BORT and have demonstrated progression on or within 60 days of completion of the last therapy. Pomalidomide is a novel IMID with significant anti-myeloma activity and manageable toxicity. This compound has shown high efficacy in MM patients who were resistant to prior use of LEN/BORT as well as in patients with a high-risk cytogenetic profile. Carfilzomib and POM have very high efficacy and will be used also in first line therapy in future.

  3. 75 FR 33317 - Antibacterial Resistance and Diagnostic Device and Drug Development Research for Bacterial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Antibacterial Resistance and Diagnostic Device and Drug... resistance, rapid diagnostic device development for bacterial diseases, and antibacterial drug development. The workshop will address antibacterial drug resistance, mechanisms of resistance, epidemiology...

  4. Drug-Resistant Leptomonas: Cross-Resistance in Trypanocide-Resistant Clones

    PubMed Central

    Bacchi, C. J.; Lambros, C.; Ellenbogen, B. B.; Penkovsky, L. N.; Sullivan, W.; Eyinna, E. E.; Hutner, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    A Leptomonas of insect origin was highly susceptible to several standard trypanocides and leishmanicides in vitro. Resistance was induced to some of these drugs; clones were isolated from each strain. Cross-resistance patterns of the clones were derived for diamidines, quinapyramine (Antrycide), acriflavin, phenanthridines, and other drugs active against trypanosomes and leishmanias. Clones tested included two each that were resistant to acriflavin, Antrycide, diminazene aceturate (Berenil), and pentamidine and one that was resistant to stilbamidine. Appreciable cross-resistance was evident for all clones. Differences were observed between clones from the same parent strain. Collateral susceptibility towards isometamidium and oxophenarsine was detected in most clone-derived populations. In clones passaged without drug to test for drug fastness, acriflavin and pentamidine clones lost resistance within 10 transfers, whereas Berenil and Antrycide clones retained considerable resistance after 20 to 30 subcultures without drug. Considerations of differences in life cycles suggest that the clone collection may be useful in screening for agents effective against leishmanias and stercorarian trypanosomes rather than against salivary trypanosomes. PMID:1211922

  5. Multi-Drug Resistance among Salmonella spp. Isolated from Food Animals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: Since the early 1990’s there has been increasing awareness and concern regarding the development of antimicrobial resistance among bacteria of public health significance. Of particular concern starting in 2000, was the emergence of multiple drug resistant (MDR) Salmonella Newport. How...

  6. Using drug exposure for predicting drug resistance – A data-driven genotypic interpretation tool

    PubMed Central

    Pironti, Alejandro; Pfeifer, Nico; Walter, Hauke; Jensen, Björn-Erik O.; Zazzi, Maurizio; Gomes, Perpétua; Kaiser, Rolf; Lengauer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Antiretroviral treatment history and past HIV-1 genotypes have been shown to be useful predictors for the success of antiretroviral therapy. However, this information may be unavailable or inaccurate, particularly for patients with multiple treatment lines often attending different clinics. We trained statistical models for predicting drug exposure from current HIV-1 genotype. These models were trained on 63,742 HIV-1 nucleotide sequences derived from patients with known therapeutic history, and on 6,836 genotype-phenotype pairs (GPPs). The mean performance regarding prediction of drug exposure on two test sets was 0.78 and 0.76 (ROC-AUC), respectively. The mean correlation to phenotypic resistance in GPPs was 0.51 (PhenoSense) and 0.46 (Antivirogram). Performance on prediction of therapy-success on two test sets based on genetic susceptibility scores was 0.71 and 0.63 (ROC-AUC), respectively. Compared to geno2pheno[resistance], our novel models display a similar or superior performance. Our models are freely available on the internet via www.geno2pheno.org. They can be used for inferring which drug compounds have previously been used by an HIV-1-infected patient, for predicting drug resistance, and for selecting an optimal antiretroviral therapy. Our data-driven models can be periodically retrained without expert intervention as clinical HIV-1 databases are updated and therefore reduce our dependency on hard-to-obtain GPPs. PMID:28394945

  7. Using drug exposure for predicting drug resistance - A data-driven genotypic interpretation tool.

    PubMed

    Pironti, Alejandro; Pfeifer, Nico; Walter, Hauke; Jensen, Björn-Erik O; Zazzi, Maurizio; Gomes, Perpétua; Kaiser, Rolf; Lengauer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Antiretroviral treatment history and past HIV-1 genotypes have been shown to be useful predictors for the success of antiretroviral therapy. However, this information may be unavailable or inaccurate, particularly for patients with multiple treatment lines often attending different clinics. We trained statistical models for predicting drug exposure from current HIV-1 genotype. These models were trained on 63,742 HIV-1 nucleotide sequences derived from patients with known therapeutic history, and on 6,836 genotype-phenotype pairs (GPPs). The mean performance regarding prediction of drug exposure on two test sets was 0.78 and 0.76 (ROC-AUC), respectively. The mean correlation to phenotypic resistance in GPPs was 0.51 (PhenoSense) and 0.46 (Antivirogram). Performance on prediction of therapy-success on two test sets based on genetic susceptibility scores was 0.71 and 0.63 (ROC-AUC), respectively. Compared to geno2pheno[resistance], our novel models display a similar or superior performance. Our models are freely available on the internet via www.geno2pheno.org. They can be used for inferring which drug compounds have previously been used by an HIV-1-infected patient, for predicting drug resistance, and for selecting an optimal antiretroviral therapy. Our data-driven models can be periodically retrained without expert intervention as clinical HIV-1 databases are updated and therefore reduce our dependency on hard-to-obtain GPPs.

  8. On the Spread of Drug-Resistant Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinazi, Rinaldo B.

    1999-10-01

    We introduce an interacting particle system to model the emergence of drug-resistant diseases, one of the most serious health problems in modern society. We are interested in diseases for which a natural strain may mutate into a drug-resistant strain. This happens, for instance, when antibiotics are misused. The main result of our analysis is that with an efficient drug against the natural strain, if there is even a small chance that the natural strain mutates into the drug-resistant one, then there will eventually be an outbreak of the drug-resistant strain throughout the population. In that case the natural strain disappears and is replaced by the drug-resistant strain. The disturbing part of this is that an efficient treatment of the natural strain gives an edge to the drug-resistant strain.

  9. My Cousin, My Enemy: quasispecies suppression of drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kirkegaard, Karla; van Buuren, Nicholas J; Mateo, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    If a freshly minted genome contains a mutation that confers drug resistance, will it be selected in the presence of the drug? Not necessarily. During viral infections, newly synthesized viral genomes occupy the same cells as parent and other progeny genomes. If the antiviral target is chosen so that the drug-resistant progeny’s growth is dominantly inhibited by the drug-susceptible members of its intracellular family, its outgrowth can be suppressed. Precedent for ‘dominant drug targeting’ as a deliberate approach to suppress the outgrowth of inhibitor-resistant viruses has been established for envelope variants of vesicular stomatitis virus and for capsid variants of poliovirus and dengue virus. Small molecules that stabilize oligomeric assemblages are a promising means to an unfit family to destroy the effectiveness of a newborn drug-resistant relative due to the co-assembly of drug-susceptible and drug-resistant monomers. PMID:27764731

  10. Comparative drug pair screening across multiple glioblastoma cell lines reveals novel drug-drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Linnéa; Kling, Teresia; Monsefi, Naser; Olsson, Maja; Hansson, Caroline; Baskaran, Sathishkumar; Lundgren, Bo; Martens, Ulf; Häggblad, Maria; Westermark, Bengt; Forsberg Nilsson, Karin; Uhrbom, Lene; Karlsson-Lindahl, Linda; Gerlee, Philip; Nelander, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive brain tumor in adults, and despite state-of-the-art treatment, survival remains poor and novel therapeutics are sorely needed. The aim of the present study was to identify new synergistic drug pairs for GBM. In addition, we aimed to explore differences in drug-drug interactions across multiple GBM-derived cell cultures and predict such differences by use of transcriptional biomarkers. Methods We performed a screen in which we quantified drug-drug interactions for 465 drug pairs in each of the 5 GBM cell lines U87MG, U343MG, U373MG, A172, and T98G. Selected interactions were further tested using isobole-based analysis and validated in 5 glioma-initiating cell cultures. Furthermore, drug interactions were predicted using microarray-based transcriptional profiling in combination with statistical modeling. Results Of the 5 × 465 drug pairs, we could define a subset of drug pairs with strong interaction in both standard cell lines and glioma-initiating cell cultures. In particular, a subset of pairs involving the pharmaceutical compounds rimcazole, sertraline, pterostilbene, and gefitinib showed a strong interaction in a majority of the cell cultures tested. Statistical modeling of microarray and interaction data using sparse canonical correlation analysis revealed several predictive biomarkers, which we propose could be of importance in regulating drug pair responses. Conclusion We identify novel candidate drug pairs for GBM and suggest possibilities to prospectively use transcriptional biomarkers to predict drug interactions in individual cases. PMID:24101737

  11. Rhabdomyolysis associated with antimicrobial drug-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Tomohiro; Narita, Mitsuo; Ohya, Hitomi; Yamanaka, Takayuki; Aizawa, Yuta; Matsuo, Mai; Matsunaga, Masamichi; Tsukano, Shinya; Taguchi, Testuo

    2012-05-01

    We describe a case of rhabdomyolysis in a patient infected with antimicrobial drug-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae The patient's acute-phase serum levels of interleukin-18 and tumor necrosis factor-α were high, which suggests a pathogenic role for M. pneumoniae. In an era of increasing antimicrobial drug resistance, a system for rapidly identifying resistant M. pneumoniae would be beneficial.

  12. Rural Adolescent Perceptions of Alcohol and Other Drug Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Jeanne E.

    2001-01-01

    Used questionnaires and focus groups to examine 361 rural high schoolers' perceptions of drug resistance difficulties when offered beer, marijuana, and hard drugs. Found that drug nonusers had the widest range of explanations for resistance difficulty. Peer pressure was cited most frequently by nonusers, and seldom by heavy users. Frequent users…

  13. Young Women's Experiences of Resisting Invitations to Use Illicit Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehn, Corinne V.; O'Neill, Linda K.

    2011-01-01

    Ten young women were interviewed regarding their experiences of resisting invitations to use illicit drugs. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used to gather and analyze information. One key theme was the motivations that inspired women to refuse drug offers. Young women resisted drug invitations because of their desires to be authentic, protect their…

  14. Evaluation of Idaho's DARE "Drug Abuse Resistance Education Projects."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Roberta K.

    The goal of DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) is not to completely eliminate the drug and alcohol problems of society. It is a proactive prevention program designed to equip youth (focusing on elementary school) with skills for resisting peer pressure to experiment with drugs, and to manage anger without resorting to violence or the use of…

  15. 2015 Update of the Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Wensing, Annemarie M; Calvez, Vincent; Günthard, Huldrych F; Johnson, Victoria A; Paredes, Roger; Pillay, Deenan; Shafer, Robert W; Richman, Douglas D

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 edition of the IAS-USA drug resistance mutations list updates the figures last published in July 2014. The mutations listed are those that have been identified by specific criteria for evidence and drugs described. The figures are designed to assist practitioners in identifying key mutations associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs and, therefore, in making clinical decisions regarding antiretroviral therapy.

  16. 2017 Update of the Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Wensing, Annemarie M; Calvez, Vincent; Günthard, Huldrych F; Johnson, Victoria A; Paredes, Roger; Pillay, Deenan; Shafer, Robert W; Richman, Douglas D

    The 2017 edition of the IAS-USA drug resistance mutations list updates the figures last published in November 2015. The mutations listed are those that have been identified by specific criteria for evidence and drugs described. The figures are designed to assist practitioners in identifying key mutations associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs and, therefore, in making clinical decisions regarding antiretroviral therapy.

  17. Bioinformatics Identification of Drug Resistance-Associated Gene Pairs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ze-Jia; Yang, Qing-Yong; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Zhu, Qiang; Zhang, Qing-Ye

    2016-08-27

    Tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Due to the extensive use of anti-tuberculosis drugs and the development of mutations, the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is recognized as one of the most dangerous threats to global tuberculosis control. Some single mutations have been identified to be significantly linked with drug resistance. However, the prior research did not take gene-gene interactions into account, and the emergence of transmissible drug resistance is connected with multiple genetic mutations. In this study we use the bioinformatics software GBOOST (The Hong Kong University, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China) to calculate the interactions of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) pairs and identify gene pairs associated with drug resistance. A large part of the non-synonymous mutations in the drug target genes that were included in the screened gene pairs were confirmed by previous reports, which lent sound solid credits to the effectiveness of our method. Notably, most of the identified gene pairs containing drug targets also comprise Pro-Pro-Glu (PPE) family proteins, suggesting that PPE family proteins play important roles in the drug resistance of Mtb. Therefore, this study provides deeper insights into the mechanisms underlying anti-tuberculosis drug resistance, and the present method is useful for exploring the drug resistance mechanisms for other microorganisms.

  18. Bedaquiline: a novel antitubercular drug for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nagabushan, H; Roopadevi, H S

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) are emerging global health threats. Bedaquiline is a new antituberculous drug belonging to the diarylquinoline class that efficiently inhibits the adenosine triphosphate synthase enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is a bactericidal and long-acting drug. It inhibits both dormant as well as replicating bacterial sub-populations and thus shortens the duration of TB treatment. This drug has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration in December 2012 for the management of multidrug resistant-TB. The drug marks the introduction of a new addition to the TB armamentarium after four decades.

  19. GEAR: A database of Genomic Elements Associated with drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin-Ying; Chen, Wei-Hua; Xiao, Pei-Pei; Xie, Wen-Bin; Luo, Qibin; Bork, Peer; Zhao, Xing-Ming

    2017-03-15

    Drug resistance is becoming a serious problem that leads to the failure of standard treatments, which is generally developed because of genetic mutations of certain molecules. Here, we present GEAR (A database of Genomic Elements Associated with drug Resistance) that aims to provide comprehensive information about genomic elements (including genes, single-nucleotide polymorphisms and microRNAs) that are responsible for drug resistance. Right now, GEAR contains 1631 associations between 201 human drugs and 758 genes, 106 associations between 29 human drugs and 66 miRNAs, and 44 associations between 17 human drugs and 22 SNPs. These relationships are firstly extracted from primary literature with text mining and then manually curated. The drug resistome deposited in GEAR provides insights into the genetic factors underlying drug resistance. In addition, new indications and potential drug combinations can be identified based on the resistome. The GEAR database can be freely accessed through http://gear.comp-sysbio.org.

  20. GEAR: A database of Genomic Elements Associated with drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin-Ying; Chen, Wei-Hua; Xiao, Pei-Pei; Xie, Wen-Bin; Luo, Qibin; Bork, Peer; Zhao, Xing-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance is becoming a serious problem that leads to the failure of standard treatments, which is generally developed because of genetic mutations of certain molecules. Here, we present GEAR (A database of Genomic Elements Associated with drug Resistance) that aims to provide comprehensive information about genomic elements (including genes, single-nucleotide polymorphisms and microRNAs) that are responsible for drug resistance. Right now, GEAR contains 1631 associations between 201 human drugs and 758 genes, 106 associations between 29 human drugs and 66 miRNAs, and 44 associations between 17 human drugs and 22 SNPs. These relationships are firstly extracted from primary literature with text mining and then manually curated. The drug resistome deposited in GEAR provides insights into the genetic factors underlying drug resistance. In addition, new indications and potential drug combinations can be identified based on the resistome. The GEAR database can be freely accessed through http://gear.comp-sysbio.org. PMID:28294141

  1. New drugs in multiple myeloma: mechanisms of action and phase I/II clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Ocio, Enrique M; Mateos, María-Victoria; Maiso, Patricia; Pandiella, Atanasio; San-Miguel, Jesús F

    2008-12-01

    The outcome of multiple myeloma has substantially improved over the past decade, mainly due to recently approved drugs, such as thalidomide, lenalidomide, and bortezomib. Nevertheless, most patients still relapse and, therefore, drugs with new mechanisms of action are urgently needed to overcome this resistance. In this Review, we discuss some of the new targeted therapeutic strategies under assessment in preclinical and clinical studies in multiple myeloma. Unfortunately, the single-agent clinical activity of most of these new drugs has been limited; nevertheless, their effectiveness might be enhanced by their rational combination with each other or with conventional agents.

  2. Prevalence of multi-drug resistant Salmonella on comercial dairies utilizing a single heifer raising facility

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objectives of the current research were two-fold: 1) Determine the prevalence of multiple drug resistant (MDR) Salmonella in the various classes of dairy cattle; and 2) Determine if co-mingling of calves from multiple farms at a heifer feedlot serves as a transmission vector for Salmonella back ...

  3. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of acquired cancer drug resistance to pazopanib and dasatinib.

    PubMed

    Vyse, Simon; McCarthy, Frank; Broncel, Malgorzata; Paul, Angela; Wong, Jocelyn P; Bhamra, Amandeep; Huang, Paul H

    2017-08-24

    Acquired drug resistance impacts the majority of patients being treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and remains a key challenge in modern anti-cancer therapy. The lack of clinically effective therapies to overcome resistance represents an unmet need. Understanding the signalling that drives drug resistance will facilitate the development of new salvage therapies to treat patients with secondary TKI resistance. In this study, we utilise mass spectrometry to characterise the global phosphoproteomic alterations that accompany the acquisition of resistance to two FDA-approved TKIs, pazopanib and dasatinib, in the A204 rhabdoid tumour cell line. Our analysis finds that only 6% and 9.7% of the quantified phosphoproteome is altered upon the acquisition of pazopanib and dasatinib resistance, respectively. Pazopanib resistant cells display elevated phosphorylation in cytoskeletal regulatory pathways while dasatinib resistant cells show an upregulation of the insulin receptor/IGF-1R signalling pathway. Drug response profiling rediscovers several previously reported vulnerabilities associated with pazopanib and dasatinib resistance and identifies a new dependency to the second generation HSP90 inhibitor NVP-AUY-922. This study provides a useful resource detailing the candidate signalling determinants of acquired TKI resistance; and reveals a therapeutic approach of inhibiting HSP90 function as a means of salvage therapy to overcome pazopanib and dasatinib resistance. Pazopanib and dasatinib are tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) approved for the treatment of multiple cancer types. Patients who are treated with these drugs are prone to the development of drug resistance and consequently tumour relapse. Here we use quantitative phosphoproteomics to characterise the signalling pathways which are enriched in cells that have acquired resistance to these two drugs. Furthermore, targeted drug screens were used to identify salvage therapies capable of overcoming pazopanib

  4. Antimalarial Drug Resistance: Literature Review and Activities and Findings of the ICEMR Network

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liwang; Mharakurwa, Sungano; Ndiaye, Daouda; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Rosenthal, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs are key tools for the control and elimination of malaria. Recent decreases in the global malaria burden are likely due, in part, to the deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapies. Therefore, the emergence and potential spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites in southeast Asia and changes in sensitivities to artemisinin partner drugs have raised concerns. In recognition of this urgent threat, the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMRs) are closely monitoring antimalarial drug efficacy and studying the mechanisms underlying drug resistance. At multiple sentinel sites of the global ICEMR network, research activities include clinical studies to track the efficacies of antimalarial drugs, ex vivo/in vitro assays to measure drug susceptibilities of parasite isolates, and characterization of resistance-mediating parasite polymorphisms. Taken together, these efforts offer an increasingly comprehensive assessment of the efficacies of antimalarial therapies, and enable us to predict the emergence of drug resistance and to guide local antimalarial drug policies. Here we briefly review worldwide antimalarial drug resistance concerns, summarize research activities of the ICEMRs related to drug resistance, and assess the global impacts of the ICEMR programs. PMID:26259943

  5. Discordant resistance to kanamycin and amikacin in drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Krüüner, Annika; Jureen, Pontus; Levina, Klavdia; Ghebremichael, Solomon; Hoffner, Sven

    2003-09-01

    It is generally thought that there is full cross-resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis between the aminoglycoside drugs kanamycin and amikacin. However, kanamycin resistance and amikacin susceptibility were seen in 43 of 79 (54%) multidrug-resistant Estonian isolates, indicating that there might be a need to test the resistance of M. tuberculosis isolates to both drugs.

  6. AN ELEMENTARY APPROACH TO MODELING DRUG RESISTANCE IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Tomasetti, Cristian; Levy, Doron

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to drugs has been an ongoing obstacle to a successful treatment of many diseases. In this work we consider the problem of drug resistance in cancer, focusing on random genetic point mutations. Most previous works on mathematical models of such drug resistance have been based on stochastic methods. In contrast, our approach is based on an elementary, compartmental system of ordinary differential equations. We use our very simple approach to derive results on drug resistance that are comparable to those that were previously obtained using much more complex mathematical techniques. The simplicity of our model allows us to obtain analytic results for resistance to any number of drugs. In particular, we show that the amount of resistance generated before the start of the treatment, and present at some given time afterward, always depends on the turnover rate, no matter how many drugs are simultaneously used in the treatment. PMID:21077714

  7. Antimalarial Drug Resistance: A Threat to Malaria Elimination.

    PubMed

    Menard, Didier; Dondorp, Arjen

    2017-07-05

    Increasing antimalarial drug resistance once again threatens effective antimalarial drug treatment, malaria control, and elimination. Artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) are first-line treatment for uncomplicated falciparum malaria in all endemic countries, yet partial resistance to artemisinins has emerged in the Greater Mekong Subregion. Concomitant emergence of partner drug resistance is now causing high ACT treatment failure rates in several areas. Genetic markers for artemisinin resistance and several of the partner drugs have been established, greatly facilitating surveillance. Single point mutations in the gene coding for the Kelch propeller domain of the K13 protein strongly correlate with artemisinin resistance. Novel regimens and strategies using existing antimalarial drugs will be needed until novel compounds can be deployed. Elimination of artemisinin resistance will imply elimination of all falciparum malaria from the same areas. In vivax malaria, chloroquine resistance is an increasing problem. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  8. Drug resistance reversal--are we getting closer?

    PubMed

    Baird, R D; Kaye, S B

    2003-11-01

    Clinical drug resistance is a major barrier to overcome before chemotherapy can become curative for most patients presenting with metastatic cancer. Rational attempts to tackle clinical drug resistance need to be based on an understanding of the mechanisms involved; these are likely to be complex and multifactorial, and may be due to inadequate drug exposure or alterations in the cancer cell itself. This article reviews a number of strategies used to tackle drug resistance, focussing on work in our institution related to the treatment of ovarian cancer and resistance to platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy. Further progress towards drug resistance reversal will require a three-pronged approach, namely: the development of novel cytotoxics which exploit selectively expressed targets; modulation of resistance to conventional agents and, most importantly, a serious attempt to understand resistance mechanisms in tumour samples taken both pre- and post-chemotherapy.

  9. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL AND GENETICAL STUDIES ON THE DRUG-RESISTANCE OF SHIGELLAE AND STAPHYLOCOCCI.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ANTIBIOTICS , RESISTANCE (BIOLOGY)), (*SHIGELLA, RESISTANCE(BIOLOGY)), (*STAPHYLOCOCCUS, RESISTANCE(BIOLOGY)), EPIDEMIOLOGY, GENETICS, DRUGS, BACTERIOPHAGES, TETRACYCLINES, PENICILLINS, ESCHERICHIA COLI, JAPAN

  10. Transmitted drug resistance in French HIV-2-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Charlotte; Visseaux, Benoit; Bénard, Antoine; Peytavin, Gilles; Damond, Florence; Roy, Céline; Taieb, Audrey; Chêne, Geneviève; Matheron, Sophie; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Descamps, Diane

    2013-06-19

    We report the first transmitted drug resistance survey study in HIV-2-infected patients living in France. The prevalence of transmitted drug resistance was 5.0% (95% confidence interval, 0.1-9.9) with mutations detected only in protease, not in reverse transcriptase. In this series, 10% of patients displayed X4/dual-mixed viruses. These findings classified the rate of transmitted drug resistance in the HIV-2 French Cohort as low prevalence.

  11. Overcoming Platinum Drug Resistance with Copper-lowering Agents

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, HELEN H.W.; KUO, MACUS TIEN

    2014-01-01

    Platinum (Pt)-based antitumor agents have been the mainstay of cancer chemotherapy for the last three decades. While multiple mechanisms are responsible for treatment failure, deficiency in drug transport is an important contributor. The human high-affinity copper (Cu) transporter-1 (hCtr1) can also transport Pt-based drugs including cisplatin (cDDP) and carboplatin. Reduced hCtr1 expression frequently occurs in cDDP-resistant cell lines and in cancer in patients who failed chemotherapy with these drugs. We previously demonstrated that Cu chelation induces the expression of transcription factor Sp1 which binds the promoters of Sp1 and hCtr1, thereby, up-regulating their expression, whereas Cu overload shuts down hCtr1 and Sp1 expression by dissociating Sp1 from their promoter promoters. Thus, mammalian Cu homeostasis is transcriptionally regulated within a loop consisting of Sp1, hCtr1, and Cu in a three-way mutually regulated manner. These findings suggest that it is feasible to module cDDP transport capacity through intervention of mammalian Cu homeostasis. Indeed, we found that cDDP resistance can be overcome by Cu-lowering agents through enhanced hCtr1 expression by up-regulation of Sp1 in cultured cells. This discovery provided a mechanistic basis for the ongoing clinical study using Cu chelator to overcome cDDP resistance in ovarian cancer chemotherapy. Preliminary study using copper chelator (trientine) for enhancing the treatment efficacy of carboplatin in 5 ovarian cancer patients showed encouraging results. This short review describes the perspectives of using Cu-lowering agents in overcoming Pt resistance in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:24122978

  12. Inhibitory effect of steroidal alkaloids on drug transport and multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Y; Harel-Orbital, T; Gaffield, W; Liscovitch, M

    2001-01-01

    Intrinsic or acquired resistance of tumor cells to multiple cytotoxic drugs (multidrug resistance MDR) is a major cause of failure of cancer chemotherapy. MDR is often caused by elevated expression of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or multidrug resistance protein (MRP). A number of compounds, termed chemosensitizers, have little or no cytotoxic action of their own, but inhibit (P-gp) or MRP-mediated drug export and are capable of sensitizing MDR cells to the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. Here we examined the ability of steroidal alkaloids of plant origin, namely the Veratrum sp. alkaloid cyclopamine and the Lycopersicon sp. alkaloid tomatidine, to act as potent and effective chemosensitizers in multidrug resistant tumor cells. Drug uptake was determined by measuring accumulation of tetramethylrosamine in multidrug resistant NCI AdrR human adenocarcinoma cells. Resistance to adriamycin and vinblastine was determined by utilizing the MTT cell survival assay. Cyclopamine and tomatidine elevate tetramethylrosamine uptake by NCI AdrR cells and sensitize the cells to the cytotoxic action of adriamycin and vinblastine. In both cases these agents are comparable in patency and efficacy to verapamil, a reversal agent commonly used in MDR research. It is concluded that steroidal alkaloids of plant origin act as inhibitors of P-gp-mediated drug transport and multidrug resistance and therefore may serve as chemosensitizers in combination chemotherapy with conventional cytotoxic drugs for treating multidrug resistant cancer.

  13. Engineered reversal of drug resistance in cancer cells--metastases suppressor factors as change agents.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Kumar, Akinchan; Mann, Anita; Aggarwal, Suruchi; Kumar, Maneesh; Roy, Sumitabho Deb; Pore, Subrata Kumar; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Mahesh Kumar, Jerald; Thakur, Ram Krishna; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    Building molecular correlates of drug resistance in cancer and exploiting them for therapeutic intervention remains a pressing clinical need. To identify factors that impact drug resistance herein we built a model that couples inherent cell-based response toward drugs with transcriptomes of resistant/sensitive cells. To test this model, we focused on a group of genes called metastasis suppressor genes (MSGs) that influence aggressiveness and metastatic potential of cancers. Interestingly, modeling of 84 000 drug response transcriptome combinations predicted multiple MSGs to be associated with resistance of different cell types and drugs. As a case study, on inducing MSG levels in a drug resistant breast cancer line resistance to anticancer drugs caerulomycin, camptothecin and topotecan decreased by more than 50-60%, in both culture conditions and also in tumors generated in mice, in contrast to control un-induced cells. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of engineered reversal of drug resistance in cancer cells based on a model that exploits inherent cellular response profiles.

  14. In vitro Development of Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy Drug-Resistant Cancer Cell Lines: A Practical Guide with Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Martina; Eustace, Alex J.; Busschots, Steven; Breen, Laura; Crown, John; Clynes, Martin; O’Donovan, Norma; Stordal, Britta

    2014-01-01

    The development of a drug-resistant cell line can take from 3 to 18 months. However, little is published on the methodology of this development process. This article will discuss key decisions to be made prior to starting resistant cell line development; the choice of parent cell line, dose of selecting agent, treatment interval, and optimizing the dose of drug for the parent cell line. Clinically relevant drug-resistant cell lines are developed by mimicking the conditions cancer patients experience during chemotherapy and cell lines display between two- and eight-fold resistance compared to their parental cell line. Doses of drug administered are low, and a pulsed treatment strategy is often used where the cells recover in drug-free media. High-level laboratory models are developed with the aim of understanding potential mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy agents. Doses of drug are higher and escalated over time. It is common to have difficulty developing stable clinically relevant drug-resistant cell lines. A comparative selection strategy of multiple cell lines or multiple chemotherapeutic agents mitigates this risk and gives insight into which agents or type of cell line develops resistance easily. Successful selection strategies from our research are presented. Pulsed-selection produced platinum or taxane-resistant large cell lung cancer (H1299 and H460) and temozolomide-resistant melanoma (Malme-3M and HT144) cell lines. Continuous selection produced a lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cell line (HCC1954). Techniques for maintaining drug-resistant cell lines are outlined including; maintaining cells with chemotherapy, pulse treating with chemotherapy, or returning to master drug-resistant stocks. The heterogeneity of drug-resistant models produced from the same parent cell line with the same chemotherapy agent is explored with reference to P-glycoprotein. Heterogeneity in drug-resistant cell lines reflects the heterogeneity that can occur in clinical

  15. In vitro Development of Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy Drug-Resistant Cancer Cell Lines: A Practical Guide with Case Studies.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Martina; Eustace, Alex J; Busschots, Steven; Breen, Laura; Crown, John; Clynes, Martin; O'Donovan, Norma; Stordal, Britta

    2014-01-01

    The development of a drug-resistant cell line can take from 3 to 18 months. However, little is published on the methodology of this development process. This article will discuss key decisions to be made prior to starting resistant cell line development; the choice of parent cell line, dose of selecting agent, treatment interval, and optimizing the dose of drug for the parent cell line. Clinically relevant drug-resistant cell lines are developed by mimicking the conditions cancer patients experience during chemotherapy and cell lines display between two- and eight-fold resistance compared to their parental cell line. Doses of drug administered are low, and a pulsed treatment strategy is often used where the cells recover in drug-free media. High-level laboratory models are developed with the aim of understanding potential mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy agents. Doses of drug are higher and escalated over time. It is common to have difficulty developing stable clinically relevant drug-resistant cell lines. A comparative selection strategy of multiple cell lines or multiple chemotherapeutic agents mitigates this risk and gives insight into which agents or type of cell line develops resistance easily. Successful selection strategies from our research are presented. Pulsed-selection produced platinum or taxane-resistant large cell lung cancer (H1299 and H460) and temozolomide-resistant melanoma (Malme-3M and HT144) cell lines. Continuous selection produced a lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cell line (HCC1954). Techniques for maintaining drug-resistant cell lines are outlined including; maintaining cells with chemotherapy, pulse treating with chemotherapy, or returning to master drug-resistant stocks. The heterogeneity of drug-resistant models produced from the same parent cell line with the same chemotherapy agent is explored with reference to P-glycoprotein. Heterogeneity in drug-resistant cell lines reflects the heterogeneity that can occur in clinical

  16. Overcoming drug efflux-based multidrug resistance in cancer with nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xue; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), which significantly decreases the efficacy of anticancer drugs and causes tumor recurrence, has been a major challenge in clinical cancer treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs for decades. Several mechanisms of overcoming drug resistance have been postulated. Well known P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and other drug efflux transporters are considered to be critical in pumping anticancer drugs out of cells and causing chemotherapy failure. Innovative theranostic (therapeutic and diagnostic) strategies with nanoparticles are rapidly evolving and are anticipated to offer opportunities to overcome these limits. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of drug efflux-mediated resistance and the application of multiple nanoparticle-based platforms to overcome chemoresistance and improve therapeutic outcome. PMID:22237039

  17. Infectious Drug Resistance Among Clinically Isolated Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Ann C.; Feary, Thomas W.

    1968-01-01

    Of 398 strains of clinically isolated Escherichia coli from three Birmingham, Alabama, hospitals, 38% were found to be resistant to one or more drugs tested. Fifty-seven per cent of the resistant strains transferred all or a part of their resistance pattern to sensitive cells during mixed cultivation. Of the 152 resistant strains, 29.1% were singly resistant, and 70.5% were resistant to more than one drug. Of the multiply resistant strains, 61% transferred all or a part of their pattern. Strains isolated from Veterans Hospital patients demonstrated higher percentages of resistance than strains isolated from Children's Hospital patients. An extremely low incidence of infective drug resistance was noted among E. coli isolated from the stools of healthy hospital employees. PMID:4882016

  18. Engaging Resistant Adolescents in Drug Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Holly Barrett; Kern-Jones, Sheryl; Turner, Charles W.; Peterson, Thomas R.; Ozechowski, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    In the first phase of a two-part treatment development study, families with a treatment-resistant, drug-abusing adolescent (n=42) were offered 12 sessions of Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT). This parent-focused intervention was designed to help parents facilitate their adolescents' entry in treatment and support adolescents' subsequent behavior change and to improve parent and family functioning. In the second phase, successfully engaged adolescents (n=30) were offered 12 sessions of a multicomponent individual cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) targeting substance use and related problem behaviors. Measures were collected at pre- and post-treatment for parents and adolescents, with an additional follow-up assessment for parents at 3-months post-treatment. Parents in the CRAFT intervention experienced a significant reduction in negative symptoms and 71% of parents were successful in engaging their resistant youth in treatment. The CBT intervention for the engaged youth was associated with a statistically significant, but not clinically significant, reduction in marijuana use. PMID:17306722

  19. A genomic and evolutionary approach reveals non-genetic drug resistance in malaria.

    PubMed

    Herman, Jonathan D; Rice, Daniel P; Ribacke, Ulf; Silterra, Jacob; Deik, Amy A; Moss, Eli L; Broadbent, Kate M; Neafsey, Daniel E; Desai, Michael M; Clish, Clary B; Mazitschek, Ralph; Wirth, Dyann F

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance remains a major public health challenge for malaria treatment and eradication. Individual loci associated with drug resistance to many antimalarials have been identified, but their epistasis with other resistance mechanisms has not yet been elucidated. We previously described two mutations in the cytoplasmic prolyl-tRNA synthetase (cPRS) gene that confer resistance to halofuginone. We describe here the evolutionary trajectory of halofuginone resistance of two independent drug resistance selections in Plasmodium falciparum. Using this novel methodology, we discover an unexpected non-genetic drug resistance mechanism that P. falciparum utilizes before genetic modification of the cPRS. P. falciparum first upregulates its proline amino acid homeostasis in response to halofuginone pressure. We show that this non-genetic adaptation to halofuginone is not likely mediated by differential RNA expression and precedes mutation or amplification of the cPRS gene. By tracking the evolution of the two drug resistance selections with whole genome sequencing, we further demonstrate that the cPRS locus accounts for the majority of genetic adaptation to halofuginone in P. falciparum. We further validate that copy-number variations at the cPRS locus also contribute to halofuginone resistance. We provide a three-step model for multi-locus evolution of halofuginone drug resistance in P. falciparum. Informed by genomic approaches, our results provide the first comprehensive view of the evolutionary trajectory malaria parasites take to achieve drug resistance. Our understanding of the multiple genetic and non-genetic mechanisms of drug resistance informs how we will design and pair future anti-malarials for clinical use.

  20. Targeting efflux pumps to overcome antifungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Ann R; Cardno, Tony S; Strouse, J Jacob; Ivnitski-Steele, Irena; Keniya, Mikhail V; Lackovic, Kurt; Monk, Brian C; Sklar, Larry A; Cannon, Richard D

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to antifungal drugs is an increasingly significant clinical problem. The most common antifungal resistance encountered is efflux pump-mediated resistance of Candida species to azole drugs. One approach to overcome this resistance is to inhibit the pumps and chemosensitize resistant strains to azole drugs. Drug discovery targeting fungal efflux pumps could thus result in the development of azole-enhancing combination therapy. Heterologous expression of fungal efflux pumps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides a versatile system for screening for pump inhibitors. Fungal efflux pumps transport a range of xenobiotics including fluorescent compounds. This enables the use of fluorescence-based detection, as well as growth inhibition assays, in screens to discover compounds targeting efflux-mediated antifungal drug resistance. A variety of medium- and high-throughput screens have been used to identify a number of chemical entities that inhibit fungal efflux pumps.

  1. Drug Resistance to EGFR Inhibitors in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tetsu, Osamu; Hangauer, Matthew J.; Phuchareon, Janyaporn; Eisele, David W.; McCormick, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background The discovery of mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has dramatically changed the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)—the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. EGFR-targeted therapies show considerable promise, but drug resistance has become a substantial issue. Methods We reviewed the literature to provide an overview of the drug resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in NSCLC. Results The mechanisms causing primary, acquired, and persistent drug resistance to TKIs vary. Researchers and clinicians, who have used study findings to develop more effective therapeutic approaches, have found that the sequential use of single agents presents a formidable challenge, suggesting that multi-drug combinations must be considered. Conclusions In the era of precision medicine, oncologists should promptly obtain an accurate diagnosis of drug resistance in each patient to design the most relevant combination therapy to overcome patient-specific drug resistance. PMID:26910730

  2. New approaches for understanding mechanisms of drug resistance in schistosomes

    PubMed Central

    GREENBERG, ROBERT M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Schistosomes are parasitic flatworms that cause schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease that affects hundreds of millions worldwide. Treatment and control of schistosomiasis relies almost entirely on the single drug praziquantel (PZQ), making the prospect of emerging drug resistance particularly worrisome. This review will survey reports of PZQ (and other drug) resistance in schistosomes and other platyhelminths, and explore mechanisms by which drug resistance might develop. Newer genomic and post-genomic strategies that offer the promise of better understanding of how drug resistance might arise in these organisms will be discussed. These approaches could also lead to insights into the mode of action of these drugs and potentially provide markers for monitoring the emergence of resistance. PMID:23552512

  3. Impaired fitness of drug-resistant malaria parasites: evidence and implication on drug-deployment policies.

    PubMed

    Babiker, Hamza A; Hastings, Ian M; Swedberg, Göte

    2009-06-01

    Malaria, a leading parasitic disease, inflicts an enormous toll on human lives and is caused by protozoal parasites belonging to the genus Plasmodium. Antimalarial drugs targeting essential biochemical processes in the parasite are the primary resources for management and control. However, the parasite has established mutations, substantially reducing the efficacy of these drugs. First-line therapy is faced the with the consistent evolution of drug-resistant genotypes carrying these mutations. However, drug-resistant genotypes are likely to be less fit than the wild-type, suggesting that they might disappear by reducing the volume of drug pressure. A substantial body of epidemiological evidence confirmed that the frequency of resistant genotypes wanes when active drug selection declines. Drug selection on the parasite genome that removes genetic variation in the vicinity of drug-resistant genes (hitch-hiking) is common among resistant parasites in the field. This can further disadvantage drug-resistant strains and limit their variability in the face of a mounting immune response. Attempts to provide unequivocal evidence for the fitness cost of drug resistance have monitored the outcomes of laboratory competition experiments of deliberate mixtures of sensitive and resistant strains, in the absence of drug pressure, using isogenic clones produced either by drug selection or gene manipulation. Some of these experiments provided inconclusive results, but they all suggested reduced fitness of drug-resistant clones in the absence of drug pressure. In addition, biochemical analyses provided clearer information demonstrating that the mutation of some antimalarial-targeted enzymes lowers their activity compared with the wild-type enzyme. Here, we review current evidences for the disadvantage of drug-resistance mutations, and discuss some strategies of drug deployment to maximize the cost of resistance and limit its spread.

  4. Adaptation or selection? Old issues and new stakes in the postwar debates over bacterial drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Creager, Angela N H

    2007-03-01

    The 1940s and 1950s were marked by intense debates over the origin of drug resistance in microbes. Bacteriologists had traditionally invoked the notions of 'training' and 'adaptation' to account for the ability of microbes to acquire new traits. As the field of bacterial genetics emerged, however, its participants rejected 'Lamarckian' views of microbial heredity, and offered statistical evidence that drug resistance resulted from the selection of random resistant mutants. Antibiotic resistance became a key issue among those disputing physiological (usually termed 'adaptationist') vs. genetic (mutation and selection) explanations of variation in bacteria. Postwar developments connected with the Lysenko affair gave this debate a new political valence. Proponents of the neo-Darwinian synthesis weighed in with support for the genetic theory. However, certain features of drug resistance seemed inexplicable by mutation and selection, particularly the phenomenon of 'multiple resistance'--the emergence of resistance in a single strain against several unrelated antibiotics. In the late 1950s, Tsutomu Watanabe and his collaborators solved this puzzle by determining that resistance could be conferred by cytoplasmic resistance factors rather than chromosomal mutation. These R factors could carry resistance to many antibiotics and seemed able to promote their own dissemination in bacterial populations. In the end, the vindication of the genetic view of drug resistance was accompanied by a recasting of the 'gene' to include extrachromosomal hereditary units carried on viruses and plasmids.

  5. Emergence of a Potent Multidrug Efflux Pump Variant That Enhances Campylobacter Resistance to Multiple Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hong; Shen, Zhangqi; Wang, Yang; Deng, Fengru; Liu, Dejun; Naren, Gaowa; Dai, Lei; Su, Chih-Chia; Wang, Bing; Wang, Shaolin; Wu, Congming; Yu, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial antibiotic efflux pumps are key players in antibiotic resistance. Although their role in conferring multidrug resistance is well documented, the emergence of “super” efflux pump variants that enhance bacterial resistance to multiple drugs has not been reported. Here, we describe the emergence of a resistance-enhancing variant (named RE-CmeABC) of the predominant efflux pump CmeABC in Campylobacter, a major zoonotic pathogen whose resistance to antibiotics is considered a serious antibiotic resistance threat in the United States. Compared to the previously characterized CmeABC transporters, RE-CmeABC is much more potent in conferring Campylobacter resistance to antibiotics, which was shown by increased MICs and reduced intracellular accumulation of antibiotics. Structural modeling suggests that sequence variations in the drug-binding pocket of CmeB possibly contribute to the enhanced efflux function. Additionally, RE-CmeABC expands the mutant selection window of ciprofloxacin, enhances the emergence of antibiotic-resistant mutants, and confers exceedingly high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones, an important class of antibiotics for clinical therapy of campylobacteriosis. Furthermore, RE-CmeABC is horizontally transferable, shifts antibiotic MIC distribution among clinical isolates, and is increasingly prevalent in Campylobacter jejuni isolates, suggesting that it confers a fitness advantage under antimicrobial selection. These findings reveal a new mechanism for enhanced multidrug resistance and an effective strategy utilized by bacteria for adaptation to selection from multiple antibiotics. PMID:27651364

  6. In vitro study of human mutL homolog 1 hypermethylation in inducing drug resistance of esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Chen, Y; Huang, Y; Liu, Z; Li, G

    2017-05-01

    Aberrant promoter methylation of tumor suppressor gene can inhibit corresponding protein expression and promote carcinogenesis. Many studies have demonstrated that human mutL homolog 1(hMLH1) promoter methylation is correlated with occurrence and progression of multiple types of tumors. However, its correlation with esophageal carcinoma drug resistance is still unknown. To confirm methylation status of hMLH1 promoter in drug-resistance cell line of esophageal carcinoma, further confirm whether hMLH1 promoter methylation is responsible for drug resistance. Two stable esophageal carcinoma drug-resistance cell lines were successfully established by Cisplatin (DDP) concentration increment method; methylation status of hMLH1 promoter, mRNA and protein expression of hMLH1 were detected by methylation-specific PCR (MSP), RT-PCR and western blot, respectively; Drug-resistance ability assay was used to detect drug-resistance ability. Stronger methylation status of hMLH1 promoter, lower hMLH1 mRNA and protein expression were found in both drug-resistance cell lines; after removing methylated bands using 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine(5-Aza-CdR) in drug-resistance cell lines, hMLH1 mRNA and protein expression were restored and drug-resistance abilities declined nearly by half. hMLH1 promoter hypermethylation plays important roles in esophageal carcinoma drug-resistance and show us the prospect that combination of demethylation treatment with conventional chemotherapy drugs may bring better therapy effect.

  7. Environmental, pharmacological and genetic influences on the spread of drug-resistant malaria.

    PubMed

    Antao, Tiago; Hastings, Ian M

    2011-06-07

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is subject to artificial selection from antimalarial drugs that select for drug-resistant parasites. We describe and apply a flexible new approach to investigate how epistasis, inbreeding, selection heterogeneity and multiple simultaneous drug deployments interact to influence the spread of drug-resistant malaria. This framework recognizes that different human 'environments' within which treatment may occur (such as semi- and non-immune humans taking full or partial drug courses) influence the genetic interactions between parasite loci involved in resistance. Our model provides an explanation for how the rate of spread varies according to different malaria transmission intensities, why resistance might stabilize at intermediate frequencies and also identifies several factors that influence the decline of resistance after a drug is removed. Results suggest that studies based on clinical outcomes might overestimate the spread of resistant parasites, especially in high-transmission areas. We show that when transmission decreases, prevalence might decrease without a corresponding change in frequency of resistance and that this relationship is heavily influenced by the extent of linkage disequilibrium between loci. This has important consequences on the interpretation of data from areas where control is being successful and suggests that reducing transmission might have less impact on the spread of resistance than previously expected.

  8. A rapid fluorescence polarization-based method for genotypic detection of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yisuo; Li, Shufen; Zhou, Lin; Zhou, Lin; Zhong, Qiu; Fang, Shisong; Chen, Tao; Bi, Lijun; Mat, Wai-Kin; Zhao, Cunyou; Xue, Hong

    2014-05-01

    Rapid detection of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is critical to the effective early treatment and prevention of the transmission of tuberculosis. However, conventional drug susceptibility tests for M. tuberculosis require up to several weeks. In the present study, the One Label Extension genotyping method was adapted for rapid detection of drug resistance-associated sequence variations in six genes of M. tuberculosis, viz. rpoB, rpsL, rrs, embB, katG, or inhA. The method utilizes polymerase chain reaction amplified fragments of the drug resistant genes as reaction templates, and proceeds with template-directed primer extension incorporating a fluorescence-labeled nucleotide, which is then measured by fluorescence polarization. A total of 121 M. tuberculosis isolates from clinical sputum specimens were examined by this genotyping method and verified by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction amplicons harboring previously reported mutational sites associated with M. tuberculosis drug resistance. Based on phenotyping results obtained from microbiology-based drug susceptibility tests, the sensitivity, specificity, and test efficiency estimated for One Label Extension assays were respectively 83.9 %, 95.5 %, and 92.4 % with ropB in rifampin resistance, 67.3 %, 97.1 %, and 84.3 % with rpsL and rrs in streptomycin resistance, 60.0 %, 96.0 %, and 91.4 % with embB in ethambutol resistance, 68.4 %, 94.9 %, and 86.3 % with inhA and katG in isoniazid resistance, and 74.1 %, 98.9 %, and 93.2 % in multiple drug resistance defined as resistance to at least both isoniazid and rifampin. In conclusion, examination of clinical sputum specimens by One Label Extension based genotyping provides a valid method for the rapid molecular detection of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis.

  9. The dynamics of drug resistance: a mathematical perspective.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Orit; Gottesman, Michael M; Levy, Doron

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a key impediment to successful cancer treatment that has been intensively studied for the last three decades. Several central mechanisms have been identified as contributing to the resistance. In the case of multidrug resistance (MDR), the cell becomes resistant to a variety of structurally and mechanistically unrelated drugs in addition to the drug initially administered. Mathematical models of drug resistance have dealt with many of the known aspects of this field, such as pharmacologic sanctuary and location/diffusion resistance, intrinsic resistance, induced resistance and acquired resistance. In addition, there are mathematical models that take into account the kinetic/phase resistance, and models that investigate intracellular mechanisms based on specific biological functions (such as ABC transporters, apoptosis and repair mechanisms). This review covers aspects of MDR that have been mathematically studied, and explains how, from a methodological perspective, mathematics can be used to study drug resistance. We discuss quantitative approaches of mathematical analysis, and demonstrate how mathematics can be used in combination with other experimental and clinical tools. We emphasize the potential benefits of integrating analytical and mathematical methods into future clinical and experimental studies of drug resistance.

  10. Modeling of signaling crosstalk-mediated drug resistance and its implications on drug combination

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Bao, Jiguang; You, Zhuhong; Chen, Xing; Cui, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of pharmacological perturbation to the signaling transduction network depends on the network topology. However, whether and how signaling dynamics mediated by crosstalk contributes to the drug resistance are not fully understood and remain to be systematically explored. In this study, motivated by a realistic signaling network linked by crosstalk between EGF/EGFR/Ras/MEK/ERK pathway and HGF/HGFR/PI3K/AKT pathway, we develop kinetic models for several small networks with typical crosstalk modules to investigate the role of the architecture of crosstalk in inducing drug resistance. Our results demonstrate that crosstalk inhibition diminishes the response of signaling output to the external stimuli. Moreover, we show that signaling crosstalk affects the relative sensitivity of drugs, and some types of crosstalk modules that could yield resistance to the targeted drugs were identified. Furthermore, we quantitatively evaluate the relative efficacy and synergism of drug combinations. For the modules that are resistant to the targeted drug, we identify drug targets that can not only increase the relative drug efficacy but also act synergistically. In addition, we analyze the role of the strength of crosstalk in switching a module between drug-sensitive and drug-resistant. Our study provides mechanistic insights into the signaling crosstalk-mediated mechanisms of drug resistance and provides implications for the design of synergistic drug combinations to reduce drug resistance. PMID:27590512

  11. Insights into the involvement of noncoding RNAs in 5-fluorouracil drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jun; Wang, Yi; Lei, Jun; Lei, Wan; Xiong, Jian Ping

    2017-04-01

    5-Fluorouracil is a classic chemotherapeutic drug that is widely used to treat various cancers. However, patients often exhibit primary or acquired drug resistance during treatment with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. 5-Fluorouracil resistance is a multifactorial event that involves abnormal enzyme metabolism, transport deregulation, cell cycle disorders, apoptosis resistance, and mismatch repair deficiency. Despite advancements in bioresearch technologies in the past several decades, the molecular mechanisms of 5-fluorouracil resistance have not been completely clarified. Recently, microarray analyses have shown that noncoding RNAs (i.e. microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs) play a vital role in 5-fluorouracil resistance in multiple cancer cell lines. These noncoding RNAs can function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors, contributing to 5-fluorouracil drug resistance. In this review, we discuss the effects of microRNAs on 5-fluorouracil sensitivity via targeting of metabolic enzymes, the cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and cancer stem cells. In particular, we focus on summarizing current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms through which long noncoding RNAs mediate 5-fluorouracil drug resistance. Moreover, we describe the specific microRNAs that may function as markers for prediction of chemotherapeutic response to 5-fluorouracil. This review will help to improve the current understanding of how to reverse 5-fluorouracil resistance and may facilitate the establishment of new strategies for alleviating drug resistance in the future.

  12. Characteristics of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis in Sanatoria of North Korea

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Although several reports about drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in North Korea have been published, a nationwide surveillance on this disease remains to be performed. This study aims to analyze the drug resistance patterns of Mycobacterium tuberculosis among the patients in the sanatoria of North Korea, especially during the period when second-line drugs (SLDs) had not yet been officially supplied to this country. The Eugene Bell Foundation (EBF) transferred 947 sputum specimens obtained from 667 patients from 2007 to 2009 to the Clinical Research Center, Masan National Tuberculosis Hospital (MNTH), South Korea. Four hundred ninety-two patients were culture positive for TB (73.8%). Drug susceptibility test (DST) was performed for the bacilli isolated from 489 patients. Over 3 quarters of the cases (76.9%) were multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB. Additionally, 2 patients had extremely drug-resistant (XDR)-TB. Very high resistance to first-line drugs and low resistance to fluoroquinolones (FQs) and injectable drugs (IDs) except for streptomycin (S) were detected. A small but significant regional variation in resistance pattern was observed. Big city regions had higher rate of MDR-TB, higher resistance to FQs and IDs than relatively isolated regions. In conclusion, significant number of drug-resistant TB was detected in North Korean sanatoria, and small but significant regional variations in resistance pattern were noticeable. However, the data in this study do not represent the nationwide drug resistance pattern in North Korea. Further large-scale evaluations are necessary to estimate the resistance pattern of TB in North Korea. PMID:28581266

  13. Characteristics of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis in Sanatoria of North Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jihee; Jegal, Yangjin; Ki, Moran; Shin, Young Jeon; Kim, Cheon Tae; Shim, Tae Sun; Sung, Nackmoon

    2017-07-01

    Although several reports about drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in North Korea have been published, a nationwide surveillance on this disease remains to be performed. This study aims to analyze the drug resistance patterns of Mycobacterium tuberculosis among the patients in the sanatoria of North Korea, especially during the period when second-line drugs (SLDs) had not yet been officially supplied to this country. The Eugene Bell Foundation (EBF) transferred 947 sputum specimens obtained from 667 patients from 2007 to 2009 to the Clinical Research Center, Masan National Tuberculosis Hospital (MNTH), South Korea. Four hundred ninety-two patients were culture positive for TB (73.8%). Drug susceptibility test (DST) was performed for the bacilli isolated from 489 patients. Over 3 quarters of the cases (76.9%) were multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB. Additionally, 2 patients had extremely drug-resistant (XDR)-TB. Very high resistance to first-line drugs and low resistance to fluoroquinolones (FQs) and injectable drugs (IDs) except for streptomycin (S) were detected. A small but significant regional variation in resistance pattern was observed. Big city regions had higher rate of MDR-TB, higher resistance to FQs and IDs than relatively isolated regions. In conclusion, significant number of drug-resistant TB was detected in North Korean sanatoria, and small but significant regional variations in resistance pattern were noticeable. However, the data in this study do not represent the nationwide drug resistance pattern in North Korea. Further large-scale evaluations are necessary to estimate the resistance pattern of TB in North Korea. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  14. Tuberculosis drug resistance in Bamako, Mali, from 2006 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Diarra, B; Goita, D; Tounkara, S; Sanogo, M; Baya, B; Togo, A C G; Maiga, M; Sarro, Y S; Kone, A; Kone, B; M'Baye, O; Coulibaly, N; Kassambara, H; Cisse, A; Belson, M; Polis, M A; Otu, J; Gehre, F; Antonio, M; Dao, S; Siddiqui, S; Murphy, R L; de Jong, B C; Diallo, S

    2016-11-28

    Although Drug resistance tuberculosis is not a new phenomenon, Mali remains one of the "blank" countries without systematic data. Between 2006 and 2014, we enrolled pulmonary TB patients from local TB diagnostics centers and a university referral hospital in several observational cohort studies. These consecutive patients had first line drug susceptibility testing (DST) performed on their isolates. A subset of MDR was subsequently tested for second line drug resistance. A total of 1186 mycobacterial cultures were performed on samples from 522 patients, including 1105 sputa and 81 blood samples, yielding one or more Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (Mtbc) positive cultures for 343 patients. Phenotypic DST was performed on 337 (98.3%) unique Mtbc isolates, of which 127 (37.7%) were resistant to at least one drug, including 75 (22.3%) with multidrug resistance (MDR). The overall prevalence of MDR-TB was 3.4% among new patients and 66.3% among retreatment patients. Second line DST was available for 38 (50.7%) of MDR patients and seven (18.4%) had resistance to either fluoroquinolones or second-line injectable drugs. The drug resistance levels, including MDR, found in this study are relatively high, likely related to the selected referral population. While worrisome, the numbers remained stable over the study period. These findings prompt a nationwide drug resistance survey, as well as continuous surveillance of all retreatment patients, which will provide more accurate results on countrywide drug resistance rates and ensure that MDR patients access appropriate second line treatment.

  15. The Drug Resistance Strategies Project as Translational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Michael L.; Miller-Day, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    This paper tells the story of the multi-layered translational process of the Drug Resistance Strategies Project. The Drug Resistance Strategies Project provides an exemplar of translational scholarship, translating adolescent narratives about their substance use experiences into an efficacious, substance abuse prevention middle school curriculum.…

  16. Long non-coding RNAs in anti-cancer drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qin-nan; Wei, Chen-chen; Wang, Zhao-xia; Sun, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the basic treatments for cancers; however, drug resistance is mainly responsible for the failure of clinical treatment. The mechanism of drug resistance is complicated because of interaction among various factors including drug efflux, DNA damage repair, apoptosis and targets mutation. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been a focus of research in the field of bioscience, and the latest studies have revealed that lncRNAs play essential roles in drug resistance in breast cancer, gastric cancer and lung cancer, et al. Dysregulation of multiple targets and pathways by lncRNAs results in the occurrence of chemoresistance. In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms underlying lncRNA-mediated resistance to chemotherapy and the therapeutic potential of lncRNAs in future cancer treatment. PMID:27713133

  17. Prediction of resistance development against drug combinations by collateral responses to component drugs

    PubMed Central

    Munck, Christian; Gumpert, Heidi K.; Nilsson Wallin, Annika I.; Wang, Harris H.; Sommer, Morten O. A.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance arises quickly during chemotherapeutic selection and is particularly problematic during long-term treatment regimens such as those for tuberculosis, HIV infections, or cancer. Although drug combination therapy reduces the evolution of drug resistance, drug pairs vary in their ability to do so. Thus, predictive models are needed to rationally design resistance-limiting therapeutic regimens. Using adaptive evolution, we studied the resistance response of the common pathogen Escherichia coli to 5 different single antibiotics and all 10 different antibiotic drug pairs. By analyzing the genomes of all evolved E. coli lineages, we identified the mutational events that drive the differences in drug resistance levels and found that the degree of resistance development against drug combinations can be understood in terms of collateral sensitivity and resistance that occurred during adaptation to the component drugs. Then, using engineered E. coli strains, we confirmed that drug resistance mutations that imposed collateral sensitivity were suppressed in a drug pair growth environment. These results provide a framework for rationally selecting drug combinations that limit resistance evolution. PMID:25391482

  18. Stability analysis for drugs with multiple active ingredients.

    PubMed

    Chow, Shein-Chung; Shao, Jun

    2007-03-30

    For every drug product on the market, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires that an expiration dating period (shelf-life) must be indicated on the immediate container label. For determination of the expiration dating period of a drug product, regulatory requirements and statistical methodology are provided in the FDA and ICH Guidelines. However, this guideline is developed for drug products with a single active ingredient. There are many drug products consisting of multiple active ingredients, especially for most traditional Chinese medicine. In this article, we propose a statistical method for determining the shelf-life of a drug product with multiple active ingredients following similar idea as suggested by the FDA and assuming that these active ingredients are linear combinations of some factors. Stability data observed from a traditional Chinese medicine were analysed to illustrate the proposed method.

  19. Transport of isometamidium (Samorin) by drug-resistant and drug-sensitive Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, I A; Mounsey, A; Holmes, P H

    1992-06-01

    The uptake kinetics of a 14C-labelled trypanocidal compound isometamidium chloride (Samorin, RMB Animal Health Ltd, UK) was measured in drug-resistant and drug-sensitive Trypanosoma congolense. It was established that drug uptake was significantly more rapid and quantitatively greater in drug-sensitive parasites. There was clear evidence that drug uptake in both the resistant and sensitive trypanosomes was by a specific, receptor-mediated process. This specific drug transport was energy-dependent, being sensitive to metabolic inhibition with SHAM/glycerol. Significant differences in drug transport were observed which could be correlated with resistance to isometamidium. The optimal pH for drug accumulation was lowered in the resistant trypanosomes; this finding, along with an observed change in specificity for the related compound homidium bromide, suggested that the specific receptor for isometamidium is altered in the resistant trypanosomes, possibly resulting in a reduction in drug uptake. In addition to these alterations in drug uptake, efflux of isometamidium also appears to occur in the resistant trypanosomes. Both a reduction in incubation temperature and metabolic inhibition increased the level of trypanosome-associated isometamidium in the resistant parasites. This was in contrast to observations using drug-sensitive parasites. Furthermore, the addition of calcium flux-modulating agents to the incubation medium also resulted in an increase in accumulation by the resistant parasites.

  20. Diagnosis and Treatment of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Caminero, José A; Cayla, Joan A; García-García, José-María; García-Pérez, Francisco J; Palacios, Juan J; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2017-03-27

    In the last 2 decades, drug-resistant tuberculosis has become a threat and a challenge to worldwide public health. The diagnosis and treatment of these forms of tuberculosis are much more complex and prognosis clearly worsens as the resistance pattern intensifies. Nevertheless, it is important to remember that with the appropriatesystematic clinical management, most of these patients can be cured. These guidelines itemize the basis for the diagnosis and treatment of all tuberculosis patients, from those infected by strains that are sensitive to all drugs, to those who are extensively drug-resistant. Specific recommendations are given forall cases. The current and future role of new molecular methods for detecting resistance, shorter multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis regimens, and new drugs with activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also addressed.

  1. Improving Viral Protease Inhibitors to Counter Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Nese Kurt; Swanstrom, Ronald; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in health care, undermining therapy outcomes and necessitating novel approaches to drug design. Extensive studies on resistance to viral protease inhibitors, particularly those of HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease, revealed a plethora of information on the structural and molecular mechanisms underlying resistance. These insights led to several strategies to improve viral protease inhibitors to counter resistance, such as exploiting the essential biological function and leveraging evolutionary constraints. Incorporation of these strategies into structure-based drug design can minimize vulnerability to resistance, not only for viral proteases but for other quickly evolving drug targets as well, toward designing inhibitors one step ahead of evolution to counter resistance with more intelligent and rational design. PMID:27090931

  2. Managing Drug Resistance in Cancer: Role of Cancer Informatics.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Ankur; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Rahul; Gupta, Sudheer; Singh, Harinder; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and managing cancer drug resistance is the main goal of the modern oncology programs worldwide. One of the major factors contributing to drug resistance in cancer cells is the acquired mutations in drug targets. Advances in sequencing technologies and high-throughput screening assays have generated huge information related to pharmaco-profiling of anticancer drugs and revealed the mutational spectrum of different cancers. Systematic meta-analysis of this complex data is very essential to make useful conclusions in order to manage cancer drug resistance. Bioinformatics can play a significant role to interpret this complex data into useful conclusions. In this chapter, the use of bioinformatics platforms, particularly CancerDR, in understanding the cancer drug resistance is described.

  3. Epidemiological control of drug resistance and compensatory mutation under resistance testing and second-line therapy.

    PubMed

    Saddler, Clare A; Wu, Yue; Valckenborgh, Frank; Tanaka, Mark M

    2013-12-01

    The fitness cost of antibiotic resistance in the absence of treatment raises the possibility that prudent use of drugs may slow or reverse the rise of resistance. Unfortunately, compensatory mutations that lower this cost may lead to entrenched resistance. Here, we develop a mathematical model of resistance evolution and compensatory mutation to determine whether reversion to sensitivity can occur, and how disease control might be facilitated by a second-line therapy. When only a single antibiotic is available, sensitive bacteria reach fixation only under treatment rates so low that hardly any cases are treated. We model a scenario in which drug sensitivity can be accurately tested so that a second-line therapy is administered to resistant cases. Before the rise of resistance to the second drug, disease eradication is possible if resistance testing and second-line treatment are conducted at a high enough rate. However, if double drug resistance arises, the possibility of disease eradication is greatly reduced and compensated resistance prevails in most of the parameter space. The boundary separating eradication from fixation of compensated resistance is strongly influenced by the underlying basic reproductive number of the pathogen and drug efficacy in sensitive cases, but depends less on the resistance cost and compensation. When double resistance is possible, the boundary is affected by the relative strengths of resistance against the two drugs in the double-resistant-compensated strain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Efficiency of novel splash-proof ventilator circuit component on VAP and the colonization of multiple-drug resistant bacteria prevention in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation: a prospective randomized controlled intervention study with 318 patients].

    PubMed

    Xu, Songao; Yu, Huijie; Sun, Hui; Zhu, Xiangyun; Xu, Xiaoqin; Xu, Jun; Cao, Weizhong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the efficiency of closed tracheal suction system (CTSS) using novel splash-proof ventilator circuit component on ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and the colonization of multiple-drug resistant bacteria (MDR) in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation (MV) prevention. A prospective single-blinded randomized parallel controlled intervention study was conducted. 330 severe patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of the First Hospital of Jiaxing from January 2014 to May 2016 were enrolled, and they were divided into open tracheal suction group, closed tracheal suction group, and splash-proof suction group on average by random number table. The patients in the three groups used conventional ventilator circuit component, conventional CTSS, and CTSS with a novel splash-proof ventilator circuit component for MV and sputum suction, respectively. The incidence of VAP, airway bacterial colonization rate, MDR and fungi colonization rate, duration of MV, length of ICU and hospitalization stay, and financial expenditure during hospitalization, as well as the in-hospital prognosis were recorded. After excluding patients who did not meet the inclusion criteria, incomplete data, backed out and so on, 318 patients were enrolled in the analysis finally. Compared with the open tracheal suction group, the total incidence of VAP was decreased in the closed tracheal suction group and splash-proof suction group [20.95% (22/105), 21.90% (23/105) vs. 29.63% (32/108)], but no statistical difference was found (both P > 0.05), and the incidence of VAP infections/1 000 MV days showed the same change tendency (cases: 14.56, 17.35 vs. 23.07). The rate of airway bacterial colonization and the rate of MDR colonization in the open tracheal suction group and splash-proof suction group were remarkably lower than those of closed tracheal suction group [32.41% (35/108), 28.57% (30/105) vs. 46.67% (49/105), 20.37% (22/108), 15.24% (16/105) vs. 39.05% (41/105)] with

  5. Relatively low primary drug resistant tuberculosis in southwestern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Ethiopia in general, and Jimma area in particular, is not well documented. We conducted a study at Jimma University specialized hospital in southwest Ethiopia among new cases of smear positive TB patients to determine the pattern of resistance to first-line drugs. Methods A health institution based cross sectional study was conducted from November 2010 to September 2011. Any newly diagnosed smear positive TB patient 18 years and above was included in the study. Demographic and related data were collected by trained personnel using a pretested structured questionnaire. Mycobacterial drug susceptibility testing (DST) to the first line drugs isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RIF), ethambutol (EMB) and streptomycin (STM) was performed on cultures using the indirect proportion method. M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC) was identified with the Capilia TB-Neo test. Results 136 patients were enrolled in the study. Resistance to at least one drug was identified in 18.4%. The highest prevalence of resistance to any drug was identified against INH (13.2%) followed by STM (8.1%). There was no statistically significant difference in the proportion of any resistance by sex, age, HIV status and history of being imprisoned. The highest mono resistance was observed against INH (7.4%). Mono resistance to streptomycin was associated with HIV infection (crude OR 15.63, 95%CI: 1.31, 187). Multidrug-resistance TB (MDR-TB) was observed in two patients (1.5%). Conclusion Resistance to at least one drug was 18.4% (INH-13.2% and STM-8.1%). STM resistance was associated with HIV positivity. There was relatively low prevalence of MDR-TB yet INH resistance was common around Jimma. The capacity of laboratories for TB culture and DST should be strengthened, in order to correctly manage TB patients and avoid amplification of drug resistance. PMID:22574696

  6. Quantifying the Determinants of Evolutionary Dynamics Leading to Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chevereau, Guillaume; Dravecká, Marta; Batur, Tugce; Guvenek, Aysegul; Ayhan, Dilay Hazal; Toprak, Erdal; Bollenbach, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistant pathogens is a serious public health problem. It is a long-standing goal to predict rates of resistance evolution and design optimal treatment strategies accordingly. To this end, it is crucial to reveal the underlying causes of drug-specific differences in the evolutionary dynamics leading to resistance. However, it remains largely unknown why the rates of resistance evolution via spontaneous mutations and the diversity of mutational paths vary substantially between drugs. Here we comprehensively quantify the distribution of fitness effects (DFE) of mutations, a key determinant of evolutionary dynamics, in the presence of eight antibiotics representing the main modes of action. Using precise high-throughput fitness measurements for genome-wide Escherichia coli gene deletion strains, we find that the width of the DFE varies dramatically between antibiotics and, contrary to conventional wisdom, for some drugs the DFE width is lower than in the absence of stress. We show that this previously underappreciated divergence in DFE width among antibiotics is largely caused by their distinct drug-specific dose-response characteristics. Unlike the DFE, the magnitude of the changes in tolerated drug concentration resulting from genome-wide mutations is similar for most drugs but exceptionally small for the antibiotic nitrofurantoin, i.e., mutations generally have considerably smaller resistance effects for nitrofurantoin than for other drugs. A population genetics model predicts that resistance evolution for drugs with this property is severely limited and confined to reproducible mutational paths. We tested this prediction in laboratory evolution experiments using the “morbidostat”, a device for evolving bacteria in well-controlled drug environments. Nitrofurantoin resistance indeed evolved extremely slowly via reproducible mutations—an almost paradoxical behavior since this drug causes DNA damage and increases the mutation rate. Overall

  7. Resistance to anti-influenza drugs: adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Ho, Hui-Ting; Barr, Ian

    2006-10-01

    Development of effective drugs for the treatment or prevention of epidemic and pandemic influenza is important in order to reduce its impact. Adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors are two classes of anti-influenza drugs available for influenza therapy currently. However, emergence of resistance to these drugs has been detected, which raises concerns regarding their widespread use. In this review, resistance to the adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors will be discussed in relation to both epidemic and pandemic influenza viruses.

  8. Fitness cost of chromosomal drug resistance-conferring mutations.

    PubMed

    Sander, Peter; Springer, Burkhard; Prammananan, Therdsak; Sturmfels, Antje; Kappler, Martin; Pletschette, Michel; Böttger, Erik C

    2002-05-01

    To study the cost of chromosomal drug resistance mutations to bacteria, we investigated the fitness cost of mutations that confer resistance to different classes of antibiotics affecting bacterial protein synthesis (aminocyclitols, 2-deoxystreptamines, macrolides). We used a model system based on an in vitro competition assay with defined Mycobacterium smegmatis laboratory mutants; selected mutations were introduced by genetic techniques to address the possibility that compensatory mutations ameliorate the resistance cost. We found that the chromosomal drug resistance mutations studied often had only a small fitness cost; compensatory mutations were not involved in low-cost or no-cost resistance mutations. When drug resistance mutations found in clinical isolates were considered, selection of those mutations that have little or no fitness cost in the in vitro competition assay seems to occur. These results argue against expectations that link decreased levels of antibiotic consumption with the decline in the level of resistance.

  9. Drug resistant tuberculosis in prisons in Azerbaijan: case study.

    PubMed

    Coninx, R; Pfyffer, G E; Mathieu, C; Savina, D; Debacker, M; Jafarov, F; Jabrailov, I; Ismailov, A; Mirzoev, F; de Haller, R; Portaels, F

    1998-05-09

    To document the existence of drug resistance in a tuberculosis treatment programme that adheres strictly to the DOTS principles (directly observed treatment, short course) and to determine the extent of drug resistance in a prison setting in one of the republics of the former Soviet Union. Case study. Central Penitentiary Hospital in Baku, the referral centre for tuberculosis patients from all prisons in Azerbaijan. Prisoners with tuberculosis: 28 selected patients not responding clinically or bacteriologically to the standard treatment (group 1) and 38 consecutive patients at admission to the programme (group 2). Drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains grown from sputum. All the non-responding patients (group 1) had strains resistant to at least one drug. 25 (89%) of the non-responding patients and nine (24%) of the consecutive patients had M tuberculosis strains resistant to both rifampicin and isoniazid. A further 17 patients in group 2 had strains resistant to one or more first line drugs. Drug resistant M tuberculosis strains are common in prisons in Azerbaijan. Tuberculosis problems tend to be worse in prisons, but prisoners and former prisoners may have an important role in the transmission of tuberculosis, particularly of drug resistant forms, in the community. National programmes to control tuberculosis will have to take into account and address the problems in prisons to ensure their success.

  10. Antitubercular Drug Resistance in Four Healthcare Facilities in North India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anamika; Mathuria, Jitendra Prasad; Singh, Surya Kumar; Gulati, Anil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public-health problem in India, having the highest number of incident and multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB cases. The study was carried out to appraise the prevalence of first-line anti-TB drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and its patterns among different types of TB patients from different settings in a province of North India. Of 3,704 clinical specimens, 345 (9.3%) were culture-positive, and drug-susceptibility testing was carried out for 301 MTB strains. A high level of primary and acquired drug resistance of MTB was observed in the region studied, with weighted mean of 10.5% and 28.08%, 12.81% and 29.72%, 17.12% and 29.94%, 11.97% and 27.84%, and 10.74% and 23.54% for rifampicin, isoniazid, streptomycin, ethambutol-resistant and MDR cases respectively. Drug resistance was significantly higher in pulmonary (p=0.014) and acquired drug-resistant TB cases (p<0.001). Any drug resistance (p=0.002) and MDR TB were significantly (p=0.009) associated with HIV-seropositive cases. An urgent plan is needed to continuously monitor the transmission trends of drug-resistant strains, especially MDR-TB strains, in the region. PMID:22283032

  11. Overcome Cancer Cell Drug Resistance Using Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Yang, Hua Li; Yang, Ying Juan; Wang, Lan; Lee, Shao Chin

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the major treatment methods for cancer. However, failure in chemotherapy is not uncommon, mainly due to dose-limiting toxicity associated with drug resistance. Management of drug resistance is important towards successful chemotherapy. There are many reports in the Chinese literature that natural products can overcome cancer cell drug resistance, which deserve sharing with scientific and industrial communities. We summarized the reports into four categories: (1) in vitro studies using cell line models; (2) serum pharmacology; (3) in vivo studies using animal models; and (4) clinical studies. Fourteen single compounds were reported to have antidrug resistance activity for the first time. In vitro, compounds were able to overcome drug resistance at nontoxic or subtoxic concentrations, in a dose-dependent manner, by inhibiting drug transporters, cell detoxification capacity, or cell apoptosis sensitivity. Studies in vivo showed that single compounds, herbal extract, and formulas had potent antidrug resistance activities. Importantly, many single compounds, herbal extracts, and formulas have been used clinically to treat various diseases including cancer. The review provides comprehensive data on use of natural compounds to overcome cancer cell drug resistance in China, which may facilitate the therapeutic development of natural products for clinical management of cancer drug resistance. PMID:26421052

  12. Cancer stem cells and drug resistance: the potential of nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Wei, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Properties of the small group of cancer cells called tumor-initiating or cancer stem cells (CSCs) involved in drug resistance, metastasis and relapse of cancers can significantly affect tumor therapy. Importantly, tumor drug resistance seems to be closely related to many intrinsic or acquired properties of CSCs, such as quiescence, specific morphology, DNA repair ability and overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, drug efflux transporters and detoxifying enzymes. The specific microenvironment (niche) and hypoxic stability provide additional protection against anticancer therapy for CSCs. Thus, CSC-focused therapy is destined to form the core of any effective anticancer strategy. Nanomedicine has great potential in the development of CSC-targeting drugs, controlled drug delivery and release, and the design of novel gene-specific drugs and diagnostic modalities. This review is focused on tumor drug resistance-related properties of CSCs and describes current nanomedicine approaches, which could form the basis of novel combination therapies for eliminating metastatic and CSCs. PMID:22471722

  13. Unusual regioversatility of acetyltransferase Eis, a cause of drug resistance in XDR-TB

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wenjing; Biswas, Tapan; Porter, Vanessa R.; Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2011-09-06

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) is a serious global threat. Aminoglycoside antibiotics are used as a last resort to treat XDR-TB. Resistance to the aminoglycoside kanamycin is a hallmark of XDR-TB. Here, we reveal the function and structure of the mycobacterial protein Eis responsible for resistance to kanamycin in a significant fraction of kanamycin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates. We demonstrate that Eis has an unprecedented ability to acetylate multiple amines of many aminoglycosides. Structural and mutagenesis studies of Eis indicate that its acetylation mechanism is enabled by a complex tripartite fold that includes two general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5)-related N-acetyltransferase regions. An intricate negatively charged substrate-binding pocket of Eis is a potential target of new antitubercular drugs expected to overcome aminoglycoside resistance.

  14. Unusual regioversatility of acetyltransferase Eis, a cause of drug resistance in XDR-TB.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjing; Biswas, Tapan; Porter, Vanessa R; Tsodikov, Oleg V; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2011-06-14

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) is a serious global threat. Aminoglycoside antibiotics are used as a last resort to treat XDR-TB. Resistance to the aminoglycoside kanamycin is a hallmark of XDR-TB. Here, we reveal the function and structure of the mycobacterial protein Eis responsible for resistance to kanamycin in a significant fraction of kanamycin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates. We demonstrate that Eis has an unprecedented ability to acetylate multiple amines of many aminoglycosides. Structural and mutagenesis studies of Eis indicate that its acetylation mechanism is enabled by a complex tripartite fold that includes two general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5)-related N-acetyltransferase regions. An intricate negatively charged substrate-binding pocket of Eis is a potential target of new antitubercular drugs expected to overcome aminoglycoside resistance.

  15. New oral drugs for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gasperini, Claudio; Ruggieri, S

    2009-10-01

    Disease-modifying treatments are now available in relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), and their beneficial effects have been shown in several clinical studies. However, as these treatments are only partially effective in halting the MS disease process and are frequently associated with side effects and suboptimal patient adherence, new oral therapeutic approaches are warranted. This review focuses on advances in current and novel oral treatment approaches for MS. Several pivotal reports have provided promising results for new oral therapies evaluating the safety and efficacy of new agents including fingolimod, fumaric acid, cladribine, teriflunomide and laquinimod.

  16. Multifunctional Nanographene Oxide for Targeted Gene-Mediated Thermochemotherapy of Drug-resistant Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yiping; Yang, Zhangyou; Li, Hong; Hao, Yuhui; Liu, Cong; Zhu, Lin; Liu, Jing; Lu, Binghui; Li, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance remains a major challenge for anticancer treatment, and one of the major mechanisms of drug resistance is the overexpression of drug efflux transporters in cancer. A new approach for defeating drug resistance is the use of a co-delivery strategy that utilizes small interfering RNA (siRNA) to silence the expression of efflux transporters together with a suitable anticancer drug for drug-resistant cells. In this work, multifunctional graphene capable of integrating multiple functions in one system was employed as a novel co-delivery system for siRNA and doxorubicin (Dox), as well as for the controlled release of intracellular pH-triggered and heat-triggered Dox. Additionally, it was used as a synergistic therapy based on the photothermal effect of graphene oxide (GO) under near-infrared (NIR) irradiation and the chemotherapeutic effect of Dox. The nanocomplex exhibited high drug and siRNA loading. Furthermore, the dual delivery of siRNA and Dox by folic acid (FA)-conjugated polyethylenimine-modified PEGylated nanographene (PPG-FA/siRNA/Dox) exhibited a satisfactory gene silencing effect as well as efficient intracellular delivery of Dox. Thus, Dox could access the nucleus and induce greater cytotoxicity compared with siRNA-absent delivery systems. Significantly, under irradiation, the combined treatment showed more synergistic effect for overcoming drug resistance compared with chemotherapy effect alone. PMID:28272412

  17. Fitness Costs of Drug Resistance Mutations in Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Household-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Phillip P; Becerra, Mercedes C; Abel zur Wiesch, Pia; Hinkley, Trevor; Kaur, Devinder; Sloutsky, Alexander; Cohen, Ted

    2016-01-01

    The projected long-term prevalence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis depends upon the relative fitness of MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, compared with non-MDR strains. While many experimental models have tested the in vitro or in vivo fitness costs of various drug resistance mutations, fewer epidemiologic studies have attempted to validate these experimental findings. We performed a case-control study comparing drug resistance-associated mutations from MDR M. tuberculosis strains causing multiple cases in a household to matched MDR strains without evidence of secondary household cases. Eighty-eight multiple-case and 88 single-case household MDR strains were analyzed for 10 specific drug resistance-associated polymorphisms previously associated with fitness effects. We found that the isoniazid-resistant katG Ser315Thr mutation occurred more than twice as frequently in multiple-case households than in single-case households (odds ratio [OR], 2.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21-4.70), corroborating previous experimental findings. However, strains carrying both the katG Ser315Thr mutation and the rpsL Lys43Arg mutation were less likely to be found in multiple-case households (OR, 0.09; 95% CI, .01-.73), suggesting a negative epistatic interaction which contrasts previous findings. The case-control design presents a useful approach for assessing in vivo fitness effects of drug resistance mutations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Totally drug-resistant tuberculosis and adjunct therapies.

    PubMed

    Parida, S K; Axelsson-Robertson, R; Rao, M V; Singh, N; Master, I; Lutckii, A; Keshavjee, S; Andersson, J; Zumla, A; Maeurer, M

    2015-04-01

    The first cases of totally drug-resistant (TDR) tuberculosis (TB) were reported in Italy 10 years ago; more recently, cases have also been reported in Iran, India and South Africa. Although there is no consensus on terminology, it is most commonly described as 'resistance to all first- and second-line drugs used to treat TB'. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) acquires drug resistance mutations in a sequential fashion under suboptimal drug pressure due to monotherapy, inadequate dosing, treatment interruptions and drug interactions. The treatment of TDR-TB includes antibiotics with disputed or minimal effectiveness against M.tb, and the fatality rate is high. Comorbidities such as diabetes and infection with human immunodeficiency virus further impact on TB treatment options and survival rates. Several new drug candidates with novel modes of action are under late-stage clinical evaluation (e.g., delamanid, bedaquiline, SQ109 and sutezolid). 'Repurposed' antibiotics have also recently been included in the treatment of extensively drug resistant TB. However, because of mutations in M.tb, drugs will not provide a cure for TB in the long term. Adjunct TB therapies, including therapeutic vaccines, vitamin supplementation and/or repurposing of drugs targeting biologically and clinically relevant molecular pathways, may achieve better clinical outcomes in combination with standard chemotherapy. Here, we review broader perspectives of drug resistance in TB and potential adjunct treatment options.

  19. Multiple-pulse drug delivery systems: setting a new paradigm for infectious disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Nitin; Baboota, Sanjula; Ahuja, Alka; Ali, Javed

    2009-04-01

    Pulsatile drug delivery of actives based on the body's biological rhythms came into sight as a novel and emerging concept in the field of drug delivery. The concept of late has given birth to another field of research worth exploring: multiple-pulse drug delivery. Delivering a drug in multiple pulses has been applied to antibiotics for effective and patient compliant drug delivery. Delivering antibiotics in divided pulses results in better annihilation of microbes, as it prevents them going into a resistant/dormant stage and developing biological tolerance. The concept appears to have potential, and on 16 March 2009 MiddleBrook Pharmaceuticals, Inc. will launch the first of such once-daily product based on their proprietary pulsatile drug delivery technology, PULSYS. This review focuses on the rationale, possible strategies and technologies employed for multiple-pulse delivery, as well as current status and future trends. The concept is in its infancy and promises great potential in the fight against microbial resistance; many approved formulations based on similar approaches with new and improved therapeutic paradigms are anticipated in the near future.

  20. A 13 mer LNA-i-miR-221 Inhibitor Restores Drug Sensitivity in Melphalan-Refractory Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Gullà, Annamaria; Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Gallo Cantafio, Maria Eugenia; Morelli, Eugenio; Amodio, Nicola; Botta, Cirino; Pitari, Maria Rita; Lio, Santo Giovanni; Britti, Domenico; Stamato, Maria Angelica; Hideshima, Teru; Munshi, Nikhil C; Anderson, Kenneth C; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2016-03-01

    The onset of drug resistance is a major cause of treatment failure in multiple myeloma. Although increasing evidence is defining the role of miRNAs in mediating drug resistance, their potential activity as drug-sensitizing agents has not yet been investigated in multiple myeloma. Here we studied the potential utility of miR-221/222 inhibition in sensitizing refractory multiple myeloma cells to melphalan. miR-221/222 expression inversely correlated with melphalan sensitivity of multiple myeloma cells. Inhibition of miR-221/222 overcame melphalan resistance and triggered apoptosis of multiple myeloma cells in vitro, in the presence or absence of human bone marrow (BM) stromal cells. Decreased multiple myeloma cell growth induced by inhibition of miR-221/222 plus melphalan was associated with a marked upregulation of pro-apoptotic BBC3/PUMA protein, a miR-221/222 target, as well as with modulation of drug influx-efflux transporters SLC7A5/LAT1 and the ABC transporter ABCC1/MRP1. Finally, in vivo treatment of SCID/NOD mice bearing human melphalan-refractory multiple myeloma xenografts with systemic locked nucleic acid (LNA) inhibitors of miR-221 (LNA-i-miR-221) plus melphalan overcame drug resistance, evidenced by growth inhibition with significant antitumor effects together with modulation of PUMA and ABCC1 in tumors retrieved from treated mice. Taken together, our findings provide the proof of concept that LNA-i-miR-221 can reverse melphalan resistance in preclinical models of multiple myeloma, providing the framework for clinical trials to overcome drug resistance, and improve patient outcome in multiple myeloma. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Drug Resistance and the Role of Combination Chemotherapy in Improving Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yardley, Denise A.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to cancer chemotherapy is a common phenomenon especially in metastatic breast cancer (MBC), a setting in which patients typically have had exposure to multiple lines of prior therapy. The subsequent development of drug resistance can result in rapid disease progression during or shortly after completion of treatment. Moreover, cross-class multidrug resistance limits patient treatment choices, particularly in a setting where treatments options are few. One attempt to minimize the impact of drug resistance has been the concurrent use of two or more chemotherapy agents with unrelated mechanisms of action and differing modes of drug resistance, with the intent of blocking the development of multiple intracellular escape pathways essential for tumor survival. Within the past decade, an array of mechanistically diverse agents has augmented the list of combination regimens that may be both synergistic and efficacious in pretreated MBC. The aim of this paper is to review mechanisms of resistance to common chemotherapy agents and to consider current combination treatment options for heavily pretreated and/or drug-resistant patients with MBC. PMID:23864953

  2. Anticancer drug nanomicelles formed by self-assembling amphiphilic dendrimer to combat cancer drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tuo; Chen, Chao; Liu, Juan; Liu, Cheng; Posocco, Paola; Liu, Xiaoxuan; Cheng, Qiang; Huo, Shuaidong; Liang, Zicai; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Pricl, Sabrina; Liang, Xing-Jie; Rocchi, Palma; Peng, Ling

    2015-03-10

    Drug resistance and toxicity constitute challenging hurdles for cancer therapy. The application of nanotechnology for anticancer drug delivery is expected to address these issues and bring new hope for cancer treatment. In this context, we established an original nanomicellar drug delivery system based on an amphiphilic dendrimer (AmDM), which could generate supramolecular micelles to effectively encapsulate the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) with high drug-loading capacity (>40%), thanks to the unique dendritic structure creating large void space for drug accommodation. The resulting AmDM/DOX nanomicelles were able to enhance drug potency and combat doxorubicin resistance in breast cancer models by significantly enhancing cellular uptake while considerably decreasing efflux of the drug. In addition, the AmDM/DOX nanoparticles abolished significantly the toxicity related to the free drug. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that the drug delivery system based on nanomicelles formed with the self-assembling amphiphilic dendrimer constitutes a promising and effective drug carrier in cancer therapy.

  3. Multiple hormonal resistances: Diagnosis, evaluation and therapy.

    PubMed

    Linglart, Agnès; Silve, Caroline; Rothenbuhler, Anya

    2015-05-01

    Molecular alterations of cAMP-mediated signaling affect primarily the signaling of the PTH/PTHrp receptor, and, with different severities the signaling of other hormones, including TSH. The identification of PTH and other hormonal resistances implies to look for the genetic disorder supporting the metabolic disorder. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Exploiting bacterial drug resistance: a single construct for the diagnosis and treatment of drug resistant infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallum, Ulysses W.; Zheng, Xiang; Verma, Sarika; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2009-06-01

    β-lactamase enzyme-activated photosensitizer (β-LEAP). We aim to exploit drug resistance mechanisms to selectively release photosensitizers (PSs) for a specific photodynamic antimicrobial effect and reduced host tissue damage. Consequently, the fluorescence emission intensity of the PSs increases and allows for the detection of enzyme activity. In this work we sought to evaluate β-LEAP for use as a sensitive molecular probe. We have reported the enzyme specific antibacterial action of β-LEAP. Here we report the use of β-LEAP for the rapid functional definition of a β-lactamase.

  5. Multiple insect resistance in 53 commmercial corn hybrids - 2015

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Commercial corn hybrids were screened for ear- and kernel-feeding insect resistance under field conditions at Tifton, GA. Fifteen hybrids were rated Very Good (VG), the highest rating for multiple insect resistance in 2015 (Table 1). Sixteen were Good (G), 9 were Fair (F), and 13 were Poor (P). Two...

  6. Multiple insect resistance in 53 commercial corn hybrids - 2015

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Commercial corn hybrids were screened for ear- and kernel-feeding insect resistance under field conditions at Tifton, GA. Fifteen hybrids were rated Very Good (VG), the highest rating for multiple insect resistance in 2015 (Table 1). Sixteen were Good (G), 9 were Fair (F), and 13 were Poor (P). Two...

  7. Multiple insect resistance in 70 commercial corn hybrids - 2013

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Commercial corn hybrids were screened for ear- and kernel-feeding insect resistance under the field conditions at Tifton, GA. Nineteen hybrids were rated as very good (VG), the highest rating for multiple insect resistance in 2013. Five hybrids were developed utilizing YHR or BHR traits (also known ...

  8. Multiple insect resistance in 77 commercial corn hybrids - 2014

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Commercial corn hybrids were screened for ear- and kernel-feeding insect resistance under the field conditions at Tifton, GA. Twenty hybrids were rated as very good (VG), the highest rating for multiple insect resistance in 2014. Two hybrids were developed utilizing YHR traits (also known as Optimum...

  9. Multiple insect resistance in 50 commercial corn hybrids, 2016

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Commercial corn hybrids were screened for ear- and kernel-feeding insect resistance under field conditions at Tifton, GA. Nine hybrids were rated Very Good (VG), the highest rating for multiple insect resistance in 2016 (see following table). Thirteen were Good (G), 19 were Fair (F), and 13 were Poo...

  10. Automated prediction of HIV drug resistance from genotype data.

    PubMed

    Shen, ChenHsiang; Yu, Xiaxia; Harrison, Robert W; Weber, Irene T

    2016-08-31

    HIV/AIDS is a serious threat to public health. The emergence of drug resistance mutations diminishes the effectiveness of drug therapy for HIV/AIDS. Developing a computational prediction of drug resistance phenotype will enable efficient and timely selection of the best treatment regimens. A unified encoding of protein sequence and structure was used as the feature vector for predicting phenotypic resistance from genotype data. Two machine learning algorithms, Random Forest and K-nearest neighbor, were used. The prediction accuracies were examined by five-fold cross-validation on the genotype-phenotype datasets. A supervised machine learning approach for automatic prediction of drug resistance was developed to handle genotype-phenotype datasets of HIV protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT). It predicts the drug resistance phenotype and its relative severity from a query sequence. The accuracy of the classification was higher than 0.973 for eight PR inhibitors and 0.986 for ten RT inhibitors, respectively. The overall cross-validated regression R(2)-values for the severity of drug resistance were 0.772-0.953 for 8 PR inhibitors and 0.773-0.995 for 10 RT inhibitors. Machine learning using a unified encoding of sequence and protein structure as a feature vector provides an accurate prediction of drug resistance from genotype data. A practical webserver for clinicians has been implemented.

  11. Understanding Drug Resistance in Breast Cancer with Mathematical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Brocato, Terisse; Dogra, Prashant; Koay, Eugene J.; Day, Armin; Chuang, Yao-Li; Wang, Zhihui; Cristini, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy is mainstay of treatment for the majority of patients with breast cancer, but results in only 26% of patients with distant metastasis living 5 years past treatment in the United States, largely due to drug resistance. The complexity of drug resistance calls for an integrated approach of mathematical modeling and experimental investigation to develop quantitative tools that reveal insights into drug resistance mechanisms, predict chemotherapy efficacy, and identify novel treatment approaches. This paper reviews recent modeling work for understanding cancer drug resistance through the use of computer simulations of molecular signaling networks and cancerous tissues, with a particular focus on breast cancer. These mathematical models are developed by drawing on current advances in molecular biology, physical characterization of tumors, and emerging drug delivery methods (e.g., nanotherapeutics). We focus our discussion on representative modeling works that have provided quantitative insight into chemotherapy resistance in breast cancer and how drug resistance can be overcome or minimized to optimize chemotherapy treatment. We also discuss future directions of mathematical modeling in understanding drug resistance. PMID:24891927

  12. The mechanism of resistance to sulfa drugs in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Triglia, Tony; Cowman, Alan F.

    1999-02-01

    The sulfonamide and sulfone (sulfa) group of antimalarials has been used extensively throughout malaria endemic regions of the world to control this important infectious disease of humans. Sulfadoxine is the most extensively used drug of this group of drugs and is usually combined with pyrimethamine (Fansidar), particularly for the control of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most lethal form of malaria. Resistance to the sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine combination is widespread. Analysis using molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches has shown that the mechanism of resistance to sulfadoxine involves mutation of dihydropteroate synthase, the enzyme target of this group of drugs. Understanding the mechanism of resistance of P. falciparum to sulfa drugs has allowed detailed analysis of the epidemiology of the spread of drug resistance alleles in the field(1)and, in the future, opens the way to the development of novel antimalarials to this target enzyme. Copyright 1999 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  13. Long Non-coding RNAs and Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing-Jing; Xie, Xiao-Juan; Li, Xu; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as key players in gene expression that govern cell developmental processes, and thus contributing to diseases, especially cancers. Many studies have suggested that aberrant expression of lncRNAs is responsible for drug resistance, a substantial obstacle for cancer therapy. Drug resistance not only results from individual variations in patients, but also from genetic and epigenetic differences in tumors. It is reported that drug resistance is tightly modulated by lncRNAs which change the stability and translation of mRNAs encoding factors involved in cell survival, proliferation, and drug metabolism. In this review, we summarize recent advances in research on lncRNAs associated with drug resistance and underlying molecular or cellular mechanisms, which may contribute helpful approaches for the development of new therapeutic strategies to overcome treatment failure.

  14. Structure and function of efflux pumps that confer resistance to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Borges-Walmsley, M Ines; McKeegan, Kenneth S; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to therapeutic drugs encompasses a diverse range of biological systems, which all have a human impact. From the relative simplicity of bacterial cells, fungi and protozoa to the complexity of human cancer cells, resistance has become problematic. Stated in its simplest terms, drug resistance decreases the chance of providing successful treatment against a plethora of diseases. Worryingly, it is a problem that is increasing, and consequently there is a pressing need to develop new and effective classes of drugs. This has provided a powerful stimulus in promoting research on drug resistance and, ultimately, it is hoped that this research will provide novel approaches that will allow the deliberate circumvention of well understood resistance mechanisms. A major mechanism of resistance in both microbes and cancer cells is the membrane protein-catalysed extrusion of drugs from the cell. Resistant cells exploit proton-driven antiporters and/or ATP-driven ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters to extrude cytotoxic drugs that usually enter the cell by passive diffusion. Although some of these drug efflux pumps transport specific substrates, many are transporters of multiple substrates. These multidrug pumps can often transport a variety of structurally unrelated hydrophobic compounds, ranging from dyes to lipids. If we are to nullify the effects of efflux-mediated drug resistance, we must first of all understand how these efflux pumps can accommodate a diverse range of compounds and, secondly, how conformational changes in these proteins are coupled to substrate translocation. These are key questions that must be addressed. In this review we report on the advances that have been made in understanding the structure and function of drug efflux pumps. PMID:13678421

  15. [New tuberculosis drugs in resistant and multiresistant tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Lapausa, Marta; Pascual Pareja, José Francisco; Noguerado Asensio, Arturo

    2013-10-05

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis is a globally emerging problem with a rising incidence. According to the WHO in 2008, 17% of strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in untreated cases were resistant to at least one drug and 3.6% were resistant to rifampicin and isoniazid, which is called multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The problem is greater in patients previously treated and in some countries, where rates of multidrug resistance reach 60%. Approximately 5% of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients are also resistant to any fluoroquinolone and at least one injectable drug, being called extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. The treatment of these forms of tuberculosis requires the use of second-line drugs, which causes higher cost, higher toxicity and a longer duration of treatment. There is a need for new compounds with efficacy and safety profiles better than those currently used to treat these forms of tuberculosis. In the last decade different drugs have being reassessed and appeared, which are at different stages of development.

  16. Identification of Long Non-Coding RNAs Deregulated in Multiple Myeloma Cells Resistant to Proteasome Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Ehsan; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Driscoll, James J.

    2016-01-01

    While the clinical benefit of proteasome inhibitors (PIs) for multiple myeloma (MM) treatment remains unchallenged, dose-limiting toxicities and the inevitable emergence of drug resistance limit their long-term utility. Disease eradication is compromised by drug resistance that is either present de novo or therapy-induced, which accounts for the majority of tumor relapses and MM-related deaths. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a broad class of RNA molecules, including long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), that do not encode proteins but play a major role in regulating the fundamental cellular processes that control cancer initiation, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance. While lncRNAs have recently attracted significant attention as therapeutic targets to potentially improve cancer treatment, identification of lncRNAs that are deregulated in cells resistant to PIs has not been previously addressed. We have modeled drug resistance by generating three MM cell lines with acquired resistance to either bortezomib, carfilzomib, or ixazomib. Genome-wide profiling identified lncRNAs that were significantly deregulated in all three PI-resistant cell lines relative to the drug-sensitive parental cell line. Strikingly, certain lncRNAs deregulated in the three PI-resistant cell lines were also deregulated in MM plasma cells isolated from newly diagnosed patients compared to healthy plasma cells. Taken together, these preliminary studies strongly suggest that lncRNAs represent potential therapeutic targets to prevent or overcome drug resistance. More investigations are ongoing to expand these initial studies in a greater number of MM patients to better define lncRNAs signatures that contribute to PI resistance in MM. PMID:27782060

  17. Partner-Drug Resistance and Population Substructuring of Artemisinin-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Parobek, Christian M.; Parr, Jonathan B.; Brazeau, Nicholas F.; Lon, Chanthap; Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Gosi, Panita; Barnett, Eric J.; Norris, Lauren D.; Meshnick, Steven R.; Spring, Michele D.; Lanteri, Charlotte A.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Saunders, David L.; Lin, Jessica T.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Plasmodium falciparum in western Cambodia has developed resistance to artemisinin and its partner drugs, causing frequent treatment failure. Understanding this evolution can inform the deployment of new therapies. We investigated the genetic architecture of 78 falciparum isolates using whole-genome sequencing, correlating results to in vivo and ex vivo drug resistance and exploring the relationship between population structure, demographic history, and partner drug resistance. Principle component analysis, network analysis and demographic inference identified a diverse central population with three clusters of clonally expanding parasite populations, each associated with specific K13 artemisinin resistance alleles and partner drug resistance profiles which were consistent with the sequential deployment of artemisinin combination therapies in the region. One cluster displayed ex vivo piperaquine resistance and mefloquine sensitivity with a high rate of in vivo failure of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine. Another cluster displayed ex vivo mefloquine resistance and piperaquine sensitivity with high in vivo efficacy of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine. The final cluster was clonal and displayed intermediate sensitivity to both drugs. Variations in recently described piperaquine resistance markers did not explain the difference in mean IC90 or clinical failures between the high and intermediate piperaquine resistance groups, suggesting additional loci may be involved in resistance. The results highlight an important role for partner drug resistance in shaping the P. falciparum genetic landscape in Southeast Asia and suggest that further work is needed to evaluate for other mutations that drive piperaquine resistance. PMID:28854635

  18. Prevalence of tuberculosis drug resistance in 10 provinces of China.

    PubMed

    He, Guang Xue; Zhao, Yan Lin; Jiang, Guang Lu; Liu, Yu Hong; Xia, Hui; Wang, Sheng Fen; Wang, Li Xia; Borgdorff, Martien W; van der Werf, Marieke J; van den Hof, Susan

    2008-12-11

    The emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) hampers TB control. Ten provinces in China performed drug resistance surveys among tuberculosis (TB) patients in 1996-2004 to assess levels of drug resistance. Provincial drug resistance surveys included all isolates from newly diagnosed, smear-positive TB patients. Drug susceptibility testing (DST) against isoniazid, rifampicin, streptomycin and ethambutol was carried out in the provincial laboratories. For purposes of quality assurance, a random sample (11.6%) was re-tested by the national reference laboratory (NRL). Of 14,059 patients tested 11,052 (79%) were new TB cases. The weighted mean prevalence of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) among all cases was 9.3% (range 2.2%-10.4%); 5.4% (range 2.1% - 10.4%) among new cases and 25.6% (range 11.7%-36.9%) among previously treated cases. Adjusting the drug resistance proportions using the re-testing results did not change the estimated national mean prevalence significantly. However, in some individual provinces the estimated resistance proportions were greatly influenced, especially among re-treatment patients. MDR-TB levels varied greatly between provinces in China, but on average were high compared to the global estimated average of 4.8%. This study shows the importance of quality-assured laboratory performance. Programmatic management of drug-resistant TB, including high quality DST for patients at high risk of resistance and treatment with second-line drugs, should become the standard, especially in high MDR-TB settings.

  19. Drug resistance analysis of bacterial strains isolated from burn patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, L F; Li, J L; Ma, W H; Li, J Y

    2014-01-22

    This study aimed to analyze the spectrum and drug resistance of bacteria isolated from burn patients to provide a reference for rational clinical use of antibiotics. Up to 1914 bacterial strain specimens isolated from burn patients admitted to hospital between 2001 and 2010 were subjected to resistance monitoring by using the K-B paper disk method. Retrospective analysis was performed on drug resistance analysis of burn patients. The top eight bacterium strains according to detection rate. A total of 1355 strains of Gram-negative (G(-)) bacteria and 559 strains of Gram-positive (G(+)) bacteria were detected. The top eight bacterium strains, according to detection rate, were Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Enterococcus. Drug resistance rates were higher than 90% in A. baumannii, P. aeruginosa, S. epidermidis, and S. aureus, which accounted for 52.2, 21.7, 27.8, and 33.3%, respectively, of the entire sample. Those with drug resistance rates lower than 30% accounted for 4.3, 30.4, 16.7, and 16.7%, respectively. Multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) accounted for 49.2 and 76.4% of the S. epidermis and S. aureus resistance, respectively. Antibacterial drugs that had drug resistance rates to MRSE and MRSA higher than 90% accounted for 38.9 and 72.2%, respectively, whereas those with lower than 30% drug resistance rates accounted for 11.1 and 16.7%, respectively. The burn patients enrolled in the study were mainly infected with G(-) bacteria. These results strongly suggest that clinicians should practice rational use of antibiotics based on drug susceptibility test results.

  20. Meconium drug testing in multiple births in the USA.

    PubMed

    Wood, Kelly E; Krasowski, Matthew D; Strathmann, Frederick G; McMillin, Gwendolyn A

    2014-09-01

    Little is published about newborn drug testing in multiple gestations. The objective of this study was to review the results of meconium drug screening in multiple births to compare drug(s) and/or drug metabolite(s) detected. A retrospective analysis was conducted using data from a national reference laboratory and an academic medical center. The data were de-identified for the reference laboratory dataset. For the academic center data, a detailed chart review of the newborn and mother's medical record was performed on cases for which one or more drug(s) and/or metabolites(s) were identified and confirmed in meconium. Meconium was analyzed for amphetamine, methamphetamine, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, cannabinoid metabolites, cocaine metabolites, methadone, opiates, oxycodone, phencyclidine and propoxyphene. One hundred and forty-two of 1,084 sets of twins and 2 of 20 sets of triplets had mismatched results. The incidence of mismatched results among the individual drug or drug classes tested was 0.9% (208 of 23,848 total results). For the panel of drug testing performed, mismatches were seen in 13% (142 of 1,084) sets of twins and 10% (2 of 20) sets of triplets. Barbiturates (33%), opiates (30%) and benzodiazepines (28%) were the most common mismatches in the national reference laboratory dataset. Benzodiazepines (89%) and opiates (51%) were most common in the academic medical center dataset with most explained by iatrogenic medications administered to one infant but not the other. Mismatches for cannabinoids most often occurred when tetrahydrocannabinol metabolites were present at a low concentration (near lower reporting limit) in one infant but not the other. Mismatched results of meconium drug testing in multiples not explainable by differences in prescribed medications are uncommon and most often occur when an analyte is barely above reporting cutoff in only one infant. Administration of iatrogenic medications to one infant but not the other(s) is another

  1. The pharmacogenomics of drug resistance to protein kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, Nancy K.; McLeod, Howard L.

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of growth factor cell signaling is a major driver of most human cancers. This has led to development of numerous drugs targeting protein kinases, with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of a wide spectrum of cancers. Despite their high initial response rates and survival benefits, the majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these targeted therapies. This review article discusses examples of established mechanisms of drug resistance to anticancer therapies, including drug target mutations or gene amplifications, emergence of alternate signaling pathways, and pharmacokinetic variation. This reveals a role for pharmacogenomic analysis to identify and monitor for resistance, with possible therapeutic strategies to combat chemoresistance. PMID:27620953

  2. PCP prevention--more cases of resistance to sulfa drugs.

    PubMed

    1998-09-01

    Three studies that are highlighted suggest that PCP-causing microbes are developing resistance to Bactrim/Septra (B/S), the drug of choice for preventing the life-threatening complications caused by PCP, toxoplasmosis, and bacterial pneumonia. While resistance does not appear to be happening on a large scale, it is a concern because no other drug has the same beneficial effects of B/S. Research is needed for simple, low-toxicity treatments and prophylactic drugs for PCP, before resistance becomes a common problem.

  3. PfCRT and its role in antimalarial drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Andrea; Lehane, Adele M.; Clain, Jérôme; Fidock, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to chloroquine, the former gold standard antimalarial drug, is mediated primarily by mutant forms of the ‘Chloroquine Resistance Transporter’ (PfCRT). These mutations impart upon PfCRT the ability to efflux chloroquine from the intracellular digestive vacuole, the site of drug action. Recent studies reveal that PfCRT variants can also affect parasite fitness, protect immature gametocytes against chloroquine action, and alter P. falciparum susceptibility to current first-line therapies. These results highlight the need to be vigilant in screening for the appearance of novel pfcrt alleles that could contribute to new multi-drug resistance phenotypes. PMID:23020971

  4. Prediction of Cancer Drug Resistance and Implications for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Volm, Manfred; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance still impedes successful cancer chemotherapy. A major goal of early concepts in individualized therapy was to develop in vitro tests to predict tumors’ drug responsiveness. We have developed an in vitro short-term test based on nucleic acid precursor incorporation to determine clinical drug resistance. This test detects inherent and acquired resistance in vitro and transplantable syngeneic and xenografted tumors in vivo. In several clinical trials, clinical resistance was predictable with more than 90% accuracy, while drug sensitivity was detected with less accuracy (~60%). Remarkably, clinical cross-resistance to numerous drugs (multidrug resistance, broad spectrum resistance) was detectable by a single compound, doxorubicin, due to its multifactorial modes of action. The results of this predictive test were in good agreement with predictive assays of other authors. As no predictive test has been established as yet for clinical diagnostics, the identification of sensitive drugs may not reach sufficiently high reliability for clinical routine. A meta-analysis of the literature published during the past four decades considering test results of more than 15,000 tumor patients unambiguously demonstrated that, in the majority of studies, resistance was correctly predicted with an accuracy between 80 and 100%, while drug sensitivity could only be predicted with an accuracy of 50–80%. This synopsis of the published literature impressively illustrates that prediction of drug resistance could be validated. The determination of drug resistance was reliable independent of tumor type, test assay, and drug used in these in vitro tests. By contrast, chemosensitivity could not be predicted with high reliability. Therefore, we propose a rethinking of the “chemosensitivity” concept. Instead, predictive in vitro tests may reliably identify drug-resistant tumors. The clinical consequence imply to subject resistant tumors not to chemotherapy, but to other new

  5. Terbinafine resistance conferred by multiple copies of the salicylate 1-monooxygenase gene in Trichophyton rubrum.

    PubMed

    Santos, Hemelin L; Lang, Elza A S; Segato, Fernando; Rossi, Antonio; Martinez-Rossi, Nilce M

    2017-06-02

    Resistance to antifungals is a leading concern in the treatment of human mycoses. We demonstrate that the salA gene, encoding salicylate 1-monooxygenase, is involved in resistance of the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum to terbinafine, one of the most effective antifungal drugs against dermatophytes. A strain with multiple copies of salA was constructed and exhibited elevated expression of salA and increased terbinafine resistance. This reflects a mechanism not yet reported in a pathogenic fungus. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Co-delivery of Gefitinib and chloroquine by chitosan nanoparticles for overcoming the drug acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Yang, Guang; Shi, Yijie; Su, Chang; Chang, Jin

    2015-09-22

    Acquired drug resistance is becoming common during cancer chemotherapy and leads to treatment failure in clinic. To conquer acquired drug resistance, nanotechnology has been employed to deliver drug. In this paper, we prepared chitosan nanoparticles (CS NPs) capable of entrapping Gefitinib and chloroquine (CQ) for multiple drugs combinational therapy. The results showed that Gefitinib/CQ-NPs were characterized of small particle size about 80.8 ± 9.7 nm and positive zeta potential about 21.3 ± 1.56 mV, and drug controlled to release slowly on a biphasic pattern. Compared with free Gefitinib and Gefitinib loaded NPs, Gefitinib and CQ co-delivery by CS nanoparticles showed the higher inhibition rates and enhanced cell apoptosis. Through western blot analysis, we found that Gefitinib could promote LC3 expression, which is the marker of autophagosomes. So, the acquired drug resistance may be associated with autophagy. CQ as an inhibitor of autophagolysosomes formation could overcome autophagy in the resistant cells. These findings demonstrated that chitosan nanoparticles entrapping Gefitinib and chloroquine have the potential to overcome acquired resistance and improve cancer treatment efficacy, especially towards resistant strains. Graphical abstract: Cellular distribution of NPs after incubating QGY (a) and QGY/Gefitinib cells (b) with rhodamine B-labeled NPs.

  7. The Impact of Microenvironmental Heterogeneity on the Evolution of Drug Resistance in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mumenthaler, Shannon M; Foo, Jasmine; Choi, Nathan C; Heise, Nicholas; Leder, Kevin; Agus, David B; Pao, William; Michor, Franziska; Mallick, Parag

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic resistance arises as a result of evolutionary processes driven by dynamic feedback between a heterogeneous cell population and environmental selective pressures. Previous studies have suggested that mutations conferring resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells lower the fitness of resistant cells relative to drug-sensitive cells in a drug-free environment. Here, we hypothesize that the local tumor microenvironment could influence the magnitude and directionality of the selective effect, both in the presence and absence of a drug. Using a combined experimental and computational approach, we developed a mathematical model of preexisting drug resistance describing multiple cellular compartments, each representing a specific tumor environmental niche. This model was parameterized using a novel experimental dataset derived from the HCC827 erlotinib-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cell lines. We found that, in contrast to in the drug-free environment, resistant cells may hold a fitness advantage compared to parental cells in microenvironments deficient in oxygen and nutrients. We then utilized the model to predict the impact of drug and nutrient gradients on tumor composition and recurrence times, demonstrating that these endpoints are strongly dependent on the microenvironment. Our interdisciplinary approach provides a model system to quantitatively investigate the impact of microenvironmental effects on the evolutionary dynamics of tumor cells.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of an Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Indigo-Pigmented Strain

    PubMed Central

    Traglia, German; Vilacoba, Elisabet; Almuzara, Marisa; Diana, Leticia; Iriarte, Andres; Centrón, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Last year in 2013, we reported an outbreak due to indigo-pigmented Acinetobacter baumannii strains in a hospital from Buenos Aires, Argentina. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of one of the strains (A. baumannii A33405) involved in the outbreak. This isolate was categorized as extensively drug-resistant (XDR) and harbors different genetic elements associated with horizontal genetic transfer and multiple antibiotic resistances. PMID:25395633

  9. Profile of adverse drug reactions in drug resistant tuberculosis from Punjab.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Chander, Ramesh; Kajal, N C; Ranga, Vikrant; Gupta, Ajay; Bharti, Heena

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the profile of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with second-line anti-tubercular treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis. ADR profile of diagnosed drug-resistant tuberculosis cases on supervised second-line anti-tubercular drug regimen under Programmatic Management of Drug-resistant Tuberculosis under Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme, were studied over two years' period. Adverse reactions were categorised into mild, moderate and severe types with subsequent systematic data-analysis. Out of total 207 patients in the study, 81.16% reported with adverse drug reactions. Out of total 195 adverse events, 63.58%, 18.46% and 17.94% were of mild, moderate and severe types respectively. Gastrointestinal events, hepatitis, hearing impairment, arthralgia, psychosis, hypothyroidism, visual disturbances, giddiness, peripheral neuropathy, skin reactions, swelling or pain at injection site, anorexia and sleep disturbances were important amongst these. High proportion of drug and/or alcohol abuse was an important observation. The offending drug(s) had to be terminated in 12.08% of the patients. Early detection, management and pharmaco-vigilance reporting of ADRs remain key factors in the management of drug-resistant tuberculosis with remarkable relevance of the need for early diagnosis and treatment of 'drug-sensitive tuberculosis', to prevent emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  10. Developing new drugs for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis: a regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Leonard V; Behrman, Rachel E

    2008-08-01

    Simplifying and shortening treatment for drug-sensitive tuberculosis and providing new treatment options for drug-resistant tuberculosis constitute two principal goals in the development of novel drugs for tuberculosis. Demonstration of clinical efficacy in drug-sensitive tuberculosis is challenging, given high success rates for existing regimens, concerns about substituting an investigational agent for the most effective agents in a regimen and difficulties in determining the effect size of the components of a combination regimen. Large and prolonged studies would be needed either to show superiority over existing regimens or statistically defensible non-inferiority compared to existing regimens. In contrast, exploring efficacy of novel treatments in the setting of drug-resistant disease may present certain opportunities. In drug-resistant disease, the efficacy of existing regimens is comparatively poor, and companion drugs used to treat drug-resistant disease are weak or ineffective, enabling demonstration of the effect of the new drug. Other advantages of this approach, which has been used successfully in the development of antiretroviral agents, include the possibility of demonstrating drug efficacy using smaller studies, the possibility of accelerated approval based on a surrogate endpoint and the opportunity to address an urgent public health need. Experience with the activity and the safety of new agents in drug-resistant disease may provide a platform from which their indication can be broadened to include drug-sensitive disease.

  11. Bedaquiline for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bélard, Sabine; Heuvelings, Charlotte C; Janssen, Saskia; Grobusch, Martin P

    2015-05-01

    Bedaquiline is a much-needed novel drug which is highly effective against drug-resistant tuberculosis. While its clinical development has been laudably fast-tracked and the drug is now available for inclusion into treatment regimens when no suitable alternatives exist, clinical experience with bedaquiline is still limited. Phase III trial data and Phase IV studies are needed particularly to study different patient populations and to optimize treatment regimens. Drug resistance to bedaquiline needs to be monitored carefully, and full access to bedaquiline treatment where it is appropriate and needed must be promoted.

  12. Longitudinal Detection and Persistence of Minority Drug-Resistant Populations and Their Effect on Salvage Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Masako; Matsuda, Masakazu; Hattori, Junko; Shiino, Teiichiro; Matano, Tetsuro; Heneine, Walid; Johnson, Jeffrey A; Sugiura, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Drug-resistant HIV are more prevalent and persist longer than previously demonstrated by bulk sequencing due to the ability to detect low-frequency variants. To clarify a clinical benefit to monitoring minority-level drug resistance populations as a guide to select active drugs for salvage therapy, we retrospectively analyzed the dynamics of low-frequency drug-resistant population in antiretroviral (ARV)-exposed drug resistant individuals. Six HIV-infected individuals treated with ARV for more than five years were analyzed. These individuals had difficulty in controlling viremia, and treatment regimens were switched multiple times guided by standard drug resistance testing using bulk sequencing. To detect minority variant populations with drug resistance, we used a highly sensitive allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) with detection thresholds of 0.3-2%. According to ARV used in these individuals, we focused on the following seven reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant mutations: M41L, K65R, K70R, K103N, Y181C, M184V, and T215F/Y. Results of AS-PCR were compared with bulk sequencing data for concordance and presence of additional mutations. To clarify the genetic relationship between low-frequency and high-frequency populations, AS-PCR amplicon sequences were compared with bulk sequences in phylogenetic analysis. The use of AS-PCR enabled detection of the drug-resistant mutations, M41L, K103N, Y181C, M184V and T215Y, present as low-frequency populations in five of the six individuals. These drug resistant variants persisted for several years without ARV pressure. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that pre-existing K103N and T215I variants had close genetic relationships with high-frequency K103N and T215I observed during treatment. Our results demonstrate the long-term persistence of drug-resistant viruses in the absence of drug pressure. The rapid virologic failures with pre-existing mutant viruses detectable by AS-PCR highlight the clinical importance of low

  13. Longitudinal Detection and Persistence of Minority Drug-Resistant Populations and Their Effect on Salvage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, Masako; Matsuda, Masakazu; Hattori, Junko; Shiino, Teiichiro; Matano, Tetsuro; Heneine, Walid; Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Sugiura, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug-resistant HIV are more prevalent and persist longer than previously demonstrated by bulk sequencing due to the ability to detect low-frequency variants. To clarify a clinical benefit to monitoring minority-level drug resistance populations as a guide to select active drugs for salvage therapy, we retrospectively analyzed the dynamics of low-frequency drug-resistant population in antiretroviral (ARV)-exposed drug resistant individuals. Materials and Methods Six HIV-infected individuals treated with ARV for more than five years were analyzed. These individuals had difficulty in controlling viremia, and treatment regimens were switched multiple times guided by standard drug resistance testing using bulk sequencing. To detect minority variant populations with drug resistance, we used a highly sensitive allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) with detection thresholds of 0.3–2%. According to ARV used in these individuals, we focused on the following seven reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant mutations: M41L, K65R, K70R, K103N, Y181C, M184V, and T215F/Y. Results of AS-PCR were compared with bulk sequencing data for concordance and presence of additional mutations. To clarify the genetic relationship between low-frequency and high-frequency populations, AS-PCR amplicon sequences were compared with bulk sequences in phylogenetic analysis. Results The use of AS-PCR enabled detection of the drug-resistant mutations, M41L, K103N, Y181C, M184V and T215Y, present as low-frequency populations in five of the six individuals. These drug resistant variants persisted for several years without ARV pressure. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that pre-existing K103N and T215I variants had close genetic relationships with high-frequency K103N and T215I observed during treatment. Discussion and Conclusion Our results demonstrate the long-term persistence of drug-resistant viruses in the absence of drug pressure. The rapid virologic failures with pre-existing mutant viruses

  14. Mathematical modeling and computational prediction of cancer drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Hu, Bin

    2017-06-23

    Diverse forms of resistance to anticancer drugs can lead to the failure of chemotherapy. Drug resistance is one of the most intractable issues for successfully treating cancer in current clinical practice. Effective clinical approaches that could counter drug resistance by restoring the sensitivity of tumors to the targeted agents are urgently needed. As numerous experimental results on resistance mechanisms have been obtained and a mass of high-throughput data has been accumulated, mathematical modeling and computational predictions using systematic and quantitative approaches have become increasingly important, as they can potentially provide deeper insights into resistance mechanisms, generate novel hypotheses or suggest promising treatment strategies for future testing. In this review, we first briefly summarize the current progress of experimentally revealed resistance mechanisms of targeted therapy, including genetic mechanisms, epigenetic mechanisms, posttranslational mechanisms, cellular mechanisms, microenvironmental mechanisms and pharmacokinetic mechanisms. Subsequently, we list several currently available databases and Web-based tools related to drug sensitivity and resistance. Then, we focus primarily on introducing some state-of-the-art computational methods used in drug resistance studies, including mechanism-based mathematical modeling approaches (e.g. molecular dynamics simulation, kinetic model of molecular networks, ordinary differential equation model of cellular dynamics, stochastic model, partial differential equation model, agent-based model, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model, etc.) and data-driven prediction methods (e.g. omics data-based conventional screening approach for node biomarkers, static network approach for edge biomarkers and module biomarkers, dynamic network approach for dynamic network biomarkers and dynamic module network biomarkers, etc.). Finally, we discuss several further questions and future directions for the use of

  15. Trypanocidal drug resistance in eastern province of Zambia.

    PubMed

    Sinyangwe, L; Delespaux, V; Brandt, J; Geerts, S; Mubanga, J; Machila, N; Holmes, P H; Eisler, M C

    2004-01-30

    A survey to investigate resistance to drugs used in the treatment of bovine trypanosomosis was conducted in the eastern province of Zambia between 1996 and 1998. A cross-sectional study was conducted in three districts (Petauke, Katete, Lundazi) at 34 village sampling sites selected at random from villages that had shown greater than 6% prevalence of bovine trypanosomosis during an earlier survey. A longitudinal study was conducted in same three districts over a 1-year period. The study sites were chosen from the cross-sectional study and included eight sites showing high trypanosomosis prevalence and where no control activities were recorded. Use was made of parasitological methods, tests of resistance in cattle and mice and isometamidium-ELISA. Overall mean prevalence of trypanosomosis was 14.4, with 96% of infections caused by Trypanosoma congolense. The remainder was caused by Trypanosoma vivax (2%) and Trypanosoma brucei (2%). Tests in mice showed that of the stabilates collected, 24 (34%) were resistant to only isometamidium chloride, 8 (11.3%) were resistant to only diminazene aceturate, 1 (1.4%) was resistant to both drugs, and 38 (53.5%) were sensitive to both drugs. At least 2 out of 27 stabilates tested in cattle appeared to be resistant to trypanocidal drugs, 1 to isometamidium and 1 to diminazene. Isometamidium could be detected in only 63 (4.1%) of 1526 serum samples from cattle in the study. Only 6 (2.8%) of 212 serum samples from trypanosome-infected cattle had serum levels of the drug above 0.4 ng isometamidium per ml serum which is indicative for drug resistance in the infecting parasite population. Although some drug resistance is apparent, diminazene aceturate and isometamidium chloride can still be expected to be effective as a sanative pair in this area in most cases, since not more than 1 stabilate of 71 investigated showed evidence of resistance to both drugs.

  16. Origin of Robustness in Generating Drug-Resistant Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Kümpornsin, Krittikorn; Modchang, Charin; Heinberg, Adina; Ekland, Eric H.; Jirawatcharadech, Piyaporn; Chobson, Pornpimol; Suwanakitti, Nattida; Chaotheing, Sastra; Wilairat, Prapon; Deitsch, Kirk W.; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Fidock, David A.; Kirkman, Laura A.; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Chookajorn, Thanat

    2014-01-01

    Biological robustness allows mutations to accumulate while maintaining functional phenotypes. Despite its crucial role in evolutionary processes, the mechanistic details of how robustness originates remain elusive. Using an evolutionary trajectory analysis approach, we demonstrate how robustness evolved in malaria parasites under selective pressure from an antimalarial drug inhibiting the folate synthesis pathway. A series of four nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions at the targeted enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), render the parasites highly resistant to the antifolate drug pyrimethamine. Nevertheless, the stepwise gain of these four dhfr mutations results in tradeoffs between pyrimethamine resistance and parasite fitness. Here, we report the epistatic interaction between dhfr mutations and amplification of the gene encoding the first upstream enzyme in the folate pathway, GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1). gch1 amplification confers low level pyrimethamine resistance and would thus be selected for by pyrimethamine treatment. Interestingly, the gch1 amplification can then be co-opted by the parasites because it reduces the cost of acquiring drug-resistant dhfr mutations downstream in the same metabolic pathway. The compensation of compromised fitness by extra GCH1 is an example of how robustness can evolve in a system and thus expand the accessibility of evolutionary trajectories leading toward highly resistant alleles. The evolution of robustness during the gain of drug-resistant mutations has broad implications for both the development of new drugs and molecular surveillance for resistance to existing drugs. PMID:24739308

  17. Origin of robustness in generating drug-resistant malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Kümpornsin, Krittikorn; Modchang, Charin; Heinberg, Adina; Ekland, Eric H; Jirawatcharadech, Piyaporn; Chobson, Pornpimol; Suwanakitti, Nattida; Chaotheing, Sastra; Wilairat, Prapon; Deitsch, Kirk W; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Fidock, David A; Kirkman, Laura A; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Chookajorn, Thanat

    2014-07-01

    Biological robustness allows mutations to accumulate while maintaining functional phenotypes. Despite its crucial role in evolutionary processes, the mechanistic details of how robustness originates remain elusive. Using an evolutionary trajectory analysis approach, we demonstrate how robustness evolved in malaria parasites under selective pressure from an antimalarial drug inhibiting the folate synthesis pathway. A series of four nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions at the targeted enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), render the parasites highly resistant to the antifolate drug pyrimethamine. Nevertheless, the stepwise gain of these four dhfr mutations results in tradeoffs between pyrimethamine resistance and parasite fitness. Here, we report the epistatic interaction between dhfr mutations and amplification of the gene encoding the first upstream enzyme in the folate pathway, GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1). gch1 amplification confers low level pyrimethamine resistance and would thus be selected for by pyrimethamine treatment. Interestingly, the gch1 amplification can then be co-opted by the parasites because it reduces the cost of acquiring drug-resistant dhfr mutations downstream in the same metabolic pathway. The compensation of compromised fitness by extra GCH1 is an example of how robustness can evolve in a system and thus expand the accessibility of evolutionary trajectories leading toward highly resistant alleles. The evolution of robustness during the gain of drug-resistant mutations has broad implications for both the development of new drugs and molecular surveillance for resistance to existing drugs.

  18. Rational polypharmacology: systematically identifying and engaging multiple drug targets to promote axon growth

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ali, Hassan; Lee, Do-Hun; Danzi, Matt C.; Nassif, Houssam; Gautam, Prson; Wennerberg, Krister; Zuercher, Bill; Drewry, David H.; Lee, Jae K.; Lemmon, Vance P.; Bixby, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian Central Nervous System (CNS) neurons regrow their axons poorly following injury, resulting in irreversible functional losses. Identifying therapeutics that encourage CNS axon repair has been difficult, in part because multiple etiologies underlie this regenerative failure. This suggests a particular need for drugs that engage multiple molecular targets. Although multi-target drugs are generally more effective than highly selective alternatives, we lack systematic methods for discovering such drugs. Target-based screening is an efficient technique for identifying potent modulators of individual targets. In contrast, phenotypic screening can identify drugs with multiple targets; however, these targets remain unknown. To address this gap, we combined the two drug discovery approaches using machine learning and information theory. We screened compounds in a phenotypic assay with primary CNS neurons and also in a panel of kinase enzyme assays. We used learning algorithms to relate the compounds’ kinase inhibition profiles to their influence on neurite outgrowth. This allowed us to identify kinases that may serve as targets for promoting neurite outgrowth, as well as others whose targeting should be avoided. We found that compounds that inhibit multiple targets (polypharmacology) promote robust neurite outgrowth in vitro. One compound with exemplary polypharmacology, was found to promote axon growth in a rodent spinal cord injury model. A more general applicability of our approach is suggested by its ability to deconvolve known targets for a breast cancer cell line, as well as targets recently shown to mediate drug resistance. PMID:26056718

  19. Mechanisms of Resistance to Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Loganzo, Frank; Sung, Matthew; Gerber, Hans-Peter

    2016-12-01

    Drug resistance limits the effectiveness of cancer therapies. Despite attempts to develop curative anticancer treatments, tumors evolve evasive mechanisms limiting durable responses. Hence, diverse therapies are used to attack cancer, including cytotoxic and targeted agents. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) are biotherapeutics designed to deliver potent cytotoxins to cancer cells via tumor-specific antigens. Little is known about the clinical manifestations of drug resistance to this class of therapy; however, recent preclinical studies reveal potential mechanisms of resistance. Because ADCs are a combination of antibody and small molecule cytotoxin, multifactorial modes of resistance are emerging that are inherent to the structure and function of the ADC. Decreased cell-surface antigen reduces antibody binding, whereas elevated drug transporters such as MDR1 and MRP1 reduce effectiveness of the payload. Inherent to the uniqueness of the ADC, other novel resistance mechanisms are emerging, including altered antibody trafficking, ADC processing, and intracellular drug release. Most importantly, the modular nature of the ADC allows components to be switched and replaced, enabling development of second-generation ADCs that overcome acquired resistance. This review is intended to highlight recent progress in our understanding of ADC resistance, including approaches to create preclinical ADC-refractory models and to characterize their emerging mechanisms of resistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 2825-34. ©2016 AACR.

  20. Efficiently mining Adverse Event Reporting System for multiple drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yang; Albin, Aaron; Ren, Kaiyu; Zhang, Pengyue; Etter, Jonathan P.; Lin, Simon; Li, Lang

    2014-01-01

    Efficiently mining multiple drug interactions and reactions from Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) is a challenging problem which has not been sufficiently addressed by existing methods. To tackle this challenge, we propose a FCI-fliter approach which leverages the efforts of UMLS mapping, frequent closed itemset mining, and uninformative association identification and removal. By applying our method on AERS, we identified a large number of multiple drug interactions with reactions. By statistical analysis, we found most of the identified associations have very small p-values which suggest that they are statistically significant. Further analysis on the results shows that many multiple drug interactions and reactions are clinically interesting, and suggests that our method may be further improved with the combination of external knowledge. PMID:25717411

  1. Antimicrobial resistance determinant microarray for analysis of multi-drug resistant isolates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taitt, Chris Rowe; Leski, Tomasz; Stenger, David; Vora, Gary J.; House, Brent; Nicklasson, Matilda; Pimentel, Guillermo; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Craft, David; Waterman, Paige E.; Lesho, Emil P.; Bangurae, Umaru; Ansumana, Rashid

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections in personnel wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan has made it challenging for physicians to choose effective therapeutics in a timely fashion. To address the challenge of identifying the potential for drug resistance, we have developed the Antimicrobial Resistance Determinant Microarray (ARDM) to provide DNAbased analysis for over 250 resistance genes covering 12 classes of antibiotics. Over 70 drug-resistant bacteria from different geographic regions have been analyzed on ARDM, with significant differences in patterns of resistance identified: genes for resistance to sulfonamides, trimethoprim, chloramphenicol, rifampin, and macrolide-lincosamidesulfonamide drugs were more frequently identified in isolates from sources in Iraq/Afghanistan. Of particular concern was the presence of genes responsible for resistance to many of the last-resort antibiotics used to treat war traumaassociated infections.

  2. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-11

    parasites. With the collaboration of Dr. Esther Orozco, we cloned two mdr-like genes from Entamoeba histolytica and demonstrated an association of...Orozco (1990). " Entamoeba histolytica : "Physiology of multidrug resistance." Exp Parasitol. 71:169-175. Buschman, E., and P. Gros. (1991). "Functional...Ayala, E. Orozco, and D. Wirth. (1990). "Emetine-resistant mutants of Entamoeba histolytica overexpress mRNAs for multidrug resistance." Mol Biochem

  3. Drug resistance and biochemical characteristics of Salmonella from turkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, C; Kolar, J J; Demczuk, W H; Harris, J E

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the antibiotic resistance and biochemical characteristics of 2690 Salmonella strains belonging to 52 serovars and isolated from environmental and feed samples from 270 turkey flocks in Canada. Resistance of the Salmonella strains to the aminoglycoside antibiotics varied widely; none of the strains were resistant to amikacin, 14.2% were resistant to neomycin, 25.8% were resistant to gentamicin, and 27.7% of the strains were resistant to kanamycin. Most strains (97.6%) were resistant to the aminocyclitol, spectinomycin. Regarding resistance to the beta-lactam antibiotics, 14.3% and 14.4% of the strains were resistant to ampicillin and carbenicillin, respectively, whereas only 5 (0.2%) of the strains were resistant to cephalothin. None of the strains were resistant to the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin or to polymyxin B. Resistance to chloramphenicol and nitrofurantoin was found in 2.4% and 7% of the strains, respectively. Only 1.7% of the strains were resistant to the trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole combination, whereas 58.1% were resistant to sulfisoxazole. Thirty-eight percent of the strains were resistant to tetracycline. Salmonella serovars differed markedly in their drug resistance profiles. Biochemical characterization of the Salmonella showed that the S. anatum, S. saintpaul and S. reading serovars could be divided into distinct biotypes. PMID:8548684

  4. Dual-functional drug liposomes in treatment of resistant cancers.

    PubMed

    Mu, Li-Min; Ju, Rui-Jun; Liu, Rui; Bu, Ying-Zi; Zhang, Jing-Ying; Li, Xue-Qi; Zeng, Fan; Lu, Wan-Liang

    2017-06-01

    Efficacy of regular chemotherapy is significantly hampered by multidrug resistance (MDR) and severe systemic toxicity. The reduced toxicity has been evidenced after administration of drug liposomes, consisting of the first generation of regular drug liposomes, the second generation of long-circulation drug liposomes, and the third generation of targeting drug liposomes. However, MDR of cancers remains as an unsolved issue. The objective of this article is to review the dual-functional drug liposomes, which demonstrate the potential in overcoming MDR. Herein, dual-functional drug liposomes are referring to the drug-containing phospholipid bilayer vesicles that possess a dual-function of providing the basic efficacy of drug and the extended effect of the drug carrier. They exhibit unique roles in treatment of resistant cancer via circumventing drug efflux caused by adenosine triphosphate binding cassette (ABC) transporters, eliminating cancer stem cells, destroying mitochondria, initiating apoptosis, regulating autophagy, destroying supply channels, utilizing microenvironment, and silencing genes of the resistant cancer. As the prospect of an estimation, dual-functional drug liposomes would exhibit more strength in their extended function, hence deserving further investigation for clinical validation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Electrical Stimulation for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, A; Bowen, JM

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the effectiveness of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy in adults and children. Data Sources A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published from January 2007 until December 2012. Review Methods Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and observational studies (in the absence of RCTs) of adults or children were included. DBS studies were included if they specified that the anterior nucleus of thalamus was the area of the brain stimulated. Outcomes of interest were seizure frequency, health resource utilization, and safety. A cost analysis was also performed. Results The search identified 6 studies that assessed changes in seizure frequency after electrical stimulation: 1 RCT on DBS in adults, 4 RCTs on VNS in adults, and 1 RCT on VNS in children. The studies of DBS and VNS in adults found significantly improved rates of seizure frequency, but the study of VNS in children did not find a significant difference in seizure frequency between the high and low stimulation groups. Significant reductions in hospitalizations and emergency department visits were found for adults and children who received VNS. No studies addressed the use of health resources for patients undergoing DBS. Five studies reported on adverse events, which ranged from serious to transient for both procedures in adults and were mostly transient in the 1 study of VNS in children. Limitations We found no evidence on DBS in children or on health care use related to DBS. The measurement of seizure frequency is self-reported and is therefore subject to bias and issues of compliance. Conclusions Based on evidence of low to moderate quality, both DBS and VNS seemed to reduce seizure frequency in adults. In children, VNS did not appear to be as

  6. Drug resistance in cancer: molecular evolution and compensatory proliferation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Ran

    2016-03-15

    Targeted therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment. Unfortunately, their success is limited due to the development of drug resistance within the tumor, which is an evolutionary process. Understanding how drug resistance evolves is a prerequisite to a better success of targeted therapies. Resistance is usually explained as a response to evolutionary pressure imposed by treatment. Thus, evolutionary understanding can and should be used in the design and treatment of cancer. In this article, drug-resistance to targeted therapies is reviewed from an evolutionary standpoint. The concept of apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation (AICP) is developed. It is shown that AICP helps to explain some of the phenomena that are observed experimentally in cancers. Finally, potential drug targets are suggested in light of AICP.

  7. Drug resistance in African trypanosomiasis: the melarsoprol and pentamidine story.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nicola; de Koning, Harry P; Mäser, Pascal; Horn, David

    2013-03-01

    Melarsoprol and pentamidine represent the two main classes of drugs, the arsenicals and diamidines, historically used to treat the diseases caused by African trypanosomes: sleeping sickness in humans and Nagana in livestock. Cross-resistance to these drugs was first observed over 60 years ago and remains the only example of cross-resistance among sleeping sickness therapies. A Trypanosoma brucei adenosine transporter is well known for its role in the uptake of both drugs. More recently, aquaglyceroporin 2 (AQP2) loss of function was linked to melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistance. AQP2, a channel that appears to facilitate drug accumulation, may also be linked to clinical cases of resistance. Here, we review these findings and consider some new questions as well as future prospects for tackling the devastating diseases caused by these parasites.

  8. World Antimalarial Resistance Network (WARN) III: Molecular markers for drug resistant malaria

    PubMed Central

    Plowe, Christopher V; Roper, Cally; Barnwell, John W; Happi, Christian T; Joshi, Hema H; Mbacham, Wilfred; Meshnick, Steven R; Mugittu, Kefas; Naidoo, Inbarani; Price, Ric N; Shafer, Robert W; Sibley, Carol H; Sutherland, Colin J; Zimmerman, Peter A; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2007-01-01

    Molecular markers for drug resistant malaria represent public health tools of great but mostly unrealized potential value. A key reason for the failure of molecular resistance markers to live up to their potential is that data on the their prevalence is scattered in disparate databases with no linkage to the clinical, in vitro and pharmacokinetic data that are needed to relate the genetic data to relevant phenotypes. The ongoing replacement of older monotherapies for malaria by new, more effective combination therapies presents an opportunity to create an open access database that brings together standardized data on molecular markers of drug resistant malaria from around the world. This paper presents a rationale for creating a global database of molecular markers for drug resistant malaria and for linking it to similar databases containing results from clinical trials of drug efficacy, in vitro studies of drug susceptibility, and pharmacokinetic studies of antimalarial drugs, in a World Antimalarial Resistance Network (WARN). This database will be a global resource, guiding the selection of first line drugs for treating uncomplicated malaria, for preventing malaria in travelers and for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnant women, infants and other vulnerable groups. Perhaps most important, a global database for molecular markers of drug resistant malaria will accelerate the identification and validation of markers for resistance to artemisinin-based combination therapies and, thereby, potentially prolong the useful therapeutic lives of these important new drugs. PMID:17822535

  9. Highly active ozonides selected against drug resistant malaria.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Lis; Sousa, Bruno de; Cabral, Lília; Cristiano, Maria Ls; Nogueira, Fátima

    2016-06-07

    Ever increasing multi-drug resistance by Plasmodium falciparum is creating new challenges in malaria chemotherapy. In the absence of licensed vaccines, treatment and prevention of malaria is heavily dependent on drugs. Potency, range of activity, safety, low cost and ease of administration are crucial issues in the design and formulation of antimalarials. We have tested three synthetic ozonides NAC89, LC50 and LCD67 in vitro and in vivo against multidrug resistant Plasmodium. In vitro, LC50 was at least 10 times more efficient inhibiting P. falciparum multidrug resistant Dd2 strain than chloroquine and mefloquine and as efficient as artemisinin (ART), artesunate and dihydroartemisinin. All three ozonides showed high efficacy in clearing parasitaemia in mice, caused by multi-drug resistant Plasmodium chabaudi strains, by subcutaneous administration, demonstrating high efficacy in vivo against ART and artesunate resistant parasites.

  10. Drug resistance analysis by next generation sequencing in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Leprohon, Philippe; Fernandez-Prada, Christopher; Gazanion, Élodie; Monte-Neto, Rubens; Ouellette, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The use of next generation sequencing has the power to expedite the identification of drug resistance determinants and biomarkers and was applied successfully to drug resistance studies in Leishmania. This allowed the identification of modulation in gene expression, gene dosage alterations, changes in chromosome copy numbers and single nucleotide polymorphisms that correlated with resistance in Leishmania strains derived from the laboratory and from the field. An impressive heterogeneity at the population level was also observed, individual clones within populations often differing in both genotypes and phenotypes, hence complicating the elucidation of resistance mechanisms. This review summarizes the most recent highlights that whole genome sequencing brought to our understanding of Leishmania drug resistance and likely new directions. PMID:25941624

  11. Highly active ozonides selected against drug resistant malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Lis; de Sousa, Bruno; Cabral, Lília; Cristiano, Maria LS; Nogueira, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Ever increasing multi-drug resistance by Plasmodium falciparum is creating new challenges in malaria chemotherapy. In the absence of licensed vaccines, treatment and prevention of malaria is heavily dependent on drugs. Potency, range of activity, safety, low cost and ease of administration are crucial issues in the design and formulation of antimalarials. We have tested three synthetic ozonides NAC89, LC50 and LCD67 in vitro and in vivo against multidrug resistant Plasmodium. In vitro, LC50 was at least 10 times more efficient inhibiting P. falciparum multidrug resistant Dd2 strain than chloroquine and mefloquine and as efficient as artemisinin (ART), artesunate and dihydroartemisinin. All three ozonides showed high efficacy in clearing parasitaemia in mice, caused by multi-drug resistant Plasmodium chabaudi strains, by subcutaneous administration, demonstrating high efficacy in vivo against ART and artesunate resistant parasites. PMID:27276364

  12. Combined antiretroviral and anti-tuberculosis drug resistance following incarceration

    PubMed Central

    Stott, K E; de Oliviera, T; Lessells, R J

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of HIV/tuberculosis (TB) co-infection from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, characterised by drug resistance in both pathogens. The development of drug resistance was linked temporally to two periods of incarceration. This highlights the urgent need for improved integration of HIV/TB control strategies within prison health systems and within the broader public health framework. PMID:24273475

  13. The challenges of multi-drug-resistance in hepatology.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Javier; Bert, Frédéric; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène

    2016-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance has become a major global public health security problem that needs coordinated approaches at regional, national and international levels. Antibiotic overuse and the failure of control measures to prevent the spread of resistant bacteria in the healthcare environment have led to an alarming increase in the number of infections caused by resistant bacteria, organisms that resist many (multi-drug and extensively drug-resistant strains), if not all (pan-drug-resistant bacteria) currently available antibiotics. While Gram-positive cocci resistance (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci) shows a heterogeneous geographical distribution, extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae have become pandemic worldwide and endemic in some parts of the world, respectively. Moreover, currently available therapeutic options for resistant bacteria are very limited, with very few new agents in development. Antimicrobial resistance is especially relevant in decompensated cirrhosis. Firstly, cirrhotic patients are highly susceptible to develop infections caused by resistant bacteria as risk factors of multiresistance concentrate in this population (mainly repeated hospitalizations and antibiotic exposure). Secondly, inappropriate empirical antibiotic schedules easily translate into increased morbidity (acute kidney injury, acute-on-chronic liver failure, septic shock) and hospital mortality in advanced cirrhosis. Therefore, hepatologists must face nowadays a complex clinical scenario that requires new empirical antibiotic strategies that may further spread resistance. Global, regional and local preventive measures should therefore be implemented to combat antimicrobial resistance in cirrhosis including the restriction of antibiotic prophylaxis to high-risk populations, investigation on non-antibiotic prophylaxis, stewardship programs on adequate antibiotic

  14. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post-chemotherapy tissues.

    PubMed

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens.

  15. Inheritance of 2,4-D resistance traits in multiple herbicide- resistant Raphanus raphanistrum populations.

    PubMed

    Busi, Roberto; Powles, Stephen B

    2017-04-01

    A relatively low number of weed species have evolved resistance to auxinic herbicides despite their use for almost 70 years. This inheritance study with two Raphanus raphanistrum populations multiple-resistant 2,4-D and the ALS-inhibiting herbicide chlorsulfuron determined the number of genes and genetic dominance of 2,4-D resistance and investigated the association between traits conferring resistance to the two herbicide modes of action. Levels of 2,4-D phenotypic resistance and resistance segregation patterns were assessed in parental populations, F1 and F2 families.

  16. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis: epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    Matteelli, Alberto; Roggi, Alberto; Carvalho, Anna Cc

    2014-01-01

    The advent of antibiotics for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) represented a major breakthrough in the fight against the disease. However, since its first use, antibiotic therapy has been associated with the emergence of resistance to drugs. The incorrect use of anti-TB drugs, either due to prescription errors, low patient compliance, or poor quality of drugs, led to the widespread emergence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains with an expanding spectrum of resistance. The spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains (ie, strains resistant to both isoniazid and rifampicin) has represented a major threat to TB control since the 1990s. In 2006, the first cases of MDR strains with further resistance to fluoroquinolone and injectable drugs were described and named extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB). The emergence of XDR-TB strains is a result of mismanagement of MDR cases, and treatment relies on drugs that are less potent and more toxic than those used to treat drug-susceptible or MDR strains. Furthermore, treatment success is lower and mortality higher than achieved in MDR-TB cases, and the number of drugs necessary in the intensive phase of treatment may be higher than the four drugs recommended for MDR-TB. Linezolid may represent a valuable drug to treat cases of XDR-TB. Delamanid, bedaquiline, and PA-824 are new anti-TB agents in the development pipeline that have the potential to enhance the cure rate of XDR-TB. The best measures to prevent new cases of XDR-TB are the correct management of MDR-TB patients, early detection, and proper treatment of existing patients with XDR-TB.

  17. Drug efflux pump deficiency and drug target resistance masking in growing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fange, David; Nilsson, Karin; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that drug efflux pump deficiency not only increases the susceptibility of pathogens to antibiotics, but also seems to “mask” the effects of mutations, that decrease the affinities of drugs to their intracellular targets, on the growth rates of drug-exposed bacteria. That is, in the presence of drugs, the growth rates of drug-exposed WT and target mutated strains are the same in a drug efflux pump deficient background, but the mutants grow faster than WT in a drug efflux pump proficient background. Here, we explain the mechanism of target resistance masking and show that it occurs in response to drug efflux pump inhibition among pathogens with high-affinity drug binding targets, low cell-membrane drug-permeability and insignificant intracellular drug degradation. We demonstrate that target resistance masking is fundamentally linked to growth-bistability, i.e., the existence of 2 different steady state growth rates for one and the same drug concentration in the growth medium. We speculate that target resistance masking provides a hitherto unknown mechanism for slowing down the evolution of target resistance among pathogens. PMID:19416855

  18. The Ocular Manifestations of Drugs Used to Treat Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Heath, Gregory; Airody, Archana; Gale, Richard Peter

    2017-03-01

    Recent times have seen an increase in the number of options to treat multiple sclerosis. Ocular manifestations of multiple sclerosis are well known to treating physicians; however, the medications used to treat multiple sclerosis can also have ocular side effects. This review article focuses on the ocular manifestations of corticosteroids and disease-modifying agents such as interferon, fingolomod, natalizumab, alemtuzumab and mitoxantron used to treat the disease. The ocular manifestations of multiple sclerosis treatments can be varied depending on the drug used, and include retinopathy, chronic central serous chorioretinopathy, macular oedema, Graves' ophthalmopathy and cortical blindness. These effects may be specific to the drug or secondary to their immunosuppressive effect. The association of macular oedema with fingolomod is clear and merits ocular screening for toxicity. The immunosuppressive nature of the treatments makes patients prone to acquired infections. Hence, if a patient with multiple sclerosis presents with vision loss, infectious and drug-induced aetiology should be considered alongside relapses of multiple sclerosis itself as a cause.

  19. Sparse Representation for Prediction of HIV-1 Protease Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaxia; Weber, Irene T; Harrison, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    HIV rapidly evolves drug resistance in response to antiviral drugs used in AIDS therapy. Estimating the specific resistance of a given strain of HIV to individual drugs from sequence data has important benefits for both the therapy of individual patients and the development of novel drugs. We have developed an accurate classification method based on the sparse representation theory, and demonstrate that this method is highly effective with HIV-1 protease. The protease structure is represented using our newly proposed encoding method based on Delaunay triangulation, and combined with the mutated amino acid sequences of known drug-resistant strains to train a machine-learning algorithm both for classification and regression of drug-resistant mutations. An overall cross-validated classification accuracy of 97% is obtained when trained on a publically available data base of approximately 1.5×10(4) known sequences (Stanford HIV database http://hivdb.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/GenoPhenoDS.cgi). Resistance to four FDA approved drugs is computed and comparisons with other algorithms demonstrate that our method shows significant improvements in classification accuracy.

  20. Emergence of a Potent Multidrug Efflux Pump Variant That Enhances Campylobacter Resistance to Multiple Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong; Shen, Zhangqi; Wang, Yang; Deng, Fengru; Liu, Dejun; Naren, Gaowa; Dai, Lei; Su, Chih-Chia; Wang, Bing; Wang, Shaolin; Wu, Congming; Yu, Edward W; Zhang, Qijing; Shen, Jianzhong

    2016-09-20

    Bacterial antibiotic efflux pumps are key players in antibiotic resistance. Although their role in conferring multidrug resistance is well documented, the emergence of "super" efflux pump variants that enhance bacterial resistance to multiple drugs has not been reported. Here, we describe the emergence of a resistance-enhancing variant (named RE-CmeABC) of the predominant efflux pump CmeABC in Campylobacter, a major zoonotic pathogen whose resistance to antibiotics is considered a serious antibiotic resistance threat in the United States. Compared to the previously characterized CmeABC transporters, RE-CmeABC is much more potent in conferring Campylobacter resistance to antibiotics, which was shown by increased MICs and reduced intracellular accumulation of antibiotics. Structural modeling suggests that sequence variations in the drug-binding pocket of CmeB possibly contribute to the enhanced efflux function. Additionally, RE-CmeABC expands the mutant selection window of ciprofloxacin, enhances the emergence of antibiotic-resistant mutants, and confers exceedingly high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones, an important class of antibiotics for clinical therapy of campylobacteriosis. Furthermore, RE-CmeABC is horizontally transferable, shifts antibiotic MIC distribution among clinical isolates, and is increasingly prevalent in Campylobacter jejuni isolates, suggesting that it confers a fitness advantage under antimicrobial selection. These findings reveal a new mechanism for enhanced multidrug resistance and an effective strategy utilized by bacteria for adaptation to selection from multiple antibiotics. Bacterial antibiotic efflux pumps are ubiquitously present in bacterial organisms and protect bacteria from the antibacterial effects of antimicrobials and other toxic compounds by extruding them out of cells. Thus, these efflux transporters represent an important mechanism for antibiotic resistance. In this study, we discovered the emergence and increasing

  1. A Research-Inspired Laboratory Sequence Investigating Acquired Drug Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Elizabeth Vogel; Fortune, Jennifer A.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we present a six-session laboratory exercise designed to introduce students to standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a high impact research topic, acquired resistance to the cancer drug Gleevec. Students express a Gleevec-resistant mutant of the Abelson tyrosine kinase domain, the active domain of an oncogenic…

  2. The interplay between drug resistance and fitness in malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Philip J

    2013-09-01

    Controlling the spread of antimalarial drug resistance, especially resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to artemisinin-based combination therapies, is a high priority. Available data indicate that, as with other microorganisms, the spread of drug-resistant malaria parasites is limited by fitness costs that frequently accompany resistance. Resistance-mediating polymorphisms in malaria parasites have been identified in putative drug transporters and in target enzymes. The impacts of these polymorphisms on parasite fitness have been characterized in vitro and in animal models. Additional insights have come from analyses of samples from clinical studies, both evaluating parasites under different selective pressures and determining the clinical consequences of infection with different parasites. With some exceptions, resistance-mediating polymorphisms lead to malaria parasites that, compared with wild type, grow less well in culture and in animals, and are replaced by wild type when drug pressure diminishes in the clinical setting. In some cases, the fitness costs of resistance may be offset by compensatory mutations that increase virulence or changes that enhance malaria transmission. However, not enough is known about effects of resistance mediators on parasite fitness. A better appreciation of the costs of fitness-mediating mutations will facilitate the development of optimal guidelines for the treatment and prevention of malaria.

  3. Bacteremic pneumonia caused by extensively drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cheol-In; Baek, Jin Yang; Jeon, Kyeongman; Kim, So Hyun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Nam Yong; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2012-12-01

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance threatens the successful treatment of pneumococcal infections. Here we report a case of bacteremic pneumonia caused by an extremely drug-resistant strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae, nonsusceptible to at least one agent in all classes but vancomycin and linezolid, posing an important new public health threat in our region.

  4. Antimicrobial Drug Use and Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pyogenes, Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Coenen, Samuel; Lammens, Christine; Hens, Niel; Goossens, Herman

    2012-01-01

    In Belgium, decreasing macrolide, lincosamide, streptogramins B, and tetracycline use during 1997–2007 correlated significantly with decreasing macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes during 1999–2009. Maintaining drug use below a critical threshold corresponded with low-level macrolide-resistant S. pyogenes and an increased number of erm(A)-harboring emm77 S. pyogenes with low fitness costs. PMID:22932671

  5. A Research-Inspired Laboratory Sequence Investigating Acquired Drug Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Elizabeth Vogel; Fortune, Jennifer A.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we present a six-session laboratory exercise designed to introduce students to standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a high impact research topic, acquired resistance to the cancer drug Gleevec. Students express a Gleevec-resistant mutant of the Abelson tyrosine kinase domain, the active domain of an oncogenic…

  6. New strategies against Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: a serious worldwide intrinsically drug-resistant opportunistic pathogen.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Joanna S

    2014-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a worldwide human opportunistic pathogen associated with serious infections in humans, and is most often recovered from respiratory tract infections. In addition to its intrinsic drug resistance, this organism may acquire resistance via multiple molecular mechanisms. New antimicrobial strategies are needed to combat S. maltophilia infections, particularly in immunocompromised patients, cystic fibrosis patients with polymicrobial infections of the lung, and in patients with chronic infections. This editorial reports on newer drugs and antimicrobial strategies and their potential for use in treatment of S. maltophilia infections, the development of new technologies to detect this organism, and identifies strategies currently in use to reduce transmission of this pathogen.

  7. Identification of precision treatment strategies for relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma by functional drug sensitivity testing.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Muntasir Mamun; Silvennoinen, Raija; Anttila, Pekka; Tamborero, David; Eldfors, Samuli; Yadav, Bhagwan; Karjalainen, Riikka; Kuusanmäki, Heikki; Lievonen, Juha; Parsons, Alun; Suvela, Minna; Jantunen, Esa; Porkka, Kimmo; Heckman, Caroline A

    2017-08-22

    Novel agents have increased survival of multiple myeloma (MM) patients, however high-risk and relapsed/refractory patients remain challenging to treat and their outcome is poor. To identify novel therapies and aid treatment selection for MM, we assessed the ex vivo sensitivity of 50 MM patient samples to 308 approved and investigational drugs. With the results we i) classified patients based on their ex vivo drug response profile; ii) identified and matched potential drug candidates to recurrent cytogenetic alterations; and iii) correlated ex vivo drug sensitivity to patient outcome. Based on their drug sensitivity profiles, MM patients were stratified into four distinct subgroups with varied survival outcomes. Patients with progressive disease and poor survival clustered in a drug response group exhibiting high sensitivity to signal transduction inhibitors. Del(17p) positive samples were resistant to most drugs tested with the exception of histone deacetylase and BCL2 inhibitors. Samples positive for t(4;14) were highly sensitive to immunomodulatory drugs, proteasome inhibitors and several targeted drugs. Three patients treated based on the ex vivo results showed good response to the selected treatments. Our results demonstrate that ex vivo drug testing may potentially be applied to optimize treatment selection and achieve therapeutic benefit for relapsed/refractory MM.

  8. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Bolzonella, T.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Menmuir, S.; Ortolani, S.; Rachlew, E.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitive agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7 8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback.

  9. Impact Evaluation of Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Harold K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Assessed impact of Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) on approximately 3,000 fifth-grade students in 1 school district. Findings from pretest and posttest self-report survey suggest that DARE did not significantly change amount of drug use, which was minimal at fifth-grade level. In general, children receiving DARE during the study period…